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Sample records for adrenal sympathetic nerve

  1. Centrally administered glucagon stimulates sympathetic nerve activity in rat.

    PubMed

    Krzeski, R; Czyzyk-Krzeska, M F; Trzebski, A; Millhorn, D E

    1989-12-18

    The effect of pancreatic glucagon given intravenously, intracerebroventricularly and microinjected into the nucleus of the solitary tract on sympathetic activity in the cervical trunk and adrenal nerve was examined in rat. In each case glucagon caused a relatively long-lasting substantial increase in discharge of both nerves. This finding shows that glucagon can act centrally to stimulate sympathetic activity. The most probable site for the sympathoexcitatory effect of glucagon is the nucleus of the solitary tract. PMID:2598031

  2. Mechanisms of insulin action on sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muntzel, Martin S.; Anderson, Erling A.; Johnson, Alan Kim; Mark, Allyn L.

    1996-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia may contribute to the development of arterial hypertension. Although insulin may elevate arterial pressure, in part, through activation of the sympathetic nervous system, the sites and mechanisms of insulin-induced sympathetic excitation remain uncertain. While sympathoexcitation during insulin may be mediated by the baroreflex, or by modulation of norepinephrine release from sympathetic nerve endings, it has been shown repeatedly that insulin increases sympathetic outflow by actions on the central nervous system. Previous studies employing norepinephrine turnover have suggested that insulin causes sympathoexcitation by acting in the hypothalamus. Recent experiments from our laboratory involving direct measurements of regional sympathetic nerve activity have provided further evidence that insulin acts in the central nervous system. For example, administration of insulin into the third cerebralventricle increased lumbar but not renal or adrenal sympathetic nerve activity in normotensive rats. Interestingly, this pattern of regional sympathetic nerve responses to central neural administration of insulin is similar to that seen with systemic administration of insulin. Further, lesions of the anteroventral third ventricle hypothalamic (AV3V) region abolished increases in sympathetic activity to systemic administration of insulin with euglycemic clamp, suggesting that AV3V-related structures are critical for insulin-induced elevations in sympathetic outflow.

  3. Central oscillators responsible for sympathetic nerve discharge.

    PubMed

    Gebber, G L

    1980-08-01

    The current state of knowledge concerning central mechanisms responsible for the generation of background discharges in sympathetic nerves is examined. It is apparent from recent investigations that the classic concept of a randomly discharging and diffusely organized central network onto which rhythms (cardiac- and respiratory-related) are imposed by extrinsic inputs has not passed the test of time. Rather, brain stem as well as spinal networks that govern the discharges of sympathetic nerves are inherently capable of rhythm generation. Sympathetic nerve rhythms inherent to the central nervous system imply the existence of neuronal circuits that are capable of oscillatory activity. Central oscillators provide a mechanism for synchronization of the activity of populations of sympathetic neurons in the absence of periodic input from sources extrinsic to the central nervous system. Indeed, the thesis is developed that, rather than creating rhythms in sympathetic nerve discharge, the function of periodic input from extrinsic sources such as the baroreceptors is to entrain rhythms of central origin. Finally, the problems associated with the identification of neuronal types that comprise central oscillators which govern the discharges of sympathetic nerves are discussed. PMID:6996496

  4. Vestibular activation of sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.; Carter, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The vestibulosympathetic reflex refers to sympathetic nerve activation by the vestibular system. Animal studies indicate that the vestibular system assists in blood pressure regulation during orthostasis. Although human studies clearly demonstrate activation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during engagement of the otolith organs, the role of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in maintaining blood pressure during orthostasis is not well-established. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes indicates that it is a powerful and independent reflex. Ageing, which is associated with an increased risk for orthostatic hypotension, attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex. The attenuated reflex is associated with a reduction in arterial pressure. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the vestibulosympathetic reflex assists in blood pressure regulation in humans, but future studies examining this reflex in other orthostatically intolerant populations are necessary to address this hypothesis.

  5. Properties of postganglionic sympathetic neurons with axons in phrenic nerve.

    PubMed

    Bałkowiec, A; Szulczyk, P

    1992-06-01

    The aim of the study was to test the reflex and resting properties of postganglionic sympathetic neurons with axons located in the right phrenic nerve. The experiments have been performed on chloralose-anesthetized cats with both vago-aortic nerves cut. The somata or the postganglionic sympathetic neurons were located in the stellate ganglion. Axons of these neurons passed through the upper and lower phrenic nerve roots and through the phrenic nerve itself. The presence of cardiac and respiratory rhythmicities was detected in the activity of the phrenic postganglionic sympathetic neurons. Hyperventilation, which abolished burst discharges of the phrenic nerve, decreased the sympathetic activity by 14%. Systemic hypoxia (ventilating the animals for 2 min with 8% O2 in N2) increased the sympathetic activity threefold. The results of our experiments suggest that axons of the sympathetic neurons located in the right phrenic nerve could possibly be diaphragmatic muscle vasoconstrictors. PMID:1615229

  6. Seasonal variation in muscle sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Muller, Matthew D; Blaha, Cheryl; Kunselman, Allen R; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-08-01

    Epidemiologic data suggest there are seasonal variations in the incidence of severe cardiac events with peak levels being evident in the winter. Whether autonomic indices including muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) vary with season remains unclear. In this report, we tested the hypothesis that resting MSNA varies with the seasons of the year with peak levels evident in the winter. We analyzed the supine resting MSNA in 60 healthy subjects. Each subject was studied during two, three, or four seasons (total 237 visits). MSNA burst rate in the winter (21.0 ± 6.8 burst/min, mean ± SD) was significantly greater than in the summer (13.5 ± 5.8 burst/min, P < 0.001), the spring (17.1 ± 9.0 burst/min, P = 0.03), and the fall (17.9 ± 7.7 burst/min, P = 0.002). There was no significant difference in MSNA for other seasonal comparisons. The results suggest that resting sympathetic nerve activity varies along the seasons, with peak levels evident in the winter. We speculate that the seasonal changes in sympathetic activity may be a contribution to the previously observed seasonal variations in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26265752

  7. Seasonal variation in muscle sympathetic nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jian; Muller, Matthew D; Blaha, Cheryl; Kunselman, Allen R; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiologic data suggest there are seasonal variations in the incidence of severe cardiac events with peak levels being evident in the winter. Whether autonomic indices including muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) vary with season remains unclear. In this report, we tested the hypothesis that resting MSNA varies with the seasons of the year with peak levels evident in the winter. We analyzed the supine resting MSNA in 60 healthy subjects. Each subject was studied during two, three, or four seasons (total 237 visits). MSNA burst rate in the winter (21.0 ± 6.8 burst/min, mean ± SD) was significantly greater than in the summer (13.5 ± 5.8 burst/min, P < 0.001), the spring (17.1 ± 9.0 burst/min, P = 0.03), and the fall (17.9 ± 7.7 burst/min, P = 0.002). There was no significant difference in MSNA for other seasonal comparisons. The results suggest that resting sympathetic nerve activity varies along the seasons, with peak levels evident in the winter. We speculate that the seasonal changes in sympathetic activity may be a contribution to the previously observed seasonal variations in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. PMID:26265752

  8. [Clinical application of skin sympathetic nerve activity].

    PubMed

    Iwase, Satoshi

    2009-03-01

    Skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) is microneurographically recorded from the skin nerve fascicle in the peripheral nerves. It is characterized by the following features: 1) irregular, pulse asynchronous, burst activity with respiratory variation, 2) burst activity followed by vasoconstriction and/or sweating, 3) elicited by mental stress and arousal stimuli, e.g., sound, pain, electric stimulation, 4) burst with longer duration as compared with sympathetic outflow to muscles, and 5) burst activity following sudden inspiratory action. It comprises vasoconstrictor (VC) and sudomotor(SM) activity, as well as vasodilator (VD) activity. VC and SM discharge independently, whereas VD is the same activity with different neurotransmission. The VC and SM are differentiated by effector response, e.g., laser Doppler flowmetry and skin potential changes. SSNA function in thermoregulation in the human body; however it is also elicited by mental stress. SSNA is the lowest at thermoneutral ambient temperature (approximately 27 degrees C), and is enhanced in the pressence of ambient warm and cool air. The burst amplitude is well-correlated to both skin blood flow reduction rate or sweat rate change. The clinical application of SSNA comprises the following: 1) clarification of sweating phenomenon, 2) clarification and diagnosis of anhidrosis, 3) clarification and diagnosis of hyperhidrosis, 4) clarification of thermoregulatory function and diagnosis of thermoregulatory disorder, 5) clarification of pathophysiology and diagnosis of vascular diseases, e.g., Raynaud and Buerger diseases. 6) clarification of the relation between cognitive function and SSNA and 7) determination of pharmacological effect attributable to change in neuroeffector responses. PMID:19301594

  9. Chronically lowering sympathetic activity protects sympathetic nerves in spleens from aging F344 rats

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Sam D.; Kozic, Brooke; Molinaro, Christine; Thyagarajan, Srinivasan; Ghamsary, Mark; Lubahn, Cheri L.; Lorton, Dianne; Bellinger, Denise L.

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated how increased sympathetic tone during middle-age affects the splenic sympathetic neurotransmission. Fifteen-month-old F344 rats received rilmenidine (0, 0.5 or 1.5 mg/kg/day, i.p. for 90 days) to lower sympathetic tone. Controls for age were untreated 3 or 18M rats. We report that rilmenidine (1) reduced plasma and splenic norepinephrine concentrations and splenic norepinephrine turnover, and partially reversed the sympathetic nerve loss; and (2) increased β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) density and β-AR-stimulated cAMP production. Collectively, these findings suggest a protective effect of lowering sympathetic tone on sympathetic nerve integrity, and enhanced sympathetic neurotransmission in secondary immune organs. PMID:22546498

  10. Renal sympathetic nerve ablation for treatment-resistant hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Krum, Henry; Schlaich, Markus; Sobotka, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for increased cardiovascular events with accelerated sympathetic nerve activity implicated in the pathogenesis and progression of disease. Blood pressure is not adequately controlled in many patients, despite the availability of effective pharmacotherapy. Novel procedure- as well as device-based strategies, such as percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve denervation, have been developed to improve blood pressure in these refractory patients. Renal sympathetic denervation not only reduces blood pressure but also renal as well as systemic sympathetic nerve activity in such patients. The reduction in blood pressure appears to be sustained over 3 years after the procedure, which suggests absence of re-innervation of renal sympathetic nerves. Safety appears to be adequate. This approach may also have potential in other disorders associated with enhanced sympathetic nerve activity such as congestive heart failure, chronic kidney disease and metabolic syndrome. This review will focus on the current status of percutaneous renal sympathetic nerve denervation, clinical efficacy and safety outcomes and prospects beyond refractory hypertension. PMID:23819768

  11. Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin alters regulation of visceral sympathetic nerve discharge.

    PubMed

    Garcia, A A; Fels, R J; Mosher, L J; Kenney, M J

    2012-03-01

    Bacillus anthracis infection is a pathophysiological condition that is complicated by progressive decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP). Lethal toxin (LeTx) is central to the pathogenesis of B. anthracis infection, and the sympathetic nervous system plays a critical role in physiological regulation of acute stressors. However, the effect of LeTx on sympathetic nerve discharge (SND), a critical link between central sympathetic neural circuits and MAP regulation, remains unknown. We determined visceral (renal, splenic, and adrenal) SND responses to continuous infusion of LeTx [lethal factor (100 μg/kg) + protective antigen (200 μg/kg) infused at 0.5 ml/h for ≤6 h] and vehicle (infused at 0.5 ml/h) in anesthetized, baroreceptor-intact and baroreceptor (sinoaortic)-denervated (SAD) Sprague-Dawley rats. LeTx infusions produced an initial state of cardiovascular and sympathetic nervous system activation in intact and SAD rats. Subsequent to peak LeTx-induced increases in arterial blood pressure, intact rats demonstrated a marked hypotension that was accompanied by significant reductions in SND (renal and splenic) and heart rate (HR) from peak levels. After peak LeTx-induced pressor and sympathoexcitatory responses in SAD rats, MAP, SND (renal, splenic, and adrenal), and HR were progressively and significantly reduced, supporting the hypothesis that LeTx alters the central regulation of sympathetic nerve outflow. These findings demonstrate that the regulation of visceral SND is altered in a complex manner during continuous anthrax LeTx infusions and suggest that sympathetic nervous system dysregulation may contribute to the marked hypotension accompanying B. anthracis infection. PMID:22114180

  12. Patterning of sympathetic nerve activity in response to vestibular stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; McAllen, R. M.; Yates, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests a role for the vestibular system in regulation of autonomic outflow during postural adjustments. In the present paper we review evidence for the patterning of sympathetic nerve activity elicited by vestibular stimulation. In response to electrical activation of vestibular afferents, firing of sympathetic nerves located throughout the body is altered. However, activity of the renal nerve is most sensitive to vestibular inputs. In contrast, high-intensity simultaneous activation of cutaneous and muscle inputs elicits equivalent changes in firing of the renal, superior mesenteric and lumbar colonic nerves. Responses of muscle vasoconstrictor (MVC) efferents to vestibular stimulation are either inhibitory (Type I) or are comprised of a combination of excitation and inhibition (Type II). Interestingly, single MVC units located in the hindlimb exhibited predominantly Type I responses while those located in the forelimb and face exhibited Type II responses. Furthermore, brachial and femoral arterial blood flows were dissociated in response to vestibular stimulation, such that brachial vascular resistance increased while femoral resistance decreased. These studies demonstrate that vestibulosympathetic reflexes are patterned according to both the anatomical location and innervation target of a particular sympathetic nerve, and can lead to distinct changes in local blood flow.

  13. Animal aging and regulation of sympathetic nerve discharge

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Studies completed in human subjects have made seminal contributions to understanding the effects of age on sympathetic nervous system (SNS) regulation. Numerous experimental constraints limit the design of studies involving human subjects; therefore, completion of studies in animal models of aging would be expected to provide additional insight regarding mechanisms mediating age-related changes in sympathetic nerve discharge (SND) regulation. The present review assesses the current state of the literature regarding contributions from animal studies on the effects of advancing age on SND regulation, focusing primarily on studies that have used direct recordings of sympathetic nerve outflow. Few studies using direct SND recordings have been completed in animal models of aging, regardless of the fundamental component of SND regulation reviewed (basal levels, acute responsiveness, relationships between the discharges in sympathetic nerves, central neural regulation). SNS responsiveness to various acute stressors is altered in aged compared with young animals; however, mechanisms remain virtually unexplored. There is a marked dearth of studies that have used central neural microinjection techniques in conjunction with SND recordings in aged animals, making it difficult to develop an evidence-based framework regarding potential age-associated effects on central regulation of SND. Determination of age-related changes in mechanisms regulating SND is important for understanding relationships between chronic disease development and changes in SNS function; however, this can only be achieved by substantially extending the current knowledge base regarding the effects of age on SND regulation in animal studies. PMID:20651223

  14. Dexmedetomidine and Regulation of Splenic Sympathetic Nerve Discharge

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, MJ; Larsen, BT; McMurphy, RM; Mason, D; Fels, RJ

    2014-01-01

    Recent lines of inquiry indicate sedatives can influence the immune system, leading to the concept of sedative-induced immunomodulation. It has been hypothesized that sedatives may alter immune responses by modulating the sympathetic nervous system, however, little information is known regarding the effects of sedatives on regulation of splenic sympathetic nerve discharge (SND), a significant omission based on the functional role that changes in splenic SND exert on splenic cytokine gene expression. The present investigation determined the effect of systemic Dexmedetomidine (Dex) administration on the level of directly-recorded splenic SND and tested the hypothesis that the intravenous administration of Dex would inhibit splenic SND in anesthetized rats. The present results demonstrate for the first time that intravenous Dex administration significantly reduces splenic sympathetic nerve outflow in baroreceptor-intact and sinoaortic-denervated rats, indicating that Dex administration alters the central regulation of splenic SND. The present results provide new information regarding the effect of a centrally-acting alpha2-adrenergic agonist on the level of sympathetic nerve outflow to a secondary lymphoid organ that plays a critical role in peripheral immune responses. PMID:24656574

  15. Nerve Growth Factor Decreases in Sympathetic and Sensory Nerves of Rats with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) plays a critical role in the maintenance and survival of both sympathetic and sensory nerves. Also, NGF can regulate receptor expression and neuronal activity in the sympathetic and sensory neurons. Abnormalities in NGF regulation are observed in patients and animals with heart failure (HF). Nevertheless, the effects of chronic HF on the levels of NGF within the sympathetic and sensory nerves are not known. Thus, the ELISA method was used to assess the levels of NGF in the stellate ganglion (SG) and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons of control rats and rats with chronic HF induced by myocardial infarction. Our data show for the first time that the levels of NGF were significantly decreased (P < 0.05) in the SG and DRG neurons 6–20 weeks after ligation of the coronary artery. In addition, a close relation was observed between the NGF levels and the left ventricular function. In conclusion, chronic HF impairs the expression of NGF in the sympathetic and sensory nerves. Given that sensory afferent nerves are engaged in the sympathetic nervous responses to somatic stimulation (i.e. muscle activity during exercise) via a reflex mechanism, our data indicate that NGF is likely responsible for the development of muscle reflex-mediated abnormal sympathetic responsiveness observed in chronic HF. PMID:24913185

  16. Attenuated sympathetic nerve responses after 24 hours of bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khan, Mazhar H.; Kunselman, Allen R.; Leuenberger, Urs A.; Davidson, William R Jr; Ray, Chester A.; Gray, Kristen S.; Hogeman, Cynthia S.; Sinoway, Lawrence I.

    2002-01-01

    Bed rest reduces orthostatic tolerance. Despite decades of study, the cause of this phenomenon remains unclear. In this report we examined hemodynamic and sympathetic nerve responses to graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP) before and after 24 h of bed rest. LBNP allows for baroreceptor disengagement in a graded fashion. We measured heart rate (HR), cardiac output (HR x stroke volume obtained by echo Doppler), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during a progressive and graded LBNP paradigm. Negative pressure was increased by 10 mmHg every 3 min until presyncope or completion of -60 mmHg. After bed rest, LBNP tolerance was reduced in 11 of 13 subjects (P <.023), HR was greater (P <.002), cardiac output was unchanged, and the ability to augment MSNA at high levels of LBNP was reduced (rate of rise for 30- to 60-mmHg LBNP before bed rest 0.073 bursts x min(-1) x mmHg(-1); after bed rest 0.035 bursts x min(-1) x mmHg(-1); P < 0.016). These findings suggest that 24 h of bed rest reduces sympathetic nerve responses to LBNP.

  17. Mechanisms mediating renal sympathetic nerve activation in obesity-related hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chen, W; Leo, S; Weng, C; Yang, X; Wu, Y; Tang, X

    2015-04-01

    Excessive renal sympathetic nerve activation may be one of the mechanisms underlying obesity-related hypertension. Impaired baroreflex sensitivity, adipokine disorders-such as leptin, adiponectin, and resistin-activation of the renin-angiotensin system, hyperinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and renal sodium retention present in obesity increase renal sympathetic nerve activity, thus contributing to the development of hypertension. Renal sympathetic denervation reduces both renal sympathetic activity and blood pressure in patients with obesity-related hypertension. PMID:24609799

  18. Asian women have attenuated sympathetic activation but enhanced renal-adrenal responses during pregnancy compared to Caucasian women.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yoshiyuki; Best, Stuart A; Jarvis, Sara S; Shibata, Shigeki; Parker, Rosemary S; Casey, Brian M; Levine, Benjamin D; Fu, Qi

    2015-03-01

    Asians have a lower prevalence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy than Caucasians. Since sympathetic overactivity and dysregulation of the renal-adrenal system (e.g. low aldosterone levels) have been found in preeclamptic women, we hypothesized that Asians have lower muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and greater aldosterone concentrations during normal pregnancy than Caucasians. In a prospective study, blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and MSNA were measured during supine and upright tilt (30 deg and 60 deg for 5 min each) in 9 Asians (32 ± 1 years (mean ± SEM)) and 12 Caucasians (29 ± 1 years) during pre-, early (≤8 weeks of gestation) and late (32-36 weeks) pregnancy, and post-partum (6-10 weeks after delivery). Supine MSNA increased with pregnancy in both groups (P < 0.001); it was significantly lower in Asians than Caucasians (14 ± 3 vs. 23 ± 3 bursts min(-1) and 16 ± 5 vs. 30 ± 3 bursts min(-1) in early and late pregnancy, respectively; P = 0.023). BP decreased during early pregnancy (P < 0.001), but was restored during late pregnancy. HR increased during pregnancy (P < 0.001) with no racial difference (P = 0.758). MSNA increased during tilting and it was markedly lower in Asians than Caucasians in late pregnancy (31 ± 6 vs. 49 ± 3 bursts min(-1) at 60 deg tilt; P = 0.003). Upright BP was lower in Asians, even in pre-pregnancy (P = 0.006), and this racial difference persisted during pregnancy. Direct renin and aldosterone increased during pregnancy (both P < 0.001); these hormones were greater in Asians (P = 0.086 and P = 0.014). Thus, Asians have less sympathetic activation but more upregulated renal-adrenal responses than Caucasians during pregnancy. These results may explain, at least in part, why Asian women are at low risk of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. PMID:25545472

  19. Effects of leptin on sympathetic nerve activity in conscious mice.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Donald A; Despas, Fabien; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2015-09-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone, leptin, has emerged as an important regulator of regional sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) with pathophysiological implications in obesity. Genetically engineered mice are useful to understand the molecular pathways underlying the SNA responses evoked by leptin. However, so far the effect of leptin on direct SNA in mice has been studied under general anesthesia. Here, we examined the sympathetic responses evoked by leptin in conscious mice. Mice were instrumented, under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia, with renal or lumbar SNA recordings using a thin (40 gauge) bipolar platinum-iridium wire. The electrodes were exteriorized at the nape of the neck and mice were allowed (5 h) to recover from anesthesia. Interestingly, the reflex increases in renal and lumbar SNA caused by sodium nitroprusside (SNP)-induced hypotension was higher in the conscious phase versus the anesthetized state, whereas the increase in both renal and lumbar SNA evoked by leptin did not differ between anesthetized or conscious mice. Next, we assessed whether isoflurane anesthesia would yield a better outcome. Again, the SNP-induced increase in renal SNA and baroreceptor-renal SNA reflex were significantly elevated in the conscious states relative to isoflurane-anesthetized phase, but the renal SNA response induced by leptin in the conscious states were qualitatively comparable to those evoked above. Thus, despite improvement in sympathetic reflexes in conscious mice the sympathetic responses evoked by leptin mimic those induced during anesthesia. PMID:26381017

  20. Effect of morphine on sympathetic nerve activity in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Jason R.; Sauder, Charity L.; Ray, Chester A.

    2002-01-01

    There are conflicting reports for the role of endogenous opioids on sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to exercise in humans. A number of studies have utilized naloxone (an opioid-receptor antagonist) to investigate the effect of opioids during exercise. In the present study, we examined the effect of morphine (an opioid-receptor agonist) on sympathetic and cardiovascular responses at rest and during isometric handgrip (IHG). Eleven subjects performed 2 min of IHG (30% maximum) followed by 2 min of postexercise muscle ischemia (PEMI) before and after systemic infusion of morphine (0.075 mg/kg loading dose + 1 mg/h maintenance) or placebo (saline) in double-blinded experiments on separate days. Morphine increased resting muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; 17 +/- 2 to 22 +/- 2 bursts/min; P < 0.01) and increased mean arterial pressure (MAP; 87 +/- 2 to 91 +/- 2 mmHg; P < 0.02), but it decreased heart rate (HR; 61 +/- 4 to 59 +/- 3; P < 0.01). However, IHG elicited similar increases for MSNA, MAP, and HR between the control and morphine trial (drug x exercise interaction = not significant). Moreover, responses to PEMI were not different. Placebo had no effect on resting, IHG, and PEMI responses. We conclude that morphine modulates cardiovascular and sympathetic responses at rest but not during isometric exercise.

  1. Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Simulated Diving in Healthy Humans

    PubMed Central

    Shamsuzzaman, Abu; Ackerman, Michael J.; Kuniyoshi, Fatima Sert; Accurso, Valentina; Davison, Diane; Amin, Raouf S.; Somers, Virend K.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of our study was to develop a simple and practical method for simulating diving in humans using facial cold exposure and apnea stimuli to measure neural and circulatory responses during the stimulated diving reflex. We hypothesized that responses to simultaneous facial cold exposure and apnea (simulated diving) would be synergistic, exceeding the sum of responses to individual stimuli. We studied 56 volunteers (24 female and 32 male), average age 39 years. All subjects were healthy, free of cardiovascular and other diseases, and on no medications. Although muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), blood pressure, and vascular resistance increased markedly during both early and late phases of simulated diving, significant reductions in heart rate were observed only during the late phase. Total MSNA during simulated diving was greater than combined MSNA responses to the individual stimuli. We found that simulated diving is a powerful stimulus to sympathetic nerve traffic with significant bradycardia evident in the late phase of diving and eliciting synergistic sympathetic and parasympathetic responses. Our data provide insight into autonomic triggers that could help explain catastrophic cardiovascular events that may occur during asphyxia or swimming, such as in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and congenital long QT syndrome. PMID:24368150

  2. Sympathetic nerve activity and simulated diving in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Shamsuzzaman, Abu; Ackerman, Michael J; Kuniyoshi, Fatima Sert; Accurso, Valentina; Davison, Diane; Amin, Raouf S; Somers, Virend K

    2014-04-01

    The goal of our study was to develop a simple and practical method for simulating diving in humans using facial cold exposure and apnea stimuli to measure neural and circulatory responses during the stimulated diving reflex. We hypothesized that responses to simultaneous facial cold exposure and apnea (simulated diving) would be synergistic, exceeding the sum of responses to individual stimuli. We studied 56 volunteers (24 female and 32 male), average age of 39 years. All subjects were healthy, free of cardiovascular and other diseases, and on no medications. Although muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), blood pressure, and vascular resistance increased markedly during both early and late phases of simulated diving, significant reductions in heart rate were observed only during the late phase. Total MSNA during simulated diving was greater than combined MSNA responses to the individual stimuli. We found that simulated diving is a powerful stimulus to sympathetic nerve traffic with significant bradycardia evident in the late phase of diving and eliciting synergistic sympathetic and parasympathetic responses. Our data provide insight into autonomic triggers that could help explain catastrophic cardiovascular events that may occur during asphyxia or swimming, such as in patients with obstructive sleep apnea or congenital long QT syndrome. PMID:24368150

  3. Gross anatomical study of the sympathetic cardiac nerves in the house musk shrew (Suncus murinus).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Ai; Tanaka, Shigenori; Miyamoto, Kensaku; Yi, Shuang-Qin; Nakatani, Toshio

    2007-05-01

    The sympathetic cardiac nerves originating from the cervical and upper thoracic sympathetic ganglia in the house musk shrew (Suncus murinus) were examined using macroscopic and whole-mount immunohistochemical methods. Based on the results, the nerves were macroscopically classified into the following three groups: nerves innervating the cervical sympathetic ganglia mainly to the arterial porta of the heart; nerves supplying the stellate and thoracic sympathetic ganglia at the level of T2-T5 or T6 for both the arterial and venous portae of the heart; and nerves innervating the thoracic sympathetic ganglia at the level of T4-T9 to the esophagus and lung and then the heart via the blood vessels within the mediastinal pleura. These findings in the house musk shrew suggest a possible primitive morphological pattern of the cervical and thoracic sympathetic nervous system that may be related to those in other mammals, including humans. PMID:17393537

  4. The storage of endogenous noradrenaline in sympathetic nerve terminals

    PubMed Central

    Bisby, M. A.; Fillenz, Marianne

    1971-01-01

    1. The subcellular distribution of noradrenaline in sympathetic nerve terminals of rat vas deferens and cat spleen has been studied by cell fractionation methods combined with fluorescence and electronmicroscopic histochemical methods for noradrenaline. 2. Pinched-off axon varicosities (synaptosomes) were isolated and identified by fluorescence and electronmicroscopy in the mitochondrial pellet. 3. The proportion of large to small dense-cored vesicles in electronmicrographs of sympathetic nerve terminals varies in different organs. In rat vas deferens 4% and in cat spleen 20% are large vesicles. 4. Density gradients of rat vas deferens have a single low density peak of noradrenaline at 0·6 M sucrose, whereas those of cat spleen have an additional peak of noradrenaline at 1·1 M sucrose. 5. Small dense-cored vesicles were identified electronmicroscopically in the low density fractions and large dense-cored vesicles in the high density fractions from density gradients. 6. We conclude that both small and large dense-cored vesicles store noradrenaline. ImagesPlate 1Plate 2Plate 3 PMID:5579649

  5. Modified sympathetic nerve regulation in AKAP5-null mice.

    PubMed

    Han, Chong; Tomita, Hirofumi; Ohba, Takayoshi; Nishizaki, Kimitaka; Ogata, Yoshiki; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Sawamura, Daisuke; Yanagisawa, Teruyuki; Osanai, Tomohiro; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Matsubara, Atsushi; Adachi, Takeshi; Ono, Kyoichi; Okumura, Ken; Murakami, Manabu

    2016-01-22

    Genetic analyses have revealed an important association between A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) and the intracellular calcium modulating system. AKAP5, also known as AKAP79/150, is an anchoring protein between PKA and voltage-dependent calcium channels, ryanodine receptor-2, phospholamban and other molecules. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the physiological importance of AKAP5 in the creation of cardiac rhythm using AKAP5-null mice. ECG analysis showed a normal sinus rhythm and a decreased responsiveness to isoproterenol in AKAP5-null mice compared with wild-type mice. Analysis of heart rate variability revealed that the R-R interval was unstable in AKAP5-null mutants and that the low-frequency components had decreased, indicating that the tonus of the sympathetic nervous system was affected. Furthermore, the atrium of the AKAP5-null mice showed a decreased positive inotropic response to isoproterenol, indicating the involvement of AKAP5 in a PKA-dependent pathway. Thus, our present study revealed that AKAP5 plays a significant role in the regulation of sympathetic nerve activities. PMID:26713362

  6. Obesity-induced increases in sympathetic nerve activity: sex matters

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Virginia L.; Shi, Zhigang; Holwerda, Seth W.; Fadel, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Abundant evidence obtained largely from male human and animal subjects indicates that obesity increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), which contributes to hypertension development. However, recent studies that included women reported that the strong relationships between muscle SNA and waist circumference or body mass index (BMI) found in men are not present in overweight and obese women. A similar sex difference in the association between adiposity and hypertension development has been identified in animal models of obesity. In this brief review, we consider two possible mechanisms for this sex difference. First, visceral adiposity, leptin, insulin, and angiotensin II have been identified as potential culprits in obesity-induced sympathoexcitation in males. We explore if these factors wield the same impact in females. Second, we consider if sex differences in vascular reactivity to sympathetic activation contribute. Our survey of the literature suggests that premenopausal females may be able to resist obesity-induced sympathoexcitation and hypertension in part due to differences in adipose disposition as well as its muted inflammatory response and reduced production of pressor versus depressor components of the renin-angiotensin system. In addition, vascular responsiveness to increased SNA may be reduced. However, more importantly, we identify the urgent need for further study, not only of sex differences per se, but also of the mechanisms that may mediate these differences. This information is required not only to refine treatment options for obese premenopausal women but also to potentially reveal new therapeutic avenues in obese men and women. PMID:25435000

  7. Influence of laser radiation on some integrative indications of sympathetic-adrenal system activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronchenkova, G. F.; Chesnokova, N. P.

    2002-07-01

    One of the goals of this experimental research is elucidation of the influence of laser radiation on the functional state of the sympathetic-adrenal system of a microorganism, which to a large extent defines the intensity of an inflammatory reaction development, and in particular regeneration and repair process in the zone of post traumatic influence of infectious and non-infectious pathogen factors. We have also studied the alteration of adrenaline and noradrenaline content in the wound itself in the dynamics of regeneration.

  8. Low-order chaos in sympathetic nerve activity causes 1/f fluctuation of heartbeat intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osaka, Motohisa; Kumagai, Hiroo; Sakata, Katsufumi; Onami, Toshiko; Chon, Ki H.; Watanabe, Mari A.; Saruta, Takao

    2004-04-01

    The mechanism of 1/f scaling of heartbeat intervals remains unknown. We recorded heartbeat intervals, sympathetic nerve activity, and blood pressure in conscious rats with normal or high blood pressure. Using nonlinear analyses, we demonstrate that the dynamics of this system of 3 variables is low-order chaos, and that sympathetic nerve activity leads to heartbeat interval and blood pressure changes. It is suggested that 1/f scaling of heartbeat intervals results from the low-order chaos of these variables and that impaired regulation of blood pressure by sympathetic nerve activity is likely to cause experimentally observable steeper scaling of heartbeat intervals in hypertensive (high blood pressure) rats.

  9. Low-order chaos in sympathetic nerve activity and scaling of heartbeat intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osaka, Motohisa; Kumagai, Hiroo; Sakata, Katsufumi; Onami, Toshiko; Chon, Ki H.; Watanabe, Mari A.; Saruta, Takao

    2003-04-01

    The mechanism of 1/f scaling of heartbeat intervals remains unknown. We recorded heartbeat intervals, sympathetic nerve activity, and blood pressure in conscious rats with normal or high blood pressure. Using nonlinear analyses, we demonstrate that the dynamics of this system of three variables is low-order chaos, and that sympathetic nerve activity leads to heartbeat interval and blood pressure changes. It is suggested that impaired regulation of blood pressure by sympathetic nerve activity is likely to cause experimentally observable steeper scaling of heartbeat intervals in hypertensive (high blood pressure) rats.

  10. Detection of disease-associated prion protein in the optic nerve and the adrenal gland of cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy by using highly sensitive immunolabeling procedures.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Fukuda, Shigeo; Yokoyama, Takashi; Mohri, Shirou

    2012-04-01

    A sensitive immunohistochemical procedure, the tyramide signal amplification (TSA) system, was applied to detect the localization of immunolabeled disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in cattle affected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). In this procedure, immunolabeling could be visualized in the optic nerve and the adrenal medulla. In the optic nerve, the dual immunofluorescent technique showed that the granular PrP(Sc) was occasionally detected in the astrocytes, microglia, and myelin sheath adjacent to the axon. Clustered PrP(Sc) was also scattered in association with microglial cells and astrocytes of the optic nerve. In the adrenal gland, PrP(Sc) immunolabeling was confined within the sympathetic nerve fibers and endings. The results suggest that (1) PrP(Sc) might centrifugally spread within and between glial cells and/or the non-axonal (also known as ad-axonal) region of nerve fibers, rather than the axonal and/or extracellular space pathway in the optic nerve, and (2) the sympathetic innervations might be important for the trafficking of BSE agent in the adrenal glands of cattle. This study also suggests that tyramide-based immunochemical analysis should be performed to detect immunolabeled PrP(Sc) in the extracerebral tissues of BSE-affected cattle. PMID:22260993

  11. Significant Differences in Sympathetic Nerve Fiber Density Among the Facial Skin Nerves: A Histologic Study Using Human Cadaveric Specimens.

    PubMed

    Matsubayashi, Tadatoshi; Cho, Kwang Ho; Jang, Hyung Suk; Murakami, Gen; Yamamoto, Masahito; Abe, Shin-Ichi

    2016-08-01

    Sympathetic nerve fibers in the skin nerves are connected with vasomotor, thermoregulatory, sensory input modulatory, and immunologic events; however, to our knowledge, no histological information is available for skin nerves in the human face. Using specimens from 17 donated cadavers (mean age, 86 years), we measured a sectional area of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive fibers in (1) the frontal nerve (V1), (2) the infraorbital nerve (V2), (3) the mental nerve (V3), (4) the greater auricular nerve (C2), (5) the auriculotemporal nerve (ATN), and (6) the zygomatic branch of the facial nerve (VII). The V1, V2, and V3 were obtained at their entrances to the subcutaneous tissue from the bony canal or notch. The V1, C2, ATN, and/or VII usually contained abundant TH-positive fibers (almost 3%-8% of the nerve sectional area), whereas the V2 and V3 consistently carried few TH-positive fibers (<1%). The difference between these two groups was quite significant (P < 0.001). Thus, from the superior cervical ganglion, the sympathetic nerve fibers reached the forehead through the frontal nerve trunk, whereas artery-bounded fibers came to the cheek, nose, and mouth. The sympathetic palsy caused by trigeminal nerve involvement is mainly characterized by the symptoms seen in the distribution of the ophthalmic division of the trigeminal nerve, such as in Horner's syndrome. It suggests that the forehead and the other facial areas are representative parts of those different sympathetic innervations that could be useful for evaluating the sympathetic function of the face in various diseases. Anat Rec, 299:1054-1059, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27072367

  12. Recording sympathetic nerve activity chronically in rats: surgery techniques, assessment of nerve activity, and quantification

    PubMed Central

    Muntzel, Martin S.

    2013-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system plays a pivotal role in homeostasis through its direct innervation and functional impact on a variety of end organs. In rats, a number of methods are available to assess sympathetic nervous system function. Traditionally, direct recording of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) has been restricted to acute, anesthetized preparations or conscious animals within a few days after electrode implantation. However, these approaches provide short-term data in studies designed to investigate changes in SNA during chronic disease states. Over the last several years, chronic SNA recording has been pioneered in rabbits and more recently in rats. The purpose of this article is to provide insights and a “how to” guide for chronic SNA recordings in rats based on experiences from two independent laboratories. We will present common methodologies used to chronically record SNA, characteristics and methods to distinguish sympathetic bursts versus electrical artifacts (and provide corresponding audio clips when available), and provide suggestions for analysis and presentation of data. In many instances, these same guidelines are applicable to acute SNA recordings. Using the surgical approaches described herein, both laboratories have been able to chronically record SNA in >50% of rats for a duration >3 wk. The ability to record SNA over the time course of several weeks will, undoubtedly, greatly impact the field of autonomic and cardiovascular physiology. PMID:24014674

  13. Higher sympathetic nerve activity during ventricular (VVI) than during dual-chamber (DDD) pacing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. A.; Morillo, C. A.; Eckberg, D. L.; Ellenbogen, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We determined the short-term effects of single-chamber ventricular pacing and dual-chamber atrioventricular (AV) pacing on directly measured sympathetic nerve activity. BACKGROUND: Dual-chamber AV cardiac pacing results in greater cardiac output and lower systemic vascular resistance than does single-chamber ventricular pacing. However, it is unclear whether these hemodynamic advantages result in less sympathetic nervous system outflow. METHODS: In 13 patients with a dual-chamber pacemaker, we recorded the electrocardiogram, noninvasive arterial pressure (Finapres), respiration and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (microneurography) during 3 min of underlying basal heart rate and 3 min of ventricular and AV pacing at rates of 60 and 100 beats/min. RESULTS: Arterial pressure was lowest and muscle sympathetic nerve activity was highest at the underlying basal heart rate. Arterial pressure increased with cardiac pacing and was greater with AV than with ventricular pacing (change in mean blood pressure +/- SE: 10 +/- 3 vs. 2 +/- 2 mm Hg at 60 beats/min; 21 +/- 5 vs. 14 +/- 2 mm Hg at 100 beats/min; p < 0.05). Sympathetic nerve activity decreased with cardiac pacing and the decline was greater with AV than with ventricular pacing (60 beats/min -40 +/- 11% vs. -17 +/- 7%; 100 beats/min -60 +/- 9% vs. -48 +/- 10%; p < 0.05). Although most patients showed a strong inverse relation between arterial pressure and muscle sympathetic nerve activity, three patients with severe left ventricular dysfunction (ejection fraction < or = 30%) showed no relation between arterial pressure and sympathetic activity. CONCLUSIONS: Short-term AV pacing results in lower sympathetic nerve activity and higher arterial pressure than does ventricular pacing, indicating that cardiac pacing mode may influence sympathetic outflow simply through arterial baroreflex mechanisms. We speculate that the greater incidence of adverse outcomes in patients treated with single-chamber ventricular

  14. Comparison of sympathetic nerve activity normalization procedures in conscious rabbits.

    PubMed

    Burke, Sandra L; Lim, Kyungjoon; Moretti, John-Luis; Head, Geoffrey A

    2016-05-01

    One of the main constraints associated with recording sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in both humans and experimental animals is that microvolt values reflect characteristics of the recording conditions and limit comparisons between different experimental groups. The nasopharyngeal response has been validated for normalizing renal SNA (RSNA) in conscious rabbits, and in humans muscle SNA is normalized to the maximum burst in the resting period. We compared these two methods of normalization to determine whether either could detect elevated RSNA in hypertensive rabbits compared with normotensive controls. We also tested whether either method eliminated differences based only on different recording conditions by separating RSNA of control (sham) rabbits into two groups with low or high microvolts. Hypertension was induced by 5 wk of renal clipping (2K1C), 3 wk of high-fat diet (HFD), or 3 mo infusion of a low dose of angiotensin (ANG II). Normalization to the nasopharyngeal response revealed RSNA that was 88, 51, and 34% greater in 2K1C, HFD, and ANG II rabbits, respectively, than shams (P < 0.05), but normalization to the maximum burst showed no differences. The RSNA baroreflex followed a similar pattern whether RSNA was expressed in microvolts or normalized. Both methods abolished the difference between low and high microvolt RSNA. These results suggest that maximum burst amplitude is a useful technique for minimizing differences between recording conditions but is unable to detect real differences between groups. We conclude that the nasopharyngeal reflex is the superior method for normalizing sympathetic recordings in conscious rabbits. PMID:26921439

  15. Asian women have attenuated sympathetic activation but enhanced renal–adrenal responses during pregnancy compared to Caucasian women

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Yoshiyuki; Best, Stuart A; Jarvis, Sara S; Shibata, Shigeki; Parker, Rosemary S; Casey, Brian M; Levine, Benjamin D; Fu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Asians have a lower prevalence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy than Caucasians. Since sympathetic overactivity and dysregulation of the renal–adrenal system (e.g. low aldosterone levels) have been found in preeclamptic women, we hypothesized that Asians have lower muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and greater aldosterone concentrations during normal pregnancy than Caucasians. In a prospective study, blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and MSNA were measured during supine and upright tilt (30 deg and 60 deg for 5 min each) in 9 Asians (32 ± 1 years (mean ± SEM)) and 12 Caucasians (29 ± 1 years) during pre-, early (≤8 weeks of gestation) and late (32–36 weeks) pregnancy, and post-partum (6–10 weeks after delivery). Supine MSNA increased with pregnancy in both groups (P < 0.001); it was significantly lower in Asians than Caucasians (14 ± 3 vs. 23 ± 3 bursts min−1 and 16 ± 5 vs. 30 ± 3 bursts min−1 in early and late pregnancy, respectively; P = 0.023). BP decreased during early pregnancy (P < 0.001), but was restored during late pregnancy. HR increased during pregnancy (P < 0.001) with no racial difference (P = 0.758). MSNA increased during tilting and it was markedly lower in Asians than Caucasians in late pregnancy (31 ± 6 vs. 49 ± 3 bursts min−1 at 60 deg tilt; P = 0.003). Upright BP was lower in Asians, even in pre-pregnancy (P = 0.006), and this racial difference persisted during pregnancy. Direct renin and aldosterone increased during pregnancy (both P < 0.001); these hormones were greater in Asians (P = 0.086 and P = 0.014). Thus, Asians have less sympathetic activation but more upregulated renal–adrenal responses than Caucasians during pregnancy. These results may explain, at least in part, why Asian women are at low risk of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy. Key points Asian women have a lower prevalence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy than Caucasian

  16. Regulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity after bed rest deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pawelczyk, J. A.; Zuckerman, J. H.; Blomqvist, C. G.; Levine, B. D.

    2001-01-01

    Cardiovascular deconditioning reduces orthostatic tolerance. To determine whether changes in autonomic function might produce this effect, we developed stimulus-response curves relating limb vascular resistance, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) with seven subjects before and after 18 days of -6 degrees head-down bed rest. Both lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -15 and -30 mmHg) and rapid saline infusion (15 and 30 ml/kg body wt) were used to produce a wide variation in PCWP. Orthostatic tolerance was assessed with graded LBNP to presyncope. Bed rest reduced LBNP tolerance from 23.9 +/- 2.1 to 21.2 +/- 1.5 min, respectively (means +/- SE, P = 0.02). The MSNA-PCWP relationship was unchanged after bed rest, though at any stage of the LBNP protocol PCWP was lower, and MSNA was greater. Thus bed rest deconditioning produced hypovolemia, causing a shift in operating point on the stimulus-response curve. The relationship between limb vascular resistance and MSNA was not significantly altered after bed rest. We conclude that bed rest deconditioning does not alter reflex control of MSNA, but may produce orthostatic intolerance through a combination of hypovolemia and cardiac atrophy.

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid Hypernatremia Elevates Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Blood Pressure via the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla.

    PubMed

    Stocker, Sean D; Lang, Susan M; Simmonds, Sarah S; Wenner, Megan M; Farquhar, William B

    2015-12-01

    Elevated NaCl concentrations of the cerebrospinal fluid increase sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in salt-sensitive hypertension. Neurons of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) play a pivotal role in the regulation of SNA and receive mono- or polysynaptic inputs from several hypothalamic structures responsive to hypernatremia. Therefore, the present study investigated the contribution of RVLM neurons to the SNA and pressor response to cerebrospinal fluid hypernatremia. Lateral ventricle infusion of 0.15 mol/L, 0.6 mol/L, and 1.0 mol/L NaCl (5 µL/10 minutes) produced concentration-dependent increases in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure, despite no change in splanchnic SNA and a decrease in renal SNA. Ganglionic blockade with chlorisondamine or acute lesion of the lamina terminalis blocked or significantly attenuated these responses, respectively. RVLM microinjection of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) agonist muscimol abolished the sympathoexcitatory response to intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 mol/L NaCl. Furthermore, blockade of ionotropic glutamate, but not angiotensin II type 1, receptors significantly attenuated the increase in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure. Finally, single-unit recordings of spinally projecting RVLM neurons revealed 3 distinct populations based on discharge responses to intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 mol/L NaCl: type I excited (46%; 11/24), type II inhibited (37%; 9/24), and type III no change (17%; 4/24). All neurons with slow conduction velocities were type I cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that acute increases in cerebrospinal fluid NaCl concentrations selectively activate a discrete population of RVLM neurons through glutamate receptor activation to increase SNA and arterial blood pressure. PMID:26416846

  18. Sympathetic and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal asymmetry in generalized anxiety disorder.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Jonathan W; Fisher, Aaron J; Newman, Michelle G; Granger, Douglas A

    2016-06-01

    Physiologic investigations of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) have skewed toward assessment of the autonomic nervous system, largely neglecting hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis variables. Although these systems coordinate-suggesting a degree of symmetry-to promote adaptive functioning, most studies opt to monitor either one system or the other. Using a ratio of salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) over salivary cortisol, the present study examined symmetry between the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and HPA axis in individuals with GAD (n = 71) and healthy controls (n = 37). Compared to healthy controls, individuals with GAD exhibited greater baseline ratios of sAA/cortisol and smaller ratios of sAA/cortisol following a mental arithmetic challenge. We propose that the present study provides evidence for SNS-HPA asymmetry in GAD. Further, these results suggest that increased SNS suppression in GAD may be partially mediated by cortisol activity. PMID:26934635

  19. Renal sympathetic nerve activity is increased in monosodium glutamate induced hyperadipose rats.

    PubMed

    da Silva Mattos, Alexandro Márcio; Xavier, Carlos Henrique; Karlen-Amarante, Marlusa; da Cunha, Natália Veronez; Fontes, Marco Antonio Peliky; Martins-Pinge, Marli Cardoso

    2012-08-01

    The literature suggests that both obesity and hypertension are associated with increased sympathetic nerve activity. In the present study we evaluated the renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) in hyperadipose rats induced by neonatal administration of monosodium glutamate (MSG). Neonatal Wistar male rats were injected with MSG (4 mg/g body weight ID) or equimolar saline (control) for 5 days. At 90th day, all rats were anesthetized (urethane 1.4 g/kg) and prepared for MAP, HR and renal sympathetic nerve activity recordings. The anesthetized MSG rats presented baseline hypertension and increased baseline RSNA compared with control. Our results suggest the involvement of the renal sympathetic nervous system in the physiopathology of the MSG obesity. PMID:22705582

  20. Studies on the Release of Renin by Direct and Reflex Activation of Renal Sympathetic Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donald, David E.

    1979-01-01

    Presents data on release of renin during direct and indirect stimulation of renal nerves. Conclusions show that renin release is influenced by change in activity of carotid and cardiopulmonary baroreceptor systems, and excitation of discrete areas of brain and hypothalamus by changes in renal sympathetic nerve. (Author/SA)

  1. Alterations of sympathetic nerve fibers in avascular necrosis of femoral head

    PubMed Central

    Li, Deqiang; Liu, Peilai; Zhang, Yuankai; Li, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Avascular necrosis of the femoral head (ANFH) was mainly due to alterations of bone vascularity. And noradrenaline (NA), as the neurotransmitter of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), leads to the vasoconstriction by activating its α-Receptor. This study was to explore the nerve fiber density of the femoral head in the rabbit model of ANFH. Methods: Twenty New Zealand white rabbits were used in this study. The rabbit model of ANFH was established by the injection of methylprednisolone acetate. The nerve fiber density and distribution in the femoral head was determined using an Olympus BH2 microscope. Results: Significant fewer sympathetic nerve fibers was found in the ANFH intertrochanteric bone samples (P = 0.036) with osteonecrosis. The number of sympathetic nerve fibers was compared between the two groups. And less sympathetic nerve fibers were found in later stage ANFH samples in comparison with those of early stages. Conclusions: ANFH might be preceded by an inflammatory reaction, and an inflammatory response might lead to arthritic changes in tissue samples, which in turn reduces the number of sympathetic nerve fibers. PMID:26617812

  2. Nerve Growth Factor Inhibits Sympathetic Neurons' Response to an Injury Cytokine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadiack, Annette M.; Vaccariello, Stacey A.; Sun, Yi; Zigmond, Richard E.

    1998-06-01

    Axonal damage to adult peripheral neurons causes changes in neuronal gene expression. For example, axotomized sympathetic, sensory, and motor neurons begin to express galanin mRNA and protein, and recent evidence suggests that galanin plays a role in peripheral nerve regeneration. Previous studies in sympathetic and sensory neurons have established that galanin expression is triggered by two consequences of nerve transection: the induction of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and the reduction in the availability of the target-derived factor, nerve growth factor. It is shown in the present study that no stimulation of galanin expression occurs following direct application of LIF to intact neurons in the superior cervical sympathetic ganglion. Injection of animals with an antiserum to nerve growth factor concomitant with the application of LIF, on the other hand, does stimulate galanin expression. The data suggest that the response of neurons to an injury factor, LIF, is affected by whether the neurons still receive trophic signals from their targets.

  3. Influence of cervical sympathetic nerves on ventilation and upper airway resistance in the rat.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, K D; Curran, A K; Bradford, A

    1998-07-01

    The cervical sympathetic trunks innervate the carotid bodies, carotid baroreceptors, thyroid gland and the upper airway mucosa, structures which can influence breathing and upper airway resistance. However, their role in the control of ventilation and upper airway patency is poorly understood. A constant airflow was applied to the upper airway through a high-cervical tracheostomy in anaesthetized rats breathing spontaneously through a low-cervical tracheostomy. The peripheral ends of the cut cervical sympathetic trunks were stimulated electrically and airflow resistance and ventilation were measured. The effects of cervical sympathetic trunk section on ventilation were also measured in conscious rats. In conscious rats, cutting the sympathetic trunks caused a decrease in ventilation during normoxia but only slightly affected ventilatory responses to hypoxia and hypercapnia. In anaesthetized rats, sympathetic trunk stimulation caused an inhibition of breathing which was sometimes followed by excitation. These responses were unaffected by alpha- or beta-adrenoceptor blockade but were abolished by cutting the carotid sinus nerves. Sympathetic stimulation also caused a fall in upper airway resistance which was reduced by bypassing the nose, unaffected by propranolol or carotid sinus nerve section and abolished by phentolamine. It was concluded that the cervical sympathetic nerves exert important influences on ventilation and upper airway resistance. PMID:9701434

  4. Myocardial Infarction Causes Transient Cholinergic Transdifferentiation of Cardiac Sympathetic Nerves via gp130

    PubMed Central

    Olivas, Antoinette; Gardner, Ryan T.; Wang, Lianguo; Ripplinger, Crystal M.; Woodward, William R.

    2016-01-01

    Sympathetic and parasympathetic control of the heart is a classic example of norepinephrine (NE) and acetylcholine (ACh) triggering opposing actions. Sympathetic NE increases heart rate and contractility through activation of β receptors, whereas parasympathetic ACh slows the heart through muscarinic receptors. Sympathetic neurons can undergo a developmental transition from production of NE to ACh and we provide evidence that mouse cardiac sympathetic nerves transiently produce ACh after myocardial infarction (MI). ACh levels increased in viable heart tissue 10–14 d after MI, returning to control levels at 21 d, whereas NE levels were stable. At the same time, the genes required for ACh synthesis increased in stellate ganglia, which contain most of the sympathetic neurons projecting to the heart. Immunohistochemistry 14 d after MI revealed choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in stellate sympathetic neurons and vesicular ACh transporter immunoreactivity in tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cardiac sympathetic fibers. Finally, selective deletion of the ChAT gene from adult sympathetic neurons prevented the infarction-induced increase in cardiac ACh. Deletion of the gp130 cytokine receptor from sympathetic neurons prevented the induction of cholinergic genes after MI, suggesting that inflammatory cytokines induce the transient acquisition of a cholinergic phenotype in cardiac sympathetic neurons. Ex vivo experiments examining the effect of NE and ACh on rabbit cardiac action potential duration revealed that ACh blunted both the NE-stimulated decrease in cardiac action potential duration and increase in myocyte calcium transients. This raises the possibility that sympathetic co-release of ACh and NE may impair adaptation to high heart rates and increase arrhythmia susceptibility. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sympathetic neurons normally make norepinephrine (NE), which increases heart rate and the contractility of cardiac myocytes. We found that, after myocardial infarction, the

  5. Characteristics of sympathetic nerve activity in the rat sciatic nerve in response to microstimulation in a sympathetic fascicle in the contralateral side.

    PubMed

    Sato, Daisuke; Shiwaku, Yutaka; Nakamura, Ryoichi; Koizumi, Shuntaro; Feng, Zhonggang; Kusunoki, Masataka; Nakamura, Takao

    2013-01-01

    Microneurography is used for the monitor of various peripheral nerve activities. We recently reported that the electrical stimulation of peripheral sympathetic nerve fascicle via the microelectrode, i.e., microstimulation, temporarily reduced the blood glucose level in rats in case that the stimulation intensity was set high enough to induce small muscle contraction. However, the nature of microstimulation has little been clarified yet. Therefore, in the present study, we first detected sympathetic nerve signal microneurographically in the bilateral sciatic nerves of rats, and one of the microelectrodes was used for the microstimulation (0.25 ms-width pulse train at a rate of 1 Hz) while sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) was recorded in the contralateral side as a parameter of systemic sympathetic effects. The SNA, expressed as action potential rate, was transiently increased 150 ms after each stimulation pulse in case that the stimulation intensity was set not less than -0.1 V from the contraction threshold (around 0.32 V). To confirm that the increase was not caused by the activation of low threshold, thick fibers such as motor nerves in the vicinity of the microelectrode tip, next, a bipolar hook electrode, instead of the microelectrode, was then used in the stimulation side. As a result, the above-mentioned, transient increase in SNA was not observed any more in the contralateral side. These results suggest that systemic SNA could be enhanced with lower stimulation intensity than that inducing muscle contraction, and that thicker fibers may little affect the increase in the contralateral SNA. PMID:24111188

  6. [Changes in the activity of sympathetic-adrenal medullary system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system in humans exposed to psychogenic stressors and their effects on immunoreactivity].

    PubMed

    Simić, Natasa

    2010-10-01

    This paper gives an account of the functioning of the two systems in different stress induced situations. The activation of the sympathetic-adrenal medullary system is accompanied by the release of catecholamines, while the increased activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system results in the increased release of corticosteroids, especially cortisol. The role of the sympathetic-adrenal medullary system was investigated in immunologic changes induced by laboratory stressors. In the real, as in laboratory conditions, the effects of different stressors on the level of cortisol were studied, as it is the final product of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system activity. Additional (negative) effects on the functioning of these systems could induce some variables, as an increased consumption of alcohol, smoking, and sleeping disorder. Furthermore, the methodological shortcomings and the selection of subjects in previous studies are discussed. Previous results are also discussed, such as the immunosuppressive effects of cortisol, as well as the mediator and moderator variables in relation to stress and immunoreactivity. PMID:21688610

  7. Respiratory modulation of sympathetic nerve activity is enhanced in male rat offspring following uteroplacental insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Menuet, C; Wlodek, M E; Fong, A Y; Allen, A M

    2016-06-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity to the cardiovascular system displays prominent respiratory-related modulation which leads to the generation of rhythmic oscillations in blood pressure called Traube-Hering waves. An amplification of this respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity is observed in hypertension of both genetic, the spontaneously hypertensive rat, and induced, chronic intermittent hypoxia or maternal protein restriction during gestation, origin. Male offspring of mothers with uteroplacental insufficiency, induced by bilateral uterine vessel ligation at 18 days of gestation, are also hypertensive in adulthood. In this study we examined whether these male offspring display altered respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity at pre-hypertensive ages compared to controls. Respiratory, cardiovascular and sympathetic parameters were examined using the working heart-brainstem preparation in 35 day old male rats that had reduced birth weight due to uteroplacental insufficiency. Whilst all respiratory parameters were not different between groups, we observed an enhanced respiratory-related burst of thoracic sympathetic nerve activity and amplified Traube-Hering waves in the growth-restricted group. This group also showed an increased sympathetic and bradycardic response to activation of peripheral chemoreceptors. The observations add support to the view that altered respiratory modulation of sympathetic activity represents a common mechanism involved in the development of several forms of hypertension. PMID:26593642

  8. Baroreflex modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity at rest does not differ between morning and afternoon

    PubMed Central

    Hissen, Sarah L.; Macefield, Vaughan G.; Brown, Rachael; Witter, Trevor; Taylor, Chloe E.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular events is significantly higher in the morning than other times of day. This has previously been associated with poor blood pressure control via the cardiac baroreflex. However, it is not known whether diurnal variation exists in vascular sympathetic baroreflex function, in which blood pressure is regulated via muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). The aim of this study was to compare vascular sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in the same participants between the morning and afternoon. In 10 participants (mean age 22 ± 2.9 years), continuous measurements of blood pressure, heart rate and MSNA were made during 10 min of rest in the morning (between 0900 and 1000 h) and afternoon (between 1400 and 1500 h). Spontaneous vascular sympathetic BRS was quantified by plotting MSNA burst incidence against diastolic pressure (vascular sympathetic BRSinc), and by plotting total MSNA against diastolic pressure (vascular sympathetic BRStotal). Significant vascular sympathetic BRSinc and vascular sympathetic BRStotal slopes were obtained for 10 participants at both times of day. There was no significant difference in vascular sympathetic BRSinc between morning (−2.2 ± 0.6% bursts/mmHg) and afternoon (−2.5 ± 0.2% bursts/mmHg; P = 0.68) sessions. Similarly, vascular sympathetic BRStotal did not differ significantly between the morning (−3.0±0.5 AU/beat/mmHg) and afternoon (−2.9 ± 0.4 AU/beat/mmHg; P = 0.89). It is concluded that in healthy, young individuals baroreflex modulation of MSNA at rest does not differ between the morning and afternoon. The results indicate that recording MSNA at different times of the day is a valid means of assessing sympathetic function. PMID:26388723

  9. Baroreflex modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity at rest does not differ between morning and afternoon.

    PubMed

    Hissen, Sarah L; Macefield, Vaughan G; Brown, Rachael; Witter, Trevor; Taylor, Chloe E

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular events is significantly higher in the morning than other times of day. This has previously been associated with poor blood pressure control via the cardiac baroreflex. However, it is not known whether diurnal variation exists in vascular sympathetic baroreflex function, in which blood pressure is regulated via muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). The aim of this study was to compare vascular sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) in the same participants between the morning and afternoon. In 10 participants (mean age 22 ± 2.9 years), continuous measurements of blood pressure, heart rate and MSNA were made during 10 min of rest in the morning (between 0900 and 1000 h) and afternoon (between 1400 and 1500 h). Spontaneous vascular sympathetic BRS was quantified by plotting MSNA burst incidence against diastolic pressure (vascular sympathetic BRSinc), and by plotting total MSNA against diastolic pressure (vascular sympathetic BRStotal). Significant vascular sympathetic BRSinc and vascular sympathetic BRStotal slopes were obtained for 10 participants at both times of day. There was no significant difference in vascular sympathetic BRSinc between morning (-2.2 ± 0.6% bursts/mmHg) and afternoon (-2.5 ± 0.2% bursts/mmHg; P = 0.68) sessions. Similarly, vascular sympathetic BRStotal did not differ significantly between the morning (-3.0±0.5 AU/beat/mmHg) and afternoon (-2.9 ± 0.4 AU/beat/mmHg; P = 0.89). It is concluded that in healthy, young individuals baroreflex modulation of MSNA at rest does not differ between the morning and afternoon. The results indicate that recording MSNA at different times of the day is a valid means of assessing sympathetic function. PMID:26388723

  10. Sympathetic nerve stimulation induces local endothelial Ca2+ signals to oppose vasoconstriction of mouse mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Nausch, Lydia W. M.; Bonev, Adrian D.; Heppner, Thomas J.; Tallini, Yvonne; Kotlikoff, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the endothelium regulates vascular tone independent of the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the activation of sympathetic nerves engages the endothelium to oppose vasoconstriction. Local inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-mediated Ca2+ signals (“pulsars”) in or near endothelial projections to vascular smooth muscle (VSM) were measured in an en face mouse mesenteric artery preparation. Electrical field stimulation of sympathetic nerves induced an increase in endothelial cell (EC) Ca2+ pulsars, recruiting new pulsar sites without affecting activity at existing sites. This increase in Ca2+ pulsars was blocked by bath application of the α-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin or by TTX but was unaffected by directly picospritzing the α-adrenergic receptor agonist phenylephrine onto the vascular endothelium, indicating that nerve-derived norepinephrine acted through α-adrenergic receptors on smooth muscle cells. Moreover, EC Ca2+ signaling was not blocked by inhibitors of purinergic receptors, ryanodine receptors, or voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, suggesting a role for IP3, rather than Ca2+, in VSM-to-endothelium communication. Block of intermediate-conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels, which have been shown to colocalize with IP3 receptors in endothelial projections to VSM, enhanced nerve-evoked constriction. Collectively, our results support the concept of a transcellular negative feedback module whereby sympathetic nerve stimulation elevates EC Ca2+ signals to oppose vasoconstriction. PMID:22140050

  11. Sympathetic response to oral carbohydrate administration. Evidence from microelectrode nerve recordings.

    PubMed Central

    Berne, C; Fagius, J; Niklasson, F

    1989-01-01

    Microneurography was used to measure sympathetic outflow in human muscle nerves (MSA) for up to 90 min after the ingestion of 100 g D-glucose, 75.8 g D-xylose, intravenous D-glucose (0.35 g/kg), and 300 ml water. 19 healthy subjects were examined using a microelectrode positioned in the right peroneal nerve. MSA increased from 21 +/- 0.9 bursts/min at rest to 36.9 +/- 4.3 bursts/min 30 min after ingestion of D-glucose and from 18.9 +/- 2.9 to 26.3 +/- 3.4 bursts/min 30 min after D-xylose. The increase in MSA was already significant by 15 min. MSA had not returned to the basal level after 90 min. Neither intravenous D-glucose nor water intake enhanced MSA. MSA increased in parallel with plasma norepinephrine, and a significant correlation (r = 0.55; P less than 0.001) was observed between the plasma insulin concentration and MSA after D-glucose ingestion. In three subjects the outflow of sympathetic nerve activity to the skin was examined after oral D-glucose and no change was observed, emphasizing the differentiated nature of the sympathetic nerve response to carbohydrate. Multiple factors such as insulin alone, hemodynamic adjustment to splanchnic vasodilation, and gastrointestinal distension are probably involved in the increased muscle nerve sympathetic outflow after carbohydrate ingestion. PMID:2681266

  12. Lineage and stage specific requirement for Dicer1 in sympathetic ganglia and adrenal medulla formation and maintenance.

    PubMed

    Stubbusch, Jutta; Narasimhan, Priyanka; Hennchen, Melanie; Huber, Katrin; Unsicker, Klaus; Ernsberger, Uwe; Rohrer, Hermann

    2015-04-15

    The development of sympathetic neurons and chromaffin cells is differentially controlled at distinct stages by various extrinsic and intrinsic signals. Here we use conditional deletion of Dicer1 in neural crest cells and noradrenergic neuroblasts to identify stage specific functions in sympathoadrenal lineages. Conditional Dicer1 knockout in neural crest cells of Dicer1(Wnt1Cre) mice results in a rapid reduction in the size of developing sympathetic ganglia and adrenal medulla. In contrast, Dicer1 elimination in noradrenergic neuroblasts of Dicer1(DbhiCre) animals affects sympathetic neuron survival starting at late embryonic stages and chromaffin cells persist at least until postnatal week 1. A differential function of Dicer1 signaling for the development of embryonic noradrenergic and cholinergic sympathetic neurons is demonstrated by the selective increase in the expression of Tlx3 and the cholinergic marker genes VAChT and ChAT at E16.5. The number of Dbh, Th and TrkA expressing noradrenergic neurons is strongly decreased in Dicer1-deficient sympathetic ganglia at birth, whereas Tlx3(+)/ Ret(+) cholinergic neurons cells are spared from cell death. The postnatal death of chromaffin cells is preceded by the loss of Ascl1, mir-375 and Pnmt and an increase in the markers Ret and NF-M, which suggests that Dicer1 is required for the maintenance of chromaffin cell differentiation and survival. Taken together, these findings demonstrate distinct stage and lineage specific functions of Dicer1 signaling in differentiation and survival of sympathetic neurons and adrenal chromaffin cells. PMID:25661788

  13. Spike rate of multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve fibers after catheter-based renal nerve ablation.

    PubMed

    Tank, Jens; Heusser, Karsten; Brinkmann, Julia; Schmidt, Bernhard M; Menne, Jan; Bauersachs, Johann; Haller, Hermann; Diedrich, André; Jordan, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Patients with treatment-resistant arterial hypertension exhibited profound reductions in single sympathetic vasoconstrictor fiber firing rates after renal nerve ablation. In contrast, integrated multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) changed little or not at all. We hypothesized that conventional MSNA analysis may have missed single fiber discharges, thus, obscuring sympathetic inhibition after renal denervation. We studied patients with difficult-to-control arterial hypertension (age 45-74 years) before, 6 (n = 11), and 12 months (n = 8) after renal nerve ablation. Electrocardiogram, respiration, brachial, and finger arterial blood pressure (BP), as well as the MSNA and raw MSNA signals were analyzed. We detected MSNA action-potential spikes using 2 stage kurtosis wavelet denoising techniques to assess mean, median, and maximum spike rates for each beat-to-beat interval. Supine heart rate and systolic BP did not change at 6 (ΔHR: -2 ± 3 bpm; ΔSBP: 2 ± 9 mm Hg) or at 12 months (ΔHR: -1 ± 3 mm Hg, ΔSBP: -1 ± 9 mm Hg) after renal nerve ablation. Mean burst frequency and mean spike frequency at baseline were 34 ± 3 bursts per minute and 8 ± 1 spikes per second. Both measurements did not change at 6 months (-1.4 ± 3.6 bursts/minute; -0.6 ± 1.4 spikes/second) or at 12 months (-2.5 ± 4.0 bursts/minute; -2.0 ± 1.6 spikes/second) after renal nerve ablation. After renal nerve ablation, BP decreased in 3 of 11 patients. BP and MSNA spike frequency changes were not correlated (slope = -0.06; P = .369). Spike rate analysis of multi-unit MSNA neurograms further suggests that profound sympathetic inhibition is not a consistent finding after renal nerve ablation. PMID:26324745

  14. Peripheral chemoreflex sensitivity and sympathetic nerve activity are normal in apnea divers during training season.

    PubMed

    Breskovic, Toni; Ivancev, Vladimir; Banic, Ivana; Jordan, Jens; Dujic, Zeljko

    2010-04-19

    Apnea divers are exposed to repeated massive arterial oxygen desaturation, which could perturb chemoreflexes. An earlier study suggested that peripheral chemoreflex regulation of sympathetic vasomotor tone and ventilation may have recovered 4 or more weeks into the off season. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that peripheral chemoreflex regulation of ventilation and sympathetic vasomotor tone is present during the training season. We determined ventilation, heart rate, blood pressure, cardiac stroke volume, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during isocapnic hypoxia in 10 breath hold divers and 11 matched control subjects. The study was carried out at the end of the season of intense apnea trainings. Baseline MSNA frequency was 30+/-4bursts/min in control subjects and 25+/-4bursts/min in breath hold divers (P=0.053). During hypoxia burst frequency and total sympathetic activity increased similarly in both groups. Sympathetic activity normalized during the 30-minute recovery. Hypoxia-induced stimulation of minute ventilation was similar in both groups, although in divers it was maintained by higher tidal volumes and lower breathing frequency compared with control subjects. In both groups, hypoxia increased heart rate and cardiac output whereas total peripheral resistance decreased. Blood pressure remained unchanged. We conclude that peripheral chemoreflex regulation of ventilation and sympathetic vasomotor tone is paradoxically preserved in apnea divers, both, during the off and during the training season. The observation suggests that repeated arterial oxygen desaturation may not be sufficient explaining sympathetic reflex abnormalities similar to those in obstructive sleep apnea patients. PMID:19926535

  15. 5-Hydroxytryptamine does not reduce sympathetic nerve activity or neuroeffector function in the splanchnic circulation.

    PubMed

    Darios, Emma S; Barman, Susan M; Orer, Hakan S; Morrison, Shaun F; Davis, Robert P; Seitz, Bridget M; Burnett, Robert; Watts, Stephanie W

    2015-05-01

    Infusion of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in conscious rats results in a sustained (up to 30 days) fall in blood pressure. This is accompanied by an increase in splanchnic blood flow. Because the splanchnic circulation is regulated by the sympathetic nervous system, we hypothesized that 5-HT would: 1) directly reduce sympathetic nerve activity in the splanchnic region; and/or 2) inhibit sympathetic neuroeffector function in splanchnic blood vessels. Moreover, removal of the sympathetic innervation of the splanchnic circulation (celiac ganglionectomy) would reduce 5-HT-induced hypotension. In anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats, mean blood pressure was reduced from 101±4 to 63±3mm Hg during slow infusion of 5-HT (25μg/kg/min, i.v.). Pre- and postganglionic splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity were unaffected during 5-HT infusion. In superior mesenteric arterial rings prepared for electrical field stimulation, neither 5-HT (3, 10, 30nM), the 5-HT1B receptor agonist CP 93129 nor 5-HT1/7 receptor agonist 5-carboxamidotryptamine inhibited neurogenic contraction compared to vehicle. 5-HT did not inhibit neurogenic contraction in superior mesenteric venous rings. Finally, celiac ganglionectomy did not modify the magnitude of fall or time course of 5-HT-induced hypotension when compared to animals receiving sham ganglionectomy. We conclude it is unlikely 5-HT interacts with the sympathetic nervous system at the level of the splanchnic preganglionic or postganglionic nerve, as well as at the neuroeffector junction, to reduce blood pressure. These important studies allow us to rule out a direct interaction of 5-HT with the splanchnic sympathetic nervous system as a cause of the 5-HT-induced fall in blood pressure. PMID:25732865

  16. 5-Hydroxytryptamine does not reduce sympathetic nerve activity or neuroeffector function in the splanchnic circulation

    PubMed Central

    Darios, Emma S.; Barman, Susan M.; Orer, Hakan S.; Morrison, Shaun F.; Davis, Robert P.; Seitz, Bridget M.; Burnett, Robert; Watts, Stephanie W.

    2015-01-01

    Infusion of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in conscious rats results in a sustained (up to 30 days) fall in blood pressure. This is accompanied by an increase in splanchnic blood flow. Because the splanchnic circulation is regulated by the sympathetic nervous system, we hypothesized that 5-HT would: 1) directly reduce sympathetic nerve activity in the splanchnic region; and/or 2) inhibit sympathetic neuroeffector function in splanchnic blood vessels. Moreover, removal of the sympathetic innervation of the splanchnic circulation (celiac ganglionectomy) would reduce 5-HT-induced hypotension. In anaesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats, mean blood pressure was reduced from 101 ± 4 to 63 ± 3 mm Hg during slow infusion of 5-HT (25 μg/kg/min, i.v.). Pre- and postganglionic splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity was unaffected during 5-HT infusion. In superior mesenteric arterial rings prepared for electrical field stimulation, neither 5-HT (3, 10, 30 nM), the 5-HT1B receptor agonist CP 93129 nor 5-HT1/7 receptor agonist 5-carboxamidotryptamine inhibited neurogenic contraction compared to vehicle. 5-HT did not inhibit neurogenic contraction in superior mesenteric venous rings. Finally, celiac ganglionectomy did not modify the magnitude of fall or time course of 5-HT-induced hypotension when compared to animals receiving sham ganglionectomy. We conclude it is unlikely 5-HT interacts with the sympathetic nervous system at the level of the splanchnic preganglionic or postganglionic nerve, as well as at the neuroeffector junction, to reduce blood pressure. These important studies allow us to rule out a direct interaction of 5-HT with the splanchnic sympathetic nervous system as a cause of the 5-HT-induced fall in blood pressure. PMID:25732865

  17. Modelling the vascular response to sympathetic postganglionic nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Briant, Linford J.B.; Paton, Julian F.R.; Pickering, Anthony E.; Champneys, Alan R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the influence of burst properties of the sympathetic nervous system on arterial contractility. Specifically, a mathematical model is constructed of the pathway from action potential generation in a sympathetic postganglionic neurone to contraction of an arterial smooth muscle cell. The differential equation model is a synthesis of models of the individual physiological processes, and is shown to be consistent with physiological data. The model is found to be unresponsive to tonic (regular) stimulation at typical frequencies recorded in sympathetic efferents. However, when stimulated at the same average frequency, but with repetitive respiratory-modulated burst patterns, it produces marked contractions. Moreover, the contractile force produced is found to be highly dependent on the number of spikes in each burst. In particular, when the model is driven by preganglionic spike trains recorded from wild-type and spontaneously hypertensive rats (which have increased spiking during each burst) the contractile force was found to be 10-fold greater in the hypertensive case. An explanation is provided in terms of the summative increased release of noradrenaline. Furthermore, the results suggest the marked effect that hypertensive spike trains had on smooth muscle cell tone can provide a significant contribution to the pathology of hypertension. PMID:25698230

  18. Afferent vagal nerve stimulation resets baroreflex neural arc and inhibits sympathetic nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Saku, Keita; Kishi, Takuya; Sakamoto, Kazuo; Hosokawa, Kazuya; Sakamoto, Takafumi; Murayama, Yoshinori; Kakino, Takamori; Ikeda, Masataka; Ide, Tomomi; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Abstract It has been established that vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) benefits patients and/or animals with heart failure. However, the impact of VNS on sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) remains unknown. In this study, we investigated how vagal afferent stimulation (AVNS) impacts baroreflex control of SNA. In 12 anesthetized Sprague–Dawley rats, we controlled the pressure in isolated bilateral carotid sinuses (CSP), and measured splanchnic SNA and arterial pressure (AP). Under a constant CSP, increasing the voltage of AVNS dose dependently decreased SNA and AP. The averaged maximal inhibition of SNA was ‐28.0 ± 10.3%. To evaluate the dynamic impacts of AVNS on SNA, we performed random AVNS using binary white noise sequences, and identified the transfer function from AVNS to SNA and that from SNA to AP. We also identified transfer functions of the native baroreflex from CSP to SNA (neural arc) and from SNA to AP (peripheral arc). The transfer function from AVNS to SNA strikingly resembled the baroreflex neural arc and the transfer functions of SNA to AP were indistinguishable whether we perturbed ANVS or CSP, indicating that they likely share common central and peripheral neural mechanisms. To examine the impact of AVNS on baroreflex, we changed CSP stepwise and measured SNA and AP responses with or without AVNS. AVNS resets the sigmoidal neural arc downward, but did not affect the linear peripheral arc. In conclusion, AVNS resets the baroreflex neural arc and induces sympathoinhibition in the same manner as the control of SNA and AP by the native baroreflex. PMID:25194023

  19. Neuroplasticity of Sensory and Sympathetic Nerve Fibers in the Painful Arthritic Joint

    PubMed Central

    Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Freeman, Katie T.; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Coughlin, Kathleen; Kaczmarska, Magdalena J.; Castaneda-Corral, Gabriela; Bloom, Aaron P.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Many forms of arthritis are accompanied by significant chronic joint pain. Here we studied whether there is significant sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers in the painful arthritic knee joint and whether nerve growth factor (NGF) drives this pathological reorganization. Methods A painful arthritic knee joint was produced by injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) into the knee joint of young adult mice. CFA-injected mice were then treated systemically with vehicle or anti-NGF antibody. Pain behaviors were assessed and at 28 days following the initial CFA injection, the knee joints were processed for immunohistochemistry using antibodies raised against calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP; sensory nerve fibers), neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200; sensory nerve fibers), growth associated protein-43 (GAP43; sprouted nerve fibers), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; sympathetic nerve fibers), CD31 (endothelial cells) or CD68 (monocytes/macrophages). Results In CFA-injected mice, but not vehicle-injected mice, there was a significant increase in the density of CD68+ macrophages, CD31+ blood vessels, CGRP+, NF200+, GAP43+, and TH+ nerve fibers in the synovium as well as joint pain-related behaviors. Administration of anti-NGF reduced these pain-related behaviors and the ectopic sprouting of nerve fibers, but had no significant effect on the increase in density of CD31+ blood vessels or CD68+ macrophages. Conclusions Ectopic sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers occurs in the painful arthritic joint and may be involved in the generation and maintenance of arthritic pain. PMID:22246649

  20. Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Sprouting and Susceptibility to Ventricular Arrhythmias after Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Li, Chang-Yi; Li, Yi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmogenesis is thought to be a common cause of sudden cardiac death following myocardial infarction (MI). Nerve remodeling as a result of MI is known to be an important genesis of life-threatening arrhythmias. It is hypothesized that neural modulation might serve as a therapeutic option of malignant arrhythmias. In fact, left stellectomy or β-blocker therapy is shown to be effective in the prevention of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT), ventricular fibrillation (VF), and sudden cardiac death (SCD) after MI both in patients and in animal models. Results from decades of research already evidenced a positive relationship between abnormal nerve density and ventricular arrhythmias after MI. In this review, we summarized the molecular mechanisms involved in cardiac sympathetic rejuvenation and mechanisms related to sympathetic hyperinnervation and arrhythmogenesis after MI and analyzed the potential therapeutic implications of nerve sprouting modification for ventricular arrhythmias and SCD control. PMID:26793403

  1. Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Sprouting and Susceptibility to Ventricular Arrhythmias after Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chang-Yi; Li, Yi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Ventricular arrhythmogenesis is thought to be a common cause of sudden cardiac death following myocardial infarction (MI). Nerve remodeling as a result of MI is known to be an important genesis of life-threatening arrhythmias. It is hypothesized that neural modulation might serve as a therapeutic option of malignant arrhythmias. In fact, left stellectomy or β-blocker therapy is shown to be effective in the prevention of ventricular tachyarrhythmias (VT), ventricular fibrillation (VF), and sudden cardiac death (SCD) after MI both in patients and in animal models. Results from decades of research already evidenced a positive relationship between abnormal nerve density and ventricular arrhythmias after MI. In this review, we summarized the molecular mechanisms involved in cardiac sympathetic rejuvenation and mechanisms related to sympathetic hyperinnervation and arrhythmogenesis after MI and analyzed the potential therapeutic implications of nerve sprouting modification for ventricular arrhythmias and SCD control. PMID:26793403

  2. Vagal and sympathetic nerve activities influenced by posterior cerebral circulation in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Kubo, T; Matsunaga, T

    1993-01-01

    Vagal and sympathetic nervous activities in the rabbit were recorded while vertebral blood flow was partially blocked by the injection of adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP; platelet aggregator). When a small dose of ADP (0.2 mg/kg) was administered into a unilateral vertebral artery, sympathetic nerve (SN) activity increased, and its magnitude was inversely correlated with the extent of the decrease in blood pressure (BP). A larger dose (2 mg/kg) of ADP suppressed SN activity on the injected side, whereas the change was small on the non-injected side. Vagal nerve (VN) activity showed a monophasic excitatory response on both sides, although the change was larger on the injected than on the non-injected side. As a result, asymmetry in autonomic nerve activity was more distinct in SN than in VN. The present study demonstrated that asymmetry of autonomic nervous function can result from changes in blood flow in the cerebellum and brainstem. PMID:8256597

  3. Relation between QT interval variability and muscle sympathetic nerve activity in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    El-Hamad, Fatima; Lambert, Elisabeth; Abbott, Derek; Baumert, Mathias

    2015-10-01

    Beat-to-beat variability of the QT interval (QTV) is sought to provide an indirect noninvasive measure of sympathetic nerve activity, but a formal quantification of this relationship has not been provided. In this study we used power contribution analysis to study the relationship between QTV and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). ECG and MSNA were recorded in 10 healthy subjects in the supine position and after 40° head-up tilt. Power spectrum analysis was performed using a linear autoregressive model with two external inputs: heart period (RR interval) variability (RRV) and MSNA. Total and low-frequency power of QTV was decomposed into contributions by RRV, MSNA, and sources independent of RRV and MSNA. Results show that the percentage of MSNA power contribution to QT is very small and does not change with tilt. RRV power contribution to QT power is notable and decreases with tilt, while the greatest percentage of QTV is independent of RRV and MSNA in the supine position and after 40° head-up tilt. In conclusion, beat-to-beat QTV in normal subjects does not appear to be significantly affected by the rhythmic modulations in MSNA following low to moderate orthostatic stimulation. Therefore, MSNA oscillations may not represent a useful surrogate for cardiac sympathetic nerve activity at moderate levels of activation, or, alternatively, sympathetic influences on QTV are complex and not quantifiable with linear shift-invariant autoregressive models. PMID:26276814

  4. A clinician's perspective of the role of renal sympathetic nerves in hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Briasoulis, Alexandros; Bakris, George L.

