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Sample records for adrenal hypoplasia congenita

  1. [Hypoplasia adrenal congenita of anencephalic type: two cases with pituitary abnormalities and review of literature].

    PubMed

    Folligan, K; Roume, J; Razavi, F; Sepaniak, S; Bouvier, R; Morel, Y; Trouillas, J

    2011-03-01

    Hypoplasia adrenal congenita is an extremely uncommon disease of early onset. This condition can be lethal in the absence of treatment. Some forms are due to the congenital adrenal hypoplasia of anencephalic type whose origin is even unknown. Here, we present two cases of congenital adrenal hypoplasia of anencephalic type with pituitary abnormalities. The two male newborns died because adrenal insufficiency in the neonatal period. The adrenal glands were hypoplastic with a histological structure of anencephalic type Immunocytochemical study of the pituitary revealed an absence of the gonadotrophs. No mutation of DAX 1 and SF-1 was found.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita

    MedlinePlus

    ... more common in particular ethnic groups? Genetic Changes Mutations in the NR0B1 gene cause X-linked adrenal ... glands control many important body functions. Some NR0B1 mutations result in the production of an inactive version ...

  3. X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita: a case report and ethical dilemma.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Heba M; Rincon, Marielisa

    2014-07-01

    Our objective is to present the first case report of X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita in a child conceived by a donated egg and which also presented atypically, with initial mineralocorticoid deficiency. Case report with literature review. A late preterm fraternal twin male, conceived by in vitro fertilization of donated eggs, presented shortly after birth with feeding intolerance, hyponatremia, and hyperkalemia. Testing revealed a low aldosterone level, high plasma renin activity, normal cortisol level, and normal 17-hydroxyprogesterone level. He was diagnosed with 18-hydroxylase deficiency based on low 18-hydroxycorticosterone levels and was treated with mineralocorticoid successfully for 17 months. At age 18 months, he presented with dehydration secondary to herpetic gingivostomatitis and was found to be hypoglycemic, hyponatremic, hyperkalemic, and acidotic, with a low serum cortisol level. An adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation test revealed low levels of all adrenal cortex products, with an elevated ACTH level. He was started on glucocorticoids. Genetic testing confirmed X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC). His asymptomatic fraternal twin underwent genetic testing and the results were negative. The fertility center records indicated that the mother had donated eggs to other families, but none of the children were known to have this disorder. The egg donor was informed but did not pursue genetic testing. We report a case of X-linked AHC presenting in the context of extraordinary ethical considerations. Our case raises a question unique to the era of assisted reproduction: should routine genetic screening of gamete donors be done for rare but potentially life-threatening conditions?

  4. Central precocious puberty in a patient with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita and Xp21 contiguous gene deletion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Koh, Ji Won; Kang, So Young; Kim, Gu Hwan; Yoo, Han Wook; Yu, Jeesuk

    2013-06-01

    X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita is caused by the mutation of DAX-1 gene (dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1), and can occur as part of a contiguous gene deletion syndrome in association with glycerol kinase (GK) deficiency, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and X-linked interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein-like 1 (IL1RAPL1) gene deficiency. It is usually associated with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, although in rare cases, it has been reported to occur in normal puberty or even central precocious puberty. This study addresses a case in which central precocious puberty developed in a boy with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita who had complete deletion of the genes DAX-1, GK and IL1RAPL1 (Xp21 contiguous gene deletion syndrome). Initially he was admitted for the management of adrenal crisis at the age of 2 months, and managed with hydrocortisone and florinef. At 45 months of age, his each testicular volumes of 4 mL and a penile length of 5 cm were noted, with pubic hair of Tanner stage 2. His bone age was advanced and a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation test showed a luteinizing hormone peak of 8.26 IU/L, confirming central precocious puberty. He was then treated with a GnRH agonist, as well as steroid replacement therapy. In Korea, this is the first case of central precocious puberty developed in a male patient with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita.

  5. Yeast artificial chromosome cloning in the glycerol kinase and adrenal hypoplasia congenita region of Xp21

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, K.C.; Ellison, K.A.; Zhang, Y.H.; Wang, D.F.; Mason, J.; Roth, E.J.; Adams, V.; Fogt, D.D.; Zhu, X.M.; Towbin, J.A.

    1993-05-01

    The adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and glycerol kinase (GK) loci are telomeric to the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus in Xp21. The authors developed a pair of yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contigs spanning at least 1.2 Mb and encompassing the region from the telomeric end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) locus to beyond YHX39 (DXS727), including the genes for AHC and GK. The centromeric contig consists of 13 YACs reaching more than 600 kb from DMD through GK. The telomeric contig group consists of 8 YACs containing more than 600 kb including the markers YHX39 (DXS727) and QST-59 (DXS319). Patient deletion breakpoints in the region of the two YAC contigs define at least eight intervals, and seven deletion breakpoints are contained within these contigs. In addition to the probes developed from YAC ends, they have mapped eight Alu-PCR probes amplified from a radiation-reduced somatic cell hybrid, two anonymous DNA probes, and one Alu-PCR product amplified from a cosmid end, for a total of 26 new markers within this region of 2 Mb or less. One YAC in the centromeric contig contains an insert encompassing the minimum interval for GK deficiency defined by patient deletion breakpoints, and this clone includes all or part of the GK gene. 33 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. A novel mutation in DAX1 (NR0B1) causing X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita: clinical, hormonal and genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    García-Malpartida, Katherine; Gómez-Balaguer, Marcelino; Solá-Izquierdo, Eva; Fuentes-Pardilla, M José; Jover-Fernández, Ana; Sanz-Ruiz, Isabel; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio

    2009-10-01

    The association of primary adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is extremely infrequent in daily clinical practice. Differential diagnosis includes X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita, a genetic disease characterized by an alteration in the formation of the adrenal glands and the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis. The gene responsible is DAX1 (NR0B1). The most common form of clinical presentation is neonatal primary adrenal insufficiency and complete hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Members of a single family often present the same clinical form, although there may be relatives affected with different clinical symptoms. The aim of this study is to characterize clinically and genetically a family affected by different forms of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and/or primary adrenal insufficiency. We describe a family with three members affected, two adults and a neonate. The way of presentation of the adults was neonatal primary adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (one complete and another presenting as interrupted puberty). The genetic study revealed a new mutation in DAX1, p.Q76X gene (c.C226T), resulting in a truncated protein of 76 amino acids, the same in all three affected male patients and in the asymptomatic women of the family. These cases further expand the number of DAX1 mutations reported, as well as the description of infrequent forms of presentation of this disease as interrupted puberty.

  7. [Clinical features of 9 patients with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita caused by DAX1/NR0B1 gene mutations].

    PubMed

    Fu, Yong; Nie, Min; Xia, Wei-Bo; Lu, Lin; Mao, Jiang-Feng; Pan, Hui; Wu, Xue-Yan; Zhao, Wei-Gang

    2010-08-10

    To study the clinical features of 9 patients with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) by gene sequencing so as to provide diagnostic rationales. The patients were 9 cases of X-linked AHC treated at our hospital from July 2007 to June 2009. The clinical manifestations were analyzed. The blood biochemistry tests and the hormone examinations including luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) stimulation tests and human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) stimulation tests were conducted to evaluate the functions of gonads. And CT scans of adrenal glands and gene tests of DAX1/NR0B1 were performed. Nine AHC patients from 8 families were studied. All patients had DAX1/NR0B1 gene mutations. The main clinical features were: (1) some patients (3 families) had a family history of X-linked recessive inheritance; (2) the ages of onset were all below 10 years old (from 2 month after birth to 9 years old) and ages of being treated at our hospital were from 15 to 34 years old; (3) all patients had adrenocortical hypofunctions, but clinical situations were different, most of them had pigmentation (n = 9), nausea and vomiting (n = 8), hypotension (n = 6), Addisonian crisis (n = 4). Others were debility, hypoglycemia and cold susceptibility. Laboratory tests indicated that all patients had hyponatremia at the onset and higher blood adrenocorticotropic hormone level, lower blood 17-hydroxyprogesterone level compared to normal controls; (4) none of the patients had puberty and there was no responses to LHRH stimulation tests, 3 of them had normal responses to HCG stimulation tests; (5) small bilateral adrenal glands were displayed on CT scans. The main clinical features of X-linked AHC are adrenocortical hypofunction and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. But the phenotypes vary greatly in different patients. So male children with adrenal cortical hypofunction should be suspected of X-linked AHC and DAX1/NR0B1 gene tests should be performed. The sexual development of the patients

  8. A novel stop mutation (p.(Gln22*)) of DAX1 (NR0B1) results in late-onset X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita.

    PubMed

    Gerards, Judith; Ritter, Michael M; Kaminsky, Elke; Gal, Andreas; Hoeppner, Wolfgang; Quinkler, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    DAX1 (NR0B1) is an orphan nuclear receptor, which plays an important role in development and function of the adrenal glands and gonads. Mutations in DAX1 cause X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (X-linked AHC), which is characterized by adrenal insufficiency (AI) and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HHG). Affected boys present with adrenal failure usually in childhood and, later in life, with delayed puberty. However, patients with a late-onset form of X-linked AHC have also been described in the past years. We report a male patient who presented with symptoms of an adrenal crisis at the age of 38 years and was later diagnosed with HHG. Family history was positive with several male relatives diagnosed with AI and compatible with the assumed X-chromosomal inheritance of the trait. Direct sequencing of DAX1 of the patient revealed a hemizygous cytosine-to-thymine substitution at nucleotide 64 in exon 1, which creates a novel nonsense mutation (p.(Gln22*)). In order to compare the clinical presentation of the patient to that of other patients with X-linked AHC, we searched the electronic database MEDLINE (PubMed) and found reports of nine other cases with delayed onset of X-linked AHC. In certain cases, genotype-phenotype correlation could be assumed. X-linked AHC is a rare disease characterized by primary AI and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HHG). The full-blown clinical picture is seen usually only in males with a typical onset in childhood.Patients with a late-onset form of X-linked AHC have also been described recently. Being aware of this late-onset form might help to reach an early diagnosis and prevent life-threatening adrenal crises.Adult men with primary AI of unknown etiology should be investigated for HHG. Detecting a DAX1 mutation may confirm the clinical diagnosis of late-onset X-linked AHC.In relatives of patients with genetically confirmed X-linked AHC, targeted mutation analysis may help to identify family members at risk and asymptomatic carriers

  9. Longitudinal Evaluation of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Testicular Function in 8 Boys with Adrenal Hypoplasia Congenita (AHC) Due to NR0B1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Galeotti, Caroline; Lahlou, Zineb; Goullon, Domitille; Sarda-Thibault, Hélène; Cahen-Varsaux, Juliette; Bignon-Topalovic, Joëlle; Bashamboo, Anu; McElreavey, Ken; Brauner, Raja

    2012-01-01

    Background Boys carrying mutations in the NR0B1 gene develop adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and impaired sexual development due to the combination of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) and primary defects in spermatogenesis. Methods We analysed the evolution of hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular function of 8 boys with AHC due to NR0B1 mutations. Our objective was to characterize and monitor the progressive deterioration of this function. Results The first symptoms appeared in the neonatal period (n = 5) or between 6 months and 8.7 years (n = 3). Basal plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) concentrations increased in all boys, whilst cortisol levels decreased in one case. The natremia was equal or below 134 mmol/L and kaliemia was over 5 mmol/L. All had increased plasma renin. In 3 of 4 patients diagnosed in the neonatal period and evaluated during the first year, the basal plasma gonadotropins concentrations, and their response to gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) test (n = 2), and those of testosterone were normal. The plasma inhibin B levels were normal in the first year of life. With the exception of two cases these concentrations decreased to below the normal for age. Anti-Müllerian hormone concentrations were normal for age in all except one case, which had low concentrations before the initiation of testosterone treatment. In 3 of the 8 cases the gene was deleted and the remaining 5 cases carried frameshift mutations that are predicted to introduce a downstream nonsense mutation resulting in a truncated protein. Conclusions The decreases in testosterone and inhibin B levels indicated a progressive loss of testicular function in boys carrying NR0B1 mutations. These non-invasive examinations can help to estimate the age of the testicular degradation and cryopreservation of semen may be considered in these cases as investigational procedure with the aim of restoring fertility. PMID:22761912

  10. A Novel Missense Mutation in Dax-1 with an Unusual Presentation of X-Linked Adrenal Hypoplasia Congenita

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Imran; Paterson, Wendy F.; Lin, Lin; Adlard, Peter; Duncan, Philippa; Tolmie, John; Achermann, John C.; Donaldson, Malcolm D.C.

    2012-01-01

    A male presented at age 2.2 years with a 6-week history of intermittent vomiting and hyperpigmentation. Investigations showed salt wasting with hyperkalaemia, a grossly impaired cortisol response to ACTH stimulation, elevated renin and ACTH. Family history revealed that two maternal uncles had died soon after birth. A third uncle failed to thrive during infancy but improved with a course of cortisone, then being untreated until further investigation revealed adrenal insufficiency. A fourth uncle died aged 10 days, with urinary salt loss and hypoplastic adrenal glands at postmortem. Molecular studies on the proband, his mother, maternal grandmother, and surviving uncle showed a novel C to G substitution at nucleotide position 794 (missense mutation T265R) in the DAX1 (NR0B1) gene. The proband has responded well to steroid replacement but has proved sensitive to 9α-fludrocortisone treatment, developing hypertension on a dose of 133 μg/m2/day. At 8.8 years he was noted to have testicular volumes of 4 ml, despite no other evidence of secondary sexual development and prepubertal gonadotrophin levels. Novel features of this family include a novel DAX1 mutation, marked variability in age of presentation, hypertension on ‘standard’ doses of 9α-fludrocortisone and mild testicular enlargement. PMID:17308433

  11. A novel missense mutation in DAX-1 with an unusual presentation of X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Imran; Paterson, Wendy F; Lin, Lin; Adlard, Peter; Duncan, Philippa; Tolmie, John; Achermann, John C; Donaldson, Malcolm D C

    2007-01-01

    A male presented at age 2.2 years with a 6-week history of intermittent vomiting and hyperpigmentation. Investigations showed salt wasting with hyperkalaemia, a grossly impaired cortisol response to ACTH stimulation, elevated renin and ACTH. Family history revealed that two maternal uncles had died soon after birth. A third uncle failed to thrive during infancy but improved with a course of cortisone, then being untreated until further investigation revealed adrenal insufficiency. A fourth uncle died aged 10 days, with urinary salt loss and hypoplastic adrenal glands at postmortem. Molecular studies on the proband, his mother, maternal grandmother, and surviving uncle showed a novel C to G substitution at nucleotide position 794 (missense mutation T265R) in the DAX1 (NR0B1) gene. The proband has responded well to steroid replacement but has proved sensitive to 9alpha-fludrocortisone treatment, developing hypertension on a dose of 133 microg/m(2)/day. At 8.8 years he was noted to have testicular volumes of 4 ml, despite no other evidence of secondary sexual development and prepubertal gonadotrophin levels. Novel features of this family include a novel DAX1 mutation, marked variability in age of presentation, hypertension on 'standard' doses of 9alpha-fludrocortisone and mild testicular enlargement. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. X-Linked Adrenal Hypoplasia Congenita in a Boy due to a Novel Deletion of the Entire NR0B1 (DAX1) and MAGEB1–4 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rojek, Aleksandra; Krawczynski, Maciej R.; Jamsheer, Aleksander; Sowinska-Seidler, Anna; Iwaniszewska, Barbara; Malunowicz, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    X-linked Adrenal Hypoplasia Congenita (AHC) is caused by deletions or point mutations in the NR0B1 (DAX1) gene. We present a boy with AHC who came at the age of 25 days in a severe state due to prolonged vomiting and progressive dehydration. Laboratory studies showed prominent hyponatremia and hyperkaliemia but not hypoglycemia. Primary adrenal insufficiency was confirmed with low serum cortisol levels and high plasma ACTH levels. Hydrocortisone therapy combined with saline and glucose infusions was started immediately after blood collection. Two exons of the NR0B1 (DAX1) gene were impossible to amplify using the standard PCR method. Array CGH was used to confirm the putative copy-number variation of NR0B1 (DAX1) revealing a novel hemizygous deletion encompassing the entire NR0B1 (DAX1) gene together with the MAGEB genes. This genetic defect was also present in heterozygosity in the patient's mother. We show that NR0B1 (DAX1) gene analysis is important for confirmation of AHC diagnosis and highlights the role of genetic counseling in families with AHC patients, particularly those with X chromosome microdeletions, covering more than NR0B1 (DAX1) alone. We hope that further clinical follow-up of this patient and his family will shed a new light on the role of MAGEB genes. PMID:27656210

  13. IMAGe association: report of two cases in siblings with adrenal hypoplasia and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Katherine; Arroyo, May R; Duckworth, Lizette Vila

    2014-01-01

    We report the postmortem findings of two siblings with gross and microscopic features consistent with IMAGe association (Intrauterine growth retardation, Metaphyseal dysplasia, Adrenal hypoplasia congenita, and Genital anomalies) with an emphasis on the histopathology of the adrenal gland in this rare syndrome. The first sibling was an 8-week old male diagnosed postnatally with primary adrenal insufficiency. There was no deletion of the DAX1 gene by FISH. Examination at autopsy revealed dysmorphic features including frontal bossing, epicanthal folds, flat philtrum, cryptorchidism, penile chordee, overriding fourth toe, and height and weight below 3rd percentile. Grossly, the adrenal glands were not identified; however, microscopic examination of the suprarenal soft tissue revealed a 3 mm focus of disorganized fetal adrenal cortex with distended "cytomegalic" cells with abundant pink eosinophilic cytoplasm, vesicular nuclei, and cytoplasmic vacuolization. A minute focus of permanent adult cortex was also seen, but no adrenal medulla was identified. An autopsy of the sibling, who died 12 years previously at day 9 of life, revealed dysmorphic facial features with cryptorchidism and a large phallus. The adrenal glands were grossly hypoplastic (11 mm). Histologically, the adrenal glands showed disorganized fetal cortex with cytomegalic cells, a larger amount of permanent adult cortex, and bizarre nuclei with numerous pseudoinclusions. While there is currently limited information regarding the histopathologic adrenal findings in IMAGe association, our small case series suggests overlapping features between X-linked recessive congenital adrenal hypoplasia (cytomegalic cells with lack of permanent adult cortex) and autosomal recessive congenital adrenal hypoplasia (diminished permanent adult cortex without cytomegalic cells).

  14. Mental retardation in a boy with congenital adrenal hypoplasia: a clue to contiguous gene syndrome involving DAX1 and IL1RAPL.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Rie; Inamo, Yasuji; Saitoh, Kazumasa; Hasegawa, Tomonobu; Kinoshita, Eiichi; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2003-06-01

    We report on a 2 years and 9 months old Japanese boy with adrenal hypoplasia and mental retardation (MR) (developmental quotient approximately 60) which occurred in the absence of severe adrenal crisis and resultant brain damage. Cytogenetic and molecular studies were performed in this boy and his parents with normal phenotype, showing that the boy had a maternally derived approximately 2 Mb interstitial Xp deletion involving DAX1 (DSS-AHC critical region on the X chromosome, gene 1) for adrenal hypoplasia congenita and disrupting IL1RAPL (interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein-like) for non-specific MR. The results explain the development of MR in this boy in terms of contiguous gene syndrome, and suggest the importance of IL1RAPL analysis in patients with adrenal hypoplasia and MR.

  15. Growth hormone deficiency due to traumatic brain injury in a patient with X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Engiz, Ozlem; Ozön, Alev; Riepe, Felix; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer; Gönç, Nazli; Kandemir, Nurgün

    2010-01-01

    X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) is characterized by primary adrenal insufficiency and is frequently associated with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). The production of other pituitary hormones (adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH], growth hormone [GH], thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], and prolactin [PRL]) is usually normal. Mutations of the DAX-1 gene have been reported in patients with AHC and HH. We present a 13-year-old male patient with AHC caused by a nonsense mutation in the DAX-1 gene who developed GH deficiency following head trauma. He showed signs of adrenal insufficiency at the age of 23 months, and glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid treatment was started. His parents reported head trauma due to a traffic accident at the age of 21 months. Adrenal computed tomography revealed hypoplasia of the left and agenesis of the right adrenal gland. Decreased growth rate was noted at the age of 12.5 years while receiving hydrocortisone 15 mg/m2/day. His height was 139.9 cm (-1.46 SD), body weight was 54.9 kg, pubic hair was Tanner stage 1, and testis size was 3 ml. His bone age was 7 years. His gonadotropin (follicle-stimulating hormone [FSH], luteinizing hormone [LH]) and testosterone levels were prepubertal. The evaluation of GH/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) secretion at the age of 13 years revealed GH deficiency. Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a hypoplastic hypophysis (< 2.5 mm) and a normal infundibulum. GH treatment (0.73 IU/kg/week) was started. This paper reports a patient with genetically confirmed AHC demonstrating GH deficiency possibly due to a previous head trauma. Complete pituitary evaluation should be performed in any child who has survived severe traumatic brain injury.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: intrauterine growth restriction, metaphyseal dysplasia, adrenal hypoplasia congenita, and ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... Case report with a previously unreported feature and review of published literature. Am J Med Genet A. 2010 Dec; ... Endocrinol Metab. 1999 Dec;84(12):4335-40. Review. Citation on PubMed Reviewed : April 2013 Published : October 10, 2017 The resources on this site ...

  17. De novo dup (5p) in a patient with congenital hypoplasia of the adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Kusyk, C.J.; Tuck-Muller, C.M.

    1995-02-13

    We report on a black male child with congenital hypoplasia of the adrenal gland (CHA) with a de novo duplication of 5p (dir dup(5) (p13.3{r_arrow}p15.1)), confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In addition to a characteristic clinical course, the patient has hyperpigmentation (melanoderma) since birth, normal external genitalia, marked elevation of ACTH, and absent response to an IV ACTH challenge. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of congenital hypoplasia of the adrenal gland associated with a chromosome abnormality. Reviews of dup (5p) and of our patient suggest that duplication of 5p13.3-pter has only minor phenotypic effect, while duplication of the relatively small critical segment p11-p13.2 apparently causes far more deleterious changes. The concurrence of CHA and dup(5p) in our patient may indicate the possible gene localization of an autosomal form of CHA to either at or near 5p13.3 or 5p15.1. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Congenital adrenal hypoplasia: clinical spectrum, experience with hormonal diagnosis, and report on new point mutations of the DAX-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Peter, M; Viemann, M; Partsch, C J; Sippell, W G

    1998-08-01

    X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia (AHC) is a rare developmental disorder of the human adrenal cortex and is caused by deletion or mutation of the DAX-1 gene, a recently discovered member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is frequently associated with AHC. AHC occurs as part of a contiguous gene syndrome together with glycerol kinase deficiency (GKD) and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy. The present series, collected over the past 2 decades, includes 18 AHC boys from 16 families: 4 with AHC, GKD, and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy; 2 with AHC and GKD; and 12 with AHC (5 young adults with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism). Most of the boys presented with salt wasting and hyperpigmentation during the neonatal period. Plasma steroid determinations performed in the first weeks of life often showed confusing results, probably caused by steroids produced in the neonates' persisting fetocortex. Aldosterone deficiency usually preceded cortisol deficiency, which explains why the patients more often presented with salt-wasting rather than with hypoglycemic symptoms. An ACTH test was often necessary to detect cortisol deficiency in the very young infants. In some patients, serial testing was necessary to establish the correct diagnosis. In 4 boys studied during the first 3 months after birth, we found pubertal LH, FSH, and testosterone plasma levels indicating postnatal transient activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis as in normal boys. Previous studies have shown that the DAX-1 gene is deleted in the AHC patients with a contiguous gene syndrome and is mutated in nondeletion patients. Most of the point mutations identified in AHC patients were frameshift mutations and stop mutations. In the 15 patients available for molecular analysis of the DAX-1 gene, there were large deletions in 6 patients and point mutations in another 7 patients. All of the point mutations identified in the present study resulted in a nonfunctional

  19. Dyskeratosis congenita.

    PubMed

    Drachtman, R A; Alter, B P

    1995-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita is a rare genodermatosis. Malignant deterioration and hematologic complications are well-described features of this syndrome. Correct recognition is essential for proper management. A review of diagnostic considerations and treatment guidelines is presented.

  20. Role of DAX-1 (NR0B1) and steroidogenic factor-1 (NR5A1) in human adrenal function.

    PubMed

    El-Khairi, Ranna; Martinez-Aguayo, Alejandro; Ferraz-de-Souza, Bruno; Lin, Lin; Achermann, John C

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear receptor transcription factors DAX-1 (NR0B1) and SF-1 (NR5A1) regulate many aspects of adrenal and reproductive development and function. Disruption of the genes encoding these factors can be associated with pediatric adrenal disease. DAX-1 mutations are classically associated with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and impaired spermatogenesis. However, other phenotypes are also being reported, such as isolated mineralocorticoid insufficiency, premature sexual development, primary adrenal insufficiency in a 46, XX patient and late-onset X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita and/or hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. SF-1 mutations have also been associated with primary adrenal insufficiency, together with 46, XY disorders of sex development. However it is emerging that SF-1 changes are a relatively rare cause of primary adrenal failure in humans, and most individuals with SF-1 mutations have a spectrum of 46, XY disorders of sex development phenotypes. These conditions range from 46, XY females with streak gonads and müllerian structures, through children with ambiguous genitalia and inguinal testes, to severe penoscrotal hypospadias with undescended testes. Therefore, the human gonad appears to be more sensitive than the adrenal gland to loss of SF-1 function. This review will focus on the expanding range of phenotypes associated with DAX-1 and SF-1 mutations. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Erythroblastic Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, R. K.

    1964-01-01

    Three patients with erythroblastic hypoplasia were observed for prolonged periods. In one patient, the phenomenon recurred on three occasions over a 12-year period. In the second, erythroblastic hypoplasia accompanied acute hemolytic anemia of the autoimmune type. The third patient had congenital erythroblastic hypoplasia which was observed for 14 years without remission. From the prolonged periods of observation of these three patients, it is concluded that the phenomenon of erythroblastic hypoplasia may develop abruptly, persist for variable periods of time, remit spontaneously and recur unpredictably. A total of four remissions observed in two patients were believed to be spontaneous and not a result of any of the forms of treatment administered. No remission has occurred in a 14-year-old boy with congenital erythroblastic hypoplasia. A classification of erythroblastic hypoplasia is proposed, based on the clinical circumstances in which the phenomenon has been encountered. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:14155120

  2. Clinical Features of Congenital Adrenal Insufficiency Including Growth Patterns and Significance of ACTH Stimulation Test

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Ji Won; Kim, Gu Hwan; Yoo, Han Wook

    2013-01-01

    Congenital adrenal insufficiency is caused by specific genetic mutations. Early suspicion and definite diagnosis are crucial because the disease can precipitate a life-threatening hypovolemic shock without prompt treatment. This study was designed to understand the clinical manifestations including growth patterns and to find the usefulness of ACTH stimulation test. Sixteen patients with confirmed genotyping were subdivided into three groups according to the genetic study results: congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (CAH, n=11), congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (n=3) and X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (n=2). Bone age advancement was prominent in patients with CAH especially after 60 months of chronologic age (n=6, 67%). They were diagnosed in older ages in group with bone age advancement (P<0.05). Comorbid conditions such as obesity, mental retardation, and central precocious puberty were also prominent in this group. In conclusion, this study showed the importance of understanding the clinical symptoms as well as genetic analysis for early diagnosis and management of congenital adrenal insufficiency. ACTH stimulation test played an important role to support the diagnosis and serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone levels were significantly elevated in all of the CAH patients. The test will be important for monitoring growth and puberty during follow up of patients with congenital adrenal insufficiency. PMID:24265530

  3. Clinical features of congenital adrenal insufficiency including growth patterns and significance of ACTH stimulation test.

    PubMed

    Koh, Ji Won; Kim, Gu Hwan; Yoo, Han Wook; Yu, Jeesuk

    2013-11-01

    Congenital adrenal insufficiency is caused by specific genetic mutations. Early suspicion and definite diagnosis are crucial because the disease can precipitate a life-threatening hypovolemic shock without prompt treatment. This study was designed to understand the clinical manifestations including growth patterns and to find the usefulness of ACTH stimulation test. Sixteen patients with confirmed genotyping were subdivided into three groups according to the genetic study results: congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (CAH, n=11), congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (n=3) and X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (n=2). Bone age advancement was prominent in patients with CAH especially after 60 months of chronologic age (n=6, 67%). They were diagnosed in older ages in group with bone age advancement (P<0.05). Comorbid conditions such as obesity, mental retardation, and central precocious puberty were also prominent in this group. In conclusion, this study showed the importance of understanding the clinical symptoms as well as genetic analysis for early diagnosis and management of congenital adrenal insufficiency. ACTH stimulation test played an important role to support the diagnosis and serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone levels were significantly elevated in all of the CAH patients. The test will be important for monitoring growth and puberty during follow up of patients with congenital adrenal insufficiency.

  4. [Cerebellar hypoplasias].

    PubMed

    Safronova, Marta Maia; Barbot, Clara; Resende Pereira, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Cerebellar hypoplasias are cerebellar malformations with small but completely formed cerebellum. They can be divided in focal and in diffuse or generalized. It is sometimes difficult to make distinction between cerebellar atrophy (progressive condition) and hipoplasia (not progressive condition). Focal hypoplasias are restricted to one cerebellar hemisphere or to the vermis. Diffuse hypoplasias refer to both cerebellar hemispheres and vermis. If there is associated IVth ventricle enlargement, hypoplasias occur in the context of Dandy-Walker complex, a continuum of posterior fossa cystic anomalies. A revision of cerebellar hypoplasias and associated pathology is done, illustrated with 22 cases tha include focal and diffuse cerebellar hypoplasias, Dandy-Walker malformations and its variant, persistent Blake's pouch cyst, megacisterna magna, PEHO síndrome (progressive encephalopathy with oedema, hipsarrhythmia and optic atrophy), Joubert syndrome, congenital disorder of glycosylation type Ia, pontocerebellar hipoplasias Barth type I and II, diffuse subcortical heterotopia. The imaging finding of structural cerebellar anomalies frequently leads to diagnostic incertainty as the anomalies are mostly unspecific, implying an extenuating analytical and genetic workup. Their knowledge and classification may be useful to decide the patient adjusted laboratorial workup.

  5. Lethal skeletal dysplasia owing to double heterozygosity for achondroplasia and spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita.

    PubMed Central

    Young, I D; Ruggins, N R; Somers, J M; Zuccollo, J M; Rutter, N

    1992-01-01

    A male infant with lethal short limbed dwarfism is described. His father had spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita and his mother had achondroplasia. It is believed that the infant inherited both of these disorders and that their combined effects resulted in early death owing primarily to severe pulmonary hypoplasia. Images PMID:1453438

  6. Evidence of Adrenal Failure in Aging Dax1-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Scheys, Joshua O.; Heaton, Joanne H.

    2011-01-01

    Dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) critical region on the X chromosome, gene 1 (Dax1) is an orphan nuclear receptor essential for development and function of the mammalian adrenal cortex and gonads. DAX1 was cloned as the gene responsible for X-linked AHC, which is characterized by adrenocortical failure necessitating glucocorticoid replacement. Contrary to these human data, young mice with genetic Dax1 knockout (Dax1−/Y) exhibit adrenocortical hyperfunction, consistent with the historic description of Dax1 as a transcriptional repressor that inhibits steroidogenic factor 1-dependent steroidogenesis. This paradox of molecular function and two apparently opposite phenotypes associated with Dax1 deficiency in mice and humans is compounded by the recent observations that under certain circumstances, Dax1 can serve as a transcriptional activator of steroidogenic factor 1. The recently revealed role of Dax1 in embryonic stem cell pluripotency, together with the observation that its expression in the adult adrenal is restricted to the subcapsular cortex, where presumptive undifferentiated progenitor cells reside, has led us to reexamine the phenotype of Dax1−/Y mice in order to reconcile the conflicting mouse and human data. In this report, we demonstrate that although young Dax1−/Y mice have enhanced steroidogenesis and subcapsular adrenocortical proliferation, as these mice age, they exhibit declining adrenal growth, decreasing adrenal steroidogenic capacity, and a reversal of their initial enhanced hormonal sensitivity. Together with a marked adrenal dysplasia in aging mice, these data reveal that both Dax1−/Y mice and patients with X-linked AHC exhibit adrenal failure that is consistent with adrenocortical subcapsular progenitor cell depletion and argue for a significant role of Dax1 in maintenance of these cells. PMID:21733829

  7. Hypertrichosis lanuginosa congenita.

    PubMed

    Mendiratta, Vibhu; Harjai, Bhawna; Gupta, Tanvi

    2008-01-01

    Hypertrichosis lanuginosa congenita is a rare, autosomal dominant cutaneous disorder with sporadic presentations reported. It manifests at birth with the affected infant presenting with excessive lanugo hair covering the entire body surface, sparing palms, soles, and mucous membranes. The hypertrichosis may increase or decrease during childhood, but the lanugo character of hairs may be retained even after puberty. The disorder may be associated with several other congenital defects. We report a case of hypertrichosis lanuginosa congenita in a male infant who presented to us at 3 months of age with the classical features of the disorder but without any other associated congenital defect.

  8. Aplasia cutis congenita.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J.; Ross, J. B.

    1984-01-01

    A newborn child was noted to have an ulcerated lesion on the vertex of her scalp, which was diagnosed as aplasia cutis congenita. As this disorder is relatively rare and frequently misdiagnosed, this case is reported and the relevant literature reviewed. Images FIG. 1A FIG. 1B PMID:6692238

  9. Prenatal diagnosis of hypophosphatasia congenita using ultrasonography

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Congenital hypophosphatasia is a rare fatal skeletal dysplasia. Antenatal determinants of Epub ahead of print lethality include small thoracic circumference with pulmonary hypoplasia and severe micromelia. These features were present in the fetus of a 25-year-old female who came for an anomaly scan in her second trimester of pregnancy. Additional findings of generalized demineralization and osteochondral spurs led to the diagnosis of hypophosphatasia congenita. The pregnancy was terminated, and the findings were confirmed on autopsy. Common differential diagnoses with clues to diagnose the above mentioned condition have been discussed here. Early and accurate detection of this medical condition is important as no treatment has been established for this condition. Therefore, antenatal ultrasonography helps in diagnosing and decision making with respect to the current pregnancy and lays the foundation for the genetic counseling of the couple. PMID:25971898

  10. Pachyonychia congenita with unusual features.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, S; Kaarthigeyan, K; Ramnath, B

    2009-10-01

    Pachyonychia congenita is a rare hereditary disorder characterized by gross thickening of all finger and toenails. We report an infant who had clinical features consistent with pachyonychia congenita type II, with unusual features of microcephaly, seizures, electroencephalogram abnormalities, failure to thrive, and heterochromia iridis.

  11. [Aplasia cutis congenita].

    PubMed

    Trevizo Ortiz, L; Ruiz-Maldonado, R; Tamayo s, L

    1978-01-01

    Communication of fifteen cases of Aplasia Cutis Congenita, seen from 1971 to 1977, in the Department of Pediatric Dermatology at the Hospital del Niño DIF (formerly IMAN). Patients of both sexes were equally affected. The scalp was by far the most common location of lesions. Lesiones were usually single and when multiple, they were symmetrical. The family history for the disease was negative. No relationship could be found with obstetric trauma or with the number of pregnancies. Epithelialized lesions were present in fourteen cases and ulcerated lesions in one. The more frequent congenital associated malformations were: cutaneous, neurological, ocular and osseous.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: dyskeratosis congenita

    MedlinePlus

    ... R, Alter BP, Artandi SE. Disruption of telomerase trafficking by TCAB1 mutation causes dyskeratosis congenita. Genes Dev. ... Accessibility FOIA Viewers & Players U.S. Department of Health & Human Services National Institutes of Health National Library of ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: myotonia congenita

    MedlinePlus

    ... more common in particular ethnic groups? Genetic Changes Mutations in the CLCN1 gene cause myotonia congenita . The ... electrical charge, which prevents muscles from contracting abnormally. Mutations in the CLCN1 gene alter the usual structure ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: pachyonychia congenita

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pachyonychia Congenita McLean WH, Hansen CD, Eliason MJ, Smith FJ. The phenotypic and molecular genetic features of ... 10.1001/jamadermatol.2013.6448. Citation on PubMed Smith FJ, Liao H, Cassidy AJ, Stewart A, Hamill ...

  15. Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, E. P.; Pandya, S. S.; Dastur, Darab K.

    1972-01-01

    Sixteen cases with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita were examined clinically and electromyographically; three of them were re-examined later. Joint deformities were present in all extremities in 13 of the cases; in eight there was some degree of mental retardation. In two cases, there was clinical and electromyographic evidence of a myopathic disorder. In the majority, the appearances of the shoulder-neck region suggested a developmental defect. At the same time, selective weakness of muscles innervated by C5-C6 segments suggested a neuropathic disturbance. EMG revealed, in eight of 13 cases, clear evidence of denervation of muscles, but without any regenerative activity. The non-progressive nature of this disorder and capacity for improvement in muscle bulk and power suggest that denervation alone cannot explain the process. Re-examination of three patients after two to three years revealed persistence of the major deformities and muscle weakness noted earlier, with no appreciable deterioration. Images PMID:5049804

  16. Cancer in dyskeratosis congenita

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Neelam; Savage, Sharon A.; Rosenberg, Philip S.

    2009-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is a rare inherited bone marrow failure syndrome. The spectrum of cancer susceptibility in this disorder of telomere biology has not been described. There were more than 500 cases of DC reported in the literature from 1910 to 2008; the National Cancer Institute (NCI) prospective DC cohort enrolled 50 cases from 2002 to 2007. Sixty cancers were reported in 52 literature cases, while 7 occurred among patients in the NCI DC cohort. The 2 cohorts were comparable in their median overall survival (42 years) and cumulative incidence of cancer (40%-50% by age 50 years). The most frequent solid tumors were head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (40% of patients in either cohort), followed by skin and anorectal cancer. The ratio of observed to expected cancers (O/E ratio) in the NCI cohort was 11-fold compared with the general population (P < .05). Significantly elevated O/E ratios were 1154 for tongue cancer and 195 for acute myeloid leukemia. Survival after bone marrow transplantation for aplastic anemia or leukemia was poor in both cohorts. The frequency and types of cancer in DC are surpassed only by those in Fanconi anemia (FA), indicating that FA and DC have similarly high risks of adverse hematologic and neoplastic events, and patients with these diseases should be counseled and monitored similarly. PMID:19282459

  17. Congenital optic tract hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Hatsukawa, Yoshikazu; Fujio, Takahiro; Nishikawa, Masanori; Taylor, David

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of isolated unilateral optic tract hypoplasia, described only twice previously. Bilateral optic disk hypoplasia was seen ophthalmoscopically and visual field studies showed an incongruous right homonymous hemianopia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral hypoplasia of both optic nerves and the left optic tract. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography mapping correlated well with the visual field studies.

  18. Hirschsprung's disease associated with alopecia universalis congenita: a case report.

    PubMed

    Malik, Sushma; Singhal, Mani; Jadhav, Shruti Sudhir; Korday, Charusheela Sujit; Nayak, Chitra Shivanand

    2016-09-15

    Hirschsprung's disease is one of the commonest causes of intestinal obstruction in neonates because of gut motility disorder. It is characterized as a complex genetic heterogenous disorder with variable inheritance. Hirschsprung's disease occurs as an isolated phenotype in majority (70 %) of cases. In other cases it may be associated with syndromes (such as Down's syndrome, Waardenburg syndrome, congenital central hypoventilation, or cartilage-hair hypoplasia) or with a spectrum of congenital anomalies involving neurological, cardiovascular, or urological systems or with sensorineural anomalies. In our patient, Hirschsprung's disease was associated with alopecia universalis. Alopecia universalis congenita is a rare disorder of skin characterized by generalized absence of hair at or shortly after birth. The inheritance patterns range from autosomal recessive, dominant or X-linked recessive forms. The autosomal recessive form is the most common and severe type in which patients present with complete absence of hair development, affecting the entire scalp and body. Alopecia universalis congenita occurs either in isolation or as a part of congenital syndromes. Here, we report the case of a neonate who presented with Hirschsprung's disease with alopecia universalis congenita, an association which has not been reported before. A preterm (33 weeks' gestation) 1.4 kg Indian baby girl was born to a gravida two mother by caesarean section. At birth, clinical examination revealed total absence of scalp and body hair. On day 3, she had bilious vomiting and a barium study was suggestive of Hirschsprung's disease. An exploratory laparotomy and intestinal biopsy report revealed aganglionic muscularis propria; a skin biopsy from her scalp was suggestive of alopecia universalis. Postoperatively, she died due to multiorgan failure. Her family history revealed that her elder sibling also had alopecia universalis and esophageal atresia. This child died on day twelve. Our patient

  19. Bilateral Maxillary Sinus Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Khanduri, Sachin; Agrawal, Sumit; Goyal, Swati

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary sinus hypoplasia (MSH) is an uncommon abnormality of paranasal sinuses noted in clinical practice. Computed tomography (CT) scan helps in diagnosing the anomaly along with any anatomical variation that may be associated with it. MSH is usually associated with other anomalies like uncinate process hypoplasia. Three types of MSH have been described. Type 1 MSH shows mild maxillary sinus hypoplasia, type 2 shows significant sinus hypoplasia with narrowed infundibular passage and hypoplastic or absent uncinate process, and type 3 is cleft like maxillary sinus hypoplasia with absent uncinate process. CT and endoscopic examination usually complement each other in diagnosing MSH. PMID:25548709

  20. Chronological hypoplasia: aesthetic management

    PubMed Central

    Jayam, Cheranjeevi; Bandlapalli, Anila; Patel, Nikunj; Choudhary, Rama Shankar Kashinath

    2014-01-01

    Enamel hypoplasia is defined as a break in the continuity of enamel with a reduction in the layers leading to depressions or grooves. Chronological hypoplasia is differentiated from other forms of hypoplasia due to its characteristic presentation (multiple, symmetrical, chronological pattern). Chronological hypoplasias are seen at the time tooth erupts into the oral cavity leading to several problems like aesthetic problems, tooth sensitivity, caries and early pulpal involvement. Prevention of interaction of aetiological factors is not possible because multiple factors are required for enamel synthesis. This paper highlights how to diagnose, intercept and treat chronological hypoplasias. It also mentions reasons for treating a case and different modalities available. PMID:24907208

  1. [Maxillary sinus hypoplasia].

    PubMed

    Plaza, G; Ferrando, J; Martel, J; Toledano, A; de los Santos, G

    2001-03-01

    Maxillary sinus hypoplasia is rare, with an estimated prevalence of 1-5%. Out of the CT scans performed in sinusal patients between March 1998 and June 1999, we report on 4 isolated maxillary sinus hypoplasia, 4 maxillary sinus hypoplasia associated to concha bullosa, and 10 isolated conchae bullosas. All cases were evaluated by nasosinusal endoscopy and CT scan. Size, location and uni/bilateral presentation of concha bullosa is correlated to maxillary sinus hypoplasia presence, specially with regards to uncinate process presence, medial or lateral retraction. The pathogenesis of maxillary sinus hypoplasia is reviewed, and its relation to concha bullosa, evaluating how this could explain some cases of the so called chronic maxillary sinus atelectasia, as an acquired and progressive variant of maxillary sinus hypoplasia in adults.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: nonsyndromic aplasia cutis congenita

    MedlinePlus

    ... bones and other tissues occur rarely. However, the characteristic skin lesions can occur as one of many ... baby to be born with the skin lesions characteristic of nonsyndromic aplasia cutis congenita . Other cases are ...

  3. Cartilage hair hypoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Siggers, D. C.; Burke, J. B.; Morris, B.; Normand, I. C.; Tanner, J. M.; Williamson, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Six cases of cartilage hair hypoplasia from five kindreds are described. They demonstrate variation in the expression of clinical features such as sparsity of hair, hair calibre, radiological changes, short stature and the extent of the disproportion between sitting height and stature. Images Figs. 1-6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:917962

  4. Pachyonychia congenita: A rare genodermatosis.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Puneet; Chhaperwal, Mahendra K; Singh, Apurva; Verma, Arvind; Nijhawan, Manisha; Singh, Kishore; Mathur, Dinesh

    2013-07-01

    Pachyonychia congenita (PC) is a rare genodermatosis with only 450 cases reported since 1906. It is of two types, type I due to mutation in genes 6a and 16, and 6b and 17 in type II with an autosomal dominant inheritance in both types. A 22 yr old female patient presented in our OPD with hypertrophy of finger and toe nails, palmoplantar keratoderma, oral punctuate leukokeratosis, hyperhidrosis in palms and soles with maceration and malodour since childhood. She had a positive family history with father and grandfather affected but less severely. Microscopy and culture of nail clippings and scrapping were done to rule out fungal infection. On biopsy acanthotic epidermis, parakeratosis, orthokeratosis were seen. No evidence of any associated malignancy was found after thorough workup. She was diagnosed as PC Type 1. She was put on topical steroids and orally on acetretin 25 mg OD. Paring of the nails was done too reduce the thickness of nails & to provide symptomatic relief. She was on a regular treatment for 3-4 months and showed some improvement in the form of reduced palmoplantar hyperkeratosis and reduced oral punctate keratosis but was later lost on followup. She showed no adverse effect to therapy during this period. This case is being reported because of its rarity.

  5. Faun tail nevus with aplasia cutis congenita.

    PubMed

    Chander, Ram; Jain, Arpita; Jaykar, Kranti; Garg, Taru; Anand, Rama

    2009-01-01

    Faun tail nevus describes abnormal lumbar hypertrichosis, which may overlie on occult spinal abnormality and be a marker of asymptomatic underlying spinal dysraphism. We report a case of faun tail nevus, with dermal pits along with aplasia cutis congenita and asymptomatic spina bifida occulta, tethered conus, and diastematomyelia, a constellation of findings which to our knowledge has not been previously reported.

  6. Prenatal prediction of pulmonary hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Triebwasser, Jourdan E; Treadwell, Marjorie C

    2017-03-15

    Pulmonary hypoplasia, although rare, is associated with significant neonatal morbidity and mortality. Conditions associated with pulmonary hypoplasia include those which limit normal thoracic capacity or movement, including skeletal dysplasias and abdominal wall defects; those with mass effect, including congenital diaphragmatic hernia and pleural effusions; and those with decreased amniotic fluid, including preterm, premature rupture of membranes, and genitourinary anomalies. The ability to predict severe pulmonary hypoplasia prenatally aids in family counseling, as well as obstetric and neonatal management. The objective of this review is to outline the imaging techniques that are widely used prenatally to assess pulmonary hypoplasia and to discuss the limitations of these methods.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... Open All Close All Description Lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia (LCH) affects brain development, resulting in the brain ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Leydig cell hypoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions Leydig cell hypoplasia Leydig cell hypoplasia Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Leydig cell hypoplasia is a condition that affects male sexual development. ...

  9. Adrenal cortex dysfunction: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Huebener, K.H.; Treugut, H.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of the adrenal gland was studied in 302 patients with possible endocrinologic disease and 107 patients undergoing CT for nonendocrinologic reasons. Measurements of adrenal size were also made in 100 adults with no known adrenal pathology. CT proved to be a sensitive diagnostic tool in combination with clinical studies. When blood hormone levels are increased, CT can differentiate among homogeneous organic hyperplasia, nodular hyperplasia, benign adenoma, and malignant cortical adenoma. When blood hormone levels are decreased, CT can demonstrate hypoplasia or metastatic tumorous destruction. Calcifications can be demonstrated earlier than on plain radiographs. When hormone elimination is increased, the morphologic substrate can be identified; tumorous changes can be localized and infiltration of surrounding organs recognized.

  10. Aplasia Cutis Congenita Associated with Fetus Papyraceus.

    PubMed

    Pieretti, María Lía; Alcalá, Rebeca; Boggio, Paula; Noguera-Morel, Lucero; Porriño, María Librada; Luna, Paula C; Hernández-Martín, Angela; Schroh, Roberto; Larralde, Margarita; Torrelo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Aplasia cutis congenita (ACC), or congenital absence of skin, is a heterogeneous condition that may be due to varied mechanisms. ACC has rarely been reported in association with fetus papyraceus, representing a peculiar phenotype of ACC. We present six new cases of neonates born with symmetric ACC associated with intrauterine fetal demise of co-twins during the late first or early second trimester. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Adrenal glands

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002219.htm Adrenal glands To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The adrenal glands are two triangle-shaped glands. One gland is ...

  12. Biliary hypoplasia in Williams syndrome.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, K; Ahmed, S F; Murday, V; McGrogan, P

    2006-05-01

    Neonatal hepatitis and biliary hypoplasia are not recognised features of Williams syndrome. A case of Williams syndrome, presenting with neonatal conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia leading to an initial misdiagnosis is reported.

  13. Optic nerve hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Savleen; Jain, Sparshi; Sodhi, Harsimrat B. S.; Rastogi, Anju; Kamlesh

    2013-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65%) than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED). PMID:24082663

  14. Adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Auron, Moises; Raissouni, Nouhad

    2015-03-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is a life-threatening condition that occurs secondary to impaired secretion of adrenal glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid hormones. This condition can be caused by primary destruction or dysfunction of the adrenal glands or impairment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. In children, the most common causes of primary adrenal insufficiency are impaired adrenal steroidogenesis (congenital adrenal hyperplasia) and adrenal destruction or dysfunction (autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome and adrenoleukodystrophy), whereas exogenous corticosteroid therapy withdrawal or poor adherence to scheduled corticosteroid dosing with long-standing treatment constitute the most common cause of acquired adrenal insufficiency. Although there are classic clinical signs (eg, fatigue, orthostatic hypotension, hyperpigmentation, hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, and hypoglycemia) of adrenal insufficiency, its early clinical presentation is most commonly vague and undefined, requiring a high index of suspicion. The relevance of early identification of adrenal insufficiency is to avoid the potential lethal outcome secondary to severe cardiovascular and hemodynamic insufficiency. The clinician must be aware of the need for increased corticosteroid dose supplementation during stress periods.

  15. Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita: Multiple Congenital Joint Contractures

    PubMed Central

    Sucuoglu, Hamza; Ornek, Nurettin Irem; Caglar, Cagkan

    2015-01-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a syndrome characterized by nonprogressive multiple congenital joint contractures. The etiology of disease is multifactorial; it is most commonly suspected from absent fetal movements and genetic defects. AMC affects mainly limbs; also it might present with other organs involvement. It is crucial that the diagnosis of AMC should be kept in mind by musculoskeletal physicians in newborns with multiple joint contractures and patients must begin rehabilitation in early stage after accurate diagnosis in terms of functional independence. We present the diagnosis, types, clinical features, and treatment approaches of this disease in our case with literature reviews. PMID:26604929

  16. Dermoscopic Findings of Scalp Aplasia Cutis Congenita

    PubMed Central

    Damiani, Leandro; Aguiar, Fernanda Musa; da Silva, Mariana Vale Scribel; Miteva, Mariya I.; Pinto, Giselle Martins

    2017-01-01

    Aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) is a rare disease characterized by congenital absence of skin, affecting preferentially the scalp. Diagnosis is made clinically; however, recent studies have shown that dermoscopy can be a useful tool for the diagnosis and differentiation from sebaceous nevus. The clinical findings include a shiny atrophic alopecic patch associated with dermoscopic findings of absent follicular openings, thicker vessels and a distinct collar hypertrichosis. We report 2 cases of alopecia presenting from birth. At dermoscopy, the absence of follicular openings and the increase in the caliber of vessels led us to establish the diagnosis of ACC. PMID:28232928

  17. Congenital glaucoma in cutis marmorata teleangiectatica congenita.

    PubMed

    Mayatepek, E; Krastel, H; Völcker, H E; Pfau, B; Almasan, K

    1991-01-01

    A case of congenital glaucoma in cutis marmorata teleangiectatica congenita (CMTC, van Lohuizen syndrome) is described. The cutaneous anomaly and heterochromia iridium were noticed at birth. Brown discoloration of one iris was due to iris anterior layer dysplasia, resulting in unilateral glaucoma. Two trabeculotomies were performed until persistent normalization of intraocular pressure could be achieved. The possibility of a genetic basis and hereditary condition of CMTC and its association with congenital glaucoma is discussed. Patients with CMTC should regularly undergo ophthalmological follow-up to rule out development of glaucoma.

  18. Fatal bilateral pneumothoraces complicating dyskeratosis congenita: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Dyskeratosis congenita is a rare genodermatosis, characterized by a triad of reticular skin pigmentation, nail dystrophy and leukoplakia of mucous membranes. It is also associated with a variety of non-cutaneous abnormalities such as bone marrow failure, malignancy and pulmonary complications. Among its wide range of clinical manifestations, fatal pneumothorax has rarely been reported. Case presentation We report the case of a 31-year-old Lebanese woman with dyskeratosis congenita who succumbed to devastating bilateral pneumothoraces. Conclusion Careful surveillance of patients with dyskeratosis congenita is required as incipient respiratory failure due to pneumothorax may be successfully treated if detected at an early stage. PMID:19830116

  19. Adrenal autotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Srougi, M; Gittes, R F

    1978-04-01

    New tools for the diagnosis of adrenal diseases and the development of successful techniques to treat patients with bilateral tumors of the kidney have increased the number of procedures involving removal of both adrenals. Offering to these patients an adrenal autograft represents more than a superfluous medical exercise, since a successful outcome of the graft will relieve them of the burdens and risks of long-term postoperative steroid replacement therapy. The aim of this review is to bring to mind the possibility of autografting adrenal glands in some clinical situations and to emphasize some points that could be relevant in obtaining successful results. The available data justify clinical trials with the procedure.

  20. [Enamel hypoplasia in tuberous sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Durán-Padilla, M A; Paredes-Farreras, G F; Torres-González, C

    2001-01-01

    Dental enamel hypoplasia is a constant and pathognomonic sign in patients with TS. The defect consists in small cavities (pits) that measure average 80 microns and affect only the enamel without producing lesion to the dentin. We studied the morphology of retained dental pieces of three patients with TS. The pits showed conical and cylindrical shape and measured from 50 to 500 microns. The identification of enamel hypoplasia in deciduous and permanent teeth is of a great value for early diagnosis when other anomalies of TS are not yet produced.

  1. Pachyonychia congenita cornered: report on the 11th Annual International Pachyonychia Congenita Consortium Meeting.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, E A; Kaspar, R L; Sprecher, E; Schwartz, M E; Rittié, L

    2014-11-01

    This is a report of the research presented at the 11th Annual Meeting of the International Pachyonychia Congenita Consortium, held on 6 May 2014 in Albuquerque, NM, U.S.A. This year's meeting was divided into five corners concerning pachyonychia congenita (PC) research: (i) 'PC Pathogenesis Cornered', an overview of recent keratin research, for PC and other skin disorders; (ii) 'From All Corners of …', an outline of other genetic disorders that we can learn from; (iii) 'Fighting For Our Corner', an outline of National Institutes of Health/National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases programmes and U.S. funding opportunities applicable to rare skin disorders; (iv) 'The PC Corner', focusing on recent clinical studies related to PC; and (v) 'Clinical Corners: Turning the Corner?', an update on ongoing PC clinical trials.

  2. Common Variable Immunodeficiency as the initial presentation of Dyskeratosis Congenita

    PubMed Central

    Allenspach, Eric J.; Bellodi, Cristian; Jeong, David; Kopmar, Noam; Nakamura, Tomoka; Ochs, Hans D.; Ruggero, Davide; Skoda-Smith, Suzanne; Shimamura, Akiko; Torgerson, Troy R.

    2013-01-01

    Short Summary We present a case highlighting the clinical overlap between Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID) and Dyskeratosis Congenita (DC). It demonstrates that DC may initially present as an isolated humoral immunodeficiency resembling CVID. PMID:23403051

  3. Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita: Neurogenic Type with Autosomal Recessive Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Rosenmann, A.; Arad, I.

    1974-01-01

    An infant affected by severe arthrogryposis multiplex congenita leading to death in infancy due to neurogenic atrophy is described. Six other sibs were similarly affected. An autosomal recessive mode of inheritance is suggested. Images PMID:4837288

  4. Adrenal Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... three types of steroid hormones. In adrenal insufficiency (AI), the cortex does not make enough steroid hormones. ... unlike “adrenal fatigue.” There are two kinds of AI: • Primary AI, also called Addison’s disease. In this ...

  5. [A 2-month-old child with complex tracheal hypoplasia].

    PubMed

    De Cloedt, L; Papadopoulos, J; Corouge, P; Khalil, T; Van Laer, P

    2013-12-01

    We describe the case of a 2-month-old child with complex tracheal hypoplasia with bilateral bronchial hypoplasia and left pulmonary hypoplasia. Tracheal hypoplasia is complex when it is associated with critical stenosis, cricoid stenosis, bronchial hypoplasia, tracheal bronchus, or esophageal atresia with severe tracheomalacia. Slide tracheoplasty is the gold standard treatment for the complex tracheal hypoplasia.

  6. Total joint replacement in multiplex congenita contractures: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Hugh U.

    1998-01-01

    A 34-year-old man with multiplex congenita contractures underwent replacement of 2 hips and 1 knee. Even though a good range of movement was achieved at surgery and intensive physiotherapy, his joints returned to their preoperative status within 2 years. This outcome suggests that total joint replacement has little to offer the patient with multiplex congenita contractures who has immobile joints. PMID:9627553

  7. Pulmonary hypoplasia and anasarca syndrome in Cika cattle.

    PubMed

    Švara, Tanja; Cociancich, Vasilij; Šest, Katarina; Gombač, Mitja; Paller, Tomislav; Starič, Jože; Drögemüller, Cord

    2016-06-06

    Hydrops foetalis is defined as excessive fluid accumulation within the foetal extravascular compartments and body cavities. It has been described in human and veterinary medicine, but despite several descriptive studies its aetiology is still not fully clarified. Pulmonary hypoplasia and anasarca (PHA) syndrome is a rare congenital abnormality in cattle that is characterised by hydrops foetalis including extreme subcutaneous oedema (anasarca) and undeveloped or poorly formed lungs (pulmonary hypoplasia). Until now, sporadic cases of PHA were reported in cattle breeds like Australian Dexter, Belted Galloway, Maine-Anjou, and Shorthorn. This report describes the first known cases of PHA syndrome in Slovenian Cika cattle. A 13-year-old cow aborted a male calf in the seventh month of pregnancy, while a male calf was delivered by caesarean section on the due date from a 14-year-old cow. The pedigree analysis showed that the calves were sired by the same bull, the dams were paternal half-sisters and the second calf was the product of a dam-son mating. Gross lesions were similar in both cases and characterized by severe anasarca, hydrothorax, hydropericardium, ascites, hypoplastic lungs, absence of lymph nodes, and an enlarged heart. The first calf was also athymic. Histopathology of the second affected calf confirmed severe oedema of the subcutis and interstitium of the organs, and pulmonary hypoplasia. The lymph vessels in the subcutis and other organs were severely dilated. Histopathology of the second calf revealed also lack of bronchus associated lymphoid tissue and adrenal gland hypoplasia. The findings were consistent with known forms of the bovine PHA syndrome. This is the first report of the PHA syndrome occurring in the local endangered breed of Cika cattle. Observed inbreeding practice supports that this lethal defect most likely follows an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. In the light of the disease phenotype it is assumed that a mutation causing an

  8. Diagnosing arthrogryposis multiplex congenita: a review.

    PubMed

    Kalampokas, Emmanouil; Kalampokas, Theodoros; Sofoudis, Chrisostomos; Deligeoroglou, Efthymios; Botsis, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) refers either to a syndromic or to a nonsyndromic group of conditions with varied etiology and complex clinical features, including multiple congenital contractures in different body areas. Its etiology still remains unclear but generally any cause that leads to reduced fetal movement may lead to congenital contractures and in severe cases to fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS). It affects approximately 1 in 2-3000 live births with an approximately equal gender ratio. There are many known subgroups of AMC differing in signs, symptoms, and causes. The primary diagnosis is made when a lack of mobility and an abnormal position is noted in routine ultrasound scanning. Early diagnosis, prenatal evaluation, and further surveillance via image scanning (ultrasound and MRI) give the opportunity for family counseling concerning neonatal morbidity and mortality and labor or delivery planning. Better understanding of the ultrasound findings and the etiology of this clinical situation offers the opportunity for careful prenatal assessment.

  9. Diagnosing Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kalampokas, Emmanouil; Kalampokas, Theodoros; Sofoudis, Chrisostomos; Deligeoroglou, Efthymios; Botsis, Dimitrios

    2012-01-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) refers either to a syndromic or to a nonsyndromic group of conditions with varied etiology and complex clinical features, including multiple congenital contractures in different body areas. Its etiology still remains unclear but generally any cause that leads to reduced fetal movement may lead to congenital contractures and in severe cases to fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS). It affects approximately 1 in 2-3000 live births with an approximately equal gender ratio. There are many known subgroups of AMC differing in signs, symptoms, and causes. The primary diagnosis is made when a lack of mobility and an abnormal position is noted in routine ultrasound scanning. Early diagnosis, prenatal evaluation, and further surveillance via image scanning (ultrasound and MRI) give the opportunity for family counseling concerning neonatal morbidity and mortality and labor or delivery planning. Better understanding of the ultrasound findings and the etiology of this clinical situation offers the opportunity for careful prenatal assessment. PMID:23050160

  10. Proteomic profiling of Pachyonychia congenita plantar callus.

    PubMed

    Rice, Robert H; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe P; Salemi, Michelle; Schwartz, Mary E; Rocke, David M; Phinney, Brett S

    2017-08-08

    Callus samples from the ball and the arch of the foot, collected on tape circles, were compared by shotgun proteomic profiling. Pachyonychia congenita subjects were sampled who exhibited a mutation in KRT6A, KRT6B, KRT6C, KRT16 or KRT17, and the proteins were digested and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. In comparison with samples from unaffected control subjects, those from subjects with KRT6A or KRT16 mutations displayed the most differences in profile from normal, while those from subjects with KRT6C or KRT17 mutations showed few differences from normal. The profiles from subjects with KRT6B mutations were intermediate in protein profile differences. Degree of departure from the normal profile could be estimated by expression of numerous proteins in callus from the ball of the foot that were consistently different. By contrast, the protein profile from the arch of the foot was hardly affected. The results provide a foundation for noninvasive monitoring of the efficacy of treatments with quantitative assessment of departure from the normal phenotype. Pachyonychia congenita is an orphan disease in which the connection between the basic defect (keratin mutation) and debilitating symptoms (severe plantar pain) is poorly understood. Present work addresses the degree to which the protein profile is altered in the epidermis where the severe pain originates. The results indicate that the mutated keratins differ greatly in the degree to which they elicit perturbations in protein profile. In those cases with markedly altered protein levels, monitoring the callus profile may provide an objective measure of treatment efficacy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Optic nerve hypoplasia in children.

