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Sample records for adrenal hypoplasia congenital

  1. De novo dup (5p) in a patient with congenital hypoplasia of the adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Kusyk, C.J.; Tuck-Muller, C.M.

    1995-02-13

    We report on a black male child with congenital hypoplasia of the adrenal gland (CHA) with a de novo duplication of 5p (dir dup(5) (p13.3{r_arrow}p15.1)), confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). In addition to a characteristic clinical course, the patient has hyperpigmentation (melanoderma) since birth, normal external genitalia, marked elevation of ACTH, and absent response to an IV ACTH challenge. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of congenital hypoplasia of the adrenal gland associated with a chromosome abnormality. Reviews of dup (5p) and of our patient suggest that duplication of 5p13.3-pter has only minor phenotypic effect, while duplication of the relatively small critical segment p11-p13.2 apparently causes far more deleterious changes. The concurrence of CHA and dup(5p) in our patient may indicate the possible gene localization of an autosomal form of CHA to either at or near 5p13.3 or 5p15.1. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  2. New mutations of DAX-1 genes in two Japanese patients with X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    SciTech Connect

    Yanase, Toshihiko; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Oba, Koichi

    1996-02-01

    Congenital adrenal hypoplasia, an X-linked disorder, is characterized by primary adrenal insufficiency and frequent association with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. The X-chromosome gene DAX-1 has been most recently identified and shown to be responsible for this disorder. We analyzed the DAX-1 genes of two unrelated Japanese patients with congenital adrenal hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism by using PCR amplification of genomic DNA and its complete exonic sequencing. In a family containing several affected individuals, the proband male patient had a stop codon (TGA) in place of tryptophan (TGG) at amino acid position 171. As expected, his mother was a heterozygous carrier for the mutation, whereas his father and unaffected brother did not carry this mutation. In another male patient with noncontributory family history, sequencing revealed a 1-bp (T) deletion at amino acid position 280, leading to a frame shift and, subsequently a premature stop codon at amino acid position 371. The presence of this mutation in the patients` genome was further confirmed by digestion of genomic PCR product with MspI created by this mutation. Family studies using MspI digestion of genomic PCR products revealed that neither parent of this individual carried the mutation. These results clearly indicate that congenital adrenal hypoplasia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism result from not only inherited but also de novo mutation in the DAX-1 gene. 31 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. A de novo mutation of DAX1 in a boy with congenital adrenal hypoplasia without hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun Lin; Fen, Zhu Wei; Liang, Li

    2014-03-01

    We report the case of a 12-year-old boy with a de novo mutation in the DAX1 gene (for dosage-sensitive sex reversal, congenital adrenal hypoplasia critical region on the X chromosome, gene 1; also called NROB1). He was born at term, Addison's disease was diagnosed at 8 years with a salt-wasting syndrome, and then hydrocortisone substitution was taken; the child continued to develop normally. A reoccurrence of salt-wasting syndrome usually happened after an episode of an abrupt withdrawal of hydrocortisone substitution. Because of adrenal insufficiency without hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, he came to the clinic at 12 years of age and hypoplasia of adrenal glands was found by MRI scans. We proposed the diagnosis of congenital adrenal hypoplasia in this patient and identified a hemizygous mutation (c.999_1000insCTCA, p.Leu335ThrfsX389) in exon 1 of the DAX1 gene. To our knowledge, it is a de novo mutation that leads to a frame-shift, a premature stop codon. In conclusion, it is very important to identify mutation in the DAX1 gene for a boy with adrenal insufficiency of unknown etiology. PMID:24197767

  4. Congenital adrenal hypoplasia, myopathy, and glycerol kinase deficiency: Molecular genetic evidence for deletions

    PubMed Central

    Francke, Uta; Harper, John F.; Darras, Basil T.; Cowan, Janet M.; McCabe, Edward R. B.; Kohlschütter, Alfried; Seltzer, William K.; Saito, Fumiko; Goto, Jun; Harpey, Jean-Paul; Wise, Joyce E.

    1987-01-01

    Glycerol kinase deficiency (GKD) is an X-linked recessive trait that occurs in association with congenital adrenal hypoplasia (AH) and developmental delay with or without congenital dystrophic myopathy. Several such patients have recently been reported to have cytological deletions of chromosome region Xp21 and/or of DNA markers that map near the locus for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) in band Xp21. We have examined the initial family reported in the literature and, using prometaphase chromosome studies and Southern blot analysis with 13 different DNA probes derived from band Xp21, have found no deletions within this region of the X chromosome. When DNA samples from six other unrelated affected males were analyzed, four of them were found to have different-size deletions within Xp21. Thus, the form of GKD associated with AH and dystrophic myopathy exhibits significant genetic heterogeneity at the DNA level. No deletions were detected in two patients with isolated GK deficiency. Comparison of our molecular studies of unrelated patients with deletions of DNA segments allows us to define the region of Xp21 (between probes J-Bir and L1.4) that most likely contains the genes for GKD and AH. This location is distal to the DMD locus. The patients with progressive muscular dystrophy tended to have larger deletions that include markers known to derive from the DMD locus, while GKD/AH/dystrophic-myopathy patients without current evidence of deletion seemed to have a milder, nonprogressive form of congenital myopathy. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:2883886

  5. Inappropriate tall stature and renal ectopy in a male patient with X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia due to a novel missense mutation in the DAX-1 gene.

    PubMed

    Franzese, Adriana; Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Spagnuolo, Maria Immacolata; Spadaro, Raffaella; Giugliano, Michela; Mukai, Tokuo; Valerio, Giuliana

    2005-05-15

    Mutations in DAX-1 gene cause congenital adrenal hypoplasia (AHC). We present a male patient affected by X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita due to a novel DAX-1 missense mutation. The mutation V287G affects the C-terminal end of the DAX-1 protein which plays an important role in functioning of the receptor. In addition, our patient presented an inappropriate tall stature and renal ectopy, which have not been described in AHC so far. PMID:15800903

  6. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Overview What is congenital adrenal hyperplasia? Congenital adrenal hyperplasia, or CAH, is a disorder that affects the adrenal glands. The adrenal ...

  7. Genetic analysis of NR0B1 in congenital adrenal hypoplasia patients: identification of a rare regulatory variant resulting in congenital adrenal hypoplasia and hypogonadal hypogonadism without testicular carcinoma in situ.

    PubMed

    Walker, A P; Fowkes, R C; Saleh, F; Kim, S-H; Wilkinson, P; Cabrera-Sharp, V; Talmud, P J; Humphries, S E; Looijenga, L H J; Bouloux, P M G

    2012-01-01

    There have been few testicular histology reports of adult patients with congenital adrenal hypoplasia/hypogonadal hypogonadism (AHC/HH), but Leydig cell hyperplasia has been observed, an indicator of the possibility of malignant transformation. We aimed to define the basis of AHC/HH in 4 pedigrees of different ethnic backgrounds. One patient was elected to have testicular biopsy which was examined for evidence of carcinoma in situ (CIS). NR0B1 mutation analysis was performed by sequence analysis. NR0B1 expression was investigated by RT-PCR. Testicular biopsy sections were stained with HE or immunostained for OCT3/4, an established marker of CIS. We identified NR0B1 variants in the 4 AHC pedigrees: pedigree 1 (United Arab Emirates), c.1130A>G predicting p.(Glu377Gly); pedigree 2 (English Caucasian), c.327C>A predicting p.(Cys109*); pedigree 3 (Oman), a 6-bp deletion of a direct repeat, c.857_862delTGGTGC predicting p.(Leu286_Val287del); pedigree 4 (English Caucasian), c.1168+1G>A, a regulatory variant within the NR0B1 splice donor site. This last male patient, aged 30 years, presented with evidence of HH but incomplete gonadotrophin deficiency, following an earlier diagnosis of Addison's disease at 3 years. Hormonal therapy induced virilisation. Testicular biopsy was performed. The c.1168+1G>A variant abrogated normal splicing of testicular mRNA. Histological examination showed poorly organised testicular architecture and absence of spermatozoa. Morphological analyses and the absence of immunohistochemical staining for OCT3/4 excluded the presence of malignant germ cell cancer and its precursor lesion, CIS. These studies add to the knowledge of the types and ethnic diversity of NR0B1 mutations and their associated phenotypes, and provide insight into the assessment and interpretation of testicular histology in AHC and HH. PMID:23018754

  8. Growth hormone deficiency due to traumatic brain injury in a patient with X-linked congenital adrenal hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Engiz, Ozlem; Ozön, Alev; Riepe, Felix; Alikaşifoğlu, Ayfer; Gönç, Nazli; Kandemir, Nurgün

    2010-01-01

    X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) is characterized by primary adrenal insufficiency and is frequently associated with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). The production of other pituitary hormones (adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH], growth hormone [GH], thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], and prolactin [PRL]) is usually normal. Mutations of the DAX-1 gene have been reported in patients with AHC and HH. We present a 13-year-old male patient with AHC caused by a nonsense mutation in the DAX-1 gene who developed GH deficiency following head trauma. He showed signs of adrenal insufficiency at the age of 23 months, and glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid treatment was started. His parents reported head trauma due to a traffic accident at the age of 21 months. Adrenal computed tomography revealed hypoplasia of the left and agenesis of the right adrenal gland. Decreased growth rate was noted at the age of 12.5 years while receiving hydrocortisone 15 mg/m2/day. His height was 139.9 cm (-1.46 SD), body weight was 54.9 kg, pubic hair was Tanner stage 1, and testis size was 3 ml. His bone age was 7 years. His gonadotropin (follicle-stimulating hormone [FSH], luteinizing hormone [LH]) and testosterone levels were prepubertal. The evaluation of GH/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) secretion at the age of 13 years revealed GH deficiency. Pituitary magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a hypoplastic hypophysis (< 2.5 mm) and a normal infundibulum. GH treatment (0.73 IU/kg/week) was started. This paper reports a patient with genetically confirmed AHC demonstrating GH deficiency possibly due to a previous head trauma. Complete pituitary evaluation should be performed in any child who has survived severe traumatic brain injury. PMID:20718192

  9. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Speiser, Phyllis W.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia associated with deficiency of steroid 21-hydroxylase is the most common inborn error in adrenal function and the most common cause of adrenal insufficiency in the pediatric age group. As patients now survive into adulthood, adult health-care providers must also be familiar with this condition. Over the past several years, F1000 has published numerous commentaries updating research and practical guidelines for this condition. The purposes of this review are to summarize basic information defining congenital adrenal hyperplasia and to highlight current knowledge and controversies in management. PMID:26339484

  10. Clinical and molecular genetic analysis of a Chinese family with congenital X-linked adrenal hypoplasia caused by novel mutation 1268delA in the DAX-1 gene*

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, Zhe; FENG, Ye; YE, Dan; LI, Cheng-jiang; DONG, Feng-qin; TONG, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Congenital X-linked adrenal hypoplasia (AHC) is a rare disease characterized by primary adrenal insufficiency before adolescence and by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HHG) during adolescence. In this paper, we present a Chinese family with AHC. Two brothers, misdiagnosed with adrenal insufficiency of unknown etiology at the age of 9, were correctly diagnosed with AHC when delayed puberty, HHG, and testicular defects were observed. We investigated the clinical features and identified the dosage-sensitive sex reversal AHC critical region of the X chromosome gene 1 (DAX-1) mutation in this kindred. Direct sequencing of the DAX-1 gene revealed that the two siblings have a novel mutation (1268delA) of which their mother is a heterozygous carrier. This mutation causes a frameshift and a premature stop codon at position 436, encoding a truncated protein. It is important to increase knowledge of the mutational spectrum in genes related to this disease, linking phenotype to genotype. PMID:26537215

  11. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or inappropriately). Congenital adrenal hyperplasia can affect both boys and girls. About 1 in 10,000 to 18,000 ... penis but normal testes Well-developed muscles Both boys and girls will be tall as children, but much shorter ...

  12. Nonclassic Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Witchel, Selma Feldman; Azziz, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH) due to P450c21 (21-hydroxylase deficiency) is a common autosomal recessive disorder. This disorder is due to mutations in the CYP21A2 gene which is located at chromosome 6p21. The clinical features predominantly reflect androgen excess rather than adrenal insufficiency leading to an ascertainment bias favoring diagnosis in females. Treatment goals include normal linear growth velocity and “on-time” puberty in affected children. For adolescent and adult women, treatment goals include regularization of menses, prevention of progression of hirsutism, and fertility. This paper will review key aspects regarding pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of NCAH. PMID:20671993

  13. Primary congenital pulmonary hypoplasia of a neonate.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jui-Sheng; Lee, Yu-Sheng; Lin, Chin-Hsuan; Li, Fen-Yau; Jeng, Mei-Jy; Soong, Wen-Jue; Chen, Sue-Jen; Tang, Ren-Bin

    2012-02-01

    Pulmonary hypoplasia is a rare but usually lethal disease. We report a full-term male neonate who presented with respiratory failure immediately after birth. Chest X-ray revealed a small lung volume despite advanced ventilator support. Respiratory failure persisted and this baby died at 40.5 hours of age. The autopsy showed a lung-to-birth weight ratio of 0.69% and a radial alveoli count of 2.97. All this information confirmed the diagnosis of primary congenital pulmonary hypoplasia. PMID:22340744

  14. Adrenal steroidogenesis and congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Turcu, Adina F; Auchus, Richard J

    2015-06-01

    Adrenal steroidogenesis is a dynamic process, reliant on de novo synthesis from cholesterol, under the stimulation of ACTH and other regulators. The syntheses of mineralocorticoids (primarily aldosterone), glucocorticoids (primarily cortisol), and adrenal androgens (primarily dehydroepiandrosterone and its sulfate) occur in separate adrenal cortical zones, each expressing specific enzymes. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) encompasses a group of autosomal-recessive enzymatic defects in cortisol biosynthesis. 21-Hydroxylase (21OHD) deficiency accounts for more than 90% of CAH cases and, when milder or nonclassic forms are included, 21OHD is one of the most common genetic diseases. PMID:26038201

  15. Adrenal Steroidogenesis and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Turcu, Adina F.; Auchus, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Adrenal steroidogenesis is a dynamic process, reliant on de novo synthesis from cholesterol, under the stimulation of ACTH and other regulators. The syntheses of mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and adrenal androgens occur in separate adrenal cortical zones, each expressing specific enzymes. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) encompasses a group of autosomal recessive enzymatic defects in cortisol biosynthesis. 21-hydroxylase (21OHD) deficiency accounts for over 90% of CAH cases and when milder or nonclassic forms are included, 21OHD is one of the most common genetic diseases. This review discusses in detail the epidemiology, genetics, diagnostic, clinical aspects and management of 21OHD. PMID:26038201

  16. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Dessinioti, Cleo; Katsambas, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia consists of a heterogenous group of inherited disorders due to enzymatic defects in the biosynthetic pathway of cortisol and/or aldosterone. This results in glucocorticoid deficiency, mineralocorticoid deficiency, and androgen excess. 95% of CAH cases are due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Clinical forms range from the severe, classical CAH associated with complete loss of enzyme function, to milder, non-classical forms (NCAH). Androgen excess affects the pilosebaceous unit, causing cutaneous manifestations such as acne, androgenetic alopecia and hirsutism. Clinical differential diagnosis between NCAH and polycystic ovary syndrome may be difficult. In this review, the evaluation of patients with suspected CAH, the clinical presentation of CAH forms, with emphasis on the cutaneous manifestations of the disease, and available treatment options, will be discussed. PMID:22523607

  17. Marrow hypoplasia associated with congenital neurologic anomalies in two siblings.

    PubMed

    Drachtman, R; Weinblatt, M; Sitarz, A; Gold, A; Kochen, J

    1990-10-01

    Two siblings with congenital neurologic structural anomalies and delayed-onset selective bone marrow hypoplasia in a previously undescribed constellation of symptoms are presented. Differences between these cases and other well known syndromes are discussed. The importance of this association is the implication that children with congenital neurologic abnormalities may be at increased risk for the development of hypoplastic hematopoietic conditions. PMID:2264478

  18. Management of adolescents with congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Merke, Deborah P; Poppas, Dix P

    2014-01-01

    The management of congenital adrenal hyperplasia involves suppression of adrenal androgen production, in addition to treatment of adrenal insufficiency. Management of adolescents with congenital adrenal hyperplasia is especially challenging because changes in the hormonal milieu during puberty can lead to inadequate suppression of adrenal androgens, psychosocial issues often affect adherence to medical therapy, and sexual function plays a major part in adolescence and young adulthood. For these reasons, treatment regimen reassessment is indicated during adolescence. Patients with non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia require reassessment regarding the need for glucocorticoid drug treatment. No clinical trials have compared various regimens for classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia in adults, thus therapy is individualised and based on the prevention of adverse outcomes. Extensive patient education is key during transition from paediatric care to adult care and should include education of females with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia regarding their genital anatomy and surgical history. Common issues for these patients include urinary incontinence, vaginal stenosis, clitoral pain, and cosmetic concerns; for males with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia, common issues include testicular adrenal rest tumours. Transition from paediatric to adult care is most successful when phased over many years. Education of health-care providers on how to successfully transition patients is greatly needed. PMID:24622419

  19. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita

    MedlinePlus

    ... glands on top of each kidney called the adrenal glands . These glands produce a variety of hormones that ... disorder is adrenal insufficiency, which occurs when the adrenal glands do not produce enough hormones. Adrenal insufficiency typically ...

  20. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: Unresolved Issues.

    PubMed

    Yau, Mabel; Khattab, Ahmed; Poppas, Dix; Ghizzoni, Lucia; New, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) describes a family of disorders that comes from enzymatic deficiencies in cortisol production, with 21-hydroxylase deficiency causing ∼90% of cases. Distinction is made between the severe classical form and milder nonclassical form of CAH. Molecular genetic analysis is used to confirm the hormonal diagnosis. A high rate of genotype-phenotype disconcordance has been found in 21-hydroxylase deficiency. The goal of treatment is to replace with synthetic glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids and suppress adrenal androgen production. The treatment of patients affected with nonclassical CAH, particularly males, remains controversial. Variable synthetic glucocorticoids are used and new modes of glucocorticoid delivery are under investigation. To improve height, growth hormone and other adjuvant therapies are employed. Long-term outcomes of genital surgery using modern techniques in females affected with classical CAH continue to be investigated. Prenatal treatment with dexamethasone is available to avoid ambiguous genitalia in these females. Although studies have shown its safety to mother and fetus, prenatal treatment is still regarded as experimental. Currently, prenatal diagnosis of CAH can only be obtained through invasive methods. Recently, the detection of cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma has made it possible to make this diagnosis earlier and noninvasively. PMID:27211889

  1. Prenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Yau, Mabel; Khattab, Ahmed; New, Maria I

    2016-06-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) owing to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is a monogenic disorder of adrenal steroidogenesis. To prevent genital ambiguity, in girls, prenatal dexamethasone treatment is administered early in the first trimester. Prenatal genetic diagnosis of CAH and fetal sex determination identify affected female fetuses at risk for genital virilization. Advancements in prenatal diagnosis are owing to improved understanding of the genetic basis of CAH and improved technology. Cloning of the CYP21A2 gene ushered in molecular genetic analysis as the current standard of care. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis allows for targeted treatment and avoids unnecessary treatment of males and unaffected females. PMID:27241964

  2. A case of congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Hashemipour, Mahin; Ghasemi, Mahmoud; Hovsepian, Silva

    2012-07-01

    Lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (lipoid CAH), a rare disorder of steroid biosynthesis, is the most severe form of CAH. In this disorder the synthesis of glucocorticoids, mineralocorticoids and sex steroids is impaired which result in adrenal failure, severe salt wasting crisis and hyperpigmentation in phenotypical female infants irrespective of genetic sex. In this report, we presented a 28-day-old phenotypic female infant, which referred with lethargy, failure to thrive and electrolyte abnormalities. Considering the clinical and biochemical findings, lipoid CAH was diagnosed and replacement therapy with standard doses of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid and sodium chloride was initiated. During follow-up, she had good clinical condition, but at 6 years of age, she refers with hypertension and adrenal insufficiency because of arbitrary drug discontinuation by mother. In ultrasonography an abdominal mass (the testicles) was reported. Chromosome study showed 46XY pattern. Orchiectomy was performed. We recommended that in cases with clinical presentation of adrenal insufficiency if there is not the facility to determine the karyotype, repeated ultrasonography perform during follow-up. In addition, investigating the genetic bases of the disorder would help us to determine the pathogenesis of lipoid CAH in our community. It would be helpful in prenatal diagnosis and treatment of the disorder to prevent its related comorbidities. PMID:22891154

  3. Polycystic Ovaries Associated with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Lucis, O. J.; Hobkirk, R.; Hollenberg, C. H.; MacDonald, S. A.; Blahey, P.

    1966-01-01

    Polycystic ovaries were found in a 16-year-old female with congenital absence of vagina, male-like external genitalia, and congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Masculinization was sufficiently severe to cause the patient to be reared as a male. Biochemical studies of ovarian tissue revealed hyperactivity and an imbalance of enzyme systems concerned with steroid-hormone biosynthesis, which led to production of large amounts of androgens. The pathway towards estrogens was preserved but less efficient than normal. Urinary steroid metabolites before and after hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy revealed an absence of Porter-Silber chromogens and tetrahydrocortisone. Excretion of aldosterone was normal and that of corticosterone slightly higher than normal. The patterns of urinary 17-ketosteroids, pregnanediol, pregnanetriol and pregnanetriolone were similar to those commonly seen in congenital adrenal hyperplasia with steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Urinary estrogens after panhysterectomy were low, being in the post-menopausal range. The pathogenesis of polycystic ovaries and their possible contribution to masculinization are discussed. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:5901591

  4. Steroid 21 hydroxylase deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Nimkarn, Saroj; Lin-Su, Karen; New, Maria I

    2011-10-01

    Steroid 21 hydroxylase deficiency is the most common form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). The severity of this disorder depends on the extent of impaired enzymatic activity, which is caused by various mutations of the 21 hydroxylase gene. This article reviews adrenal steroidogenesis and the pathophysiology of 21 hydroxylase deficiency. The three forms of CAH are then discussed in terms of clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment, and genetic basis. Prenatal diagnosis and treatment are also reviewed. The goal of therapy is to correct the deficiency in cortisol secretion and suppress androgen overproduction. Glucocorticoid replacement has been the mainstay of treatment for CAH, but new treatment strategies continue to be developed and studied. PMID:21981961

  5. What Are the Treatments for Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH)? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Treatments for CAH ... pepubs/cah.pdf (PDF - 751 KB) [top] Screening, Technology and Research in Genetics ... Endocrine Society. (2010). Congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to steroid 21- ...

  6. Early Hormonal Influences on Cognitive Functioning in Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnick, Susan M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reports the results of cognitive test performance and early childhood activities in individuals with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, an autosomal recessive disorder associated with elevated prenatal adrenal androgen levels, demonstrating the effects of early exposure to excess androgenizing hormones on sexually dimorphic cognitive functioning.…

  7. An update of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    New, Maria I

    2004-12-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a family of autosomal recessive disorders caused by mutations that encode for enzymes involved in one of the various steps of adrenal steroid synthesis. These defects result in the absence or the decreased synthesis of cortisol from its cholesterol precursor. The anterior pituitary secretes excess adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) via feedback regulation by cortisol, which results in overstimulation of the adrenals and causes hyperplasia. Symptoms due to CAH can vary from mild to severe depending on the degree of ensymatic defect. In the classical form of CAH, there is a severe enzymatic defect owing to mutations in the CYP21 gene. Classically affected female fetuses undergo virilization of the genitalia prenatally and present with genital ambiguity at birth; however, prenatal treatment of CAH with dexamethasone to prevent ambiguity has been successfully utilized for over a decade. In the less severe, late-onset form of CAH, prenatal virilization does not occur. The milder enzyme deficiency was termed nonclassical 21-hydroxylase deficiency (NC21OHD) in 1979 and was later found to be the most common autosomal recessive disorder in humans. Disease frequency of NC21OHD varies between ethnic groups with the highest ethnic-specific disease frequency in Ashkenazi Jews at 1/27. NC21OHD is diagnosed by serum elevations of 17-OHP that plot on a nomogram between the range for unaffected individuals and levels observed for classical CAH and is typically confirmed with molecular genetic analysis. Similar to classical CAH, nonclassical 21-hydroxylase deficiency may cause premature development of pubic hair, advanced bone age, accelerated linear growth velocity and diminished final height in both males and females. Severe cystic acne has also been attributed to nonclassical CAH. Women may present with symptoms of androgen excess, including hirsutism, temporal baldness, and infertility. Menarche in females may be normal or delayed and

  8. [Pollicization of the Index Finger in Patients with Congenital Thumb Hypoplasia].

    PubMed

    Moser, U; Singer, G; Schmidt, B; Spendel, S

    2016-08-01

    Congenital thumb hypoplasia is a radial deficiency occurring in the form of sole dysplasia or in combination with additional aberrations. Thumb hypoplasia can be categorised into 5 grades ranging from mild deformity to complete absence of the thumb. Thumb hypoplasia leads to a disturbance of grip function depending on its severity. The choice of treatment is based on the degree of thumb hypoplasia. For hypoplasia greater than grade 3B, restoration of the thumb using pollicization of the index finger is the treatment of choice. For this purpose the index finger is transformed into a thumb and is transposed to the position of the thumb with vessels and nerves being retained. The skeleton has to be shortened, rotated and abducted, followed by reconstruction of the muscles in line with the function of the new thumb. This procedure facilitates a restoration with maximal stability, sensitivity and mobility. In cases of isolated thumb hypoplasia, pollicization of the index finger yields good results persisting into adulthood. If associated aberrations are present, the outcome is less predictable because of the preexistent stiffness of the index finger. Nevertheless, associated aberrations do not represent a contraindication for index finger pollicization. PMID:27580437

  9. Nonclassical Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Cuhaci, Neslihan; Aydın, Cevdet; Yesilyurt, Ahmet; Pınarlı, Ferda Alpaslan; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The most common form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is 21-hydroxylase (21-OH) deficiency due to mutation of the CYP21A2 gene. Patients with nonclassical CAH (NC-CAH) are usually asymptomatic at birth and typically present in late childhood, adolescence, or adulthood with symptoms of excessive androgen secretion. Subfertility is relative in NC-CAH, but the incidence of spontaneous miscarriage is higher. Here, we report a previously undiagnosed female who gave birth to a normal male child and is planning to become pregnant again. Case Report. A 32-year-old female was referred to our clinic for obesity. Her medical history revealed that she had had three pregnancies. She was planning to become pregnant again. Her laboratory results revealed that she had NC-CAH. Since her husband is the son of her aunt and she had miscarriages and intrauterin exitus in her history, their genetic analyses were performed. Conclusion. Since most patients with NC-CAH have a severe mutation, these patients may give birth to a child with the classical CAH (C-CAH) if their partner is also carrying a severe mutation. Females with NC-CAH who desire pregnancy must be aware of the risk of having an infant with C-CAH. PMID:26558116

  10. Noninvasive Prenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Khattab, Ahmed; Yuen, Tony; Sun, Li; Yau, Mabel; Barhan, Ariella; Zaidi, Mone; Lo, Y M Dennis; New, Maria I

    2016-01-01

    A major hallmark of classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is genital ambiguity noted at birth in affected females, which leads to psychological and psychosexual issues in adult life. Attempts to correct genital ambiguity through surgical intervention have been partially successful. Fetal hyperandrogenemia and genital ambiguity have been shown to be preventable by prenatal administration of low-dose dexamethasone initiated before the 9th week of gestation. In 7 of 8 at-risk pregnancies, the unaffected fetus is unnecessarily exposed to dexamethasone for weeks until the diagnosis of classical CAH is ruled out by invasive procedures. This therapeutic dilemma calls for early prenatal diagnosis so that dexamethasone treatment can be directed to affected female fetuses only. We describe the utilization of cell-free fetal DNA in mothers carrying at-risk fetuses as early as 6 gestational weeks by targeted massively parallel sequencing of the genomic region including and flanking the CYP21A2 gene. Our highly personalized and innovative approach should permit the diagnosis of CAH before genital development begins, therefore restricting the purposeful administration of dexamethasone to mothers carrying affected females. PMID:26683339

  11. Yeast artificial chromosome cloning in the glycerol kinase and adrenal hypoplasia congenita region of Xp21

    SciTech Connect

    Worley, K.C.; Ellison, K.A.; Zhang, Y.H.; Wang, D.F.; Mason, J.; Roth, E.J.; Adams, V.; Fogt, D.D.; Zhu, X.M.; Towbin, J.A.

    1993-05-01

    The adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and glycerol kinase (GK) loci are telomeric to the Duchenne muscular dystrophy locus in Xp21. The authors developed a pair of yeast artificial chromosome (YAC) contigs spanning at least 1.2 Mb and encompassing the region from the telomeric end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) locus to beyond YHX39 (DXS727), including the genes for AHC and GK. The centromeric contig consists of 13 YACs reaching more than 600 kb from DMD through GK. The telomeric contig group consists of 8 YACs containing more than 600 kb including the markers YHX39 (DXS727) and QST-59 (DXS319). Patient deletion breakpoints in the region of the two YAC contigs define at least eight intervals, and seven deletion breakpoints are contained within these contigs. In addition to the probes developed from YAC ends, they have mapped eight Alu-PCR probes amplified from a radiation-reduced somatic cell hybrid, two anonymous DNA probes, and one Alu-PCR product amplified from a cosmid end, for a total of 26 new markers within this region of 2 Mb or less. One YAC in the centromeric contig contains an insert encompassing the minimum interval for GK deficiency defined by patient deletion breakpoints, and this clone includes all or part of the GK gene. 33 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Mistaken gender identity in non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kukreti, Prerna; Kandpal, Manish; Jiloha, R. C.

    2014-01-01

    Gender identity is the sense of belonging that one feels for a particular sex psychologically and socially, independent of one's biological sex. There is much less systematic data on gender identity in females with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). We report a case of non-classical CAH presenting as a case of gender identity disorder. PMID:24891708

  13. Mediastinal stabilization by an expansion prosthesis in postoperative congenital diaphragmatic hernia with severe pulmonary hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Becmeur, F; Horta, P; Christmann, D; Donato, L; Livolsi, A; de Geeter, B; Sauvage, P

    1995-10-01

    The authors illustrate a case of right neonatal congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) of Bochdalek with major pulmonary hypoplasia and postoperative massive mediastinal displacement to the right, leading to tracheal compression and recurrent respiratory distress at every attempt to wean the infant from the ventilator. Mediastinal stabilization was obtained by placing an expansion prosthesis (of the cutaneous type) in the right hemithorax, to prevent mediastinal obstruction of the main airways. This procedure may prove to be an original and efficient solution for the critical postoperative respiratory obstruction due to severe pulmonary hypoplasia and mediastinal mass effect in the newborn with CDH. However, this may not prevent progressive scoliosis, a serious problem frequently seen in the absence of one lung. PMID:8555135

  14. The next 150 years of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Turcu, Adina F; Auchus, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasias (CAH) are a group of autosomal recessive defects in cortisol biosynthesis. Substantial progress has been made since the description of the first report, 150 years ago. This article reviews some of the recent advances in the genetics, diagnosis and treatment of CAH. In addition, we underline the aspects where further progress is required, including, among others, better diagnostic modalities for the mild phenotype and for some of the rare forms of disease, elucidation of epigenetic factors that lead to different phenotypes in patients with identical genotype and expending on treatment options for controlling the adrenal androgen excess. PMID:26047556

  15. The Next 150 Years of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Turcu, Adina F.; Auchus, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasias (CAH) are a group of autosomal recessive defects in cortisol biosynthesis. Substantial progress has been made since the description of the first report, 150 years ago. This article reviews some of the recent advances in the genetics, diagnosis and treatment of CAH. In addition, we underline the aspects where further progress is required, including, among others, better diagnostic modalities for the mild phenotype and for some of the rare forms of disease, elucidation of epigenetic factors that lead to different phenotypes in patients with identical genotype and expending on treatment options for controlling the adrenal androgen excess. PMID:26047556

  16. Prenatal treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia: risks outweigh benefits.

    PubMed

    Miller, Walter L; Witchel, Selma Feldman

    2013-05-01

    Prenatal treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia by administering dexamethasone to a woman presumed to be carrying an at-risk fetus has been described as safe and effective in several reports. A review of data from animal experimentation and human trials indicates that first-trimester dexamethasone decreases birthweight; affects renal, pancreatic beta cell, and brain development; increases anxiety; and predisposes to adult hypertension and hyperglycemia. In human studies, first-trimester dexamethasone is associated with orofacial clefts, decreased birthweight, poorer verbal working memory, and poorer self-perception of scholastic and social competence. Numerous medical societies have cautioned that prenatal treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia with dexamethasone should only be done in prospective clinical research settings with institutional review board approval, and therefore is not appropriate for routine community practice. PMID:23123167

  17. Genetics Home Reference: intrauterine growth restriction, metaphyseal dysplasia, adrenal hypoplasia congenita, and ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most severe feature of IMAGe syndrome . The adrenal glands are a pair of small glands on top ... how these genetic changes underlie the bone abnormalities, adrenal gland underdevelopment, and other signs and symptoms of this ...

  18. Diagnosis and management of classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Marumudi, Eunice; Khadgawat, Rajesh; Surana, Vineet; Shabir, Iram; Joseph, Angela; Ammini, Ariachery C

    2013-08-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is among the most common genetic disorders. Deficiency of adrenal steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency due to mutations in the CYP21A2 gene accounts for about 95% cases of CAH. This disorder manifests with androgen excess with or without salt wasting. It also is a potentially life threatening disorder; neonatal screening with 17-hydroxyprogesterone measurement can diagnose the condition in asymptomatic children. Carefully monitored therapy with glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid supplementation will ensure optimal growth and development for children with CAH. Genital surgery may be required for girls with CAH. Continued care is required for individuals with CAH as adults to prevent long-term adverse consequences of the disease, including infertility, metabolic syndrome and osteoporosis. PMID:23624029

  19. A case of androgen-secreting adrenal carcinoma with non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Varma, Tarun; Panchani, Roopal; Goyal, Ashutosh; Maskey, Robin

    2013-10-01

    Androgen excess is one of the most common and disturbing endocrine disorder of reproductive-aged women, affecting approximately 7% of this population Androgen excess results in the development of androgenic features in the women affected, with the development of hirsutism, androgenic alopecia, ovulatory dysfunction, and, if extreme, even virilization and masculinization. Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy accounting for 0.02% of all annual cancers reported. About 60% are functional tumors secreting hormones, with its consequent clinical manifestations, the Cushing's syndrome due to cortisone, virilization due to androgens, feminization due to estrogens, or hypertension due to aldosterone. Adrenal tumors that secrete androgens exclusively are extremely rare. Here, we present a rare case of androgen-secreting adrenocortical carcinoma with non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia. PMID:24251173

  20. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia: issues in diagnosis and treatment in children.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rajni; Seth, Anju

    2014-02-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a common disorder of impaired adrenal cortisol biosynthesis with associated androgen excess. The clinical presentation of 21-hydroxylase deficiency, the commonest cause of CAH, forms a spectrum and can be divided into classic and non-classic types. The former consists of life threatening salt wasting and non-life threatening simple virilizing phenotypes. Patients with the non-classic form are asymptomatic or have mild features of androgen excess. Most developed countries have newborn screening facilities for CAH. In the absence of newborn screening, the diagnosis of CAH may be missed or delayed. This can result in neonatal mortality in salt wasting forms and incorrect sex of rearing in females with simple virilizing form. The diagnosis is reached by demonstrating high serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17OHP) levels. Preterm birth and neonatal illness can cause physiological elevation of 17OHP, thus complicating the diagnosis of CAH in the newborn period. Prenatal diagnosis and treatment with dexamethasone to prevent virilization of affected female fetuses is another area of controversy. The management of CAH is complicated by the need to use supraphysiologic doses of glucocorticoids to suppress adrenal androgen synthesis. In this review, the authors address pertinent issues related to the diagnosis and management of CAH in children. PMID:24254335

  1. Staged Transcatheter Treatment of Portal Hypoplasia and Congenital Portosystemic Shunts in Children

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckheimer, Elchanan Dagan, Tamir; Atar, Eli; Schwartz, Michael; Kachko, Ludmila; Superina, Riccardo; Amir, Gabriel; Shapiro, Rivka; Birk, Einat

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) with portal venous hypoplasia cause hyperammonemia. Acute shunt closure results in portal hypertension. A transcatheter method of staged shunt reduction to afford growth of portal vessels followed by shunt closure is reported. Methods: Pressure measurements and angiography in the CPSS or superior mesenteric artery (SMA) during temporary occlusion of the shunt were performed. If vessels were diminutive and the pressure was above 18 mmHg, a staged approach was performed, which included implantation of a tailored reducing stent to reduce shunt diameter by {approx}50 %. Recatheterization was performed approximately 3 months later. If the portal pressure was below 18 mmHg and vessels had developed, the shunt was closed with a device. Results: Six patients (5 boys, 1 girl) with a median age of 3.3 (range 0.5-13) years had CPSS portal venous hypoplasia and hyperammonemia. Five patients underwent staged closure. One patient tolerated acute closure. One patient required surgical shunt banding because a reducing stent could not be positioned. At median follow-up of 3.8 (range 2.2-8.4) years, a total of 21 procedures (20 transcatheter, 1 surgical) were performed. In all patients, the shunt was closed with a significant reduction in portal pressure (27.7 {+-} 11.3 to 10.8 {+-} 1.8 mmHg; p = 0.016), significant growth of the portal vessels (0.8 {+-} 0.5 to 4.0 {+-} 2.4 mm; p = 0.037), and normalization of ammonia levels (202.1 {+-} 53.6 to 65.7 {+-} 9.6 {mu}mol/L; p = 0.002) with no complications. Conclusion: Staged CPSS closure is effective in causing portal vessel growth and treating hyperammonemia.

  2. Isolated Congenital Unilateral Agenesis of the Left Pulmonary Artery with Left Lung Hypoplasia in an Asymptomatic Adult Patient

    PubMed Central

    Emren, Sadık Volkan; Tülüce, Selcen Yakar; Tülüce, Kamil

    2015-01-01

    The congenital unilateral agenesis of pulmonary artery is a congenital cardiovascular anomaly rarely seen in adulthood. A 21-year-old asymptomatic male was admitted to our hospital to obtain a routine health report to accompany a job application. Posteroanterior chest radiograph revealed a mediastinal shift to the left, with increased radiopacity in the left lung and increased radiolucency in the right lung. Thoracoabdominal computed tomography revealed hypoplasia of the left pulmonary artery. Transthoracic echocardiography excluded any accompanying cardiac abnormalities. Pulmonary angiography was undertaken and confirmed diffuse hypoplasia of the left pulmonary artery while right pulmonary artery was significantly enlarged. The patient’s pulmonary artery pressure was within the normal limits, after which he decided to be carefully followed-up. PMID:27122926

  3. Approach to the Patient: The Adult With Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Arlt, Wiebke

    2013-01-01

    The most common form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia is steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD). When the nonclassical (mild) form is included, 21OHD is the most common genetic disease in human beings. With the advent of pharmaceutical preparation of glucocorticoids starting in the 1960s and newborn screening starting in the 1990s, the majority of children with 21OHD are reaching adulthood, which has yielded a cohort of patients with, in essence, a new disease. Only recently have some data emerged from cohorts of adults with 21OHD, and in some centers, experience with the management of these patients is growing. These patients suffer from poor health, infertility, characteristic tumors in the adrenal glands and gonads, and consequences of chronic glucocorticoid therapy. Their care is fragmented and inconsistent, and many stop taking their medications out of frustration. Internal medicine residents and endocrinology fellows receive little training in their care, which further discourages their seeking medical attention. Adults with 21OHD have a different physiology from patients with Addison's disease or other androgen excess states, and their needs are different than those of young children with 21OHD. Consequently, their care requires unorthodox treatment and monitoring strategies foreign to most endocrine practitioners. Our goal for this article is to review their physiology, complications, and needs in order to develop rational and effective treatment and monitoring strategies. PMID:23837188

  4. Physiological Basis for the Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Adrenal Disorders: Cushing’s Syndrome, Adrenal Insufficiency, and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Raff, Hershel; Sharma, Susmeeta T.; Nieman, Lynnette K.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a classic neuroendocrine system. One of the best ways to understand the HPA axis is to appreciate its dynamics in the variety of diseases and syndromes that affect it. Excess glucocorticoid activity can be due to endogenous cortisol overproduction (spontaneous Cushing’s syndrome) or exogenous glucocorticoid therapy (iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome). Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome can be subdivided into ACTH-dependent and ACTH-independent, the latter of which is usually due to autonomous adrenal overproduction. The former can be due to a pituitary corticotroph tumor (usually benign) or ectopic ACTH production from tumors outside the pituitary; both of these tumor types overexpress the proopiomelanocortin gene. The converse of Cushing’s syndrome is the lack of normal cortisol secretion and is usually due to adrenal destruction (primary adrenal insufficiency) or hypopituitarism (secondary adrenal insufficiency). Secondary adrenal insufficiency can also result from a rapid discontinuation of long-term, pharmacological glucocorticoid therapy because of HPA axis suppression and adrenal atrophy. Finally, mutations in the steroidogenic enzymes of the adrenal cortex can lead to congenital adrenal hyperplasia and an increase in precursor steroids, particularly androgens. When present in utero, this can lead to masculinization of a female fetus. An understanding of the dynamics of the HPA axis is necessary to master the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of pituitary-adrenal diseases. Furthermore, understanding the pathophysiology of the HPA axis gives great insight into its normal control. PMID:24715566

  5. Genetics Home Reference: congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Intersex Society of North America MalaCards: adrenal hyperplasia, congenital, due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency March of Dimes: Genital and Urinary Tract Defects Merck Manual Consumer Version: The Body's Control ...

  6. Influence of breast feeding on the clinical features of salt-losing congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Joseph A; Bailey, John D

    1983-01-01

    Feeding habits before diagnosis were reviewed in 32 infants with salt-losing congenital adrenal hyperplasia who were admitted to hospital in adrenal crisis. Most breast-fed babies failed to thrive, seldom vomited, and despite severe salt wasting, presented at a later age than their formula-fed counterparts. PMID:6830279

  7. Nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia misdiagnosed as Turner syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vineet V.; Pritti, Kumari; Aggarwal, Rohina; Choudhary, Sumesh

    2015-01-01

    We present a patient with nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH) misdiagnosed as mosaic Turner syndrome. She presented with complaints of primary infertility. Short stature, the presence of facial hair and hoarse voice was also noted. She had primary amenorrhea and was advised for karyotype at 16 years of age, which was reported as 45, X[20]/46, XX[80], stating her as a case of mosaic Turner syndrome. Clitoroplasty was done at 21 years of age for clitoromegaly, which was noticed during puberty. The diagnosis of mosaic Turner could not explain the virilization. Therefore, we repeated the karyotype, which revealed 46, XX in more than 100 metaphases and was sufficient to exclude mosaicism. Furthermore, the endocrinological evaluation revealed high testosterone level with a normal 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP). The presence of pubertal onset virilization with a karyotype of 46, XX and raised testosterone level with normal 17-OHP level, raised the suspicion of NCAH for which adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test was done which confirmed the diagnosis of NCAH. PMID:26751945

  8. Nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia misdiagnosed as Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Vineet V; Pritti, Kumari; Aggarwal, Rohina; Choudhary, Sumesh

    2015-01-01

    We present a patient with nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH) misdiagnosed as mosaic Turner syndrome. She presented with complaints of primary infertility. Short stature, the presence of facial hair and hoarse voice was also noted. She had primary amenorrhea and was advised for karyotype at 16 years of age, which was reported as 45, X[20]/46, XX[80], stating her as a case of mosaic Turner syndrome. Clitoroplasty was done at 21 years of age for clitoromegaly, which was noticed during puberty. The diagnosis of mosaic Turner could not explain the virilization. Therefore, we repeated the karyotype, which revealed 46, XX in more than 100 metaphases and was sufficient to exclude mosaicism. Furthermore, the endocrinological evaluation revealed high testosterone level with a normal 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP). The presence of pubertal onset virilization with a karyotype of 46, XX and raised testosterone level with normal 17-OHP level, raised the suspicion of NCAH for which adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test was done which confirmed the diagnosis of NCAH. PMID:26751945

  9. [Contemporary diagnosis and therapy in women with congenital adrenal hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Maciejewska-Jeske, Marzena; Meczekalski, Błazej

    2013-11-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is an autosomal recessive defect in steroidogenesis, mostly affecting 21-hydroxylase enzyme deficiency. The other seldom cortisol synthesis abnormalities include deficiencies of: 11beta-hydroxylase, 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 17beta-hydroxylase, 17,20-lase and 11 beta-hydroxysteroid dwehydrogenase type 1. There are three main types, depending on the clinical level of 21-hydroxylase deficiency: (1) classical form--salt-wasting CAH (2) the classical form non- salt-wasting (3) non-classical form. CAH incidence is estimated at 1/14 000-1/10 000, of which about 70% is the classic salt-wasting form. The clinical picture varies considerably depending on the form. In the classic salt-wasting CAH may develop into the a shock. In classic CAH without loss of salt dominates virilization in girls and precocious puberty in boys. A non-classical forms usually presents as hyperandrogenisation and fertility. CAH treatment is mainly based on the use of glucocorticoid therapy, and if necessary supplemented mineralocorticoids. There is also potential to consider prenatal treatment (female fetuses diagnosed as CAH) with the use of dexamethason. However this kind of treatment is related to some medical and ethical controversies. PMID:24575652

  10. Microcephaly with agenesis of corticospinal tracts and arthrogryposis, hypospadias, single umbilical artery, hypertelorism, and renal and adrenal hypoplasia--previously undescribed syndrome.

    PubMed

    Coad, J E; Angel, C; Pierpont, M E; Gorlin, R J; Anderson, M L

    1997-09-01

    We describe a small, term, male infant with corticospinal tract aplasia secondary to motor cortex dysplasia from a neuronal proliferation and/or migrational defect. The infant also had microdolichocephaly, sloping forehead, hypertelorism, flat nose, apparently low-set ears, micrognathia, arthrogryposis without muscle wasting, cortical thumbs, rocker-bottom feet, scoliosis, single umbilical artery, and hypospadias with chordee. Oligohydramnios was present prenatally. Neurologic examination showed a comatose state, seizures, minimal spontaneous movement, minimal response to pain, and absent primitive reflexes. At autopsy, hypoplasia of kidneys and adrenal glands was found. There was no aqueductal stenosis or pulmonary hypoplasia. Chromosomes were apparently normal. These manifestations do not correspond to those of any recognized syndrome; therefore, this patient may represent a previously undefined syndrome. PMID:9286455

  11. Newborn screening for congenital adrenal hyperplasia in New York State.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Melissa; DeMartino, Lenore; McMahon, Rebecca; Hamel, Rhonda; Maloney, Breanne; Stansfield, Daniele-Marisa; McGrath, Emily C; Occhionero, Amanda; Gearhart, Adam; Caggana, Michele; Tavakoli, Norma P

    2016-06-01

    From 2007 to 2014 the New York State (NYS) Newborn Screening (NBS) program screened 2 million newborns for congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). The data was analyzed to determine factors that affect 17α-hydroxyprogesterone levels and assist in developing algorithm changes that would improve the positive predictive value of the methodology being used. The concentration of 17-OHP in dried blood spots was measured using the AutoDELFIA Neonatal 17-OHP kit (Perkin Elmer, Turku, Finland). During the 8 year period of this study 2476 babies were referred, 105 babies were diagnosed with CAH (90 with the salt-wasting (SW), 8 with simple virilizing (SV), 5 with non-classical CAH, and 2 with another enzyme deficiency) and, 14 with possible CAH. Three false negative cases with SV-CAH were reported to the program. Of the total 108 known cases, 74 (69%) infants were detected by newborn screening in the absence of clinical information, or, known family history. The incidence of CAH in NYS is 1 in 18,170 with a ratio of SW to SV of 8.2:1. The incidence of CAH is lower in Black infants than in White, Hispanic and Asian infants. Despite a lower mean birth weight, female infants have a lower mean 17-OHP value than male infants and are under-represented in the referred category. As per other NBS programs the false positive rate is exacerbated by prematurity/low birth weight and by over-early specimen collection. PMID:27331001

  12. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia secondary to 11beta-hydroxylase deficiency in a domestic cat.

    PubMed

    Knighton, Elizabeth L

    2004-07-15

    A calico-colored domestic shorthair cat was examined because of possible cryptorchidism. The cat had a fully formed penis, prepuce, and scrotum, but no descended testes, and exploratory laparotomy revealed a grossly normal female internal genital tract (ie, 2 ovaries, 2 uterine horns, and uterine body). Chromosomal analysis revealed a normal female (38,XX) karyotype. Four months later, the cat was examined because of polyuria, polydipsia, and inappropriate urination. Serum cortisol and aldosterone concentrations were low, and results of an ACTH stimulation test were suggestive of decreased adrenal gland function. Serum ACTH, testosterone, androstenedione, progesterone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, 11-deoxycortisol, and deoxycorticosterone concentrations were high, and a diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia secondary to 11beta-hydroxylase deficiency was made. Treatment with prednisone diminished clinical signs but had a variable effect on corticosteroids hormone concentrations. To the author's knowledge, this is the first report of congenital adrenal hyperplasia in a cat. PMID:15323380

  13. Unknown syndrome: ischiadic hypoplasia, renal dysfunction, immunodeficiency, and a pattern of minor congenital anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Braegger, C; Bottani, A; Hallé, F; Giedion, A; Leumann, E; Seger, R; Willi, U; Schinzel, A

    1991-01-01

    We report a 6 year old male with a pattern of malformations and anomalies including intrauterine growth retardation, microcephaly, psychomotor retardation, a pattern of craniofacial anomalies (flat face, hypertelorism, epicanthic folds, strabismus, short nose, low set ears), hypospadias and cryptorchidism, bilateral partial cutaneous syndactyly between fingers 2 to 5 and toes 2 to 4, postaxial polydactyly of the fingers and toes, severe conductive hearing loss, hypoplasia of the ischiadic bones, complex renal dysfunction, hypogammaglobulinaemia with proneness to bacterial infections of the upper and lower respiratory tract, and recurrent pseudomembranous enterocolitis. The parents are cousins of Turkish origin. Images PMID:1999836

  14. A patient with refractory testicular adrenal rest tumour in the setting of cyp11b1 deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Mohammad Reza; Rezvanian, Hassan; Siavash, Mansour; Parham, Mahmoud; Mahzouni, Parvin

    2009-01-01

    Testicular adrenal rest tumour (TART) due to CYP11B1 deficiency is a very rare clinical finding. Only seven cases have been reported previously. Here, the case of a 19-year-old boy with classic CYP11B1 deficiency and large testicles refractory to medical treatment that led to orchidectomy is reported. The clinical and laboratory manifestations of this patient are discussed and compared with that of the previously reported cases. The patient presented with rapid body growth, precocious puberty, hypertension, recurrent hypokalaemic paralysis and testicular enlargement. The most important differential diagnosis of his latter presentation is Leydig cell tumour (LCT). It was found that positive family history of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), hypertension, bilaterality, hypokalaemia and multiple hypoechoic masses on ultrasonography of the testes are in favour of a diagnosis of TART. Conversely, high titres of tumour markers and presence of Reinke crystalloids are supportive of a diagnosis of LCT. PMID:21686875

  15. Thumb hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Soldado, Francisco; Zlotolow, Dan A; Kozin, Scott H

    2013-07-01

    Thumb hypoplasia, congenital underdevelopment of the thumb, can range from a slight decrease in thumb size to complete absence of the thumb. As part of the radial longitudinal deficiency spectrum, other organ systems may be affected as well. Hence, the global health of the child should be addressed before focusing on the thumb. The decision of whether to reconstruct the existing thumb or to ablate the thumb and perform a pollicization of the index finger hinges primarily on the examination of trapeziometacarpal joint stability. Ultrasound imaging may play a role in decision making in borderline cases. The ultimate goal of surgical treatment is to provide a stable and functional thumb. PMID:23702392

  16. New Recessive Syndrome of Microcephaly, Cerebellar Hypoplasia, and Congenital Heart Conduction Defect

    PubMed Central

    Zaki, Maha S; Salam, Ghada M H Abdel; Saleem, Sahar N; Dobyns, William B; Issa, Mahmoud Y; Sattar, Shifteh; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2011-01-01

    We identified a two-branch consanguineous family in which four affected members (three females and one male) presented with constitutive growth delay, severe psychomotor retardation, microcephaly, cerebellar hypoplasia, and second-degree heart block. They also shared distinct facial features and similar appearance of their hands and feet. Childhood-onset insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus developed in one affected child around the age of 9 years. Molecular analysis excluded mutations in potentially related genes such as PTF1A, EIF2AK3, EOMES, and WDR62. This condition appears to be unique of other known conditions, suggesting a unique clinical entity of autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22002884

  17. Cardiovascular malformations in DiGeorge syndrome (congenital absence of hypoplasia of the thymus).

    PubMed Central

    Moerman, P; Goddeeris, P; Lauwerijns, J; Van der Hauwaert, L G

    1980-01-01

    Partial or complete absence of the thymus (DiGeorge syndrome, III-IV pharyngeal pouch syndrome) is often associated with agenesis or hypoplasia of the parathyroid glands and, almost invariably, with cardiovascular malformations. The clinical and pathologcial findings in 10 cases proven at necropsy are presented. All patients presented with cardiac symptoms and signs in the first weeks of life and, with one exception, all died of a cardiac cause. Major cardiovascular malformations were found in all 10 cases. Four had, in association with a ventricular septal defect of the infundibular type, an interrupted aortic arch, which was left-sided in two and right-sided in two other cases. Four patients had truncus arteriosus type I, in two of them associated with a right-sided aortic arch. Two patients with tetralogy of Fallot had a right-sided aortic arch. Only two of the 10 had a normally developed left aortic arch. Aberrant subclavian arteries were found in five cases. From our observations and a survey of the previously published patients it appears that 90 per cent of the necropsy-proven cases of DiGeorge syndrome have cardiovascular malformations and that 95 per cent of these malformations can be classified as aortic arch anomalies, truncus ateriosus, or tetralogy of Fallot. Images PMID:7426208

  18. Feminising genitoplasty: one-stage genital reconstruction in congenital adrenal hyperplasia: 30 years' experience.

    PubMed

    Roll, M F; Kneppo, C; Roth, H; Bettendorf, M; Waag, K-L; Holland-Cunz, S

    2006-10-01

    The study objective is to evaluate the results of our surgical technique for children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia and ambiguous genitalia at the University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Paediatric Surgery. The records of 19 patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia treated between 1972 and 2004 were reviewed with respect to age at surgery, operative procedures and outcome. We describe the recession clitoroplasty technique currently used in our hospital and highlight the importance of short and long-term follow-up results with respect to appearance, position and size of the clitoris and quality of the vagina. One-stage recession clitoroplasty and vaginoplasty gives very satisfactory cosmetic and functional results, with few complications and a reduced need for secondary surgical interventions. The results of this study support the assumption that total correction can be achieved through a single-stage operation, performed in infancy. PMID:17160777

  19. Prenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Lipoid Adrenal Hyperplasia (CLAH) by Molecular Genetic Testing in Korean Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Hyun Sun; Lee, Seungok; Chae, Hyojin; Choi, Sae Kyung; Kim, Myungshin; Park, In Yang; Suh, Byung Kyu

    2011-01-01

    Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (CLAH) is caused by mutations to the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene associated with the inability to synthesize all adrenal and gonadal steroids. Inadequate treatment in an infant with this condition may result in sudden death from an adrenal crisis. We report a case in which CLAH developed in Korean siblings; the second child was prenatally diagnosed because the first child was affected and low maternal serum estriol was detected in a prenatal screening test. To our knowledge, this is the first prenatal diagnosis of the Q258X StAR mutation, which is the only consistent genetic cluster identified to date in Japanese and Korean populations. PMID:22028173

  20. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (CLAH) by molecular genetic testing in Korean siblings.

    PubMed

    Ko, Hyun Sun; Lee, Seungok; Chae, Hyojin; Choi, Sae Kyung; Kim, Myungshin; Park, In Yang; Suh, Byung Kyu; Shin, Jong Chul

    2011-11-01

    Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (CLAH) is caused by mutations to the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene associated with the inability to synthesize all adrenal and gonadal steroids. Inadequate treatment in an infant with this condition may result in sudden death from an adrenal crisis. We report a case in which CLAH developed in Korean siblings; the second child was prenatally diagnosed because the first child was affected and low maternal serum estriol was detected in a prenatal screening test. To our knowledge, this is the first prenatal diagnosis of the Q258X StAR mutation, which is the only consistent genetic cluster identified to date in Japanese and Korean populations. PMID:22028173

  1. In vitro gene amplification for prenatal diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Rumsby, G; Honour, J W

    1990-01-01

    A simple, rapid, non-radioactive method for detecting homozygous deletions/conversions of the steroid 21-hydroxylase gene is described. In our experience this method will be useful for first trimester prenatal diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia in 17% of families of a child with the salt losing form. This test includes an internal control to monitor the success of amplification. Images PMID:2277381

  2. Prostate gland development and adrenal tumor in a female with congenital adrenal hyperplasia: a case report and review from radiology perspective.

    PubMed

    Fang, Benjamin; Cho, Francis; Lam, Wendy

    2013-12-01

    We describe a case of a female with simple virilizing congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) reared as a male diagnosed at the late age of 64. Computed Tomography (CT) demonstrated a large adrenal mass, bilateral diffuse adrenal enlargement, female pelvic organs as well as a clearly visualized prostate gland. This is to the best of our knowledge the first case of such a sizable prostate gland in a female CAH patient documented on CT. We review the literature regarding aspects where radiologists may encounter CAH and the finding of presence of a prostate gland in female CAH patients. PMID:24421935

  3. Primary adrenal insufficiency caused by a novel mutation in DAX1 gene.

    PubMed

    Evliyaoğlu, Olcay; Dokurel, İpek; Bucak, Feride; Özcabı, Bahar; Ercan, Özcabı; Ceylaner, Serdar

    2013-01-01

    Adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) is a rare disorder. The X-linked form is related to mutations in the DAX1 (NROB1) gene. Here, we report a newborn who had a novel hemizygous frameshift mutation in DAX1(c.543delA) and presented with primary adrenal failure that was initially misdiagnosed as congenital adrenal hyperplasia. This report highlights the value of genetic testing for definite diagnosis in children with primary adrenal failure due to abnormal adrenal gland development, providing the possibility both for presymptomatic, and in cases with a sibling with this condition, for prenatal diagnosis. PMID:23367499

  4. Thyroid hypoplasia as a cause of congenital hypothyroidism in monozygotic twins concordant for Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Akın, Mustafa Ali; Güneş, Tamer; Akın, Leyla; Çoban, Dilek; Oncu, Sena Kara; Kiraz, Aslıhan; Kurtoğlu, Selim

    2011-01-01

    Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RSTS), a genetic disorder characterized by growth retardation, mental deficiency, dysmorphic face, broad thumbs and large toes, generally affects monozygotic twins concordantly. Thyroid hypoplasia (TH) is a common cause of congenital hypothyroidism (CH) and often accompanies dysmorphic syndromes. A pair of female twins were admitted to our neonatology unit 16 hours after delivery. They were born at 35 weeks of gestation. Both twins had an unusual dysmorphic facial appearance with microcephaly, as well as broad short thumbs and large toes. Based on the presence of characteristic dysmorphic features, the twins were diagnosed as RSTS. Thyroid function tests in the first twin revealed the following results: free thyroxine (T4) 8.4 pg/mL, thyrotropin (TSH) 4.62 mIU/L, thyroglobulin (TG) 213.24 ng/mL and a normal level of urinary iodine excretion (UIE). Thyroid function test results in the second twin in the second week were: free T4 5.9 pg/mL, TSH 9.02 mIU/L, TG 204.87 ng/mL, and normal UIE levels. Thyroid volumes were 0.36 mL and 0.31 mL in the first and second twin, respectively. TH was confirmed by technetium 99 m pertechnetate thyroid scans in both infants. Thyroid function tests normalized with L-thyroxine replacement therapy (10 μg/kg/day) around the end of the 3(rd) week of life. The infants were discharged planning their follow-up by both endocrinology and cardiology units. The rarity of cases of twins with RSTS (concordant) co-existing with CH led us to present this report. PMID:21448332

  5. [Adrenalitis].