    2015-01-01

    The renal sympathetic nerves have significant contribution to the control of different aspects of kidney function. Early animal studies of renal denervation in a large number of different models of hypertension showed that that RDN improved BP control. Recently, data from prospective cohorts and randomized studies showed that renal denervation therapy (RDN) is a safe procedure but is associated with only modest reduction of ambulatory blood pressure (BP) in patients on intensive medical therapy. The main goal of this article is to review the results of preclinical and clinical studies on the contribution of the renal sympathetic nervous system to hypertension and the therapeutic applications of catheter-based renal denervation. PMID:25859218

  5. Methods and considerations for the analysis and standardization of assessing muscle sympathetic nerve activity in humans.

    PubMed

    White, Daniel W; Shoemaker, J Kevin; Raven, Peter B

    2015-12-01

    The technique of microneurography and the assessment of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) are used in laboratories throughout the world. The variables used to describe MSNA, and the criteria by which these variables are quantified from the integrated neurogram, vary among studies and laboratories and, therefore, can become confusing to those starting to learn the technique. Therefore, the purpose of this educational review is to discuss guidelines and standards for the assessment of sympathetic nervous activity through the collection and analysis of MSNA. This review will reiterate common practices in the collection of MSNA, but will also introduce considerations for the evaluation and physiological inference using MSNA. PMID:26299824

  6. [The effect of loading tests on the activity and reactivity of the sympathetic-adrenal system in subjects with arterial hypertension and overweight].

    PubMed

    Kartvelishvili, H Iu

    1997-01-01

    Regulatory potentialities were studied of the sympathetic-adrenal system that reveal themselves in response to psychoemotional testing and acute peroral salt loading. In the group of over-weight (OW) patients presenting with hypertensive disease (HD), 1-h excretion of catecholamines following the psychoemotional testing was not different from that during the testing itself, which fact suggests more prolonged reaction of the sympathetic-adrenal system to stress in these examinees. An acute peroral salt loading causes increase in activity of the hormonal and mediator links of the sympathetic-adrenal system in HD patients both overweight and in the normal range body weight (BW). It was only those persons presenting with normal BW that were retaining sodium after the test. PMID:9491695

  7. Secretion of corticotrophin releasing factor from the adrenal during splanchnic nerve stimulation in conscious calves.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A V; Jones, C T

    1988-01-01

    1. The output of corticotrophin releasing factor-like immunoreactivity (CRF) from the adrenal gland has been investigated using the 'adrenal clamp' technique in conscious calves. 2. Stimulation of the peripheral end of the splanchnic nerve for 10 min increased the mean output of CRF progressively, so that it had risen by about twentyfold, to a peak incremental value of 24 +/- 4 pmol min-1 kg-1 at 10 min. This response was significantly increased by stimulating in bursts at 40 Hz for 1 s at 10 s intervals, which raised the mean CRF output by 44 +/- 7 pmol min-1 kg-1 at 10 min (P less than 0.05). 3. The mean output of adrenaline and noradrenaline rose more abruptly in response to splanchnic nerve stimulation with peak incremental values realized within 2.5 min. However, the ratios of adrenal CRF to catecholamine output were closely similar during the later stages of stimulation (7.5-10 min). There was a similarly abrupt rise in adrenal cortisol output in response to splanchnic nerve stimulation which was, nevertheless, linearly related to arterial plasma ACTH concentration throughout. 4. In hypophysectomized calves, administration of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH1-24) at a dose of 5 ng min-1 kg-1 reduced the output of adrenal CRF in response to splanchnic nerve stimulation by about 50% (P less than 0.05). 5. CRF isolated from adrenal venous effluent plasma, collected both at rest and during splanchnic nerve stimulation, was separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography and found to elute in a position identical to that of human 41CRF. This suggests that adrenal CRF is structurally closely similar to its pituitary counterpart. PMID:2843642

  8. Human Type 1 Diabetes Is Characterized by an Early, Marked, Sustained, and Islet-Selective Loss of Sympathetic Nerves.

    PubMed

    Mundinger, Thomas O; Mei, Qi; Foulis, Alan K; Fligner, Corinne L; Hull, Rebecca L; Taborsky, Gerald J

    2016-08-01

    In humans, the glucagon response to moderate-to-marked insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH) is largely mediated by the autonomic nervous system. Because this glucagon response is impaired early in type 1 diabetes, we sought to determine if these patients, like animal models of autoimmune diabetes, have an early and severe loss of islet sympathetic nerves. We also tested whether this nerve loss is a permanent feature of type 1 diabetes, is islet-selective, and is not seen in type 2 diabetes. To do so, we quantified pancreatic islet and exocrine sympathetic nerve fiber area from autopsy samples of patients with type 1 or 2 diabetes and control subjects without diabetes. Our central finding is that patients with either very recent onset (<2 weeks) or long duration (>10 years) of type 1 diabetes have a severe loss of islet sympathetic nerves (Δ = -88% and Δ = -79%, respectively). In contrast, patients with type 2 diabetes lose no islet sympathetic nerves. There is no loss of exocrine sympathetic nerves in either type 1 or type 2 diabetes. We conclude that patients with type 1, but not type 2, diabetes have an early, marked, sustained, and islet-selective loss of sympathetic nerves, one that may impair their glucagon response to IIH. PMID:27207540

  9. Attenuated baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity after cardiovascular deconditioning in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffitt, J. A.; Foley, C. M.; Schadt, J. C.; Laughlin, M. H.; Hasser, E. M.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of cardiovascular deconditioning on baroreflex control of the sympathetic nervous system was evaluated after 14 days of hindlimb unloading (HU) or the control condition. Rats were chronically instrumented with catheters and sympathetic nerve recording electrodes for measurement of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) and recording of lumbar (LSNA) or renal (RSNA) sympathetic nerve activity. Experiments were conducted 24 h after surgery, with the animals in a normal posture. Baroreflex function was assessed using a logistic function that related HR and LSNA or RSNA to MAP during infusion of phenylephrine and nitroprusside. Baroreflex influence on HR was not affected by HU. Maximum baroreflex-elicited LSNA was significantly reduced in HU rats (204 +/- 11.9 vs. 342 +/- 30.6% baseline LSNA), as was maximum reflex gain (-4.0 +/- 0.6 vs. -7.8 +/- 1.3 %LSNA/mmHg). Maximum baroreflex-elicited RSNA (259 +/- 10.8 vs. 453 +/- 28.0% baseline RSNA), minimum baroreflex-elicited RSNA (-2 +/- 2.8 vs. 13 +/- 4.5% baseline RSNA), and maximum gain (-5.8 +/- 0.5 vs. -13.6 +/- 3.1 %RSNA/mmHg) were significantly decreased in HU rats. Results demonstrate that baroreflex modulation of sympathetic nervous system activity is attenuated after cardiovascular deconditioning in rodents. Data suggest that alterations in the arterial baroreflex may contribute to orthostatic intolerance after a period of bedrest or spaceflight in humans.

  10. The gross anatomy of the renal sympathetic nerves revisited.

    PubMed

    Mompeo, Blanca; Maranillo, Eva; Garcia-Touchard, Arturo; Larkin, Theresa; Sanudo, Jose

    2016-07-01

    Catheter-based renal denervation techniques focus on reducing blood pressure in resistant hypertension. This procedure requires exact knowledge of the anatomical interrelation between the renal arteries and the targeted renal nervous plexus. The aim of this work was to build on classical anatomical studies and describe the gross anatomy and anatomical relationships of the renal arteries and nerve supply to the kidneys in a sample of human cadavers. Twelve human cadavers (six males and six females), age range 73 to 94 years, were dissected. The nervous fibers and renal arteries were dissected using a surgical microscope. The renal plexus along the hilar renal artery comprised a fiber-ganglionic ring surrounding the proximal third of the renal artery, a neural network along the middle and distal thirds, and smaller accessory ganglia along the course of the nerve fibers. The fibers of the neural network were mainly located on the superior (95.83%) and inferior (91.66%) surfaces of the renal artery and they were sparsely interconnected by diagonal fibers. Polar arteries were present in 33.33% of cases and the renal nerve pattern for these was similar to that of the hilar arteries. Effective renal denervation needs to target the superior and inferior surfaces of the hilar and polar arteries, where the fibers of the neural network are present. Clin. Anat. 29:660-664, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27090982

  11. Cardiac-locked bursts of muscle sympathetic nerve activity are absent in familial dysautonomia

    PubMed Central

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Axelrod, Felicia B; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2013-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia (Riley–Day syndrome) is an hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN type III), expressed at birth, that is associated with reduced pain and temperature sensibilities and absent baroreflexes, causing orthostatic hypotension as well as labile blood pressure that increases markedly during emotional excitement. Given the apparent absence of functional baroreceptor afferents, we tested the hypothesis that the normal cardiac-locked bursts of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) are absent in patients with familial dysautonomia. Tungsten microelectrodes were inserted percutaneously into muscle or cutaneous fascicles of the common peroneal nerve in 12 patients with familial dysautonomia. Spontaneous bursts of MSNA were absent in all patients, but in five patients we found evidence of tonically firing sympathetic neurones, with no cardiac rhythmicity, that increased their spontaneous discharge during emotional arousal but not during a manoeuvre that unloads the baroreceptors. Conversely, skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), recorded in four patients, appeared normal. We conclude that the loss of phasic bursts of MSNA and the loss of baroreflex modulation of muscle vasoconstrictor drive contributes to the poor control of blood pressure in familial dysautonomia, and that the increase in tonic firing of muscle vasoconstrictor neurones contributes to the increase in blood pressure during emotional excitement. PMID:23165765

  12. Human muscle sympathetic nerve activity and plasma noradrenaline kinetics in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ertl, Andrew C.; Diedrich, Andre; Biaggioni, Italo; Levine, Benjamin D.; Robertson, Rose Marie; Cox, James F.; Zuckerman, Julie H.; Pawelczyk, James A.; Ray, Chester A.; Buckey, Jay C Jr; Lane, Lynda D.; Shiavi, Richard; Gaffney, F. Andrew; Costa, Fernando; Holt, Carol; Blomqvist, C. Gunnar; Eckberg, Dwain L.; Baisch, Friedhelm J.; Robertson, David

    2002-01-01

    Astronauts returning from space have reduced red blood cell masses, hypovolaemia and orthostatic intolerance, marked by greater cardio-acceleration during standing than before spaceflight, and in some, orthostatic hypotension and presyncope. Adaptation of the sympathetic nervous system occurring during spaceflight may be responsible for these postflight alterations. We tested the hypotheses that exposure to microgravity reduces sympathetic neural outflow and impairs sympathetic neural responses to orthostatic stress. We measured heart rate, photoplethysmographic finger arterial pressure, peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity and plasma noradrenaline spillover and clearance, in male astronauts before, during (flight day 12 or 13) and after the 16 day Neurolab space shuttle mission. Measurements were made during supine rest and orthostatic stress, as simulated on Earth and in space by 7 min periods of 15 and 30 mmHg lower body suction. Mean (+/- S.E.M.) heart rates before lower body suction were similar pre-flight and in flight. Heart rate responses to -30 mmHg were greater in flight (from 56 +/- 4 to 72 +/- 4 beats min(-1)) than pre-flight (from 56 +/- 4 at rest to 62 +/- 4 beats min(-1), P < 0.05). Noradrenaline spillover and clearance were increased from pre-flight levels during baseline periods and during lower body suction, both in flight (n = 3) and on post-flight days 1 or 2 (n = 5, P < 0.05). In-flight baseline sympathetic nerve activity was increased above pre-flight levels (by 10-33 %) in the same three subjects in whom noradrenaline spillover and clearance were increased. The sympathetic response to 30 mmHg lower body suction was at pre-flight levels or higher in each subject (35 pre-flight vs. 40 bursts min(-1) in flight). No astronaut experienced presyncope during lower body suction in space (or during upright tilt following the Neurolab mission). We conclude that in space, baseline sympathetic neural outflow is increased moderately and sympathetic

  13. Human muscle sympathetic nerve activity and plasma noradrenaline kinetics in space

    PubMed Central

    Ertl, Andrew C; Diedrich, André; Biaggioni, Italo; Levine, Benjamin D; Robertson, Rose Marie; Cox, James F; Zuckerman, Julie H; Pawelczyk, James A; Ray, Chester A; Buckey, Jay C; Lane, Lynda D; Shiavi, Richard; Gaffney, F Andrew; Costa, Fernando; Holt, Carol; Blomqvist, C Gunnar; Eckberg, Dwain L; Baisch, Friedhelm J; Robertson, David

    2002-01-01

    Astronauts returning from space have reduced red blood cell masses, hypovolaemia and orthostatic intolerance, marked by greater cardio–acceleration during standing than before spaceflight, and in some, orthostatic hypotension and presyncope. Adaptation of the sympathetic nervous system occurring during spaceflight may be responsible for these postflight alterations. We tested the hypotheses that exposure to microgravity reduces sympathetic neural outflow and impairs sympathetic neural responses to orthostatic stress. We measured heart rate, photoplethysmographic finger arterial pressure, peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity and plasma noradrenaline spillover and clearance, in male astronauts before, during (flight day 12 or 13) and after the 16 day Neurolab space shuttle mission. Measurements were made during supine rest and orthostatic stress, as simulated on Earth and in space by 7 min periods of 15 and 30 mmHg lower body suction. Mean (± s.e.m.) heart rates before lower body suction were similar pre–flight and in flight. Heart rate responses to −30 mmHg were greater in flight (from 56 ± 4 to 72 ± 4 beats min−1) than pre–flight (from 56 ± 4 at rest to 62 ± 4 beats min−1, P < 0.05). Noradrenaline spillover and clearance were increased from pre–flight levels during baseline periods and during lower body suction, both in flight (n = 3) and on post–flight days 1 or 2 (n = 5, P < 0.05). In–flight baseline sympathetic nerve activity was increased above pre–flight levels (by 10–33 %) in the same three subjects in whom noradrenaline spillover and clearance were increased. The sympathetic response to 30 mmHg lower body suction was at pre–flight levels or higher in each subject (35 pre–flight vs. 40 bursts min−1 in flight). No astronaut experienced presyncope during lower body suction in space (or during upright tilt following the Neurolab mission). We conclude that in space, baseline sympathetic neural outflow is increased moderately

  14. Involvement of the histamine H1 receptor in the regulation of sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Manabu; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Nakamura, Tadaho; Ohba, Takayoshi; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Sawamura, Daisuke; Kuwasako, Kenji; Yanagisawa, Teruyuki; Ono, Kyouichi; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2015-03-13

    The histamine system is involved in the regulation of the autonomic nervous system. We used gene-targeted mice to investigate the role of histamine receptors in the regulation of the sympathetic nervous system. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed histamine H1, H2, and H3 receptor expression in the superior cervical ganglion, which contains sympathetic nerve cell bodies. We measured the heart rate variability (HRV), the changes in the beat-to-beat heart rate, which is widely used to assess autonomic activity in the heart. H1 blockade attenuated the baroreflex-mediated changes in heart rate in wild-type (WT) mice, whereas the heart rate response to H2- and H3-specific blockers was unaffected. l-Histidine decarboxylase (HDC) expression in the superior cervical ganglion of H1R-null mice was higher than that in WT controls, whereas the enzyme levels in H2R- and H3R-null mice were not significantly different from those in the WT. All mutant mice (H1R-, H2R-, and H3R-null mice) showed normal electrocardiogram (ECG) patterns with little modification in ECG parameters and the expected response to the β-adrenergic blocker propranolol. Similar to our findings in WT mice, H1 blockade attenuated the baroreflex-mediated heart rate change in H1R-null mice, whereas the heart rate response was unaffected in H2R- and H3R-null mice. The HRV analysis revealed relatively unstable RR intervals, an increased standard deviation of the interbeat interval (SDNN), and low-frequency (LF) component in H1R-null mice compared with the other groups, suggesting that sympathetic nerve activity was altered in H1R-null mice. Taken together, our findings indicate that H1 receptors play a major role in the regulation of sympathetic nerve activity. PMID:25680462

  15. The adrenal contribution to the neuroendocrine responses to splanchnic nerve stimulation in conscious calves.

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, S R; Edwards, A V; Jones, C T

    1988-01-01

    1. The extent to which the adrenal gland contributes to neuroendocrine responses to electrical stimulation of the peripheral end of the splanchnic nerve has been investigated in conscious calves in which the right nerve was stimulated either at 4 Hz continuously for 10 min or at 40 Hz in 1 s bursts at 10 s intervals for the same period. 2. It was confirmed that the release of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is potentiated by stimulation in bursts at a relatively high frequency and shown that the adrenal gland made a negligible contribution to these responses. 3. There was no detectable change in the concentration of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the arterial plasma but the existence of a very small but highly significant rise in the output of VIP from the adrenal provided evidence that it was released within the gland in response to splanchnic nerve stimulation. 4. The concentration of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the arterial and adrenal venous effluent plasma was consistently below the level of detection of the assay. 5. Splanchnic nerve stimulation resulted in an abrupt rise in the output of both free and total met5-enkephalin-like immunoreactivity from the adrenal gland which was substantially potentiated by stimulating in bursts. This pattern of stimulation also increased the proportion released in a high-molecular-weight form. 6. Stimulation in bursts significantly enhanced the output of both adrenaline and noradrenaline from the adrenal and resulted in the release of proportionately more noradrenaline. Small amounts of dopamine and DOPAC were also released during splanchnic nerve stimulation and the output of dopamine was significantly increased by stimulating in bursts. 7. Both patterns of stimulation elicited an abrupt rise in mean plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) concentration, which was associated with an increase in mean adrenal cortisol output and the former effect was significantly enhanced

  16. Increased Efferent Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Defective Intrinsic Heart Rate Regulation in Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Thaung, H P Aye; Baldi, J Chris; Wang, Heng-Yu; Hughes, Gillian; Cook, Rosalind F; Bussey, Carol T; Sheard, Phil W; Bahn, Andrew; Jones, Peter P; Schwenke, Daryl O; Lamberts, Regis R

    2015-08-01

    Elevated sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) coupled with dysregulated β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) signaling is postulated as a major driving force for cardiac dysfunction in patients with type 2 diabetes; however, cardiac SNA has never been assessed directly in diabetes. Our aim was to measure the sympathetic input to and the β-AR responsiveness of the heart in the type 2 diabetic heart. In vivo recording of SNA of the left efferent cardiac sympathetic branch of the stellate ganglion in Zucker diabetic fatty rats revealed an elevated resting cardiac SNA and doubled firing rate compared with nondiabetic rats. Ex vivo, in isolated denervated hearts, the intrinsic heart rate was markedly reduced. Contractile and relaxation responses to β-AR stimulation with dobutamine were compromised in externally paced diabetic hearts, but not in diabetic hearts allowed to regulate their own heart rate. Protein levels of left ventricular β1-AR and Gs (guanine nucleotide binding protein stimulatory) were reduced, whereas left ventricular and right atrial β2-AR and Gi (guanine nucleotide binding protein inhibitory regulatory) levels were increased. The elevated resting cardiac SNA in type 2 diabetes, combined with the reduced cardiac β-AR responsiveness, suggests that the maintenance of normal cardiovascular function requires elevated cardiac sympathetic input to compensate for changes in the intrinsic properties of the diabetic heart. PMID:25784543

  17. Skin Sympathetic Nerve Activity is Modulated during Slow Sinusoidal Linear Displacements in Supine Humans.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Philip S; Hammam, Elie; Kwok, Kenny; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2016-01-01

    Low-frequency sinusoidal linear acceleration (0.08 Hz, ±4 mG) modulates skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) in seated subjects (head vertical), suggesting that activation of the utricle in the peripheral vestibular labyrinth modulates SSNA. The aim of the current study was to determine whether SSNA is also modulated by input from the saccule. Tungsten microelectrodes were inserted into the common peroneal nerve to record oligounitary SSNA in 8 subjects laying supine on a motorized platform with the head aligned with the longitudinal axis of the body. Slow sinusoidal (0.08 Hz, 100 cycles) linear acceleration-decelerations (peak ±4 mG) were applied rostrocaudally to predominately activate the saccules, or mediolaterally to predominately activate the utricles. Cross-correlation histograms were constructed between the negative-going sympathetic spikes and the positive peaks of the sinusoidal stimuli. Sinusoidal linear acceleration along the rostrocaudal axis or mediolateral axis both resulted in sinusoidal modulation of SSNA (Median, IQR 27.0, 22-33% and 24.8, 17-39%, respectively). This suggests that both otolith organs act on sympathetic outflow to skin and muscle in a similar manner during supine displacements. PMID:26909019

  18. Afferent fibres from pulmonary arterial baroreceptors in the left cardiac sympathetic nerve of the cat

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, K.; Sakanashi, M.; Takenaka, F.

    1974-01-01

    1. Afferent discharges were recorded from the left cardiac sympathetic nerve or the third sympathetic ramus communicans of anaesthetized cats. Twenty-one single units with baroreceptor activity were obtained. 2. The receptors of each unit were localized to the extrapulmonary part of the pulmonary artery, determined by direct mechanical probing of the wall of the pulmonary artery after death of the animals. Conduction velocity of the fibres ranged from 2·5 to 15·7 m/sec. 3. Afferent discharges occurred irregularly under artificial ventilation. The impulse activity was increased when pulmonary arterial pressure was raised by an intravenous infusion of Locke solution, or by occlusion of lung roots, and decreased by bleeding the animal from the femoral artery. 4. Above a threshold pressure, discharges occurred synchronously with the systolic pressure pulse in the pulmonary artery. A progressive further rise in pressure did not produce an increase in the number of impulses per heart beat. Occlusion of lung roots initially elicited a burst of discharges but the number of impulses for each cardiac cycle gradually decreased. 5. The receptors responded to repetitive mechanical stimuli up to a frequency of 10/sec, but failed to respond to stimuli delivered at 20/sec. 6. The results provide further evidence for the presence of afferent fibres in the cardiac sympathetic nerve. These afferent fibres are likely to provide the spinal cord with specific information only on transient changes in pulmonary arterial pressure. PMID:4850456

  19. Skin Sympathetic Nerve Activity is Modulated during Slow Sinusoidal Linear Displacements in Supine Humans

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Philip S.; Hammam, Elie; Kwok, Kenny; Macefield, Vaughan G.

    2016-01-01

    Low-frequency sinusoidal linear acceleration (0.08 Hz, ±4 mG) modulates skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) in seated subjects (head vertical), suggesting that activation of the utricle in the peripheral vestibular labyrinth modulates SSNA. The aim of the current study was to determine whether SSNA is also modulated by input from the saccule. Tungsten microelectrodes were inserted into the common peroneal nerve to record oligounitary SSNA in 8 subjects laying supine on a motorized platform with the head aligned with the longitudinal axis of the body. Slow sinusoidal (0.08 Hz, 100 cycles) linear acceleration-decelerations (peak ±4 mG) were applied rostrocaudally to predominately activate the saccules, or mediolaterally to predominately activate the utricles. Cross-correlation histograms were constructed between the negative-going sympathetic spikes and the positive peaks of the sinusoidal stimuli. Sinusoidal linear acceleration along the rostrocaudal axis or mediolateral axis both resulted in sinusoidal modulation of SSNA (Median, IQR 27.0, 22–33% and 24.8, 17–39%, respectively). This suggests that both otolith organs act on sympathetic outflow to skin and muscle in a similar manner during supine displacements. PMID:26909019

  20. Localization of NADPH Oxidase in Sympathetic and Sensory Ganglion Neurons and Perivascular Nerve Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xian; Demel, Stacie L.; Quinn, Mark T.; Galligan, James J.; Kreulen, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Superoxide anion (O2−•) production was previously reported to be increased in celiac ganglia (CG) during DOCA-salt hypertension, possibly via activation of the reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. This suggested a role for neuronal NADPH oxidase in autonomic neurovascular control. However, the expression and localization of NADPH oxidase in the peripheral neurons is not fully known. The purpose of this study was to examine the subcellular localization of NADPH oxidase in sympathetic and sensory ganglion neurons and perivascular nerve fibers. In rat CG, p22phox and neuropeptide Y (NPY) were colocalized in all neurons. P22phox was also localized to dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons that contain calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP). In mesenteric arteries, p22phox and p47phox were colocalized with NPY or CGRP in perivascular nerve terminals. A similar pattern of nerve terminal staining of p22phox and p47phox was also found in cultured CG neurons and nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells. These data demonstrate a previously uncharacterized localization of NADPH oxidase in perivascular nerve fibers. The presence of a O2−• – generating enzyme in close vicinity to the sites of neurotransmitter handling in the nerve fibers suggests the possibility of novel redox-mediated mechanisms in peripheral neurovascular control. PMID:19716351

  1. The importance of the selection of appropriate reference genes for gene expression profiling in adrenal medulla or sympathetic ganglia of spontaneously hypertensive rat.

    PubMed

    Vavřínová, A; Behuliak, M; Zicha, J

    2016-07-18

    Catecholaminergic system plays an important role in hypertension development. The available results on mRNA expression of catecholaminergic system genes in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) are often contradictory. One of the possible causes might be the use of various reference genes as internal controls. In the present study, we searched for suitable reference genes in adrenal medulla or sympathetic ganglia of SHR and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, which would enable reliable comparison of mRNA expression between these two strains. The mRNA expression was measured by quantitative real-time PCR in adrenal medulla and superior cervical ganglia of 4-week-old or 24-week-old SHR and WKY rats. We evaluated 12 reference genes by three software tools (Normfinder, BestKeeper, geNorm) and compared them for the standardization of mRNA expression. Combination of reference genes Hprt1 and Ywhaz in adrenal medulla and Gapdh and 18S in sympathetic ganglia were chosen as the best ones. 18S was found as applicable reference gene in both tissues. We found many alterations in expression of catecholaminergic system genes in adrenal medulla and sympathetic ganglia of SHR. The usage of the most or the least stable reference gene as internal control changed results moderately in sympathetic ganglia but seriously in adrenal medulla. For example, tyrosine hydroxylase (Th) gene was underexpressed in adrenal medulla of adult SHR using the appropriate reference gene but unchanged after the standardization to the least stable reference gene. Our results indicate the importance of appropriate internal control. The suitability of reference genes should be checked again in the case of change in experimental conditions. PMID:27070752

  2. Sympathetic nerve responses to muscle contraction and stretch in ischemic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Koba, Satoshi; Xing, Jihong; Sinoway, Lawrence I; Li, Jianhua

    2008-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) induces abnormal regulation of peripheral blood flow during exercise. Previous studies have suggested that a reflex from contracting muscle is disordered in this disease. However, there has been very little investigation of the muscle reflex regulating sympathetic outflows in CHF. Myocardial infarction (MI) was induced by the coronary artery ligation in rats. Echocardiography was performed to determine fractional shortening (FS), an index of the left ventricular function. We examined renal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activities (RSNA and LSNA, respectively) during 1-min repetitive (1- to 4-s stimulation to relaxation) contraction or stretch of the triceps surae muscles. During these interventions, the RSNA and LSNA responded synchronously as tension was developed. The RSNA and LSNA responses to contraction were significantly greater in MI rats (n = 13) with FS <30% than in control animals (n = 13) with FS >40% (RSNA: +49 +/- 7 vs. +19 +/- 4 a.u., P < 0.01; LSNA: +28 +/- 7 vs. +8 +/- 2 a.u., P < 0.01) at the same tension development. Stretch also increased the RSNA and LSNA to a larger degree in MI (n = 13) than in control animals (n = 13) (RSNA: +36 +/- 6 vs. +19 +/- 3 a.u., P < 0.05; LSNA: +24 +/- 3 vs. +9 +/- 2 a.u., P < 0.01). The data demonstrate that CHF exaggerates sympathetic nerve responses to muscle contraction as well as stretch. We suggest that muscle afferent-mediated sympathetic outflows contribute to the abnormal regulation of peripheral blood flow seen during exercise in CHF. PMID:17965282

  3. Role of supraspinal vasopressin neurones in the effects of atrial natriuretic peptide on sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Yusof, A P M; Yusoff, N H M; Suhaimi, F W; Coote, J H

    2009-06-15

    The aim of the present study was to determine if paraventricular-spinal vasopressin neurones participate in the sympatho-inhibitory effects of systemically administered atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Experiments were carried out on male Sprague-Dawley rats anesthetized with 1.3 g/kg urethane. Changes in mean arterial pressure (mm Hg), heart rate (beats per minute) and RSNA (%) were measured following intravenous bolus administration of ANP (250 ng, 500 ng and 5 microg). Intrathecal application of selective V 1a receptor antagonist was performed to test for the involvement of supraspinal vasopressin pathways in mediating the effect on sympathetic outflow evoked by intravenous ANP administration. The results obtained demonstrated that both low and high doses of ANP caused renal sympathoinhibition (250 ng; - 7.5 +/- 1%, 500 ng; - 14.2 +/- 1%, 5 microg; - 16.4 +/- 2%), concomitant with vasodilation and bradycardia. After spinal vasopressin receptor blockade, the inhibitory effects of ANP were prevented and there was a small renal sympatho-excitation (250 ng; + 1.7 +/- 0.2%, 500 ng; + 6.1 +/- 0.03%, 5 microg; + 8.0 +/- 0.03%, P < 0.05). Therefore, the renal sympathetic nerve inhibition elicited by circulating ANP is dependent on the efficacy of a well established supraspinal vasopressin pathway. Since supraspinal vasopressin neurones without exception excite renal sympathetic neurones, it is suggested that ANP elicits this effect by activating cardiac vagal afferents that inhibit the spinally projecting vasopressin neurones at their origin in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. PMID:19349212

  4. [Adrenalitis].

    PubMed

    Saeger, W

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation of the adrenal glands is caused by autoimmunopathies or infections and can induce adrenal insufficiency. Autoimmune lymphocytic adrenalitis is often combined with other autoimmune diseases and the most frequent cause of Addison's disease; however, it only becomes clinically apparent when more than 90 % of the adrenal cortex has been destroyed. Histological features are characterized by lymphoplasmacytic inflammation leading to an increased destruction of adrenocortical tissue but less severe courses can also occur. The second most frequent form of adrenalitis is adrenal tuberculosis, showing typical granulomatous findings that are nearly always caused by spreading from a tuberculous pulmonary focus. Other bacterial as well as viral infections, such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) and others, generally affect the adrenal glands only in patients with immunodeficiency disorders. In these infections, the adrenal cortex and medulla are frequently involved to roughly the same extent. Although surgical specimens from inflammatory adrenal lesions are extremely rare, the various forms of adrenalitis play an important role in the post-mortem examination of the adrenal glands for clarification of unclear causes of death (e.g. death during an Addisonian crisis). PMID:27099224

  5. Carotid baroreflex regulation of sympathetic nerve activity during dynamic exercise in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fadel, P. J.; Ogoh, S.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Wasmund, W.; Olivencia-Yurvati, A.; Smith, M. L.; Raven, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    We sought to determine whether carotid baroreflex (CBR) control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was altered during dynamic exercise. In five men and three women, 23.8 +/- 0.7 (SE) yr of age, CBR function was evaluated at rest and during 20 min of arm cycling at 50% peak O(2) uptake using 5-s periods of neck pressure and neck suction. From rest to steady-state arm cycling, mean arterial pressure (MAP) was significantly increased from 90.0 +/- 2.7 to 118.7 +/- 3.6 mmHg and MSNA burst frequency (microneurography at the peroneal nerve) was elevated by 51 +/- 14% (P < 0.01). However, despite the marked increases in MAP and MSNA during exercise, CBR-Delta%MSNA responses elicited by the application of various levels of neck pressure and neck suction ranging from +45 to -80 Torr were not significantly different from those at rest. Furthermore, estimated baroreflex sensitivity for the control of MSNA at rest was the same as during exercise (P = 0.74) across the range of neck chamber pressures. Thus CBR control of sympathetic nerve activity appears to be preserved during moderate-intensity dynamic exercise.

  6. A vesicular sequestration to oxidative deamination shift in myocardial sympathetic nerves in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S; Sullivan, Patricia; Holmes, Courtney; Miller, Gary W; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Kopin, Irwin J

    2014-10-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD), profound putamen dopamine (DA) depletion reflects denervation and a shift from vesicular sequestration to oxidative deamination of cytoplasmic DA in residual terminals. PD also involves cardiac sympathetic denervation. Whether PD entails myocardial norepinephrine (NE) depletion and a sequestration-deamination shift have been unknown. We measured apical myocardial tissue concentrations of NE, DA, and their neuronal metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG), and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) from 23 PD patients and 23 controls and ascertained the extent of myocardial NE depletion in PD. We devised, validated in VMAT2-Lo mice, and applied 5 neurochemical indices of the sequestration-deamination shift-concentration ratios of DOPAC:DA, DA:NE, DHPG:NE, DOPAC:NE, and DHPG:DOPAC-and used a kinetic model to estimate the extent of the vesicular storage defect. The PD group had decreased myocardial NE content (p < 0.0001). The majority of patients (70%) had severe NE depletion (mean 2% of control), and in this subgroup all five indices of a sequestration-deamination shift were increased compared to controls (p < 0.001 for each). Vesicular storage in residual nerves was estimated to be decreased by 84-91% in this subgroup. We conclude that most PD patients have severe myocardial NE depletion, because of both sympathetic denervation and decreased vesicular storage in residual nerves. We found that the majority (70%) of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients have profound (98%) myocardial norepinephrine depletion, because of both cardiac sympathetic denervation and a shift from vesicular sequestration to oxidative deamination of cytoplasmic catecholamines in the residual nerves. This shift may be part of a final common pathogenetic pathway in the loss of catecholaminergic neurons that characterizes PD. PMID:24848581

  7. Topohistology of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerve fibers in branches of the pelvic plexus: an immunohistochemical study using donated elderly cadavers

    PubMed Central

    Hieda, Keisuke; Sasaki, Hiromasa; Murakami, Gen; Abe, Shinichi; Matsubara, Akio; Miyake, Hideaki; Fujisawa, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Although the pelvic autonomic plexus may be considered a mixture of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves, little information on its composite fibers is available. Using 10 donated elderly cadavers, we investigated in detail the topohistology of nerve fibers in the posterior part of the periprostatic region in males and the infero-anterior part of the paracolpium in females. Neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) were used as parasympathetic nerve markers, and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was used as a marker of sympathetic nerves. In the region examined, nNOS-positive nerves (containing nNOS-positive fibers) were consistently predominant numerically. All fibers positive for these markers appeared to be thin, unmyelinated fibers. Accordingly, the pelvic plexus branches were classified into 5 types: triple-positive mixed nerves (nNOS+, VIP+, TH+, thick myelinated fibers + or -); double-positive mixed nerves (nNOS+, VIP-, TH+, thick myelinated fibers + or -); nerves in arterial walls (nNOS-, VIP+, TH+, thick myelinated fibers-); non-parasympathetic nerves (nNOS-, VIP-, TH+, thick myelinated fibers + or -); (although rare) pure sensory nerve candidates (nNOS-, VIP-, TH-, thick myelinated fibers+). Triple-positive nerves were 5-6 times more numerous in the paracolpium than in the periprostatic region. Usually, the parasympathetic nerve fibers did not occupy a specific site in a nerve, and were intermingled with sympathetic fibers. This morphology might be the result of an "incidentally" adopted nerve fiber route, rather than a target-specific pathway. PMID:24693483

  8. Sympathetic preganglionic efferent and afferent neurons mediated by the greater splanchnic nerve in rabbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torigoe, Yasuhiro; Cernucan, Roxana D.; Nishimoto, Jo Ann S.; Blanks, Robert H. I.

    1985-01-01

    As a part of the study of the vestibular-autonomic pathways involved in motion sickness, the location and the morphology of preganglionic sympathetic neurons (PSNs) projecting via the greater splanchnic nerve were examined. Retrograde labeling of neurons was obtained by application of horseradish peroxidase to the cut end of the greater splanchnic nerve. Labeled PSNs were found, ipsilaterally, within the T1 to T11 spinal cord segments, with the highest density of neurons in T6. Most PSNs were located within the intermediolateral column, but a significant portion also occurred within the lateral funiculus, the intercalated region, and the central autonomic area; the proportion of labeling between the four regions depended on the spinal cord segment.

  9. Hypothalamic Nesfatin-1 Stimulates Sympathetic Nerve Activity via Hypothalamic ERK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Tanida, Mamoru; Gotoh, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Wang, Mofei; Kuda, Yuhichi; Kurata, Yasutaka; Mori, Masatomo; Shibamoto, Toshishige

    2015-11-01

    Nesfatin-1 acts on the hypothalamus and regulates the autonomic nervous system. However, the hypothalamic mechanisms of nesfatin-1 on the autonomic nervous system are not well understood. In this study, we found that intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of nesfatin-1 increased the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity in rats. Furthermore, the activity of sympathetic nerves, in the kidneys, liver, and white adipose tissue (WAT), and blood pressure was stimulated by the ICV injection of nesfatin-1, and these effects were abolished owing to pharmacological inhibition of ERK. Renal sympathoexcitatory and hypertensive effects were also observed with nesfatin-1 microinjection into the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN). Moreover, nesfatin-1 increased the number of phospho (p)-ERK1/2-positive neurons in the PVN and coexpression of the protein in neurons expressing corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). Pharmacological blockade of CRH signaling inhibited renal sympathetic and hypertensive responses to nesfatin-1. Finally, sympathetic stimulation of WAT and increased p-ERK1/2 levels in response to nesfatin-1 were preserved in obese animals such as rats that were fed a high-fat diet and leptin receptor-deficient Zucker fatty rats. These findings indicate that nesfatin-1 regulates the autonomic nervous system through ERK signaling in PVN-CRH neurons to maintain cardiovascular function and that the antiobesity effect of nesfatin-1 is mediated by hypothalamic ERK-dependent sympathoexcitation in obese animals. PMID:26310564

  10. Asymmetric and Symmetric Dimethylarginine and Sympathetic Nerve Traffic after Renal Denervation in Patients with Resistant Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Guido; Seravalle, Gino; Trevano, Fosca Quarti; Spaziani, Domenico; Scalise, Filippo; Auguadro, Carla; Pizzini, Patrizia; Tripepi, Giovanni; D’Arrigo, Graziella; Mallamaci, Francesca; Mancia, Giuseppe; Zoccali, Carmine

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives The plasma concentration of the endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) associates with sympathetic activity in patients with CKD, but the driver of this association is unknown. Design, setting, participants, & measurements In this longitudinal study (follow-up: 2 weeks–6 months), repeated measurements over time of muscle sympathetic nerve activity corrected (MSNAC), plasma levels of ADMA and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA), and BP and heart rate were performed in 14 patients with drug-resistant hypertension who underwent bilateral renal denervation (enrolled in 2013 and followed-up until February 2014). Stability of ADMA, SDMA, BP, and MSNAC over time (6 months) was assessed in two historical control groups of patients maintained on stable antihypertensive treatment. Results Time-integrated changes in MSNAC after renal denervation ranged from –40.6% to 10% (average, –15.1%), and these changes were strongly associated with the corresponding changes in plasma ADMA (r= 0.62, P=0.02) and SDMA (r=0.72, P=0.004). Changes in MSNAC went along with simultaneous changes in standardized systolic (r=0.65, P=0.01) and diastolic BP (r=0.61, P=0.02). In the historical control groups, no change in ADMA, SDMA, BP, and MSNAC levels was recorded during a 6-month follow-up. Conclusions In patients with resistant hypertension, changes in sympathetic activity after renal denervation associate with simultaneous changes in plasma levels of the two major endogenous methylarginines, ADMA and SDMA. These observations are compatible with the hypothesis that the sympathetic nervous system exerts an important role in modulating circulating levels of ADMA and SDMA in this condition. PMID:26138262

  11. Comparison of sympathetic nerve responses to neck and forearm isometric exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steele, S. L. Jr; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: Although the autonomic and cardiovascular responses to arm and leg exercise have been studied, the sympathetic adjustments to exercise of the neck have not. The purpose of the present study was twofold: 1) to determine sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric contractions of the neck extensors and 2) to compare sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to isometric exercise of the neck and forearm. METHODS: Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate were measured in nine healthy subjects while performing isometric neck extension (INE) and isometric handgrip (IHG) in the prone position. After a 3-min baseline period, subjects performed three intensities of INE for 2.5 min each: 1) unloaded (supporting head alone), 2) 10% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC), and 3) 30% MVC, then subjects performed two intensities (10% and 30% MVC) of IHG for 2.5 min. RESULTS: Supporting the head by itself did not significantly change any of the variables. During [NE, MAP significantly increased by 10 +/- 2 and 31 +/- 4 mm Hg and MSNA increased by 67 +/- 46 and 168 +/- 36 units/30 s for 10% and 30% MVC, respectively. IHG and INE evoked similar responses at 10% MVC, but IHG elicited higher peak MAP and MSNA at 30% MVC (37 +/- 7 mm Hg (P < 0.05) and 300 +/- 48 units/30 s (P < 0.01) for IHG, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The data indicate that INE can elicit marked increases in MSNA and cardiovascular responses but that it evokes lower peak responses as compared to IHG. We speculate that possible differences in muscle fiber type composition, muscle mass, and/or muscle architecture of the neck and forearm are responsible for these differences in peak responses.

  12. Leptin differentially increases sympathetic nerve activity and its baroreflex regulation in female rats: role of oestrogen.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhigang; Brooks, Virginia L

    2015-04-01

    Obesity and hypertension are commonly associated, and activation of the sympathetic nervous system is considered to be a major contributor, at least in part due to the central actions of leptin. However, while leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in males, whether leptin is equally effective in females is unknown. Here, we show that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) leptin increases lumbar (LSNA) and renal (RSNA) SNA and baroreflex control of LSNA and RSNA in α-chloralose anaesthetized female rats, but only during pro-oestrus. In contrast, i.c.v. leptin increased basal and baroreflex control of splanchnic SNA (SSNA) and heart rate (HR) in rats in both the pro-oestrus and dioestrus states. The effects of leptin on basal LSNA, RSNA, SSNA and HR were similar in males and pro-oestrus females; however, i.c.v. leptin increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) only in males. Leptin did not alter LSNA or HR in ovariectomized rats, but its effects were normalized with 4 days of oestrogen treatment. Bilateral nanoinjection of SHU9119 into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), to block α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) type 3 and 4 receptors, decreased LSNA in leptin-treated pro-oestrus but not dioestrus rats. Unlike leptin, i.c.v. insulin infusion increased basal and baroreflex control of LSNA and HR similarly in pro-oestrus and dioestrus rats; these responses did not differ from those in male rats. We conclude that, in female rats, leptin's stimulatory effects on SNA are differentially enhanced by oestrogen, at least in part via an increase in α-MSH activity in the PVN. These data further suggest that the actions of leptin and insulin to increase the activity of various sympathetic nerves occur via different neuronal pathways or cellular mechanisms. These results may explain the poor correlation in females of SNA with adiposity, or of MAP with leptin. PMID:25398524

  13. Adrenal responses to splanchnic nerve stimulation in conscious calves given naloxone.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A V; Jones, C T

    1989-01-01

    1. The effects of stimulating the peripheral end of the right splanchnic nerve in the presence of naloxone (2 mg kg-1) have been investigated in conscious 3 to 6-week-old calves. 2. Mean aortic blood pressure rose to significantly higher levels during splanchnic stimulation in bursts at 40 Hz for 1 s at 10 s intervals than it did during stimulation at the corresponding continuous frequency (4 Hz). Furthermore, naloxone significantly reduced the fall in mean vascular resistance in response to both patterns of stimulation. 3. The output of catecholamines from the adrenal gland, together with the proportion of noradrenaline released, was significantly enhanced by stimulating the splanchnic nerves in bursts in animals pre-treated with naloxone and the proportion of noradrenaline released also increased. In both cases the output of adrenaline and noradrenaline was within the same range as that reported previously in normal control animals. 4. Naloxone significantly increased the amounts of enkephalin-like immunoreactivity and corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF)-like immunoreactivity released from the adrenal gland in response to splanchnic nerve stimulation and raised the proportion of total to free met5-enkephalin that was secreted. 5. Naloxone also inhibited the rise in plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) concentration during continuous stimulation at 4 Hz, but not during stimulation at 40 Hz in bursts. Under these latter conditions the output of cortisol apparently directly from the adrenal gland was inhibited. The finding that splanchnic nerve stimulation can potentiate the output of cortisol in response to ACTH was confirmed. 6. These results provide evidence that release of enkephalins and of CRF from the adrenal is inhibited by activating opioid receptors within the gland itself. PMID:2559970

  14. Sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers undergo sprouting and neuroma formation in the painful arthritic joint of geriatric mice

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Although the prevalence of arthritis dramatically increases with age, the great majority of preclinical studies concerning the mechanisms that drive arthritic joint pain have been performed in young animals. One mechanism hypothesized to contribute to arthritic pain is ectopic nerve sprouting; however, neuroplasticity is generally thought to be greater in young versus old nerves. Here we explore whether sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers can undergo a significant ectopic nerve remodeling in the painful arthritic knee joint of geriatric mice. Methods Vehicle (saline) or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) was injected into the knee joint of 27- to 29-month-old female mice. Pain behaviors, macrophage infiltration, neovascularization, and the sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers were then assessed 28 days later, when significant knee-joint pain was present. Knee joints were processed for immunohistochemistry by using antibodies raised against CD68 (monocytes/macrophages), PECAM (endothelial cells), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP; sensory nerve fibers), neurofilament 200 kDa (NF200; sensory nerve fibers), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; sympathetic nerve fibers), and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43; nerve fibers undergoing sprouting). Results At 4 weeks after initial injection, CFA-injected mice displayed robust pain-related behaviors (which included flinching, guarding, impaired limb use, and reduced weight bearing), whereas animals injected with vehicle alone displayed no significant pain-related behaviors. Similarly, in the CFA-injected knee joint, but not in the vehicle-injected knee joint, a remarkable increase was noted in the number of CD68+ macrophages, density of PECAM+ blood vessels, and density and formation of neuroma-like structures by CGRP+, NF200+, and TH+ nerve fibers in the synovium and periosteum. Conclusions Sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers that innervate the aged knee joint clearly maintain the capacity for robust

  15. The Involvement of Parasympathetic and Sympathetic Nerve in the Inflammatory Reflex.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Mariana Rodrigues; Leite, Paulo Emílio Corrêa

    2016-09-01

    Production of inflammatory cytokines plays important roles in the response against tissue injury and in host defense. Alterations in the production of inflammatory cytokines may cause local or systemic inflammatory imbalance, culminating in organ failure or lethal systemic inflammation. The cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway has been implicated as an important mechanism to regulate inflammation of targeted tissue. In this review, we discuss important advances, conflicting and controversial findings regarding the involvement of parasympathetic vagus and sympathetic splenic nerve through acetylcholine (ACh) release and α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRα7) activation in the spleen. In addition, we address the involvement of cholinergic control of inflammation in other organs innerved by the vagus nerve such as gut, liver, kidney and lung, and independent of parasympathetic innervations such as skin and skeletal muscle. Then, other structures and mechanisms independent of vagus or splenic nerve may be involved in this process, such as local cells and motor neurons producing ACh. Altogether, the convergence of these findings may contribute to current anti-inflammatory strategies involving selective drug-targeting and electrical nerve stimulation. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1862-1869, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26754950

  16. Sympathetic sprouting near sensory neurons after nerve injury occurs preferentially on spontaneously active cells and is reduced by early nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith Ann; Li, Huiqing; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2006-01-01

    Some chronic pain conditions are maintained or enhanced by sympathetic activity. In animal models of pathological pain, abnormal sprouting of sympathetic fibers around large- and medium-size sensory neurons is observed in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Large and medium size cells are also more likely to be spontaneously active, suggesting that sprouting may be related to neuron activity. We previously showed that sprouting could be reduced by systemic or locally applied lidocaine. In the complete sciatic nerve transection model in rats, spontaneous activity initially originates in the injury site; later, the DRG become the major source of spontaneous activity. In this study, spontaneous activity reaching the DRG soma was reduced by early nerve blockade (local perfusion of the transected nerve with TTX for the first 7 days after injury). This significantly reduced sympathetic sprouting. Conversely, increasing spontaneous activity by local nerve perfusion with K+ channel blockers increased sprouting. The hyperexcitability and spontaneous activity of DRG neurons observed in this model were also significantly reduced by early nerve blockade. These effects of early nerve blockade on sprouting, excitability, and spontaneous activity were all observed 4 to 5 weeks after the end of early nerve blockade, indicating that the early period of spontaneous activity in the injured nerve is critical for establishing the more long-lasting pathologies observed in the DRG. Individual spontaneously active neurons, labeled with fluorescent dye, were 5–6 times more likely than quiescent cells to be co-localized with sympathetic fibers, suggesting a highly localized correlation of activity and sprouting. PMID:17065247

  17. L-Ornithine intake affects sympathetic nerve outflows and reduces body weight and food intake in rats.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Yuuki; Koosaka, Yasutaka; Maruyama, Ryuutaro; Imanishi, Kazuki; Kasahara, Kazuaki; Matsuda, Ai; Akiduki, Saori; Hishida, Yukihiro; Kurata, Yasutaka; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Satomi, Jun; Tanida, Mamoru

    2015-02-01

    Ingesting the amino acid l-ornithine effectively improves lipid metabolism in humans, although it is unknown whether it affects the activities of autonomic nerves that supply the peripheral organs related to lipid metabolism, such as adipose tissues. Thus, we investigated the effects of l-ornithine ingestion on autonomic nerves that innervate adipose tissues and the feeding behaviors of rats. Intragastric injection of l-ornithine (2.5%) in urethane-anesthetized rats activated sympathetic nerve activity to white adipose tissue (WAT-SNA), and stimulated sympathetic nerve activity to brown adipose tissue (BAT-SNA). In addition, WAT-SNA responses to l-ornithine were abolished in rats with ablated abdominal vagal nerves. l-ornithine ingestion for 9 weeks also significantly reduced rats' body weight, food intake, and abdominal fat weight. Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) levels in the hypothalamus and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) levels in brown adipose tissue were significantly increased in rats that ingested 2.5% l-ornithine for 9 weeks. These results suggested that ingested l-ornithine was taken up in the gastrointestinal organs and stimulated afferent vagal nerves and activated the central nervous system. Subsequently, increased hypothalamic POMC activated sympathetic neurotransmission to adipose tissues and accelerated energy expenditure. PMID:25526897

  18. Properties of postganglionic sympathetic fibers isolated from the right recurrent laryngeal nerve.

    PubMed

    Bałkowiec, A; Szulczyk, P

    1995-08-01

    The pattern of response of 45 single postganglionic sympathetic axons dissected from the right recurrent laryngeal nerve was examined in chloralose-anesthetized cats. Both vagoaortic nerves were cut, and both sinus nerves were left intact. Each neuron, based on the presence of cardiac and respiratory rhythmicities in its resting activity and reaction to systemic hypoxia (10% O2 in N2 for 2 min), was classified into one of three classes. Class I neurons (n = 29, 64%) were activated during systemic hypoxia and had a pronounced cardiac and inspiration-related rhythmicity in their resting activity. Class II neurons (n = 12,27%) were inhibited during systemic hypoxia, and their cardiac and respiratory rhythmicities were either negligible or totally absent. Class III neurons (n = 4,9%), similarly to class I, had a pronounced cardiac and inspiratory rhythmicity but were not affected by systemic hypoxia. The systemic hypoxia was always accompanied by an increase in blood pressure. We conclude that class I and possibly class III neurons innervate the arteries of upper airways. We also discuss the possibility that class II neurons are responsible for regulating the smooth muscles of upper airways. PMID:7592223

  19. Augmented supraorbital skin sympathetic nerve activity responses to symptom trigger events in rosacea patients

    PubMed Central

    Metzler-Wilson, Kristen; Toma, Kumika; Sammons, Dawn L.; Mann, Sarah; Jurovcik, Andrew J.; Demidova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Facial flushing in rosacea is often induced by trigger events. However, trigger causation mechanisms are currently unclear. This study tested the central hypothesis that rosacea causes sympathetic and axon reflex-mediated alterations resulting in trigger-induced symptomatology. Twenty rosacea patients and age/sex-matched controls participated in one or a combination of symptom triggering stressors. In protocol 1, forehead skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA; supraorbital microneurography) was measured during sympathoexcitatory mental (2-min serial subtraction of novel numbers) and physical (2-min isometric handgrip) stress. In protocol 2, forehead skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) and transepithelial water loss/sweat rate (capacitance hygrometry) were measured during sympathoexcitatory heat stress (whole body heating by perfusing 50°C water through a tube-lined suit). In protocol 3, cheek, forehead, forearm, and palm skin blood flow were measured during nonpainful local heating to induce axon reflex vasodilation. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded via finger photoplethysmography to calculate cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; flux·100/MAP). Higher patient transepithelial water loss was observed (rosacea 0.20 ± 0.02 vs. control 0.10 ± 0.01 mg·cm−2·min−1, P < 0.05). HR and MAP changes were not different between groups during sympathoexcitatory stressors or local heating. SSNA during early mental (32 ± 9 and 9 ± 4% increase) and physical (25 ± 4 and 5 ± 1% increase, rosacea and controls, respectively) stress was augmented in rosacea (both P < 0.05). Heat stress induced more rapid sweating and cutaneous vasodilation onset in rosacea compared with controls. No axon reflex vasodilation differences were observed between groups. These data indicate that rosacea affects SSNA and that hyperresponsiveness to trigger events appears to have a sympathetic component. PMID:26133800

  20. Mild DOCA-salt hypertension: sympathetic system and role of renal nerves.

    PubMed

    Kandlikar, Sachin S; Fink, Gregory D

    2011-05-01

    Excess sympathetic nervous system activity (SNA) is linked to human essential and experimental hypertension. To test whether sympathetic activation is associated with a model of deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertension featuring two kidneys and a moderate elevation of blood pressure, we measured whole body norepinephrine (NE) spillover as an index of global SNA. Studies were conducted in chronically catheterized male Sprague-Dawley rats drinking water containing 1% NaCl and 0.2% KCl. After a 7-day surgical recovery and a 3-day control period, a DOCA pellet (50 mg/kg) was implanted subcutaneously in one group of rats (DOCA), while the other group underwent sham implantation (Sham). NE spillover was measured on control day 2 and days 7 and 14 after DOCA administration or sham implantation. During the control period, mean arterial pressure (MAP) was similar in Sham and DOCA rats. MAP was significantly increased in the DOCA group compared with the Sham group after DOCA administration (day 14: Sham = 109 ± 5.3, DOCA = 128 ± 3.6 mmHg). However, plasma NE concentration, clearance, and spillover were not different in the two groups at any time. To determine whether selective sympathetic activation to the kidneys contributes to hypertension development, additional studies were performed in renal denervated (RDX) and sham-denervated (Sham-DX) rats. MAP, measured by radiotelemetry, was similar in both groups during the control and DOCA treatment periods. In conclusion, global SNA is not increased during the development of mild DOCA-salt hypertension, and fully intact renal nerves are not essential for hypertension development in this model. PMID:21357502

  1. Increase in Operator's Sympathetic Nerve Activity during Complicated Hepatobiliary Surgery: Evidence for Surgeons' Mental Stress.

    PubMed

    Yamanouchi, Kosho; Hayashida, Naomi; Kuba, Sayaka; Sakimura, Chika; Kuroki, Tamotsu; Togo, Michita; Katayama, Noritada; Takamura, Noboru; Eguchi, Susumu

    2015-01-01

    Surgeons often experience stress during operations. The heart rate variability (HRV) is the variability in the beat-to-beat interval, which has been used as parameters of stress. The purpose of this study was to evaluate mental stress of surgeons before, during and after operations, especially during pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) and living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Additionally, the parameters were compared in various procedures during the operations. By frequency domain method using electrocardiograph, we measured the high frequency (HF) component, representing the parasympathetic activity, and the low frequency (LF)/HF ratio, representing the sympathetic activity. In all 5 cases of PD, the surgeon showed significantly lower HF component and higher LF/HF during operation, indicating predominance of sympathetic nervous system and increased stress, than those before the operation (p < 0.01) and these did not return to the baseline level one hour after the operation. Out of the 4 LDLT cases, the value of HF was decreased in two and the LF/HF increased in three cases (p < 0.01) during the operation compared to those before the operation. In all cases, the value of HF was decreased and/or the LF/HF increased significantly during the reconstruction of the vessels or bile ducts than during the removal of the liver. Thus, sympathetic nerve activity increased during hepatobiliary surgery compared with the level before the operation, and various procedures during the operations induced diverse changes in the autonomic nervous activities. The HRV analysis could assess the chronological changes of mental stress by measuring the autonomic nervous balances. PMID:26466520

  2. Augmented supraorbital skin sympathetic nerve activity responses to symptom trigger events in rosacea patients.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Wilson, Kristen; Toma, Kumika; Sammons, Dawn L; Mann, Sarah; Jurovcik, Andrew J; Demidova, Olga; Wilson, Thad E

    2015-09-01

    Facial flushing in rosacea is often induced by trigger events. However, trigger causation mechanisms are currently unclear. This study tested the central hypothesis that rosacea causes sympathetic and axon reflex-mediated alterations resulting in trigger-induced symptomatology. Twenty rosacea patients and age/sex-matched controls participated in one or a combination of symptom triggering stressors. In protocol 1, forehead skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA; supraorbital microneurography) was measured during sympathoexcitatory mental (2-min serial subtraction of novel numbers) and physical (2-min isometric handgrip) stress. In protocol 2, forehead skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) and transepithelial water loss/sweat rate (capacitance hygrometry) were measured during sympathoexcitatory heat stress (whole body heating by perfusing 50°C water through a tube-lined suit). In protocol 3, cheek, forehead, forearm, and palm skin blood flow were measured during nonpainful local heating to induce axon reflex vasodilation. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded via finger photoplethysmography to calculate cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; flux·100/MAP). Higher patient transepithelial water loss was observed (rosacea 0.20 ± 0.02 vs. control 0.10 ± 0.01 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1), P < 0.05). HR and MAP changes were not different between groups during sympathoexcitatory stressors or local heating. SSNA during early mental (32 ± 9 and 9 ± 4% increase) and physical (25 ± 4 and 5 ± 1% increase, rosacea and controls, respectively) stress was augmented in rosacea (both P < 0.05). Heat stress induced more rapid sweating and cutaneous vasodilation onset in rosacea compared with controls. No axon reflex vasodilation differences were observed between groups. These data indicate that rosacea affects SSNA and that hyperresponsiveness to trigger events appears to have a sympathetic component. PMID:26133800

  3. Direct conscious telemetry recordings demonstrate increased renal sympathetic nerve activity in rats with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Ibrahim M.; Sarma Kandukuri, Divya; Harrison, Joanne L.; Hildreth, Cara M.; Phillips, Jacqueline K.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with sympathetic hyperactivity and impaired blood pressure control reflex responses, yet direct evidence demonstrating these features of autonomic dysfunction in conscious animals is still lacking. Here we measured renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) using telemetry-based recordings in a rat model of CKD, the Lewis Polycystic Kidney (LPK) rat, and assessed responses to chemoreflex activation and acute stress. Male LPK and Lewis control animals (total n = 16) were instrumented for telemetric recording of RSNA and MAP. At 12–13 weeks-of-age, resting RSNA and MAP, sympathetic and haemodynamic responses to both peripheral (hypoxia: 10% O2) and central chemoreflex (hypercapnia: 7% CO2) activation and acute stress (open-field exposure), were measured. As indicators of renal function, urinary protein (UPro) and creatinine (UCr) levels were assessed. LPK rats had higher resting RSNA (1.2 ± 0.1 vs. 0.6 ± 0.1 μV, p < 0.05) and MAP (151 ± 8 vs. 97 ± 2 mmHg, p < 0.05) compared to Lewis. MAP was negatively correlated with UCr (r = −0.80, p = 0.002) and positively correlated with RSNA (r = 0.66, p = 0.014), with multiple linear regression modeling indicating the strongest correlation was with Ucr. RSNA and MAP responses to activation of the central chemoreflex and open-field stress were reduced in the LPK relative to the Lewis (all p < 0.05). This is the first description of dual conscious telemetry recording of RSNA and MAP in a genetic rodent model of CKD. Elevated RSNA is likely a key contributor to the marked hypertension in this model, while attenuated RSNA and MAP responses to central chemoreflex activation and acute stress in the LPK indicate possible deficits in the neural processing of autonomic outflows evoked by these sympathoexcitatory pathways. PMID:26300784

  4. Function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the sympathetic nervous system in models of acute stress in domestic farm animals.

    PubMed

    Minton, J E

    1994-07-01

    In response to stressors, the central nervous system of livestock (and other mammalian species) evokes physiological responses that ultimately result in activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis and the sympatho-adrenal axis. The responses of these major systems are presumed to have adaptive and homeostatic value during periods of stress. The major hormone regulating the synthesis and secretion of adrenal glucocorticoids is ACTH. In sheep, cattle, and pigs, both corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and vasopressin (VP) participate in the regulation of secretion of ACTH, and the two peptides seem to interact to enhance that secretion. In cattle and pigs, CRH is the more potent peptide, whereas VP is the more potent in sheep. In addition to its better-known role in regulating pituitary function, CRH also may participate as a neurotransmitter acting centrally to enhance sympathetic activation of the adrenal medulla. Many experimental models of stress have been evaluated that reliably activate the HPA axis and the sympatho-adrenal medullary axis, and some of these model systems also reduce functions of cells of the immune system. Recent data support an important role of stressor-activation of the sympathetics rather than increased glucocorticoids per se in modulating some measures of immune function in response to stress. Thus, current dogma of glucocorticoids as the primary mediator of stressor-associated alteration in immune function of domestic livestock may require reevaluation. PMID:7928769

  5. Muscle sympathetic nerve responses to physiological changes in prostaglandin production in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doerzbacher, K. J.; Ray, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that prostaglandins may contribute to exercise-induced increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). To test this hypothesis, MSNA was measured at rest and during exercise before and after oral administration of ketoprofen, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, or placebo. Twenty-one subjects completed two bouts of graded dynamic and isometric handgrip to fatigue. Each exercise bout was followed by 2 min of postexercise muscle ischemia. The second exercise bouts were performed after 60 min of rest in which 11 subjects were given ketoprofen (300 mg) and 10 subjects received a placebo. Ketoprofen significantly lowered plasma thromboxane B(2) in the drug group (from 36 +/- 6 to 22 +/- 3 pg/ml, P < 0.04), whereas thromboxane B(2) in the placebo group increased from 40 +/- 5 to 61 +/- 9 pg/ml from trial 1 to trial 2 (P < 0.008). Ketoprofen and placebo did not change sympathetic and cardiovascular responses to dynamic handgrip, isometric handgrip, and postexercise muscle ischemia. There was no relationship between thromboxane B(2) concentrations and MSNA or arterial pressure responses during both exercise modes. The data indicate that physiological increases or decreases in prostaglandins do not alter exercise-induced increases in MSNA and arterial pressure in humans. These findings suggest that contraction-induced metabolites other than prostaglandins mediate MSNA responses to exercise in humans.

  6. Dissociation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity and leg vascular resistance in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Herr, M. D.; Sinoway, L. I.

    2000-01-01

    We examined the hypothesis that the increase in inactive leg vascular resistance during forearm metaboreflex activation is dissociated from muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). MSNA (microneurography), femoral artery mean blood velocity (FAMBV, Doppler), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) were assessed during fatiguing static handgrip exercise (SHG, 2 min) followed by posthandgrip ischemia (PHI, 2 min). Whereas both MAP and MSNA increase during SHG, the transition from SHG to PHI is characterized by a transient reduction in MAP but sustained elevation in MSNA, facilitating separation of these factors in vivo. Femoral artery vascular resistance (FAVR) was calculated (MAP/MBV). MSNA increased by 59 +/- 20% above baseline during SHG (P < 0.05) and was 58 +/- 18 and 78 +/- 18% above baseline at 10 and 20 s of PHI, respectively (P < 0.05 vs. baseline). Compared with baseline, FAVR increased 51 +/- 22% during SHG (P < 0.0001) but returned to baseline levels during the first 30 s of PHI, reflecting the changes in MAP (P < 0.005) and not MSNA. It was concluded that control of leg muscle vascular resistance is sensitive to changes in arterial pressure and can be dissociated from sympathetic factors.

  7. Characteristics of renal sympathetic nerve single units in rabbits with angiotensin-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Burke, Sandra L; Lukoshkova, Elena V; Head, Geoffrey A

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effect of chronic angiotensin (Ang II)-induced hypertension on activity of postganglionic renal sympathetic units to determine whether altered whole renal nerve activity is due to recruitment or changes in firing frequency. Rabbits were treated with a low (20 ng kg(-1) min(-1), 8 weeks) or high dose (50 ng kg(-1) min(-1), 4 weeks) of Ang II before the experiment under chloralose-urethane anaesthesia. Spontaneously active units were detected from multiunit recordings using an algorithm that separated units by action potential shape using templates that matched spikes within a prescribed standard deviation. Multiunit sympathetic nerve activity was 40% higher in rabbits treated with low-dose Ang II than in sham (P = 0.012) but not different in high-dose Ang II. Resting firing frequency was similar in sham rabbits (1.00 ± 0.09 spikes s(-1), n = 144) and in those treated with high-dose Ang II (1.10 ± 0.08 spikes s(-1), n = 112) but was lower with low-dose Ang II (0.65 ± 0.08 spikes s(-1), n = 149, P < 0.05). Unit firing rhythmicity was linked to the cardiac cycle and was similar in sham and low-dose Ang II groups but 29-32% lower in rabbits treated with high-dose Ang II (P < 0.001). Cardiac linkage followed a similar pattern during hypoxia. All units showed baroreceptor dependency. Baroreflex gain and range were reduced and curves shifted to the right in Ang II groups. Firing frequency during hypoxia increased by +39% in low-dose Ang II and +82% in shams, but the greatest increase was in the high-dose Ang II group (+103%, P(dose) = 0.001). Responses to hypercapnia were similar in all groups. Increases in sympathetic outflow in hypertension caused by low-dose chronic Ang II administration are due to recruitment of neurons, but high-dose Ang II increases firing frequency in response to chemoreceptor stimuli independently of the arterial baroreceptors. PMID:26467849

  8. Peripheral nerve injury leads to the establishment of a novel pattern of sympathetic fibre innervation in the rat skin.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, I; Cuello, A C; Ribeiro-Da-Silva, A

    2000-06-26

    Peripheral nerve injury has been shown to result in sympathetic fibre sprouting around dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. It has been suggested that this anomalous sympathetic fibre innervation of the DRG plays a role in neuropathic pain. Other studies have suggested an interaction between sympathetic and sensory fibres more peripherally. To date, no anatomical study of these possible interactions in the terminal fields of sensory and sympathetic fibres has been performed; therefore, the authors set out to study them in the rat lower lip after bilateral lesions of a sensory nerve, the mental nerve (MN). Immunocytochemistry for both substance P (SP) and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DbetaH) was performed. Within the first week post-MN lesions, the SP-immunoreactive (IR) fibres had degenerated almost completely, whereas DbetaH-IR fibres were found in the upper dermis, an area from which they normally are absent. These DbetaH-IR fibres were present in the upper dermis at all postsurgery times studied (1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 8 weeks). It is noteworthy that, although, by week 6 post-MN lesions, SP-IR fibre reinnervation of the lower lip was occurring, the DbetaH-IR fibres still were present in the upper dermis. Quantification revealed that the migration and branching of the DbetaH-IR fibres into the upper dermis occurred gradually and was most significant at 4 weeks post-MN lesions, as demonstrated by the fact that the DbetaH-IR fibres were found 169.6 +/- 91.4 microm away from the surface of the skin compared with 407.1 +/- 78.4 microm away in sham-operated animals. These findings suggest that the ectopic innervation of the upper dermis by sympathetic fibres may be important in the genesis of neuropathic pain through the interactions of sympathetic and SP-containing sensory fibres. PMID:10842232

  9. Leptin differentially increases sympathetic nerve activity and its baroreflex regulation in female rats: role of oestrogen

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhigang; Brooks, Virginia L

    2015-01-01

    Key points Leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in males, which contributes to obesity-induced hypertension; however, whether leptin is equally effective in females is unknown. We report that leptin does increase SNA and heart rate in female rats; however, for lumbar and renal SNA, this action is only evident in pro-oestrus and in oestrogen-treated ovariectomized rats, but not in ovariectomized or dioestrus rats. Leptin increases SNA and heart rate similarly in male and pro-oestrus female rats; however, leptin increases arterial pressure only in males. Blockade of MC3/4 receptors in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) with SHU9119 decreases SNA in leptin-treated pro-oestrus rats, suggesting that leptin increases SNA in part by increasing α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone drive of PVN presympathetic neurons. Our data establish sex differences in leptin's effects to increase SNA and arterial pressure, which emphasizes the need for enhanced recognition and investigation of sex differences in obesity-induced sympathoexcitation and hypertension. Abstract Obesity and hypertension are commonly associated, and activation of the sympathetic nervous system is considered to be a major contributor, at least in part due to the central actions of leptin. However, while leptin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in males, whether leptin is equally effective in females is unknown. Here, we show that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) leptin increases lumbar (LSNA) and renal (RSNA) SNA and baroreflex control of LSNA and RSNA in α-chloralose anaesthetized female rats, but only during pro-oestrus. In contrast, i.c.v. leptin increased basal and baroreflex control of splanchnic SNA (SSNA) and heart rate (HR) in rats in both the pro-oestrus and dioestrus states. The effects of leptin on basal LSNA, RSNA, SSNA and HR were similar in males and pro-oestrus females; however, i.c.v. leptin increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) only in males. Leptin did not alter LSNA or HR

  10. Contributions of Central Command and Muscle Feedback to Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Contracting Human Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Boulton, Daniel; Taylor, Chloe E.; Macefield, Vaughan G.; Green, Simon

    2016-01-01

    During voluntary contractions, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) to contracting muscles increases in proportion to force but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. To shed light on these mechanisms, particularly the influences of central command and muscle afferent feedback, the present study tested the hypothesis that MSNA is greater during voluntary compared with electrically-evoked contractions. Seven male subjects performed a series of 1-min isometric dorsiflexion contractions (left leg) separated by 2-min rest periods, alternating between voluntary and electrically-evoked contractions at similar forces (5–10% of maximum). MSNA was recorded continuously (microneurography) from the left peroneal nerve and quantified from cardiac-synchronized, negative-going spikes in the neurogram. Compared with pre-contraction values, MSNA increased by 51 ± 34% (P < 0.01) during voluntary contractions but did not change significantly during electrically-evoked contractions (−8 ± 12%, P > 0.05). MSNA analyzed at 15-s intervals revealed that this effect of voluntary contraction appeared 15–30 s after contraction onset (P < 0.01), remained elevated until the end of contraction, and disappeared within 15 s after contraction. These findings suggest that central command, and not feedback from contracting muscle, is the primary mechanism responsible for the increase in MSNA to contracting muscle. The time-course of MSNA suggests that there is a longer delay in the onset of this effect compared with its cessation after contraction. PMID:27242537

  11. Contributions of Central Command and Muscle Feedback to Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Contracting Human Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Boulton, Daniel; Taylor, Chloe E; Macefield, Vaughan G; Green, Simon

    2016-01-01

    During voluntary contractions, muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) to contracting muscles increases in proportion to force but the underlying mechanisms are not clear. To shed light on these mechanisms, particularly the influences of central command and muscle afferent feedback, the present study tested the hypothesis that MSNA is greater during voluntary compared with electrically-evoked contractions. Seven male subjects performed a series of 1-min isometric dorsiflexion contractions (left leg) separated by 2-min rest periods, alternating between voluntary and electrically-evoked contractions at similar forces (5-10% of maximum). MSNA was recorded continuously (microneurography) from the left peroneal nerve and quantified from cardiac-synchronized, negative-going spikes in the neurogram. Compared with pre-contraction values, MSNA increased by 51 ± 34% (P < 0.01) during voluntary contractions but did not change significantly during electrically-evoked contractions (-8 ± 12%, P > 0.05). MSNA analyzed at 15-s intervals revealed that this effect of voluntary contraction appeared 15-30 s after contraction onset (P < 0.01), remained elevated until the end of contraction, and disappeared within 15 s after contraction. These findings suggest that central command, and not feedback from contracting muscle, is the primary mechanism responsible for the increase in MSNA to contracting muscle. The time-course of MSNA suggests that there is a longer delay in the onset of this effect compared with its cessation after contraction. PMID:27242537

  12. Isometric handgrip training reduces arterial pressure at rest without changes in sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.; Carrasco, D. I.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether isometric handgrip (IHG) training reduces arterial pressure and whether reductions in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) mediate this drop in arterial pressure. Normotensive subjects were assigned to training (n = 9), sham training (n = 7), or control (n = 8) groups. The training protocol consisted of four 3-min bouts of IHG exercise at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) separated by 5-min rest periods. Training was performed four times per week for 5 wk. Subjects' resting arterial pressure and heart rate were measured three times on 3 consecutive days before and after training, with resting MSNA (peroneal nerve) recorded on the third day. Additionally, subjects performed IHG exercise at 30% of MVC to fatigue followed by muscle ischemia. In the trained group, resting diastolic (67 +/- 1 to 62 +/- 1 mmHg) and mean arterial pressure (86 +/- 1 to 82 +/- 1 mmHg) significantly decreased, whereas systolic arterial pressure (116 +/- 3 to 113 +/- 2 mmHg), heart rate (67 +/- 4 to 66 +/- 4 beats/min), and MSNA (14 +/- 2 to 15 +/- 2 bursts/min) did not significantly change following training. MSNA and cardiovascular responses to exercise and postexercise muscle ischemia were unchanged by training. There were no significant changes in any variables for the sham training and control groups. The results indicate that IHG training is an effective nonpharmacological intervention in lowering arterial pressure.

