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Sample records for adrenal tumor cells

  1. Adrenal Gland Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... here Home > Types of Cancer > Adrenal Gland Tumor Adrenal Gland Tumor This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Adrenal Gland Tumor. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Adrenal Gland Tumor Introduction Statistics Risk Factors Symptoms and ...

  2. Immunohistochemical distinction of metastases of renal cell carcinoma to the adrenal from primary adrenal nodules, including oncocytic tumor.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongmei; Hes, Ondrej; MacLennan, Gregory T; Eastwood, Daniel C; Iczkowski, Kenneth A

    2015-05-01

    Metastases of clear cell renal cell carcinoma to the adrenal can mimic primary adrenal cortical neoplasms or normal adrenal, especially in biopsy material. We compared 34 cases of clear cell renal cell carcinoma metastasis to the adrenal with 49 primary adrenal lesions (16 carcinoma, 22 adenoma, 9 oncocytic tumor, and 2 hyperplasia). Normal adrenal was available in 59 cases. Each entity was represented on tissue microarrays by duplicate-triplicate evaluable spots taken from spatially separate areas. Two pathologists evaluated all reactivity from 0 to 3+. A panel of 12 immunohistochemical stains was performed, including the first diagnostic uses of steroid receptor coactivator (SRC1) and equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1). The most sensitive and specific renal cell carcinoma markers were membranous reactivity for carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) and RCC marker and nuclear reactivity for PAX8. For adrenal cortical carcinomas, best markers were synaptophysin, SRC1, and MelanA; and for adrenal oncocytic tumor, synaptophysin and ENT1. Optimal markers for adrenal cortical adenoma and normal adrenal were ENT1 (more specific) and either MelanA or SRC1 (more sensitive). Calretinin, cytokeratin 34βE12 and CAM5.2, inhibin, and steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) proved less valuable to the panel. Nonspecific cytoplasmic biotin reactivity was frequent for CAIX and PAX8. Tumors with high-grade cytology should be worked up with 2 of the 3 stains: CAIX, PAX8, or RCC marker; and either SRC1 or MelanA. Adrenal adenoma, or normal adrenal, versus low-grade renal cell carcinoma are distinguished by a panel of: CAIX, PAX8, or RCC Marker; ENT1 and either SRC1 or MelanA. PMID:25690138

  3. Radionuclide therapy of adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Carrasquillo, Jorge A; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Chen, Clara C

    2012-10-01

    Adrenal tumors arising from chromaffin cells will often accumulate radiolabeled metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and thus are amenable to therapy with I-131 MIBG. More recently, therapy studies have targeted the somatostatin receptors using Lu-177 or Y-90 radiolabeled somatostatin analogs. Because pheochromocytoma (PHEO)/paraganglioma (PGL) and neuroblastoma (NB), which often arise from the adrenals, express these receptors, clinical trials have been performed with these reagents. We will review the experience using radionuclide therapy for targeting PHEO/PGL and NBs. PMID:22718415

  4. Adrenalectomy for metastatic adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Kita, Masafumi; Tamaki, Gaku; Okuyama, Mitsuhiko; Saga, Yuji; Kakizaki, Hidehiro

    2007-11-01

    The indications for adrenalectomy in cases of metastatic adrenal tumor remain controversial. To clarify indications and outcomes of adrenalectomy for adrenal metastasis, we performed a retrospective review of all 8 patients who underwent adrenalectomy for adrenal metastasis between 1990 and 2006 in Asahikawa Medical College Hospital. The Primary tumor was renal cell carcinoma in 2 cases, and eccrine poro carcinoma, rectal cancer, lung cancer, melanoma, bladder cancer and cancer of unknown origin in 1 case each. Open adrenalectomy was performed in all cases, including 1 case that was converted from laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Of the 4 patients with solitary adrenal metastasis, 3 were considered tumor-free after adrenalectomy, while the remaining patient was not due to unresectable primary tumor. Of the 3 patients with complete resection, one remained alive as of 88 months after adrenalectomy but was then lost to follow-up, and the other 2 patients remain alive 12 and 7 months after adrenalectomy. Of the 2 patients with other resectable metastasis who were tumor-free after removal of all metastases, one was alive 31 months postoperatively and the other died 23 months after operation. The remaining 2 cases with other unresectable metastasis died within 6 months after adrenalectomy. At least in cases of solitary adrenal metastasis, adrenalectomy can be effective if other valid methods are unavailable. PMID:18051798

  5. Percutaneous Ablation of Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Locklin, Julia; Dupuy, Damian E.; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Adrenal tumors comprise a broad spectrum of benign and malignant neoplasms, and include functional adrenal adenomas, pheochromocytomas, primary adrenocortical carcinoma and adrenal metastases. Percutaneous ablative approaches that have been described and used in the treatment of adrenal tumors include percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA), cryoablation, microwave ablation and chemical ablation. Local tumor ablation in the adrenal gland presents unique challenges, secondary to the adrenal gland’s unique anatomic and physiologic features. The results of clinical series employing percutaneous ablative techniques in the treatment of adrenal tumors are reviewed in this article. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the adrenal gland are presented, including approaches commonly used in our practices, and risks and potential complications are discussed. PMID:20540918

  6. Woman with virilizing congenital adrenal hyperplasia and Leydig cell tumor of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Fernández-García Salazar, Rosario; Muñoz-Darias, Carmen; Haro-Mora, Juan Jesús; Almaraz, M Cruz; Audí, Laura; Martínez-Tudela, Juana; Yahyaoui, Raquel; Esteva, Isabel

    2014-08-01

    We report the case of a 36-year-old woman with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency, and corticosteroid replacement therapy since birth. She manifested persistent virilization and high testosterone levels that were attributed to nonadherence to medical treatment. The patient was referred to our gender unit for genitoplastic surgery. We recommended the patient for left oophorectomy after detecting an ovarian mass. Pathologic findings confirmed an ovarian hilus cell tumor. Testosterone levels fell back to normal and masculinization disappeared but ACTH remained elevated. This case represents a very rare type of primary ovarian tumor that must be considered in persistent virilizing symptoms in women with CAH. PMID:24702195

  7. Expression of neuropeptide hormone receptors in human adrenal tumors and cell lines: antiproliferative effects of peptide analogues.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, C G; Brown, J W; Schally, A V; Erler, A; Gebauer, L; Treszl, A; Young, L; Fishman, L M; Engel, J B; Willenberg, H S; Petersenn, S; Eisenhofer, G; Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Bornstein, S R

    2009-09-15

    Peptide analogues targeting various neuropeptide receptors have been used effectively in cancer therapy. A hallmark of adrenocortical tumor formation is the aberrant expression of peptide receptors relating to uncontrolled cell proliferation and hormone overproduction. Our microarray results have also demonstrated a differential expression of neuropeptide hormone receptors in tumor subtypes of human pheochromocytoma. In light of these findings, we performed a comprehensive analysis of relevant receptors in both human adrenomedullary and adrenocortical tumors and tested the antiproliferative effects of peptide analogues targeting these receptors. Specifically, we examined the receptor expression of somatostatin-type-2 receptor, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor or GHRH receptor splice variant-1 (SV-1) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor at the mRNA and protein levels in normal human adrenal tissues, adrenocortical and adrenomedullary tumors, and cell lines. Cytotoxic derivatives of somatostatin AN-238 and, to a lesser extent, AN-162, reduced cell numbers of uninduced and NGF-induced adrenomedullary pheochromocytoma cells and adrenocortical cancer cells. Both the splice variant of GHRH receptor SV-1 and the LHRH receptor were also expressed in adrenocortical cancer cell lines but not in the pheochromocytoma cell line. The GHRH receptor antagonist MZ-4-71 and LHRH antagonist Cetrorelix both significantly reduced cell growth in the adrenocortical cancer cell line. In conclusion, the expression of receptors for somatostatin, GHRH, and LHRH in the normal human adrenal and in adrenal tumors, combined with the growth-inhibitory effects of the antitumor peptide analogues, may make possible improved treatment approaches to adrenal tumors. PMID:19717419

  8. Adrenal Schwannomas: Rare Tumor of the Retroperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Emanuele; Simone, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Schwannoma is a benign neurogenic tumor originating from Schwann cells. These produce the myelin sheath that covers peripheral nerves that are often affected. This latter localization is extremely rare, and only a few case reports can be found in the medical literature. Studies have shown that approximately 0.5% to 5% of schwannomas are retroperitoneal, constituting 0.2% of adrenal incidental tumors. These usually present as incidental findings, nonsecreting adrenal masses in asymptomatic patients. Diagnosis of a schwannoma is based on detection of spindle cells with Antoni A and Antoni B regions in histological sections and positive staining for S-100 protein by immunohistochemical analysis. We report a case of an incidentally identified during an abdominal ultrasound examination with schwannoma localized in the left adrenal gland. PMID:26101687

  9. Cushing syndrome due to adrenal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome. It occurs when a tumor of the adrenal gland releases excess amounts of the hormone cortisol. Causes ... hormone cortisol. This hormone is made in the adrenal glands . Too much cortisol can be due to various ...

  10. Diabetic ketoacidosis with concurrent pancreatitis, pancreatic β islet cell tumor, and adrenal disease in an obese ferret (Mustela putorius furo).

    PubMed

    Phair, Kristen A; Carpenter, James W; Schermerhorn, Thomas; Ganta, Chanran K; DeBey, Brad M

    2011-07-01

    A 5.5-y-old spayed female ferret (Mustela putorius furo) with a history of adrenal disease, respiratory disease, and chronic obesity was evaluated for progressive lethargy and ataxia, diminished appetite, and possible polyuria and polydipsia. Physical examination revealed obesity, lethargy, tachypnea, dyspnea, a pendulous abdomen, significant weakness and ataxia of the hindlimbs, prolonged skin tenting, and mild tail-tip alopecia. Clinicopathologic analysis revealed severe hyperglycemia, azotemia, an increased anion gap, glucosuria, ketonuria, proteinuria, and hematuria. Abdominal ultrasonography showed hyperechoic hepatomegaly, bilateral adrenomegaly, splenic nodules, mild peritoneal effusion, and thickened and mildly hypoechoic limbs of the pancreas with surrounding hyperechoic mesentery. Fine-needle aspirates of the liver were highly suggestive of hepatic lipidosis. In light of a diagnosis of concurrent diabetic ketoacidosis and pancreatitis, the ferret was treated with fluid therapy, regular and long-acting insulin administration, and pain medication. However, electrolyte derangements, metabolic acidosis, dyspnea, and the clinical appearance of the ferret progressively worsened despite treatment, and euthanasia was elected. Necropsy revealed severe hepatic lipidosis, severe suppurative pancreatitis and vacuolar degeneration of pancreatic islet cells, a pancreatic β islet cell tumor, bilateral adrenal cortical adenomas, and myocardial fibrosis. To our knowledge, this case represents the first report of concurrent diabetes mellitus, pancreatitis, pancreatic β islet cell tumor (insulinoma), and adrenal disease in a domestic ferret. The simultaneous existence of 3 endocrine diseases, pancreatitis, and their associated complications is a unique and clinically challenging situation. PMID:21838985

  11. Diabetic Ketoacidosis with Concurrent Pancreatitis, Pancreatic β Islet Cell Tumor, and Adrenal Disease in an Obese Ferret (Mustela putorius furo)

    PubMed Central

    Phair, Kristen A; Carpenter, James W; Schermerhorn, Thomas; Ganta, Chanran K; DeBey, Brad M

    2011-01-01

    A 5.5-y-old spayed female ferret (Mustela putorius furo) with a history of adrenal disease, respiratory disease, and chronic obesity was evaluated for progressive lethargy and ataxia, diminished appetite, and possible polyuria and polydipsia. Physical examination revealed obesity, lethargy, tachypnea, dyspnea, a pendulous abdomen, significant weakness and ataxia of the hindlimbs, prolonged skin tenting, and mild tail-tip alopecia. Clinicopathologic analysis revealed severe hyperglycemia, azotemia, an increased anion gap, glucosuria, ketonuria, proteinuria, and hematuria. Abdominal ultrasonography showed hyperechoic hepatomegaly, bilateral adrenomegaly, splenic nodules, mild peritoneal effusion, and thickened and mildly hypoechoic limbs of the pancreas with surrounding hyperechoic mesentery. Fine-needle aspirates of the liver were highly suggestive of hepatic lipidosis. In light of a diagnosis of concurrent diabetic ketoacidosis and pancreatitis, the ferret was treated with fluid therapy, regular and long-acting insulin administration, and pain medication. However, electrolyte derangements, metabolic acidosis, dyspnea, and the clinical appearance of the ferret progressively worsened despite treatment, and euthanasia was elected. Necropsy revealed severe hepatic lipidosis, severe suppurative pancreatitis and vacuolar degeneration of pancreatic islet cells, a pancreatic β islet cell tumor, bilateral adrenal cortical adenomas, and myocardial fibrosis. To our knowledge, this case represents the first report of concurrent diabetes mellitus, pancreatitis, pancreatic β islet cell tumor (insulinoma), and adrenal disease in a domestic ferret. The simultaneous existence of 3 endocrine diseases, pancreatitis, and their associated complications is a unique and clinically challenging situation. PMID:21838985

  12. Renal and adrenal tumors: Pathology, radiology, ultrasonography, therapy, immunology

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, E.; Leder, L.D.

    1987-01-01

    Aspects as diverse as radiology, pathology, urology, pediatrics and immunology have been brought together in one book. The most up-do-date methods of tumor diagnosis by CT, NMR, and ultrasound are covered, as are methods of catheter embolization and radiation techniques in case of primarily inoperable tumors. Contents: Pathology of Renal and Adrenal Neoplasms; Ultrasound Diagnosis of Renal and Pararenal Tumors; Computed-Body-Tomography of Renal Carcinoma and Perirenal Masses; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Renal Mass Lesions; I-125 Embolotherapy of Renal Tumors; Adrenal Mass Lesions in Infants and Children; Computed Tomography of the Adrenal Glands; Scintigraphic Studies of Renal and Adrenal Function; Surgical Management of Renal Cell Carcinoma; Operative Therapy of Nephroblastoma; Nonoperative Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma; Prenatal Wilms' Tumor; Congenital Neuroblastoma; Nonsurgical Management of Wilms' Tumor; Immunologic Aspects of Malignant Renal Disease.

  13. Amitosis in human adrenal cells.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, M C; Pignatelli, D; Magalhães, M M

    1991-04-01

    Adrenal pieces obtained from 3 female and 2 male patients showed morphological figures of amitosis in adrenal zona reticularis cells. Such aspects were observed in both normal and hyperactive adrenals. Nuclei appeared constricted, heavily stained, with coarse chromatin, sometimes scattered among cytoplasmic organelles, but never marginating in crescentic caps. Cleavage of the cells originated two halves with a nucleolus in each pole. Binucleated cells were also seen in zona reticularis. The meaning of amitosis in human adrenal is discussed. PMID:1802124

  14. Inhibition of the Tcf/beta-catenin complex increases apoptosis and impairs adrenocortical tumor cell proliferation and adrenal steroidogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Leal, Letícia F.; Bueno, Ana Carolina; Gomes, Débora C.; Abduch, Rafael; de Castro, Margaret; Antonini, Sonir R.

    2015-01-01

    Background To date, there is no effective therapy for patients with advanced/metastatic adrenocortical cancer (ACC). The activation of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is frequent in ACC and this pathway is a promising therapeutic target. Aim To investigate the effects of the inhibition of the Wnt/beta-catenin in ACC cells. Methods Adrenal (NCI-H295 and Y1) and non-adrenal (HeLa) cell lines were treated with PNU-74654 (5–200 μM) for 24–96 h to assess cell viability (MTS-based assay), apoptosis (Annexin V), expression/localization of beta-catenin (qPCR, immunofluorescence, immunocytochemistry and western blot), expression of beta-catenin target genes (qPCR and western blot), and adrenal steroidogenesis (radioimmunoassay, qPCR and western blot). Results In NCI-H295 cells, PNU-74654 significantly decreased cell proliferation 96 h after treatment, increased early and late apoptosis, decreased nuclear beta-catenin accumulation, impaired CTNNB1/beta-catenin expression and increased beta-catenin target genes 48 h after treatment. No effects were observed on HeLa cells. In NCI-H295 cells, PNU-74654 decreased cortisol, testosterone and androstenedione secretion 24 and 48 h after treatment. Additionally, in NCI-H295 cells, PNU-74654 decreased SF1 and CYP21A2 mRNA expression as well as the protein levels of STAR and aldosterone synthase 48 h after treatment. In Y1 cells, PNU-74654 impaired corticosterone secretion 24 h after treatment but did not decrease cell viability. Conclusions Blocking the Tcf/beta-catenin complex inhibits the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in adrenocortical tumor cells triggering increased apoptosis, decreased cell viability and impairment of adrenal steroidogenesis. These promising findings pave the way for further experiments inhibiting the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in pre-clinical models of ACC. The inhibition of this pathway may become a promising adjuvant therapy for patients with ACC. PMID:26515592

  15. Dopamine receptor expression and function in human normal adrenal gland and adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Pivonello, Rosario; Ferone, Diego; de Herder, Wouter W; de Krijger, Ronald R; Waaijers, Marlijn; Mooij, Diana M; van Koetsveld, Peter M; Barreca, Antonina; De Caro, Maria Laura del Basso; Lombardi, Gaetano; Colao, Annamaria; Lamberts, Steven W J; Hofland, Leo J

    2004-09-01

    Dopamine is known to play a role in the modulation of aldosterone and catecholamine secretion from the adrenal gland, where dopamine receptors (DR), in particular the DR type 2 (D(2)), have been found to be expressed. DR expression has also been demonstrated in some types of benign adrenal tumors. The aims of the current study were to evaluate DR expression and D(2) localization in the normal adrenal gland and in different types of benign and malignant adrenal tumors, as well as to evaluate the in vitro effects of the dopamine agonists bromocriptine and cabergoline on hormone secretion in nontumoral adrenal cells. Adrenal tissues from 25 patients, subjected to adrenal surgery for different diseases, were studied. These included three normal adrenals; five adrenal hyperplasias; four aldosterone-secreting, two cortisol-secreting, and two clinically nonfunctioning adrenal adenomas; two aldosterone-secreting, two cortisol-secreting, and two androgen-secreting adrenal carcinomas; and three pheochromocytomas. In all tissues, DR and D(2) isoform (D(2long) and D(2short)) expression was evaluated by RT-PCR. D(2) localization was also evaluated by immunohistochemistry using a specific polyclonal antibody, whereas D(2)-like receptor expression was evaluated by receptor-ligand binding study, using the radiolabeled D(2) analog (125)I-epidepride. The effects of bromocriptine and cabergoline on baseline and ACTH and/or angiotensin II-stimulated aldosterone, cortisol, and androstenedione secretion were evaluated in cell cultures derived from five different adrenal hyperplasia. At RT-PCR, both D(1)-like and D(2)-like receptors were expressed in all normal and hyperplastic adrenals. D(2) and D(4) were expressed in aldosterone- and cortisol-secreting adenomas, cortisol-secreting carcinomas, and clinically nonfunctioning adenomas, whereas no DR was expressed in aldosterone- and androgen-secreting carcinomas. D(2), D(4), and D(5) were expressed in pheochromocytomas. In all D(2

  16. YPEL4 modulates HAC15 adrenal cell proliferation and is associated with tumor diameter.

    PubMed

    Oki, Kenji; Plonczynski, Maria W; Gomez-Sanchez, Elise P; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E

    2016-10-15

    Yippee-like (YPEL) proteins are thought to be related to cell proliferation because of their structure and location in the cell. The aim of this study was to clarify the effects of YPEL4 on aldosterone production and cell proliferation in the human adrenocortical cell line (HAC15) and aldosterone producing adenoma (APA). Basal aldosterone levels in HAC15 cells over-expressing YPEL4 was higher than those of control HAC15 cells. The positive effects of YPEL4 on cell proliferation were detected by XTT assay and crystal violet staining. YPEL4 levels in 39 human APA were 2.4-fold higher compared to those in 12 non-functional adrenocortical adenomas, and there was a positive relationship between YPEL4 levels and APA diameter (r = 0.316, P < 0.05). In summary, we have demonstrated that YPEL4 stimulates human adrenal cortical cell proliferation, increasing aldosterone production as a consequence. These results in human adrenocortical cells are consistent with the clinical observations with APA in humans. PMID:27333825

  17. Angiomyolipoma and Malignant PEComa: Discussion of Two Rare Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kwazneski II, Douglas; Merrill, Megan; Young, Jessica; Sell, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Angiomyolipoma and PEComa are rare tumors descending from perivascular epithelial cells (PECs), with distinctive IHC, morphological, and ultrastructural features. The kidney is the most frequent site of origin, but not the only one; however, adrenal gland angiomyolipomas are extremely rare. We describe two cases being found in the adrenal glands. Given the paucity of literature on the subject, more information on this disease is necessary for diagnosis and treatment. Here, we describe two complete case reports, from presentation to treatment and follow-up, along with imaging and microscopic pathology samples, and provide a comprehensive review as to the history and current literature available regarding these extremely rare tumors. PMID:26998374

  18. Diagnosis of adrenal tumors with radionuclide imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Beierwaltes, W.H.; Sisson, J.C.; Shapiro, B.

    1984-01-01

    The development of radiolabeled cholesterols in 1969 as precursors of adrenocortical steroid production allowed the first noninvasive imaging of the adrenal cortices. FDA-NDA approval in 1984 should allow routine use of these agents in most hospitals. NP-59 is most commonly used in the diagnosis and management of Cushing syndrome; the second most common use is in the diagnosis of primary aldosteronism. It is also helpful in the differential diagnosis of adrenal and ovarian hyperandrogenism and hirsutism, and is the only noninvasive method of detecting unilateral adrenocortical hypofunction. The newest and most popular use is in the differential diagnosis of asymptomatic masses in the region of the adrenal gland discovered incidentally with CT scan (incidentalomas). In this situation, the NP-59 scan can define whether the tumor is in the adrenal gland and if it is functional or nonfunctional. The authors believe that, in the future, radiolabeled enzyme inhibitors might offer better diagnostic imaging of the adrenal cortex, although these agents will probably not be available for routine use for some time. The development of a radioiodinated guanethidine analog, /sup 131/I-MIBG, has allowed differentiation of normal adrenal medullary function from bilateral adrenal medullary hyperplasia before the development of hypertension or tachycardia, diagnostic increases in plasma or urinary catecholamines, or abnormal CT scans. The search for a pheochromocytoma should begin with /sup 131/I-MIBG scintigraphy. While over 90% of primary pheochromocytomas occur in the abdomen, neither a survey of the abdomen nor the finding of a single tumor should conclude the search.

  19. Human adrenal tumor cell line SW-13 contains a natriuretic peptide receptor system that responds preferentially to ANP among various natriuretic peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Katafuchi, T.; Hagiwara, H.; Ito, T.; Kangawa, K.; Matsuo, H.; Hirose, S. )

    1990-12-31

    A new type of ANP receptor system which clearly distinguishes natriuretic peptides A and B (ANP and BNP) has been identified in the human adrenal tumor cell line SW-13 and characterized. SW-13 cells responded to nanomolar concentrations of ANP with large increases in cGMP levels but in the case of BNP, much higher concentrations were required to produce the same extent of response. This property is unique since the 140-kDa ANP receptors so far characterized do not discriminate between ANP and BNP. For comparison, various natriuretic peptide receptors were also re-characterized using the recently identified CNP.

  20. Telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations in tumors originating from the adrenal gland and extra-adrenal paraganglia.

    PubMed

    Papathomas, Thomas G; Oudijk, Lindsey; Zwarthoff, Ellen C; Post, Edward; Duijkers, Floor A; van Noesel, Max M; Hofland, Leo J; Pollard, Patrick J; Maher, Eamonn R; Restuccia, David F; Feelders, Richard A; Franssen, Gaston J H; Timmers, Henri J; Sleijfer, Stefan; de Herder, Wouter W; de Krijger, Ronald R; Dinjens, Winand N M; Korpershoek, Esther

    2014-08-01

    Hotspot mutations in the promoter of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene have been recently reported in human cancers and proposed as a novel mechanism of telomerase activation. To explore TERT promoter mutations in tumors originating from the adrenal gland and extra-adrenal paraganglia, a set of 253 tumors (38 adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs), 127 pheochromocytomas (PCCs), 18 extra-adrenal paragangliomas (ea PGLs), 37 head and neck PGLs (HN PGLs), and 33 peripheral neuroblastic tumors) was selected along with 16 human neuroblastoma (NBL) and two ACC cell lines to assess TERT promoter mutations by the Sanger sequencing method. All mutations detected were confirmed by a SNaPshot assay. Additionally, 36 gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) were added to explore an association between TERT promoter mutations and SDH deficiency. TERT promoter mutations were found in seven out of 289 tumors and in three out of 18 human cell lines; four C228T mutations in 38 ACCs (10.5%), two C228T mutations in 18 ea PGLs (11.1%), one C250T mutation in 36 GISTs (2.8%), and three C228T mutations in 16 human NBL cell lines (18.75%). No mutation was detected in PCCs, HN PGLs, neuroblastic tumors as well as ACC cell lines. TERT promoter mutations preferentially occurred in a SDH-deficient setting (P=0.01) being present in three out of 47 (6.4%) SDH-deficient tumors vs zero out of 171 (0%) SDH-intact tumors. We conclude that TERT promoter mutations occur in ACCs and ea PGLs. In addition, preliminary evidence indicates a potential association with the acquisition of TERT promoter mutations in SDH-deficient tumors. PMID:24951106

  1. Cushing syndrome due to adrenal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... levels Dexamethasone suppression test Blood cortisol levels Blood DHEA level Saliva cortisol level Tests to determine cause ... not possible, such as in cases of adrenal cancer, medicines can be used to stop the release ...

  2. [Primary bilateral adrenal T-cell lymphoma. A case report rarer than B-cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Sfaxi, M; Bouzouita, A; Bouasker, I; Kourda, N; Ben Slama, M R; Ben Jilani Baltaji, S; Chebil, M

    2008-06-01

    Primary adrenal lymphoma is a rare condition. Only 70 cases were described in the literature. Adrenal lymphoma is often bilateral and in most of the cases of B-cell type. T-cell lymphoma is exceptional. The prognosis is bad and patient can die early because of acute adrenal insufficiency. We report a case of a 70-year-old man who was admitted for acute adrenal insufficiency due to primary bilateral adrenal T-cell lymphoma. He had corticotherapy and surgical exploration for intra-abdominal sepsis. He died because of multivisceral deficiency. Clinical features and imaging are not specific. (18)F-FDG PET Scan is an excellent mean to detect malignant tumor of adrenal gland. Percutaneous needle biopsy is useful to determine histology. The standard treatment is chemotherapy. PMID:18455145

  3. Laser autofluorescent spectroscopy in adrenal tumor surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetshev, Petr S.; Ippolitov, Leonid I.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Kazaryan, Airazat M.; Minnibaev, Marat T.; Vetshev, Sergei P.

    1999-12-01

    Determination of a histological type of adrenal lesion at the preoperative or intraoperative stage allows to choose the optimal volume of surgery and in the short time effectively correct the postoperative hormonal therapy. 12 patients with different adrenal tumours (3 - lightcellular adenoma, 3 - mixedcellular adenoma, 1 - darkcellular adenoma, 1 - trabecular adenoma, 1 - malignant lymphoma, 3 - aldosteroma, 1 - pheochromocytoma, including the chance of combination of mixedcellular adenoma and aldosteroma of left adrenal) were operated on. The patients' aged varied from 33 to 62 years. For the first time we made intraoperative laser autofluorescent spectroscopy (IOLAS). The laser ve1ength was 632.8 nm. We defined a autofluorescent intensity. Portable equipment was used. The duration of the procedure did not exceed 2mm. The autofluorescent peak of adrenal tissue was 1.33+/-0.05 relativistic unit (RU) at 685 nm. The autofiurescent peaks of adrenal adenomas were 1 .07 RU, 0.9-1 .15 RU, 1.7-1 .9 RU, 3.4 RU accordingly for trabecular adenoma, lightcellular adenoma, mixedcellular adenoma, darkcellular adenoma Besides greater contribution of longwave component to auflurescence is characteristic for mixecellular adenoma and especially for darkcellular adenoma. The autofiurescent peaks of aldosteroma and pheochromocytoma were accordingly 1.2-1.4 RU and 2.2 RU. Spectral distribution of intensity was like mixedcellular adenoma's one. In the case of malignant lymphoma the autofiurescence peak was 2,3 RU and we also noted displacement of maximum of autoflurescence (-15 nm, from 685 nm to 670 nm).The results of IOLAS application as a adjuvant diagnosticmethod point to promise for intraoperative rapid diagnostics of adrenal tumours.

  4. Retroperitoneal calcifying fibrous tumor mimicking an adrenal tumor.

    PubMed

    Prochaska, Erica C; Sciallis, Andrew P; Miller, Barbra S

    2016-01-01

    Establishing the etiology of a retroperitoneal tumor may be difficult due to close proximity of multiple organs. Evaluation of retroperitoneal tumors often leads to surgery, many times to obtain a definitive diagnosis and rule out malignancy. Calcifying fibrous tumors (CFT) are very rare soft tissue tumors occurring most often in young patients. They are most often found arising in the thoracic cavity, mediastinum, abdominal cavity and extremities and usually have a benign clinical course. Macrocscopically, the tumors are well circumscribed and firm with a white-tan appearance. Histologically, CFT comprised a hypocellular proliferation of bland spindle cells, densely hyalinized collagen, chronic lymphoplasmacytic inflammation and dystrophic calcifications. Other considerations in the pathologic differential diagnosis include solitary fibrous tumor and inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. PMID:27252518

  5. Retroperitoneal calcifying fibrous tumor mimicking an adrenal tumor

    PubMed Central

    Prochaska, Erica C.; Sciallis, Andrew P.; Miller, Barbra S.

    2016-01-01

    Establishing the etiology of a retroperitoneal tumor may be difficult due to close proximity of multiple organs. Evaluation of retroperitoneal tumors often leads to surgery, many times to obtain a definitive diagnosis and rule out malignancy. Calcifying fibrous tumors (CFT) are very rare soft tissue tumors occurring most often in young patients. They are most often found arising in the thoracic cavity, mediastinum, abdominal cavity and extremities and usually have a benign clinical course. Macrocscopically, the tumors are well circumscribed and firm with a white-tan appearance. Histologically, CFT comprised a hypocellular proliferation of bland spindle cells, densely hyalinized collagen, chronic lymphoplasmacytic inflammation and dystrophic calcifications. Other considerations in the pathologic differential diagnosis include solitary fibrous tumor and inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. PMID:27252518

  6. Functional atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in human adrenal tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Shionoiri, H.; Hirawa, N.; Takasaki, I.; Ishikawa, Y.; Oda, H.; Minamisawa, K.; Sugimoto, K.; Matsukawa, T.; Ueda, S.; Miyajima, E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of synthetic human atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the release of catecholamines, aldosterone, or cortisol were observed in human adrenal tumors obtained surgically from patients with pheochromocytoma, primary aldosteronism, or Cushing's syndrome, respectively. Each tumor tissue or adjacent normal cortical tissue was sectioned into slices, which were incubated in medium-199 in the presence or absence of adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) and ANP. The amounts of epinephrine, norepinephrine, aldosterone, or cortisol released into the medium were measured. Existence of ANP receptors on the adrenal tissues was examined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry. Release of catecholamines from pheochromocytoma tissues was inhibited by ANP, and the presence of the ANP receptor on pheochromocytoma was further demonstrated by both binding assays and affinity labeling; Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of binding sites for ANP with a Kd of 1.0 nM and a Bmax of 0.4 pmol/mg of protein and the molecular size was estimated as 140 and a 70 kDa under nonreducing and reducing conditions, respectively. The presence of ANP receptors in pheochromocytoma was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. ANP inhibited both basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone secretion in the slices of normal cortex, and localization of ANP receptors in zona glomerulosa cells was also demonstrated. However, ANP did not inhibit basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone and cortisol secretion in both tissue slices from aldosteronoma and Cushing's adenoma. Consistent with these observations, the absence of ANP receptors in adenoma tissues was determined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry.

  7. Endocytosis of connexin protein in adrenal cells.

    PubMed

    Murray, Sandra A; Nickel, B M; Gay, V L

    2004-11-01

    The ability of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) to affect gap junctions was examined in adrenal cells in vivo and in vitro. Treatment with ACTH increased the size and number of gap junction plaques on the cell membranes in hypophysectomized animals and in adrenal culture. Intracellular (cytoplasmic) annular gap junctions were observed in cells of the inner adrenal cortical zones and in adrenal cell cultures. To investigate the relationship of annular gap junctions to surface junctions, adrenal cells in culture were transfected with cDNA encoding a green fluorescent protein tagged connexin 43 construct (Cx43-GFP), and subsequently studied by time-lapse video microscopy, immunocytochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Internalization of part or all of a surface gap junction plaque resulted in annular gap junction formation. These studies support the hypothesis that cytoplasmic vesicles, initially described with TEM methods, can result from removal of gap junction plaques from the cell surface. It is suggested that hormones can play a regulatory role in cell-cell communication by influencing the availability of gap junction protein at the cell surface and that hormonally-sensitive processes might serve as a means of altering intercellular communication. PMID:15666807

  8. Localization of functional adrenal tumors by computed tomography and venous sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Dunnick, N.R.; Doppman, J.L.; Gill, J.R. Jr.; Strott, C.A.; Keiser, H.R.; Brennan, M.F.

    1982-02-01

    Fifty-eight patients with functional lesions of the adrenal glands underwent radiographic evaluation. Twenty-eight patients had primary aldosteronism (Conn syndrome), 20 had Cushing syndrome, and 10 had pheochromocytoma. Computed tomography (CT) correctly identified adrenal tumors in 11 (61%) of 18 patients with aldosteronomas, 6 of 6 patients with benign cortisol-producing adrenal tumors, and 5 (83%) of 6 patients with pheochromocytomas. No false-positive diagnoses were encountered among patients with adrenal adenomas. Bilateral adrenal hyperplasia appeared on CT scans as normal or prominent adrenal glands with a normal configuration; however, CT was not able to exclude the presence of small adenomas. Adrenal venous sampling was correct in each case, and reliably distinguished adrenal tumors from hyperplasia. Recurrent pheochromocytomas were the most difficult to loclize on CT due to the surgical changes in the region of the adrenals and the frequent extra-adrenal locations.

  9. [Hypokalaemic paralysis as a presentation of adrenal tumor].

    PubMed

    Briere, C; Milhaud, D; Heroum, C; Ringeard, I; Blard, J-M; Pagès, M

    2003-12-01

    A 24-year-old patient presented with flaccid quadriplegia due to severe hypokaliemia, initially presumed to have been induced by glycyrrhizin. Persistence of low potassium levels and hypertension led to the diagnosis of primary hyperaldosteronism related to an adrenal cortical tumor. After surgery, the patient recovered from hypertension and hypokaliemia. PMID:14978420

  10. [A Case of Retroperitoneal Tumor in the Adrenal Area Turned Out to Be Schwannoma Mimicking an Adrenal Malignant Tumor].

    PubMed

    Yumiba, Satoru; Kou, Yoko; Okada, Takayuki; Sato, Mototaka; Nin, Mikio; Tsujihata, Masao

    2015-10-01

    A 76-year-old woman was found to have bilateral suprarenal tumors, 6.5 cm in diameter on the right side, and 2.4 cm in diameter on the left side, by ultrasonography, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging. Strong accumulation of fluorodeoxyglucose in these tumors was found on positron emission tomography. Since it mimicked an adrenal malignant tumor, we performed right adrenalectomy. The pathological diagnosis of the removed mass was benign schwannoma, consistent of the Antoni type A. The left suprarenal tumor was not removed and she has been followed up for 18 months without any recurrence or tumor increase. PMID:26563620

  11. Adrenal myelolipoma.

    PubMed

    Cyran, K M; Kenney, P J; Memel, D S; Yacoub, I

    1996-02-01

    In 1905, Gierke [1] first described the occurrence of a tumor in the adrenal composed of mature fat and mixed myeloid and erythroid cells, subsequently termed "formations myelolipomatoses" by Oberling [2] in 1929. PMID:8553954

  12. [Von Hippel-Lindau disease type 2-related pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor and adrenal myelolipoma].

    PubMed

    Dolzhansky, O V; Morozova, M M; Korostelev, S A; Kanivets, I V; Chardarov, N K; Shatveryan, G A; Pal'tseva, E M; Fedorov, D N

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes a case of von Hippel--Lindau-related pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor and adrenal myelolipoma in a 44-year-old woman. The pancreatic tumor and a left retroperitoneal mass were removed in the women in July 2014 and May 2015. Histological examination of the pancreatic tumor revealed that the latter consisted of clear cells forming tubular and tubercular structures showing the expression of chromogranin A, synaptophysin, and cytokeratins 18 and 19 and a negative response to CD10 and RCC. The adrenal medullary mass presented as clear-cell alveolar structures with inclusions of adipose tissue mixed with erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid cells. The clear-cell component of the adrenal gland expressed neuroendocrine markers with a negative response to cytokeratins, CD10, and RCC. Molecular genetic examination yielded a signal corresponding to two copies of the VHL gene. No deletions or amplifications of the gene were detected. Cases of von Hippel--Lindau disease concurrent with adrenal pheochromocytoma and myelolipoma and simultaneous pancreatic involvement were not found in the literature. PMID:26978235

  13. The Role of gsp Mutations on the Development of Adrenocortical Tumors and Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Villares Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson; Wanichi, Ingrid Quevedo; Cavalcante, Isadora Pontes; Mariani, Beatriz Marinho de Paula

    2016-01-01

    Somatic GNAS point mutations, commonly known as gsp mutations, are involved in the pathogenesis of McCune–Albright syndrome (MAS) and have also been described in autonomous hormone-producing tumors, such as somatotropinoma, corticotrophoma, thyroid cancer, ovarian and testicular Leydig cell tumors, and primary macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasia (PMAH) (1–3). The involvement of gsp mutations in adrenal tumors was first described by Lyons et al. Since then, several studies have detected the presence of gsp mutations in adrenal tumors, but none of them could explain its presence along or the mechanism that leads to tumor formation and hormone hypersecretion. As a result, the molecular pathogenesis of the majority of sporadic adrenocortical tumors remains unclear (3). PMAH has also been reported with gsp somatic mutations in a few cases. Fragoso et al. identified two distinct gsp somatic mutations affecting arginine residues on codon 201 of GNAS in a few patients with PMAH who lacked any features or manifestations of MAS. Followed by this discovery, other studies have continued looking for gsp mutations based on strong prior evidence demonstrating that increased cAMP signaling is sufficient for cell proliferation and cortisol production (2, 4). With consideration for the previously reported findings, we conjecture that although somatic activating mutations in GNAS are a rare molecular event, these mutations could probably be sufficient to induce the development of macronodule hyperplasia and variable cortisol secretion. In this manuscript, we revised the presence of gsp mutations associated with adrenal cortical tumors and hyperplasia. PMID:27512387

  14. Plasma content of soluble fas antigen in patients with adrenal tumors and tumor-like pathologies.

    PubMed

    Kushlinskii, N E; Britvin, T A; Polyakova, G A; Abbasova, S G; Baronini, A A; Tishenina, R S; Molchanova, G S; Sel'chuk, V Yu; Pirogov, D A; Bogatyrev, O P; Lipkin, V M; Kalinin, A P

    2002-08-01

    We compared plasma content of soluble Fas antigen (sFas) in 59 patients with tumors and tumor-like pathologies of the adrenal cortex and medulla and 60 healthy donors (control). The incidence and content of sFas in the plasma from patients with adrenal tumors was significantly higher than in healthy donors. A direct correlation was found between sFas content and patient's age. The maximum sFas concentrations were found in patients with pheochromocytoma and aldosterone-producing adenoma. In patients with adrenocortical cancer plasma content of sFas was lower than in patients with tumors of other morphological types. Plasma sFas content in patients with adrenocortical cancer directly correlated with the size of tumors. Our results suggest that sFas plays a role in the pathogenesis of primary adrenal tumors. PMID:12459844

  15. [Diagnostic benefits of adrenocortical scintigraphy in hepatic adrenal rest tumor].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kosuke; Horii, Rika; Yamashita, Tatsuya; Arai, Kuniaki; Yamashita, Taro; Kagaya, Takashi; Sakai, Yoshio; Mizukoshi, Eishiro; Honda, Masao; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2014-10-01

    An 81-year-old female was referred to our hospital for the examination of an S7 liver tumor. The tumor was suspected to be a hepatic adrenal rest tumor (HART) based on ultrasonography, dynamic CT, Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI, and CT during abdominal angiography. After various hormonal tests, the tumor was confirmed as hormonally non-functional. The diagnosis of HART was confirmed based on (131)I-adosterol accumulation in the tumor by adrenocortical scintigraphy. The resected tumor was histologically compatible with HART, and it may have been able to produce cortisol based on the immunohistochemical findings of various adrenocortical hormone metabolic enzymes. Adrenocortical scintigraphy may thus be useful in diagnosing HART. PMID:25283230

  16. Juxta-adrenal Ancient Schwannoma: A Rare Retroperitoneal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Wollin, Daniel A; Sivarajan, Ganesh; Shukla, Pratibha; Melamed, Jonathan; Huang, William C; Lepor, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Retroperitoneal schwannoma is a rare tumor that is often misdiagnosed as malignancy due to a concerning appearance on cross-sectional imaging. Pathology and immunohistochemistry form the gold standard for diagnosis; as such, local excision is the treatment of choice for this disease. We present two cases of juxta-adrenal ancient schwannoma that were treated with adrenalectomy and discuss the current literature regarding this entity.

  17. [Adrenalitis].

    PubMed

    Saeger, W

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation of the adrenal glands is caused by autoimmunopathies or infections and can induce adrenal insufficiency. Autoimmune lymphocytic adrenalitis is often combined with other autoimmune diseases and the most frequent cause of Addison's disease; however, it only becomes clinically apparent when more than 90 % of the adrenal cortex has been destroyed. Histological features are characterized by lymphoplasmacytic inflammation leading to an increased destruction of adrenocortical tissue but less severe courses can also occur. The second most frequent form of adrenalitis is adrenal tuberculosis, showing typical granulomatous findings that are nearly always caused by spreading from a tuberculous pulmonary focus. Other bacterial as well as viral infections, such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) and others, generally affect the adrenal glands only in patients with immunodeficiency disorders. In these infections, the adrenal cortex and medulla are frequently involved to roughly the same extent. Although surgical specimens from inflammatory adrenal lesions are extremely rare, the various forms of adrenalitis play an important role in the post-mortem examination of the adrenal glands for clarification of unclear causes of death (e.g. death during an Addisonian crisis). PMID:27099224

  18. Pediatric Adrenocortical Tumors: What They Can Tell Us on Adrenal Development and Comparison with Adult Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lalli, Enzo; Figueiredo, Bonald C.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenocortical tumors (ACT) in children are very rare and are most frequently diagnosed in the context of the Li-Fraumeni syndrome, a multiple cancer syndrome linked to germline mutations of the tumor suppressor gene TP53 with loss of heterozygosity in the tumors. A peak of children ACT incidence is present in the states of southern Brazil, where they are linked to the high prevalence in the population of a specific TP53 mutation (R337H). Children ACT have specific features distinguishing them from adult tumors in their pathogenetic mechanisms, genomic profiles, and prognosis. Epidemiological and molecular evidence suggests that in most cases they are derived from the fetal adrenal. PMID:25741319

  19. Preoperative CT evaluation of adrenal glands in non-small cell bronchogenic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, M.E. Jr.; Heaston, D.K.; Dunnick, N.R.; Korobkin, M.

    1982-08-01

    Preoperative chest computed tomographic (CT) scans in 84 patients with biopsy-proven non-small cell bronchogenic carcinoma were reviewed. At least one adrenal gland was visualized in 70 of these. Evidence of a solid adrenal mass was present in 18 (14.5%) glands in 15 (21.4%) patients. Percutaneous needle aspiration under CT guidance confirmed metastatic malignancy in the four patients who were biopsied. Because the documented presence of adrenal metastases in non-small cell lung cancer makes surgical resection or local irradiation inappropriate, it is recommended that both adrenal glands in their entirety be specifically included whenever a staging chest CT examination is performed in patients with such tumors. Percutaneous needle biopsy for pathologic confirmation of the nature of solid adrenal masses discovered in this process is also useful.

  20. Recurrent activating mutation in PRKACA in cortisol-producing adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Goh, Gerald; Scholl, Ute I; Healy, James M; Choi, Murim; Prasad, Manju L; Nelson-Williams, Carol; Kunstman, John W; Kuntsman, John W; Korah, Reju; Suttorp, Anna-Carinna; Dietrich, Dimo; Haase, Matthias; Willenberg, Holger S; Stålberg, Peter; Hellman, Per; Akerström, Göran; Björklund, Peyman; Carling, Tobias; Lifton, Richard P

    2014-06-01

    Adrenal tumors autonomously producing cortisol cause Cushing's syndrome. We performed exome sequencing of 25 tumor-normal pairs and identified 2 subgroups. Eight tumors (including three carcinomas) had many somatic copy number variants (CNVs) with frequent deletion of CDC42 and CDKN2A, amplification of 5q31.2 and protein-altering mutations in TP53 and RB1. Seventeen tumors (all adenomas) had no somatic CNVs or TP53 or RB1 mutations. Six of these had known gain-of-function mutations in CTNNB1 (β-catenin) or GNAS (Gαs). Six others had somatic mutations in PRKACA (protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit) resulting in a p.Leu206Arg substitution. Further sequencing identified this mutation in 13 of 63 tumors (35% of adenomas with overt Cushing's syndrome). PRKACA, GNAS and CTNNB1 mutations were mutually exclusive. Leu206 directly interacts with the regulatory subunit of PKA, PRKAR1A. Leu206Arg PRKACA loses PRKAR1A binding, increasing the phosphorylation of downstream targets. PKA activity induces cortisol production and cell proliferation, providing a mechanism for tumor development. These findings define distinct mechanisms underlying adrenal cortisol-producing tumors. PMID:24747643

  1. Current status of imaging for adrenal gland tumors.

    PubMed

    Song, Julie H; Mayo-Smith, William W

    2014-10-01

    Adrenal glands are common sites of disease involved in a wide spectrum of pathology. Several imaging studies allow accurate diagnosis of adrenal masses, separating inconsequential benign masses from the lesions that require treatment. This article discusses contemporary adrenal imaging techniques, imaging appearance, and the optimal imaging algorithm for the workup of common adrenal masses. PMID:25246052

  2. Transplantation of Adrenal Cortical Progenitor Cells Enriched by Nile Red

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, James C.Y.; Chu, Yinting; Qin, Harry H.; Zupekan, Tatiana

    2009-01-01

    Background The adrenal cortex may contain progenitor cells useful for tissue regeneration. Currently there are no established methods to isolate these cells. Material and Methods Murine adrenal cells were sorted into a Nile-Red-bright (NRbright) and a Nile-Red-dim (NRdim) population of cells according to their degree of cholesterol content revealed by Nile Red fluorescence. The cells were transplanted under the renal capsule to determine their ability for regeneration. Results The NRbright cells contained an abundance of lipid droplets, whereas the NRdim cells contained little. The NRbright cells expressed Sf1 and the more differentiated adrenal cortical genes including Cyp11a1, Cyp11b1, and Cyp11b2, whereas the NRdim cells expressed Sf1 but not the more differentiated adrenal cortical genes. After 56 days of implantation in unilateral adrenalectomized mice, the NRdim cells expressed Sf1 and the more differentiated adrenal cortical genes, whereas the NRbright cells ceased to express Sf1 as well as the more differentiated adrenal cortical genes. NRdim cells also proliferated in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor. Conclusions The population of NRdim cells contained adrenal cortical progenitor cells that can proliferate and give rise to differentiated daughter cells. These cells may be useful for adrenal cortical regeneration. PMID:19592014

  3. Methylation Status of Vitamin D Receptor Gene Promoter in Benign and Malignant Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pilon, Catia; Rebellato, Andrea; Urbanet, Riccardo; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Cappellesso, Rocco; Sasano, Hironobu; Fassina, Ambrogio

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed a decreased expression of vitamin D receptor (VDR) mRNA/protein in a small group of adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) tissues, suggesting the loss of a protective role of VDR against malignant cell growth in this cancer type. Downregulation of VDR gene expression may result from epigenetics events, that is, methylation of cytosine nucleotide of CpG islands in VDR gene promoter. We analyzed methylation of CpG sites in the VDR gene promoter in normal adrenals and adrenocortical tumor samples. Methylation of CpG-rich 5′ regions was assessed by bisulfite sequencing PCR using bisulfite-treated DNA from archival microdissected paraffin-embedded adrenocortical tissues. Three normal adrenals and 23 various adrenocortical tumor samples (15 adenomas and 8 carcinomas) were studied. Methylation in the promoter region of VDR gene was found in 3/8 ACCs, while no VDR gene methylation was observed in normal adrenals and adrenocortical adenomas. VDR mRNA and protein levels were lower in ACCs than in benign tumors, and VDR immunostaining was weak or negative in ACCs, including all 3 methylated tissue samples. The association between VDR gene promoter methylation and reduced VDR gene expression is not a rare event in ACC, suggesting that VDR epigenetic inactivation may have a role in adrenocortical carcinogenesis. PMID:26843863

  4. Intrinsic GABAergic system of adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kataoka, Y; Gutman, Y; Guidotti, A; Panula, P; Wroblewski, J; Cosenza-Murphy, D; Wu, J Y; Costa, E

    1984-01-01

    Histochemical and biochemical studies demonstrate that gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), glutamic acid decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.15), and GABA aminotransferase (EC 2.6.1.19) are present in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Moreover, [3H]GABA can be taken up and stored by primary cultures of adrenal chromaffin cells. Nicotinic receptor stimulation or KCl depolarization releases the [3H]GABA taken up by these cell cultures. GABA and benzodiazepine recognition sites located in chromaffin cells interact with each other with modalities similar to those described for GABA and benzodiazepine recognition sites located in synaptic membranes prepared from brain tissue. Bicuculline facilitates the release of catecholamine from chromaffin cells induced by nicotinic receptor stimulation but it fails to influence the release of catecholamine evoked by K+ depolarization. Since the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor system appears to modulate nicotinic receptor function, it is suggested that GABA transmission might participate in modulating responsiveness of chromaffin cells to incoming cholinergic stimuli. Images PMID:6328506

  5. [Mantle cell lymphoma markedly infiltrated into adrenal glands with adrenal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ryo; Iwakiri, Rika; Tsutsumi, Hisashi; Ohta, Masatsugu; Mori, Mayumi

    2004-07-01

    A 66-year-old male was admitted to our hospital complaining of bilateral hypochondrial pain, back pain and loss of weight in May, 2002. Superficial lymph nodes were not palpable on admission. The leukocyte count was 3430/microl, hemoglobin concentration, 13.0g/dl, and platelet count, 174000/microl. LDH, soluble IL-2 receptor, ACTH and cortisol values were out of the normal range (LDH 1368IU/l, sIL-2R 2630U/ml, ACTH 132pg/ml, cortisol 7.4microg/dl). Abdominal CT scan showed bilateral adrenal masses, and abnormal uptake of Ga-scintigraphy was seen correspondent with the bilateral adrenal masses. The histological diagnosis of bilateral adrenal masses cannot be performed because of the bleeding tendency, but atypical cells were observed in the patient's bone marrow aspirate. Surface marker analysis of atypical cells showed CD5+, cyclin D1+, CD19+, CD20+ and HLA-DR+. From these results we diagnosed this case as a mantle cell lymphoma (stage IV B) markedly infiltrated into the adrenal glands with adrenal insufficiency. The bilateral adrenal masses dramatically reduced in size after CHOP chemotherapy with hydrocortisone supplementation. We report on the present case and summarize the reports of adrenal grand-infiltrating lymphomas. PMID:15359915

  6. Pathology of the adrenal cortex: a reappraisal of the past 25 years focusing on adrenal cortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Papotti, Mauro; Duregon, Eleonora; Volante, Marco; McNicol, Anne Marie

    2014-03-01

    A reappraisal of the major advances in the diagnostic pathology of adrenal cortical lesions and tumors in the last 25 years is presented, with special reference to the definition of malignancy in primary adrenal cancer and its variants. Slightly more than 25 years ago, Weiss proposed his diagnostic scoring system for adrenal cortical carcinoma. This represented a milestone for adrenal pathologists and the starting point for further modifications of the system, either through minor changes in the scoring procedure itself or concentrating on some particular Weiss criterion such as mitotic index, integrated into alternative scoring schemes or algorithms that are currently under validation. Improvements in diagnostic immunohistochemistry have led to the identification of markers of cortical origin, such as Melan-A, alpha-inhibin, and SF-1 and of prognostic factors in carcinoma, such as the Ki-67 proliferation index and SF-1 itself. With regard to hyperplastic conditions, genetic investigations have allowed the association of the majority of cases of primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD) in Carney complex to mutations in the gene encoding the regulatory subunit 1A of protein kinase A (PRKAR1A). Other hereditary conditions are also associated with adrenal cortical tumors, including the Li-Fraumeni, Beckwith-Wiedemann, Gardner, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1, and neurofibromatosis type 1 syndromes. Moreover, several advances have been made in the knowledge of the molecular background of sporadic tumors, and a number of molecules/genes are of particular interest as potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. PMID:24382573

  7. Adrenal Lymphangioma Masquerading as a Catecholamine Producing Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Hodish, Israel; Schmidt, Lindsay; Moraitis, Andreas G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To report the unusual case of an adrenal lymphangioma presenting in a patient with an adrenal cystic lesion and biochemical testing concerning for pheochromocytoma. The pertinent diagnostic and imaging features of adrenal lymphangiomas are reviewed. Methods. We describe a 59-year-old patient who presented with hyperhidrosis and a 2.2 by 2.2 cm left adrenal nodule. Biochemical evaluation revealed elevated plasma-free normetanephrine, urine normetanephrine, urine vanillylmandelic acid, and urine norepinephrine levels. Elevated plasma norepinephrine levels were not suppressed appropriately with clonidine administration. Results. Given persistent concern for pheochromocytoma, the patient underwent adrenalectomy. The final pathology was consistent with adrenal lymphangioma. Conclusions. Lymphangiomas are benign vascular lesions that can very rarely occur in the adrenal gland. Imaging findings are generally consistent with a cyst but are nonspecific. Excluding malignancy in patients presenting with adrenal cysts can be difficult. Despite its benign nature, the diagnosis of adrenal lymphangioma may ultimately require pathology. PMID:26618011

  8. Isolated adrenal masses in nonsmall-cell bronchogenic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, T.W. Jr.; Bernardino, M.E.; Miller, J.I.; Mansour, K.; Greene, D.; Davis, W.A.

    1984-10-01

    Computed tomography has become an important diagnostic modality in the preoperative staging of patients with bronchogenic carcinoma. The adrenal glands represent one of the most frequent sites of metastasis. Therefore, an isolated adrenal mass discovered on preoperative thoracoabdominal CT poses a diagnostic problem. Three hundred thirty patients with histologically proved nonsmall-cell bronchogenic carcinoma were evaluated. Thirty-two had adrenal masses without further evidence of disease in the abdomen, Eight of these 32 masses were metastases, 17 were proved adenomas, and 7 did not undergo biopsy. Thus an isolated adrenal mass is more likely benign than metastatic, and biopsy is advocated prior to withholding potentially curative surgery.

  9. A Rare Case of Renal Cell Carcinoma With Leiomyomatous Stroma and Concomitant Ruptured Adrenal Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chuanyong; Nicastri, Anthony; Shao, Charles

    2016-09-01

    Here we report a rare case of coexisting renal cell carcinoma (RCC) with leiomyomatous stroma and a ruptured adrenal aneurysm. The patient was a 75-year-old woman with acute abdominal pain. Imaging studies showed a left peri-renal hematoma and a mass in the left kidney. Left nephrectomy and adrenalectomy were performed. Pathological examination showed a ruptured aneurysm in the left adrenal gland. The renal mass was composed of tubules and acini of epithelial cells and a prominent leiomyomatous stroma. The tumor cells were positive for carbonic anhydrase IX, cytokeratin 7, and negative for AMACR, consistent with clear cell (tubulo) papillary RCC. PMID:27516974

  10. Combined Adrenal and Ovarian Venous Sampling to Localize an Androgen Producing Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Monica D.; Trerotola, Scott O.