    PubMed

    Saeger, W

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation of the adrenal glands is caused by autoimmunopathies or infections and can induce adrenal insufficiency. Autoimmune lymphocytic adrenalitis is often combined with other autoimmune diseases and the most frequent cause of Addison's disease; however, it only becomes clinically apparent when more than 90 % of the adrenal cortex has been destroyed. Histological features are characterized by lymphoplasmacytic inflammation leading to an increased destruction of adrenocortical tissue but less severe courses can also occur. The second most frequent form of adrenalitis is adrenal tuberculosis, showing typical granulomatous findings that are nearly always caused by spreading from a tuberculous pulmonary focus. Other bacterial as well as viral infections, such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) and others, generally affect the adrenal glands only in patients with immunodeficiency disorders. In these infections, the adrenal cortex and medulla are frequently involved to roughly the same extent. Although surgical specimens from inflammatory adrenal lesions are extremely rare, the various forms of adrenalitis play an important role in the post-mortem examination of the adrenal glands for clarification of unclear causes of death (e.g. death during an Addisonian crisis). PMID:27099224

  6. X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: Identification and in vitro study of a novel small indel in the NR0B1 gene.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tingting; Wang, Jian; Yu, Yongguo; Huang, Xiaodong; Fu, Qihua; Shen, Yiping; Chen, Fuxiang

    2016-05-01

    DAX1 is an orphan nuclear receptor that has a key role in the development and function of the adrenal and reproductive axes. Mutations in NR0B1, the gene encoding DAX1, result in X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HHG). A Chinese pedigree with X-linked AHC and HHG was investigated in the present study. Sequence analysis identified a novel small indel variant, c.195_207delinsTG, in the NR0B1 gene. To determine the effect of this variant on DAX1 expression, reverse‑transcription quantitative PCR and western blot assays were performed. The mRNA expression levels in carriers of mutant NR0B1 were significantly reduced (62% decrease) compared to those in individuals with wild-type NR0B1 (WT). The c.195_207delinsTG mutation was demonstrated to lead to various truncated DAX1 proteins, including the C‑terminal truncated DAX1, which was only detected in the cytoplasm, and the N‑terminal truncated DAX1, which was present in the cytoplasm and nucleus. A luciferase assay was then performed to assess the repressor function of DAX1 in modulating steroidogenic factor 1 (SF‑1)‑mediated transactivation. WT DAX1 significantly suppressed the SF‑1‑mediated promoter activity of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein by 35.5±1.9%. In contrast to other known pathogenic mutations which abolish the repressor function of DAX1, the c.195_207delinsTG mutant proxkduced a higher repressor activity, demonstrating a 49.9±2.6% reduction of promoter activity. These findings suggested that the mutation of NR0B1 in X‑linked AHC with HHG enhanced the function of DAX1 to repress SF-1 activation, while DAX1 is expected to have additional roles in the pathological mechanism. PMID:27035099

  7. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia--pharmacologic interventions from the prenatal phase to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Claahsen-van der Grinten, H L; Stikkelbroeck, N M M L; Otten, B J; Hermus, A R M M

    2011-10-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is one of the most common inherited autosomal recessive disorders, caused by deficiency of one of the enzymes involved in steroid synthesis. The clinical picture of the most prevalent form, i.e. 21-hydroxylase deficiency, is characterized by cortisol and mostly aldosterone deficiency and androgen excess (leading to congenital virilization in girls). Treatment consists of glucocorticoids, aimed at substitution of cortisol deficiency and, decrease of androgen excess. Usually supraphysiological doses of glucocorticoids are required to effectively suppress adrenal androgens. Furthermore, with the currently available glucocorticoid preparations, it is not possible to simulate a normal circadian rhythm in CAH patients. Therefore, it is a difficult task for (pediatric) endocrinologists to find the best balance between under- and overtreatment thereby avoiding important long term complications. In this review we will discuss the current pharmacologic treatment options. We give age dependent dose recommendations and describe the limitations of current treatment strategies. We discuss effects on fertility, bone density and cardiovascular risks. Recommendations about the use of glucocorticoids in case of fever or stress situations are given. The principles of treatment of non classic (mild) CAH are discussed in a separate section. Also prenatal therapy, to prevent congenital virilization of a female CAH newborn, is discussed. Furthermore, an overview of alternative pharmacological treatment options in the future is given. PMID:21635919

  8. Fetal endocrine therapy for congenital adrenal hyperplasia should not be done.

    PubMed

    Miller, Walter L

    2015-06-01

    Prenatal treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia by administering dexamethasone to a woman presumed to be carrying an at-risk fetus remains a controversial experimental treatment. Review of data from animal experimentation and human trials indicates that dexamethasone cannot be considered safe for the fetus. In animals, prenatal dexamethasone decreases birth weight, affects renal, pancreatic beta cell and brain development, increases anxiety and predisposes to adult hypertension and hyperglycemia. In human studies, prenatal dexamethasone is associated with orofacial clefts, decreased birth weight, poorer verbal working memory, and poorer self-perception of scholastic and social competence. Numerous medical societies have cautioned that prenatal treatment of adrenal hyperplasia with dexamethasone is not appropriate for routine clinical practice and should only be done in Institutional Review Board approved, prospective clinical research settings with written informed consent. The data indicate that this treatment is inconsistent with the classic medical ethical maxim to 'first do no harm'. PMID:26051303

  9. [Congenital adrenal hyperplasia caused by 11beta-hydroxylase deficiency. A case report].

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Jadwiga; Bohdanowicz-Pawlak, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The authors describe a case of an adult woman with congenital adrenal hyperplasia caused by 11beta-hydroxylase deficiency. The patient presented not only typical features of this disease such as virilization and hypokaliemic hypertension but also rare pathologies, such as ectopic adrenal tissues, salt loss during infancy, and functional adrenomedullary hyperactivity. In spite of the severe disease and delays in its diagnosis and adequate treatment, significant improvement in appearance and normalization of blood pressure as well as the birth of a healthy child were achieved. The paper also discusses current opinions concerning the pathogenesis and treatment in CAH with 11beta-hydroxylase deficiency as well as difficulties in diagnostic and therapeutic management. PMID:19347818

  10. p.R182C mutation in Korean twin with congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Won; Kwak, Byung Ok; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Yoo, Han-Wook; Chung, Sochung

    2013-03-01

    Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (CLAH) is the most severe form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia which is caused by mutations in the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). The mutations in StAR gene resulted in failure of the transport cholesterol into mitochondria for steroidogenesis in the adrenal gland. Twin sisters (A, B) with normal 46, XX were born at 36+2 gestational week, premature to nonrelated parents. They had symptoms as hyperpigmentation, slightly elevated potassium level and low level of sodium. Laboratory finding revealed normal 17-hydroxyprogesterone level, elevated adrenocorticotropin hormone (A, 4,379.2 pg/mL; B, 11,616.1 pg/mL), and high plasma renin activity (A, 49.02 ng/mL/hr; B, 52.7 ng mL/hr). However, the level of plasma cortisol before treatment was low (1.5 µg/dL) in patient B but normal (8.71 µg/dL) in patient A. Among them, only patient A was presented with adrenal insufficiency symptoms which was suggestive of CLAH and prompted us to order a gene analysis in both twin. The results of gene analysis of StAR in twin revealed same heterozygous conditions for c.544C>T (Arg182Cys) in exon 5 and c.722C>T (Gln258(*)) in exon 7. We report the first case on the mutation of p.R182C in exon 5 of the StAR gene in Korea. PMID:24904850

  11. Woman with virilizing congenital adrenal hyperplasia and Leydig cell tumor of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Fernández-García Salazar, Rosario; Muñoz-Darias, Carmen; Haro-Mora, Juan Jesús; Almaraz, M Cruz; Audí, Laura; Martínez-Tudela, Juana; Yahyaoui, Raquel; Esteva, Isabel

    2014-08-01

    We report the case of a 36-year-old woman with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency, and corticosteroid replacement therapy since birth. She manifested persistent virilization and high testosterone levels that were attributed to nonadherence to medical treatment. The patient was referred to our gender unit for genitoplastic surgery. We recommended the patient for left oophorectomy after detecting an ovarian mass. Pathologic findings confirmed an ovarian hilus cell tumor. Testosterone levels fell back to normal and masculinization disappeared but ACTH remained elevated. This case represents a very rare type of primary ovarian tumor that must be considered in persistent virilizing symptoms in women with CAH. PMID:24702195

  12. High 17-hydroxyprogesterone level in newborn screening test for congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Levy-Shraga, Yael; Pinhas-Hamiel, Orit

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a female infant with an elevated 17-hydroxyprogesterone level detected in the newborn screening for 21-hydroxylase deficiency, the most common cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. The physical examination was unremarkable including no dysmorphism and no signs of virilisation. In the absence of clinical evidence of androgen excess, as would be expected in a female infant with 21-hydroxylase deficiency, further evaluation was performed and led to the diagnosis of the extremely rare disorder, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency. This case highlights the differential diagnosis of elevated 17-hydroxyprogesterone levels in newborn screening and the importance of correct diagnosis for improving patient care. PMID:26912766

  13. Untreated Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia with 17-α Hydroxylase/17,20-Lyase Deficiency Presenting as Massive Adrenocortical Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su Jin; Song, Je Eun; Hwang, Sena; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Park, Hye-Sun; Han, Seunghee

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) with 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency is usually characterized by hypertension and primary amenorrhea, sexual infantilism in women, and pseudohermaphroditism in men. hypertension, and sexual infantilism in women and pseudohermaphroditism in men. In rare cases, a huge adrenal gland tumor can present as a clinical manifestation in untreated CAH. Adrenal cortical adenoma is an even more rare phenotype in CAH with 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency. A 36-year-old female presented with hypertension and abdominal pain caused by a huge adrenal mass. Due to mass size and symptoms, left adrenalectomy was performed. After adrenalectomy, blood pressure remained high. Based on hormonal and genetic evaluation, the patient was diagnosed as CAH with 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency. The possibility of a tumorous change in the adrenal gland due to untreated CAH should be considered. It is important that untreated CAH not be misdiagnosed as primary adrenal tumor as these conditions require different treatments. Adequate suppression of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in CAH is also important to treat and to prevent the tumorous changes in the adrenal gland. Herein, we report a case of untreated CAH with 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency presenting with large adrenal cortical adenoma and discuss the progression of adrenal gland hyperplasia due to inappropriate suppression of ACTH secretion. PMID:26248854

  14. Molecular and structural analysis of two novel StAR mutations in patients with lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Achermann, J C; Meeks, J J; Jeffs, B; Das, U; Clayton, P E; Brook, C G; Jameson, J L

    2001-08-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) cause lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia. We report a novel homozygous splice site mutation (IVS1 + 2T --> G) in STAR in two sisters (46XY, 46XX) who presented with primary adrenal insufficiency at birth and a novel homozygous R182H missense mutation in the putative lipid transfer domain of StAR in a phenotypic female (46XY) with adrenal failure and a parotid tumor. These cases highlight the importance of StAR-dependent steroidogenesis during fetal development and early infancy and of the critical functional role of R182 in cholesterol transport. PMID:11509019

  15. Congenital Medial Meniscus Hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Benedick, Alex; Shiraj, Sahar; Williams, James; Sundaram, Murali; Subhas, Naveen

    2016-05-01

    An 18-year-old man with no prior surgical history presented with left knee pain after sustaining a basketball injury and was diagnosed with transient patellar dislocation. Magnetic resonance imaging was ordered to further assess the extent of injury. PMID:27064776

  16. Left ventricular failure due to a rare variant of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Sonal; Muranjan, Mamta N; Lahiri, Keya R

    2012-09-01

    "Hypertensive" variant of congenital adrenal hyperplasia is rare. The authors describe an interesting case of a 6-y-old boy who presented with an acute respiratory illness and progressive breathlessness since 1 y. Genital hyperpigmentation was noticed since 2 y of age; the onset of pubarche and increasing penile size at 4 y. He was admitted in congestive cardiac failure with a blood pressure of 150/100 mm Hg. Facial acne; slight facial, pubic hair and penile enlargement were additionally noted. Chest radiograph revealed cardiomegaly. Basal ACTH and 17-OHP levels were high. A diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (11β-hydroxylase deficiency) was made due to hypertension with virilized genitalia. Cardiac failure was controlled with fluid restriction and diuretics; he was started on prednisolone, spironolactone and nifedipine. This case is presented for its rarity where hypertension can cause complication of cardiac failure, if diagnosis is delayed despite early features of pseudoprecocious puberty. PMID:22231770

  17. A Case Report of Adrenocortical Adenoma Mimicking Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia in a Young Girl.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Qingfeng; Lv, Zhibao; Xu, Weijue; Liu, Jiangbin; Wu, Yibo; Xi, Zhengjun

    2015-06-01

    Adrenal cortical tumors are rare in children. Secondary tumors associated with untreated congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) have also been reported in pediatric population. It is difficult for pediatricians to differentiate these 2 lesions.We described a 4.5-year-old girl who presented with symptoms and signs of virilization. Bone age was 9.5 years. Genetic analysis of CYP21A2 and CYP11B1 revealed a heterozygous mutation of CYP11B1 at c.1157C>T (A386V). No germline p53 gene mutation including R337H was detected.The patient was first misdiagnosed as CAH and treated with hydrocortisone for 3 months. Diagnosis of an adrenal cortical tumor was confirmed by laboratory data and abdominal computed tomography. After resection of the tumor, serum steroids normalized and clinical signs receded. The child received no additional treatment and remains disease free after 12 months of close observation. Histological examination showed neoplasia cells with predominantly eosinophilic cytoplasm and few atypical mitotic figures. The proliferation-associated Ki-67 index was <1% detected by immunohistochemistry.Neoplasm is a rare but significant cause of precocious puberty (PP). The possibility of neoplasms should always be considered early to avoid delayed cancer diagnosis and treatment in cases of PP. PMID:26107677

  18. Classical forms of congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency in adults.

    PubMed

    Bachelot, Anne; Chakthoura, Zeina; Rouxel, Agnès; Dulon, Jérome; Touraine, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    During childhood, the main aims of the medical treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) secondary to 21-hydroxylase are to prevent salt loss and virilization and to attain normal stature and normal puberty. As such, there is a narrow therapeutic window through which the intended results can be achieved. In adulthood, the clinical management has received little attention, but recent studies have shown the relevance of long-term follow-up of these patients. The aims here are to review the multiple clinical, hormonal and metabolic abnormalities that could be found in adult CAH patients as such a decrease in bone mineral density, overweight and disturbed reproductive functions. In women with classic CAH, a low fertility rate is reported, and is probably the consequence of multiple factors including neuroendocrine and hormonal factors, feminizing surgery, and psychological factors. Men with CAH may present hypogonadism either through the effect of adrenal rests or from suppression of gonadotropins resulting in infertility. Therefore a multidisciplinary team with knowledge of CAH should carefully follow up these patients, from childhood through to adulthood, to avoid these complications and to ensure treatment compliance and tight control of the adrenal androgens. PMID:18204267

  19. Identification of five novel STAR variants in ten Chinese patients with congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhuo; Ye, Jun; Han, Lianshu; Qiu, Wenjuan; Zhang, Huiwen; Yu, Yongguo; Liang, Lili; Gong, Zhuwen; Gu, Xuefan

    2016-04-01

    Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (CLAH) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by defective synthesis of all steroids. This disorder is characterized by 46,XY sex reversal, skin hyperpigmentation, early-onset adrenal crisis and enlarged adrenal with fatty accumulation. CLAH is caused by mutations in the STAR gene. The clinical features and STAR gene mutation spectrum of a large cohort of Chinese patients with CLAH were not reported previously. We performed clinical retrospective review and genetic analysis of the STAR gene in ten unrelated Chinese phenotypic female patients who were clinically diagnosed with CLAH and followed up in our hospital from 2006 to 2015. All ten patients, including two 46,XY females and eight 46,XX females, presented skin hyperpigmentation and early salt-wasting episode, and showed normal growth and development after steroid replacement treatment. Totally 20 mutant alleles containing 11 different STAR gene mutations were identified in these ten patients, including five novel variants (two missense and three null variants), all predicted to be pathogenic in bioinformatics analysis, and six mutations described in previous literature. Among these 11 mutations, a reported mutation c.772C>T and a novel variant c.707_708delinsCTT were most frequent, accounting for 35% and 15% of the total mutant alleles, respectively. This is the first report of a large Chinese cohort with CLAH, presenting the mutation spectrum of the STAR gene and two possible founder mutations in the Chinese population, which may contribute to better genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis. PMID:26827627

  20. Motor development in individuals with congenital adrenal hyperplasia: Strength, targeting, and fine motor skill

    PubMed Central

    Collaer, Marcia L.; Brook, Charles; Conway, Gerard S.; Hindmarsh, Peter C.; Hines, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Summary This study investigated early androgen influence on the development of human motor and visuomotor characteristics. Participants, ages 12 to 45 years, were individuals with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), a disorder causing increased adrenal androgen production before birth (40 females, 29 males) and their unaffected relatives (29 females, 30 males). We investigated grip strength and visuomotor targeting tasks on which males generally outperform females, and fine motor pegboard tasks on which females generally outperform males. Physical characteristics (height and weight) were measured to explore whether body parameters could explain differences in motor skills. Females with CAH were stronger and showed better targeting than unaffected females and showed reduced fine visuomotor skill on one pegboard measure, with no difference on the other. Males with CAH were weaker than unaffected males in grip strength but did not differ on the targeting or pegboard measures. Correction for body size could not explain the findings for females, but suggests that the reduced strength of males with CAH may relate to their smaller stature. Further, the targeting advantage in females with CAH persisted following adjustment for their greater strength. Results in females support the hypothesis that androgen may masculinize, or promote, certain motor characteristics at which males excel, and contribute to defeminization of certain fine motor characteristics at which females excel. Thus, these data suggest that organizational effects of androgens on behavior during prenatal life may extend to motor characteristics and may contribute to general sex differences in motor-related behaviors; however, alternative explanations based on activational influences of androgen or altered experiential factors cannot be excluded without further study. KEYWORDS: congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), androgen, sex, motor, strength, targeting PMID:18938041

  1. Steroid disorders in children: Congenital adrenal hyperplasia and apparent mineralocorticoid excess

    PubMed Central

    New, Maria I.; Wilson, Robert C.

    1999-01-01

    Our research team and laboratories have concentrated on two inherited endocrine disorders, congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) and apparent mineralocorticoid excess, in thier investigations of the pathophysiology of adrenal steroid hormone disorders in children. CAH refers to a family of inherited disorders in which defects occur in one of the enzymatic steps required to synthesize cortisol from cholesterol in the adrenal gland. Because of the impaired cortisol secretion, adrenocorticotropic hormone levels rise due to impairment of a negative feedback system, which results in hyperplasia of the adrenal cortex. The majority of cases is due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD). Owing to the blocked enzymatic step, cortisol precursors accumulate in excess and are converted to potent androgens, which are secreted and cause in utero virilization of the affected female fetus genitalia in the classical form of CAH. A mild form of the 21-OHD, termed nonclassical 21-OHD, is the most common autosomal recessive disorder in humans, and occurs in 1/27 Ashkenazic Jews. Mutations in the CYP21 gene have been identified that cause both classical and nonclassical CAH. Apparent mineralocorticoid excess is a potentially fatal genetic disorder causing severe juvenile hypertension, pre- and postnatal growth failure, and low to undetectable levels of potassium, renin, and aldosterone. It is caused by autosomal recessive mutations in the HSD11B2 gene, which result in a deficiency of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2. In 1998, we reported a mild form of this disease, which may represent an important cause of low-renin hypertension. PMID:10536001

  2. Longitudinal Evaluation of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Testicular Function in 8 Boys with Adrenal Hypoplasia Congenita (AHC) Due to NR0B1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Galeotti, Caroline; Lahlou, Zineb; Goullon, Domitille; Sarda-Thibault, Hélène; Cahen-Varsaux, Juliette; Bignon-Topalovic, Joëlle; Bashamboo, Anu; McElreavey, Ken; Brauner, Raja

    2012-01-01

    Background Boys carrying mutations in the NR0B1 gene develop adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and impaired sexual development due to the combination of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) and primary defects in spermatogenesis. Methods We analysed the evolution of hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular function of 8 boys with AHC due to NR0B1 mutations. Our objective was to characterize and monitor the progressive deterioration of this function. Results The first symptoms appeared in the neonatal period (n = 5) or between 6 months and 8.7 years (n = 3). Basal plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) concentrations increased in all boys, whilst cortisol levels decreased in one case. The natremia was equal or below 134 mmol/L and kaliemia was over 5 mmol/L. All had increased plasma renin. In 3 of 4 patients diagnosed in the neonatal period and evaluated during the first year, the basal plasma gonadotropins concentrations, and their response to gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) test (n = 2), and those of testosterone were normal. The plasma inhibin B levels were normal in the first year of life. With the exception of two cases these concentrations decreased to below the normal for age. Anti-Müllerian hormone concentrations were normal for age in all except one case, which had low concentrations before the initiation of testosterone treatment. In 3 of the 8 cases the gene was deleted and the remaining 5 cases carried frameshift mutations that are predicted to introduce a downstream nonsense mutation resulting in a truncated protein. Conclusions The decreases in testosterone and inhibin B levels indicated a progressive loss of testicular function in boys carrying NR0B1 mutations. These non-invasive examinations can help to estimate the age of the testicular degradation and cryopreservation of semen may be considered in these cases as investigational procedure with the aim of restoring fertility. PMID:22761912

  3. Prenatal Androgens and Gender-Typed Behavior: A Study of Girls with Mild and Severe Forms of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Servin, Anna; Nordenstrom, Anna; Larsson, Agne; Bohlin, Gunilla

    2003-01-01

    Examined gender-typed behavior and interests in 2- to 10-year-old girls with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) and in unaffected girls matched for age. Found that, compared with unaffected girls, girls with CAH were more interested in masculine toys and less interested in feminine toys and were more likely to report having male playmates and…

  4. Neonatal Bartter Syndrome in association with congenital adrenal hyperplasia in a neonate - a rare combination.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Shabbir

    2016-05-01

    Neonatal Bartter syndrome (NBS) is an autosomal recessive renal tubulopathy characterized by hypokalaemic, hypochloraemic metabolic alkalosis associated with increased urinary loss of sodium, potassium, calcium and chloride. There is hyperreninaemia and hyperaldosteronaemia but normotension. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), another autosomal recessive condition, may present in the neonatal period with vomiting, hypovolaemia, failure to gain weight or ambiguous genitalia. We report a case of NBS and CAH combination in a neonate. A male neonate born at term was admitted with history of recurrent vomiting and dehydration episodes. Investigations revealed electrolytes imbalance, metabolic alkalosis, raised aldosterone and renin levels suggestive of NBS. He was treated successfully and discharged. He was re-admitted with the same symptoms. Further evaluation confirmed the presence of CAH as well. We report this case because of the rarity of this combination (NBS plus CAH) and to the best of our knowledge this is the first such case report from Pakistan. PMID:27183948

  5. Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Adult Women with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Due to 21-hydroxylase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mimi S.; Merke, Deborah P.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is a common autosomal recessive disorder characterized by impaired cortisol biosynthesis, with or without aldosterone deficiency, and androgen excess. Patients with the classic (severe) form also have epinephrine deficiency. Patients with CAH have an increased prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease including obesity, hypertension and insulin resistance. Androgen excess in women appears to be an additional risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Carotid intima media thickness, a measure of subclinical atherosclerosis also has been found to be increased in adults with CAH. The multiple hormonal imbalances present in the adult woman with CAH, in combination with chronic glucocorticoid therapy, contribute to cardiovascular disease risk. Further investigation of the predisposition to cardiovascular disease in women with CAH is warranted. Longitudinal studies are needed and interventions targeting obesity, insulin resistance, hypertension and hyperandrogenism may offer improved outcome. PMID:19530065

  6. Prenatal Dexamethasone for Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: An Ethics Canary in the Modern Medical Mine.

    PubMed

    Dreger, Alice; Feder, Ellen K; Tamar-Mattis, Anne

    2012-09-01

    Following extensive examination of published and unpublished materials, we provide a history of the use of dexamethasone in pregnant women at risk of carrying a female fetus affected by congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). This intervention has been aimed at preventing development of ambiguous genitalia, the urogenital sinus, tomboyism, and lesbianism. We map out ethical problems in this history, including: misleading promotion to physicians and CAH-affected families; de facto experimentation without the necessary protections of approved research; troubling parallels to the history of prenatal use of diethylstilbestrol (DES); and the use of medicine and public monies to attempt prevention of benign behavioral sex variations. Critical attention is directed at recent investigations by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Office of Human Research Protections (OHRP); we argue that the weak and unsupported conclusions of these investigations indicate major gaps in the systems meant to protect subjects of high-risk medical research. PMID:22904609

  7. Successful pregnancy and delivery of a patient with congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Da Hyun; Yun, Ha Na; Kim, Jong Woon; Song, Tae-Bok

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) during pregnancy is a rare condition. Only a few cases have been reported in the literature. CAH patients has lower pregnancy rate compared to normal women. A 27-year-old nulliparous woman, a diagnosed case of 21-hydroxylase deficient simple virilising form of classic CAH visited. She got pregnant spontaneously without any trial of assisted reproductive technology. At the age of 12, she underwent clitoral resection and vaginoplasty. She took dexamethasone or prednisolone after operation. She delivered healthy singleton female baby by cesarean section. Four years later, she delivered healthy singleton female baby by repeat cesarean section. Two female babies have shown normal external genitalia. Here, we report a case of successful pregnancy and delivery in a patient with CAH. PMID:26866036

  8. 150 years of congenital adrenal hyperplasia: translation and commentary of De Crecchio's classic paper from 1865.

    PubMed

    Delle Piane, Luisa; Rinaudo, Paolo F; Miller, Walter L

    2015-04-01

    In 1865, Luigi De Crecchio, a Neapolitan pathologist, published a detailed autopsy description of Giuseppe Marzo, who lived as a man, had nearly-normal appearing male external genitalia, female internal reproductive organs, and massively enlarged adrenals. This report is widely cited as the first report of non-salt-losing congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), but a complete English translation has not been available. Via interlibrary loan, we obtained the original volume containing De Crecchio's paper. The complete 39-page publication was translated by two reproductive endocrinologists (L.D.P. and P.F.R.) who are native speakers of Italian. A pediatric endocrinologist conversant with CAH (W.L.M.) summarizes and comments on De Crecchio's observations. Anatomically, the external genitalia were characterized by labio-scrotal fusion and a 10-cm curved phallus with hypospadias. Internally, the ovaries, tubes, and uterus were hypoplastic but otherwise normal, except that the uterus inserted into a utricle. The adrenals were massively enlarged, but this observation was dismissed as unimportant. De Crecchio's exposition of Marzo's life shows many of the issues affecting patients today: family ill-ease regarding genital ambiguity at birth, social pressure following reversed sex assignment in childhood, adult embarassment about genital appearance, difficulties with a legal sex assignment on a birth certificate, and substantial efforts to exhibit maleness to self and associates. De Crecchio was an astute observer who provides insight into both nineteenth-century endocrinology and continuing twenty-first-century difficulties in the care of patients with disordered sex development. PMID:25635623

  9. Lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to STAR mutations in a Caucasian patient

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Casas, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Summary Lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (lipoid CAH), the most severe form of CAH, is most commonly caused by mutations in steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), which is required for the movement of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membranes to synthesize pregnenolone. This study was performed to evaluate whether the salt-losing crisis and the adrenal inactivity experienced by a Scandinavian infant is due to a de novo STAR mutation. The study was conducted at the University of North Dakota, the Mercer University School of Medicine and the Memorial University Medical Center to identify the cause of this disease. The patient was admitted to a pediatric endocrinologist at the Sanford Health Center for salt-losing crisis and possible adrenal failure. Lipoid CAH is an autosomal recessive disease, we identified two de novo heterozygous mutations (STAR c.444C>A (STAR p.N148K) and STAR c.557C>T (STAR p.R193X)) in the STAR gene, causing lipoid CAH. New onset lipoid CAH can occur through de novo mutations and is not restricted to any specific region of the world. This Scandinavian family was of Norwegian descent and had lipoid CAH due to a mutation in S TAR exons 4 and 5. Overexpression of the STAR p.N148K mutant in nonsteroidogenic COS-1 cells supplemented with an electron transport system showed activity similar to the background level, which was ∼10% of that observed with wild-type (WT) STAR. Protein-folding analysis showed that the finger printing of the STAR p.N148K mutant is also different from the WT protein. Inherited STAR mutations may be more prevalent in some geographical areas but not necessarily restricted to those regions. Learning points STAR mutations cause lipoid CAH.This is a pure population from a caucasian family.Mutation ablated STAR activity.The mutation resulted in loosely folded conformation of STAR. PMID:27047663

  10. Serum melatonin is not affected by glucocorticoid replacement in congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Waldhauser, F; Frisch, H; Krautgasser-Gasparotti, A; Schober, E; Bieglmayer, C

    1986-03-01

    Recently a hypothesis has been proposed suggesting a negative feedback in the regulation of cortisol (F) and melatonin (Mel). To study a possible influence of F on Mel regulation we examined 13 children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) on two occasions: once 3 days after cessation of F substitution (group 1; n = 13) and once during treatment with dexamethasone (1 mg/m2/day) and fludrocortisone (0.1 mg/m2/day) (group 2; n = 11) 11 children matched by sex and age served as controls (group 3). While serum 17 OH-progesterone levels, an indicator for the activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis in CAH, were significantly (P less than 0.001) elevated in untreated patients (group 1), serum Mel levels were not different among the 3 groups nor was the diurnal secretion pattern of Mel affected. Nocturnal serum Mel concentrations, however, correlated with the age of the subjects (r = 0.55, P less than 0.001 at 23.00 h), displaying high values in early childhood that declined with progressing age. The presented data do not support the view of a classical feedback mechanism in the regulation of Mel and F in humans. However, it confirms the description of a tremendous fall of nocturnal Mel concentrations during childhood. PMID:3962565

  11. Preventing female virilisation in congenital adrenal hyperplasia: The controversial role of antenatal dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Heland, Sarah; Hewitt, Jacqueline K; McGillivray, George; Walker, Susan P

    2016-06-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) refers to a group of recessively inherited disorders of cortisol production, which in the classical form results in virilisation of female fetuses. Since the 1980s, antenatal treatment with dexamethasone has been recommended in high-risk pregnancies to minimise the risk of virilising the female genitalia of affected fetuses. To be effective, this treatment requires implementation in early pregnancy, prior to the commencement of autonomous fetal adrenal androgen synthesis. Using this approach, seven of eight high-risk pregnancies are treated unnecessarily, prior to establishing the fetal gender or the confirmed diagnosis of a genetically affected pregnancy. In the face of ongoing concerns regarding potential adverse maternal-fetal effects of antenatal dexamethasone exposure, a review of this practice has been advocated by expert advisory groups. In this review, we summarise current controversies, potential improvements and future directions in the management of pregnancies at risk of CAH. In high-risk families, recent genomic advances include early prenatal diagnosis utilising noninvasive genetic techniques to minimise unnecessary dexamethasone exposure to unaffected fetuses. In affected pregnancies when families elect for antenatal treatment, optimal antenatal dosing regimens need to be defined and a standardised treatment and follow-up protocol are recommended. Establishment of a national registry with standardised follow-up will allow future families to be better informed of the risks and benefits of both treated and untreated fetal CAH. PMID:26661642

  12. Recent advances in biochemical and molecular analysis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gu-Hwan; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2016-01-01

    The term congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) covers a group of autosomal recessive disorders caused by defects in one of the steroidogenic enzymes involved in the synthesis of cortisol or aldosterone from cholesterol in the adrenal glands. Approximately 95% of all CAH cases are caused by 21-hydroxylase deficiency encoded by the CYP21A2 gene. The disorder is categorized into classical forms, including the salt-wasting and the simple virilizing types, and nonclassical forms based on the severity of the disease. The severity of the clinical features varies according to the level of residual 21-hydroxylase activity. Newborn screening for CAH is performed in many countries to prevent salt-wasting crises in the neonatal period, to prevent male sex assignment in affected females, and to reduce long-term morbidities, such as short stature, gender confusion, and psychosexual disturbances. 17α-hydroxyprogesterone is a marker for 21-hydroxylase deficiency and is measured using a radioimmunoassay, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, or a fluoroimmunoassay. Recently, liquid chromatography linked with tandem mass spectrometry was developed for rapid, highly specific, and sensitive analysis of multiple analytes. Urinary steroid analysis by gas chromatography mass spectrometry also provides qualitative and quantitative data on the excretion of steroid hormone metabolites. Molecular analysis of CYP21A2 is useful for genetic counseling, confirming diagnosis, and predicting prognoses. In conclusion, early detection using neonatal screening tests and treatment can prevent the worst outcomes of 21-hydroxylase deficiency. PMID:27104172

  13. Recent advances in biochemical and molecular analysis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jin-Ho; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2016-03-01

    The term congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) covers a group of autosomal recessive disorders caused by defects in one of the steroidogenic enzymes involved in the synthesis of cortisol or aldosterone from cholesterol in the adrenal glands. Approximately 95% of all CAH cases are caused by 21-hydroxylase deficiency encoded by the CYP21A2 gene. The disorder is categorized into classical forms, including the salt-wasting and the simple virilizing types, and nonclassical forms based on the severity of the disease. The severity of the clinical features varies according to the level of residual 21-hydroxylase activity. Newborn screening for CAH is performed in many countries to prevent salt-wasting crises in the neonatal period, to prevent male sex assignment in affected females, and to reduce long-term morbidities, such as short stature, gender confusion, and psychosexual disturbances. 17α-hydroxyprogesterone is a marker for 21-hydroxylase deficiency and is measured using a radioimmunoassay, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, or a fluoroimmunoassay. Recently, liquid chromatography linked with tandem mass spectrometry was developed for rapid, highly specific, and sensitive analysis of multiple analytes. Urinary steroid analysis by gas chromatography mass spectrometry also provides qualitative and quantitative data on the excretion of steroid hormone metabolites. Molecular analysis of CYP21A2 is useful for genetic counseling, confirming diagnosis, and predicting prognoses. In conclusion, early detection using neonatal screening tests and treatment can prevent the worst outcomes of 21-hydroxylase deficiency. PMID:27104172

  14. Prenatal treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia-not standard of care.

    PubMed

    Witchel, Selma Feldman; Miller, Walter L

    2012-10-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency is a common autosomal recessive disorder due to mutations in the CYP21A2 gene. Since genetic counselors play a crucial role in educating families about inherited disorders, they need to have thorough knowledge regarding the pathophysiology of CAH especially the effects on the fetus, the complex genetics of this disorder, and the controversies surrounding experimental prenatal dexamethasone treatment. Affected female fetuses may have varying degree of virilization of the external genitalia. Starting in the 1980's, supraphysiologic glucocorticoid treatment was used to decrease the virilization of the external genitalia of affected female fetuses. However, recent clinical observations, animal studies and greater awareness of the details of human fetal adrenal physiology raise concerns regarding the safety of this prenatal treatment. We review the pathophysiology of CAH, the safety and ethical considerations of prenatal dexamethasone treatment and the views of multiple medical societies that conclude that this experimental therapy should only be done in prospective trials approved by ethical review boards. PMID:22639328

  15. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia, ovarian failure and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to a 6p deletion.

    PubMed

    Moysés-Oliveira, Mariana; Mancini, Tatiane I; Takeno, Sylvia S; Rodrigues, Andressa D S; Bachega, Tania A S S; Bertola, Debora; Melaragno, Maria Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Cryptic deletions in balanced de novo translocations represent a frequent cause of abnormal phenotypes, including Mendelian diseases. In this study, we describe a patient with multiple congenital abnormalities, such as late-onset congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), primary ovarian failure and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), who carries a de novo t(6;14)(p21;q32) translocation. Genomic array analysis identified a cryptic 1.1-Mb heterozygous deletion, adjacent to the breakpoint on chromosome 6, extending from 6p21.33 to 6p21.32 and affecting 85 genes, including CYP21A2,TNXB and MSH5. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis of the 6p21.3 region was performed in the patient and her family and revealed a 30-kb deletion in the patient's normal chromosome 6, inherited from her mother, resulting in homozygous loss of genes CYP21A1P and C4B. CYP21A2 sequencing showed that its promoter region was not affected by the 30-kb deletion, suggesting that the deletion of other regulatory sequences in the normal chromosome 6 caused a loss of function of the CYP21A2 gene. EDS and primary ovarian failure phenotypes could be explained by the loss of genes TNXB and MSH5, a finding that may contribute to the characterization of disease-causing genes. The detection of this de novo microdeletion drastically reduced the estimated recurrence risk for CAH in the family. PMID:24970489

  16. Cerebellar Hypoplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders that begin in early childhood, such as ataxia telangiectasia. In an infant or young child, symptoms of a disorder that features cerebellar hypoplasia might include floppy muscle tone, developmental or ...

  17. Mutation analysis of the CYP21A2 gene in congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Forouzanfar, K; Seifi, M; Hashemi-Gorji, F; Karimi, N; Estiar, M A; Karimoei, M; Sakhinia, E; Karimipour, M; Ghergherehchi, R

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is an inherited autosomal recessive enzymatic disorder involving the synthesis of adrenal corticosteroids. 21-Hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) is the most common form of the disease which is observed in more than 90% of patients with CAH. Early identification of mutations in the genes involved in this disease is critical. A marker of the disease, errors in the CYP21A2 gene, is thought to be part of the pathophysiology of CAH. Therefore, the identification of gene mutations would be very beneficial in the early detection of CAH. This research was a descriptive epidemiological study conducted on individuals elected by the inclusion criteria whom were referred to the Genetic Diagnosis Center of Tabriz during 2012 to 2013. After sampling and DNA extraction, PCR for the detection of mutations in the CYP21A2 gene was performed followed by sequencing. For data analysis, the results of sequencing were compared with the reference gene by blast, Gene Runner and MEGA-5 software. Obtained changes were compared with NCBI databases. The analysis of the sequencing determined the mutations located in Exons 6, 7, 8 and 10. The most frequent findings were Q318X (53%) and R356W (28%). Exon 6 cluster (7%), E431k (4%), V237E (2%), V281L (2%), E351K (2%), R426C (2%) were also frequent in our patients. The most frequent genotype was compound heterozygote, Q318X/R356W. Three rare mutations in our study were E431K, E351K and R426C. Observed mutation frequencies in this study were much higher than those reported in previous studies in Iranian populations. Thus, it seems that it is necessary to follow-up screening programs and use sequencing methods to better identify mutations in the development of the disease. PMID:26278268

  18. Recommendations for Treatment of Nonclassic Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (NCCAH): an Update

    PubMed Central

    Trapp, Christine M.; Oberfield, Sharon E.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a family of autosomal recessive disorders. 21-hydroxylase deficiency, in which there are mutations in CYP21A2 (the gene encoding the adrenal 21-hydroxylase enzyme), is the most common form (90%) of CAH. In classic CAH there is impaired cortisol production with diagnostic increased levels of 17-OH progesterone. Excess androgen production results in virilization and in the newborn female may cause development of ambiguous external genitalia. Three-fourths of patients with classic CAH also have aldosterone insufficiency, which can result in salt-wasting; in infancy this manifests as shock, hyponatremia and hyperkalemia. CAH has a reported incidence of 1:10,000–1:20,000 births although there is an increased prevalence in certain ethnic groups. Nonclassic CAH (NCCAH) is a less severe form of the disorder, in which there is 20–50% of 21-hydroxylase enzyme activity (vs. 0–5% in classic CAH) and no salt wasting. The degree of symptoms related to androgen excess is variable and may be progressive with age, although some individuals are asymptomatic. NCCAH has an incidence of 1:1000–1:2000 births (0.1–0.2% prevalence) in the White population; an even higher prevalence is noted in certain ethnic groups such as Ashkenazi Jews (1–2%). As many as two-thirds of persons with NCCAH are compound heterozygotes and carry a severe and mild mutation on different alleles. This paper discusses the genetics of NCCAH, along with its variable phenotypic expression, and reviews the clinical course in untreated patients, which includes rapid early childhood growth, advanced skeletal age, premature adrenarche, acne, impaired reproductive function in both sexes and hirsutism as well as menstrual disorders in females. Finally, it addresses treatment with glucocorticoids vs. and other alternatives, particularly with respect to long term issues such as adult metabolic disease including insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome

  19. Clinical Characteristics of a Cohort of 244 Patients with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Finkielstain, Gabriela P.; Kim, Mimi S.; Sinaii, Ninet; Nishitani, Miki; Van Ryzin, Carol; Hill, Suvimol C.; Reynolds, James C.; Hanna, Reem M.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) often suffer from long-term complications secondary to chronic glucocorticoid therapy and suboptimal treatment regimens. Objective: The aim of the study was to describe clinical characteristics of a large cohort of pediatric and adult CAH patients. Design and Setting: We conducted a cross-sectional study of 244 CAH patients [183 classic, 61 nonclassic (NC)] included in a Natural History Study at the National Institutes of Health. Main Outcome Measure(s): Outcome variables of interest were height sd score, obesity, hypertensive blood pressure (BP), insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, bone mineral density, hirsutism (females), and testicular adrenal rest (TART). Results: The majority had elevated or suppressed androgens, with varied treatment regimens. Mean adult height sd score was −1.0 ± 1.1 for classic vs. −0.4 ± 0.9 for NC patients (P = 0.015). Obesity was present in approximately one third of patients, across phenotypes. Elevated BP was more common in classic than NC patients (P ≤ 0.01); pediatric hypertensive BP was associated with suppressed plasma renin activity (P = 0.001). Insulin resistance was common in classic children (27%) and adults (38% classic, 20% NC); 18% of adults had metabolic syndrome. The majority (61%) had low vitamin D; 37% of adults had low bone mineral density. Hirsutism was common (32% classic; 59% NC women). TART was found in classic males (33% boys; 44% men). Conclusions: Poor hormonal control and adverse outcomes are common in CAH, necessitating new treatments. Routine monitoring of classic children should include measuring BP and plasma renin activity. Osteoporosis prophylaxis and TART screening should begin during childhood. A longitudinal study is under way. PMID:22990093

  20. Precursor-to-product ratios reflect biochemical phenotype in congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Hicks, Rebecca A; Yee, Jennifer K; Mao, Catherine S; Graham, Steve; Kharrazi, Martin; Lorey, Fred; Lee, W P

    2014-02-01

    Precursor-to-product ratios in steroid hormone metabolism may accurately reflect enzymatic activity and production of metabolites relative to their disappearance. The purpose of this study was to explore the use of direct precursor-to-product steroid ratios to discriminate between infants with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21- α -hydroxylase deficiency and infants with no disorder, thus characterizing the biochemical phenotype in CAH. Deidentified dried blood spot samples from confirmed CAH cases identified by newborn screen (CAH-positive, N = 8) and from cases with no disorder (CAH-negative, N = 10) were obtained from the California State Newborn Screening Program. Samples (∼6.25 mm circular spots) underwent methanol and water extraction (9:1 ratio). Deuterated steroids served as isotope internal standards. 17-α-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP), 11-deoxycortisol (S), androstenedione (A4) and cortisol (F) concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and the 17-OHP/S, 17-OHP/A4, and S/F ratios were calculated. The mean 17-OHP and A4 concentrations in samples from CAH cases were significantly increased when compared to cases with no disorder (p = 0.003 for both). 17-OHP/S and 17-OHP/A4 ratios were also significantly elevated in CAH cases (p = 0.007 and p < 0.001, respectively). In contrast, S and F concentrations and the S/F ratio were similar between the two groups. In CAH, the elevated 17-OHP/S ratio is a biomarker of diminished 21-α-hydroxylase activity, and the elevated 17-OHP/A4 ratio is a biomarker of adrenal androgen excess via increased 17,20-lyase activity. The similar S/F ratio indicates that the rate of production via 11-β-hydroxylase and disappearance of F is maintained in CAH. PMID:24489528

  1. Metachronous Bilateral Testicular Leydig-Like Tumors Leading to the Diagnosis of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (Adrenogenital Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Vukina, Josip; Chism, David D.; Sharpless, Julie L.; Raynor, Mathew C.; Milowsky, Matthew I.; Funkhouser, William K.

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old male with a history of left testis Leydig cell tumor (LCT), 3-month status after left radical orchiectomy, presented with a rapidly enlarging (0.6 cm to 3.7 cm) right testicular mass. He underwent a right radical orchiectomy, sections interpreted as showing a similar Leydig cell-like oncocytic proliferation, with a differential diagnosis including metachronous bilateral LCT and metachronous bilateral testicular tumors associated with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (a.k.a. “testicular adrenal rest tumors” (TARTs) and “testicular tumors of the adrenogenital syndrome” (TTAGS)). Additional workup demonstrated a markedly elevated serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and elevated adrenal precursor steroid levels. He was diagnosed with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency (3BHSD) type, and started on treatment. Metachronous bilateral testicular masses in adults should prompt consideration of adult presentation of CAH. Since all untreated CAH patients are expected to have elevated serum ACTH, formal exclusion of CAH prior to surgical resection of a testicular Leydig-like proliferation could be accomplished by screening for elevated serum ACTH. PMID:26351608

  2. [Acute adrenal insufficiency in the newborn].

    PubMed

    Limal, J-M; Bouhours-Nouet, N; Rouleau, S; Gatelais, F; Coutant, R

    2006-10-01

    Neonatal acute adrenal insufficiency is a rare condition. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia with 21-hydroxylase defect appears to be the most frequent cause, but the neonatal screening has improved its potential severe outcome. The other causes and the various clinical presentations have been exposed, with a special reference to the salt-wasting syndrome. Among them, the severity of X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) deserves special attention. Two other causes of adrenal hypoplasia have been recently discovered, i.e. a mutation of the SF-1 gene and the syndrome IMAGe. Adrenal insufficiency secondary to ACTH deficiency is often unrecognised despite the risk of severe seizures and hypoglycaemia with brain damage. Finally, the hormonal diagnostic testing and the main therapeutic approach by corticosteroids have been indicated. The aim of this work is to focus the attention of paediatricians who examine a newborn because the risk of delayed diagnosis and fatal outcome may be limited if the clinical symptoms are soon recognized. PMID:16962294

  3. Pitfalls in molecular diagnosis of 21-hydroxylase deficiency in congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kolahdouz, Mahsa; Mohammadi, Zahra; Kolahdouz, Parisa; Tajamolian, Masoud; Khanahmad, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a putative error of metabolism with autosomal recessive heredity pattern. The main manifestations of classic form of CAH are salt-wasting, dehydration and simple virilization in both sexes and ambiguous genitalia in female gender. 21-hyroxylase (CYP21A2) impairment with prevalence value of 1 in 10,000–15,000 live births is the most common etiology of CAH. Because of consanguineous marriages, the frequency of the CAH in Iran is very high. A wide range of mutations diversity exists in CYP21A2 gene and a large number of these mutations derived from a highly homologous pseudogene, CYP21A1P, through gene conversion. In addition, new mutations such as small and large deletion and point mutations can also result in enzyme deficiency. Various methods for mutation detection were performed. The main obstacle in molecular diagnosis of CAH is amplification of pseudogene during polymerase chain reaction of CYP21A2. All attempts focus on discrimination of pseudogene from gene; that is why, there is the majority of mutations on pseudogene, and if we have contamination with the pseudogene, the result will be unreliable. Here, we discuss this methods and advantage and disadvantage of those. PMID:26605228

  4. Brain white matter abnormality in a newborn infant with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kaga, Akimune; Saito-Hakoda, Akiko; Uematsu, Mitsugu; Kamimura, Miki; Kanno, Junko; Kure, Shigeo; Fujiwara, Ikuma

    2013-10-01

    Several studies have described brain white matter abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children and adults with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), while the brain MRI findings of newborn infants with CAH have not been clarified. We report a newborn boy with CAH who presented brain white matter abnormality on MRI. He was diagnosed as having salt-wasting CAH with a high 17-OHP level at neonatal screening and was initially treated with hydrocortisone at 8 days of age. On day 11 after birth, he had a generalized tonic seizure. No evidence of serum electrolyte abnormalities was observed. Brain MRI revealed white matter abnormalities that consisted of bilateral small diffuse hyperintensities on T1-weighted images with slightly low intensity on T2-weighted images in the watershed area. Several factors associated with brain white matter abnormalities in adults with CAH, such as increasing age, hypertension, diabetes and corticosteroid replacement, were not applicable. Although the cause of the phenomenon in this case is unclear, brain white matter abnormality could be observed in newborn infants with CAH as well as in adult patients. PMID:24170965

  5. Urinary excretion of pregnanetriol and Δ5-pregnenetriol in two forms of congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bongiovanni, Alfred M.; Eberlein, Walter R.; Moshang, Thomas

    1971-01-01

    Although congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency generally reveals a predominance of Δ5-3β-hydroxysteroids, on occasion substantial quantities of pregnanetriol have been found as well. It appears that the latter steroid more often occurs in the subjects who have survived beyond infancy. The use of the measurement of pregnanetriol alone may therefore not be relied upon as a sole determinant of the specific form of defective steroidal biogenesis. It is more characteristic of the 21-hydroxylase deficiency. However when both Δ5-pregnenetriol and pregnanetriol are measured the ratio of the former to the latter is always considerably below 1.0 in 21-hydroxylase deficiency and always above 1.0 in 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. Furthermore, 11-ketopregnanetriol has been found only in the urine of subjects with the 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Thus, these two forms of defective steroidal biogenesis may be distinguished by the measurement of these three urinary steroidal metabolites. PMID:5129323

  6. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and criminal behavior: A Swedish population based study.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson Gotby, Agnes; Nordenström, Anna; Falhammar, Henrik; Nordenskjöld, Agneta; Linden Hirschberg, Angelica; Frisén, Louise; Landén, Mikael; Lichtenstein, Paul

    2015-10-30

    Both prenatal and circulating testosterone and other androgens have been suggested to influence the individual's propensity to commit crime, but empirical evidence is limited and inconsistent. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) and Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) are both hyperandrogenic conditions but with an important difference; whereas subjects with CAH are exposed to high concentrations of androgens in utero, women with PCOS are subjected to high androgens in adulthood. Comparing these groups can therefore yield important insights of androgenic effects on behavior. In the current study, information on medical diagnoses and convicted crimes were gathered from Swedish population-based registers. The associations between diagnoses of CAH or PCOS and any crime, violent crime or sex crime were estimated with conditional logistic regression. Results showed that CAH in women and men did not predict criminality, whereas an increased risk for any crime and violent crime was found in PCOS women. Our findings indicate that female hyperandrogenism in adulthood, but not prenatal hyperandrogenism, is associated with risk for criminal behavior. Further research into hyperandrogenic conditions holds opportunities to deepen our understanding of the etiology of crime and psychopathology. PMID:26254797

  7. Working Memory Performance is Reduced in Children with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Browne, Wendy V.; Hindmarsh, Peter C.; Pasterski, Vickie; Hughes, Ieuan A.; Acerini, Carlo L.; Spencer, Debra; Neufeld, Sharon; Hines, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) experience impaired glucocorticoid production and are treated postnatally with glucocorticoids. Prior research with animals and other human populations indicates that glucocorticoids can influence memory, particularly working memory. We tested the hypothesis that children with CAH would show reduced working memory. Children in the United Kingdom, aged 7-11 years, with classical CAH (31 girls, 26 boys) were compared to their unaffected relatives (30 girls, 20 boys) on a test of working memory, the Digit Span test. Vocabulary was also assessed to measure verbal intelligence for control purposes. Children with CAH showed reduced working memory performance compared to controls, on both components of the Digit Span test: p = .008 for Digit Span Forward, and p = .027 for Digit Span Backward, and on a composite score, p = .004. These differences were of moderate size (d = .53 to .70). Similar differences were also seen in a subset of 23 matched pairs of children with CAH and their relatives (d = .78 to .92). There were no group differences on Vocabulary. Glucocorticoid abnormality, including treatment effects, could be responsible for the reduced Digit Span performance in children with CAH. Other factors related to CAH, such as salt-wasting crises, could also be involved. Additional research is needed to identify the cause of the memory reduction, which will help to determine if more rapid diagnosis or more precise glucocorticoid treatment would help prevent memory reduction. Educational interventions might also be considered for children with CAH. PMID:25496755

  8. Hormones, context, and "brain gender": a review of evidence from congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Jordan-Young, Rebecca M

    2012-06-01

    Brain organization theory suggests that steroid hormones during fetal development permanently organize the brain for gender, including patterns of sexuality, cognition, temperament, and interests that differ by sex. This widely-accepted theory has important implications for health, ranging from medical management of infants with intersex conditions to suggested etiologies for sex differences in autism, depression, and other mental health problems. Studies of genetic females with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), in which high prenatal androgens have been linked to both atypical genitals and "masculine" patterns of gender and sexuality, are particularly important. Based on a comprehensive review of research on CAH, this article demonstrates that such studies have neglected four broad categories of variables that plausibly affect psychosexual development: (1) physiological effects of CAH, including complex disruption of steroid hormones from early development onwards; (2) intensive medical intervention and surveillance, which many women with CAH describe as traumatic; (3) direct effects of genital morphology on sexuality (versus indirect effects that "masculine" genitals may have on gender socialization); and (4) expectations of masculinization that likely affect both the development and evaluation of gender and sexuality in CAH. Complex and iterative interactions among postnatal biological variables, medical interventions, and social context provide a more plausible explanation for atypicalities in psychology and behavior that have been reported for genetic females with CAH than the conventional explanation that early androgens have "masculinized" their brains. PMID:21962724

  9. Long-term outcome of prenatal treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Lajic, Svetlana; Nordenström, Anna; Hirvikoski, Tatja

    2008-01-01

    Prenatal treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) with dexamethasone to minimize the genital virilization of external genitalia of affected girls has been in use since the mid-1980s. The positive effect of reducing virilization is now established. However, experimental data from animal studies and observations on adverse medical events in human newborns have raised concerns about the long-term safety of the treatment. Most animal studies on prenatal treatment with synthetic glucocorticoids have been designed to mimic treatment for lung maturation in preterm infants. The primary focus has been on a possible impact on fetal programming and the development of the metabolic syndrome with insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and high blood pressure. Altered reactivity to stress as a function of differences in reactivity of the HPA axis and glucocorticoid receptor function have been assayed. Effects on cognition, especially memory, have been observed. In children at risk for CAH and treated prenatally with dexamethasone, no overall effects on full-scale IQ have been observed, but a negative effect on verbal working memory has been reported. Contradictory effects on social behavior with respect to shyness and inhibition have been discussed. There is an urgent need for in-depth studies of long-term outcome in prenatal treatment of CAH regarding both maternal side effects and possible negative metabolic as well as cognitive and behavioral effects in the growing fetus and the child in her development into adulthood. PMID:18493135

  10. Timing of surgery for feminizing genitoplasty in patients suffering from congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Eckoldt-Wolke, Felicitas

    2014-01-01

    This chapter refers only to female patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). CAH represents the largest subgroup of individuals with 46,XX disorders of sex development. The stimulation of the androgen production leads to a prenatal virilization among these girls. The phenotype is influenced by the severity of the enzyme defect, leading to a virilization of the external genitalia in varying degrees. On the other hand, the affected girls are clearly anatomically female with regularly developed female internal genitalia. Female puberty and potential female fertility are therefore to be expected. The operation to feminize the genitalia includes the separation of the sinus urogenitalis, the creation of a functionally wide enough vagina, the remodeling of the labioscrotal folds to create larger labia, and, if necessary, a reduction clitoroplasty. Considering the lack of scientific evidence, it is not possible to make definitive statements regarding the timing of surgery for girls with CAH. There are no studies that prove whether one- or two-stage surgery provides more or clearer advantages. PMID:25247657

  11. AB079. Phenotype variation in untreated 46,XX congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Faradz, Sultana MH; Utari, Agustini; Ediati, Annastasia; Ariani, Mahayu Dewi; Juniarto, Achmad Zulfa

    2015-01-01

    Simple virilizing congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by 21 hydroxylase deficiency leading to excessive androgen production. In infants with 46,XX karyotype, prenatal exposure of androgen overproduction leads to a gradual virilization of the external genital. Consequently, babies are born with an ambiguous genital which complicates sex assignment. Genital virilization will be progressive if these babies remain untreated. In country where newborn screening is available, patients with CAH are identified soon after birth and receive medication afterward, unlike in Indonesia. Many parents and patients with CAH did not seek healthcare professionals due to lack of information about inheritance and clinical manifestation of CAH. In Indonesia, newborn screening has not been applied yet; management and therapy for CAH are only available in some big cities but glucocorticoid medications need to be imported. Diagnosis was established using karyotype, hormonal and gene mutation analysis. In this study, we reported 30 patients with different physical appearance i.e., big phallus, one or two ending perineum, very severe chordae, labioscrotal fusion, complete labial fusion with scrotalization, masculization, no breast development, severe hyperpigmentation, appears Adam’s apple and short stature. Sex assignment is still a dilemma; some of the children were raised as males, females, or left undefined. The complex management of children and adults with CAH highlights the importance of raising awareness among medical personnels to promote early detection and treatment for CAH patients. Genetic counseling is essential for these families.