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, S. M.; Dutton, G. N.

    1990-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is characterised by a diminished number of optic nerve fibres in the optic nerve(s) and until recently was thought to be rare. It may be associated with a wide range of other congenital abnormalities. Its pathology, clinical features, and the conditions associated with it are reviewed. Neuroendocrine disorders should be actively sought in any infant or child with bilateral ONH. Early recognition of the disorder may in some cases be life saving. Images PMID:2191713

  12. Almost Unilateral Focal Dermal Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Solam; Choe, Sung Jay

    2017-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia, caused by mutations in PORCN, is an X-linked ectodermal dysplasia, also known as Goltz syndrome. Only seven cases of unilateral or almost unilateral focal dermal hypoplasia have been reported in the English literature and there have been no previously reported cases in the Republic of Korea. A 19-year-old female presented with scalp defects, skin lesions on the right leg and the right trunk, and syndactyly of the right fourth and fifth toes. Cutaneous examination revealed multiple atrophic plaques and a brown and yellow mass with fat herniation and telangiectasia that was mostly located on the lower right leg. She had syndactyly on the right foot and the scalp lesion appeared to be an atrophic, membranous, fibrotic alopecic scar. A biopsy of the calf revealed upper dermal extension of fat cells, dermal atrophy, and loss of dermal collagen. A diagnosis of almost unilateral focal dermal hypoplasia was made on the basis of physical and histologic findings. Henceforth, the patient was referred to a plastic surgeon and an orthopedics department to repair her syndactyly. PMID:28223754

  13. MR findings in pontocerebellar hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Uhl, M; Pawlik, H; Laubenberger, J; Darge, K; Baborie, A; Korinthenberg, R; Langer, M

    1998-07-01

    We present four cases with combined hypoplasia of the cerebellum and the ventral pons-pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH). PCH represents an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder with fetal onset. The disease is rare, with less than 20 cases having been reported. The main findings of PCH and the inclusion criteria for our cases can be summarised as progressive microcephaly from birth, pontocerebellar hypoplasia documented by MRI and marked chorea, which may change, later in childhood, to more dystonic patterns. The cerebral cortex becomes progressively atrophic. Motor and mental development are delayed, and epilepsy, mainly tonic-clonic seizures, is frequent. The MRI features in all of our cases were: (1) Hypoplastic cerebellum situated close to the tentorium. The hypoplastic cerebellum has a reduced number of folia, in contrast to the normal number of thin folia in simple cerebellar atrophy. (2) The cerebellar hemispheres are reduced to bean-like or wing-like structures. The cerebellar hemispheres appear to 'float' in the posterior fossa. (3) Markedly hypoplastic ventral pons. (4) Slight atrophy of the supratentorial gyral pattern. (5) Dilated cerebromedullary cistern and fourth ventricle. (6) Delayed myelination of the white matter. (7) No significant disorganisation of brain architecture and no severe corpus callosum defect.

  14. Characterization of a group unrelated patients with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Valdés-Flores, Margarita; Casas-Avila, Leonora; Hernández-Zamora, Edgar; Kofman, Susana; Hidalgo-Bravo, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita is a relatively rare neuromuscular syndrome, with a prevalence of 1:3000-5000 newborns. In this study, the authors describe the clinical features of a group of 50 unrelated Mexican patients with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. Patients were diagnosed by physical and radiographic examination and the family history was evaluated. Of the 50 cases, nine presented other features (pectum excavatum, cleft palate, mental retardation, ulnar agenesis, etc.). Environmental factors, as well as prenatal and family history, were analyzed. The chromosomal anomalies and clinical entities associated with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita were reported. No chromosomal aberrations were present in the cases with mental retardation. Three unrelated familial cases with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita were observed in which autosomal recessive, autosomal dominant and X-linked inheritance patterns are possible. A literature review regarding arthrogryposis multiplex congenita was also conducted. It is important to establish patient-specific physical therapy and rehabilitation programs. A multidisciplinary approach is necessary, with medical, surgical, rehabilitation, social and psychological care, including genetic counseling. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Germline mutations of regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1, RTEL1, in Dyskeratosis congenita.

    PubMed

    Ballew, Bari J; Yeager, Meredith; Jacobs, Kevin; Giri, Neelam; Boland, Joseph; Burdett, Laurie; Alter, Blanche P; Savage, Sharon A

    2013-04-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is an inherited bone marrow failure and cancer predisposition syndrome caused by aberrant telomere biology. The classic triad of dysplastic nails, abnormal skin pigmentation, and oral leukoplakia is diagnostic of DC, but substantial clinical heterogeneity exists; the clinically severe variant Hoyeraal Hreidarsson syndrome (HH) also includes cerebellar hypoplasia, severe immunodeficiency, enteropathy, and intrauterine growth retardation. Germline mutations in telomere biology genes account for approximately one-half of known DC families. Using exome sequencing, we identified mutations in RTEL1, a helicase with critical telomeric functions, in two families with HH. In the first family, two siblings with HH and very short telomeres inherited a premature stop codon from their mother who has short telomeres. The proband from the second family has HH and inherited a premature stop codon in RTEL1 from his father and a missense mutation from his mother, who also has short telomeres. In addition, inheritance of only the missense mutation led to very short telomeres in the proband's brother. Targeted sequencing identified a different RTEL1 missense mutation in one additional DC proband who has bone marrow failure and short telomeres. Both missense mutations affect the helicase domain of RTEL1, and three in silico prediction algorithms suggest that they are likely deleterious. The nonsense mutations both cause truncation of the RTEL1 protein, resulting in loss of the PIP box; this may abrogate an important protein-protein interaction. These findings implicate a new telomere biology gene, RTEL1, in the etiology of DC.

  16. Dyskeratosis congenita and the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Kirwan, Michael; Beswick, Richard; Walne, Amanda J; Hossain, Upal; Casimir, Colin; Vulliamy, Tom; Dokal, Inderjeet

    2011-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is a heterogeneous bone marrow failure disorder with known mutations in components of telomerase and telomere shelterin. Recent work in a mouse model with a dyskerin mutation has implicated an increased DNA damage response as part of the cellular pathology, while mouse models with Terc and Tert mutations displayed a normal response. To clarify how these contradictory results might apply to DC pathology in humans, we studied the cellular phenotype in primary cells from DC patients of several genetic subtypes, focussing on T lymphocytes to remain close to the haematopoietic system. We observed novel cell cycle abnormalities in conjunction with impaired growth and an increase in apoptosis. Using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy we examined induction of the DNA damage proteins γ-H2AX and 53BP1 and the cell cycle protein TP53 (p53). We found an increase in damage foci at telomeres in lymphocytes and an increase in the basal level of DNA damage in fibroblasts, but crucially no increased response to DNA damaging agents in either cell type. As the response to induced DNA damage was normal and levels of global DNA damage were inconsistent between cell types, DNA damage may contribute differently to the pathology in different tissues. PMID:21477209

  17. Clinical and pathological features of pachyonychia congenita.

    PubMed

    Leachman, Sancy A; Kaspar, Roger L; Fleckman, Philip; Florell, Scott R; Smith, Frances J D; McLean, W H Irwin; Lunny, Declan P; Milstone, Leonard M; van Steensel, Maurice A M; Munro, Colin S; O'Toole, Edel A; Celebi, Julide T; Kansky, Aleksej; Lane, E Birgitte

    2005-10-01

    Pachyonychia congenita (PC) is a rare genodermatosis affecting the nails, skin, oral mucosae, larynx, hair, and teeth. Pathogenic mutations in keratins K6a or K16 are associated with the PC-1 phenotype whereas K6b and K17 mutations are associated with the PC-2 phenotype. Analysis of clinical, pathological, and genetic data from the literature and two research registries reveal that >97% of PC cases exhibit fingernail and toenail thickening, and painful plantar keratoderma. Prospective evaluation of 57 PC patients from 41 families revealed variable clinical findings: hyperhidrosis (79%), oral leukokeratosis (75%), follicular keratosis (65%), palmar keratoderma (60%), cutaneous cysts (35%), hoarseness or laryngeal involvement (16%), coarse or twisted hair (26%), early primary tooth loss (14%), and presence of natal or prenatal teeth (2%). Stratification of these data by keratin mutation confirmed the increased incidence of cyst formation and natal teeth among PC-2 patients, although cysts were more commonly seen in PC-1 than previously reported (25%-33%). Previously unreported clinical features of PC include development of painful oral and nipple lesions during breastfeeding, copious production of waxy material in ears, and inability to walk without an ambulatory aid (50%). Possible pathogenic mechanisms are discussed with respect to the clinicopathologic and genetic correlations observed.

  18. The genetic basis of pachyonychia congenita.

    PubMed

    Smith, Frances J D; Liao, Haihui; Cassidy, Andrew J; Stewart, Arlene; Hamill, Kevin J; Wood, Pamela; Joval, Iris; van Steensel, Maurice A M; Björck, Erik; Callif-Daley, Faith; Pals, Gerald; Collins, Paul; Leachman, Sancy A; Munro, Colin S; McLean, W H Irwin

    2005-10-01

    In 1994, the molecular basis of pachyonychia congenita (PC) was elucidated. Four keratin genes are associated with the major subtypes of PC: K6a or K16 defects cause PC-1; and mutations in K6b or K17 cause PC-2. Mutations in keratins, the epithelial-specific intermediate filament proteins, result in aberrant cytoskeletal networks which present clinically as a variety of epithelial fragility phenotypes. To date, mutations in 20 keratin genes are associated with human disorders. Here, we review the genetic basis of PC and report 30 new PC mutations. Of these, 25 mutations were found in PC-1 families and five mutations were identified in PC-2 kindreds. All mutations identified were heterozygous amino acid substitutions or small in-frame deletion mutations with the exception of an unusual mutation in a sporadic case of PC-1. The latter carried a 117 bp duplication resulting in a 39 amino acid insertion in the 2B domain of K6a. Also of note was mutation L388P in K17, which is the first genetic defect identified in the helix termination motif of this protein. Understanding the genetic basis of these disorders allows better counseling for patients and paves the way for therapy development.

  19. [Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita and retinitis pigmentosa].

    PubMed

    Stübiger, N; Biester, S; Deuter, C; Zrenner, E; Besch, D

    2009-12-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a heterogeneous pattern of symptoms consisting of clinically different types. AMC is a non-progressive condition, which is characterized by congenital contracture of several joints in different body areas and may also occur as a manifestation of other syndromes. In such syndromes retinopathy as an ophthalmological manifestation of AMC has been described in the literature in only two patients. A 12-year-old girl with AMC presented with progressive visual loss since 1 year. Visual acuity was 0.5 in the right and 0.8 in the left eye. Visual fields were concentrically constricted. Funduscopy revealed an atrophic retinal pigment epithelium of the whole fundus with vital optic discs. In the scotopic electroretinogram (ERG) amplitudes were dramatically decreased or absent and cone signals were delayed. The multifocal ERG (mfERG) presented pathologically reduced amplitudes in the macular region as well as in the periphery. Examinations 5 and 8 years later revealed a reduction of visual acuity to 0.05 in the right and to 0.1 in the left eye, in addition the results of perimetry and of the Ganzfeld-ERG had deceased and the mfERG was no longer measurable. This young female demonstrated an AMC in combination with retinitis pigmentosa, but other disease manifestations or cerebral retardation could not be found. We present here an unusual case of what seems to be a new athrogryposis syndrome.

  20. [Surgical management of aplasia cutis congenita].

    PubMed

    Betancourth-Alvarenga, J E; Vázquez-Rueda, F; Vargas-Cruz, V; Paredes-Esteban, R M; Ayala-Montoro, J

    2015-11-01

    Aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) is a rare congenital malformation that commonly involves the scalp, but can affect pericranium, bone and dura mater. Complications are rare, but can be fatal, so early treatment must be achieved. The treatment remains controversial with no consensus between the conservative and surgical approach. The aim of this study is to describe our experience in the management of ACC. Retrospective review of the medical records of all children up to 14 years diagnosed with ACC and treated between 2000 and 2013. There were a total of 22 cases of ACC with lesions ranging from 1cm (0.79 cm(2)) to 14cm (153.94 cm(2)). ACC of the scalp was found in 18 cases, with 3 in extremities and 1 in trunk. Conservative treatment was performed on 9 patients and 13 underwent surgical treatment (8 primary closures, 2 plasties, 2 skin grafts, and 1 skin flap). Two patients died due to complications of other diseases not related with the ACC. ACC is a rare disease that can be fatal. A complete initial assessment to establish early treatment is necessary to prevent this. Surgery should be considered as an initial therapeutic option in defects >4cm (>12.6 cm(2)) as it prevents the risk of fatal complications. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. [Aplasia cutis congenita associated with epidermolysis bullosa].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Guerrero, Félix; Muñoz-Solís, Adrián Antonio; Ornelas-Aguirre, José Manuel

    2016-12-12

    Aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) is a skin condition of rare presentation, this disease is characterized by absence of skin at birth and associated with facial, skin and bone skull deformities. The diagnosis is mainly clinical. Male 5 days after birth, unique product of primigravida mother and no family history of relevance. Physical examination revealed bilateral and symmetrical skin defects of both lower extremities, the disease is characterized by skin fragility, scabs, and coated pseudomembrane ulcers, decreased interdigital space between toes of the left foot, retraction of the foot and genu varum. It was handled with allograft of epidermis cultured in vitro, general wound care and clinical follow-up. ACC associated with epidermolysis bullosa is one of the rarer forms of presentation. It is necessary to rule out other skin diseases. Clinical management is recommended with biological or synthetic skin cover, infection prevention, early treatment of complications and clinical follow. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  2. [Adrenal mass and adrenal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Martínez Albaladejo, M; García López, B; Serrano Corredor, S; Alguacil García, G

    1996-12-01

    Primary adrenal insufficiency is a non frequent disease, that is declared in young adults and in the most of the cases is produced from an autoimmune mechanism or a tuberculous disease. The incidence of these forms in the different geographic areas is dependent of degree of irradication of the tuberculosis. We report the case of a patient with latent chronic adrenal insufficiency of tuberculous origin who was affected for an addisonian crisis during an intercurrent infectious disease, which permitted the diagnosis of the addisonian crisis, and Mal of Pott was moreover detected. Evolution with corticosteroid and specific treatment was very favorable.

  3. Bilateral hypoplasia of the internal carotid artery

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Dhananjaya I; Somanna, Sampath; Kovoor, Jerry ME

    2011-01-01

    Agenesis and hypoplasia of the internal carotid artery (ICA) are rare congenital anomalies, occurring in less than 0.01% of the population. We report a rare case of bilateral hypoplasia of the ICA in a patient with post-traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage. We describe the embryological development of the cerebral vasculature and present a review of literature. PMID:22223934

  4. Genetics Home Reference: focal dermal hypoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... HYPOPLASIA Sources for This Page Clements SE, Mellerio JE, Holden ST, McCauley J, McGrath JA. PORCN gene ... on PubMed Clements SE, Wessagowit V, Lai-Cheong JE, Arita K, McGrath JA. Focal dermal hypoplasia resulting ...

  5. Hypertrichosis lanuginosa congenita treated with diode laser epilation during infancy.

    PubMed

    Salas-Alanis, Julio C; Lopez-Cepeda, Larissa D; Elizondo-Rodriguez, Aurora; Morales-Barrera, Maria Enriqueta; Ramos-Garibay, Alberto R

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a girl with hypertrichosis lanuginosa congenita treated with diode laser depilation since the age of 9 months. The treatment was well tolerated, and neither general nor local anesthesia was needed. A reduction of approximately 80% of facial and body hair was noted, which improved her condition significantly.

  6. Embryological and molecular development of the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Ross, Ian L; Louw, Graham J

    2015-03-01

    In this mini review, the embryological and functional development of the adrenal glands is presented from a molecular perspective. While acknowledging that this is a highly complex series of events, the processes are described in simple and broad strokes in a single text for the reader who is interested in this field but is not an active researcher. The origin of the adrenal glands is in the mesodermal ridge as early as the fourth week of gestation. Between the eighth and ninth weeks of gestation, the adrenal glands are encapsulated and this results in the presence of a distinct organ. There have been great strides in deciphering the very complicated molecular aspects of adrenal gland development in which multiple transcription factors have been identified, directing the adrenogonadal primordium into the adrenal cortex, kidney, or bipotential gonad. Adrenocorticotrophic hormone is critical for early development of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis. Several mutations in transcription factors, responsible for normal adrenal gland development have been found to induce the familial syndrome of congenital adrenal hypoplasia or neoplasia. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Amyoplasia Congenita of the Lower Extremity: Report in a Premature Baby

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Amyoplasia congenita is a diagnostic subgroup of children with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC). AMC is a relatively rare syndrome characterized by multiple joint contractures at birth. Amyoplasia congenita is the most common type of this syndrome with an occurrence rate of 1 in 10,000 live births, and mainly refers to the disorders with limb involvement. In this report, the author presents a premature baby with amyoplasia congenita, whose hips showed flexion, abduction, and external rotation contractures. The knees showed fixed extension contractures, so that his lower extremities were cylindrical with absent skin creases at birth. PMID:16127784

  8. A rare case of type 1 diabetes mellitus with pituitary hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Jostol; Sudeep, K; Venkatesha, B M

    2014-01-01

    Growth failure and pubertal abnormalities are not uncommon in chronic uncontrolled metabolic diseases like diabetes mellitus. We present a young girl with uncontrolled type 1 diabetes mellitus, who presented with short stature and primary amenorrhea, and on evaluation was found to have anterior pituitary hypoplasia. In addition to uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, she presented with early onset growth failure and lack of spontaneous secondary sexual characteristics. She had central hypothyroidism and inappropriately normal gonadotropin levels. However her serum cortisol levels were normal. MRI of the sellar-suprasellar region revealed a small anterior pituitary gland with thinning of the pituitary stalk consistent with pituitary hypoplasia. While uncontrolled type 1 diabetes itself may cause growth retardation and pubertal abnormalities, this girl had coexisting pituitary maldevelopment - a rare co-existence of two major illnesses of unrelated etiologies. The partial pituitary hormonal deficiency, which spared the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, may be due to a transcription factor defect.

  9. Unilateral Optic Nerve Hypoplasia with Contralateral Optic Pathway Hypoplasia: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Nishi, Tomo; Yukawa, Eiichi; Taoka, Toshiaki; Ogata, Nahoko

    2013-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia is diagnosed by the ophthalmoscopic appearance of the fundus of the eye and by standard magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. The ability to study eyes with optic nerve hypoplasia by magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging has improved the evaluation of the optic pathways. The authors report a case of unilateral optic nerve hypoplasia with hypoplasia of the contralateral optic pathway. The entire visual pathway of this patient was examined by magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging. The images show a decrease of the volume of the optic radiation contralateral to the optic nerve abnormality and also pre- and post-chiasmal abnormalities.

  10. Heterogeneous telomere defects in patients with severe forms of dyskeratosis congenita.

    PubMed

    Touzot, Fabien; Gaillard, Laetitia; Vasquez, Nadia; Le Guen, Tangui; Bertrand, Yves; Bourhis, Jean; Leblanc, Thierry; Fischer, Alain; Soulier, Jean; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Revy, Patrick

    2012-02-01

    Telomeres represent the tips of linear chromosomes. In human subjects telomere maintenance deficiency leads to dyskeratosis congenita (DC), a rare genetic disorder characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, accelerated aging, and cancer predisposition. Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome (HH) is a severe variant of DC in which an early onset of bone marrow failure leading to combined immunodeficiency is associated with microcephaly, cerebellar hypoplasia, and growth retardation. Limited information is available on the cellular and molecular phenotypes of cells from patients with HH. We analyzed fibroblasts and whole blood cells from 5 patients with HH, 3 of them of unknown molecular origin. Telomere length, cellular senescence rate, telomerase activity, telomeric aberration, and DNA repair pathways were investigated. Although patients' cells exhibit dysfunctional telomeres, sharp differences in the telomeric aberrations and telomere lengths were noted among these patients. In some patients the dysfunctional telomere phenotype was unprecedented and associated with either normal telomere length or with telomeric aberrations akin to fragile telomeres. This result is of particular importance because the molecular diagnosis of these patients is primarily based on telomere length, which therefore misses a subset of patients with telomere dysfunction. These observations provide the notions that (1) various telomere defects can lead to similar clinical features, (2) telomere dysfunction in cells from patients with DC/HH is not always associated with short telomeres, and (3) additional factors, likely involved in telomere protection rather than in length regulation, are responsible for a subset of DC/HH. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Unilateral Pulmonary Hypoplasia in a Child.

    PubMed

    Dewan, G

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypoplasia is an uncommon congenital anomaly. A case reported in a six year old male child from Bangladesh who presented with chronic dry cough, episodic fever and occasional haemoptysis causing confusion with tuberculosis. X-ray suggested lung collapse. Final diagnosis reached by combined bronchoscopy, computed tomogram scan of chest and pulmonary angiogram. In a child with complete radiological lung collapse possibility of pulmonary hypoplasia should be kept in mind.

  12. Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita: airway concerns in an emergency situation.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Babita; Suri, Saurabh; Kohli, Santvana; Ahmad, Suma; Gupta, Surender

    2014-06-01

    Difficult airway is always of special concern to anesthesiologists, but in a trauma setting where having a secured airway is most important, the incidence of difficult airway increases manifold. We report a "cannot ventilate cannot intubate" situation in a trauma patient who was later diagnosed to have arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, a syndrome known to affect the airway, and in whom all measures of securing a nonsurgical airway failed. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. POT of gold: modeling dyskeratosis congenita in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Autexier, Chantal

    2008-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is a rare syndrome, characterized by cutaneous abnormalities and premature death caused by bone marrow failure. In this issue of Genes & Development, Hockemeyer and colleagues (pp. 1773–1785) report a new mouse model that reconstitutes key features of DC. Disease phenotypes are generated by a POT1b deletion in a telomerase-deficient background that accelerates the shortening of telomeres by degradation. PMID:18593874

  14. Maxillofacial implications and surgical treatment of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J A; Chiu-Yeh, M; Moriconi, E S

    2001-07-01

    A case of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita that affected a patient's temporomandibular joint is described. Preoperatively, the patient's interincisal opening was limited to 9 mm. Elective surgery was performed, which consisted of bilateral coronoidotomies, right and left meninscectomies, capsular release, and lateral pterygoid myotomies. Physical therapy was initiated postoperatively. Eighteen weeks after the surgery, the patient was able to open 18 mm and force open to 20 mm. The patient also noted significant improvement in speech and jaw function in the postoperative period.

  15. APLASIA CUTIS CONGENITA TYPE I - A CASE SERIES.

    PubMed

    Wollina, U; Chokoeva, A; Verma, Sh; Tchernev, G; Handjani, F

    2017-03-01

    Aplasia Cutis Congenita is a rare disorder with circumscribed, partial or widespread absence of skin and subcutaneous soft tissue; in about 20% it also causes skull defects. The disease is heterogeneous in its clinical presentation with nine major subtypes. Type I represents nonsyndromic Aplasia Cutis Congenita. We report 5 infants with skin defects of the scalp and limbs presented to dermatologists. Pediatric workup ruled out any other malformations or genetic disorders. All patients were treated by conservative wound and skin care without complications. In one case the formation of milia has been observed - an outcome not described before. Therapeutic approach and differential diagnoses are described. Topical wound and skin care resulted in complete closure of the defects. Skin appendages did not recover, leaving hairless areas on the scalp and limbs. Aplasia Cutis Congenita type I is a rare disorder in newborns with >85% of all solitary lesions occurring on the scalp. Conservative treatment is a simple and safe option in many cases. Exposed large veins and sagittal plexus demand urgent surgical approaches to prevent fatal hemorrhages or infections.

  16. Report of the 13th Annual International Pachyonychia Congenita Consortium Symposium.

    PubMed

    Rittié, L; Kaspar, R L; Sprecher, E; Smith, F J D

    2017-03-27

    The International Pachyonychia Congenita Consortium (IPCC) is a group of physicians and scientists from around the world dedicated to developing therapies for pachyonychia congenita, a rare autosomal dominant skin disorder. The research presented at the 13th Annual Research Symposium of the IPCC, held on 10-11 May 2016, in Scottsdale, AZ, U.S.A., is reported here.

  17. Adrenal gland disorders.

    PubMed

    Berry, Matthew E

    2009-01-01

    Medical imaging of the adrenal glands is an important aspect of the diagnosis of any adrenal gland disorder. This article discusses the normal anatomy and functions of the adrenal glands, as well as specific adrenal gland disorders and how they are diagnosed and treated. Radiologic technologists need to understand the causes, signs, symptoms, diagnosis and management of disorders that prevent the adrenal glands from functioning properly.

  18. Neuropathologic features of pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 6.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jeffrey T; Innes, A Micheil; Smith, Amanda C; Vanstone, Megan R; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy A; Bulman, Dennis E; Majewski, Jacek; Daza, Ray A; Hevner, Robert F; Michaud, Jean; Boycott, Kym M

    2014-11-01

    Pontocerebellar hypoplasia is a group of severe developmental disorders with prenatal onset affecting the growth and function of the brainstem and cerebellum. The rarity and genetic heterogeneity of this group of disorders can make molecular diagnosis challenging. We report 3 siblings who were born to nonconsanguineous parents, were hypotonic at birth, developed seizures, had repeated apneic spells, and died within 2 months of life. Neuroimaging showed that all had profound cerebellar hypoplasia and simplified cortical gyration. Genetic analysis by whole-exome sequencing demonstrated compound heterozygous mutations in the mitochondrial arginyl transfer RNA synthetase gene RARS2, indicating that the children had pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 6. Autopsies on the younger twin siblings revealed small and immature cerebella at an approximate developmental age of less than 18 weeks. The basis pontis showed regressive changes, and the medulla had marked inferior olivary hypoplasia. The brains of both twins were microencephalic and had simplified gyri; cortices were immature, and deep white matter had extensive astrocytosis. The findings suggest a near-normal embryologic period followed by midgestation developmental slowing or cessation and later regression in select anatomic regions. This is the first detailed description of neuropathologic findings associated with pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 6 and demonstrates the profound effects of RARS2 disruption during early neurodevelopment.

  19. Clinical characteristics of high grade foveal hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyung-Ah; Oh, Sei Yeul

    2013-02-01

    To report clinical characteristics of high grade foveal hypoplasia. Patients with foveal hypoplasia of grade 3 or 4 on spectral domain optical coherence tomography according to a previously published scheme were enrolled. All patients underwent a full ophthalmologic assessment including visual acuity testing, slit lamp biomicroscopy, fundus examination, and evaluation of ocular alignment. The underlying causes of foveal hypoplasia were identified as albinism in five patients and aniridia in six patients. The mean logMAR visual acuity was 0.57 ± 0.24 (range 0.22-1.00) in the right eyes and 0.58 ± 0.21 (range 0.30-1.00) in the left eyes. On fundus examination in patients with albinism, two patients showed marked transparency, one patient showed moderate transparency, and two patients showed minimal transparency. Among six patients with aniridia, five patients showed normal macular pigmentation without macular reflex and one patient showed decreased macular pigmentation with no macular reflex. Patients with high grade macular hypoplasia tended to have poor visual acuities; however, the range of visual acuity was quite variable. Other factors associated with underlying disease could be the reason of this variability. Therefore, careful consideration should be given when assessing visual prognosis in foveal hypoplasia using optical coherence tomography.

  20. Marked overlap of four genetic syndromes with dyskeratosis congenita confounds clinical diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Walne, Amanda J.; Collopy, Laura; Cardoso, Shirleny; Ellison, Alicia; Plagnol, Vincent; Albayrak, Canan; Albayrak, Davut; Kilic, Sara Sebnem; Patıroglu, Turkan; Akar, Haluk; Godfrey, Keith; Carter, Tina; Marafie, Makia; Vora, Ajay; Sundin, Mikael; Vulliamy, Thomas; Tummala, Hemanth; Dokal, Inderjeet

    2016-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita is a highly pleotropic genetic disorder. This heterogeneity can lead to difficulties in making an accurate diagnosis and delays in appropriate management. The aim of this study was to determine the underlying genetic basis in patients presenting with features of dyskeratosis congenita and who were negative for mutations in the classical dyskeratosis congenita genes. By whole exome and targeted sequencing, we identified biallelic variants in genes that are not associated with dyskeratosis congenita in 17 individuals from 12 families. Specifically, these were homozygous variants in USB1 (8 families), homozygous missense variants in GRHL2 (2 families) and identical compound heterozygous variants in LIG4 (2 families). All patients had multiple somatic features of dyskeratosis congenita but not the characteristic short telomeres. Our case series shows that biallelic variants in USB1, LIG4 and GRHL2, the genes mutated in poikiloderma with neutropenia, LIG4/Dubowitz syndrome and the recently recognized ectodermal dysplasia/short stature syndrome, respectively, cause features that overlap with dyskeratosis congenita. Strikingly, these genes also overlap in their biological function with the known dyskeratosis congenita genes that are implicated in telomere maintenance and DNA repair pathways. Collectively, these observations demonstrate the marked overlap of dyskeratosis congenita with four other genetic syndromes, confounding accurate diagnosis and subsequent management. This has important implications for establishing a genetic diagnosis when a new patient presents in the clinic. Patients with clinical features of dyskeratosis congenita need to have genetic analysis of USB1, LIG4 and GRHL2 in addition to the classical dyskeratosis congenita genes and telomere length measurements. PMID:27612988

  1. Dental enamel hypoplasias in prehistoric populations.

    PubMed

    Goodman, A H

    1989-09-01

    Recent years have witnessed an impressive increase in research on enamel hypoplasias in archaeological populations. By reviewing a series of studies of enamel hypoplasias at Dickson Mounds, Illinois, North America (950-1300 A.D.), a prehistoric site involved in the transition from gathering-hunting to agriculture, this paper provides an illustration of this type of research. The location of linear hypoplasias on labial tooth surfaces of 111 adults was studied with a thin-tipped caliper, and this location was converted to an age at development. Most defects developed between two and four years of developmental age. Hypoplasias increased in prevalence from 45% in the pre-agriculture group to 80% in the agricultural group (p less than 0.01). The transition to agriculture occurred at a cost to infant and childhood health. Defects are associated with decreased longevity. Individuals with defects have a life expectancy of nearly ten years fewer than those without defects, suggesting that the development of a defect marks a significant and lasting health event. Enamel hypoplasias occur most frequently on anterior teeth, polar teeth in developmental fields, and the middle developmental thirds of teeth. Analysis of these data suggests that enamel may be differentially susceptible to growth disruption and that susceptibility varies both within and among teeth. The study of enamel defects at Dickson provides insights into the health and nutritional consequences of the economic change from hunting and gathering to agriculture. More generally, with the availability of teeth from genetically homogeneous populations, studies of enamel hypoplasias in prehistory should provide a useful complement to research on this condition in contemporary peoples.

  2. Adrenal Steroidogenesis and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Turcu, Adina F.; Auchus, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Adrenal steroidogenesis is a dynamic process, reliant on de novo synthesis from cholesterol, under the stimulation of ACTH and other regulators. The syntheses of mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and adrenal androgens occur in separate adrenal cortical zones, each expressing specific enzymes. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) encompasses a group of autosomal recessive enzymatic defects in cortisol biosynthesis. 21-hydroxylase (21OHD) deficiency accounts for over 90% of CAH cases and when milder or nonclassic forms are included, 21OHD is one of the most common genetic diseases. This review discusses in detail the epidemiology, genetics, diagnostic, clinical aspects and management of 21OHD. PMID:26038201

  3. Aplasia Cutis Congenita of the Scalp with a Familial Pattern

    PubMed Central

    AlShehri, Waleed; AlOthri, Alhanouf; Alabdulkarim, Abdulaziz O.; Wani, Shabeer A.; Rabah, Sari M.

    2016-01-01

    Aplasia Cutis Congenita (ACC) is a condition characterized by congenital absence of skin, usually on the scalp. ACC can occur as an isolated condition or in the presence of other congenital anomalies. Here we describe a case of a 16-day-old baby girl with an isolated ACC of the scalp. Her elder two siblings have been diagnosed with ACC with concomitant cardiac or limb anomalies. The patient was managed conservatively until the defect has formed scar tissue 6 months later. PMID:27429826

  4. Subsidiary lateral femoral condyle in arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Schopler, S A; Menelaus, M B

    1987-01-01

    A previously undescribed anomaly of the distal femur occurred in a 3-month-old child with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. There was a large boss of bone superior and posterior to the true lateral femoral condyle with which the lateral tibial femoral condyle articulated. To obtain full extension of the knee, it was necessary to perform a full posterior release and to replace the tibial condyle distally onto the true lateral condyle. The etiology of the anomaly remains conjectural, but the lesion should be sought for in patients with resistant flexion contracture requiring surgical release.

  5. Adrenal Gland Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... adrenal gland disorders include Genetic mutations Tumors including pheochromocytomas Infections A problem in another gland, such as the pituitary, which helps to regulate the adrenal gland Certain medicines Treatment depends on which problem you have. Surgery or ...

  6. Adrenal Gland Tumors: Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gland Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Adrenal Gland Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 03/ ... primary adrenal gland tumor is very uncommon. Exact statistics are not available for this type of tumor ...

  7. Adrenal Gland Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. Most adrenal gland tumors are ... and may not require treatment. Malignant adrenal gland cancers are uncommon. Types of tumors include Adrenocortical carcinoma - ...

  8. Acute adrenal crisis

    MedlinePlus

    ... adrenal gland is damaged due to, for example, Addison disease or other adrenal gland disease, and surgery The ... Call your health care provider if you have Addison disease and are unable to take your glucocorticoid medicine ...

  9. Tooth enamel hypoplasia in PHACE syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Yvonne E; Siegel, Dawn H; Drolet, Beth A; Hodgson, Brian D

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with PHACE syndrome (posterior fossa malformations, hemangiomas, arterial anomalies, cardiac defects, eye abnormalities, sternal cleft, and supraumbilical raphe syndrome) have reported dental abnormalities to their healthcare providers and in online forums, but dental involvement has not been comprehensively studied. A study was conducted at the third PHACE Family Conference, held in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in July 2012. A pediatric dentist examined subjects at enrollment. Eighteen subjects were enrolled. The median age was 4.2 years (range 9 mos-9 yrs; 14 girls, 4 boys). Eleven of 18 patients had intraoral hemangiomas and five of these (50%) had hypomature enamel hypoplasia. None of the seven patients without intraoral hemangiomas had enamel hypoplasia. No other dental abnormalities were seen. Enamel hypoplasia may be a feature of PHACE syndrome when an intraoral hemangioma is present. Enamel hypoplasia increases the risk of caries, and clinicians should refer children with PHACE syndrome to a pediatric dentist by 1 year of age.

  10. A family with autosomal dominant distal arthrogryposis multiplex congenita and brown syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lobefalo, L T; Mancini, A T; Petitti, M T; Verrotti, A E; Della Loggia, G E; Di Muzio, A E; Chiarelli, F E; Gallenga, P E

    1999-12-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita is a heterogeneous condition found in a number of different disorders and characterized by congenital joint contractures. We describe typical signs of congenital Brown syndrome (inability to elevate the affected eye actively or passively in full adduction) in three relatives with distal arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. We found a thickening of the superior oblique muscles in these patients with pain and increased intraocular pressure in upgaze. The pathogenesis of clinical and morphological findings is discussed. The association of Brown syndrome with distal arthrogryposis multiplex congenita has not been previously reported and provides us with an important point of reference in the understanding of both syndromes.

  11. Becker's nevus with ipsilateral breast hypoplasia: improvement with spironolactone.

    PubMed

    Hoon Jung, Jae; Chan Kim, You; Joon Park, Hyang; Woo Cinn, Yong

    2003-02-01

    Ipsilateral breast hypoplasia is a rare abnormality in Becker's nevus. The pathogenesis of the breast hypoplasia is not understood, but an increased level of androgenic receptor in the affected area may play a role. We report a case of Becker's nevus with ipsilateral breast hypoplasia. Spironolactone, an anti-androgenic agent, was tried for treatment of the hypoplasia, and, one month later, breast enlargement was seen in only the hypoplastic breast with Becker's nevus. This finding supports the theory that breast hypoplasia in Becker's nevus is related to an increase in androgenic receptor.

  12. Sebaceous nevus syndrome, central nervous system malformations, aplasia cutis congenita, limbal dermoid, and pigmented nevus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chih-Wei; Wu, Yu-Hung; Lin, Shuan-Pei; Peng, Chun-Chih; Ho, Che-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    SCALP syndrome is an acronym describing the coincidence of sebaceous nevus syndrome, central nervous system malformations, aplasia cutis congenita, limbal dermoid, and pigmented nevus (giant congenital melanocytic nevus). We present a fourth case of this syndrome.

  13. [Pediatric emergency: adrenal insufficiency and adrenal crisis].

    PubMed

    Martínez, Alicia; Pasqualini, Titania; Stivel, Mirta; Heinrich, Juan Jorge

    2010-04-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is defined by impaired secretion of adrenocortical hormones. It is classified upon the etiology in primary and secondary. Rapid recognition and therapy of adrenocortical crisis are critical to survival. Patients often have nonspecific symptoms: anorexia, vomiting, weakness, fatigue and lethargy. They are followed by hypotension, shock, hypoglicemia, hyponatremia and hyperkalemia. All patients with adrenal insufficiency require urgent fluid reposition, correction of hypoglycemia and glucocorticoid replacement, in order to avoid serious consequences of adrenal crisis. After initial crisis treatment, maintenance dose of corticoids should be indicated. Mineralocorticoids replacement, if necessary, should also be initiated.

  14. Enamel hypoplasia: challenges of esthetic restorative treatment.

    PubMed

    Ruschel, Vanessa Carla; Araújo, Élito; Bernardon, Jussara Karina; Lopes, Guilherme Carpena

    2016-01-01

    Enamel defects, such as white or yellow-brown spots, usually cause problems that are more esthetic than functional. Enamel hypoplasia may be the result of hereditary, systemic, or local factors. Dental trauma is a local etiologic factor. It is relatively common in the primary dentition and can cause defects on the surface of permanent successors. Treatment for such defects can differ, depending on the depth of the spots. For deeper white-spot lesions, a composite resin restoration may be necessary. This is an excellent mode of treatment, due to both its low cost and its conservation of healthy tooth structure. The objective of this case report is to describe composite resin restoration of a maxillary central incisor affected by enamel hypoplasia.

  15. On the classification of congenital thumb hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Tonkin, M A

    2014-11-01

    In 1937, Müller introduced the concept of a teratological sequence of thumb hypoplasia with increasing severity from mild deficiency, through severe deficiency, to thumb absence. Blauth subsequently detailed five specific grades. In 1992, Manske and McCarroll altered Blauth's classification such that Grade 3 was sub-divided into Grades 3A and 3B, according to a presence or absence of the proximal metacarpal. Buck-Gramcko added a Grade 3C in which there was only a remnant metacarpal head. This article investigates their publications and those of others to identify 'who said what' and clarify the definitions of grades of thumb hypoplasia. A modification of Blauth's classification is proposed, which retains the integrity of the concept of Müller and the skeletal and soft tissue grading of Blauth, but which also incorporates the disparate anomalies that may present in Grades 2 and 3 hypoplastic thumbs.

  16. [Oligomeganephronic renal hypoplasia complicated by glomerulonephritis].

    PubMed

    Kan'shina, N F; Rykov, V A; Lakhno, P A

    1990-01-01

    Clinico-anatomical data of a rare condition congenital oligomeganephronic renal hypoplasia with a glomerulonephritis as a complication are available for a 13-year-old girl who died of chronic renal failure. Large aglomerular zones consisting of primitive canaliculi in a loose stroma were observed in kidneys that were decreased in size. The glomeruli were few in number, some of them of a large size (2-2.5-fold), firmly attached to the capsule, with pronounced extracapillary proliferation.

  17. [Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita--a rare congenital stiff joints syndrome].

    PubMed

    Velisavljev-Filipović, Gordana

    2006-01-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita is not a disease but a term describing multiple congenital contractures. Etiological factors include neurological and primary myogenic diseases. This rare syndrome is present at birth and is characterized by reduced mobility of many joints. The contractures involve two or more joints with ankylosis. The accompanying musculature is hypoplastic, but multiple pterygia are also present. Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita is a heterogeneous group of disorders with the incidence rate of 6.2/100000 liveborn infants. The true incidence cannot be established, because many cases result in spontaneous miscarriages or stillbirth. More than 90% of cases are associated with birth defects. The cause of this syndrome is unknown. Many forms are not hereditary, though there are hereditary forms as well. This paper presents a case with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. The pregnancy was not controlled regularly. During the pregnancy, oligohydramnion was detected. Due to contractures, labor ended is cesarean section. The child was born in the 34th week of gestation. Flexion and extension joint contractures were observed. Active and passive mobility of the afflicted joints was reduced. There was a limited motor function in the shoulder, elbow and wrist joints with a slight internal rotation of the shoulder joint and lower arm joints during pronation. The hips were subluxated; the feet were in equinovarus position and the fingers in ulnar deviation with partial syndactyly of the 4th and 5th fingers on the left hand. The infant had abnormal dermatoglyphics. The neck was short, and the 2nd and 3rd cervical vertebrae were fused. There was also a slight left-sided thoracic scoliosis. Trismus was present due to the existing ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint. The karyotype was normal. The serum creatinine phosphokinase was slightly elevated The electromyographic picture indicate non-specific signs of myopathy. This is a case report of a "stiff joint

  18. Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 2: a neuropathological update

    PubMed Central

    Aronica, Eleonora; de Vries, Linda; Nikkels, Peter G. J.; Scheper, Wiep; Hoozemans, Jeroen J.; Poll-The, Bwe - Tien; Troost, Dirk

    2007-01-01

    Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 2 (PCH-2; MIM 277470), an autosomal recessive neurodegeneration with fetal onset, was studied in six autopsies with ages at death ranging between 1 and 22 years. Three patients were distantly related. A case of olivopontocerebellar hypoplasia (OPCH; MIM 225753) was studied for comparison. Typical findings are: short cerebellar folia with poor branching (“hypoplasia”), relative sparing of the vermis, sharply demarcated areas of full thickness loss of cerebellar cortex probably resulting from regression at an early stage of development, segmental loss of dentate nuclei with preserved islands and reactive changes, segmental loss in the inferior olivary nucleus with reactive changes, loss of ventral pontine nuclei with near absence of transverse pontine fibers and sparing of spinal anterior horn cells. Variable findings are: cystic cerebellar degeneration, found in two, with vascular changes limited to the cerebellum in one. Comparison to olivopontocerebellar hypoplasia (OPCH) strongly suggests a continuum of pathology between this disorder and PCH-2. Immunohistochemical evaluation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response is negative. We conclude that the neuropathological findings in PCH-2 are sufficiently specific to enable an unequivocal diagnosis based on neuropathology. PMID:17641900

  19. Cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita: report of two persistent cases.

    PubMed

    Mazereeuw-Hautier, Juliette; Carel-Caneppele, Stephanie; Bonafé, Jean-Louis

    2002-01-01

    Cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita (CMTC) is defined as a localized or generalized reticulated, blue-violet vascular network in skin that is present at birth. The evolution is characterized by rapid improvement within 2 years. Rarely the lesions do not improve very much with age. Few reports include long-term follow-up of CMTC. We report two patients with persistent CMTC, including one with nervous breakdown and failure of laser treatment. The cause and incidence of persistent CMTC is unknown. Parents can be counseled that over time the lesions of CMTC may or not improve. There seems to be no predictive clinical sign. CMTC is usually a benign condition and therapy is rarely discussed. Treatment of persistent CMTC seems difficult and the effectiveness of laser therapy needs to be evaluated.

  20. Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita: classification, diagnosis, perioperative care, and anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lulu; Yu, Xuerong

    2017-03-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a rare disorder characterized by non-progressive, multiple contractures. In addition to affected extremities, patients may also present microstomia, decreased temporomandibular joint mobility. Although the etiology of AMC is unclear, any factor that decreases fetal movement is responsible for AMC. Thus, accurate diagnosis and classification are crucial to the appropriate treatment of AMC. The development of ultrasound technology has enabled prenatal diagnosis. Very early treatment is favorable, and multidisciplinary treatment is necessary to improve the function of AMC patients. Most patients require surgery to release contracture and reconstruct joints. However, perioperative care is challenging, and difficult airway is the first concern of anesthesiologists. Postoperative pulmonary complications are common and regional anesthesia is recommended for postoperative analgesia. This review on AMC is intended for anesthesiologists. Thus, we discuss the treatment and perioperative management of patients undergoing surgery, as well as the diagnosis and classification of AMC.

  1. Bilateral total hip replacement in arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Dalton, David Michael; Magill, Paul; Mulhall, Kevin James

    2015-11-25

    The authors present a case of bilateral total hip replacements (THRs) in a 56-year-old patient with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC). The considerations for the perioperative period and the outcome are discussed. Preoperative planning included an anaesthetic review and availability of fiberoptic intubation due to poor mouth opening. Perioperatively, contractures can make positioning and exposure difficult but in this case a standard posterior approach was taken. Particular attention was given to soft tissue balancing given the theoretical risk of dislocation. There were no perioperative complications. Postoperatively there has been improvement in pain and hip scores but the patient has failed to return to work. Objective improvements in range of motion (ROM) have not been made. This experience suggests THR is a safe and effective treatment for osteoarthritic hip pain in patients with AMC but patients should be informed that ROM is unlikely to improve. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  2. Successful pregnancy in a woman with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Jorge; Abreu-Silva, João; Godinho, Cristina; Valente, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita refers to a clinical condition or syndrome characterised by multiple congenital contractures that affect two or more different areas of the body. Of the cases reported so far, an important percentage had to be terminated before pregnancy term, predominantly by caesarean section. We describe a 36 year-old woman who wanted to conceive. A multidisciplinary approach was set from the preconceptional period and special attention was given to respiratory function, potential anaesthetic difficulties and thromboembolic risks. She delivered by caesarean section at 38 weeks. This case emphasises the possibility of achieving a term delivery in these patients and points out the importance of a multidisciplinary team, specially of obstetricians and anaesthesiologists. PMID:24311425

  3. The diagnosis and treatment of dyskeratosis congenita: a review

    PubMed Central

    Fernández García, M Soledad; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is an inherited bone marrow failure (BMF) syndrome characterized by the classic triad of abnormal skin pigmentation, nail dystrophy, and oral leukoplakia. However, patients usually develop BMF and are predisposed to cancer, with increased risk for squamous cell carcinoma and hematolymphoid neoplasms. DC is a disease of defective telomere maintenance and is heterogeneous at the genetic level. It can be inherited in X-linked, autosomal dominant, or autosomal recessive patterns. Mutations in at least ten telomere- and telomerase-associated genes have been described in DC. There are no targeted therapies for DC and patients usually die of BMF due to a deficient renewing capability of hematopoietic stem cells. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only curative treatment for BMF. PMID:25170286

  4. A case of amblyopia with contralateral optic nerve hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Frantz, Kelly A; Pang, Yi

    2013-09-01

    We describe an unusual case of unilateral optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) in a patient with contralateral anisometropic/strabismic amblyopia. A seven-year-old boy presented with visual acuities of 6/12 R and 6/18 L and eccentric fixation in the left eye. Cycloplegic retinoscopy was R +1.50/-0.50 × 180 and L +5.25 DS. Funduscopy revealed optic nerve hypoplasia of the right eye. The patient fixated with his better-seeing right eye, despite the optic nerve hypoplasia. His reduced vision may be attributed to optic nerve hypoplasia in the right eye and amblyopia in the left. Although optic nerve hypoplasia can occur with ipsilateral amblyopia, we believe this is the first reported case of unilateral optic nerve hypoplasia in the fellow eye of an amblyopic patient.

  5. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Speiser, Phyllis W.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia associated with deficiency of steroid 21-hydroxylase is the most common inborn error in adrenal function and the most common cause of adrenal insufficiency in the pediatric age group. As patients now survive into adulthood, adult health-care providers must also be familiar with this condition. Over the past several years, F1000 has published numerous commentaries updating research and practical guidelines for this condition. The purposes of this review are to summarize basic information defining congenital adrenal hyperplasia and to highlight current knowledge and controversies in management. PMID:26339484

  6. A rare adrenal incidentaloma: adrenal schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Adas, Mine; Ozulker, Filiz; Adas, Gokhan; Koc, Bora; Ozulker, Tamer; Sahin, Ilknur Mansuroglu

    2013-01-01

    Adrenal schwannoma is an extremely uncommon cause of incidentaloma. It originates from neural sheath Schwann cells of the adrenal gland. We report the case of a left adrenal schwannoma incidentally discovered in a 32-year-old woman during examination of bloated feeling and stomach ache. The patient was incidentally found to have a left adrenal mass of 9 cm on abdominal ultrasonography. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and [(18)F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) were also performed. Metabolic evaluation was unremarkable. Due to the large size of the tumor, left adrenalectomy was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful. Histological examination established the diagnosis of schwannoma. This diagnosis was supported by immunohistochemistry of S-100 and vimentin positivity. In conclusion, adrenal schwannoma is an extremely rare entity and can grow considerably in size. The present case report emphasizes that clinicians should be aware of the possibility of retroperitoneal schwannoma. Total excision of benign schwannoma is associated with a favorable outcome. To our knowledge, there are case reports of schwannoma with CT and magnetic resonance imaging findings in the literature, although this is the first schwannoma case with PET-CT imaging.

  7. Chest wall hypoplasia--principles and treatment.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Oscar Henry

    2015-01-01

    The chest is a dynamic structure. For normal movement it relies on a coordinated movement of the multiple bones, joints and muscles of the respiratory system. While muscle weakness can have clear impact on respiration by decreasing respiratory motion, so can conditions that cause chest wall hypoplasia and produce an immobile chest wall. These conditions, such as Jarcho-Levin and Jeune syndrome, present significantly different challenges than those faced with early onset scoliosis in which chest wall mechanics and thoracic volume may be much closer to normal. Because of this difference more aggressive approaches to clinical and surgical management are necessary.

  8. Left Main Coronary Artery Hypoplasia in Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Kenar Tiryakioglu, Selma; Bahadir, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the coronary artery causing coronary occlusive disease may be of many different types. A 67-year-old woman with no coronary risk factors was referred for coronary angiography with few months' history of angina. The patient underwent coronary angiography due to ischemic cardiac symptoms with nondiagnostic exercising test. In coronary angiography, the left main coronary artery was arising from normal anatomical position; however, left anterior descending artery and circumflex artery were hypoplastic. The treatment of patient was discussed in cardiology-cardiovascular surgery council and coronary surgery was found inappropriate due to the hypoplasia of the left coronary system entirely. PMID:27047696

  9. Breast hypoplasia and breastfeeding: a case history.

    PubMed

    Thorley, Virginia

    2005-07-01

    Hypoplasia, or glandular insufficiency, of the breasts is an infrequent cause of breastfeeding failure or infant failure to thrive. Early evaluation of the breasts of early identification of infant indicators can enable mothers to breastfeed while providing appropriate supplementation to facilitate satisfactory hydration and growth. A case report is presented of a highly motivated mother with minimal breast tissue who was able to soothe four of her infants at her breasts, supplying some breastmilk, while providing the bulk of their nutritional requirements by other means. At the time of writing she is tandem breastfeeding as well as providing artificial milk by bottle.

  10. Adrenal cortex ontogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lalli, Enzo

    2010-12-01

    During the early phases of development, adrenal glands share a common origin with kidneys and gonads. The action of diverse transcription factors, signalling pathways and endocrine signals is required for the individualization of the adrenal primordium and its subsequent differentiation into an adult adrenal gland, with massive remodelling taking place around the time of birth in humans. Here I summarize the most important steps by which the adrenal cortex is shaped and present an overview of the current understanding of the genes and molecular pathways implicated in adrenal development and involved in the pathogenesis of its congenital diseases. Evidence is accumulating that some pivotal factors acting during adrenocortical development also play an important role to regulate the growth of adrenocortical tumors, representing promising therapeutical targets for a biology-oriented therapy. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hypertension and adrenal disorders.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, J D

    1993-03-01

    Abnormalities of adrenal cortical and medullary function are important causes of hypertension in adults. Mineralocorticoid hypertension, characterized by spontaneous hypokalemia with excessive kaliuresis and low plasma renin activity, is most commonly caused by aldosterone-producing adenoma or, less frequently, by nonadenomatous adrenal hyperplasia. However, recent evidence indicates that this classification oversimplifies the pathophysiologic diversity of this syndrome. Advances in steroid biochemistry and molecular biology have improved our ability to identify patients with various forms of mineralocorticoid hypertension and also provide evidence that they are underdiagnosed. Pheochromocytomas are most commonly located in the adrenal medulla, where they may overproduce norepinephrine or epinephrine. Appropriate screening of norepinephrine, epinephrine, and their metabolites is essential because tumors that secrete epinephrine exclusively may not present with hypertension and, thus, can be overlooked. Extra-adrenal pheochromocytomas are more prevalent than previously considered and pose special problems because they may be multicentric, difficult to locate, and more likely to be malignant than are adrenal pheochromocytomas.

  12. Analysis of DAX1 (NR0B1) and steroidogenic factor-1 (SF1/Ad4BP, NR5A1) in children and adults with primary adrenal failure: ten years' experience

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Gu, Wen-Xia; Ozisik, Gokhan; To, Wing S.; Owen, Catherine J.; Jameson, J. Larry; Achermann, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Context Primary adrenal failure is a life-threatening condition that can be caused by a range of etiologies, including autoimmune, metabolic, and developmental disorders. The nuclear receptors DAX1 (NR0B1) and steroidogenic factor-1 (SF1/Ad4BP, NR5A1) play an important role in adrenal development and function, and mutations in these transcription factors have been found in patients with adrenal hypoplasia. Objective To investigate the prevalence of DAX1 and SF1 mutations in children and adults with primary adrenal failure of unknown etiology (i.e., not caused by congenital adrenal hyperplasia, adrenoleukodystrophy, autoimmune disease). Patients One-hundred and seventeen patients were included. Eighty-eight individuals presented in infancy or childhood with adrenal hypoplasia or primary adrenal failure of unknown etiology (n=64, 46,XY phenotypic males; n=17, 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis/impaired androgenization; n=7, 46,XX females). Twenty-nine individuals presented in adulthood with “Addison disease” of unknown etiology. Methods Mutational analysis of DAX1 (NR0B1) (including exon 2α/1A) and SF1 (NR5A1) by direct sequencing. Results DAX1 mutations were found in 58% (37/64) of 46,XY phenotypic boys referred with adrenal hypoplasia, and in all boys (8/8) with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and a family history suggestive of adrenal failure in males. SF1 mutations causing adrenal failure were found only in two patients with 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis. No DAX1 or SF1 mutations were identified in the adult-onset group. Conclusions DAX1 mutations are a relatively frequent cause of adrenal failure in this group of boys. SF1 mutations causing adrenal failure in humans are rare and are more likely to be associated with significant underandrogenization and gonadal dysfunction in 46,XY individuals. PMID:16684822

  13. Spectrum of PORCN mutations in Focal Dermal Hypoplasia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Focal Dermal Hypoplasia (FDH), also known as Goltz syndrome (OMIM 305600), is a genetic disorder that affects multiple organ systems early in development. Features of FDH include skin abnormalities, (hypoplasia, atrophy, linear pigmentation, and herniation of fat through dermal defects); papillomas...

  14. Prevalence and possible etiology of dental enamel hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    El-Najjar, M Y; DeSanti, M V; Ozebek, L

    1978-02-01

    Two hundred black and white adult human skeletons and 200 living black and white children from the greater Cleveland area were examined for evidence of enamel hypoplasia. Enamel hypoplasia, present in varying expressings (pits, lines and grooves), was found to be more prevalent in both skeletal samples, than in the living groups. In the majority of cases, sex differences between white and black males and females through time and space are highly significant for all tooth catagories. Regardless of the mechanisms behind it, prevalence of enamel hypoplasia for both white and black group has significantly declined through time. No evidence suggesting specific etiologies responsible for enamel hypoplasia can be found. In the majority of previously published reports, the etiology is still idiopathic. The reduction in the prevalence of enamel hypoplasia in the groups examined through time may be related to improved nutritional conditions and the elimination or decline of childhood diseases that have been implicated in this condition.

  15. Novel Mutations in the CLCN1 Gene of Myotonia Congenita: 2 Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Lakraj, Amanda Amrita; Miller, Geoffrey; Vortmeyer, Alexander O.; Khokhar, Babar; Nowak, Richard J.; DiCapua, Daniel B.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Myotonia Congenita is an inherited myotonia that is due to a mutation in the skeletal muscle chloride channel CLCN1. These mutations lead to reduced sarcolemmal chloride conductance, causing delayed muscle relaxation that is evident as clinical and electrical myotonia. Methods: We report the clinical presentations of two individuals with Myotonia Congenita (MC). Results: Patient 1 has been diagnosed with the recessive form of MC, known as the Becker variant, and Patient 2 has been diagnosed with the dominant form of MC, known as the Thomsen variant. In both patients, the diagnosis was made based on the clinical presentation, EMG and CLCN1 gene sequencing. Patient 1 also had a muscle biopsy. Conclusions: Genetic testing in both patients reveals previously unidentified mutations in the CLCN1 gene specific to Myotonia Congenita. We report the salient clinical features of each patient and discuss the effects and common types of CLCN1 mutations and review the literature. PMID:23483815

  16. Management of Adrenal Masses.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Hattangadi Sanjay; Tiyadath, Balagopal Nair

    2017-03-01

    An adrenal mass can be either symptomatic or asymptomatic in the form of adrenal incidentalomas (AIs) in up to 8 % in autopsy and 4 % in imaging series. Once a diagnosis of adrenal mass is made, we need to differentiate whether it is functioning or nonfunctioning, benign, or malignant. In this article, we provide a literature review of the diagnostic workup including biochemical evaluation and imaging characteristics of the different pathologies. We also discuss the surgical strategies with laparoscopy as the mainstay with partial adrenalectomy in select cases and adrenalectomy in large masses. Follow-up protocol of AIs and adrenocortical carcinoma is also discussed.

  17. A previously undescribed syndrome combining fibular agenesis/hypoplasia, oligodactylous clubfeet, anonychia/ungual hypoplasia, and other defects.

    PubMed

    Santos, Silvana C; Pardono, Eliete; Ferreira da Costa, Maria Ione; de Melo, Aurea Nogueira; Graciani, Zodja; de Albuquerque e Souza, Alessandra Cavalcanti; Lezirovitz, Karina; Thiele-Aguiar, Renata Soares; Mingroni-Netto, Regina Célia; Opitz, John M; Kok, Fernando; Otto, Paulo A

    2008-12-15

    We describe an apparently new genetic syndrome in six members of a family living in a remote area in Northeastern Brazil. This syndrome comprises: short stature due to a marked decrease in the length of the lower limbs (predominantly mesomelic with fibular agenesis/marked hypoplasia), grossly malformed/deformed clubfeet with severe oligodactyly, upper limbs with acromial dimples and variable motion limitation of the forearms and/or hands, severe nail hypoplasia/anonychia sometimes associated with mild brachydactyly and occasionally with pre-axial polydactyly. This syndrome is apparently distinct from the syndrome of brachydactyly-ectrodactyly with fibular aplasia or hypoplasia (OMIM 113310), the syndrome of fibular aplasia or hypoplasia, femoral bowing and poly-, syn-, and oligodactyly (OMIM 228930), and from other previously described conditions exhibiting fibular agenesis/hypoplasia.

