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Sample records for adrenal insufficiency due

  1. Adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Auron, Moises; Raissouni, Nouhad

    2015-03-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is a life-threatening condition that occurs secondary to impaired secretion of adrenal glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid hormones. This condition can be caused by primary destruction or dysfunction of the adrenal glands or impairment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. In children, the most common causes of primary adrenal insufficiency are impaired adrenal steroidogenesis (congenital adrenal hyperplasia) and adrenal destruction or dysfunction (autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome and adrenoleukodystrophy), whereas exogenous corticosteroid therapy withdrawal or poor adherence to scheduled corticosteroid dosing with long-standing treatment constitute the most common cause of acquired adrenal insufficiency. Although there are classic clinical signs (eg, fatigue, orthostatic hypotension, hyperpigmentation, hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, and hypoglycemia) of adrenal insufficiency, its early clinical presentation is most commonly vague and undefined, requiring a high index of suspicion. The relevance of early identification of adrenal insufficiency is to avoid the potential lethal outcome secondary to severe cardiovascular and hemodynamic insufficiency. The clinician must be aware of the need for increased corticosteroid dose supplementation during stress periods.

  2. Adrenal Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... three types of steroid hormones. In adrenal insufficiency (AI), the cortex does not make enough steroid hormones. ... unlike “adrenal fatigue.” There are two kinds of AI: • Primary AI, also called Addison’s disease. In this ...

  3. Bilateral adrenal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with adrenal insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, R; Read, D

    2000-01-01

    A 74 year old women presented with lethargy and weight loss and was found to have profound adrenal insufficiency and bilateral adrenal mass lesions. Histological examination revealed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. There was no evidence of lymphoma outside the adrenal glands. Isolated bilateral adrenal masses may rarely be due to primary adrenal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which is often associated with adrenal insufficiency.


Keywords: lymphoma; adrenal insufficiency PMID:10908383

  4. [Adrenal mass and adrenal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Martínez Albaladejo, M; García López, B; Serrano Corredor, S; Alguacil García, G

    1996-12-01

    Primary adrenal insufficiency is a non frequent disease, that is declared in young adults and in the most of the cases is produced from an autoimmune mechanism or a tuberculous disease. The incidence of these forms in the different geographic areas is dependent of degree of irradication of the tuberculosis. We report the case of a patient with latent chronic adrenal insufficiency of tuberculous origin who was affected for an addisonian crisis during an intercurrent infectious disease, which permitted the diagnosis of the addisonian crisis, and Mal of Pott was moreover detected. Evolution with corticosteroid and specific treatment was very favorable.

  5. Budesonide-related adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Arntzenius, Alexander; van Galen, Louise

    2015-10-01

    Iatrogenic adrenal insufficiency is a potential harmful side effect of treatment with corticosteroids. It manifests itself when an insufficient cortisol response to biological stress leads to an Addisonian crisis: a life-threatening situation. We describe a case of a patient who developed an Addisonian crisis after inappropriate discontinuation of budesonide (a topical steroid used in Crohn's disease) treatment. Iatrogenic adrenal insufficiency due to budesonide use has been rarely reported. Prescribers should be aware of the resulting risk for an Addisonian crisis.

  6. A Case of Therapy-Resistant Folliculitis due to Adrenal Insufficiency?

    PubMed Central

    Stausholm, Kirsten Rønholt; Spaun, Eva; Koppelhus, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    A report on a 40-year-old patient with recalcitrant, suppurative folliculitis is presented. After years of unsuccessful treatment with conventional therapies, the patient was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency with a low level of circulating cortisol. A few weeks after the patient was subjected to substitution therapy with hydrocortisone, his folliculitis resolved. We discuss the role of plasma cortisol level in the pathogenesis of folliculitis. PMID:28101019

  7. [Pediatric emergency: adrenal insufficiency and adrenal crisis].

    PubMed

    Martínez, Alicia; Pasqualini, Titania; Stivel, Mirta; Heinrich, Juan Jorge

    2010-04-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is defined by impaired secretion of adrenocortical hormones. It is classified upon the etiology in primary and secondary. Rapid recognition and therapy of adrenocortical crisis are critical to survival. Patients often have nonspecific symptoms: anorexia, vomiting, weakness, fatigue and lethargy. They are followed by hypotension, shock, hypoglicemia, hyponatremia and hyperkalemia. All patients with adrenal insufficiency require urgent fluid reposition, correction of hypoglycemia and glucocorticoid replacement, in order to avoid serious consequences of adrenal crisis. After initial crisis treatment, maintenance dose of corticoids should be indicated. Mineralocorticoids replacement, if necessary, should also be initiated.

  8. Managing Adrenal Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body. • Surgical removal of the adrenals Temporary AI is caused by some medications, infections, and/or surgeries. Causes of temporary AI include the following: • Transsphenoidal surgery for Cushing’s disease ...

  9. Adrenal Insufficiency and Addison's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... used if the diagnosis remains unclear. What other tests might a health care provider perform after diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency? After ... skin. A nurse or lab technician performs the test in a health care provider’s office; a patient does not need anesthesia. ...

  10. Patient With Severe Hyponatremia Caused by Adrenal Insufficiency Due to Ectopic Posterior Pituitary Lobe and Miscommunication Between Hypothalamus and Pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Grammatiki, Maria; Rapti, Eleni; Mousiolis, Athanasios C.; Yavropoulou, Maria; Karras, Spyridon; Tsona, Afroditi; Daniilidis, Michalis; Yovos, John; Kotsa, Kalliopi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hyponatremia may be one of the clinical manifestations of adrenal insufficiency (AI) and during the diagnostic workup of hyponatremic patients investigation of AI should be included. We report the case of an 82-year-old patient who was admitted to our hospital with clinical symptoms and laboratory findings of hyponatremia. Following the diagnostic algorithm of hyponatremia we reached the diagnosis of AI. Clinician's attention must focus on the underlying cause of AI which in this case was hidden in a miscommunication between hypothalamus and pituitary due to an ectopic posterior pituitary lobe and became apparent by a pituitary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan. Treatment with oral hydrocortisone resulted in full clinical recovery and electrolyte balance, which was maintained after 7 months of follow-up. Secondary AI is related with hyponatremia through increased ADH secretion. Although a hyponatremic episode may be the first presentation of AI, clinical suspicion is of high importance in order to place the right diagnosis. Disruption of communication between hypothalamus and pituitary is a rare but considerable cause of AI. PMID:26962783

  11. Adrenal insufficiency presenting as bilateral rigid auricles: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Stiff ears appear to be a warning sign for adrenal insufficiency. This remarkable and rare sign has not been described to present in adrenal insufficiency in the setting of critical care. Case presentation We present the case of a 68-year-old Caucasian male who underwent a thymoma resection and suffered from preoperative weight loss and lack of strength. The perioperative phase was characterised by hypotension and sputum stasis due to muscle weakness, which caused two readmissions to the intensive care unit. His physical examination showed two fully rigid auricles. In retrospect, our patient suffered from secondary adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadism. Conclusions The bilateral rigid auricles appeared to be a warning sign for adrenal insufficiency. This remarkable sign is easily checked, and should prompt a higher index of suspicion towards adrenal insufficiency and other hormonal deficiencies. PMID:25209544

  12. Occult adrenal insufficiency in surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hubay, C A; Weckesser, E C; Levy, R P

    1975-01-01

    Eight patients admitted to a University hospital with acute surgical problems and related adrenal insufficiency were reviewed and three are presented in detail. Surgical stress and continued sepsis played major roles in the lack of responsiveness to usual modes of therapy until the adrenal insufficiency was corrected. The patients fell into three major clinical categories of adrenal insufficiency. Chronic illness and sepsis are shown to affect steroid production and metabolism, as well as adrenal responsiveness to ACTH. Pharmacologic amounts of steroids are often needed in patients with shock, gram negative sepsis and prolonged illnesses, even if normal or elevated serum cortisols are present. Therapeutic trials of cortisol administration are shown to be confusing when not accompanied by easily performed diagnostic tests of adrenal function. It is emphasized that a pretreatment serum cortisol should be obtained whenever possible. The evaluation of adrenal function is of lifelong importance to the patient. PMID:165792

  13. [Adrenal insufficiency in cirrhotic patients].

    PubMed

    Orozco, Federico; Anders, María; Mella, José; Antinucci, Florencia; Pagano, Patricia; Esteban, Paula; Cartier, Mariano; Romero, Gustavo; Francini, Bettina; Mastai, Ricardo

    Relative adrenal insufficiency (RAI) is a common finding in cirrhotic patients with severe sepsis, and increased mortality. Its significance is unknown in stable conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of RAI in stable cirrhotic patients at different stages of the disease. Also, the impact of RAI on the survival was evaluated and basal cortisol levels between plasma and saliva was correlated in control subjects and cirrhotic patients. Forty seven ambulatory patients and 16 control subjects were studied. RAI was defined as a serum cortisol increase of less than 9 υg/dl from baseline after the stimulation with 250 mg of synthetic ACTH. Twenty two had Child-Pugh = 8 and 25 = 9. The prevalence of RAI in patients with stable cirrhosis was 22%. A higher incidence of RAI was observed in patients with a Child-Pugh = 9 (8/32) than in those with = 8 (3/13, p < 0.05). A correlation between salivary cortisol and basal plasma cortisol (r = 0.6, p < 0.0004) was observed. Finally, survival at 1 year (97%) and 3 years (91%) was significantly higher without RAI than those who developed this complication (79% and 51%, p < 0.05, respectively). In summary, the prevalence of RAI is frequent in patients with stable cirrhosis and that it is related to the severity of liver diseaseand increased mortality.

  14. Asymptomatic Congenital Hyperinsulinism due to a Glucokinase-Activating Mutation, Treated as Adrenal Insufficiency for Twelve Years

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Kae; Kyo, Chika; Kosugi, Rieko; Ogawa, Tatsuo; Inoue, Tatsuhide

    2017-01-01

    Congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI) caused by a glucokinase- (GCK-) activating mutation shows autosomal dominant inheritance, and its severity ranges from mild to severe. A 43-year-old female with asymptomatic hypoglycemia (47 mg/dL) was diagnosed as partial adrenal insufficiency and the administration of hydrocortisone (10 mg/day) was initiated. Twelve years later, her 8-month-old grandchild was diagnosed with CHI. Heterozygosity of exon 6 c.590T>C (p.M197T) was identified in a gene analysis of GCK, which was also detected in her son and herself. The identification of GCK-activating mutations in hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia patients may be useful for a deeper understanding of the pathophysiology involved and preventing unnecessary glucocorticoid therapy. PMID:28163940

  15. Sideroblastic anaemia and primary adrenal insufficiency due to a mitochondrial respiratory chain disorder in the absence of mtDNA deletion

    PubMed Central

    O'Grady, Michael J; Monavari, Ahmad A; Cotter, Melanie; Murphy, Nuala P

    2015-01-01

    A fatigued 8-year-old boy was found to have sideroblastic anaemia (haemoglobin 7.8 g/dL) which over time became transfusion dependent. Subtle neurological dysfunction, initially manifesting as mild spastic diplegia, was slowly progressive and ultimately led to wheelchair dependence. Elevated plasma lactate and urinary 3-methylglutaconate led to a muscle biopsy which confirmed partial complex IV deficiency. PCR in leucocytes and muscle was negative for mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions. Faltering growth prompted an insulin tolerance test which confirmed growth hormone sufficiency and adrenal insufficiency. Plasma renin was elevated and adrenal androgens were low, suggesting primary adrenal insufficiency. Glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement therapy was initiated. A renal tubular Fanconi syndrome and diabetes mellitus developed subsequently. Sideroblastic anaemia and primary adrenal insufficiency, both individually and collectively, are associated with mtDNA deletion; however, absence of the same does not exclude the possibility that sideroblastic anaemia and primary adrenal insufficiency are of mitochondrial origin. PMID:25721834

  16. Severe hyponatremia caused by hypothalamic adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Shibata, T; Oeda, T; Saito, Y

    1999-05-01

    A 60-year-old woman was admitted with severe hyponatremia. Basal values of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), thyroid hormone and cortisol were normal on admission. Impairment of water diuresis was observed by water loading test. Initially, we diagnosed her condition as the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). By provocation test, we finally confirmed that the hyponatremia was caused by hypothalamic adrenal insufficiency. The basal values of ACTH and cortisol might not be sufficient to exclude the possibility of adrenal insufficiency. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate adrenal function by provocation test or to re-evaluate it after recovery from hyponatremia.

  17. Delayed Diagnosis of Graves’ Thyrotoxicoisis Presenting as Recurrent Adrenal Crisis in Primary Adrenal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Dukhabandhu; Jebasingh, K Felix

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal crisis is a potential life threatening complication. The common causes of adrenal crisis are infections, surgical stress and abrupt cessation of steroid medications. Endocrine causes like Graves’ disease with thyrotoxicosis is one of the less common causes of an adrenal crisis. We report a 42-year-old female who presented with recurrent episodes of adrenal crisis due to delayed diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis. She was initially treated with Carbimazole followed by Radio-iodine ablation and currently she is euthyroid. Her adrenal insufficiency was initially treated with hydrocortisone during the time of adrenal crisis followed by Prednisolone 5 mg once daily in the morning along with fludrocortisone 50 mcg once daily. This case highlights the need for high index of suspicion and less common causes like thyrotoxicosis should be ruled out in patients with adrenal crisis. PMID:27190873

  18. Delay in Diagnosis of Adrenal Insufficiency Is a Frequent Cause of Adrenal Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Rabijewski, Michał

    2013-01-01

    Delay of diagnosis of primary adrenal insufficiency (PAI) leads to adrenal crisis which is potentially lethal complication. The objective of our work was an assessment whether the establishment of diagnosis of adrenocortical insufficiency in Poland is so much delayed as assessed in the past. We have analysed data from 60 patients with diagnosis of PAI established in our department during the past 12 years and who are still under our care. We found that the time to diagnosis of primary adrenal insufficiency in Poland exceeds 3 months in every patient and 6 months in patients admitted with symptoms of adrenal crisis. Forty-four percent of patients were diagnosed only just after the hospitalisation due to crisis, despite the evident signs and symptoms of PAI. Lack of appetite and loss of body weight occurred in all patients and for that reason a diagnosis of chronic gastric and duodenal ulcer disease was the most often incorrect diagnosis. After the proper diagnosis and treatment, in the course of 1–11 years of observation, there was only 6 imminent adrenal crises in 5 patients. Our results indicated that training of primary care physicians in the field of recognising and treatment of adrenal insufficiency is still essential. PMID:23864857

  19. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the adrenal gland: a rare cause of primary adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    de Sousa Lages, Adriana; Bastos, Margarida; Oliveira, Patrícia; Carrilho, Francisco

    2016-03-18

    Although it is a rare entity, primary lymphoma of the adrenal gland should be considered in the differential diagnosis of bilateral nodular adrenal lesions, particularly when there is evidence of associated adrenal insufficiency. We describe the case of an 83-year-old woman admitted to the emergency department due to a month's history of asthenia, weight loss, anorexia and nausea. Abdominopelvic CT showed bilateral nodular lesions of adrenal glands and a stimulation test with tetracosactide was compatible with primary adrenal insufficiency. CT-guided biopsy of the left adrenal gland was performed, and histopathological results were consistent with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Positron emission tomography (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose detected two intensely hypermetabolic lesions limited to both adrenal glands. Replacement therapy with hydrocortisone 15 mg/day and fludrocortisone 0.1 mg/day was promptly started and chemotherapy with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone was initiated after haematology-oncology consultation.

  20. Physiological Basis for the Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Adrenal Disorders: Cushing’s Syndrome, Adrenal Insufficiency, and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Raff, Hershel; Sharma, Susmeeta T.; Nieman, Lynnette K.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a classic neuroendocrine system. One of the best ways to understand the HPA axis is to appreciate its dynamics in the variety of diseases and syndromes that affect it. Excess glucocorticoid activity can be due to endogenous cortisol overproduction (spontaneous Cushing’s syndrome) or exogenous glucocorticoid therapy (iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome). Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome can be subdivided into ACTH-dependent and ACTH-independent, the latter of which is usually due to autonomous adrenal overproduction. The former can be due to a pituitary corticotroph tumor (usually benign) or ectopic ACTH production from tumors outside the pituitary; both of these tumor types overexpress the proopiomelanocortin gene. The converse of Cushing’s syndrome is the lack of normal cortisol secretion and is usually due to adrenal destruction (primary adrenal insufficiency) or hypopituitarism (secondary adrenal insufficiency). Secondary adrenal insufficiency can also result from a rapid discontinuation of long-term, pharmacological glucocorticoid therapy because of HPA axis suppression and adrenal atrophy. Finally, mutations in the steroidogenic enzymes of the adrenal cortex can lead to congenital adrenal hyperplasia and an increase in precursor steroids, particularly androgens. When present in utero, this can lead to masculinization of a female fetus. An understanding of the dynamics of the HPA axis is necessary to master the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of pituitary-adrenal diseases. Furthermore, understanding the pathophysiology of the HPA axis gives great insight into its normal control. PMID:24715566

  1. Adrenal insufficiency presenting as hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Seung Won; Kim, Tong Yoon; Lee, Sangmin; Jeong, Jeong Yeon; Shim, Hojoon; Han, Yu min; Choi, Kyu Eun; Shin, Seok Joon; Yoon, Hye Eun

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is an uncommon cause of hypercalcemia and not easily considered as an etiology of adrenal insufficiency in clinical practice, as not all cases of adrenal insufficiency manifest as hypercalcemia. We report a case of secondary adrenal insufficiency presenting as hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury in a 66-year-old female. The patient was admitted to the emergency department with general weakness and poor oral intake. Hypercalcemia (11.5 mg/dL) and moderate renal dysfunction (serum creatinine 4.9 mg/dL) were shown in her initial laboratory findings. Studies for malignancy and hyperparathyroidism showed negative results. Basal cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone levels and adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test confirmed the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency. With the administration of oral hydrocortisone, hypercalcemia was dramatically resolved within 3 days. This case shows that adrenal insufficiency may manifest as hypercalcemia and acute kidney injury, which implicates that adrenal insufficiency should be considered a cause of hypercalcemia in clinical practice. PMID:27536162

  2. Primary Adrenal Insufficiency Misdiagnosed as Hypothyroidism in a Patient with Polyglandular Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Upala, Sikarin; Yong, Wai Chung; Sanguankeo, Anawin

    2016-01-01

    Context: Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome is a rare condition that causes a variety of clinical symptoms due to autoimmune processes involving multiple endocrine organs. Its vague presentation can cause missed or delayed treatment for adrenal insufficiency, resulting in a life-threatening adrenal crisis. Case Report: A 21-yr-old man presented with lethargy, hypotension, hyponatremia, hypoglycemia, and an elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone level. He was binge drinking the day before presentation. No significant response to initial treatment with levothyroxine and dextrose occurred. Diagnostic workup later revealed primary adrenal insufficiency. All initial symptoms completely resolved following treatment with hydrocortisone, fludrocortisone, and levothyroxine. Conclusion: Autoimmune polyglandular syndrome causes dysfunction of multiple endocrine organs such as the thyroid gland, adrenal gland, and pancreas. Initial diagnosis of APS is crucial and difficult because of its vague, acute presentation, which often involves hypothyroidism and adrenal insufficiency. Delayed treatment of adrenal insufficiency can result in a life-threatening adrenal crisis. A diagnostic workup for adrenal insufficiency should be performed in patients who do not respond to hypothyroidism treatment. PMID:27298818

  3. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving a femur bone and bilateral adrenal glands alone with adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Iwahara, Yoshihito; Shinohara, Tsutomu; Naruse, Keishi; Komatsu, Yukihisa

    2017-01-31

    Primary bone lymphoma and primary adrenal lymphoma are rare clinicopathological entities of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). We present the first case of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with the involvement of a single bone and both adrenal glands alone with adrenal insufficiency. As primary extranodal NHL may have other unusual extranodal lesions, which may present unexplained clinical findings, patients with primary extranodal NHL require careful systemic examination, even when lymphadenopathy is absent.

  4. A Case Report of Bilateral Sarcomatoid Carcinoma of Adrenal Glands With Adrenal Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Noriyoshi; Nagase, Mamiko; Takami, Saki; Araki, Asuka; Ishikawa, Nahoko; Koike, Chiaki; Shiina, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Riruke

    2016-12-01

    Adrenocortical carcinomas are relatively rare, but they are considered to be highly aggressive malignant tumors. Sarcomatoid carcinomas represent an even more aggressive type. Bilateral malignant adrenal tumors are extraordinary rare, except for those that represent metastatic spread from a primary neoplasm. Here we report a case of a 69-year-old woman who presented symptoms that raised strong suspicions of adrenal insufficiency. Bilateral adrenal masses, identified in the imaging study, were responsible for the clinical manifestation and surgically resected. Surgical specimens of the bilateral adrenal tumors shared histological features compatible with sarcomatoid carcinoma. It was very difficult to confirm that the sarcomatoid carcinomas were derived from the cortex of the adrenal glands, but careful morphological observation and the panel of antibodies used for immunohistochemistry made the diagnosis possible. This is the first report of sarcomatoid carcinomas involving both adrenal glands. It should be emphasized that sarcomatoid carcinoma can arise bilaterally from even functionally impaired adrenal glands.

  5. Neurosarcoidosis-associated central diabetes insipidus masked by adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Non, Lemuel; Brito, Daniel; Anastasopoulou, Catherine

    2015-01-22

    Central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is an infrequent complication of neurosarcoidosis (NS). Its presentation may be masked by adrenal insufficiency (AI) and uncovered by subsequent steroid replacement. A 45-year-old woman with a history of NS presented 2 weeks after abrupt cessation of prednisone with nausea, vomiting, decreased oral intake and confusion. She was diagnosed with secondary AI and intravenous hydrocortisone was promptly begun. Over the next few days, however, the patient developed severe thirst and polyuria exceeding 6 L of urine per day, accompanied by hypernatraemia and hypo-osmolar urine. She was presumed to have CDI due to NS, and intranasal desmopressin was administered. This eventually normalised her urine output and serum sodium. The patient was discharged improved on intranasal desmopressin and oral prednisone. AI may mask the manifestation of CDI because low serum cortisol impairs renal-free water clearance. Steroid replacement reverses this process and unmasks an underlying CDI.

  6. Primary adrenal insufficiency in case of antiphospholipid syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sanyal, Debmalya; Raychaudhuri, Moutusi

    2013-01-01

    Addison's disease or primary adrenal insufficiency (PAI) is a rare manifestation of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). PAI is the most common among the endocrinologic manifestations and can also rarely be the presenting symptom of APS. Venous thrombosis and/or adrenal hemorrhage are the leading cause of PAI in APS. Autoimmune adrenal failure is postulated to be another possible mechanism. We report a case of PAI in a 44-year-old lady preceding primary APS, probably autoimmune, without any evidence of adrenal hemorrhage or infarction. High index of clinical suspicion for PAI in APS is needed; conversely APS should be considered as a possible pathogenetic process in patients presenting with Addison's disease where the etiology is not obvious. PMID:24251177

  7. Cushing syndrome due to adrenal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome. It occurs when a tumor of the adrenal gland releases excess amounts of the hormone cortisol. Causes ... hormone cortisol. This hormone is made in the adrenal glands . Too much cortisol can be due to various ...

  8. Mifepristone Accelerates HPA Axis Recovery in Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Cohan, Pejman

    2016-01-01

    Context. Transient secondary adrenal insufficiency (SAI) is an expected complication following successful adenomectomy of ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas or unilateral adrenalectomy for cortisol-secreting adrenal adenomas. To date, no pharmacological therapy has been shown to hasten recovery of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in this clinical scenario. Case Description. A 33-year-old woman underwent uncomplicated unilateral adrenalectomy for a 3.7 cm cortisol-secreting adrenal adenoma. Postoperatively, she developed SAI and was placed on hydrocortisone 15 mg/day, given in divided doses. In the ensuing six years, the patient's HPA axis failed to recover and she remained corticosteroid-dependent. Quarterly biochemical testing (after withholding hydrocortisone for 18 hours) consistently yielded undetectable serum cortisol and subnormal plasma ACTH levels. While she was on hydrocortisone 15 mg/day, mifepristone was initiated and gradually titrated to a maintenance dose of 600 mg/day after 5 months. Rapid recovery of the HPA axis was subsequently noted with ACTH rising into the supranormal range at 4 months followed by a subsequent rise in cortisol levels into the normal range. After 6 months, the dose of hydrocortisone and mifepristone was lowered and both were ultimately stopped after 8 months. The HPA axis remains normal after an additional 16 months of follow-up. Conclusion. Mifepristone successfully restored the HPA axis in a woman with prolonged secondary adrenal insufficiency (SAI) after adrenalectomy for Cushing's syndrome (CS).

  9. Mifepristone Accelerates HPA Axis Recovery in Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Context. Transient secondary adrenal insufficiency (SAI) is an expected complication following successful adenomectomy of ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas or unilateral adrenalectomy for cortisol-secreting adrenal adenomas. To date, no pharmacological therapy has been shown to hasten recovery of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in this clinical scenario. Case Description. A 33-year-old woman underwent uncomplicated unilateral adrenalectomy for a 3.7 cm cortisol-secreting adrenal adenoma. Postoperatively, she developed SAI and was placed on hydrocortisone 15 mg/day, given in divided doses. In the ensuing six years, the patient's HPA axis failed to recover and she remained corticosteroid-dependent. Quarterly biochemical testing (after withholding hydrocortisone for 18 hours) consistently yielded undetectable serum cortisol and subnormal plasma ACTH levels. While she was on hydrocortisone 15 mg/day, mifepristone was initiated and gradually titrated to a maintenance dose of 600 mg/day after 5 months. Rapid recovery of the HPA axis was subsequently noted with ACTH rising into the supranormal range at 4 months followed by a subsequent rise in cortisol levels into the normal range. After 6 months, the dose of hydrocortisone and mifepristone was lowered and both were ultimately stopped after 8 months. The HPA axis remains normal after an additional 16 months of follow-up. Conclusion. Mifepristone successfully restored the HPA axis in a woman with prolonged secondary adrenal insufficiency (SAI) after adrenalectomy for Cushing's syndrome (CS). PMID:27516913

  10. Clinical features of congenital adrenal insufficiency including growth patterns and significance of ACTH stimulation test.

    PubMed

    Koh, Ji Won; Kim, Gu Hwan; Yoo, Han Wook; Yu, Jeesuk

    2013-11-01

    Congenital adrenal insufficiency is caused by specific genetic mutations. Early suspicion and definite diagnosis are crucial because the disease can precipitate a life-threatening hypovolemic shock without prompt treatment. This study was designed to understand the clinical manifestations including growth patterns and to find the usefulness of ACTH stimulation test. Sixteen patients with confirmed genotyping were subdivided into three groups according to the genetic study results: congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (CAH, n=11), congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (n=3) and X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (n=2). Bone age advancement was prominent in patients with CAH especially after 60 months of chronologic age (n=6, 67%). They were diagnosed in older ages in group with bone age advancement (P<0.05). Comorbid conditions such as obesity, mental retardation, and central precocious puberty were also prominent in this group. In conclusion, this study showed the importance of understanding the clinical symptoms as well as genetic analysis for early diagnosis and management of congenital adrenal insufficiency. ACTH stimulation test played an important role to support the diagnosis and serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone levels were significantly elevated in all of the CAH patients. The test will be important for monitoring growth and puberty during follow up of patients with congenital adrenal insufficiency.

  11. Clinical Features of Congenital Adrenal Insufficiency Including Growth Patterns and Significance of ACTH Stimulation Test

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Ji Won; Kim, Gu Hwan; Yoo, Han Wook

    2013-01-01

    Congenital adrenal insufficiency is caused by specific genetic mutations. Early suspicion and definite diagnosis are crucial because the disease can precipitate a life-threatening hypovolemic shock without prompt treatment. This study was designed to understand the clinical manifestations including growth patterns and to find the usefulness of ACTH stimulation test. Sixteen patients with confirmed genotyping were subdivided into three groups according to the genetic study results: congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (CAH, n=11), congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (n=3) and X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (n=2). Bone age advancement was prominent in patients with CAH especially after 60 months of chronologic age (n=6, 67%). They were diagnosed in older ages in group with bone age advancement (P<0.05). Comorbid conditions such as obesity, mental retardation, and central precocious puberty were also prominent in this group. In conclusion, this study showed the importance of understanding the clinical symptoms as well as genetic analysis for early diagnosis and management of congenital adrenal insufficiency. ACTH stimulation test played an important role to support the diagnosis and serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone levels were significantly elevated in all of the CAH patients. The test will be important for monitoring growth and puberty during follow up of patients with congenital adrenal insufficiency. PMID:24265530

  12. A Case of Rathke's Cleft Cyst Associated with Transient Central Adrenal Insufficiency and Masked Diabetes Insipidus

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Rina; Niitsu, Yoshihiro; Sekine, Tetsuo; Niwa, Arisa; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Hirata, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman admitted to our hospital because of headache, poor appetite, malaise, weight loss, and vomiting was found to have central adrenal insufficiency and thyrotoxicosis due to silent thyroiditis. Polyuria developed after replacement with glucocorticoid (masked diabetes insipidus), which was controlled with nasal administration of desmopressin. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a large cystic pituitary mass (18 × 18 × 12 mm) extending suprasellarly to the optic chiasm. Transsphenoidal surgery revealed that the pituitary tumor was Rathke's cleft cyst. Following surgery, replacement with neither glucocorticoid nor desmopressin was needed any more. Therefore, it is suggested that Rathke's cleft cyst is responsible for the masked diabetes insipidus and the central insufficiency. Furthermore, it is speculated that thyrotoxicosis with painless thyroiditis might induce changes from subclinical adrenal insufficiency to transiently overt insufficiency. PMID:25431697

  13. Megace Mystery: A Case of Central Adrenal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Kunal; Weiss, Irene; Goldberg, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Megestrol acetate (MA) is a synthetic progestin with both antineoplastic and orexigenic properties. In addition to its effects on the progesterone receptor, MA also binds the glucocorticoid receptor. Some patients receiving MA therapy have been reported to develop clinical features of glucocorticoid excess, while others have experienced the clinical syndrome of cortisol deficiency—either following withdrawal of MA therapy or during active treatment. We describe a patient who presented with clinical and biochemical features of central adrenal insufficiency. Pituitary function was otherwise essentially normal, and the etiology of the isolated ACTH suppression was initially unclear. The use of an exogenous glucocorticoid was suspected but was initially denied by the patient; ultimately, the culprit medication was uncovered when a synthetic steroid screen revealed the presence of MA. The patient's symptoms improved after she was switched to hydrocortisone. Clinicians should be aware of the potential effects of MA on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. PMID:26770843

  14. Recovery of Adrenal Function in Patients with Glucocorticoids Induced Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jong Ha; Kim, Soo Kyoung; Jung, Jung Hwa; Hahm, Jong Ryeal

    2016-01-01

    Background The chronic use of glucocorticoids (GC) suppresses function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and often results in secondary adrenal insufficiency (AI). The present study aimed to determine the recovery rate of adrenal function in patients with secondary AI within 1 to 2 years and to assess the factors predictive of adrenal function recovery. Methods This was a retrospective observational study that enrolled patients diagnosed with GC-induced secondary AI between 2007 and 2013. AI was defined by peak serum cortisol levels <18 µg/dL during a standard-dose short synacthen test (SST). A follow-up SST was performed after 1 to 2 years, and responders were defined as those with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-stimulated peak serum cortisol levels ≥18 µg/dL. Results Of the total 34 patients diagnosed with GC-induced secondary AI at first, 20 patients (58.8%) recovered normal adrenal function by the time of the follow-up SST (median follow-up period, 16.5 months). Although the baseline serum ACTH and cortisol levels at the first SST did not differ between responders and non-responders, the incremental cortisol response during the first SST was higher in responders than that of non-responders (7.88 vs. 3.56, P<0.01). Additionally, higher cortisol increments during the first SST were an independent predictive factor of the adrenal function recovery (odds ratio, 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 2.46; P<0.05). Conclusion In the present study, adrenal function recovery was achieved frequently in patients with GC-induced secondary AI within 1 to 2 years. Additionally, an incremental cortisol response at the first SST may be an important predictive factor of adrenal function recovery. PMID:26676337

  15. A De Novo Arisen Case of Primary Adrenal Insufficiency in an Adolescent Patient With Crohn Disease

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yun; Mao, Ren; Chen, Min-hu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Several recent population-based studies have demonstrated that patients with inflammatory bowel disease are likely to have other autoimmune diseases. Here we describe the first de novo arisen case of primary adrenal insufficiency in an adolescent female patient with Crohn disease (CD). A 17-year-old female diagnosed with stricturing colonic CD received the maintenance regimen of Remicade (infliximab) 5 mg/kg every 8 weeks following the standard induction regimen. She had an ileocecostomy due to acute small bowel obstruction at 1.5-year since the last infusion of Remicade. She was presented with skin hyperpigmentation of her face, neck, upper limbs, buccal mucosa and lips, which worsened when commenced on 6-mercaptopurine treatment for prophylaxis of postoperative recurrence. An increased adrenocorticotropic hormone (20.3 pmol/L, range 2–11) measurement was obtained. Radiography of the sella turcica region showed no signs of pituitary disease, or abnormality of bilateral adrenal cortex. Since serum aldosterone was below the reference range, more importantly, assessments for both antiadrenal antibodies and anti-21-hydroxylase antibodies were positive, she was then diagnosed as primary adrenal insufficiency. The symptoms improved after supplement of hydrocortisone. This case highlights a rare immune-mediated comorbidity in an adolescent patient with CD. Recognition of a new pattern of autoimmune endocrine comorbidity enables clinicians to be alert about the possibility of concurrence of primary adrenal insufficiency with CD. PMID:26061303

  16. Adrenal Insufficiency under Standard Dosage of Glucocorticoid Replacement after Unilateral Adrenalectomy for Cushing's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Kentaro; Kurihara, Isao; Hiratsuka, Ken; Sato, Seiji; Yokota, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Sakiko; Shibata, Hirotaka; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid replacement is needed for patients after adrenal surgery for Cushing's syndrome; however, the adequate dosage is not easily determined. The patient was a 62-year-old woman who has had hypertension for 5 years and presented with heart failure due to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. She consulted with us because of general fatigue, facial edema, and muscle weakness and was diagnosed with Cushing's syndrome. A laparoscopic left adrenalectomy was performed, standard dosage of postoperative replacement was administered, and she was discharged with 30 mg/day of hydrocortisone (cortisol). However, she suffered from loss of appetite and was transferred to an emergency unit with the symptoms of adrenal insufficiency on postoperative day 15. After initial hydrocortisone replacement with 200 mg/day, the dosage was gradually decreased during hospitalization; however, reduction of hydrocortisone dosage lower than 60 mg/day was difficult because of nausea and fatigue. Her circadian cortisol profile after hydrocortisone administration showed delayed and lowered peaks, which suggested that hydrocortisone absorption in the intestine was impaired. Therefore, complicated heart failure may have led to the adrenal insufficiency in the patient. In such cases, we should consider postoperative administration of more than the standard dosage of hydrocortisone to avoid adrenal insufficiency after surgery for Cushing's syndrome. PMID:27375907

  17. Delayed adrenal insufficiency long after unilateral adrenalectomy: prolonged glucocorticoid therapy reduced reserved secretory capacity of cortisol.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Itsuro; Komatsu, Yasuhiro; Ohiwa, Takafumi; Sanayama, Kyo; Nagata, Mikio

    2005-06-01

    A 51-year-old woman with Cushing's syndrome underwent unilateral adrenalectomy for left adrenal adenoma. After 7 years of prednisolone treatment (with some interruptions), followed by 4 years of total withdrawal from prednisolone treatment, she presented with hypotension, weight loss, general fatigue, nausea, hyponatremia and hypoglycemia. These clinical features together with a low response in the rapid adrenocorticotropic hormone test led to the diagnosis of acute adrenal insufficiency. Relatively low serum adrenocorticotropic hormone levels in the face of increased demand for cortisol during adrenal crisis suggested a disordered hypothalamic-pituitary function, indicating secondary adrenal insufficiency. This patient demonstrated the etiology of acute adrenal insufficiency long after unilateral adrenalectomy in association with subsequent glucocorticoid therapy. A reduction in the reserved secretory capacity of cortisol after prolonged prednisolone treatment was considered to have induced secondary adrenal insufficiency, even after 4 years of total withdrawal from prednisolone.

  18. Acute adrenal insufficiency secondary to bilateral adrenal B-cell lymphoma: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    De Miguel Sánchez, Carlos; Ruiz, Luis; González, Jose Luis; Hernández, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Primary adrenal lymphoma is an extremely rare entity which constitutes less than 1% of extranodal lymphomas. Most cases present with bilateral adrenal masses and without extraadrenal involvement, which can lead to symptoms of adrenal insufficiency. The prognosis is usually poor and chemotherapy is the first-line treatment option. We report here on a 78-year-old man admitted to our Internal Medicine Department because of constitutional symptoms and high fever spikes. He was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency and a CT-scan revealed bilateral adrenal masses of about 6 cm in diameter. A percutaneous biopsy was performed and the histological exam was consistent with diffuse large B cell lymphoma. A review of the literature of this unusual entity was also carried out. PMID:27170834

  19. The use of inhaled corticosteroids and the risk of adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Lapi, Francesco; Kezouh, Abbas; Suissa, Samy; Ernst, Pierre

    2013-07-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is a potential complication of therapy with an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS). Although prior studies found the highest risk of adrenal insufficiency with fluticasone, a more potent ICS, these results might be explained by a channelling bias and concomitant exposure to oral corticosteroids. We re-examined the relationship between the use of ICSs and adrenal insufficiency by using a cohort of patients treated for respiratory conditions during 1990-2005, identified in the healthcare databases from the province of Quebec, Canada, with follow-up until 2007. A nested case-control analysis was performed within this cohort. Cases of adrenal insufficiency were matched with up to 10 controls. 392 cases were identified (incidence rate 1.1 per 10 000 person-years). Although the rate of adrenal insufficiency was not significantly higher among all current users of ICSs, patients receiving the highest dosages showed a greater risk (OR 1.84, 95% CI 1.16-2.90). Consistently, an increased risk was estimated for the highest tertile of ICS dose (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.07-3.37) cumulated in the year before the event. ICS at high doses appear to be a significant independent risk factor for adrenal insufficiency. Physicians prescribing ICS at such dosages should be sensitive to the signs and symptoms of adrenal insufficiency in their patients.

  20. Alacrima as a Harbinger of Adrenal Insufficiency in a Child with Allgrove (AAA) Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Brande; Agdere, Levon; Muntean, Cornelia; David, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 6 Final Diagnosis: Allgrove syndrome Symptoms: Achalasia • adrenal insufficiency • alacrima Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Pediatrics and Neonatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Allgrove syndrome, or triple “A” syndrome (3A syndrome), is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome with variable phenotype, and an estimated prevalence of 1 per 1,000,000 individuals. Patients usually display the triad of achalasia, alacrima, and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) insensitive adrenal insufficiency, though the presentation is inconsistent. Case Report: Here, the authors report a case of Allgrove syndrome in a pediatric patient with delayed diagnosis in order to raise awareness of this potentially fatal disease as a differential diagnosis of alacrima. Conclusions: The prevalence of Allgrove syndrome may be much higher as a result of underdiagnosis and missed diagnosis due to the variable presentation and sudden unexplained childhood death from adrenal crisis. The authors review the characteristic symptoms of Allgrove syndrome in relation to the case study in order to avoid missed or delayed diagnosis, potentially decreasing morbidity, and mortality in those affected by this disease. PMID:27698338

  1. Rare Causes of Primary Adrenal Insufficiency: Genetic and Clinical Characterization of a Large Nationwide Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Buonocore, Federica; Saka, Nurcin; Ozbek, Mehmet Nuri; Aycan, Zehra; Bereket, Abdullah; Bas, Firdevs; Darcan, Sukran; Bideci, Aysun; Guven, Ayla; Demir, Korcan; Akinci, Aysehan; Buyukinan, Muammer; Aydin, Banu Kucukemre; Turan, Serap; Agladioglu, Sebahat Yilmaz; Atay, Zeynep; Abali, Zehra Yavas; Tarim, Omer; Catli, Gonul; Yuksel, Bilgin; Akcay, Teoman; Yildiz, Metin; Ozen, Samim; Doger, Esra; Demirbilek, Huseyin; Ucar, Ahmet; Isik, Emregul; Ozhan, Bayram; Bolu, Semih; Ozgen, Ilker Tolga; Suntharalingham, Jenifer P.; Achermann, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Primary adrenal insufficiency (PAI) is a life-threatening condition that is often due to monogenic causes in children. Although congenital adrenal hyperplasia occurs commonly, several other important molecular causes have been reported, often with overlapping clinical and biochemical features. The relative prevalence of these conditions is not known, but making a specific diagnosis can have important implications for management. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate the clinical and molecular genetic characteristics of a nationwide cohort of children with PAI of unknown etiology. Design: A structured questionnaire was used to evaluate clinical, biochemical, and imaging data. Genetic analysis was performed using Haloplex capture and next-generation sequencing. Patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, adrenoleukodystrophy, autoimmune adrenal insufficiency, or obvious syndromic PAI were excluded. Setting: The study was conducted in 19 tertiary pediatric endocrinology clinics. Patients: Ninety-five children (48 females, aged 0–18 y, eight familial) with PAI of unknown etiology participated in the study. Results: A genetic diagnosis was obtained in 77 patients (81%). The range of etiologies was as follows: MC2R (n = 25), NR0B1 (n = 12), STAR (n = 11), CYP11A1 (n = 9), MRAP (n = 9), NNT (n = 7), ABCD1 (n = 2), NR5A1 (n = 1), and AAAS (n = 1). Recurrent mutations occurred in several genes, such as c.560delT in MC2R, p.R451W in CYP11A1, and c.IVS3ds+1delG in MRAP. Several important clinical and molecular insights emerged. Conclusion: This is the largest nationwide study of the molecular genetics of childhood PAI undertaken. Achieving a molecular diagnosis in more than 80% of children has important translational impact for counseling families, presymptomatic diagnosis, personalized treatment (eg, mineralocorticoid replacement), predicting comorbidities (eg, neurological, puberty/fertility), and targeting clinical genetic testing in the

  2. Hypopituitarism Presenting as Adrenal Insufficiency and Hypothyroidism in a Patient with Wilson's Disease: a Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae Won; Kang, Jin Du; Yeo, Chang Woo; Yoon, Sung Woon; Lee, Kwang Jae; Choi, Mun Ki

    2016-08-01

    Wilson's disease typically presents symptoms associated with liver damage or neuropsychiatric disturbances, while endocrinologic abnormalities are rare. We report an unprecedented case of hypopituitarism in a patient with Wilson's disease. A 40-year-old woman presented with depression, general weakness and anorexia. Laboratory tests and imaging studies were compatible with liver cirrhosis due to Wilson's disease. Basal hormone levels and pituitary function tests indicated secondary hypothyroidism and adrenal insufficiency due to hypopituitarism. Brain MRI showed T2 hyperintense signals in both basal ganglia and midbrain but the pituitary imaging was normal. She is currently receiving chelation therapy along with thyroid hormone and steroid replacement. There may be a relationship between Wilson's disease and hypopituitarism. Copper deposition or secondary neuronal damage in the pituitary may be a possible explanation for this theory.

  3. Hypopituitarism Presenting as Adrenal Insufficiency and Hypothyroidism in a Patient with Wilson's Disease: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Wilson's disease typically presents symptoms associated with liver damage or neuropsychiatric disturbances, while endocrinologic abnormalities are rare. We report an unprecedented case of hypopituitarism in a patient with Wilson's disease. A 40-year-old woman presented with depression, general weakness and anorexia. Laboratory tests and imaging studies were compatible with liver cirrhosis due to Wilson's disease. Basal hormone levels and pituitary function tests indicated secondary hypothyroidism and adrenal insufficiency due to hypopituitarism. Brain MRI showed T2 hyperintense signals in both basal ganglia and midbrain but the pituitary imaging was normal. She is currently receiving chelation therapy along with thyroid hormone and steroid replacement. There may be a relationship between Wilson's disease and hypopituitarism. Copper deposition or secondary neuronal damage in the pituitary may be a possible explanation for this theory. PMID:27478349

  4. A De Novo Arisen Case of Primary Adrenal Insufficiency in an Adolescent Patient With Crohn Disease: A Case report.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yun; Mao, Ren; Chen, Min-hu

    2015-06-01

    Several recent population-based studies have demonstrated that patients with inflammatory bowel disease are likely to have other autoimmune diseases. Here we describe the first de novo arisen case of primary adrenal insufficiency in an adolescent female patient with Crohn disease (CD). A 17-year-old female diagnosed with stricturing colonic CD received the maintenance regimen of Remicade (infliximab) 5 mg/kg every 8 weeks following the standard induction regimen. She had an ileocecostomy due to acute small bowel obstruction at 1.5-year since the last infusion of Remicade. She was presented with skin hyperpigmentation of her face, neck, upper limbs, buccal mucosa and lips, which worsened when commenced on 6-mercaptopurine treatment for prophylaxis of postoperative recurrence. An increased adrenocorticotropic hormone (20.3 pmol/L, range 2-11) measurement was obtained. Radiography of the sella turcica region showed no signs of pituitary disease, or abnormality of bilateral adrenal cortex. Since serum aldosterone was below the reference range, more importantly, assessments for both antiadrenal antibodies and anti-21-hydroxylase antibodies were positive, she was then diagnosed as primary adrenal insufficiency. The symptoms improved after supplement of hydrocortisone. This case highlights a rare immune-mediated comorbidity in an adolescent patient with CD. Recognition of a new pattern of autoimmune endocrine comorbidity enables clinicians to be alert about the possibility of concurrence of primary adrenal insufficiency with CD.

  5. An acute adrenal insufficiency revealing pituitary metastases of lung cancer in an elderly patient

    PubMed Central

    Marmouch, Hela; Arfa, Sondes; Mohamed, Saoussen Cheikh; Slim, Tensim; Khochtali, Ines

    2016-01-01

    Metastases of solid tumors to the pituitary gland are often asymptomatic or appereas as with diabetes insipid us. Pituitary metastases more commonly affect the posterior lobe and the infundibulum than the anterior lobe. The presentation with an acute adrenal insufficiency is a rare event. A 69-year-old men presented with vomiting, low blood pressure and hypoglycemia. Hormonal exploration confirmed a hypopituitarism. Appropriate therapy was initiated urgently. The hypothalamic-pituitary MRI showed a pituitary hypertrophy, a nodular thickening of the pituitary stalk. The chest X Rays revealed pulmonary opacity. Computed tomography scan of the chest showed a multiples tumors with mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Bronchoscopy and biopsy demonstrated a pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Hence we concluded to a lung cancer with multiple pituitary and adrenal gland metastases. This case emphasizes the need for an etiological investigation of acute adrenal insufficiency after treatment of acute phase. PMID:27200139

  6. Chronic oral exposure to bunker C fuel oil causes adrenal insufficiency in ranch mink (Mustela vison).

    PubMed

    Mohr, F C; Lasley, B; Bursian, S

    2008-02-01

    Animals living in the near-shore marine environment are predisposed to contact with chemical contaminants through land- and ocean-based activities. The release of petroleum hydrocarbons into the marine environment is a stressor to this environment and its resident wildlife. The stress response to chemical threats is dependent on an intact hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, which also may be a target to the effects of these chemicals. Ranch mink (Mustela vison) were used as surrogates for sea otters (Enhydra lutris) to examine the development of adrenal hypertrophy after chronic, oral exposure to low concentrations of bunker C fuel oil. Animals were fed three different concentrations of fuel oil (48, 520, and 908 ppm) or mineral oil (control) for 60-62 days. At the end of the exposure, blood and fecal samples were collected and organs were weighed and examined microscopically. In all fuel oil groups, exposure resulted in adrenal hypertrophy, an adaptation suggestive of adrenal activation. However, concentrations of serum and fecal glucocorticoids and serum progesterone were not elevated over control values. Hematologic parameters and serum chemistries showed no changes consistent with increased adrenal activity. In addition, adrenal glands from animals fed the higher concentrations of fuel oil contained large numbers of heavily vacuolated cells. We conclude that petroleum hydrocarbons are inducing an adrenal insufficiency that leads to the adaptive enlargement of the gland. This would increase the susceptibility of fuel oil-exposed animals to the deleterious effects of other environmental stressors.

  7. Cosyntropin-Stimulated Serum Free Cortisol in Healthy, Adrenally Insufficient, and Mildly Cirrhotic Populations

    PubMed Central

    Rauschecker, Mitra; Abraham, Smita Baid; Abel, Brent S.; Wesley, Robert; Saverino, Elizabeth; Trivedi, Apurva; Heller, Theo

    2016-01-01

    Context: Serum free cortisol (SFF) responses to cosyntropin simulation test (CST) may more accurately assess adrenal function than total cortisol (TF). Objective: The objective of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic utility of SFF responses during a 250-μg CST. Design: We recruited healthy volunteers (HV; n = 27), patients with primary and secondary adrenal insufficiency (n = 19 and n = 24, respectively), and subjects with Child-Pugh class A cirrhosis (CH; n = 15). Each received 250 μg cosyntropin with measurement of ACTH and corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) at time 0 and TF and SFF at 0, 30, and 60 minutes. Salivary cortisol was measured at all time points in CH subjects. Results: Peak SFF and TF were significantly higher in HVs vs both AI groups (P < .05). Peak SFF and TF (6.8 μg/dL vs 2.2 μg/dL; [188 nmol/L vs 62 nmol/L]; P < .01) were significantly higher in the secondary adrenal insufficiency vs primary adrenal insufficiency patients. The optimal peak SFF criterion to identify adrenal insufficiency patients vs HV was 0.9 μg/dL (25 nmol/L) (sensitivity of 95%, specificity of 100%). Mean CBG and albumin levels were similar among all four groups. CH patients had a higher peak SFF than HV (2.4 vs 2.0 μg/dL; P = .02. In the CH patients, peak salivary cortisol levels correlated well with peak SFF (rs = 0.84, P = .005). CBG levels were similar among the groups. Conclusion: We provide normative data for SFF values in HV and AI during the CST. Normal CBG levels in mild cirrhosis did not affect the interpretation of the CST. PMID:26647150

  8. Genetics Home Reference: congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... collectively called congenital adrenal hyperplasia) that affect the adrenal glands . The adrenal glands are located on top of the kidneys and ... CAH due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency, the adrenal glands produce excess androgens, which are male sex hormones. ...

  9. [Primary hyperaldosteronism due to unilateral adrenal hyperplasia with surgical resolution].

    PubMed

    Rubio-Puchol, O; Garzón-Pastor, S; Salom-Vendrell, C; Hernández-Mijares, A

    Unilateral adrenal hyperplasia is a rare cause of primary hyperaldosteronism (around a 3%) that has surgical treatment. A case of a patient with hypertension resistant to conventional therapy in treatment with 7 drugs who presented with primary hyperaldosteronism due to unilateral adrenal hyperplasia is presented. A left adrenalectomy was performed, and the patient had a good clinical response, with no need of any drug after 2 years of surgery. Unilateral adrenal hyperplasia is a different entity and it is not an asymmetric variant of the bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. In the study of patients with primary hyperaldosteronism and imaging tests with absence of adenoma is a diagnosis that must be considered before cataloguing patients with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia and start a medical treatment, because unilateral adrenal hyperplasia would have a surgical resolution.

  10. Endocrine and metabolic emergencies in children: hypocalcemia, hypoglycemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    It is important to fast diagnosis and management of the pediatric patients of the endocrine metabolic emergencies because the signs and symptoms of these disorders are nonspecific. Delayed diagnosis and treatment may lead to serious consequences of the pediatric patients, for example, cerebral dysfunction leading to coma or death of the patients with hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, or diabetic ketoacidosis. The index of suspicion of the endocrine metabolic emergencies should be preceded prior to the starting nonspecific treatment. Importantly, proper diagnosis depends on the collection of blood and urine specimen before nonspecific therapy (intravenous hydration, electrolytes, glucose or calcium injection). At the same time, the taking of precise history and searching for pathognomonic physical findings should be performed. This review was described for fast diagnosis and proper management of hypoglycemic emergencies, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis. PMID:26817004

  11. Sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase mutations cause primary adrenal insufficiency and steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rathi; Hadjidemetriou, Irene; Maharaj, Avinaash; Meimaridou, Eirini; Buonocore, Federica; Saleem, Moin; Hurcombe, Jenny; Bierzynska, Agnieszka; Barbagelata, Eliana; Bergadá, Ignacio; Cassinelli, Hamilton; Das, Urmi; Krone, Ruth; Hacihamdioglu, Bulent; Sari, Erkan; Yesilkaya, Ediz; Storr, Helen L; Clemente, Maria; Fernandez-Cancio, Monica; Camats, Nuria; Ram, Nanik; Achermann, John C; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Guasti, Leonardo; Braslavsky, Debora; Guran, Tulay; Metherell, Louise A

    2017-03-01

    Primary adrenal insufficiency is life threatening and can present alone or in combination with other comorbidities. Here, we have described a primary adrenal insufficiency syndrome and steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome caused by loss-of-function mutations in sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (SGPL1). SGPL1 executes the final decisive step of the sphingolipid breakdown pathway, mediating the irreversible cleavage of the lipid-signaling molecule sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Mutations in other upstream components of the pathway lead to harmful accumulation of lysosomal sphingolipid species, which are associated with a series of conditions known as the sphingolipidoses. In this work, we have identified 4 different homozygous mutations, c.665G>A (p.R222Q), c.1633_1635delTTC (p.F545del), c.261+1G>A (p.S65Rfs*6), and c.7dupA (p.S3Kfs*11), in 5 families with the condition. In total, 8 patients were investigated, some of whom also manifested other features, including ichthyosis, primary hypothyroidism, neurological symptoms, and cryptorchidism. Sgpl1-/- mice recapitulated the main characteristics of the human disease with abnormal adrenal and renal morphology. Sgpl1-/- mice displayed disrupted adrenocortical zonation and defective expression of steroidogenic enzymes as well as renal histology in keeping with a glomerular phenotype. In summary, we have identified SGPL1 mutations in humans that perhaps represent a distinct multisystemic disorder of sphingolipid metabolism.

  12. Sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase mutations cause primary adrenal insufficiency and steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Rathi; Hadjidemetriou, Irene; Meimaridou, Eirini; Buonocore, Federica; Saleem, Moin; Hurcombe, Jenny; Bierzynska, Agnieszka; Barbagelata, Eliana; Bergadá, Ignacio; Cassinelli, Hamilton; Das, Urmi; Krone, Ruth; Hacihamdioglu, Bulent; Sari, Erkan; Yesilkaya, Ediz; Storr, Helen L.; Clemente, Maria; Fernandez-Cancio, Monica; Camats, Nuria; Ram, Nanik; Achermann, John C.; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; Guasti, Leonardo; Braslavsky, Debora; Guran, Tulay; Metherell, Louise A.

    2017-01-01

    Primary adrenal insufficiency is life threatening and can present alone or in combination with other comorbidities. Here, we have described a primary adrenal insufficiency syndrome and steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome caused by loss-of-function mutations in sphingosine-1-phosphate lyase (SGPL1). SGPL1 executes the final decisive step of the sphingolipid breakdown pathway, mediating the irreversible cleavage of the lipid-signaling molecule sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P). Mutations in other upstream components of the pathway lead to harmful accumulation of lysosomal sphingolipid species, which are associated with a series of conditions known as the sphingolipidoses. In this work, we have identified 4 different homozygous mutations, c.665G>A (p.R222Q), c.1633_1635delTTC (p.F545del), c.261+1G>A (p.S65Rfs*6), and c.7dupA (p.S3Kfs*11), in 5 families with the condition. In total, 8 patients were investigated, some of whom also manifested other features, including ichthyosis, primary hypothyroidism, neurological symptoms, and cryptorchidism. Sgpl1–/– mice recapitulated the main characteristics of the human disease with abnormal adrenal and renal morphology. Sgpl1–/– mice displayed disrupted adrenocortical zonation and defective expression of steroidogenic enzymes as well as renal histology in keeping with a glomerular phenotype. In summary, we have identified SGPL1 mutations in humans that perhaps represent a distinct multisystemic disorder of sphingolipid metabolism. PMID:28165343

  13. Corticotropin-releasing hormone links pituitary adrenocorticotropin gene expression and release during adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Muglia, L J; Jacobson, L; Luedke, C; Vogt, S K; Schaefer, M L; Dikkes, P; Fukuda, S; Sakai, Y; Suda, T; Majzoub, J A

    2000-05-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)-deficient (KO) mice provide a unique system to define the role of CRH in regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Despite several manifestations of chronic glucocorticoid insufficiency, basal pituitary proopiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) peptide content within the pituitary, and plasma ACTH concentrations are not elevated in CRH KO mice. The normal POMC mRNA content in KO mice is dependent upon residual glucocorticoid secretion, as it increases in both KO and WT mice after adrenalectomy; this increase is reversed by glucocorticoid, but not aldosterone, replacement. However, the normal plasma levels of ACTH in CRH KO mice are not dependent upon residual glucocorticoid secretion, because, after adrenalectomy, these levels do not undergo the normal increase seen in KO mice despite the increase in POMC mRNA content. Administration of CRH restores ACTH secretion to its expected high level in adrenalectomized CRH KO mice. Thus, in adrenal insufficiency, loss of glucocorticoid feedback by itself can increase POMC gene expression in the pituitary; but CRH action is essential for this to result in increased secretion of ACTH. This may explain why, after withdrawal of chronic glucocorticoid treatment, reactivation of CRH secretion is a necessary prerequisite for recovery from suppression of the HPA axis.

  14. Adrenal Insufficiency as a Result of Ritonavir and Exogenous Steroid Exposure: Report of 6 Cases and Recommendation for Management.

    PubMed

    Wood, Brian R; Lacy, John Matthew; Johnston, Christine; Weigle, David S; Dhanireddy, Shireesha

    2015-01-01

    Numerous cases of Cushing syndrome have been reported as a result of the interaction between ritonavir (RTV) and exogenous steroid medications. Another complication that frequently occurs is secondary adrenal insufficiency, which can be profound and has not been well described. Here, we report 6 cases of adrenal suppression caused by RTV and exogenous steroids, all of which required corticosteroid replacement therapy and 2 of which were severe enough to require hospitalization. These cases add to the body of literature on the dangerous interaction between RTV and corticosteroids and highlight the risk of secondary adrenal suppression. We also review the literature on this complication and make a recommendation for managing and monitoring such cases.

  15. Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Adrenal Insufficiency in a General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ye Yeon; Cho, Nan Hee; Lee, Jong Won; Kim, Nam Kyung; Kim, Hye Soon

    2017-01-01

    Background Adrenal insufficiency (AI) is a life-threatening disorder caused by the deficiency of adrenal steroid hormones. This retrospective cross-sectional study investigated the characteristics of patients with AI in Korea. Methods All consecutive patients with suspected AI who received care at a tertiary referral center in Korea in 2014 and underwent adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation or insulin-tolerance testing were identified through a review of medical charts. Patients diagnosed with AI were enrolled. Their demographic, clinical, and treatment details were extracted. Results Of 771 patients with suspected AI, 183 (23.7%) received a definitive diagnosis. The most common reason for testing was the presence of suspicious AI-related symptoms (30.0%), followed by a history of steroid medications (23.5%). Their mean age was 66.7 years, and females predominated (67.8%). The most common symptoms were general weakness, anorexia, arthralgia, and fever. Approximately half (53.6%) had a history of steroid use. Hydrocortisone was the most common treatment (71.6%), with most patients taking a 30 mg dose (44.2%). The most common dose frequency was twice a day (78.6%). Fourteen patients were treated for adrenal crisis (n=10, 5.5%) or an intercurrent illness (n=4, 2.2%). Conclusion AI may have been caused by steroid medication use in many of the patients included in this study. The detection of AI can be improved by careful history-taking and being alert to the possibility that a patient has used steroids. PMID:28256113

  16. Prednisolone is associated with a worse lipid profile than hydrocortisone in patients with adrenal insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ekman, Bertil; Marelli, Claudio; Uddin, Sharif; Zelissen, Pierre; Murray, Robert D

    2017-01-01

    Objective Prednisolone is used as glucocorticoid replacement therapy for adrenal insufficiency (AI). Recent data indicate that its use in AI is associated with low bone mineral density. Data on risk factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with AI treated with prednisolone are scarce, despite this condition being the predominant cause of excess mortality. We aimed to address this question using real-world data from the European Adrenal Insufficiency Registry (EU-AIR). Design/methods EU-AIR, comprising of 19 centres across Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden and the UK, commenced enrolling patients with AI in August 2012. Patients receiving prednisolone (3–6 mg/day, n = 50) or hydrocortisone (15–30 mg/day, n = 909) were identified and grouped at a ratio of 1:3 (prednisolone:hydrocortisone) by matching for gender, age, duration and type of disease. Data from baseline and follow-up visits were analysed. Data from patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia were excluded. Results Significantly higher mean ± s.d. total (6.3 ± 1.6 vs 5.4 ± 1.1 mmol/L; P = 0.003) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels (3.9 ± 1.4 vs 3.2 ± 1.0 mmol/L; P = 0.013) were identified in 47 patients on prednisolone vs 141 receiving hydrocortisone at baseline and at follow-up (P = 0.005 and P = 0.006, respectively). HbA1c, high-density lipoprotein and triglyceride levels, body mass index, systolic and diastolic blood pressure and waist circumference were not significantly different. Conclusions This is the first matched analysis of its kind. Significantly higher LDL levels in patients receiving prednisolone relative to hydrocortisone could predict a higher relative risk of cardiovascular disease in the former group. PMID:27864317

  17. Current practice of glucocorticoid replacement therapy and patient-perceived health outcomes in adrenal insufficiency - a worldwide patient survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim was to survey current practice in glucocorticoid replacement therapy and self-perceived health outcomes in patients with adrenal insufficiency. Methods Participants were recruited via patient organizations to respond anonymously to a web-based survey developed by clinical experts. Unique entries were set up for each patient organization enabling geographical localization of the entries. Results 1245 participants responded (primary adrenal insufficiency: 84%; secondary adrenal insufficiency: 11%; unsure: 5%). Therapies included hydrocortisone (75%), prednisone/prednisolone (11%), cortisone acetate (6%) and dexamethasone (4%). Dosing regimens were once daily (10%), twice daily (42%), thrice daily (32%) or other (17%). Compromised subjective health necessitating changes to physical activity or social-, work- or family life was reported by 64% of the participants. 40% of the participants reported absence from work/school in the last 3 months. Irrespective of diagnosis, 76% were concerned about long-term side-effects of therapy, mainly osteoporosis (78%), obesity (64%) and cardiovascular morbidity (46%). 38% of the participants had been hospitalized in the last year. Conclusions Glucocorticoid replacement therapy among the respondents consisted primarily of hydrocortisone administered twice or thrice daily. A majority reported impact of their disease or treatment on subjective health requiring alterations in e.g. physical activity or family life. Three quarters reported concerns about long-term side-effects of the treatment. These data demonstrate - from the patients' perspective - a need for improvement in the management of adrenal insufficiency. PMID:22695167

  18. Diagnosis and Treatment of Primary Adrenal Insufficiency: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Bornstein, Stefan R.; Allolio, Bruno; Arlt, Wiebke; Barthel, Andreas; Don-Wauchope, Andrew; Hammer, Gary D.; Husebye, Eystein S.; Merke, Deborah P.; Murad, M. Hassan; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Torpy, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This clinical practice guideline addresses the diagnosis and treatment of primary adrenal insufficiency. Participants: The Task Force included a chair, selected by The Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee of the Endocrine Society, eight additional clinicians experienced with the disease, a methodologist, and a medical writer. The co-sponsoring associations (European Society of Endocrinology and the American Association for Clinical Chemistry) had participating members. The Task Force received no corporate funding or remuneration in connection with this review. Evidence: This evidence-based guideline was developed using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system to determine the strength of recommendations and the quality of evidence. Consensus Process: The evidence used to formulate recommendations was derived from two commissioned systematic reviews as well as other published systematic reviews and studies identified by the Task Force. The guideline was reviewed and approved sequentially by the Endocrine Society's Clinical Guidelines Subcommittee and Clinical Affairs Core Committee, members responding to a web posting, and the Endocrine Society Council. At each stage, the Task Force incorporated changes in response to written comments. Conclusions: We recommend diagnostic tests for the exclusion of primary adrenal insufficiency in all patients with indicative clinical symptoms or signs. In particular, we suggest a low diagnostic (and therapeutic) threshold in acutely ill patients, as well as in patients with predisposing factors. This is also recommended for pregnant women with unexplained persistent nausea, fatigue, and hypotension. We recommend a short corticotropin test (250 μg) as the “gold standard” diagnostic tool to establish the diagnosis. If a short corticotropin test is not possible in the first instance, we recommend an initial screening procedure comprising the measurement of morning plasma ACTH

  19. Mainly adrenal gland involving NK/T-cell nasal type lymphoma diagnosed with delay due to mimicking adrenal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seon Mee; Kim, Woong Ji; Lee, Kyung Ae; Baek, Hong Sun; Park, Tae Sun; Jin, Heung Yong

    2011-10-01

    A 29-yr-old man, presented with abdominal pain and fever, had an initial computed tomography (CT) scan revealing low attenuation of both adrenal glands. The initial concern was for tuberculous adrenalitis or autoimmune adrenalitis combined with adrenal hemorrhage. The patient started empirical anti-tuberculous medication, but there was no improvement. Enlargement of cervical lymph nodes were developed after that and excisional biopsy of cervical lymph nodes was performed. Pathological finding of excised lymph nodes was compatible to NK/T-cell lymphoma. The patient died due to the progression of the disease even after undergoing therapeutic trials including chemotherapy. Lymphoma mainly involving adrenal gland in the early stage of the disease is rare and the vast majority of cases that have been reported were of B-cell origin. From this case it is suggested that extra-nodal NK/T-cell lymphoma should be considered as a cause of bilateral adrenal masses although it is rare.

  20. Cortisol-dependent stress effects on cell distribution in healthy individuals and individuals suffering from chronic adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Ashley M; Pitts, Kenneth P; Feldkamp, Joachim; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Wolf, Jutta M

    2015-11-01

    Chronic adrenal insufficiency (CAI) is characterized by a lack of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid production due to destroyed adrenal cortex cells. However, elevated cortisol secretion is thought to be a central part in a well-orchestrated immune response to stress. This raises the question to what extent lack of cortisol in CAI affects stress-related changes in immune processes. To address this question, 28 CAI patients (20 females) and 18 healthy individuals (11 females) (age: 44.3 ± 8.4 years) were exposed to a psychosocial stress test (Trier Social Stress Test: TSST). Half the patients received a 0.03 mg/kg body weight injection of hydrocortisone (HC) post-TSST to mimic a healthy cortisol stress response. Catecholamines and immune cell composition were assessed in peripheral blood and free cortisol measured in saliva collected before and repeatedly after TSST. CAI patients showed norepinephrine (NE) stress responses similar to healthy participants, however, epinephrine (E) as well as cortisol levels were significantly lower. HC treatment post-TSST resulted in cortisol increases comparable to those observed in healthy participants (interaction effects--NE: F=1.05, p=.41; E: F=2.56, p=.045; cortisol: F=13.28, p<.001). Healthy individuals showed the expected pattern of stress-related early lymphocyte increase with subsequent decrease below baseline. The opposite pattern was observed in granulocytes. While exhibiting a similar initial increase, lymphocytes kept increasing over the following 2h in untreated patients. HC treatment buffered this effect (interaction effects--lymphocyte%: F=7.31, p<.001; granulocyte%: F=7.71, p<.001). Using CAI in humans as a model confirms cortisol's central involvement in post-stress lymphocyte migration from blood into immune-relevant body compartments. As such, future studies should investigate whether psychosocial stress exposure may put CAI patients at an increased health risk due to attenuated immune responses to pathogens.