  12. An update on prenatal diagnosis and treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    New, Maria I; Abraham, Moolamannil; Yuen, Tony; Lekarev, Oksana

    2012-10-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia causes genital ambiguity in females affected with the severe form of the disease; yet the abnormality is preventable with prenatal dexamethasone treatment that must be given to the mother before the ninth week of gestation. In the period from 1978 to March 2011 we have made prenatal diagnosis in 719 pregnancies. Our results indicate that the average Prader score of those fetuses treated with dexamethasone was 1.7, which is much lower than the average Prader score of 3.73 in those not treated. While our data demonstrate no significant abnormalities in the long-range medical and cognitive outcomes in patients prenatally treated with dexamethasone, the current protocol involves invasive procedures such as chorionic villus sampling or amniocentesis, and all fetuses are treated unnecessarily for several weeks before the sex and the affection status of the fetus is known. We are collaborating with Dr. Dennis Lo in Hong Kong to develop a noninvasive protocol, whereby at the sixth to seventh week of gestation we can determine the sex and the affection status of the fetus by harvesting fetal DNA from the maternal plasma. The method will eliminate invasive procedures and unnecessary prenatal treatment and bring noninvasive prenatal diagnosis to underdeveloped areas where amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling are not available. PMID:23044876

  13. The frequency and the effects of 21-hydroxylase gene defects in congenital adrenal hyperplasia patients.

    PubMed

    Kirac, Deniz; Guney, Ahmet Ilter; Akcay, Teoman; Guran, Tulay; Ulucan, Korkut; Turan, Serap; Ergec, Deniz; Koc, Gulsah; Eren, Fatih; Kaspar, Elif Cigdem; Bereket, Abdullah

    2014-11-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a group of genetic endocrine disorders, caused by enzyme deficiencies in the conversion of cholesterol to cortisol. More than 90% of the cases have 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD). The clinical phenotype of the disease is classified as classic, the severe form, and nonclassic, the mild form. In this study, it was planned to characterize the mutations that cause 21-OHD in Turkish CAH patients by direct sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis and to investigate the type of CAH (classic or nonclassic type) that these mutations cause. A total of 124 CAH patients with 21-OHD and 100 healthy volunteers were recruited to the study. Most of the mutations were detected by direct sequencing. Large gene deletions/duplications/conversions were investigated with MLPA analysis. Results were evaluated statistically. At the end of our study, 66 different variations were detected including SNPs and deletions/duplications/conversions. Of these variations, 18 are novel, of which three cause amino acid substitutions. In addition, 15 SNPs which cause amino acid changes were identified among these variations. If similar results are obtained in different populations, these mutations, in particular the novel mutation 711 G>A, may be used as markers for prenatal diagnosis. PMID:25227725

  14. Molecular Diagnosis of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia in Iran: Focusing on CYP21A2 Gene.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Bahareh; Mahdieh, Nejat; Haghi Ashtiani, Mohammad-Taghi; Akbari, Mohammad-Taghi; Rabbani, Ali

    2011-06-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is characterized by impaired biosynthesis of cortisol. 21-hydroxylase deficiency is the most common cause of CAH affecting 1 in 10000-15000 live births over the world. The frequency of the disorder is very high in Iran due to frequent consanguineous marriages. Although biochemical tests are used to confirm the clinical diagnosis, molecular methods could help to define accurate diagnosis of the genetic defect. Recent molecular approaches such as polymerase chain reaction based methods could be used to detect carriers and identify different genotypes of the affected individuals in Iran which may cause variable degrees of clinical expression of the condition. Molecular tests are also applied for prenatal diagnosis, and genetic counseling of the affected families. Here, we are willing to delineate mechanisms underlying the disease, genetic causes of CAH, genetic approaches being used in the country and recommendations for health care improvement on the basis of the molecular and clinical genetics to control and diminish such a high prevalent disorder in Iran. Also, the previous studies on CAH in Iran are gathered and a diagnostic algorithm for the genetic causes is proposed. PMID:23056780

  15. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia and vanishing testis: rare case of male pseudohermaphroditism

    PubMed Central

    Ghanei, Azam; Mohammadzade, Golnaz; Zarepur, Ehsan; Soheilikhah, Sedigheh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) and vanishing testes are uncommon diseases that can result from hormonal and mechanical factors. Classic CAH is determined by ambiguous genitalia and increase in amount of 17-Hydroxyprogesterone. Simultaneous occurrence of CAH and vanishing testes is a rare condition. Case: A 22-year-old boy, known case of CAH who was diagnosed as female pseudohermaphroditism due to ambiguous genitalia, was referred to Shahid Sadoughi Hospital, Yazd, Iran with colicky abdominal pain and hematuria. Ultrasonography has been performed and prostate tissue was reported. Karyotyping was done because of uncertainty in primary diagnosis, which revealed 46XY. For finding location of testes, ultrasonography and MRI were done and nothing was found in abdomen, inguinal canal or scrotum. Inhibin B serum level was measured to find out whether testis tissue was present in the body, which was <1 pg/ml and vanishing testis was confirmed. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and treatment are essential to prevent further sequels and karyotyping for all patients with CAH is recommended. Lifelong treatment with synthetic glucocorticoid replacement is necessary. PMID:27294221

  16. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Caused by Biallelic TNXB Variants in Patients with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wuyan; Perritt, Ashley F; Morissette, Rachel; Dreiling, Jennifer L; Bohn, Markus-Frederik; Mallappa, Ashwini; Xu, Zhi; Quezado, Martha; Merke, Deborah P

    2016-09-01

    Some variants that cause autosomal-recessive congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) also cause hypermobility type Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) due to the monoallelic presence of a chimera disrupting two flanking genes: CYP21A2, encoding 21-hydroxylase, necessary for cortisol and aldosterone biosynthesis, and TNXB, encoding tenascin-X, an extracellular matrix protein. Two types of CAH tenascin-X (CAH-X) chimeras have been described with a total deletion of CYP21A2 and characteristic TNXB variants. CAH-X CH-1 has a TNXB exon 35 120-bp deletion resulting in haploinsufficiency, and CAH-X CH-2 has a TNXB exon 40 c.12174C>G (p.Cys4058Trp) variant resulting in a dominant-negative effect. We present here three patients with biallelic CAH-X and identify a novel dominant-negative chimera termed CAH-X CH-3. Compared with monoallelic CAH-X, biallelic CAH-X results in a more severe phenotype with skin features characteristic of classical EDS. We present evidence for disrupted tenascin-X function and computational data linking the type of TNXB variant to disease severity. PMID:27297501

  17. Quality of life, social situation, and sexual satisfaction, in adult males with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Falhammar, Henrik; Nyström, Helena Filipsson; Thorén, Marja

    2014-09-01

    To determine quality of life (QoL) in adult males with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). CAH males with 21-hydroxylase deficiency (n = 30), 19-67 years old, were compared with controls (n = 32). QoL was assessed using questionnaires on general living conditions and sexual issues, and the psychological well-being index (PGWB) form. Fewer CAH males than controls were students (3 vs. 25 %, P = 0.028) and more had blue-collar work (57 vs. 33 %, P = 0.023). Patients were less interested in sports (47 vs. 72 %, P = 0.034) and art/literature/film (10 vs. 47 %, P = 0.004). PGWB total score was 82.7 ± 13.7 versus 87.0 ± 11.1 (P = NS), but hydrocortisone/cortisone acetate treated scored lower than controls and prednisolone treated. Glucocorticoid over-treated had lower QoL than those with poor control (PGWB total score 77.1 ± 13.5 vs. 92.4 ± 11.1, P = 0.026) and controls (P = 0.025). Total PGWB score was positively correlated with adrenal androgens and steroid precursors. Subscale scores indicated that patients with late diagnosis were more depressive (12.1 ± 2.8 vs. 13.9 ± 1.4, P = 0.011) and had a lower self-control (11.3 ± 3.6 vs. 13.1 ± 1.0, P = 0.019) compared with controls. Sexual satisfaction was similar in spite of more patients being sexually inactive (27 vs. 6 %, P = 0.040). Adult CAH males differed from controls with respect to type of occupation and spare time interests but had similar QoL despite being less sexually active. Optimizing glucocorticoid therapy might further improve QoL. Some disadvantages found in patients diagnosed late will hopefully not be seen in patients diagnosed by neonatal screening, but this has yet to be studied. PMID:24408051

  18. The nasopalpebral lipoma-coloboma syndrome: a new autosomal dominant dysplasia-malformation syndrome with congenital nasopalpebral lipomas, eyelid colobomas, telecanthus, and maxillary hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Penchaszadeh, V B; Velasquez, D; Arrivillaga, R

    1982-04-01

    We describe a new autosomal dominant dysplasia-malformation syndrome from eight affected individuals in three generations of a Venezuelan family. It is characterized by congenital symmetrical upper lid and nasopalpebral lipomas, bilateral symmetrical upper and lower palpebral colobomas located at the junction of the inner and middle thirds of the lids, telecanthus, and maxillary hypoplasia. Affected individuals have a broad forehead, window's peak, abnormal pattern of eyebrows and eyelashes, and maldevelopment of the lacrimal punctae. Interorbital distance is normal, but interpupillary distance is increased due to divergent strabismus originating from visual interference from inner canthal masses. Persistent epiphora, conjunctival hyperemia, and corneal (and less frequently lens) opacities are a secondary consequence of the defect of the lacrimal punctae and the inability to close the lids completely. The syndrome has complete penetrance and a rather narrow range of expressivity. The primary defect could involve a dysplasia of adipose tissue leading to nasopalpebral and upper lid lipomas during embryogenesis, with the rest of the malformations being secondary to interference of morphogenesis of the mid-upperface developmental field from the lipomatous hamartomas. Alternatively, a central rather than a peripheral mechanism of malformation might be considered, such as defective migration of neural crest cells. PMID:7091184

  19. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: Current Surgical Management in United States Academic Medical Centers

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, Renea M; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Kurzrock, Eric A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Controversy exists regarding the necessity and timing of genitoplasty in girls with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). Our knowledge of surgical preferences is limited to retrospective series from single institutions and physician surveys which have suggested a high rate of early reconstruction. Our objective was to evaluate current CAH surgical treatment in academic centers. Methods We queried the FPSC database to identify all girls under 18 years of age with a diagnosis of CAH between 2009 and 2012. Procedures were identified by CPT codes for vaginoplasty, clitoroplasty and other genital procedures. Type of reconstruction, age at surgery and surgeon-volume were analyzed. Results There were a total of 2,614 females with a diagnosis of CAH seen at 60 institutions identified in the database. Of infants who were less than 12 months of age between 2009 and 2011, as few as 18% proceeded to surgery within a one to four year follow up period. Of those referred to a pediatric urologist, 46% proceeded to surgery. Of girls who had surgery before 2 years of age, 73% underwent clitoroplasty and 89% vaginoplasty; 68% had a combined procedure. A medium- or high-volume surgeon was involved in 63% of cases. Conclusions Many girls with CAH did not proceed to early reconstructive surgery. Of those referred to surgeons, possibly the most virilized girls, about half proceeded to early surgery and almost all had vaginoplasty as a component of surgery. About two-thirds of procedures were performed by medium- or high- volume surgeons indicative of DSD surgical centralization. PMID:25817160

  20. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Due to Steroid 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Speiser, Phyllis W.; Azziz, Ricardo; Baskin, Laurence S.; Ghizzoni, Lucia; Hensle, Terry W.; Merke, Deborah P.; Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.; Miller, Walter L.; Montori, Victor M.; Oberfield, Sharon E.; Ritzen, Martin; White, Perrin C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We developed clinical practice guidelines for congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). Participants: The Task Force included a chair, selected by The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee (CGS), ten additional clinicians experienced in treating CAH, a methodologist, and a medical writer. Additional experts were also consulted. The authors received no corporate funding or remuneration. Consensus Process: Consensus was guided by systematic reviews of evidence and discussions. The guidelines were reviewed and approved sequentially by The Endocrine Society’s CGS and Clinical Affairs Core Committee, members responding to a web posting, and The Endocrine Society Council. At each stage, the Task Force incorporated changes in response to written comments. Conclusions: We recommend universal newborn screening for severe steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency followed by confirmatory tests. We recommend that prenatal treatment of CAH continue to be regarded as experimental. The diagnosis rests on clinical and hormonal data; genotyping is reserved for equivocal cases and genetic counseling. Glucocorticoid dosage should be minimized to avoid iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome. Mineralocorticoids and, in infants, supplemental sodium are recommended in classic CAH patients. We recommend against the routine use of experimental therapies to promote growth and delay puberty; we suggest patients avoid adrenalectomy. Surgical guidelines emphasize early single-stage genital repair for severely virilized girls, performed by experienced surgeons. Clinicians should consider patients’ quality of life, consulting mental health professionals as appropriate. At the transition to adulthood, we recommend monitoring for potential complications of CAH. Finally, we recommend judicious use of medication during pregnancy and in symptomatic patients with nonclassic CAH. PMID:20823466

  1. Male genitoplasty for 46 XX congenital adrenal hyperplasia patients presenting late and reared as males

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shilpa; Gupta, Devendra K.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the clinical profile and management of 46 XX Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) patients presenting with severe virilization and assigned a male gender. Materials and Methods: Of 173 children diagnosed with CAH at the Pediatric Intersex Clinic since 1980, seven children with CAH presented late with severe virilization and were reared as males. All of them were assigned the male sex with removal of the female adnexa. Six were treated with male genitoplasty. Appropriate hormonal supplementation was offered after puberty. Results: The mean age at presentation was 14.2 years (7 – 21). Six patients had presented after puberty, only one at seven years of age. Staged male genitoplasty comprising of chordee correction, male urethroplasty, and bilateral testicular prosthesis was performed. The female adnexa (uterus, ovaries, most of the upper vagina, and the fallopian tubes) were removed. The mental makeup was masculine in six and bigender in one. Bilateral mastectomy was performed at puberty in all. Hormonal treatment comprised of glucocorticoids and testosterone. Six patients were comfortable with the outcome of the masculinizing genitoplasty. One had a short-sized phallus. One had repeated attacks of urinary tract infection arising from the retained lower vaginal pouch. Social adjustments were good in all, except in one who had a bigender mental makeup. Conclusion: CAH patients with severe virilization presenting late and reared as males are extremely rare. However, the assigned gender can be retained adequately as males, meeting the socioeconomic compulsions of the society. The results are satisfactory following appropriate surgical procedures and hormonal supplementation. PMID:23226638

  2. Cortical Bone Mineral Density in Patients with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia due to 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    El-Maouche, Diala; Collier, Suzanne; Prasad, Mala; Reynolds, James C; Merke, Deborah P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Prior studies reveal that bone mineral density (BMD) in congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is mostly in the osteopenic range and is associated with lifetime glucocorticoid dose. The forearm, a measure of cortical bone density, has not been evaluated. Objective We aimed to evaluate BMD at various sites, including the forearm, and the factors associated with low BMD in CAH patients. Methods Eighty CAH adults (47 classic, 33 nonclassic) underwent dual-energy-x-ray absorptiometry and laboratory and clinical evaluation. BMD Z-scores at the AP spine, total hip, femoral neck, forearm, and whole body were examined in relation to phenotype, body mass index, current glucocorticoid dose, average 5-year glucocorticoid dose, vitamin D, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, androstenedione, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS). Results Reduced BMD (T-score < −1 at hip, spine, or forearm) was present in 52% and was more common in classic than nonclassic patients (P = .005), with the greatest difference observed at the forearm (P = .01). Patients with classic compared to nonclassic CAH, had higher 17-hydroxyprogesterone (P = .005), lower DHEAS (P = .0002), and higher non-traumatic fracture rate (P = .0005). In a multivariate analysis after adjusting for age, sex, height standard deviation, phenotype, and cumulative glucocorticoid exposure, higher DHEAS was independently associated with higher BMD at the spine, radius, and whole body. Conclusion Classic CAH patients have lower BMD than nonclassic patients, with the most affected area being the forearm. This first study of forearm BMD in CAH patients suggests that low DHEAS may be associated with weak cortical bone independent of glucocorticoid exposure. PMID:24862755

  3. A rare combination: congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21 hydroxylase deficiency and Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kendirci, Havva Nur Peltek; Aycan, Zehra; Çetinkaya, Semra; Baş, Veysel Nijat; Ağladıoğlu, Sebahat Yılmaz; Önder, Aşan

    2012-12-01

    A combination of Turner syndrome (TS) and classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is rare. A one-day-old newborn was referred to our hospital with ambiguous genitalia. The parents were third-degree relatives. The infant's weight was 3350g (50-75p), and the head circumference was 34.5cm (50p). The gonads were nonpalpable. Presence of a 3 cm phallus, one urogenital opening into the perineum, and incomplete labial fusion were identified. Laboratory tests revealed a classical type of CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Karyotyping revealed a 45X0(35)/46XX(22) pattern with negative sex-determining region Y (SRY) on gene analysis. At the most recent follow-up visit, the patient appeared to be in good health - her height was 70.4 cm [-1.5 standard deviation (SD)] and her weight was 9.8 kg (0.3 SD). She was receiving hydrocortisone in a dose of 10 mg/m²/day, fludrocortisone acetate in a dose of 0.075 mg/day, and oral salt of 1 g/day. System examinations were normal. The patient's electrolyte levels were found to be normal and she was in good metabolic control. The findings of this patient demonstrate that routine karyotyping during investigation of patients with sexual differentiation disorders can reveal TS. Additionally, signs of virilism should always be investigated at diagnosis or during physical examinations for follow-up of TS cases. SRY analysis should be performed primarily when signs of virilism are observed. CAH should also be considered in patients with negative SRY. PMID:23261864

  4. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia: long-term evaluation of feminizing genitoplasty and psychosocial aspects.

    PubMed

    Gupta, D K; Shilpa, Sharma; Amini, A C; Gupta, M; Aggarwal, Gautam; Deepika, Gupta; Kamlesh, Khatri

    2006-11-01

    Analyzing the long-term outcome in females with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is crucial to evaluate effectiveness of treatment strategies. The aim of the study was to evaluate the long-term results in patients with CAH after feminizing surgery from the pediatric intersex clinic. Of 163 patients of CAH being followed (1980-2005), 50 responded for review. The patients had undergone feminizing genitoplasty and hormonal therapy. Evaluation included filling a detailed questionnaire along with physical examination and a structured interview in privacy. Assessment was performed for cosmetic results (50), psychosocial adjustment (42) above 5-year age, and functional outcome in 19 cases above 14-year age. Mean age at clitoroplasty was 3.6 years (1-16 years) and at time of the study was 14.6 years (4-23 years), with a mean post-op follow up of 6 years after the final surgery (6 months-17 years). The cosmetic outcome of clitoroplasty was excellent in 37, satisfactory in 10, and poor in 3. Gender identity was female, male, and mixed in 45, 4, and 1, respectively. The attitude to self and life was positive in 36 and negative in 6. The functional outcome of vaginoplasty was satisfactory, unsatisfactory, and undetermined in 11, 4, and 4, respectively. Endocrine control was satisfactory in 36/50. A novel assessment system has been adopted for analyzing the results of clitoroplasty and vaginoplasty. Endocrine control and surgical treatment are complimentary to each other to achieve satisfactory results in majority of CAH patients. PMID:16947028

  5. [Health status of adults with congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency].

    PubMed

    Bachelot, Anne; Touraine, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is the commonest genetic endocrine disorder. Mutations in the 21-hydroxylase gene account for 95 % of cases. CAH is classified according to symptoms and signs and to age of presentation. The clinical phenotype is typically classified as classic, the severe form, or nonclassic (NCF), the mild or late-onset form. Classic CAH is a life-long chronic disorder. In childhood, treatment focuses on genital surgery and optimization of growth and pubertal development. Priorities change with increasing age, typically focusing on fertility in early adult life and prevention of metabolic syndrome and osteoporosis in middle and older age. Recent studies highlight the importance of long-term follow-up of these patients and of transitional care between childhoods to adult life. In nonclassic CAH women, subfertility is mild compared with the classic form and seems to be mainly due to hormonal imbalance. Menstrual cycle or ovulation disorders observed in these women who consulted for infertility are in most cases corrected by hydrocortisone treatment, which led to simultaneous lowering of plasma androgen levels and rapid occurrence of pregnancy. Hydrocortisone also reduces the incidence of miscarriages. Several studies have reported that near 60 % of nonclassic CAH patients are carriers of a severe mutation. These patients may therefore give birth to a child with the classical form of CAH if their partner is also carrying a severe mutation. Due to the high frequency of CYP21A2 mutations in the general population, it is essential to genotype the partner of NC-CAH patients with one severe mutation to offer genetic counselling. PMID:24630263

  6. Splicing mutation in CYP21 associated with delayed presentation of salt-wasting congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, B.; Patel, S.V.; Pelczar, J.V.

    1995-07-03

    Patients with salt-wasting congenital adrenal hyperplasia (SW-CAH) most commonly carry an A-G transition at nucleotide 656 (nt 656 A{r_arrow}G), causing abnormal splicing of exons 2 and 3 in CYP21, the gene encoding active steroid 21-hydroxylase. Affected infants are severely deficient in cortisol and aldosterone, and usually come to medical attention during the neonatal period. We report on 2 affected boys, homozygous for the nt 656 mutation, who thrived in early infancy, but suffered salt-wasting crises unusually late in infancy, at 3.5 and 5.5 months, respectively. Laboratory studies at presentation showed hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, dehydration, and acidosis; serum aldosterone was low in spite of markedly elevated plasma renin activity. Basal 17-hydroxyprogesterone levels were only moderately elevated, yet the stimulated levels were more typical of severe, classic CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Genomic DNA from the patients was analyzed. Southern blot showed no major deletions or rearrangements. CYP21-specific amplification by polymerase chain reaction, coupled with allele-specific hybridization using wild-type and mutant probes at each of 9 sites for recognized disease-causing mutations, revealed a single, homozygous mutation in each patient: nt 656 A{r_arrow}G. These results were confirmed by sequence analysis. We conclude that the common nt 656 A{r_arrow}G mutation is sometimes associated with delayed phenotypic expression of SW-CAH. We speculate that variable splicing of the mutant CYP21 may modify the clinical manifestation of this disease. 22 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. Anorexia nervosa in congenital adrenal hyperplasia: long-term follow-up of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Brand, M; Schoof, E; Partsch C-J; Peter, M; Hoepffner, W; Dörr, H G; Sippell, W G

    2000-01-01

    Studies which evaluate the psychosocial development and integration of adult female congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) patients are rare but show that patients with the salt wasting form are significantly more virilized and more frequently single and childless. Major complaints are irregular menstruation, hirsutism, acne, obesity, deep voice, and cushingoid features. Surprisingly, a higher prevalence of psychosomatic disorders has not yet been described. Since anorexia nervosa (AN) has not yet been described in patients with CAH, we here report 4 cases of female CAH patients who developed AN during adolescence. Diagnosis of CAH was made between the age of 10 days and 3 years. Three patients suffer from the simple-virilizing form of CAH, one patient has a mild salt wasting CAH. Genital malformation varied from Prader stage II to IV. All 4 patients were compound heterozygotes for mutations/deletions of the CYP21B gene. Control of substitution therapy consisting of hydrocortisone and fluorocortisone was good. AN developed at ages 12, 13, 17, and 21 years (ICD 10 criteria for AN are BMI below 17.5 kg/m2, deliberate weight loss, body image disturbance, and primary or secondary amenorrhoea). Diagnosis of AN was established by psychiatrists and/or psychologists. All four patients showed an impressive and deliberate weight loss between 13 and 20 kg within 6 months, had primary or secondary amenorrhoea, and presented with BMI between 13 and 17.9 kg/m2. All patients received psychological treatment and recovered. However, one patient had a severe relapse of AN. Two patients are now married and one has a healthy son. These cases demonstrate that the diagnosis of CAH is compatible with the development of AN and illustrate the importance of providing treatment for CAH patients that encompasses not only medical but also psychological and social care. PMID:11026757

  8. Ethnic disparity in 21-hydroxylase gene mutations identified in Pakistani congenital adrenal hyperplasia patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a group of autosomal recessive disorders caused by defects in the steroid 21 hydroxylase gene (CYP21A2). We studied the spectrum of mutations in CYP21A2 gene in a multi-ethnic population in Pakistan to explore the genetics of CAH. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted for the identification of mutations CYP21A2 and their phenotypic associations in CAH using ARMS-PCR assay. Results Overall, 29 patients were analyzed for nine different mutations. The group consisted of two major forms of CAH including 17 salt wasters and 12 simple virilizers. There were 14 phenotypic males and 15 females representing all the major ethnic groups of Pakistan. Parental consanguinity was reported in 65% cases and was equally distributed in the major ethnic groups. Among 58 chromosomes analyzed, mutations were identified in 45 (78.6%) chromosomes. The most frequent mutation was I2 splice (27%) followed by Ile173Asn (26%), Arg 357 Trp (19%), Gln319stop, 16% and Leu308InsT (12%), whereas Val282Leu was not observed in this study. Homozygosity was seen in 44% and heterozygosity in 34% cases. I2 splice mutation was found to be associated with SW in the homozygous. The Ile173Asn mutation was identified in both SW and SV forms. Moreover, Arg357Trp manifested SW in compound heterozygous state. Conclusion Our study showed that CAH exists in our population with ethnic difference in the prevalence of mutations examined. PMID:21329531

  9. Growth impairment in a boy with late-onset congenital adrenal hyperplasia and anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Niedziela, M; Sippell, W

    2010-03-01

    Treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) in its salt-wasting form with appropriate doses of glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids should promote growth, puberty and final height in a similar to normal pattern. However, the individual requirements for these drugs to normalize the hormonal profile and to achieve a physiologic growth pattern may differ. Moreover, the time of onset of puberty is also unpredictable since the course of the disease may predispose for precocity. The aim of this study was to explain the unexpected arrest of growth during puberty in a boy with late-onset CAH, who had been treated with glucocorticoid from early childhood. A short course of GnRH agonist treatment was also introduced in later years. The growth chart reflects two periods of impaired growth velocity preceded by weight loss. The reason for the first decline is difficult to prove retrospectively, but during the second episode the boy became both clinically and hormonally hypogonadal. At that time the anorexia nervosa (AN) was diagnosed according to APA DSM-IV criteria. We conclude that there were several reasons for the discontinued growth spurt and reduced final height in this boy with CAH: (a) early variant of puberty and subsequent late treatment with GnRH agonist, (b) AN possibly occurring during mid-childhood and clearly during puberty and (c) the repeated use of high doses of glucocorticoids. AN, a relatively rare disorder in boys, appears to have had a significant negative effect on this patient's growth and should be considered in the differential diagnosis in CAH children with impaired growth. PMID:20198557

  10. Bone mineral density in young adult women with congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Raizada, Nishant; Jyotsna, Viveka P.; Upadhyay, Ashish Datt; Gupta, Nandita

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is equipoise regarding the status of bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), where patients need to be on long-term low-dose steroids. Objective: We aimed to evaluate BMD at the hip, spine and forearm in women with CAH and compare it to healthy young adult women of the same age range. Subjects and Methods: Fifteen adult women with CAH with age ranging from 18 to 40 years (mean ± standard deviation = 27.5 ± 6.2 years) underwent dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry along with laboratory evaluation. BMD at lumbar spine, hip, forearm along with T-scores were measured. Serum total calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, 25 hydroxy Vitamin D, intact parathyroid hormone, total testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone were assayed. History of any fractures in the past was taken. Fifteen healthy women in the same age range were taken as controls for comparison. Results: The BMD at hip (0.85 ± 0.02 g/cm2) in CAH was significantly lower as compared with controls (0.92 ± 0.03 g/cm2, P = 0.029). BMD at lumbar spine was also reduced (0.96 ± 0.02 vs. 1.03 ± 0.03, P = 0.057). The BMD at forearm was not significantly different between CAH and controls. The mean Vitamin D was 9.8 ng/ml (deficient range). There was no history of fractures in CAH. Conclusion: Young adult CAH women had lower BMD at spine and hip than healthy young adult women of the same age range. The forearm BMD was not different from controls. No change in fracture frequency was present. Patients with CAH being treated with steroids are at increased risk of osteopenia, and their bone health needs to be monitored. PMID:26904470

  11. A Case of Bilateral Testicular Tumors Subsequently Diagnosed as Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Due to 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Yan-Kun; Sha, Yan-Wei; Ding, Lu; Liu, Wei-Wu; Song, Yue-Qiang; Lin, Jin; He, Xue-Mei; Qiu, Ping-Ping; Zhang, Ling; Li, Ping

    2016-01-01

    21-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) caused congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a group of autosomal recessive genetic disorders resulting from mutations in genes involved with cortisol (CO) synthesis in the adrenal glands. Testicular adrenal rest tumors (TARTs) are rarely the presenting symptoms of CAH. Here, we describe a case of simple virilizing CAH with TARTs, in a 15-year-old boy. The patient showed physical signs of precocious puberty. The levels of blood adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), urinary 17-ketone steroids (17-KS), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), and serum progesterone (PRGE) were elevated, whereas those of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and CO were reduced. Computed tomography (CT) of the adrenal glands and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the testes showed a soft tissue density (more pronounced on the right side) and an irregularly swollen mass (more pronounced on the left side), respectively. Pathological examination of a specimen of the mass indicated polygonal/circular eosinophilic cytoplasm, cord-like arrangement of interstitial cells, and lipid pigment in the cytoplasm. Immunohistochemistry results precluded a diagnosis of Leydig cell tumors. DNA sequencing revealed a hackneyed homozygous mutation, I2g, on intron 2 of the CYP21A2 gene. The patient’s symptoms improved after a three-month of dexamethasone therapy. Recent radiographic data showed reduced hyperplastic adrenal nodules and testicular tumors. A diagnosis of TART should be considered and prioritized in CAH patients with testicular tumors. Replacement therapy using a sufficient amount of dexamethasone in this case helps combat TART. PMID:26985347

  12. Broadening the Spectrum of Ehlers Danlos Syndrome in Patients With Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wuyan; Perritt, Ashley F.; Dreiling, Jennifer L.; Arai, Andrew E.; Sachdev, Vandana; Hannoush, Hwaida; Mallappa, Ashwini; Xu, Zhi; McDonnell, Nazli B.; Quezado, Martha; Merke, Deborah P.

    2015-01-01

    Context: The contiguous gene deletion syndrome (CAH-X) was described in a subset (7%) of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) patients with a TNXA/TNXB chimera, resulting in deletions of CYP21A2, encoding 21-hydroxylase necessary for cortisol biosynthesis, and TNXB, encoding the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-X (TNX). This TNXA/TNXB chimera is characterized by a 120-bp deletion in exon 35 and results in TNXB haploinsufficiency, disrupted TGF-β signaling, and an Ehlers Danlos syndrome phenotype. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine the genetic status of TNXB and resulting protein defects in CAH patients with a CAH-X phenotype but not the previously described TNXA/TNXB chimera. Design, Settings, Participants, and Intervention: A total of 246 unrelated CAH patients were screened for TNXB defects. Genetic defects were investigated by Southern blotting, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, Sanger, and next-generation sequencing. Dermal fibroblasts and tissue were used for immunoblotting, immunohistochemical, and coimmunoprecipitation experiments. Main Outcome Measures: The genetic and protein status of tenascin-X in phenotypic CAH-X patients was measured. Results: Seven families harbor a novel TNXB missense variant c.12174C>G (p.C4058W) and a clinical phenotype consistent with hypermobility-type Ehlers Danlos syndrome. Fourteen CAH probands carry previously described TNXA/TNXB chimeras, and seven unrelated patients carry the novel TNXB variant, resulting in a CAH-X prevalence of 8.5%. This highly conserved pseudogene-derived variant in the TNX fibrinogen-like domain is predicted to be deleterious and disulfide bonded, results in reduced dermal elastin and fibrillin-1 staining and altered TGF-β1 binding, and represents a novel TNXA/TNXB chimera. Tenascin-X protein expression was normal in dermal fibroblasts, suggesting a dominant-negative effect. Conclusions: CAH-X syndrome is commonly found in CAH due to 21-hydroxylase

  13. Mutation detection of CYP21A2 gene in nonclassical congenital adrenal hyperplasia patients with premature pubarche

    PubMed Central

    Kolahdouz, Mahsa; Hashemipour, Mahin; Khanahmad, Hossein; Rabbani, Bahareh; Salehi, Mansoor; Rabbani, Ali; Ansari, Arman; Naseri, Mona Mobalegh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to mutations in the gene encoding 21-hydroxilase is one of common disease with an autosomal recessive form. In this study, our aim is to detect the prevalence of eight common mutations in nonclassical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH). Materials and Methods: A total of 30 patients with clinical and laboratory evidence of NCAH was selected. Gene-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) without contamination of pseudogene was carried out, and PCR product of this step was used to amplification-refractory mutation system PCR on eight common mutations in CYP21A2 gene. Results: Two heterozygote patients for I2G mutation and six heterozygote patients for Q318X mutation is reported in our study. These mutations associated with the classic form of CAH, and heterozygotes presented with NC symptom, including premature pubarche and hirsutism. Conclusion: There are some data about the association of the mutation with the clinical form of CAH including classic (salt-wasting and simple virilizing) and NC form. I2G and Q318X mutations were reported in classic form in homozygote state, but the heterozygote form associated with NC form. CAH diagnosis with NC symptom and with measurement of 17-hydroxyprogestrone as NCAH is not a trusted assessment and require to molecular analysis for accurate diagnosis. PMID:27099846

  14. Erroneous prenatal diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia owing to a duplication of the CYP21A2 gene.

    PubMed

    Lekarev, O; Tafuri, K; Lane, A H; Zhu, G; Nakamoto, J M; Buller-Burckle, A M; Wilson, T A; New, M I

    2013-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is an autosomal recessive disorder where steroidogenesis in the adrenal cortex is impaired. The most common form is caused by 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD). Classical 21OHD is characterized by glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid deficiency and by overproduction of adrenal androgens. The diagnosis rests on biochemical and genetic analyses. In families with history of CAH, prenatal genetic diagnosis is offered. We herein present a case of an infant whose parents were identified to carry mutations on the CYP21A2 gene. The fetal DNA analysis demonstrated that the fetus carried a paternal exon 8 (Q318X) mutation and a maternal exon 8 (R356X) mutation. The fetus was presumed to be affected with CAH, yet his clinical presentation at birth was not consistent with the diagnosis. Repeated genetic analysis identified a paternal CYP21A2 gene duplication with Q318X mutation on one copy of CYP21A2. We conclude that a duplication of the CYP21A2 gene should be suspected when clinical and hormonal findings do not support the genetic diagnosis. Furthermore, because individuals with Q318X mutation frequently have a duplication of the CYP21A2 gene, when Q318X is detected, it is important to distinguish the severe point mutation in single gene copy alleles from the non-deficient variant in gene-duplicated alleles. PMID:23269230

  15. Lethal hypoplasia and developmental anomalies of the lungs in a newborn with intrauterine adrenal hemorrhage and cerebral infarcts: a proposed pulmonary disruption sequence.

    PubMed

    Lertsburapa, Terakeith; Vargas, Diana; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn; Tantravahi, Umadevi; Gündoğan, Füsun; DeLaMonte, Suzanne; Coyle, Mara G; De Paepe, Monique E

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 31-week-gestation male newborn who died soon after birth from intractable respiratory failure and persistent pulmonary hypertension. The pregnancy had been complicated by intermittent bleeding between 13 and 20 weeks' gestation, attributed to peripheral placental separation, as well as bilateral fetal adrenal hemorrhage, first detected at 17 weeks' gestation. Postmortem examination revealed small, calcified adrenal glands as well as several remote cerebral and cerebellar infarcts. The lungs were hypoplastic (lung weight/body weight ratio: 1.64%; 10th percentile for 28-36 weeks' gestation: 2.27%) and distorted by exaggerated lobulation. Microscopically, the lungs exhibited several developmental anomalies, including focal acinar dysgenesis suggestive of arrested development in the pseudoglandular stage of development (8-16 weeks' gestation) (mainly in the upper lobes), and features of bronchial obstruction, including focal lobular hyperplasia and microcystic maldevelopment (mainly in the lower lobes). The adrenal and cerebral findings were consistent with a severe early-gestation hypoxic-ischemic insult, likely related to peripheral placental separation and chronic abruption. The co-occurrence and timing of these well-recognized hypoxic lesions provide further evidence that certain developmental lung anomalies, such as focal acinar dysplasia, focal lobular hyperplasia, and microcystic maldevelopment, may, at least in some cases, have a hypoxic/ischemic etiology. PMID:24971487

  16. Embryological and molecular development of the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Ross, Ian L; Louw, Graham J

    2015-03-01

    In this mini review, the embryological and functional development of the adrenal glands is presented from a molecular perspective. While acknowledging that this is a highly complex series of events, the processes are described in simple and broad strokes in a single text for the reader who is interested in this field but is not an active researcher. The origin of the adrenal glands is in the mesodermal ridge as early as the fourth week of gestation. Between the eighth and ninth weeks of gestation, the adrenal glands are encapsulated and this results in the presence of a distinct organ. There have been great strides in deciphering the very complicated molecular aspects of adrenal gland development in which multiple transcription factors have been identified, directing the adrenogonadal primordium into the adrenal cortex, kidney, or bipotential gonad. Adrenocorticotrophic hormone is critical for early development of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis. Several mutations in transcription factors, responsible for normal adrenal gland development have been found to induce the familial syndrome of congenital adrenal hypoplasia or neoplasia. PMID:25255746

  17. Androgen and the Development of Human Sex-Typical Behavior: Rough-and-Tumble Play and Sex of Preferred Playmates in Children with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, Melissa; Kaufman, Francine R.

    1994-01-01

    Examined the rough-and-tumble play and gender of preferred playmates in three- to eight-year olds with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH)--hypothesized to masculinize behaviors that show sex differences--and in unaffected three- to eight-year-old relatives. Found that CAH girls did not exhibit increased levels of masculine behavior when compared…

  18. Prenatal Hormones and Postnatal Socialization by Parents as Determinants of Male-Typical Toy Play in Girls With Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pasterski, Vickie L.; Geffner, Mitchell E.; Brain, Caroline; Hindmarsh, Peter; Brook, Charles; Hines, Melissa

    2005-01-01

    Toy choices of 3- to 10-year-old children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) and of their unaffected siblings were assessed. Also assessed was parental encouragement of sex-typed toy play. Girls with CAH displayed more male-typical toy choices than did their unaffected sisters, whereas boys with and without CAH did not differ. Mothers and…

  19. Optic nerve hypoplasia in children.

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, S. M.; Dutton, G. N.

    1990-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is characterised by a diminished number of optic nerve fibres in the optic nerve(s) and until recently was thought to be rare. It may be associated with a wide range of other congenital abnormalities. Its pathology, clinical features, and the conditions associated with it are reviewed. Neuroendocrine disorders should be actively sought in any infant or child with bilateral ONH. Early recognition of the disorder may in some cases be life saving. Images PMID:2191713

  20. Prenatal treatment of mothers with fetuses at risk for congenital adrenal hyperplasia: How relevant is it to Indian context?

    PubMed

    Eunice, Marumudi; Ammini, Ariachery C

    2013-05-01

    Management of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) from embryonic stage to adulthood is a critical challenge. We would like to comment on some of the practical difficulties in offering prenatal treatment for CAH-affected fetuses in Indian population. For initiating the prenatal dexamethasone (DEX) treatment, all members of the family need to be informed about the risks and benefits of the treatment to the mother and the fetus as well as about the available invasive diagnostic tests to determine the gender and genotype of the fetus. Prenatal sex disclosure is not routinely practiced in India due to high female feticide rate. The treatment has to be given to both unaffected and affected female fetuses until the determination of prenatal sex. Moreover, most of our populations reside in rural areas where the antenatal care is not adequate. Prenatal DEX treatment in India outruns the risks rather than the benefits, as evident from the literature on the safety of pregnant mothers and fetuses. PMID:23869292

  1. Identification of novel mutations in STAR gene in patients with lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia: a first report from India.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Lakshmi; Joshi, Rajesh; Das, Dhanjit Kumar; Rao, Sudha; Sanghavi, Daksha; Babu, Shiny; Tamhankar, Parag M

    2013-01-01

    Lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (LCAH), a rare disorder of steroid biosynthesis, is the most severe form of CAH. We report novel molecular findings of three unrelated infants with LCAH diagnosed at our center. A known missense mutation c.653C>T (p.A218V) and two novel mutations [premature termination c.441G>A (or p.W147X) and frameshift deletion c.del815G (or p.R272PfsX35)] were identified after complete sequencing of the STAR gene. Prenatal diagnosis was carried out for the family with mutation c.815delG by molecular testing wherein the fetus was found to be homozygous for the mutation. This is the first report of molecular diagnosis and prenatal testing for LCAH from India. PMID:23748066

  2. Non-Classic Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia due to 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency that Developed into Symptomatic Severe Hyponatremia.

    PubMed

    Goto, Sawako; Ookawara, Susumu; Takase, Kaoru; Goto, Mizue; Nakayama, Takahiro; Oyama, Yuhta; Tabei, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    A 78-year-old woman diagnosed with non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency had been under glucocorticoid replacement therapy since the age of 17 years. After several weeks of suffering from gastroenteritis with vomiting, she presented with disturbance of consciousness, hypotension, dehydration, and severe hyponatremia (108 mEq/L) and a markedly increased serum vasopressin concentration (45.5 pg/mL). She regained consciousness after correcting her body-fluid balance with hypertonic saline and intravenous hydrocortisone sodium therapy. Her hyponatremia was likely caused by extra-renal sodium loss and impaired water excretion induced by an increase of serum vasopressin due to volume depletion and glucocorticoid deficiency. PMID:25986269

  3. Variants of the CYP21A2 and CYP21A1P genes in congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsien-Hsiung

    2013-03-15

    More than 90% of congenital adrenal hyperplasia cases are caused by mutation of the CYP21A2 gene which converted from the CYP21A1P pseudogene. Sizes of the 3.7-kb TaqI-produced fragment that exists downstream of the TNXB gene, representing the CYP21A2, and the 3.2-kb TaqI-produced fragment that exists downstream of the XA gene, representing the CYP21A1P pseudogene, are used as size markers in the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. However, the size of and location for distinguishing these two genes might not be completely precise or reliable. Recent studies indicated that the 3.2-kb TaqI fragment may include multiple variants of chimeric CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 genes, a haplotype with dual mutations of IVS2-12A/C>G and 707-714del, and a functional CYP21A2 gene caused by small-scale conversions of the 5' end of the CYP21A1P sequence. In addition, a 3.7-kb TaqI fragment with more than 4 haplotypes of CYP21A2-like downstream of the TNXA gene and a 6.2-kb TaqI fragment of the CYP21A2 that results from a nucleotide mutation in the 3' end sequence were also identified. Accordingly, these structural variants reveal that traditional recognition of these two genes based on the TaqI fragment size analysis may lead to misinterpretation and increasingly interfere with the molecular diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. PMID:23313747

  4. Analysis of DAX1 (NR0B1) and steroidogenic factor-1 (SF1/Ad4BP, NR5A1) in children and adults with primary adrenal failure: ten years' experience

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Gu, Wen-Xia; Ozisik, Gokhan; To, Wing S.; Owen, Catherine J.; Jameson, J. Larry; Achermann, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Context Primary adrenal failure is a life-threatening condition that can be caused by a range of etiologies, including autoimmune, metabolic, and developmental disorders. The nuclear receptors DAX1 (NR0B1) and steroidogenic factor-1 (SF1/Ad4BP, NR5A1) play an important role in adrenal development and function, and mutations in these transcription factors have been found in patients with adrenal hypoplasia. Objective To investigate the prevalence of DAX1 and SF1 mutations in children and adults with primary adrenal failure of unknown etiology (i.e., not caused by congenital adrenal hyperplasia, adrenoleukodystrophy, autoimmune disease). Patients One-hundred and seventeen patients were included. Eighty-eight individuals presented in infancy or childhood with adrenal hypoplasia or primary adrenal failure of unknown etiology (n=64, 46,XY phenotypic males; n=17, 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis/impaired androgenization; n=7, 46,XX females). Twenty-nine individuals presented in adulthood with “Addison disease” of unknown etiology. Methods Mutational analysis of DAX1 (NR0B1) (including exon 2α/1A) and SF1 (NR5A1) by direct sequencing. Results DAX1 mutations were found in 58% (37/64) of 46,XY phenotypic boys referred with adrenal hypoplasia, and in all boys (8/8) with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and a family history suggestive of adrenal failure in males. SF1 mutations causing adrenal failure were found only in two patients with 46,XY gonadal dysgenesis. No DAX1 or SF1 mutations were identified in the adult-onset group. Conclusions DAX1 mutations are a relatively frequent cause of adrenal failure in this group of boys. SF1 mutations causing adrenal failure in humans are rare and are more likely to be associated with significant underandrogenization and gonadal dysfunction in 46,XY individuals. PMID:16684822

  5. Unusual phenotype of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) with a novel mutation of the CYP21A2 gene.

    PubMed

    Raisingani, Manish; Contreras, Maria F; Prasad, Kris; Pappas, John G; Kluge, Michelle L; Shah, Bina; David, Raphael

    2016-07-01

    Gonadotropin independent sexual precocity (SP) may be due to congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), and its timing usually depends on the type of mutation in the CYP21A2 gene. Compound heterozygotes are common and express phenotypes of varying severity. The objective of this case report was to investigate the hormonal pattern and unusual genetic profile in a 7-year-old boy who presented with pubic hair, acne, an enlarged phallus, slightly increased testicular volume and advanced bone age. Clinical, hormonal and genetic studies were undertaken in the patient as well as his parents. We found elevated serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) and androstenedione that were suppressed with dexamethasone, and elevated testosterone that actually rose after giving dexamethasone, indicating activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. An initial search for common mutations was negative, but a more detailed genetic analysis of the CYP21A2 gene revealed two mutations including R341W, a non-classical mutation inherited from his mother, and g.823G>A, a novel not previously reported consensus donor splice site mutation inherited from his father, which is predicted to be salt wasting. However, the child had a normal plasma renin activity. He was effectively treated with low-dose dexamethasone and a GnRH agonist. His father was an unaffected carrier, but his mother had evidence of mild non-classical CAH. In a male child presenting with gonadotropin independent SP it is important to investigate adrenal function with respect to the androgen profile, and to carry out appropriate genetic studies. PMID:27180336

  6. Linking Prenatal Androgens to Gender-Related Attitudes, Identity, and Activities: Evidence From Girls With Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Endendijk, Joyce J; Beltz, Adriene M; McHale, Susan M; Bryk, Kristina; Berenbaum, Sheri A

    2016-10-01

    Key questions for developmentalists concern the origins of gender attitudes and their implications for behavior. We examined whether prenatal androgen exposure was related to gender attitudes, and whether and how the links between attitudes and gendered activity interest and participation were mediated by gender identity and moderated by hormones. Gender attitudes (i.e., gender-role attitudes and attitudes about being a girl), gender identity, and gender-typed activities were reported by 54 girls aged 10-13 years varying in degree of prenatal androgen exposure, including 40 girls with classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (C-CAH) exposed to high prenatal androgens and 14 girls with non-classical (NC) CAH exposed to low, female-typical, prenatal androgens. Both girls with C-CAH and NC-CAH reported positive attitudes about being a girl and egalitarian gender attitudes, consistent with their female-typical gender identity. In contrast, girls with C-CAH had more male-typed activity interest and participation than girls with NC-CAH. Gender attitudes were linked to activities in both groups, with gender identity mediating the links. Specifically, gender-role attitudes and positive attitudes about being a girl were associated with feminine gender identity, which in turn was associated with decreased male-typed activity interests and participation, and increased female-typed activity interests. Our results are consistent with schema theories, with attitudes more closely associated with gender identity than with prenatal androgens. PMID:26940967

  7. Metabolic profile and cardiovascular risk factors in adult patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mnif, Mouna Feki; Kamoun, Mahdi; Mnif, Fatma; Charfi, Nadia; Naceur, Basma Ben; Kallel, Nozha; Rekik, Nabila; Mnif, Zainab; Sfar, Mohamed Habib; Sfar, Mohamed Tahar; Hachicha, Mongia; Abid, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Background: In congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), long-term glucocorticoid treatment coupled with increased androgens may lead to undesirable metabolic effects. The aim of our report was to determine the prevalence of metabolic abnormalities and cardiovascular risk factors in a population of adult patients with CAH due to 21 hydroxylase deficiency. Materials and Methods: Twenty-six patients (11 males and 15 females, mean age ± SD=27.4±8.2 years) were recruited. Anthropometry, body composition, metabolic parameters and cardiovascular risk factors were studied. Results: Obesity (overweight included) was noted in 16 patients (61.5%), with android distribution in all cases. Bioelectrical impedance showed increased body fat mass in 12 patients (46.1%). Lipid profile alterations and carbohydrate metabolism disorders were detected in seven (26.9%) and five (19.2%) patients respectively. Moderate hepatic cytolysis, associated with hepatic steatosis, was found in one patient. Seven patients (27%) had insulin resistance. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring showed abnormalities in six patients (23%). Increased carotid intima media thickness was found in 14 patients (53.8%). Conclusion: Adult CAH patients tend to have altered metabolic parameters and a higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors. Lifelong follow-up, lifestyle modifications, and attempts to adjust and reduce the glucocorticoid doses seem important. PMID:23226639

  8. Guidelines for the Development of Comprehensive Care Centers for Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: Guidance from the CARES Foundation Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Auchus, Richard J.; Witchel, Selma Feldman; Leight, Kelly R.; Aisenberg, Javier; Azziz, Ricardo; Bachega, Tânia A.; Baker, Linda A.; Baratz, Arlene B.; Baskin, Laurence S.; Berenbaum, Sheri A.; Breault, David T.; Cerame, Barbara I.; Conway, Gerard S.; Eugster, Erica A.; Fracassa, Stephanie; Gearhart, John P.; Geffner, Mitchell E.; Harris, Katharine B.; Hurwitz, Richard S.; Katz, Aviva L.; Kalro, Brinda N.; Lee, Peter A.; Alger Lin, Gretchen; Loechner, Karen J.; Marshall, Ian; Merke, Deborah P.; Migeon, Claude J.; Miller, Walter L.; Nenadovich, Tamara L.; Oberfield, Sharon E.; Pass, Kenneth A.; Poppas, Dix P.; Lloyd-Puryear, Michele A.; Quigley, Charmian A.; Riepe, Felix G.; Rink, Richard C.; Rivkees, Scott A.; Sandberg, David E.; Schaeffer, Traci L.; Schlussel, Richard N.; Schneck, Francis X.; Seely, Ellen W.; Snyder, Diane; Speiser, Phyllis W.; Therrell, Bradford L.; VanRyzin, Carol; Vogiatzi, Maria G.; Wajnrajch, Michael P.; White, Perrin C.; Zuckerman, Alan E.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with rare and complex diseases such as congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) often receive fragmented and inadequate care unless efforts are coordinated among providers. Translating the concepts of the medical home and comprehensive health care for individuals with CAH offers many benefits for the affected individuals and their families. This manuscript represents the recommendations of a 1.5 day meeting held in September 2009 to discuss the ideal goals for comprehensive care centers for newborns, infants, children, adolescents, and adults with CAH. Participants included pediatric endocrinologists, internal medicine and reproductive endocrinologists, pediatric urologists, pediatric surgeons, psychologists, and pediatric endocrine nurse educators. One unique aspect of this meeting was the active participation of individuals personally affected by CAH as patients or parents of patients. Representatives of Health Research and Services Administration (HRSA), New York-Mid-Atlantic Consortium for Genetics and Newborn Screening Services (NYMAC), and National Newborn Screening and Genetics Resource Center (NNSGRC) also participated. Thus, this document should serve as a “roadmap” for the development phases of comprehensive care centers (CCC) for individuals and families affected by CAH. PMID:21274448

  9. Successful pregnancy after the treatment of primary amenorrhea in a patient with non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Purwana, Indri N; Kanasaki, Haruhiko; Oride, Aki; Miyazaki, Kohji

    2013-01-01

    We describe a case of non-classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCCAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency in a 30-year-old Japanese woman who achieved pregnancy after treatment of primary amenorrhea. Hirsutism and clitoromegaly were present. Ultrasound examination showed polycystic appearance of the ovary. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) test resulted in exaggerated LH response, showing a polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) pattern. The diagnosis was based on the elevated intial levels of 17-hydroxyprogesterone (55 ng/mL) and dihydroepiandosterone (7780 ng/mL). The first withdrawal bleeding occurred within 6 weeks after treatment with hydrocortisone (20 mg/day) combined with conjugated estrogens (1.25 mg/day) and medroxyprogesterone acetate (10 mg/day), which were continued for five courses. The bleeding remained cyclic every 28 days with maintenance doses of hydrocortisone. Subsequently, ovulation was induced using clomiphene citrate (100 mg/day). Pregnancy was achieved at the second attempt of ovulation induction and was within 10 months after initial presentation. Continuing hydrocortisone, the patient delivered a healthy baby at term. PMID:22672538

  10. Spatial function in adolescents and young adults with congenital adrenal hyperplasia: clinical phenotype and implications for the androgen hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Hampson, Elizabeth; Rovet, Joanne F

    2015-04-01

    Females with the classic form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency are said to perform better than unaffected female controls on tests of mental rotation or other visuospatial abilities, but findings are conflicting. We studied 31 adolescents and young adults with CAH and 19 unaffected sibling controls, who were given standardized spatial tests and tests of other sexually differentiated cognitive functions (verbal fluency, perceptual speed). The possible role of CAH subtype (salt-wasting or simple-virilizing) was evaluated. Only females with the more severe, salt-wasting form of CAH, but not females with the simple-virilizing form, performed significantly better than sex-matched sibling controls on measures of mental rotation. Subtype differences were not significant for verbal fluency or perceptual speed. Severity of prenatal genital virilization, but not postnatal age when medication was started, predicted accuracy on the Mental Rotations Test. Results are consistent with the possibility of an organizational effect of androgens in the central nervous system that impacts the development of spatial abilities. Implications for the timing of the hypothetical critical period are discussed. PMID:25686803

  11. Haplotype-based approach for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia by maternal plasma DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dingyuan; Ge, Huijuan; Li, Xuchao; Jiang, Tao; Chen, Fang; Zhang, Yanyan; Hu, Ping; Chen, Shengpei; Zhang, Jingjing; Ji, Xiuqing; Xu, Xun; Jiang, Hui; Chen, Minfeng; Wang, Wei; Xu, Zhengfeng

    2014-07-10

    Prenatal diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is of clinical significance because in utero treatment is available to prevent virilization of an affected female fetus. However, traditional prenatal diagnosis of CAH relies on genetic testing of fetal genomic DNA obtained using amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling, which is associated with an increased risk of miscarriage. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of a new haplotype-based approach for the noninvasive prenatal testing of CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Parental haplotypes were constructed using target-region sequencing data of the parents and the proband. With the assistance of the parental haplotypes, we recovered fetal haplotypes using a hidden Markov model (HMM) through maternal plasma DNA sequencing. In the genomic region around the CYP21A2 gene, the fetus inherited the paternal haplotype '0' alleles linked to the mutant CYP21A2 gene, but the maternal haplotype '1' alleles linked to the wild-type gene. The fetus was predicted to be an unaffected carrier of CAH, which was confirmed by genetic analysis of fetal genomic DNA from amniotic fluid cells. This method was further validated by comparing the inferred SNP genotypes with the direct sequencing data of fetal genomic DNA. The result showed an accuracy of 96.41% for the inferred maternal alleles and an accuracy of 97.81% for the inferred paternal alleles. The haplotype-based approach is feasible for noninvasive prenatal testing of CAH. PMID:24768736

  12. Genotype-phenotype correlation in 1,507 families with congenital adrenal hyperplasia owing to 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    New, Maria I; Abraham, Moolamannil; Gonzalez, Brian; Dumic, Miroslav; Razzaghy-Azar, Maryam; Chitayat, David; Sun, Li; Zaidi, Mone; Wilson, Robert C; Yuen, Tony

    2013-02-12

    Over the last two decades, we have extensively studied the genetics of congenital adrenal hyperplasia caused by 21-hydroxylase deficiency (CAH) and have performed 8,290 DNA analyses of the CYP21A2 gene on members of 4,857 families at risk for CAH--the largest cohort of CAH patients reported to date. Of the families studied, 1,507 had at least one member affected with one of three known forms of CAH, namely salt wasting, simple virilizing, or nonclassical CAH. Here, we report the genotype and phenotype of each affected patient, as well as the ethnic group and country of origin for each patient. We showed that 21 of 45 genotypes yielded a phenotypic correlation in our patient cohort. In particular, contrary to what is generally reported in the literature, we found that certain mutations, for example, the P30L, I2G, and I172N mutations, yielded different CAH phenotypes. In salt wasting and nonclassical CAH, a phenotype can be attributed to a genotype; however, in simple virilizing CAH, we observe wide phenotypic variability, particularly with the exon 4 I172N mutation. Finally, there was a high frequency of homozygous I2G and V281L mutations in Middle Eastern and Ashkenazi Jewish populations, respectively. By identifying the predominant phenotype for a given genotype, these findings should assist physicians in prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling of parents who are at risk for having a child with CAH. PMID:23359698

  13. Prenatal hormones and childhood sex segregation: playmate and play style preferences in girls with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Pasterski, Vickie; Geffner, Mitchell E; Brain, Caroline; Hindmarsh, Peter; Brook, Charles; Hines, Melissa

    2011-04-01

    We investigated playmate and play style preference in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) (26 females, 31 males) and their unaffected siblings (26 females, 17 males) using the Playmate and Play Style Preferences Structured Interview (PPPSI). Both unaffected boys and girls preferred same-sex playmates and sex-typical play styles. In the conflict condition where children chose between a same-sex playmate engaged in an other-sex activity or an other-sex playmate engaged in a same-sex activity, boys (both CAH and unaffected brothers) almost exclusively chose playmates based on the preferred play style of the playmate as opposed to the preferred gender label of the playmate. By contrast, unaffected girls used play style and gender label about equally when choosing playmates. Girls with CAH showed a pattern similar to that of boys: their playmate selections were more masculine than unaffected girls, they preferred a boy-typical play style and, in the conflict condition, chose playmates engaged in a masculine activity. These findings suggest that prenatal androgen exposure contributes to sex differences in playmate selection observed in typically developing children and that, among boys and girls exposed to high levels of androgens prenatally, play style preferences drive sex segregation in play. PMID:21338606

  14. Steroid abnormalities and the developing brain: Declarative memory for emotionally arousing and neutral material in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Maheu, Françoise S.; Merke, Deborah P.; Schroth, Elizabeth A.; Keil, Margaret F.; Hardin, Julie; Poeth, Kaitlin; Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique

    2008-01-01

    Summary Steroid hormones modulate memory in animals and human adults. Little is known on the developmental effect of these hormones on the neural networks underlying memory. Using Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) as a naturalistic model of early steroid abnormalities, this study examines the consequences of CAH on memory and its neural correlates for emotionally arousing and neutral material in children. Seventeen patients with CAH and 17 age- and sex-matched healthy children (ages 12 to 14 years) completed the study. Subjects were presented positive, negative and neutral pictures. Memory recall occurred about 30 minutes after viewing the pictures. Children with CAH showed memory deficits for negative pictures compared to healthy children (p < 0.01). There were no group differences on memory performance for either positive or neutral pictures (p’s >0.1). In patients, 24h urinary-free cortisol levels (reflecting glucocorticoid replacement therapy) and testosterone levels were not associated with memory performance. These findings suggest that early steroid imbalances affect memory for negative material in children with CAH. Such memory impairments may result from abnormal brain organization and function following hormonal dysfunction during critical periods of development. PMID:18162329

  15. AB074. Registry of congenital adrenal hyperplasia at the north pediatric referral centre of Vietnam during 15 years

    PubMed Central

    Dung, Vu Chi; Thao, Bui Phuong; Ngoc, Can Thi Bich; Khanh, Nguyen Ngoc; Dat, Nguyen Phu; Hoan, Nguyen Thi; Mai, Do Thanh; Huong, Bui Thi

    2015-01-01

    The National Hospital of Pediatrics (NHP), Hanoi, Vietnam is a 1,200 bed tertiary referral centre servicing approximately 30 million people from northern provinces of Vietnam. This audit was undertaken to analyze anecdotal reports of increasing patient numbers. Retrospective review of all congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) patients registered at NHP from 1999-2014. Ethical clearance was granted by the NHP Directorate. At the start of 1999 there were 90 children with CAH managed at NHP. By May 2014 this increased to 715 including 375 (52%) male patients and 340 (48%) female patients. Number of cases with 21α-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD), 11β-hydroxylase deficiency and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency was 703 (98.3%); 9 (1.3%) and 3 (0.4%), respectively. Among cases with 21-OHD, 72% were salt wasting and 28% were simple virilisation). Total number of cases represents a more than seven folds increase over 14 years. Number of new cases doubled from 30 to 67 in 2013. Most children (85%) were diagnosed at less than 12 months of age (55% at less than 1 month of age); 70% of all children were younger than 10 years. Formal mortality figures were low (seven known deaths). The caseload of CAH at NHP has increased since 1999 and additional capacity is needed for patient care. Introduction of NBS would enable more accurate estimation of CAH incidence, reduce infant mortality and minimize trauma to affected infants and their families.

  16. Laparoscopic-assisted vaginal pull-through: A new approach for congenital adrenal hyperplasia patients with high urogenital sinus

    PubMed Central

    Birraux, Jacques; Mouafo, Faustin Tambo; Dahoun, Sophie; Tardy, Veronique; Morel, Yves; Mouriquand, Pierre; Le Coultre, Claude; Mure, Pierre-Yves

    2015-01-01

    Background: To open vaginal cavity to the pelvic floor is part of surgical treatment for urogenital sinus (UGS) in girls with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). For high UGS, this operative procedure can be challenging and may jeopardise urinary continence. Combined perineal and laparoscopic approaches could be useful to minimise perineal dissection and to facilitate the vaginal lowering. Patients and Methods: We report the procedure of a laparoscopic-assisted vaginal pull-through for supra-sphincteric UGS in a 5-year-old girl with CAH. Laparoscopic dissection of the vagina from the posterior wall of the bladder and urethra, division of the confluence and vaginal pull-through to the perineum are described. Discussion: The technique is derived from laparoscopic-assisted treatment for high ano-rectal malformations. Compared with current procedures for treatment for high UGS, laparoscopic-assisted approach allows mobilising vagina with minimal dissection of perineum and complete preservation of urethra. Another major advantage is to provide a direct vision for dissection of the space between rectum and urethra prior to vaginal pull-through. Conclusion: Laparoscopic-assisted vaginal pull-through appears to be an interesting approach for high UGS in CAH patients, reducing dissection and risk of urinary incontinence. This new approach needs to be strengthened by other cases. PMID:26612122

  17. Effects on gender identity of prenatal androgens and genital appearance: evidence from girls with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Berenbaum, Sheri A; Bailey, J Michael

    2003-03-01

    To address questions about sex assignment in children with ambiguous genitalia, we studied gender identity in girls with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) in relation to characteristics of the disease and treatment, particularly genital appearance and surgery. A 9-item gender identity interview was administered to 43 girls with classical CAH ranging in age from 3-18 yr, 7 tomboys, and 29 sister control girls. Groups were compared on total score and on individual items. Results showed that, on the total gender identity score, 88% of girls with CAH had scores overlapping those of control girls, but the average score was intermediate between control girls and tomboys. On individual items of gender identity (discomfort as a girl, wish to be a boy), girls with CAH were similar to control girls. Gender identity in girls with CAH was not related to degree of genital virilization or age at which genital reconstructive surgery was done. Thus, moderate androgen excess early in development appears to produce a small increase in the risk of atypical gender identity, but this risk cannot be predicted from genital virilization. PMID:12629091

  18. Chronological hypoplasia: aesthetic management

    PubMed Central

    Jayam, Cheranjeevi; Bandlapalli, Anila; Patel, Nikunj; Choudhary, Rama Shankar Kashinath

    2014-01-01

    Enamel hypoplasia is defined as a break in the continuity of enamel with a reduction in the layers leading to depressions or grooves. Chronological hypoplasia is differentiated from other forms of hypoplasia due to its characteristic presentation (multiple, symmetrical, chronological pattern). Chronological hypoplasias are seen at the time tooth erupts into the oral cavity leading to several problems like aesthetic problems, tooth sensitivity, caries and early pulpal involvement. Prevention of interaction of aetiological factors is not possible because multiple factors are required for enamel synthesis. This paper highlights how to diagnose, intercept and treat chronological hypoplasias. It also mentions reasons for treating a case and different modalities available. PMID:24907208

  19. Optic nerve hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Savleen; Jain, Sparshi; Sodhi, Harsimrat B S; Rastogi, Anju; Kamlesh

    2013-05-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65%) than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED). PMID:24082663

  20. Increased expression of ACTH (MC2R) and androgen (AR) receptors in giant bilateral myelolipomas from patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although chronic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and androgen hyperstimulation are assumed to be involved in the pathogenesis of adrenal myelolipomas associated with poor-compliance patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), the expression of their receptors has not yet been demonstrated in these tumors so far. Methods We analyzed Melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), Androgen Receptor (AR), Leptin (LEP), and Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) expression using real-time qRT-PCR in two giant bilateral adrenal myelolipomas from two untreated simple virilizing CAH cases and in two sporadic adrenal myelolipomas. In addition, the X-chromosome inactivation pattern and CAG repeat numbers in AR exon 1 gene were evaluated in the 4 cases. Results The MC2R gene was overexpressed in myelolipomas from 3 out of 4 patients. AR overexpression was detected in 2 tumors: a giant bilateral myelolipoma in a CAH patient and a sporadic case. Simultaneous overexpression of AR and MC2R genes was found in two of the cases. Interestingly, the bilateral giant myelolipoma associated with CAH that had high androgen and ACTH levels but lacked MC2R and AR overexpression presented a significantly shorter AR allele compared with other tumors. In addition, X-chromosome inactivation pattern analysis showed a polyclonal origin in all tumors, suggesting a stimulatory effect as the trigger for tumor development. Conclusion These findings are the first evidence for MC2R or AR overexpression in giant bilateral myelolipomas from poor-compliance CAH patients. PMID:24884994

  1. The Effect of Simvastatin on Plasma Steroid Hormone Levels in Metformin-Treated Women with Non-Classic Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Krysiak, R; Kowalcze, K; Bednarska-Czerwińska, A; Okopień, B

    2016-04-01

    Non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NC-CAH), one of the most common genetic disorders, is often associated with the presence of hyperandrogenism. Recently both simvastatin and metformin were found to reduce plasma steroid hormone levels in this disorder. This study included 8 women with NC-CAH and diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance, as well as 12 matched women with similar glucose metabolism abnormalities but normal adrenal function. Both groups of women, receiving metformin for at least 6 months, were then treated with simvastatin (20 mg daily) for the following 12 weeks. Compared to patients with normal adrenal function, metformin-treated women with NC-CAH showed increased plasma levels of 17-hydroxyprogesterone, total testosterone, free testosterone, androstenedione and DHEA-S. Simvastatin reduced total and LDL cholesterol levels in both patients with NC-CAH and normal adrenal function. Moreover, in the former group of women, statin therapy decreased plasma levels of testosterone, free testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate and tended to reduce 17-hydroxyprogesterone. Our results suggest that metformin-statin combination therapy may be useful in the management of symptomatic women with NC-CAH. PMID:26824284

  2. [Maxillary sinus hypoplasia].

    PubMed

    Plaza, G; Ferrando, J; Martel, J; Toledano, A; de los Santos, G

    2001-03-01

    Maxillary sinus hypoplasia is rare, with an estimated prevalence of 1-5%. Out of the CT scans performed in sinusal patients between March 1998 and June 1999, we report on 4 isolated maxillary sinus hypoplasia, 4 maxillary sinus hypoplasia associated to concha bullosa, and 10 isolated conchae bullosas. All cases were evaluated by nasosinusal endoscopy and CT scan. Size, location and uni/bilateral presentation of concha bullosa is correlated to maxillary sinus hypoplasia presence, specially with regards to uncinate process presence, medial or lateral retraction. The pathogenesis of maxillary sinus hypoplasia is reviewed, and its relation to concha bullosa, evaluating how this could explain some cases of the so called chronic maxillary sinus atelectasia, as an acquired and progressive variant of maxillary sinus hypoplasia in adults. PMID:11428268

  3. Are there parental socialization effects on the sex-typed behavior of individuals with congenital adrenal hyperplasia?

    PubMed

    Wong, Wang I; Pasterski, Vickie; Hindmarsh, Peter C; Geffner, Mitchell E; Hines, Melissa

    2013-04-01

    Influences of prenatal androgen exposure on human sex-typical behavior have been established largely through studies of individuals with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). However, evidence that addresses the potential confounding influence of parental socialization is limited. Parental socialization and its relationship to sex-typical toy play and spatial ability were investigated in two samples involving 137 individuals with CAH and 107 healthy controls. Females with CAH showed more boy-typical toy play and better targeting performance than control females, but did not differ in mental rotations performance. Males with CAH showed worse mental rotations performance than control males, but did not differ in sex-typical toy play or targeting. Reported parental encouragement of girl-typical toy play correlated with girl-typical toy play in all four groups. Moreover, parents reported encouraging less girl-typical, and more boy-typical, toy play in females with CAH than in control females and this reported encouragement partially mediated the relationship between CAH status and sex-typical toy play. Other evidence suggests that the reported parental encouragement of sex-atypical toy play in girls with CAH may be a response to the girls' preferences for boys' toys. Nevertheless, this encouragement could further increase boy-typical behavior in girls with CAH. In contrast to the results for toy play, we found no differential parental socialization for spatial activities and little evidence linking parental socialization to spatial ability. Overall, evidence suggests that prenatal androgen exposure and parental socialization both contribute to sex-typical toy play. PMID:22810998

  4. Novel Use of Tolvaptan in a Pediatric Patient With Congestive Heart Failure Due to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Sami, Sarah A.; Moffett, Brady S.; Karlsten, Melissa L.; Cabrera, Antonio G.; Price, Jack F.; Dreyer, William J.; Denfield, Susan W.