  18. Enhanced G2 chromatid radiosensitivity in dyskeratosis congenita fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    DeBauche, D M; Pai, G S; Stanley, W S

    1990-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is an inherited disorder characterized by reticular pigmentation of the skin, dystrophic nails, mucosal leukoplakia, and a predisposition to cancer in early adult life. In the majority of cases, DC is an X-linked recessive trait. However, one or more autosomal form(s) of DC may exist. Although excessive spontaneous chromatid breakage has been reported in DC, it is not a consistent cytological marker for this disorder. We examined the frequency and specificity of X-irradiation-induced G2 chromatid breakage in fibroblasts from three unrelated DC patients (two males and one female). Metaphase cells from DC patients had significantly more chromatid breaks (16-18-fold and 17-26-fold at 50 and 100 rad X-irradiation, respectively) and chromatid gaps (10-12-fold and 6-7-fold at 50 and 100 rad, respectively) than those from two different controls. Analysis of banded chromosomes revealed a nonrandom distribution of chromatid aberrations in DC but not in controls, a distribution corresponding to some of the known breakpoints for cancer-specific rearrangements, constitutive fragile sites, and/or loci for cellular proto-oncogenes. The significance of this finding for cancer predisposition in DC patients is uncertain, but the increased susceptibility of X-irradiation-induced chromatid breakage may serve as a cellular marker of diagnostic value. PMID:2301400

  19. ECEL1 mutation causes fetal arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Dohrn, N; Le, V Q; Petersen, A; Skovbo, P; Pedersen, I S; Ernst, A; Krarup, H; Petersen, M B

    2015-04-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a descriptor for the clinical finding of congenital fixation of multiple joints. We present a consanguineous healthy couple with two pregnancies described with AMC due to characteristic findings on ultrasonography of fixated knee extension and reduced fetal movement at the gestational age of 13 weeks + 2 days and 12 weeks + 4 days. Both pregnancies were terminated and postmortem examinations were performed. The postmortem examinations confirmed AMC and suggested a diagnosis of centronuclear myopathy (CNM) due to characteristic histological findings in muscle biopsies. Whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed on all four individuals and the outcome was filtered by application of multiple filtration parameters satisfying a recessive inheritance pattern. Only one gene, ECEL1, was predicted damaging and had previously been associated with neuromuscular disease or AMC. The variant found ECEL1 is a missense mutation in a highly conserved residue and was predicted pathogenic by prediction software. The finding expands the molecular basis of congenital contractures and the phenotypic spectrum of ECEL1 mutations. The histological pattern suggestive of CNM in the fetuses can expand the spectrum of genes causing CNM, as we propose that mutations in ECEL1 can cause CNM or a condition similar to this. Further investigation of this is needed and we advocate that future patients with similar clinical presentation or proven ECEL1 mutations are examined with muscle biopsy. Secondly, this study illustrates the great potential of the clinical application of WES in couples with recurrent abortions or stillborn neonates. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Investigation into neurogenic bladder in arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Arantes de Araújo, Liubiana; Ferraz de Arruda Musegante, André; de Oliveira Damasceno, Edjane; Barroso, Ubirajara; Badaro, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    During the follow-up of children who had been diagnosed with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC), it was noted that some were experiencing dysfunctional voiding. Further investigation into these cases led to a diagnosis of neurogenic bladder. Few studies have investigated the relationship between AMC and neurogenic bladder, this being the first to describe the clinical characteristics of neurogenic bladder among these patients. A series of 26 cases were obtained from the electronic medical records of patients with AMC who were admitted to Hospital Sarah in Salvador between 1994 and 2007. The patients had all been diagnosed with neurogenic bladder through clinical symptoms, lower urinary tract exams, and urodynamic findings. There was urinary incontinence in 21 patients (81%), and 50% had a history of urinary tract infections. Renal function was altered in 4 patients (15%) and normal in 22 (85%). In the urodynamic study, 14 patients (64%) had detrusor overactivity and 6 (27%) had underactivity. Patients with AMC may show changes in the urinary tract, including neurogenic bladder. It is mandatory to study these symptomatic children with urinary disorders. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Enhanced G2 chromatid radiosensitivity in dyskeratosis congenita fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    DeBauche, D.M.; Pai, G.S.; Stanley, W.S. )

    1990-02-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is an inherited disorder characterized by reticular pigmentation of the skin, dystrophic nails, mucosal leukoplakia, and a predisposition to cancer in early adult life. In the majority of cases, DC is an X-linked recessive trait. However, one or more autosomal form(s) of DC may exist. Although excessive spontaneous chromatid breakage has been reported in DC, it is not a consistent cytological marker for this disorder. We examined the frequency and specificity of X-irradiation-induced G2 chromatid breakage in fibroblasts from three unrelated DC patients (two males and one female). Metaphase cells from DC patients had significantly more chromatid breaks (16-18-fold and 17-26-fold at 50 and 100 rad X-irradiation, respectively) and chromatid gaps (10-12-fold and 6-7-fold at 50 and 100 rad, respectively) than those from two different controls. Analysis of banded chromosomes revealed a nonrandom distribution of chromatid aberrations in DC but not in controls, a distribution corresponding to some of the known breakpoints for cancer-specific rearrangements, constitutive fragile sites, and/or loci for cellular proto-oncogenes. The significance of this finding for cancer predisposition in DC patients is uncertain, but the increased susceptibility of X-irradiation-induced chromatid breakage may serve as a cellular marker of diagnostic value.

  2. Dyskeratosis Congenita- Management and Review of Complications: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Shivam; Trivedi, Vikas; Krishna, Arvind; Rao, Nidhi

    2013-01-01

    Among the inherited bone marrow failure disorders, dyskeratosis congenita is an X-linked inherited disorder arising as a consequence of short telomere and mutations in telomere biology. Production of the altered protein dyskerin, leads to vulnerable skin, nails, and teeth which lead to higher permeability for noxious agents which can induce carcinogenesis accounting for the classical triad of skin pigmentation, nail dystrophy and oral leukoplakia. This condition is fatal and patients succumb to aplastic anemia, malignancy or immunocompromised state. We present a young male with the classic clinical triad and avascular necrosis of both femoral heads, with no evidence of hematologic anomaly or any malignancy. He was managed for osteonecrosis with uncemented total hip arthroplasty for the symptomatic left hip. Our case represents a benign form of such a fatal and rare condition, which if detected and managed early can result in improved quality of life for the patient suffering from this disorder. This patient is under our meticulous follow-up for the last 2 years in order to determine any late development of complications before being labelled as a variant of this syndrome. PMID:23904924

  3. [Clinical and molecular findings of pachyonychia congenita type 2 (PC-2)].

    PubMed

    Cammarata-Scalisi, Francisco; Natsuga, Ken; Toyonaga, Ellen; Nishie, Wataru; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Stock, Frances; Milano, Melisse; Petrosino, Pierina; Arenas de Sotolongo, Asmiria; Medina, Yoel

    2015-01-01

    Pachyonychia congenita is a group of autosomal dominant inheritance pattern disorders characterized by hypertrophic nail dystrophy There are two main clinical subtypes: type 1 and 2. Pachyonychia congenita type 2 is readily differentiated from type 1 by multiple steatocysts and/or presence of natal teeth and can be confirmed by mutations of KRT6B and KRT17. We report the case of a 33-year-o/d female patient with the missense mutation in KRT17 gene (c.280C> T, p.Arg94Cys) and discuss the several clinical features found with this mutation in the literature.

  4. Managing Adrenal Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body. • Surgical removal of the adrenals Temporary AI is caused by some medications, infections, and/or surgeries. Causes of temporary AI include the following: • Transsphenoidal surgery for Cushing’s disease ...

  5. Unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia with different clinical features.

    PubMed

    Benbir, Gulcin; Kara, Simay; Yalcinkaya, Beyza Citci; Karhkaya, Geysu; Tuysuz, Beyhan; Kocer, Naci; Yalcinkaya, Cengiz

    2011-03-01

    Unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia (UCH) is a rare pathological condition characterized by the loss of volume in cerebellar hemispheres ranging from mild asymptomatic to severe symptomatic cases. As the designation of UCH remains problematic, the underlying etiopathogenesis also lacks explanation. We investigated the patients admitted to Departments of Child Neurology, Neurology, and Genetics between the years 1992 and 2010 and detected 12 patients with unilateral cerebellar volume loss, with the exclusion of all other cerebellar pathologies. The ages of patients ranged between 6 months to 55 years. Five patients had a delay in developmental milestones, and one of these was diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 1. Two patients had epileptic seizures, one patient had peripheral facial paralysis as a component of Moebius syndrome, and four patients were incidentally diagnosed during etiological work-up for headache. The clinical outcomes of patients varied from healthy subjects to marked developmental impairment. Radiologically, five patients had severe disproportionate UCH, six had moderate disproportionate, and one had mild proportionate UCH. Cerebellar peduncles were affected in all, and vermis was partly hypoplastic in eight patients. Brainstem was involved in four patients, and seven patients showed involvement of white matter and/or corpus callosum. Imaging features supported that patients with severe disproportionate UCH also displayed additional cerebral and commissural changes, which were related to ischemic or vascular injuries, implying a prenatally acquired disruption. In the presence of such a wide spectrum of clinical and radiological features, a prenatally acquired lesion and, thus, a disruption seem to be more explanatory rather than a primary developmental process or malformation in the etiopathogenesis of unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia.

  6. Adrenal gland and bone.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Rowan; Cooper, Mark S

    2010-11-01

    The adrenal gland synthesizes steroid hormones from the adrenal cortex and catecholamines from the adrenal medulla. Both cortisol and adrenal androgens can have powerful effects on bone. The overproduction of cortisol in Cushing's disease leads to a dramatic reduction in bone density and an increase risk of fracture. Overproduction of adrenal androgens in congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) leads to marked changes in bone growth and development with early growth acceleration but ultimately a significant reduction in final adult height. The role of more physiological levels of glucocorticoids and androgens on bone metabolism is less clear. Cortisol levels measured in elderly individuals show a weak correlation with measures of bone density and change in bone density over time with a high cortisol level associated with lower bone density and more rapid bone loss. Cortisol levels and the dynamics of cortisol secretion change with age which could also explain some age related changes in bone physiology. It is also now clear that adrenal steroids can be metabolized within bone tissue itself. Local synthesis of cortisol within bone from its inactive precursor cortisone has been demonstrated and the amount of cortisol produced within osteoblasts appears to increase with age. With regard to adrenal androgens there is a dramatic reduction in levels with aging and several studies have examined the impact that restoration of these levels back to those seen in younger individuals has on bone health. Most of these studies show small positive effects in women, not men, but the skeletal sites where benefits are seen varies from study to study.

  7. An additional manifestation in acrocallosal syndrome: temporal lobe hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Aykut, A; Cogulu, O; Ekmekci, A Y; Ozkinay, F

    2008-01-01

    Acrocallosal Syndrome is a rare genetic disorder which is characterized by moderate to severe mental retardation, agenesis or hypoplasia of the corpus callosum and polydactyly of fingers and toes. The spectrum of this syndrome is very variable. Prominent forehead, broad nasal bridge, short nose and mandible, hypertelorism, epicanthic folds, large anterior fontanelle and tapered fingers, omphalocele and inguinal hernia are some other common findings in this syndrome. Twenty percent of the patients have associated brain abnormalities such as cerebral atrophy, hypothalamic dysfunction, small cerebrum, micropolygyria, hypoplasia of pons, hypoplasia of cerebellar hemispheres, hypoplasia of medulla oblongata, agenesis or hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis and corpus callosum abnormalities. Here we present a 10-month-old female infant with clinical and radiological findings indicative of acrocallosal syndrome. She was noted to have craniofacial abnormalities suggestive of acrocallosal syndrome, optic atrophy and polydactyly. MRI revealed cerebral atrophy, corpus callosum agenesis, dilated lateral ventricules and unilateral right temporal lobe hypoplasia, the latter not previously reported in the spectrum of this syndrome. Based on this observation we conclude the importance of screening brain abnormalities and present temporal lobe hypoplasia as a new additional anomaly in this syndrome.

  8. Clinical and genetic features of dyskeratosis congenita, cryptic dyskeratosis congenita, and Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Sakaguchi, Hirotoshi; Yoshida, Kenichi; Yabe, Miharu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Okuno, Yusuke; Muramatsu, Hideki; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Yui, Shunsuke; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Chiba, Kenichi; Tanaka, Hiroko; Miyano, Satoru; Inokuchi, Koiti; Ito, Etsuro; Ogawa, Seishi; Kojima, Seiji

    2015-11-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DKC) is an inherited bone marrow failure (BMF) syndrome typified by reticulated skin pigmentation, nail dystrophy, and mucosal leukoplakia. Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome (HHS) is considered to be a severe form of DKC. Unconventional forms of DKC, which develop slowly in adulthood but without the physical anomalies characteristic of DKC (cryptic DKC), have been reported. Clinical and genetic features of DKC have been investigated in Caucasian, Black, and Hispanic populations, but not in Asian populations. The present study aimed to determine the clinical and genetic features of DKC, HHS, and cryptic DKC among Japanese patients. We analyzed 16 patients diagnosed with DKC, three patients with HHS, and 15 patients with cryptic DKC. We found that platelet count was significantly more depressed than neutrophil count or hemoglobin value in DKC patients, and identified DKC patients with large deletions in the telomerase reverse transcriptase and cryptic DKC patients with RTEL1 mutations on both alleles. This led to some patients previously considered to have unclassifiable BMF being diagnosed with cDKC through identification of new gene mutations. It thus seems important from a clinical viewpoint to re-examine the clinical characteristics, frequency of genetic mutations, and treatment efficacy in DKC, HHS, and cDKC.

  9. Brain stem hypoplasia associated with Cri-du-Chat syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jin Ho; Lee, Ha Young; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kim, Mi Young; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu

    2013-01-01

    Cri-du-Chat syndrome, also called the 5p-syndrome, is a rare genetic abnormality, and only few cases have been reported on its brain MRI findings. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 1-year-old girl with Cri-du-Chat syndrome who showed brain stem hypoplasia, particularly in the pons, with normal cerebellum and diffuse hypoplasia of the cerebral hemispheres. We suggest that Cri-du-Chat syndrome chould be suspected in children with brain stem hypoplasia, particularly for those with high-pitched cries.

  10. Brain Stem Hypoplasia Associated with Cri-du-Chat Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jin Ho; Lim, Myung Kwan; Kim, Mi Young; Kang, Young Hye; Lee, Kyung Hee; Cho, Soon Gu

    2013-01-01

    Cri-du-Chat syndrome, also called the 5p-syndrome, is a rare genetic abnormality, and only few cases have been reported on its brain MRI findings. We describe the magnetic resonance imaging findings of a 1-year-old girl with Cri-du-Chat syndrome who showed brain stem hypoplasia, particularly in the pons, with normal cerebellum and diffuse hypoplasia of the cerebral hemispheres. We suggest that Cri-du-Chat syndrome chould be suspected in children with brain stem hypoplasia, particularly for those with high-pitched cries. PMID:24265573

  11. A case of systemic aplasia cutis congenita: a newly recognized syndrome?

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Tokio; Kouwaki, Masanori; Kiyosawa, Shusuke; Sasada, Yoshie; Maeda, Matsuyoshi; Goto, Kenji; Koyama, Norihisa

    2008-04-01

    Aplasia cutis congenita, congenital absence of a localized area of skin, usually on the vertex of the scalp, occurs as an isolated defect, or with one or more other congenital anomalies as part of a syndrome, sequence or association. To date, more than 500 cases have been reported. A more severe and extensive form, almost complete absence of skin and subcutaneous tissue, was reported by Park et al. in 1998 [J Med Genet 35:609-611]. Until now, no other such lethal case has been reported. Here, we report the second case of systemic aplasia cutis congenita. The female was born without any skin at all, and with hypoplastic lungs, syndactyly, skull defect, esophageal atresia, intestinal malrotation, and calcifications of the hepatic capsule, as well as with other anomalies. She died about 12 hours after birth probably due to dehydration. On microscopic examination, the external surface of the body showed complete absence of the epidermis. Muscle fibers were thin. There was no evidence of skin appendages. The present case gives strong support to the suggestion that systemic aplasia cutis congenita is a newly recognized syndrome. More cases will have to be reported and studied in order to understand the etiology and establish diagnostic criteria. Thus, it is our conclusion that systemic aplasia cutis congenita might be a newly recognized syndrome.

  12. Pachyonychia Congenita Type 1: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rathore, Praveen Kumar; Khullar, Varun; Das, Anupam

    2016-01-01

    The case of an 8-year-old boy is hereby reported, who presented with nail dystrophy, subungual hyperkeratosis, oral leukokeratosis, and numerous follicular papules all over the body. The features were consistent with a diagnosis of pachyonychia congenita type 1. The case is being reported for its rarity. We also discuss in a nutshell, the literature till date. PMID:27057022

  13. Use of left ventricular assist device for cardiomyopathy associated with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Mohite, Prashant N; Sabashnikov, Anton; Bowles, Christopher T; Sáez, Diana García; Fatullayev, Javid; Zych, Bartlomiej; Simon, André R

    2014-12-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is characterized by contractions of multiple joints present at birth. AMC is rarely associated with cardiomyopathy. We present a case of a young man with dilated cardiomyopathy associated with AMC admitted with rapidly deteriorating severe heart failure who was offered left ventricular assist device as a bridge to transplant.

  14. Genetics Home Reference: VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Facebook Share on Twitter Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Search MENU Toggle navigation Home Page Search ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions VLDLR-associated cerebellar hypoplasia VLDLR- ...

  15. Ossification of the posterior atlantoaxial membrane associated with atlas hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Yichen; Zhou, Dongxiao; Gao, Rui; Ma, Jun; Wang, Ce; Zhou, Xuhui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Hypoplasia with an intact posterior arch of the atlas and ossification of the posterior atlantoaxial membrane (PAAM) are individually rare. Patient concerns: The patient presented with a 6-month history of progressive weakness and paresthesia of his lower extremities. Diagnoses: Cervical myelopathy resulting from atlas hypoplasia and ossification of the posterior atlantoaxial membrane. Interventions: Laminectomy of the atlas with duroplasty. Outcomes: Preoperative symptoms were alleviated. Lessons: In most reported cases, either atlas hypoplasia or ossification of the PAAM is responsible for patients’ myelopathy. The case illustrated here, to the best of our knowledge, is the first one with coexistent atlas hypoplasia and ossification of the PAAM. And laminectomy of the atlas with duroplasty provided satisfied outcome. PMID:27902623

  16. Pulmonary hypoplasia presenting with recurrent wheezing in an infant.

    PubMed

    Çeliksoy, Mehmet Halil; Tander, Burak; Aşılıoğlu, Nazik; Barış, Yakup Sancar; Yıldıran, Alişan

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary hypoplasia is characterized by decrease in the number and size of pulmonary airways, alveoli and vessels. In autopsy, pulmonary hypoplasia is a major cause of death in neonates and infants. The disease is usually diagnosed in childhood period. Although it mimics lung parenchymal disease and other vascular abnormalities radiologically, it is easily recognized with computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance angiography examinations. In 50% of patients, concomitant cardiovascular, neuromuscular, gastrointestinal tract, and urogenital anomalies are also available. There are two types of pulmonary hypoplasia: primary and secondary. Primary unilateral pulmonary hypoplasia may be asymptomatic and the tendency for bronchopulmonary infections is often increased in children. In this case report, a 22-month-old male patient characterized by recurrent infections and recurrent wheezes in infantile period, whose episodes of wheezing regressed after the pulmonectomy, was presented.

  17. [Adrenal tumours in childhood].

    PubMed

    Martos-Moreno, G A; Pozo-Román, J; Argente, J

    2013-09-01

    This special article aims to summarise the current knowledge regarding the two groups of tumours with their origin in the adrenal gland: 1) adrenocortical tumours, derived from the cortex of the adrenal gland and 2) phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas, neuroendocrine tumours derived from nodes of neural crest derived cells symmetrically distributed at both sides of the entire spine (paragangliomas [PG]). These PGs can be functioning tumors that secrete catecholamines, which confers their typical dark colour after staining with chromium salts (chromaffin tumors). Among these, the term phaeochromocytoma (PC) is restricted to those PGs derived from the chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla (intra-adrenal PGs), whereas the term PG is used for those sympathetic or parasympathetic ones in an extra-adrenal location. We analyse the state of the art of their pathogenic and genetic bases, as well as their clinical signs and symptoms, the tests currently available for performing their diagnosis (biochemical, hormonal, imaging and molecular studies) and management (surgery, pre- and post-surgical medical treatment), considering the current and developing strategies in chemo- and radiotherapy.

  18. Oral rehabilitation for a patient with oligodontia and maxillary hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Da-Woon; Vang, Mong-Sook; Park, Sang-Won; Lim, Hyun-Pil

    2009-01-01

    An 18 year old female with oligodontia and maxillary hypoplasia was treated using an interdisciplinary team approach involving orthodontists, maxillofacial surgeons and prosthodontists. Full mouth one-piece fixed partial dentures were the final restoration. The fixed partial dentures fabricated for the maxilla and mandible using the concept of a shortened dental arch resulted in improved esthetics and the masticatory function. This paper describes the treatment procedures for an oligodontia patient with alveolar bone hypoplasia. PMID:21165248

  19. Enamel hypoplasia in the middle pleistocene hominids from Atapuerca (Spain).

    PubMed

    Bermúdez de Castro, J M; Pérez, P J

    1995-03-01

    The prevalence and chronology of enamel hypoplasias were studied in a hominid dental sample from the Sima de los Huesos (SH) Middle Pleistocene site at the Sierra de Atapuerca (Burgos, northern Spain). A total of 89 permanent maxillary teeth, 143 permanent mandibular teeth, and one deciduous lower canine, belonging to a minimum of 29 individuals, were examined. Excluding the antimeres (16 maxillary and 37 mandibular cases) from the sample, the prevalence of hypoplasias in the permanent dentition is 12.8% (23/179), whereas the deciduous tooth also showed an enamel defect. No statistically significant differences were found between both arcades and between the anterior and postcanine teeth for the prevalence of hypoplasias. In both the maxilla and the mandible the highest frequency of enamel hypoplasias was recorded in the canines. Only one tooth (a permanent upper canine) showed two different enamel defects, and most of the hypoplasias were expressed as faint linear horizontal defects. Taking into account the limitations that the incompleteness of virtually all permanent dentitions imposes, we have estimated that the frequency by individual in the SH hominid sample was not greater than 40%. Most of the hypoplasias occurred between birth and 7 years (N = 18, X = 3.5, SD = 1.3). Both the prevalence and severity of the hypoplasias of the SH hominid sample are significantly less than those of a large Neandertal sample. Furthermore, prehistoric hunter-gatherers and historic agricultural and industrial populations exhibit a prevalence of hypoplasias generally higher than that of the SH hominids. Implications for the survival strategies and life quality of the SH hominids are also discussed.

  20. Mammary hypoplasia: not every breast can produce sufficient milk.

    PubMed

    Arbour, Megan W; Kessler, Julia Lange

    2013-01-01

    Breast milk is considered the optimal form of nutrition for newborn infants. Current recommendations are to breastfeed for 6 months. Not all women are able to breastfeed. Mammary hypoplasia is a primary cause of failed lactogenesis II, whereby the mother is unable to produce an adequate milk volume. Women with mammary hypoplasia often have normal hormone levels and innervation but lack sufficient glandular tissue to produce an adequate milk supply to sustain their infant. The etiology of this rare condition is unclear, although there are theories that refer to genetic predisposition and estrogenic environmental exposures in select agricultural environments. Women with mammary hypoplasia may not exhibit the typical breast changes associated with pregnancy and may fail to lactate postpartum. Breasts of women with mammary hypoplasia may be widely spaced (1.5 inches or greater), asymmetric, or tuberous in nature. Awareness of the history and clinical signs of mammary hypoplasia during the prenatal period and immediate postpartum increases the likelihood that women will receive the needed education and physical and emotional support and encouragement. Several medications and herbs demonstrate some efficacy in increasing breast milk production in women with mammary hypoplasia.

  1. [Phenotype analysis and the molecular mechanism of enamel hypoplasia].

    PubMed

    Lv, Ping; Gao, Xue-jun

    2009-02-18

    Enamel hypoplasia is a surface defect of the tooth crown caused by a disturbance of enamel matrix secretion. Enamel hypoplasia may be inherited, or result from illness, malnutrition, trauma, or high concentrations of fluorides or strontium in the drinking water or food. Different types of enamel hypoplasia have been distinguished, such as pit-type, plane-type, and linear enamel hypoplasia. Hypoplasia has been related to the intensity and duration of stress events, the number of affected ameloblasts, and their position along the forming tooth crown. Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a heterogeneous group of inherited defects in dental enamel formation, most teeth are affected in both the primary and permanent dentition. The malformed enamel can be unusually thin, soft, rough and stained. The strict definition of AI includes only those cases where enamel defects occur in the absence of other symptoms. Currently, there are seven candidate genes for AI: amelogenin, enamelin, ameloblastin, tuftelin, distal-less homeobox 3, enamelysin, and kallikrein 4. Since the enamel is formed according to a strict chronological sequence, and once formed, undergoes no repair or regeneration. Then the analysis the phenotype of enamel hypoplasia can provide insights of the severity of inherited or environmental stress and the molecular mechanism during the period of enamel formation.

  2. What Is Adrenal Cortical Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... include pheochromocytomas (which are most often benign) and neuroblastomas . This document is about tumors and cancers of ... does not discuss tumors of the adrenal medulla. Neuroblastoma s are covered in a separate document . Adrenal cortex ...

  3. Adrenal gland hormone secretion (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The adrenal gland secretes steroid hormones such as cortisol and aldosterone. It also makes precursors that can be converted to ... steroids (androgen, estrogen). A different part of the adrenal gland makes adrenaline (epinephrine). When the glands produce more ...

  4. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Merke, Deborah P; Bornstein, Stefan R

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to deficiency of 21-hydroxylase is a disorder of the adrenal cortex characterised by cortisol deficiency, with or without aldosterone deficiency, and androgen excess. Patients with the most severe form also have abnormalities of the adrenal medulla and epinephrine deficiency. The severe classic form occurs in one in 15,000 births worldwide, and the mild non-classic form is a common cause of hyperandrogenism. Neonatal screening for CAH and gene-specific prenatal diagnosis are now possible. Standard hormone replacement fails to achieve normal growth and development for many children with CAH, and adults can experience iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome, hyperandrogenism, infertility, or the development of the metabolic syndrome. This Seminar reviews the epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of CAH, and provides an overview of clinical challenges and future therapies.

  5. The rat adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Tischler, A S

    1989-01-01

    Adult adrenal medullary cells, in many strains of rats, develop diffuse and nodular hyperplasia and neoplasia under a variety of conditions. Both endogenous and exogenous factors affect the development of these proliferative changes. The former include the animals' strain, age, and sex. The latter include drugs and other environmental agents, diet, and perhaps stress. Adrenal medullary neoplasms which arise under diverse circumstances often closely resemble each other both morphologically and functionally, and exhibit characteristics of immature chromaffin cells. Recent data indicate that normal, mature-appearing epinephrine- and norepinephrine-type chromaffin cells are able to divide, and suggest that signals which regulate chromaffin cell function also regulate cell proliferation. Prolongation of these signals or superimposed abnormalities might initiate pathological proliferative states. It remains to be determined whether the mechanisms which promote or prevent cell proliferation in the adult adrenal are related to those involved in normal development.

  6. Adrenal Gland Disorders: Condition Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... source of sex steroids, such as estrogen and testosterone. What are adrenal gland disorders? Adrenal gland disorders occur when the adrenal glands do not work properly. They can be classified into disorders that occur when too much hormone is produced or when too little hormone is produced. These ...

  7. Mouse Adrenal Chromaffin Cell Isolation

    PubMed Central

    Kolski-Andreaco, Aaron; Cai, Haijiang; Currle, D. Spencer; Chandy, K. George; Chow, Robert H.

    2007-01-01

    Adrenal medullary chromaffin cell culture systems are extremely useful for the study of excitation-secretion coupling in an in vitro setting. This protocol illustrates the method used to dissect the adrenals and then isolate the medullary region by stripping away the adrenal cortex. The digestion of the medulla into single chromaffin cells is then demonstrated. PMID:18830430

  8. Adrenal venous sampling in a patient with adrenal Cushing syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Franco, Carlos Andrés; Román-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Velez-Hoyos, Alejandro; Echeverri-Isaza, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia or the independent adrenocorticotropic hormone bilateral nodular adrenal hyperplasia is a rare cause hypercortisolism, its diagnosis is challenging and there is no clear way to decide the best therapeutic approach. Adrenal venous sampling is commonly used to distinguish the source of hormonal production in patients with primary hyperaldosteronism. It could be a useful tool in this context because it might provide information to guide the treatment. We report the case of a patient with ACTH independent Cushing syndrome in whom the use of adrenal venous sampling with some modifications radically modified the treatment and allowed the diagnosis of a macronodular adrenal hyperplasia. PMID:26309345

  9. Adrenal venous sampling in a patient with adrenal Cushing syndrome.

    PubMed

    Builes-Montaño, Carlos Esteban; Villa-Franco, Carlos Andrés; Román-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Velez-Hoyos, Alejandro; Echeverri-Isaza, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia or the independent adrenocorticotropic hormone bilateral nodular adrenal hyperplasia is a rare cause hypercortisolism, its diagnosis is challenging and there is no clear way to decide the best therapeutic approach. Adrenal venous sampling is commonly used to distinguish the source of hormonal production in patients with primary hyperaldosteronism. It could be a useful tool in this context because it might provide information to guide the treatment. We report the case of a patient with ACTH independent Cushing syndrome in whom the use of adrenal venous sampling with some modifications radically modified the treatment and allowed the diagnosis of a macronodular adrenal hyperplasia.

  10. A case report on a rare disease: dyskeratosis congenita.

    PubMed

    Shiferaw, Bethel; Mukka, Satish; Ha, Lawrence; Bekele, Ebisa; Ramos De Oleo, Radhames

    2015-05-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is a rare hereditary disorder characterized by bone marrow failure, cancer predisposition (11-fold increase compared to general population), ectodermal dysplasia (nail dystrophy, oral leukoplakia, and abnormal skin pigmentation) and other additional somatic abnormalities. A 22-year-old man presented with fever, chills, and a painful throat. Leukoplakia was noted on his tongue and some of his fingers and toe nails were markedly dystrophic. His skin seemed spotted with pigmentation on the anterior chest and neck. Patient reported family history of "blood disease" and leukemia. He was admitted for the management of neutropenic fever (102.9 °F, WBC: 940, ANC: 404, platelets: 21,000 and Hb: 9.2), and was put on broad spectrum antibiotics. A bone marrow biopsy revealed normocellular marrow with erythroid predominance and mild dyserythropoiesis. Chromosomal analysis indicated no numerical or structural chromosomal abnormalities. The fluorescence in situ hybridization report did not reveal any assay specific abnormalities. Viral marker for hepatitis and studies of autoimmune antibodies showed negative results. CT scan had shown splenomegaly. Patient was discharged after he has been fever and symptoms free, with a follow-up at hematology clinic. Individuals with DC most commonly present with skin pigmentation, dystrophic nails and leukoplakia, as presented in this case. Genetic abnormality was not confirmed in our patient, but it is suggested that X-linked recessive pattern would be significant because of greater prevalence in men than in women (10:1). The distribution of blood counts and bone marrow biopsy categorizes our patient in the moderate aplastic anemia class which is the most prevalent pattern. When fever in young patients with a failing bone marrow is diagnosed, it is important that physicians rule out the possible underlying causes. DC is a rare disease, but can be diagnosed by simple inspection of the mucocutaneous abnormalities. DC

  11. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or inappropriately). Congenital adrenal hyperplasia can affect both boys and girls. About 1 in 10,000 to 18,000 ... penis but normal testes Well-developed muscles Both boys and girls will be tall as children, but much shorter ...

  12. Optic nerve hypoplasia: septo-optic-pituitary dysplasia syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Acers, T E

    1981-01-01

    Forty-five patients with the common clinical factor of optic nerve hypoplasia are analyzed regarding their clinical appearance, echographic and computed tomographic measurements of the optic nerves, and the correlation of anatomic size with visual function. Computed axial tomographic studies of the midline brain were performed on all 45 patients to determine the incidence of correlated structural defects, especially the septum pellucidum, and neuroendocrine dysfunction. Review of the spectrum of septo-optic-pituitary syndrome is separately developed to include historical background, embryogenesis, histopathology, and pathogenesis of the three major components of the syndrome. In summary, 45 patients had optic nerve hypoplasia, 32 with evidence of segmental or partial hypoplasia and 13 with evidence of complete or diffuse hypoplasia--the optic nerve hypoplasia syndrome. Twelve of these patients demonstrated absence of the septum pellucidum by computed axial tomography--the septo-optic dysplasia syndrome. Of these 12 patients with partial or complete absence of the septum pellucidum, six demonstrated evidence of pituitary hypofunction--the septo-optic-pituitary dysplasia syndrome. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 a FIGURE 3 b FIGURE 4 a FIGURE 4 b FIGURE 4 c FIGURE 4 d PMID:7043865

  13. Increased enamel hypoplasia and very low birthweight infants.

    PubMed

    Nelson, S; Albert, J M; Geng, C; Curtan, S; Lang, K; Miadich, S; Heima, M; Malik, A; Ferretti, G; Eggertsson, H; Slayton, R L; Milgrom, P

    2013-09-01

    Birth cohort studies of developmental defects of enamel (DDE) and early childhood caries (ECC) in very low birthweight (VLBW) and normal birthweight (NBW) infants are rare. In this birth cohort of 234 VLBW and 234 NBW infants, we report the incidence of ECC and DDE at 8 and 18-20 mos of corrected age. Infant medical and maternal socio-demographic data were abstracted from medical records at birth. Dental assessments for ECC and DDE (enamel hypoplasia, demarcated and diffuse opacities) were completed at 8 and 18-20 mos. The incidence of hypoplasia was significantly higher in VLBW compared with NBW infants (8 mos, 19% vs. 2%; 18 mos, 31% vs. 8%). The incidence of ECC (International Caries Detection and Assessment System: ICDAS ≥ 2) was 1.4% (8 mos) and 12% (18-20 mos) and was similar between the VLBW and NBW groups. At both ages, using a beta-binomial regression model to control for potential confounders (maternal and infant characteristics), we found increased risk for enamel hypoplasia among the VLBW infants compared with the NBW infants. African Americans had a lower risk for enamel hypoplasia at 18-20 mos. The VLBW infants should be monitored for ECC due to the presence of enamel hypoplasia.

  14. Fryns anophthalmia-plus syndrome with hypoplastic adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Ozalp, O; Ozcimen, E E; Yilmaz, Z; Yanik, F; Sahin, F I

    2008-01-01

    We report a family with two consequent sibs with anophthalmia and cleft lip and palate. A 27 year old woman married to her first cousin was counseled for anophthalmia and cleft lip and palate detected during routine fetal ultrasonographic examination on the 23rd week of the pregnancy. Her obstetric history revealed a healthy girl aged 7 years and a boy with anophthalmia and cleft lip and palate who lived for 20 days in the neonatal intensive care unit. The current pregnancy was terminated after the diagnosis, and post mortem examination of the fetus revealed pre-maxilla agenesis, anophthalmia, cerebral ventricular dilatation, adrenal hypoplasia and single umbilical artery. Chromosome analysis resulted in normal karyotypes of the fetus and both parents. The inheritance pattern was regarded as autosomal recessive and the family was informed about the condition and risks during genetic counseling.

  15. Total hip and knee replacement in a patient with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Kimberly A; Fisher, David A

    2014-04-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a complex disorder that leads to joint stiffness and deformities in 2 or more joints in afflicted children. Late manifestations of this disorder can include secondary degeneration of the abnormal joints with arthritic symptoms of pain and loss of function. There are few reports in the orthopedic literature on the use of total joint arthroplasty to improve the pain and function in patients with arthrogryposis. This case report presents one patient who underwent bilateral total hip and total knee arthroplasties for deteriorating function and pain in her hips and knees secondary to the congenital deformities created by arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. We discuss the intraoperative difficulties and techniques used to reconstruct her hips and knees, as well as the potential indications for joint arthroplasty in this challenging group of patients.

  16. Identification of a novel CNTNAP1 mutation causing arthrogryposis multiplex congenita with cerebral and cerebellar atrophy.

    PubMed

    Lakhani, Shenela; Doan, Ryan; Almureikhi, Mariam; Partlow, Jennifer N; Al Saffar, Muna; Elsaid, Mahmoud F; Alaaraj, Nada; James Barkovich, A; Walsh, Christopher A; Ben-Omran, Tawfeg

    2017-05-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenital, the occurrence of multiple joint contractures at birth, can in some cases be accompanied by insufficient myelination of peripheral nerves, muscular hypotonia, reduced tendon reflexes, and respiratory insufficiency. Recently mutations in the CASPR/CNTN1 complex have been associated with similar severe phenotypes and CNTNAP1 gene mutations, causing loss of the CASPR protein, were shown to cause severe, prenatal onset arthrogryposis multiplex congenita in four unrelated families. Here we report a consanguineous Arab family from Qatar with three children having an early lethal form of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita and a novel frameshift mutation in CNTNAP1. We further expand the existing CNTNAP1-associated phenotype to include profound cerebral and cerebellar atrophy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Adrenal cortical and medullary imaging.

    PubMed

    Freitas, J E

    1995-07-01

    Adrenal disease can be manifested by endocrine dysfunction or anatomic abnormalities detected by cross-sectional imaging modalities. With the advent of newer and more reliable in vitro assays and a better understanding of the spectrum of adrenal pathology, the physician can now adopt a more accurate and cost-effective approach to the diagnosis of adrenal disease. Both functional and anatomic imaging modalities can play an important role in the evaluation of the incidental adrenal mass, the early detection of adrenal metastases, differentiation of the various causes of Cushings's syndrome, selection of patients for potentially curative surgery in primary aldosteronism and adrenal hyperandrogenism, and localization of pheochromocytomas and neuroblastomas. The usefulness of the adrenal cortical radiopharmaceutical, 131I-6-beta-iodomethylnorcholesterol (NP-59), and the adrenal medullary radiopharmaceuticals, 131I and 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), is detailed for these various clinical settings and the role of NP-59 and MIBG is contrasted to that of the cross-sectional modalities, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Incidental adrenal masses are common, but malignancies are few. Imaging studies select those patients who require a further evaluation by biopsy examination or adrenalectomy. In the hyperfunctioning endocrine states, such as Cushing's syndrome, primary aldosteronism, adrenal androgenism, and pheochromocytoma, correlation of biochemical findings with both functional and anatomic imaging is necessary to avoid inappropriate and ineffective surgical intervention, yet not miss an opportunity for curative resection. Lastly, MIBG and MRI are complementary in the detection and staging of neuroblastoma.

  18. [Contiguous gene deletion syndrome in Xp21: the association between glycerol kinase deficiency, congenital suprarenal hypoplasia and Duchenne's muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Pantoja-Martínez, J; Martínez-Castellano, F; Tarazona-Casany, I; Buesa-Ibáñez, E; Ardid-Encinar, M; Esparza-Sánchez, M A; Bonet-Arzo, J

    Complex glycerol kinase (GK) deficiency is a contiguous deletion of genes in Xp21 with loss of the locus for GK, for congenital adrenal hypoplasia (AHC) and/or for Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD). We report the case of a 7-year-old patient with this rare disease. Our patient was a full-term male, with normal gestation and delivery, and no relevant family history. At the age of 11 days he presented a clinical picture of salt loss with lethargy, vomiting, metabolic acidosis, hypoglycaemia, hyponatraemia and hyperpotassaemia. Fluid therapy and treatment with corticoids was established. The patient's condition developed with moderate mental retardation and progressive muscular weakness. In the physical examination, the skull and face were seen to be 'hourglass' shaped. Decompensations associated to infectious processes and fasting hypoglycaemia, hydroelectrolytic disorders and ketoacidosis are all frequent. Lab findings showed a drop in cortisol levels, elevation of muscle enzymes, 'pseudohypertriglyceridaemia' and raised levels of glycerol in plasma and urine. Karyotype and neuroimaging tests were normal. A myopathic pattern was observed in the electromyogram. The genetic study confirmed the deletion in Xp21 of the genes responsible for DMD, the GK deficit and AHC. Early identification of this disease makes it possible to foresee the acute metabolic decompensations and to establish suitable genetic counselling. CK and triglyceride counts should be performed in all male patients that present a suprarenal hypoplasia; if levels are high, then it is necessary to confirm the raised glycerol values and to carry out a confirmatory genetic study.

  19. CT demonstration of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, D.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1983-08-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage with subsequent adrenal insufficiency is a recognized complication of anticoagulant therapy. Because the clinical manifestations are often nonspecific, the antemortem diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage has been a difficult clinical problem. Computed tomography (CT) provides detailed images of the adrenal glands that are not possible with conventional imaging methods. The CT findings of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in an anticoagulated patient are reported.

  20. Left pulmonary artery hypoplasia presenting with unilateral hyperluscent lung.

    PubMed

    Sunavala, A J; Thacker, H P; Khann, J N

    2011-03-01

    Agenesis or hypoplasia of the right or left pulmonary arteries are among the rarest pulmonary artery anomalies with left sided anomalies being reported even less frequently. Pulmonary artery agenesis should be suspected in asymptomatic patients if a plain chest X-ray shows asymmetric lung fields, lung hypoplasia, or hyperinflation of the contralateral lung. It must be considered as a rare cause of recurrent lower respiratory tract infections in childhood and in subjects with a low threshold for or recurrent "High Altitude Pulmonary Edema".

  1. Lissencephaly with brainstem and cerebellar hypoplasia and congenital cataracts.

    PubMed

    Abumansour, Iman S; Wrogemann, Jens; Chudley, Albert E; Chodirker, Bernard N; Salman, Michael S

    2014-06-01

    Classical lissencephaly may be associated with cerebellar hypoplasia and when significant cerebellar abnormalities occur, defects in proteins encoded by TUBA1A, RELN, and very-low-density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR) genes have been reported. We present a neonate with a severe neurologic phenotype associated with hypotonia, oropharyngeal incoordination that required a gastric tube for feeding, intractable epilepsy, and congenital cataracts. Her brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed classical lissencephaly, ventriculomegaly, absent corpus callosum, globular and vertical hippocampi, and severe cerebellar and brainstem hypoplasia. She died at 6 weeks of age. No specific molecular diagnosis was made. This likely represents a previously undescribed genetic lissencephaly syndrome.

  2. Association of pulmonary artery agenesis and hypoplasia of the lung.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, Renato; Pisanti, Chiara; Pisanti, Antonello; Silberbach, Michael

    2006-09-01

    Pulmonary artery agenesis and hypoplasia of the homolateral lung occasionally occurs as an isolated lesion, but more often has associated congenital cardiac anomalies. We present a case where pulmonary artery agenesis was the sole lesion in an asymptomatic child. Pulmonary artery agenesis should be suspected in asymptomatic patients if a plain chest X-ray shows asymmetric lung fields, lung hypoplasia, or hyperinflation of the contralateral lung. Echocardiography is the best tool to establish the diagnosis. In our opinion, invasive procedures, such as cardiac catheterization, may be postponed if there is no echocardiographic evidence of pulmonary hypertension.

  3. Trigeminal hypoplasia due to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia: A new entity

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Abhishek; Gupta, Prakhar; Haroon, Mohammad; Shah, Gaurav; Gupta, Gagan; Khalid, Mohd.

    2015-01-01

    The term “vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia” refers to anomalous dilatation of the intracranial arteries associated with elongation or tortuosity of the affected vessels. The etiology of the disease is unknown and is usually detected incidentally. The predominant clinical manifestations arise due to the mass effect of the dilated vessels and may include cranial nerve compression, extrinsic aqueductal compression, motor and sensory disturbances. Trigeminal hypoplasia is a very uncommon condition, usually described in association with Goldenhar-Gorlin syndrome and has not yet been attributed to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia. The current case report highlights this rare association of trigeminal nerve hypoplasia and vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia, leading to hemifacial and corneal anesthesia. PMID:26167222

  4. Mutations of GPR126 Are Responsible for Severe Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita

    PubMed Central

    Ravenscroft, Gianina; Nolent, Flora; Rajagopalan, Sulekha; Meireles, Ana M.; Paavola, Kevin J.; Gaillard, Dominique; Alanio, Elisabeth; Buckland, Michael; Arbuckle, Susan; Krivanek, Michael; Maluenda, Jérome; Pannell, Stephen; Gooding, Rebecca; Ong, Royston W.; Allcock, Richard J.; Carvalho, Ellaine D.F.; Carvalho, Maria D.F.; Kok, Fernando; Talbot, William S.; Melki, Judith; Laing, Nigel G.

    2015-01-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita is defined by the presence of contractures across two or more major joints and results from reduced or absent fetal movement. Here, we present three consanguineous families affected by lethal arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. By whole-exome or targeted exome sequencing, it was shown that the probands each harbored a different homozygous mutation (one missense, one nonsense, and one frameshift mutation) in GPR126. GPR126 encodes G-protein-coupled receptor 126, which has been shown to be essential for myelination of axons in the peripheral nervous system in fish and mice. A previous study reported that Gpr126−/− mice have a lethal arthrogryposis phenotype. We have shown that the peripheral nerves in affected individuals from one family lack myelin basic protein, suggesting that this disease in affected individuals is due to defective myelination of the peripheral axons during fetal development. Previous work has suggested that autoproteolytic cleavage is important for activating GPR126 signaling, and our biochemical assays indicated that the missense substitution (p.Val769Glu [c.2306T>A]) impairs autoproteolytic cleavage of GPR126. Our data indicate that GPR126 is critical for myelination of peripheral nerves in humans. This study adds to the literature implicating defective axoglial function as a key cause of severe arthrogryposis multiplex congenita and suggests that GPR126 mutations should be investigated in individuals affected by this disorder. PMID:26004201

  5. Mutations of GPR126 are responsible for severe arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Ravenscroft, Gianina; Nolent, Flora; Rajagopalan, Sulekha; Meireles, Ana M; Paavola, Kevin J; Gaillard, Dominique; Alanio, Elisabeth; Buckland, Michael; Arbuckle, Susan; Krivanek, Michael; Maluenda, Jérome; Pannell, Stephen; Gooding, Rebecca; Ong, Royston W; Allcock, Richard J; Carvalho, Ellaine D F; Carvalho, Maria D F; Kok, Fernando; Talbot, William S; Melki, Judith; Laing, Nigel G

    2015-06-04

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita is defined by the presence of contractures across two or more major joints and results from reduced or absent fetal movement. Here, we present three consanguineous families affected by lethal arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. By whole-exome or targeted exome sequencing, it was shown that the probands each harbored a different homozygous mutation (one missense, one nonsense, and one frameshift mutation) in GPR126. GPR126 encodes G-protein-coupled receptor 126, which has been shown to be essential for myelination of axons in the peripheral nervous system in fish and mice. A previous study reported that Gpr126(-/-) mice have a lethal arthrogryposis phenotype. We have shown that the peripheral nerves in affected individuals from one family lack myelin basic protein, suggesting that this disease in affected individuals is due to defective myelination of the peripheral axons during fetal development. Previous work has suggested that autoproteolytic cleavage is important for activating GPR126 signaling, and our biochemical assays indicated that the missense substitution (p.Val769Glu [c.2306T>A]) impairs autoproteolytic cleavage of GPR126. Our data indicate that GPR126 is critical for myelination of peripheral nerves in humans. This study adds to the literature implicating defective axoglial function as a key cause of severe arthrogryposis multiplex congenita and suggests that GPR126 mutations should be investigated in individuals affected by this disorder.

  6. Myotonia congenita-associated mutations in chloride channel-1 affect zebrafish body wave swimming kinematics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wei; Tian, Jing; Burgunder, Jean-Marc; Hunziker, Walter; Eng, How-Lung

    2014-01-01

    Myotonia congenita is a human muscle disorder caused by mutations in CLCN1, which encodes human chloride channel 1 (CLCN1). Zebrafish is becoming an increasingly useful model for human diseases, including muscle disorders. In this study, we generated transgenic zebrafish expressing, under the control of a muscle specific promoter, human CLCN1 carrying mutations that have been identified in human patients suffering from myotonia congenita. We developed video analytic tools that are able to provide precise quantitative measurements of movement abnormalities in order to analyse the effect of these CLCN1 mutations on adult transgenic zebrafish swimming. Two new parameters for body-wave kinematics of swimming reveal changes in body curvature and tail offset in transgenic zebrafish expressing the disease-associated CLCN1 mutants, presumably due to their effect on muscle function. The capability of the developed video analytic tool to distinguish wild-type from transgenic zebrafish could provide a useful asset to screen for compounds that reverse the disease phenotype, and may be applicable to other movement disorders besides myotonia congenita.

  7. A case of pachyonychia congenita with unusual manifestations: an unusual type or a new syndrome?

    PubMed

    Gönül, Müzeyyen; Gül, Ülker; Kılıç, Arzu; Soylu, Seçil; Koçak, Oğuzhan; Demiriz, Murat

    2015-03-01

    A 30-year-old man presented with lesions on his oral mucosa and soles. There were no similar complaints in his family members. The dermatological examination revealed follicular hyperkeratosis on his trunk and upper extremities and flesh-colored, firm cystic lesions on his axillae. He had focal, painful, hyperkeratotic areas sited particularly on both his soles and palms. In addition to these, leukokeratosis and ulcerative areas on buccal, labial mucosa, tongue, and at corners of the mouth, and complete loss of teeth was observed. The proximal layering was revealed on all of his nails. The laboratory investigations produced normal results except the deficiency of immunoglobulin A. The psychiatric examination revealed mild mental retardation. Keratin gene (KRT6a, KRT6b, KRT16, and KRT17) mutations for pachyonychia congenita were negative. He got removable dental prosthesis because of inadequate alimentation. Squamous cell cancer developed on lower lip mucosa during follow-up. We present an individual who had different nail dystrophy, epidermal cysts, mental retardation, blepharitis, complete loss of teeth, and negative keratin gene mutations for pachyonychia congenita and developed squamous cell cancer on the oral leukokeratosis lesions. We think that the present case may be an unusual new type of pachyonychia congenita. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  8. Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (lipoid CAH) is the most fatal form of CAH, as it disrupts adrenal and gonadal steroidogenesis. Most cases of lipoid CAH are caused by recessive mutations in the gene encoding steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Affected patients typically present with signs of severe adrenal failure in early infancy and 46,XY genetic males are phenotypic females due to disrupted testicular androgen secretion. The StAR p.Q258X mutation accounts for about 70% of affected alleles in most patients of Japanese and Korean ancestry. However, it is more prevalent (92.3%) in the Korean population. Recently, some patients have been showed that they had late and mild clinical findings. These cases and studies constitute a new entity of 'nonclassic lipoid CAH'. The cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme, P450scc (CYP11A1), plays an essential role converting cholesterol to pregnenolone. Although progesterone production from the fetally derived placenta is necessary to maintain a pregnancy to term, some patients with P450scc mutations have recently been reported. P450scc mutations can also cause lipoid CAH and establish a recently recognized human endocrine disorder. PMID:25654062

  9. Radioguided Adrenal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Deus, Javier; Millera, Alfonso; Andrés, Alejandro; Prats, Enrique; Gil, Ismael; Suarez, Manuel; Salcini, José L.; Lahoz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The laparoscopic adrenalectomy is considered as the procedure of choice for the treatment of adrenal hyperplasia and tumor lesions. However, some special situations may limit the use of this method due to the difficulty to locate the gland and perform the lesion excision. We analyze 2 patients of a left adrenal tumor, explaining how they have overcome the difficulties in both situations. The first case was a patient with a history of intra-abdominal surgery and the other patient suffered from severe obesity. We performed with the use of the gamma probe, and the 2 cases, was of great help to access and glandular localization. The help of gamma probe test was achieved in the surgical bed, that removal was complete. The use of the portable gamma probe facilitated the access to the left adrenal gland as well as conducting the glandular excision without delay, despite the difficulties due to the intra abdominal surgery caused by the previous surgery, and in the case of severe obesity. PMID:26426608

  10. Development of adrenal cortex zonation.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yewei; Lerario, Antonio M; Rainey, William; Hammer, Gary D

    2015-06-01

    The human adult adrenal cortex is composed of the zona glomerulosa (zG), zona fasciculata (zF), and zona reticularis (zR), which are responsible for production of mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids, and adrenal androgens, respectively. The final completion of cortical zonation in humans does not occur until puberty with the establishment of the zR and its production of adrenal androgens; a process called adrenarche. The maintenance of the adrenal cortex involves the centripetal displacement and differentiation of peripheral Sonic hedgehog-positive progenitors cells into zG cells that later transition to zF cells and subsequently zR cells.

  11. [Sonography of the adrenal glands].

    PubMed

    Rüeger, R

    2005-03-02

    In the abdominal ultrasonography, the representation of normal adrenal glands is frequently problematic, also for experienced practitioners in ultrasonography. During a seminary at the congress of the SGUM in Davos, in June 2004, it was specially entered to this problematic by anatomical illustrations and live demonstrations. These statements will be summarized in the following article. Also, the technics of examination of the adrenal glands will be explained, especially in comparison to anatomical cut-preparations. It will be entered to particular pathological statements of the adrenal glands. The proceeding will be described by the localisation of accidentally detected tumours of adrenal glands.

  12. Adrenal crisis secondary to bilateral adrenal haemorrhage after hemicolectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Venessa H M; Kabir, Shahrir; Ip, Julian C Y

    2016-01-01

    Summary Adrenal haemorrhage is a rare cause of adrenal crisis, which requires rapid diagnosis, prompt initiation of parenteral hydrocortisone and haemodynamic monitoring to avoid hypotensive crises. We herein describe a case of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage after hemicolectomy in a 93-year-old female with high-grade colonic adenocarcinoma. This patient’s post-operative recovery was complicated by an acute hypotensive episode, hypoglycaemia and syncope, and subsequent computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen revealed bilateral adrenal haemorrhage. Given her labile blood pressure, intravenous hydrocortisone was commenced with rapid improvement of blood pressure, which had incompletely responded with fluids. A provisional diagnosis of hypocortisolism was made. Initial heparin-induced thrombocytopenic screen (HITTS) was positive, but platelet count and coagulation profile were both normal. The patient suffered a concurrent transient ischaemic attack with no neurological deficits. She was discharged on a reducing dose of oral steroids with normal serum cortisol levels at the time of discharge. She and her family were educated about lifelong steroids and the use of parenteral steroids should a hypoadrenal crisis eventuate. Learning points: Adrenal haemorrhage is a rare cause of hypoadrenalism, and thus requires prompt diagnosis and management to prevent death from primary adrenocortical insufficiency. Mechanisms of adrenal haemorrhage include reduced adrenal vascular bed capillary resistance, adrenal vein thrombosis, catecholamine-related increased adrenal blood flow and adrenal vein spasm. Standard diagnostic assessment is a non-contrast CT abdomen. Intravenous hydrocortisone and intravenous substitution of fluids are the initial management. A formal diagnosis of primary adrenal insufficiency should never delay treatment, but should be made afterwards. PMID:27855238

  13. Traumatic and non-traumatic adrenal emergencies.

    PubMed

    Chernyak, Victoria; Patlas, Michael N; Menias, Christine O; Soto, Jorge A; Kielar, Ania Z; Rozenblit, Alla M; Romano, Luigia; Katz, Douglas S

    2015-12-01

    Multiple traumatic and non-traumatic adrenal emergencies are occasionally encountered during the cross-sectional imaging of emergency department patients. Traumatic adrenal hematomas are markers of severe polytrauma, and can be easily overlooked due to multiple concomitant injuries. Patients with non-traumatic adrenal emergencies usually present to an emergency department with a non-specific clinical picture. The detection and management of adrenal emergencies is based on cross-sectional imaging. Adrenal hemorrhage, adrenal infection, or rupture of adrenal neoplasm require immediate detection to avoid dire consequences. More often however, adrenal emergencies are detected incidentally in patients being investigated for non-specific acute abdominal pain. A high index of suspicion is required for the establishment of timely diagnosis and to avert potentially life-threatening complications. We describe cross-sectional imaging findings in patients with traumatic and non-traumatic adrenal hemorrhage, adrenal infarctions, adrenal infections, and complications of adrenal masses.

  14. [Optic nerve hypoplasia and septo-optic dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Zimmermann-Paiz, Martín A; Fang-Sung, Jen Wen

    2009-12-01

    The septo-optic dysplasia or De Morsier syndrome is an unusual disorder of the embryonic development. It consists of hypoplasia in one or both optic nerves, midline cerebral malformations and hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction, which is inconstant. The present work describes the findings of 9 patients with septo-optic dysplasia.

  15. Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1: new leads for an earlier diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Salman, Michael S; Blaser, Susan; Buncic, J Raymond; Westall, Carol A; Héon, Elise; Becker, Laurence

    2003-03-01

    Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1 is a rare disease characterized by pontocerebellar hypoplasia and anterior horn cell degeneration. The oldest reported child died at the age of 26 months. Two siblings were diagnosed with pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1 after the death of the second sibling at 40 months of age from respiratory failure and the unexpected finding of anterior horn cell degeneration on her autopsy. The older sibling was a boy who was labeled as having cerebral palsy. He died at 14 months of age from pneumonia following a clinical course similar to his sister's, who was born 5 years after his death. Both siblings had significant global developmental delay with axial and peripheral hypotonia initially. Peripheral hypertonia with brisk reflexes developed later but were absent prior to death. Extensive investigations in the second sibling ruled out known metabolic (including congenital disorders of glycosylation) and mitochondrial diseases using skin fibroblast cultures and enzyme analysis. Genetic testing for Friedreich's ataxia; neuropathy, ataxia, and retinitis pigmentosa (NARP); spinal muscular atrophy; and spinocerebellar ataxia type 1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8 gene abnormalities was negative. The elecroretinogram showed a previously unreported finding of abnormal and progressive rod/cone response. Our cases provide clinical and previously unreported electroretinographic evidence for neurodegeneration in pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 1 and call for the expansion of the disease phenotype.

  16. Adrenal glands transabdominal ultrasonography - pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Chira, Romeo Ioan; Chira, Alexandra; Manzat-Saplacan, Roberta Maria; Nagy, Georgiana; Valea, Ana; Silaghi, Alina Cristina; Mircea, Petru Adrian; Valean, Simona

    2017-05-03

    Adrenal gland ultrasonography is one of the corner stones of the abdominal ultrasonography examination for many medical specialties. The adrenal areas can be easily overlooked though adrenal gland pathology is diverse. We present the normal aspects and various transabdominal ultrasonography findings of the adrenal glands, both common and rare. Even though ultrasound examination is operator and patient dependent, we consider the examination of the adrenal glands very important, due to relatively frequent incidental detection of an adrenal mass.

  17. Adrenal Histoplasmosis in Immunocompetent Patients Presenting as Adrenal Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Gajendra, Smeeta; Sharma, Rashi; Goel, Shalini; Goel, Ruchika; Lipi, Lipika; Sarin, Hemanti; Guleria, Mridula; Sachdev, Ritesh

    2016-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is an infectious disease caused by the dimorphic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum, endemic in central and eastern states of United States, South America and Africa. India is considered to be non-endemic area for histoplasmosis. Disseminated histoplasmosis may affect almost all systems. Disseminated histoplasmosis with asymptomatic adrenal involvement has been described in immunocompromised patients; whereas isolated adrenal involvement with adrenal insufficiency as the presenting manifestation of the disease is rare. Twelve patients from a non-endemic area with adrenal histoplasmosis, who were immunocompetent and diagnosed as adrenal histoplasmosis by cytology/histopathology between January 2012 to December 2014 were studied. 18F-FDG PET/CT (fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography) was used to assess the extent of involvement. There were a total of 12 immunocompetent males (mean age: 56.9 years). Ten patients had bilateral adrenal involvement and two had a unilateral left adrenal mass. All the patients had histopathologically/cytologically proven adrenal histoplasmosis. Two patients had simultaneous histoplasmosis of other sites, one in the epiglottis and the other in the alveolus. 18F-FDG PET/CT was performed in 10 patients showing high FDG uptake in the adrenals. All these patients received Amphotericin B and/or Itraconazole treatment that led to symptomatic improvement. A diagnosis of invasive fungal infection requires a high index of suspicion, especially in immunocompetent patients who present with nonspecific symptoms, clinical signs, laboratory and radiological features that can resemble adrenal neoplasms. Clinical specimens must be sent for cytopathology/histopathology together with fungal culture for a definite diagnosis and appropriate management.

  18. [Adrenal carcinoma induced hypoglycemia].

    PubMed

    Soutelo, Jimena; Saban, Melina; Borghi Torzillo, Florencia; Lutfi, Ruben; Leal Reyna, Mariela

    2013-01-01

    Adrenal carcinoma is a rare malignancy of poor prognosis. The most common clinical presentation is secondary to hormone production, while the development of symptomatic hypoglycemia is exceptional. We report the case of a 37 year old-woman admitted to hospital with severe hypoglycemia, hypertension, hypokalemia and amenorrhea. In the laboratory we found hypoglycemia, with low insulin levels, and androgen levels in tumor range. CT of abdomen and pelvis showed a heterogeneous lesion of solid appearance without a cleavage plane relative to liver parenchyma, and intense contrast enhancement. Retroperitoneal mass was removed, and the patient evolved without complications, blood glucose and potassium were normalized, blood pressure stabilized and menstrual cycles recovered.

  19. Aplasia Cutis Congenita of the Scalp, Composite Type: The Criticality and Inseparability of Neurosurgical and Plastic Surgical Management.

    PubMed

    Winston, Ken R; Ketch, Lawrence L

    2016-01-01

    The object of this report is to review the management of patients having the composite type of aplasia cutis congenita in the context of the relevant literature on this condition. Clinical records, neuroimaging and photographic documentation of identified cases of composite type aplasia cutis congenita, with a comprehensive review of the literature, are the material basis of this report. Two neonates with composite type aplasia cutis congenita are described as examples of this disorder, and their management, including complications, is discussed. Both had satisfactory outcomes. Early aggressive surgical management with scalp rotation flaps has a low rate of complications, provides satisfactory functional and esthetic outcome, minimizes hospital stays, and should provide cost-effective care by reduction of the time to secure wound closure. Most bony defects, even large ones, commonly ossify completely. Optimal case management requires a synchronized neurosurgical and plastic surgical team. Intuitive nonsurgical and surgical approaches by the inexperienced can be hazardous. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. [Lumbar pain and bilateral adrenal masses].

    PubMed

    García, Elena; Sánchez, Raquel; Martínez, Guillermo; Bernal, Carmen; Calatayud, M; Partida, M; Hawkins, Federico

    2009-05-01

    Many problems may arise when defining whether adrenal lesions are primary to the adrenal glands or represent other tissue, whether they are benign or malignant and whether they are functioning or nonfunctioning. Adrenal imaging complements the clinical and hormonal evaluation of these patients. We present a patient with lumbar pain and bilateral adrenal masses.