  1. No Postoperative Adrenal Insufficiency in a Patient with Unilateral Cortisol-Secreting Adenomas Treated with Mifepristone Before Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Saroka, Rachel M.; Kane, Michael P.; Robinson, Lawrence; Busch, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Glucocorticoid replacement is commonly required to treat secondary adrenal insufficiency after surgical resection of unilateral cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas. Here, we describe a patient with unilateral cortisol-secreting adenomas in which the preoperative use of mifepristone therapy was associated with recovery of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis, eliminating the need for postoperative glucocorticoid replacement. CASE PRESENTATION A 66-year-old Caucasian man with type 2 diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and obesity was hospitalized for Fournier’s gangrene and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus sepsis. Abdominal computed tomography scan revealed three left adrenal adenomas measuring 1.4, 2.1, and 1.2 cm and an atrophic right adrenal gland. Twenty-four-hour urinary free cortisol level was elevated (237 µg/24 hours, reference range 0–50 µg/24 hours). Hormonal evaluation after resolution of the infection showed an abnormal 8 mg overnight dexamethasone suppression test (cortisol postdexamethasone 14.5 µg/dL), suppressed adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH; <5 pg/mL, reference range 7.2–63.3 pg/mL), and low-normal dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (50.5 µg/dL, male reference range 30.9–295.6 µg/dL). Because of his poor medical condition and uncontrolled diabetes, his Cushing’s syndrome was treated with medical therapy before surgery. Mifepristone therapy was started and, within five months, his diabetes was controlled and insulin discontinued. The previously suppressed ACTH increased to above normal range accompanied by an increase in dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels, indicating recovery of the HPA axis and atrophic contralateral adrenal gland. The patient received one precautionary intraoperative dose of hydrocortisone and none thereafter. Two days postoperatively, ACTH (843 pg/mL) and cortisol levels (44.8 µg/dL) were significantly elevated, reflecting an appropriate HPA axis response to

  2. Adrenal pseudotumors on CT due to dilated portosystemic veins

    SciTech Connect

    Mitty, H.M.; Cohen, B.A.; Sprayregen, S.; Schwartz, K.

    1983-10-01

    The adrenal and periadrenal venous systems are part of the portosystemic collateral pathways that may enlarge in portal hypertension. The cross-sectional image of the resulting enlarged venous channels may simulate an adrenal msss. Three examples of such computed tomographic (CT) scans are presented with selective venographic correlation. Patients with portal hypertension and suspected adrenal pathology may require enhanced or dynamic CT scans.

  3. Delayed diagnosis of cholestatic drug-induced liver injury treated with corticosteroid for adrenal insufficiency secondary to miliary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, S Y; Schneier, A; Schiano, T; Liu, S J; Machado, O N

    2015-08-01

    Drug-induced liver injury (DILI) in a patient with multiple comorbidities is often challenging to diagnose because liver injury can be attributed to multiple disease processes. Delayed treatment of DILI could have fatal consequences and, therefore, understanding the features and risks of DILI is crucial. We report a unique case of a patient who was admitted for severe sepsis of unknown etiology. This patient was later found to have miliary tuberculosis (TB) with associated adrenal insufficiency, complicated by acute cholestatic liver injury. Liver injury fully improved after initiation of corticosteroid for the treatment of adrenal insufficiency. The most likely pathophysiology of acute liver injury was DILI, given the clinical course of liver injury and the liver biopsy result of non-caseating granulomas. Although five different antibiotics including ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, vancomycin, imipenem/cilastatin, and cefepime were provided, the timing of liver injury and pharmacology of each drug imply that ciprofloxacin was the most likely antibiotic causing DILI, given the pharmacology of each antibiotics. This case is unique because miliary TB was complicated by adrenal insufficiency and drug-induced cholestatic liver injury, but acute liver injury was fully reversed after corticosteroid treatment. This implies an immune-mediated etiology of DILI, especially ciprofloxacin-induced cholestatic liver injury. DILI is challenging to diagnose in the setting of multiple comorbidities. Therefore, it is crucial that clinicians are to be aware of signs and symptoms of DILI, in that delayed diagnose and treatment may have fatal consequences.

  4. Large-Dose Glucocorticoid Induced Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency in Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the incidence of adrenal insufficiency (AI) in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) with symptoms similar to those of AI and to assess the relevance of AI and large-dose glucocorticoids in SCI. Methods The medical records of 228 patients who were admitted to the rehabilitation center after SCI from January 2014 to January 2016 were reviewed retrospectively. Twenty-nine of 228 patients had persistent symptoms suspicious for AI despite continuous care for more than 4 weeks. Therefore, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation tests were conducted in these 29 patients. Results Twelve of these 29 patients (41.4%) with SCI who manifested AI-like symptoms were diagnosed as having AI. Among these 29 patients, 15 patients had a history of large-dose glucocorticoid treatment use and the other 14 patients did not have such a history. Ten of the 15 patients (66.7%) with SCI treated with large-dose glucocorticoids after injury were diagnosed as having AI. In 12 patients with AI, the most frequent symptom was fatigue (66%), followed by orthostatic dizziness (50%), and anorexia (25%). In the chi-square test, the presence of AI was positively correlated with large-dose glucocorticoid use (p=0.008, Fisher exact test). Conclusion Among the patients with SCI who manifested similar symptoms as those of AI, high incidence of AI was found especially in those who were treated with large-dose glucocorticoids. During management of SCI, if a patient has similar symptoms as those of AI, clinicians should consider the possibility of AI, especially when the patient has a history of large-dose glucocorticoid use. Early recognition and treatment of the underlying AI should be performed. PMID:28119833

  5. Diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency using the GHRP-6 Test: comparison with the insulin tolerance test in patients with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal disease.

    PubMed

    Alaioubi, B; Mann, K; Petersenn, S

    2010-03-01

    The insulin tolerance test (ITT) is considered the gold standard for the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency (AI). However, the test is unpleasant to perform and has the risk of serious complications. We therefore evaluated the clinical applicability of GHRP6, which is a known activator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, to test for AI. For this purpose a comparative clinical study was designed. Forty-nine patients with suspected dysfunction of the HPA axis and 20 healthy controls were enrolled. The ITT was performed in patients, and GHRP6 (1 microg/kg) testing in patients and controls. Serum cortisol over 90 min after GHRP6, in comparison to the ITT, was the main outcome measure. Thirty-one patients had a peak cortisol response of less than 500 nmol/l during ITT and were considered adrenal insufficient. For GHRP6, the mean cortisol peak was 227+/-25.7 nmol/l in the AI group versus 395+/-35.3 nmol/l in the adrenal sufficient (AS) group. ROC analysis of peak cortisol levels during GHRP6 test suggested an optimal threshold of 299 nmol/l for the diagnosis of AI (Sens. 71.0%, Spec. 77.8%). Applying upper (416 nmol/l) and lower (137 nmol/l) thresholds with high specificities in combination with early morning cortisol established the diagnosis in nearly half of the patients, even when the GHRP6 test is limited to 30 min duration. GHRP6 led to significant activation of the HPA axis with no detectable side effects, but had limited accuracy in comparison to the ITT.

  6. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis and Its Association with Adrenal Insufficiency: Assessment with the Low-Dose ACTH Stimulation Test

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, René; Rendon, Adrian; Barrera-Sánchez, Maximiliano; Carlos-Reyna, Kevin Erick Gabriel; Álvarez-Villalobos, Neri Alejandro; González-Saldivar, Gloria; González-González, José Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a major public health care concern that affects the life of millions of people around the world. The association of tuberculosis and adrenal insufficiency is well known; however, it is thought to be less prevalent every time. A spike in TB incidence and a lack of evidence of this association in patients with MDR-TB call for reassessment of an illness (adrenal dysfunction) that if not diagnosed could seriously jeopardize patients' health. Objective. To determine the prevalence of adrenocortical insufficiency in patients with MDR-TB using the low-dose (1 μg) ACTH stimulation test at baseline and at 6–12 months of follow-up after antituberculosis treatment and culture conversion. Methods. A total of 48 men or women, aged ≥18 years (HIV-negative patients diagnosed with pulmonary MDR-TB) were included in this prospective observational study. Blood samples for serum cortisol were taken at baseline and 30 and 60 minutes after 1 μg ACTH stimulation at our tertiary level university hospital before and after antituberculosis treatment. Results. Forty-seven percent of subjects had primary MDR-TB; 43.8% had type 2 diabetes; none were HIV-positive. We found at enrollment 2 cases (4.2%) of adrenal insufficiency taking 500 nmol/L as the standard cutoff point value and 4 cases (8.3%) alternatively, using 550 nmol/L. After antituberculosis intensive phase drug-treatment and a negative mycobacterial culture (10.2 ± 3.6 months) adrenocortical function was restored in all cases. Conclusions. In patients with MDR-TB, using the low-dose ACTH stimulation test, a low prevalence of mild adrenal insufficiency was observed. After antituberculosis treatment adrenal function was restored in all cases. Given the increasing and worrying epidemic of MDR-TB these findings have important clinical implications that may help clinicians and patients make better decisions when deciding to test for adrenocortical dysfunction or

  7. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis and Its Association with Adrenal Insufficiency: Assessment with the Low-Dose ACTH Stimulation Test.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, René; Rendon, Adrian; Barrera-Sánchez, Maximiliano; Carlos-Reyna, Kevin Erick Gabriel; Álvarez-Villalobos, Neri Alejandro; González-Saldivar, Gloria; González-González, José Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a major public health care concern that affects the life of millions of people around the world. The association of tuberculosis and adrenal insufficiency is well known; however, it is thought to be less prevalent every time. A spike in TB incidence and a lack of evidence of this association in patients with MDR-TB call for reassessment of an illness (adrenal dysfunction) that if not diagnosed could seriously jeopardize patients' health. Objective. To determine the prevalence of adrenocortical insufficiency in patients with MDR-TB using the low-dose (1 μg) ACTH stimulation test at baseline and at 6-12 months of follow-up after antituberculosis treatment and culture conversion. Methods. A total of 48 men or women, aged ≥18 years (HIV-negative patients diagnosed with pulmonary MDR-TB) were included in this prospective observational study. Blood samples for serum cortisol were taken at baseline and 30 and 60 minutes after 1 μg ACTH stimulation at our tertiary level university hospital before and after antituberculosis treatment. Results. Forty-seven percent of subjects had primary MDR-TB; 43.8% had type 2 diabetes; none were HIV-positive. We found at enrollment 2 cases (4.2%) of adrenal insufficiency taking 500 nmol/L as the standard cutoff point value and 4 cases (8.3%) alternatively, using 550 nmol/L. After antituberculosis intensive phase drug-treatment and a negative mycobacterial culture (10.2 ± 3.6 months) adrenocortical function was restored in all cases. Conclusions. In patients with MDR-TB, using the low-dose ACTH stimulation test, a low prevalence of mild adrenal insufficiency was observed. After antituberculosis treatment adrenal function was restored in all cases. Given the increasing and worrying epidemic of MDR-TB these findings have important clinical implications that may help clinicians and patients make better decisions when deciding to test for adrenocortical dysfunction or treat

  8. Just another abdominal pain? Psoas abscess-like metastasis in large cell lung cancer with adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Bernardino, Vera; Val-Flores, Luis Silva; Dias, João Lopes; Bento, Luís

    2015-06-10

    The authors report the case of a 69-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and previous pulmonary tuberculosis, who presented to the emergency department with abdominal and low back pain, anorexia and weight loss, rapidly evolving into shock. An initial CT scan revealed pulmonary condensation with associated cavitation and an iliopsoas mass suggestive of a psoas abscess. He was admitted in an intensive care unit unit; after a careful examination and laboratory assessment, the aetiology was yet undisclosed. MRI showed multiple retroperitoneal lymphadenopathies, bulky nodular adrenal lesions and bilateral iliac lytic lesions. Hypocortisolism was detected and treated with steroids. A CT-guided biopsy to the psoas mass and lytic lesions identified infiltration of non-small lung carcinoma. The patient died within days. Psoas metastases and adrenal insufficiency as initial manifestations of malignancy are rare and can be misdiagnosed, particularly in the absence of a known primary tumour.

  9. Shunt insufficiency due to knot formation in the peritoneal catheter.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Gábor; Nagy, Andrea; Pataki, István; Bognar, László; Novák, László

    2013-07-30

    The authors report a rare case of the peripheral obstruction of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Premature baby was operated on hydrocephalus due to germinal matrix bleeding. After two months of implantation of venticuloperitoneal shunt peripheral insufficiency of the system was emerged. During the shunt revision extensive knot formation became visible. We simply cut the catheter above the knot and the working shunt was replaced into the abdominal cavity. The postoperative course was uneventful and the baby was free of complaints for more than one year. The pathomechanism of knot formation is not clear thus the discovery of the problem during the operation is an unexpected event. In our opinion tight knot cannot be spontaneously formed intraabdominally. Loose knots can be developed and can reduce the capacity of liquor flow. We think that the knot tightens during pulling out. Longer peritoneal catheters can precipitate multiple looping and/or axial torquations and increase the peripheral resistance of the shunt. In such cases when the pulling out is challenged conversion to laparotomy is suggested.

  10. Malakoplakia of the Kidney Extending to the Descending Colon in a Patient with Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Soo Jin; Choi, Jun Jeong

    2011-01-01

    Malakoplakia is an uncommon but distinctive type of chronic granulomatous inflammation that occurs most commonly in the genitourinary tract, especially the urinary bladder. Most patients have associated conditions characterized by some degree of immunosuppression, as seen in solid-organ transplants, autoimmune diseases requiring steroid use, chemotherapy, chronic systemic diseases, alcohol abuse and poorly controlled diabetes. We report an unusual case of the renal malakoplakia that involved the perirenal space, extending to the descending colon in a 65-year-old Korean woman with secondary adrenal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. PMID:22745875

  11. [Congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency--management in adults].

    PubMed

    Ambroziak, Urszula; Bednarczuk, Tomasz; Ginalska-Malinowska, Maria; Małunowicz, Ewa Maria; Grzechocińska, Barbara; Kamiński, Paweł; Bablok, Leszek; Przedlacki, Jerzy; Bar-Andziak, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is one of the most common autosomal recessive hereditary diseases. The impairment of cortisol synthesis leads to excessive stimulation of the adrenal glands by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), adrenal hyperplasia, and excessive androgen synthesis. The syndrome is characterised by a considerable correlation between the genotype and the phenotype with the type of CYP21A2 gene mutation affecting the severity of 21-hydroxylase deficiency. The clinical manifestations of CAH in adults result from adrenocortical and adrenomedullary insufficiency, hyperandrogenism, and the adverse effects of glucocorticosteroids used for the treatment of the condition. Non-classic CAH may sometimes be asymptomatic. In patients with classic CAH obesity, hyperinsulinaemia, insulin resistance, and hyperleptinaemia are more often seen than in the general population. These abnormalities promote the development of metabolic syndrome and its sequelae, including endothelial dysfunction, and cardiovascular disease. Long-term glucocorticosteroid treatment is also a known risk factor for osteoporosis. Patients with CAH require constant monitoring of biochemical parameters (17a-hydroxyprogesterone and androstenedione), clinical parameters (body mass, waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose, and lipids), and bone mineral density by densitometry. The principal goal of treatment in adults with CAH is to improve quality of life, ensure that they remain fertile, reduce the manifestations of hyperandrogenisation in females, and minimise the adverse effects of glucocorticosteroid treatment. Patients with classic CAH require treatment with glucocorticosteroids and, in cases of salt wasting, also with a mineralocorticosteroid. Radical measures, such as bilateral adrenalectomy, are very rarely needed. Asymptomatic patients with non-classic CAH require monitoring: treatment is not always necessary. Medical care for patients with CAH

  12. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency - management in adults.

    PubMed

    Ambroziak, Urszula; Bednarczuk, Tomasz; Ginalska-Malinowska, Maria; Małunowicz, Ewa Maria; Grzechocińska, Barbara; Kamiński, Paweł; Bablok, Leszek; Przedlacki, Jerzy; Bar-Andziak, Ewa

    2010-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is one of the most common autosomal recessive hereditary diseases. The impairment of cortisol synthesis leads to excessive stimulation of the adrenal glands by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), adrenal hyperplasia, and excessive androgen synthesis. The syndrome is characterised by a considerable correlation between the genotype and the phenotype with the type of CYP21A2 gene mutation affecting the severity of 21-hydroxylase deficiency. The clinical manifestations of CAH in adults result from adrenocortical and adrenomedullary insufficiency, hyperandrogenism, and the adverse effects of glucocorticosteroids used for the treatment of the condition. Non-classic CAH may sometimes be asymptomatic. In patients with classic CAH obesity, hyperinsulinaemia, insulin resistance, and hyperleptinaemia are more often seen than in the general population. These abnormalities promote the development of metabolic syndrome and its sequelae, including endothelial dysfunction, and cardiovascular disease. Long-term glucocorticosteroid treatment is also a known risk factor for osteoporosis. Patients with CAH require constant monitoring of biochemical parameters (17a-hydroxyprogesterone [17-OHP] and androstenedione), clinical parameters (body mass, waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose, and lipids), and bone mineral density by densitometry. The principal goal of treatment in adults with CAH is to improve quality of life, ensure that they remain fertile, reduce the manifestations of hyperandrogenisation in females, and minimise the adverse effects of glucocorticosteroid treatment. Patients with classic CAH require treatment with glucocorticosteroids and, in cases of salt wasting, also with a mineralocorticosteroid. Radical measures, such as bilateral adrenalectomy, are very rarely needed. Asymptomatic patients with non-classic CAH require monitoring: treatment is not always necessary. Medical care for patients

  13. Adrenocorticotropic hormone but not high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or salivary cortisol was a predictor of adrenal insufficiency in patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Festti, Josiane; Grion, Cintia Magalhães Carvalho; Festti, Luciana; Mazzuco, Tânia Longo; Lima-Valassi, Helena Pantelion; Brito, Vinícius Nahime; Barbosa, Décio Sabbatini; Carrilho, Alexandre José Faria

    2014-07-01

    Relative adrenal insufficiency in sepsis has been extensively debated on; however, accurate diagnosis and therapeutic intervention remain controversial. The authors aimed to evaluate adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), salivary cortisol, total cortisol and estimated plasma-free cortisol, cholesterol, and lipoproteins as predictors of adrenal insufficiency in patients within 24 h of septic shock diagnosis. This prospective study evaluated all hospitalized patients older than 18 years who developed septic shock and were using vasoactive drugs within 24 h of diagnosis. Blood and saliva samples were drawn at baseline and 60 min (T60) after 250 μg tetracosactide intravenous injection. Patients were divided into two groups: responders (Δ [T60 minus baseline] total cortisol >9 μg/dL) and nonresponders (Δ total cortisol ≤ 9 μg/dL or baseline total cortisol <10 μg/dL). The latter group was considered to have adrenal insufficiency. A total of 7,324 hospitalized patients were monitored, and 34 subjects with septic shock were included in the analysis. Adrenal insufficiency was found in 32.4%. Total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, and salivary cortisol did not differ between groups. Estimated plasma-free cortisol was not better than total plasma cortisol in estimating adrenal function. Baseline endogenous ACTH was higher in nonresponders than responders (55.5 pg/mL vs. 18.3 pg/mL, respectively; P = 0.01). The cutoff ACTH value that discriminated patients with adrenal insufficiency was 31.5 pg/mL. Thus, endogenous ACTH measured within 24 h of septic shock diagnosis could predict adrenal response to tetracosactide.

  14. Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a patient with pituitary adenoma and secondary adrenal insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Georgene; Manickam, Ari; Sethuraman, Manikandan; Rathod, Ramesh Chandra

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of Takotsubo cardiomyopathy in a case of pituitary macroadenoma in acute adrenal crisis. A 48-year-old man presented with acute onset altered sensorium, vomiting, and gasping. On admission, he was unresponsive and hemodynamically unstable. He was intubated and ventilated and resuscitated with fluids and inotropes. The biochemical evaluation revealed hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, and hypocortisolism. Hyponatremia was corrected with 3% hypertonic saline. Contrast enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain revealed a sellar-suprasellar mass with hypothalamic extension with no evidence of pituitary apoplexy. A diagnosis of invasive pituitary adenoma with the Addisonian crisis was made and steroid replacement was initiated. Despite volume resuscitation, he had persistent refractory hypotension, recurrent ventricular tachycardia, and metabolic acidosis. Electrocardiogram (ECG) showed ST elevation and T-wave inversion in lateral leads; cardiac-enzymes were increased suggestive of acute coronary syndrome. Transthoracic echocardiography showed severe regional wall motion abnormalities (RWMAs) involving left anterior descending territory and low ejection fraction (EF). Coronary angiogram revealed normal coronaries, apical ballooning, and severe left ventricular dysfunction, consistent with a diagnosis of Takotsubo's cardiomyopathy. Patient was managed with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and B-blockers. He improved over few days and recovered completely. At discharge, ECG changes and RWMA resolved and EF normalized to 56%. In patients with Addisonian Crisis with persistent hypotension refractory to optimal resuscitation, possibility of Takotsubo's cardiomyopathy should be considered. Early recognition of association of Takotsubos cardiomyopathy in neurological conditions, prompt resuscitation, and supportive care are essential to ensure favorable outcomes in this potentially lethal condition. PMID:26816449

  15. Assessment of the effect of continuous sedation with mechanical ventilation on adrenal insufficiency in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Zhang, Ying; Wu, Kang-Song; Hu, Ying-Hong

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of continuous propofol sedation plus prolonged mechanical ventilation on adrenal insufficiency (AI) in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Eighty-five adult patients diagnosed with moderate TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score 9-13) from October 2011 to October 2012 were included in this prospective study. The patients comprised three groups: no mechanical ventilation and sedation (n=27), mechanical ventilation alone (n=24) and mechanical ventilation plus sedation (n=34). The low-dose short Synacthen test was performed at 8:00 on the first, third, and fifth days after TBI. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors affecting the use of mechanical ventilation and sedation, and the incidence of AI. On the fifth day after injury, the mean baseline cortisol and simulated cortisol levels were significantly lower in the mechanical ventilation plus sedation group compared with the other two groups. Multivariate regression analysis showed that the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) score was independently associated with treatment with mechanical ventilation and sedation compared to mechanical ventilation alone. Furthermore, hypoxemia on admission and shock were associated with the development of AI. The findings showed that sedation is associated with an increased incidence of AI. Patients with TBI who are treated with continuous sedation should be monitored for AI carefully.

  16. Adrenal insufficiency from over-the-counter medicine as a cause of shock in rural area of Thailand: a study at Sisaket Provincial Hospital during October 2012--October 2013.

    PubMed

    Kamrat, Nuttamon

    2015-04-01

    This retrospective study was carried out to estimate the prevalence of an adrenal crisis at a provincial hospital in Thailand over a period of 1 year, and also to explore the relationship between adrenal insufficiency and over-the-counter medicine (OTCM) ingestion. We recruited those patients admitted at Sisaket Hospital between October 2012 and October 2013 who were diagnosed with shock and adrenal insufficiency or adrenal crisis. Of 2,435 patients diagnosed with shock from all causes, 62 (2.55 %) were diagnosed with adrenal crisis, of whom 31 (50.0%) gave a history of OTCM ingestion. This study suggests adrenal crisis with shock is not that uncommon and that the use of OTCM may be the prime culprit.

  17. Long-term follow-up of a female with congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to P450-oxidoreductase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bonamichi, Beatriz D S F; Santiago, Stella L M; Bertola, Débora R; Kim, Chong A; Alonso, Nivaldo; Mendonca, Berenice B; Bachega, Tania A S S; Gomes, Larissa G

    2016-10-01

    P450 oxidoreductase deficiency (PORD) is a variant of congenital adrenal hyperplasia that is caused by POR gene mutations. The POR gene encodes a flavor protein that transfers electrons from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) to all microsomal cytochrome P450 type II (including 21-hydroxylase, 17α-hydroxylase 17,20 lyase and aromatase), which is fundamental for their enzymatic activity. POR mutations cause variable impairments in steroidogenic enzyme activities that result in wide phenotypic variability ranging from 46,XX or 46,XY disorders of sexual differentiation, glucocorticoid deficiency, with or without skeletal malformations similar to Antley-Bixler syndrome to asymptomatic newborns diagnosed during neonatal screening test. Little is known about the PORD long-term evolution. We described a 46,XX patient with mild atypical genitalia associated with severe bone malformation, who was diagnosed after 13 years due to sexual infantilism. She developed large ovarian cysts and late onset adrenal insufficiency during follow-up, both of each regressed after hormone replacement therapies. We also described a late surgical approach for the correction of facial hypoplasia in a POR patient.

  18. Genotype-Phenotype Analysis in Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia due to P450 Oxidoreductase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Krone, Nils; Reisch, Nicole; Idkowiak, Jan; Dhir, Vivek; Ivison, Hannah E.; Hughes, Beverly A.; Rose, Ian T.; O'Neil, Donna M.; Vijzelaar, Raymon; Smith, Matthew J.; MacDonald, Fiona; Cole, Trevor R.; Adolphs, Nicolai; Barton, John S.; Blair, Edward M.; Braddock, Stephen R.; Collins, Felicity; Cragun, Deborah L.; Dattani, Mehul T.; Day, Ruth; Dougan, Shelley; Feist, Miriam; Gottschalk, Michael E.; Gregory, John W.; Haim, Michaela; Harrison, Rachel; Haskins Olney, Ann; Hauffa, Berthold P.; Hindmarsh, Peter C.; Hopkin, Robert J.; Jira, Petr E.; Kempers, Marlies; Kerstens, Michiel N.; Khalifa, Mohamed M.; Köhler, Birgit; Maiter, Dominique; Nielsen, Shelly; O'Riordan, Stephen M.; Roth, Christian L.; Shane, Kate P.; Silink, Martin; Stikkelbroeck, Nike M. M. L.; Sweeney, Elizabeth; Szarras-Czapnik, Maria; Waterson, John R.; Williamson, Lori; Hartmann, Michaela F.; Taylor, Norman F.; Wudy, Stefan A.; Malunowicz, Ewa M.; Shackleton, Cedric H. L.

    2012-01-01

    Context: P450 oxidoreductase deficiency (PORD) is a unique congenital adrenal hyperplasia variant that manifests with glucocorticoid deficiency, disordered sex development (DSD), and skeletal malformations. No comprehensive data on genotype-phenotype correlations in Caucasian patients are available. Objective: The objective of the study was to establish genotype-phenotype correlations in a large PORD cohort. Design: The design of the study was the clinical, biochemical, and genetic assessment including multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) in 30 PORD patients from 11 countries. Results: We identified 23 P450 oxidoreductase (POR) mutations (14 novel) including an exonic deletion and a partial duplication detected by MLPA. Only 22% of unrelated patients carried homozygous POR mutations. p.A287P was the most common mutation (43% of unrelated alleles); no other hot spot was identified. Urinary steroid profiling showed characteristic PORD metabolomes with variable impairment of 17α-hydroxylase and 21-hydroxylase. Short cosyntropin testing revealed adrenal insufficiency in 89%. DSD was present in 15 of 18 46,XX and seven of 12 46,XY individuals. Homozygosity for p.A287P was invariably associated with 46,XX DSD but normal genitalia in 46,XY individuals. The majority of patients with mild to moderate skeletal malformations, assessed by a novel scoring system, were compound heterozygous for missense mutations, whereas nearly all patients with severe malformations carried a major loss-of-function defect on one of the affected alleles. Conclusions: We report clinical, biochemical, and genetic findings in a large PORD cohort and show that MLPA is a useful addition to POR mutation analysis. Homozygosity for the most frequent mutation in Caucasians, p.A287P, allows for prediction of genital phenotype and moderate malformations. Adrenal insufficiency is frequent, easily overlooked, but readily detected by cosyntropin testing. PMID:22162478

  19. Diagnostic Accuracy of Perioperative Measurement of Basal Anterior Pituitary and Target Gland Hormones in Predicting Adrenal Insufficiency After Pituitary Surgery.

    PubMed

    Cerina, Vatroslav; Kruljac, Ivan; Radosevic, Jelena Marinkovic; Kirigin, Lora Stanka; Stipic, Darko; Pecina, Hrvoje Ivan; Vrkljan, Milan

    2016-03-01

    The insulin tolerance test (ITT) is the gold standard for diagnosing adrenal insufficiency (AI) after pituitary surgery. The ITT is unpleasant for patients, requires close medical supervision and is contraindicated in several comorbidities. The aim of this study was to analyze whether tumor size, remission rate, preoperative, and early postoperative baseline hormone concentrations could serve as predictors of AI in order to increase the diagnostic accuracy of morning serum cortisol. This prospective study enrolled 70 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed pituitary adenomas. Thirty-seven patients had nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NPA), 28 had prolactinomas and 5 had somatotropinomas. Thyroxin (T4), thyrotropin (TSH), prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) were measured preoperatively and on the sixth postoperative day. Serum morning cortisol was measured on the third postoperative day (CORT3) as well as the sixth postoperative day (CORT6). Tumor mass was measured preoperatively and remission was assessed 3 months after surgery. An ITT was performed 3 to 6 months postoperatively. Remission was achieved in 48% of patients and AI occurred in 51%. Remission rates and tumor type were not associated with AI. CORT3 had the best predictive value for AI (area under the curve (AUC) 0.868, sensitivity 82.4%, specificity 83.3%). Tumor size, preoperative T4, postoperative T4, and TSH were also associated with AI in a multivariate regression model. A combination of all preoperative and postoperative variables (excluding serum cortisol) had a sensitivity of 75.0% and specificity of 77.8%. The predictive power of CORT3 substantially improved by adding those variables into the model (AUC 0.921, sensitivity 94.1%, specificity 78.3%, PPV 81.9%, NPV of 92.7%). In a subgroup analysis that included only female patients with NPA, LH had exactly the same predictive value as CORT3. The addition

  20. Diagnostic Accuracy of Perioperative Measurement of Basal Anterior Pituitary and Target Gland Hormones in Predicting Adrenal Insufficiency After Pituitary Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cerina, Vatroslav; Kruljac, Ivan; Radosevic, Jelena Marinkovic; Kirigin, Lora Stanka; Stipic, Darko; Pecina, Hrvoje Ivan; Vrkljan, Milan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The insulin tolerance test (ITT) is the gold standard for diagnosing adrenal insufficiency (AI) after pituitary surgery. The ITT is unpleasant for patients, requires close medical supervision and is contraindicated in several comorbidities. The aim of this study was to analyze whether tumor size, remission rate, preoperative, and early postoperative baseline hormone concentrations could serve as predictors of AI in order to increase the diagnostic accuracy of morning serum cortisol. This prospective study enrolled 70 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed pituitary adenomas. Thirty-seven patients had nonfunctioning pituitary adenomas (NPA), 28 had prolactinomas and 5 had somatotropinomas. Thyroxin (T4), thyrotropin (TSH), prolactin, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), testosterone, and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I) were measured preoperatively and on the sixth postoperative day. Serum morning cortisol was measured on the third postoperative day (CORT3) as well as the sixth postoperative day (CORT6). Tumor mass was measured preoperatively and remission was assessed 3 months after surgery. An ITT was performed 3 to 6 months postoperatively. Remission was achieved in 48% of patients and AI occurred in 51%. Remission rates and tumor type were not associated with AI. CORT3 had the best predictive value for AI (area under the curve (AUC) 0.868, sensitivity 82.4%, specificity 83.3%). Tumor size, preoperative T4, postoperative T4, and TSH were also associated with AI in a multivariate regression model. A combination of all preoperative and postoperative variables (excluding serum cortisol) had a sensitivity of 75.0% and specificity of 77.8%. The predictive power of CORT3 substantially improved by adding those variables into the model (AUC 0.921, sensitivity 94.1%, specificity 78.3%, PPV 81.9%, NPV of 92.7%). In a subgroup analysis that included only female patients with NPA, LH had exactly the same predictive value as CORT3. The

  1. Reproductive outcomes of female patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase defi ciency

    PubMed Central

    Mnif, Mouna Feki; Kamoun, Mahdi; Kacem, Faten Hadj; Mnif, Fatma; Charfi, Nadia; Naceur, Basma Ben; Rekik, Nabila; Abid, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Fertility in women with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) appears to be reduced, especially in women with the classic salt-wasting type. Several factors have been suggested to contribute to this subfertility such as androgen excess, adrenal progesterone hypersecretion, consequences of genital reconstructive surgery, secondary polycystic ovaries syndrome, and psychosexual factors. In contrast to this subfertility, pregnancies are commonly normal and uneventful. Adequate glucocorticoid therapy and improvement of surgical and psychological management could contribute to optimize fertility in CAH female patients, even among women with the classic variant. This review provides current information regarding the reproductive outcomes of women with CAH due to 21-OHD and the fertility and pregnancy issues in this population. PMID:24083158

  2. Multiple osteoblastomas in a child with Cushing syndrome due to bilateral adrenal micronodular hyperplasias

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hyeoh Won; Cho, Won Im; Choi, Keun Hee; Yun, Sumi; Cho, Hwan Seong; Shin, Choong Ho; Yang, Sei Won

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin-independent adrenal hyperplasias are rare diseases, which are classified into macronodular (>1 cm) and micronodular (≤1 cm) hyperplasia. Micronodular adrenal hyperplasia is subdivided into primary pigmented adrenocortical disease and a limited or nonpigmented form 'micronodular adrenocortical disease (MAD)', although considerable morphological and genetic overlap is observed between the 2 groups. We present an unusual case of a 44-month-old girl who was diagnosed with Cushing syndrome due to MAD. She had presented with spotty pigmentation on her oral mucosa, lips and conjunctivae and was diagnosed with multiple bone tumors in her femur, pelvis and skull base at the age of 8 years. Her bone tumor biopsies were compatible with osteoblastoma. This case highlights the importance of verifying the clinicopathologic correlation in Cushing syndrome and careful follow-up and screening for associated diseases. PMID:27104180

  3. A case report of subclinical hypercortisolism due to adrenal incidentaloma complicated by myasthenia gravis after adrenalectomy.

    PubMed

    Petramala, Luigi; Marinelli, Cristiano; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Concistrè, Antonio; Lucia, Piernatale; Venuta, Federico; Cerbelli, Bruna; Ciardi, Antonio; De Toma, Giorgio; Letizia, Claudio

    2016-11-11

    A 62-year-old woman was admitted for evaluation of an incidentally discovered adrenal mass and hypertension. CT scan revealed a 7 cm mass in the right adrenal gland. After careful examination, the patient was diagnosed with subclinical hypercortisolism (SH). Adrenalectomy was performed. Histopathological examination showed an adrenocortical adenoma. Symptoms and signs of myasthenia gravis appeared 5 months later. CT of the chest showed a solid tissue mass in the mediastinum. The patient underwent a sternotomy with excision of the tumor, which histologically proved to be a type 2B thymoma. We describe a rare case of SH due to an incidentally discovered adrenocortical adenoma in a patient who manifested myasthenia gravis after surgical remission of the cortisol excess.

  4. Adrenal pseudomasses due to varices: angiographic-CT-MRI-pathologic correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, T.M.; Gross, B.H.; Glazer, G.M. Williams, D.M.

    1985-08-01

    Periadrenal and adrenal portosystemic collaterals are a recently reported cause of adrenal pseudotumor on computed tomography (CT). Nine patients with this left adrenal pseudotumor illustrate its typical position and appearance on CT, angiography, CT-angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The anatomic basis for variceal adrenal pseudotumors is the left inferior phrenic vein, which passes immediately anterior to the left adrenal gland and which serves as a collateral pathway from splenic to left renal vein in portal hypertension. Thus, unlike previously described adrenal pseudotumors, these venous collaterals are not anatomically distinguishable from the adrenal gland on CT. Bolus dynamic CT is usually diagnostic, but in equivocal cases, MRI may prove useful.

  5. Recent advances in diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Riepe, Felix G; Sippell, Wolfgang G

    2007-12-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) is an autosomal-recessive disease causing cortisol deficiency, aldosterone deficiency and hyperandrogenism. Diagnosis of 21-OHD is confirmed by steroid analysis in newborn screening or later on. Standard medical treatment consists of oral glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid administration in order to suppress adrenal androgens and to compensate for adrenal steroid deficiencies. However, available treatment is far from ideal, and not much is known about the long-term outcome in CAH as trials in patients in adulthood or old age are rare. Here we briefly describe the pathophysiology, clinical picture, genetics and epidemiology of 21-OHD. This is followed by a comprehensive review of the recent advances in diagnosis, treatment and outcome. Novel insights have been gained in the fields of newborn screening, specific steroid measurement utilizing mass spectrometry, genetics, glucocorticoid stress dosing, additive medical therapy, prenatal treatment, side-effects of medical treatment, adrenomedullary involvement, metabolic morbidity, fertility and gender identity. However, many issues are still unresolved, and novel questions, which will have to be answered in the future, arise with every new finding.

  6. Lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to STAR mutations in a Caucasian patient

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Casas, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Summary Lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (lipoid CAH), the most severe form of CAH, is most commonly caused by mutations in steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), which is required for the movement of cholesterol from the outer to the inner mitochondrial membranes to synthesize pregnenolone. This study was performed to evaluate whether the salt-losing crisis and the adrenal inactivity experienced by a Scandinavian infant is due to a de novo STAR mutation. The study was conducted at the University of North Dakota, the Mercer University School of Medicine and the Memorial University Medical Center to identify the cause of this disease. The patient was admitted to a pediatric endocrinologist at the Sanford Health Center for salt-losing crisis and possible adrenal failure. Lipoid CAH is an autosomal recessive disease, we identified two de novo heterozygous mutations (STAR c.444C>A (STAR p.N148K) and STAR c.557C>T (STAR p.R193X)) in the STAR gene, causing lipoid CAH. New onset lipoid CAH can occur through de novo mutations and is not restricted to any specific region of the world. This Scandinavian family was of Norwegian descent and had lipoid CAH due to a mutation in S TAR exons 4 and 5. Overexpression of the STAR p.N148K mutant in nonsteroidogenic COS-1 cells supplemented with an electron transport system showed activity similar to the background level, which was ∼10% of that observed with wild-type (WT) STAR. Protein-folding analysis showed that the finger printing of the STAR p.N148K mutant is also different from the WT protein. Inherited STAR mutations may be more prevalent in some geographical areas but not necessarily restricted to those regions. Learning points STAR mutations cause lipoid CAH.This is a pure population from a caucasian family.Mutation ablated STAR activity.The mutation resulted in loosely folded conformation of STAR. PMID:27047663

  7. NIH conference. Future directions in the study and management of congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Merke, Deborah P; Bornstein, Stefan R; Avila, Nilo A; Chrousos, George P

    2002-02-19

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia describes a group of inherited autosomal recessive disorders characterized by an enzymatic defect in cortisol biosynthesis, compensatory increases in corticotropin secretion, and adrenocortical hyperplasia. 21-Hydroxylase deficiency is responsible for more than 95% of cases and is one of the most common known autosomal recessive disorders. The classic or severe type presents in the newborn period or early childhood with virilization and adrenal insufficiency, with or without salt loss; the mild or nonclassic form presents in late childhood or early adulthood with mild hyperandrogenism and is an important cause of masculinization and infertility in women. This wide range of phenotypic expression is mostly explained by genetic variation, although genotype-phenotype discrepancies have been described. Reproductive, metabolic, and other comorbid conditions, including risk for tumors, are currently under investigation in both forms of the disease. A high proportion of patients with adrenal incidentalomas may be homozygous or heterozygous for 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Women with congenital adrenal hyperplasia often develop the polycystic ovary syndrome. Ectopic adrenal rest tissue is often found in the testes of men with congenital adrenal hyperplasia; characteristic clinical and radiologic findings help differentiate this tissue from other tumors. Levels of corticotropin-releasing hormone are elevated in patients with depression and anxiety and are expected to be elevated in patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia; it is unknown whether patients with 21-hydroxylase deficiency have an increased incidence of these psychiatric disorders. Abnormalities in both the structure and function of the adrenal medulla have been shown in patients with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia, and the degree of adrenomedullary impairment may be a biomarker of disease severity. The 21-hydroxylase-deficient mouse has provided a useful model with which

  8. Gender role across development in adult women with congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Long, Dominique N; Wisniewski, Amy B; Migeon, Claude J

    2004-10-01

    This study evaluated the degree of femininity and masculinity at different developmental stages in a group of adult women, some of whom were exposed to elevated prenatal adrenal androgens as a result of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21 hydroxylase (21-OH) deficiency. Women who had presented to the Johns Hopkins Hospital Pediatric Endocrine Clinic for treatment of CAH due to 21-OH deficiency were included. The control group consisted of sisters of CAH participants and women referred for evaluation of polycystic ovary syndrome. Study participants were given a questionnaire asking them to indicate their degree of masculinity and femininity during childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. In addition, participants were asked questions related to their play behavior during childhood, including playmate preferences, toy preferences, and admiration of male or female characters during fantasy play. Across participant groups, self-reported femininity decreased in a dose response manner, according to prenatal androgen exposure. For all groups, femininity increased through developmental stages. Women with salt-losing CAH remained less feminine than controls into adulthood. Conversely, self-reported masculinity increased in a dose-response manner, according to prenatal androgen exposure, across participant groups. Women with CAH showed a decrease in masculinity across developmental stages, such that by adulthood, there were no significant differences in masculinity between controls and the women with CAH. Women with salt-losing CAH were more likely to recall preferences for boy playmates, male-typical toys, and admiration for male characters during childhood than other study participants. Our data support the effect of both prenatal androgen exposure and socialization on gender role behavior in adult women with CAH due to 21-OH deficiency.

  9. Longitudinal femoral shaft due to bone insufficiency. A review of three cases.

    PubMed

    Maraval, Anne; Grados, Franck; Royant, Valérie; Damade, Richard; Boulu, Gilles; Fardellone, Patrice

    2003-12-01

    We report three new cases of longitudinal femoral shaft fracture due to bone insufficiency and review the eight cases reported in the literature. The typical patient is a woman older than 65 years of age who present with mechanical pain in the thigh and/or groin. Palpation of the thigh may reproduce the pain. The diagnosis is often made late because the radiographs are normal initially. However, an early and consistent finding is increased radionuclide uptake along the femoral shaft. The fracture line is readily evidenced by computed tomography but may be difficult to see on magnetic resonance imaging. Use of crutches for 6 weeks to protect the bone from weight bearing ensures healing of the fracture.

  10. Evaluation of serum myeloperoxidase concentration in dogs with heart failure due to chronic mitral valvular insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong-In; Suh, Sang-Il; Hyun, Changbaig

    2017-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a leukocyte-derived enzyme involved in the process of heart failure and is found to have good diagnostic and prognostic values in humans with chronic heart failure. This study evaluated the relationship between serum MPO levels and the severity of heart failure (HF) due to chronic mitral valvular insufficiency (CMVI) in dogs. Eighty-two client-owned dogs consisting of 69 dogs with different stages of HF due to CMVI and 13 age-matched healthy dogs were enrolled in this study. Serum MPO concentrations in the healthy and CMVI groups were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a canine-specific monoclonal anti-MPO antibody. Serum MPO concentrations were 273.3 ± 179.6 ng/L in the controls, 140.8 ± 114.1 ng/L in the International Small Animal Cardiac Health Council (ISACHC) I group, 109.0 ± 85.2 ng/L in the ISACHC II group, and 106.0 ± 42.3 ng/L in the ISACHC III group. Close negative correlation to serum MPO concentration was found in the severity of heart failure (ISACHC stage). Although this study found a modest relationship between serum MPO levels and the severity of HF due to CMVI in dogs, it also suggested that serum MPO levels decreased as the severity of HF increased.

  11. Medical Treatment for Acromegaly does not Increase the Risk of Central Adrenal Insufficiency: A Long-Term Follow-Up Study.

    PubMed

    Ceccato, F; Lizzul, L; Zilio, M; Barbot, M; Denaro, L; Emanuelli, E; Alessio, L; Rolma, G; Manara, R; Saller, A; Boscaro, M; Scaroni, C

    2016-08-01

    Central adrenal insufficiency (CAI) in acromegaly may be related to pituitary adenoma or induced by various medical treatments, transsphenoidal neurosurgery (TNS) or radiotherapy (RT), alone or combined. We assessed the role of all available treatments for acromegaly in inducing CAI. We retrospectively studied 97 patients. CAI was diagnosed if morning serum cortisol was <138 nmol/l, or if its response was inadequate in the low-dose short synacthen test. Seventy-four subjects underwent TNS (and 17 of whom also underwent RT), and 23 were on primary medical therapy: overall we diagnosed 21 cases of CAI. Duration of acromegaly, invasion of cavernous sinus, disease control, and type of medical treatment were much the same for patients with and without CAI, which was identified in 18% of patients (10/57) after one TNS, and in 53% (9/17) after RT (p=0.01); repeat surgery increased the risk of CAI (p=0.02). The risk of CAI onset during the follow-up was lower among patients treated with TNS or medical therapy than after RT (p=0.035). Medical treatment did not raise the risk of CAI, whereas a 5- and 4-fold higher risk of CAI was associated with repeat TNS and RT, respectively. Basal or stimulated cortisol levels were similar among acromegalic patients without CAI and matched controls with nonsecreting pituitary lesions. A significant proportion of patients with acromegaly developed CAI over time. While primary or secondary medical treatment did not contribute to the risk of CAI, repeat TNS and RT correlated with pituitary-adrenal axis impairment.

  12. The ICET-A Survey on Current Criteria Used by Clinicians for the Assessment of Central Adrenal Insufficiency in Thalassemia: Analysis of Results and Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Soliman, Ashraf T.; Elsedfy, Heba; Albu, Alice; Al Jaouni, Soad; Yaarubi, Saif AL; Anastasi, Salvatore; Canatan, Duran; Di Maio, Massimo; Di Maio, Salvatore; El Kholy, Mohamed; Karimi, Mehran; Khater, Doaa; Kilinc, Yurdanur; Lum, Su Han; Skordis, Nicos; Sobti, Praveen; Stoeva, Iva; Tzoulis, Ploutarchos; Wali, Yasser; Kattamis, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Background In March 2015, the International Network of Clinicians for Endocrinopathies in Thalassemia and Adolescent Medicine (ICET-A) implemented a two-step survey on central adrenal insufficiency (CAI) assessment in TM patients and after analysis of the collected data, recommendations for the assessment of hypothalamic-pituitary- adrenal (HPA) axis in clinical practice were defined. Methods To ascertain the current practice for assessment of CAI in thalassemia, the Coordinator of ICET-A sent two questionnaires by email: i) The first to evaluate the current interpretation of basal serum cortisol level (first step) and ii) The second to assess the current usage of ACTH test and the variability in practice” (second step). Based on the surveys the core ICET-A group prepared the recommendations for the assessment of suspected CAI in thalassemia (third step). Results A total of 19 thalassemologists/endocrinologists have participated in the first survey and 35 specialists participated in the second step questionnaire. The study demonstrated a considerable variability in almost all aspects of relevant current criteria used for the diagnosis of CAI. An ROC analysis using peak value > 20 μg/dl (> 550 nmol/L), after ACTH stimulation test, was performed with the aim of identifying the optimal basal serum cortisol cut-off. The optimal threshold that maximizes sensitivity plus specificity for morning basal cortisol against peak post-ACTH value >20 μg/dl (>550 nmol/L) was 10 μg/dl (275 nmol/L). Furthermore, the values associated with the highest negative predictive value (NPV) and highest, positive predictive value (PPV) were 4.20 (115 nmol/L) and 18.45 μg/dl (510 nmol/L), respectively. Surprisingly, 20 specialists in thalassemia working in blood bank, thalassemia centres (day hospital), internal medicine, hematology and onco-hematology had poor knowledge and experience in testing for CAI and stopped filling the questionnaire after the second question. In contrast, 9

  13. Approach to the adult with congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Merke, Deborah P

    2008-03-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) describes a group of autosomal recessive disorders where there is impairment of cortisol biosynthesis. CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency accounts for 95% of cases and shows a wide range of clinical severity. Treatment of the classic or severe form of CAH is targeted at replacing cortisol and aldosterone and effectively controlling excess androgen symptoms by using the lowest possible glucocorticoid dose. Treatment of the mild or nonclassic form is targeted at controlling excess androgen symptoms and may or may not involve glucocorticoid therapy. Hydrocortisone is the treatment of choice for children, but there is no consensus on how patients should be treated as adults. Current glucocorticoid therapy is suboptimal because it is often difficult to reduce excess androgen without giving excess glucocorticoid, and patients may experience hypercortisolism, androgen excess, or a combination of these states. Treatment of CAH, especially in the adult patient, remains controversial given the lack of prospective randomized controlled trials comparing treatment regimens. Nevertheless, patients benefit from careful individualized therapy with avoidance of Cushingoid side effects and optimization of reproductive, sexual, and bone health.

  14. Quality of life in patients with adrenal insufficiency correlates stronger with hydrocortisone dosage, than with long-term systemic cortisol levels.

    PubMed

    Andela, Cornelie D; Staufenbiel, Sabine M; Joustra, Sjoerd D; Pereira, Alberto M; van Rossum, Elisabeth F C; Biermasz, Nienke R

    2016-10-01

    In patients with adrenal insufficiency (AI) a higher hydrocortisone intake has been associated with more impairment in quality of life (QoL). Irrespective of age, sex and severity of AI the dosage of hydrocortisone is titrated around 20mg/D in all patients with AI based on physical and mental signs and symptoms. However, until now it is unknown whether these QoL impairments are related to increased systemic cortisol exposure. Measurement of hair cortisol levels (CORThair) can be used to assess chronic systemic cortisol exposure. This study aimed to explore whether QoL in patients with AI is associated with CORThair and daily hydrocortisone intake. We performed a cross-sectional study in 120 patients with AI on stable hydrocortisone replacement, in whom hair samples and QoL data were collected. CORThair were measured with ELISA, and QoL was assessed with validated questionnaires (SF-36, EQ-5D, HADS, MFI-20). Patients reported impairments in 14 of 15 QoL subscales (p<0.001). More impairments in physical aspects of QoL correlated with higher CORThair and higher daily hydrocortisone intake (p<0.05), an effect that was more pronounced in female patients. Regression analyses including both CORThair and hydrocortisone intake revealed a significant negative contribution of higher hydrocortisone intake on physical aspects of QoL (p≤0.046), whereas no significant contribution was found for CORThair. The present study showed that patients with AI report several impairments in QoL which are associated with hydrocortisone intake, and to a lesser extent reflected by chronic systemic cortisol exposure as measured by hair cortisol. This suggests that QoL impairments in patients with AI are not per se the effect of prolonged exposure to elevated systemic cortisol levels.

  15. CT demonstration of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, D.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1983-08-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage with subsequent adrenal insufficiency is a recognized complication of anticoagulant therapy. Because the clinical manifestations are often nonspecific, the antemortem diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage has been a difficult clinical problem. Computed tomography (CT) provides detailed images of the adrenal glands that are not possible with conventional imaging methods. The CT findings of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in an anticoagulated patient are reported.

  16. Adrenal Insufficiency and Addison's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosed, health care providers may use the following tests to obtain a detailed view of the pituitary gland and assess how it is functioning: Computerized tomography (CT) scan. CT scans use a combination of x-rays and computer technology to create images. For a CT scan, the ...

  17. [Adrenal gland hematoma due to rupture of myelolipoma. A case report].

    PubMed

    Suárez Artacho, G; Rodríguez Muñoz, J; Gómez Bravo, M A; Campoy Martínez, P; López Bernal, F

    2004-01-01

    The myelolipoma is a benign tumour of the adrenal cortex, non functioning and normally asymptomatic, which can be diagnosed by chance in imaging test. Rupture and bleeding of the myelolipoma is an infrequent complication, which can conclude with the formation of a haematoma or, less usually, result in a massive retroperitoneal haemorrhage. The compression of adjacent structures by retroperitoneal haematomas with adrenal origin is a possible but not frequent eventuality. Indications for surgery of haematoma retroperitoneal continue to be, nowadays, a difficult and controversial decision, because the problem is normally resolved with conservative treatment and a watchful approach. We are presented with a 69 year old male who came to casualty with abdominal pain of 7 days duration, whose origin coincided with a light blow. The image test revealed the existence of a retroperitoneal haematoma with adrenal gland origin of 16 cm, with active bleeding, which was displaced and compressed the cava vein. We have only found one case, in the literature, of compression of the cava vein coused by adrenal gland haematoma. In the case under our observation, urgent surgery was needed.

  18. Treatment failure in celiac disease due to coexistent exocrine pancreatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Weizman, Z; Hamilton, J R; Kopelman, H R; Cleghorn, G; Durie, P R

    1987-12-01

    A 17-year-old white adolescent had a history of chronic diarrhea, delayed puberty, and growth failure. Investigations excluded cystic fibrosis, Shwachman syndrome, and endocrine causes of growth failure. Severe steatorrhea was diagnosed from fecal fat studies, and a jejunal suction biopsy showed total villus atrophy, consistent with a diagnosis of celiac disease. Following introduction of a gluten-free diet, his appetite and growth improved, but he continued to have abdominal discomfort and loose offensive bowel motions. One year later, severe steatorrhea was present. A repeat jejunal biopsy showed partial recovery of villus architecture. Serum immuno-reactive trypsinogen level was low, which was highly suggestive of exocrine pancreatic failure. Results of quantitative pancreatic stimulation test confirmed the presence of primary pancreatic insufficiency. After introduction of oral pancreatic enzyme supplements with meals, his gastrointestinal symptoms resolved and growth velocity accelerated. Previously, primary pancreatic insufficiency has only been described in elderly patients with long-standing untreated celiac disease. This case, however, emphasizes that pancreatic failure can occur with celiac disease at any age. Determination of a serum immunoreactive trypsinogen level should be considered a useful screening tool for pancreatic insufficiency in patients with celiac disease who have not responded to a gluten-free diet.

  19. The first simultaneous kidney-adrenal gland-pancreas transplantation: outcome at 1 year.

    PubMed

    Vouillarmet, J; Buron, F; Houzard, C; Carlier, M C; Chauvet, C; Brunet, M; Thivolet, C; Morelon, E; Badet, L

    2013-07-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is a rare but life-threatening disease. Replacement therapy sometimes fails to prevent an acute adrenal crisis and most often does not lead to restoration of well-being. We report here the 1-year outcome of the first simultaneous kidney-adrenal gland-pancreas transplantation in a 33-year-old patient with type 1 diabetes and concomitant autoimmune adrenal insufficiency. En bloc left adrenal gland and kidney grafts were anastomosed on the left iliac vessels in normal vascular conditions and the pancreas graft was anastomosed on the right iliac vessels. The immunosuppressive regimen was not modified by the addition of the adrenal gland. We observed no additional morbidity due to the adrenal gland transplantation, as there were no surgical complications. One-year kidney and pancreas graft functions were satisfactory (estimated glomerular filtration rate: 55 mL/min/1.73 m(2) and HbA1c: 4.8%). The adrenal graft functioned well at 12 months with a normalization of cortisol and aldosterone baseline levels. Functional imaging at 3 months showed good uptake of [(123) I]-metaiodobenzylguanidine by the adrenal graft. Transplantation of the adrenal gland en bloc with the left kidney appears to be a good therapeutic option in patients with adrenal insufficiency awaiting kidney or kidney-pancreas transplantation.

  20. [Hypoplasia adrenal congenita of anencephalic type: two cases with pituitary abnormalities and review of literature].

    PubMed

    Folligan, K; Roume, J; Razavi, F; Sepaniak, S; Bouvier, R; Morel, Y; Trouillas, J

    2011-03-01

    Hypoplasia adrenal congenita is an extremely uncommon disease of early onset. This condition can be lethal in the absence of treatment. Some forms are due to the congenital adrenal hypoplasia of anencephalic type whose origin is even unknown. Here, we present two cases of congenital adrenal hypoplasia of anencephalic type with pituitary abnormalities. The two male newborns died because adrenal insufficiency in the neonatal period. The adrenal glands were hypoplastic with a histological structure of anencephalic type Immunocytochemical study of the pituitary revealed an absence of the gonadotrophs. No mutation of DAX 1 and SF-1 was found.

  1. The influence of hepatic insufficiency due to alcoholic cirrhosis on the erythrocyte transketolase activity (ETKA).

    PubMed

    Graudal, N; Torp-Pedersen, K; Bonde, J; Hanel, H K; Kristensen, M; Milman, N; Thomsen, A C

    1987-04-01

    The erythrocyte transketolase activity (ETKA), the stimulated erythrocyte transketolase activity (ETKAS), and the thiaminepyrophosphate effect (TPPE) were measured in 21 alcoholic patients with cirrhosis and hepatic insufficiency, 13 alcoholic patients without cirrhosis and 21 non-alcoholic persons before and after oral treatment with 100 mg of thiamine daily for 2 weeks in order to investigate the influence of hepatic insufficiency on these variables. A statistically significant rise in ETKA and fall in TPPE were found in all three groups. ETKA, ETKAS and TPPE did not differ from each other in alcoholic patients with and without cirrhosis, but TPPE was significantly higher in these patients than in the non-alcoholic persons. The conclusions are that severe cirrhosis does not affect the erythrocyte transketolase apoenzyme, the ability of the tissues to convert thiamine to thiaminepyrophosphate for use in the erythrocytes or the absorption of thiamine from the gastrointestinal tract. Besides alcoholism seems to dispose to thiamine deficiency to a higher degree than cirrhosis, and the role of the liver as a thiamine store appears to be of minor importance in the development of thiamine deficiency. Finally, ETKA, ETKAS, and TPPE are considered to be usable as thiamine deficiency indicators in patients with cirrhosis as well as in patients without cirrhosis.

  2. Classical forms of congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency in adults.

    PubMed

    Bachelot, Anne; Chakthoura, Zeina; Rouxel, Agnès; Dulon, Jérome; Touraine, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    During childhood, the main aims of the medical treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) secondary to 21-hydroxylase are to prevent salt loss and virilization and to attain normal stature and normal puberty. As such, there is a narrow therapeutic window through which the intended results can be achieved. In adulthood, the clinical management has received little attention, but recent studies have shown the relevance of long-term follow-up of these patients. The aims here are to review the multiple clinical, hormonal and metabolic abnormalities that could be found in adult CAH patients as such a decrease in bone mineral density, overweight and disturbed reproductive functions. In women with classic CAH, a low fertility rate is reported, and is probably the consequence of multiple factors including neuroendocrine and hormonal factors, feminizing surgery, and psychological factors. Men with CAH may present hypogonadism either through the effect of adrenal rests or from suppression of gonadotropins resulting in infertility. Therefore a multidisciplinary team with knowledge of CAH should carefully follow up these patients, from childhood through to adulthood, to avoid these complications and to ensure treatment compliance and tight control of the adrenal androgens.

  3. Hormonal treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bachelot, A; Chakhtoura, Z; Rouxel, A; Dulon, J; Touraine, P

    2007-09-01

    During childhood, the main aims of the medical treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) secondary to 21-hydroxylase deficiency, are to prevent salt loss and virilization and to achieve normal stature and normal puberty. As such, there is a narrow therapeutic window through which the intended results can be achieved. In adulthood, the clinical management has received little attention, but recent studies have shown the relevance of long-term follow-up of these patients. Indeed, long-term evaluation of adult CAH patients enables the identification of multiple clinical, hormonal and metabolic abnormalities as bone mineral density alteration, overweight and disturbed reproductive functions. In women with classic CAH, low fertility rate is reported, and is probably the consequence of multiple factors, including neuroendocrine and hormonal factors, feminizing surgery, and psychological factors. Men with CAH may present hypogonadism either through the effect of adrenal rests or from suppression of gonadotropins resulting in infertility. These patients should therefore be carefully followed-up, from childhood through to adulthood, to avoid these complications and to ensure treatment compliance and tight control of the adrenal androgens, by multidisciplinary teams who have knowledge of CAH.

  4. [Congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to lack of 17α-hydroxylase: a report of a new mutation in the gene CYP17A1].

    PubMed

    Perales Martínez, J I; Pina Marqués, B; de Arriba Muñoz, A; Mayayo Dehesa, E; Labarta Aizpún, J I; Loidi Fernández, L

    2015-01-01

    P450c17 enzyme catalyses two different reactions: the 17α-hydroxylation of progesterone and pregnenolone, and segmenting the carbon 17-20 binding from the 17,20lyase producing adrenal androgens. This enzyme is coded by the CYP17A1 gene. The case is presented of a 14 year old patient with delayed pubertal development and a high blood pressure for height and age. 46,XX karyotype. Hormonal studies highlighted hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, adrenal insufficiency and mineralocorticoid excess. Subsequent genetic studies showed a homozygous mutation in the CYP17A1 gene (c.753+G>A), not previously described, which is responsible for the pathophysiology of 17α-hydroxylase deficiency. This entity is a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. The disease often goes unnoticed until adolescence or early adult life, and should be suspected in 46,XY individuals with ambiguous genitalia or 46,XX with delayed puberty associated with hypertension and/or hypokalaemia.

  5. Health problems in congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Reisch, Nicole; Arlt, Wiebke; Krone, Nils

    2011-01-01

    Following the introduction of life-saving glucocorticoid replacement 60 years ago, congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) has evolved from being perceived as a paediatric disorder to being recognized as a lifelong, chronic condition affecting patients of all age groups. Increasing evidence suggests that patients with CAH have an increased risk to develop health problems during adult life, with signs and symptoms of forerunner conditions of adult disease already emerging during the time of paediatric care. Transition of paediatric CAH patients to medical care in the adult setting is an important step to ensure optimal lifelong treatment, aiming to achieve good health and normal life expectancy and quality of life. Thus, primary and secondary prevention of health problems has to become a task of increasing importance for those involved in the care of CAH patients throughout their life.

  6. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Speiser, Phyllis W.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia associated with deficiency of steroid 21-hydroxylase is the most common inborn error in adrenal function and the most common cause of adrenal insufficiency in the pediatric age group. As patients now survive into adulthood, adult health-care providers must also be familiar with this condition. Over the past several years, F1000 has published numerous commentaries updating research and practical guidelines for this condition. The purposes of this review are to summarize basic information defining congenital adrenal hyperplasia and to highlight current knowledge and controversies in management. PMID:26339484

  7. Bilateral symmetrical adrenal hypermetabolism on FDG PET/CT due to Cushing syndrome in well differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aktas, G E; Soyluoglu Demir, S; Sarikaya, A

    2016-01-01

    The (18)F-FDG PET/CT scan has been suggested for whole-body imaging to identify ectopic adrenocorticotrophic hormone secreting tumours, but there are some challenges involved. The case of a patient is presented, who was admitted with the pre-diagnosis of ectopic ACTH syndrome. On the CT, a nodular lesion was detected in the medial segment of the right lung. The FDG uptake of the lesion seemed to be increased visually, but was not pathological quantitatively (SUVmax: 1.8) on the PET/CT. There was also diffuse increased uptake (SUVmax: 14.2) in the enlarged adrenal glands. The lesion was reported as a possible malignant lesion with low FDG affinity, such as a low grade neuroendocrine tumour, while the diffuse enlarged adrenal glands with high uptake were interpreted as diffusely hyperplasic, due to Cushing's syndrome. The patient was treated with a surgical wedge resection. The histopathological diagnosis confirmed that the tumour was a grade 1 well-differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma.

  8. Clinical, genetic, and structural basis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 11β-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Khattab, Ahmed; Haider, Shozeb; Kumar, Ameet; Dhawan, Samarth; Alam, Dauood; Romero, Raquel; Burns, James; Li, Di; Estatico, Jessica; Rahi, Simran; Fatima, Saleel; Alzahrani, Ali; Hafez, Mona; Musa, Noha; Razzghy Azar, Maryam; Khaloul, Najoua; Gribaa, Moez; Saad, Ali; Charfeddine, Ilhem Ben; Bilharinho de Mendonça, Berenice; Belgorosky, Alicia; Dumic, Katja; Dumic, Miroslav; Aisenberg, Javier; Kandemir, Nurgun; Alikasifoglu, Ayfer; Ozon, Alev; Gonc, Nazli; Cheng, Tina; Kuhnle-Krahl, Ursula; Cappa, Marco; Holterhus, Paul-Martin; Nour, Munier A; Pacaud, Daniele; Holtzman, Assaf; Li, Sun; Zaidi, Mone; Yuen, Tony; New, Maria I

    2017-03-07

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), resulting from mutations in CYP11B1, a gene encoding 11β-hydroxylase, represents a rare autosomal recessive Mendelian disorder of aberrant sex steroid production. Unlike CAH caused by 21-hydroxylase deficiency, the disease is far more common in the Middle East and North Africa, where consanguinity is common often resulting in identical mutations. Clinically, affected female newborns are profoundly virilized (Prader score of 4/5), and both genders display significantly advanced bone ages and are oftentimes hypertensive. We find that 11-deoxycortisol, not frequently measured, is the most robust biochemical marker for diagnosing 11β-hydroxylase deficiency. Finally, computational modeling of 25 missense mutations of CYP11B1 revealed that specific modifications in the heme-binding (R374W and R448C) or substrate-binding (W116C) site of 11β-hydroxylase, or alterations in its stability (L299P and G267S), may predict severe disease. Thus, we report clinical, genetic, hormonal, and structural effects of CYP11B1 gene mutations in the largest international cohort of 108 patients with steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency CAH.

  9. Severe hyponatremia due to ACTH insufficiency in a 14 year-old girl with growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Lo-Lin; Lue, Hung-Chi; Huang, Cheng-Hung; Niu, Dau-Ming

    2010-01-01

    SIADH-like hyponatremia as the presenting manifestation of ACTH deficiency is rare in childhood. Here we report a 14 year-old girl who, after 8 years of GH replacement and subsequent treatment for subclinical secondary hypothyroidism, presented with confusion and disorientation due to severe hyponatremia. When her pituitary axis was re-assessed, she was diagnosed as having ACTH deficiency associated with multiple pituitary hormone deficiencies (MPHD) (including GH, FSH, LH, and subclinical TSH deficiencies). She responded poorly to treatment with only hypertonic fluid, but improved after addition of hydrocortisone replacement. The purpose of this paper is to emphasize the importance of suspecting ACTH insufficiency in children with GH deficiency if hyponatremia develops.

  10. Adrenal involvement in non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Williamson, B.R.J.

    1983-08-01

    Adrenal masses are described in seven cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a series of 173 patients. In all seven patients the lymphoma was diffuse rather than nodular. Three patients had adrenal masses at the time of presentation, whereas in four cases the adrenal gland was a site of tumor recurrence after therapy. Three patients had simultaneous bilateral adrenal involvement by tumor. No characteristic features were recognized that might have distinguished these tumors from other adrenal masses. Appropriate therapy successfully resolved the adrenal masses in all but one case. The latter patient was the only one with evidence of adrenal insufficiency.

  11. X-Linked Adrenal Hypoplasia Congenita in a Boy due to a Novel Deletion of the Entire NR0B1 (DAX1) and MAGEB1–4 Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rojek, Aleksandra; Krawczynski, Maciej R.; Jamsheer, Aleksander; Sowinska-Seidler, Anna; Iwaniszewska, Barbara; Malunowicz, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    X-linked Adrenal Hypoplasia Congenita (AHC) is caused by deletions or point mutations in the NR0B1 (DAX1) gene. We present a boy with AHC who came at the age of 25 days in a severe state due to prolonged vomiting and progressive dehydration. Laboratory studies showed prominent hyponatremia and hyperkaliemia but not hypoglycemia. Primary adrenal insufficiency was confirmed with low serum cortisol levels and high plasma ACTH levels. Hydrocortisone therapy combined with saline and glucose infusions was started immediately after blood collection. Two exons of the NR0B1 (DAX1) gene were impossible to amplify using the standard PCR method. Array CGH was used to confirm the putative copy-number variation of NR0B1 (DAX1) revealing a novel hemizygous deletion encompassing the entire NR0B1 (DAX1) gene together with the MAGEB genes. This genetic defect was also present in heterozygosity in the patient's mother. We show that NR0B1 (DAX1) gene analysis is important for confirmation of AHC diagnosis and highlights the role of genetic counseling in families with AHC patients, particularly those with X chromosome microdeletions, covering more than NR0B1 (DAX1) alone. We hope that further clinical follow-up of this patient and his family will shed a new light on the role of MAGEB genes. PMID:27656210

  12. Spontaneous bilateral adrenal hemorrhage following cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Dahan, Meryl; Lim, Chetana; Salloum, Chady

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative bilateral adrenal hemorrhage is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. This diagnosis is often missed because the symptoms and laboratory results are usually nonspecific. We report a case of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage associated with acute primary adrenal insufficiency following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The knowledge of this uncommon complication following any abdominal surgery allows timey diagnosis and rapid treatment. PMID:27275469

  13. Spontaneous bilateral adrenal hemorrhage following cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Meryl; Lim, Chetana; Salloum, Chady; Azoulay, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative bilateral adrenal hemorrhage is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. This diagnosis is often missed because the symptoms and laboratory results are usually nonspecific. We report a case of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage associated with acute primary adrenal insufficiency following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The knowledge of this uncommon complication following any abdominal surgery allows timey diagnosis and rapid treatment.