    2010-12-15

    A postmenopausal woman presented with hirsutism and elevated serum testosterone levels. A 1-cm adrenal adenoma was noted on computed tomography. Combined adrenal and ovarian venous sampling was performed to localize an androgen producing tumor to the left ovary. The patient underwent a bilateral salpingo-oophrectomy and was spared an unnecessary adrenalectomy.

  11. Intra-adrenal murine TH-MYCN neuroblastoma tumors grow more aggressive and exhibit a distinct tumor microenvironment relative to their subcutaneous equivalents.

    PubMed

    Kroesen, Michiel; Brok, Ingrid C; Reijnen, Daphne; van Hout-Kuijer, Maaike A; Zeelenberg, Ingrid S; Den Brok, Martijn H; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M; Adema, Gosse J

    2015-05-01

    In around half of the patients with neuroblastoma (NBL), the primary tumor is located in one of the adrenal glands. We have previously reported on a transplantable TH-MYCN model of subcutaneous (SC) growing NBL in C57Bl/6 mice for immunological studies. In this report, we describe an orthotopic TH-MYCN transplantable model where the tumor cells were injected intra-adrenally (IA) by microsurgery. Strikingly, 9464D cells grew out much faster in IA tumors compared to the subcutis. Tumors were infiltrated by equal numbers of lymphocytes and myeloid cells. Within the myeloid cell population, however, tumor-infiltrating macrophages were more abundant in IA tumors compared to SC tumors and expressed lower levels of MHC class II, indicative of a more immunosuppressive phenotype. Using 9464D cells stably expressing firefly luciferase, enhanced IA tumor growth could be confirmed using bioluminescence. Collectively, these data show that the orthotopic IA localization of TH-MYCN cells impacts the NBL tumor microenvironment, resulting in a more stringent NBL model to study novel immunotherapeutic approaches for NBL. PMID:25687736

  12. Metachronous Bilateral Testicular Leydig-Like Tumors Leading to the Diagnosis of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (Adrenogenital Syndrome)

    PubMed Central

    Vukina, Josip; Chism, David D.; Sharpless, Julie L.; Raynor, Mathew C.; Milowsky, Matthew I.; Funkhouser, William K.

    2015-01-01

    A 33-year-old male with a history of left testis Leydig cell tumor (LCT), 3-month status after left radical orchiectomy, presented with a rapidly enlarging (0.6 cm to 3.7 cm) right testicular mass. He underwent a right radical orchiectomy, sections interpreted as showing a similar Leydig cell-like oncocytic proliferation, with a differential diagnosis including metachronous bilateral LCT and metachronous bilateral testicular tumors associated with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (a.k.a. “testicular adrenal rest tumors” (TARTs) and “testicular tumors of the adrenogenital syndrome” (TTAGS)). Additional workup demonstrated a markedly elevated serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and elevated adrenal precursor steroid levels. He was diagnosed with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency (3BHSD) type, and started on treatment. Metachronous bilateral testicular masses in adults should prompt consideration of adult presentation of CAH. Since all untreated CAH patients are expected to have elevated serum ACTH, formal exclusion of CAH prior to surgical resection of a testicular Leydig-like proliferation could be accomplished by screening for elevated serum ACTH. PMID:26351608

  13. Generation of Murine Sympathoadrenergic Progenitor-Like Cells from Embryonic Stem Cells and Postnatal Adrenal Glands

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Shobhit; Wahl, Joachim; Huber-Lang, Markus S.; Stadel, Dominic; Braubach, Peter; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Beltinger, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Sympathoadrenergic progenitor cells (SAPs) of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are important for normal development of the sympathetic PNS and for the genesis of neuroblastoma, the most common and often lethal extracranial solid tumor in childhood. However, it remains difficult to isolate sufficient numbers of SAPs for investigations. We therefore set out to improve generation of SAPs by using two complementary approaches, differentiation from murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and isolation from postnatal murine adrenal glands. We provide evidence that selecting for GD2 expression enriches for ESC-derived SAP-like cells and that proliferating SAP-like cells can be isolated from postnatal adrenal glands of mice. These advances may facilitate investigations about the development and malignant transformation of the sympathetic PNS. PMID:23675538

  14. A Case of Bilateral Testicular Tumors Subsequently Diagnosed as Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Due to 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Yan-Kun; Sha, Yan-Wei; Ding, Lu; Liu, Wei-Wu; Song, Yue-Qiang; Lin, Jin; He, Xue-Mei; Qiu, Ping-Ping; Zhang, Ling; Li, Ping

    2016-01-01

    21-hydroxylase deficiency (21-OHD) caused congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a group of autosomal recessive genetic disorders resulting from mutations in genes involved with cortisol (CO) synthesis in the adrenal glands. Testicular adrenal rest tumors (TARTs) are rarely the presenting symptoms of CAH. Here, we describe a case of simple virilizing CAH with TARTs, in a 15-year-old boy. The patient showed physical signs of precocious puberty. The levels of blood adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), urinary 17-ketone steroids (17-KS), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), and serum progesterone (PRGE) were elevated, whereas those of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and CO were reduced. Computed tomography (CT) of the adrenal glands and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the testes showed a soft tissue density (more pronounced on the right side) and an irregularly swollen mass (more pronounced on the left side), respectively. Pathological examination of a specimen of the mass indicated polygonal/circular eosinophilic cytoplasm, cord-like arrangement of interstitial cells, and lipid pigment in the cytoplasm. Immunohistochemistry results precluded a diagnosis of Leydig cell tumors. DNA sequencing revealed a hackneyed homozygous mutation, I2g, on intron 2 of the CYP21A2 gene. The patient’s symptoms improved after a three-month of dexamethasone therapy. Recent radiographic data showed reduced hyperplastic adrenal nodules and testicular tumors. A diagnosis of TART should be considered and prioritized in CAH patients with testicular tumors. Replacement therapy using a sufficient amount of dexamethasone in this case helps combat TART. PMID:26985347

  15. Vesicle Pools: Lessons from Adrenal Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, David R.; Schirra, Claudia; Becherer, Ute; Rettig, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The adrenal chromaffin cell serves as a model system to study fast Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. Membrane capacitance measurements in combination with Ca2+ uncaging offers a temporal resolution in the millisecond range and reveals that catecholamine release occurs in three distinct phases. Release of a readily releasable (RRP) and a slowly releasable (SRP) pool are followed by sustained release, due to maturation, and release of vesicles which were not release-ready at the start of the stimulus. Trains of depolarizations, a more physiological stimulus, induce release from a small immediately releasable pool of vesicles residing adjacent to calcium channels, as well as from the RRP. The SRP is poorly activated by depolarization. A sequential model, in which non-releasable docked vesicles are primed to a slowly releasable state, and then further mature to the readily releasable state, has been proposed. The docked state, dependent on membrane proximity, requires SNAP-25, synaptotagmin, and syntaxin. The ablation or modification of SNAP-25 and syntaxin, components of the SNARE complex, as well as of synaptotagmin, the calcium sensor, and modulators such complexins and Snapin alter the properties and/or magnitudes of different phases of release, and in particular can ablate the RRP. These results indicate that the composition of the SNARE complex and its interaction with modulatory molecules drives priming and provides a molecular basis for different pools of releasable vesicles. PMID:21423410

  16. The effects of stress on brain and adrenal stem cells.

    PubMed

    de Celis, M F R; Bornstein, S R; Androutsellis-Theotokis, A; Andoniadou, C L; Licinio, J; Wong, M-L; Ehrhart-Bornstein, M

    2016-05-01

    The brain and adrenal are critical control centers that maintain body homeostasis under basal and stress conditions, and orchestrate the body's response to stress. It is noteworthy that patients with stress-related disorders exhibit increased vulnerability to mental illness, even years after the stress experience, which is able to generate long-term changes in the brain's architecture and function. High levels of glucocorticoids produced by the adrenal cortex of the stressed subject reduce neurogenesis, which contributes to the development of depression. In support of the brain-adrenal connection in stress, many (but not all) depressed patients have alterations in the components of the limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (LHPA) axis, with enlarged adrenal cortex and increased glucocorticoid levels. Other psychiatric disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, bipolar disorder and depression, are also associated with abnormalities in hippocampal volume and hippocampal function. In addition, hippocampal lesions impair the regulation of the LHPA axis in stress response. Our knowledge of the functional connection between stress, brain function and adrenal has been further expanded by two recent, independent papers that elucidate the effects of stress on brain and adrenal stem cells, showing similarities in the way that the progenitor populations of these organs behave under stress, and shedding more light into the potential cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the adaptation of tissues to stress. PMID:26809844

  17. Tumoral angiogenesis in both adrenal adenomas and nonadenomas: a promising computed tomography biomarker for diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xifu; Li, Kangan; Sun, Haoran; Zhao, Jinglong; Zhang, Zhuoli; Zheng, Linfeng; Li, Weiguo; Bai, Renju; Zhang, Guixiang

    2016-01-01

    To explore the correlation between the typical findings of dynamic contrast-enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) and tumoral angiogenesis (microvessel density [MVD] and vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]) in adenomas and nonadenomas such that the enhancement mechanism of DCE-CT in adrenal masses can be explained more precisely. Forty-two patients with 46 adrenal masses confirmed by surgery and pathology were included in the study; these masses included 23 adenomas, 18 nonadenomas, and 5 hyperplastic nodules. The findings of DCE-CT and angiogenesis in adrenal masses were studied. The features of DCE-CT in adenomas and nonadenomas were evaluated to determine whether the characteristics of DCE-CT in adrenal masses were closely correlated with tumoral angiogenesis. Adrenal adenomas were significantly different from nonadenomas in the time density curve and the mean percentage of enhancement washout at the 7-minute delay time in DCE-CT. The mean MVD and VEGF expression exhibited significant differences between the rapid washout group (types A and C) and the slow washout group (types B, D, and E) and between the relative washout (Washr) ≥34% and the absolute washout (Washa) ≥43% on the 7-minute enhanced CT scans (P=0.000). Adenomas were suggested when adrenal masses presented as types A and C, and/or the Washr ≥34%, and/or the Washa ≥43%, and the opposite was suggested for nonadenomas. These results showed a close correlation between the characteristics of DCE-CT and both MVD and VEGF expression in adrenal masses. There was also a significant difference in MVD and VEGF expression between adenomas and nonadenomas. In conclusion, MVD and VEGF expression are two important pathological factors that play important roles in the characterization of DCE-CT in adrenal masses because they cause different time density curve types, the Washr and the Washa for adrenal adenomas and nonadenomas. PMID:27099515

  18. How Is Adrenal Surgery Performed?

    MedlinePlus

    HOME ADRENAL GLANDS Background Where are the adrenal glands? What do the adrenal glands do? Is this adrenal tumor a genetic problem? Primary hyperaldosteronism (aldosterone-producing tumor) What is primary hyperaldosteronism? Signs ...

  19. The activating TERT promoter mutation C228T is recurrent in subsets of adrenal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tiantian; Brown, Taylor C; Juhlin, C Christofer; Andreasson, Adam; Wang, Na; Bäckdahl, Martin; Healy, James M; Prasad, Manju L; Korah, Reju; Carling, Tobias; Xu, Dawei; Larsson, Catharina

    2014-01-01

    The telomerase reverse transcriptase gene (TERT) encodes the reverse transcriptase component of the telomerase complex, which is essential for telomere stabilization and cell immortalization. Recent studies have demonstrated a transcriptional activation role for the TERT promoter mutations C228T and C250T in many human cancers, as well as a role in aggressive disease with potential clinical applications. Although telomerase activation is known in adrenal tumors, the underlying mechanisms are not established. We assessed C228T and C250T TERT mutations by direct Sanger sequencing in tumors of the adrenal gland, and further evaluated potential associations with clinical parameters and telomerase activation. A total of 199 tumors were evaluated, including 34 adrenocortical carcinomas (ACC), 47 adrenocortical adenomas (ACA), 105 pheochromocytomas (PCC; ten malignant and 95 benign), and 13 abdominal paragangliomas (PGL; nine malignant and four benign). TERT expression levels were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The C228T mutation was detected in 4/34 ACCs (12%), but not in any ACA (P=0.028). C228T was also observed in one benign PCC and in one metastatic PGL. The C250T mutation was not observed in any case. In the ACC and PGL groups, TERT mutation-positive cases exhibited TERT expression, indicating telomerase activation; however, since expression was also revealed in TERT WT cases, this could denote additional mechanisms of TERT activation. To conclude, the TERT promoter mutation C228T is a recurrent event associated with TERT expression in ACCs, but rarely occurs in PGL and PCC. The involvement of the TERT gene in ACC represents a novel mutated gene in this entity. PMID:24803525

  20. Urine Steroid Metabolomics as a Biomarker Tool for Detecting Malignancy in Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Biehl, Michael; Taylor, Angela E.; Hahner, Stefanie; Libé, Rossella; Hughes, Beverly A.; Schneider, Petra; Smith, David J.; Stiekema, Han; Krone, Nils; Porfiri, Emilio; Opocher, Giuseppe; Bertherat, Jerôme; Mantero, Franco; Allolio, Bruno; Terzolo, Massimo; Nightingale, Peter; Shackleton, Cedric H. L.; Bertagna, Xavier; Fassnacht, Martin; Stewart, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Adrenal tumors have a prevalence of around 2% in the general population. Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is rare but accounts for 2–11% of incidentally discovered adrenal masses. Differentiating ACC from adrenocortical adenoma (ACA) represents a diagnostic challenge in patients with adrenal incidentalomas, with tumor size, imaging, and even histology all providing unsatisfactory predictive values. Objective: Here we developed a novel steroid metabolomic approach, mass spectrometry-based steroid profiling followed by machine learning analysis, and examined its diagnostic value for the detection of adrenal malignancy. Design: Quantification of 32 distinct adrenal derived steroids was carried out by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry in 24-h urine samples from 102 ACA patients (age range 19–84 yr) and 45 ACC patients (20–80 yr). Underlying diagnosis was ascertained by histology and metastasis in ACC and by clinical follow-up [median duration 52 (range 26–201) months] without evidence of metastasis in ACA. Steroid excretion data were subjected to generalized matrix learning vector quantization (GMLVQ) to identify the most discriminative steroids. Results: Steroid profiling revealed a pattern of predominantly immature, early-stage steroidogenesis in ACC. GMLVQ analysis identified a subset of nine steroids that performed best in differentiating ACA from ACC. Receiver-operating characteristics analysis of GMLVQ results demonstrated sensitivity = specificity = 90% (area under the curve = 0.97) employing all 32 steroids and sensitivity = specificity = 88% (area under the curve = 0.96) when using only the nine most differentiating markers. Conclusions: Urine steroid metabolomics is a novel, highly sensitive, and specific biomarker tool for discriminating benign from malignant adrenal tumors, with obvious promise for the diagnostic work-up of patients with adrenal incidentalomas. PMID:21917861

  1. Adrenal cortical carcinoma with tumor thrombus extension into the right atrium: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YIMIN; ZHOU, FENG; PAN, HAO; JIN, BAIYE

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare aggressive malignant tumor associated with a poor prognosis. Patients with ACC usually present with abnormal hormone secretion, tumor growth or encroachment on the surrounding viscera. An early diagnosis of ACC is considered challenging. The present study reports a case of ACC with tumor thrombus extension into the inferior vena cava and right atrium. A 33-year-old male patient exhibited symptoms of gynecomastia and abdominal distention, which were due to the abnormal hormone secretion levels and to the presence of a large mass in the right adrenal gland. An en bloc resection of the tumor was the selected treatment option. Extirpation of the tumor thrombus was performed by means of extracorporeal circulation. No signs of metastasis or recurrence were identified at the 1-month follow-up. PMID:27313728

  2. Testicular adrenal rest tumors (TARTs) as a male infertility factor. Case report.

    PubMed

    Niedziela, Marek; Joanna, Talarczyk; Piotr, JedrzejczaK

    2012-09-01

    Since testes and adrenal cortex derive from the same urogenital ridge, adrenal tissue with descending gonads may migrate in early embryonic period. Although most often ectopic tissue undergoes atrophy in some cases, when adrenocorticotrophic (ACTH) overstimulation occurs, the adrenal remnants in the testes may become hypertrophic and form testicular adrenal rest tumors (TARTs). The growth of TARTs in the testes leads to obstruction of the seminiferous tubules which can mechanically impair the function of the gonads and cause irreversible azoospermia. We describe a patient suffering since neonatal period from congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), disorder with defected pathway of cortisol production, which leads to increased ACTH production and to overstimulation of adrenal cortex. He had very poor disease control and therefore in late puberty he was diagnosed with TARTs. At the age of 19.5 he was diagnosed with azoospermia, most likely caused by TARTs. It is the first evidence of TARTs in Polish literature. Although not many cases have been published so far the incidence of TARTs seems to be highly underdiagnosed, so it seems reasonable to consider the disease in differential diagnosis of male infertility. PMID:23342900

  3. Acute adrenal insufficiency secondary to bilateral adrenal B-cell lymphoma: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    De Miguel Sánchez, Carlos; Ruiz, Luis; González, Jose Luis; Hernández, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Primary adrenal lymphoma is an extremely rare entity which constitutes less than 1% of extranodal lymphomas. Most cases present with bilateral adrenal masses and without extraadrenal involvement, which can lead to symptoms of adrenal insufficiency. The prognosis is usually poor and chemotherapy is the first-line treatment option. We report here on a 78-year-old man admitted to our Internal Medicine Department because of constitutional symptoms and high fever spikes. He was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency and a CT-scan revealed bilateral adrenal masses of about 6 cm in diameter. A percutaneous biopsy was performed and the histological exam was consistent with diffuse large B cell lymphoma. A review of the literature of this unusual entity was also carried out. PMID:27170834

  4. Untreated Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia with 17-α Hydroxylase/17,20-Lyase Deficiency Presenting as Massive Adrenocortical Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su Jin; Song, Je Eun; Hwang, Sena; Lee, Ji-Yeon; Park, Hye-Sun; Han, Seunghee

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) with 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency is usually characterized by hypertension and primary amenorrhea, sexual infantilism in women, and pseudohermaphroditism in men. hypertension, and sexual infantilism in women and pseudohermaphroditism in men. In rare cases, a huge adrenal gland tumor can present as a clinical manifestation in untreated CAH. Adrenal cortical adenoma is an even more rare phenotype in CAH with 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency. A 36-year-old female presented with hypertension and abdominal pain caused by a huge adrenal mass. Due to mass size and symptoms, left adrenalectomy was performed. After adrenalectomy, blood pressure remained high. Based on hormonal and genetic evaluation, the patient was diagnosed as CAH with 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency. The possibility of a tumorous change in the adrenal gland due to untreated CAH should be considered. It is important that untreated CAH not be misdiagnosed as primary adrenal tumor as these conditions require different treatments. Adequate suppression of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in CAH is also important to treat and to prevent the tumorous changes in the adrenal gland. Herein, we report a case of untreated CAH with 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase deficiency presenting with large adrenal cortical adenoma and discuss the progression of adrenal gland hyperplasia due to inappropriate suppression of ACTH secretion. PMID:26248854

  5. GPCRs of adrenal chromaffin cells & catecholamines: The plot thickens.

    PubMed

    Lymperopoulos, Anastasios; Brill, Ava; McCrink, Katie A

    2016-08-01

    The circulating catecholamines (CAs) epinephrine (Epi) and norepinephrine (NE) derive from two major sources in the whole organism: the sympathetic nerve endings, which release NE on effector organs, and the chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla, which are cells that synthesize, store and release Epi (mainly) and NE. All of the Epi in the body and a significant amount of circulating NE derive from the adrenal medulla. The secretion of CAs from adrenal chromaffin cells is regulated in a complex way by a variety of membrane receptors, the vast majority of which are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including adrenergic receptors (ARs), which act as "presynaptic autoreceptors" in this regard. There is a plethora of CA-secretagogue signals acting on these receptors but some of them, most notably the α2ARs, inhibit CA secretion. Over the past few years, however, a few new proteins present in chromaffin cells have been uncovered to participate in CA secretion regulation. Most prominent among these are GRK2 and β-arrestin1, which are known to interact with GPCRs regulating receptor signaling and function. The present review will discuss the molecular and signaling mechanisms by which adrenal chromaffin cell-residing GPCRs and their regulatory proteins modulate CA synthesis and secretion. Particular emphasis will be given to the newly discovered roles of GRK2 and β-arrestins in these processes and particular points of focus for future research will be highlighted, as well. PMID:26851510

  6. [Importance of rapid MR imaging for tumor diagnosis in the area of the kidneys and adrenals].

    PubMed

    Friedmann, G; Krestin, G P; Engelking, R; Vorreuther, R

    1988-02-01

    Gradient-echo pulse sequences with fast acquisition times permit examinations in short breath-holding intervals. In this way an improvement of MR imaging of upper abdominal organs can be expected. In 41 patients with space-occupying lesions of kidneys and adrenals, influence of external parameter variations on resulting contrasts was analyzed and results were compared to other imaging methods. Gradient-echo sequences demonstrated a high sensitivity in detection of tumorous lesions of kidneys and adrenals, the specificity being similar to that of CT. Further differentiation was only possible by performing dynamic perfusion studies using paramagnetic contrast agents. PMID:2831575

  7. Recurrence of renal cell carcinoma diagnosed using contralateral adrenal biopsy with endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration

    PubMed Central

    TANIMOTO, AZUSA; TAKEUCHI, SHINJI; YAEGASHI, HIROSHI; KOTANI, HIROSHI; KITAI, HIDENORI; NANJO, SHIGEKI; EBI, HIROMICHI; YAMASHITA, KANAME; MOURI, HISATSUGU; OHTSUBO, KOUSHIRO; IKEDA, HIROKO; YANO, SEIJI

    2016-01-01

    A 76-year-old female in whom a renal cell carcinoma (RCC) lesion was resected 19 years previously presented to our hospital with cognitive dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography revealed nodules in the brain, lung, adrenal gland and a pelvic osteolytic lesion. To identify the primary cancer site, the present study performed endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) of the left adrenal lesion. Consequently, the pathological findings of the tissue obtained by EUS-FNA were similar to those of the previous nephrectomy specimen, revealing that the adrenal lesion was the recurrence of RCC. The majority of the metastatic lesions in the patient were reduced in size by the multiple kinase inhibitor, pazopanib. Contralateral adrenal metastasis of RCC is rare and the use of EUS-FNA in the diagnosis of adrenal lesions remains to be elucidated. This is a rare case of adrenal lesion, diagnosed by EUS-FNA. Therefore, EUS-FNA is considered to be a useful diagnostic modality of adrenal metastases from unidentified primary tumor types. PMID:27073657

  8. Use of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in the Differential Diagnosis of Adrenal Tumors in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Bargellini, Paolo; Orlandi, Riccardo; Dentini, Alfredo; Paloni, Chiara; Rubini, Giuseppe; Fonti, Paolo; Diana, Alessia; Peterson, Mark E; Boiti, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS), using a second-generation microbubble contrast agent, in differentiating the different types of adrenal mass lesions in 24 dogs. At B-mode ultrasound, 9 lesions involved the right adrenal gland, 14 the left, and 1 was bilateral. Each dog received a bolus of the contrast agent into the cephalic vein, immediately followed by a 5-mL saline flush. The first contrast enhancement of each adrenal lesion was evaluated qualitatively to assess the degree of enhancement and its distribution during the wash-in and wash-out phases, as well as the presence of non-vascularized areas and specific vascular patterns. Pathological diagnoses were determined in all dogs by histopathology or by cytology. Combining enhancement degree and vascularity resulted in the best predictive model, allowing CEUS to differentiate adrenocortical adenoma (n=10), adenocarcinoma (n=7), and pheochromocytoma (n=7) with an accuracy of 91.7% (P < 0.001). Combining enhancement degree and vascularity, CEUS can discriminate malignant versus benign adrenal lesions with a sensitivity of 100.0%, a specificity of 80.0%, and an accuracy of 91.7% (P < 0.001). In conclusion, results of this study confirm that CEUS is useful for differentiating between the different types of adrenal tumors in dogs. PMID:27008325

  9. Adrenal Gland Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. Most adrenal gland tumors are ... and may not require treatment. Malignant adrenal gland cancers are uncommon. Types of tumors include Adrenocortical carcinoma - ...

  10. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Islet cell tumors; Islet of Langerhans tumor; Neuroendocrine tumors ... In the healthy pancreas, cells called islet cells produce hormones that regulate a several bodily functions. These include blood sugar level and the production of ...

  11. Effects of cannabinoids on adrenaline release from adrenal medullary cells

    PubMed Central

    Niederhoffer, Nathalie; Hansen, Henrik H; Fernandez-Ruiz, Javier J; Szabo, Bela

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to analyse the peripheral effects of cannabinoids on adrenaline release from adrenal chromaffin cells. In pithed rabbits with electrically stimulated sympathetic outflow, intravenous injection of the cannabinoid receptor agonists WIN55212-2 and CP55940 (5, 50 and 500 μg kg−1) markedly lowered the plasma adrenaline concentration. The effect of WIN55212-2 was attenuated by the selective CB1 cannabinoid receptor antagonist SR141716A (500 μg kg−1). WIN55212-3 (same doses as WIN55212-2), the enantiomer of WIN55212-2 lacking affinity for cannabinoid receptors, had no effect on the plasma adrenaline concentration. In rabbit isolated adrenal glands, the release of adrenaline elicited by electrical stimulation was measured by fast cyclic voltammetry. Electrically-evoked adrenaline release was inhibited by WIN55212-2 (0.3, 1, 3 and 10 μM) and this effect was antagonized by SR141716A (1 μM). The non-cholinergic component of adrenaline release observed after blockade of nicotinic (by hexamethonium 100 μM) and muscarinic (by atropine 0.5 μM) acetylcholine receptors was not depressed by WIN55212-2. WIN55212-3 (10 μM) had no effect on adrenaline release. No detectable specific CB1 receptor binding and mRNA expression were found in rabbit adrenal glands with autoradiography and in situ hybridization. The results show that cannabinoids inhibit adrenaline secretion in rabbit isolated adrenal glands; the likely mechanism is a presynaptic CB1 receptor-mediated inhibition of acetylcholine release from preganglionic sympathetic neurons. The inhibition of adrenaline secretion in adrenal glands most probably accounts for the decrease in the plasma adrenaline concentration observed after cannabinoid administration in pithed rabbits. PMID:11704653

  12. Extra-Adrenal Retroperitoneal Paraganglioma with Extensive Duodenal Invasion and Inferior Vena Cava Tumor Thrombus.

    PubMed

    Sadamori, Hiroshi; Monden, Kazuteru; Hioki, Masayoshi; Yoshimoto, Masashi; Ueki, Toru; Hyodo, Tsuyoshi; Omonishi, Kunihiro; Kioka, Yukio; Kuriyama, Mitsuhito; Ohno, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Kohsaku; Matsuda, Tadakazu; Takakura, Norihisa

    2016-08-01

    We report a case of extra-adrenal retroperitoneal paraganglioma (RP) with extensive duodenal invasion and tumor thromboses both in the right testicular vein and in the inferior vena cava (IVC). Because there was rigid adherence between the RP and the abdominal aorta, pancreatoduodenectomy with replacement of the IVC and aorta was performed for complete surgical resection. In the present case, both the mode of progression of the RP and the surgical approach were extremely rare. PMID:26921027

  13. Clinical study on the influence of motion and other factors on stereotactic radiotherapy in the treatment of adrenal gland tumor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingsheng; Li, Fengtong; Dong, Yang; Song, Yongchun; Yuan, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the adrenal tumor motion law and influence factors in the treatment of adrenal gland tumor and provide a reference value basis for determining the planning target volume margins for therapy. Materials and methods The subjects considered in this study were 38 adrenal tumor patients treated with CyberKnife with the placement of 45 gold fiducials. Fiducials were implanted into each adrenal tumor using β-ultrasonic guidance. Motion amplitudes of gold fiducials were measured with a Philips SLS simulator and motion data in the left–right, anterior–posterior, and cranio–caudal directions were obtained. Multiple linear regression models were used to analyze influencing factors. t-Test was used for motion amplitude comparison of different tumor locations along the z-axis. Results The motion distances were 0.1–0.4 cm (0.27±0.07 cm), 0.1–0.5 cm (0.31±0.11 cm), and 0.5–1.2 cm (0.87±0.21 cm) along the x-, y-, and z-axes, respectively. Motion amplitude along the z-axis may be affected by tumor location, but movement along the other axes was not affected by age, height, body mass, location, and size. Conclusion The maximum motion distance was along the z-axis. Therefore, this should be the main consideration when defining the planning target volume safety margin. Due to the proximity of the liver, adrenal gland tumor motion amplitude was smaller on the right than the left. This study analyzed adrenal tumor motion amplitude data to evaluate how motion and other factors influence the treatment of adrenal tumor with a goal of providing a reference for stereotactic radiotherapy boundary determination. PMID:27486331

  14. GABA Signaling and Neuroactive Steroids in Adrenal Medullary Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Keita; Matsuoka, Hidetada; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Ueta, Yoichi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Inoue, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is produced not only in the brain, but also in endocrine cells by the two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD65 and GAD67. In rat adrenal medullary chromaffin cells only GAD67 is expressed, and GABA is stored in large dense core vesicles (LDCVs), but not synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs). The α3β2/3γ2 complex represents the majority of GABAA receptors expressed in rat and guinea pig chromaffin cells, whereas PC12 cells, an immortalized rat chromaffin cell line, express the α1 subunit as well as the α3. The expression of α3, but not α1, in PC12 cells is enhanced by glucocorticoid activity, which may be mediated by both the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). GABA has two actions mediated by GABAA receptors in chromaffin cells: it induces catecholamine secretion by itself and produces an inhibition of synaptically evoked secretion by a shunt effect. Allopregnanolone, a neuroactive steroid which is secreted from the adrenal cortex, produces a marked facilitation of GABAA receptor channel activity. Since there are no GABAergic nerve fibers in the adrenal medulla, GABA may function as a para/autocrine factor in the chromaffin cells. This function of GABA may be facilitated by expression of the immature isoforms of GAD and GABAA receptors and the lack of expression of plasma membrane GABA transporters (GATs). In this review, we will consider how the para/autocrine function of GABA is achieved, focusing on the structural and molecular mechanisms for GABA signaling. PMID:27147972

  15. GABA Signaling and Neuroactive Steroids in Adrenal Medullary Chromaffin Cells.

    PubMed

    Harada, Keita; Matsuoka, Hidetada; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Ueta, Yoichi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Inoue, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is produced not only in the brain, but also in endocrine cells by the two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD65 and GAD67. In rat adrenal medullary chromaffin cells only GAD67 is expressed, and GABA is stored in large dense core vesicles (LDCVs), but not synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs). The α3β2/3γ2 complex represents the majority of GABAA receptors expressed in rat and guinea pig chromaffin cells, whereas PC12 cells, an immortalized rat chromaffin cell line, express the α1 subunit as well as the α3. The expression of α3, but not α1, in PC12 cells is enhanced by glucocorticoid activity, which may be mediated by both the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). GABA has two actions mediated by GABAA receptors in chromaffin cells: it induces catecholamine secretion by itself and produces an inhibition of synaptically evoked secretion by a shunt effect. Allopregnanolone, a neuroactive steroid which is secreted from the adrenal cortex, produces a marked facilitation of GABAA receptor channel activity. Since there are no GABAergic nerve fibers in the adrenal medulla, GABA may function as a para/autocrine factor in the chromaffin cells. This function of GABA may be facilitated by expression of the immature isoforms of GAD and GABAA receptors and the lack of expression of plasma membrane GABA transporters (GATs). In this review, we will consider how the para/autocrine function of GABA is achieved, focusing on the structural and molecular mechanisms for GABA signaling. PMID:27147972

  16. Adrenal imaging (Part 2): Medullary and secondary adrenal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dhamija, Ekta; Panda, Ananya; Das, Chandan J.; Gupta, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal malignancies can be either primary adrenal tumors or secondary metastases, with metastases representing the most common malignant adrenal lesion. While imaging cannot always clearly differentiate between various adrenal malignancies, presence of certain imaging features, in conjunction with appropriate clinical background and hormonal profile, can suggest the appropriate diagnosis. The second part of the article on adrenal imaging describes adrenal medullary tumors, secondary adrenal lesions, bilateral adrenal lesions, adrenal incidentalomas and provides an algorithmic approach to adrenal lesions based on current imaging recommendations. PMID:25593821

  17. Effect of the growth hormone-secreting tumor StW5 on pituitary and adrenal gland function in rats.

    PubMed

    Coyne, M D; Alpert, L C; Harter, K C; Nunez, A

    1981-01-01

    A growth hormone-secreting tumor (StW5 was implanted into male rats and resulted in a tripling of adrenal weight concomitant with a 30% decrement in pituitary weight. Plasma concentrations of corticosterone in tumor-bearing (TB) rats were significantly elevated at rest or after ACTH injections or the stress of either anesthesia. The rise in plasma concentrations of corticosterone was due mainly to the large increment in adrenal size although a significant increase in adrenal responsiveness to ACTH was demonstrated in vitro. In addition, plasma corticosterone concentrations were higher in TB rats despite both a doubling of the blood volume and a 50% increase in liver capacity to metabolize corticosterone. Pituitary ACTH content was significantly lower in TB rats, but these pituitary glands could still release near-normal quantities of ACTH as shown both by in vitro incubations and adrenal corticosterone output following ether stress. PMID:6266940

  18. Adrenal Insufficiency Associated with Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Shingo; Torii, Ryo; Shimabukuro, Ikuko; Yamasaki, Kei; Kido, Takashi; Yoshii, Chiharu; Mukae, Hiroshi; Yatera, Kazuhiro

    2016-06-01

    A 78-year-old Japanese man with fatigue, appetite loss, skin hyperpigmentation, hypotension and hypoglycemia, visited our hospital to evaluate an abnormal chest X-ray and adrenal gland swelling in echography in February 2015. Chest computed tomography showed a mass lesion in the right lower lobe and bilateral adrenal swellings, and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) with bilateral adrenal metastasis was diagnosed after bronchoscopy. According to low levels of serum cortisol, elevated adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and rapid ACTH test, the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency associated with SCLC was made. Treatment with hydrocortisone (20 mg/day) was started in addition to systemic chemotherapy with carboplatin and etoposide. The patient's symptoms were slightly improved, however, systemic chemotherapy was discontinued according to the patient's request after 1 course of chemotherapy. Thereafter, he received only supportive care, and his general condition gradually worsened and he ultimately died in August 2015. Adrenal insufficiency associated with SCLC, which is caused by tissue destruction more than 90% of the adrenal glands, is rare although adrenal metastasis is not rare in patients with lung cancer. The findings such as general fatigue, appetite loss, hypotension, and hyponatremia are often got follow up as findings of advanced cancer, but appropriate therapy for adrenal insufficiency, supplement of the adrenal corticosteroid hormone, may lead to a significant improvement in the symptoms and quality of life in clinical practice of lung cancer. Therefore, physicians must consider potential adrenal insufficiency in lung cancer patients with bilateral adrenal metastasis. PMID:27302729

  19. Synchronous renal cell carcinoma metastasis to the contralateral adrenal gland and pancreas: A case report with 7-year follow-up subsequent to surgical therapy

    PubMed Central

    WU, CUNZAO; ZHOU, ZHENXU; YE, XUETING; HU, WEILIE

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) disseminates to a number of organ sites and few patients demonstrate long-term survival following surgery. However, synchronous metastasis of RCC to the contralateral adrenal gland and pancreas is rare. In the present report, a case of synchronous RCC metastasis to the contralateral adrenal gland and pancreas in a 55-year-old patient, with an 116×92×61 mm right renal tumor and a 96×79×57 mm left adrenal lesion, is described. In April 2007, right nephrectomy was performed to treat the RCC, left adrenalectomy was performed to treat the adrenal tumor and the pancreatic metastases were resected. The patient remained alive at the 7-year follow-up appointment. PMID:27313756

  20. Cholinergic regulation of protein phosphorylation in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Haycock, J.W.; Browning, M.D.; Greengard, P.

    1988-03-01

    Chromaffin cells were isolated from bovine adrenal medullae and maintained in primary culture. After prelabeling with /sup 32/PO/sub 4/, exposure of the chromaffin cells to acetylcholine increased the phosphorylation of a M/sub r/ approx. = 100,000 protein and a M/sub r/ approx. = 60,000 protein (tyrosine hydroxylase), visualized after separation of total cellular proteins in NaDodSO/sub 4//polyacrylamide gels. Immunoprecipitation with antibodies to three known phosphoproteins (100-kDa, 87-kDa, and protein III) revealed an acetylcholine-dependent phosphorylation of these proteins. These three proteins were also shown to be present in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells by immunolabeling techniques. 100-kDa is a M/sub r/ approx. = 100,000 protein selectively phosphorylated by calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase III, 87-kDa is a M/sub r/ approx. = 87,000 protein selectively phosphorylated by protein kinase C, and protein III is a phosphoprotein doublet of M/sub r/ approx. = 74,000 (IIIa) and M/sub r/ approx. = 55,000 (IIIb) phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase I. The data demonstrate that cholinergic activation of chromaffin cells increases the phosphorylation of several proteins and that several protein kinase systems may be involved in these effects.

  1. POD-1/Tcf21 overexpression reduces endogenous SF-1 and StAR expression in rat adrenal cells

    PubMed Central

    França, M. M.; Abreu, N. P.; Vrechi, T. A. M.; Lotfi, C. F.

    2015-01-01

    During gonad and adrenal development, the POD-1/capsulin/TCF21transcription factor negatively regulates SF-1/NR5A1expression, with higher SF-1 levels being associated with increased adrenal cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. In adrenocortical tumor cells, POD-1 binds to the SF-1 E-box promoter region, decreasing SF-1 expression. However, the modulation of SF-1 expression by POD-1 has not previously been described in normal adrenal cells. Here, we analyzed the basal expression of Pod-1 and Sf-1 in primary cultures of glomerulosa (G) and fasciculata/reticularis (F/R) cells isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats, and investigated whether POD-1 overexpression modulates the expression of endogenous Sf-1 and its target genes in these cells. POD-1 overexpression, following the transfection of pCMVMycPod-1, significantly decreased the endogenous levels of Sf-1 mRNA and protein in F/R cells, but not in G cells, and also decreased the expression of the SF-1 target StAR in F/R cells. In G cells overexpressing POD-1, no modulation of the expression of SF-1 targets, StAR and CYP11B2, was observed. Our data showing that G and F/R cells respond differently to ectopic POD-1 expression emphasize the functional differences between the outer and inner zones of the adrenal cortex, and support the hypothesis that SF-1 is regulated by POD-1/Tcf21 in normal adrenocortical cells lacking the alterations in cellular physiology found in tumor cells. PMID:26421867

  2. Normal adrenal glands in small cell lung carcinoma: CT-guided biopsy

    SciTech Connect

    Pagani, J.J.

    1983-05-01

    Twenty-four small cell lung carcinoma patients with morphologically normal adrenal glands by computed tomographic (CT) criteria underwent percutaneous thin-needle biopsy of their adrenal glands. Of 43 glands biopsied, 29 had adequate cellular material for interpretation. Five (17%) of the 29 glands were positive for metastases; the rest had negative biopsies. This series indicates an approximate 17% false-negative diagnosis rate by CT when staging the adrenal glands in patients with small cell lung carcinoma. It also demonstrates the utility of percutaneous needle biopsy as an investigational tool to further evaluate normal-sized adrenal glands in the oncologic patient.

  3. Renal myelolipoma: a rare extra-adrenal tumor in a rare site: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Myelolipomas are uncommon, benign tumors composed of mature adipose tissue and hematopoietic elements. They mostly occur in the adrenal glands, but extra-adrenal myelolipomas have also been reported in other locations such as the presacral region, retroperitoneum, pelvis and mediastinum. Here, we present a case of an extra-adrenal myelolipoma in a rare site: the renal parenchyma. To the best of our knowledge, it is only the third case reported in this unusual location. Case presentation We report a case of primary myelolipoma occurring in the kidney of a 55-year-old Moroccan man. We describe the radiological and clinicopathologic features of this unusual tumor with a review of the literature, and we discuss differential diagnosis of retroperitoneal myelolipomas. Conclusion This case is noteworthy because the tumor site was unusual. Although renal myelolipoma is rare, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of lesions in this site. PMID:23556993

  4. A case of primary adrenal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in HIV.

    PubMed

    Malik, Seema; Chapman, Cordelia B-P; Drew, Olivia

    2016-07-01

    Primary adrenal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in HIV is a very rare, highly aggressive extra-nodal lymphoma. There is only one previous case reported in the literature. Our patient presented with isolated bilateral adrenal masses with no lymphadenopathy or visceral involvement, which made the diagnosis challenging. PMID:26113518

  5. Massive renal urothelial carcinoma with renal vein tumor thrombus, pancreatic infiltration and adrenal metastasis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tao; Gao, Liang; Wu, Weilu; Chen, Peng; Bu, Siyuan; Wei, Qiang; Yang, Lu

    2016-01-01

    A 49-year-old female patient presented with a massive left renal tumor, recurrent left flank pain and gross hematuria. The tumor was accompanied by a renal vein tumor thrombus, pancreatic infiltration and a solitary adrenal metastasis. Radical nephrectomy, distal pancreatectomy, ipsilateral adrenalectomy and splenectomy were performed. Histopathological examination suggested high-grade urothelial carcinoma (UC); however, tumor recurrence and multiple metastases were detected only 3 months after the surgery, and the patient succumbed during follow-up 1 month later. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of renal UC of such advanced stage with renal vein tumor thrombus, pancreatic infiltration and a solitary adrenal metastasis. PMID:27446406

  6. Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... adrenal tumors that appear malignant. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal? In the past, ... of procedure and the patients overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain Shorter hospital stay Quicker ...

  7. Copy number variations alter methylation and parallel IGF2 overexpression in adrenal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Helene Myrtue; How-Kit, Alexandre; Guerin, Carole; Castinetti, Frederic; Vollan, Hans Kristian Moen; De Micco, Catherine; Daunay, Antoine; Taieb, David; Van Loo, Peter; Besse, Celine; Kristensen, Vessela N; Hansen, Lise Lotte; Barlier, Anne; Sebag, Frederic; Tost, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of insulin growth factor 2 (IGF2) is a hallmark of adrenocortical carcinomas and pheochromocytomas. Previous studies investigating the IGF2/H19 locus have mainly focused on a single molecular level such as genomic alterations or altered DNA methylation levels and the causal changes underlying IGF2 overexpression are still not fully established. In the current study, we analyzed 62 tumors of the adrenal gland from patients with Conn's adenoma (CA, n=12), pheochromocytomas (PCC, n=10), adrenocortical benign tumors (ACBT, n=20), and adrenocortical carcinomas (ACC, n=20). Gene expression, somatic copy number variation of chr11p15.5, and DNA methylation status of three differential methylated regions of the IGF2/H19 locus including the H19 imprinting control region were integratively analyzed. IGF2 overexpression was found in 85% of the ACCs and 100% of the PCCs compared to 23% observed in CAs and ACBTs. Copy number aberrations of chr11p15.5 were abundant in both PCCs and ACCs but while PCCs retained a diploid state, ACCs were frequently tetraploid (7/19). Loss of either a single allele or loss of two alleles of the same parental origin in tetraploid samples resulted in a uniparental disomy-like genotype. These copy number changes correlated with hypermethylation of the H19 ICR suggesting that the lost alleles were the unmethylated maternal alleles. Our data provide conclusive evidence that loss of the maternal allele correlates with IGF2 overexpression in adrenal tumors and that hypermethylation of the H19 ICR is a consequence thereof. PMID:26400872

  8. Copy number variations alter methylation and parallel IGF2 overexpression in adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Helene Myrtue; How-Kit, Alexandre; Guerin, Carole; Castinetti, Frederic; Vollan, Hans Kristian Moen; De Micco, Catherine; Daunay, Antoine; Taieb, David; Van Loo, Peter; Besse, Celine; Kristensen, Vessela N; Hansen, Lise Lotte; Barlier, Anne; Sebag, Frederic; Tost, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    Overexpression of insulin growth factor 2 (IGF2) is a hallmark of adrenocortical carcinomas and pheochromocytomas. Previous studies investigating the IGF2/H19 locus have mainly focused on a single molecular level such as genomic alterations or altered DNA methylation levels and the causal changes underlying IGF2 overexpression are still not fully established. In the current study, we analyzed 62 tumors of the adrenal gland from patients with Conn's adenoma (CA, n=12), pheochromocytomas (PCC, n=10), adrenocortical benign tumors (ACBT, n=20), and adrenocortical carcinomas (ACC, n=20). Gene expression, somatic copy number variation of chr11p15.5, and DNA methylation status of three differential methylated regions of the IGF2/H19 locus including the H19 imprinting control region were integratively analyzed. IGF2 overexpression was found in 85% of the ACCs and 100% of the PCCs compared to 23% observed in CAs and ACBTs. Copy number aberrations of chr11p15.5 were abundant in both PCCs and ACCs but while PCCs retained a diploid state, ACCs were frequently tetraploid (7/19). Loss of either a single allele or loss of two alleles of the same parental origin in tetraploid samples resulted in a uniparental disomy-like genotype. These copy number changes correlated with hypermethylation of the H19 ICR suggesting that the lost alleles were the unmethylated maternal alleles. Our data provide conclusive evidence that loss of the maternal allele correlates with IGF2 overexpression in adrenal tumors and that hypermethylation of the H19 ICR is a consequence thereof. PMID:26400872

  9. Fetal adrenal capsular cells serve as progenitor cells for steroidogenic and stromal adrenocortical cell lineages in M. musculus

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Michelle A.; Acharya, Asha; Finco, Isabella; Swonger, Jessica M.; Elston, Marlee J.; Tallquist, Michelle D.; Hammer, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    The lineage relationships of fetal adrenal cells and adrenal capsular cells to the differentiated adrenal cortex are not fully understood. Existing data support a role for each cell type as a progenitor for cells of the adult cortex. This report reveals that subsets of capsular cells are descendants of fetal adrenocortical cells that once expressed Nr5a1. These fetal adrenocortical cell descendants within the adrenal capsule express Gli1, a known marker of progenitors of steroidogenic adrenal cells. The capsule is also populated by cells that express Tcf21, a known inhibitor of Nr5a1 gene expression. We demonstrate that Tcf21-expressing cells give rise to Nr5a1-expressing cells but only before capsular formation. After the capsule has formed, capsular Tcf21-expressing cells give rise only to non-steroidogenic stromal adrenocortical cells, which also express collagen 1a1, desmin and platelet-derived growth factor (alpha polypeptide) but not Nr5a1. These observations integrate prior observations that define two separate origins of adult adrenocortical steroidogenic cells (fetal adrenal cortex and/or the adrenal capsule). Thus, these observations predict a unique temporal and/or spatial role of adult cortical cells that arise directly from either fetal cortical cells or from fetal cortex-derived capsular cells. Last, the data uncover the mechanism by which two populations of fetal cells (fetal cortex derived Gli1-expressing cells and mesenchymal Tcf21-expressing mesenchymal cells) participate in the establishment of the homeostatic capsular progenitor cell niche of the adult cortex. PMID:24131628

  10. Estimation of the Mechanism of Adrenal Action of Endocrine-Disrupting Compounds Using a Computational Model of Adrenal Steroidogenesis in NCI-H295R Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Ryuta; Terasaki, Natsuko; Yamazaki, Makoto; Masutomi, Naoya; Tsutsui, Naohisa; Okamoto, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal toxicity is one of the major concerns in drug development. To quantitatively understand the effect of endocrine-active compounds on adrenal steroidogenesis and to assess the human adrenal toxicity of novel pharmaceutical drugs, we developed a mathematical model of steroidogenesis in human adrenocortical carcinoma NCI-H295R cells. The model includes cellular proliferation, intracellular cholesterol translocation, diffusional transport of steroids, and metabolic pathways of adrenal steroidogenesis, which serially involve steroidogenic proteins and enzymes such as StAR, CYP11A1, CYP17A1, HSD3B2, CYP21A2, CYP11B1, CYP11B2, HSD17B3, and CYP19A1. It was reconstructed in an experimental dynamics of cholesterol and 14 steroids from an in vitro steroidogenesis assay using NCI-H295R cells. Results of dynamic sensitivity analysis suggested that HSD3B2 plays the most important role in the metabolic balance of adrenal steroidogenesis. Based on differential metabolic profiling of 12 steroid hormones and 11 adrenal toxic compounds, we could estimate which steroidogenic enzymes were affected in this mathematical model. In terms of adrenal steroidogenic inhibitors, the predicted action sites were approximately matched to reported target enzymes. Thus, our computer-aided system based on systems biological approach may be useful to understand the mechanism of action of endocrine-active compounds and to assess the human adrenal toxicity of novel pharmaceutical drugs. PMID:27057163

  11. Cell-To-Cell Communication in Bilateral Macronodular Adrenal Hyperplasia Causing Hypercortisolism

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Hervé; Duparc, Céline; Prévost, Gaëtan; Bertherat, Jérôme; Louiset, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    It has been well established that, in the human adrenal gland, cortisol secretion is not only controlled by circulating corticotropin but is also influenced by a wide variety of bioactive signals, including conventional neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, released within the cortex by various cell types such as chromaffin cells, neurons, cells of the immune system, adipocytes, and endothelial cells. These different types of cells are present in bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (BMAH), a rare etiology of primary adrenal Cushing’s syndrome, where they appear intermingled with adrenocortical cells in the hyperplastic cortex. In addition, the genetic events, which cause the disease, favor abnormal adrenal differentiation that results in illicit expression of paracrine regulatory factors and their receptors in adrenocortical cells. All these defects constitute the molecular basis for aberrant autocrine/paracrine regulatory mechanisms, which are likely to play a role in the pathophysiology of BMAH-associated hypercortisolism. The present review summarizes the current knowledge on this topic as well as the therapeutic perspectives offered by this new pathophysiological concept. PMID:25941513

  12. Exposure to an Extremely-Low-Frequency Magnetic Field Stimulates Adrenal Steroidogenesis via Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase Activity in a Mouse Adrenal Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Kitaoka, Kazuyoshi; Kawata, Shiyori; Yoshida, Tomohiro; Kadoriku, Fumiya; Kitamura, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) are generated by power lines and household electrical devices. In the last several decades, some evidence has shown an association between ELF-MF exposure and depression and/or anxiety in epidemiological and animal studies. The mechanism underlying ELF-MF-induced depression is considered to involve adrenal steroidogenesis, which is triggered by ELF-MF exposure. However, how ELF-MFs stimulate adrenal steroidogenesis is controversial. In the current study, we investigated the effect of ELF-MF exposure on the mouse adrenal cortex-derived Y-1 cell line and the human adrenal cortex-derived H295R cell line to clarify whether the ELF-MF stimulates adrenal steroidogenesis directly. ELF-MF exposure was found to significantly stimulate adrenal steroidogenesis (p < 0.01–0.05) and the expression of adrenal steroid synthetic enzymes (p < 0.05) in Y-1 cells, but the effect was weak in H295R cells. Y-1 cells exposed to an ELF-MF showed significant decreases in phosphodiesterase activity (p < 0.05) and intracellular Ca2+ concentration (p < 0.01) and significant increases in intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentration (p < 0.001–0.05) and cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation (p < 0.05). The increase in cAMP was not inhibited by treatment with NF449, an inhibitor of the Gs alpha subunit of G protein. Our results suggest that ELF-MF exposure stimulates adrenal steroidogenesis via an increase in intracellular cAMP caused by the inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity in Y-1 cells. The same mechanism may trigger the increase in adrenal steroid secretion in mice observed in our previous study. PMID:27100201

  13. Unilateral adrenal tumor, erectile dysfunction and infertility in a patient with 21-hydroxylase deficiency: effects of glucocorticoid treatment and surgery.

    PubMed

    Scaroni, C; Favia, G; Lumachi, F; Opocher, G; Bonanni, G; Mantero, F; Armanini, D

    2003-02-01

    In untreated congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHDS) the presence of adrenal and testicular tumors had been described; however little is known about the effect of the enzymatic defect on fertility in males. We studied a male adult patient affected by 21OHDS for infertility, after a long period of discontinuation of glucocorticoid therapy and then during resumption of treatment and 8 months after monoadrenalectomy. The initial spermatic count revealed azoospermia and testicular needle aspiration showed a cytological picture consistent with prepuberty. The morphofunctional study revealed a right adrenal mass with reduced uptake at radioscan. Treatment was resumed with onset of impotency, which improved after reduction of the dose of glucocorticoids. The patient was monoadrenalectomised and his spermatic count increased. The patient shows that corticosteroid therapy in 21OHDS should be continued lifelong to avoid adrenal hyperplasia with possible areas of autonomy and to allow regular fertility. Impotence during treatment is probably due to a decrease of excessive adrenal androgens while testicular androgen production is still suppressed. PMID:12605349

  14. What Is Adrenal Cortical Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... include pheochromocytomas (which are most often benign) and neuroblastomas . This document is about tumors and cancers of ... does not discuss tumors of the adrenal medulla. Neuroblastoma s are covered in a separate document . Adrenal cortex ...

  15. Myxoid adrenal adenoma with focal pseudoglandular pattern.

    PubMed

    De Padua, Michelle; Rajagopal, V

    2008-05-01

    Adrenal cortical tumors with myxoid change are rare tumors. To our knowledge, only 22 cases have been described so far in literature, which include 13 carcinomas and 9 adenomas. A pseudoglandular pattern has been described in 9 of these tumors. We report a case of a myxoid adenoma of the left adrenal gland in a 67-year-old woman, with a focal pseudoglandular pattern involving about 20% of the studied tumor. Rest of the tumor was composed of anastomosing cords of tumor cells. Abundant myxoid stroma was present, which stained positively with alcian blue and was weakly focally positive with periodic acid Schiff. Immunophenotype was consistent with an adrenal tumor, i.e., positive for vimentin, inhibin, and melan A. Cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and chromogranin were negative. MIB-1 index was < 0.1%. PMID:18579979

  16. Mass spectrometry of gangliosides in extracranial tumors: Application to adrenal neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Robu, Adrian C; Vukelić, Željka; Schiopu, Catalin; Capitan, Florina; Zamfir, Alina D

    2016-09-15

    We report here on the introduction of mass spectrometry (MS) for profiling of native gangliosides from an extracranial tumor. The analytical approach was based on a modern platform combining the superior sensitivity and reproducibility of fully automated chip-based nanoelectrospray ionization (nanoESI) with the high resolution and mass accuracy provided by a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight (QTOF) instrument. The feasibility of the method for the analysis of gangliosides, which are much less expressed in extracranial tissues, was here tested using as the model substrate an adrenal neuroblastoma (NB) specimen located in the abdominal region of a 2-year-old infant. Under properly optimized conditions, MS profiling revealed information on at least 61 different gangliosides exhibiting heterogeneity of the glycan and lipid compositions. NB was found dominated by species bearing short-chain oligosaccharide cores with a reduced overall Neu5Ac content. By chip-nanoESI MS, preceding findings related to the GD2 role in NB were confirmed. Moreover, the screening experiments offered novel information supporting the possible biomarker role of GM4, GM3, and GM1 ganglioside classes. Structural analysis of GM1(d18:1/18:2) and GD1(d18:0/19:0) possibly tumor-associated markers, carried out by tandem MS (MS/MS) using collision-induced dissociation (CID) at low energies, indicated that both GM1a and GD1b isomers are present in NB. PMID:27311552

  17. Angiotensin II binding to cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells: identification of angiotensin II receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, V.L.; Printz, M.P.

    1986-03-05

    Physiological experiments have provided evidence that angiotensin II stimulates catecholamine secretion from the adrenal gland. Their laboratory and others have now shown by receptor autoradiography the presence of angiotensin II receptors (AIIR) in bovine and rat adrenal medulla. In order to extend these studies they have undertaken to define AIIR on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Cells were isolated using the method of Levitt including cell enrichment with Percoll gradient centrifugation. Primary cultures of bovine adrenal medullary cells were maintained in DME/F12 medium containing 10% FCS. Cells were characterized by immunocytochemistry for Met- and Leu-enkephalin, PNMT, DBH and Chromagranin A. Cultured cells bind with high affinity and specificity (/sup 125/I)-ANG II yielding a K/sub D/ of 0.74 nM and B/sub max/ of 24,350 sites/cell. After Percoll treatment values of .77 nm and 34,500 sites/cell are obtained. K/sub D/ values are in close agreement with that obtained in adrenal slices by Healy. Competition studies identify a rank order of binding by this receptor similar to that of other tissues. They conclude that cultured chromaffin cells provide a suitable model system for the investigation and characterization of the ANG II receptor and for cellular studies of its functional significance.