  13. [The relationship between the sympathetic nerves and immunocytes in the spleen].

    PubMed

    Saito, H

    1991-02-01

    Ever since Galen, the ancient Greek physician, said "Melancholic women develop disease more than sanguine women," it has been said that the mental condition affects the physical condition. However, there is hardly any scientific verification. About half a century ago, Selye (1936) proposed a relationship between stress and immune function, and it is becoming increasingly clear that the nervous system and immune system interact with each other. Also researchers have strongly hoped to demonstrate the existence of specific pathways by which immunocytes can be directly regulated by the nervous elements instead of by the humoral influence of immunomodulators. In this study, the author showed by electron microscopic observation how the immunocytes in the guinea pig spleen are directly innervated. The sustentacular supporting element of the guinea pig spleen is the connective tissue system which includes the capsulo-trabecular, peri-vascular and reticular systems. The latter system is composed of the outer sheath of the reticular cell or its cellular processes which have abundant microfilaments and the inner minute connective tissue space in which lamina densa-like material, collagenous fibrils, elastic fibers and nervous elements are present. The sympathetic adrenergic nerves for the spleen enter the organ, and scatter around the arterial walls. All components of the connective tissue system are continuous with each other, and the nervous elements appearing in the reticular system are the elongated ones from other connective tissue systems, especially peri-vascular connective tissue. Thus, the adrenergic nerves are more abundant in the white pulp, into which the central artery penetrates, than in the red pulp which arterioles or capillaries pass through. The minute connective tissue space of the reticular system may be called the noradrenalin (NA) canal because catecholamine released from the naked adrenergic nerve terminals in this tissue diffuses and is stored in this

  14. Mental Stress Elicits Sustained and Reproducible Increases in Skin Sympathetic Nerve Activity.

    PubMed

    Muller, Matthew D; Sauder, Charity L; Ray, Chester A

    2013-03-01

    Mental stress (MS) is a known trigger of myocardial infarction and sudden death. By activating the sympathetic nervous system, MS may have deleterious effect on the cardiovascular system but this process is not completely understood. The primary aim of this study was to quantify the effect of MS on skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA). The secondary aim was to determine the reproducibility of SSNA to MS within a given day and ~1 week later. Ten subjects (26±1 yr.) performed two bouts of mental arithmetic lasting 3 min. The bouts were separated by 45 min. One week later the subjects returned to repeat MS. All experiments were conducted in the supine posture during the morning hours. To maintain neutral skin temperature, each subject wore a custom suit (34-35°C). Skin blood flow and sweat rate were measured on the dorsal foot. MS elicited a marked increase in SSNA within the first 10 s (184±42%; P<0.01) in all subjects, which was less during the remaining period of MS but remained elevated (87±20; P<0.01). The pattern of responses to MS was unchanged during the second bout (10 s, 247±55%; 3 min avg., 133±29%) and during the retest 1 week later (10 s, 196±55%; 3 min avg., 117±36%). MS did not significantly affect cutaneous vascular conductance or sweat rate during any trial. In summary, MS elicits robust and reproducible increases in SSNA in humans which may be followed over time to observe alterations in the regulation of the autonomic nervous system. PMID:23750321

  15. Interaction of the vestibular system and baroreflexes on sympathetic nerve activity in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) is altered by vestibular otolith stimulation. This study examined interactive effects of the vestibular system and baroreflexes on MSNA in humans. In study 1, MSNA was measured during 4 min of lower body negative pressure (LBNP) at either -10 or -30 mmHg with subjects in prone posture. During the 3rd min of LBNP, subjects lowered their head over the end of a table (head-down rotation, HDR) to engage the otolith organs. The head was returned to baseline upright position during the 4th min. LBNP increased MSNA above baseline during both trials with greater increases during the -30-mmHg trial. HDR increased MSNA further during the 3rd min of LBNP at -10 and -30 mmHg (Delta32% and Delta34%, respectively; P < 0.01). MSNA returned to pre-HDR levels during the 4th min of LBNP when the head was returned upright. In study 2, MSNA was measured during HDR, LBNP, and simultaneously performed HDR and LBNP. The sum of MSNA responses during individual HDR and LBNP trials was not significantly different from that observed during HDR and LBNP performed together (Delta131 +/- 28 vs. Delta118 +/- 47 units and Delta340 +/- 77 vs. Delta380 +/- 90 units for the -10 and -30 trials, respectively). These results demonstrate that vestibular otolith stimulation can increase MSNA during unloading of the cardiopulmonary and arterial baroreflexes. Also, the interaction between the vestibulosympathetic reflex and baroreflexes is additive in humans. These studies indicate that the vestibulosympathetic reflex may help defend against orthostatic challenges in humans by increasing sympathetic outflow.

  16. Permanent lesion of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve after low-volume ethanol 96%application on the lumbar sympathetic chain.

    PubMed

    Pennekamp, Werner; Krumova, Elena K; Feigl, Georg Pd; Frombach, Elke; Nicolas, Volkmar; Schwarzer, Andreas; Maier, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar sympathetic blocks and chemical sympathectomies are used for the pain treatment of peripheral arterial occlusive disease or sympathetically maintained pain syndrome after nerve injury or complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). A 30-year-old patient was referred to the pain department with all the clinical signs and symptoms of a CRPS of the right foot one and a half years after being surgically treated for rupture of the achilles tendon. An inpatient admission was necessary due to insufficient pain reduction upon the current treatment, strong allodynia in the medial distal right lower leg and decreased load-bearing capacity of the right foot. A computed tomography (CT)-guided lumbar sympathetic block at the right L3 (Bupivacaine 0.5%, 4 mL) led to a skin temperature increase from 21° C before block to > 34° C for about 5 hours after the intervention. The patient experienced significant pain relief, indicating sympathetically maintained pain. Thus, we performed a CT-guided lumbar sympathetic neurolysis at the same level (ethanol 96%, 2 mL) 5 days later, achieving again a significant skin temperature increase of the right foot and a slight reduction of his pain intensity from numeric rating scale (NRS) 7 prior to the intervention to NRS 4 after 8 hours (NRS, 0 = no pain, 10 = strongest pain imaginable). Eight months later a repeated inpatient admission was necessary due to considerable pain relapse and decreased load-bearing capacity of his right foot. A CT-guided lumbar sympathetic neurolysis was repeated at the L4 level on the right side and was successful, inducing a significant skin temperature increase. Despite a temporary irritation of the genitofemoral nerve 8 hours after the intervention, a delayed irritation of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve occurred. This was a long-lasting lesion of the lateral femoral cutaneous nerve following a CT-guided chemical sympathectomy with a low-volume ethanol 96% application - a complication which has not been

  17. Increased Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Impaired Executive Performance Capacity in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Goya, Thiago T.; Silva, Rosyvaldo F.; Guerra, Renan S.; Lima, Marta F.; Barbosa, Eline R.F.; Cunha, Paulo Jannuzzi; Lobo, Denise M.L.; Buchpiguel, Carlos A.; Busatto-Filho, Geraldo; Negrão, Carlos E.; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo; Ueno-Pardi, Linda M.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) response and executive performance during mental stress in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods: Individuals with no other comorbidities (age = 52 ± 1 y, body mass index = 29 ± 0.4, kg/m2) were divided into two groups: (1) control (n = 15) and (2) untreated OSA (n = 20) defined by polysomnography. Mini-Mental State of Examination (MMSE) and Inteligence quocient (IQ) were assessed. Heart rate (HR), blood pressure (BP), and MSNA (microneurography) were measured at baseline and during 3 min of the Stroop Color Word Test (SCWT). Sustained attention and inhibitory control were assessed by the number of correct answers and errors during SCWT. Results: Control and OSA groups (apnea-hypopnea index, AHI = 8 ± 1 and 47 ± 1 events/h, respectively) were similar in age, MMSE, and IQ. Baseline HR and BP were similar and increased similarly during SCWT in control and OSA groups. In contrast, baseline MSNA was higher in OSA compared to controls. Moreover, MSNA significantly increased in the third minute of SCWT in OSA, but remained unchanged in controls (P < 0.05). The number of correct answers was lower and the number of errors was significantly higher during the second and third minutes of SCWT in the OSA group (P < 0.05). There was a significant correlation (P < 0.01) between the number of errors in the third minute of SCWT with AHI (r = 0.59), arousal index (r = 0.55), and minimum O2 saturation (r = −0.57). Conclusions: As compared to controls, MSNA is increased in patients with OSA at rest, and further significant MSNA increments and worse executive performance are seen during mental stress. Clinical Trial Registration: URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, registration number: NCT002289625. Citation: Goya TT, Silva RF, Guerra RS, Lima MF, Barbosa ER, Cunha PJ, Lobo DM, Buchpiguel CA, Busatto-Filho G, Negrão CE, Lorenzi-Filho G, Ueno-Pardi LM. Increased muscle sympathetic nerve activity and

  18. Perfusion of isolated carotid sinus with hydrogen sulfide attenuated the renal sympathetic nerve activity in anesthetized male rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Q; Wu, Y; Xue, H; Xiao, L; Jin, S; Wang, R

    2016-07-18

    The purpose of the present study was to define the indirect central effect of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) on baroreflex control of sympathetic outflow. Perfusing the isolated carotid sinus with sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), a H(2)S donor, the effect of H(2)S was measured by recording changes of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) in anesthetized male rats. Perfusion of isolated carotid sinus with NaHS (25, 50, 100 micromol/l) dose and time-dependently inhibited sympathetic outflow. Preconditioning of glibenclamide (20 micromol/l), a ATP-sensitive K(+) channels (K(ATP)) blocker, the above effect of NaHS was removed. With 1, 4-dihydro-2, 6-dimethyl-5-nitro-4-(2-[trifluoromethyl] phenyl) pyridine-3-carboxylic acid methyl ester (Bay K8644, 500 nmol/l) pretreatment, which is an agonist of L-calcium channels, the effect of NaHS was eliminated. Perfusion of cystathionine gamma-lyase (CSE) inhibitor, DL-propargylglycine (PPG, 200 micromol/l), increased sympathetic outflow. The results show that exogenous H(2)S in the carotid sinus inhibits sympathetic outflow. The effect of H(2)S is attributed to opening K(ATP) channels and closing the L-calcium channels. PMID:26988151

  19. Effects of chronic oestrogen treatment are not selective for uterine noradrenaline-containing sympathetic nerves: a transplantation study

    PubMed Central

    BRAUER, M. MONICA; CHAVEZ-GENARO, REBECA; LLODRA, JAIME; RICHERI, ANALIA; SCORZA, M. CECILIA

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that chronic administration of oestrogen during postnatal rat development dramatically reduces the total content of noradrenaline in the uterine horn, abolishes myometrial noradrenergic innervation and reduces noradrenaline-fluorescence intensity of intrauterine perivascular nerve fibres. In the present study we analysed if this response is due to a direct and selective effect of oestrogen on the uterine noradrenaline-containing sympathetic nerves, using the in oculo transplantation method. Small pieces of myometrium from prepubertal rats were transplanted into the anterior eye chamber of adult ovariectomised host rats. The effect of systemic chronic oestrogen treatment on the reinnervation of the transplants by noradrenaline-containing sympathetic fibres from the superior cervical ganglion was analysed on cryostat tissue sections processed by the glyoxylic acid technique. In addition, the innervation of the host iris was assessed histochemically and biochemically. The histology of the transplants and irises was examined in toluidine blue-stained semithin sections. These studies showed that after 5 wk in oculo, the overall size of the oestrogen-treated transplants was substantially larger than controls, and histology showed that this change was related to an increase in the size and number of smooth muscle cells within the transplant. Chronic oestrogen treatment did not provoke trophic changes in the irideal muscle. Histochemistry showed that control transplants had a rich noradrenergic innervation, associated with both myometrium and blood vessels. Conversely, in oestrogen-treated transplants only occasional fibres were recognised, showing a reduced NA fluorescence intensity. No changes in the pattern and density of innervation or in the total content of noradrenaline of the host irises were detected after chronic exposure to oestrogen. We interpreted these results to indicate that the effects of oestrogen on uterine noradrenaline

  20. Computational solution of spike overlapping using data-based subtraction algorithms to resolve synchronous sympathetic nerve discharge

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chun-Kuei; Chiang, Chia-Hsun; Lee, Chia-Ming; Fan, Yu-Pei; Ho, Chiu-Ming; Shyu, Liang-Yu

    2013-01-01

    Sympathetic nerves conveying central commands to regulate visceral functions often display activities in synchronous bursts. To understand how individual fibers fire synchronously, we establish “oligofiber recording techniques” to record “several” nerve fiber activities simultaneously, using in vitro splanchnic sympathetic nerve–thoracic spinal cord preparations of neonatal rats as experimental models. While distinct spike potentials were easily recorded from collagenase-dissociated sympathetic fibers, a problem arising from synchronous nerve discharges is a higher incidence of complex waveforms resulted from spike overlapping. Because commercial softwares do not provide an explicit solution for spike overlapping, a series of custom-made LabVIEW programs incorporated with MATLAB scripts was therefore written for spike sorting. Spikes were represented as data points after waveform feature extraction and automatically grouped by k-means clustering followed by principal component analysis (PCA) to verify their waveform homogeneity. For dissimilar waveforms with exceeding Hotelling's T2 distances from the cluster centroids, a unique data-based subtraction algorithm (SA) was used to determine if they were the complex waveforms resulted from superimposing a spike pattern close to the cluster centroid with the other signals that could be observed in original recordings. In comparisons with commercial software, higher accuracy was achieved by analyses using our algorithms for the synthetic data that contained synchronous spiking and complex waveforms. Moreover, both T2-selected and SA-retrieved spikes were combined as unit activities. Quantitative analyses were performed to evaluate if unit activities truly originated from single fibers. We conclude that applications of our programs can help to resolve synchronous sympathetic nerve discharges (SND). PMID:24198782

  1. The Role of Lumbar Sympathetic Nerves in Regulation of Blood Flow to Skeletal Muscle during Anaphylactic Hypotension in Anesthetized Rats.

    PubMed

    Song, Jie; Tanida, Mamoru; Shibamoto, Toshishige; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Mofei; Kuda, Yuhichi; Kurata, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    During hypovolemic shock, skeletal muscle blood flow could be redistributed to vital organs via vasoconstriction in part evoked by activation of the innervating sympathetic nerve activity. However, it is not well known whether this mechanism operates during anaphylactic shock. We determined the femoral artery blood flow (FBF) and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA) mainly regulating the hindquater muscle blood flow during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats. Anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to the following groups (n = 7/group): (1) non-sensitized, (2) anaphylaxis, (3) anaphylaxis-lumbar sympathectomy (LS) and (4) anaphylaxis-sinoaortic denervation (SAD) groups. Anaphylaxis was induced by an intravenous injection of the ovalbumin antigen to the sensitized rats. The systemic arterial pressure (SAP), heart rate (HR), central venous pressure (CVP), FBF and LSNA were continuously measured. In the anaphylaxis group, LSNA and HR increased, while SAP and FBF decreased after antigen injection. In the anaphylaxis-SAD group, LSNA did not significantly change during the early phase, but the responses of SAP and FBF were similar to those in the anaphylaxis group. In the anaphylaxis-LS group, both FBF and SAP decreased similarly to the anaphylaxis group during anaphylactic hypotension. These results indicated that LSNA increased via baroreceptor reflex, but this sympathoexcitation or LS did not affect antigen-induced decreases in FBF or SAP. Lumbar sympathetic nerves are not involved in regulation of the blood flow to the hindlimb or systemic blood pressure during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats. PMID:26998924

  2. Neurochemical evidence for the presence of sympathetic nerve terminals in the rat mammary gland: Changes during the lactogenic cycle.

    PubMed

    Donoso, E A; Sapag-Hagar, M; Lara, H E

    1992-02-01

    Experiments were undertaken to obtain neurochemical evidence of the presence of sympathetic nerve terminals in the rat mammary gland and the changes occurring in them during the lactogenic cycle. The norepinephrine (NE) content of the gland changed during the lactogenic cycle. Higher levels of NE were found during virginity and involution, whereas a lower level was found at 14 days of lactation. Surgical and chemical (with 6-hydroxydopamine) denervation reduced the norepinephrine content of the gland by 61 and 90%, respectively. Uptake of [(3)H]norepinephrine by the mammary gland was saturable and specifically blocked by cocaine. No changes in the maximal capacity of incorporation during the lactogenic cycle were found, but the affinity of NE for the transmembrane carrier was low during lactation, as was the NE content, suggesting a decrease in the sympathetic nerve activity during this stage of the lactogenic cycle. In support of this, we found a decrease in total NE released after stimulation with 80 mM KCI. The neurochemical evidence obtained during this research strongly suggests that rat mammary gland is innervated by sympathetic nerves and that their activity changes during the lactogenic cycle. PMID:19912841

  3. The Role of Lumbar Sympathetic Nerves in Regulation of Blood Flow to Skeletal Muscle during Anaphylactic Hypotension in Anesthetized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shibamoto, Toshishige; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Mofei; Kuda, Yuhichi; Kurata, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    During hypovolemic shock, skeletal muscle blood flow could be redistributed to vital organs via vasoconstriction in part evoked by activation of the innervating sympathetic nerve activity. However, it is not well known whether this mechanism operates during anaphylactic shock. We determined the femoral artery blood flow (FBF) and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity (LSNA) mainly regulating the hindquater muscle blood flow during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats. Anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to the following groups (n = 7/group): (1) non-sensitized, (2) anaphylaxis, (3) anaphylaxis-lumbar sympathectomy (LS) and (4) anaphylaxis-sinoaortic denervation (SAD) groups. Anaphylaxis was induced by an intravenous injection of the ovalbumin antigen to the sensitized rats. The systemic arterial pressure (SAP), heart rate (HR), central venous pressure (CVP), FBF and LSNA were continuously measured. In the anaphylaxis group, LSNA and HR increased, while SAP and FBF decreased after antigen injection. In the anaphylaxis-SAD group, LSNA did not significantly change during the early phase, but the responses of SAP and FBF were similar to those in the anaphylaxis group. In the anaphylaxis-LS group, both FBF and SAP decreased similarly to the anaphylaxis group during anaphylactic hypotension. These results indicated that LSNA increased via baroreceptor reflex, but this sympathoexcitation or LS did not affect antigen-induced decreases in FBF or SAP. Lumbar sympathetic nerves are not involved in regulation of the blood flow to the hindlimb or systemic blood pressure during anaphylactic hypotension in anesthetized rats. PMID:26998924

  4. Single-Unit Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity Reflects Sleep Apnea Severity, Especially in Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients.

    PubMed

    Hamaoka, Takuto; Murai, Hisayoshi; Kaneko, Shuichi; Usui, Soichiro; Okabe, Yoshitaka; Tokuhisa, Hideki; Kato, Takeshi; Furusho, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Yu; Nakatsumi, Yasuto; Takata, Shigeo; Takamura, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with augmented sympathetic nerve activity, as assessed by multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). However, it is still unclear whether single-unit MSNA is a better reflection of sleep apnea severity according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). One hundred and two OSAS patients underwent full polysomnography and single- and multi-unit MSNA measurements. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis were performed to determine which parameters correlated with OSAS severity, which was defined by the AHI. Single- and multi-unit MSNA were significantly and positively correlated with AHI severity. The AHI was also significantly correlated with multi-unit MSNA burst frequency (r = 0.437, p < 0.0001) and single-unit MSNA spike frequency (r = 0.632, p < 0.0001). Multivariable analysis revealed that SF was correlated most significantly with AHI (T = 7.27, p < 0.0001). The distributions of multiple single-unit spikes per one cardiac interval did not differ between patients with an AHI of <30 and those with and AHI of 30-55 events/h; however, the pattern of each multiple spike firing were significantly higher in patients with an AHI of >55. These results suggest that sympathetic nerve activity is associated with sleep apnea severity. In addition, single-unit MSNA is a more accurate reflection of sleep apnea severity with alternation of the firing pattern, especially in patients with very severe OSAS. PMID:26973534

  5. Single-Unit Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity Reflects Sleep Apnea Severity, Especially in Severe Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hamaoka, Takuto; Murai, Hisayoshi; Kaneko, Shuichi; Usui, Soichiro; Okabe, Yoshitaka; Tokuhisa, Hideki; Kato, Takeshi; Furusho, Hiroshi; Sugiyama, Yu; Nakatsumi, Yasuto; Takata, Shigeo; Takamura, Masayuki

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with augmented sympathetic nerve activity, as assessed by multi-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). However, it is still unclear whether single-unit MSNA is a better reflection of sleep apnea severity according to the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI). One hundred and two OSAS patients underwent full polysomnography and single- and multi-unit MSNA measurements. Univariate and multivariate regression analysis were performed to determine which parameters correlated with OSAS severity, which was defined by the AHI. Single- and multi-unit MSNA were significantly and positively correlated with AHI severity. The AHI was also significantly correlated with multi-unit MSNA burst frequency (r = 0.437, p < 0.0001) and single-unit MSNA spike frequency (r = 0.632, p < 0.0001). Multivariable analysis revealed that SF was correlated most significantly with AHI (T = 7.27, p < 0.0001). The distributions of multiple single-unit spikes per one cardiac interval did not differ between patients with an AHI of <30 and those with and AHI of 30–55 events/h; however, the pattern of each multiple spike firing were significantly higher in patients with an AHI of >55. These results suggest that sympathetic nerve activity is associated with sleep apnea severity. In addition, single-unit MSNA is a more accurate reflection of sleep apnea severity with alternation of the firing pattern, especially in patients with very severe OSAS. PMID:26973534

  6. Muscle pain perception and sympathetic nerve activity to exercise during opioid modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, D. B.; O'Connor, P. J.; Ray, C. A.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to examine the effects of the endogenous opioid system on forearm muscle pain and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during dynamic fatiguing exercise. Twelve college-age men (24 +/- 4 yr) performed graded (1-min stages; 30 contractions/min) handgrip to fatigue 1 h after the ingestion of either 60 mg codeine, 50 mg naltrexone, or placebo. Pain (0-10 scale) and exertion (0-10 and 6-20 scales) intensities were measured during the last 15 s of each minute of exercise and every 15 s during recovery. MSNA was measured continuously from the peroneal nerve in the left leg. Pain threshold occurred earlier [1.8 +/- 1, 2. 2 +/- 1, 2.2 +/- 1 J: codeine, naltrexone, and placebo, respectively] and was associated with a lower rating of perceived exertion (RPE) (2.7 +/- 2, 3.6 +/- 2, 3.8 +/- 2: codeine, naltrexone, and placebo, respectively) in the codeine condition compared with either the naltrexone or placebo conditions. There were no main effects (i.e., drugs) or interaction (i.e., drugs x time) for either forearm muscle pain or RPE during exercise [pain: F (2, 22) = 0.69, P = 0.51]. There was no effect of drug on MSNA, heart rate, or blood pressure during baseline, exercise, or recovery. Peak exercise MSNA responses were 21 +/- 1, 21 +/- 2.0, and 21 +/- 2.0 bursts/30 s for codeine, naltrexone, and placebo conditions, respectively. Peak mean arterial pressure responses were 135 +/- 4, 131 +/- 3, and 132 +/- 4 mmHg for codeine, naltrexone, and placebo conditions, respectively. It is concluded that neither 60 mg codeine nor 50 mg naltrexone has an effect on forearm muscle pain, exertion, or MSNA during high- intensity handgrip to fatigue.

  7. Blood pressure is maintained during dehydration by hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus-driven tonic sympathetic nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Holbein, Walter W; Bardgett, Megan E; Toney, Glenn M

    2014-01-01

    Resting sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) consists primarily of respiratory and cardiac rhythmic bursts of action potentials. During homeostatic challenges such as dehydration, the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is activated and drives SNA in support of arterial pressure (AP). Given that PVN neurones project to brainstem cardio-respiratory regions that generate bursting patterns of SNA, we sought to determine the contribution of PVN to support of rhythmic bursting of SNA during dehydration and to elucidate which bursts dominantly contribute to maintenance of AP. Euhydrated (EH) and dehydrated (DH) (48 h water deprived) rats were anaesthetized, bilaterally vagotomized and underwent acute PVN inhibition by bilateral injection of the GABA-A receptor agonist muscimol (0.1 nmol in 50 nl). Consistent with previous studies, muscimol had no effect in EH rats (n = 6), but reduced mean AP (MAP; P < 0.001) and integrated splanchnic SNA (sSNA; P < 0.001) in DH rats (n = 6). Arterial pulse pressure was unaffected in both groups. Muscimol reduced burst frequency of phrenic nerve activity (P < 0.05) equally in both groups without affecting the burst amplitude–duration integral (i.e. area under the curve). PVN inhibition did not affect the amplitude of the inspiratory peak, expiratory trough or expiratory peak of sSNA in either group, but reduced cardiac rhythmic sSNA in DH rats only (P < 0.001). The latter was largely reversed by inflating an aortic cuff to restore MAP (n = 5), suggesting that the muscimol-induced reduction of cardiac rhythmic sSNA in DH rats was an indirect effect of reducing MAP and thus arterial baroreceptor input. We conclude that MAP is largely maintained in anaesthetized DH rats by a PVN-driven component of sSNA that is neither respiratory nor cardiac rhythmic. PMID:24973410

  8. Baroreflex modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity during cold pressor test in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to test the hypothesis that baroreceptor modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and heart rate is altered during the cold pressor test. Ten subjects were exposed to a cold pressor test by immersing a hand in ice water for 3 min while arterial blood pressure, heart rate, and MSNA were recorded. During the second and third minute of the cold pressor test, blood pressure was lowered and then raised by intravenous bolus infusions of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine HCl, respectively. The slope of the relationship between MSNA and diastolic blood pressure was more negative (P < 0.005) during the cold pressor test (-244.9 +/- 26.3 units x beat(-1) x mmHg(-1)) when compared with control conditions (-138.8 +/- 18.6 units x beat(-1) x mmHg(-1)), whereas no significant change in the slope of the relationship between heart rate and systolic blood pressure was observed. These data suggest that baroreceptors remain capable of modulating MSNA and heart rate during a cold pressor test; however, the sensitivity of baroreflex modulation of MSNA is elevated without altering the sensitivity of baroreflex control of heart rate.

  9. Arterial baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity during acute hypotension: effect of fitness.

    PubMed

    Fadel, P J; Stromstad, M; Hansen, J; Sander, M; Horn, K; Ogoh, S; Smith, M L; Secher, N H; Raven, P B

    2001-06-01

    We examined arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during abrupt decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and evaluated whether endurance training alters baroreflex function. Acute hypotension was induced nonpharmacologically in 14 healthy subjects, of which 7 were of high fitness (HF) and 7 were of average fitness (AF), by releasing a unilateral arterial thigh cuff after 9 min of resting ischemia under two conditions: control, which used aortic and carotid baroreflex (ABR and CBR, respectively) deactivation; and suction, which used ABR deactivation alone. The application of neck suction to counteract changes in carotid sinus transmural pressure during cuff release significantly attenuated the MSNA response (which increased 134 +/- 32 U/14 s) compared with control (which increased 195 +/- 43 U/14 s) and caused a greater decrease in MAP (19 +/- 2 vs. 15 +/- 2 mmHg; P < 0.05). Furthermore, during both trials, the HF subjects exhibited a greater decrease in MAP compared with AF subjects despite an augmented baroreflex control of MSNA. These data indicate that the CBR contributes importantly to the MSNA response during acute systemic hypotension. Additionally, we suggest that an impaired control of vascular reactivity hinders blood pressure regulation in HF subjects. PMID:11356607

  10. Skin sympathetic nerve activity in humans during exposure to emotionally-charged images: sex differences.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rachael; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2014-01-01

    While it is known that anxiety or emotional arousal affects skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), the galvanic skin response (GSR) is the most widely used parameter to infer increases in SSNA during stress or emotional studies. We recently showed that SSNA provides a more sensitive measure of emotional state than effector-organ responses. The aim of the present study was to assess whether there are gender differences in the responses of SSNA and other physiological parameters such as blood pressure, heart rate, skin blood flow and sweat release, while subjects viewed neutral or emotionally-charged images from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS). Changes in SSNA were assessed using microneurography in 20 subjects (10 male and 10 female). Blocks of positively-charged (erotica) or negatively-charge images (mutilation) were presented in a quasi-random fashion, following a block of neutral images, with each block containing 15 images and lasting 2 min. Images of both erotica and mutilation caused significant increases in SSNA, with increases being greater for males viewing erotica and greater for females viewing mutilation. The increases in SSNA were often coupled with sweat release and cutaneous vasoconstriction; however, these markers were not significantly different than those produced by viewing neutral images and were not always consistent with the SSNA increases. We conclude that SSNA increases with both positively-charged and negatively-charged emotional images, yet sex differences are present. PMID:24678303

  11. Neuropeptide Y acts in the paraventricular nucleus to suppress sympathetic nerve activity and its baroreflex regulation.

    PubMed

    Cassaglia, Priscila A; Shi, Zhigang; Li, Baoxin; Reis, Wagner L; Clute-Reinig, Nicholas M; Stern, Javier E; Brooks, Virginia L

    2014-04-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a brain neuromodulator that has been strongly implicated in the regulation of energy balance, also acts centrally to inhibit sympathetic nerve activity (SNA); however, the site and mechanism of action are unknown. In chloralose-anaesthetized female rats, nanoinjection of NPY into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) dose-dependently suppressed lumbar SNA (LSNA) and its baroreflex regulation, and these effects were blocked by prior inhibition of NPY Y1 or Y5 receptors. Moreover, PVN injection of Y1 and Y5 receptor antagonists in otherwise untreated rats increased basal and baroreflex control of LSNA, indicating that endogenous NPY tonically inhibits PVN presympathetic neurons. The sympathoexcitation following blockade of PVN NPY inhibition was eliminated by prior PVN nanoinjection of the melanocortin 3/4 receptor inhibitor SHU9119. Moreover, presympathetic neurons, identified immunohistochemically using cholera toxin b neuronal tract tracing from the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), express NPY Y1 receptor immunoreactivity, and patch-clamp recordings revealed that both NPY and α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) inhibit and stimulate, respectively, PVN-RVLM neurons. Collectively, these data suggest that PVN NPY inputs converge with α-MSH to influence presympathetic neurons. Together these results identify endogenous NPY as a novel and potent inhibitory neuromodulator within the PVN that may contribute to changes in SNA that occur in states associated with altered energy balance, such as obesity and pregnancy. PMID:24535439

  12. Arterial baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity during acute hypotension: effect of fitness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fadel, P. J.; Stromstad, M.; Hansen, J.; Sander, M.; Horn, K.; Ogoh, S.; Smith, M. L.; Secher, N. H.; Raven, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    We examined arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during abrupt decreases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and evaluated whether endurance training alters baroreflex function. Acute hypotension was induced nonpharmacologically in 14 healthy subjects, of which 7 were of high fitness (HF) and 7 were of average fitness (AF), by releasing a unilateral arterial thigh cuff after 9 min of resting ischemia under two conditions: control, which used aortic and carotid baroreflex (ABR and CBR, respectively) deactivation; and suction, which used ABR deactivation alone. The application of neck suction to counteract changes in carotid sinus transmural pressure during cuff release significantly attenuated the MSNA response (which increased 134 +/- 32 U/14 s) compared with control (which increased 195 +/- 43 U/14 s) and caused a greater decrease in MAP (19 +/- 2 vs. 15 +/- 2 mmHg; P < 0.05). Furthermore, during both trials, the HF subjects exhibited a greater decrease in MAP compared with AF subjects despite an augmented baroreflex control of MSNA. These data indicate that the CBR contributes importantly to the MSNA response during acute systemic hypotension. Additionally, we suggest that an impaired control of vascular reactivity hinders blood pressure regulation in HF subjects.

  13. Neuropeptide Y acts in the paraventricular nucleus to suppress sympathetic nerve activity and its baroreflex regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cassaglia, Priscila A; Shi, Zhigang; Li, Baoxin; Reis, Wagner L; Clute-Reinig, Nicholas M; Stern, Javier E; Brooks, Virginia L

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), a brain neuromodulator that has been strongly implicated in the regulation of energy balance, also acts centrally to inhibit sympathetic nerve activity (SNA); however, the site and mechanism of action are unknown. In chloralose-anaesthetized female rats, nanoinjection of NPY into the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) dose-dependently suppressed lumbar SNA (LSNA) and its baroreflex regulation, and these effects were blocked by prior inhibition of NPY Y1 or Y5 receptors. Moreover, PVN injection of Y1 and Y5 receptor antagonists in otherwise untreated rats increased basal and baroreflex control of LSNA, indicating that endogenous NPY tonically inhibits PVN presympathetic neurons. The sympathoexcitation following blockade of PVN NPY inhibition was eliminated by prior PVN nanoinjection of the melanocortin 3/4 receptor inhibitor SHU9119. Moreover, presympathetic neurons, identified immunohistochemically using cholera toxin b neuronal tract tracing from the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), express NPY Y1 receptor immunoreactivity, and patch-clamp recordings revealed that both NPY and α–melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) inhibit and stimulate, respectively, PVN–RVLM neurons. Collectively, these data suggest that PVN NPY inputs converge with α-MSH to influence presympathetic neurons. Together these results identify endogenous NPY as a novel and potent inhibitory neuromodulator within the PVN that may contribute to changes in SNA that occur in states associated with altered energy balance, such as obesity and pregnancy. PMID:24535439

  14. Reflex control of rat tail sympathetic nerve activity by abdominal temperature

    PubMed Central

    Shafton, Anthony D; Kitchener, Peter; McKinley, Michael J; McAllen, Robin M

    2014-01-01

    The thermoregulatory reflex effects of warming and cooling in the abdomen were investigated in 4 urethane-anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were shaved and surrounded by a water-perfused silastic jacket. Skin temperature under the jacket was recorded by thermocouples at 3 sites and brain temperature was monitored by a thermocouple inserted lateral to the hypothalamus. A heat exchanger made from an array of silicon tubes in parallel loops was placed through a ventral incision into the abdomen; it rested against the intestinal serosa and the temperature of this interface was monitored by a thermocouple. Few- or multi-unit postganglionic activity was recorded from sympathetic nerves supplying tail vessels (tail SNA). Intra-abdominal temperature was briefly lowered or raised between 35–41 °C by perfusing the heat exchanger with cold or warm water. Warming the abdomen inhibited tail SNA while cooling it excited tail SNA in all 4 animals. We also confirmed that cooling the trunk skin activated tail SNA. Multivariate analysis of tail SNA with respect to abdominal, brain and trunk skin temperatures revealed that all had highly significant independent inhibitory actions on tail SNA, but in these experiments abdominal temperature had the weakest and brain temperature the strongest effect. We conclude that abdominal temperature has a significant thermoregulatory action in the rat, but its influence on cutaneous vasomotor control appears to be weaker than that of skin or brain temperatures.

  15. Motor imagery muscle contraction strength influences spinal motor neuron excitability and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity

    PubMed Central

    Bunno, Yoshibumi; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Iwatsuki, Hiroyasu

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in spinal motor neuron excitability and autonomic nervous system activity during motor imagery of isometric thenar muscle activity at 10% and 50% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). [Methods] The F-waves and low frequency/high frequency (LF/HF) ratio were recorded at rest, during motor imagery, and post-trial. For motor imagery trials, subjects were instructed to imagine thenar muscle activity at 10% and 50% MVC while holding the sensor of a pinch meter for 5 min. [Results] The F-waves and LF/HF ratio during motor imagery at 50% MVC were significantly increased compared with those at rest, whereas those during motor imagery at 10% MVC were not significantly different from those at rest. The relative values of the F/M amplitude ratio during motor imagery at 50% MVC were significantly higher than those at 10% MVC. The relative values of persistence and the LF/HF ratio during motor imagery were similar during motor imagery at the two muscle contraction strengths. [Conclusion] Motor imagery can increase the spinal motor neuron excitability and cardiac sympathetic nerve activity. Motor imagery at 50% MVC may be more effective than motor imagery at 10% MVC. PMID:26834354

  16. Baroreflex modulation of sympathetic nerve activity to muscle in heat-stressed humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Jian; Wilson, Thad E.; Crandall, Craig G.

    2002-01-01

    To identify whether whole body heating alters arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), MSNA and beat-by-beat arterial blood pressure were recorded in seven healthy subjects during acute hypotensive and hypertensive stimuli in both normothermic and heat stress conditions. Whole body heating significantly increased sublingual temperature (P < 0.01), MSNA (P < 0.01), heart rate (P < 0.01), and skin blood flow (P < 0.001), whereas mean arterial blood pressure did not change significantly (P > 0.05). During both normothermic and heat stress conditions, MSNA increased and then decreased significantly when blood pressure was lowered and then raised via intravenous bolus infusions of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine HCl, respectively. The slope of the relationship between MSNA and diastolic blood pressure during heat stress (-128.3 +/- 13.9 U x beats(-1) x mmHg(-1)) was similar (P = 0.31) with normothermia (-140.6 +/- 21.1 U x beats(-1) x mmHg(-1)). Moreover, no significant change in the slope of the relationship between heart rate and systolic blood pressure was observed. These data suggest that arterial baroreflex modulation of MSNA and heart rate are not altered by whole body heating, with the exception of an upward shift of these baroreflex curves to accommodate changes in these variables that occur with whole body heating.

  17. Baroreflex modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity during posthandgrip muscle ischemia in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, J.; Wilson, T. E.; Shibasaki, M.; Hodges, N. A.; Crandall, C. G.

    2001-01-01

    To identify whether muscle metaboreceptor stimulation alters baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), MSNA, beat-by-beat arterial blood pressure (Finapres), and electrocardiogram were recorded in 11 healthy subjects in the supine position. Subjects performed 2 min of isometric handgrip exercise at 40% of maximal voluntary contraction followed by 2.5 min of posthandgrip muscle ischemia. During muscle ischemia, blood pressure was lowered and then raised by intravenous bolus infusions of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine HCl, respectively. The slope of the relationship between MSNA and diastolic blood pressure was more negative (P < 0.001) during posthandgrip muscle ischemia (-201.9 +/- 20.4 units. beat(-1). mmHg(-1)) when compared with control conditions (-142.7 +/- 17.3 units. beat(-1). mmHg(-1)). No significant change in the slope of the relationship between heart rate and systolic blood pressure was observed. However, both curves shifted during postexercise ischemia to accommodate the elevation in blood pressure and MSNA that occurs with this condition. These data suggest that the sensitivity of baroreflex modulation of MSNA is elevated by muscle metaboreceptor stimulation, whereas the sensitivity of baroreflex of modulate heart rate is unchanged during posthandgrip muscle ischemia.

  18. Nicotine and sympathetic neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Haass, M; Kübler, W

    1997-01-01

    Nicotine increases heart rate, myocardial contractility, and blood pressure. These nicotine-induced cardiovascular effects are mainly due to stimulation of sympathetic neurotransmission, as nicotine stimulates catecholamine release by an activation of nicotine acetylcholine receptors localized on peripheral postganglionic sympathetic nerve endings and the adrenal medulla. The nicotinic acetylcholine receptor is a ligand-gated cation channel with a pentameric structure and a central pore with a cation gate, which is essential for ion selectivity and permeability. Binding of nicotine to its extracellular binding site leads to a conformational change of the central pore, which results in the influx of sodium and calcium ions. The resulting depolarization of the sympathetic nerve ending stimulates calcium influx through voltage-dependent N-type calcium channels, which triggers the nicotine-evoked exocytotic catecholamine release. In the isolated perfused guinea-pig heart, cardiac energy depletion sensitizes cardiac sympathetic nerves to the norepinephrine-releasing effect of nicotine, as indicated by a leftward shift of the concentration-response curve, a potentiation of maximum transmitter release, and a delay of the tachyphylaxis of nicotine-evoked catecholamine release. This sensitization was also shown to occur in the human heart under in vitro conditions. Through the intracardiac release of norepinephrine, nicotine induces a beta-adrenoceptor-mediated increase in heart rate and contractility, and an alpha-adrenoceptor-mediated increase in coronary vasomotor tone. The resulting simultaneous increase in oxygen demand and coronary resistance has a detrimental effect on the oxygen balance of the heart, especially in patients with coronary artery disease. Sensitization of the ischemic heart to the norepinephrine-releasing effect of nicotine may be a trigger for acute cardiovascular events in humans, such as acute myocardial infarction and/or life

  19. Median Sacral Artery, Sympathetic Nerves, and the Coccygeal Body: A Study Using Serial Sections of Human Embryos and Fetuses.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhe Wu; Cho, Kwang Ho; Jang, Hyung Suk; Murakami, Gen; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jose Francisco

    2016-07-01

    To examine how the median sacral artery (MSA) is involved with the coccygeal body or glomus coccygeum, we studied serial frontal or sagittal sections of 14 embryos (approximately 5-6 weeks of gestation) and 12 fetuses (10-18 weeks). At five weeks, the caudal end of the dorsal aorta (i.e., MSA) accompanied putative sympathetic ganglion cells in front of the upper coccygeal and lower sacral vertebrae. At six weeks, a candidate for the initial coccygeal body was identified as a longitudinal arterial plexus involving nerve fibers and sympathetic ganglion cells between arteries. At 10-18 weeks, the MSA exhibited a highly tortuous course at the lower sacral and coccygeal levels, and was attached to and surrounded by veins, nerve fibers, and sympathetic ganglion cells near and between the bilateral origins of the levator ani muscle. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated expression of tyrosine hydroxylase and chromogranin A in the nerves. However, throughout the stages examined, we found no evidence suggestive of an arteriovenous anastomosis, such as well-developed smooth muscle. An acute anterior flexure of the vertebrae at the lower sacrum, as well as regression of the secondary neural tube, seemed to induce arterial plexus formation from an initial straight MSA. Nerves and ganglion cells were likely to be secondarily involved with the plexus because of the close topographical relationship. However, these nerves might play a major role in the extreme change into adult morphology. An arteriovenous anastomosis along the MSA might be an overinterpretation, at least in the prenatal human. Anat Rec, 299:819-827, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27149546

  20. Altered firing pattern of single-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity during handgrip exercise in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Hisayoshi; Takamura, Masayuki; Maruyama, Michirou; Nakano, Manabu; Ikeda, Tatsunori; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Otowa, Kan-ichi; Ootsuji, Hiroshi; Okajima, Masaki; Furusho, Hiroshi; Takata, Shigeo; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2009-01-01

    Sympathetic activation in chronic heart failure (CHF) is greatly augmented at rest but the response to exercise remains controversial. We previously demonstrated that single-unit muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) provides a more detailed description of the sympathetic response to physiological stress than multi-unit nerve recordings. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the reflex response and discharge properties of single-unit MSNA are altered during handgrip exercise (HG, 30% of maximum voluntary contraction for 3 min) in CHF patients (New York Heart Association functional class II or III, n= 16) compared with age-matched healthy control subjects (n= 13). At rest, both single-unit and multi-unit indices of sympathetic outflow were augmented in CHF compared with controls (P < 0.05). However, the percentage of cardiac intervals that contained one, two, three or four single-unit spikes were not different between the groups. Compared to the control group, HG elicited a larger increase in multi-unit total MSNA (Δ1002 ± 50 compared with Δ636 ± 76 units min−1, P < 0.05) and single-unit MSNA spike incidence (Δ27 ± 5 compared with Δ8 ± 2 spikes (100 heart beats)−1), P < 0.01) in the CHF patients. More importantly, the percentage of cardiac intervals that contained two or three single-unit spikes was increased (P < 0.05) during exercise in the CHF group only (Δ8 ± 2% and Δ5 ± 1% for two and three spikes, respectively). These results suggest that the larger multi-unit total MSNA response observed during HG in CHF is brought about in part by an increase in the probability of multiple firing of single-unit sympathetic neurones. PMID:19403612

  1. Tetrahydrobiopterin lowers muscle sympathetic nerve activity and improves augmentation index in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Peizhou; Sher, Salman; Lyles, Robert H.; Deveaux, Don D.; Quyyumi, Arshed A.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by overactivation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) that contributes to cardiovascular risk. Decreased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability is a major factor contributing to SNS overactivity in CKD, since reduced neuronal NO leads to increased central SNS activity. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential cofactor for nitric oxide synthase that increases NO bioavailability in experimental models of CKD. We conducted a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial testing the benefits of oral sapropterin dihydrochloride (6R-BH4, a synthetic form of BH4) in CKD. 36 patients with CKD and hypertension were randomized to 12 wk of 1) 200 mg 6R-BH4 twice daily + 1 mg folic acid once daily; vs. 2) placebo + folic acid. The primary endpoint was a change in resting muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). Secondary endpoints included arterial stiffness using pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx), endothelial function using brachial artery flow-mediated dilation and endothelial progenitor cells, endothelium-independent vasodilatation (EID), microalbuminuria, and blood pressure. We observed a significant reduction in MSNA after 12 wk of 6R-BH4 (−7.5 ± 2.1 bursts/min vs. +3.2 ± 1.3 bursts/min; P = 0.003). We also observed a significant improvement in AIx (by −5.8 ± 2.0% vs. +1.8 ± 1.7 in the placebo group, P = 0.007). EID increased significantly (by +2.0 ± 0.59%; P = 0.004) in the 6R-BH4 group, but there was no change in endothelial function. There was a trend toward a reduction in diastolic blood pressure by −4 ± 3 mmHg at 12 wk with 6R-BH4 (P = 0.055). 6R-BH4 treatment may have beneficial effects on SNS activity and central pulse wave reflections in hypertensive patients with CKD. PMID:25477424

  2. Tetrahydrobiopterin lowers muscle sympathetic nerve activity and improves augmentation index in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeanie; Liao, Peizhou; Sher, Salman; Lyles, Robert H; Deveaux, Don D; Quyyumi, Arshed A

    2015-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is characterized by overactivation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) that contributes to cardiovascular risk. Decreased nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability is a major factor contributing to SNS overactivity in CKD, since reduced neuronal NO leads to increased central SNS activity. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential cofactor for nitric oxide synthase that increases NO bioavailability in experimental models of CKD. We conducted a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial testing the benefits of oral sapropterin dihydrochloride (6R-BH4, a synthetic form of BH4) in CKD. 36 patients with CKD and hypertension were randomized to 12 wk of 1) 200 mg 6R-BH4 twice daily + 1 mg folic acid once daily; vs. 2) placebo + folic acid. The primary endpoint was a change in resting muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). Secondary endpoints included arterial stiffness using pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx), endothelial function using brachial artery flow-mediated dilation and endothelial progenitor cells, endothelium-independent vasodilatation (EID), microalbuminuria, and blood pressure. We observed a significant reduction in MSNA after 12 wk of 6R-BH4 (-7.5 ± 2.1 bursts/min vs. +3.2 ± 1.3 bursts/min; P = 0.003). We also observed a significant improvement in AIx (by -5.8 ± 2.0% vs. +1.8 ± 1.7 in the placebo group, P = 0.007). EID increased significantly (by +2.0 ± 0.59%; P = 0.004) in the 6R-BH4 group, but there was no change in endothelial function. There was a trend toward a reduction in diastolic blood pressure by -4 ± 3 mmHg at 12 wk with 6R-BH4 (P = 0.055). 6R-BH4 treatment may have beneficial effects on SNS activity and central pulse wave reflections in hypertensive patients with CKD. PMID:25477424

  3. Influence of age on respiratory modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity, blood pressure and baroreflex function in humans

    PubMed Central

    Shantsila, Alena; McIntyre, David B.; Lip, Gregory Y. H.; Fadel, Paul J.; Paton, Julian F. R.; Pickering, Anthony E.

    2015-01-01

    New Findings What is the central question of this study? Does ageing influence the respiratory‐related bursting of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and the association between the rhythmic fluctuations in MSNA and blood pressure (Traube–Hering waves) that occur with respiration? What is the main finding and its importance? Despite the age‐related elevation in MSNA, the cyclical inhibition of MSNA during respiration is similar between young and older individuals. Furthermore, central respiratory–sympathetic coupling plays a role in the generation of Traube–Hering waves in both young and older humans. Healthy ageing and alterations in respiratory–sympathetic coupling have been independently linked with heightened sympathetic neural vasoconstrictor activity. We investigated how age influences the respiratory‐related modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and the association between the rhythmic fluctuations in MSNA and blood pressure that occur with respiration (Traube–Hering waves; THW). Ten young (22 ± 2 years; mean ± SD) and 10 older healthy men (58 ± 6 years) were studied while resting supine and breathing spontaneously. MSNA, blood pressure and respiration were recorded simultaneously. Resting values were ascertained and respiratory cycle‐triggered averaging of MSNA and blood pressure measurements performed. The MSNA burst incidence was higher in older individuals [22.7 ± 9.2 versus 42.2 ± 13.7 bursts (100 heart beats)−1, P < 0.05], and was reduced to a similar extent in the inspiratory to postinspiratory period in young and older subjects (by ∼25% compared with mid‐ to late expiration). A similar attenuation of MSNA burst frequency (in bursts per minute), amplitude and total activity (burst frequency × mean burst amplitude) was also observed in the inspiratory to postinspiratory period in both groups. A significant positive correlation between respiratory‐related MSNA and the magnitude of

  4. Sympathetic nerves and the endothelium influence the vasoconstrictor effect of low concentrations of ouabain in pressurized small arteries

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Hema; Zhang, Qingli; Rhee, Albert Y.; Pallone, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesized that in salt-dependent forms of hypertension, endogenous ouabain acts on arterial smooth muscle to cause enhanced vasoconstriction. Here, we tested for the involvement of the arterial endothelium and perivascular sympathetic nerve terminals in ouabain-induced vasoconstriction. Segments of rat mesenteric or renal interlobar arteries were pressurized to 70 mmHg at 37°C and exposed to ouabain (10−11–10−7 M). Removal of the endothelium enhanced ouabain-induced vasoconstriction by as much as twofold (at an ouabain concentration of 10−9 M). A component of the ouabain-induced vasoconstriction is due to the enhanced spontaneous release of norepinephrine (NE) from nerve terminals in the arterial wall. The α1-adrenoceptor blocker prazosin (10−6 M) decreased ouabain-induced vasoconstrictions by as much as 50%. However, neither the contraction induced by sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) nor the NE release evoked by SNA (measured directly by carbon fiber amperometry) was increased by ouabain (<10−7 M). Nevertheless, the converse case was true: after brief bursts of SNA, vasoconstrictor responses to ouabain were transiently increased (1.75-fold). This effect may be mediated by neuropeptide Y and Y1 receptors on smooth muscle. In arteries lacking the endothelium and exposed to prazosin, ouabain (10−11 M and greater) caused vasoconstriction, indicating a direct effect of very “low” concentrations of ouabain on arterial smooth muscle. In conclusion, in intact arteries, the endothelium opposes ouabain (10−11–10−7M)-induced vasoconstriction, which is caused by both enhanced spontaneous NE release and direct effects on smooth muscle. Ouabain (<10−7M) does not enhance SNA-mediated contractions, but SNA enhances ouabain-induced contractions. The effects of endogenous ouabain may be accentuated in forms of hypertension that involve sympathetic nerve hyperactivity and/or endothelial dysfunction. PMID:20382851

  5. Disruption of phase synchronization between blood pressure and muscle sympathetic nerve activity in postural vasovagal syncope

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Christopher E.; Lambert, Elisabeth; Medow, Marvin S.

    2013-01-01

    Withdrawal of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) may not be necessary for the precipitous fall of peripheral arterial resistance and arterial pressure (AP) during vasovagal syncope (VVS). We tested the hypothesis that the MSNA-AP baroreflex entrainment is disrupted before VVS regardless of MSNA withdrawal using the phase synchronization between blood pressure and MSNA during head-up tilt (HUT) to measure reflex coupling. We studied eight VVS subjects and eight healthy control subjects. Heart rate, AP, and MSNA were measured during supine baseline and at early, mid, late, and syncope stages of HUT. Phase synchronization indexes, measuring time-dependent differences between MSNA and AP phases, were computed. Directionality indexes, indicating the influence of AP on MSNA (neural arc) and MSNA on AP (peripheral arc), were computed. Heart rate was greater in VVS compared with control subjects during early, mid, and late stages of HUT and significantly declined at syncope (P = 0.04). AP significantly decreased during mid, late, and syncope stages of tilt in VVS subjects only (P = 0.001). MSNA was not significantly different between groups during HUT (P = 0.700). However, the phase synchronization index significantly decreased during mid and late stages in VVS subjects but not in control subjects (P < .001). In addition, the neural arc was significantly affected more than the peripheral arc before syncope. In conclusion, VVS is accompanied by a loss of the synchronous AP-MSNA relationship with or without a loss in MSNA at faint. This provides insight into the mechanisms behind the loss of vasoconstriction and drop in AP independent of MSNA at the time of vasovagal faint. PMID:23934851

  6. Role of endothelin-1 in mediating changes in cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Abukar, Yonis; May, Clive N; Ramchandra, Rohit

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with increased sympathetic nerve activity to the heart (CSNA), which is directly linked to mortality in HF patients. Previous studies indicate that HF is associated with high levels of plasma endothelin-1 (ET-1), which correlates with the severity of the disease. We hypothesized that blockade of endothelin receptors would decrease CSNA. The effects of intravenous tezosentan (a nonselective ETA and ETB receptor antagonist) (8 mg·kg(-1)·h(-1)) on resting levels of CSNA, arterial pressure, and heart rate were determined in conscious normal sheep (n = 6) and sheep with pacing-induced HF (n = 7). HF was associated with a significant decrease in ejection fraction (from 74 ± 2% to 38 ± 1%, P < 0.001) and a significant increase in resting levels of CSNA burst incidence (from 56 ± 11 to 87 ± 2 bursts/100 heartbeats, P < 0.01). Infusion of tezosentan for 60 min significantly decreased resting mean aterial pressure (MAP) in both normal and HF sheep (-8 ± 4 mmHg and -4 ± 3 mmHg, respectively; P < 0.05). This was associated with a significant decrease in CSNA (by 25 ± 26% of control) in normal sheep, but there was no change in CSNA in HF sheep. Calculation of spontaneous baroreflex gain indicated significant impairment of the baroreflex control of HR after intravenous tezosentan infusion in normal animals but no change in HF animals. These data suggest that endogenous levels of ET-1 contribute to the baseline levels of CSNA in normal animals, but this effect is absent in HF. PMID:26468257

  7. Inhibition of exocytotic noradrenaline release by presynaptic cannabinoid CB1 receptors on peripheral sympathetic nerves.

    PubMed Central

    Ishac, E. J.; Jiang, L.; Lake, K. D.; Varga, K.; Abood, M. E.; Kunos, G.

    1996-01-01

    1. Activation of CB1 receptors by plant cannabinoids or the endogenous ligand, anandamide, causes hypotension via a sympathoinhibitory action in anaesthetized rats. In mouse isolated vas deferens, activation of CB1 receptors inhibits the electrically evoked twitch response. To determine if these effects are related to presynaptic inhibition of noradrenaline (NA) release, we examined the effects of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC), anandamide and the CB1 antagonist, SR141716A, on exocytotic NA release in rat isolated atria and vasa deferentia. 2. In isolated atria and vasa deferentia preloaded with [3H]-NA, electrical field stimulation caused [3H]-NA release, which was abolished by tetrodotoxin 0.5 microM and concentration-dependently inhibited by delta 9-THC or anandamide, 0.3-10 microM. The inhibitory effect of delta 9-THC and anandamide was competitively antagonized by SR 141716A, 1-10 microM. 3. Tyramine, 1 microM, also induced [3H]-NA release, which was unaffected by tetrodotoxin, delta 9-THC or anandamide in either atria or vasa deferentia. 4. CB1 receptor mRNA is present in the superior cervical ganglion, as well as in whole brain, cerebellum, hypothalamus, spleen, and vas deferens and absent in medulla oblongata and atria, as demonstrated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. There was no evidence of the presence of CB1A receptor mRNA in ganglia, brain, or cerebellum. These results suggest that activation of presynaptic CB1 receptors located on peripheral sympathetic nerve terminals mediate sympathoinhibitory effects in vitro and in vivo. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8864538

  8. Matured Hop Bittering Components Induce Thermogenesis in Brown Adipose Tissue via Sympathetic Nerve Activity

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto-Kobayashi, Yumie; Ohara, Kazuaki; Takahashi, Chika; Kitao, Sayoko; Wang, Guanying; Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Katayama, Mikio; Nagai, Katsuya

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is the principal symptom of metabolic syndrome, which refers to a group of risk factors that increase the likelihood of atherosclerosis. In recent decades there has been a sharp rise in the incidence of obesity throughout the developed world. Iso-α-acids, the bitter compounds derived from hops in beer, have been shown to prevent diet-induced obesity by increasing lipid oxidation in the liver and inhibition of lipid absorption from the intestine. Whereas the sharp bitterness induced by effective dose of iso-α-acids precludes their acceptance as a nutrient, matured hop bittering components (MHB) appear to be more agreeable. Therefore, we tested MHB for an effect on ameliorating diet-induced body fat accumulation in rodents. MHB ingestion had a beneficial effect but, compared to iso-α-acids and despite containing structurally similar compounds, acted via different mechanisms to reduce body fat accumulation. MHB supplementation significantly reduced body weight gain, epididymal white adipose tissue weight, and plasma non-esterified free fatty acid levels in diet-induced obese mice. We also found that uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) expression in brown adipose tissue (BAT) was significantly increased in MHB-fed mice at both the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, MHB administration in rats induced the β-adrenergic signaling cascade, which is related to cAMP accumulation in BAT, suggesting that MHB could modulate sympathetic nerve activity innervating BAT (BAT-SNA). Indeed, single oral administration of MHB elevated BAT-SNA in rats, and this elevation was dissipated by subdiaphragmatic vagotomy. Single oral administration of MHB maintained BAT temperature at a significantly higher level than in control rats. Taken together, these findings indicate that MHB ameliorates diet-induced body fat accumulation, at least partly, by enhancing thermogenesis in BAT via BAT-SNA activation. Our data suggests that MHB is a useful tool for developing functional foods or

  9. Sex comparisons in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and arterial pressure oscillations during progressive central hypovolemia

    PubMed Central

    Carter III, Robert; Hinojosa-Laborde, Carmen; Convertino, Victor A

    2015-01-01

    Increased tolerance to central hypovolemia is generally associated with greater sympathoexcitation, high-frequency oscillatory patterns of mean arterial pressure (MAP), and tachycardia. On average, women are less tolerant to central hypovolemia than men; however, the autonomic mechanisms governing these comparisons are not fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that women with relatively high tolerance (HT) to central hypovolemia would display similar physiological reserve capacity for sympathoexcitation and oscillations in MAP at presyncope compared to HT men. About 10 men and five women were exposed to progressive lower body negative pressure (LBNP) until the presence of presyncopal symptoms. Based on our previous classification system, all subjects were classified as HT because they completed at least −60 mmHg LBNP. Muscle sympathetic serve activity (MSNA) was measured directly from the peroneal nerve via microneurography and arterial pressure (AP) was measured at the finger by photoplethysmography. LBNP time to presyncope was less (P < 0.01) in women (1727 ± 70 sec) than in men (2022 ± 201 sec). At presyncope, average MSNA in men (50 ± 12 bursts/min) and women (51 ± 7 bursts/min) was similar (P = 0.87). Coincident with similar stroke volume (SV) at presyncope, women had similar MAP and heart rates. However, women had less physiological reserve capacity for SV, AP-MSNA coherence, and oscillations in the high-frequency (HF) components of arterial pressure compared to men. Contrary to our hypothesis, lower tolerance to central hypovolemia in women was not associated with sympathoexcitation, but can be explained, in part by lower physiological reserve to elicit oscillatory patterns in AP, maintenance of AP-MSNA coherence and SV when compared to men. PMID:26109186

  10. Sex comparisons in muscle sympathetic nerve activity and arterial pressure oscillations during progressive central hypovolemia.

    PubMed

    Carter, Robert; Hinojosa-Laborde, Carmen; Convertino, Victor A

    2015-06-01

    Increased tolerance to central hypovolemia is generally associated with greater sympathoexcitation, high-frequency oscillatory patterns of mean arterial pressure (MAP), and tachycardia. On average, women are less tolerant to central hypovolemia than men; however, the autonomic mechanisms governing these comparisons are not fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that women with relatively high tolerance (HT) to central hypovolemia would display similar physiological reserve capacity for sympathoexcitation and oscillations in MAP at presyncope compared to HT men. About 10 men and five women were exposed to progressive lower body negative pressure (LBNP) until the presence of presyncopal symptoms. Based on our previous classification system, all subjects were classified as HT because they completed at least -60 mmHg LBNP. Muscle sympathetic serve activity (MSNA) was measured directly from the peroneal nerve via microneurography and arterial pressure (AP) was measured at the finger by photoplethysmography. LBNP time to presyncope was less (P < 0.01) in women (1727 ± 70 sec) than in men (2022 ± 201 sec). At presyncope, average MSNA in men (50 ± 12 bursts/min) and women (51 ± 7 bursts/min) was similar (P = 0.87). Coincident with similar stroke volume (SV) at presyncope, women had similar MAP and heart rates. However, women had less physiological reserve capacity for SV, AP-MSNA coherence, and oscillations in the high-frequency (HF) components of arterial pressure compared to men. Contrary to our hypothesis, lower tolerance to central hypovolemia in women was not associated with sympathoexcitation, but can be explained, in part by lower physiological reserve to elicit oscillatory patterns in AP, maintenance of AP-MSNA coherence and SV when compared to men. PMID:26109186

  11. Oral Contraceptive Use, Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity, and Systemic Hemodynamics in Young Women.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Ronee E; Hart, Emma C; Charkoudian, Nisha; Curry, Timothy B; Carter, Jason R; Fu, Qi; Minson, Christopher T; Joyner, Michael J; Barnes, Jill N

    2015-09-01

    Endogenous female sex hormones influence muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), a regulator of arterial blood pressure and important factor in hypertension development. Although ≈80% of American women report using hormonal contraceptives sometime during their life, the influence of combined oral contraceptives (OCs) on MSNA and systemic hemodynamics remains equivocal. The goal of this study was to determine whether women taking OCs have altered MSNA and hemodynamics (cardiac output and total peripheral resistance) at rest during the placebo phase of OC use compared with women with natural menstrual cycles during the early follicular phase. We retrospectively analyzed data from studies in which healthy, premenopausal women (aged 18-35 years) participated. We collected MSNA values at rest and hemodynamic measurements in women taking OCs (n=53; 25±4 years) and women with natural menstrual cycles (n=74; 25±4 years). Blood pressure was higher in women taking OCs versus those with natural menstrual cycles (mean arterial pressure, 89±1 versus 85±1 mm Hg, respectively; P=0.01), although MSNA was similar in both groups (MSNA burst incidence, 16±1 versus 18±1 bursts/100 heartbeats, respectively; P=0.19). In a subset of women in which detailed hemodynamic data were available, those taking OCs (n=33) had similar cardiac output (4.9±0.2 versus 4.7±0.2 L/min, respectively; P=0.47) and total peripheral resistance (19.2±0.8 versus 20.0±0.9 U, respectively; P=0.51) as women with natural menstrual cycles (n=22). In conclusion, women taking OCs have higher resting blood pressure and similar MSNA and hemodynamics during the placebo phase of OC use when compared with naturally menstruating women in the early follicular phase. PMID:26101348

  12. Oral contraceptive use, muscle sympathetic nerve activity, and systemic hemodynamics in young women

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Ronee E.; Hart, Emma C.; Charkoudian, Nisha; Curry, Timothy B.; Carter, Jason R.; Fu, Qi; Minson, Christopher T.; Joyner, Michael J.; Barnes, Jill N.

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous female sex hormones influence muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), a regulator of arterial blood pressure and important factor in hypertension development. While nearly 80% of American women report using hormonal contraceptives sometime during their life, the influence of combined oral contraceptives (OCs) on MSNA and systemic hemodynamics remains equivocal. The goal of this study was to determine if women taking OCs have altered MSNA and hemodynamics (cardiac output and total peripheral resistance) at rest during the placebo phase of OC use compared to women with natural menstrual cycles during the early follicular phase. We retrospectively analyzed data from studies in which healthy, premenopausal women (ages 18–35 years old) participated. We collected MSNA values at rest and hemodynamic measurements in women taking OCs (n=53, 25±4 yr) and women with natural menstrual cycles (n=74, 25±4 yr). Blood pressure was higher in women taking OCs versus those with natural menstrual cycles (mean arterial pressure: 89±1 vs. 85±1 mmHg, respectively; p=0.01), although MSNA was similar in both groups (MSNA burst incidence: 16±1 vs. 18±1 bursts/100 heartbeats, respectively, p=0.19). In a subset of women in which detailed hemodynamic data were available, those taking OCs (n=33) had similar cardiac output (4.9±0.2 vs. 4.7±0.2 L/min, respectively; p=0.47) and total peripheral resistance (19.2±0.8 vs. 20.0±0.9 units, respectively; p=0.51) as women with natural menstrual cycles (n=22). In conclusion, women taking OCs have higher resting blood pressure and similar MSNA and hemodynamics during the placebo phase of OC use compared to naturally menstruating women in the early follicular phase. PMID:26101348

  13. Cardiopulmonary baroreceptor control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity in heat-stressed humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Etzel, R. A.; Farr, D. B.

    1999-01-01

    Whole body heating decreases central venous pressure (CVP) while increasing muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). In normothermia, similar decreases in CVP elevate MSNA, presumably via cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading. The purpose of this project was to identify whether increases in MSNA during whole body heating could be attributed to cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading coincident with the thermal challenge. Seven subjects were exposed to whole body heating while sublingual temperature, skin blood flow, heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and MSNA were monitored. During the heat stress, 15 ml/kg warmed saline was infused intravenously over 7-10 min to increase CVP and load the cardiopulmonary baroreceptors. We reported previously that this amount of saline was sufficient to return CVP to pre-heat stress levels. Whole body heating increased MSNA from 25 +/- 3 to 39 +/- 3 bursts/min (P < 0. 05). Central blood volume expansion via rapid saline infusion did not significantly decrease MSNA (44 +/- 4 bursts/min, P > 0.05 relative to heat stress period) and did not alter mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) or pulse pressure. To identify whether arterial baroreceptor loading decreases MSNA during heat stress, in a separate protocol MAP was elevated via steady-state infusion of phenylephrine during whole body heating. Increasing MAP from 82 +/- 3 to 93 +/- 4 mmHg (P < 0.05) caused MSNA to decrease from 36 +/- 3 to 15 +/- 4 bursts/min (P < 0.05). These data suggest that cardiopulmonary baroreceptor unloading during passive heating is not the primary mechanism resulting in elevations in MSNA. Moreover, arterial baroreceptors remain capable of modulating MSNA during heat stress.

  14. Modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity by low-frequency physiological activation of the vestibular utricle in awake humans.

    PubMed

    Hammam, Elie; Kwok, Kenny; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2013-09-01

    We recently showed that selective stimulation of one set of otolithic organs-those located in the utricle, sensitive to displacement in the horizontal axis-causes a marked entrainment of skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA). Here, we assessed whether muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) is similarly modulated. MSNA was recorded via tungsten microelectrodes inserted into cutaneous fascicles of the common peroneal nerve in 12 awake subjects, seated (head vertical, eyes closed) on a motorised platform. Slow sinusoidal accelerations-decelerations (±4 mG) were applied in the X (antero-posterior) or Y (medio-lateral) direction at 0.08 Hz. Cross-correlation analysis revealed partial entrainment of MSNA: vestibular modulation was 32 ± 3 % for displacements in the X-axis and 29 ± 3 % in the Y-axis; these were significantly smaller than those evoked in SSNA (97 ± 3 and 91 ± 5 %, respectively). For each sinusoidal cycle, there were two peaks of modulation-one associated with acceleration as the platform moved forward or to the side and one associated with acceleration in the opposite direction. We believe the two peaks reflect inertial displacement of the stereocilia within the utricle during sinusoidal acceleration, which evokes vestibulosympathetic reflexes that are expressed as vestibular modulation of MSNA as well as of SSNA. The smaller vestibular modulation of MSNA can be explained by the dominant modulation of MSNA by the arterial baroreceptors. PMID:23852323

  15. Reverse Na(+)/Ca(2+)-exchange mediated Ca(2+)-entry and noradrenaline release in Na(+)-loaded peripheral sympathetic nerves.

    PubMed

    Török, Tamás L; Rácz, Dániel; Sáska, Zsuzsanna; Dávid, Adám Z; Tábi, Tamás; Zillikens, Stefan; Nada, Somaia A; Klebovich, Imre; Gyires, Klára; Magyar, Kálmán

    2008-12-01

    [(3)H]noradrenaline ([(3)H]NA) released from sympathetic nerves in the isolated main pulmonary artery of the rabbit was measured in response to field stimulation (2Hz, 1ms, 60V for 3min) in the presence of uptake blockers (cocaine, 3 x10(-5)M and corticosterone, 5 x10(-5)M). The [(3)H]NA-release was fully blocked by the combined application of the selective and irreversible 'N-type' voltage-sensitive Ca(2+)-channel (VSCC)-blocker omega-conotoxin (omega-CgTx) GVIA (10(-8)M) and the 'non-selective' VSCC-blocker aminoglycoside antibiotic neomycin (3x10(-3)M). Na(+)-loading (Na(+)-pump inhibition by K(+)-free perfusion) was required to elicit further NA-release after blockade of VSCCs (omega-CgTx GVIA+neomycin). In K(+)-free solution, in the absence of functioning VSCCs (omega-CgTx GVIA+neomycin), the fast Na(+)-channel activator veratridine (10(-5)M) further potentiated the nerve-evoked release of [(3)H]NA. This NA-release was significantly inhibited by KB-R7943, and fully blocked by Ca(o)(2+)-removal. However, Li(+)-substitution was surprisingly ineffective. The non-selective K(+)-channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 10(-4)M) also further potentiated the nerve-evoked release of NA in K(+)-free solution. This potentiated release was concentration-dependently inhibited by KB-R7943, significantly inhibited by Li(+)-substitution and abolished by Ca(o)(2+)-removal. It is concluded that in Na(+)-loaded sympathetic nerves, in which the VSCCs are blocked, the reverse Na(+)/Ca(2+)-exchange-mediated Ca(2+)-entry is responsible for transmitter release on nerve-stimulation. Theoretically we suppose that the fast Na(+)-channel and the exchanger proteins are close to the vesicle docking sites. PMID:18831999

  16. Renal glucose release during hypoglycemia is partly controlled by sympathetic nerves - a study in pigs with unilateral surgically denervated kidneys.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, Sabine J; Schmidt, Martin; Lehmann, Thomas; Schwab, Matthias; Matziolis, Georg; Saemann, Alexander; Schiffner, René

    2015-11-01

    Catecholamines are known to increase renal glucose release during hypoglycemia. The specific extent of the contribution of different sources of catecholamines, endocrine delivery via circulation or release from autonomous sympathetic renal nerves, though, is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that sympathetic renal innervation plays a major role in the regulation of renal gluconeogenesis. For this purpose, instrumented adolescent pigs had one kidney surgically denervated while the other kidney served as a control. A hypoglycemic clamp with arterial blood glucose below 2 mmol/L was maintained for 75 min. Arteriovenous blood glucose difference, inulin clearance, p-aminohippurate clearance, and sodium excretion were measured in intervals of 15 min separately for both kidneys. Blood glucose was lowered to 0.84 ± 0.33 mmol/L for 75 min. The side-dependent renal net glucose release (SGN) decreased significantly after the unilateral ablation of renal nerves. In the linear mixed model, renal denervation had a significant inhibitory effect on renal net glucose release (P = 0.036). The SGN of the ablated kidney decreased by 0.02 mmol/min and was equivalent to 43.3 ± 23.2% of the control (nonablated) kidney in the pigs. This allows the conclusion that renal glucose release is partly controlled by sympathetic nerves. This may be relevant in humans as well, and could explain the increased risk of severe hypoglycemia of patients with diabetes mellitus and autonomous neuropathy. The effects of denervation on renal glucose metabolism should be critically taken into account when considering renal denervation as a therapy in diabetic patients. PMID:26564063

  17. Motion sickness is associated with an increase in vestibular modulation of skin but not muscle sympathetic nerve activity.

    PubMed

    Klingberg, Danielle; Hammam, Elie; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2015-08-01

    We have previously shown that sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (sGVS), delivered bilaterally at frequencies of 0.08-2.00 Hz, causes a pronounced modulation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), together with robust frequency-dependent illusions of side-to-side motion. At low frequencies of sGVS (≤0.2 Hz), some subjects report nausea, so we tested the hypothesis that vestibular modulation of MSNA and SSNA is augmented in individuals reporting nausea. MSNA was recorded via tungsten microelectrodes inserted into the left common peroneal nerve in 22 awake, seated subjects; SSNA was recorded in 14 subjects. Bipolar binaural sGVS (±2 mA, 100 cycles) was applied to the mastoid processes at 0.08, 0.13, and 0.18 Hz. Nausea was reported by 21 out of 36 subjects (58 %), but across frequencies of sGVS there was no difference in the magnitude of the vestibular modulation of MSNA in subjects who reported nausea (27.1 ± 1.8 %) and those who did not (30.4 ± 2.9 %). This contrasts with the significantly greater vestibular modulation of SSNA with nausea (41.1 ± 2.0 vs. 28.7 ± 3.1 %) and indicates an organ-specific modulation of sympathetic outflow via the vestibular system during motion sickness. PMID:26025612

  18. Evidence for the differential release of the cotransmitters ATP and noradrenaline from sympathetic nerves of the guinea-pig vas deferens.

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, L D; Mihaylova-Todorova, S; Craviso, G L; Bjur, R A; Westfall, D P

    1996-01-01

    1. Experiments were carried out to quantify the stimulation-evoked overflow of catecholamines and purines (ATP, ADP, AMP and adenosine) from an in vitro sympathetic nerve-smooth muscle preparation of the guinea-pig vas deferens and from isolated bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. The superfused preparations were stimulated for 60 s with electrical field stimulation (EFS; vas deferens), dimethylphenylpiperazinium (chromaffin cells) or KCl (both preparations). 2. Samples of superfusate were taken at 10 s intervals during the 60 s stimulation period for analysis of purines by HPLC-fluorescence detection and catecholamines by HPLC-electrochemical detection. 3. The evoked overflow of catecholamines and purines from chromaffin cells occurred with the same time course and in a constant ratio of approximately 4:1 (catecholamine to purine). These findings are compatible with the release of catecholamines and purines from a homogeneous population of exocytotic vesicles in the chromaffin cells. 4. The evoked overflow of purines and noradrenaline (NA) from the vas deferens preparation differed from the pattern of overflow from chromaffin cells and there was also some temporal disparity in the overflow of the two cotransmitters. The evoked overflow of ATP exceeded that of NA. In addition, the overflow of NA was tonic while the overflow of ATP and the other purines was phasic. 5. The EFS-evoked overflow of NA and the purines from the guniea-pig vas deferens preparation was examined after treatment with the neuronal amine-uptake inhibitors desipramine and cocaine, the alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist methoxamine, the alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin, the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonists idazoxan and yohimbine, the noradrenaline-depleting drug reserpine and the adrenergic neuron-blocking agent guanethidine. The results of these studies, together with an analysis of the metabolic degradation of extracellular ATP, indicated that the temporal disparity in the overflow of NA and ATP

  19. K(ATP)-channel-dependent regulation of catecholaminergic neurons controls BAT sympathetic nerve activity and energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tovar, Sulay; Paeger, Lars; Hess, Simon; Morgan, Donald A; Hausen, A Christine; Brönneke, Hella S; Hampel, Brigitte; Ackermann, P Justus; Evers, Nadine; Büning, Hildegard; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Rahmouni, Kamal; Kloppenburg, Peter; Brüning, Jens C

    2013-09-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a critical regulator of glucose, lipid, and energy homeostasis, and its activity is tightly controlled by the sympathetic nervous system. However, the mechanisms underlying CNS-dependent control of BAT sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) are only partly understood. Here, we demonstrate that catecholaminergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) adapt their firing frequency to extracellular glucose concentrations in a K(ATP)-channel-dependent manner. Inhibiting K(ATP)-channel-dependent control of neuronal activity via the expression of a variant K(ATP) channel in tyrosine-hydroxylase-expressing neurons and in neurons of the LC enhances diet-induced obesity in mice. Obesity results from decreased energy expenditure, lower steady-state BAT SNA, and an attenuated ability of centrally applied glucose to activate BAT SNA. This impairs the thermogenic transcriptional program of BAT. Collectively, our data reveal a role of K(ATP)-channel-dependent neuronal excitability in catecholaminergic neurons in maintaining thermogenic BAT sympathetic tone and energy homeostasis. PMID:24011078

  20. Diving and exercise: the interaction of trigeminal receptors and muscle metaboreceptors on muscle sympathetic nerve activity in humans.