  1. Fatal Hemorrhagic Gastrointestinal Angioectasia after Bone Marrow Transplantation for Dyskeratosis Congenita.

    PubMed

    Imai, Jin; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Yoshikawa, Marie; Dekiden, Makiko; Nakae, Hirohiko; Nakahara, Fumio; Tsuda, Shingo; Mizukami, Hajime; Koike, Jun; Igarashi, Muneki; Yabe, Hiromasa; Mine, Tetsuya

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is a rare inherited disease in which the telomere complex cannot be maintained. Shortened telomeres can cause a number of clinical conditions. We herein report a case of unrelated bone marrow transplantation due to aplastic anemia associated with DC. The patient died of uncontrollable refractory intestinal bleeding. Three cases of DC with life-threatening hemorrhaging after transplantation have been reported; however, the bleeding origin could not be determined. Our case is the only patient in which a gastrointestinal bleeding point, jejunal multiple angioectasia, was determined.

  2. Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita with callosal agenesis and dentato-olivary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiaki; Hayashi, Masaharu; Miyazono, Yayoi; Shimogama, Tatsuro; Ohno, Kousaku

    2006-05-01

    We report the autopsy case of a boy with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, associated with callosal agenesis and dentato-olivary dysplasia. The patient manifested with dysmorphic facial features and suffered from intractable epilepsy during the neonatal period. These sets of complications suggest that a common molecular mechanism may be involved in the development of corpus callosum and the folding of the dentate and inferior olivary nuclei. Deep brain structures, including the brainstem and the cerebellum, may be involved in the pathophysiology of symptomatic generalized epilepsy. The differential diagnoses for the clinical and pathological characteristics of this patient are discussed.

  3. Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. Search for prenatal factors in 66 sporadic cases.

    PubMed Central

    Wynne-Davies, R; Lloyd-Roberts, G C

    1976-01-01

    In a family and epidemiological survey of 66 cases of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita all cases were found to be sporadic and no family association with clubfoot, congenital dislocation of the hip, or hereditary neuromuscular disease was found. The mothers were significantly older than average. Oligohydramnios was noted in only one-third of cases but many other complications of pregnancy, including probable attempts at abortion, had occurred. It is likely that most cases of arthrogryposis are nongenetic and result from a defective intrauterine environment, whether hormonal, vascular, mechanical, or possibly infective. Images FIG. PMID:962372

  4. Skewed X-chromosome inactivation in female carriers of dyskeratosis congenita

    SciTech Connect

    Devriendt, K.; Matthijs, G.; Legius, E.

    1997-03-01

    In this study, we report on a family with X-linked dyskeratosis congenita (DC). Linkage analysis with markers in the factor VIII gene at Xq28 yielded a LOD score of 2 at a recombination of 0. Clinical manifestations of DC, such as skin lesions following the Blaschko lines, were present in two obligate carrier females. Highly skewed X inactivation was observed in white blood cells, cultured skin fibroblasts, and buccal mucosa from female carriers of DC in this family. This suggests a critical role for the DC gene in bone marrow-cell and fibroblast-cell proliferation. 23 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Fatal Hemorrhagic Gastrointestinal Angioectasia after Bone Marrow Transplantation for Dyskeratosis Congenita

    PubMed Central

    Imai, Jin; Suzuki, Takayoshi; Yoshikawa, Marie; Dekiden, Makiko; Nakae, Hirohiko; Nakahara, Fumio; Tsuda, Shingo; Mizukami, Hajime; Koike, Jun; Igarashi, Muneki; Yabe, Hiromasa; Mine, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is a rare inherited disease in which the telomere complex cannot be maintained. Shortened telomeres can cause a number of clinical conditions. We herein report a case of unrelated bone marrow transplantation due to aplastic anemia associated with DC. The patient died of uncontrollable refractory intestinal bleeding. Three cases of DC with life-threatening hemorrhaging after transplantation have been reported; however, the bleeding origin could not be determined. Our case is the only patient in which a gastrointestinal bleeding point, jejunal multiple angioectasia, was determined. PMID:27904106

  6. [Analgesia for labour and delivery in a parturient with paramytonia congenita].

    PubMed

    Frossard, B; Combret, C; Benhamou, D

    2013-05-01

    A patient presenting with paramyotonia congenita (Eulenburg's paramyotonia) was seen at the preanaesthetic visit during pregnancy. The underlying disease was known for years. Analysis of the literature and advice taken from specialists emphasized the safe use of regional anaesthesia and analgesia which was indeed used for labour and delivery without any complication. By contrast, the limited information available on the use of general anaesthesia suggests the risks associated with the use of succinylcholine and possibly with halogenated agents. Additional and useful factors that may limit the occurrence of myotonic crises such as maintenance of normal temperature and plasma potassium concentration, should be undertaken simultaneously. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  7. Vertically transmitted hypoplasia of the abdominal wall musculature.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yuin-Chew; Bird, Lynne M

    2004-01-01

    The prune belly syndrome (OMIM 100100) is an association of bladder dilation with hypoplasia of the abdominal wall muscles. This malformation sequence is due to early urethral obstruction. We report a family with abdominal wall muscular hypoplasia as an isolated defect, not associated with the urethral obstruction sequence. The proband is a q3-year-old male who presented with abdominal wall laxity and severe constipation. His mother, maternal grandmother and younger brother had varying degrees of abdominal wall muscular deficiency and constipation. His mother's condition was aggravated by her 2 pregnancies. This family shows vertical transmission (compatible with autosomal dominant or mitochondrial inheritance) of the abdominal phenotype of prune belly sequence without any evidence of urinary tract or renal pathology. The expression in the sons may remain incomplete because abdominal distention due to pregnancy will not occur.

  8. [Reconstructive surgery of Blauth type III hypoplasia of the thumb].

    PubMed

    Foucher, G; Gazarian, A; Pajardi, G

    1999-01-01

    Thumb hypoplasia type III according to Blauth remains a rare congenital malformation. Recently Manske has promoted reconstruction versus pollicization in the sub-type IIIA where a first carpometacarpal joint is present. However we felt that pollicization is the solution for sub-type IIB where the basal joint is absent. We have reviewed 14 cases of thumb hypoplasia type III, four of them being type IIIB. After performing a first step with a free vascularized second metatarso-phalangeal joint transfer, the secondary steps were identical in both sub-groups. After a mean follow up of five years, no great difference was found in the two sub-groups and basal stability was even better in type IIIB. However the results were functionally and cosmetically inferior to the ones observed after pollicization. When the relatives refuse pollicization or the patient consults late for functional improvement, reconstruction remains worthwhile.

  9. Aesthetic approach for anterior teeth with enamel hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Martos, Josué; Gewehr, Andréa; Paim, Emanuele

    2012-01-01

    Enamel hypoplasia is a developmental defect of the enamel that is produced by a disturbance in the formation of the organic enamel matrix, clinically visible as enamel defects. Disorders that occur during the stages of enamel development and maturation reduce the amount or thickness of the enamel, resulting in white spots, tiny grooves, depressions and fissures in the enamel surface. The complexity and intensity of the dental deformity lesions will conduct the ideal treatment-associating conservative techniques. This article presents a case report of a restorative treatment of enamel hypoplasia using hybrid composite resin to mask color alteration and enamel defects. An aesthetic appearance that respects the tooth polychromatic and the self-esteem of the patient can be achieved with this approach. PMID:22629075

  10. Hypoplastic area method for analyzing dental enamel hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ensor, B E; Irish, J D

    1995-12-01

    Most analyses of dental enamel hypoplasia compare frequencies of disturbed tooth types, which do not account for variability in the area of affected enamel. An alternate methodology, hypoplastic area, is presented here that accounts for this variability by combining acute and continuous enamel hypoplasia into an interval-level variable. The method compares samples based on individuals, by multiple tooth type variables, or by a single value rather than by tooth types. Use of the hypoplastic area method is illustrated by analyzing human skeletal dentitions in three archaeological samples: Meroitic Nubians from Semna South, Sudan; Anasazi from Navajo Reservoir, New Mexico; and Mogollon from Grasshopper Pueblo, Arizona. Both univariate and multivariate statistical tests are employed to assess variation in defects between individuals and samples. By incorporating measurements of continuous defects, the hypoplastic area method provides information beyond that of frequency data in comparing levels of stress. Flexibility of the method is also discussed.

  11. Unilateral primary pulmonary agenesis and hypoplasia in monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Alsaadi, Muslim; Al Muqhem, Badr; Boukai, A; Iqbal, Shaikh M

    2012-01-01

    We describe 10-month-old identical female twin infants, one with primary left-sided pulmonary agenesis and the other with primary left-sided pulmonary hypoplasia. They came to our outpatient clinic complaining of persistent dry cough. The clinical examination revealed decreased air entry over the left hemithorax. Chest x-rays showed complete left-sided radio-opacity in both the twins. The chest computed tomography scan with contrast confirmed the diagnoses of left-sided pulmonary agenesis (twin A) and left-sided hypoplasia (twin B). No other associated congenital anomaly was noted in either of the twins. To our knowledge, such a condition in live monozygotic twins has not been previously reported in published studies.

  12. Lung hypoplasia and patellar agenesis in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, P; Deb, J; Deb, R; Chakrabarti, S

    2009-12-01

    A 22-year-old male patient was admitted with severe cough associated with purulent expectoration, left-sided chest pain and breathlessness. There was a history of recurrent respiratory ailments since childhood. The patient appeared younger than his chronological age. His face and ears were both dysmorphic. Clinically, the patient was diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). Computed tomography of the thoracic region revealed hypoplasia of the left lung and hyperplasia of the right lung. Both the patellae were absent. However, ultrasonography of his abdomen, echocardiography and other routine blood and urine examination showed no gross abnormalities. Although other respiratory tract abnormalities with EDS are not uncommon, unilateral lung hypoplasia and patellar agenesis in EDS make this case unique.

  13. Becker Nevus Syndrome Presented with Ipsilateral Breast Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Pektas, Suzan Demir; Akoglu, Gulsen; Metin, Ahmet; Adiyaman, Nuran Sungu; Demirseren, Mustafa Erol

    2014-01-01

    Becker nevus syndrome (BNS) is a rare epidermal nevus syndrome characterized with Becker nevus and ipsilateral breast gland hypoplasia or other skin, skeletal and/or muscle tissue disorders. A 24-year-old woman presented with brown, irregular bordered patch with a diameter of approximately 10 cm which consisted of several small macules on the left breast skin. The ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed left breast hypoplasia. Histopathological examination demonstrated minimal acanthosis, papillomatosis, increase in basal layer melanin and hypertrophy of the erector pili muscle. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for androgen in the epidermis, dermal stromal cells and skin appendages. Depending on the clinical and histopathological findings, the patient was diagnosed as BNS. Diagnosis of BNS needs careful examination of pigmented macules and patches since non-hairy BN may be easily overlooked. Patients with BN should be evaluated for associated abnormalities of BNS, in which the severity and extend of ectodermal involvement may differ from patient to other. PMID:25484431

  14. Adrenal involvement in non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Williamson, B.R.J.

    1983-08-01

    Adrenal masses are described in seven cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a series of 173 patients. In all seven patients the lymphoma was diffuse rather than nodular. Three patients had adrenal masses at the time of presentation, whereas in four cases the adrenal gland was a site of tumor recurrence after therapy. Three patients had simultaneous bilateral adrenal involvement by tumor. No characteristic features were recognized that might have distinguished these tumors from other adrenal masses. Appropriate therapy successfully resolved the adrenal masses in all but one case. The latter patient was the only one with evidence of adrenal insufficiency.

  15. Tetralogy of fallot with left heart hypoplasia, total anomalous pulmonary venous return, and right lung hypoplasia: role of magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Festa, P; Lamia, A-A; Murzi, B; Bini, M R

    2005-01-01

    We report a rare case of tetralogy of Fallot with total anomalous pulmonary venous return, left heart hypoplasia, right lung hypoplasia, and left ocular-mandibular synchinesia (Marcus-Gunn phenomenon), correctly diagnosed by cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging and successfully operated by modified Glenn anastomosis.

  16. Laparoendoscopic single site adrenal surgery.

    PubMed

    Han, Deok Hyun; Lim, Meng Shi; Seo, Joo Wan; Jeong, Byong Chang; Rha, Koong Ho

    2012-04-01

    Laparoscopic adrenal surgery is a standard procedure for the management of benign adrenal pathology and small malignant tumors. There has been an increasing interest over the last few years in the use of laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS). From recent literatures, LESS adrenalectomy was demonstrated that this technique was safe and feasible despite the relatively difficult anatomical location of the adrenal gland. We reviewed the surgical techniques and outcomes of LESS adrenalectomy including robot-assisted approach and gave an overview of the current role of LESS in adrenalectomy.

  17. [Hormonal evaluation of adrenal incidentalomas].

    PubMed

    Le Loupp, Anne-Gaëlle; Cariou, Bertrand; Drui, Delphine; Graveline, Nolwenn; Masson, Damien; Bach-Ngohou, Kalyane

    2014-01-01

    Imaging technological advances and widespread use of abdominal imaging have led to the identification of an increasing number of adrenal incidentalomas in the last decades. Causes of these adrenal masses are multiple, but the most common etiology is the non-functional adenoma. Although in most cases, these masses are benign and non-functional, clinicians have to perform biochemical testing for subclinical cushing's syndrome, pheochromocytoma or primary hyperaldosteronism. This screening is essential for their etiological diagnosis and therapeutic management. We report in this article the biological approach to detect secretory activity of adrenal incidentalomas and the diagnostic accuracy of the biochemical tests used.

  18. Alar Pinning in Rigid External Distraction for Midfacial Hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jenny L; Woo, Albert S

    2017-09-01

    Distraction osteogenesis with a rigid external distractor is a widely accepted treatment for midfacial hypoplasia. In this study, the authors introduce the utilization of alar pinning with the external halo distractor for maxillary advancement, in place of an oral splint. A retrospective chart review was conducted of 7 patients who successfully underwent distraction osteogenesis using the alar pinning technique. Midfacial hypoplasia was secondary to Crouzon syndrome (n = 4), Apert syndrome (n = 1), Pfeiffer syndrome (n = 1), or bacterial meningitis (n = 1). Three patients were managed with monobloc osteotomies, 2 with Le Fort III osteotomies, 1 with Le Fort III osteotomy and frontoorbital advancement, and 1 with Le Fort I osteotomy alone. Patient charts were analyzed for postoperative course and complications relating to the alar pins. Two patients had minor complications specifically related to the alar pins. One patient had concern for a mild skin infection at a pin site that resolved with oral antibiotics. The other patient had loosening of an alar pin, which did not require operative management. Retrospective chart review indicated that all patients were pleased with their results from the distraction, and no patients opted for further advancement. Utilization of alar pin sites for external distraction is a feasible and reasonable option for treatment of midfacial hypoplasia involving a Le Fort osteotomy or monobloc procedure. Fixation sites within the alar crease minimize the visibility of pin site scars and eliminate the need for a custom-made oral splint, which prevents usage of the upper dentition and frequently requires consulting a dentist or orthodontist for fabrication. Alar pinning with an external halo distraction system for management of midfacial hypoplasia has minimal complications and is an alternative to using a custom-made oral splint.

  19. Esophageal squamous papillomas with focal dermal hypoplasia and eosinophilic esophagitis

    PubMed Central

    Pasman, Eric A; Heifert, Theresa A; Nylund, Cade M

    2017-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH) is a rare disorder of the mesodermal and ectodermal tissues. Here we present an eight-year-old female known to have FDH who presents with poor weight gain and dysphagia. She was diagnosed with multiple esophageal papillomas and eosinophilic esophagitis. She was successfully treated with argon plasma coagulation and ingested fluticasone propionate, which has not been described previously in a child. PMID:28405153

  20. Focal dermal hypoplasia: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Christiana; de Oliveira Lira Ortega, Adriana; Guimarães, Antônio Sérgio; Gonçalves-Bittar, Daniela; Bönecker, Marcelo; Ciamponi, Ana Lídia

    2011-08-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH), also known as Goltz-Gorlin syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disease affecting tissues derived from the ectoderm and mesoderm. Knowledge and early diagnosis of the craniofacial alterations commonly found in patients with FDH provide oral health care professionals with effective preventive and therapeutic tools. This article aims to review the craniofacial characteristics present in FDH and the main systemic manifestations that have implications for dental management, while presenting a new case of the syndrome with novel oral findings.

  1. Foetal presentation of cartilage hair hypoplasia with extensive granulomatous inflammation.

    PubMed

    Crahes, Marie; Saugier-Veber, Pascale; Patrier, Sophie; Aziz, Moutaz; Pirot, Nathalie; Brasseur-Daudruy, Marie; Layet, Valérie; Frébourg, Thierry; Laquerrière, Annie

    2013-07-01

    Cartilage-hair-hypoplasia is a rare autosomal recessive metaphyseal dysplasia due to RMRP (the RNA component of the RNase MRP ribonuclease mitochondrial RNA processing complex) gene mutations. So far, about 100 mutations have been reported in the promoter and the transcribed regions. Clinical characteristics include short-limbed short stature, sparse hair and defective cell-mediated immunity. We report herein the antenatal presentation of a female foetus, in whom CHH was suspected from 23 weeks' gestation, leading to a medical termination of the pregnancy at 34 weeks gestation, and thereafter confirmed by morphological and molecular studies. Post-mortem examination confirmed short stature and limbs, and revealed thymic hypoplasia associated with severe CD4 T-cell immunodeficiency along with extensive non caseating epithelioid granulomas in almost all organs, which to our knowledge has been described only in five cases. Molecular studies evidenced on one allele the most frequently reported founder mutation NR_003051: g.70A>G, which is present in 92% of Finnish patients with Cartilage Hair Hypoplasia. On the second allele, a novel mutation consisting of a 10 nucleotide insertion at position -18 of the promoter region of the RMRP gene (M29916.1:g.726_727insCTCACTACTC) was detected. The founder mutation was inherited from the father, and the novel mutation from the mother. To our knowledge, this case report represents the first detailed foetal analysis described in the literature. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. SCALP syndrome: sebaceous nevus syndrome, CNS malformations, aplasia cutis congenita, limbal dermoid, and pigmented nevus (giant congenital melanocytic nevus) with neurocutaneous melanosis: a distinct syndromic entity.

    PubMed

    Lam, Joseph; Dohil, Magdalene A; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Cunningham, Bari B

    2008-05-01

    Nevus sebaceus syndrome (SNS) is a constellation of nevus sebaceus with extracutaneous findings, including the ophthalmologic nervous, and musculoskeletal systems. Didymosis aplasticosebacea is a recently described entity consisting of aplasia cutis congenita and nevus sebaceus, implying twin spotting (didymosis). We describe a neonate with a nevus sebaceus on the scalp and a limbal dermoid on her left eye. Contiguous with the nevus sebaceus was a giant congenital melanocytic nevus and numerous areas of membranous aplasia cutis congenita. We propose the acronym SCALP (nevus sebaceus, central nervous system malformations, aplasia cutis congenita, limbal dermoid, pigmented nevus) to summarize the unique features of this case and review the two similar cases in the literature.

  3. Adrenal Insufficiency and Addison's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... cortisol. If ACTH output is too low, cortisol production drops. Eventually, the adrenal glands can shrink due ... sodium and potassium in the blood. When aldosterone production falls too low, the body loses too much ...

  4. A Missense Mutation in the Mouse Col2a1 Gene Causes Spondyloepiphyseal Dysplasia Congenita, Hearing Loss, and Retinoschisis

    PubMed Central

    DONAHUE, LEAH RAE; CHANG, BO; MOHAN, SUBBURAMAN; MIYAKOSHI, NAO; WERGEDAL, JON E; BAYLINK, DAVID J; HAWES, NORMAN L; ROSEN, CLIFFORD J; WARD-BAILEY, PATRICIA; ZHENG, QING Y; BRONSON, RODERICK T; JOHNSON, KENNETH R; DAVISSON, MURIEL T

    2010-01-01

    A missense mutation in the mouse Col2a1 gene has been discovered, resulting in a mouse phenotype with similarities to human spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) congenita. In addition, SED patients have been identified with a similar molecular mutation in human COL2A1. This mouse model offers a useful tool for molecular and biological studies of bone development and pathology. Introduction A new mouse autosomal recessive mutation has been discovered and named spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (gene symbol sedc). Materials and Methods Homozygous sedc mice can be identified at birth by their small size and shortened trunk. Adults have shortened noses, dysplastic vertebrae, femora, and tibias, plus retinoschisis and hearing loss. The mutation was mapped to Chr15, and Col2a1 was identified as a candidate gene. Results Sequence analyses revealed that the affected gene is Col2a1, which has a missense mutation at exon 48 causing an amino acid change of arginine to cysteine at position 1417. Two human patients with spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia (SED) congenita have been reported with the same amino acid substitution at position 789 in the human COL2A1 gene. Conclusions Thus, sedc/sedc mice provide a valuable model of human SED congenita with molecular and phenotypic homology. Further biochemical analyses, molecular modeling, and cell culture studies using sedc/sedc mice could provide insight into mechanisms of skeletal development dependent on Col2a1 and its role in fibril formation and cartilage template organization. PMID:12968670

  5. Aplasia cutis congenita: a conservative approach of a case with large, extensive skin, and underlying skull defect

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Dalila; Rodrigues, Joana; Marques, Jorge Sales; Pinto, Rui; Gomes, Anabela

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Aplasia cutis congenita is a disease in which skin, bone, and dura mater can be absent. In majority of the cases it affects the scalp. We report a baby girl born at term with a large scalp and skull defect measuring 9 × 10 cm. Conservative treatment led to complete epithelization. PMID:26509020

  6. [Pheochromocytomas as adrenal gland incidentalomas].

    PubMed

    Cerović, Snezana; Cizmić, Milica; Milović, Novak; Ajdinović, Boris; Brajusković, Goran

    2002-07-01

    Adrenal incidentalomas are a heterogeneous group of pathological entities, including benign or malignant adrenocortical or medullary tumors, hormonally active or inactive lesions, which are identified incidentally during the examination of nonadrenal-related abdominal complaints. About 1.5% to 23% of adrenal incidentalomas are pheochromocytomas. Composite pheochromocytoma is a rare tumour of adrenal medulla with divergente clinical course. This type of pheochromocytoma is designated "composite" or "mixed," depending on whether pheochromocytoma and nonpheochromocytoma components show the same embryologic origin. Nonpheochromocytoma components found in the composite pheochromocytoma include ganglioneuroma, ganglioneuroblastoma, neuroblastoma, and malignant schwannoma. The biologic behavior of composite pheochromocytomas may be as difficult to predict as more traditional pheochromocytomas; based on the number of cases reported to date the presence of areas resembling ganglioneuroblastoma or neuroblastoma does not necessary indicate a poor prognosis. Some may behave in a malignant fashion with metastasis by a component of the tumour which has neural features. Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are well-defined entities. Some of their nonsporadic associations and unusual morphological appearances are not universally appreciated. We report on a rare association of left adrenal CP, with typical right adrenal phochromocytoma and retroperitoneal paraganglioma, and a review of literature. We analyzed the clinical and immunohistochemical features in a 24-year-old woman with composite pheochromocytoma localized in the left adrenal gland and associated with blood pressure of 200/140 mmHg. Abdominal computed tomography and 131-J MIBG revealed a 65 x 60 mm mass in the right adrenal gland, but no revealed 45 x 40 mm retroperitoneal mass and 20 x 20 mm mass in the left adrenal region. Serum and urinary adrenaline levels were high, and catecholamine levels in the blood sample of

  7. Budesonide-related adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Arntzenius, Alexander; van Galen, Louise

    2015-10-01

    Iatrogenic adrenal insufficiency is a potential harmful side effect of treatment with corticosteroids. It manifests itself when an insufficient cortisol response to biological stress leads to an Addisonian crisis: a life-threatening situation. We describe a case of a patient who developed an Addisonian crisis after inappropriate discontinuation of budesonide (a topical steroid used in Crohn's disease) treatment. Iatrogenic adrenal insufficiency due to budesonide use has been rarely reported. Prescribers should be aware of the resulting risk for an Addisonian crisis.

  8. [Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia in Adults].

    PubMed

    Vrbíková, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia is a life-long disease requiring an integrated therapy. It may negatively influence the quality of life. In childhood, the main problems of the care of these patients involve sex determination and ensuring optimum growth and puberty. The therapeutic goals for adults are the prevention of Addisonian crisis and ensuring the best possible quality of life, including fertility.Key words: androgens - cardiovascular risk - congenital adrenal hyperplasia - bone density - testicular rest tumors.

  9. Compound heterozygous GFM2 mutations with Leigh syndrome complicated by arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Fukumura, Shinobu; Ohba, Chihiro; Watanabe, Toshihide; Minagawa, Kimio; Shimura, Masaru; Murayama, Kei; Ohtake, Akira; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki

    2015-09-01

    Defects in the mitochondrial translation apparatus can impair energy production in affected tissues and organs. Most components of this apparatus are encoded by nuclear genes, including GFM2, which encodes a mitochondrial ribosome recycling factor. A few patients with mutations in some of these genes have been reported to date. Here, we present two female siblings with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita, optic atrophy and severe mental retardation. The younger sister had a progressive cerebellar atrophy and bilateral neuropathological findings in the brainstem. Although her cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of lactate and pyruvate were not increased, brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed a lactate peak. Additionally, her CSF lactate/pyruvate and serum beta-hydroxybutyrate/acetoacetate ratios were high, and levels of oxidative phosphorylation in skin fibroblasts were reduced. We therefore diagnosed Leigh syndrome. Genomic investigation confirmed the presence of compound heterozygous GFM2 mutations (c.206+4A>G and c.2029-1G>A) in both siblings, causing aberrant splicing with premature stop codons (p.Gly50Glufs*4 and p.Ala677Leufs*2, respectively). These findings suggest that GFM2 mutations could be causative of a phenotype of Leigh syndrome with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

  10. The molecular genetic analysis of the expanding pachyonychia congenita case collection

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, NJ; O'Toole, EA; Milstone, LM; Hansen, CD; Shepherd, AA; Al-Asadi, E; Schwartz, ME; McLean, WHI; Sprecher, E; Smith, FJD

    2014-01-01

    Background Pachyonychia congenita (PC) is a rare autosomal dominant keratinizing disorder characterized by severe, painful, palmoplantar keratoderma and nail dystrophy, often accompanied by oral leucokeratosis, cysts and follicular keratosis. It is caused by mutations in one of five keratin genes: KRT6A, KRT6B, KRT6C, KRT16 or KRT17. Objectives To identify mutations in 84 new families with a clinical diagnosis of PC, recruited by the International Pachyonychia Congenita Research Registry during the last few years. Methods Genomic DNA isolated from saliva or peripheral blood leucocytes was amplified using primers specific for the PC-associated keratin genes and polymerase chain reaction products were directly sequenced. Results Mutations were identified in 84 families in the PC-associated keratin genes, comprising 46 distinct keratin mutations. Fourteen were previously unreported mutations, bringing the total number of different keratin mutations associated with PC to 105. Conclusions By identifying mutations in KRT6A, KRT6B, KRT6C, KRT16 or KRT17, this study has confirmed, at the molecular level, the clinical diagnosis of PC in these families. PMID:24611874

  11. Improving arm function by prosthetic limb replacement in a patient with severe arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Salminger, Stefan; Roche, Aidan D; Sturma, Agnes; Hruby, Laura A; Aszmann, Oskar C

    2016-10-05

    In patients with severe bilateral congenital arm deficiencies, even simple activities of daily living, such as feeding, may be major challenges. We report here a case of a patient with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita affecting all 4 extremities, who underwent prosthetic replacement after elective transhumeral amputation of his right functionless arm. A 22-year-old man with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita had severe deficits of his upper limbs. Previous surgeries for upper and lower limbs had enabled this patient to walk without aids; however, his upper limbs remained severely impaired. After prosthetic rehabilitation, including nerve and muscle transfers, a carefully planned elective amputation, signal processing and a comprehensive rehabilitation programme, the patient was able to independently conduct normal activities of daily living that had hitherto been impossible. The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand measure improved from 73.3 to 44.2, the Action Research Arm Test improved from 10 to 18 out of 57 points and the Southampton Hand Assessment Procedure improved from 8 to 23 after prosthetic replacement. Prosthetic replacement can improve upper limb function in patients with severe congenital limb deficiencies. In the case reported here, functional rehabilitation had a positive impact on the patient's quality of life and self-confidence, as he integrated the prosthesis into his body image.

  12. Results of Primary Talectomy for Clubfoot in Infants and Toddlers with Arthrogryposis Multiplex Congenita.

    PubMed

    Chotigavanichaya, Chatupon; Ariyawatkul, Thanase; Eamsobhana, Perajit; Kaewpornsawan, Kamolporn

    2015-09-01

    Equinovarus deformity in arthrogryposis multiplex congenita patients is rigid and difficult to treat. Radical soft tissue operations yielded good results though recurrence of deformity was high. Talectomy is a bony procedure recommended as either a salvage procedure or a primary operation. To evaluate the results ofprimary talectomy in infant and toddler patients retrospectively. Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita patients with rigid equinovarus deformity treated with talectomy initially were retrospectively reviewed. Pain score, residual foot deformity, shoe modification, and ambulatory status were assessed. Talectomy were performed in 19 arthrogrypotic feet in 10 infants and toddlers. There were 6 males and 4 females. The mean age at surgery was 1.3 years old and the mean age of the follow-up time was 4.9 years. All patients had plantigrade foot without pain. One arthrogrypotic foot required posteromedial release 2 years after index surgery due to recurrent deformity. Talectomy as theprimaryprocedure in arthrogrypotic infants and toddlers demonstrated good results withfew residual deformities and recurrence. Patients could achieve plantigrade position.

  13. Acetylcholine receptor δ subunit mutations underlie a fast-channel myasthenic syndrome and arthrogryposis multiplex congenita

    PubMed Central

    Brownlow, Sharon; Webster, Richard; Croxen, Rebecca; Brydson, Martin; Neville, Brian; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Vincent, Angela; Newsom-Davis, John; Beeson, David

    2001-01-01

    Limitation of movement during fetal development may lead to multiple joint contractures in the neonate, termed arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. Neuromuscular disorders are among the many different causes of reduced fetal movement. Many congenital myasthenic syndromes (CMSs) are due to mutations of the adult-specific ε subunit of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR), and, thus, functional deficits do not arise until late in gestation. However, an earlier effect on the fetus might be predicted with some defects of other AChR subunits. We studied a child who presented at birth with joint contractures and was subsequently found to have a CMS. Mutational screening revealed heteroallelic mutation within the AChR δ subunit gene, δ756ins2 and δE59K. Expression studies demonstrate that δ756ins2 is a null mutation. By contrast, both fetal and adult AChR containing δE59K have shorter than normal channel activations that predict fast decay of endplate currents. Thus, δE59K causes dysfunction of fetal as well as the adult AChR and would explain the presence of joint contractures on the basis of reduced fetal movement. This is the first report of the association of AChR gene mutations with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. It is probable that mutations that severely disrupt function of fetal AChR will underlie additional cases. PMID:11435464

  14. Telomere phenotypes in females with heterozygous mutations in the dyskeratosis congenita 1 (DKC1) gene

    PubMed Central

    Alder, Jonathan K.; Parry, Erin M.; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Wagner, Christa L.; Lieblich, Lawrence M.; Auerbach, Robert; Auerbach, Arleen D.; Wheelan, Sarah J.; Armanios, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita is a telomere-mediated syndrome defined by mucocutaneous features. The X-linked mode of inheritance accounts for half the cases, and is thought to predominantly manifest in childhood as bone marrow failure. We identified two male probands who presented in the fifth decade with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and cancer. Their pedigrees displayed consecutively affected generations. Five of six females (83%) manifested mucocutaneous features of dyskeratosis congenita, and two had wound-healing complications. No mutations in autosomal dominant telomere genes were present, but exome sequencing revealed novel variants in the X-chromosome DKC1 gene that predicted missense mutations in conserved residues, p.Thr49Ser and p.Pro409Arg. Variants segregated with the telomere phenotype, and affected females were heterozygotes showing skewed X-inactivation. Telomerase RNA levels were compromised in cells from DKC1 mutation carriers, consistent with their pathogenic role. These findings indicate that females with heterozygous DKC1 mutations may be at increased risk for developing telomere phenotypes that, at times, may be associated with clinical morbidity. PMID:23946118

  15. Hypothalamic dysfunction without hamartomas causing gelastic seizures in optic nerve hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Fink, Cassandra; Borchert, Mark; Simon, Carrie Zaslow; Saper, Clifford

    2015-02-01

    This report describes gelastic seizures in patients with optic nerve hypoplasia and hypothalamic dysfunction without hypothalamic hamartoma. All participants (n = 4) from the optic nerve hypoplasia registry study at Children's Hospital Los Angeles presenting with gelastic seizures were included. The clinical and pathology characteristics include hypothalamic dysgenesis and dysfunction, but no hamartomas. Optic nerve hypoplasia is the only reported condition with gelastic seizures without hypothalamic hamartomas, suggesting that hypothalamic disorganization alone can cause gelastic seizures.

  16. Liver Transplantation After Bone Marrow Transplantation for End Stage Liver Disease with Severe Hepatopulmonary Syndrome in Dyskeratosis Congenita: A Literature First

    PubMed Central

    Mahansaria, Shyam Sunder; Kumar, Senthil; Bharathy, Kishore G.S.; Kumar, Sachin; Pamecha, Viniyendra

    2015-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita is a multisystem genetic disorder. Although hepatic involvement is reported in about 7% of patients with dyskeratosis congenita, it is not well characterized and often attributed to hemochromatosis from frequent blood transfusions. A few case reports describe cirrhosis and hepatic cell necrosis in affected individuals in autosomal dominant pedigrees. Bone marrow failure and malignancies are the principal causes of death in dyskeratosis congenita. We describe the first case of living donor liver transplantation, in dyskeratosis congenita for decompensated cirrhosis with portal hypertension. The patient also had associated severe hepatopulmonary syndrome, interstitial lung disease, bilateral hip replacement for avascular necrosis of the head of femur, and a past history of bone marrow transplantation for bone marrow failure. PMID:26900277

  17. Hereditary lissencephaly and cerebellar hypoplasia in Churra lambs.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Valentín; Suárez-Vega, Aroa; Fuertes, Miguel; Benavides, Julio; Delgado, Laetitia; Ferreras, M Carmen; Arranz, Juan José

    2013-08-09

    Lissencephaly is a rare developmental brain disorder in veterinary and human medicine associated with defects in neuronal migration leading to a characteristic marked reduction or absence of the convolutional pattern of the cerebral hemispheres. In many human cases the disease has a genetic basis. In sheep, brain malformations, mainly cerebellar hypoplasia and forms of hydrocephalus, are frequently due to in utero viral infections. Although breed-related malformations of the brain have been described in sheep, breed-related lissencephaly has not been previously recorded in a peer reviewed publication. Here we report neuropathological findings in 42 newborn lambs from a pure Churra breed flock, with clinical signs of weakness, inability to walk, difficulty in sucking and muscular rigidity observed immediately after birth. All the lambs showed near-total agyria with only a rudimentary formation of few sulci and gyri, and a severe cerebellar hypoplasia. On coronal section, the cerebral grey matter was markedly thicker than that of age-matched unaffected lambs and the ventricular system was moderately dilated. Histologically, the normal layers of the cerebral cortex were disorganized and, using an immunohistochemical technique against neurofilaments, three layers were identified instead of the six present in normal brains. The hippocampus was also markedly disorganised and the number and size of lobules were reduced in the cerebellum. Heterotopic neurons were present in different areas of the white matter. The remainder of the brain structures appeared normal. The pathological features reported are consistent with the type LCH-b (lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia group b) defined in human medicine. No involvement of pestivirus or bluetongue virus was detected by immunohistochemistry. An analysis of pedigree data was consistent with a monogenic autosomal recessive pattern inheritance. The study describes the clinical and pathological findings of lissencephaly

  18. Hereditary lissencephaly and cerebellar hypoplasia in Churra lambs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lissencephaly is a rare developmental brain disorder in veterinary and human medicine associated with defects in neuronal migration leading to a characteristic marked reduction or absence of the convolutional pattern of the cerebral hemispheres. In many human cases the disease has a genetic basis. In sheep, brain malformations, mainly cerebellar hypoplasia and forms of hydrocephalus, are frequently due to in utero viral infections. Although breed-related malformations of the brain have been described in sheep, breed-related lissencephaly has not been previously recorded in a peer reviewed publication. Results Here we report neuropathological findings in 42 newborn lambs from a pure Churra breed flock, with clinical signs of weakness, inability to walk, difficulty in sucking and muscular rigidity observed immediately after birth. All the lambs showed near-total agyria with only a rudimentary formation of few sulci and gyri, and a severe cerebellar hypoplasia. On coronal section, the cerebral grey matter was markedly thicker than that of age-matched unaffected lambs and the ventricular system was moderately dilated. Histologically, the normal layers of the cerebral cortex were disorganized and, using an immunohistochemical technique against neurofilaments, three layers were identified instead of the six present in normal brains. The hippocampus was also markedly disorganised and the number and size of lobules were reduced in the cerebellum. Heterotopic neurons were present in different areas of the white matter. The remainder of the brain structures appeared normal. The pathological features reported are consistent with the type LCH-b (lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia group b) defined in human medicine. No involvement of pestivirus or bluetongue virus was detected by immunohistochemistry. An analysis of pedigree data was consistent with a monogenic autosomal recessive pattern inheritance. Conclusions The study describes the clinical and

  19. Spontaneous patella fracture presenting as osteomyelitis in focal dermal hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Altschuler, Eric L; Yoon, Richard S; Dentico, Richard; Liporace, Frank A

    2012-08-01

    We report the first case of the assessment and treatment of a spontaneous patellar fracture in a patient with Goltz syndrome-a rare dermal hypoplasia. This case illustrates the non-straightforward presentation of a spontaneous patellar fracture in seemingly osteoporotic bone stock further complicated by the inability to rule out osteomyelitis. In this confusing presentation, a high index of suspicion for patella fracture should be maintained for patients with knee pain and osteoporosis on x-ray with a dysplastic syndrome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ehrlichiosis: a cause of bone marrow hypoplasia in humans.

    PubMed

    Pearce, C J; Conrad, M E; Nolan, P E; Fishbein, D B; Dawson, J E

    1988-05-01

    Infection with Ehrlichia canis should be suspected in patients with fever, headache, malaise, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and a history of recent exposure to ticks. The cytopenia is caused by bone marrow hypoplasia which may be severe. The disease may be confused with spotless Rocky Mountain spotted fever but can be differentiated from this infection serologically with acute and convalescent sea. In humans, recovery has occurred with and without antibiotic therapy. However, prompt antibiotic therapy is advised prior to serologic studies, especially in immunocompromised individuals, splenectomized persons, and patients with AIDS-who may develop a more overwhelming rickettsial infection.

  1. Compensatory adrenal growth - A neurally mediated reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dallman, M. F.; Engeland, W. C.; Shinsako, J.

    1976-01-01

    The responses of young rats to left adrenalectomy or left adrenal manipulation were compared to surgical sham adrenalectomy in which adrenals were observed but not touched. At 12 h right adrenal wet weight, dry weight, DNA, RNA, and protein content were increased (P less than 0.05) after the first two operations. Left adrenal manipulation resulted in increased right adrenal weight at 12 h but no change in left adrenal weight. Sequential manipulation of the left adrenal at time 0 and the right adrenal at 12 h resulted in an enlarged right adrenal at 12 h (P less than 0.01), and an enlarged left adrenal at 24 h (P less than 0.05), showing that the manipulated gland was capable of response. Bilateral adrenal manipulation of the adrenal glands resulted in bilateral enlargement of 12 h (P less than 0.01). Taken together with previous results, these findings strongly suggest that compensatory adrenal growth is a neurally mediated reflex.

  2. Cushing syndrome due to adrenal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome. It occurs when a tumor of the adrenal gland releases excess amounts of the hormone cortisol. Causes ... hormone cortisol. This hormone is made in the adrenal glands . Too much cortisol can be due to various ...

  3. [Addison's disease, primary adrenal insufficiency in adults].

    PubMed

    Krikke, Maaike; ten Wolde, Marije; Smit, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is a rare but fatal disease if left unrecognized. Symptoms often mimic more prevalent diseases. We discuss three patients with primary adrenal insufficiency. These cases illustrate that presenting symptoms such as syncope, nausea, vomiting, weight loss and hypoglycemia are often non-specific and, therefore, often not immediately recognized. When an adrenal crisis is suspected, glucocorticoids should be given promptly. The symptoms are caused by insufficient production of adrenal hormones due to destruction of the adrenal glands by auto-immune adrenalitis. An ACTH stimulation test should confirm the diagnosis when primary adrenal insufficiency is suspected. Treatment consists of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement. Primary adrenal insufficiency is a 'master of disguise'. Unexplained syncope, vomiting, weight loss or hypoglycemia should prompt suspicion of this disease.

  4. Adrenal gland disease in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Simone-Freilicher, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    Adrenal gland disease in ferrets is unique to this species, with clinical signs and pathophysiology different from those seen in the dog. Its prevalence is increasing; 70% of pet ferrets in the United States were affected in 2003. The exact causes of the adrenal gland changes that lead to the disease are not known. Early oophorohysterectomies and neutering, combined with the artificially prolonged photoperiod experienced by indoor pet ferrets, and a possible genetic component, may be contributing factors. Signs of adrenal gland disease include progressive hair loss, pruritus, lethargy, atrophy, and, in female ferrets, vulvar swelling. An understanding of the signs and physiologic changes is necessary for diagnosis and treatment. A review of anatomy, physiology, and current surgical and medical options is presented.

  5. Intraadrenal corticotropin in bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Louiset, Estelle; Duparc, Céline; Young, Jacques; Renouf, Sylvie; Tetsi Nomigni, Milène; Boutelet, Isabelle; Libé, Rossella; Bram, Zakariae; Groussin, Lionel; Caron, Philippe; Tabarin, Antoine; Grunenberger, Fabienne; Christin-Maitre, Sophie; Bertagna, Xavier; Kuhn, Jean-Marc; Anouar, Youssef; Bertherat, Jérôme; Lefebvre, Hervé

    2013-11-28

    Bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia is a rare cause of primary adrenal Cushing's syndrome. In this form of hyperplasia, hypersecretion of cortisol suppresses the release of corticotropin by pituitary corticotrophs, which results in low plasma corticotropin levels. Thus, the disease has been termed corticotropin-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia. We examined the abnormal production of corticotropin in these hyperplastic adrenal glands. We obtained specimens of hyperplastic macronodular adrenal tissue from 30 patients with primary adrenal disease. The corticotropin precursor proopiomelanocortin and corticotropin expression were assessed by means of a polymerase-chain-reaction assay and immunohistochemical analysis. The production of corticotropin and cortisol was assessed in 11 specimens with the use of incubated explants and cell cultures coupled with hormone assays. Corticotropin levels were measured in adrenal and peripheral venous blood samples from 2 patients. The expression of proopiomelanocortin messenger RNA (mRNA) was detected in all samples of hyperplastic adrenal tissue. Corticotropin was detected in steroidogenic cells arranged in clusters that were disseminated throughout the adrenal specimens. Adrenal corticotropin levels were higher in adrenal venous blood samples than in peripheral venous samples, a finding that was consistent with local production of the peptide within the hyperplastic adrenals. The release of adrenal corticotropin was stimulated by ligands of aberrant membrane receptors but not by corticotropin-releasing hormone or dexamethasone. A semiquantitative score for corticotropin immunostaining in the samples correlated with basal plasma cortisol levels. Corticotropin-receptor antagonists significantly inhibited in vitro cortisol secretion. Cortisol secretion by the adrenals in patients with macronodular hyperplasia and Cushing's syndrome appears to be regulated by corticotropin, which is produced by a subpopulation of

  6. Adrenal myelolipoma with osseous metaplasia and hypercortisolism

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ujwal; Priyadarshi, Shivam; Tomar, Vinay; Vohra, Rishi Raj

    2017-01-01

    Adrenal myelolipomas are rare adrenal tumors generally diagnosed incidentally. A 42-year-old female reported to us with complaints of left flank pain attributable to her left ureteric calculi. On evaluation, a large adrenal mass was diagnosed along with hypercortisolism. After adrenalectomy, the histopathology revealed adrenal myelolipoma along with osseous metaplasia not reported in English literature, to the best of our knowledge till date. PMID:28216934

  7. Interbrachial Pinch by Trapezius Transfer in Amyoplasia Congenita: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Thione, Alessandro; Cavadas, Pedro C.; Rubi, Carlo G.

    2017-01-01

    Summary: Amyoplasia congenita, or “classic distal arthrogryposis,” is the most common disorder among the congenital, non-progressive, multiple joint contractural conditions named arthrogryposis. The cause remains unknown, and it occurs sporadically. Abnormal neurological examination indicates that movement in utero was diminished as a result of an abnormality of the central or peripheral nervous system, the motor end plate, or muscle. The absence of central neural pathology indicates the origin in akinetic fetal condition. Three weeks are enough to cause muscle weakness and joint fibrosis. Joint contractures in amyoplasia are often rigid and refractory to nonoperative treatment such as passive stretching. Surgery is focused on each patient's need respecting adaptive maneuvers to accomplish daily tasks. We present a case in which pectoral major muscle had no strength for pinching; a trapezius muscle transfer was planned to obtain an interbrachial pinch useful for grasping. PMID:28607845

  8. Interbrachial Pinch by Trapezius Transfer in Amyoplasia Congenita: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Thione, Alessandro; Cavadas, Pedro C; Espadero, Alberto Perez; Rubi, Carlo G

    2017-05-01

    Amyoplasia congenita, or "classic distal arthrogryposis," is the most common disorder among the congenital, non-progressive, multiple joint contractural conditions named arthrogryposis. The cause remains unknown, and it occurs sporadically. Abnormal neurological examination indicates that movement in utero was diminished as a result of an abnormality of the central or peripheral nervous system, the motor end plate, or muscle. The absence of central neural pathology indicates the origin in akinetic fetal condition. Three weeks are enough to cause muscle weakness and joint fibrosis. Joint contractures in amyoplasia are often rigid and refractory to nonoperative treatment such as passive stretching. Surgery is focused on each patient's need respecting adaptive maneuvers to accomplish daily tasks. We present a case in which pectoral major muscle had no strength for pinching; a trapezius muscle transfer was planned to obtain an interbrachial pinch useful for grasping.

  9. Aplasia Cutis Congenita in a Newborn Child Associated with Two Fetus Papyraceous.

    PubMed

    Šimić, Dubravka; Prohić, Asja; Puizina Ivić, Neira; Zeljko Penavić, Jasna; Tomić, Teo

    2015-01-01

    Aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) is a rare inborn lesion, presenting with absence of skin. The etiology is unknown and is probably not attributable to a single cause but to a combination of genetic factors. Multiple causes have been suggested for ACC: syndromes and teratogens, intrauterine infection--varicella zoster virus, herpes simplex virus--fetal exposure to cocaine, heroin, alcohol, or antithyroid drugs. The most common site is the scalp. We report a case with multiple lesions on the trunk, resembling an instance with ACC group 5. This form of ACC occurs in association with the in utero death of a twin or more (in this case triple) fetus. Histological findings are available in very few reports. Therapy options depend on the characteristics of the lesion, but conservative treatment is usually chosen.

  10. Efficacy of botulinum toxin in pachyonychia congenita type 1: report of two new cases.

    PubMed

    González-Ramos, Jéssica; Sendagorta-Cudós, Elena; González-López, Guillermo; Mayor-Ibarguren, Ander; Feltes-Ochoa, Rosa; Herranz-Pinto, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Pachyonychia congenita (PC) is a rare genodermatosis caused by a mutation in keratin genes, which can lead to hypertrophic nail dystrophy and focal palmoplantar keratoderma (predominantly plantar), amongst other manifestations. Painful blisters and callosities, sometimes exacerbated by hyperhidrosis, are major issues that can have a significant impact on patient quality of life. Many alternative treatments for this condition have been applied with variable and partial clinical response, but a definitive cure for this disease has yet to be discovered. After obtaining informed consent, two patients with genetically confirmed PC type 1 were treated with plantar injections of botulinum toxin type A. Both patients showed a marked improvement in pain and blistering with an average response time of one week, a six-month mean duration of effectiveness, and a lack of any side effects or tachyphylaxis.

  11. Chronic ventilator use in osteogenesis imperfecta congenita with basilar impression: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, T G; Yang, G F; Alba, A

    1994-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta, a rare connective tissue disorder, is known to be associated sometimes with the invagination of the basilar skull. This deformity may disturb respiratory function secondary to brain stem compression and hydrocephalus. In addition, the deformed thoracic cage and fragile ribs make pulmonary care more complicated. A case of 24-year-old man is presented with brain stem compression syndrome secondary to osteogenesis imperfecta congenita with basilar impression. He developed respiratory failure and became tracheostomy positive-pressure ventilator dependent at the age of 21 years. He also suffered multiple skeletal abnormalities and mental retardation, and following the brain stem compression, severe quadriparesis. The patient's condition is stable since he has been using the ventilator and he is currently living in the community.

  12. Microcephaly and arthrogryposis multiplex congenita: The full-blown CNS spectrum in newborns with ZIKV infection.

    PubMed

    Leyser, Marcio; Fernandes, Alexandre; Passos, Pamela; Pupe, Camila; Matta, Andre Pc; Vasconcelos, Marcio Moacyr; Nascimento, Osvaldo Jm

    2017-01-15

    The recent alarming statements concerning the newborn ZIKV-induced microcephaly epidemics in the Northeast of Brazil, released by the Brazilian Ministry of Health, as well as important international health agencies, such as the World Health Organization and the Pan American Health Organization, raised many "why and how" questions so far, that will hopefully be scientifically answered, as more researches in that regard come up in the long term. In this paper, we describe another potentially ZIKV-induced central nervous system and musculoskeletal disorder that has accompanied microcephaly in these children: atrhogryposis multiplex congenita. The goal is to bring up some hypotheses for possible underlying molecular mechanisms based on published data taken from animal models, such as ovine and cattle, which once infected by other types of arboviroses and viruses that also belong to the Flaviviridae family, presented, too, with the full-blown CNS spectrum of malformations at birth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Aplasia cutis congenita type V: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Perry, Benjamin M; Maughan, Cory B; Crosby, Matthew S; Hadenfeld, Scott D

    2017-06-01

    Aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) is a relatively rare congenital anomaly that most commonly occurs as a solitary cutaneous defect on the scalp. Depth of involvement varies, and involvement of deeper calvarium and dural structures can be seen in more severe cases. Multiple classification systems have been devised with the Frieden Classification System being the most widely adopted. Using this system, we describe a patient that developed Type V ACC with associated fetal papyraceous. The child healed remarkably well with the application of petrolatum impregnated gauze and topical silver sulfadiazine twice daily for approximately 4 weeks. The child was noted to have no significant contractures or complications at 6-months and 1-year follow-up exams. Herein, we review the current literature on type V ACC including a discussion of treatment options. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  14. Chronic Foot Pain due to Pachyonychia Congenita in a Pediatric Patient: A Successful Management Strategy.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Sarah; Schmitz, Michael L; Kanjia, Megha Karkera

    2016-05-15

    We report the case of an 11-year-old girl who presented to our multidisciplinary pain center with the chief complaint of chronic bilateral foot pain because of a rare congenital keratin disorder. This patient had been diagnosed with pachyonychia congenita, an extremely rare genetic disorder primarily affecting the skin and nails. The child had bilateral foot pain for years because of the characteristic blisters and calluses on the soles of her feet. Chronic pain was negatively impacting her quality of life; she was severely limited in her activities of daily living secondary to pain. Furthermore, she reported absenteeism from school, lack of social activities, and frequent nighttime awakenings. We discuss the successful management of her chronic foot pain using a multimodal, multidisciplinary approach.

  15. [Pontocerebellar hypoplasia secondary to CASK gene deletion: Case report].

    PubMed

    Rivas, Lucía; Blanco, Óscar; Torreira, Cristina; Repáraz, Alfredo; Melcón, Cristina; Amado, Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    Pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) is a reduction of the size of the cerebellum and pons secondary to an alteration in its development, and can be caused by neurodegenerative diseases of genetic origin, of which there are known 10 subtypes (PCH 1-10), cortical malformations, metabolic and genetic diseases. To present the case of a child with microcephaly, PCH and West syndrome, in which the genetic study allowed to make the diagnosis of a deletion on chromosome X. This is a female infant of 7-month at diagnosis, without family or obstetric history of interest, head circumference at birth -1.5 standard deviations (SD). She had little weight and growth in head circumference progression. In addition, physical examination revealed no fixating gaze, hypotonia with preserved deep tendon reflexes. Progressively developed refractary seizures. Brainsteam Auditory Evoked Potential demonstrated involvement of pontomesencefphalic ways and neuroimaging Pontocerebellar hypoplasia. The genetic study (aCGH) showed heterozygous deletion on the X chromosome, affecting the CASK gene. Given the wide differential diagnosis proposed at the PCH, new cytogenetic techniques have improved the classification of HPC and in some cases establish their etiology, so in these cases can provide appropriate genetic counseling to families.

  16. Congenital hypoplasia of the cerebellum: developmental causes and behavioral consequences.

    PubMed

    Basson, M Albert; Wingate, Richard J

    2013-09-03

    Over the last 60 years, the spotlight of research has periodically returned to the cerebellum as new techniques and insights have emerged. Because of its simple homogeneous structure, limited diversity of cell types and characteristic behavioral pathologies, the cerebellum is a natural home for studies of cell specification, patterning, and neuronal migration. However, recent evidence has extended the traditional range of perceived cerebellar function to include modulation of cognitive processes and implicated cerebellar hypoplasia and Purkinje neuron hypo-cellularity with autistic spectrum disorder. In the light of this emerging frontier, we review the key stages and genetic mechanisms behind cerebellum development. In particular, we discuss the role of the midbrain hindbrain isthmic organizer in the development of the cerebellar vermis and the specification and differentiation of Purkinje cells and granule neurons. These developmental processes are then considered in relation to recent insights into selected human developmental cerebellar defects: Joubert syndrome, Dandy-Walker malformation, and pontocerebellar hypoplasia. Finally, we review current research that opens up the possibility of using the mouse as a genetic model to study the role of the cerebellum in cognitive function.

  17. Congenital hypoplasia of the cerebellum: developmental causes and behavioral consequences

    PubMed Central

    Basson, M. Albert; Wingate, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last 60 years, the spotlight of research has periodically returned to the cerebellum as new techniques and insights have emerged. Because of its simple homogeneous structure, limited diversity of cell types and characteristic behavioral pathologies, the cerebellum is a natural home for studies of cell specification, patterning, and neuronal migration. However, recent evidence has extended the traditional range of perceived cerebellar function to include modulation of cognitive processes and implicated cerebellar hypoplasia and Purkinje neuron hypo-cellularity with autistic spectrum disorder. In the light of this emerging frontier, we review the key stages and genetic mechanisms behind cerebellum development. In particular, we discuss the role of the midbrain hindbrain isthmic organizer in the development of the cerebellar vermis and the specification and differentiation of Purkinje cells and granule neurons. These developmental processes are then considered in relation to recent insights into selected human developmental cerebellar defects: Joubert syndrome, Dandy–Walker malformation, and pontocerebellar hypoplasia. Finally, we review current research that opens up the possibility of using the mouse as a genetic model to study the role of the cerebellum in cognitive function. PMID:24027500

  18. Oral phenotype and variation in focal dermal hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Wright, John Timothy; Puranik, Chaitanya P; Farrington, Frank

    2016-03-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH) or Goltz Syndrome (OMIM# 305600) is an X-linked dominant ectodermal dysplasia caused by mutations in the PORCN gene. This gene encodes an endoplasmic reticulum transmembrane protein that is involved in processing the embryonically critical WNT signaling proteins. Individuals diagnosed with FDH were recruited to participate in the study through the National Foundation for Ectodermal Dysplasia. Individuals were evaluated to characterize the FDH phenotype. Each participant completed a brief dental survey and oral evaluation using artificial light. To identify the oral soft and hard tissue findings 19 individuals (16 female and 3 male) participated with a median age of 10 years (range 2-56 years). Soft and hard tissue defects were present in 68% (13) and 94% (18) of the patients, respectively. Dental anomalies were highly prevalent with 68% (13) demonstrating vertical enamel grooving, 52% (10) having peg shaped tooth deformities, and 78% (15) having enamel hypoplasia with or without discoloration. Cleft lip and cleft palate presented in 15% (3) of the participants. Other findings included 57% (11) having intra-oral lipoma or papilloma with no site predilection. Dental malocclusions were common with 63% (12) having some degree of malocclusion with 15% (3) of participants having class III malocclusion with an anterior dental cross bite. Participants frequently reported speech problems or difficulty with chewing (73%; N = 14). This study shows there is marked variation in the oral phenotype of individuals with FDH and underscores the important role of WNT signaling in oro-facial development.

  19. Bilateral implantation in children with cochleovestibular nerve hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Oker, N; Loundon, N; Marlin, S; Rouillon, I; Leboulanger, N; Garabédian, E N

    2009-10-01

    To report on the outcomes of sequential bilateral cochlear implantation (CI) in children with inner ear malformation. The study design is a retrospective case study. The setting is a tertiary reference center. Two children presenting a profound bilateral congenital hearing loss with bilateral hypoplasia of the cochleovestibular nerves and hypoplasic external semicircular canal had a cochlear implant at respectively 16 months and 33 months. A second implant was proposed at respectively 17 and 20 months after the first implant. The main outcome measures are audiometry, perceptive results in closed and open set words (CSW and OSW) and oral production at follow-up. The first cochlear implant gave respectively mean thresholds at 60 dB and 70 dB. Bilateral CI showed mean threshold at respectively 40 dB and 55 dB. In case 1, perceptive assessment was 83% and 70% in respectively CSW and OSW with oral production and comprehension of sentences after 1 year follow-up. In case 2, the perceptive assessment showed no perceptive or linguistic evolution at 6 months follow-up. In cochleovestibular nerve hypoplasia, bilateral implantation could be discussed in cases of limited result after unilateral implant.

  20. Congenital torticollis due to sternomastoid aplasia with unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia: a rare association.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V R Ravi; Sabapathy, S Raja; Duraisami, Vijayagiri

    2012-10-01

    Congenital torticollis is most commonly caused by sternomastoid contracture. Aplasia of sternomastoid muscle causing congenital torticollis, though rare, has been reported. However the association of cerebellar hypoplasia with sternomastoid aplasia is extremely rare. The authors describe a case of congenital torticollis due to absence of the left sternomastoid with ipsilateral cerebellar hypoplasia, confirmed by MRI.

  1. The role of the uncinate process in sinusitis aetiology: isolated agenesis versus maxillary sinus hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Uluyol, S; Arslan, İ B; Demir, A; Mercan, G C; Dogan, O; Çukurova, İ

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of maxillary sinus hypoplasia and isolated agenesis of the uncinate process in sinusitis aetiology. Three patients with isolated agenesis of the uncinate process and 27 patients with 43 maxillary sinus hypoplasia variations were recruited. The frequencies of sinusitis episodes and radiological findings were compared between patient subgroups. In all, 23 type I maxillary sinus hypoplasia, 13 type II maxillary sinus hypoplasia and 7 type III maxillary sinus hypoplasia variations were detected. Patients with isolated agenesis of the uncinate process underwent antibiotic treatment an average of 7 times per year, whereas those with types I, II and III maxillary sinus hypoplasia were treated 1.57, 3.22, and 5.75 times per year, respectively, over a 5-year period. The antibiotic treatment frequency for patients with isolated agenesis of the uncinate process was significantly higher than for those with types I and II maxillary sinus hypoplasia. Isolated agenesis of the uncinate process seems to play a stronger role than types I and II maxillary sinus hypoplasia in the pathophysiology of chronic sinusitis.

  2. Radionuclide therapy of adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Carrasquillo, Jorge A; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Chen, Clara C

    2012-10-01

    Adrenal tumors arising from chromaffin cells will often accumulate radiolabeled metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and thus are amenable to therapy with I-131 MIBG. More recently, therapy studies have targeted the somatostatin receptors using Lu-177 or Y-90 radiolabeled somatostatin analogs. Because pheochromocytoma (PHEO)/paraganglioma (PGL) and neuroblastoma (NB), which often arise from the adrenals, express these receptors, clinical trials have been performed with these reagents. We will review the experience using radionuclide therapy for targeting PHEO/PGL and NBs. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. [Immunoendocrine associations in adrenal glands].

    PubMed

    Sterzl, I; Hrdá, P

    2010-12-01

    Immune and endocrine systems are basic regulatory mechanisms of organism and, including the nervous system, maintain the organism's homeostasis. The main immune system representatives are mononuclear cells, T- and B-cells and their products, in the endocrine system the main representatives are cells of the glands with inner secretion and their products. One of the most important glands for maintaining homeostasis are adrenal glands. It has been proven that either cells of the immune system, either endocrine cells can, although in trace amounts, produce mutually mediators of both systems (hormones, cytokines). Disorders in one system can lead to pathological symptoms in the other system. Also here represent adrenals an important model.

  4. OPEN REDUCTION OF HIP DISLOCATION IN PATIENTS WITH ARTHROGRYPOSIS MULTIPLEX CONGENITA – AN ANTEROMEDIAL APPROACH

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Luis Eduardo Munhoz da; Nishimori, Fábio Koiti; Figueiredo, Daniel Carvalho de; Grimm, Dulce Helena; Cunha, Luiz Antonio Munhoz da

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the results from surgical treatment of hip dislocation through the anteromedial approach, in patients with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC). Methods: The medical files and radiographs of seven children with AMC who presented hip dislocation (total of 10 dislocated hips) were retrospectively reviewed. Pre and postoperative joint mobility was evaluated by summing the joint range of motion in flexion and abduction. The acetabular angle and height of the femoral neck before the operation, and the continuity of the Shenton arc, Sharp angle and center-edge (CE) angle after the operation, were evaluated radiographically. When avascular necrosis was identified, it was classified in accordance with Ogden and Bucholz. Results: The mean age of the children at the time of the surgery was 5.5 months (range: 3 to 11 months). The mean duration of follow-up for the patients was 9.5 years (range: 2 to 13 years). The mean amplitude of the sum of the joint range of motion in flexion and abduction in the preoperative examination was 108° (range: 70° to 155°) and postoperatively, it was 125° (range: 75° to 175°). In the last evaluation, eight hips were found to be centered and two were subluxated. Two hips had been subjected to Salter iliac osteotomy. Two hips (20%) had presented significant signs of Ogden type IV avascular necrosis. Eight hips had good results while two were fair. Conclusion: We consider that the anteromedial approach is a good option for treating hip dislocation in very young patients with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. PMID:27022586

  5. Spontaneous bilateral adrenal hemorrhage following cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Meryl; Lim, Chetana; Salloum, Chady; Azoulay, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative bilateral adrenal hemorrhage is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. This diagnosis is often missed because the symptoms and laboratory results are usually nonspecific. We report a case of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage associated with acute primary adrenal insufficiency following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The knowledge of this uncommon complication following any abdominal surgery allows timey diagnosis and rapid treatment.