  18. Laparoscopic Resection of Adrenal Teratoma

    PubMed Central

    Vitagliano, Gonzalo; Villeta, Matias; Arellano, Leonardo; Santis, Oscar

    2006-01-01

    Background: Teratoma is a germ-cell tumor that commonly affects the gonads. Its components originate in the ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm. Extragonadal occurrence is rare. Teratomas confined to the adrenal gland are exceptional; only 3 cases have been reported in the English-language literature. We report 2 cases of mature teratomas of the adrenal gland that were laparoscopically excised. Methods: Two patients (ages 8 and 61 years) were diagnosed with adrenal teratoma at our institution. Radiological examination showed a solid 8-cm adrenal lesion in both cases. Hormonal assessment was normal. Both patients underwent laparoscopic transperitoneal adrenalectomy. Results: Surgical time was 120 minutes and 50 minutes, respectively. One patient was discharged on postoperative day 2, and the other remained hospitalized until day 10. The latter patient required percutaneous drainage of a retroperitoneal collection. Both tumors were identified as mature cystic teratomas. No evidence was present of recurring disease in either patient. Conclusions: Adrenal teratoma is rare. Laparoscopic transperitoneal adrenalectomy is a feasible, effective technique that enables excellent oncologic results. To our knowledge, this is the first report of laparoscopic adrenalectomy for pure adrenal teratoma. PMID:17575773

  19. Isolation, characterization, and differentiation of progenitor cells from human adult adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Santana, Magda M; Chung, Kuei-Fang; Vukicevic, Vladimir; Rosmaninho-Salgado, Joana; Kanczkowski, Waldemar; Cortez, Vera; Hackmann, Klaus; Bastos, Carlos A; Mota, Alfredo; Schrock, Evelin; Bornstein, Stefan R; Cavadas, Cláudia; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika

    2012-11-01

    Chromaffin cells, sympathetic neurons of the dorsal ganglia, and the intermediate small intensely fluorescent cells derive from a common neural crest progenitor cell. Contrary to the closely related sympathetic nervous system, within the adult adrenal medulla a subpopulation of undifferentiated progenitor cells persists, and recently, we established a method to isolate and differentiate these progenitor cells from adult bovine adrenals. However, no studies have elucidated the existence of adrenal progenitor cells within the human adrenal medulla. Here we describe the isolation, characterization, and differentiation of chromaffin progenitor cells obtained from adult human adrenals. Human chromaffin progenitor cells were cultured in low-attachment conditions for 10-12 days as free-floating spheres in the presence of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and epidermal growth factor. These primary human chromosphere cultures were characterized by the expression of several progenitor markers, including nestin, CD133, Notch1, nerve growth factor receptor, Snai2, Sox9, Sox10, Phox2b, and Ascl1 on the molecular level and of Sox9 on the immunohistochemical level. In opposition, phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT), a marker for differentiated chromaffin cells, significantly decreased after 12 days in culture. Moreover, when plated on poly-l-lysine/laminin-coated slides in the presence of FGF-2, human chromaffin progenitor cells were able to differentiate into two distinct neuron-like cell types, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)(+)/β-3-tubulin(+) cells and TH(-)/β-3-tubulin(+) cells, and into chromaffin cells (TH(+)/PNMT(+)). This study demonstrates the presence of progenitor cells in the human adrenal medulla and reveals their potential use in regenerative medicine, especially in the treatment of neuroendocrine and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23197690

  20. Isolation, Characterization, and Differentiation of Progenitor Cells from Human Adult Adrenal Medulla

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Magda M.; Chung, Kuei-Fang; Vukicevic, Vladimir; Rosmaninho-Salgado, Joana; Kanczkowski, Waldemar; Cortez, Vera; Hackmann, Karl; Bastos, Carlos A.; Mota, Alfredo; Schrock, Evelin; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2012-01-01

    Chromaffin cells, sympathetic neurons of the dorsal ganglia, and the intermediate small intensely fluorescent cells derive from a common neural crest progenitor cell. Contrary to the closely related sympathetic nervous system, within the adult adrenal medulla a subpopulation of undifferentiated progenitor cells persists, and recently, we established a method to isolate and differentiate these progenitor cells from adult bovine adrenals. However, no studies have elucidated the existence of adrenal progenitor cells within the human adrenal medulla. Here we describe the isolation, characterization, and differentiation of chromaffin progenitor cells obtained from adult human adrenals. Human chromaffin progenitor cells were cultured in low-attachment conditions for 10–12 days as free-floating spheres in the presence of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and epidermal growth factor. These primary human chromosphere cultures were characterized by the expression of several progenitor markers, including nestin, CD133, Notch1, nerve growth factor receptor, Snai2, Sox9, Sox10, Phox2b, and Ascl1 on the molecular level and of Sox9 on the immunohistochemical level. In opposition, phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT), a marker for differentiated chromaffin cells, significantly decreased after 12 days in culture. Moreover, when plated on poly-l-lysine/laminin-coated slides in the presence of FGF-2, human chromaffin progenitor cells were able to differentiate into two distinct neuron-like cell types, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)+/β-3-tubulin+ cells and TH−/β-3-tubulin+ cells, and into chromaffin cells (TH+/PNMT+). This study demonstrates the presence of progenitor cells in the human adrenal medulla and reveals their potential use in regenerative medicine, especially in the treatment of neuroendocrine and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23197690

  1. Canine mast cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Macy, D W

    1985-07-01

    Despite the fact that the mast cell tumor is a common neoplasm of the dog, we still have only a meager understanding of its etiology and biologic behavior. Many of the published recommendations for treatment are based on opinion rather than facts derived from careful studies and should be viewed with some skepticism. Because of the infrequent occurrence of this tumor in man, only a limited amount of help can be expected from human oncologists; therefore, burden of responsibility for progress in predicting behavior and developing treatment effective for canine mast cell tumors must fall on the shoulders of the veterinary profession. PMID:3929444

  2. Brain tumor stem cells.

    PubMed

    Palm, Thomas; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2010-06-01

    Since the end of the 'no-new-neuron' theory, emerging evidence from multiple studies has supported the existence of stem cells in neurogenic areas of the adult brain. Along with this discovery, neural stem cells became candidate cells being at the origin of brain tumors. In fact, it has been demonstrated that molecular mechanisms controlling self-renewal and differentiation are shared between brain tumor stem cells and neural stem cells and that corruption of genes implicated in these pathways can direct tumor growth. In this regard, future anticancer approaches could be inspired by uncovering such redundancies and setting up treatments leading to exhaustion of the cancer stem cell pool. However, deleterious effects on (normal) neural stem cells should be minimized. Such therapeutic models underline the importance to study the cellular mechanisms implicated in fate decisions of neural stem cells and the oncogenic derivation of adult brain cells. In this review, we discuss the putative origins of brain tumor stem cells and their possible implications on future therapies. PMID:20370314

  3. Non-Functional Adrenal Gland Ganglioneuroma Masquerading as Chronic Calculus Cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rashmi D; Vanikar, Aruna V; Trivedi, H L

    2015-09-01

    Adrenal ganglioneuromas in young adults are rare and ill-understood. We report an incidentally detected adrenal gland tumor diagnosed as ganglioneuroma (mature type) in 33 years old man who presented with vomiting and epigastric pain for 2 months. Histopathology examination revealed a well-encapsulated benign tumor of mature ganglion cells and Schwann-like cells arranged in fascicles, staining strongly with NSE and s-100 proteins, with adjacent unremarkable adrenal cortex and medulla. PMID:27608876

  4. Temporal and spatial distribution of mast cells and steroidogenic enzymes in the human fetal adrenal.

    PubMed

    Naccache, Alexandre; Louiset, Estelle; Duparc, Céline; Laquerrière, Annie; Patrier, Sophie; Renouf, Sylvie; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Mukai, Kuniaki; Lefebvre, Hervé; Castanet, Mireille

    2016-10-15

    Mast cells are present in the human adult adrenal with a potential role in the regulation of aldosterone secretion in both normal cortex and adrenocortical adenomas. We have investigated the human developing adrenal gland for the presence of mast cells in parallel with steroidogenic enzymes profile and serotonin signaling pathway. RT-QPCR and immunohistochemical studies were performed on adrenals at 16-41 weeks of gestation (WG). Tryptase-immunopositive mast cells were found from 18 WG in the adrenal subcapsular layer, close to 3βHSD- and CYP11B2-immunoreactive cells, firstly detected at 18 and 24 WG, respectively. Tryptophan hydroxylase and serotonin receptor type 4 expression increased at 30 WG before the CYP11B2 expression surge. In addition, HDL and LDL cholesterol receptors were expressed in the subcapsular zone from 24 WG. Altogether, our findings suggest the implication of mast cells and serotonin in the establishment of the mineralocorticoid synthesizing pathway during fetal adrenal development. PMID:27302892

  5. Testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Looijenga, Leendert H J

    2014-02-01

    Human germ cell tumors are of interest because of their epidemiology, clinical behavior and pathobiology. Histologically, they are subdivided into various elements, with similarities to embryogenesis. Recent insights resulted in a division of five types of human germ cell tumors. In the context of male germ cells, three are relevant; Type I: teratomas and yolk sac tumors of neonates and infants; Type II: seminomas and nonseminomas of (predominantly) adolescents and adults; and Type III: spermatocytic seminomas of the elderly. Recent studies led to significant increases in understanding of the parameters involved in the earliest pathogenetic steps of human germ cells tumors, in particularly the seminomas and nonseminomas (Type II). In case of a disturbed gonadal physiology, either due to the germ cell itself, or the micro-environment, embryonic germ cells during a specific window of sensitization can be blocked in their maturation, resulting in carcinoma in situ or gonadoblastoma, the precursors of seminomas and nonseminomas. The level of testicularization of the gonad determines the histological composition of the precursor. These insights will allow better definition of individuals at risk to develop a germ cell malignancy, with putative preventive measurements, and allow better selection of scientific approaches to elucidate the pathogenesis. PMID:24683949

  6. Adrenal hemangioma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Auh, Y H; Anand, J; Zirinsky, K; Kazam, E

    1986-01-01

    Adrenal hemangioma is a very rare tumor. Presented is the 18th case proved by autopsy or surgery reported in world literature. The tumor was incidentally discovered at autopsy. Unless this tumor has characteristic calcifications, phlebolith or phlebolithlike, its computed tomography appearance is nonspecific. Therefore, by computed tomography this tumor cannot be differentiated from other primary or secondary adrenal tumors. PMID:3943357

  7. Cell cycle-dependent regulation of extra-adrenal glucocorticoid synthesis in murine intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Atanasov, Atanas G; Leiser, Dominic; Roesselet, Corinne; Noti, Mario; Corazza, Nadia; Schoonjans, Kristina; Brunner, Thomas

    2008-12-01

    Glucocorticoids are anti-inflammatory steroids with important applications in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Endogenous glucocorticoids are mainly produced by the adrenal glands, although there is increasing evidence for extra-adrenal sources. Recent findings show that intestinal crypt cells produce glucocorticoids, which contribute to the maintenance of intestinal immune homeostasis. Intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis is critically regulated by the transcription factor liver receptor homologue-1 (LRH-1). As expression of steroidogenic enzymes and LRH-1 is restricted to the proliferating cells of the crypts, we aimed to investigate the role of the cell cycle in the regulation of LRH-1 activity and intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis. We here show that either pharmacological or molecular modulation of cell cycle progression significantly inhibited expression of steroidogenic enzymes and synthesis of glucocorticoids in intestinal epithelial cells. Synchronization of intestinal epithelial cells in the cell cycle revealed that expression of steroidogenic enzymes is preferentially induced at the G(1)/S stage. Differentiation of immature intestinal epithelial cells to mature nonproliferating cells also resulted in reduced expression of steroidogenic enzymes. This cell cycle-related effect on intestinal steroidogenesis was found to be mediated through the regulation of LRH-1 transcriptional activity. This mechanism may restrict intestinal glucocorticoid synthesis to the proliferating cells of the crypts. PMID:18711026

  8. The adrenal capsule is a signaling center controlling cell renewal and zonation through Rspo3.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Valerie; Sacco, Sonia; Rocha, Ana Sofia; da Silva, Fabio; Panzolini, Clara; Dumontet, Typhanie; Doan, Thi Mai Phuong; Shan, Jingdong; Rak-Raszewska, Aleksandra; Bird, Tom; Vainio, Seppo; Martinez, Antoine; Schedl, Andreas

    2016-06-15

    Adrenal glands are zonated endocrine organs that are essential in controlling body homeostasis. How zonation is induced and maintained and how renewal of the adrenal cortex is ensured remain a mystery. Here we show that capsular RSPO3 signals to the underlying steroidogenic compartment to induce β-catenin signaling and imprint glomerulosa cell fate. Deletion of RSPO3 leads to loss of SHH signaling and impaired organ growth. Importantly, Rspo3 function remains essential in adult life to ensure replenishment of lost cells and maintain the properties of the zona glomerulosa. Thus, the adrenal capsule acts as a central signaling center that ensures replacement of damaged cells and is required to maintain zonation throughout life. PMID:27313319

  9. Altered glycosylation in tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reading, C.L. ); Hakomori, S. ); Marcus, D.M. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceeding on the following: Glycoconjugates of normal and tumor cells; Glycosyltransferases in normal and neoplastic cells; Mammalian lectins of normal tissues and tumor cells; and Immune recognition of carbohydrates and clinical applications.

  10. En Masse Resection of Pancreas, Spleen, Celiac Axis, Stomach, Kidney, Adrenal, and Colon for Invasive Pancreatic Corpus and Tail Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kutluturk, Koray; Alam, Abdul Hamid; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Otan, Emrah; Aydin, Cemalettin

    2013-01-01

    Providing a more comfortable life and a longer survival for pancreatic corpus/tail tumors without metastasis depends on the complete resection. Recently, distal pancreatectomy with celiac axis resection was reported as a feasible and favorable method in selected pancreatic corpus/tail tumors which had invaded the celiac axis. Additional organ resections to the celiac axis were rarely required, and when necessary it was included only a single extra organ resection such as adrenal or intestine. Here, we described a distal pancreatic tumor invading most of the neighboring organs—stomach, celiac axis, left renal vein, left adrenal gland, and splenic flexure were treated by en bloc resection of all these organs. The patient was a 60-year-old man without any severe medical comorbidities. Postoperative course of the patient was uneventful, and he was discharged on postoperative day eight without any complication. Histopathology and stage of the tumor were adenocarcinoma and T4 N1 M0, respectively. Preoperative back pain of the patient was completely relieved in the postoperative period. As a result, celiac axis resection for pancreatic cancer is an extensive surgery, and a combined en masse resection of the invaded neighboring organs is a more extensive surgery than the celiac axis resection alone. This more extensive surgery is safe and feasible for selected patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:24159408

  11. En masse resection of pancreas, spleen, celiac axis, stomach, kidney, adrenal, and colon for invasive pancreatic corpus and tail tumor.

    PubMed

    Kutluturk, Koray; Alam, Abdul Hamid; Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Otan, Emrah; Aydin, Cemalettin

    2013-01-01

    Providing a more comfortable life and a longer survival for pancreatic corpus/tail tumors without metastasis depends on the complete resection. Recently, distal pancreatectomy with celiac axis resection was reported as a feasible and favorable method in selected pancreatic corpus/tail tumors which had invaded the celiac axis. Additional organ resections to the celiac axis were rarely required, and when necessary it was included only a single extra organ resection such as adrenal or intestine. Here, we described a distal pancreatic tumor invading most of the neighboring organs-stomach, celiac axis, left renal vein, left adrenal gland, and splenic flexure were treated by en bloc resection of all these organs. The patient was a 60-year-old man without any severe medical comorbidities. Postoperative course of the patient was uneventful, and he was discharged on postoperative day eight without any complication. Histopathology and stage of the tumor were adenocarcinoma and T4 N1 M0, respectively. Preoperative back pain of the patient was completely relieved in the postoperative period. As a result, celiac axis resection for pancreatic cancer is an extensive surgery, and a combined en masse resection of the invaded neighboring organs is a more extensive surgery than the celiac axis resection alone. This more extensive surgery is safe and feasible for selected patients with pancreatic cancer. PMID:24159408

  12. Tumor heterogeneity and circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chufeng; Guan, Yan; Sun, Yulan; Ai, Dan; Guo, Qisen

    2016-05-01

    In patients with cancer, individualized treatment strategies are generally guided by an analysis of molecular biomarkers. However, genetic instability allows tumor cells to lose monoclonality and acquire genetic heterogeneity, an important characteristic of tumors, during disease progression. Researchers have found that there is tumor heterogeneity between the primary tumor and metastatic lesions, between different metastatic lesions, and even within a single tumor (either primary or metastatic). Tumor heterogeneity is associated with heterogeneous protein functions, which lowers diagnostic precision and consequently becomes an obstacle to determining the appropriate therapeutic strategies for individual cancer patients. With the development of novel testing technologies, an increasing number of studies have attempted to explore tumor heterogeneity by examining circulating tumor cells (CTCs), with the expectation that CTCs may comprehensively represent the full spectrum of mutations and/or protein expression alterations present in the cancer. In addition, this strategy represents a minimally invasive approach compared to traditional tissue biopsies that can be used to dynamically monitor tumor evolution. The present article reviews the potential efficacy of using CTCs to identify both spatial and temporal tumor heterogeneity. This review also highlights current issues in this field and provides an outlook toward future applications of CTCs. PMID:26902424

  13. Adrenal Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... What is adrenal insufficiency? Did you know? The adrenal glands, located on top of the kidneys, make hormones ... body functions. The outer layer (cortex) of the adrenal glands makes three types of steroid hormones. In adrenal ...

  14. Tumor cell intravasation.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Serena P H; Cabrera, Ramon M; Segall, Jeffrey E

    2016-07-01

    The process of entering the bloodstream, intravasation, is a necessary step in the development of distant metastases. The focus of this review is on the pathways and molecules that have been identified as being important based on current in vitro and in vivo assays for intravasation. Properties of the vasculature which are important for intravasation include microvessel density and also diameter of the vasculature, with increased intravasation correlating with increased vessel diameter in some tumors. TGFB signaling can enhance intravasation at least in part through induction of EMT, and we discuss other TGFB target genes that are important for intravasation. In addition to TGFB signaling, a number of studies have demonstrated that activation of EGF receptor family members stimulates intravasation, with downstream signaling through PI3K, N-WASP, RhoA, and WASP to induce invadopodia. With respect to proteases, there is strong evidence for contributions by uPA/uPAR, while the roles of MMPs in intravasation may be more tumor specific. Other cells including macrophages, fibroblasts, neutrophils, and platelets can also play a role in enhancing tumor cell intravasation. The technology is now available to interrogate the expression patterns of circulating tumor cells, which will provide an important reality check for the model systems being used. With a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying intravasation, the goal is to provide new opportunities for improving prognosis as well as potentially developing new treatments. PMID:27076614

  15. Management of adrenal incidentalomas: European Society of Endocrinology Clinical Practice Guideline in collaboration with the European Network for the Study of Adrenal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Fassnacht, Martin; Arlt, Wiebke; Bancos, Irina; Dralle, Henning; Newell-Price, John; Sahdev, Anju; Tabarin, Antoine; Terzolo, Massimo; Tsagarakis, Stylianos; Dekkers, Olaf M

    2016-08-01

    : By definition, an adrenal incidentaloma is an asymptomatic adrenal mass detected on imaging not performed for suspected adrenal disease. In most cases, adrenal incidentalomas are nonfunctioning adrenocortical adenomas, but may also represent conditions requiring therapeutic intervention (e.g. adrenocortical carcinoma, pheochromocytoma, hormone-producing adenoma or metastasis). The purpose of this guideline is to provide clinicians with best possible evidence-based recommendations for clinical management of patients with adrenal incidentalomas based on the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. We predefined four main clinical questions crucial for the management of adrenal incidentaloma patients, addressing these four with systematic literature searches: (A) How to assess risk of malignancy?; (B) How to define and manage low-level autonomous cortisol secretion, formerly called 'subclinical' Cushing's syndrome?; (C) Who should have surgical treatment and how should it be performed?; (D) What follow-up is indicated if the adrenal incidentaloma is not surgically removed? SELECTED RECOMMENDATIONS: (i) At the time of initial detection of an adrenal mass establishing whether the mass is benign or malignant is an important aim to avoid cumbersome and expensive follow-up imaging in those with benign disease. (ii) To exclude cortisol excess, a 1mg overnight dexamethasone suppression test should be performed (applying a cut-off value of serum cortisol ≤50nmol/L (1.8µg/dL)). (iii) For patients without clinical signs of overt Cushing's syndrome but serum cortisol levels post 1mg dexamethasone >138nmol/L (>5µg/dL), we propose the term 'autonomous cortisol secretion'. (iv) All patients with '(possible) autonomous cortisol' secretion should be screened for hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus, to ensure these are appropriately treated. (v) Surgical treatment should be considered in an individualized approach in patients with

  16. Differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into gonad and adrenal steroidogenic cells

    PubMed Central

    Yazawa, Takashi; Imamichi, Yoshitaka; Miyamoto, Kaoru; Umezawa, Akihiro; Taniguchi, Takanobu

    2014-01-01

    Hormone replacement therapy is necessary for patients with adrenal and gonadal failure. Steroid hormone treatment is also employed in aging people for sex hormone deficiency. These patients undergo such therapies, which have associated risks, for their entire life. Stem cells represent an innovative tool for tissue regeneration and the possibility of solving these problems. Among various stem cell types, mesenchymal stem cells have the potential to differentiate into steroidogenic cells both in vivo and in vitro. In particular, they can effectively be differentiated into steroidogenic cells by expressing nuclear receptor 5A subfamily proteins (steroidogenic factor-1 and liver receptor homolog-1) with the aid of cAMP. This approach will provide a source of cells for future regenerative medicine for the treatment of diseases caused by steroidogenesis deficiencies. It can also represent a useful tool for studying the molecular mechanisms of steroidogenesis and its related diseases. PMID:24772247

  17. Endothelial cells from bovine adrenal medulla develop capillary-like growth patterns in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, D K; Ornberg, R L; Youdim, M B; Heldman, E; Pollard, H B

    1985-01-01

    The endocrine barrier between chromaffin cells and the blood stream in the adrenal medulla is made of capillary endothelial cells. We have now succeeded in isolating endothelial cells from adrenal medullary tissue, which are probably derived from this barrier. These cells grow on plastic surfaces in the absence of special growth factors or collagen overlays and differentiate into organized structures quite similar to true capillaries. The cells contain factor VIII:R, a marker for endothelial cells, and form intercellular junctions characteristic of capillary endothelial cells. They also synthesize and secrete basal lamina structures and engage in transcytosis, a characteristic ultrastructural and functional combination of exocytosis and endocytosis across the thin endothelial cell processes. These endothelial cells can take up and deaminate catecholamines by A-type monoamine oxidase, an enzyme functionally distinct from the B-type monoamine oxidase found in chromaffin cells. These data indicate that the chromaffin cell and its endothelial cell neighbor may constitute the functional unit of catecholamine metabolism in the adrenal medulla. Images PMID:3927288

  18. PC12 Cells Differentiate into Chromaffin Cell-Like Phenotype in Coculture with Adrenal Medullary Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizrachi, Yaffa; Naranjo, Jose R.; Levi, Ben-Zion; Pollard, Harvey B.; Lelkes, Peter I.

    1990-08-01

    Previously we described specific in vitro interactions between PC12 cells, a cloned, catecholamine-secreting pheochromocytoma cell line derived from the rat adrenal medulla, and bovine adrenal medullary endothelial cells. We now demonstrate that these interactions induce the PC12 cells to acquire physical and biochemical characteristics reminiscent of chromaffin cells. Under coculture conditions involving direct cell-cell contact, the endothelial cells and the PC12 cells reduced their rates of proliferation; upon prolonged coculture PC12 cells clustered into nests of cells similar to the organization of chromaffin cells seen in vivo. Within 3 days in coculture with endothelial cells, but not with unrelated control cells, PC12 cells synthesized increased levels of [Met]enkephalin. In addition, PC12 cells, growing on confluent endothelial monolayers, failed to extend neurites in response to nerve growth factor. Neither medium conditioned by endothelial cells nor fixed endothelial cells could by themselves induce all of these different phenomena in the PC12 cells. These results suggest that under coculture conditions PC12 cells change their state of differentiation toward a chromaffin cell-like phenotype. The rapid, transient increase in the expression of the protooncogene c-fos suggests that the mechanism(s) inducing the change in the state of differentiation in PC12 cells in coculture with the endothelial cells may be distinct from that described for the differentiation of PC12 cells--e.g., by glucocorticoids. We propose that similar interactions between endothelial cells and chromaffin cell precursors may occur during embryonic development and that these interactions might be instrumental for the organ-specific differentiation of the adrenal medulla in vivo.

  19. [Mediastinal germ cell tumors].

    PubMed

    Bremmer, F; Ströbel, P

    2016-09-01

    The mediastinum is among the most frequent anatomic region in which germ cell tumors (GCT) arise, second only to the gonads. Mediastinal GCT (mGCT) account for 16 % of all mediastinal neoplasms. Although the morphology and (according to all available data) the molecular genetics of mediastinal and gonadal GCT are identical, a number of unique aspects exist. There is a highly relevant bi-modal age distribution. In pre-pubertal children of both sexes, mGCT consist exclusively of teratomas and yolk sac tumors. The prognosis is generally favorable with modern treatment. In post-pubertal adults, virtually all patients with malignant mGCT are males; the prognosis is more guarded and depends (among other factors) on the histological GCT components and is similar to GCT in other organs. So-called somatic type malignancies (i. e. clonally related, non-germ cell neoplasias arising in a GCT) are much more frequent in mGCT than in other organs, and the association between mediastinal yolk sac tumors and hematological malignancies, such as myelodysplasias and leukemias, is unique to mediastinal tumors. The prognosis of GCT with somatic type malignancies is generally dismal. PMID:27491549

  20. MCM4 mutation causes adrenal failure, short stature, and natural killer cell deficiency in humans

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Claire R.; Guasti, Leonardo; Meimaridou, Eirini; Chuang, Chen-Hua; Schimenti, John C.; King, Peter J.; Costigan, Colm; Clark, Adrian J.L.; Metherell, Louise A.

    2012-01-01

    An interesting variant of familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD), an autosomal recessive form of adrenal failure, exists in a genetically isolated Irish population. In addition to hypocortisolemia, affected children show signs of growth failure, increased chromosomal breakage, and NK cell deficiency. Targeted exome sequencing in 8 patients identified a variant (c.71-1insG) in minichromosome maintenance–deficient 4 (MCM4) that was predicted to result in a severely truncated protein (p.Pro24ArgfsX4). Western blotting of patient samples revealed that the major 96-kDa isoform present in unaffected human controls was absent, while the presence of the minor 85-kDa isoform was preserved. Interestingly, histological studies with Mcm4-depleted mice showed grossly abnormal adrenal morphology that was characterized by non-steroidogenic GATA4- and Gli1-positive cells within the steroidogenic cortex, which reduced the number of steroidogenic cells in the zona fasciculata of the adrenal cortex. Since MCM4 is one part of a MCM2-7 complex recently confirmed as the replicative helicase essential for normal DNA replication and genome stability in all eukaryotes, it is possible that our patients may have an increased risk of neoplastic change. In summary, we have identified what we believe to be the first human mutation in MCM4 and have shown that it is associated with adrenal insufficiency, short stature, and NK cell deficiency. PMID:22354170

  1. Role of calcium in effects of atrial natriuretic peptide on aldosterone production in adrenal glomerulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chartier, L.; Schiffrin, E.L.

    1987-04-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits the stimulation of aldosterone secretion by isolated adrenal glomerulosa cells produced by angiotensin II (ANG II), ACTH, and potassium. The effect of ANP on the dose-response curve of aldosterone stimulated by ANG II, ACTH, and potassium on isolated rat adrenal glomerulosa cells was studied. In the presence of ANP the maximal response of aldosterone output stimulated by ANG II or potassium decreased and the half-maximum (EC/sub 50/) of the response to ACTH was displaced to the right. Because these effects resemble those of calcium-channel blockers, the authors investigated the effect of different concentrations of nifedipine, a dihydropyridine calcium-channel blocker, on the dose-response curve of aldosterone stimulated by ANG II, ACTH, and potassium. Nifedipine produced effects similar to ANP. The maximal response of aldosterone stimulated by ANG II and potassium was decreased and the dose-response curve to ACTH was displaced to the right. ANP decreased the maximal response of aldosterone to the dihydropyridine derivative BAY K8644, a calcium-channel activator, without change in its EC/sub 50/. In contrast, nifedipine displaced the dose-response curve to BAY K8644 to the right as expected of a competitive inhibitor. The effect of ANP and nifedipine on basal and stimulated /sup 45/Ca influx into isolated rat adrenal glomerulosa cells was studied. ANP may act on the rat adrenal glomerulosa cells at least in part by interference with calcium entry.

  2. Left adrenal gland metastasis of breast invasive ductal carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    HE, TAO; LIU, JIAJU; LI, YIFAN; JIN, LU; SUN, SHUOLEI; NI, LIANGCHAO; MAO, XIANGMING; YANG, SHANGQI; LAI, YONGQING

    2016-01-01

    The majority of the metastatic lesions of the adrenal gland normally originate from lung cancer, colon malignant tumor, renal cell carcinoma and melanoma. However, adrenal gland metastasis that metastasize from breast invasive ductal carcinoma are extremely rare. The present study reported a rare case of left adrenal gland metastasis in a 35-year-old female who was diagnosed as breast carcinoma 5 years ago with a mass located on the left adrenal gland, which was detected during a routine examination. The patient was asymptomatic and adrenal gland computed tomography revealed a mass in the left adrenal gland. Definitive preoperative diagnosis failed to be established. Left adrenal gland laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed and the diagnosis of adrenal gland metastasis of breast invasive ductal carcinoma was confirmed by pathological and immunohistochemical examination. The patient remained in good condition by the time of writing. PMID:27123296

  3. Dentinogenic ghost cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Bafna, Sweety Sagarmal; Joy, Tabita; Tupkari, Jagdish Vishnu; Landge, Jayant Shivaji

    2016-01-01

    Dentinogenic ghost cell tumor (DGCT) is a rare, odontogenic neoplasm which is considered to be a solid variant of calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) with locally aggressive behavior. It accounts for only 2–14% of all COCs. To the best of our knowledge, only 88 cases of DGCT have been reported in the literature from 1968 to 2014. Herewith, we report a case of DGCT in a 68-year-old male patient with clinical presentation as a soft tissue growth over alveolar ridge and histopathologically characterized by ameloblastomatous epithelium, abundance of eosinophilic material and ghost cells. PMID:27194885

  4. Adrenal involvement in non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Williamson, B.R.J.

    1983-08-01

    Adrenal masses are described in seven cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a series of 173 patients. In all seven patients the lymphoma was diffuse rather than nodular. Three patients had adrenal masses at the time of presentation, whereas in four cases the adrenal gland was a site of tumor recurrence after therapy. Three patients had simultaneous bilateral adrenal involvement by tumor. No characteristic features were recognized that might have distinguished these tumors from other adrenal masses. Appropriate therapy successfully resolved the adrenal masses in all but one case. The latter patient was the only one with evidence of adrenal insufficiency.

  5. Expression of the human apolipoprotein E gene suppresses steroidogenesis in mouse Y1 adrenal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reyland, M.E.; Forgez, P.; Prack, M.M.; Williams, D.L. ); Gwynne, J.T. )

    1991-03-15

    The lipid transport protein, apolipoprotein E (apoE), is expressed in many peripheral tissues in vivo including the adrenal gland and testes. To investigate the role of apoE in adrenal cholesterol homeostasis, the authors have expressed a human apoE genomic clone in the Y1 mouse adrenocortical cell line. Y1 cells do not express endogenous apoE mRNA or protein. Expression of apoE in Y1 cells resulted in a dramatic decrease in basal steroidogenesis; secretion of fluorogenic steroid was reduced 7- to {gt}100-fold relative to Y1 parent cells. Addition of 5-cholesten-3{beta},25-idol failed to overcome the suppression of steroidogenesis in these cells. Cholesterol esterification under basal conditions, as measured by the production of cholesteryl ({sup 14}C)oleate, was similar in the Y1 parent and the apoE-transfected cell lines. Upon incubation with adrenocorticotropin or dibutyryl cAMP, production of cholesteryl ({sup 14}C)oleate decreased 5-fold in the Y1 parent cells but was unchanged in the apoE-transfected cell lines. These results suggest that apoE may be an important modulator of cholesterol utilization and steroidogenesis in adrenal cells.

  6. Prostate gland development and adrenal tumor in a female with congenital adrenal hyperplasia: a case report and review from radiology perspective.

    PubMed

    Fang, Benjamin; Cho, Francis; Lam, Wendy

    2013-12-01

    We describe a case of a female with simple virilizing congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) reared as a male diagnosed at the late age of 64. Computed Tomography (CT) demonstrated a large adrenal mass, bilateral diffuse adrenal enlargement, female pelvic organs as well as a clearly visualized prostate gland. This is to the best of our knowledge the first case of such a sizable prostate gland in a female CAH patient documented on CT. We review the literature regarding aspects where radiologists may encounter CAH and the finding of presence of a prostate gland in female CAH patients. PMID:24421935

  7. Synthesis of hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETE's) by adrenal glomerulosa cells and incorporation into cellular lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, W.B.; Richards, C.F.; Brady, M.T.; Falck, J.R.

    1986-03-05

    The role of lipoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) in the regulation of aldosterone secretion was studied in isolated rat adrenal glomerulosa cells. Cells were incubated with /sup 14/C-AA in the presence of angiotensin (AII). The media was extracted, metabolites isolated by HPLC, and structures of the metabolites determined by UV absorbance and mass spectrometry. The major products were 12- and 15-HETE with lesser amounts of 11- and 5-HETE. When adrenal cells were incubated with 15-, 12- or 5-HPETE or their respective HETE's (0.03-300nM), there was no significant change in basal or AII-stimulated aldosterone release. Cells were incubated with (/sup 3/H)-AA, -5-HETE, -15-HETE, -12-HETE or -LTB. The cellular lipids were extracted and analyzed by TLC. AA was incorporated into phospholipids (22%), cholesterol esters (50%) and triglycerides (21%). Neither the HETE's or LTB/sub 4/ were incorporated into phospholipids. 5-HETE was taken up into di- and mono-glycerides. The rates of incorporation of AA and 5-HETE were similar (+ 1/2 = 10 min). The incorporation of 5-HETE into glycerol esters did not modify the release of aldosterone by the cells. Thus, while adrenal cells synthesize HETE's, these eicosanoids do not appear to alter the synthesis of aldosterone.

  8. Asthma Pregnancy Alters Postnatal Development of Chromaffin Cells in the Rat Adrenal Medulla

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Zhao; Zou, Ye-Qiang; Zou, Jun-Tao; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Feng, Jun-Tao

    2011-01-01

    Background Adrenal neuroendocrine plays an important role in asthma. The activity of the sympathoadrenal system could be altered by early life events. The effects of maternal asthma during pregnancy on the adrenal medulla of offspring remain unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings This study aims to explore the influence of maternal asthma during pregnancy on the development and function of adrenal medulla in offspring from postnatal day 3 (P3) to postnatal day 60 (P60). Asthmatic pregnant rats (AP), nerve growth factor (NGF)-treated pregnant rats (NP) and NGF antibody-treated pregnant rats (ANP) were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA); NP and ANP were treated with NGF and NGF antibody respectively. Offspring rats from the maternal group were divided into four groups: offspring from control pregnant rats (OCP), offspring from AP (OAP), offspring from NP (ONP), and offspring from ANP (OANP). The expressions of phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) protein in adrenal medulla were analyzed. The concentrations of epinephrine (EPI), corticosterone and NGF in serum were measured. Adrenal medulla chromaffin cells (AMCC) were prone to differentiate into sympathetic nerve cells in OAP and ONP. Both EPI and PNMT were decreased in OAP from P3 to P14, and then reached normal level gradually from P30 to P60, which were lower from birth to adulthood in ONP. Corticosterone concentration increased significantly in OAP and ONP. Conclusion/Significance Asthma pregnancy may promote AMCC to differentiate into sympathetic neurons in offspring rats and inhibit the synthesis of EPI, resulting in dysfunction of bronchial relaxation. PMID:21647384

  9. Frequency of varicella zoster virus DNA in human adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Badani, Hussain; White, Teresa; Schulick, Nicole; Raeburn, Christopher D; Topkaya, Ibrahim; Gilden, Don; Nagel, Maria A

    2016-06-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) becomes latent in ganglionic neurons derived from neural crest cells. Because the adrenal gland also contains medullary chromaffin cells of neural crest origin, we examined human adrenal glands and medullary chromaffin cell tumors (pheochromocytomas) for VZV and herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). We found VZV, but not HSV-1, DNA in 4/63 (6 %) normal adrenal glands. No VZV transcripts or antigens were detected in the 4 VZV DNA-positive samples. No VZV or HSV-1 DNA was found in 21 pheochromocytomas. PMID:26843382

  10. Effect of angiotensin II, ATP, and ionophore A23187 on potassium efflux in adrenal glomerulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo, M.V.; Marusic, E.T.

    1986-02-01

    Angiotensin II stimulus on perifused bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells elicited an increase in 86Rb efflux from cells previously equilibrated with the radioisotope. When 45Ca fluxes were measured under similar conditions, it was observed that Ca and Rb effluxes occurred within the first 30 s of the addition of the hormone and were independent of the presence of external Ca. The 86Rb efflux due to angiotensin II was inhibited by quinine and apamin. The hypothesis that the angiotensin II response is a consequence of an increase in the K permeability of the glomerulosa cell membrane triggered by an increase in cytosolic Ca is supported by the finding that the divalent cation ionophore A23187 also initiated 86Rb or K loss (as measured by an external K electrode). This increased K conductance was also seen with 10(-4) M ATP. Quinine and apamin greatly reduced the effect of ATP or A23187 on 86Rb or K release in adrenal glomerulosa cells. The results suggest that Ca-dependent K channels or carriers are present in the membranes of bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells and are sensitive to hormonal stimulus.

  11. Tetrodotoxin-insensitive Na+ channel activator palytoxin inhibits tyrosine uptake into cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, K.; Teraoka, K.; Azuma, M.; Oka, M.; Hamano, S. )

    1991-07-01

    The effects of the tetrodotoxin-insensitive Na+ channel activator palytoxin on both the secretion of endogenous catecholamines and the formation of 14C-catecholamines from (14C)tyrosine were examined using cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Palytoxin was shown to cause the stimulation of catecholamine secretion in a concentration-dependent manner. However, this toxin caused the reduction rather than the stimulation of 14C-catecholamine formation at the same concentrations. Palytoxin failed to cause any alteration in the activity of tyrosine hydroxylase prepared from bovine adrenal medulla. Furthermore, the uptake of (14C)tyrosine into the cells was shown to be inhibited by this toxin under the conditions in which the suppression of 14C-catecholamine formation was observed, and this inhibitory action on tyrosine uptake was closely correlated with that on catecholamine formation. The inhibitory action of palytoxin on tyrosine uptake into the cells was observed to be noncompetitive, and this effect was not altered by the removal of Na+ from the incubation mixture. These results suggest that palytoxin may be able to inhibit the uptake of (14C)tyrosine into the cells, resulting in the suppression of 14C-catecholamine formation, probably through its direct action on the plasma membranes of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells.

  12. Partial MCM4 deficiency in patients with growth retardation, adrenal insufficiency, and natural killer cell deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gineau, Laure; Cognet, Céline; Kara, Nihan; Lach, Francis Peter; Dunne, Jean; Veturi, Uma; Picard, Capucine; Trouillet, Céline; Eidenschenk, Céline; Aoufouchi, Said; Alcaïs, Alexandre; Smith, Owen; Geissmann, Frédéric; Feighery, Conleth; Abel, Laurent; Smogorzewska, Agata; Stillman, Bruce; Vivier, Eric; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Jouanguy, Emmanuelle

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are circulating cytotoxic lymphocytes that exert potent and nonredundant antiviral activity and antitumoral activity in the mouse; however, their function in host defense in humans remains unclear. Here, we investigated 6 related patients with autosomal recessive growth retardation, adrenal insufficiency, and a selective NK cell deficiency characterized by a lack of the CD56dim NK subset. Using linkage analysis and fine mapping, we identified the disease-causing gene, MCM4, which encodes a component of the MCM2-7 helicase complex required for DNA replication. A splice-site mutation in the patients produced a frameshift, but the mutation was hypomorphic due to the creation of two new translation initiation methionine codons downstream of the premature termination codon. The patients’ fibroblasts exhibited genomic instability, which was rescued by expression of WT MCM4. These data indicate that the patients’ growth retardation and adrenal insufficiency likely reflect the ubiquitous but heterogeneous impact of the MCM4 mutation in various tissues. In addition, the specific loss of the NK CD56dim subset in patients was associated with a lower rate of NK CD56bright cell proliferation, and the maturation of NK CD56bright cells toward an NK CD56dim phenotype was tightly dependent on MCM4-dependent cell division. Thus, partial MCM4 deficiency results in a genetic syndrome of growth retardation with adrenal insufficiency and selective NK deficiency. PMID:22354167

  13. General Information about Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Islet Cell Tumors) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors) Go ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  14. Characterization of insulin-like growth factor I and insulin receptors on cultured bovine adrenal fasciculata cells. Role of these peptides on adrenal cell function

    SciTech Connect

    Penhoat, A.; Chatelain, P.G.; Jaillard, C.; Saez, J.M.

    1988-06-01

    We have characterized insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and insulin receptors in cultured bovine adrenal cells by binding and cross-linking affinity experiments. At equilibrium the dissociation constant and the number of binding sites per cell for IGF-I were 1.4 +/- (SE) 0.3 x 10(-9) M and 19,200 +/- 2,100, respectively. Under reduction conditions, disuccinimidyl suberate cross-linked (/sup 125/I)iodo-IGF-I to one receptor complex with an Mr of 125,000. Adrenal cells also contain specific insulin receptors with an apparent dissociation constant (Kd) of 10(-9) M. Under reduction conditions (/sup 125/I)iodo-insulin binds to one band with an approximate Mr of 125,000. IGF-I and insulin at micromolar concentrations, but not at nanomolar concentrations, slightly stimulated DNA synthesis, but markedly potentiated the mitogenic action of fibroblast growth factor. Adrenal cells cultured in a serum-free medium containing transferrin, ascorbic acid, and insulin (5 micrograms/ml) maintained fairly constant angiotensin-II (A-II) receptor concentration per cell and increased cAMP release on response to ACTH and their steroidogenic response to both ACTH and A-II. When the cells were cultured in the same medium without insulin, the number of A-II receptors significantly decreased to 65% and the increased responsiveness was blunted. Treatment of such cells for 3 days with increasing concentrations of IGF-I (1-100 ng/ml) produced a 2- to 3-fold increase in A-II receptors and enhanced the cAMP response (3- to 4-fold) to ACTH and the steroidogenic response (4- to 6-fold) to ACTH and A-II. These effects were time and dose dependent (ED50 approximately equal to 10(-9) M). Insulin at micromolar concentrations produced an effect similar to that of IGF-I, but at nanomolar concentrations the effect was far less.

  15. Pannexin 1 channels: new actors in the regulation of catecholamine release from adrenal chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Momboisse, Fanny; Olivares, María José; Báez-Matus, Ximena; Guerra, María José; Flores-Muñoz, Carolina; Sáez, Juan C.; Martínez, Agustín D.; Cárdenas, Ana M.

    2014-01-01

    Chromaffin cells of the adrenal gland medulla synthesize and store hormones and peptides, which are released into the blood circulation in response to stress. Among them, adrenaline is critical for the fight-or-flight response. This neurosecretory process is highly regulated and depends on cytosolic [Ca2+]. By forming channels at the plasma membrane, pannexin-1 (Panx1) is a protein involved in many physiological and pathological processes amplifying ATP release and/or Ca2+ signals. Here, we show that Panx1 is expressed in the adrenal gland where it plays a role by regulating the release of catecholamines. In fact, inhibitors of Panx1 channels, such as carbenoxolone (Cbx) and probenecid, reduced the secretory activity induced with the nicotinic agonist 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenyl-piperazinium (DMPP, 50 μM) in whole adrenal glands. A similar inhibitory effect was observed in single chromaffin cells using Cbx or 10Panx1 peptide, another Panx1 channel inhibitors. Given that the secretory response depends on cytosolic [Ca2+] and Panx1 channels are permeable to Ca2+, we studied the possible implication of Panx1 channels in the Ca2+ signaling occurring during the secretory process. In support of this possibility, Panx1 channel inhibitors significantly reduced the Ca2+ signals evoked by DMPP in single chromaffin cells. However, the Ca2+ signals induced by caffeine in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ was not affected by Panx1 channel inhibitors, suggesting that this mechanism does not involve Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Conversely, Panx1 inhibitors significantly blocked the DMPP-induce dye uptake, supporting the idea that Panx1 forms functional channels at the plasma membrane. These findings indicate that Panx1 channels participate in the control the Ca2+ signal that triggers the secretory response of adrenal chromaffin cells. This mechanism could have physiological implications during the response to stress. PMID:25237296

  16. The innervation of the adrenal gland. IV. Innervation of the rat adrenal medulla from birth to old age. A descriptive and quantitative morphometric and biochemical study of the innervation of chromaffin cells and adrenal medullary neurons in Wistar rats.

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, A; Coupland, R E

    1990-01-01

    The innervation of the adrenal medulla has been investigated in normal Wistar rats from birth to old age and ultrastructural findings compared with biochemical markers of the cholinergic innervation of the adrenal gland and catecholamine storage. Morphological evidence of the immaturity of the innervation during the first postnatal week is provided and using quantitative morphometry the innervation of chromaffin cells is shown to reach a mean total of 5.4 synapses per chromaffin cell during the period 26 days to 12 weeks of age. The variation in contents of synaptic profiles is discussed in the light of recent work that demonstrates a major sensory as well as visceral efferent innervation of the gland. Adrenal medullary neurons usually occur in closely packed groups, intimately associated with Schwann cells. Axodendritic and axosomatic synapses on these neurons are described and the likely origin of axonal processes innervating the neurons discussed. In old age the density of innervation remains the same as in young adult animals even though the medulla shows evidence of hyperplasia and hypertrophy of individual chromaffin cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 Fig. 20 Fig. 21 Fig. 22 Fig. 23 Fig. 24 Fig. 25 PMID:2384334

  17. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of CART-containing cells in adrenal glands of male rats with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kasacka, I; Piotrowska, Ż; Knaś, M; Lewandowska, A

    2014-10-01

    Adrenal activity is stimulated and secretion of stress hormones is increased during advanced stages of renovascular hypertension. The literature suggests that the neuropeptide, cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART), might regulate adrenal secretory function and thus could influence its activity. We assessed potential quantitative and qualitative changes in the cells that contained CART in the adrenal glands of rats with renovascular hypertension. The renal arteries of ten rats were subjected to a clipping procedure, i.e., two-kidney one-clip (2K1C) model of arterial hypertension, and after 6 weeks each rat developed stable hypertension. CART was localized using immunohistochemistry. CART was detected in a large population of cells in the medulla, sparse nerve fibers in the cortex and the capsule of the adrenal gland. The population of CART-positive cells in adrenal glands of two kidney-one clip (2K1C) treated rats was greater and their immunoreactivity was increased compared to controls. Similarly, the length, width, area and diameter of CART-immunoreactive cells were significantly greater in the hypertensive rats than in controls. We demonstrated that renovascular hypertension alters the number and immunoreactivity of CART-containing cells in adrenal glands. PMID:25151991

  18. Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas has created an accompanying need for methods to determine if the tumor will be responsive to the intended therapy and to monitor its effectiveness. Ideally, these methods would be noninvasive and provide quantitative real-time analysis of tumor activity in a variety of carcinomas. Assessment of circulating tumor cells shed into the blood during metastasis may satisfy this need. Here we review the CellSearch technology used for the detection of circulating tumor cells and discuss potential future directions for improvements. PMID:25133014

  19. Stimulatory actions of bioflavenoids on tyrosine uptake into cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, K.; Hamano, S.; Oka, M.; Teraoka, K. )

    1990-09-28

    The effects of flavenoids on L-({sup 14}C)tyrosine uptake into cultured adrenal chromaffin cells were examined. Flavone markedly stimulated tyrosine uptake into these cells in a manner dependent on its concentration. Apigenin also caused a moderate stimulatory action, but quercetin had no significant effect on the uptake. Flavone also stimulated the uptake of histidine, but did not affect the uptake of serine, lysine, or glutamic acid. These results are considered to propose the possibility that flavonoids may be able to stimulate the precursor uptake into the cells, resulting in an enhancement of the biogenic amine production.

  20. Deformability of Tumor Cells versus Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Shaw Bagnall, Josephine; Byun, Sangwon; Begum, Shahinoor; Miyamoto, David T; Hecht, Vivian C; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon L; Toner, Mehmet; Hynes, Richard O; Manalis, Scott R

    2015-01-01

    The potential for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to elucidate the process of cancer metastasis and inform clinical decision-making has made their isolation of great importance. However, CTCs are rare in the blood, and universal properties with which to identify them remain elusive. As technological advancements have made single-cell deformability measurements increasingly routine, the assessment of physical distinctions between tumor cells and blood cells may provide insight into the feasibility of deformability-based methods for identifying CTCs in patient blood. To this end, we present an initial study assessing deformability differences between tumor cells and blood cells, indicated by the length of time required for them to pass through a microfluidic constriction. Here, we demonstrate that deformability changes in tumor cells that have undergone phenotypic shifts are small compared to differences between tumor cell lines and blood cells. Additionally, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model, cells that are able to exit a tumor and enter circulation are not required to be more deformable than the cells that were first injected into the mouse. However, a limited study of metastatic prostate cancer patients provides evidence that some CTCs may be more mechanically similar to blood cells than to typical tumor cell lines. PMID:26679988

  1. Deformability of Tumor Cells versus Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shaw Bagnall, Josephine; Byun, Sangwon; Begum, Shahinoor; Miyamoto, David T.; Hecht, Vivian C.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon L.; Toner, Mehmet; Hynes, Richard O.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    The potential for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to elucidate the process of cancer metastasis and inform clinical decision-making has made their isolation of great importance. However, CTCs are rare in the blood, and universal properties with which to identify them remain elusive. As technological advancements have made single-cell deformability measurements increasingly routine, the assessment of physical distinctions between tumor cells and blood cells may provide insight into the feasibility of deformability-based methods for identifying CTCs in patient blood. To this end, we present an initial study assessing deformability differences between tumor cells and blood cells, indicated by the length of time required for them to pass through a microfluidic constriction. Here, we demonstrate that deformability changes in tumor cells that have undergone phenotypic shifts are small compared to differences between tumor cell lines and blood cells. Additionally, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model, cells that are able to exit a tumor and enter circulation are not required to be more deformable than the cells that were first injected into the mouse. However, a limited study of metastatic prostate cancer patients provides evidence that some CTCs may be more mechanically similar to blood cells than to typical tumor cell lines. PMID:26679988

  2. Primary malignant lymphoma combined with clinically "silent" pheochromocytoma in the same adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Babinska, Anna; Peksa, Rafał; Sworczak, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    An increased number of adrenal tumors are now diagnosed due to the increased number of abdominal CT scans being performed. We present the first case of malignant lymphoma combined with clinically "silent" pheochromocytoma in the same adrenal gland. An abdominal CT scan demonstrates unilateral adrenal lesion which suggests pheochromocytoma or adrenal carcinoma. Laboratory examinations revealed a slight increase of 24-h urine vanillylmandelic acid and 24-h urinary methanephrine excretion. Histological examination revealed two intermingled tumor cell proliferations-diffuse B cell lymphoma and pheochromocytoma.Unexpected coexistence of catecholamine-producing tumor with the other adrenal lesion can lead to serious complications of diagnosis and treatment. The adequate preparation for surgery can protect patient from threatening catecholamine crisis. PMID:26419235

  3. Synthetic High-Density Lipoprotein (sHDL) Inhibits Steroid Production in HAC15 Adrenal Cells.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Matthew J; Sanjanwala, Aalok R; Morin, Emily E; Rowland-Fisher, Elizabeth; Anderson, Kyle; Schwendeman, Anna; Rainey, William E

    2016-08-01

    High density lipoprotein (HDL) transported cholesterol represents one of the sources of substrate for adrenal steroid production. Synthetic HDL (sHDL) particles represent a new therapeutic option to reduce atherosclerotic plaque burden by increasing cholesterol efflux from macrophage cells. The effects of the sHDL particles on steroidogenic cells have not been explored. sHDL, specifically ETC-642, was studied in HAC15 adrenocortical cells. Cells were treated with sHDL, forskolin, 22R-hydroxycholesterol, or pregnenolone. Experiments included time and concentration response curves, followed by steroid assay. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to study mRNA of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, lanosterol 14-α-methylase, cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme, and steroid acute regulatory protein. Cholesterol assay was performed using cell culture media and cell lipid extracts from a dose response experiment. sHDL significantly inhibited production of cortisol. Inhibition occurred in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and in a concentration range of 3μM-50μM. Forskolin (10μM) stimulated cortisol production was also inhibited. Incubation with 22R-hydroxycholesterol (10μM) and pregnenolone (10μM) increased cortisol production, which was unaffected by sHDL treatment. sHDL increased transcript levels for the rate-limiting cholesterol biosynthetic enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase. Extracellular cholesterol assayed in culture media showed a positive correlation with increasing concentration of sHDL, whereas intracellular cholesterol decreased after treatment with sHDL. The current study suggests that sHDL inhibits HAC15 adrenal cell steroid production by efflux of cholesterol, leading to an overall decrease in steroid production and an adaptive rise in adrenal cholesterol biosynthesis. PMID:27253994

  4. Interaction of urokinase with specific receptors stimulates mobilization of bovine adrenal capillary endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fibbi, G.; Ziche, M.; Morbidelli, L. ); Magnelli, L.; Del Rosso, M. )

    1988-12-01

    On the basis of {sup 125}I-labeled plasminogen activator binding analysis the authors have found that bovine adrenal capillary endothelial cells have specific receptors for human urinary-type plasminogen activator on the cell membrane. Each cell exposes about 37,000 free receptors with a K{sub d} of 0.8958{times}10{sup {minus}12} M. A monoclonal antibody against the 17,500 proteolytic fragment of the A chain of the plasminogen activator, not containing the catalytic site of the enzyme, impaired the specific binding, thus suggesting the involvement of a sequence present on the A chain in the interaction with the receptor, as previously shown in other cell model systems. Both the native molecule and the A chain are able to stimulate endothelial cell motility in the Boyden chamber, when used at nanomolar concentrations. The use of the same monoclonal antibody that can inhibit ligand-receptor interaction can impair the plasminogen activator and A-chain-induced endothelial cell motility, suggesting that under the conditions used in this in vitro model system, the motility of bovine adrenal capillary endothelial cells depends on the specific interaction of the ligand with free receptors on the surface of endothelial cells.