    PubMed

    Fisher, James P; Fernandes, Igor A; Barbosa, Thales C; Prodel, Eliza; Coote, John H; Nóbrega, Antonio Claudio L; Vianna, Lauro C

    2015-03-01

    Swimming involves muscular activity and submersion, creating a conflict of autonomic reflexes elicited by the trigeminal receptors and skeletal muscle afferents. We sought to determine the autonomic cardiovascular responses to separate and concurrent stimulation of the trigeminal cutaneous receptors and metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents (muscle metaboreflex). In eight healthy men (30 ± 2 yr) muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; microneurography), mean arterial pressure (MAP; Finometer), femoral artery blood flow (duplex Doppler ultrasonography), and femoral vascular conductance (femoral artery blood flow/MAP) were assessed during the following three experimental conditions: 1) facial cooling (trigeminal nerve stimulation), 2) postexercise ischemia (PEI; muscle metaboreflex activation) following isometric handgrip, and 3) trigeminal nerve stimulation with concurrent PEI. Trigeminal nerve stimulation produced significant increases in MSNA total activity (Δ347 ± 167%) and MAP (Δ21 ± 5%) and a reduction in femoral artery vascular conductance (Δ-17 ± 9%). PEI also evoked significant increases in MSNA total activity (Δ234 ± 83%) and MAP (Δ36 ± 4%) and a slight nonsignificant reduction in femoral artery vascular conductance (Δ-9 ± 12%). Trigeminal nerve stimulation with concurrent PEI evoked changes in MSNA total activity (Δ341 ± 96%), MAP (Δ39 ± 4%), and femoral artery vascular conductance (Δ-20 ± 9%) that were similar to those evoked by either separate trigeminal nerve stimulation or separate PEI. Thus, excitatory inputs from the trigeminal nerve and metabolically sensitive skeletal muscle afferents do not summate algebraically in eliciting a MSNA and cardiovascular response but rather exhibit synaptic occlusion, suggesting a high degree of convergent inputs on output neurons. PMID:25527781

  1. The innervation of the mammalian adrenal gland.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, T L; Kesse, W K; Mohamed, A A; Afework, M

    1993-01-01

    Early conflicting reports and the lack of sensitive anatomical methods have led to an oversimplified view of adrenal gland innervation. It was not until the introduction of nerve fibre tracing techniques in the mid-1970s that the true complexity of adrenal innervation began to emerge. The first part of this article comprises a brief review of these and other relevant reports dealing with both medullary and cortical innervation. In the second part a detailed account is given of the work undertaken in Rex Coupland's Department relating to the innervation of the rodent and primate adrenal medulla using a retrograde fluorescent tracer technique. It was concluded that, in all 3 species studied, the adrenal medulla receives a sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent and an afferent innervation. The possible interrelationship between neural control of cortical and medullar secretions is discussed briefly. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:8300416

  2. The effect of splanchnic nerve section on the sensitivity of the adrenal cortex to adrenocorticotrophin in the calf.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A V; Jones, C T

    1987-01-01

    1. Adrenal cortical responses to adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) in conscious 2-6-week-old calves, in which both splanchnic nerves had been cut at least 7 days previously, were compared with those of normal calves of the same age in order to discover whether splanchnic nerve section affects the sensitivity of the adrenal cortex to the trophin. 2. In one series of experiments an increase in the release of endogenous ACTH was elicited by an i.v. infusion of noradrenaline (333 ng min-1 kg-1 for 10 min) and in another the concentration of ACTH in the plasma was artificially increased by infusing synthetic ACTH1-24 intravenously at either 5 or 10 ng min-1 kg-1 for 10 min. 3. In all groups mean plasma ACTH was linearly related to mean plasma cortisol and the sensitivity of the adrenal steroidogenic response to ACTH was found to be substantially reduced 7 or more days after section of both splanchnic nerves. PMID:2832590

  3. Region-specific changes in sympathetic nerve activity in angiotensin II-salt hypertension in the rat.

    PubMed

    Osborn, John W; Fink, Gregory D

    2010-01-01

    It is now well accepted that many forms of experimental hypertension and human essential hypertension are caused by increased activity of the sympathetic nervous system. However, the role of region-specific changes in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in the pathogenesis of hypertension has been difficult to determine because methods for chronic measurement of SNA in conscious animals have not been available. We have recently combined indirect, and continuous and chronic direct, assessment of region-specific SNA to characterize hypertension produced by administration of angiotensin II (Ang II) to rats consuming a high-salt diet (Ang II-salt hypertension). Angiotensin II increases whole-body noradrenaline (NA) spillover and depressor responses to ganglionic blockade in rats consuming a high-salt diet, but not in rats on a normal-salt diet. Despite this evidence for increased 'whole-body SNA' in Ang II-salt hypertensive rats, renal SNA is decreased in this model and renal denervation does not attenuate the steady-state level of arterial pressure. In addition, neither lumbar SNA, which largely targets skeletal muscle, nor hindlimb NA spillover is changed from control levels in Ang II-salt hypertensive rats. However, surgical denervation of the splanchnic vascular bed attenuates/abolishes the increase in arterial pressure and total peripheral resistance, as well as the decrease in vascular capacitance, observed in Ang II-salt hypertensive rats. We hypothesize that the 'sympathetic signature' of Ang II-salt hypertension is characterized by increased splanchnic SNA, no change in skeletal muscle SNA and decreased renal SNA, and this sympathetic signature creates unique haemodynamic changes capable of producing sustained hypertension. PMID:19717492

  4. Effect of morphine on the nerve terminal impulse and transmitter release from sympathetic varicosities innervating the mouse vas deferens.

    PubMed Central

    Lavidis, N. A.

    1995-01-01

    1 The effect of morphine on both the propagation of the nerve terminal impulse along the sympathetic varicose axons as well as the evoked and spontaneous transmitter release has been evaluated. 2 Morphine (1 microM) did not significantly change the shape or the regularity by which the nerve terminal impulse was recorded while evoked transmitter release was greatly reduced. 3 Morphine induced a uniform decrease in evoked transmitter release irrespective of the release probability of individual varicosities of their position along terminal branches. 4 Procedures which are thought to increase intracellular calcium concentration such as increasing the extracellular calcium concentration, stimulation of the nerve with trains of impulses and increasing the duration of the action potential with 4-aminopyridine reduced the ability of morphine to decrease evoked transmitter release. 5 Morphine had to act directly on the varicosities to induce a decrease in evoked transmitter release. 6 The decrease in evoked quantal release does not involve an affect on the nerve terminal impulse or the vesicle release process and morphine may affect the dependence of the secretory process on calcium. PMID:8680716

  5. Coping with chronic social stress in mice: hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal/ sympathetic-adrenal-medullary axis activity, behavioral changes and effects of antalarmin treatment: implications for the study of stress-related psychopathologies.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Tejada, Joana; Arregi, Amaia; Gómez-Lázaro, Eneritz; Vegas, Oscar; Azpiroz, Arantza; Garmendia, Larraitz

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the individual differences that lead to the development of psychopathological changes in response to chronic social stress. We also assessed the ability of an antagonist of the corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) receptors to reverse the effects of stress. Male adult mice were exposed to repeated defeat experiences for 21 days using a sensorial contact model. After 18 days of defeat, two groups of subjects were established (active and passive), according to their behaviors during social confrontation. Antalarmin treatment was given for 4 and 6 days. The results corroborated previous data indicating that subjects who adopted a passive coping strategy had higher corticosterone levels after 21 days of defeat and decreased resting levels 3 days later. Moreover, they showed higher resting expression levels of hypothalamic CRH than their active counterparts. On day 24, the experimental animals were subjected to another social defeat to determine whether the stress response remained. The increase in corticosterone and hypothalamic CRH levels was similar for all of the stressed subjects, but the passive subjects also had a greater CRH response in the amygdala. Passive subjects had decreased levels of adrenal dopamine β-hydroxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase and plasma adrenaline compared to the active subjects, and lower plasma noradrenaline levels than manipulated controls. The passive profile of physiological changes in both the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and sympathetic-adrenal-medullary (SAM) axes has been associated with changes related to mood disorders, such as posttraumatic stress disorder and depression. The active coping profile is characterized by similar corticosterone resting levels to controls and increased SAM activity. Both profiles showed alterations in the novel palatable and forced swimming tests, with the passive profile being the most vulnerable to the effects of stress in this last test. Pharmacological

  6. "Real-time" imaging of cortical and subcortical sites of cardiovascular control: concurrent recordings of sympathetic nerve activity and fMRI in awake subjects.

    PubMed

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Henderson, Luke A

    2016-09-01

    We review our approach to functionally identifying cortical and subcortical areas involved in the generation of spontaneous fluctuations in sympathetic outflow to muscle or skin. We record muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) or skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), via a tungsten microelectrode inserted percutaneously into the common peroneal nerve, at the same time as performing functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the brain. By taking advantage of the neurovascular coupling delay associated with BOLD (blood oxygen level dependent) fMRI, and the delay associated with conduction of a burst of sympathetic impulses to the peripheral recording site, we can identify structures in which BOLD signal intensity covaries with MSNA or SSNA. Using this approach, we found MSNA-coupled increases in BOLD signal intensity in the mid-insula and dorsomedial hypothalamus on the left side, and in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, precuneus, ventromedial hypothalamus and rostral ventrolateral medulla on both sides. Conversely, spontaneous bursts of SSNA were positively correlated with BOLD signal intensity in the ventromedial thalamus and posterior insula on the left side, and in the anterior insula, orbitofrontal cortex and frontal cortex on the right side, and in the mid-cingulate cortex and precuneus on both sides. Inverse relationships were observed between MSNA and BOLD signal intensity in the right ventral insula, nucleus tractus solitarius and caudal ventrolateral medulla, and between SSNA and signal intensity in the left orbitofrontal cortex. These results emphasize the contributions of cortical regions of the brain to sympathetic outflow in awake human subjects, and the extensive interactions between cortical and subcortical regions in the ongoing regulation of sympathetic nerve activity to muscle and skin in awake human subjects. PMID:27334958

  7. Effect of renal sympathetic nerve on adrenergically and angiotensin II-induced renal vasoconstriction in normal Wistar-Kyoto rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This study examined the effect of renal sympathetic innervation on adrenergically and angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced renal vasoconstriction in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Methods Forty-eight WKY rats were treated with either losartan (10 mg/kg/day p.o.) or carvedilol (5 mg/kg/day p.o.) or a combination of them (10 mg/kg/day + 5 mg/kg/day p.o.) for 7 days. On day 8, the rats were anaesthetized, and renal vasoconstrictor experiments were carried out. A group of rats was subjected to acute unilateral renal denervation during the acute study. Changes in the renal vasoconstrictor responses were determined in terms of reductions in renal blood flow caused by Ang II, noradrenaline (NA), and methoxamine (ME). Results In normal animals, losartan decreased (P < 0.05) the renal vasoconstrictor response to Ang II but not to NA or ME. Carvedilol treatment, however, blunted (P < 0.05) the renal vasoconstrictor responses to Ang II and adrenergic agonists. Combination of losartan and carvedilol blunted (P < 0.05) the renal vasoconstrictor response to Ang II but augmented the responses to NA and ME (all P < 0.05). Interestingly, when denervated rats were treated with the same combination, there was a reduction (P < 0.05) in the renal vasoconstrictor responses to Ang II and adrenergic agonists. Conclusions Data suggest that the renal sympathetic nerve contributes to adrenergic agonist-mediated renal vasoconstrictions in normal rats. The data further indicate an interactive relationship between renin-angiotensin and sympathetic nervous systems in modulating adrenergically and Ang II-induced renal vasoconstriction in WKY rats. PMID:21047287

  8. Longitudinal tracking of muscle sympathetic nerve activity and its relationship with blood pressure in subjects with prehypertension.

    PubMed

    Hering, Dagmara; Kara, Tomas; Kucharska, Wiesława; Somers, Virend K; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof

    2016-06-01

    Prehypertension is associated with increased cardiovascular events. While the "tracking phenomenon" is an important longitudinal characteristic of blood pressure (BP), changes in muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) over time remain unclear. This study tested the hypothesis that MSNA tracking contributes to BP trends in prehypertension. BP and MSNA were assessed in 13 prehypertensive males at rest, during hand grip and mental stressors at baseline and after 8 years. Baseline office BP averaged 127 ± 2/81 ± 2 mmHg and MSNA 24 ± 4 bursts/min. BP increased by 7 ± 2/5 ± 2 mmHg (P < 0.01) and MSNA by 11 ± 2 bursts/min (P < 0.001) at follow-up. SBP and DBP were interrelated at baseline (r = 0.65, P = 0.02) and at follow-up (r = 0.78, P = 0.002). MSNA tracking (r = 0.82; P < 0.001) was similar to BP. MSNA was strongly related to DBP at baseline (r = 0.73; P < 0.01) and follow-up (r = 0.64; P = 0.01), more so than SBP. BMI increased (P < 0.001) at follow-up but was unrelated to BP or MSNA. Despite comparable pressor and cardiac increases to handgrip and mental stressors, sympathetic responses were blunted, more pronounced to isometric test (P < 0.006) at follow-up. In conclusion, the trend in MSNA corresponds with BP changes over time suggesting that tonic sympathetic activation may contribute to time-related increase in resting BP and the development of sustained hypertension in prehypertension. PMID:26654200

  9. Salivation in the red kangaroo (Macropus rufus) during sympathetic nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Beal, A M

    1989-01-01

    1. Continuous electrical stimulation at low frequency (5 Hz) and short pulse duration (500 microseconds) of the cervical sympathetic trunk for periods up to 15 min caused no obvious flow from the parotid or mandibular glands of the red kangaroo. 2. Higher frequencies combined with longer pulse durations caused both glands to secrete. Flow reached maximum in less than 3 min and then declined but, on cessation of stimulation, flow increased again for a short period. This flow response may be caused by the interaction of the secretory response with myoepithelial contraction. 3. The parotid saliva had substantially higher protein, phosphate and hydrogen ion concentrations, and lower sodium concentrations than cholinergic parotid saliva. The low pH indicates bicarbonate concentrations far lower than in other sympathetic salivas. 4. The mandibular saliva had higher protein, urea and potassium, and lower chloride and hydrogen concentrations than cholinergic mandibular saliva. PMID:2566416

  10. Noise-enhanced heart rate and sympathetic nerve responses to oscillatory lower body negative pressure in humans.

    PubMed

    Hidaka, I; Ando, S; Shigematsu, H; Sakai, K; Setoguchi, S; Seto, T; Hirooka, Y; Takeshita, A; Yamamoto, Y

    2001-08-01

    By injecting noise into the carotid sinus baroreceptors, we previously showed that heart rate (HR) responses to weak oscillatory tilt were enhanced via a mechanism known as "stochastic resonance." It remains unclear, however, whether the same responses would be observed when using oscillatory lower body negative pressure (LBNP), which would unload the cardiopulmonary baroreceptors with physically negligible effects on the arterial system. Also, the vasomotor sympathetic activity directly controlling peripheral resistance against hypotensive stimuli was not observed. We therefore investigated the effects of weak (0 to approximately -10 mmHg) oscillatory (0.03 Hz) LBNP on HR and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) while adding incremental noise to the carotid sinus baroreceptors via a pneumatic neck chamber. The signal-to-noise ratio of HR, cardiac interbeat interval, and total MSNA were all significantly improved by increasing noise intensity, while there was no significant change in the arterial blood pressure in synchronized with the oscillatory LBNP. We conclude that the stochastic resonance, affecting both HR and MSNA, results from the interaction of noise with the signal in the brain stem, where the neuronal inputs from the arterial and cardiopulmonary baroreceptors first come together in the nucleus tractus solitarius. Also, these results indicate that the noise could induce functional improvement in human blood pressure regulatory system in overcoming given hypotensive stimuli. PMID:11495931

  11. Phrenic and sympathetic nerve responses to glutamergic blockade during normoxia and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Chae, L O; Melton, J E; Neubauer, J A; Edelman, N H

    1993-04-01

    Because hypoxia increases brain extracellular glutamate levels, we hypothesized that gasping and increased sympathetic activity during severe hypoxia result from glutamergic excitation. To test this hypothesis, we exposed anesthetized paralyzed vagotomized glomectomized cats to hypoxia before and after N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamergic blockade (MK-801, 1 mg/kg iv) or non-NMDA blockade (NBQX, 3 mg/kg iv) while monitoring phrenic neurogram (PN) and inspiratory-synchronous (ISSN) and tonic (TSN) activity in cervical sympathetic neurogram (SN). Before hypoxia, MK-801 caused apneusis and reduced PN and ISSN amplitude by 38 and 84%, respectively, but TSN activity was unaffected. During hypoxia, MK-801 had no effect on PN gasping or TSN activity but reduced ISSN amplitude during gasping. Before hypoxia, NBQX reduced PN and ISSN amplitude by 54 and 60%, respectively but did not affect inspiratory timing or TSN activity. Gasping activity in PN and ISSN and TSN activity during hypoxia were unaffected by NBQX. We conclude that 1) ionotropic glutamergic receptor activation is important for eupneic phrenic patterning but is not involved in genesis of gasping, 2) NMDA receptor activation is involved in integration of respiratory and sympathetic activity, and 3) changes in TSN activity are independent of ionotropic glutamergic receptor activation. PMID:8514717

  12. Enhanced sympathetic nerve activity induced by neonatal colon inflammation induces gastric hypersensitivity and anxiety-like behavior in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Winston, John H; Sarna, Sushil K

    2016-07-01

    Gastric hypersensitivity (GHS) and anxiety are prevalent in functional dyspepsia patients; their underlying mechanisms remain unknown largely because of lack of availability of live visceral tissues from human subjects. Recently, we demonstrated in a preclinical model that rats subjected to neonatal colon inflammation show increased basal plasma norepinephrine (NE), which contributes to GHS through the upregulation of nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in the gastric fundus. We tested the hypothesis that neonatal colon inflammation increases anxiety-like behavior and sympathetic nervous system activity, which upregulates the expression of NGF to induce GHS in adult life. Chemical sympathectomy, but not adrenalectomy, suppressed the elevated NGF expression in the fundus muscularis externa and GHS. The measurement of heart rate variability showed a significant increase in the low frequency-to-high frequency ratio in GHS vs. the control rats. Stimulus-evoked release of NE from the fundus muscularis externa strips was significantly greater in GHS than in the control rats. Tyrosine hydroxylase expression was increased in the celiac ganglia of the GHS vs. the control rats. We found an increase in trait but not stress-induced anxiety-like behavior in GHS rats in an elevated plus maze. We concluded that neonatal programming triggered by colon inflammation upregulates tyrosine hydroxylase in the celiac ganglia, which upregulates the release of NE in the gastric fundus muscularis externa. The increase of NE release from the sympathetic nerve terminals concentration dependently upregulates NGF, which proportionately increases the visceromotor response to gastric distention. Neonatal programming concurrently increases anxiety-like behavior in GHS rats. PMID:27151940

  13. Exercise training prevents the deterioration in the arterial baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity in chronic heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Groehs, Raphaela V.; Toschi-Dias, Edgar; Antunes-Correa, Ligia M.; Trevizan, Patrícia F.; Rondon, Maria Urbana P. B.; Oliveira, Patrícia; Alves, Maria J. N. N.; Almeida, Dirceu R.; Middlekauff, Holly R.

    2015-01-01

    Arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (ABRMSNA) is impaired in chronic systolic heart failure (CHF). The purpose of the study was to test the hypothesis that exercise training would improve the gain and reduce the time delay of ABRMSNA in CHF patients. Twenty-six CHF patients, New York Heart Association Functional Class II-III, EF ≤ 40%, peak V̇o2 ≤ 20 ml·kg−1·min−1 were divided into two groups: untrained (UT, n = 13, 57 ± 3 years) and exercise trained (ET, n = 13, 49 ± 3 years). Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was directly recorded by microneurography technique. Arterial pressure was measured on a beat-to-beat basis. Time series of MSNA and systolic arterial pressure were analyzed by autoregressive spectral analysis. The gain and time delay of ABRMSNA was obtained by bivariate autoregressive analysis. Exercise training was performed on a cycle ergometer at moderate intensity, three 60-min sessions per week for 16 wk. Baseline MSNA, gain and time delay of ABRMSNA, and low frequency of MSNA (LFMSNA) to high-frequency ratio (HFMSNA) (LFMSNA/HFMSNA) were similar between groups. ET significantly decreased MSNA. MSNA was unchanged in the UT patients. The gain and time delay of ABRMSNA were unchanged in the ET patients. In contrast, the gain of ABRMSNA was significantly reduced [3.5 ± 0.7 vs. 1.8 ± 0.2, arbitrary units (au)/mmHg, P = 0.04] and the time delay of ABRMSNA was significantly increased (4.6 ± 0.8 vs. 7.9 ± 1.0 s, P = 0.05) in the UT patients. LFMSNA-to-HFMSNA ratio tended to be lower in the ET patients (P < 0.08). Exercise training prevents the deterioration of ABRMSNA in CHF patients. PMID:25747752

  14. Exercise training prevents the deterioration in the arterial baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity in chronic heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Groehs, Raphaela V; Toschi-Dias, Edgar; Antunes-Correa, Ligia M; Trevizan, Patrícia F; Rondon, Maria Urbana P B; Oliveira, Patrícia; Alves, Maria J N N; Almeida, Dirceu R; Middlekauff, Holly R; Negrão, Carlos E

    2015-05-01

    Arterial baroreflex control of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (ABRMSNA) is impaired in chronic systolic heart failure (CHF). The purpose of the study was to test the hypothesis that exercise training would improve the gain and reduce the time delay of ABRMSNA in CHF patients. Twenty-six CHF patients, New York Heart Association Functional Class II-III, EF ≤ 40%, peak V̇o2 ≤ 20 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1) were divided into two groups: untrained (UT, n = 13, 57 ± 3 years) and exercise trained (ET, n = 13, 49 ± 3 years). Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was directly recorded by microneurography technique. Arterial pressure was measured on a beat-to-beat basis. Time series of MSNA and systolic arterial pressure were analyzed by autoregressive spectral analysis. The gain and time delay of ABRMSNA was obtained by bivariate autoregressive analysis. Exercise training was performed on a cycle ergometer at moderate intensity, three 60-min sessions per week for 16 wk. Baseline MSNA, gain and time delay of ABRMSNA, and low frequency of MSNA (LFMSNA) to high-frequency ratio (HFMSNA) (LFMSNA/HFMSNA) were similar between groups. ET significantly decreased MSNA. MSNA was unchanged in the UT patients. The gain and time delay of ABRMSNA were unchanged in the ET patients. In contrast, the gain of ABRMSNA was significantly reduced [3.5 ± 0.7 vs. 1.8 ± 0.2, arbitrary units (au)/mmHg, P = 0.04] and the time delay of ABRMSNA was significantly increased (4.6 ± 0.8 vs. 7.9 ± 1.0 s, P = 0.05) in the UT patients. LFMSNA-to-HFMSNA ratio tended to be lower in the ET patients (P < 0.08). Exercise training prevents the deterioration of ABRMSNA in CHF patients. PMID:25747752

  15. Sympathetic nerve-derived ATP regulates renal medullary vasa recta diameter via pericyte cells: a role for regulating medullary blood flow?

    PubMed

    Crawford, C; Wildman, S S P; Kelly, M C; Kennedy-Lydon, T M; Peppiatt-Wildman, C M

    2013-01-01

    Pericyte cells are now known to be a novel locus of blood flow control, being able to regulate capillary diameter via their unique morphology and expression of contractile proteins. We have previously shown that exogenous ATP causes constriction of vasa recta via renal pericytes, acting at a variety of membrane bound P2 receptors on descending vasa recta (DVR), and therefore may be able to regulate medullary blood flow (MBF). Regulation of MBF is essential for appropriate urine concentration and providing essential oxygen and nutrients to this region of high, and variable, metabolic demand. Various sources of endogenous ATP have been proposed, including from epithelial, endothelial, and red blood cells in response to stimuli such as mechanical stimulation, local acidosis, hypoxia, and exposure to various hormones. Extensive sympathetic innervation of the nephron has previously been shown, however the innervation reported has focused around the proximal and distal tubules, and ascending loop of Henle. We hypothesize that sympathetic nerves are an additional source of ATP acting at renal pericytes and therefore regulate MBF. Using a rat live kidney slice model in combination with video imaging and confocal microscopy techniques we firstly show sympathetic nerves in close proximity to vasa recta pericytes in both the outer and inner medulla. Secondly, we demonstrate pharmacological stimulation of sympathetic nerves in situ (by tyramine) evokes pericyte-mediated vasoconstriction of vasa recta capillaries; inhibited by the application of the P2 receptor antagonist suramin. Lastly, tyramine-evoked vasoconstriction of vasa recta by pericytes is significantly less than ATP-evoked vasoconstriction. Sympathetic innervation may provide an additional level of functional regulation in the renal medulla that is highly localized. It now needs to be determined under which physiological/pathophysiological circumstances that sympathetic innervation of renal pericytes is important

  16. Ketamine as an adjuvant in sympathetic blocks for management of central sensitization following peripheral nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Proliferation of NMDA receptors and role of glutamate in producing central sensitization and 'wind up' phenomena in CRPS [complex regional pain syndrome] forms a strong basis for the use of Ketamine to block the cellular mechanisms that initiate and maintain these changes. In this case series, we describe 3 patients of CRPS Type II with debilitating central sensitization, heat/mechano allodynia and cognitive symptoms that we termed 'vicarious pain'. Each of these patients had dramatic relief with addition of Ketamine as an adjuvant to the sympathetic blocks after conventional therapy failed. Case Reports All 3 patients suffered gunshot wounds and developed characteristic features of CRPS Type II. Within 2–3 weeks they developed extraterritorial symptoms typical of central sensitization. The generalized mechanical allodynia and debilitating heat allodynia described to be rare in human subjects had life altering affect on their daily life. Case 2 and 3 also described an unusual cognitive phenomenon i.e. visual stimuli of friction would evoke severe pain in the affected limb that we have termed as 'vicarious pain'. They responded positively to sympathetic blocks but the sympatholysis did not bring relief to the heat and mechanical allodynia. Addition of Ketamine 0.5 mg/kg to the sympathetic blocks elicited resulted in marked relief in the allodynia. Conclusion Ketamine has a special role in patients with debilitating heat allodynia and positive cognitive symptoms via its action on central pain pathway. As an adjuvant in sympatholytic blocks it has a targeted action without significant neuropsychiatric side effects. PMID:18950516

  17. Response of lymphatics of canine hind limb to sympathetic nerve stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Browse, N. L.

    1968-01-01

    1. The changes in lymphatic pressure in a limb whose circulation was temporarily arrested with a pneumatic cuff have been studied. 2. Stimulation of the lumbar sympathetic chain caused an increase in lymphatic pressure. It has been shown that this is a primary not a secondary phenomenon, due to an active lymphomotor mechanism. 3. The increase of lymphatic tone is proportional to the rate of stimulation; peak values are reached between 5 and 9 impulses/sec. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7 PMID:5675052

  18. Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation Raises the Plasma Level of NGF-β Which Is Associated with Sympathetic Nerve Activity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae Hyung; Wi, Jin; Lee, Da Lyung; Joung, Boyoung; Lee, Moon Hyoung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The expression of nerve growth factor-β (NGF-β) is related to cardiac nerve sprouting and sympathetic hyper innervation. We investigated the changes of plasma levels of NGF-β and the relationship to follow-up heart rate variability (HRV) after radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) of atrial fibrillation (AF). Materials and Methods This study included 147 patients with AF (117 men, 55.8±11.5 years, 106 paroxysmal AF) who underwent RFCA. The plasma levels of NGF-β were quantified using double sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay method before (NGF-βpre) and 1 hour after RFCA (NGF-βpost-1hr). HRV at pre-procedure (HRVpre), 3 months (HRVpost-3mo), and 1 year post-procedure (HRVpost-1yr) were analyzed and compared with plasma levels of NGF-β. Results 1) The plasma levels of NGF-β significantly increased after RFCA (20.05±11.09 pg/mL vs. 29.60±19.43 pg/mL, p<0.001). The patients who did not show increased NGF-βpost-1hr were older (p=0.023) and had greater left atrial volume index (p=0.028) than those with increased NGF-βpost-1hr. 2) In patients with NGF-βpre >18 pg/mL, low frequency components (LF)/high-frequency components (HF) (p=0.003) and the number of atrial premature contractions (APCs, p=0.045) in HRVpost-3mo were significantly higher than those with ≤18 pg/mL. 3) The LF/HF at HRVpost-3mo was linearly associated with the NGF-βpre (B=4.240, 95% CI 1.114-7.336, p=0.008) and the NGF-βpost-1hr (B=7.617, 95% CI 2.106-13.127, p=0.007). 4) Both NGF-βpre (OR=1.159, 95% CI 1.045-1.286, p=0.005) and NGF-βpost-1hr (OR=1.098, 95% CI 1.030-1.170, p=0.004) were independent predictors for the increase of LF/HF at HRVpost-3mo. Conclusion AF catheter ablation increases plasma level of NGF-β, and high plasma levels of NGF-βpre was associated with higher sympathetic nerve activity and higher frequency of APCs in HRVpost-3mo. PMID:26446633

  19. Regeneration of putative sensory and sympathetic cutaneous nerve endings in the rat foot after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Stankovic, N; Johansson, O; Hildebrand, C

    1996-01-01

    The present study examines the occurrence of calcitonin gene-related peptide-, substance P- and tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactive profiles in glabrous and hairy foot skin from normal and nerve-injured rats. After neurotomy/suture, glabrous skin samples contain few calcitonin gene-related peptide-, substance P- and tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactive profies. The number of calcitonin gene-related peptide- and substance P-like immunoreacive profiles in the epidermis is significantly subnormal. Hairy skin from these rats does also contain few calcitonin gene-related peptide-, substance P- and tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactive profiles. In addition, the presence of epidermal calcitonin gene-related peptide-like imunoreactive profiles in glabrous skin is subnormal on the contralateral side. After nerve crush injury, the occurrence of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like, but not substance P-like, immunoreactive profiles in th epidermis of the glabrous skin is significantly subnormal. The occurrence of tyrosine hylase-like immnunoreactive fibres in relation to the digital artery is also subnormal. The occurrence in hairy skin of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactive, substance P-like immunoreactive and tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactive profiles is subnormal. In both skin types, the contralateral occurrence of such profiles is subjectively normal. These results show that the occurrence of calcitonin gene-related peptide-, substance P-, and tyrosine hydroxylase-like immunoreactive profiles in glabrous and hairy foot skin is clearly subnormal after neurotomy and suture and less abnormal after nerve crush. After neurotomy and suture the contralateral side is also affected. PMID:10970110

  20. Effects of nerve growth factor and heart cell conditioned medium on neurite regeneration of aged sympathetic neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Y; Tomonaga, M

    1985-11-25

    The effects of nerve growth factor (NGF) and heart-cell-conditioned medium (HCM) on the neurite regeneration of aged sympathetic neurons were investigated in culture. Investigation of HCM was carried out by two different methods: one was the use of whole HCM on collagen substratum, which reflected component(s) effective in solution (HCM-S); the other was the use of polyornithine (PORN)-binding component(s) (P-HCM). Superior cervical ganglion neurons prepared from male mice from 6 to 30 months of age were cultured in MEM-10% FCS on collagen or gelatin-PORN substratum for 3 days. The number of neurons with neurites and the length of neurites were quantified as neurite production and elongation, respectively. Neuronal survival was not affected by addition of NGF, HCM-S or P-HCM. Neurite production of early adult neurons was enhanced by NGF, HCM-S or P-HCM. In contrast, neurite production of aged neurons was enhanced by only HCM-S, but not NGF or P-HCM. HCM-S did not promote neurite elongation in neurons at any age. Neurite elongation of early adult neurons was enhanced by NGF or P-HCM. Neurite elongation of aged neurons was enhanced by P-HCM. However, responsiveness of NGF for neurite elongation varied according to substrata. No age-related difference was found in neurite production and elongation in the absence of NGF, HCM-S or P-HCM. These results indicate that responsiveness of aged sympathetic neurons is various in different growth factors. PMID:3840716

  1. Changes in baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity in high-fat-fed rats as a predictor of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fardin, Núbia M; Oyama, Lila M; Campos, Ruy R

    2012-08-01

    There is evidence that obesity is associated with increased sympathetic activity and hypertension. However, the mechanisms responsible for these changes are not fully understood. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the cardiovascular function and the baroreceptor reflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity (rSNA) in rats exposed to a high-fat diet over different periods (10 and 20 weeks) compared to control rats. Serum leptin levels were assessed for all time points. Male Wistar rats weighing 150-180 g were used. Four groups of rats were studied: control 10 weeks (Ct10), obese 10 weeks (Ob10), control 20 weeks (Ct20), and obese 20 weeks (Ob20). Blood pressure (BP) and rSNA were recorded in urethane-anesthetized rats (1.4 g/kg, intravenous).The sensitivity of rSNA responses to baroreceptor reflex was assessed by changes in BP induced by increasing doses of phenylephrine or sodium nitroprusside. Significant and progressive increases in serum leptin levels were found in the obese rats, but not in the control rats. No changes in basal BP or rSNA were found in the Ob10 and Ob20 groups; however, a significant impairment in the baroreceptor sensitivity was observed in the Ob20 group for phenylephrine (slope Ob20: -0.78 ± 0.12 vs. Ct20: -1.00 ± 0.08 potential per second (pps)/mm Hg, P < 0.05) and sodium nitroprusside (slope Ob20: -0.82 ± 0.09 vs. 1.13 ± 0.13 pps/mm Hg, P < 0.05). The results suggest that the baroreceptor dysfunction that controls the rSNA is an initial change in the obesity induced in high-fat-fed rats, which might be a predictor of sympathoexcitation and hypertension associated to obesity. PMID:22257982

  2. Gastrointestinal Intervention Ameliorates High Blood Pressure Through Antagonizing Overdrive of the Sympathetic Nerve in Hypertensive Patients and Rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hexuan; Pu, Yunfei; Chen, Jing; Tong, Weidong; Cui, Yuanting; Sun, Fang; Zheng, Zhou; Li, Qiang; Yang, Tao; Meng, Changyuan; Lu, Zongshi; Li, Li; Yan, Zhencheng; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2014-01-01

    Background We investigated the hypothesis that the favorable effects of gastrointestinal (GI) intervention on hypertension (HTN) and cardiovascular (CV) disturbances are mediated by antagonizing overdrive of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). Methods and Results Hypertensive patients with metabolic disturbances underwent laparoscopic Roux‐en‐Y gastric bypass surgery, and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) underwent RYGB or sham surgery. Blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), endothelium‐dependent flow‐mediated dilation, and anthropometric as well as laboratory parameters were measured at baseline and during follow‐up. Changes of BP and HR in response to cold stress, renal sympathetic nervous activity (RSNA), vasoconstriction induced by electrical field stimulation, microinjection of nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), and CV function and structure were examined in SHRs with or without surgery. Compared with baseline, BP and HR were significantly reduced in both hypertensive patients with type 2 diabetes and rats. Impaired endothelial‐dependent vasodilatation and metabolic disturbances in hypertensive patients were also ameliorated after surgery. CV disturbances were reversed by surgery in SHRs. Under acute cold exposure, the variations in BP and HR were smaller in surgically treated SHRs, compared to sham SHRs. RSNA and vasoconstriction induced by perivascular nerve stimulation as well as NTS‐mediated changes of BP were decreased in surgically treated SHRs, compared to sham SHR. Weight loss did not affect BP and RSNA in sham SHRs. Conclusions GI intervention ameliorates HTN in both hypertensive patients and rats by inhibiting overdrive of the SNS. Therefore, targeting gastrointestine could be a novel strategy to treat HTN with metabolic disturbances. PMID:25240055

  3. Binding, internalization, and retrograde transport of /sup 125/I-nerve growth factor in cultured rat sympathetic neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Claude, P.; Hawrot, E.; Dunis, D.A.; Campenot, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    Sympathetic neurons internalize nerve growth factor (NGF) and transport it retrogradely to their cell bodies where it appears to serve a trophic function in maintaining neuronal survival. We have characterized the binding, internalization, and retrograde transport of /sup 125/I-NGF by cultured rat sympathetic neurons. After 3 to 4 weeks in culture, sympathetic neurons possessed approximately 2 X 10(7) specific, cell surface NGF binding sites per neuron with an apparent affinity constant of 2 to 5 X 10(9) M. The density of binding sites on the plasma membrane of the neurites approximately twice that on the plasma membrane of the cell bodies. Because of the extensive network of neuronal processes, the neurites probably account for more than 99.5% of the total binding in mature cultures. Using electron microscope autoradiography, we localized the distribution of /sup 125/I-NGF in the cell body following a 1-hr exposure to /sup 125/I-NGF. The majority of silver grains were associated with lysosomal organelles, including secondary lysosomes, residual bodies, and multivesicular bodies (MVB). The MVB were the most heavily labeled, with a labeling density (L.D.) of 21, while the lysosomes had a L.D. of 3.1. To study the retrograde transport of /sup 125/I-NGF, neurons were grown in compartmentalized culture dishes and their distal processes were exposed to /sup 125/I-NGF. Radioactive material was transported to the cell bodies at the rate of approximately 3 mm/hr. The transport mechanism was sensitive to colchicine and was saturable with respect to NGF. After 8 hr of transport, when the radioactivity in the cell bodies had reached a steady state, the label again was localized primarily to the MVB (L.D. . 16.8) and the lysosomes (L.D. . 3.8). The nuclei were not labeled significantly and had an overall L.D. of 0.47. We saw no evidence for the accumulation of NGF by the nuclear membrane, the nucleolus, or chromatin.

  4. Hypothalamic Paraventricular and Arcuate Nuclei Contribute to Elevated Sympathetic Nerve Activity in Pregnant Rats: Roles of Neuropeptide Y and α-Melanocyte-Stimulating Hormone.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhigang; Cassaglia, Priscila A; Gotthardt, Laura C; Brooks, Virginia L

    2015-12-01

    Pregnancy increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), but the mechanisms are unknown. Here, we investigated the contributions of the hypothalamic paraventricular and arcuate nuclei in α-chloralose-anesthetized pregnant and nonpregnant rats. Baseline arterial pressure (AP) was lower, and heart rate (HR), lumbar sympathetic activity, and splanchnic SNA were higher in pregnant rats compared with nonpregnant rats. Inhibition of the paraventricular nucleus via bilateral muscimol nanoinjections decreased AP and HR more in pregnant rats than in nonpregnant rats and decreased lumbar SNA only in pregnant rats. Similarly, after arcuate muscimol nanoninjections, the decreases in AP, HR, and lumbar, renal, and splanchnic sympathetic nerve activities were greater in pregnant rats than in nonpregnant rats. Major arcuate neuronal groups that project to the paraventricular nucleus express inhibitory neuropeptide Y (NPY) and excitatory α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone. Inhibition of paraventricular melanocortin 3/4 receptors with SHU9119 also decreased AP, HR, and lumbar SNA in pregnant rats but not in nonpregnant rats. Conversely, paraventricular nucleus NPY expression was reduced in pregnant animals, and although blockade of paraventricular NPY Y1 receptors increased AP, HR, and lumbar sympathetic activity in nonpregnant rats, it had no effects in pregnant rats. Yet, the sympathoinhibitory, depressor, and bradycardic effects of paraventricular NPY nanoinjections were similar between groups. In conclusion, the paraventricular and arcuate nuclei contribute to increased basal SNA during pregnancy, likely due in part to decreased tonic NPY inhibition and increased tonic α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone excitation of presympathetic neurons in the paraventricular nucleus. PMID:26483343

  5. Effects of sympathetic stimulation and applied catecholamines on mechanical and electrical responses to stimulation of the vagus nerve in guinea-pig isolated trachea.

    PubMed Central

    McCaig, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Mechanical and electrical responses to stimulation of the vagus nerve were studied in the isolated, innervated trachea of the guinea-pig. In approximately half the preparations tested, the amplitudes of mechanical constrictor responses to stimulation of the vagus were reduced substantially during a period of sympathetic stimulation. Vagal responses were unaltered in the remainder. In single trachealis cells, stimulation of the vagus nerve or sympathetic stellate ganglion elicited depolarization and hyperpolarization, respectively. Vagally-mediated depolarization was decreased, unchanged or increased in amplitude after a period of sympathetic stimulation. Isoprenaline almost abolished mechanical responses induced by stimulation of the vagus, and this effect was blocked by propranolol. Noradrenaline attenuated markedly vagal mechanical responses also, and this effect was blocked by a combination of propranolol and phentolamine. Both noradrenaline and isoprenaline hyperpolarized single trachealis cells and greatly reduced the amplitude of vagally-mediated depolarization. Neither sympathetic stimulation nor applied catecholamines altered mechanical responses to applied acetylcholine, strongly suggesting that their effects on vagal responses are predominantly presynaptic. PMID:3607363

  6. Targeted NGF siRNA Delivery Attenuates Sympathetic Nerve Sprouting and Deteriorates Cardiac Dysfunction in Rats with Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ye; Xue, Mei; Suo, Fei; Li, Xiaolu; Cheng, Wenjuan; Li, Xinran; Yin, Jie; Liu, Ju; Yan, Suhua

    2014-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is involved in nerve sprouting, hyper-innervation, angiogenesis, anti-apoptosis, and preservation of cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI). Positively modulating NGF expression may represent a novel pharmacological strategy to improve post-infarction prognosis. In this study, lentivirus encoding NGF short interfering RNA (siRNA) was prepared, and MI was modeled in the rat using left anterior descending coronary artery ligation. Rats were randomly grouped to receive intramyocardial injection of lentiviral solution containing NGF-siRNA (n = 19, MI-SiNGF group), lentiviral solution containing empty vector (n = 18, MI-GFP group) or 0.9% NaCl solution (n = 18, MI-control group), or to receive thoracotomy and pericardiotomy (n = 17, sham-operated group). At 1, 2, 4, and 8 wk after transduction, rats in the MI-control group had higher levels of NGF mRNA and protein than those in the sham-operated group, rats in the MI-GFP group showed similar levels as the MI-control group, and rats in the MI-SiNGF group had lower levels compared to the MI-GFP group, indicating that MI model was successfully established and NGF siRNA effectively inhibited the expression of NGF. At 8 wk, echocardiographic and hemodynamic studies revealed a more severe cardiac dysfunction in the MI-siRNA group compared to the MI-GFP group. Moreover, rats in the MI-siRNA group had lower mRNA and protein expression levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and growth-associated protein 43-positive nerve fibers (GAP-43) at both the infarcted border and within the non-infarcted left ventricles (LV). NGF silencing also reduced the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and decreased the arteriolar and capillary densities at the infarcted border compared to the MI-GFP group. Histological analysis indicated a large infarcted size in the MI-SiNGF group. These findings suggested that endogenous NGF silencing attenuated sympathetic nerve sprouting and

  7. CT-clinical approach to patients with symptoms related to the V, VII, IX-XII cranial nerves and cervical sympathetics

    SciTech Connect

    Kalovidouris, A.; Mancuso, A.A.; Dillon, W.

    1984-06-01

    Forty-three patients who had signs and symptoms possibly related to the extracranial course of cranial nerves V, VII, IX, X-XII, and the cervical sympathetics were examined prospectively using high resolution CT to obtain images of thin sections during rapid drip infusion of contrast material. Anatomic areas in the scan protocols included the posterior fossa, cavernous and paranasal sinuses, skull base, temporal bone, nasopharynx, parotid gland, tongue base, and neck. Nine of the 23 patients with possible fifth nerve deficits had extracranial structural lesions that explained the symptoms; none of these nine, however, had typical trigeminal neuralgia. Of eight patients with peripheral seventh nerve abnormalities, two had positive findings on scans. Of five patients presenting with referred ear pain, three had carcinoma of the upper aerodigestive tract. The authors' experience suggests that patients at high risk for structural lesions responsible for cranial nerve deficits can be selected by clinical criteria. Protocols for each clinical setting are presented.

  8. N-11C-Methyl-Dopamine PET Imaging of Sympathetic Nerve Injury in a Swine Model of Acute Myocardial Ischemia: A Comparison with 13N-Ammonia PET

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weina; Wang, Xiangcheng; He, Yulin; Nie, Yongzhen; Zhang, Guojian; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Chunmei; Wang, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Using a swine model of acute myocardial ischemia, we sought to validate N-11C-methyl-dopamine (11C-MDA) as an agent capable of imaging cardiac sympathetic nerve injury. Methods. Acute myocardial ischemia was surgically generated in Chinese minipigs. ECG and serum enzyme levels were used to detect the presence of myocardial ischemia. Paired 11C-MDA PET and 13N-ammonia PET scans were performed at baseline, 1 day, and 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery to relate cardiac sympathetic nerve injury to blood perfusion. Results. Seven survived the surgical procedure. The ECG-ST segment was depressed, and levels of the serum enzymes increased. Cardiac uptake of tracer was quantified as the defect volume. Both before and immediately after surgery, the images obtained with 11C-MDA and 13N-ammonia were similar. At 1 to 6 months after surgery, however, 11C-MDA postsurgical left ventricular myocardial defect volume was significantly greater compared to 13N-ammonia. Conclusions. In the Chinese minipig model of acute myocardial ischemia, the extent of the myocardial defect as visualized by 11C-MDA is much greater than would be suggested by blood perfusion images, and the recovery from myocardial sympathetic nerve injury is much slower than the restoration of blood perfusion. 11C-MDA PET may provide additional biological information during recovery from ischemic heart disease. PMID:27034950

  9. Effects of Inhaled Citronella Oil and Related Compounds on Rat Body Weight and Brown Adipose Tissue Sympathetic Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Batubara, Irmanida; Suparto, Irma H.; Sa’diah, Siti; Matsuoka, Ryunosuke; Mitsunaga, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Citronella oil is one of the most famous Indonesian essential oils, having a distinctive aroma. As with other essential oils, it is crucial to explore the effects of inhalation of this oil. Therefore, the aim of this research was to elucidate the effects of inhalation of citronella oil and its components isolated from Cymbopogon nardus L. (Poaceae), Indonesian local name: “Sereh Wangi” on the body weight, blood lipid profile, and liver function of rats, as well as on the sympathetic nerve activity and temperature of brown adipose tissue. Sprague-Dawley male adult rats fed with high fat diet (HFD) were made to inhale citronella oil, R-(+)-citronellal, and β-citronellol for five weeks, and the observations were compared to those of HFD rats that were not subjected to inhalation treatment. The results showed that inhalation of β-citronellol decreased feed consumption. As a consequence, the percentage of weight gain decreased compared with that in control group and the blood cholesterol level in the β-citronellol group was significantly lowered. Concentration of liver function enzymes were not significantly different among the groups. In conclusion, inhalation of citronella oil, specifically β-citronellol, decreased body weight by decreasing appetite, without any marked changes in liver enzyme concentrations. PMID:25774603

  10. Effects of inhaled citronella oil and related compounds on rat body weight and brown adipose tissue sympathetic nerve.

    PubMed

    Batubara, Irmanida; Suparto, Irma H; Sa'diah, Siti; Matsuoka, Ryunosuke; Mitsunaga, Tohru

    2015-03-01

    Citronella oil is one of the most famous Indonesian essential oils, having a distinctive aroma. As with other essential oils, it is crucial to explore the effects of inhalation of this oil. Therefore, the aim of this research was to elucidate the effects of inhalation of citronella oil and its components isolated from Cymbopogon nardus L. (Poaceae), Indonesian local name: "Sereh Wangi" on the body weight, blood lipid profile, and liver function of rats, as well as on the sympathetic nerve activity and temperature of brown adipose tissue. Sprague-Dawley male adult rats fed with high fat diet (HFD) were made to inhale citronella oil, R-(+)-citronellal, and β-citronellol for five weeks, and the observations were compared to those of HFD rats that were not subjected to inhalation treatment. The results showed that inhalation of β-citronellol decreased feed consumption. As a consequence, the percentage of weight gain decreased compared with that in control group and the blood cholesterol level in the β-citronellol group was significantly lowered. Concentration of liver function enzymes were not significantly different among the groups. In conclusion, inhalation of citronella oil, specifically β-citronellol, decreased body weight by decreasing appetite, without any marked changes in liver enzyme concentrations. PMID:25774603

  11. The renal response to electrical stimulation of renal efferent sympathetic nerves in the anaesthetized greyhound.

    PubMed

    Poucher, S M; Karim, F

    1991-03-01

    1. The effect of direct electrical stimulation of the renal efferent nerves upon renal haemodynamics and function was studied in greyhounds anaesthetized with chloralose and artificially ventilated. The left kidney was neurally and vascularly isolated, and perfused with blood from one of the femoral arteries at a constant pressure of 99 +/- 1 mmHg. Renal blood flow was measured with a cannulating electromagnetic flow probe placed in the perfusion circuit, glomerular filtration rate by creatinine clearance, urinary sodium excretion by flame photometry and solute excretion by osmometry. Beta-Adrenergic receptor activation was blocked by the infusion of dl-propranolol (17 micrograms kg-1 min-1). The peripheral ends of the ligated renal nerves were stimulated at 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 Hz. 2. At 0.5 Hz frequency only osmolar excretion was significantly reduced (10.3 +/- 3.2%, P less than 0.05, n = 6). Reductions in sodium excretion (53.6 +/- 8.5%, P less than 0.01, n = 6) and water excretion (26.9 +/- 8.0%, P less than 0.05, n = 6) and further reductions of osmolar excretion (20.7 +/- 3.7%, P less than 0.01, n = 6) were observed at 1.0 Hz; however, these were observed in the absence of significant changes in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate. Significant reductions were observed in glomerular filtration rate at 1.5 Hz (16.3 +/- 4.1%, P less than 0.02, n = 5) and in renal blood flow at 2.0 Hz (13.1 +/- 4.0%, P less than 0.05, n = 5). Further reductions in urine flow and sodium excretion were also observed at these higher frequencies. 3. These results clearly show that significant changes in renal tubular function can occur in the absence of changes in renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate when the renal nerves are stimulated electrically from a zero baseline activity up to a frequency of 1.5 Hz. Higher frequencies caused significant changes in both renal haemodynamics and function. PMID:2023113

  12. A microcontroller-based telemetry system for sympathetic nerve activity and ECG measurement.

    PubMed

    Harada, E; Yonezawa, Y; Caldwell, W M; Hahn, A W

    1999-01-01

    A telemetry system employing a low power 8-bit microcontroller has been developed for chronic unanesthetized small animal studies. The two-channel system is designed for use with animals in shielded cages. Analog signals from implantable ECG and nerve electrodes are converted to an 8-bit serial digital format. This is accomplished by individual 8 bit A/D converters included in the microcontroller, which also has serial I/O port. The converted serial binary code is applied directly to an antenna wire. Therefore, the system does not need to employ a separate transmitter, such as in FM or infrared optical telemeters. The system is used in a shielded animal cage to reduce interference from external radio signals and 60 Hz power line fields. The code is received by a high input impedance amplifier in the cage and is then demodulated. The telemeter is powered by a small 3 V lithium battery, which provides 100 hours of continuous operation. The circuit is constructed on two 25 x 25 mm. printed circuit boards and encapsulated in epoxy, yielding a total volume of 6.25 cc. The weight is 15 g. PMID:11143393

  13. Arterial baroreceptor reflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity following chronic myocardial infarction in male, female, and ovariectomized female rats.

    PubMed

    Pinkham, Maximilian I; Whalley, Gillian A; Guild, Sarah-Jane; Malpas, Simon C; Barrett, Carolyn J

    2015-07-15

    There is controversy regarding whether the arterial baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in heart failure is altered. We investigated the impact of sex and ovarian hormones on changes in the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA following a chronic myocardial infarction (MI). Renal SNA and arterial pressure were recorded in chloralose-urethane anesthetized male, female, and ovariectomized female (OVX) Wistar rats 6-7 wk postsham or MI surgery. Animals were grouped according to MI size (sham, small and large MI). Ovary-intact females had a lower mortality rate post-MI (24%) compared with both males (38%) and OVX (50%) (P < 0.05). Males and OVX with large MI, but not small MI, displayed an impaired ability of the arterial baroreflex to inhibit renal SNA. As a result, the male large MI group (49 ± 6 vs. 84 ± 5% in male sham group) and OVX large MI group (37 ± 3 vs. 75 ± 5% in OVX sham group) displayed significantly reduced arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA (P < 0.05). In ovary-intact females, arterial baroreflex control of normalized renal SNA was unchanged regardless of MI size. In males and OVX there was a significant, positive correlation between left ventricle (LV) ejection fraction and arterial baroreflex range of control of normalized renal SNA, but not absolute renal SNA, that was not evident in ovary-intact females. The current findings demonstrate that the arterial baroreflex control of renal SNA post-MI is preserved in ovary-intact females, and the state of left ventricular dysfunction significantly impacts on the changes in the arterial baroreflex post-MI. PMID:25994953

  14. Circumferential targeted renal sympathetic nerve denervation with preservation of the renal arterial wall using intra-luminal ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Austin; Coleman, Leslie; Sakakura, Kenichi; Ladich, Elena; Virmani, Renu

    2015-03-01

    An intra-luminal ultrasound catheter system (ReCor Medical's Paradise System) has been developed to provide circumferential denervation of the renal sympathetic nerves, while preserving the renal arterial intimal and medial layers, in order to treat hypertension. The Paradise System features a cylindrical non-focused ultrasound transducer centered within a balloon that circulates cooling fluid and that outputs a uniform circumferential energy pattern designed to ablate tissues located 1-6 mm from the arterial wall and protect tissues within 1 mm. RF power and cooling flow rate are controlled by the Paradise Generator which can energize transducers in the 8.5-9.5 MHz frequency range. Computer simulations and tissue-mimicking phantom models were used to develop the proper power, cooling flow rate and sonication duration settings to provide consistent tissue ablation for renal arteries ranging from 5-8 mm in diameter. The modulation of these three parameters allows for control over the near-field (border of lesion closest to arterial wall) and far-field (border of lesion farthest from arterial wall, consisting of the adventitial and peri-adventitial spaces) depths of the tissue lesion formed by the absorption of ultrasonic energy and conduction of heat. Porcine studies have confirmed the safety (protected intimal and medial layers) and effectiveness (ablation of 1-6 mm region) of the system and provided near-field and far-field depth data to correlate with bench and computer simulation models. The safety and effectiveness of the Paradise System, developed through computer model, bench and in vivo studies, has been demonstrated in human clinical studies.

  15. A single oral dose of flavan-3-ols enhances energy expenditure by sympathetic nerve stimulation in mice.

    PubMed

    Kamio, Naoya; Suzuki, Takuma; Watanabe, Yuto; Suhara, Yoshitomo; Osakabe, Naomi

    2016-02-01

    Numerous clinical studies have found that ingestion of chocolate reduces the risk of metabolic syndrome, however, the mechanisms were remain unclear. We have reported that a single dose of a flavan-3-ol fraction derived from cocoa (FL) enhanced energy expenditure (EE) and increased the mRNA expression levels of uncoupling proteins (UCPs) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α), and the protein level of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)α in tissues, along with plasma adrenaline level. In the present study, we examined whether the EE enhancing activity of FL is mediated by adrenergic effect using several adrenalin receptor (AR) blockers. In the first study, mice were butoxamine, as β2AR blocker, with vehicle or 10mg/kg FL orally. We found that pretreatment with butoxamine prevented the increases of EE, the mRNA expression of UCP-3, and phosphorylated AMPKα that were induced in the gastrocnemius muscle of mice by 10mg/kg FL. Secondly, mice were given SR52930, as β3AR blocker. Pretreatment with SR52930 prevented the increases of EE, the mRNA expression of UCP-3, and phosphorylated AMPKα that were induced in the gastrocnemius muscle of mice by 10mg/kg FL. Pretreatment with a combination of both blockers also reduced the increments in mRNA expression levels of UCPs and PGC-1α, however, phosphorylated AMPKα in skeletal muscle was rather increased. These results suggest that the ability of a single oral dose of FL to enhance metabolic activity is mediated by sympathetic nerve system (SNS). PMID:26738802

  16. Angiotensin Type 2 Receptors in the Intermediolateral Cell Column of the Spinal Cord: Negative Regulation of Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Blood Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Jie; Gao, Juan; Parbhu, Karma-Jaya K.; Gao, Lie

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Our previous study demonstrated that AT2R in brainstem nuclei participated in the regulation of sympathetic outflow and cardiovascular function. However, the functional significance of AT2R in the intermediolateral cell column (IML) of the thoracic spinal cord in normal rats remains elusive. We hypothesized that AT2R activation in the IML exert a sympatho-inhibitory effect. METHODS and RESULTS Using Western-blot analysis, immunohistochemical staining and quantitative Real-Time PCR, both AT1R and AT2R expression were detected in the spinal cord. The highest AT2R protein expression was found in the IML, while AT1R expression didn’t display regional differences within the gray matter. Microinjection of AngII into the IML dose-dependently elevated mean blood pressure (MAP, employing a transducer-tipped catheter) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA, using a pair of platinum-iridium recording electrodes), which was completely abolished by Losartan, and attenuated by TEMPOL and apocynin. Activation of AT2R in the IML with CGP42112 evoked hypotension (ΔMAP: −21 ± 4 mmHg) and sympatho-inhibition (RSNA: 73 ± 3% of baseline), which were completely abolished by PD123319 and L-NAME. Blockade of AT2R in the IML with PD123319 significantly increased MAP (11 ± 1 mmHg) and sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA: 133 ± 13 % of baseline). Moreover, PD123319 significantly enhanced the AngII induced pressor response. Furthermore, in isolated IML neurons, CGP42112 treatment augmented potassium current and decreased resting membrane potential by employing whole-cell patch clamp. Conclusion In the normal condition, AT2R in the IML tonically inhibit sympathetic activity through an NO/NOS dependent pathway and subsequent potassium channel activation. PMID:23871345

  17. 4-[18F]fluoro-m-hydroxyphenethylguanidine: A Radiopharmaceutical for Quantifying Regional Cardiac Sympathetic Nerve Density with Positron Emission Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Keun Sam; Jung, Yong-Woon; Gu, Guie; Koeppe, Robert A.; Sherman, Phillip S.; Quesada, Carole A.; Raffel, David M.

    2013-01-01

    4-[18F]fluoro-m-hydroxyphenethylguanidine ([18F]4F-MHPG, [18F]1) is a new cardiac sympathetic nerve radiotracer with kinetic properties favorable for quantifying regional nerve density with PET and tracer kinetic analysis. An automated synthesis of [18F]1 was developed in which the intermediate 4-[18F]fluoro-m-tyramine ([18F]16) was prepared using a diaryliodonium salt precursor for nucleophilic aromatic [18F]fluorination. In PET imaging studies in rhesus macaque monkeys, [18F]1 demonstrated high quality cardiac images with low uptake in lungs and liver. Compartmental modeling of [18F]1 kinetics provided ‘net uptake rate’ constants Ki (mL/min/g wet) and Patlak graphical analysis of [18F]1 kinetics provided Patlak slopes Kp (mL/min/g). In pharmacological blocking studies with the norepinephrine transporter inhibitor desipramine (DMI), each of these quantitative measures declined in a dose-dependent manner with increasing DMI doses. These initial results strongly suggest that [18F]1 can provide quantitative measures of regional cardiac sympathetic nerve density in human hearts using PET. PMID:23965035

  18. Evidence that nerve growth factor dependence of sympathetic neurons for survival in vitro may be determined by levels of cytoplasmic free Ca2+.

    PubMed Central

    Koike, T; Tanaka, S

    1991-01-01

    Developing sympathetic neurons established in the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF) die in vitro after acute withdrawal of NGF. This in vitro model mimics the physiological situation in which neurons die during development or after axotomy when trophic support becomes insufficient. We have previously shown that depolarizing agents including high K+ and cholinergic agonists prevent neuronal death induced by acute deprivation of NGF in vitro. Based on this finding, a Ca2+ set-point hypothesis was proposed for the degree of neuronal dependence on tropic factor in vitro. Here we have examined the validity of this hypothesis by measuring the level of cytoplasmic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) with fura-2 as a probe for monitoring Ca2+. (i) There was a good correlation between cell survival in the absence of NGF and [Ca2+]i levels of young sympathetic neurons (1 week in vitro) chronically exposed to various concentrations of extracellular K+, which shows that 50% survival occurred at approximately 184 nM [Ca2+]i and complete survival, independent of trophic support, occurred at approximately 240 nM [Ca2+]i. (ii) The basal level of [Ca2+]i of sympathetic neurons was relatively low (93.0 +/- 10.5 nM) at days 6-8, then increased with incubation time, and finally reached a plateau level of 241 +/- 7 nM at around week 3, when the neurons became independent of NGF for survival. (iii) Sympathetic neurons maintained in the presence of high or low concentrations of Ca2+ displayed altered trophic dependence. Thus, these findings are consistent with this Ca2+ set-point hypothesis for the degree of NGF dependence of sympathetic neurons for survival in vitro. Images PMID:2023936

  19. Exuberant sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers in nonhealed bone fractures and the generation and maintenance of chronic skeletal pain

    PubMed Central

    Chartier, Stephane R.; Thompson, Michelle L.; Longo, Geraldine; Fealk, Michelle N.; Majuta, Lisa A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal injury is a leading cause of chronic pain and long-term disability worldwide. While most acute skeletal pain can be effectively managed with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opiates, chronic skeletal pain is more difficult to control using these same therapy regimens. One possibility as to why chronic skeletal pain is more difficult to manage over time is that there may be nerve sprouting in non-healed areas of the skeleton that normally receive little (mineralized bone) to no (articular cartilage) innervation. If such ectopic sprouting did occur, it could result in normally nonnoxious loading of the skeleton being perceived as noxious and/or the generation of a neuropathic pain state. To explore this possibility, a mouse model of skeletal pain was generated by inducing a closed fracture of the femur. Examined animals had comminuted fractures and did not fully heal even at 90+ days post fracture. In all mice with nonhealed fractures, exuberant sensory and sympathetic nerve sprouting, an increase in the density of nerve fibers, and the formation of neuroma-like structures near the fracture site were observed. Additionally, all of these animals exhibited significant pain behaviors upon palpation of the nonhealed fracture site. In contrast, sprouting of sensory and sympathetic nerve fibers or significant palpation-induced pain behaviors was never observed in naïve animals. Understanding what drives this ectopic nerve sprouting and the role it plays in skeletal pain may allow a better understanding and treatment of this currently difficult-to-control pain state. PMID:25196264

  20. Renal glucose release during hypoglycemia is partly controlled by sympathetic nerves – a study in pigs with unilateral surgically denervated kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Bischoff, Sabine J; Schmidt, Martin; Lehmann, Thomas; Schwab, Matthias; Matziolis, Georg; Saemann, Alexander; Schiffner, René

    2015-01-01

    Catecholamines are known to increase renal glucose release during hypoglycemia. The specific extent of the contribution of different sources of catecholamines, endocrine delivery via circulation or release from autonomous sympathetic renal nerves, though, is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that sympathetic renal innervation plays a major role in the regulation of renal gluconeogenesis. For this purpose, instrumented adolescent pigs had one kidney surgically denervated while the other kidney served as a control. A hypoglycemic clamp with arterial blood glucose below 2 mmol/L was maintained for 75 min. Arteriovenous blood glucose difference, inulin clearance, p-aminohippurate clearance, and sodium excretion were measured in intervals of 15 min separately for both kidneys. Blood glucose was lowered to 0.84 ± 0.33 mmol/L for 75 min. The side-dependent renal net glucose release (SGN) decreased significantly after the unilateral ablation of renal nerves. In the linear mixed model, renal denervation had a significant inhibitory effect on renal net glucose release (P = 0.036). The SGN of the ablated kidney decreased by 0.02 mmol/min and was equivalent to 43.3 ± 23.2% of the control (nonablated) kidney in the pigs. This allows the conclusion that renal glucose release is partly controlled by sympathetic nerves. This may be relevant in humans as well, and could explain the increased risk of severe hypoglycemia of patients with diabetes mellitus and autonomous neuropathy. The effects of denervation on renal glucose metabolism should be critically taken into account when considering renal denervation as a therapy in diabetic patients. PMID:26564063

  1. Effects of high thoracic epidural anesthesia on atrial electrophysiological characteristics and sympathetic nerve sprouting in a canine model of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shu-sen; Han, Wei; Cao, Yong; Dong, Guo; Zhou, Guo; Li, Wei-min; Gan, Run-tao; Chang, Hui-ying; Wang, Zheng

    2011-05-01

    High thoracic epidural anesthesia (HTEA) blocks the afferent and efferent cardiac sympathetic nerve fibers and may affect atrial electrophysiological characteristics and nerve sprouting in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). In this study, 18 dogs were randomly divided into a control group (n = 6), in which dogs were atrially paced at 400 beats/min for 6 weeks; an HTEA group (n = 6), in which dogs underwent atrial pacing and HTEA for 6 weeks; and a sham-operated group (n = 6), in which dogs underwent the operation but did not receive atrial pacing or HTEA. Electrophysiological examinations were performed in all groups. Cardiac nerves were immunocytochemically stained with anti-growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) and anti-tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) antibodies. The protein expressions of nerve growth factor (NGF), GAP43 and TH in atrial myocardium were also studied by western blot. In addition, the plasma levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and norepinephrine, as well as atrial production of superoxide anion (O(2)(·-)) and malondialdehyde, were measured. In the HTEA group, atrial effective refractory period increased (P < 0.05) and AF maintenance decreased (P < 0.01) significantly compared with the control group. The densities of GAP43-positive nerves and TH-positive nerves were significantly lower in the HTEA group compared with the control group. The protein levels of NGF, GAP43 and TH were also lower in the HTEA group compared with the control group. A significant positive correlation between the expressions of NGF and GAP43 (P < 0.01) was observed. A similar correlation was demonstrated for NGF and TH (P < 0.01) in our study. Furthermore, the plasma levels of CRP and norepinephrine, as well as the amount of O(2)(·-) and malondialdehyde produced from myocardium, decreased in the HTEA group compared with the control group. In conclusion, HTEA inhibited electrical and nerve remodeling and reduced the maintenance of AF in a canine AF model, in which process HTEA

  2. Nucleus tractus solitarii A(2a) adenosine receptors inhibit cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of sympathetic outputs.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2014-02-01

    Previously we have shown that stimulation of inhibitory A1 adenosine receptors located in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) attenuates cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) evoked inhibition of renal, adrenal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Activation of facilitatory A2a adenosine receptors, which dominate over A1 receptors in the NTS, contrastingly alters baseline activity of regional sympathetic outputs: it decreases renal, increases adrenal and does not change lumbar nerve activity. Considering that NTS A2a receptors may facilitate release of inhibitory transmitters we hypothesized that A2a receptors will act in concert with A1 receptors differentially inhibiting regional sympathetic CCR responses (adrenal>lumbar>renal). In urethane/chloralose anesthetized rats (n=38) we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of serotonin 5HT3 receptor agonist, phenylbiguanide, (1-8μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation, blockade or combined blockade and stimulation of NTS A2a adenosine receptors (microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 0.2-20pmol/50nl, ZM-241385 40pmol/100nl or ZM-241385+CGS-21680, respectively). We found that stimulation of A2a adenosine receptors uniformly inhibited the regional sympathetic and hemodynamic reflex responses and this effect was abolished by the selective blockade of NTS A2a receptors. This indicates that A2a receptor triggered inhibition of CCR responses and the contrasting shifts in baseline sympathetic activity are mediated via different mechanisms. These data implicate that stimulation of NTS A2a receptors triggers unknown inhibitory mechanism(s) which in turn inhibit transmission in the CCR pathway when adenosine is released into the NTS during severe hypotension. PMID:24216055

  3. Roles for the sympathetic nervous system, renal nerves, and CNS melanocortin-4 receptor in the elevated blood pressure in hyperandrogenemic female rats

    PubMed Central

    Maranon, Rodrigo; Lima, Roberta; Spradley, Frank T.; do Carmo, Jussara M.; Zhang, Howei; Smith, Andrew D.; Bui, Elizabeth; Thomas, R. Lucas; Moulana, Mohadetheh; Hall, John E.; Granger, Joey P.

    2015-01-01

    Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have hyperandrogenemia and increased prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including elevated blood pressure. We recently characterized a hyperandrogenemic female rat (HAF) model of PCOS [chronic dihydrotestosterone (DHT) beginning at 4 wk of age] that exhibits similar characteristics as women with PCOS. In the present studies we tested the hypotheses that the elevated blood pressure in HAF rats is mediated in part by sympathetic activation, renal nerves, and melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) activation. Adrenergic blockade with terazosin and propranolol or renal denervation reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP by telemetry) in HAF rats but not controls. Hypothalamic MC4R expression was higher in HAF rats than controls, and central nervous system MC4R antagonism with SHU-9119 (1 nmol/h icv) reduced MAP in HAF rats. Taking a genetic approach, MC4R null and wild-type (WT) female rats were treated with DHT or placebo from 5 to 16 wk of age. MC4R null rats were obese and had higher MAP than WT control rats, and while DHT increased MAP in WT controls, DHT failed to further increase MAP in MC4R null rats. These data suggest that increases in MAP with chronic hyperandrogenemia in female rats are due, in part, to activation of the sympathetic nervous system, renal nerves, and MC4R and may provide novel insights into the mechanisms responsible for hypertension in women with hyperandrogenemia such as PCOS. PMID:25695289

  4. Reflex splanchnic nerve stimulation increases levels of proenkephalin A mRNA and proenkephalin A-related peptides in the rat adrenal medulla.

    PubMed Central

    Kanamatsu, T; Unsworth, C D; Diliberto, E J; Viveros, O H; Hong, J S

    1986-01-01

    The effect of reflex splanchnic nerve stimulation on proenkephalin A biosynthesis was investigated in the rat adrenal medulla. Tissue levels of native [Met5]enkephalin-like immunoreactivity (IR) (measured by direct RIA of tissue extracts), cryptic [Met5]enkephalin-like IR (calculated as the increase in [Met5]enkephalin-like IR detected in tissue extracts after sequential digestion with trypsin and carboxypeptidase B), and proenkephalin A mRNA were determined in adrenal medulla from rats sacrificed at various times after a period of insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Two hours of insulin hypoglycemia, which produced intense reflex stimulation of the splanchnic nerves as evidenced by a 55% decrease in the adrenal medulla catecholamine levels, resulted in a 3-fold increase in proenkephalin A mRNA levels in this tissue. The proenkephalin A mRNA levels reached a maximum 15-fold increase over control values 24 hr after this period of hypoglycemic stress and then gradually declined with an approximate half-life of 4 days. Native and cryptic [Met5]enkephalin-like IR had increased 9-fold and 12-fold, respectively, 24 hr after this period of hypoglycemia, and both demonstrated maximum increases of 130-fold and 50-fold, respectively, after 96 hr. Combined pretreatment (i.p. administration) with the ganglionic and muscarinic blocking agents chlorisondamine (5 mg/kg of body weight) and atropine (1 mg/kg) blocked the increase in levels of proenkephalin A mRNA seen in the rat adrenal medulla following insulin hypoglycemia. These data indicate that reflex splanchnic nerve discharge stimulates proenkephalin biosynthesis, probably at the level of gene expression. Images PMID:3538020

  5. Leptin acts in the forebrain to differentially influence baroreflex control of lumbar, renal, and splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity and heart rate.

    PubMed

    Li, Baoxin; Shi, Zhigang; Cassaglia, Priscila A; Brooks, Virginia L

    2013-04-01

    Although leptin is known to increase sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), we tested the hypothesis that leptin also enhances baroreflex control of SNA and heart rate (HR). Using α-chloralose anesthetized male rats, mean arterial pressure (MAP), HR, lumbar SNA (LSNA), splanchnic SNA (SSNA), and renal SNA (RSNA) were recorded before and for 2 hours after lateral cerebroventricular leptin or artificial cerebrospinal fluid administration. Baroreflex function was assessed using a 4-parameter sigmoidal fit of HR and SNA responses to slow ramp (3-5 minutes) changes in MAP, induced by intravenous infusion of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. Leptin (3 μg) increased (P<0.05) basal LSNA, SSNA, RSNA, HR, and MAP, and the LSNA, SSNA, RSNA, and HR baroreflex maxima. Leptin also increased gain of baroreflex control of LSNA and RSNA, but not of SSNA or HR. The elevations in HR were eliminated by pretreatment with methscopalamine, to block parasympathetic nerve activity; however, after cardiac sympathetic blockade with atenolol, leptin still increased basal HR and MAP and the HR baroreflex maximum and minimum. Leptin (1.5 μg) also increased LSNA and enhanced LSNA baroreflex gain and maximum, but did not alter MAP, HR, or the HR baroreflex. Lateral cerebroventricular artificial cerebrospinal fluid had no effects. Finally, to test whether leptin acts in the brain stem, leptin (3 μg) was infused into the 4th ventricle; however, no significant changes were observed. In conclusion, leptin acts in the forebrain to differentially influence baroreflex control of LSNA, RSNA, SSNA, and HR, with the latter action mediated via suppression of parasympathetic nerve activity. PMID:23424232

  6. High Vascular Tone of Mouse Femoral Arteries In Vivo Is Determined by Sympathetic Nerve Activity Via α1A- and α1D-Adrenoceptor Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Hema; Fisher, Steven A.; Wier, Withrow G.

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Determining the role of vascular receptors in vivo is difficult and not readily accomplished by systemic application of antagonists or genetic manipulations. Here we used intravital microscopy to measure the contributions of sympathetic receptors, particularly α1-adrenoceptor subtypes, to contractile activation of femoral artery in vivo. Experimental approach Diameter and intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) in femoral arteries were determined by intravital fluorescence microscopy in mice expressing a Myosin Light Chain Kinase (MLCK) based calcium-calmodulin biosensor. Pharmacological agents were applied locally to the femoral artery to determine the contributions of vascular receptors to tonic contraction and [Ca2+]i,. Key results In the anesthetized animal, femoral arteries were constricted to a diameter equal to 54% of their passive diameter (i.e. tone = 46%). Of this total basal tone, 16% was blocked by RS79948 (0.1 µM) and thus attributable to α2-adrenoceptors. A further 46% was blocked by prazosin (0.1 µM) and thus attributable to α1-adrenoceptors. Blockade of P2X and NPY1 receptors with suramin (0.5 mM) and BIBP3226 (1.0 µM) respectively, reduced tone by a further 22%, leaving 16% of basal tone unaffected at these concentrations of antagonists. Application of RS100329 (α1A-selective antagonist) and BMY7378 (α1D-selective) decreased tone by 29% and 26%, respectively, and reduced [Ca2+]i. Chloroethylclonidine (1 µM preferential for α1B-) had no effect. Abolition of sympathetic nerve activity (hexamethonium, i.p.) reduced basal tone by 90%. Conclusion and Implications Tone of mouse femoral arteries in vivo is almost entirely sympathetic in origin. Activation of α1A- and α1D-adrenoceptors elevates [Ca2+]i and accounts for at least 55% of the tone. PMID:23776582

  7. Excitation of afferent fibres in the cardiac sympathetic nerves induced by coronary occlusion and injection of bradykinin. The influence of acetylsalicylic acid and dipyron.

    PubMed

    Vogt, A; Vetterlein, F; dal Ri, H; Schmidt, G

    1979-05-01

    Afferent impulse activity was recorded in single fibres of the inferior cardiac sympathetic nerve of the cat. When the descending branch of the left coronary artery was ligated for 60 sec an enhancement of afferent impulses was recorded. Elevations in discharge frequency were also induced by injecting bradykinin, epinephrine, and isoprenaline or by general hypoxia due to interruption of the artificial ventilation. When these procedures were after pretreatment with the analgesic agents, acetylsalicylic acid or dipyron a reduction in spike discharge was observed only with bradykinin after application of acetylsalicylic acid. No influence of these pretreatments on the effects of coronary occlusion, general hypoxia and injection of epinephrine and isoprenaline could be observed. These results suggest that bradykinin does not predominate as mediator substance in eliciting ischemic heart pain. PMID:485722

  8. Inter-Individual Responses to Experimental Muscle Pain: Baseline Physiological Parameters Do Not Determine Whether Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity Increases or Decreases During Pain

    PubMed Central

    Kobuch, Sophie; Fazalbhoy, Azharuddin; Brown, Rachael; Macefield, Vaughan G.

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that there are inter-individual differences in the cardiovascular responses to experimental muscle pain, which are consistent over time: intramuscular infusion of hypertonic saline, causing pain lasting ~60 min, increases muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA)—as well as blood pressure and heart rate—in certain subjects, but decrease it in others. Here, we tested the hypothesis that baseline physiological parameters (resting MSNA, heart rate, blood pressure, heart rate variability) determine the cardiovascular responses to long-lasting muscle pain. MSNA was recorded from the common peroneal nerve, together with heart rate and blood pressure, during a 45-min intramuscular infusion of hypertonic saline solution into the tibialis anterior of 50 awake human subjects (25 females and 25 males). Twenty-four subjects showed a sustained increase in mean amplitude of MSNA (160.9 ± 7.3%), while 26 showed a sustained decrease (55.1 ± 3.5%). Between the increasing and decreasing groups there were no differences in baseline MSNA (19.0 ± 1.5 vs. 18.9 ± 1.2 bursts/min), mean BP (88.1 ± 5.2 vs. 88.0 ± 3.8 mmHg), HR (74.7 ± 2.0 vs. 72.8 ± 1.8 beats/min) or heart rate variability (LF/HF 1.8 ± 0.2 vs. 2.2 ± 0.3). Furthermore, neither sex nor body mass index had any effect on whether MSNA increased or decreased during tonic muscle pain. We conclude that the measured baseline physiological parameters cannot account for the divergent sympathetic responses during tonic muscle pain. PMID:26733786

  9. Inter-Individual Responses to Experimental Muscle Pain: Baseline Physiological Parameters Do Not Determine Whether Muscle Sympathetic Nerve Activity Increases or Decreases During Pain.