  6. Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage from Adrenal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez Valverde, F.M. Balsalobre, M.; Torregrosa, N.; Molto, M.; Gomez Ramos, M.J.; Vazquez Rojas, J.L.

    2007-04-15

    Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage is a very rare but serious disorder of the adrenal gland that can require emergent treatment. We report on a 42-year-old man who underwent selective angiography for diagnosis and treatment of retroperitoneal hemorrhage from small adrenal artery aneurysm. This case gives further details about the value of transluminal artery embolization in the management of visceral aneurysm rupture.

  7. The adrenal glands and their functions.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Deepthi C; Wijesiriwardene, Bandula

    2007-09-01

    The adrenal glands secrete hormones essential for metabolism, regulation of blood pressure, and sodium and glucose homeostasis. Hypo- or hypersecretion of these hormones is life threatening. Understanding the physiological functions of adrenal hormones is a prerequisite to the management of adrenal gland disease.

  8. Spontaneous bilateral adrenal hemorrhage following cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Dahan, Meryl; Lim, Chetana; Salloum, Chady

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative bilateral adrenal hemorrhage is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. This diagnosis is often missed because the symptoms and laboratory results are usually nonspecific. We report a case of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage associated with acute primary adrenal insufficiency following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The knowledge of this uncommon complication following any abdominal surgery allows timey diagnosis and rapid treatment. PMID:27275469

  9. Active and suppressor T cells: diminution in a patient with dyskeratosis congenita and in first-degree relatives.

    PubMed

    Fudenberg, H H; Goust, J M; Vesole, D H; Salinas, C F

    1979-01-01

    Active, total and nonspecific suppressor T cells were studied in a 15-year-old black male with dyskeratosis congenita syndrome, a precancerous mucosal disease, and in 7 siblings and several other relatives in three generations. The propositus and 1 elder sister, products of a second-cousin marriage, died with dyskeratosis congenita. The mother had dermatomyositis, and the maternal grandmother and her sister reportedly had rheumatoid arthritis. Studies of available siblings, father, and grandparents revealed a high incidence of deficiency in number of active and/or suppressor T cells, sometimes severe enough to result in a decrease in total T cells. The patient had many stigmata of precocious aging, as did the sibling who died with the same syndrome. The laboratory data suggest that a defect in cell-mediated immunity, involving mainly or exclusively suppressor T cells, is associated with, and is presumably the cause of, precocious aging; perhaps an abiotrophy in this cell subpopulation results in physiologic aging.

  10. Adrenal Insufficiency and Addison's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... used if the diagnosis remains unclear. What other tests might a health care provider perform after diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency? After ... skin. A nurse or lab technician performs the test in a health care provider’s office; a patient does not need anesthesia. ...

  11. Anesthetic Considerations on Adrenal Gland Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Domi, Rudin; Sula, Hektor; Kaci, Myzafer; Paparisto, Sokol; Bodeci, Artan; Xhemali, Astrit

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal gland surgery needs a multidisciplinary team including endocrinologist, radiologist, anesthesiologist, and surgeon. The indications for adrenal gland surgery include hormonal secreting and non-hormonal secreting tumors. Adrenal hormonal secreting tumors present to the anesthesiologist unique challenges requiring good preoperative evaluation, perioperative hemodynamic control, corrections of all electrolytes and metabolic abnormalities, a detailed and careful anesthetic strategy, overall knowledge about the specific diseases, control and maintaining of postoperative adrenal function, and finally a good collaboration with other involved colleagues. This review will focus on the endocrine issues, as well as on the above-mentioned aspects of anesthetic management during hormone secreting adrenal gland tumor resection. PMID:25368694

  12. [Frequency of Kongenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Müller, W; Prader, M; Kofler, J; Glatzl, J; Geir, W

    1979-01-01

    The frequency of homozygous congenital adrenal hyperplasia in Tyrol is found to be 1 : 8991, the gene-frequency for congenital adrenal hyperplasia 1 : 95 and the frequency of heterozygous congenital adrenal hyperplasia 1 : 48. Our data is compared on a numerical and statistical base with that in Zürich and Munich with regard to the frequency of congenital adrenal hyperplasia, to its distribution with and without salt loss and to its sex-distribution. According to our study one may assume a frequency of homozygous congenital adrenal hyperplasia in Tyrol, Zürich and Munich of 1 : 7000--10,000.

  13. A novel mutation in the C-propeptide of COL2A1 causes atypical spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita

    PubMed Central

    Kusano, Chieko; Takagi, Masaki; Hori, Naoaki; Murotsuki, Jun; Nishimura, Gen; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2017-01-01

    Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC, OMIM #183900) is one of the type II collagenopathies caused by a heterozygous mutation in the COL2A1 gene. Although typical SEDC shows delay of pubic bone ossification on radiographs, atypical SEDC exists without this finding. We identified an atypical SEDC patient with a novel missense mutation in the C-propeptide region of COL2A1. This case suggests that a COL2A1 C-propeptide mutation can cause atypical SEDC. PMID:28265456

  14. An infant with large fontanelles, aplasia cutis congenita, tessier facial cleft, polydactyly inversus, and toe syndactyly: a previously undescribed syndrome?

    PubMed

    Jackson, Jessica; Delk, Paula; Farrow, Emily; Griffith, Christopher; Lah, Melissa; Weaver, David D

    2015-04-01

    We report on a 5-month-old female with large and widely spaced anterior and posterior fontanelles, aplasia cutis congenita, Tessier 3 oblique facial cleft, polydactyly, and syndactyly of toes. The polydactyly is unusual as an accessory finger is attached to the left fifth finger with mirrored, end-to-end fusion. We are naming this anomaly "polydactyly inversus." The infant appears to have a previously unreported syndrome of unknown cause.

  15. Adrenal adrenoceptors in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    de Lucia, Claudio; Femminella, Grazia D.; Gambino, Giuseppina; Pagano, Gennaro; Allocca, Elena; Rengo, Carlo; Silvestri, Candida; Leosco, Dario; Ferrara, Nicola; Rengo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a chronic clinical syndrome characterized by the reduction in left ventricular (LV) function and it represents one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite considerable advances in pharmacological treatment, HF represents a severe clinical and social burden. Sympathetic outflow, characterized by increased circulating catecholamines (CA) biosynthesis and secretion, is peculiar in HF and sympatholytic treatments (as β-blockers) are presently being used for the treatment of this disease. Adrenal gland secretes Epinephrine (80%) and Norepinephrine (20%) in response to acetylcholine stimulation of nicotinic cholinergic receptors on the chromaffin cell membranes. This process is regulated by adrenergic receptors (ARs): α2ARs inhibit CA release through coupling to inhibitory Gi-proteins, and β ARs (mainly β2ARs) stimulate CA release through coupling to stimulatory Gs-proteins. All ARs are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and GPCR kinases (GRKs) regulate their signaling and function. Adrenal GRK2-mediated α2AR desensitization and downregulation are increased in HF and seem to be a fundamental regulator of CA secretion from the adrenal gland. Consequently, restoration of adrenal α2AR signaling through the inhibition of GRK2 is a fascinating sympatholytic therapeutic strategy for chronic HF. This strategy could have several significant advantages over existing HF pharmacotherapies minimizing side-effects on extra-cardiac tissues and reducing the chronic activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone and endothelin systems. The role of adrenal ARs in regulation of sympathetic hyperactivity opens interesting perspectives in understanding HF pathophysiology and in the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:25071591

  16. Posterior retroperitoneoscopic approach to the adrenal arteries.

    PubMed

    Lotti, Marco; Giulii Capponi, Michela

    2016-12-01

    Differently from transperitoneal adrenalectomy, with the posterior retroperitoneoscopic approach adrenal arteries are dissected first [1, 2]. Knowledge of their position is pivotal as they are covered by peri-adrenal fat [3, 4]. Four posterior retroperitoneoscopic adrenalectomies were selected, in which adrenal arteries are dissected to show their path and how they can be localized among peri-adrenal fat. A video is presented herein, which focuses on surgical anatomy of adrenal arteries when approached during a posterior retroperitoneoscopic adrenalectomy. Details about relative positions between adrenal arteries and adjacent structures are considered and shown during their dissection. The posterior retroperitoneoscopic approach offers a direct view of adrenal arteries and allows for their exposure and safe division in the early steps of adrenalectomy.

  17. Myotonia Congenita

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page NINDS Cerebral Cavernous Malformation Information Page NINDS Chronic Pain Information Page NINDS Coma Information Page NINDS ... Marie-Tooth Disease Information Page Chorea Information Page Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy (CIDP) Information Page Coffin Lowry ...

  18. [Pachyonychia congenita].

    PubMed

    Alperovich, B A; de los Rios, E H; Conejos, M

    1981-01-01

    The authors describe a new case of this unusual disease, which correspond to a three years old girl, derived from a family without others observations nor consaguinity between her parents. The clinic-neurological examen was normal. The typical dermatological lesions were quite clear to the diagnostic. The pathological anatomy showed the typical structure.

  19. Tibial hypoplasia with a bifid tibia: an unclassified tibial hemimelia.

    PubMed

    Shah, Krupa; Shah, Hitesh

    2016-08-16

    Tibial hemimelia is a rare congenital limb deficiency which is characterised by a hypoplastic/aplastic tibia. It actually represents a spectrum of anomalies, ranging from mild hypoplasia of the tibia to total absence of the tibia. Several classifications based on radiological description exist in the literature. The tibial hemimelia is usually described with preaxial mirror polydactyly, split hand/foot syndrome-ectrodactyly, polydactyly-triphalangeal thumb syndrome (Werner syndrome) and micromelia-trigonal brachycephaly syndrome. We describe a child with unclassified tibial hemimelia. The child had right incomplete tibial hemimelia with bifid tibia, left complete tibial hemimelia, bilateral split hands and left split foot. This is the first report of the bifid tibia in the literature.

  20. Bone marrow hypoplasia associated with fenbendazole administration in a dog.

    PubMed

    Gary, Anthony T; Kerl, Marie E; Wiedmeyer, Charles E; Turnquist, Susan E; Cohn, Leah A

    2004-01-01

    A 1.5-year-old Doberman pinscher was presented with sudden-onset of fever and malaise. Twelve days prior to presentation, fenbendazole therapy was initiated for a suspected lungworm infection. Results of a complete blood count on presentation showed pancytopenia, while histopathological evaluation of a bone marrow core sample revealed bone marrow hypoplasia of undetermined etiology. Bactericidal antibiotics and fluid therapy, as well as discontinuation of fenbendazole administration, led to a complete resolution of clinical and hematological abnormalities within 15 days. An idiosyncratic reaction to fenbendazole was suspected based on the absence of infectious, neoplastic, autoimmune, and toxic etiologies, as well as resolution of clinical signs and pancytopenia upon drug withdrawal.

  1. Linear enamel hypoplasia in gibbons (Hylobates lar carpenteri).

    PubMed

    Guatelli-Steinberg, D

    2000-07-01

    This study describes the expression of linear enamel hypoplasia (LEH), a sensitive dental indicator of physiological stress, in Thailand gibbons (Hylobates lar carpenteri). Previous studies of enamel hypoplasia in hominoids have focused on great apes, with little attention given to the expression of this stress indicator in gibbons. In that gibbons differ from both monkeys and great apes in numerous life history features, LEH expression in gibbons might be expected to show significant differences from both. In this study, 92 gibbon specimens from two sites in Thailand were compared with several samples of monkeys and great apes in their expression of LEH. The intertooth distribution of LEH in gibbons was compared to that of chimpanzees and rhesus monkeys. Gibbon populations from both sites exhibit LEH frequencies intermediate between those of the monkey samples, in which LEH prevalence is usually low, and those of the great ape samples, in which LEH prevalence is high. Gibbons differ significantly from monkeys, but not great apes, in the number of individuals whose teeth record multiple stress events. Multiple episodes of stress are rarely recorded in the teeth of monkeys, while multiple stress events occur with higher frequency in gibbons and great apes. Taxonomic variation in the duration of crown formation, the prominence and spacing of perikymata on dental crowns, life history features, and/or experience of physiological stress may explain these patterns. The intertooth distribution of LEH in gibbons is, for different reasons, unlike that of either chimpanzees or rhesus monkeys. The mandibular canines of gibbons have significantly more LEH than any of their other teeth. Aspects of crown morphology, perikymata prominence/spacing, enamel thickness, and crown formation spans are potential causes of taxonomic variation in the intertooth distribution of LEH.

  2. Polarized light and scanning electron microscopic investigation of enamel hypoplasia in primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Sabel, Nina; Klingberg, Gunilla; Dietz, Wolfram; Nietzsche, Sandor; Norén, Jörgen G

    2010-01-01

    Enamel hypoplasia is a developmental disturbance during enamel formation, defined as a macroscopic defect in the enamel, with a reduction of the enamel thickness with rounded, smooth borders. Information on the microstructural level is still limited, therefore further studies are of importance to better understand the mechanisms behind enamel hypoplasia. To study enamel hypoplasia in primary teeth by means of polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Nineteen primary teeth with enamel hypoplasia were examined in a polarized light microscope and in a scanning electron microscope. The cervical and incisal borders of the enamel hypoplasia had a rounded appearance, as the prisms in the rounded cervical area of the hypoplasia were bent. The rounded borders had a normal surface structure whereas the base of the defects appeared rough and porous. Morphological findings in this study indicate that the aetiological factor has a short duration and affects only certain ameloblasts. The bottom of the enamel hypoplasia is porous and constitutes possible pathways for bacteria into the dentin.

  3. Systemic and ocular findings in 100 patients with optic nerve hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M Lourdes; Ty, Edna B; Taban, Mehryar; David Rothner, A; Rogers, Douglas; Traboulsi, Elias I

    2006-11-01

    To describe associated ocular, neurologic, and systemic findings in a population of children with optic nerve hypoplasia, a retrospective chart review of 100 patients with optic nerve hypoplasia for the presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine abnormalities was performed. Neuroimaging and endocrine studies were obtained in 65 cases. Visual acuity and associated ocular, neurologic, endocrine, systemic, and structural brain abnormalities were recorded. Seventy-five percent had bilateral optic nerve hypoplasia. Conditions previously associated with optic nerve hypoplasia and present in our patients include premature birth in 21%, fetal alcohol syndrome in 9%, maternal diabetes in 6%, and endocrine abnormalities in 6%. Developmental delay was present in 32%, cerebral palsy in 13%, and seizures in 12%. Of those imaged, 60% had an abnormal study. Neuroimaging showed abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development in 29 patients, septo-optic dysplasia in 10, hydrocephalus in 10, and corpus callosum abnormalities in 8. There was an associated clinical neurologic abnormality in 57% of patients with bilateral optic nerve hypoplasia and in 32% of patients with unilateral optic nerve hypoplasia. Patients with unilateral and bilateral optic nerve hypoplasia frequently have a wide range and common occurrence of concomitant neurologic, endocrine, and systemic abnormalities.

  4. Fibular a/hypoplasia: review and documentation of the fibular developmental field.

    PubMed

    Lewin, S O; Opitz, J M

    1986-01-01

    Fibular aplasia and/or hypoplasia is documented as a developmental field defect and the extent of the fibular developmental field is delineated. The term fibular a/hypoplasia denotes the clinical spectrum of fibular deficiency in different patients and also implies that aplasia can be present in one limb and hypoplasia in the other. Causal heterogeneity of fibular a/hypoplasia is demonstrated, thereby defining it as a developmental field defect. Most cases of fibular a/hypoplasia are isolated, sporadic events. An autosomal dominant form of isolated fibular a/hypoplasia with ankle joint anomaly is reviewed. Fibular a/hypoplasia may be part of more complex sporadic dysostoses; sporadic syndromes, an aneuploidy syndrome; several autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive conditions. Fibular a/hypoplasia is also postulated to occur as a result of disruption or teratogenic insult; in animals, fibular development can be disturbed by radiation, busulfan, and retinoic acid. Clinical data allow evaluation of the extent of the fibular developmental field of the lower limb. This appears to include the pubic portion of the pelvis, proximal femur (distal half being apparent tibial developmental territory), patella, anterior cruciate ligament, and lateral and/or axial foot rays (but "never" the hallux and almost never associated with polydactyly). The rare cases of fibuloulnar dimelia allow confirmation of the well known homology of mesomelic limb segments responsible for concordant ulnar and fibular (and radial and tibial) defect, if both upper and lower limbs are involved in a given condition. Because fibular a/hypoplasia is the commonest of the mesomelic paraxial hemimelias, is usually nonsyndromal, and in most cases is apparently nongenetic (ie, with negligible recurrence risk), we propose that in humans, as in several other tetrapods, the fibula is undergoing regressive evolution and hence is developmentally especially labile.

  5. Blaschko Linear Enamel Defects – A Marker for Focal Dermal Hypoplasia: Case Report of Focal Dermal Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gysin, Stefan; Itin, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH) is a rare genetic skin disorder. The inheritance of FDH or Goltz-Gorlin syndrome is X-linked dominant and the disease is associated with a PORCN gene mutation. This gene plays a key role in the Wnt pathway, which has an impact on embryonic development. Every tissue derived from meso- and ectoderm can be affected. Patients suffer from cutaneous, ocular, osseous, oral and dental defects. The skin and dental alterations manifest along the Blaschko lines. We present a woman (born in 1962) suffering from FDH with congenital skin changes and Blaschko linear enamel defects. Typical symptoms (e.g. fat herniations, scoliosis, syndactyly, microphthalmia, caries and alopecia) plus vertical grooving of all teeth gave a first indication. Molecular genetic testing confirmed the definitive diagnosis of FDH. We hypothesize that, in the context of typical skin changes, visible Blaschko lines on the teeth in the form of vertical grooves are almost pathognomonic for FDH. PMID:26078738

  6. Optic nerve hypoplasia with posterior pituitary ectopia: male predominance and nonassociation with breech delivery.

    PubMed

    Brodsky, M C

    1999-02-01

    To determine whether posterior pituitary ectopia in children with optic nerve hypoplasia has a male predominance or an increased incidence of breech delivery. Retrospective analysis of 12 children with optic nerve hypoplasia and posterior pituitary ectopia. Eleven of 12 patients with posterior pituitary ectopia were boys. No child had a history of breech delivery. Two children had a history of breech positioning but were delivered by cesarean section. Posterior pituitary ectopia with optic nerve hypoplasia shows a strong male predominance but no association with breech delivery.

  7. Congenital Horner Syndrome with Heterochromia Iridis Associated with Ipsilateral Internal Carotid Artery Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Coulier, Julie; Rommel, Denis; Boschi, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Background Horner syndrome (HS), also known as Claude-Bernard-Horner syndrome or oculosympathetic palsy, comprises ipsilateral ptosis, miosis, and facial anhidrosis. Case Report We report herein the case of a 67-year-old man who presented with congenital HS associated with ipsilateral hypoplasia of the internal carotid artery (ICA), as revealed by heterochromia iridis and confirmed by computed tomography (CT). Conclusions CT evaluation of the skull base is essential to establish this diagnosis and distinguish aplasia from agenesis/hypoplasia (by the absence or hypoplasia of the carotid canal) or from acquired ICA obstruction as demonstrated by angiographic CT. PMID:25749818

  8. Management of adolescents with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Merke, Deborah P; Poppas, Dix P

    2013-12-01

    The management of congenital adrenal hyperplasia involves suppression of adrenal androgen production, in addition to treatment of adrenal insufficiency. Management of adolescents with congenital adrenal hyperplasia is especially challenging because changes in the hormonal milieu during puberty can lead to inadequate suppression of adrenal androgens, psychosocial issues often affect adherence to medical therapy, and sexual function plays a major part in adolescence and young adulthood. For these reasons, treatment regimen reassessment is indicated during adolescence. Patients with non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia require reassessment regarding the need for glucocorticoid drug treatment. No clinical trials have compared various regimens for classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia in adults, thus therapy is individualised and based on the prevention of adverse outcomes. Extensive patient education is key during transition from paediatric care to adult care and should include education of females with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia regarding their genital anatomy and surgical history. Common issues for these patients include urinary incontinence, vaginal stenosis, clitoral pain, and cosmetic concerns; for males with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia, common issues include testicular adrenal rest tumours. Transition from paediatric to adult care is most successful when phased over many years. Education of health-care providers on how to successfully transition patients is greatly needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Management of adolescents with congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Merke, Deborah P; Poppas, Dix P

    2014-01-01

    The management of congenital adrenal hyperplasia involves suppression of adrenal androgen production, in addition to treatment of adrenal insufficiency. Management of adolescents with congenital adrenal hyperplasia is especially challenging because changes in the hormonal milieu during puberty can lead to inadequate suppression of adrenal androgens, psychosocial issues often affect adherence to medical therapy, and sexual function plays a major part in adolescence and young adulthood. For these reasons, treatment regimen reassessment is indicated during adolescence. Patients with non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia require reassessment regarding the need for glucocorticoid drug treatment. No clinical trials have compared various regimens for classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia in adults, thus therapy is individualised and based on the prevention of adverse outcomes. Extensive patient education is key during transition from paediatric care to adult care and should include education of females with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia regarding their genital anatomy and surgical history. Common issues for these patients include urinary incontinence, vaginal stenosis, clitoral pain, and cosmetic concerns; for males with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia, common issues include testicular adrenal rest tumours. Transition from paediatric to adult care is most successful when phased over many years. Education of health-care providers on how to successfully transition patients is greatly needed. PMID:24622419

  10. Adrenal imaging (Part 1): Imaging techniques and primary cortical lesions

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Ananya; Das, Chandan J.; Dhamija, Ekta; Kumar, Rakesh; Gupta, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal glands can be affected by a variety of lesions. Adrenal lesions can either be primary, of adrenal origin, or secondary to other pathologies. Primary adrenal lesions can further be either of cortical or medullary origin. Functioning adrenal lesions can also give clues to the histologic diagnosis and direct workup. Over the years, various imaging techniques have been developed that have increased diagnostic accuracy and helped in better characterization of adrenal lesions non-invasively. In the first part of the two part series, we review adrenal imaging techniques and adrenal cortical tumors such as adenomas, adrenocortical tumors, adrenal hyperplasia and oncocytomas. PMID:25593820

  11. Addiction and the adrenal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Vinson, Gavin P; Brennan, Caroline H

    2013-01-01

    Substantial evidence shows that the hypophyseal–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis and corticosteroids are involved in the process of addiction to a variety of agents, and the adrenal cortex has a key role. In general, plasma concentrations of cortisol (or corticosterone in rats or mice) increase on drug withdrawal in a manner that suggests correlation with the behavioural and symptomatic sequelae both in man and in experimental animals. Corticosteroid levels fall back to normal values in resumption of drug intake. The possible interactions between brain corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) products and the systemic HPA, and additionally with the local CRH–POMC system in the adrenal gland itself, are complex. Nevertheless, the evidence increasingly suggests that all may be interlinked and that CRH in the brain and brain POMC products interact with the blood-borne HPA directly or indirectly. Corticosteroids themselves are known to affect mood profoundly and may themselves be addictive. Additionally, there is a heightened susceptibility for addicted subjects to relapse in conditions that are associated with change in HPA activity, such as in stress, or at different times of the day. Recent studies give compelling evidence that a significant part of the array of addictive symptoms is directly attributable to the secretory activity of the adrenal cortex and the actions of corticosteroids. Additionally, sex differences in addiction may also be attributable to adrenocortical function: in humans, males may be protected through higher secretion of DHEA (and DHEAS), and in rats, females may be more susceptible because of higher corticosterone secretion. PMID:23825159

  12. Primitive neuroectodermal adrenal gland tumour.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Y P; Lang, Brian H H; Tam, S C; Wong, K P

    2014-10-01

    Ewing's sarcoma, also called primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the adrenal gland, is extremely rare. Only a few cases have been reported in the literature. We report on a woman with adult-onset primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the adrenal gland presenting with progressive flank pain. Computed tomography confirmed an adrenal tumour with invasion of the left diaphragm and kidney. Radical surgery was performed and the pain completely resolved; histology confirmed the presence of primitive neuroectodermal tumour, for which she was given chemotherapy. The clinical presentation of this condition is non-specific, and a definitive diagnosis is based on a combination of histology, as well as immunohistochemical and cytogenic analysis. According to the literature, these tumours demonstrate rapid growth and aggressive behaviour but there are no well-established guidelines or treatment strategies. Nevertheless, surgery remains the mainstay of local disease control; curative surgery can be performed in most patients. Adjuvant chemoirradiation has been advocated yet no consensus is available. The prognosis of patients with primitive neuroectodermal tumours remains poor.

  13. Rare adrenal tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Radu

    2014-04-01

    Apart from neuroblastomas, adrenal tumors are exceedingly rare in children and young adults. In this age group, the vast majority of patients present with clinical signs associated with excess hormone production. The most common tumor to arise from the adrenal cortex is an adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). Similar to the situation in adults, this tumor is frequently diagnosed at a late stage and carries a very poor prognosis. ACCs require extensive/aggressive local resection followed by mitotane chemotherapy. A multidisciplinary approach is essential, and these children should be referred to units that have previous experience in managing ACCs. International registries are an invaluable source for evidence-based care, and such collaborations should be further developed in the future. Pheochromocytomas are derived from the adrenal medulla and present with symptoms caused by high secretion of catecholamines. At least one-third of these children will be found to carry genetic mutations, most commonly the RET gene (MEN2 syndrome) or the VHL gene. Open radical adrenalectomy should be offered to children with adrenocortical cancers. For all other cases, laparoscopic adrenalectomy is the treatment of choice. It is possible that the retroperitoneoscopic approach will gain increasing favor. The role of robotic adrenalectomy remains controversial.

  14. Occult adrenal insufficiency in surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hubay, C A; Weckesser, E C; Levy, R P

    1975-01-01

    Eight patients admitted to a University hospital with acute surgical problems and related adrenal insufficiency were reviewed and three are presented in detail. Surgical stress and continued sepsis played major roles in the lack of responsiveness to usual modes of therapy until the adrenal insufficiency was corrected. The patients fell into three major clinical categories of adrenal insufficiency. Chronic illness and sepsis are shown to affect steroid production and metabolism, as well as adrenal responsiveness to ACTH. Pharmacologic amounts of steroids are often needed in patients with shock, gram negative sepsis and prolonged illnesses, even if normal or elevated serum cortisols are present. Therapeutic trials of cortisol administration are shown to be confusing when not accompanied by easily performed diagnostic tests of adrenal function. It is emphasized that a pretreatment serum cortisol should be obtained whenever possible. The evaluation of adrenal function is of lifelong importance to the patient. PMID:165792

  15. Laparoscopic Resection of an Adrenal Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinos, Toutouzas G.; Panagiotis, Kekis B.; Nikolaos, Michalopoulos V.; Ioannis, Flessas; Andreas, Manouras; Geogrios, Zografos

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Schwannomas are tumors originating from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve sheath (neurilemma) of the neuroectoderm. Rarely, schwannomas can arise from the retroperitoneum and adrenal medulla. We describe a case of a 71-y-old woman who presented with an incidentally discovered adrenal tumor. Methods: Ultrasound and computed tomography scans revealed a lesion with solid and cystic areas originating from the left adrenal gland. The patient underwent complete laparoscopic resection of the tumor and the left adrenal gland. Results: Histopathological examination and immunohistochemical staining of the excised specimen revealed a benign schwannoma measuring 5.5×5×3.7 cm. To our knowledge, few other cases of laparoscopic resection of adrenal schwannomas have been reported. Conclusion: Because preoperative diagnosis of adrenal tumors is inconclusive, complete laparoscopic excision allows for definitive diagnosis with histological evaluation and represents the treatment of choice. PMID:23484583

  16. Purkinje cell heterotopy with cerebellar hypoplasia in two free-living American kestrels (Falco sparverius)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two wild fledgling kestrels exhibited lack of motor coordination, postural reaction deficits, and abnormal propioception. At necropsy, the cerebellum and brainstem were markedly underdeveloped. Microscopically, there was Purkinje cells heterotopy, abnormal circuitry, and hypoplasia with defective fo...

  17. Congenital hypoplasia of the lumbar pedicle with spondylolisthesis: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chang-Sheng; Lee, Sang-Ho; Lee, Hyung Chang; Oh, Hyeong-Seok; Hwang, Byeong-Wook; Park, Sang-Joon; Chen, Jian-Han

    2017-04-01

    Congenital hypoplasia of the spinal pedicle is a rare condition. Previously reported cases were treated conservatively or with posterior instrumented fusion. However, the absence or hypoplasia of the lumbar pedicle may increase the difficulty of pedicle screw fixation and fusion. Herein, the authors describe 2 cases of rare adult congenital hypoplasia of the right lumbar pedicles associated with spondylolisthesis. The patients underwent anterior lumbar interbody fusion with a stand-alone cage as well as percutaneous pedicle screw fixation. This method was used to avoid the difficulties associated with pedicle screw fixation and to attain solid fusion. Both patients achieved satisfactory outcomes after a minimum of 2 years of follow-up. This method may be an alternative for patients with congenital hypoplasia of the lumbar spinal pedicle.

  18. Le Fort II midfacial distraction combined with orthognathic surgery in the treatment of nasomaxillary hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongbo; Dai, Jiewen; Wang, Xudong; Zhang, Wenbin; Shen, Steve Guofang

    2014-05-01

    Patients with nasomaxillary hypoplasia have severe facial concavity and compromised skeletal class III malocclusion. Its treatment is still a challenge to surgeons. Our aim was to evaluate the combination of midfacial distraction and orthognathic surgery in the treatment of nasomaxillary hypoplasia. Four patients with nasomaxillary hypoplasia were enrolled in this study. After Le Fort II osteotomy, the rotational distraction of nasomaxillary complex was performed to rehabilitate facial convexity. Then bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy with or without Le Fort I osteotomy was used to correct malocclusion. All patients healed uneventfully, and the maxillae moved forward conspicuously. No obvious pain and severe discomfort were complained during distraction. A significant advancement and downward movement of the maxilla were shown by cephalometric analysis. The combination of midfacial distraction and orthognathic surgery provides us an ideal alternative in the treatment of nasomaxillary hypoplasia.

  19. Abrasion, erosion, and abfraction combined with linear enamel hypoplasia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Boston, D W; al-bargi, H; Bogert, M

    1999-10-01

    Linear enamel hypoplasia is a developmental disturbance of enamel resulting in clinically visible horizontal defects in enamel that are present on eruption of the tooth. Nondevelopmental lesions of the hard tissues of the tooth, including carious, abrasion, erosion, attrition, and abfraction lesions, require varying amounts of time after tooth eruption to develop. Because linear enamel hypoplasia lesions are present on eruption and are exposed to the factors responsible for abrasion, erosion, and abfraction, nondevelopmental lesions could occur within them in any combination. This report describes a patient with multiple teeth with linear enamel hypoplasia lesions containing nondevelopmental defects as well as nondevelopmental defects that occurred separately. Severe pain and a unique lesion morphology were associated with the linear enamel hypoplasia defects. Affected teeth were extracted because of advanced periodontitis and were sectioned to determine the nature of the enamel and dentin lesions.

  20. [Virilizing adrenal ganglioneuroma : A rare differential diagnosis in testosterone secreting adrenal tumours].

    PubMed

    Gaisa, N T; Klöppel, G; Brehmer, B; Neulen, J; Stephan, P; Knüchel, R; Donner, A

    2009-09-01

    Testosterone secreting tumours of the adrenal glands are usually adrenal carcinomas or adenomas. Here we report the rare case of an adrenal ganglioneuroma with ectopic Leydig cells, a so-called virilizing adrenal ganglioneuroma. Clinically it is characterized by symptoms of virilization, histologically by the occurrence of a population of eosinophilic cells. In the absence of crystalloids of Reinke this cell population can be identified as Leydig cells based on positive immunohistochemical staining of inhibin and calretinin.

  1. [Development of the human adrenal glands].

    PubMed

    Folligan, K; Bouvier, R; Targe, F; Morel, Y; Trouillas, J

    2005-09-01

    The human adrenal is an endocrine gland located at the superior part of the kidney. Composed of the adrenal cortex of mesoblastic origin and the adrenal medulla of neuroectoblastic origin, the human fetal adrenal grows considerably during the first three months of development. From 12 to 18 weeks of development (WD), the weight of the adrenals increases seven-fold. The gland's weight doubles from 18 to 28 WD and from 28 to 36 WD. At birth, the two adrenals weigh on average 10 g. At the 8th week, two zones are individualized in the adrenal cortex: the definitive zone and the fetal inner zone. At the second trimester, according to ultrastructural and biochemical studies, a third zone, called the transition zone, is individualized between the definitive zone and the fetal inner zone. The definitive zone persists, but the origin of the three zones (glomerular, fascicular and reticular) of adult adrenal cortex is not known. The fetal inner zone regresses from the 5th month of gestation and disappears totally one year after birth. At the 8th week, the immature neuroblasts migrate to the definitive zone, then to the fetal inner zone to compose the adrenal medulla, which develops essentially after birth and during the first year. Before the 10th week, the human fetal adrenal is able to produce steroid hormones, in particular dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S); the secretion of cortisol remains discussed. The development of the human fetal adrenal is complex and is under the control of hormones (ACTH, LH and betaHCG), growth factors (ACTH essentially) and transcription factors (essentially SF1 and DAX-1). Knowledge of morphological and molecular phenomena of this development permits to understand the pathophisiology of congenital adrenal deficiencies.

  2. Metabolism of adrenal cholesterol in man

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Abraham; Delcroix, Claude; Levin, Sam

    1972-01-01

    The kinetics of plasma and adrenal cholesteral equilibration were analyzed in patients undergoing bilateral adrenalectomy for generalized mammary carcinoma. A biological model is proposed to help in the understanding of adrenal cholesterol physiology. It comprises two intracellular compartments: (1) A compartment of free adrenal cholesterol which is small (of the order of 17 mg) but turns over very fast; it is renewed approximately 8 times per day: 3 times by the inflow of free plasma cholesterol, and 5 times by the hydrolysis of esterified adrenal cholesterol, the contribution of adrenal cholesterol synthesis appearing to be relatively small. (2) A compartment of esterified adrenal cholesterol which is 20 times larger; it is constantly renewed by in situ esterification and hydrolysis with a daily fractional turnover rate of the order of 0.25. The direct and selective accumulation of plasma cholesteryl esters is practically absent. Only free adrenal cholesterol returns to plasma, mostly after conversion into steroid “hormones.” However small the synthesis of adrenal cholesterol may be, it seems more important in the zona “reticularis.” On the other hand, the inflow of plasma cholesterol and the turnover of the free adrenal compartment tend to be faster in the zona “fasciculata.” The equilibration of plasma and adrenal cholesterol can proceed unmodified under conditions of ACTH suppression. In one patient with Cushing's disease the size of the two adrenal compartments was clearly increased but their equilibration with plasma cholesterol proceeded normally. In another patient the kinetics of hydrocortisone corresponded to those of free adrenal cholesterol in the control studies. PMID:4338119

  3. Complete sternal cleft associated with right clavicular, manubrial, and thyroid hypoplasia, pectus deformity, and spinal anomalies.

    PubMed

    Golden, Eleza T; Alazraki, Adina; Loewen, Jonathan; Braithwaite, Kiery

    2016-01-01

    Sternal cleft anomalies are rare. Associated anomalies include pentalogy of Cantrell and posterior fossa abnormalities, hemangiomas, arteriopathy, cardiac anomalies, eye abnormalities, and sternal defects syndrome. There is only a single report of complete sternal cleft, pectus excavatum, and right clavicular hypoplasia in an adult. Thyroid hemiagenesis is also very rare. To our knowledge, this is the first case of complete sternal cleft, pectus deformity, and right clavicular hypoplasia in a child and the first case with right thyroid hemiagenesis.

  4. Anatomical vertebral artery hypoplasia and insufficiency impairs dynamic blood flow regulation.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kohei; Yoneya, Marina; Otsuki, Aki; Sadamoto, Tomoko; Ogoh, Shigehiko

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have suggested that vertebral artery (VA) hypoplasia is a predisposing factor for posterior cerebral stroke. We examined whether anatomical vertebrobasilar ischemia, i.e., unilateral VA hypoplasia and insufficiency, impairs dynamic blood flow regulation. Twenty-eight female subjects were divided into three groups by defined criteria: (i) unilateral VA hypoplasia (n = 8), (ii) VA insufficiency (n = 6), and (iii) control (n = 14). Hypoplastic VA criterion was VA blood flow of 40 ml min(-1) , whereas VA insufficiency criterion was net (left + right) VA blood flow of 100 ml min(-1) or less. We evaluated left, right, and net VA blood flows by ultrasonography during hypercapnia, normocapnia, and hypocapnia to evaluate VA CO2 reactivity. The unilateral VA hypoplasia group showed lower CO2 reactivity at hypoplastic VA than at non-hypoplastic VA (2.65 ± 0.58 versus 3.00 ± 0.48% per mmHg, P = 0.027) and net VA CO2 reactivity was preserved (Unilateral VA hypoplasia, 2.95 ± 0.48 versus Control, 2.93 ± 0.42% per mmHg, P = 0.992). However, the VA insufficiency group showed a lower net VA CO2 reactivity compared to the control (2.29 ± 0.55 versus 2.93 ± 0.42% per mmHg, P = 0.032) and the unilateral VA hypoplasia (P = 0.046). VA hypoplasia reduced CO2 reactivity, although non-hypoplastic VA may compensate this regulatory limitation. In subjects with VA insufficiency, lowered CO2 reactivity at the both VA could not preserve normal net VA CO2 reactivity. These findings provide a possible physiological mechanism for the increased risk of posterior cerebral stroke in subjects with VA hypoplasia and insufficiency.

  5. The adrenal medulla and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, S L

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature describing the condition of the adrenal medulla in Parkinson's disease. Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized primarily by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Clinical observations have revealed that Parkinson's disease is also frequently accompanied by a variety of autonomic symptoms. The adrenal medulla is a major component of the autonomic nervous system. However, until recently this organ has not been of particular interest in Parkinson's disease. Early studies found histologic abnormalities in adrenal medullary cells, and several groups measured urinary and plasma catecholamines to determine general autonomic status. In the late 1980s adrenal medullary tissue was first transplanted to the caudate nucleus in an attempt to augment the decreased levels of dopamine, and thus treat the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. At this time the status of the adrenal medulla in this disease became clinically important. We measured the total catecholamine content of the parkinsonian adrenal medulla in tissue collected both at autopsy and in conjunction with adrenal-caudate transplants. Adrenal medullary catecholamines and several neuropeptides were severely depressed in parkinsonian glands. Thus, the adrenal medulla appears to be a target of the peripheral manifestations of Parkinson's disease.

  6. Imaging of adrenal and renal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Nancy A; Lostumbo, Antonella; Adam, Sharon Z; Remer, Erick M; Nikolaidis, Paul; Yaghmai, Vahid; Berggruen, Senta M; Miller, Frank H

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhage of the kidneys and adrenal glands has many etiologies. In the adrenal glands, trauma, anticoagulation, stress, sepsis, surgery, and neoplasms are common causes of hemorrhage. In the kidneys, reasons for hemorrhage include trauma, bleeding diathesis, vascular diseases, infection, infarction, hemorrhagic cyst rupture, the Antopol-Goldman lesion, and neoplasms. Angiomyolipoma and renal cell carcinoma are the neoplasms most commonly associated with hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal cortical carcinoma, metastases, and pheochromocytoma are associated with hemorrhage in the adrenal glands. Understanding the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features, and causes of hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal glands is critical. It is also important to keep in mind that mimickers of hemorrhage exist, including lymphoma in both the kidneys and adrenal glands, and melanoma metastases in the adrenal glands. Appropriate imaging follow-up of renal and adrenal hemorrhage should occur to exclude an underlying malignancy as the cause. If there is suspicion for malignancy that cannot be definitively diagnosed on imaging, surgery or biopsy may be warranted. Angiography may be indicated when there is a suspected underlying vascular disease. Unnecessary intervention, such as nephrectomy, may be avoided in patients with benign causes or no underlying disease. Appropriate management is dependent on accurate diagnosis of the cause of renal or adrenal hemorrhage and it is incumbent upon the radiologist to determine the etiology.

  7. Unilateral adrenal enlargement due to Histoplasma capsulatum.

    PubMed

    Swartz, M A; Scofield, R H; Dickey, W D; Kirk, J L; Wilson, D A; Pitha, J V; Muchmore, H G

    1996-10-01

    Human infection with Histoplasma capsulatum runs the gamut from asymptomatic to disseminated disease. CT-directed fine-needle aspiration of bilaterally enlarged adrenal glands has been used in diagnosing serious infections with this ubiquitous organism. Three cases have previously been reported in which H. capsulatum infection caused unilateral adrenal enlargement; this enlargement was diagnosed post-mortem. We describe three patients with unilateral adrenal enlargement due to H. capsulatum whose conditions were diagnosed antemortem. We encourage clinicians to include infection with H. capsulatum as well as other granulomatous diseases and tumors in the differential diagnosis of unilateral adrenal enlargement.

  8. Adrenal scan in 17-alpha-hydroxylase deficiency: false indication of adrenal adenoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, R.M.; Lieberman, L.M.; Newman, T.J.; Friedman, A.; Bargman, G.J.

    1981-07-01

    A patient who was thought to have testicular feminization syndrome and primary aldosteronism had an adrenal scan that suggested an adrenal adenoma. After later diagnosis of 17-alpha-hydroxylase deficiency, she was treated with glucocorticoids rather than surgery. Her clinical course and a repeat adrenal scan confirmed she did not have a tumor.

  9. Therapeutic siRNAs for dominant genetic skin disorders including pachyonychia congenita.

    PubMed

    Leachman, Sancy A; Hickerson, Robyn P; Hull, Peter R; Smith, Frances J D; Milstone, Leonard M; Lane, E Birgitte; Bale, Sherri J; Roop, Dennis R; McLean, W H Irwin; Kaspar, Roger L

    2008-09-01

    The field of science and medicine has experienced a flood of data and technology associated with the human genome project. Over 10,000 human diseases have been genetically defined, but little progress has been made with respect to the clinical application of this knowledge. A notable exception to this exists for pachyonychia congenita (PC), a rare, dominant-negative keratin disorder. The establishment of a non-profit organization, PC Project, has led to an unprecedented coalescence of patients, scientists, and physicians with a unified vision of developing novel therapeutics for PC. Utilizing the technological by-products of the human genome project, such as RNA interference (RNAi) and quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), physicians and scientists have collaborated to create a candidate siRNA therapeutic that selectively inhibits a mutant allele of KRT6A, the most commonly affected PC keratin. In vitro investigation of this siRNA demonstrates potent inhibition of the mutant allele and reversal of the cellular aggregation phenotype. In parallel, an allele-specific quantitative real-time RT-PCR assay has been developed and validated on patient callus samples in preparation for clinical trials. If clinical efficacy is ultimately demonstrated, this "first-in-skin" siRNA may herald a paradigm shift in the treatment of dominant-negative genetic disorders.

  10. A Novel Mutation in CLCN1 Associated with Feline Myotonia Congenita

    PubMed Central

    Gandolfi, Barbara; Daniel, Rob J.; O'Brien, Dennis P.; Guo, Ling T.; Youngs, Melanie D.; Leach, Stacey B.; Jones, Boyd R.; Shelton, G. Diane; Lyons, Leslie A.

    2014-01-01

    Myotonia congenita (MC) is a skeletal muscle channelopathy characterized by inability of the muscle to relax following voluntary contraction. Worldwide population prevalence in humans is 1∶100,000. Studies in mice, dogs, humans and goats confirmed myotonia associated with functional defects in chloride channels and mutations in a skeletal muscle chloride channel (CLCN1). CLCN1 encodes for the most abundant chloride channel in the skeletal muscle cell membrane. Five random bred cats from Winnipeg, Canada with MC were examined. All cats had a protruding tongue, limited range of jaw motion and drooling with prominent neck and proximal limb musculature. All cats had blepharospasm upon palpebral reflex testing and a short-strided gait. Electromyograms demonstrated myotonic discharges at a mean frequency of 300 Hz resembling the sound of a ‘swarm of bees’. Muscle histopathology showed hypertrophy of all fiber types. Direct sequencing of CLCN1 revealed a mutation disrupting a donor splice site downstream of exon 16 in only the affected cats. In vitro translation of the mutated protein predicted a premature truncation and partial lack of the highly conserved CBS1 (cystathionine β-synthase) domain critical for ion transport activity and one dimerization domain pivotal in channel formation. Genetic screening of the Winnipeg random bred population of the cats' origin identified carriers of the mutation. A genetic test for population screening is now available and carrier cats from the feral population can be identified. PMID:25356766

  11. Telomerase RNA level limits telomere maintenance in X-linked dyskeratosis congenita

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Judy M.Y.; Collins, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) patients suffer a progressive and ultimately fatal loss of hematopoietic renewal correlating with critically short telomeres. The predominant X-linked form of DC results from substitutions in dyskerin, a protein required both for ribosomal RNA (rRNA) pseudouridine modification and for cellular accumulation of telomerase RNA (TER). Accordingly, alternative models have posited that the exhaustion of cellular renewal in X-linked DC arises as a primary consequence of ribosome deficiency or telomerase deficiency. Here we test, for the first time, whether X-linked DC patient cells are compromised for telomerase function at telomeres. We show that telomerase activation in family-matched control cells allows telomere elongation and telomere length maintenance, while telomerase activation in X-linked DC patient cells fails to prevent telomere erosion with proliferation. Furthermore, we demonstrate by phenotypic rescue that telomere defects in X-linked DC patient cells arise solely from reduced accumulation of TER. We also show that X-linked DC patient cells averted from premature senescence support normal levels of rRNA pseudouridine modification and normal kinetics of rRNA precursor processing, in contrast with phenotypes reported for a proposed mouse model of the human disease. These findings support the significance of telomerase deficiency in the pathology of X-linked DC. PMID:17015423

  12. Telomerase reverse-transcriptase homozygous mutations in autosomal recessive dyskeratosis congenita and Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Marrone, Anna; Walne, Amanda; Tamary, Hannah; Masunari, Yuka; Kirwan, Michael; Beswick, Richard; Vulliamy, Tom; Dokal, Inderjeet

    2010-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is a multisystem bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by a triad of mucocutaneous abnormalities and an increased predisposition to malignancy. X-linked DC is due to mutations in DKC1, while heterozygous mutations in TERC (telomerase RNA component) and TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase) have been found in autosomal dominant DC. Many patients with DC remain uncharacterized, particularly families displaying autosomal recessive (AR) inheritance. We have now identified novel homozygous TERT mutations in 2 unrelated consanguineous families, where the index cases presented with classical DC or the more severe variant, Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson (HH) syndrome. These TERT mutations resulted in reduced telomerase activity and extremely short telomeres. As these mutations are homozygous, these patients are predicted to have significantly reduced telomerase activity in vivo. Interestingly, in contrast to patients with heterozygous TERT mutations or hemizygous DKC1 mutations, these 2 homozygous TERT patients were observed to have higher-than-expected TERC levels compared with controls. Collectively, the findings from this study demonstrate that homozygous TERT mutations, resulting in a pure but severe telomerase deficiency, produce a phenotype of classical AR-DC and its severe variant, the HH syndrome. PMID:17785587

  13. Recurrent de novo BICD2 mutation associated with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita and bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria.

    PubMed

    Ravenscroft, Gianina; Di Donato, Nataliya; Hahn, Gabriele; Davis, Mark R; Craven, Paul D; Poke, Gemma; Neas, Katherine R; Neuhann, Teresa M; Dobyns, William B; Laing, Nigel G

    2016-11-01

    Autosomal dominantly inherited mutations of BICD2 are associated with congenital-onset spinal muscular atrophy characterised by lower limb predominance. A few cases have also showed upper motor neuron pathology, including presenting with features resembling hereditary spastic paraplegia. The age-of-onset for the published families is usually at birth but also included cases with childhood- and adult-onset disease. In this report we described two isolated probands that presented in utero with features associated with reduced fetal movements. Both cases were diagnosed at birth with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) and hypotonia. Other variable features included congenital fractures, hip dislocation, micrognathia, respiratory insufficiency, microcephaly and bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria. Patient 1 is 4 years of age and stable, but shows significant motor developmental delay and delayed speech. Patient 2 passed away at 7 weeks of age. Through next generation sequencing we identified the same missense substitution in BICD2 (p.Arg694Cys) in both probands. Sanger sequencing showed that in both cases the mutation arose de novo. The in utero onset in both cases suggests that the p.Arg694Cys substitution may have a more deleterious effect on BICD2 function than previously described mutations. Our results broaden the phenotypes associated with BICD2 mutations to include AMC and cortical malformations and therefore to a similar phenotypic spectrum to that associated with its binding partner DYNC1H1.

  14. Bone marrow skeletal stem/progenitor cell defects in dyskeratosis congenita and telomere biology disorders.

    PubMed

    Balakumaran, Arun; Mishra, Prasun J; Pawelczyk, Edyta; Yoshizawa, Sayuri; Sworder, Brian J; Cherman, Natasha; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Bianco, Paolo; Giri, Neelam; Savage, Sharon A; Merlino, Glenn; Dumitriu, Bogdan; Dunbar, Cynthia E; Young, Neal S; Alter, Blanche P; Robey, Pamela G

    2015-01-29

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is an inherited multisystem disorder, characterized by oral leukoplakia, nail dystrophy, and abnormal skin pigmentation, as well as high rates of bone marrow (BM) failure, solid tumors, and other medical problems such as osteopenia. DC and telomere biology disorders (collectively referred to as TBD here) are caused by germline mutations in telomere biology genes leading to very short telomeres and limited proliferative potential of hematopoietic stem cells. We found that skeletal stem cells (SSCs) within the BM stromal cell population (BMSCs, also known as BM-derived mesenchymal stem cells), may contribute to the hematologic phenotype. TBD-BMSCs exhibited reduced clonogenicity, spontaneous differentiation into adipocytes and fibrotic cells, and increased senescence in vitro. Upon in vivo transplantation into mice, TBD-BMSCs failed to form bone or support hematopoiesis, unlike normal BMSCs. TERC reduction (a TBD-associated gene) in normal BMSCs by small interfering TERC-RNA (siTERC-RNA) recapitulated the TBD-BMSC phenotype by reducing proliferation and secondary colony-forming efficiency, and by accelerating senescence in vitro. Microarray profiles of control and siTERC-BMSCs showed decreased hematopoietic factors at the messenger RNA level and decreased secretion of factors at the protein level. These findings are consistent with defects in SSCs/BMSCs contributing to BM failure in TBD.

  15. Mutation of a type II keratin gene (K6a) in pachyonychia congenita.

    PubMed

    Bowden, P E; Haley, J L; Kansky, A; Rothnagel, J A; Jones, D O; Turner, R J

    1995-07-01

    Pachyonychia congenita (PC) is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterized by multiple ectodermal abnormalities. Patients with Jadassohn-Lewandowsky Syndrome (MIM #167200; PC-1) have nail defects (onchyogryposis), palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, follicular hyperkeratosis and oral leukokeratosis. Those with the rarer Jackson-Lawler Syndrome (MIM #167210; PC-2) lack oral involvement but have natal teeth and cutaneous cysts. Ultra-structural studies have identified abnormal keratin tonofilaments and linkage to the keratin gene cluster on chromosome 17 has been found in PC families. Keratins are the major structural proteins of the epidermis and associated appendages and the nail, hair follicle, palm, sole and tongue are the main sites of constitutive K6, K16 and K17 expression. Furthermore, mutations in K16 and K17 have recently been identified in some PC patients. Although we did not detect K16 or K17 mutations in PC families from Slovenia, we have found a heterozygous deletion in a K6 isoform (K6a) in the affected members of one family. This 3 bp deletion (AAC) in exon 1 of K6a removes a highly conserved asparagine residue (delta N170) from position 8 of the 1A helical domain (delta N8). This is the first K6a mutation to be described and this heterozygous K6a deletion is sufficient to explain the pathology observed in this PC-1 family.

  16. Rapid molecular prenatal diagnosis of spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita by PCR-SSP assay.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ying-Xia; Xia, Xin-Yi; Bu, Ying; Zhou, Guo-Hua; Yang, Bin; Lu, Hong-Yong; Shi, Yi-Chao; Pan, Lian-Jun; Huang, Yu-Feng; Li, Xiao-Jun

    2008-12-01

    Heterozygous mutations of COL2A1 gene are responsible for type II collagenopathies. The common skeletal phenotypes include achondrogenesis type II, hypochondrogenesis, Stickler dysplasia, Kniest dysplasia, late onset spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia, and spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC). Prevention of SEDC can be achieved by prenatal diagnosis. This study reports the first rapid molecular prenatal diagnosis of SEDC performed in China by polymerase chain reaction sequence-specific primer (PCR-SSP) analysis. The pregnant woman we previously reported with SEDC carried the G to A substitution at nucleotide 1510 in exon 23 of COL2A1 gene, which caused a change from glycine to serine at codon 504 (G504S). By the time the woman got pregnant again, she had terminated two pregnancies and still had no child. In the first pregnancy, the molecular mutation of the family was not yet identified, and therefore prenatal diagnosis was unable to be performed by DNA analysis. In the second pregnancy, G504S mutation was found from fetal DNA. At the time of her third pregnancy, the woman and her husband became extremely worried about the potential SEDC for the fetus. For this reason, a quick and reliable molecular prenatal diagnosis of SEDC was performed by a PCR-SSP on an amniocyte sample collected at the 14th week of pregnancy. No mutation of the fetal DNA was identified. The result was obtained within 24 h after the sample was collected. The technique could be applied in confirmatory diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis for the affected family.

  17. Disabling foot cramping in a runner secondary to paramyotonia congenita: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fredericson, Michael; Kim, Byung-Jo; Date, Elaine S

    2004-07-01

    An 18-year-old male runner was referred to the authors' clinic with a 1-year history of cramping left foot pain. His symptoms developed insidiously when he increased his training, with an onset of severe left foot pain and tightness that would develop after about 20 minutes of exercise. The more he continued to run, the more the symptoms were aggravated and evolved to the toes curling with intrinsic muscle spasm. This symptom was easily provoked when he was exposed to cold temperature. A family history of similar symptoms was revealed in his sister and uncle. Physical examination including neurologic examination was normal. Diagnostic workup revealed generalized myotonia. According to the history, physical examination, and diagnostic workup, his diagnosis was considered to be most compatible to paramyotonia congenita. He was given phenytoin, which lessened his symptoms and allowed him to continue running with minimal symptoms, but he stopped running because he was not able to maintain mileage high enough to compete successfully.

  18. Insights into genotype-phenotype correlation in pachyonychia congenita from the human intermediate filament mutation database.

    PubMed

    McLean, W H Irwin; Smith, Frances J D; Cassidy, Andrew J

    2005-10-01

    Keratins are the intermediate filament proteins specifically expressed by epithelial cells. The Human Genome Project has uncovered a total of 54 functional keratin genes that are differentially expressed in specific epithelial structures of the body, many of which involve the epidermis and its appendages. Pachyonychia congenita (PC) is a group of autosomal dominant genodermatoses affecting the nails, thick skin and other ectodermal structures, according to specific sub-type. The major clinical variants of the disorder (PC-1 and PC-2) are known to be caused by dominant-negative mutations in one of four differentiation-specific keratins: K6a, K6b, K16, and K17. A total of 20 human keratin genes are currently linked to single-gene disorders or are predisposing factors in complex traits. In addition, a further six intermediate filament genes have been linked to other non-epithelial genetic disorders. We have established a comprehensive mutation database that catalogs all published independent occurrences of intermediate filament mutations (http://www.interfil.org), with details of phenotypes, published papers, patient support groups and other information. Here, we review the genotype-phenotype trends emerging from the spectrum of mutations in these genes and apply these correlations to make predictions about PC phenotypes based on the site of mutation and keratin pair involved.

  19. Expanding the MYBPC1 phenotypic spectrum: a novel homozygous mutation causes arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Ekhilevitch, N; Kurolap, A; Oz-Levi, D; Mory, A; Hershkovitz, T; Ast, G; Mandel, H; Baris, H N

    2016-07-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is characterized by heterogeneous nonprogressive multiple joint contractures appearing at birth. We present a consanguineous Israeli-Druze family with several members presenting with AMC. A variable intra-familial phenotype and pected autosomal recessive inheritance prompted molecular diagnosis by whole-exome sequencing. Variant analysis focused on rare homozygous changes, revealed a missense variant in MYBPC1, NM_002465:c.556G>A (p.E286K), affecting the last nucleotide of Exon 8. This novel variant was not observed in the common variant databases and co-segregated as expected within the extended family. MYBPC1 encodes a slow skeletal muscle isoform, essential for muscle contraction. Heterozygous mutations in this gene are associated with distal arthrogryposis types 1b and 2, whereas a homozygous nonsense mutation is implicated in one family with lethal congenital contractural syndrome 4. We present a novel milder MYBPC1 homozygous phenotype. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Fatal broncho-pneumonia of an infant with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC).

    PubMed

    Hikiji, Wakako; Fukunaga, Tatsushige

    2014-05-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a heterogenous group of disorders characterized by multiple joint contractures with an estimated frequency of 1 in 3000-5100 livebirths. The authors present a case of an 11-month-old infant with AMC who died due to severe pneumonia. The deceased had no significant anomaly except for the stated orthpaediatric deformities, and the long-term outcome was expected to be positive. The only remarkable past medical history was respiratory syncytial virus (RS) infection at 6-months old which had taken a few days for a complete recovery. Onset of high fever was observed 3 days prior to her death and she was found in a state of cardiopulmonary arrest in bed by her father in an early morning. Forensic autopsy confirmed the pathohistological diagnosis of severe broncho-pneumonia. The presence of scoliosis and funnel chest was considered to be attributable to the disability to turn herself over and excrete sputum sufficiently, leading to a fatal respiratory complication. This paper stresses the possibility of distal arthrogryposis type of AMC becoming contributory to death despite the initial optimistic prognosis, as well as the importance of postmortem investigation in unexpected fatal cases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mutations in the NEB gene cause fetal akinesia/arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Feingold-Zadok, Michal; Chitayat, David; Chong, Karen; Injeyan, Marie; Shannon, Patrick; Chapmann, Daphne; Maymon, Ron; Pillar, Nir; Reish, Orit

    2017-02-01

    We studied a series of patients with fetal akinesia deformation sequence (FADS)/arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC), with nemaline bodies on muscle specimens, which revealed mutations in the NEB gene. We pathologically assessed seven cases from three families, who presented with AMC/FADS. Targeted genetic analysis for Ashkenazi Jewish mutation (in relevant patients) was followed by next-generation sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. All cases were detected on prenatal ultrasound. Characteristic nemaline bodies on muscle specimens were demonstrated in at least one case in each of the nuclear families. In the Ashkenazi Jewish family, the known founder mutation was compounded by one recurrent novel splice site. The other two families were of Chinese and Korean origins, and only one pathogenic heterozygous mutation was detected in each. Nemaline myopathy due to NEB mutation(s) leads to FADS/AMC. Currently, mutated NEB is under-recognized as a cause for AMC/FADS. Our study attempts to raise recognition of this gene as a cause, suggesting the NEB gene should be included in genetic panels used for FADS/AMC cases and be fully covered when EXOME sequencing is utilized. A heterozygous mutation may suggest either compounding undetected one or digenic interaction that requires further genetic analyses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Porcine arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC): new diagnostic test and narrowed candidate region.

    PubMed

    Haubitz, Monika; Neuenschwander, Stefan; Vögeli, Peter

    2012-12-01

    In the Swiss Large White pig population a genetically caused arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) variant was identified. The disease is autosomal recessively inherited and is a fatal defect. Affected piglets are of normal size, but show malformed and permanently contracted joints in their legs. Often the spinal cord is curved and the lower jaw is shortened. Originally, AMC was mapped to a 5 Mb region on pig chromosome 5 (SSC5) between microsatellite markers SW152 and SW904. In order to detect unaffected carriers a diagnostic test using markers within the candidate region was developed. However, two independent recombination events occurred in a diseased and in a healthy piglet. Therefore, we selected 24 consecutive markers (3 microsatellites, 19 SNPs and 2 indels) in the candidate region, and determined the haplotypes in the two pedigrees with the recombinations. The parents and five offspring were investigated. In consequence, we were able to narrow down the candidate region and map AMC between SNPs ALGA0032767 and DRGA0006010 on SSC5 which span around 2.32 Mb. The candidate region shares homology to human chromosome 12. However, we are still lacking good candidate genes. A PCR-RFLP was developed and is used as an improved genetic test for AMC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Long-term functional and mobility outcomes for individuals with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Nouraei, Hirmand; Sawatzky, Bonita; MacGillivray, Megan; Hall, Judith

    2017-05-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a birth defect that involves congenital joint contractures in two or more joints including the limbs, spine, and jaw. The purpose of our study was to identify long-term outcomes of adults with AMC. We recruited 177 participants from over 15 countries, making this the largest international study of adults with AMC. Participants provided demographic information including living situation and mobility and completed two standardized outcome measures, of quality of life and physical activity, using an online survey format. The data were compiled and descriptive analyses were performed. The study group consisted of 72% females and a mean age of 39 years. Over 90% of participants had upper and lower limb involvement, 35% had scoliosis or lordosis while 16% had jaw problems. Participants had an average of nine (0-70) surgeries at the time of the study. The majority (75%) of respondents lived independently of family members (on their own or with a partner). Participants were nearly three times more likely to have a graduate degree than the general US population. Participants reported lower physical function scores than the general US population; however, they reported similar or higher scores for the other quality of life domains of the SF-36. They were considerably less physically active than able-bodied individuals. Half of participants experienced chronic back pain and 60% reported joint pain. Additionally, almost half of the participants took regular pain medications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Expansion of the GLE1-associated arthrogryposis multiplex congenita clinical spectrum.