  5. A Rare Cavernous Hemangioma of the Adrenal Gland

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Cheng; Wu, Pengjie; Zhu, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal cavernous hemangiomas are rare nonfunctioning benign tumors. This case report presents a patient with a huge nonfunctioning adrenal cavernous hemangioma presenting as an adrenal incidentaloma suspicious for adrenal myelolipoma. Although adrenal cavernous hemangiomas are rare, they should be considered as a part of the differential diagnosis of adrenal neoplasms. The proper treatment is surgical excision due the risk of spontaneous tumor rupture and the difficulty of ruling out malignancy. PMID:26793524

  6. How does cAMP/protein kinase A signaling lead to tumors in the adrenal cortex and other tissues?

    PubMed

    Almeida, Madson Q; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2011-04-10

    The overwhelming majority of benign lesions of the adrenal cortex leading to Cushing syndrome are linked to one or another abnormality of the cAMP signaling pathway. A small number of both massive macronodular adrenocortical disease and cortisol-producing adenomas harbor somatic GNAS mutations. Micronodular adrenocortical hyperplasias are either pigmented (the classic form being that of primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease) or non-pigmented; micronodular adrenocortical hyperplasias can be seen in the context of other conditions or isolated; for example, primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease usually occurs in the context of Carney complex, but isolated primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease has also been described. Both Carney complex and isolated primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease are caused by germline PRKAR1A mutations; somatic mutations of this gene that regulates cAMP-dependent protein kinase are also found in cortisol-producing adenomas, and abnormalities of PKA are present in most cases of massive macronodular adrenocortical disease. Micronodular adrenocortical hyperplasias and some cortisol-producing adenomas are associated with phosphodiesterase 11A and 8B defects, coded, respectively, by the PDE11A and PDE8B genes. Mouse models of Prkar1a deficiency also show that increased cAMP signaling leads to tumors in adrenal cortex and other tissues. In this review, we summarize all recent data from ours and other laboratories, supporting the view that Wnt-signaling acts as an important mediator of tumorigenicity induced by abnormal PRKAR1A function and aberrant cAMP signaling. PMID:21111774

  7. Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-10

    Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Somatostatinoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoid Tumor; VIP-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Well Differentiated Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

  8. Mobile and immobile calcium buffers in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Z; Neher, E

    1993-01-01

    1. The calcium binding capacity (kappa S) of bovine chromaffin cells preloaded with fura-2 was measured during nystatin-perforated-patch recordings. 2. Subsequently, the perforated patch was ruptured to obtain a whole-cell recording situation, and the time course of kappa S was monitored during periods of up to one hour. 3. No rapid change (within 10-20 s) of kappa S was observed upon transition to whole-cell recording, as would be expected, if highly mobile organic anions contributed significantly to calcium buffering. However, approximately half of the cells investigated displayed a drop in kappa S within 2-5 min, indicative of the loss of soluble Ca2+ binding proteins in the range of 7-20 kDa. 4. The average Ca2+ binding capacity (differential ratio of bound calcium over free calcium) was 9 +/- 7 (mean +/- S.E.M.) for the poorly mobile component and 31 +/- 10 for the fixed component. It was concluded that a contribution of 7 from highly mobile buffer would have been detected, if present. Thus, this value can be considered as an upper bound to highly mobile Ca2+ buffer. 5. Both mobile and fixed calcium binding capacity appeared to have relatively low Ca2+ affinity, since kappa S did not change in the range of Ca2+ concentrations between 0.1 and 3 microM. 6. It was found that cellular autofluorescence and contributions to fluorescence of non-hydrolysed or compartmentalized dye contribute a serious error in estimation of kappa S. 'Balanced loading', a degree of fura-2 loading such that the calcium binding capacity of fura-2 equals cellular calcium binding capacity, minimizes these errors. Also, changes in kappa S at the transition from perforated-patch to whole-cell recording can be most faithfully recorded for similar degrees of loading in both situations. 7. Nystatin was found unable to make pores from inside of the plasma membrane of chromaffin cells. With careful preparation and storage the diluted nystatin solution maintained its high activity of membrane

  9. Identification, characterization, and regulation of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor on bovine adrenal chromaffin cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    Synaptic input to bovine adrenal chromaffin cells is mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and results in secretion of catecholamines. Three probes previously shown to recognize AChRs on neurons were used to identify the AChR on bovine adrenal chromaffin cells in culture: monoclonal antibody mAb 35, a toxin that blocks receptor function, and the agonist nicotine. Competition for {sup 3}H-nicotine binding was used to measure the affinity of cholinergic ligands, and revealed the pharmacological profile expected for a neuronal-type AChR. At steady state the rate both of receptor insertion into and loss from the plasma membrane is about 3%/hour, resulting in a half-life in the surface of about 24 hours. Exposure to the anti-AChR antibody results in a loss of AChRs from the surface of the cells through a process that has the characteristics of antigenic modulation. The number of AChRs on the surface of the chromaffin cells can also be modulated by agonists and hormones, including glucocotricoids. Catecholamines, three peptides that may be secreted by chromaffin cells, and K{sup +}-induced secretion reduce agonist-induced catecholamine release by decreasing the number of AChRs, providing a mechanism for autoregulation.

  10. Enucleation-induced rat adrenal gland regeneration: expression profile of selected genes involved in control of adrenocortical cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Tyczewska, Marianna; Rucinski, Marcin; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Szyszka, Marta; Trejter, Marcin; Hochol-Molenda, Anna; Nowak, Krzysztof W; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2014-01-01

    Enucleation-induced adrenal regeneration is a highly controlled process; however, only some elements involved in this process have been recognized. Therefore, we performed studies on regenerating rat adrenals. Microarray RNA analysis and QPCR revealed that enucleation resulted in a rapid elevation of expression of genes involved in response to wounding, defense response, and in immunological processes. Factors encoded by these genes obscure possible priming effects of various cytokines on initiation of regeneration. In regenerating adrenals we identified over 100 up- or downregulated genes involved in adrenocortical cell proliferation. The changes were most significant at days 2-3 after enucleation and their number decreased during regeneration. For example, expression analysis revealed a notable upregulation of the growth arrest gene, Gadd45, only 24 hours after surgery while expression of cyclin B1 and Cdk1 genes was notably elevated between days 1-8 of regeneration. These changes were accompanied by changes in expression levels of numerous growth factors and immediate-early transcription factors genes. Despite notable differences in mechanisms of adrenal and liver regeneration, in regenerating adrenals we identified genes, the expression of which is well recognized in regenerating liver. Thus, it seems legitimate to suggest that, in the rat, the general model of liver and adrenal regeneration demonstrate some degree of similarity. PMID:25431590

  11. Enucleation-Induced Rat Adrenal Gland Regeneration: Expression Profile of Selected Genes Involved in Control of Adrenocortical Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Tyczewska, Marianna; Rucinski, Marcin; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Szyszka, Marta; Trejter, Marcin; Hochol-Molenda, Anna; Nowak, Krzysztof W.; Malendowicz, Ludwik K.

    2014-01-01

    Enucleation-induced adrenal regeneration is a highly controlled process; however, only some elements involved in this process have been recognized. Therefore, we performed studies on regenerating rat adrenals. Microarray RNA analysis and QPCR revealed that enucleation resulted in a rapid elevation of expression of genes involved in response to wounding, defense response, and in immunological processes. Factors encoded by these genes obscure possible priming effects of various cytokines on initiation of regeneration. In regenerating adrenals we identified over 100 up- or downregulated genes involved in adrenocortical cell proliferation. The changes were most significant at days 2-3 after enucleation and their number decreased during regeneration. For example, expression analysis revealed a notable upregulation of the growth arrest gene, Gadd45, only 24 hours after surgery while expression of cyclin B1 and Cdk1 genes was notably elevated between days 1–8 of regeneration. These changes were accompanied by changes in expression levels of numerous growth factors and immediate-early transcription factors genes. Despite notable differences in mechanisms of adrenal and liver regeneration, in regenerating adrenals we identified genes, the expression of which is well recognized in regenerating liver. Thus, it seems legitimate to suggest that, in the rat, the general model of liver and adrenal regeneration demonstrate some degree of similarity. PMID:25431590

  12. Muscarinic receptor-mediated inositol tetrakisphosphate response in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sanborn, B.B.; Schneider, A.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Inositol trisphosphate (IP{sub 3}), a product of the phosphoinositide cycle, mobilizes intracellular Ca{sup 2+} in many cell types. New evidence suggests that inositol tetrakisphosphate (IP{sub 4}), an IP{sub 3} derivative, may act as another second messenger to further alter calcium homeostasis. However, the function and mechanism of action of IP{sub 4} are presently unresolved. We now report evidence of muscarinic receptor-mediated accumulation of IP{sub 4} in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells, a classic neurosecretory system in which calcium movements have been well studied. Muscarine stimulated an increase in ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 4} and ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 3} accumulation in chromaffin cells and this effect was completely blocked by atropine. ({sup 3}H)IP{sub 4} accumulation was detectable within 15 sec, increased to a maximum by 30 sec and thereafter declined. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, an inhibitor of IP{sub 3} and IP{sub 4} hydrolysis, enhanced accumulation of these inositol polyphosphates. The results provide the first evidence of a rapid inositol tetrakisphosphate response in adrenal chromaffin cells, which should facilitate the future resolution of the relationship between IP{sub 4} and calcium homeostasis.

  13. Impaired maturation of large dense-core vesicles in muted-deficient adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Hao, Zhenhua; Wei, Lisi; Feng, Yaqin; Chen, Xiaowei; Du, Wen; Ma, Jing; Zhou, Zhuan; Chen, Liangyi; Li, Wei

    2015-04-01

    The large dense-core vesicle (LDCV), a type of lysosome-related organelle, is involved in the secretion of hormones and neuropeptides in specialized secretory cells. The granin family is a driving force in LDCV biogenesis, but the machinery for granin sorting to this biogenesis pathway is largely unknown. The mu mutant mouse, which carries a spontaneous null mutation on the Muted gene (also known as Bloc1s5), which encodes a subunit of the biogenesis of lysosome-related organelles complex-1 (BLOC-1), is a mouse model of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome. Here, we found that LDCVs were enlarged in mu adrenal chromaffin cells. Chromogranin A (CgA, also known as CHGA) was increased in mu adrenals and muted-knockdown cells. The increased CgA in mu mice was likely due a failure to export this molecule out of immature LDCVs, which impairs LDCV maturation and docking. In mu chromaffin cells, the size of readily releasable pool and the vesicle release frequency were reduced. Our studies suggest that the muted protein is involved in the selective export of CgA during the biogenesis of LDCVs. PMID:25673877

  14. Identification and characterization of an angiotensin II receptor on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, V.L.

    1987-01-01

    The presence of an angiotensin II receptor on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was demonstrated by radioligand binding. A single class of finding sites with a K/sub D/ of 0.7 nM was characterized. The use of radioligands also allows the localization of receptors by autoradiography. Autoradiography demonstrated that approximately 50% of the isolated cells bound angiotensin II. It was of interest to see if angiotensin II bound to a cell that possessed a certain phenotype. In order to evaluate this possibility a technique was developed that combined autoradiography and immunocytochemistry. Results indicated that angiotensin II binding sites were not localized preferentially to either norepinephrine or epinephrine cells. Binding of angiotensin II was associated with the release of intracellular catecholamine stores. Cells were pre-loaded with /sup 3/H-norepinephrine and secretion was monitored by following radioactivity released into the supernatant. Alternatively, release of endogenous catecholamines was determined by fluorometric assay.

  15. Tumor angiogenesis--characteristics of tumor endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hida, Kyoko; Maishi, Nako; Torii, Chisaho; Hida, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Tumor blood vessels provide nutrition and oxygen to the tumor, resulting in tumor progression. They also act as gatekeepers, inducing tumor metastasis. Thus, targeting tumor blood vessels is an important strategy in cancer therapy. Tumor endothelial cells (TECs), which line the inner layer of blood vessels of the tumor stromal tissue, are the main targets of anti-angiogenic therapy. Because new tumor blood vessels generally sprout from pre-existing vasculature, they have been considered to be the same as normal blood vessels. However, tumor blood vessels demonstrate a markedly abnormal phenotype that includes several important morphological changes. The degree of angiogenesis is determined by the balance between the angiogenic stimulators and inhibitors released by the tumor and host cells. Recent studies have revealed that TECs also exhibit altered characteristics which depend on the tumor microenvironment. Here, we review recent studies on TEC abnormalities and heterogeneity with respect to tumor progression and consider their therapeutic implications. PMID:26879652

  16. [Ovarian germ cell tumors in girls].

    PubMed

    Nechushkina, I V; Karseladze, A I

    2015-01-01

    Morphological structure of tumor influences on the clinical course of the disease in children with germ cell tumors. Patients with ovarian dysgerminoma at the time of diagnosis are significantly older than patients with immature teratoma and yolk sac tumor. Immature teratoma and mixed germ cell tumors are significantly larger compared to other germ cell tumors. Yolk sac tumor and embryonal carcinoma are the most common cause of emergency surgical interventions and are accompanied by rupture of tumor capsule. PMID:26087605

  17. Adrenal glands

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002219.htm Adrenal glands To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The adrenal glands are two triangle-shaped glands. One gland is ...

  18. Combined steroidogenic characters of fetal adrenal and Leydig cells in childhood adrenocortical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Yasuko; Sakaguchi, Kimiyoshi; Ono, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Rie; Kato, Fumiko; Kagami, Masayo; Fukami, Maki; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2016-05-01

    Although childhood adrenocortical carcinomas (c-ACCs) with a TP53 mutation are known to produce androgens, detailed steroidogenic characters have not been clarified. Here, we examined steroid metabolite profiles and expression patterns of steroidogenic genes in a c-ACC removed from the left adrenal position of a 2-year-old Brazilian boy with precocious puberty, using an atrophic left adrenal gland removed at the time of tumorectomy as a control. The c-ACC produced not only abundant dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate but also a large amount of testosterone via the Δ5 pathway with Δ5-androstenediol rather than Δ4-androstenedione as the primary intermediate metabolite. Furthermore, the c-ACC was associated with elevated expressions of CYP11A1, CYP17A1, POR, HSD17B3, and SULT2A1, a low but similar expression of CYB5A, and reduced expressions of AKR1C3 (HSD17B5) and HSD3B2. Notably, a Leydig cell marker INSL3 was expressed at a low but detectable level in the c-ACC. Furthermore, molecular studies revealed a maternally inherited heterozygous germline TP53 mutation, and several post-zygotic genetic aberrations in the c-ACC including loss of paternally derived chromosome 17 with a wildtype TP53 and loss of maternally inherited chromosome 11 and resultant marked hyperexpression of paternally expressed growth promoting gene IGF2 and drastic hypoexpression of maternally expressed growth suppressing gene CDKN1C. These results imply the presence of combined steroidogenic properties of fetal adrenal and Leydig cells in this patient's c-ACC with a germline TP53 mutation and several postzygotic carcinogenic events. PMID:26940356

  19. Primary extra-renal clear cell renal cell carcinoma masquerading as an adrenal mass: A diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Roumina; Kumar, Sandeep; Monappa, Vidya; Ayachit, Anurag

    2015-01-01

    We present the first case of a nonmetastasizing renal cell carcinoma (RCC) masquerading as an adrenal mass, in the presence of normal bilateral native kidneys, in a young adult. The possibility of this mass developing in a supernumerary kidney was ruled out, since no identifiable renal tissue, pelvis or ureters was seen within the mass, nor was any separate systemic arterial supply to the mass seen. The diagnosis of extra-renal clear cell RCC was based on cyto-morphological features, further confirmed by immunohistochemistry findings. The origin of this extra-renal clear cell renal cell is proposed to be from the mesodermal embryonic rests. PMID:26692677

  20. Anesthetic Considerations on Adrenal Gland Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Domi, Rudin; Sula, Hektor; Kaci, Myzafer; Paparisto, Sokol; Bodeci, Artan; Xhemali, Astrit

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal gland surgery needs a multidisciplinary team including endocrinologist, radiologist, anesthesiologist, and surgeon. The indications for adrenal gland surgery include hormonal secreting and non-hormonal secreting tumors. Adrenal hormonal secreting tumors present to the anesthesiologist unique challenges requiring good preoperative evaluation, perioperative hemodynamic control, corrections of all electrolytes and metabolic abnormalities, a detailed and careful anesthetic strategy, overall knowledge about the specific diseases, control and maintaining of postoperative adrenal function, and finally a good collaboration with other involved colleagues. This review will focus on the endocrine issues, as well as on the above-mentioned aspects of anesthetic management during hormone secreting adrenal gland tumor resection. PMID:25368694

  1. Symptomatic Ovarian Steroid Cell Tumor not Otherwise Specified in a Post-Menopausal Woman.

    PubMed

    Sood, Neha; Desai, Kaniksha; Chindris, Ana-Maria; Lewis, Jason; Dinh, Tri A

    2016-06-28

    Steroid cell tumor not otherwise specified (NOS) is a rare subtype of sex cord stromal tumor of the ovary and contributes less than 0.1% of all ovarian neoplasms. The majority of tumors occur in pre-menopausal women (mean age: 43 years), in which 56-77% of patients present with virilization due to excess testosterone. An 80-year-old woman with worsening alopecia and excessive growth of coarse hair on abdomen and genital area was found to have elevated serum testosterone level (462 ng/mL). Radiologic studies were consistent with bilateral adrenal adenomas. Bilateral adrenal venous sampling ruled out the adrenal gland as origin of hormone secretion. A diagnostic and therapeutic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy confirmed steroid cell tumor NOS of the left ovary. Post-operatively, the patient had complete resolution of her symptoms and normalization of testosterone level. Our case emphasizes the importance of a clinical suspicion for an occult testosterone secreting ovarian tumor in a symptomatic patient without obvious ovarian mass on imaging. PMID:27441075

  2. Symptomatic Ovarian Steroid Cell Tumor not Otherwise Specified in a Post-Menopausal Woman

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Neha; Desai, Kaniksha; Chindris, Ana-Maria; Lewis, Jason; Dinh, Tri A.

    2016-01-01

    Steroid cell tumor not otherwise specified (NOS) is a rare subtype of sex cord stromal tumor of the ovary and contributes less than 0.1% of all ovarian neoplasms. The majority of tumors occur in pre-menopausal women (mean age: 43 years), in which 56-77% of patients present with virilization due to excess testosterone. An 80-year-old woman with worsening alopecia and excessive growth of coarse hair on abdomen and genital area was found to have elevated serum testosterone level (462 ng/mL). Radiologic studies were consistent with bilateral adrenal adenomas. Bilateral adrenal venous sampling ruled out the adrenal gland as origin of hormone secretion. A diagnostic and therapeutic bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy confirmed steroid cell tumor NOS of the left ovary. Post-operatively, the patient had complete resolution of her symptoms and normalization of testosterone level. Our case emphasizes the importance of a clinical suspicion for an occult testosterone secreting ovarian tumor in a symptomatic patient without obvious ovarian mass on imaging. PMID:27441075

  3. Stimulation of secretion from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells by microsecond bursts of therapeutic levels of ultrasound.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, I M; Kinnick, R R; Greenleaf, J F; Fernandez, J M

    1996-01-01

    1. In this study the secretory response of individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was monitored using amperometric carbon-fibre microelectrodes. Cells were stimulated to secrete by exposure to 20-100 microseconds long tonebursts of ultrasound (2-4 x 10(5) Pa; peak pressure at 1 MHz). 2. Three types of secretory responses were observed: an almost instantaneous response, a delayed release of catecholamines, or a series of 'burst-like' secretory bouts. 3. Fura-2 measurements of intracellular Ca2+ concentrations showed that the release of catecholamines was accompanied by an increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, secretory responses were not evoked showing that Ca2+ entry was necessary to elicit catecholamine release. Images Figure 1 PMID:8730600

  4. Selective accumulation of meso-tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin in steroid-synthesizing cells of the rat adrenal gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo-Benkmann, Mario; Muhm, Markus; Gahlen, Johannes; Vry, Magnus-Sebastian; Deubzer, Hedwig; Holloschi, Andreas; Haffner, Matthias; Heym, Christine; Senninger, Norbert

    1998-04-01

    Rat adrenal glands fluoresce intensely after systemic application of meso-tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (mTHPC). We investigated which parts of the adrenal gland accumulate mTHPC. Furthermore we examined the time course of adrenal mTHPC-accumulation. Ten male Wistar rats each were given 0.5 or 0.7 mg mTHPC kg-1 iv. Each two animals were perfused with normal saline and Zamboni fixative 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours after photosensitization. Untreated animals served as controls. Fluorescence was quantified on 20 micrometer frozen sections with CCD-camera and appropriate software. Immunohistochemistry identified specific cell types with antibodies to steroid-synthesizing enzymes. The cortex exhibited an intense fluorescence, with weaker fluorescence of corticocytes in the zona glomerulosa compared to the other zones. Besides intensely fluorescing singly lying scattered cells, the medulla showed a faint mTHPC-induced fluorescence. Immunohistochemistry revealed that intramedullary cells with intense fluorescence were corticocytes, showing a positive reaction to the 21-(beta) -hydroxylase antibody. Peak accumulation of mTHPC was always observed after 24 hours. Our results indicate for the first time that only steroid synthesizing cells of the adrenal gland exhibit an intense photosensitizer-induced fluorescence. Thus mTHPC-application is an uncomplicated method to identify steroid-synthesizing cells, possibly also in other organs.

  5. Secretion of Catecholamines from Adrenal Gland by a Single Electrical Shock: Electrotonic Depolarization of Medullary Cell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakade, Arun R.; Wakade, Taruna D.

    1982-05-01

    Transmural stimulation of the isolated adrenal gland of the rat and guinea pig results in secretion of catecholamines. The secretion is due to activation of cholinergic receptors of the adrenal medulla by acetylcholine released from splanchnic nerve terminals after transmural stimulation. Our aim was to see whether the same experimental technique could be used to directly excite the adrenal medullary cell membrane by electrical stimulation and whether such stimulation would result in secretion of catecholamines. We demonstrate here that a single electrical shock to the perfused adrenal gland of the rat results in massive secretion of epinephrine and norepinephrine. The secretion is directly related to the strength and duration of the applied stimulus over a wide range. Catecholamine secretion is unaffected by tetrodotoxin or hexamethonium/atropine but is abolished by Ca2+ lack or 3 mM Mn2+. We suggest that the adrenal medullary membrane undergoes nonpropagated electrotonic depolarization on electrical stimulation and thereby voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels are opened to initiate secretion.

  6. Calcifying fibrous pseudotumor of the adrenal gland: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Zhu, Pingyu; Duan, Xi; Yang, Xuesong; Lu, Dongliang

    2016-01-01

    Calcifying fibrous pseudotumor (CFP) is a rare benign soft tissue lesion. We herein present an extremely rare case of CFP of the adrenal gland. A 32-year-old male patient presented to our hospital with a tumor-like lesion in the area of the left adrenal gland detected by ultrasound during a routine check-up several days prior. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging examination revealed a solitary, well-circumscribed mass, in close proximity to the medial arterial branch of the left adrenal gland. Histological examination revealed that the tumor consisted of sheets of varying amount of inflammatory cell infiltration; interstitial fibrosis and psammomatous calcifications were also observed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the third case of CFP occurring in the adrenal gland in the published literature. We herein report the findings of this case and review the two previously reported cases of CFP of the adrenal gland with valuable information.

  7. CD44 expression in normal adrenal tissue and adrenal tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Barshack, I; Goldberg, I; Nass, D; Olchovsky, D; Kopolovic, J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CD44 is a cell surface glycoprotein found on many normal cells, mainly lymphoid and epithelial. Normal cells usually express standard CD44 (CD44-S), whereas malignant tumours may express CD44 variant isoforms (CD44-V). CD44 expression has been described for neural crest derivatives. Characterisation of differences in CD44 expression may help in the diagnosis and differentiation of distinct adrenal tumours. AIMS: To examine CD44 expression in different layers of cortical cortex, in adrenal medulla, and in adrenal tumours. METHODS: CD44-S and CD44-V6 expression were studied in 12 cases of adrenal cortical adenoma, 3 of adrenal cortical carcinoma, 10 of pheochromocytoma, and 4 normal adrenal glands. RESULTS: CD44-V6 staining showed cytoplasmic expression in normal adrenal cortex and in cortical adenomas and carcinomas. Pheochromocytomas also showed CD44-V6 expression but in 5 of the 10 cases it was sparse, focal, and sometimes perinuclear. Strong membranous staining for CD44-S was observed in normal adrenal medulla. Analysis of CD44-S expression revealed differences between cortical adrenal tumours and pheochromocytomas. Ten of 12 cortical adenomas and 2 of 3 cortical carcinoma cells showed weak to moderate cytoplasmic staining, but all cases of pheochromocytoma had strong membranous staining. CONCLUSIONS: Membranous CD44-S staining may help to distinguish pheochromocytoma from adrenal cortical adenoma. Images PMID:9577373

  8. Calcitriol-mediated hypercalcemia in a patient with bilateral adrenal non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma case report

    PubMed Central

    Abaroa-Salvatierra, Ana; Shaikh, Bilal; Deshmukh, Mrunalini; Alweis, Richard; Patel, Arti

    2016-01-01

    Calcitriol-mediated hypercalcemia is a frequent manifestation of hematological malignancies. However, there are a few reports of cases presenting with increased angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) level, which suggests a possible mechanism similar to that of granulomatous diseases. We present a patient with hypercalcemia, normal parathyroid hormone, and parathyroid hormone-related protein levels but high calcitriol and ACE levels that, after further investigation, was diagnosed with bilateral adrenal non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma. Primary adrenal lymphoma represents only 1% of all non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and is usually asymptomatic but should be considered by clinicians among the malignancies that cause calcitriol-mediated hypercalcemia. PMID:27124160

  9. A 5-Year Prospective Follow-Up Study of Lipid-Rich Adrenal Incidentalomas: No Tumor Growth or Development of Hormonal Hypersecretion

    PubMed Central

    Raade, Merja; Hämäläinen, Esa; Sane, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Background Current guidelines for follow-up of adrenal incidentalomas are extensive and hampered by lack of follow-up studies. We tested the hypothesis that small lipid-rich adrenal incidentalomas, initially characterized by tumor size <40 mm and <10 Hounsfield units (HUs) on unenhanced computed tomography (CT) may not demonstrate excessive growth/hormonal hypersecretion on follow-up. Methods Sixty-nine incidentalomas in 56 patients were restudied with unenhanced CT and screening for hypercortisolism (dexamethasone suppression test [DST], plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone) and pheochromocytoma (24-hour urinary metanephrines and normetanephrines) 5 years later. Primary hyperaldosteronism was excluded at base-line. Results Tumor (n=69) size was similar before and after 5 years follow-up (19±6 mm vs. 20±7 mm). Mean tumor growth was 1±2 mm. Largest increase in tumor size was 8 mm, this tumor was surgically removed and histopathology confirmed cortical adenoma. DST was normal in 54 patients and two patients (3.6%) were still characterized by subclinical hypercortisolism. Initial tumor size was >20 mm for the patient with largest tumor growth and those with subclinical hypercortisolism. All patients had normal 24-hour urinary metanephrines and normetanephrines. Low attenuation (<10 HU) was demonstrated in 97% of 67 masses re-evaluated with unenhanced CT. Conclusion None of the patients developed clinically relevant tumor growth or new subclinical hypercortisolism. Biochemical screening for pheochromocytoma in incidentalomas demonstrating <10 HU on unenhanced CT is not needed. For such incidentalomas <40 mm, it seems sufficient to perform control CT and screen for hypercortisolism after 5 years. PMID:26354488

  10. L-type calcium channels in adrenal chromaffin cells: role in pace-making and secretion.

    PubMed

    Marcantoni, A; Baldelli, P; Hernandez-Guijo, J M; Comunanza, V; Carabelli, V; Carbone, E

    2007-01-01

    Voltage-gated L-type (Cav1.2 and Cav1.3) channels are widely expressed in cardiovascular tissues and represent the critical drug-target for the treatment of several cardiovascular diseases. The two isoforms are also abundantly expressed in neuronal and neuroendocrine tissues. In the brain, Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 channels control synaptic plasticity, somatic activity, neuronal differentiation and brain aging. In neuroendocrine cells, they are involved in the genesis of action potential generation, bursting activity and hormone secretion. Recent studies have shown that Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 are also expressed in chromaffin cells but their functional role has not yet been identified despite that L-type channels possess interesting characteristics, which confer them an important role in the control of catecholamine secretion during action potentials stimulation. In intact rat adrenal glands L-type channels are responsible for adrenaline and noradrenaline release following splanchnic nerve stimulation or nicotinic receptor activation. L-type channels can be either up- or down-modulated by membrane autoreceptors following distinct second messenger pathways. L-type channels are tightly coupled to BK channels and activate at relatively low-voltages. In this way they contribute to the action potential hyperpolarization and to the pace-maker current controlling action potential firings. L-type channels are shown also to regulate the fast secretion of the immediate readily releasable pool of vesicles with the same Ca(2+)-efficiency of other voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. In mouse adrenal slices, repeated action potential-like stimulations drive L-type channels to a state of enhanced stimulus-secretion efficiency regulated by beta-adrenergic receptors. Here we will review all these novel findings and discuss the possible implication for a specific role of L-type channels in the control of chromaffin cells activity. PMID:17561252

  11. Interaction of MSC with tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Catharina; Yang, Yuanyuan; Hass, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Tumor development and tumor progression is not only determined by the corresponding tumor cells but also by the tumor microenvironment. This includes an orchestrated network of interacting cell types (e.g. immune cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and mesenchymal stroma/stem cells (MSC)) via the extracellular matrix and soluble factors such as cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and various metabolites. Cell populations of the tumor microenvironment can interact directly and indirectly with cancer cells by mutually altering properties and functions of the involved partners. Particularly, mesenchymal stroma/stem cells (MSC) play an important role during carcinogenesis exhibiting different types of intercellular communication. Accordingly, this work focusses on diverse mechanisms of interaction between MSC and cancer cells. Moreover, some functional changes and consequences for both cell types are summarized which can eventually result in the establishment of a carcinoma stem cell niche (CSCN) or the generation of new tumor cell populations by MSC-tumor cell fusion. PMID:27608835

  12. Detection of angiotensin II binding to single adrenal zona glomerulosa cells by confocal Raman microspectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCoy, Michael J.; Habermann, Timothy J.; Hanke, Craig J.; Adar, Fran; Campbell, William B.; Nithipatikom, Kasem

    1999-04-01

    We developed a confocal Raman microspectroscopic technique to study ligand-receptor bindings in single cells using Raman-labeled ligands and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The adrenal zona glomerulosa (ZG) cells were used as a model in this study. ZG cells have a high density of angiotensin II (AII) receptors on the cellular membrane. There are two identified subtypes of AII receptors,namely AT1 and AT2 receptors. AII is a peptidic hormone, which upon binding to its receptors, stimulates the release of aldosterone from ZG cells. The cellular localization of these receptors subtypes was detected in single ZG cells by using immunocomplexation of receptors with specific antibodies and confocal Raman microspectroscopy. In the binding study, we used biotin-labeled AII to bind to its receptors in ZG cells. Then, avidin and Raman-labeled AII. The binding was measure directly on the single ZG cells. The results showed that the binding was displaced with unlabeled AII and specific AII antagonists. This is a rapid and sensitive technique for detection of cellular ligand bindings as well as antagonists screening in drug discovery.

  13. Effect of immunomodulation on the fate of tumor cells in the central nervous system and systemic organs of mice. Distribution of (/sup 125/I)5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled KHT tumor cells after left intracardial injection

    SciTech Connect

    Conley, F.K.

    1982-08-01

    The effect of systemic immunomodulation on tumor cell arrest and retention in the central nervous system was studied by following radioactively labeled tumor cells. KHT mouse sarcoma tumor cells were labeled in vitro with (/sup 125/I)IdUrd, and 1x10/sup 5/ tumor cells were injected into the left side of the hearts of syngeneic C3H mice. Experimental groups consisted of untreated normal mice, mice pretreated iv with Corynebacterium parvum, and mice chronically infected with Toxoplasma gondii; in this model both groups of immunomodulated mice are protected from developing systemic metastatic tumor, but only Toxoplasma-infected mice have protection against metastatic brain tumor. At time intervals from 1 to 96 hours, groups of mice from each experimental group were killed, and the brain and other organs were monitored for radioactivity to determine the number of viable tumor cells that had been present at the time of death. Normal mice demonstrated significant retention of tumor cells in the brain and kidneys plus adrenals at 96 hours. By contrast, in both groups of immunomodulated mice tumor cells were rapidly eliminated from systemic organs, but tumor cells were significantly retained in the central nervous system even at 96 hours after tumor cell injections. The results indicated that generalized immunomodulation had more effect in elimination of tumor cells from systemic organs than from the brain and that the elimination of tumor cells from the brain in Toxoplasma-infected mice was a delayed phenomenon.

  14. Affinity isolation of cultured tumor cells by means of drugs and hormones covalently bound to glass and Sepharose beads.

    PubMed Central

    Venter, B R; Venter, J C; Kaplan, N O

    1976-01-01

    Isoproterenol, corticotropin (ACTH), and triodothyronine immobilized on glass and Sepharose beads by diazotization procedures have been shown to interact with cultured tumor cells of "target tissue" origin. Cells used were rat glioma cells (C6), rat adrenal tumor cells (Y-1), and rat pituitary tumor cells (GH3). The rat glioma cells bound principally to immobilized isoproterenol, whereas the rat adrenal tumor cells bound to immobilized corticotropin, and rat pituitary tumor cells bound to immobilized triiodothyronine. Binding was inhibited by preincubation of the cells in soluble drug or hormone. With C6 cells there was a positive correlation between adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing, EC 4.6.1.1] stimulation and the degree of binding to the immobilized isoproterenol. Norepinephrine, bound through the ethanolamine side chain via an amide linkage, did not bind cells, demonstrating specific structural requirements for drug-cell interactions. HeLa cells were shown to bind tightly to diphtheria toxin coupled to Sepharose beads via an amide bond. This binding was inhibited by prior incubation of the Sepharose toxin with purified antitoxin. Toxin bound to Sepharose via an azo bond did not bind cells. These data suggest that the cell affinities are due to cell surface receptors interacting with the immobilized drugs and hormones, and that the observed affinities possibly reflect the relative receptor complement of these cells. Images PMID:180534

  15. Palifosfamide in Treating Patients With Recurrent Germ Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-11

    Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Teratoma; Malignant Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Malignant Extragonadal Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Seminoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Extragonadal Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Extragonadal Seminoma; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  16. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia Overview What is congenital adrenal hyperplasia? Congenital adrenal hyperplasia, or CAH, is a disorder that affects the adrenal glands. The adrenal ...

  17. Simultaneous amperometric measurement of ascorbate and catecholamine secretion from individual bovine adrenal medullary cells.

    PubMed

    Cahill, P S; Wightman, R M

    1995-08-01

    Secretion of ascorbate and catecholamines from single bovine adrenal medullary cells has been detected with amperometry at carbon-fiber microelectrodes. Two carbon-fiber electrodes were employed. One was beveled, and voltammograms at this electrode showed overlap of the responses for ascorbate and the catecholamines. The other was beveled and electrochemically oxidized to shift the ascorbate oxidation wave to potentials more negative than that of the catecholamines. Thus, at an applied potential of 0.05 V vs SSCE, ascorbate was selectively oxidized at the treated electrode and both catecholamines and ascorbate were oxidized at an applied potential of 0.65 V at the untreated electrode. Exocytotic release from the cell was stimulated with K+, nicotine, and digitonin. Nicotine and K+ depolarize the cell membrane and elicit vesicular release. Digitonin is a detergent that reacts with cholesterol in the plasma membrane and causes the formation of pores. Ascorbate efflux from individual cells could be induced by digitonin but not by K+ or nicotine and was observed as a single peak with a full width at half-maximum of 4 s. In contrast, catecholamine release was observed as many rapid, sequential current spikes when the cell was exposed to either digitonin, K+, or nicotine. The two different types of release show that ascorbate and catecholamines are being released from two different cellular compartments. The calcium independence of the digitonin-induced ascorbate release provides additional evidence that ascorbate is released by a nonexocytotic process. PMID:8849026

  18. General Information about Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  19. General Information about Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  20. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  1. Clear cell carcinoma of exocrine pancreas: a rare tumor with an unusual presentation.

    PubMed

    Ray, Biswajit; New, Norman E; Wedgwood, Kevin R

    2005-03-01

    Metastatic clear cell carcinomas are relatively common from primary tumors arising in the kidney, female genital tract, adrenal cortex, and lung, but they rarely occur from primary tumors of the pancreas. We report a case of metastatic pancreatic tumor with marked clear cell changes in a 46-year-old white man presenting with a pseudocyst of the pancreas. At laparotomy, there was a hard area in the head of the pancreas and another hard nodule was present in the omentum. The histologic and immunohistochemical test of the excised omental nodule exhibited features consistent with clear cell carcinoma from pancreatic primary. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a metastatic clear cell pancreatic tumor with such an unusual presentation. PMID:15714142

  2. Adrenal scan in 17-alpha-hydroxylase deficiency: false indication of adrenal adenoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, R.M.; Lieberman, L.M.; Newman, T.J.; Friedman, A.; Bargman, G.J.

    1981-07-01

    A patient who was thought to have testicular feminization syndrome and primary aldosteronism had an adrenal scan that suggested an adrenal adenoma. After later diagnosis of 17-alpha-hydroxylase deficiency, she was treated with glucocorticoids rather than surgery. Her clinical course and a repeat adrenal scan confirmed she did not have a tumor.

  3. Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal cell-mediated immunity regulation in the Immune Restoration Inflammatory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Khakshooy, Allen; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Over one third of the patients sero-positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with signs of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and under treatment with anti-retroviral therapy (ART), develop the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). It is not clear what variables are that determine whether a patient with HIV/AIDS will develop ART-related IRIS, but the best evidence base thus far indicates that HIV/AIDS patients with low CD4 cell count, and HIV/AIDS patients whose CD4 count recovery shows a sharp slope, suggesting a particularly fast "immune reconstitution", are at greater risk of developing IRIS. Here, we propose the hypothesis that one important variable that can contribute to low CD4 cell count number and function in ART-treated HIV/AIDS patients is altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) cell-mediated immune (CMI) regulation. We discuss HPA-CMI deregulation in IRIS as the new frontier in comparative effectiveness research (CRE) for obtaining and utilizing the best evidence base for treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in specific clinical settings. We propose that our hypothesis about altered HPA-CMI may extend to the pathologies observed in related viral infection, including Zika PMID:27212842

  4. Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal cell-mediated immunity regulation in the Immune Restoration Inflammatory Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khakshooy, Allen; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Over one third of the patients sero-positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with signs of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and under treatment with anti-retroviral therapy (ART), develop the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). It is not clear what variables are that determine whether a patient with HIV/AIDS will develop ART-related IRIS, but the best evidence base thus far indicates that HIV/AIDS patients with low CD4 cell count, and HIV/AIDS patients whose CD4 count recovery shows a sharp slope, suggesting a particularly fast "immune reconstitution", are at greater risk of developing IRIS. Here, we propose the hypothesis that one important variable that can contribute to low CD4 cell count number and function in ART-treated HIV/AIDS patients is altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) cell-mediated immune (CMI) regulation. We discuss HPA-CMI deregulation in IRIS as the new frontier in comparative effectiveness research (CRE) for obtaining and utilizing the best evidence base for treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in specific clinical settings. We propose that our hypothesis about altered HPA-CMI may extend to the pathologies observed in related viral infection, including Zika. PMID:27212842

  5. Expression of the beacon gene in the rat adrenal gland: direct inhibitory effect of beacon[47-73] on aldosterone secretion from dispersed adrenal zona glomerulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Rucinski, Marcin; Neri, Giuliano; Di Liddo, Rosa; Nussdorfer, Gastone G; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2004-02-01

    Beacon gene was recently identified in the rat hypothalamus, and there is evidence that beacon may be involved in the functional regulation of neuroendocrine axes. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry showed the expression of beacon mRNA and protein in the rat adrenal gland, especially in the cortex. Beacon[47-73], at a concentration over 10(-7) M decreased basal aldosterone secretion from dispersed rat zona glomerulosa (ZG) cells, without affecting the ACTH-stimulated one. Basal and agonist-stimulated corticosterone secretion from dispersed zona fasciculata-reticularis cells and catecholamine release from adrenomedullary slices were unaffected by beacon[47-73]. The suppressive effect of beacon[47-73] on aldosterone secretion from ZG cells was abolished by either H-89 or calphostin-C, which are inhibitors of protein kinase A and C signaling cascades. Taken together, these findings allow us to suggest that beacon can be included in the group of regulatory peptides involved in the fine tuning of ZG secretory activity. PMID:14719126

  6. Expression of the spexin gene in the rat adrenal gland and evidences suggesting that spexin inhibits adrenocortical cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Rucinski, Marcin; Porzionato, Andrea; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Szyszka, Marta; Macchi, Veronica; De Caro, Raffaele; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2010-04-01

    Spexin (SPX, also called NPQ) is a recently identified, highly conserved peptide which is processed and secreted. We analysed the SPX gene and its protein product in the rat adrenal gland to ascertain whether SPX is involved in the regulation of corticosteroid secretion of and growth of adrenocortical cells. In adult rat adrenal glands the highest levels of SPX mRNA were present in the glomerulosa (ZG) and fasciculate/reticularis (ZF/R) zones. High SPX gene expression levels were found in freshly isolated adult rat ZG and ZF/R cells. In cultured adrenocortical cells the levels of SPX mRNA were lower than in freshly isolated cells. SPX mRNA expression levels were found to be 2-3 times higher during days 90-540 of postnatal development than found during days 2-45. Prolonged ACTH administration lowered and dexamethasone increased adrenal SPX mRNA levels in vivo. Adrenal enucleation produced a significant linear increase in SPX mRNA levels, with the highest value occurring at day 8 after surgery, with control values taken on day 30 after enucleation. Immunohistochemistry revealed SPX-like immunoreactivity in the entire cortex of the adult male rat and in enucleation-induced regenerating cortex. A concentration of 10-6M SPX peptide stimulated basal aldosterone secretion by freshly isolated ZG. In prolonged exposure of adrenocortical cell primary cultures to SPX (10-6M) resulted in a small increase in corticosterone secretion and a notable decrease in BrdU incorporation. The results suggest the direct involvement of SPX in the regulation of adrenocortical cell proliferation; however, the mechanism of action remains unknown. PMID:20045034

  7. Primary, non-exophytic, optic nerve germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    DiLuna, Michael L; Two, Aimee M; Levy, Gillian H; Patel, Toral; Huttner, Anita J; Duncan, Charles C; Piepmeier, Joseph M

    2009-12-01

    Tumors of the optic chiasm are relatively uncommon and usually associated with phakomatoses such as neurofibromatosis. Even more rare is the presentation of a primary, non-exophytic, isolated optic chiasm germ cell tumor (GCT). These tumors have imaging characteristics nearly indistinguishable from optic chiasmatic gliomas (OCGs). Herein we describe two cases of young men who presented with similar findings of progressive, painless visual loss and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysfunction including diabetes insipidus. Brain imaging was non-diagnostic and suggestive of an OCG. Pathology demonstrated GCTs in each case highlighting the importance of biopsy confirmation of the diagnosis. Both patients underwent a pterional craniotomy and sub-frontal approach to the optic chiasm. The chiasm was diffusely enlarged and discolored in each case without evidence of sellar, suprasellar or perichiasmatic pathology. Pathology demonstrated a malignant mixed GCT in the first patient and a germinoma in the second. This case series highlights the importance of tissue biopsy for patients with progressive symptoms from optic chiasm tumors. Furthermore, this is the first report of a primary, non-exophytic malignant mixed GCT. As the treatment regimens differ widely between optic chiasm GCTs and chiasm gliomas, tissue diagnosis is important. PMID:19554263

  8. Catecholamines-evoked cytosolic Ca2+ rise in endothelial cells from bovine adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Vinet, R; Rojas, F; Luxoro, M; Vargas, F; Cortés, M

    2000-01-01

    The effects of catecholamines on intracellular Ca2+ concentrations ([Ca2+]i) in single acutely dissociated bovine adrenal medulla endothelial cells (BAMECs) were measured using the intracellular fluorescent probe Fluo-3 AM. 100 microm epinephrine or norepinephrine induced a biphasic [Ca2+]i rise with an initial peak followed by a delayed phase. 10 microm phenylephrine (alpha1-adrenergic agonist) caused a [Ca2+]i rise similar to that evoked by catecholamines. The increase in [Ca2+]i induced by 10 microm phenylephrine was reverted by 10 microm phenoxybenzamine (alpha-adrenergic antagonist). Neither isoproterenol (beta-adrenergic agonist) nor clonidine (alpha2-adrenergic agonist) induced [Ca2+]i rise. The initial peak was insensitive to zero external Ca2+ and it was abolished after Ca2+ internal storages were emptied by 10 mM caffeine. The delayed phase was reduced to near zero by external Ca2+ removal. These results indicate that BAMECs possess alpha1-adrenergic receptors associated to both the release of caffeine-sensitive intracellular Ca2+ stores and the entry of extracellular Ca2+. We suggest that chromaffin cell secretion may activate BAMECs in vivo through an increase in [Ca2+]i which could induce the secretion of vasoactive factors allowing a rapid entry of hormones into the circulation. PMID:10724332

  9. Treatment Option Overview (Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... hCG and LDH may be at any level. Poor prognosis A nonseminoma extragonadal germ cell tumor is in the poor prognosis group if: the tumor is in the ... extragonadal germ cell tumor does not have a poor prognosis group. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There ...

  10. Diagnostic dilemmas in enlarged and diffusely hemorrhagic adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Diolombi, Mairo L; Khani, Francesca; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2016-07-01

    We have noted an increasing number of cases of enlarged adrenal glands where the underlying diagnosis was masked by a diffusely hemorrhagic process. We identified from our database 59 cases (32 consults, 27 routine) of adrenal glands with diffuse (>25%) hemorrhage received between 2000 and 2014. Fifty-three adrenalectomies and 6 biopsies were identified. The diagnoses after central review were 41 adrenocortical adenomas, 1 nodular adrenocortical hyperplasia with associated myelolipoma, 1 benign adrenocortical cyst, and 10 nonneoplastic adrenal glands with hemorrhage. A definitive diagnosis for the 6 biopsies was precluded by the sample size. The adrenocortical adenomas (size, 1-13 cm; 25%-95% hemorrhage) showed clear cell change in the neoplastic area (10%-80% of the tumor), 19 showed focal calcification (1 with ossification), 11 showed areas of papillary endothelial hyperplasia, 10 showed scattered lymphoplasmacytic inflammation, 6 showed benign cortical tissue extending beyond the adrenal capsule into soft tissue, 1 showed necrosis in the form of ghost cells, 2 showed lipomatous change, and 6 were associated with incidental benign lesions (1 cortical cyst, 1 schwannoma, and 4 myelolipomas). Twenty-four of the adrenocortical adenomas were consults where the referring pathologist had trouble classifying the lesion. Of the 10 nonneoplastic adrenals (4.5-22 cm; 40%-80% hemorrhage), 2 were consults. In summary, pathologists have difficulties recognizing adrenocortical adenomas in the setting of a massively enlarged and hemorrhagic adrenal gland. Although there is a correlation between adrenocortical malignancy and size, hemorrhage into nonmalignant adrenal glands can result in markedly enlarged adrenals. PMID:27001431

  11. Interaction of tumor cells with the microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in tumor biology have revealed that a detailed analysis of the complex interactions of tumor cells with their adjacent microenvironment (tumor stroma) is mandatory in order to understand the various mechanisms involved in tumor growth and the development of metastasis. The mutual interactions between tumor cells and cellular and non-cellular components (extracellular matrix = ECM) of the tumor microenvironment will eventually lead to a loss of tissue homeostasis and promote tumor development and progression. Thus, interactions of genetically altered tumor cells and the ECM on the one hand and reactive non-neoplastic cells on the other hand essentially control most aspects of tumorigenesis such as epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT), migration, invasion (i.e. migration through connective tissue), metastasis formation, neovascularisation, apoptosis and chemotherapeutic drug resistance. In this mini-review we will focus on these issues that were recently raised by two review articles in CCS. PMID:21914164

  12. Granular Cell Tumor: An Uncommon Benign Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Gayen, Tirthankar; Das, Anupam; Shome, Kaushik; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Das, Dipti; Saha, Abanti

    2015-01-01

    Granular cell tumor is a distinctly rare neoplasm of neural sheath origin. It mainly presents as a solitary asymptomatic swelling in the oral cavity, skin, and rarely internal organs in the middle age. Histopathology is characteristic, showing polyhedral cells containing numerous fine eosinophilic granules with indistinct cell margins. We present a case of granular cell tumor on the back of a 48-year-old woman which was painful, mimicking an adnexal tumor. PMID:26120181

  13. Conditional Mutagenesis of Gata6 in SF1-Positive Cells Causes Gonadal-Like Differentiation in the Adrenal Cortex of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pihlajoki, Marjut; Gretzinger, Elisabeth; Cochran, Rebecca; Kyrönlahti, Antti; Schrade, Anja; Hiller, Theresa; Sullivan, Laura; Shoykhet, Michael; Schoeller, Erica L.; Brooks, Michael D.; Heikinheimo, Markku

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factor GATA6 is expressed in the fetal and adult adrenal cortex and has been implicated in steroidogenesis. To characterize the role of transcription factor GATA6 in adrenocortical development and function, we generated mice in which Gata6 was conditionally deleted using Cre-LoxP recombination with Sf1-cre. The adrenal glands of adult Gata6 conditional knockout (cKO) mice were small and had a thin cortex. Cytomegalic changes were evident in fetal and adult cKO adrenal glands, and chromaffin cells were ectopically located at the periphery of the glands. Corticosterone secretion in response to exogenous ACTH was blunted in cKO mice. Spindle-shaped cells expressing Gata4, a marker of gonadal stroma, accumulated in the adrenal subcapsule of Gata6 cKO mice. RNA analysis demonstrated the concomitant upregulation of other gonadal-like markers, including Amhr2, in the cKO adrenal glands, suggesting that GATA6 inhibits the spontaneous differentiation of adrenocortical stem/progenitor cells into gonadal-like cells. Lhcgr and Cyp17 were overexpressed in the adrenal glands of gonadectomized cKO vs control mice, implying that GATA6 also limits sex steroidogenic cell differentiation in response to the hormonal changes that accompany gonadectomy. Nulliparous female and orchiectomized male Gata6 cKO mice lacked an adrenal X-zone. Microarray hybridization identified Pik3c2g as a novel X-zone marker that is downregulated in the adrenal glands of these mice. Our findings offer genetic proof that GATA6 regulates the differentiation of steroidogenic progenitors into adrenocortical cells. PMID:23471215

  14. Dietary unsaturated fatty acids differently affect catecholamine handling by adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Andreia; Correia, Gustavo; Coelho, Marisa; Araújo, João Ricardo; Pinho, Maria João; Teixeira, Ana Luisa; Medeiros, Rui; Ribeiro, Laura

    2015-05-01

    Catecholamines (CA) play an important role in cardiovascular (CDV) disease risk. Namely, noradrenaline (NA) levels positively correlate whereas adrenaline (AD) levels negatively correlate with obesity and/or CDV disease. Western diets, which are tipically rich in Ω-6 fatty acids (FAs) and deficient in Ω-3 FAs, may contribute to the development of obesity, type 2 diabetes and/or coronary artery disease. Taking this into consideration and the fact that our group has already described that saturated FAs affect catecholamine handling by adrenal chromaffin cells, this work aimed to investigate the effect of unsaturated FAs upon catecholamine handling in the same model. Our results showed that chronic exposure to unsaturated FAs differently modulated CA cellular content and release, regardless of both FA series and number of carbon atoms. Namely, the Ω-6 arachidonic and linoleic acids, based on their effect on CA release and cellular content, seemed to impair NA and AD vesicular transport, whereas γ-linolenic acid selectively impaired AD synthesis and release. Within the Ω-9 FAs, oleic acid was devoid of effect, and elaidic acid behaved similarly to γ-linolenic acid. Eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids (Ω-3 series) impaired the synthesis and release of both NA and AD. These results deserve attention and future development, namely, in what concerns the mechanisms involved and correlative effects in vivo. PMID:25727966

  15. What Are the Treatments for Adrenal Gland Disorders?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources and Publications What are the treatments for adrenal gland disorders? Skip sharing on social media links Share ... a variety of surgical and medical treatments for adrenal gland disorders. These include 1 : Surgery to remove tumors ...

  16. Induction of autoantibodies to the adrenal cortex and pancreatic islet cells by interferon alpha therapy for chronic hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Wesche, B; Jaeckel, E; Trautwein, C; Wedemeyer, H; Falorni, A; Frank, H; von zur Muhlen, A; Manns, M; Brabant, G

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Interferon alpha (IFN-α) therapy for chronic hepatitis C may trigger induction of autoimmunity against several organs. Immune reactions against distinct adrenocortical protein antigens involved in adrenal autoimmune disease have not been reported to date. Therefore, we investigated the development of highly sensitive and specific adrenal autoantibodies in patients with chronic hepatitis C in response to IFN-α treatment. In addition, we studied induction of pancreatic islet and thyroid autoantibodies.
PATIENTS/METHODS—Sera of 75 patients (42 males, 33 females; mean age 47 (13) years) were analysed before, during, and after IFN-α therapy (9-18×106 IE/week; mean duration 8.3 (3.5) months). Autoantibodies (Abs) to adrenal 21-hydroxylase (21OH-Abs), and to islet glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65-Abs) and protein tyrosine phosphatase (IA2-Abs) were determined by a radiobinding assay using 35S labelled protein generated by an in vitro translation system. Thyroid antibodies were measured by a commercially available ELISA.
RESULTS—Thirteen of 75 patients were initially positive for some of the autoantibodies. During or after IFN-α therapy, 3/62 initially negative patients (4.8%) developed 21OH-Abs. GAD65-Abs or IA2-Abs appeared in 5/62 and 1/62 patients, respectively (9.7% in total). In 12/62 patients (19.4%), thyroid specific antibodies appeared. In none of the 21OH-Ab positive subjects was adrenal dysfunction observed, and no patient with islet autoantibodies developed diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance.
CONCLUSIONS—IFN-α induces 21OH-Abs in some cases, while islet and thyroid specific autoantibodies are more frequently found. However, our results indicate for the first time that the adrenal cortex also has to be considered as a potential target of IFN-α related autoimmunity.


Keywords: hepatitis C; interferon alpha; autoantibodies; adrenal cortex; pancreatic islet cells PMID:11171829

  17. Tumor initiating cells in malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Hadjipanayis, Costas G.; Van Meir, Erwin G.

    2009-01-01

    A rare subpopulation of cells within malignant gliomas, which shares canonical properties with neural stem cells (NSCs), may be integral to glial tumor development and perpetuation. These cells, also known as tumor initiating cells (TICs), have the ability to self-renew, develop into any cell in the overall tumor population (multipotency), and proliferate. A defining property of TICs is their ability to initiate new tumors in immunocompromised mice with high efficiency. Mounting evidence suggests that TICs originate from the transformation of NSCs and their progenitors. New findings show that TICs may be more resistant to chemotherapy and radiation than the bulk of tumor cells, thereby permitting recurrent tumor formation and accounting for the failure of conventional therapies. The development of new therapeutic strategies selectively targeting TICs while sparing NSCs may provide for more effective treatment of malignant gliomas. PMID:19189072

  18. Cell Fusion Connects Oncogenesis with Tumor Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaofeng; Merchak, Kevin; Lee, Woojin; Grande, Joseph P.; Cascalho, Marilia; Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Cell fusion likely drives tumor evolution by undermining chromosomal and DNA stability and/or by generating phenotypic diversity; however, whether a cell fusion event can initiate malignancy and direct tumor evolution is unknown. We report that a fusion event involving normal, nontransformed, cytogenetically stable epithelial cells can initiate chromosomal instability, DNA damage, cell transformation, and malignancy. Clonal analysis of fused cells reveals that the karyotypic and phenotypic potential of tumors formed by cell fusion is established immediately or within a few cell divisions after the fusion event, without further ongoing genetic and phenotypic plasticity, and that subsequent evolution of such tumors reflects selection from the initial diverse population rather than ongoing plasticity of the progeny. Thus, one cell fusion event can both initiate malignancy and fuel evolution of the tumor that ensues. PMID:26066710

  19. Therapeutic Trial for Patients With Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumor and Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-01

    Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Ewing Sarcoma of Bone or Soft Tissue; Localized Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  20. In vivo evidence for the crucial role of SF1 in steroid-producing cells of the testis, ovary and adrenal gland

    PubMed Central

    Buaas, F. William; Gardiner, Jennifer R.; Clayton, Sally; Val, Pierre; Swain, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Adrenal and gonadal steroids are essential for life and reproduction. The orphan nuclear receptor SF1 (NR5A1) has been shown to regulate the expression of enzymes involved in steroid production in vitro. However, the in vivo role of this transcription factor in steroidogenesis has not been elucidated. In this study, we have generated steroidogenic-specific Cre-expressing mice to lineage mark and delete Sf1 in differentiated steroid-producing cells of the testis, the ovary and the adrenal gland. Our data show that SF1 is a regulator of the expression of steroidogenic genes in all three organs. In addition, Sf1 deletion leads to a radical change in cell morphology and loss of identity. Surprisingly, sexual development and reproduction in mutant animals were not compromised owing, in part, to the presence of a small proportion of SF1-positive cells. In contrast to the testis and ovary, the mutant adult adrenal gland showed a lack of Sf1-deleted cells and our studies suggest that steroidogenic adrenal cells during foetal stages require Sf1 to give rise to the adult adrenal population. This study is the first to show the in vivo requirements of SF1 in steroidogenesis and provides novel data on the cellular consequences of the loss of this protein specifically within steroid-producing cells. PMID:23136395

  1. Enhanced BDNF signalling following chronic hypoxia potentiates catecholamine release from cultured rat adrenal chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Angela L; Zhang, Min; Nurse, Colin A

    2015-01-01

    Environmental stressors, including chronic hypoxia, enhance the ability of adrenomedullary chromaffin cells (AMCs) to secrete catecholamines; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigated the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling in rat AMCs exposed to chronic hypoxia. In rat adrenal glands, BDNF and its tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor are highly expressed in the cortex and medulla, respectively. Exposure of AMCs to chronic hypoxia (2% O2; 48 h) in vitro caused a significant increase to TrkB mRNA expression. A similar increase was observed in an immortalized chromaffin cell line (MAH cells); however, it was absent in MAH cells deficient in the transcription factor HIF-2α. A specific TrkB agonist, 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF), stimulated quantal catecholamine secretion from chronically hypoxic (CHox; 2% O2) AMCs to a greater extent than normoxic (Nox; 21% O2) controls. Activation of TrkB by BDNF or 7,8-DHF increased intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), an effect that was significantly larger in CHox cells. The 7,8-DHF-induced [Ca2+]i rise was sensitive to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor K252a and nickel (2 mm), but not the Ca2+ store-depleting agent cyclopiazonic acid. Blockade of T-type calcium channels with TTA-P2 (1 μm) or voltage-gated Na+ channels with TTX inhibited BDNF-induced [Ca2+]i increases. BDNF also induced a dose-dependent enhancement of action potential firing in CHox cells. These data demonstrate that during chronic hypoxia, enhancement of BDNF-TrkB signalling increases voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx and catecholamine secretion in chromaffin cells, and that T-type Ca2+ channels play a key role in the signalling pathway. Key points We investigated the role of the neurotrophin BDNF signalling via the TrkB receptor in rat adrenomedullary chromaffin cells (AMCs) exposed to normoxia (Nox; 21% O2) and chronic hypoxia (CHox; 2% O2) in vitro for ∼48 h. TrkB receptor expression was

  2. Electric Field Analysis of Breast Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sree, V. Gowri; Udayakumar, K.; Sundararajan, R.