    2015-01-01

    Successful management of hyponatremia in heart failure patients requires a multifaceted approach in order to preserve end-organ function. We describe the novel use of a selective vasopressin receptor antagonist, tolvaptan, for management of hyponatremia in a 17-year-old Caucasian male with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy, congestive heart failure (CHF), and congenital adrenal hyperplasia. The medical history was significant for recurrent admissions for hyponatremia secondary to adrenal crises, which was also exacerbated by his CHF. After initiation of tolvaptan and its extended administration, he had no further hyponatremia-related admissions and no adverse reactions. The complexity of this combination of conditions is presented, and the efficacy of the drug and the rationale behind the treatment approach is discussed. PMID:26472954

  5. CYP21A2 Gene Mutations in Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: Genotype−phenotype correlation in Turkish children

    PubMed Central

    Kayserili, Hülya; Darendeliler, Feyza; Uyguner, Oya; Günöz, Hülya; Yüksel Apak, Memnune; Atalar, Fatmahan; Bundak, Rüveyde; Wilson, Robert C.; New, Maria I.; Wollnik, Bernd; Saka, Nurçin

    2009-01-01

    Background: Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due 21−hydroxylase deficiency (21−OHD) is a common autosomal recessive disorder. It is caused by defects in the CYP21A2 gene. Objective: Our aim was to determine the frequency of common gene mutations and to evaluate genotype−phenotype correlations in Turkish 21−OHD patients. Methods: Molecular analysis of the CYP21A2 gene was performed for the detection of the eight most common point mutations [p.P30L, IVS2−13C>G (IVS−2), p.I172N, exon 6 mutation cluster (p.I236N, p.V237E, p.M239K), p.V281L, p.Q318X, p.R356W, 8−bp−deletion], of large deletion and conversion by southern blotting, allele specific semi−quantitative PCR/enzyme restriction method and sequencing, in 56 patients with 21−OHD, from 52 families. Results: Disease−causing mutations were identified in 77 out of 91 alleles (84.6%) of the patients. Mutations were found in 34 of 43 alleles (79.1%) in salt wasting (SW; n=26), 32 of 36 alleles (88.8%) in simple virilizing (SV; n=24) and 11 of 12 alleles (91.6%) in non−classical (NC; n=6) form of CAH. The most frequent mutations were IVS−2 (22.0%), large conversion (14.3%), p.I172N (9.9%) p.R356W (8.8%), and large deletion (6.6%). In the SW form, the most frequent genotypes were homozygous for IVS−2 (11.5%) and homozygous for large conversion of the gene (11.5%). In the SV form, the most frequent genotype was homozygous for IVS−2 (20%), followed by compound heterozygous for p.I172N/8−bp del (10%). Homozygous for p.V281L (16.7%) was most common in NC. In most cases there was good correlation between genotype and phenotype. In the SW and NC forms, genotypes of all the patients correlated with their phenotypes. Conclusions: This is the first comprehensive study on the molecular basis of CAH patients in the Turkish population. Based on these results, we propose a modified screening strategy to facilitate molecular testing of CAH patients in our population. Conflict of interest:None declared

  6. Reduced short term memory in congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) and its relationship to spatial and quantitative performance.

    PubMed

    Collaer, Marcia L; Hindmarsh, Peter C; Pasterski, Vickie; Fane, Briony A; Hines, Melissa

    2016-02-01

    Girls and women with classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) experience elevated androgens prenatally and show increased male-typical development for certain behaviors. Further, individuals with CAH receive glucocorticoid (GC) treatment postnatally, and this GC treatment could have negative cognitive consequences. We investigated two alternative hypotheses, that: (a) early androgen exposure in females with CAH masculinizes (improves) spatial perception and quantitative abilities at which males typically outperform females, or (b) CAH is associated with performance decrements in these domains, perhaps due to reduced short-term-memory (STM). Adolescent and adult individuals with CAH (40 female and 29 male) were compared with relative controls (29 female and 30 male) on spatial perception and quantitative abilities as well as on Digit Span (DS) to assess STM and on Vocabulary to assess general intelligence. Females with CAH did not perform better (more male-typical) on spatial perception or quantitative abilities than control females, failing to support the hypothesis of cognitive masculinization. Rather, in the sample as a whole individuals with CAH scored lower on spatial perception (p ≤ .009), a quantitative composite (p ≤ .036), and DS (p ≤ .001), despite no differences in general intelligence. Separate analyses of adolescent and adult participants suggested the spatial and quantitative effects might be present only in adult patients with CAH; however, reduced DS performance was found in patients with CAH regardless of age group. Separate regression analyses showed that DS predicted both spatial perception and quantitative performance (both p ≤ .001), when age, sex, and diagnosis status were controlled. Thus, reduced STM in CAH patients versus controls may have more general cognitive consequences, potentially reducing spatial perception and quantitative skills. Although hyponatremia or other aspects of salt-wasting crises or additional hormone

  7. First case report of rare congenital adrenal insufficiency caused by mutations in the CYP11A1 gene in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Pomahačová, Renata; Sýkora, Josef; Zamboryová, Jana; Paterová, Petra; Varvařovská, Jana; Šubrt, Ivan; Dort, Jiří; Dortová, Eva

    2016-06-01

    We characterized a case of congenital adrenal insufficiency caused by cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) deficiency. The patient presented after birth with cardiopulmonary instability, hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, hypoglycemia and metabolic acidosis. We confirmed primary adrenal insufficiency. There were no signs of the external genitalia virilism. The replacement therapy with glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids led to normal laboratory results. At the age of 12 years, we confirmed hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, which revealed disorder of steroidogenesis in the adrenal glands and in the gonads. The enzymatic block was found at the beginning of steroidogenesis. The mutation was confirmed in the CYP11A1 gene. The patient is compound heterozygote for the novel CYP11A1 missense mutation c.412G>A (p.Gly138Arg) in exon 2 and frameshift mutation c.508_509delCT (p.Leu170Valfs*30) in exon 3. The CYP11A1: c.412G>A (p.Gly138Arg) was predicted as pathogenic by in silico analysis. So far, only 19 patients with CYP11A1 mutations causing P450scc deficiency have been reported worldwide. There are no related reports in the Czech Republic. PMID:27008691

  8. Multiple ophthalmic anomalies and digital hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Chemke, J; Oliver, M; Mallek, D; Kaveh, Z

    1978-03-01

    Multiple congenital eye and hand anomalies occurred in a young female born to normal but consanguineous parents. Both eyes were microphthalmic with severe corneal, iris lens pathology. Ultrasonography revealed multiple echos from the vitreous. The ocular findings are suggestive of retinal dysplasia. A skeletal dysplasia, presenting as distal phalangeal hypoplasia, was found in both hands. There was no history of intrauterine exposure to drugs. This appears to be a unique association of congenital malformations, without other systemic involvement. Diagnostic and genetic implications are discussed. PMID:97363

  9. Autopsy features in a newborn baby affected by a central congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Bolino, Giorgio; Gitto, Lorenzo; Serinelli, Serenella; Maiese, Aniello

    2015-03-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a congenital malformation of the diaphragm, resulting in the herniation of the abdominal organs into the thoracic cavity. The most common types of congenital diaphragmatic hernia are Bochdalek hernia (postero-lateral hernia), Morgagni hernia (anterior defect), and diaphragm eventration (abnormal displacement of part or all of an otherwise intact diaphragm into the chest cavity). Congenital diaphragmatic hernia is a life-threatening pathology in infants, and a major cause of death due to pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension. We present a fatal case of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in a newborn. At the autopsy, a central defect of the diaphragm was found, 8 × 5 cm in size, that led to a herniation of the small intestine, the right lobe of the liver, and the right adrenal gland into the thorax. An esophageal atresia was associated with the congenital diaphragmatic hernia. The lungs showed severe hypoplasia and atelectasia. Physicians should pay attention to a prenatal diagnosis of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in order to prevent newborn fatalities. PMID:25573226

  10. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... and potassium in the blood) Abnormal heart rhythm Girls with the milder form will usually have normal female reproductive organs (ovaries, uterus, and fallopian tubes). They may also have the following changes: Abnormal ...

  11. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... with questions about grants, contracts & research areas Training, Education & Career Development Support for Training at Universities & Other Institutions Extramural training, fellowships & career development opportunities Training at ...

  12. Review of Outcome Information in 46,XX Patients with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Assigned/Reared Male: What Does It Say about Gender Assignment?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Peter A.; Houk, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    There is ample historical verification of 46,XX congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) patients being born with essentially male genitaliawhile outcome information is scant. Prior to glucocorticoid therapy, most patients died very young from adrenal insufficiency. Most available reports from laterchildhood, contain little information concerning sexual identity. Reports on older individuals lack adequate information about sexual identity and quality of life. The difficulty in assessing the relative impact of multiple dynamic environmental factors on the development of sexual identity, self- and body esteem and overall adjustment to life is clear. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether those infants whose masculine genitalia at birth resulted in an initial male assignment would have enjoyed a better adult outcome had they been allowed to remain male rather than the female reassignment that most received. Further, one could ask whether a male sex of rearing should be considered in 46,XX CAH infants with male external genitalia. After reviewing available literature, we conclude that because those extremely virlized 46,XX CAH patients who were reared male with healthy social support demonstrated satisfactory levels of social and sexual function as adults a male sex assignment should be considered in these types of infants when social and cultural environment are supportive. PMID:21197442

  13. Adrenal Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... What is adrenal insufficiency? Did you know? The adrenal glands, located on top of the kidneys, make hormones ... body functions. The outer layer (cortex) of the adrenal glands makes three types of steroid hormones. In adrenal ...

  14. Imaging of congenital pulmonary malformations.

    PubMed

    Praticò, Francesco Emanuele; Corrado, Michele; Della Casa, Giovanni; Parziale, Raffaele; Russo, Giuseppe; Gazzani, Silvia Eleonora; Rossi, Enrica; Borgia, Daniele; Mostardi, Maurizio; Bacchini, Emanuele; Cella, Simone; De Filippo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital pulmonary malformations represent a broad spectrum of anomalies that may result in varied clinical and pathologic pictures, ranging from recurrent pulmonary infections and acute respiratory distress syndrome, which require timely drug therapy, up to large space-occupying lesions needing surgical treatment. This classification includes three distinct anatomical and pathological entities, represented by Congenital Cystic Adenomatoid Malformation, Bronchopulmonary Sequestration and Congenital Lobar Emphysema. The final result in terms of embryological and fetal development of these alterations is a Congenital Lung Hypoplasia. Since even Bronchial Atresia, Pulmonary Bronchogenic Cysts and Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernias are due to Pulmonary Hypoplasia, these diseases will be discussed in this review (1, 2). PMID:27467867

  15. The syndrome of optic nerve hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Borchert, Mark; Garcia-Filion, Pamela

    2008-09-01

    The congenital malformation known as optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) has been recognized in the past 30 years as an epidemic cause of congenital blindness. It was believed to occur either as an isolated anomaly or as a component of the syndrome of septo-optic dysplasia, which has evolved to include midline brain malformations and hypopituitarism. Evidence now suggests that ONH infrequently occurs in isolation. Most afflicted children will have hypothalamic dysfunction and/or neurodevelopmental impairment, regardless of MRI findings or severity of ONH. Adverse outcomes can often be ameliorated with early intervention. Thus, the syndrome of ONH should be suspected in all infants with signs of hypothalamic dysfunction or vision impairment. PMID:18713575

  16. Health-Related Quality of Life, Mental Health and Psychotherapeutic Considerations for Women Diagnosed with a Disorder of Sexual Development: Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Malouf, Matthew A.; Inman, Arpana G.; Carr, Amanda G.; Franco, Jill; Brooks, Lindsey M.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the long-term health-related quality of life (HRQL) and mental health outcomes for women diagnosed with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), a disorder of sex development. Though recommendations for therapists exist, no research has empirically investigated women's experiences in therapy or their recommendations for therapy. Thus the purpose of the study was to investigate HRQL, mental health concerns of women with CAH, and patients' recommendations for therapists. A qualitative methodology, consensual qualitative research, was used to answer these questions. Eight women with CAH participated in the study. Results from their interviews revealed six domains: physical functioning, psychological functioning, interpersonal processes and relationships, healthcare experiences of women with CAH, recommendations for health care professionals, and systemic considerations. Domains were further broken down into categories with results yielding implications for both medical and mental health professionals and shedding light on issues related to normalcy, concerns both related and unrelated to CAH, sex, and gender, and highlighting effective supports and therapeutic interventions. PMID:20614002

  17. Trophoblast Retrieval and Isolation From the Cervix for Noninvasive, First Trimester, Fetal Gender Determination in a Carrier of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bolnick, Alan D; Fritz, Rani; Jain, Chandni; Kadam, Leena; Bolnick, Jay M; Kilburn, Brian A; Singh, Manvinder; Diamond, Michael P; Drewlo, Sascha; Armant, D Randall

    2016-06-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is an autosomal recessive defect in cortisol biosynthesis that elevates fetal androgen levels to cause genital ambiguity and external genital masculinization in newborn females. Introducing dexamethasone in utero by 7 weeks gestation precludes virilization of affected females. However, identification of a male fetus prior to week 7 could avert the necessity of steroid treatment in half of pregnancies at risk of CAH. We recently introduced trophoblast retrieval and isolation from the cervix (TRIC), an approach that noninvasively isolate homogeneous trophoblast cells from pregnant women as early as 5 weeks gestation, using a Papanicolaou test. Here, we have used TRIC to correctly identify male fetal DNA when both parents were carriers of the mutation that produces CAH and previously produced an affected child. Trophoblast cells (1400) obtained by TRIC were assessed using immunocytochemistry with an antibody against the trophoblast-specific β subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin, which labeled 100% (17 of 17) of isolated cells, while none of the excluded maternal cervical cells were labeled. The isolated cells were examined by fluorescent in situ hybridization for chromosomes 18, X, and Y at a clinical cytogenetics laboratory, demonstrating 100% (18 of 18) of cells to be diploid 18/XY. Aliquots of DNA obtained from the isolated cells assayed for SRY and RNASEH genes by TaqMan assays confirmed a male fetus. This case study demonstrates the utility of TRIC to accurately identify fetal gender as a means of reducing the need for prophylactic administration of exogenous steroids in pregnancies at risk of CAH. PMID:26919977

  18. 21-Hydroxylase deficiency-induced congenital adrenal hyperplasia in 230 Chinese patients: Genotype-phenotype correlation and identification of nine novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruifang; Yu, Yongguo; Ye, Jun; Han, Lianshu; Qiu, Wenjuan; Zhang, Huiwen; Liang, Lili; Gong, Zhuwen; Wang, Lili; Gu, Xuefan

    2016-04-01

    Steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) caused by the CYP21A2 gene mutations accounts for more than 90% of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) cases. In this study, molecular defects of 230 patients with 21-OHD were investigated. Point mutations of CYP21A2 gene were analyzed by Sanger sequencing, and large gene deletions were detected by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Nine micro-conversions and 18 spontaneous mutations accounted for 74.6% of alleles, while large gene deletions and large gene conversions accounted for 25.4% of alleles. The most frequent micro-conversion was c.292-13A/C>G (I2G) (35%), followed by p.I173N (14.3%), p.R357W (5.9%) and p.Q319(∗) (4.6%). Nine novel mutations were identified in these patients, which were predicted to hamper the 21-hydroxylase protein function in varying degrees. Genotype and phenotype correlated well in 89.6% of our patients, but disparity in phenotypic appearance also appeared in a small portion of the patients. 16.1% of the patients carried homozygous genotypes while 83.9% of patients carried compound heterozygous mutations. We concluded that the frequency of CYP21A2 mutations in our study was slightly different from those reported for other ethnic groups. Micro-conversions were the main category of the mutation spectrum, while large deletions and large gene conversions could also cause 21-OHD. A large portion of different types of the compound heterozygous genotypes may partially contribute to the discordance in genotype-phenotype comparison. This study expanded the CYP21A2 mutation spectrum of Chinese patients and could be helpful in prenatal diagnosis and genetic counseling for 21-OHD patients. PMID:26804566

  19. CYP21A2 p.E238 deletion as result of multiple microconversion events: a genetic study on an Italian congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) family.

    PubMed

    Concolino, Paola; Mello, Enrica; Zuppi, Cecilia; Toscano, Vincenzo; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2013-03-01

    More than 90% of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) cases are associated with mutations in the 21-hydroxylase gene (CYP21A2) in the HLA class III area on the short arm of chromosome 6p21.3. The major part of disease-causing mutations in CYP21A2 alleles are CYP21A1P-derived sequence transferred to the active gene by macroconversion or microconversion events. Only around 5% of all disease-causing CYP21A2 alleles harbor rare mutations that do not originate from the pseudogene. A complete list of all reported CYP21A2 mutations can be found in the CYP21A2 database created by the Human Cytochrome P450 (CYP) Allele Nomenclature Committee (http://www.imm.Ki.se/CYPalleles/cyp21.htm). In this report, we describe clinical and genetic findings regarding an Italian woman suffering from a classic salt-wasting form of CAH due to a severe 21-hydroxylase deficiency. A complex genetic family study was performed including a prenatal diagnosis. The patient was found to be heterozygous for p.I172N (exon 4), p.E238del (exon 6), p.M239K (exon 6), and p.F306insT (exon 7) mutations and homozygous for p.I236N (exon 6) and p.V237E (exon 6) mutations. The deletion of glutamic acid 238 is a new mutation not reported before in the literature. CYP21A2 genotyping has become a valuable complement to biochemical CAH investigation. We highlight the contribution of molecular genetic advancements to the clinical management of patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency. PMID:23370425

  20. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency: A five-year retrospective study in the Children's Hospital of Damascus, Syria

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh Alshabab, Lina Ibrahem; AlebrahIm, Assad; Kaddoura, Ahmad; Al-Fahoum, Sahar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is one of the most common inherited metabolic disorders. 21-hydroxylase deficiency is responsible for the majority of cases (90-95%) and considered the most common cause of genital ambiguity. There are no statistics concerning the prevalence of this disorder in Syria, although the high rate of consanguineous marriages indicates a possible high prevalence. Objectives: This study aims to collect baseline information about CAH in Syria to evaluate the potential need of a screening program. Subjects and Methods: All medical records of inpatients who had CAH as a final or presumptive diagnosis at the Children's Hospital of Damascus between 2008–2012, or were diagnosed elsewhere and then admitted at the hospital for the first time within the same period, were retrospectively reviewed and divided into two groups: confirmed and suspected cases. Results: Eighty-nine cases were confirmed, 25 were still suspected. Of the 89 confirmed cases: 20 (22.5%) were males, 66 (74.1%) were females, and 3 were ambiguous. Sixty-one patients (68.5%) were of the salt wasting type and 28 (31.5%) were of the simple virilizing type. The mortality rate was 6.7%. Thirty-two females were assigned as males at birth. Seventeen cases (19.1%) underwent previous hospitalization. 69.7% of patients were not diagnosed during the first month of life. Of the 25 suspected cases: 12 were males, 8 were females and 5 were ambiguous. Confirmatory tests had not been performed because of death in 7 patients (28%) and early discharge upon parental request in another 7 patients (28%). Conclusion: A mandatory screening program for CAH in Syria seems necessary due to the obvious lack of awareness, delayed diagnosis and high expected prevalence. However, further efforts are needed to confirm the effectiveness of such a program in the Syrian society. PMID:26535179

  1. A Novel Mutation in the CYP11B1 Gene Causes Steroid 11β-Hydroxylase Deficient Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia with Reversible Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Mohammad A; Shati, Ayed A; Zou, Minjing; Alsuheel, Ali M; Alhayani, Abdullah A; Al-Qahtani, Saleh M; Gilban, Hessa M; Meyer, Brain F; Shi, Yufei

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency is the second most common form of CAH, resulting from a mutation in the CYP11B1 gene. Steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency results in excessive mineralcorticoids and androgen production leading to hypertension, precocious puberty with acne, enlarged penis, and hyperpigmentation of scrotum of genetically male infants. In the present study, we reported 3 male cases from a Saudi family who presented with penile enlargement, progressive darkness of skin, hypertension, and cardiomyopathy. The elder patient died due to heart failure and his younger brothers were treated with hydrocortisone and antihypertensive medications. Six months following treatment, cardiomyopathy disappeared with normal blood pressure and improvement in the skin pigmentation. The underlying molecular defect was investigated by PCR-sequencing analysis of all coding exons and intron-exon boundary of the CYP11B1 gene. A novel biallelic mutation c.780 G>A in exon 4 of the CYP11B1 gene was found in the patients. The mutation created a premature stop codon at amino acid 260 (p.W260 (∗) ), resulting in a truncated protein devoid of 11β-hydroxylase activity. Interestingly, a somatic mutation at the same codon (c.779 G>A, p.W260 (∗) ) was reported in a patient with papillary thyroid cancer (COSMIC database). In conclusion, we have identified a novel nonsense mutation in the CYP11B1 gene that causes classic steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficient CAH. Cardiomyopathy and cardiac failure can be reversed by early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26265915

  2. Ischial hypoplasia, tibial hypoplasia and facial abnormalities: a new syndrome?

    PubMed

    Nishimura, G; Haga, Y; Aoki, K; Hasegawa, T

    1998-12-01

    A child with facial abnormalities, short stature and a variety of skeletal alterations is reported. The facial abnormalities comprised low-set ears, short nose with a long philtrum, micrognathia and cleft palate. The skeletal alterations included ischial hypoplasia, malformations of the cervical spine, hypoplasia of the lesser trochanters, tibial hypoplasia with bowing of the lower legs, tibio-fibular diastasis with malformed distal tibial epiphyses, clubfeet and brachymesophalangy. The constellation of clinical and radiological findings in the present patient do not fit any known malformation syndrome. PMID:9880644

  3. Adrenal cortex dysfunction: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Huebener, K.H.; Treugut, H.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of the adrenal gland was studied in 302 patients with possible endocrinologic disease and 107 patients undergoing CT for nonendocrinologic reasons. Measurements of adrenal size were also made in 100 adults with no known adrenal pathology. CT proved to be a sensitive diagnostic tool in combination with clinical studies. When blood hormone levels are increased, CT can differentiate among homogeneous organic hyperplasia, nodular hyperplasia, benign adenoma, and malignant cortical adenoma. When blood hormone levels are decreased, CT can demonstrate hypoplasia or metastatic tumorous destruction. Calcifications can be demonstrated earlier than on plain radiographs. When hormone elimination is increased, the morphologic substrate can be identified; tumorous changes can be localized and infiltration of surrounding organs recognized.

  4. A new CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 chimeric gene identified in an Italian woman suffering from classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia form

    PubMed Central

    Concolino, Paola; Mello, Enrica; Minucci, Angelo; Giardina, Emiliano; Zuppi, Cecilia; Toscano, Vincenzo; Capoluongo, Ettore

    2009-01-01

    Background More than 90% of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) cases are associated with mutations in the 21-hydroxylase gene (CYP21A2) in the HLA class III area on the short arm of chromosome 6p21.3. In this region, a 30 kb deletion produces a non functional chimeric gene with its 5' and 3' ends corresponding to CYP21A1P pseudogene and CYP21A2, respectively. To date, five different CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 chimeric genes have been found and characterized in recent studies. In this paper, we describe a new CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 chimera (CH-6) found in an Italian CAH patient. Methods Southern blot analysis and CYP21A2 sequencing were performed on the patient. In addition, in order to isolate the new CH-6 chimeric gene, two different strategies were used. Results The CYP21A2 sequencing analysis showed that the patient was homozygote for the g.655C/A>G mutation and heterozygote for the p.P30L missense mutation. In addition, the promoter sequence revealed the presence, in heterozygosis, of 13 SNPs generally produced by microconversion events between gene and pseudogene. Southern blot analysis showed that the woman was heterozygote for the classic 30-kb deletion producing a new CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 chimeric gene (CH-6). The hybrid junction site was located between the end of intron 2 pseudogene, after the g.656C/A>G mutation, and the beginning of exon 3, before the 8 bp deletion. Consequently, CH-6 carries three mutations: the weak pseudogene promoter region, the p.P30L and the g.655C/A>G splice mutation. Conclusion We describe a new CYP21A1P/CYP21A2 chimera (CH-6), associated with the HLA-B15, DR13 haplotype, in a young Italian CAH patient. PMID:19624807

  5. Phenotypic, metabolic, and molecular genetic characterization of six patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia caused by novel mutations in the CYP11B1 gene.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Huy-Hoang; Eiden-Plach, Antje; Hannemann, Frank; Malunowicz, Ewa M; Hartmann, Michaela F; Wudy, Stefan A; Bernhardt, Rita

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder of steroidogenesis. Steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency (11β-OHD) due to mutations in the CYP11B1 gene is the second most common form of CAH. In this study, 6 patients suffering from CAH were diagnosed with 11β-OHD using urinary GC-MS steroid metabolomics analysis. The molecular basis of the disorder was investigated by molecular genetic analysis of the CYP11B1 gene, functional characterization of splicing and missense mutations, and analysis of the missense mutations in a computer model of CYP11B1. All patients presented with abnormal clinical signs of hyperandrogenism. Their urinary steroid metabolomes were characterized by excessive excretion rates of metabolites of 11-deoxycortisol as well as metabolites of 11-deoxycorticosterone, and allowed definite diagnosis. Patient 1 carries compound heterozygous mutations consisting of a novel nonsense mutation p.Q102X (c.304C>T) in exon 2 and the known missense mutation p.T318R (c.953C>G) in exon 5. Two siblings (patient 2 and 3) were compound heterozygous carriers of a known splicing mutation c.1200+1G>A in intron 7 and a known missense mutation p.R448H (c.1343G>A) in exon 8. Minigene experiments demonstrated that the c.1200+1G>A mutation caused abnormal pre-mRNA splicing (intron retention). Two further siblings (patient 4 and 5) were compound heterozygous carriers of a novel missense mutation p.R332G (c.994C>G) in exon 6 and the known missense mutation p.R448H (c.1343G>A) in exon 8. A CYP11B1 activity study in COS-1 cells showed that only 11% of the enzyme activity remained in the variant p.R332G. Patient 6 carried a so far not described homozygous deletion g.2470_5320del of 2850 bp corresponding to a loss of the CYP11B1 exons 3-8. The breakpoints of the deletion are embedded into two typical 6 base pair repeats (GCTTCT) upstream and downstream of the gene. Experiments analyzing the influence of mutations on splicing and on enzyme

  6. The human peripheral benzodiazepine receptor gene: Cloning and characterization of alternative splicing in normal tissues and in a patient with congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, D.; Miller, W.L. ); Chang, Y.J.; Strauss, J.F. III )

    1993-12-01

    The mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptor (mBzR) appears to be a key factor in the flow of cholesterol into mitochondia to permit the initiation of steroid hormone synthesis. The mBzR consists of three components; the 18-kDa component on the outer mitochondrial membrane appears to contain the benzodiazepine binding site, and is hence often termed the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR). Using a cloned human PBR cDNA as probe, the authors have cloned the human PBR gene. The 13-kb gene is divided into four exons, with exon 1 encoding only a short 5[prime] untranslated segment. The 5[prime] flanking DNA lacks TATA and CAAT boxes but contains a cluster of SP-1 binding sites, typical of [open quotes]housekeeping[close quotes] genes. The encoded PBR mRNA is alternately spliced into two forms: [open quotes]authentic[close quotes] PBR mRNA retains all four exons, while a short form termed PBR-S lacks exon 2. While PBR-S contains a 102-codon open reading frame with a typical initiator sequence, the reading frame differs from that of PBR, so that the encoded protein is unrelated to PBR. RT-PCR and RNase protection experiments confirm that both PBR and PBR-S are expressed in all tissues examined and that expression of PBR-S is about 10 times the level of PBR. Expression of PBR cDNA in pCMV5 vectors transfected into COS-1 cells resulted in increased binding of [[sup 3]H]PK11195, but expression of PBR-S did not. It has been speculated that patients with congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia, who cannot make any steroids, might have a genetic lesion in mBzR. RT-PCR analysis of testicular RNA from such a patient, sequencing of the cDNA, and blotting analysis of genomic DNA all indicate that the gene and mRNA for the PBR component of mBzR are normal in this disease. 36 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia and risk for psychiatric disorders in girls and women born between 1915 and 2010: A total population study.

    PubMed

    Engberg, Hedvig; Butwicka, Agnieszka; Nordenström, Anna; Hirschberg, Angelica Lindén; Falhammar, Henrik; Lichtenstein, Paul; Nordenskjöld, Agneta; Frisén, Louise; Landén, Mikael

    2015-10-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a chronic condition and individuals are exposed to elevated androgen levels in utero as a result of the endogenous cortisol deficiency. Prenatal androgen exposure has been suggested to influence mental health, but population based studies on psychiatric morbidity among girls and women with CAH are lacking. Therefore, we performed a cohort study based on Swedish nationwide registers linked with the national CAH register. Girls and women with CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (n = 335) born between January 1915 and January 2010 were compared with aged-matched female (n = 33500) and male controls (n = 33500). Analyses were stratified by phenotype [salt wasting (SW), simple virilizing (SV), and non-classical type (NC)] and by CYP21A2 genotype subgroups (null, I2splice, I172N, and P30L). Results are presented as estimated risks (OR, 95%CI) of psychiatric disorders among girls and women with CAH compared with age-matched controls. Any psychiatric diagnoses were more common in CAH females compared with female and male population controls [1.9 (1.4-2.5), and 2.2 (1.7-2.9)]. In particular, the risk of alcohol misuse was increased compared with female and male population controls [2.8 (1.7-4.7) and 2.1 (1.2-3.5)], and appeared most common among the girls and women with the most severe null genotype [6.7 (2.6-17.8)]. The risk of stress and adjustment disorders was doubled compared with female population controls [2.1 (1.3-3.6)]. Girls and women with CAH have an increased risk of psychiatric disorders in general and substance use disorders in particular compared with unexposed females, with the highest risk among those with the most severe genotype. Prenatal androgen exposure and deficient endogenous cortisol and/or adrenaline production may provide explanations for these findings, but other factors related to CAH cannot be excluded. PMID:26184920

  8. A new compound heterozygous frameshift mutation in the type II 3{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 3{beta}-HSD gene causes salt-wasting 3{beta}-HSD deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, L.; Sakkal-Alkaddour, S.; Chang, Ying T.; Yang, Xiaojiang; Songya Pang

    1996-01-01

    We report a new compound heterozygous frameshift mutation in the type II 3{Beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3{beta}-HSD) gene in a Pakistanian female child with the salt-wasting form of 3{Beta}-HSD deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia. The etiology for her congenital adrenal hyperplasia was not defined. Although the family history suggested possible 3{beta}-HSd deficiency disorder, suppressed adrenal function caused by excess glucocorticoid therapy in this child at 7 yr of age did not allow hormonal diagnosis. To confirm 3{beta}-HSD deficiency, we sequenced the type II 3{beta}-HSD gene in the patient, her family, and the parents of her deceased paternal cousins. The type II 3{beta}-HSD gene region of a putative promotor, exons I, II, III, and IV, and exon-intron boundaries were amplified by PCR and sequenced in all subjects. The DNA sequence of the child revealed a single nucleotide deletion at codon 318 [ACA(Thr){r_arrow}AA] in exon IV in one allele, and two nucleotide deletions at codon 273 [AAA(Lys){r_arrow}A] in exon IV in the other allele. The remaining gene sequences were normal. The codon 318 mutation was found in one allele from the father, brother, and parents of the deceased paternal cousins. The codon 273 mutation was found in one allele of the mother and a sister. These findings confirmed inherited 3{beta}-HSD deficiency in the child caused by the compound heterozygous type II 3{beta}-HSD gene mutation. Both codons at codons 279 and 367, respectively, are predicted to result in an altered and truncated type II 3{beta}-HSD protein, thereby causing salt-wasting 3{beta}-HSD deficiency in the patient. 21 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Adrenal glands

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002219.htm Adrenal glands To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The adrenal glands are two triangle-shaped glands. One gland is ...

  10. Palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis.

    PubMed

    Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, M Narendra; Gowrishankar; Ramesh, S

    2016-01-01

    A new-born male presented within 12 h of birth with respiratory distress. On examination and workup, he had palatoglossal fusion, cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. A 2.5 Fr endotracheal tube was inserted into the pharynx through nostril as a nasopharyngeal stent, following which his respiratory distress improved. Once child was optimised, then feeding was started by nasogastric tube and feeds were tolerated well. Elective tracheostomy and gastrostomy were done, followed by release of adhesions between the tongue and palate at a later stage. Review of literature suggests that palatoglossal fusion is uncommon and presents as an emergency. Mostly, these oral synechiae are associated with digital and/or cardiac anomaly. Other disorders associated with intra-oral synechiae include congenital alveolar synechiae, van der Woude syndrome, popliteal pterygium syndrome and oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome. The authors report a hitherto undescribed association of palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. PMID:27274132

  11. Unilateral primary pulmonary agenesis and hypoplasia in monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Alsaadi, Muslim; Al Muqhem, Badr; Boukai, A; Iqbal, Shaikh M

    2012-01-01

    We describe 10-month-old identical female twin infants, one with primary left-sided pulmonary agenesis and the other with primary left-sided pulmonary hypoplasia. They came to our outpatient clinic complaining of persistent dry cough. The clinical examination revealed decreased air entry over the left hemithorax. Chest x-rays showed complete left-sided radio-opacity in both the twins. The chest computed tomography scan with contrast confirmed the diagnoses of left-sided pulmonary agenesis (twin A) and left-sided hypoplasia (twin B). No other associated congenital anomaly was noted in either of the twins. To our knowledge, such a condition in live monozygotic twins has not been previously reported in published studies. PMID:22156648

  12. Palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis

    PubMed Central

    Solanki, Shailesh; Babu, M. Narendra; Gowrishankar; Ramesh, S.

    2016-01-01

    A new-born male presented within 12 h of birth with respiratory distress. On examination and workup, he had palatoglossal fusion, cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. A 2.5 Fr endotracheal tube was inserted into the pharynx through nostril as a nasopharyngeal stent, following which his respiratory distress improved. Once child was optimised, then feeding was started by nasogastric tube and feeds were tolerated well. Elective tracheostomy and gastrostomy were done, followed by release of adhesions between the tongue and palate at a later stage. Review of literature suggests that palatoglossal fusion is uncommon and presents as an emergency. Mostly, these oral synechiae are associated with digital and/or cardiac anomaly. Other disorders associated with intra-oral synechiae include congenital alveolar synechiae, van der Woude syndrome, popliteal pterygium syndrome and oromandibular limb hypogenesis syndrome. The authors report a hitherto undescribed association of palatoglossal fusion with cleft palate and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. PMID:27274132

  13. Adrenal glands in patients with cogenital renal anomalies: CT appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, P.J.; Robbins, G.L.; Ellis, D.A.; Spirt, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    The CT appearance of the adrenal glands was investigated in 30 patients with congenital renal anomalies. The ipsilateral adrenal was clearly identified in 83% of these patients; in all of them, the adrenal was a paraspinal disk-shaped organ, which appeared linear on CT. Conversely, the adrenals retained their normal shape in a control group of 20 patients with acquired renal atrophy or prior simple nephrectomy.

  14. Adrenal myelolipoma.

    PubMed

    Cyran, K M; Kenney, P J; Memel, D S; Yacoub, I

    1996-02-01

    In 1905, Gierke [1] first described the occurrence of a tumor in the adrenal composed of mature fat and mixed myeloid and erythroid cells, subsequently termed "formations myelolipomatoses" by Oberling [2] in 1929. PMID:8553954

  15. Idiopathic left ventricular apical hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Raza, Ali; Waleed, Mohammad; Balerdi, Matthew; Bragadeesh, Thanjavur; Clark, Andrew L

    2014-01-01

    A 46-year-old man was found to have an abnormal ECG taken during a routine health and blood pressure check. His only symptom was non-specific central chest discomfort, unrelated to exertion. His ECG showed sinus rhythm, a normal axis and poor R wave progression across the chest leads and lateral T wave flattening. An echocardiogram showed a dilated left ventricle with a thin and hypokinetic septum bulging to the right. The apex was 'not well seen' but also appeared thin and hypokinetic. The right heart and valves were normal. The patient was further investigated for left ventricular hypoplasia. PMID:24585345

  16. Focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome).

    PubMed

    Riyaz, Najeeba; Riyaz, A; Chandran, Rajesh; Rakesh, S V

    2005-01-01

    A 7-year-old girl born of non-consanguineous marriage was evaluated for facial dysmorphism. She had multiple skeletal anomalies like hypoplasia of the right mandible, narrow nasal bridge with broad tip and unilateral notching of the right ala nasi, concomitant squint and low set ears. She also had generalized hypopigmented, atrophic linear macules, multiple papillomas, fat herniations, umbilical hernia, hypoplastic nails, cicatricial alopecia, mild mental retardation, 'lobster-claw' hand and osteopathia striata of long bones, pointing to a diagnosis of Goltz syndrome. The unusual features noted were absence of the left first rib and aortic regurgitation. PMID:16394441

  17. Persistent testicular delta5-isomerase-3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (delta5-3beta-HSD) deficiency in the delta5-3beta-HSD form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, G; Genel, M; Bongiovanni, A M; Goldman, A S; Rosenfield, R L

    1975-01-01

    A partial testicular defect in testosterone secretion has been documented in a pubertal male with a congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to hereditary deficiency of the delta5-isomerase-3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzyme complex (delta5-3beta-HSD). Diagnosis of the enzymatic defect is based on the clinical picture of ambiguous genitalia and salt-losing crisis in infancy, together with high urinary delta5-pregnenetriol and plasma dehydroepiandrosterone when the patient was taken off replacement corticoid treatment. No hormonal response to ACTH or salt deprivation was demonstrable. In addition, in vivo studies revealed a partial enzymatic defect in the testis. Although plasma testosterone was low-normal (250 ng/100 ml), plasma delta5-androstenediol was markedly elevated and rose to a greater extent than testosterone after human chorionic gonadotropin administration. In vitro testicular incubation studies suggested a testicular delta5-3beta-HSD enzyme defect with less delta4 products formed from delta5 precursors than in a control testis. Histochemical studies of the testis were also consistent with this defect. Testicular biopsy revealed spermatogenic arrest, generally diminished Leydig cells, but with focal areas of Leydig cell hyperplasia as well as benign Leydig cell hyperplasia as well as benign Leudig cell nodules within the spermatic cord. In vivo studies of steroid metabolism suggested intact peripheral or hepatic delta5-3beta-HSD activity. These studies imply that delta5-3beta-HSD activity differs in the gonad, adrenal, and peripheral organs. These findings are compatible with the concept that the enzyme complex consists of subunits and/or that enzymes in these organs are under different genetic control. PMID:164481

  18. Enamel hypoplasia and its role in identification of individuals: A review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kanchan, Tanuj; Machado, Meghna; Rao, Ashwin; Krishan, Kewal; Garg, Arun K

    2015-01-01

    Identification of individuals is the mainstay of any forensic investigation especially in cases of mass disasters when mutilated remains are brought for examination. Dental examination helps in establishing the identity of an individual and thus, has played a vital role in forensic investigation process since long. In this regard, description on the role of enamel hypoplasia is limited in the literature. The present article reviews the literature on the enamel hypoplasia and discusses its utility in forensic identification. Enamel hypoplasia is a surface defect of the tooth crown caused by disturbance of enamel matrix secretion. Enamel defects can be congenital or acquired. In cases of mass disasters, or when the body is completely charred, putrefied and mutilated beyond recognition, the unique dental features can help in identification of the victims. PMID:26097340

  19. Enamel hypoplasia and its role in identification of individuals: A review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kanchan, Tanuj; Machado, Meghna; Rao, Ashwin; Krishan, Kewal; Garg, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    Identification of individuals is the mainstay of any forensic investigation especially in cases of mass disasters when mutilated remains are brought for examination. Dental examination helps in establishing the identity of an individual and thus, has played a vital role in forensic investigation process since long. In this regard, description on the role of enamel hypoplasia is limited in the literature. The present article reviews the literature on the enamel hypoplasia and discusses its utility in forensic identification. Enamel hypoplasia is a surface defect of the tooth crown caused by disturbance of enamel matrix secretion. Enamel defects can be congenital or acquired. In cases of mass disasters, or when the body is completely charred, putrefied and mutilated beyond recognition, the unique dental features can help in identification of the victims. PMID:26097340

  20. Maternal anticonvulsants and optic nerve hypoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Hoyt, C. S.; Billson, F. A.

    1978-01-01

    Seven patients with optic nerve hypoplasia, born of epileptic mothers, are presented. All the mothers took anticonvulsants during pregnancy. The possibility that maternal anticonvulsant therapy may play a role in the genesis of optic nerve hypoplasia is discussed in the light of what is known about the teratogenicity of these agents. Images PMID:415754

  1. Regional hypoplasia of somatosensory cortex in growth-retarded mice (grt/grt).

    PubMed

    Sawada, Kazuhiko; Saito, Shigeyoshi; Sugasawa, Akari; Sato, Chika; Aoyama, Junya; Ohara, Naoko; Horiuchi-Hirose, Miwa; Kobayashi, Tetsuya

    2016-07-01

    Growth-retarded mouse (grt/grt) is a spontaneous mutant that is known as an animal model for primary congenital hypothyroidism caused by resistance to TSH signaling. The regional pattern of cerebral cortical hypoplasia was characterized in grt/grt mice. Ex vivo computed tomography (CT)-based volumetry was examined in four regions of the cerebral cortex, i.e., prefrontal, frontal, parietal and occipito-temporal regions, which were demarcated by structural landmarks on coronal CT images. A region-specific reduced volume of the parietal cortical region covering most of the somatosensory cortex was noted in grt/grt mice rather than in both heterozygous (grt/+) and wild-type (+/+) mice. We concluded that the cortical hypoplasia in grt/grt was seen in identical cortical regions corresponding to human congenital hypothyroidism. PMID:26915353

  2. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in the treatment of non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 11-hydroxylase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kalani, Amir; Thomas, Nithin; Sacerdote, Alan; Bahtiyar, Gül

    2013-01-01

    Non-classic adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH) has been associated with insulin resistance (IR). Therapies such as metformin, thiazolidinediones and lifestyle alterations improve IR and also ameliorate the biochemical and clinical abnormalities of NCAH, much as they do in polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). More recently, bariatric surgery, such as Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP), has also been associated with improvement in IR and amelioration of PCOS and may, therefore, be beneficial in NCAH. We report a case of a 39-year-old, deaf-mute, obese woman with NCAH due to 11-hydroxylase deficiency who underwent RYGBP followed by improvement of NCAH manifestations. She was initially treated with metformin and pioglitazone, which lowered serum 11-deoxycortisol from 198 ng/dl (<51) to 26 ng/dl. Five weeks after undergoing RYGBP her body mass index fell from 44.18 kg/m2 to 39.54 kg/m2 and, despite not taking metformin or pioglitazone, serum 11-deoxycortisol remained normal at <40 ng/dl. Concurrently and subsequently, her NCAH symptoms, for example, alopecia, hirsutism and irregular menses normalised as well. We conclude that RYGBP, like other interventions that reduce IR, may be another way of treating non-classic 11-hydroxylase deficiency in selected patients. PMID:23513016

  3. Right Liver Lobe Hypoplasia and Related Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Alicioglu, Banu

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Hypoplasia and agenesis of the liver lobe is a rare abnormality. It is associated with biliary system abnormalities, high location of the right kidney, and right colon interposition. These patients are prone to gallstones, portal hypertension and possible surgical complications because of anatomical disturbance. Case Report Magnetic resonance imaging features of a rare case of hypoplasia of the right lobe of the liver in a sigmoid cancer patient are presented. Conclusions Hypoplasia of the right liver should not be confused with liver atrophy; indeed, associations with other coexistent abnormalities are also possible. Awareness and familiarity with these anomalies are necessary to avoid fatal surgical and interventional complications. PMID:26634012

  4. Bilateral implantation in children with cochleovestibular nerve hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Oker, N; Loundon, N; Marlin, S; Rouillon, I; Leboulanger, N; Garabédian, E N

    2009-10-01

    To report on the outcomes of sequential bilateral cochlear implantation (CI) in children with inner ear malformation. The study design is a retrospective case study. The setting is a tertiary reference center. Two children presenting a profound bilateral congenital hearing loss with bilateral hypoplasia of the cochleovestibular nerves and hypoplasic external semicircular canal had a cochlear implant at respectively 16 months and 33 months. A second implant was proposed at respectively 17 and 20 months after the first implant. The main outcome measures are audiometry, perceptive results in closed and open set words (CSW and OSW) and oral production at follow-up. The first cochlear implant gave respectively mean thresholds at 60 dB and 70 dB. Bilateral CI showed mean threshold at respectively 40 dB and 55 dB. In case 1, perceptive assessment was 83% and 70% in respectively CSW and OSW with oral production and comprehension of sentences after 1 year follow-up. In case 2, the perceptive assessment showed no perceptive or linguistic evolution at 6 months follow-up. In cochleovestibular nerve hypoplasia, bilateral implantation could be discussed in cases of limited result after unilateral implant. PMID:19665238

  5. CYP21A2 Mutation Analysis in Korean Patients With Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Using Complementary Methods: Sequencing After Long-Range PCR and Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Analysis With Multiple Ligation-Dependent Probe Amplification Assay

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Geehay; Choi, Rihwa; Jin, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Jae Hyeon; Ki, Chang-Seok; Lee, Soo-Youn; Song, Junghan; Kim, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    CYP21A2 mutation analysis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is challenging because of the genomic presence of a homologous CYP21A2 pseudogene and the significant incidence of pseudogene conversion and large deletions. The objective of this study was to accurately analyze the CYP21A2 genotype in Korean CAH patients using a combination of complementary methods. Long-range PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses were performed to confirm valid amplification of CYP21A2 and to detect large gene conversions and deletions before direct sequencing. Multiple ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) analysis was conducted concurrently in 14 CAH-suspected patients and six family members of three patients. We identified 27 CYP21A2 mutant alleles in 14 CAH-suspected patients. The c.293-13A>G (or c.293-13C>G) was the most common mutation, and p.Ile173Asn was the second, identified in 25% and 17.9% of alleles, respectively. A novel frame-shift mutation of c.492delA (p.Glu 164Aspfs*24) was detected. Large deletions were detected by MLPA in 10.7% of the alleles. Mutation studies of the six familial members for three of the patients aided in the identification of haplotypes. In summary, we successfully identified CYP21A2 mutations using both long-range PCR and sequencing and dosage analyses. Our data correspond relatively well with the previously reported mutation spectrum analysis. PMID:26206692

  6. Increased Cross-Gender Identification Independent of Gender Role Behavior in Girls with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: Results from a Standardized Assessment of 4- to 11-Year-Old Children.

    PubMed

    Pasterski, Vickie; Zucker, Kenneth J; Hindmarsh, Peter C; Hughes, Ieuan A; Acerini, Carlo; Spencer, Debra; Neufeld, Sharon; Hines, Melissa

    2015-07-01

    While reports showing a link between prenatal androgen exposure and human gender role behavior are consistent and the effects are robust, associations to gender identity or cross-gender identification are less clear. The aim of the current study was to investigate potential cross-gender identification in girls exposed prenatally to high concentrations of androgens due to classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). Assessment included two standardized measures and a short parent interview assessing frequency of behavioral features of cross-gender identification as conceptualized in Part A of the diagnostic criteria for gender identity disorder (GID) in the DSM-IV-TR. Next, because existing measures may have conflated gender role behavior with gender identity and because the distinction is potentially informative, we factor analyzed items from the measures which included both gender identity and gender role items to establish the independence of the two constructs. Participants were 43 girls and 38 boys with CAH and 41 unaffected female and 31 unaffected male relatives, aged 4- to 11-years. Girls with CAH had more cross-gender responses than female controls on all three measures of cross-gender identification as well as on a composite measure of gender identity independent of gender role behavior. Furthermore, parent report indicated that 5/39 (12.8 %) of the girls with CAH exhibited cross-gender behavior in all five behavioral domains which comprise the cross-gender identification component of GID compared to 0/105 (0.0 %) of the children in the other three groups combined. These data suggest that girls exposed to high concentrations of androgens prenatally are more likely to show cross-gender identification than girls without CAH or boys with and without CAH. Our findings suggest that prenatal androgen exposure could play a role in gender identity development in healthy children, and may be relevant to gender assignment in cases of prenatal hormone disruption

  7. Hereditary lissencephaly and cerebellar hypoplasia in Churra lambs

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    pathological findings of lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia in Churra lambs for which an autosomal recessive inheritance was the most likely cause. Histopathological features observed in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus are consistent with a possible failure in neuronal migration during brain development. This report suggests that lissencephaly should be considered in the differential diagnosis of congenital neurological disease in newborn lambs showing weakness, inability to walk and difficulty sucking. PMID:23938146

  8. Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage leading to adrenal crisis

    PubMed Central

    McGowan-Smyth, Sam

    2014-01-01

    A 77-year-old man presented with an acute worsening of chronic back pain. CT showed dense bilateral adrenal glands suggestive of adrenal haemorrhage which was confirmed by MRI. Despite appropriate glucocorticoid replacement for adrenal insufficiency, 7 days after admission this patient suffered an adrenal crisis. Owing to the timely diagnosis, appropriate treatment was given and the patient survived. Large bilateral adrenal haemorrhage however, can lead to cardiovascular collapse and death if not appropriately diagnosed and managed promptly. Despite its rarity, bilateral adrenal haemorrhage should always be considered as a differential for back pain in the setting of an acute illness due to its potentially fatal consequences. PMID:24969071

  9. Congenital limb deficiency disorders.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, William R; Coulter, Colleen P; Schmitz, Michael L

    2015-06-01

    Congenital limb deficiency disorders (LDDs) are birth defects characterized by the aplasia or hypoplasia of bones of the limbs. Limb deficiencies are classified as transverse, those due to intrauterine disruptions of previously normal limbs, or longitudinal, those that are isolated or associated with certain syndromes as well as chromosomal anomalies. Consultation with a medical geneticist is advisable. Long-term care should occur in a specialized limb deficiency center with expertise in orthopedics, prosthetics, and occupational and physical therapy and provide emotional support and contact with other families. With appropriate care, most children with LDDs can lead productive lives. PMID:26042905

  10. Congenital deficiency of the fibula with ipsilateral iliac horn and absence of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Haga, N; Lee, K; Nakamura, K; Okazaki, Y; Mamada, K; Kurokawa, T

    1997-04-01

    Congenital deficiency of the fibula is sometimes accompanied by femoral hypoplasia, genu valgum, patellar a/hypoplasia or dislocation, tibial bowing, foot deformity, and toe deficiency in the affected limb. 'Iliac horns' are bony projections extending posterolaterally from the ilium and considered to be pathognomonic of nail-patella syndrome. We report a 5-year-old Japanese girl with congenital complete deficiency of the left fibula, ipsilateral iliac horn and absence of the left kidney. PMID:9134300

  11. Molecular mechanisms of ventricular hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, D; Gottlieb, P D; Olson, E N

    2002-01-01

    We have established the beginnings of a road map to understand how ventricular cells become specified, differentiate, and expand into a functional cardiac chamber (Fig. 5). The transcriptional networks described here provide clear evidence that disruption of pathways affecting ventricular growth could be the underlying etiology in a subset of children born with malformation of the right or left ventricle. As we learn details of the precise mechanisms through which the critical factors function, the challenge will lie in devising innovative methods to augment or modify the effects of gene mutations on ventricular development. Because most congenital heart disease likely occurs in a setting of heterozygous, predisposing mutations of one or more genes, modulation of activity of critical pathways in a preventive fashion may be useful in averting disease in genetically susceptible individuals. PMID:12858532

  12. Optic nerve hypoplasia, encephalopathy, and neurodevelopmental handicap.

    PubMed Central

    Burke, J P; O'Keefe, M; Bowell, R

    1991-01-01

    Abnormalities of the central nervous system are frequently described in optic nerve hypoplasia. In a longitudinal study of 46 consecutive children (32 term, 14 preterm) with bilateral optic nerve hypoplasia 32 (69.5%) had associated neurodevelopmental handicap. Of these, 90% had structural central nervous system abnormalities on computed tomographic brain scans. Neurodevelopmental handicap occurred in 62.5% of the term and 86% of the preterm infants respectively. Term infants had a greater incidence of ventral developmental midline defects and proportionately fewer maternal and/or neonatal complications throughout pregnancy, while encephaloclastic lesions were commoner among the premature infants. An association of optic nerve hypoplasia with the twin transfusion syndrome and prenatal vascular encephalopathies is described. PMID:2021594

  13. [Evaluation of the diagnostic usefulness for ultrasonographic and echocardiographic lethal markers in fetal pulmonary hypoplasia. Analysis of 11 cases].

    PubMed

    Kieszek, S; Kaczmarek, P; Czichos, E; Respondek, M

    1996-07-01

    Results of ultrasonographic and echocardiographic studies of 11 fetuses were analysed retrospectively in relation to their pulmonary hypoplasia. Congenital malformations, quality of hydramnios and echocardiographical measurements of fetal chest were estimated. The best symptoms of pulmonary hypoplasia were: oligo/ahydramnios, absence of fetal breathing movements and malformations in fetal chest cavity (diaphragmatic hernia, cardiomegaly, hydrothorax). Systemic malformations were present in each case. The measurements such as CC, CA, HA, (CA-HA) x 100/CA were not accurate enough and we did not find any statistical differences between the control and the studied group. Finding several factors predisposing to lung hypoplasia means that its lethal form may be present in fetus. PMID:9138996

  14. Adrenal Gland Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... here Home > Types of Cancer > Adrenal Gland Tumor Adrenal Gland Tumor This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Adrenal Gland Tumor. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Adrenal Gland Tumor Introduction Statistics Risk Factors Symptoms and ...

  15. Focal Dermal Hypoplasia: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, Sahana M; Hiremagalore, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome) is a rare genetic multisystem disorder primarily involving the skin, skeletal system, eyes, and face. We report the case of an eight-month-old female child who presented with multiple hypopigmented atrophic macules along the lines of blaschko, skeletal anomalies, umbilical hernia, developmental delay, hypoplastic nails, syndactyly, and lobster claw deformity characteristic of Goltz syndrome. PMID:25657436

  16. Focal dermal hypoplasia: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Sahana M; Hiremagalore, Ravi

    2015-01-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz syndrome) is a rare genetic multisystem disorder primarily involving the skin, skeletal system, eyes, and face. We report the case of an eight-month-old female child who presented with multiple hypopigmented atrophic macules along the lines of blaschko, skeletal anomalies, umbilical hernia, developmental delay, hypoplastic nails, syndactyly, and lobster claw deformity characteristic of Goltz syndrome. PMID:25657436

  17. How Is Adrenal Surgery Performed?

    MedlinePlus

    HOME ADRENAL GLANDS Background Where are the adrenal glands? What do the adrenal glands do? Is this adrenal tumor a genetic problem? Primary hyperaldosteronism (aldosterone-producing tumor) What is primary hyperaldosteronism? Signs ...

  18. Congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Abduljabbar, Mohammad A; Afifi, Ashraf M

    2012-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is defined as thyroid hormone deficiency present at birth. Babies with CH who are not identified and treated promptly develop severe mental retardation. Most of the babies with CH do not manifest the typical known signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism, and this is most likely due to transplacental passage of some maternal thyroid hormone in addition to some residual neonatal thyroid function, as might be seen with thyroid hypoplasia, an ectopic gland, or mild dyshormonogenesis. Screening for CH has enabled the virtual eradication of the devastating effects of mental retardation due to sporadic CH in most developed countries of the world. CH is classified into permanent and transient forms, which in turn can be divided into primary, secondary, or peripheral etiologies. Permanent CH refers to a persistent deficiency of thyroid hormone that requires life-long treatment. Transient CH refers to a temporary deficiency of thyroid hormone that is discovered at birth but recovers to normal in the first few months or years of life. In the last several decades, there have been exciting advances in our understanding of fetal and neonatal thyroid physiology. In addition, advances in molecular biology have helped in understanding the early events in thyroid gland embryogenesis, mechanisms of thyroid action in the brain, the molecular basis for many of the inborn errors of thyroid hormonogenesis, and thyroid hormone action. However, many questions and challenges are still not answered. For example, the increasing numbers of surviving small and premature neonates with abnormalities in thyroid function need definite diagnostic criteria and whether they require medical therapy. Another challenge is the dilemma of finding the best screening methodology that is sensitive and cost effective. PMID:22570946

  19. Adrenal Gland Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    The adrenal glands are small glands located on top of each kidney. They produce hormones that you can't live ... stress and has many other important functions. With adrenal gland disorders, your glands make too much or not ...

  20. Adrenal Gland Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. Most adrenal gland tumors are ... and may not require treatment. Malignant adrenal gland cancers are uncommon. Types of tumors include Adrenocortical carcinoma - ...

  1. Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... adrenal tumors that appear malignant. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal? In the past, ... of procedure and the patients overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain Shorter hospital stay Quicker ...

  2. Enamel hypoplasia: challenges of esthetic restorative treatment.

    PubMed

    Ruschel, Vanessa Carla; Araújo, Élito; Bernardon, Jussara Karina; Lopes, Guilherme Carpena

    2016-01-01

    Enamel defects, such as white or yellow-brown spots, usually cause problems that are more esthetic than functional. Enamel hypoplasia may be the result of hereditary, systemic, or local factors. Dental trauma is a local etiologic factor. It is relatively common in the primary dentition and can cause defects on the surface of permanent successors. Treatment for such defects can differ, depending on the depth of the spots. For deeper white-spot lesions, a composite resin restoration may be necessary. This is an excellent mode of treatment, due to both its low cost and its conservation of healthy tooth structure. The objective of this case report is to describe composite resin restoration of a maxillary central incisor affected by enamel hypoplasia. PMID:27599287

  3. Adrenal imaging (Part 2): Medullary and secondary adrenal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dhamija, Ekta; Panda, Ananya; Das, Chandan J.; Gupta, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal malignancies can be either primary adrenal tumors or secondary metastases, with metastases representing the most common malignant adrenal lesion. While imaging cannot always clearly differentiate between various adrenal malignancies, presence of certain imaging features, in conjunction with appropriate clinical background and hormonal profile, can suggest the appropriate diagnosis. The second part of the article on adrenal imaging describes adrenal medullary tumors, secondary adrenal lesions, bilateral adrenal lesions, adrenal incidentalomas and provides an algorithmic approach to adrenal lesions based on current imaging recommendations. PMID:25593821

  4. Role of DAX-1 (NR0B1) and steroidogenic factor-1 (NR5A1) in human adrenal function.

    PubMed

    El-Khairi, Ranna; Martinez-Aguayo, Alejandro; Ferraz-de-Souza, Bruno; Lin, Lin; Achermann, John C

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear receptor transcription factors DAX-1 (NR0B1) and SF-1 (NR5A1) regulate many aspects of adrenal and reproductive development and function. Disruption of the genes encoding these factors can be associated with pediatric adrenal disease. DAX-1 mutations are classically associated with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and impaired spermatogenesis. However, other phenotypes are also being reported, such as isolated mineralocorticoid insufficiency, premature sexual development, primary adrenal insufficiency in a 46, XX patient and late-onset X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita and/or hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. SF-1 mutations have also been associated with primary adrenal insufficiency, together with 46, XY disorders of sex development. However it is emerging that SF-1 changes are a relatively rare cause of primary adrenal failure in humans, and most individuals with SF-1 mutations have a spectrum of 46, XY disorders of sex development phenotypes. These conditions range from 46, XY females with streak gonads and müllerian structures, through children with ambiguous genitalia and inguinal testes, to severe penoscrotal hypospadias with undescended testes. Therefore, the human gonad appears to be more sensitive than the adrenal gland to loss of SF-1 function. This review will focus on the expanding range of phenotypes associated with DAX-1 and SF-1 mutations. PMID:21164257

  5. Role of adrenal imaging in surgical management

    SciTech Connect

    Lamki, L.M.; Haynie, T.P. )

    1990-03-01

    Adrenal imaging using radiopharmaceuticals is a functional test that can contribute significantly to surgical management and follow-up of patients with either benign or malignant conditions of the adrenal cortex and medulla. Imaging of the cortex is achieved by iodine-131-labeled iodomethyl nor-cholesterol (NP-59), while adrenal medulla imaging can be successfully accomplished by 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), which localizes in the adrenergic nerve terminal with norepinephrine. Both tests carry high sensitivity and specificity for functional tumors and hyperplasia, and often better than CT scanning. This article reviews the current status and clinical utility of nuclear imaging of the adrenal cortex in congenital hyperplasia, low renin hypertension and aldosteronism, and Cushing's syndrome. Adrenal medulla imaging is reviewed in light of our experience at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in pheochromocytoma, neuroblastoma, and other neuroectodermal tumors. Investigation of {sup 131}I-MIBG therapy of metastatic tumors of neuroectodermal origin potentially offers a means of at least controlling symptoms of hormonal secretion in these patients. 40 references.

  6. Rare Case of Unilateral Hypoplasia of Lung with Associated Ventricular Mass in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Azad; Iyer, Aparna; Kutty, Jayalakshmi Thelapurath

    2016-01-01

    Hypoplasia of the lung is a rare congenital condition which can be: a) primary i.e. no apparent cause is found; or b) secondary i.e. associated with other congenital anomalies that are implicated in its pathogenesis. These anomalies may involve the diaphragm, cardiovascular, central nervous, urogenital and musculoskeletal system. Patients usually present in neonatal, infancy or childhood period and very rarely in adulthood. Our patient was an adult having a unilateral hypoplastic lung associated with a ventricular mass and to our knowledge this rare combination has never been reported in the English literature; though there are reports of prenatal or newborns with hypoplastic lung and rhabdomyoma of ventricle who did not survive.

  7. Congenital Hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body in Balance › Congenital Hypothyroidism Fact Sheet Congenital Hypothyroidism March, 2012 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Rosalind S. ... MD Susan R. Rose, MD What is congenital hypothyroidism? Newborn babies who are unable to make enough ...