  14. Massive neonatal adrenal enlargement due to cytomegaly, persistence of the transient cortex, and hyperplasia of the permanent cortex: findings in Cushing syndrome associated with hemihypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Carney, J Aidan; Ho, Josephine; Kitsuda, Kazuteru; Young, William F; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2012-10-01

    Described in this article is the massive enlargement of both adrenal glands in 3 newborns-2 girls and 1 boy. Two had hemihypertrophy and other congenital abnormalities but no identified genetic mutation; the third had genetically proven Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. Two had severe Cushing syndrome, the third had hypercortisolemia but no clinical Cushing syndrome. Bilateral adrenalectomy cured Cushing syndrome in the 2 with severe symptoms; total adrenal weight in these patients was 44 and 53 g, respectively. Unilateral adrenalectomy was performed in the third patient: the gland weighed 52 g; postoperatively, the patient's hypercortisolemia normalized, and, concomitantly, the enlarged contralateral adrenal gland had a 5-fold decrease in size with slight enlargement 6 years postoperatively. Microscopically, the 3 patients had similar pathology: massive adrenal enlargement due to a combination of cytomegaly, persistence of the transient cortex, and hyperplasia of the permanent cortex. The pathologic findings were most likely the result of the genetic mutation identified in 1 patient and of an unknown mutation in the remaining 2 patients.

  15. Endogenous Cushing's Syndrome with Precocious Puberty in an 8-Year-Old Boy due to a Large Unilateral Adrenal Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Muhammad Rajib; Alam, Md. Mashiul; Nabi, Junaid; Kibria, Mahzabin

    2013-01-01

    Adrenocortical tumors (ACTs) causing Cushing's syndrome are extremely rare in children and adolescents. Bilateral macronodular adrenocortical disease which is a component of the McCune-Albright syndrome is the most common cause of endogenous Cushing's syndrome. We report the case of a boy with Cushing's syndrome who presented with obesity and growth retardation. The child was hypertensive. The biochemical evaluation revealed that his serum cortisol levels were 25.80 μg/dL, with a concomitant plasma ACTH level of 10.0 pg/mL and nonsuppressed serum cortisol on high-dose dexamethasone suppression test (HDDST) to be 20.38 μg/dL. Computed tomography of the abdomen demonstrated a 8 × 6 × 5 cm left adrenal mass with internal calcifications. Following preoperative stabilization, laparotomy was carried out which revealed a lobulated left adrenal mass with intact capsule weighing 120 grams. Histopathological examination revealed a benign cortical neoplastic lesion, suggestive of adrenal adenoma; composed of large polygonal cells with centrally placed nuclei and prominent nucleoli without capsular and vascular invasion. On the seventh postoperative day, cortisol levels were within normal range indicating biochemical remission of Cushing's syndrome. On followup after three months, the patient showed significant clinical improvement and had lost moderate amount of weight and adrenal imaging was found to be normal. PMID:23533838

  16. Primary Adrenal Lymphoma Possibly Associated With Epstein–Barr Virus Reactivation Due to Immunosuppression Under Methotrexate Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ohkura, Yu; Shindoh, Junichi; Haruta, Shusuke; Kaji, Daisuke; Ota, Yasunori; Fujii, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Masaji; Watanabe, Goro; Matsuda, Masamichi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Primary adrenal lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD) is an extremely rare disease that is widely known to be associated with methotrexate (MTX) use in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A 70-year-old man was incidentally found to have a tumor at the dorsal part of the liver in a medical check-up. He had a history of RA treated with MTX. Abdominal ultrasonography demonstrated a low echoic mass (30 mm in diameter) at the dorsal part of the liver, located close to the inferior vena cava. Preoperative differential diagnoses included intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, adrenal tumor, and hepatic malignant lymphoma, but no definitive diagnosis was reached. On exploratory laparotomy, the tumor seemed to be derived from the right adrenal gland and adhered tightly to segment 7 of the liver. Therefore, right adrenectomy with partial resection of segment 7 of the liver was performed. Pathological findings revealed diffuse inflammatory cell infiltration with a population of small atypical lymphoid cells, with positive immunohistochemical evidence for Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). Final diagnosis was primary adrenal iatrogenic EBV-positive LPD, classified as “other iatrogenic immunodeficiency-associated LPDs: Hodgkin-like lesions.” In this report, we described the possibility of the spontaneous healing of MTX-associated LPD (MTX-LPD) before treatment and the importance of doubting MTX-LPD and doing immunostaining to necrotic tissue. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MTX-related EBV-positive LPD, Hodgkin-like lesion, of the unilateral adrenal gland in patient with RA. PMID:26252293

  17. A Case of Bilateral Testicular Tumors Subsequently Diagnosed as Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Due to 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Yan-Kun; Sha, Yan-Wei; Ding, Lu; Liu, Wei-Wu; Song, Yue-Qiang; Lin, Jin; He, Xue-Mei; Qiu, Ping-Ping; Zhang, Ling; Li, Ping

    2016-01-01

    21-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) caused congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a group of autosomal recessive genetic disorders resulting from mutations in genes involved with cortisol (CO) synthesis in the adrenal glands. Testicular adrenal rest tumors (TARTs) are rarely the presenting symptoms of CAH. Here, we describe a case of simple virilizing CAH with TARTs, in a 15-year-old boy. The patient showed physical signs of precocious puberty. The levels of blood adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), urinary 17-ketone steroids (17-KS), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), and serum progesterone (PRGE) were elevated, whereas those of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and CO were reduced. Computed tomography (CT) of the adrenal glands and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the testes showed a soft tissue density (more pronounced on the right side) and an irregularly swollen mass (more pronounced on the left side), respectively. Pathological examination of a specimen of the mass indicated polygonal/circular eosinophilic cytoplasm, cord-like arrangement of interstitial cells, and lipid pigment in the cytoplasm. Immunohistochemistry results precluded a diagnosis of Leydig cell tumors. DNA sequencing revealed a hackneyed homozygous mutation, I2g, on intron 2 of the CYP21A2 gene. The patient’s symptoms improved after a three-month of dexamethasone therapy. Recent radiographic data showed reduced hyperplastic adrenal nodules and testicular tumors. A diagnosis of TART should be considered and prioritized in CAH patients with testicular tumors. Replacement therapy using a sufficient amount of dexamethasone in this case helps combat TART. PMID:26985347

  18. Traumatic and non-traumatic adrenal emergencies.

    PubMed

    Chernyak, Victoria; Patlas, Michael N; Menias, Christine O; Soto, Jorge A; Kielar, Ania Z; Rozenblit, Alla M; Romano, Luigia; Katz, Douglas S

    2015-12-01

    Multiple traumatic and non-traumatic adrenal emergencies are occasionally encountered during the cross-sectional imaging of emergency department patients. Traumatic adrenal hematomas are markers of severe polytrauma, and can be easily overlooked due to multiple concomitant injuries. Patients with non-traumatic adrenal emergencies usually present to an emergency department with a non-specific clinical picture. The detection and management of adrenal emergencies is based on cross-sectional imaging. Adrenal hemorrhage, adrenal infection, or rupture of adrenal neoplasm require immediate detection to avoid dire consequences. More often however, adrenal emergencies are detected incidentally in patients being investigated for non-specific acute abdominal pain. A high index of suspicion is required for the establishment of timely diagnosis and to avert potentially life-threatening complications. We describe cross-sectional imaging findings in patients with traumatic and non-traumatic adrenal hemorrhage, adrenal infarctions, adrenal infections, and complications of adrenal masses.

  19. Folate Insufficiency Due to Celiac Disease in a 49-Year-Old Woman of Southeast Asian-Indian Ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Datta Mitra, Ananya; Gupta, Asha; Jialal, Ishwarlal

    2016-08-01

    The clinical presentation of celiac disease has evolved from chronic diarrhea and malnutrition to mild nutrient insufficiencies. Recently diagnosed adults with celiac disease should be assessed for micronutrient deficiencies because early institution of a gluten-free diet (GFD) prevents morbidity and reduces the incidence of gastrointestinal malignant neoplasms and osteoporosis. In this report, we present the case of a 49-year-old woman of Southeast Asian-Indian descent living in the United States who had folate insufficiency, as manifested by low serum and red blood cell (RBC) folate levels. Further investigation, including serologic testing and intestinal biopsy, confirmed a diagnosis of celiac disease and other nutrient deficiencies. Managing the condition of this patient with folate supplements and implementation of a recommended GFD reversed the folate insufficiency. In conclusion, when serum and/or RBC levels are low in a person of Southeast Asian-Indian descent living in a country with folate fortification of the grain supply, such as the United States, the medical team needs to look for an organic cause, as in our patient, to diagnose and manage celiac disease early and, hopefully, forestall complications.

  20. Severe de novo Hepatitis B Recovered from Late-Onset Liver Insufficiency with Prolonged Ascites and Hypoalbuminemia due to Hepatitis B Virus Genotype Bj with Precore Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Akira; Ishii, Toshiya; Sano, Fumiaki; Yamada, Takayuki; Takahashi, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    De novo hepatitis B is associated with a high risk of hepatic failure often resulting in fatal fulminant hepatitis even when nucleotide analogues are administered. A 77-year-old female developed de novo hepatitis B after R-CHOP (rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisolone) treatment for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) isolated from the patient was of genotype Bj, with a precore mutation (G1896A) exhibiting an extremely high viral load at the onset of hepatitis. She showed markedly high levels of transaminase with mild jaundice on admission and rapid decrease of prothrombin activity after admission. Although acute liver failure was averted by the administration of entecavir and corticosteroid pulse therapy, liver volume decreased to 860 ml, and marked hypoalbuminemia accompanying massive ascites occurred 2 months after the onset of hepatitis and persisted for 3 months with high levels of HBV DNA and mild abnormal alanine aminotransferase levels. Frequent infusions of albumin solution, nutrition support, and alleviation therapy showed limited effect. However, overall improvement along with HBV DNA reduction was observed after increasing the dose of entecavir and completion of prednisolone that was administered with a minimum dose for adrenal insufficiency. An immediate and sufficient suppression of virus replication with potent antiviral therapy is critical, particularly in patients infected with HBV precore mutation (G1896A) and/or Bj genotype, which may have a high viral replication and direct hepatocellular damage. PMID:27920641

  1. Adrenal glands

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002219.htm Adrenal glands To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The adrenal glands are two triangle-shaped glands. One gland is ...

  2. Adrenal crisis secondary to bilateral adrenal haemorrhage after hemicolectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Venessa H M; Kabir, Shahrir; Ip, Julian C Y

    2016-01-01

    Summary Adrenal haemorrhage is a rare cause of adrenal crisis, which requires rapid diagnosis, prompt initiation of parenteral hydrocortisone and haemodynamic monitoring to avoid hypotensive crises. We herein describe a case of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage after hemicolectomy in a 93-year-old female with high-grade colonic adenocarcinoma. This patient’s post-operative recovery was complicated by an acute hypotensive episode, hypoglycaemia and syncope, and subsequent computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen revealed bilateral adrenal haemorrhage. Given her labile blood pressure, intravenous hydrocortisone was commenced with rapid improvement of blood pressure, which had incompletely responded with fluids. A provisional diagnosis of hypocortisolism was made. Initial heparin-induced thrombocytopenic screen (HITTS) was positive, but platelet count and coagulation profile were both normal. The patient suffered a concurrent transient ischaemic attack with no neurological deficits. She was discharged on a reducing dose of oral steroids with normal serum cortisol levels at the time of discharge. She and her family were educated about lifelong steroids and the use of parenteral steroids should a hypoadrenal crisis eventuate. Learning points: Adrenal haemorrhage is a rare cause of hypoadrenalism, and thus requires prompt diagnosis and management to prevent death from primary adrenocortical insufficiency. Mechanisms of adrenal haemorrhage include reduced adrenal vascular bed capillary resistance, adrenal vein thrombosis, catecholamine-related increased adrenal blood flow and adrenal vein spasm. Standard diagnostic assessment is a non-contrast CT abdomen. Intravenous hydrocortisone and intravenous substitution of fluids are the initial management. A formal diagnosis of primary adrenal insufficiency should never delay treatment, but should be made afterwards. PMID:27855238

  3. Macronodular Adrenal Hyperplasia due to Mutations in an Armadillo Repeat Containing 5 (ARMC5) Gene: A Clinical and Genetic Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Faucz, Fabio R.; Zilbermint, Mihail; Lodish, Maya B.; Szarek, Eva; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Sinaii, Ninet; Berthon, Annabel; Libé, Rossella; Assié, Guillaume; Espiard, Stéphanie; Drougat, Ludivine; Ragazzon, Bruno; Bertherat, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    Context: Inactivating germline mutations of the probable tumor suppressor gene, armadillo repeat containing 5 (ARMC5), have recently been identified as a genetic cause of macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (MAH). Objective: We searched for ARMC5 mutations in a large cohort of patients with MAH. The clinical phenotype of patients with and without ARMC5 mutations was compared. Methods: Blood DNA from 34 MAH patients was genotyped using Sanger sequencing. Diurnal serum cortisol measurements, plasma ACTH levels, urinary steroids, 6-day Liddle's test, adrenal computed tomography, and weight of adrenal glands at adrenalectomy were assessed. Results: Germline ARMC5 mutations were found in 15 of 34 patients (44.1%). In silico analysis of the mutations indicated that seven (20.6%) predicted major implications for gene function. Late-night cortisol levels were higher in patients with ARMC5-damaging mutations compared with those without and/or with nonpathogenic mutations (14.5 ± 5.6 vs 6.7 ± 4.3, P < .001). All patients carrying a pathogenic ARMC5 mutation had clinical Cushing's syndrome (seven of seven, 100%) compared with 14 of 27 (52%) of those without or with mutations that were predicted to be benign (P = .029). Repeated-measures analysis showed overall higher urinary 17-hydroxycorticosteroids and free cortisol values in the patients with ARMC5-damaging mutations during the 6-day Liddle's test (P = .0002). Conclusions: ARMC5 mutations are implicated in clinically severe Cushing's syndrome associated with MAH. Knowledge of a patient's ARMC5 status has important clinical implications for the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome and genetic counseling of patients and their families. PMID:24601692

  4. Single-Session CT-Guided Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Bilateral Adrenal Gland Hyperplasia Due to Ectopic ACTH Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, Asha Shyn, Paul B.; Vivian, Mark A.; Ng, Ju-Mei; Tuncali, Kemal; Lorch, Jorchen H.; Zaheer, Sarah N.; Gordon, Michael S.; Silverman, Stuart G.

    2015-10-15

    Bilateral adrenalectomy is currently the only available treatment for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent Cushing’s syndrome (ectopic ACTH syndrome) that is refractory to pharmacologic therapy. We describe two patients with refractory ectopic ACTH syndrome who were treated with CT-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of both hyperplastic adrenal glands in a single session: One was not a surgical candidate, and the other had undergone unsuccessful surgery. Following the procedure, both patients achieved substantial decreases in serum cortisol, symptomatic improvement, and decreased anti-hypertensive medication requirements.

  5. The Suppressed Induction of Human Mature Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Caused by Asbestos Is Not due to Interleukin-2 Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Yoshitome, Kei; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Otsuki, Takemi

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that exposure to chrysotile B (CB) asbestos suppressed the induction of mature cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) during mixed lymphocyte reaction assays (MLRs) with a decrease in the proliferation of immature CTLs. However, the mechanism responsible for the effect of asbestos fibers on the differentiation of CTLs remains unclear. Since interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a regulator of T lymphocyte proliferation, we examined the effect of IL-2 addition on suppressed CTL differentiation in CB-exposed cultures using flow cytometry (FCM). When IL-2 was added at 1 ng/mL on the second day of MLRs, the asbestos-caused decreases in the proliferation and percentages of CD25(+) and CD45RO(+) cells in CD8(+) lymphocytes were not recovered by IL-2 addition, although the decrease in percentage of granzyme B(+) cells was partially recovered. CD8(+) lymphocytes from the IL-2-treated culture with asbestos showed the same degree of cytotoxicity as those in cultures without IL-2 or asbestos. These findings indicate that IL-2 insufficiency is not the main cause for the suppressed induction of CTLs by asbestos exposure, although they suggest a potential for the improvement of such suppressed CTL functions. Secretory factors other than IL-2 in addition to membrane-bound stimulatory molecules may play a role in asbestos-caused suppressed CTL differentiation.

  6. The Suppressed Induction of Human Mature Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Caused by Asbestos Is Not due to Interleukin-2 Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Lee, Suni; Yoshitome, Kei; Hayashi, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that exposure to chrysotile B (CB) asbestos suppressed the induction of mature cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) during mixed lymphocyte reaction assays (MLRs) with a decrease in the proliferation of immature CTLs. However, the mechanism responsible for the effect of asbestos fibers on the differentiation of CTLs remains unclear. Since interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a regulator of T lymphocyte proliferation, we examined the effect of IL-2 addition on suppressed CTL differentiation in CB-exposed cultures using flow cytometry (FCM). When IL-2 was added at 1 ng/mL on the second day of MLRs, the asbestos-caused decreases in the proliferation and percentages of CD25+ and CD45RO+ cells in CD8+ lymphocytes were not recovered by IL-2 addition, although the decrease in percentage of granzyme B+ cells was partially recovered. CD8+ lymphocytes from the IL-2-treated culture with asbestos showed the same degree of cytotoxicity as those in cultures without IL-2 or asbestos. These findings indicate that IL-2 insufficiency is not the main cause for the suppressed induction of CTLs by asbestos exposure, although they suggest a potential for the improvement of such suppressed CTL functions. Secretory factors other than IL-2 in addition to membrane-bound stimulatory molecules may play a role in asbestos-caused suppressed CTL differentiation. PMID:27975069

  7. Oral doxycycline with topical tacrolimus for treatment of stasis dermatitis due to chronic venous insufficiency: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Maroo, Niteeka; Choudhury, Supriyo; Sen, Sumit; Chatterjee, Suparna

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) in lower limbs manifest as stasis dermatitis. The anti-collagenase, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of doxycycline and the T-cell inhibitory effects of tacrolimus could theoretically modify the disease pathophysiology. This study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy and safety of four weeks combination therapy of oral doxycycline 100 mg with topical tacrolimus 0.1% for stasis dermatitis associated with CVI. Materials and Methods: A single-arm, interventional pilot study was conducted on subjects with CVI of C4 to C6 category (CEAP classification: clinical, etiology, anatomical, pathophysiology). Treatment duration was four weeks with fortnightly follow-ups. Primary efficacy was assessed as changes from baseline of pigmentation, erythema, edema, itching and hair loss of the affected area evaluated on Likert scale scores. Secondary efficacy parameters were percentage improvement of the dermatitis area and changes in ulcer dimensions (maximum length and breadth), if present. Safety evaluation included all treatment emergent clinical signs and symptoms reported by the patients and/or observed by the physician. Results: Out of 19 recruited subjects, 15 completed the study for analysis. Significant (P<0.01) improvement in pain, edema, pigmentation, erythema and exudation were observed. Reduction of ulcer dimensions was also statistically significant (P<0.01). 86.6% showed improvement of the dermatitis area, 6.7% patients failed to show any improvement and 6.7% showed worsening. Adverse effects were observed in only two subjects. Conclusion: This pilot study suggests efficacy of this combination therapy in controlling features of stasis dermatitis but further studies are needed for validation. PMID:22345882

  8. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency: description of a new mutation, R384X

    PubMed Central

    Matallana-Rhoades, Audrey Mary; Corredor-Castro, Juan David; Mecias-Cruz, Bony Valentina; Mejia de Beldjena, Liliana

    2016-01-01

    Case Description: It is presented the phenotype of a new compound heterozygous mutation of the genes R384X and Q356X encoding the enzyme of 11-beta-hydroxylase Clinical Findings: Severe virilization, peripheral hypertension, and early puberty. Treatment and Outcome: Managed with hormone replacement therapy (corticosteroid) and antihypertensive therapy (beta-blocker), resulting in the control of physical changes and levels of arterial tension. Clinical Relevance: According to the phenotypic characteristics of the patient, it is inferred that the R384X mutation carries an additional burden on the Q356X mutation, with the latter previously described as a cause of 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency. The description of a new genotype, as in this case, expands the understanding of the hereditary burden and deciphers the various factors that lead to this pathology as well as the other forms of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), presenting with a broad spectrum of clinical presentations. This study highlights the importance of a complete description of the patient's CAH genetic profile as well as their parents' genetic profile. PMID:27821898

  9. A rare adrenal incidentaloma: adrenal schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Adas, Mine; Ozulker, Filiz; Adas, Gokhan; Koc, Bora; Ozulker, Tamer; Sahin, Ilknur Mansuroglu

    2013-01-01

    Adrenal schwannoma is an extremely uncommon cause of incidentaloma. It originates from neural sheath Schwann cells of the adrenal gland. We report the case of a left adrenal schwannoma incidentally discovered in a 32-year-old woman during examination of bloated feeling and stomach ache. The patient was incidentally found to have a left adrenal mass of 9 cm on abdominal ultrasonography. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and [(18)F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) were also performed. Metabolic evaluation was unremarkable. Due to the large size of the tumor, left adrenalectomy was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful. Histological examination established the diagnosis of schwannoma. This diagnosis was supported by immunohistochemistry of S-100 and vimentin positivity. In conclusion, adrenal schwannoma is an extremely rare entity and can grow considerably in size. The present case report emphasizes that clinicians should be aware of the possibility of retroperitoneal schwannoma. Total excision of benign schwannoma is associated with a favorable outcome. To our knowledge, there are case reports of schwannoma with CT and magnetic resonance imaging findings in the literature, although this is the first schwannoma case with PET-CT imaging.

  10. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency: functional consequences of four CYP11B1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Menabò, Soara; Polat, Seher; Baldazzi, Lilia; Kulle, Alexandra E; Holterhus, Paul-Martin; Grötzinger, Joachim; Fanelli, Flaminia; Balsamo, Antonio; Riepe, Felix G

    2014-05-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is one of the most common autosomal recessive inherited endocrine disease. Steroid 11β-hydroxylase deficiency (11β-OHD) is the second most common form of CAH. The aim of the study was to study the functional consequences of three novel and one previously described CYP11B1 gene mutations (p.(Arg143Trp), p.(Ala306Val), p.(Glu310Lys) and p.(Arg332Gln)) detected in patients suffering from classical and non-classical 11β-OHD. Functional analyses were performed by using a HEK293 cell in vitro expression system comparing wild type (WT) with mutant 11β-hydroxylase activity. Mutant proteins were examined in silico to study their effect on the three-dimensional structure of the protein. Two mutations (p.(Ala306Val) and p.(Glu310Lys)) detected in patients with classical 11β-OHD showed a nearly complete loss of 11β-hydroxylase activity. The mutations p.(Arg143Trp) and p.(Arg332Gln) detected in patients with non-classical 11β-OHD showed a partial functional impairment with approximately 8% and 6% of WT activity, respectively. Functional mutation analysis allows the classification of novel CYP11B1 mutations as causes of classical and non-classical 11β-OHD. The detection of patients with non-classical phenotypes underscores the importance to screen patients with a phenotype comparable to non-classical 21-hydroxylase deficiency for mutations in the CYP11B1 gene in case of a negative analysis of the CYP21A2 gene. As CYP11B1 mutations are most often individual for a family, the in vitro analysis of novel mutations is essential for clinical and genetic counselling.

  11. Arterial insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... the most common causes of arterial insufficiency is atherosclerosis or "hardening of the arteries." Fatty material (called ... Images Arteries of the brain Developmental process of atherosclerosis References Hansson GK, Hamsten A. Atherosclerosis, thrombosis, and ...

  12. A design thinking approach to primary ovarian insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lisa A; Porter, Alison G; Pelligrini, Vincent A; Schnatz, Peter F; Jiang, Xuezhi; Kleinstreuer, Nicole; Hall, Janet E; Verbiest, Sarah; Olmstead, Jill; Fair, Ryan; Falorni, Alberto; Persani, Luca; Rajkovic, Aleksandar; Mehta, Khanjan; Nelson, Lawrence M

    2017-03-01

    Most clinicians are not prepared to provide integrated personal care to address all the clinical needs of women with primary ovarian insufficiency. Design thinking is an engineering methodology used to develop and evaluate novel concepts for systems operation. Here we articulate the need for a seamlessly integrated mobile health system to support genomic research as well as patient care. We also review the pathophysiology and management of primary ovarian insufficiency. Molecular understanding regarding the pathogenesis is essential to developing strategies for prevention, earlier diagnosis, and appropriate management of the disorder. The syndrome is a chronic disorder characterized by oligo/amenorrhea and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism before age 40 years. There may be significant morbidity due to: 1) depression and anxiety related to the loss of reproductive hormones and infertility; 2) associated autoimmune adrenal insufficiency or hypothyroidism; and 3) reduced bone mineral density and increased risk of cardiovascular disease related to estrogen deficiency. Approximately 5% to 10% of women with primary ovarian insufficiency conceive and have a child. Women who develop primary ovarian insufficiency related to a premutation in FMR1 are at risk of having a child with fragile X syndrome, the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability. In most cases of spontaneous primary ovarian insufficiency no environmental exposure or genetic mechanism can be identified. As a rare disease, the diagnosis of primary ovarian insufficiency presents special challenges. Connecting patients and community health providers in real time with investigators who have the requisite knowledge and expertise would help solve this dilemma.

  13. Adrenal Function Status in Patients with Paracoccidioidomycosis after Prolonged Post-Therapy Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Tobón, Angela M.; Agudelo, Carlos A.; Restrepo, Carlos A.; Villa, Carlos A.; Quiceno, William; Estrada, Santiago; Restrepo, Angela

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed adrenal function in patients with paracoccididioidomycosis who had been treated to determine a possible connection between high antibody titers and adrenal dysfunction attributable to persistence of the fungus in adrenal gland. Adrenal gland function was studied in 28 previously treated patients, 2 (7.1%) of whom were shown to have adrenal insufficiency and 7 (259%) who showed a below normal response to stimuli by adrenocorticotropic hormone. Paracoccidioides brasiliensis was detected in the adrenal gland from one of the patients with adrenal insufficiency. Although the study failed to demonstrate a significant difference between high antibody titers and low cortisol levels, the proportion of adrenal insufficiency detected and the subnormal response to adrenocorticotropic hormone confirmed that adrenal damage is an important sequela of paracoccidioidomycosis. Studies with a larger number of patients should be conducted to confirm the hypothesis of persistence of P. brasiliensis in adrenal gland after therapy. PMID:20595488

  14. Neurologic complications of disorders of the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Bertorini, Tulio E; Perez, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of the adrenal glands frequently have secondary neurological manifestations, while some diseases that involve the central nervous system are accompanied by adrenal gland dysfunction. Excessive corticosteroid secretions in primary or secondary Cushing's syndrome causes muscle weakness and behavioral disturbances, such as emotional lability and sometimes depression, while adrenal insufficiency may cause fatigue, weakness, and depression. Adrenoleukodystrophy and adrenoneuromyelopathy are X-linked recessive disorders of the metabolism of very long chain fatty acids that manifest with white matter abnormalities of the brain, myelopathy and/or neuropathy, as well as adrenal insufficiency. Other disorders of the adrenal glands include hyperaldosteroidism, which may cause weakness from hypokalemia. Dysfunction of the adrenal medulla causes excessive or deficient secretion of catecholamines, primarily causing cardiovascular symptoms. This chapter reviews the clinical manifestations and diagnostic aspects and treatment of the various disorders of the adrenal glands. Some of the congenital adrenal diseases are also discussed.

  15. Functional characterization of two novel point mutations in the CYP21 gene causing simple virilizing forms of congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Krone, Nils; Riepe, Felix G; Grötzinger, Joachim; Partsch, Carl-Joachim; Sippell, Wolfgang G

    2005-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia is a group of autosomal recessive disorders most often caused by deficiency of steroid 21-hydroxylase due to mutations in the CYP21 gene. We studied the functional and structural consequences of two novel missense mutations in the CYP21 gene, detected in two simple virilizing congenital adrenal hyperplasia patients. Both the male and female patient were compound heterozygous for the novel I77T and A434V point mutations, respectively. The in vitro expression analysis in COS-7 cells revealed a reduced 21-hydroxylase activity in the I77T mutant of 3 +/- 2% (sd) for the conversion of 17-hydroxyprogesterone to 11-deoxycortisol and of 5 +/- 3% for the conversion of progesterone to 11-deoxycorticosterone. The A434V mutant had a residual enzyme activity of 14 +/- 2% for 17-hydroxyprogesterone and 12 +/- 6% for progesterone. Substrate affinity was similar in the mutants as in the CYP21 wild-type protein, whereas reaction velocity was markedly decreased in both mutants. These effects could be readily explained by structural changes induced by the mutations, which were rationalized by a three-dimensional-model structure of the CYP21 protein. We hypothesize that the I77T mutation markedly decreases the reaction product release and/or substrate entrance to the enzyme's active site, whereas the A434V mutant reduces both the catalytic capacity and reaction velocity. Studying the enzyme function in vitro helps to understand the phenotypical expression and disease severity of 21-hydroxylase deficiency and also provides new insights into cytochrome P450 structure-function relationships.

  16. Cystic adrenal lesions: focus on pediatric population (a review)

    PubMed Central

    CARSOTE, MARA; GHEMIGIAN, ADINA; TERZEA, DANA; GHEORGHISAN-GALATEANU, ANCUTA AUGUSTINA; VALEA, ANA

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim The cysts may potentially affect any organ; adrenals cysts are rare. This is a review of the literature regarding adrenal cysts, focusing on children and young adults. General data Three major types have been described: pure cysts (endothelial, epithelial, and hemorrhagic or pseudocyst), parasitic (as hydatid) cysts and cystic part of a tumour (most frequent are neuroblastoma, ganglioneuroma, pheocromocytoma, and teratoma). The complications are: bleeding, local pressure effects; infection; rupture (including post-traumatic); arterial hypertension due to renal vessels compression. Adrenal hemorrhage represents a particular condition associating precipitating factors such as: coagulation defects as Factor IX or X deficiency, von Willebrand disease, thrombocytopenia; antiphospholipid syndrome; previous therapy with clopidogrel or corticosteroids; the rupture of a prior tumour. At birth, the most suggestive features are abdominal palpable mass, anemia, and persistent jaundice. Adrenal insufficiency may be found especially in premature delivery. The hemorrhage is mostly self-limiting. Antenatal ultrasound diagnosis of a cyst does not always predict the exact pathology result. The most important differential diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage/hemorrhagic cyst is cystic neuroblastoma which is highly suggestive in the presence of distant metastases and abnormal catecholamine profile. The major clue to differentiate the two conditions is the fact that the tumor is stable or increases over time while the adrenal hemorrhage is expected to remit within one to two weeks. Conclusion Pediatric adrenal cysts vary from simple cysts with a benign behavior to neoplasia- related lesions displaying severe prognosis as seen in cystic neuroblastoma. A multidisciplinary team is required for their management which is conservative as close follow-up or it makes necessary different surgical procedures in cases with large masses or if a malignancy suspicion is presented

  17. Placental insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... other drugs Certain medicines can also increase the risk of placental insufficiency. In some cases, the placenta: May have an abnormal shape May not grow big enough (more likely if you are carrying twins or other multiples) Does not attach correctly to ...

  18. Adrenal Disorders and the Paediatric Brain: Pathophysiological Considerations and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Polizzi, Agata; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Romeo, Anna Claudia; Dipasquale, Valeria; Chirico, Valeria; Arrigo, Teresa; Ruggieri, Martino

    2014-01-01

    Various neurological and psychiatric manifestations have been recorded in children with adrenal disorders. Based on literature review and on personal case-studies and case-series we focused on the pathophysiological and clinical implications of glucocorticoid-related, mineralcorticoid-related, and catecholamine-related paediatric nervous system involvement. Childhood Cushing syndrome can be associated with long-lasting cognitive deficits and abnormal behaviour, even after resolution of the hypercortisolism. Exposure to excessive replacement of exogenous glucocorticoids in the paediatric age group (e.g., during treatments for adrenal insufficiency) has been reported with neurological and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities (e.g., delayed myelination and brain atrophy) due to potential corticosteroid-related myelin damage in the developing brain and the possible impairment of limbic system ontogenesis. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), a disorder of unclear pathophysiology characterised by increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, has been described in children with hypercortisolism, adrenal insufficiency, and hyperaldosteronism, reflecting the potential underlying involvement of the adrenal-brain axis in the regulation of CSF pressure homeostasis. Arterial hypertension caused by paediatric adenomas or tumours of the adrenal cortex or medulla has been associated with various hypertension-related neurological manifestations. The development and maturation of the central nervous system (CNS) through childhood is tightly regulated by intrinsic, paracrine, endocrine, and external modulators, and perturbations in any of these factors, including those related to adrenal hormone imbalance, could result in consequences that affect the structure and function of the paediatric brain. Animal experiments and clinical studies demonstrated that the developing (i.e., paediatric) CNS seems to be particularly vulnerable to alterations induced by adrenal

  19. Adrenal disorders and the paediatric brain: pathophysiological considerations and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Salpietro, Vincenzo; Polizzi, Agata; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Romeo, Anna Claudia; Dipasquale, Valeria; Morabito, Paolo; Chirico, Valeria; Arrigo, Teresa; Ruggieri, Martino

    2014-01-01

    Various neurological and psychiatric manifestations have been recorded in children with adrenal disorders. Based on literature review and on personal case-studies and case-series we focused on the pathophysiological and clinical implications of glucocorticoid-related, mineralcorticoid-related, and catecholamine-related paediatric nervous system involvement. Childhood Cushing syndrome can be associated with long-lasting cognitive deficits and abnormal behaviour, even after resolution of the hypercortisolism. Exposure to excessive replacement of exogenous glucocorticoids in the paediatric age group (e.g., during treatments for adrenal insufficiency) has been reported with neurological and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities (e.g., delayed myelination and brain atrophy) due to potential corticosteroid-related myelin damage in the developing brain and the possible impairment of limbic system ontogenesis. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), a disorder of unclear pathophysiology characterised by increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, has been described in children with hypercortisolism, adrenal insufficiency, and hyperaldosteronism, reflecting the potential underlying involvement of the adrenal-brain axis in the regulation of CSF pressure homeostasis. Arterial hypertension caused by paediatric adenomas or tumours of the adrenal cortex or medulla has been associated with various hypertension-related neurological manifestations. The development and maturation of the central nervous system (CNS) through childhood is tightly regulated by intrinsic, paracrine, endocrine, and external modulators, and perturbations in any of these factors, including those related to adrenal hormone imbalance, could result in consequences that affect the structure and function of the paediatric brain. Animal experiments and clinical studies demonstrated that the developing (i.e., paediatric) CNS seems to be particularly vulnerable to alterations induced by adrenal

  20. Histoplasmosis of the adrenal glands studied by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.A.; Muchmore, H.G.; Tisdal, R.G.; Fahmy, A.; Pitha, J.V.

    1984-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the adrenal glands was performed on seven patients who had histologically proved disseminated histoplasmosis. All seven patients showed some degree of adrenal gland abnormality. The range of CT findings included minimal enlargement with faint flecks of calcium, moderate enlargement with focal low attenuation nodules, and massive enlargement with large areas of necrosis or dense calcification. The changes in each patient were bilateral and symmetrical. Adrenal gland shape was usually preserved. Finding of percutaneous adrenal biopsy, which was performed under CT guidance, made the diagnosis in one patient. Five of seven patients had adrenal insufficiency. It is concluded that the diagnosis of disseminated histoplasmosis should be considered in any patient who has bilateral adrenal gland enlargement and who resides in an endemic area, especially if there is evidence of adrenal insufficiency.

  1. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Merke, Deborah P; Bornstein, Stefan R

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to deficiency of 21-hydroxylase is a disorder of the adrenal cortex characterised by cortisol deficiency, with or without aldosterone deficiency, and androgen excess. Patients with the most severe form also have abnormalities of the adrenal medulla and epinephrine deficiency. The severe classic form occurs in one in 15,000 births worldwide, and the mild non-classic form is a common cause of hyperandrogenism. Neonatal screening for CAH and gene-specific prenatal diagnosis are now possible. Standard hormone replacement fails to achieve normal growth and development for many children with CAH, and adults can experience iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome, hyperandrogenism, infertility, or the development of the metabolic syndrome. This Seminar reviews the epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of CAH, and provides an overview of clinical challenges and future therapies.

  2. A case of recurrent labial adhesions in a 15-month-old child with asymptomatic non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Janus, Dominika; Wojcik, Malgorzata; Malunowicz, Ewa; Starzyk, Jerzy B

    2012-01-01

    Labial adhesions (synechia vulvae) are a relatively common disorder of the external genitalia in prepubertal girls. They usually occur between 3 months and 6 years of age, with a peak between 13 and 23 months of life. In the majority of cases, labial adhesions are asymptomatic and noticed by the parents or a physician during a routine physical examination. Frequently, they cause recurrent urinary tract infections. This report presents the case of a 15-month-old girl with recurrent labial adhesions and urinary tract infections. She was followed-up by a urologist from the age of 3 months, treated topically (estriol cream 1 mg/g and emollients) and surgically. No signs of androgenization were seen apart from advanced bone age. Urinary steroid profile and molecular analysis confirmed the diagnosis of non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCCAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. In the described case, a coincidence of NCCAH and labial adhesion cannot be excluded particularly in view of the resolving of urinary tract infections at the same time as resolving of labial adhesions. However, it seems that in cases of recurrent labial adhesion/synechia that require repeated surgical interventions in view of ineffectiveness of conservative treatment - as it was observed in the presented case - one should consider searching for NCCAH. This may allow not only for the causal treatment of labial adhesions but, above all, NCCAH and, in consequence, the prevention of intensification of virilization, hirsutism, menstrual cycle, and fertility disturbances that are observed starting from puberty.

  3. Idiopathic Bilateral Adrenal Hemorrhage in a 63-Year-Old Male: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bodukam, Vijay Kumar; Thakur, Kshitij; Singh, Amandeep; Jenkins, Donald; Bahl, Jaya

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal hemorrhage is a largely uncommon condition typically caused by a number of factors including infection, MI, CHF, anticoagulants, trauma, surgery, and antiphospholipid syndrome. Yet, idiopathic bilateral hemorrhage is rare. The authors present a case of a 63-year-old male who presented with abdominal pain that was eventually diagnosed as bilateral adrenal hemorrhages due to an unknown origin. Abdominal CT revealed normal adrenal glands without enlargement, but an MRI displayed enlargement due to hemorrhage in both adrenals. There was no known cause; the patient had not suffered from an acute infection and was not on anticoagulants, and the patient's history did not reveal any of the other known causative factors. The case underscores the importance of keeping bilateral adrenal hemorrhages on the list of differentials even when a cause is not immediately clear. It also raises the question of whether CT is the most sensitive test in the diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage and whether the diagnostic approach should place greater weight on MRI. The case highlights the need for prompt therapy with steroids once bilateral hemorrhage is suspected to avert the development or progression of adrenal insufficiency. PMID:25973281

  4. Cord blood CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells fail to inhibit cord blood NK cell functions due to insufficient production and expression of TGF-beta1.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liqing; Tanaka, Shigeki; Bonno, Motoki; Ido, Masaru; Kawai, Masatoshi; Yamamoto, Hatsumi; Komada, Yoshihiro

    2014-07-01

    Although CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg (Treg) cells are known to modulate NK cell functions, the modulation mechanism of these cells in cord blood has not been fully clarified. The purpose of this study was to clarify the mechanism whereby cord blood Treg cells modulate cord NK cells. By performing various cultures of purified NK cells with or without autologous Treg cells, diminished inhibitory effects of cord Treg cells towards cord NK cell functions, including activation, cytokine production, and cytotoxicity, were observed. We also observed lower secretion of sTGF-beta1 and lower expression of mTGF-beta1 by cord Treg cells than by adult Treg cells. These data revealed the capability of adult Treg cells to suppress rhIL-2-stimulated NK cell function by TGF-beta1, both membrane-bound and soluble types. The reduced inhibitory capabilities of cord Treg cells compared with adult Treg cells is thought to be due to insufficient expression of TGF-beta1.

  5. Longitudinal Evaluation of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Testicular Function in 8 Boys with Adrenal Hypoplasia Congenita (AHC) Due to NR0B1 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Galeotti, Caroline; Lahlou, Zineb; Goullon, Domitille; Sarda-Thibault, Hélène; Cahen-Varsaux, Juliette; Bignon-Topalovic, Joëlle; Bashamboo, Anu; McElreavey, Ken; Brauner, Raja

    2012-01-01

    Background Boys carrying mutations in the NR0B1 gene develop adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and impaired sexual development due to the combination of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) and primary defects in spermatogenesis. Methods We analysed the evolution of hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular function of 8 boys with AHC due to NR0B1 mutations. Our objective was to characterize and monitor the progressive deterioration of this function. Results The first symptoms appeared in the neonatal period (n = 5) or between 6 months and 8.7 years (n = 3). Basal plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) concentrations increased in all boys, whilst cortisol levels decreased in one case. The natremia was equal or below 134 mmol/L and kaliemia was over 5 mmol/L. All had increased plasma renin. In 3 of 4 patients diagnosed in the neonatal period and evaluated during the first year, the basal plasma gonadotropins concentrations, and their response to gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) test (n = 2), and those of testosterone were normal. The plasma inhibin B levels were normal in the first year of life. With the exception of two cases these concentrations decreased to below the normal for age. Anti-Müllerian hormone concentrations were normal for age in all except one case, which had low concentrations before the initiation of testosterone treatment. In 3 of the 8 cases the gene was deleted and the remaining 5 cases carried frameshift mutations that are predicted to introduce a downstream nonsense mutation resulting in a truncated protein. Conclusions The decreases in testosterone and inhibin B levels indicated a progressive loss of testicular function in boys carrying NR0B1 mutations. These non-invasive examinations can help to estimate the age of the testicular degradation and cryopreservation of semen may be considered in these cases as investigational procedure with the aim of restoring fertility. PMID:22761912

  6. An endocrinologist's view on relative adrenocortical insufficiency in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Imrich, Richard; Vlcek, Miroslav; Aldag, Jean C; Kerlik, Jana; Radikova, Zofia; Rovensky, Jozef; Vigas, Milan; Masi, Alfonse T

    2010-04-01

    The concept of relative adrenal insufficiency (RAI) has been originally introduced to describe a situation in which critically ill patients, without any prior risk or evidence for adrenal insufficiency, have total serum cortisol levels inadequate for the severity of patients' illness. The concept provided a framework for other disease states, in which higher than normal adrenal function could be expected, such as in chronic inflammation. An intense research in RAI field highlighted some new methodological aspects that significantly improved assessment of adrenal function in chronic illness. Measurement of salivary cortisol may provide additional information on locally available cortisol in target tissues. Low levels of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEAS) for given age and gender were confirmed as a simple and reliable indicator of decreased adrenal function, even in subjects with normal baseline cortisol or normal corticotropin-stimulated cortisol response. Combined lower DHEAS and lower baseline cortisol levels could be an example of hypocompetence of adrenocortical function, yet clinically not apparent.

  7. [Recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of classic forms of 21-hydroxylase-deficient congenital adrenal hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Amparo; Ezquieta, Begoña; Labarta, José Igancio; Clemente, María; Espino, Rafael; Rodriguez, Amaia; Escribano, Aranzazu

    2017-02-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the CYP21A2 gene. Cortisol and aldosterone synthesis are impaired in the classic forms (adrenal insufficiency and salt-wasting crisis). Females affected are virilised at birth, and are at risk for genital ambiguity. In this article we give recommendations for an early as possible diagnosis and an appropriate and individualised treatment. A patient and family genetic study is essential for the diagnosis of the patient, and allows genetic counselling, as well as a prenatal diagnosis and treatment for future pregnancy.

  8. Novel Use of Tolvaptan in a Pediatric Patient With Congestive Heart Failure Due to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Sami, Sarah A; Moffett, Brady S; Karlsten, Melissa L; Cabrera, Antonio G; Price, Jack F; Dreyer, William J; Denfield, Susan W; Jeewa, Aamir

    2015-01-01

    Successful management of hyponatremia in heart failure patients requires a multifaceted approach in order to preserve end-organ function. We describe the novel use of a selective vasopressin receptor antagonist, tolvaptan, for management of hyponatremia in a 17-year-old Caucasian male with severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy, congestive heart failure (CHF), and congenital adrenal hyperplasia. The medical history was significant for recurrent admissions for hyponatremia secondary to adrenal crises, which was also exacerbated by his CHF. After initiation of tolvaptan and its extended administration, he had no further hyponatremia-related admissions and no adverse reactions. The complexity of this combination of conditions is presented, and the efficacy of the drug and the rationale behind the treatment approach is discussed.

  9. Hyponatraemia secondary to nivolumab-induced primary adrenal failure

    PubMed Central

    Trainer, Harris; Hulse, Paul; Higham, Claire E; Trainer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Summary Checkpoint inhibitors, such as ipilimumab and pembrolizumab, have transformed the prognosis for patients with advanced malignant melanoma and squamous non-small-cell lung cancer, and their use will only expand as experience is gained in a variety of other malignancies, for instance, renal and lymphoma. As the use of checkpoint inhibitors increases, so too will the incidence of their unique side effects, termed immune-related adverse events (irAEs), which can affect dermatological, gastrointestinal, hepatic, endocrine and other systems. Nivolumab is a monoclonal antibody that blocks the human programmed death receptor-1 ligand (PD-L1) found on many cancer cells and is licensed for the treatment of advanced malignant melanoma. We describe the first case of nivolumab-induced adrenalitis resulting in primary adrenal failure presenting with hyponatraemia in a 43-year-old man with malignant melanoma. The case highlights the potentially life-threatening complications of checkpoint inhibitors and the need for patient education and awareness of irAEs among the wider clinical community because such side effects require prompt recognition and treatment. Learning points: Nivolumab can cause primary adrenal insufficiency. Not all cases of hyponatraemia in patients with malignancy are due to SIADH. Any patient on a checkpoint inhibitor becoming unwell should have serum cortisol urgently measured and if in doubt hydrocortisone therapy should be initiated. Although hyponatraemia can occur in patients with ACTH deficiency, the possibility of primary adrenal failure should also be considered and investigated by measurement of renin, aldosterone and ACTH. Patients receiving checkpoint inhibitors require education on the potential risks of hypocortisolaemia. PET imaging demonstrated bilateral increased activity consistent with an autoimmune adrenalitis. PMID:27857838

  10. Radioguided Adrenal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Deus, Javier; Millera, Alfonso; Andrés, Alejandro; Prats, Enrique; Gil, Ismael; Suarez, Manuel; Salcini, José L.; Lahoz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The laparoscopic adrenalectomy is considered as the procedure of choice for the treatment of adrenal hyperplasia and tumor lesions. However, some special situations may limit the use of this method due to the difficulty to locate the gland and perform the lesion excision. We analyze 2 patients of a left adrenal tumor, explaining how they have overcome the difficulties in both situations. The first case was a patient with a history of intra-abdominal surgery and the other patient suffered from severe obesity. We performed with the use of the gamma probe, and the 2 cases, was of great help to access and glandular localization. The help of gamma probe test was achieved in the surgical bed, that removal was complete. The use of the portable gamma probe facilitated the access to the left adrenal gland as well as conducting the glandular excision without delay, despite the difficulties due to the intra abdominal surgery caused by the previous surgery, and in the case of severe obesity. PMID:26426608

  11. Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in polycythemia vera

    PubMed Central

    Agito, Katrina; Krug, Esther I.

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage (BAH) is a rare complication typically seen in critically ill patients, which can lead to acute adrenal insufficiency and death unless it is recognized promptly and treated appropriately. We describe the case of a 64-year-old man with polycythemia vera found to be unresponsive with fever, hypotension, tachycardia, and hypoglycemia. Electrocardiogram showed ST-elevation with elevated troponin, hemoglobin, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time. He required aggressive ventilator and vasopressor support. Despite primary coronary intervention, he remained hypotensive. Random cortisol level was low. He received stress dose hydrocortisone with immediate hemodynamic stability. BAH was highly suspected and was confirmed by non-contrast abdominal computed tomography. Prompt recognition and timely initiated treatment remain crucial to impact the mortality associated with acute adrenal insufficiency. PMID:27609733

  12. The clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of adrenal emergencies.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Veronica; Sokari, Telematé

    2014-05-01

    Emergency medicine physicians should be able to identify and treat patients whose clinical presentations, including key historical, physical examination, and laboratory findings are consistent with diagnoses of primary, secondary, and tertiary adrenal insufficiency, adrenal crisis, and pheochromocytoma. Failure to make a timely diagnosis leads to increased morbidity and mortality. As great mimickers, adrenal emergencies often present with a constellation of nonspecific signs and symptoms that can lead even the most diligent emergency physician astray. The emergency physician must include adrenal emergencies in the differential diagnosis when encountering such clinical pictures.

  13. Adrenal gland disorders.

    PubMed

    Berry, Matthew E

    2009-01-01

    Medical imaging of the adrenal glands is an important aspect of the diagnosis of any adrenal gland disorder. This article discusses the normal anatomy and functions of the adrenal glands, as well as specific adrenal gland disorders and how they are diagnosed and treated. Radiologic technologists need to understand the causes, signs, symptoms, diagnosis and management of disorders that prevent the adrenal glands from functioning properly.

  14. Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (lipoid CAH) is the most fatal form of CAH, as it disrupts adrenal and gonadal steroidogenesis. Most cases of lipoid CAH are caused by recessive mutations in the gene encoding steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Affected patients typically present with signs of severe adrenal failure in early infancy and 46,XY genetic males are phenotypic females due to disrupted testicular androgen secretion. The StAR p.Q258X mutation accounts for about 70% of affected alleles in most patients of Japanese and Korean ancestry. However, it is more prevalent (92.3%) in the Korean population. Recently, some patients have been showed that they had late and mild clinical findings. These cases and studies constitute a new entity of 'nonclassic lipoid CAH'. The cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme, P450scc (CYP11A1), plays an essential role converting cholesterol to pregnenolone. Although progesterone production from the fetally derived placenta is necessary to maintain a pregnancy to term, some patients with P450scc mutations have recently been reported. P450scc mutations can also cause lipoid CAH and establish a recently recognized human endocrine disorder. PMID:25654062

  15. Adrenal Steroidogenesis and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Turcu, Adina F.; Auchus, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Adrenal steroidogenesis is a dynamic process, reliant on de novo synthesis from cholesterol, under the stimulation of ACTH and other regulators. The syntheses of mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and adrenal androgens occur in separate adrenal cortical zones, each expressing specific enzymes. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) encompasses a group of autosomal recessive enzymatic defects in cortisol biosynthesis. 21-hydroxylase (21OHD) deficiency accounts for over 90% of CAH cases and when milder or nonclassic forms are included, 21OHD is one of the most common genetic diseases. This review discusses in detail the epidemiology, genetics, diagnostic, clinical aspects and management of 21OHD. PMID:26038201

  16. How Is Adrenal Surgery Performed?

    MedlinePlus

    HOME ADRENAL GLANDS Background Where are the adrenal glands? What do the adrenal glands do? Is this adrenal tumor a genetic problem? Primary hyperaldosteronism (aldosterone-producing tumor) What is primary hyperaldosteronism? Signs ...

  17. Prevalence of microdeletion 22q11 in patients with hypernasal speech due to velopharyngeal insufficiency: Expanded phenotype and clinical comparison to nondeletion

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel-Bartelt, J.; Cytrynbaum, C.; Witzel, M.A.; Teshima, I.E.

    1994-09-01

    Microdeletion 22q11.2 has been reported as a frequent ethiology of both velocardiofacial (VCF) and DiGeorge syndromes. We have studied the prevalence of microdeletion 22q11 in a group of patients ascertained through a Speech and Language clinic presenting with (1) velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) and (2) difficultly in school. Growth parameters were measured, and facies were scored for features of VCF. Microdeletions were detected at locus D22S75 by FISH with probe N25 (Oncor), and at 22q11.2 with high resolution banding analysis (HRB). One child with typical VCF facies was considered to have a deletion at 22q11 with HRB, but is not deleted with N25, indicating that N25 may not detect all deletion patients. An additional 8/30 children tested to date were deleted with the N25 probe. Heart defects were present in only 2/8 deletion patients: VSD/ASD and PS/AS. One N25 deletion patient was atypica; he has a tall, lanky habitus (height = 90%), and facies not characteristic of CVF. As expected, there is a trend to lower head size, smaller ear size, and more typical facies in deletion patients; however, four of the nondeletion patients also had a clinical diagnosis of VCF. Medially displaced carotid arteries were present in both groups, which is therefore not a diagnostic feature of microdeletion 22q11. Our findings indicate that the microdeletion 22q11 is frequent (26% in this series) in a population with VPI, even when not selected for typical facies. We believe this series supports the view that microdeletion 22q11 has a broader clinical phenotype than previously recognized.

  18. Report: EPA’s Information Systems and Data Are at Risk Due to Insufficient Training of Personnel With Significant Information Security Responsibilities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #14-P-0142, March 21, 2014. The EPA places its information systems and data at risk due to an organizational structure that has not specified required duties and responsibilities to ensure personnel are trained on key information security roles.

  19. Adrenal Gland Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. Most adrenal gland tumors are ... and may not require treatment. Malignant adrenal gland cancers are uncommon. Types of tumors include Adrenocortical carcinoma - ...

  20. Adrenal Gland Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    The adrenal glands are small glands located on top of each kidney. They produce hormones that you can't live ... stress and has many other important functions. With adrenal gland disorders, your glands make too much or not ...

  1. Adrenal Gland Tumors: Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gland Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Adrenal Gland Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 03/ ... primary adrenal gland tumor is very uncommon. Exact statistics are not available for this type of tumor ...

  2. Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... malignant. Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal? In the past, ... of procedure and the patients overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain Shorter hospital stay Quicker ...

  3. [Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Götze, H

    1980-12-01

    Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency usually does not develop before reduction of enzyme output by more than 90%. Patients with pancreatic insufficiency have a ravenous appetite but fail to thrive from malnutrition. The caloric deprivation is primarily due to fat malabsorption, recognized by the passage of bulky foul smelling greasy stools. Several isolated enzyme deficiencies can be separated from diseases with generalised pancreatic insufficiency. Under replacement therapy with pancreatic enzyme supplements most patients improve and gain weight, although fat and bile acid malabsorption are not abolished.

  4. Rifampicin induced adrenal crisis in an uncommon setting

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Animesh; Suri, J. C.; Gupta, Mansi

    2013-01-01

    Adrenal crisis occurs when there is decreased secretions of steroid hormones (mainly cortisol) from the adrenal glands due to varied reasons. It may arise due to a primary adrenal condition or due to decreased hormonal signals from the pituitary secondary to a hypofunctioning pituitary. Hypopituitarism may result due to direct causes like trauma, tumour, infection or it may be due to some vascular insult as seen in Sheehan syndrome. We report an unusual presentation of Sheehan syndrome in the form of life-threatening adrenal crisis precipitated by the usage of rifampicin. PMID:24339502

  5. Adrenal venous sampling using Dyna-CT--a practical guide.

    PubMed

    Plank, Christina; Wolf, Florian; Langenberger, Herbert; Loewe, Christian; Schoder, Maria; Lammer, Johannes

    2012-09-01

    Primary hyperaldosteronism due to aldosterone secreting adrenal adenomas is an important and potentially curable cause for hypertension. The differentiation between unilateral or bilateral adrenal adenomas is crucial, as unilateral adenomas can easily be cured by surgery whereas bilateral adenomas have to be treated conservatively. Exact diagnosis can be made when unilateral or bilateral hormone production is proven with adrenal vein sampling. We present an effective step-by-step technique how to perform an adrenal vein sampling with a special emphasis on how to reliably catheterize the right adrenal vein using Dyna CT.

  6. Is DHEA replacement beneficial in chronic adrenal failure?

    PubMed

    Lang, Katharina; Burger-Stritt, Stephanie; Hahner, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    Although dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulphate ester dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) are the most abundant steroid hormones in the human circulation, its exact physiological role is not yet fully understood. In patients with adrenal insufficiency, secretion of DHEA is impaired, leading to decreased circulating DHEA and DHEAS levels, and to androgen deficiency in women. Replacement of DHEA in patients with adrenal insufficiency positively influence mood, sexuality and subjective health status. These effects are generally moderate and show high inter-individual variability. Limited evidence exists for immunomodulatory effects of DHEA. Although an increase of IGF-I levels has been documented, relevant effects on body composition, metabolic or cardiovascular parameters has not been observed in patients with adrenal insufficiency receiving DHEA. Larger-scale phase III studies are still lacking; therefore, initiation of DHEA replacement is decided on an individual basis, focussing on those patients with impaired well-being associated with signs and symptoms of androgen deficiency.

  7. Spontaneous Unilateral Adrenal Hemorrhage in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahem, Rawaa; Munguti, Cyrus; Mortada, Rami

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious medical condition associated with variable clinical presentation depending on the extent of the hemorrhage. Pregnancy-induced adrenal hemorrhage is poorly understood. A low cortisol level in the peripartum period with radiological findings is sufficient to establish the diagnosis. Prompt hormone replacement and supportive care to ensure good clinical outcomes is crucial. Due to the potentially life-threatening complications, physicians should have a high suspicion for adrenal hemorrhage when they evaluate patients with hypotension, fatigue, and abdominal pain during the peripartum period. PMID:28191381

  8. Intense Adrenal Enhancement: A CT Feature of Cardiogenic Shock

    SciTech Connect

    Hrabak-Paar, Maja

    2016-02-15

    In this report, images of intense adrenal enhancement in a 79-year-old female patient with right-sided heart failure and severe tricuspid insufficiency are presented. Only two cases of intense adrenal enhancement as a sign of cardiogenic shock were previously reported in the literature. Intense adrenal enhancement could be one of the earliest CT signs of cardiogenic shock. Its presence should be immediately reported to the referring physician as a sign of significant hemodynamic instability warranting early critical-care management.

  9. Localization of functional adrenal tumors by computed tomography and venous sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Dunnick, N.R.; Doppman, J.L.; Gill, J.R. Jr.; Strott, C.A.; Keiser, H.R.; Brennan, M.F.

    1982-02-01

    Fifty-eight patients with functional lesions of the adrenal glands underwent radiographic evaluation. Twenty-eight patients had primary aldosteronism (Conn syndrome), 20 had Cushing syndrome, and 10 had pheochromocytoma. Computed tomography (CT) correctly identified adrenal tumors in 11 (61%) of 18 patients with aldosteronomas, 6 of 6 patients with benign cortisol-producing adrenal tumors, and 5 (83%) of 6 patients with pheochromocytomas. No false-positive diagnoses were encountered among patients with adrenal adenomas. Bilateral adrenal hyperplasia appeared on CT scans as normal or prominent adrenal glands with a normal configuration; however, CT was not able to exclude the presence of small adenomas. Adrenal venous sampling was correct in each case, and reliably distinguished adrenal tumors from hyperplasia. Recurrent pheochromocytomas were the most difficult to loclize on CT due to the surgical changes in the region of the adrenals and the frequent extra-adrenal locations.

  10. Clinicopathological correlates of adrenal Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Duan, Kai; Gomez Hernandez, Karen; Mete, Ozgur

    2015-03-01

    Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is a rare endocrine disorder that incurs significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, due to glucocorticoid excess. It comprises adrenal (20%) and non-adrenal (80%) aetiologies. While the majority of cases are attributed to pituitary or ectopic corticotropin (ACTH) overproduction, primary cortisol-producing adrenal cortical lesions are increasingly recognised in the pathophysiology of Cushing's syndrome. Our understanding of this disease has progressed substantially over the past decade. Recently, important mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of adrenal hypercortisolism have been elucidated with the discovery of mutations in cyclic AMP signalling (PRKACA, PRKAR1A, GNAS, PDE11A, PDE8B), armadillo repeat containing 5 gene (ARMC5) a putative tumour suppressor gene, aberrant G-protein-coupled receptors, and intra-adrenal secretion of ACTH. Accurate subtyping of Cushing's syndrome is crucial for treatment decision-making and requires a complete integration of clinical, biochemical, imaging and pathology findings. Pathological correlates in the adrenal glands include hyperplasia, adenoma and carcinoma. While the most common presentation is diffuse adrenocortical hyperplasia secondary to excess ACTH production, this entity is usually treated with pituitary or ectopic tumour resection. Therefore, when confronted with adrenalectomy specimens in the setting of Cushing's syndrome, surgical pathologists are most commonly exposed to adrenocortical adenomas, carcinomas and primary macronodular or micronodular hyperplasia. This review provides an update on the rapidly evolving knowledge of adrenal Cushing's syndrome and discusses the clinicopathological correlations of this important disease.

  11. How Is Adrenal Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... exam will give other information about signs of adrenal gland cancer and other health problems. Your doctor will ... an adrenal cancer will spread outside of the adrenal gland. Imaging tests Chest x-ray A chest x- ...

  12. Three uncommon adrenal incidentalomas: a 13-year surgical pathology review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The discovery of adrenal incidentalomas due to the widespread use of sophisticated abdominal imaging techniques has resulted in an increasing trend of adrenal gland specimens being received in the pathology laboratory. In this context, we encountered three uncommon adrenal incidentalomas. The aim of this manuscript is to report in detail the three index cases of adrenal incidentalomas in the context of a 13-year retrospective surgical pathology review. Methods The three index cases were investigated and analyzed in detail with relevant review of the English literature as available in PubMed and Medline. A 13-year retrospective computer-based histopathological surgical review was conducted in our laboratory and the results were analyzed in the context of evidence-based literature on adrenal incidentalomas. Results A total of 94 adrenal specimens from incidentalomas were identified, accounting for 0.025% of all surgical pathology cases. In all 76.6% were benign and 23.4% were malignant. A total of 53 females (56.4%) and 41 males (43.6%) aged 4 to 85 years were identified. The benign lesions included cortical adenoma (43.1%), pheochromocytoma (29.3%) and inflammation/fibrosis/hemorrhage (8.3%). Metastatic neoplasms were the most common malignant lesions (50%) followed by primary adrenocortical carcinomas (31.8%) and neuroblastoma (13.6%). These cases were discovered as adrenal incidentalomas that led to surgical exploration. The three index cases of adrenal incidentalomas with unusual pathologies were encountered that included (a) adrenal ganglioneuroma, (b) periadrenal schwannoma and (c) primary adrenal pleomorphic leiomyosarcoma. These cases are discussed, with a literature and clinicopathological review. Conclusions Adrenal lesions are uncommon surgical specimens in the pathology laboratory. However, higher detection rates of adrenal incidentalomas aided by the ease of laparoscopic adrenalectomy has resulted in increased adrenal surgical specimens

  13. Ultrasonographic evaluation of adrenal glands in dogs with primary hypoadrenocorticism or mimicking diseases.

    PubMed

    Wenger, M; Mueller, C; Kook, P H; Reusch, C E

    2010-08-07

    The adrenal glands of 30 dogs with primary adrenal insufficiency (hypoadrenocorticism) were measured ultrasonographically and compared with those of 14 healthy dogs and those of 10 dogs with diseases mimicking hypoadrenocorticism. Thickness and length of the adrenals were measured on abdominal ultrasonography and the results for each group were compared. Dogs with primary hypoadrenocorticism had significantly thinner adrenals compared with the other two groups, and their left adrenal glands were also significantly shorter than those of healthy dogs. Adrenal ultrasonography may be of diagnostic value in dogs with clinical signs suggestive of primary hypoadrenocorticism, as a left adrenal gland measuring less than 3.2 mm in thickness is strongly suggestive of the disease.

  14. Anatomical variations of the arterial supply to the adrenal gland in the rat

    PubMed Central

    KIGATA, Tetsuhito; SHIBATA, Hideshi

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal gland is an essential endocrine organ for the stress response. The functions of this organ may be studied by ligation of the adrenal artery or adrenalectomy. However, in prior studies, descriptions of the anatomical variations of the adrenal artery were insufficient and inconsistent. Therefore, anatomical variations of the arterial supply to the adrenal gland were studied in 18 male and 18 female Wistar rats by colored latex injection into the arteries. The vascularization pattern was categorized into 4 types based on the origin of each adrenal artery. The cranial and middle adrenal arteries arose from the caudal phrenic artery in Types 1–3, but the caudal adrenal artery emerged from the caudal phrenic artery in Type 1, from the renal artery in Type 2 and from the abdominal aorta in Type 3. In Type 4, the cranial and middle adrenal arteries stemmed from the cranial phrenic artery, and the caudal adrenal artery arose from the caudal phrenic artery. The number of adrenal arteries varied from 3 to 11 on the left side and from 4 to 12 on the right side, and the total varied from 9 to 20 (predominantly 14) in each individual. There was no sex difference in the vascularization pattern. The results show that more individual variations occur in the adrenal arteries of rats than was previously reported. Such variations should always be considered when experimental treatments of the rat adrenal gland are performed. PMID:27867163

  15. Hypertension and adrenal disorders.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, J D

    1993-03-01

    Abnormalities of adrenal cortical and medullary function are important causes of hypertension in adults. Mineralocorticoid hypertension, characterized by spontaneous hypokalemia with excessive kaliuresis and low plasma renin activity, is most commonly caused by aldosterone-producing adenoma or, less frequently, by nonadenomatous adrenal hyperplasia. However, recent evidence indicates that this classification oversimplifies the pathophysiologic diversity of this syndrome. Advances in steroid biochemistry and molecular biology have improved our ability to identify patients with various forms of mineralocorticoid hypertension and also provide evidence that they are underdiagnosed. Pheochromocytomas are most commonly located in the adrenal medulla, where they may overproduce norepinephrine or epinephrine. Appropriate screening of norepinephrine, epinephrine, and their metabolites is essential because tumors that secrete epinephrine exclusively may not present with hypertension and, thus, can be overlooked. Extra-adrenal pheochromocytomas are more prevalent than previously considered and pose special problems because they may be multicentric, difficult to locate, and more likely to be malignant than are adrenal pheochromocytomas.

  16. [Disorder of adrenal gland function in chronic fatigue syndrome].

    PubMed

    Zarković, Milos; Pavlović, Milorad; Pokrajac-Simeunović, Ana; Cirić, Jasmina; Beleslin, Biljana; Penezić, Zorana; Ognjanović, Sanja; Savić, Slavica; Poluga, Jasmina; Trbojević, Bozo; Drezgić, Milka

    2003-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is defined as constellation of the prolonged fatigue and several somatic symptoms, in the absence of organic or severe psychiatric disease. However, this is an operational definition and conclusive biomedical explanation remains elusive. Similarities between the signs and symptoms of CFS and adrenal insufficiency prompted the research of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) derangement in the pathogenesis of the CFS. Early studies showed mild glucocorticoid deficiency, probably of central origin that was compensated by enhanced adrenal sensitivity to ACTH. Further studies showed reduced ACTH response to vasopressin infusion. The response to CRH was either blunted or unchanged. Cortisol response to insulin induced hypoglycaemia was same as in the control subjects while ACTH response was reported to be same or enhanced. However, results of direct stimulation of the adrenal cortex using ACTH were conflicting. Cortisol and DHEA responses were found to be the same or reduced compared to control subjects. Scott et al found that maximal cortisol increment from baseline is significantly lower in CFS subjects. The same group also found small adrenal glands in some CFS subjects. These varied and inconsistent results could be explained by the heterogeneous study population due to multifactorial causes of the disease and by methodological differences. The aim of our study was to assess cortisol response to low dose (1 microgram) ACTH using previously validated methodology. We compared cortisol response in the CFS subjects with the response in control and in subjects with suppressed HPA axis due to prolonged corticosteroid use. Cortisol responses were analysed in three subject groups: control (C), secondary adrenal insufficiency (AI), and in CFS. The C group consisted of 39 subjects, AI group of 22, and CFS group of nine subjects. Subject data are presented in table 1. Low dose ACTH test was started at 0800 h with the i.v. injection of 1

  17. Thirty-Eight-Year Follow-Up of Two Sibling Lipoid Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Patients Due to Homozygous Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory (STARD1) Protein Mutation. Molecular Structure and Modeling of the STARD1 L275P Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, Khalil; Barbar, Elie; Ainmelk, Youssef; Ouellet, Annie; Lavigne, Pierre; LeHoux, Jean-Guy

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Review the impact of StAR (STARD1) mutations on steroidogenesis and fertility in LCAH patients. Examine the endocrine mechanisms underlying the pathology of the disorder and the appropriate therapy for promoting fertility and pregnancies. Design: Published data in the literature and a detailed 38-year follow-up of two sibling LCAH patients. Molecular structure and modeling of the STARD1 L275P mutation. Setting: University hospital. Patients: Patient A (46,XY female phenotype) and patient B (46,XX female) with LCAH bearing the L275P mutation in STARD1. Interventions: Since early-age diagnosis, both patients underwent corticoid replacement therapy. Patient A received estrogen therapy at pubertal age. Clomiphene therapy was given to Patient B to induce ovulation. Pregnancies were protected with progesterone administration. Main Outcome Measures: Clinical and molecular assessment of adrenal and gonadal functions. Results: Both patients have classic manifestations of corticosteroid deficiency observed in LCAH. Time of onset and severity were different. Patient A developed into a female phenotype due to early and severe damage of Leydig cells. Patient B started a progressive pubertal development, menarche and regular non-ovulatory cycle. She was able to have successful pregnancies. Conclusions: Understanding the molecular structure and function of STARD1 in all steroidogenic tissues is the key for comprehending the heterogeneous clinical manifestations of LCAH, and the development of an appropriate strategy for the induction of ovulation and protecting pregnancies in this disease. PMID:27917104

  18. Management of Adrenal Masses.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Hattangadi Sanjay; Tiyadath, Balagopal Nair

    2017-03-01

    An adrenal mass can be either symptomatic or asymptomatic in the form of adrenal incidentalomas (AIs) in up to 8 % in autopsy and 4 % in imaging series. Once a diagnosis of adrenal mass is made, we need to differentiate whether it is functioning or nonfunctioning, benign, or malignant. In this article, we provide a literature review of the diagnostic workup including biochemical evaluation and imaging characteristics of the different pathologies. We also discuss the surgical strategies with laparoscopy as the mainstay with partial adrenalectomy in select cases and adrenalectomy in large masses. Follow-up protocol of AIs and adrenocortical carcinoma is also discussed.