    2011-01-01

    An attractive alternative treatment for malignant tumors that are refractive to conventional therapies, such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, is electrical-pulse-mediated drug delivery. Electric field distribution of tissue/tumor is important for effective treatment of tissues. This paper deals with the electric field distribution study of a tissue model using MAXWELL 3D Simulator. Our results indicate that tumor tissue had lower electric field strength compared to normal cells, which makes them susceptible to electrical-pulse-mediated drug delivery. This difference could be due to the altered properties of tumor cells compared to normal cells, and our results corroborate this. PMID:22295214

  3. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection. PMID:27004193

  4. Testosterone-secreting adrenal adenoma in a peripubertal girl

    SciTech Connect

    Kamilaris, T.C.; DeBold, C.R.; Manolas, K.J.; Hoursanidis, A.; Panageas, S.; Yiannatos, J.

    1987-11-13

    A 15-year-old girl who presented with primary amenorrhea and virilization had an adrenocortical adenoma that secreted predominantly testosterone. To the authors' knowledge, she is the first peripubertal and second youngest patient with a testosterone-secreting adrenal tumor described. Serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and urinary 17-ketosteroid an 17-hydroxycorticosteroid levels were normal. A tumor was located by a computed tomographic (CT) scan and by uptake of 6-..beta..-(/sup 75/Se) selenomethylnorcholesterol. Microscopic examination of the tumor showed typical features of an adrenocortical adenoma with no histologic features characteristic of Leydig cells. Postoperatively, her hirsutism regressed, she rapidly went through puberty, and regular monthly menstruation started four months later. Finding the source of testosterone in a virilized patient can be difficult. Eleven of the 14 previously described patients with testosterone-secreting adrenal tumors initially underwent misdirected surgery on the ovaries. Review of these cases revealed that results of hormone stimulation and suppression tests are unreliable and that these tumors are usually large. Therefore, CT scanning of the adrenal glands is recommended in all patients suspected of having a testosterone-secreting tumor.

  5. Immune Cells in Blood Recognize Tumors

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists have developed a novel strategy for identifying immune cells circulating in the blood that recognize specific proteins on tumor cells, a finding they believe may have potential implications for immune-based therapies.

  6. Photosensitizer-induced fluorescence of the rat adrenal gland and rat pheochromocytoma cells (PC 12) by meso-tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (mTHPC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo-Benkmann, Mario; Muhm, Markus; Gahlen, Johannes; Heym, Christine; Senninger, Norbert

    1997-12-01

    Rat adrenal glands exhibit an intense mTHPC-induced fluorescence. The objective of our study was the identification of adrenal cells exhibiting mTHPC-induced fluorescence under normal conditions and under stimulation of adrenal proliferation by reserpine. Furthermore mTHPC-uptake of rat pheochromocytoma (PC 12) cells was investigated. Four male Wistar rats received 0.5 mg mTHPC/kg iv 48 hours before perfusion. Furthermore four rats received reserpine (2 mg/kg im od), bromo-deoxy-uridine (BrdU; 50 mg/kg ip od) each for one week and mTHPC (0.5 mg/kg) 48 hours before perfusion. BrdU was detected immunohistochemically. PC 12-cells were incubated with 0.5 mg mTHPC/l culture medium for 24 or 48 hours. Cells and tissues were examined by fluorescence microscopy. The adrenal cortex exhibited an intense mTHPC-induced fluorescence. The adrenal medulla fluoresced faintly. Reserpine increased fluorescence of intramedullary cells, not coinciding with adrenal proliferation. Cortical fluorescence remained unchanged. PC 12-cells lying singly or in small groups and differentiating cells showed a more intense mTHPC- induced fluorescence than confluent cells. Differences of cortical and medullary uptake of mTHPC are independent of proliferation and may be explained by lipophilia of mTHPC, since adrenocytes have an uptake mechanism for cholesterol. The difference of mTHPC-uptake between PC 12-cells and chromaffin cells implicate the possibility of photodynamic applications for medullary neoplasia.

  7. CD44 enhances tumor aggressiveness by promoting tumor cell plasticity.

    PubMed

    Paulis, Yvette W J; Huijbers, Elisabeth J M; van der Schaft, Daisy W J; Soetekouw, Patricia M M B; Pauwels, Patrick; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G; Griffioen, Arjan W

    2015-08-14

    Aggressive tumor cells can obtain the ability to transdifferentiate into cells with endothelial features and thus form vasculogenic networks. This phenomenon, called vasculogenic mimicry (VM), is associated with increased tumor malignancy and poor clinical outcome. To identify novel key molecules implicated in the process of vasculogenic mimicry, microarray analysis was performed to compare gene expression profiles of aggressive (VM+) and non-aggressive (VM-) cells derived from Ewing sarcoma and breast carcinoma. We identified the CD44/c-Met signaling cascade as heavily relevant for vasculogenic mimicry. CD44 was at the center of this cascade, and highly overexpressed in aggressive tumors. Both CD44 standard isoform and its splice variant CD44v6 were linked to increased aggressiveness in VM. Since VM is most abundant in Ewing sarcoma tumors functional analyses were performed in EW7 cells. Overexpression of CD44 allowed enhanced adhesion to its extracellular matrix ligand hyaluronic acid. CD44 expression also facilitated the formation of vasculogenic structures in vitro, as CD44 knockdown experiments repressed migration and vascular network formation. From these results and the observation that CD44 expression is associated with vasculogenic structures and blood lakes in human Ewing sarcoma tissues, we conclude that CD44 increases aggressiveness in tumors through the process of vasculogenic mimicry. PMID:26189059

  8. Ectopic and abnormal hormone receptors in adrenal Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, A; Ndiaye, N; Tremblay, J; Hamet, P

    2001-02-01

    The mechanism by which cortisol is produced in adrenal Cushing's syndrome, when ACTH is suppressed, was previously unknown and was referred to as being "autonomous." More recently, several investigators have shown that some cortisol and other steroid-producing adrenal tumors or hyperplasias are under the control of ectopic (or aberrant, illicit, inappropriate) membrane hormone receptors. These include ectopic receptors for gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), beta-adrenergic agonists, or LH/hCG; a similar outcome can result from altered activity of eutopic receptors, such as those for vasopressin (V1-AVPR), serotonin (5-HT4), or possibly leptin. The presence of aberrant receptors places adrenal cells under stimulation by a trophic factor not negatively regulated by glucocorticoids, leading to increased steroidogenesis and possibly to the proliferative phenotype. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the abnormal expression and function of membrane hormone receptors are still largely unknown. Identification of the presence of these illicit receptors can eventually lead to new pharmacological therapies as alternatives to adrenalectomy, now demonstrated by the long-term control of ectopic P-AR- and LH/hCGR-dependent Cushing's syndrome by propanolol and leuprolide acetate. Further studies will potentially identify a larger diversity of hormone receptors capable of coupling to G proteins, adenylyl cyclase, and steroidogenesis in functional adrenal tumors and probably in other endocrine and nonendocrine tumors. PMID:11159817

  9. Circulating tumor cells in germ cell tumors: are those biomarkers of real prognostic value? A review

    PubMed Central

    CEBOTARU, CRISTINA LIGIA; OLTEANU, ELENA DIANA; ANTONE, NICOLETA ZENOVIA; BUIGA, RARES; NAGY, VIORICA

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of circulating tumor cells from patients with different types of cancer is nowadays a fascinating new tool of research and their number is proven to be useful as a prognostic factor in metastatic breast, colon and prostate cancer patients. Studies are going beyond enumeration, exploring the circulating tumor cells to better understand the mechanisms of tumorigenesis, invasion and metastasis and their value for characterization, prognosis and tailoring of treatment. Few studies investigated the prognostic significance of circulating tumor cells in germ cell tumors. In this review, we examine the possible significance of the detection of circulating tumor cells in this setting. PMID:27152069

  10. Radioguided Adrenal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Deus, Javier; Millera, Alfonso; Andrés, Alejandro; Prats, Enrique; Gil, Ismael; Suarez, Manuel; Salcini, José L.; Lahoz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The laparoscopic adrenalectomy is considered as the procedure of choice for the treatment of adrenal hyperplasia and tumor lesions. However, some special situations may limit the use of this method due to the difficulty to locate the gland and perform the lesion excision. We analyze 2 patients of a left adrenal tumor, explaining how they have overcome the difficulties in both situations. The first case was a patient with a history of intra-abdominal surgery and the other patient suffered from severe obesity. We performed with the use of the gamma probe, and the 2 cases, was of great help to access and glandular localization. The help of gamma probe test was achieved in the surgical bed, that removal was complete. The use of the portable gamma probe facilitated the access to the left adrenal gland as well as conducting the glandular excision without delay, despite the difficulties due to the intra abdominal surgery caused by the previous surgery, and in the case of severe obesity. PMID:26426608

  11. Images of pheochromocytoma in adrenal glands

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Colin J.; Blake, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas are relatively rare tumors of the adrenal medulla. A wide spectrum of imaging findings has been described. The aim of this article is to describe the multimodality imaging features of pheochromocytomas including diagnostic pearls that can help differentiate them from other adrenal lesions and pitfalls to avoid. PMID:26310999

  12. Imaging Tumor Cell Movement In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Entenberg, David; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Sahai, Erik; Condeelis, John; Segall, Jeffrey E.

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes the methods that we have been developing for analyzing tumor cell motility in mouse and rat models of breast cancer metastasis. Rodents are commonly used both to provide a mammalian system for studying human tumor cells (as xenografts in immunocompromised mice) as well as for following the development of tumors from a specific tissue type in transgenic lines. The Basic Protocol in this unit describes the standard methods used for generation of mammary tumors and imaging them. Additional protocols for labeling macrophages, blood vessel imaging, and image analysis are also included. PMID:23456602

  13. Benign adrenal hemangiomas may mimic metastases on PET.

    PubMed

    Calata, Jed F; Sukerkar, Arun N; August, Carey Z; Maker, Ajay V

    2013-11-01

    CT or MRI are utilized in the initial evaluation of adrenal incidentalomas; however, overlap exists between benign and malignant lesions on these examinations. The American College of Radiology recommends PET scans to complement CT and MRI for patients with adrenal masses and a moderate-to-high likelihood of neoplastic disease. We present images of a PET-avid adrenal lesion in a patient with pulmonary and pancreatic neoplasms that mimicked metastasis, but was found to be a benign adrenal hemangioma on surgical resection. The use of PET for adrenal tumors, specifically adrenal hemangiomas, will be reviewed. PMID:24089061

  14. Targeting tumor cell motility to prevent metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Trenis D.; Ashby, William J.; Lewis, John D.; Zijlstra, Andries

    2011-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity in patients with solid tumors invariably results from the disruption of normal biological function caused by disseminating tumor cells. Tumor cell migration is under intense investigation as the underlying cause of cancer metastasis. The need for tumor cell motility in the progression of metastasis has been established experimentally and is supported empirically by basic and clinical research implicating a large collection of migration-related genes. However, there are few clinical interventions designed to specifically target the motility of tumor cells and adjuvant therapy to specifically prevent cancer cell dissemination is severely limited. In an attempt to define motility targets suitable for treating metastasis, we have parsed the molecular determinants of tumor cell motility into five underlying principles including cell autonomous ability, soluble communication, cell-cell adhesion, cell-matrix adhesion, and integrating these determinants of migration on molecular scaffolds. The current challenge is to implement meaningful and sustainable inhibition of metastasis by developing clinically viable disruption of molecular targets that control these fundamental capabilities. PMID:21664937

  15. Direct visualization of secretion from single bovine adrenal chromaffin cells by laser-induced native fluorescence imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, W.; Yeung, E.S.

    1998-03-01

    Direct visualization of the secretion process of individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was achieved with laser-induced native fluorescence imaging microscopy. By monitoring the native fluorescence of catecholamines excited by the 275 nm laser line with an intensified charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera, we obtained good temporal and spatial resolution simultaneously without using additional fluorescent probes. Large variations were found among individual cells in terms of the amounts of catecholamines secreted and the rates of secretion. Different regions of a cell also behave differently during the secretion process. However, the degree of this local heterogeneity is smaller than in neurons and neuralgia. The influence of deep-ultraviolet (UV) laser excitation on cells is also discussed. This quantitative imaging technique provides a useful noninvasive approach for the study of dynamic cellular changes and the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of secretory processes. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  16. Safety of targeting tumor endothelial cell antigens.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Samuel C; Riordan, Neil H; Ichim, Thomas E; Szymanski, Julia; Ma, Hong; Perez, Jesus A; Lopez, Javier; Plata-Munoz, Juan J; Silva, Francisco; Patel, Amit N; Kesari, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying discrimination between "self" and "non-self", a central immunological principle, require careful consideration in immune oncology therapeutics where eliciting anti-cancer immunity must be weighed against the risk of autoimmunity due to the self origin of tumors. Whole cell vaccines are one promising immunotherapeutic avenue whereby a myriad of tumor antigens are introduced in an immunogenic context with the aim of eliciting tumor rejection. Despite the possibility collateral damage to healthy tissues, cancer immunotherapy can be designed such that off target autoimmunity remains limited in scope and severity or completely non-existent. Here we provide an immunological basis for reconciling the safety of cancer vaccines, focusing on tumor endothelial cell vaccines, by discussing the following topics: (a) Antigenic differences between neoplastic and healthy tissues that can be leveraged in cancer vaccine design; (b) The layers of tolerance that control T cell responses directed against antigens expressed in healthy tissues and tumors; and, (c) The hierarchy of antigenic epitope selection and display in response to whole cell vaccines, and how antigen processing and presentation can afford a degree of selectivity against tumors. We conclude with an example of early clinical data utilizing ValloVax™, an immunogenic placental endothelial cell vaccine that is being advanced to target the tumor endothelium of diverse cancers, and we report on the safety and efficacy of ValloVax™ for inducing immunity against tumor endothelial antigens. PMID:27071457

  17. DNA Tumor Viruses and Cell Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mushtaq, Muhammad; Darekar, Suhas

    2016-01-01

    Viruses play an important role in cancerogenesis. It is estimated that approximately 20% of all cancers are linked to infectious agents. The viral genes modulate the physiological machinery of infected cells that lead to cell transformation and development of cancer. One of the important adoptive responses by the cancer cells is their metabolic change to cope up with continuous requirement of cell survival and proliferation. In this review we will focus on how DNA viruses alter the glucose metabolism of transformed cells. Tumor DNA viruses enhance “aerobic” glycolysis upon virus-induced cell transformation, supporting rapid cell proliferation and showing the Warburg effect. Moreover, viral proteins enhance glucose uptake and controls tumor microenvironment, promoting metastasizing of the tumor cells. PMID:27034740

  18. Tumor-associated macrophages (not tumor cells) are the determinants of photosensitizer tumor localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd

    1995-03-01

    The distribution of Photofrin and several other photosensitizers among major cellular populations contained in solid mouse tumors was examined using flow cytometry. Seven tumor models were included in the analysis: sarcomas EMT6, KHT, RIF, FsaR and FsaN, Lewis lung carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma SCCVII. In all these tumors, the highest photosensitizer levels were found in a subpopulation of tumor associated macrophages consisting of activated cells (as suggested by their increased size, granularity, and the number of interleukin 2 receptors). There was no evidence of selective photosensitizer accumulation in malignant tumor cells. Results consistent with these observations were also obtained with the carcinogen induced squamous cell carcinoma growing in hamster cheek pouch.

  19. Adrenal cortex dysfunction: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Huebener, K.H.; Treugut, H.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of the adrenal gland was studied in 302 patients with possible endocrinologic disease and 107 patients undergoing CT for nonendocrinologic reasons. Measurements of adrenal size were also made in 100 adults with no known adrenal pathology. CT proved to be a sensitive diagnostic tool in combination with clinical studies. When blood hormone levels are increased, CT can differentiate among homogeneous organic hyperplasia, nodular hyperplasia, benign adenoma, and malignant cortical adenoma. When blood hormone levels are decreased, CT can demonstrate hypoplasia or metastatic tumorous destruction. Calcifications can be demonstrated earlier than on plain radiographs. When hormone elimination is increased, the morphologic substrate can be identified; tumorous changes can be localized and infiltration of surrounding organs recognized.

  20. Natural Killer Cells and Neuroblastoma: Tumor Recognition, Escape Mechanisms, and Possible Novel Immunotherapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Bottino, Cristina; Dondero, Alessandra; Bellora, Francesca; Moretta, Lorenzo; Locatelli, Franco; Pistoia, Vito; Moretta, Alessandro; Castriconi, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extra-cranial solid tumor of childhood and arises from developing sympathetic nervous system. Most primary tumors localize in the abdomen, the adrenal gland, or lumbar sympathetic ganglia. Amplification in tumor cells of MYCN, the major oncogenic driver, patients’ age over 18 months, and the presence at diagnosis of a metastatic disease (stage IV, M) identify NB at high risk of treatment failure. Conventional therapies did not significantly improve the overall survival of these patients. Moreover, the limited landscape of somatic mutations detected in NB is hampering the development of novel pharmacological approaches. Major efforts aim to identify novel NB-associated surface molecules that activate immune responses and/or direct drugs to tumor cells and tumor-associated vessels. PVR (Poliovirus Receptor) and B7-H3 are promising targets, since they are expressed by most high-risk NB, are upregulated in tumor vasculature and are essential for tumor survival/invasiveness. PVR is a ligand of DNAM-1 activating receptor that triggers the cytolytic activity of natural killer (NK) cells against NB. In animal models, targeting of PVR with an attenuated oncolytic poliovirus induced tumor regression and elimination. Also B7-H3 was successfully targeted in preclinical studies and is now being tested in phase I/II clinical trials. B7-H3 down-regulates NK cytotoxicity, providing NB with a mechanism of escape from immune response. The immunosuppressive potential of NB can be enhanced by the release of soluble factors that impair NK cell function and/or recruitment. Among these, TGF-β1 modulates the cytotoxicity receptors and the chemokine receptor repertoire of NK cells. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the main cell surface molecules and soluble mediators that modulate the function of NK cells in NB, considering the pros and cons that must be taken into account in the design of novel NK cell-based immunotherapeutic

  1. Natural killer cells and neuroblastoma: tumor recognition, escape mechanisms, and possible novel immunotherapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Bottino, Cristina; Dondero, Alessandra; Bellora, Francesca; Moretta, Lorenzo; Locatelli, Franco; Pistoia, Vito; Moretta, Alessandro; Castriconi, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extra-cranial solid tumor of childhood and arises from developing sympathetic nervous system. Most primary tumors localize in the abdomen, the adrenal gland, or lumbar sympathetic ganglia. Amplification in tumor cells of MYCN, the major oncogenic driver, patients' age over 18 months, and the presence at diagnosis of a metastatic disease (stage IV, M) identify NB at high risk of treatment failure. Conventional therapies did not significantly improve the overall survival of these patients. Moreover, the limited landscape of somatic mutations detected in NB is hampering the development of novel pharmacological approaches. Major efforts aim to identify novel NB-associated surface molecules that activate immune responses and/or direct drugs to tumor cells and tumor-associated vessels. PVR (Poliovirus Receptor) and B7-H3 are promising targets, since they are expressed by most high-risk NB, are upregulated in tumor vasculature and are essential for tumor survival/invasiveness. PVR is a ligand of DNAM-1 activating receptor that triggers the cytolytic activity of natural killer (NK) cells against NB. In animal models, targeting of PVR with an attenuated oncolytic poliovirus induced tumor regression and elimination. Also B7-H3 was successfully targeted in preclinical studies and is now being tested in phase I/II clinical trials. B7-H3 down-regulates NK cytotoxicity, providing NB with a mechanism of escape from immune response. The immunosuppressive potential of NB can be enhanced by the release of soluble factors that impair NK cell function and/or recruitment. Among these, TGF-β1 modulates the cytotoxicity receptors and the chemokine receptor repertoire of NK cells. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the main cell surface molecules and soluble mediators that modulate the function of NK cells in NB, considering the pros and cons that must be taken into account in the design of novel NK cell-based immunotherapeutic approaches

  2. Targeting regulatory T cells in tumors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Workman, Creg J; Vignali, Dario A A

    2016-07-01

    Regulatory T (Treg ) cells play a crucial role in maintaining peripheral tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. However, they also represent a major barrier to effective antitumor immunity and immunotherapy. Consequently, there has been considerable interest in developing approaches that can selectively or preferentially target Treg cells in tumors, while not impacting their capacity to maintain peripheral immune homeostasis. In this review, we describe our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the recruitment, expansion, and suppressive activity of tumor-associated Treg cells, and discuss the approaches used and the challenges encountered in the immunotherapeutic targeting of Treg cells. In addition, we summarize the primary clinical targets and some emerging data on exciting new potential Treg cell-restricted targets. We propose that discovering and understanding mechanisms that are preferentially used by Treg cells within the tumor microenvironment will lead to strategies that selectively target Treg cell-mediated suppression of antitumor immunity while maintaining peripheral immune tolerance. PMID:26787424

  3. Bilateral adrenal haemorrhage leading to adrenal crisis

    PubMed Central

    McGowan-Smyth, Sam

    2014-01-01

    A 77-year-old man presented with an acute worsening of chronic back pain. CT showed dense bilateral adrenal glands suggestive of adrenal haemorrhage which was confirmed by MRI. Despite appropriate glucocorticoid replacement for adrenal insufficiency, 7 days after admission this patient suffered an adrenal crisis. Owing to the timely diagnosis, appropriate treatment was given and the patient survived. Large bilateral adrenal haemorrhage however, can lead to cardiovascular collapse and death if not appropriately diagnosed and managed promptly. Despite its rarity, bilateral adrenal haemorrhage should always be considered as a differential for back pain in the setting of an acute illness due to its potentially fatal consequences. PMID:24969071

  4. Ceramide Kinase Promotes Tumor Cell Survival and Mammary Tumor Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Ania W.; Pant, Dhruv K.; Pan, Tien-chi; Chodosh, Lewis A.

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent breast cancer is typically an incurable disease and, as such, is disproportionately responsible for deaths from this disease. Recurrent breast cancers arise from the pool of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) that survive adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy, and patients with detectable DTCs following therapy are at substantially increased risk for recurrence. Consequently, the identification of pathways that contribute to the survival of breast cancer cells following therapy could aid in the development of more effective therapies that decrease the burden of residual disease and thereby reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence. We now report that Ceramide Kinase (Cerk) is required for mammary tumor recurrence following HER2/neu pathway inhibition and is spontaneously up-regulated during tumor recurrence in multiple genetically engineered mouse models for breast cancer. We find that Cerk is rapidly up-regulated in tumor cells following HER2/neu down-regulation or treatment with Adriamycin and that Cerk is required for tumor cell survival following HER2/neu down-regulation. Consistent with our observations in mouse models, analysis of gene expression profiles from over 2,200 patients revealed that elevated CERK expression is associated with an increased risk of recurrence in women with breast cancer. Additionally, although CERK expression is associated with aggressive subtypes of breast cancer, including those that are ER–, HER2+, basal-like, or high grade, its association with poor clinical outcome is independent of these clinicopathological variables. Together, our findings identify a functional role for Cerk in breast cancer recurrence and suggest the clinical utility of agents targeted against this pro-survival pathway. PMID:25164007

  5. Characterization of cell suspensions from solid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pallavicini, M.

    1985-07-10

    The desirable features of cells in suspension will necessarily be dependent upon the use for which the cells were prepared. Adequate cell yield or recovery is defined by the measurement to be performed. Retention of cellular morphology is important for microscopic identification of cell types in a heterogenous cell suspension, and may be used to determine whether the cells in suspension are representative of those in the tumor in situ. Different dispersal protocols may yield cells with different degrees of clonogenicity, as well as altered biochemical features, such as loss of cellular proteins, surface antigens, nucleotide pools, etc. The quality of the cell suspension can be judged by the degree of cell clumping and level of cellular debris, both of which impact on flow cytometric measurements and studies in which the number of cells be known accurately. Finally, if the data measured on the cells in suspension are to be extrapolated to phenomena occurring in the tumor in situ, it is desirable that the cells in suspension are representative of those in the solid tumor in vivo. This report compares characteristics of tumor cell suspensions obtained by different types of selected disaggregation methods. 33 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Tumor sialylation impedes T cell mediated anti-tumor responses while promoting tumor associated-regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Perdicchio, Maurizio; Cornelissen, Lenneke A. M.; Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Engels, Steef; Verstege, Marleen I.; Boon, Louis; Geerts, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The increased presence of sialylated glycans on the tumor surface has been linked to poor prognosis, yet the effects on tumor-specific T cell immunity are hardly studied. We here show that hypersialylation of B16 melanoma substantially influences tumor growth by preventing the formation of effector T cells and facilitating the presence of high regulatory T cell (Treg) frequencies. Knock-down of the sialic acid transporter created “sialic acid low” tumors, that grew slower in-vivo than hypersialylated tumors, altered the Treg/Teffector balance, favoring immunological tumor control. The enhanced effector T cell response in developing “sialic acid low” tumors was preceded by and dependent on an increased influx and activity of Natural Killer (NK) cells. Thus, tumor hypersialylation orchestrates immune escape at the level of NK and Teff/Treg balance within the tumor microenvironment, herewith dampening tumor-specific T cell control. Reducing sialylation provides a therapeutic option to render tumors permissive to immune attack. PMID:26741508

  7. Tumor sialylation impedes T cell mediated anti-tumor responses while promoting tumor associated-regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Perdicchio, Maurizio; Cornelissen, Lenneke A M; Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Engels, Steef; Verstege, Marleen I; Boon, Louis; Geerts, Dirk; van Kooyk, Yvette; Unger, Wendy W J

    2016-02-23

    The increased presence of sialylated glycans on the tumor surface has been linked to poor prognosis, yet the effects on tumor-specific T cell immunity are hardly studied. We here show that hypersialylation of B16 melanoma substantially influences tumor growth by preventing the formation of effector T cells and facilitating the presence of high regulatory T cell (Treg) frequencies. Knock-down of the sialic acid transporter created "sialic acid low" tumors, that grew slower in-vivo than hypersialylated tumors, altered the Treg/Teffector balance, favoring immunological tumor control. The enhanced effector T cell response in developing "sialic acid low" tumors was preceded by and dependent on an increased influx and activity of Natural Killer (NK) cells. Thus, tumor hypersialylation orchestrates immune escape at the level of NK and Teff/Treg balance within the tumor microenvironment, herewith dampening tumor-specific T cell control. Reducing sialylation provides a therapeutic option to render tumors permissive to immune attack. PMID:26741508

  8. [Benign and malignant granular cell tumors. An immunohistochemical classification of tumor cells].

    PubMed

    Kuhn, A; Mahrle, G; Steigleder, G K

    1987-06-15

    Eight benign and three malignant granular cell tumors were characterized by means of antibodies and antisera against keratin, desmin, epithelial membrane antigen, factor VIII-related protein, lysozyme, myelin basic protein, myoglobin, neurone-specific enolase, S 100 protein, myelin-associated protein (Leu 7), glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin, and neurofilament. All benign granular cell tumours showed positive staining of the tumor cells to antibodies against vimentin, S 100 protein, and neurone-specific enolase; myelin-associated protein (Leu 7), in contrast, was only detectable in a few tumor sections. Histogenetically the granular cells may be classified as Schwann's cells which lost their expression of laminin. The three malignant granular cell tumors showed a staining pattern significantly different from that of the benign tumours. Thus, only neurone-specific enolase was detectable in all the tumors, whereas S 100 protein and vimentin could not be demonstrated but in one and two, resp., out of three tumors. PMID:3303714

  9. Endocrinopathies. Thyroid and adrenal disorders.

    PubMed

    Merchant, S R; Taboada, J

    1997-11-01

    This article focuses on common adrenal and thyroid diseases in the geriatric patient consisting of hypothyroidism in the dog, hyperthyroidism in the cat, and hyperadrenocorticism in the dog to include clinical signs, diagnosis, and management. A brief section on hyperadrenocorticism in the cat, thyroid tumors in the dog, and pheochromocytoma in the dog and cat are also included. PMID:9348631

  10. Tumor-Associated Endothelial Cells Promote Tumor Metastasis by Chaperoning Circulating Tumor Cells and Protecting Them from Anoikis.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Arti; Kumar, Bhavna; Yu, Jun-Ge; Old, Matthew; Teknos, Theodoros N; Kumar, Pawan

    2015-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is a highly inefficient biological process as millions of tumor cells are released in circulation each day and only a few of them are able to successfully form distal metastatic nodules. This could be due to the fact that most of the epithelial origin cancer cells are anchorage-dependent and undergo rapid anoikis in harsh circulating conditions. A number of studies have shown that in addition to tumor cells, activated endothelial cells are also released into the blood circulation from the primary tumors. However, the precise role of these activated circulating endothelial cells (CECs) in tumor metastasis process is not known. Therefore, we performed a series of experiments to examine if CECs promoted tumor metastasis by chaperoning the tumor cells to distal sites. Our results demonstrate that blood samples from head and neck cancer patients contain significantly higher Bcl-2-positive CECs as compared to healthy volunteers. Technically, it is challenging to know the origin of CECs in patient blood samples, therefore we used an orthotopic SCID mouse model and co-implanted GFP-labeled endothelial cells along with tumor cells. Our results suggest that activated CECs (Bcl-2-positive) were released from primary tumors and they co-migrated with tumor cells to distal sites. Bcl-2 overexpression in endothelial cells (EC-Bcl-2) significantly enhanced adhesion molecule expression and tumor cell binding that was predominantly mediated by E-selectin. In addition, tumor cells bound to EC-Bcl-2 showed a significantly higher anoikis resistance via the activation of Src-FAK pathway. In our in vivo experiments, we observed significantly higher lung metastasis when tumor cells were co-injected with EC-Bcl-2 as compared to EC-VC. E-selectin knockdown in EC-Bcl-2 cells or FAK/FUT3 knockdown in tumor cells significantly reversed EC-Bcl-2-mediated tumor metastasis. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role for CECs in protecting the tumor cells in circulation and

  11. Gap junction-mediated cell-to-cell communication in bovine and human adrenal cells. A process whereby cells increase their responsiveness to physiological corticotropin concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Munari-Silem, Y; Lebrethon, M C; Morand, I; Rousset, B; Saez, J M

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the role of gap junction-mediated intercellular communication on the steroidogenic response of bovine (BAC) and human (HAC) adrenal fasciculo-reticularis cells in culture to corticotropin (ACTH). Indirect immunofluorescence analyses showed that intact human and bovine adreno-cortical tissue as well as HAC and BAC in culture expressed the gap junction protein connexin43 (also termed alpha 1 connexin). Both HAC and BAC were functionally coupled through gap junctions as demonstrated by microinjection of a low molecular mass fluorescent probe, Lucifer yellow. The cell-to-cell transfer of the probe was blocked by 18 alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), an inhibitor of gap junction-mediated intercellular communication. GA markedly decreased the steroidogenic response (cortisol production) of both HAC and BAC to low (10 pM) but not to high (5 nM) concentrations of ACTH. GA had no inhibitory effect on the steroidogenic response to 8 Br-cAMP (at either low or high concentrations) and did neither modify the binding of 125I-ACTH to its receptor nor the ACTH-induced cAMP production. BAC cultured at high or low cell densities (2.4 x 10(5) vs. 0.24 x 10(5) cells/cm2) exhibited distinct levels of intercellular communication and were differently responsive to sub-maximal ACTH concentrations. The ACTH ED50 values for cortisol production were 8.5 +/- 1.3 and 45 +/- 14 pM (P < 0.02) for BAC cultured at high and low density, respectively. In the presence of GA, there was a shift of the ACTH concentration-response curves in the two culture conditions. The ACTH ED50 of high density and low density cultured BAC increased 25- and 5-fold, respectively, and became similar (220 +/- 90 and 250 +/- 120 pM). These results demonstrate that gap junction-mediated communication between hormone-responsive and nonresponsive cells is one mechanism by which adrenal cells increase their responsiveness to low ACTH concentrations. Images PMID:7706446

  12. Rodent and primate adrenal medullary cells in vitro: phenotypic plasticity in response to coculture with C6 glioma cells or NGF.

    PubMed

    Notter, M F; Hansen, J T; Okawara, S; Gash, D M

    1989-01-01

    In order to maintain a chronic supply of growth factor for medulla cells in vitro, chromaffin cells from rat, African green monkeys and man were co-cultured with C6 glioma cells, which secrete growth factors that sustain sympathetic neurons in vitro. The response of chromaffin cells to coculture was compared to treatment of medullary cells with nerve growth factor (NGF) alone. Dispersed chromaffin cell preparations were obtained by a trypsin-collagenase procedure, and subjected to differential plating on collagen-coated surfaces. With both human and monkey tissue, non-chromaffin cells did attach to the culture plates and an enriched chromaffin cell population could be replated. Rat adrenal medulla cells survived very poorly in vitro and were not enriched in this procedure. Cultured human and monkey chromaffin cells survived as epithelial cells (50%) and showed neuritic outgrowth on 55 to 66% of the cells after eight days when treated with nerve growth factor (NGF). These cells showed strong catecholamine histofluorescence, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH) immunoreactivity. In contrast, only ten percent of adult rat chromaffin cells survived in culture, although NGF treatment rescued an additional 20% of the cells and induced neuritic outgrowth after one week in vitro. C6 glioma cells were treated with mitomycin C bromodeoxyuridine to inhibit mitosis and were plated with the various medulla cells in a one to one ratio. Both human and monkey chromaffin cells expressed extensive and enhanced neuritic arborization within eight days of co-culture, (64-82% respectively) and exhibited intimate contact with the glioma cells as seen at the ultrastructural level. Importantly, survival of adult rat adrenal medulla cells was enhanced to 50% or more with 40% of the cells extending neurites when co-cultured with glioma cells for seven days. Chromaffin cells from all three species reacted for TH, DBH and PNMT in co-culture and were histo

  13. Recognition of tumor cells by Dectin-1 orchestrates innate immune cells for anti-tumor responses

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Shiho; Ikushima, Hiroaki; Ueki, Hiroshi; Yanai, Hideyuki; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Hangai, Sho; Nishio, Junko; Negishi, Hideo; Tamura, Tomohiko; Saijo, Shinobu; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu

    2014-01-01

    The eradication of tumor cells requires communication to and signaling by cells of the immune system. Natural killer (NK) cells are essential tumor-killing effector cells of the innate immune system; however, little is known about whether or how other immune cells recognize tumor cells to assist NK cells. Here, we show that the innate immune receptor Dectin-1 expressed on dendritic cells and macrophages is critical to NK-mediated killing of tumor cells that express N-glycan structures at high levels. Receptor recognition of these tumor cells causes the activation of the IRF5 transcription factor and downstream gene induction for the full-blown tumoricidal activity of NK cells. Consistent with this, we show exacerbated in vivo tumor growth in mice genetically deficient in either Dectin-1 or IRF5. The critical contribution of Dectin-1 in the recognition of and signaling by tumor cells may offer new insight into the anti-tumor immune system with therapeutic implications. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04177.001 PMID:25149452

  14. Energy and Redox Homeostasis in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Marcus Fernandes; Amoêdo, Nívea Dias; Rumjanek, Franklin David

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells display abnormal morphology, chromosomes, and metabolism. This review will focus on the metabolism of tumor cells integrating the available data by way of a functional approach. The first part contains a comprehensive introduction to bioenergetics, mitochondria, and the mechanisms of production and degradation of reactive oxygen species. This will be followed by a discussion on the oxidative metabolism of tumor cells including the morphology, biogenesis, and networking of mitochondria. Tumor cells overexpress proteins that favor fission, such as GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). The interplay between proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family that promotes Drp 1-dependent mitochondrial fragmentation and fusogenic antiapoptotic proteins such as Opa-1 will be presented. It will be argued that contrary to the widespread belief that in cancer cells, aerobic glycolysis completely replaces oxidative metabolism, a misrepresentation of Warburg's original results, mitochondria of tumor cells are fully viable and functional. Cancer cells also carry out oxidative metabolism and generally conform to the orthodox model of ATP production maintaining as well an intact electron transport system. Finally, data will be presented indicating that the key to tumor cell survival in an ROS rich environment depends on the overexpression of antioxidant enzymes and high levels of the nonenzymatic antioxidant scavengers. PMID:22693511

  15. Osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas☆

    PubMed Central

    Temesgen, Wudneh M.; Wachtel, Mitchell; Dissanaike, Sharmila

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pancreatic giant cell tumors are rare, with an incidence of less than 1% of all pancreatic tumors. Osteoclastic giant cell tumor (OGCT) of the pancreas is one of the three types of PGCT, which are now classified as undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells. PRESENTATION OF CASE The patient is a 57 year old woman who presented with a 3 week history of epigastric pain and a palpable abdominal mass. Imaging studies revealed an 18 cm × 15 cm soft tissue mass with cystic components which involved the pancreas, stomach and spleen. Exploratory laparotomy with distal pancreatectomy, partial gastrectomy and splenectomy was performed. Histology revealed undifferentiated pancreatic carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells with production of osteoid and glandular elements. DISCUSSION OGCT of the pancreas resembles benign-appearing giant cell tumors of bone, and contain osteoclastic-like multinucleated cells and mononuclear cells. OGCTs display a less aggressive course with slow metastasis and lymph node spread compared to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Due to the rarity of the cancer, there is a lack of prospective studies on treatment options. Surgical en-bloc resection is currently considered first line treatment. The role of adjuvant therapy with radiotherapy or chemotherapy has not been established. CONCLUSION Pancreatic giant cell tumors are rare pancreatic neoplasms with unique clinical and pathological characteristics. Osteoclastic giant cell tumors are the most favorable sub-type. Surgical en bloc resection is the first line treatment. Long-term follow-up of patients with these tumors is essential to compile a body of literature to help guide treatment. PMID:24631915

  16. A virilizing Leydig cell tumor of the ovary associated with stromal hyperplasia under gonadotropin control.

    PubMed

    Marcondes, J A; Nery, M; Mendonça, B B; Hayashida, S A; Halbe, H W; Carvalho, F M; Wajchenberg, B L

    1997-12-01

    A 34-yr-old nulliparous black woman presented with hair loss, facial hirsutism, irregular menses and infertility associated with greatly increased serum total testosterone levels. The adrenal glands and the ovaries were normal on radiological and ultrasonographic investigation. Catheterization of the veins draining from the adrenal glands and the ovaries yielded testosterone levels of 20.3 nmol/L and 20.0 nmol/L in the right and the left adrenal veins, respectively, and 17.9 nmol/L and 27.4 nmol/L in the right and left ovaries venous plexus, respectively. Sequencial dexamethasone and ethynyl estradiol suppression test showed a decrease in cortisol level with no change in total testosterone level on dexamethasone while an increase in testosterone from 10.5 nmol/L to 20.1 nmol/L was observed ten days after ethynil estradiol had been associated to dexamethasone. When a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (gonadorelin 3.5 mg i.m.) was administered for 2 months, serum gonadotropins levels decreased to less than 2 IU/L, total testosterone to 3.8 nmol/L and estradiol to less than 36 pmol/L. The patient was submitted to a pelvic exploratory laparotomy and a left salpingo-oophorectomy was performed. A solid and circumscribed ovarian tumor of 1.0 cm in diameter was found. The pathological diagnosis was a Leydig cell tumor with surrounding stromal hyperplasia. These findings may suggest that this tumor was gonadotropin-dependent being indirectly stimulated by ethynil estradiol, through a sensitization of the pituitary gonadotropes and increase in gonadotropin levels and suppressed by a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist. PMID:9492110

  17. Halothane inhibits the cholinergic-receptor-mediated influx of calcium in primary culture of bovine adrenal medulla cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yashima, N.; Wada, A.; Izumi, F.

    1986-04-01

    Adrenal medulla cells are cholinoceptive cells. Stimulation of the acetylcholine receptor causes the influx of Ca to the cells, and Ca acts as the coupler of the stimulus-secretion coupling. In this study, the authors investigated the effects of halothane on the receptor-mediated influx of /sup 45/Ca using cultured bovine adrenal medulla cells. Halothane at clinical concentrations (0.5-2%) inhibited the influx of /sup 45/Ca caused by carbachol, with simultaneous inhibition of catecholamine secretion. The influx of /sup 45/Ca and the secretion of catecholamines caused by K depolarization were inhibited by a large concentration of Mg, which competes with Ca at Ca channels, but not inhibited by halothane. Inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was not overcome by increase in the carbachol concentration. Inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was examined in comparison with that caused by a large concentration of Mg by the application of Scatchard analysis as the function of the external Ca concentration. Halothane decreased the maximal influx of /sup 45/Ca without altering the apparent kinetic constant of Ca to Ca channels. On the contrary, a large concentration of Mg increased the apparent kinetic constant without altering the maximal influx of /sup 45/Ca. Based on these findings, the authors suggest that inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was not due to the direct competitive inhibition of Ca channels, nor to the competitive antagonism of agonist-receptor interaction. As a possibility, halothane seems to inhibit the receptor-mediated activation of Ca channels through the interference of coupling between the receptor and Ca channels.

  18. Reversing drug resistance of soft tumor-repopulating cells by tumor cell-derived chemotherapeutic microparticles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingwei; Zhang, Yi; Tang, Ke; Zhang, Huafeng; Yin, Xiaonan; Li, Yong; Xu, Pingwei; Sun, Yanling; Ma, Ruihua; Ji, Tiantian; Chen, Junwei; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Tianzhen; Luo, Shunqun; Jin, Yang; Luo, Xiuli; Li, Chengyin; Gong, Hongwei; Long, Zhixiong; Lu, Jinzhi; Hu, Zhuowei; Cao, Xuetao; Wang, Ning; Yang, Xiangliang; Huang, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Developing novel approaches to reverse the drug resistance of tumor-repopulating cells (TRCs) or stem cell-like cancer cells is an urgent clinical need to improve outcomes of cancer patients. Here we show an innovative approach that reverses drug resistance of TRCs using tumor cell-derived microparticles (T-MPs) containing anti-tumor drugs. TRCs, by virtue of being more deformable than differentiated cancer cells, preferentially take up T-MPs that release anti-tumor drugs after entering cells, which in turn lead to death of TRCs. The underlying mechanisms include interfering with drug efflux and promoting nuclear entry of the drugs. Our findings demonstrate the importance of tumor cell softness in uptake of T-MPs and effectiveness of a novel approach in reversing drug resistance of TRCs with promising clinical applications. PMID:27167569

  19. An overview of therapeutic approaches to brain tumor stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Primary and secondary malignant central nervous system (CNS) tumors are devastating invasive tumors able to give rise to many kinds of differentiated tumor cells. Glioblastoma multiform (GBM), is the most malignant brain tumor, in which its growth and persistence depend on cancer stem cells with enhanced DNA damage repair program that also induces recurrence and resists current chemo- and radiotherapies. Unlike non-tumor stem cells, tumor stem cells lack the normal mechanisms that regulate proliferation and differentiation, resulting in uncontrolled production and incomplete differentiation of tumor cells. In current paper recent developments and new researches in the field of brain tumor stem cells have been reviewed. PMID:23483074

  20. One cell, multiple roles: contribution of mesenchymal stem cells to tumor development in tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of tissue reparative and immunosuppressive abilities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has drawn more attention to tumor microenvironment and its role in providing the soil for the tumor cell growth. MSCs are recruited to tumor which is referred as the never healing wound and altered by the inflammation environment, thereby helping to construct the tumor microenvironment. The environment orchestrated by MSCs and other factors can be associated with angiogenesis, immunosuppression, inhibition of apoptosis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), survival of cancer stem cells, which all contribute to tumor growth and progression. In this review, we will discuss how MSCs are recruited to the tumor microenvironment and what effects they have on tumor progression. PMID:23336752

  1. Failure to visualize adrenal glands in a patient with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. [/sup 131/I

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, L.; Mayfield, R.K.; Levine, J.H.; Lopes-Virella, M.F.; Sagel, J.; Buse, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    A patient with clinical and biochemical evidence of Cushing's disease and severe hyperlipidemia underwent an adrenal imaging procedure with NP-59 (6..beta..-(/sup 131/I)iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol), without visualization of either gland. Correction of the hyperlipidemia followed by repeated adrenal imaging resulted in bilateral visualization. A pituitary tumor was removed at surgery, confirming the diagnosis of Cushing's disease.

  2. Whole tumor antigen vaccination using dendritic cells: comparison of RNA electroporation and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Benencia, Fabian; Courrèges, Maria C; Coukos, George

    2008-01-01

    Because of the lack of full characterization of tumor associated antigens for solid tumors, whole antigen use is a convenient approach to tumor vaccination. Tumor RNA and apoptotic tumor cells have been used as a source of whole tumor antigen to prepare dendritic cell (DC) based tumor vaccines, but their efficacy has not been directly compared. Here we compare directly RNA electroporation and pulsing of DCs with whole tumor cells killed by ultraviolet (UV) B radiation using a convenient tumor model expressing human papilloma virus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes. Although both approaches led to DCs presenting tumor antigen, electroporation with tumor cell total RNA induced a significantly higher frequency of tumor-reactive IFN-gamma secreting T cells, and E7-specific CD8+ lymphocytes compared to pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells. DCs electroporated with tumor cell RNA induced a larger tumor infiltration by T cells and produced a significantly stronger delay in tumor growth compared to DCs pulsed with UV-irradiated tumor cells. We conclude that electroporation with whole tumor cell RNA and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells are both effective in eliciting antitumor immune response, but RNA electroporation results in more potent tumor vaccination under the examined experimental conditions. PMID:18445282

  3. Primary Adrenal Leiomyosarcoma in an Arab Male: A Rare Case Report with Immunohistochemistry Study

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Veena; Mustafa, Mohammed; Amin, Essa; Ali, Waleed; Naji Sarsam, Shamil

    2015-01-01

    Primary adrenal leiomyosarcoma is a rare form of adrenal mesenchymal tumors. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) together with histology takes a major role in determining the tumor type and predicting their biological behavior and differentiating them from adrenal cortical carcinoma. Appropriate radiological investigation is necessary to rule out metastatic disease from primary tumors elsewhere in the body. In this case, we report a primary leiomyosarcoma of the adrenal gland in a 61-year-old Bahraini male clinically presumed to be a renal neoplasm. PMID:25685588

  4. Apoptin: specific killer of tumor cells?

    PubMed

    Tavassoli, M; Guelen, L; Luxon, B A; Gäken, J

    2005-08-01

    In the early 1990s it was discovered that the VP3/Apoptin protein encoded by the Chicken Anemia virus (CAV) possesses an inherent ability to specifically kill cancer cells. Apoptin was found to be located in the cytoplasm of normal cells while in tumor cells it was localized mainly in the nucleus.(1) These differences in the localization pattern were suggested to be the main mechanism by which normal cells show resistance to Apoptin-mediated cell killing. Although the mechanism of action of Apoptin is presently unknown, it seems to function by the induction of programmed cell death (PCD) after translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and arresting the cell cycle at G2/M, possibly by interfering with the cyclosome.(2) In addition, cancer specific phosphorylation of Threonine residue 108 has been suggested to be important for Apoptin's function to kill tumor cells.(3) In contrast to the large number of publications reporting that nuclear localization, induction of PCD and phosphorylation of Apoptin is restricted to cancer cells, several recent studies have shown that Apoptin has the ability to migrate to the nucleus and induce PCD in some of the normal cell lines tested. There is evidence that high protein expression levels as well as the cellular growth rate may influence Apoptin's ability to specifically kill tumor cells. Thus far both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that Apoptin is a powerful apoptosis inducing protein with a promising prospective utility in cancer therapy. However, here we show that several recent findings contradict some of the earlier results on the tumor specificity of Apoptin, thus creating some controversy in the field. The aim of this article is to review the available data, some published and some unpublished, which either agree or contradict the reported "black and white" tumor cell specificity of Apoptin. Understanding what factors appear to influence its function should help to develop Apoptin into a potent anti

  5. Apoptin: Specific killer of tumor cells?

    PubMed Central

    Tavassoli, M.; Guelen, L.; Luxon, B. A.; Gäken, J.