    PubMed

    Smith, C; Parboosingh, J S; Boycott, K M; Bönnemann, C G; Mah, J K; Lamont, R E; Micheil Innes, A; Bernier, F P

    2017-03-01

    Mutations in GLE1 cause two recessive subtypes of arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC), a condition characterized by joint contractures at birth, and all previously reported patients died in the perinatal period. GLE1 related AMC has been almost exclusively reported in the Finnish population and is caused by a relatively common pathogenic splicing mutation in that population. Here, we report two non-Finnish brothers with novel compound heterozygous splicing mutations in GLE1, one of whom has survived to 12 years of age. We also demonstrate low levels of residual wild type transcript in fibroblasts from the surviving brother, suggesting that this residual wild-type transcript may contribute to the relatively longer-term survival in this family. We provide a detailed clinical report on the surviving patient, providing the first insight into the natural history of this rare neuromuscular disease. We also suggest that lethal congenital contracture syndrome 1 (LCCS1) and lethal arthrogryposis with anterior horn disease (LAAHD), the two AMC subtypes related to GLE1, do not have sufficient clinical or molecular differentiation to be considered allelic disorders. Rather, GLE1 mutations cause a variable spectrum of AMC severity including a non-lethal variant described herein. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Plasma from human mothers of fetuses with severe arthrogryposis multiplex congenita causes deformities in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Leslie; Polizzi, Agata; Morriss-Kay, Gillian; Vincent, Angela

    1999-01-01

    Arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is characterized by fixed joint contractures and other deformities, sometimes resulting in fetal death. The cause is unknown in most cases, but some women with fetuses affected by severe AMC have serum antibodies that inhibit fetal acetylcholine receptor (AChR) function, and antibodies to fetal antigens might play a pathogenic role in other congenital disorders. To investigate this possibility, we have established a model by injecting pregnant mice with plasma from four anti-AChR antibody–positive women whose fetuses had severe AMC. We found that human antibodies can be transferred efficiently to the mouse fetus during the last few days of fetal life. Many of the fetuses of dams injected with AMC maternal plasmas or Ig were stillborn and showed fixed joints and other deformities. Moreover, similar changes were found in mice after injection of a serum from one anti-AChR antibody–negative mother who had had four AMC fetuses. Thus, we have confirmed the role of maternal antibodies in cases of AMC associated with maternal anti-AChR, and we have demonstrated the existence of pathogenic maternal factors in one other case. Importantly, this approach can be used to look at the effects of other maternal human antibodies on development of the fetus. PMID:10194476

  6. Telomere phenotypes in females with heterozygous mutations in the dyskeratosis congenita 1 (DKC1) gene.

    PubMed

    Alder, Jonathan K; Parry, Erin M; Yegnasubramanian, Srinivasan; Wagner, Christa L; Lieblich, Lawrence M; Auerbach, Robert; Auerbach, Arleen D; Wheelan, Sarah J; Armanios, Mary

    2013-11-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is a telomere-mediated syndrome defined by mucocutaneous features. The X-linked mode of inheritance accounts for half the cases, and is thought to predominantly manifest in childhood as bone marrow failure. We identified two male probands who presented in the fifth decade with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and cancer. Their pedigrees displayed consecutively affected generations. Five of six females (83%) manifested mucocutaneous features of DC, and two had wound-healing complications. No mutations in autosomal dominant telomere genes were present, but exome sequencing revealed novel variants in the X-chromosome DKC1 gene that predicted missense mutations in conserved residues, p.Thr49Ser and p.Pro409Arg. Variants segregated with the telomere phenotype, and affected females were heterozygotes, showing skewed X-inactivation. Telomerase RNA levels were compromised in cells from DKC1 mutation carriers, consistent with their pathogenic role. These findings indicate that females with heterozygous DKC1 mutations may be at increased risk for developing penetrant telomere phenotypes that, at times, may be associated with clinical morbidity.

  7. Linkage disequilibrium mapping of the cornea plana congenita gene CNA2

    SciTech Connect

    Tahvanainen, E.; Karila, E.; Kolehmainen, J.

    1995-12-10

    We recently assigned a gene for autosomal recessive cornea plana congenita (CNA2; MIM No. 217300) by linkage analysis to the approximately 3-cM interval between markers D12S82 and D12S327. Here, we extended these studies by exploiting the haplotype and linkage disequilibrium information that can be derived from the genetically isolated Finnish population and its subpopulations. By testing 32 independent families with 10 polymorphic markers in the CNA2 interval, strong allelic association between CNA2 and a set of markers with a peak at marker D12S351 was detected. Based on linkage disequilibrium analysis, the critical region for CNA2 could be narrowed to only 0.04-0.3 cM from marker D12S351, thus defining a critical interval 0.08-0.60 cM in length. These results provide a basis for highly focused positional cloning of CNA2. 18 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. DKC1 gene mutation in a Taiwanese kindred with X-linked dyskeratosis congenita.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jeng-Hsien; Lee, J Yu-Yun; Tsao, Chao-Jung; Chao, Sheau-Chiou

    2002-11-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DKC) is a rare inherited disease characterized by the triad of abnormal skin pigmentation, nail dystrophy, and mucosal leukoplakia. Recent studies demonstrated mutations in the DKC1 gene encoding a protein named dyskerin, which is a component of human telomerase. In addition to the hypothesized function of pseudouridination in rRNA biosynthesis, ribosomal subunit assembly, and/or centromere/ microtubule binding, lower levels of telomerase activity in cells from patients with X-linked DKC have been observed. We report the mutation analysis of a Taiwanese family with X-linked DKC. The patient was a 19-year-old man who presented with progressive reticulate hyperpigmentation, nail dystrophy, alopecia, leukoplakia of the tongue, and pancytopenia. He died of enterocolitis and Escherichia coli sepsis at the age of 20 years. Only his mother's DNA was available for mutation analysis, which revealed a nucleotide transition of C to T (1058 C --> T), a hotspot mutation in DKC, resulting in an amino acid change from alanine to valine (A353V) in the DKC1 gene. Recent advances in the research of telomerase and its implications in the human aging process and cancer are discussed.

  9. Is There Such a Thing as Adrenal Fatigue?

    MedlinePlus

    ... adrenal insufficiency caused by chronic stress. The unproven theory behind adrenal fatigue is that your adrenal glands ... feel good. Existing blood tests, according to this theory, aren't sensitive enough to detect such a ...

  10. [Pollicization of the Index Finger in Patients with Congenital Thumb Hypoplasia].

    PubMed

    Moser, U; Singer, G; Schmidt, B; Spendel, S

    2016-08-01

    Congenital thumb hypoplasia is a radial deficiency occurring in the form of sole dysplasia or in combination with additional aberrations. Thumb hypoplasia can be categorised into 5 grades ranging from mild deformity to complete absence of the thumb. Thumb hypoplasia leads to a disturbance of grip function depending on its severity. The choice of treatment is based on the degree of thumb hypoplasia. For hypoplasia greater than grade 3B, restoration of the thumb using pollicization of the index finger is the treatment of choice. For this purpose the index finger is transformed into a thumb and is transposed to the position of the thumb with vessels and nerves being retained. The skeleton has to be shortened, rotated and abducted, followed by reconstruction of the muscles in line with the function of the new thumb. This procedure facilitates a restoration with maximal stability, sensitivity and mobility. In cases of isolated thumb hypoplasia, pollicization of the index finger yields good results persisting into adulthood. If associated aberrations are present, the outcome is less predictable because of the preexistent stiffness of the index finger. Nevertheless, associated aberrations do not represent a contraindication for index finger pollicization.

  11. Renal Function and Hematology in Rats with Congenital Renal Hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Hidenori; Amakasu, Kohei; Tochigi, Yuki; Katayama, Kentaro; Suzuki, Hiroetsu

    2016-02-01

    Renal hypoplasia due to a congenitally reduced number of nephrons progresses to chronic kidney disease and may cause renal anemia, given that the kidneys are a major source of erythropoietin in adults. Hypoplastic kidney (HPK) rats have only about 20% of the normal number of nephrons and develop CKD. This study assessed the renal function and hematologic changes in HPK rats from 70 to 210 d of age. HPK rats demonstrated deterioration of renal excretory function, slightly macrocytic erythropenia at all days examined, age-related increases in splenic hemosiderosis accompanied by a tendency toward increased hemolysis, normal plasma erythropoietin levels associated with increased hepatic and decreased renal erythropoietin production, and maintenance of the response for erythropoietin production to hypoxic conditions, with increased interstitial fibrosis at 140 d of age. These results indicate that increases in splenic hemosiderosis and the membrane fragility of RBC might be associated with erythropenia and that hepatic production of erythropoietin might contribute to maintaining the blood Hgb concentration in HPK rats.

  12. Retinal Structure and Function in Eyes with Optic Nerve Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Katagiri, Satoshi; Nishina, Sachiko; Yokoi, Tadashi; Mikami, Masashi; Nakayama, Yuri; Tanaka, Michiko; Azuma, Noriyuki

    2017-01-01

    We investigated retinal structure and function in eyes with optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH). Twenty-nine eyes of 18 patients with ONH and 21 eyes of 21 control patients were analyzed. Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), full-field electroretinography (FF-ERG), and focal macular ERG (FM-ERG) were performed. SD-OCT analysis of the macular region showed significant ganglion cells complex (GCC) thinning nasally and temporally (P < 0.05), but the thickness from the inner nuclear layer (INL) to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) became thinner only nasally (P < 0.05). SD-OCT analysis of the circumpapillary region showed significant thinning in the retinal nerve fiber layer and from the INL to the RPE (P < 0.05). The horizontal SD-OCT images showed variable foveal abnormalities. FF-ERG analysis showed significantly reduced amplitudes (P < 0.05) and preserved implicit time in the photopic negative response. The amplitudes and implicit times of the other FF-ERG components did not differ significantly. FM-ERG analysis showed significantly reduced amplitudes (P < 0.05) but preserved implicit times in all components. The current study showed the change of retinal structure and function in eyes with ONH compared with those with control, representing by decreased retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons, foveal abnormalities, and preserved peripheral retina except for the RGCs and their axons. PMID:28205530

  13. Cerebellar Hypoplasia and Dysmorphia in Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    PubMed

    Toelle, Sandra P; Poretti, Andrea; Weber, Peter; Seute, Tatjana; Bromberg, Jacoline E C; Scheer, Ianina; Boltshauser, Eugen

    2015-12-01

    Unidentified bright objects (UBO) and tumors are well-known cerebellar abnormalities in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Literature reports on malformative cerebellar anomalies in neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1), however, are scant. We retrospectively studied the clinical and neuroimaging findings of 5 patients with NF1 (4 females, age 6 to 29 years at last follow-up) and cerebellar anomalies. Cerebellar symptoms on neurological examination were mild or even not evident whereas learning disabilities were more or less pronounced in four patients. Two patients had cerebellar hypoplasia (diffusely enlarged cerebellar interfoliar spaces) and three cerebellar dysmorphias involving mainly one cerebellar hemisphere. In NF1, malformative cerebellar anomalies are rare (estimated prevalence of about 1%), but most likely underestimated and easily overlooked, because physicians tend to focus on more prevalent, obvious, and well-known findings such as optic pathway gliomas, other tumors, and UBO. This kind of cerebellar anomaly in NF1 has most likely a malformative origin, but the exact pathogenesis is unknown. The individual clinical significance is difficult to determine. We suggest that cerebellar anomalies should be systematically evaluated in neuroimaging studies of NF1 patients.

  14. Short-term results of early (before 6 months) open reduction of dislocated hips in arthrogryposis multiplex congenita.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Bahattin K; Yilmaz, Guney; Senaran, Hakan; Durgut, Fatih

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to report the results of early open reduction of hip dislocations in infants with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita. Seven patients who were under 6 months of age at the time of hip reduction, with a mean follow-up period of 47.5±11.3 months after surgery, were included in this study. Four of seven patients (six of 13 hips) required additional hip surgeries during their follow-up. The short-term results of early open reduction of hips were not promising as most of the patients required additional hip surgeries.

  15. Aplasia cutis congenita of the scalp- what are the steps to be followed? Case report and review of the literature*

    PubMed Central

    Brzezinski, Piotr; Pinteala, Tudor; Chiriac, Anca E; Foia, Liliana; Chiriac, Anca

    2015-01-01

    Aplasia cutis congenita is a rare malformation characterized by localized congenital absence of the skin. It rarely occurs on the trunk and limbs, and can occur in isolation or as part of a heterogeneous group of syndromes. We report a case of a 4-day-old boy with a 5.6-cm- diameter tumor, with a central crust, non-indurate and no inflammatory rim; localized on the scalp and a small, atrophic hairless scar appeared 6 months later (approximately 5cm in length) at the site of the previous tumor. PMID:25672305

  16. A Case Report of Bilateral Sarcomatoid Carcinoma of Adrenal Glands With Adrenal Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Noriyoshi; Nagase, Mamiko; Takami, Saki; Araki, Asuka; Ishikawa, Nahoko; Koike, Chiaki; Shiina, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Riruke

    2016-12-01

    Adrenocortical carcinomas are relatively rare, but they are considered to be highly aggressive malignant tumors. Sarcomatoid carcinomas represent an even more aggressive type. Bilateral malignant adrenal tumors are extraordinary rare, except for those that represent metastatic spread from a primary neoplasm. Here we report a case of a 69-year-old woman who presented symptoms that raised strong suspicions of adrenal insufficiency. Bilateral adrenal masses, identified in the imaging study, were responsible for the clinical manifestation and surgically resected. Surgical specimens of the bilateral adrenal tumors shared histological features compatible with sarcomatoid carcinoma. It was very difficult to confirm that the sarcomatoid carcinomas were derived from the cortex of the adrenal glands, but careful morphological observation and the panel of antibodies used for immunohistochemistry made the diagnosis possible. This is the first report of sarcomatoid carcinomas involving both adrenal glands. It should be emphasized that sarcomatoid carcinoma can arise bilaterally from even functionally impaired adrenal glands. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. Delayed Diagnosis of Graves’ Thyrotoxicoisis Presenting as Recurrent Adrenal Crisis in Primary Adrenal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Dukhabandhu; Jebasingh, K Felix

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal crisis is a potential life threatening complication. The common causes of adrenal crisis are infections, surgical stress and abrupt cessation of steroid medications. Endocrine causes like Graves’ disease with thyrotoxicosis is one of the less common causes of an adrenal crisis. We report a 42-year-old female who presented with recurrent episodes of adrenal crisis due to delayed diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis. She was initially treated with Carbimazole followed by Radio-iodine ablation and currently she is euthyroid. Her adrenal insufficiency was initially treated with hydrocortisone during the time of adrenal crisis followed by Prednisolone 5 mg once daily in the morning along with fludrocortisone 50 mcg once daily. This case highlights the need for high index of suspicion and less common causes like thyrotoxicosis should be ruled out in patients with adrenal crisis. PMID:27190873

  18. Unilateral adrenal hemorrhagic infarction in essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Burnet, G; Lambert, M; Annet, L; Lefebvre, C

    2015-12-01

    Adrenal hemorrhage is a rare disease associated with various conditions. We report a case of a 68-year-old woman with abdominal and back pain. The diagnostic work-up showed a left adrenal gland infarction associated with essential thrombocythemia. Treatment consisted in painkillers and treating the underlying condition in order to prevent further thrombotic events.

  19. Computed tomographic findings in bilateral adrenal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilms, G.E.; Baert, A.L.; Kint, E.J.; Pringot, J.H.; Goddeeris, P.G.

    1983-03-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) features of bilateral adrenal tuberculosis are reported in two cases that demonstrate two typical different clinical and morphological manifestations of the disease. The incidence and CT appearance of adrenal tuberculosis are discussed, with emphasis on differential diagnosis.

  20. Internal Carotid Artery Hypoplasia: Role of Color-Coded Carotid Duplex Sonography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pei-Ya; Liu, Hung-Yu; Lim, Kun-Eng; Lin, Shinn-Kuang

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the role of color-coded carotid duplex sonography for diagnosis of internal carotid artery hypoplasia. We retrospectively reviewed 25,000 color-coded carotid duplex sonograms in our neurosonographic database to establish more diagnostic criteria for internal carotid artery hypoplasia. A definitive diagnosis of internal carotid artery hypoplasia was made in 9 patients. Diagnostic findings on color-coded carotid duplex imaging include a long segmental small-caliber lumen (52% diameter) with markedly decreased flow (13% flow volume) in the affected internal carotid artery relative to the contralateral side but without intraluminal lesions. Indirect findings included markedly increased total flow volume (an increase of 133%) in both vertebral arteries, antegrade ipsilateral ophthalmic arterial flow, and a reduced vessel diameter with increased flow resistance in the ipsilateral common carotid artery. Ten patients with distal internal carotid artery dissection showed a similar color-coded duplex pattern, but the reductions in the internal and common carotid artery diameters and increase in collateral flow from the vertebral artery were less prominent than those in hypoplasia. The ipsilateral ophthalmic arterial flow was retrograde in 40% of patients with distal internal carotid artery dissection. In addition, thin-section axial and sagittal computed tomograms of the skull base could show the small diameter of the carotid canal in internal carotid artery hypoplasia and help distinguish hypoplasia from distal internal carotid artery dissection. Color-coded carotid duplex sonography provides important clues for establishing a diagnosis of internal carotid artery hypoplasia. A hypoplastic carotid canal can be shown by thin-section axial and sagittal skull base computed tomography to confirm the final diagnosis. © 2015 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  1. Extensive expertise in endocrinology. Adrenal crisis.

    PubMed

    Allolio, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    Adrenal crisis is a life-threatening emergency contributing to the excess mortality of patients with adrenal insufficiency. Studies in patients on chronic replacement therapy for adrenal insufficiency have revealed an incidence of 5-10 adrenal crises/100 patient years and suggested a mortality rate from adrenal crisis of 0.5/100 patient years. Patients with adrenal crisis typically present with profoundly impaired well-being, hypotension, nausea and vomiting, and fever responding well to parenteral hydrocortisone administration. Infections are the major precipitating causes of adrenal crisis. Lack of increased cortisol concentrations during infection enhances pro-inflammatory cytokine release and sensitivity to the toxic effects of these cytokines (e.g. tumour necrosis factor alpha). Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokines may impair glucocorticoid receptor function aggravating glucocorticoid deficiency. Treatment of adrenal crisis is simple and highly effective consisting of i.v. hydrocortisone (initial bolus of 100  mg followed by 200  mg over 24  h as continuous infusion) and 0.9% saline (1000  ml within the first hour). Prevention of adrenal crisis requires appropriate hydrocortisone dose adjustments to stressful medical procedures (e.g. major surgery) and other stressful events (e.g. infection). Patient education is a key for such dose adjustments but current education concepts are not sufficiently effective. Thus, improved education strategies are needed. Every patient should carry an emergency card and should be provided with an emergency kit for parenteral hydrocortisone self-administration. A hydrocortisone pen would hold a great potential to lower the current barriers to hydrocortisone self-injection. Improved patient education and measures to facilitate parenteral hydrocortisone self-administration in impending crisis are expected to significantly reduce morbidity and mortality from adrenal crisis. © 2015 European Society of Endocrinology.

  2. Two cases of pontocerebellar hypoplasia: ethical and prenatal diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Ajibola, Ayodeji J; Netzloff, Michael; Samaraweera, Ranji; Omar, Said A

    2010-02-01

    We report the clinical characteristics and the outcome of two cases of pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) in one family. The objective of this report is to describe the mode of presentation, discuss the clinical course, and address the dilemma of prenatal diagnosis and the prospects for genetic diagnosis for PCH. The first case is a 4-year-old boy in whom the diagnosis was made in the neonatal period. Despite extensive prenatal follow-up during the mother's subsequent pregnancy, prenatal diagnosis could not be made and a second affected child was born. Both siblings have severe developmental delay. The cases raise an important ethical dilemma about the most appropriate intervention if the mother of a child affected with PCH becomes pregnant. PCH is considered to have an autosomal-recessive mode of inheritance and a recurrence risk of 25% in each pregnancy. Until recently when genetic mutations in PCH types 2, 4, and 6 began to be identified, the lack of well-recognized genetic testing precluded experts from making clear recommendations. The best advice to these parents was difficult or elusive. With two children currently affected, should the parents terminate or continue with the latest pregnancy? Extensive monitoring with serial prenatal ultrasound failed in the previous pregnancy and resulted in the birth of the second affected child. It is evident that serial ultrasound scan may not be helpful in making the diagnosis prenatally. Therefore, other diagnostic modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging may be necessary and should be considered. With the identification of genetic basis or mutations in PCH types 2, 4, and 6 and possible development of commercial genetic testing for these types of PCH, reproductive decision or genetic testing during pregnancy should be recommended to affected families to enable informed choices. Thieme Medical Publishers.

  3. Dermatologic findings of focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome).

    PubMed

    Bree, Alanna F; Grange, Dorothy K; Hicks, M John; Goltz, Robert W

    2016-03-01

    Goltz syndrome, caused by mutations in PORCN, is an X-linked dominant ectodermal dysplasia which is also known as focal dermal hypoplasia. This name is derived from the predominant pathologic skin findings of the syndrome. Nineteen Goltz-affected participants attended a multidisciplinary scientific and clinical conference convened by the National Foundation for Ectodermal Dysplasia which allowed further characterization of the features of this very rare condition. At birth, the affected areas of skin are typically erythematous and fragile. The hallmark cutaneous features, which vary widely due to mosacism and X-inactivation, include the previously described skin changes of asymmetric Blaschko-linear and reticulated atrophy, pigmentary changes, and telangectasias. Lipomatous changes and papillomas as characteristically defined were reported in the majority of patients. A newly recognized skin finding was progressive hyperpigmented freckling that occurred within the hypopigmented areas which were noted to be photosensitive. Many patients also had a pebbly texture to the central face, dorsal hands and feet. Punctate erosions within the atrophic areas and hypohidrosis were also common. Most had patchy alopecia and many had diffusely thin hair. Scanning electron microscopy of the hair shafts revealed abnormalities in the majority of participants with several different features identified, including atrophic hairs with reduced diameters, markedly flattened hairs as noted in cross-sectional views, trichorrhexis nodosa, pili torti, and pili trianguli et canaliculi. Nail changes included V-nicking and longitudinal ridging of the nail plate, in addition to micronychia. Early recognition of the dermatologic features, in addition to the variable but universal limb anomalies, of Goltz syndrome will allow early and accurate diagnosis without the need for extensive diagnostic studies, while also allowing for accurate prognosis and appropriate genetic counseling.

  4. Neuroimaging and endocrine disorders in paediatric optic nerve hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xiaoxiao; Fouzdar Jain, Samksha; Morgan, Linda A; Kruse, Travis; Cabrera, Monina; Suh, Donny W

    2017-10-05

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is one of the leading causes of blindness among children. The purpose of this retrospective study is to determine the risk factors and association between brain MRI findings, pituitary abnormalities and endocrine disorders with the presence of ONH. A retrospective review of patients seen at paediatric ophthalmology clinics from January 2006 to December 2016 at Children's Hospital and Medical Center and the University of Nebraska Medical Center was performed. All patients with a documented diagnosis of ONH or septo-optic dysplasia were identified. MRI and endocrinology results were analysed by masked examiners. Out of 77 patients, overall incidence of abnormal pituitary on MRI was 35.1% and the incidence of endocrine abnormalities was 37.7%. Of the 57 patients with bilateral ONH, 23 (40.4%) had an abnormal pituitary while 4 of the 20 patients (20.0%) with unilateral ONH had an abnormal pituitary on MRI. The sensitivity and specific of brain MRI as signs of endocrinopathy are 67.9% and 83.3%, respectively. This study has determined that abnormal MRI findings do not have the sensitivity to predict endocrinopathy, nor does a normal MRI rule out possible endocrine abnormalities. When patients with ONH present with normal neurological examinations, normal endocrine workup and normal developmental milestones, a MRI of the brain may be deferred until new indications arise.Regardless of the MRI status, children with ONH should have a comprehensive endocrine evaluation and continue to have routine endocrine follow-up. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Mutations in the CLCN1 gene leading to myotonia congenita Thomsen and generalized myotonia Becker

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, M.C.; Meyer-Kline, C.; Otto, M.

    1994-09-01

    Autosomal dominant inherited myotonia congenita Thomsen (MC) and autosomal recessive generalized myotonia Becker (GM) are non-dystropic muscle disorders in which the symptom myotonia is based on an increased excitability of the muscle fiber membrane due to a reduced sarcolemmal chloride conductance. Affected individuals exhibit myotonic muscle stiffness in all skeletal muscles and a transient muscle weakness is particularly pronounced in the arms and hands of probands with the disorder GM. Recently we have shown linkage of the disorders MC and GM to the gene CLCN1 coding for the skeletal muscle chloride channel on chromosome 7 in German families. In addition we presented data supporting the hypothesis that GM is a genetically homogeneous disorder. Data are presented about an extended screen for mutations in the CLCN1 gene for our MC and GM population. We identified mainly missense mutations leading to altered amino acid codons. The previously described F413C mutation is by far the most common mutation for GM and is found in one family only (P480L, G482R, R496S). In addition we found 5{prime} donor and 3{prime} acceptor splice site mutations at various intron-exon boundaries, as well as a deletion mutation of 14 bp in exon 13. This deletion mutation is the second most common mutation in the GM population with a frequency of 8%. So far we have not determined sites of predominance of mutations in the CLCN1 gene, which could give us more insight into the regions critical for the function of the channel and the fact that the mutations in the gene may lead to dominant and recessive inheritance.

  6. Spondyloepiphseal dysplasia congenita in siblings born to unaffected parents: ? germ line mosaicism

    SciTech Connect

    Mulla, W.; McDonald-McGinn, D.; Zackai, E.

    1994-09-01

    Germ line mosaicism has been used to explain the birth of more than one child affected with a dominantly inherited disorder born to unaffected parents. Furthermore, it has been confirmed clinically in families where recurrence in siblings was originally thought to be autosomal recessive, but were affected individuals have reproduced affected offspring. Firm evidence of germ line mosaicism using mutation analysis by molecular methods exists for some autosomal disorders. We present two siblings with spondyloepipheseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC) born to unaffected parents. This suggests the presence of germ line mosaicism in this entity. Patient 1 was born at 32 weeks gestation to a G1P1 Puerto Rican mother. The pregnancy was complicated by polyhydramnios. The neonate, a short-limbed dwarf, died at 15 hours of age from respiratory distress and a compromised thoracic cavity. Patient 2, the sibling of patient 1 was born at 37 weeks gestation after a pregnancy complicated by polyhydramnios and prenatal ultrasound diagnosis of short-limbed dwarfism. The diagnosis of SEDC was made and, after review of the sibling`s postmortem X-rays, it was felt that she was similarly affected. The family history reveals no history of dwarfism or consanguinity. The SEDC is described as an autosomal dominant form of dwarfism with variable presentation including some cases that have been lethal in the neonatal period. SEDC is now believed to represent a family of collagen II mutations. Sporadic cases that have arisen in families with no history have been ascribed to new heterozygous mutations. Other families in which SEDC and SEMD recurred without a family history most likely represent germ line mosaicism. In these cases molecular studies should be pursued to document a collagen II mutation. We believe that germ line mosaicism is the most plausible explanation for recurrence in our family.

  7. A CHRNB1 frameshift mutation is associated with familial arthrogryposis multiplex congenita in Red dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Agerholm, Jørgen S; McEvoy, Fintan J; Menzi, Fiona; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Drögemüller, Cord

    2016-06-30

    Bovine arthrogryposis multiplex congenita (AMC) is a syndromic term for a congenital condition characterized by multiple joint contractures. Rare inherited forms of bovine AMC have been reported in different breeds. For AMC in Angus cattle a causative genomic deletion encompassing the agrin (AGRN) gene, encoding an essential neural regulator that induces the aggregation of acetylcholine receptors (AChRs), is known. In 2015, three genetically related cases of generalized AMC affecting Red dairy calves were diagnosed in Denmark. The family history of three affected calves suggested an autosomal recessive inheritance. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping showed a single genomic region of extended homozygosity of 21.5 Mb on chromosome 19. Linkage analysis revealed a maximal parametric LOD score of 1.8 at this region. By whole genome re-sequencing of the three cases, two private homozygous non-synonymous variants were detected in the critical interval. Both variants, located in the myosin phosphatase Rho interacting protein (MPRIP) and the cholinergic receptor nicotinic beta 1 subunit gene (CHRNB1), were perfectly associated with the AMC phenotype. Previously described CHRNB1 variants in humans lead to a congenital myasthenic syndrome with impaired neuromuscular transmission. The cattle variant represents a single base deletion in the first exon of CHRNB1 (c.55delG) introducing a premature stop codon (p.Ala19Profs47*) in the second exon, truncating 96 % of the protein. This study provides the first phenotypically and genetically characterized example of a bovine AMC phenotype that represents an inherited neuromuscular disorder corresponding to human congenital myasthenic syndrome. The identified CHRNB1 loss of function variant is predicted to have a deleterious effect on fetal AChR function, which could explain the lethal phenotype reported in this study. The identification of this candidate causative mutation thus widens the known phenotypic spectrum of

  8. The case of a boy with nevus of Ota, extensive Mongolian spot, nevus flammeus, nevus anemicus and cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita: a unique instance of phacomatosis pigmentovascularis*

    PubMed Central

    MA, Han; Liao, Mengsi; Qiu, Shu; Luo, Ruijun; Lu, Rongbiao; Lu, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Phacomatosis pigmentovascularis is a rare, congenital condition characterized by a combination of cutaneous melanocytic lesions and vascular malformation. We discuss an entirely unique case of Phacomatosis pigmentovascularis with nevus of Ota, extensive Mongolian spot, nevus flammeus, nevus anemicus and cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita, which may represent a heretofore undescribed variant of phacomatosis pigmentovascularis. PMID:26312661

  9. Testicular Adrenal Rest Tumors in Patients with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Şentürk Mutlu, Fatma; Eren, Erdal; Paşa, Aliye Özlem; Sağlam, Halil; Tarım, Ömer

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Early diagnosis and treatment of testicular adrenal rest tumors (TART) is important for gonadal functions and fertility protection in boys with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). In this descriptive study, we investigated the prevalence of TART in boys with 21-hydroxylase deficient (21OHD) CAH followed in our pediatric endocrine clinic. Methods: The study group consisted of 14 male patients with a mean age of 9.6±5.1 (range: 0.8-18.3) years. Six (42.9%) of the 14 patients were diagnosed as having salt-wasting type (SW) and eight (57.1%) patients - as having the simple virilizing (SV) form of 21OHD. Mean age at diagnosis was 2.9±2.7 (range: 0.03-6.3) years. Two different radiologists performed scrotal ultrasonography. Chronological age, bone age, and anthropometric measurements were evaluated. Serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), 17-alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP) and androstenedione levels were also evaluated in all patients during the follow-up period. Results: Scrotal ultrasonography revealed bilateral TART in two patients (14.3%) and testicular microlithiasis (TM) in four patients (28.6%). One patient had both TART and TM bilaterally. During the follow-up period, the mean serum adrenocorticotropic hormone, 17OHP and androstenedione levels in the total group of patients were 130.0±179.1 pg/mL (21.7-726.5), 5.8±3.3 ng/mL (0.8-11.4) and 4.3±4.1 (0.2-11.0) ng/mL, respectively. Conclusions: Microlithiasis or TART may be frequently encountered during the follow-up of patients with CAH. In order to prevent late complications including infertility, we suggest that ultrasonographic evaluations be performed yearly in all male CAH patients. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:22672867

  10. Natural course of benign adrenal incidentalomas in subjects with extra-adrenal malignancy.

    PubMed

    Yener, Serkan; Ertilav, Senem; Secil, Mustafa; Akinci, Baris; Demir, Tevfik; Comlekci, Abdurrahman; Yesil, Sena

    2009-08-01

    Patients with extra-adrenal malignancies are diagnosed increasingly with benign adrenal tumors, as well as non-oncology subjects. We aimed to demonstrate the natural course of adrenal adenomas in terms of mass size and hormonal status in oncology and non-oncology subjects. We also compared the characteristics and behavior of adrenal adenomas with adrenal malignancies. In our registry of adrenal tumors (n = 335), we prospectively evaluated 29 oncology subjects (EAM+) and age, gender, and follow-up duration matched 110 non-oncology subjects (EAM-) with adrenal adenomas. Median follow-up was 24 months. We also included 16 subjects with adrenal malignancies (primary; 3 and metastasis; 13). Tumor size was followed-up with CT or MRI at 6th and 12th months and annually in subsequent visits. Hormonal assessment was repeated at the 6th month after the initial visit and annually in subsequent visits. Initial tumor size, mean increase in tumor size, and number of subjects who showed mass enlargement or developed subclinical Cushing Syndrome were comparable (P > 0.05) between EAM+ and EAM- groups. Subjects with malignant adrenal tumors were older (P = 0.06), had larger tumors at presentation (P < 0.001), and showed mass enlargement during a shorter follow-up duration (P < 0.001). Oncology subjects with adrenal adenomas featured similar baseline and follow-up parameters in terms of mass enlargement and development of subclinical Cushing Syndrome when compared with non-oncology subjects. Malignant adrenal tumors were characterized with large, rapidly growing tumors of older ages. Conservative approach can be suggested to oncology subjects for adrenal adenomas unless clinical and radiological suspicion of adrenal malignancy is present.

  11. Quantification of mobility impairment and self-assessment of stiffness in patients with myotonia congenita by the physiotherapist.

    PubMed

    Hammarén, Elisabet; Kjellby-Wendt, Gunilla; Lindberg, Christopher

    2005-10-01

    We investigated test-retest reliability and responsiveness in two functional measuring instruments, Timed Up&Go (TUG) and Timed-Stands Test (TST), and in three self-assessment scales, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Borg's Category-Ratio Scale (BorgCR10) and Myotonia Behaviour Scale (MBS) when quantifying myotonic stiffness and mobility impairment. These methods were used in the assessment of treatment efficacy of mexiletine. Six male patients with myotonia congenita followed a standardised protocol with time scoring and rest on two occasions, with and without mexiletine. Time scoring of TUG and TST and self-assessments of stiffness were performed. A 14-day stiffness diary was used at home. Timed Up&Go and TST showed very good test-retest agreement (ICC=0.87-0.95) and significant to change (P=0.005 and 0.001, respectively). All self-assessment scales revealed excellent responsiveness and good test-retest reliability. The measurement instruments possess great capacity to detect functional impairment in the myotonia congenita patient group, and sensibility to identify true changes due to treatment. When considering the results, three instruments are favoured; Timed Up&Go and BorgCR10 for short, and MBS for long-term evaluations.

  12. Hypoplasia of the trapezius and history of ipsilateral transient neonatal brachial plexus palsy.

    PubMed

    Min, William; Price, Andrew E; Alfonso, Israel; Ramos, Lorna; Grossman, John A I

    2011-03-01

    We present two children with hypoplasia of the left trapezius muscle and a history of ipsilateral transient neonatal brachial plexus palsy without documented trapezius weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging in these patients with unilateral left hypoplasia of the trapezius revealed decreased muscles in the left side of the neck and left supraclavicular region on coronal views, decreased muscle mass between the left splenius capitis muscle and the subcutaneous tissue at the level of the neck on axial views, and decreased size of the left paraspinal region on sagittal views. Three possibilities can explain the association of hypoplasia of the trapezius and obstetric brachial plexus palsy: increased vulnerability of the brachial plexus to stretch injury during delivery because of intrauterine trapezius weakness, a casual association of these two conditions, or an erroneous diagnosis of brachial plexus palsy in patients with trapezial weakness. Careful documentation of neck and shoulder movements can distinguish among shoulder weakness because of trapezius hypoplasia, brachial plexus palsy, or brachial plexus palsy with trapezius hypoplasia. Hence, we recommend precise documentation of neck movements in the initial description of patients with suspected neonatal brachial plexus palsy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Corticomedullary mixed tumor of the adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Wieneke, J A; Thompson, L D; Heffess, C S

    2001-10-01

    Corticomedullary mixed tumors of the adrenal gland are quite rare, with only five well-documented cases reported in the literature.(1-4) Herein, we report the light microscopic and immunohistochemical features of two cases of this rare tumor. Patient 1 is a 34-year-old woman who presented with hypertension, hair loss, and amenorrhea of 1-year duration. Patient 2 is a 52-year-old woman who presented with flank pain and what appeared to be a renal mass on arteriogram with no history of hypertension, Cushing's syndrome, or other endocrine abnormalities. At surgery, the tumor was noted to arise from the adrenal gland rather than the kidney and adrenalectomy was performed. In both cases, the surgically resected specimens consisted of a well-circumscribed, single adrenal mass surrounded by a rim of uninvolved adrenal cortical tissue. The tumors were composed of adrenal cortical cells intimately admixed with pheochromocytes. Immunohistochemical studies highlighted these two cellular components. The pheochromocytes were strongly reactive with chromogranin and the sustentacular cells with S-100 protein, whereas the adrenal cortical cells reacted specifically with inhibin. Thus, we report two additional cases of mixed corticomedullary tumor of the adrenal gland. Ann Diagn Pathol 5:304-308, 2001. This is a US government work. There are no restrictions on its use.

  14. Clinicopathological correlates of adrenal Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Duan, Kai; Gomez Hernandez, Karen; Mete, Ozgur

    2015-03-01

    Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is a rare endocrine disorder that incurs significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, due to glucocorticoid excess. It comprises adrenal (20%) and non-adrenal (80%) aetiologies. While the majority of cases are attributed to pituitary or ectopic corticotropin (ACTH) overproduction, primary cortisol-producing adrenal cortical lesions are increasingly recognised in the pathophysiology of Cushing's syndrome. Our understanding of this disease has progressed substantially over the past decade. Recently, important mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of adrenal hypercortisolism have been elucidated with the discovery of mutations in cyclic AMP signalling (PRKACA, PRKAR1A, GNAS, PDE11A, PDE8B), armadillo repeat containing 5 gene (ARMC5) a putative tumour suppressor gene, aberrant G-protein-coupled receptors, and intra-adrenal secretion of ACTH. Accurate subtyping of Cushing's syndrome is crucial for treatment decision-making and requires a complete integration of clinical, biochemical, imaging and pathology findings. Pathological correlates in the adrenal glands include hyperplasia, adenoma and carcinoma. While the most common presentation is diffuse adrenocortical hyperplasia secondary to excess ACTH production, this entity is usually treated with pituitary or ectopic tumour resection. Therefore, when confronted with adrenalectomy specimens in the setting of Cushing's syndrome, surgical pathologists are most commonly exposed to adrenocortical adenomas, carcinomas and primary macronodular or micronodular hyperplasia. This review provides an update on the rapidly evolving knowledge of adrenal Cushing's syndrome and discusses the clinicopathological correlations of this important disease.

  15. Sonography of the adrenal glands in the adult.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Won; Kim, Jeong Kon; Choi, Hyuck Jae; Kim, Mi-hyun; Lee, Jeongjin; Cho, Kyoung-Sik

    2012-01-01

    Although its capability has been overlooked, sonography can be a useful screening tool for adrenal lesion in adults. In this article, we discuss scan technique, patient positioning, and anatomic consideration for adrenal sonography in adults and illustrate sonographic appearance of normal adrenal gland as well as adrenal tumors and tumor-like lesions. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Cable parameters, sodium, potassium, chloride, and water content, and potassium efflux in isolated external intercostal muscle of normal volunteers and patients with myotonia congenita

    PubMed Central

    Lipicky, R. J.; Bryant, S. H.; Salmon, J. H.

    1971-01-01

    In isolated fiber bundles of external intercostal muscle from each of 13 normal volunteers and each of 6 patients with myotonia congenita, some or all of the following were measured: concentrations of Na+, K+, and Cl-, extracellular volume, water content, K+ efflux, fiber size, fiber cable parameters, and fiber resting potentials. Muscle from patients with myotonia congenita differed significantly (0.001 congenita vs. normal): the membrane resistance was greater (5729 vs. 2619 ω·cm2), the internal resistivity was less (75.0 vs. 123.2 ω·cm), the water content was less (788.2 vs. 808.2 ml/kg wet weight), and the mean resting potential was greater (68 vs. 61 mv). No significant differences were found with respect to the following variables: K+ content (73.5 vs. 66.7 mEq/kg wet weight) and the calculated intracellular K+ concentration (215 vs. 191 mEq/liter fiber water), fiber capacitance (5.90 vs. 5.15 μf/cm2), Na+ content (97.7 vs. 94.1 mEq/kg wet weight), Cl- content (79.0 vs. 74.7 mEq/kg wet weight), mannitol extracellular volume (45.1 vs. 46.6 cc/100 g wet weight), and K+ efflux (23.2 vs. 21.5 moles × 10-12 cm-2·sec-1). These abnormalities of skeletal muscle in human myotonia congenita are like those of skeletal muscle in goats with hereditary myotonia. We tentatively conclude that a decreased Cl- permeability accounts for some of the abnormal electrical properties of skeletal muscle in myotonia congenita. PMID:4940295

  17. Anesthetic and dental management of a child with IMAGe syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lindemeyer, Rochelle G; Rashewsky, Stephanie E; Louie, Phillip J; Schleelein, Laura

    2014-01-01

    IMAGe syndrome (OMIM 300290) is a rare multisystem disorder that has a broad phenotypic presentation. Though variable, this disorder mainly consists of Intrauterine growth retardation, Metaphyseal dysplasia, Adrenal hypoplasia congenita, and Genital abnormalities. Patients with IMAGe syndrome present as an uncommon yet important challenge for dentists and anesthesiologists due to their wide range of dysmorphic facial features, adrenal insufficiency, electrolyte imbalances, and need for steroid replacement. The purpose of this case report is to describe the successful anesthetic management of a pediatric patient diagnosed with IMAGe syndrome who presented for full mouth dental rehabilitation.

  18. Anesthetic and Dental Management of a Child With IMAGe Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lindemeyer, Rochelle G.; Rashewsky, Stephanie E.; Louie, Phillip J.; Schleelein, Laura

    2014-01-01

    IMAGe syndrome (OMIM 300290) is a rare multisystem disorder that has a broad phenotypic presentation. Though variable, this disorder mainly consists of Intrauterine growth retardation, Metaphyseal dysplasia, Adrenal hypoplasia congenita, and Genital abnormalities. Patients with IMAGe syndrome present as an uncommon yet important challenge for dentists and anesthesiologists due to their wide range of dysmorphic facial features, adrenal insufficiency, electrolyte imbalances, and need for steroid replacement. The purpose of this case report is to describe the successful anesthetic management of a pediatric patient diagnosed with IMAGe syndrome who presented for full mouth dental rehabilitation. PMID:25517553

  19. Severe hyponatremia caused by hypothalamic adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Shibata, T; Oeda, T; Saito, Y

    1999-05-01

    A 60-year-old woman was admitted with severe hyponatremia. Basal values of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), thyroid hormone and cortisol were normal on admission. Impairment of water diuresis was observed by water loading test. Initially, we diagnosed her condition as the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). By provocation test, we finally confirmed that the hyponatremia was caused by hypothalamic adrenal insufficiency. The basal values of ACTH and cortisol might not be sufficient to exclude the possibility of adrenal insufficiency. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate adrenal function by provocation test or to re-evaluate it after recovery from hyponatremia.

  20. Spontaneous Unilateral Adrenal Hemorrhage in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahem, Rawaa; Munguti, Cyrus; Mortada, Rami

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious medical condition associated with variable clinical presentation depending on the extent of the hemorrhage. Pregnancy-induced adrenal hemorrhage is poorly understood. A low cortisol level in the peripartum period with radiological findings is sufficient to establish the diagnosis. Prompt hormone replacement and supportive care to ensure good clinical outcomes is crucial. Due to the potentially life-threatening complications, physicians should have a high suspicion for adrenal hemorrhage when they evaluate patients with hypotension, fatigue, and abdominal pain during the peripartum period. PMID:28191381

  1. Coexistence of Cushing syndrome from functional adrenal adenoma and Addison disease from immune-mediated adrenalitis.

    PubMed

    Colucci, Randall; Jimenez, Rafael E; Farrar, William; Malgor, Ramiro; Kohn, Leonard; Schwartz, Frank L

    2012-06-01

    A 56-year-old woman presented with an incidental adrenal adenoma and physical examination findings that included moderate obesity, a slight cervicothoracic fat pad ("buffalo hump"), increased supraclavicular fat pads, and white abdominal striae. Biochemical workup revealed elevated levels of 24-hour urinary free cortisol but normal serum morning cortisol and suppressed levels of corticotropin, suggestive of adrenal-dependent Cushing syndrome. The resected adrenal gland revealed macronodular cortical hyperplasia with a dominant nodule. Other findings included an absent cortisol response to corticotropin stimulation, presence of serum anti-21-hydroxylase antibodies, and mononuclear cell infiltration--consistent with adrenalitis. The findings represent, to the authors' knowledge, the first known case of a patient with coexistent functional cortisol-secreting macronodular adrenal tumor resulting in Cushing syndrome and immune-mediated adrenalitis resulting in Addison disease.

  2. Adrenal Collision Tumor: Coexistence of Pigmented Adrenal Cortical Oncocytoma and Ganglioneuroma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chungyeul

    2016-01-01

    Background. Adrenal collision tumors (ACTs), in which distinct tumors coexist without intermingling in the same adrenal gland, are rare and their actual prevalence is unknown. ACTs commonly consist of adrenal cortical adenoma, pheochromocytoma, or metastatic malignant tumor. Case Report. A 32-year-old woman who had been experiencing gastric discomfort for one month was referred to our hospital with abnormal imaging findings. The physical examination and the laboratory data including endocrine studies were unremarkable. Abdomen computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed two adjacent masses in the left suprarenal fossa, and a laparoscopic left adrenalectomy was done. Histological and immunohistochemical (IHC) examinations revealed two distinct tumors: a pigmented adrenal cortical oncocytoma (ACO) and a ganglioneuroma, respectively. Conclusion. Both tumors are rare in the adrenal gland and exist as ACTs only exceptionally rarely. This is the first reported case of coexisting oncocytoma and ganglioneuroma in the same adrenal gland to our knowledge. PMID:28053800

  3. Localised enamel hypoplasia of human deciduous canines: genotype or environment?

    PubMed

    Taji, S; Hughes, T; Rogers, J; Townsend, G

    2000-06-01

    A discrete area of defective enamel formation that appears on the labial surface of the crowns of deciduous canine teeth has been described in both recent and prehistoric human populations, with reported frequencies varying from 1 to 45 per cent. Suggestions about the aetiology of this localized hypoplasia range from genotypic factors to environmental conditions and systemic effects. The major aims of this study were to describe the frequency of occurrence and pattern of expression of the lesion in Australian Aboriginal and Caucasian ethnic groups, and to clarify the role of genetic factors by examining a sample of twins. The study sample consisted of dental casts of 181 pairs of Australian Caucasian twins, 215 Aborigines and 122 Caucasian singletons, together with 253 extracted deciduous canines. Examination of dental casts and extracted teeth was undertaken under 2x magnification with emphasis being placed upon location and expression of the lesion. The defect was observed in 49 per cent of twins and 44 per cent of Aborigines, but only 36 per cent of singletons. The percentages of affected teeth in each group were: 18 per cent in twins, 17 per cent in Aborigines and 13 per cent in Caucasians. A significant proportion of the defects occurred on the mesial aspect of the labial surface, in the middle area incisocervically, with the majority in the lower jaw. A number of significant differences in frequency were observed between groups, sexes, arches and sides. The results confirm some of the findings of previous studies, but also suggest that none of environmental, genetic or systemic factors can be ruled out as being involved in aetiology of the defect. The higher incidence of the lesion occurring on the mesial aspect of the labial surface is suggestive of physical trauma. Also, the vulnerability of the prominent developing mandibular canine, with its thin or missing labial covering of bone, would be expected to lead to higher prevalence of the lesion in the lower

  4. Newly identified paired box 6 mutation of variant familial aniridia: Congenital iris ectropion with foveal hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Jin; Kim, Jong Ha; Cho, Nam Chun

    2017-01-01

    Congenital aniridia is a kind of eye disease characterized by complete or partial hypoplasia of the iris and is associated with other ocular anomalies including corneal opacity, glaucoma, and foveal hypoplasia. Heterozygous mutation of paired box 6 (PAX6) gene was identified in most cases of aniridia, with iatrogenic mutations accounting for about two-third of the cases and chromosomal rearrangements accounting for the other one-third. We report rare cases of variant aniridia, congenital iris ectropion associated with foveal hypoplasia in both a woman and her son with a mutation of PAX6 gene. To our knowledge, deletion c. 936delC in exon 8 of PAX6 gene has not been reported until now. PMID:28300742

  5. Enamel hypoplasia and its role in identification of individuals: A review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kanchan, Tanuj; Machado, Meghna; Rao, Ashwin; Krishan, Kewal; Garg, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    Identification of individuals is the mainstay of any forensic investigation especially in cases of mass disasters when mutilated remains are brought for examination. Dental examination helps in establishing the identity of an individual and thus, has played a vital role in forensic investigation process since long. In this regard, description on the role of enamel hypoplasia is limited in the literature. The present article reviews the literature on the enamel hypoplasia and discusses its utility in forensic identification. Enamel hypoplasia is a surface defect of the tooth crown caused by disturbance of enamel matrix secretion. Enamel defects can be congenital or acquired. In cases of mass disasters, or when the body is completely charred, putrefied and mutilated beyond recognition, the unique dental features can help in identification of the victims. PMID:26097340

  6. Cartilage-hair hypoplasia associated with isolated hypoganglionosis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Yoshitomo; Kohno, Miyuki; Nishida, Syouichi; Shironomae, Tsubasa; Satomi, Miwa; Kuwahara, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Sadayoshi; Niida, Yo

    2017-01-01

    Cartilage-hair hypoplasia is a rare metaphyseal chondrodysplasia characterized by diverse clinical manifestations and a high incidence of Hirschsprung disease. We present a male patient with cartilage-hair hypoplasia associated with severe intestinal obstruction. Genetic analysis of ribonuclease mitochondrial RNA-processing complex gene identified compound heterozygous mutations consisted with previously reported mutations: n.-14_3dupGAAGCTGAGGACGTGGT and n.183G > T. First, we considered that intestinal obstruction was due to an extensive type of Hirschsprung disease, but it was later confirmed as isolated hypoganglionosis. Isolated hypoganglionosis is rare and its therapeutic strategies are not well established. In cases of cartilage-hair hypoplasia associated with severe intestinal obstruction, the differential diagnosis of not only Hirschsprung disease, but also isolated hypoganglionosis, should be considered. © 2016 Japanese Teratology Society.

  7. Pregnancy Outcome in Cartilage-Hair Hypoplasia, a Rare Form of Dwarfism

    PubMed Central

    Thavarajah, Harshithaa

    2017-01-01

    Background. This case report discusses the pregnancy outcome of a patient with cartilage-hair hypoplasia, a rare form of dwarfism, and multiple previous orthopedic surgeries. Literature on pregnancy outcomes in patients with cartilage-hair hypoplasia is limited. Case. A 32-year-old patient with cartilage-hair hypoplasia presented at 12 weeks' gestation to the high-risk obstetrics clinic for care. Preterm labor resulted in cesarean delivery at 34 weeks' gestation with general anesthetic. Breastfeeding was stopped at 6 weeks due to neonatal complications. Conclusion. Pregnancy and delivery were uncomplicated. A multidisciplinary approach allowed for effective management during pregnancy and postnatal care. This is the first known documented case of prenatal care, delivery, and breastfeeding in a woman with this rare disorder. PMID:28251002

  8. Isolated Left Ventricular Apical Hypoplasia with Right Ventricular Outflow Tract Obstruction: A Rare Combination.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yonghui; Zhang, Jiaying; Zhang, Jing

    2015-09-01

    Isolated left ventricular (LV) apical hypoplasia is a unusual and recently recognized congenital cardiac anomaly. A 19-year-old man was found to have an abnormal ECG and cardiac murmur identified during a routine health check since joining work. His ECG revealed normal sinus rhythm, right-axis deviation, poor R wave progression, and T wave abnormalities. On physical examination, a 2/6~3/6 systolic murmur was heard at the second intercostal space along the left sternal border. Subsequent echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the LV apical hypoplasia. Of note, we first found that LV apical hypoplasia was accompanied by RV outflow tract obstruction due to exaggerated rightward bulging of the basal-anterior septum during systole. A close follow-up was performed for the development of heart failure, pulmonary hypertension, and potentially tachyarrhythmia.

  9. Goldenhar Syndrome with Dextrocardia and Right Pulmonary Hypoplasia: An Unusual Association

    PubMed Central

    Halwai, Hemant Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Goldenhar syndrome (GS), a rare condition, occurring due to defect in development of first and second branchial arches, is characterized by a combination of various anomalies involving face, eyes, ears, vertebrae, heart, and lungs. The etiology of GS is not fully known, although various hypotheses have been proposed along with its genetic association and many other causes. Facial asymmetry and hypoplasia of the mandible are characteristic features of GS along with microtia and preauricular appendages and pits. Dextrocardia or pulmonary hypoplasia in GS has previously been reported separately. We report a 7-year-old female child of GS with combination of anomalies, dextrocardia, and pulmonary hypoplasia, which is a rare association. PMID:28377826

  10. Advances in the Treatment of Syndromic Midface Hypoplasia Using Monobloc and Facial Bipartition Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anand R.; Steinbacher, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Midface hypoplasia or retrusion remains a persistent feature of syndromic craniosynostosis years after successful treatment of the cranium. Although expansion of the cranial vault in infancy by traditional fronto-orbital advancement, posterior expansion, or both, can treat the immediate intracranial constriction, midface hypoplasia and its stigmata of exorbitism, sleep apnea, central face concavity, and malocclusion remain suboptimally treated. Initial enthusiasm for the procedures was tempered due to a high rate of infectious complications; timing and indications for surgery continue to stir controversy. During the last decade renewed interest with the monobloc and facial bipartition procedure using distraction osteogenesis with either an internal or external distraction system has decreased morbidity significantly. These procedures have re-emerged as powerful and comprehensive tools in the treatment of syndromic midface hypoplasia. PMID:26417208

  11. A case of adrenal Cushing’s syndrome with bilateral adrenal masses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ya-Wun; Hwu, Chii-Min; Won, Justin Ging-Shing; Chu, Chia-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Summary A functional lesion in corticotrophin (ACTH)-independent Cushing’s syndrome is difficult to distinguish from lesions of bilateral adrenal masses. Methods for distinguishing these lesions include adrenal venous sampling and 131I-6β-iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol (131I-NP-59) scintigraphy. We present a case of a 29-year-old Han Chinese female patient with a history of hypercholesterolaemia and polycystic ovary syndrome. She presented with a 6month history of an 8kg body weight gain and gradual rounding of the face. Serial examinations revealed loss of circadian rhythm of cortisol, elevated urinary free-cortisol level and undetectable ACTH level (<5pg/mL). No suppression was observed in both the low- and high-dose dexamethasone suppression tests. Adrenal computed tomography revealed bilateral adrenal masses. Adrenal venous sampling was performed, and the right-to-left lateralisation ratio was 14.29. The finding from adrenal scintigraphy with NP-59 was consistent with right adrenal adenoma. The patient underwent laparoscopic right adrenalectomy, and the pathology report showed adrenocortical adenoma. Her postoperative cortisol level was 3.2μg/dL, and her Cushingoid appearance improved. In sum, both adrenal venous sampling and 131I-NP-59 scintigraphy are good diagnostic methods for Cushing’s syndrome presenting with bilateral adrenal masses. Learning points The clinical presentation of Cushing’ syndrome includes symptoms and signs of fat redistribution and protein-wasting features. The diagnosis of patients with ACTH-independent Cushing’s syndrome with bilateral adrenal masses is challenging for localisation of the lesion. Both adrenal venous sampling and 131I-NP-59 scintigraphy are good methods to use in these patients with Cushing’s syndrome presenting with bilateral adrenal masses. PMID:27252858

  12. Presence of kisspeptin-like immunoreactivity in human adrenal glands and adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Shoji, Itaru; Shibasaki, Akiko; Kato, Ichiro; Hiraishi, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Hajime; Kaneko, Kiriko; Murakami, Osamu; Morimoto, Ryo; Satoh, Fumitoshi; Ito, Sadayoshi; Totsune, Kazuhito

    2010-05-01

    Kisspeptins are neuropeptides which activate the hypothalamo-pituitary gonadal axis and are considered to play important physiological roles in the reproduction. Kisspeptins have also been reported to stimulate the aldosterone secretion from the adrenal cortex. However, the expression of kisspeptins in human adrenal glands and adrenal tumors has not been clarified yet. We, therefore, studied the presence of kisspeptin-like immunoreactivity (LI) in human adrenal glands and adrenal tumors (adrenocortical adenomas, adrenocortical carcinomas, and pheochromocytomas) by radioimmunoassay and immunocytochemistry. Kisspeptin-LI was detected in all the tissues examined; normal portions of adrenal glands (3.0 +/- 2.3 pmol/g wet weight, n = 21, mean +/- SD), aldosterone-producing adenomas (4.6 +/- 3.3 pmol/g wet weight, n = 10), cortisol-producing adenomas (2.7 +/- 1.4 pmol/g wet weight, n = 14), adrenocortical carcinomas (1.7 +/- 0.2 pmol/g wet weight, n = 4), and pheochromocytomas (1.8 +/- 0.8 pmol/g wet weight, n = 6). There was no significant difference in kisspeptin-LI levels among them. Immunocytochemistry showed positive kisspeptin-immunostaining in normal adrenal glands, with stronger immunostaining found in the medulla. Furthermore, positive kisspeptin-immunostaining was found in all types of adrenal tumors examined; adrenocortical adenomas, adrenocortical carcinomas, and pheochromocytomas. The intensity of kisspeptin-immunostaining in these adrenal tumors was, however, not so strong as that in normal adrenal medulla. The present study has shown for the first time the presence of kisspeptin-LI in adrenal glands and adrenal tumors.

  13. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving a femur bone and bilateral adrenal glands alone with adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Iwahara, Yoshihito; Shinohara, Tsutomu; Naruse, Keishi; Komatsu, Yukihisa

    2017-01-31

    Primary bone lymphoma and primary adrenal lymphoma are rare clinicopathological entities of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). We present the first case of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with the involvement of a single bone and both adrenal glands alone with adrenal insufficiency. As primary extranodal NHL may have other unusual extranodal lesions, which may present unexplained clinical findings, patients with primary extranodal NHL require careful systemic examination, even when lymphadenopathy is absent. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  14. Radiology of the adrenals with sonography and CT

    SciTech Connect

    Mitty, H.A.; Yeh, H.C.

    1982-01-01

    The basic science and application of clinical adrenal imaging is presented. The initial chapters deal with anatomic review and methods of adrenal imaging. The bulk of the book consists of individual chapters describing pathologic entities and syndromes of adrenal disease. The final chapter deals with differentiation of adrenal lesions from masses arising in adjacent organs. There is no other single source available which so concisely presents adrenal imaging. (KRM)

  15. [Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage revealed by jaundice: a case report].

    PubMed

    Oulmaati, A; Hays, S; Mory-Thomas, N; Bretones, P; Bensaid, M; Jordan, I; Bonfils, M; Godbert, I; Picaud, J-C

    2012-04-01

    The clinical presentation of adrenal hemorrhage varies, depending on the extent of hemorrhage as well as the amount of adrenal cortex involved by the hemorrhage. We report here a case of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage revealed by late onset of neonatal jaundice. This adrenal hemorrhage most probably resulted from shoulder dystocia. The aim of this work was to focus on the fact that jaundice can be caused by adrenal hemorrhage and to emphasize the crucial importance of abdominal ultrasound in cases of persistent jaundice.

  16. Turner's hypoplasia and non-vitality: A case report of sequelae in permanent tooth

    PubMed Central

    Geetha Priya, P. R.; John, John B.; Elango, Indumathi

    2010-01-01

    Hypoplasia is the result of disruption in the process of enamel matrix formation, which in turn causes defect in quality and thickness of enamel. Four cases of Turner's hypoplastic teeth with a previous history of trauma/infection in their primary predecessors at the age of 2-3 years have been reported. These hypoplastic teeth had turned non-vital without any carious insult, cavitation or further trauma. This article thereby stresses the importance of early detection of enamel hypoplasia and proper management at the earliest possible stage to enable an efficient prevention from clinically non-evident microbial invasion in the dentinal tubules and concomitant pulp pathosis. PMID:22114432

  17. Cone Reconstruction of Atypical Ebstein Anomaly Associated with Right Ventricular Apical Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Reddin, Gemma; Dearani, Joseph A.; Warnes, Carole A.; Cetta, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Cone reconstruction for tricuspid valve repair has revolutionized the surgical treatment of Ebstein anomaly. We present the case of a 58-year-old woman with atypical Ebstein anomaly and right ventricular apical hypoplasia who was spared from palliative shunt physiology by our use of cone reconstruction. Compared with other techniques, cone reconstruction of the tricuspid valve more closely replicates normal valvular anatomy and function. This surgical procedure can be applied to many anatomic variations of Ebstein anomaly, as in our patient's apparently unique instance of atypical Ebstein anomaly with right ventricular apical hypoplasia. PMID:27047292

  18. A nonsense porcn mutation in severe focal dermal hypoplasia with natal teeth.

    PubMed

    Dias, Cristina; Basto, Jorge; Pinho, Odilia; Barbêdo, Carla; Mártins, Marcia; Bornholdt, Dorothea; Fortuna, Ana; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz; Lima, Margarida

    2010-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH, Goltz syndrome), is an X-linked dominant mesoectodermal developmental disorder, involving skin, skeleton, eyes, teeth, and other organs. Mutations in PORCN, which stimulates the secretion of wingless family signal proteins, are found in FDH patients. A female fetus presented at 34 weeks gestation with interuterine growth restriction (IUGR), asymmetry, limb anomalies, microphthalmia, and lung anomaly. Focal dermal hypoplasia was confirmed at birth, with hypoplastic areas of skin, malformation of the limbs, diaphragmatic hernia, and ocular anomalies. Mutation analysis of PORCN revealed a nonsense mutation-Y359X. She presented natal teeth, an unexpected feature considering the role of the Wnt pathway in tooth development.