  19. Contralateral adrenal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma with tumor thrombus in the adrenal vein: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Muśko, Natalia; Kozikowski, Mieszko; Nyk, Łukasz; Borówka, Andrzej; Dobruch, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman presented with contralateral right adrenal metastasis with adrenal vein thrombus, which was diagnosed many years after left nephrectomy with adrenalectomy due to renal cell cancer. The patient underwent right adrenalectomy with adrenal vein tumor thrombectomy for treatment. The pathologic examination confirmed metastatic clear cell carcinoma. The remote but existing risk of developing contralateral adrenal metastasis (CAM) after primary radical nephrectomy supports the idea of sparing the adrenal gland in suitable patients who undergo radical nephrectomy. Contralateral adrenal metastasis from RCC is a rare finding with the potential benefit of cure after resection. Care must be taken in preoperative diagnostics, as this metastasis is capable of causing inferior vena cava tumor thrombus via the suprarenal venous route. According to our knowledge, our case is the second similar entity described in literature so far. PMID:26807301

  20. Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage: a cause of haemodynamic collapse in heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia.

    PubMed

    Saleem, Nasir; Khan, Mahjabeen; Parveen, Sanober; Balavenkatraman, Arvind

    2016-03-10

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopaenia (HIT) is a life-threatening complication of exposure to heparin. It is mediated by autoantibodies to platelet factor-4 causing platelet activation, destruction and thrombosis. Given their rich arterial supply and a single central vein, the adrenal glands are particularly susceptible to congestive haemorrhage following venous thrombosis. We report a case of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage (BAH) associated with HIT following prophylactic use of unfractionated heparin for venous thromboembolism causing adrenal insufficiency. BAH is a life-threatening paradoxical complication associated with HIT, a prothrombotic state. The resulting adrenal insufficiency can lead to haemodynamic collapse if unrecognised. Early diagnosis, in the wake of vague symptoms, and prompt treatment primarily aimed at repletion of glucocorticoids and close monitoring of enlarging haemorrhage is of utmost importance. Likewise, early identification of HIT is important to prevent potential complications including adrenal haemorrhage.

  1. Acute adrenal crisis

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition that occurs when there is not enough cortisol. This is a hormone produced by the adrenal ... parts. The outer portion, called the cortex, produces cortisol. This is an important hormone for controlling blood ...

  2. Chronic Venous Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... with your doctor. Do not ignore these symptoms. Risk Factors The most important factors leading to the development of chronic venous insufficiency and varicose veins include: • Family history • Increasing ...

  3. Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (POI)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview Condition Information What are common symptoms? How many people are affected/at risk? ... Ovarian Insufficiency (POI): Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is POI? ...

  4. Adrenal gland and bone.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Rowan; Cooper, Mark S

    2010-11-01

    The adrenal gland synthesizes steroid hormones from the adrenal cortex and catecholamines from the adrenal medulla. Both cortisol and adrenal androgens can have powerful effects on bone. The overproduction of cortisol in Cushing's disease leads to a dramatic reduction in bone density and an increase risk of fracture. Overproduction of adrenal androgens in congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) leads to marked changes in bone growth and development with early growth acceleration but ultimately a significant reduction in final adult height. The role of more physiological levels of glucocorticoids and androgens on bone metabolism is less clear. Cortisol levels measured in elderly individuals show a weak correlation with measures of bone density and change in bone density over time with a high cortisol level associated with lower bone density and more rapid bone loss. Cortisol levels and the dynamics of cortisol secretion change with age which could also explain some age related changes in bone physiology. It is also now clear that adrenal steroids can be metabolized within bone tissue itself. Local synthesis of cortisol within bone from its inactive precursor cortisone has been demonstrated and the amount of cortisol produced within osteoblasts appears to increase with age. With regard to adrenal androgens there is a dramatic reduction in levels with aging and several studies have examined the impact that restoration of these levels back to those seen in younger individuals has on bone health. Most of these studies show small positive effects in women, not men, but the skeletal sites where benefits are seen varies from study to study.

  5. Bilateral adrenal masses: a single-centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Bandgar, Tushar; Khare, Shruti; Jadhav, Swati; Lila, Anurag; Goroshi, Manjunath; Kasaliwal, Rajeev; Khadilkar, Kranti; Shah, Nalini S

    2016-01-01

    Background Bilateral adrenal masses may have aetiologies like hyperplasia and infiltrative lesions, besides tumours. Hyperplastic and infiltrative lesions may have coexisting hypocortisolism. Bilateral tumours are likely to have hereditary/syndromic associations. The data on clinical profile of bilateral adrenal masses are limited. Aims To analyse clinical, biochemical and radiological features, and management outcomes in patients with bilateral adrenal masses. Methods Retrospective analysis of 70 patients with bilateral adrenal masses presenting to a single tertiary care endocrine centre from western India (2002–2015). Results The most common aetiology was pheochromocytoma (40%), followed by tuberculosis (27.1%), primary adrenal lymphoma (PAL) (10%), metastases (5.7%), non-functioning adenomas (4.3%), primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (4.3%), and others (8.6%). Age at presentation was less in patients with pheochromocytoma (33 years) and tuberculosis (41 years) compared with PAL (48 years) and metastases (61 years) (P<0.001). The presenting symptoms for pheochromocytoma were hyperadrenergic spells (54%) and abdominal pain (29%), whereas tuberculosis presented with adrenal insufficiency (AI) (95%). The presenting symptoms for PAL were AI (57%) and abdominal pain (43%), whereas all cases of metastasis had abdominal pain. Mean size of adrenal masses was the largest in lymphoma (5.5cm) followed by pheochromocytoma (4.8cm), metastasis (4cm) and tuberculosis (2.1cm) (P<0.001). Biochemically, most patients with pheochromocytoma (92.8%) had catecholamine excess. Hypocortisolism was common in tuberculosis (100%) and PAL (71.4%) and absent with metastases (P<0.001). Conclusion In evaluation of bilateral adrenal masses, age at presentation, presenting symptoms, lesion size, and biochemical features are helpful in delineating varied underlying aetiologies. PMID:27037294

  6. Value of the CT "capsular sign" as a potential indicator of acute adrenal ischemia.

    PubMed

    Moschetta, Marco; Telegrafo, Michele; Pignatelli, Armando; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Angelelli, Giuseppe

    2015-10-01

    Acute adrenal ischemia represents a rare cause of adrenal insufficiency which should be promptly diagnosed in order to preserve adrenal vitality and function. Our study aims to retrospectively evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the CT capsular sign as an indicator of adrenal ischemia and its association with vascular involvement. Between January 2013 and January 2014, 69 consecutive patients (47 men, 22 women; mean age 46; range 22-67) with suspected adrenal insufficiency based on clinical and biochemical data underwent 320-row CT examination in our Emergency Department. Written informed consent was obtained for the CT examinations, and the institutional review board approval was obtained for our retrospective study. CT multi-planar images were retrospectively and independently analyzed by two radiologists searching for the patency of adrenal vessels, enlarged adrenals, the presence of the "capsular sign" represented by a peripheral subtle hyperdense line around a hypodense enlarged adrenal, and the presence of any periadrenal inflammatory changes. All CT findings were then compared with the surgical findings (n = 5), follow-up examinations (n = 20), or autopsy (n = 4). Sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy (DA), positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated for the "capsular sign" and were further evaluated by ROC analysis. Acute adrenal ischemia occurred in 29/69 patients (42 %), unilateral in 20, and bilateral in 9. Forty of sixty-nine patients (58 %) had no evidence of adrenal disease on CT. Thrombosis of the main adrenal vein was found in 20/29 (69 %) and non-venous ischemia in 9/29 (31 %). The capsular sign was found in 24/29 patients (83 %). Sensitivity, specificity, DA, PPV, and NPV values of 83, 100, 93, 100, and 89 %, respectively, were obtained. The capsular sign represents a CT indicator of acute adrenal ischemia, with a specificity of 100 % and leading to a prompt diagnosis in the early

  7. [Adrenal tumours in childhood].

    PubMed

    Martos-Moreno, G A; Pozo-Román, J; Argente, J

    2013-09-01

    This special article aims to summarise the current knowledge regarding the two groups of tumours with their origin in the adrenal gland: 1) adrenocortical tumours, derived from the cortex of the adrenal gland and 2) phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas, neuroendocrine tumours derived from nodes of neural crest derived cells symmetrically distributed at both sides of the entire spine (paragangliomas [PG]). These PGs can be functioning tumors that secrete catecholamines, which confers their typical dark colour after staining with chromium salts (chromaffin tumors). Among these, the term phaeochromocytoma (PC) is restricted to those PGs derived from the chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla (intra-adrenal PGs), whereas the term PG is used for those sympathetic or parasympathetic ones in an extra-adrenal location. We analyse the state of the art of their pathogenic and genetic bases, as well as their clinical signs and symptoms, the tests currently available for performing their diagnosis (biochemical, hormonal, imaging and molecular studies) and management (surgery, pre- and post-surgical medical treatment), considering the current and developing strategies in chemo- and radiotherapy.

  8. Thymus and adrenal glands in elder abuse.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahito; Bunai, Yasuo; Ago, Kazutoshi; Ago, Mihoko; Ogata, Mamoru

    2011-12-01

    Endogenous glucocorticoid-induced thymic involution is generally considered to be an important finding for determining child abuse. The present study investigated the weight of the thymus and the adrenal glands in elder abuse cases to identify a potential marker for elder abuse. There was no significant difference in the thymus and the adrenal weight between elder abuse and control cases. However, the elder abuse cases in which the duration of abuse was less than 3 months showed a significant increase in the adrenal weight in comparison to control cases. In such cases, histopathological findings showed a loss of intracellular light granules from the zona fasciculata, which might indicate a loss of cholesterol due to the overproduction of glucocorticoid. These results might imply that the elderly, who were maltreated for less than 3 months, were in the early phase of a long-term stress state during which stress-induced overproduction of glucocorticoid was observed in adrenal glands as indicated by Selye. Our results suggest that an increase in adrenal weight may be a potential marker for elder abuse of relatively short periods, especially less than a few months.

  9. Myth vs. Fact: Adrenal Fatigue

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hormones Do? Infographics Myth vs Fact Scientific Statements Social Media Resources Peer Support Resources Diseases and Conditions Adrenal ... Hormones Do? Infographics Myth vs Fact Scientific Statements Social Media Resources Peer Support Resources Diseases and Conditions Adrenal ...

  10. What Is Adrenal Cortical Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... include pheochromocytomas (which are most often benign) and neuroblastomas . This document is about tumors and cancers of ... does not discuss tumors of the adrenal medulla. Neuroblastoma s are covered in a separate document . Adrenal cortex ...

  11. Percutaneous ablation of adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M; Locklin, Julia; Dupuy, Damian E; Wood, Bradford J

    2010-06-01

    Adrenal tumors comprise a broad spectrum of benign and malignant neoplasms and include functional adrenal adenomas, pheochromocytomas, primary adrenocortical carcinoma, and adrenal metastases. Percutaneous ablative approaches that have been described and used in the treatment of adrenal tumors include percutaneous radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, microwave ablation, and chemical ablation. Local tumor ablation in the adrenal gland presents unique challenges, secondary to the adrenal gland's unique anatomic and physiological features. The results of clinical series employing percutaneous ablative techniques in the treatment of adrenal tumors are reviewed in this article. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the adrenal gland are presented, including approaches commonly used in our practices, and risks and potential complications are discussed.

  12. Standards of ultrasound imaging of the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Słapa, Rafał Z; Jakubowski, Wiesław S; Dobruch-Sobczak, Katarzyna; Kasperlik-Załuska, Anna A

    2015-12-01

    Adrenal glands are paired endocrine glands located over the upper renal poles. Adrenal pathologies have various clinical presentations. They can coexist with the hyperfunction of individual cortical zones or the medulla, insufficiency of the adrenal cortex or retained normal hormonal function. The most common adrenal masses are tumors incidentally detected in imaging examinations (ultrasound, tomography, magnetic resonance imaging), referred to as incidentalomas. They include a range of histopathological entities but cortical adenomas without hormonal hyperfunction are the most common. Each abdominal ultrasound scan of a child or adult should include the assessment of the suprarenal areas. If a previously non-reported, incidental solid focal lesion exceeding 1 cm (incidentaloma) is detected in the suprarenal area, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging should be conducted to confirm its presence and for differentiation and the tumor functional status should be determined. Ultrasound imaging is also used to monitor adrenal incidentaloma that is not eligible for a surgery. The paper presents recommendations concerning the performance and assessment of ultrasound examinations of the adrenal glands and their pathological lesions. The article includes new ultrasound techniques, such as tissue harmonic imaging, spatial compound imaging, three-dimensional ultrasound, elastography, contrast-enhanced ultrasound and parametric imaging. The guidelines presented above are consistent with the recommendations of the Polish Ultrasound Society.

  13. Robot-assisted partial adrenalectomy for isolated adrenal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Angelish; Hyams, Elias S; Stifelman, Michael D

    2009-04-01

    Adrenal-sparing surgery is an effective and safe alternative to total adrenalectomy for small, benign adrenal lesions and may decrease the risk of the development of adrenal insufficiency. While series of laparoscopic partial adrenalectomy have demonstrated safety and excellent long-term outcomes, there have been no reports of a complete robot-assisted partial adrenalectomy. We believe that robotic techniques may be useful for this procedure, given the complex vascularity and small size of the adrenal gland. Furthermore, there have been no reports of minimally invasive partial adrenalectomy for management of small, isolated adrenal metastasis. We report a case of robot-assisted partial adrenalectomy in a patient with a history of renal-cell carcinoma who had previously undergone contralateral adrenalectomy for metastasis. We report our surgical technique and short-term follow-up for our patient. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a complete robot-assisted partial adrenalectomy and the first report of minimally invasive partial adrenalectomy for an isolated adrenal metastasis.

  14. The rat adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Tischler, A S

    1989-01-01

    Adult adrenal medullary cells, in many strains of rats, develop diffuse and nodular hyperplasia and neoplasia under a variety of conditions. Both endogenous and exogenous factors affect the development of these proliferative changes. The former include the animals' strain, age, and sex. The latter include drugs and other environmental agents, diet, and perhaps stress. Adrenal medullary neoplasms which arise under diverse circumstances often closely resemble each other both morphologically and functionally, and exhibit characteristics of immature chromaffin cells. Recent data indicate that normal, mature-appearing epinephrine- and norepinephrine-type chromaffin cells are able to divide, and suggest that signals which regulate chromaffin cell function also regulate cell proliferation. Prolongation of these signals or superimposed abnormalities might initiate pathological proliferative states. It remains to be determined whether the mechanisms which promote or prevent cell proliferation in the adult adrenal are related to those involved in normal development.

  15. Adrenal venous sampling in a patient with adrenal Cushing syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Franco, Carlos Andrés; Román-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Velez-Hoyos, Alejandro; Echeverri-Isaza, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia or the independent adrenocorticotropic hormone bilateral nodular adrenal hyperplasia is a rare cause hypercortisolism, its diagnosis is challenging and there is no clear way to decide the best therapeutic approach. Adrenal venous sampling is commonly used to distinguish the source of hormonal production in patients with primary hyperaldosteronism. It could be a useful tool in this context because it might provide information to guide the treatment. We report the case of a patient with ACTH independent Cushing syndrome in whom the use of adrenal venous sampling with some modifications radically modified the treatment and allowed the diagnosis of a macronodular adrenal hyperplasia. PMID:26309345

  16. Adrenal venous sampling in a patient with adrenal Cushing syndrome.

    PubMed

    Builes-Montaño, Carlos Esteban; Villa-Franco, Carlos Andrés; Román-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Velez-Hoyos, Alejandro; Echeverri-Isaza, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia or the independent adrenocorticotropic hormone bilateral nodular adrenal hyperplasia is a rare cause hypercortisolism, its diagnosis is challenging and there is no clear way to decide the best therapeutic approach. Adrenal venous sampling is commonly used to distinguish the source of hormonal production in patients with primary hyperaldosteronism. It could be a useful tool in this context because it might provide information to guide the treatment. We report the case of a patient with ACTH independent Cushing syndrome in whom the use of adrenal venous sampling with some modifications radically modified the treatment and allowed the diagnosis of a macronodular adrenal hyperplasia.

  17. [Travel and renal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Lavelle, O; Berland, Y

    1997-01-01

    Traveling can be dangerous for subjects with kidney insufficiency. Water loss or septic episodes can further increase renal dysfunction. Poor diet can lead to hyperkaliemia. Immunosuppression not only enhances the risk of infection but also complicates administration of live vaccines. Some antimalarial drugs are contraindicated (e.g. mefloquine) and others must be used with precaution. Prior to departure persons requiring hemodialysis should book sessions at centers listed in specialized guidebooks. In addition to infection, risks for hemodialysis patients include thrombosis of the arteriovenous fistula in case of dehydration or hypotension. In subjects with transplanted kidney, the risk of rejection can be enhanced either by poor compliance with immunodepressor treatment or by vaccination-induced antigenic stimulation. Pre-travel evaluation is necessary to determine metabolic, nutritional, and immune status. Subjects with kidney insufficiency and transplanted kidneys should be informed of the dangers and appropriate action in case of trouble.

  18. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or inappropriately). Congenital adrenal hyperplasia can affect both boys and girls. About 1 in 10,000 to 18,000 ... penis but normal testes Well-developed muscles Both boys and girls will be tall as children, but much shorter ...

  19. Mesenteric Artery Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Coles, John C.; Walker, John B.; Gergely, N. F.; Buttigliero, Jorge

    1963-01-01

    The syndromes of superior mesenteric artery insufficiency are briefly reviewed. Three cases associated with infarction of bowel which were treated with restoration of arterial flow and resection of residual irretrievable bowel are reported. In two patients an embolectomy and in one patient a bypass graft were used to restore arterial continuity. The importance of the recognition and removal of irretrievable bowel at the time of vascular reconstruction is emphasized. Success is not necessarily predicated by the time factor alone, although the importance of early diagnosis and surgical intervention cannot be denied. PMID:14042788

  20. [Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI)].

    PubMed

    Renner, R; Simon, J

    2009-10-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is an important and frequent disease for dermatologists, phlebologists and general practitioners. There are various hypotheses for the ethiopathology in CVI, e. g. hormone receptors and impairments concerning the venous contraction or relaxation of the vessel wall and the venous valves might play an important role. At the moment, colour doppler-duplex sonography seems to be the diagnostic method of choice. Modern therapeutic options include compression systems alone or in combination with topical or systemic treatment including minimal invasive methods like endovenous laser or radiofrequency obliteration or foam sclerotherapy.

  1. Adrenal cortical and medullary imaging.

    PubMed

    Freitas, J E

    1995-07-01

    Adrenal disease can be manifested by endocrine dysfunction or anatomic abnormalities detected by cross-sectional imaging modalities. With the advent of newer and more reliable in vitro assays and a better understanding of the spectrum of adrenal pathology, the physician can now adopt a more accurate and cost-effective approach to the diagnosis of adrenal disease. Both functional and anatomic imaging modalities can play an important role in the evaluation of the incidental adrenal mass, the early detection of adrenal metastases, differentiation of the various causes of Cushings's syndrome, selection of patients for potentially curative surgery in primary aldosteronism and adrenal hyperandrogenism, and localization of pheochromocytomas and neuroblastomas. The usefulness of the adrenal cortical radiopharmaceutical, 131I-6-beta-iodomethylnorcholesterol (NP-59), and the adrenal medullary radiopharmaceuticals, 131I and 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), is detailed for these various clinical settings and the role of NP-59 and MIBG is contrasted to that of the cross-sectional modalities, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Incidental adrenal masses are common, but malignancies are few. Imaging studies select those patients who require a further evaluation by biopsy examination or adrenalectomy. In the hyperfunctioning endocrine states, such as Cushing's syndrome, primary aldosteronism, adrenal androgenism, and pheochromocytoma, correlation of biochemical findings with both functional and anatomic imaging is necessary to avoid inappropriate and ineffective surgical intervention, yet not miss an opportunity for curative resection. Lastly, MIBG and MRI are complementary in the detection and staging of neuroblastoma.

  2. Childhood virilization and adrenal suppression after ingestion of methandienone and cyproheptadine.

    PubMed

    Poomthavorn, Preamrudee; Mahachoklertwattana, Pat; Khlairit, Patcharin

    2009-05-01

    We report a combination of precocious pseudopuberty and adrenal insufficiency in a 4 year-old boy who had received an off-label 'appetite stimulant' syrup and excessive virilization in a 2 year-old girl who had received the same medication. Both patients presented with excessive virilization for a period of approximately 1-2 years. The syrup contains cyproheptadine and methandienone, a derivative of testosterone. Both cyproheptadine and methandienone were responsible for severe adrenal suppression in the boy. Methandienone undoubtedly caused precocious virilization in both children. Cessation of the syrup led to partial regression of virilization in both children and normalization of adrenal reserve function in the boy.

  3. Betahistine in vertebrobasilar insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Kaźmierczak, Henryk; Pawlak-Osińska, Katarzyna; Kaźmierczak, Wojciech

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to observe the usefulness of betahistine dihydrochloride--Betaserc--in therapy for vestibular disorders in patients with vertebrobasilar insufficiency. Two groups of patients, in each of which were 150 patients (mean age, 52.2 years), were tested on the basis of videonystagmography and stabilometry. Betaserc was administrated in two separate doses: 8 mg three times daily and 16 mg three times daily for 120-180 days (mean, 132 days). In every case before and after therapy, visuo-oculomotor and vestibulo-oculomotor reflexes were tested, and amplitude and velocity of the sway were measured during dynamic posturographic testing. After Betaserc treatment, pathological visuo-oculomotor reactions and pathological cervical test results disappeared in most cases: Smooth pursuit improved in 59.9% of cases and saccadic movements in 55.9% of patients, and cervical nystagmus disappeared in 62.2% of tested people. During stabilometry, mean and maximal platform amplitude and mean head velocity decreased as compared with results from tests performed before treatment. These observations were significant after the greater dose of Betaserc; nonetheless, improvement was noted after both doses. The usefulness of Betaserc in vertebrobasilar insufficiency was proved, 4-6 months' therapy was sufficient, and the effect on central compensation seemed to be most probable.

  4. [Analysis of causes contributing to inefficiency of roentgenoendovascular destruction of adrenal glands in hypertensive patients].

    PubMed

    Karimov, Sh I; Tusrsunov, B Z; Sunnatov, R Dzh; Temirov, S N

    2009-01-01

    The study was aimed at bettering therapeutic outcomes for patients suffering from adrenal-aetiology arterial hypertension, with the objective deemed attainable at the expense of revealing and removing the underlying causes potentially contributing to unfavourable results obtained after roentgenoendovascular ablation of the adrenal glands. We retrospectively examined the medical records of 49 patients having undergone hospital treatment within the time frame from 1992 to 2007 for recurrent arterial hypertension poorly controlled by previously endured roentgenoendovascular (REV) interventions. The identified causes contributing heavily to poor clinical outcomes obtained after the REV-ablation procedures appeared to have been as follows: renal parenchymatous diseases in 20 patients having a long history of arterial hypertension with evidence ofnephroangiosclerosis; insufficient devitalisation of the adrenal glands in a further 19 patients; a pheochromocytoma of the right adrenal gland in only one instance; and newly onset renovascular hypertension in the remaining nine subjects. It was determined that poor therapeutic outcomes had primarily been caused by overestimating the indications for performing REV ablation of the adrenal glands, being seemingly wanton as a corrective measure to have been taken in the presence of inflammatory diseases of the renal parenchyma and secondary hyperplasia of the adrenal gland, with the second-in-order contributory cause appearing to be insufficient devitalisation of the adrenal glands afflicted by hyperplasia and/or aldosteroma. The development of renal artery stenosis in the remote period after REV interventions may also be responsible for a relapse of arterial hypertension, which is quite often the case.

  5. Adrenal metabolism of mitotane and related compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Djanegara, T.K.S.

    1989-01-01

    Mitotane (o,p{prime}-DDD; 1-(2-chlorophenyl)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-2,2-dichloroethane) has been used in the treatment of Cushing's syndrome due to adrenal hyperfunction and it the drug of choice for adrenocortical carcinoma. The object of this investigation is to study the biotransformation of o,p{prime}-DDD and p,p{prime}-DDD in dogs and bovine adrenal cortex to explain its selective toxicity and mechanism of action. The in vitro biotransformation of {sup 14}C-labeled o,p{prime}-DDD and p,p{prime}-DDD by dog and bovine adrenal cortex as studied. Of the cortex subcellular fractions, the cytosol fraction was found to be the most active in metabolizing the substrates, followed by the mitochondrial fraction. This metabolism including that in cytosolic fractions, did not take place with boiled enzyme preparations and required an NADPH generating system. This study has been directed towards establishing the metabolic activation mechanism which may account for the adrenocorticolytic effect of mitotane in contrast to detoxication by the liver. HPLC and TLC metabolic profiles have been generated from incubations of bovine and dog adrenal cortex homogenates and their subfractions for {sup 14}C-labeled p,p{prime}-DDD, o,p{prime}-DDD and its monochloroethylene derivative, o,p{prime}-DDMU.

  6. Adrenal cryptococcosis in an immunosuppressed patient showing intensely increased metabolic activity on (18)F-FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Georgios Z; Holland, Steven M; Quezado, Martha; Patronas, Nicholas J

    2016-12-01

    Disseminated cryptococcosis most commonly occurs in immunosuppressed patients and can rarely affect the adrenal glands. We report on a patient with biopsy proven bilateral adrenal cryptococcosis resulting in primary adrenal insufficiency, which was evaluated with whole-body positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan using (18)F-FDG. Both enlarged adrenal glands presented intensely increased (18)F-FDG activity in the periphery, while central necrotic regions were photopenic. Although diagnosis was established by adrenal gland biopsy, (18)F-FDG positron emission tomography/computed tomography scan can significantly contribute to the assessment of disease activity and monitoring of treatment response. Furthermore, fungal infections should always be considered when encountering hypermetabolic adrenal masses, especially in the setting of immunodeficient patients.

  7. Complex Glycerol Kinase Deficiency and Adrenocortical Insufficiency in Two Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Korkut, Sabriye; Baştuğ, Osman; Raygada, Margarita; Hatipoğlu, Nihal; Kurtoğlu, Selim; Kendirci, Mustafa; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2016-01-01

    Contiguous gene deletions of chromosome Xp21 can lead to glycerol kinase deficiency and severe adrenocortical insufficiency (AI) in a male newborn among other problems. We describe our experience with two such patients who presented with dysmorphic facies, AI, and pseudo-hypertriglyceridemia. Both infants had normal serum 17-hidroxyprogesterone levels, and adrenal glands could not be observed with ultrasonography. Creatine kinase and triglyceride levels were measured to elucidate the etiology of adrenal hypoplasia and were above normal limits in both cases. Both patients required steroid and salt supplementation. They were both found to have Xp21.2 deletions (DMD, NR0B1, GK, IL1RAPL1). We conclude that AI in the context of other genetic abnormalities should prompt chromosomal investigations in the absence of another unifying explanation. PMID:27087023

  8. Complex Glycerol Kinase Deficiency and Adrenocortical Insufficiency in Two Neonates.

    PubMed

    Korkut, Sabriye; Baştuğ, Osman; Raygada, Margarita; Hatipoğlu, Nihal; Kurtoğlu, Selim; Kendirci, Mustafa; Lyssikatos, Charalampos; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-12-01

    Contiguous gene deletions of chromosome Xp21 can lead to glycerol kinase deficiency and severe adrenocortical insufficiency (AI) in a male newborn among other problems. We describe our experience with two such patients who presented with dysmorphic facies, AI, and pseudo-hypertriglyceridemia. Both infants had normal serum 17-hidroxyprogesterone levels, and adrenal glands could not be observed with ultrasonography. Creatine kinase and triglyceride levels were measured to elucidate the etiology of adrenal hypoplasia and were above normal limits in both cases. Both patients required steroid and salt supplementation. They were both found to have Xp21.2 deletions (DMD, NR0B1, GK, IL1RAPL1). We conclude that AI in the context of other genetic abnormalities should prompt chromosomal investigations in the absence of another unifying explanation.

  9. Development of adrenal cortex zonation.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yewei; Lerario, Antonio M; Rainey, William; Hammer, Gary D

    2015-06-01

    The human adult adrenal cortex is composed of the zona glomerulosa (zG), zona fasciculata (zF), and zona reticularis (zR), which are responsible for production of mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids, and adrenal androgens, respectively. The final completion of cortical zonation in humans does not occur until puberty with the establishment of the zR and its production of adrenal androgens; a process called adrenarche. The maintenance of the adrenal cortex involves the centripetal displacement and differentiation of peripheral Sonic hedgehog-positive progenitors cells into zG cells that later transition to zF cells and subsequently zR cells.

  10. [Sonography of the adrenal glands].

    PubMed

    Rüeger, R

    2005-03-02

    In the abdominal ultrasonography, the representation of normal adrenal glands is frequently problematic, also for experienced practitioners in ultrasonography. During a seminary at the congress of the SGUM in Davos, in June 2004, it was specially entered to this problematic by anatomical illustrations and live demonstrations. These statements will be summarized in the following article. Also, the technics of examination of the adrenal glands will be explained, especially in comparison to anatomical cut-preparations. It will be entered to particular pathological statements of the adrenal glands. The proceeding will be described by the localisation of accidentally detected tumours of adrenal glands.

  11. IMAGe association: report of two cases in siblings with adrenal hypoplasia and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Katherine; Arroyo, May R; Duckworth, Lizette Vila

    2014-01-01

    We report the postmortem findings of two siblings with gross and microscopic features consistent with IMAGe association (Intrauterine growth retardation, Metaphyseal dysplasia, Adrenal hypoplasia congenita, and Genital anomalies) with an emphasis on the histopathology of the adrenal gland in this rare syndrome. The first sibling was an 8-week old male diagnosed postnatally with primary adrenal insufficiency. There was no deletion of the DAX1 gene by FISH. Examination at autopsy revealed dysmorphic features including frontal bossing, epicanthal folds, flat philtrum, cryptorchidism, penile chordee, overriding fourth toe, and height and weight below 3rd percentile. Grossly, the adrenal glands were not identified; however, microscopic examination of the suprarenal soft tissue revealed a 3 mm focus of disorganized fetal adrenal cortex with distended "cytomegalic" cells with abundant pink eosinophilic cytoplasm, vesicular nuclei, and cytoplasmic vacuolization. A minute focus of permanent adult cortex was also seen, but no adrenal medulla was identified. An autopsy of the sibling, who died 12 years previously at day 9 of life, revealed dysmorphic facial features with cryptorchidism and a large phallus. The adrenal glands were grossly hypoplastic (11 mm). Histologically, the adrenal glands showed disorganized fetal cortex with cytomegalic cells, a larger amount of permanent adult cortex, and bizarre nuclei with numerous pseudoinclusions. While there is currently limited information regarding the histopathologic adrenal findings in IMAGe association, our small case series suggests overlapping features between X-linked recessive congenital adrenal hypoplasia (cytomegalic cells with lack of permanent adult cortex) and autosomal recessive congenital adrenal hypoplasia (diminished permanent adult cortex without cytomegalic cells).

  12. [Adrenal carcinoma induced hypoglycemia].

    PubMed

    Soutelo, Jimena; Saban, Melina; Borghi Torzillo, Florencia; Lutfi, Ruben; Leal Reyna, Mariela

    2013-01-01

    Adrenal carcinoma is a rare malignancy of poor prognosis. The most common clinical presentation is secondary to hormone production, while the development of symptomatic hypoglycemia is exceptional. We report the case of a 37 year old-woman admitted to hospital with severe hypoglycemia, hypertension, hypokalemia and amenorrhea. In the laboratory we found hypoglycemia, with low insulin levels, and androgen levels in tumor range. CT of abdomen and pelvis showed a heterogeneous lesion of solid appearance without a cleavage plane relative to liver parenchyma, and intense contrast enhancement. Retroperitoneal mass was removed, and the patient evolved without complications, blood glucose and potassium were normalized, blood pressure stabilized and menstrual cycles recovered.

  13. Palliative intensity modulated radiation therapy for symptomatic adrenal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Mod, H; Patel, V

    2013-05-01

    Metastasis to the adrenal glands is quite common; especially from melanomas, breast, lung, renal and gastro-intestinal tumours. The most common tumour found in the adrenals in post mortem series is a metastatic tumour; incidence ranging from 13 to 27%. The diagnosis of adrenal metastasis is now more common and easier due to staging and subsequent follow up with Computed tomography /Magnetic resonance imaging and or positron emission tomography-computed tomography imaging studies. Most of the times these metastatic lesions are clinically occult and those that do have clinical symptoms complain of pain, nausea, vomiting and early satiety. We irradiated a patient of non small cell lung cancer with adrenal metastasis with palliative Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and achieved a good response in terms of pain relief, stable disease and no side effects of the treatment.

  14. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Vocal Folds in Women with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia and Virilized Voices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nygren, Ulrika; Isberg, Bengt; Arver, Stefan; Hertegård, Stellan; Södersten, Maria; Nordenskjöld, Agneta

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Women with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) may develop a virilized voice due to late diagnosis or suboptimal suppression of adrenal androgens. Changes in the vocal folds due to virilization have not been studied in vivo. The purpose was to investigate if the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle is affected by virilization and correlate…

  15. Insufficiency fractures of the tibial plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Manco, L.G.; Schneider, R.; Pavlov, H.

    1983-06-01

    An insufficiency fracture of the tibial plateau may be the cause of knee pain in patients with osteoporosis. The diagnosis is usually not suspected until a bone scan is done, as initial radiographs are often negative or inconclusive and clinical findings are nonspecific and may simulate osteoarthritis or spontaneous osteonecrosis. In five of 165 patients referred for bone scans due to nontraumatic knee pain, a characteristic pattern of intense augmented uptake of radionuclide confined to the tibial plateau led to a presumptive diagnosis of insufficiency fracture, later confirmed on radiographs.

  16. Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Valente, Roberto; Del Chiaro, Marco; Permert, Johan; Löhr, J-Matthias

    2017-02-23

    Abstract: Cancer patients experience weight loss for a variety of reasons, commencing with the tumor's metabolism (Warburg effect) and proceeding via cachexia to loss of appetite. In pancreatic cancer, several other factors are involved, including a loss of appetite with a particular aversion to meat and the incapacity of the pancreatic gland to function normally when a tumor is present in the pancreatic head. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is characterized by a deficiency of the enzymes secreted from the pancreas due to the obstructive tumor, resulting in maldigestion. This, in turn, contributes to malnutrition, specifically a lack of fat-soluble vitamins, antioxidants, and other micronutrients. Patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency have, overall, an extremely poor prognosis with regard to surgical outcome and overall survival. Therefore, it is crucial to be aware of the mechanisms involved in the disease, to be able to diagnose pancreatic exocrine insufficiency early on, and to treat malnutrition appropriately, for example, with pancreatic enzymes.

  17. [Lumbar pain and bilateral adrenal masses].

    PubMed

    García, Elena; Sánchez, Raquel; Martínez, Guillermo; Bernal, Carmen; Calatayud, M; Partida, M; Hawkins, Federico

    2009-05-01

    Many problems may arise when defining whether adrenal lesions are primary to the adrenal glands or represent other tissue, whether they are benign or malignant and whether they are functioning or nonfunctioning. Adrenal imaging complements the clinical and hormonal evaluation of these patients. We present a patient with lumbar pain and bilateral adrenal masses.

  18. Ontogeny of adrenal steroid biosynthesis: why girls will be girls

    PubMed Central

    White, Perrin C.

    2006-01-01

    Male and female external genitalia appear identical early in gestation. Testosterone exposure at 8–12 weeks’ gestation causes male differentiation. Female fetuses virilize if their adrenals secrete excessive levels of androgens, as occurs in congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. This can be ameliorated by administering dexamethasone to the mother. A study by Goto et al. in this issue of the JCI provides a rationale for this treatment by demonstrating that the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis is fully functional when the genitalia differentiate (see the related article beginning on page 953). Dexamethasone suppresses this axis, reducing abnormal secretion of adrenal androgens. Their results also show that cortisol synthesis by the fetal adrenal decreases after this period, allowing the adrenal to secrete high levels of dehydroepiandrosterone, an androgen precursor. However, this does not virilize female fetuses because androgens are aromatized to estrogens in the placenta. Thus normal sexual differentiation requires exquisite timing of fetal cortisol and androgen secretion versus placental capacity for aromatization. PMID:16585958

  19. Outcome of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kuhnle, U; Bullinger, M

    1997-09-01

    In congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency, affected girls are born with ambiguous genitalia due to increased secretion of androgens in utero by the defective adrenal gland. Even though it is generally accepted that there are differences between male and female brain development, determining factors have been difficult to identify. Girls with CAH have frequently been studied to evaluate the impact of prenatal androgen exposure on psychological, psychosocial, and psychosexual development, and impairments in various areas have been identified. However, there is no comprehensive study available regarding the outcome of this chronic disorder in adult life. We studied the quality of life in women with CAH, with particular emphasis on how they cope with genital malformations, genital operations, and chronic disease as well as lifelong medication. The patients filled out questionnaires covering their physical state, psychological well-being, social relationships, and functional capacity, as well as questionnaires on psychosexual identification and psychosocial integration. The results were evaluated using a computerized statistical program for social studies. Out of a total of 94 patients above 18 years of age, 45 agreed to participate and were compared to 46 healthy, age-matched controls. Age at diagnosis was 2. 31 +/- 1.55 years and 38% suffered from the simple-virilizing, 45% from the salt-wasting, and 17.0% from the late-onset form of CAH. About one-third of patients had Prader stage 3 or 4 genital virilization. While the overall quality of life did not differ significantly, CAH patients were more often single (47.8% vs. 66.7%) and fewer of them had children (22.2% vs. 38.6%) compared to controls. Significant impairments were found in regard to body image and attitudes toward sexuality, but there was no increased homosexual preference. The women were successful in adjusting to illness and receiving social support. It is speculated that

  20. Stimulation of adrenal DNA synthesis in cadmium-treated male rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, S.; Nakamura, K.

    1984-07-01

    Cadmium chloride (CdCl2) at a dose of 1 mg/kg body wt was injected into male rats of the Wistar strain, weighing 250 g on the average, twice a day (12-hr intervals) for 7 consecutive days. DNA and RNA contents and (/sup 3/H)-thymidine and (/sup 3/H)-uridine incorporation into the acid-insoluble fraction significantly increased in the adrenals of rats treated with Cd for 2 and 7 consecutive days. Adrenal protein content and weight also significantly increased. These results indicate that continued treatment with Cd stimulates DNA and RNA synthesis in the adrenal cortex, which in turn results in the increase of the total protein contents of the adrenal gland and subsequently in the enlargement of the gland. Serum adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) and insulin levels in Cd-treated rats were not higher than control levels, suggesting that the stimulation of DNA synthesis in the adrenals of Cd-treated rats is due to factor(s) other than serum ACTH and insulin. Treatment with Cd inhibited DNA synthesis in cultured adrenocortical cells at concentrations of 10(-4) to 10(-8) M, suggesting that Cd does not directly stimulate DNA synthesis in the adrenal gland in vivo. Although the adrenal gland became enlarged, the total adrenal corticosterone content decreased significantly. The decrease of total adrenal corticosterone content may be due to the fall in serum ACTH level of Cd-treated rats.

  1. Adrenal Metastasis from Uterine Papillary Serous Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lubana, Sandeep Singh; Singh, Navdeep; Tuli, Sandeep S.; Seligman, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 60 Final Diagnosis: UPSC with adrenal metastasis Symptoms: Post menopausal bleeding Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Adrenalectomy Specialty: Oncology Objective: Rare disease Background: Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is a highly malignant form of endometrial cancer with a high propensity for metastases and recurrences even when there is minimal or no myometrial invasion. It usually metastasizes to the pelvis, retroperitoneal lymph nodes, upper abdomen, and peritoneum. However, adrenal metastases from UPSC is extremely rare. Here, we present a case of UPSC with adrenal metastasis that occurred 6 years after the initial diagnosis. Case Report: A 60-year-old woman previously diagnosed with uterine papillary serous carcinoma at an outside facility presented in September of 2006 with postmenopausal bleeding. She underwent comprehensive surgical staging with FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) stage 2. Post-operatively, the patient was treated with radiation and chemotherapy. The treatment was completed in April of 2007. The patient had no evidence of disease until July 2009 when she was found to have a mass highly suspicious for malignancy. Subsequently, she underwent right upper lobectomy. The morphology of the carcinoma was consistent with UPSC. She refused chemotherapy due to a previous history of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. The patient was followed up with regular computed tomography (CT) scans. In October 2012 a new right adrenal nodule was seen on CT, which showed intense metabolic uptake on positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan. The patient underwent right adrenalectomy. Pathology of the surgical specimen was consistent with UPSC. Conclusions: UPSC is an aggressive variant of endometrial cancer associated with high recurrence rate and poor prognoses. Long-term follow-up is needed because there is a possibility of late metastases, as in this case. PMID:27117594

  2. Non Hodgkin's lymphoma involving the adrenal glands and the central nervous system (CNS): a particular evolution after chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vélayoudom, F-L; Cardot-Bauters, C; Decouvelaere, A-V; Vlaeminck, V; Bauters, F; Wémeau, J-L

    2005-12-01

    Adrenal lymphoma is extremely rare. The prognostic depends on involvement of other organs (such as the central nervous system) responsible for lower median survival. We report the case of a 51-year-old man with non Hodgkin's Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) involving the central nervous system (CNS) and the adrenal glands simultaneously. The endocrine exploration revealed a partial adrenal insufficiency and ruled out a pheochromocytoma. Computerized tomographic (CT) scan directed needle biopsy of the adrenal gland allowed the diagnostic of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). CNS biopsies showed similar histopathologic lesions. After aggressive polychemotherapy and methotrexate intrathecal injection, a dissociated therapeutic response was observed with a decrease of the cerebral lesion and an increase of the adrenal mass. This result may be explained by the efficacy of corticosteroid therapy on cerebral edema. The prognosis was poor with tumor infiltration of the leptomeninges and death 16 months after diagnosis.

  3. Poorly Controlled Congenital Hypothyroidism due to an Underlying Allgrove Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    van Tellingen, V.; Finken, M.J.J.; Israëls, J.; Hendriks, Y.M.C.; Kamp, G.A.; van Santen, H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital hypothyroidism of thyroidal origin (CHT) is a common disorder in pediatric endocrinology practices, which can be difficult to manage. Elevated thyrotropin (TSH) concentrations are in the great majority of cases explained by poor compliance to levothyroxine therapy. Methods Case description. Results We present a boy with CHT, with 2 heterozygous mutations in the TSH receptor gene, who showed persistently elevated TSH concentrations and psychomotor retardation, initially misinterpreted as malcompliance. At the age of 4 years, he was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency, wherefore a broad diagnostic search was initiated. After the start of glucocorticoid replacement therapy, his TSH normalized and the levothyroxine could be lowered. At the age of 6 years, his TSH increased again, this time caused by malabsorption of levothyroxine due to esophageal achalasia. In retrospect, alacrima was also present and the diagnosis of Allgrove syndrome was genetically confirmed. The CHT was considered a separate disease entity. Conclusions In case of persistently elevated TSH levels in children with CHT, causes other than noncompliance must be considered. Second, in establishing the cause of adrenal insufficiency, specific symptoms, such as alacrima, are easily overlooked. Third, Allgrove syndrome is a rare disorder, in which diagnostic delay can lead to potentially life-threatening complications. PMID:27255745

  4. [Pheochromocytomas as adrenal gland incidentalomas].

    PubMed

    Cerović, Snezana; Cizmić, Milica; Milović, Novak; Ajdinović, Boris; Brajusković, Goran

    2002-07-01

    Adrenal incidentalomas are a heterogeneous group of pathological entities, including benign or malignant adrenocortical or medullary tumors, hormonally active or inactive lesions, which are identified incidentally during the examination of nonadrenal-related abdominal complaints. About 1.5% to 23% of adrenal incidentalomas are pheochromocytomas. Composite pheochromocytoma is a rare tumour of adrenal medulla with divergente clinical course. This type of pheochromocytoma is designated "composite" or "mixed," depending on whether pheochromocytoma and nonpheochromocytoma components show the same embryologic origin. Nonpheochromocytoma components found in the composite pheochromocytoma include ganglioneuroma, ganglioneuroblastoma, neuroblastoma, and malignant schwannoma. The biologic behavior of composite pheochromocytomas may be as difficult to predict as more traditional pheochromocytomas; based on the number of cases reported to date the presence of areas resembling ganglioneuroblastoma or neuroblastoma does not necessary indicate a poor prognosis. Some may behave in a malignant fashion with metastasis by a component of the tumour which has neural features. Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are well-defined entities. Some of their nonsporadic associations and unusual morphological appearances are not universally appreciated. We report on a rare association of left adrenal CP, with typical right adrenal phochromocytoma and retroperitoneal paraganglioma, and a review of literature. We analyzed the clinical and immunohistochemical features in a 24-year-old woman with composite pheochromocytoma localized in the left adrenal gland and associated with blood pressure of 200/140 mmHg. Abdominal computed tomography and 131-J MIBG revealed a 65 x 60 mm mass in the right adrenal gland, but no revealed 45 x 40 mm retroperitoneal mass and 20 x 20 mm mass in the left adrenal region. Serum and urinary adrenaline levels were high, and catecholamine levels in the blood sample of

  5. [Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia in Adults].

    PubMed

    Vrbíková, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia is a life-long disease requiring an integrated therapy. It may negatively influence the quality of life. In childhood, the main problems of the care of these patients involve sex determination and ensuring optimum growth and puberty. The therapeutic goals for adults are the prevention of Addisonian crisis and ensuring the best possible quality of life, including fertility.Key words: androgens - cardiovascular risk - congenital adrenal hyperplasia - bone density - testicular rest tumors.

  6. Adrenal-derived 11-Oxygenated 19-Carbon Steroids are the Dominant Androgens in Classic 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Turcu, Adina F.; Nanba, Aya T.; Chomic, Robert; Upadhyay, Sunil K.; Giordano, Thomas J.; Shields, James J.; Merke, Deborah P.; Rainey, William E.; Auchus, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To comprehensively characterize androgens and androgen precursors in classic 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD) and to gain insight to the mechanisms of their formation. Design Serum samples were obtained from 38 patients (19 men) with classic 21OHD, age 3-59, and 38 sex- and age-matched controls; 3 patients with 11β-hydroxylase deficiency; 4 patients with adrenal insufficiency; and 16 patients (8 men) undergoing adrenal vein sampling. Paraffin-embedded normal (n=5) and 21OHD adrenal tissue (n=3) was used for immunohistochemical studies. Methods We measured 11 steroids in all sera using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Immunofluroescence localized 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (HSD3B2) and cytochrome b5 (CYB5A) within the normal and 21OHD adrenals. Results Four 11-oxygenated 19-carbon (11oxC19) steroids were significantly higher in male and female 21OHD patients than in controls: 11β-hydroxyandrostenedione, 11-ketoandrostenedione 11β-hydroxytestosterone, and 11-ketotestosterone (3-4-fold, p< 0.0001). For 21OHD patients, testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone were positively correlated in females, but inversely correlated in males. All 11oxC19 steroids were higher in adrenal vein than in inferior vena cava samples from men and women and rose with cosyntropin stimulation. Only trace amounts of 11oxC19 steroids were found in sera from patients with 11β-hydroxylase deficiency and adrenal insufficiency, confirming their adrenal origin. HSD3B2 and CYB5A immunoreactivities were sharply segregated in the normal adrenal glands, whereas areas of overlapping expression were identified in the 21OHD adrenals. Conclusions All four 11oxC19 steroids are elevated in both men and women with classic 21OHD. Our data suggest that 11oxC19 steroids are specific biomarkers of adrenal-derived androgen excess. PMID:26865584

  7. Hypothalamo‑hypophysial system in rats with autotransplantation of the adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Nae; Tanaka, Susumu; Oe, Souichi; Koike, Taro; Matsuda, Tadashi; Yamada, Hisao

    2017-03-24

    Patients with bilateral pheochromocytoma often require an adrenalectomy. Autotransplantation of the adrenal cortex is an alternative therapy that could potentially be performed instead of receiving glucocorticoid replacement following adrenalectomy. Adrenal cortex autotransplantation aims to avoid the side effects of long‑term steroid treatment and adrenal insufficiency. Although the function of the hypothalamo‑hypophysial system is critical for patients who have undergone adrenal cortex autotransplantation, the details of that system, with the exception of adrenocorticotropic hormone in the subjects with adrenal autotransplantation, have been overlooked for a long time. To clarify the precise effect of adrenal autotransplantation on the pituitary gland and hypothalamus, the current study examined the gene expression of hormones produced from the hypothalamus and pituitary gland. Bilateral adrenalectomy and adrenal autotransplantation were performed in 8 to 9‑week‑old male rats. The hypothalamus and pituitary tissues were collected at 4 weeks after surgery. Transcriptional regulation of hypothalamic and pituitary hormones was subsequently examined by reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Proopiomelanocortin, glycoprotein hormone α polypeptide, and thyroid stimulating hormone β were significantly elevated in the pituitary gland of autotransplanted rats when compared with sham‑operated rats. In addition, there were significant differences in the levels of corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (Crhr1), Crhr2, nuclear receptor subfamily 3 group C member 1 and thyrotropin releasing hormone receptor between the sham‑operated rats and autotransplanted rats in the pituitary gland. In the hypothalamus, corticotropin releasing hormone and urocortin 2 mRNA was significantly upregulated in autotransplanted rats compared with sham‑operated rats. The authors identified significant alterations in the function of not only the

  8. Genetics of primary ovarian insufficiency: a review.

    PubMed

    Fortuño, Cristina; Labarta, Elena

    2014-12-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency is one of the main causes of female infertility owing to an abnormal ovarian reserve. Its relevance has increased in more recent years due to the fact that age of motherhood is being delayed in developed countries, with the risk of having either primary ovarian insufficiency or less chances of pregnancy when women consider the option of having their first baby. Several exogenous factors can lead to this event, such us viral infections, metabolomic dysfunction, autoimmune diseases, and environmental or iatrogenic factors, although in most cases the mechanism that leads to the disorder is unknown. Genetic factors represent the most commonly identified cause and the impact of sex chromosome abnormalities (e.g., Turner syndrome or X structural abnormalities), autosomal and X-linked mutations on the genesis of primary ovarian insufficiency has also been well described. Yet in most cases, the genetic origin remains unknown and there are multiple candidate genes. This review aims to collect all the genetic abnormalities and genes associated with syndromic and non syndromic primary ovarian insufficiency that have been published in the literature to date using the candidate-gene approach and a genome-wide analysis.

  9. Adrenal function in Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bianconi, Simona E; Conley, Sandra K; Keil, Meg F; Sinaii, Ninet; Rother, Kristina I; Porter, Forbes D; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2012-01-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a multiple malformation syndrome due to mutations of the 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase gene (DHCR7), which leads to a deficiency of cholesterol synthesis and an accumulation of 7-dehydrocholesterol and related metabolites. The SLOS clinical spectrum ranges from multiple major malformations to a mild phenotype with dysmorphic features, intellectual disability and a specific behavioral presentation. Several cases of SLOS with adrenal insufficiency have been described. We performed ovine corticotropin (oCRH) testing in 35 SLOS patients and 16 age- and gender-matched controls. We reviewed prior ACTH stimulation tests of our SLOS patients (19 of 35 available) and reviewed ACTH stimulation tests from additional 10 other SLOS patients. Results from oCRH testing showed that patients with SLOS had significantly higher ACTH baseline values than healthy controls (24.8 ± 15.3 pg/mL vs. 17.8 ± 7.5 pg/mL, p=0.034). However, no statistically significant differences were noted for peak ACTH values (74.4 ± 35.0 pg/mL vs. 64.0 ± 24.9 pg/mL, p=0.303) and for baseline (14.2 ± 7.8 mcg/dL vs. 14.2 ± 6.3 mcg/dL, p=0.992) and peak cortisol values (28.2 ± 7.9 mcg/dL vs. 24.8 ± 8.1 mcg/dL, p=0.156). The area-under-the-curve (AUC) was not significantly different in SLOS patients compared to controls for both ACTH (250.1 ± 118.7 pg/mL vs. 195.3 ± 96.6 pg/mL, p=0.121) as well as cortisol secretion (83.1 ± 26.1 mcg/dL vs. 77.8 ± 25.9 mcg/dL, p=0.499). ACTH stimulation test was normal in 28 of 29 tests. The individual with the abnormal ACTH stimulation test had a normal oCRH test during the same evaluation. The slightly increased baseline ACTH level seen during oCRH testing may be due to compensated mild adrenocortical insufficiency. However, we were able to show that our cohort affected with SLOS had an adequate stress response and that in mild to moderate cases of SLOS stress steroid coverage should not be required. PMID:21990131

  10. Contemporary approach to preoperative preparation of patients with adrenal cortex hormones dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kalezić, Nevena; Malenković, Vesna; Zivaljević, Vladan; Sabljak, Vera; Diklić, Aleksandar; Ivan, Paunović

    2011-01-01

    Preoperative preparation of the patients with adrenal cortex dysfunction is based on the careful preoperative evaluation of the type and the severity of the disturbance. The dysfunction involving adrenal glands may be: insufficiency (severe, mild, expressed) and hyperfunction (hypercorticism and/or hyperaldosteronism). If we speak about the patients with limited adrenal reserve (Addison's disease, therapeutic glucocorticoid application etc.) they need necessary corticosteroid supplementation, during preoperative preparation, as well as, during complete perioperative period. Doses needed for the substitution are adjusted according to the severity of adrenal insufficiency and according to the extent of the planned surgical procedure. Patients with Cushing's syndrome (or other form of hypercorticism), as well as, patients with Conn's syndrome (or other forms of hyperaldosteronism), do have numerous organ dysfunctions, that are significant in preoperative preparation, anesthesia and for the outcome of the surgical treatment. Common feature for both of the above syndromes is hydroelectrolyte disbalance, with hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis and hypertension. Disturbances related to the adrenal cortex hyperfunction must be corrected preoperatively, in order to avoid complications. When we speak about hypokalemia it must be promptly corrected even before urgent/vital surgical procedure because it may cause severe intraoperative cardiac arrhythmia.

  11. Role of the endothelial-derived endogenous anti-inflammatory factor Del-1 in inflammation-mediated adrenal gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kanczkowski, Waldemar; Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Grossklaus, Sylvia; Sprott, David; Bornstein, Stefan R; Chavakis, Triantafyllos

    2013-03-01

    Inflammation in the course of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) or sepsis often results in dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis; however, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. The adrenal gland is highly vascularized; thus, we hypothesized that endothelial dysfunction may actively participate in inflammation-related adrenal insufficiency. To address this hypothesis, we used the properties of developmental endothelial locus-1 (Del-1), which is an endothelial-derived anti-inflammatory factor that antagonizes integrin-dependent leukocyte adhesion. Here we identified that Del-1 is expressed in the adrenal gland and that its expression was down-regulated upon SIRS induction by systemic lipopolysaccharide administration. Furthermore, we observed increased leukocyte accumulation, inflammation, and higher apoptosis in the adrenal glands of Del-1-deficient mice as compared with wild-type mice. Strikingly, Del-1 deficiency was also associated with reduced corticosterone and ACTH levels 24 hours after lipopolysaccharide administration. Together, these data suggest that Del-1 may act as a gatekeeper of adrenal gland inflammation and may regulate the integrity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis stress response, thereby modulating adrenal (dys)function in the course of SIRS.

  12. Compensatory adrenal growth - A neurally mediated reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dallman, M. F.; Engeland, W. C.; Shinsako, J.

    1976-01-01

    The responses of young rats to left adrenalectomy or left adrenal manipulation were compared to surgical sham adrenalectomy in which adrenals were observed but not touched. At 12 h right adrenal wet weight, dry weight, DNA, RNA, and protein content were increased (P less than 0.05) after the first two operations. Left adrenal manipulation resulted in increased right adrenal weight at 12 h but no change in left adrenal weight. Sequential manipulation of the left adrenal at time 0 and the right adrenal at 12 h resulted in an enlarged right adrenal at 12 h (P less than 0.01), and an enlarged left adrenal at 24 h (P less than 0.05), showing that the manipulated gland was capable of response. Bilateral adrenal manipulation of the adrenal glands resulted in bilateral enlargement of 12 h (P less than 0.01). Taken together with previous results, these findings strongly suggest that compensatory adrenal growth is a neurally mediated reflex.

  13. Science review: mechanisms of impaired adrenal function in sepsis and molecular actions of glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Prigent, Hélène; Maxime, Virginie; Annane, Djillali

    2004-08-01

    This review describes current knowledge on the mechanisms that underlie glucocorticoid insufficiency in sepsis and the molecular action of glucocorticoids. In patients with severe sepsis, numerous factors predispose to glucocorticoid insufficiency, including drugs, coagulation disorders and inflammatory mediators. These factors may compromise the hypothalamic-pituitary axis (i.e. secondary adrenal insufficiency) or the adrenal glands (i.e. primary adrenal failure), or may impair glucocorticoid access to target cells (i.e. peripheral tissue resistance). Irreversible anatomical damages to the hypothalamus, pituitary, or adrenal glands rarely occur. Conversely, transient functional impairment in hormone synthesis may be a common complication of severe sepsis. Glucocorticoids interact with a specific cytosolic glucocorticoid receptor, which undergoes conformational changes, sheds heat shock proteins and translocates to the nucleus. Glucocorticoids may also interact with membrane binding sites at the surface of the cells. The molecular action of glucocorticoids results in genomic and nongenomic effects. Direct and indirect transcriptional and post-transcriptional effects related to the cytosolic glucocorticoid receptor account for the genomic effects. Nongenomic effects are probably subsequent to cytosolic interaction between the glucocorticoid receptor and proteins, or to interaction between glucocorticoids and specific membrane binding sites.

  14. A rare case of Cushing's syndrome due to bilateral adrenocortical adenomas.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Atsushi; Seki, Toshiro; Ito, Kazuko; Takagi, Atsushi; Watanabe, Daisuke; Nakamura, Naoya; Hanai, Kazuya; Terachi, Toshiro; Maekawa, Takashi; Sasano, Hironobu; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2014-12-20

    We report a rare case of Cushing's syndrome caused by bilateral cortisol-secreting adenomas in a 63-year-old man. Our preoperative diagnosis was based on endocrinological results and imaging findings. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy has become a standard technique for adrenal tumors; however, bilateral adrenalectomy results in postoperative adrenal insufficiency, necessitating lifelong steroid replacement. To preserve adrenal function, the left adrenal gland was completely resected, whereas the right adrenal gland was partially resected laparoscopically. Hydrocortisone supplementation was initiated at a dose of 30 mg/day and was slowly tapered. However, symptoms of adrenal insufficiency developed, and adrenal steroid secretion did not respond to exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone. Bilateral cortisol-secreting tumors rarely cause Cushing's syndrome. The present study comprised few patients, and the utilized surgical procedures (i.e., total/partial adrenalectomy or bilateral total adrenalectomy) were not uniform. Few cases of bilateral adrenal-preserving surgery have been reported. However, our patient developed adrenal insufficiency after the oral cortisone supplementation was tapered. This report demonstrates that partial adrenalectomy does not necessarily preserve normal adrenocortical function. Therefore, careful postoperative observation is necessary for patients undergoing a partial adrenalectomy.

  15. Isolated mucinous adrenal metastasis in a breast cancer patient.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Umut; Buyukberber, Suleyman; Cakir, Tansel; Poyraz, Aylar; Baykara, Meltem; Karakus, Esra; Tufan, Gulnihal; Benekli, Mustafa; Coskun, Ugur

    2011-12-01

    Mucinous breast carcinoma (MBC) is a rare histological type of breast cancer and rarely associated with advanced disease. We report a case that had MBC with an isolated adrenal metastasis which was removed by laparoscopic adrenelectomy. This case is unique due to the unexpected metastasis of pure mucinous carcinoma developed after 4 years of hormone therapy.

  16. Adrenal gland disease in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Simone-Freilicher, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    Adrenal gland disease in ferrets is unique to this species, with clinical signs and pathophysiology different from those seen in the dog. Its prevalence is increasing; 70% of pet ferrets in the United States were affected in 2003. The exact causes of the adrenal gland changes that lead to the disease are not known. Early oophorohysterectomies and neutering, combined with the artificially prolonged photoperiod experienced by indoor pet ferrets, and a possible genetic component, may be contributing factors. Signs of adrenal gland disease include progressive hair loss, pruritus, lethargy, atrophy, and, in female ferrets, vulvar swelling. An understanding of the signs and physiologic changes is necessary for diagnosis and treatment. A review of anatomy, physiology, and current surgical and medical options is presented.

  17. Adrenal cortex dysfunction: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Huebener, K.H.; Treugut, H.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of the adrenal gland was studied in 302 patients with possible endocrinologic disease and 107 patients undergoing CT for nonendocrinologic reasons. Measurements of adrenal size were also made in 100 adults with no known adrenal pathology. CT proved to be a sensitive diagnostic tool in combination with clinical studies. When blood hormone levels are increased, CT can differentiate among homogeneous organic hyperplasia, nodular hyperplasia, benign adenoma, and malignant cortical adenoma. When blood hormone levels are decreased, CT can demonstrate hypoplasia or metastatic tumorous destruction. Calcifications can be demonstrated earlier than on plain radiographs. When hormone elimination is increased, the morphologic substrate can be identified; tumorous changes can be localized and infiltration of surrounding organs recognized.

  18. Adrenal myelolipoma with osseous metaplasia and hypercortisolism

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ujwal; Priyadarshi, Shivam; Tomar, Vinay; Vohra, Rishi Raj

    2017-01-01

    Adrenal myelolipomas are rare adrenal tumors generally diagnosed incidentally. A 42-year-old female reported to us with complaints of left flank pain attributable to her left ureteric calculi. On evaluation, a large adrenal mass was diagnosed along with hypercortisolism. After adrenalectomy, the histopathology revealed adrenal myelolipoma along with osseous metaplasia not reported in English literature, to the best of our knowledge till date. PMID:28216934

  19. Chronic stress induces adrenal hyperplasia and hypertrophy in a subregion-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M; Figueiredo, Helmer F; Ostrander, Michelle M; Choi, Dennis C; Engeland, William C; Herman, James P

    2006-11-01

    The adrenal gland is an essential stress-responsive organ that is part of both the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the sympatho-adrenomedullary system. Chronic stress exposure commonly increases adrenal weight, but it is not known to what extent this growth is due to cellular hyperplasia or hypertrophy and whether it is subregion specific. Moreover, it is not clear whether increased production of adrenal glucocorticoid after chronic stress is due to increased sensitivity to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) vs. increased maximal output. The present studies use a 14-day chronic variable stress (CVS) paradigm in adult male rats to assess the effects of chronic stress on adrenal growth and corticosterone steroidogenesis. Exogenous ACTH administration (0-895 ng/100 g body wt) to dexamethasone-blocked rats demonstrated that CVS increased maximal plasma and adrenal corticosterone responses to ACTH without affecting sensitivity. This enhanced function was associated with increased adrenal weight, DNA and RNA content, and RNA/DNA ratio after CVS, suggesting that both cellular hyperplasia and hypertrophy occurred. Unbiased stereological counting of cells labeled for Ki67 (cell division marker) or 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (nuclear marker), combined with zone specific markers, showed that CVS induced hyperplasia in the outer zona fasciculata, hypertrophy in the inner zona fasciculata and medulla, and reduced cell size in the zona glomerulosa. Collectively, these results demonstrate that increased adrenal weight after CVS is due to hyperplasia and hypertrophy that occur in specific adrenal subregions and is associated with increased maximal corticosterone responses to ACTH. These chronic stress-induced changes in adrenal growth and function may have implications for patients with stress-related disorders.

  20. [Travel and chronic respiratory insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Bonnet, D; Marotel, C; Miltgen, J; N'Guyen, G; Cuguilliere, A; L'Her, P

    1997-01-01

    Changes in climate, altitude and lifestyle during travel confronts patients presenting chronic respiratory insufficiency with special problems. A major challenge is related to high altitude during air travel. To limit risks, a preflight examination is necessary to ascertain respiratory status. Patients requiring oxygen therapy must ensure availability both during the flight and at the destination. Patients with asthma or chronic bronchitis must bring along a sufficient supply of usual inhalers. All patients should carry a doctor's letter describing their condition and listing medications. Using these elementary precautions, patients with chronic respiratory insufficiency can safely enjoy sightseeing and outdoor leisure activities.

  1. Primary ovarian insufficiency: an update

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Leticia; Liu, James H

    2014-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency is a condition that represents impaired ovarian function on a continuum with intermittent ovulation. This condition commonly leads to premature menopause, defined as cessation of ovulation prior to the age of 40 years. Because there are potential immediate and long-term consequences of hypoestrogenism, a timely diagnosis is invaluable. This comprehensive review will discuss identifiable causes for primary ovarian insufficiency, including genetic disorders and metabolic abnormalities, as well as review current strategies for diagnosis, evaluation, and management of women with this condition. PMID:24591848

  2. [Immunoendocrine associations in adrenal glands].

    PubMed

    Sterzl, I; Hrdá, P

    2010-12-01

    Immune and endocrine systems are basic regulatory mechanisms of organism and, including the nervous system, maintain the organism's homeostasis. The main immune system representatives are mononuclear cells, T- and B-cells and their products, in the endocrine system the main representatives are cells of the glands with inner secretion and their products. One of the most important glands for maintaining homeostasis are adrenal glands. It has been proven that either cells of the immune system, either endocrine cells can, although in trace amounts, produce mutually mediators of both systems (hormones, cytokines). Disorders in one system can lead to pathological symptoms in the other system. Also here represent adrenals an important model.

  3. The adrenal glands and their functions.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Deepthi C; Wijesiriwardene, Bandula

    2007-09-01

    The adrenal glands secrete hormones essential for metabolism, regulation of blood pressure, and sodium and glucose homeostasis. Hypo- or hypersecretion of these hormones is life threatening. Understanding the physiological functions of adrenal hormones is a prerequisite to the management of adrenal gland disease.

  4. Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage from Adrenal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez Valverde, F.M. Balsalobre, M.; Torregrosa, N.; Molto, M.; Gomez Ramos, M.J.; Vazquez Rojas, J.L.

    2007-04-15

    Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage is a very rare but serious disorder of the adrenal gland that can require emergent treatment. We report on a 42-year-old man who underwent selective angiography for diagnosis and treatment of retroperitoneal hemorrhage from small adrenal artery aneurysm. This case gives further details about the value of transluminal artery embolization in the management of visceral aneurysm rupture.

  5. A clinical update on female androgen insufficiency--testosterone testing and treatment in women presenting with low sexual desire.