  8. Isolated foveal hypoplasia with secondary nystagmus and low vision is associated with a homozygous SLC38A8 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Yonatan; Gradstein, Libe; Flusser, Hagit; Markus, Barak; Cohen, Idan; Langer, Yshaia; Marcus, Mira; Lifshitz, Tova; Kadir, Rotem; Birk, Ohad S

    2014-01-01

    Foveal hypoplasia, always accompanied by nystagmus, is found as part of the clinical spectrum of various eye disorders such as aniridia, albinism and achromatopsia. However, the molecular basis of isolated autosomal recessive foveal hypoplasia is yet unknown. Individuals of apparently unrelated non consanguineous Israeli families of Jewish Indian (Mumbai) ancestry presented with isolated foveal hypoplasia associated with congenital nystagmus and reduced visual acuity. Genome-wide homozygosity mapping followed by fine mapping defined a 830 Kb disease-associated locus (LOD score 3.5). Whole-exome sequencing identified a single missense mutation in the homozygosity region: c.95T>G, p.(Ile32Ser), in a conserved amino acid within the first predicted transmembrane domain of SLC38A8. The mutation fully segregated with the disease-associated phenotype, demonstrating an ∼10% carrier rate in Mumbai Jews. SLC38A8 encodes a putative sodium-dependent amino-acid/proton antiporter, which we showed to be expressed solely in the eye. Thus, a homozygous SLC38A8 mutation likely underlies isolated foveal hypoplasia. PMID:24045842

  9. Congenital aganglionosis in a 3-day-old Holstein calf

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Necropsy of a 3-day-old Holstein heifer revealed proximal megacolon and distal colorectal hypoplasia. Histologically, the hypoplastic distal colon and rectum lacked submucosal and myenteric ganglia. Clinical history, physical examination, and pathologic findings were consistent with intestinal aganglionosis, a congenital anomaly well documented in humans and foals but not previously reported in cattle. PMID:15943121

  10. Management of complications of congenital hand disorders.

    PubMed

    Comer, Garet C; Ladd, Amy L

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews treatment and presents complications seen in the treatment of 7 common congenital hand differences, including syndactyly, camptodactyly, ulnar and radial polydactyly, thumb hypoplasia, radial longitudinal deficiency, and epidermolysis bullosa. The management of these conditions is challenging but has evolved over the last several decades with refined understanding of the disease processes and treatments. The goal of this article is to synthesize prior knowledge and provide further insights into these conditions that will help the surgeon avoid treatment complications. PMID:25934210

  11. Spectrum of PORCN mutations in Focal Dermal Hypoplasia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Focal Dermal Hypoplasia (FDH), also known as Goltz syndrome (OMIM 305600), is a genetic disorder that affects multiple organ systems early in development. Features of FDH include skin abnormalities, (hypoplasia, atrophy, linear pigmentation, and herniation of fat through dermal defects); papillomas...

  12. Renal and adrenal tumors: Pathology, radiology, ultrasonography, therapy, immunology

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, E.; Leder, L.D.

    1987-01-01

    Aspects as diverse as radiology, pathology, urology, pediatrics and immunology have been brought together in one book. The most up-do-date methods of tumor diagnosis by CT, NMR, and ultrasound are covered, as are methods of catheter embolization and radiation techniques in case of primarily inoperable tumors. Contents: Pathology of Renal and Adrenal Neoplasms; Ultrasound Diagnosis of Renal and Pararenal Tumors; Computed-Body-Tomography of Renal Carcinoma and Perirenal Masses; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Renal Mass Lesions; I-125 Embolotherapy of Renal Tumors; Adrenal Mass Lesions in Infants and Children; Computed Tomography of the Adrenal Glands; Scintigraphic Studies of Renal and Adrenal Function; Surgical Management of Renal Cell Carcinoma; Operative Therapy of Nephroblastoma; Nonoperative Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma; Prenatal Wilms' Tumor; Congenital Neuroblastoma; Nonsurgical Management of Wilms' Tumor; Immunologic Aspects of Malignant Renal Disease.

  13. A previously undescribed syndrome combining fibular agenesis/hypoplasia, oligodactylous clubfeet, anonychia/ungual hypoplasia, and other defects.

    PubMed

    Santos, Silvana C; Pardono, Eliete; Ferreira da Costa, Maria Ione; de Melo, Aurea Nogueira; Graciani, Zodja; de Albuquerque e Souza, Alessandra Cavalcanti; Lezirovitz, Karina; Thiele-Aguiar, Renata Soares; Mingroni-Netto, Regina Célia; Opitz, John M; Kok, Fernando; Otto, Paulo A

    2008-12-15

    We describe an apparently new genetic syndrome in six members of a family living in a remote area in Northeastern Brazil. This syndrome comprises: short stature due to a marked decrease in the length of the lower limbs (predominantly mesomelic with fibular agenesis/marked hypoplasia), grossly malformed/deformed clubfeet with severe oligodactyly, upper limbs with acromial dimples and variable motion limitation of the forearms and/or hands, severe nail hypoplasia/anonychia sometimes associated with mild brachydactyly and occasionally with pre-axial polydactyly. This syndrome is apparently distinct from the syndrome of brachydactyly-ectrodactyly with fibular aplasia or hypoplasia (OMIM 113310), the syndrome of fibular aplasia or hypoplasia, femoral bowing and poly-, syn-, and oligodactyly (OMIM 228930), and from other previously described conditions exhibiting fibular agenesis/hypoplasia. PMID:19012338

  14. Pontine hypoplasia in a child with sensorineural deafness.

    PubMed

    Maeoka, Y; Yamamoto, T; Ohtani, K; Takeshita, K

    1997-09-01

    A 2-year-old girl with bilateral sensorineural deafness showed pontine hypoplasia as well as a bulging contour of the pontine tegmentum on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). There were no bilateral responses of brainstem auditory-evoked potentials (BAEPs). The absent late components of blink reflex (BR) indicated brainstem dysfunction. Chromosomal abnormalities and neurodegenerative or neurometabolic disorders, which might have been the cause of the pontine hypoplasia, were ruled out. The authors describe a rare case with pontine hypoplasia combined with sensorineural deafness and absent blink reflex and suggest that the brainstem in this child may become involved in the early gestation period. PMID:9339875

  15. Congenital multi-organ malformations in a Holstein calf.

    PubMed

    Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram; Nazarizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    A 5-day-old female Holstein calf was necropsied because of lethargy, recumbency and anorexia. At necropsy, multiple gross defects were evident in several organs, including unclosed sutures of skull bones, asymmetrical orbits, doming of the skull bones, hydrocephalus, hydranencephaly, cleft palate, brachygnathia, ventricular septal defect, mitral valve dysplasia and rudimentary lungs. On microscopic examination, pulmonary hypoplasia was characterized by reduced number of alveoli, replacement of peri-bronchiolar smooth muscles with connective tissue and small masses of undeveloped cartilage around the small airways. The present report is the first description of the congenital pulmonary hypoplasia accompanied by numerous malformations in Holstein breed. PMID:26893818

  16. Congenital multi-organ malformations in a Holstein calf

    PubMed Central

    Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Dalir-Naghadeh, Bahram; Nazarizadeh, Ali

    2015-01-01

    A 5-day-old female Holstein calf was necropsied because of lethargy, recumbency and anorexia. At necropsy, multiple gross defects were evident in several organs, including unclosed sutures of skull bones, asymmetrical orbits, doming of the skull bones, hydrocephalus, hydranencephaly, cleft palate, brachygnathia, ventricular septal defect, mitral valve dysplasia and rudimentary lungs. On microscopic examination, pulmonary hypoplasia was characterized by reduced number of alveoli, replacement of peri-bronchiolar smooth muscles with connective tissue and small masses of undeveloped cartilage around the small airways. The present report is the first description of the congenital pulmonary hypoplasia accompanied by numerous malformations in Holstein breed. PMID:26893818

  17. Ectopia cordis with a double outlet right ventricle, large ventricular septal defect, malposed great arteries and left ventricular hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Malik, Rabiya; Zilberman, Mark V; Tang, Liwen; Miller, Susan; Pandian, Natesa G

    2015-03-01

    Ectopia cordis, defined as partial or complete displacement of the heart outside of the thoracic cavity, is a rare congenital malformation. If not surgically corrected during the early years of life, ectopia cordis can prove to be a fatal abnormality. However, due to the presence of multiple intracardiac and extracardiac malformations, a corrective surgery might not always be successful. The pathology of ectopia cordis with a double outlet right ventricle, large ventricular septal defect, malposed great arteries and left ventricular hypoplasia is discussed, highlighting the complexities involved in such a rare disorder. PMID:25409882

  18. Left ventricular apical hypoplasia: Case report on cardiomyopathy and a history of sudden cardiac death

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh Sani, Zahra; Vojdanparast, Mohammad; Rezaeian, Nahid; Seifi, Azin; Omidvar Tehrani, Sahar; Nezafati, Pouya

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Isolated left ventricular apical hypoplasia with several different unrecognized dimensions is a newly discovered congenital anomaly of the heart. CASE REPORT In this report, we describe a case of cardiomyopathy of this type occurring in a 13-year-old male with a history of mental retardation and sudden cardiac death (SCD) of second-degree relatives. The patient was referred for an evaluation of cardiac status. An echocardiography analysis demonstrated a spherical left ventricle (LV) appearance with mild mitral regurgitation. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed a spherical and truncated LV appearance. The right ventricle was found to have elongated and wrapped around the LV, and diverticulum was also seen in the cardiac MRI. CONCLUSION To the best of our knowledge, this is to present the first case of LV apical hypoplasia combined with LV diverticulum and a family history of SCD. As more cases featuring this cardiomyopathy type are recognized, it will be easier to elucidate the natural history and management of such cardiac anomalies. PMID:27114737

  19. Portal hypertension associated with primary hypoplasia of the hepatic portal vein in dogs.

    PubMed

    Van den Ingh, T S; Rothuizen, J; Meyer, H P

    1995-10-21

    Portal hypertension caused by primary hypoplasia of the portal vein was diagnosed in 42 dogs. The portal hypertension was manifested by the presence of multiple portosystemic collateral vessels. The main clinical signs were retarded growth or weight loss, apathy, intermittent diarrhoea and vomiting, anorexia, abdominal distension and polydipsia. Major findings at physical examination were ascites in 23 dogs and neurological signs in 16 dogs. The dogs had increased activities of liver enzymes in plasma and increased fasting levels of total bile acids and ammonia; in many of the dogs the packed red cell volume, total serum protein and albumin were low. Gross inspection of the portal vein revealed a patent but underdeveloped extrahepatic vein in 13 of the dogs. Microscopic examination of the liver revealed hypoplasia of the intrahepatic portal veins in all the dogs, and this was associated with minor arteriolar proliferation and absence of fibrosis in 12 of them, with moderate to marked arteriolar proliferation often combined with ductular proliferation in 13, and with marked portal fibrosis (formerly described as hepatoportal fibrosis) with a varying number of arteriolar and bile ductular structures in 17 of the dogs. The disease affected mainly young dogs, and was most likely to have been of congenital origin. PMID:8560700

  20. Macular optical coherence tomography in patients with unilateral optic nerve hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Abbasian, Javaneh; Blair, Norman; Shahidi, Mahnaz; Ying, Gui-Shuaung; Huang, Jiayan; Kaufman, Lawrence; Blair, Michael

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To characterize the extent and location of macular thinning in patients with unilateral optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) as compared to the contralateral normal eye. METHODS The medical records of patients with unilateral ONH who underwent spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) of the macula were retrospectively reviewed. SD-OCT scans were manually segmented by 3 observers in 3 macular regions (superior, central, inferior). Boundaries identified included the inner limiting membrane, the junction between the inner nuclear layer and outer plexiform layer, and the neural retina–retinal pigment epithelium interface. Using custom MATLAB software, inner and outer retinal thickness profiles were quantified. A paired t test was used to compare the retinal thickness between the ONH eye and the contralateral normal eyes. RESULTS Inner retinal thickness of the ONH eye was decreased in all areas of the macula (superior, central, and inferior) compared to the contralateral normal eye (P < 0.05). Outer retinal thicknesses were also decreased in the central and inferior sections compared with the normal eye (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Optic nerve hypoplasia is a congenital disease known to result in thinning of the nerve fiber and ganglion cell layer. Our small cohort demonstrated thinning of the inner retinal layers as well as the outer retinal layers in the ONH eye compared with the contralateral normal eye. PMID:25727589

  1. Acute adrenal crisis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cortisol and adrenaline are released in response to stress . Cortisol production is regulated by the pituitary gland. This ... adrenal crisis include: Dehydration Infection and other physical ... medicines such as prednisone or hydrocortisone Surgery Trauma

  2. Enamel hypoplasia in the middle pleistocene hominids from Atapuerca (Spain).

    PubMed

    Bermúdez de Castro, J M; Pérez, P J

    1995-03-01

    The prevalence and chronology of enamel hypoplasias were studied in a hominid dental sample from the Sima de los Huesos (SH) Middle Pleistocene site at the Sierra de Atapuerca (Burgos, northern Spain). A total of 89 permanent maxillary teeth, 143 permanent mandibular teeth, and one deciduous lower canine, belonging to a minimum of 29 individuals, were examined. Excluding the antimeres (16 maxillary and 37 mandibular cases) from the sample, the prevalence of hypoplasias in the permanent dentition is 12.8% (23/179), whereas the deciduous tooth also showed an enamel defect. No statistically significant differences were found between both arcades and between the anterior and postcanine teeth for the prevalence of hypoplasias. In both the maxilla and the mandible the highest frequency of enamel hypoplasias was recorded in the canines. Only one tooth (a permanent upper canine) showed two different enamel defects, and most of the hypoplasias were expressed as faint linear horizontal defects. Taking into account the limitations that the incompleteness of virtually all permanent dentitions imposes, we have estimated that the frequency by individual in the SH hominid sample was not greater than 40%. Most of the hypoplasias occurred between birth and 7 years (N = 18, X = 3.5, SD = 1.3). Both the prevalence and severity of the hypoplasias of the SH hominid sample are significantly less than those of a large Neandertal sample. Furthermore, prehistoric hunter-gatherers and historic agricultural and industrial populations exhibit a prevalence of hypoplasias generally higher than that of the SH hominids. Implications for the survival strategies and life quality of the SH hominids are also discussed. PMID:7785727

  3. Cerebellar hypoplasia of genetic origin in calves.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, B M; McPhee, C P

    1975-10-01

    Within 2 years, following the introduction of 2 Shorthorn bulls from the same stud into an Australian Illawarra Shorthorn (AIS) herd, 16 calves were born with cerebellar hypoplasia. All affected calves were the progeny of one bull mated to the daughters of the other. All other progeny of these bulls, most of which were from AIS dams, were normal. Affected calves exhibited severe ataxia, consistent head movement and abduction of the forelimbs. Microscopic changes in the cerebellum included sparsity of cells of the granular layer, loss of Purkinje cells and narrowing of the molecular layer. Observations on the frequencies of normal and abnormal calves are consistent with the hypothesis that the condition is caused by an autosomal recessive gene for which affected calves were homozygous and which was introduced into the herd in heterozygous condition by both of the Shorthorn bulls. Evidence is given for an unusually high frequency of the gene in the stud of origin of the Shorthorn bulls and a procedure for reducing its frequency is outlined. The possibility of a viral or toxic aetiology is discussed but is considered to be an unlikely explanation for the condition in this herd. PMID:1200928

  4. [Addison's disease : Primary adrenal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Pulzer, A; Burger-Stritt, S; Hahner, S

    2016-05-01

    Adrenal insufficiency, a rare disorder which is characterized by the inadequate production or absence of adrenal hormones, may be classified as primary adrenal insufficiency in case of direct affection of the adrenal glands or secondary adrenal insufficiency, which is mostly due to pituitary or hypothalamic disease. Primary adrenal insufficiency affects 11 of 100,000 individuals. Clinical symptoms are mainly nonspecific and include fatigue, weight loss, and hypotension. The diagnostic test of choice is dynamic testing with synthetic ACTH. Patients suffering from chronic adrenal insufficiency require lifelong hormone supplementation. Education in dose adaption during physical and mental stress or emergency situations is essential to prevent life-threatening adrenal crises. Patients with adrenal insufficiency should carry an emergency card and emergency kit with them. PMID:27129928

  5. MicroRNA-561 promotes acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in HepG2 cells and primary human hepatocytes through downregulation of the nuclear receptor corepressor dosage-sensitive sex-reversal adrenal hypoplasia congenital critical region on the X chromosome, gene 1 (DAX-1).

    PubMed

    Li, Minghua; Yang, Yinxue; He, Zhi-Xu; Zhou, Zhi-Wei; Yang, Tianxin; Guo, Peixuan; Zhang, Xueji; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2014-01-01

    One of the major mechanisms involved in acetaminophen (APAP)-induced hepatotoxicity is hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α)-mediated activation of pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). In the present study, we investigated the role of miR-561 and its target gene DAX-1 encoding a corepressor of HNF4α in the process of APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. We used both human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) cells and primary human hepatocytes in this study and monitored the levels of reactive oxygen species, lactate dehydrogenase, and glutathione. Our bioinformatics study suggests an association between miR-561 and DAX-1, but not HNF4α. Treatment of HepG2 cells with APAP significantly reduced the expression of DAX-1 in a concentration-dependent manner. miR-561 was induced by APAP treatment in HepG2 cells. Transfection of HepG2 cells with an miR-561 mimic exacerbated APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. HNF4α is physically associated with DAX-1 in HepG2 cells. A decreased protein level of DAX-1 by APAP treatment was also enhanced by miR-561 mimic transfection in HepG2 cells and primary human hepatocytes. The basal and APAP-induced expression of PXR and CAR was enhanced by miR-561 mimic transfection; however, transfection of HepG2 cells or primary human hepatocytes with a miR-561 inhibitor or DAX-1 small interfering RNA reversed these effects. Additionally, the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay revealed that recruitment of DAX-1 onto the PXR promoter was inversely correlated with the recruitment of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α coactivator-1α and HNF4α on APAP treatment. These results indicate that miR-561 worsens APAP-induced hepatotoxicity via inhibition of DAX-1 and consequent transactivation of nuclear receptors. PMID:24104199

  6. Does an expanding fetal abdominal mass produce pulmonary hypoplasia?

    PubMed

    Sauer, L; Harrison, M R; Flake, A W; Krummel, T R

    1987-06-01

    Fetal pulmonary hypoplasia has been related to multiple factors. In an effort to define which fetuses may benefit from prenatal intervention to prevent or reverse pulmonary hypoplasia, we studied the relative contribution of an enlarging abdominal mass in the fetus. We produced abdominal masses in fetal rabbits at 24 days gestation by two methods. In one group, a small cylindrical chip of Takasen, (a synthetic polymer that expands to 50 times its size in 1 week; Grobeast, Pop Art Co, Cleveland, OH) was inserted into the peritoneal cavity of the fetal rabbit; in another group, the bladder neck was obstructed with a surgical clip. Amniotic fluid volume was restored at the surgical procedure. Sham-operated littermates served as controls. At cesarean delivery on day 30, fetal lung, liver, and body weights were measured, and the abdominal masses were quantitated by volume displacement of the removed mass or bladder. In both groups large abdominal masses of comparable size were produced. Newborns with the synthetic abdominal mass did not have significant pulmonary hypoplasia, but often had a prune belly deformity of the abdominal wall, whereas newborns with bladder obstruction had significant pulmonary hypoplasia. Liver weight was not significantly affected. We conclude that a fetal abdominal mass does not independently produce pulmonary hypoplasia, possibly because the "mass effect" is relieved by distension of the abdominal wall rather than elevation of the diaphragm; the pulmonary hypoplasia that occurs in bladder outlet obstruction is probably due to the associated oligohydramnios rather than the mass effect of the dilated urinary tract; and prenatal decompression of an abdominal mass or dilated urinary tract is not justified to prevent pulmonary hypoplasia in the absence of oligohydramnios. PMID:3612441

  7. What Is Adrenal Cortical Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... include pheochromocytomas (which are most often benign) and neuroblastomas . This document is about tumors and cancers of ... does not discuss tumors of the adrenal medulla. Neuroblastoma s are covered in a separate document . Adrenal cortex ...

  8. Percutaneous Ablation of Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Locklin, Julia; Dupuy, Damian E.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Adrenal tumors comprise a broad spectrum of benign and malignant neoplasms, and include functional adrenal adenomas, pheochromocytomas, primary adrenocortical carcinoma and adrenal metastases. Percutaneous ablative approaches that have been described and used in the treatment of adrenal tumors include percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA), cryoablation, microwave ablation and chemical ablation. Local tumor ablation in the adrenal gland presents unique challenges, secondary to the adrenal gland’s unique anatomic and physiologic features. The results of clinical series employing percutaneous ablative techniques in the treatment of adrenal tumors are reviewed in this article. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the adrenal gland are presented, including approaches commonly used in our practices, and risks and potential complications are discussed. PMID:20540918

  9. Congenital hemangiomas.

    PubMed

    Boull, Christina; Maguiness, Sheilagh M

    2016-03-01

    Congenital hemangiomas are rare solitary vascular tumors that do not proliferate after birth. They are characterized as either rapidly involuting congenital hemangiomas (RICHs) or noninvoluting congenital hemangiomas (NICHs) based on their clinical progression. NICHs have no associated complications, but are persistent. RICH, while usually asymptomatic, may ulcerate or bleed early in their presentation, but involute quickly during the first few months of life. Hepatic RICHs are not associated with cutaneous RICHs, but may result in high-output cardiac failure due to arteriovenous or portovenous shunting. In the following review, the clinical characteristics and current management specific to congenital hemangiomas is discussed. PMID:27607320

  10. [Giant adrenal myelolipoma].

    PubMed

    El Mejjad, Amine; Fekak, Hamid; Dakir, Mohamed; Sarf, Ismail; Manni, Ahmed; Meziane, Fethi

    2004-02-01

    Adrenal myelolipoma is a rare, benign, non-secreting tumour composed of adipose and haematopoietic tissue. The authors report a rare case of giant adrenal myelolipoma in a 53-year-old patient presenting with low back pain and a palpable flank mass on examination. CT scan suggested the diagnosis and surgical resection was indicated in view of the size and symptomatic nature of this mass. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis. The outcome was favourable without recurrence after a follow-up of one year. The diagnosis of adrenal myelolipoma is based on radiology. Conservative management is generally sufficient for small asymptomatic tumours, but resection is required for large (> 5 cm) and/or symptomatic tumours. PMID:15098761

  11. Optic nerve hypoplasia: septo-optic-pituitary dysplasia syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Acers, T E

    1981-01-01

    Forty-five patients with the common clinical factor of optic nerve hypoplasia are analyzed regarding their clinical appearance, echographic and computed tomographic measurements of the optic nerves, and the correlation of anatomic size with visual function. Computed axial tomographic studies of the midline brain were performed on all 45 patients to determine the incidence of correlated structural defects, especially the septum pellucidum, and neuroendocrine dysfunction. Review of the spectrum of septo-optic-pituitary syndrome is separately developed to include historical background, embryogenesis, histopathology, and pathogenesis of the three major components of the syndrome. In summary, 45 patients had optic nerve hypoplasia, 32 with evidence of segmental or partial hypoplasia and 13 with evidence of complete or diffuse hypoplasia--the optic nerve hypoplasia syndrome. Twelve of these patients demonstrated absence of the septum pellucidum by computed axial tomography--the septo-optic dysplasia syndrome. Of these 12 patients with partial or complete absence of the septum pellucidum, six demonstrated evidence of pituitary hypofunction--the septo-optic-pituitary dysplasia syndrome. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 a FIGURE 3 b FIGURE 4 a FIGURE 4 b FIGURE 4 c FIGURE 4 d PMID:7043865

  12. Increased enamel hypoplasia and very low birthweight infants.

    PubMed

    Nelson, S; Albert, J M; Geng, C; Curtan, S; Lang, K; Miadich, S; Heima, M; Malik, A; Ferretti, G; Eggertsson, H; Slayton, R L; Milgrom, P

    2013-09-01

    Birth cohort studies of developmental defects of enamel (DDE) and early childhood caries (ECC) in very low birthweight (VLBW) and normal birthweight (NBW) infants are rare. In this birth cohort of 234 VLBW and 234 NBW infants, we report the incidence of ECC and DDE at 8 and 18-20 mos of corrected age. Infant medical and maternal socio-demographic data were abstracted from medical records at birth. Dental assessments for ECC and DDE (enamel hypoplasia, demarcated and diffuse opacities) were completed at 8 and 18-20 mos. The incidence of hypoplasia was significantly higher in VLBW compared with NBW infants (8 mos, 19% vs. 2%; 18 mos, 31% vs. 8%). The incidence of ECC (International Caries Detection and Assessment System: ICDAS ≥ 2) was 1.4% (8 mos) and 12% (18-20 mos) and was similar between the VLBW and NBW groups. At both ages, using a beta-binomial regression model to control for potential confounders (maternal and infant characteristics), we found increased risk for enamel hypoplasia among the VLBW infants compared with the NBW infants. African Americans had a lower risk for enamel hypoplasia at 18-20 mos. The VLBW infants should be monitored for ECC due to the presence of enamel hypoplasia. PMID:23857641

  13. Infant and perinatal pulmonary hypoplasia frequently associated with brainstem hypodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, Giulia; Mingrone, Rosaria; Lavezzi, Anna M; Matturri, Luigi

    2009-04-01

    Recent anatomo-pathological studies have revealed a frequent associated hypoplasia of both arcuate nucleus and lungs in stillbirths. The purpose of this study is to analyze the lung and brainstem development in sudden unexplained perinatal death and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). A total of 51 cases were investigated. A complete autopsy was performed in each case. Anatomo-pathologic examination of the central autonomic nervous system included an in-depth study on histological serial sections of the brains where the main structures participating in control of the vital functions are located. The stage of lung development was evaluated by macroscopic and microscopic criteria. In 52.9% of cases, a pulmonary hypoplasia was detected. The pulmonary hypoplasia was significantly more frequent in the SIDS group compared to the sudden perinatal unexplained death groups (p < 0.05). In 72.5% of cases, histological examination of the brainstem on serial sections showed hypodevelopment of the brainstem nuclei, particularly hypoplasia, of the arcuate nucleus (60.8%). In 47.1% of cases, pulmonary hypoplasia was associated with brainstem hypodevelopment. PMID:19288128

  14. Amitosis in human adrenal cells.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, M C; Pignatelli, D; Magalhães, M M

    1991-04-01

    Adrenal pieces obtained from 3 female and 2 male patients showed morphological figures of amitosis in adrenal zona reticularis cells. Such aspects were observed in both normal and hyperactive adrenals. Nuclei appeared constricted, heavily stained, with coarse chromatin, sometimes scattered among cytoplasmic organelles, but never marginating in crescentic caps. Cleavage of the cells originated two halves with a nucleolus in each pole. Binucleated cells were also seen in zona reticularis. The meaning of amitosis in human adrenal is discussed. PMID:1802124

  15. Adrenal venous sampling in a patient with adrenal Cushing syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Franco, Carlos Andrés; Román-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Velez-Hoyos, Alejandro; Echeverri-Isaza, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia or the independent adrenocorticotropic hormone bilateral nodular adrenal hyperplasia is a rare cause hypercortisolism, its diagnosis is challenging and there is no clear way to decide the best therapeutic approach. Adrenal venous sampling is commonly used to distinguish the source of hormonal production in patients with primary hyperaldosteronism. It could be a useful tool in this context because it might provide information to guide the treatment. We report the case of a patient with ACTH independent Cushing syndrome in whom the use of adrenal venous sampling with some modifications radically modified the treatment and allowed the diagnosis of a macronodular adrenal hyperplasia. PMID:26309345

  16. Potter sequence complicated by congenital cystic lesion of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yoshifusa; Mizuno, Katsumi; Horie, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Michihiro; Yamaoka, Akiko; Mizutani, Kayo; Takeuchi, Toshio; Iikura, Yoji

    2002-07-01

    We report a case complicated by oligohydramnios, pulmonary hypoplasia, bilateral renal dysplasia, and cystic lesion of the bladder. He was clinically compatible with Potter sequence. Congenital cystic bladder is the rarest form of the bladder. We can find no report of Potter sequence complicated by cystic lesion of the bladder. This lesion was similar to multilocular bladder. The diagnosis was confirmed it by autopsy, magnetic resonance imaging, and urography after his death. PMID:12152145

  17. Trigeminal hypoplasia due to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia: A new entity

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Abhishek; Gupta, Prakhar; Haroon, Mohammad; Shah, Gaurav; Gupta, Gagan; Khalid, Mohd.

    2015-01-01

    The term “vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia” refers to anomalous dilatation of the intracranial arteries associated with elongation or tortuosity of the affected vessels. The etiology of the disease is unknown and is usually detected incidentally. The predominant clinical manifestations arise due to the mass effect of the dilated vessels and may include cranial nerve compression, extrinsic aqueductal compression, motor and sensory disturbances. Trigeminal hypoplasia is a very uncommon condition, usually described in association with Goldenhar-Gorlin syndrome and has not yet been attributed to vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia. The current case report highlights this rare association of trigeminal nerve hypoplasia and vertebrobasilar dolichoectasia, leading to hemifacial and corneal anesthesia. PMID:26167222

  18. Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often left and posterolateral that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The lungs are hypoplastic and have abnormal vessels that cause respiratory insufficiency and persistent pulmonary hypertension with high mortality. About one third of cases have cardiovascular malformations and lesser proportions have skeletal, neural, genitourinary, gastrointestinal or other defects. CDH can be a component of Pallister-Killian, Fryns, Ghersoni-Baruch, WAGR, Denys-Drash, Brachman-De Lange, Donnai-Barrow or Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes. Some chromosomal anomalies involve CDH as well. The incidence is < 5 in 10,000 live-births. The etiology is unknown although clinical, genetic and experimental evidence points to disturbances in the retinoid-signaling pathway during organogenesis. Antenatal diagnosis is often made and this allows prenatal management (open correction of the hernia in the past and reversible fetoscopic tracheal obstruction nowadays) that may be indicated in cases with severe lung hypoplasia and grim prognosis. Treatment after birth requires all the refinements of critical care including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation prior to surgical correction. The best hospital series report 80% survival but it remains around 50% in population-based studies. Chronic respiratory tract disease, neurodevelopmental problems, neurosensorial hearing loss and gastroesophageal reflux are common problems in survivors. Much more research on several aspects of this severe condition is warranted. PMID:22214468

  19. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Juan A

    2012-01-01

    Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia (CDH) is defined by the presence of an orifice in the diaphragm, more often left and posterolateral that permits the herniation of abdominal contents into the thorax. The lungs are hypoplastic and have abnormal vessels that cause respiratory insufficiency and persistent pulmonary hypertension with high mortality. About one third of cases have cardiovascular malformations and lesser proportions have skeletal, neural, genitourinary, gastrointestinal or other defects. CDH can be a component of Pallister-Killian, Fryns, Ghersoni-Baruch, WAGR, Denys-Drash, Brachman-De Lange, Donnai-Barrow or Wolf-Hirschhorn syndromes. Some chromosomal anomalies involve CDH as well. The incidence is < 5 in 10,000 live-births. The etiology is unknown although clinical, genetic and experimental evidence points to disturbances in the retinoid-signaling pathway during organogenesis. Antenatal diagnosis is often made and this allows prenatal management (open correction of the hernia in the past and reversible fetoscopic tracheal obstruction nowadays) that may be indicated in cases with severe lung hypoplasia and grim prognosis. Treatment after birth requires all the refinements of critical care including extracorporeal membrane oxygenation prior to surgical correction. The best hospital series report 80% survival but it remains around 50% in population-based studies. Chronic respiratory tract disease, neurodevelopmental problems, neurosensorial hearing loss and gastroesophageal reflux are common problems in survivors. Much more research on several aspects of this severe condition is warranted. PMID:22214468

  20. [Congenital broncho-biliary fistula: a case report].

    PubMed

    Pérez, Cinthia G; Reusmann, Aixa

    2016-10-01

    Congenital tracheo-or-bronchobiliary fistula or congenital he-patopulmonary fistula is a rare malformation with high morbidity and mortality if the diagnosis is not made early. The tracheo-or-bronchobiliary fistula is a communication between the respiratory (trachea or bronchus) and biliary tract. To date, only 35 cases have been published worldwide. We report a case of a neonate with right pneumonia and bilious fluid in the endotracheal tube. Diagnosis was made using bronchoscopy with fluoroscopy. Videothoracoscopy was used to remove the bronchobiliary fistula. Subsequently, a left he-patectomy with Roux-en-Y biliary-digestive anastomosis was performed as bile ductus hypoplasia was present. PMID:27606661

  1. CD44 expression in normal adrenal tissue and adrenal tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Barshack, I; Goldberg, I; Nass, D; Olchovsky, D; Kopolovic, J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CD44 is a cell surface glycoprotein found on many normal cells, mainly lymphoid and epithelial. Normal cells usually express standard CD44 (CD44-S), whereas malignant tumours may express CD44 variant isoforms (CD44-V). CD44 expression has been described for neural crest derivatives. Characterisation of differences in CD44 expression may help in the diagnosis and differentiation of distinct adrenal tumours. AIMS: To examine CD44 expression in different layers of cortical cortex, in adrenal medulla, and in adrenal tumours. METHODS: CD44-S and CD44-V6 expression were studied in 12 cases of adrenal cortical adenoma, 3 of adrenal cortical carcinoma, 10 of pheochromocytoma, and 4 normal adrenal glands. RESULTS: CD44-V6 staining showed cytoplasmic expression in normal adrenal cortex and in cortical adenomas and carcinomas. Pheochromocytomas also showed CD44-V6 expression but in 5 of the 10 cases it was sparse, focal, and sometimes perinuclear. Strong membranous staining for CD44-S was observed in normal adrenal medulla. Analysis of CD44-S expression revealed differences between cortical adrenal tumours and pheochromocytomas. Ten of 12 cortical adenomas and 2 of 3 cortical carcinoma cells showed weak to moderate cytoplasmic staining, but all cases of pheochromocytoma had strong membranous staining. CONCLUSIONS: Membranous CD44-S staining may help to distinguish pheochromocytoma from adrenal cortical adenoma. Images PMID:9577373

  2. Enhanced Pulmonary Vascular and Alveolar Development via Prenatal Administration of a Slow-Release Synthetic Prostacyclin Agonist in Rat Fetal Lung Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Umeda, Satoshi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Fukushima, Satsuki; Oda, Noriko; Saito, Atsuhiro; Sakai, Yoshiki; Sawa, Yoshiki; Okuyama, Hiroomi

    2016-01-01

    Lung hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension are the major causes of mortality in neonates with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Although the prostaglandin pathway plays a pivotal role in lung development, the reported efficacy of postnatal prostaglandin agonist treatment is suboptimal. We hypothesized that prenatal treatment with ONO-1301SR, a slow-release form of a novel synthetic prostacyclin agonist with thromboxane inhibitory activity, might enhance the development of lungs exhibiting hypoplasia in the fetal period. On embryonic day (E) 9.5, nitrofen was given to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats to establish a CDH-related lung hypoplasia model, whereas normal rats received the vehicle only. The same day, either ONO-1301SR or a placebo was also randomly administered. On E21.5, the fetuses of the normal group and those exhibiting CDH were analyzed. Prenatal ONO-1301SR administration had no influence on the incidence of nitrofen-induced CDH. The lung-to-body weight ratio in the CDH+ONO group was greater than that in the CDH group. Histologically, the medial wall in the CDH+ONO group was two-thirds thinner than that in the CDH group. In addition, the number of Ttf-1-positive cells and the capillary density were ≥1.5 times greater in the CDH+ONO group than in the CDH group, and this increase was associated with higher expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and stromal cell-derived factor in the CDH+ONO group, suggesting enhanced development of the alveolar and capillary networks. Thus, prenatal ONO-1301SR was protective against the progression of lung hypoplasia associated with CDH in a nitrofen-induced rat model, indicating the potential of this treatment for pathologies exhibiting lung hypoplasia. PMID:27529478

  3. Enhanced Pulmonary Vascular and Alveolar Development via Prenatal Administration of a Slow-Release Synthetic Prostacyclin Agonist in Rat Fetal Lung Hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Satoshi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Fukushima, Satsuki; Oda, Noriko; Saito, Atsuhiro; Sakai, Yoshiki; Sawa, Yoshiki; Okuyama, Hiroomi

    2016-01-01

    Lung hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension are the major causes of mortality in neonates with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH). Although the prostaglandin pathway plays a pivotal role in lung development, the reported efficacy of postnatal prostaglandin agonist treatment is suboptimal. We hypothesized that prenatal treatment with ONO-1301SR, a slow-release form of a novel synthetic prostacyclin agonist with thromboxane inhibitory activity, might enhance the development of lungs exhibiting hypoplasia in the fetal period. On embryonic day (E) 9.5, nitrofen was given to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats to establish a CDH-related lung hypoplasia model, whereas normal rats received the vehicle only. The same day, either ONO-1301SR or a placebo was also randomly administered. On E21.5, the fetuses of the normal group and those exhibiting CDH were analyzed. Prenatal ONO-1301SR administration had no influence on the incidence of nitrofen-induced CDH. The lung-to-body weight ratio in the CDH+ONO group was greater than that in the CDH group. Histologically, the medial wall in the CDH+ONO group was two-thirds thinner than that in the CDH group. In addition, the number of Ttf-1-positive cells and the capillary density were ≥1.5 times greater in the CDH+ONO group than in the CDH group, and this increase was associated with higher expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and stromal cell-derived factor in the CDH+ONO group, suggesting enhanced development of the alveolar and capillary networks. Thus, prenatal ONO-1301SR was protective against the progression of lung hypoplasia associated with CDH in a nitrofen-induced rat model, indicating the potential of this treatment for pathologies exhibiting lung hypoplasia. PMID:27529478

  4. Congenital basis of posterior fossa anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Cotes, Claudia; Bonfante, Eliana; Lazor, Jillian; Jadhav, Siddharth; Caldas, Maria; Swischuk, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    The classification of posterior fossa congenital anomalies has been a controversial topic. Advances in genetics and imaging have allowed a better understanding of the embryologic development of these abnormalities. A new classification schema correlates the embryologic, morphologic, and genetic bases of these anomalies in order to better distinguish and describe them. Although they provide a better understanding of the clinical aspects and genetics of these disorders, it is crucial for the radiologist to be able to diagnose the congenital posterior fossa anomalies based on their morphology, since neuroimaging is usually the initial step when these disorders are suspected. We divide the most common posterior fossa congenital anomalies into two groups: 1) hindbrain malformations, including diseases with cerebellar or vermian agenesis, aplasia or hypoplasia and cystic posterior fossa anomalies; and 2) cranial vault malformations. In addition, we will review the embryologic development of the posterior fossa and, from the perspective of embryonic development, will describe the imaging appearance of congenital posterior fossa anomalies. Knowledge of the developmental bases of these malformations facilitates detection of the morphological changes identified on imaging, allowing accurate differentiation and diagnosis of congenital posterior fossa anomalies. PMID:26246090

  5. [Congenital thrombophilia].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Tetsuhito

    2016-03-01

    Congenital thrombophilia is a thrombotic diathesis caused by a variety of genetic abnormalities in blood coagulation factors or their inhibitory factors associated with physiological thrombus formation. Patients with congenital thrombophilia often present with unusual clinical episodes of venous thrombosis (occasionally combined with pulmonary embolism, known as venous thromboembolism) at a young age and recurrence in atypical vessels, such as the mesenteric vein and superior sagittal sinus, often with a family history of this condition. Studies in Japan as well as in western countries have shown congenital thrombophilia to be caused by a wide variety of genetic abnormalities in natural anticoagulant proteins, such as antithrombin, protein C, and protein S. However, there may still be many unknown causes of hereditary thrombosis. We recently reported a case of hereditary thrombosis induced by a novel mechanism of antithrombin resistance, that is, congenital thrombophilia caused by a gain-of-function mutation in the gene encoding the coagulation factor prothrombin. PMID:27076244

  6. Congenital toxoplasmosis

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital toxoplasmosis is a group of symptoms that occur when an unborn baby (fetus) is infected with the parasite ... Toxoplasmosis infection can be passed to a developing baby if the mother becomes infected while pregnant. The ...

  7. Congenital Myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... arms and legs, droopy eyelids, and problems with eye movements. Weakness often gets worse with time. Central core ... difficulties occur as well. Some children have weakened eye movements. Congenital fiber-type disproportion myopathy is a rare ...

  8. Congenital cataract

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the following birth defects: Chondrodysplasia syndrome Congenital rubella Conradi-Hünermann syndrome Down syndrome (trisomy 21) Ectodermal ... Images Eye Cataract - close-up of the eye Rubella syndrome Cataract References Dahan E. Pediatric cataract surgery. ...

  9. Congenital syphilis

    MedlinePlus

    ... fact that this disease can be cured with antibiotics if caught early, rising rates of syphilis among pregnant women in the United States have increased the number of infants born with congenital syphilis.

  10. Congenital rubella

    MedlinePlus

    ... mother is infected with the virus that causes German measles. Congenital means the condition is present at ... Gershon AA. Rubella virus (German measles). In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, ... of Infectious Diseases . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  11. Congenital rubella

    MedlinePlus

    ... is infected with the virus that causes German measles. Congenital means the condition is present at birth. ... Gershon AA. Rubella virus (German measles). In: Mandell GL, Bennett JE, ... . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; ...

  12. CT demonstration of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, D.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1983-08-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage with subsequent adrenal insufficiency is a recognized complication of anticoagulant therapy. Because the clinical manifestations are often nonspecific, the antemortem diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage has been a difficult clinical problem. Computed tomography (CT) provides detailed images of the adrenal glands that are not possible with conventional imaging methods. The CT findings of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in an anticoagulated patient are reported.

  13. Radioguided Adrenal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Deus, Javier; Millera, Alfonso; Andrés, Alejandro; Prats, Enrique; Gil, Ismael; Suarez, Manuel; Salcini, José L.; Lahoz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The laparoscopic adrenalectomy is considered as the procedure of choice for the treatment of adrenal hyperplasia and tumor lesions. However, some special situations may limit the use of this method due to the difficulty to locate the gland and perform the lesion excision. We analyze 2 patients of a left adrenal tumor, explaining how they have overcome the difficulties in both situations. The first case was a patient with a history of intra-abdominal surgery and the other patient suffered from severe obesity. We performed with the use of the gamma probe, and the 2 cases, was of great help to access and glandular localization. The help of gamma probe test was achieved in the surgical bed, that removal was complete. The use of the portable gamma probe facilitated the access to the left adrenal gland as well as conducting the glandular excision without delay, despite the difficulties due to the intra abdominal surgery caused by the previous surgery, and in the case of severe obesity. PMID:26426608

  14. Lung hypoplasia and patellar agenesis in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, P; Deb, J; Deb, R; Chakrabarti, S

    2009-12-01

    A 22-year-old male patient was admitted with severe cough associated with purulent expectoration, left-sided chest pain and breathlessness. There was a history of recurrent respiratory ailments since childhood. The patient appeared younger than his chronological age. His face and ears were both dysmorphic. Clinically, the patient was diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). Computed tomography of the thoracic region revealed hypoplasia of the left lung and hyperplasia of the right lung. Both the patellae were absent. However, ultrasonography of his abdomen, echocardiography and other routine blood and urine examination showed no gross abnormalities. Although other respiratory tract abnormalities with EDS are not uncommon, unilateral lung hypoplasia and patellar agenesis in EDS make this case unique. PMID:20087544

  15. Becker nevus syndrome presented with ipsilateral breast hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Pektas, Suzan Demir; Akoglu, Gulsen; Metin, Ahmet; Adiyaman, Nuran Sungu; Demirseren, Mustafa Erol

    2014-11-01

    Becker nevus syndrome (BNS) is a rare epidermal nevus syndrome characterized with Becker nevus and ipsilateral breast gland hypoplasia or other skin, skeletal and/or muscle tissue disorders. A 24-year-old woman presented with brown, irregular bordered patch with a diameter of approximately 10 cm which consisted of several small macules on the left breast skin. The ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed left breast hypoplasia. Histopathological examination demonstrated minimal acanthosis, papillomatosis, increase in basal layer melanin and hypertrophy of the erector pili muscle. Immunohistochemical staining was positive for androgen in the epidermis, dermal stromal cells and skin appendages. Depending on the clinical and histopathological findings, the patient was diagnosed as BNS. Diagnosis of BNS needs careful examination of pigmented macules and patches since non-hairy BN may be easily overlooked. Patients with BN should be evaluated for associated abnormalities of BNS, in which the severity and extend of ectodermal involvement may differ from patient to other. PMID:25484431

  16. Multiple myeloma presenting with coexisting severe marrow hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Medhi, K; Kalita, Dipti; Chopra, Anita; Anand, Mona; Raina, Vinod; Kumar, Rajive

    2008-01-01

    A 68-year-old man was referred to us with clinical and bone marrow (BM) features compatible with aplastic anemia. The correct diagnosis, hypoplasia of the BM coexisting with multiple myeloma, became apparent after noting rouleaux in the peripheral blood (PB) and approximately 50% plasma cells in the touch imprint of one of the two BM biopsies done. As standard therapy was precluded, the patient was put on dexamethasone but died within 4 days. This first case of the coexistence of untreated myeloma with aplastic BM shows that even apparently straightforward hypoplasia seen on the BM biopsy should be interpreted in conjunction with the PB smear and the BM touch imprint findings. Among other things, the BM biopsy and imprint should be repeated if the PB has findings such as rouleaux that do not fit with straightforward aplastic anemia. The combination of myeloma and BM aplasia precludes standard therapy and is rapidly fatal. PMID:19008591

  17. [Congenital syphilis].

    PubMed

    Tabák, Réka; Tabák, Adám; Várkonyi, Viktória

    2010-01-10

    Syphilis has been a re-emerging disease in the past few decades. As a consequence, the prevalence of congenital syphilis is expected to be on the rise. Maternal syphilis may be related to several pathologies, such as miscarriage, stillbirth, or congenital syphilis in the child. Infants that acquire syphilis in utero are frequently asymptomatic, and the organ damage caused by the infection may be apparent only years later. Syphilis is a curable disease, and most of its complications in the infant can be prevented by screening and treating the mother. Every newborn potentially infected should be treated with penicillin immediately starting on the day of birth. PMID:20061233

  18. Prenatal diagnosis of congenital mesoblastic nephroma.

    PubMed

    Do, A Young; Kim, Jung-Sun; Choi, Suk-Joo; Oh, Soo-Young; Roh, Cheong-Rae; Kim, Jong-Hwa

    2015-09-01

    Congenital mesoblastic nephroma is a rare renal tumor that is diagnosed during pregnancy and is associated with polyhydramnios, prematurity, and neonatal hypertension. Differential diagnoses include Wilms tumor, adrenal neuroblastoma, and other abdominal tumors. We report a case of congenital mesoblastic nephroma detected by prenatal ultrasonography as a large fetal renal mass with polyhydramnios at 32 weeks of gestation. Ultrasonography showed a 6×6-cm complex, solid, hyperechoic, round mass in the right kidney. At 35 weeks of gestation, the patient was admitted with preterm premature rupture of membranes and the baby was delivered vaginally. Postnatal ultrasonography and computed tomography showed a heterogeneous solid mass on the right kidney. At the end of the first week of life, a right nephrectomy was performed and subsequent pathological examination confirmed a cellular variant of congenital mesoblastic nephroma with a high mitotic count. Postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy was administered. The newborn was discharged in good condition. PMID:26430667

  19. Adrenal hemangioma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Auh, Y H; Anand, J; Zirinsky, K; Kazam, E

    1986-01-01

    Adrenal hemangioma is a very rare tumor. Presented is the 18th case proved by autopsy or surgery reported in world literature. The tumor was incidentally discovered at autopsy. Unless this tumor has characteristic calcifications, phlebolith or phlebolithlike, its computed tomography appearance is nonspecific. Therefore, by computed tomography this tumor cannot be differentiated from other primary or secondary adrenal tumors. PMID:3943357

  20. Vertebral Artery Hypoplasia in a Black Kenyan Population

    PubMed Central

    Ogeng'o, Julius; Olabu, Beda; Sinkeet, Rankeet; Ogeng'o, Nafula M.; Elbusaid, Hemedi

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the characteristics of vertebral artery hypoplasia in 346 arteries of adult black Kenyans. The circumference was measured on haematoxylin/eosin stained microscopic sections of the distal one-third of the intracranial vertebral arteries using scion image analyser. Internal diameter was calculated in millimetre. Data were analysed using SPSS version 16.0. Vertebral artery hypoplasia (diameter < 2.0 mm) occurred in 100 (28.9%) arteries. Sixty of these (17.3%) were on the left and 40 (11.6%) on the right. Sixty (17.3%) were in females while 40 (11.6%) were in males. The side and gender differences were statistically significant at confidence interval of 95%. Frequency of vertebral artery hypoplasia was higher than in most other populations studied. The condition differs from that in other populations because it is more common on the left side and in females. We recommend ultrasound, angio-CT, or angio-MRI evaluation of vertebral arterial system before diagnostic or interventional procedures on posterior circulation.

  1. Prenatal determinants of optic nerve hypoplasia: Review of suggested correlates and future focus

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Filion, Pamela; Borchert, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH), a congenital malformation characterized by an underdeveloped optic nerve, is a seemingly epidemic cause of childhood blindness and visual impairment with associated lifelong morbidity. While the prenatal determinants of ONH are unknown, early case reports have led to a longstanding speculation that risky health behaviors (e.g. recreational drugs, alcohol) are a likely culprit. There has yet to be a systematic review of the epidemiology of ONH to assess the common prenatal features that may help focus research efforts in the identification of likely prenatal correlates. A review of the past 50 years of epidemiologic research was conducted to examine the prenatal features linked with ONH and provide direction for future research. There are select prominent prenatal features associated with ONH: young maternal age and primiparity. Commonly implicated prenatal exposures (e.g., recreational or pharmaceutical drugs, viral infection, etc.) were rare or uncommon in large cohort studies of ONH and therefore unlikely to be major contributors to ONH. Familial cases and gene mutations are rare. The preponderance of young mothers and primiparity among cases of ONH is striking, although the significance is unclear. Recent research suggests a potential role for prenatal nutrition, weight gain, and factors of deprivation. With the rapidly increasing prevalence of ONH, future research should focus on investigating the relevance of young maternal age and primiparity and exploring the recently suggested etiologic correlates in epidemic clusters of ONH. PMID:24160732

  2. Adrenal function testing.

    PubMed

    Dluhy, R G

    1978-12-01

    Glucocorticoid stimulation and suppression tests are essential to the definitive diagnosis of diseases of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, because they document abnormal physiologic control of hormonal secretion. Similarly, diseases of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis are diagnosed by mineralocorticoid stimulation and suppression testing. [Ed. Note: See Moore TJ, Williams GH: Adrenal causes of hypertension, in this issue.] Unlike tests of glucocorticoid function, testing of the renin-angiotension-aldosterone system is more complicated, because knowledge of posture and dietary sodium are necessary to interpret the results. However, measurement of the tropic hormone renin and plasma levels of aldosterone can be accurately made, allowing precise definition of this system. Errors are most commonly encountered when dynamic tests of cortisol output are performed in patients taking medications that may interfere with the assays or with the metabolism of the administered compounds, such as dexamethasone or metyrapone. Abnormal, spurious values may also be obtained in some individuals who do not have adrenocortical hyperfunction if they are very obese or if testing is performed in a setting of clinical stress. Careful attention to these pitfalls will avoid errors and allow the clinician to arrive at the correct diagnosis. PMID:216524

  3. Congenital Defects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Allen S.; And Others

    There are two general categories (not necessarily mutually exclusive) of congenital defects: (1) abnormalities that have an hereditary basis, such as single and multiple genes, or chromosomal abberration; and (2) abnormalities that are caused by nonhereditary factors, such as malnutrition, maternal disease, radiation, infections, drugs, or…

  4. Congenital amusias.

    PubMed

    Tillmann, B; Albouy, P; Caclin, A

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to the sophisticated music processing reported in the general population, individuals with congenital amusia show deficits in music perception and production. Congenital amusia occurs without brain damage, sensory or cognitive deficits, and has been suggested as a lifelong deficit with genetic origin. Even though recognized for a long time, this disorder has been systematically studied only relatively recently for its behavioral and neural correlates. The currently most investigated hypothesis about the underlying deficits concerns the pitch dimension, notably with impaired pitch discrimination and memory. Anatomic and functional investigations of pitch processing revealed that the amusic brain presents abnormalities in the auditory and inferior frontal cortices, associated with decreased connectivity between these structures. The deficit also impairs processing of pitch in speech material and processing of the time dimension in music for some of the amusic individuals, but does not seem to affect spatial processing. Some studies suggest at least partial dissociation in the disorder between perception and production. Recent studies revealed spared implicit pitch perception in congenital amusia, supporting the power of implicit cognition in the music domain. Current challenges consist in defining different subtypes of congenital amusia as well as developing rehabilitation programs for this "musical handicap." PMID:25726292

  5. Congenital adenohypophyseal hypoplasia associated with secondary hypothyroidism in a 2-week-old Portuguese water dog

    PubMed Central

    Gal, Arnon; Raetzman, Lori T.; Singh, Kuldeep

    2012-01-01

    This report describes the histomorphological changes of central hypothyroidism (pituitary dependent) in several target organs of thyroid hormones of a Portuguese water dog, and contrasts those with the reported features of central hypothyroidism in German shepherd dogs, in which central hypothyroidism is a part of a combined pituitary hormonal deficiency. PMID:23204587

  6. Adrenal involvement in non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Williamson, B.R.J.

    1983-08-01

    Adrenal masses are described in seven cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a series of 173 patients. In all seven patients the lymphoma was diffuse rather than nodular. Three patients had adrenal masses at the time of presentation, whereas in four cases the adrenal gland was a site of tumor recurrence after therapy. Three patients had simultaneous bilateral adrenal involvement by tumor. No characteristic features were recognized that might have distinguished these tumors from other adrenal masses. Appropriate therapy successfully resolved the adrenal masses in all but one case. The latter patient was the only one with evidence of adrenal insufficiency.

  7. Total knee arthroplasty in a patient with neglected congenital patellar dislocation.

    PubMed

    Tunay, Servet; Ozkan, Huseyin; Köse, Ozkan; Atik, Aziz; Basbozkurt, Mustafa

    2009-10-01

    Late presentation of congenital patellar dislocation with advanced osteoarthritis is rare. This article presents a case of 56-year-old woman with advanced osteoarthritis due to right neglected congenital patellar dislocation treated with total knee arthroplasty (TKA) with release of the lateral retinaculum and proximal extensor mechanism realignment. One year later, the patient had improvement of her Knee Society scores and painless function, stability, and better extensor strength. A literature search revealed a limited number of similar cases in which congenital patellar dislocation was treated with TKA. Total knee arthroplasty provides a valid treatment option for adults with congenital patellar dislocation who have absence of the femoral sulcus and associated osteoarthritis. Total knee arthroplasty has the ability to correct the pathologies seen with congenital patellar dislocation, eg, external tibial rotation, absence of femoral groove, and patellar hypoplasia. Realignment of extensor mechanism restores quadriceps strength, normal knee biomechanics, and may prevent complications such as dislocation. PMID:19824599

  8. Congenital Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Estey, Chelsie M

    2016-03-01

    There are several types of hydrocephalus, which are characterized based on the location of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) accumulation. Physical features of animals with congenital hydrocephalus may include a dome-shaped skull, persistent fontanelle, and bilateral ventrolateral strabismus. Medical therapy involves decreasing the production of CSF. The most common surgical treatment is placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Postoperative complications may include infection, blockage, drainage abnormalities, and mechanical failure. PMID:26704658

  9. Isolated Left Ventricular Hypoplasia in a Postpartum Patient.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wern Yew; Meah, Mohammed; Rao, Archana; Fairbairn, Timothy; Hasleton, Jonathan

    2016-06-01

    A 22-year-old woman presented with lethargy and shortness of breath at 13 weeks postpartum. She was clinically tachypnoeic with signs of fluid overload. Telemetry revealed 2 different morphologies of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, associated with chest discomfort. Cardiac imaging demonstrated a truncated, spherical left ventricle (LV) with severe systolic dysfunction and fatty replacement of the LV apex but no evidence of myocardial fibrosis. The right ventricle was elongated wrapping around the LV apex and had moderate systolic impairment. A diagnosis of "isolated LV apical hypoplasia" was made with possible concomitant peripartum cardiomyopathy. PMID:26706664

  10. Unusual Anatomic Variations Associated With Bilateral Ulnar Artery Hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ro, Hyung-Suk; Roh, Si-Gyun; Shin, Jin Yong; Lee, Nae-Ho; Yang, Kyung-Moo

    2016-05-01

    Variations and anomalies of upper extremities have been commonly reported in routine dissection, clinical practices, and cadaver studies. Despite ongoing research on arterial variations of upper extremities, the absence of bilateral ulnar artery is extremely rare with only 3 patients reported. As the authors are presenting a successfully treated patient, initially prepped for radial forearm osteocutaneous free flap for treatment on oromandibular defect after a wide resection of head and neck cancer lesion, being confirmed to have bilateral ulnar artery hypoplasia and due to this, the patient had to change her surgical plan to fibular osteocutaneous free flap. PMID:27100648

  11. Prostaglandin synthesis inhibitors block alcohol-induced fetal hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Pennington, S; Allen, Z; Runion, J; Farmer, P; Rowland, L; Kalmus, G

    1985-01-01

    Alcohol-induced growth retardation is a fetal effect consistently associated with maternal ethanol consumption. In humans, those infants whose mothers consume even a limited amount of ethanol during pregnancy have a significant incidence of growth inhibition. The molecular mechanism responsible for this growth deficiency is unknown, and prevention depends on maternal abstinence during pregnancy. The data reported here suggest that ethanol-mediated increases in tissue prostaglandin (PG) E levels (PGE1 plus PGE2) are correlated with the growth retardation. Further, simultaneous administration of PG synthesis inhibitors with the alcohol blocks the rise in tissue PG levels and protects against the alcohol-induced hypoplasia. PMID:3904508

  12. Adrenal Gland Disorders: Condition Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... of salt and water Controlling the "fight or flight" response to stress Maintaining pregnancy Initiating and controlling ... overview of the adrenal glands: Beyond fight or flight . Retrieved June 29, 2012 from http://www.endocrineweb. ...

  13. Radionuclide therapy of adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Carrasquillo, Jorge A; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Chen, Clara C

    2012-10-01

    Adrenal tumors arising from chromaffin cells will often accumulate radiolabeled metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and thus are amenable to therapy with I-131 MIBG. More recently, therapy studies have targeted the somatostatin receptors using Lu-177 or Y-90 radiolabeled somatostatin analogs. Because pheochromocytoma (PHEO)/paraganglioma (PGL) and neuroblastoma (NB), which often arise from the adrenals, express these receptors, clinical trials have been performed with these reagents. We will review the experience using radionuclide therapy for targeting PHEO/PGL and NBs. PMID:22718415

  14. Laparoscopic Resection of Adrenal Teratoma

    PubMed Central

    Vitagliano, Gonzalo; Villeta, Matias; Arellano, Leonardo; Santis, Oscar

    2006-01-01

    Background: Teratoma is a germ-cell tumor that commonly affects the gonads. Its components originate in the ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm. Extragonadal occurrence is rare. Teratomas confined to the adrenal gland are exceptional; only 3 cases have been reported in the English-language literature. We report 2 cases of mature teratomas of the adrenal gland that were laparoscopically excised. Methods: Two patients (ages 8 and 61 years) were diagnosed with adrenal teratoma at our institution. Radiological examination showed a solid 8-cm adrenal lesion in both cases. Hormonal assessment was normal. Both patients underwent laparoscopic transperitoneal adrenalectomy. Results: Surgical time was 120 minutes and 50 minutes, respectively. One patient was discharged on postoperative day 2, and the other remained hospitalized until day 10. The latter patient required percutaneous drainage of a retroperitoneal collection. Both tumors were identified as mature cystic teratomas. No evidence was present of recurring disease in either patient. Conclusions: Adrenal teratoma is rare. Laparoscopic transperitoneal adrenalectomy is a feasible, effective technique that enables excellent oncologic results. To our knowledge, this is the first report of laparoscopic adrenalectomy for pure adrenal teratoma. PMID:17575773

  15. Testicular adrenal rest tumors (TARTs) as a male infertility factor. Case report.

    PubMed

    Niedziela, Marek; Joanna, Talarczyk; Piotr, JedrzejczaK

    2012-09-01

    Since testes and adrenal cortex derive from the same urogenital ridge, adrenal tissue with descending gonads may migrate in early embryonic period. Although most often ectopic tissue undergoes atrophy in some cases, when adrenocorticotrophic (ACTH) overstimulation occurs, the adrenal remnants in the testes may become hypertrophic and form testicular adrenal rest tumors (TARTs). The growth of TARTs in the testes leads to obstruction of the seminiferous tubules which can mechanically impair the function of the gonads and cause irreversible azoospermia. We describe a patient suffering since neonatal period from congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), disorder with defected pathway of cortisol production, which leads to increased ACTH production and to overstimulation of adrenal cortex. He had very poor disease control and therefore in late puberty he was diagnosed with TARTs. At the age of 19.5 he was diagnosed with azoospermia, most likely caused by TARTs. It is the first evidence of TARTs in Polish literature. Although not many cases have been published so far the incidence of TARTs seems to be highly underdiagnosed, so it seems reasonable to consider the disease in differential diagnosis of male infertility. PMID:23342900

  16. Congenital neuroblastoma with placental involvement.

    PubMed

    Kume, Ayako; Morikawa, Teppei; Ogawa, Makiko; Yamashita, Aki; Yamaguchi, Shunichi; Fukayama, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    We describe an extremely rare case of congenital neuroblastoma with placental involvement. A fetus with a left abdominal mass detected during ultrasonography at 23 weeks' gestation developed hydrops fetalis by 26 weeks' gestation. The mother developed hypertension at 26 5/7 weeks' gestation. Based on a clinical diagnosis of pregnancy-induced hypertension, labor was induced at 26 6/7 weeks. However, intrauterine fetal death was diagnosed during delivery. Postmortern examination revealed a solid tumor at the site of the left adrenal gland. Histological examination of the tumor revealed dense proliferation of small round tumor cells with sparse cytoplasm and hyperchromatic nuclei. Some tumor-cell complexes contained abundant neurofibrils and Hormer-Wright rosettes were observed. A diagnosis of neuroblastoma of the left adrenal gland was made. The liver was markedly enlarged and was extensively replaced by neuroblastoma cells. In addition, small nests of tumor cells were detected in the blood vessels of various organs including the heart, lung, spleen, kidneys, stomach, small and large intestine, thyroid gland, testis, spinal cord, and bone marrow. Histological examination of the enlarged placenta revealed numerous neuroblastoma cells in the villous fetal capillary spaces. The present case was unusual in that the tumor cells were found not only in the chorionic villi, but also in the intervillous space of the maternal vascular system. However, there was no clinical evidence of maternal metastasis. PMID:25550872

  17. Congenital Aniridia: Clinic, Genetics, Therapeutics, and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Silva, R.; Falcão-Reis, F.; Rocha-Sousa, A.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital aniridia is a rare condition related to a deficiency in the PAX6 gene expression, which may occur as a result of a family inheritance or a sporadic occurrence. Additionally, this condition may occur as an isolated ocular phenotype or in association with a systemic syndrome. The most common abnormality is iris hypoplasia; however, a panocular disease which also affects the cornea, anterior chamber of the eye, lens, and the posterior segment with presence of optic nerve and foveal hypoplasia is also evident. The development of keratopathy, glaucoma, and cataract is frequent and its presence has implications in the patient's visual acuity. Managing aniridia is challenging since the focus is on treating the previously mentioned disorders, and the outcomes are often disappointing. In this paper, we shall review the epidemiology, pathophysiology, and clinical characteristics of patients with aniridia. We shall also make a review of the therapeutic options for the several conditions affecting this syndrome and consider the genetics and prognostic factors. PMID:27355034

  18. Congenital Anomalies in Infant with Congenital Hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Zahra; Yavarikia, Alireza; Torabian, Saadat

    2012-01-01

    Objective Congenital hypothyroidism is characterized by inadequate thyroid hormone production in newborn infants. Many infants with CH have co-occurring congenital malformations. This is an investigation on the frequency and types of congenital anomalies in infants with congenital hypothyroidism born from May 2006-2010 in Hamadan, west province of Iran. Methods The Iranian neonatal screening program for congenital hypothyroidism was initiated in May 2005. This prospective descriptive study was conducted in infants diagnosed with congenital hypothyroidism being followed up in Pediatric Endocrinology Clinic of Besat Hospital, a tertiary care centre in Hamadan. Cases included all infants with congenital hypothyroidism diagnosed through newborn screening program or detected clinically. Anomalies were identified by clinical examination, echocardiography, and X-ray of the hip during the infant’s first year of life. Results A total of 150 infants with biochemically confirmed primary congenital hypothyroidism (72 females and 78 males) were recruited during the period between May 2006-2010. Overall, 30 (20%) infants had associated congenital anomalies. The most common type of anomaly was Down syndrome. Seven infants (3.1%) had congenital cardiac anomalies such as: ASD (n=3), VSD (n=2), PS (n =1), PDA (n=1). Three children (2.6%) had developmental dysplasia of the hip (n=3). Conclusion The overall frequency of Down syndrome, cardiac malformation and other birth defect was high in infants with CH. This reinforces the need to examine all infants with congenital hypothyroidism for the presence of associated congenital anomalies. PMID:23074545

  19. Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    McAuley, James B.