  19. A new syndrome of severe upper limb hypoplasia and Müllerian duct anomalies.

    PubMed

    Halal, F

    1986-05-01

    We report on the occurrence of a new syndrome of upper limb hypoplasia and Müllerian duct anomalies in a French Canadian family. Limb/acral anomalies varied in expression from postaxial polydactyly to ectrodactyly to severe upper limb hypoplasia with split hand. Genital anomalies varied in expression from only a vaginal septum to complete duplication of uterus and vagina in the female to a micropenis in one of two affected males. The syndrome appears to be inherited as an autosomal dominant trait.

  20. Adhesive solutions: report of a case using multiple adhesive techniques in the management of enamel hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Li, R W

    1999-09-01

    Enamel hypoplasia is a common condition that may present a severe aesthetic problem. Although the teeth affected may not be particularly susceptible to caries, patients may request cosmetic improvement. Adhesive techniques may be useful in such situations. This paper discusses the management of a patient with enamel hypoplasia using a combination of adhesive systems including enamel- and dentine-bonded veneers, dentine-bonded crowns, a cantilever resin-retained bridge, bonded amalgam restorations and chairside tin plating. Where adhesion was contraindicated, conventionally retained crowns were used.

  1. Successful staged neonatal repair of tetralogy of Fallot with long-segment hypoplasia of the aorta.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jimmy C; Shah, Sanket S; Owens, Sonal T; Dorfman, Adam L; Vedre, Ameeth; Goble, Monica M; Hirsch, Jennifer C; Charpie, John R

    2010-01-01

    We describe an extremely rare combination of tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), right-sided cervical aortic arch with long-segment hypoplasia, and other vascular anomalies. A two-stage surgical approach included aortic arch reconstruction followed by right ventricular muscle bundle division and ventricular septal defect closure a few weeks later. The initial clinical presentation, perioperative course, and imaging studies are presented along with a review of the relevant literature. This is the first report of successful neonatal repair of TOF with long-segment hypoplasia of the aorta.

  2. Cone Reconstruction of Atypical Ebstein Anomaly Associated with Right Ventricular Apical Hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Reddin, Gemma; Poterucha, Joseph T; Dearani, Joseph A; Warnes, Carole A; Cetta, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Cone reconstruction for tricuspid valve repair has revolutionized the surgical treatment of Ebstein anomaly. We present the case of a 58-year-old woman with atypical Ebstein anomaly and right ventricular apical hypoplasia who was spared from palliative shunt physiology by our use of cone reconstruction. Compared with other techniques, cone reconstruction of the tricuspid valve more closely replicates normal valvular anatomy and function. This surgical procedure can be applied to many anatomic variations of Ebstein anomaly, as in our patient's apparently unique instance of atypical Ebstein anomaly with right ventricular apical hypoplasia.

  3. Skeletal stability after correction of maxillary hypoplasia by the Glasgow extra-oral distraction (GED) device.

    PubMed

    Jayade, C V; Ayoub, A F; Khambay, B S; Walker, F S; Gopalakrishnan, K; Malik, N A; Srivastava, D; Pradhan, R

    2006-08-01

    Maxillary distraction osteogenesis delivers excellent results, particularly in patients with clefts. In the past, devices such as the conventional facemask and the rigid external distraction device have been used to correct maxillary hypoplasia after a Le Fort I osteotomy. We describe a new device, the Glasgow extra-oral distraction device. The extent of skeletal and dental stability of corrections achieved in 10 patients with maxillary hypoplasia associated with clefts was satisfactory. This device costs little, can be produced in developing countries, and provides effective treatment for severe secondary deformity associated with clefts.

  4. Lung hypoplasia and surfactant system immaturity induced in the fetal rat by prenatal exposure to nitrofen.

    PubMed

    Alfanso, L F; Arnaiz, A; Alvarez, F J; Qi, B; Diez-Pardo, J A; Vallis-i-Soler, A; Tovar, J A

    1996-01-01

    We studied the biochemical maturity of the lungs of fetuses born to rats exposed to nitrofen on day 9.5 of gestation. In comparison with controls, nitrofen-treated fetuses had pulmonary hypoplasia (decreased lung/body weight), lung hypocellularity (low DNA content) and cellular atrophy (low protein/DNA and phospholipid/DNA) on gestational days 19 and 21. Treated animals with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) also had cell atrophy and surfactant immaturity (decreased disaturated phosphatidylcholine/DNA) near term. Our data demonstrate that nitrofen causes lung hypoplasia and some degree of surfactant system immaturity that is particularly prominent in fetuses with CDH.

  5. Bone marrow hypoplasia and intestinal crypt cell necrosis associated with fenbendazole administration in five painted storks.

    PubMed

    Weber, Martha A; Terrell, Scott P; Neiffer, Donald L; Miller, Michele A; Mangold, Barbara J

    2002-08-01

    Five painted storks were treated with fenbendazole for 5 days for internal parasitism. Four birds died following treatment. Profound heteropenia was a consistent finding in all samples evaluated; additionally, the 1 surviving bird had progressive anemia. Consistent necropsy findings in the 4 birds that died were small intestinal crypt cell necrosis and severe bone marrow depletion and necrosis. Fenbendazole has been associated with bone marrow hypoplasia and enteric damage in mammals and other species of birds. The dosages of fenbendazole used in birds are often substantially higher than those recommended for mammals, which may contribute to bone marrow hypoplasia and intestinal crypt cell necrosis associated with fenbendazole administration in birds.

  6. Image-Guided Ablation of Adrenal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yamakado, Koichiro

    2014-01-01

    Although laparoscopic adrenalectomy has remained the standard of care for the treatment for adrenal tumors, percutaneous image-guided ablation therapy, such as chemical ablation, radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, and microwave ablation, has been shown to be clinically useful in many nonsurgical candidates. Ablation therapy has been used to treat both functioning adenomas and malignant tumors, including primary adrenal carcinoma and metastasis. For patients with functioning adenomas, biochemical and symptomatic improvement is achieved in 96 to 100% after ablation; for patients with malignant adrenal neoplasms, however, the survival benefit from ablation therapy remains unclear, though good initial results have been reported. This article outlines the current role of ablation therapy for adrenal lesions, as well as identifying some of the technical considerations for this procedure. PMID:25049444

  7. Advanced glycosylation end products in adrenal lipofuscin.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, I; Higami, Y; Horiuchi, S; Iwasaki, M; Ikeda, T

    1998-01-01

    The present study examined the presence of advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs) in lipofuscin present in the brain and adrenal gland of aging rats by immunohistochemistry using antibodies raised against AGEs. Lipofuscin identified as yellow to brown granules emitting bright yellow to orange autofluorescence with ultraviolet light were detected in cortical neurons, cerebellar Purkinje cells, and adrenal cells in the inner part of the zona reticularis. However, none of the antibodies visualized lipofuscin in these areas. The outer part of the zona reticularis contained yellow granules emitting a faint orange autofluorescence. These granules were immunostained by an antibody that reacted with AGEs structures unrelated to the carboxymethyllysine moiety. Newly formed adrenal cortical cells are thought to migrate from the outer layer to the inner layer of the zona reticularis. Therefore, our results suggest that glycosylation-related processes are involved in lipofuscinogenesis, at least in its early stage, in the adrenal zona reticularis.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: primary macronodular adrenal hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... produced from the GNAS gene helps stimulate the activity of an enzyme called adenylate cyclase. This enzyme is involved in controlling the production of several hormones that help regulate the activity of certain endocrine glands, including the adrenal glands. ...

  9. Ancient history of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    New, Maria I

    2011-01-01

    Although there are many erudite reports on the history of endocrinology and endocrine disorders, the history of congenital adrenal hyperplasia has not been published. I have tried to review ancient as well as modern history of CAH.

  10. Molecular prenatal diagnosis in 2 pregnancies at risk for spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xin-Yi; Cui, Ying-Xia; Huang, Yu-Feng; Pan, Lian-Jun; Feng, Yao; Yang, Bin; Li, Xiao-Jun; Zhu, Pei-Yuan; Shi, Yi-Chao; Liang, Quan

    2008-01-01

    Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC) is an autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasia characterized by short stature, abnormal epiphyses, and flattened vertebral bodies. Secondary prevention of SEDC can be achieved by prenatal diagnosis. Reports of antenatally-diagnosed SEDC fetuses have been very rare and molecular prenatal diagnosis even rarer. We previously reported a familial G504S mutation in the type II collagen (COL2A1) gene resulting in SEDC. In this study, molecular prenatal diagnosis was performed to 2 couples in this family with pregnancies at risk for SEDC. Amniotic fluid was sampled by amniocentesis under ultrasound guidance at 19+3 and 18+6 weeks' gestation, respectively. Karyotype and molecular genetic analysis were performed on cultured amniotic fluid cells. Maternal cell contamination was excluded by short tandem repeat (STR) analysis. Direct DNA sequencing and DHPLC were conducted to detect the potential mutation in exon 23 of COL2A1 gene. Both women underwent serial sonograms because they insisted that the molecular diagnosis should be confirmed by another method, although they had been informed that mutation analysis is predictive of the disease. Karyotype of both fetuses was normal and molecular genetic analysis revealed that fetus 1 carried a G504S mutation in exon 23, while fetus 2 was normal. In case 1, femur length of the fetus was markedly below the 5th centile at 23 weeks' gestation, which confirms the accuracy of molecular diagnosis. A medical termination was carried out at 27+5 weeks' gestation and a male fetus with a relatively large head and short limbs was delivered. The fetal radiograph demonstrated a number of features, including generalised platyspondyly, absent ossification of the vertebral bodies in the cervical region and significant shortening of the long bones. The diagnosis of SEDC was thus confirmed clinically. Ultrasound monitoring of fetus 2 showed that its femur length was normal for gestational age at repeated scans

  11. The effect of bedrest on adrenal function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.; Hulley, S. B.; Rambaut, P. C.; Dietlein, L. F.

    1973-01-01

    Eight male subjects were subjected to continuous bedrest for 24-80 weeks for the purpose of studying metabolic responses. Three of the subjects did supine exercises daily during part of the study. Adrenal function was examined in relation to adrenal cortical and medullary excretions. The results reveal an increase in hydrocortisone throughout the test period, a decrease in norepinephrine and no change in epinephrine. These data suggest that exercise could decrease the severity of deconditioning caused by bedrest.

  12. Primary hydatid cyst in the adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Afshin; Ghasemi-Rad, Mohammad; Oklu, Rahmi

    2014-10-23

    An elderly man presented with a 2-year history of refractory hypertension. His medical history, physical examination and laboratory findings were unremarkable. On subsequent ultrasound study for the evaluation of renal artery stenosis, a large mass obliterating the adrenal gland containing internal cystic structures was identified. A CT study confirmed the diagnosis of primary adrenal gland hydatid cyst. Following surgical resection, the patient's hypertension resolved and medications to control blood pressure were discontinued.

  13. Metabolism of adrenal cholesterol in man

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Abraham; Delcroix, Claude; Levin, Sam

    1972-01-01

    The synthesis of adrenal cholesterol, its esterification and the synthesis of the glucocorticosteroid hormones were studied in vitro on human adrenal tissue. It was found that the synthesis of adrenal cholesterol may normally be small in the zona “fasciculata,” particularly when compared with the synthesis of the glucocorticosteroid hormones, that it is several times higher in the zona “reticularis” where esterified cholesterol is less abundant, and that under ACTH stimulation it increases strikingly and proportionally to the degree of esterified adrenal cholesterol depletion. On the other hand, the relative rate of esterification as well as the concentration of free adrenal cholesterol are remarkably stable: they do not differ according to the adrenal zonation and are unaffected by ACTH. Furthermore, from a qualitative point of view, the relative proportions of Δ1 and Δ2 cholesteryl esters formed in situ are similar to those anticipated from their relative concentrations, suggesting that the characteristic fatty acid distribution of the adrenal cholesteryl esters results from an in situ esterification rather than from a selective uptake of the plasma cholesteryl esters. Besides, the in vitro esterification reveals a propensity to the formation of the most unsaturated cholesteryl esters. Regarding hydrocortisone and corticosterone, their synthesis tends to be more elevated in the zona “fasciculata.” Despite its higher cholesterol concentration the zona “fasciculata” should not therefore be viewed as a quiescent functional complement to the zona “reticularis” and the cortical distribution of glucocorticosteroid hormone synthesis is quite distinct from that of adrenal cholesterol synthesis. PMID:4338120

  14. Coexistence of pheochromocytoma, adrenal adenoma and hypokalemia.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, G. E.; Schmidt, N.; Lee-Son, L.

    1977-01-01

    A 56-year-old woman had a 22-year history of hypertension. Investigation showed hypokalemia and kaliuresis without pronounced suppression of plasma renin activity or elevation of urinary aldosterone excretion. There was biochemical evidence of catecholamine metabolite excess but the usual clinical features of pheochromocytoma were absent. Laparotomy revealed a pheochromocytoma and adrenal adenoma in the right adrenal gland. Excision of the tumours was followed by resolution of the hypertension and metabolic abnormalities. Images FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:844017

  15. Black adrenal adenoma causing preclinical Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Inomoto, Chie; Sato, Haruhiro; Kanai, Genta; Hirukawa, Takashi; Shoji, Sunao; Terachi, Toshiro; Kajiwara, Hiroshi; Osamura, Robert Yoshiyuki

    2010-07-20

    Functioning black adrenal adenoma (BAA) rarely causes preclinical Cushing's syndrome (CS). In the present case, a 46-year-old Japanese Peruvian woman presented with left flank pain and hypertension. Abdominal computed tomography showed that she had a 15-mm in diameter, round, left adrenal adenoma. She had no physical features of CS, such as moon face, buffalo hump, truncal obesity, or purple striae. Endocrinological examination showed that the plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level was below the detectable level, despite a serum cortisol level within the normal range. A normal cortisol circadian rhythm was not present. Dexamethasone (1 mg and 8 mg) suppression testing did not decrease serum cortisol levels to the reference levels. These findings were compatible with preclinical CS. The left adrenal adenoma was laparoscopically removed. Examination of the surgical specimen revealed unilateral double adrenal adenomas of the left adrenal gland, one of which was a BAA. The BAA measured 20 × 11 × 10 mm. Microscopically, the BAA showed proliferation of compact cells containing numerous brown-pigmented granules. There were also foci of myelolipomatous degenerative changes in the tumor. The compact cell zones remained in the adrenal cortex adjacent to the BAA showed atrophic change. These findings indicated that BAA appeared to have caused preclinical CS in this patient.

  16. [Adrenal gland insufficiency secondary to paracoccidioidomycosis].

    PubMed

    Oñate, José M; Tobón, Angela María; Restrepo, Angela

    2002-09-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is regularly associated with adrenal insufficiency in 10-15% of symptomatic cases, and in some instances, diagnosis of the mycosis precedes the adrenal manifestation. To establish the frequency of this association, records were reviewed of 207 cases diagnosed with mycosis at the Mycology Service of the Corporación para Investigaciones Biológicas. Six cases (2.9%) were found to have adrenal insufficiency. Patients were all males with a mean age of 67.2 years (range 48-75) and most worked in agriculture. The duration of the symptoms of adrenal damage was 4.1 months (range 2-6). All patients experienced weight loss and malaise; all had abnormal lung X-rays. Major clinical improvement was recorded after initiation of the specific treatments consisting of itraconazole, prednisolone and fluorcortisone. Diminished antibody titers against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis were also recorded after treatment. Prompt treatment re-established adrenal function and effected recovery of normal gland morphology. Consequently, early detection of hypoadrenalism in patients living in the endemic areas is necessary to avoid further adrenal damage and permits a shorter hormonal treatment period in patients afflicted by the mycosis.

  17. Expression of adrenomedullin 2/intermedin in human adrenal tumors and attached non-neoplastic adrenal tissues.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Ryo; Satoh, Fumitoshi; Murakami, Osamu; Hirose, Takuo; Totsune, Kazuhito; Imai, Yutaka; Arai, Yoichi; Suzuki, Takashi; Sasano, Hironobu; Ito, Sadayoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhiro

    2008-07-01

    Adrenomedullin 2/intermedin (AM2/IMD) is a new member of calcitonin/calcitonin gene-related peptide family. AM is expressed in various tumors including adrenocortical tumors and modulates tumor growth. The AM2/IMD expression has not been studied, however, in adrenal tumors. The expression of AM2/IMD and AM was therefore studied in human adrenal tumors and attached non-neoplastic adrenal tissues by immunocytochemistry (ICC). Immunoreactive (IR)-AM2/IMD was measured by RIA. Furthermore, the expression of AM2/IMD and its receptor components, calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR), and receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs) 1, 2, and 3 mRNA in these tissues was studied by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR). ICC showed that AM2/IMD and AM immunoreactivities were localized in adrenocortical tumors and pheochromocytomas. AM2/IMD and AM immunoreactivities were detected in medulla of attached non-neoplastic tissues, while the degree of immunoreactivity for AM2/IMD and AM in cortices of attached adrenals was relatively weak or undetectable. RIA detected IR-AM2/IMD in adrenal tumors (0.414+/-0.12 to 0.786+/-0.27 pmol/g wet weight, mean+/-S.E.M.) and attached adrenal tissues (0.397+/-0.052 pmol/g wet weight). Reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography showed one broad peak eluted in the similar position to synthetic AM2/IMD with several minor peaks. RT-PCR showed expression of AM2/IMD, CRLR, and RAMP1, RAMP2, and RAMP3 mRNA in tissues of adrenal tumors and attached adrenal glands. In conclusion, AM2/IMD is expressed in human adrenal tumors and attached non-neoplastic adrenal tissues and may play (patho-)physiological roles in normal and neoplastic adrenals as an autocrine/paracrine regulator.

  18. Outcome of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kuhnle, U; Bullinger, M

    1997-09-01

    In congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency, affected girls are born with ambiguous genitalia due to increased secretion of androgens in utero by the defective adrenal gland. Even though it is generally accepted that there are differences between male and female brain development, determining factors have been difficult to identify. Girls with CAH have frequently been studied to evaluate the impact of prenatal androgen exposure on psychological, psychosocial, and psychosexual development, and impairments in various areas have been identified. However, there is no comprehensive study available regarding the outcome of this chronic disorder in adult life. We studied the quality of life in women with CAH, with particular emphasis on how they cope with genital malformations, genital operations, and chronic disease as well as lifelong medication. The patients filled out questionnaires covering their physical state, psychological well-being, social relationships, and functional capacity, as well as questionnaires on psychosexual identification and psychosocial integration. The results were evaluated using a computerized statistical program for social studies. Out of a total of 94 patients above 18 years of age, 45 agreed to participate and were compared to 46 healthy, age-matched controls. Age at diagnosis was 2. 31 +/- 1.55 years and 38% suffered from the simple-virilizing, 45% from the salt-wasting, and 17.0% from the late-onset form of CAH. About one-third of patients had Prader stage 3 or 4 genital virilization. While the overall quality of life did not differ significantly, CAH patients were more often single (47.8% vs. 66.7%) and fewer of them had children (22.2% vs. 38.6%) compared to controls. Significant impairments were found in regard to body image and attitudes toward sexuality, but there was no increased homosexual preference. The women were successful in adjusting to illness and receiving social support. It is speculated that

  19. Adrenal Imaging: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Colin J; McDermott, Shaunagh; Blake, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal glands are located superior to the kidneys and play an important role in the endocrine system. Each adrenal gland contains an outer cortex, responsible mainly for the secretion of androgens and corticosteroids, and an inner medulla, which secretes epinephrine and norepinephrine. Here, we review the anatomy of the adrenal glands and explain the current imaging modalities that are most useful for the assessment of the various conditions--both benign and malignant--that can affect these glands. As adrenal lesions are often identified incidentally on cross-sectional imaging performed for other reasons, the management of such adrenal 'incidentalomas' is also discussed. In many cases, adrenal lesions have distinctive imaging features that allow for a full characterization with noninvasive techniques. In some cases, invasive studies such as adrenal vein sampling or adrenal biopsy become necessary. This review should give the reader a wide overview of how various imaging techniques can be useful in the assessment of adrenal pathology.

  20. The agonistic adrenal: melatonin elicits female aggression via regulation of adrenal androgens.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Nikki M; Rudolph, Lauren M; Sengelaub, Dale R; Demas, Gregory E

    2015-11-22

    Classic findings have demonstrated an important role for sex steroids as regulators of aggression, but this relationship is lacking within some environmental contexts. In mammals and birds, the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a non-gonadal precursor of biologically active steroids, has been linked to aggression. Although females, like males, use aggression when competing for limited resources, the mechanisms underlying female aggression remain understudied. Here, we propose a previously undescribed endocrine mechanism regulating female aggression via direct action of the pineal hormone melatonin on adrenal androgens. We examined this in a solitary hamster species, Phodopus sungorus, in which both sexes are highly territorial across the seasons, and display increased aggression concomitant with decreased serum levels of sex steroids in short 'winter-like' days. Short- but not long-day females had increased adrenal DHEA responsiveness co-occurring with morphological changes in the adrenal gland. Further, serum DHEA and total adrenal DHEA content were elevated in short days. Lastly, melatonin increased DHEA and aggression and stimulated DHEA release from cultured adrenals. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that DHEA is a key peripheral regulator of aggression and that melatonin coordinates a 'seasonal switch' from gonadal to adrenal regulation of aggression by direct action on the adrenal glands.

  1. The agonistic adrenal: melatonin elicits female aggression via regulation of adrenal androgens

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Lauren M.; Sengelaub, Dale R.; Demas, Gregory E.

    2015-01-01

    Classic findings have demonstrated an important role for sex steroids as regulators of aggression, but this relationship is lacking within some environmental contexts. In mammals and birds, the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a non-gonadal precursor of biologically active steroids, has been linked to aggression. Although females, like males, use aggression when competing for limited resources, the mechanisms underlying female aggression remain understudied. Here, we propose a previously undescribed endocrine mechanism regulating female aggression via direct action of the pineal hormone melatonin on adrenal androgens. We examined this in a solitary hamster species, Phodopus sungorus, in which both sexes are highly territorial across the seasons, and display increased aggression concomitant with decreased serum levels of sex steroids in short ‘winter-like' days. Short- but not long-day females had increased adrenal DHEA responsiveness co-occurring with morphological changes in the adrenal gland. Further, serum DHEA and total adrenal DHEA content were elevated in short days. Lastly, melatonin increased DHEA and aggression and stimulated DHEA release from cultured adrenals. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that DHEA is a key peripheral regulator of aggression and that melatonin coordinates a ‘seasonal switch’ from gonadal to adrenal regulation of aggression by direct action on the adrenal glands. PMID:26582025

  2. Failure to visualize adrenal glands in a patient with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. [/sup 131/I

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, L.; Mayfield, R.K.; Levine, J.H.; Lopes-Virella, M.F.; Sagel, J.; Buse, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    A patient with clinical and biochemical evidence of Cushing's disease and severe hyperlipidemia underwent an adrenal imaging procedure with NP-59 (6..beta..-(/sup 131/I)iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol), without visualization of either gland. Correction of the hyperlipidemia followed by repeated adrenal imaging resulted in bilateral visualization. A pituitary tumor was removed at surgery, confirming the diagnosis of Cushing's disease.

  3. [Adrenal insufficiency in cirrhotic patients].

    PubMed

    Orozco, Federico; Anders, María; Mella, José; Antinucci, Florencia; Pagano, Patricia; Esteban, Paula; Cartier, Mariano; Romero, Gustavo; Francini, Bettina; Mastai, Ricardo

    Relative adrenal insufficiency (RAI) is a common finding in cirrhotic patients with severe sepsis, and increased mortality. Its significance is unknown in stable conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of RAI in stable cirrhotic patients at different stages of the disease. Also, the impact of RAI on the survival was evaluated and basal cortisol levels between plasma and saliva was correlated in control subjects and cirrhotic patients. Forty seven ambulatory patients and 16 control subjects were studied. RAI was defined as a serum cortisol increase of less than 9 υg/dl from baseline after the stimulation with 250 mg of synthetic ACTH. Twenty two had Child-Pugh = 8 and 25 = 9. The prevalence of RAI in patients with stable cirrhosis was 22%. A higher incidence of RAI was observed in patients with a Child-Pugh = 9 (8/32) than in those with = 8 (3/13, p < 0.05). A correlation between salivary cortisol and basal plasma cortisol (r = 0.6, p < 0.0004) was observed. Finally, survival at 1 year (97%) and 3 years (91%) was significantly higher without RAI than those who developed this complication (79% and 51%, p < 0.05, respectively). In summary, the prevalence of RAI is frequent in patients with stable cirrhosis and that it is related to the severity of liver diseaseand increased mortality.

  4. Unilateral inferior turbinate hypoplasia caused by a longstanding (approximately 35 yr) nasal foreign body.

    PubMed

    Derosas, Fiorenza; Marioni, Gino; Brescia, Giuseppe; Florio, Alessandra; Staffieri, Claudia; Staffieri, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    We report the unusual case of a 44-year-old man who presented with a plastic foreign body that had been lodged in his right nasal cavity for approximately 35 years. Initial attempts to remove the object were unsuccessful; only after it was broken into several parts was removal achieved. Rigid nasal endoscopy and computed tomography revealed hypoplasia of the ipsilateral inferior turbinate.

  5. Growth, nutritional, and gastrointestinal aspects of focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz-Gorlin syndrome)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH) is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutations in the PORCN gene located on the X-chromosome. In the present study, we characterized the pattern of growth, body composition, and the nutritional and gastrointestinal aspects of children and adults (n'='19) affected with t...

  6. The newly recognised limb/pelvis-hypoplasia/aplasia syndrome: report of a Bedouin patient and review.

    PubMed

    Farag, T I; al-Awadi, S A; Marafie, M J; Bastaki, L; al-Othman, S A; Mohammed, F M; AlSuliman, I S; Murthy, D S

    1993-01-01

    A Bedouin infant born to consanguineous parents and grandparents is reported. She had Müllerian aplasia and the phenotypic features of the limb/pelvis-hypoplasia/aplasia syndrome (MIM 276820). Phenotypic variability of this newly recognised syndrome is briefly discussed.

  7. Bilateral recurrent patellar dislocation in a patient with isolated patella aplasia-hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Eiki; Inoue, Motoyasu; Kobayashi, Shigeru

    2007-10-01

    Patella aplasia-hypoplasia is a rare condition characterized by the congenital absence or marked reduction of the patellar bone. It is well known that patella aplasia-hypoplasia occurs in nail-patella syndrome, small patella syndrome, and several other syndromes. However, isolated patella aplasia-hypoplasia without associated clinical or radiologic anomalies, first described by Kutz in 1949, is an extremely rare condition. This report describes 12 years' follow-up after medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction surgery performed for bilateral recurrent patellar dislocation in a 29-year-old patient with isolated patella aplasia-hypoplasia. The patient had no radiographic findings of elbow abnormalities, exostoses of the ilia, or abnormal ossification of the ischiopubic junction. The right patella was severely subluxated, and the left patella was mildly subluxated. The preoperative Kujala score was 28 points for the right patella and 23 points for the left. Medial patellofemoral ligament reconstruction, wide lateral release, and patellaplasty with multiple drilling were done in July 1993 for the left knee and in August 1993 for the right. At 12 years' follow-up, the Kujala score was 68 points for the right patella and 73 points for the left, and the patient was satisfied with the result. Magnetic resonance images showed both patellae without subluxation and bulky regenerated ligaments.

  8. WDR73 missense mutation causes infantile onset intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia in a consanguineous family.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chen; Gai, Nan; Zou, Yongyi; Zheng, Yu; Ma, Ruiyu; Wei, Xianda; Liang, Desheng; Wu, Lingqian

    2017-01-01

    Galloway-Mowat syndrome (GMS) is a very rare autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by nephrotic syndrome associated with microcephaly, and various central nervous system abnormalities, mostly cerebral hypoplasia or cerebellar atrophy, intellectual disability and neural-migration defects. WDR73 is the only gene known to cause GMS, and has never been implicated in other disease. Here we present a Chinese consanguineous family with infantile onset intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia but no microcephaly. Whole exome sequencing identified a WDR73 p.W371G missense mutation. The mutation is confirmed to be segregated in this family by Sanger sequencing according to a recessive inheritance pattern. It is predicted to be deleterious by multiple algorithms and affect highly conserved site. Structural modeling revealed conformational differences between the wild type protein and the p.W371G protein. Real-time PCR and Western blotting revealed altered mRNA and protein levels in mutated samples. Our study indicates the novel WDR73 p.W371G missense mutation causes infantile onset intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia in recessive mode of inheritance. Our findings imply that microcephaly is a variable phenotype in WDR73-related disease, suggest WDR73 to be a candidate gene of severe intellectual disability and cerebellar hypoplasia, and expand the molecular spectrum of WDR73-related disease.

  9. Doppler velocimetry of the ductus arteriosus in normal fetuses and fetuses suspected for pulmonary hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Gerards, F A; Twisk, J W R; van Vugt, J M G

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the pulsatility index (PI) of the ductus arteriosus could predict the occurrence of pulmonary hypoplasia secondary to congenital disorders or complications during pregnancy. In this longitudinal study, 78 uncomplicated pregnancies and 43 pregnancies complicated by various disorders or complications with regard to pulmonary hypoplasia were studied by Doppler sonography between 18 and 35 weeks of gestation. A PI >97.5th percentile was considered abnormal. Using a multilevel modelling, the reference curve of the PI of the ductus arteriosus was created based on 301 measurements. Of the 43 complicated pregnancies, 21 infants (49%) were diagnosed with pulmonary hypoplasia on postmortem examination and/or the clinical and radiological presentation. Using the PI, a sensitivity of 38%, a specificity of 95%, a positive predictive value of 89% and a negative predictive value of 62% were found. The PI of the ductus arteriosus is not useful in predicting the occurrence of pulmonary hypoplasia secondary to congenital disorders or complications during pregnancy.

  10. The newly recognised limb/pelvis-hypoplasia/aplasia syndrome: report of a Bedouin patient and review.

    PubMed Central

    Farag, T I; al-Awadi, S A; Marafie, M J; Bastaki, L; al-Othman, S A; Mohammed, F M; AlSuliman, I S; Murthy, D S

    1993-01-01

    A Bedouin infant born to consanguineous parents and grandparents is reported. She had Müllerian aplasia and the phenotypic features of the limb/pelvis-hypoplasia/aplasia syndrome (MIM 276820). Phenotypic variability of this newly recognised syndrome is briefly discussed. Images PMID:8423610

  11. Mutations in X-linked PORCN, a putative regulator of Wnt signaling, cause focal dermal hypoplasia

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Focal dermal hypoplasia is an X-linked dominant disorder characterized by patchy hypoplastic skin and digital, ocular, and dental malformations. We used array comparative genomic hybridization to identify a 219-kb deletion in Xp11.23 in two affected females. We sequenced genes in this region and fou...

  12. Parvovirus associated cerebellar hypoplasia and hydrocephalus in day-old broiler chickens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cerebellar hypoplasia and hydrocephalus were detected in day-old broiler chickens. Brains of chickens evaluated at necropsy appeared to be abnormal; some were disfigured and cerebellae appeared to be smaller than normal. Histopathologic examination of brains revealed cerebellar folia that were sho...

  13. A Unique Way of Learning: Teaching Young Children with Optic Nerve Hypoplasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendiola, Rosalinda; Bahar, Cheryl; Brody, Jill; Slott, Gayle L.

    2005-01-01

    This booklet was inspired by the need of educators and therapists of preschool students who are blind and visually impaired to share their observations of children with Optic Nerve Hypoplasia (ONH) and the therapies found to be helpful when working with these children. The work done at the Blind Childrens Center is very rewarding, and these…

  14. Melnick-Needles Syndrome: report of a case associated with bilateral hypoplasia of the cochlea.

    PubMed

    Belfield, J C; Witana, J S; Connolly, D J A

    2007-01-01

    Melnick-Needles Syndrome is a rare disorder associated with many abnormalities. This case report describes a patient with Melnick-Needles Syndrome who was found to have bilateral hypoplasia of the cochlea, a finding not previously described in the literature. The case report describes the syndrome and demonstrates the findings on CT and MR imaging of temporal bones.

  15. Identification of a Novel Mutation in the COL2A1 Gene in a Chinese Family with Spondyloepiphyseal Dysplasia Congenita

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiangjun; Deng, Xiong; Xu, Hongbo; Wu, Song; Yuan, Lamei; Yang, Zhijian; Yang, Yan; Deng, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita (SEDC) is an autosomal dominant chondrodysplasia characterized by disproportionate short-trunk dwarfism, skeletal and vertebral deformities. Exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing were performed in a Chinese Han family with typical SEDC, and a novel mutation, c.620G>A (p.Gly207Glu), in the collagen type II alpha-1 gene (COL2A1) was identified. The mutation may impair protein stability, and lead to dysfunction of type II collagen. Family-based study suggested that the mutation is a de novo mutation. Our study extends the mutation spectrum of SEDC and confirms genotype-phenotype relationship between mutations at glycine in the triple helix of the alpha-1(II) chains of the COL2A1 and clinical findings of SEDC, which may be helpful in the genetic counseling of patients with SEDC. PMID:26030151

  16. Dominantly inherited myotonia congenita resulting from a mutation that increases open probability of the muscle chloride channel CLC-1.

    PubMed

    Richman, David P; Yu, Yawei; Lee, Ting-Ting; Tseng, Pang-Yen; Yu, Wei-Ping; Maselli, Ricardo A; Tang, Chih-Yung; Chen, Tsung-Yu

    2012-12-01

    Myotonia congenita-inducing mutations in the muscle chloride channel CLC-1 normally result in reduced open probability (P (o)) of this channel. One well-accepted mechanism of the dominant inheritance of this disease involves a dominant-negative effect of the mutation on the function of the common-gate of this homodimeric, double-barreled molecule. We report here a family with myotonia congenita characterized by muscle stiffness and clinical and electrophysiologic myotonic phenomena transmitted in an autosomal dominant pattern. DNA sequencing of DMPK and ZNF9 genes for myotonic muscular dystrophy types I and II was normal, whereas sequencing of CLC-1 encoding gene, CLCN1, identified a single heterozygous missense mutation, G233S. Patch-clamp analyses of this mutant CLC-1 channel in Xenopus oocytes revealed an increased P (o) of the channel's fast-gate, from ~0.4 in the wild type to >0.9 in the mutant at -90 mV. In contrast, the mutant exhibits a minimal effect on the P (o) of the common-gate. These results are consistent with the structural prediction that the mutation site is adjacent to the fast-gate of the channel. Overall, the mutant could lead to a significantly reduced dynamic response of CLC-1 to membrane depolarization, from a fivefold increase in chloride conductance in the wild type to a twofold increase in the mutant-this might result in slower membrane repolarization during an action potential. Since expression levels of the mutant and wild-type subunits in artificial model cell systems were unable to explain the disease symptoms, the mechanism leading to dominant inheritance in this family remains to be determined.

  17. Adrenal diseases during pregnancy: pathophysiology, diagnosis and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, Mahdi; Mnif, Mouna F; Charfi, Nadia; Kacem, Faten H; Naceur, Basma B; Mnif, Fatma; Dammak, Mohamed; Rekik, Nabila; Abid, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    : Adrenal diseases--including disorders such as Cushing's syndrome, Addison's disease, pheochromocytoma, primary hyperaldosteronism and congenital adrenal hyperplasia--are relatively rare in pregnancy, but a timely diagnosis and proper treatment are critical because these disorders can cause maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Making the diagnosis of adrenal disorders in pregnancy is challenging as symptoms associated with pregnancy are also seen in adrenal diseases. In addition, pregnancy is marked by several endocrine changes, including activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. The aim of this article was to review the pathophysiology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and management of various adrenal disorders during pregnancy.

  18. A Case Report of Bilateral Adrenal Sarcomatoid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cerit, Ethem Turgay; Özkan, Çiğdem; Altınova, Eroğlu; Çimen, Ali Rıza; Sözen, Sinan; Kerem, Mustafa; Aktürk, Müjde; Memiş, Leyla; Törüner, Baloş; Çakır, Nuri; Arslan, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare and aggressive malignancy. Sarcomatoid adrenal carcinoma is even more aggressive type of ACC. Bilateral malignant adrenal tumors are extremely rare except for those that represent metastasis from an extra-adrenal organ. Here we report a 53-year-old woman who presented with abdominal pain and weight loss. Abdominal computed tomography revealed bilateral adrenal masses and a mass in her liver. Surgical specimens showed pleomorphic tumor cells with epithelial and spindle cell morphology and immunohistochemical staining was compatible with sarcomatoid carcinoma. Sarcomatoid adrenal carcinoma should be kept in mind during the management of bilateral adrenal masses. PMID:28097033

  19. Diagnosis of adrenal tumors with radionuclide imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Beierwaltes, W.H.; Sisson, J.C.; Shapiro, B.

    1984-01-01

    The development of radiolabeled cholesterols in 1969 as precursors of adrenocortical steroid production allowed the first noninvasive imaging of the adrenal cortices. FDA-NDA approval in 1984 should allow routine use of these agents in most hospitals. NP-59 is most commonly used in the diagnosis and management of Cushing syndrome; the second most common use is in the diagnosis of primary aldosteronism. It is also helpful in the differential diagnosis of adrenal and ovarian hyperandrogenism and hirsutism, and is the only noninvasive method of detecting unilateral adrenocortical hypofunction. The newest and most popular use is in the differential diagnosis of asymptomatic masses in the region of the adrenal gland discovered incidentally with CT scan (incidentalomas). In this situation, the NP-59 scan can define whether the tumor is in the adrenal gland and if it is functional or nonfunctional. The authors believe that, in the future, radiolabeled enzyme inhibitors might offer better diagnostic imaging of the adrenal cortex, although these agents will probably not be available for routine use for some time. The development of a radioiodinated guanethidine analog, /sup 131/I-MIBG, has allowed differentiation of normal adrenal medullary function from bilateral adrenal medullary hyperplasia before the development of hypertension or tachycardia, diagnostic increases in plasma or urinary catecholamines, or abnormal CT scans. The search for a pheochromocytoma should begin with /sup 131/I-MIBG scintigraphy. While over 90% of primary pheochromocytomas occur in the abdomen, neither a survey of the abdomen nor the finding of a single tumor should conclude the search.

  20. Papillary thyroid cancer with bilateral adrenal metastases.

    PubMed

    Batawil, Nadia

    2013-12-01

    Papillary thyroid cancer is the most common type of thyroid malignancy and has an excellent prognosis. Distant organ metastasis is rare. Bilateral adrenal metastases with iodine uptake has not been described before. A 47-year-old woman presented for evaluation because of severe right upper arm pain and weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracic spine showed a compression fracture at the third thoracic vertebra associated with a soft tissue mass. Computed tomography (CT)-guided biopsy of the mass showed metastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma. Ultrasonography of the neck showed an enlarged right thyroid lobe with cervical lymphadenopathy. A high-resolution CT scan of the chest showed multiple bilateral pulmonary nodules. Treatment included total thyroidectomy and lymph node dissection, external beam radiation to the thoracic spine, and (131)I therapy. Initial whole body (131)I scintigraphy showed faint uptake in the right upper abdomen, interpreted as a sign of physiologic bowel activity; however, repeat whole body (131)I scintigraphy showed increased uptake in both adrenal glands, consistent with metastatic disease. Serial abdominal CT scans showed progressively enlarging bilateral adrenal masses. Despite additional treatment with (131)I, the patient's disease progressed at all metastatic sites. This patient had bilateral adrenal metastases from advanced papillary thyroid cancer with distant metastasis to lung and bone at initial presentation and poor response to repeated (131)I therapy. Unilateral adrenal metastasis from thyroid cancer has been described previously in six cases; this is the first case report of bilateral adrenal metastases. Bilateral adrenal metastasis is rare in papillary thyroid cancer. Elevated abdominal uptake of (131)I in a high-risk patient may be a sign of abdominal metastatic disease.

  1. Premature closure of the spheno-occipital synchondrosis in Pfeiffer syndrome: a link to midface hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Paliga, James Thomas; Goldstein, Jesse A; Vossough, Arastoo; Bartlett, Scott P; Taylor, Jesse Adam

    2014-01-01

    The spheno-occipital synchondrosis (SOS) is a critical component of midfacial and cranial base growth. Premature closure has been associated with midface hypoplasia in animal models and syndromic craniosynostosis subpopulations with Apert and Muenke syndromes. To link premature SOS closure and midface hypoplasia in patients with Pfeiffer syndrome, a retrospective case-control study was performed in patients treated at a large craniofacial center between 1982 and 2012 diagnosed with Pfeiffer syndrome. At least 1 computed tomography (CT) scan was required to assess SOS patency. Age-/sex-matched control CT scans were also assessed for SOS patency. Three independent reviewers with high interrater reliability (κ = 0.88) graded SOS patency as open, partially closed, or completely closed. Wilcoxon rank sum test compared the Pfeiffer patients with control subjects. A total of 63 CT scans in 16 patients with Pfeiffer syndrome, all with midface hypoplasia, and 63 age-/sex-matched control scans, none of whom had midface hypoplasia, met inclusion criteria. Earliest partial SOS closure in patients with Pfeiffer syndrome was seen at 5 days compared with control subjects at 7.07 years. Earliest age at complete fusion was 2.76 years in the Pfeiffer cohort and 12.74 years in control subjects. Average age at partial closure was significantly younger (4.99 ± 3.33 years; n = 31 scans) in patients with Pfeiffer syndrome compared with control subjects (10.92 ± 3.53 years) (P = 0.0005), whereas average age at complete closure (11.90 ± 7.04 years) was not significantly different than that in control subjects (16.07 ± 3.39 years). Although definitive causality cannot be concluded, a strong correlation exists between midface hypoplasia and premature SOS closure in Pfeiffer syndrome.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... collectively called congenital adrenal hyperplasia) that affect the adrenal glands . The adrenal glands are located on top of the kidneys and ... CAH due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency, the adrenal glands produce excess androgens, which are male sex hormones. ...

  3. Intracerebral adrenal medulla grafts: a review.

    PubMed

    Freed, W J; Poltorak, M; Becker, J B

    1990-11-01

    This review summarizes basic and clinical research on intracerebral adrenal medulla grafts, emphasizing potential applications to Parkinson's disease. Properties of intraventricular and intraparenchymal grafts are described, and cell survival and functional effects are compared. It is clear that adrenal medulla allografts survive poorly in the parenchyma of the corpus striatum and better in the lateral ventricle. Nerve growth factor (NGF) may improve the survival of adrenal medulla grafts. In the absence of added NGF even adrenal medulla grafts in the ventricle survive irregularly, and the factors required for graft survival in the ventricle are not well understood. In the 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rat model most evidence suggests, not surprisingly, that adrenal medulla grafts produce functional effects only when they survive. These effects may be related to production of catecholamines by the transplanted cells. In addition, adrenal medulla grafts may produce trophic effects on host brain. These effects are most evident in animals with MPTP-induced damage to dopaminergic systems and may be nonspecific, possibly related in part to the brain injury that is induced by graft implantation. Trophic effects may contribute to the functional effects of adrenal medulla grafts: For intraparenchymal grafts, trophic effects that do not require cell survival may contribute small functional changes, while additional behavioral effects may require substantial chromaffin cell survival. The evidence for direct dopamine-mediated effects as compared to trophic mechanisms of action for these grafts in animal models for Parkinson's disease is presented. Clinical studies of adrenal medulla grafts in human patients are examined and compared in detail. When inspected closely, the various clinical studies are in general agreement on most points, although there are differences in the degree of improvement found, both across different studies and individual patients. It is concluded that

  4. Adrenal toxicology: a strategy for assessment of functional toxicity to the adrenal cortex and steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Philip W; Everett, David J; Springall, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    The adrenal is the most common toxicological target organ in the endocrine system in vivo and yet it is neglected in regulatory endocrine disruption screening and testing. There has been a recent marked increase in interest in adrenal toxicity, but there are no standardised approaches for assessment. Consequently, a strategy is proposed to evaluate adrenocortical toxicity. Human adrenal conditions are reviewed and adrenocortical suppression, known to have been iatrogenically induced leading to Addisonian crisis and death, is identified as the toxicological hazard of most concern. The consequences of inhibition of key steroidogenic enzymes and the possible toxicological modulation of other adrenal conditions are also highlighted. The proposed strategy involves an in vivo rodent adrenal competency test based on ACTH challenge to specifically examine adrenocortical suppression. The H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line is also proposed to identify molecular targets, and is useful for measuring steroids, enzymes or gene expression. Hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal endocrinology relevant to rodent and human toxicology is reviewed (with an emphasis on multi-endocrine axis effects on the adrenal and also how the adrenal affects a variety of other hormones) and the endocrinology of the H295R cell line is also described. Chemicals known to induce adrenocortical toxicity are reviewed and over 60 examples of compounds and their confirmed steroidogenic targets are presented, with much of this work published very recently using H295R cell systems. In proposing a strategy for adrenocortical toxicity assessment, the outlined techniques will provide hazard assessment data but it will be regulatory agencies that must consider the significance of such data in risk extrapolation models. The cases of etomindate and aminoglutethimide induced adrenal suppression are clearly documented examples of iatrogenic adrenal toxicity in humans. Environmentally, sentinel species, such as

  5. Role of adrenal imaging in surgical management

    SciTech Connect

    Lamki, L.M.; Haynie, T.P. )

    1990-03-01

    Adrenal imaging using radiopharmaceuticals is a functional test that can contribute significantly to surgical management and follow-up of patients with either benign or malignant conditions of the adrenal cortex and medulla. Imaging of the cortex is achieved by iodine-131-labeled iodomethyl nor-cholesterol (NP-59), while adrenal medulla imaging can be successfully accomplished by 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), which localizes in the adrenergic nerve terminal with norepinephrine. Both tests carry high sensitivity and specificity for functional tumors and hyperplasia, and often better than CT scanning. This article reviews the current status and clinical utility of nuclear imaging of the adrenal cortex in congenital hyperplasia, low renin hypertension and aldosteronism, and Cushing's syndrome. Adrenal medulla imaging is reviewed in light of our experience at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in pheochromocytoma, neuroblastoma, and other neuroectodermal tumors. Investigation of {sup 131}I-MIBG therapy of metastatic tumors of neuroectodermal origin potentially offers a means of at least controlling symptoms of hormonal secretion in these patients. 40 references.

  6. Thymus and adrenal glands in elder abuse.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahito; Bunai, Yasuo; Ago, Kazutoshi; Ago, Mihoko; Ogata, Mamoru

    2011-12-01

    Endogenous glucocorticoid-induced thymic involution is generally considered to be an important finding for determining child abuse. The present study investigated the weight of the thymus and the adrenal glands in elder abuse cases to identify a potential marker for elder abuse. There was no significant difference in the thymus and the adrenal weight between elder abuse and control cases. However, the elder abuse cases in which the duration of abuse was less than 3 months showed a significant increase in the adrenal weight in comparison to control cases. In such cases, histopathological findings showed a loss of intracellular light granules from the zona fasciculata, which might indicate a loss of cholesterol due to the overproduction of glucocorticoid. These results might imply that the elderly, who were maltreated for less than 3 months, were in the early phase of a long-term stress state during which stress-induced overproduction of glucocorticoid was observed in adrenal glands as indicated by Selye. Our results suggest that an increase in adrenal weight may be a potential marker for elder abuse of relatively short periods, especially less than a few months.

  7. Prevalence and natural history of adrenal incidentalomas.

    PubMed

    Barzon, Luisa; Sonino, Nicoletta; Fallo, Francesco; Palu, Giorgio; Boscaro, Marco

    2003-10-01

    Clinically silent adrenal masses discovered by imaging studies performed for unrelated reasons, i.e. adrenal incidentalomas, have become a rather common finding in clinical practice. However, only limited studies of incidence, prevalence, and natural history of adrenal incidentalomas are available. A comprehensive review of the literature shows the prevalence of adrenal incidentalomas to be 2.3% at autopsy and 0.5-2% at abdominal computed tomography scan. Most lesions are adrenocortical adenomas at histology, whereas the prevalence of adrenocortical carcinomas is relatively low. The risk of malignancy over time for masses defined as benign at diagnosis is estimated at about 1/1000, even though 5-25% of masses increase in size during follow-up. Hyperfunction develops in about 1.7% of cases and the risk is higher in patients with lesions larger than 3 cm. Cortisol hypersecretion is the most likely disorder that may ensue, and it remains subclinical in about two-thirds of cases. The lack of controlled studies precludes making specific management recommendations. Large perspective controlled studies to define the epidemiology, natural history, and possible associated morbidity of adrenal incidentalomas and their impact on the quality of life of patients are needed.

  8. Brachycephaly, cutis aplasia congenita, blue sclerae, hypertelorism, polydactyly, hypoplastic nipples, failure to thrive, and developmental delay: a distinct autosomal recessive syndrome?

    PubMed

    Teebi, A S; Druker, H A

    2001-01-01

    We report a 6-year-old male of first cousin parents with the unique constellation of frontal bossing with brachycephaly, cutis aplasia congenita, blue sclerae, hypertelorism, hypoplastic nipples, rudimentary unilateral post-axial polydactyly of the hand, failure to thrive, mild to moderate developmental delay and sociable personality. Knoblock-Layer syndrome and Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome were considered in the differential diagnosis and were excluded. No similar cases were found in LDDB or other databases.

  9. Femoral hypoplasia-unusual facies syndrome with bifid hallux, absent tibia, and macrophallus: a report of a Bedouin baby.

    PubMed Central

    Sabry, M A; Obenbergerova, D; Al-Sawan, R; Saleh, Q A; Farah, S; Al-Awadi, S A; Farag, T I

    1996-01-01

    A male Bedouin baby with the clinical profile of femoral hypoplasia-unusual facies syndrome is described. The phenotype includes bilateral asymmetrical lower limb hypoplasia/aplasia with short remnants of both femora, absent right tibia, bifid right big toe, dysmorphic facies, thoracic/pelvic abnormalities, macrophallus, and bilateral cryptorchidism. This report re-emphasises the previously described rare association of femoral hypoplasia-unusual facies syndrome with preaxial polydactyly and suggests that the clinical spectrum of the syndrome could be stretched further to accommodate other unusual traits, for example, macrophallus and absent tibia. Images PMID:8929957

  10. Factors predicting the duration of adrenal insufficiency in patients successfully treated for Cushing disease and nonmalignant primary adrenal Cushing syndrome.

    PubMed

    Prete, Alessandro; Paragliola, Rosa Maria; Bottiglieri, Filomena; Rota, Carlo Antonio; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Salvatori, Roberto; Corsello, Salvatore Maria

    2017-03-01

    Successful treatment of Cushing syndrome causes transient or permanent adrenal insufficiency deriving from endogenous hypercortisolism-induced hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal-axis suppression. We analyzed pre-treatment factors potentially affecting the duration of adrenal insufficiency. We conducted a retrospective analysis on patients successfully treated for Cushing disease (15 patients) who underwent transsphenoidal surgery, and nonmalignant primary adrenal Cushing syndrome (31 patients) who underwent unilateral adrenalectomy, divided into patients with overt primary adrenal Cushing syndrome (14 patients) and subclinical primary adrenal Cushing syndrome (17 patients). Epidemiological data, medical history, and hormonal parameters depending on the etiology of hypercortisolism were collected and compared to the duration of adrenal insufficiency. The median duration of follow-up after surgery for Cushing disease and primary adrenal Cushing syndrome was 70 and 48 months, respectively. In the Cushing disease group, the median duration of adrenal insufficiency after transsphenoidal surgery was 15 months: younger age at diagnosis and longer duration of signs and symptoms of hypercortisolism before diagnosis and surgery were associated with longer duration of adrenal insufficiency. The median duration of adrenal insufficiency was 6 months for subclinical primary adrenal Cushing syndrome and 18.5 months for overt primary adrenal Cushing syndrome. The biochemical severity of hypercortisolism, the grade of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal-axis suppression, and treatment with ketoconazole before surgery accounted for longer duration of adrenal insufficiency. In patients with Cushing disease, younger age and delayed diagnosis and treatment predict longer need for glucocorticoid replacement therapy after successful transsphenoidal surgery. In patients with primary adrenal Cushing syndrome, the severity of hypercortisolism plays a primary role in influencing the duration of

  11. Testicular adrenal rest tissue in congenital adrenal hyperplasia: comparison of MR imaging and sonographic findings.

    PubMed

    Avila, N A; Premkumar, A; Merke, D P

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to describe the MR features of testicular adrenal rest tissue in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia and to compare the usefulness of MR imaging with that of sonography for the detection of testicular adrenal rest tissue. Nineteen patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia underwent MR imaging and gray-scale and color Doppler sonography of the testicles during the same visit to our institution. Findings were compared. MR features of testicular adrenal rest tissue included the following: isointensity (71% of the masses) and slight hyperintensity (29% of the masses) relative to normal testicular tissue on T1-weighted images; hypointensity relative to normal testicular tissue on T2-weighted images (100% of the masses); and diffuse enhancement on contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images (85% of the masses). MR imaging and sonography revealed the testicular lesions equally well. Eleven (58%) of 19 patients had normal findings on MR imaging and sonography. Eight (42%) of 19 patients had 14 intratesticular masses detected by both imaging techniques. MR imaging and sonography are equally useful in the detection of testicular adrenal rest tissue. Because sonography is more accessible to most institutions and is less expensive, it is the imaging technique of choice for the detection of testicular adrenal rest tissue.

  12. Neurologic complications of disorders of the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Bertorini, Tulio E; Perez, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of the adrenal glands frequently have secondary neurological manifestations, while some diseases that involve the central nervous system are accompanied by adrenal gland dysfunction. Excessive corticosteroid secretions in primary or secondary Cushing's syndrome causes muscle weakness and behavioral disturbances, such as emotional lability and sometimes depression, while adrenal insufficiency may cause fatigue, weakness, and depression. Adrenoleukodystrophy and adrenoneuromyelopathy are X-linked recessive disorders of the metabolism of very long chain fatty acids that manifest with white matter abnormalities of the brain, myelopathy and/or neuropathy, as well as adrenal insufficiency. Other disorders of the adrenal glands include hyperaldosteroidism, which may cause weakness from hypokalemia. Dysfunction of the adrenal medulla causes excessive or deficient secretion of catecholamines, primarily causing cardiovascular symptoms. This chapter reviews the clinical manifestations and diagnostic aspects and treatment of the various disorders of the adrenal glands. Some of the congenital adrenal diseases are also discussed. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Adrenal Gland Disorders?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gland Disorders > About > Diagnosis Page Content ​ ​How do health care providers diagnose adrenal gland disorders? Methods for diagnosing ... Tumors To diagnose an adrenal gland tumor, a health care provider may order one or more tests. 3 ...

  14. Long-term follow-up of a female with congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to P450-oxidoreductase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bonamichi, Beatriz D S F; Santiago, Stella L M; Bertola, Débora R; Kim, Chong A; Alonso, Nivaldo; Mendonca, Berenice B; Bachega, Tania A S S; Gomes, Larissa G

    2016-10-01

    P450 oxidoreductase deficiency (PORD) is a variant of congenital adrenal hyperplasia that is caused by POR gene mutations. The POR gene encodes a flavor protein that transfers electrons from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) to all microsomal cytochrome P450 type II (including 21-hydroxylase, 17α-hydroxylase 17,20 lyase and aromatase), which is fundamental for their enzymatic activity. POR mutations cause variable impairments in steroidogenic enzyme activities that result in wide phenotypic variability ranging from 46,XX or 46,XY disorders of sexual differentiation, glucocorticoid deficiency, with or without skeletal malformations similar to Antley-Bixler syndrome to asymptomatic newborns diagnosed during neonatal screening test. Little is known about the PORD long-term evolution. We described a 46,XX patient with mild atypical genitalia associated with severe bone malformation, who was diagnosed after 13 years due to sexual infantilism. She developed large ovarian cysts and late onset adrenal insufficiency during follow-up, both of each regressed after hormone replacement therapies. We also described a late surgical approach for the correction of facial hypoplasia in a POR patient.

  15. Imaging of the adrenal gland lesions.

    PubMed

    Herr, Keith; Muglia, Valdair F; Koff, Walter José; Westphalen, Antonio Carlos

    2014-01-01

    With the steep increase in the use of cross-sectional imaging in recent years, the incidentally detected adrenal lesion, or "incidentaloma", has become an increasingly common diagnostic problem for the radiologist, and a need for an approach to classifying these lesions as benign, malignant or indeterminate with imaging has spurred an explosion of research. While most incidentalomas represent benign disease, typically an adenoma, the possibility of malignant involvement of the adrenal gland necessitates a reliance on imaging to inform management decisions. In this article, we review the literature on adrenal gland imaging, with particular emphasis on computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and photon-emission tomography, and discuss how these findings relate to clinical practice. Emerging technologies, such as contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, dual-energy computed tomography, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging will also be briefly addressed.

  16. Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in polycythemia vera

    PubMed Central

    Agito, Katrina; Krug, Esther I.

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage (BAH) is a rare complication typically seen in critically ill patients, which can lead to acute adrenal insufficiency and death unless it is recognized promptly and treated appropriately. We describe the case of a 64-year-old man with polycythemia vera found to be unresponsive with fever, hypotension, tachycardia, and hypoglycemia. Electrocardiogram showed ST-elevation with elevated troponin, hemoglobin, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time. He required aggressive ventilator and vasopressor support. Despite primary coronary intervention, he remained hypotensive. Random cortisol level was low. He received stress dose hydrocortisone with immediate hemodynamic stability. BAH was highly suspected and was confirmed by non-contrast abdominal computed tomography. Prompt recognition and timely initiated treatment remain crucial to impact the mortality associated with acute adrenal insufficiency. PMID:27609733

  17. Principles and management of adrenal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Javadpour, N.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides information on adrenal diseases of latest developments and guides the clinicians in the care of their patients. The book is divided into two parts. The first section gives an overview of the embryology, anatomy, physiology, markers, pathology, imaging and the current progress in the field. The second edition covers specific diseases of the adrenal cortex and medulla. The increasingly significant roles played by steroids, catecholamines, blockers, computed tomography and magnetic resonance are elucidated and discussed. The contents include: Overview of progress; current problems, and perspectives - embryology anatomy, physiology, and biologic markers; pathology; advances in diagnosis; imaging techniques; adrenal disorders in childhood; primary aldosteronism; Cushing's syndrome; carcinoma; pheochromocytoma; neuroblastoma; metastatic disease; surgical management; and subject index.

  18. Imaging of the adrenal gland lesions*

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Keith; Muglia, Valdair F.; Koff, Walter José; Westphalen, Antonio Carlos

    2014-01-01

    With the steep increase in the use of cross-sectional imaging in recent years, the incidentally detected adrenal lesion, or "incidentaloma", has become an increasingly common diagnostic problem for the radiologist, and a need for an approach to classifying these lesions as benign, malignant or indeterminate with imaging has spurred an explosion of research. While most incidentalomas represent benign disease, typically an adenoma, the possibility of malignant involvement of the adrenal gland necessitates a reliance on imaging to inform management decisions. In this article, we review the literature on adrenal gland imaging, with particular emphasis on computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and photon-emission tomography, and discuss how these findings relate to clinical practice. Emerging technologies, such as contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, dual-energy computed tomography, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging will also be briefly addressed. PMID:25741090

  19. Adrenal Hemorrhage in Neonates: Unusual Presentation.

    PubMed

    Alabsi, Samir Y; Layland, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal hemorrhage (AH) is a relatively uncommon condition in newborns. It may be asymptomatic or may present with flank abdominal mass, anemia, jaundice, or rarely as scrotal bruising or hematoma. We report two cases of AH in neonates; the first presented with scrotal hematoma and the second with adrenal mass associated with hypertension and oliguria, primarily secondary to coincidental renal vein thrombosis. Diagnosis was confirmed by abdominal ultrasound. Patients were managed conservatively with clinical observation and by following hemoglobin and bilirubin levels closely. Both infants were discharged without surgical intervention after several days in the hospital. Clinicians should consider AH when a newborn presents with scrotal bruising or hematoma, unexplained anemia, unexplained jaundice, or flank abdominal mass. Timely ultrasonographic evaluation of both adrenal glands and testes in neonates with scrotal hematoma may spare infants from unnecessary surgical intervention because scrotal hematoma often raises the suspicion of testicular torsion.