    PubMed

    Burger, Henry G; Papalia, Mary-Anne

    2006-05-01

    The diagnosis of female androgen deficiency syndrome is suggested by complaints of a diminished sense of well being, persistent unexplained fatigue and decreased sexual desire, sexual receptivity and pleasure in a woman who is oestrogen-replete and in whom no other significant contributing factors can be identified. The diagnosis is supported by the finding of low circulating concentrations of free testosterone. Barriers to its recognition include the non-specificity of the symptoms and methodological problems due to insensitive testosterone assays. Barriers to its treatment include the unavailability of satisfactory forms of testosterone for administration to women and lack of data regarding long-term safety. Although several conditions lead to clear-cut androgen deficiency, such as hypopituitarism, adrenal and ovarian insufficiency, glucocorticoid therapy and use of oral contraceptives and oral oestrogens, it is important for clinicians to recognise that in normal women, androgen levels decline by 50% from the early 20s to the mid 40s, and hence age-related androgen insufficiency may occur in women in their late 30s and 40s, as well as postmenopausally. Satisfactory measurements of free testosterone requires a sensitive and reliable assay for total testosterone, and quantitation of sex hormone binding globulin, from which free testosterone is readily calculated. Adverse effects of testosterone treatment are few if replacement is monitored to achieve physiological circulating testosterone concentrations. Currently, available methods include testosterone implants and testosterone creams, and transdermal patches and sprays are in development.

  6. Effect of dietary copper and sucrose on catecholamine concentrations in the adrenal medulla

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, S.I.; Peterson, D.F.; Mason, P.A. KCOM, Kirksville, MO Air Force/SAM/RZP, Brooks AFB, TX )

    1991-03-11

    The severity of copper (Cu) deficiency in the rat is enhanced by dietary sucrose. Possible interactive effects of Cu status and sucrose on catecholamine concentrations in the adrenal medulla were investigated in Cu deficient rats fed a diet were investigated in Cu deficient rats fed a diet containing either glucose or sucrose, as compared with respective Cu-adequate controls. Catecholamines were analyzed by an HPLC method using 3,4-dihydroxybenxylamine as the internal standard. Cu deficiency caused pronounced decreases in norepinephrine and epinephrine, with no significant effect on dopamine, as expressed in nmoles/mg tissue. Dietary sucrose showed no appreciable effect on catecholamines in the adrenal medulla. The adrenal glands were markedly enlarged in Cu-deficient rats, whether fed glucose or sucrose. Adrenal weights were not affected by dietary sucrose. Data indicate that the increased severity of copper deficiency due to sucrose feeding is not associated with changes in adrenal catecholamine output.

  7. Pancreatic Exocrine Insufficiency in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vujasinovic, Miroslav; Valente, Roberto; Del Chiaro, Marco; Permert, Johan; Löhr, J.-Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Cancer patients experience weight loss for a variety of reasons, commencing with the tumor’s metabolism (Warburg effect) and proceeding via cachexia to loss of appetite. In pancreatic cancer, several other factors are involved, including a loss of appetite with a particular aversion to meat and the incapacity of the pancreatic gland to function normally when a tumor is present in the pancreatic head. Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency is characterized by a deficiency of the enzymes secreted from the pancreas due to the obstructive tumor, resulting in maldigestion. This, in turn, contributes to malnutrition, specifically a lack of fat-soluble vitamins, antioxidants, and other micronutrients. Patients with pancreatic cancer and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency have, overall, an extremely poor prognosis with regard to surgical outcome and overall survival. Therefore, it is crucial to be aware of the mechanisms involved in the disease, to be able to diagnose pancreatic exocrine insufficiency early on, and to treat malnutrition appropriately, for example, with pancreatic enzymes. PMID:28241470

  8. Anesthetic Considerations on Adrenal Gland Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Domi, Rudin; Sula, Hektor; Kaci, Myzafer; Paparisto, Sokol; Bodeci, Artan; Xhemali, Astrit

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal gland surgery needs a multidisciplinary team including endocrinologist, radiologist, anesthesiologist, and surgeon. The indications for adrenal gland surgery include hormonal secreting and non-hormonal secreting tumors. Adrenal hormonal secreting tumors present to the anesthesiologist unique challenges requiring good preoperative evaluation, perioperative hemodynamic control, corrections of all electrolytes and metabolic abnormalities, a detailed and careful anesthetic strategy, overall knowledge about the specific diseases, control and maintaining of postoperative adrenal function, and finally a good collaboration with other involved colleagues. This review will focus on the endocrine issues, as well as on the above-mentioned aspects of anesthetic management during hormone secreting adrenal gland tumor resection. PMID:25368694

  9. [Frequency of Kongenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Müller, W; Prader, M; Kofler, J; Glatzl, J; Geir, W

    1979-01-01

    The frequency of homozygous congenital adrenal hyperplasia in Tyrol is found to be 1 : 8991, the gene-frequency for congenital adrenal hyperplasia 1 : 95 and the frequency of heterozygous congenital adrenal hyperplasia 1 : 48. Our data is compared on a numerical and statistical base with that in Zürich and Munich with regard to the frequency of congenital adrenal hyperplasia, to its distribution with and without salt loss and to its sex-distribution. According to our study one may assume a frequency of homozygous congenital adrenal hyperplasia in Tyrol, Zürich and Munich of 1 : 7000--10,000.

  10. Adrenal adrenoceptors in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    de Lucia, Claudio; Femminella, Grazia D.; Gambino, Giuseppina; Pagano, Gennaro; Allocca, Elena; Rengo, Carlo; Silvestri, Candida; Leosco, Dario; Ferrara, Nicola; Rengo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a chronic clinical syndrome characterized by the reduction in left ventricular (LV) function and it represents one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite considerable advances in pharmacological treatment, HF represents a severe clinical and social burden. Sympathetic outflow, characterized by increased circulating catecholamines (CA) biosynthesis and secretion, is peculiar in HF and sympatholytic treatments (as β-blockers) are presently being used for the treatment of this disease. Adrenal gland secretes Epinephrine (80%) and Norepinephrine (20%) in response to acetylcholine stimulation of nicotinic cholinergic receptors on the chromaffin cell membranes. This process is regulated by adrenergic receptors (ARs): α2ARs inhibit CA release through coupling to inhibitory Gi-proteins, and β ARs (mainly β2ARs) stimulate CA release through coupling to stimulatory Gs-proteins. All ARs are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and GPCR kinases (GRKs) regulate their signaling and function. Adrenal GRK2-mediated α2AR desensitization and downregulation are increased in HF and seem to be a fundamental regulator of CA secretion from the adrenal gland. Consequently, restoration of adrenal α2AR signaling through the inhibition of GRK2 is a fascinating sympatholytic therapeutic strategy for chronic HF. This strategy could have several significant advantages over existing HF pharmacotherapies minimizing side-effects on extra-cardiac tissues and reducing the chronic activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone and endothelin systems. The role of adrenal ARs in regulation of sympathetic hyperactivity opens interesting perspectives in understanding HF pathophysiology and in the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:25071591

  11. Virilizing adrenal oncocytoma in a 9-year-old girl: rare neoplasm with an intriguing postoperative course.

    PubMed

    Yordanova, Galina; Iotova, Violeta; Kalchev, Kalin; Ivanov, Krasimir; Balev, Boyan; Kolev, Nikola; Tonev, Anton; Oosterhuis, Wolter

    2015-05-01

    Adrenal oncocytoma is an extremely rare neoplasm, which is mostly non-functional. Only five cases of childhood adrenal oncocytoma have been described so far, all of which were hormonally active. Currently, guidelines for management and follow-up are not available. We report a 9-year-old girl with benign adrenal oncocytoma, presenting with severe short-term virilization. After diagnostic work-up the patient underwent laparoscopic unilateral adrenalectomy. For the first 2 weeks following surgery she suffered marked mood swings, irritability and fatigue. There were no other clinical and/or laboratory abnormalities except the rapid drop-down of androgen levels to normal values. Follow-up showed no signs of recurrence and in the absence of signs of adrenal insufficiency, we speculate that, the rapid drop of androgen levels after removal of the tumor might be the reason for the deteriorated psychoemotional condition of our patient.

  12. Postnatal changes in adrenal size in very low-birth-weight infants: sonographic evaluation for the prediction of late-onset glucocorticoid-responsive circulatory collapse.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Shigeo; Uga, Naoki; Ohzeki, Takehiko

    2010-06-01

    We investigated the postnatal pattern of changes in adrenal size in very low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants and its relation to late-onset glucocorticoid-responsive circulatory collapse (LGCC) that may be associated with adrenal insufficiency. In 36 VLBW infants born at <33 weeks' gestation, ultrasound examinations of postnatal changes in adrenal size during the first 3 weeks of life were performed. VLBW infants were classified into three groups: group A (N = 6), the actual adrenal area was greater than or equal to the predicted value at birth and unchanged at 3 weeks; group B (N = 24), the actual adrenal area was greater than or equal to the predicted value and decreased at 3 weeks; and group C (N = 6), the actual adrenal area was less than the predicted value and unchanged at 3 weeks. Five infants developed LGCC, and all five were in group A. These observations suggest that the life of the adrenal fetal zone might be extended beyond 3 weeks after birth in some VLBW infants and that prolonged fetal zone activity might correlate with LGCC. On the other hand, adrenal maturation might have already occurred at birth in some VLBW infants. Sonographic evaluation of adrenal size may enable prediction of subsequent LGCC in VLBW infants.

  13. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia: Treatment and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, Mahdi; Feki, Mouna Mnif; Sfar, Mohamed Habib; Abid, Mohamed

    2013-10-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) describes a group of autosomal recessive disorders where there is impairment of cortisol biosynthesis. CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency accounts for 95% of cases and shows a wide range of clinical severity. Glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid replacement therapies are the mainstays of treatment of CAH. The optimal treatment for adults with CAH continues to be a challenge. Important long-term health issues for adults with CAH affect both men and women. These issues may either be due to the disease or to steroid treatment and may affect final height, fertility, cardiometabolic risk, bone metabolism, neuro-cognitive development and the quality-of-life. Patients with CAH should be regularly followed-up from childhood to adulthood by multidisciplinary teams who have knowledge of CAH. Optimal replacement therapy, close clinical and laboratory monitoring, early life-style interventions, early and regular fertility assessment and continuous psychological management are needed to improve outcome.

  14. Ginkgo biloba for cerebral insufficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Kleijnen, J; Knipschild, P

    1992-01-01

    1. By means of a critical review we tried to establish whether there is evidence from controlled trials in humans on the efficacy of Ginkgo biloba extracts in cerebral insufficiency. 2. The methodological quality of 40 trials on Ginkgo and cerebral insufficiency was assessed using a list of predefined criteria of good methodology, and the outcome of the trials was interpreted in relation to their quality. A comparison of the quality was made with trials of co-dergocrine, which is registered for the same indication. 3. There were eight well performed trials out of a total of 40. Shortcomings were limited numbers of patients included, and incomplete description of randomization procedures, patient characteristics, effect measurement and data presentation. In no trial was double-blindness checked. Virtually all trials reported positive results, in most trials the dosage was 120 mg Ginkgo extract a day, given for at least 4-6 weeks. For the best trials, there were no marked differences in the quality of the evidence of the efficacy of Ginkgo in cerebral insufficiency compared with co-dergocrine. The results of the review may be complicated by a combination of publication bias and other biases, because there were no negative results reported in many trials of low methodological quality. 4. Positive results have been reported for Ginkgo biloba extracts in the treatment of cerebral insufficiency. The clinical evidence is similar to that of a registered product which is prescribed for the same indication. However, further studies should be conducted for a more detailed assessment of the efficacy. PMID:1457269

  15. [The Insufficiency Type of Metabolic Balance and Nutritional Status in Patient With Heart Failure].

    PubMed

    Obrezan, A G; Spitsa, S A

    2016-08-01

    A lot of data has been accumulated at present on the metabolic and nutritional insufficiency in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Researchers have noted an actuality of the study of nutritional and metabolic insufficiency in CHF patients as independent factors affecting the course of CHF and because of its relationship with triggers of inflammation, sympathetic-adrenal system, and markers of functional state of the cardiovascular system (CVS). In some works attention has been given to relationship of nutritional and metabolic insufficiency with autonomic regulation of cardiac rhythm. Attempts have been made to systematize obtained data, create contemporary pathophysiological portrait of CHF development and highlight prevailing mechanisms of progression of the disease. This review summarizes accumulated data on nutritional insufficiency in patients with CHF and systematizes metabolic changes according to types of metabolism and CHF functional class. We have also made an attempt of creating figurative representation of pathophysiological mechanism of development of nutritional insufficiency in CHF. We have emphasized the problem of inadequate knowledge on contribution of inflammatory markers in development of nutritional insufficiency especially in patients with I-II functional classes of CHF. We also present suggestions concerning strategy of studying nutritional insufficiency in CHF, its classification according to CHF functional class, stratification of risk factors of its development, and the methods of its prevention and correction.

  16. Efficacy of single serum cortisol reading obtained between 9 AM and 10 AM as an index of adrenal function in children treated with glucocorticoids or synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone.

    PubMed

    Goto, Masahiro; Shibata, Nao; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2016-07-01

    To find a simple method to screen for iatrogenic childhood adrenal insufficiency, we retrospectively examined the results of CRH stimulation tests performed 212 times on 111 subjects (68 males; age at commencement of initial treatment ranged 0.0-19.8 yr; median age, 5.8 yr). Before the commencement of this study, 97 subjects had been treated with glucocorticoids and 14 subjects with West syndrome had been treated with synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone. Duration of the primary treatment ranged from 15 to 2150 days. CRH stimulation tests were conducted between 09:00 AM and 10:00 AM and peak cortisol values less than 15 µg/dL were considered indicative of adrenal insufficiency. The receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the optimal basal serum cortisol cut-off values when screening for adrenal suppression ranged from 5.35 to 5.80 µg/dL depending on the primary disease. All subjects having a serum cortisol value of less than 2.3 µg/dL had insufficient adrenal function while all subjects having greater than 11 µg/dL had intact adrenal function. We concluded that single serum cortisol values obtained between 09:00 AM and 10:00 AM had the potential to serve as an index of adrenal function in children treated with glucocorticoids or synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone.

  17. Work up of incidental adrenal mass: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Bada, Maida; Castellan, Pietro; Tamburro, Fabiola R; Berardinelli, Francesco; Neri, Fabio; Cindolo, Luca; Schips, Luigi

    2016-11-18

    Due to the increasing use of radiological investigations, the detection of incidental adrenal masses has become even more frequent. Therefore, it is crucial to identify the nature of the adrenal mass in order to decide the type of treatment that should be undertaken. Toward this goal, biochemical tests are useful in order to assess catecholamines levels for the presence of a pheochromocytoma or cortisol excess in case of Cushing's syndrome. Furthermore, the dexamethasone suppression test and late-night salivary cortisol may be useful in measuring plasma cortisol, respectively, in the blood and urine. Hyperaldosteronism could be suspected in the presence of arterial hypertension. With regard to imaging modalities, the contrast washout and Hounsfield units estimation might play a role as indicators on computed tomography. In terms of treatment, a surgical approach is most suitable for a hyperfunctioning adrenal mass irrespective of size, and for nonfunctioning masses >4 cm. For indeterminate smaller lesions, with washout >50%, <10 Hounsfield Unit, nonfunctioning, benign-appearing, undergoing a follow-up in regular intervals is more appropriate in order to estimate mass growth. This paper summarizes recent findings on the management of incidental adrenal masses, with a special focus on the use of imaging, surgical management and follow-up modalities in improving patient outcomes.

  18. Rare adrenal tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Radu

    2014-04-01

    Apart from neuroblastomas, adrenal tumors are exceedingly rare in children and young adults. In this age group, the vast majority of patients present with clinical signs associated with excess hormone production. The most common tumor to arise from the adrenal cortex is an adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). Similar to the situation in adults, this tumor is frequently diagnosed at a late stage and carries a very poor prognosis. ACCs require extensive/aggressive local resection followed by mitotane chemotherapy. A multidisciplinary approach is essential, and these children should be referred to units that have previous experience in managing ACCs. International registries are an invaluable source for evidence-based care, and such collaborations should be further developed in the future. Pheochromocytomas are derived from the adrenal medulla and present with symptoms caused by high secretion of catecholamines. At least one-third of these children will be found to carry genetic mutations, most commonly the RET gene (MEN2 syndrome) or the VHL gene. Open radical adrenalectomy should be offered to children with adrenocortical cancers. For all other cases, laparoscopic adrenalectomy is the treatment of choice. It is possible that the retroperitoneoscopic approach will gain increasing favor. The role of robotic adrenalectomy remains controversial.

  19. Primitive neuroectodermal adrenal gland tumour.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Y P; Lang, Brian H H; Tam, S C; Wong, K P

    2014-10-01

    Ewing's sarcoma, also called primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the adrenal gland, is extremely rare. Only a few cases have been reported in the literature. We report on a woman with adult-onset primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the adrenal gland presenting with progressive flank pain. Computed tomography confirmed an adrenal tumour with invasion of the left diaphragm and kidney. Radical surgery was performed and the pain completely resolved; histology confirmed the presence of primitive neuroectodermal tumour, for which she was given chemotherapy. The clinical presentation of this condition is non-specific, and a definitive diagnosis is based on a combination of histology, as well as immunohistochemical and cytogenic analysis. According to the literature, these tumours demonstrate rapid growth and aggressive behaviour but there are no well-established guidelines or treatment strategies. Nevertheless, surgery remains the mainstay of local disease control; curative surgery can be performed in most patients. Adjuvant chemoirradiation has been advocated yet no consensus is available. The prognosis of patients with primitive neuroectodermal tumours remains poor.

  20. Laparoscopic Resection of an Adrenal Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinos, Toutouzas G.; Panagiotis, Kekis B.; Nikolaos, Michalopoulos V.; Ioannis, Flessas; Andreas, Manouras; Geogrios, Zografos

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Schwannomas are tumors originating from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve sheath (neurilemma) of the neuroectoderm. Rarely, schwannomas can arise from the retroperitoneum and adrenal medulla. We describe a case of a 71-y-old woman who presented with an incidentally discovered adrenal tumor. Methods: Ultrasound and computed tomography scans revealed a lesion with solid and cystic areas originating from the left adrenal gland. The patient underwent complete laparoscopic resection of the tumor and the left adrenal gland. Results: Histopathological examination and immunohistochemical staining of the excised specimen revealed a benign schwannoma measuring 5.5×5×3.7 cm. To our knowledge, few other cases of laparoscopic resection of adrenal schwannomas have been reported. Conclusion: Because preoperative diagnosis of adrenal tumors is inconclusive, complete laparoscopic excision allows for definitive diagnosis with histological evaluation and represents the treatment of choice. PMID:23484583

  1. [Development of the human adrenal glands].

    PubMed

    Folligan, K; Bouvier, R; Targe, F; Morel, Y; Trouillas, J

    2005-09-01

    The human adrenal is an endocrine gland located at the superior part of the kidney. Composed of the adrenal cortex of mesoblastic origin and the adrenal medulla of neuroectoblastic origin, the human fetal adrenal grows considerably during the first three months of development. From 12 to 18 weeks of development (WD), the weight of the adrenals increases seven-fold. The gland's weight doubles from 18 to 28 WD and from 28 to 36 WD. At birth, the two adrenals weigh on average 10 g. At the 8th week, two zones are individualized in the adrenal cortex: the definitive zone and the fetal inner zone. At the second trimester, according to ultrastructural and biochemical studies, a third zone, called the transition zone, is individualized between the definitive zone and the fetal inner zone. The definitive zone persists, but the origin of the three zones (glomerular, fascicular and reticular) of adult adrenal cortex is not known. The fetal inner zone regresses from the 5th month of gestation and disappears totally one year after birth. At the 8th week, the immature neuroblasts migrate to the definitive zone, then to the fetal inner zone to compose the adrenal medulla, which develops essentially after birth and during the first year. Before the 10th week, the human fetal adrenal is able to produce steroid hormones, in particular dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S); the secretion of cortisol remains discussed. The development of the human fetal adrenal is complex and is under the control of hormones (ACTH, LH and betaHCG), growth factors (ACTH essentially) and transcription factors (essentially SF1 and DAX-1). Knowledge of morphological and molecular phenomena of this development permits to understand the pathophisiology of congenital adrenal deficiencies.

  2. Metabolism of adrenal cholesterol in man

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Abraham; Delcroix, Claude; Levin, Sam

    1972-01-01

    The kinetics of plasma and adrenal cholesteral equilibration were analyzed in patients undergoing bilateral adrenalectomy for generalized mammary carcinoma. A biological model is proposed to help in the understanding of adrenal cholesterol physiology. It comprises two intracellular compartments: (1) A compartment of free adrenal cholesterol which is small (of the order of 17 mg) but turns over very fast; it is renewed approximately 8 times per day: 3 times by the inflow of free plasma cholesterol, and 5 times by the hydrolysis of esterified adrenal cholesterol, the contribution of adrenal cholesterol synthesis appearing to be relatively small. (2) A compartment of esterified adrenal cholesterol which is 20 times larger; it is constantly renewed by in situ esterification and hydrolysis with a daily fractional turnover rate of the order of 0.25. The direct and selective accumulation of plasma cholesteryl esters is practically absent. Only free adrenal cholesterol returns to plasma, mostly after conversion into steroid “hormones.” However small the synthesis of adrenal cholesterol may be, it seems more important in the zona “reticularis.” On the other hand, the inflow of plasma cholesterol and the turnover of the free adrenal compartment tend to be faster in the zona “fasciculata.” The equilibration of plasma and adrenal cholesterol can proceed unmodified under conditions of ACTH suppression. In one patient with Cushing's disease the size of the two adrenal compartments was clearly increased but their equilibration with plasma cholesterol proceeded normally. In another patient the kinetics of hydrocortisone corresponded to those of free adrenal cholesterol in the control studies. PMID:4338119

  3. Premature ovarian insufficiency - fertility challenge.

    PubMed

    Check, J H

    2014-04-01

    Premature ovarian insufficiency, defined as amenorrhea with estrogen deficiency in a woman younger than 40 associated with a serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) >35 mIU/mL, can be temporarily reversed with ovulation achieved resulting in live delivered pregnancies. Though this may occur spontaneously the frequency of ovulation can be considerably increased by various techniques of lowering the elevated serum FSH level and thus up-regulate down-regulated FSH receptors in the granulosa-theca cells. This can be accomplished by either suppressing FSH release from the pituitary by negative feedback through high dose estrogen or by suppressing FSH production by inhibiting the gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) by either using GnRH agonists or antagonists. The estrogen method is the technique of choice because it is much less expensive than GnRH analogues, and helps stimulate cervical mucus and endometrial development. Ethinyl estradiol is the preferred estrogen because it does not contribute to the measurement of serum estradiol and thus allows proper monitoring of follicular maturation. Sometimes exogenous gonadotropins are needed as a boost but the dosage should be low so as not to down-regulate FSH receptors again. The technique is referred to as the FSH receptor restoration technique. Progesterone should be supplemented in the luteal phase. Physicians should be cognizant of trying to help prevent premature ovarian insufficiency by judiciously choosing less gonadotoxic cancer treatment alternatives that are equally efficacious. Also surgery for ovarian endometriomas should be performed only when absolutely necessary.

  4. Adrenal scan in 17-alpha-hydroxylase deficiency: false indication of adrenal adenoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, R.M.; Lieberman, L.M.; Newman, T.J.; Friedman, A.; Bargman, G.J.

    1981-07-01

    A patient who was thought to have testicular feminization syndrome and primary aldosteronism had an adrenal scan that suggested an adrenal adenoma. After later diagnosis of 17-alpha-hydroxylase deficiency, she was treated with glucocorticoids rather than surgery. Her clinical course and a repeat adrenal scan confirmed she did not have a tumor.

  5. Imaging of adrenal and renal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Nancy A; Lostumbo, Antonella; Adam, Sharon Z; Remer, Erick M; Nikolaidis, Paul; Yaghmai, Vahid; Berggruen, Senta M; Miller, Frank H

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhage of the kidneys and adrenal glands has many etiologies. In the adrenal glands, trauma, anticoagulation, stress, sepsis, surgery, and neoplasms are common causes of hemorrhage. In the kidneys, reasons for hemorrhage include trauma, bleeding diathesis, vascular diseases, infection, infarction, hemorrhagic cyst rupture, the Antopol-Goldman lesion, and neoplasms. Angiomyolipoma and renal cell carcinoma are the neoplasms most commonly associated with hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal cortical carcinoma, metastases, and pheochromocytoma are associated with hemorrhage in the adrenal glands. Understanding the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features, and causes of hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal glands is critical. It is also important to keep in mind that mimickers of hemorrhage exist, including lymphoma in both the kidneys and adrenal glands, and melanoma metastases in the adrenal glands. Appropriate imaging follow-up of renal and adrenal hemorrhage should occur to exclude an underlying malignancy as the cause. If there is suspicion for malignancy that cannot be definitively diagnosed on imaging, surgery or biopsy may be warranted. Angiography may be indicated when there is a suspected underlying vascular disease. Unnecessary intervention, such as nephrectomy, may be avoided in patients with benign causes or no underlying disease. Appropriate management is dependent on accurate diagnosis of the cause of renal or adrenal hemorrhage and it is incumbent upon the radiologist to determine the etiology.

  6. The adrenal medulla and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, S L

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature describing the condition of the adrenal medulla in Parkinson's disease. Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized primarily by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Clinical observations have revealed that Parkinson's disease is also frequently accompanied by a variety of autonomic symptoms. The adrenal medulla is a major component of the autonomic nervous system. However, until recently this organ has not been of particular interest in Parkinson's disease. Early studies found histologic abnormalities in adrenal medullary cells, and several groups measured urinary and plasma catecholamines to determine general autonomic status. In the late 1980s adrenal medullary tissue was first transplanted to the caudate nucleus in an attempt to augment the decreased levels of dopamine, and thus treat the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. At this time the status of the adrenal medulla in this disease became clinically important. We measured the total catecholamine content of the parkinsonian adrenal medulla in tissue collected both at autopsy and in conjunction with adrenal-caudate transplants. Adrenal medullary catecholamines and several neuropeptides were severely depressed in parkinsonian glands. Thus, the adrenal medulla appears to be a target of the peripheral manifestations of Parkinson's disease.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Open All Close All Description X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita is a disorder that mainly affects males. ...

  8. Adrenal morpho-functional alterations in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Scaroni, C; Selice, R; Benedini, S; De Menis, E; Arosio, M; Ronchi, C; Gasperi, M; Manetti, L; Arnaldi, G; Polenta, B; Boscaro, M; Albiger, N; Martino, E; Mantero, F

    2008-07-01

    Acromegaly is associated with a greater morbidity and higher incidence of tumors, possibly due to the permissive role of elevated GH and IGF-I levels. In the general population, adrenal masses are frequently discovered (prevalence 1-5%) at computed tomography (CT). We evaluated the prevalence of adrenal lesions in patients with acromegaly. We studied 94 acromegalic patients, 54 females (mean age 55.0+/-16.0 yr) and 40 males (mean age 50+/-14 yr) referred to 5 Endocrinology Units between 2001-2003; 49 had active disease and 45 had been treated with surgery and/or were controlled with medical therapy. Abdominal CT showed adrenal lesions in 27 patients; 9 of them had unilateral masses (10%) with benign features (diameter 0.5-3 cm) and 18 had hyperplasia (14 monolateral and 4 bilateral), with no significant differences between patients with active vs controlled disease, and with no correlation between prevalence of masses and duration of disease, GH and IGF-I levels. Hormone study (urinary free cortisol, catecholamines/metanephrines, upright plasma renin activity and aldosterone, morning plasma ACTH and low-dose dexamethasone suppression test) disclosed no major endocrine alterations. During a 1-yr follow-up, the adrenal masses increased in size in 3 cases and 1 patient also developed subclinical Cushing's syndrome. Adrenal lesions seem more frequent in acromegaly than in the general population, but no single factor (GH/IGF-I levels or disease duration) predicts them. The masses appear to be benign and nonhypersecreting, but a longer follow-up is recommended to disclose any changes in their morphofunctional state.

  9. 45 CFR 152.35 - Insufficient funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Insufficient funds. 152.35 Section 152.35 Public... CONDITION INSURANCE PLAN PROGRAM Funding § 152.35 Insufficient funds. (a) Adjustments by a PCIP to eliminate... data, that its allocated funds are insufficient to cover projected PCIP expenses, the PCIP shall...

  10. Cisplatin-induced peptic ulcers, vagotomy, adrenal and calcium modulation.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, S K; San Antonio, J D; Sokhansanj, A; Miller, C

    1994-04-01

    Cytochemical and autoradiographic studies in Wistar rats [Crl:(WI)BR] show that cisplatin treatment (9 mg/kg) inhibits the release of acetylcholine from the axonal endings of the stomach smooth muscle resulting in bloating of the stomach and ulceration. Cisplatin also induces corticosteroid release from the adrenal gland stimulating peptic ulceration. Vagotomy helps ameliorate the effect but not eliminate it. Calcium supplementation restores normal neuromuscular function to gastric smooth muscle, thereby eliminating the gastro-intestinal toxicity due to cisplatin.

  11. [Role of the adrenal glands in the cytostatic action mechanism of antitumor antibiotics].

    PubMed

    Chuchalina, N P; Gol'dberg, E D; Sal'nik, B Iu; Telesheva, V A

    1978-04-01

    The state of the steroidogenic function of the adrenal glands, lipid spectrum of the adrenal gland tissue and metabolism rate of 11-oxycorticosteroids (11-OCS) in the liver tissue and their levels in the blood plasma were studied on rats after a single administration of karminomycin in a dose of LD50 (1.55 mg/kg). The hormones of the adrenal cortex were shown to play a definite role in the mechanism of the karminomycin damaging effect. Dependence of the changes on the time of the drug effect was noted. The shifts were of a reversible character. No direct toxic damages in the tissue of the adrenal glands were observed. Only an increase in the 11-OCS blood levels and a decrease in the steroid metabolism in the liver tissue were shown. The latter must be due to the direct cytotoxic effect of karminomycin on the tissue of this organ.

  12. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy for the management of benign and malignant adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Cyriac, Jamie; Weizman, David; Urbach, David R

    2006-11-01

    Laparoscopic adrenalectomy has become the preferred approach for removal of the adrenal gland. Many published studies support the use of laparoscopic adrenalectomy, with comparisons to open adrenalectomy suggesting many advantages to laparoscopy, including less postoperative pain, shorter hospital stay and earlier return to work. Adrenalectomy is usually required for the removal of adrenal tumors causing excess hormone production or because a malignant adrenal tumor cannot be excluded. Current controversies include the appropriateness of laparoscopic adrenalectomy for large or malignant tumors, the role of partial adrenalectomy and the management of some conditions with uncertain natural history (such as subclinical hypercortisolism). With the increased use of sensitive cross-sectional imaging, the detection of clinically inapparent adrenal masses is likely to continue to increase. Due to the fact that malignancy cannot be excluded with certainty in some patients with cortical adenomas, it is expected that the rate of laparoscopic adrenalectomy will continue to increase.

  13. Unilateral adrenal hemorrhagic infarction in essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Burnet, G; Lambert, M; Annet, L; Lefebvre, C

    2015-12-01

    Adrenal hemorrhage is a rare disease associated with various conditions. We report a case of a 68-year-old woman with abdominal and back pain. The diagnostic work-up showed a left adrenal gland infarction associated with essential thrombocythemia. Treatment consisted in painkillers and treating the underlying condition in order to prevent further thrombotic events.

  14. Computed tomographic findings in bilateral adrenal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilms, G.E.; Baert, A.L.; Kint, E.J.; Pringot, J.H.; Goddeeris, P.G.

    1983-03-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) features of bilateral adrenal tuberculosis are reported in two cases that demonstrate two typical different clinical and morphological manifestations of the disease. The incidence and CT appearance of adrenal tuberculosis are discussed, with emphasis on differential diagnosis.

  15. [Evaluation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis recovery after corticotherapy by using basal cortisol secretion].

    PubMed

    Silva, Ivani N; Cunha, Cristiane F; Finch, Francisca L; Colosimo, Enrico A

    2006-02-01

    The glucocorticoid-induced inhibition that occurs after discontinuation of treatment is the most frequent cause of adrenal insufficiency. There are yet some doubts about the best way of evaluating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in those patients. The main objective of this study was to evaluate the utility of basal cortisol in diagnosing adrenal insufficiency. Thirty-five children with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) receiving glucocorticoid therapy (median age of 6.9 years) were evaluated. A stimulus test with corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH-1 mcg/kg) was performed before the introduction of dexamethasone (6 mg/m2/day, for 28 days), in the 8th and the 28th days of glucocorticoid therapy, and 48 hours and one month after discontinuation of therapy. Suppression of the basal secretion as well as the maximum concentration of cortisol (post-CRH) occurred during glucocorticoid therapy, which persisted for 48 hours after the steroid was removed from treatment (p< 0.01 and p< 0.0001, respectively, for the three tests). One month after ceasing the administration of the glucocorticoid, the basal secretion, as well as the maximum concentration of cortisol, were similar to that before glucocorticoid therapy. There was a positive and statistically significant correlation between basal secretion and maximum concentration of cortisol in all tests. We observed 95% of specificity for the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency when the inferior limit of basal cortisol was 8.5 mcg/dl. According to these results we concluded that basal secretion of cortisol is a good marker of supra-renal function in evaluating children after discontinuation of glucocorticoid therapy.

  16. Sleep improvement in an insomniac patient with global pituitary insufficiency after change from triple to quadruple cortisol replacement therapy.

    PubMed

    Voss, Ursula; Tuin, Inka; Krakow, Karsten

    2007-08-01

    Although cortisol has a distinct circadian rhythm, patients with adrenal insufficiency usually receive diurnal hydrocortisone replacement therapy (HRT), disregarding possible consequences for sleep quality. The case reported here concerns the resolution of severe insomnia in a patient with global hypopituitary insufficiency upon adjustment of triple HRT to quadruple HRT. The data show a strong influence of cortisol on total sleep time and slow wave sleep (SWS) as well as rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Clinically, the data are suggestive of the need to assimilate HRT to the natural circadian cortisol rhythm and not restrict it to the active part of the day.

  17. Velopharyngeal insufficiency: diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    Shprintzen, Robert J.; Marrinan, Eileen

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of Review Journal articles relevant to the diagnosis and treatment of velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) were reviewed. All articles ascertained by PubMed search were included. Recent Findings Articles reported on the application of magnetic resonance scanning, reliability tests of the International Working Group diagnostic protocol, the use of nasometry, and techniques designed to assess the function of the velopharyngeal mechanism. Treatment papers focused on outcomes in small samples of cases and complication rates from pharyngeal flap. One paper discussed ineffective speech therapy procedures. Summary There were relatively few papers this past year. Those that were published were hindered by small and heterogeneous sample sizes, and occasionally by inappropriate methods for assessing outcomes. None of the findings will have a major impact on the current state-of-the-art for diagnosis of VPI. The speech therapy paper has a very important message that should be taken to heart by all clinicians involved in the management of children with clefts and craniofacial disorders. PMID:19448542

  18. Genetics of primary ovarian insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, R; Ferrari, I; Bonomi, M; Persani, L

    2017-02-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is characterized by a loss of ovarian function before the age of 40 and account for one major cause of female infertility. POI relevance is continuously growing because of the increasing number of women desiring conception beyond 30 years of age, when POI prevalence is >1%. POI is highly heterogeneous and can present with ovarian dysgenesis and primary amenorrhea, or with secondary amenorrhea, and it can be associated with other congenital or acquired abnormalities. In most cases POI remains classified as idiopathic. However, the age of menopause is an inheritable trait and POI has a strong genetic component. This is confirmed by the existence of several candidate genes, experimental and natural models. The variable expressivity of POI defect may indicate that, this disease may frequently be considered as a multifactorial or oligogenic defect. The most common genetic contributors to POI are the X chromosome-linked defects. Here, we review the principal X-linked and autosomal genes involved in syndromic and non-syndromic forms of POI with the expectation that this list will soon be upgraded, thus allowing the possibility to predict the risk of an early age at menopause in families with POI.

  19. Study of awareness of adrenal disorders among interns and postgraduate students of Hamidia Hospital, Bhopal

    PubMed Central

    Chittawar, Sachin; Dubey, T. N.; Sharma, Jitendra; Khandare, Sagar

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Adrenal disorders could be a life-threatening emergency, hence requires immediate therapeutic management. For this awareness regarding its diagnosis, management, and treatment is prime important. Aims and Objective: To study the awareness of adrenal disorders among interns and postgraduates students of Hamidia Hospital, Bhopal. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study was performed. Fifty-six participants, i.e., 1st, 2nd, and 3rd years postgraduate residents of general medicine (n = 14 × 3) and interns (n = 14) were included in the study. There were 12 questions on adrenal insufficiency, adrenal adenoma, congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), nonclassical CAH (NCCAH), pheochromocytoma, and Conn's syndrome. One mark was awarded for each correct response. Results: In the present study, 14 (25%) participants scored < 5 marks, 33 (58.9%) scored between 6 and 9, and 9 (16.1%) scored between 10 and 12. The mean score among the participants was 6.38 ± 2.505, with a range from 2 to 11 marks. The number of correct answers by postgraduates residents of 1st year was 101, 2nd year was 95, and 3rd year was 93 and interns scored 68 out of total 168 questions in each group. Mean awareness score for residents of 1st, 2nd, 3rd years participants and interns was 7.21 ± 2.806, 6.79 ± 2.119, and 6.64 ± 2.818 and 6.63 ± 2.505, respectively. Most of the participants recorded correct responses related to diagnosis (57.7%) followed by responses related to treatment (64.3%). Answers to a question regarding how commonly is adrenal insufficiency diagnosed in medical Intensive Care Unit, none of the individuals responded correctly. Conclusion: There was a lack of awareness regarding diagnosis, management, and treatment of adrenal disorders in central India. We need to prioritize training related to these illnesses in our postgraduate teaching curriculum in practice. PMID:28217529

  20. Sonography of the adrenal glands in the adult.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Won; Kim, Jeong Kon; Choi, Hyuck Jae; Kim, Mi-hyun; Lee, Jeongjin; Cho, Kyoung-Sik

    2012-01-01

    Although its capability has been overlooked, sonography can be a useful screening tool for adrenal lesion in adults. In this article, we discuss scan technique, patient positioning, and anatomic consideration for adrenal sonography in adults and illustrate sonographic appearance of normal adrenal gland as well as adrenal tumors and tumor-like lesions.

  1. Corticomedullary mixed tumor of the adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Wieneke, J A; Thompson, L D; Heffess, C S

    2001-10-01

    Corticomedullary mixed tumors of the adrenal gland are quite rare, with only five well-documented cases reported in the literature.(1-4) Herein, we report the light microscopic and immunohistochemical features of two cases of this rare tumor. Patient 1 is a 34-year-old woman who presented with hypertension, hair loss, and amenorrhea of 1-year duration. Patient 2 is a 52-year-old woman who presented with flank pain and what appeared to be a renal mass on arteriogram with no history of hypertension, Cushing's syndrome, or other endocrine abnormalities. At surgery, the tumor was noted to arise from the adrenal gland rather than the kidney and adrenalectomy was performed. In both cases, the surgically resected specimens consisted of a well-circumscribed, single adrenal mass surrounded by a rim of uninvolved adrenal cortical tissue. The tumors were composed of adrenal cortical cells intimately admixed with pheochromocytes. Immunohistochemical studies highlighted these two cellular components. The pheochromocytes were strongly reactive with chromogranin and the sustentacular cells with S-100 protein, whereas the adrenal cortical cells reacted specifically with inhibin. Thus, we report two additional cases of mixed corticomedullary tumor of the adrenal gland. Ann Diagn Pathol 5:304-308, 2001. This is a US government work. There are no restrictions on its use.

  2. Effects of intra-abdominal pressure on adrenal gland function and morphology in rats.

    PubMed

    Akkapulu, Nezih; Tirnaksiz, Mehmet Bulent; Kulac, Ibrahim; Tezel, Gaye Guler; Hayran, Mutlu; Dogrul, Ahmet Bulent; Cetinkaya, Erdinc; Yorganci, Kaya

    2015-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome (IAH/ACS) are life-threatening conditions and caused by several clinical status. Although there is insufficient data regarding its effects on adrenal glands. This study aimed to identify whether elevated intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) caused any alteration on the morphology and function of adrenal glands in a rat model. Twenty four Sprague-Dawley male rats were included in the study. Animals were allocated into 4 groups. IAP was elevated to 15 mmHg for one hour and four hours in group 2 and 4. Group 1 and 3 were sham groups. Blood samples were taken for the assessment of plasma adrenaline, noradrenaline, and corticosterone levels and adrenalectomies were performed to evaluate apoptosis. Blood adrenaline, noradrenaline and corticosterone levels were significantly higher in the study groups compared with the sham groups. However, there were no significant changes in apoptotic index scores in the study groups as compared to sham groups. These results support that increased IAH leads to discharge of catecholamine and corticosterone from the adrenal glands. Failure to demonstrate similar changes in apoptotic index score may be concluded as apoptosis is not a leading pathway for impairment of adrenal glands during IAH period.

  3. Effects of intra-abdominal pressure on adrenal gland function and morphology in rats

    PubMed Central

    Akkapulu, Nezih; Tirnaksiz, Mehmet Bulent; Kulac, Ibrahim; Tezel, Gaye Guler; Hayran, Mutlu; Dogrul, Ahmet Bulent; Cetinkaya, Erdinc; Yorganci, Kaya

    2015-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome (IAH/ACS) are life-threatening conditions and caused by several clinical status. Although there is insufficient data regarding its effects on adrenal glands. This study aimed to identify whether elevated intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) caused any alteration on the morphology and function of adrenal glands in a rat model. Twenty four Sprague-Dawley male rats were included in the study. Animals were allocated into 4 groups. IAP was elevated to 15 mmHg for one hour and four hours in group 2 and 4. Group 1 and 3 were sham groups. Blood samples were taken for the assessment of plasma adrenaline, noradrenaline, and corticosterone levels and adrenalectomies were performed to evaluate apoptosis. Blood adrenaline, noradrenaline and corticosterone levels were significantly higher in the study groups compared with the sham groups. However, there were no significant changes in apoptotic index scores in the study groups as compared to sham groups. These results support that increased IAH leads to discharge of catecholamine and corticosterone from the adrenal glands. Failure to demonstrate similar changes in apoptotic index score may be concluded as apoptosis is not a leading pathway for impairment of adrenal glands during IAH period. PMID:26045846

  4. Coexistence of Cushing syndrome from functional adrenal adenoma and Addison disease from immune-mediated adrenalitis.

    PubMed

    Colucci, Randall; Jimenez, Rafael E; Farrar, William; Malgor, Ramiro; Kohn, Leonard; Schwartz, Frank L

    2012-06-01

    A 56-year-old woman presented with an incidental adrenal adenoma and physical examination findings that included moderate obesity, a slight cervicothoracic fat pad ("buffalo hump"), increased supraclavicular fat pads, and white abdominal striae. Biochemical workup revealed elevated levels of 24-hour urinary free cortisol but normal serum morning cortisol and suppressed levels of corticotropin, suggestive of adrenal-dependent Cushing syndrome. The resected adrenal gland revealed macronodular cortical hyperplasia with a dominant nodule. Other findings included an absent cortisol response to corticotropin stimulation, presence of serum anti-21-hydroxylase antibodies, and mononuclear cell infiltration--consistent with adrenalitis. The findings represent, to the authors' knowledge, the first known case of a patient with coexistent functional cortisol-secreting macronodular adrenal tumor resulting in Cushing syndrome and immune-mediated adrenalitis resulting in Addison disease.

  5. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency following esophagectomy.

    PubMed

    Huddy, J R; Macharg, F M S; Lawn, A M; Preston, S R

    2013-08-01

    Weight loss following esophagectomy is a management challenge for all patients. It is multifactorial with contributing factors including loss of gastric reservoir, rapid small bowel transit, malabsorption, and adjuvant chemotherapy. The development of a postoperative malabsorption syndrome, as a result of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI), is recognized in a subgroup of patients following gastrectomy. This has not previously been documented following esophageal resection. EPI can result in symptoms of flatulence, diarrhea, steatorrhea, vitamin deficiencies, and weight loss. It therefore has the potential to pose a significant level of morbidity in postoperative patients. There is some evidence that patients with proven EPI (fecal elastase-1 < 200 μg/g) may benefit from a trial of pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT). We observed symptoms compatible with EPI in a subgroup of patients following esophagectomy. We hypothesized that this was contributing to malabsorption and malnutrition in these patients. To investigate this, fecal elastase-1 was measured in postoperative patients, and in those with proven EPI, a trial of PERT was commenced in combination with specialist dietary education. At routine postoperative follow-up, which included assessment by a specialist dietitian, those patients with symptoms suggestive of malabsorption were given the opportunity to have their fecal elastase-1 measured. PERT was then offered to patients with fecal elastase-1 less than 200 μg/g (EPI) as well as those in the 200-500 μg/g range (mild EPI) with more severe symptoms. Fecal elastase-1 was measured in 63 patients between June 2009 and January 2011 at a median of 4 months (range 1-42) following surgery. Ten patients had fecal elastase-1 less than 200 μg/g, and all had failed to maintain preoperative weight. All accepted a trial of PERT. Nine (90%) had symptomatic improvement, and seven (70%) increased their weight. Thirty-nine patients had a fecal elastase-1 in

  6. Effects of adrenal steroids on the bone metabolism of children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Lin-Su, Karen; New, Maria I

    2007-11-01

    The primary treatment for patients with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD) is glucocorticoid replacement therapy, which at supraphysiologic levels can result in diminished bone accrual and lead to osteopenia and osteoporosis. Unlike other diseases treated with chronic glucocorticoid therapy, previous studies of patients with 21OHD have not demonstrated a detrimental effect of glucocorticoid treatment on bone mineral density (BMD). It has been postulated that the elevated androgens typically found in these patients have a protective effect on bone integrity, but the precise mechanism remains unknown. We propose that the inhibitory effect of corticosteroid therapy on bone formation is counteracted by estrogen's effect on bone resorption through the RANK-L/osteoprotegerin (OPG) system. A better understanding of the mechanism by which patients with 21OHD are protected against bone loss may lead to novel therapeutic measures to prevent or treat osteopenia and osteoporosis in other conditions, including postmenopausal women.

  7. Presence of kisspeptin-like immunoreactivity in human adrenal glands and adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Shoji, Itaru; Shibasaki, Akiko; Kato, Ichiro; Hiraishi, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Hajime; Kaneko, Kiriko; Murakami, Osamu; Morimoto, Ryo; Satoh, Fumitoshi; Ito, Sadayoshi; Totsune, Kazuhito

    2010-05-01

    Kisspeptins are neuropeptides which activate the hypothalamo-pituitary gonadal axis and are considered to play important physiological roles in the reproduction. Kisspeptins have also been reported to stimulate the aldosterone secretion from the adrenal cortex. However, the expression of kisspeptins in human adrenal glands and adrenal tumors has not been clarified yet. We, therefore, studied the presence of kisspeptin-like immunoreactivity (LI) in human adrenal glands and adrenal tumors (adrenocortical adenomas, adrenocortical carcinomas, and pheochromocytomas) by radioimmunoassay and immunocytochemistry. Kisspeptin-LI was detected in all the tissues examined; normal portions of adrenal glands (3.0 +/- 2.3 pmol/g wet weight, n = 21, mean +/- SD), aldosterone-producing adenomas (4.6 +/- 3.3 pmol/g wet weight, n = 10), cortisol-producing adenomas (2.7 +/- 1.4 pmol/g wet weight, n = 14), adrenocortical carcinomas (1.7 +/- 0.2 pmol/g wet weight, n = 4), and pheochromocytomas (1.8 +/- 0.8 pmol/g wet weight, n = 6). There was no significant difference in kisspeptin-LI levels among them. Immunocytochemistry showed positive kisspeptin-immunostaining in normal adrenal glands, with stronger immunostaining found in the medulla. Furthermore, positive kisspeptin-immunostaining was found in all types of adrenal tumors examined; adrenocortical adenomas, adrenocortical carcinomas, and pheochromocytomas. The intensity of kisspeptin-immunostaining in these adrenal tumors was, however, not so strong as that in normal adrenal medulla. The present study has shown for the first time the presence of kisspeptin-LI in adrenal glands and adrenal tumors.

  8. A case of adrenal Cushing’s syndrome with bilateral adrenal masses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ya-Wun; Hwu, Chii-Min; Won, Justin Ging-Shing; Chu, Chia-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Summary A functional lesion in corticotrophin (ACTH)-independent Cushing’s syndrome is difficult to distinguish from lesions of bilateral adrenal masses. Methods for distinguishing these lesions include adrenal venous sampling and 131I-6β-iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol (131I-NP-59) scintigraphy. We present a case of a 29-year-old Han Chinese female patient with a history of hypercholesterolaemia and polycystic ovary syndrome. She presented with a 6month history of an 8kg body weight gain and gradual rounding of the face. Serial examinations revealed loss of circadian rhythm of cortisol, elevated urinary free-cortisol level and undetectable ACTH level (<5pg/mL). No suppression was observed in both the low- and high-dose dexamethasone suppression tests. Adrenal computed tomography revealed bilateral adrenal masses. Adrenal venous sampling was performed, and the right-to-left lateralisation ratio was 14.29. The finding from adrenal scintigraphy with NP-59 was consistent with right adrenal adenoma. The patient underwent laparoscopic right adrenalectomy, and the pathology report showed adrenocortical adenoma. Her postoperative cortisol level was 3.2μg/dL, and her Cushingoid appearance improved. In sum, both adrenal venous sampling and 131I-NP-59 scintigraphy are good diagnostic methods for Cushing’s syndrome presenting with bilateral adrenal masses. Learning points The clinical presentation of Cushing’ syndrome includes symptoms and signs of fat redistribution and protein-wasting features. The diagnosis of patients with ACTH-independent Cushing’s syndrome with bilateral adrenal masses is challenging for localisation of the lesion. Both adrenal venous sampling and 131I-NP-59 scintigraphy are good methods to use in these patients with Cushing’s syndrome presenting with bilateral adrenal masses. PMID:27252858

  9. Radiology of the adrenals with sonography and CT

    SciTech Connect

    Mitty, H.A.; Yeh, H.C.

    1982-01-01

    The basic science and application of clinical adrenal imaging is presented. The initial chapters deal with anatomic review and methods of adrenal imaging. The bulk of the book consists of individual chapters describing pathologic entities and syndromes of adrenal disease. The final chapter deals with differentiation of adrenal lesions from masses arising in adjacent organs. There is no other single source available which so concisely presents adrenal imaging. (KRM)

  10. [Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage revealed by jaundice: a case report].

    PubMed

    Oulmaati, A; Hays, S; Mory-Thomas, N; Bretones, P; Bensaid, M; Jordan, I; Bonfils, M; Godbert, I; Picaud, J-C

    2012-04-01

    The clinical presentation of adrenal hemorrhage varies, depending on the extent of hemorrhage as well as the amount of adrenal cortex involved by the hemorrhage. We report here a case of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage revealed by late onset of neonatal jaundice. This adrenal hemorrhage most probably resulted from shoulder dystocia. The aim of this work was to focus on the fact that jaundice can be caused by adrenal hemorrhage and to emphasize the crucial importance of abdominal ultrasound in cases of persistent jaundice.

  11. Adrenal Pathology in the Adult: A Urological Pathologist's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Donna E; Reuter, Victor E

    2016-09-01

    Adrenal gland diagnostics can pose significant challenges. In most academic and community practice settings, adrenal gland resections are encountered less frequently than other endocrine or genitourinary specimens, leading to less familiarity with evolving classifications and criteria. The unique dichotomy between cortical and medullary lesions reflects the developmental evolution of these functionally independent components. Adrenal cortical lesions at resection include hyperplasia, adenoma, and carcinoma, with some cases straddling the boundary between these distinct clinical classifications. The lack of immunohistochemical or molecular markers to definitively categorize these intermediate lesions enhances the diagnostic challenge. In addition, modified terminology for oncocytic and myxoid cortical lesions has been proposed. Medullary lesions are somewhat easier to categorize; however, the prediction of aggressive behavior in pheochromocytomas remains a challenge due to a lack of reliable prognostic biomarkers. Recent work by the Cancer Genome Atlas Project and other research groups has identified a limited subset of molecular and signaling pathway alterations in these 2 major neoplastic categories. Ongoing research to better define prognostic and predictive biomarkers in cortical and medullary lesions has the potential to enhance both pathologic diagnosis and patient therapy.

  12. Genetics Home Reference: primary macronodular adrenal hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... produced from the GNAS gene helps stimulate the activity of an enzyme called adenylate cyclase. This enzyme is involved in controlling the production of several hormones that help regulate the activity of certain endocrine glands, including the adrenal glands. ...

  13. Advanced glycosylation end products in adrenal lipofuscin.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, I; Higami, Y; Horiuchi, S; Iwasaki, M; Ikeda, T

    1998-01-01

    The present study examined the presence of advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs) in lipofuscin present in the brain and adrenal gland of aging rats by immunohistochemistry using antibodies raised against AGEs. Lipofuscin identified as yellow to brown granules emitting bright yellow to orange autofluorescence with ultraviolet light were detected in cortical neurons, cerebellar Purkinje cells, and adrenal cells in the inner part of the zona reticularis. However, none of the antibodies visualized lipofuscin in these areas. The outer part of the zona reticularis contained yellow granules emitting a faint orange autofluorescence. These granules were immunostained by an antibody that reacted with AGEs structures unrelated to the carboxymethyllysine moiety. Newly formed adrenal cortical cells are thought to migrate from the outer layer to the inner layer of the zona reticularis. Therefore, our results suggest that glycosylation-related processes are involved in lipofuscinogenesis, at least in its early stage, in the adrenal zona reticularis.

  14. Ancient history of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    New, Maria I

    2011-01-01

    Although there are many erudite reports on the history of endocrinology and endocrine disorders, the history of congenital adrenal hyperplasia has not been published. I have tried to review ancient as well as modern history of CAH.

  15. Image-guided ablation of adrenal lesions.

    PubMed

    Yamakado, Koichiro

    2014-06-01

    Although laparoscopic adrenalectomy has remained the standard of care for the treatment for adrenal tumors, percutaneous image-guided ablation therapy, such as chemical ablation, radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, and microwave ablation, has been shown to be clinically useful in many nonsurgical candidates. Ablation therapy has been used to treat both functioning adenomas and malignant tumors, including primary adrenal carcinoma and metastasis. For patients with functioning adenomas, biochemical and symptomatic improvement is achieved in 96 to 100% after ablation; for patients with malignant adrenal neoplasms, however, the survival benefit from ablation therapy remains unclear, though good initial results have been reported. This article outlines the current role of ablation therapy for adrenal lesions, as well as identifying some of the technical considerations for this procedure.

  16. Moderate dose inhaled corticosteroid-induced symptomatic adrenal suppression: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Richard H; Neacsu, Otilia; Ascher, David P; Alpan, Oral

    2012-12-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are drugs of choice for persistent asthma. Less than 500 µg/d of fluticasone are believed to be safe. We found 92 cases of adrenal suppression in PubMed; among these cases there were 13 children who took 500 µg/d or less of fluticasone. Adrenal insufficiency was diagnosed in a 7-year-old boy on 460 µg ICS for 16 months, with a diagnosis of chronic persistent asthma. A random cortisol was nondetectable as was an early morning cortisol. ICS have greatly improved the day-to-day lives of children with chronic persistent asthma. Parents of children younger than 12 years, who use at least 400 µg of inhaled fluticasone (or bioequivalent), must be given oral and written instructions about warning symptoms of hypocortisolism. Major stress such as surgery, gastrointestinal, bronchopulmonary, or other systemic infections, and heat stress may mandate a written plan of action for use by hospital physicians.

  17. Primary hydatid cyst in the adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Afshin; Ghasemi-Rad, Mohammad; Oklu, Rahmi

    2014-10-23

    An elderly man presented with a 2-year history of refractory hypertension. His medical history, physical examination and laboratory findings were unremarkable. On subsequent ultrasound study for the evaluation of renal artery stenosis, a large mass obliterating the adrenal gland containing internal cystic structures was identified. A CT study confirmed the diagnosis of primary adrenal gland hydatid cyst. Following surgical resection, the patient's hypertension resolved and medications to control blood pressure were discontinued.

  18. Metabolism of adrenal cholesterol in man

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Abraham; Delcroix, Claude; Levin, Sam

    1972-01-01

    The synthesis of adrenal cholesterol, its esterification and the synthesis of the glucocorticosteroid hormones were studied in vitro on human adrenal tissue. It was found that the synthesis of adrenal cholesterol may normally be small in the zona “fasciculata,” particularly when compared with the synthesis of the glucocorticosteroid hormones, that it is several times higher in the zona “reticularis” where esterified cholesterol is less abundant, and that under ACTH stimulation it increases strikingly and proportionally to the degree of esterified adrenal cholesterol depletion. On the other hand, the relative rate of esterification as well as the concentration of free adrenal cholesterol are remarkably stable: they do not differ according to the adrenal zonation and are unaffected by ACTH. Furthermore, from a qualitative point of view, the relative proportions of Δ1 and Δ2 cholesteryl esters formed in situ are similar to those anticipated from their relative concentrations, suggesting that the characteristic fatty acid distribution of the adrenal cholesteryl esters results from an in situ esterification rather than from a selective uptake of the plasma cholesteryl esters. Besides, the in vitro esterification reveals a propensity to the formation of the most unsaturated cholesteryl esters. Regarding hydrocortisone and corticosterone, their synthesis tends to be more elevated in the zona “fasciculata.” Despite its higher cholesterol concentration the zona “fasciculata” should not therefore be viewed as a quiescent functional complement to the zona “reticularis” and the cortical distribution of glucocorticosteroid hormone synthesis is quite distinct from that of adrenal cholesterol synthesis. PMID:4338120

  19. [Irreversible coma following hypoglycemia in Sheehan syndrome with adrenocortical insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Sas, A M; Meynaar, I A; Laven, J S; Bakker, S L; Feelders, R A

    2003-08-23

    A 24-year-old woman of Somali origin delivered at term after an uncomplicated pregnancy. Post-partum haemorrhage resulted in hypovolaemic shock which was treated by hysterectomy. Five days later she became comatose due to unrecognised hypoglycaemia which caused severe irreversible brain damage and status epilepticus. Treatment in the intensive care unit with artificial respiration, prednisolone, desmopressin, inotropic support, barbiturates and an anaesthetic under EEG guidance was unsuccessful. The patient died 28 days post-partum. The hypoglycaemia was due to a combination of (a) inadequate glucose intake and (b) lack of counter-regulatory mechanisms due to a deficiency of steroids and growth hormone as a result of loss of pituitary function (Sheehan syndrome) together with adrenocortical insufficiency. The combination of Sheehan syndrome and primary adrenocortical insufficiency has not been described previously in the literature.

  20. Black adrenal adenoma causing preclinical Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Inomoto, Chie; Sato, Haruhiro; Kanai, Genta; Hirukawa, Takashi; Shoji, Sunao; Terachi, Toshiro; Kajiwara, Hiroshi; Osamura, Robert Yoshiyuki

    2010-07-20

    Functioning black adrenal adenoma (BAA) rarely causes preclinical Cushing's syndrome (CS). In the present case, a 46-year-old Japanese Peruvian woman presented with left flank pain and hypertension. Abdominal computed tomography showed that she had a 15-mm in diameter, round, left adrenal adenoma. She had no physical features of CS, such as moon face, buffalo hump, truncal obesity, or purple striae. Endocrinological examination showed that the plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level was below the detectable level, despite a serum cortisol level within the normal range. A normal cortisol circadian rhythm was not present. Dexamethasone (1 mg and 8 mg) suppression testing did not decrease serum cortisol levels to the reference levels. These findings were compatible with preclinical CS. The left adrenal adenoma was laparoscopically removed. Examination of the surgical specimen revealed unilateral double adrenal adenomas of the left adrenal gland, one of which was a BAA. The BAA measured 20 × 11 × 10 mm. Microscopically, the BAA showed proliferation of compact cells containing numerous brown-pigmented granules. There were also foci of myelolipomatous degenerative changes in the tumor. The compact cell zones remained in the adrenal cortex adjacent to the BAA showed atrophic change. These findings indicated that BAA appeared to have caused preclinical CS in this patient.

  1. Traumatic Tricuspid Insufficiency Requiring Valve Repair in an Acute Setting.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Yoshinori; Sudo, Yoshio; Sueta, Tomonori

    2015-01-01

    Tricuspid insufficiency due to penetrating cardiac trauma is rare. Patients with tricuspid insufficiency due to trauma can tolerate this abnormality for months or even years. We report a case of a 66-year-old female with penetrating cardiac trauma on the right side of her heart that required tricuspid valve repair in an acute setting. She sustained cut and stab wounds on her bilateral forearms and in the neck and epigastric region. She had cardiac tamponade and developed pulseless electrical activity, which required emergency surgery. The right ventricle and superior vena cava were dissected approximately 5 cm and 2 cm, respectively. After these wounds had been repaired, the patient's inability to wean from cardiopulmonary bypass suggested rightsided heart failure; transesophageal echocardiography revealed tricuspid insufficiency. Right atriotomy was performed, and a detailed examination revealed that the tricuspid valve septal leaflet was split in two. There was also an atrial septal injury that created a connection with the left atrium; these injuries were not detected from the right ventricular wound. After repair, weaning from cardiopulmonary bypass with mild tricuspid insufficiency was achieved, and she recovered uneventfully. This case emphasized the importance of thoroughly investigating intracardiac injury and transesophageal echocardiography.

  2. [Adrenal tumors as a cause of hypertension].

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the main risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, which today are the primary cause of mortality in developed countries. To decrease the mortality and morbidity due to cardiovascular disease, it is necessary to treat hypertension correctly on the basis of an accurate diagnosis. A secondary cause of hypertension must be suspected if it is severe or resistant to treatment, if there is a sudden increase in blood pressure in a patient hitherto well controlled, or if it develops in childhood or in a person under 30 years of age, especially if not obese and without a family history of hypertension. In these instances the frequency of hypertension varies from 1-5% for mild to moderate to 10-20% for severe or refractory hypertension. One of the principal causes of secondary hypertension is related to adrenal gland tumors or dysfunctions such as Cushing's syndrome, primary aldosteronism (Conn's syndrome) and pheochromocytoma. This paper will discuss the clinical presentation and diagnostic tests pertinent to these neoplasms, organ damage assessment, utilization of imaging techniques, and the medical and surgical options.

  3. Nonclassical Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Cuhaci, Neslihan; Aydın, Cevdet; Yesilyurt, Ahmet; Pınarlı, Ferda Alpaslan; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The most common form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is 21-hydroxylase (21-OH) deficiency due to mutation of the CYP21A2 gene. Patients with nonclassical CAH (NC-CAH) are usually asymptomatic at birth and typically present in late childhood, adolescence, or adulthood with symptoms of excessive androgen secretion. Subfertility is relative in NC-CAH, but the incidence of spontaneous miscarriage is higher. Here, we report a previously undiagnosed female who gave birth to a normal male child and is planning to become pregnant again. Case Report. A 32-year-old female was referred to our clinic for obesity. Her medical history revealed that she had had three pregnancies. She was planning to become pregnant again. Her laboratory results revealed that she had NC-CAH. Since her husband is the son of her aunt and she had miscarriages and intrauterin exitus in her history, their genetic analyses were performed. Conclusion. Since most patients with NC-CAH have a severe mutation, these patients may give birth to a child with the classical CAH (C-CAH) if their partner is also carrying a severe mutation. Females with NC-CAH who desire pregnancy must be aware of the risk of having an infant with C-CAH. PMID:26558116

  4. Vesicle Pools: Lessons from Adrenal Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, David R.; Schirra, Claudia; Becherer, Ute; Rettig, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The adrenal chromaffin cell serves as a model system to study fast Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. Membrane capacitance measurements in combination with Ca2+ uncaging offers a temporal resolution in the millisecond range and reveals that catecholamine release occurs in three distinct phases. Release of a readily releasable (RRP) and a slowly releasable (SRP) pool are followed by sustained release, due to maturation, and release of vesicles which were not release-ready at the start of the stimulus. Trains of depolarizations, a more physiological stimulus, induce release from a small immediately releasable pool of vesicles residing adjacent to calcium channels, as well as from the RRP. The SRP is poorly activated by depolarization. A sequential model, in which non-releasable docked vesicles are primed to a slowly releasable state, and then further mature to the readily releasable state, has been proposed. The docked state, dependent on membrane proximity, requires SNAP-25, synaptotagmin, and syntaxin. The ablation or modification of SNAP-25 and syntaxin, components of the SNARE complex, as well as of synaptotagmin, the calcium sensor, and modulators such complexins and Snapin alter the properties and/or magnitudes of different phases of release, and in particular can ablate the RRP. These results indicate that the composition of the SNARE complex and its interaction with modulatory molecules drives priming and provides a molecular basis for different pools of releasable vesicles. PMID:21423410

  5. Effects of short- and long-duration hypothyroidism on function of the rat hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E O; Kamilaris, T C; Calogero, A E; Konstandi, M; Chrousos, G P

    2013-02-01

    The effects of hypothyroidism on the functional integrity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis were investigated in adult male rats. HPA axis function was examined in vivo in sham-thyroidectomized male Sprague-Dawley rats or in thyroidectomized rats for 7 (short-term hypothyroidism) or 60 (long-term hypothyroidism) days. Peripheral ACTH and corticosterone responses to insulin-induced hypoglycemia and interleukin (IL)-1α stimulation were used to indirectly assess the hypothalamic CRH neuron. Hypothyroidism resulted in exaggerated ACTH responses to both hypoglycemic stress and IL-1α administration. The adrenal cortex of hypothyroid animals showed a significant reduction in adrenal reserves, as assessed by its response to low-dose ACTH, following suppression of the HPA axis with dexamethasone. Hypothyroid rats were also associated with significant decreases in cerebrospinal fluid corticosterone concentrations and decreased adrenal weights. The findings suggest that experimentally induced hypothyroidism is associated with a mild, yet significant, adrenal insufficiency, which involves abnormalities in all components of the HPA axis.

  6. Impaired release of corticosterone from adrenals contributes to impairment of circadian rhythms of activity in hyperammonemic rats.

    PubMed

    Llansola, Marta; Ahabrach, Hanan; Errami, Mohammed; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Addaoudi, Kaoutar; Felipo, Vicente

    2013-08-15

    Patients with liver cirrhosis may present impaired sleep-wake and circadian rhythms, relative adrenal insufficiency and altered hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal gland (HPA) axis. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Circadian rhythms are modulated by corticosteroids which secretion is regulated by HPA axis. Hyperammonemia alters circadian rhythms of activity and corticosterone in rats. The aims were: (1) assessing whether corticosterone alterations are responsible for altered circadian rhythm in hyperammonemia: (2) to shed light on the mechanism by which corticosterone circadian rhythm is altered in hyperammonemia. The effects of daily corticosterone injection at ZT10 on circadian rhythms of activity, plasma corticosterone, adreno-corticotropic hormone (ACTH) and hypothalamic corticotropic releasing hormone (CRH) were assessed in control and hyperammonemic rats. ACTH-induced corticosterone release was analyzed in cultured adrenal cells. Corticosterone injection restores the corticosterone peak in hyperammonemic rats and their activity and circadian rhythm. Plasma ACTH and CRH in hypothalamus are increased in hyperammonemic rats. Corticosterone injection normalizes ACTH. Chronic hyperammonemia impairs adrenal function, reduces corticosterone content and ACTH-induced corticosterone release in adrenals, leading to reduced feedback modulation of HPA axis by corticosterone which contributes to impair circadian rhythms of activity. Impaired circadian rhythms and motor activity may be corrected in hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy by corticosterone treatment.

  7. Adrenal Imaging: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Colin J; McDermott, Shaunagh; Blake, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal glands are located superior to the kidneys and play an important role in the endocrine system. Each adrenal gland contains an outer cortex, responsible mainly for the secretion of androgens and corticosteroids, and an inner medulla, which secretes epinephrine and norepinephrine. Here, we review the anatomy of the adrenal glands and explain the current imaging modalities that are most useful for the assessment of the various conditions--both benign and malignant--that can affect these glands. As adrenal lesions are often identified incidentally on cross-sectional imaging performed for other reasons, the management of such adrenal 'incidentalomas' is also discussed. In many cases, adrenal lesions have distinctive imaging features that allow for a full characterization with noninvasive techniques. In some cases, invasive studies such as adrenal vein sampling or adrenal biopsy become necessary. This review should give the reader a wide overview of how various imaging techniques can be useful in the assessment of adrenal pathology.