    2010-01-01

    In the early 1990s it was discovered that the VP3/Apoptin protein encoded by the Chicken Anemia virus (CAV) possesses an inherent ability to specifically kill cancer cells. Apoptin was found to be located in the cytoplasm of normal cells while in tumor cells it was localized mainly in the nucleus.1 These differences in the localization pattern were suggested to be the main mechanism by which normal cells show resistance to Apoptin-mediated cell killing. Although the mechanism of action of Apoptin is presently unknown, it seems to function by the induction of programmed cell death (PCD) after translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and arresting the cell cycle at g2/M, possibly by interfering with the cyclosome.2 In addition, cancer specific phosphorylation of Threonine residue 108 has been suggested to be important for Apoptin’s function to kill tumor cells.3 In contrast to the large number of publications reporting that nuclear localization, induction of PCD and phosphorylation of Apoptin is restricted to cancer cells, several recent studies have shown that Apoptin has the ability to migrate to the nucleus and induce PCD in some of the normal cell lines tested. There is evidence that high protein expression levels as well as the cellular growth rate may influence Apoptin’s ability to specifically kill tumor cells. Thus far both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that Apoptin is a powerful apoptosis inducing protein with a promising prospective utility in cancer therapy. However, here we show that several recent findings contradict some of the earlier results on the tumor specificity of Apoptin, thus creating some controversy in the field. The aim of this article is to review the available data, some published and some unpublished, which either agree or contradict the reported “black and white” tumor cell specificity of Apoptin. Understanding what factors appear to influence its function should help to develop Apoptin into a potent anti

  6. Tumor-Infiltrating Immune Cells Promoting Tumor Invasion and Metastasis: Existing Theories

    PubMed Central

    Man, Yan-gao; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Mason, Jeffrey; Avital, Itzhak; Bilchik, Anton; Bruecher, Bjoern; Protic, Mladjan; Nissan, Aviram; Izadjoo, Mina; Zhang, Xichen; Jewett, Anahid

    2013-01-01

    It is a commonly held belief that infiltration of immune cells into tumor tissues and direct physical contact between tumor cells and infiltrated immune cells is associated with physical destructions of the tumor cells, reduction of the tumor burden, and improved clinical prognosis. An increasing number of studies, however, have suggested that aberrant infiltration of immune cells into tumor or normal tissues may promote tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis. Neither the primary reason for these contradictory observations, nor the mechanism for the reported diverse impact of tumor-infiltrating immune cells has been elucidated, making it difficult to judge the clinical implications of infiltration of immune cells within tumor tissues. This mini-review presents several existing hypotheses and models that favor the promoting impact of tumor-infiltrating immune cells on tumor invasion and metastasis, and also analyzes their strength and weakness. PMID:23386907

  7. Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor, a “Floating Island” Pattern in Pleural Fluid Cytology: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hui; McMeekin, Emily Marie; Sturgis, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare aggressive sarcoma with characteristic clinical and pathologic features. It typically involves pelvic and abdominal organs of young male patients, and patients usually present at advanced stage with poor prognosis. A few reports are available describing the cytopathologic features of DSRCT in serous effusions, with the majority of published cases depicting undifferentiated small blue cells that need to be distinguished from other small blue cell tumors. We report an interesting case of DSRCT involving a pleural effusion with a “floating island” pattern that has been described in hepatocellular carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, and adrenal cortical carcinoma. In our case, the epithelioid tumor cells form cohesive aggregates surrounded by a single layer of spindle cells, mimicking the “endothelial wrapping” in other tumors with “floating island” patterns. We demonstrate, by ancillary testing, that these peripheral spindle cells are tapered/flattened DSRCT cells, in contrast to endothelial wrapping cells, as seen in other tumors with this unique cytomorphology. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing DSRCT showing a “floating island” pattern that needs to be differentiated from metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, and adrenal cortical carcinoma in effusion cytology. PMID:26413364

  8. Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor, a "Floating Island" Pattern in Pleural Fluid Cytology: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui; McMeekin, Emily Marie; Sturgis, Charles D

    2015-01-01

    Desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT) is a rare aggressive sarcoma with characteristic clinical and pathologic features. It typically involves pelvic and abdominal organs of young male patients, and patients usually present at advanced stage with poor prognosis. A few reports are available describing the cytopathologic features of DSRCT in serous effusions, with the majority of published cases depicting undifferentiated small blue cells that need to be distinguished from other small blue cell tumors. We report an interesting case of DSRCT involving a pleural effusion with a "floating island" pattern that has been described in hepatocellular carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, and adrenal cortical carcinoma. In our case, the epithelioid tumor cells form cohesive aggregates surrounded by a single layer of spindle cells, mimicking the "endothelial wrapping" in other tumors with "floating island" patterns. We demonstrate, by ancillary testing, that these peripheral spindle cells are tapered/flattened DSRCT cells, in contrast to endothelial wrapping cells, as seen in other tumors with this unique cytomorphology. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing DSRCT showing a "floating island" pattern that needs to be differentiated from metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma, renal cell carcinoma, and adrenal cortical carcinoma in effusion cytology. PMID:26413364

  9. Molecular biology of testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Exposito, R; Merino, M; Aguayo, C

    2016-06-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are the most common solid tumors in young adult men. They constitute a unique pathology because of their embryonic and germ origin and their special behavior. Genetic predisposition, environmental factors involved in their development and genetic aberrations have been under study in many works throughout the last years trying to explain the susceptibility and the transformation mechanism of TGCTs. Despite the high rate of cure in this type of tumors because its particular sensitivity to cisplatin, there are tumors resistant to chemotherapy for which it is needed to find new therapies. In the present work, it has been carried out a literature review on the most important molecular aspects involved in the onset and development of such tumors, as well as a review of the major developments regarding prognostic factors, new prognostic biomarkers and the possibility of new targeted therapies. PMID:26482724

  10. Enhanced delivery of liposomes to lung tumor through targeting interleukin-4 receptor on both tumor cells and tumor endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chi, Lianhua; Na, Moon-Hee; Jung, Hyun-Kyung; Vadevoo, Sri Murugan Poongkavithai; Kim, Cheong-Wun; Padmanaban, Guruprasath; Park, Tae-In; Park, Jae-Yong; Hwang, Ilseon; Park, Keon Uk; Liang, Frank; Lu, Maggie; Park, Jiho; Kim, In-San; Lee, Byung-Heon

    2015-07-10

    A growing body of evidence suggests that pathological lesions express tissue-specific molecular targets or biomarkers within the tissue. Interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4R) is overexpressed in many types of cancer cells, including lung cancer. Here we investigated the properties of IL-4R-binding peptide-1 (IL4RPep-1), a CRKRLDRNC peptide, and its ability to target the delivery of liposomes to lung tumor. IL4RPep-1 preferentially bound to H226 lung tumor cells which express higher levers of IL-4R compared to H460 lung tumor cells which express less IL-4R. Mutational analysis revealed that C1, R2, and R4 residues of IL4RPep-1 were the key binding determinants. IL4RPep-1-labeled liposomes containing doxorubicin were more efficiently internalized in H226 cells and effectively delivered doxorubicin into the cells compared to unlabeled liposomes. In vivo fluorescence imaging of nude mice subcutaneously xenotransplanted with H226 tumor cells indicated that IL4RPep-1-labeled liposomes accumulate more efficiently in the tumor and inhibit tumor growth more effectively compared to unlabeled liposomes. Interestingly, expression of IL-4R was high in vascular endothelial cells of tumor, while little was detected in vascular endothelial cells of control organs including the liver. IL-4R expression in cultured human vascular endothelial cells was also up-regulated when activated by a pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α. Moreover, the up-regulation of IL-4R expression was observed in primary human lung cancer tissues. These results indicate that IL-4R-targeting nanocarriers may be a useful strategy to enhance drug delivery through the recognition of IL-4R in both tumor cells and tumor endothelial cells. PMID:25979323

  11. Cathepsin S from both tumor and tumor-associated cells promote cancer growth and neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Small, Donna M; Burden, Roberta E; Jaworski, Jakub; Hegarty, Shauna M; Spence, Shaun; Burrows, James F; McFarlane, Cheryl; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; McCarthy, Helen O; Johnston, James A; Walker, Brian; Scott, Christopher J

    2013-11-01

    Recent murine studies have demonstrated that tumor-associated macrophages in the tumor microenvironment are a key source of the pro-tumorigenic cysteine protease, cathepsin S. We now show in a syngeneic colorectal carcinoma murine model that both tumor and tumor-associated cells contribute cathepsin S to promote neovascularization and tumor growth. Cathepsin S depleted and control colorectal MC38 tumor cell lines were propagated in both wild type C57Bl/6 and cathepsin S null mice to provide stratified depletion of the protease from either the tumor, tumor-associated host cells, or both. Parallel analysis of these conditions showed that deletion of cathepsin S inhibited tumor growth and development, and revealed a clear contribution of both tumor and tumor-associated cell derived cathepsin S. The most significant impact on tumor development was obtained when the protease was depleted from both sources. Further characterization revealed that the loss of cathepsin S led to impaired tumor vascularization, which was complemented by a reduction in proliferation and increased apoptosis, consistent with reduced tumor growth. Analysis of cell types showed that in addition to the tumor cells, tumor-associated macrophages and endothelial cells can produce cathepsin S within the microenvironment. Taken together, these findings clearly highlight a manner by which tumor-associated cells can positively contribute to developing tumors and highlight cathepsin S as a therapeutic target in cancer. PMID:23629809

  12. VLDL-activated cell signaling pathways that stimulate adrenal cell aldosterone production.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ying-Ying; Rainey, William E; Johnson, Maribeth H; Bollag, Wendy B

    2016-09-15

    Aldosterone plays an important role in regulating ion and fluid homeostasis and thus blood pressure, and hyperaldosteronism results in hypertension. Hypertension is also observed with obesity, which is associated with additional health risks, including cardiovascular disease. Obese individuals have high serum levels of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), which has been shown to stimulate aldosterone production; however, the mechanisms underlying VLDL-induced aldosterone production are still unclear. Here we demonstrate in human adrenocortical carcinoma (HAC15) cells that submaximal concentrations of angiotensin II and VLDL stimulate aldosterone production in an additive fashion, suggesting the possibility of common mechanisms of action. We show using inhibitors that VLDL-induced aldosterone production is mediated by the PLC/IP3/PKC signaling pathway. Our results suggest that PKC is upstream of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation previously observed with VLDL. An understanding of the mechanisms mediating VLDL-induced aldosterone production may provide insights into therapies to treat obesity-associated hypertension. PMID:27222295

  13. Surgery and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Children With Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-06

    Childhood Embryonal Tumor; Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Teratoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma

  14. Computing tumor trees from single cells.

    PubMed

    Davis, Alexander; Navin, Nicholas E

    2016-01-01

    Computational methods have been developed to reconstruct evolutionary lineages from tumors using single-cell genomic data. The resulting tumor trees have important applications in cancer research and clinical oncology.Please see related Research articles: http://genomebiology.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13059-016-0929-9 and http://genomebiology.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13059-016-0936-x . PMID:27230879

  15. Progenitor Cell Line (hPheo1) Derived from a Human Pheochromocytoma Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Stastny, Victor; Click, Arielle; Ding, Liang-Hao; Mizrachi, Dario; Zou, Ying S.; Chari, Raj; Lam, Wan L.; Bachoo, Robert M.; Smith, Alice L.; Story, Michael D.; Sidhu, Stan; Robinson, Bruce G.; Nwariaku, Fiemu E.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Auchus, Richard J.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pheochromocytomas are rare tumors generally arising in the medullary region of the adrenal gland. These tumors release excessive epinephrine and norepinephrine resulting in hypertension and cardiovascular crises for which surgery is the only definitive treatment. Molecular mechanisms that control tumor development and hormone production are poorly understood, and progress has been hampered by the lack of human cellular model systems. To study pheochromocytomas, we developed a stable progenitor pheochromocytoma cell line derived from a primary human tumor. Methods After IRB approval and written informed consent, human pheochromocytoma tissue was excised, minced, dispersed enzymatically, and cultured in vitro. Primary pheochromocytoma cells were infected with a lentivirus vector carrying the catalytic subunit of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). The hTERT immortalized cells (hPheo1) have been passaged >300 population doublings. The resulting cell line was characterized morphologically, biochemically and for expression of neuroendocrine properties. The expression of marker enzymes and proteins was assessed by immunofluorescence staining and immunoblotting. Telomerase activity was determined by using the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay. Results We have established a human pheochromocytoma precursor cell line that expresses the neuroendocrine marker, chromogranin A, when differentiated in the presence of bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4), nerve growth factor (NGF), and dexamethasone. Phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) expression is also detected with this differentiation regimen. CD-56 (also known as NCAM, neural cell adhesion molecule) is expressed in these cells, but CD31 (also known as PECAM-1, a marker of endothelial cells) is negative. Conclusions We have maintained hTERT-immortalized progenitor cells derived from a pheochromocytoma (hPheo1) in culture for over 300 population doublings. This progenitor human

  16. Physiological Basis for the Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Adrenal Disorders: Cushing’s Syndrome, Adrenal Insufficiency, and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Raff, Hershel; Sharma, Susmeeta T.; Nieman, Lynnette K.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a classic neuroendocrine system. One of the best ways to understand the HPA axis is to appreciate its dynamics in the variety of diseases and syndromes that affect it. Excess glucocorticoid activity can be due to endogenous cortisol overproduction (spontaneous Cushing’s syndrome) or exogenous glucocorticoid therapy (iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome). Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome can be subdivided into ACTH-dependent and ACTH-independent, the latter of which is usually due to autonomous adrenal overproduction. The former can be due to a pituitary corticotroph tumor (usually benign) or ectopic ACTH production from tumors outside the pituitary; both of these tumor types overexpress the proopiomelanocortin gene. The converse of Cushing’s syndrome is the lack of normal cortisol secretion and is usually due to adrenal destruction (primary adrenal insufficiency) or hypopituitarism (secondary adrenal insufficiency). Secondary adrenal insufficiency can also result from a rapid discontinuation of long-term, pharmacological glucocorticoid therapy because of HPA axis suppression and adrenal atrophy. Finally, mutations in the steroidogenic enzymes of the adrenal cortex can lead to congenital adrenal hyperplasia and an increase in precursor steroids, particularly androgens. When present in utero, this can lead to masculinization of a female fetus. An understanding of the dynamics of the HPA axis is necessary to master the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of pituitary-adrenal diseases. Furthermore, understanding the pathophysiology of the HPA axis gives great insight into its normal control. PMID:24715566

  17. Immunosuppressive cells in tumor immune escape and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-05-01

    Tumor immune escape and the initiation of metastasis are critical steps in malignant progression of tumors and have been implicated in the failure of some clinical cancer immunotherapy. Tumors develop numerous strategies to escape immune surveillance or metastasize: Tumors not only modulate the recruitment and expansion of immunosuppressive cell populations to develop the tumor microenvironment or pre-metastatic niche but also switch the phenotype and function of normal immune cells from a potentially tumor-reactive state to a tumor-promoting state. Immunosuppressive cells facilitate tumor immune escape by inhibiting antitumor immune responses and furthermore promote tumor metastasis by inducing immunosuppression, promoting tumor cell invasion and intravasation, establishing a pre-metastatic niche, facilitating epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and inducing angiogenesis at primary tumor or metastatic sites. Numerous translational studies indicate that it is possible to inhibit tumor immune escape and prevent tumor metastasis by blocking immunosuppressive cells and eliminating immunosuppressive mechanisms that are induced by either immunosuppressive cells or tumor cells. Furthermore, many clinical trials targeting immunosuppressive cells have also achieved good outcome. In this review, we focus on the underlying mechanisms of immunosuppressive cells in promoting tumor immune escape and metastasis, discuss our current understanding of the interactions between immunosuppressive cells and tumor cells in the tumor microenvironment, and suggest future research directions as well as potential clinical strategies in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26689709

  18. High-Dose Thiotepa Plus Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Refractory Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-06

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Childhood Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Cancer; Retinoblastoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  19. Intraventricular encapsulated calf adrenal chromaffin cells: viable for at least 500 days in vivo without detectable adverse effects on behavioral/cognitive function or host immune sensitization in rats.

    PubMed

    Lindner, M D; Plone, M A; Frydel, B; Kaplan, F A; Krueger, P M; Bell, W J; Blaney, T J; Winn, S R; Sherman, S S; Doherty, E J; Emerich, D F

    1997-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported that adrenal chromaffin cell transplants, including encapsulated xenogeneic adrenal chromaffin cells, have analgesic effects. However, in addition to efficacy, the clinical utility of encapsulated xenogeneic adrenal chromaffin cells for treatment of chronic pain is dependent on the duration of cell viability in vivo, and their relative safety. The objectives of the present study in rats were to: (1) examine encapsulated calf adrenal chromaffin (CAC) cells for evidence of viable cells and continued release of analgesic agents after an extended period in vivo; (2) determine if intraventricular encapsulated CAC cells produce detectable adverse effects on behavioral/cognitive function; and (3) test for evidence of host immune sensitization after an extended period of exposure to encapsulated xenogeneic adrenal chromaffin cells. Results of the present study suggest that some encapsulated CAC cells remain viable for nearly 1.5 years in vivo and continue to produce catecholamines and met-enkephalin. Post-explant device norepinephrine output was equivalent to amounts previously shown to produce analgesic effects with intrathecal implants. Encapsulated adrenal chromaffin cells also appeared relatively safe, even when implanted in the cerebral ventricals, with a lower side-effect profile than systemic morphine (4 mg/kg). There was no evidence that encapsulated CAC-cells implanted in the ventricles affected body weight, spontaneous activity levels, or performance in the delayed matching to position operant task which is sensitive to deficits in learning, memory, attention, motivation, and motor function. Finally, encapsulated CAC cells produced no detectable evidence of host immune sensitization after 16.7 months in vivo, although unencapsulated CAC cells produced a robust immune response even in aged rats. The results of the present study suggest that adrenal chromaffin cells remain viable in vivo for long periods of time, and that long

  20. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone - An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Sobti, Anshul; Agrawal, Pranshu; Agarwala, Sanjay; Agarwal, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Giant Cell tumors (GCT) are benign tumors with potential for aggressive behavior and capacity to metastasize. Although rarely lethal, benign bone tumors may be associated with a substantial disturbance of the local bony architecture that can be particularly troublesome in peri-articular locations. Its histogenesis remains unclear. It is characterized by a proliferation of mononuclear stromal cells and the presence of many multi- nucleated giant cells with homogenous distribution. There is no widely held consensus regarding the ideal treatment method selection. There are advocates of varying surgical techniques ranging from intra-lesional curettage to wide resection. As most giant cell tumors are benign and are located near a joint in young adults, several authors favor an intralesional approach that preserves anatomy of bone in lieu of resection. Although GCT is classified as a benign lesion, few patients develop progressive lung metastases with poor outcomes. Treatment is mainly surgical. Options of chemotherapy and radiotherapy are reserved for selected cases. Recent advances in the understanding of pathogenesis are essential to develop new treatments for this locally destructive primary bone tumor. PMID:26894211

  1. Increased Catecholamine Secretion from Single Adrenal Chromaffin Cells in DOCA-Salt Hypertension Is Associated with Potassium Channel Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of catecholamine release from single adrenal chromaffin cells isolated from normotensive and DOCA-salt hypertensive rats was investigated. These cells were used as a model for sympathetic nerves to better understand how exocytotic release of catecholamines is altered in this model of hypertension. Catecholamine secretion was evoked by local application of acetylcholine (1 mM) or high K+ (70 mM), and continuous amperometry was used to monitor catecholamine secretion as an oxidative current. The total number of catecholamine molecules secreted from a vesicle, the total number of vesicles fusing and secreting, and the duration of secretion in response to a stimulus were all significantly greater for chromaffin cells from hypertensive rats as compared to normotensive controls. The greater catecholamine secretion from DOCA-salt cells results, at least in part, from functionally impaired large conductance, Ca2+-activated (BK) and ATP-sensitive K+ channels. This work reveals that there is altered vesicular release of catecholamines from these cells (and possibly from perivascular sympathetic nerves) and this may contribute to increased vasomotor tone in DOCA-salt hypertension. PMID:23937098

  2. Granular cell tumor of the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Patel, R M; DeSota-LaPaix, F; Sika, J V; Mallaiah, L R; Purow, E

    1981-12-01

    Two cases of granular cell tumor of the esophagus are reported and the main features of the previously reported cases are summarized. Dysphagia and substernal discomfort or pain are the most common symptoms seen and are likely to occur with lesions greater than 1 cm. in diameter. The diagnosis should be considered in adult females with an intramural mass of the esophagus. The cell of origin is still disputed. The treatment of choice, when the patient is symptomatic or the lesion greater than 1 cm. in size, is local resection. The tumor, when incidentally discovered in an asymptomatic patient, may safely be followed endoscopically. PMID:6277183

  3. [A Case of Synchronous Malignant Pheochromocytomas in Bilateral Adrenal Glands].

    PubMed

    Usui, Kimitsugu; Hirasawa, Terukazu; Kobayashi, Masataka; Shioi, Kouichi; Kobayashi, Kazuki; Sakai, Naoki; Noguchi, Sumio; Tsuura, Yukio

    2016-06-01

    We present a case of synchronous malignant pheochromocytoma in bilateral adrenal glands. A 73- year-old man presented to our hospital with bilateral adrenal masses incidentally found during abdominal ultrasonography examination for an unrelated issue. The patient had a 30-year history of hypertension and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed heterogeneous tumors in bilateral adrenal glands and an enlarged para-aortic lymph node. Hormonal examinations revealed a high value of urinary catecholamines. Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy showed increased uptake in bilateral adrenal glands and the lymph node. Both adrenal tumors and the node were surgically removed. Pathological examination revealed histologically distinct tissue between the two adrenal tumors. The patient received five cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy, consisting of cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and dacarbazine. The patient has been in remission for 32 months following surgical treatment. PMID:27452493

  4. Tumor cohesion and glioblastoma cell dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Foty, Ramsey A

    2013-01-01

    Patients with glioblastoma typically present when tumors are at an advanced stage. Surgical resection, radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy are currently the standard of care for glioblastoma. However, due to the infiltrative and dispersive nature of the tumor, recurrence rate remains high and typically results in very poor prognosis. Efforts to treat the primary tumor are, therefore, palliative rather than curative. From a practical perspective, controlling growth and dispersal of the recurrence may have a greater impact on disease-free survival, In order for cells to disperse, they must first detach from the mass. Preventing detachment may keep tumors that recur more localized and perhaps more amenable to therapy. Here we introduce a new perspective in which a quantifiable mechanical property, namely tissue surface tension, can provide novel information on tumor behavior. The overall theme of the discussion will attempt to integrate how adhesion molecules can alter a tumor’s mechanical properties and how, in turn, these properties can be modified to prevent tumor cell detachment and dispersal. PMID:23902244

  5. Systemic candidiasis and mesenteric mast cell tumor with multiple metastases in a dog.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Kazuya; Sakaguchi, Kanako; Kobayashi, Shintaro; Tominaga, Makiko; Hirayama, Kazuko; Kadosawa, Tsuyoshi; Taniyama, Hiroyuki

    2009-02-01

    A 5-year-old female miniature dachshund presenting with persistent vomiting and diarrhea had two concurrent rare pathological conditions: systemic candidiasis and mesenteric mast cell tumor with multiorgan metastases. Neoplastic mast cells formed mass in the mesentery of the cecal-colonic region and were also found in the liver, spleen, kidneys, lungs, adrenal grands, ovaries, bone marrow and other tissues. The cells had intracytoplasmic granules with metachromasia and were immunohistochemically positive for c-kit and histamine. Granulomatous lesions with fungal organisms were present in the heart, lungs, kidneys, pancreas, subserosal and surrounding adipose tissue of the duodenum, thyroid glands and mesenteric mass, and phagocytosed organisms were detected in the liver and bone marrow. Bacteriologically and immunohistochemically, the fungi were consistent with Candida albicans. PMID:19262039

  6. Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... the testes, release a male sex hormone called testosterone . These cells are also found in a woman's ... the levels of female and male hormones, including testosterone . An ultrasound or another imaging test will likely ...

  7. Chemotherapy of WAP-T mouse mammary carcinomas aggravates tumor phenotype and enhances tumor cell dissemination.

    PubMed

    Jannasch, Katharina; Wegwitz, Florian; Lenfert, Eva; Maenz, Claudia; Deppert, Wolfgang; Alves, Frauke

    2015-07-01

    In this study, the effects of the standard chemotherapy, cyclophosphamide/adriamycin/5-fluorouracil (CAF) on tumor growth, dissemination and recurrence after orthotopic implantation of murine G-2 cells were analyzed in the syngeneic immunocompetent whey acidic protein-T mouse model (Wegwitz et al., PLoS One 2010; 5:e12103; Schulze-Garg et al., Oncogene 2000; 19:1028-37). Single-dose CAF treatment reduced tumor size significantly, but was not able to eradicate all tumor cells, as recurrent tumor growth was observed 4 weeks after CAF treatment. Nine days after CAF treatment, residual tumors showed features of regressive alterations and were composed of mesenchymal-like tumor cells, infiltrating immune cells and some tumor-associated fibroblasts with an intense deposition of collagen. Recurrent tumors were characterized by coagulative necrosis and less tumor cell differentiation compared with untreated tumors, suggesting a more aggressive tumor phenotype. In support, tumor cell dissemination was strongly enhanced in mice that had developed recurrent tumors in comparison with untreated controls, although only few disseminated tumor cells could be detected in various organs 9 days after CAF application. In vitro experiments revealed that CAF treatment of G-2 cells eliminates the vast majority of epithelial tumor cells, whereas tumor cells with a mesenchymal phenotype survive. These results together with the in vivo findings suggest that tumor cells that underwent epithelial-mesenchymal transition and/or exhibit stem-cell-like properties are difficult to eliminate using one round of CAF chemotherapy. The model system described here provides a valuable tool for the characterization of the effects of chemotherapeutic regimens on recurrent tumor growth and on tumor cell dissemination, thereby enabling the development and preclinical evaluation of novel therapeutic strategies to target mammary carcinomas. PMID:25449528

  8. Ectopically expressed pro-group X secretory phospholipase A2 is proteolytically activated in mouse adrenal cells by furin-like proprotein convertases: implications for the regulation of adrenal steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Layne, Joseph D; Shridas, Preetha; Webb, Nancy R

    2015-03-20

    Group X secretory phospholipase A2 (GX sPLA2) hydrolyzes mammalian cell membranes, liberating free fatty acids and lysophospholipids. GX sPLA2 is produced as a pro-enzyme (pro-GX sPLA2) that contains an N-terminal 11-amino acid propeptide ending in a dibasic motif, suggesting cleavage by a furin-like proprotein convertase (PC). Although propeptide cleavage is clearly required for enzymatic activity, the protease(s) responsible for pro-GX sPLA2 activation have not been identified. We previously reported that GX sPLA2 negatively regulates adrenal glucocorticoid production, likely by suppressing liver X receptor-mediated activation of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression. In this study, using a FLAG epitope-tagged pro-GX sPLA2 expression construct (FLAG-pro-GX sPLA2), we determined that adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) enhanced FLAG-pro-GX sPLA2 processing and phospholipase activity secreted by Y1 adrenal cells. ACTH increased the expression of furin and PCSK6, but not other members of the PC family, in Y1 cells. Overexpression of furin and PCSK6 in HEK 293 cells significantly enhanced FLAG-pro-GX sPLA2 processing, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of both PCs almost completely abolished FLAG-pro-GX sPLA2 processing in Y1 cells. Expression of either furin or PCSK6 enhanced the ability of GX sPLA2 to suppress liver X receptor reporter activity. The PC inhibitor decanoyl-Arg-Val-Lys-Arg-chloromethyl ketone significantly suppressed FLAG-pro-GX sPLA2 processing and sPLA2 activity in Y1 cells, and it significantly attenuated GX sPLA2-dependent inhibition of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein expression and progesterone production. These findings provide strong evidence that pro-GX sPLA2 is a substrate for furin and PCSK6 proteolytic processing and define a novel mechanism for regulating corticosteroid production in adrenal cells. PMID:25623068

  9. CDC20 maintains tumor initiating cells

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Qi; Wu, Qiulian; Mack, Stephen C.; Yang, Kailin; Kim, Leo; Hubert, Christopher G.; Flavahan, William A.; Chu, Chengwei; Bao, Shideng; Rich, Jeremy N.

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most prevalent and lethal primary intrinsic brain tumor. Glioblastoma displays hierarchical arrangement with a population of self-renewing and tumorigenic glioma tumor initiating cells (TICs), or cancer stem cells. While non-neoplastic neural stem cells are generally quiescent, glioblastoma TICs are often proliferative with mitotic control offering a potential point of fragility. Here, we interrogate the role of cell-division cycle protein 20 (CDC20), an essential activator of anaphase-promoting complex (APC) E3 ubiquitination ligase, in the maintenance of TICs. By chromatin analysis and immunoblotting, CDC20 was preferentially expressed in TICs relative to matched non-TICs. Targeting CDC20 expression by RNA interference attenuated TIC proliferation, self-renewal and in vivo tumor growth. CDC20 disruption mediated its effects through induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell cycle progression. CDC20 maintains TICs through degradation of p21CIP1/WAF1, a critical negative regulator of TICs. Inhibiting CDC20 stabilized p21CIP1/WAF1, resulting in repression of several genes critical to tumor growth and survival, including CDC25C, c-Myc and Survivin. Transcriptional control of CDC20 is mediated by FOXM1, a central transcription factor in TICs. These results suggest CDC20 is a critical regulator of TIC proliferation and survival, linking two key TIC nodes – FOXM1 and p21CIP1/WAF1 — elucidating a potential point for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25938542

  10. CaV1.3 as pacemaker channels in adrenal chromaffin cells: specific role on exo- and endocytosis?

    PubMed

    Comunanza, Valentina; Marcantoni, Andrea; Vandael, David H; Mahapatra, Satyajit; Gavello, Daniela; Carabelli, Valentina; Carbone, Emilio

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-gated L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) are expressed in adrenal chromaffin cells. Besides shaping the action potential (AP), LTCCs are involved in the excitation-secretion coupling controlling catecholamine release and in Ca (2+) -dependent vesicle retrieval. Of the two LTCCs expressed in chromaffin cells (CaV1.2 and CaV1.3), CaV1.3 possesses the prerequisites for pacemaking spontaneously firing cells: low-threshold, steep voltage-dependence of activation and slow inactivation. By using CaV1 .3 (-/-) KO mice and the AP-clamp it has been possible to resolve the time course of CaV1.3 pacemaker currents, which is similar to that regulating substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons. In mouse chromaffin cells CaV1.3 is coupled to fast-inactivating BK channels within membrane nanodomains and controls AP repolarization. The ability to carry subthreshold Ca (2+) currents and activate BK channels confers to CaV1.3 the unique feature of driving Ca (2+) loading during long interspike intervals and, possibly, to control the Ca (2+) -dependent exocytosis and endocytosis processes that regulate catecholamine secretion and vesicle recycling. PMID:21084859

  11. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Recurrent or Resistant Malignant Germ Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-12

    Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Choriocarcinoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Malignant Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Choriocarcinoma; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Embryonal Carcinoma; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Yolk Sac Tumor

  12. [Ectopic adrenal cortical adenoma in the spinal canal: A case report and a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Konstantinov, A S; Shelekhova, K V

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic adrenal cortical neoplasms are extremely rare. The authors describe their own case of intradural, extramedullary conus medullaris adenoma that occurred in a 55-year-old woman, which was clinically accompanied by lumbar pains, left leg numbness, and left foot weakness during 10 years. The mass was histologically composed of rounded and polygonal cell fields with rounded, regular nuclei and abundant eosinophilic and clear cytoplasm. There were no necroses or mitoses. The cells were immunohistochemically positive for cytokeratin AE1/3, vimentin, inhibin-α, melan-A, and synaptophysin. An ectopic adrenocortical adenoma was diagnosed after ruling out myxopapillary ependymoma, meningioma with oncocytic transformation, paraganglioma, metastatic renal cell carcinoma, and adrenal cortical carcinoma. In the opinion of most investigators, extra-adrenal tumors develop from ectopic adrenal cortical tissue. To date, only eight intraspinal adrenal cortical tumors have been described. These tumors should be considered in the differential diagnosis of central nervous system masses located in the lower spinal canal. PMID:27296006

  13. Circulating tumor cells: utopia or reality?

    PubMed

    Conteduca, Vincenza; Zamarchi, Rita; Rossi, Elisabetta; Condelli, Valentina; Troiani, Laura; Aieta, Michele

    2013-09-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could be considered a sign of tumor aggressiveness, but highly sensitive and specific methods of CTC detection are necessary owing to the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs in peripheral blood. This review summarizes recent studies on tumor biology, with particular attention to the metastatic cascade, and the molecular characterization and clinical significance of CTCs. Recent technological approaches to enrich and detect these cells and challenges of CTCs for individualized cancer treatment are also discussed. This review also provides an insight into the positive and negative features of the future potential applications of CTC detection, which sometimes remains still a 'utopia', but its actual utility remains among the fastest growing research fields in oncology. PMID:23980681

  14. Transcapillary Trafficking of Clustered Circulating Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, Brian; Au, Sam; Chen, Yeng-Long; Sarioglu, Fatih; Javaid, Sarah; Haber, Daniel; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-11-01

    Aggregates of circulating tumor cells (CTC-clusters) are known to be more metastatic than equal numbers of singlet circulating tumor cells. Yet the mechanisms responsible for CTC-cluster dissemination and tumor seeding are still largely unknown. Without direct experimental evidence, it was assumed that because of their size, CTC-clusters would occlude and rupture capillaries. In this work, we have challenged this assumption by investigating the transit of CTC-clusters through microfluidic capillary constrictions under physiological pressures. Remarkably, cancer cell aggregates containing 2-20 cells were observed to successfully traverse constrictions 5-10 microns with over 90% efficiency. Clusters rapidly and reversibly reorganized into chain-like geometries to pass through constrictions in single file. This observation was verified by computational simulation of clusters modeled with physiological cell-cell interaction energies. Hydrodynamic analysis suggested that CTC-clusters were able to pass narrow constrictions by acting as individual cells in series, not as cohesive units. Upon exiting constrictions, clusters remained viable, proliferative and rapidly returned to `typical' cluster morphologies.

  15. Recurrent Giant Cell Tumor of Skull Combined with Multiple Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Giant cell tumors are benign but locally invasive and frequently recur. Giant cell tumors of the skull are extremely rare. A patient underwent a surgery to remove a tumor, but the tumor recurred. Additionally, the patient developed multiple aneurysms. The patient underwent total tumor resection and trapping for the aneurysms, followed by radiotherapy. We report this rare case and suggest some possibilities for treating tumor growth combined with aneurysm development. PMID:27195256

  16. A Rare Case of Adrenal Pheochromocytoma with Unusual Clinical and Biochemical Presentation: 
A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Mula-Abed, Waad-Allah S.; Ahmed, Riyaz; Ramadhan, Fatima A.; Al-Kindi, Manal K.; Al-Busaidi, Noor B.; Al-Muslahi, Hilal N.; Al-Lamki, Mohammad A.

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old Omani woman presented to the Outpatient Clinic, Royal Hospital, Oman with right upper abdominal pain and backache that had lasted 10 days. She had no palpitation, sweating, or hypertension (blood pressure 122/78mmHg). The patient’s history revealed that she had a similar incidence of abdominal pain two months prior, which was a "dull ache" in nature and somewhat associated with headache. The pain was relieved using a mild analgesic drug. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a right adrenal mass, and both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the adrenal glands confirmed a right adrenal mass consistent with adrenal pheochromocytoma. However, clinical biochemistry tests revealed normal levels of plasma catecholamines (dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine) and metanephrine, which are unusual findings in adrenal pheochromocytoma. Meanwhile, the patient had markedly raised plasma normetanephrine (10-fold) which, together with the normal metanephrine, constitutes a metabolic profile that is compatible with extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma. The patient also had markedly raised chromogranin A (16-fold), consistent with the presence of a neuroendocrine tumor. Laparoscopic right adrenalectomy was done and the adrenal tumor was excised and retrieved in total. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry confirmed the diagnosis of adrenal pheochromocytoma; the tumor cells being positive for chromogranin, synaptophysin, and S-100 protein. Following surgery, the patient did well and showed full recovery at follow-up after three months. Molecular genetic testing showed no pathogenic mutation in pheochromocytoma genes: MAX, SDHA, SDHAF2, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, VHL, and PRKAR1A. A review of the literature was conducted to identify the pathophysiology and any previous reports of such case. To our knowledge, this is the first report in Oman of the extremely rare entity of pheochromocytoma with an unusual clinical and biochemical scenario. PMID:26421121

  17. A Rare Case of Adrenal Pheochromocytoma with Unusual Clinical and Biochemical Presentation: 
A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Mula-Abed, Waad-Allah S; Ahmed, Riyaz; Ramadhan, Fatima A; Al-Kindi, Manal K; Al-Busaidi, Noor B; Al-Muslahi, Hilal N; Al-Lamki, Mohammad A

    2015-09-01

    A 50-year-old Omani woman presented to the Outpatient Clinic, Royal Hospital, Oman with right upper abdominal pain and backache that had lasted 10 days. She had no palpitation, sweating, or hypertension (blood pressure 122/78mmHg). The patient's history revealed that she had a similar incidence of abdominal pain two months prior, which was a "dull ache" in nature and somewhat associated with headache. The pain was relieved using a mild analgesic drug. Abdominal ultrasonography showed a right adrenal mass, and both computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the adrenal glands confirmed a right adrenal mass consistent with adrenal pheochromocytoma. However, clinical biochemistry tests revealed normal levels of plasma catecholamines (dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine) and metanephrine, which are unusual findings in adrenal pheochromocytoma. Meanwhile, the patient had markedly raised plasma normetanephrine (10-fold) which, together with the normal metanephrine, constitutes a metabolic profile that is compatible with extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma. The patient also had markedly raised chromogranin A (16-fold), consistent with the presence of a neuroendocrine tumor. Laparoscopic right adrenalectomy was done and the adrenal tumor was excised and retrieved in total. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry confirmed the diagnosis of adrenal pheochromocytoma; the tumor cells being positive for chromogranin, synaptophysin, and S-100 protein. Following surgery, the patient did well and showed full recovery at follow-up after three months. Molecular genetic testing showed no pathogenic mutation in pheochromocytoma genes: MAX, SDHA, SDHAF2, SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, VHL, and PRKAR1A. A review of the literature was conducted to identify the pathophysiology and any previous reports of such case. To our knowledge, this is the first report in Oman of the extremely rare entity of pheochromocytoma with an unusual clinical and biochemical scenario. PMID:26421121

  18. Molecular Culprits Generating Brain Tumor Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se-Yeong

    2013-01-01

    Despite current advances in multimodality therapies, such as surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, the outcome for patients with high-grade glioma remains fatal. Understanding how glioma cells resist various therapies may provide opportunities for developing new therapies. Accumulating evidence suggests that the main obstacle for successfully treating high-grade glioma is the existence of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs), which share a number of cellular properties with adult stem cells, such as self-renewal and multipotent differentiation capabilities. Owing to their resistance to standard therapy coupled with their infiltrative nature, BTSCs are a primary cause of tumor recurrence post-therapy. Therefore, BTSCs are thought to be the main glioma cells representing a novel therapeutic target and should be eliminated to obtain successful treatment outcomes. PMID:24904883

  19. Imaging of adrenal and renal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Nancy A; Lostumbo, Antonella; Adam, Sharon Z; Remer, Erick M; Nikolaidis, Paul; Yaghmai, Vahid; Berggruen, Senta M; Miller, Frank H

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhage of the kidneys and adrenal glands has many etiologies. In the adrenal glands, trauma, anticoagulation, stress, sepsis, surgery, and neoplasms are common causes of hemorrhage. In the kidneys, reasons for hemorrhage include trauma, bleeding diathesis, vascular diseases, infection, infarction, hemorrhagic cyst rupture, the Antopol-Goldman lesion, and neoplasms. Angiomyolipoma and renal cell carcinoma are the neoplasms most commonly associated with hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal cortical carcinoma, metastases, and pheochromocytoma are associated with hemorrhage in the adrenal glands. Understanding the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features, and causes of hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal glands is critical. It is also important to keep in mind that mimickers of hemorrhage exist, including lymphoma in both the kidneys and adrenal glands, and melanoma metastases in the adrenal glands. Appropriate imaging follow-up of renal and adrenal hemorrhage should occur to exclude an underlying malignancy as the cause. If there is suspicion for malignancy that cannot be definitively diagnosed on imaging, surgery or biopsy may be warranted. Angiography may be indicated when there is a suspected underlying vascular disease. Unnecessary intervention, such as nephrectomy, may be avoided in patients with benign causes or no underlying disease. Appropriate management is dependent on accurate diagnosis of the cause of renal or adrenal hemorrhage and it is incumbent upon the radiologist to determine the etiology. PMID:26036792

  20. Adrenal hemangioma: computed tomogram and angiogram appearances.

    PubMed

    Wang, J H; Chiang, J H; Chang, T

    1992-08-01

    Adrenal hemangiomas are rare. To our knowledge, about 22 cases have been reported in the literature, of which 13 cases were surgically removed. We report probably the first case of CT and angiographically diagnosed and surgically confirmed adrenal hemangioma in Taiwan. We concluded that characteristic appearances on computed tomogram and angiogram associated with phlebolith-like calcification in the tumor may allow the radiologists to make correct preoperative diagnosis. PMID:1327475

  1. Myelolipoma in the spleen: a rare discovery of extra-adrenal hematopoietic tissue.

    PubMed

    Wood, William G; Restivo, Terry E; Axelsson, Karen L; Svahn, Jonathan D

    2013-01-01

    Myelolipomas are benign tumors usually found within the adrenal gland. Approximately 50 cases of extra-adrenal myelolipomas have been reported in the literature and all are associated with additional lesions. Myelolipomas contain hematopoetic cells and adipose tissue. Most commonly, they are asymptomatic and are found incidentally on radiologic imaging. Here we report a case of an isolated intrasplenic myelolipoma as an incidental finding during the work up for myasthenia gravis in an otherwise asymptomatic man. The spleen and associated mass were excised during laparotomy and the patient had an uneventful recovery. PMID:24964419

  2. Voltage-dependent currents and modulation of calcium channel expression in zona fasciculata cells from rat adrenal gland.

    PubMed Central

    Barbara, J G; Takeda, K

    1995-01-01

    1. Whole-cell voltage-activated currents from single zona fasciculata (ZF) cells from rat adrenal glands were studied. T- and L-type Ca2+ currents and a slowly inactivating A-type K+ current were the three major currents observed. 2. In freshly isolated cells, the A-type K+ current and the T-type Ca2+ current were predominant. The A-type current was activated at -50 mV and inhibited by 4-amino-pyridine with a half-maximal block (IC50) at 130 microM while the T-type current was activated at -70 mV and blocked by Cd2+, Ni2+ and amiloride with IC50 values of 24.1, 132.4 and 518.9 microM, respectively. 3. Under current clamp, depolarizing current pulses produced a single Ca2+ action potential with Cs+ in the pipette internal solution. Upon replacement of Cs+ by K+, the half-amplitude width of the action potential was shortened and membrane potential oscillations were seen after the spike. 4. In freshly isolated cells and during the first 24 h after plating, the T-type current was observed in all cells, with L-type current being observed in < 2% of cells, even in the presence of (+)SDZ 202,791, a dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel agonist. With time in culture, the T-type current disappeared, and a high-voltage-activated L-type current became increasingly apparent. In cells tested after > 2 days in culture, (+)SDZ 202,791 potentiated L-type current by 407 +/- 12% and the antagonist (-)SDZ 202,791 blocked this increase. The L-type current was activated between -30 and -20 mV and was sensitive to nitrendipine and omega-conotoxin GVIA. 5. Pre-incubation of cultured ZF cells with adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) or vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) for 3 days resulted in a high, sustained level of expression of T-type current, with a mean amplitude of 34.2 +/- 5.5 pA pF-1 for ACTH-treated cells compared with 3.4 +/- 1.8 pA pF-1 for untreated cells. Cycloheximide strongly inhibited this effect. Neither treatment affected L-type current expression. 6. The expression of both Ca

  3. Adrenal steroidogenesis and congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Turcu, Adina F; Auchus, Richard J

    2015-06-01

    Adrenal steroidogenesis is a dynamic process, reliant on de novo synthesis from cholesterol, under the stimulation of ACTH and other regulators. The syntheses of mineralocorticoids (primarily aldosterone), glucocorticoids (primarily cortisol), and adrenal androgens (primarily dehydroepiandrosterone and its sulfate) occur in separate adrenal cortical zones, each expressing specific enzymes. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) encompasses a group of autosomal-recessive enzymatic defects in cortisol biosynthesis. 21-Hydroxylase (21OHD) deficiency accounts for more than 90% of CAH cases and, when milder or nonclassic forms are included, 21OHD is one of the most common genetic diseases. PMID:26038201

  4. Adrenal Steroidogenesis and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Turcu, Adina F.; Auchus, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Adrenal steroidogenesis is a dynamic process, reliant on de novo synthesis from cholesterol, under the stimulation of ACTH and other regulators. The syntheses of mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and adrenal androgens occur in separate adrenal cortical zones, each expressing specific enzymes. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) encompasses a group of autosomal recessive enzymatic defects in cortisol biosynthesis. 21-hydroxylase (21OHD) deficiency accounts for over 90% of CAH cases and when milder or nonclassic forms are included, 21OHD is one of the most common genetic diseases. This review discusses in detail the epidemiology, genetics, diagnostic, clinical aspects and management of 21OHD. PMID:26038201

  5. Primary adrenal sarcomatoid carcinoma metastatic to the lung: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, CHUANGZHI; ZHENG, AIPING; MAO, XIANGMING; SHI, BENTAO; LI, XIANXIN

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal sarcomatoid carcinoma is a rare adrenal carcinoma. To the best of our knowledge, only 11 cases have been reported since 1987. Adrenal sarcomatoid carcinoma presents a diagnostic challenge due to its atypical symptoms and histological patterns. At the time of diagnosis, a large percentage of patients are already at the metastatic stage and succumb within a few months. The present study reports a case of a 59-year-old man presenting with asthenia and weight loss with adrenal sarcomatoid carcinoma metastatic to the lung. A computed tomography (CT) scan and ultrasonography of the patient's abdomen suggested a large homogeneous mass in the right adrenal gland, and a CT scan of his chest suggested lung metastasis. Right adrenalectomy was performed. Histological examination revealed that the tumor was composed of sarcomatous and carcinomatous differentiation elements. Immunohistochemical examination revealed tumor cell positivity for vimentin and cytokeratin. At the 6-month follow-up the patient exhibited no disease progression and refused further proposed treatment. The patient was alive at the time of writing the current report. The present case report additionally reviews the literature, for the purpose of raising awareness of these rare lesions and assisting in achieving accurate diagnoses and effective treatment. PMID:27123074

  6. POD-1/TCF21 Reduces SHP Expression, Affecting LRH-1 Regulation and Cell Cycle Balance in Adrenocortical and Hepatocarcinoma Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    França, Monica Malheiros; Ferraz-de-Souza, Bruno; Lerario, Antonio Marcondes; Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson Villares; Lotfi, Claudimara Ferini Pacicco

    2015-01-01

    POD-1/TCF21 may play a crucial role in adrenal and gonadal homeostasis and represses Sf-1/SF-1 expression in adrenocortical tumor cells. SF-1 and LRH-1 are members of the Fzt-F1 subfamily of nuclear receptors. LRH-1 is involved in several biological processes, and both LRH-1 and its repressor SHP are involved in many types of cancer. In order to assess whether POD-1 can regulate LRH-1 via the same mechanism that regulates SF-1, we analyzed the endogenous mRNA levels of POD-1, SHP, and LRH-1 in hepatocarcinoma and adrenocortical tumor cells using qRT-PCR. Hereafter, these tumor cells were transiently transfected with pCMVMycPod-1, and the effect of POD-1 overexpression on E-box elements in the LRH-1 and SHP promoter region were analyzed by ChIP assay. Also, Cyclin E1 protein expression was analyzed to detect cell cycle progression. We found that POD-1 overexpression significantly decreased SHP/SHP mRNA and protein levels through POD-1 binding to the E-box sequence in the SHP promoter. Decreased SHP expression affected LRH-1 regulation and increased Cyclin E1. These findings show that POD-1/TCF21 regulates SF-1 and LRH-1 by distinct mechanisms, contributing to the understanding of POD-1 involvement and its mechanisms of action in adrenal and liver tumorigenesis, which could lead to the discovery of relevant biomarkers. PMID:26421305

  7. The biology of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Pantel, K; Speicher, M R

    2016-03-10

    Metastasis is a biologically complex process consisting of numerous stochastic events which may tremendously differ across various cancer types. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cells that are shed from primary tumors and metastatic deposits into the blood stream. CTCs bear a tremendous potential to improve our understanding of steps involved in the metastatic cascade, starting from intravasation of tumor cells into the circulation until the formation of clinically detectable metastasis. These efforts were propelled by novel high-resolution approaches to dissect the genomes and transcriptomes of CTCs. Furthermore, capturing of viable CTCs has paved the way for innovative culturing technologies to study fundamental characteristics of CTCs such as invasiveness, their kinetics and responses to selection barriers, such as given therapies. Hence the study of CTCs is not only instrumental as a basic research tool, but also allows the serial monitoring of tumor genotypes and may therefore provide predictive and prognostic biomarkers for clinicians. Here, we review how CTCs have contributed to significant insights into the metastatic process and how they may be utilized in clinical practice. PMID:26050619

  8. Non-MHC-dependent redirected T cells against tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Almåsbak, Hilde; Lundby, Marianne; Rasmussen, Anne-Marie

    2010-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells with restricted tumor specificity provides a promising approach to immunotherapy of cancers. However, the isolation of autologous cytotoxic T cells that recognize tumor-associated antigens is time consuming and fails in many instances. Alternatively, gene modification with tumor antigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCR) or chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) can be used to redirect the specificity of large numbers of immune cells toward the malignant cells. Chimeric antigen receptors are composed of the single-chain variable fragment (scFv) of a tumor-recognizing antibody cloned in frame with human T-cell signaling domains (e.g., CD3zeta, CD28, OX40, 4-1BB), thus combining the specificity of antibodies with the effector functions of cytotoxic T cells. Upon antigen binding, the intracellular signaling domains of the CAR initiate cellular activation mechanisms including cytokine secretion and cytolysis of the antigen-positive target cell.In this chapter, we provide detailed protocols for large-scale ex vivo expansion of T cells and manufacturing of medium-scale batches of CAR-expressing T cells for translational research by mRNA electroporation. An anti-CD19 chimeric receptor for the targeting of leukemias and lymphomas was used as a model system. We are currently scaling up the protocols to adapt them to cGMP production of a large number of redirected T cells for clinical applications. PMID:20387166

  9. Identification of muscarinic receptor subtypes involved in catecholamine secretion in adrenal medullary chromaffin cells by genetic deletion

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Keita; Matsuoka, Hidetada; Miyata, Hironori; Matsui, Minoru; Inoue, Masumi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Activation of muscarinic receptors results in catecholamine secretion in adrenal chromaffin cells in many mammals, and muscarinic receptors partly mediate synaptic transmission from the splanchnic nerve, at least in guinea pigs. To elucidate the physiological functions of muscarinic receptors in chromaffin cells, it is necessary to identify the muscarinic receptor subtypes involved in excitation. Experimental Approach To identify muscarinic receptors, pharmacological tools and strains of mice where one or several muscarinic receptor subtypes were genetically deleted were used. Cellular responses to muscarinic stimulation in isolated chromaffin cells were studied with the patch clamp technique and amperometry. Key Results Muscarinic M1, M4 and M5 receptors were immunologically detected in mouse chromaffin cells, and these receptors disappeared after the appropriate gene deletion. Mouse cells secreted catecholamines in response to muscarinic agonists, angiotensin II and a decrease in external pH. Genetic deletion of M1, but not M3, M4 or M5, receptors in mice abolished secretion in response to muscarine, but not to other stimuli. The muscarine-induced secretion was suppressed by MT7, a snake peptide toxin specific for M1 receptors. Similarly, muscarine failed to induce an inward current in the presence of MT7 in mouse and rat chromaffin cells. The binding affinity of VU0255035 for the inhibition of muscarine-induced currents agreed with that for the M1 receptor. Conclusions and Implications Based upon the effects of genetic deletion of muscarinic receptors and MT7, it is concluded that the M1 receptor alone is responsible for muscarine-induced catecholamine secretion. PMID:25393049

  10. NMR exposure sensitizes tumor cells to apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ghibelli, L; Cerella, C; Cordisco, S; Clavarino, G; Marazzi, S; De Nicola, M; Nuccitelli, S; D'Alessio, M; Magrini, A; Bergamaschi, A; Guerrisi, V; Porfiri, L M

    2006-03-01

    NMR technology has dramatically contributed to the revolution of image diagnostic. NMR apparatuses use combinations of microwaves over a homogeneous strong (1 Tesla) static magnetic field. We had previously shown that low intensity (0.3-66 mT) static magnetic fields deeply affect apoptosis in a Ca2+ dependent fashion (Fanelli et al., 1999 FASEBJ., 13;95-102). The rationale of the present study is to examine whether exposure to the static magnetic fields of NMR can affect apoptosis induced on reporter tumor cells of haematopoietic origin. The impressive result was the strong increase (1.8-2.5 fold) of damage-induced apoptosis by NMR. This potentiation is due to cytosolic Ca2+ overload consequent to NMR-promoted Ca2+ influx, since it is prevented by intracellular (BAPTA-AM) and extracellular (EGTA) Ca2+ chelation or by inhibition of plasma membrane L-type Ca2+ channels. Three-days follow up of treated cultures shows that NMR decrease long term cell survival, thus increasing the efficiency of cytocidal treatments. Importantly, mononuclear white blood cells are not sensitised to apoptosis by NMR, showing that NMR may increase the differential cytotoxicity of antitumor drugs on tumor vs normal cells. This strong, differential potentiating effect of NMR on tumor cell apoptosis may have important implications, being in fact a possible adjuvant for antitumor therapies. PMID:16528477

  11. Select forms of tumor cell apoptosis induce dendritic cell maturation.

    PubMed

    Demaria, Sandra; Santori, Fabio R; Ng, Bruce; Liebes, Leonard; Formenti, Silvia C; Vukmanovic, Stanislav

    2005-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a crucial role in initiating immune responses to tumors. DC can efficiently present antigens from apoptotic tumor cells, but apoptotic cells are thought to lack the inflammatory signals required to induce DC maturation. Here, we show that apoptosis of 67NR mouse carcinoma cells via the Fas (CD95) pathway or induced by the anticancer drug bortezomib (PS-341) but not by ultraviolet irradiation is associated with the production of maturation signals for DC. These data have important implications for the effects of chemotherapy on antitumor immunity in solid and hematologic malignancies. PMID:15569694

  12. Formation of inositol 1,3,4,6-tetrakisphosphate during angiotensin II action in bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Balla, T.; Guillemette, G.; Baukal, A.J.; Catt, K.J.

    1987-10-14

    Angiotensin II stimulates the formation of several inositol polyphosphates in cultured bovine adrenal glomerulosa cells prelabelled with (/sup 3/H) inositol. Analysis by high performance anion exchange chromatography of the inositol-phosphate compounds revealed the existence of two additional inositol tetrakisphosphate (InsP4) isomers in proximity to Ins-1,3,4,5-P4, the known phosphorylation product of Ins-1,4,5-trisphosphate and precursor of Ins-1,3,4-trisphosphate. Both of these new compounds showed a slow increase after stimulation with angiotensin II. The structure of one of these new InsP4 isomers, which is a phosphorylation product of Ins-1,3,4-P3, was deduced by its resistance to periodate oxidation to be Ins-1,3,4,6-P4. The existence of multiple cycles of phosphorylation-dephosphorylation reactions for the processing of Ins-1,4,5-P4 may represent a new aspect of the inositol-lipid related signalling mechanism in agonist-activated target cells.

  13. Primary brain tumors, neural stem cell, and brain tumor cancer cells: where is the link?

    PubMed Central

    Germano, Isabelle; Swiss, Victoria; Casaccia, Patrizia

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of brain tumor-derived cells (BTSC) with the properties of stem cells has led to the formulation of the hypothesis that neural stem cells could be the cell of origin of primary brain tumors (PBT). In this review we present the most common molecular changes in PBT, define the criteria of identification of BTSC and discuss the similarities between the characteristics of these cells and those of the endogenous population of neural stem cells (NPCs) residing in germinal areas of the adult brain. Finally, we propose possible mechanisms of cancer initiation and progression and suggest a model of tumor initiation that includes intrinsic changes of resident NSC and potential changes in the microenvironment defining the niche where the NSC reside. PMID:20045420

  14. Adrenal Gland Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    The adrenal glands are small glands located on top of each kidney. They produce hormones that you can't live ... stress and has many other important functions. With adrenal gland disorders, your glands make too much or not ...

  15. [Cancer stemness and circulating tumor cells].

    PubMed

    Saito, Tomoko; Mimori, Koshi

    2015-05-01

    The principle concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) giving rise to the carcinogenesis, relapse or metastasis of malignancy is broadly recognized. On the other hand, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) also plays important roles in relapse or metastasis of malignancy, and there has been much focused on the association between CSCs and CTCs in cancer cases. The technical innovations for detection of CTCs enabled us to unveil the nature of CTCs. We now realize that CTCs isolated by cell surface antibodies, such as DCLK1, LGR5 indicated CSC properties, and CTCs with epitherial-mesenchymal transition(EMT) phenotype showed characteristics of CSCs. PMID:25985635

  16. Multifunctional Nucleic Acids for Tumor Cell Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pofahl, Monika; Wengel, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We report on a multifunctional nucleic acid, termed AptamiR, composed of an aptamer domain and an antimiR domain. This composition mediates cell specific delivery of antimiR molecules for silencing of endogenous micro RNA. The introduced multifunctional molecule preserves cell targeting, anti-proliferative and antimiR function in one 37-nucleotide nucleic acid molecule. It inhibits cancer cell growth and induces gene expression that is pathologically damped by an oncomir. These findings will have a strong impact on future developments regarding aptamer- and antimiR-related applications for tumor targeting and treatment. PMID:24494617

  17. General Information about Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors Go to ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  18. [Combined modality therapy for a patient with primary adrenal lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Teppei; Kuroda, Hiroyuki; Jomen, Wataru; Yoshida, Masahiro; Yamada, Michiko; Sato, Masanori; Abe, Tomoyuki; Sakurai, Tamaki; Fujii, Shigeyuki; Maeda, Masahiro; Fujita, Miri; Nagashima, Kazuo; Nojiri, Shuichi; Arihara, Yohei; Kato, Junji

    2014-04-01

    A 71-year-old man with malaise, anorexia, and weight loss was referred to our hospital from a clinic. Abdominal computed tomography(CT)revealed bilateral adrenal masses. An ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle biopsy of the adrenal grand indicated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. A rapid adrenocorticotropic hormone(ACTH)test revealed primary adrenal failure. Rituximab-cyclophosphamide/doxorubicin/vincristine/prednisolone(common name, R-CHOP)therapy accompanied by intrathecal treatment was initiated along with steroid replacement therapy. After the fourth courses, a CT scan showed a reduction of the adrenal masses, and there was no[18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose(FDG)uptake in the adrenal masses. The patient has remained in metabolic complete remission. Subsequently, both adrenal lymphomas were irradiated. The patient has been disease-free for 6 months after the diagnosis of primary adrenal lymphoma. The combined modality of chemoradiation therapy plus intrathecal treatment could be effective for primary adrenal lymphoma with a poor prognosis. PMID:24743371

  19. Cross-talk among myeloid-derived suppressor cells, macrophages, and tumor cells impacts the inflammatory milieu of solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Beury, Daniel W.; Parker, Katherine H.; Nyandjo, Maeva; Sinha, Pratima; Carter, Kayla A.; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    MDSC and macrophages are present in most solid tumors and are important drivers of immune suppression and inflammation. It is established that cross-talk between MDSC and macrophages impacts anti-tumor immunity; however, interactions between tumor cells and MDSC or macrophages are less well studied. To examine potential interactions between these cells, we studied the impact of MDSC, macrophages, and four murine tumor cell lines on each other, both in vitro and in vivo. We focused on IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α, and NO, as these molecules are produced by macrophages, MDSC, and many tumor cells; are present in most solid tumors; and regulate inflammation. In vitro studies demonstrated that MDSC-produced IL-10 decreased macrophage IL-6 and TNF-α and increased NO. IL-6 indirectly regulated MDSC IL-10. Tumor cells increased MDSC IL-6 and vice versa. Tumor cells also increased macrophage IL-6 and NO and decreased macrophage TNF-α. Tumor cell-driven macrophage IL-6 was reduced by MDSC, and tumor cells and MDSC enhanced macrophage NO. In vivo analysis of solid tumors identified IL-6 and IL-10 as the dominant cytokines and demonstrated that these molecules were produced predominantly by stromal cells. These results suggest that inflammation within solid tumors is regulated by the ratio of tumor cells to MDSC and macrophages and that interactions of these cells have the potential to alter significantly the inflammatory milieu within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25170116

  20. Circulating Tumor Cells Measurements in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chiappini, Franck

    2012-01-01

    Liver cancer is the fifth most common cancer in men and the seventh in women. During the past 20 years, the incidence of HCC has tripled while the 5-year survival rate has remained below 12%. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC) reflects the aggressiveness nature of a tumor. Many attempts have been made to develop assays that reliably detect and enumerate the CTC during the development of the HCC. In this case, the challenges are (1) there are few markers specific to the HCC (tumor cells versus nontumor cells) and (2) they can be used to quantify the number of CTC in the bloodstream. Another technical challenge consists of finding few CTC mixed with million leukocytes and billion erythrocytes. CTC detection and identification can be used to estimate prognosis and may serve as an early marker to assess antitumor activity of treatment. CTC can also be used to predict progression-free survival and overall survival. CTC are an interesting source of biological information in order to understand dissemination, drug resistance, and treatment-induced cell death. Our aim is to review and analyze the different new methods existing to detect, enumerate, and characterize the CTC in the peripheral circulation of patients with HCC. PMID:22690340

  1. Pediatric germ cell tumors presenting beyond childhood?

    PubMed

    Oosterhuis, J W; Stoop, J A; Rijlaarsdam, M A; Biermann, K; Smit, V T H B M; Hersmus, R; Looijenga, L H J

    2015-01-01

    Four cases are reported meeting the criteria of a pediatric (i.e., Type I) testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT), apart from the age of presentation, which is beyond childhood. The tumors encompass the full spectrum of histologies of pediatric TGCT: teratoma, yolk sac tumor, and various combinations of the two, and lack intratubular germ cell neoplasia/carcinoma in situ in the adjacent parenchyma. The neoplasms are (near)diploid, and lack gain of 12p, typical for seminomas and non-seminomas of the testis of adolescents and adults (i.e., Type II). It is proposed that these neoplasms are therefore late appearing pediatric (Type I) TGCT. The present report broadens the concept of earlier reported benign teratomas of the post-pubertal testis to the full spectrum of pediatric TGCT. The possible wide age range of pediatric TGCT, demonstrated in this study, lends credence to the concept that TGCT should according to their pathogenesis be classified into the previously proposed types. This classification is clinically relevant, because Type I mature teratomas are benign tumors, which are candidates for testis conserving surgery, as opposed to Type II mature teratomas, which have to be treated as Type II (malignant) non-seminomas. PMID:25427839

  2. Diagnostic immunohistochemistry of canine round cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Sandusky, G E; Carlton, W W; Wightman, K A

    1987-11-01

    Sixty-five canine skin neoplasms studied using immunocytochemistry, included 22 histiocytomas, 18 amelanotic melanomas, 14 cutaneous lymphosarcomas, six mast cell tumors, and five transmissible venereal tumors. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections were stained using the avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex (ABC) immunoperoxidase technique for reactivity with S-100 protein, kappa and lambda immunoglobulin light chains, alpha-1-antitrypsin, alpha-1-antichymotrypsin, leukocyte common antigen (LCA), neuron-specific enolase, keratin, cytokeratin, muramidase, and vimentin. Detection of S-100, kappa and lambda light chains, neuron-specific enolase, and vimentin were most useful for screening these neoplasms. None of the markers examined was consistent in staining histiocytomas. While reactivity of S-100 (ten cases) and neuron-specific enolase (ten cases) was detected in some amelanotic melanomas, lambda light chain immunoglobulin (eight cases) was relatively consistent in cutaneous lymphomas. Mast cell neoplasms reacted with avidin and, therefore, were positive, even on negative control sections. Vimentin reacted strongly on all amelanotic melanomas and transmissible venereal tumors examined. These antibodies are helpful adjuncts in the differential diagnosis of canine skin tumors. PMID:3137715

  3. Tumor cell response to bevacizumab single agent therapy in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis represents a highly multi-factorial and multi-cellular complex (patho-) physiologic event involving endothelial cells, tumor cells in malignant conditions, as well as bone marrow derived cells and stromal cells. One main driver is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFA), which is known to interact with endothelial cells as a survival and mitogenic signal. The role of VEGFA on tumor cells and /or tumor stromal cell interaction is less clear. Condition specific (e.g. hypoxia) or tumor specific expression of VEGFA, VEGF receptors and co-receptors on tumor cells has been reported, in addition to the expression on the endothelium. This suggests a potential paracrine/autocrine loop that could affect changes specific to tumor cells. Methods We used the monoclonal antibody against VEGFA, bevacizumab, in various in vitro experiments using cell lines derived from different tumor entities (non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), colorectal cancer (CRC), breast cancer (BC) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC)) in order to determine if potential VEGFA signaling could be blocked in tumor cells. The experiments were done under hypoxia, a major inducer of VEGFA and angiogenesis, in an attempt to mimic the physiological tumor condition. Known VEGFA induced endothelial biological responses such as proliferation, migration, survival and gene expression changes were evaluated. Results Our study was able to demonstrate expression of VEGF receptors on tumor cells as well as hypoxia regulated angiogenic gene expression. In addition, there was a cell line specific effect in tumor cells by VEGFA blockade with bevacizumab in terms of proliferation; however overall, there was a limited measurable consequence of bevacizumab therapy detected by migration and survival. Conclusion The present study showed in a variety of in vitro experiments with several tumor cell lines from different tumor origins, that by blocking VEGFA with bevacizumab, there was a limited autocrine or cell

  4. cAMP/PKA signaling defects in tumors: genetics and tissue-specific pluripotential cell-derived lesions in human and mouse.