    PubMed

    Kobuch, Sophie; Fazalbhoy, Azharuddin; Brown, Rachael; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2015-01-01

    We have previously reported that there are inter-individual differences in the cardiovascular responses to experimental muscle pain, which are consistent over time: intramuscular infusion of hypertonic saline, causing pain lasting ~60 min, increases muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA)-as well as blood pressure and heart rate-in certain subjects, but decrease it in others. Here, we tested the hypothesis that baseline physiological parameters (resting MSNA, heart rate, blood pressure, heart rate variability) determine the cardiovascular responses to long-lasting muscle pain. MSNA was recorded from the common peroneal nerve, together with heart rate and blood pressure, during a 45-min intramuscular infusion of hypertonic saline solution into the tibialis anterior of 50 awake human subjects (25 females and 25 males). Twenty-four subjects showed a sustained increase in mean amplitude of MSNA (160.9 ± 7.3%), while 26 showed a sustained decrease (55.1 ± 3.5%). Between the increasing and decreasing groups there were no differences in baseline MSNA (19.0 ± 1.5 vs. 18.9 ± 1.2 bursts/min), mean BP (88.1 ± 5.2 vs. 88.0 ± 3.8 mmHg), HR (74.7 ± 2.0 vs. 72.8 ± 1.8 beats/min) or heart rate variability (LF/HF 1.8 ± 0.2 vs. 2.2 ± 0.3). Furthermore, neither sex nor body mass index had any effect on whether MSNA increased or decreased during tonic muscle pain. We conclude that the measured baseline physiological parameters cannot account for the divergent sympathetic responses during tonic muscle pain. PMID:26733786

  10. Cardiac Sympathetic Denervation in 6-OHDA-Treated Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Joers, Valerie; Dilley, Kristine; Rahman, Shahrose; Jones, Corinne; Shultz, Jeanette; Simmons, Heather; Emborg, Marina E.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac sympathetic neurodegeneration and dysautonomia affect patients with sporadic and familial Parkinson's disease (PD) and are currently proposed as prodromal signs of PD. We have recently developed a nonhuman primate model of cardiac dysautonomia by iv 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Our in vivo findings included decreased cardiac uptake of a sympathetic radioligand and circulating catecholamines; here we report the postmortem characterization of the model. Ten adult rhesus monkeys (5–17 yrs old) were used in this study. Five animals received 6-OHDA (50 mg/kg iv) and five were age-matched controls. Three months post-neurotoxin the animals were euthanized; hearts and adrenal glands were processed for immunohistochemistry. Quantification of immunoreactivity (ir) of stainings was performed by an investigator blind to the treatment group using NIH ImageJ software (for cardiac bundles and adrenals, area above threshold and optical density) and MBF StereoInvestigator (for cardiac fibers, area fraction fractionator probe). Sympathetic cardiac nerve bundle analysis and fiber area density showed a significant reduction in global cardiac tyrosine hydroxylase-ir (TH; catecholaminergic marker) in 6-OHDA animals compared to controls. Quantification of protein gene protein 9.5 (pan-neuronal marker) positive cardiac fibers showed a significant deficit in 6-OHDA monkeys compared to controls and correlated with TH-ir fiber area. Semi-quantitative evaluation of human leukocyte antigen-ir (inflammatory marker) and nitrotyrosine-ir (oxidative stress marker) did not show significant changes 3 months post-neurotoxin. Cardiac nerve bundle α-synuclein-ir (presynaptic protein) was reduced (trend) in 6-OHDA treated monkeys; insoluble proteinase-K resistant α-synuclein (typical of PD pathology) was not observed. In the adrenal medulla, 6-OHDA monkeys had significantly reduced TH-ir and aminoacid decarboxylase-ir. Our results confirm that systemic 6-OHDA dosing to nonhuman primates

  11. Clinical Benefits of Systemic Chemotherapy for Patients with Metastatic Pheochromocytomas or Sympathetic Extra-Adrenal Paragangliomas: Insights from the Largest Single Institutional Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Ramirez, Montserrat; Feng, Lei; Habra, Mouhammed A.; Rich, Thereasa; Dickson, Paxton V.; Perrier, Nancy; Phan, Alexandria; Waguespack, Steven; Patel, Shreyaskumar; Jimenez, Camilo

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical benefits of systemic chemotherapy for patients with metastatic pheochromocytomas or sympathetic paragangliomas by assessing reduction in tumor size, blood pressure, and improvement in overall survival. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients with metastatic pheochromocytomas-sympathetic paragangliomas who had received chemotherapy at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Results Clinical benefit and overall survival (OS) were assessed. Of fifty-four patients treated with chemotherapy, fifty-two were evaluable for response. Seventeen (33%) experienced a response, defined as decreased or normalized blood pressure/decreased number and dosage of antihypertensive medications and/or reduced tumor size after the first chemotherapy regimen. The median OS time was 6.4 years (95 confidence interval (CI): 5.2–16.4) for responders and 3.7 (95% CI: 3.0–7.5) years for non-responders. Of patients who had synchronous metastatic disease, a positive response at 1 year after the start of chemotherapy was associated with a trend toward a longer overall survival (log-rank test, P-value =0.095). In a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model, the effect of response to chemotherapy on overall survival was significant (hazard ratio=0.22, 95% confidence interval: 0.05–1.0; P-value = 0.05). All responders had been treated with dacarbazine and cyclophosphamide. Vincristine was included for 14 responders and doxorubicin was included for 12 responders. We could not identify clinical factors that predicted response to chemotherapy. Conclusion Chemotherapy may decrease tumor size and facilitate blood pressure control in about 33% of patients with metastatic pheochromocytoma-sympathetic paraganglioma. These patients exhibit a longer survival. PMID:22006217

  12. Adrenal Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... What is adrenal insufficiency? Did you know? The adrenal glands, located on top of the kidneys, make hormones ... body functions. The outer layer (cortex) of the adrenal glands makes three types of steroid hormones. In adrenal ...

  13. Sympathetic nerve activity in normal and cystic follicles from isolated bovine ovary: local effect of beta-adrenergic stimulation on steroid secretion.

    PubMed

    Paredes, Alfonso H; Salvetti, Natalia R; Diaz, Ariel E; Dallard, Bibiana E; Ortega, Hugo H; Lara, Hernan E

    2011-01-01

    Cystic ovarian disease (COD) is an important cause of abnormal estrous behavior and infertility in dairy cows. COD is mainly observed in high-yielding dairy cows during the first months post-partum, a period of high stress. We have previously reported that, in lower mammals, stress induces a cystic condition similar to the polycystic ovary syndrome in humans and that stress is a definitive component in the human pathology. To know if COD in cows is also associated with high sympathetic activity, we studied isolated small antral (5 mm), preovulatory (10 mm) and cystic follicles (25 mm). Cystic follicles which present an area 600 fold greater compared with preovulatory follicles has only 10 times less concentration of NE as compared with small antral and preovulatory follicles but they had 10 times more NE in follicular fluid, suggesting a high efflux of neurotransmitter from the cyst wall. This suggestion was reinforced by the high basal release of recently taken-up 3H-NE found in cystic follicles. While lower levels of beta-adrenergic receptor were found in cystic follicles, there was a heightened response to the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol and to hCG, as measured by testosterone secretion. There was however an unexpected capacity of the ovary in vitro to produce cortisol and to secrete it in response to hCG but not to isoproterenol. These data suggest that, during COD, the bovine ovary is under high sympathetic nerve activity that in addition to an increased response to hCG in cortisol secretion could participate in COD development. PMID:21575217

  14. elPBN neurons regulate rVLM activity through elPBN-rVLM projections during activation of cardiac sympathetic afferent nerves.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhi-Ling; Longhurst, John C; Tjen-A-Looi, Stephanie C; Fu, Liang-Wu

    2016-08-01

    The external lateral parabrachial nucleus (elPBN) within the pons and rostral ventrolateral medulla (rVLM) contributes to central processing of excitatory cardiovascular reflexes during stimulation of cardiac sympathetic afferent nerves (CSAN). However, the importance of elPBN cardiovascular neurons in regulation of rVLM activity during CSAN activation remains unclear. We hypothesized that CSAN stimulation excites the elPBN cardiovascular neurons and, in turn, increases rVLM activity through elPBN-rVLM projections. Compared with controls, in rats subjected to microinjection of retrograde tracer into the rVLM, the numbers of elPBN neurons double-labeled with c-Fos (an immediate early gene) and the tracer were increased after CSAN stimulation (P < 0.05). The majority of these elPBN neurons contain vesicular glutamate transporter 3. In cats, epicardial bradykinin and electrical stimulation of CSAN increased the activity of elPBN cardiovascular neurons, which was attenuated (n = 6, P < 0.05) after blockade of glutamate receptors with iontophoresis of kynurenic acid (Kyn, 25 mM). In separate cats, microinjection of Kyn (1.25 nmol/50 nl) into the elPBN reduced rVLM activity evoked by both bradykinin and electrical stimulation (n = 5, P < 0.05). Excitation of the elPBN with microinjection of dl-homocysteic acid (2 nmol/50 nl) significantly increased basal and CSAN-evoked rVLM activity. However, the enhanced rVLM activity induced by dl-homocysteic acid injected into the elPBN was reversed following iontophoresis of Kyn into the rVLM (n = 7, P < 0.05). These data suggest that cardiac sympathetic afferent stimulation activates cardiovascular neurons in the elPBN and rVLM sequentially through a monosynaptic (glutamatergic) excitatory elPBN-rVLM pathway. PMID:27225950

  15. Calibrated variability of muscle sympathetic nerve activity during graded head-up tilt in humans and its link with noradrenaline data and cardiovascular rhythms.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Andrea; Bari, Vlasta; De Maria, Beatrice; Esler, Murray; Lambert, Elisabeth; Baumert, Mathias; Porta, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) variability is traditionally computed through a low-pass filtering procedure that requires normalization. We proposed a new beat-to-beat MSNA variability computation that preserves dimensionality typical of an integrated neural discharge (i.e., bursts per unit of time). The calibrated MSNA (cMSNA) variability technique is contrasted with the traditional uncalibrated MSNA (ucMSNA) version. The powers of cMSNA and ucMSNA variabilities in the low-frequency (LF, from 0.04 to 0.15 Hz) band were computed with those of the heart period (HP) of systolic and diastolic arterial pressure (SAP and DAP, respectively) in seven healthy subjects (age, 20-28 years; median, 22 years; 5 women) during a graded head-up tilt. Subjects were sequentially tilted at 0°, 20°, 30°, 40°, and 60° table inclinations. The LF powers of ucMSNA and HP variabilities were expressed in normalized units (LFnu), whereas all remaining spectral markers were expressed in absolute units. We found that 1) the LF power of cMSNA variability was positively correlated with tilt angle, whereas the LFnu power of the ucMSNA series was uncorrelated; 2) the LF power of cMSNA variability was correlated with LF powers of SAP and DAP, LFnu power of HP and noradrenaline concentration, whereas the relationship of the LFnu power of ucMSNA variability to LF powers of SAP and DAP was weaker and that to LFnu power of HP was absent; and 3) the stronger relationship of cMSNA variability to SAP and DAP spectral markers compared with the ucMSNA series was confirmed individually. The cMSNA variability appears to be more suitable in describing sympathetic control in humans than traditional ucMSNA variability. PMID:27009053

  16. Sympathetic nerve activity in normal and cystic follicles from isolated bovine ovary: local effect of beta-adrenergic stimulation on steroid secretion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cystic ovarian disease (COD) is an important cause of abnormal estrous behavior and infertility in dairy cows. COD is mainly observed in high-yielding dairy cows during the first months post-partum, a period of high stress. We have previously reported that, in lower mammals, stress induces a cystic condition similar to the polycystic ovary syndrome in humans and that stress is a definitive component in the human pathology. To know if COD in cows is also associated with high sympathetic activity, we studied isolated small antral (5mm), preovulatory (10mm) and cystic follicles (25mm). Cystic follicles which present an area 600 fold greater compared with preovulatory follicles has only 10 times less concentration of NE as compared with small antral and preovulatory follicles but they had 10 times more NE in follicular fluid, suggesting a high efflux of neurotransmitter from the cyst wall. This suggestion was reinforced by the high basal release of recently taken-up 3H-NE found in cystic follicles. While lower levels of beta-adrenergic receptor were found in cystic follicles, there was a heightened response to the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol and to hCG, as measured by testosterone secretion. There was however an unexpected capacity of the ovary in vitro to produce cortisol and to secrete it in response to hCG but not to isoproterenol. These data suggest that, during COD, the bovine ovary is under high sympathetic nerve activity that in addition to an increased response to hCG in cortisol secretion could participate in COD development. PMID:21575217

  17. The effect of preganglionic nerve stimulation on the accumulation of certain analogues of choline by a sympathetic ganglion.

    PubMed Central

    Collier, B; Ilson, D

    1977-01-01

    1. Cat superior cervical ganglia were perfused with a Krebs solution containing 10(-6) M [3H]homocholine (2-hydroxypropyl-trimethylammonium) or 10(-5) M [14C]triethylcholine (2-hydroxyethyl-triethylammonium). Preganglionic nerve stimulation (20 Hz) increased the accumulation of homocholine (3-2-fold) and of triethylcholine (2-1-fold). This increased accumulation during stimulation was not the result of increased metabolism. 2. The increased accumulation of homocholine or triethylcholine induced by pregnaglionic nerve stimulation was not reduced by tubocurarine or by atropine, but it was blocked by choline and by hemicholinium. These results suggested that preganglionic nerve stimulation increased choline analogue accumulation into cholinergic nerve terminals. 3. The increased accumulation of homocholine or of triethylcholine induced by preganglionic nerve stimulation was reduced when the Ca2+ concentration was reduced and was abolished in the absence of Ca2+. However, changes in the Mg2+ concentration which depressed acetylcholine (ACh) release by amounts comparable to those induced by altered Ca2+ concentrations did not alter the uptake of homocholine or triethylcholine. It is concluded that the uptake of choline analogues is not regulated by transmitter release but that stimulation increases the uptake of the choline analogues by a Ca2+-dependent mechanism. 4. The accumulation of ACh by ganglia perfused with a Krebs solution containing choline and high MgSO4 (18 mM) was measured. The ACh content of these ganglia did not increase, although choline transport presumably exceeded that necessary for ACh synthesis to replace released ACh. It is concluded that choline transport does not limit ACh synthesis in ganglia. PMID:839464

  18. Intragastric injection of Lactobacillus casei strain Shirota suppressed spleen sympathetic activation by central corticotrophin-releasing factor or peripheral 2-deoxy-d-glucose in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Tanida, Mamoru; Takada, Mai; Kato-Kataoka, Akito; Kawai, Mitsuhisa; Miyazaki, Kouji; Shibamoto, Toshishige

    2016-04-21

    Intragastric (IG) administration of probiotic strain Lactobacillus casei Shirota (LcS) decreases the sympathetic nerve outflow of anesthetized rats in a tissue-specific manner. In the present study, we examined the effects of IG administration of LcS on sympathetic activation induced by an intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and an intravenous (IV) injection of 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2DG) or interleukin (IL)-1β in urethane-anesthetized rats. The IG administration of LcS differently affected the stimulatory responses of sympathetic nerve outflow to CRF. LcS suppressed the increase in splenic sympathetic nerve activity (Spleen-SNA), induced by central CRF, in a dose-dependent manner; however, it did not alter adrenal sympathetic nervous activity (ASNA). In contrast, LcS did not affect spleen-SNA and ASNA following an IV injection of IL-1β. On the other hand, IG administration of LcS suppressed the activation of ASNA following an IV injection of 2DG. These findings suggest that the suppression of central CRF-induced sympathetic activation by LcS is tissue-specific. Moreover, it can suppress the 2DG-induced sympathetic activation. Furthermore, we found that stomach-specific vagotomy attenuates the suppressive effect of LcS on CRF-mediated spleen-SNA activation. Thus, the present study suggests that LcS administered to the stomach may act on the afferent vagal nerve and send afferent signals to the brain to regulate efferent SNA induced by sympathetic stimulators. PMID:26971699

  19. An assessment of sympathetic function in isolated tissues from mice given nerve-growth-factor antiserum and 6-hydroxydopamine

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, I. E.; Kirk, Jennifer A.; Kneen, Barbara; Large, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    1. Experiments were done on isolated tissues from mice injected with 0·9% w/v NaCl solution (saline), 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), nerve-growth-factor antiserum (NGF-As) or a combination of these agents (NGF-As+6-OHDA). 2. Fluorescence histochemistry of vasa deferentia showed clear differences between each of the treatments but no such distinction was possible in cardiac ventricle or intestine. 3. Compared with controls, the chronotropic responses of atria to field stimulation were reduced by all three treatments in the order NGF-As<6-OHDAnerve stimulation was reduced in the NGF-As group, whilst preparations from the two groups given 6-OHDA usually gave a motor response which was blocked by atropine. 6. None of the treatments employed in these experiments caused complete sympathectomy although 6-OHDA alone or in combination with NGF-As produced a more pronounced effect than NGF-As alone and the relative ineffectiveness of the latter is discussed. The implications of the motor response after 6-OHDA in ileum when the nerves were stimulated is considered in the light of the cholinergic link hypothesis. PMID:4723797

  20. Severing corneal nerves in one eye induces sympathetic loss of immune privilege and promotes rejection of future corneal allografts placed in either eye.

    PubMed

    Paunicka, K J; Mellon, J; Robertson, D; Petroll, M; Brown, J R; Niederkorn, J Y

    2015-06-01

    Less than 10% of corneal allografts undergo rejection even though HLA matching is not performed. However, second corneal transplants experience a threefold increase in rejection, which is not due to prior sensitization to histocompatibility antigens shared by the first and second transplants since corneal grafts are selected at random without histocompatibility matching. Using a mouse model of penetrating keratoplasty, we found that 50% of the initial corneal transplants survived, yet 100% of the subsequent corneal allografts (unrelated to the first graft) placed in the opposite eye underwent rejection. The severing of corneal nerves that occurs during surgery induced substance P (SP) secretion in both eyes, which disabled T regulatory cells that are required for allograft survival. Administration of an SP antagonist restored immune privilege and promoted graft survival. Thus, corneal surgery produces a sympathetic response that permanently abolishes immune privilege of subsequent corneal allografts, even those placed in the opposite eye and expressing a completely different array of foreign histocompatibility antigens from the first corneal graft. PMID:25872977

  1. Insulin increases sympathetic nerve activity in part by suppression of tonic inhibitory neuropeptide Y inputs into the paraventricular nucleus in female rats.

    PubMed

    Cassaglia, Priscila A; Shi, Zhigang; Brooks, Virginia L

    2016-07-01

    Following binding to receptors in the arcuate nucleus (ArcN), insulin increases sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and baroreflex control of SNA via a pathway that includes the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). Previous studies in males indicate that the sympathoexcitatory response is mediated by α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH), which binds to PVN melanocortin type 3/4 receptors (MC3/4R). The present study was conducted in α-chloralose-anesthetized female rats to test the hypothesis that suppression of inhibitory neuropeptide Y (NPY) inputs to the PVN is also involved. In support of this, blockade of PVN NPY Y1 receptors with BIBO 3304 (NPY1x), ArcN insulin nanoinjections, and PVN NPY1x followed by ArcN insulin each increased lumbar SNA (LSNA) and its baroreflex regulation similarly. Moreover, prior PVN injections of NPY blocked the sympathoexcitatory effects of ArcN insulin. Finally, PVN nanoinjections of the MC3/4R inhibitor SHU9119 prevented both the acute (15 min) and longer, more slowly developing (60 min), increases in LSNA in response to ArcN insulin. In conclusion, in females, ArcN insulin increases LSNA, in part, by suppressing tonic PVN NPY inhibition, which unmasks excitatory α-MSH drive of LSNA. Moreover, the steadily increasing rise in LSNA induced by ArcN insulin is also dependent on PVN MC3/4R. PMID:27122366

  2. Differential effects of enalapril-felodipine versus enalapril-lercanidipine combination drug treatment on sympathetic nerve traffic and metabolic profile in obesity-related hypertension.

    PubMed

    Seravalle, Gino; Brambilla, Gianmaria; Pizzalla, Daniela Prata; Casati, Anna; Riva, Marta; Cuspidi, Cesare; Bombelli, Michele; Mancia, Giuseppe; Grassi, Guido

    2016-03-01

    Scanty information is available on the effects of combination drug treatment based on an ACE inhibitor and a calcium channel blocker on the neurometabolic alterations characterizing obesity-related hypertension (OHT). After 2-week run-in with enalapril (20 mg), 36 OHTs were randomized according to a double-blind crossover design to a combination therapy with either lercanidipine 10 mg (L) or felodipine extended release 5 mg (F), each lasting 8 weeks. Measurements included clinic and ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and heart rate, homeostasis model assessment index, plasma norepinephrine, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Patients with uncontrolled BP were then uptitrated to 20 mg/d (L) and 10 mg/d (F) combined with enalapril 20 mg, respectively, for further 8 weeks. For similar BP reductions, enalapril-lercanidipine (EL) caused norepinephrine and MSNA increases significantly less pronounced than those seen with enalapril-felodipine, the lesser sympathoexcitation observed with EL being coupled with a significant improvement in homeostasis model assessment index. This was the case also when L and F were uptitrated in the combination. In OHT, at variance from enalapril-felodipine, EL combination is almost entirely devoid of any major sympathoexcitatory effect and is associated with an improvement in insulin sensitivity. PMID:26831124

  3. Noradrenaline synthesis after sympathetic nerve activation in rat atria and its dependence on calcium but not CAM kinase II and protein kinases A or C.

    PubMed Central

    Kotsonis, P.; Binko, J.; Majewski, H.

    1996-01-01

    1. The biosynthesis of noradrenaline following sympathetic nerve activation was investigated in rat atria. In particular the time course of noradrenaline synthesis changes, the relationship of changes in synthesis to transmitter release and the possible roles of second messengers and protein kinases were examined. 2. Rat atria incubated with the precursor [3H]-tyrosine synthesized [3H]-noradrenaline. Synthesis was enhanced following pulsatile electrical field stimulation (3 Hz for 5 min) with the bulk of the increase occurring in the first 45 min after the commencement of electrical stimulation. In separate experiments rat atria were pre-incubated with [3H]-noradrenaline and the radioactive outflow in response to electrical field stimulation (3 Hz for 5 min) was taken as an index of noradrenaline release. 3. Stimulation-induced (S-I) noradrenaline synthesis was significantly correlated to S-I noradrenaline release for a variety of procedures which modulate noradrenaline release by mechanisms altering Ca2+ entry into the neurone (r2 = 0.99): those which decreased release: tetrodotoxin (0.3 microM), Ca(2+)-free medium, lowering the frequency of nerve activation to 1 Hz, and those which increased release, tetraethylammonium (0.3 mM), phentolamine (1 microM) and the combination of phentolamine (1 microM) and adenosine (10 microM). On the strength of this relationship we suggest that Ca2+ entry is a determining factor in S-I synthesis changes rather than the amount of noradrenaline released. Indeed the reduction in noradrenaline release with the calmodulin-dependent protein (CAM) kinase II inhibitor KN-62 (10 microM) which acts subsequent to Ca2+ entry, did not affect S-I synthesis. 4. The cell permeable cyclic AMP analogue, 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (BrcAMP, 90 and 270 microM), dose-dependently increased basal [3H]-noradrenaline synthesis in unstimulated rat atria. This effect was antagonized by the selective protein kinase A (PKA) antagonist, Rp-8

  4. Enhanced sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex in rats with heart failure induced by adriamycin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujuan; Zhang, Feng; Sun, Haijian; Zhou, Yebo; Han, Ying

    2012-11-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex is enhanced in rats with chronic heart failure (CHF) induced by coronary artery ligation and contributes to the over-excitation of sympathetic activity. We sought to determine whether sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced in adriamycin-induced CHF and whether angiotensin II (Ang II) in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was involved in enhancing sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex. Heart failure was induced by intraperitoneal injection of adriamycin for six times during 2 weeks (15 mg/kg). Six weeks after the first injection, the rats underwent anesthesia with urethane and α-chloralose. After vagotomy and baroreceptor denervation, cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex was evaluated by renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure (MAP) response to epicardial application of capsaicin (1.0 nmol). The response of MAP to ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium in conscious rats was performed to evaluate sympathetic activity. The renal sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced in adriamycin rats and the maximum depressor response of MAP induced by hexamethonium was significantly greater in adriamycin rats than that in control rats. Bilateral PVN microinjection of angiotensin II (Ang II) caused larger responses of the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex, baseline renal sympathetic nerve activity and MAP in adriamycin rats than control rats. These results indicated that both sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced and Ang II in the PVN was involved in the enhanced sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex in rats with adriamycin-induced heart failure. PMID:23554781

  5. Enhanced sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex in rats with heart failure induced by adriamycin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shujuan; Zhang, Feng; Sun, Haijian; Zhou, Yebo; Han, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Our previous studies have shown that the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex is enhanced in rats with chronic heart failure (CHF) induced by coronary artery ligation and contributes to the over-excitation of sympathetic activity. We sought to determine whether sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced in adriamycin-induced CHF and whether angiotensin II (Ang II) in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was involved in enhancing sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex. Heart failure was induced by intraperitoneal injection of adriamycin for six times during 2 weeks (15 mg/kg). Six weeks after the first injection, the rats underwent anesthesia with urethane and α-chloralose. After vagotomy and baroreceptor denervation, cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex was evaluated by renal sympathetic nerve activity and mean arterial pressure (MAP) response to epicardial application of capsaicin (1.0 nmol). The response of MAP to ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium in conscious rats was performed to evaluate sympathetic activity. The renal sympathetic nerve activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced in adriamycin rats and the maximum depressor response of MAP induced by hexamethonium was significantly greater in adriamycin rats than that in control rats. Bilateral PVN microinjection of angiotensin II (Ang II) caused larger responses of the cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex, baseline renal sympathetic nerve activity and MAP in adriamycin rats than control rats. These results indicated that both sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex were enhanced and Ang II in the PVN was involved in the enhanced sympathetic activity and cardiac sympathetic afferent reflex in rats with adriamycin-induced heart failure. PMID:23554781

  6. GPCRs of adrenal chromaffin cells & catecholamines: The plot thickens.

    PubMed

    Lymperopoulos, Anastasios; Brill, Ava; McCrink, Katie A

    2016-08-01

    The circulating catecholamines (CAs) epinephrine (Epi) and norepinephrine (NE) derive from two major sources in the whole organism: the sympathetic nerve endings, which release NE on effector organs, and the chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla, which are cells that synthesize, store and release Epi (mainly) and NE. All of the Epi in the body and a significant amount of circulating NE derive from the adrenal medulla. The secretion of CAs from adrenal chromaffin cells is regulated in a complex way by a variety of membrane receptors, the vast majority of which are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including adrenergic receptors (ARs), which act as "presynaptic autoreceptors" in this regard. There is a plethora of CA-secretagogue signals acting on these receptors but some of them, most notably the α2ARs, inhibit CA secretion. Over the past few years, however, a few new proteins present in chromaffin cells have been uncovered to participate in CA secretion regulation. Most prominent among these are GRK2 and β-arrestin1, which are known to interact with GPCRs regulating receptor signaling and function. The present review will discuss the molecular and signaling mechanisms by which adrenal chromaffin cell-residing GPCRs and their regulatory proteins modulate CA synthesis and secretion. Particular emphasis will be given to the newly discovered roles of GRK2 and β-arrestins in these processes and particular points of focus for future research will be highlighted, as well. PMID:26851510

  7. Plasma Catecholamines (CA) and Gene Expression of CA Biosynthetic Enzymes in Adrenal Medulla and Sympathetic Ganglia of Rats Exposed to Single or Repeated Hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrak, J.; Jurani, M.; Baranovska, M.; Hapala, I.; Frollo, I.; Kvetnansky, R.

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate plasma epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE) levels in blood collected directly during a single or 8-times repeated centrifugation at hypergravity 4G, using remote controlled equipment. Plasma EPI levels showed a huge hypergravity-induced increase. After the last blood collection during hypergravity, the centrifuge was turned off and another blood sampling was performed immediately after the centrifuge decelerated and stopped (10 min). In these samples plasma EPI showed significantly lower levels compared to centrifugation intervals. Plasma NE levels showed none or small changes. Repeated exposure to hypergravity 4G (8 days for 60 min) eliminated the increase in plasma EPI levels at the 15 min interval but did not markedly affect plasma NE levels. To explain these findings we measured mRNA levels of CA biosynthetic enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) in the adrenal medulla (AM) and stellate ganglia (SG) of rats exposed to continuous hypergravity (2G) up to 6 days. In AM, TH, DBH and PNMT mRNA levels were significantly increased in intervals up to 3 days, however, after 6 day hypergravity exposure, no significant elevation was found. In SG, no significant changes in gene expression of CA enzymes were seen both after a single or repeated hypergravity. Thus, our data show that hypergravity highly activates the adrenomedullary system, whereas the sympathoneural system is not significantly changed. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that during repeated or continuous exposure of the organism to hypergravity the adrenomedullary system is adapted, whereas sympathoneural system is not affected.

  8. Search for a cardiac nociceptor: stimulation by bradykinin of sympathetic afferent nerve endings in the heart of the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, D G; Coleridge, H M; Coleridge, J C; Nerdrum, T

    1980-01-01

    1. We have examined the effect of bradykinin on impulse traffic in sympathetic afferent fibres from the heart, great vessels and pleura, and have attempted to identify cardiac nociceptors that on the basis of their functional characteristics might have a role in the initiation of cardiac pain. 2. In anaesthetized cats, we recorded afferent impulses from 'single-fibre' slips of the left 2nd--5th thoracic rami communicantes and associated chain, and selected fibres arising from endings in the heart, great vessels, pericardium and pleura. We applied bradykinin solution (0 . 1--1 . 0 microgram/ml.) locally to the site of the ending; we also injected bradykinin (0 . 3--1 . 0 microgram/kg) into the left atrium. 3. Afferent endings excited by bradykinin (159 of 191 tested) were of two types. The larger group (140) were primarily mechanoreceptors with A delta of C fibres (mean conduction velocity, 7 . 5 +/- 0 . 6 m/sec). They were very sensitive to light touch. Those located in the heart, great vessels or overlying pleura had a cardiac rhythm of discharge and were stimulated by an increase in blood pressure or cardiac volume. 4. Bradykinin increased mechanoreceptor firing from 0 . 7 +/- to 5 . 0 +/- 0 . 3 (mean +/- S.E. of mean) impulses/sec. Some endings appeared to be stimulated directly by bradykinin, others sensitized by it so that they responded more vigorously to the pulsatile mechanical stimulation associated with the cardiac cycle. 5. The smaller group of eighteen endings, of which ten were in the left ventricle, were primarily chemosensitive. Most had C fibres, a few had A delta fibres (mean conduction velocity, 2 . 3 +/- 0 . 7 m/sec). They were insensitive to light touch. With one exception they never fired with a cardiac rhythm, and even large increases in aortic or left ventricular pressure had little effect on impulse frequency. 6. Chemosensitive endings were stimulated by bradykinin, impulse activity increasing from 0 . 6 to 15 . 6 +/- 1 . 3 impulses/sec and

  9. Severe hemorrhage attenuates cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via NTS adenosine receptors.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; Li, Cailian; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2014-09-15

    Selective stimulation of inhibitory A1 and facilitatory A2a adenosine receptor subtypes located in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) powerfully inhibits cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) control of regional sympathetic outputs via different mechanisms: direct inhibition of glutamate release and facilitation of an inhibitory neurotransmitter release, respectively. However, it remains unknown whether adenosine naturally released into the NTS has similar inhibitory effects on the CCR as the exogenous agonists do. Our previous study showed that adenosine is released into the NTS during severe hemorrhage and contributes to reciprocal changes of renal (decreases) and adrenal (increases) sympathetic nerve activity observed in this setting. Both A1 and A2a adenosine receptors are involved. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that, during severe hemorrhage, CCR control of the two sympathetic outputs is attenuated by adenosine naturally released into the NTS. We compared renal and adrenal sympathoinhibitory responses evoked by right atrial injections of 5HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (2-8 μg/kg) under control conditions, during hemorrhage, and during hemorrhage preceded by blockade of NTS adenosine receptors with bilateral microinjections of 8-(p-sulfophenyl) theophylline (1 nmol/100 nl) in urethane/chloralose anesthetized rats. CCR-mediated inhibition of renal and adrenal sympathetic activity was significantly attenuated during severe hemorrhage despite reciprocal changes in the baseline activity levels, and this attenuation was removed by bilateral blockade of adenosine receptors in the caudal NTS. This confirmed that adenosine endogenously released into the NTS has a similar modulatory effect on integration of cardiovascular reflexes as stimulation of NTS adenosine receptors with exogenous agonists. PMID:25063794

  10. Spatial and activity-dependent catecholamine release in rat adrenal medulla under native neuronal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Kyle; Zarkua, Georgy; Chan, Shyue-An; Sridhar, Arun; Smith, Corey

    2016-09-01

    Neuroendocrine chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla in rat receive excitatory synaptic input through anterior and posterior divisions of the sympathetic splanchnic nerve. Upon synaptic stimulation, the adrenal medulla releases the catecholamines, epinephrine, and norepinephrine into the suprarenal vein for circulation throughout the body. Under sympathetic tone, catecholamine release is modest. However, upon activation of the sympathoadrenal stress reflex, and increased splanchnic firing, adrenal catecholamine output increases dramatically. Moreover, specific stressors can preferentially increase release of either epinephrine (i.e., hypoglycemia) or norepinephrine (i.e., cold stress). The mechanism for this stressor-dependent segregated release of catecholamine species is not yet fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that stimulation of either division of the splanchnic selects for epinephrine over norepinephrine release. We introduce an ex vivo rat preparation that maintains native splanchnic innervation of the adrenal gland and we document experimental advantages and limitations of this preparation. We utilize fast scanning cyclic voltammetry to detect release of both epinephrine and norepinephrine from the adrenal medulla, and report that epinephrine and norepinephrine release are regulated spatially and in a frequency-dependent manner. We provide data to show that epinephrine is secreted preferentially from the periphery of the medulla and exhibits a higher threshold and steeper stimulus-secretion function than norepinephrine. Elevated stimulation of the whole nerve specifically enhances epinephrine release from the peripheral medulla. Our data further show that elimination of either division from stimulation greatly attenuated epinephrine release under elevated stimulation, while either division alone can largely support norepinephrine release. PMID:27597763

  11. Asthma Pregnancy Alters Postnatal Development of Chromaffin Cells in the Rat Adrenal Medulla

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Zhao; Zou, Ye-Qiang; Zou, Jun-Tao; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Feng, Jun-Tao

    2011-01-01

    Background Adrenal neuroendocrine plays an important role in asthma. The activity of the sympathoadrenal system could be altered by early life events. The effects of maternal asthma during pregnancy on the adrenal medulla of offspring remain unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aims to explore the influence of maternal asthma during pregnancy on the development and function of adrenal medulla in offspring from postnatal day 3 (P3) to postnatal day 60 (P60). Asthmatic pregnant rats (AP), nerve growth factor (NGF)-treated pregnant rats (NP) and NGF antibody-treated pregnant rats (ANP) were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA); NP and ANP were treated with NGF and NGF antibody respectively. Offspring rats from the maternal group were divided into four groups: offspring from control pregnant rats (OCP), offspring from AP (OAP), offspring from NP (ONP), and offspring from ANP (OANP). The expressions of phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) protein in adrenal medulla were analyzed. The concentrations of epinephrine (EPI), corticosterone and NGF in serum were measured. Adrenal medulla chromaffin cells (AMCC) were prone to differentiate into sympathetic nerve cells in OAP and ONP. Both EPI and PNMT were decreased in OAP from P3 to P14, and then reached normal level gradually from P30 to P60, which were lower from birth to adulthood in ONP. Corticosterone concentration increased significantly in OAP and ONP. Conclusion/Significance Asthma pregnancy may promote AMCC to differentiate into sympathetic neurons in offspring rats and inhibit the synthesis of EPI, resulting in dysfunction of bronchial relaxation. PMID:21647384

  12. Isolation, characterization, and differentiation of progenitor cells from human adult adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Santana, Magda M; Chung, Kuei-Fang; Vukicevic, Vladimir; Rosmaninho-Salgado, Joana; Kanczkowski, Waldemar; Cortez, Vera; Hackmann, Klaus; Bastos, Carlos A; Mota, Alfredo; Schrock, Evelin; Bornstein, Stefan R; Cavadas, Cláudia; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika

    2012-11-01

    Chromaffin cells, sympathetic neurons of the dorsal ganglia, and the intermediate small intensely fluorescent cells derive from a common neural crest progenitor cell. Contrary to the closely related sympathetic nervous system, within the adult adrenal medulla a subpopulation of undifferentiated progenitor cells persists, and recently, we established a method to isolate and differentiate these progenitor cells from adult bovine adrenals. However, no studies have elucidated the existence of adrenal progenitor cells within the human adrenal medulla. Here we describe the isolation, characterization, and differentiation of chromaffin progenitor cells obtained from adult human adrenals. Human chromaffin progenitor cells were cultured in low-attachment conditions for 10-12 days as free-floating spheres in the presence of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and epidermal growth factor. These primary human chromosphere cultures were characterized by the expression of several progenitor markers, including nestin, CD133, Notch1, nerve growth factor receptor, Snai2, Sox9, Sox10, Phox2b, and Ascl1 on the molecular level and of Sox9 on the immunohistochemical level. In opposition, phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT), a marker for differentiated chromaffin cells, significantly decreased after 12 days in culture. Moreover, when plated on poly-l-lysine/laminin-coated slides in the presence of FGF-2, human chromaffin progenitor cells were able to differentiate into two distinct neuron-like cell types, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)(+)/β-3-tubulin(+) cells and TH(-)/β-3-tubulin(+) cells, and into chromaffin cells (TH(+)/PNMT(+)). This study demonstrates the presence of progenitor cells in the human adrenal medulla and reveals their potential use in regenerative medicine, especially in the treatment of neuroendocrine and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23197690

  13. Isolation, Characterization, and Differentiation of Progenitor Cells from Human Adult Adrenal Medulla

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Magda M.; Chung, Kuei-Fang; Vukicevic, Vladimir; Rosmaninho-Salgado, Joana; Kanczkowski, Waldemar; Cortez, Vera; Hackmann, Karl; Bastos, Carlos A.; Mota, Alfredo; Schrock, Evelin; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2012-01-01

    Chromaffin cells, sympathetic neurons of the dorsal ganglia, and the intermediate small intensely fluorescent cells derive from a common neural crest progenitor cell. Contrary to the closely related sympathetic nervous system, within the adult adrenal medulla a subpopulation of undifferentiated progenitor cells persists, and recently, we established a method to isolate and differentiate these progenitor cells from adult bovine adrenals. However, no studies have elucidated the existence of adrenal progenitor cells within the human adrenal medulla. Here we describe the isolation, characterization, and differentiation of chromaffin progenitor cells obtained from adult human adrenals. Human chromaffin progenitor cells were cultured in low-attachment conditions for 10–12 days as free-floating spheres in the presence of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and epidermal growth factor. These primary human chromosphere cultures were characterized by the expression of several progenitor markers, including nestin, CD133, Notch1, nerve growth factor receptor, Snai2, Sox9, Sox10, Phox2b, and Ascl1 on the molecular level and of Sox9 on the immunohistochemical level. In opposition, phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT), a marker for differentiated chromaffin cells, significantly decreased after 12 days in culture. Moreover, when plated on poly-l-lysine/laminin-coated slides in the presence of FGF-2, human chromaffin progenitor cells were able to differentiate into two distinct neuron-like cell types, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)+/β-3-tubulin+ cells and TH−/β-3-tubulin+ cells, and into chromaffin cells (TH+/PNMT+). This study demonstrates the presence of progenitor cells in the human adrenal medulla and reveals their potential use in regenerative medicine, especially in the treatment of neuroendocrine and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23197690

  14. Comparative effects of long-acting and short-acting loop diuretics on cardiac sympathetic nerve activity in patients with chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Yae; Kasama, Shu; Toyama, Takuji; Funada, Ryuichi; Takama, Noriaki; Koitabashi, Norimichi; Ichikawa, Shuichi; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Matsumoto, Naoya; Sato, Yuichi; Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Objective Short-acting loop diuretics are known to enhance cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA) in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). The effects of two loop diuretics—long-acting azosemide and short-acting furosemide—on CSNA were evaluated using 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy in patients with CHF. Methods The present study was a subanalysis of our previously published study, which had reported that serial 123I-MIBG studies were the most useful prognostic indicator in patients with CHF. Patients with CHF (n=208, left ventricular ejection fraction <45%) but no history of cardiac events for at least 5 months prior to the study were identified according to their histories of acute decompensated heart failure requiring hospitalisation. Patients underwent 123I-MIBG scintigraphy immediately before hospital discharge and at a 6-month follow-up. The delayed % denervation, delayed heart/mediastinum count (H/M) ratio and washout rate (WR) were determined using 123I-MIBG scintigraphy. A total of 108 patients were selected, and propensity score matching was used to compare patients treated with either oral azosemide (n=54) or furosemide (n=54). Results After treatment, 123I-MIBG scintigraphic parameters improved in both groups. However, the degree of change in % denervation was −13.8±10.5 in the azosemide group and −5.7±12.7 in the furosemide group (p<0.01), the change in H/M ratio was 0.20±0.16 in the azosemide group and 0.06±0.19 in the furosemide group (p<0.01), and the change in WR was −11.3±9.2% in the azosemide group and −3.0±12.7% in the furosemide group (p<0.01). Moreover, multivariate analysis showed an independent and significant positive relationship between furosemide and δ-WR from hospital discharge to 6 months after treatment in patients with CHF (p=0.001). Conclusions These findings indicate that azosemide suppresses CSNA compared with furosemide in patients with CHF. Trial registration number UMIN000000626

  15. Adrenal glands

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002219.htm Adrenal glands To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The adrenal glands are two triangle-shaped glands. One gland is ...

  16. Hierarchical recruitment of the sympathetic and parasympathetic limbs of the baroreflex in normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Simms, Annabel E; Paton, Julian F R; Pickering, Anthony E

    2007-03-01

    The arterial baroreflex acts to buffer acute changes in blood pressure by reciprocal modulation of sympathetic and parasympathetic activity that controls the heart and vasculature. We have examined the baroreflex pressure-function curves for changes in heart rate and non-cardiac sympathetic nerve activity (SNA, thoracic chain T8-12) in artificially perfused in situ rat preparations. We found that the non-cardiac SNA baroreflex is active over a lower range of pressures than the cardiac baroreflex (threshold 66 +/- 1 mmHg versus 82 +/- 5 mmHg and mid-point 77 +/- 3 versus 87 +/- 4 mmHg, respectively, P < 0.05, n = 6). This can manifest as a complete dissociation of the baroreflex limbs at low pressures. This difference between the cardiac and non-cardiac SNA baroreflex is also seen in end-organ sympathetic outflows (adrenal and renal nerves). Recordings of the cardiac vagal (parasympathetic) and the inferior cardiac (sympathetic) nerves identify the cardiac parasympathetic baroreflex component as being active over a higher range of pressures. This difference in the operating range of the baroreflex-function curves is exaggerated in the spontaneously hypertensive rat where the cardiac component has selectively reset by 20-25 mmHg to a higher pressure range (threshold of 104 +/- 4 mmHg and mid-point 113 +/- 4, n = 6). The difference in the pressure-function curves for the cardiac versus the vascular baroreflex indicates that there is a hierarchical recruitment of the output limbs of the baroreflex with a sympathetic predominance at lower arterial pressures. PMID:17170043

  17. The role of tonic preganglionic neuron firing in the turnover of the large dense-cored vesicle store in sympathetic preganglionic nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Weldon, P; Bachoo, M; Polosa, C

    1994-09-01

    Large dense-cored vesicles are transported centrifugally in the cervical sympathetic trunk and are depleted in a calcium-dependent manner from synaptic boutons of the cat superior cervical ganglion during orthodromic stimulation at 20-40 Hz [P. Weldon et al. (1993) Neuroscience 55, 1045-1054]. In the present study, we tested in awake cats whether the normal tonic firing of the sympathetic preganglionic neuron contributes to the turnover of large dense-cored vesicles in synaptic boutons of the superior cervical ganglion. Tetrodotoxin was applied with a mini-osmotic pump to one cervical sympathetic trunk, while vehicle alone was applied to the contralateral cervical sympathetic trunk, for two, four or seven days. The appearance of Horner syndrome ipsilateral to the tetrodotoxin application demonstrated block of action potential propagation. Both superior cervical ganglia were excised and processed for electron microscopy. The number of large dense-cored vesicles per bouton cross-section was higher in the ganglion with tetrodotoxin-treated input than in the control. The content at four days was higher than at two days; the content at seven days was similar to that at four days. The number of lysosomes per bouton profile also increased in the ganglion with tetrodotoxin-treated input. No changes were observed in size of bouton profiles, number of boutons or of synapses per grid square and length of the presynaptic densities in the ganglion with tetrodotoxin-treated input.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7830896

  18. [Nerve growth factor and the physiology of pain: the relationships among interoception, sympathetic neurons and the emotional response indicated by the molecular pathophysiology of congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis].

    PubMed

    Indo, Yasuhiro

    2015-05-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a neurotrophic factor essential for the survival and maintenance of neurons. Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in NTRK1, which encodes a receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkA, for NGF. Mutations in NTRK1 cause the selective loss of NGF-dependent neurons, including both NGF-dependent primary afferents and sympathetic postganglionic neurons, in otherwise intact systems. The NGF-dependent primary afferents are thinly myelinated AΔ or unmyelinated C-fibers that are dependent on the NGF-TrkA system during development. NGF-dependent primary afferents are not only nociceptive neurons that transmit pain and temperature sensation, but also are polymodal receptors that play essential roles for interoception by monitoring various changes in the physiological status of all tissues in the body. In addition, they contribute to various inflammatory processes in acute, chronic and allergic inflammation. Together with sympathetic postganglionic neurons, they maintain the homeostasis of the body and emotional responses via interactions with the brain, immune and endocrine systems. Pain is closely related to emotions that accompany physical responses induced by systemic activation of the sympathetic nervous system. In contrast to a negative image of emotions in daily life, Antonio Damasio proposed the 'Somatic Marker Hypothesis', wherein emotions play critical roles in the decision-making and reasoning processes. According to this hypothesis, reciprocal communication between the brain and the body-proper are essential for emotional responses. Using the pathophysiology of CIPA as a foundation, this article suggests that NGF-dependent neurons constitute a part of the neuronal network required for homeostasis and emotional responses, and indicates that this network plays important roles in mediating the reciprocal communication between the brain and the body-proper. PMID:26211335

  19. Isolation of neural crest derived chromaffin progenitors from adult adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Chung, Kuei-Fang; Sicard, Flavie; Vukicevic, Vladimir; Hermann, Andreas; Storch, Alexander; Huttner, Wieland B; Bornstein, Stefan R; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika

    2009-10-01

    Chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla are neural crest-derived cells of the sympathoadrenal lineage. Unlike the closely-related sympathetic neurons, a subpopulation of proliferation-competent cells exists even in the adult. Here, we describe the isolation, expansion, and in vitro characterization of proliferation-competent progenitor cells from the bovine adrenal medulla. Similar to neurospheres, these cells, when prevented from adherence to the culture dish, grew in spheres, which we named chromospheres. These chromospheres were devoid of mRNA specific for smooth muscle cells (MYH11) or endothelial cells (PECAM1). During sphere formation, markers for differentiated chromaffin cells, such as phenylethanolamine-N-methyl transferase, were downregulated while neural progenitor markers nestin, vimentin, musashi 1, and nerve growth factor receptor, as well as markers of neural crest progenitor cells such as Sox1 and Sox9, were upregulated. Clonal analysis and bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-incorporation analysis demonstrated the self-renewing capacity of chromosphere cells. Differentiation protocols using NGF and BMP4 or dexamethasone induced neuronal or endocrine differentiation, respectively. Electrophysiological analyses of neural cells derived from chromospheres revealed functional properties of mature nerve cells, such as tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium channels and action potentials. Our study provides evidence that proliferation and differentiation competent chromaffin progenitor cells can be isolated from adult adrenal medulla and that these cells might harbor the potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:19609938

  20. Atropine-resistant effects of the muscarinic agonists McN-A-343 and AHR 602 on cardiac performance and the release of noradrenaline from sympathetic nerves of the perfused rabbit heart

    PubMed Central

    Fozard, J.R.; Muscholl, E.

    1974-01-01

    1 The effects of 4-(m-chlorophenylcarbamoyloxy)-2-butynyltrimethylammonium chloride (McN-A-343) and N-benzyl-3-pyrrolidyl acetate methobromide (AHR 602) on cardiac performance and noradrenaline release from terminal sympathetic fibres were measured in isolated perfused hearts of rabbits. 2 In the presence of sufficient atropine to block muscarinic receptors, high concentrations of McN-A-343 and AHR 602 caused no cardiac stimulation and there was no increase in the resting output of noradrenaline into the perfusates. 3 McN-A-343 and AHR 602 increased both the mechanical responses and the transmitter overflow evoked by electrical stimulation of the sympathetic nerves (SNS) but inhibited both parameters during perfusion with 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium (DMPP). The effects were atropine-resistant and qualitatively similar to those seen with cocaine. Hexamethonium inhibited DMPP, but affected neither SNS per se nor the facilitatory effects of McN-A-343 and AHR 602 on SNS. 4 McN-A-343, cocaine and desipramine (but not AHR 602 or hexamethonium) blocked the net cardiac noradrenaline uptake and increased the positive chronotropic effect of noradrenaline. 5 Prior perfusion with concentrations of cocaine and desipramine sufficient to block uptake reduced or abolished the facilitatory effects of both McN-A-343 and AHR 602 on SNS. 6 Cocaine, McN-A-343 and AHR 602 displayed local anaesthetic properties on the guinea-pig wheal and frog nerve plexus tests, and their relative potencies in this respect were similar to those for inhibition of DMPP-evoked transmitter overflow. Hexamethonium did not produce local anaesthesia. 7 The results indicate that the facilitated release of noradrenaline after SNS and the inhibition of release after DMPP produced by McN-A-343 and AHR 602 are the result of their combined local anaesthetic action and inhibition of amine uptake. PMID:4447857

  1. NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the cardiopulmonary chemoreflex control of regional sympathetic outputs via a GABAergic mechanism.

    PubMed

    Minic, Zeljka; O'Leary, Donal S; Scislo, Tadeusz J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine is a powerful central neuromodulator acting via opposing A1 (inhibitor) and A2a (activator) receptors. However, in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), both adenosine receptor subtypes attenuate cardiopulmonary chemoreflex (CCR) sympathoinhibition of renal, adrenal, and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity and attenuate reflex decreases in arterial pressure and heart rate. Adenosine A1 receptors inhibit glutamatergic transmission in the CCR pathway, whereas adenosine A2a receptors most likely facilitate release of an unknown inhibitory neurotransmitter, which, in turn, inhibits the CCR. We hypothesized that adenosine A2a receptors inhibit the CCR via facilitation of GABA release in the NTS. In urethane-chloralose-anesthetized rats (n = 51), we compared regional sympathetic responses evoked by stimulation of the CCR with right atrial injections of the 5-HT3 receptor agonist phenylbiguanide (1-8 μg/kg) before and after selective stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors [microinjections into the NTS of CGS-21680 (20 pmol/50 nl)] preceded by blockade of GABAA or GABAB receptors in the NTS [bicuculline (10 pmol/100 nl) or SCH-50911 (1 nmol/100 nl)]. Blockade of GABAA receptors virtually abolished adenosine A2a receptor-mediated inhibition of the CCR. GABAB receptors had much weaker but significant effects. These effects were similar for the different sympathetic outputs. We conclude that stimulation of NTS adenosine A2a receptors inhibits CCR-evoked hemodynamic and regional sympathetic reflex responses via a GABA-ergic mechanism. PMID:25910812

  2. Netrin-1 controls sympathetic arterial innervation

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Isabelle; Gordon, Emma; Han, Jinah; Cristofaro, Brunella; Broqueres-You, Dong; Liu, Chun; Bouvrée, Karine; Zhang, Jiasheng; del Toro, Raquel; Mathivet, Thomas; Larrivée, Bruno; Jagu, Julia; Pibouin-Fragner, Laurence; Pardanaud, Luc; Machado, Maria J.C.; Kennedy, Timothy E.; Zhuang, Zhen; Simons, Michael; Levy, Bernard I.; Tessier-Lavigne, Marc; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger; Eichmann, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic sympathetic nerves innervate peripheral resistance arteries, thereby regulating vascular tone and controlling blood supply to organs. Despite the fundamental importance of blood flow control, how sympathetic arterial innervation develops remains largely unknown. Here, we identified the axon guidance cue netrin-1 as an essential factor required for development of arterial innervation in mice. Netrin-1 was produced by arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) at the onset of innervation, and arterial innervation required the interaction of netrin-1 with its receptor, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), on sympathetic growth cones. Function-blocking approaches, including cell type–specific deletion of the genes encoding Ntn1 in SMCs and Dcc in sympathetic neurons, led to severe and selective reduction of sympathetic innervation and to defective vasoconstriction in resistance arteries. These findings indicate that netrin-1 and DCC are critical for the control of arterial innervation and blood flow regulation in peripheral organs. PMID:24937433

  3. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Overview What is congenital adrenal hyperplasia? Congenital adrenal hyperplasia, or CAH, is a disorder that affects the adrenal glands. The adrenal ...

  4. Neural control of adrenal medullary and cortical blood flow during hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Breslow, M.J.; Jordan, D.A.; Thellman, S.T.; Traystman, R.J.

    1987-03-01

    Hemorrhagic hypotension produces an increase in adrenal medullary blood flow and a decrease in adrenal cortical blood flow. To determine whether changes in adrenal blood flow during hemorrhage are neurally mediated, the authors compared blood flow responses following adrenal denervation (splanchnic nerve section) with changes in the contralateral, neurally intact adrenal. Carbonized microspheres labeled with /sup 153/Gd, /sup 114/In, /sup 113/Sn, /sup 103/Ru, /sup 95/Nb or /sup 46/Se were used. Blood pressure was reduced and maintained at 60 mmHg for 25 min by hemorrhage into a pressurized bottle system. Adrenal cortical blood flow decreased to 50% of control with hemorrhage in both the intact and denervated adrenal. Adrenal medullary blood flow increased to four times control levels at 15 and 25 min posthemorrhage in the intact adrenal, but was reduced to 50% of control at 3, 5, and 10 min posthemorrhage in the denervated adrenal. In a separate group of dogs, the greater splanchnic nerve on one side was electrically stimulated at 2, 5, or 15 Hz for 40 min. Adrenal medullary blood flow increased 5- to 10-fold in the stimulated adrenal but was unchanged in the contralateral, nonstimulated adrenal. Adrenal cortical blood flow was not affected by nerve stimulation. They conclude that activity of the splanchnic nerve profoundly affects adrenal medullary vessels but not adrenal cortical vessels and mediates the observed increase in adrenal medullary blood flow during hemorrhagic hypotension.

  5. Role of Ca2+ channels in the ability of membrane depolarization to prevent neuronal death induced by trophic-factor deprivation: evidence that levels of internal Ca2+ determine nerve growth factor dependence of sympathetic ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Koike, T; Martin, D P; Johnson, E M

    1989-01-01

    Sympathetic neurons depend on nerve growth factor (NGF) for their survival both in vivo and in vitro; these cells die upon acute deprivation of NGF. We studied the effects of agents that cause membrane depolarization on neuronal survival after NGF deprivation. High-K+ medium (greater than or equal to 33 mM) prevented cell death; the effect of K+ was dose-dependent (EC50 = 21 mM). The protection by high K+ was abolished either by withdrawal of extracellular Ca2+ or by preloading the cells with a Ca2+ chelator. The involvement of Ca2+ flux across membranes in high-K+ saving of NGF-deprived neurons was also supported by experiments using Ca2+-channel antagonists and agonists. The Ca2+ antagonists nimodipine and nifedipine effectively blocked the survival-promoting effect of high K+. The Ca2+ agonists Bay K 8644 and (S)-202-791 did not by themselves save neurons from NGF deprivation but did strongly augment the effect of high K+; EC50 was shifted from 21 mM to 13 mM. These data suggest that dihydropyridine-sensitive L-type Ca2+ channels play a major role in the high-K+ saving. The depolarizing agents choline (EC50 = 1 mM) and carbamoylcholine (EC50 = 1 microM), acting through nicotinic cholinergic receptors, also rescued NGF-deprived neurons. The saving effect of nicotinic agonists was not blocked by withdrawal of extracellular Ca2+ but was counteracted by a chelator of intracellular Ca2+, suggesting the possible involvement of Ca2+ release from internal stores. Based on these findings we propose a "Ca2+ set-point hypothesis" for the degree of trophic-factor dependence of sympathetic neurons in vitro. Images PMID:2548215

  6. Adrenal myelolipoma.

    PubMed

    Cyran, K M; Kenney, P J; Memel, D S; Yacoub, I

    1996-02-01

    In 1905, Gierke [1] first described the occurrence of a tumor in the adrenal composed of mature fat and mixed myeloid and erythroid cells, subsequently termed "formations myelolipomatoses" by Oberling [2] in 1929. PMID:8553954

  7. Seasonal changes in the activity of the adrenal medulla of Viscacha (Lagostomus maximus maximus).

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Hugo; Filippa, Verónica Palmira; Penissi, Alicia; Fogal, Teresa; Domínguez, Susana; Piezzi, Ramón Salvador; Scardapane, Luis

    2013-07-01

    Animals living in nontropical climates modify their physiology and behavior to adapt to seasonal environmental changes. Part of this adaptation involves the release of catecholamine from sympathetic nerve endings and the adrenal medulla, which play a major role in regulating energy balance. The aim of this work was to investigate whether adult male viscachas in their natural habitat exhibits structural changes in the adrenal medulla during the annual seasonal cycle. In August-September, chromaffin granules revealed ultrastructural changes suggestive of piecemeal degranulation. Quantitative morphometric analysis by transmission electron microscopy showed a significantly lower percentage of resting chromaffin granules and a higher percentage of altered granules and empty containers in August-September (late winter) compared to February-March (late summer), suggesting an increased secretory process of catecholamines in August-September. The mechanism of piecemeal degranulation might amplify this process, encouraging the adaptive response to winter environmental conditions. Tissue levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine (analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography) changed throughout the year, reaching maximum values in February-March and minimum values in August-September. These results demonstrate morphological and biochemical seasonal variations of the adrenal medulla, suggesting that epinephrine might promote energy mobilization, which allow the Lagostomus to cope with adverse environmental conditions and thus to survive during winter season. PMID:23630194

  8. L-NAME raises systolic blood pressure in the pithed rat by a direct adrenal epinephrine releasing action.

    PubMed

    Elayan, Hamzeh H; Kennedy, Brian P; Ziegler, Michael G

    2002-04-21

    It is generally thought that inhibition of nitric oxide synthase leads to blood pressure elevation largely through reduction in vascular levels of the vasodilator nitric oxide. However, there are several reports suggesting that NO synthase inhibitors cause adrenal epinephrine (E) release by both central and peripheral mechanisms. We investigated the role of adrenal E in the pressor effects of the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME in the pithed rat to help distinguish central from peripherally mediated actions. L-NAME (10 mg/kg) raised both systolic and diastolic BP by about 30 mm Hg (P < .01) in the absence of exogenous electrical stimulation of sympathetic nerves. During stimulation at 10 V and frequencies of 1 or 2 Hz, systolic BP was about 70 mm Hg higher in L-NAME treated rats than in drug free stimulated rats. This enhancement of systolic BP by L-NAME was less pronounced at 5 or 10 Hz stimulation frequencies. Following these types of electrical stimulations of pithed rats, both plasma norepinephrine (NE) and E levels were dramatically elevated above resting plasma levels. L-NAME pretreatment of these electrically stimulated rats increased plasma E levels by an additional 60% and decreased NE by 18%. Acute adrenalectomy dramatically reduced plasma E levels and abolished the ability of L-NAME to enhance the pressor effect of sympathetic stimulation. In contrast, acute adrenalectomy of unstimulated pithed rats did not significantly reduce the pressor response to L-NAME. We conclude that adrenal E release may mediate much of the systolic pressor response of L-NAME in the stimulated pithed rat, but the magnitude of this effect varies with stimulation frequency. Since pithing disrupts central pathways, this induction of adrenal E release by L-NAME is a peripheral effect. PMID:12173412

  9. Usefulness of galvanic skin reflex monitor in CT-guided thoracic sympathetic blockade for palmar hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Uchino, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Seiichi; Miura, Hitoshi; Hirabayashi, Go; Nishiyama, Takahisa; Ohta, Takashi; Ishii, Nagao; Ito, Tatsushi

    2007-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT)-guided thoracic sympathetic blockade with ethanol was performed while monitoring sympathetic nerve activity, with an alternating current (AC) galvanic skin reflex (GSR) monitor, in a patient with palmar hyperhidrosis in whom endoscopic thoracic sympathectomy was impossible because of pleural adhesion. Sweating was suppressed after the thoracic sympathetic blockade, and the monitor showed a significant increase in skin resistance. The effect of sympathetic blockade could be evaluated directly and in real time using a GSR monitor. PMID:17680195

  10. Valsalva maneuver: Insights into baroreflex modulation of human sympathetic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael L.; Eckberg, Dwain L.; Fritsch, Janice M.; Beightol, Larry A.; Ellenbogen, Kenneth A.

    1991-01-01

    Valsalva's maneuver, voluntary forced expiration against a closed glottis, is a well-characterized research tool, used to assess the integrity of human autonomic cardiovascular control. Valsalva straining provokes a stereotyped succession of alternating positive and negative arterial pressure and heart rate changes mediated in part by arterial baroreceptors. Arterial pressure changes result primarily from fluctuating levels of venous return to the heart and changes of sympathetic nerve activity. Muscle sympathetic activity was measured directly in nine volunteers to explore quantitatively the relation between arterial pressure and human sympathetic outflow during pressure transients provoked by controlled graded Valsalva maneuvers. Our results underscore several properties of sympathetic regulation during Valsalva straining. First, muscle sympathetic nerve activity changes as a mirror image of changes in arterial pressure. Second, the magnitude of sympathetic augmentation during Valsalva straining predicts phase 4 arterial pressure elevations. Third, post-Valsalva sympathetic inhibition persists beyond the return of arterial and right atrial pressures to baseline levels which reflects an alteration of the normal relation between arterial pressure and muscle sympathetic activity. Therefore, Valsalva straining may have some utility for investigating changes of reflex control of sympathetic activity after space flight; however, measurement of beat-to-beat arterial pressure is essential for this use. The utility of this technique in microgravity can not be determined from these data. Further investigations are necessary to determine whether these relations are affected by the expansion of intrathoracic blood volume associated with microgravity.

  11. The Human Sympathetic Nervous System Response to Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ertl, Andrew C.; Diedrich, Andre; Paranjape, Sachin Y.; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, Rose Marie; Lane, Lynda D.; Shiavi, Richard; Robertson, David

    2003-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system is an important part of the autonomic (or automatic) nervous system. When an individual stands up, the sympathetic nervous system speeds the heart and constricts blood vessels to prevent a drop in blood pressure. A significant number of astronauts experience a drop in blood pressure when standing for prolonged periods after they return from spaceflight. Difficulty maintaining blood pressure with standing is also a daily problem for many patients. Indirect evidence available before the Neurolab mission suggested the problem in astronauts while in space might be due partially to reduced sympathetic nervous system activity. The purpose of this experiment was to identify whether sympathetic activity was reduced during spaceflight. Sympathetic nervous system activity can be determined in part by measuring heart rate, nerve activity going to blood vessels, and the release of the hormone norepinephrine into the blood. Norepinephrine is a neurotransmitter discharged from active sympathetic nerve terminals, so its rate of release can serve as a marker of sympathetic nervous system action. In addition to standard cardiovascular measurements (heart rate, blood pressure), we determined sympathetic nerve activity as well as norepinephrine release and clearance on four crewmembers on the Neurolab mission. Contrary to our expectation, the results demonstrated that the astronauts had mildly elevated resting sympathetic nervous system activity in space. Sympathetic nervous system responses to stresses that simulated the cardiovascular effects of standing (lower body negative pressure) were brisk both during and after spaceflight. We concluded that, in the astronauts tested, the activity and response of the sympathetic nervous system to cardiovascular stresses appeared intact and mildly elevated both during and after spaceflight. These changes returned to normal within a few days.

  12. Reflex carotid body chemoreceptor control of phrenic sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Bałkowiec, A; Revenko, S; Szulczyk, P

    1993-04-01

    The reflex reaction of phrenic sympathetic neurons to stimulation of carotid body chemoreceptors was tested in chloralose-anesthetized and paralyzed cats with both vago-aortic nerves cut. During systemic hypoxia (animals ventilated with 10% O2 in N2) the sympathetic phrenic nerve activity increased from 100% in the control to 269%. This increase was markedly attenuated after cutting both sinus nerves. Reflex excitatory response in phrenic sympathetic neurons with the latency of 150 msec was evoked by electrical stimulation of the right carotid sinus nerve (3 pulses of 0.2 msec, 333 Hz). The central transmission time of the reflex was about 90 msec. Injecting 0.1 ml of 1 M NaHCO3 saturated with CO2 (in order to activate carotid body chemoreceptors) into the right or left carotid sinus, evoked excitatory responses in sympathetic neurons regardless of the side. The stimulation of carotid body chemoreceptors also increased somatic phrenic nerve activity. The three methods applied to the stimulation of carotid body chemoreceptors produced increase of phrenic nerve sympathetic activity. PMID:8390088

  13. Vagal and sympathetic mechanisms in patients with orthostatic vasovagal syncope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morillo, C. A.; Eckberg, D. L.; Ellenbogen, K. A.; Beightol, L. A.; Hoag, J. B.; Tahvanainen, K. U.; Kuusela, T. A.; Diedrich, A. M.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Autonomic and particularly sympathetic mechanisms play a central role in the pathophysiology of vasovagal syncope. We report direct measurements of muscle sympathetic nerve activity in patients with orthostatic vasovagal syncope. METHODS AND RESULTS: We studied 53 otherwise healthy patients with orthostatic syncope. We measured RR intervals and finger arterial pressures and in 15 patients, peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity before and during passive 60 degree head-up tilt, with low-dose intravenous isoproterenol if presyncope did not develop by 15 minutes. We measured baroreflex gain before tilt with regression of RR intervals or sympathetic bursts on systolic or diastolic pressures after sequential injections of nitroprusside and phenylephrine. Orthostatic vasovagal reactions occurred in 21 patients, including 7 microneurography patients. Presyncopal and nonsyncopal patients had similar baseline RR intervals, arterial pressure, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity. Vagal baroreflex responses were significantly impaired at arterial pressures below (but not above) baseline levels in presyncopal patients. Initial responses to tilt were comparable; however, during the final 200 seconds of tilt, presyncopal patients had lower RR intervals and diastolic pressures than nonsyncopal patients and gradual reduction of arterial pressure and sympathetic activity. Frank presyncope began abruptly with precipitous reduction of arterial pressure, disappearance of muscle sympathetic nerve activity, and RR interval lengthening. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with orthostatic vasovagal reactions have impaired vagal baroreflex responses to arterial pressure changes below resting levels but normal initial responses to upright tilt. Subtle vasovagal physiology begins before overt presyncope. The final trigger of human orthostatic vasovagal reactions appears to be the abrupt disappearance of muscle sympathetic nerve activity.

  14. Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage leading to adrenal crisis

    PubMed Central

    McGowan-Smyth, Sam

    2014-01-01

    A 77-year-old man presented with an acute worsening of chronic back pain. CT showed dense bilateral adrenal glands suggestive of adrenal haemorrhage which was confirmed by MRI. Despite appropriate glucocorticoid replacement for adrenal insufficiency, 7 days after admission this patient suffered an adrenal crisis. Owing to the timely diagnosis, appropriate treatment was given and the patient survived. Large bilateral adrenal haemorrhage however, can lead to cardiovascular collapse and death if not appropriately diagnosed and managed promptly. Despite its rarity, bilateral adrenal haemorrhage should always be considered as a differential for back pain in the setting of an acute illness due to its potentially fatal consequences. PMID:24969071

  15. Increased Catecholamine Secretion from Single Adrenal Chromaffin Cells in DOCA-Salt Hypertension Is Associated with Potassium Channel Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of catecholamine release from single adrenal chromaffin cells isolated from normotensive and DOCA-salt hypertensive rats was investigated. These cells were used as a model for sympathetic nerves to better understand how exocytotic release of catecholamines is altered in this model of hypertension. Catecholamine secretion was evoked by local application of acetylcholine (1 mM) or high K+ (70 mM), and continuous amperometry was used to monitor catecholamine secretion as an oxidative current. The total number of catecholamine molecules secreted from a vesicle, the total number of vesicles fusing and secreting, and the duration of secretion in response to a stimulus were all significantly greater for chromaffin cells from hypertensive rats as compared to normotensive controls. The greater catecholamine secretion from DOCA-salt cells results, at least in part, from functionally impaired large conductance, Ca2+-activated (BK) and ATP-sensitive K+ channels. This work reveals that there is altered vesicular release of catecholamines from these cells (and possibly from perivascular sympathetic nerves) and this may contribute to increased vasomotor tone in DOCA-salt hypertension. PMID:23937098

  16. Venous endothelin guides sympathetic innervation of the developing mouse heart

    PubMed Central

    Manousiouthakis, Eleana; Mendez, Monica; Garner, Madeline C.; Exertier, Prisca; Makita, Takako

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for establishing correct target innervation during organ development are largely unknown. Sympathetic nerves traverse or follow blood vessels to reach their end-organs, suggesting the existence of vascular guidance cues that direct axonal extension. The sinoatrial node and the ventricle of the heart receive sympathetic innervation from the stellate ganglia (STG). Here we show that STG axons follow veins, specifically the superior vena cavae and sinus venosus, to reach these targets. We find that the election of these routes is determined by venous endothelium-derived endothelin-1, acting through its specific receptor Ednra expressed within a subpopulation of STG neurons. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Edn1-Ednra signaling is essential for functional regulation of the heart by sympathetic nerves. Our findings present venous Edn1 as a sympathetic guidance cue, and show how axon guidance mechanisms are coordinated with end-organ morphogenesis. PMID:24875861

  17. Olfactory stimulatory with grapefruit and lavender oils change autonomic nerve activity and physiological function.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Katsuya; Niijima, Akira; Horii, Yuko; Shen, Jiao; Tanida, Mamoru

    2014-10-01

    This review summarizes the effects of olfactory stimulation with grapefruit and lavender oils on autonomic nerve activity and physiological function. Olfactory stimulation with the scent of grapefruit oil (GFO) increases the activity of sympathetic nerves that innervate white and brown adipose tissues, the adrenal glands, and the kidneys, decreases the activity of the gastric vagal nerve in rats and mice. This results in an increase in lipolysis, thermogenesis, and blood pressure, and a decrease in food intake. Olfactory stimulation with the scent of lavender oil (LVO) elicits the opposite changes in nerve activity and physiological variables. Olfactory stimulation with scent of limonene, a component of GFO, and linalool, a component of LVO, has similar effects to stimulation with GFO and LVO, respectively. The histamine H1-receptor antagonist, diphenhydramine, abolishes all GFO-induced changes in nerve activity and physiological variables, and the hitstamine H3-receptor antagonist, thioperamide, eliminates all LVO-induced changes. Lesions to the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus and anosmic treatment with ZnSO4 also abolish all GFO- and LVO-induced changes. These findings indicate that limonene and linalool might be the active substances in GFO and LVO, and suggest that the suprachiasmatic nucleus and histamine are involved in mediating the GFO- and LVO-induced changes in nerve activity and physiological variables. PMID:25002406

  18. Renal sympathetic baroreflex effects of angiotensin II infusions into the rostral ventrolateral medulla of the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Saigusa, T; Head, G A

    1993-05-01

    1. The effects of local infusion of angiotensin II (AII) into the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) pressor area on the renal sympathetic baroreflex were compared with the excitatory amino acid glutamate in urethane anaesthetized rabbits with chronically implanted renal nerve electrodes. Baroreflex blood pressure-renal nerve activity curves were obtained by intravenous infusion of phenylephrine and nitroprusside before and after treatments. 2. Infusion of 4 pmol/min of AII into the RVLM increased blood pressure by 12 +/- 2 mmHg and transiently increased resting sympathetic nerve activity. The renal sympathetic baroreflex curves were shifted to the right. The upper plateau of the sympathetic reflex increased by 29 +/- 8% (n = 6, P < 0.025). 3. Infusions of glutamate into the RVLM, at a dose which was equipressor to that of AII, also increased resting renal sympathetic nerve activity. In contrast to AII, this increase was maintained throughout the infusion. Glutamate shifted the reflex curve to the right and increased the upper plateau of the sympathetic reflex by 44 +/- 5% without affecting the lower plateau. 4. These results support the suggestion that AII can act at the level of the RVLM pressor area to facilitate baroreflex control of renal sympathetic activity in a similar fashion to that produced by fourth ventricular administration. 5. Thus the RVLM is a likely candidate site for modulation of the renal sympathetic baroreflex. The similarity of the actions of AII to those of glutamate suggest that it may directly excite sympathetic vasomotor cells in this region. PMID:8100748

  19. Sympathetic baroreflex gain in normotensive pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Usselman, Charlotte W.; Skow, Rachel J.; Matenchuk, Brittany A.; Chari, Radha S.; Julian, Colleen G.; Stickland, Michael K.; Davenport, Margie H.

    2015-01-01

    Muscle sympathetic nerve activity is increased during normotensive pregnancy while mean arterial pressure is maintained or reduced, suggesting baroreflex resetting. We hypothesized spontaneous sympathetic baroreflex gain would be reduced in normotensive pregnant women relative to nonpregnant matched controls. Integrated muscle sympathetic burst incidence and total sympathetic activity (microneurography), blood pressure (Finometer), and R-R interval (ECG) were assessed at rest in 11 pregnant women (33 ± 1 wk gestation, 31 ± 1 yr, prepregnancy BMI: 23.5 ± 0.9 kg/m2) and 11 nonpregnant controls (29 ± 1 yr; BMI: 25.2 ± 1.7 kg/m2). Pregnant women had elevated baseline sympathetic burst incidence (43 ± 2 vs. 33 ± 2 bursts/100 heart beats, P = 0.01) and total sympathetic activity (1,811 ± 148 vs. 1,140 ± 55 au, P < 0.01) relative to controls. Both mean (88 ± 3 vs. 91 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.4) and diastolic (DBP) (72 ± 3 vs. 73 ± 2 mmHg, P = 0.7) pressures were similar between pregnant and nonpregnant women, respectively, indicating an upward resetting of the baroreflex set point with pregnancy. Baroreflex gain, calculated as the linear relationship between sympathetic burst incidence and DBP, was reduced in pregnant women relative to controls (−3.7 ± 0.5 vs. −5.4 ± 0.5 bursts·100 heart beats−1·mmHg−1, P = 0.03), as was baroreflex gain calculated with total sympathetic activity (−294 ± 24 vs. −210 ± 24 au·100 heart beats−1·mmHg−1; P = 0.03). Cardiovagal baroreflex gain (sequence method) was not different between nonpregnant controls and pregnant women (49 ± 8 vs. 36 ± 8 ms/mmHg; P = 0.2). However, sympathetic (burst incidence) and cardiovagal gains were negatively correlated in pregnant women (R = −0.7; P = 0.02). Together, these data indicate that the influence of the sympathetic nervous system over arterial blood pressure is reduced in normotensive pregnancy, in terms of both long-term and beat-to-beat regulation of arterial pressure

  20. Adrenal Gland Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... here Home > Types of Cancer > Adrenal Gland Tumor Adrenal Gland Tumor This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Adrenal Gland Tumor. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Adrenal Gland Tumor Introduction Statistics Risk Factors Symptoms and ...

  1. Sympathetic nervous system and inflammation: a conceptual view.

    PubMed

    Jänig, Wilfrid

    2014-05-01

    The peripheral sympathetic nervous system is organized into function-specific pathways that transmit the activity from the central nervous system to its target tissues. The transmission of the impulse activity in the sympathetic ganglia and to the effector tissues is target cell specific and guarantees that the centrally generated command is faithfully transmitted. This is the neurobiological basis of autonomic regulations in which the sympathetic nervous system is involved. Each sympathetic pathway is connected to distinct central circuits in the spinal cord, lower and upper brain stem and hypothalamus. In addition to its conventional functions, the sympathetic nervous system is involved in protection of body tissues against challenges arising from the environment as well as from within the body. This function includes the modulation of inflammation, nociceptors and above all the immune system. Primary and secondary lymphoid organs are innervated by sympathetic postganglionic neurons and processes in the immune tissue are modulated by activity in these sympathetic neurons via adrenoceptors in the membranes of the immune cells (see Bellinger and Lorton, 2014). Are the primary and secondary lymphoid organs innervated by a functionally specific sympathetic pathway that is responsible for the modulation of the functioning of the immune tissue by the brain? Or is this modulation of immune functions a general function of the sympathetic nervous system independent of its specific functions? Which central circuits are involved in the neural regulation of the immune system in the context of neural regulation of body protection? What is the function of the sympatho-adrenal system, involving epinephrine, in the modulation of immune functions? PMID:24525016

  2. Do changes in the coupling between respiratory and sympathetic activities contribute to neurogenic hypertension?

    PubMed

    Zoccal, Daniel B; Paton, Julian F R; Machado, Benedito H

    2009-12-01

    1. It is well known that respiration markedly modulates the sympathetic nervous system. Interactions between pontine and medullary neurons involved in the control of sympathetic and respiratory functions are the main mechanism underlying the respiratory related oscillations in sympathetic nerve activity. 2. Recently, in rats treated with chronic intermittent hypoxia, we demonstrated that alterations in respiratory pattern may drive increased sympathetic outflow and hence the development of systemic hypertension. These experiments, performed in the in situ working heart-brain stem preparation, raise the possibility that enhanced central coupling between respiratory and sympathetic activities could be a potential mechanism underpinning the development and/or the maintenance of neurogenic hypertension. 3. In the present review, we discuss the neural basis of the enhanced entrainment between respiratory and sympathetic neurons in the brain stem that can be induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia and the possible implications of these mechanisms in the genesis of sympathetic overactivity and, consequently, hypertension. PMID:19413588

  3. Sympathetic Hyperinnervation and Inflammatory Cell NGF Synthesis Following Myocardial Infarction in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Wohaib; Jama, Abdi; Donohue, Timothy; Wernli, Gwenaelle; Onyszchuk, Gregory; Al-Hafez, Baraa; Bilgen, Mehmet; Smith, Peter G.