  8. The agonistic adrenal: melatonin elicits female aggression via regulation of adrenal androgens

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Lauren M.; Sengelaub, Dale R.; Demas, Gregory E.

    2015-01-01

    Classic findings have demonstrated an important role for sex steroids as regulators of aggression, but this relationship is lacking within some environmental contexts. In mammals and birds, the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a non-gonadal precursor of biologically active steroids, has been linked to aggression. Although females, like males, use aggression when competing for limited resources, the mechanisms underlying female aggression remain understudied. Here, we propose a previously undescribed endocrine mechanism regulating female aggression via direct action of the pineal hormone melatonin on adrenal androgens. We examined this in a solitary hamster species, Phodopus sungorus, in which both sexes are highly territorial across the seasons, and display increased aggression concomitant with decreased serum levels of sex steroids in short ‘winter-like' days. Short- but not long-day females had increased adrenal DHEA responsiveness co-occurring with morphological changes in the adrenal gland. Further, serum DHEA and total adrenal DHEA content were elevated in short days. Lastly, melatonin increased DHEA and aggression and stimulated DHEA release from cultured adrenals. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that DHEA is a key peripheral regulator of aggression and that melatonin coordinates a ‘seasonal switch’ from gonadal to adrenal regulation of aggression by direct action on the adrenal glands. PMID:26582025

  9. Failure to visualize adrenal glands in a patient with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. [/sup 131/I

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, L.; Mayfield, R.K.; Levine, J.H.; Lopes-Virella, M.F.; Sagel, J.; Buse, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    A patient with clinical and biochemical evidence of Cushing's disease and severe hyperlipidemia underwent an adrenal imaging procedure with NP-59 (6..beta..-(/sup 131/I)iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol), without visualization of either gland. Correction of the hyperlipidemia followed by repeated adrenal imaging resulted in bilateral visualization. A pituitary tumor was removed at surgery, confirming the diagnosis of Cushing's disease.

  10. The agonistic adrenal: melatonin elicits female aggression via regulation of adrenal androgens.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Nikki M; Rudolph, Lauren M; Sengelaub, Dale R; Demas, Gregory E

    2015-11-22

    Classic findings have demonstrated an important role for sex steroids as regulators of aggression, but this relationship is lacking within some environmental contexts. In mammals and birds, the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a non-gonadal precursor of biologically active steroids, has been linked to aggression. Although females, like males, use aggression when competing for limited resources, the mechanisms underlying female aggression remain understudied. Here, we propose a previously undescribed endocrine mechanism regulating female aggression via direct action of the pineal hormone melatonin on adrenal androgens. We examined this in a solitary hamster species, Phodopus sungorus, in which both sexes are highly territorial across the seasons, and display increased aggression concomitant with decreased serum levels of sex steroids in short 'winter-like' days. Short- but not long-day females had increased adrenal DHEA responsiveness co-occurring with morphological changes in the adrenal gland. Further, serum DHEA and total adrenal DHEA content were elevated in short days. Lastly, melatonin increased DHEA and aggression and stimulated DHEA release from cultured adrenals. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that DHEA is a key peripheral regulator of aggression and that melatonin coordinates a 'seasonal switch' from gonadal to adrenal regulation of aggression by direct action on the adrenal glands.

  11. Refractory hypoglycemia in a patient with functional adrenal cortical carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Katia Regina; Pereira, Maria Adelaide Albergaria; Lichtenstein, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Adrenacarcinomas are rare, and hypoglycemic syndrome resulting from the secretion of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) by these tumors have been described infrequently. This study describes the case of a young woman with severe persistent hypoglycemia and a large adrenal tumor and discusses the physiopathological mechanisms involved in hypoglycemia. The case is described as a 21-year-old woman who presented with 8 months of general symptoms and, in the preceding 3 months, with episodes of mental confusion and visual blurring secondary to hypoglycemia. A functional assessment of the adrenal cortex revealed ACTH-independent hypercortisolism and hyperandrogenism. Hypoglycemia, hypoinsulinemia, low C-peptide and no ketones were also detected. An evaluation of the GH–IGF axis revealed GH blockade (0.03; reference: up to 4.4 ng/mL), greatly reduced IGF-I levels (9.0 ng/mL; reference: 180–780 ng/mL), slightly reduced IGF-II levels (197 ng/mL; reference: 267–616 ng/mL) and an elevated IGF-II/IGF-I ratio (21.9; reference: ~3). CT scan revealed a large expansive mass in the right adrenal gland and pulmonary and liver metastases. During hospitalization, the patient experienced frequent difficult-to-control hypoglycemia and hypokalemia episodes. Octreotide was ineffective in controlling hypoglycemia. Due to unresectability, chemotherapy was tried, but after 3 months, the patient’s condition worsened and progressed to death. In conclusion, our patient presented with a functional adrenal cortical carcinoma, with hyperandrogenism associated with hypoinsulinemic hypoglycemia and blockage of the GH–IGF-I axis. Patient’s data suggested a diagnosis of hypoglycemia induced by an IGF-II or a large IGF-II-producing tumor (low levels of GH, greatly decreased IGF-I, slightly decreased IGF-II and an elevated IGF-II/IGF-I ratio). Learning points: Hypoglycemyndrome resulting from the secretion of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) by adrenal tumors is a

  12. A Case Report of Bilateral Adrenal Sarcomatoid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cerit, Ethem Turgay; Özkan, Çiğdem; Altınova, Eroğlu; Çimen, Ali Rıza; Sözen, Sinan; Kerem, Mustafa; Aktürk, Müjde; Memiş, Leyla; Törüner, Baloş; Çakır, Nuri; Arslan, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare and aggressive malignancy. Sarcomatoid adrenal carcinoma is even more aggressive type of ACC. Bilateral malignant adrenal tumors are extremely rare except for those that represent metastasis from an extra-adrenal organ. Here we report a 53-year-old woman who presented with abdominal pain and weight loss. Abdominal computed tomography revealed bilateral adrenal masses and a mass in her liver. Surgical specimens showed pleomorphic tumor cells with epithelial and spindle cell morphology and immunohistochemical staining was compatible with sarcomatoid carcinoma. Sarcomatoid adrenal carcinoma should be kept in mind during the management of bilateral adrenal masses. PMID:28097033

  13. Adrenal diseases during pregnancy: pathophysiology, diagnosis and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, Mahdi; Mnif, Mouna F; Charfi, Nadia; Kacem, Faten H; Naceur, Basma B; Mnif, Fatma; Dammak, Mohamed; Rekik, Nabila; Abid, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    : Adrenal diseases--including disorders such as Cushing's syndrome, Addison's disease, pheochromocytoma, primary hyperaldosteronism and congenital adrenal hyperplasia--are relatively rare in pregnancy, but a timely diagnosis and proper treatment are critical because these disorders can cause maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Making the diagnosis of adrenal disorders in pregnancy is challenging as symptoms associated with pregnancy are also seen in adrenal diseases. In addition, pregnancy is marked by several endocrine changes, including activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. The aim of this article was to review the pathophysiology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and management of various adrenal disorders during pregnancy.

  14. Diagnosis of adrenal tumors with radionuclide imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Beierwaltes, W.H.; Sisson, J.C.; Shapiro, B.

    1984-01-01

    The development of radiolabeled cholesterols in 1969 as precursors of adrenocortical steroid production allowed the first noninvasive imaging of the adrenal cortices. FDA-NDA approval in 1984 should allow routine use of these agents in most hospitals. NP-59 is most commonly used in the diagnosis and management of Cushing syndrome; the second most common use is in the diagnosis of primary aldosteronism. It is also helpful in the differential diagnosis of adrenal and ovarian hyperandrogenism and hirsutism, and is the only noninvasive method of detecting unilateral adrenocortical hypofunction. The newest and most popular use is in the differential diagnosis of asymptomatic masses in the region of the adrenal gland discovered incidentally with CT scan (incidentalomas). In this situation, the NP-59 scan can define whether the tumor is in the adrenal gland and if it is functional or nonfunctional. The authors believe that, in the future, radiolabeled enzyme inhibitors might offer better diagnostic imaging of the adrenal cortex, although these agents will probably not be available for routine use for some time. The development of a radioiodinated guanethidine analog, /sup 131/I-MIBG, has allowed differentiation of normal adrenal medullary function from bilateral adrenal medullary hyperplasia before the development of hypertension or tachycardia, diagnostic increases in plasma or urinary catecholamines, or abnormal CT scans. The search for a pheochromocytoma should begin with /sup 131/I-MIBG scintigraphy. While over 90% of primary pheochromocytomas occur in the abdomen, neither a survey of the abdomen nor the finding of a single tumor should conclude the search.

  15. Abnormal gel flotation caused by contrast media during adrenal vein sampling

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Oliveira, Gabriel; Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Gelati, Matteo; Bassi, Antonella; Contro, Alberto; Pizzolo, Francesca; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2016-01-01

    Introduction During adrenal venous sampling (AVS) procedure, radiologists administer a contrast agent via the catheter to visualize the proper catheter position. Materials and methods A patient with primary aldosteronism diagnostic-hypothesis was admitted for AVS. A venogram was performed to
confirm the catheter’s position with 2mL of Iopamidol 300 mg/mL. Samples were collected with syringe connected to a hydrophilic coated catheter by low-pressure aspiration from each of the four collection sites: inferior vena cava in the suprarenal portion, inferior vena cava in the infrarenal portion, left adrenal vein, and right adrenal vein; then immediately transferred from syringe to tubes with gel separator. All tubes were centrifuged at 1200 x g for 10 minutes. Results At the end of centrifugation process, primary blood tubes containing blood from inferior vena cava and left adrenal vein exhibited the standard gel separator barrier, while tubes from right adrenal vein showed abnormal flotation of gel separator. The radiologist confirmed the usage of 2.6 mL instead of 2.0 mL of Iopamidol 300 mg/mL. This iodinated contrast media, with 1.33 g/cm3 of density, was used close to the right adrenal vein due to some difficulty to access it. Conclusion The abnormal flotation of gel separator in samples taken from right adrenal vein can be explained by the usage of the iodinated
contrast media. We suggest using plain-tubes (without gel separator) for AVS in order to avoid preanalytical nonconformities. Moreover, a blood volume equivalent to twice the catheter extension should be discarded to eliminate residual contrast media before collection of samples for laboratory assays. PMID:27812311

  16. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia and Schmid Metaphyseal Chondrodysplasia in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Khorasani, Efat; Vakili, Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a group of hereditary diseases, which are autosomal recessive. CAH occurs due to defect in one of the cortisol coding genes and often clinically presents itself with signs of androgen overproduction. In this article, we report a case of CAH and Schmid metaphyseal dysplasia. Our literature review indicated that this report is the first attempt on CYP11B1 and Schmid dysplasia in a child. The specific diagnosis of 11-β-hydroxylase deficiency can be determined using high basal levels of deoxycorticosterone and/or 11-deoxycortisol serums. PMID:26722148

  17. Fuel oil-induced adrenal hypertrophy in ranch mink (Mustela vison): effects of sex, fuel oil weathering, and response to adrenocorticotropic hormone.

    PubMed

    Mohr, F C; Lasley, B; Bursian, S

    2010-01-01

    Environmental contamination by petroleum hydrocarbons from anthropogenic sources can be a cause of stress for free-ranging wildlife. The response of wildlife to chemical contaminants requires that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis be precisely regulated to allow for proper glucocorticoid-mediated adaptive responses. Chronic oral exposure to low concentrations of bunker C fuel oil causes the development of adrenal hypertrophy in male ranch mink (Mustela vison) without increasing serum or fecal glucocorticoid concentrations. This hypertrophy is an adaptive response to fuel oil-induced adrenal insufficiency. To determine if the same phenomenon occurs in female mink or male mink exposed to artificially weathered fuel oil, female mink were fed 0 ppm (mineral oil) or 420 ppm fuel oil and male mink were exposed to 0 ppm, 420 ppm fuel oil, or 480 ppm artificially weathered fuel oil in the diet for 60-62 days. At the end of the exposure, serum glucocorticoid concentrations were assayed along with body and organ weight measurements. Fecal glucocorticoid concentrations were assayed at time points throughout the exposure. Male mink fed fuel oil or weathered fuel oil and female mink fed fuel oil had adrenal enlargement without any significant increases in the serum or fecal concentration of glucocorticoids, which is consistent with fuel oil-induced adrenal insufficiency. To address the physiological consequences of adrenal insufficiency, fuel oil-exposed male mink were administered an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation test. Fuel oil-exposed animals had a smaller incremental increase in serum glucocorticoid concentration after ACTH challenge compared to control animals. Our findings provide further evidence that the HPA axis of fuel oil-exposed animals is compromised and, therefore, not able to respond appropriately to the diverse stressors found in the environment.

  18. Adrenal toxicology: a strategy for assessment of functional toxicity to the adrenal cortex and steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Philip W; Everett, David J; Springall, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    The adrenal is the most common toxicological target organ in the endocrine system in vivo and yet it is neglected in regulatory endocrine disruption screening and testing. There has been a recent marked increase in interest in adrenal toxicity, but there are no standardised approaches for assessment. Consequently, a strategy is proposed to evaluate adrenocortical toxicity. Human adrenal conditions are reviewed and adrenocortical suppression, known to have been iatrogenically induced leading to Addisonian crisis and death, is identified as the toxicological hazard of most concern. The consequences of inhibition of key steroidogenic enzymes and the possible toxicological modulation of other adrenal conditions are also highlighted. The proposed strategy involves an in vivo rodent adrenal competency test based on ACTH challenge to specifically examine adrenocortical suppression. The H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line is also proposed to identify molecular targets, and is useful for measuring steroids, enzymes or gene expression. Hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal endocrinology relevant to rodent and human toxicology is reviewed (with an emphasis on multi-endocrine axis effects on the adrenal and also how the adrenal affects a variety of other hormones) and the endocrinology of the H295R cell line is also described. Chemicals known to induce adrenocortical toxicity are reviewed and over 60 examples of compounds and their confirmed steroidogenic targets are presented, with much of this work published very recently using H295R cell systems. In proposing a strategy for adrenocortical toxicity assessment, the outlined techniques will provide hazard assessment data but it will be regulatory agencies that must consider the significance of such data in risk extrapolation models. The cases of etomindate and aminoglutethimide induced adrenal suppression are clearly documented examples of iatrogenic adrenal toxicity in humans. Environmentally, sentinel species, such as

  19. Role of adrenal imaging in surgical management

    SciTech Connect

    Lamki, L.M.; Haynie, T.P. )

    1990-03-01

    Adrenal imaging using radiopharmaceuticals is a functional test that can contribute significantly to surgical management and follow-up of patients with either benign or malignant conditions of the adrenal cortex and medulla. Imaging of the cortex is achieved by iodine-131-labeled iodomethyl nor-cholesterol (NP-59), while adrenal medulla imaging can be successfully accomplished by 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), which localizes in the adrenergic nerve terminal with norepinephrine. Both tests carry high sensitivity and specificity for functional tumors and hyperplasia, and often better than CT scanning. This article reviews the current status and clinical utility of nuclear imaging of the adrenal cortex in congenital hyperplasia, low renin hypertension and aldosteronism, and Cushing's syndrome. Adrenal medulla imaging is reviewed in light of our experience at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in pheochromocytoma, neuroblastoma, and other neuroectodermal tumors. Investigation of {sup 131}I-MIBG therapy of metastatic tumors of neuroectodermal origin potentially offers a means of at least controlling symptoms of hormonal secretion in these patients. 40 references.

  20. Effects of short- and long-duration hypothyroidism on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function in rats: in vitro and in situ studies.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Elizabeth O; Calogero, Aldo E; Konstandi, Mary; Kamilaris, Themis C; La Vignera, Sandro; Chrousos, George P

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the effects of hypothyroidism on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis; the functional integrity of each component of the HPA axis was examined in short-term and long-term hypothyroidism. Neuropeptide synthesis, release, and content were evaluated in vitro both in the hypothalamus and anterior pituitary, and corticosterone release was assessed in primary adrenal cell cultures at 7 (short-term) and 60 days (long-term hypothyroidism) after thyroidectomy in male rats. Hypothyroid rats showed adrenal insufficiency in several parameters, which were associated with the duration of hypothyroidism. Cerebrospinal (CSF) ACTH was decreased in all hypothyroid animals, while CSF corticosterone levels were significantly decreased only in long-term hypothyroidism. Long-term hypothyroid animals showed decreased corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA expression in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus under both basal and stress conditions, decreased CRH release from hypothalamic organ cultures after KCL and arginine vasopressin stimulation, as well as an increased number of anterior pituitary CRH receptors. In contrast, short-term hypothyroid rats showed changes in anterior pituitary function with an increased responsiveness to CRH that was associated with an increase in CRH receptors. Although both short- and long-term hypothyroidism was associated with significant decreases in adrenal weights, only long-term hypothyroid rats showed changes in adrenal function with a significant decrease of ACTH-induced corticosterone release from cultured adrenal cells. The data suggest that long-term hypothyroidism is associated with adrenal insufficiency with abnormalities in all three components of the HPA axis. Short-term hypothyroidism, on the other hand, is associated with increased pituitary corticotroph responsiveness to CRH.

  1. Memantine effects on liver and adrenal gland of rats exposed to cold stress

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Memantine attenuates heart stress due cold stress, however, no study focused its effects on liver and adrenal gland. We evaluated its effects on lipid depletion in adrenal gland and glycogen depletion in liver of rats exposed to cold stress. Methods Male rats divided into 4 groups: 1)Control (CON); 2)Memantine (MEM); 3)Induced cold stress (IH) and; 4)Induced cold stress memantine (IHF). Memantine were administrated by gavage (20 mg/kg/day) during eight days. Cold stress were performed during 4 hours once at - 8°C. Lipid and glycogen depletion were presented as its intensity levels. Results Rats exposed to cold stress presented the highest glycogen (p < 0.001) and lipid depletion (p < 0.001) in liver and adrenal gland, respectively. We noted that memantine significantly reduced lipid depletion in adrenal gland and glycogen depletion in liver. Conclusion Memantine prevented glycogen depletion in liver and lipid depletion in adrenal gland of rats under a cold stress condition. PMID:21255456

  2. Primary adrenal sarcomatoid carcinoma metastatic to the lung: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, CHUANGZHI; ZHENG, AIPING; MAO, XIANGMING; SHI, BENTAO; LI, XIANXIN

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal sarcomatoid carcinoma is a rare adrenal carcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, only 11 cases have been reported since 1987. Adrenal sarcomatoid carcinoma presents a diagnostic challenge due to its atypical symptoms and histological patterns. At the time of diagnosis, a large percentage of patients are already at the metastatic stage and succumb within a few months. The present study reports a case of a 59-year-old man presenting with asthenia and weight loss with adrenal sarcomatoid carcinoma metastatic to the lung. A computed tomography (CT) scan and ultrasonography of the patient's abdomen suggested a large homogeneous mass in the right adrenal gland, and a CT scan of his chest suggested lung metastasis. Right adrenalectomy was performed. Histological examination revealed that the tumor was composed of sarcomatous and carcinomatous differentiation elements. Immunohistochemical examination revealed tumor cell positivity for vimentin and cytokeratin. At the 6-month follow-up the patient exhibited no disease progression and refused further proposed treatment. The patient was alive at the time of writing the current report. The present case report additionally reviews the literature, for the purpose of raising awareness of these rare lesions and assisting in achieving accurate diagnoses and effective treatment. PMID:27123074

  3. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Adrenal Gland Disorders?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gland Disorders > About > Diagnosis Page Content ​ ​How do health care providers diagnose adrenal gland disorders? Methods for diagnosing ... Tumors To diagnose an adrenal gland tumor, a health care provider may order one or more tests. 3 ...

  4. Calcitriol-mediated Reversible Hypercalcemia in a Patient with Primary Adrenal Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mir, Shahnaz Ahmad; Masoodi, Shariq Rashid; Wani, Arshad Iqbal; Ahmad, Syed Nisar; Hameed, Iqra

    2016-01-01

    Primary adrenal lymphomas (PAL) are rare occurrences with only less than 150 cases reported in the literature. Two-thirds of these cases were reported in the last decade due to the advancements in imaging techniques and immunohistochemistry. The non-specific signs and symptoms have resulted in a delayed onset of symptoms and diagnosis of these tumors. Reports of the results of chemotherapy are not gratifying, and most patients die within one year of the diagnosis. We report a 65-year-old male with adrenal non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL), who presented with hypercalcemia and renal failure. We reviewed all adrenal NHL cases presented with hypercalcemia and attempted to comprehend its etiology and overall survival effect. PMID:28090186

  5. Imaging of the adrenal gland lesions.

    PubMed

    Herr, Keith; Muglia, Valdair F; Koff, Walter José; Westphalen, Antonio Carlos

    2014-01-01

    With the steep increase in the use of cross-sectional imaging in recent years, the incidentally detected adrenal lesion, or "incidentaloma", has become an increasingly common diagnostic problem for the radiologist, and a need for an approach to classifying these lesions as benign, malignant or indeterminate with imaging has spurred an explosion of research. While most incidentalomas represent benign disease, typically an adenoma, the possibility of malignant involvement of the adrenal gland necessitates a reliance on imaging to inform management decisions. In this article, we review the literature on adrenal gland imaging, with particular emphasis on computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and photon-emission tomography, and discuss how these findings relate to clinical practice. Emerging technologies, such as contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, dual-energy computed tomography, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging will also be briefly addressed.

  6. Image-Guided Adrenal and Renal Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Karun V.; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Swerdlow, Daniel; DaSilva, Daniel; Beck, Avi; Jain, Nidhi; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided biopsy is a safe and well-established technique that is familiar to most interventional radiologists (IRs). Improvements in image-guidance, biopsy tools and biopsy techniques now routinely allow for safe biopsy of renal and adrenal lesions which traditionally were considered difficult to reach or technically challenging. Image-guided biopsy is used to establish the definitive tissue diagnosis in adrenal mass lesions that can not be fully characterized with imaging or laboratory tests alone. It is also used to establish definitive diagnosis in some cases of renal parenchymal disease and has an expanding role in diagnosis and characterization of renal masses prior to treatment. Although basic principles and techniques for image-guided needle biopsy are similar regardless of organ, this paper will highlight some technical considerations, indications and complications which are unique to the adrenal gland and kidney because of their anatomic location and physiologic features. PMID:20540919

  7. Imaging of the adrenal gland lesions*

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Keith; Muglia, Valdair F.; Koff, Walter José; Westphalen, Antonio Carlos

    2014-01-01

    With the steep increase in the use of cross-sectional imaging in recent years, the incidentally detected adrenal lesion, or "incidentaloma", has become an increasingly common diagnostic problem for the radiologist, and a need for an approach to classifying these lesions as benign, malignant or indeterminate with imaging has spurred an explosion of research. While most incidentalomas represent benign disease, typically an adenoma, the possibility of malignant involvement of the adrenal gland necessitates a reliance on imaging to inform management decisions. In this article, we review the literature on adrenal gland imaging, with particular emphasis on computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and photon-emission tomography, and discuss how these findings relate to clinical practice. Emerging technologies, such as contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, dual-energy computed tomography, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging will also be briefly addressed. PMID:25741090

  8. Adrenal Hemorrhage in Neonates: Unusual Presentation.

    PubMed

    Alabsi, Samir Y; Layland, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal hemorrhage (AH) is a relatively uncommon condition in newborns. It may be asymptomatic or may present with flank abdominal mass, anemia, jaundice, or rarely as scrotal bruising or hematoma. We report two cases of AH in neonates; the first presented with scrotal hematoma and the second with adrenal mass associated with hypertension and oliguria, primarily secondary to coincidental renal vein thrombosis. Diagnosis was confirmed by abdominal ultrasound. Patients were managed conservatively with clinical observation and by following hemoglobin and bilirubin levels closely. Both infants were discharged without surgical intervention after several days in the hospital. Clinicians should consider AH when a newborn presents with scrotal bruising or hematoma, unexplained anemia, unexplained jaundice, or flank abdominal mass. Timely ultrasonographic evaluation of both adrenal glands and testes in neonates with scrotal hematoma may spare infants from unnecessary surgical intervention because scrotal hematoma often raises the suspicion of testicular torsion.

  9. Principles and management of adrenal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Javadpour, N.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides information on adrenal diseases of latest developments and guides the clinicians in the care of their patients. The book is divided into two parts. The first section gives an overview of the embryology, anatomy, physiology, markers, pathology, imaging and the current progress in the field. The second edition covers specific diseases of the adrenal cortex and medulla. The increasingly significant roles played by steroids, catecholamines, blockers, computed tomography and magnetic resonance are elucidated and discussed. The contents include: Overview of progress; current problems, and perspectives - embryology anatomy, physiology, and biologic markers; pathology; advances in diagnosis; imaging techniques; adrenal disorders in childhood; primary aldosteronism; Cushing's syndrome; carcinoma; pheochromocytoma; neuroblastoma; metastatic disease; surgical management; and subject index.

  10. Laparoscopic Operative Technique for Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Szostek, Grzegorz; Nazarewski, Slawomir; Borkowski, Tomasz; Chudzinski, Witold; Tolloczko, Tadeusz

    2000-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopy has acquired an unquestionable position in surgical practice as a diagnostic and operative tool. Recently, the laparoscopic approach has become a valuable option for adrenalectomy. This paper reports, in detail, our experience of laparoscopic adrenalectomy performed for adrenal tumors. Methods: We performed 12 laparoscopic adrenalectomies from October 29, 1997 to October 31, 1998. The technique of laparoscopic adrenalectomy is described thoroughly in all relevant details for either left or right-sided adrenal lesions. Results: The presented technique of laparoscopic adrenalectomy in all 12 cases provided good and relatively simple exposure of the immediate operative area. All relevant vascular elements were safely controlled, adrenal tumors could be successfully removed, and adequate hemostasis was achieved. No intraoperative or postoperative complications were observed. Conclusions: Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is a safe alternative to open surgery and is preferred for most patients because of shorter postoperative hospital stay and less postoperative discomfort. PMID:10917119

  11. Adrenal glands in patients with cogenital renal anomalies: CT appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, P.J.; Robbins, G.L.; Ellis, D.A.; Spirt, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    The CT appearance of the adrenal glands was investigated in 30 patients with congenital renal anomalies. The ipsilateral adrenal was clearly identified in 83% of these patients; in all of them, the adrenal was a paraspinal disk-shaped organ, which appeared linear on CT. Conversely, the adrenals retained their normal shape in a control group of 20 patients with acquired renal atrophy or prior simple nephrectomy.

  12. Localization of metastatic adrenal cortical carcinoma with Ga-67

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, F.T.; Anderson, J.H.; Jelinek, J.; Anderson, D.W. )

    1991-02-01

    Data are limited on the localization of Ga-67 in primary or metastatic adrenal cortical carcinoma. We report the localization of Ga-67 to pathologically confirmed adrenal cortical carcinoma metastatic to the lung. A review of the literature revealed four patients have previously been reported to have metastatic adrenal cortical carcinoma detected on Ga-67 scan. Gallium imaging may be useful in the evaluation of patients with adrenal cortical carcinoma. SPECT imaging should further improve lesion resolution and localization.

  13. Two cases of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage presenting with persistent jaundice.

    PubMed

    Ruffini, E; De Petris, L; Zorzi, G; Paoletti, P; Mambelli, G; Carlucci, A

    2013-01-01

    The adrenal hemorrhage is a relatively rare event in newborns but must be considered in the presence of a persistent unexplained jaundice, especially in presence of predisposing factors. Serial ultrasonography is the modality of choice for initial diagnosis and follow-up of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage. We report two cases of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage presenting with persistent jaundice. The causes of the neonatal adrenal hemorrhages were a difficult vaginal delivery in macrosomic infant and a neonatal infection.

  14. Steroid 21 hydroxylase deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Nimkarn, Saroj; Lin-Su, Karen; New, Maria I

    2011-10-01

    Steroid 21 hydroxylase deficiency is the most common form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). The severity of this disorder depends on the extent of impaired enzymatic activity, which is caused by various mutations of the 21 hydroxylase gene. This article reviews adrenal steroidogenesis and the pathophysiology of 21 hydroxylase deficiency. The three forms of CAH are then discussed in terms of clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment, and genetic basis. Prenatal diagnosis and treatment are also reviewed. The goal of therapy is to correct the deficiency in cortisol secretion and suppress androgen overproduction. Glucocorticoid replacement has been the mainstay of treatment for CAH, but new treatment strategies continue to be developed and studied.

  15. Brain serotonin and pituitary-adrenal functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Berger, P.; Barchas, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    It had been concluded by Scapagnini et al. (1971) that brain serotonin (5-HT) was involved in the regulation of the diurnal rhythm of the pituitary-adrenal system but not in the stress response. A study was conducted to investigate these findings further by evaluating the effects of altering brain 5-HT levels on the daily fluctuation of plasma corticosterone and on the response of the pituitary-adrenal system to a stressful or noxious stimulus in the rat. In a number of experiments brain 5-HT synthesis was inhibited with parachlorophenylalanine. In other tests it was tried to raise the level of brain 5-HT with precursors.

  16. Cystic Pheochromocytoma Presenting as Adrenal Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Abdulsalam, Mohammed Shafi; Satish, Priyanka; Janakiraman, Raghunath Keddy; Singh, Shivshankar

    2016-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas are usually solid tumours. But it can present as cystic lesions in the adrenal gland. Cystic lesions in adrenal gland with hypertension needs attention to rule out pheochromocytoma. If ignored, it may lead to hypertensive emergency, multisystem crisis and death. Early diagnosis with biochemistry, Computed Tomography (CT) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of abdomen, proper functional imaging like Meta Iodo Benzyl Guanidine (MIBG) scan is essential. Proper preoperative preparation is important to prevent hypertensive crisis during and after surgery. We are reporting a case of cystic pheochromocytoma in a young male. PMID:28050427

  17. Noncholinergic control of adrenal catecholamine secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Livett, B G; Marley, P D

    1993-01-01

    It has been known for over 70 years that adrenal catecholamine secretion can be modulated or elicited by noncholinergic neurotransmitters and hormones. However, our understanding of the cellular mechanisms by which these agents produce their effects and the physiological conditions under which they act are not well characterised. Here we briefly review the mechanisms by which one such agent (the neuropeptide substance P) modulates the cholinergic secretory response of adrenal chromaffin cells, and another agent (angiotensin II) elicits catecholamine secretion independently of the cholinergic innervation. PMID:7507911

  18. Ultrasonographic appearance of adrenal glands in healthy and sick cats.

    PubMed

    Combes, Anaïs; Pey, Pascaline; Paepe, Dominique; Rosenberg, Dan; Daminet, Sylvie; Putcuyps, Ingrid; Bedu, Anne-Sophie; Duchateau, Luc; de Fornel-Thibaud, Pauline; Benchekroun, Ghita; Saunders, Jimmy H

    2013-06-01

    The first part of the study aimed to describe prospectively the ultrasonographic features of the adrenal glands in 94 healthy cats and 51 chronically sick cats. It confirmed the feasibility of ultrasonography of adrenal glands in healthy and chronically sick cats, which were not statistically different. The typical hypoechoic appearance of the gland surrounded by hyperechoic fat made it recognisable. A sagittal plane of the gland, not in line with the aorta, may be necessary to obtain the largest adrenal measurements. The reference intervals of adrenal measurements were inferred from the values obtained in the healthy and chronically sick cats (mean ± 0.96 SD): adrenal length was 8.9-12.5 mm; cranial height was 3.0-4.8 mm; caudal height was 3.0-4.5 mm. The second part of the study consisted of a retrospective analysis of the ultrasonographic examination of the adrenal glands in cats with adrenal diseases (six had hyperaldosteronism and four had pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism) and a descriptive comparison with the reference features obtained in the control groups from the prospective study. Cats with hyperaldosteronism presented with unilateral severely enlarged adrenal glands. However, a normal contralateral gland did not preclude a contralateral infiltration in benign or malignant adrenal neoplasms. The ultrasonographic appearance of the adrenal glands could not differentiate benign and malignant lesions. The ultrasonographic appearance of pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism was mainly a symmetrical adrenal enlargement; however, a substantial number of cases were within the reference intervals of adrenal size.

  19. Imaging of an adrenal cortical carcinoma and its skeletal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Drane, W.E.; Graham, M.M.; Nelp, W.B.

    1983-08-01

    Though the typical scintigraphic appearance in adrenal cortical carcinoma is bilateral nonvisualization of the adrenal glands, we report a case with simultaneous visualization of both an adrenal cortical carcinoma and its skeletal metastasis using 6-beta-(/sup 131/I)iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol.

  20. Imaging of an adrenal cortical carcinoma and its skeletal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Drane, W.E.; Graham, M.M.; Nelp, W.B.

    1983-08-01

    Though the typical scintigraphic appearance in adrenal cortical carcinoma is bilateral nonvisualization of the adrenal glands, a case with simultaneous visualization of both an adrenal cortical carcinoma and its skeletal metastasis using 6-..beta..-(/sup 131/I)iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol is reported.

  1. Biopsy of the right adrenal gland by the transhepatic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.B.; Bernardino, M.E.; Berkman, W.A.; Sones, P.J. Jr.; Torres, W.E.

    1983-08-01

    A transhepatic computed-tomographic-guided biopsy of a right adrenal mass is described. This method is simpler to perform than the usual posterior biopsy carried out with the patient prone and is less likely to cause a complicating pneumothorax. In seven of eight patients with right adrenal masses, adrenal tissue was obtained and an accurate diagnosis was possible. No complications resulted.

  2. Polygyny: insufficient father-son contact and son's masculine identity.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, M

    1976-05-01

    In polygynous societies in which the family consists of husband, wives, and children only, if each cowife lives in a separate quarter with her children, males are more likely to be circumcised or segregated at puberty. These customs are interpreted as the measures to rectify boys' mother-oriented personality development because of limited contact with their fathers due to their mother's separate quarters. Circumcision and segregation can be explained better in terms of the son's insufficient contact with the father rather than a very close relationship with the mother due to the long postpartum sexual taboo.

  3. Minimally invasive treatments for perforator vein insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Gloria Maria; Prabhakar, Anand M.; Ganguli, Suvranu

    2016-01-01

    Incompetent superficial veins are the most common cause of lower extremity superficial venous reflux and varicose veins; however, incompetent or insufficient perforator veins are the most common cause of recurrent varicose veins after treatment, often unrecognized. Perforator vein insufficiency can result in pain, skin changes, and skin ulcers, and often merit intervention. Minimally invasive treatments have replaced traditional surgical treatments for incompetent perforator veins. Current minimally invasive treatment options include ultrasound guided sclerotherapy (USGS) and endovascular thermal ablation (EVTA) with either laser or radiofrequency energy sources. Advantages and disadvantages of each modality and knowledge on these treatments are required to adequately address perforator venous disease. PMID:28123979

  4. Imaging features of benign adrenal cysts.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Kocaoglu, Murat; Yildirim, Duzgun; Bulakbasi, Nail; Guvenc, Inanc; Tayfun, Cem; Ucoz, Taner

    2006-12-01

    Benign adrenal gland cysts (BACs) are rare lesions with a variable histological spectrum and may mimic not only each other but also malignant ones. We aimed to review imaging features of BACs which can be helpful in distinguishing each entity and determining the subsequent appropriate management.

  5. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy for benign adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, T; Inaba, M; Nishiguchi, Y; Ishibashi, R; Ogisawa, K; Yukimoto, K; Ogawa, Y; Onoda, N; Hirakawa, K; Chung, Y S

    2000-06-01

    Laparoscopic adrenalectomy has been rapidly accepted for treatment of benign adrenal tumors. To evaluate the advantages of laparoscopic adrenalectomy, we examined 55 patients who underwent laparoscopic adrenalectomy. In all patients, adrenal tumors were successfully removed. The mean operating time was 143 minutes, and the estimated mean blood loss was 49 mL in all patients. The postoperative course was uneventful in all cases. The mean frequency of administration of analgesics was only 2.9 times, and the time elapsed to first walking after surgery was 17 hours. The peak white blood cell count and C-reactive protein values after surgery were 8,266 +/- 1,963/mm3 and 2.5 +/- 1.2 mg/dL, respectively. Of the 55 patients, 44 underwent total adrenalectomy and another 11 underwent partial adrenalectomy, which was introduced in the expectation of preserving normal adrenal cortex; it is therefore indicated in solitary and peripherally located benign tumors. The mean operating time was 154 minutes for the total adrenalectomy, which was longer than that of partial adrenalectomy (92 minutes). The estimated blood loss was 50 mL for the total and 46 mL for the partial adrenalectomy. The postoperative course was uneventful and surgical outcome was excellent in each group. In conclusion, our results are encouraging enough to suggest that laparoscopic adrenalectomy should be a preferential therapeutic option for benign adrenal tumors; also, partial adrenalectomy could be a safe, effective, and less invasive procedure in selected cases.

  6. Primary malignant hepatic pheochromocytoma with negative adrenal scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Homma, Koichiro; Hayashi, Koichi; Wakino, Shu; Irie, Rie; Mukai, Makio; Kumagai, Hiroo; Shibata, Hirotaka; Saruta, Takao

    2006-07-01

    A 60-year-old male patient with hypertension was referred to our hospital because of insufficient blood pressure control (190/98 mmHg) and to rule out secondary hypertension. A computed tomography scan revealed no adrenal tumor but a large liver mass (5 x 5 cm), and magnetic resonance imaging showed a high signal intensity lesion on the T2-weighted image. Twenty-four hour urinary excretion of catecholamine metabolites was markedly increased, although a 123I-metaiodobenzyl guanidine (MIBG) scintigram failed to show accumulation in the hepatic mass, and no difference was noted between the catecholamine concentration in the tumor-drainage vein and that obtained from the vein draining from the non-tumor area. Liver biopsy did show features compatible with pheochromocytoma (i.e., chromogranin A-positive cells). Transcatheter arterial embolization of the liver tumor was conducted and resulted in a marked (50%) decrease in the 24-h urine normetanephrine excretion. Several metastatic foci were noted in the spinal bone and transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) was also conducted with successful results. Thus, we experienced a case of primary malignant hepatic pheochromocytoma with negative 123I-MIBG scanning.

  7. Laparoscope resection of ectopic corticosteroid-secreting adrenal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-Ling; Dou, Jing-Tao; Gao, Jiang-Ping; Zhong, Wen-Wen; Jin, Du; Hui, Lüzhao; Lu, Ju-Ming; Mu, Yi-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Tumors originating from ectopic adrenal tissue are relatively rare. In this article, we describe a case with Cushing's syndrome caused by an ectopic adrenal adenoma. A 38 year-old male patient presenting with cushingoid appearance for 2 years was diagnosed to have ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome based on endocrinological evaluation. Mutiple radiological examinations detected bilateral adrenal atrophy. When the images were investigated in a more expanded scope, a 3.0×3.5×5.3 cm mass was detected in the anterior of left renal hilum and left renal vein. The mass was successfully resected with intraoperative endoscopy and pathological evaluation revealed an ectopic adrenal tumor. It is suggested that when the endocrinlogically confirmed adrenal neoplasm could not be well and definitely localized, the possibility of ectopic adrenal should be presumed and further radiography examinations should extend to the field where ectopic adrenal usually presents.

  8. Adrenal myelolipoma: Controversies in its management

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Vasanth G.; Thota, Anuroop; Shankar, Ravi; Desai, Mallikarjun G.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal myelolipomas (AMLs) are rare, benign neoplasms of the adrenal gland with varied clinical presentations. The rarity of these tumors precludes any case-controlled or randomized study into their management. The available literature is limited to case reports and short series from referral centers. This review is an effort to put the available literature into perspective such that clinical decision making can be done with some clarity. The PubMed and Cochrane databases were searched with key words Adrenal Myelolipoma, Adrenal Incidentaloma (AI) and Adrenal Collision Tumor (ACT). From over 1300 search results, 547 relevant publications dating from 1954 to 2014 were reviewed. Details of about 1231 AMLs in the indexed literature were analyzed. Increasing usage of imaging studies has significantly increased the discovery of AMLs. Although AMLs are benign tumors, those measuring larger than 6 cm are prone to rupture and hemorrhage. Thorough endocrine work-up may benefit a selected group of patients, especially those who are hypertensive, diabetic/pre-diabetic, young patients (<50 years) and those with bilateral AML. Regular observation is needed for AML patients who are being treated non-operatively, as many of them may require surgery during follow-up. Although the AACE/AAES guidelines for AI (2009) exclude AML from mandatory metabolic work-up for a newly discovered AI, we feel that a significant number of patients with AML would benefit from metabolic work-up. In the literature, endocrine dysfunction in AML is 7% as compared with 11% in AI. Endocrine dysfunction in AML is probably underdiagnosed. PMID:25878407

  9. Sectional anatomy of the adrenal gland in the coronal plane.

    PubMed

    Ma, Gang; Liu, Shu Wei; Zhao, Zhen Mei; Lin, Xiang Tao; Lou, Li; Li, Zhen Ping; Tang, Yu Chun; Zhong, Shi Zhen

    2008-05-01

    To provide practical anatomic data for the imaging diagnosis and surgical treatment of adrenal disease, we investigated the anatomy of the adrenal gland and its relationships to regional structures using 31 sets of serial coronal sections of upper abdomen of Chinese adult cadavers and correlated coronal magnetic resonance (MR) images of ten upper abdomens of adult healthy volunteers and coronal reconstructed multislice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) images of five patients without lesions in the adrenal gland. The adrenal glands were visualized mainly on the successive coronal sections between 18 mm anterior to the posterior margin of inferior vena cava and 24 mm posterior to the posterior margin of inferior vena cava. In general, the left adrenal gland was visualized two sections earlier than the right adrenal gland. On the plane through the anterior parts of bilateral renal hili (A18), the appearance rate of bilateral adrenal glands was 100%, and the maximal measurements of bilateral adrenal glands were visualized. The length, width, thickness of right adrenal body, thickness of medial limb and lateral limb were, respectively, 34.02 +/- 2.12 mm, 10.91 +/- 0.89 mm, 5.82 +/- 0.26 mm, 2.78 +/- 0.08 mm, 2.62 +/- 0.06 mm, whereas the measurements of left adrenal gland were 28.31 +/- 2.46 mm, 18.40 +/- 1.06 mm, 6.84 +/- 0.24 mm, 3.02 +/- 0.08 mm, 2.86 +/- 0.07 mm, respectively. The coronal plane has superior advantage in showing the bilateral adrenal glands. The shapes of adrenal glands are various, whereas the range of adrenal thickness is quite narrow. The thickness of adrenal medial and lateral limbs, especially the thickness of lateral limb are useful for the diagnosis of the bilateral adrenocortical disease.

  10. Executive functioning in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Agoston, A Monica; Gonzalez-Bolanos, Maria Teresa; Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret; Vanderburg, Nancy; Sarafoglou, Kyriakie

    2017-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is a disorder characterized by impaired cortisol synthesis leading to excessive production of adrenal androgens. Prenatal and postnatal exposure to excess androgens may increase neural vulnerability to insult and affect cognitive functions, particularly dopamine-dependent neural circuits responsible for executive functioning (EF). Our study aimed to investigate relationship between more pronounced androgen exposure and EF-related behaviors in children with CAH, as well as sex differences in these associations. Parents of patients with CAH (n=41, boys=17, girls=24; age: M=8.41, SD=4.43) completed the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF), a measure assessing behavioral manifestations of EF. Assessments of bone age advancement, a proxy of cumulative androgen exposure, were analyzed. Advanced bone age predicted more inhibition difficulties in boys but not in girls, and more difficulties in all other BRIEF domains in the total sample. Excessive androgen production affected EF such that more advanced bone age led to more EF-related difficulties. Sex differences in inhibition may result from estrogen exposure moderating the impact of androgens in girls but not in boys. Future interventions may include targeting EF in patients with CAH to enhance quality of life and reduce cognitive consequences associated with this disease.

  11. [Chronic venous insufficiency in postthrombotic syndrome and varicose veins].

    PubMed

    Hafner, Jürg; Mayer, D; Amann, B; French, L E; Läuchli, S; Hofer, T; Ramelet, A-A; Jeanneret, Ch

    2010-10-06

    Venous disorders have a high prevalence and require approximately 1% of health budgets of industrialized countries. The postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) is defined by subjective symptoms and morphologic trophical skin changes following deep venous thrombosis. Prevention of venous thromboembolism in risk situations, easy availability of diagnostic tools (D-dimers, colour-coded duplex sonography) and early detection of deep venous thrombosis, as well as immediate therapeutic anticoagulation along with leg compression during the acute phase and over a two year period of time significantly reduce the incidence of PTS. Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) includes trophical skin and soft tissue pathologies of the lower leg due to venous hypertension in the distal venous system of the lower extremity. Roughly, two main causes can be distinguished. (A) Deep venous insufficiency (A1 in postthrombotic syndrome; A2 in primary deep venous insufficiency) and (B) superficial venous reflux, usually varicose veins. Compression therapy, surgical ablation of superficial venous reflux, and tangential ablation with split skin graft (shave treatment) of refractory venous ulcers are the mainstays in the treatment of CVI.

  12. A case with combined rare inborn metabolic disorders: congenital adrenal hyperplasia and ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoo-Mi; Lee, Beom Hee; Choi, Jin-Ho; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Lim, Han Hyuk; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2013-09-15

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is a common autosomal recessive disorder. Ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency is the most common urea cycle disorder and demonstrates X-linked inheritance. In female OTC deficiency, phenotypes are variable according to X-inactivation patterns. These disorders develop separately, and their co-morbidity is extremely rare. We report one girl with CAH showing recurrent hyperammonemia and hepatitis after 2 years-of-age due to additional OTC deficiency.

  13. An isolated inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Al Sannaa, Ghadah; Wimmer, Jana L; Ayala, Alberto G; Ro, Jae Y

    2016-12-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is an uncommon lesion that shows a wide range of anatomic distribution. The adrenal gland, however, is a distinctly rare site of occurrence. To date, only a few cases of IMT arising in the adrenal gland have been reported in the English literature. Here, we report another case of isolated adrenal IMT. A 34-year-old man presented to the emergency department with a complaint of a sudden severe right-sided back pain. Subsequent computed tomographic scan imaging studies demonstrated a large right adrenal mass associated with a hematoma. The right adrenal gland was resected. Microscopic examination revealed an encapsulated cellular spindle cell proliferation with a prominent inflammatory infiltrate. Immunohistochemically, those spindle cells were diffusely and strongly positive for anaplastic lymphoma kinase-1, and focally and weakly positive for smooth muscle actin. S-100 protein and cytokeratin were negative. The findings were consistent with IMT arising from the adrenal gland. Although IMTs in the adrenal gland are rare, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of adrenal masses. The clinical behavior of IMTs in general is currently indeterminate and a close clinical follow-up is recommended. The behavior of adrenal IMTs remains uncertain because of rare reported cases and lack of long-term follow-up. Further follow-up of reported cases and recognition of additional new cases is warranted to unmask the true biological behavior of adrenal IMTs.

  14. Adrenal gland hemorrhage in patients with fatal bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Guarner, Jeannette; Paddock, Christopher D; Bartlett, Jeanine; Zaki, Sherif R

    2008-09-01

    A wide spectrum of adrenal gland pathology is seen during bacterial infections. Hemorrhage is particularly associated with meningococcemia, while abscesses have been described with several neonatal infections. We studied adrenal gland histopathology of 65 patients with bacterial infections documented in a variety of tissues by using immunohistochemistry. The infections diagnosed included Neisseria meningitidies, group A streptococcus, Rickettsia rickettsii, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Ehrlichia sp., Bacillus anthracis, Leptospira sp., Clostridium sp., Klebsiella sp., Legionella sp., Yersinia pestis, and Treponema pallidum. Bacteria were detected in the adrenal of 40 (61%) cases. Adrenal hemorrhage was present in 39 (60%) cases. Bacteria or bacterial antigens were observed in 31 (79%) of the cases with adrenal hemorrhage including 14 with N. meningitidis, four with R. rickettsii, four with S. pneumoniae, three with group A streptococcus, two with S. aureus, two with B. anthracis, one with T. pallidum, and one with Legionella sp. Bacterial antigens were observed in nine of 26 non-hemorrhagic adrenal glands that showed inflammatory foci (four cases), edema (two cases), congestion (two cases), or necrosis (one case). Hemorrhage is the most frequent adrenal gland pathology observed in fatal bacterial infections. Bacteria and bacterial antigens are frequently seen in adrenal glands with hemorrhage and may play a pathogenic role. Although N. meningitidis is the most frequent bacteria associated with adrenal gland pathology, a broad collection of bacteria can also cause adrenal lesions.

  15. Skeletal Dysplasias That Cause Thoracic Insufficiency in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    İpek, Mehmet Sah; Akgul Ozmen, Cihan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Skeletal dysplasias are a heterogeneous group of conditions associated with various abnormalities of the skeleton. Some of them are perinatally lethal and can be diagnosed at birth. Lethality is usually due to thoracic underdevelopment and lung hypoplasia. A correct diagnosis and typing of the skeletal disorder is essential for the prognosis as is genetic counseling of the family. A retrospective review of 12 cases of clinico-radiologic diagnosis of skeletal dysplasia, leading to thoracic insufficiency, was conducted. We aimed to make differential diagnosis with special emphasis on radiological findings, and to emphasize the importance of parental counseling. PMID:27057899

  16. Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in the cat.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Jörg M

    2012-08-01

    Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) is a syndrome caused by an insufficient amount of pancreatic digestive enzymes in the small intestine. Clinical signs most commonly reported in cats with EPI are weight loss, loose and voluminous stools, steatorrhea, polyphagia, and in some cases a greasy soiling of the hair coat in the perianal region. Serum feline trypsin-like immunoreactivity concentration is the diagnostic test of choice for the diagnosis of affected cats. Treatment of cats with EPI consists of enzyme supplementation with either a powdered pancreatic extract or raw pancreas. Most cats with EPI also have severely decreased serum cobalamin concentrations and may require lifelong parenteral cobalamin supplementation. Most cats respond well to therapy and can have a normal life expectancy and quality of life.

  17. [Orthoptic treatment efficiency in convergence insufficiency treatment].

    PubMed

    Dragomir, M; Truş, L; Chirilă, D; Stîngu, C

    2001-01-01

    We studied a group of 162 patients(89 females, 73 males), with ages between 15-30 years, who complained of blurred vision at near work. 98 patients(60.4%) were diagnosed with convergence insufficiency (C.I.), the rest of 64 patients(39.6%) had: low refractive errors, heterophoria and intermittent heterotropia. Patients with convergence insufficiency were divided in 3 groups: group 1(34 patients--34.6%) were treated with orthoptic exercises and near point exercises at home, group 2 (34 patients--34.6%) were treated with only near point exercises at home and control group 3 (30 patients--30.8%) without treatment. The result of the treatment of C.I. was good at 25 patients(73.5%) of group 1, at 8 patients(23.5%) of group 2 while in group 3 at only one patient the symptoms disappeared.

  18. [The use of Phonagel in glottic insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Motta, G; Cesari, U

    1992-01-01

    The authors describe their experience concerning collagen implantation in case of glottic insufficiency after cordectomy by the CO2 Laser. Three different kinds of injection are indicated as follows: injection of 3/4 of collagen in the site responding to vocal fold removal on 1/4 in the survival fold after cordectomy with conservation of the thyroarytenoid muscle; implantation of 1/2 in the new fold and 1/2 in the surviving one after cordectomy with removing of the cricoarytenoid muscle; infiltration of the whole material in the residual vocal fold after cordectomy enlarged to the false vocal fold and the ventricule as well. Video laryngoscopic and spectrographic examinations documented good phonatory results after collagen implantation in 19 cases over 21; two cases had a persisting insufficiency depending on the fact they had been previously operated of enlarged cordectomy and the scar tissue was not sufficient for measures and consistency to obtain a satisfactory injection of collagen.

  19. Cefazolin in children with renal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Hiner, L B; Baluarte, H J; Polinsky, M S; Gruskin, A B

    1980-02-01

    Cefazolin (7 mg/kg) were administered to 11 children with renal insufficiency and to ten children on hemodialysis. The serum half-life of the drug was progressively prolonged as glomerular filtration rate fell. The serum half-life of cefazolin was variably prolonged in those children on hemodialysis, but their serum levels of cefaxolin had dropped by 35 to 65% during dialysis. Most had no measurable level prior to the next dialysis. Dosage recommendations are made for both groups of patients.

  20. Adrenal regeneration hypertension prevented by thyroidectomy: a quantitative ultrastructural study of the regenerating adrenal cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Conran, R. M.; Nickerson, P. A.

    1980-01-01

    Thyroparathyroidectomy (TPX) prevents adrenal regeneration hypertension (ARH) in female rats and concomitantly inhibits regeneration of the adrenal cortex. Removal of the thyroid gland plays the major role in preventing ARH inasmuch as parathyroidectomized adrenal-enucleated (PX-AE) rats became hypertensive, whereas thyroparathyroidectomized adrenal-enucleated rats (TPX-AE + PT) did not. Inhibition of adrenocortical regneration by TPX is reflected by a significant decrease in adrenal weight, volume of cortical parenchymal tissue per gland, and average cell volume at three weeks, compared with the regenerating adrenal gland in adrenal-enucleated thyroid-parathyroid-intact (AE) rats. Mitochondria in TPX-AE rats resembled closely those from zona fasciculata cells of a normal adrenal gland; stereologic techniques for electron microscopic examination confirmed that mitochondrial volume/cell and surface area of total mitochondrial membranes/cell (outer/inner membranes plus cristae) of adrenocortical cells from TPX-AE rats did not differ significantly from those of AE animals. The surface area of mitochondrial cristae of TPX-AE rats, however, was significantly greater than that of AE rats, whereas the surface area of the inner/outer mitochondrial membrane of the TPX-AE group was decreased significantly as compared with that of the AE group. The diameter of mitochondria in TPX-AE rats was larger than in the AE group, although the number of mitochondria/cell was significantly less in TPX-AE rats than in AE rats. Although TPX had no significant effect on the levels of DOC or corticosterone in the serum of quiescent AE rats as compared with TPX-AE rats, the rise in DOC in the serum after ether stress was blunted in the TPX-AE group as compared with that in the AE group. The rise in corticosterone in the TPX-AE group was comparable to that of the AE animals. Thus, partial inhibition of adrenal regeneration in TPX-AE rats in combination with a blunted rise in DOC levels in

  1. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia with cholestatic jaundice.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nisreen Feroz; Zafar, Farhana; Bangash, Areeb Sohail; Malik, Abdul; Mohammedi, Karimunnisa

    2014-01-01

    Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia describes a group of autosomal recessive disorders characterized by a decrease in Cortisol production. 11 beta hydroxylase deficiencies is the second most common form. However, its presentation with cholestatic jaundice is extremely rare. We present a case of a 29-day-old infant who came to us with unusual dark complexion, persistent jaundice, and electrolyte imbalance. On investigation he was diagnosed as a case of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Treatment with hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone cleared his jaundice and complexion with subsequent improvement in electrolytes. The aim of this report is to illustrate an unusual presentation of CAH with Cholestatic jaundice. This is the first case to be reported from Pakistan. The case outlines the difficult workup that was encountered in the diagnosis and management of the patient.

  2. Cushing syndrome associated with an adrenal tumour

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Helena; Brain, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Cushing syndrome (CS) in children is a rare disorder that is most frequently caused by an adrenal tumour or a pituitary corticotrophin-secreting adenoma. The management is challenging and requires an individualised approach and multidisciplinary care. We present the case of a 23-month-old female child with a history of excessive weight gain, growth failure, hirsutism, acne and behavioural difficulties. Investigations revealed elevated serum midnight cortisol and 24 h urinary free cortisol. Overnight dexamethasone suppression testing showed no suppression of cortisol levels. Abdominal imaging revealed a right-sided suprarenal mass. She underwent right adrenalectomy and the histology showed an adrenal cortical carcinoma. There was clinical improvement with catch-up growth and weight normalisation. Despite being rare in clinical practice, in a child with weight gain, hirsuitism and growth failure the diagnosis must be considered. The overall prognosis of CS in childhood is good, but challenges remain to ensure normal growth and body composition. PMID:22927284

  3. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    PubMed

    Feek, C M; Marante, D J; Edwards, C R

    1983-11-01

    Anterior pituitary corticotrophin cells secrete ACTH as part of a larger precursor molecule, pro-opiomelanocortin. Post-translational cleavage of this precursor yields three major peptides: ACTH, beta-LPH and N-POMC. Experiments both in vivo and in vitro suggest that N-POMC may act as a prohormone amplifier for ACTH-induced adrenal steroidogenesis and as regulator of adrenocortical cell growth. The secretion of POMC is under the control of CRF. These findings are discussed in relation to the pathophysiology of corticotrophinoma. The primary defect in this condition appears to reside at the level of the anterior pituitary cell and is readily amenable to treatment by trans-sphenoidal microsurgery. The estimation of plasma ACTH concentrations is proving useful in the monitoring of various clinical conditions including Addison's disease and congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

  4. Cushing syndrome associated with an adrenal tumour.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Helena; Brain, Caroline

    2012-08-27

    Cushing syndrome (CS) in children is a rare disorder that is most frequently caused by an adrenal tumour or a pituitary corticotrophin-secreting adenoma. The management is challenging and requires an individualised approach and multidisciplinary care. We present the case of a 23-month-old female child with a history of excessive weight gain, growth failure, hirsutism, acne and behavioural difficulties. Investigations revealed elevated serum midnight cortisol and 24 h urinary free cortisol. Overnight dexamethasone suppression testing showed no suppression of cortisol levels. Abdominal imaging revealed a right-sided suprarenal mass. She underwent right adrenalectomy and the histology showed an adrenal cortical carcinoma. There was clinical improvement with catch-up growth and weight normalisation. Despite being rare in clinical practice, in a child with weight gain, hirsuitism and growth failure the diagnosis must be considered. The overall prognosis of CS in childhood is good, but challenges remain to ensure normal growth and body composition.

  5. Functional ectopic adrenal carcinoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jim A; Lee, Maris S; Nicholson, Matthew E; Justin, Robert B

    2014-09-01

    An 11-year-old spayed female pit bull terrier was presented with a 2-month history of polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, and panting. Serum chemistry, blood and urine analysis, and tests for hyperadrenocorticism suggested an adrenal tumor. Abdominal ultrasound identified a mass caudal to the right kidney. The mass was completely excised and histopathology was consistent with endocrine carcinoma. Three years later there was no evidence of recurrence or metastasis.

  6. Chronic ethanol consumption depresses hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function in aged rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, C.J.; Bestervelt, L.L.; Mousigian, C.A.; Maimansomsuk, P.; Yong Cai; Piper, W.N. )

    1991-01-01

    In separate experiments, nine (n=20) and fifteen (n=12) month old rats were treated with either 6% ethanol or 12% sucrose in the drinking water to examine the effect of chronic ethanol consumption on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis of aged rats. Blood was collected and plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone were determined by radioimmunoassay. Adrenal glands were cleaned, quartered and used to test in vitro responsiveness to ACTH. Anterior pituitary glands from all 15 month old rats and one half of the nine month old rats were collected, frozen and extracted for measurement of tissue ACTH concentration. The remaining anterior pituitary glands from the nine month old rats were challenged with corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) to test in vitro responsiveness. In nine month old rats, chronic ethanol consumption decreased plasma ACTH and corticosterone. Pituitary ACTH concentrations were unchanged in treated nine month old rats, but the amount of pituitary ACTH released in response to CRH was decreased in rats consuming ethanol. In vitro responsiveness of the adrenal gland to ACTH in nine month old rats consuming ethanol was unchanged. Plasma ACTH and corticosterone concentrations were also decreased in 15 month old rats chronically consuming ethanol. No differences were noted in responsiveness of the adrenal gland or in the amount of pituitary ACTH due to ethanol consumptions in 15 month old rats.

  7. Unilateral adrenal tumor, erectile dysfunction and infertility in a patient with 21-hydroxylase deficiency: effects of glucocorticoid treatment and surgery.

    PubMed

    Scaroni, C; Favia, G; Lumachi, F; Opocher, G; Bonanni, G; Mantero, F; Armanini, D

    2003-02-01

    In untreated congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHDS) the presence of adrenal and testicular tumors had been described; however little is known about the effect of the enzymatic defect on fertility in males. We studied a male adult patient affected by 21OHDS for infertility, after a long period of discontinuation of glucocorticoid therapy and then during resumption of treatment and 8 months after monoadrenalectomy. The initial spermatic count revealed azoospermia and testicular needle aspiration showed a cytological picture consistent with prepuberty. The morphofunctional study revealed a right adrenal mass with reduced uptake at radioscan. Treatment was resumed with onset of impotency, which improved after reduction of the dose of glucocorticoids. The patient was monoadrenalectomised and his spermatic count increased. The patient shows that corticosteroid therapy in 21OHDS should be continued lifelong to avoid adrenal hyperplasia with possible areas of autonomy and to allow regular fertility. Impotence during treatment is probably due to a decrease of excessive adrenal androgens while testicular androgen production is still suppressed.

  8. [A Case of Synchronous Malignant Pheochromocytomas in Bilateral Adrenal Glands].

    PubMed

    Usui, Kimitsugu; Hirasawa, Terukazu; Kobayashi, Masataka; Shioi, Kouichi; Kobayashi, Kazuki; Sakai, Naoki; Noguchi, Sumio; Tsuura, Yukio

    2016-06-01

    We present a case of synchronous malignant pheochromocytoma in bilateral adrenal glands. A 73- year-old man presented to our hospital with bilateral adrenal masses incidentally found during abdominal ultrasonography examination for an unrelated issue. The patient had a 30-year history of hypertension and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed heterogeneous tumors in bilateral adrenal glands and an enlarged para-aortic lymph node. Hormonal examinations revealed a high value of urinary catecholamines. Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy showed increased uptake in bilateral adrenal glands and the lymph node. Both adrenal tumors and the node were surgically removed. Pathological examination revealed histologically distinct tissue between the two adrenal tumors. The patient received five cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy, consisting of cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and dacarbazine. The patient has been in remission for 32 months following surgical treatment.

  9. Adrenal Diagnostics: An Endocrinologist’s Perspective focused on Hyperaldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    The era of sophisticated high resolution imaging with the consequent identification of previously unrecognised adrenal masses (adrenal incidentalomas), has emphasised the need for an appropriate biochemical approach to define adrenal function. The focus of this testing is on catecholamines from the adrenal medulla (testing that has been rendered relatively straightforward by plasma metanephrine measurements) and the physiological corticosteroids, cortisol and aldosterone, synthesised by the adrenal cortex. The diagnosis of hypercortisolism remains a challenge and has been extensively reviewed. In the context of hypertension and an adrenal incidentaloma, the exclusion of hyperaldosteronism has an importance beyond simple blood pressure control. This review focuses on the recommended approaches to both the diagnosis of hyperaldosteronism and the characterisation of its aetiology. Monogenetic causes of mineralocorticoid hypertension are discussed as are recent developments with respect to both the molecular aetiology and the differential diagnosis of aldosterone-producing adenomas. PMID:24353356

  10. New PCOS-like phenotype in older infertile women of likely autoimmune adrenal etiology with high AMH but low androgens.

    PubMed

    Gleicher, Norbert; Kushnir, Vitaly A; Darmon, Sarah K; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Lin; Albertini, David F; Barad, David H

    2017-03-01

    How anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) and testosterone (T) interrelate in infertile women is currently largely unknown. We, therefore, in a retrospective cohort study investigated how infertile women with high-AMH (AMH ≥75th quantile; n=144) and with normal-AMH (25th-75th quantile; n=313), stratified for low-T (total testosterone ≤19.0ng/dL), normal-T (19.0-29.0ng/dL) and high-T (>29.0ng/dL) phenotypically behaved. Patient age, follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), dehyroepiandrosterone (DHEA), DHEA sulphate (DHEAS), cortisol (C), adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), IVF outcomes, as well as inflammatory and immune panels were then compared between groups, with AMH and T as variables. We identified a previously unknown infertile PCOS-like phenotype, characterized by high-AMH but, atypically, low-T, with predisposition toward autoimmunity. It presents with incompatible high-AMH and low-T (<19.0ng/dL), is restricted to lean PCOS-like patients, presenting delayed for tertiary fertility services. Since also characterized by low DHEAS, low-T is likely of adrenal origina, and consequence of autoimmune adrenal insufficiency since also accompanied by low-C and evidence of autoimmunity. DHEA supplementation in such patients equalizes low- to normal-T and normalizes IVF cycle outcomes. Once recognized, this high-AMH/low-T phenotype is surprisingly common in tertiary fertility centers but, currently, goes unrecognized. Its likely adrenal autoimmune etiology offers interesting new directions for investigations of adrenals control over ovarian function via adrenal androgen production.

  11. THE NUMBER OF CATECHOLAMINE STORAGE GRANULES IN ADRENAL MEDULLA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A method is described for counting the catecholamine-containing heavy granules of adrenal glands. There are 5.0 ! 0.8 (S. E.) x 10 to the 12th power... granules /gram wet weight of fowl adrenal gland. Individual heavy granules contain about 8 million molecules of catecholamines (1.4 x 10 to the 17th...power mole). Reference to published electron microphotographs of adrenal medulla cells allows estimation of the average volume of heavy granules and

  12. Adrenal incidentalomas: are they being worked up appropriately?

    PubMed Central

    Sahni, Pooja; Trivedi, Apoorva; Omer, Abdulkadir; Trivedi, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adrenal incidentalomas are defined as masses picked up on imaging studies that were done for apparently different reasons. With frequent use of imaging modalities, incidental adrenal masses are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Guidelines are currently available for the diagnosis and management of adrenal incidentalomas, but the appropriateness of initial work-up and subsequent follow-up of incidental adrenal masses in the community hospital setting is unknown. Objective We studied the appropriateness of initial work-up and follow-up of incidental adrenal masses discovered on abdominal computerized tomography (CT). Methods In our retrospective study, we reviewed sequential CT scans of the abdomen performed in the month of January 2010 at a community hospital. Once patients with one or more adrenal masses were identified, outpatient charts for initial biochemical testing and follow-up imaging were obtained either through directly accessing the electronic medical records or through contacting primary care physician's offices. Patient charts were reviewed to assess the data for the next 2 years following the discovery of an adrenal abnormality. Results Twenty adrenal masses were incidentally discovered on 723 abdominal CTs performed within the month of January 2010 resulting in an overall incidence of 2.76%. Of the patients with incidentally discovered adrenal masses, appropriate biochemical and follow-up imaging were only performed in patients referred to an endocrinologist (2 of 20 patients). Thirty percent of patients with incidental masses received a repeat CT scan for non-adrenal reasons, and no change in the mass size was noted. Conclusion Despite published guidelines, the initial work-up and follow-up of patients with an incidentally discovered adrenal mass is unsatisfactory. There is a desperate need for education of providers regarding appropriate work-up of incidental adrenal masses. PMID:27802863

  13. Positive iodine-131 6 beta-iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol (NP-59) adrenal images can precede return of adrenocortical function after o,p' DDD treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sparagana, M.; Ackerman, L.

    1988-05-01

    A patient with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia, due to the ectopic adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) syndrome, received a 3-month course of treatment with 1,1 dichloro-2(o-chlorophenyl)-2-(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (o,p' DDD), which caused adrenal hypofunction requiring steroid therapy. Eleven months later, Cushing's syndrome recurred. His CT scan showed a left adrenal gland that was enlarged and a normal-sized right adrenal gland. However, the NP-59 image showed increased uptake by both glands. Venous effluent was sampled from each adrenal vein. The plasma cortisol level from the left gland was 1392 ng/ml, and that from the right gland was 667 ng/ml. The latter value was not significantly different from the values obtained at peripheral sites (517-744 ng/ml). In the course of recovery from o,p' DDD damage, the ability of the adrenal gland to take up NP-59 may be restored before the return of its biosynthetic and secretory functions. Serial NP-59 adrenal images can anticipate the recurrence of Cushing's syndrome after adrenolytic therapy, thereby permitting early retreatment.

  14. Isolated adrenal masses in nonsmall-cell bronchogenic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, T.W. Jr.; Bernardino, M.E.; Miller, J.I.; Mansour, K.; Greene, D.; Davis, W.A.