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is caused by infection with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. It is one of the most common parasitic infections in humans and is most typically asymptomatic. However, primary infection in a pregnant woman can cause severe and disabling disease in the developing fetus. Recent developments have included increased understanding of the role of parasite genotype in determining infectivity and disease severity. Risk factors for acquisition of infection have been better defined, and the important role of foodborne transmission has been further delineated. In addition, strategies have emerged to decrease mother-to-child transmission through prompt identification of acutely infected pregnant women followed by appropriate treatment. Refined diagnostic tools, particularly the addition of immunoglobulin G avidity testing, allow for more accurate timing of maternal infection and hence better decision making during pregnancy. Congenitally infected children can be treated, beginning in utero and continuing through the first year of life, to ameliorate the severity of disease. However, despite these many advances in our understanding of congenital toxoplasmosis prevention and treatment, significant areas of study remain: we need better drugs, well defined strategies for screening of pregnant women, improved food safety, and improved diagnostic tests. PMID:25232475

  20. Compensatory adrenal growth - A neurally mediated reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dallman, M. F.; Engeland, W. C.; Shinsako, J.

    1976-01-01

    The responses of young rats to left adrenalectomy or left adrenal manipulation were compared to surgical sham adrenalectomy in which adrenals were observed but not touched. At 12 h right adrenal wet weight, dry weight, DNA, RNA, and protein content were increased (P less than 0.05) after the first two operations. Left adrenal manipulation resulted in increased right adrenal weight at 12 h but no change in left adrenal weight. Sequential manipulation of the left adrenal at time 0 and the right adrenal at 12 h resulted in an enlarged right adrenal at 12 h (P less than 0.01), and an enlarged left adrenal at 24 h (P less than 0.05), showing that the manipulated gland was capable of response. Bilateral adrenal manipulation of the adrenal glands resulted in bilateral enlargement of 12 h (P less than 0.01). Taken together with previous results, these findings strongly suggest that compensatory adrenal growth is a neurally mediated reflex.

  1. Adrenalectomy for metastatic adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Kita, Masafumi; Tamaki, Gaku; Okuyama, Mitsuhiko; Saga, Yuji; Kakizaki, Hidehiro

    2007-11-01

    The indications for adrenalectomy in cases of metastatic adrenal tumor remain controversial. To clarify indications and outcomes of adrenalectomy for adrenal metastasis, we performed a retrospective review of all 8 patients who underwent adrenalectomy for adrenal metastasis between 1990 and 2006 in Asahikawa Medical College Hospital. The Primary tumor was renal cell carcinoma in 2 cases, and eccrine poro carcinoma, rectal cancer, lung cancer, melanoma, bladder cancer and cancer of unknown origin in 1 case each. Open adrenalectomy was performed in all cases, including 1 case that was converted from laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Of the 4 patients with solitary adrenal metastasis, 3 were considered tumor-free after adrenalectomy, while the remaining patient was not due to unresectable primary tumor. Of the 3 patients with complete resection, one remained alive as of 88 months after adrenalectomy but was then lost to follow-up, and the other 2 patients remain alive 12 and 7 months after adrenalectomy. Of the 2 patients with other resectable metastasis who were tumor-free after removal of all metastases, one was alive 31 months postoperatively and the other died 23 months after operation. The remaining 2 cases with other unresectable metastasis died within 6 months after adrenalectomy. At least in cases of solitary adrenal metastasis, adrenalectomy can be effective if other valid methods are unavailable. PMID:18051798

  2. Adrenal oncoctyoma of uncertain malignant potential: a rare etiology of adrenal incidentaloma.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Rohit R; Muinov, Lucy; Lele, Subodh M; Shivaswamy, Vijay

    2016-03-01

    A rare cause for rapid adrenal enlargement is adrenal oncocytoma of uncertain malignant potential. A full biochemical evaluation is warranted to screen secreting adrenal adenomas as well as to evaluate adrenal cortical carcinoma. Careful pathologic evaluation is required as the diagnosis of AOC cannot be made by imaging. PMID:27014458

  3. Cushing syndrome due to adrenal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome. It occurs when a tumor of the adrenal gland releases excess amounts of the hormone cortisol. Causes ... hormone cortisol. This hormone is made in the adrenal glands . Too much cortisol can be due to various ...

  4. Giant adrenal cyst displacing the right kidney

    PubMed Central

    Chodisetti, Subbarao; Boddepalli, Yogesh; Kota, Malakondareddy

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cysts are rare and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of retroperitoneal cysts. We present a case of a huge adrenal cyst displacing the right kidney anteriorly toward the left side in a young female. PMID:26941503

  5. Bone marrow hypoplasia associated with fenbendazole administration in a dog.

    PubMed

    Gary, Anthony T; Kerl, Marie E; Wiedmeyer, Charles E; Turnquist, Susan E; Cohn, Leah A

    2004-01-01

    A 1.5-year-old Doberman pinscher was presented with sudden-onset of fever and malaise. Twelve days prior to presentation, fenbendazole therapy was initiated for a suspected lungworm infection. Results of a complete blood count on presentation showed pancytopenia, while histopathological evaluation of a bone marrow core sample revealed bone marrow hypoplasia of undetermined etiology. Bactericidal antibiotics and fluid therapy, as well as discontinuation of fenbendazole administration, led to a complete resolution of clinical and hematological abnormalities within 15 days. An idiosyncratic reaction to fenbendazole was suspected based on the absence of infectious, neoplastic, autoimmune, and toxic etiologies, as well as resolution of clinical signs and pancytopenia upon drug withdrawal. PMID:15131104

  6. Unilateral optical nerve hypoplasia in a Beagle dog.

    PubMed

    Negishi, H; Hoshiya, T; Tsuda, Y; Doi, K; Kanemaki, N

    2008-07-01

    Unilateral (left eye) optic nerve hypoplasia was detected in a six-month-old male Beagle dog. Vision testing indicated that the left eye had poor vision and testing the pupillary light reflex showed the left eye to have an absence of the afferent pathway of the reflex but it had a normal efferent pathway. Ophthalmoscopy revealed a small-sized optic disc, winding retinal artery and dilated retinal vasculature in the left globe. Electroretinography showed no abnormal findings even in the left globe. Histopathologically, the left optic nerve was markedly hypoplastic and was composed of sparse neural elements and a moderate amount of connective and glial tissues. In the retina of the left globe, the nerve fibre layer and the ganglion cell layer were reduced in thickness, although a small number of ganglion cells were still present. There were no abnormal findings detected in the right globe and the right optic nerve. The brain appeared normal macroscopically. PMID:18625594

  7. Pre- and Postnatal Neuroimaging of Congenital Cerebellar Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Poretti, Andrea; Boltshauser, Eugen; Huisman, Thierry A G M

    2016-02-01

    The human cerebellum has a protracted development that makes it vulnerable to a broad spectrum of developmental disorders including malformations and disruptions. Starting from 19 to 20 weeks of gestation, prenatal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can reliably study the developing cerebellum. Pre- and postnatal neuroimaging plays a key role in the diagnostic work-up of congenital cerebellar abnormalities. Diagnostic criteria for cerebellar malformations and disruptions are based mostly on neuroimaging findings. The diagnosis of a Dandy-Walker malformation is based on the presence of hypoplasia, elevation, and counterclockwise upward rotation of the cerebellar vermis and cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle, which extends posteriorly filling out the posterior fossa. For the diagnosis of Joubert syndrome, the presence of the molar tooth sign (thickened, elongated, and horizontally orientated superior cerebellar peduncles and an abnormally deep interpeduncular fossa) is needed. The diagnostic criteria of rhombencephalosynapsis include a complete or partial absence of the cerebellar vermis and continuity of the cerebellar hemispheres across the midline. Unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia is defined by the complete aplasia or hypoplasia of one cerebellar hemisphere. Familiarity with these diagnostic criteria as well as the broad spectrum of additional neuroimaging findings is important for a correct pre- and postnatal diagnosis. A correct diagnosis is essential for management, prognosis, and counseling of the affected children and their family. PMID:26166429

  8. Congenital neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Evans, A. R.

    1965-01-01

    The clinical histories and post-mortem findings in five cases of neuroblastoma are described, and an account given of the microscopic characteristics of the tumours. In four of the cases the tumour was present at birth and was probably so in the fifth case. In only one case was the presence of the malignant tumour a significant factor in causing death. The differential diagnosis of such tumours is discussed. The accumulated evidence of many recorded cases suggests that neuroblastoma, becoming manifest in the early months or weeks of life, and congenital tumour, would be included in such a group, and has an appreciably better prognosis than has this same tumour when it becomes manifest in later childhood. The literature is briefly reviewed to illustrate this aspect of prognosis and possible reasons for it are indicated. Images PMID:14247705

  9. Congenital Cholesteatoma.

    PubMed

    Walker, David; Shinners, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Congenital cholesteatoma is one of the more common causes of the onset of childhood conductive hearing loss unrelated to middle ear effusion. If undiagnosed, the disease can progress to irreversibly destroy the conductive hearing architecture, as well as the surrounding skull base of the lateral temporal bone. When diagnosed early, the growth can be removed and the conductive hearing mechanism preserved in the vast majority of patients. Because most children are asymptomatic, the burden falls on primary care providers to perform pneumatic otoscopy and visualize all quadrants of the tympanic membrane even in young children who frequently resist attempts to conduct a thorough examination to rule out suspicious lesions. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(5):e167-e170.]. PMID:27171804

  10. Congenital amusia.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Victoria J; Stewart, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    For most people, music, like language, is acquired effortlessly in early life. But a few percent of the population have lifelong difficulties in the perception and production of music. In this chapter we discuss psycho-acoustic and behavioral studies that have attempted to delineate the nature of the auditory perceptual deficits in this group and consider whether these difficulties extend outside the musical domain. Finally, we review structural imaging studies in this group which point to subtle anomalies in temporal and frontal areas. We suggest that amusia can be considered a disorder of neural development, which has relatively specific consequences at the behavioral level. Studies of congenital amusia provide a unique window on the neurocognitive architecture of music processing. PMID:23622169

  11. Control of adrenal androgen production.

    PubMed

    Odell, W D; Parker, L N

    The major adrenal androgens are dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) and androstenedione (delta 4). Studies by Cutler et al in 1978 demonstrated that these androgens are detectable in blood of all domestic and laboratory animals studied, but that only 4 species show increase in one or more with sexual maturation: rabbit, dog, chimpanzee and man. Studies by Grover and Odell in 1975 show these androgens do not bind to the androgen receptor obtained from rat prostate and thus probably are androgens only by conversion to an active androgen in vivo. Thomas and Oake in 1974 showed human skin converted DHEA to testosterone. The control of adrenal androgen secretion is in part modulated by ACTH. However, other factors or hormones must exist also, for a variety of clinical observations show dissociation in adrenal androgen versus cortisol secretion. Other substances that have been said to be controllers of adrenal androgen secretion include estrogens, prolactin, growth hormone, gonadotropins and lipotropin. None of these appear to be the usual physiological modulator, although under some circumstances each may increase androgen production. Studies from our laboratory using in vivo experiments in the castrate dog and published in 1979 indicated that crude extracts of bovine pituitary contained a substance that either modified ACTH stimulation of adrenal androgen secretion, or stimulated secretion itself - Cortisol Androgen Stimulating Hormone. Parker et al in 1983 showed a 60,000 MW glycoprotein was extractable from human pituitaries, which stimulated DHA secretion by dispersed canine adrenal cells in vitro, but did not stimulate cortisol secretion. This material contained no ACTH by radioimmunoassay. In 1982 Brubaker et al reported a substance was also present in human fetal pituitaries, which stimulated DHA secretion, but did not effect cortisol. PMID:6100259

  12. Congenital hypothyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Pankaj; Philip, Rajeev; Saran, Sanjay; Gutch, Manish; Razi, Mohd Sayed; Agroiya, Puspalata; Gupta, Keshavkumar

    2015-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is the one of the most common preventable cause of mental retardation. In the majority of patients, CH is caused by an abnormal development of the thyroid gland (thyroid dysgenesis) that is a sporadic disorder and accounts for 85% of cases and the remaining 15% of cases are caused by dyshormonogenesis. The clinical features of congenital hypothyroidism are so subtle that many newborn infants remain undiagnosed at birth and delayed diagnosis leads to the most severe outcome of CH, mental retardation, emphasizing the importance of neonatal screening. Dried capillary blood is used for screening and it is taken from heel prick optimally between 2 and 5 days of age. Blood spot TSH or thyroxine (T4) or both are being used for CH screening in different programs around the world. Neonates with abnormal thyroid screening tests should be recalled immediately for examination and a venipuncture blood sample should be drawn for confirmatory serum testing. Confirmatory serum should be tested for TSH and free T4, or total T4. Serum TSH and T4 undergo dynamic changes in the first weeks of life; it is important to compare serum results with age-normal reference ranges. Treatment should be started promptly and infant should be rendered euthyroid as early as possible, as there is an inverse relationship between intelligence quotient (IQ) and the age at diagnosis. Levothyroxine (l-thyroxine) is the treatment of choice and American academy of pediatrics and European society of pediatric endocrinology recommend 10-15μgm/kg/day as initial dose. The immediate goal of therapy is to normalize T4 within 2 weeks and TSH within one month. The overall goal of treatment is to ensure growth and neurodevelopmental outcomes as close as possible to their genetic potential. PMID:25729683

  13. Budesonide-related adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Arntzenius, Alexander; van Galen, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Iatrogenic adrenal insufficiency is a potential harmful side effect of treatment with corticosteroids. It manifests itself when an insufficient cortisol response to biological stress leads to an Addisonian crisis: a life-threatening situation. We describe a case of a patient who developed an Addisonian crisis after inappropriate discontinuation of budesonide (a topical steroid used in Crohn's disease) treatment. Iatrogenic adrenal insufficiency due to budesonide use has been rarely reported. Prescribers should be aware of the resulting risk for an Addisonian crisis. PMID:26430235

  14. Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage from Adrenal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez Valverde, F.M. Balsalobre, M.; Torregrosa, N.; Molto, M.; Gomez Ramos, M.J.; Vazquez Rojas, J.L.

    2007-04-15

    Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage is a very rare but serious disorder of the adrenal gland that can require emergent treatment. We report on a 42-year-old man who underwent selective angiography for diagnosis and treatment of retroperitoneal hemorrhage from small adrenal artery aneurysm. This case gives further details about the value of transluminal artery embolization in the management of visceral aneurysm rupture.

  15. Spontaneous bilateral adrenal hemorrhage following cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Dahan, Meryl; Lim, Chetana; Salloum, Chady

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative bilateral adrenal hemorrhage is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. This diagnosis is often missed because the symptoms and laboratory results are usually nonspecific. We report a case of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage associated with acute primary adrenal insufficiency following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The knowledge of this uncommon complication following any abdominal surgery allows timey diagnosis and rapid treatment. PMID:27275469

  16. The radiological features of Goltz syndrome: focal dermal hypoplasia. A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Boothroyd, A E; Hall, C M

    1988-01-01

    Two female infants with Goltz syndrome (focal dermal hypoplasia) were recently investigated in the Department of Radiology, The Hospital for Sick Children, Great Ormond Street for severe feeding problems and failure to thrive. Both demonstrated severe skeletal malformations and marked gastrooesophageal reflux with laxity of the hiatus. One child (case 1) exhibited nasal regurgitation during feeding. Interestingly, both children had undergone surgery; Case 1 or a right parasagittal abdominal hernia associated with focal dermal hypoplasia of the abdominal wall and Case 2 for an exomphalos also associated with dermal hypoplasia. This observation suggests a more widespread mesodermal abnormality. PMID:3201278

  17. Anesthetic Considerations on Adrenal Gland Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Domi, Rudin; Sula, Hektor; Kaci, Myzafer; Paparisto, Sokol; Bodeci, Artan; Xhemali, Astrit

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal gland surgery needs a multidisciplinary team including endocrinologist, radiologist, anesthesiologist, and surgeon. The indications for adrenal gland surgery include hormonal secreting and non-hormonal secreting tumors. Adrenal hormonal secreting tumors present to the anesthesiologist unique challenges requiring good preoperative evaluation, perioperative hemodynamic control, corrections of all electrolytes and metabolic abnormalities, a detailed and careful anesthetic strategy, overall knowledge about the specific diseases, control and maintaining of postoperative adrenal function, and finally a good collaboration with other involved colleagues. This review will focus on the endocrine issues, as well as on the above-mentioned aspects of anesthetic management during hormone secreting adrenal gland tumor resection. PMID:25368694

  18. Adrenal Insufficiency and Addison's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... through hormonal blood and urine tests. A health care provider uses these tests first to determine whether cortisol levels are too ... if the diagnosis remains unclear. [ Top ] What other tests might a health care provider perform after diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency? After ...

  19. Endocrinopathies. Thyroid and adrenal disorders.

    PubMed

    Merchant, S R; Taboada, J

    1997-11-01

    This article focuses on common adrenal and thyroid diseases in the geriatric patient consisting of hypothyroidism in the dog, hyperthyroidism in the cat, and hyperadrenocorticism in the dog to include clinical signs, diagnosis, and management. A brief section on hyperadrenocorticism in the cat, thyroid tumors in the dog, and pheochromocytoma in the dog and cat are also included. PMID:9348631

  20. Congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Maynika V; LaFranchi, Stephen H

    2010-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) occurs in approximately 1:2,000 to 1:4,000 newborns. The clinical manifestations are often subtle or not present at birth. This likely is due to trans-placental passage of some maternal thyroid hormone, while many infants have some thyroid production of their own. Common symptoms include decreased activity and increased sleep, feeding difficulty, constipation, and prolonged jaundice. On examination, common signs include myxedematous facies, large fontanels, macroglossia, a distended abdomen with umbilical hernia, and hypotonia. CH is classified into permanent and transient forms, which in turn can be divided into primary, secondary, or peripheral etiologies. Thyroid dysgenesis accounts for 85% of permanent, primary CH, while inborn errors of thyroid hormone biosynthesis (dyshormonogeneses) account for 10-15% of cases. Secondary or central CH may occur with isolated TSH deficiency, but more commonly it is associated with congenital hypopitiutarism. Transient CH most commonly occurs in preterm infants born in areas of endemic iodine deficiency. In countries with newborn screening programs in place, infants with CH are diagnosed after detection by screening tests. The diagnosis should be confirmed by finding an elevated serum TSH and low T4 or free T4 level. Other diagnostic tests, such as thyroid radionuclide uptake and scan, thyroid sonography, or serum thyroglobulin determination may help pinpoint the underlying etiology, although treatment may be started without these tests. Levothyroxine is the treatment of choice; the recommended starting dose is 10 to 15 mcg/kg/day. The immediate goals of treatment are to rapidly raise the serum T4 above 130 nmol/L (10 ug/dL) and normalize serum TSH levels. Frequent laboratory monitoring in infancy is essential to ensure optimal neurocognitive outcome. Serum TSH and free T4 should be measured every 1-2 months in the first 6 months of life and every 3-4 months thereafter. In general, the prognosis

  1. Intraoperative identification of adrenal-renal fusion.

    PubMed

    Boll, Griffin; Rattan, Rishi; Yilmaz, Osman; Tarnoff, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal - renal fusion is a rare entity defined as incomplete encapsulation of the adrenal gland and kidney with histologically adjacent functional tissue. This report describes the first published intraoperative identification of this anomaly during laparoscopic adrenalectomy. The patient was a 59-year-old man with chronic hypertension refractory to multiple antihypertensives found to be caused by a right-sided aldosterone-producing adrenal adenoma in the setting of bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. During laparoscopic adrenalectomy, the normal avascular plane between the kidney and adrenal gland was absent. Pathologic evaluation confirmed adrenal - renal fusion without adrenal heterotopia. Identified intraoperatively, this may be misdiagnosed as invasive malignancy, and thus awareness of this anomaly may help prevent unnecessarily morbid resection. PMID:26195881

  2. Congenital anomalies of kidney and hand: a review.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Gopalakrishnan; Jeyachandran, Dhanapriya; Subramaniyan, Bala; Thanigachalam, Dineshkumar; Rajagopalan, Arul

    2013-04-01

    'Acro-renal syndrome' refers to co-occurrence of congenital renal and limb anomalies. The term acro-renal syndrome was coined by Curran et al. in 1972 though Dieker and Opitz were the first to report this phenomenon in three male patients in 1969. The common limb defects include oligodactyly, ectrodactyly, syndactyly or brachydactyly anomalies of the carpal and tarsal bones and the common renal anomalies observed are unilateral renal agenesis (URA), bilateral renal hypoplasia, ureteric hypoplasia, hydroureteronephrosis and duplication abnormalities. The acro-renal syndrome as originally described is rare, reported only in ∼20 patients in the international literature. We report a 23-year-old male patient with renal anomalies in the form of absent right kidney, left-sided vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) and skeletal anomalies viz short radius, absent first metacarpal ray in left hand and left undescended testis, consistent with Dieker's type acro-renal syndrome. Apart from the classical acro-renal syndrome, several anomalies of acro-renal patterns and the abnormal gene loci involved are described in the literature. This article is a comprehensive review of the development of kidneys, types of acro-renal syndromes, congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT), syndromes associated with combined limb and renal anomalies, and anomalies associated with URA. PMID:26019842

  3. Congenital anomalies of kidney and hand: a review

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Gopalakrishnan; Jeyachandran, Dhanapriya; Subramaniyan, Bala; Thanigachalam, Dineshkumar; Rajagopalan, Arul

    2013-01-01

    ‘Acro-renal syndrome’ refers to co-occurrence of congenital renal and limb anomalies. The term acro-renal syndrome was coined by Curran et al. in 1972 though Dieker and Opitz were the first to report this phenomenon in three male patients in 1969. The common limb defects include oligodactyly, ectrodactyly, syndactyly or brachydactyly anomalies of the carpal and tarsal bones and the common renal anomalies observed are unilateral renal agenesis (URA), bilateral renal hypoplasia, ureteric hypoplasia, hydroureteronephrosis and duplication abnormalities. The acro-renal syndrome as originally described is rare, reported only in ∼20 patients in the international literature. We report a 23-year-old male patient with renal anomalies in the form of absent right kidney, left-sided vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) and skeletal anomalies viz short radius, absent first metacarpal ray in left hand and left undescended testis, consistent with Dieker's type acro-renal syndrome. Apart from the classical acro-renal syndrome, several anomalies of acro-renal patterns and the abnormal gene loci involved are described in the literature. This article is a comprehensive review of the development of kidneys, types of acro-renal syndromes, congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT), syndromes associated with combined limb and renal anomalies, and anomalies associated with URA. PMID:26019842

  4. Isolated foveal hypoplasia: report of a new case and detailed genetic investigation.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, Ahmed A; Hellani, Ali; Abu-Amero, Khaled K

    2011-04-01

    To carry out an ophthalmological and detailed genetic investigation on a 7-year-old boy with isolated foveal hypoplasia. A full ophthalmological examination and optical coherence tomography (OCT) was performed. We also performed a full genome screen for chromosomal abnormalities, and searched for mutations in two genes (GPR143 and OCA2) known to be associated with ocular albinism and PAX6 gene known to be associated with aniridia. His eye examination was normal with no iris transillumination. A fundus examination, however, showed classic signs of foveal hypoplasia. A molecular genetic investigation showed no mutation(s) in all genes screened and no chromosomal deletion(s) and/or duplication(s) were detected. We report a case of isolated foveal hypoplasia where the underlying genetic cause could not be established. We could not rule out other genetic or epigenetic factors contributing to the pathogenesis of isolated foveal hypoplasia. PMID:21264491

  5. Purkinje cell heterotopy with cerebellar hypoplasia in two free-living American kestrels (Falco sparverius).

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two wild fledgling kestrels exhibited lack of motor coordination, postural reaction deficits, and abnormal propioception. At necropsy, the cerebellum and brainstem were markedly underdeveloped. Microscopically, there was Purkinje cells heterotopy, abnormal circuitry, and hypoplasia with defective fo...

  6. Further delineation of pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 6 due to mutations in the gene encoding mitochondrial arginyl-tRNA synthetase, RARS2.

    PubMed

    Glamuzina, Emma; Brown, Ruth; Hogarth, Kieran; Saunders, Dawn; Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle; Pitt, Matthew; de Sousa, Carlos; Rahman, Shamima; Brown, Garry; Grunewald, Stephanie

    2012-05-01

    Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 6 (PCH6) (MIM #611523) is a recently described disorder caused by mutations in RARS2 (MIM *611524), the gene encoding mitochondrial arginyl-transfer RNA (tRNA) synthetase, a protein essential for translation of all mitochondrially synthesised proteins. This case confirms that progressive cerebellar and cerebral atrophy with microcephaly and complex epilepsy are characteristic features of PCH6. Additional features of PCH subtypes 2 and 4, including severe dystonia, optic atrophy and thinning of the corpus callosum, are demonstrated. Congenital lactic acidosis can be present, but respiratory chain dysfunction may be mild or absent, suggesting that disordered mitochondrial messenger RNA (mRNA) translation may not be the only mechanism of impairment or that a secondary mechanism exists to allow some translation. We report two novel mutations and expand the phenotypic spectrum of this likely underdiagnosed PCH variant, where recognition of the characteristic neuroradiological phenotype could potentially expedite genetic diagnosis and limit invasive investigations. PMID:22086604

  7. Congenital myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Colombo, Irene; Scoto, Mariacristina; Manzur, Adnan Y.; Robb, Stephanie A.; Maggi, Lorenzo; Gowda, Vasantha; Cullup, Thomas; Yau, Michael; Phadke, Rahul; Sewry, Caroline; Jungbluth, Heinz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the natural history of congenital myopathies (CMs) due to different genotypes. Methods: Retrospective cross-sectional study based on case-note review of 125 patients affected by CM, followed at a single pediatric neuromuscular center, between 1984 and 2012. Results: Genetic characterization was achieved in 99 of 125 cases (79.2%), with RYR1 most frequently implicated (44/125). Neonatal/infantile onset was observed in 76%. At birth, 30.4% required respiratory support, and 25.2% nasogastric feeding. Twelve percent died, mainly within the first year, associated with mutations in ACTA1, MTM1, or KLHL40. All RYR1-mutated cases survived and did not require long-term ventilator support including those with severe neonatal onset; however, recessive cases were more likely to require gastrostomy insertion (p = 0.0028) compared with dominant cases. Independent ambulation was achieved in 74.1% of all patients; 62.9% were late walkers. Among ambulant patients, 9% eventually became wheelchair-dependent. Scoliosis of variable severity was reported in 40%, with 1/3 of (both ambulant and nonambulant) patients requiring surgery. Bulbar involvement was present in 46.4% and required gastrostomy placement in 28.8% (at a mean age of 2.7 years). Respiratory impairment of variable severity was a feature in 64.1%; approximately half of these patients required nocturnal noninvasive ventilation due to respiratory failure (at a mean age of 8.5 years). Conclusions: We describe the long-term outcome of a large cohort of patients with CMs. While overall course is stable, we demonstrate a wide clinical spectrum with motor deterioration in a subset of cases. Severity in the neonatal/infantile period is critical for survival, with clear genotype-phenotype correlations that may inform future counseling. PMID:25428687

  8. Cognitive and psychological functioning in focal dermal hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Deidrick, Kathleen K M; Early, Martha; Constance, Jordan; Stein, Margot; Fete, Timothy J

    2016-03-01

    Focal dermal hypoplasia (FDH) is a condition caused by heterozygous mutation of the PORCN gene on chromosome Xp22.3. It impacts the primitive ectoderm and mesoderm, affecting skin, teeth, nails, hair, musculoskeletal development, and vision and hearing. To date, there has been no systematic research examining the psychoeducational impact of the disorder. The current study examined emotional, behavioral, adaptive, and intellectual ability in 17 subjects with ages ranging from 3 to 55 with FDH attending the 2013 Annual Family Conference of the National Foundation for Ectodermal Dysplasias. Findings suggested overall average functioning in all areas. However, wide variability was noted in this sample, with 3 participants (18%) exhibiting overall cognitive ability in the borderline to impaired range. These findings are consistent with previous reports suggesting intellectual impairment in 15% of persons with FDH. Similarly, a subgroup of children was rated by parents as exhibiting difficulties with behavior (2 out of 11; 18%) and emotions (5 out of 11; 45%). Of particular concern was withdrawn behavior, reported by 65% of parents. These findings suggest that clinicians should routinely screen persons with FDH to rule out cognitive and emotional/behavioral difficulties and offer timely treatment. Future research should focus on identifying risk factors for psychoeducational problems in this population. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26818018

  9. Congenital deformities and developmental abnormalities of the mandibular condyle in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Kaneyama, Keiseki; Segami, Natsuki; Hatta, Toshihisa

    2008-09-01

    The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) consists of the mandibular condyle and the articular eminence of the temporal bone. The morphological development of the TMJ during prenatal life lags behind other joints in terms of both the timing of its appearance and its progress. At birth, the joint is still largely underdeveloped. There are many causes of the various growth disturbances and abnormalities of the mandibular condyle and related structures. Growth disturbances in the development of the mandibular condyle may occur in utero late in the first trimester and may result in disorders such as aplasia or hypoplasia of the mandibular condyle. Meanwhile, hyperplasia of the mandibular condyle is not visible at birth and seems to be gradually acquired during growth. In the present review article, the congenital abnormalities of the mandibular condyle are classified morphologically into three major groups and two subgroups from a clinical standpoint: (1) hypoplasia or aplasia of the mandibular condyle, including (i) primary condylar aplasia and hypoplasia, (ii) secondary condylar hypoplasia; (2) hyperplasia; and (3) bifidity. In addition, the molecular-based etiology of anomalies of the mandibular condyle is also discussed. PMID:18778456

  10. Giant congenital nevus

    MedlinePlus

    ... A congenital pigmented or melanocytic nevus is a dark-colored, often hairy, patch of skin. A congenital ... rare. Symptoms A nevus will appear as a dark-colored patch with any of the following: Brown ...

  11. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital heart disease is a problem with the heart's structure and function that is present at birth. ... Congenital heart disease (CHD) can describe a number of different problems affecting the heart. It is the most common ...

  12. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... to ACHA Search The futures of adults with congenital heart disease made brighter by their pasts Get Involved 2016 ... conference theme is "The Changing Landscape of Adult Congenital Heart Disease." Join Us Help us improve the quality of ...

  13. Congenital Heart Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart defects. Important Notice The Congenital Heart Information Network website is temporarily out of service. Please join ... and Uwe Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright © ...

  14. Congenital Intralabyrinthine Cholesteatoma

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sanjay; Prasad, Kiran; Azadarmaki, Roya

    2014-01-01

    A patient with a congenital intralabyrinthine cholesteatoma is presented. High-resolution computerized tomographic scans and intraoperative photomicrographs display features of intralabyrinthine extension. We discuss pathogenetic theories for the development of congenital intralabyrinthine cholesteatoma. The distinction of this condition from congenital cholesteatoma with labyrinthine erosion is discussed. PMID:25057421

  15. Congenital sternoclavicular dermoid sinus.

    PubMed

    Willaert, Annelore; Bruninx, Liesje; Hens, Greet; Hauben, Esther; Devriendt, Koen; Vander Poorten, Vincent

    2016-02-01

    We report a case series of 8 patients, presenting with a congenital sinus in the region of the sternoclavicular joint. This rare malformation has only been reported in the Japanese dermatological literature under the name of "congenital dermoid fistula of the anterior chest region". It has to be distinguished from other congenital anomalies and requires complete excision. PMID:26810293

  16. Evolving hybrid approaches: the preservation of the 'neglected' pulmonary valve function in patients with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Vida, Vladimiro L; Bacha, Emile; Stellin, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    The involvement of the hemodynamic expertise in the operating room led to the development of new strategies aimed to improve both early and long-term outcome of patients with congenital heart disease. During the last decade, with the aim of preserving the pulmonary valve function, we embarked on a new surgical approach, which combines surgical and interventional techniques, which are performed in the operating room. We believe that the preservation of the pulmonary valve function can be extended to any patients with classic tetralogy of Fallot and other selected patients with congenital pulmonary valve hypoplasia and dysfunction. PMID:26950198

  17. Congenital anonychia and brachydactyly of the left foot - Cooks syndrome variant: Case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Daipayan

    2014-04-01

    Cooks syndrome is characterized by familial congenital anonychia or onychodystrophy, hypoplasia or absence of distal phalanges of the hands and feet with brachydactyly of the fifth finger and digitalization of the thumb (triphalangism). It is listed as a "rare disease" by the Office of Rare Diseases of the National Institutes of Health. Here, we report a case of congenital anonychia and brachydactyly of the left foot, which possibly is a variant of Cooks syndrome with a positive family history of similar deformity. PMID:25400355

  18. Adrenal scan in 17-alpha-hydroxylase deficiency: false indication of adrenal adenoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, R.M.; Lieberman, L.M.; Newman, T.J.; Friedman, A.; Bargman, G.J.

    1981-07-01

    A patient who was thought to have testicular feminization syndrome and primary aldosteronism had an adrenal scan that suggested an adrenal adenoma. After later diagnosis of 17-alpha-hydroxylase deficiency, she was treated with glucocorticoids rather than surgery. Her clinical course and a repeat adrenal scan confirmed she did not have a tumor.

  19. Imaging of adrenal and renal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Nancy A; Lostumbo, Antonella; Adam, Sharon Z; Remer, Erick M; Nikolaidis, Paul; Yaghmai, Vahid; Berggruen, Senta M; Miller, Frank H

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhage of the kidneys and adrenal glands has many etiologies. In the adrenal glands, trauma, anticoagulation, stress, sepsis, surgery, and neoplasms are common causes of hemorrhage. In the kidneys, reasons for hemorrhage include trauma, bleeding diathesis, vascular diseases, infection, infarction, hemorrhagic cyst rupture, the Antopol-Goldman lesion, and neoplasms. Angiomyolipoma and renal cell carcinoma are the neoplasms most commonly associated with hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal cortical carcinoma, metastases, and pheochromocytoma are associated with hemorrhage in the adrenal glands. Understanding the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features, and causes of hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal glands is critical. It is also important to keep in mind that mimickers of hemorrhage exist, including lymphoma in both the kidneys and adrenal glands, and melanoma metastases in the adrenal glands. Appropriate imaging follow-up of renal and adrenal hemorrhage should occur to exclude an underlying malignancy as the cause. If there is suspicion for malignancy that cannot be definitively diagnosed on imaging, surgery or biopsy may be warranted. Angiography may be indicated when there is a suspected underlying vascular disease. Unnecessary intervention, such as nephrectomy, may be avoided in patients with benign causes or no underlying disease. Appropriate management is dependent on accurate diagnosis of the cause of renal or adrenal hemorrhage and it is incumbent upon the radiologist to determine the etiology. PMID:26036792

  20. A Rare Cavernous Hemangioma of the Adrenal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Cheng; Wu, Pengjie; Zhu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal cavernous hemangiomas are rare nonfunctioning benign tumors. This case report presents a patient with a huge nonfunctioning adrenal cavernous hemangioma presenting as an adrenal incidentaloma suspicious for adrenal myelolipoma. Although adrenal cavernous hemangiomas are rare, they should be considered as a part of the differential diagnosis of adrenal neoplasms. The proper treatment is surgical excision due the risk of spontaneous tumor rupture and the difficulty of ruling out malignancy. PMID:26793524

  1. The CHILD syndrome. Congenital hemidysplasia with ichthyosiform erythroderma and limb defects.

    PubMed

    Happle, R; Koch, H; Lenz, W

    1980-06-01

    The term CHILD syndrome is proposed as an acronym for congenital hemidysplasia with ichthyosiform erythroderma and limb defects. The syndrome is characterized by unilateral erythema and scaling, with a distinct demarcation in the middle of the trunk. The dermatosis is either present at birth or develops during the first weeks of life. Ipsilateral limb defects may vary from hypoplasia of some fingers to complete absence of an extremity. In addition, ipsilateral hypoplasia of other parts of the skeleton, as well as defects of the brain and the viscera are found. In some cases, ipsilateral punctate epiphyseal calcifications have been observed. Two further cases of this syndrome are reported, and a review of 18 previous observations is presented. The ratio of females to males is 19 : 1. Apparently, the CHILD syndrome is genetically determined. Arguments are presented in favor of the hypothesis that the conditions is due to an X-linked dominant gene lethal in hemizygous males. PMID:7408908

  2. Delayed Diagnosis of Graves' Thyrotoxicoisis Presenting as Recurrent Adrenal Crisis in Primary Adrenal Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Naik, Dukhabandhu; Jebasingh, K Felix; Thomas, Nihal

    2016-04-01

    Adrenal crisis is a potential life threatening complication. The common causes of adrenal crisis are infections, surgical stress and abrupt cessation of steroid medications. Endocrine causes like Graves' disease with thyrotoxicosis is one of the less common causes of an adrenal crisis. We report a 42-year-old female who presented with recurrent episodes of adrenal crisis due to delayed diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis. She was initially treated with Carbimazole followed by Radio-iodine ablation and currently she is euthyroid. Her adrenal insufficiency was initially treated with hydrocortisone during the time of adrenal crisis followed by Prednisolone 5 mg once daily in the morning along with fludrocortisone 50 mcg once daily. This case highlights the need for high index of suspicion and less common causes like thyrotoxicosis should be ruled out in patients with adrenal crisis. PMID:27190873

  3. Delayed Diagnosis of Graves’ Thyrotoxicoisis Presenting as Recurrent Adrenal Crisis in Primary Adrenal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Dukhabandhu; Jebasingh, K Felix

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal crisis is a potential life threatening complication. The common causes of adrenal crisis are infections, surgical stress and abrupt cessation of steroid medications. Endocrine causes like Graves’ disease with thyrotoxicosis is one of the less common causes of an adrenal crisis. We report a 42-year-old female who presented with recurrent episodes of adrenal crisis due to delayed diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis. She was initially treated with Carbimazole followed by Radio-iodine ablation and currently she is euthyroid. Her adrenal insufficiency was initially treated with hydrocortisone during the time of adrenal crisis followed by Prednisolone 5 mg once daily in the morning along with fludrocortisone 50 mcg once daily. This case highlights the need for high index of suspicion and less common causes like thyrotoxicosis should be ruled out in patients with adrenal crisis. PMID:27190873

  4. Natural course of pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 2A

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pontocerebellar hypoplasia Type 2 (PCH2) is a rare autosomal recessive condition, defined on MRI by a small cerebellum and ventral pons. Clinical features are severe developmental delay, microcephaly and dyskinesia.Ninety percent carry a p.A307S mutation in the TSEN54-gene. Our aim was to describe the natural course including neurological and developmental features and other aspects of care in a homogeneous group of PCH2 patients all carrying the p.A307S mutation. Patients and methods Patients were recruited via the German patients' organizations. Inclusion criteria were imaging findings of PCH2 and a p.A307S mutation. Data were collected using medical reports and patient questionnaires discussed in a standardized telephone interview. Results Thirty-three patients were included. When considering survival until age 11 years, 53% of children had died Weight, length and head circumference, mostly in the normal range at birth, became abnormal, especially head circumference (-5.58 SD at age 5 yrs). Neurologic symptoms: Choreathetosis was present in 88% (62% with pyramidal signs), 12% had pure spasticity. Epileptic seizures were manifest in 82%, status epilepticus in 39%. Non-epileptic dystonic attacks occurred in 33%. General symptoms: feeding difficulties were recorded in 100%, sleep disorder in 96%, apneas in 67% and recurrent infections in 52%; gastroesophageal reflux disease was diagnosed in 73%, 67% got percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and 36% a Nissen-fundoplication. Neurodevelopmental data: All children made progress, but on a low level: such as fixing and following with the eyes was seen in 76%, attempting to grasp objects (76%), moderate head control (73%), social smile (70%), rolling from prone to supine (58%), and sitting without support (9%). Ten percent lost achieved abilities on follow-up. The presence of prenatal symptoms did not correlate with outcome. Conclusion Phenotype of this genetically homogeneous group of PCH2 children was

  5. Images of pheochromocytoma in adrenal glands

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Colin J.; Blake, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas are relatively rare tumors of the adrenal medulla. A wide spectrum of imaging findings has been described. The aim of this article is to describe the multimodality imaging features of pheochromocytomas including diagnostic pearls that can help differentiate them from other adrenal lesions and pitfalls to avoid. PMID:26310999

  6. Computed tomographic findings in bilateral adrenal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilms, G.E.; Baert, A.L.; Kint, E.J.; Pringot, J.H.; Goddeeris, P.G.

    1983-03-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) features of bilateral adrenal tuberculosis are reported in two cases that demonstrate two typical different clinical and morphological manifestations of the disease. The incidence and CT appearance of adrenal tuberculosis are discussed, with emphasis on differential diagnosis.

  7. Adrenal function in patients with active tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, D J; Naraqi, S; Temu, P; Turtle, J R

    1989-01-01

    Although tuberculosis is a recognised cause of adrenal insufficiency, little is known about adrenal function in patients with active tuberculosis. Ninety Melanesian adults with active tuberculosis (30 pulmonary, 30 miliary, 30 extrapulmonary) had adrenal function assessed prospectively before and three to four weeks after starting antituberculous chemotherapy. Basal serum cortisol concentrations were normal in 55 (61%) and raised in 35 (39%) of the subjects. No patient had a low basal cortisol concentration. After Synacthen stimulation, cortisol responses were normal in 81 (92%) of the patients and subnormal in seven (8%). After antituberculous chemotherapy the response to Synacthen stimulation was normal in all but one patient. It is concluded that adrenal dysfunction is an uncommon problem in patients with active tuberculosis, and that, contrary to recent reports, antituberculous chemotherapy regimens that include rifampicin do not have an adverse effect on adrenal function. PMID:2763243

  8. Reappraisal of the ratio of disc to macula/disc diameter in optic nerve hypoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Zeki, S M; Dudgeon, J; Dutton, G N

    1991-01-01

    The ratio of disc to macula/disc diameter is characteristically increased in eyes with optic nerve hypoplasia. We present the largest reported series of patients with a definitive diagnosis of optic nerve hypoplasia for whom this ratio has been determined. All measurements were made by an independent masked observer. Our results are in accordance with previous reports. A ratio of 2.94 provides a one-tailed upper population limit of 95%. An attempt has been made to correlate optic disc size and visual acuity. In 75% of bilateral cases the eye with the relatively smaller optic disc was found to have a better Snellen visual acuity than the fellow eye. This suggests that additional pathogenic mechanism(s) may have determined the eventual visual outcome in such eyes. Such mechanisms include macular hypoplasia, high refractive error, refractive amblyopia, central scotoma, and optic atrophy. Images PMID:1911656

  9. Advances in the Treatment of Syndromic Midface Hypoplasia Using Monobloc and Facial Bipartition Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Anand R.; Steinbacher, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Midface hypoplasia or retrusion remains a persistent feature of syndromic craniosynostosis years after successful treatment of the cranium. Although expansion of the cranial vault in infancy by traditional fronto-orbital advancement, posterior expansion, or both, can treat the immediate intracranial constriction, midface hypoplasia and its stigmata of exorbitism, sleep apnea, central face concavity, and malocclusion remain suboptimally treated. Initial enthusiasm for the procedures was tempered due to a high rate of infectious complications; timing and indications for surgery continue to stir controversy. During the last decade renewed interest with the monobloc and facial bipartition procedure using distraction osteogenesis with either an internal or external distraction system has decreased morbidity significantly. These procedures have re-emerged as powerful and comprehensive tools in the treatment of syndromic midface hypoplasia. PMID:26417208

  10. Rare Causes of Primary Adrenal Insufficiency: Genetic and Clinical Characterization of a Large Nationwide Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Buonocore, Federica; Saka, Nurcin; Ozbek, Mehmet Nuri; Aycan, Zehra; Bereket, Abdullah; Bas, Firdevs; Darcan, Sukran; Bideci, Aysun; Guven, Ayla; Demir, Korcan; Akinci, Aysehan; Buyukinan, Muammer; Aydin, Banu Kucukemre; Turan, Serap; Agladioglu, Sebahat Yilmaz; Atay, Zeynep; Abali, Zehra Yavas; Tarim, Omer; Catli, Gonul; Yuksel, Bilgin; Akcay, Teoman; Yildiz, Metin; Ozen, Samim; Doger, Esra; Demirbilek, Huseyin; Ucar, Ahmet; Isik, Emregul; Ozhan, Bayram; Bolu, Semih; Ozgen, Ilker Tolga; Suntharalingham, Jenifer P.; Achermann, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Primary adrenal insufficiency (PAI) is a life-threatening condition that is often due to monogenic causes in children. Although congenital adrenal hyperplasia occurs commonly, several other important molecular causes have been reported, often with overlapping clinical and biochemical features. The relative prevalence of these conditions is not known, but making a specific diagnosis can have important implications for management. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate the clinical and molecular genetic characteristics of a nationwide cohort of children with PAI of unknown etiology. Design: A structured questionnaire was used to evaluate clinical, biochemical, and imaging data. Genetic analysis was performed using Haloplex capture and next-generation sequencing. Patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, adrenoleukodystrophy, autoimmune adrenal insufficiency, or obvious syndromic PAI were excluded. Setting: The study was conducted in 19 tertiary pediatric endocrinology clinics. Patients: Ninety-five children (48 females, aged 0–18 y, eight familial) with PAI of unknown etiology participated in the study. Results: A genetic diagnosis was obtained in 77 patients (81%). The range of etiologies was as follows: MC2R (n = 25), NR0B1 (n = 12), STAR (n = 11), CYP11A1 (n = 9), MRAP (n = 9), NNT (n = 7), ABCD1 (n = 2), NR5A1 (n = 1), and AAAS (n = 1). Recurrent mutations occurred in several genes, such as c.560delT in MC2R, p.R451W in CYP11A1, and c.IVS3ds+1delG in MRAP. Several important clinical and molecular insights emerged. Conclusion: This is the largest nationwide study of the molecular genetics of childhood PAI undertaken. Achieving a molecular diagnosis in more than 80% of children has important translational impact for counseling families, presymptomatic diagnosis, personalized treatment (eg, mineralocorticoid replacement), predicting comorbidities (eg, neurological, puberty/fertility), and targeting clinical genetic testing in the

  11. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hypothyroidism

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions congenital hypothyroidism congenital hypothyroidism Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital hypothyroidism is a partial or complete loss of function ...

  12. GPR143 Gene Mutations in Five Chinese Families with X-linked Congenital Nystagmus.

    PubMed

    Han, Ruifang; Wang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Dongjie; Wang, Liming; Yuan, Zhongfang; Ying, Ming; Li, Ningdong

    2015-01-01

    The ocular albinism type I (OA1) is clinically characterized by impaired visual acuity, nystagmus, iris hypopigmentation with translucency, albinotic fundus, and macular hypoplasia together with normally pigmented skin and hair. However, it is easily misdiagnosed as congenital idiopathic nystagmus in some Chinese patients with OA1 caused by the G-protein coupled receptor 143 (GPR143) gene mutations. Mutations in the FERM domain-containing 7 (FRMD7) gene are responsible for the X-linked congenital idiopathic nystagmus. In this study, five Chinese families initially diagnosed as X-linked congenital nystagmus were recruited and patients underwent ophthalmological examinations. After direct sequencing of the FRMD7 and GPR143 genes, five mutations in GPR143 gene were detected in each of the five families, including a novel nonsense mutation of c.333G>A (p.W111X), two novel splicing mutations of c.360+1G>C and c.659-1G>A, a novel small deletion mutation of c.43_50dupGACGCAGC (p.L20PfsX25), and a previously reported missense mutation of c.703G>A (p.E235K). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) examination showed foveal hypoplasia in all the affected patients with nystagmus. Our study further expands the GPR143 mutation spectrum and contributes to the study of GPR143 molecular pathogenesis. Molecular diagnosis and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are two useful tools for differential diagnosis. PMID:26160353

  13. GPR143 Gene Mutations in Five Chinese Families with X-linked Congenital Nystagmus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ruifang; Wang, Xiaojuan; Wang, Dongjie; Wang, Liming; Yuan, Zhongfang; Ying, Ming; Li, Ningdong

    2015-01-01

    The ocular albinism type I (OA1) is clinically characterized by impaired visual acuity, nystagmus, iris hypopigmentation with translucency, albinotic fundus, and macular hypoplasia together with normally pigmented skin and hair. However, it is easily misdiagnosed as congenital idiopathic nystagmus in some Chinese patients with OA1 caused by the G-protein coupled receptor 143 (GPR143) gene mutations. Mutations in the FERM domain–containing 7 (FRMD7) gene are responsible for the X-linked congenital idiopathic nystagmus. In this study, five Chinese families initially diagnosed as X-linked congenital nystagmus were recruited and patients underwent ophthalmological examinations. After direct sequencing of the FRMD7 and GPR143 genes, five mutations in GPR143 gene were detected in each of the five families, including a novel nonsense mutation of c.333G>A (p.W111X), two novel splicing mutations of c.360+1G>C and c.659-1G>A, a novel small deletion mutation of c.43_50dupGACGCAGC (p.L20PfsX25), and a previously reported missense mutation of c.703G>A (p.E235K). Optical coherence tomography (OCT) examination showed foveal hypoplasia in all the affected patients with nystagmus. Our study further expands the GPR143 mutation spectrum and contributes to the study of GPR143 molecular pathogenesis. Molecular diagnosis and optical coherence tomography (OCT) are two useful tools for differential diagnosis. PMID:26160353

  14. Turner's hypoplasia and non-vitality: a case report of sequelae in permanent tooth.

    PubMed

    Geetha Priya, P R; John, John B; Elango, Indumathi

    2010-10-01

    Hypoplasia is the result of disruption in the process of enamel matrix formation, which in turn causes defect in quality and thickness of enamel. Four cases of Turner's hypoplastic teeth with a previous history of trauma/infection in their primary predecessors at the age of 2-3 years have been reported. These hypoplastic teeth had turned non-vital without any carious insult, cavitation or further trauma. This article thereby stresses the importance of early detection of enamel hypoplasia and proper management at the earliest possible stage to enable an efficient prevention from clinically non-evident microbial invasion in the dentinal tubules and concomitant pulp pathosis. PMID:22114432

  15. Thoracic Hypoplasia at Birth as Presenting Feature of Shwachman-Diamond Syndrome in Twins.

    PubMed

    Capasso, Letizia; Borrelli, Angela Carla; Cerullo, Julia; Pirozzi, Maria Rosaria; Raimondi, Francesco

    2016-09-01

    Shwachman-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of marrow failure syndrome and exocrine pancreatic dysfunction with an estimated incidence of 1/76,000. When present, characteristic skeletal abnormalities are strongly suggestive of SDS but most often they are seen during childhood and adolescence. We present a case of preterm twins with prenatal diagnosis of thoracic hypoplasia and a clinical evolution that lead to an early diagnosis of SDS. This report highlights the importance of a high index of suspicion for SDS in case of neonatal thoracic hypoplasia. PMID:27617157

  16. Unilateral adrenal tumor, erectile dysfunction and infertility in a patient with 21-hydroxylase deficiency: effects of glucocorticoid treatment and surgery.

    PubMed

    Scaroni, C; Favia, G; Lumachi, F; Opocher, G; Bonanni, G; Mantero, F; Armanini, D

    2003-02-01

    In untreated congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHDS) the presence of adrenal and testicular tumors had been described; however little is known about the effect of the enzymatic defect on fertility in males. We studied a male adult patient affected by 21OHDS for infertility, after a long period of discontinuation of glucocorticoid therapy and then during resumption of treatment and 8 months after monoadrenalectomy. The initial spermatic count revealed azoospermia and testicular needle aspiration showed a cytological picture consistent with prepuberty. The morphofunctional study revealed a right adrenal mass with reduced uptake at radioscan. Treatment was resumed with onset of impotency, which improved after reduction of the dose of glucocorticoids. The patient was monoadrenalectomised and his spermatic count increased. The patient shows that corticosteroid therapy in 21OHDS should be continued lifelong to avoid adrenal hyperplasia with possible areas of autonomy and to allow regular fertility. Impotence during treatment is probably due to a decrease of excessive adrenal androgens while testicular androgen production is still suppressed. PMID:12605349

  17. Current status of imaging for adrenal gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Song, Julie H; Mayo-Smith, William W

    2014-10-01

    Adrenal glands are common sites of disease involved in a wide spectrum of pathology. Several imaging studies allow accurate diagnosis of adrenal masses, separating inconsequential benign masses from the lesions that require treatment. This article discusses contemporary adrenal imaging techniques, imaging appearance, and the optimal imaging algorithm for the workup of common adrenal masses. PMID:25246052

  18. Therapy of adrenal insufficiency: an update.

    PubMed

    Falorni, Alberto; Minarelli, Viviana; Morelli, Silvia

    2013-06-01

    Adrenal insufficiency may be caused by the destruction or altered function of the adrenal gland with a primary deficit in cortisol secretion (primary adrenal insufficiency) or by hypothalamic-pituitary pathologies determining a deficit of ACTH (secondary adrenal insufficiency). The clinical picture is determined by the glucocorticoid deficit, which may in some conditions be accompanied by a deficit of mineralcorticoids and adrenal androgens. The substitutive treatment is aimed at reducing the signs and symptoms of the disease as well as at preventing the development of an addisonian crisis, a clinical emergency characterized by hypovolemic shock. The oral substitutive treatment should attempt at mimicking the normal circadian profile of cortisol secretion, by using the lower possible doses able to guarantee an adequate quality of life to patients. The currently available hydrocortisone or cortisone acetate preparations do not allow an accurate reproduction of the physiological secretion pattern of cortisol. A novel dual-release formulation of hydrocortisone, recently approved by EMEA, represents an advancement in the optimization of the clinical management of patients with adrenal insufficiency. Future clinical trials of immunomodulation or immunoprevention will test the possibility to delay (or prevent) the autoimmune destruction of the adrenal gland in autoimmune Addison's disease. PMID:23179775

  19. Clinicopathological correlates of adrenal Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Duan, Kai; Hernandez, Karen Gomez; Mete, Ozgur

    2015-06-01

    Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is a rare endocrine disorder that incurs significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, due to glucocorticoid excess. It comprises adrenal (20%) and non-adrenal (80%) aetiologies. While the majority of cases are attributed to pituitary or ectopic corticotropin (ACTH) overproduction, primary cortisol-producing adrenal cortical lesions are increasingly recognised in the pathophysiology of Cushing's syndrome. Our understanding of this disease has progressed substantially over the past decade. Recently, important mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of adrenal hypercortisolism have been elucidated with the discovery of mutations in cyclic AMP signalling (PRKACA, PRKAR1A, GNAS, PDE11A, PDE8B), armadillo repeat containing 5 gene (ARMC5) a putative tumour suppressor gene, aberrant G-protein-coupled receptors, and intra-adrenal secretion of ACTH. Accurate subtyping of Cushing's syndrome is crucial for treatment decision-making and requires a complete integration of clinical, biochemical, imaging and pathology findings. Pathological correlates in the adrenal glands include hyperplasia, adenoma and carcinoma. While the most common presentation is diffuse adrenocortical hyperplasia secondary to excess ACTH production, this entity is usually treated with pituitary or ectopic tumour resection. Therefore, when confronted with adrenalectomy specimens in the setting of Cushing's syndrome, surgical pathologists are most commonly exposed to adrenocortical adenomas, carcinomas and primary macronodular or micronodular hyperplasia. This review provides an update on the rapidly evolving knowledge of adrenal Cushing's syndrome and discusses the clinicopathological correlations of this important disease. PMID:26045561

  20. Clinicopathological correlates of adrenal Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Duan, Kai; Gomez Hernandez, Karen; Mete, Ozgur

    2015-03-01

    Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is a rare endocrine disorder that incurs significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, due to glucocorticoid excess. It comprises adrenal (20%) and non-adrenal (80%) aetiologies. While the majority of cases are attributed to pituitary or ectopic corticotropin (ACTH) overproduction, primary cortisol-producing adrenal cortical lesions are increasingly recognised in the pathophysiology of Cushing's syndrome. Our understanding of this disease has progressed substantially over the past decade. Recently, important mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of adrenal hypercortisolism have been elucidated with the discovery of mutations in cyclic AMP signalling (PRKACA, PRKAR1A, GNAS, PDE11A, PDE8B), armadillo repeat containing 5 gene (ARMC5) a putative tumour suppressor gene, aberrant G-protein-coupled receptors, and intra-adrenal secretion of ACTH. Accurate subtyping of Cushing's syndrome is crucial for treatment decision-making and requires a complete integration of clinical, biochemical, imaging and pathology findings. Pathological correlates in the adrenal glands include hyperplasia, adenoma and carcinoma. While the most common presentation is diffuse adrenocortical hyperplasia secondary to excess ACTH production, this entity is usually treated with pituitary or ectopic tumour resection. Therefore, when confronted with adrenalectomy specimens in the setting of Cushing's syndrome, surgical pathologists are most commonly exposed to adrenocortical adenomas, carcinomas and primary macronodular or micronodular hyperplasia. This review provides an update on the rapidly evolving knowledge of adrenal Cushing's syndrome and discusses the clinicopathological correlations of this important disease. PMID:25425660

  1. Management of pulmonary hypertension in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Gien, J; Kinsella, J P

    2016-06-01

    In infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH), a posterolateral diaphragmatic defect results in herniation of abdominal contents into the chest and compression of the intrathoracic structures. In the most severe cases, hypoplasia of the ipsilateral and contralateral lungs, severe pulmonary hypertension (PH) and left ventricular (LV) hypoplasia/dysfunction all contribute to increased mortality. The management of PH in CDH is complicated by structural and functional changes in the heart, pulmonary vasculature, airways and lung parenchyma; consequently, determining optimal management strategies is challenging. Treatment of PH in patients with CDH changes as the underlying pathophysiology evolves in the days and weeks after birth. During the early transition, the use of pulmonary vasodilators is limited by LV structural and functional abnormalities, and pulmonary vasodilators such as inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) may have a limited role (for example, stabilization for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), treatment of marked preductal desaturation and treatment of PH as LV performance improves). In contrast, subacute treatment of PH in CDH with iNO has an important role in recurrent or persistent PH and potentially improves survival. Chronic PH and vascular abnormalities may persist into childhood in patients with CDH, contributing to late mortality. It is unclear how pulmonary vasodilator therapies, such as iNO, sildenafil and bosentan, will modulate late outcomes in CDH with late/chronic PH. PMID:27225962

  2. Giant congenital nevus

    MedlinePlus

    A congenital pigmented or melanocytic nevus is a dark-colored, often hairy, patch of skin. A congenital ... A nevus will appear as a dark-colored patch with any of the ... Hair Regular or uneven borders Smaller affected areas near the ...

  3. Congenital CMV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... CMV Babies Born with CMV (Congenital CMV Infection) Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... Detection and Intervention Helping Children With Congenital CMV Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats Help: How do I ...

  4. Congenital heat disease

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, C.B.; Silverman, N.H.; Kersting-Somerhoff, B.A.

    1990-01-01

    The book covers the tomographic anatomy of the normal and congenitally malformed heart and tomographic imaging of the normal heat. It then compares echocardiographic evaluation and the use of MR imaging in the diagnosis and evaluation of individual congenital cardiac malformations.