    PubMed

    Stratakis, Constantine A

    2013-05-22

    In the last few years, bench and clinical studies led to significant new insight into how cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling, the molecular pathway that had been identified in the early 2000s as the one involved in most benign cortisol-producing adrenal hyperplasias, affects adrenocortical growth and development, as well as tumor formation. A major discovery was the identification of tissue-specific pluripotential cells (TSPCs) as the culprit behind tumor formation not only in the adrenal, but also in bone. Discoveries in animal studies complemented a number of clinical observations in patients. Gene identification continued in parallel with mouse and other studies on the cAMP signaling and other pathways. PMID:23485729

  5. Comparison between adrenal, gonadal, and pituitary hormones on the behavior of rhesus monkey kidney cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Hull, S; Benghuzzi, H; Tucci, M; Hughes, J

    1999-01-01

    Recently, several studies have indicated that the use of Rhesus Monkey Kidney epithelial cells (RMKEC) in culture could provide significant knowledge regarding the alteration or dysfunction of kidney tissues that often resulted into kidney failure. The interrelationship between various steroid hormones, as well as, growth-promoting hormones such as growth hormone (GH) and RMKEC has not been fully investigated. The specific objective of this study was to investigate the effects of cortisol (C), testosterone (T), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), estradiol (E), and GH on the proliferation and viability of RMKEC in culture. The cell line was adapted to grow in Morgan, Morton, and Parker's medium 199 (with 1.68 g/L sodium bicarbonate) supplemented with 1% horse serum. A total of 30 tubes were plated with RMKEC and divided into six equal groups. In-groups 1-5, each well (n = 5) were treated with a physiological dose of C, T, DHEA, E, and GH, respectively. At 24, 48, and 96 hours the cells and supernatants were collected and stored for further analysis. The biochemical markers were assessed using lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), catalase, and malinodialdehyde (MDA). Data obtained suggest that: (I) treatment of RMKEC with C and DHEA resulted in an increase in MDA levels compared to the control and other experimental groups, (II) no significant increase was observed in LDH levels in all treated tubes compared to the control group, (III) higher proliferation rate was observed in cells treated with T compared to the control group. However, treatment with C showed suppression to the proliferation rate and no significant difference was observed between DHEA, GH and the control groups. In conclusion this study suggests that steroid hormones regardless of the source of secretion (gonads or adrenals) can influence the functional capacity of RMKEC in culture. PMID:11143395

  6. NK Cells, Tumor Cell Transition, and Tumor Progression in Solid Malignancies: New Hints for NK-Based Immunotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Huergo-Zapico, Leticia; Parodi, Monica; Pedrazzi, Marco; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Sparatore, Bianca; Gonzalez, Segundo; Olive, Daniel; Bottino, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Several evidences suggest that NK cells can patrol the body and eliminate tumors in their initial phases but may hardly control established solid tumors. Multiple factors, including the transition of tumor cells towards a proinvasive/prometastatic phenotype, the immunosuppressive effect of the tumor microenvironment, and the tumor structure complexity, may account for limited NK cell efficacy. Several putative mechanisms of NK cell suppression have been defined in these last years; conversely, the cross talk between NK cells and tumor cells undergoing different transitional phases remains poorly explored. Nevertheless, recent in vitro studies and immunohistochemical analyses on tumor biopsies suggest that NK cells could not only kill tumor cells but also influence their evolution. Indeed, NK cells may induce tumor cells to change the expression of HLA-I, PD-L1, or NKG2D-L and modulate their susceptibility to the immune response. Moreover, NK cells may be preferentially located in the borders of tumor masses, where, indeed, tumor cells can undergo Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) acquiring prometastatic phenotype. Finally, the recently highlighted role of HMGB1 both in EMT and in amplifying the recruitment of NK cells provides further hints on a possible effect of NK cells on tumor progression and fosters new studies on this issue. PMID:27294158

  7. Juxtaglomerular cell tumor: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YANG, HONGYUAN; WANG, ZUFEI; JI, JIANSONG

    2016-01-01

    The current study reports the case of a 29-year-old female with a long-standing history of hypertension and headaches who presented to the Outpatient Clinic of The Central Hospital of Lishui (Lishui, Zhejiang, China). Abdominal ultrasound and contrast-enhanced computed tomography were performed, which showed a left renal neoplasm, prompting a diagnosis of renal angiomyolipoma or renal cell carcinoma. After a laparoscopic partial nephrectomy was performed, a number of different diagnoses were suggested by several pathologists from eight hospitals. Considering the patient's gender, age, medical history, histopathological features and immunohistochemistry, a final diagnosis of a juxtaglomerular cell tumor (JGCT) was established. The present study therefore indicates that the possibility of a JGCT should be considered when young adults present with renal parenchymatous tumors and high blood pressure. In addition, pathologists must take clinical information into account to form a precise diagnosis. PMID:26893753

  8. Single-cell analyses of circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xi-Xi; Bai, Fan

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are a population of tumor cells mediating metastasis, which results in most of the cancer related deaths. The number of CTCs in the peripheral blood of patients is rare, and many platforms have been launched for detection and enrichment of CTCs. Enumeration of CTCs has already been used as a prognosis marker predicting the survival rate of cancer patients. Yet CTCs should be more potential. Studies on CTCs at single cell level may help revealing the underlying mechanism of tumorigenesis and metastasis. Though far from developed, this area of study holds much promise in providing new clinical application and deep understanding towards metastasis and cancer development. PMID:26487963

  9. Regulatory T cells in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures suppress anti-tumor T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Nikhil S.; Akama-Garren, Elliot H.; Lu, Yisi; Lee, Da-Yae; Chang, Gregory P.; Li, Amy; DuPage, Michel; Tammela, Tuomas; Kerper, Natanya R.; Farago, Anna F.; Robbins, Rebecca; Crowley, Denise M.; Bronson, Roderick T.; Jacks, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Infiltration of regulatory T (Treg) cells into many tumor types correlates with poor patient prognoses. However, mechanisms of intratumoral Treg cell function remain to be elucidated. We investigated Treg cell function in a genetically-engineered mouse lung adenocarcinoma model and found Treg cells suppress anti-tumor responses in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures (TA-TLS). TA-TLS have been described in human lung cancers, but their function remains to be determined. TLS in this model were spatially associated with >90% of tumors and facilitated interactions between T cells and tumor-antigen presenting dendritic cells (DCs). Costimulatory ligand expression by DCs and T cell proliferation rates increased in TA-TLS upon Treg cell depletion, leading to tumor destruction. Thus, we propose Treg cells in TA-TLS can inhibit endogenous immune responses against tumors, and targeting these cells may provide therapeutic benefit for cancer patients. PMID:26341400

  10. Vaccine-induced tumor regression requires a dynamic cooperation between T cells and myeloid cells at the tumor site.

    PubMed

    Thoreau, Maxime; Penny, HweiXian Leong; Tan, KarWai; Regnier, Fabienne; Weiss, Julia Miriam; Lee, Bernett; Johannes, Ludger; Dransart, Estelle; Le Bon, Agnès; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Tartour, Eric; Trautmann, Alain; Bercovici, Nadège

    2015-09-29

    Most cancer immunotherapies under present investigation are based on the belief that cytotoxic T cells are the most important anti-tumoral immune cells, whereas intra-tumoral macrophages would rather play a pro-tumoral role. We have challenged this antagonistic point of view and searched for collaborative contributions by tumor-infiltrating T cells and macrophages, reminiscent of those observed in anti-infectious responses. We demonstrate that, in a model of therapeutic vaccination, cooperation between myeloid cells and T cells is indeed required for tumor rejection. Vaccination elicited an early rise of CD11b+ myeloid cells that preceded and conditioned the intra-tumoral accumulation of CD8+ T cells. Conversely, CD8+ T cells and IFNγ production activated myeloid cells were required for tumor regression. A 4-fold reduction of CD8+ T cell infiltrate in CXCR3KO mice did not prevent tumor regression, whereas a reduction of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells significantly interfered with vaccine efficiency. We show that macrophages from regressing tumors can kill tumor cells in two ways: phagocytosis and TNFα release. Altogether, our data suggest new strategies to improve the efficiency of cancer immunotherapies, by promoting intra-tumoral cooperation between macrophages and T cells. PMID:26337837

  11. Vaccine-induced tumor regression requires a dynamic cooperation between T cells and myeloid cells at the tumor site

    PubMed Central

    Thoreau, Maxime; Penny, HweiXian Leong; Tan, KarWai; Regnier, Fabienne; Weiss, Julia Miriam; Lee, Bernett; Johannes, Ludger; Dransart, Estelle; Le Bon, Agnès; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Tartour, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Most cancer immunotherapies under present investigation are based on the belief that cytotoxic T cells are the most important anti-tumoral immune cells, whereas intra-tumoral macrophages would rather play a pro-tumoral role. We have challenged this antagonistic point of view and searched for collaborative contributions by tumor-infiltrating T cells and macrophages, reminiscent of those observed in anti-infectious responses. We demonstrate that, in a model of therapeutic vaccination, cooperation between myeloid cells and T cells is indeed required for tumor rejection. Vaccination elicited an early rise of CD11b+ myeloid cells that preceded and conditioned the intra-tumoral accumulation of CD8+ T cells. Conversely, CD8+ T cells and IFNγ production activated myeloid cells were required for tumor regression. A 4-fold reduction of CD8+ T cell infiltrate in CXCR3KO mice did not prevent tumor regression, whereas a reduction of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells significantly interfered with vaccine efficiency. We show that macrophages from regressing tumors can kill tumor cells in two ways: phagocytosis and TNFα release. Altogether, our data suggest new strategies to improve the efficiency of cancer immunotherapies, by promoting intra-tumoral cooperation between macrophages and T cells. PMID:26337837

  12. Circulating Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Hall, Carolyn; Valad, Lily; Lucci, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women, resulting in an estimated 40,000 deaths in 2014.1 Metastasis, a complex, multi-step process, remains the primary cause of death for these patients. Although the mechanisms involved in metastasis have not been fully elucidated, considerable evidence suggests that metastatic spread is mediated by rare cells within the heterogeneous primary tumor that acquire the ability to invade into the bloodstream. In the bloodstream, they can travel to distant sites, sometimes remaining undetected and in a quiescent state for an extended period of time before they establish distant metastases in the bone, lung, liver, or brain. These occult micrometastatic cells (circulating tumor cells, CTCs) are rare, yet their prognostic significance has been demonstrated in both metastatic and non-metastatic breast cancer patients. Because repeated tumor tissue collection is typically not feasible and peripheral blood draws are minimally invasive, serial CTC enumeration might provide "real-time liquid biopsy" snapshots that could be used to identify early-stage breast cancer patients with micrometastatic disease who are at risk for disease progression and monitor treatment response in patients with advanced disease. In addition, characterizing CTCs might aid in the development of novel, personalized therapies aimed at eliminating micrometastases. This review describes current CTC isolation, detection, and characterization strategies in operable breast cancer. PMID:27481009

  13. Lymphatic endothelial cells support tumor growth in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Esak; Pandey, Niranjan B.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor lymphatic vessels (LV) serve as a conduit of tumor cell dissemination, due to their leaky nature and secretion of tumor-recruiting factors. Though lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) lining the LV express distinct factors (also called lymphangiocrine factors), these factors and their roles in the tumor microenvironment are not well understood. Here we employ LEC, microvascular endothelial cells (MEC), and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cultured in triple-negative MDA-MB-231 tumor-conditioned media (TCM) to determine the factors that may be secreted by various EC in the MDA-MB-231 breast tumor. These factors will serve as endothelium derived signaling molecules in the tumor microenvironment. We co-injected these EC with MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells into animals and showed that LEC support tumor growth, HUVEC have no significant effect on tumor growth, whereas MEC suppress it. Focusing on LEC-mediated tumor growth, we discovered that TCM-treated LEC (‘tumor-educated LEC') secrete high amounts of EGF and PDGF-BB, compared to normal LEC. LEC-secreted EGF promotes tumor cell proliferation. LEC-secreted PDGF-BB induces pericyte infiltration and angiogenesis. These lymphangiocrine factors may support tumor growth in the tumor microenvironment. This study shows that LV serve a novel role in the tumor microenvironment apart from their classical role as conduits of metastasis. PMID:25068296

  14. Tumor-associated macrophages promote tumor cell proliferation in nasopharyngeal NK/T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yixiong; Fan, Linni; Wang, Yingmei; Li, Peifeng; Zhu, Jin; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Weichen; Zhang, Yuehua; Huang, Gaosheng

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between the number of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and proliferative activity of tumor cells and the relationship between two macrophage biomarkers CD68 and CD163 in nasopharyngeal NK/T-cell lymphoma. Methods: Immunohistochemistry was used to reconfirm the diagnosis of nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma and detect the numbers of TAMs and the ki-67 label index of the tumor cells in all 31 cases. In addition, 12 cases of inflammatory cases were collected as controls, for which the immunostaining of CD68 and CD163 were done as well. Then staining results were analyzed with Pearson correlation and t test. Results: The number of TAMs was positively correlated with tumor proliferative activity (P = 0.024) in nasopharyngeal NK/T-cell lymphoma. The expression of CD68 and CD163 was closely related (P = 0.009), and the positive rate of CD68 was generally higher than CD163, however there is no statistical significance. Conclusion: The increase in numbers of TAMs in nasopharyngeal NK/T-cell lymphoma is related to higher proliferative index, indicating the TAMs play an important role in tumor proliferation. Meanwhile both CD68 and CD163 might be the markers for TAMs but CD163 would be the better one. PMID:25337185

  15. Mast cells: potential positive and negative roles in tumor biology.

    PubMed

    Marichal, Thomas; Tsai, Mindy; Galli, Stephen J

    2013-11-01

    Mast cells are immune cells that reside in virtually all vascularized tissues. Upon activation by diverse mechanisms, mast cells can secrete a broad array of biologically active products that either are stored in the cytoplasmic granules of the cells (e.g., histamine, heparin, various proteases) or are produced de novo upon cell stimulation (e.g., prostaglandins, leukotrienes, cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors). Mast cells are best known for their effector functions during anaphylaxis and acute IgE-associated allergic reactions, but they also have been implicated in a wide variety of processes that maintain health or contribute to disease. There has been particular interest in the possible roles of mast cells in tumor biology. In vitro studies have shown that mast cells have the potential to influence many aspects of tumor biology, including tumor development, tumor-induced angiogenesis, and tissue remodeling, and the shaping of adaptive immune responses to tumors. Yet, the actual contributions of mast cells to tumor biology in vivo remain controversial. Here, we review some basic features of mast cell biology with a special emphasis on those relevant to their potential roles in tumors. We discuss how using in vivo tumor models in combination with models in which mast cell function can be modulated has implicated mast cells in the regulation of host responses to tumors. Finally, we summarize data from studies of human tumors that suggest either beneficial or detrimental roles for mast cells in tumors. PMID:24777963

  16. Tumor-associated stromal cells as key contributors to the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Bussard, Karen M; Mutkus, Lysette; Stumpf, Kristina; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Marini, Frank C

    2016-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a heterogeneous population of cells consisting of the tumor bulk plus supporting cells. It is becoming increasingly evident that these supporting cells are recruited by cancer cells from nearby endogenous host stroma and promote events such as tumor angiogenesis, proliferation, invasion, and metastasis, as well as mediate mechanisms of therapeutic resistance. In addition, recruited stromal cells range in type and include vascular endothelial cells, pericytes, adipocytes, fibroblasts, and bone-marrow mesenchymal stromal cells. During normal wound healing and inflammatory processes, local stromal cells change their phenotype to become that of reactive stroma. Under certain conditions, however, tumor cells can co-opt these reactive stromal cells and further transition them into tumor-associated stromal cells (TASCs). These TASCs express higher levels of proteins, including alpha-smooth muscle actin, fibroblast activating protein, and matrix metalloproteinases, compared with their normal, non-reactive counterparts. TASCs are also known to secrete many pro-tumorigenic factors, including IL-6, IL-8, stromal-derived factor-1 alpha, vascular endothelial growth factor, tenascin-C, and matrix metalloproteinases, among others, which recruit additional tumor and pro-tumorigenic cells to the developing microenvironment. Here, we review the current literature pertaining to the origins of recruited host stroma, contributions toward tumor progression, tumor-associated stromal cells, and mechanisms of crosstalk between endogenous host stroma and tumor cells. PMID:27515302

  17. Effusion cytomorphology of small round cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Katsuhide; Tsuta, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Background: Small round cell tumors (SRCTs) are a group of tumors composed of small, round, and uniform cells with high nuclear/cytoplasmic (N/C) ratios. The appearance of SRCT neoplastic cells in the effusion fluid is very rare. We reported the cytomorphological findings of SRCTs in effusion cytology, and performed statistical and mathematical analyses for a purpose to distinguish SRCTs. Materials and Methods: We analyzed the cytologic findings of effusion samples from 40 SRCT cases and measured the lengths of the nuclei, cytoplasms, and the cell cluster areas. The SRCT cases included 14 Ewing sarcoma (EWS)/primitive neuroectodermal tumor cases, 5 synovial sarcoma cases, 6 rhabdomyosarcoma cases, 9 small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) cases, and 6 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBL) cases. Results: Morphologically, there were no significant differences in the nuclear and cytoplasmic lengths in cases of EWS, synovial sarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma. The cytoplasmic lengths in cases of SCLC and DLBL were smaller than those of EWS, synovial sarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma. The nuclear density of the cluster in SCLC was higher than that in other SRCTs, and cases of DLBL showed a lack of anisokaryosis and anisocytosis. Conclusion: We believe that it might be possible to diagnose DLBL and SCLC from cytologic analysis of effusion samples but it is very difficult to use this method to distinguish EWS, synovial sarcoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma. Statistical and mathematical analyses indicated that nuclear density and dispersion of nuclear and cytoplasmic sizes are useful adjuncts to conventional cytologic diagnostic criteria, which are acquired from experience. PMID:27279684

  18. Immune response to UV-induced tumors: mediation of progressor tumor rejection by natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Streeter, P.R.; Fortner, G.W.

    1986-03-01

    Skin tumors induced in mice by chronic ultraviolet (UV) irradiation are highly antigenic and can induce a state of transplantation immunity in syngeneic animals. In the present study, the authors compared the in vitro cytolytic activity of splenic lymphocytes from mice immunized with either regressor or progressor UV-tumors. The results of this comparison implicated tumor-specific cytolytic T (Tc) lymphocytes in rejection of regressor UV-tumors, and revealed that immunization with the progressor UV-tumor 2237 failed to elicit detectable levels of progressor tumor-specific Tc cells even as the tumors rejected. Following in vitro resensitization of spleen cells from either regressor or progressor tumor immune animals, the authors found NK-like lymphocytes with anti-tumor activity. As the authors had not detected cells with this activity in splenic lymphocyte preparations prior to in vitro resensitization, the authors examined lymphocytes from the local tumor environment during the course of progressor tumor rejection for this activity. This analysis revealed NK lymphocytes exhibiting significant levels of cytolytic activity against UV-tumors. These results implicate NK cells as potential effector cells in the rejection of progressor UV-tumors by immune animals, and suggests that these cells may be regulated by T lymphocytes.

  19. Specific action of the lipoxygenase pathway in mediating angiotensin II-induced aldosterone synthesis in isolated adrenal glomerulosa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nadler, J L; Natarajan, R; Stern, N

    1987-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AII) in adrenal glomerulosa cells activates phospholipase C resulting in the formation of inositol phosphates and diacylglycerol rich in arachidonic acid (AA). Although glomerulosa cells can metabolize AA via cyclooxygenase (CO), this pathway plays little role in aldosterone synthesis. Recent evidence suggests that the lipoxygenase (LO) pathway may be important for hormonal secretion in endocrine tissues such as the islet of Langerhans. However, the capacity of the glomerulosa cell to synthesize LO products and their role in aldosterone secretion is not known. To study this, the effect of nonselective and selective LO inhibitors on AII, ACTH, and potassium-induced aldosterone secretion and LO product formation was evaluated in isolated rat glomerulosa cells. BW755c, a nonselective LO inhibitor dose dependently reduced the AII-stimulated level of aldosterone without altering AII binding (91 +/- 6 to 36 +/- 4 ng/10(6) cells/h 10(-4) M, P less than 0.001). The same effect was observed with another nonselective LO blocker, phenidone, and a more selective 12-LO inhibitor, Baicalein. In contrast U-60257, a selective 5-LO inhibitor did not change the AII-stimulated levels of aldosterone (208 +/- 11% control, AII 10(-9) M vs. 222 +/- 38%, AII + U-60257). The LO blockers action was specific for AII since neither BW755c nor phenidone altered ACTH or K+-induced aldosterone secretion. AII stimulated the formation of the 12-LO product 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE) as measured by ultraviolet detection and HPLC in AA loaded cells and by a specific RIA in unlabeled cells (501 +/- 50 to 990 +/- 10 pg/10(5) cells, P less than 0.02). BW755c prevented the AII-mediated rise in 12-HETE formation. In contrast, neither ACTH nor K+ increased 12-HETE levels. The addition of 12-HETE or its unstable precursor 12-HPETE (10(-9) or 10(-8) M) completely restored AII action during LO blockade. AII also produced an increase in 15-HETE formation, but the 15-LO products

  20. Colon tumor cells grown in NASA Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    These photos compare the results of colon carcinoma cells grown in a NASA Bioreactor flown on the STS-70 Space Shuttle in 1995 flight and ground control experiments. The cells grown in microgravity (left) have aggregated to form masses that are larger and more similar to tissue found in the body than the cells cultured on the ground (right). The principal investigator is Milburn Jessup of the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The NASA Bioreactor provides a low turbulence culture environment which promotes the formation of large, three-dimensional cell clusters. Due to their high level of cellular organization and specialization, samples constructed in the bioreactor more closely resemble the original tumor or tissue found in the body. NASA-sponsored bioreactor research has been instrumental in helping scientists to better understand normal and cancerous tissue development. In cooperation with the medical community, the bioreactor design is being used to prepare better models of human colon, prostate, breast and ovarian tumors. Cartilage, bone marrow, heart muscle, skeletal muscle, pancreatic islet cells, liver and kidney are just a few of the normal tissues being cultured in rotating bioreactors by investigators. Cell constructs grown in a rotating bioreactor on Earth (left) eventually become too large to stay suspended in the nutrient media. In the microgravity of orbit, the cells stay suspended. Rotation then is needed for gentle stirring to replenish the media around the cells. The work is sponsored by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research. The bioreactor is managed by the Biotechnology Cell Science Program at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC). Credit: NASA and University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

  1. Mast cell tumor destruction by deionized water.

    PubMed

    Grier, R L; Di Guardo, G; Schaffer, C B; Pedrosa, B; Myers, R; Merkley, D F; Thouvenelle, M

    1990-07-01

    In a controlled study, malignant murine P815 mastocytoma cells exposed in vitro to distilled and deionized water died as a result of progressive swelling, degranulation, and membrane rupture. A 90% mean cell death occurred when cells obtained directly from culture were exposed to deionized water for 2 minutes. Of 6 cryopreserved malignant murine cell lines, which included Cloudman S91 melanoma, CMT-93 rectum carcinoma, MMT-06052 mammary carcinoma, and S-180 Sarcoma, only P815 mastocytoma and YAC-1 lymphoma were significantly (P less than 0.05) affected by hypotonic shock; Cloudman S91 melanoma cells were the most resistant. Mastocytoma cells were selectively killed by hypotonic solution, and lymphoma cells were also killed by isotonic saline solution. Local mast cell tumor (MCT) recurrence and percentage survival were evaluated in 12 cats (21 MCT) and 54 dogs (85 MCT) subjected to surgery alone or local infiltration of deionized water as an adjunct to surgery. Of all 16 incompletely excised MCT in cats, there was no local recurrence following injection. Four mast cell tumors (2 cats) regressed after being injected in situ. In dogs with clinical stage-I MCT, local recurrence was detected in 50% (5/10), but with injection after incomplete excision, local MCT recurrence was significantly (P less than 0.05) less (6.6%, 1/15). Percentage recurrence was significantly (P less than 0.05) less and survival significantly greater when incompletely excised grade-II MCT were injected. Mean follow-up period after surgery in cats and dogs was 35 and 23.4 months, respectively. PMID:2117868

  2. Giant Cell Tumors of the Axial Skeleton

    PubMed Central

    Balke, Maurice; Henrichs, Marcel P.; Gosheger, Georg; Ahrens, Helmut; Streitbuerger, Arne; Koehler, Michael; Bullmann, Viola; Hardes, Jendrik

    2012-01-01

    Background. We report on 19 cases of giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) affecting the spine or sacrum and evaluate the outcome of different treatment modalities. Methods. Nineteen patients with GCT of the spine (n = 6) or sacrum (n = 13) have been included in this study. The mean followup was 51.6 months. Ten sacral GCT were treated by intralesional procedures of which 4 also received embolization, and 3 with irradiation only. All spinal GCT were surgically treated. Results. Two (15.4%) patients with sacral and 4 (66.7%) with spinal tumors had a local recurrence, two of the letter developed pulmonary metastases. One local recurrence of the spine was successfully treated by serial arterial embolization, a procedure previously described only for sacral tumors. At last followup, 9 patients had no evidence of disease, 8 had stable disease, 1 had progressive disease, 1 died due to disease. Six patients had neurological deficits. Conclusions. GCT of the axial skeleton have a high local recurrence rate. Neurological deficits are common. En-bloc spondylectomy combined with embolization is the treatment of choice. In case of inoperability, serial arterial embolization seems to be an alternative not only for sacral but also for spinal tumors. PMID:22448122

  3. Giant cell tumor of the spine.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Toshifumi; Liljenqvist, Ulf; Halm, Henry; Hillmann, Axel; Gosheger, Georg; Winkelmann, Winfried

    2002-08-01

    Six patients with giant cell tumor of the spine had surgery between 1981 and 1995. Three lesions were located in the scrum, two lesions were in the thoracic spine, and one lesion was in the lumbar spine. Preoperatively, all patients had local pain and neurologic symptoms. Two patients had cement implanted after curettage or intralesional excision of the sacral tumor; one patient had a local relapse. After the second curettage and cement implantation, the tumor was controlled. One patient with a sacral lesion had marginal excision and spondylodesis; no relapse developed. Two patients with thoracic lesions had planned marginal excision and spondylodesis; the margins finally became intralesional, but no relapse developed. One patient with a lumbar lesion had incomplete removal of the tumor and received postoperative irradiation. At the final followup (median, 69 months), five of six patients were disease-free and one patient died of disease progression. Two of the five surviving patients had pain after standing or neurologic problems. Although some contamination occurred, planning a marginal excision of the lesion seems beneficial for vertebral lesions above the sacrum. Total sacrectomy of a sacral lesion seems to be too invasive when cement implantation can control the lesion. PMID:12151896

  4. Interleukin 2 expression by tumor cells alters both the immune response and the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Fenton, B M; Koch, C J; Frelinger, J G; Lord, E M

    1998-04-01

    Microenvironmental conditions within solid tumors can have marked effects on the growth of the tumors and their response to therapies. The disorganized growth of tumors and their attendant vascular systems tends to result in areas of the tumors that are deficient in oxygen (hypoxic). Cells within these hypoxic areas are more resistant to conventional therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy. Here, we examine the hypoxic state of EMT6 mouse mammary tumors and the location of host cells within the different areas of the tumors to determine whether such microenvironmental conditions might also affect their ability to be recognized by the immune system. Hypoxia within tumors was quantified by flow cytometry and visualized by immunohistochemistry using a monoclonal antibody (ELK3-51) against cellular adducts of 2-(2-nitro-1H-imidazol-1-yl)-N-(2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropyl)acetam ide (EF5), a nitroimidazole compound that binds selectively to hypoxic cells. Thy-1+ cells, quantified using a monoclonal antibody, were found only in the well-oxygenated areas. The location of these Thy-1+ cells was also examined in EMT6 tumors that had been transfected with the gene for interleukin-2 (IL-2) because these tumors contain greatly increased numbers of host cells. Surprisingly, we found that IL-2-transfected tumors had significantly decreased hypoxia compared to parental tumors. Furthermore, using the fluorescent dye Hoechst 33342, an in vivo marker of perfused vessels, combined with immunochemical staining of PECAM-1 (CD31) as a marker of tumor vasculature, we found increased vascularization in the IL-2-transfected tumors. Thus, expression of IL-2 at the site of tumor growth may enhance tumor immunity not only by inducing the generation of tumor-reactive CTLs but also by allowing increased infiltration of activated T cells into the tumors. PMID:9537251

  5. Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Germ Cell Tumor; Teratoma; Choriocarcinoma; Germinoma; Mixed Germ Cell Tumor; Yolk Sac Tumor; Childhood Teratoma; Malignant Germ Cell Neoplasm; Extragonadal Seminoma; Non-seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Seminoma

  6. Endothelial cell Ca2+ increases upon tumor cell contact and modulates cell-cell adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Pili, R; Corda, S; Passaniti, A; Ziegelstein, R C; Heldman, A W; Capogrossi, M C

    1993-01-01

    The signal transduction mechanisms involved in tumor cell adhesion to endothelial cells are still largely undefined. The effect of metastatic murine melanoma cell and human prostate carcinoma cell contact on cytosolic [Ca2+] of bovine artery endothelial cells was examined in indo-1-loaded endothelial cell monolayers. A rapid increase in endothelial cell [Ca2+] occurred on contact with tumor cells, but not on contact with 8-microns inert beads. A similar increase in endothelial cell [Ca2+] was observed with human neutrophils or monocyte-like lymphoma cells, but not with endothelial cells, red blood cells, and melanoma cell-conditioned medium. The increase in endothelial cell [Ca2+] was not inhibited by extracellular Ca2+ removal. In contrast, endothelial cell pretreatment with thapsigargin, which releases endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ into the cytosol and depletes this Ca2+ store site, abolished the cytosolic [Ca2+] rise upon melanoma cell contact. Endothelial cell pretreatment with the membrane-permeant form of the Ca2+ chelator bis-(O-aminophenoxyl)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid blocked the increase in cytosolic [Ca2+]. Under static and dynamic flow conditions (0.46 dyn/cm2) bis-(O-aminophenoxyl)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid pretreatment of bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cell monolayers inhibited melanoma cell adhesion to the endothelial cells. Thus, tumor cell contact with endothelial cells induces a rapid Ca2+ release from endothelial intracellular stores, which has a functional role in enhancing cell-cell adhesion. Images PMID:8254056

  7. Medulloblastoma/Primitive neuroectodermal tumor and germ cell tumors: the uncommon but potentially curable primary brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Samkari, Ayman; Hwang, Eugene; Packer, Roger J

    2012-08-01

    This article presents an overview of medulloblastomas, central nervous system primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and germ cell tumors for the practicing oncologist. Discussion includes the definition of these tumors, histopathologic findings, molecular and genetic characteristics, prognoses, and evolution of treatment. PMID:22794288

  8. Control of adrenal androgen production.

    PubMed

    Odell, W D; Parker, L N

    The major adrenal androgens are dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) and androstenedione (delta 4). Studies by Cutler et al in 1978 demonstrated that these androgens are detectable in blood of all domestic and laboratory animals studied, but that only 4 species show increase in one or more with sexual maturation: rabbit, dog, chimpanzee and man. Studies by Grover and Odell in 1975 show these androgens do not bind to the androgen receptor obtained from rat prostate and thus probably are androgens only by conversion to an active androgen in vivo. Thomas and Oake in 1974 showed human skin converted DHEA to testosterone. The control of adrenal androgen secretion is in part modulated by ACTH. However, other factors or hormones must exist also, for a variety of clinical observations show dissociation in adrenal androgen versus cortisol secretion. Other substances that have been said to be controllers of adrenal androgen secretion include estrogens, prolactin, growth hormone, gonadotropins and lipotropin. None of these appear to be the usual physiological modulator, although under some circumstances each may increase androgen production. Studies from our laboratory using in vivo experiments in the castrate dog and published in 1979 indicated that crude extracts of bovine pituitary contained a substance that either modified ACTH stimulation of adrenal androgen secretion, or stimulated secretion itself - Cortisol Androgen Stimulating Hormone. Parker et al in 1983 showed a 60,000 MW glycoprotein was extractable from human pituitaries, which stimulated DHA secretion by dispersed canine adrenal cells in vitro, but did not stimulate cortisol secretion. This material contained no ACTH by radioimmunoassay. In 1982 Brubaker et al reported a substance was also present in human fetal pituitaries, which stimulated DHA secretion, but did not effect cortisol. PMID:6100259

  9. Granular cell tumor presenting as a large leg mass.

    PubMed

    Andalib, Ali; Heidary, Mohsen; Sajadieh-Khajouei, Sahar

    2014-10-01

    Granular cell tumor is a rare benign neoplasm most commonly appears in the head and neck region, especially in the tongue, cheek mucosa, and palate. Occurrence in limbs is even rarer. These tumors account for approximately 0.5% of all soft tissue tumors. Granular cell tumor can also affect other organs including skin, breast, and lungs. Local recurrence and metastasis is potentially higher in malignant forms with poor prognosis in respect to the benign counterparts. The average diameter of the tumor is usually about 2-3 cm. We report a granular cell tumor in the leg with an unusual size. PMID:25692157

  10. Ewing's Sarcoma of the Adrenal Gland.

    PubMed

    Pal, Dilip Kumar; Chandra, Vipin; Ranjan, Kumar Rajiv; Chakrabortty, Debasis; Banerjee, Manju

    2016-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma (ES) or primitive neuro-ectodermal tumor (PNET) typically occurs in long or flat bones, the chest wall, extra-skeletal soft tissue, and rarely in solid organs. Incidence of adrenal Ewing's sarcoma is very rare. Here we report a case of Ewing's sarcoma of the right adrenal gland in an 8-year-old girl who presented with an abdominal mass. The huge tumor was managed by preoperative neo-adjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgical resection. She died due to metastasis after five months of surgery. PMID:27398321

  11. Isolation of Cancer Epithelial Cells from Mouse Mammary Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Sara; Chen, Hexin; Lo, Pang-Kuo

    2016-01-01

    The isolation of cancer epithelial cells from mouse mammary tumor is accomplished by digestion of the solid tumor. Red blood cells and other contaminates are removed using several washing techniques such that primary epithelial cells can further enriched. This procedure yields primary tumor cells that can be used for in vitro tissue culture, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and a wide variety of other experiments (Lo et al., 2012).

  12. Activity of nintedanib in germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Steinemann, Gustav; Jacobsen, Christine; Gerwing, Mirjam; Hauschild, Jessica; von Amsberg, Gunhild; Höpfner, Michael; Nitzsche, Bianca; Honecker, Friedemann

    2016-02-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are the most frequent malignancy in male patients between 15 and 45 years of age. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy shows excellent cure rates, but patients with cisplatin-resistant GCTs have a poor prognosis. Nintedanib (BIBF 1120, Vargatef) inhibits the receptor classes vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet derived growth factor receptor, and fibroblast growth factor receptor, and has shown activity against many tumors, as well as in idiopathic lung fibrosis and bleomycin-induced lung injury. Here, we investigated the antineoplastic and antiangiogenic properties of nintedanib in cisplatin-resistant and cisplatin-sensitive GCT cells, both alone and in combination with classical cytotoxic agents such as cisplatin, etoposide, and bleomycin. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of nintedanib was 4.5 ± 0.43 μmol/l, 3.1 ± 0.45 μmol/l, and 3.6 ± 0.33 μmol/l in cisplatin-sensitive NTERA2, 2102Ep, and NCCIT cells, whereas the IC50 doses of the cisplatin-resistant counterparts were 6.6 ± 0.37 μmol/l (NTERA2-R), 4.5 ± 0.83 μmol/l (2102Ep-R), and 6.1 ± 0.41 μmol/l (NCCIT-R), respectively. Single treatment with nintedanib induced apoptosis and resulted in a sustained reduction in the capacity of colony formation in both cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant GCT cells. Cell cycle analysis showed that nintedanib induced a strong G0/G1-phase arrest in all investigated cell lines. Combination treatment with cisplatin did not result in additive, synergistic, or antagonistic effects. The in-vivo activity was studied using the chorioallantoic membrane assay and indicated the antiangiogenic potency of nintedanib with markedly reduced microvessel density. Topical treatment of inoculated tumor plaques resulted in a significant reduction of the tumor size. This indicates that nintedanib might be a promising substance in the treatment of GCT. PMID:26479145

  13. B cell regulation of anti-tumor immune response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Morgan, Richard; Podack, Eckhard R; Rosenblatt, Joseph

    2013-12-01

    Our laboratory has been investigating the role of B cells on tumor immunity. We have studied the immune response in mice that are genetically lacking in B cells (BCDM) using a variety of syngeneic mouse tumors and compared immune responses in BCDM with those seen in wild type (WT) immunocompetent mice (ICM). A variety of murine tumors are rejected or inhibited in their growth in BCDM, compared with ICM, including the EL4 thymoma, and the MC38 colon carcinoma in C57BL/6 mice, as well as the EMT-6 breast carcinoma in BALB/c mice. In all three murine models, tumors show reduced growth in BCDM which is accompanied by increased T cell and NK cell infiltration, and a more vigorous Th1 cytokine response, and increased cytolytic T cell response in the absence of B cells. Reconstitution of the mice with B cells results in augmented tumor growth due to a diminished anti-tumor immune response and in reduction in CD8+ T cell and NK cell infiltration. Studies involving BCR transgenic mice indicated that B cells inhibit anti-tumor T cell responses through antigen non-specific mechanisms. More recent studies using the EMT-6 model demonstrated that both the number and function of Treg cells in ICM was increased relative to that seen in BCDM. Increased expansion of Treg cells was evident following EMT-6 implantation in ICM relative to that seen in non-tumor-bearing mice or BCDM. The percentage and number of Tregs in spleen, tumor draining lymph nodes, and the tumor bed are increased in ICM compared with BCDM. Treg functional capacity as measured by suppression assays appears to be reduced in BCDM compared with ICM. In contrast to other described types of B regulatory activity, adoptive transfer of B cells can rescue tumor growth independently of the ability of B cells to secrete IL-10, and also independently of MHC-II expression. In experiments using the MC38 adenocarcinoma model, BCDM reconstituted with WT B cells support tumor growth while tumor growth continues to be inhibited

  14. Isolation of Circulating Tumor Cells by Dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Shim, Sangjo

    2014-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is an electrokinetic method that allows intrinsic dielectric properties of suspended cells to be exploited for discrimination and separation. It has emerged as a promising method for isolating circulation tumor cells (CTCs) from blood. DEP-isolation of CTCs is independent of cell surface markers. Furthermore, isolated CTCs are viable and can be maintained in culture, suggesting that DEP methods should be more generally applicable than antibody-based approaches. The aim of this article is to review and synthesize for both oncologists and biomedical engineers interested in CTC isolation the pertinent characteristics of DEP and CTCs. The aim is to promote an understanding of the factors involved in realizing DEP-based instruments having both sufficient discrimination and throughput to allow routine analysis of CTCs in clinical practice. The article brings together: (a) the principles of DEP; (b) the biological basis for the dielectric differences between CTCs and blood cells; (c) why such differences are expected to be present for all types of tumors; and (d) instrumentation requirements to process 10 mL blood specimens in less than 1 h to enable routine clinical analysis. The force equilibrium method of dielectrophoretic field-flow fractionation (DEP-FFF) is shown to offer higher discrimination and throughput than earlier DEP trapping methods and to be applicable to clinical studies. PMID:24662940

  15. Microelectrode Arrays of Diamond-Insulated Graphitic Channels for Real-Time Detection of Exocytotic Events from Cultured Chromaffin Cells and Slices of Adrenal Glands.

    PubMed

    Picollo, Federico; Battiato, Alfio; Bernardi, Ettore; Marcantoni, Andrea; Pasquarelli, Alberto; Carbone, Emilio; Olivero, Paolo; Carabelli, Valentina

    2016-08-01

    A microstructured graphitic 4 × 4 multielectrode array was embedded in a single-crystal diamond substrate (4 × 4 μG-SCD MEA) for real-time monitoring of exocytotic events from cultured chromaffin cells and adrenal slices. The current approach relies on the development of a parallel ion beam lithographic technique, which assures the time-effective fabrication of extended arrays with reproducible electrode dimensions. The reported device is suitable for performing amperometric and voltammetric recordings with high sensitivity and temporal resolution, by simultaneously acquiring data from 16 rectangularly shaped microelectrodes (20 × 3.5 μm(2)) separated by 200 μm gaps. Taking advantage of the array geometry we addressed the following specific issues: (i) detect both the spontaneous and KCl-evoked secretion simultaneously from several chromaffin cells directly cultured on the device surface, (ii) resolve the waveform of different subsets of exocytotic events, and (iii) monitoring quantal secretory events from thin slices of the adrenal gland. The frequency of spontaneous release was low (0.12 and 0.3 Hz, respectively, for adrenal slices and cultured cells) and increased up to 0.9 Hz after stimulation with 30 mM KCl in cultured cells. The spike amplitude as well as rise and decay time were comparable with those measured by carbon fiber microelectrodes and allowed to identify three different subsets of secretory events associated with "full fusion" events, "kiss-and-run" and "kiss-and-stay" exocytosis, confirming that the device has adequate sensitivity and time resolution for real-time recordings. The device offers the significant advantage of shortening the time to collect data by allowing simultaneous recordings from cell populations either in primary cell cultures or in intact tissues. PMID:27376596

  16. Risk of tumor cell seeding through biopsy and aspiration cytology

    PubMed Central

    Shyamala, K.; Girish, H. C.; Murgod, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells, besides reproducing uncontrollably, lose cohesiveness and orderliness of normal tissue, invade and get detached from the primary tumor to travel and set up colonies elsewhere. Dislodging neoplastically altered cells from a tumor during biopsy or surgical intervention or during simple procedure like needle aspiration is a possibility because they lack cohesiveness, and they attain the capacity to migrate and colonize. Considering the fact that, every tumor cell, is bathed in interstitial fluid, which drains into the lymphatic system and has an individualized arterial blood supply and venous drainage like any other normal cell in our body, inserting a needle or a knife into a tumor, there is a jeopardy of dislodging a loose tumor cell into either the circulation or into the tissue fluid. Tumor cells are easier to dislodge due to lower cell-to-cell adhesion. This theory with the possibility of seeding of tumor cells is supported by several case studies that have shown that after diagnostic biopsy of a tumor, many patients developed cancer at multiple sites and showed the presence of circulating cancer cells in the blood stream on examination. In this review, we evaluate the risk of exposure to seeding of tumor cells by biopsy and aspiration cytology and provide some suggested practices to prevent tumor cell seeding. PMID:24818087

  17. Role of adrenal imaging in surgical management

    SciTech Connect

    Lamki, L.M.; Haynie, T.P. )

    1990-03-01

    Adrenal imaging using radiopharmaceuticals is a functional test that can contribute significantly to surgical management and follow-up of patients with either benign or malignant conditions of the adrenal cortex and medulla. Imaging of the cortex is achieved by iodine-131-labeled iodomethyl nor-cholesterol (NP-59), while adrenal medulla imaging can be successfully accomplished by 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), which localizes in the adrenergic nerve terminal with norepinephrine. Both tests carry high sensitivity and specificity for functional tumors and hyperplasia, and often better than CT scanning. This article reviews the current status and clinical utility of nuclear imaging of the adrenal cortex in congenital hyperplasia, low renin hypertension and aldosteronism, and Cushing's syndrome. Adrenal medulla imaging is reviewed in light of our experience at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in pheochromocytoma, neuroblastoma, and other neuroectodermal tumors. Investigation of {sup 131}I-MIBG therapy of metastatic tumors of neuroectodermal origin potentially offers a means of at least controlling symptoms of hormonal secretion in these patients. 40 references.

  18. Antigen loading of dendritic cells with whole tumor cell preparations.

    PubMed

    Thumann, Peter; Moc, Isabelle; Humrich, Jens; Berger, Thomas G; Schultz, Erwin S; Schuler, Gerold; Jenne, Lars

    2003-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) based vaccinations have been widely used for the induction of anti-tumoral immunity in clinical studies. Antigen loading of DC with whole tumor cell preparations is an attractive method whenever tumor cell material is available. In order to determine parameters for the loading procedure, we performed dose finding and timing experiments. We found that apoptotic and necrotic melanoma cells up to a ratio of one-to-one, equivalent to 1mg/ml protein per 1 x 10(6) DC, can be added to monocyte derived DC without effecting DC recovery extensively. Using the isolated protein content of tumor cells (lysate) as a parameter, up to 5 mg/ml protein per 1 x 10(6) DC can be added. To achieve significant protein uptake at least 1 mg/ml of protein have to be added for more than 24 h as tested with FITC-labelled ovalbumin. Maturation inducing cytokines can be added simultaneously with the tumor cell preparations to immature DC without affecting the uptake. Furthermore, we tested the feasibility of cryopreservation of loaded and matured DC to facilitate the generation of ready to use aliquots. DC were cryopreserved in a mix of human serum albumin, DMSO and 5% glucose. After thawing, surface expression of molecules indicating the mature status (CD83, costimulatory and MHC molecules), was found to be unaltered. Furthermore, cryopreserved DC kept the capability to stimulate allogenic T-cell proliferation in mixed leukocyte reactions at full level. Loaded and matured DC pulsed with influenza matrix peptide (IMP) retained the capacity to induce the generation of IMP-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes after cryopreservation as measured by ELISPOT and tetramer staining. The expression of the chemokine receptor CXCR-4 and CCR-7 remained unaltered during cryopreservation and the migratory responsiveness towards MIP-3beta was unaltered as measured in a migration assay. Thus we conclude that the large scale loading and maturation of DC with whole tumor cell preparations can be

  19. Tumor cells as cellular vehicles to deliver gene therapies to metastatic tumors.

    PubMed

    García-Castro, Javier; Martínez-Palacio, Jesús; Lillo, Rosa; García-Sánchez, Félix; Alemany, Ramón; Madero, Luis; Bueren, Juan A; Ramírez, Manuel

    2005-04-01

    A long-pursued goal in cancer treatment is to deliver a therapy specifically to metastases. As a result of the disseminated nature of the metastatic disease, carrying the therapeutic agent to the sites of tumor growth represents a major step for success. We hypothesized that tumor cells injected intravenously (i.v.) into an animal with metastases would respond to many of the factors driving the metastatic process, and would target metastases. Using a model of spontaneous metastases, we report here that i.v. injected tumor cells localized on metastatic lesions. Based on this fact, we used genetically transduced tumor cells for tumor targeting of anticancer agents such as a suicide gene or an oncolytic virus, with evident antitumoral effect and negligible systemic toxicity. Therefore, autologous tumor cells may be used as cellular vehicles for systemic delivery of anticancer therapies to metastatic tumors. PMID:15650763

  20. Risk assessment of thyroid follicular cell tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, R N; Crisp, T M; Hurley, P M; Rosenthal, S L; Singh, D V

    1998-01-01

    Thyroid follicular cell tumors arise in rodents from mutations, perturbations of thyroid and pituitary hormone status with increased stimulation of thyroid cell growth by thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), or a combination of the two. The only known human thyroid carcinogen is ionizing radiation. It is not known for certain whether chemicals that affect thyroid cell growth lead to human thyroid cancer. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency applies the following science policy positions: 1) chemically induced rodent thyroid tumors are presumed to be relevant to humans; 2) when interspecies information is lacking, the default is to assume comparable carcinogenic sensitivity in rodents and humans; 3) adverse rodent noncancer thyroid effects due to chemically induced thyroid-pituitary disruption are presumed to be relevant to humans; 4) linear dose-response considerations are applied to thyroid cancer induced by chemical substances that either do not disrupt thyroid functioning or lack mode of action information; 5) nonlinear thyroid cancer dose-response considerations are applied to chemicals that reduce thyroid hormone levels, increase TSH and thyroid cell division, and are judged to lack mutagenic activity; and 6) nonlinear considerations may be applied in thyroid cancer dose-response assessments on a case-by-case basis for chemicals that disrupt thyroid-pituitary functioning and demonstrate some mutagenic activity. Required data for risk assessment purposes is mode of action information on mutagenicity, increases in follicular cell growth (cell size and number) and thyroid gland weight, thyroid-pituitary hormones, site of action, correlations between doses producing thyroid effects and cancer, and reversibility of effects when dosing ceases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9681971

  1. T cells from the tumor microenvironment of patients with progressive myeloma can generate strong, tumor-specific cytolytic responses to autologous, tumor-loaded dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Krasovsky, Joseph; Olson, Kara

    2002-10-01

    Most untreated cancer patients develop progressive tumors. We tested the capacity of T lymphocytes from patients with clinically progressive, multiple myeloma to develop killer function against fresh autologous tumor. In this malignancy, it is feasible to reproducibly evaluate freshly isolated tumor cells and T cells from the marrow tumor environment. When we did this with seven consecutive patients, with all clinical stages of disease, we did not detect reactivity to autologous cancer cells. However, both cytolytic and IFN--producing responses to autologous myeloma were generated in six of seven patients after stimulation ex vivo with dendritic cells that had processed autologous tumor cells. The antitumor effectors recognized fresh autologous tumor but not nontumor cells in the bone marrow, myeloma cell lines, dendritic cells loaded with tumor-derived Ig, or allogeneic tumor. Importantly, these CD8+ effectors developed with similar efficiency by using T cells from both the blood and the bone marrow tumor environment. Therefore, even in the setting of clinical tumor progression, the tumor bed of myeloma patients contains T cells that can be activated readily by dendritic cells to kill primary autologous tumor.

  2. Subcellular compartmentalization of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium with catecholamines in adrenal medullary chromaffin vesicles may explain the lack of toxicity to adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhard, J.F. Jr.; Diliberto, E.J. Jr.; Viveros, O.H.; Daniels, A.J.

    1987-11-01

    Cultures of bovine adrenomedullary chromaffin cells accumulated 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP/sup +/) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by a process that was prevented by desmethylimipramine. The subcellular localization of the incorporated (methyl-/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ was examined by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient fractionation and was found to be predominantly colocalized with catecholamines in chromaffin vesicles, and negligible amounts were detected within the mitochondrial fraction. When chromaffin cell membranes were made permeable with the detergent digitonin the absence of calcium, there was no increase in the release of (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/, indicating that there is negligible accumulation of the neurotoxin in the cytosol. Simultaneous exposure to digitonin and calcium induced cosecretion of MPP/sup +/ and catecholamines. Stimulation of the cells with nicotine released both catecholamines and MPP/sup +/ at identical rates and percentages of cellular content in a calcium-dependent manner. Last, when cells were incubated with MPP/sup +/ in the presence of tetrabenazine (an inhibitor of vesicular uptake), the chromaffin cell toxicity of MPP/sup +/ was potentiated. The authors submit that the ability of the chromaffin cells to take up and store MPP/sup +/ in the chromaffin vesicle prevents the toxin's interaction with other structures and, thus, prevents cell damage. As an extension of this hypothesis, the relative resistance of some brain monoaminergic neurons to the toxic actions of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine may result from the subcellular sequestration of MPP/sup +/ in the storage vesicle.

  3. Role of [Na+]i and [Ca2+]i in nicotine-induced norepinephrine release from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Gerber, S H; Haunstetter, A; Krüger, C; Kaufmann, A; Nobiling, R; Haass, M

    1995-09-01

    Intracellular free sodium ([Na+]i) and calcium ([Ca2+]i) concentrations were determined by sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate (SBFI) and fura 2 microfluorimetry, respectively, in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells (BCC). Validation of SBFI microfluorimetry by in vitro and in vivo calibration revealed a reliable assessment of [Na+]i within a range of 1-30 mM in single BCC. Nicotine (0.1-10 microM) induced concentration-dependent increases of both [Na+]i (from 3.3 +/- 0.1 to 25.6 +/- 0.4 mM, n = 76, P < 0.001) and [Ca2+]i (from 64 +/- 1 to 467 +/- 16 nM, n = 87, P < 0.001), which were accompanied by an increase in [3H]norepinephrine (NE) release. Consistent with an exocytotic release mechanism, nicotine-induced increments of [Ca2+]i and [3H]NE release were reduced under calcium-free conditions and by gadolinium chloride (40 microM), whereas [Na+]i was not affected. In contrast, a parallel attenuation of nicotine-evoked changes in [Na+]i, [Ca2+]i, and [3H]NE release was observed during reduction of the extracellular sodium concentration. The nicotine-evoked responses were neutralized by the nicotinic receptor antagonist hexamethonium (100 microM) but not by blockade of voltage-dependent sodium channels (1 microM tetrodotoxin). In conclusion, the nicotine-induced exocytotic release of [3H]NE is triggered by an increase in [Ca2+]i, which is facilitated by sodium influx through the nicotinic receptor ionophore. PMID:7573386

  4. Clonality as Expression of Distinctive Cell Kinetics Patterns in Nodular Hyperplasias and Adenomas of the Adrenal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Cano, Salvador J.; de Miguel, Manuel; Blanes, Alfredo; Tashjian, Robert; Galera, Hugo; Wolfe, Hubert J.