    1984-10-01

    Computed tomography has become an important diagnostic modality in the preoperative staging of patients with bronchogenic carcinoma. The adrenal glands represent one of the most frequent sites of metastasis. Therefore, an isolated adrenal mass discovered on preoperative thoracoabdominal CT poses a diagnostic problem. Three hundred thirty patients with histologically proved nonsmall-cell bronchogenic carcinoma were evaluated. Thirty-two had adrenal masses without further evidence of disease in the abdomen, Eight of these 32 masses were metastases, 17 were proved adenomas, and 7 did not undergo biopsy. Thus an isolated adrenal mass is more likely benign than metastatic, and biopsy is advocated prior to withholding potentially curative surgery.

  15. [Morphometry in Development of Red Deer's Adrenal Glands].

    PubMed

    Ovcharenko, N D; Gribanova, O G; Bondyreva, L A

    2015-01-01

    Histological structures and morphometric and some histochemical indicators of elk's adrenal gland development as subspecies of red deer in prenatal and postnatal ontogenies stages was studied. It was found that the growth of the fetus adrenal glands weight and the thickness of the structures adrenal glands fragments continue throughout the prenatal period of ontogeny. The cells of androgenic zone with single wandering sympathogoniae are differentiated in the adrenal glands in the second month of development. The androgenic and definite zone and the adrenal medulla are differentiated by the third month of development. At the 4 months, adrenal gland cortex zona glomerulosa and zona fasciculate-reticularis are differentiated; zona reticularis is differentiated only by the seventh month. By the eighth month, the structure of adrenal glands corresponds to the adrenal glands of a newborn. Full structural formation of the adrenal glands takes place in young animals by age 1.5. Obvious structural changes were not found late in the postnatal stages of development.

  16. Partial adrenalectomy in patients with multiple adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Pavlovich, C P; Linehan, W M; Walther, M M

    2001-02-01

    Most adrenal tumors are found incidentally and appear as small solitary nodules on abdominal imaging. Occasionally, work-up demonstrates multifocal or bilateral adrenal tumors. Certain patients are predisposed to multiple lesions, such as those with hereditary forms of pheochromocytoma as seen in von Hippel-Lindau disease, multiple endocrine neoplasia type II, and von Recklinghausen's disease. Partial rather than total adrenalectomy should be considered for these patients in an attempt to preserve endogenous adrenocortical function. Partial adrenalectomy has also been used to resect other types of adrenal tumors, especially in patients with a solitary adrenal gland. A discussion of the indications for partial adrenalectomy and of the surgical technique follows.

  17. Adrenal-preserving minimally invasive surgery: the role of laparoscopic partial adrenalectomy, cryosurgery, and radiofrequency ablation of the adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Munver, Ravi; Del Pizzo, Joseph J; Sosa, R Ernest

    2003-02-01

    Adrenalectomy has become the standard of care for the management of hormonally active adrenal masses. Various surgical therapies have been proposed to excise completely or destroy these adrenal lesions, which may be benign or malignant. New minimally invasive, adrenal-sparing procedures have recently been introduced, among them laparoscopic partial adrenalectomy, cryosurgery, and radiofrequency ablation. These procedures focus on reducing patient morbidity and hastening postoperative recovery while preserving normal adrenal tissue. However, questions remain about the risks and benefits associated with routine application of minimally invasive therapies for adrenal-sparing surgery in terms of complete tumor extirpation. Clearly, more experience and longer follow-up is necessary to validate these procedures. Herein we describe the surgical techniques and early results of treatment with adrenal-sparing surgery.

  18. Clinical study on the influence of motion and other factors on stereotactic radiotherapy in the treatment of adrenal gland tumor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingsheng; Li, Fengtong; Dong, Yang; Song, Yongchun; Yuan, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the adrenal tumor motion law and influence factors in the treatment of adrenal gland tumor and provide a reference value basis for determining the planning target volume margins for therapy. Materials and methods The subjects considered in this study were 38 adrenal tumor patients treated with CyberKnife with the placement of 45 gold fiducials. Fiducials were implanted into each adrenal tumor using β-ultrasonic guidance. Motion amplitudes of gold fiducials were measured with a Philips SLS simulator and motion data in the left–right, anterior–posterior, and cranio–caudal directions were obtained. Multiple linear regression models were used to analyze influencing factors. t-Test was used for motion amplitude comparison of different tumor locations along the z-axis. Results The motion distances were 0.1–0.4 cm (0.27±0.07 cm), 0.1–0.5 cm (0.31±0.11 cm), and 0.5–1.2 cm (0.87±0.21 cm) along the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively. Motion amplitude along the z-axis may be affected by tumor location, but movement along the other axes was not affected by age, height, body mass, location, and size. Conclusion The maximum motion distance was along the z-axis. Therefore, this should be the main consideration when defining the planning target volume safety margin. Due to the proximity of the liver, adrenal gland tumor motion amplitude was smaller on the right than the left. This study analyzed adrenal tumor motion amplitude data to evaluate how motion and other factors influence the treatment of adrenal tumor with a goal of providing a reference for stereotactic radiotherapy boundary determination. PMID:27486331

  19. Health Alert: Adrenal Crisis Causes Death in Some People Who Were Treated with hGH

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Resource List Health Alert: Adrenal Crisis Causes Death in Some People Who Were Treated with hGH ... People lacking this hormone are at risk of death from adrenal crisis, but adrenal crisis can be ...

  20. Genetics of Cleft Palate and Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Walter M.; Lanier, Steve T.; Purnell, Chad A.; Gosain, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    Velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) can occur in the setting of an unrepaired or repaired cleft lip and palate. The rate of VPI has been documented as high as 33% in some studies with higher rates of recurrences following surgery associated with genetic syndromes such as 22q11.2 deletions. The primary cause of VPI in these groups is still identified as the anatomic abnormalities of the velum. In this review, the anatomy and physiology of the velum are discussed along with genetic mutations associated with VPI. PMID:27617110

  1. Normal adrenal function in an infant following a pregnancy complicated by maternal adrenal cortical carcinoma and mitotane exposure.

    PubMed

    Kojori, Fatemeh; Cronin, Catherine M G; Salamon, Elizabeth; Burym, Craig; Sellers, Elizabeth Ann Cameron

    2011-01-01

    Maternal adrenal cortical carcinoma in pregnancy is rare. We report a case of an infant born to a mother with a history of adrenal cortical carcinoma. The pregnancy was complicated by fetal exposure to mitotane and dexamethasone. Despite the potential teratogenic exposures, there was no evidence of adrenal dysfunction in the infant. Growth and development at 12 months of age are normal and prognosis appears favorable. The long-term impact of fetal exposure to mitotane and glucocorticoid requires further investigation.

  2. Reliability of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis assessment methods for use in population-based studies

    PubMed Central

    Wand, Gary S.; Malhotra, Saurabh; Kamel, Ihab; Horton, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Population-based studies have been hampered in exploring hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis (HPA) activity as a potential explanatory link between stress-related and metabolic disorders due to their lack of incorporation of reliable measures of chronic cortisol exposure. The purpose of this review is to summarize current literature on the reliability of HPA axis measures and to discuss the feasibility of performing them in population-based studies. We identified articles through PubMed using search terms related to cortisol, HPA axis, adrenal imaging, and reliability. The diurnal salivary cortisol curve (generated from multiple salivary samples from awakening to midnight) and 11 p.m. salivary cortisol had the highest between-visit reliabilities (r = 0.63–0.84 and 0.78, respectively). The cortisol awakening response and dexamethasone-suppressed cortisol had the next highest between-visit reliabilities (r = 0.33–0.67 and 0.42–0.66, respectively). Based on our own data, the inter-reader reliability (rs) of adrenal gland volume from non-contrast CT was 0.67–0.71 for the left and 0.47–0.70 for the right adrenal glands. While a single 8 a.m. salivary cortisol is one of the easiest measures to perform, it had the lowest between-visit reliability (R = 0.18–0.47). Based on the current literature, use of sampling multiple salivary cortisol measures across the diurnal curve (with awakening cortisol), dexamethasone-suppressed cortisol, and adrenal gland volume are measures of HPA axis tone with similar between-visit reliabilities which likely reflect chronic cortisol burden and are feasible to perform in population-based studies. PMID:21533585

  3. Homozygous disruption of P450 side-chain cleavage (CYP11A1) is associated with prematurity, complete 46,XY sex reversal, and severe adrenal failure.

    PubMed

    Hiort, Olaf; Holterhus, Paul-Martin; Werner, Ralf; Marschke, Christine; Hoppe, Ute; Partsch, Carl-Joachim; Riepe, Felix G; Achermann, John C; Struve, Dagmar

    2005-01-01

    Disruption of the P450 side-chain cleavage cytochrome (P450scc) enzyme due to deleterious mutations of the CYP11A1 gene is thought to be incompatible with fetal survival because of impaired progesterone production by the fetoplacental unit. We present a 46,XY patient with a homozygous disruption of CYP11A1. The child was born prematurely with complete sex reversal and severe adrenal insufficiency. Laboratory data showed diminished or absent steroidogenesis in all pathways. Molecular genetic analysis of the CYP11A1 gene revealed a homozygous single nucleotide deletion leading to a premature termination at codon position 288. This mutation will delete highly conserved regions of the P450scc enzyme and thus is predicted to lead to a nonfunctional protein. Both healthy parents were heterozygous for this mutation. Our report demonstrates that severe disruption of P450scc can be compatible with survival in rare instances. Furthermore, defects in this enzyme are inherited in an autosomal-recessive fashion, and heterozygote carriers can be healthy and fertile. The possibility of P450scc-independent pathways of steroid synthesis in addition to the current concept of luteoplacental shift of progesterone synthesis in humans has to be questioned.

  4. Varicose veins and chronic venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Partsch, H

    2009-11-01

    Varicose veins are a very frequent disorder with prevalence in our adult population between 14% for large varices and 59% for small teleangiectasias. Subjective symptoms may be very non-specific. The term "chronic venous insufficiency (CVI)" defines functional abnormalities of the venous system producing advanced symptoms like oedema, skin changes or leg ulcers. Both entities, varicose veins and CVI, may be summarized under the term "chronic venous disorders" which includes the full spectrum of morphological and functional abnormalities of the venous system. A classification system to describe chronic venous disorders regarding clinical appearance, etiology, anatomical distribution and pathophysiology has been proposed under the acronym of CEAP. The revised version of the CEAP classification contains also definitions of clinical signs and suggests three levels of apparative investigations adjusted to the clinical stage. Concerning the etiology of venous disorders controversial theories exist leading to different therapeutic concepts. As a matter of fact there is a vicious circle between structural changes in valves and venous wall and hemodynamic forces leading to reflux and venous hypertension. Different methods for treating varicose veins are available producing satisfactory early outcome in most cases, but followed by a high recurrence rate after years. Chronic venous insufficiency requires "chronic management". Compression therapy by bandages for initial treatment of severe stages and maintenance therapy using medical compression stockings is essential. In addition correction of venous refluxes by surgery or endovenous procedures including echo-guided foam sclerotherapy should be considered in every single case.

  5. Adrenal clocks and the role of adrenal hormones in the regulation of circadian physiology.

    PubMed

    Leliavski, Alexei; Dumbell, Rebecca; Ott, Volker; Oster, Henrik

    2015-02-01

    The mammalian circadian timing system consists of a master pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and subordinate clocks that disseminate time information to various central and peripheral tissues. While the function of the SCN in circadian rhythm regulation has been extensively studied, we still have limited understanding of how peripheral tissue clock function contributes to the regulation of physiological processes. The adrenal gland plays a special role in this context as adrenal hormones show strong circadian secretion rhythms affecting downstream physiological processes. At the same time, they have been shown to affect clock gene expression in various other tissues, thus mediating systemic entrainment to external zeitgebers and promoting internal circadian alignment. In this review, we discuss the function of circadian clocks in the adrenal gland, how they are reset by the SCN and may further relay time-of-day information to other tissues. Focusing on glucocorticoids, we conclude by outlining the impact of adrenal rhythm disruption on neuropsychiatric, metabolic, immune, and malignant disorders.

  6. Long-term Results after CT-Guided Percutaneous Ethanol Ablation for the Treatment of Hyperfunctioning Adrenal Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Frenk, Nathan Elie; Sebastianes, Fernando; Lerario, Antonio Marcondes; Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson Villares; Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho; de Menezes, Marcos Roberto

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the safety and long-term efficacy of computed tomography-guided percutaneous ethanol ablation for benign primary and secondary hyperfunctioning adrenal disorders. METHOD: We retrospectively evaluated the long-term results of nine patients treated with computed tomography-guided percutaneous ethanol ablation: eight subjects who presented with primary adrenal disorders, such as pheochromocytoma, primary macronodular adrenal hyperplasia and aldosterone-producing adenoma, and one subject with Cushing disease refractory to conventional treatment. Eleven sessions were performed for the nine patients. The patient data were reviewed for the clinical outcome and procedure-related complications over ten years. RESULTS: Patients with aldosterone-producing adenoma had clinical improvement: symptoms recurred in one case 96 months after ethanol ablation, and the other patient was still in remission 110 months later. All patients with pheochromocytoma had clinical improvement but were eventually submitted to surgery for complete remission. No significant clinical improvement was seen in patients with hypercortisolism due to primary macronodular adrenal hyperplasia or Cushing disease. Major complications were seen in five of the eleven procedures and included cardiovascular instability and myocardial infarction. Minor complications attributed to sedation were seen in two patients. CONCLUSION: Computed tomography-guided ethanol ablation does not appear to be suitable for the long-term treatment of hyperfunctioning adrenal disorders and is not without risks. PMID:27759849

  7. Secretion of Catecholamines from Adrenal Gland by a Single Electrical Shock: Electrotonic Depolarization of Medullary Cell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakade, Arun R.; Wakade, Taruna D.

    1982-05-01

    Transmural stimulation of the isolated adrenal gland of the rat and guinea pig results in secretion of catecholamines. The secretion is due to activation of cholinergic receptors of the adrenal medulla by acetylcholine released from splanchnic nerve terminals after transmural stimulation. Our aim was to see whether the same experimental technique could be used to directly excite the adrenal medullary cell membrane by electrical stimulation and whether such stimulation would result in secretion of catecholamines. We demonstrate here that a single electrical shock to the perfused adrenal gland of the rat results in massive secretion of epinephrine and norepinephrine. The secretion is directly related to the strength and duration of the applied stimulus over a wide range. Catecholamine secretion is unaffected by tetrodotoxin or hexamethonium/atropine but is abolished by Ca2+ lack or 3 mM Mn2+. We suggest that the adrenal medullary membrane undergoes nonpropagated electrotonic depolarization on electrical stimulation and thereby voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels are opened to initiate secretion.

  8. Development and Function of the Human Fetal Adrenal Cortex: A Key Component in the Feto-Placental Unit

    PubMed Central

    Ishimoto, Hitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Continuous efforts have been devoted to unraveling the biophysiology and development of the human fetal adrenal cortex, which is structurally and functionally unique from other species. It plays a pivotal role, mainly through steroidogenesis, in the regulation of intrauterine homeostasis and in fetal development and maturation. The steroidogenic activity is characterized by early transient cortisol biosynthesis, followed by its suppressed synthesis until late gestation, and extensive production of dehydroepiandrosterone and its sulfate, precursors of placental estrogen, during most of gestation. The gland rapidly grows through processes including cell proliferation and angiogenesis at the gland periphery, cellular migration, hypertrophy, and apoptosis. Recent studies employing modern technologies such as gene expression profiling and laser capture microdissection have revealed that development and/or function of the fetal adrenal cortex may be regulated by a panoply of molecules, including transcription factors, extracellular matrix components, locally produced growth factors, and placenta-derived CRH, in addition to the primary regulator, fetal pituitary ACTH. The role of the fetal adrenal cortex in human pregnancy and parturition appears highly complex, probably due to redundant and compensatory mechanisms regulating these events. Mounting evidence indicates that actions of hormones operating in the human feto-placental unit are likely mediated by mechanisms including target tissue responsiveness, local metabolism, and bioavailability, rather than changes only in circulating levels. Comprehensive study of such molecular mechanisms and the newly identified factors implicated in adrenal development should help crystallize our understanding of the development and physiology of the human fetal adrenal cortex. PMID:21051591

  9. Stability analysis of a hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis model with inclusion of glucocorticoid receptor and memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaslik, Eva; Navolan, Dan Bogdan; Neamţu, Mihaela

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyzes a four-dimensional model of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis that includes the influence of the glucocorticoid receptor in the pituitary. Due to the spatial separation between the hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal glands, distributed time delays are introduced in the mathematical model. The existence of the positive equilibrium point is proved and a local stability and bifurcation analysis is provided, considering several types of delay kernels. The fractional-order model with discrete time delays is also taken into account. Numerical simulations are provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical findings.

  10. Laparoscopic adrenal-sparing surgery: personal experience, review on technical aspects.

    PubMed

    Cavallaro, Giuseppe; Letizia, Claudio; Polistena, Andrea; De Toma, Giorgio

    2011-03-01

    Partial adrenalectomy is usually performed for the treatment of bilateral pheochromocytomas and in case of sporadic, monolateral tumors, to minimize the risk of adrenal failure, especially in younger patients. Due to the lack of consistent series, many issues such as correct surgical indications and technical aspects still need to be debated. From 2007 to 2010 we performed four unilateral partial adrenalectomies (3 aldosterone-producing adenomas and 1 cortisol-producing adenoma), and three bilateral subtotal adrenalectomies, consisting in total adrenalectomy on one side and partial adrenalectomy on the contralateral gland (3 bilateral pheochromocytomas in MEN IIa). In case of single tumor, partial adrenalectomy was carried out without adrenal vein ligation and the results were similar to total adrenalectomy both in terms of surgical and functional outcome, with normalization of hormone levels and control of hypertension. Operating time and postoperative stay were not significantly different from unilateral total adrenalectomy. In case of bilateral subtotal adrenalectomy our results demonstrate effectiveness in terms of surgical outcome and control of hypertension, but one patient needed steroid replacement therapy due to post-operative adrenocortical failure. Care must be taken when giving indication to adrenal sparing surgery, because this procedure can be technically difficult, and due to the risk of recurrence, especially in case of bilateral tumors, it can affect both surgical and functional outcomes.

  11. Apparent diffusion coefficient of normal adrenal glands*

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias, Paula Condé Lamparelli; Leite, Andrea Farias de Melo; de Oliveira, Tatiane Mendes Gonçalves; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Elias Junior, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility and reliability of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements of normal adrenal glands. Materials and methods This was a retrospective study involving 32 healthy subjects, divided into two groups: prepubertal (PreP, n = 12), aged from 2 months to 12.5 years (4 males; 8 females); and postpubertal (PostP, n = 20), aged from 11.9 to 61 years (5 males; 15 females). Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) sequences were acquired at a 1.5 T scanner using b values of 0, 20, 500, and 1000 s/mm2. Two radiologists evaluated the images. ADC values were measured pixel-by-pixel on DW-MRI scans, and automatic co-registration with the ADC map was obtained. Results Mean ADC values for the right adrenal glands were 1.44 × 10-3 mm2/s for the PreP group and 1.23 × 10-3 mm2/s for the PostP group, whereas they were 1.58 × 10-3 mm2/s and 1.32 × 10-3 mm2/s, respectively, for the left glands. ADC values were higher in the PreP group than in the PostP group (p < 0.05). Agreement between readers was almost perfect (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.84-0.94; p < 0.05). Conclusion Our results demonstrate the feasibility and reliability of performing DW-MRI measurements of normal adrenal glands. They could also support the feasibility of ADC measurements of small structures. PMID:28057963

  12. Spontaneous Massive Adrenal Hemorrhage: A Management Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anshuman

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adrenal hemorrhage (AH) is a rare but life-threatening condition. Small focal hemorrhage may present subclinically, but massive hemorrhage may lead to rapid cardiovascular collapse and ultimately death if not diagnosed appropriately and treated quickly. Most cases reported in the literature have been treated conservatively. In an event of increasing hemorrhage during conservative management, it may be tricky to intervene surgically because of the hematoma around the gland. Here we describe a case where we managed a large spontaneous AH by a combination of angioembolization and laparoscopic adrenalectomy. PMID:27579389

  13. Serotonin involvement in pituitary-adrenal function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Kellar, K. J.; Kent, D.; Gonzales, C.; Berger, P. A.; Barchas, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments clarifying the effects of serotonin (5-HT) in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system are surveyed. Lesion experiments which seek to determine functional maps of serotonergic input to areas involved in regulation are reported. Investigations of the effects of 5-HT levels on the plasma ACTH response to stress and the diurnal variation in basal plasma corticosterone are summarized, and the question of whether serotonergic transmission is involved in the regulation of all aspects of pituitary-adrenal function is considered with attention to the stimulatory and inhibitory action of 5-HT.

  14. A Case of Adrenal Lymphangiectatic Cyst Associated with Severe Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ha Young; Lee, Jun Ho; Lee, Hye Ran; Choi, Chan Ok; Park, Jang Pil; Jin, Tae Sun; Lee, Sung Yoon

    1990-01-01

    Adrenal lymphangiectatic cyst is a very rare pathological and clinical disease entity, and its clinical silence and lack of characteristic symptoms and signs makes it difficult to diagnose preoperatively. We experienced a case of adrenal lymphangiectatic cyst, accompanied by severe refractory hypertension, which was corrected by surgical removal of the cyst. We reprot it with a review of the literature. PMID:2098094

  15. Bilateral Cystic Adrenal Neuroblastoma with Cystic Liver metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Mine; Kalyoncu, Ayse Ucar; Habibi, Hatice Arioz; Ozdemir, Gul Nihal; Koc, Basak; Adaletli, Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    Bilateral congenital cystic adrenal neuroblastoma (NB) with cystic liver metastasis is a very rare condition and only few cases have been reported in the literature. Herein we report a case of a congenital bilateral cystic adrenal NB with cystic liver metastasis and briefly discuss characteristic imaging features of cystic NB. PMID:28163998

  16. Embryological and molecular development of the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Ross, Ian L; Louw, Graham J

    2015-03-01

    In this mini review, the embryological and functional development of the adrenal glands is presented from a molecular perspective. While acknowledging that this is a highly complex series of events, the processes are described in simple and broad strokes in a single text for the reader who is interested in this field but is not an active researcher. The origin of the adrenal glands is in the mesodermal ridge as early as the fourth week of gestation. Between the eighth and ninth weeks of gestation, the adrenal glands are encapsulated and this results in the presence of a distinct organ. There have been great strides in deciphering the very complicated molecular aspects of adrenal gland development in which multiple transcription factors have been identified, directing the adrenogonadal primordium into the adrenal cortex, kidney, or bipotential gonad. Adrenocorticotrophic hormone is critical for early development of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis. Several mutations in transcription factors, responsible for normal adrenal gland development have been found to induce the familial syndrome of congenital adrenal hypoplasia or neoplasia.

  17. Adrenal incidentaloma in thalassemia: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Gamberini, Maria Rita; Prandini, Napoleone; Chiodi, Elisabetta; Farneti, Carlotta; Garani, Maria Chiara

    2011-03-01

    In the last 30 years the development and widespread use of modern imaging techniques has caused a 20-time increase in the diagnosis of adrenal incidentaloma (AI). Among AIs myelolipoma (ML) is reported with a frequency up to 10%. In the literature 8 patients with adrenal masses in thalassaemia or chronic haemolytic anaemia have been reported: five cases were shown to have extramedullary haematopoiesis (EH) and 3 ML. We describe here a case of an adult male affected by beta thalassaemia intermedia and large bilateral lipomatous adrenal masses. The patient was referred to our ward at the age of 55 and underwent hormonal testing, MRI, and SPECT/CT scans. Adrenal masses were hormonally inactive, and fat-containing on MRI and CT scans. SPECT/CT examination with 99mTccolloid demonstrated the presence of marrow tissue. ML and EH are the only two tumours with marrow tissue among lipomatous adrenal masses. In our patient a brown nodular mass was resected and histologically classified as ML. In benign adrenal masses, radiological follow-up is indicated; in case of large bilateral masses adrenal function tests are suggested periodically in order to detect possible adrenal hypofunction.

  18. Incidence and Cause of Hypertension During Adrenal Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakado, Koichiro Takaki, Haruyuki; Yamada, Tomomi; Yamanaka, Takashi; Uraki, Junji; Kashima, Masataka; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Takeda, Kan

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and cause of hypertension prospectively during adrenal radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods: For this study, approved by our institutional review board, written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients who received RFA for adrenal tumors (adrenal ablation) and other abdominal tumors (nonadrenal ablation) were included in this prospective study. Blood pressure was monitored during RFA. Serum adrenal hormone levels including epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, and cortisol levels were measured before and during RFA. The respective incidences of procedural hypertension (systolic blood pressure >200 mmHg) of the two patient groups were compared. Factors correlating with procedural systolic blood pressure were evaluated by regression analysis.ResultsNine patients underwent adrenal RFA and another 9 patients liver (n = 5) and renal (n = 4) RFA. Asymptomatic procedural hypertension that returned to the baseline by injecting calcium blocker was found in 7 (38.9%) of 18 patients. The incidence of procedural hypertension was significantly higher in the adrenal ablation group (66.7%, 6/9) than in the nonadrenal ablation group (11.1%, 1/9, P < 0.0498). Procedural systolic blood pressure was significantly correlated with serum epinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.68, P < 0.0001) and norepinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.72, P < 0.0001) levels during RFA. The other adrenal hormones did not show correlation with procedural systolic blood pressure. Conclusion: Hypertension occurs frequently during adrenal RFA because of the release of catecholamine.

  19. Adrenal hemorrhage complicating ACTH therapy in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Levin, T L; Morton, E

    1993-01-01

    Huge dose ACTH therapy is used in some severely ill patients with inflammatory bowel disease. We report a teenage girl with Crohn's disease who developed an acute abdomen following ACTH therapy. CT revealed the mass to be a hemorrhagic adrenal gland; the opposite adrenal gland was hypertrophied but without signs of hemorrhage.

  20. Is There Such a Thing as Adrenal Fatigue?

    MedlinePlus

    ... it? Is there such a thing as adrenal fatigue? Answers from Todd B. Nippoldt, M.D. Adrenal fatigue is a term applied to a collection of nonspecific symptoms, such as body aches, fatigue, nervousness, sleep disturbances and digestive problems. The term ...

  1. 29 CFR 541.2 - Job titles insufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Job titles insufficient. 541.2 Section 541.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS DEFINING AND... General Regulations § 541.2 Job titles insufficient. A job title alone is insufficient to establish...

  2. 29 CFR 541.2 - Job titles insufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Job titles insufficient. 541.2 Section 541.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS DEFINING AND... General Regulations § 541.2 Job titles insufficient. A job title alone is insufficient to establish...

  3. 29 CFR 541.2 - Job titles insufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Job titles insufficient. 541.2 Section 541.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS DEFINING AND... General Regulations § 541.2 Job titles insufficient. A job title alone is insufficient to establish...

  4. 29 CFR 541.2 - Job titles insufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Job titles insufficient. 541.2 Section 541.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS DEFINING AND... General Regulations § 541.2 Job titles insufficient. A job title alone is insufficient to establish...

  5. 29 CFR 541.2 - Job titles insufficient.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Job titles insufficient. 541.2 Section 541.2 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS DEFINING AND... General Regulations § 541.2 Job titles insufficient. A job title alone is insufficient to establish...

  6. Calcaneal Insufficiency Fracture after Ipsilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Min; Shin, Sung Jin; Kang, Byoung Youl

    2016-01-01

    Insufficiency fracture of the calcaneus is a rare entity. In the absence of trauma, evaluating a painful ankle in an elderly patient can be difficult and also it might be overlook the insufficiency fracture. We experienced a case of insufficiency calcaneus fracture that occurred after ipsilateral total knee arthroplasty. Here, we report our case with a review of literatures. PMID:26981521

  7. Primary hyperaldosteronism: comparison of CT, adrenal venography, and venous sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Geisinger, M.A.; Zelch, M.G.; Bravo, E.L.; Risius, B.F.; O'Donovan, P.B.; Borkowski, G.P.

    1983-08-01

    Twenty-nine patients with primary hyperaldosteronism were evaluated with computed tomography (CT), adrenal venous sampling, and adrenal venography. Twenty-three patients had aldosteronomas and six had bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia. Sixteen (70%) of the adenomas were accurately located by CT. All nodules of 1.5 cm or larger diameter and 50% of nodules 1.0 to 1.4 cm in diameter were demonstrated. Nodules of less than 1.0 cm in diameter generally were not detected. High-resolution CT appeared more sensitive than standard CT (75% vs 58%). Adrenal venous sampling for aldosterone assay was the most sensitive of the three methods, localizing 22 (96%) of the 23 adenomas. Eighteen (78%) of the adenomas were identified by adrenal venography, although two patients with bilateral cortical hyperplasia were mistakenly diagnosed as having a small adenoma. No such false-positive studies were encountered with CT or adrenal venous sampling.

  8. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for metastasis to the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Kevin; Song, Andrew; Teh, Bin S; Ellis, Rodney J; Yao, Min; Mayr, Nina A; Huang, Zhibin; Sohn, Jason; Machtay, Mitchell; Lo, Simon S

    2012-12-01

    Many primary cancers can metastasize to the adrenal glands. Adrenalectomy via an open or laparoscopic approach is the current definitive treatment, but not all patients are eligible or wish to undergo surgery. There are only limited studies on the use of conventional radiation therapy for palliation of symptoms from adrenal metastasis. However, the advent of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) - also named stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for primary lung cancer, metastases to the lung, and metastases to the liver - have prompted some investigators to consider the use of SBRT for metastases to the adrenal glands. This review focuses on the emerging data on SBRT of metastasis to the adrenal glands, while also providing a brief discussion of the overall management of adrenal metastasis.

  9. Neural control of adrenal medullary and cortical blood flow during hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Breslow, M.J.; Jordan, D.A.; Thellman, S.T.; Traystman, R.J.

    1987-03-01

    Hemorrhagic hypotension produces an increase in adrenal medullary blood flow and a decrease in adrenal cortical blood flow. To determine whether changes in adrenal blood flow during hemorrhage are neurally mediated, the authors compared blood flow responses following adrenal denervation (splanchnic nerve section) with changes in the contralateral, neurally intact adrenal. Carbonized microspheres labeled with /sup 153/Gd, /sup 114/In, /sup 113/Sn, /sup 103/Ru, /sup 95/Nb or /sup 46/Se were used. Blood pressure was reduced and maintained at 60 mmHg for 25 min by hemorrhage into a pressurized bottle system. Adrenal cortical blood flow decreased to 50% of control with hemorrhage in both the intact and denervated adrenal. Adrenal medullary blood flow increased to four times control levels at 15 and 25 min posthemorrhage in the intact adrenal, but was reduced to 50% of control at 3, 5, and 10 min posthemorrhage in the denervated adrenal. In a separate group of dogs, the greater splanchnic nerve on one side was electrically stimulated at 2, 5, or 15 Hz for 40 min. Adrenal medullary blood flow increased 5- to 10-fold in the stimulated adrenal but was unchanged in the contralateral, nonstimulated adrenal. Adrenal cortical blood flow was not affected by nerve stimulation. They conclude that activity of the splanchnic nerve profoundly affects adrenal medullary vessels but not adrenal cortical vessels and mediates the observed increase in adrenal medullary blood flow during hemorrhagic hypotension.

  10. Ultrasonographic measurements of adrenal glands in cats with hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Combes, Anaïs; Vandermeulen, Eva; Duchateau, Luc; Peremans, Kathelijne; Daminet, Sylvie; Saunders, Jimmy

    2012-01-01

    Feline hyperthyroidism is potentially associated with exaggerated responsiveness of the adrenal gland cortex. The adrenal glands of 23 hyperthyroid cats were examined ultrasonographically and compared to the adrenal glands of 30 control cats. Ten hyperthyroid cats had received antithyroid drugs until 2 weeks before sonography, the other 13 were untreated. There was no difference in adrenal gland shape between healthy and hyperthyroid cats: bean-shaped, well-defined, hypoechoic structures surrounded by a hyperechoic halo in 43/60 (71.6%) healthy cats and 34/46 (73.9%) hyperthyroid cats; more ovoid in 13/60 (21.6%) healthy cats and 9/46 (19.6%) hyperthyroid cats while more elongated in 4/60 (6.7%) healthy cats, 3/46 (6.5%) hyperthyroid cats. Hyperechoic foci were present in 9/23 (39.1%) hyperthyroid cats and 2/30 (6.7%) healthy cats. The adrenal glands were significantly larger in hyperthyroid cats, although there was overlap in size range. The mean difference between hyperthyroid cats and healthy cats was 1.6 and 1.7 mm in left and right adrenal gland length, 0.8 and 0.9 mm in left and right cranial adrenal gland height, and 0.4 and 0.9 mm in left and right caudal adrenal gland height. There was no significant difference between the adrenal gland measurements in treated and untreated hyperthyroid cats. The adrenomegaly was most likely associated with the hypersecretion of the adrenal cortex documented in hyperthyroid cats. Hyperthyroidism should be an alternative to hyperadrenocorticism, hyperaldosteronism, and acromegaly in cats with bilateral moderate adrenomegaly.

  11. Adrenal G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 in regulation of sympathetic nervous system activity in heart failure.

    PubMed

    McCrink, Katie A; Brill, Ava; Lymperopoulos, Anastasios

    2015-09-26

    Heart failure (HF), the number one cause of death in the western world, is caused by the insufficient performance of the heart leading to tissue underperfusion in response to an injury or insult. It comprises complex interactions between important neurohormonal mechanisms that try but ultimately fail to sustain cardiac output. The most prominent such mechanism is the sympathetic (adrenergic) nervous system (SNS), whose activity and outflow are greatly elevated in HF. SNS hyperactivity confers significant toxicity to the failing heart and markedly increases HF morbidity and mortality via excessive activation of adrenergic receptors, which are G protein-coupled receptors. Thus, ligand binding induces their coupling to heterotrimeric G proteins that transduce intracellular signals. G protein signaling is turned-off by the agonist-bound receptor phosphorylation courtesy of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), followed by βarrestin binding, which prevents the GRK-phosphorylated receptor from further interaction with the G proteins and simultaneously leads it inside the cell (receptor sequestration). Recent evidence indicates that adrenal GRK2 and βarrestins can regulate adrenal catecholamine secretion, thereby modulating SNS activity in HF. The present review gives an account of all these studies on adrenal GRKs and βarrestins in HF and discusses the exciting new therapeutic possibilities for chronic HF offered by targeting these proteins pharmacologically.

  12. Adrenal cortical carcinoma with tumor thrombus extension into the right atrium: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YIMIN; ZHOU, FENG; PAN, HAO; JIN, BAIYE

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare aggressive malignant tumor associated with a poor prognosis. Patients with ACC usually present with abnormal hormone secretion, tumor growth or encroachment on the surrounding viscera. An early diagnosis of ACC is considered challenging. The present study reports a case of ACC with tumor thrombus extension into the inferior vena cava and right atrium. A 33-year-old male patient exhibited symptoms of gynecomastia and abdominal distention, which were due to the abnormal hormone secretion levels and to the presence of a large mass in the right adrenal gland. An en bloc resection of the tumor was the selected treatment option. Extirpation of the tumor thrombus was performed by means of extracorporeal circulation. No signs of metastasis or recurrence were identified at the 1-month follow-up. PMID:27313728

  13. Chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, A; Comi, G; Federico, A

    2011-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the CNS caused by the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. In the last years, it has been suggested that an abnormal venous drainage due to stenosis or malformation of the internal jugular and/or azygous veins may play a major pathogenetic role in MS. This abnormality called chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) could result in increased permeability of blood brain barrier, local iron deposition and secondary multifocal inflammation. In the present paper, literature data in favour and against this hypothesis are reported. A great variability of CCSVI has been found in both MS patients (ranging from 0 to 100%) and in control subjects (from 0 to 23%). This large variability is explained by methodological aspects, problems in assessing CCSVI, and differences among clinical series. It is urgent to perform appropriate epidemiological studies to define the possible relationship between CCSVI and MS.

  14. Transgenic Expression of Ad4BP/SF-1 in Fetal Adrenal Progenitor Cells Leads to Ectopic Adrenal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Mohamad; Oka, Sanae; Parker, Keith L.; Morohashi, Ken-ichirou

    2009-01-01

    Deficiency of adrenal 4 binding protein/steroidogenic factor 1 (Ad4BP/SF-1; NR5A1) impairs adrenal development in a dose-dependent manner, whereas overexpression of Ad4BP/SF-1 is associated with adrenocortical tumorigenesis. Despite its essential roles in adrenal development, the mechanism(s) by which Ad4BP/SF-1 regulates this process remain incompletely understood. We previously identified a fetal adrenal enhancer (FAdE) that stimulates Ad4BP/SF-1 expression in the fetal adrenal gland by a two-step mechanism in which homeobox proteins initiate Ad4BP/SF-1 expression, which then maintains FAdE activity in an autoregulatory loop. In the present study, we examined the effect of transgenic expression of Ad4BP/SF-1 controlled by FAdE on adrenal development. When Ad4BP/SF-1 was overexpressed using a FAdE-Ad4BP/SF-1 transgene, FAdE activity expanded outside of its normal field, resulting in increased adrenal size and the formation of ectopic adrenal tissue in the thorax. The increased size of the adrenal gland did not result from a corresponding increase in cell proliferation, suggesting rather that the increased levels of Ad4BP/SF-1 may divert uncommitted precursors to the steroidogenic lineage. The effects of FAdE-controlled Ad4BP/SF-1 overexpression in mice provide a novel model of ectopic adrenal formation that further supports the critical role of Ad4BP/SF-1 in the determination of steroidogenic cell fate in vivo. PMID:19628584

  15. Convergence Insufficiency/Divergence Insufficiency Convergence Excess/Divergence Excess: Some Facts and Fictions.

    PubMed

    Khawam, Edward; Abiad, Bachir; Boughannam, Alaa; Saade, Joanna; Alameddine, Ramzi

    2015-01-01

    Great discrepancies are often encountered between the distance fixation and the near-fixation esodeviations and exodeviations. They are all attributed to either anomalies of the AC/A ratio or anomalies of the fusional convergence or divergence amplitudes. We report a case with pseudoconvergence insufficiency and another one with pseudoaccommodative convergence excess. In both cases, conv./div. excess and insufficiency were erroneously attributed to anomalies of the AC/A ratio or to anomalies of the fusional amplitudes. Our purpose is to show that numerous factors, other than anomalies in the AC/A ratio or anomalies in the fusional conv. or divergence amplitudes, can contaminate either the distance or the near deviations. This results in significant discrepancies between the distance and the near deviations despite a normal AC/A ratio and normal fusional amplitudes, leading to erroneous diagnoses and inappropriate treatment models.

  16. Pendrin localizes to the adrenal medulla and modulates catecholamine release.

    PubMed

    Lazo-Fernandez, Yoskaly; Aguilera, Greti; Pham, Truyen D; Park, Annie Y; Beierwaltes, William H; Sutliff, Roy L; Verlander, Jill W; Pacak, Karel; Osunkoya, Adeboye O; Ellis, Carla L; Kim, Young Hee; Shipley, Gregory L; Wynne, Brandi M; Hoover, Robert S; Sen, Shurjo K; Plotsky, Paul M; Wall, Susan M

    2015-09-15

    Pendrin (Slc26a4) is a Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchanger expressed in renal intercalated cells and mediates renal Cl(-) absorption. With pendrin gene ablation, blood pressure and vascular volume fall, which increases plasma renin concentration. However, serum aldosterone does not significantly increase in pendrin-null mice, suggesting that pendrin regulates adrenal zona glomerulosa aldosterone production. Therefore, we examined pendrin expression in the adrenal gland using PCR, immunoblots, and immunohistochemistry. Pendrin protein was detected in adrenal lysates from wild-type but not pendrin-null mice. However, immunohistochemistry and qPCR of microdissected adrenal zones showed that pendrin was expressed in the adrenal medulla, rather than in cortex. Within the adrenal medulla, pendrin localizes to both epinephrine- and norepinephrine-producing chromaffin cells. Therefore, we examined plasma catecholamine concentration and blood pressure in wild-type and pendrin-null mice under basal conditions and then after 5 and 20 min of immobilization stress. Under basal conditions, blood pressure was lower in the mutant than in the wild-type mice, although epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations were similar. Catecholamine concentration and blood pressure increased markedly in both groups with stress. With 20 min of immobilization stress, epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations increased more in pendrin-null than in wild-type mice, although stress produced a similar increase in blood pressure in both groups. We conclude that pendrin is expressed in the adrenal medulla, where it blunts stress-induced catecholamine release.

  17. Pendrin localizes to the adrenal medulla and modulates catecholamine release

    PubMed Central

    Lazo-Fernandez, Yoskaly; Aguilera, Greti; Pham, Truyen D.; Park, Annie Y.; Beierwaltes, William H.; Sutliff, Roy L.; Verlander, Jill W.; Pacak, Karel; Osunkoya, Adeboye O.; Ellis, Carla L.; Kim, Young Hee; Shipley, Gregory L.; Wynne, Brandi M.; Hoover, Robert S.; Sen, Shurjo K.; Plotsky, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Pendrin (Slc26a4) is a Cl−/HCO3− exchanger expressed in renal intercalated cells and mediates renal Cl− absorption. With pendrin gene ablation, blood pressure and vascular volume fall, which increases plasma renin concentration. However, serum aldosterone does not significantly increase in pendrin-null mice, suggesting that pendrin regulates adrenal zona glomerulosa aldosterone production. Therefore, we examined pendrin expression in the adrenal gland using PCR, immunoblots, and immunohistochemistry. Pendrin protein was detected in adrenal lysates from wild-type but not pendrin-null mice. However, immunohistochemistry and qPCR of microdissected adrenal zones showed that pendrin was expressed in the adrenal medulla, rather than in cortex. Within the adrenal medulla, pendrin localizes to both epinephrine- and norepinephrine-producing chromaffin cells. Therefore, we examined plasma catecholamine concentration and blood pressure in wild-type and pendrin-null mice under basal conditions and then after 5 and 20 min of immobilization stress. Under basal conditions, blood pressure was lower in the mutant than in the wild-type mice, although epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations were similar. Catecholamine concentration and blood pressure increased markedly in both groups with stress. With 20 min of immobilization stress, epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations increased more in pendrin-null than in wild-type mice, although stress produced a similar increase in blood pressure in both groups. We conclude that pendrin is expressed in the adrenal medulla, where it blunts stress-induced catecholamine release. PMID:26173457

  18. Insufficient sleep in adolescents: causes and consequences.

    PubMed

    Owens, Judith A; Weiss, Miriam R

    2017-02-17

    Insufficient sleep poses an important and complicated set of health risks in the adolescent population. Not only is deficient sleep (defined as both sleep duration inadequate to meet sleep needs and sleep timing misaligned with the body's circadian rhythms) at epidemic levels in this population, but the contributing factors are both complex and numerous and there are a myriad of negative physical and mental health, safety and performance consequences. Causes of inadequate sleep identified in this population include internal biological processes such as the normal shift (delay) in circadian rhythm that occurs in association with puberty and a developmentally-based slowing of the "sleep drive", and external factors including extracurricular activities, excessive homework load, evening use of electronic media, caffeine intake and early school start times. Consequences range from inattentiveness, reduction in executive functioning and poor academic performance to increased risk of obesity and cardio-metabolic dysfunction, mood disturbances which include increased suicidal ideation, a higher risk of engaging in health risk behaviors such as alcohol and substance use, and increased rates of car crashes, occupational injuries and sports-related injuries. In response to these concerns, a number of promising measures have been proposed to reduce the burden of adolescent sleep loss, including healthy sleep education for students and families, and later school start times to allow adolescents to obtain sufficient and appropriately-timed sleep.

  19. [Almitrine bismesylate treatment in chronic respiratory insufficiency].

    PubMed

    González Ruiz, J M; Villamor León, J; García-Satué, J L; Sánchez Agudo, L; Calatrava, J M; Carreras, J

    1994-12-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the gasometric and functional respiratory responses in chronic bronchitic patients with chronic respiratory insufficiency (CRI) under ambulatory oxygen therapy (AOT) with almitrine bismesylate (AB). It was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, prospective study which lasted three months and with a dosage regime of 50-100 mg/day of AB. Fiftyfour patients completed the study (28 in AB and 24 in the placebo (P) groups, respectively). All patients were males, with a mean age or 65 +/- 6.1 years. In the study of pulmonary function only airway resistance (Raw) was changed, with a significant decrease at the third month in the AB group compared with the P group (0.83 +/- 0.31 vs. 1.07 +/- 0.46 kpa/L.S), with a p value of 0.05 (mean +/- SD) and PaO2 which improved from 8.15 +/- 0.88 to 8.81 +/- 2.3 kpa (61.17 +/- 6.6 to 66.10 +/- 10 mmHg), with a p value of 0.05. AB therapy was well tolerated.

  20. [Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency and diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Weitgasser, Raimund; Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Clodi, Martin; Zlamal-Fortunat, Sandra; Hammer, Heinz F

    2016-04-01

    Exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) in diabetic patients is frequent. Studies based on fecal elastase-1 measurement give prevalence rates of 10‒30 % of severe and 22‒56 % of moderate EPI in type 1 and rates of 5‒46 % in type 2 diabetic patients. Nevertheless, not all patients report typical symptoms like diarrhea, steatorrhea and weight loss. For noninvasive testing the determination of fecal elastase-1 has the highest sensitivity and specificity. This test should be performed at least in all symptomatic patients. As differential diagnosis celiac disease (with a prevalence of about 3-5 % of type 1 diabetic patients), autonomic neuropathy, but also diseases like irritable bowel syndrome and gastrointestinal tumors have to be taken into account. Patients with symptoms and a fecal elastase-1 < 100 µg/g should be treated with pancreatic enzymes in adequate daily doses administered at main meals. Treatment improves symptoms significantly, supply with fat soluble vitamins is normalised, risk for osteoporosis is reduced. However, improvement of glucose metabolism has not been demonstrated consistently. A pancreatogenic diabetes, also termed as type 3c diabetes, has not necessarily to be treated with insulin, often-at least initially-treatment with oral antidiabetic drugs is sufficient.

  1. Convergence Insufficiency, Accommodative Insufficiency, Visual Symptoms, and Astigmatism in Tohono O'odham Students

    PubMed Central

    Twelker, J. Daniel; Miller, Joseph M.; Campus, Irene

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To determine rate of convergence insufficiency (CI) and accommodative insufficiency (AI) and assess the relation between CI, AI, visual symptoms, and astigmatism in school-age children. Methods. 3rd–8th-grade students completed the Convergence Insufficiency Symptom Survey (CISS) and binocular vision testing with correction if prescribed. Students were categorized by astigmatism magnitude (no/low: <1.00 D, moderate: 1.00 D to <3.00 D, and high: ≥3.00 D), presence/absence of clinical signs of CI and AI, and presence of symptoms. Analyses determine rate of clinical CI and AI and symptomatic CI and AI and assessed the relation between CI, AI, visual symptoms, and astigmatism. Results. In the sample of 484 students (11.67 ± 1.81 years of age), rate of symptomatic CI was 6.2% and symptomatic AI 18.2%. AI was more common in students with CI than without CI. Students with AI only (p = 0.02) and with CI and AI (p = 0.001) had higher symptom scores than students with neither CI nor AI. Moderate and high astigmats were not at increased risk for CI or AI. Conclusions. With-the-rule astigmats are not at increased risk for CI or AI. High comorbidity rates of CI and AI and higher symptoms scores with AI suggest that research is needed to determine symptomatology specific to CI. PMID:27525112

  2. Non-functioning adrenal adenomas discovered incidentally on computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mitnick, J.S.; Bosniak, M.A.; Megibow, A.J.; Naidich, D.P.

    1983-08-01

    Eighteen patients with unilateral non-metastatic non-functioning adrenal masses were studied with computed tomography (CT). Pathological examination in cases revealed benign adrenal adenomas. The others were followed up with serial CT scans and found to show no change in tumor size over a period of six months to three years. On the basis of these findings, the authors suggest certain criteria of a benign adrenal mass, including (a) diameter less than 5 cm, (b) smooth contour, (c) well-defined margin, and (d) no change in size on follow-up. Serial CT scanning can be used as an alternative to surgery in the management of many of these patients.

  3. Frequency of varicella zoster virus DNA in human adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Badani, Hussain; White, Teresa; Schulick, Nicole; Raeburn, Christopher D; Topkaya, Ibrahim; Gilden, Don; Nagel, Maria A

    2016-06-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) becomes latent in ganglionic neurons derived from neural crest cells. Because the adrenal gland also contains medullary chromaffin cells of neural crest origin, we examined human adrenal glands and medullary chromaffin cell tumors (pheochromocytomas) for VZV and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). We found VZV, but not HSV-1, DNA in 4/63 (6 %) normal adrenal glands. No VZV transcripts or antigens were detected in the 4 VZV DNA-positive samples. No VZV or HSV-1 DNA was found in 21 pheochromocytomas.

  4. A NEW CRYSTAL-CONTAINING CELL IN HUMAN ADRENAL CORTEX

    PubMed Central

    Magalhães, Maria C.

    1972-01-01

    Electron microscope examination of the adrenal cortex from three male human subjects revealed a special type of cell occurring in periendothelial spaces, in all adrenal cortex zones. It is a clear, spindle-shaped cell the principal cytoplasmic features of which are crystalline inclusions with a structure similar to that of the Reinke crystals of human testicular interstitial cells and an abundance of microfilaments. Enzymatic digestions with pronase, pepsin, and ribonuclease were performed, and no digestion of the crystals was obtained. The crystals had no peroxidase or acid phosphatase activities. This cell appears to be exclusive to human males and it may be related to adrenal androgen secretion. PMID:4347248

  5. Adrenal steroid metabolism in birds: anatomy, physiology, and clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    de Matos, Ricardo

    2008-01-01

    The hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal system in birds is anatomically and functionally different from that in mammals. The adrenal gland structure and corticosteroid hormone physiology of birds will be reviewed. The anatomy and physiology sections of this article will be important for better understanding the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and possible treatment of primary or secondary adrenal gland disease. Causes of hyper- and hypoadrenocorticism in birds also will be reviewed. The article will conclude with current indications and complications to the clinical use of glucocorticoids in birds.

  6. Right adrenal abscess -- an unusual complication of acute apendicitis.

    PubMed

    Dimofte, Gabriel; Dubei, Liviu; Lozneanu, Lili-Gabriela; Ursulescu, Corina; Grigora Scedil, Mihai

    2004-09-01

    Acute appendicitis represents one of the most frequent abdominal emergencies encountered in everyday surgical practice. Local infectious complications are not unusual and retroperitoneal abscesses after acute retrocaecal appendicitis have been previously described. The authors present the case of a 22-years-young female patient, admitted for a right iliac fossa abscess, secondary to gangrenous appendicitis. A right adrenal mass 35/40 mm was revealed during preoperative ultrasound evaluation, which evolved in an adrenal abscess that spontaneously drained 10 days after appendectomy and retrocecal drainage. Adrenal abscesses are exceptionally rare, with only a few cases being reported in the literature, but none of these after acute appendicitis.

  7. Circadian clock signals in the adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Ota, Takumi; Fustin, Jean-Michel; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Doi, Masao; Okamura, Hitoshi

    2012-02-05

    Circadian secretion of steroid hormones by the adrenal cortex is required to maintain whole body homeostasis and to adequately respond to or anticipate environmental changes. The richly vascularized zona glomerulosa (ZG) cells in the pericapsular region regulate osmotic balance of body fluid by secreting mineralocorticoids responding to circulating bioactive substances, and more medially located zona fasciculata (ZF) cells regulate energy supply and consumption by secreting glucocorticoids under neuronal and hormonal regulation. The circadian clock regulates both steroidogenic pathways: the clock within the ZG regulates mineralocorticoid production via controlling rate-limiting synthetic enzymes, and the ZF secretes glucocorticoid hormones into the systemic circulation under the control of central clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. A functional biological clock at the systemic and cellular levels is therefore necessary for steroid synthesis and secretion.

  8. Neonatal screening for congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Cacciari, E; Balsamo, A; Cassio, A; Piazzi, S; Bernardi, F; Salardi, S; Cicognani, A; Pirazzoli, P; Zappulla, F; Capelli, M

    1983-01-01

    Capillary blood samples from 42930 infants born in the Italian region of Emilia-Romagna were collected for 17-hydroxyprogesterone radioimmunoassays on days 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7, or between days 7 and 15 of life. A microfilter paper method modified from that of Pang et al.1 was used for this assay. Pathologic values of 17-hydroxyprogesterone were found in 5 infants giving an incidence in this homogeneous Caucasian population of 1:8586. We also investigated 17-hydroxyprogesterone values in relation to the day of sampling and the possible correlation between 17-hydroxyprogesterone values and birthweight and gestational age. We concluded that neonatal screening for congenital adrenal hyperplasia caused by 21-hydroxylase deficiency was possible by this method and that the infants' maturity and the particular day of collection of the samples affect the values but not the validity of the screening. PMID:6639129

  9. Extensive Training Is Insufficient to Produce the Work-Ethic Effect in Pigeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasconcelos, Marco; Urcuioli, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Zentall and Singer (2007a) hypothesized that our failure to replicate the work-ethic effect in pigeons (Vasconcelos, Urcuioli, & Lionello-DeNolf, 2007) was due to insufficient overtraining following acquisition of the high- and low-effort discriminations. We tested this hypothesis using the original work-ethic procedure (Experiment 1) and one…

  10. Inflammatory mediators in mastitis and lactation insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Ingman, Wendy V; Glynn, Danielle J; Hutchinson, Mark R

    2014-07-01

    Mastitis is a common inflammatory disease during lactation that causes reduced milk supply. A growing body of evidence challenges the central role of pathogenic bacteria in mastitis, with disease severity associated with markers of inflammation rather than infection. Inflammation in the mammary gland may be triggered by microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) as well as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) binding to pattern recognition receptors such as the toll-like receptors (TLRs) on the surface of mammary epithelial cells and local immune cell populations. Activation of the TLR4 signalling pathway and downstream nuclear factor kappa B (NFkB) is critical to mediating local mammary gland inflammation and systemic immune responses in mouse models of mastitis. However, activation of NFkB also induces epithelial cell apoptosis and reduced milk protein synthesis, suggesting that inflammatory mediators activated during mastitis promote partial involution. Perturbed milk flow, maternal stress and genetic predisposition are significant risk factors for mastitis, and could lead to a heightened TLR4-mediated inflammatory response, resulting in increased susceptibility and severity of mastitis disease in the context of low MAMP abundance. Therefore, heightened host inflammatory signalling may act in concert with pathogenic or commensal bacterial species to cause both the inflammation associated with mastitis and lactation insufficiency. Here, we present an alternate paradigm to the widely held notion that breast inflammation is driven principally by infectious bacterial pathogens, and suggest there may be other therapeutic strategies, apart from the currently utilised antimicrobial agents, that could be employed to prevent and treat mastitis in women.

  11. Effect of angiotensin II, ATP, and ionophore A23187 on potassium efflux in adrenal glomerulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, M.V.; Marusic, E.T.

    1986-02-01

    Angiotensin II stimulus on perifused bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells elicited an increase in 86Rb efflux from cells previously equilibrated with the radioisotope. When 45Ca fluxes were measured under similar conditions, it was observed that Ca and Rb effluxes occurred within the first 30 s of the addition of the hormone and were independent of the presence of external Ca. The 86Rb efflux due to angiotensin II was inhibited by quinine and apamin. The hypothesis that the angiotensin II response is a consequence of an increase in the K permeability of the glomerulosa cell membrane triggered by an increase in cytosolic Ca is supported by the finding that the divalent cation ionophore A23187 also initiated 86Rb or K loss (as measured by an external K electrode). This increased K conductance was also seen with 10(-4) M ATP. Quinine and apamin greatly reduced the effect of ATP or A23187 on 86Rb or K release in adrenal glomerulosa cells. The results suggest that Ca-dependent K channels or carriers are present in the membranes of bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells and are sensitive to hormonal stimulus.

  12. Evidence for extracellular, but not intracellular, generation of angiotensin II in the rat adrenal zona glomerulosa

    SciTech Connect

    Urata, H.; Khosla, M.C.; Bumpus, M.; Husain, A. )

    1988-11-01

    Based on the observation that high levels of renin and angiotensin II (Ang II) are found in the adrenal zona glomerulosa (ZG), it has been postulated that Ang II is formed intracellularly by the renin-converting enzyme cascade in this tissue. To test this hypothesis, the authors examined renin-angiotensin system components in subcellular fractions of the rat adrenal ZG. Renin activity and immunoreactive-Ang II (IR-Ang II) were observed in vesicular fractions but were not colocalized. In addition, angiotensinogen, angiotensin I, and converting enzyme were not observed in the renin or IR-Ang II-containing vesicular fractions. These data do not support the hypothesis that Ang II is formed intracellularly within the renin-containing vesicles of the ZG. Rather, since modulatable renin release from adrenal ZG slices was observed and renin activity was found in dense vesicular fractions (33-39% sucrose), it is likely that Ang II formation in the ZG is extracellular and initiated by the release of vesicular renin. In ZG lysomal fractions {sup 125}I-labeled Ang II was degraded to {sup 125}I-labeled des-(Phe{sup 8})Ang II. Since Ang II antibodies do not recognize des-(Phe{sup 8})Ang II, these finding explain why IR-Ang II in the ZG is due predominantly to Ang II and not to its C-terminal immunoreactive fragments.

  13. Children with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia have decreased amygdala volume: potential prenatal and postnatal hormonal effects.

    PubMed

    Merke, Deborah P; Fields, Jeremy D; Keil, Margaret F; Vaituzis, A Catherine; Chrousos, George P; Giedd, Jay N

    2003-04-01

    Children with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) have multiple endocrine imbalances, including prenatal glucocorticoid and adrenomedullary deficiency and androgen excess, with possible postnatal iatrogenic glucocorticoid excess, hyperandrogenism, and adrenomedullary hypofunction. Prenatal masculinization of the brain has been suggested in girls with classic CAH. Hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and sex hormones interact with extrahypothalamic regulatory centers of the brain, including the amygdala and hippocampus. The amygdala is important in the processing of emotion and generation of fear, whereas the hippocampus plays an important role in memory. Chronic hypercortisolemia has been shown to be associated with hippocampal damage, while glucocorticoids and corticotropin-releasing factor play a major role in the regulation of amygdala function. We performed magnetic resonance imaging of the brain on 27 children with classic CAH and 47 sex- and age-matched controls. Volumes of the cerebrum, ventricles, temporal lobe, amygdala, and hippocampus were quantified. Females with CAH did not have brains with male-specific characteristics. In contrast, a significant decrease in amygdala volume was observed in both males and females with CAH (males, P = 0.01; females, P = 0.002). Iatrogenic effects on the hippocampus due to glucocorticoid therapy were not observed in children with CAH. These results suggest that prenatal glucocorticoid deficiency with resulting alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation, sex steroid excess, or some combination of these preferentially affect the growth and development of the amygdala, a structure with major functional implications that warrant further exploration.

  14. Prenatal xenobiotic exposure and intrauterine hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis programming alteration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chong; Xu, Dan; Luo, Hanwen; Lu, Juan; Liu, Lian; Ping, Jie; Wang, Hui

    2014-11-05

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is one of the most important neuroendocrine axes and plays an important role in stress defense responses before and after birth. Prenatal exposure to xenobiotics, including environmental toxins (such as smoke, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide), drugs (such as synthetic glucocorticoids), and foods and beverage categories (such as ethanol and caffeine), affects fetal development indirectly by changing the maternal status or damaging the placenta. Certain xenobiotics (such as caffeine, ethanol and dexamethasone) may also affect the fetus directly by crossing the placenta into the fetus due to their lipophilic properties and lower molecular weights. All of these factors probably result in intrauterine programming alteration of the HPA axis, which showed a low basal activity but hypersensitivity to chronic stress. These alterations will, therefore, increase the susceptibility to adult neuropsychiatric (such as depression and schizophrenia) and metabolic diseases (such as hypertension, diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease). The "over-exposure of fetuses to maternal glucocorticoids" may be the main initiation factor by which the fetal HPA axis programming is altered. Meantime, xenobiotics can directly induce abnormal epigenetic modifications and expression on the important fetal genes (such as hippocampal glucocorticoid receptor, adrenal steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, et al) or damage by in situ oxidative metabolism of fetal adrenals, which may also be contributed to the programming alteration of fetal HPA axis.

  15. Adrenal Medullary Grafts Restore Olfactory Deficits and Catecholamine Levels of 6-OHDA Amygdala Lesioned Animals

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ruiz, Juan; Guzmán, Rubén; Martínez, María Dolores; Miranda, María Isabel; Bermúdez-Rattoni, Federico; Drucker-Colín, René

    1993-01-01

    Aside from motor and cognitive deficits, Parkinson patients also manifest a little-studied olfactory deficit. Since in Parkinson's disease there is a dopamine depletion of the amygdala due to mesocorticolimbic system degeneration, we decided to test olfactory and taste performance of 6-OHDA amygdala lesioned rats, as well as the possible restoration of either function with adrenal medullary transplants. Two 6-OHDA lesioned groups and one control group were tested in the potentiation of odor by taste aversion paradigm. On taste aversion none of the groups showed any impairment. In contrast, the 6-OHDA lesioned rats showed a marked impairment in olfactory aversion. At this point, one of the lesioned groups received a bilateral adrenal medullary graft within the lesioned area. After two months, all groups were submitted again to the behavioral paradigm. Taste remained unaffected, but the lesioned only group did not recover either olfactory aversion or normal catecholamine levels. The grafted group, on the other hand, restored olfactory aversion and catecholamine levels. It can be concluded from this study that catecholamine depletion of the amygdala is sufficient to produce a selective olfactory deficit, not accompanied by taste impairments, and that such a deficit can be reversed by adrenal medullary transplants, which in turn restore catecholamine levels. PMID:7948179

  16. An ectopic renin-secreting adrenal corticoadenoma in a child with malignant hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kaslow, Abraham M; Riquier-Brison, Anne; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Shillingford, Nick; HaDuong, Josephine; Venkatramani, Rajkumar; Gayer, Christopher P

    2016-03-01

    A previously healthy 7-year-old male presented with hypertensive emergency, hypokalemia, and elevated plasma renin activity and aldosterone levels. There was no evidence of virilization or cushingoid features. MRI of the abdomen revealed a large (5 × 5 × 3 cm) peripherally enhancing, heterogeneous mass arising from the left adrenal gland. The patient was treated for a suspected pheochromocytoma. However, his blood pressure was not responsive to alpha-blockade. Blood pressure was controlled with a calcium channel blocker and an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor. A complete surgical resection of the mass was performed. Postoperatively, his blood pressure normalized and he did not require antihypertensives. On pathological examination, the tumor tissue stained negative for chromogranin and positive for renin. The final diagnosis was renin-secreting adrenal corticoadenoma, an extremely rare adrenal tumor not previously reported in a pediatric patient. Malignant hypertension due to a renin-secreting tumor may need to be distinguished from a pheochromocytoma if alpha-adrenergic blockade is ineffective.

  17. Differential expression of a stress-modulating gene, BRE, in the adrenal gland, in adrenal neoplasia, and in abnormal adrenal tissues.

    PubMed

    Miao, J; Panesar, N S; Chan, K T; Lai, F M; Xia, N; Wang, Y; Johnson, P J; Chan, J Y

    2001-04-01

    Genes that modulate the action of hormones and cytokines play a critical role in stress response, survival, and in growth and differentiation of cells. Many of these biological response modifiers are responsible for various pathological conditions, including inflammation, infection, cachexia, aging, genetic disorders, and cancer. We have previously identified a new gene, BRE, that is responsive to DNA damage and retinoic acid. Using multiple-tissue dot-blotting and Northern blotting, BRE was recently found to be strongly expressed in adrenal cortex and medulla, in testis, and in pancreas, whereas low expression was found in the thyroid, thymus, small intestine and stomach. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemical staining indicated that BRE was strongly expressed in the zona glomerulosa of the adrenal cortex, which synthesizes and secretes the mineralocorticoid hormones. It is also highly expressed in the glial and neuronal cells of the brain and in the round spermatids, Sertoli cells, and Leydig cells of the testis, all of which are associated with steroid hormones and/or TNF synthesis. However, BRE expression was downregulated in human adrenal adenoma and pheochromocytoma, whereas its expression was enhanced in abnormal adrenal tissues of rats chronically treated with nitrate or nitrite. These data, taken together, indicate that the expression of BRE is apparently associated with steroids and/or TNF production and the regulation of endocrine functions. BRE may play an important role in the endocrine and immune system, such as the cytokine-endocrine interaction of the adrenal gland.

  18. Unilateral pulmonary edema during laparoscopic resection of adrenal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Smita; Nayar, Pavan; Virmani, Pooja; Bansal, Shipra; Pawar, Mridula

    2015-01-01

    Despite technological, therapeutic and diagnostic advancements, surgical intervention in pheochromocytoma may result in a life-threatening situation. We report a patient who developed unilateral pulmonary edema during laparoscopic resection of adrenal tumor. PMID:26330724

  19. Involvement of adrenal medulla grafts in the open field behavior.

    PubMed

    Jousselin-Hosaja, M; Venault, P; Tobin, C; Joubert, C; Delacour, J; Chapouthier, G

    2001-06-01

    Immunohistochemical and behavioral techniques were used to study the effects of adrenal medulla grafts, implanted in striatum after bilateral kainic acid (KA) lesions of this structure, on the open field behavior of mice. KA-induced behavioral changes in leaning, grooming and locomotor activity of the open field test were significantly improved after grafting of the adrenal medulla, and in some respects, fully restored. Immunohistochemical identification showed that grafts contained neuron-like cells with a tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), and enkephalin-like immunostainings. A likely interpretation of this complex pattern of results is that adrenal medullary grafts may restore the deficits of GABAergic neurons which in turn reverse the abnormalities in emotionality and locomotion. Neurobiologically, these behavioral improvements probably involve GABAergic and catecholaminergic factors of adrenal medulla grafts, although other neuroactive substances, such as acetylcholine and enkephalins, cannot be excluded.

  20. Effect of Space Flight on Adrenal Medullary Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lelkes, Peter I.

    1999-01-01

    We hypothesize that microgravity conditions during space flight alter the expression and specific activities of the adrenal medullary CA synthesizing enzymes (CASE). Previously, we examined adrenals from six rats flown for six days aboard STS 54 and reported that microgravity induced a decrease in the expression and specific activity of rat adrenal medullary tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate limiting enzyme of CA synthesis, without affecting the expression of other CASE. In the past, we analyzed some of the > 300 adrenals from two previous Space Shuttle missions (PARE 03 and SLS 2). The preliminary results (a) attest to the good state of tissue preservation, thus proving the feasibility of subsequent large-scale evaluation, and (b) confirm and extend our previous findings. With this grant we will be able to expeditiously analyze all our specimens and to complete our studies in a timely fashion.

  1. Nongenomic Actions of Adrenal Steroids in the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Evanson, Nathan K.; Herman, James P.; Sakai, Randall R.; Krause, Eric G.

    2015-01-01

    Mineralocorticoids and glucocorticoids are steroid hormones that are released by the adrenal cortex in response to stress and hydromineral imbalance. Historically, adrenocorticosteroid actions are attributed to effects on gene transcription. More recently, however, it has become clear that genome-independent pathways represent an important facet of adrenal steroid actions. These hormones exert nongenomic effects throughout the body, but a significant portion of their actions are specific to the central nervous system. These actions are mediated by a variety of signalling pathways, and lead to physiologically meaningful events in vitro and in vivo. Here we review nongenomic effects of adrenal steroids in the central nervous system at the levels of behaviour, neural system activity, individual neurone activity, and subcellular signalling activity. A clearer understanding of adrenal steroid activity in the central nervous system will lead to a better ability both to treat human disease, and to reduce side-effects of steroid treatments already in use. PMID:20367759

  2. Renal and adrenal tumors: Pathology, radiology, ultrasonography, therapy, immunology

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, E.; Leder, L.D.

    1987-01-01

    Aspects as diverse as radiology, pathology, urology, pediatrics and immunology have been brought together in one book. The most up-do-date methods of tumor diagnosis by CT, NMR, and ultrasound are covered, as are methods of catheter embolization and radiation techniques in case of primarily inoperable tumors. Contents: Pathology of Renal and Adrenal Neoplasms; Ultrasound Diagnosis of Renal and Pararenal Tumors; Computed-Body-Tomography of Renal Carcinoma and Perirenal Masses; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Renal Mass Lesions; I-125 Embolotherapy of Renal Tumors; Adrenal Mass Lesions in Infants and Children; Computed Tomography of the Adrenal Glands; Scintigraphic Studies of Renal and Adrenal Function; Surgical Management of Renal Cell Carcinoma; Operative Therapy of Nephroblastoma; Nonoperative Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma; Prenatal Wilms' Tumor; Congenital Neuroblastoma; Nonsurgical Management of Wilms' Tumor; Immunologic Aspects of Malignant Renal Disease.