  5. A Deletion in the VLDLR Gene in Eurasier Dogs with Cerebellar Hypoplasia Resembling a Dandy-Walker-Like Malformation (DWLM)

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Martina; Fischer, Andrea; Jagannathan, Vidhya; Drögemüller, Michaela; Drögemüller, Cord; Schmidt, Martin J.; Bernardino, Filipa; Manz, Eberhard; Matiasek, Kaspar; Rentmeister, Kai; Leeb, Tosso

    2015-01-01

    Dandy-Walker-like malformation (DWLM) is the result of aberrant brain development and mainly characterized by cerebellar hypoplasia. DWLM affected dogs display a non-progressive cerebellar ataxia. Several DWLM cases were recently observed in the Eurasier dog breed, which strongly suggested a monogenic autosomal recessive inheritance in this breed. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) with 9 cases and 11 controls and found the best association of DWLM with markers on chromosome 1. Subsequent homozygosity mapping confirmed that all 9 cases were homozygous for a shared haplotype in this region, which delineated a critical interval of 3.35 Mb. We sequenced the genome of an affected Eurasier and compared it with the Boxer reference genome and 47 control genomes of dogs from other breeds. This analysis revealed 4 private non-synonymous variants in the critical interval of the affected Eurasier. We genotyped these variants in additional dogs and found perfect association for only one of these variants, a single base deletion in the VLDLR gene encoding the very low density lipoprotein receptor. This variant, VLDLR:c.1713delC is predicted to cause a frameshift and premature stop codon (p.W572Gfs*10). Variants in the VLDLR gene have been shown to cause congenital cerebellar ataxia and mental retardation in human patients and Vldlr knockout mice also display an ataxia phenotype. Our combined genetic data together with the functional knowledge on the VLDLR gene from other species thus strongly suggest that VLDLR:c.1713delC is indeed causing DWLM in Eurasier dogs. PMID:25668033

  6. Muscarine binding sites in bovine adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Barron, B A; Murrin, L C; Hexum, T D

    1986-03-18

    The presence of muscarinic binding sites in the bovine adrenal medulla was investigated using [3H]QNB and the bovine adrenal medulla. Scatchard analysis combined with computer analysis yielded data consistent with a two binding site configuration. KDs of 0.15 and 14 nM and Bmax s of 29 and 210 fmol/mg protein, respectively, were observed. Displacement of [3H]QNB by various cholinergic agents is, in order of decreasing potency: QNB, dexetimide, atropine, scopolamine, imipramine, desipramine, oxotremorine, pilocarpine, acetylcholine, methacholine and carbachol. These results demonstrate the presence of more than one muscarine binding site in the bovine adrenal gland. PMID:3709656

  7. Congenital pulmonary venolobar syndrome: Value of multidetector computed tomography in preoperative assessment

    PubMed Central

    Hamad, Abdel-Mohsen Mahmoud

    2012-01-01

    A 6-month old baby referred to our department because of recurrent attacks of respiratory distress with chest infection. Chest radiology revealed reduction of the right hemithorax with mediastinal shift to the right. Multidetector computed tomography showed hypoplasia of the right lung and right pulmonary artery, systemic arterial supply to the lung from the abdominal aorta, and and absence of right venous drainage to the left atrium. This picture is consistent with congenital pulmonary venolobar syndrome. The patient underwent right pneumonectomy; the postoperative course was uneventful. PMID:22924077

  8. Rare combination of congenital heart disease and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuki; Miyamoto, Takashi; Yoshitake, Shuichi; Naito, Yuji; Kobayashi, Tomio

    2015-10-01

    Here, we describe a case of total anomalous pulmonary venous return with coarctation of the aorta that was diagnosed as pulmonary alveolar proteinosis at autopsy in a male infant. Surgical repair was performed at 1 day of age, but the infant died on postoperative day 51 due to respiratory insufficiency without any evidence of pulmonary venous obstruction. He had been unexpectedly diagnosed with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and pulmonary hypoplasia on autopsy. Congenital pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is a serious condition with a high mortality rate, which should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with a clinical picture of pulmonary venous obstruction, because most patients are unable to survive without proper treatment. In this report, we address specific issues that should be discussed in such cases based on our recent experience. PMID:26310609

  9. A case of adrenal Cushing’s syndrome with bilateral adrenal masses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ya-Wun; Hwu, Chii-Min; Won, Justin Ging-Shing; Chu, Chia-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Summary A functional lesion in corticotrophin (ACTH)-independent Cushing’s syndrome is difficult to distinguish from lesions of bilateral adrenal masses. Methods for distinguishing these lesions include adrenal venous sampling and 131I-6β-iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol (131I-NP-59) scintigraphy. We present a case of a 29-year-old Han Chinese female patient with a history of hypercholesterolaemia and polycystic ovary syndrome. She presented with a 6month history of an 8kg body weight gain and gradual rounding of the face. Serial examinations revealed loss of circadian rhythm of cortisol, elevated urinary free-cortisol level and undetectable ACTH level (<5pg/mL). No suppression was observed in both the low- and high-dose dexamethasone suppression tests. Adrenal computed tomography revealed bilateral adrenal masses. Adrenal venous sampling was performed, and the right-to-left lateralisation ratio was 14.29. The finding from adrenal scintigraphy with NP-59 was consistent with right adrenal adenoma. The patient underwent laparoscopic right adrenalectomy, and the pathology report showed adrenocortical adenoma. Her postoperative cortisol level was 3.2μg/dL, and her Cushingoid appearance improved. In sum, both adrenal venous sampling and 131I-NP-59 scintigraphy are good diagnostic methods for Cushing’s syndrome presenting with bilateral adrenal masses. Learning points The clinical presentation of Cushing’ syndrome includes symptoms and signs of fat redistribution and protein-wasting features. The diagnosis of patients with ACTH-independent Cushing’s syndrome with bilateral adrenal masses is challenging for localisation of the lesion. Both adrenal venous sampling and 131I-NP-59 scintigraphy are good methods to use in these patients with Cushing’s syndrome presenting with bilateral adrenal masses. PMID:27252858

  10. Radiology of the adrenals with sonography and CT

    SciTech Connect

    Mitty, H.A.; Yeh, H.C.

    1982-01-01

    The basic science and application of clinical adrenal imaging is presented. The initial chapters deal with anatomic review and methods of adrenal imaging. The bulk of the book consists of individual chapters describing pathologic entities and syndromes of adrenal disease. The final chapter deals with differentiation of adrenal lesions from masses arising in adjacent organs. There is no other single source available which so concisely presents adrenal imaging. (KRM)

  11. Persistence of histoplasma in adrenals 7 years after antifungal therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Deepak; Chopra, Shweta; Bhardwaj, Minakshi; Ajmani, Ajay K.; Kulshreshtha, Bindu

    2013-01-01

    Adrenal histoplasmosis is an uncommon cause for adrenal insufficiency. The duration of treatment for adrenal histoplasmosis is not clear. Existing treatment regimens advocate antifungals given for periods ranging from 6 months to 2 years. We report here a rare case who showed persistence of histoplasma in adrenal biopsy 7 years after being initially treated with itraconazole for 9 months. This calls for a prolonged therapy with regular review of adrenal morphology and histology in these patients. PMID:23869317

  12. Parvovirus associated cerebellar hypoplasia and hydrocephalus in day-old broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cerebellar hypoplasia and hydrocephalus were detected in day-old broiler chickens. Brains of chickens evaluated at necropsy appeared to be abnormal; some were disfigured and cerebellae appeared to be smaller than normal. Histopathologic examination of brains revealed cerebellar folia that were sho...

  13. Evidence for genetic heterogeneity in male pseudohermaphroditism due to Leydig cell hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Zenteno, J C; Canto, P; Kofman-Alfaro, S; Mendez, J P

    1999-10-01

    Leydig cell aplasia or hypoplasia is a rare form of male pseudohermaphroditism resulting from inadequate fetal testicular Leydig cell differentiation. Affected individuals presented a wide phenotypic spectrum, ranging from complete female external genitalia to males with micropenis. Recessive mutations in the LH receptor gene have been identified as responsible for the condition. The majority of these mutations are point mutations and have been located in exon 11 of the gene. In this study, we report the molecular characterization of the LH receptor gene in three siblings with Leydig cell hypoplasia. After sequencing the 11 exons of the gene, no deleterious mutations were detected in any patient. However, we identified a previously described polymorphism in exon 11. In patients 1 and 3 DNA sequencing revealed a C to T substitution at nucleotide 1065; both patients were homozygous GAT/GAT at codon 355. In contrast, patient 2 was homozygous GAC/GAC, whereas the father and one unaffected sister were heterozygous GAC/GAT at this polymorphic site. These results exclude that Leydig cell hypoplasia in this family is due to a mutation in the LH receptor gene and provide evidence that defects in other loci may also result in failure of Leydig cell differentiation, demonstrating, for the first time, that Leydig cell hypoplasia is a genetically heterogeneous condition. PMID:10523033

  14. The newly recognised limb/pelvis-hypoplasia/aplasia syndrome: report of a Bedouin patient and review.

    PubMed Central

    Farag, T I; al-Awadi, S A; Marafie, M J; Bastaki, L; al-Othman, S A; Mohammed, F M; AlSuliman, I S; Murthy, D S

    1993-01-01

    A Bedouin infant born to consanguineous parents and grandparents is reported. She had Müllerian aplasia and the phenotypic features of the limb/pelvis-hypoplasia/aplasia syndrome (MIM 276820). Phenotypic variability of this newly recognised syndrome is briefly discussed. Images PMID:8423610

  15. Mutations in X-linked PORCN, a putative regulator of Wnt signaling, cause focal dermal hypoplasia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Focal dermal hypoplasia is an X-linked dominant disorder characterized by patchy hypoplastic skin and digital, ocular, and dental malformations. We used array comparative genomic hybridization to identify a 219-kb deletion in Xp11.23 in two affected females. We sequenced genes in this region and fou...

  16. A Unique Way of Learning: Teaching Young Children with Optic Nerve Hypoplasia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendiola, Rosalinda; Bahar, Cheryl; Brody, Jill; Slott, Gayle L.

    2005-01-01

    This booklet was inspired by the need of educators and therapists of preschool students who are blind and visually impaired to share their observations of children with Optic Nerve Hypoplasia (ONH) and the therapies found to be helpful when working with these children. The work done at the Blind Childrens Center is very rewarding, and these…

  17. Cushing syndrome due to adrenal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... levels Dexamethasone suppression test Blood cortisol levels Blood DHEA level Saliva cortisol level Tests to determine cause ... not possible, such as in cases of adrenal cancer, medicines can be used to stop the release ...

  18. Hyperkalemic paralysis in primary adrenal insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ajay; Pandya, Himanshu V.; Dave, Nikhil; Sapre, Chinmaye M.; Chaudhary, Sneha

    2014-01-01

    Hyperkalemic paralysis due to Addison's disease is rare, and potentially life-threatening entity presenting with flaccid motor weakness. This case under discussion highlights Hyperkalemic paralysis as initial symptomatic manifestation of primary adrenal insufficiency. PMID:25136192

  19. The innervation of the mammalian adrenal gland.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, T L; Kesse, W K; Mohamed, A A; Afework, M

    1993-01-01

    Early conflicting reports and the lack of sensitive anatomical methods have led to an oversimplified view of adrenal gland innervation. It was not until the introduction of nerve fibre tracing techniques in the mid-1970s that the true complexity of adrenal innervation began to emerge. The first part of this article comprises a brief review of these and other relevant reports dealing with both medullary and cortical innervation. In the second part a detailed account is given of the work undertaken in Rex Coupland's Department relating to the innervation of the rodent and primate adrenal medulla using a retrograde fluorescent tracer technique. It was concluded that, in all 3 species studied, the adrenal medulla receives a sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent and an afferent innervation. The possible interrelationship between neural control of cortical and medullar secretions is discussed briefly. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:8300416

  20. Adrenal hemangioma: computed tomogram and angiogram appearances.

    PubMed

    Wang, J H; Chiang, J H; Chang, T

    1992-08-01

    Adrenal hemangiomas are rare. To our knowledge, about 22 cases have been reported in the literature, of which 13 cases were surgically removed. We report probably the first case of CT and angiographically diagnosed and surgically confirmed adrenal hemangioma in Taiwan. We concluded that characteristic appearances on computed tomogram and angiogram associated with phlebolith-like calcification in the tumor may allow the radiologists to make correct preoperative diagnosis. PMID:1327475

  1. The effect of bedrest on adrenal function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leach, C. S.; Hulley, S. B.; Rambaut, P. C.; Dietlein, L. F.

    1973-01-01

    Eight male subjects were subjected to continuous bedrest for 24-80 weeks for the purpose of studying metabolic responses. Three of the subjects did supine exercises daily during part of the study. Adrenal function was examined in relation to adrenal cortical and medullary excretions. The results reveal an increase in hydrocortisone throughout the test period, a decrease in norepinephrine and no change in epinephrine. These data suggest that exercise could decrease the severity of deconditioning caused by bedrest.

  2. Congenital myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    Nizamani, Noor Bakht; Talpur, Khalid Iqbal; Memon, Mariya Nazish

    2013-07-01

    Congenital myasthenia gravis is caused by genetic mutations affecting neuromuscular transmission, characterized by muscle weakness usually starting in childhood. A two and a half years old male child presented with bilateral ptosis and hoarseness of voice. The symptoms progressed giving the clinical impression of congenital myasthenia gravis. A series of tests were done including Ice Pack Test, acetylcholine receptor antibody test, trial of steroids and finally neostigmine test which confirmed the diagnosis. This case illustrates the challenges in diagnosing congenital myasthenia gravis and highlights the potential benefits of neostigmine test in its diagnosis. PMID:23823963

  3. Dopamine receptor expression and function in human normal adrenal gland and adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Pivonello, Rosario; Ferone, Diego; de Herder, Wouter W; de Krijger, Ronald R; Waaijers, Marlijn; Mooij, Diana M; van Koetsveld, Peter M; Barreca, Antonina; De Caro, Maria Laura del Basso; Lombardi, Gaetano; Colao, Annamaria; Lamberts, Steven W J; Hofland, Leo J

    2004-09-01

    Dopamine is known to play a role in the modulation of aldosterone and catecholamine secretion from the adrenal gland, where dopamine receptors (DR), in particular the DR type 2 (D(2)), have been found to be expressed. DR expression has also been demonstrated in some types of benign adrenal tumors. The aims of the current study were to evaluate DR expression and D(2) localization in the normal adrenal gland and in different types of benign and malignant adrenal tumors, as well as to evaluate the in vitro effects of the dopamine agonists bromocriptine and cabergoline on hormone secretion in nontumoral adrenal cells. Adrenal tissues from 25 patients, subjected to adrenal surgery for different diseases, were studied. These included three normal adrenals; five adrenal hyperplasias; four aldosterone-secreting, two cortisol-secreting, and two clinically nonfunctioning adrenal adenomas; two aldosterone-secreting, two cortisol-secreting, and two androgen-secreting adrenal carcinomas; and three pheochromocytomas. In all tissues, DR and D(2) isoform (D(2long) and D(2short)) expression was evaluated by RT-PCR. D(2) localization was also evaluated by immunohistochemistry using a specific polyclonal antibody, whereas D(2)-like receptor expression was evaluated by receptor-ligand binding study, using the radiolabeled D(2) analog (125)I-epidepride. The effects of bromocriptine and cabergoline on baseline and ACTH and/or angiotensin II-stimulated aldosterone, cortisol, and androstenedione secretion were evaluated in cell cultures derived from five different adrenal hyperplasia. At RT-PCR, both D(1)-like and D(2)-like receptors were expressed in all normal and hyperplastic adrenals. D(2) and D(4) were expressed in aldosterone- and cortisol-secreting adenomas, cortisol-secreting carcinomas, and clinically nonfunctioning adenomas, whereas no DR was expressed in aldosterone- and androgen-secreting carcinomas. D(2), D(4), and D(5) were expressed in pheochromocytomas. In all D(2

  4. Dental Stigmata of Congenital Syphilis: A Historic Review With Present Day Relevance.

    PubMed

    Nissanka-Jayasuriya, Eranga H; Odell, Edward W; Phillips, Carina

    2016-09-01

    Syphilis was the first sexually transmitted disease to be diagnosed in childhood. Most developed countries controlled syphilis effectively after the 1950s and congenital syphilis became rare. Since the late 1990s there has been a resurgence of syphilis in developed and developing countries and the WHO estimates that at least half a million infants die of congenital syphilis every year. The earliest reference to the dental manifestations of congenital syphilis was by Sir Jonathan Hutchinson, Assistant Surgeon at The London Hospital in 1861. Three main dental defects are described in congenital syphilis; Hutchinson's incisors, Moon's molars or bud molars, and Fournier's molars or mulberry molars. Although many physicians, dentists, and pathologists in developed countries will be aware of the dental features of syphilis, most will never have seen a case or made the diagnosis. The purpose of this article is to review some of the history of congenital syphilis, remind healthcare professionals of the features, and bring to their attention that the changes are still prevalent and that milder cases can be mistaken for other causes of hypoplasia. PMID:26897633

  5. Failure to visualize adrenal glands in a patient with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. [/sup 131/I

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, L.; Mayfield, R.K.; Levine, J.H.; Lopes-Virella, M.F.; Sagel, J.; Buse, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    A patient with clinical and biochemical evidence of Cushing's disease and severe hyperlipidemia underwent an adrenal imaging procedure with NP-59 (6..beta..-(/sup 131/I)iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol), without visualization of either gland. Correction of the hyperlipidemia followed by repeated adrenal imaging resulted in bilateral visualization. A pituitary tumor was removed at surgery, confirming the diagnosis of Cushing's disease.

  6. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... about genetic counseling and screening if you have a family history of cogenital heart disease. ... Fraser CD, Carberry KE. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM ... Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  7. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... survivable, manageable, yet in the routine years between infancy and adulthood, sometimes forgettable. The Adult Congenital Heart ... understand the continuum of the disease from its infancy. The Adult Congential Heart Association brings together valuable ...

  8. Congenital nephrotic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be high. There may be signs of malnutrition. A urinalysis reveals fat and large amounts of ... The disorder often leads to infection, malnutrition, and kidney failure. ... die within the first year. Congenital nephrotic syndrome ...

  9. [Adrenal insufficiency in cirrhotic patients].

    PubMed

    Orozco, Federico; Anders, María; Mella, José; Antinucci, Florencia; Pagano, Patricia; Esteban, Paula; Cartier, Mariano; Romero, Gustavo; Francini, Bettina; Mastai, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Relative adrenal insufficiency (RAI) is a common finding in cirrhotic patients with severe sepsis, and increased mortality. Its significance is unknown in stable conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of RAI in stable cirrhotic patients at different stages of the disease. Also, the impact of RAI on the survival was evaluated and basal cortisol levels between plasma and saliva was correlated in control subjects and cirrhotic patients. Forty seven ambulatory patients and 16 control subjects were studied. RAI was defined as a serum cortisol increase of less than 9 υg/dl from baseline after the stimulation with 250 mg of synthetic ACTH. Twenty two had Child-Pugh = 8 and 25 = 9. The prevalence of RAI in patients with stable cirrhosis was 22%. A higher incidence of RAI was observed in patients with a Child-Pugh = 9 (8/32) than in those with = 8 (3/13, p < 0.05). A correlation between salivary cortisol and basal plasma cortisol (r = 0.6, p < 0.0004) was observed. Finally, survival at 1 year (97%) and 3 years (91%) was significantly higher without RAI than those who developed this complication (79% and 51%, p < 0.05, respectively). In summary, the prevalence of RAI is frequent in patients with stable cirrhosis and that it is related to the severity of liver diseaseand increased mortality. PMID:27576278

  10. Ashwagandha root in the treatment of non-classical adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kalani, Amir; Bahtiyar, Gul; Sacerdote, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a well-characterised family of disorders of the adrenal cortices, resulting in varying degrees of cortisol, aldosterone and androgen deficiency or androgen excess, depending on the enzyme(s) affected and the degree of quantitative or functional enzyme deficit. Withania somnifera (WS), commonly known as Ashwagandha, is a medicinal plant that has been employed for centuries in ayurvedic medicine. Preclinical studies have shown that WS increases circulating cortisol levels and improves insulin sensitivity. We report the case of a 57-year-old woman with non-classical adrenal hyperplasia due to both 3-β-ol dehydrogenase deficiency and aldosterone synthase deficiency who was self-treated with WS for 6 months. After 6 months of treatment her serum 18-OH-hydroxycorticoserone, 17-OH-pregnenolone, corticosterone and 11-deoxycortisol decreased by 31%, 66%, 69% and 55%, respectively. The biochemical improvement was accompanied by a noticeable reduction in scalp hair loss. PMID:22987912

  11. Congenital defects in northern elephant seals stranded along the central California coast.

    PubMed

    Trupkiewicz, J G; Gulland, F M; Lowenstine, L J

    1997-04-01

    Eleven cases of congenital anomalies were identified in 210 (5%) juvenile northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) found stranded along the central California (USA) coast from 1 January 1988 to 31 December 1995. Seven individuals had mild-to-moderate hydrocephalus involving the lateral ventricles bilaterally, or the lateral and third ventricles. Two animals had severe cardiac anomalies: hypoplasia of the right ventricle with overriding aorta, and ventricular septal defect. Other anomalies included single cases of hydronephrosis, focal pulmonary dysplasia, and congenital epidermal angiomatosis. Common intercurrent disease processes were verminous pneumonia and arteritis, verminous enteritis and coliti, and splenic and hepatic hemosiderosis. The more severe anomalies were considered to be the cause of debilitation and stranding. Milder anomalies were found incidentally during routine gross necropsy and histopathologic examination. PMID:9131551

  12. Craniorachischisis Totalis with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia-A Rare Presentation of Fryns Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Singh, Aneet; Pilli, Ganga S; Bannur, Hema

    2016-01-01

    Fryns syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome with an autosomal recessive inheritance. Here we describe the autopsy case findings of a 19-week male fetus, born out of a consanguineous marriage. The dissection revealed left-sided diaphragmatic hernia, resulting in pulmonary hypoplasia and shift of heart to the right side. In addition, anencephaly and spina bifida throughout the vertebral column were observed. All six criteria for Fryns syndrome were met. Such a presentation of Fryns syndrome associated with Craniorachischisis Totalis has not been reported so far. We have also tabulated the overlapping features of some multiple congenital anomaly syndromes that need to be distinguished at autopsy for an accurate diagnosis. PMID:27064748

  13. Primary Bilateral Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma of the Adrenal Gland Presenting as Incidental Adrenal Masses

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Christopher; Camilleri, David James; Gatt, Andre'

    2015-01-01

    Although lymphoma may occasionally involve the adrenal glands as part of a generalized disease process, primary adrenal lymphoma (PAL) is a rare disease. We present a case of a 62-year-old woman with a history of mild/moderate hereditary spherocytosis with a well-compensated baseline haemoglobin, who presented with rapidly progressive symptomatic anaemia. During the diagnostic workup, imaging revealed bilateral large adrenal masses and she was later diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (DLBCL), with the adrenal glands being the dominant site of the disease. The patient was started on systemic chemotherapy, but her disease progressed with neurological involvement which responded to second-line therapy. Her adrenal disease however was refractory to further therapy. PMID:26681947

  14. Benign adrenal hemangiomas may mimic metastases on PET.

    PubMed

    Calata, Jed F; Sukerkar, Arun N; August, Carey Z; Maker, Ajay V

    2013-11-01

    CT or MRI are utilized in the initial evaluation of adrenal incidentalomas; however, overlap exists between benign and malignant lesions on these examinations. The American College of Radiology recommends PET scans to complement CT and MRI for patients with adrenal masses and a moderate-to-high likelihood of neoplastic disease. We present images of a PET-avid adrenal lesion in a patient with pulmonary and pancreatic neoplasms that mimicked metastasis, but was found to be a benign adrenal hemangioma on surgical resection. The use of PET for adrenal tumors, specifically adrenal hemangiomas, will be reviewed. PMID:24089061

  15. Diagnosis of adrenal tumors with radionuclide imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Beierwaltes, W.H.; Sisson, J.C.; Shapiro, B.

    1984-01-01

    The development of radiolabeled cholesterols in 1969 as precursors of adrenocortical steroid production allowed the first noninvasive imaging of the adrenal cortices. FDA-NDA approval in 1984 should allow routine use of these agents in most hospitals. NP-59 is most commonly used in the diagnosis and management of Cushing syndrome; the second most common use is in the diagnosis of primary aldosteronism. It is also helpful in the differential diagnosis of adrenal and ovarian hyperandrogenism and hirsutism, and is the only noninvasive method of detecting unilateral adrenocortical hypofunction. The newest and most popular use is in the differential diagnosis of asymptomatic masses in the region of the adrenal gland discovered incidentally with CT scan (incidentalomas). In this situation, the NP-59 scan can define whether the tumor is in the adrenal gland and if it is functional or nonfunctional. The authors believe that, in the future, radiolabeled enzyme inhibitors might offer better diagnostic imaging of the adrenal cortex, although these agents will probably not be available for routine use for some time. The development of a radioiodinated guanethidine analog, /sup 131/I-MIBG, has allowed differentiation of normal adrenal medullary function from bilateral adrenal medullary hyperplasia before the development of hypertension or tachycardia, diagnostic increases in plasma or urinary catecholamines, or abnormal CT scans. The search for a pheochromocytoma should begin with /sup 131/I-MIBG scintigraphy. While over 90% of primary pheochromocytomas occur in the abdomen, neither a survey of the abdomen nor the finding of a single tumor should conclude the search.

  16. BMP4 and LGL1 are Down Regulated in an Ovine Model of Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Emmerton-Coughlin, Heather M. A.; Martin, K. Kathryn; Chiu, Jacky S. S.; Zhao, Lin; Scott, Leslie A.; Regnault, Timothy R. H.; Bütter, Andreana

    2014-01-01

    Background/Purpose: The molecular pathophysiology of lung hypoplasia in congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) remains poorly understood. The Wnt signaling pathway and downstream targets, such as bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) 4 and other factors such as late gestation lung protein 1 (LGL1), are essential to normal lung development. Nitrofen-induced hypoplastic CDH rodent lungs demonstrate down regulation of the Wnt pathway including BMP4 and reduced LGL1 expression. The aim of the current study was to examine the molecular pathophysiology associated with a surgically induced CDH in an ovine model. Methods: Left thoracotomy was performed at 80 days in 14 fetal sheep; CDH was created in seven experimental animals. Lungs were harvested at 136 days (term = 145 days). Lung weight (LW) and mean terminal bronchiole density (MTBD) were measured to determine the degree of pulmonary hypoplasia. Quantitative real time PCR was undertaken to analyze Wnt2, Wnt7b, BMP4, and LGL1 mRNA expression. Results: Total LW was decreased while MTBD was increased in the CDH group (p < 0.05), confirming pulmonary hypoplasia. BMP4 and LGL1 mRNA was significantly reduced in CDH lungs (p < 0.05). Wnt2 mRNA was decreased, although not significantly (p < 0.06). Conclusion: For the first time, down regulation of BMP4 and LGL1 are reported in an ovine CDH model. In contrast to other animal models, these changes are persistent to near term. These findings suggest that mechanical compression from herniated viscera may play a more important role in causing pulmonary hypoplasia in CDH, rather than a primary defect in lung organogenesis. PMID:25593968

  17. Familial cytomegalic adrenocortical hypoplasia: an X-linked syndrome of pubertal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Hay, I D; Smail, P J; Forsyth, C C

    1981-01-01

    Five boys with familial cytomegalic adrenocortical hypoplasia have been followed up for an average of 19 years. Despite treatment with replacement corticosteroids, all 5 failed to show a spontaneous onset of puberty and, when assessed at ages 13 to 19 years, all had both sexual infantilism and skeletal immaturity. Hypogonadism was confirmed by low levels of plasma testosterone, and pituitary reserve of gonadotrophin was shown to be inadequate by testing with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone. Two boys, both with adequate testosterone output on human chorionic gonadotrophin stimulation, were given gonadotrophin therapy, whereas the other 3 were treated with parenterally administered testosterone. With treatment, all 5 patients showed advances in pubertal staging. Although the mechanism of the hypogonadotropism remains unclear, the association of hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism with familial cytomegalic adrenocortical hypoplasia appears to be a constant one and may be considered as a treatable inherited syndrome of pubertal failure. PMID:7197507

  18. The pathogenesis of renal dysplasia. I. Quantification of hypoplasia and dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, R D; Stephens, F D; Cussen, L J

    1981-09-01

    In order to assess the relative effects of abnormal ureteric orifice position and abnormal urodynamics on the morphogenesis of hypoplasia and dysplasia in kidneys obtained from infants, we devised a method of quantifying the renal structures. The method was based on radial glomerular counts which ranged from zero to normal (seven to nine), a score for dysplastic structures, and the ratio of normal to abnormal tissues present. These three values, when plotted against each other, correlated closely. The glomerular count, with occasional minor adjustment for inconsistencies, was the best parameter of hypodysplasia. Severe to moderate grades of hypodysplasias fell in the low and middle ranges and hypoplasia through to normal in the highest range. By grading kidneys in this way, we were able to compare the effects of ureteral ectopy and abnormal urinary dynamics on the developing kidney. PMID:7024184

  19. Subdural effusions and lack of early pontocerebellar hypoplasia in siblings with RARS2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Kastrissianakis, Katherina; Anand, Geetha; Quaghebeur, Gerardine; Price, Sue; Prabhakar, Prab; Marinova, Jasmina; Brown, Garry; McShane, Tony

    2013-12-01

    Mutations in the recently described RARS2 gene encoding for mitochondrial arginyl-transfer RNA synthetase give rise to a disorder characterised by early onset seizures, progressive microcephaly and developmental delay. The disorder was named pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 6 (PCH6) based on the corresponding radiological findings observed in the original cases. We report two siblings with the RARS2 mutation who displayed typical clinical features of PCH6, but who had distinct neuroimaging features. Early scans showed marked supratentorial, rather than infratentorial, atrophy, and the pons remained preserved throughout. One sibling also had bilateral subdural effusions at presentation. The deceleration in head growth pointed to an evolving genetic/metabolic process giving rise to cerebral atrophy and secondary subdural effusions. RARS2 mutations should be considered in infants presenting with seizures, subdural effusions, decelerating head growth and evidence of cerebral atrophy even in the absence of pontocerebellar hypoplasia on imaging. PMID:24047924

  20. Endocytosis of connexin protein in adrenal cells.

    PubMed

    Murray, Sandra A; Nickel, B M; Gay, V L

    2004-11-01

    The ability of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) to affect gap junctions was examined in adrenal cells in vivo and in vitro. Treatment with ACTH increased the size and number of gap junction plaques on the cell membranes in hypophysectomized animals and in adrenal culture. Intracellular (cytoplasmic) annular gap junctions were observed in cells of the inner adrenal cortical zones and in adrenal cell cultures. To investigate the relationship of annular gap junctions to surface junctions, adrenal cells in culture were transfected with cDNA encoding a green fluorescent protein tagged connexin 43 construct (Cx43-GFP), and subsequently studied by time-lapse video microscopy, immunocytochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Internalization of part or all of a surface gap junction plaque resulted in annular gap junction formation. These studies support the hypothesis that cytoplasmic vesicles, initially described with TEM methods, can result from removal of gap junction plaques from the cell surface. It is suggested that hormones can play a regulatory role in cell-cell communication by influencing the availability of gap junction protein at the cell surface and that hormonally-sensitive processes might serve as a means of altering intercellular communication. PMID:15666807

  1. Combination esthetic treatment of anterior teeth affected by idiopathic enamel hypoplasia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Donald L; Warner, Ben F; Bentley, Dan A; Quock, Ryan L

    2016-01-01

    The esthetic management of enamel dysplasia presents an opportunity for the practitioner to integrate expertise in diagnosis, biomaterials, and technique. In addition to considerations of appearance, careful attention must be paid to occlusal function and restorative material properties. This case report highlights a combined approach of conservative lithium disilicate indirect restorations and composite resin direct veneers to electively restore the anterior teeth of a patient diagnosed with idiopathic enamel hypoplasia. PMID:27148656

  2. Cartilage Hair Hypoplasia: Two Unrelated Cases with g.70 A > G Mutation in RMRP Gene.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Dhanya Lakshmi; Shukla, Anju; Siddesh, Anju Rani; Stephen, Joshi; Srivastava, Priyanka; Mandal, Kausik; Phadke, Shubha R

    2016-09-01

    Cartilage-hair hypoplasia is an autosomal recessive disorder, characterized by short stature, metaphyseal dysplasia, hypotrichosis and immunodeficiency. More than 90 different biallelic mutations in RMRP gene have been identified to cause this condition. Three cases previously reported from India showed novel mutations in RMRP gene. The authors report two unrelated cases with the more common g.70A > G mutation, stressing the need to screen for this mutation in Indian population having features of cartilage-hair hypoplasia. PMID:26830278

  3. Bilateral coronoid hypoplasia and complex odontoma: a rare concurrence of developmental pathology and odontogenic tumour of the mandible.

    PubMed

    Dar, Mohd Arif; Alaparthi, Ravikiran; Yalamanchili, Samatha; Santosh, Arvind Babu Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    We present a rare case of concurrent bilateral coronoid hypoplasia and complex odontoma in the mandible, with replacement of missing posterior teeth in both sides of the lower jaw. A 20-year-old woman was diagnosed with bilateral occurrence of coronoid hypoplasia and unerupted complex odontoma after radiographic and histopathological examination. The patient was surgically treated with complete removal of the unerupted complex odontoma and prosthetic replacement of the missing teeth. PMID:26464410

  4. Neuropathological features in a female fetus with OPHN1 deletion and cerebellar hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Rocas, Delphine; Alix, Eudeline; Michel, Jessica; Cordier, Marie-Pierre; Labalme, Audrey; Guilbert, Hélène; Till, Marianne; Schluth-Bolard, Caroline; de Haas, Pascale; Massardier, Jérôme; Portes, Vincent des; Edery, Patrick; Touraine, Renaud; Guibaud, Laurent; Vasiljevic, Alexandre; Sanlaville, Damien

    2013-05-01

    We report the case of a 33-year-old pregnant woman. The third-trimester ultrasound scan during pregnancy revealed fetal bilateral ventricular dilatation, macrosomia and a transverse diameter of the cerebellum at the 30th centile. A brain MRI scan at 31 weeks of gestation led to a diagnosis of hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis without hemisphere abnormalities and a non compressive expansion of the cisterna magna. The fetal karyotype was 46,XX. The pregnancy was terminated and array-CGH analysis of the fetus identified a 238 kb de novo deletion on chromosome Xp12, encompassing part of OPHN1 gene. Further studies revealed a completely skewed pattern of X inactivation. OPHN1 is involved in X-linked mental retardation (XLMR) with cerebellar hypoplasia and encodes a Rho-GTPase-activating protein called oligophrenin-1, which is produced throughout the developing mouse brain and in the hippocampus and Purkinje cells of the cerebellum in adult mice. Neuropathological examination of the female fetus revealed cerebellar hypoplasia and the heterotopia of Purkinje cells at multiple sites in the white matter of the cerebellum. This condition mostly affects male fetuses in humans. We report here the first case of a de novo partial deletion of OPHN1, with radiological and neuropathological examination, in a female fetus. PMID:23416624

  5. [Risk factors for teeth aplasia and hypoplasia in cleft lip and palate children].

    PubMed

    Korolenkova, M V; Starikova, N V; Ageeva, L V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the significance of environmental risk factors for teeth aplasia and hypoplasia in cleft lip and palate children. Two hundred and forty-seven cleft lip and palate (CLP) children were enrolled in the study including 105 (42.5%) with bilateral CLP and 57.5% with unilateral CLP. The mean age was 11.2±4.9 years. Teeth condition was assessed clinically and radiologically. The impact of risk factors for teeth anomalies was analyzed by retrospective data obtained from computer database (absence of preoperative orthopedic treatment, palatal defects after primary palatoplasty and type of primary procedures). Surgical trauma by early periosteoplasty (at the age of 3-4 months), excessive scarring and tissue traction due to absence of early orthopedic treatment and palatal defect were associated with significantly higher incidence of incisors hypoplasia (both developmental enamel defects and microdentia) and aplasia of central incisors not seen in the other study subgroups. Incisors aplasia and hypoplasia in CLP patients do not always have disembryogenic origin but may depend on external environmental factors, including surgical trauma. PMID:26925569

  6. Gross enamel hypoplasia in molars from subadults in a 16th-18th century London graveyard.

    PubMed

    Ogden, A R; Pinhasi, R; White, W J

    2007-07-01

    Dental Enamel Hypoplasia has long been used as a common nonspecific stress indicator in teeth from archaeological samples. Most researchers report relatively minor linear and pitted hypoplastic defects on tooth crown surfaces. In this work we report a high prevalence and early age of onset of extensive enamel defects in deciduous and permanent molars in the subadults from the post-medieval cemetery of Broadgate, east central London. Analysis of the dentition of all 45 subadults from the cemetery, using both macroscopic and microscopic methods, reveals disturbed cusp patterns and pitted, abnormal and arrested enamel formation. Forty-one individuals from this group (93.2%) showed some evidence of enamel hypoplasia, 28 of them showing moderate or extensive lesions of molars, deciduous or permanent (63.6% of the sample). Scanning Electron Microscope images reveal many molars with grossly deformed cuspal architecture, multiple extra cusps and large areas of exposed Tomes' process pits, where the ameloblasts have abruptly ceased matrix production, well before normal completion. This indented, rough and poorly mineralized surface facilitates both bacterial adhesion and tooth wear, and when such teeth erupt fully into the mouth they are likely to wear and decay rapidly. We suggest that this complex combination of pitted and plane-form lesions, combined with disruption of cusp pattern and the formation of multiple small cusps, should henceforth be identified as "Cuspal Enamel Hypoplasia." PMID:17492667

  7. How Do I Find an Experienced Adrenal Surgeon?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Adrenal Gland Disorders: Other FAQs Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page ... do I find an experienced adrenal surgeon? Make sure that the surgeon you choose ...

  8. What Are the Treatments for Adrenal Gland Disorders?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources and Publications What are the treatments for adrenal gland disorders? Skip sharing on social media links Share ... a variety of surgical and medical treatments for adrenal gland disorders. These include 1 : Surgery to remove tumors ...

  9. Adrenal Lymphangioma Masquerading as a Catecholamine Producing Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Hodish, Israel; Schmidt, Lindsay; Moraitis, Andreas G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To report the unusual case of an adrenal lymphangioma presenting in a patient with an adrenal cystic lesion and biochemical testing concerning for pheochromocytoma. The pertinent diagnostic and imaging features of adrenal lymphangiomas are reviewed. Methods. We describe a 59-year-old patient who presented with hyperhidrosis and a 2.2 by 2.2 cm left adrenal nodule. Biochemical evaluation revealed elevated plasma-free normetanephrine, urine normetanephrine, urine vanillylmandelic acid, and urine norepinephrine levels. Elevated plasma norepinephrine levels were not suppressed appropriately with clonidine administration. Results. Given persistent concern for pheochromocytoma, the patient underwent adrenalectomy. The final pathology was consistent with adrenal lymphangioma. Conclusions. Lymphangiomas are benign vascular lesions that can very rarely occur in the adrenal gland. Imaging findings are generally consistent with a cyst but are nonspecific. Excluding malignancy in patients presenting with adrenal cysts can be difficult. Despite its benign nature, the diagnosis of adrenal lymphangioma may ultimately require pathology. PMID:26618011

  10. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Adrenal Cortical Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... after treatment for adrenal cancer? What should you ask your doctor about adrenal cancer? As you deal ... frank, open discussions with your cancer care team. Ask any questions, no matter how trivial they might ...

  11. [Combined modality therapy for a patient with primary adrenal lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Teppei; Kuroda, Hiroyuki; Jomen, Wataru; Yoshida, Masahiro; Yamada, Michiko; Sato, Masanori; Abe, Tomoyuki; Sakurai, Tamaki; Fujii, Shigeyuki; Maeda, Masahiro; Fujita, Miri; Nagashima, Kazuo; Nojiri, Shuichi; Arihara, Yohei; Kato, Junji

    2014-04-01

    A 71-year-old man with malaise, anorexia, and weight loss was referred to our hospital from a clinic. Abdominal computed tomography(CT)revealed bilateral adrenal masses. An ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle biopsy of the adrenal grand indicated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. A rapid adrenocorticotropic hormone(ACTH)test revealed primary adrenal failure. Rituximab-cyclophosphamide/doxorubicin/vincristine/prednisolone(common name, R-CHOP)therapy accompanied by intrathecal treatment was initiated along with steroid replacement therapy. After the fourth courses, a CT scan showed a reduction of the adrenal masses, and there was no[18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose(FDG)uptake in the adrenal masses. The patient has remained in metabolic complete remission. Subsequently, both adrenal lymphomas were irradiated. The patient has been disease-free for 6 months after the diagnosis of primary adrenal lymphoma. The combined modality of chemoradiation therapy plus intrathecal treatment could be effective for primary adrenal lymphoma with a poor prognosis. PMID:24743371

  12. [Mantle cell lymphoma markedly infiltrated into adrenal glands with adrenal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ryo; Iwakiri, Rika; Tsutsumi, Hisashi; Ohta, Masatsugu; Mori, Mayumi

    2004-07-01

    A 66-year-old male was admitted to our hospital complaining of bilateral hypochondrial pain, back pain and loss of weight in May, 2002. Superficial lymph nodes were not palpable on admission. The leukocyte count was 3430/microl, hemoglobin concentration, 13.0g/dl, and platelet count, 174000/microl. LDH, soluble IL-2 receptor, ACTH and cortisol values were out of the normal range (LDH 1368IU/l, sIL-2R 2630U/ml, ACTH 132pg/ml, cortisol 7.4microg/dl). Abdominal CT scan showed bilateral adrenal masses, and abnormal uptake of Ga-scintigraphy was seen correspondent with the bilateral adrenal masses. The histological diagnosis of bilateral adrenal masses cannot be performed because of the bleeding tendency, but atypical cells were observed in the patient's bone marrow aspirate. Surface marker analysis of atypical cells showed CD5+, cyclin D1+, CD19+, CD20+ and HLA-DR+. From these results we diagnosed this case as a mantle cell lymphoma (stage IV B) markedly infiltrated into the adrenal glands with adrenal insufficiency. The bilateral adrenal masses dramatically reduced in size after CHOP chemotherapy with hydrocortisone supplementation. We report on the present case and summarize the reports of adrenal grand-infiltrating lymphomas. PMID:15359915

  13. Whole-Exome Sequencing in the Differential Diagnosis of Primary Adrenal Insufficiency in Children

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Li F.; Campbell, Daniel C.; Novoselova, Tatiana V.; Clark, Adrian J. L.; Metherell, Louise A.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is a rare, but potentially fatal medical condition. In children, the cause is most commonly congenital and in recent years a growing number of causative gene mutations have been identified resulting in a myriad of syndromes that share adrenal insufficiency as one of the main characteristics. The evolution of adrenal insufficiency is dependent on the variant and the particular gene affected, meaning that rapid and accurate diagnosis is imperative for effective treatment of the patient. Common practice is for candidate genes to be sequenced individually, which is a time-consuming process and complicated by overlapping clinical phenotypes. However, with the availability, and increasing cost effectiveness of whole-exome sequencing, there is the potential for this to become a powerful diagnostic tool. Here, we report the results of whole-exome sequencing of 43 patients referred to us with a diagnosis of familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD) who were mutation negative for MC2R, MRAP, and STAR the most commonly mutated genes in FGD. WES provided a rapid genetic diagnosis in 17/43 sequenced patients, for the remaining 60% the gene defect may be within intronic/regulatory regions not covered by WES or may be in gene(s) representing novel etiologies. The diagnosis of isolated or familial glucocorticoid deficiency was only confirmed in 3 of the 17 patients, other genetic diagnoses were adrenal hypo- and hyperplasia, Triple A, and autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome type I, emphasizing both the difficulty of phenotypically distinguishing between disorders of PAI and the utility of WES as a tool to achieve this. PMID:26300845

  14. Principles and management of adrenal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Javadpour, N.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides information on adrenal diseases of latest developments and guides the clinicians in the care of their patients. The book is divided into two parts. The first section gives an overview of the embryology, anatomy, physiology, markers, pathology, imaging and the current progress in the field. The second edition covers specific diseases of the adrenal cortex and medulla. The increasingly significant roles played by steroids, catecholamines, blockers, computed tomography and magnetic resonance are elucidated and discussed. The contents include: Overview of progress; current problems, and perspectives - embryology anatomy, physiology, and biologic markers; pathology; advances in diagnosis; imaging techniques; adrenal disorders in childhood; primary aldosteronism; Cushing's syndrome; carcinoma; pheochromocytoma; neuroblastoma; metastatic disease; surgical management; and subject index.

  15. Myxoid adrenal adenoma with focal pseudoglandular pattern.

    PubMed

    De Padua, Michelle; Rajagopal, V

    2008-05-01

    Adrenal cortical tumors with myxoid change are rare tumors. To our knowledge, only 22 cases have been described so far in literature, which include 13 carcinomas and 9 adenomas. A pseudoglandular pattern has been described in 9 of these tumors. We report a case of a myxoid adenoma of the left adrenal gland in a 67-year-old woman, with a focal pseudoglandular pattern involving about 20% of the studied tumor. Rest of the tumor was composed of anastomosing cords of tumor cells. Abundant myxoid stroma was present, which stained positively with alcian blue and was weakly focally positive with periodic acid Schiff. Immunophenotype was consistent with an adrenal tumor, i.e., positive for vimentin, inhibin, and melan A. Cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and chromogranin were negative. MIB-1 index was < 0.1%. PMID:18579979

  16. Role of phospholipases in adrenal steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bollag, Wendy B

    2016-04-01

    Phospholipases are lipid-metabolizing enzymes that hydrolyze phospholipids. In some cases, their activity results in remodeling of lipids and/or allows the synthesis of other lipids. In other cases, however, and of interest to the topic of adrenal steroidogenesis, phospholipases produce second messengers that modify the function of a cell. In this review, the enzymatic reactions, products, and effectors of three phospholipases, phospholipase C, phospholipase D, and phospholipase A2, are discussed. Although much data have been obtained concerning the role of phospholipases C and D in regulating adrenal steroid hormone production, there are still many gaps in our knowledge. Furthermore, little is known about the involvement of phospholipase A2, perhaps, in part, because this enzyme comprises a large family of related enzymes that are differentially regulated and with different functions. This review presents the evidence supporting the role of each of these phospholipases in steroidogenesis in the adrenal cortex. PMID:26878860

  17. Adrenal Schwannomas: Rare Tumor of the Retroperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Emanuele; Simone, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Schwannoma is a benign neurogenic tumor originating from Schwann cells. These produce the myelin sheath that covers peripheral nerves that are often affected. This latter localization is extremely rare, and only a few case reports can be found in the medical literature. Studies have shown that approximately 0.5% to 5% of schwannomas are retroperitoneal, constituting 0.2% of adrenal incidental tumors. These usually present as incidental findings, nonsecreting adrenal masses in asymptomatic patients. Diagnosis of a schwannoma is based on detection of spindle cells with Antoni A and Antoni B regions in histological sections and positive staining for S-100 protein by immunohistochemical analysis. We report a case of an incidentally identified during an abdominal ultrasound examination with schwannoma localized in the left adrenal gland. PMID:26101687

  18. Image-Guided Adrenal and Renal Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Karun V.; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Swerdlow, Daniel; DaSilva, Daniel; Beck, Avi; Jain, Nidhi; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided biopsy is a safe and well-established technique that is familiar to most interventional radiologists (IRs). Improvements in image-guidance, biopsy tools and biopsy techniques now routinely allow for safe biopsy of renal and adrenal lesions which traditionally were considered difficult to reach or technically challenging. Image-guided biopsy is used to establish the definitive tissue diagnosis in adrenal mass lesions that can not be fully characterized with imaging or laboratory tests alone. It is also used to establish definitive diagnosis in some cases of renal parenchymal disease and has an expanding role in diagnosis and characterization of renal masses prior to treatment. Although basic principles and techniques for image-guided needle biopsy are similar regardless of organ, this paper will highlight some technical considerations, indications and complications which are unique to the adrenal gland and kidney because of their anatomic location and physiologic features. PMID:20540919

  19. Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Shruti; Agito, Katrina; Krug, Esther I

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage (BAH) is a rare complication typically seen in critically ill patients, which can lead to acute adrenal insufficiency and death unless it is recognized promptly and treated appropriately. We describe the case of a 64-year-old man with polycythemia vera found to be unresponsive with fever, hypotension, tachycardia, and hypoglycemia. Electrocardiogram showed ST-elevation with elevated troponin, hemoglobin, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time. He required aggressive ventilator and vasopressor support. Despite primary coronary intervention, he remained hypotensive. Random cortisol level was low. He received stress dose hydrocortisone with immediate hemodynamic stability. BAH was highly suspected and was confirmed by non-contrast abdominal computed tomography. Prompt recognition and timely initiated treatment remain crucial to impact the mortality associated with acute adrenal insufficiency. PMID:27609733

  20. Novel Mutations in Two Saudi Patients with Congenital Retinal Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Safieh, Leen Abu; Al-Otaibi, Humoud M.; Lewis, Richard Alan; Kozak, Igor

    2016-01-01

    To report novel mutations in two Saudi children with clinical features of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) and Alström syndrome. Case reports. Case 1 was a child with phenotypic features of LCA including oculodigital sign, bilateral enophthalmos, nystagmus, pale disc, and retinal changes. Direct sequencing of the coding sequence of GUCY2D revealed a missense mutation affecting highly conserved position (c. 743C > T; p.S248 L). Case 2 describes a girl with marked nystagmus, photophobia, and retinal changes in both eyes with short and stubby fingers tapering at the distal phalanges. The electroretinograms were nonrecordable in each eye. She had a hearing aid in the left ear, mid-facial hypoplasia, bilateral enophthalmos, and insulin dependent diabetes. Mutation screening of candidates genes revealed a pathogenic mutation in ALMS1 gene (c. 8441C > A, p.S2814*). Two novel mutations causing phenotypic LCA and Alström syndrome in Saudi patients from consanguineous families expand the genotypic spectrum of congenital retinal dystrophies PMID:26957854

  1. Localization of metastatic adrenal cortical carcinoma with Ga-67

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, F.T.; Anderson, J.H.; Jelinek, J.; Anderson, D.W. )

    1991-02-01

    Data are limited on the localization of Ga-67 in primary or metastatic adrenal cortical carcinoma. We report the localization of Ga-67 to pathologically confirmed adrenal cortical carcinoma metastatic to the lung. A review of the literature revealed four patients have previously been reported to have metastatic adrenal cortical carcinoma detected on Ga-67 scan. Gallium imaging may be useful in the evaluation of patients with adrenal cortical carcinoma. SPECT imaging should further improve lesion resolution and localization.

  2. Genetics of Congenital Cataract.

    PubMed

    Pichi, Francesco; Lembo, Andrea; Serafino, Massimiliano; Nucci, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a type of cataract that presents at birth or during early childhood, and it is one of the most easily treatable causes of visual impairment and blindness during infancy, with an estimated prevalence of 1-6 cases per 10,000 live births. Approximately 50% of all congenital cataract cases may have a genetic cause, and such cases are quite heterogeneous. Although congenital nuclear cataract can be caused by multiple factors, genetic mutation remains the most common cause. All three types of Mendelian inheritance have been reported for cataract; however, autosomal dominant transmission seems to be the most frequent. The transparency and high refractive index of the lens are achieved by the precise architecture of fiber cells and homeostasis of the lens proteins in terms of their concentrations, stabilities, and supramolecular organization. Research on hereditary congenital cataract has led to the identification of several classes of candidate genes that encode proteins such crystallins, lens-specific connexins, aquaporin, cytoskeletal structural proteins, and developmental regulators. In this review, we highlight the identified genetic mutations that account for congenital nuclear cataract. PMID:27043388

  3. Laser autofluorescent spectroscopy in adrenal tumor surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetshev, Petr S.; Ippolitov, Leonid I.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Kazaryan, Airazat M.; Minnibaev, Marat T.; Vetshev, Sergei P.

    1999-12-01

    Determination of a histological type of adrenal lesion at the preoperative or intraoperative stage allows to choose the optimal volume of surgery and in the short time effectively correct the postoperative hormonal therapy. 12 patients with different adrenal tumours (3 - lightcellular adenoma, 3 - mixedcellular adenoma, 1 - darkcellular adenoma, 1 - trabecular adenoma, 1 - malignant lymphoma, 3 - aldosteroma, 1 - pheochromocytoma, including the chance of combination of mixedcellular adenoma and aldosteroma of left adrenal) were operated on. The patients' aged varied from 33 to 62 years. For the first time we made intraoperative laser autofluorescent spectroscopy (IOLAS). The laser ve1ength was 632.8 nm. We defined a autofluorescent intensity. Portable equipment was used. The duration of the procedure did not exceed 2mm. The autofluorescent peak of adrenal tissue was 1.33+/-0.05 relativistic unit (RU) at 685 nm. The autofiurescent peaks of adrenal adenomas were 1 .07 RU, 0.9-1 .15 RU, 1.7-1 .9 RU, 3.4 RU accordingly for trabecular adenoma, lightcellular adenoma, mixedcellular adenoma, darkcellular adenoma Besides greater contribution of longwave component to auflurescence is characteristic for mixecellular adenoma and especially for darkcellular adenoma. The autofiurescent peaks of aldosteroma and pheochromocytoma were accordingly 1.2-1.4 RU and 2.2 RU. Spectral distribution of intensity was like mixedcellular adenoma's one. In the case of malignant lymphoma the autofiurescence peak was 2,3 RU and we also noted displacement of maximum of autoflurescence (-15 nm, from 685 nm to 670 nm).The results of IOLAS application as a adjuvant diagnosticmethod point to promise for intraoperative rapid diagnostics of adrenal tumours.

  4. Brain serotonin and pituitary-adrenal functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Berger, P.; Barchas, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    It had been concluded by Scapagnini et al. (1971) that brain serotonin (5-HT) was involved in the regulation of the diurnal rhythm of the pituitary-adrenal system but not in the stress response. A study was conducted to investigate these findings further by evaluating the effects of altering brain 5-HT levels on the daily fluctuation of plasma corticosterone and on the response of the pituitary-adrenal system to a stressful or noxious stimulus in the rat. In a number of experiments brain 5-HT synthesis was inhibited with parachlorophenylalanine. In other tests it was tried to raise the level of brain 5-HT with precursors.

  5. Ewing's Sarcoma of the Adrenal Gland.

    PubMed

    Pal, Dilip Kumar; Chandra, Vipin; Ranjan, Kumar Rajiv; Chakrabortty, Debasis; Banerjee, Manju

    2016-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma (ES) or primitive neuro-ectodermal tumor (PNET) typically occurs in long or flat bones, the chest wall, extra-skeletal soft tissue, and rarely in solid organs. Incidence of adrenal Ewing's sarcoma is very rare. Here we report a case of Ewing's sarcoma of the right adrenal gland in an 8-year-old girl who presented with an abdominal mass. The huge tumor was managed by preoperative neo-adjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgical resection. She died due to metastasis after five months of surgery. PMID:27398321

  6. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Adrenal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Angelousi, Anna; Zilbermint, Mihail; Berthon, Annabel; Espiard, Stéphanie; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-01-01

    Benign adrenocortical tumours (ACT) are relatively frequent lesions; on the contrary, adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare and aggressive malignancy with unfavourable prognosis. Recent advances in the molecular understanding of adrenal cancer offer promise for better therapies in the future. Many of these advances stem from the molecular elucidation of genetic conditions predisposing to the development of ACC. Six main clinical syndromes have been described to be associated with hereditary adrenal cancer. In these conditions, genetic counselling plays an important role for the early detection and follow-up of the patients and the affected family members. PMID:27075352

  7. Noncholinergic control of adrenal catecholamine secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Livett, B G; Marley, P D

    1993-01-01

    It has been known for over 70 years that adrenal catecholamine secretion can be modulated or elicited by noncholinergic neurotransmitters and hormones. However, our understanding of the cellular mechanisms by which these agents produce their effects and the physiological conditions under which they act are not well characterised. Here we briefly review the mechanisms by which one such agent (the neuropeptide substance P) modulates the cholinergic secretory response of adrenal chromaffin cells, and another agent (angiotensin II) elicits catecholamine secretion independently of the cholinergic innervation. PMID:7507911

  8. Biopsy of the right adrenal gland by the transhepatic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.B.; Bernardino, M.E.; Berkman, W.A.; Sones, P.J. Jr.; Torres, W.E.

    1983-08-01

    A transhepatic computed-tomographic-guided biopsy of a right adrenal mass is described. This method is simpler to perform than the usual posterior biopsy carried out with the patient prone and is less likely to cause a complicating pneumothorax. In seven of eight patients with right adrenal masses, adrenal tissue was obtained and an accurate diagnosis was possible. No complications resulted.

  9. Imaging of an adrenal cortical carcinoma and its skeletal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Drane, W.E.; Graham, M.M.; Nelp, W.B.

    1983-08-01

    Though the typical scintigraphic appearance in adrenal cortical carcinoma is bilateral nonvisualization of the adrenal glands, a case with simultaneous visualization of both an adrenal cortical carcinoma and its skeletal metastasis using 6-..beta..-(/sup 131/I)iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol is reported.

  10. Adrenal pseudotumors on CT due to dilated portosystemic veins

    SciTech Connect

    Mitty, H.M.; Cohen, B.A.; Sprayregen, S.; Schwartz, K.

    1983-10-01

    The adrenal and periadrenal venous systems are part of the portosystemic collateral pathways that may enlarge in portal hypertension. The cross-sectional image of the resulting enlarged venous channels may simulate an adrenal msss. Three examples of such computed tomographic (CT) scans are presented with selective venographic correlation. Patients with portal hypertension and suspected adrenal pathology may require enhanced or dynamic CT scans.

  11. Imaging of an adrenal cortical carcinoma and its skeletal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Drane, W.E.; Graham, M.M.; Nelp, W.B.

    1983-08-01

    Though the typical scintigraphic appearance in adrenal cortical carcinoma is bilateral nonvisualization of the adrenal glands, we report a case with simultaneous visualization of both an adrenal cortical carcinoma and its skeletal metastasis using 6-beta-(/sup 131/I)iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol.

  12. Ultrasonographic appearance of adrenal glands in healthy and sick cats.

    PubMed

    Combes, Anaïs; Pey, Pascaline; Paepe, Dominique; Rosenberg, Dan; Daminet, Sylvie; Putcuyps, Ingrid; Bedu, Anne-Sophie; Duchateau, Luc; de Fornel-Thibaud, Pauline; Benchekroun, Ghita; Saunders, Jimmy H

    2013-06-01

    The first part of the study aimed to describe prospectively the ultrasonographic features of the adrenal glands in 94 healthy cats and 51 chronically sick cats. It confirmed the feasibility of ultrasonography of adrenal glands in healthy and chronically sick cats, which were not statistically different. The typical hypoechoic appearance of the gland surrounded by hyperechoic fat made it recognisable. A sagittal plane of the gland, not in line with the aorta, may be necessary to obtain the largest adrenal measurements. The reference intervals of adrenal measurements were inferred from the values obtained in the healthy and chronically sick cats (mean ± 0.96 SD): adrenal length was 8.9-12.5 mm; cranial height was 3.0-4.8 mm; caudal height was 3.0-4.5 mm. The second part of the study consisted of a retrospective analysis of the ultrasonographic examination of the adrenal glands in cats with adrenal diseases (six had hyperaldosteronism and four had pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism) and a descriptive comparison with the reference features obtained in the control groups from the prospective study. Cats with hyperaldosteronism presented with unilateral severely enlarged adrenal glands. However, a normal contralateral gland did not preclude a contralateral infiltration in benign or malignant adrenal neoplasms. The ultrasonographic appearance of the adrenal glands could not differentiate benign and malignant lesions. The ultrasonographic appearance of pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism was mainly a symmetrical adrenal enlargement; however, a substantial number of cases were within the reference intervals of adrenal size. PMID:23234721

  13. Enamel hypoplasia in the deciduous teeth of great apes: variation in prevalence and timing of defects.

    PubMed

    Lukacs, J R

    2001-11-01

    The prevalence of enamel hypoplasia in the deciduous teeth of great apes has the potential to reveal episodes of physiological stress in early stages of ontogenetic development. However, little is known about enamel defects of deciduous teeth in great apes. Unresolved questions addressed in this study are: Do hypoplastic enamel defects occur with equal frequency in different groups of great apes? Are enamel hypoplasias more prevalent in the deciduous teeth of male or female apes? During what phase of dental development do enamel defects tend to form? And, what part of the dental crown is most commonly affected? To answer these questions, infant and juvenile skulls of two sympatric genera of great apes (Gorilla and Pan) were examined for dental enamel hypoplasias. Specimens from the Powell-Cotton Museum (Quex Park, UK; n = 107) are reported here, and compared with prior findings based on my examination of juvenile apes at the Cleveland Museum of Natural History (Hamman-Todd Collection; n = 100) and Smithsonian Institution (National Museum of Natural History; n = 36). All deciduous teeth were examined by the author with a x10 hand lens, in oblique incandescent light. Defects were classified using Fédération Dentaire International (FDI)/Defects of Dental Enamel (DDE) standards; defect size and location on the tooth crown were measured and marked on dental outline charts. Enamel defects of ape deciduous teeth are most common on the labial surface of canine teeth. While deciduous incisor and molar teeth consistently exhibit similar defects with prevalences of approximately 10%, canines average between 70-75%. Position of enamel defects on the canine crown was analyzed by dividing it into three zones (apical, middle, and cervical) and calculating defect prevalence by zone. Among gorillas, enamel hypoplasia prevalence increases progressively from the apical zone (low) to the middle zone to the cervical zone (highest), in both maxillary and mandibular canine teeth

  14. Adults with Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Updated:Apr ... topic from the list below to learn more. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Introduction Introduction: ...

  15. Congenital heart defect - corrective surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... born with one or more heart defects has congenital heart disease . Surgery is needed if the defect could harm ... 2008 Guidelines for the Management of Adults with Congenital Heart Disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/ ...

  16. Impact of Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... complex lesions, limitations are common. Some children with congenital heart disease have developmental delay or other learning difficulties. What ... defects? Successful treatment requires highly specialized care. Severe congenital heart disease requires extensive financial resources both in and out ...