    2006-01-01

    Sympathetic hyperinnervation occurs in human ventricular tissue after myocardial infarction and may contribute to arrhythmias. Aberrant sympathetic sprouting is associated with elevated nerve growth factor (NGF) in many contexts, including ventricular hyperinnervation. However, it is unclear whether cardiomyocytes or other cell types are responsible for increased NGF synthesis. In this study, left coronary arteries were ligated and ventricular tissue examined in rats 1-28 days post-infarction. Infarct and peri-infarct tissue was essentially devoid of sensory and parasympathetic nerves at all time points. However, areas of increased sympathetic nerve density were observed in the peri-infarct zone between post-ligation days 4-14. Hyperinnervation occurred in regions containing accumulations of macrophages and myofibroblasts. To assess whether these inflammatory cells synthesize NGF, sections were processed for NGF in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Both macrophage1 antigen-positive macrophages and α-smooth muscle actin immunoreactive myofibroblasts expressed NGF in areas where they were closely proximate to sympathetic nerves. To investigate whether NGF produced by peri-infarct cells induces sympathetic outgrowth, we co-cultured adult sympathetic ganglia with peri-infarct explants. Neurite outgrowth from sympathetic ganglia was significantly greater at post-ligation days 7-14 as compared to control tissue. Addition of an NGF function-blocking antibody prevented the increased neurite outgrowth induced by peri-infarct tissue. These findings provide evidence that inflammatory cell NGF synthesis plays a causal role in sympathetic hyperinnervation following myocardial infarction. Section: Disease-Related Neuroscience PMID:17084822

  4. The Sympathetic Release Test: A Test Used to Assess Thermoregulation and Autonomic Control of Blood Flow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tansey, E. A.; Roe, S. M.; Johnson, C. J.

    2014-01-01

    When a subject is heated, the stimulation of temperature-sensitive nerve endings in the skin, and the raising of the central body temperature, results in the reflex release of sympathetic vasoconstrictor tone in the skin of the extremities, causing a measurable temperature increase at the site of release. In the sympathetic release test, the…

  5. How Is Adrenal Surgery Performed?

    MedlinePlus

    HOME ADRENAL GLANDS Background Where are the adrenal glands? What do the adrenal glands do? Is this adrenal tumor a genetic problem? Primary hyperaldosteronism (aldosterone-producing tumor) What is primary hyperaldosteronism? Signs ...

  6. Adrenal steroidogenesis and congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Turcu, Adina F; Auchus, Richard J

    2015-06-01

    Adrenal steroidogenesis is a dynamic process, reliant on de novo synthesis from cholesterol, under the stimulation of ACTH and other regulators. The syntheses of mineralocorticoids (primarily aldosterone), glucocorticoids (primarily cortisol), and adrenal androgens (primarily dehydroepiandrosterone and its sulfate) occur in separate adrenal cortical zones, each expressing specific enzymes. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) encompasses a group of autosomal-recessive enzymatic defects in cortisol biosynthesis. 21-Hydroxylase (21OHD) deficiency accounts for more than 90% of CAH cases and, when milder or nonclassic forms are included, 21OHD is one of the most common genetic diseases. PMID:26038201

  7. Adrenal Steroidogenesis and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Turcu, Adina F.; Auchus, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Adrenal steroidogenesis is a dynamic process, reliant on de novo synthesis from cholesterol, under the stimulation of ACTH and other regulators. The syntheses of mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and adrenal androgens occur in separate adrenal cortical zones, each expressing specific enzymes. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) encompasses a group of autosomal recessive enzymatic defects in cortisol biosynthesis. 21-hydroxylase (21OHD) deficiency accounts for over 90% of CAH cases and when milder or nonclassic forms are included, 21OHD is one of the most common genetic diseases. This review discusses in detail the epidemiology, genetics, diagnostic, clinical aspects and management of 21OHD. PMID:26038201

  8. The sympathetic nervous system alterations in human hypertension.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Guido; Mark, Allyn; Esler, Murray

    2015-03-13

    Several articles have dealt with the importance and mechanisms of the sympathetic nervous system alterations in experimental animal models of hypertension. This review addresses the role of the sympathetic nervous system in the pathophysiology and therapy of human hypertension. We first discuss the strengths and limitations of various techniques for assessing the sympathetic nervous system in humans, with a focus on heart rate, plasma norepinephrine, microneurographic recording of sympathetic nerve traffic, and measurements of radiolabeled norepinephrine spillover. We then examine the evidence supporting the importance of neuroadrenergic factors as promoters and amplifiers of human hypertension. We expand on the role of the sympathetic nervous system in 2 increasingly common forms of secondary hypertension, namely hypertension associated with obesity and with renal disease. With this background, we examine interventions of sympathetic deactivation as a mode of antihypertensive treatment. Particular emphasis is given to the background and results of recent therapeutic approaches based on carotid baroreceptor stimulation and radiofrequency ablation of the renal nerves. PMID:25767284

  9. THE SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM ALTERATIONS IN HUMAN HYPERTENSION

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Guido; Mark, Allyn; Esler, Murray

    2015-01-01

    A number of articles have dealt with the importance and mechanisms of the sympathetic nervous system alterations in experimental animal models of hypertension. This review addresses the role of the sympathetic nervous system in the pathophysiology and therapy of human hypertension. We first discuss the strengths and limitations of various techniques for assessing the sympathetic nervous system in humans, with a focus on heart rate, plasma norepinephrine, microneurographic recording of sympathetic nerve traffic, and measurements of radiolabeled norepinephrine spillover. We then examine the evidence supporting the importance of neuroadrenergic factors as “promoters” and “amplifiers” of human hypertension. We expand on the role of the sympathetic nervous system in two increasingly common forms of secondary hypertension, namely hypertension associated with obesity and with renal disease. With this background, we examine interventions of sympathetic deactivation as a mode of antihypertensive treatment. Particular emphasis is given to the background and results of recent therapeutic approaches based on carotid baroreceptor stimulation and radiofrequency ablation of the renal nerves. PMID:25767284

  10. Impaired sympathetic vascular regulation in humans after acute dynamic exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Halliwill, J R; Taylor, J A; Eckberg, D L

    1996-01-01

    1. The reduction in vascular resistance which accompanies acute dynamic exercise does not subside immediately during recovery, resulting in a post-exercise hypotension. This sustained vasodilatation suggests that sympathetic vascular regulation is altered after exercise. 2. Therefore, we assessed the baroreflex control of sympathetic outflow in response to arterial pressure changes, and transduction of sympathetic activity into vascular resistance during a sympatho-excitatory stimulus (isometric handgrip exercise) after either exercise (60 min cycling at 60% peak aerobic power (VO2,peak)) or sham treatment (60 min seated rest) in nine healthy subjects. 3. Both muscle sympathetic nerve activity and calf vascular resistance were reduced after exercise (-29.7 +/- 8.8 and -25.3 +/- 9.1%, both P < 0.05). The baroreflex relation between diastolic pressure and sympathetic outflow was shifted downward after exercise (post-exercise intercept, 218 +/- 38 total integrated activity (heartbeat)-1; post-sham intercept, 318 +/- 51 total integrated activity (heartbeat)-1, P < 0.05), indicating less sympathetic outflow across all diastolic pressures. Further, the relation between sympathetic activity and vascular resistance was attenuated after exercise (post-exercise slope, 0.0031 +/- 0.0007 units (total integrated activity)-1 min; post-sham slope, 0.0100 +/- 0.0033 units (total integrated activity)-1 min, P < 0.05), indicating less vasoconstriction with any increase in sympathetic activity. 4. Thus, both baroreflex control of sympathetic outflow and the transduction of sympathetic activity into vascular resistance are altered after dynamic exercise. We conclude that the vasodilation which underlies post-exercise hypotension results from both neural and vascular phenomena. Images Figure 7 PMID:8866370

  11. Impaired sympathetic vascular regulation in humans after acute dynamic exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halliwill, J. R.; Taylor, J. A.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1996-01-01

    1. The reduction in vascular resistance which accompanies acute dynamic exercise does not subside immediately during recovery, resulting in a post-exercise hypotension. This sustained vasodilatation suggests that sympathetic vascular regulation is altered after exercise. 2. Therefore, we assessed the baroreflex control of sympathetic outflow in response to arterial pressure changes, and transduction of sympathetic activity into vascular resistance during a sympatho-excitatory stimulus (isometric handgrip exercise) after either exercise (60 min cycling at 60% peak aerobic power (VO2,peak)) or sham treatment (60 min seated rest) in nine healthy subjects. 3. Both muscle sympathetic nerve activity and calf vascular resistance were reduced after exercise (-29.7 +/- 8.8 and -25.3 +/- 9.1%, both P < 0.05). The baroreflex relation between diastolic pressure and sympathetic outflow was shifted downward after exercise (post-exercise intercept, 218 +/- 38 total integrated activity (heartbeat)-1; post-sham intercept, 318 +/- 51 total integrated activity (heartbeat)-1, P < 0.05), indicating less sympathetic outflow across all diastolic pressures. Further, the relation between sympathetic activity and vascular resistance was attenuated after exercise (post-exercise slope, 0.0031 +/- 0.0007 units (total integrated activity)-1 min; post-sham slope, 0.0100 +/- 0.0033 units (total integrated activity)-1 min, P < 0.05), indicating less vasoconstriction with any increase in sympathetic activity. 4. Thus, both baroreflex control of sympathetic outflow and the transduction of sympathetic activity into vascular resistance are altered after dynamic exercise. We conclude that the vasodilation which underlies post-exercise hypotension results from both neural and vascular phenomena.

  12. A Sympathetic Neuron Autonomous Role for Egr3-Mediated Gene Regulation in Dendrite Morphogenesis and Target Tissue Innervation

    PubMed Central

    Quach, David H.; Oliveira-Fernandes, Michelle; Gruner, Katherine A.; Tourtellotte, Warren G.

    2013-01-01

    Egr3 is a nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced transcriptional regulator that is essential for normal sympathetic nervous system development. Mice lacking Egr3 in the germline have sympathetic target tissue innervation abnormalities and physiologic sympathetic dysfunction similar to humans with dysautonomia. However, since Egr3 is widely expressed and has pleiotropic function, it has not been clear whether it has a role within sympathetic neurons and if so, what target genes it regulates to facilitate target tissue innervation. Here, we show that Egr3 expression within sympathetic neurons is required for their normal innervation since isolated sympathetic neurons lacking Egr3 have neurite outgrowth abnormalities when treated with NGF and mice with sympathetic neuron-restricted Egr3 ablation have target tissue innervation abnormalities similar to mice lacking Egr3 in all tissues. Microarray analysis performed on sympathetic neurons identified many target genes deregulated in the absence of Egr3, with some of the most significantly deregulated genes having roles in axonogenesis, dendritogenesis, and axon guidance. Using a novel genetic technique to visualize axons and dendrites in a subpopulation of randomly labeled sympathetic neurons, we found that Egr3 has an essential role in regulating sympathetic neuron dendrite morphology and terminal axon branching, but not in regulating sympathetic axon guidance to their targets. Together, these results indicate that Egr3 has a sympathetic neuron autonomous role in sympathetic nervous system development that involves modulating downstream target genes affecting the outgrowth and branching of sympathetic neuron dendrites and axons. PMID:23467373

  13. A sympathetic neuron autonomous role for Egr3-mediated gene regulation in dendrite morphogenesis and target tissue innervation.

    PubMed

    Quach, David H; Oliveira-Fernandes, Michelle; Gruner, Katherine A; Tourtellotte, Warren G

    2013-03-01

    Egr3 is a nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced transcriptional regulator that is essential for normal sympathetic nervous system development. Mice lacking Egr3 in the germline have sympathetic target tissue innervation abnormalities and physiologic sympathetic dysfunction similar to humans with dysautonomia. However, since Egr3 is widely expressed and has pleiotropic function, it has not been clear whether it has a role within sympathetic neurons and if so, what target genes it regulates to facilitate target tissue innervation. Here, we show that Egr3 expression within sympathetic neurons is required for their normal innervation since isolated sympathetic neurons lacking Egr3 have neurite outgrowth abnormalities when treated with NGF and mice with sympathetic neuron-restricted Egr3 ablation have target tissue innervation abnormalities similar to mice lacking Egr3 in all tissues. Microarray analysis performed on sympathetic neurons identified many target genes deregulated in the absence of Egr3, with some of the most significantly deregulated genes having roles in axonogenesis, dendritogenesis, and axon guidance. Using a novel genetic technique to visualize axons and dendrites in a subpopulation of randomly labeled sympathetic neurons, we found that Egr3 has an essential role in regulating sympathetic neuron dendrite morphology and terminal axon branching, but not in regulating sympathetic axon guidance to their targets. Together, these results indicate that Egr3 has a sympathetic neuron autonomous role in sympathetic nervous system development that involves modulating downstream target genes affecting the outgrowth and branching of sympathetic neuron dendrites and axons. PMID:23467373

  14. Adrenal Gland Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    The adrenal glands are small glands located on top of each kidney. They produce hormones that you can't live ... stress and has many other important functions. With adrenal gland disorders, your glands make too much or not ...

  15. Adrenal Gland Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. Most adrenal gland tumors are ... and may not require treatment. Malignant adrenal gland cancers are uncommon. Types of tumors include Adrenocortical carcinoma - ...

  16. Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... adrenal tumors that appear malignant. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal? In the past, ... of procedure and the patients overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain Shorter hospital stay Quicker ...

  17. Adrenal imaging (Part 2): Medullary and secondary adrenal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dhamija, Ekta; Panda, Ananya; Das, Chandan J.; Gupta, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal malignancies can be either primary adrenal tumors or secondary metastases, with metastases representing the most common malignant adrenal lesion. While imaging cannot always clearly differentiate between various adrenal malignancies, presence of certain imaging features, in conjunction with appropriate clinical background and hormonal profile, can suggest the appropriate diagnosis. The second part of the article on adrenal imaging describes adrenal medullary tumors, secondary adrenal lesions, bilateral adrenal lesions, adrenal incidentalomas and provides an algorithmic approach to adrenal lesions based on current imaging recommendations. PMID:25593821

  18. Catecholamine-induced excitation of nociceptors in sympathetically maintained pain.

    PubMed

    Jørum, Ellen; Ørstavik, Kristin; Schmidt, Roland; Namer, Barbara; Carr, Richard W; Kvarstein, Gunnvald; Hilliges, Marita; Handwerker, Hermann; Torebjörk, Erik; Schmelz, Martin

    2007-02-01

    Sympathetically maintained pain could either be mediated by ephaptic interactions between sympathetic efferent and afferent nociceptive fibers or by catecholamine-induced activation of nociceptive nerve endings. We report here single fiber recordings from C nociceptors in a patient with sympathetically maintained pain, in whom sympathetic blockade had repeatedly eliminated the ongoing pain in both legs. We classified eight C-fibers as mechano-responsive and six as mechano-insensitive nociceptors according to their mechanical responsiveness and activity-dependent slowing of conduction velocity (latency increase of 0.5+/-1.1 vs. 7.1+/-2.0 ms for 20 pulses at 0.125 Hz). Two C-fibers were activated with a delay of several seconds following strong endogenous sympathetic bursts; they were also excited for about 3 min following the injection of norepinephrine (10 microl, 0.05%) into their innervation territory. In these two fibers, a prolonged activation by injection of low pH solution (phosphate buffer, pH 6.0, 10 microl) and sensitization of their heat response following prostaglandin E2 injection were recorded, evidencing their afferent nature. Moreover, their activity-dependent slowing was typical for mechano-insensitive nociceptors. We conclude that sensitized mechano-insensitive nociceptors can be activated by endogenously released catecholamines and thereby may contribute to sympathetically maintained pain. No evidence for ephaptic interaction between sympathetic efferent and nociceptive afferent fibers was found. PMID:16997471

  19. Bursting into space: alterations of sympathetic control by space travel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckberg, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Astronauts return to Earth with reduced red cell masses and hypovolaemia. Not surprisingly, when they stand, their heart rates may speed inordinately, their blood pressures may fall, and some may experience frank syncope. We studied autonomic function in six male astronauts (average +/- SEM age: 40 +/- 2 years) before, during, and after the 16-day Neurolab space shuttle mission. METHOD: We recorded electrocardiograms, finger photoplethysmographic arterial pressures, respiration, peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity, plasma noradrenaline and noradrenaline kinetics, and cardiac output, and we calculated stroke volume and total peripheral resistance. We perturbed autonomic function before and during spaceflight with graded Valsalva manoeuvres and lower body suction, and before and after the mission with passive upright tilt. RESULTS: In-flight baseline sympathetic nerve activity was increased above pre-flight levels (by 10-33%) in three subjects, in whom noradrenaline spillover and clearance also were increased. Valsalva straining provoked greater reductions of arterial pressure, and proportionally greater sympathetic responses in space than on Earth. Lower body suction elicited greater increases of sympathetic nerve activity, plasma noradrenaline, and noradrenaline spillover in space than on Earth. After the Neurolab mission, left ventricular stroke volume was lower and heart rate was higher during tilt, than before spaceflight. No astronaut experienced orthostatic hypotension or pre-syncope during 10 min of post-flight tilting. CONCLUSION: We conclude that baseline sympathetic outflow, however measured, is higher in space than on earth, and that augmented sympathetic nerve responses to Valsalva straining, lower body suction, and post-flight upright tilt represent normal adjustments to greater haemodynamic stresses associated with hypovolaemia.

  20. Regional sympathetic denervation after myocardial infarction in humans detected noninvasively using I-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine

    SciTech Connect

    Stanton, M.S.; Tuli, M.M.; Radtke, N.L.; Heger, J.J.; Miles, W.M.; Mock, B.H.; Burt, R.W.; Wellman, H.N.; Zipes, D.P. )

    1989-11-15

    Transmural myocardial infarction in dogs produces denervation of sympathetic nerves in viable myocardium apical to the infarct that may be arrhythmogenic. It is unknown whether sympathetic denervation occurs in humans. The purpose of this study was to use iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a radiolabeled guanethidine analog that is actively taken up by sympathetic nerve terminals, to image noninvasively the cardiac sympathetic nerves in patients with and without ventricular arrhythmias after myocardial infarction. Results showed that 10 of 12 patients with spontaneous ventricular tachyarrhythmias after myocardial infarction exhibited regions of thallium-201 uptake indicating viable perfused myocardium, with no MIBG uptake. Such a finding is consistent with sympathetic denervation. One patient had frequent episodes of nonsustained ventricular tachycardia induced at exercise testing that was eliminated by beta-adrenoceptor blockade. Eleven of the 12 patients had ventricular tachycardia induced at electrophysiologic study and metoprolol never prevented induction. Sympathetic denervation was also detected in two of seven postinfarction patients without ventricular arrhythmias. Normal control subjects had no regions lacking MIBG uptake. This study provides evidence that regional sympathetic denervation occurs in humans after myocardial infarction and can be detected noninvasively by comparing MIBG and thallium-201 images. Although the presence of sympathetic denervation may be related to the onset of spontaneous ventricular tachyarrhythmias in some patients, it does not appear to be related to sustained ventricular tachycardia induced at electrophysiologic study.

  1. Intracranial distribution of the sympathetic system in mice: DiI tracing and immunocytochemical labeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maklad, A.; Quinn, T.; Fritzsch, B.

    2001-01-01

    The intracranial distribution of the cephalic branches of the superior cervical ganglion (scg) was studied in mice using indocarbocyanine dye (DiI) anterograde tracing. Two main branches were traced from the scg. The first branch joined the nerve of the pterygoid canal (the vidian nerve), npc, from which several intracranial sympathetic branches passed to the branches of the trigeminal nerve (tgn), abducent nerve (abn), trochlear nerve (trn), and oculomotor nerve (ocn). Most of the second branch joined the abn, from which sympathetic fibers dispersed in the distal region of the trigeminal ganglion (tgg) to form a plexus close to the ganglion's branches. Branches from this plexus joined the branches of the tgn, trn, and ocn. Several minor branches arising from the second branch of the scg were also observed. One formed a sympathetic plexus around the internal carotid artery (ica); a second formed a sympathetic plexus in the proximal region of tgg, close to its root; and a third branch coursed laterally to reach the ear by passing along the greater petrosal nerve (gpn). All of the intracranial trajectories traced from scg were found to be catecholaminergic, and likely sympathetic, using tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunocytochemistry.

  2. Properties of postganglionic sympathetic neurons with axons in the right thoracic vagus.

    PubMed

    Bałkowiec, A; Szulczyk, P

    1992-01-01

    The resting and reflex-evoked activities of single postganglionic sympathetic neurons with axons in the right thoracic vagus were tested in chloralose-anaesthetized cats. The properties of a majority of neurons were found to be similar. Cardiac- and inspiration-related rhythmicities were present in the resting activity of sympathetic neurons. Their resting activity was not affected by hyperventilation which abolished phrenic nerve discharges. Systemic hypoxia (2 min; 8% O2 in N2) increased the activity of the neurons more effectively in the deafferented state than when both sinus nerves remained intact. Injection of 0.1 ml 1 M sodium bicarbonate saturated with CO2, which activates peripheral chemoreceptors in the right or left carotid sinus, usually evoked a decrease in sympathetic activity in animals with both sinus nerves intact. We concluded that activation of peripheral chemoreceptors may inhibit the activity of the sympathetic neurons with axons in the right thoracic vagus. We suggest that the described sympathetic neurons may be a functionally homogeneous population which may innervate the conducting system of the heart. The close localization of sympathetic and parasympathetic axons in the vagus nerve may facilitate sympathetic-parasympathetic interaction at the level of their endings in the heart. PMID:1584420

  3. Adrenal Schwannomas: Rare Tumor of the Retroperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Emanuele; Simone, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Schwannoma is a benign neurogenic tumor originating from Schwann cells. These produce the myelin sheath that covers peripheral nerves that are often affected. This latter localization is extremely rare, and only a few case reports can be found in the medical literature. Studies have shown that approximately 0.5% to 5% of schwannomas are retroperitoneal, constituting 0.2% of adrenal incidental tumors. These usually present as incidental findings, nonsecreting adrenal masses in asymptomatic patients. Diagnosis of a schwannoma is based on detection of spindle cells with Antoni A and Antoni B regions in histological sections and positive staining for S-100 protein by immunohistochemical analysis. We report a case of an incidentally identified during an abdominal ultrasound examination with schwannoma localized in the left adrenal gland. PMID:26101687

  4. Human sympathetic and vagal baroreflex responses to sequential nitroprusside and phenylephrine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudas, L.; Crossman, A. A.; Morillo, C. A.; Halliwill, J. R.; Tahvanainen, K. U.; Kuusela, T. A.; Eckberg, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    We evaluated a method of baroreflex testing involving sequential intravenous bolus injections of nitroprusside followed by phenylephrine and phenylephrine followed by nitroprusside in 18 healthy men and women, and we drew inferences regarding human sympathetic and vagal baroreflex mechanisms. We recorded the electrocardiogram, photoplethysmographic finger arterial pressure, and peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity. We then contrasted least squares linear regression slopes derived from the depressor (nitroprusside) and pressor (phenylephrine) phases with 1) slopes derived from spontaneous fluctuations of systolic arterial pressures and R-R intervals, and 2) baroreflex gain derived from cross-spectral analyses of systolic pressures and R-R intervals. We calculated sympathetic baroreflex gain from integrated muscle sympathetic nerve activity and diastolic pressures. We found that vagal baroreflex slopes are less when arterial pressures are falling than when they are rising and that this hysteresis exists over pressure ranges both below and above baseline levels. Although pharmacological and spontaneous vagal baroreflex responses correlate closely, pharmacological baroreflex slopes tend to be lower than those derived from spontaneous fluctuations. Sympathetic baroreflex slopes are similar when arterial pressure is falling and rising; however, small pressure elevations above baseline silence sympathetic motoneurons. Vagal, but not sympathetic baroreflex gains vary inversely with subjects' ages and their baseline arterial pressures. There is no correlation between sympathetic and vagal baroreflex gains. We recommend repeated sequential nitroprusside followed by phenylephrine doses as a simple, efficientmeans to provoke and characterize human vagal and sympathetic baroreflex responses.

  5. The search for the mechanism of early sympathetic islet neuropathy (eSIN) in autoimmune diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Taborsky, Gerald J.; Mei, Qi; Hackney, Daryl J.; Mundinger, Thomas O.

    2014-01-01

    This review outlines our search for the mechanism causing the early loss of islet sympathetic nerves in autoimmune diabetes. Since our previous work has documented the importance of autonomic stimulation of glucagon secretion during hypoglycaemia, the loss of these nerves may contribute to the known impairment of this specific glucagon response early in human type 1 diabetes. We therefore briefly review the contribution that autonomic activation, and sympathetic neural activation in particular, makes to the subsequent glucagon response to hypoglycaemia. We also detail evidence that animal models of autoimmune diabetes mimic both the early loss of islet sympathetic nerves and the impaired glucagon response seen in human type 1 diabetes. Using data from these animal models, we examine mechanisms by which this loss of islet nerves could occur. We provide evidence that it is not due to diabetic hyperglycaemia, but it is related to the lymphocytic infiltration of the islet. Ablating the p75 neurotrophin receptor, which is present on sympathetic axons, prevents eSIN, but, interestingly, not diabetes. Thus, we appear to have separated the immune-related loss of islet sympathetic nerves from the immune-mediated destruction of islet β-cells. Finally, we speculate on a way to restore the sympathetic innervation of the islet. PMID:25200302

  6. Skin sympathetic outflow during head-down neck flexion in humans.

    PubMed

    Ray, C A; Hume, K M; Shortt, T L

    1997-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity during head-down neck flexion (HDNF). The purpose of the present study was to determine if HDNF also activates skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA). SSNA, heart rate, arterial pressure, skin blood flow, calf blood flow, and calculated calf vascular resistance (mean arterial pressure/calf blood flow) were determined in 12 subjects during 3 min of baseline (lying prone with chin supported) and 3 min of HDNF. There were no significant changes in heart rate and arterial pressures during HDNF; however, diastolic and mean arterial pressure tended to increase slightly. Calf blood flow decreased 22% and calf vascular resistance increased 46% during HDNF. SSNA did not significantly change during HDNF. In three subjects we measured both muscle and skin sympathetic nerve activity during HDNF. In these trials, muscle sympathetic nerve activity consistently increased, but SSNA did not. The results indicate that HDNF in humans activates muscle sympathetic nerve activity, but does not activate SSNA. Thus vestibular stimulation may elicit differential activation of sympathetic outflow in humans. PMID:9321897

  7. Hypercapnia selectively attenuates the somato-sympathetic reflex.

    PubMed

    Makeham, John M; Goodchild, A K; Costin, N S; Pilowsky, Paul M

    2004-05-20

    The effects of hyperoxic hypercapnia (5, 10 or 15% CO2 in O2) on splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity (sSNA) and sympathetic reflexes such as the somato-sympathetic reflex or baroreflex were studied in urethane anaesthetised, paralysed, artificially ventilated and vagotomized Sprague-Dawley rats. Hypercapnia caused a small increase in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) in the 10% CO2 group and a fall in heart rate (HR) in all three groups. sSNA increased in all three groups. Phrenic frequency and amplitude increased during hypercapnia, with frequency adapting back towards baseline during the CO2 exposure. The somato-sympathetic reflex was attenuated in the 5% CO2 group and abolished in the 10 and 15% CO2 groups, whereas there was little effect on the sSNA baroreflex. Hypercapnia significantly affects phrenic nerve activity (PNA), sSNA and selectively inhibits the somato-sympathetic reflex with little effect on the sSNA baroreflex. PMID:15134661

  8. REGULATION OF ADRENAL CHROMAFFIN CELL DEVELOPMENT BY THE CENTRAL MONOAMINERGIC SYSTEM: DIFFERENTIAL CONTROL OF NOREPINEPHRINE AND EPINEPHRINE LEVELS AND SECRETORY RESPONSES (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the mature rat, reflex sympathetic stimulation by insulin-induced hypoglycemia resulted in profound depletion of adrenal epinephrine, and to a lesser extent, Norepinephrine. In the developing rat, insulin evoked little or no secretory response from the adrenals prior to 1 week...

  9. Role of adrenal imaging in surgical management

    SciTech Connect

    Lamki, L.M.; Haynie, T.P. )

    1990-03-01

    Adrenal imaging using radiopharmaceuticals is a functional test that can contribute significantly to surgical management and follow-up of patients with either benign or malignant conditions of the adrenal cortex and medulla. Imaging of the cortex is achieved by iodine-131-labeled iodomethyl nor-cholesterol (NP-59), while adrenal medulla imaging can be successfully accomplished by 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), which localizes in the adrenergic nerve terminal with norepinephrine. Both tests carry high sensitivity and specificity for functional tumors and hyperplasia, and often better than CT scanning. This article reviews the current status and clinical utility of nuclear imaging of the adrenal cortex in congenital hyperplasia, low renin hypertension and aldosteronism, and Cushing's syndrome. Adrenal medulla imaging is reviewed in light of our experience at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in pheochromocytoma, neuroblastoma, and other neuroectodermal tumors. Investigation of {sup 131}I-MIBG therapy of metastatic tumors of neuroectodermal origin potentially offers a means of at least controlling symptoms of hormonal secretion in these patients. 40 references.

  10. Preliminary study of the intense sympathetic discharge induced centrally after lateral ventricular administration of whole venom of Dendroaspis polylepis.

    PubMed

    Kyegombe, D B; Njoroge, D; Wangai, J; Telang, B V

    1977-01-01

    Lateral ventricular administration of 100 microgram of Dendroaspis polylepis venom is cats consistently produced a marked rise in arterial blood pressure, heart rate dilatation of pupils and piloerection. This intense central sympathetic discharge occurred after a latent period of 11.7 +/- 0.72 min. Bilateral adrenelectomy abolished the sympathetic discharge showing that central release of catecholamines from the adrenal medulla may play an important role in elicting the cardiovascular response. PMID:885604

  11. Sympatho-adrenal activation by chronic intermittent hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ganesh K.; Peng, Ying-Jie

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent apnea with chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) is a major clinical problem in adult humans and infants born preterm. Patients with recurrent apnea exhibit heightened sympathetic activity as well as elevated plasma catecholamine levels, and these phenotypes are effectively recapitulated in rodent models of CIH. This article summarizes findings from studies addressing sympathetic activation in recurrent apnea patients and rodent models of CIH and the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. Available evidence suggests that augmented chemoreflex and attenuated baroreflex contribute to sympathetic activation by CIH. Studies on rodents showed that CIH augments the carotid body response to hypoxia and attenuates the carotid baroreceptor response to increased sinus pressures. Processing of afferent information from chemoreceptors at the central nervous system is also facilitated by CIH. Adult and neonatal rats exposed to CIH exhibit augmented catecholamine secretion from the adrenal medulla. Adrenal demedullation prevents the elevation of circulating catecholamines in CIH-exposed rodents. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling is emerging as the major cellular mechanism triggering sympatho-adrenal activation by CIH. Molecular mechanisms underlying increased ROS generation by CIH seem to involve transcriptional dysregulation of genes encoding pro-and antioxidant enzymes by hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and -2, respectively. PMID:22723632

  12. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Speiser, Phyllis W.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia associated with deficiency of steroid 21-hydroxylase is the most common inborn error in adrenal function and the most common cause of adrenal insufficiency in the pediatric age group. As patients now survive into adulthood, adult health-care providers must also be familiar with this condition. Over the past several years, F1000 has published numerous commentaries updating research and practical guidelines for this condition. The purposes of this review are to summarize basic information defining congenital adrenal hyperplasia and to highlight current knowledge and controversies in management. PMID:26339484

  13. Extra-adrenal retroperitoneal paraganglioma associated with duplication of inferior vena cava

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Parangama; Singh, Ashish; Ayyappan, Anoop; Nair, Aravindan

    2008-01-01

    Retroperitoneal paragangliomas arise from specialized neural crest cells symmetrically distributed along the aorta in association with the sympathetic chain. If this tissue aggregates in the adrenal medulla pheochromocytoma may arise. When it remains in the paraaortic sites it could develop into extra-adrenal, retroperitoneal paraganglioma. We report a case of extra-adrenal paraganglioma in the renal hilum intimately related to the left side of a double inferior vena cava. To the best of our knowledge such an association has never been described before. The clinical significance of this venous anomaly is reviewed. PMID:22470594

  14. Cardiorespiratory Coupling: Common Rhythms in Cardiac, Sympathetic, and Respiratory Activities

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Thomas E.; Hsieh, Yee-Hsee; Dhingra, Rishi R.; Baekey, David M.; Galán, Roberto F.; Wehrwein, Erica; Morris, Kendall F.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiorespiratory coupling is an encompassing term describing more than the well-recognized influences of respiration on heart rate and blood pressure. Our data indicate that cardiorespiratory coupling reflects a reciprocal interaction between autonomic and respiratory control systems, and the cardiovascular system modulates the ventilatory pattern as well. For example, cardioventilatory coupling refers to the influence of heart beats and arterial pulse pressure on respiration and is the tendency for the next inspiration to start at a preferred latency after the last heart beat in expiration. Multiple complementary, well-described mechanisms mediate respiration’s influence on cardiovascular function, whereas mechanisms mediating the cardiovascular system’s influence on respiration may only be through the baroreceptors but are just being identified. Our review will describe a differential effect of conditioning rats with either chronic intermittent or sustained hypoxia on sympathetic nerve activity but also on ventilatory pattern variability. Both intermittent and sustained hypoxia increase sympathetic nerve activity after 2 weeks but affect sympatho-respiratory coupling differentially. Intermittent hypoxia enhances sympatho-respiratory coupling, which is associated with low variability in the ventilatory pattern. In contrast, after constant hypobaric hypoxia, 1-to-1 coupling between bursts of sympathetic and phrenic nerve activity is replaced by 2-to-3 coupling. This change in coupling pattern is associated with increased variability of the ventilatory pattern. After baro-denervating hypobaric hypoxic-conditioned rats, splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity becomes tonic (distinct bursts are absent) with decreases during phrenic nerve bursts and ventilatory pattern becomes regular. Thus, conditioning rats to either intermittent or sustained hypoxia accentuates the reciprocal nature of cardiorespiratory coupling. Finally, identifying a compelling physiologic

  15. NK1 receptor activation in rat rostral ventrolateral medulla selectively attenuates somato-sympathetic reflex while antagonism attenuates sympathetic chemoreflex.

    PubMed

    Makeham, John M; Goodchild, Ann K; Pilowsky, Paul M

    2005-06-01

    The effects of activation and blockade of the neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) on arterial blood pressure (ABP), splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity (sSNA), phrenic nerve activity, the somato-sympathetic reflex, baroreflex, and chemoreflex were studied in urethane-anesthetized and artificially ventilated Sprague-Dawley rats. Bilateral microinjection of either the stable substance P analog (pGlu5, MePhe8, Sar9)SP(5-11) (DiMe-SP) or the highly selective NK1 agonist [Sar9, Met (O(2))11]SP into the RVLM resulted in an increase in ABP, sSNA, and heart rate and an abolition of phrenic nerve activity. The effects of [Sar9, Met (O(2))11]SP were blocked by the selective nonpeptide NK1 receptor antagonist WIN 51708. NK1 receptor activation also dramatically attenuated the somato-sympathetic reflex elicited by tibial nerve stimulation, while leaving the baroreflex and chemoreflex unaffected. This effect was again blocked by WIN 51708. NK1 receptor antagonism in the RVLM, with WIN 51708 significantly attenuated the sympathoexcitatory response to hypoxia but had no effect on baseline respiratory function. Our findings suggest that substance P and the NK1 receptor play a significant role in the cardiorespiratory reflexes integrated within the RVLM. PMID:15731401

  16. Renal sympathetic denervation for the treatment of refractory hypertension.

    PubMed

    Leong, Kui Toh Gerard; Walton, Antony; Krum, Henry

    2014-01-01

    Resistant hypertension poses significant health concerns. There are strong demands for new and safe therapies to control resistant hypertension while addressing its common causes, specifically poor compliance to lifelong polypharmacy, lifestyle modifications, and physician inertia. The sympathetic nervous system plays a significant pathophysiological role in hypertension. Surgical sympathectomy for blood pressure reduction is an old but extremely efficacious therapeutic concept, now abandoned with the dawn of a safer contemporary pharmacology era. Recently, clinical studies have revealed promising results for safe and sustained blood pressure reduction with percutaneous renal sympathetic denervation. This is a novel, minimally invasive, device-based therapy, specifically targeting and ablating the renal artery nerves with radiofrequency waves without permanent implantation. There are also reported additional benefits in related comorbidities, such as impaired glucose metabolism, renal impairment, left ventricular hypertrophy, heart failure, and others. This review focuses on how selective renal sympathetic denervation works, its present and potential therapeutic indications, and its future directions. PMID:24422574

  17. Carotid Body Chemoreflex Mediates Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Adrenal Medulla

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ganesh K.; Peng, Ying-Jie; Nanduri, Jayasri; Prabhakar, Nanduri R.

    2016-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) increases reactive oxygen species generation resulting in oxidative stress in the adrenal medulla (AM), a major end-organ of the sympathetic nervous system which facilitates catecholamine secretion by hypoxia. Here, we show that carotid body chemoreflex contributes to IH-induced oxidative stress in the AM. Carotid bodies were ablated by cryocoagulation of glomus cells, the putative O2 sensing cells. Carotid body ablated (CBA) and control rats were exposed to IH and the redox state of the AM was assessed biochemically. We found that IH raised reactive oxygen species levels along with an increase in NADPH oxidase (Nox), a pro-oxidant enzyme and a decrease in superoxide dismutase-2 (SOD2), an anti-oxidant enzyme. Further, IH increased hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, whereas decreased HIF-2α, the transcriptional regulator of Nox and SOD-2, respectively. These IH-induced changes in the AM were absent in CBA rats. Moreover, IH increased splanchnic nerve activity and facilitated hypoxia-evoked catecholamine efflux from the AM and CBA prevented these effects. These findings suggest that IH-induced oxidative stress and catecholamine efflux in the AM occurs via carotid body chemoreflex involving HIF α isoform mediated imbalance in pro-, and anti-oxidant enzymes. PMID:26303481

  18. Sympathetic adaptations to one-legged training.

    PubMed

    Ray, C A

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of leg exercise training on sympathetic nerve responses at rest and during dynamic exercise. Six men were trained by using high-intensity interval and prolonged continuous one-legged cycling 4 day/wk, 40 min/day, for 6 wk. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; peroneal nerve) were measured during 3 min of upright dynamic one-legged knee extensions at 40 W before and after training. After training, peak oxygen uptake in the trained leg increased 19 +/- 2% (P < 0.01). At rest, heart rate decreased from 77 +/- 3 to 71 +/- 6 beats/min (P < 0.01) with no significant changes in MAP (91 +/- 7 to 91 +/- 11 mmHg) and MSNA (29 +/- 3 to 28 +/- 1 bursts/min). During exercise, both heart rate and MAP were lower after training (108 +/- 5 to 96 +/- 5 beats/min and 132 +/- 8 to 119 +/- 4 mmHg, respectively, during the third minute of exercise; P < 0.01). MSNA decreased similarly from rest during the first 2 min of exercise both before and after training. However, MSNA was significantly less during the third minute of exercise after training (32 +/- 2 to 22 +/- 3 bursts/min; P < 0.01). This training effect on MSNA remained when MSNA was expressed as bursts per 100 heartbeats. Responses to exercise in five untrained control subjects were not different at 0 and 6 wk. These results demonstrate that exercise training prolongs the decrease in MSNA during upright leg exercise and indicates that attenuation of MSNA to exercise reported with forearm training also occurs with leg training. PMID:10233121

  19. Sympathetic adaptations to one-legged training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of leg exercise training on sympathetic nerve responses at rest and during dynamic exercise. Six men were trained by using high-intensity interval and prolonged continuous one-legged cycling 4 day/wk, 40 min/day, for 6 wk. Heart rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; peroneal nerve) were measured during 3 min of upright dynamic one-legged knee extensions at 40 W before and after training. After training, peak oxygen uptake in the trained leg increased 19 +/- 2% (P < 0.01). At rest, heart rate decreased from 77 +/- 3 to 71 +/- 6 beats/min (P < 0.01) with no significant changes in MAP (91 +/- 7 to 91 +/- 11 mmHg) and MSNA (29 +/- 3 to 28 +/- 1 bursts/min). During exercise, both heart rate and MAP were lower after training (108 +/- 5 to 96 +/- 5 beats/min and 132 +/- 8 to 119 +/- 4 mmHg, respectively, during the third minute of exercise; P < 0.01). MSNA decreased similarly from rest during the first 2 min of exercise both before and after training. However, MSNA was significantly less during the third minute of exercise after training (32 +/- 2 to 22 +/- 3 bursts/min; P < 0.01). This training effect on MSNA remained when MSNA was expressed as bursts per 100 heartbeats. Responses to exercise in five untrained control subjects were not different at 0 and 6 wk. These results demonstrate that exercise training prolongs the decrease in MSNA during upright leg exercise and indicates that attenuation of MSNA to exercise reported with forearm training also occurs with leg training.

  20. Central chemoreceptors and sympathetic vasomotor outflow

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Thiago S; Takakura, Ana C; Colombari, Eduardo; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2006-01-01

    The present study explores how elevations in brain PCO2 increase the sympathetic nerve discharge (SND). SND, phrenic nerve discharge (PND) and putative sympathoexcitatory vasomotor neurons of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) were recorded in anaesthetized sino-aortic denervated and vagotomized rats. Hypercapnia (end-expiratory CO2 from 5% to 10%) increased SND (97 ± 6%) and the activity of RVLM neurons (67 ± 4%). Injection of kynurenic acid (Kyn, ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonist) into RVLM or the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) eliminated or reduced PND, respectively, but did not change the effect of CO2 on SND. Bilateral injection of Kyn or muscimol into the rostral ventral respiratory group (rVRG-pre-Bötzinger region, also called CVLM) eliminated PND while increasing the stimulatory effect of CO2 on SND. Muscimol injection into commissural part of the solitary tract nucleus (commNTS) had no effect on PND or SND activation by CO2. As expected, injection of Kyn into RVLM or muscimol into commNTS virtually blocked the effect of carotid body stimulation on SND in rats with intact carotid sinus nerves. In conclusion, CO2 increases SND by activating RVLM sympathoexcitatory neurons. The relevant central chemoreceptors are probably located within or close to RVLM and not in the NTS or in the rVRG-pre-Bötzinger/CVLM region. RVLM sympathoexcitatory neurons may be intrinsically pH-sensitive and/or receive excitatory synaptic inputs from RTN chemoreceptors. Activation of the central respiratory network reduces the overall sympathetic response to CO2, presumably by activating barosensitive CVLM neurons and inhibiting RTN chemoreceptors. PMID:16901945

  1. Forearm sympathetic withdrawal and vasodilatation during mental stress in humans.

    PubMed

    Halliwill, J R; Lawler, L A; Eickhoff, T J; Dietz, N M; Nauss, L A; Joyner, M J

    1997-10-01

    1. In humans, mental stress elicits vasodilatation in the muscle vascular beds of the forearm that may be neurally mediated. We sought to determine the extent to which this vasodilatation is due to sympathetic withdrawal, active neurogenic vasodilatation, or beta-adrenergically mediated vasodilatation. 2. We simultaneously measured forearm blood flow and muscle sympathetic nerve traffic to the forearm during mental stress in humans. In a second study, we measured forearm blood flow responses to mental stress after selective blockade of alpha-adrenergic neurotransmission in one forearm. In a final study, we measured forearm blood flow responses to mental stress after unilateral anaesthetic blockade of the stellate ganglion, alone or in combination with selective beta-adrenergic receptor blockade of the forearm. 3. During mental stress, muscle sympathetic nerve activity decreased from 5113 +/- 788 to 1509 +/- 494 total integrated activity min-1 (P < 0.05) and forearm vascular resistance decreased from 96 +/- 29 to 33 +/- 7 mmHg (dl of tissue) min ml-1 (P < 0.05). Considerable vasodilation was still elicited by mental stress after selective blockade of alpha-adrenergic neurotransmission. Vasodilatation also occurred during mental stress after stellate ganglion blockade. This dilatation was reduced by selective blockade of beta-adrenergic receptors in the forearm. 4. Our results support a role for both sympathetic withdrawal and beta-adrenergic vasodilatation as the major causes of the forearm vasodilatation during mental stress in humans. PMID:9350631

  2. Forearm sympathetic withdrawal and vasodilatation during mental stress in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Halliwill, J R; Lawler, L A; Eickhoff, T J; Dietz, N M; Nauss, L A; Joyner, M J

    1997-01-01

    1. In humans, mental stress elicits vasodilatation in the muscle vascular beds of the forearm that may be neurally mediated. We sought to determine the extent to which this vasodilatation is due to sympathetic withdrawal, active neurogenic vasodilatation, or beta-adrenergically mediated vasodilatation. 2. We simultaneously measured forearm blood flow and muscle sympathetic nerve traffic to the forearm during mental stress in humans. In a second study, we measured forearm blood flow responses to mental stress after selective blockade of alpha-adrenergic neurotransmission in one forearm. In a final study, we measured forearm blood flow responses to mental stress after unilateral anaesthetic blockade of the stellate ganglion, alone or in combination with selective beta-adrenergic receptor blockade of the forearm. 3. During mental stress, muscle sympathetic nerve activity decreased from 5113 +/- 788 to 1509 +/- 494 total integrated activity min-1 (P < 0.05) and forearm vascular resistance decreased from 96 +/- 29 to 33 +/- 7 mmHg (dl of tissue) min ml-1 (P < 0.05). Considerable vasodilation was still elicited by mental stress after selective blockade of alpha-adrenergic neurotransmission. Vasodilatation also occurred during mental stress after stellate ganglion blockade. This dilatation was reduced by selective blockade of beta-adrenergic receptors in the forearm. 4. Our results support a role for both sympathetic withdrawal and beta-adrenergic vasodilatation as the major causes of the forearm vasodilatation during mental stress in humans. PMID:9350631

  3. Sympathetic Neural and Hemodynamic Responses During Cold Pressor Test in Elderly Blacks and Whites.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yoshiyuki; Jarvis, Sara S; Best, Stuart A; Edwards, Jeffrey G; Hendrix, Joseph M; Adams-Huet, Beverley; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen; Levine, Benjamin D; Fu, Qi

    2016-05-01

    The sympathetic response during the cold pressor test (CPT) has been reported to be greater in young blacks than whites, especially in those with a family history of hypertension. Because blood pressure (BP) increases with age, we evaluated whether elderly blacks have greater sympathetic activation during CPT than age-matched whites. BP, heart rate, cardiac output, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity were measured during supine baseline, 2-minute CPT, and 3-minute recovery in 47 elderly (68±7 [SD] years) volunteers (12 blacks and 35 whites). Baseline BP, heart rate, cardiac output, or muscle sympathetic nerve activity did not differ between races. Systolic and diastolic BP and heart rate increased during CPT (allP<0.001) with no racial differences (allP>0.05). Cardiac output increased during CPT and ≤30 s of recovery in both groups, but was lower in blacks than whites. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity increased during CPT in both groups (bothP<0.001); the increase in burst frequency was similar between groups, whereas the increase in total activity was smaller in blacks (P=0.030 for interaction). Peak change (Δ) in diastolic BP was correlated with Δ total activity at 1 minute into CPT in both blacks (r=0.78,P=0.003) and whites (r=0.43,P=0.009), whereas the slope was significantly greater in blacks (P=0.007). Thus, elderly blacks have smaller sympathetic and central hemodynamic (eg, cardiac output) responses, but a greater pressor response for a given sympathetic activation during CPT than elderly whites. This response may stem from augmented sympathetic vascular transduction, greater sympathetic activation to other vascular bed(s), or enhanced nonadrenergically mediated vasoconstriction in elderly blacks. PMID:27021009

  4. Relationship between spontaneous sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity and cardiac baroreflex sensitivity in healthy young individuals.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Chloe E; Witter, Trevor; El Sayed, Khadigeh; Hissen, Sarah L; Johnson, Aaron W; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2015-11-01

    Low baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is associated with elevated cardiovascular risk. However, the evidence is based primarily on measurements of cardiac BRS. It cannot be assumed that cardiac or sympathetic BRS alone represent a true reflection of baroreflex control of blood pressure. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between spontaneous sympathetic and cardiac BRS in healthy, young individuals. Continuous measurements of blood pressure, heart rate, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were made under resting conditions in 50 healthy individuals (18-28 years). Sympathetic BRS was quantified by plotting MSNA burst incidence against diastolic pressure (sympathetic BRSinc), and by plotting total MSNA against diastolic pressure (sympathetic BRStotal). Cardiac BRS was quantified by plotting R-R interval against systolic pressure using the sequence method. Significant sympathetic BRSinc and cardiac BRS slopes were obtained for 42 participants. A significant positive correlation was found between sympathetic BRSinc and cardiac BRS (r = 0.31, P = 0.049). Among this group, significant sympathetic baroreflex slopes were obtained for 39 participants when plotting total MSNA against diastolic pressure. In this subset, a significant positive correlation was observed between sympathetic BRStotal and cardiac BRS (r = 0.40, P = 0.012). When males and females were assessed separately, these modest relationships only remained significant in females. Analysis by gender revealed correlations in the females between sympathetic BRSinc and cardiac BRS (r = 0.49, P = 0.062), and between sympathetic BRStotal and cardiac BRS (r = 0.57, P = 0.025). These findings suggest that gender interactions exist in baroreflex control of blood pressure, and that cardiac BRS is not appropriate for estimating overall baroreflex function in healthy, young populations. This relationship warrants investigation in aging and clinical populations. PMID:26564059

  5. Relationship between spontaneous sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity and cardiac baroreflex sensitivity in healthy young individuals

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Chloe E; Witter, Trevor; El Sayed, Khadigeh; Hissen, Sarah L; Johnson, Aaron W; Macefield, Vaughan G

    2015-01-01

    Low baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is associated with elevated cardiovascular risk. However, the evidence is based primarily on measurements of cardiac BRS. It cannot be assumed that cardiac or sympathetic BRS alone represent a true reflection of baroreflex control of blood pressure. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between spontaneous sympathetic and cardiac BRS in healthy, young individuals. Continuous measurements of blood pressure, heart rate, and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were made under resting conditions in 50 healthy individuals (18–28 years). Sympathetic BRS was quantified by plotting MSNA burst incidence against diastolic pressure (sympathetic BRSinc), and by plotting total MSNA against diastolic pressure (sympathetic BRStotal). Cardiac BRS was quantified by plotting R-R interval against systolic pressure using the sequence method. Significant sympathetic BRSinc and cardiac BRS slopes were obtained for 42 participants. A significant positive correlation was found between sympathetic BRSinc and cardiac BRS (r = 0.31, P = 0.049). Among this group, significant sympathetic baroreflex slopes were obtained for 39 participants when plotting total MSNA against diastolic pressure. In this subset, a significant positive correlation was observed between sympathetic BRStotal and cardiac BRS (r = 0.40, P = 0.012). When males and females were assessed separately, these modest relationships only remained significant in females. Analysis by gender revealed correlations in the females between sympathetic BRSinc and cardiac BRS (r = 0.49, P = 0.062), and between sympathetic BRStotal and cardiac BRS (r = 0.57, P = 0.025). These findings suggest that gender interactions exist in baroreflex control of blood pressure, and that cardiac BRS is not appropriate for estimating overall baroreflex function in healthy, young populations. This relationship warrants investigation in aging and clinical populations. PMID:26564059

  6. Microneurographic evidence of sudden sympathetic withdrawal in carotid sinus syncope; treatment with ergotamine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costa, F.; Biaggioni, I.

    1994-01-01

    A proportion of patients with carotid sinus syncope (CSS) remain symptomatic even after pacemaker implantation because of persistence of a vasodepressor component. We report a patient with CSS whose syncopal episodes could be reproduced by carotid sinus massage and were due to profound hypotension associated with sudden sympathetic withdrawal, based on direct measurements of sympathetic nerve traffic. A double-blind trial with inhaled ergotamine provided significant symptomatic relief.

  7. The sympathetic nervous system in polycystic ovary syndrome: a novel therapeutic target?

    PubMed

    Lansdown, Andrew; Rees, D Aled

    2012-12-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine condition associated with long-term health risks, including type 2 diabetes and vascular dysfunction in addition to reproductive sequelae. Many of the common features of PCOS, such as central obesity, hyperinsulinaemia and obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), are associated with chronic sympathetic overactivity, suggesting that sympathoexcitation may be involved in the pathogenesis of this condition. Rodent models of polycystic ovaries have shown that ovarian sympathetic outflow may be increased, accompanied by elevated intra-ovarian synthesis of nerve growth factor (NGF) which may be involved in initiation of ovarian pathology. Patients with PCOS have evidence of increased muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), altered heart rate variability and attenuated heart rate recovery postexercise, compared with age- and BMI-matched controls, suggesting a generalized increase in sympathetic nerve activity. Active weight loss can reduce MSNA and whole body noradrenaline spillover, whereas low-frequency electroacupuncture decreased MSNA in overweight women with PCOS. Treatment of OSA with continuous positive airways pressure may reduce plasma noradrenaline levels and diastolic blood pressure and improve cardiac sympathovagal balance. Renal sympathetic denervation also reduced MSNA, noradrenaline spillover and blood pressure in two PCOS subjects with hypertension, accompanied by improved insulin sensitivity. The sympathetic nervous system may thus offer a new therapeutic target in PCOS but larger and longer-term studies are needed before these treatments can be considered in clinical practice. PMID:22882204

  8. Acute adrenal crisis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cortisol and adrenaline are released in response to stress . Cortisol production is regulated by the pituitary gland. This ... adrenal crisis include: Dehydration Infection and other physical ... medicines such as prednisone or hydrocortisone Surgery Trauma

  9. Pulmonary chemoreflex and phrenic sympathetic efferents.

    PubMed

    Bałkowiec, A; Szulczyk, P

    1993-11-01

    The pulmonary chemoreflex components such as reactions of phrenic sympathetic neuron (PhSN) activity, phrenic nerve activity, heart rate and blood pressure were tested in chloralose-anesthetized, paralyzed cats. 10 micrograms to 160 micrograms phenylbiguanide (PBG) in 0.9% NaCl was injected into the pulmonary circulation. PBG injected into the right atrium (in 11 of 19 experiments) and into the pulmonary artery (in 5 of 8 experiments), evoked short-latency (1-1.4 sec) dose-dependent increase in PhSN activity accompanied by increase in blood pressure, and followed by decrease in these two variables. In all experiments, activity of the phrenic nerve was depressed, and bradycardia occurred after PBG injection. All responses to PBG injections into the pulmonary artery were abolished following bilateral vagotomy. In the same procedure related to the right atrium after vagotomy, the increases in PhSN activity and blood pressure were also abolished, although a decrease in heart rate, PhSN activity and in the amplitude of phrenic nerve discharges together with an increase in their frequency persisted. Our results suggest that short-latency increase in PhSN activity is a component of pulmonary chemoreflex. PMID:8272587

  10. Effects of cannabinoids on adrenaline release from adrenal medullary cells

    PubMed Central

    Niederhoffer, Nathalie; Hansen, Henrik H; Fernandez-Ruiz, Javier J; Szabo, Bela

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to analyse the peripheral effects of cannabinoids on adrenaline release from adrenal chromaffin cells. In pithed rabbits with electrically stimulated sympathetic outflow, intravenous injection of the cannabinoid receptor agonists WIN55212-2 and CP55940 (5, 50 and 500 μg kg−1) markedly lowered the plasma adrenaline concentration. The effect of WIN55212-2 was attenuated by the selective CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR141716A (500 μg kg−1). WIN55212-3 (same doses as WIN55212-2), the enantiomer of WIN55212-2 lacking affinity for cannabinoid receptors, had no effect on the plasma adrenaline concentration. In rabbit isolated adrenal glands, the release of adrenaline elicited by electrical stimulation was measured by fast cyclic voltammetry. Electrically-evoked adrenaline release was inhibited by WIN55212-2 (0.3, 1, 3 and 10 μM) and this effect was antagonized by SR141716A (1 μM). The non-cholinergic component of adrenaline release observed after blockade of nicotinic (by hexamethonium 100 μM) and muscarinic (by atropine 0.5 μM) acetylcholine receptors was not depressed by WIN55212-2. WIN55212-3 (10 μM) had no effect on adrenaline release. No detectable specific CB1 receptor binding and mRNA expression were found in rabbit adrenal glands with autoradiography and in situ hybridization. The results show that cannabinoids inhibit adrenaline secretion in rabbit isolated adrenal glands; the likely mechanism is a presynaptic CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of acetylcholine release from preganglionic sympathetic neurons. The inhibition of adrenaline secretion in adrenal glands most probably accounts for the decrease in the plasma adrenaline concentration observed after cannabinoid administration in pithed rabbits. PMID:11704653

  11. [Addison's disease : Primary adrenal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Pulzer, A; Burger-Stritt, S; Hahner, S

    2016-05-01

    Adrenal insufficiency, a rare disorder which is characterized by the inadequate production or absence of adrenal hormones, may be classified as primary adrenal insufficiency in case of direct affection of the adrenal glands or secondary adrenal insufficiency, which is mostly due to pituitary or hypothalamic disease. Primary adrenal insufficiency affects 11 of 100,000 individuals. Clinical symptoms are mainly nonspecific and include fatigue, weight loss, and hypotension. The diagnostic test of choice is dynamic testing with synthetic ACTH. Patients suffering from chronic adrenal insufficiency require lifelong hormone supplementation. Education in dose adaption during physical and mental stress or emergency situations is essential to prevent life-threatening adrenal crises. Patients with adrenal insufficiency should carry an emergency card and emergency kit with them. PMID:27129928

  12. Vestibular control of sympathetic activity. An otolith-sympathetic reflex in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufmann, H.; Biaggioni, I.; Voustianiouk, A.; Diedrich, A.; Costa, F.; Clarke, R.; Gizzi, M.; Raphan, T.; Cohen, B.

    2002-01-01

    It has been proposed that a vestibular reflex originating in the otolith organs and other body graviceptors modulates sympathetic activity during changes in posture with regard to gravity. To test this hypothesis, we selectively stimulated otolith and body graviceptors sinusoidally along different head axes in the coronal plane with off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) and recorded sympathetic efferent activity in the peroneal nerve (muscle sympathetic nerve activity, MSNA), blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate. All parameters were entrained during OVAR at the frequency of rotation, with MSNA increasing in nose-up positions during forward linear acceleration and decreasing when nose-down. MSNA was correlated closely with blood pressure when subjects were within +/-90 degrees of nose-down positions with a delay of 1.4 s, the normal latency of baroreflex-driven changes in MSNA. Thus, in the nose-down position, MSNA was probably driven by baroreflex afferents. In contrast, when subjects were within +/-45 degrees of the nose-up position, i.e., when positive linear acceleration was maximal along the naso-ocipital axis, MSNA was closely related to gravitational acceleration at a latency of 0.4 s. This delay is too short for MSNA changes to be mediated by the baroreflex, but it is compatible with the delay of a response originating in the vestibular system. We postulate that a vestibulosympathetic reflex, probably originating mainly in the otolith organs, contributes to blood pressure maintenance during forward linear acceleration. Because of its short latency, this reflex may be one of the earliest mechanisms to sustain blood pressure upon standing.

  13. Relevance of Sympathetic Nervous System Activation in Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Thorp, Alicia A.; Schlaich, Markus P.

    2015-01-01

    Sympathetic tone is well recognised as being implicit in cardiovascular control. It is less readily acknowledged that activation of the sympathetic nervous system is integral in energy homeostasis and can exert profound metabolic effects. Accumulating data from animal and human studies suggest that central sympathetic overactivity plays a pivotal role in the aetiology and complications of several metabolic conditions that can cluster to form the Metabolic Syndrome (MetS). Given the known augmented risk for type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and premature mortality associated with the MetS understanding the complex pathways underlying the metabolic derangements involved has become a priority. Many factors have been proposed to contribute to increased sympathetic nerve activity in metabolic abnormalities including obesity, impaired baroreflex sensitivity, hyperinsulinemia, and elevated adipokine levels. Furthermore there is mounting evidence to suggest that chronic sympathetic overactivity can potentiate two of the key metabolic alterations of the MetS, central obesity and insulin resistance. This review will discuss the regulatory role of the sympathetic nervous system in metabolic control and the proposed pathophysiology linking sympathetic overactivity to metabolic abnormalities. Pharmacological and device-based approaches that target central sympathetic drive will also be discussed as possible therapeutic options to improve metabolic control in at-risk patient cohorts. PMID:26064978

  14. Nicotine-induced exocytotic norepinephrine release in guinea-pig heart, human atrium and bovine adrenal chromaffin cells: modulation by single components of ischaemia.

    PubMed

    Krüger, C; Haunstetter, A; Gerber, S; Serf, C; Kaufmann, A; Kübler, W; Haass, M

    1995-08-01

    The influence of single components of myocardial ischaemia, such as anoxia, substrate withdrawal, hyperkalemia and extracellular acidosis, on nicotine-induced norepinephrine (NE) release was investigated in the isolated perfused guinea-pig heart, in incubated human atrial tissue and in cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells (BCC). In normoxia, nicotine (1-1000 mumol/l) evoked a concentration-dependent release of NE (determined by high pressure liquid chromatography and electrochemical detection) from guinea-pig heart and human atrium. In contrast to selective anoxia (Po2 < 5 mmHg) or glucose withdrawal, respectively, anoxia in combination with glucose withdrawal (5-40 min) markedly potentiated nicotine-induced NE release both in guinea-pig heart and human atrium. The sensitization of cardiac sympathetic nerve endings to nicotine was characterized by a lower threshold concentration and an approximate two-fold increase of maximum NE release, peaking after 10 min of anoxia and glucose withdrawal. Cyanide intoxication (1 mmol/l) combined with glucose withdrawal resulted in a similar increase of nicotine-induced sympathetic transmitter release both in guinea-pig heart and human atrium. In contrast, the nicotine-induced (10 mumol/l) NE overflow was only slightly potentiated by 10 min of global ischaemia in guinea-pig heart. Both hyperkalemia ([K+] 16 mmol/l) and acidosis (pH 6.8-6.0) distinctly attenuated the stimulatory effect of nicotine in guinea-pig heart and human atrium under normoxic conditions. Consistent with an exocytotic release mechanism, NE release was dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium under all conditions tested. Furthermore, NE overflow from guinea-pig heart was accompanied by a release of the exocytosis marker neuropeptide Y (NPY; determined by radioimmunoassay). In BCC, nicotine (1-10 mumol/l) evoked a release of NE and NPY and a transient rise of [Ca2+]i (determined with fura-2) during normoxia which were both dependent on the

  15. Sympathetic innervation, norepinephrine content, and norepinephrine turnover in orthotopic and spontaneous models of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Szpunar, Mercedes J; Belcher, Elizabeth K; Dawes, Ryan P; Madden, Kelley S

    2016-03-01

    Activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) drives breast cancer progression in preclinical breast cancer models, but it has yet to be established if neoplastic and stromal cells residing in the tumor are directly targeted by locally released norepinephrine (NE). In murine orthotopic and spontaneous mammary tumors, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)+ sympathetic nerves were limited to the periphery of the tumor. No TH+ staining was detected deeper within these tumors, even in regions with a high density of blood vessels. NE concentration was much lower in tumors compared to the more densely innervated spleen, reflecting the relative paucity of tumor TH+ innervation. Tumor and spleen NE concentration decreased with increased tissue mass. In mice treated with the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to selectively destroy sympathetic nerves, tumor NE concentration was reduced approximately 50%, suggesting that the majority of tumor NE is derived from local sympathetic nerves. To evaluate NE utilization, NE turnover in orthotopic 4T1 mammary tumors was compared to spleen under baseline and stress conditions. In non-stressed mice, NE turnover was equivalent between tumor and spleen. In mice exposed to a stressor, tumor NE turnover was increased compared to spleen NE turnover, and compared to non-stressed tumor NE turnover. Together, these results demonstrate that NE in mammary tumors is derived from local sympathetic nerves that synthesize and metabolize NE. However, differences between spleen and tumor NE turnover with stressor exposure suggest that sympathetic NE release is regulated differently within the tumor microenvironment compared to the spleen. Local mammary tumor sympathetic innervation, despite its limited distribution, is responsive to stressor exposure and therefore can contribute to stress-induced tumor progression. PMID:26718447

  16. Human muscle sympathetic neural and haemodynamic responses to tilt following spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Benjamin D.; Pawelczyk, James A.; Ertl, Andrew C.; Cox, James F.; Zuckerman, Julie H.; Diedrich, Andre; Biaggioni, Italo; Ray, Chester A.; Smith, Michael L.; Iwase, Satoshi; Saito, Mitsuru; Sugiyama, Yoshiki; Mano, Tadaaki; Zhang, Rong; Iwasaki, Kenichi; Lane, Lynda D.; Buckey, Jay C Jr; Cooke, William H.; Baisch, Friedhelm J.; Eckberg, Dwain L.; Blomqvist, C. Gunnar

    2002-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance is common when astronauts return to Earth: after brief spaceflight, up to two-thirds are unable to remain standing for 10 min. Previous research suggests that susceptible individuals are unable to increase their systemic vascular resistance and plasma noradrenaline concentrations above pre-flight upright levels. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that adaptation to the microgravity of space impairs sympathetic neural responses to upright posture on Earth. We studied six astronauts approximately 72 and 23 days before and on landing day after the 16 day Neurolab space shuttle mission. We measured heart rate, arterial pressure and cardiac output, and calculated stroke volume and total peripheral resistance, during supine rest and 10 min of 60 deg upright tilt. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity was recorded in five subjects, as a direct measure of sympathetic nervous system responses. As in previous studies, mean (+/- S.E.M.) stroke volume was lower (46 +/- 5 vs. 76 +/- 3 ml, P = 0.017) and heart rate was higher (93 +/- 1 vs. 74 +/- 4 beats min(-1), P = 0.002) during tilt after spaceflight than before spaceflight. Total peripheral resistance during tilt post flight was higher in some, but not all astronauts (1674 +/- 256 vs. 1372 +/- 62 dynes s cm(-5), P = 0.32). No crew member exhibited orthostatic hypotension or presyncopal symptoms during the 10 min of postflight tilting. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity was higher post flight in all subjects, in supine (27 +/- 4 vs. 17 +/- 2 bursts min(-1), P = 0.04) and tilted (46 +/- 4 vs. 38 +/- 3 bursts min(-1), P = 0.01) positions. A strong (r(2) = 0.91-1.00) linear correlation between left ventricular stroke volume and muscle sympathetic nerve activity suggested that sympathetic responses were appropriate for the haemodynamic challenge of upright tilt and were unaffected by spaceflight. We conclude that after 16 days of spaceflight, muscle sympathetic nerve responses to upright tilt are normal.

  17. Morphologic Changes in Autonomic Nerves in Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Heung Yong; Baek, Hong Sun; Park, Tae Sun

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic neuropathy is one of the major complications of diabetes, and it increases morbidity and mortality in patients with both type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Because the autonomic nervous system, for example, parasympathetic axons, has a diffuse and wide distribution, we do not know the morphological changes that occur in autonomic neural control and their exact mechanisms in diabetic patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN). Although the prevalence of sympathetic and parasympathetic neuropathy is similar in T1DM versus T2DM patients, sympathetic nerve function correlates with parasympathetic neuropathy only in T1DM patients. The explanation for these discrepancies might be that parasympathetic nerve function was more severely affected among T2DM patients. As parasympathetic nerve damage seems to be more advanced than sympathetic nerve damage, it might be that parasympathetic neuropathy precedes sympathetic neuropathy in T2DM, which was Ewing's concept. This could be explained by the intrinsic morphologic difference. Therefore, the morphological changes in the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves of involved organs in T1DM and T2DM patients who have DAN should be evaluated. In this review, evaluation methods for morphological changes in the epidermal nerves of skin, and the intrinsic nerves of the stomach will be discussed. PMID:26706915

  18. Physiological and pathophysiological interactions between the respiratory central pattern generator and the sympathetic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Zoccal, Daniel B; Baekey, David M; Abdala, Ana P L; Machado, Benedito H; Dick, Thomas E; Paton, Julian F R; Rybak, Ilya A

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory modulation seen in the sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) implies that the respiratory and sympathetic networks interact. During hypertension elicited by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), the SNA displays an enhanced respiratory modulation reflecting strengthened interactions between the networks. In this chapter, we review a series of experimental and modeling studies that help elucidate possible mechanisms of sympatho-respiratory coupling. We conclude that this coupling significantly contributes to both the sympathetic baroreflex and the augmented sympathetic activity after exposure to CIH. This conclusion is based on the following findings. (1) Baroreceptor activation results in perturbation of the respiratory pattern via transient activation of postinspiratory neurons in the Bötzinger complex (BötC). The same BötC neurons are involved in the respiratory modulation of SNA, and hence provide an additional pathway for the sympathetic baroreflex. (2) Under hypercapnia, phasic activation of abdominal motor nerves (AbN) is accompanied by synchronous discharges in SNA due to the common source of this rhythmic activity in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN). CIH conditioning increases the CO2 sensitivity of central chemoreceptors in the RTN which results in the emergence of AbN and SNA discharges under normocapnic conditions similar to those observed during hypercapnia in naïve animals. Thus, respiratory-sympathetic interactions play an important role in defining sympathetic output and significantly contribute to the sympathetic activity and hypertension under certain physiological or pathophysiological conditions, and the theoretical framework presented may be instrumental in understanding of malfunctioning control of sympathetic activity in a variety of disease states. PMID:25194190

  19. Effect of weightlessness on sympathetic-adrenomedullary activity of rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvetňanský, R.; Torda, T.; Macho, L.; Tigranian, R. A.; Serova, L.; Genin, A. M.

    Three cosmic experiments were performed in which rats spent 18-20 days in space on board the biosatellites "COSMOS 782", "COSMOS 936" and "COSMOS 1129". The following indicators of the sympathetic-adrenomedullary system (SAS) activity were measured: tissue and plasma catecholamines (CA), CA-synthesizing enzymes—tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH), phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PNMT)—as well as CA-degrading enzymes—monoamine oxidase (MAO) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT). Adrenal epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE) as well as CA-synthesizing and degrading enzymes were not significantly changed in the animals after flight on COSMOS 782. On the other hand, a significant increase was found in heart CA, the indicator which is usually decreased after stress. 26 days after landing all values were at control levels. The results obtained, compared to our previous stress experiments on Earth, suggest that prolonged weightlessness does not appear to be a pronounced stressful stimulus for the SAS. Heart and plasma CA, mainly NE, were increased both in the group living in the state of weightlessness and the group living in a centrifuge and exposed to artificial gravitation 1 g (COSMOS 936), suggesting again that prolonged weightlessness is not an intensive stressful stimulus for the SAS. The animals exposed after space flight on COSMOS 1129 to repeated immobilization stress on Earth showed a significant decrease of adrenal EPI and an expressive increase of adrenal TH activity compared to stressed animals which were not in space. Thus, the results corroborate that prolonged state of weightlessness during space flight though not representing by itself an intensive stressful stimulus for the sympathetic-adrenomedullary system, was found to potentiate the response of "cosmic rats" to stress exposure after return to Earth.

  20. Neurochemical codes of sympathetic preganglionic neurons activated by glucoprivation.

    PubMed

    Parker, Lindsay M; Kumar, Natasha N; Lonergan, Tina; Goodchild, Ann K

    2013-08-15

    Glucoprivation or hypoglycemia induces a range of counterregulatory responses, including glucose mobilization, reduced glucose utilization, and de novo glucose synthesis. These responses are mediated in part by the sympathetic nervous system. The aim of this study was to determine the chemical codes of sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPN) activated by glucoprivation, induced by 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG). SPN controlling the adrenal glands and celiac ganglia, which ultimately can innervate the liver and pancreas, were targeted together with the superior cervical ganglia (control). 23.9% ± 1.3% of SPN in the T4-T11 region contained c-Fos immunoreactivity following 2DG; 70.3% ± 1.8% of SPN innervating the adrenal glands and 37.4% ± 3% of SPN innervating celiac ganglia were activated. 14.8% ± 3.5% of SPN (C8-T3) innervating superior cervical ganglia were activated. In the C8-T3 region 55% ± 10% of SPN activated contained PPCART, with only 12% ± 3% expressing PPE mRNA, whereas, in the T4-T11 region, 78% ± 4% contained PPE, with only 6.0% ± 0.6% expressing PPCART mRNA. Thus CART is not involved in glucose mobilization. Two chemically distinct populations of SPN (PPE⁺ 57.4% ± 5%, PPE⁻ ∼40%) were identified to regulate adrenaline release in response to glucoprivation. Multiple chemically distinct SPN populations innervating a specific target could suggest their graded recruitment. The two distinct populations of SPN (PPE⁺ 67.6% ± 9%, PPE⁻ ∼30%) projecting to celiac ganglia activated by glucoprivation could direct pancreatic and hepatic or other counterregulatory responses. Nearly all SPN that expressed PPE mRNA and projected to the adrenal glands or celiac ganglia were activated, suggesting a role for the inhibitory peptide enkephalin in responses evoked by glucoprivation. PMID:23348748

  1. Agmatine suppresses peripheral sympathetic tone by inhibiting N-type Ca(2+) channel activity via imidazoline I2 receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Hwan; Jeong, Ji-Hyun; Ahn, Duck-Sun; Chung, Seungsoo

    2016-08-26

    Agmatine, a putative endogenous ligand of imidazoline receptors, suppresses cardiovascular function by inhibiting peripheral sympathetic tone. However, the molecular identity of imidazoline receptor subtypes and its cellular mechanism underlying the agmatine-induced sympathetic suppression remains unknown. Meanwhile, N-type Ca(2+) channels are important for the regulation of NA release in the peripheral sympathetic nervous system. Therefore, it is possible that agmatine suppresses NA release in peripheral sympathetic nerve terminals by inhibiting Ca(2+) influx through N-type Ca(2+) channels. We tested this hypothesis by investigating agmatine effect on electrical field stimulation (EFS)-evoked contraction and NA release in endothelium-denuded rat superior mesenteric arterial strips. We also investigated the effect of agmatine on the N-type Ca(2+) current in superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons in rats. Our study demonstrates that agmatine suppresses peripheral sympathetic outflow via the imidazoline I2 receptor in rat mesenteric arteries. In addition, the agmatine-induced suppression of peripheral vascular sympathetic tone is mediated by modulating voltage-dependent N-type Ca(2+) channels in sympathetic nerve terminals. These results suggest a potential cellular mechanism for the agmatine-induced suppression of peripheral sympathetic tone. Furthermore, they provide basic and theoretical information regarding the development of new agents to treat hypertension. PMID:27320860

  2. What Is Adrenal Cortical Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... include pheochromocytomas (which are most often benign) and neuroblastomas . This document is about tumors and cancers of ... does not discuss tumors of the adrenal medulla. Neuroblastoma s are covered in a separate document . Adrenal cortex ...

  3. Percutaneous Ablation of Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Locklin, Julia; Dupuy, Damian E.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Adrenal tumors comprise a broad spectrum of benign and malignant neoplasms, and include functional adrenal adenomas, pheochromocytomas, primary adrenocortical carcinoma and adrenal metastases. Percutaneous ablative approaches that have been described and used in the treatment of adrenal tumors include percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA), cryoablation, microwave ablation and chemical ablation. Local tumor ablation in the adrenal gland presents unique challenges, secondary to the adrenal gland’s unique anatomic and physiologic features. The results of clinical series employing percutaneous ablative techniques in the treatment of adrenal tumors are reviewed in this article. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the adrenal gland are presented, including approaches commonly used in our practices, and risks and potential complications are discussed. PMID:20540918

  4. Regulation of sympathetic nervous system function after cardiovascular deconditioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasser, E. M.; Moffitt, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Humans subjected to prolonged periods of bed rest or microgravity undergo deconditioning of the cardiovascular system, characterized by resting tachycardia, reduced exercise capability, and a predisposition for orthostatic intolerance. These changes in cardiovascular function are likely due to a combination of factors, including changes in control of body fluid balance or cardiac alterations resulting in inadequate maintenance of stroke volume, altered arterial or venous vascular function, reduced activation of cardiovascular hormones, and diminished autonomic reflex function. There is evidence indicating a role for each of these mechanisms. Diminished reflex activation of the sympathetic nervous system and subsequent vasoconstriction appear to play an important role. Studies utilizing the hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rat, an animal model of deconditioning, evaluated the potential role of altered arterial baroreflex control of the sympathetic nervous system. These studies indicate that HU results in blunted baroreflex-mediated activation of both renal and lumbar sympathetic nerve activity in response to a hypotensive stimulus. HU rats are less able to maintain arterial pressure during hemorrhage, suggesting that diminished ability to increase sympathetic activity has functional consequences for the animal. Reflex control of vasopressin secretion appears to be enhanced following HU. Blunted baroreflex-mediated sympathoexcitation appears to involve altered central nervous system function. Baroreceptor afferent activity in response to changes in arterial pressure is unaltered in HU rats. However, increases in efferent sympathetic nerve activity for a given decrease in afferent input are blunted after HU. This altered central nervous system processing of baroreceptor inputs appears to involve an effect at the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM). Specifically, it appears that tonic GABAA-mediated inhibition of the RVLM is enhanced after HU. Augmented inhibition apparently

  5. [Giant adrenal myelolipoma].