  3. Adrenal lymphangioma: clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical characteristics of a rare lesion.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Carla L; Banerjee, Priya; Carney, Erin; Sharma, Rajni; Netto, George J

    2011-07-01

    Adrenal lymphangiomas, also known as cystic adrenal lymphangiomas, are rare, benign vascular lesions that usually remain asymptomatic throughout life. Although previously adrenal lymphangioma lesions were primarily found at autopsy, they are currently detected during imaging work-up for unrelated causes and are likely to imitate other adrenocortical or adrenal medullary neoplasms. We aimed to retrospectively review all adrenal lymphangioma cases at our hospital and further document their lymphatic origin by immunohistochemical staining. A search of surgical pathology records (1984-2008) was conducted. All hematoxylin and eosin sections were retrieved from archives and reviewed by 2 pathologists in the study. Clinical information was gathered from electronic medical records. Representative paraffin-embedded sections from each case were selected for immunohistochemical analysis using monoclonal antibodies D2-40 and AE1/AE3. A total of 9 adrenal lymphangioma cases were identified (6 women and 3 men). All 9 patients were adults at time of diagnosis with a mean age of 42 years (range, 28-56 years). There were 7 white patients, 1 African American patient, and 1 Asian patient. The average size of an adrenal lymphangioma lesion was 4.9 cm (range, 2.0-13.5 cm). Adrenal lymphangioma was twice more frequently located on the right side (6 right-sided and 3 left-sided). Clinically, 4 (44%) of the 9 lesions presented with abdominal, flank, or back pain. One lymphangioma was found during work-up for labile hypertension. The remaining 4 lesions (44%) were asymptomatic and incidentally found during imaging studies for unrelated causes. Surgical removal was achieved by total adrenalectomy in 8 of the 9 lesions and by partial adrenalectomy in the remaining case. No evidence of recurrence or development of a contralateral lesion was encountered in any of the patients. Histologically, our adrenal lymphangiomas showed a typical multicystic architecture with dilated spaces lined by

  4. Diagnostic dilemmas in enlarged and diffusely hemorrhagic adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Diolombi, Mairo L; Khani, Francesca; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2016-07-01

    We have noted an increasing number of cases of enlarged adrenal glands where the underlying diagnosis was masked by a diffusely hemorrhagic process. We identified from our database 59 cases (32 consults, 27 routine) of adrenal glands with diffuse (>25%) hemorrhage received between 2000 and 2014. Fifty-three adrenalectomies and 6 biopsies were identified. The diagnoses after central review were 41 adrenocortical adenomas, 1 nodular adrenocortical hyperplasia with associated myelolipoma, 1 benign adrenocortical cyst, and 10 nonneoplastic adrenal glands with hemorrhage. A definitive diagnosis for the 6 biopsies was precluded by the sample size. The adrenocortical adenomas (size, 1-13 cm; 25%-95% hemorrhage) showed clear cell change in the neoplastic area (10%-80% of the tumor), 19 showed focal calcification (1 with ossification), 11 showed areas of papillary endothelial hyperplasia, 10 showed scattered lymphoplasmacytic inflammation, 6 showed benign cortical tissue extending beyond the adrenal capsule into soft tissue, 1 showed necrosis in the form of ghost cells, 2 showed lipomatous change, and 6 were associated with incidental benign lesions (1 cortical cyst, 1 schwannoma, and 4 myelolipomas). Twenty-four of the adrenocortical adenomas were consults where the referring pathologist had trouble classifying the lesion. Of the 10 nonneoplastic adrenals (4.5-22 cm; 40%-80% hemorrhage), 2 were consults. In summary, pathologists have difficulties recognizing adrenocortical adenomas in the setting of a massively enlarged and hemorrhagic adrenal gland. Although there is a correlation between adrenocortical malignancy and size, hemorrhage into nonmalignant adrenal glands can result in markedly enlarged adrenals.

  5. Serotonin and pituitary-adrenal function. [in rat under stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, P. A.; Barchas, J. D.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation is conducted to evaluate the response of the pituitary-adrenal system to a stress stimulus in the rat. In the investigation brain serotonin synthesis was inhibited with p-chlorophenylalanine. In other tests the concentration of serotonin was enhanced with precursors such as tryptophan or 5-hydroxytryptophan. On the basis of the results obtained in the study it is speculated that in some disease states there is a defect in serotonergic neuronal processes which impairs pituitary-adrenal feedback mechanisms.

  6. Autochthonous blastomycosis of the adrenal: first case report from Asia.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anil; Sreehari, Sreekala; Velayudhan, Kandan; Biswas, Lalitha; Babu, Rachana; Ahmed, Shabeer; Sharma, Neelakanta; Kurupath, Vasanth P; Jojo, Annie; Dinesh, Kavitha R; Karim, Shamsul; Biswas, Raja

    2014-04-01

    Systemic endemic mycoses, such as blastomycosis, are rare in Asia and have been reported as health risks among travelers who visit or reside in an endemic area. Adrenal involvement is rarely seen in blastomycosis and has never been reported from Asia. We report the first case of blastomycosis with bilateral involvement of the adrenals in a diabetic patient residing in the state of Arunachal Pradesh, India.

  7. A clinical research integration special program (CRISP) for young women with primary ovarian insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    FALORNI, A.; MINARELLI, V.; EADS, C. M.; JOACHIM, C. M.; PERSANI, L.; ROSSETTI, R.; BEIM, P. YURTTAS; PELLEGRINI, V. A.; SCHNATZ, P. F.; RAFIQUE, S.; KISSELL, K.; CALIS, K. A.; POPAT, V.; NELSON, L. M.

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale medical sequencing provides a focal point around which to reorganize health care and health care research. Mobile health (mHealth) is also currently undergoing explosive growth and could be another innovation that will change the face of future health care. We are employing primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) as a model rare condition to explore the intersection of these potentials. As both sequencing capabilities and our ability to intepret this information improve, sequencing for medical purposes will play an increasing role in health care beyond basic research: it will help guide the delivery of care to patients. POI is a serious chronic disorder and syndrome characterized by hypergonadotrophic hypogonadism before the age of 40 years and most commonly presents with amenorrhea. It may have adverse health effects that become fully evident years after the initial diagnosis. The condition is most commonly viewed as one of infertility, however, it may also be associated with adverse long-term outcomes related to inadequate bone mineral density, increased risk of cardiovascular disease, adrenal insufficiency, hypothyroidism and, if pregnancy ensues, having a child with Fragile X Syndrome. There may also be adverse outcomes related to increased rates of anxiety and depression. POI is also a rare disease, and accordingly, presents special challenges. Too often advances in research are not effectively integrated into community care at the point of service for those with rare diseases. There is a need to connect community health providers in real time with investigators who have the requisite knowledge and expertise to help manage the rare disease and to conduct ongoing research. Here we review the pathophysiology and management of POI and propose the development of an international Clinical Research Integration Special Program (CRISP) for the condition. PMID:25288327

  8. [Definition, classification and diagnosis of chronic venous insufficiency - part II].

    PubMed

    Kasperczak, Jarosław; Ropacka-Lesiak, Mariola; Breborowicz, H Grzegorz

    2013-01-01

    Venous insufficiency can be defined as a fixed venous outflow disturbance of the limbs. It is caused by the malfunction of the venous system, that may or may not be associated with venous valvular insufficiency and may involve the superficial or deep venous system of the lower limbs, or both. The CEAP scale includes clinical, etiologic, anatomic and pathophysiologic aspects and has been used in the assessment of venous insufficiency Clinical classification comprises of 7 groups. It takes into account the appearance of the skin of the lower limbs, presence of edema, teleangiectasis and varicose ulcers. CLINICAL GRADING: Group C0 - no visible changes in the clinical examination; Group C1 - telangiectasis, reticular veins, redness of the skin around the ankles; Group C2 - varicose veins, Group C3 - the presence of edema without skin changes; Group C4 - lesions dependent of venous diseases (discoloration, blemishes, lipodermatosclerosis); C5 Group - skin changes described above with signs of healed venous ulcers; Group C6 - skin lesions such as in groups C1 to C4 plus active venous ulcers. ETIOLOGICAL CLASSIFICATION INCLUDES: Ec - congenital defects of the venous system, Ep - primary pathological changes of the venous system, without identification of their causes; Es - secondary causes of venous insufficiency of known etiology (post-thrombotic, post-traumatic, etc.). There are many methods of assessing the venous system. One of the most accurate methods is an ascending phlebography which is especially useful in determining detailed anatomy of the venous system, venous patency and identification of perforans veins. The second method may be a descending phlebography useful in determining the venous reflux and morphology of venous valves. Another radiological method is varicography in which the injection of the contrast medium directly into the veins is performed. It is especially useful in the ,,mapping" of venous connections. Trans-uterine phlebography when contrast

  9. Phosphodiesterases and Adrenal Cushing in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Szarek, E.; Stratakis, C. A.

    2016-01-01

    The majority of benign adrenal cortex lesions leading to Cushing syndrome are associated to one or another abnormality of the cAMP/cGMP-phosphodiesterase signaling pathway. Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are key regulatory enzymes of intracellular cAMP/cGMP levels. These second messengers play important regulatory roles in controlling steroidogenesis in the adrenal. Disruption of PDEs has been associated with a number of adrenal diseases. Specifically, genetic mutations have been associated with benign adrenal lesions, leading to Cushing syndrome and/or related adrenal hyperplasias. A Genome Wide Association study, in 2006, led to the identification of mutations in 2 PDE genes: PDE8B and PDE11A; mutations in these 2 genes modulate steroidogenesis. Further human studies have identified PDE2 as also directly regulating steroidogenesis. PDE2 decreases aldosterone production. This review focuses on the most recent knowledge we have gained on PDEs and their association with adrenal steroidogenesis and altered function, through analysis of patient cohorts and what we have learned from mouse studies. PMID:25232906

  10. The adrenal gland: common disease states and suspected new applications.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Linda S

    2013-01-01

    The adrenal gland, while small in size, provides a major punch to human metabolism. The interplay between the adrenal cortex hormones aldosterone and cortisol provides needed regulation to human metabolism. Aldosterone regulates the body sodium content affecting blood pressure thru fluid-volume regulation by the kidney. Cortisol, also from the adrenal cortex, contributes to regulation of glucose and protein metabolism. Diseases like addison's disease and Cushing's syndrome that affect the normal levels of these hormones can lead to serious pathologies that need to be detected thru clinical laboratory testing. The inner core of the adrenal gland, called the medulla, houses the catecholamine epinephrine, a fast acting neuropeptide hormone that can influence body action and energy levels quickly. The pheochromocytomas pathology of the adrenal medulla adversely affects the medulla hormones and needs to be recognized by clinical laboratory testing. The overview of the adrenal gland and its potential pathologies needs to be looked at anew in relation to post-traumatic stress disorder to find any linkage that may aid in the treatment and cure of our affected military soldiers. This interrelationship between cortisol and epinephrine in PTSD should be closely evaluated to determine if the suspected linkages are significant.

  11. Direct effects of recurrent hypoglycaemia on adrenal catecholamine release.

    PubMed

    Orban, Branly O; Routh, Vanessa H; Levin, Barry E; Berlin, Joshua R

    2015-01-01

    In Type 1 and advanced Type 2 diabetes mellitus, elevation of plasma epinephrine plays a key role in normalizing plasma glucose during hypoglycaemia. However, recurrent hypoglycaemia blunts this elevation of plasma epinephrine. To determine whether recurrent hypoglycaemia affects peripheral components of the sympatho-adrenal system responsible for epinephrine release, male rats were administered subcutaneous insulin daily for 3 days. These recurrent hypoglycaemic animals showed a smaller elevation of plasma epinephrine than saline-injected controls when subjected to insulin-induced hypoglycaemia. Electrical stimulation of an adrenal branch of the splanchnic nerve in recurrent hypoglycaemic animals elicited less release of epinephrine and norepinephrine than in controls, without a change in adrenal catecholamine content. Responsiveness of isolated, perfused adrenal glands to acetylcholine and other acetylcholine receptor agonists was also unchanged. These results indicate that recurrent hypoglycaemia compromised the efficacy with which peripheral neuronal activity stimulates adrenal catecholamine release and demonstrate that peripheral components of the sympatho-adrenal system were directly affected by recurrent hypoglycaemia.

  12. Percutaneous interstitial brachytherapy for adrenal metastasis: technical report.

    PubMed

    Kishi, Kazushi; Tamura, Shinji; Mabuchi, Yasushi; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Noda, Yasutaka; Nakai, Motoki; Sato, Morio; Ino, Kazuhiko; Yamanaka, Noboru

    2012-09-01

    We developed and evaluated the feasibility of a brachytherapy technique as a safe and effective treatment for adrenal metastasis. Adapting a paravertebral insertion technique in radiofrequency ablation of adrenal tumors, we developed an interstitial brachytherapy for adrenal metastasis achievable on an outpatient basis. Under local anesthesia and under X-ray CT guidance, brachytherapy applicator needles were percutaneously inserted into the target. A treatment plan was created to eradicate the tumor while preserving normal organs including the spinal cord and kidney. We applied this interstitial brachytherapy technique to two patients: one who developed adrenal metastasis as the third recurrence of uterine cervical cancer after reirradiation, and one who developed metachronous multiple metastases from malignant melanoma. The whole procedure was completed in 2.5 hours. There were no procedure-related or radiation-related early/late complications. FDG PET-CT images at two and three months after treatment showed absence of FDG uptake, and no recurrence of the adrenal tumor was observed for over seven months until expiration, and for six months until the present, respectively. This interventional interstitial brachytherapy procedure may be useful as a safe and eradicative treatment for adrenal metastasis.

  13. Mass spectrometry theory and application to adrenal diseases.

    PubMed

    Wooding, Kerry M; Auchus, Richard J

    2013-05-22

    The diagnosis and management of adrenal diseases hinge upon accurate determination of hormone concentrations in blood and other body fluids. The advent of immunoassays for various steroid hormones has enabled the remarkable progress in adrenal disease over the last several decades, with some limitation. Sequential immunoassay of single analytes is a tedious process, which requires aliquots for each assay. In many complex adrenal diseases, including adrenal cancer and congenital adrenal hyperplasia, the patterns or ratios of multiple steroids rather than the value of any one steroid is more relevant. Although gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of urinary steroid metabolites has been employed to profile steroid production, throughput is slow, and availability is sparse. Recent generations of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry instruments (LC-MS/MS) provide the throughput and sensitivity required to measure many steroids simultaneously using small samples for commercial and research uses. Even in the best hands, however, LC-MS/MS suffers from limitations and requires diligent attention to detail during method development and implementation. This article reviews the theory, instrumentation principles and terminology, and practical application of mass spectrometry to clinical adrenal disorders.

  14. The Interplay between Estrogen and Fetal Adrenal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kaludjerovic, Jovana; Ward, Wendy E.

    2012-01-01

    Estrogen is a steroid hormone that regulates embryogenesis, cell proliferation and differentiation, organogenesis, the timing of parturition, and fetal imprinting by carrying chemical messages from glands to cells within tissues or organs in the body. During development, placenta is the primary source of estrogen production but estrogen can only be produced if the fetus or the mother supplies dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), the estrogen prohormone. Studies show that the fetal zone of the fetal adrenal cortex supplies 60% of DHEA for placental estrogen production, and that placental estrogen in turn modulates the morphological and functional development of the fetal adrenal cortex. As such, in developed countries where humans are exposed daily to environmental estrogens, there is concern that the development of fetal adrenal cortex, and in turn, placental estrogen production may be disrupted. This paper discusses fetal adrenal gland development, how endogenous estrogen regulates the structure and function of the fetal adrenal cortex, and highlights the potential role that early life exposure to environmental estrogens may have on the development and endocrinology of the fetal adrenal cortex. PMID:22536492

  15. Cascading failures in interdependent networks due to insufficient received support capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Pengshuai; Zhu, Peidong; Shao, Chengcheng; Xun, Peng

    2017-03-01

    We propose a capability based dependency model of interdependent network that takes two node dependency properties into account. One is support capability and the other is required capability. The redundancy degree of an interdependent network is also defined, whose value is the ratio of its total support capability and total required capability. Through the numerical simulations, we found that: (1) Interdependent networks without redundant support-dependence links are extremely vulnerable, even the failure of one node could cause the collapse of whole network; (2) Increasing support-dependence links and redistributing the nodes' dependency properties can enhance the robustness of network without changing its redundancy degree; (3) Improving the redundancy degree could enhance network robustness without adding support-dependence links. These conclusions enlighten the design of interdependent networks: when network's redundancy degree is fixed, we can take strategy from results (2), and when network structure is settled, we can apply strategy from results (3).

  16. Nitrous oxide by itself is insufficient to relieve pain due to castration in piglet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surgical castration is performed on all male pigs in the United States. However, castration is painful and analgesics have been considered to relieve pain. Inhalant gases with analgesic properties allow for a fast induction, short-term and reversible effects, and are a needle-free option. Nitrous ox...

  17. Luteinizing hormone (LH)-releasing hormone agonist reduces serum adrenal androgen levels in prostate cancer patients: implications for the effect of LH on the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Masahiro; Nomura, Masashi; Sekine, Yoshitaka; Koike, Hidekazu; Matsui, Hiroshi; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Ito, Kazuto; Oyama, Tetsunari; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Recently, adrenal androgens have been targeted as key hormones for the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer therapeutics. Although circulating adrenal androgens originate mainly from the adrenal glands, the testes also supply about 10%. Although widely used in androgen deprivation medical castration therapy, the effect of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) agonist on adrenal androgens has not been fully studied. In this study, changes in testicular and adrenal androgen levels were measured and compared to adrenocorticotropic hormone levels. To assess the possible role of LH in the adrenal glands, immunohistochemical studies of the LH receptor in normal adrenal glands were performed. Forty-seven patients with localized or locally progressive prostate cancer were treated with LH-RH agonist with radiotherapy. Six months after initiation of treatment, testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, and estradiol levels were decreased by 90%-95%, and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, dehydroepiandrosterone, and androstenedione levels were significantly decreased by 26%-40%. The suppressive effect of LH-RH agonist at 12 months was maintained. Adrenocorticotropic hormone levels showed an increasing trend at 6 months and a significant increase at 12 months. LH receptors were positively stained in the cortex cells of the reticular layer of the adrenal glands. The long-term LH-RH agonist treatment reduced adrenal-originated adrenal androgens. LH receptors in the adrenal cortex cells of the reticular layer might account for the underlying mechanism of reduced adrenal androgens.

  18. Adipose tissue and adrenal glands: novel pathophysiological mechanisms and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Kargi, Atil Y; Iacobellis, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Hormones produced by the adrenal glands and adipose tissues have important roles in normal physiology and are altered in many disease states. Obesity is associated with changes in adrenal function, including increase in adrenal medullary catecholamine output, alterations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, elevations in circulating aldosterone together with changes in adipose tissue glucocorticoid metabolism, and enhanced adipocyte mineralocorticoid receptor activity. It is unknown whether these changes in adrenal endocrine function are in part responsible for the pathogenesis of obesity and related comorbidities or represent an adaptive response. In turn, adipose tissue hormones or "adipokines" have direct effects on the adrenal glands and interact with adrenal hormones at several levels. Here we review the emerging evidence supporting the existence of "cross talk" between the adrenal gland and adipose tissue, focusing on the relevance and roles of their respective hormones in health and disease states including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and primary disorders of the adrenals.

  19. [THERAPY OF TRANSIENT LACTASE INSUFFICIENCY OF CHILDREN IN PECTORAL AGE].

    PubMed

    Marushko, Yu V; Iovitsa, T V

    2015-01-01

    Thus, we have discovered that the children of the first half-year of life have different degrees of severity of transient lactase insufficiency basing on the results of hydrogen respiratory test. It was set that the starting dose of enzyme lactase must depend on the degree of severity of displays of transient lactase insufficiency, taking into account the indexes of hydrogen respiratory test.

  20. Prediction of adrenocortical insufficiency after pituitary adenoma surgery using postoperative basal cortisol levels.

    PubMed

    Hána, V; JeŽková, J; Kosák, M; Kršek, M; Marek, J; Netuka, D; Hill, M; Hána, V

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to analyze the correlation of early postoperative cortisol levels in patients after transsphenoidal pituitary adenoma surgery compared to the standard dose ACTH test and Insulin tolerance test (ITT) several months later. We retrospectively reviewed data from 94 patients operated for pituitary adenoma in years 2009-2012. The comparison of day 7 (median) postoperative basal cortisol levels and 3.6 months (median) after pituitary adenoma surgery stimulation test - standard dose 250 microg 1-24ACTH test in 83 patients or ITT in 11 patients were performed. All 16 patients with early postoperative cortisol levels >500 nmol/l proved a sufficient response in the stimulation tests. At basal cortisol levels of 370-500 nmol/l the sufficient response was found in 96 % (27/28) of patients. In the postoperative basal cortisol levels 200-370 nmol/l we found a preserved corticotroph axis later on in 88 % (28/32) of cases. Patients with basal cortisol levels 100-200 nmol/l had a maintained corticotroph axis function in 8/11 cases - 73 %. All patients with an early postoperative basal cortisol level above 500 nmol/l proved in the stimulation tests a preserved corticotroph axis function. The interval 370-500 nmol/l showed a minimal risk of postoperative adrenal insufficiency.

  1. AB191. Laparoscopic subcutaneous transposition of a pedicled adrenal for ACTH-independent bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weixing; Zhang, Tianbiao

    2016-01-01

    Objective Bilateral adrenalectomy or unilateral adrenalectomy and contralateral partial adrenalectomy are indicated for the treatment of ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia. Independent of the surgical procedure, the prognosis is poor. This paper discusses a new treatment method and its efficacy for treating nodular adrenal hyperplasia. Methods We performed a retrospective review of the medical records of 12 patients operated on between January 2008 and October 2014 at the First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University. All patients were treated by laparoscopic subcutaneous transposition of a pedicled adrenal. We performed postoperative monitoring of patients including clinical symptoms and 24-hour levels of serum free and urinary free cortisol. Results All twelve patients were pathologically confirmed to have nodular adrenal hyperplasia, and were followed for an average of 45.5 months (range, 24–60 months). The clinical symptoms of all patients disappeared, and the 24-hour plasma free cortisol and urinary free cortisol levels were within the normal range. Conclusions Laparoscopic subcutaneous transposition of a pedicled adrenal is a new and effective method for treating bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia, and can achieve long-term remission of Cushing’s syndrome.

  2. MANAGEMENT OF ENDOCRINE DISEASE: Imaging for the diagnosis of malignancy in incidentally discovered adrenal masses: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dinnes, Jacqueline; Bancos, Irina; Ferrante di Ruffano, Lavinia; Chortis, Vasileios; Davenport, Clare; Bayliss, Susan; Sahdev, Anju; Guest, Peter; Fassnacht, Martin; Deeks, Jonathan J

    2016-01-01

    Objective Adrenal masses are incidentally discovered in 5% of CT scans. In 2013/2014, 81 million CT examinations were undertaken in the USA and 5 million in the UK. However, uncertainty remains around the optimal imaging approach for diagnosing malignancy. We aimed to review the evidence on the accuracy of imaging tests for differentiating malignant from benign adrenal masses. Design A systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane CENTRAL Register of Controlled Trials, Science Citation Index, Conference Proceedings Citation Index, and ZETOC (January 1990 to August 2015). We included studies evaluating the accuracy of CT, MRI, or 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG)-PET compared with an adequate histological or imaging-based follow-up reference standard. Results We identified 37 studies suitable for inclusion, after screening 5469 references and 525 full-text articles. Studies evaluated the accuracy of CT (n=16), MRI (n=15), and FDG-PET (n=9) and were generally small and at high or unclear risk of bias. Only 19 studies were eligible for meta-analysis. Limited data suggest that CT density >10HU has high sensitivity for detection of adrenal malignancy in participants with no prior indication for adrenal imaging, that is, masses with ≤10HU are unlikely to be malignant. All other estimates of test performance are based on too small numbers. Conclusions Despite their widespread use in routine assessment, there is insufficient evidence for the diagnostic value of individual imaging tests in distinguishing benign from malignant adrenal masses. Future research is urgently needed and should include prospective test validation studies for imaging and novel diagnostic approaches alongside detailed health economics analysis. PMID:27257145

  3. Obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekhara, K.L.; Iyer, S.K.

    1984-10-01

    A case of obstructive jaundice due to radiation-induced hepatic duct stricture is reported. The patient received postoperative radiation for left adrenal carcinoma, seven years prior to this admission. The sequelae of hepatobiliary radiation and their management are discussed briefly.

  4. Naloxone inhibits and morphine potentiates. The adrenal steroidogenic response to ACTH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heybach, J. P.; Vernikos, J.

    1980-01-01

    The adrenal actions were stereospecific since neither the positve stereoisomer of morphine, nor that of naloxone, had any effect on the adrenal response to exogenous adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH). The administration of human beta endorphin to phyophysectomized rats had no effect on the adrenal corticosterone concentration nor did it alter the response of the adrenal gland to ACTH. These results indicate that morphine can potentiate the action of ACTH on the adrenal by a direct, stereospecific, dose dependent mechanism that is prevented by naloxone pretreatment and which may involve competition for ACTH receptors on the corticosterone secreting cells of the adrenal cortex.

  5. (18)F-FDG PET/CT in bilateral primary adrenal T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, Sampath; Mittal, Bhagwant Rai; Shankar, Praveen; Kashyap, Raghava; Bhattacharya, Anish; Singh, Baljinder; Das, Ashim; Bhansali, Anil

    2011-01-01

    Primary adrenal lymphoma is extremely rare. We report a young patient who presented with non- specific symptoms of fever and abdominal pain. Conventional imaging modalities demonstrated bilateral bulky adrenal masses, and whole-body fluorine-18-fluorodesoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography showed intense (18)F-FDG-avid bilateral adrenal masses with no evidence of extra-adrenal spread. A pathological diagnosis of non-Hodgkin lymphoma of peripheral T-cell type was made. The present case indicates that primary adrenal lymphoma should be included in the differential diagnosis of bilateral adrenal masses.

  6. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Treatment of Adrenal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Chawla, Sheema; Chen, Yuhchyau; Katz, Alan W.; Muhs, Ann G.; Philip, Abraham; Okunieff, Paul; Milano, Michael T.

    2009-09-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetry and outcomes of patients undergoing stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for metastases to the adrenal glands. Methods and Materials: At University of Rochester, patients have been undergoing SBRT for limited metastases since 2001. We retrospectively reviewed 30 patients who had undergone SBRT for adrenal metastases from various primary sites, including lung (n = 20), liver (n = 3), breast (n = 3), melanoma (n = 1), pancreas (n = 1), head and neck (n = 1), and unknown primary (n = 1). Results: Of the 30 patients, 14 with five or fewer metastatic lesions (including adrenal) underwent SBRT, with the intent of controlling all known sites of metastatic disease, and 16 underwent SBRT for palliation or prophylactic palliation of bulky adrenal metastases. The prescribed dose ranged from 16 Gy in 4 fractions to 50 Gy in 10 fractions. The median dose was 40 Gy. Of the 30 patients, 24 had >3 months of follow-up with serial computed tomography. Of these 24 patients, 1 achieved a complete response, 15 achieved a partial response, 4 had stable disease, and 4 developed progressive disease. No patient developed symptomatic progression of their adrenal metastases. The 1-year survival, local control, and distant control rate was 44%, 55%, and 13%, respectively. No patient developed Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 2 or greater toxicity. Conclusion: SBRT for adrenal metastases is well tolerated. Most patients developed widespread metastases shortly after treatment. Local control was poor, although this was a patient population selected for adverse risk factors, such as bulky disease. Additional studies are needed to determine the efficacy of SBRT for oligometastatic adrenal metastases, given the propensity of these patients to develop further disease progression.

  7. [Kinetics of the inhibition of succinate dehydrogenase in bull adrenal cortex by malonate and oxaloacetate].

    PubMed

    Mandrik, K A; Vonsovich, V A; Vinogradov, V V

    1983-01-01

    The activity of succinate dehydrogenase from bull adrenal cortex was studied as affected by malonate and oxaloacetate. The both substrate analogs without preincubation (separately and in the mixture) inhibit the enzyme by the competitive type. After a 3 min oxaloacetate preincubation of the enzyme inhibition is of a mixed character. Malonate under these conditions lowers the oxaloacetate effect without changing the type of inhibition. It is supposed that the protective effect is due to a high rate of formation and decay of the enzyme-inhibitory malonate complex.

  8. Recommendations for treatment of nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCCAH): an update.

    PubMed

    Trapp, Christine M; Oberfield, Sharon E

    2012-03-10

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a family of autosomal recessive disorders. 21-Hydroxylase deficiency, in which there are mutations in CYP21A2 (the gene encoding the adrenal 21-hydroxylase enzyme), is the most common form (90%) of CAH. In classic CAH there is impaired cortisol production with diagnostic increased levels of 17-OH progesterone. Excess androgen production results in virilization and in the newborn female may cause development of ambiguous external genitalia. Three-fourths of patients with classic CAH also have aldosterone insufficiency, which can result in salt-wasting; in infancy this manifests as shock, hyponatremia and hyperkalemia. CAH has a reported incidence of 1:10,000-1:20,000 births although there is an increased prevalence in certain ethnic groups. Nonclassic CAH (NCCAH) is a less severe form of the disorder, in which there is 20-50% of 21-hydroxylase enzyme activity (vs. 0-5% in classic CAH) and no salt wasting. The degree of symptoms related to androgen excess is variable and may be progressive with age, although some individuals are asymptomatic. NCCAH has an incidence of 1:1000-1:2000 births (0.1-0.2% prevalence) in the White population; an even higher prevalence is noted in certain ethnic groups such as Ashkenazi Jews (1-2%). As many as two-thirds of persons with NCCAH are compound heterozygotes and carry a severe and mild mutation on different alleles. This paper discusses the genetics of NCCAH, along with its variable phenotypic expression, and reviews the clinical course in untreated patients, which includes rapid early childhood growth, advanced skeletal age, premature adrenarche, acne, impaired reproductive function in both sexes and hirsutism as well as menstrual disorders in females. Finally, it addresses treatment with glucocorticoids vs. non treatment and other therapies, particularly with respect to long term issues such as adult metabolic disease including insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome

  9. The Recovery of Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Is Rapid in Subclinical Cushing Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background In subclinical Cushing syndrome (SC), it is assumed that glucocorticoid production is insufficient to cause a clinically recognizable syndrome. Differences in hormonal levels or recovery time of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis after adrenalectomy between patients with overt Cushing syndrome (OC) and SC remain unknown. Methods Thirty-six patients (10 with OC and 26 with SC) with adrenal Cushing syndrome who underwent adrenalectomy from 2004 to 2014 were reviewed retrospectively. Patients were treated with glucocorticoid after adrenalectomy and were reevaluated every 1 to 6 months using a rapid adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulation test. Results Levels of basal 24-hour urine free cortisol (UFC), serum cortisol after an overnight dexamethasone suppression test (DST), and serum cortisol and 24-hour UFC after low-dose DST and high-dose DST were all significantly lower in patients with SC compared with OC. Basal ACTH levels showed significantly higher in patients with SC compared with OC. The probability of recovering adrenal function during follow-up differed significantly between patients with OC and SC (P=0.001), with significant correlations with the degree of preoperative cortisol excess. Patients with OC required a longer duration of glucocorticoid replacement to recover a normal ACTH stimulation test compared with patients with SC (median 17.0 months vs. 4.0 months, P<0.001). Conclusion The HPA axis recovery time after adrenalectomy in patients with SC is rapid and is dependent on the degree of cortisol excess. More precise definition of SC is necessary to achieve a better management of patients and to avoid the risk of under- or over-treatment of SC patients. PMID:28029028

  10. Ovarian carcinoma in a 14-year-old with classical salt-wasting congenital adrenal hyperplasia and bilateral adrenalectomy.

    PubMed

    Pina, Christian; Khattab, Ahmed; Katzman, Philip; Bruckner, Lauren; Andolina, Jeffrey; New, Maria; Yau, Mabel

    2015-05-01

    A 14-year-old female with classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia because of 21-hydroxylase deficiency underwent bilateral adrenalectomy at 6 years of age as a result of poor hormonal control. Because the patient was adrenalectomized, extra adrenal androgen production was suspected. Imaging studies including pelvic ultrasound and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were obtained to evaluate for adrenal rest tumors of the ovaries. Abdominal MRI was obtained to evaluate for residual adrenal tissue. A cystic lesion arising from her right ovary suspicious for ovarian neoplasm was noted on pelvic MRI. Right salpingo-oophorectomy was performed and histopathological examination revealed ovarian serous adenocarcinoma, low-grade, and well-differentiated. Tumor marker CA-125 was elevated and additional ovarian cancer staging workup confirmed stage IIIC due to one lymph node positive for carcinoma. The patient then developed a large left ovarian cyst, which led to a complete total abdominal hysterectomy and removal of the left ovary and fallopian tube. Pathology confirmed ovarian serous adenocarcinoma with microscopic focus of carcinoma in the left ovary. After numerous complications, the patient responded well to chemotherapy, CA-125 levels fell and no evidence of carcinoma was observed on subsequent imaging. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an ovarian serous adenocarcinoma in a patient with CAH. Although rare, we propose that the ovaries were the origin of androgen production and not residual adrenal tissue. The relationship between CAH and ovarian carcinomas has yet to be established, but further evaluation is needed given the poor survival rate of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma.

  11. The evaluation of saphenofemoral insufficiency in primary adult varicocele.

    PubMed

    Koyuncu, Hakan; Ergenoglu, Mehmet; Yencilek, Faruk; Gulcan, Nilay; Tasdelen, Neslihan; Yencilek, Esin; Sarica, Kemal

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible relationship between varicocele and saphenofemoral insufficiency in patients diagnosed with primary varicocele. A total of 70 patients with the primary diagnosis of varicocele were included into the study. A total of 30 age-matched healthy adults were also included in the study as a control group. Varicocele was diagnosed by palpation and observation of each spermatic cord in standing position before and during a valsalva maneuver. Additionally, scrotal Doppler and lower extremity venous Doppler ultrasonography were performed. Patients who were with spermatic varicose vein larger than 3.0 mm were included in the study group as a varicocele patient. At the lower extremity venous Doppler ultrasonography, a retrograde flow lasting longer than 0.5 seconds during normal breathing or at the valsalva maneuver was considered to be meaningful for saphenofemoral junction insufficiency. Thirty-six (51.35%) patients had insufficiency in saphenofemoral junction in the study group (6 [8.5%] bilateral, 30 [42.85%] unilateral) whereas 8 (26.6%) had insufficiency in the control group (2 [6.6%] bilateral, 6 [20%] unilateral insufficiency). The patients with primary varicocele had a statistically significant (P = .02) higher rate of venous insufficiency in their saphenofemoral junctions when compared with the control group. In the present study, the rate of saphenofemoral insufficiency has been found to be statistically higher in patients with primary varicocele compared with healthy men. Depending on the common presence of valvular insufficiency, we believe that the presence of varicocele should be investigated in the young population suffering from saphenofemoral junction insufficiency.

  12. Arterial vascularization and morphological characteristics of adrenal glands in the Pampas deer (Ozotoceros bezoarticus, Linnaeus 1758).

    PubMed

    Erdoğan, S; Pérez, W

    2014-10-01

    This research presents morphological characteristics of adrenal glands and a demonstration of arterial vascularization in the Pampas deer, which is considered to be in extreme danger of extinction. A total of ten deer constituted the material of the study. Vascularization of organs was investigated by using latex injection technique. Left adrenal glands were basically supplied by coeliac, cranial mesenteric, renal and lumbal arteries. The arterial vascularization of the left adrenal glands was very complex in comparison with right adrenal glands. In two examples, branch of the lumbal artery was divided into phrenic caudal artery and cranial adrenal artery. In six examples, it was observed that the caudomedial and ventral regions of the left adrenal glands were also supplied by thinner branches that stemmed from second left lumbal artery. Besides, coeliac and cranial mesenteric arteries also gave off shorter branches supplying the cranial region of the left adrenal glands in five examples. It was determined that two branches originated from abdominal aorta directly for supplying left adrenal glands in only two examples. In four examples, two caudal adrenal arteries stemmed separately from left renal artery in a short distance. Arterial vascularization of right adrenal glands was more constant and supplied by lumbal and renal arteries. The adrenal glands were generally oval or round shaped. In only two examples, left adrenal glands were 'V-' or heart-shaped. There was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in sizes between right and left adrenal glands.

  13. Adrenal and Thyroid Supplementation Outperforms Nutritional Supplementation and Medications for Autoimmune Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Wellwood, Christopher; Rardin, Sean

    2014-01-01

    One of the many challenges for any physician is determining the correct course of treatment for patients with more than 1 area of complaint. Should the physician treat the symptoms or the underlying cause of a condition? If treating the cause, what and who determines the cause? Further complicating the issue, doctors must succeed in getting patients to follow the prescribed treatment, which has always been and will continue to be an issue in reaching therapeutic goals. In late 2009, a 49-year-old Caucasian woman visited the Natural Health Center of Medical Lake (NHCML) in Medical Lake, WA, complaining of multiple symptoms. One symptom was a goiter that had not been relieved with a prescription for 0.375 mg of Synthroid daily. Her comorbidities included mixed hyperlipidemia; multiple joint pains; alopecia; fatigue; bilateral, lower-extremity edema; and severe gastric disruption with bloating and acid reflux. After initial success from treatment, with a complete reduction of her presenting goiter and most of her other symptoms, the patient withdrew herself from her prescription medication and her nutritional supplementation. After 4 wk, the patient visited NHCML with indications of severe hypothyroidism, including a severely enlarged goiter of the right wing. After 6 wk of treatment with iodine and a glandular nutritional supplement (GTA Forte), her symptoms of severe hypothyroidism abated. Subsequent treatment for adrenal insufficiency, which was diagnosed at NHCML using salivary adrenal stress-index testing for cortisol rhythm and load, allowed complete resolution of her presenting complaints. This result persisted even at the 3-y follow-up to a greater degree than did the results from the use of thyroid nutritional supplementation and Synthroid, both alone and combined. The hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may contribute to the existence of thyroid-type symptoms, particularly for those individuals with subclinical thyroid conditions. The treatment of the

  14. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: Review from a Surgeon’s Perspective in the Beginning of the Twenty-First Century

    PubMed Central

    Piaggio, Lisandro Ariel

    2013-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) most commonly due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is the most common type of disorder of sex development. This review will focus on CAH addressing historical and current surgical techniques with their anatomical foundations, with special attention to long-term results and outcomes on sexual function, patient satisfaction, patient attitude toward surgery, and ongoing controversies in management of these patients. PMID:24400298

  15. Adrenal and gonadal function in hypothyroid adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Tohei, A; Akai, M; Tomabechi, T; Mamada, M; Taya, K

    1997-01-01

    The functional relationship between thyroid, adrenal and gonadal hormones was investigated using adult male rats. Hypothyroidism was produced by the administration of 4-methyl-2-thiouracil (thiouracil) in the drinking water for 2 weeks. Plasma concentrations of TSH dramatically increased, whereas plasma concentrations of tri-iodothyronine and thyroxine decreased in thiouraciltreated rats as compared with euthyroid rats. Hypothyroidism increased basal levels of plasma ACTH and pituitary content of ACTH. The pituitary responsiveness to CRH for ACTH release markedly increased, whereas the adrenal responsiveness to ACTH for corticosterone release decreased. These results indicated that hypothyroidism causes adrenal dysfunction in adult male rats. Pituitary contents of LH and prolactin decreased in hypothyroid rats as compared with euthyroid rats. In addition, hypothyroidism lowered pituitary LH responsiveness to LHRH. Testicular responsiveness to human chorionic gonadotrophin for testosterone release, however, was not different between euthyroid and hypothyroid animals. These results indicated that hypothyroidism causes adrenal dysfunction and results in hypersecretion of ACTH from the pituitary gland. Adrenal dysfunction may contribute to the inhibition of LHRH secretion from the hypothalamus, possibly mediated by excess CRH.

  16. Nonreutilizaton of adrenal chromaffin granule membranes following secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Nobiletti, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    The intracellular postexocytotic fate of the adrenal chromaffin granule membrane (reutilization vs. nonreutilization) was addressed through two experimental approaches. First, (/sup 3/H) leucine pulse-chase labeling experiments were conducted in two systems - the isolated retrograde perfused cat adrenal gland and cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells to compare chromaffin granule soluble dopamine-B-hydroxylase (DBH) turnover (marker for granule soluble content turnover) to that of membrane-bound DBH (marker for granule membrane turnover). Experiments in cat adrenal glands showed that at all chase periods the granule distribution of radiolabeled DBH was in agreement with the DBH activity distribution (73% membrane-bound/27% soluble) - a result consistent with parallel turnover of soluble and membrane-bound DBH. Experiments in cultured bovine cells showed that labeled soluble and membrane-bound DBH had parallel turnover patterns and at all chase period, the distribution of radiolabeled DBH between the soluble contents and membranes was similar to the DBH activity distribution (50% soluble/50% membrane-bound). The above experiments showed that the soluble contents and membranes turnover in parallel and are consistent with nonreutilization of chromaffin granule membranes following exocytosis. Isolated retrograde perfused bovine adrenal glands were subjected to repetitive acetylcholine stimulation to induce exocytosis and then the dense and less-dense chromaffin granule fractions were isolated. Since both approaches gave results consistent with membrane nonreutilization, the authors conclude that once a chromaffin granule is involved in exocytosis, its membrane is not reutilized for the further synthesis, storage, and secretion of catecholamines.

  17. Zinc deficiency affects the composition of the rat adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, R.J.; Leure-DuPree, A.E.; Fosmire, G.J.

    1986-07-01

    The response of the adrenal gland to zinc deficiency was examined in male weanling rats. In comparison with decapsulated adrenals from ad libitum fed controls, glands from zinc deficient rats had greater relative weight (mg/g body wt), DNA concentration, and total lipid and cholesterol concentrations as well as a smaller protein/DNA ratio. Several of these differences (protein/DNA and cholesterol concentration) could be attributed to the inanition accompanying zinc deficient values were similar to those of pair fed controls. Values for total DNA and protein concentration were similar for all groups. Electron micrographs of the zona fasciculata showed a small number of lipid droplets in the adrenals from ad libitum fed controls, an increase in lipid droplets from pair fed controls, and an even more striking increase in lipid droplets from the zinc deficient adrenals. The increased adrenal lipid composition in the zinc deficient group may be secondary to enhanced steroidogenesis or a zinc deficiency-induced defect of lipid metabolism.

  18. Adrenal medullary regulation of rat renal cortical adrenergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaresan, P.R.; Guarnaccia, M.M.; Izzo, J.L. Jr. )

    1987-11-01

    The role of the adrenal medulla in the regulation of renal cortical adrenergic receptors was investigated in renal cortical particular fractions from control rats and rats 6 wk after adrenal demedullation. The specific binding of ({sup 3}H)prazosin, ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine, and ({sup 125}I)iodocyanopindolol were used to quantitate {alpha}{sub 1}-, {alpha}{sub 2}-, and {beta}-adrenergic receptors, respectively. Adrenal demedullation increased the concentration of all three groups of renal adrenergic receptors; maximal number of binding sites (B{sub max}, per milligram membrane protein) for {alpha}{sub 1}-, and {alpha}{sub 2}-, and {beta}-adrenergic receptors were increased by 22, 18.5, and 25%, respectively. No differences were found in the equilibrium dissociation constants (K{sub D}) for any of the radioligands. Plasma corticosterone and plasma and renal norepinephrine levels were unchanged, whereas plasma epinephrine was decreased 72% by adrenal demedullation, renal cortical epinephrine was not detectable in control or demedullated animals. The results suggest that, in the physiological state, the adrenal medulla modulates the number of renal cortical adrenergic receptors, presumably through the actions of a circulating factor such as epinephrine.

  19. Development of automated detection of radiology reports citing adrenal findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zopf, Jason; Langer, Jessica; Boonn, William; Kim, Woojin; Zafar, Hanna

    2011-03-01

    Indeterminate incidental findings pose a challenge to both the radiologist and the ordering physician as their imaging appearance is potentially harmful but their clinical significance and optimal management is unknown. We seek to determine if it is possible to automate detection of adrenal nodules, an indeterminate incidental finding, on imaging examinations at our institution. Using PRESTO (Pathology-Radiology Enterprise Search tool), a newly developed search engine at our institution that mines dictated radiology reports, we searched for phrases used by attendings to describe incidental adrenal findings. Using these phrases as a guide, we designed a query that can be used with the PRESTO index. The results were refined using a modified version of NegEx to eliminate query terms that have been negated within the report text. In order to validate these findings we used an online random date generator to select two random weeks. We queried our RIS database for all reports created on those dates and manually reviewed each report to check for adrenal incidental findings. This survey produced a ground- truth dataset of reports citing adrenal incidental findings against which to compare query performance. We further reviewed the false positives and negatives identified by our validation study, in an attempt to improve the performance query. This algorithm is an important step towards automating the detection of incidental adrenal nodules on cross sectional imaging at our institution. Subsequently, this query can be combined with electronic medical record data searches to determine the clinical significance of these findings through resultant follow-up.

  20. Signaling Interactions in the Adrenal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Spät, András; Hunyady, László; Szanda, Gergő

    2016-01-01

    The major physiological stimuli of aldosterone secretion are angiotensin II (AII) and extracellular K+, whereas cortisol production is primarily regulated by corticotropin (ACTH) in fasciculata cells. AII triggers Ca2+ release from internal stores that is followed by store-operated and voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry, whereas K+-evoked depolarization activates voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. ACTH acts primarily through the formation of cAMP and subsequent protein phosphorylation by protein kinase A. Both Ca2+ and cAMP facilitate the transfer of cholesterol to mitochondrial inner membrane. The cytosolic Ca2+ signal is transferred into the mitochondrial matrix and enhances pyridine nucleotide reduction. Increased formation of NADH results in increased ATP production, whereas that of NADPH supports steroid production. In reality, the control of adrenocortical function is a lot more sophisticated with second messengers crosstalking and mutually modifying each other’s pathways. Cytosolic Ca2+ and cGMP are both capable of modifying cAMP metabolism, while cAMP may enhance Ca2+ release and voltage-activated Ca2+ channel activity. Besides, mitochondrial Ca2+ signal brings about cAMP formation within the organelle and this further enhances aldosterone production. Maintained aldosterone and cortisol secretion are optimized by the concurrent actions of Ca2+ and cAMP, as exemplified by the apparent synergism of Ca2+ influx (inducing cAMP formation) and Ca2+ release during response to AII. Thus, cross-actions of parallel signal transducing pathways are not mere intracellular curiosities but rather substantial phenomena, which fine-tune the biological response. Our review focuses on these functionally relevant interactions between the Ca2+ and the cyclic nucleotide signal transducing pathways hitherto described in the adrenal cortex. PMID:26973596

  1. Increased gene expression of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes in adrenal glands contributes to high circulating catecholamines in pigs with tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tomaszek, A; Kiczak, L; Bania, J; Paslawska, U; Zacharski, M; Janiszewski, A; Noszczyk-Nowak, A; Dziegiel, P; Kuropka, P; Ponikowski, P; Jankowska, E A

    2015-04-01

    High levels of circulating catecholamines have been established as fundamental pathophysiological elements of heart failure (HF). However, it is unclear whether the increased gene expression of catecholamine-synthesis enzymes in the adrenal glands contributes to these hormone abnormalities in large animal HF models. We analyzed the mRNA levels of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes: tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) in adrenal glands of 18 pigs with chronic systolic non-ischaemic HF (tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy due to right ventricle pacing) and 6 sham-operated controls. Pigs with severe HF demonstrated an increased expression of TH and DBH (but neither AAAD nor PNMT) as compared to animals with milder HF and controls (P<0.05 in all cases). The increased adrenal mRNA expression of TH and DBH was accompanied by a reduced left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) (P<0.001) and an elevated plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) (P<0.01), the other indices reflecting HF severity. There was a positive relationship between the increased adrenal mRNA expression of TH and DBH, and the high levels of circulating adrenaline and noradrenaline (all P<0.05). The association with noradrenaline remained significant also when adjusted for LVEF and plasma BNP, suggesting a significant contribution of adrenals to the circulating pool of catecholamines in subjects with systolic HF.

  2. Epidemiological support for genetic variability at hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis and serotonergic system as risk factors for major depression

    PubMed Central

    Ching-López, Ana; Cervilla, Jorge; Rivera, Margarita; Molina, Esther; McKenney, Kathryn; Ruiz-Perez, Isabel; Rodríguez-Barranco, Miguel; Gutiérrez, Blanca

    2015-01-01

    Background Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a serious, and common psychiatric disorder worldwide. By the year 2020, MDD will be the second cause of disability in the world. The GranadΣp study is the first, to the best of our knowledge, epidemiological study of mental disorders carried out in Andalusia (South Spain), being one of its main objectives to identify genetic and environmental risk factors for MDD and other major psychiatric disorders. In this study, we focused on the possible association of 91 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with MDD. Methods A total of 711 community-based individuals participated in the GranadΣp study. All individuals were extensively assessed for clinical, psychological, sociodemographic, life style, and other environmental variables. A biological sample was also collected for subsequent genetic analyses in 91 candidate SNPs for MDD. DSM-IV diagnosis of MDD was used as the outcome variable. Logistic regression analysis assuming an additive genetic model was performed to test the association between MDD and the genetic data. The experiment-wide significance threshold adjusted with the SNP spectral decomposition method provided a maximum P-value (8×10−3) required to identify an association. Haplotype analyses were also performed. Results One SNP (rs623580) located in the tryptophan hydroxylase 1 gene (TPH1; chromosome 11), one intergenic variant (rs9526236) upstream of the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 2A gene (HTR2A; chromosome 13), and five polymorphisms (rs17689966, rs173365, rs7209436, rs110402, and rs242924) located in the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 gene (CRHR1; chromosome 17), all showed suggestive trends for association with MDD (P<0.05). Within CRHR1 gene, the TATGA haplotype combination was found to increase significantly the risk for MDD with an odds ratio =1.68 (95% CI: 1.16–2.42, P=0.006). Conclusion Although limited, perhaps due to insufficient sample size power, our results seem to

  3. Insufficient Lymph Drainage Causes Abnormal Lipid Accumulation and Vein Wall Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Naoto; Suzuki, Minoru; Mano, Yuuki; Sano, Masaki; Zaima, Nobuhiro; Sasaki, Takeshi; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Previously, we analyzed human varicose veins (VV) using imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) and detected the abnormal accumulation of lipid molecules in the walls of VV, possibly due to insufficient lipid drainage by the lymphatic vessels. In this study, we created an animal model of lymphatic insufficiency to investigate the effects of insufficient lymph drainage on vein walls. Methods: In rats, the lymphatic collecting vessels surrounding the femoral vein were ligated on one side (the model tissue), which caused the local retention of lymphatic fluid in the perivascular tissue. The equivalent contralateral tissue was used as a control. A histological study of the femoral vein and the surrounding perivascular tissue was conducted. IMS was used to analyze the distribution of lipid molecules in the perivascular tissue. Results: Fourteen days after the procedure, the lymphatic vessels in the model tissue were significantly dilated. Furthermore, IMS revealed that the composition of the lipid molecules in the perivascular regions of the model tissue had altered. Compared with the control tissue, the model tissue exhibited marked perivascular accumulation of lysophosphatidylcholine (1-acyl 16:0), phosphatidylcholine (16:0/20:4), and triglycerides (52:2). Interestingly, the walls of the femoral veins running through the model tissue were 3.4-fold thicker than those of the femoral veins running through the control tissue. The number of tumor necrosis factor α-positive adipocytes was increased in the perivascular regions of the model tissue. Conclusion: The findings of this study indicated that the accumulation of lymphatic fluid due to insufficient lymph drainage changes the structure of vein walls, and such changes might be associated with chronic venous insufficiency. (This is a translation of Jpn J Phlebol 2015; 26: 227–235.) PMID:28018498

  4. Left adrenal gland metastasis of breast invasive ductal carcinoma: A case report.

    PubMed

    He, Tao; Liu, Jiaju; Li, Yifan; Jin, L U; Sun, Shuolei; Ni, Liangchao; Mao, Xiangming; Yang, Shangqi; Lai, Yongqing

    2016-05-01

    The majority of the metastatic lesions of the adrenal gland normally originate from lung cancer, colon malignant tumor, renal cell carcinoma and melanoma. However, adrenal gland metastasis that metastasize from breast invasive ductal carcinoma are extremely rare. The present study reported a rare case of left adrenal gland metastasis in a 35-year-old female who was diagnosed as breast carcinoma 5 years ago with a mass located on the left adrenal gland, which was detected during a routine examination. The patient was asymptomatic and adrenal gland computed tomography revealed a mass in the left adrenal gland. Definitive preoperative diagnosis failed to be established. Left adrenal gland laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed and the diagnosis of adrenal gland metastasis of breast invasive ductal carcinoma was confirmed by pathological and immunohistochemical examination. The patient remained in good condition by the time of writing.

  5. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the adrenal gland: a preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, K.L. Jr.; Hricak, H.; Crooks, L.E.; Gooding, C.A.; Moss, A.A.; Engelstad, B.L.; Kaufman, L.

    1983-04-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging characteristics of the normal and abnormal adrenal gland were evaluated and compared with findings on computed tomography (CT). Forty-two patients were examined: 36 had normal adrenal glands and 6 had adrenal disease (3 metastatic lesions, 1 pheochromocytoma, and 2 cortical hyperplasia). NMR clearly showed all 42 left adrenals (100%) and 36 right adrenals (86%). In some patients, it appeared to differentiate the adrenal cortex from the medulla. The ability of NMR to detect adrenal disease was similar to that of CT in 6 cases examined. CT demonstrated superior spatial resolution in most cases, but NMR provided superior soft-tissue contrast. Since NMR does not involve ionizing radiation and provides excellent soft-tissue differentiation without contrast material, it has advantages over CT and appears to be a promising modality for imaging of the adrenal gland.

  6. Limited significance of asymmetric adrenal visualization on dexamethasone-suppression scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, M.D.; Shapiro, B.; Freitas, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    To access whether a single measurement of the adrenal uptake of 6..beta..-(/sup 131/I)-iodomethylnorocholesterol (NP-59) on constant dexamethasone suppression would allow discrimination of adenoma from normal and bilateral hyperplasia, the adrenal uptake of 6..beta..-(/sup 131/I)-iodomethylnorocholesterol (NP-59) was determined in 50 patients with primary aldosteronism (30 adenoma, 20 hyperplasia) and in 13 with hyperandrogenism (six adenoma, seven hyperplasia). Bilateral adrenal NP-59 activity at 5 days was seen in 14 of 36 patients with adenoma whereas marked asymmetric uptake of NP-59 was seen in six of 27 patients with hyperplasia. Thus the level of adrenal NP-59 uptake does not alone serve to distinguish either adenoma from the normal, contralateral adrenal or the adrenal glands in bilateral hyperplasia in all cases. It appears that the pattern of adrenal imaging best serves to separate adrenal adenoma from bilateral hyperplasia.

  7. Influence of chronic and repeated stress on the pituitary-adrenal system and behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, S.

    1975-01-01

    The role of adrenal glucocorticoids and ACTH in behavior, and the influence of various behavioral situations on the neuroendocrine regulation of the pituitary-adrenal system were investigated. Results are presented and discussed.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: intrauterine growth restriction, metaphyseal dysplasia, adrenal hypoplasia congenita, and ...

    MedlinePlus

    ... IMAGe syndrome intrauterine growth restriction, metaphyseal dysplasia, adrenal hypoplasia congenita, and genital anomalies Enable Javascript to view ... combination of intrauterine growth restriction, metaphyseal dysplasia, adrenal hypoplasia congenita, and genital anomalies is commonly known by ...

  9. A martial arts injury: karate induced unilateral haematoma of the adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Ortu, M; Vaccarezza, M; Trovati, S; Galli, M; Gervasoni, C; Vella, A

    2006-08-01

    Adrenal gland haematoma is often a complication of traumatic events. The case is reported of a 45 year old man with unilateral non-symptomatic adrenal gland haematoma caused by a trauma during martial arts practice.

  10. Fragile X-Associated Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (FXPOI): Condition Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... genes cause it? What are common symptoms? How many people are affected/at ... Primary Ovarian Insufficiency (FXPOI): Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is Fragile ...

  11. Diurnal locomotor activity and oxidative metabolism of the suprachiasmatic nucleus in two models of hepatic insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Laudino; Cimadevilla, Jose M; Aller, Maria A; Arias, Jaime; Nava, M Paz; Arias, Jorge L

    2003-08-15

    Subjects with hepatic cirrhosis develop alterations of several rhythmic behavioural and biochemical patterns. Since most cirrhotic patients combine portal hypertension and hepatic impairment, our work aims to assess the extent to which rhythmical changes can be due to hepatic insufficiency or portal hypertension. This was done using two experimental models in rats, portacaval shunt model (PC) and portal hypertension by a triple stenosing ligature of the portal vein (PH). We assess diurnal locomotor activity and determine the oxidative metabolism of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) by histochemical determination of cytochrome oxidase (COX). The results show that animals with PC have altered diurnal locomotor rhythm compared to control and PH rats (p<0.001). They also present lower COX activity in the SCN (p<0.05). We conclude that rhythmic alterations are due to hepatic insufficiency and not to portal hypertension.

  12. [Genetics and phenogenetics of the hormonal characteristics of animals. VI. Functional activity of certain chemoreceptors connected with the pituitary-adrenal system of silver foxes selected for their behavior].

    PubMed

    Naumenko, E V; Trut, L N; Pavlova, S I; Beliaev, D K

    1980-01-01

    Seasonal differences in the reaction of the pituitary-adrenal system in domesticated and non-domesticated silver foxes of both sexes to substances activating alpha-, beta-adrenoreceptors, and serotonin receptors were studied. It was shown that the reactivity of the pituitary-adrenal system in silver foxes of either type of behaviour is due, at least partially, to seasonal differences in the state of adrenergic and serotoninergic mechanisms. At the same time, in silver foxes selected for behaviour to man the reaction of the pituitary-adrenal system to the injection of substances activating adrenergic and serotoninergic receptors differs, during the year, from the reaction to these compounds in non-selected animals. The conclusion was made, that in the process of domestication changes take place in the state of serotonin- and noradrenaline mechanisms connected with the regulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal complex.

  13. [Ultrasound evaluation of fetal adrenal gland volume. The role of fetal adrenal glands in the pathogenesis of preterm labor].

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowski, Arkadiusz; Karwasik-Kajszczarek, Katarzyna; Dymanowska-Dyjak, Izabela; Kondracka, Adrianna; Kwaśniewska, Anna

    2014-02-01

    Preterm labor remains to be one of the most important challenges of contemporary perinatology and constitutes the main reason of perinatal mortality and prematurity of neonates. Studies on preterm labor have confirmed the mutual interactions of several different hormonal systems while the activation of hypothalamic- pituitary- adrenal axis seems to have the greatest influence. It has been also suggested that size and mass of fetal adrenal glands may be associated with the risk of preterm labor. Several authors have shown that the evaluation of fetal adrenal gland volume may be a useful marker of fetal growth during pregnancy. Technological advancements enabled the development of three-dimensional ultrasound evaluation (3D) of the fetal adrenal glands, facilitating a more precise evaluation of their volume. Also, it seems to have higher sensitivity and specificity than two-dimensional ultrasonography (2D). Studies have confirmed a direct relationship between fetal adrenal gland size and the onset of preterm labor within at least 1 week since the ultrasound exam. They have also suggested that in a physiological pregnancy the relation between fetal zone and the whole organ remains constant throughout the pregnancy. Disruption of these proportions and fetal zone enlargement are considered to be a marker of labor cascade and preterm labor with significantly higher sensitivity and specificity than ultrasound evaluation of the cervical length and assessment of the fetal fibronectin concentration.

  14. [Ultrasound evaluation of fetal adrenal gland volume. The role of fetal adrenal glands in the pathogenesis of preterm labor].

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowski, Arkadiusz; Karwasik-Kajszczarek, Katarzyna; Dymanowska-Dyjak, Izabela; Kondracka, Adrianna; Kwaśniewska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Preterm labor remains to be one of the most important challenges of contemporary perinatology and constitutes the main reason of perinatal mortality and prematurity of neonates. Studies on preterm labor have confirmed the mutual interactions of several different hormonal systems while the activation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis seems to have the greatest influence. It has been also suggested that size and mass of fetal adrenal glands may be associated with the risk of preterm labor Several authors have shown that the evaluation of fetal adrenal gland volume may be a useful marker of fetal growth during pregnancy Technological advancements enabled the development of three-dimensional ultrasound evaluation (3D) of the fetal adrenal glands, facilitating a more precise evaluation of their volume. Also, it seems to have higher sensitivity and specificity than two-dimensional ultrasonography (2D). Studies have confirmed a direct relationship between fetal adrenal gland size and the onset of preterm labor within at least 1 week since the ultrasound exam. They have also suggested that in a physiological pregnancy the relation between fetal zone and the whole organ remains constant throughout the pregnancy Disruption of these proportions and fetal zone enlargement are considered to be a marker of labor cascade and preterm labor with significantly higher sensitivity and specificity than ultrasound evaluation of the cervical length and assessment of the fetal fibronectin concentration.

  15. Suppression of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis responsiveness to stress in a rat model of acute cholestasis.

    PubMed Central

    Swain, M G; Patchev, V; Vergalla, J; Chrousos, G; Jones, E A

    1993-01-01

    Cholestatic patients undergoing surgery have increased mortality and demonstrate clinical features suggestive of adrenal insufficiency. To examine whether cholestasis influences the status of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, we evaluated rats with acute cholestasis caused by bile duct resection (BDR) and sham-operated and unoperated controls. Basal unstressed plasma concentrations of ACTH and corticosterone were similar in BDR and sham-operated and unoperated control rats. However, exposure of BDR rats to saturated ether vapor resulted in significantly less ACTH and corticosterone release in plasma than in the control animals. To understand the mechanism(s) of decreased HPA axis responsiveness to ether stress in cholestasis, we administered corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and measured hypothalamic content, mRNA levels and in vitro secretion of CRF and arginine vasopressin (AVP), the two principal secretagogues of ACTH. In BDR animals, ACTH responses to CRF were decreased and hypothalamic content of CRF and CRF mRNA expression in the paraventricular nucleus were decreased by 25 and 37%, respectively. Furthermore, CRF release from hypothalamic explants of BDR rats was 23% less than that of controls. In contrast to CRF, hypothalamic content of AVP was 35% higher, AVP mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus was increased by 6.6-fold, and hypothalamic explant release of AVP was 24% higher in BDR rats than in control animals. Pituitary ACTH contents were similar in BDR and sham resected rats, but higher than unoperated controls. These findings demonstrate that acute cholestasis in the rat is associated with suppression of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis responsiveness to stress and demonstrate a dissociation between mechanisms of ACTH regulation mediated by CRF and AVP. Images PMID:8387536

  16. Targeted disruption of the mouse gene encoding steroidogenic acute regulatory protein provides insights into congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Caron, K M; Soo, S C; Wetsel, W C; Stocco, D M; Clark, B J; Parker, K L

    1997-10-14

    An essential component of regulated steroidogenesis is the translocation of cholesterol from the cytoplasm to the inner mitochondrial membrane where the cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme carries out the first committed step in steroidogenesis. Recent studies showed that a 30-kDa mitochondrial phosphoprotein, designated steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), is essential for this translocation. To allow us to explore the roles of StAR in a system amenable to experimental manipulation and to develop an animal model for the human disorder lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (lipoid CAH), we used targeted gene disruption to produce StAR knockout mice. These StAR knockout mice were indistinguishable initially from wild-type littermates, except that males and females had female external genitalia. After birth, they failed to grow normally and died from adrenocortical insufficiency. Hormone assays confirmed severe defects in adrenal steroids-with loss of negative feedback regulation at hypothalamic-pituitary levels-whereas hormones constituting the gonadal axis did not differ significantly from levels in wild-type littermates. Histologically, the adrenal cortex of StAR knockout mice contained florid lipid deposits, with lesser deposits in the steroidogenic compartment of the testis and none in the ovary. The sex-specific differences in gonadal involvement support a two-stage model of the pathogenesis of StAR deficiency, with trophic hormone stimulation inducing progressive accumulation of lipids within the steroidogenic cells and ultimately causing their death. These StAR knockout mice provide a useful model system in which to determine the mechanisms of StAR's essential roles in adrenocortical and gonadal steroidogenesis.

  17. Adrenal and hepatic aspergillosis in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liyu; Liu, Yanbin; Wang, Weiya; Liu, Kai

    2015-06-01

    Invasive aspergillosis, an infection most frequently induced by Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus flavus, typically occurs in immunocompromised patients and is usually transmitted through inhalation of Aspergillus spores. As the lungs are by far the most common site involved in invasive aspergillosis and invasive aspergillosis in immunocompetent hosts is very rare, there have been a few case reports of extra-pulmonary, disseminated invasive aspergillosis in immunocompetent persons. Herein, we report a case of an adult, male, immunocompetent patient with disseminated invasive aspergillosis that successively spread from the right adrenal gland to the left hepatic lobe. The patient was successfully treated through surgical excisions of his adrenal and hepatic masses followed by voriconazole therapy. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of invasive aspergillosis affecting the adrenal glands.

  18. FDOPA Patterns in Adrenal Glands: A Pictorial Essay.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Aurélie; Giraudet, Anne Laure; Kryza, David; Borson-Chazot, Françoise; Bournaud-Salinas, Claire; Mognetti, Thomas; Lifante, Jean-Christophe; Combemale, Patrick; Giammarile, Francesco; Houzard, Claire

    2017-05-01

    F-FDOPA is a well-established tool to explore pheochromocytomas. It tends to replace I-MIBG scan in metastatic pheochromocytomas, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2-related tumors, succinate dehydrogenase [ubiquinone] iron-sulfur subunit-negative tumors, and succinate dehydrogenase[ZERO WIDTH SPACE]-positive lesions. To our knowledge, no study has characterized physiological and pathological adrenal glands with F-FDOPA from a quantitative point of view. We report the features of different normal and pathological adrenal glands with F-FDOPA. Within our series, only pheochromocytomas present a significantly increased uptake reflecting the high specificity of this tracer. Tumors such as adenomas or myelolipomas present no F-FDOPA significant accumulation. Interestingly, adrenal gland hyperplasia and solitary glands do not demonstrate compensatory uptake.

  19. Regulation of the Adrenal Cortex Function During Stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soliman, K. F. A.

    1978-01-01

    A proposal to study the function of the adrenal gland in the rat during stress is presented. In the proposed project, three different phases of experimentation will be undertaken. The first phase includes establishment of the circadian rhythm of both brain amines and glucocoticoids, under normal conditions and under chronic and acute stressful conditions. The second phase includes the study of the pharmacokinetics of glucocorticoid binding under normal and stress conditions. The third phase includes brain uptake and binding under different experimental conditions. In the outlined experiments brain biogenic amines will be evaluated, adrenal functions will be measured and stress effect on those parameters will be studied. It is hoped that this investigation can explain some of the complex relationships between the brain neurotransmitter and adrenal function.

  20. Feminizing adrenal tumors: Our experience about three cases.

    PubMed

    Chentli, Farida; Farida, Chentli; Bekkaye, Ilyes; Ilyes, Bekkaye; Yahiaoui, Smina; Smina, Yahiaoui; Souidi, Sabrina; Sabrina, Souidi; Fedala, Nora Soumeya; Soumeya, Fedala Nora; Azzoug, Said; Said, Azzoug

    2013-05-01

    Feminizing adrenal tumors (FATs) are very rare as they account for less than 2% of all the adrenal neoplasms. Their prognosis is deemed to be very poor. We aimed to present a mono centre (adult and pediatric) experience over a long period of time (January 1980 to Jun 2012). During the study period, we observed only three cases in men aged 22 (2 cases) and 45 (1 case). They all consulted for a painful gynecomastia, decreased libido and impotency. Estradiol was high in two cases at presentation, and after a relapsing tumor in the third one. All had big adrenal tumors (5.9, 6, and 17 cm), and a mixed secretion composed by high estradiol and cortisol. The pathological study argued for malignancy in two cases. But, only one had diffuse metastasis and died 4 years after diagnosis; the others diagnosed one and three years ago are still alive without any metastasis or relapsing.