  17. Congenital tracheobronchial stenosis.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Richard J; Butler, Colin R; Maughan, Elizabeth F; Elliott, Martin J

    2016-06-01

    Congenital tracheobronchial stenosis is a rare disease characterized by complete tracheal rings that can affect variable lengths of the tracheobronchial tree. It causes high levels of morbidity and mortality both due to the stenosis itself and to the high incidence of other associated congenital malformations. Successful management of this complex condition requires a highly individualized approach delivered by an experienced multidisciplinary team, which is best delivered within centralized units with the necessary diverse expertise. In such settings, surgical correction by slide tracheoplasty has become increasingly successful over the past 2 decades such that long-term survival now exceeds 88%, with normalization of quality of life scores for patients with non-syndrome-associated congenital tracheal stenosis. Careful assessment and planning of treatment strategies is of paramount importance for both successful management and the provision of patients and carers with accurate and realistic treatment counseling. PMID:27301600

  18. Familial microduplication of 17q23.1–q23.2 involving TBX4 is associated with congenital clubfoot and reduced penetrance in females.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Jess F; Ghaloul-Gonzalez, Lina; Madan-Khetarpal, Suneeta; Hartman, Jessica; Surti, Urvashi; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Yatsenko, Svetlana A

    2014-02-01

    Congenital clubfoot is a heterogeneous disorder that can result in functional disability, deformity, and pain if left untreated. Although the etiology is considered multifactorial in the majority of cases, a 17q23.1–q23.2 duplication has been reported in families with congenital clubfoot characterized by variable expressivity and incomplete penetrance. The candidate gene within the duplicated region is TBX4, a T-box transcription factor required for normal hind limb development. We describe a familial 2.15 Mb duplication in the 17q23.1–q23.2 region identified in a mother, daughter, and two sons. The male proband was referred for genetic evaluation due to multiple congenital anomalies including bilateral clubfoot, dysplastic hips, multiple heart defects, microcephaly, midfacial hypoplasia, brain anomalies on MRI scan, seizure disorder, optic nerve hypoplasia, hearing loss, and bilateral vocal cord paralysis. Cytogenetic testing on family members identified the 17q23.1–q23.2 duplication in both older siblings and the mother. In this family both male siblings had clubfoot, while females were phenotypically normal. Although TBX4 remains the candidate gene for congenital clubfoot involving 17q23.1–q23.2 duplications, the explanation for variable expressivity and penetrance remains unknown. PMID:24592505

  19. Postnatal Diagnosis of a Baby With Multiple Rare Congenital Anomalies Including Syngnathia, Brain Dysmorphism, and Skin Pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Mahgoub, Linda; Joynt, Chloe; Bhargava, Ravi; Davies, Dawn; El-Hakim, Hamdy; Dobrovolsky, Walter

    2015-11-01

    Syngnathia is a rare congenital disorder of jaw fusion with a paucity of literature from developed countries. We present a case of an infant noted to have multiple anomalies at birth including syngnathia, microcephaly with a variant of brain abnormality between holoprosencephaly and syntelencephaly, optic nerve hypoplasia, ear canal anomalies, hemi-vertebrae, and suspected hypomelanosis of Ito. To our knowledge, this patient with syngnathia and multiple anomalies is the first to be reported, but whether they are a coincidence, a pathogenetic association, or a new syndrome remains unknown. This case is discussed with a brief review of the literature. PMID:25325328

  20. Congenital hyperinsulinism with hyperammonaemia

    PubMed Central

    Pschibul, Alex; Müller, Jörg; Fahnenstich, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Congenital hyperinsulinism is considered to be the most frequent cause of persistent recurrent hypoglycaemia in infants. The clinical presentation and response to pharmacological treatment may vary significantly depending on the underlying pathology. We report a case of a female infant with mild but early onset of recurrent hypoglycaemia. Metabolic workup revealed hyperinsulinism combined with mild hyperammonaemia as well as elevation of α-ketoglutarate in urine. Genetic testing demonstrated a de novo mutation in exon 7 of the glutamate dehydrogenase gene on chromosome 10. Episodes of hypoglycaemia responded to treatment with diazoxide. The differential diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment of congenital hyperinsulinism is discussed. PMID:22315648

  1. Congenital midline nasofrontal masses.

    PubMed

    Saettele, Megan; Alexander, Alan; Markovich, Brian; Morelli, John; Lowe, Lisa H

    2012-09-01

    Congenital midline nasal masses are uncommon anomalies including nasal dermoids/epidermoids, nasal glial heterotopias and encephaloceles. These lesions can occur at the nasal bridge, extend intranasally and have intracranial extension with communication to the subarachnoid space. Therefore, accurate diagnosis of these lesions is critically important for presurgical planning and prevention of potentially fatal complications. Neuroimaging is essential in the evaluation of congenital midline nasal masses to identify the specific type of lesion, evaluate for the presence of intracranial extension and allow for appropriate presurgical planning. PMID:22648391

  2. Congenital muscular torticollis.

    PubMed

    Nilesh, Kumar; Mukherji, Srijon

    2013-07-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is a rare congenital musculoskeletal disorder characterized by unilateral shortening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). It presents in newborn infants or young children with reported incidence ranging from 0.3% to 2%. Owing to effective shortening of SCM on the involved side there is ipsilateral head tilt and contralateral rotation of the face and chin. This article reports a case of CMT in a 3½-year-old male child successfully managed by surgical release of the involved SCM followed by physiotherapy. PMID:24205484

  3. Congenital muscular torticollis

    PubMed Central

    Nilesh, Kumar; Mukherji, Srijon

    2013-01-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is a rare congenital musculoskeletal disorder characterized by unilateral shortening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). It presents in newborn infants or young children with reported incidence ranging from 0.3% to 2%. Owing to effective shortening of SCM on the involved side there is ipsilateral head tilt and contralateral rotation of the face and chin. This article reports a case of CMT in a 3½-year-old male child successfully managed by surgical release of the involved SCM followed by physiotherapy. PMID:24205484

  4. [A rare form of adrenal tuberculosis presenting as an asymptomatic adrenal mass].

    PubMed

    Sarf, Ismail; el Mejjad, Amine; Badre, Latifa; Dakir, Mohamed; Aboutaieb, Rachid; Meziane, Fethi

    2003-02-01

    The authors report a case of adrenal tuberculosis discovered during staging of a biopsy-confirmed bladder tumour, in a 70-year-old patient consulting for haematuria. Cystoscopy with biopsy revealed a high-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma invading the detrusor. Staging abdominopelvic computed tomography revealed a necrotic, multilobed right adrenal mass. Histological examination of the adrenalectomy specimen revealed adrenal tuberculosis. Antituberculous therapy was administered for 9 months and comprised streptomycin, isoniazid, rifampicin and pyrazinamide for 2 months, followed by rifampicin and isoniazid for 7 months. In the light of this case and with the increasing incidence of AIDS, the diagnosis of adrenal tuberculosis must be considered in any case of incidentaloma. PMID:12703369

  5. Delayed presentation of congenital diaphragmatic hernia.

    PubMed

    Numanoglu, A; Steiner, Z; Millar, A; Cywes, S

    1997-05-01

    Patients with congenital diaphragmatic hernias (CDH) usually present soon after birth with respiratory distress. Occasionally presentation is delayed. Twelve patients with delayed presentation (outside the neonatal period) of a total of 91 with CHD were seen over 17 years (1977-1994). Case records were reviewed to identify reasons for late presentation, evidence of morbidity, treatment and outcome. Age at presentation ranged from 6 weeks to 30 months (mean 8 months). Ten patients were aged 6 months or younger and there was an equal number of boys and girls. Seven cases were left-sided, 4 right-sided and 1 was anteriorly placed and bilateral. Ten patients presented acutely, 5 with small-bowel obstruction and 5 with respiratory distress, but all of the latter had a history of previous recurrent chest infection. Diagnosis was confirmed by radiographic examination of the chest in 10, barium meal in 1 and a 5-month-old patient had an inappropriate laparotomy and gastrojejunostomy for duodenal obstruction at an outlying hospital. Two had documented normal chest radiographs 3 and 6 months prior to diagnosis. Patients who presented with gastro-intestinal symptoms were older (mean age 1 year) compared with those with predominantly respiratory symptoms (mean age 19 weeks). None had any evidence of bowel strangulation. All were repaired via an abdominal approach. A hernial sac was found in half the cases (4/7 left and 2/5 right). Five had non-rotation of bowel. Primary repair without patch was carried out in all. One child with lung hypoplasia and multiple cardiac abnormalities died; the others recovered well. Delay in presentation of CDH is not uncommon (14% in this series). Most patients will have respiratory symptoms. A normal previous chest radiograph does not exclude the diagnosis. All patients with recurrent chest infection should have a contrast meal investigation early on. Long-term prognosis is favourable and postoperative morbidity is minimal, despite late

  6. Recovery of Adrenal Function in Patients with Glucocorticoids Induced Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jong Ha; Kim, Soo Kyoung; Jung, Jung Hwa; Hahm, Jong Ryeal

    2016-01-01

    Background The chronic use of glucocorticoids (GC) suppresses function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and often results in secondary adrenal insufficiency (AI). The present study aimed to determine the recovery rate of adrenal function in patients with secondary AI within 1 to 2 years and to assess the factors predictive of adrenal function recovery. Methods This was a retrospective observational study that enrolled patients diagnosed with GC-induced secondary AI between 2007 and 2013. AI was defined by peak serum cortisol levels <18 µg/dL during a standard-dose short synacthen test (SST). A follow-up SST was performed after 1 to 2 years, and responders were defined as those with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-stimulated peak serum cortisol levels ≥18 µg/dL. Results Of the total 34 patients diagnosed with GC-induced secondary AI at first, 20 patients (58.8%) recovered normal adrenal function by the time of the follow-up SST (median follow-up period, 16.5 months). Although the baseline serum ACTH and cortisol levels at the first SST did not differ between responders and non-responders, the incremental cortisol response during the first SST was higher in responders than that of non-responders (7.88 vs. 3.56, P<0.01). Additionally, higher cortisol increments during the first SST were an independent predictive factor of the adrenal function recovery (odds ratio, 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 2.46; P<0.05). Conclusion In the present study, adrenal function recovery was achieved frequently in patients with GC-induced secondary AI within 1 to 2 years. Additionally, an incremental cortisol response at the first SST may be an important predictive factor of adrenal function recovery. PMID:26676337

  7. [Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage revealed by jaundice: a case report].

    PubMed

    Oulmaati, A; Hays, S; Mory-Thomas, N; Bretones, P; Bensaid, M; Jordan, I; Bonfils, M; Godbert, I; Picaud, J-C

    2012-04-01

    The clinical presentation of adrenal hemorrhage varies, depending on the extent of hemorrhage as well as the amount of adrenal cortex involved by the hemorrhage. We report here a case of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage revealed by late onset of neonatal jaundice. This adrenal hemorrhage most probably resulted from shoulder dystocia. The aim of this work was to focus on the fact that jaundice can be caused by adrenal hemorrhage and to emphasize the crucial importance of abdominal ultrasound in cases of persistent jaundice. PMID:22424898

  8. CT manifestations of adrenal trauma: experience with 73 cases.

    PubMed

    Sinelnikov, Alex O; Abujudeh, Hani H; Chan, David; Novelline, Robert A

    2007-03-01

    Adrenal injuries, although an uncommon consequence of abdominal trauma, are important to recognize. If bilateral, adrenal trauma could result in life-threatening adrenal insufficiency. Furthermore, in the setting of trauma, adrenal injury can point to other concomitant injuries and has been associated with overall increased morbidity and mortality. In the past, before the advent of computed tomography (CT), detection was difficult, and the diagnosis was often made only at surgery or postmortem. Today, the diagnosis of adrenal injuries can be quickly and accurately made with CT. This retrospective review was carried out to identify, describe, and analyze different CT appearances of adrenal injuries and correlated with associated injuries and observed clinical context and outcomes. A patient cohort of CT-detected adrenal injuries was identified through a radiology software research tool by searching for keywords in radiology reports. The identified CT scans were reviewed and correlated with the patients' available clinical chart data and follow-up. Between April 1995 and October 2004, 73 cases of CT-detected adrenal injuries were identified, including 48 men and 25 women, with an age range 6 to 90 years and a mean age of 42.7 years. Of the cases, 77% were right-sided, 15% were left-sided, and 8% were bilateral. The causes of injuries were motor vehicle collisions (75%), falls (14%), sports related (4%), and miscellaneous causes (7%). Associated trauma included injuries of the liver (43%), spleen (23%), lung (19%), and kidney (18%), as well as pneumothoraces/hemothoraces (22%). Skeletal injuries included fractures of the ribs, clavicles, and/or scapulae (39%), pelvis and hips (30%), and the spine (23%). Isolated adrenal trauma was seen in only 4% of the cases. The CT findings of adrenal trauma were focal hematoma (30%), indistinct (27%) or enlarged (18%) adrenal gland, gross (15%) or focal (7%) adrenal hemorrhage, and adrenal mass (11%). Associated CT findings

  9. Adrenal gland denervation and diving in ducks.

    PubMed

    Mangalam, H J; Jones, D R; Lacombe, A M

    1987-06-01

    The extreme elevation in plasma levels of free norepinephrine (NE) and free epinephrine (EP), which occurs during forced diving of ducks (Anas platyrhynchos), was studied before and after denervation of the adrenal glands. In intact animals both NE and EP concentration increased by up to two orders of magnitude in a 4-min dive but by a significantly lesser amount if the duck breathed O2 before the dive. Denervating the adrenal glands reduced the amounts of both catecholamines (CA) released during dives, plasma EP decreased to 10%, and NE to 50% of values obtained before denervation. Breathing O2 before a dive virtually eliminated CA release in denervates, indicating that hypoxia was the important non-neural releasing agent. Hypoxia was also the most important neural releasing agent compared with hypercapnia, acidosis, or hypoglycemia. Adrenal denervation did not cause significant changes in heart rate, blood pressure, arterial blood gas tensions, pH, or plasma glucose during dives, although denervation caused increased variation in some of these variables. In ducks CA release in dives is largely due to decreasing arterial O2 partial pressure, and full expression of the response is dependent on intact innervation of the adrenal gland. PMID:3591985

  10. Genetics Home Reference: primary macronodular adrenal hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... germline and somatic mutations are associated with both primary macronodular adrenal hyperplasia and meningioma. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2015 Jan;100(1):E119-28. doi: 10.1210/jc.2014-2648. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Faucz FR, Zilbermint M, Lodish ...

  11. Adrenal metabolism of mitotane and related compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Djanegara, T.K.S.

    1989-01-01

    Mitotane (o,p{prime}-DDD; 1-(2-chlorophenyl)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-2,2-dichloroethane) has been used in the treatment of Cushing's syndrome due to adrenal hyperfunction and it the drug of choice for adrenocortical carcinoma. The object of this investigation is to study the biotransformation of o,p{prime}-DDD and p,p{prime}-DDD in dogs and bovine adrenal cortex to explain its selective toxicity and mechanism of action. The in vitro biotransformation of {sup 14}C-labeled o,p{prime}-DDD and p,p{prime}-DDD by dog and bovine adrenal cortex as studied. Of the cortex subcellular fractions, the cytosol fraction was found to be the most active in metabolizing the substrates, followed by the mitochondrial fraction. This metabolism including that in cytosolic fractions, did not take place with boiled enzyme preparations and required an NADPH generating system. This study has been directed towards establishing the metabolic activation mechanism which may account for the adrenocorticolytic effect of mitotane in contrast to detoxication by the liver. HPLC and TLC metabolic profiles have been generated from incubations of bovine and dog adrenal cortex homogenates and their subfractions for {sup 14}C-labeled p,p{prime}-DDD, o,p{prime}-DDD and its monochloroethylene derivative, o,p{prime}-DDMU.

  12. Primary Adrenal Failure due to Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Murat; Oguz, Ayten; Tuzun, Dilek; Boysan, Serife Nur; Mese, Bülent; Sahin, Hatice; Gul, Kamile

    2015-01-01

    Background. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) characterized by thrombosis and abortus may rarely cause primary adrenal failure. Case Presentations. A 34-year-old male presented with hypotension, hypoglycemia, hyperpigmentation on his skin and oral mucosa, scars on both legs, and loss of consciousness. In laboratory examinations, hyponatremia (135 mmol/L), hyperpotassemia (6 mmol/L), and thrombocytopenia (83 K/µL) were determined. Cortisol (1.91 µg/dL) and adrenocorticotropic (550 pg/mL) hormone levels were also evaluated. The patient was hospitalized with a diagnosis of acute adrenal crisis due to primary adrenal insufficiency. A Doppler ultrasound revealed venous thrombosis. The patient was diagnosed with antiphospholipid syndrome after the detection of venous thrombosis, thrombocytopenia, elevated aPTT, and anticardiolipin antibody levels. Anticoagulation treatment was started for antiphospholipid syndrome. The patient is now following up with hydrocortisone, fludrocortisone, and warfarin sodium. Conclusion. Antiphospholipid syndrome is a rare reason for adrenal failure. Antiphospholipid syndrome should be suspected if patients have morbidity secondary to venous-arterial thrombosis. PMID:26583075

  13. Primary adrenal lymphoma: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rashidi, Armin; Fisher, Stephen I

    2013-12-01

    Fewer than 200 cases of primary adrenal lymphoma (PAL) have been reported. We have systematically reviewed all 187 cases of PAL reported in the English literature until June 2013, from which we drew the following conclusions: PAL is typically a highly symptomatic and aggressive, metabolically hyperactive, hypovascular, hypoechoic (and heterogeneous on ultrasound), hypodense (with slight to moderate enhancement on computed tomography), high-grade lymphoma, primarily affecting elderly males and presenting with large bilateral adrenal masses. Most cases have adrenal insufficiency, B-symptoms, and elevated lactate dehydrogenase. Hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, concurrent or prior immune dysregulation, and bone marrow involvement are uncommon. Epstein-Barr virus positivity is observed in more than half of cases and the disease is disseminated at presentation in 18 % of cases. The two most common WHO 2008-defined PAL subtypes are diffuse large B cell lymphoma (78 %) and peripheral T cell lymphoma (7 %). The prognosis of PAL has improved with the advent of rituximab-containing chemotherapeutic regimens. According to our results, administration of chemotherapy and adrenal insufficiency are significant independent predictors of prognosis. PMID:23771429

  14. Multiple congenital ocular anomalies in Icelandic horses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Multiple congenital ocular anomalies (MCOA) syndrome is a hereditary congenital eye defect that was first described in Silver colored Rocky Mountain horses. The mutation causing this disease is located within a defined chromosomal interval, which also contains the gene and mutation that is associated with the Silver coat color (PMEL17, exon 11). Horses that are homozygous for the disease-causing allele have multiple defects (MCOA-phenotype), whilst the heterozygous horses predominantly have cysts of the iris, ciliary body or retina (Cyst-phenotype). It has been argued that these ocular defects are caused by a recent mutation that is restricted to horses that are related to the Rocky Mountain Horse breed. For that reason we have examined another horse breed, the Icelandic horse, which is historically quite divergent from Rocky Mountain horses. Results We examined 24 Icelandic horses and established that the MCOA syndrome is present in this breed. Four of these horses were categorised as having the MCOA-phenotype and were genotyped as being homozygous for the PMEL17 mutation. The most common clinical signs included megaloglobus, iris stromal hypoplasia, abnormal pectinate ligaments, iridociliary cysts occasionally extending into the peripheral retina and cataracts. The cysts and pectinate ligament abnormalities were observed in the temporal quadrant of the eyes. Fourteen horses were heterozygous for the PMEL17 mutation and were characterized as having the Cyst-phenotype with cysts and occasionally curvilinear streaks in the peripheral retina. Three additional horses were genotyped as PMEL17 heterozygotes, but in these horses we were unable to detect cysts or other forms of anomalies. One eye of a severely vision-impaired 18 month-old stallion, homozygous for the PMEL17 mutation was examined by light microscopy. Redundant duplication of non-pigmented ciliary body epithelium, sometimes forming cysts bulging into the posterior chamber and localized areas of

  15. The congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, N J; Chilton, J K

    2015-07-01

    Congenital cranial dysinnervation disorders (CCDD) encompass a number of related conditions and includes Duane syndrome, congenital fibrosis of the external ocular muscles, Möbius syndrome, congenital ptosis and hereditary congenital facial paresis. These are congenital disorders where the primary findings are non-progressive and are caused by developmental abnormalities of cranial nerves/nuclei with primary or secondary dysinnervation. Several CCDD genes have been found, which enhance our understanding of the mechanisms involved in brain stem development and axonal guidance. PMID:25633065

  16. Congenital alopecia universalis.

    PubMed

    Saraswat, P K; Laha, N N

    1989-09-01

    A case of congenital alopecia universalis without any other ectodermal defect and mental abnormality is described in a girl of eight years. There was no family history in any of the members. The child was born of a non-consanguineous marriage. PMID:2632563

  17. OPERATION FOR CONGENITAL CATARACT

    PubMed Central

    Barkan, Otto

    1949-01-01

    The traditional treatment of needling or discission of congenital cataract or membrane is open to many serious objections. Removal of the cataract by a modified form of linear extraction is recommended. The technique, with recent improvements which further assure extraction without hazard in early infancy, is described. PMID:18125222

  18. Congenital Midline Cervical Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Glastonbury, Christine; Marcovici, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Congenital midline cervical cleft is a rare anomaly that typically presents in the neonatal period as a thin suprasternal vertical band of erythematous skin with a nipple-like projection superiorly, which may exude fluid. We present the clinical and pathophysiologic features and the imaging findings of this uncommon, and rarely described entity in a newborn girl. PMID:25926928

  19. Bilateral Adrenal Adenoma Presented As Multiple Metatarsal And Phalangeal Fractures

    PubMed Central

    LiYeung, L L; Lui, T H

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Symptomatic adrenal adenoma usually presents with systemic symptoms. Depending on the function of the adenoma, the patient can present with pheochromocytoma-like symptoms; primary hyperaldosteronism and Cushing syndrome (weight gain, weakness, depression, and bruising). Case report: A 41 year-old lady presented with multiple metatarsal and phalangeal fractures of the both feet without significant injury. DEXA scan showed evidence of osteoporosis. Investigations showed that the picture was compatible with adrenal Cushing syndrome. Computed tomogram showed bilateral adrenal adenoma. Adrenal cortex scintigraphy with NP-59 scan showed hyperfunctioning right adrenal adenoma. Laproscopic R adrenalectomy was performed and histological study confirmed adrenal cortical adenoma with adjacent cortical atrophy suggestive of a functioning adenoma. Post-operatively, she was put on hydrocortisone replacement and recovered well. Conclusion: Adrenal adenoma can present with insufficiency fractures of the feet. PMID:27299107

  20. Histoplasmosis of the adrenal glands studied by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.A.; Muchmore, H.G.; Tisdal, R.G.; Fahmy, A.; Pitha, J.V.

    1984-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the adrenal glands was performed on seven patients who had histologically proved disseminated histoplasmosis. All seven patients showed some degree of adrenal gland abnormality. The range of CT findings included minimal enlargement with faint flecks of calcium, moderate enlargement with focal low attenuation nodules, and massive enlargement with large areas of necrosis or dense calcification. The changes in each patient were bilateral and symmetrical. Adrenal gland shape was usually preserved. Finding of percutaneous adrenal biopsy, which was performed under CT guidance, made the diagnosis in one patient. Five of seven patients had adrenal insufficiency. It is concluded that the diagnosis of disseminated histoplasmosis should be considered in any patient who has bilateral adrenal gland enlargement and who resides in an endemic area, especially if there is evidence of adrenal insufficiency.

  1. Adrenal myelolipoma: Controversies in its management

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Vasanth G.; Thota, Anuroop; Shankar, Ravi; Desai, Mallikarjun G.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal myelolipomas (AMLs) are rare, benign neoplasms of the adrenal gland with varied clinical presentations. The rarity of these tumors precludes any case-controlled or randomized study into their management. The available literature is limited to case reports and short series from referral centers. This review is an effort to put the available literature into perspective such that clinical decision making can be done with some clarity. The PubMed and Cochrane databases were searched with key words Adrenal Myelolipoma, Adrenal Incidentaloma (AI) and Adrenal Collision Tumor (ACT). From over 1300 search results, 547 relevant publications dating from 1954 to 2014 were reviewed. Details of about 1231 AMLs in the indexed literature were analyzed. Increasing usage of imaging studies has significantly increased the discovery of AMLs. Although AMLs are benign tumors, those measuring larger than 6 cm are prone to rupture and hemorrhage. Thorough endocrine work-up may benefit a selected group of patients, especially those who are hypertensive, diabetic/pre-diabetic, young patients (<50 years) and those with bilateral AML. Regular observation is needed for AML patients who are being treated non-operatively, as many of them may require surgery during follow-up. Although the AACE/AAES guidelines for AI (2009) exclude AML from mandatory metabolic work-up for a newly discovered AI, we feel that a significant number of patients with AML would benefit from metabolic work-up. In the literature, endocrine dysfunction in AML is 7% as compared with 11% in AI. Endocrine dysfunction in AML is probably underdiagnosed. PMID:25878407

  2. The effect of changes in adrenal blood flow on adrenal cortical responses to adrenocorticotrophin in conscious calves.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, C T; Edwards, A V; Bloom, S R

    1990-01-01

    1. The effect of varying adrenal blood flow on the rate at which it was estimated that adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) was presented to the adrenal gland was related to right adrenal cortisol output in conscious calves fitted with 'adrenal clamps'. 2. Intra-aortic infusions of endothelin at either 15.0 or 7.5 pmol min-1 kg-1 produced a substantial fall in right adrenal blood flow which was dose-related over this range. There was an associated fall in right adrenal cortisol output and cortisol output was linearly related to estimated ACTH presentation to the gland over the whole range investigated. The changes in adrenal cortisol output were reflected by changes in the concentration of cortisol in the peripheral plasma, which could be attributed entirely to the fluctuations in adrenal cortisol output. 3. It is concluded that delivery of ACTH to the adrenal gland is flow dependent over the physiological range in these animals and that changes in adrenal cortical blood flow can therefore be expected to result in changes in adrenal output due to variations in the presentation rate of ACTH. PMID:2177504

  3. Congenital Viral Infections of the Brain: Lessons Learned from Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus in the Neonatal Rat

    PubMed Central

    Bonthius, Daniel J; Perlman, Stanley

    2007-01-01

    The fetal brain is highly vulnerable to teratogens, including many infectious agents. As a consequence of prenatal infection, many children suffer severe and permanent brain injury and dysfunction. Because most animal models of congenital brain infection do not strongly mirror human disease, the models are highly limited in their abilities to shed light on the pathogenesis of these diseases. The animal model for congenital lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection, however, does not suffer from this limitation. LCMV is a well-known human pathogen. When the infection occurs during pregnancy, the virus can infect the fetus, and the developing brain is particularly vulnerable. Children with congenital LCMV infection often have substantial neurological deficits. The neonatal rat inoculated with LCMV is a superb model system of human congenital LCMV infection. Virtually all of the neuropathologic changes observed in humans congenitally infected with LCMV, including microencephaly, encephalomalacia, chorioretinitis, porencephalic cysts, neuronal migration disturbances, periventricular infection, and cerebellar hypoplasia, are reproduced in the rat model. Within the developing rat brain, LCMV selectively targets mitotically active neuronal precursors. Thus, the targets of infection and sites of pathology depend on host age at the time of infection. The rat model has further shown that the pathogenic changes induced by LCMV infection are both virus-mediated and immune-mediated. Furthermore, different brain regions simultaneously infected with LCMV can undergo widely different pathologic changes, reflecting different brain region–virus–immune system interactions. Because the neonatal rat inoculated with LCMV so faithfully reproduces the diverse neuropathology observed in the human counterpart, the rat model system is a highly valuable tool for the study of congenital LCMV infection and of all prenatal brain infections In addition, because LCMV induces delayed

  4. Congenital Zika syndrome with arthrogryposis: retrospective case series study

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Epitacio Leite Rolim; Lins, Otavio Gomes; Aragão, Maria de Fátima Viana Vasco; Brainer-Lima, Alessandra Mertens; Cruz, Danielle Di Cavalcanti Sousa; Rocha, Maria Angela Wanderley; Sobral da Silva, Paula Fabiana; Carvalho, Maria Durce Costa Gomes; do Amaral, Fernando José; Gomes, Joelma Arruda; Ribeiro de Medeiros, Igor Colaço; Ventura, Camila V; Ramos, Regina Coeli

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the clinical, radiological, and electromyographic features in a series of children with joint contractures (arthrogryposis) associated with congenital infection presumably caused by Zika virus. Design Retrospective case series study. Setting Association for Assistance of Disabled Children, Pernambuco state, Brazil. Participants Seven children with arthrogryposis and a diagnosis of congenital infection presumably caused by Zika virus during the Brazilian microcephaly epidemic. Main outcome measures Main clinical, radiological, and electromyographic findings, and likely correlation between clinical and primary neurological abnormalities. Results The brain images of all seven children were characteristic of congenital infection and arthrogryposis. Two children tested positive for IgM to Zika virus in the cerebrospinal fluid. Arthrogryposis was present in the arms and legs of six children (86%) and the legs of one child (14%). Hip radiographs showed bilateral dislocation in seven children, subluxation of the knee associated with genu valgus in three children (43%), which was bilateral in two (29%). All the children underwent high definition ultrasonography of the joints, and there was no evidence of abnormalities. Moderate signs of remodeling of the motor units and a reduced recruitment pattern were found on needle electromyography (monopolar). Five of the children underwent brain computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the remaining two CT only. All presented malformations of cortical development, calcifications predominantly in the cortex and subcortical white matter (especially in the junction between the cortex and white matter), reduction in brain volume, ventriculomegaly, and hypoplasia of the brainstem and cerebellum. MRI of the spine in four children showed apparent thinning of the cord and reduced ventral roots. Conclusions Congenital Zika syndrome should be added to the differential diagnosis of congenital

  5. [Aplasia and hypoplasia of the side of the nose in the Mocha Period and today].

    PubMed

    Pirsig, W

    1989-01-01

    In earthenware vessels from the Moche period (200-700 A.D.) pathological findings of nasal deformities have been depicted in a realistic manner. By means of two recent casuistics and of two portrait vessels of Old Peru it is demonstrated how exactly the nasal pathology was observed by the artists of the Moche period. The first example shows a unilateral hypoplasia of the nasal ala due to injury in early childhood, the second example shows a bilateral aplasia of the nasal alae due to an intrauterine growth disturbance. PMID:2690796

  6. Sexual Differentiation of Circadian Clock Function in the Adrenal Gland.

    PubMed

    Kloehn, Ian; Pillai, Savin B; Officer, Laurel; Klement, Claire; Gasser, Paul J; Evans, Jennifer A

    2016-05-01

    Sex differences in glucocorticoid production are associated with increased responsiveness of the adrenal gland in females. However, the adrenal-intrinsic mechanisms that establish sexual dimorphic function remain ill defined. Glucocorticoid production is gated at the molecular level by the circadian clock, which may contribute to sexual dimorphic adrenal function. Here we examine sex differences in the adrenal gland using an optical reporter of circadian clock function. Adrenal glands were cultured from male and female Period2::Luciferase (PER2::LUC) mice to assess clock function in vitro in real time. We confirm that there is a pronounced sex difference in the intrinsic capacity to sustain PER2::LUC rhythms in vitro, with higher amplitude rhythms in adrenal glands collected from males than from females. Changes in adrenal PER2::LUC rhythms over the reproductive life span implicate T as an important factor in driving sex differences in adrenal clock function. By directly manipulating hormone levels in adult mice in vivo, we demonstrate that T increases the amplitude of PER2::LUC rhythms in adrenal glands of both male and female mice. In contrast, we find little evidence that ovarian hormones modify adrenal clock function. Lastly, we find that T in vitro can increase the amplitude of PER2::LUC rhythms in male adrenals but not female adrenals, which suggests the existence of sex differences in the mechanisms of T action in vivo. Collectively these results reveal that activational effects of T alter circadian timekeeping in the adrenal gland, which may have implications for sex differences in stress reactivity and stress-related disorders. PMID:27007073

  7. Severe hypoplasia of the omasal laminae in a Japanese Black steer with chronic bloat--a case report.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Mitsuhiro; Mukai, Shuhei; Fushimi, Yasuo; Matsushita, Kouhei; Miyoshi, Nobuaki; Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Kitajima, Hideo; Takamure, Senro; Matsushita, Toshihiko; Kitamura, Nobuo; Deguchi, Eisaburo

    2007-12-01

    An 11-month-old Japanese Black steer with chronic bloat underwent clinical and histological analyses. During the observation period, it showed normal appetite and fecal volume but persistent chronic bloat symptoms. Compared to controls, the steer's feces contained undigested large straws. Necropsy revealed normal rumen, reticulum, and abomasum but a small omasum. The rumen, reticulum, and abomasum mucosa was normal, with well-developed ruminal papillae. However, severe hypoplasia of the omasal laminae was observed along with hypoplasia reticular groove and ruminoreticular fold. The contents of the reticulum, omasum, and abomasums comprised undigested large sized hay particles. The omasum papillae showed no pathological abnormalities. This is a rare case of a steer with chronic bloat probably caused by severe hypoplasia of the omasal laminae. PMID:18176026

  8. Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Deshingkar, S A; Barpande, S R; Bhavthankar, J D

    2011-07-01

    Congenital hemifacial hyperplasia (CHH) is a rare congenital malformation characterized by marked unilateral overdevelopment of hard and soft tissues of the face. Asymmetry in CHH is usually evident at birth and accentuated with age, especially at puberty. The affected side grows at a rate proportional to the nonaffected side so that the disproportion is maintained thr oughout the life. Multisystem involvement has resulted in etiological heterogeneity including heredity, chromosomal abnormalities, atypical forms of twinning, altered intrauterine environment, and endocrine dysfunctions; however, no single theory explains the etiology adequately. Deformities of all tissues of face, including teeth and their related tissues in the jaw, are key findings for correct diagnosis of CHH. Here an attempt has been made to present a case of CHH with its archetypal features and to supplement existing clinical knowledge. PMID:22090778

  9. Congenital hemophagocytic reticulosis.

    PubMed

    Koto, A; Morecki, R; Santorineou, M

    1976-04-01

    A fatal case of an apparently congenital form of hemophagocytic reticulosis is reported. The onset was manifested by hyperbilirubinemia and hepatosplenomegaly which were present at birth and persisted throughout life. Fever, anemia and pancytopenia developed at 1 month of age and became progressively worse. A splenectomy was performed at the age of 3 months, but the child died one day later with disseminated intravascular coagulation and pulmonary hemorrhage. The literature is reviewed with regard to the relationship of this case to (familial) hemophagocytic reticulosis and malignant histiocytosis (histiocytic medullary reticulosis). It is suggested that congenital hemophagocytic reticulosis, as described here, (familial) hemophagocytic reticulosis in infants, and malignant histiocytosis in adults all represent the same basic disorder with different ages of onset and clinicopathologic manifestations. PMID:1266810

  10. Update on congenital glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Anil K; Chakrabarti, Debasis

    2011-01-01

    Congenital glaucoma is a global problem and poses a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge to the ophthalmologist. A detailed evaluation under general anesthesia is advisable to establish the diagnosis and plan for management. Medical therapy has a limited role and surgery remains the primary therapeutic modality. While goniotomy or trabeculotomy ab externo is valuable in the management of congenital glaucoma, primary combined trabeculotomy–trabeculectomy offers the best hope of success in advanced cases. Trabeculectomy with antifibrotic agent and glaucoma drainage devices has a role in the management of refractory cases, and cyclodestructive procedures should be reserved for patients where these procedures have failed. Early diagnosis, prompt therapeutic intervention and proper refractive correction are keys to success. Management of residual vision and visual rehabilitation should be an integral part of the management of children with low vision and lifelong follow-up is a must. PMID:21150027

  11. Congenital scoliosis - Quo vadis?

    PubMed

    Debnath, Ujjwal K; Goel, Vivek; Harshavardhana, Nanjanduppa; Webb, John K

    2010-04-01

    Congenital spinal vertebral anomalies can present as scoliosis or kyphosis or both. The worldwide prevalence of the vertebral anomalies is 0.5-1 per 1000 live births. Vertebral anomalies can range from hemi vertebrae (HV) which may be single or multiple, vertebral bar with or without HV, block vertebrae, wedge shaped or butterfly vertebrae. Seventy per cent of congenital vertebral anomalies result in progressive deformities. The risk factors for progression include: type of defect, site of defect (junctional regions) and patient's age at the time of diagnosis. The key to success in managing these spinal deformities is early diagnosis and anticipation of progression. One must intervene surgically to halt the progression of deformity and prevent further complications associated with progressive deformity. Planning for surgery includes a preoperative MRI scan to rule out spinal anomalies such as diastematomyelia. The goals of surgical treatment for congenital spinal deformity are to achieve a straight growing spine, a normal standing sagittal profile, and a short fusion segment. The options of surgery include in situ fusion, convex hemi epiphysiodesis and hemi vertebra excision. These basic surgical procedures can be combined with curve correction, instrumentation and short segment fusion. Most surgeons prefer posterior (only) surgery for uncomplicated HV excision and short segment fusion. These surgical procedures can be performed through posterior, anterior or combined approaches. The advocates of combined approaches suggest greater deformity correction possibilities with reduced incidence of pseudoarthrosis and minimize crankshaft phenomenon. We recommend posterior surgery for curves involving only an element of kyphosis or modest deformity, whereas combined anterior and posterior approach is indicated for large or lordotic deformities. In the last decade, the use of growing rods and vertebral expandable prosthetic titanium rib has improved the armamentarium of the

  12. Congenital midline cervical cleft.

    PubMed

    Agag, Richard; Sacks, Justin; Silver, Lester

    2007-01-01

    Congenital midline cervical cleft (CMCC) is a rare disorder of the ventral neck that is clinically evident at birth and must be differentiated from the more common thyroglossal duct cyst. The case of CMCC presented here was associated with chromosomes 13/14 de novo Robertsonian translocations as well as midline deformities including a sacral tuft and a minor tongue-tie. The case is presented as well as discussion of histopathology, embryology, and surgical treatment. PMID:17214531

  13. Other congenital abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Cobbett, J R

    1974-06-29

    The plastic surgeon is not a miracle worker, as so many of his patients believe. Nevertheless, he can do much to minimize the functional and cosmetic effect of many congenital deformities. If a moral can be drawn from this article it must be that the plastic surgeon should be given an early opportunity to see and assess the patients described here, if only to ease the anxiety in the minds of their parents by appropriate reassurance and discussion. PMID:4853507

  14. Giant adrenal pseudocyst harbouring adrenocortical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Michael; Fanning, Deirdre Mary; Moloney, James; Flood, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a very rare case of adreno-cortical carcinoma arising in a giant adrenal pseudocyst. A 64-year-old woman presented to the emergency department with a 6 week history of progressively worsening severe left abdominal pain, anorexia, anergia and constipation. On examination, she was cachectic with tenderness over the left abdomen and flank. Medical history was significant for gastritis and anaemia. During her investigation, a well-defined para-renal 12×6 centimetre multi-loculated cyst, of uncertain origin was identified on CT. Ultrasound-guided biopsy was not diagnostic. MRI showed the cyst to be likely adrenal in origin. Serum and urinary catecholamines were unremarkable. At laparotomy an unresectable large, tense, fixed, cystic mass was seen to occupy the left side of the abdomen. The cyst was de-roofed. Pathology showed a high-grade poorly differentiated adreno-cortical carcinoma with a pseudo-capsule. She died 2 months postoperatively. PMID:22679267

  15. Mitochondrial structure in the rat adrenal cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Merry, B J

    1975-01-01

    Two distinct classes of mitochondria are described in the normal adrenal cortex of the Sprague Dawley CFY rat. Polyaminar mitochondria were frequently observed in the zona fasciculata and zona reticularis, particularly after ACTH stimulation of the cortex resulting from cold-stress exposure. It is uncertain whether such organelles are degenerating forms, or whether they have a specific functional role related to steroidogenesis in the normal cortical cell. In both normal and stressed adrenal cortices, protrusions of the outer membrane of mitochondria were evident, and were often seen penetrating lipid droplets. It is suggested that these protrusions may have some significance in the transport of cholesterol from the lipid droplet to the inner mitochondrial memrane 'desmolase complex', thus facilitating side-chain cleavage of cholesterol to pregnenolone. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:166969

  16. Bilateral adrenal gland haemorrhage: an unusual cause

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Vasant; Malabu, Usman; Cameron, Donald; Sangla, Kunwarjit

    2014-01-01

    Summary Our patient had drainage of a large amoebic liver abscess. This got complicated by a severe degree of hypotension, which required aggressive fluid resuscitation and hydrocortisone support. Computerised tomography (CT) of the abdomen revealed bilateral adrenal gland haemorrhage (BAH) resulting in primary adrenal gland failure, which was the cause for hypotension. Patient was on long-term warfarin for provoked deep vein thrombosis of lower limb, which was discontinued before the procedure. Thrombophilia profile indicated the presence of lupus anticoagulant factor with prolonged activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). Patient was discharged on lifelong warfarin. This case emphasises the need for strong clinical suspicion for diagnosing BAH, rare but life-threatening condition, and its association with amoebic liver abscess and anti-phospholipid antibody syndrome (APLS). Learning points Recognition of BAH as a rare complication of sepsis.APLS can rarely cause BAH. PMID:25276353

  17. Lhx4 Deficiency: Increased Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitor Expression and Pituitary Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Gergics, Peter; Brinkmeier, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Defects in the Lhx4, Lhx3, and Pitx2 genes can cause combined pituitary hormone deficiency and pituitary hypoplasia in both humans and mice. Not much is known about the mechanism underlying hypoplasia in these mutants beyond generally increased cell death and poorly maintained proliferation. We identified both common and unique abnormalities in developmental regulation of key cell cycle regulator gene expression in each of these three mutants. All three mutants exhibit reduced expression of the proliferative marker Ki67 and the transitional marker p57. We discovered that expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1a (Cdkn1a or p21) is expanded dorsally in the pituitary primordium of both Lhx3 and Lhx4 mutants. Uniquely, Lhx4 mutants exhibit reduced cyclin D1 expression and have auxiliary pouch-like structures. We show evidence for indirect and direct effects of LHX4 on p21 expression in αT3-1 pituitary cells. In summary, Lhx4 is necessary for efficient pituitary progenitor cell proliferation and restriction of p21 expression. PMID:25668206

  18. Chronic hepatitis C infection in a patient with bone marrow hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Bethlen, S; Chandrikakumari, K; de Leval, L; Giot, J-B; Mukeba, D; Leonard, P; Frippiat, F; Meuris, C; Delwaide, J; Moutschen, M

    2008-07-14

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with multifarious extra-hepatic manifestations; the most described and discussed being mixed cryoglobulinemia which is strongly related to B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs). We present a case of chronic HCV infection and mixed cryoglobulinemia, with minimal liver involvement. The case is a 53-year-old patient who was diagnosed as having bone marrow hypoplasia at the age of three. She received several blood transfusions to normalize her haemoglobin. At the age of 31, she was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis on account of her diffuse joint pain and inflammation, elevated rheumatoid factor (RF) and Raynaud's phenomenon. Twenty years later, monoclonal gammopathy of IgG Lambda (one year later, changed to IgM Kappa) was detected during a routine examination. A bone marrow biopsy showed hypoplasia, Kappa positive B-lymphocytes and low-grade malignant lymphoma cells. PCR of the bone marrow aspirate was not contributory. No treatment was initiated owing to her poor bone marrow function and she is under regular follow-up. PMID:18636673

  19. Application of ferrokinetic investigation for differential diagnosis in bone marrow hypoplasia and their clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Gupta, M; Roth, P; Werner, E; Kaltwasser, J P

    1979-02-01

    In this study, erythropoietic activity of bone marrow has been evaluated by ferrokinetics. For that purpose, the data of radioiron disappearance from plasma and its ultimate incorporation in red blood cells after the injection of about 10 muCi of 59Fe tagged autologous plasma, were analysed and fitted to the sum of three exponentials, using a non-linear least square SAAM-25 program on UNIVAC-1108 computer. A function representing time-activity relationship, was constructed. The functional physiological model of iron metabolism, proposed by Cavill and Ricketts, was used to calculate various ferrokinetic parameters in terms of coefficients and exponents of the time-activity function. After identifying the parameters that could be used as indices of erythropoietic activity of bone marrow, the study was repeated in six patients after they had undergone myelostimulative therapy. A distinct correlation was found between ferrokinetic observations and clinical and biochemical findings. It has been demonstrated that in histologically diagnosed cases with bone marrow hypoplasia, a further differentiation between pure aplasia and those with hypoplasia together with ineffective erythropoiesis was possible. This discrimination which is clinically very important, is only possible by means of kinetic investigations. PMID:499222

  20. Congenital Cataract Screening.

    PubMed

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (<6 weeks of age, based on general neonatal health) is important for achieving the best visual outcome particularly in unilateral cases. In bilateral cases, surgery is highly recommended before appearance of strabismus or nystagmus (<10 weeks of age) with no longer than a one-week interval between the fellow eyes. Parents should be informed that surgery is a starting point and not the endpoint of treatment. Appropriate postoperative management including immediate optical correction in the form of aphakic glasses or contact lenses, or intraocular lens (IOL) implantation at the appropriate age (>1 year) is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender. PMID:27621790

  1. Congenital Cataract Screening

    PubMed Central

    Rajavi, Zhale; Sabbaghi, Hamideh

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (<6 weeks of age, based on general neonatal health) is important for achieving the best visual outcome particularly in unilateral cases. In bilateral cases, surgery is highly recommended before appearance of strabismus or nystagmus (<10 weeks of age) with no longer than a one-week interval between the fellow eyes. Parents should be informed that surgery is a starting point and not the endpoint of treatment. Appropriate postoperative management including immediate optical correction in the form of aphakic glasses or contact lenses, or intraocular lens (IOL) implantation at the appropriate age (>1 year) is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender.

  2. Functional ectopic adrenal carcinoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jim A; Lee, Maris S; Nicholson, Matthew E; Justin, Robert B

    2014-09-01

    An 11-year-old spayed female pit bull terrier was presented with a 2-month history of polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, and panting. Serum chemistry, blood and urine analysis, and tests for hyperadrenocorticism suggested an adrenal tumor. Abdominal ultrasound identified a mass caudal to the right kidney. The mass was completely excised and histopathology was consistent with endocrine carcinoma. Three years later there was no evidence of recurrence or metastasis. PMID:25183891

  3. Adrenal Metastasis from Uterine Papillary Serous Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lubana, Sandeep Singh; Singh, Navdeep; Tuli, Sandeep S.; Seligman, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 60 Final Diagnosis: UPSC with adrenal metastasis Symptoms: Post menopausal bleeding Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Adrenalectomy Specialty: Oncology Objective: Rare disease Background: Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is a highly malignant form of endometrial cancer with a high propensity for metastases and recurrences even when there is minimal or no myometrial invasion. It usually metastasizes to the pelvis, retroperitoneal lymph nodes, upper abdomen, and peritoneum. However, adrenal metastases from UPSC is extremely rare. Here, we present a case of UPSC with adrenal metastasis that occurred 6 years after the initial diagnosis. Case Report: A 60-year-old woman previously diagnosed with uterine papillary serous carcinoma at an outside facility presented in September of 2006 with postmenopausal bleeding. She underwent comprehensive surgical staging with FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) stage 2. Post-operatively, the patient was treated with radiation and chemotherapy. The treatment was completed in April of 2007. The patient had no evidence of disease until July 2009 when she was found to have a mass highly suspicious for malignancy. Subsequently, she underwent right upper lobectomy. The morphology of the carcinoma was consistent with UPSC. She refused chemotherapy due to a previous history of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. The patient was followed up with regular computed tomography (CT) scans. In October 2012 a new right adrenal nodule was seen on CT, which showed intense metabolic uptake on positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan. The patient underwent right adrenalectomy. Pathology of the surgical specimen was consistent with UPSC. Conclusions: UPSC is an aggressive variant of endometrial cancer associated with high recurrence rate and poor prognoses. Long-term follow-up is needed because there is a possibility of late metastases, as in this case. PMID:27117594

  4. Restoration of incisal half with edge-up technique using ceramic partial crown in turner's hypoplasia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Shreya; Kundabala, M

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes a rare treatment modality for Turner's hypoplasia done with a very conservative approach for the esthetic and functional problem of the defect. Diagnosis was made as Turner's hypoplasia of upper two central incisors with proximal caries. Treatment planning was done after considering many factors such as conservation of tooth structure, esthetics, occlusion and economy. Tooth preparation was done to receive Edge-up, all ceramic partial crowns for both the upper central incisors,using pressable all ceramic material and cemented with resin cement. PMID:24554869

  5. Genetics of primary macronodular adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson Villares; Alencar, Guilherme Asmar; Lerario, Antonio Marcondes; Bourdeau, Isabelle; Almeida, Madson Queiroz; Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho; Lacroix, André

    2015-01-01

    ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia is a rare cause of Cushing's syndrome (CS), accounting for <2% of all endogenous CS cases; however it is more frequently identified incidentally with sub-clinical cortisol secretion. Recently, cortisol secretion has been shown to be regulated by ectopic corticotropin, which is in turn produced by clusters of steroidogenic cells of the hyperplastic adrenal nodules. Hence, the term 'ACTH-independent' is not entirely appropriate for this disorder. Accordingly, the disease is designated primary macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (PMAH) in this review article. The means by which cortisol production is regulated in PMAH despite the suppressed levels of ACTH of pituitary origin is exceedingly complex. Several molecular events have been proposed to explain the enhanced cortisol secretion, increased cell proliferation, and nodule formation in PMAH. Nonetheless, the precise sequence of events and the molecular mechanisms underlying this condition remain unclear. The purpose of this review is therefore to present new insights on the molecular and genetic profile of PMAH pathophysiology, and to discuss the implications for disease progression. PMID:25472909

  6. Gallium-68 PSMA uptake in adrenal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Law, W Phillip; Fiumara, Frank; Fong, William; Miles, Kenneth A

    2016-08-01

    Gallium-68 (Ga-68) labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) has emerged as a promising tool for staging of prostate cancer and restaging of disease in recurrence or biochemical failure after definitive treatment of prostate cancer. Ga-68 PSMA PET produces high target-to-background images of prostate cancer and its metastases which are reflective of the significant overexpression of PSMA in these cells and greatly facilitates tumour detection. However, relatively little is known about the PSMA expression of benign neoplasms and non-prostate epithelial malignancies. This is a case report of PSMA uptake in an adrenal adenoma incidentally discovered on PET performed for restaging of biochemically suspected prostate cancer recurrence. With the increasing use of PSMA PET in the management of prostate cancer - and the not infrequent occurrence of adrenal adenomas - the appearance of low- to moderate-grade PSMA uptake in adrenal adenomas should be one with which reporting clinicians are familiar. PMID:26394552

  7. Inhaled Corticosteroids and Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sannarangappa, Vishnu; Jalleh, Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) have been used as first line treatment of asthma for many decades. ICS are a form of exogenous glucocorticosteroids that can suppress the endogenous production of glucocorticosteroids, a condition known as adrenal suppression (AS). As a result, cessation, decreasing the dose or changing the type of ICS may trigger features of adrenal insufficiency (AI). AI may cause a spectrum of presentations varying from vague symptoms of fatigue to potentially life threatening acute adrenal crises. This article reviews the current literature on ICS and AI particularly in adults (although majority of data available is from the paediatric population). It aims to increase awareness of the potential risk of AI associated with ICS use, delineate the pathogenesis of AI and to provide recommendations on screening and management. From our literature review, we have found numerous case reports that have shown an association between ICS and AI particularly in children and patients using high doses. However, there have also been reports of AI in adults as well as in patients using low to moderate doses of ICS. To conclude, we recommend screening for AI in select patient groups with an initial early morning serum cortisol. If results are abnormal, more definitive testing such as the low dose corticotropin stimulation test may be done to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:25674179

  8. [A Case of Synchronous Malignant Pheochromocytomas in Bilateral Adrenal Glands].

    PubMed

    Usui, Kimitsugu; Hirasawa, Terukazu; Kobayashi, Masataka; Shioi, Kouichi; Kobayashi, Kazuki; Sakai, Naoki; Noguchi, Sumio; Tsuura, Yukio

    2016-06-01

    We present a case of synchronous malignant pheochromocytoma in bilateral adrenal glands. A 73- year-old man presented to our hospital with bilateral adrenal masses incidentally found during abdominal ultrasonography examination for an unrelated issue. The patient had a 30-year history of hypertension and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed heterogeneous tumors in bilateral adrenal glands and an enlarged para-aortic lymph node. Hormonal examinations revealed a high value of urinary catecholamines. Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy showed increased uptake in bilateral adrenal glands and the lymph node. Both adrenal tumors and the node were surgically removed. Pathological examination revealed histologically distinct tissue between the two adrenal tumors. The patient received five cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy, consisting of cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and dacarbazine. The patient has been in remission for 32 months following surgical treatment. PMID:27452493

  9. Adrenal Diagnostics: An Endocrinologist’s Perspective focused on Hyperaldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    The era of sophisticated high resolution imaging with the consequent identification of previously unrecognised adrenal masses (adrenal incidentalomas), has emphasised the need for an appropriate biochemical approach to define adrenal function. The focus of this testing is on catecholamines from the adrenal medulla (testing that has been rendered relatively straightforward by plasma metanephrine measurements) and the physiological corticosteroids, cortisol and aldosterone, synthesised by the adrenal cortex. The diagnosis of hypercortisolism remains a challenge and has been extensively reviewed. In the context of hypertension and an adrenal incidentaloma, the exclusion of hyperaldosteronism has an importance beyond simple blood pressure control. This review focuses on the recommended approaches to both the diagnosis of hyperaldosteronism and the characterisation of its aetiology. Monogenetic causes of mineralocorticoid hypertension are discussed as are recent developments with respect to both the molecular aetiology and the differential diagnosis of aldosterone-producing adenomas. PMID:24353356

  10. Radiology of congenital heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Amplatz, K.

    1986-01-01

    This is a text on the radiologic diagnosis of congenital heart disease and its clinical manifestations. The main thrust of the book is the logical approach which allows an understanding of the complex theory of congenital heart disease. The atlas gives a concise overview of the entire field of congenital heart disease. Emphasis is placed on the understanding of the pathophysiology and its clinical and radiological consequences. Surgical treatment is included since it provides a different viewpoint of the anatomy.

  11. Spontaneous Bilateral Adrenal Haemorrhage after Duodenopancreatectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Guglielmo, N; Montalto, G M; Della Pietra, F; Garofalo, M; Mennini, G; Melandro, F; Berloco, P B

    2015-01-01

    it is difficult to diagnose because of its nonspecific presentation. This condition frequently occurs in association with an extreme physical stress and may lead to acute adrenal insufficiency or death if not promptly and properly treated. We report a rare case of acute bilateral adrenal hemorrhage with adrenal insufficiency following duodenopancreatectomy for ampulloma in absence of surgical complications. Early diagnosis and corticosteroid replacement with aggressive management of the precipitating pathology are essential to enable a successful outcome. PMID:25945442

  12. Pheochromocytoma complicated by cyanotic congenital heart disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Keiko; Namba, Noriyuki; Kubota, Takuo; Usui, Takeshi; Takahashi, Kunihiko; Kitaoka, Taichi; Fujiwara, Makoto; Hori, Yumiko; Kogaki, Shigetoyo; Oue, Takaharu; Morii, Eiichi; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-04-01

    Coincidental cyanotic congenital heart disease and pheochromocytoma is uncommon, although some cases have been reported. We describe a girl aged 15 yr and 11 mo with pheochromocytoma and tricuspid atresia treated by performing the Fontan surgery. The patient did not have any specific symptoms of syndrome related to pheochromoytoma or a family history of pheochromocytoma. During cardiac catheterization, her blood pressure increased markedly, and an α-blocker was administered. Catecholamine hypersecretion was observed in the blood and urine, and abdominal computed tomography revealed a tumor in the right adrenal gland. Scintigraphy showed marked accumulation of (123)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine in the tumor, which led to a diagnosis of pheochromocytoma. We did not detect any germline mutations in the RET, VHL, SDHB, SDHD, TMEM127, or MAX genes. This patient had experienced mild systemic hypoxia since birth, which may have contributed to the development of pheochromocytoma. PMID:27212797

  13. Pheochromocytoma complicated by cyanotic congenital heart disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Keiko; Namba, Noriyuki; Kubota, Takuo; Usui, Takeshi; Takahashi, Kunihiko; Kitaoka, Taichi; Fujiwara, Makoto; Hori, Yumiko; Kogaki, Shigetoyo; Oue, Takaharu; Morii, Eiichi; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Coincidental cyanotic congenital heart disease and pheochromocytoma is uncommon, although some cases have been reported. We describe a girl aged 15 yr and 11 mo with pheochromocytoma and tricuspid atresia treated by performing the Fontan surgery. The patient did not have any specific symptoms of syndrome related to pheochromoytoma or a family history of pheochromocytoma. During cardiac catheterization, her blood pressure increased markedly, and an α-blocker was administered. Catecholamine hypersecretion was observed in the blood and urine, and abdominal computed tomography revealed a tumor in the right adrenal gland. Scintigraphy showed marked accumulation of 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine in the tumor, which led to a diagnosis of pheochromocytoma. We did not detect any germline mutations in the RET, VHL, SDHB, SDHD, TMEM127, or MAX genes. This patient had experienced mild systemic hypoxia since birth, which may have contributed to the development of pheochromocytoma. PMID:27212797

  14. Genetics Home Reference: congenital hepatic fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions congenital hepatic fibrosis congenital hepatic fibrosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Congenital hepatic fibrosis is a disease of the liver that is ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Leber congenital amaurosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Registry: Leber congenital amaurosis 9 National Eye Institute: Gene Therapy for Leber Congenital Amaurosis These resources from MedlinePlus ... Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Eye Institute: Gene Therapy for Leber Congenital Amaurosis Educational Resources (3 links) ...

  16. Isolated adrenal masses in nonsmall-cell bronchogenic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, T.W. Jr.; Bernardino, M.E.; Miller, J.I.; Mansour, K.; Greene, D.; Davis, W.A.

    1984-10-01

    Computed tomography has become an important diagnostic modality in the preoperative staging of patients with bronchogenic carcinoma. The adrenal glands represent one of the most frequent sites of metastasis. Therefore, an isolated adrenal mass discovered on preoperative thoracoabdominal CT poses a diagnostic problem. Three hundred thirty patients with histologically proved nonsmall-cell bronchogenic carcinoma were evaluated. Thirty-two had adrenal masses without further evidence of disease in the abdomen, Eight of these 32 masses were metastases, 17 were proved adenomas, and 7 did not undergo biopsy. Thus an isolated adrenal mass is more likely benign than metastatic, and biopsy is advocated prior to withholding potentially curative surgery.

  17. Immunohistochemical distinction of metastases of renal cell carcinoma to the adrenal from primary adrenal nodules, including oncocytic tumor.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongmei; Hes, Ondrej; MacLennan, Gregory T; Eastwood, Daniel C; Iczkowski, Kenneth A

    2015-05-01

    Metastases of clear cell renal cell carcinoma to the adrenal can mimic primary adrenal cortical neoplasms or normal adrenal, especially in biopsy material. We compared 34 cases of clear cell renal cell carcinoma metastasis to the adrenal with 49 primary adrenal lesions (16 carcinoma, 22 adenoma, 9 oncocytic tumor, and 2 hyperplasia). Normal adrenal was available in 59 cases. Each entity was represented on tissue microarrays by duplicate-triplicate evaluable spots taken from spatially separate areas. Two pathologists evaluated all reactivity from 0 to 3+. A panel of 12 immunohistochemical stains was performed, including the first diagnostic uses of steroid receptor coactivator (SRC1) and equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1). The most sensitive and specific renal cell carcinoma markers were membranous reactivity for carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) and RCC marker and nuclear reactivity for PAX8. For adrenal cortical carcinomas, best markers were synaptophysin, SRC1, and MelanA; and for adrenal oncocytic tumor, synaptophysin and ENT1. Optimal markers for adrenal cortical adenoma and normal adrenal were ENT1 (more specific) and either MelanA or SRC1 (more sensitive). Calretinin, cytokeratin 34βE12 and CAM5.2, inhibin, and steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) proved less valuable to the panel. Nonspecific cytoplasmic biotin reactivity was frequent for CAIX and PAX8. Tumors with high-grade cytology should be worked up with 2 of the 3 stains: CAIX, PAX8, or RCC marker; and either SRC1 or MelanA. Adrenal adenoma, or normal adrenal, versus low-grade renal cell carcinoma are distinguished by a panel of: CAIX, PAX8, or RCC Marker; ENT1 and either SRC1 or MelanA. PMID:25690138

  18. Molecular and Genetic Studies of Congenital Myopathies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-26

    Central Core Disease; Centronuclear Myopathy; Congenital Fiber Type Disproportion; Multiminicore Disease; Myotubular Myopathy; Nemaline Myopathy; Rigid Spine Muscular Dystrophy; Undefined Congenital Myopathy

  19. A case of optic-nerve hypoplasia and anterior segment abnormality associated with facial cleft

    PubMed Central

    Miyake, Tomoko; Kojima, Shota; Sugiyama, Tetsuya; Ueki, Mari; Sugasawa, Jun; Oku, Hidehiro; Tajiri, Kensuke; Shigemura, Yuka; Ueda, Koichi; Harada, Atsuko; Yamasaki, Mami; Yamanaka, Takumi; Utsunomiya, Hidetsuna; Ikeda, Tsunehiko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The incidence of facial cleft is rare and ranges between 1.43 and 4.85 per 100,000 births. To date, there have been few reports of detailed ophthalmologic examinations performed in cases of facial cleft. Here, we report a case of optic-nerve hypoplasia and anterior segment abnormality associated with facial cleft. Case report A 9-day-old female infant was delivered by cesarian section at 34 weeks of gestational age (the second baby of twins) and weighed 2,276 g upon presentation. She had a facial cleft and ectrodactyly at birth. Right eye-dominant blepharophimosis was obvious. Examination of the right eye revealed inferior corneal opacity with vascularization, downward corectopia, and optic-nerve hypoplasia. The corneal diameter was 8 mm in both eyes, and tonometry by use of a Tono-Pen® XL (Reichert Technologies, Depew, NY, USA) handheld applanation tonometer revealed that her intraocular pressure was 11–22 mmHg (Oculus Dexter) and 8 mmHg (Oculus Sinister). B-mode echo revealed no differences in axial length between her right and left eyes. When she was 15–16 months old, we attempted to examine her eyes before she underwent plastic surgery under general anesthesia. She had a small optic disc in both eyes and the right-eye disc was tilted. After undergoing canthotomy, gonioscopy and ultrasound biomicroscopy revealed that almost all directions were open except for the peripheral anterior synechia. Since magnetic resonance imaging revealed ventriculomegaly associated with an interhemispheric cyst at birth, a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was inserted at 12 days of age. At 25 months of age, her condition suddenly deteriorated due to occlusion of the ventricular shunt catheter, and she died 5 days later. In this patient, amniotic band syndrome was presumed to be the primary cause due to the clinical findings. Conclusion We experienced a case of optic-nerve hypoplasia and anterior segment abnormality that occurred with facial cleft. The cause of these

  20. Renal artery stenosis in association with congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract

    PubMed Central

    Kari, Jameela A.; Roebuck, Derek J.; Tullus, Kjell

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To describe 8 cases of renal artery stenosis (RAS) in children with congenital anomalies of the renal tract. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart review of 78 children with RAS who were followed up at Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, United Kingdom between 2003 and 2012. We used an interventional radiology database to identify all patients who had RAS confirmed by digital subtraction angiography and examined all cases of congenital anomaly of the renal tract that had been diagnosed during childhood. Results: We documented the following renal anomalies: multicystic dysplastic kidney (n=2), renal hypoplasia (n=1), congenital solitary kidney with hydronephrosis (n=1), and unilateral vesicoureteric reflux with poorly functioning kidneys (n=2). The anomaly was unknown in 2 cases. Seven children had unilateral nephrectomy at a median age of 2.5 years (range, 0.4-10 years) for various urological abnormalities. All children were confirmed to have RAS after presentation with hypertension at a median age of 10 (3.5-16.2) years. Angioplasty was performed in 7 children, of which 6 achieved control of their blood pressure on reduced medications. Conclusion: We highlight the association between RAS and other renal anomalies, which indicates that they could share a common genetic background. PMID:25316474