    PubMed

    El Mejjad, Amine; Fekak, Hamid; Dakir, Mohamed; Sarf, Ismail; Manni, Ahmed; Meziane, Fethi

    2004-02-01

    Adrenal myelolipoma is a rare, benign, non-secreting tumour composed of adipose and haematopoietic tissue. The authors report a rare case of giant adrenal myelolipoma in a 53-year-old patient presenting with low back pain and a palpable flank mass on examination. CT scan suggested the diagnosis and surgical resection was indicated in view of the size and symptomatic nature of this mass. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis. The outcome was favourable without recurrence after a follow-up of one year. The diagnosis of adrenal myelolipoma is based on radiology. Conservative management is generally sufficient for small asymptomatic tumours, but resection is required for large (> 5 cm) and/or symptomatic tumours. PMID:15098761

  6. Amitosis in human adrenal cells.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, M C; Pignatelli, D; Magalhães, M M

    1991-04-01

    Adrenal pieces obtained from 3 female and 2 male patients showed morphological figures of amitosis in adrenal zona reticularis cells. Such aspects were observed in both normal and hyperactive adrenals. Nuclei appeared constricted, heavily stained, with coarse chromatin, sometimes scattered among cytoplasmic organelles, but never marginating in crescentic caps. Cleavage of the cells originated two halves with a nucleolus in each pole. Binucleated cells were also seen in zona reticularis. The meaning of amitosis in human adrenal is discussed. PMID:1802124

  7. Lumbar Sympathetic Block with Botulinum Toxin Type B for Complex Regional Pain Syndrome: A Case Study.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eunjoo; Cho, Chan Woo; Kim, Hye Young; Lee, Pyung Bok; Nahm, Francis Sahngun

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar sympathetic block (LSB) is an effective method for relief of sympathetically mediated pain in the lower extremities. To prolong the sympathetic blockade, sympathetic destruction with alcohol or radiofrequency has been used. The pre-ganglionic sympathetic nerves are cholinergic, and botulinum toxin (BTX) has been found to inhibit the release of acetylcholine at the cholinergic nerve terminals. Moreover, BTX type B (BTX-B) is more convenient to use than BTX type A. Based on these findings, we performed LSB on the 2 patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) in the lower extremity. Levobupivacaine 0.25% 5 mL mixed with BTX-B 5,000 IU was given under fluoroscopic guidance. Two months after LSB with BTX-B, pain intensity and the Leeds assessment of neuropathic symptoms and signs (LANSS) score were significantly reduced. Allodynia and coldness disappeared and skin color came back to normal. In conclusion, BTX-B can produce an efficacious and durable sympathetic blocking effect on patients with CRPS. PMID:26431145

  8. Muscle sympathetic activity in resting and exercising humans with and without heart failure.

    PubMed

    Notarius, Catherine F; Millar, Philip J; Floras, John S

    2015-11-01

    The sympathetic nervous system is critical for coordinating the cardiovascular response to various types of physical exercise. In a number of disease states, including human heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF), this regulation can be disturbed and adversely affect outcome. The purpose of this review is to describe sympathetic activity at rest and during exercise in both healthy humans and those with HFrEF and outline factors, which influence these responses. We focus predominately on studies that report direct measurements of efferent sympathetic nerve traffic to skeletal muscle (muscle sympathetic nerve activity; MSNA) using intraneural microneurographic recordings. Differences in MSNA discharge between subjects with and without HFrEF both at rest and during exercise and the influence of exercise training on the sympathetic response to exercise will be discussed. In contrast to healthy controls, MSNA increases during mild to moderate dynamic exercise in the presence of HFrEF. This increase may contribute to the exercise intolerance characteristic of HFrEF by limiting muscle blood flow and may be attenuated by exercise training. Future investigations are needed to clarify the neural afferent mechanisms that contribute to efferent sympathetic activation at rest and during exercise in HFrEF. PMID:26481289

  9. Contribution of the cervical sympathetic ganglia to the innervation of the pharyngeal arch arteries and the heart in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Verberne, M E; Gittenberger-De Groot, A C; Van Iperen, L; Poelmann, R E

    1999-08-01

    In the chick heart, sympathetic innervation is derived from the sympathetic neural crest (trunk neural crest arising from somite level 10-20). Since the trunk neural crest gives rise to sympathetic ganglia of their corresponding level, it suggests that the sympathetic neural crest develops into cervical ganglia 4-14. We therefore tested the hypothesis that, in addition to the first thoracic ganglia, the cervical ganglia might contribute to cardiac innervation as well. Putative sympathetic nerve connections between the cervical ganglia and the heart were demonstrated using the differentiation markers tyrosine hydroxylase and HNK-1. In addition, heterospecific transplantation (quail to chick) of the cardiac and trunk neural crest was used to study the relation between the sympathetic neural crest and the cervical ganglia. Quail cells were visualized using the quail nuclear antibody QCPN. The results by immunohistochemical study show that the superior and the middle cervical ganglia and possibly the carotid paraganglia contribute to the carotid nerve. This nerve subsequently joins the nodose ganglion of the vagal nerve via which it contributes to nerve fibers in cardiac vagal branches entering the arterial and venous pole of the heart. In addition, the carotid nerve contributes to nerve fibers connected to putative baro- and chemoreceptors in and near the wall of pharyngeal arch arteries suggesting a role of the superior and middle cervical ganglia and the paraganglia of the carotid plexus in sensory afferent innervation. The lower cervical ganglia 13 and 14 contribute predominantly to nerve branches entering the venous pole via the anterior cardinal veins. We did not observe a thoracic contribution. Heterospecific transplantation shows that the cervical ganglia 4-14 as well as the carotid paraganglia are derived from the sympathetic neural crest. The cardiac neural crest does not contribute to the neurons of the cervical ganglia. We conclude that the cervical ganglia

  10. Nonclassic Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Witchel, Selma Feldman; Azziz, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Nonclassic congenital adrenal hyperplasia (NCAH) due to P450c21 (21-hydroxylase deficiency) is a common autosomal recessive disorder. This disorder is due to mutations in the CYP21A2 gene which is located at chromosome 6p21. The clinical features predominantly reflect androgen excess rather than adrenal insufficiency leading to an ascertainment bias favoring diagnosis in females. Treatment goals include normal linear growth velocity and “on-time” puberty in affected children. For adolescent and adult women, treatment goals include regularization of menses, prevention of progression of hirsutism, and fertility. This paper will review key aspects regarding pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of NCAH. PMID:20671993

  11. Adrenal venous sampling in a patient with adrenal Cushing syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Franco, Carlos Andrés; Román-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Velez-Hoyos, Alejandro; Echeverri-Isaza, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia or the independent adrenocorticotropic hormone bilateral nodular adrenal hyperplasia is a rare cause hypercortisolism, its diagnosis is challenging and there is no clear way to decide the best therapeutic approach. Adrenal venous sampling is commonly used to distinguish the source of hormonal production in patients with primary hyperaldosteronism. It could be a useful tool in this context because it might provide information to guide the treatment. We report the case of a patient with ACTH independent Cushing syndrome in whom the use of adrenal venous sampling with some modifications radically modified the treatment and allowed the diagnosis of a macronodular adrenal hyperplasia. PMID:26309345

  12. [Reflex sympathetic dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marta; Manuela, Manuela; Cantinho, Guilhermina

    2011-01-01

    Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy is rare in pediatrics. It is a complex regional pain syndrome, of unknown etiology, usually post-traumatic, characterized by dysfunctions of the musculoskeletal, vascular and skin systems: severe persistent pain of a limb, sensory and vascular alterations, associated disability and psychosocial dysfunction. The diagnosis is based in high clinical suspection. In children and adolescents there are aspects that are different from the adult ones. Excessive tests may result in worsening of the clinical symptoms. Bone scintigraphy can help. Pain treatment is difficult, not specific. Physical therapies and relaxation technics give some relief. Depression must be treated. This syndrome includes fibromyalgia and complex regional pain syndrome type I. We present a clinical report of an adolescent girl, referred for pain, cold temperature, pallor and functional disability of an inferior limb, all signals disclosed by a minor trauma. She had been diagnosed depression the year before. The bone scintigraphy was a decisive test. The treatment with gabapentin, C vitamin, physiotherapy and pshycotherapy has been effective. PMID:22713207

  13. Sympathetic Solar Filament Eruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Liu, Ying D.; Zimovets, Ivan; Hu, Huidong; Dai, Xinghua; Yang, Zhongwei

    2016-08-01

    The 2015 March 15 coronal mass ejection as one of the two that together drove the largest geomagnetic storm of solar cycle 24 so far was associated with sympathetic filament eruptions. We investigate the relations between the different filaments involved in the eruption. A surge-like small-scale filament motion is confirmed as the trigger that initiated the erupting filament with multi-wavelength observations and using a forced magnetic field extrapolation method. When the erupting filament moved to an open magnetic field region, it experienced an obvious acceleration process and was accompanied by a C-class flare and the rise of another larger filament that eventually failed to erupt. We measure the decay index of the background magnetic field, which presents a critical height of 118 Mm. Combining with a potential field source surface extrapolation method, we analyze the distributions of the large-scale magnetic field, which indicates that the open magnetic field region may provide a favorable condition for F2 rapid acceleration and have some relation with the largest solar storm. The comparison between the successful and failed filament eruptions suggests that the confining magnetic field plays an important role in the preconditions for an eruption.

  14. Traumatic panhypopituitarism resulting in acute adrenal crisis.

    PubMed

    Ham, Phillip Benson; Cunningham, Aaron Joseph; Mentzer, Caleb James; Ahmad, Anbar; Young, Lester S; Abuzeid, Adel M

    2015-09-01

    Pituitary function plays an integral role in the physiologic response to traumatic injury. A significant proportion of trauma patients develop partial pituitary insufficiency. While isolated deficiencies of individual pituitary hormones are common, there are few reports in the literature of traumatic pan-pituitary failure with deficiency of all major pituitary hormones. We present a case of a patient involved in a motorcycle accident who sustained a sella turcica fracture, epidural hemorrhage, subdural hemorrhage, optic nerve palsy, and bilateral abducens nerve palsies. Three days after the accident, the patient became hypotensive and progressed to cardiopulmonary arrest. He was resuscitated and had spontaneous return of circulation. Despite adequate fluid resuscitation and vasopressor support, he remained profoundly hypotensive. Following administration of hydrocortisone, his blood pressures dramatically improved. He was found to have laboratory abnormalities, suggesting deficiencies of corticotropins, somatotropins, thyrotropins, gonadotropins, prolactin, and antidiuretic hormone. This is the first reported case of a patient with traumatic total panhypopituitarism complicated by acute adrenal crises during initial postinjury hospitalization. A review of the literature with comparison with other studies of trauma patients with deficiencies in five or more axes is presented. A high level of suspicion for central adrenal insufficiency and prompt administration of corticosteroids in the setting of symptomatic pituitary trauma can result in favorable outcomes. Screening for and treating posttraumatic hypopituitarism can result in improved rehabilitation and increased quality of life for trauma patients. PMID:26307884

  15. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or inappropriately). Congenital adrenal hyperplasia can affect both boys and girls. About 1 in 10,000 to 18,000 ... penis but normal testes Well-developed muscles Both boys and girls will be tall as children, but much shorter ...

  16. Effects of active chronic cocaine use on cardiac sympathetic neuronal function assessed by carbon-11-hydroxyephedrine

    SciTech Connect

    Melon, P.G.; Boyd, C.J.; McVey, S. |

    1997-03-01

    Cardiac toxicity of cocaine has been linked to its inhibitory effect on norepinephrine reuptake by sympathetic nerve terminals of the heart. Carbon-11-hydroxyephedrine is a positron-emitting tracer that has been validated as a highly specific marker for norepinephrine transporter activity of the sympathetic nerve terminals and thus makes possible in vivo assessment of the effect of cocaine on norepinephrine reuptake and storage in the cardiac sympathetic nerve terminals. The aim of the study was to use the catecholamine analog {sup 11}C-hydroxyephedrine with PET to determine whether active chronic use of cocaine in women modifies the function of sympathetic nerve terminals of the heart. Six normal female volunteers and nine female active chronic cocaine users were studied. Cardiac regional {sup 11}C-hydroxyephedrine uptake and blood flow, as assessed with {sup 13}N-ammonia, were determined using semi-quantitative polar map analysis of myocardial tracer distribution. Carbon-11-hydroxyephedrine cardiac retention was quantified using dynamic data acquisition and kinetic analysis of blood and tissue activity. 27 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Influence of microgravity on astronauts' sympathetic and vagal responses to Valsalva's manoeuvre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, James F.; Tahvanainen, Kari U O.; Kuusela, Tom A.; Levine, Benjamin D.; Cooke, William H.; Mano, Tadaaki; Iwase, Satoshi; Saito, Mitsuru; Sugiyama, Yoshiki; Ertl, Andrew C.; Biaggioni, Italo; Diedrich, Andre; Robertson, Rose Marie; Zuckerman, Julie H.; Lane, Lynda D.; Ray, Chester A.; White, Ronald J.; Pawelczyk, James A.; Buckey, Jay C Jr; Baisch, Friedhelm J.; Blomqvist, C. Gunnar; Robertson, David; Eckberg, Dwain L.; Roberton, D. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    When astronauts return to Earth and stand, their heart rates may speed inordinately, their blood pressures may fall, and some may experience frank syncope. We studied brief autonomic and haemodynamic transients provoked by graded Valsalva manoeuvres in astronauts on Earth and in space, and tested the hypothesis that exposure to microgravity impairs sympathetic as well as vagal baroreflex responses. We recorded the electrocardiogram, finger photoplethysmographic arterial pressure, respiration and peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity in four healthy male astronauts (aged 38-44 years) before, during and after the 16 day Neurolab space shuttle mission. Astronauts performed two 15 s Valsalva manoeuvres at each pressure, 15 and 30 mmHg, in random order. Although no astronaut experienced presyncope after the mission, microgravity provoked major changes. For example, the average systolic pressure reduction during 30 mmHg straining was 27 mmHg pre-flight and 49 mmHg in flight. Increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity during straining were also much greater in space than on Earth. For example, mean normalized sympathetic activity increased 445% during 30 mmHg straining on earth and 792% in space. However, sympathetic baroreflex gain, taken as the integrated sympathetic response divided by the maximum diastolic pressure reduction during straining, was the same in space and on Earth. In contrast, vagal baroreflex gain, particularly during arterial pressure reductions, was diminished in space. This and earlier research suggest that exposure of healthy humans to microgravity augments arterial pressure and sympathetic responses to Valsalva straining and differentially reduces vagal, but not sympathetic baroreflex gain.

  18. Influence of microgravity on astronauts' sympathetic and vagal responses to Valsalva's manoeuvre

    PubMed Central

    Cox, James F; Tahvanainen, Kari UO; Kuusela, Tom A; Levine, Benjamin D; Cooke, William H; Mano, Tadaaki; Iwase, Satoshi; Saito, Mitsuru; Sugiyama, Yoshiki; Ertl, Andrew C; Biaggioni, Italo; Diedrich, André; Robertson, Rose Marie; Zuckerman, Julie H; Lane, Lynda D; Ray, Chester A; White, Ronald J; Pawelczyk, James A; Buckey, Jay C; Baisch, Friedhelm J; Bomqvist, C Gunnar; Robertson, David; Eckberg, Dwain L

    2002-01-01

    When astronauts return to Earth and stand, their heart rates may speed inordinately, their blood pressures may fall, and some may experience frank syncope. We studied brief autonomic and haemodynamic transients provoked by graded Valsalva manoeuvres in astronauts on Earth and in space, and tested the hypothesis that exposure to microgravity impairs sympathetic as well as vagal baroreflex responses. We recorded the electrocardiogram, finger photoplethysmographic arterial pressure, respiration and peroneal nerve muscle sympathetic activity in four healthy male astronauts (aged 38–44 years) before, during and after the 16 day Neurolab space shuttle mission. Astronauts performed two 15 s Valsalva manoeuvres at each pressure, 15 and 30 mmHg, in random order. Although no astronaut experienced presyncope after the mission, microgravity provoked major changes. For example, the average systolic pressure reduction during 30 mmHg straining was 27 mmHg pre-flight and 49 mmHg in flight. Increases in muscle sympathetic nerve activity during straining were also much greater in space than on Earth. For example, mean normalized sympathetic activity increased 445 % during 30 mmHg straining on earth and 792 % in space. However, sympathetic baroreflex gain, taken as the integrated sympathetic response divided by the maximum diastolic pressure reduction during straining, was the same in space and on Earth. In contrast, vagal baroreflex gain, particularly during arterial pressure reductions, was diminished in space. This and earlier research suggest that exposure of healthy humans to microgravity augments arterial pressure and sympathetic responses to Valsalva straining and differentially reduces vagal, but not sympathetic baroreflex gain. PMID:11773338

  19. CD44 expression in normal adrenal tissue and adrenal tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Barshack, I; Goldberg, I; Nass, D; Olchovsky, D; Kopolovic, J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CD44 is a cell surface glycoprotein found on many normal cells, mainly lymphoid and epithelial. Normal cells usually express standard CD44 (CD44-S), whereas malignant tumours may express CD44 variant isoforms (CD44-V). CD44 expression has been described for neural crest derivatives. Characterisation of differences in CD44 expression may help in the diagnosis and differentiation of distinct adrenal tumours. AIMS: To examine CD44 expression in different layers of cortical cortex, in adrenal medulla, and in adrenal tumours. METHODS: CD44-S and CD44-V6 expression were studied in 12 cases of adrenal cortical adenoma, 3 of adrenal cortical carcinoma, 10 of pheochromocytoma, and 4 normal adrenal glands. RESULTS: CD44-V6 staining showed cytoplasmic expression in normal adrenal cortex and in cortical adenomas and carcinomas. Pheochromocytomas also showed CD44-V6 expression but in 5 of the 10 cases it was sparse, focal, and sometimes perinuclear. Strong membranous staining for CD44-S was observed in normal adrenal medulla. Analysis of CD44-S expression revealed differences between cortical adrenal tumours and pheochromocytomas. Ten of 12 cortical adenomas and 2 of 3 cortical carcinoma cells showed weak to moderate cytoplasmic staining, but all cases of pheochromocytoma had strong membranous staining. CONCLUSIONS: Membranous CD44-S staining may help to distinguish pheochromocytoma from adrenal cortical adenoma. Images PMID:9577373

  20. Forearm training attenuates sympathetic responses to prolonged rhythmic forearm exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinoway, L.; Shenberger, J.; Leaman, G.; Zelis, R.; Gray, K.; Baily, R.; Leuenberger, U.

    1996-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that nonfatiguing rhythmic forearm exercise at 25% maximal voluntary contraction (12 2-s contractions/min) evokes sympathoexcitation without significant engagement of metabolite-sensitive muscle afferents (B.A. Batman, J.C. Hardy, U.A. Leuenberger, M.B. Smith, Q.X. Yang and L.I. Sinoway. J. Appl. Physiol. 76: 1077-1081, 1994). This is in contrast to the sympathetic nervous system responses observed during fatiguing static forearm exercise where metabolite-sensitive afferents are the key determinants of sympathetic activation. In this report we examined whether forearm exercise training would attenuate sympathetic nervous system responses to rhythmic forearm exercise. We measured heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (microneurography), plasma norepinephrine (NE), and NE spillover and clearance (tritiated NE kinetics) during nonfatiguing rhythmic forearm exercise before and after a 4-wk unilateral forearm training paradigm. Training had no effect on forearm mass, maximal voluntary contraction, or heart rate but did attenuate the increase in MAP (increase in MAP: from 15.2 +/- 1.8 before training to 11.4 +/- 1.4 mmHg after training; P < 0.017), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (increase in bursts: from 10.8 +/- 1.4 before training to 6.2 +/- 1.1 bursts/min after training; P < 0.030), and the NE spillover (increases in arterial spillover: from 1.3 +/- 0.2 before training to 0.6 +/- 0.2 nmol.min-1.m-2 after training, P < 0.014; increase in venous spillover: from 2.0 +/- 0.6 before training to 1.0 +/- 0.5 nmol.min-1.m-2 after training, P < 0.037) seen in response to exercise performed by the trained forearm. Thus forearm training reduces sympathetic responses during a nonfatiguing rhythmic handgrip paradigm that does not engage muscle metaboreceptors. We speculate that this effect is due to a conditioning-induced reduction in mechanically sensitive muscle afferent discharge.

  1. Generation of Murine Sympathoadrenergic Progenitor-Like Cells from Embryonic Stem Cells and Postnatal Adrenal Glands

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Shobhit; Wahl, Joachim; Huber-Lang, Markus S.; Stadel, Dominic; Braubach, Peter; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Beltinger, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Sympathoadrenergic progenitor cells (SAPs) of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are important for normal development of the sympathetic PNS and for the genesis of neuroblastoma, the most common and often lethal extracranial solid tumor in childhood. However, it remains difficult to isolate sufficient numbers of SAPs for investigations. We therefore set out to improve generation of SAPs by using two complementary approaches, differentiation from murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and isolation from postnatal murine adrenal glands. We provide evidence that selecting for GD2 expression enriches for ESC-derived SAP-like cells and that proliferating SAP-like cells can be isolated from postnatal adrenal glands of mice. These advances may facilitate investigations about the development and malignant transformation of the sympathetic PNS. PMID:23675538

  2. Composite pheochromocytoma with a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Namekawa, Takeshi; Utsumi, Takanobu; Imamoto, Takashi; Kawamura, Koji; Oide, Takashi; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Nihei, Naoki; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Nakatani, Yukio; Ichikawa, Tomohiko

    2016-07-01

    Adrenal tumors with more than one cellular component are uncommon. Furthermore, an adrenal tumor composed of a pheochromocytoma and a malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor is extremely rare. A composite pheochromocytoma with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a 42-year-old man is reported here. After adequate preoperative control, left adrenalectomy was performed simultaneously with resection of the ipsilateral kidney for spontaneous rupture of the left adrenal tumor. Pathological findings demonstrated pheochromocytoma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor in a ruptured adrenal tumor. To date, there have been only four reported cases of composite pheochromocytoma with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, so the present case is only the fifth case in the world. Despite the very poor prognosis of patients with pheochromocytoma and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors reported in the literature, the patient remains well without evidence of recurrence or new metastatic lesions at 36 months postoperatively. PMID:27338175

  3. In oculo transplants of myometrium from postpartum guinea pigs fail to support sympathetic reinnervation

    PubMed Central

    BRAUER, M. MONICA; BURNSTOCK, GEOFFREY; THRASIVOULOU, CHRISTOPHER; COWEN, TIMOTHY

    1998-01-01

    Sympathetic nerves to the enlarged fetus-containing region of the uterus undergo degenerative changes during late pregnancy and show slow regrowth after parturition. It is not known whether this unusual response of sympathetic nerves to smooth muscle hypertrophy is due to the sensitivity of short adrenergic neurons to hormonal changes, or whether the nerves respond to changes in the neurotrophic capacity of the target. We have investigated this question using in oculo transplantation. Small pieces of myometrium from the uterine horn of virgin guinea pigs, or from the region previously occupied by the placenta and fetus in postpartum guinea pigs, were transplanted into the anterior eye chamber. After 3 wk in oculo, the pattern of reinnervation of the transplants was assessed on whole mount stretch preparations stained for tyrosine hydroxylase. The histology of the transplants was examined in toluidine blue-stained semithin sections. Myometrial transplants from virgin donors and uterine artery transplants from both virgin and postpartum donors became organotypically reinnervated by sympathetic fibres from the host iris. In contrast, sympathetic nerves did not reinnervate myometrial transplants from postpartum donors, although they approached the transplants and became distributed in the surrounding connective tissue. All transplanted tissues showed a normal histological appearance. Both the myometrium and uterine artery from postpartum donors retained a hypertrophic appearance after 3 wk in oculo. We interpret these results to indicate that the degeneration of sympathetic nerves in late pregnancy, as well as their slow regrowth to the uterus after delivery, may be due to changes in uterine smooth muscle rather than a particular sensitivity of short adrenergic neurons to hormonal changes. PMID:10029184

  4. Pinched Nerve

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Pinched Nerve Information Page Table of Contents (click to jump ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Pinched Nerve? The term "pinched nerve" is a colloquial term ...

  5. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy may be done to help diagnose: Axon degeneration (destruction of the axon portion of the nerve cell) Damage to the ... Demyelination Inflammation of the nerve Leprosy Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis

  6. CT demonstration of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, D.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1983-08-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage with subsequent adrenal insufficiency is a recognized complication of anticoagulant therapy. Because the clinical manifestations are often nonspecific, the antemortem diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage has been a difficult clinical problem. Computed tomography (CT) provides detailed images of the adrenal glands that are not possible with conventional imaging methods. The CT findings of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in an anticoagulated patient are reported.

  7. Angiotensin II--nitric oxide interactions in the control of sympathetic outflow in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Zucker, I H; Liu, J L

    2000-03-01

    Activation of the sympathetic nervous system is a compensatory mechanism which initially provides support for the circulation in the face of a falling cardiac output. It has been recognized for some time that chronic elevation of sympathetic outflow with the consequent increase in plasma norepinephrine, is counterproductive to improving cardiac function. Indeed, therapeutic targeting to block excessive sympathetic activation in heart failure is becoming a more accepted modality. The mechanism(s) by which sympathetic excitation occurs in the heart failure state are not completely understood. Components of abnormal cardiovascular reflex regulation most likely contribute to this sympatho-excitation. However, central mechanisms which relate to the elaboration of angiotensin II (Ang II) and nitric oxide (NO) may also play an important role. Ang II has been shown to be a sympatho-excitatory peptide in the central nervous system while NO is sympatho-inhibitory. Recent studies have demonstrated that blockade of Ang II receptors of the AT(1) subtype augments arterial baroreflex control of sympathetic nerve activity in the heart failure state, thereby predisposing to a reduction in sympathetic tone. Ang II and NO interact to regulate sympathetic outflow. Blockade of NO production in normal conscious rabbits was only capable of increasing sympathetic outflow when accompanied by a background infusion of Ang II. Conversely, providing a source of NO to rabbits with heart failure reduced sympathetic nerve activity when accompanied by blockade of AT(1) receptors. Chronic heart failure is also associated with a decrease in NO synthesis in the brain as indicated by a reduction in the mRNA for the neuronal isoform (nNOS). Chronic blockade of Ang II receptors can up regulate nNOS expression. In addition, exercise training of rabbits with developing heart failure has been shown to reduce sympathetic tone, decrease plasma Ang II, improve arterial baroreflex function and increase n

  8. Radioguided Adrenal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Deus, Javier; Millera, Alfonso; Andrés, Alejandro; Prats, Enrique; Gil, Ismael; Suarez, Manuel; Salcini, José L.; Lahoz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The laparoscopic adrenalectomy is considered as the procedure of choice for the treatment of adrenal hyperplasia and tumor lesions. However, some special situations may limit the use of this method due to the difficulty to locate the gland and perform the lesion excision. We analyze 2 patients of a left adrenal tumor, explaining how they have overcome the difficulties in both situations. The first case was a patient with a history of intra-abdominal surgery and the other patient suffered from severe obesity. We performed with the use of the gamma probe, and the 2 cases, was of great help to access and glandular localization. The help of gamma probe test was achieved in the surgical bed, that removal was complete. The use of the portable gamma probe facilitated the access to the left adrenal gland as well as conducting the glandular excision without delay, despite the difficulties due to the intra abdominal surgery caused by the previous surgery, and in the case of severe obesity. PMID:26426608

  9. Attenuated preejection period response to tyramine in patients with cardiac sympathetic denervation

    PubMed Central

    Imrich, Richard; Eldadah, Basil A.; Bentho, Oladi; Pechnik, Sandra; Sharabi, Yehonatan; Holmes, Courtney; Goldstein, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Stress is a well-known factor affecting cardiac contractility through the cardiac sympathetic nerves. A positive inotropic effect of the cardiac sympathetic nerves on the myocardium is reflected by preejection period (PEP) shortening. Patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (NOH) (PD+NOH) or with pure autonomic failure (PAF) have markedly decreased myocardial 6-[18]F-fluorodopamine-derived radioactivity, reflecting cardiac sympathetic denervation. The functional effects of the cardiac sympathetic denervation have been unknown. Methods We measured PEP and heart rate-corrected PEP (PEPI) responses to i.v. tyramine (1 mg/min) in 13 patients (9 PD+OH and 4 PAF) with low 6-[18]F-fluorodopamine-derived radioactivity and in subjects with normal radioactivity (15 multiple system atrophy with NOS patients (MSA+NOS). Results Baseline PEP and PEPI did not differ between the groups. By 10 minutes after initiation of tyramine infusion, PEP and PEPI were significantly lower (p<0.01) in MSA+NOS, compared to baseline, whereas PEP and PEPI remained unchanged in the PD+NOH/PAF group. The PEP and PEPI decrease was larger in the MSA+NOS group than in the PD+NOH/PAF group (p<0.05). Conclusion One of the functional consequences of cardiac sympathetic denervation is failure to increase contractility in response to stimuli that depend on endogenous norepinephrine release. PMID:19120145

  10. Sympathetic regulation of cerebral blood flow during seizures in newborn lambs

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, C.D.; Wagerle, L.C.; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, M. )

    1988-09-01

    The authors examined cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation by the sympathetic nerves in 12 newborn lambs during seizures, a potent reflex stimulator of the sympathetic nervous system. CBF was measured with microspheres, and seizures were induced with bicuculline. In six of these lambs, one hemibrain was denervated (D) chronically by interrupting the ipsilateral cervical sympathetic trunk; the other hemibrain remained innervated (I). Before and after 10, 35, and 70 min of seizures, cerebral gray matter blood flow was measured. In the cerebral white matter, hippocampus, caudate, and thalamus blood flows to the D and I hemibrains were similar before seizures but during seizures they were 10-39% greater in the D than in the I hemibrain. Midbrain, brainstem, and cerebellum D and I blood flows were always similar. In the other six lambs, acute denervation during seizures increased ipsilateral cerebral gray and hippocampus blood flow by 10-31%, but unilateral electrical stimulation decreased ipsilateral cerebral gray, cerebral white, hippocampus, thalamus, and caudate blood flow by 17-27%. The data demonstrate that, during seizures, sympathetic nerve activity modifies regional CBF and the effect is sustained, suggesting a role for the sympathetic nervous system in newborn CBF regulation.

  11. Short-term diabetic hyperglycemia suppresses celiac ganglia neurotransmission, thereby impairing sympathetically mediated glucagon responses.

    PubMed

    Mundinger, Thomas O; Cooper, Ellis; Coleman, Michael P; Taborsky, Gerald J

    2015-08-01

    Short-term hyperglycemia suppresses superior cervical ganglia neurotransmission. If this ganglionic dysfunction also occurs in the islet sympathetic pathway, sympathetically mediated glucagon responses could be impaired. Our objectives were 1) to test for a suppressive effect of 7 days of streptozotocin (STZ) diabetes on celiac ganglia (CG) activation and on neurotransmitter and glucagon responses to preganglionic nerve stimulation, 2) to isolate the defect in the islet sympathetic pathway to the CG itself, and 3) to test for a protective effect of the WLD(S) mutation. We injected saline or nicotine in nondiabetic and STZ-diabetic rats and measured fos mRNA levels in whole CG. We electrically stimulated the preganglionic or postganglionic nerve trunk of the CG in nondiabetic and STZ-diabetic rats and measured portal venous norepinephrine and glucagon responses. We repeated the nicotine and preganglionic nerve stimulation studies in nondiabetic and STZ-diabetic WLD(S) rats. In STZ-diabetic rats, the CG fos response to nicotine was suppressed, and the norepinephrine and glucagon responses to preganglionic nerve stimulation were impaired. In contrast, the norepinephrine and glucagon responses to postganglionic nerve stimulation were normal. The CG fos response to nicotine, and the norepinephrine and glucagon responses to preganglionic nerve stimulation, were normal in STZ-diabetic WLD(S) rats. In conclusion, short-term hyperglycemia's suppressive effect on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors of the CG impairs sympathetically mediated glucagon responses. WLD(S) rats are protected from this dysfunction. The implication is that this CG dysfunction may contribute to the impaired glucagon response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia seen early in type 1 diabetes. PMID:26037249

  12. Rodent and primate adrenal medullary cells in vitro: phenotypic plasticity in response to coculture with C6 glioma cells or NGF.

    PubMed

    Notter, M F; Hansen, J T; Okawara, S; Gash, D M

    1989-01-01

    In order to maintain a chronic supply of growth factor for medulla cells in vitro, chromaffin cells from rat, African green monkeys and man were co-cultured with C6 glioma cells, which secrete growth factors that sustain sympathetic neurons in vitro. The response of chromaffin cells to coculture was compared to treatment of medullary cells with nerve growth factor (NGF) alone. Dispersed chromaffin cell preparations were obtained by a trypsin-collagenase procedure, and subjected to differential plating on collagen-coated surfaces. With both human and monkey tissue, non-chromaffin cells did attach to the culture plates and an enriched chromaffin cell population could be replated. Rat adrenal medulla cells survived very poorly in vitro and were not enriched in this procedure. Cultured human and monkey chromaffin cells survived as epithelial cells (50%) and showed neuritic outgrowth on 55 to 66% of the cells after eight days when treated with nerve growth factor (NGF). These cells showed strong catecholamine histofluorescence, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH) immunoreactivity. In contrast, only ten percent of adult rat chromaffin cells survived in culture, although NGF treatment rescued an additional 20% of the cells and induced neuritic outgrowth after one week in vitro. C6 glioma cells were treated with mitomycin C bromodeoxyuridine to inhibit mitosis and were plated with the various medulla cells in a one to one ratio. Both human and monkey chromaffin cells expressed extensive and enhanced neuritic arborization within eight days of co-culture, (64-82% respectively) and exhibited intimate contact with the glioma cells as seen at the ultrastructural level. Importantly, survival of adult rat adrenal medulla cells was enhanced to 50% or more with 40% of the cells extending neurites when co-cultured with glioma cells for seven days. Chromaffin cells from all three species reacted for TH, DBH and PNMT in co-culture and were histo

  13. Essential role of sympathetic endothelin A receptors for adverse cardiac remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Lorenz H.; Rostosky, Julia S.; Buss, Sebastian J.; Kreusser, Michael M.; Krebs, Jutta; Mier, Walter; Enseleit, Frank; Spiger, Katharina; Hardt, Stefan E.; Wieland, Thomas; Haass, Markus; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Schneider, Michael D.; Parlato, Rosanna; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Haberkorn, Uwe; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Katus, Hugo A.; Backs, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    In preclinical studies, endothelin receptor A (ETA) antagonists (ETAi) attenuated the progression of heart failure (HF). However, clinical HF trials failed to demonstrate beneficial effects of ETAi. These conflicting data may be explained by the possibility that established HF drugs such as adrenergic receptor blockers interfered with the mechanism of ETAi action in clinical trials. Here we report that mice lacking ETA only in sympathetic neurons (SN-KO) showed less adverse structural remodeling and cardiac dysfunction in response to pathological pressure overload induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). In contrast, mice lacking ETA only in cardiomyocytes (CM-KO) were not protected. TAC led to a disturbed sympathetic nerve function as measured by cardiac norepinephrine (NE) tissue levels and [124I]-metaiodobenzylguanidine-PET, which was prevented in SN-KO. In a rat model of HF, ETAi improved cardiac and sympathetic nerve function. In cocultures of cardiomyocytes (CMs) and sympathetic neurons (SNs), endothelin-1 (ET1) led to a massive NE release and exaggerated CM hypertrophy compared with CM monocultures. ETA-deficient CMs gained a hypertrophic response through wild-type SNs, but ETA-deficient SNs failed to mediate exaggerated CM hypertrophy. Furthermore, ET1 mediated its effects indirectly via NE in CM-SN cocultures through adrenergic receptors and histone deacetylases, resulting in activation of the prohypertrophic transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2. In conclusion, sympathetic ETA amplifies ET1 effects on CMs through adrenergic signaling pathways. Thus, antiadrenergic therapies may blunt potentially beneficial effects of ETAi. Taken together, this may indicate that patients with β blocker intolerance or disturbed sympathetic nerve function could be evaluated for a potential benefit from ETAi. PMID:25197047

  14. Regulation of Glucose Tolerance and Sympathetic Activity by MC4R Signaling in the Lateral Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Donald A.; McDaniel, Latisha N.; Yin, Terry; Khan, Michael; Jiang, Jingwei; Acevedo, Michael R.; Walsh, Susan A.; Ponto, Laura L. Boles; Norris, Andrew W.; Lutter, Michael; Rahmouni, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) signaling mediates diverse physiological functions, including energy balance, glucose homeostasis, and autonomic activity. Although the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) is known to express MC4Rs and to receive input from leptin-responsive arcuate proopiomelanocortin neurons, the physiological functions of MC4Rs in the LHA are incompletely understood. We report that MC4RLHA signaling regulates glucose tolerance and sympathetic nerve activity. Restoring expression of MC4Rs specifically in the LHA improves glucose intolerance in obese MC4R-null mice without affecting body weight or circulating insulin levels. Fluorodeoxyglucose-mediated tracing of whole-body glucose uptake identifies the interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT) as a primary source where glucose uptake is increased in MC4RLHA mice. Direct multifiber sympathetic nerve recording further reveals that sympathetic traffic to iBAT is significantly increased in MC4RLHA mice, which accompanies a significant elevation of Glut4 expression in iBAT. Finally, bilateral iBAT denervation prevents the glucoregulatory effect of MC4RLHA signaling. These results identify a novel role for MC4RLHA signaling in the control of sympathetic nerve activity and glucose tolerance independent of energy balance. PMID:25605803

  15. Sympathetic and sensory innervation of small intensely fluorescent (SIF) cells in rat superior cervical ganglion.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Fumiya; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Kusakabe, Tatsumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio

    2015-02-01

    The sympathetic ganglion contains small intensely fluorescent (SIF) cells derived from the neural crest. We morphologically characterize SIF cells and focus on their relationship with ganglionic cells, preganglionic nerve fibers and sensory nerve endings. SIF cells stained intensely for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), with a few cells also being immunoreactive for dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH). Vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT)-immunoreactive puncta were distributed around some clusters of SIF cells, whereas some SIF cells closely abutted DBH-immunoreactive ganglionic cells. SIF cells contained bassoon-immunoreactive products beneath the cell membrane at the attachments and on opposite sites to the ganglionic cells. Ganglion neurons and SIF cells were immunoreactive to dopamine D2 receptors. Immunohistochemistry for P2X3 revealed ramified nerve endings with P2X3 immunoreactivity around SIF cells. Triple-labeling for P2X3, TH and VAChT allowed the classification of SIF cells into three types based on their innervation: (1) with only VAChT-immunoreactive puncta, (2) with only P2X3-immunoreactive nerve endings, (3) with both P2X3-immunoreactive nerve endings and VAChT-immunoreactive puncta. The results of retrograde tracing with fast blue dye indicated that most of these nerve endings originated from the petrosal ganglion. Thus, SIF cells in the superior cervical ganglion are innervated by preganglionic fibers and glossopharyngeal sensory nerve endings and can be classified into three types. SIF cells might modulate sympathetic activity in the superior cervical ganglion. PMID:25416508

  16. Role of renal sensory nerves in physiological and pathophysiological conditions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Whether activation of afferent renal nerves contributes to the regulation of arterial pressure and sodium balance has been long overlooked. In normotensive rats, activating renal mechanosensory nerves decrease efferent renal sympathetic nerve activity (ERSNA) and increase urinary sodium excretion, an inhibitory renorenal reflex. There is an interaction between efferent and afferent renal nerves, whereby increases in ERSNA increase afferent renal nerve activity (ARNA), leading to decreases in ERSNA by activation of the renorenal reflexes to maintain low ERSNA to minimize sodium retention. High-sodium diet enhances the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves, while low dietary sodium reduces the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves, thus producing physiologically appropriate responses to maintain sodium balance. Increased renal ANG II reduces the responsiveness of the renal sensory nerves in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, including hypertension, congestive heart failure, and ischemia-induced acute renal failure. Impairment of inhibitory renorenal reflexes in these pathological states would contribute to the hypertension and sodium retention. When the inhibitory renorenal reflexes are suppressed, excitatory reflexes may prevail. Renal denervation reduces arterial pressure in experimental hypertension and in treatment-resistant hypertensive patients. The fall in arterial pressure is associated with a fall in muscle sympathetic nerve activity, suggesting that increased ARNA contributes to increased arterial pressure in these patients. Although removal of both renal sympathetic and afferent renal sensory nerves most likely contributes to the arterial pressure reduction initially, additional mechanisms may be involved in long-term arterial pressure reduction since sympathetic and sensory nerves reinnervate renal tissue in a similar time-dependent fashion following renal denervation. PMID:25411364

  17. Is it time to think about the sodium glucose co-transporter 2 sympathetically?

    PubMed

    Elliott, Rosemary H; Matthews, Vance B; Rudnicka, Caroline; Schlaich, Markus P

    2016-04-01

    Disturbances in glucose homeostasis are a key feature of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Renal glucose reabsorption is an important factor in glycaemic control. Glucose reabsorption in the proximal tubules is mediated by the sodium glucose co-transporter 2. The capacity for glucose reabsorption is increased in type 2 diabetes and contributes significantly to hyperglycaemia and impaired glucose control. Understanding the mechanisms underpinning the regulation of the sodium glucose co-transporter 2 is therefore of high clinical relevance. However, despite recent advances in the field and the availability of pharmacological inhibitors of this glucose transporter for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, the mechanisms that regulate sodium glucose co-transporter 2 expression are not fully understood. The sympathetic nervous system is an important modulator of glucose homeostasis, and sympathetic hyperactivity is a characteristic feature of obesity, the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. Sympathetic inhibition either achieved pharmacologically or by renal sympathetic denervation has been associated with improved glucose control. Importantly, sympathetic nerves innervate the proximal tubules of the kidney where they have been shown to regulate the expression of other transporters such as the sodium hydrogen exchanger 3. This review aims to explore the evidence for the regulation of sodium glucose co-transporter 2-mediated glucose reabsorption by the sympathetic nervous system. PMID:26369359

  18. Modulation of the sympathetic response to acute hypoxia by the caudal ventrolateral medulla in rats

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Daniel A; Schreihofer, Ann M

    2009-01-01

    Hypoxia elevates splanchnic sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) with differential effects during inspiration and expiration by unresolved central mechanisms. We examined the hypothesis that cardiovascular-related neurones in the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM) contribute to the complex sympathetic response to hypoxia. In chloralose-anaesthetized, ventilated, vagotomized rats, acute hypoxia (10% O2, 60 s) evoked an increase in SNA (103 ± 12%) that was characterized by a decrease in activity during early inspiration followed by a prominent rise during expiration. Some recorded baro-activated CVLM neurones (n= 13) were activated by hypoxia, and most of these neurones displayed peak activity during inspiration that was enhanced during hypoxia. In contrast, other baro-activated CVLM neurones were inhibited during hypoxia (n= 6), and most of these neurones showed peak activity during expiration prior to the onset of hypoxia. Microinjection of the glutamate antagonist kynurenate into the CVLM eliminated the respiratory-related fluctuations in SNA during hypoxia and exaggerated the magnitude of the sympathetic response. In contrast, microinjection of a GABAA antagonist (bicuculline or gabazine) into the CVLM dramatically attenuated the sympathetic response to hypoxia. These data suggest the response to hypoxia in baro-activated CVLM neurones is related to their basal pattern of respiratory-related activity, and changes in the activity of these neurones is consistent with a contribution to the respiratory-related sympathetic responses to hypoxia. Furthermore, both glutamate and GABA in the CVLM contribute to the complex sympathetic response to acute hypoxia. PMID:19047207

  19. Syringomyelia, limb hypertrophy and sympathetic overactivity: a rare association

    PubMed Central

    Khanra, Dibbendhu; Ray, Sayantan; Sonthalia, Nikhil; Talukdar, Arunansu

    2012-01-01

    A 32-year-old man presented with uniform enlargement of right upper limb for 6 years. Examination revealed painful disorganised elbow joint along with sensory impairment in the affected limb with weakness of small muscles. The patient was given empirical antileprotic therapy from outside without any benefit. Ultrasonography showed pan-hypertrophic nature of local tissues. Although axonal type of sensorimotor neuropathy involving right ulnar and median nerve was detected in nerve conduction velocity study, biopsy of the same failed to confirm any axonal degeneration or evidence of leprosy. Considering the nature of sensory abnormality MRI of cervical spine was done which revealed a syrinx extending from C3 till D2. Tests for vasomotor tone showed positive results on the affected limb. Syringomyelia can rarely give rise to pan-hypertrophy of limb due to sympathetic overactivity, which is infrequently reported in literatures and deficient in logical grounds. PMID:22707684

  20. Sympathetic vascular transduction is augmented in young normotensive blacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Chester A.; Monahan, Kevin D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine sympathetic vascular transduction in young normotensive black and white adults. We hypothesized that blacks would demonstrate augmented transduction of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) into vascular resistance. To test this hypothesis, MSNA, forearm blood flow, heart rate, and arterial blood pressure were measured during lower body negative pressure (LBNP). At rest, no differences existed in arterial blood pressure, heart rate, forearm blood flow, and forearm vascular resistance (FVR). Likewise, LBNP elicited comparable responses of these variables for blacks and whites. Baseline MSNA did not differ between blacks and whites, but whites demonstrated greater increases during LBNP (28 +/- 7 vs. 55 +/- 18%, 81 +/- 21 vs. 137 +/- 42%, 174 +/- 81 vs. 556 +/- 98% for -5, -15, and -40 mmHg LBNP, respectively; P < 0.001). Consistent with smaller increases in MSNA but similar FVR responses during LBNP, blacks demonstrated greater sympathetic vascular transduction (%FVR/%MSNA) than whites (0.95 +/- 0.07 vs. 0.82 +/- 0.07 U; 0.82 +/- 0.11 vs. 0.64 +/- 0.09 U; 0.95 +/- 0.37 vs. 0.35 +/- 0.09 U; P < 0.01). In summary, young whites demonstrate greater increases in MSNA during baroreceptor unloading than age-matched normotensive blacks. However, more importantly, for a given increase in MSNA, blacks demonstrate greater forearm vasoconstriction than whites. This finding may contribute to augmented blood pressure reactivity in blacks.

  1. Sympathetic Activation is Associated with Exercise Limitation in COPD.

    PubMed

    Haarmann, Helge; Folle, Jan; Nguyen, Xuan Phuc; Herrmann, Peter; Heusser, Karsten; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Andreas, Stefan; Raupach, Tobias

    2016-10-01

    Exercise intolerance, skeletal muscle dysfunction, and reduced daily activity are central in COPD patients and closely related to quality of life and prognosis. Studies assessing muscle exercise have revealed an increase in sympathetic outflow as a link to muscle hypoperfusion and exercise limitation. Our primary hypothesis was that muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) correlates with exercise limitation in COPD. MSNA was evaluated at rest and during dynamic or static handgrip exercise. Additionally, we assessed heart rate, blood pressure, CO2 tension, oxygen saturation (SpO2), and breathing frequency. Ergospirometry was performed to evaluate exercise capacity. We assessed MSNA of 14 COPD patients and 8 controls. In patients, MSNA was negatively correlated with peak oxygen uptake (VO2% pred) (r = -0.597; p = 0.040). During dynamic or static handgrip exercise, patients exhibited a significant increase in MSNA, which was not observed in the control group. The increase in MSNA during dynamic handgrip was highly negatively correlated with peak exercise capacity in Watts (w) and peak oxygen uptake (VO2/kg) (r = -0.853; p = 0.002 and r = -0.881; p = 0.002, respectively). Our study reveals an association between increased MSNA and limited exercise capacity in patients with COPD. Furthermore, we found an increased sympathetic response to moderate physical exercise (handgrip), which may contribute to exercise intolerance in COPD. PMID:26829234

  2. Truths, errors, and lies around "reflex sympathetic dystrophy" and "complex regional pain syndrome".

    PubMed

    Ochoa, J L

    1999-10-01

    The shifting paradigm of reflex sympathetic dystrophy-sympathetically maintained pains-complex regional pain syndrome is characterized by vestigial truths and understandable errors, but also unjustifiable lies. It is true that patients with organically based neuropathic pain harbor unquestionable and physiologically demonstrable evidence of nerve fiber dysfunction leading to a predictable clinical profile with stereotyped temporal evolution. In turn, patients with psychogenic pseudoneuropathy, sustained by conversion-somatization-malingering, not only lack physiological evidence of structural nerve fiber disease but display a characteristically atypical, half-subjective, psychophysical sensory-motor profile. The objective vasomotor signs may have any variety of neurogenic, vasogenic, and psychogenic origins. Neurological differential diagnosis of "neuropathic pain" versus pseudoneuropathy is straight forward provided that stringent requirements of neurological semeiology are not bypassed. Embarrassing conceptual errors explain the assumption that there exists a clinically relevant "sympathetically maintained pain" status. Errors include historical misinterpretation of vasomotor signs in symptomatic body parts, and misconstruing symptomatic relief after "diagnostic" sympathetic blocks, due to lack of consideration of the placebo effect which explains the outcome. It is a lie that sympatholysis may specifically cure patients with unqualified "reflex sympathetic dystrophy." This was already stated by the father of sympathectomy, René Leriche, more than half a century ago. As extrapolated from observations in animals with gross experimental nerve injury, adducing hypothetical, untestable, secondary central neuron sensitization to explain psychophysical sensory-motor complaints displayed by patients with blatantly absent nerve fiber injury, is not an error, but a lie. While conceptual errors are not only forgivable, but natural to inexact medical science, lies

  3. Adrenergic vasoconstriction in peripheral nerves of the rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Selander, D.; Mansson, L.G.; Karlsson, L.; Svanvik, J.

    1985-01-01

    The blood flow in the sciatic nerve of the rabbit was estimated from the wash out of intraneurally injected /sup 133/Xe. To avoid diffusion of the tracer into the surrounding muscular tissue, the nerve was covered by a gas-tight plastic film. Using this technique, the basal blood flow in the sciatic nerve was estimated to 35 ml X min-1 X 100 g-1. It was found that intraarterial norepinephrine and electrical stimulation of the lumbar sympathetic chain strongly reduced the wash out of /sup 133/Xe, which only can be explained by a pronounced reduction of the blood flow in the nerve itself. The blood flow again increased within 4 min of stopping the infusion of norepinephrine or the sympathetic stimulation. The prolonged effect and higher neurotoxicity of local anesthetics containing adrenaline may be explained by an alpha receptor-mediated vasoconstriction of the microvessels of peripheral nerves.

  4. Adrenal hemangioma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Auh, Y H; Anand, J; Zirinsky, K; Kazam, E

    1986-01-01

    Adrenal hemangioma is a very rare tumor. Presented is the 18th case proved by autopsy or surgery reported in world literature. The tumor was incidentally discovered at autopsy. Unless this tumor has characteristic calcifications, phlebolith or phlebolithlike, its computed tomography appearance is nonspecific. Therefore, by computed tomography this tumor cannot be differentiated from other primary or secondary adrenal tumors. PMID:3943357

  5. [The effect of lessons with a computer on the function of the sympathoadrenal and hypothalamo-hypophyseal-adrenal systems in 6-year-old children].

    PubMed

    Gubareva, L I; Kupriĭ, G A; Mishina, N F; Mishina, E A

    1996-04-01

    Computer classes were shown to affect the sympathetic-adrenal and hypothalamo-hypophyseal-adrenocortical systems in 6-year-old children. The data obtained suggests the necessity of a medical-pedagogical control of the selection of children for computer groups. PMID:8963344

  6. Sympathetic neurons can produce and respond to interleukin 6

    PubMed Central

    März, Pia; Cheng, Jr-Gang; Gadient, Reto A.; Patterson, Paul H.; Stoyan, Tanja; Otten, Uwe; Rose-John, Stefan

    1998-01-01

    Neuronal expression of cytokines is an area of active investigation in the contexts of development, disease, and normal neural function. Although cultured rat sympathetic neurons respond very weakly to exogenous interleukin 6 (IL-6), we find that addition of soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6R) and IL-6 enhances neuronal survival in the absence of nerve growth factor. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against IL-6 block these effects. Addition of IL-6 and sIL-6R also induces a subset of neuropeptide and transmitter synthetic enzyme mRNAs identical to that demonstrated for leukemia inhibitory factor, ciliary neurotrophic factor, and oncostatin M. Both of these effects are duplicated by addition of a highly active fusion protein of sIL-6R and IL-6, covalently linked by a flexible peptide chain, which is designated H-IL-6. In addition, we show that sympathetic neurons produce IL-6. In situ hybridization indicates a neuronal localization of IL-6 mRNA in superior cervical ganglia, and bioactive IL-6 protein is detected in ganglion culture supernatants. Interestingly, the IL-6 produced by sympathetic neurons does not lead to survival of these cells in culture unless sIL-6R is added. Thus, sympathetic neurons can produce IL-6 and may respond to it in an autocrine/paracrine manner if sIL-6R is present. Moreover, the prior findings of sIL-6R in serum and inflammatory fluids now have added interest in the context of neuro–immune interactions. PMID:9501249

  7. A new concept of the sympathetic pathways to the eye.

    PubMed

    Palumbo, L T

    1976-08-01

    The sympathetic pupillociliary pathways controlling the dilatation of the pupil in man have been recorded by many authorities as passing via the first and/or second thoracic (dorsal) rami to the lower part of the stellate (first thoracic) ganglion. It has been stated by these and other authorities that the removal of the lower part of the stellate ganglion and/or resection of the first and/or second thoracic rami would produce a Horner's syndrome. This currently accepted concept of the sympathetic pathways to the eye we believe to be incorrect. Our entire clinical experience has consistently contradicted the findings and reports of other investigators. It is suggested that the ability afforded by a new surgical approach to reach, dissect, and exactly control the line of resection without undue trauma to the stellate ganglion has made possible for the first time a definitive statement concerning the entry of the pupillociliary pathways into the sympathetic chain. It is, therefore, postulated that the preganglionic neurons controlling the pupil enter the upper portion of the stellate ganglion by a separate paravertebral route leaving the ventral roots of the eighth cervical, first and/or second thoracic nerves. Our entire clinical experience refutes the concept that these pathways pass via the first ramus communicans to the first thoracic ganglion. This thesis is based on and supported by the results of new surgical approach originally designed to permit a more direct exposure and to overcome many of the deficiencies of current surgical approaches. The anterior transthoracic, transpleural wound employed allows a more direct approach and a more accurate and complete dissection of this segment of the sympathetic supply to the head, neck, upper extremity, heart, and coronary vessels without incurring the undesirable sequela of a Horner's syndrome in 93% of patients. PMID:962268

  8. A Demonstration of Sympathetic Cotransmission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Christopher D.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, most undergraduate textbooks that cover the autonomic nervous system retain the concept that autonomic nerves release either acetylcholine or norepinephrine. However, in recent years, a large volume of research has superseded this concept with one in which autonomic nerves normally release at least one cotransmitter along with a…

  9. Adrenal function testing.

    PubMed

    Dluhy, R G

    1978-12-01

    Glucocorticoid stimulation and suppression tests are essential to the definitive diagnosis of diseases of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, because they document abnormal physiologic control of hormonal secretion. Similarly, diseases of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone axis are diagnosed by mineralocorticoid stimulation and suppression testing. [Ed. Note: See Moore TJ, Williams GH: Adrenal causes of hypertension, in this issue.] Unlike tests of glucocorticoid function, testing of the renin-angiotension-aldosterone system is more complicated, because knowledge of posture and dietary sodium are necessary to interpret the results. However, measurement of the tropic hormone renin and plasma levels of aldosterone can be accurately made, allowing precise definition of this system. Errors are most commonly encountered when dynamic tests of cortisol output are performed in patients taking medications that may interfere with the assays or with the metabolism of the administered compounds, such as dexamethasone or metyrapone. Abnormal, spurious values may also be obtained in some individuals who do not have adrenocortical hyperfunction if they are very obese or if testing is performed in a setting of clinical stress. Careful attention to these pitfalls will avoid errors and allow the clinician to arrive at the correct diagnosis. PMID:216524

  10. Foxo1 regulates Dbh expression and the activity of the sympathetic nervous system in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kajimura, Daisuke; Paone, Riccardo; Mann, J John; Karsenty, Gerard

    2014-10-01

    The transcription factor FoxO1 regulates multiple physiological processes. Here, we show that FoxO1 is highly expressed in neurons of the locus coeruleus and of various sympathetic ganglions, but not in the adrenal medulla. Consistent with this pattern of expression, mice lacking FoxO1 only in sympathetic neurons (FoxO1 Dbh-/-) display a low sympathetic tone without modification of the catecholamine content in the adrenal medulla. As a result, FoxO1 Dbh-/- mice demonstrate an increased insulin secretion, improved glucose tolerance, low energy expenditure, and high bone mass. FoxO1 favors catecholamine synthesis because it is a potent regulator of the expression of Dbh that encodes the initial and rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of these neurotransmitters. By identifying FoxO1 as a transcriptional regulator of the sympathetic tone, these results advance our understanding of the control of some aspects of metabolism and of bone mass accrual. PMID:25353004

  11. Adrenal Development in Mice Requires GATA4 and GATA6 Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Elizabeth; Hatch, Heather M.; Jiang, Tianyu; Morse, Deborah A.; Fox, Shawna C.

    2015-01-01

    The adrenal glands consist of an outer cortex and an inner medulla, and their primary purposes include hormone synthesis and secretion. The adrenal cortex produces a complex array of steroid hormones, whereas the medulla is part of the sympathetic nervous system and produces the catecholamines epinephrine and norepinephrine. In the mouse, GATA binding protein (GATA) 4 and GATA6 transcription factors are coexpressed in several embryonic tissues, including the adrenal cortex. To explore the roles of GATA4 and GATA6 in mouse adrenal development, we conditionally deleted these genes in adrenocortical cells using the Sf1Cre strain of animals. We report here that mice with Sf1Cre-mediated double deletion of Gata4 and Gata6 genes lack identifiable adrenal glands, steroidogenic factor 1-positive cortical cells and steroidogenic gene expression in the adrenal location. The inactivation of the Gata6 gene alone (Sf1Cre;Gata6flox/flox) drastically reduced the adrenal size and corticosterone production in the adult animals. Adrenocortical aplasia is expected to result in the demise of the animal within 2 weeks after birth unless glucocorticoids are provided. In accordance, Sf1Cre;Gata4flox/floxGata6flox/flox females depend on steroid supplementation to survive after weaning. Surprisingly, Sf1Cre;Gata4flox/floxGata6flox/flox males appear to live normal lifespans as vital steroidogenic synthesis shifts to their testes. Our results reveal a requirement for GATA factors in adrenal development and provide a novel tool to characterize the transcriptional network controlling adrenocortical cell fates. PMID:25933105

  12. Effect of chronic clonidine treatment on transmitter release from sympathetic varicosities of the guinea-pig vas deferens

    PubMed Central

    Knight, David; Cunnane, Tom C; Lavidis, Nickolas A

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that chronic pre-synaptic inhibition of transmitter release by morphine evokes a counter-adaptive response in the sympathetic nerve terminals that manifests itself as an increase in transmitter release during acute withdrawal. In the present study we examined the possibility that other pre-synaptically acting drugs such as clonidine also evoke a counter-adaptive response in the sympathetic nerve terminals.In chronically saline treated (CST) preparations, clonidine (0.5 μM) completely abolished evoked transmitter release from sympathetic varicosities bathed in an extracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]o) of 2 mM. The inhibitory effect of clonidine was reduced by increasing [Ca2+]o from 2 to 4 mM and the stimulation frequency from 0.1 to 1 Hz.The nerve terminal impulse (NTI) was not affected by concentrations of clonidine that completely abolished evoked transmitter release.Sympathetic varicosities developed a tolerance to clonidine (0.5 μM) following 7 – 9 days of chronic exposure to clonidine.Acute withdrawal of preparations following chronic clonidine treatment (CCT) resulted in a significant (P<0.005) enhancement of neurotransmitter release (3.75 times) above control levels observed in CST preparations.The present findings demonstrate an enhancement of neurotransmitter release from sympathetic varicosities following acute withdrawal from chronic clonidine treatment. PMID:11724754

  13. Neuropeptide Y Gates a Stress-Induced, Long-Lasting Plasticity in the Sympathetic Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian; Wang, Manqi

    2013-01-01

    Acute stress evokes the fight-or-flight reflex, which via release of the catecholamine hormones affects the function of every major organ. Although the reflex is transient, it has lasting consequences that produce an exaggerated response when stress is reexperienced. How this change is encoded is not known. We investigated whether the reflex affects the adrenal component of the sympathetic nervous system, a major branch of the stress response. Mice were briefly exposed to the cold-water forced swim test (FST) which evoked an increase in circulating catecholamines. Although this hormonal response was transient, the FST led to a long-lasting increase in the catecholamine secretory capacity measured amperometrically from chromaffin cells and in the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase. A variety of approaches indicate that these changes are regulated postsynaptically by neuropeptide Y (NPY), an adrenal cotransmitter. Using immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR, and NPY(GFP) BAC mice, we find that NPY is synthesized by all chromaffin cells. Stress failed to increase secretory capacity in NPY knock-out mice. Genetic or pharmacological interference with NPY and Y1 (but not Y2 or Y5) receptor signaling attenuated the stress-induced change in tyrosine hydroxylase expression. These results indicate that, under basal conditions, adrenal signaling is tonically inhibited by NPY, but stress overrides this autocrine negative feedback loop. Because acute stress leads to a lasting increase in secretory capacity in vivo but does not alter sympathetic tone, these postsynaptic changes appear to be an adaptive response. We conclude that the sympathetic limb of the stress response exhibits an activity-dependent form of long-lasting plasticity. PMID:23904607

  14. Sympathetic neural control of indoleamine metabolism in the rat pineal gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, H. J.; Hsuan, M.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for the acceleration in rat pineal biosynthetic activity in response to prolonged exposure to darkness or to immobilization were investigated in animals whose pineals were surgically denervated. Some animals were adrenalectomized to remove one potential source of circulating catecholamines, and some were subjected to a partial chemical sympathectomy accomplished by a series of intravenous injections of 6-hydroxydopamine. Results suggest that N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity can be enhanced either by release of norepinephrine from sympathetic terminals within the pineal or from sympathetic nerve terminals elsewhere. The stress of immobilization stimulates the pineal by increasing circulating catecholamines. Photic control of pineal function requires intact pineal sympathetic innervation, since the onset of darkness apparently does not cause a sufficient rise in circulating catecholamines to stimulate the pineal. The present studies suggest that nonspecific stress triggers increased biosynthesis and secretion of melatonin; it is possible that this hormone may participate in mechanisms of adaptation.

  15. Artifacts produced during electrical stimulation of the vestibular nerve in cats. [autonomic nervous system components of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, P. C.

    1973-01-01

    Evidence is presented to indicate that evoked potentials in the recurrent laryngeal, the cervical sympathetic, and the phrenic nerve, commonly reported as being elicited by vestibular nerve stimulation, may be due to stimulation of structures other than the vestibular nerve. Experiments carried out in decerebrated cats indicated that stimulation of the petrous bone and not that of the vestibular nerve is responsible for the genesis of evoked potentials in the recurrent laryngeal and the cervical sympathetic nerves. The phrenic response to electrical stimulation applied through bipolar straight electrodes appears to be the result of stimulation of the facial nerve in the facial canal by current spread along the petrous bone, since stimulation of the suspended facial nerve evoked potentials only in the phrenic nerve and not in the recurrent laryngeal nerve. These findings indicate that autonomic components of motion sickness represent the secondary reactions and not the primary responses to vestibular stimulation.

  16. The effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide on adrenal steroid hormone secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-immunoreactive nerve fibers have been demonstrated in the rat adrenal cortex in close association with zona glomerulosa cells. We have studied the effects of VIP on steroid hormone secretion from the outer zones of the normal rat adrenal cortex. Intact capsule-glomerulosa preparations, consisting of the capsule, zona glomerulosa, and a small portion of the zona fasciculata were perifused in vitro. The secretory responsiveness was assessed by measuring aldosterone and corticosterone release following stimulation with the physiological secretagogues ACTH and angiotensin II. The distribution of adrenal VIP receptors was assessed by in vitro autoradiography of {sup 125}I-VIP binding. {sup 125}I-VIP (0.75 and 2.0 nM) binding was concentrated in the capsule and zone glomerulosa, coincident with the distribution of VIP nerve fibers which aborize extensively in this region. The specificity of this binding was demonstrated using unlabelled VIP, ACTH and angiotensin II.

  17. Human muscle sympathetic neural and haemodynamic responses to tilt following spaceflight

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Benjamin D; Pawelczyk, James A; Ertl, Andrew C; Cox, James F; Zuckerman, Julie H; Diedrich, André; Biaggioni, Italo; Ray, Chester A; Smith, Michael L; Iwase, Satoshi; Saito, Mitsuru; Sugiyama, Yoshiki; Mano, Tadaaki; Zhang, Rong; Iwasaki, Kenichi; Lane, Lynda D; Buckey, Jay C; Cooke, William H; Baisch, Friedhelm J; Robertson, David; Eckberg, Dwain L; Blomqvist, C Gunnar

    2002-01-01

    Orthostatic intolerance is common when astronauts return to Earth: after brief spaceflight, up to two-thirds are unable to remain standing for 10 min. Previous research suggests that susceptible individuals are unable to increase their systemic vascular resistance and plasma noradrenaline concentrations above pre-flight upright levels. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that adaptation to the microgravity of space impairs sympathetic neural responses to upright posture on Earth. We studied six astronauts ∼72 and 23 days before and on landing day after the 16 day Neurolab space shuttle mission. We measured heart rate, arterial pressure and cardiac output, and calculated stroke volume and total peripheral resistance, during supine rest and 10 min of 60 deg upright tilt. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity was recorded in five subjects, as a direct measure of sympathetic nervous system responses. As in previous studies, mean (± s.e.m.) stroke volume was lower (46 ± 5 vs. 76 ± 3 ml, P = 0.017) and heart rate was higher (93 ± 1 vs. 74 ± 4 beats min−1, P = 0.002) during tilt after spaceflight than before spaceflight. Total peripheral resistance during tilt post flight was higher in some, but not all astronauts (1674 ± 256 vs. 1372 ± 62 dynes s cm−5, P = 0.32). No crew member exhibited orthostatic hypotension or presyncopal symptoms during the 10 min of postflight tilting. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity was higher post flight in all subjects, in supine (27 ± 4 vs. 17 ± 2 bursts min−1, P = 0.04) and tilted (46 ± 4 vs. 38 ± 3 bursts min−1, P = 0.01) positions. A strong (r2 = 0.91–1.00) linear correlation between left ventricular stroke volume and muscle sympathetic nerve activity suggested that sympathetic responses were appropriate for the haemodynamic challenge of upright tilt and were unaffected by spaceflight. We conclude that after 16 days of spaceflight, muscle sympathetic nerve responses to upright tilt are normal. PMID:11773340

  18. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis Risks Allergic reaction to the local anesthetic Discomfort ... Neurosarcoidosis Peripheral neuropathy Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sarcoidosis Tibial nerve dysfunction Update Date 6/1/2015 ...

  19. Nerve conduction

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... the spinal cord to muscles and sensory receptors. A peripheral nerve is composed of nerve bundles (fascicles) ... two neurons, it must first be converted to a chemical signal, which then crosses a space of ...

  20. Adrenal involvement in non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Williamson, B.R.J.

    1983-08-01

    Adrenal masses are described in seven cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a series of 173 patients. In all seven patients the lymphoma was diffuse rather than nodular. Three patients had adrenal masses at the time of presentation, whereas in four cases the adrenal gland was a site of tumor recurrence after therapy. Three patients had simultaneous bilateral adrenal involvement by tumor. No characteristic features were recognized that might have distinguished these tumors from other adrenal masses. Appropriate therapy successfully resolved the adrenal masses in all but one case. The latter patient was the only one with evidence of adrenal insufficiency.

  1. Adrenergic innervation of the developing chick heart: neural crest ablations to produce sympathetically aneural hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, M.; Stewart, D.

    1984-11-01

    Ablation of various regions of premigratory trunk neural crest which gives rise to the sympathetic trunks was used to remove sympathetic cardiac innervation. Neuronal uptake of (/sup 3/H)-norepinephrine was used as an index of neuronal development in the chick atrium. Following ablation of neural crest over somites 10-15 or 15-20, uptake was significantly decreased in the atrium at 16 and 17 days of development. Ablation of neural crest over somites 5-10 and 20-25 caused no decrease in (/sup 3/H)-norepinephrine uptake. Removal of neural crest over somites 5-25 or 10-20 caused approximately equal depletions of (/sup 3/H)-norepinephrine uptake in the atrium. Cardiac norepinephrine concentration was significantly depressed following ablation of neural crest over somites 5-25 but not over somites 10-20. Light-microscopic and histofluorescent preparations confirmed the absence of sympathetic trunks in the region of the normal origin of the sympathetic cardiac nerves following neural crest ablation over somites 10-20. The neural tube and dorsal root ganglia were damaged in the area of the neural-crest ablation; however, all of these structures were normal cranial and caudal to the lesioned area. Development of most of the embryos as well as the morphology of all of the hearts was normal following the lesion. These results indicate that it is possible to produce sympathetically aneural hearts by neural-crest ablation; however, sympathetic cardiac nerves account for an insignificant amount of cardiac norepinephrine.

  2. Sympathetic modulation of blood flow and O2 uptake in rhythmically contracting human forearm muscles.

    PubMed

    Joyner, M J; Nauss, L A; Warner, M A; Warner, D O

    1992-10-01

    This study tested the effects of sympathetically mediated changes in blood flow to active muscles on muscle O2 uptake (VO2) in humans. Four minutes of graded (15-80% of maximum voluntary contraction, MVC) rhythmic handgrip exercise were performed. Forearm blood flow (FBF) (plethysmography) and deep vein O2 saturation were measured each minute. Forearm O2 uptake was calculated using the Fick principle. In protocol 1, exercise was performed while supine and again while upright to augment sympathetic outflow to the active muscles. Standing reduced FBF at rest from 3.6 to 2.2 ml.100 ml-1.min-1 (P < 0.05). During light exercise (15-40% MVC) FBF was unaffected by body position. Standing reduced FBF (P < 0.05) from 36.0 to 25.2 ml.100 ml-1.min-1 and forearm VO2 from 38.2 to 28.1 ml.kg-1.min-1 during the final work load. In protocol 2, exercise was performed while supine before and after local anesthetic block of the sympathetic nerves to the forearm. Sympathetic block increased FBF at rest from 3.1 to 8.9 ml.100 ml-1.min-1 (P < 0.05), and FBF was higher during all work loads At 70-80% of MVC sympathetic block increased FBF from 35.4 to 50.7 ml.100 ml-1.min-1 (P < 0.05), and forearm VO2 from 45.5 to 54.2 ml.kg-1.min-1 (P < 0.05). These results suggest that in humans sympathetic nerves modulate blood flow to active muscles during light and heavy rhythmic exercise and that this restraint of flow can limit O2 uptake in muscles performing heavy rhythmic exercise. PMID:1415755

  3. Methodological Standardization for the Preclinical Evaluation of Renal Sympathetic Denervation

    PubMed Central

    Sakakura, Kenichi; Ladich, Elena; Edelman, Elazer R.; Markham, Peter; Stanley, James R.L.; Keating, John; Kolodgie, Frank D.; Virmani, Renu; Joner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Transcatheter ablation of renal autonomic nerves is a viable option for the treatment of resistent arterial hypertension; however, structured preclinical evaluation with standardization of analytical procedures remains a clear gap in this field. Here we discuss the topics relevant to the preclinical model for the evaluation of renal denervation (RDN) devices and report methodologies and criteria towards standardization of the safety and efficacy assessment, including histopathological evaluations of the renal artery, peri-arterial nerves, and associated peri-adventitial tissues. The preclinical swine renal artery model can be used effectively to assess both the safety and efficacy of RDN technologies. Assessment of the efficacy of RDN modalities primarily focuses on the determination of the depth of penetration of treatment-related injury (eg, necrosis) of the peri-arterial tissues and its relationship (ie, location and distance) and affect on the associated renal nerves and the correlation thereof with proxy biomarkers including renal norepinephrine concentrations and nerve-specific immunohistochemical stains (eg, tyrosine hydroxylase). The safety evaluation of RDN technologies involves assessing for adverse effects on tissues local to the site of treatment (ie, on the arterial wall) as well as tissues at a distance (eg, soft tissue, veins, arterial branches, skeletal muscle, adrenal gland, ureters). Increasing experience will help to create a standardized means of examining all arterial beds subject to ablative energy and in doing so enable us to proceed to optimize development and assessment of these emerging technologies. PMID:25240550

  4. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Dessinioti, Cleo; Katsambas, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia consists of a heterogenous group of inherited disorders due to enzymatic defects in the biosynthetic pathway of cortisol and/or aldosterone. This results in glucocorticoid deficiency, mineralocorticoid deficiency, and androgen excess. 95% of CAH cases are due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency. Clinical forms range from the severe, classical CAH associated with complete loss of enzyme function, to milder, non-classical forms (NCAH). Androgen excess affects the pilosebaceous unit, causing cutaneous manifestations such as acne, androgenetic alopecia and hirsutism. Clinical differential diagnosis between NCAH and polycystic ovary syndrome may be difficult. In this review, the evaluation of patients with suspected CAH, the clinical presentation of CAH forms, with emphasis on the cutaneous manifestations of the disease, and available treatment options, will be discussed. PMID:22523607

  5. Sympathetic activity during passive heat stress in healthy aged humans

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Daniel; Schlader, Zachary J; Crandall, Craig G

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular adjustments during heat stress are generally attenuated in healthy aged humans, which could be due to lower increases in sympathetic activity compared to the young. We compared muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) between 11 young (Y: 28 ± 4 years) and 10 aged (A: 70 ± 5 years) subjects prior to and during passive heating. Furthermore, MSNA responses were compared when a cold pressor test (CPT) and lower body negative pressure (LBNP) were superimposed upon heating. Baseline MSNA burst frequency (Y: 15 ± 4 vs. A: 31 ± 3 bursts min−1, P ≤ 0.01) and burst incidence (Y: 26 ± 8 vs. A: 50 ± 7 bursts (100 cardiac cycles (CC))−1, P ≤ 0.01) were greater in the aged. Heat stress increased core temperature to a similar extent in both groups (Y: +1.2 ± 0.1 vs. A: +1.2 ± 0.0°C, P = 0.99). Absolute levels of MSNA remained greater in the aged during heat stress (burst frequency: Y: 47 ± 6 vs. A: 63 ± 11 bursts min−1, P ≤ 0.01; burst incidence: Y: 48 ± 8 vs. A: 67 ± 9 bursts (100 CC)−1, P ≤ 0.01); however, the increase in both variables was similar between groups (both P ≥ 0.1). The CPT and LBNP further increased MSNA burst frequency and burst incidence, although the magnitude of increase was similar between groups (both P ≥ 0.07). These results suggest that increases in sympathetic activity during heat stress are not attenuated in healthy aged humans. Key points Cardiovascular adjustments to heat stress are attenuated in healthy aged individuals, which could contribute to their greater prevalence of heat-related illnesses and deaths during heat waves. The attenuated cardiovascular adjustments in the aged could be due to lower increases in sympathetic nerve activity during heat stress. We examined muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and plasma catecholamine concentrations in healthy young and aged individuals during whole-body passive heat stress. The main finding

  6. Increased peripherin in sympathetic axons innervating plantar metatarsal arteries in STZ-induced type I diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Niloufer J.; Frugier, Tony; Hunne, Billie; Brock, James A.

    2014-01-01

    A common characteristic of axonopathy is the abnormal accumulation of cytoskeletal proteins. We recently reported that streptozotocin (STZ)-induced type 1 diabetes produced a change in the morphology of sympathetic nerve fibers supplying rat plantar metatarsal arteries (PMAs). Here we investigated whether these morphological changes are associated with axonal accumulation of the type III intermediate filament peripherin and the microtubule protein β-tubulin III, as both are implicated in axonal remodeling. PMAs from hyperglycemic STZ-treated rats receiving a low dose of insulin (STZ-LI) were compared with those from normoglycemic STZ-treated rats receiving a high dose of insulin (STZ-HI) and vehicle-treated controls. Western blotting revealed an increase in protein expression level for peripherin in PMAs from STZ-LI rats but no change in that for β-tubulin III. In addition, there was an increase in the number of peripherin immunoreactive nerve fibers in the perivascular nerve plexus of PMAs from STZ-LI rats. Co-labeling for peripherin and neuropeptide Y (a marker for sympathetic axons) revealed that peripherin immunoreactivity increased in sympathetic axons. None of these changes were detected in PMAs from STZ-HI rats, indicating that increased peripherin in sympathetic axons of STZ-LI rats is likely due to hyperglycemia and provides a marker of diabetes-induced nerve damage. PMID:24847201

  7. [Improvement of approach to performance of lumbar sympathetic blockade in patients with tissue ischemia of the lower extremities].

    PubMed

    Panov, V M; Fesenko, U A; Kutsyn, V M

    2014-06-01

    New access for performance of sympathic blockade in region of aortal bifurcation, was elaborated, basing on calculations, conducted on 30 spiral computeric tomograms of lumbar and sacral parts of vertebral column. Application of the method permits to escape such complications, as a renal and the main vessels damage, the sympathetic nerves blockade, do not demand roentgenological control. PMID:25252554

  8. DEATH OF INTERMEDIOLATERAL SPINAL CORD NEURONS FOLLOWS SELECTIVE COMPLEMENT-MEDIATED DESTRUCTION OF PERIPHERAL PREGANGLIONIC SYMPATHETIC TERMINALS BY ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE ANTIBODIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Systemically administered antibodies to acetylcholinesterase (ACHE) cause a selective complement-mediated destruction of preganglionic sympathetic nerve terminals. o assess neurologic integrity, rats given murine monoclonal AChE-antibodies or normal mouse IgG (1.5 mg,i.v.) were e...

  9. The Evolution and Technique of Nerve-Sparing Retroperitoneal Lymphadenectomy.

    PubMed

    Masterson, Timothy A; Cary, Clint; Rice, Kevin R; Foster, Richard S

    2015-08-01

    The evolution of retroperitoneal lymph node dissection technique and associated template modifications for nonseminomatous germ cell tumors have resulted in significant improvement in the long-term morbidity. Through the preservation of sympathetic nerves via exclusion from or prospective identification within the boundaries of resection, maintenance and recovery of antegrade ejaculation are achieved. Nerve-sparing strategies in early-stage disease are feasible in most patients. Postchemotherapy, select patients can be considered for nerve preservation. This article describes the anatomic and physiologic basis for, indications and technical aspects of, and functional and oncologic outcomes reported after nerve-sparing retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy in testicular cancer. PMID:26216818

  10. The yin and yang of cardiac autonomic control: vago-sympathetic interactions revisited.

    PubMed

    Paton, J F R; Boscan, P; Pickering, A E; Nalivaiko, E

    2005-11-01

    We review the pattern of activity in the parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves innervating the heart. Unlike the conventional textbook picture of reciprocal control of cardiac vagal and sympathetic nervous activity, as seen during a baroreceptor reflex, many other reflexes involve simultaneous co-activation of both autonomic limbs. Indeed, even at 'rest', the heart receives tonic drives from both sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiac nerves. Autonomic co-activation occurs during peripheral chemoreceptor, diving, oculocardiac, somatic nociceptor reflex responses as well as being evoked from structures within the brain. It is suggested that simultaneous co-activation may lead to a more efficient cardiac function giving greater cardiac output than activation of the sympathetic limb alone; this permits both a longer time for ventricular filling and a stronger contraction of the myocardium. This may be important when pumping blood into a constricted vascular tree such as is the case during the diving response. We discuss that in some instances, high drive to the heart from both autonomic limbs may also be arrhythmogenic. PMID:16269319

  11. Adrenal Gland Disorders: Condition Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... of salt and water Controlling the "fight or flight" response to stress Maintaining pregnancy Initiating and controlling ... overview of the adrenal glands: Beyond fight or flight . Retrieved June 29, 2012 from http://www.endocrineweb. ...