  20. Laparoscopic Operative Technique for Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Szostek, Grzegorz; Nazarewski, Slawomir; Borkowski, Tomasz; Chudzinski, Witold; Tolloczko, Tadeusz

    2000-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopy has acquired an unquestionable position in surgical practice as a diagnostic and operative tool. Recently, the laparoscopic approach has become a valuable option for adrenalectomy. This paper reports, in detail, our experience of laparoscopic adrenalectomy performed for adrenal tumors. Methods: We performed 12 laparoscopic adrenalectomies from October 29, 1997 to October 31, 1998. The technique of laparoscopic adrenalectomy is described thoroughly in all relevant details for either left or right-sided adrenal lesions. Results: The presented technique of laparoscopic adrenalectomy in all 12 cases provided good and relatively simple exposure of the immediate operative area. All relevant vascular elements were safely controlled, adrenal tumors could be successfully removed, and adequate hemostasis was achieved. No intraoperative or postoperative complications were observed. Conclusions: Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is a safe alternative to open surgery and is preferred for most patients because of shorter postoperative hospital stay and less postoperative discomfort. PMID:10917119

  1. Addison, pernicious anemia and adrenal insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Graner, John L.

    1985-01-01

    In 1849 Thomas Addison described the clinical entity now known as pernicious anemia. In 1855 he reported several cases of adrenal insufficiency, or Addison's disease. Considering the importance of these works, there remains a great deal of confusion about them. Contrary to what many historians have written, a review of Addison's original publications demonstrates a firm appreciation of the distinction between pernicious anemia and adrenal insufficiency, based particularly on the discoloration of the skin in these conditions. Three major sources of possible confusion for historians who are attempting to understand Addison's views include Addison's early attempts to link pernicious anemia with disease of the supra-renal capsules, Addison's redefinition of pernicious anemia in his monograph on adrenal disease, and several confusing statements made by Wilks and Daldy in the first reprint of Addison's monograph. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:3902186

  2. Image-Guided Adrenal and Renal Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Karun V.; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Swerdlow, Daniel; DaSilva, Daniel; Beck, Avi; Jain, Nidhi; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided biopsy is a safe and well-established technique that is familiar to most interventional radiologists (IRs). Improvements in image-guidance, biopsy tools and biopsy techniques now routinely allow for safe biopsy of renal and adrenal lesions which traditionally were considered difficult to reach or technically challenging. Image-guided biopsy is used to establish the definitive tissue diagnosis in adrenal mass lesions that can not be fully characterized with imaging or laboratory tests alone. It is also used to establish definitive diagnosis in some cases of renal parenchymal disease and has an expanding role in diagnosis and characterization of renal masses prior to treatment. Although basic principles and techniques for image-guided needle biopsy are similar regardless of organ, this paper will highlight some technical considerations, indications and complications which are unique to the adrenal gland and kidney because of their anatomic location and physiologic features. PMID:20540919

  3. Laser autofluorescent spectroscopy in adrenal tumor surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetshev, Petr S.; Ippolitov, Leonid I.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Kazaryan, Airazat M.; Minnibaev, Marat T.; Vetshev, Sergei P.

    1999-12-01

    Determination of a histological type of adrenal lesion at the preoperative or intraoperative stage allows to choose the optimal volume of surgery and in the short time effectively correct the postoperative hormonal therapy. 12 patients with different adrenal tumours (3 - lightcellular adenoma, 3 - mixedcellular adenoma, 1 - darkcellular adenoma, 1 - trabecular adenoma, 1 - malignant lymphoma, 3 - aldosteroma, 1 - pheochromocytoma, including the chance of combination of mixedcellular adenoma and aldosteroma of left adrenal) were operated on. The patients' aged varied from 33 to 62 years. For the first time we made intraoperative laser autofluorescent spectroscopy (IOLAS). The laser ve1ength was 632.8 nm. We defined a autofluorescent intensity. Portable equipment was used. The duration of the procedure did not exceed 2mm. The autofluorescent peak of adrenal tissue was 1.33+/-0.05 relativistic unit (RU) at 685 nm. The autofiurescent peaks of adrenal adenomas were 1 .07 RU, 0.9-1 .15 RU, 1.7-1 .9 RU, 3.4 RU accordingly for trabecular adenoma, lightcellular adenoma, mixedcellular adenoma, darkcellular adenoma Besides greater contribution of longwave component to auflurescence is characteristic for mixecellular adenoma and especially for darkcellular adenoma. The autofiurescent peaks of aldosteroma and pheochromocytoma were accordingly 1.2-1.4 RU and 2.2 RU. Spectral distribution of intensity was like mixedcellular adenoma's one. In the case of malignant lymphoma the autofiurescence peak was 2,3 RU and we also noted displacement of maximum of autoflurescence (-15 nm, from 685 nm to 670 nm).The results of IOLAS application as a adjuvant diagnosticmethod point to promise for intraoperative rapid diagnostics of adrenal tumours.

  4. Adrenal glands in patients with cogenital renal anomalies: CT appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, P.J.; Robbins, G.L.; Ellis, D.A.; Spirt, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    The CT appearance of the adrenal glands was investigated in 30 patients with congenital renal anomalies. The ipsilateral adrenal was clearly identified in 83% of these patients; in all of them, the adrenal was a paraspinal disk-shaped organ, which appeared linear on CT. Conversely, the adrenals retained their normal shape in a control group of 20 patients with acquired renal atrophy or prior simple nephrectomy.

  5. Localization of metastatic adrenal cortical carcinoma with Ga-67

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, F.T.; Anderson, J.H.; Jelinek, J.; Anderson, D.W. )

    1991-02-01

    Data are limited on the localization of Ga-67 in primary or metastatic adrenal cortical carcinoma. We report the localization of Ga-67 to pathologically confirmed adrenal cortical carcinoma metastatic to the lung. A review of the literature revealed four patients have previously been reported to have metastatic adrenal cortical carcinoma detected on Ga-67 scan. Gallium imaging may be useful in the evaluation of patients with adrenal cortical carcinoma. SPECT imaging should further improve lesion resolution and localization.

  6. Two cases of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage presenting with persistent jaundice.

    PubMed

    Ruffini, E; De Petris, L; Zorzi, G; Paoletti, P; Mambelli, G; Carlucci, A

    2013-01-01

    The adrenal hemorrhage is a relatively rare event in newborns but must be considered in the presence of a persistent unexplained jaundice, especially in presence of predisposing factors. Serial ultrasonography is the modality of choice for initial diagnosis and follow-up of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage. We report two cases of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage presenting with persistent jaundice. The causes of the neonatal adrenal hemorrhages were a difficult vaginal delivery in macrosomic infant and a neonatal infection.

  7. Noncholinergic control of adrenal catecholamine secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Livett, B G; Marley, P D

    1993-01-01

    It has been known for over 70 years that adrenal catecholamine secretion can be modulated or elicited by noncholinergic neurotransmitters and hormones. However, our understanding of the cellular mechanisms by which these agents produce their effects and the physiological conditions under which they act are not well characterised. Here we briefly review the mechanisms by which one such agent (the neuropeptide substance P) modulates the cholinergic secretory response of adrenal chromaffin cells, and another agent (angiotensin II) elicits catecholamine secretion independently of the cholinergic innervation. PMID:7507911

  8. Ewing's Sarcoma of the Adrenal Gland.

    PubMed

    Pal, Dilip Kumar; Chandra, Vipin; Ranjan, Kumar Rajiv; Chakrabortty, Debasis; Banerjee, Manju

    2016-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma (ES) or primitive neuro-ectodermal tumor (PNET) typically occurs in long or flat bones, the chest wall, extra-skeletal soft tissue, and rarely in solid organs. Incidence of adrenal Ewing's sarcoma is very rare. Here we report a case of Ewing's sarcoma of the right adrenal gland in an 8-year-old girl who presented with an abdominal mass. The huge tumor was managed by preoperative neo-adjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgical resection. She died due to metastasis after five months of surgery.

  9. [Association between Williams syndrome and adrenal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Rchachi, Meryem; Larwanou, Maazou Mahamane; El Ouahabi, Hanan; Ajdi, Farida

    2017-01-01

    Williams syndrome is a developmental disorder including dysmorphia, cardiovascular malformations and a specific neuropsychological profile together with other associated disorders. We report the case of a 17-year old girl, born of a non-inbred marriage, with Williams syndrome discovered during an assessment of degree of failure to thrive. Its association with primary adrenal insufficiency makes it unique. Diagnosis is confirmed by cytogenetic and molecular analysis. Its management consists of the implementation of treatment for adrenal insufficiency associated with a clinico-biological monitoring.

  10. Brain serotonin and pituitary-adrenal functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Berger, P.; Barchas, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    It had been concluded by Scapagnini et al. (1971) that brain serotonin (5-HT) was involved in the regulation of the diurnal rhythm of the pituitary-adrenal system but not in the stress response. A study was conducted to investigate these findings further by evaluating the effects of altering brain 5-HT levels on the daily fluctuation of plasma corticosterone and on the response of the pituitary-adrenal system to a stressful or noxious stimulus in the rat. In a number of experiments brain 5-HT synthesis was inhibited with parachlorophenylalanine. In other tests it was tried to raise the level of brain 5-HT with precursors.

  11. Cystic Pheochromocytoma Presenting as Adrenal Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Abdulsalam, Mohammed Shafi; Satish, Priyanka; Janakiraman, Raghunath Keddy; Singh, Shivshankar

    2016-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas are usually solid tumours. But it can present as cystic lesions in the adrenal gland. Cystic lesions in adrenal gland with hypertension needs attention to rule out pheochromocytoma. If ignored, it may lead to hypertensive emergency, multisystem crisis and death. Early diagnosis with biochemistry, Computed Tomography (CT) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of abdomen, proper functional imaging like Meta Iodo Benzyl Guanidine (MIBG) scan is essential. Proper preoperative preparation is important to prevent hypertensive crisis during and after surgery. We are reporting a case of cystic pheochromocytoma in a young male. PMID:28050427

  12. Steroid 21 hydroxylase deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Nimkarn, Saroj; Lin-Su, Karen; New, Maria I

    2011-10-01

    Steroid 21 hydroxylase deficiency is the most common form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). The severity of this disorder depends on the extent of impaired enzymatic activity, which is caused by various mutations of the 21 hydroxylase gene. This article reviews adrenal steroidogenesis and the pathophysiology of 21 hydroxylase deficiency. The three forms of CAH are then discussed in terms of clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment, and genetic basis. Prenatal diagnosis and treatment are also reviewed. The goal of therapy is to correct the deficiency in cortisol secretion and suppress androgen overproduction. Glucocorticoid replacement has been the mainstay of treatment for CAH, but new treatment strategies continue to be developed and studied.

  13. Cystic Pheochromocytoma Presenting as Adrenal Cyst.

    PubMed

    Abdulsalam, Mohammed Shafi; Ganapathy, Vijaya; Satish, Priyanka; Janakiraman, Raghunath Keddy; Singh, Shivshankar

    2016-11-01

    Pheochromocytomas are usually solid tumours. But it can present as cystic lesions in the adrenal gland. Cystic lesions in adrenal gland with hypertension needs attention to rule out pheochromocytoma. If ignored, it may lead to hypertensive emergency, multisystem crisis and death. Early diagnosis with biochemistry, Computed Tomography (CT) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of abdomen, proper functional imaging like Meta Iodo Benzyl Guanidine (MIBG) scan is essential. Proper preoperative preparation is important to prevent hypertensive crisis during and after surgery. We are reporting a case of cystic pheochromocytoma in a young male.

  14. Brain serotonin and pituitary-adrenal functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Berger, P.; Barchas, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    It had been concluded by Scapagnini et al. (1971) that brain serotonin (5-HT) was involved in the regulation of the diurnal rhythm of the pituitary-adrenal system but not in the stress response. A study was conducted to investigate these findings further by evaluating the effects of altering brain 5-HT levels on the daily fluctuation of plasma corticosterone and on the response of the pituitary-adrenal system to a stressful or noxious stimulus in the rat. In a number of experiments brain 5-HT synthesis was inhibited with parachlorophenylalanine. In other tests it was tried to raise the level of brain 5-HT with precursors.

  15. Imaging of an adrenal cortical carcinoma and its skeletal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Drane, W.E.; Graham, M.M.; Nelp, W.B.

    1983-08-01

    Though the typical scintigraphic appearance in adrenal cortical carcinoma is bilateral nonvisualization of the adrenal glands, a case with simultaneous visualization of both an adrenal cortical carcinoma and its skeletal metastasis using 6-..beta..-(/sup 131/I)iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol is reported.

  16. Adrenal pseudotumors on CT due to dilated portosystemic veins

    SciTech Connect

    Mitty, H.M.; Cohen, B.A.; Sprayregen, S.; Schwartz, K.

    1983-10-01

    The adrenal and periadrenal venous systems are part of the portosystemic collateral pathways that may enlarge in portal hypertension. The cross-sectional image of the resulting enlarged venous channels may simulate an adrenal msss. Three examples of such computed tomographic (CT) scans are presented with selective venographic correlation. Patients with portal hypertension and suspected adrenal pathology may require enhanced or dynamic CT scans.

  17. Biopsy of the right adrenal gland by the transhepatic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.B.; Bernardino, M.E.; Berkman, W.A.; Sones, P.J. Jr.; Torres, W.E.

    1983-08-01

    A transhepatic computed-tomographic-guided biopsy of a right adrenal mass is described. This method is simpler to perform than the usual posterior biopsy carried out with the patient prone and is less likely to cause a complicating pneumothorax. In seven of eight patients with right adrenal masses, adrenal tissue was obtained and an accurate diagnosis was possible. No complications resulted.

  18. Ultrasonographic appearance of adrenal glands in healthy and sick cats.

    PubMed

    Combes, Anaïs; Pey, Pascaline; Paepe, Dominique; Rosenberg, Dan; Daminet, Sylvie; Putcuyps, Ingrid; Bedu, Anne-Sophie; Duchateau, Luc; de Fornel-Thibaud, Pauline; Benchekroun, Ghita; Saunders, Jimmy H

    2013-06-01

    The first part of the study aimed to describe prospectively the ultrasonographic features of the adrenal glands in 94 healthy cats and 51 chronically sick cats. It confirmed the feasibility of ultrasonography of adrenal glands in healthy and chronically sick cats, which were not statistically different. The typical hypoechoic appearance of the gland surrounded by hyperechoic fat made it recognisable. A sagittal plane of the gland, not in line with the aorta, may be necessary to obtain the largest adrenal measurements. The reference intervals of adrenal measurements were inferred from the values obtained in the healthy and chronically sick cats (mean ± 0.96 SD): adrenal length was 8.9-12.5 mm; cranial height was 3.0-4.8 mm; caudal height was 3.0-4.5 mm. The second part of the study consisted of a retrospective analysis of the ultrasonographic examination of the adrenal glands in cats with adrenal diseases (six had hyperaldosteronism and four had pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism) and a descriptive comparison with the reference features obtained in the control groups from the prospective study. Cats with hyperaldosteronism presented with unilateral severely enlarged adrenal glands. However, a normal contralateral gland did not preclude a contralateral infiltration in benign or malignant adrenal neoplasms. The ultrasonographic appearance of the adrenal glands could not differentiate benign and malignant lesions. The ultrasonographic appearance of pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism was mainly a symmetrical adrenal enlargement; however, a substantial number of cases were within the reference intervals of adrenal size.

  19. Imaging of an adrenal cortical carcinoma and its skeletal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Drane, W.E.; Graham, M.M.; Nelp, W.B.

    1983-08-01

    Though the typical scintigraphic appearance in adrenal cortical carcinoma is bilateral nonvisualization of the adrenal glands, we report a case with simultaneous visualization of both an adrenal cortical carcinoma and its skeletal metastasis using 6-beta-(/sup 131/I)iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol.

  20. Physiological Basis for the Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Adrenal Disorders: Cushing’s Syndrome, Adrenal Insufficiency, and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Raff, Hershel; Sharma, Susmeeta T.; Nieman, Lynnette K.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a classic neuroendocrine system. One of the best ways to understand the HPA axis is to appreciate its dynamics in the variety of diseases and syndromes that affect it. Excess glucocorticoid activity can be due to endogenous cortisol overproduction (spontaneous Cushing’s syndrome) or exogenous glucocorticoid therapy (iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome). Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome can be subdivided into ACTH-dependent and ACTH-independent, the latter of which is usually due to autonomous adrenal overproduction. The former can be due to a pituitary corticotroph tumor (usually benign) or ectopic ACTH production from tumors outside the pituitary; both of these tumor types overexpress the proopiomelanocortin gene. The converse of Cushing’s syndrome is the lack of normal cortisol secretion and is usually due to adrenal destruction (primary adrenal insufficiency) or hypopituitarism (secondary adrenal insufficiency). Secondary adrenal insufficiency can also result from a rapid discontinuation of long-term, pharmacological glucocorticoid therapy because of HPA axis suppression and adrenal atrophy. Finally, mutations in the steroidogenic enzymes of the adrenal cortex can lead to congenital adrenal hyperplasia and an increase in precursor steroids, particularly androgens. When present in utero, this can lead to masculinization of a female fetus. An understanding of the dynamics of the HPA axis is necessary to master the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of pituitary-adrenal diseases. Furthermore, understanding the pathophysiology of the HPA axis gives great insight into its normal control. PMID:24715566

  1. Extreme redundancy of the valve of the fossa ovalis with right heart hypoplasia in a neonate with trisomy 18.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Himeshkumar; Cabalka, Allison K

    2006-10-01

    Infants with trisomy 18 often have important cardiovascular malformations. We describe an infant with trisomy 18 who had extreme redundancy of the flap valve of the fossa ovalis along with right heart hypoplasia.

  2. Unilateral hypoplasia with contralateral hypertrophy of anterior belly of digastric muscle: a case report.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Escudero, Martin; Juliano, Amy F

    2016-10-01

    Anomalies of the anterior belly of the digastric muscle (DM) are uncommon. We present a case of hypoplasia of the anterior belly of the left DM with hypertrophy of the anterior belly of the contralateral DM. The importance of recognizing this finding is to differentiate hypoplasia of the anterior belly of the DM from denervation atrophy, and not to confuse contralateral hypertrophy with a submental mass or lymphadenopathy. In denervation atrophy of the anterior belly of the DM, associated atrophy of the ipsilateral mylohyoid muscle is present. Hypertrophy of the anterior belly of the contralateral DM can be differentiated from a submental mass or lymphadenopathy by recognizing its isodensity on computed tomography and isointensity on magnetic resonance imaging to other muscles, without abnormal contrast enhancement.

  3. Massive foetal pericardiomegaly causing pulmonary hypoplasia, associated with intra-pericardial herniation of the liver.

    PubMed

    Davies, M R; Oksenberg, T; Da Fonseca, J M

    1993-12-01

    The clinical features, investigation, treatment and outcome of four newly born babies with the following recognisable triad of findings are presented: Bilateral pulmonary compression with or without hypoplasia. Massive pericardial effusion without cardiac compromise. An intrapericardial hernia containing part of the liver. The primary event in the causation of this triad is a congenital defect in the central tendon of the diaphragm. Compromised hepatic venous outflow involving the herniated part of the liver is the postulated origin of the fluid within the pericardium (Budd-Chiari-like effect). Although rare, this triad is clinically identifiable. Sonar imaging clinches the diagnosis. Surgical correction is simple but the prognosis depends on the presence of pulmonary hypoplasia which caused death in two cases and on other described lethal associated anomalies which were not encountered in the reported patients.

  4. Neonatal diabetes mellitus and cerebellar hypoplasia/agenesis: report of a new recessive syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hoveyda, N.; Shield, J.; Garrett, C.; Chong, W; Beardsall, K.; Bentsi-Enchill, E.; Mallya, H.; Thompson, M.

    1999-01-01

    Classical neonatal diabetes mellitus is defined as hyperglycaemia occurring within the first six weeks of life in term infants. Cerebellar agenesis is rare. We report three cases of neonatal diabetes mellitus, cerebellar hypoplasia/agenesis, and dysmorphism occurring within a highly consanguineous family. This constellation of abnormalities has not previously been described. Two of these cases are sisters and the third case is a female first cousin. The pattern of inheritance suggests this is a previously undescribed autosomal recessive disorder. Prenatal diagnosis of the condition in this family was possible by demonstration of the absence of the cerebellum and severe IUGR.


Keywords: cerebellar agenesis/hypoplasia; neonatal diabetes mellitus; dysmorphic features; autosomal recessive PMID:10507728

  5. Severe, fetal-onset form of olivopontocerebellar hypoplasia in three sibs: PCH type 5?

    PubMed

    Patel, Millan S; Becker, Laurence E; Toi, Ants; Armstrong, Dawna L; Chitayat, David

    2006-03-15

    We present three siblings with a precise onset of fetal seizure-like activity who had severe olivopontocerebellar hypoplasia (OPCH) and degeneration. Autopsies at 20, 27, and 37 weeks gestation showed diffuse central nervous system volume loss that was most marked for the cerebellum and brain stem structures. Neuropathological abnormalities included dysplastic, C-shaped inferior olivary nuclei, absent or immature dentate nuclei, and cell paucity more marked for the cerebellar vermis than the hemispheres. Delayed development was seen in layer 2 of the cerebral cortex and in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. Prenatal monitoring defined a developmental window of 16-18 weeks gestation when ultrasonic assessment of cerebellar width was used for prenatal diagnosis. We discuss our findings in the context of the differential diagnosis for infantile (O)PCH and propose a classification scheme for the pontocerebellar hypoplasias. These patients represent the earliest reported with OPCH and provide unique information regarding the developmental neuropathology of this condition.

  6. Regional hypoplasia of somatosensory cortex in growth-retarded mice (grt/grt).

    PubMed

    Sawada, Kazuhiko; Saito, Shigeyoshi; Sugasawa, Akari; Sato, Chika; Aoyama, Junya; Ohara, Naoko; Horiuchi-Hirose, Miwa; Kobayashi, Tetsuya

    2016-07-01

    Growth-retarded mouse (grt/grt) is a spontaneous mutant that is known as an animal model for primary congenital hypothyroidism caused by resistance to TSH signaling. The regional pattern of cerebral cortical hypoplasia was characterized in grt/grt mice. Ex vivo computed tomography (CT)-based volumetry was examined in four regions of the cerebral cortex, i.e., prefrontal, frontal, parietal and occipito-temporal regions, which were demarcated by structural landmarks on coronal CT images. A region-specific reduced volume of the parietal cortical region covering most of the somatosensory cortex was noted in grt/grt mice rather than in both heterozygous (grt/+) and wild-type (+/+) mice. We concluded that the cortical hypoplasia in grt/grt was seen in identical cortical regions corresponding to human congenital hypothyroidism.

  7. [Hypoplasia of the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta in Williams-Beuren syndrome].

    PubMed

    Romer, G Schenk; Weishaupt, D; Koppensteiner, R

    2005-05-01

    Hypoplasia of the descending thoracic and abdominal aorta is a very rare condition and its etiology is poorly understood. Associations with congenital and acquired disorders have been reported. In this article we present the case of a 24-year-old woman with hypoplasia of the thoracic and abdominal aorta and Williams-Beurensyndrome. This rare syndrome is attributed to deletions of genes on chromosome 7, among other the elastin-gene, and is characterized by cardiovascular anomalies, dysmorph facial features and mental retardation. The patient presented with a history of severe hypertension and recurrent abdominal pain since childhood. Diagnosis was established by duplex-sonography and magnetic resonance angiography. The patient was treated by an aortoaortic bypass from the ascending to the infrarenal aorta with reinsertion of the visceral and the right renal arteries. It is essential to recognize the condition early to withhold high morbidity and mortality resulting from long standing severe hypertension.

  8. Severe diffuse hypoplasia of the aorta associated with multiple vascular abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Grebeldinger, Slobodan P; Balj, Svetlana S; Adic, Oto

    2011-06-01

    Hypoplasia of the thoracic and abdominal aorta is an extremely rare vascular pathology. The most common clinical manifestation is severe uncontrolled hypertension in adolescents and young adults. Medical treatment alone can decrease blood pressure, but often very high doses of antihypertensive drugs are needed. When hypertension is refractory to the antihypertensive medications, surgical revascularization is considered as the treatment of choice. We report the case of a severe and diffuse hypoplasia of the aorta, beginning with the aortic isthmus, to the aortic bifurcation, associated with an aberrant celiac trunk and superior mesenteric artery, and with other multiple vascular abnormalities. Unlikely, the only manifestation of this extensive vascular malformation was medicamentously controllable hypertension. To our knowledge, this severe vascular anomaly, with such a minimal clinical manifestation, has not been previously described in the English literature.

  9. Subdural effusions and lack of early pontocerebellar hypoplasia in siblings with RARS2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kastrissianakis, Katherina; Anand, Geetha; Quaghebeur, Gerardine; Price, Sue; Prabhakar, Prab; Marinova, Jasmina; Brown, Garry; McShane, Tony

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in the recently described RARS2 gene encoding for mitochondrial arginyl-transfer RNA synthetase give rise to a disorder characterised by early onset seizures, progressive microcephaly and developmental delay. The disorder was named pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 6 (PCH6) based on the corresponding radiological findings observed in the original cases. We report two siblings with the RARS2 mutation who displayed typical clinical features of PCH6, but who had distinct neuroimaging features. Early scans showed marked supratentorial, rather than infratentorial, atrophy, and the pons remained preserved throughout. One sibling also had bilateral subdural effusions at presentation. The deceleration in head growth pointed to an evolving genetic/metabolic process giving rise to cerebral atrophy and secondary subdural effusions. RARS2 mutations should be considered in infants presenting with seizures, subdural effusions, decelerating head growth and evidence of cerebral atrophy even in the absence of pontocerebellar hypoplasia on imaging.

  10. Hypoplasia of the left portal vein territory of the human liver: a case study.

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yong-Hyun; Murakami, Gen; Lee, Moo Sam; Song, Chang Ho; Han, Eui-Hyeog; Jin, Zhe-Wu; Cho, Baik-Hwan

    2003-01-01

    Although reports of hypoplasia or absence of the liver of left lobe are not few, descriptions of the intrahepatic vessels are rare but valuable for discussion of the pathogenesis. The present report demonstrates a case of the left surgical lobe hypoplasia that is characterized by 1) the scar-like lobe with few parenchymal tissue and dilated bile ducts, 2) no Spiegel's lobe with the portal vein stuck to the inferior vena cava, 3) unusual configurations of the right hepatic vein and the 8th segmental portal vein branch, 4) the hepatic groove on S8, and 5) the trifurcation pattern of the portal vein primary division. According to the macroscopic and histological observations, we hypothesized that the secondary abnormal peritoneal fusion occurred in utero and/or during the postnatal growth, and that it involved the left portal vein and other adjacent structures, resulting in severe atrophy of the left surgical lobe. PMID:14676439

  11. Two sib cases of Leber congenital amaurosis with cerebellar vermis hypoplasia and multiple systemic anomalies.

    PubMed

    Yano, S; Oda, K; Watanabe, Y; Watanabe, S; Matsuishi, T; Kojima, K; Abe, T; Kato, H

    1998-08-06

    Leber's congenital amaurosis (LCA), a type of congenital blindness, is clinically and genetically heterogeneous and often associated with systemic anomalies. We report on two sisters who were born to a consanguineous couple and had retinitis pigmentosa-like pigmented retinal lesions, alternating exotropia, bilateral cataracts, and anomalous coarse facies characterized by deformed skull with narrow forehead, low anterior hairline, hypertelorism, short philtrum, thin upper lip, and prominent jaw; cerebellar vermis hypoplasia; dilatation of the fourth ventricle; severe mental retardation; tremor; brisk deep tendon reflexes and abnormal behavior; and skeletal abnormalities such as limited extension of elbow and/ or finger joints and talipes equinovalgus. Skin defect and renal anomalies were seen in only one patient. Our patients are the first familial LCA associated with cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, and the disease involving particular multiple systemic anomalies may represent a distinct clinical entity.

  12. Bilateral adrenal myelolipoma in Cushing's disease: a relook into the role of corticotropin in adrenal tumourigenesis.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Bhattacharjee, Rana; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2016-06-15

    Adrenal myelolipomas are infrequently encountered benign tumours of unknown aetiology. In the majority of cases they are unilateral, and clinically and hormonally silent, only requiring periodic follow-up. However, bilateral adrenal myelolipomas are sometimes associated with endocrine disorders and warrant appropriate evaluation. Though the understanding of the pathophysiology of adrenal myelolipomas has long been elusive, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) has been proposed as the main tropic factor in a number of studies. Cushing's disease is rarely associated with bilateral and sometimes giant myelolipomas. In this article, the association of bilateral adrenal myelolipomas with Cushing's disease has been discussed and the role of ACTH in the tumourigenesis has been reviewed. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Bilateral coronoid hypoplasia and complex odontoma: a rare concurrence of developmental pathology and odontogenic tumour of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Dar, Mohd Arif; Alaparthi, Ravikiran; Yalamanchili, Samatha; Santosh, Arvind Babu Rajendra

    2015-10-13

    We present a rare case of concurrent bilateral coronoid hypoplasia and complex odontoma in the mandible, with replacement of missing posterior teeth in both sides of the lower jaw. A 20-year-old woman was diagnosed with bilateral occurrence of coronoid hypoplasia and unerupted complex odontoma after radiographic and histopathological examination. The patient was surgically treated with complete removal of the unerupted complex odontoma and prosthetic replacement of the missing teeth.

  14. Alaninuria, Associated with Microcephaly, Dwarfism, Enamel Hypoplasia, and Diabetes Mellitus in Two Sisters

    PubMed Central

    Stimmler, L.; Jensen, N.; Toseland, P.

    1970-01-01

    Two sisters, both microcephalic at birth and of low birthweight, are described. They are both severely mentally retarded and dwarfed, and have developed diabetes mellitus. Their teeth show enamel hypoplasia. Excessive quantities of alanine were found in their urine, which was associated with high levels of alanine pyruvate and lactate in the blood. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3aFIG. 3b PMID:5477682

  15. Multivectorial, external halo-assisted midface distraction in patients with severe hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Malagon, Hector Hidalgo; Romo, Gabriela Wong; Quintero Mosqueda, Francisco Rafael; Magaña, Fernando Gonzalez

    2008-11-01

    Osteogenesis distraction is an increasingly used technique for the correction of facial deformities because it offers a faster and more controlled growth of the hypoplasic bone along with the elongation of the soft tissues. In this article, we describe the technique and our experience in midface distraction using an external multivectoral distraction device (BLUE Device; W. Lorenz, Jacksonville, FL) and custom-made midface osteotomies for the correction of severe hypoplasia.

  16. AMMECR1: a single point mutation causes developmental delay, midface hypoplasia and elliptocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Andreoletti, Gaia; Seaby, Eleanor G; Dewing, Jennifer M; O'Kelly, Ita; Lachlan, Katherine; Ennis, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Background Deletions in the Xq22.3–Xq23 region, inclusive of COL4A5, have been associated with a contiguous gene deletion syndrome characterised by Alport syndrome with intellectual disability (Mental retardation), Midface hypoplasia and Elliptocytosis (AMME). The extrarenal biological and clinical significance of neighbouring genes to the Alport locus has been largely speculative. We sought to discover a genetic cause for two half-brothers presenting with nephrocalcinosis, early speech and language delay and midface hypoplasia with submucous cleft palate and bifid uvula. Methods Whole exome sequencing was undertaken on maternal half-siblings. In-house genomic analysis included extraction of all shared variants on the X chromosome in keeping with X-linked inheritance. Patient-specific mutants were transfected into three cell lines and microscopically visualised to assess the nuclear expression pattern of the mutant protein. Results In the affected half-brothers, we identified a hemizygous novel non-synonymous variant of unknown significance in AMMECR1 (c.G530A; p.G177D), a gene residing in the AMME disease locus. Transfected cell lines with the p.G177D mutation showed aberrant nuclear localisation patterns when compared with the wild type. Blood films revealed the presence of elliptocytes in the older brother. Conclusions Our study shows that a single missense mutation in AMMECR1 causes a phenotype of midface hypoplasia, mild intellectual disability and the presence of elliptocytes, previously reported as part of a contiguous gene deletion syndrome. Functional analysis confirms mutant-specific protein dysfunction. We conclude that AMMECR1 is a critical gene in the pathogenesis of AMME, causing midface hypoplasia and elliptocytosis and contributing to early speech and language delay, infantile hypotonia and hearing loss, and may play a role in dysmorphism, nephrocalcinosis and submucous cleft palate. PMID:27811305

  17. Ophthalmologic findings in an 18-month-old boy with focal dermal hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Young, Marielle P; Sawyer, Briana L; Hartnett, M Elizabeth

    2014-04-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia is a rare X-linked dominant disorder with in utero lethality in males. Affected patients have been reported to have several different mutations in the PORCN gene on chromosome Xp11.23. Dysplastic mesodermal and ectodermal tissue causes clinical findings in the skin, skeleton, teeth, central nervous system, and eyes of affected patients. We describe the ophthalmologic findings in an 18-month-old boy with mosaicism of a novel mutation in PORCN.

  18. Autosomal-dominant nystagmus, foveal hypoplasia and presenile cataract associated with a novel PAX6 mutation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Shery; Thomas, Mervyn G; Andrews, Caroline; Chan, Wai-Man; Proudlock, Frank A; McLean, Rebecca J; Pradeep, Archana; Engle, Elizabeth C; Gottlob, Irene

    2014-03-01

    Autosomal-dominant idiopathic infantile nystagmus has been linked to 6p12 (OMIM 164100), 7p11.2 (OMIM 608345) and 13q31-q33 (OMIM 193003). PAX6 (11p13, OMIM 607108) mutations can also cause autosomal-dominant nystagmus, typically in association with aniridia or iris hypoplasia. We studied a large multigenerational white British family with autosomal-dominant nystagmus, normal irides and presenile cataracts. An SNP-based genome-wide analysis revealed a linkage to a 13.4-MB region on chromosome 11p13 with a maximum lod score of 2.93. A mutation analysis of the entire coding region and splice junctions of the PAX6 gene revealed a novel heterozygous missense mutation (c.227C>G) that segregated with the phenotype and is predicted to result in the amino-acid substitution of proline by arginine at codon 76 p.(P76R). The amino-acid variation p.(P76R) within the paired box domain is likely to destabilise the protein due to steric hindrance as a result of the introduction of a polar and larger amino acid. Eye movement recordings showed a significant intrafamilial variability of horizontal, vertical and torsional nystagmus. High-resolution in vivo imaging of the retina using optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed features of foveal hypoplasia, including rudimentary foveal pit, incursion of inner retinal layers, short photoreceptor outer segments and optic nerve hypoplasia. Thus, this study presents a family that segregates a PAX6 mutation with nystagmus and foveal hypoplasia in the absence of iris abnormalities. Moreover, it is the first study showing detailed characteristics using eye movement recordings of autosomal-dominant nystagmus in a multigenerational family with a novel PAX6 mutation.

  19. Atlas hypoplasia associated with non-traumatic retro-odontoid mass.

    PubMed

    Sato, Kazufumi; Kubota, Toshihiko; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Handa, Yuji

    2006-04-01

    A 38-year-old man presented with progressive cervical myelopathy due to atlas hypoplasia associated with non-traumatic retro-odontoid mass. The neuroimaging findings suggested hypertrophy of the transverse ligament of the atlas. No histological confirmation of the retro-odontoid mass was obtained. Clinical manifestations improved after posterior decompression. Decompressive laminectomy of the atlas with or without fusion can achieve a good outcome in such cases.

  20. A range of malar and masseteric hypoplasia exists in Treacher Collins syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kenneth R; Pfaff, Miles J; Chang, Christopher C; Travieso, Roberto; Steinbacher, Derek M

    2013-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a facial dysostosis, the hallmark being bilateral malar hypoplasia. The purpose of this study is to morphologically classify the TCS malar deformity and to volumetrically characterise both the TCS zygoma and masseter muscle, including for left-right symmetry, compared to controls. We hypothesise that the TCS zygoma will be smaller than controls and zygomatic deficiency will portend masseteric hypoplasia. Demographic and computed tomography (CT) data were recorded. The CT scans were converted into three-dimensional facial renderings, and the zygomatic morphology was grossly evaluated. A classification was reported based on malar structure and presence/absence of normal zygomaticomaxillary complex articulations. The zygoma and masseter muscles were then digitally isolated using 3-D planning software (Materialise, Leuven, Belgium). Volumes and sidedness ratios were calculated and compared using two-sided t-tests. 58 sides were identified (24 TCS: 34 controls), mean age of 60.0 months and normally distributed. The phenotypic dysmorphology was graded as mild, moderate or severe (I, II and III, respectively). TCS malar and masseteric volumes were significantly smaller than controls (p < 0.0001 in both cases). The TCS zygomatic side-side symmetry ratio was 0.66 ± 0.28, compared to 0.97 ± 0.02 for controls (p = 0.002). The TCS masseteric side-side ratio was 0.74 ± 0.20, compared to 0.92 ± 0.09 for controls (p = 0.001). A range of zygomatic hypoplasia exists in TCS (mild-severe). The decrease in malar volume occurs in concert with masseteric hypoplasia, and the left and right sides are not equally affected. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Unilateral pulmonary artery agenesis with ipsilateral pulmonary hypoplasia as incidental finding in an asthmatic patient].

    PubMed

    Contreras-Arias, Catalina; Duarte, Diana; Ramírez, Luis F; Serrano, Carlos D

    2014-01-01

    Unilateral absence of a pulmonary artery is an uncommon congenital heart disease. It can be related to respiratory symptoms such as asthma, an unusual finding in some of these patients. This paper reports the case of a 4-year-old male with recurrent respiratory infections and asthma symptoms, in who further studies found agenesia of right pulmonary artery with pulmonary hypoplasia of the same side.

  2. Autosomal-dominant nystagmus, foveal hypoplasia and presenile cataract associated with a novel PAX6 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Shery; Thomas, Mervyn G; Andrews, Caroline; Chan, Wai-Man; Proudlock, Frank A; McLean, Rebecca J; Pradeep, Archana; Engle, Elizabeth C; Gottlob, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal-dominant idiopathic infantile nystagmus has been linked to 6p12 (OMIM 164100), 7p11.2 (OMIM 608345) and 13q31-q33 (OMIM 193003). PAX6 (11p13, OMIM 607108) mutations can also cause autosomal-dominant nystagmus, typically in association with aniridia or iris hypoplasia. We studied a large multigenerational white British family with autosomal-dominant nystagmus, normal irides and presenile cataracts. An SNP-based genome-wide analysis revealed a linkage to a 13.4-MB region on chromosome 11p13 with a maximum lod score of 2.93. A mutation analysis of the entire coding region and splice junctions of the PAX6 gene revealed a novel heterozygous missense mutation (c.227C>G) that segregated with the phenotype and is predicted to result in the amino-acid substitution of proline by arginine at codon 76 p.(P76R). The amino-acid variation p.(P76R) within the paired box domain is likely to destabilise the protein due to steric hindrance as a result of the introduction of a polar and larger amino acid. Eye movement recordings showed a significant intrafamilial variability of horizontal, vertical and torsional nystagmus. High-resolution in vivo imaging of the retina using optical coherence tomography (OCT) revealed features of foveal hypoplasia, including rudimentary foveal pit, incursion of inner retinal layers, short photoreceptor outer segments and optic nerve hypoplasia. Thus, this study presents a family that segregates a PAX6 mutation with nystagmus and foveal hypoplasia in the absence of iris abnormalities. Moreover, it is the first study showing detailed characteristics using eye movement recordings of autosomal-dominant nystagmus in a multigenerational family with a novel PAX6 mutation. PMID:23942204

  3. Recovery of Adrenal Function in Patients with Glucocorticoids Induced Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jong Ha; Kim, Soo Kyoung; Jung, Jung Hwa; Hahm, Jong Ryeal

    2016-01-01

    Background The chronic use of glucocorticoids (GC) suppresses function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and often results in secondary adrenal insufficiency (AI). The present study aimed to determine the recovery rate of adrenal function in patients with secondary AI within 1 to 2 years and to assess the factors predictive of adrenal function recovery. Methods This was a retrospective observational study that enrolled patients diagnosed with GC-induced secondary AI between 2007 and 2013. AI was defined by peak serum cortisol levels <18 µg/dL during a standard-dose short synacthen test (SST). A follow-up SST was performed after 1 to 2 years, and responders were defined as those with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-stimulated peak serum cortisol levels ≥18 µg/dL. Results Of the total 34 patients diagnosed with GC-induced secondary AI at first, 20 patients (58.8%) recovered normal adrenal function by the time of the follow-up SST (median follow-up period, 16.5 months). Although the baseline serum ACTH and cortisol levels at the first SST did not differ between responders and non-responders, the incremental cortisol response during the first SST was higher in responders than that of non-responders (7.88 vs. 3.56, P<0.01). Additionally, higher cortisol increments during the first SST were an independent predictive factor of the adrenal function recovery (odds ratio, 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 2.46; P<0.05). Conclusion In the present study, adrenal function recovery was achieved frequently in patients with GC-induced secondary AI within 1 to 2 years. Additionally, an incremental cortisol response at the first SST may be an important predictive factor of adrenal function recovery. PMID:26676337

  4. Liver X receptors regulate adrenal cholesterol balance

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Carolyn L.; Volle, David H.; Zhang, Yuan; McDonald, Jeffrey G.; Sion, Benoît; Lefrançois-Martinez, Anne-Marie; Caira, Françoise; Veyssière, Georges; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Lobaccaro, Jean-Marc A.

    2006-01-01

    Cholesterol is the obligate precursor to adrenal steroids but is cytotoxic at high concentrations. Here, we show the role of the liver X receptors (LXRα and LXRβ) in preventing accumulation of free cholesterol in mouse adrenal glands by controlling expression of genes involved in all aspects of cholesterol utilization, including the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, StAR, a novel LXR target. Under chronic dietary stress, adrenal glands from Lxrαβ–/– mice accumulated free cholesterol. In contrast, wild-type animals maintained cholesterol homeostasis through basal expression of genes involved in cholesterol efflux and storage (ABC transporter A1 [ABCA1], apoE, SREBP-1c) while preventing steroidogenic gene (StAR) expression. Upon treatment with an LXR agonist that mimics activation by oxysterols, expression of these target genes was increased. Basally, Lxrαβ–/– mice exhibited a marked decrease in ABCA1 and a derepression of StAR expression, causing a net decrease in cholesterol efflux and an increase in steroidogenesis. These changes occurred under conditions that prevented the acute stress response and resulted in a phenotype more specific to the loss of LXRα, including hypercorticosteronemia, cholesterol ester accumulation, and adrenomegaly. These results imply LXRα provides a safety valve to limit free cholesterol levels as a basal protective mechanism in the adrenal gland, where cholesterol is under constant flux. PMID:16823488

  5. Adrenal metabolism of mitotane and related compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Djanegara, T.K.S.

    1989-01-01

    Mitotane (o,p{prime}-DDD; 1-(2-chlorophenyl)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-2,2-dichloroethane) has been used in the treatment of Cushing's syndrome due to adrenal hyperfunction and it the drug of choice for adrenocortical carcinoma. The object of this investigation is to study the biotransformation of o,p{prime}-DDD and p,p{prime}-DDD in dogs and bovine adrenal cortex to explain its selective toxicity and mechanism of action. The in vitro biotransformation of {sup 14}C-labeled o,p{prime}-DDD and p,p{prime}-DDD by dog and bovine adrenal cortex as studied. Of the cortex subcellular fractions, the cytosol fraction was found to be the most active in metabolizing the substrates, followed by the mitochondrial fraction. This metabolism including that in cytosolic fractions, did not take place with boiled enzyme preparations and required an NADPH generating system. This study has been directed towards establishing the metabolic activation mechanism which may account for the adrenocorticolytic effect of mitotane in contrast to detoxication by the liver. HPLC and TLC metabolic profiles have been generated from incubations of bovine and dog adrenal cortex homogenates and their subfractions for {sup 14}C-labeled p,p{prime}-DDD, o,p{prime}-DDD and its monochloroethylene derivative, o,p{prime}-DDMU.

  6. Giant cavernous hemangioma of the adrenal gland

    PubMed Central

    Quildrian, Sergio Damián; Silberman, Ezequiel Aníbal; Vigovich, Felix Alberto; Porto, Eduardo Agustín

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cavernous hemangioma of the adrenal gland is a rare non-functioning benign neoplasm. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 62-year-old woman with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was diagnosed as having an incidental non-functioning adrenal tumor. Because of the impossibility of ruling out the presence of malignancy, conventional surgical resection was carried out. The histopathology revealed a 12.5 cm × 11.5 cm × 8 cm adrenal mass with large and lacunae vascular spaces lined with mature endothelial cells. These findings were compatible with cavernous hemangioma. DISCUSSION The majority of patients in the literature underwent surgical resection due to the impossibility of excluding malignancy, because of related symptoms in patients with large masses, or because of the risk of spontaneous tumoral rupture. CONCLUSION These tumors are quite infrequent. Due to the low frequency and the lack of specific symptoms, most adrenal hemangiomas are diagnosed postoperatively. PMID:23287064

  7. Imaging features of benign adrenal cysts.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Kocaoglu, Murat; Yildirim, Duzgun; Bulakbasi, Nail; Guvenc, Inanc; Tayfun, Cem; Ucoz, Taner

    2006-12-01

    Benign adrenal gland cysts (BACs) are rare lesions with a variable histological spectrum and may mimic not only each other but also malignant ones. We aimed to review imaging features of BACs which can be helpful in distinguishing each entity and determining the subsequent appropriate management.

  8. Korsakoff's Syndrome Associated with Adrenal Virilism

    PubMed Central

    Cookson, B. A.

    1964-01-01

    Korsakoff's syndrome of obscure etiology was observed in a 34-year-old single woman with an 11-year history of hirsutism and mood swings, and previous hospitalizations for mania three years ago and depression 11 years ago. Recently the virilism had intensified with increased muscularity and coarsening of facial features. The 24-hour urinary 17-ketosteroids ranged between 14.4 mg. and 21.5 mg. and were suppressed by dexamethasone. The 17-hydroxycorticosteroid excretion was normal. These and other findings suggested a diagnosis of adrenal virilism due to adrenocortical hyperplasia. In the absence of other discernible causes it appeared that the adrenal pathology was responsible for the Korsakoff's syndrome. Both conditions responded well to glucocorticoid therapy although low doses were necessary to avoid mania. It is speculated that the encephalopathy was due to an associated adrenal insufficiency. Although hypoadrenalism is accepted as a complication of only the infant form of adrenal virilism, it is noteworthy that this patient had pathological pigmentation of her skin. PMID:14158554

  9. CT manifestations of adrenal trauma: experience with 73 cases.

    PubMed

    Sinelnikov, Alex O; Abujudeh, Hani H; Chan, David; Novelline, Robert A

    2007-03-01

    Adrenal injuries, although an uncommon consequence of abdominal trauma, are important to recognize. If bilateral, adrenal trauma could result in life-threatening adrenal insufficiency. Furthermore, in the setting of trauma, adrenal injury can point to other concomitant injuries and has been associated with overall increased morbidity and mortality. In the past, before the advent of computed tomography (CT), detection was difficult, and the diagnosis was often made only at surgery or postmortem. Today, the diagnosis of adrenal injuries can be quickly and accurately made with CT. This retrospective review was carried out to identify, describe, and analyze different CT appearances of adrenal injuries and correlated with associated injuries and observed clinical context and outcomes. A patient cohort of CT-detected adrenal injuries was identified through a radiology software research tool by searching for keywords in radiology reports. The identified CT scans were reviewed and correlated with the patients' available clinical chart data and follow-up. Between April 1995 and October 2004, 73 cases of CT-detected adrenal injuries were identified, including 48 men and 25 women, with an age range 6 to 90 years and a mean age of 42.7 years. Of the cases, 77% were right-sided, 15% were left-sided, and 8% were bilateral. The causes of injuries were motor vehicle collisions (75%), falls (14%), sports related (4%), and miscellaneous causes (7%). Associated trauma included injuries of the liver (43%), spleen (23%), lung (19%), and kidney (18%), as well as pneumothoraces/hemothoraces (22%). Skeletal injuries included fractures of the ribs, clavicles, and/or scapulae (39%), pelvis and hips (30%), and the spine (23%). Isolated adrenal trauma was seen in only 4% of the cases. The CT findings of adrenal trauma were focal hematoma (30%), indistinct (27%) or enlarged (18%) adrenal gland, gross (15%) or focal (7%) adrenal hemorrhage, and adrenal mass (11%). Associated CT findings

  10. Adrenal venous sampling using Dyna-CT--a practical guide.

    PubMed

    Plank, Christina; Wolf, Florian; Langenberger, Herbert; Loewe, Christian; Schoder, Maria; Lammer, Johannes

    2012-09-01

    Primary hyperaldosteronism due to aldosterone secreting adrenal adenomas is an important and potentially curable cause for hypertension. The differentiation between unilateral or bilateral adrenal adenomas is crucial, as unilateral adenomas can easily be cured by surgery whereas bilateral adenomas have to be treated conservatively. Exact diagnosis can be made when unilateral or bilateral hormone production is proven with adrenal vein sampling. We present an effective step-by-step technique how to perform an adrenal vein sampling with a special emphasis on how to reliably catheterize the right adrenal vein using Dyna CT.

  11. Diagnosis and classification of Addison's disease (autoimmune adrenalitis).

    PubMed

    Brandão Neto, Rodrigo Antonio; de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune adrenalitis, or autoimmune Addison disease (AAD), is the most prevalent cause of primary adrenal insufficiency in the developed world. AAD is rare and can easily be misdiagnosed as other conditions. The diagnosis depends on demonstrating inappropriately low cortisol production and the presence of high titers of adrenal cortex autoantibodies (ACAs), along with excluding other causes of adrenal failure using other tests as necessary. The treatment corticosteroid replacement, and the prognosis following the treatment is the same as the normal population. Spontaneous recovery of adrenal function has been described but is rare. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Cerebellar hypoplasia in three sibling cats after intrauterine or early postnatal parvovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Aeffner, F; Ulrich, R; Schulze-Rückamp, L; Beineke, A

    2006-11-01

    The present report describes the case of an intrauterine or early postnatal parvovirus infection with subsequent cerebellar hypoplasia in three kittens from the same litter. Clinical examination of affected cats revealed neurologic signs indicative of cerebellar ataxia. Due to poor prognosis, animals were euthanised and submitted for necropsy. Post mortem examination demonstrated variable degrees of cerebellar hypoplasia. Histologically, brain lesions were characterised by segmental loss of the external and internal granular layer and decreased numbers of Purkinje cells. Reactive proliferation of astrocytes in the central nervous system was verified by the detection of GFAP-expressing glial cells in affected areas using immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, parvovirus antigen was detected immunohistochemically in neuronal cells of the cerebellum, but not in other parts of the brain and spinal cord or non-neuronal tissues. The present report demonstrates the usefulness of post mortem examination and detection of viral antigen by immunohistochemistry for the discrimination of neurologic disorders in feline species. Neurologic deficiencies due to cerebellar hypoplasia caused by in utero or perinatal feline parvovirus infection should be taken into consideration as differential diagnoses for ataxia in neonatal and juvenile cats.

  13. Gross enamel hypoplasia in molars from subadults in a 16th-18th century London graveyard.

    PubMed

    Ogden, A R; Pinhasi, R; White, W J

    2007-07-01

    Dental Enamel Hypoplasia has long been used as a common nonspecific stress indicator in teeth from archaeological samples. Most researchers report relatively minor linear and pitted hypoplastic defects on tooth crown surfaces. In this work we report a high prevalence and early age of onset of extensive enamel defects in deciduous and permanent molars in the subadults from the post-medieval cemetery of Broadgate, east central London. Analysis of the dentition of all 45 subadults from the cemetery, using both macroscopic and microscopic methods, reveals disturbed cusp patterns and pitted, abnormal and arrested enamel formation. Forty-one individuals from this group (93.2%) showed some evidence of enamel hypoplasia, 28 of them showing moderate or extensive lesions of molars, deciduous or permanent (63.6% of the sample). Scanning Electron Microscope images reveal many molars with grossly deformed cuspal architecture, multiple extra cusps and large areas of exposed Tomes' process pits, where the ameloblasts have abruptly ceased matrix production, well before normal completion. This indented, rough and poorly mineralized surface facilitates both bacterial adhesion and tooth wear, and when such teeth erupt fully into the mouth they are likely to wear and decay rapidly. We suggest that this complex combination of pitted and plane-form lesions, combined with disruption of cusp pattern and the formation of multiple small cusps, should henceforth be identified as "Cuspal Enamel Hypoplasia." (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Lung hypoplasia in newborn rabbits with a diaphragmatic hernia affects pulmonary ventilation but not perfusion.

    PubMed

    Flemmer, Andreas W; Thio, Marta; Wallace, Megan J; Lee, Katie; Kitchen, Marcus J; Kerr, Lauren; Roehr, Charles C; Fouras, Andreas; Carnibella, Richard; Jani, Jaccques C; DeKoninck, Philip; Te Pas, Arjan B; Pearson, James T; Hooper, Stuart B

    2017-09-01

    BackgroundA congenital diaphragmatic hernia (DH) can result in severe lung hypoplasia that increases the risk of morbidity and mortality after birth; however, little is known about the cardiorespiratory transition at birth.MethodsUsing phase-contrast X-ray imaging and angiography, we examined the cardiorespiratory transition at birth in rabbit kittens with DHs. Surgery was performed on pregnant New Zealand white rabbits (n=18) at 25 days' gestation to induce a left-sided DH. Kittens were delivered at 30 days' gestation, intubated, and ventilated to achieve a tidal volume (Vt) of 8 ml/kg in control and 4 ml/kg in DH kittens while they were imaged.ResultsFunctional residual capacity (FRC) recruitment and Vt in the hypoplastic left lung were markedly reduced, resulting in a disproportionate distribution of FRC into the right lung. Following lung aeration, relative pulmonary blood flow (PBF) increased equally in both lungs, and the increase in pulmonary venous return was similar in both control and DH kittens.ConclusionThese findings indicate that nonuniform lung hypoplasia caused by DH alters the distribution of ventilation away from hypoplastic and into normally grown lung regions. During transition, the increase in PBF and pulmonary venous return, which is vital for maintaining cardiac output, is not affected by lung hypoplasia.

  15. Identification of feline panleukopenia virus proteins expressed in Purkinje cell nuclei of cats with cerebellar hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Poncelet, Luc; Héraud, Céline; Springinsfeld, Marie; Ando, Kunie; Kabova, Anna; Beineke, Andreas; Peeters, Dominique; Op De Beeck, Anne; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2013-06-01

    Parvoviruses depend on initiation of host cell division for their replication. Undefined parvoviral proteins have been detected in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum after experimental feline panleukopenia virus (FPV) infection of neonatal kittens and in naturally occurring cases of feline cerebellar hypoplasia. In this study, a parvoviral protein in the nucleus of Purkinje cells of kittens with cerebellar hypoplasia was shown by immunoprecipitation to be the FPV viral capsid protein VP2. In PCR-confirmed, FPV-associated feline cerebellar hypoplasia, expression of the FPV VP2 protein was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry in Purkinje cell nuclei in 4/10 cases and expression of the FPV non-structural protein NS1 was demonstrated in Purkinje cell nuclei in 5/10 cases. Increased nuclear ERK1 expression was observed in several Purkinje cells in 1/10 kittens. No expression of the G1 and S mitotic phase marker proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was evident in Purkinje cell nuclei. These results support the hypothesis that FPV is able to proceed far into its replication cycle in post-mitotic Purkinje cells.

  16. Echocardiographic characterization of left ventricular apical hypoplasia accompanied by a patent ductus arteriosus.

    PubMed

    Haffajee, Jessica A; Finley, John J; Brooks, Erica L; Kuvin, Jeffrey T; Patel, Ayan R

    2011-03-01

    Left ventricular (LV) apical hypoplasia is an unusual, recently identified cardiomyopathy, whose clinical course is uncertain. In this report, we describe a case of this cardiomyopathy occurring in an asymptomatic 50-year-old male with a remote history of a surgically corrected patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), primarily using transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) to illustrate the imaging characteristics. This patient had been referred to our institution for an abnormal electrocardiogram, and TTE subsequently (Figure 1) revealed a dilated left ventricle with moderately to severely reduced function; LV ejection fraction was 30% by two- and three-dimensional quantification. The left ventricle had a spherical appearance with a thin-walled, truncated, and akinetic distal LV. The right ventricle appeared elongated and was noted to wrap around the distal left ventricle, but right ventricular systolic function was normal. There were no significant valvular abnormalities, and no evidence of residual PDA flow. Subsequent cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging confirmed these findings (Figure 1). The TTE and CMR findings seen in this patient are consistent with LV apical hypoplasia. Until now, this cardiomyopathy has been described only as an isolated congenital anomaly primarily using CMR and cardiac computed tomography. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of LV apical hypoplasia in conjunction with another congenital cardiac abnormality, and the findings demonstrate that the distinctive appearance of this cardiomyopathy can be easily identified with echocardiography. As more cases are recognized and patients are followed over time, the natural history and optimal treatment for this cardiomyopathy may be further elucidated.

  17. Serial amnioinfusions prevent fetal pulmonary hypoplasia in a large animal model of oligohydramnios.

    PubMed

    Nicksa, Grace A; Yu, David C; Kalish, Brian T; Klein, Justin D; Turner, Christopher G B; Zurakowski, David; Barnewolt, Carol E; Fauza, Dario O; Buchmiller, Terry L

    2011-01-01

    Severe neonatal pulmonary hypoplasia incurs mortality rates approaching 71% to 95%. We sought to determine the utility of serial amnioinfusions through a subcutaneously implanted intraamniotic catheter to prevent pulmonary hypoplasia in fetal obstructive uropathy. Fetal lambs (n = 32) were divided into 3 groups. Group I (n = 12) underwent a sham operation, group II (n = 15) underwent a complete urinary tract obstruction via ligation of the urachus and urethra with a subcutaneous tunneled intraamniotic port-a-cath without amnioinfusions, and group III (n = 5) underwent a creation of a complete urinary tract obstruction with a port-a-cath as described in group II with serial amnioinfusions. Lung tissue was analyzed by lung volume to body weight ratios and stereology. Statistical analysis was performed by analysis of variance and Bonferroni comparisons (P < .05). Obstructed fetuses grossly had smaller lungs than treated and control animals. Lung volume to body weight ratios were statistically significant between groups. Airspace fractions were comparable between groups I and III (average = 0.53 and 0.55, respectively), although both were significantly greater than group II (average = 0.48) (P = .049). Serial amnioinfusions through an intraamniotic port-a-cath prevented pulmonary hypoplasia in an ovine model of complete obstructive uropathy. The use of an easily accessible device for amnioinfusions may be a viable option to treat oligohydramnios. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of ethnicity and birth month on localized enamel hypoplasia of the primary canine.

    PubMed

    Skinner, M F; Hadaway, W; Dickie, J

    1994-01-01

    Localized enamel hypoplasia of the primary canine (LHPC) is produced by a different mechanism from that causing linear enamel hypoplasia, and yet contributes disproportionately to epidemiological studies of enamel hypoplasia in childhood that do not separate the two etiological types. LHPC results from impact, probably self-inflicted by infants mouthing objects, to the unerupted primary canine crown through abnormally fenestrated cortical bone overlying the crypt. Examination of the primary teeth of ninety-six children whose mothers were enrolled in the Healthiest Babies Possible Program in Vancouver showed an average prevalence of 31 percent with LHPC (ranging from 19 percent in Vietnamese Canadians to 56 percent among Indocanadians). This is much higher than previously reported for unselected samples from Vancouver, but equivalent to studies in the USA. Mean hours of sunshine in the birth month of children with LHPC is 141.7 hours and those without is 169.4 hours; the difference is statistically significant (p = .0383). Seasonal increase in food costs and reduced availability of fresh foods containing vitamin A are thought to contribute to facial osteopenia predisposing the infant to LHPC.

  19. Neuropathological features in a female fetus with OPHN1 deletion and cerebellar hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Rocas, Delphine; Alix, Eudeline; Michel, Jessica; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Labalme, Audrey; Guilbert, Hélène; Till, Marianne; Schluth-Bolard, Caroline; de Haas, Pascale; Massardier, Jérôme; Portes, Vincent des; Edery, Patrick; Touraine, Renaud; Guibaud, Laurent; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Sanlaville, Damien

    2013-05-01

    We report the case of a 33-year-old pregnant woman. The third-trimester ultrasound scan during pregnancy revealed fetal bilateral ventricular dilatation, macrosomia and a transverse diameter of the cerebellum at the 30th centile. A brain MRI scan at 31 weeks of gestation led to a diagnosis of hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis without hemisphere abnormalities and a non compressive expansion of the cisterna magna. The fetal karyotype was 46,XX. The pregnancy was terminated and array-CGH analysis of the fetus identified a 238 kb de novo deletion on chromosome Xp12, encompassing part of OPHN1 gene. Further studies revealed a completely skewed pattern of X inactivation. OPHN1 is involved in X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) with cerebellar hypoplasia and encodes a Rho-GTPase-activating protein called oligophrenin-1, which is produced throughout the developing mouse brain and in the hippocampus and Purkinje cells of the cerebellum in adult mice. Neuropathological examination of the female fetus revealed cerebellar hypoplasia and the heterotopia of Purkinje cells at multiple sites in the white matter of the cerebellum. This condition mostly affects male fetuses in humans. We report here the first case of a de novo partial deletion of OPHN1, with radiological and neuropathological examination, in a female fetus.

  20. [Risk factors for teeth aplasia and hypoplasia in cleft lip and palate children].

    PubMed

    Korolenkova, M V; Starikova, N V; Ageeva, L V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the significance of environmental risk factors for teeth aplasia and hypoplasia in cleft lip and palate children. Two hundred and forty-seven cleft lip and palate (CLP) children were enrolled in the study including 105 (42.5%) with bilateral CLP and 57.5% with unilateral CLP. The mean age was 11.2±4.9 years. Teeth condition was assessed clinically and radiologically. The impact of risk factors for teeth anomalies was analyzed by retrospective data obtained from computer database (absence of preoperative orthopedic treatment, palatal defects after primary palatoplasty and type of primary procedures). Surgical trauma by early periosteoplasty (at the age of 3-4 months), excessive scarring and tissue traction due to absence of early orthopedic treatment and palatal defect were associated with significantly higher incidence of incisors hypoplasia (both developmental enamel defects and microdentia) and aplasia of central incisors not seen in the other study subgroups. Incisors aplasia and hypoplasia in CLP patients do not always have disembryogenic origin but may depend on external environmental factors, including surgical trauma.