  12. Role of the caudal pressor area in the regulation of sympathetic vasomotor tone.

    PubMed

    Campos, R R; Carillo, B A; Oliveira-Sales, E B; Silva, A M; Silva, N F; Futuro Neto, H A; Bergamaschi, C T

    2008-07-01

    It is well known that the ventrolateral medulla contains neurons involved in the tonic and reflex control of the cardiovascular system. Two regions within the ventrolateral medulla were initially identified: the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) and the caudal ventrolateral medulla (CVLM). Activation of the RVLM raises arterial blood pressure and sympathetic nerve activity, and activation of the CVLM causes opposite effects. The RVLM premotor neurons project directly to sympathetic preganglionic neurons and are involved in the maintenance of resting sympathetic vasomotor tone. A significant proportion of tonic activity in the RVLM sympathetic premotor neurons is driven by neurons located in a third region of the ventrolateral medulla denominated caudal pressor area (CPA). The CPA is a pressor region located at the extreme caudal part of the ventrolateral medulla that appears to have an important role controlling the activity of RVLM neurons. In this brief review, we will address the importance of the ventrolateral medulla neurons for the generation of resting sympathetic tone related to arterial blood pressure control focusing on two regions, the RVLM and the CPA. PMID:18719736

  13. Therapeutic strategies for targeting excessive central sympathetic activation in human hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, James P.; Fadel, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hypertension and its mode of progression are complex, multifactoral and incompletely understood. However, there is accumulating evidence from humans and animal models of hypertension indicating that excessive central sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) plays a pathogenic role in triggering and sustaining the essential hypertensive state (the so-called “neuroadrenergic hypothesis”). Importantly, augmented central sympathetic outflow has also been implicated in the initiation and progression of a plethora of pathophysiological processes independent of any increase in blood pressure, such as left ventricular hypertrophy and cardiac arrhythmias. Thus, the sympathetic nervous system constitutes an important putative drug target in hypertension. However, traditional pharmacological approaches for the management of essential hypertension appear ineffective in reducing central sympathetic outflow. Recently, several new and promising therapeutic strategies targeting neurogenic hypertension have been developed. The present report will provide a brief update of this topic with a particular emphasis on human studies examining the efficacy of novel pharmacological approaches (central sympatholytics, statins), lifestyle modification (aerobic exercise training, weight loss, stress reduction) and surgical intervention (renal denervation, chronic carotid baroreflex stimulation, deep brain stimulation) in reducing excessive central sympathetic activation in hypertension. PMID:20304932

  14. Radionuclide therapy of adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Carrasquillo, Jorge A; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Chen, Clara C

    2012-10-01

    Adrenal tumors arising from chromaffin cells will often accumulate radiolabeled metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and thus are amenable to therapy with I-131 MIBG. More recently, therapy studies have targeted the somatostatin receptors using Lu-177 or Y-90 radiolabeled somatostatin analogs. Because pheochromocytoma (PHEO)/paraganglioma (PGL) and neuroblastoma (NB), which often arise from the adrenals, express these receptors, clinical trials have been performed with these reagents. We will review the experience using radionuclide therapy for targeting PHEO/PGL and NBs. PMID:22718415

  15. Laparoscopic Resection of Adrenal Teratoma

    PubMed Central

    Vitagliano, Gonzalo; Villeta, Matias; Arellano, Leonardo; Santis, Oscar

    2006-01-01

    Background: Teratoma is a germ-cell tumor that commonly affects the gonads. Its components originate in the ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm. Extragonadal occurrence is rare. Teratomas confined to the adrenal gland are exceptional; only 3 cases have been reported in the English-language literature. We report 2 cases of mature teratomas of the adrenal gland that were laparoscopically excised. Methods: Two patients (ages 8 and 61 years) were diagnosed with adrenal teratoma at our institution. Radiological examination showed a solid 8-cm adrenal lesion in both cases. Hormonal assessment was normal. Both patients underwent laparoscopic transperitoneal adrenalectomy. Results: Surgical time was 120 minutes and 50 minutes, respectively. One patient was discharged on postoperative day 2, and the other remained hospitalized until day 10. The latter patient required percutaneous drainage of a retroperitoneal collection. Both tumors were identified as mature cystic teratomas. No evidence was present of recurring disease in either patient. Conclusions: Adrenal teratoma is rare. Laparoscopic transperitoneal adrenalectomy is a feasible, effective technique that enables excellent oncologic results. To our knowledge, this is the first report of laparoscopic adrenalectomy for pure adrenal teratoma. PMID:17575773

  16. Cervical Vagal Nerve Stimulation Activates the Stellate Ganglion in Ambulatory Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Kyoung-Suk; Hsueh, Chia-Hsiang; Hellyer, Jessica A.; Park, Hyung Wook; Lee, Young Soo; Garlie, Jason; Onkka, Patrick; Doytchinova, Anisiia T.; Garner, John B.; Patel, Jheel; Chen, Lan S.; Fishbein, Michael C.; Everett, Thomas; Lin, Shien-Fong

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Recent studies showed that, in addition to parasympathetic nerves, cervical vagal nerves contained significant sympathetic nerves. We hypothesized that cervical vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) may capture the sympathetic nerves within the vagal nerve and activate the stellate ganglion. Materials and Methods We recorded left stellate ganglion nerve activity (SGNA), left thoracic vagal nerve activity (VNA), and subcutaneous electrocardiogram in seven dogs during left cervical VNS with 30 seconds on-time and 30 seconds off time. We then compared the SGNA between VNS on and off times. Results Cervical VNS at moderate (0.75 mA) output induced large SGNA, elevated heart rate (HR), and reduced HR variability, suggesting sympathetic activation. Further increase of the VNS output to >1.5 mA increased SGNA but did not significantly increase the HR, suggesting simultaneous sympathetic and parasympathetic activation. The differences of integrated SGNA and integrated VNA between VNS on and off times (ΔSGNA) increased progressively from 5.2 mV-s {95% confidence interval (CI): 1.25-9.06, p=0.018, n=7} at 1.0 mA to 13.7 mV-s (CI: 5.97-21.43, p=0.005, n=7) at 1.5 mA. The difference in HR (ΔHR, bpm) between on and off times was 5.8 bpm (CI: 0.28-11.29, p=0.042, n=7) at 1.0 mA and 5.3 bpm (CI 1.92 to 12.61, p=0.122, n=7) at 1.5 mA. Conclusion Intermittent cervical VNS may selectively capture the sympathetic components of the vagal nerve and excite the stellate ganglion at moderate output. Increasing the output may result in simultaneously sympathetic and parasympathetic capture. PMID:25810737

  17. The functional significance of the sympathetic innervation of mucous glands in the bronchi of man.

    PubMed Central

    Pack, R J; Richardson, P S; Smith, I C; Webb, S R

    1988-01-01

    1. Pieces of human bronchi, from lung resected for carcinoma of the bronchus, were mounted in Ussing chambers and given [35S]sulphate as radiolabelled precursor of mucous glycoproteins (mucins). The release of 35S, bound to macromolecules, into the luminal half-chamber was used as an index of mucin secretion. 2. Noradrenaline, at concentrations of 1, 10 and 100 microM, was given into both halves of the Ussing chamber. At the lowest concentration, noradrenaline failed to change mucin output, but at the two higher concentrations it stimulated output. 3. In other experiments the sympathetic nerves in the bronchial wall were labelled with 5-hydroxydopamine and examined under the electron microscope. The distances between adrenergic nerve varicosities and submucosal glands were measured; some sympathetic nerve varicosities were seen within 1 microns of gland cells. 4. A simple mathematical model for the diffusion of noradrenaline was used to predict the concentrations of the transmitter likely to result at different distances from a nerve if one or more vesicles of noradrenaline were released. 5. The model predicts that the release of a single large vesicle of noradrenaline is likely to generate an effective concentration of transmitter provided that the nerve is within 1 micron of the target cell. Images Fig. 2 PMID:3253421

  18. Acute intermittent optogenetic stimulation of nucleus tractus solitarius neurons induces sympathetic long-term facilitation

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kenta; Lalley, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) induces sympathetic and phrenic long-term facilitation (LTF), defined as a sustained increase in nerve discharge. We investigated the effects of AIH and acute intermittent optogenetic (AIO) stimulation of neurons labeled with AAV-CaMKIIa, hChR2(H134R), and mCherry in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) of anesthetized, vagotomized, and mechanically ventilated rats. We measured renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), phrenic nerve activity (PNA), power spectral density, and coherence, and we made cross-correlation measurements to determine how AIO stimulation and AIH affected synchronization between PNA and RSNA. Sixty minutes after AIH produced by ventilation with 10% oxygen in balanced nitrogen, RSNA and PNA amplitude increased by 80% and by 130%, respectively (P < 0.01). Sixty minutes after AIO stimulation, RSNA and PNA amplitude increased by 60% and 100%, respectively, (P < 0.01). These results suggest that acute intermittent stimulation of NTS neurons can induce renal sympathetic and phrenic LTF in the absence of hypoxia or chemoreceptor afferent activation. We also found that while acute intermittent optogenetic and hypoxic stimulations increased respiration-related RSNA modulation (P < 0.01), they did not increase synchronization between central respiratory drive and RSNA. We conclude that mechanisms that induce LTF originate within the caudal NTS and extend to other interconnecting neuronal elements of the central nervous cardiorespiratory network. PMID:25519734

  19. The existence of a linear system consisting of sympathetic endings in rat skin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Yuan; Zhang, Hui; Pan, Juan; Pen, An

    2005-09-01

    In a previous pilot study we suggested the novel notion that the catecholaminergic sympathetic nerve endings are non-homogeneously distributed in the rat skin. In the present study we have utilized several independent methods to determine the in vivo distribution of catecholamine-containing fibers in rat skin. Using whole body macro-autoradiography with an iodine125-labeled tyrosine, we localized the distribution of iodine-125-catecholamine in rat skin. The images on the film showed various pairs of symmetrical linear arrays running from the head through the back and to the hind limbs of the animal that we arbitrarily termed sympathetic substance lines (SSLs). The distribution of catecholamine in rat skin was also visualized by light microscopy autoradiography with tritiated tyrosine. The majority of silver grains in the sections were located among hair follicles along a band or zone. Furthermore, a modified sucrose-phosphate-glyoxilic acid (SPG) method was adapted to observe sympathetic fibers in the skin sections. Dense clusters of fluorescent nerve fibers in correspondence of arrector pili muscles (AP muscles) were located along lengthwise lines of the body, in a pattern coinciding with the linear arrays identified by macro-autoradiography. We concluded that concentrated clusters of noradrenergic nerve fibers innervate AP muscles and form a longitudinal linear system in the whole skin. These results are discussed in terms of physiological functions associated with hair follicles, sensory signal pathways and Meridians in Chinese traditional medicine. PMID:16133589

  20. Chemoreflexes, Sleep Apnea, and Sympathetic Dysregulation

    PubMed Central

    Mansukhani, Meghna P.; Kara, Tomas; Caples, Sean; Somers, Virend K.

    2014-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and hypertension are closely linked conditions. Disordered breathing events in OSA are characterized by increasing efforts against an occluded airway whilst asleep, resulting in a marked sympathetic response. This is predominantly due to hypoxemia activating the chemoreflexes, resulting in reflex increases in sympathetic neural outflow. In addition, apnea, and the consequent lack of inhibition of the sympathetic system that occurs with lung inflation during normal breathing, potentiates central sympathetic outflow. Sympathetic activation persists into the daytime, and is thought to contribute to hypertension and other adverse cardiovascular outcomes. This review discusses chemoreflex physiology and sympathetic modulation during normal sleep, as well as the sympathetic dysregulation seen in OSA, its extension into wakefulness, and changes after treatment. Evidence supporting the role of the peripheral chemoreflex in the sympathetic dysregulation seen in OSA, including in the context of co-morbid obesity, metabolic syndrome and systemic hypertension is reviewed. Finally, alterations in cardiovascular variability and other potential mechanisms that might play a role in the autonomic imbalance seen in OSA are also discussed. PMID:25097113

  1. TRPA1 mediates amplified sympathetic responsiveness to activation of metabolically sensitive muscle afferents in rats with femoral artery occlusion

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Jihong; Lu, Jian; Li, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    Autonomic responses to activation of mechanically and metabolically sensitive muscle afferent nerves during static contraction are augmented in rats with femoral artery occlusion. Moreover, metabolically sensitive transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily A, member 1 (TRPA1) has been reported to contribute to sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) and arterial blood pressure (BP) responses evoked by static muscle contraction. Thus, in the present study, we examined the mechanisms by which afferent nerves' TRPA1 plays a role in regulating amplified sympathetic responsiveness due to a restriction of blood flow directed to the hindlimb muscles. Our data show that 24–72 h of femoral artery occlusion (1) upregulates the protein levels of TRPA1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) tissues; (2) selectively increases expression of TRPA1 in DRG neurons supplying metabolically sensitive afferent nerves of C-fiber (group IV); and (3) enhances renal SNA and BP responses to AITC (a TRPA1 agonist) injected into the hindlimb muscles. In addition, our data demonstrate that blocking TRPA1 attenuates SNA and BP responses during muscle contraction to a greater degree in ligated rats than those responses in control rats. In contrast, blocking TRPA1 fails to attenuate SNA and BP responses during passive tendon stretch in both groups. Overall, results of this study indicate that alternations in muscle afferent nerves' TRPA1 likely contribute to enhanced sympathetically mediated autonomic responses via the metabolic component of the muscle reflex under circumstances of chronic muscle ischemia. PMID:26441669

  2. Menstrual cycle phase does not affect sympathetic neural activity in women with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Stickford, Abigail SL; VanGundy, Tiffany B; Levine, Benjamin D; Fu, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients with the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) are primarily premenopausal women, which may be attributed to female sex hormones. We tested the hypothesis that hormonal fluctuations of the menstrual cycle alter sympathetic neural activity and orthostatic tolerance in POTS women. Ten POTS women were studied during the early follicular (EF) and mid-luteal (ML) phases of the menstrual cycle. Haemodynamics and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were measured when supine, during 60 deg upright tilt for 45 min or until presyncope, and during the cold pressor test (CPT) and Valsalva manoeuvres. Blood pressure and total peripheral resistance were higher during rest and tilting in the ML than EF phase; however, heart rate, stroke volume and cardiac output were similar between phases. There were no mean ± SD differences in MSNA burst frequency (8 ± 8 EF phase vs. 10 ± 10 bursts min–1 ML phase at rest; 34 ± 15 EF phase vs. 36 ± 16 bursts min–1 ML phase at 5 min tilt), burst incidence or total activity, nor any differences in the cardiovagal and sympathetic baroreflex sensitivities between phases under any condition. The incidence of presyncope was also the same between phases. There were no differences in haemodynamic or sympathetic responses to CPT or Valsalva. These results suggest that the menstrual cycle does not affect sympathetic neural activity but modulates blood pressure and vasoconstriction in POTS women during tilting. Thus, factors other than sympathetic neural activity are probably responsible for the symptoms of orthostatic intolerance across the menstrual cycle in women with POTS. Key points Women with the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) report fluctuations in orthostatic tolerance throughout the menstrual cycle. The mechanism(s) underlying blood pressure control across the menstrual cycle in women with POTS are unknown. The findings of the present study indicate that the menstrual

  3. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita

    MedlinePlus

    ... glands on top of each kidney called the adrenal glands . These glands produce a variety of hormones that ... disorder is adrenal insufficiency, which occurs when the adrenal glands do not produce enough hormones. Adrenal insufficiency typically ...

  4. Differential Sympathetic Vasomotor Activation Induced by Liver Cirrhosis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bergamaschi, Cássia T.; Campos, Ruy R.

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that there is a topographical sympathetic activation in rats submitted to experimental cirrhosis. Baseline renal (rSNA) and splanchnic (sSNA) sympathetic nerve activities were evaluated in anesthetized rats. In addition, we evaluated main arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and baroreceptor reflex sensitivity (BRS). Cirrhotic Wistar rats were obtained by bile duct ligation (BDL). MAP and HR were measured in conscious rats, and cardiac BRS was assessed by changes in blood pressure induced by increasing doses of phenylephrine or sodium nitroprusside. The BRS and baseline for the control of sSNA and rSNA were also evaluated in urethane-anesthetized rats. Cirrhotic rats had increased baseline sSNA (BDL, 102 vs control, 58 spikes/s; p<0.05), but no baseline changes in the rSNA compared to controls. These data were accompanied by increased splanchnic BRS (p<0.05) and decreased cardiac (p<0.05) and renal BRS (p<0.05). Furthermore, BDL rats had reduced basal MAP (BDL, 93 vs control, 101 mmHg; p<0.05) accompanied by increased HR (BDL, 378 vs control, 356; p<0.05). Our data have shown topographical sympathetic activation in rats submitted to experimental cirrhosis. The BDL group had increased baseline sSNA, independent of dysfunction in the BRS and no changes in baseline rSNA. However, an impairment of rSNA and HR control by arterial baroreceptor was noted. We suggest that arterial baroreceptor impairment of rSNA and HR is an early marker of cardiovascular dysfunction related to liver cirrhosis and probably a major mechanism leading to sympathoexcitation in decompensated phase. PMID:27055088

  5. Decreased catecholamine secretion from the adrenal medullae of chronically diabetic BB-Wistar rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilke, R. A.; Riley, D. A.; Lelkes, P. I.; Hillard, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Many humans with IDDM eventually lose the capacity to secrete epinephrine from their adrenal medullae. The mechanism for this pathological change is unknown. We hypothesized that this abnormality is attributable to neuropathic changes in the greater splanchnic nerves or in the chromaffin cells that they innervate. To study this hypothesis, we isolated rat adrenal glands, perfused them ex vivo, and measured the epinephrine content of the perfusate under various conditions of stimulation. We used transmural electrical stimulation (20-80 V, at 10 Hz) to induce epinephrine secretion indirectly by selectively activating residual splanchnic nerve terminals within the isolated glands. Under these conditions, epinephrine secretion was severely attenuated in glands from female BB-Wistar rats with diabetes of 4 mo duration compared with their age-matched, nondiabetic controls. These perfused diabetic adrenal medullae also demonstrated decreased catecholamine release in response to direct chromaffin cell depolarization with 20 mM K+, evidence that a functional alteration exists within the chromaffin cells themselves. Nonetheless, total catecholamine content of adrenal medullae from these diabetic rats was not significantly different from controls, indicating that the secretory defect was not simply attributable to a difference in the amount of catecholamines stored and available for release. Herein, we also provide histological evidence of degenerative changes within the cholinergic nerve terminals that innervate these glands.

  6. Adrenal cortical responses to vasoactive intestinal peptide in conscious hypophysectomized calves.

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, S R; Edwards, A V; Jones, C T

    1987-01-01

    1. Right adrenal and various cardiovascular responses to an intra-aortic infusion of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP; 4 micrograms min-1 kg-1) have been investigated in the presence and absence of exogenous adrenocorticotrophin, (ACTH1-24; 5 ng min-1 kg-1, i.v.). The adrenal clamp technique was employed in conscious calves in which the pituitary stalk had been cauterized 3-4 days previously. 2. The i.v. infusion of ACTH1-24 increased mean plasma ACTH concentration by between 1000 and 1100 pg ml-1 and mean right cortisol output by about 700 ng min-1 kg-1. Under these conditions the intra-aortic infusion of VIP produced a further rise in mean adrenal cortisol output, together with a consequential rise in mean arterial plasma cortisol concentration, without affecting the concentration of ACTH in the arterial plasma significantly. In the absence of ACTH the same infusion of VIP had no detectable effect on adrenal cortisol output. 3. In each of the above respects this intra-aortic infusion of VIP closely mimicked the effect of stimulation of the peripheral end of the right splanchnic nerve in these animals, as it also did by causing a substantial fall in adrenal vascular resistance in the absence, but not in the presence, of ACTH. 4. It is concluded that release of this peptide from splanchnic nerve terminals in the adrenal gland most probably accounts, at least in part, for the powerful adrenocortical steroidogenic response to splanchnic nerve stimulation, that occurs in the presence of submaximal doses of ACTH. PMID:2832592

  7. Compensatory adrenal growth - A neurally mediated reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dallman, M. F.; Engeland, W. C.; Shinsako, J.

    1976-01-01

    The responses of young rats to left adrenalectomy or left adrenal manipulation were compared to surgical sham adrenalectomy in which adrenals were observed but not touched. At 12 h right adrenal wet weight, dry weight, DNA, RNA, and protein content were increased (P less than 0.05) after the first two operations. Left adrenal manipulation resulted in increased right adrenal weight at 12 h but no change in left adrenal weight. Sequential manipulation of the left adrenal at time 0 and the right adrenal at 12 h resulted in an enlarged right adrenal at 12 h (P less than 0.01), and an enlarged left adrenal at 24 h (P less than 0.05), showing that the manipulated gland was capable of response. Bilateral adrenal manipulation of the adrenal glands resulted in bilateral enlargement of 12 h (P less than 0.01). Taken together with previous results, these findings strongly suggest that compensatory adrenal growth is a neurally mediated reflex.

  8. Sympathetic activation in exercise is not dependent on muscle acidosis. Direct evidence from studies in metabolic myopathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vissing, J.; Vissing, S. F.; MacLean, D. A.; Saltin, B.; Quistorff, B.; Haller, R. G.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Muscle acidosis has been implicated as a major determinant of reflex sympathetic activation during exercise. To test this hypothesis we studied sympathetic exercise responses in metabolic myopathies in which muscle acidosis is impaired or augmented during exercise. As an index of reflex sympathetic activation to muscle, microneurographic measurements of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were obtained from the peroneal nerve. MSNA was measured during static handgrip exercise at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction force to exhaustion in patients in whom exercise-induced muscle acidosis is absent (seven myophosphorylase deficient patients; MD [McArdle's disease], and one patient with muscle phosphofructokinase deficiency [PFKD]), augmented (one patient with mitochondrial myopathy [MM]), or normal (five healthy controls). Muscle pH was monitored by 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy during handgrip exercise in the five control subjects, four MD patients, and the MM and PFKD patients. With handgrip to exhaustion, the increase in MSNA over baseline (bursts per minute [bpm] and total activity [%]) was not impaired in patients with MD (17+/-2 bpm, 124+/-42%) or PFKD (65 bpm, 307%), and was not enhanced in the MM patient (24 bpm, 131%) compared with controls (17+/-4 bpm, 115+/-17%). Post-handgrip ischemia studied in one McArdle patient, caused sustained elevation of MSNA above basal suggesting a chemoreflex activation of MSNA. Handgrip exercise elicited an enhanced drop in muscle pH of 0.51 U in the MM patient compared with the decrease in controls of 0.13+/-0.02 U. In contrast, muscle pH increased with exercise in MD by 0.12+/-0.05 U and in PFKD by 0.01 U. In conclusion, patients with glycogenolytic, glycolytic, and oxidative phosphorylation defects show normal muscle sympathetic nerve responses to static exercise. These findings indicate that muscle acidosis is not a prerequisite for sympathetic activation in exercise.

  9. Sympathetic regulation during thermal stress in human aging and disease.

    PubMed

    Greaney, Jody L; Kenney, W Larry; Alexander, Lacy M

    2016-04-01

    Humans control their core temperature within a narrow range via precise adjustments of the autonomic nervous system. In response to changing core and/or skin temperature, several critical thermoregulatory reflex effector responses are initiated and include shivering, sweating, and changes in cutaneous blood flow. Cutaneous vasomotor adjustments, mediated by modulations in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA), aid in the maintenance of thermal homeostasis during cold and heat stress since (1) they serve as the first line of defense of body temperature and are initiated before other thermoregulatory effectors, and (2) they are on the efferent arm of non-thermoregulatory reflex systems, aiding in the maintenance of blood pressure and organ perfusion. This review article highlights the sympathetic responses of humans to thermal stress, with a specific focus on primary aging as well as impairments that occur in both heart disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Age- and pathology-related changes in efferent muscle and skin SNA during cold and heat stress, measured directly in humans using microneurography, are discussed. PMID:26627337

  10. Action of cocaine and chronic sympathetic denervation on vagal escape

    PubMed Central

    Campos, H. A.; Urquilla, P. R.

    1969-01-01

    1. The effect of cocaine has been studied on vagal escape and on the tachycardia due to vagal stimulation in the atropinized dog. All the dogs were submitted to acute cervical section of the spinal cord and acute or chronic sympathetic denervation. 2. Cocaine, 5 mg/kg or 40 μg/kg/min, I.V., induces a significant enhancement of the ventricular escape. The effects of a continuous infusion of cocaine are more reproducible than those of a single injection of the drug. 3. Cocaine, 40 μg/kg/min, I.V., potentiates the tachycardia due to vagal stimulation in the atropinized dog. 4. Chronic thoracic sympathectomy markedly retards the recovery of the ventricular rate from the inhibitory action of the vagus. Under this condition, the infusion of cocaine does not significantly enhance the ventricular escape. 5. These findings suggest that an adrenergic mechanism located at the sympathetic nerves supplying the heart is substantially involved in the phenomenon of vagal escape. PMID:5249864

  11. DC photoplethysmography in the evaluation of sympathetic vasomotor responses.

    PubMed

    Barron, S A; Rogowski, Z; Kanter, Y; Hemli, J

    1993-11-01

    The d.c. component of the photoplethsmographic signal was used to determine the response of the finger vasculature to three standard tests of vasomotor function: (1) an inspiratory gasp (IG), (2) immersion of the contralateral hand in ice water (IW), and (3) the Valsalva manoeuvre. The vasoconstrictor response to the first two of these stimuli could be measured in all of 25 normal subjects. The response to the Valsalva manoeuvre could not be detected consistently. Seven patients with known sympathetic autonomic dysfunction showed no response to either IG or IW. In 30 patients with diabetes mellitus of over 10 years duration, 46.7% had no response to IG, and 20% had no response to IW. Absent responses correlated with abnormal autonomic cardiovascular reflexes, with absent sympathetic skin responses and with the severity of peripheral somatic neuropathy. The d.c. photoplethysmographic determination of the vasoconstrictor response in the finger after a deep inspiratory gasp and after ice water immersion offers an additional measure of the function of small (2 mu-6 mu) peripheral nerve fibres. Because of variability in the amplitude of the responses in normals, only an absent response should be accepted as abnormal. PMID:8119051

  12. Sympathetic discharge and vascular resistance after bed rest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoemaker, J. K.; Hogeman, C. S.; Leuenberger, U. A.; Herr, M. D.; Gray, K.; Silber, D. H.; Sinoway, L. I.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of -6 degrees head-down-tilt bed rest (HDBR) for 14 days on supine sympathetic discharge and cardiovascular hemodynamics at rest was assessed. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate (n = 25), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA; n = 16) burst frequency, and forearm blood flow (n = 14) were measured, and forearm vascular resistance (FVR) was calculated. Stroke distance, our index of stroke volume, was derived from measurements of aortic mean blood velocity (Doppler) and R-R interval (n = 7). With these data, an index of total peripheral resistance was determined. Heart rate at rest was greater in the post (71 +/- 2 beats/min)- compared with the pre-HDBR test (66 +/- 2 beats/min; P < 0.003), but mean arterial pressure was unchanged. Aortic stroke distance during post-HDBR (15.5 +/- 1.1 cm/beat) was reduced from pre-HDBR levels (20.0 +/- 1.5 cm/beat) (P < 0.03). Also, MSNA burst frequency was reduced in the post (16.7 +/- 2.8 beats/min)- compared with the pre (25.2 +/- 2.6 beats/min)-HDBR condition (P < 0.01). Bed rest did not alter forearm blood flow, FVR, or total peripheral resistance. Thus reductions in MSNA with HDBR were not associated with a decrease in FVR.

  13. Adrenalectomy for metastatic adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Kita, Masafumi; Tamaki, Gaku; Okuyama, Mitsuhiko; Saga, Yuji; Kakizaki, Hidehiro

    2007-11-01

    The indications for adrenalectomy in cases of metastatic adrenal tumor remain controversial. To clarify indications and outcomes of adrenalectomy for adrenal metastasis, we performed a retrospective review of all 8 patients who underwent adrenalectomy for adrenal metastasis between 1990 and 2006 in Asahikawa Medical College Hospital. The Primary tumor was renal cell carcinoma in 2 cases, and eccrine poro carcinoma, rectal cancer, lung cancer, melanoma, bladder cancer and cancer of unknown origin in 1 case each. Open adrenalectomy was performed in all cases, including 1 case that was converted from laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Of the 4 patients with solitary adrenal metastasis, 3 were considered tumor-free after adrenalectomy, while the remaining patient was not due to unresectable primary tumor. Of the 3 patients with complete resection, one remained alive as of 88 months after adrenalectomy but was then lost to follow-up, and the other 2 patients remain alive 12 and 7 months after adrenalectomy. Of the 2 patients with other resectable metastasis who were tumor-free after removal of all metastases, one was alive 31 months postoperatively and the other died 23 months after operation. The remaining 2 cases with other unresectable metastasis died within 6 months after adrenalectomy. At least in cases of solitary adrenal metastasis, adrenalectomy can be effective if other valid methods are unavailable. PMID:18051798

  14. Obstructive sleep apnea and insight into mechanisms of sympathetic overactivity

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, François; Kumar, Ravinder

    2014-01-01

    Nearly two decades ago, we evaluated ten patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We determined that alarming nocturnal oscillations in arterial pressure and sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) were caused by regulatory coupling and neural interactions among SNA, apnea, and ventilation. Patients with OSA exhibited high levels of SNA when awake, during normal ventilation, and during normoxia, which contributed to hypertension and organ damage. Additionally, we achieved a beneficial and potentially lifesaving reduction in SNA through the application of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), which remains a primary therapeutic approach for patients with OSA. With these results in hindsight, we herein discuss three concepts with functional and therapeutic relevance to the integrative neurobiology of autonomic cardiovascular control and to the mechanisms involved in excessive sympathoexcitation in OSA. PMID:24691480

  15. Adrenal oncoctyoma of uncertain malignant potential: a rare etiology of adrenal incidentaloma.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Rohit R; Muinov, Lucy; Lele, Subodh M; Shivaswamy, Vijay

    2016-03-01

    A rare cause for rapid adrenal enlargement is adrenal oncocytoma of uncertain malignant potential. A full biochemical evaluation is warranted to screen secreting adrenal adenomas as well as to evaluate adrenal cortical carcinoma. Careful pathologic evaluation is required as the diagnosis of AOC cannot be made by imaging. PMID:27014458

  16. Cushing syndrome due to adrenal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome. It occurs when a tumor of the adrenal gland releases excess amounts of the hormone cortisol. Causes ... hormone cortisol. This hormone is made in the adrenal glands . Too much cortisol can be due to various ...

  17. Giant adrenal cyst displacing the right kidney

    PubMed Central

    Chodisetti, Subbarao; Boddepalli, Yogesh; Kota, Malakondareddy

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cysts are rare and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of retroperitoneal cysts. We present a case of a huge adrenal cyst displacing the right kidney anteriorly toward the left side in a young female. PMID:26941503

  18. Cerebral vasoreactivity during hypercapnia is reset by augmented sympathetic influence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peizhen; Huang, Guoyuan; Shi, Xiangrong

    2011-02-01

    Sympathetic nerve activity influences cerebral blood flow, but it is unknown whether augmented sympathetic nerve activity resets cerebral vasoreactivity to hypercapnia. This study tested the hypothesis that cerebral vasodilation during hypercapnia is restrained by lower-body negative pressure (LBNP)-stimulated sympathoexcitation. Cerebral hemodynamic responses were assessed in nine healthy volunteers [age 25 yr (SD 3)] during rebreathing-induced increases in partial pressure of end-tidal CO(2) (Pet(CO(2))) at rest and during LBNP. Cerebral hemodynamic responses were determined by changes in flow velocity of middle cerebral artery (MCAV) using transcranial Doppler sonography and in regional cerebral tissue oxygenation (ScO(2)) using near-infrared spectroscopy. Pet(CO(2)) values during rebreathing were similarly increased from 41.9 to 56.5 mmHg at rest and from 40.7 to 56.0 mmHg during LBNP of -15 Torr. However, the rates of increases in MCAV and in ScO(2) per unit increase in Pet(CO(2)) (i.e., the slopes of MCAV/Pet(CO(2)) and ScO(2)/Pet(CO(2))) were significantly (P ≤0.05) decreased from 2.62 ± 0.16 cm·s(-1)·mmHg(-1) and 0.89 ± 0.10%/mmHg at rest to 1.68 ± 0.18 cm·s(-1)·mmHg(-1) and 0.63 ± 0.07%/mmHg during LBNP. In conclusion, the sensitivity of cerebral vasoreactivity to hypercapnia, in terms of the rate of increases in MCAV and in ScO(2), is diminished by LBNP-stimulated sympathoexcitation. PMID:21071587

  19. Adrenal cortex dysfunction: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Huebener, K.H.; Treugut, H.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of the adrenal gland was studied in 302 patients with possible endocrinologic disease and 107 patients undergoing CT for nonendocrinologic reasons. Measurements of adrenal size were also made in 100 adults with no known adrenal pathology. CT proved to be a sensitive diagnostic tool in combination with clinical studies. When blood hormone levels are increased, CT can differentiate among homogeneous organic hyperplasia, nodular hyperplasia, benign adenoma, and malignant cortical adenoma. When blood hormone levels are decreased, CT can demonstrate hypoplasia or metastatic tumorous destruction. Calcifications can be demonstrated earlier than on plain radiographs. When hormone elimination is increased, the morphologic substrate can be identified; tumorous changes can be localized and infiltration of surrounding organs recognized.

  20. Development of sympathetic cardiovascular control in embryonic, hatchling, and yearling female American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Eme, John; Elsey, Ruth M; Crossley, Dane A

    2013-06-01

    We used arterial tyramine injections to study development of sympathetic actions on in vivo heart rate and blood pressure in embryonic, hatching and yearling female American alligators. Tyramine is a pharmacological tool for understanding comparative and developmental sympathetic regulation of cardiovascular function, and this indirect sympathomimetic agent causes endogenous neuronal catecholamine release, increasing blood pressure and heart rate. Arterial tyramine injection in hatchling and yearling alligators caused the typical vertebrate response - rise in heart rate and blood pressure. However, in embryonic alligators, tyramine caused a substantial and immediate bradycardia at both 70% and 90% of embryonic development. This embryonic bradycardia was accompanied by hypotension, followed by a sustained hypertension similar to the hatchling and juvenile responses. Pretreatment with atropine injection (cholinergic receptor blocker) eliminated the embryonic hypotensive bradycardia, and phentolamine pretreatment (α-adrenergic receptor blocker) eliminated the embryonic hypotensive and hypertensive responses but not the bradycardia. In addition, hexamethonium pretreatment (nicotinic receptor blocker) significantly blunted embryos' bradycardic tyramine response. However, pretreatment with 6-hydroxydopamine, a neurotoxin that destroys catecholaminergic terminals, did not eliminate the embryonic bradycardia. Tyramine likely stimulated a unique embryonic response - neurotransmitter release from preganglionic nerve terminals (blocked with hexamethonium) and an acetylcholine mediated bradycardia with a secondary norepinephrine-dependent sustained hypertension. In addition, tyramine appears to stimulate sympathetic nerve terminals directly, which contributed to the overall hypertension in the embryonic, hatchling and yearling animals. Data demonstrated that humoral catecholamine control of cardiovascular function was dominant over the immature parasympathetic nervous system

  1. Control of adrenal androgen production.

    PubMed

    Odell, W D; Parker, L N

    The major adrenal androgens are dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) and androstenedione (delta 4). Studies by Cutler et al in 1978 demonstrated that these androgens are detectable in blood of all domestic and laboratory animals studied, but that only 4 species show increase in one or more with sexual maturation: rabbit, dog, chimpanzee and man. Studies by Grover and Odell in 1975 show these androgens do not bind to the androgen receptor obtained from rat prostate and thus probably are androgens only by conversion to an active androgen in vivo. Thomas and Oake in 1974 showed human skin converted DHEA to testosterone. The control of adrenal androgen secretion is in part modulated by ACTH. However, other factors or hormones must exist also, for a variety of clinical observations show dissociation in adrenal androgen versus cortisol secretion. Other substances that have been said to be controllers of adrenal androgen secretion include estrogens, prolactin, growth hormone, gonadotropins and lipotropin. None of these appear to be the usual physiological modulator, although under some circumstances each may increase androgen production. Studies from our laboratory using in vivo experiments in the castrate dog and published in 1979 indicated that crude extracts of bovine pituitary contained a substance that either modified ACTH stimulation of adrenal androgen secretion, or stimulated secretion itself - Cortisol Androgen Stimulating Hormone. Parker et al in 1983 showed a 60,000 MW glycoprotein was extractable from human pituitaries, which stimulated DHA secretion by dispersed canine adrenal cells in vitro, but did not stimulate cortisol secretion. This material contained no ACTH by radioimmunoassay. In 1982 Brubaker et al reported a substance was also present in human fetal pituitaries, which stimulated DHA secretion, but did not effect cortisol. PMID:6100259

  2. Chronic orthostatic intolerance: a disorder with discordant cardiac and vascular sympathetic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furlan, R.; Jacob, G.; Snell, M.; Robertson, D.; Porta, A.; Harris, P.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic orthostatic intolerance (COI) is a debilitating autonomic condition in young adults. Its neurohumoral and hemodynamic profiles suggest possible alterations of postural sympathetic function and of baroreflex control of heart rate (HR). METHODS AND RESULTS: In 16 COI patients and 16 healthy volunteers, intra-arterial blood pressure (BP), ECG, central venous pressure (CVP), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were recorded at rest and during 75 degrees tilt. Spectral analysis of RR interval and systolic arterial pressure (SAP) variabilities provided indices of sympathovagal modulation of the sinoatrial node (ratio of low-frequency to high-frequency components, LF/HF) and of sympathetic vasomotor control (LFSAP). Baroreflex mechanisms were assessed (1) by the slope of the regression line obtained from changes of RR interval and MSNA evoked by pharmacologically induced alterations in BP and (2) by the index alpha, obtained from cross-spectral analysis of RR and SAP variabilities. At rest, HR, MSNA, LF/HF, and LFSAP were higher in COI patients, whereas BP and CVP were similar in the two groups. During tilt, BP did not change and CVP fell by the same extent in the 2 groups; the increase of HR and LF/HF was more pronounced in COI patients. Conversely, the increase of MSNA was lower in COI than in control subjects. Baroreflex sensitivity was similar in COI and control subjects at rest; tilt reduced alpha similarly in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: COI is characterized by an overall enhancement of noradrenergic tone at rest and by a blunted postganglionic sympathetic response to standing, with a compensatory cardiac sympathetic overactivity. Baroreflex mechanisms maintain their functional responsiveness. These data suggest that in COI, the functional distribution of central sympathetic tone to the heart and vasculature is abnormal.

  3. Oscillatory patterns in sympathetic neural discharge and cardiovascular variables during orthostatic stimulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furlan, R.; Porta, A.; Costa, F.; Tank, J.; Baker, L.; Schiavi, R.; Robertson, D.; Malliani, A.; Mosqueda-Garcia, R.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We tested the hypothesis that a common oscillatory pattern might characterize the rhythmic discharge of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) and the spontaneous variability of heart rate and systolic arterial pressure (SAP) during a physiological increase of sympathetic activity induced by the head-up tilt maneuver. METHODS AND RESULTS: Ten healthy subjects underwent continuous recordings of ECG, intra-arterial pressure, respiratory activity, central venous pressure, and MSNA, both in the recumbent position and during 75 degrees head-up tilt. Venous samplings for catecholamine assessment were obtained at rest and during the fifth minute of tilt. Spectrum and cross-spectrum analyses of R-R interval, SAP, and MSNA variabilities and of respiratory activity provided the low (LF, 0.1 Hz) and high frequency (HF, 0.27 Hz) rhythmic components of each signal and assessed their linear relationships. Compared with the recumbent position, tilt reduced central venous pressure, but blood pressure was unchanged. Heart rate, MSNA, and plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine levels increased, suggesting a marked enhancement of overall sympathetic activity. During tilt, LF(MSNA) increased compared with the level in the supine position; this mirrored similar changes observed in the LF components of R-R interval and SAP variabilities. The increase of LF(MSNA) was proportional to the amount of the sympathetic discharge. The coupling between LF components of MSNA and R-R interval and SAP variabilities was enhanced during tilt compared with rest. CONCLUSIONS: During the sympathetic activation induced by tilt, a similar oscillatory pattern based on an increased LF rhythmicity characterized the spontaneous variability of neural sympathetic discharge, R-R interval, and arterial pressure.

  4. Long-term facilitation of expiratory and sympathetic activities following acute intermittent hypoxia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lemes, Eduardo V.; Aiko, Simone; Orbem, Caroline B.; Formentin, Cleiton; Bassi, Mirian; Colombari, Eduardo; Zoccal, Daniel B.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) promotes persistent increases in ventilation and sympathetic activity, referred as long-term facilitation (LTF). Augmented inspiratory activity is suggested as a major component of respiratory LTF. In the present study, we hypothesized that AIH also elicits a sustained increase in expiratory motor activity. We also investigated whether the expiratory LTF contributes to the development of sympathetic LTF after AIH. Methods Rats were exposed to AIH (10 × 6–7 % O2 for 45 s, every 5 min) and the cardiorespiratory parameters were evaluated during 60 min using in vivo and in situ approaches. Results In unanesthetized conditions (n=9), AIH elicited a modest but sustained increase in baseline mean arterial pressure (MAP, 104±2 vs 111±3 mmHg, P<0.05) associated with enhanced sympathetic and respiratory-related variabilities. In the in situ preparations (n=9), AIH evoked LTF in phrenic (33±12%), thoracic sympathetic (75±25%) and abdominal nerve activities (69±14%). The sympathetic overactivity after AIH was phase-locked with the emergence of bursts in abdominal activity during the late-expiratory phase. In anesthetized vagus-intact animals, AIH increased baseline MAP (113±3 vs 122±2 mmHg, P<0.05) and abdominal muscle activity (535±94%), which were eliminated after pharmacological inhibition of the retrotrapezoid nucleus/parafacial respiratory group (RTN/pFRG). Conclusion These findings indicate that increased expiratory activity is also an important component of AIH-elicited respiratory LTF. Moreover, the development of sympathetic LTF after AIH is linked to the emergence of active expiratory pattern and depends on the integrity of the neurones of the RTN/pFRG. PMID:26910756

  5. Parachute Jumping Induces More Sympathetic Activation Than Cortisol Secretion in First-Time Parachutists

    PubMed Central

    Messina, Giovanni; Chieffi, Sergio; Viggiano, Andrea; Tafuri, Domenico; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Valenzano, Anna; Triggiani, Antonio Ivano; Messina, Antonietta; De Luca, Vincenzo; Monda, Marcellino

    2016-01-01

    Background: The word “stress” describes the status of the body affected by external or internal forces, or “stressors”, threatening to alter its dynamic balance or homeostasis. The adaptive changes which occur in reply to stressors are either behavioral or physical. Once a given threshold is surpassed, a systemic reaction takes place involving the “stress system” in the brain together with its peripheral components, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and autonomic sympathetic. Objectives: Stress induces an activation of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the SNS and the HPA axis would show parallel or divergent stress response patterns in a session of first parachute jump. Patients and Methods: Activation of the SNS was evaluated by dosage of salivary alpha-amylase, galvanic skin responses, and heart rate in seven male novice parachutists. Activation of HPA axis was tested by dosage of cortisol. These variables were measured before and 1 minute and 90 minute after the jump. Results: All variables reached a peak at 1 minute post-jump. Salivary alpha-amylase, galvanic skin responses and heart rate did not return to basal value at 90 minutes post-jump, while cortisol returned to basal value at 90 minutes post-jump. Conclusions: This evidence indicates that parachute jumping is accompanied by a dissociation of SNS and HPA response patterns in novice parachutists, showing a slower recovery in sympathetic activity than in cortisol secretion. PMID:27217924

  6. Budesonide-related adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Arntzenius, Alexander; van Galen, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Iatrogenic adrenal insufficiency is a potential harmful side effect of treatment with corticosteroids. It manifests itself when an insufficient cortisol response to biological stress leads to an Addisonian crisis: a life-threatening situation. We describe a case of a patient who developed an Addisonian crisis after inappropriate discontinuation of budesonide (a topical steroid used in Crohn's disease) treatment. Iatrogenic adrenal insufficiency due to budesonide use has been rarely reported. Prescribers should be aware of the resulting risk for an Addisonian crisis. PMID:26430235

  7. Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage from Adrenal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez Valverde, F.M. Balsalobre, M.; Torregrosa, N.; Molto, M.; Gomez Ramos, M.J.; Vazquez Rojas, J.L.

    2007-04-15

    Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage is a very rare but serious disorder of the adrenal gland that can require emergent treatment. We report on a 42-year-old man who underwent selective angiography for diagnosis and treatment of retroperitoneal hemorrhage from small adrenal artery aneurysm. This case gives further details about the value of transluminal artery embolization in the management of visceral aneurysm rupture.

  8. Spontaneous bilateral adrenal hemorrhage following cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Dahan, Meryl; Lim, Chetana; Salloum, Chady

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative bilateral adrenal hemorrhage is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. This diagnosis is often missed because the symptoms and laboratory results are usually nonspecific. We report a case of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage associated with acute primary adrenal insufficiency following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The knowledge of this uncommon complication following any abdominal surgery allows timey diagnosis and rapid treatment. PMID:27275469

  9. Nociception attenuates parasympathetic but not sympathetic baroreflex via NK1 receptors in the rat nucleus tractus solitarii

    PubMed Central

    Pickering, Anthony E; Boscan, Pedro; Paton, Julian F R

    2003-01-01

    Somatic noxious stimulation can evoke profound cardiovascular responses by altering activity in the autonomic nervous system. This noxious stimulation attenuates the cardiac vagal baroreflex, a key cardiovascular homeostatic reflex. This attenuation is mediated via NK1 receptors expressed on GABAergic interneurones within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). We have investigated the effect of noxious stimulation and exogenous substance P (SP) on the sympathetic component of the baroreflex. We recorded from the sympathetic chain in a decerebrate, artificially perfused rat preparation. Noxious hindlimb pinch was without effect on the sympathetic baroreflex although the cardiac vagal baroreflex gain was decreased (56%, P < 0.01). Bilateral NTS microinjection of SP (500 fmol) produced a similar selective attenuation of the cardiac vagal baroreflex gain (62%, P < 0.005) without effect on the sympathetic baroreflex. Recordings from the cardiac sympathetic and vagal nerves confirmed the selectivity of the SP inhibition. Control experiments using a GABAA receptor agonist, isoguvacine, indicated that both components of the baroreflex (parasympathetic and sympathetic) could be blocked from the NTS injection site. The NTS microinjection of a NK1 antagonist (CP-99,994) in vivo attenuated the tachycardic response to hindlimb pinch. Our data suggest that noxious pinch releases SP within the NTS to selectively attenuate the cardiac vagal, but not the sympathetic, component of the baroreflex. This selective withdrawal of the cardiac vagal baroreflex seems to underlie the pinch-evoked tachycardia seen in vivo. Further, these findings confirm that baroreflex sympathetic and parasympathetic pathways diverge, and can be independently controlled, within the NTS. PMID:12813142

  10. Nociception attenuates parasympathetic but not sympathetic baroreflex via NK1 receptors in the rat nucleus tractus solitarii.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Anthony E; Boscan, Pedro; Paton, Julian F R

    2003-09-01

    Somatic noxious stimulation can evoke profound cardiovascular responses by altering activity in the autonomic nervous system. This noxious stimulation attenuates the cardiac vagal baroreflex, a key cardiovascular homeostatic reflex. This attenuation is mediated via NK1 receptors expressed on GABAergic interneurones within the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). We have investigated the effect of noxious stimulation and exogenous substance P (SP) on the sympathetic component of the baroreflex. We recorded from the sympathetic chain in a decerebrate, artificially perfused rat preparation. Noxious hindlimb pinch was without effect on the sympathetic baroreflex although the cardiac vagal baroreflex gain was decreased (56 %, P < 0.01). Bilateral NTS microinjection of SP (500 fmol) produced a similar selective attenuation of the cardiac vagal baroreflex gain (62 %, P < 0.005) without effect on the sympathetic baroreflex. Recordings from the cardiac sympathetic and vagal nerves confirmed the selectivity of the SP inhibition. Control experiments using a GABAA receptor agonist, isoguvacine, indicated that both components of the baroreflex (parasympathetic and sympathetic) could be blocked from the NTS injection site. The NTS microinjection of a NK1 antagonist (CP-99,994) in vivo attenuated the tachycardic response to hindlimb pinch. Our data suggest that noxious pinch releases SP within the NTS to selectively attenuate the cardiac vagal, but not the sympathetic, component of the baroreflex. This selective withdrawal of the cardiac vagal baroreflex seems to underlie the pinch-evoked tachycardia seen in vivo. Further, these findings confirm that baroreflex sympathetic and parasympathetic pathways diverge, and can be independently controlled, within the NTS. PMID:12813142

  11. Reflex sympathetic dystrophy following traumatic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Wainapel, S F

    1984-04-01

    Two cases of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in the upper extremity of patients with traumatic cervical spinal cord injuries are reported. Both patients had very incomplete lesions with early neurological recovery, suggesting an underlying central cord syndrome. Although reflex sympathetic dystrophy is often seen following stroke, it has only rarely been documented in traumatic myelopathy, and it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained pain syndromes in the extremities of paraplegic or quadriplegic patients. PMID:6728500

  12. Anesthetic Considerations on Adrenal Gland Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Domi, Rudin; Sula, Hektor; Kaci, Myzafer; Paparisto, Sokol; Bodeci, Artan; Xhemali, Astrit

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal gland surgery needs a multidisciplinary team including endocrinologist, radiologist, anesthesiologist, and surgeon. The indications for adrenal gland surgery include hormonal secreting and non-hormonal secreting tumors. Adrenal hormonal secreting tumors present to the anesthesiologist unique challenges requiring good preoperative evaluation, perioperative hemodynamic control, corrections of all electrolytes and metabolic abnormalities, a detailed and careful anesthetic strategy, overall knowledge about the specific diseases, control and maintaining of postoperative adrenal function, and finally a good collaboration with other involved colleagues. This review will focus on the endocrine issues, as well as on the above-mentioned aspects of anesthetic management during hormone secreting adrenal gland tumor resection. PMID:25368694

  13. Adrenal Insufficiency and Addison's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... through hormonal blood and urine tests. A health care provider uses these tests first to determine whether cortisol levels are too ... if the diagnosis remains unclear. [ Top ] What other tests might a health care provider perform after diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency? After ...

  14. Endocrinopathies. Thyroid and adrenal disorders.

    PubMed

    Merchant, S R; Taboada, J

    1997-11-01

    This article focuses on common adrenal and thyroid diseases in the geriatric patient consisting of hypothyroidism in the dog, hyperthyroidism in the cat, and hyperadrenocorticism in the dog to include clinical signs, diagnosis, and management. A brief section on hyperadrenocorticism in the cat, thyroid tumors in the dog, and pheochromocytoma in the dog and cat are also included. PMID:9348631

  15. Potential role of estrogen in maintaining the imbalanced sympathetic and sensory innervation in endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yanchun; Yao, Shuzhong

    2016-03-15

    Endometriosis, one of the most common benign gynecological diseases, affects millions of women of childbearing age. Endometriosis-associated pain is a major cause of disability and compromised quality of life in women. Neuropathic mechanisms are believed to play an important role. An imbalanced sympathetic and sensory innervation (reduced sympathetic innervation, with unchanged or increased sensory innervation in endometriotic lesions) has been demonstrated in endometriosis in recent studies. And it is believed to contribute to the pathogenesis of endometriosis-associated pain. It is primarily considered to be a natural adaptive program to endometriosis-associated inflammation. However, it is important to further clarify whether other potential modulating factors are involved in this dysregulation. It is generally accepted that endometriosis is an estrogen dependent disease. Higher estrogen biosynthesis and lower estrogen inactivation in endometriosis can lead to an excess of local estrogen in endometriotic lesions. In addition to its proliferative and anti-inflammatory actions, local estrogen in endometriosis also exerts potential neuromodulatory effects on the innervation in endometriosis. The aim of this review is to highlight the role of estrogen in mediating this imbalanced sympathetic and sensory innervation in endometriosis, through direct and indirect mechanisms on sympathetic and sensory nerves. Theoretical elaboration of the underlying mechanisms provides new insights in supporting the therapeutic role of estrogen in endometriosis-associated pain. PMID:26777300

  16. Sympathetic restraint of respiratory sinus arrhythmia: implications for vagal-cardiac tone assessment in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. A.; Myers, C. W.; Halliwill, J. R.; Seidel, H.; Eckberg, D. L.

    2001-01-01

    Clinicians and experimentalists routinely estimate vagal-cardiac nerve traffic from respiratory sinus arrhythmia. However, evidence suggests that sympathetic mechanisms may also modulate respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Our study examined modulation of respiratory sinus arrhythmia by sympathetic outflow. We measured R-R interval spectral power in 10 volunteers that breathed sequentially at 13 frequencies, from 15 to 3 breaths/min, before and after beta-adrenergic blockade. We fitted changes of respiratory frequency R-R interval spectral power with a damped oscillator model: frequency-dependent oscillations with a resonant frequency, generated by driving forces and modified by damping influences. beta-Adrenergic blockade enhanced respiratory sinus arrhythmia at all frequencies (at some, fourfold). The damped oscillator model fit experimental data well (39 of 40 ramps; r = 0.86 +/- 0.02). beta-Adrenergic blockade increased respiratory sinus arrhythmia by amplifying respiration-related driving forces (P < 0.05), without altering resonant frequency or damping influences. Both spectral power data and the damped oscillator model indicate that cardiac sympathetic outflow markedly reduces heart period oscillations at all frequencies. This challenges the notion that respiratory sinus arrhythmia is mediated simply by vagal-cardiac nerve activity. These results have important implications for clinical and experimental estimation of human vagal cardiac tone.

  17. Altered Differential Control of Sympathetic Outflow Following Sedentary Conditions: Role of Subregional Neuroplasticity in the RVLM

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Madhan; Mueller, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the classically held belief of an “all-or-none” activation of the sympathetic nervous system, differential responses in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) can occur acutely at varying magnitudes and in opposing directions. Sympathetic nerves also appear to contribute differentially to various disease states including hypertension and heart failure. Previously we have reported that sedentary conditions enhanced responses of splanchnic SNA (SSNA) but not lumbar SNA (LSNA) to activation of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) in rats. Bulbospinal RVLM neurons from sedentary rats also exhibit increased dendritic branching in rostral regions of the RVLM. We hypothesized that regionally specific structural neuroplasticity would manifest as enhanced SSNA but not LSNA following activation of the rostral RVLM. To test this hypothesis, groups of physically active (10–12 weeks on running wheels) or sedentary, male Sprague-Dawley rats were instrumented to record mean arterial pressure, LSNA and SSNA under Inactin anesthesia and during microinjections of glutamate (30 nl, 10 mM) into multiple sites within the RVLM. Sedentary conditions enhanced SSNA but not LSNA responses and SSNA responses were enhanced at more central and rostral sites. Results suggest that enhanced SSNA responses in rostral RVLM coincide with enhanced dendritic branching in rostral RVLM observed previously. Identifying structural and functional neuroplasticity in specific populations of RVLM neurons may help identify new treatments for cardiovascular diseases, known to be more prevalent in sedentary individuals. PMID:27486405

  18. Sympathetic activation by chemical stimulation of white adipose tissues in rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhen; Chen, Wei-Wei; Xiong, Xiao-Qing; Han, Ying; Zhou, Ye-Bo; Zhang, Feng; Gao, Xing-Ya; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2012-03-01

    Injection of leptin into white adipose tissue (WAT) increases sympathetic outflow. The present study was designed to determine the effects of capsaicin and other chemicals in WAT on the sympathetic outflow and blood pressure and the roles of WAT afferents and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) in the adipose afferent reflex (AAR). The AAR was induced by injection of capsaicin, bradykinin, adenosine, adenosine triphosphate (ATP), or leptin into inguinal WAT (iWAT) or retroperitoneal WAT (rWAT) in anesthetized rats. The iWAT injection of capsaicin increased the renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) but not the heart rate. Bradykinin, adenosine, or leptin but not ATP in the iWAT caused similar effects to capsaicin on the RSNA and MAP. Intravenous, intramuscular, or intradermal injection of capsaicin had no significant effects on the RSNA and MAP. The effects of capsaicin in rWAT were similar to that in iWAT on the RSNA and MAP. Furthermore, injection of capsaicin into the iWAT increased the WAT afferent nerve activities, WAT efferent nerve activity, and brown adipose tissue efferent nerve activity. The iWAT denervation or chemical lesion of the PVN neurons with kainic acid abolished the AAR induced by the iWAT injection of capsaicin. These results indicate that the stimulation of iWAT afferents with capsaicin, bradykinin, adenosine, or leptin reflexly increases the RSNA and blood pressure. The iWAT afferents and the PVN are involved in the AAR induced by capsaicin in the iWAT. PMID:22223453

  19. Intraoperative identification of adrenal-renal fusion.

    PubMed

    Boll, Griffin; Rattan, Rishi; Yilmaz, Osman; Tarnoff, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal - renal fusion is a rare entity defined as incomplete encapsulation of the adrenal gland and kidney with histologically adjacent functional tissue. This report describes the first published intraoperative identification of this anomaly during laparoscopic adrenalectomy. The patient was a 59-year-old man with chronic hypertension refractory to multiple antihypertensives found to be caused by a right-sided aldosterone-producing adrenal adenoma in the setting of bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. During laparoscopic adrenalectomy, the normal avascular plane between the kidney and adrenal gland was absent. Pathologic evaluation confirmed adrenal - renal fusion without adrenal heterotopia. Identified intraoperatively, this may be misdiagnosed as invasive malignancy, and thus awareness of this anomaly may help prevent unnecessarily morbid resection. PMID:26195881

  20. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal and Sympathetic Nervous System Activity and Children's Behavioral Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lisonbee, Jared A.; Pendry, Patricia; Mize, Jacquelyn; Gwynn, Eugenia Parrett

    2010-01-01

    Self-regulation ability is an important component of children's academic success. Physiological reactivity may relate to brain activity governing attention and behavioral regulation. Saliva samples collected from 186 preschool children (101 boys, mean age = 53 months, 34% minority) before and after a series of mildly challenging games and again 30…

  1. [The effect of bromantane on the cardiovascular and sympathetic-adrenal systems in animals].

    PubMed

    Morozov, I S; Efimova, L P; Kryzhanovskiĭ, S A

    2000-01-01

    Bromantan administration markedly increases the stroke and minute blood volume at a reduced heart rate and peripheral resistance in anaesthetized rats, while the systemic arterial pressure exhibits an insignificant short-time increase. Bromantan also weakly increases the pressor effects of adrenaline and noradrenaline. In anaesthetized cats, bromantan modifies the shape of the amplitude-frequency characteristic of EEG measured in the upper cervical ganglion, reducing (against the initial level) the induced potential in the frequency range of the preganglionic fiber stimulation (1-10 and 25-30 Hz). In freely moving rats, capable of well-learnt Sidman's [correction of Seedman's] operant activity, bromantan showed a reliable tendency to decrease the rate of noradrenaline and adrenaline excretion with urine. PMID:10763107

  2. DO SYMPATHETIC NEURONS COORDINATE CELLULAR DEVELOPMENT IN THE HEART AND KIDNEY? EFFECTS OF NEONATAL CENTRAL AND PERIPHERAL CATECHOLMINERGIC LESIONS ON CARDIAC AND RENAL NUCLEIC ACIDS AND PROTEINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sympathetic nerve activity has been hypothesized to set the timing of cellular maturational events in target tissues. n the current study, this hypothesis was tested by lesioning catecholamine pathways in the periphery and central nervous system through the use of subcutaneous or...

  3. Phosphorylated α-synuclein in skin nerve fibres differentiates Parkinson's disease from multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Zange, Leonora; Noack, Cornelia; Hahn, Katrin; Stenzel, Werner; Lipp, Axel

    2015-08-01

    Deposition of phosphorylated SNCA (also known as α-synuclein) in cutaneous nerve fibres has been shown pre- and post-mortem in Parkinson's disease. Thus far, no pre-mortem studies investigating the presence of phosphorylated SNCA in skin sympathetic nerve fibres of multiple system atrophy, another synucleinopathy, have been conducted. In this in vivo study, skin from the ventral forearm of 10 patients with multiple system atrophy and 10 with Parkinson's disease, together with six control subjects with essential tremor, were examined by immunohistochemistry. Phosphorylated SNCA deposits in skin sympathetic nerve fibres and dermal nerve fibre density were assessed. All patients with Parkinson's disease expressed phosphorylated SNCA in sympathetic skin nerve fibres, correlating with an age-independent denervation of autonomic skin elements. In contrast, no phosphorylated SNCA was found in autonomic skin nerve fibres of patients with multiple system atrophy and essential tremor control subjects. These findings support that phosphorylated SNCA deposition is causative for nerve fibre degeneration in Parkinson's disease. Moreover, pre-mortem investigation of phosphorylated SNCA in cutaneous nerve fibres may prove a relevant and easily conductible diagnostic procedure to differentiate Parkinson's disease from multiple system atrophy. PMID:26017579

  4. Effect of regional myocardial ischemia on sympathetic nervous system as assessed by fluorine-18-metaraminol

    SciTech Connect

    Schwaiger, M.; Guibourg, H.; Rosenspire, K.; McClanahan, T.; Gallagher, K.; Hutchins, G.; Wieland, D.M. )

    1990-08-01

    With the introduction of radiolabeled catecholamine analogues, the noninvasive evaluation of the cardiac sympathetic nervous system has become possible. This study evaluated the effect of regional ischemia on myocardial retention of the new norepinephrine analogue 6-({sup 18}F) fluorometaraminol (FMR) in the open chest dog model. Six dogs were injected intravenously with FMR following 30-min occlusion of the left anterior descending artery. Six sham animals served as control group. Regional myocardial blood flow as determined by microspheres decreased 87% during ischemia (p less than 0.01), but was not significantly different from control myocardium following reperfusion. Regional myocardial 18F activity as determined postmortem was significantly reduced in reperfused myocardium (-34%), which paralleled an 18% reduction of tissue norepinephrine concentration. Thus, short time periods of coronary occlusion affect neuronal function indicating the sensitivity of the sympathetic nerve terminals to ischemia. FMR provides a new tracer approach for the characterization of neuronal integrity in postischemic myocardium.

  5. Sympathetic denervation impairs responses of brown adipose tissue to VMH stimulation

    SciTech Connect

    Minokoshi, Y.; Saito, M.; Shimazu, T.

    1986-11-01

    Effects of unilateral surgical denervation of the interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT) on its thermogenic and lipogenic responses to electrical stimulation of the ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) nucleus were studied in anesthetized rats. The rapid rise in IBAT temperature in response to VMH stimulation was greatly suppressed in the denervated IBAT, whereas the temperature response was not impaired in the contralateral innervated IBAT in the same animals. Similarly, the increased rates of conversion of (/sup 14/C) glucose and (/sup 3/H)H/sub 2/O to fatty acids and glyceride glycerol in vivo in IBAT after VMH stimulation were almost completely inhibited by sympathetic denervation. These results indicate clearly that the increases in lipogenic and thermogenic activities in IBAT in response to VMH stimulation are mediated by the sympathetic nerve supply of this tissue.

  6. Association between vasovagal hypotension and low sympathetic neural activity during presyncope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, William H.; Convertino, Victor A.

    2002-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that an underlying mechanism for susceptibility of patients and astronauts to presyncope includes hypoadrenergic responses to orthostatic stress. However, data used to reach this conclusion are open to various interpretations. In this report, maintenance of sympathetic neural activity (MSNA; peroneal nerve microneurography) during -60 mmHg lower body negative pressure (LBNP) was associated with maintenance of orthostatic tolerance, and disappearance of MSNA was associated with hypotension and pre-syncope. However, MSNA was substantially higher during progressive increases of negative pressure in the presyncopal subject, compared to the non-presyncopal subjects. The data from this case report question the notion that orthostatic hypotension occurs due to inadequate sympathetic neural activation during orthostatic stress in apparently normal, healthy subjects.

  7. Long-acting dihydropyridine calcium-channel blockers and sympathetic nervous system activity in hypertension: A literature review comparing amlodipine and nifedipine GITS

    PubMed Central

    Toal, Corey B.; Meredith, Peter A.; Elliott, Henry L.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium-channel blockers (CCBs) constitute a diverse group of compounds but are often referred to as a single homogeneous class of drug and the clinical responses indiscriminately summarized. Even within the dihydropyridine subgroup, there are significant differences in formulations, pharmacokinetics, durations of action and their effects on blood pressure, heart rate, end organs and the sympathetic nervous system. Amlodipine and nifedipine in the gastrointestinal therapeutic system (GITS) formulation are the most studied of the once-daily CCBs. Amlodipine has an inherently long pharma-cokinetic half-life, whereas, in contrast, nifedipine has an inherently short half-life but in the GITS formulation the sophisticated delivery system allows for once-daily dosing. This article is derived from a systematic review of the published literature in hypertensive patients. The following search terms in three main databases (MEDLINE, Embase, Science Citation Index) from 1990 to 2011 were utilized: amlodipine, nifedipine, sympathetic nervous system, sympathetic response, sympathetic nerve activity, noradrenaline, norepinephrine and heart rate. More than 1500 articles were then screened to derive the relevant analysis. As markers of sympathetic nervous system activation, studies of plasma norepinephrine concentrations, power spectral analysis, muscle sympathetic nerve activity and norepinephrine spillover were reviewed. Overall, each drug lowered blood pressure in hypertensive patients in association with only small changes in heart rate (i.e. < 1 beat/min). Plasma norepinephrine concentrations, as the most widely reported marker of sympathetic nervous system activity, showed greater increases in patients treated with amlodipine than with nifedipine GITS. The evidence indicates that both these once-daily dihydropyridine CCBs lower blood pressure effectively with minimal effects on heart rate. There are small differences between the drugs in the extent to which each activates

  8. Management of adolescents with congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Merke, Deborah P; Poppas, Dix P

    2014-01-01

    The management of congenital adrenal hyperplasia involves suppression of adrenal androgen production, in addition to treatment of adrenal insufficiency. Management of adolescents with congenital adrenal hyperplasia is especially challenging because changes in the hormonal milieu during puberty can lead to inadequate suppression of adrenal androgens, psychosocial issues often affect adherence to medical therapy, and sexual function plays a major part in adolescence and young adulthood. For these reasons, treatment regimen reassessment is indicated during adolescence. Patients with non-classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia require reassessment regarding the need for glucocorticoid drug treatment. No clinical trials have compared various regimens for classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia in adults, thus therapy is individualised and based on the prevention of adverse outcomes. Extensive patient education is key during transition from paediatric care to adult care and should include education of females with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia regarding their genital anatomy and surgical history. Common issues for these patients include urinary incontinence, vaginal stenosis, clitoral pain, and cosmetic concerns; for males with classic congenital adrenal hyperplasia, common issues include testicular adrenal rest tumours. Transition from paediatric to adult care is most successful when phased over many years. Education of health-care providers on how to successfully transition patients is greatly needed. PMID:24622419

  9. Sympathetic skin response following thermal, electrical, acoustic, and inspiratory gasp stimulation in familial dysautonomia patients and healthy persons.

    PubMed

    Hilz, M J; Azelrod, F B; Schweibold, G; Kolodny, E H

    1999-08-01

    To determine whether sympathetic skin response (SSR) testing evaluates afferent small or efferent sympathetic nerve fiber dysfunction, we studied SSR in patients with familial dysautonomia (FD) in whom both afferent small and efferent sympathetic fibers are largely reduced. We analyzed whether the response pattern to a combination of stimuli specific for large or small fiber activation allows differentiation between afferent and efferent small fiber dysfunction. In 52 volunteers and 13 FD patients, SSR was studied at palms and soles after warm, cold and heat as well as electrical, acoustic, and inspiratory gasp stimulation. In addition, thermal thresholds were assessed at four body sites using a Thermotest device (Somedic; Stockholm, Sweden). In volunteers, any stimulus induced reproducible SSRs. Only cold failed to evoke SSR in two volunteers. In all FD patients, electrical SSR was present, but amplitudes were reduced. Five patients had no acoustic SSR, four had no inspiratory SSR. Thermal SSR was absent in 10 patients with abnormal thermal perception and present in one patient with preserved thermal sensation. In two patients, thermal SSR was present only when skin areas with preserved temperature perception were stimulated. In patients with FD, preserved electrical SSR demonstrated the overall integrity of the SSR reflex but amplitude reduction suggested impaired sudomotor activation. SSR responses were dependent on the perception of the stimulus. In the presence of preserved electrical SSR, absent thermal SSR reflects afferent small fiber dysfunction. A combination of SSR stimulus types allows differentiation between afferent small or efferent sympathetic nerve fiber dysfunction. PMID:10574280

  10. Nerve-mediated antidiuresis and antinatriuresis after air-jet stress is modulated by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Veelken, R; Hilgers, K F; Stetter, A; Siebert, H G; Schmieder, R E; Mann, J F

    1996-11-01

    A putative interaction between angiotensin II (Ang II) and the sympathetic nervous system within the kidney has been reported. We tested the hypothesis in conscious rats that endogenous Ang II modulates the renal effects of a stress-induced increase in sympathetic nerve activity. We recorded mean arterial blood pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve activity, renal hemodynamics, urine volume, and urinary sodium content in conscious rats. We used the Ang II type 1 receptor blocker ZD 7155 to inhibit the effects of endogenous Ang II. Ten minutes of air-jet stress increased renal sympathetic nerve activity by 98 +/- 4% (n = 6) without changing systemic hemodynamics. Air-jet stress reduced urine volume (from 31 +/- 3 to 8 +/- 4 microL/min per gram kidney weight, P < .05, n = 12) and sodium excretion (from 4.3 +/- 0.9 to 1.2 +/- 0.3 mumol/min per gram kidney weight, P < .05, n = 12). After renal denervation, air-jet stress had no effect on either parameter. Six micrograms of the Ang II type 1 receptor inhibitor ZD 7155 blunted the decrease in urine volume and sodium excretion in response to air-jet stress, although the increase in renal sympathetic nerve activity during air-jet stress and the pressor response to exogenous Ang II were not affected. Glomerular filtration rate and renal plasma flow were also not affected. Higher doses of 30 and 60 micrograms ZD 7155 inhibited the pressor response to exogenous Ang II and abolished the changes in urine volume and sodium excretion in response to air-jet stress. None of the ZD 7155 doses affected urinary sodium excretion permanently. Hence, the Ang II type 1 receptor antagonist ZD 7155 impaired or abolished the renal nerve-mediated antinatriuresis and anitidiuresis in response to air-jet stress. We conclude that endogenous Ang II modulates the renal effects of centrally mediated changes of sympathetic nerve activity in conscious rats. PMID:8901830

  11. 5-HT1D receptor inhibits renal sympathetic neurotransmission by nitric oxide pathway in anesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    García-Pedraza, José-Ángel; García, Mónica; Martín, María-Luisa; Morán, Asunción

    2015-09-01

    Although serotonin has been shown to inhibit peripheral sympathetic outflow, serotonin regulation on renal sympathetic outflow has not yet been elucidated. This study investigated which 5-HT receptor subtypes are involved. Wistar rats were anesthetized (sodium pentobarbital; 60mg/kg, i.p.), and prepared for in situ autoperfused rat kidney, which allows continuous measurement of systemic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate (HR) and renal perfusion pressure (PP). Electrical stimulation of renal sympathetic nerves resulted in frequency-dependent increases in PP (18.3±1.0, 43.7±2.7 and 66.7±4.0 for 2, 4 and 6Hz, respectively), without altering SBP or HR. 5-HT, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (5-HT1/7 agonist) (0.00000125-0.1μg/kg each) or l-694,247 (5-HT1D agonist; 0.0125μg/kg) i.a. bolus inhibited vasopressor responses by renal nerve electrical stimulation, unlike i.a. bolus of agonists α-methyl-5-HT (5-HT2), 1-PBG (5-HT3), cisapride (5-HT4), AS-19 (5-HT7), CGS-12066B (5-HT1B) or 8-OH-DPAT (5-HT1A) (0.0125μg/kg each). The effect of l-694,247 did not affect the exogenous norepinephrine-induced vasoconstrictions, whereas was abolished by antagonist LY310762 (5-HT1D; 1mg/kg) or l-NAME (nitric oxide; 10mg/kg), but not by indomethacin (COX1/2; 2mg/kg) or glibenclamide (ATP-dependent K(+) channel; 20mg/kg). These results suggest that 5-HT mechanism-induced inhibition of rat vasopressor renal sympathetic outflow is mainly mediated by prejunctional 5-HT1D receptors via nitric oxide release. PMID:26003124

  12. Effects of nitric oxide synthase inhibition on sympathetically-mediated tachycardia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, E. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Lewis, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis directly alters the tachycardia produced by sympathetically-derived norepinephrine. The NO synthase inhibitor, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 50 micromol/kg, i.v.), produced a marked rise in mean arterial blood pressure. This pressor response was associated with a fall in heart rate which involved the withdrawal of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity. The NO-donor, sodium nitroprusside (5 microg/kg, i.v.), produced a pronounced fall in mean arterial blood pressure but only a minor increase in heart rate. The beta-adrenoceptor agonist, isoproterenol (0.5 micromol/kg, i.v.), and the membrane-permeable cAMP analogue, 8-(4-chlorophenylthiol)-cAMP (10 micromol/kg, i.v.), produced falls in mean arterial blood pressure and pronounced increases in heart rate. The indirectly acting sympathomimetic agent, tyramine (0.5 mg/kg, i.v.), produced a pressor response and a tachycardia. The effects of sodium nitroprusside, tyramine, isoproterenol and 8-(4-chlorophenylthiol)-cAMP on mean arterial blood pressure were not markedly affected by L-NAME. However, the tachycardia produced by these agents was considerably exaggerated in the presence of this NO synthesis inhibitor. These findings suggest that L-NAME potentiates the tachycardia produced by sympathetically-derived norepinephrine. The increased responsiveness to norepinephrine may involve (i) a rapid up-regulation of cardiac beta1-adrenoceptors and cAMP signaling in cardiac pacemaker cells due to the loss of the inhibitory influence of cardiac NO, and (ii) the up-regulation of beta1-adrenoceptor-mediated signal transduction processes in response to the L-NAME-induced withdrawal of cardiac sympathetic nerve activity.

  13. Activation of Rho-kinase in the brainstem enhances sympathetic drive in mice with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Ito, Koji; Kimura, Yoshikuni; Hirooka, Yoshitaka; Sagara, Yoji; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2008-11-01

    Rho-kinase is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension and left ventricular remodelling after myocardial infarction (MI). In an earlier study, we had demonstrated that Rho-kinase in the brainstem contributes to hypertensive mechanisms via the sympathetic nervous system; however, it is not known whether Rho-kinase in the brainstem also contributes to sympathetic nerve activation after MI. Male Institute of Cancer Research mice (8-10 weeks old) were used for the study. Two days before coronary artery occlusion (MI group), the left ventricular function was estimated by echocardiography. Following this, Y-27632 (0.5 mM, 0.25 microL/h), a specific Rho-kinase inhibitor, or a vehicle was intracisternally infused in the mice using an osmotic mini-pump. Nine days after coronary artery occlusion, we evaluated the 24-hour urinary norepinephrine excretion (U-NE) as a marker of sympathetic nerve activity. Ten days after coronary artery occlusion, we measured organ weight and evaluated Rho-kinase activity in the brainstem by measuring the amount of phosphorylated ezrin/radixin/moesin proteins, one of the substrates of Rho-kinase. The control group underwent a sham operation. Rho-kinase activity, U-NE, and lungs and liver weight were significantly greater in the MI group compared with the control group. Left ventricular size increased and percent fractional shortening decreased in the MI group compared with the control group. Y-27632 significantly decreased Rho-kinase activity and attenuated the increase in U-NE after MI. These results demonstrate that Rho-kinase is activated in the brainstem after MI and that the activation of this pathway is involved in the resulting enhanced sympathetic drive. PMID:18762460

  14. Sympathetic vasomotor outflow and blood pressure increase during exercise with expiratory resistance.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Keisho; Itoh, Yuka; Saito, Mitsuru; Koike, Teruhiko; Ishida, Koji

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the effect of increasing expiratory muscle work on sympathetic vasoconstrictor outflow and arterial blood pressure (BP) during dynamic exercise. We hypothesized that expiratory muscle fatigue would elicit increases in sympathetic vasomotor outflow and BP during submaximal exercise. The subjects performed four submaximal exercise tests; two were maximal expiratory pressure (PE max) tests and two were muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) tests. In each test, the subjects performed two 10-min exercises at 40% peak oxygen uptake using a cycle ergometer in a semirecumbent position [spontaneous breathing for 5 min and voluntary hyperpnoea with and without expiratory resistive breathing for 5 min (breathin