    2000-01-01

    Although histopathologic criteria for adrenal cortical nodular hyperplasias (ACNHs) and adenomas (ACAs) have been developed, their kinetics and clonality are virtually unknown. We studied 20 ACNHs and 25 ACAs (based on World Health Organization criteria) from 45 females. Representative samples were histologically evaluated, and the methylation pattern of the androgen receptor alleles was analyzed on microdissected samples. Consecutive sections were selected for slide cytometry, flow cytometry, and in situ end labeling (ISEL). Apoptosis was studied by flow cytometry (nuclear area/DNA content plotter analysis) and by ISEL. Appropriate tissue controls were run in every case. Polyclonal gel patterns were revealed in 14/18 informative ACNHs and in 3/22 informative ACAs, whereas monoclonal gel patterns were observed in 4/18 ACNHs and 19/22 ACAs. Overlapping proliferation rates (PRs) were observed in both clonal groups, and apoptosis was detected only in G0/G1 cells, especially in monoclonal ACNHs (3/4; 75%) and in polyclonal ACAs (2/3; 67%). Significantly higher PRs were observed in ACNHs with polyclonal patterns and G0/G1 apoptosis and in ACAs regardless of clonality pattern and presence of G0/G1 apoptosis. All except one ACNH (19/20; 95%) and 15/25 ACAs (60%) showed diploid DNA content, whereas the remaining cases were hyperdiploid. A direct correlation between PR and ISEL was observed in polyclonal lesions (PR = 29.32 ISEL − 1.93), whereas the correlation was inverse for monoclonal lesions (PR = −9.13 ISEL + 21.57). We concluded that only simultaneous down-regulated apoptosis and high proliferation result in selective kinetic advantage, dominant clone expansion, and unbalanced methylation patterns of androgen receptor alleles in ACNHs and ACAs. PMID:10623680

  5. Clonality as expression of distinctive cell kinetics patterns in nodular hyperplasias and adenomas of the adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Cano, S J; de Miguel, M; Blanes, A; Tashjian, R; Galera, H; Wolfe, H J

    2000-01-01

    Although histopathologic criteria for adrenal cortical nodular hyperplasias (ACNHs) and adenomas (ACAs) have been developed, their kinetics and clonality are virtually unknown. We studied 20 ACNHs and 25 ACAs (based on World Health Organization criteria) from 45 females. Representative samples were histologically evaluated, and the methylation pattern of the androgen receptor alleles was analyzed on microdissected samples. Consecutive sections were selected for slide cytometry, flow cytometry, and in situ end labeling (ISEL). Apoptosis was studied by flow cytometry (nuclear area/DNA content plotter analysis) and by ISEL. Appropriate tissue controls were run in every case. Polyclonal gel patterns were revealed in 14/18 informative ACNHs and in 3/22 informative ACAs, whereas monoclonal gel patterns were observed in 4/18 ACNHs and 19/22 ACAs. Overlapping proliferation rates (PRs) were observed in both clonal groups, and apoptosis was detected only in G(0)/G(1) cells, especially in monoclonal ACNHs (3/4; 75%) and in polyclonal ACAs (2/3; 67%). Significantly higher PRs were observed in ACNHs with polyclonal patterns and G(0)/G(1) apoptosis and in ACAs regardless of clonality pattern and presence of G(0)/G(1) apoptosis. All except one ACNH (19/20; 95%) and 15/25 ACAs (60%) showed diploid DNA content, whereas the remaining cases were hyperdiploid. A direct correlation between PR and ISEL was observed in polyclonal lesions (PR = 29.32 ISEL - 1.93), whereas the correlation was inverse for monoclonal lesions (PR = -9.13 ISEL + 21.57). We concluded that only simultaneous down-regulated apoptosis and high proliferation result in selective kinetic advantage, dominant clone expansion, and unbalanced methylation patterns of androgen receptor alleles in ACNHs and ACAs. PMID:10623680

  6. Late Relapse of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, Matthew J; Feldman, Darren R; Carver, Brett S; Sheinfeld, Joel

    2015-08-01

    Germ cell tumors of the testis have an overall survival rate greater than 90% as a result of a successful multidisciplinary approach to management. Late relapse affects a subset of patients however, and tends to be chemorefractory and the overall prognosis is poor. Surgery is the mainstay in management of late relapse but salvage chemotherapy can be successful. In this review, the clinical presentation and detection of late relapse, clinical outcomes, and predictors of survival in late relapse and the importance of a multidisciplinary treatment approach for successful management of late relapse are discussed. PMID:26216823

  7. Myeloid cell-driven angiogenesis and immune regulation in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Lee B.; Bergers, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a hallmark of cancer as its induction is indispensable to fuel an expanding tumor. The tumor microenvironment contributes to tumor vessel growth, and distinct myeloid cells recruited by the tumor have been shown to not only support angiogenesis but to foster an immune suppressive environment that supports tumor expansion and progression. Recent findings suggest that the intertwined regulation of angiogenesis and immune modulation can offer therapeutic opportunities for the treatment of cancer. Here we review the mechanisms by which distinct myeloid cell populations contribute to tumor angiogenesis, discuss current approaches in the clinic that are targeting both angiogenic and immune suppressive pathways, and highlight important areas of future research. PMID:25770923

  8. Single Unpurified Breast Tumor-Initiating Cells from Multiple Mouse Models Efficiently Elicit Tumors in Immune-Competent Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Kurpios, Natasza A.; Girgis-Gabardo, Adele; Hallett, Robin M.; Rogers, Stephen; Gludish, David W.; Kockeritz, Lisa; Woodgett, James; Cardiff, Robert; Hassell, John A.

    2013-01-01

    The tumor-initiating cell (TIC) frequency of bulk tumor cell populations is one of the criteria used to distinguish malignancies that follow the cancer stem cell model from those that do not. However, tumor-initiating cell frequencies may be influenced by experimental conditions and the extent to which tumors have progressed, parameters that are not always addressed in studies of these cells. We employed limiting dilution cell transplantation of minimally manipulated tumor cells from mammary tumors of several transgenic mouse models to determine their tumor-initiating cell frequency. We determined whether the tumors that formed following tumor cell transplantation phenocopied the primary tumors from which they were isolated and whether they could be serially transplanted. Finally we investigated whether propagating primary tumor cells in different tissue culture conditions affected their resident tumor-initiating cell frequency. We found that tumor-initiating cells comprised between 15% and 50% of the bulk tumor cell population in multiple independent mammary tumors from three different transgenic mouse models of breast cancer. Culture of primary mammary tumor cells in chemically-defined, serum-free medium as non-adherent tumorspheres preserved TIC frequency to levels similar to that of the primary tumors from which they were established. By contrast, propagating the primary tumor cells in serum-containing medium as adherent populations resulted in a several thousand-fold reduction in their tumor-initiating cell fraction. Our findings suggest that experimental conditions, including the sensitivity of the transplantation assay, can dramatically affect estimates of tumor initiating cell frequency. Moreover, conditional on cell culture conditions, the tumor-initiating cell fraction of bulk mouse mammary tumor cell preparations can either be maintained at high or low frequency in vitro thus permitting comparative studies of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cancer cells

  9. Tumoral expression of IL-33 inhibits tumor growth and modifies the tumor microenvironment through CD8+ T and NK cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Wang, Xuefeng; Yang, Qianting; Zhao, Xin; Wen, Wen; Li, Gang; Lu, Junfeng; Qin, Wenxin; Qi, Yuan; Xie, Fang; Jiang, Jingting; Wu, Changping; Zhang, Xueguang; Chen, Xinchun; Turnquist, Heth; Zhu, Yibei; Lu, Binfeng

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has shown great promise as a new standard cancer therapeutic modality. However, the response rates are limited for current approach that depends on enhancing spontaneous antitumor immune responses. Therefore, increasing tumor immunogenicity by expressing appropriate cytokines should further improve the current immunotherapy. IL-33 is a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines and is released by necrotic epithelial cells or activated innate immune cells and is thus considered a "danger" signal. The role of IL-33 in promoting type 2 immune responses and tissue inflammation has been well established. However, whether IL-33 drives antitumor immune responses is controversial. Our previous work established that IL-33 promoted the function of CD8(+) T cells. In this study, we showed that the expression of IL-33 in two types of cancer cells potently inhibited tumor growth and metastasis. Mechanistically, IL-33 increased numbers and IFN-γ production by CD8(+) T and NK cells in tumor tissues, thereby inducing a tumor microenvironment favoring tumor eradication. Importantly, IL-33 greatly increased tumor Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, both NK and CD8(+) T cells were required for the antitumor effect of IL-33. Moreover, depletion of regulatory T cells worked synergistically with IL-33 expression for tumor elimination. Our studies established "alarmin" IL-33 as a promising new cytokine for tumor immunotherapy through promoting cancer-eradicating type 1 immune responses. PMID:25429071

  10. Tumoral expression of IL-33 inhibits tumor growth and modifies the tumor microenvironment through CD8+ T and NK cells

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xin; Wang, Xuefeng; Yang, Qianting; Zhao, Xin; Wen, Wen; Li, Gang; Lu, Junfeng; Qin, Wenxin; Qi, Yuan; Xie, Fang; Jiang, Jingting; Wu, Changping; Zhang, Xueguang; Chen, Xinchun; Turnquist, Heth; Zhu, Yibei; Lu, Binfeng

    2014-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has shown great promise as a new standard cancer therapeutic modality. However, the response rates are limited for current approach that depends on enhancing spontaneous antitumor immune responses. Therefore, increasing tumor immunogenicity by expressing appropriate cytokines should further improve the current immunotherapy. Interleukin-33 is a member of the IL-1 family of cytokines and is released by necrotic epithelial cells or activated innate immune cells and is thus considered a “danger” signal. The role of IL-33 in promoting type 2 immune responses and tissue inflammation has been well established. However, whether IL-33 drives antitumor immune responses is controversial. Our previous work established that IL-33 promoted the function of CD8+ T cells. Here, we showed that the expression of IL-33 in two types of cancer cells potently inhibited tumor growth and metastasis. Mechanistically, IL-33 increased numbers and IFNγ production by CD8+ T and NK cells in tumor tissues, thereby inducing a tumor microenvironment favoring tumor eradication. Importantly, IL-33 greatly increased tumor-antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, both NK and CD8+ T cells were required for the antitumor effect of IL-33. Moreover, depletion of regulatory T cells (Treg) worked synergistically with IL-33 expression for tumor elimination. Our studies established “alarmin” IL-33 as a promising new cytokine for tumor immunotherapy through promoting cancer-eradicating type 1 immune responses. PMID:25429071

  11. Bladder pheochromocytoma: case presentation and the use of OctreoScan for localization of extra-adrenal tumor sites in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Fournier, José R; Baez-Trinidad, Luis; Acosta, Alex; Marrero, Miguel; Correa-Rivas, María; Rodríguez-Becerra, Javier; Nieves, Francisco

    2008-03-01

    An eleven year old boy presented with headaches and dizziness associated to micturition. On radiologic imaging, he was found with a bladder mass. The biochemical work up was suggestive of pheochromocytoma. An OctreoScan (111In-pentreotide) was used to rule out metastatic extension or other extra-adrenal locations of the pheochromocytoma. OctreoScan data correlated well with other radiologic studies, operative findings and with the final diagnosis, validating its use on pediatric patients. PMID:18450243

  12. Gastrointestinal tract spindle cell tumors with interstitial cells of Cajal: Prevalence excluding gastrointestinal stromal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So Jung; Hwang, Chung Su; Kim, Ahrong; Kim, Kyungbin; Choi, Kyung Un

    2016-01-01

    Leiomyomas and schwannomas of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) are mainly comprised of spindle-shaped tumor cells and should always be differentiated from gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Mast/stem cell growth factor receptor Kit (KIT) and discovered on GIST-1 (DOG1) are well-known diagnostic markers for the detection of a GIST by immunohistochemical staining. The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence and significance of spindle cell tumors of the GIT with KIT- or DOG1-positive spindle-shaped cells, presumed to be interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs), other than GISTs. A total of 71 leiomyomas and 35 schwannomas were examined and clinicopathological information was obtained. KIT and DOG1 immunostaining was performed to determine the proportions of positive cells. Mutation screening of KIT exons 9, 11, 13 and 17, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRA) exons 12 and 18 was performed in cases with a relatively high proportion of either KIT- or DOG1-positive cells. The frequency of leiomyomas and schwannomas with KIT- and DOG1-positive ICCs was 35.2% (25/71 cases) and 5.7% (2/35 cases), respectively. Among the esophageal leiomyomas with KIT- and DOG-positive ICCs (14/25; 56.0%), 5 leiomyomas involved the muscularis mucosa and 9 leiomyomas involved the muscularis propria. All gastric leiomyomas with KIT- and DOG1-positive ICCs (11/25; 44%) involved the muscularis propria. All schwannomas with an increased proportion of KIT- or DOG1-positive ICCs were of gastric origin. No KIT or PDGFRA mutations were detected in 7 leiomyomas and 2 schwannomas. In conclusion, the majority of leiomyomas and the minority of schwannomas in the GIT had a significant portion of KIT- and DOG1-positive cells. All of the tumors were located in the upper GIT, and could be present in the muscularis propria or muscularis mucosa. The tumors represented a non-neoplastic proliferation of KIT- and DOG1-positive cells in the GIT. Careful evaluation of KIT- or DOG1

  13. Endoscopic resection of colorectal granular cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Take, Iri; Shi, Qiang; Qi, Zhi-Peng; Cai, Shi-Lun; Yao, Li-Qing; Zhou, Ping-Hong; Zhong, Yun-Shi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the feasibility and effectiveness of endoscopic resection for the treatment of colorectal granular cell tumors (GCTs). METHODS: This was a retrospective study performed at a single institution. From January 2008 to April 2015, we examined a total of 11 lesions in 11 patients who were treated by an endoscopic procedure for colorectal GCTs in the Endoscopy Center, Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, China. Either endoscopic mucosal resection or endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) was performed by three surgeons with expertise in endoscopic treatment. The pre- and post-operative condition and follow-up of these patients were evaluated by colonoscopy and endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS). RESULTS: Of these 11 lesions, 2 were located in the cecum, 3 were in the ileocecal junction, 5 were in the ascending colon, and 1 was in the rectum. The median maximum diameter of the tumors was 0.81 cm (range 0.4-1.2 cm). The en bloc rate was 100%, and the complete resection rate was 90.9% (10/11). Post-operative pathology in one patient showed a tumor at the cauterization margin. However, during ESD, this lesion was removed en bloc, and no tumor tissue was seen in the wound. No perforations or delayed perforations were observed and emergency surgery was not required for complications. All patients were followed up to May 2015, and none had recurrence, metastasis, or complaints of discomfort. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic treatment performed by endoscopists with sufficient experience appears to be feasible and effective for colorectal GCTs. PMID:26730166

  14. A think tank of TINK/TANKs: tumor-infiltrating/tumor-associated natural killer cells in tumor progression and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Antonino; Ferlazzo, Guido; Albini, Adriana; Noonan, Douglas M

    2014-08-01

    Tumor-infiltrating leukocytes are often induced by the cancer microenvironment to display a protumor, proangiogenic phenotype. This "polarization" has been described for several myeloid cells, in particular macrophages. Natural killer (NK) cells represent another population of innate immune cells able to infiltrate tumors. The role of NK in tumor progression and angiogenesis has not yet been fully investigated. Several studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating NK (here referred to as "TINKs") and tumor-associated NK (altered peripheral NK cells, which here we call "TANKs") are compromised in their ability to lysew tumor cells. Recent data have suggested that they are potentially protumorigenic and can also acquire a proangiogenic phenotype. Here we review the properties of TINKs and TANKs and compare their activities to that of NK cells endowed with a physiological proangiogenic phenotype, in particular decidual NK cells. We speculate on the potential origins of TINKs and TANKs and on the immune signals involved in their differentiation and polarization. The TINK and TANK phenotype has broad implications in the immune response to tumors, ranging from a deficient control of cancer and cancer stem cells to an altered crosstalk with other relevant players of the immune response, such as dendritic cells, to induction of cancer angiogenesis. With this recently acquired knowledge that has not yet been put into perspective, we point out new potential avenues for therapeutic intervention involving NK cells as a target or an ally in oncology. PMID:25178695

  15. A Think Tank of TINK/TANKs: Tumor-Infiltrating/Tumor-Associated Natural Killer Cells in Tumor Progression and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Antonino; Ferlazzo, Guido; Albini, Adriana; Noonan, Douglas M.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating leukocytes are often induced by the cancer microenvironment to display a protumor, proangiogenic phenotype. This “polarization” has been described for several myeloid cells, in particular macrophages. Natural killer (NK) cells represent another population of innate immune cells able to infiltrate tumors. The role of NK in tumor progression and angiogenesis has not yet been fully investigated. Several studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating NK (here referred to as “TINKs”) and tumor-associated NK (altered peripheral NK cells, which here we call “TANKs”) are compromised in their ability to lysew tumor cells. Recent data have suggested that they are potentially protumorigenic and can also acquire a proangiogenic phenotype. Here we review the properties of TINKs and TANKs and compare their activities to that of NK cells endowed with a physiological proangiogenic phenotype, in particular decidual NK cells. We speculate on the potential origins of TINKs and TANKs and on the immune signals involved in their differentiation and polarization. The TINK and TANK phenotype has broad implications in the immune response to tumors, ranging from a deficient control of cancer and cancer stem cells to an altered crosstalk with other relevant players of the immune response, such as dendritic cells, to induction of cancer angiogenesis. With this recently acquired knowledge that has not yet been put into perspective, we point out new potential avenues for therapeutic intervention involving NK cells as a target or an ally in oncology. PMID:25178695

  16. Expression of Hyaluronidase by Tumor Cells Induces Angiogenesis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dacai; Pearlman, Eric; Diaconu, Eugenia; Guo, Kun; Mori, Hiroshi; Haqqi, Tariq; Markowitz, Sanford; Willson, James; Sy, Man-Sun

    1996-07-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is important for the maintenance of tissue architecture. Depolymerization of hyaluronic acid may facilitate tumor invasion. In addition, oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid have been reported to induce angiogenesis. We report here that a hyaluronidase similar to the one on human sperm is expressed by metastatic human melanoma, colon carcinoma, and glioblastoma cell lines and by tumor biopsies from patients with colorectal carcinomas, but not by tissues from normal colon. Moreover, angiogenesis is induced by hyaluronidase+ tumor cells but not hyaluronidase- tumor cells and can be blocked by an inhibitor of hyaluronidase. Tumor cells thus use hyaluronidase as one of the ``molecular saboteurs'' to depolymerize hyaluronic acid to facilitate invasion. As a consequence, breakdown products of hyaluronic acid can further promote tumor establishment by inducing angiogenesis. Hyaluronidase on tumor cells may provide a target for anti-neoplastic drugs.

  17. ULTRASONOGRAPHIC FEATURES OF CANINE GASTROINTESTINAL STROMAL TUMORS COMPARED TO OTHER GASTROINTESTINAL SPINDLE CELL TUMORS.

    PubMed

    Hobbs, Joshua; Sutherland-Smith, James; Penninck, Dominique; Jennings, Samuel; Barber, Lisa; Barton, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Canine gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are a recent subtype of gastrointestinal spindle cell tumor recognized with the increasing use of immunohistochemistry. To our knowledge, no imaging features have been described in immunostochemically confirmed canine GISTs. The objective of this retrospective, cross-sectional study was to describe ultrasonographic features of canine GISTs compared with other spindle cell tumors. Thirty-seven dogs with an ultrasonographically visible gastrointestinal mass and a histopathologic diagnosis of spindle cell neoplasia were examined. Immunohistochemistry staining was performed for retrieved tissue samples to further differentiate the tumor type and each sample was interpreted by a single veterinary pathologist. Ultrasonographic features recorded examined included mass echogenicity, homogeneity, presence of cavitation, layer of origin, bowel wall symmetry, and loss of wall layering, location, size, vascularity, and evidence of perforation or ulceration. Tumor types included 19 GISTs, eight leiomyosarcomas, six leiomyomas, and four nonspecified sarcomas. Gastrointestinal stromal tumors were significantly more likely to be associated (P < 0.03) with abdominal effusion than other tumor types. There was overlap between the anatomical locations of all tumors types with the exception of the cecum where all eight tumors identified were GISTs. Besides location, there were no unique ultrasound features of GISTs that would allow distinction from other gastrointestinal spindle cell tumors. Similar to previous studies, GISTs appeared to be the most common spindle cell tumor associated with the cecum in our sample of dogs. The high frequency of abdominal effusion with GIST's was of unknown etiology could possibly have been due to septic peritonitis. PMID:25846814

  18. Colocalization of calcium entry and exocytotic release sites in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, I M; Finnegan, J M; Monck, J R; Wightman, R M; Fernandez, J M

    1995-01-01

    "Snapshot" images of localized Ca2+ influx into patch-clamped chromaffin cells were captured by using a recently developed pulsed-laser imaging system. Transient opening of voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels gave rise to localized elevations of Ca2+ that had the appearance of either "hotspots" or partial rings found immediately beneath the plasma membrane. When the Ca2+ imaging technique was employed in conjunction with flame-etched carbon-fiber electrodes to spatially map the release sites of catecholamines, it was observed that the sites of Ca2+ entry and catecholamine release were colocalized. These results provide functional support for the idea that secretion occurs from "active zone"-like structures in neuroendocrine cells. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7708668

  19. Internalization and lysosomal association of (/sup 125/I)angiotensin II in norepinephrine-containing cells of the rat adrenal medulla

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchi, C.; Gutkowska, J.; Charbonneau, C.; Ballak, M.; Anand-Srivastava, M.B.; De Lean, A.; Genest, J.; Cantin, M.

    1986-10-01

    The morphological localization of (/sup 125/I)angiotensin II (AII) in the rat adrenal medulla (AM) was studied by light- and electron-microscopic radioautography in vivo. With light microscopy the presence of binding sites for AII in both norepinephrine-containing (NE) and epinephrine-containing (E) cells was confirmed. With electron microscopy, it was found that AII binds to the cell surface of NE cells, is progressively internalized, and is associated with lysosomes and Golgi complex within 20 min, whereas in E cells AII seems to be internalized earlier and recycled back to the cell surface within 5 min without any appreciable association with intracellular organelles. These results suggest different intracellular pathways for AII in NE and E cells of the rat AM.

  20. Giant Cell Tumor of the Peroneus Brevis Tendon Sheath

    PubMed Central

    Ch, Li; TH, Lui

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath is most commonly found in the flexor aspect of hand and wrist and is rare in the foot and ankle. Case report: A 49-year-old lady noticed a right lateral foot mass for 10 years. Magnetic resonance imaging suggested that the mass is originated from the peroneal tendons. The mass was excised and intra-operative findings showed that the tumor came from the peroneus brevis tendon sheath. Histological study confirmed the diagnosis of giant cell tumor. Conclusion: Giant cell tumor, although rare, should be one of the differential diagnoses of tendon sheath tumor of the foot and ankle. PMID:27299104

  1. Molecular genetics of testicular germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sheikine, Yuri; Genega, Elizabeth; Melamed, Jonathan; Lee, Peng; Reuter, Victor E.; Ye, Huihui

    2012-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) are the most common malignancy in young men. While most TGCT are potentially curable, approximately 5% of patients with TGCT may develop chemoresistance and die from the disease. This review article summarizes current knowledge in genetics underlying the development, progression and chemoresistance of TGCT. Most post-pubertal TGCT originate from intratubular germ cell neoplasia unclassified (IGCNU), which are transformed fetal gonocytes. Development of IGCNU may involve aberrantly activated KITLG/KIT pathway and overexpression of embryonic transcription factors such as NANOG and POU5F1, which leads to suppression of apoptosis, increased proliferation, and accumulation of mutations in gonocytes. Invasive TGCT consistently show gain of chromosome 12p, typically isochromosome 12p. Single gene mutations are uncommon in TGCT. KIT, TP53, KRAS/NRAS, and BRAF are genes most commonly mutated in TGCT and implicated in their pathogenesis. Different histologic subtypes of TGCT possess different gene expression profiles that reflect different directions of differentiation. Their distinct gene expression profiles are likely caused by epigenetic regulation, in particular DNA methylation, but not by gene copy number alterations. Resistance of TGCT to chemotherapy has been linked to karyotypic aberrations, single-gene mutations, and epigenetic regulation of gene expression in small-scale studies. The study of TGCT genetics could ultimately translate into development of new molecular diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for these tumors and improve the care of patients with these malignancies. PMID:22432056

  2. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Speiser, Phyllis W.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia associated with deficiency of steroid 21-hydroxylase is the most common inborn error in adrenal function and the most common cause of adrenal insufficiency in the pediatric age group. As patients now survive into adulthood, adult health-care providers must also be familiar with this condition. Over the past several years, F1000 has published numerous commentaries updating research and practical guidelines for this condition. The purposes of this review are to summarize basic information defining congenital adrenal hyperplasia and to highlight current knowledge and controversies in management. PMID:26339484

  3. Pharmacogenomics of Scopoletin in Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ean-Jeong; Saeed, Mohamed; Law, Betty Yuen Kwan; Wu, An Guo; Kadioglu, Onat; Greten, Henry Johannes; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance and the severe side effects of chemotherapy necessitate the development of novel anticancer drugs. Natural products are a valuable source for drug development. Scopoletin is a coumarin compound, which can be found in several Artemisia species and other plant genera. Microarray-based RNA expression profiling of the NCI cell line panel showed that cellular response of scopoletin did not correlate to the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters as classical drug resistance mechanisms (ABCB1, ABCB5, ABCC1, ABCG2). This was also true for the expression of the oncogene EGFR and the mutational status of the tumor suppressor gene, TP53. However, mutations in the RAS oncogenes and the slow proliferative activity in terms of cell doubling times significantly correlated with scopoletin resistance. COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses of transcriptome-wide mRNA expression resulted in a set of 40 genes, which all harbored binding motifs in their promoter sequences for the transcription factor, NF-κB, which is known to be associated with drug resistance. RAS mutations, slow proliferative activity, and NF-κB may hamper its effectiveness. By in silico molecular docking studies, we found that scopoletin bound to NF-κB and its regulator IκB. Scopoletin activated NF-κB in a SEAP-driven NF-κB reporter cell line, indicating that NF-κB might be a resistance factor for scopoletin. In conclusion, scopoletin might serve as lead compound for drug development because of its favorable activity against tumor cells with ABC-transporter expression, although NF-κB activation may be considered as resistance factor for this compound. Further investigations are warranted to explore the full therapeutic potential of this natural product. PMID:27092478

  4. Tumor infiltrating immune cells in gliomas and meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Patrícia; González-Tablas, María; Otero, Álvaro; Pascual, Daniel; Miranda, David; Ruiz, Laura; Sousa, Pablo; Ciudad, Juana; Gonçalves, Jesús María; Lopes, María Celeste; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, María Dolores

    2016-03-01

    Tumor-infiltrating immune cells are part of a complex microenvironment that promotes and/or regulates tumor development and growth. Depending on the type of cells and their functional interactions, immune cells may play a key role in suppressing the tumor or in providing support for tumor growth, with relevant effects on patient behavior. In recent years, important advances have been achieved in the characterization of immune cell infiltrates in central nervous system (CNS) tumors, but their role in tumorigenesis and patient behavior still remain poorly understood. Overall, these studies have shown significant but variable levels of infiltration of CNS tumors by macrophage/microglial cells (TAM) and to a less extent also lymphocytes (particularly T-cells and NK cells, and less frequently also B-cells). Of note, TAM infiltrate gliomas at moderate numbers where they frequently show an immune suppressive phenotype and functional behavior; in contrast, infiltration by TAM may be very pronounced in meningiomas, particularly in cases that carry isolated monosomy 22, where the immune infiltrates also contain greater numbers of cytotoxic T and NK-cells associated with an enhanced anti-tumoral immune response. In line with this, the presence of regulatory T cells, is usually limited to a small fraction of all meningiomas, while frequently found in gliomas. Despite these differences between gliomas and meningiomas, both tumors show heterogeneous levels of infiltration by immune cells with variable functionality. In this review we summarize current knowledge about tumor-infiltrating immune cells in the two most common types of CNS tumors-gliomas and meningiomas-, as well as the role that such immune cells may play in the tumor microenvironment in controlling and/or promoting tumor development, growth and control. PMID:26216710

  5. Extra-adrenal myelolipoma presenting as efferent limb obstruction.

    PubMed

    Conley, Alexandria; Klein, Elizabeth; Edhayan, E; Berri, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Myelolipomas are rare benign lesions composed of mature adipose tissue and immature hematopoetic cells. The adrenal gland is the most common location for these lesions, but cases of extra-adrenal myelolipomas have been described. The predominant location for extra-adrenal myelolipomas is the retroperitoneum, and very few reported cases describe these lesions in the peritoneal cavity. Typically these lesions are incidental findings and asymptomatic, but occasionally can present with symptoms secondary to mass effect. We present the case of a 72 year old man presenting with a gastric outlet obstruction secondary to an epigastric mass. The mass was resected and pathology was consistent with myelolipoma. This case illustrates an atypical location and presentation of a myelolipoma. These are rare tumors with only 5 intra-abdominal myelolipomas reported in the literature. This article is a review of the surgical literature and a discussion on myelolipomas. Knowledge of these rare entities can help ensure proper management of these patients, which may include early surgical intervention. PMID:22888458

  6. Tumor Heterogeneity, Single-Cell Sequencing, and Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Felix; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity has been compared with Darwinian evolution and survival of the fittest. The evolutionary ecosystem of tumors consisting of heterogeneous tumor cell populations represents a considerable challenge to tumor therapy, since all genetically and phenotypically different subpopulations have to be efficiently killed by therapy. Otherwise, even small surviving subpopulations may cause repopulation and refractory tumors. Single-cell sequencing allows for a better understanding of the genomic principles of tumor heterogeneity and represents the basis for more successful tumor treatments. The isolation and sequencing of single tumor cells still represents a considerable technical challenge and consists of three major steps: (1) single cell isolation (e.g., by laser-capture microdissection), fluorescence-activated cell sorting, micromanipulation, whole genome amplification (e.g., with the help of Phi29 DNA polymerase), and transcriptome-wide next generation sequencing technologies (e.g., 454 pyrosequencing, Illumina sequencing, and other systems). Data demonstrating the feasibility of single-cell sequencing for monitoring the emergence of drug-resistant cell clones in patient samples are discussed herein. It is envisioned that single-cell sequencing will be a valuable asset to assist the design of regimens for personalized tumor therapies based on tumor subpopulation-specific genetic alterations in individual patients. PMID:27322289

  7. Tumor Heterogeneity, Single-Cell Sequencing, and Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Felix; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity has been compared with Darwinian evolution and survival of the fittest. The evolutionary ecosystem of tumors consisting of heterogeneous tumor cell populations represents a considerable challenge to tumor therapy, since all genetically and phenotypically different subpopulations have to be efficiently killed by therapy. Otherwise, even small surviving subpopulations may cause repopulation and refractory tumors. Single-cell sequencing allows for a better understanding of the genomic principles of tumor heterogeneity and represents the basis for more successful tumor treatments. The isolation and sequencing of single tumor cells still represents a considerable technical challenge and consists of three major steps: (1) single cell isolation (e.g., by laser-capture microdissection), fluorescence-activated cell sorting, micromanipulation, whole genome amplification (e.g., with the help of Phi29 DNA polymerase), and transcriptome-wide next generation sequencing technologies (e.g., 454 pyrosequencing, Illumina sequencing, and other systems). Data demonstrating the feasibility of single-cell sequencing for monitoring the emergence of drug-resistant cell clones in patient samples are discussed herein. It is envisioned that single-cell sequencing will be a valuable asset to assist the design of regimens for personalized tumor therapies based on tumor subpopulation-specific genetic alterations in individual patients. PMID:27322289

  8. Dendritic-Tumor Fusion Cell-Based Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Koido, Shigeo

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that play a critical role in the induction of antitumor immunity. Therefore, various strategies have been developed to deliver tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) to DCs as cancer vaccines. The fusion of DCs and whole tumor cells to generate DC-tumor fusion cells (DC-tumor FCs) is an alternative strategy to treat cancer patients. The cell fusion method allows DCs to be exposed to the broad array of TAAs originally expressed by whole tumor cells. DCs then process TAAs endogenously and present them through major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II pathways in the context of costimulatory molecules, resulting in simultaneous activation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. DC-tumor FCs require optimized enhanced immunogenicity of both DCs and whole tumor cells. In this context, an effective fusion strategy also needs to produce immunogenic DC-tumor FCs. We discuss the potential ability of DC-tumor FCs and the recent progress in improving clinical outcomes by DC-tumor FC-based cancer vaccines. PMID:27240347

  9. Tumor-induced myeloid deviation: when myeloid-derived suppressor cells meet tumor-associated macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ugel, Stefano; De Sanctis, Francesco; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    The generation of an inflammatory environment is favorable and often decisive for the growth of both primary tumors and metastases. Tumor cells either express membrane molecules or release tumor-derived soluble factors able to alter myelopoiesis. Tumor-reprogrammed myeloid cells not only create a tolerogenic environment by blocking T cell functions and proliferation, but also directly drive tumor growth by promoting cancer stemness, angiogenesis, stroma deposition, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and metastasis formation. In this Review, we discuss the interplay between immunosuppressive and protumoral myeloid cells and detail their immune-regulatory mechanisms, the molecular pathways involved in their differentiation, as well as their potential role as prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers and prospective targets for innovative approaches to treat tumor-bearing hosts. PMID:26325033

  10. Nitric oxide sets off an antioxidant response in adrenal cells: involvement of sGC and Nrf2 in HO-1 induction.

    PubMed

    Astort, F; Mercau, M; Giordanino, E; Degese, M S; Caldareri, L; Coso, O; Cymeryng, C B

    2014-02-15

    Induction of microsomal heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) activity is considered a cytoprotective mechanism in different cell types. In adrenal cells, HO-1 induction by ACTH exerts a modulatory effect on steroid production as well. As nitric oxide (NO) has been also regarded as an autocrine/paracrine modulator of adrenal steroidogenesis we sought to study the effects of NO on the induction of HO-1 and the mechanism involved. We hereby analyzed the time and dose-dependent effect of a NO-donor (DETA/NO) on HO-1 induction in a murine adrenocortical cell line. We showed that this effect is mainly exerted at a transcriptional level as it is inhibited by actinomycin D and HO-1 mRNA degradation rates were not affected by DETA/NO treatment. HO-1 induction by NO does not appear to involve the generation of oxidative stress as it was not affected by antioxidant treatment. We also demonstrated that NO-treatment results in the nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2), an effect that is attenuated by transfecting the cells with a dominant negative isoform of Nrf2. We finally show that the effects of the NO-donor are reproduced by a permeable analog of cGMP and that a soluble guanylate cyclase specific inhibitor blocked both the induction of HO-1 by NO and the nuclear translocation of Nrf2. PMID:24361900

  11. Experimental Adaptation of Rotaviruses to Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A.; Guerrero, Rafael A.; Silva, Elver; Acosta, Orlando; Barreto, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    A number of viruses show a naturally extended tropism for tumor cells whereas other viruses have been genetically modified or adapted to infect tumor cells. Oncolytic viruses have become a promising tool for treating some cancers by inducing cell lysis or immune response to tumor cells. In the present work, rotavirus strains TRF-41 (G5) (porcine), RRV (G3) (simian), UK (G6-P5) (bovine), Ym (G11-P9) (porcine), ECwt (murine), Wa (G1-P8), Wi61 (G9) and M69 (G8) (human), and five wild-type human rotavirus isolates were passaged multiple times in different human tumor cell lines and then combined in five different ways before additional multiple passages in tumor cell lines. Cell death caused by the tumor cell-adapted isolates was characterized using Hoechst, propidium iodide, 7-AAD, Annexin V, TUNEL, and anti-poly-(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) and -phospho-histone H2A.X antibodies. Multiple passages of the combined rotaviruses in tumor cell lines led to a successful infection of these cells, suggesting a gain-of-function by the acquisition of greater infectious capacity as compared with that of the parental rotaviruses. The electropherotype profiles suggest that unique tumor cell-adapted isolates were derived from reassortment of parental rotaviruses. Infection produced by such rotavirus isolates induced chromatin modifications compatible with apoptotic cell death. PMID:26828934

  12. Pseudopapillary Granulosa Cell Tumor: A Case of This Rare Subtype.

    PubMed

    Heller, Debra; Haddad, Andrew; Cracchiolo, Bernadette

    2016-08-01

    Background The pseudopapillary pattern of granulosa cell tumor is rare. Case We describe the case of a 35-year-old woman who presented with an initial diagnosis of papillary serous cystadenocarcinoma. Results Evaluation, including immunohistochemistry, led to the diagnosis of pseudopapillary granulosa cell tumor. Conclusion The pseudopapillary pattern of granulosa cell tumor is rare and must be suspected in order to utilize appropriate immunohistochemistry and reach the correct diagnosis. Inhibin positivity is particularly helpful. PMID:27020373

  13. Primary Bilateral Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma of the Adrenal Gland Presenting as Incidental Adrenal Masses

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Christopher; Camilleri, David James; Gatt, Andre'

    2015-01-01

    Although lymphoma may occasionally involve the adrenal glands as part of a generalized disease process, primary adrenal lymphoma (PAL) is a rare disease. We present a case of a 62-year-old woman with a history of mild/moderate hereditary spherocytosis with a well-compensated baseline haemoglobin, who presented with rapidly progressive symptomatic anaemia. During the diagnostic workup, imaging revealed bilateral large adrenal masses and she was later diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (DLBCL), with the adrenal glands being the dominant site of the disease. The patient was started on systemic chemotherapy, but her disease progressed with neurological involvement which responded to second-line therapy. Her adrenal disease however was refractory to further therapy. PMID:26681947

  14. Tumor-Related Methylated Cell-Free DNA and Circulating Tumor Cells in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Salvianti, Francesca; Orlando, Claudio; Massi, Daniela; De Giorgi, Vincenzo; Grazzini, Marta; Pazzagli, Mario; Pinzani, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumor release into the circulation cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which represent promising biomarkers for cancer diagnosis. Circulating tumor DNA may be studied in plasma from cancer patients by detecting tumor specific alterations, such as genetic or epigenetic modifications. Ras association domain family 1 isoform A (RASSF1A) is a tumor suppressor gene silenced by promoter hypermethylation in a variety of human cancers including melanoma. The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic performance of a tumor-related methylated cfDNA marker in melanoma patients and to compare this parameter with the presence of CTCs. RASSF1A promoter methylation was quantified in cfDNA by qPCR in a consecutive series of 84 melanoma patients and 68 healthy controls. In a subset of 68 cases, the presence of CTCs was assessed by a filtration method (Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor Cells, ISET) as well as by an indirect method based on the detection of tyrosinase mRNA by RT-qPCR. The distribution of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA was investigated in cases and controls and the predictive capability of this parameter was assessed by means of the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The percentage of cases with methylated RASSF1A promoter in cfDNA was significantly higher in each class of melanoma patients (in situ, invasive and metastatic) than in healthy subjects (Pearson chi-squared test, p < 0.001). The concentration of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA in the subjects with a detectable quantity of methylated alleles was significantly higher in melanoma patients than in controls. The biomarker showed a good predictive capability (in terms of AUC) in discriminating between melanoma patients and healthy controls. This epigenetic marker associated to cfDNA did not show a significant correlation with the presence of CTCs, but, when the two parameters are jointly considered, we obtain a higher sensitivity of the detection of positive cases in invasive and

  15. α-Conotoxins Identify the α3β4* Subtype as the Predominant Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Expressed in Human Adrenal Chromaffin Cells.

    PubMed

    Hone, Arik J; McIntosh, J Michael; Azam, Layla; Lindstrom, Jon; Lucero, Linda; Whiteaker, Paul; Passas, Juan; Blázquez, Jesús; Albillos, Almudena

    2015-11-01

    Ligands that selectively inhibit human α3β2 and α6β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChRs) and not the closely related α3β4 and α6β4 subtypes are lacking. Current α-conotoxins (α-Ctxs) that discriminate among these nAChR subtypes in rat fail to discriminate among the human receptor homologs. In this study, we describe the development of α-Ctx LvIA(N9R,V10A) that is 3000-fold more potent on oocyte-expressed human α3β2 than α3β4 and 165-fold more potent on human α6/α3β2β3 than α6/α3β4 nAChRs. This analog was used in conjuction with three other α-Ctx analogs and patch-clamp electrophysiology to characterize the nAChR subtypes expressed by human adrenal chromaffin cells. LvIA(N9R,V10A) showed little effect on the acetylcholine-evoked currents in these cells at concentrations expected to inhibit nAChRs with β2 ligand-binding sites. In contrast, the β4-selective α-Ctx BuIA(T5A,P6O) inhibited >98% of the acetylcholine-evoked current, indicating that most of the heteromeric receptors contained β4 ligand-binding sites. Additional studies using the α6-selective α-Ctx PeIA(A7V,S9H,V10A,N11R,E14A) indicated that the predominant heteromeric nAChR expressed by human adrenal chromaffin cells is the α3β4* subtype (asterisk indicates the possible presence of additional subunits). This conclusion was supported by polymerase chain reaction experiments of human adrenal medulla gland and of cultured human adrenal chromaffin cells that demonstrated prominent expression of RNAs for α3, α5, α7, β2, and β4 subunits and a low abundance of RNAs for α2, α4, α6, and α10 subunits. PMID:26330550

  16. Detection and Characterization of Circulating Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, Richard

    2009-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) occur in blood below the concentration of 1 cell in a hundred thousand white blood cells and can provide prognostic and diagnostic information about the underlying disease. While numeration of CTCs has provided useful information on progression-free and overall survival, it does not provide guidance of treatment choice. Since CTCs are presumed contain features of the metastatic tissue, characterization of cancer markers on these cells could help selection of treatment. At such low concentrations, reliable location and identification of these cells represents a significant technical challenge. Automated digital microscopy (ADM) provides high levels of sensitivity, but the analysis time is prohibitively long for a clinical assay. Enrichment methods have been developed to reduce sample size but can result in cell loss. A major barrier in reliable enrichment stems from the biological heterogeneity of CTCs, exhibited in a wide range of genetic, biochemical, immunological and biological characteristics. We have developed an approach that uses fiber-optic array scanning technology (FAST) to detect CTCs. Here, laser-printing optics are used to excite 300,000 cells/sec, and fluorescence from immuno-labels is collected in an array of optical fibers that forms a wide collection aperture. The FAST cytometer can locate CTCs at a rate that is 500 times faster than an ADM with comparable sensitivity and improved specificity. With this high scan rate, no enrichment of CTCs is required. The target can be a cytoplasm protein with a very high expression level, which reduces sensitivity to CTC heterogeneity. We use this method to measure expression levels of multiple markers on CTCs to help predict effective cancer treatment.

  17. Mammary gland tumors in irradiated and untreated guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Hoch-Ligeti, C.; Liebelt, A.G.; Congdon, C.C.; Stewart, H.L.

    1986-01-01

    This is a report of mammary gland tumors from 62 guinea pigs. The tumors arose in the terminal ductal-lobular units as either lobular acinar carcinoma or cystadenocarcinoma or as papillary carcinomas within large ducts near the mammilla. About half the number of the males had terminal ductal-lobular carcinomas and all but 2 of the papillary duct carcinomas also arose in males. Large tumors frequently exhibited squamous, chondromatous, osseous, fatty and myoepitheliomatous types of tissues. In 2 irradiated males and 1 female the tumors metastasized. Whole-body irradiation did not produce significant changes in the number or sex distribution or in the morphology of mammary gland tumors in inbred or outbred guinea pigs. All females had cystic ovaries without increase in granulosa cells, 24 (66.6%) had uterine tumors and 13 (34.2%) had adrenal gland tumors; all males had atrophic testes, 5 (16.5%) had testicular and 6 (22.2%) had adrenal gland tumors.

  18. The metabolic advantage of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    1- Oncogenes express proteins of "Tyrosine kinase receptor pathways", a receptor family including insulin or IGF-Growth Hormone receptors. Other oncogenes alter the PP2A phosphatase brake over these kinases. 2- Experiments on pancreatectomized animals; treated with pure insulin or total pancreatic extracts, showed that choline in the extract, preserved them from hepatomas. Since choline is a methyle donor, and since methylation regulates PP2A, the choline protection may result from PP2A methylation, which then attenuates kinases. 3- Moreover, kinases activated by the boosted signaling pathway inactivate pyruvate kinase and pyruvate dehydrogenase. In addition, demethylated PP2A would no longer dephosphorylate these enzymes. A "bottleneck" between glycolysis and the oxidative-citrate cycle interrupts the glycolytic pyruvate supply now provided via proteolysis and alanine transamination. This pyruvate forms lactate (Warburg effect) and NAD+ for glycolysis. Lipolysis and fatty acids provide acetyl CoA; the citrate condensation increases, unusual oxaloacetate sources are available. ATP citrate lyase follows, supporting aberrant transaminations with glutaminolysis and tumor lipogenesis. Truncated urea cycles, increased polyamine synthesis, consume the methyl donor SAM favoring carcinogenesis. 4- The decrease of butyrate, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, elicits epigenic changes (PETEN, P53, IGFBP decrease; hexokinase, fetal-genes-M2, increase) 5- IGFBP stops binding the IGF - IGFR complex, it is perhaps no longer inherited by a single mitotic daughter cell; leading to two daughter cells with a mitotic capability. 6- An excess of IGF induces a decrease of the major histocompatibility complex MHC1, Natural killer lymphocytes should eliminate such cells that start the tumor, unless the fever prostaglandin PGE2 or inflammation, inhibit them... PMID:21649891

  19. Reprogramming the tumor microenvironment: tumor-induced immunosuppressive factors paralyze T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Annie A; Drake, Virginia; Huang, Huai-Shiuan; Chiu, ShihChi; Zheng, Lei

    2015-01-01

    It has become evident that tumor-induced immuno-suppressive factors in the tumor microenvironment play a major role in suppressing normal functions of effector T cells. These factors serve as hurdles that limit the therapeutic potential of cancer immunotherapies. This review focuses on illustrating the molecular mechanisms of immunosuppression in the tumor microenvironment, including evasion of T-cell recognition, interference with T-cell trafficking, metabolism, and functions, induction of resistance to T-cell killing, and apoptosis of T cells. A better understanding of these mechanisms may help in the development of strategies to enhance the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapies. PMID:26140242

  20. Antiangiogenic Variant of TSP-1 Targets Tumor Cells in Glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung Hugh; Tamura, Kaoru; Khajuria, Rajiv Kumar; Bhere, Deepak; Nesterenko, Irina; Lawler, Jack; Shah, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Three type-1 repeat (3TSR) domain of thrombospondin-1 is known to have anti-angiogenic effects by targeting tumor-associated endothelial cells, but its effect on tumor cells is unknown. This study explored the potential of 3TSR to target glioblastoma (GBM) cells in vitro and in vivo. We show that 3TSR upregulates death receptor (DR) 4/5 expression in a CD36-dependent manner and primes resistant GBMs to tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-induced caspase-8/3/7 mediated apoptosis. We engineered human mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) for on-site delivery of 3TSR and a potent and secretable variant of TRAIL (S-TRAIL) in an effort to simultaneously target tumor cells and associated endothelial cells and circumvent issues of systemic delivery of drugs across the blood–brain barrier. We show that MSC-3TSR/S-TRAIL inhibits tumor growth in an expanded spectrum of GBMs. In vivo, a single administration of MSC-3TSR/S-TRAIL significantly targets both tumor cells and vascular component of GBMs, inhibits tumor progression, and extends survival of mice bearing highly vascularized GBM. The ability of 3TSR/S-TRAIL to simultaneously act on tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelial cells offers a great potential to target a broad spectrum of cancers and translate 3TSR/TRAIL therapies into clinics. PMID:25358253

  1. Host cell infiltration into PDT-treated tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd; Dougherty, Graeme J.; Chaplin, David J.

    1992-06-01

    C3H mice bearing SCCVII squamous cell carcinoma were treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT) 24 hours after receiving Photofrin (25 mg/kg, i.v.). Single cell suspensions obtained by the enzymatic digestion of tumors excised either 30 minutes or 4 hours after PDT were analyzed for the content of host immune cells and colony forming ability of malignant cells. The results were compared to the data obtained with non-treated tumors. It is shown that there is a marked increase in the content of cells expressing Mac-1 (monocytes/macrophages or granulocytes) in the tumor 30 minutes post PDT, while a high level of other leucocytes are found within the tumors by 4 hours after PDT. As elaborated in Discussion, the infiltration rate of host immune cells, dying of malignant tumor cells, and yet unknown death rate of host cells originally present in PDT treated tumor occurring concomitantly during this time period complicates this analysis. The results of this study suggest a massive infiltration of macrophages and other leucocytes in PDT treated SCCVII tumor, supporting the suggestion that a potent immune reaction is one of the main characteristics of PDT action in solid tumors. It remains to be determined to what extent is the activity of tumor infiltrating immune cells responsible for its eradication by PDT.

  2. Tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Cima, Igor; Kong, Say Li; Sengupta, Debarka; Tan, Iain B; Phyo, Wai Min; Lee, Daniel; Hu, Min; Iliescu, Ciprian; Alexander, Irina; Goh, Wei Lin; Rahmani, Mehran; Suhaimi, Nur-Afidah Mohamed; Vo, Jess H; Tai, Joyce A; Tan, Joanna H; Chua, Clarinda; Ten, Rachel; Lim, Wan Jun; Chew, Min Hoe; Hauser, Charlotte A E; van Dam, Rob M; Lim, Wei-Yen; Prabhakar, Shyam; Lim, Bing; Koh, Poh Koon; Robson, Paul; Ying, Jackie Y; Hillmer, Axel M; Tan, Min-Han

    2016-06-29

    Clusters of tumor cells are often observed in the blood of cancer patients. These structures have been described as malignant entities for more than 50 years, although their comprehensive characterization is lacking. Contrary to current consensus, we demonstrate that a discrete population of circulating cell clusters isolated from the blood of colorectal cancer patients are not cancerous but consist of tumor-derived endothelial cells. These clusters express both epithelial and mesenchymal markers, consistent with previous reports on circulating tumor cell (CTC) phenotyping. However, unlike CTCs, they do not mirror the genetic variations of matched tumors. Transcriptomic analysis of single clusters revealed that these structures exhibit an endothelial phenotype and can be traced back to the tumor endothelium. Further results show that tumor-derived endothelial clusters do not form by coagulation or by outgrowth of single circulating endothelial cells, supporting a direct release of clusters from the tumor vasculature. The isolation and enumeration of these benign clusters distinguished healthy volunteers from treatment-naïve as well as pathological early-stage (≤IIA) colorectal cancer patients with high accuracy, suggesting that tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters could be used as a means of noninvasive screening for colorectal cancer. In contrast to CTCs, tumor-derived endothelial cell clusters may also provide important information about the underlying tumor vasculature at the time of diagnosis, during treatment, and throughout the course of the disease. PMID:27358499

  3. The chemosensitivity of testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Voutsadakis, Ioannis A

    2014-04-01

    Although rare cancers overall, testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are the most common type of cancer in young males below 40 years of age. Both subtypes of TGCTs, i.e., seminomas and non-seminomas, are highly curable and the majority of even metastatic patients may expect to be cured. These high cure rates are not due to the indolent nature of these cancers, but rather to their sensitivity to chemotherapy (and for seminomas to radiotherapy). The delineation of the cause of chemosensitivity at the molecular level is of paramount importance, because it may provide insights into the minority of TGCTs that are chemo-resistant and, thereby, provide opportunities for specific therapeutic interventions aimed at reverting them to chemosensitivity. In addition, delineation of the molecular basis of TGCT chemo-sensitivity may be informative for the cause of chemo-resistance of other more common types of cancer and, thus, may create new therapeutic leads. p53, a frequently mutated tumor suppressor in cancers in general, is not mutated in TGCTs, a fact that has implications for their chemo-sensitivity. Oct4, an embryonic transcription factor, is uniformly expressed in the seminoma and embryonic carcinoma components of non-seminomas, and its interplay with p53 may be important in the chemotherapy response of these tumors. This interplay, together with other features of TGCTs such as the gain of genetic material from the short arm of chromosome 12 and the association with disorders of testicular development, will be discussed in this paper and integrated in a unifying hypothesis that may explain their chemo-sensitivity. PMID:24692098

  4. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) inhibits human colon tumor growth by promoting apoptosis of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuguang; Li, Bingji; Liu, Jie; He, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) has recently been suggested in several epithelial cancers, either pro-tumor or anti-tumor. However, the role of TSLP in colon cancer remains unknown. We here found significantly decreased TSLP levels in tumor tissues compared with tumor-surrounding tissues of patients with colon cancer and TSLP levels negatively correlated with the clinical staging score of colon cancer. TSLPR, the receptor of TSLP, was expressed in all three colon cancer cell lines investigated and colon tumor tissues. The addition of TSLP significantly enhanced apoptosis of colon cancer cells in a TSLPR-dependent manner. Interestingly, TSLP selectively induced the apoptosis of colon cancer cells, but not normal colonic epithelial cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that TSLP induced JNK and p38 activation and initiated apoptosis mainly through the extrinsic pathway, as caspase-8 inhibitor significantly reversed the apoptosis-promoting effect of TSLP. Finally, using a xenograft mouse model, we demonstrated that peritumoral administration of TSLP greatly reduced tumor growth accompanied with extensive tumor apoptotic response, which was abolished by tumor cell-specific knockdown of TSLPR. Collectively, our study reveals a novel anti-tumor effect of TSLP via direct promotion of the apoptosis of colon cancer cells, and suggests that TSLP could be of value in treating colon cancer. PMID:26919238

  5. DAPK loss in colon cancer tumor buds: implications for migration capacity of disseminating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Karamitopoulou, Eva; Dawson, Heather; Koelzer, Viktor Hendrik; Agaimy, Abbas; Garreis, Fabian; Söder, Stephan; Laqua, William; Lugli, Alessandro; Hartmann, Arndt; Rau, Tilman T.; Schneider-Stock, Regine

    2015-01-01

    Defining new therapeutic strategies to overcome therapy resistance due to tumor heterogeneity in colon cancer is challenging. One option is to explore the molecular profile of aggressive disseminating tumor cells. The cytoskeleton-associated Death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) is involved in the cross talk between tumor and immune cells at the invasion front of colorectal cancer. Here dedifferentiated tumor cells histologically defined as tumor budding are associated with a high risk of metastasis and poor prognosis. Analyzing samples from 144 colorectal cancer patients we investigated immunhistochemical DAPK expression in different tumor regions such as center, invasion front, and buds. Functional consequences for tumor aggressiveness were studied in a panel of colon tumor cell lines using different migration, wound healing, and invasion assays. DAPK levels were experimentally modified by siRNA transfection and overexpression as well as inhibitor treatments. We found that DAPK expression was reduced towards the invasion front and was nearly absent in tumor buds. Applying the ECIS system with HCT116 and HCT116 stable lentiviral DAPK knock down cells (HCTshDAPK) we identified an important role for DAPK in decreasing the migratory capacity whereas proliferation was not affected. Furthermore, the migration pattern differed with HCTshDAPK cells showing a cluster-like migration of tumor cell groups. DAPK inhibitor treatment revealed that the migration rate was independent of DAPK's catalytic activity. Modulation of DAPK expression level in SW480 and DLD1 colorectal cancer cells significantly influenced wound closure rate. DAPK seems to be a major player that influences the migratory capability of disseminating tumor cells and possibly affects the dynamic interface between pro- and anti-survival factors at the invasion front of colorectal cancer. This interesting and new finding requires further evaluation. PMID:26405175

  6. Transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhihong; Nör, Jacques E.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that angiogenesis plays a critical role in the pathobiology of tumors. Recent clinical trials have shown that inhibition of angiogenesis can be an effective therapeutic strategy for patients with cancer. However, one of the outstanding issues in anti-angiogenic treatment for cancer is the development of toxicities related to off-target effects of drugs. Transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells involves the use of specific promoters for selective expression of therapeutic genes in the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels of tumors. Recently, several genes that are expressed specifically in tumor-associated endothelial cells have been identified and characterized. These discoveries have enhanced the prospectus of transcriptionaly targeting tumor endothelial cells for cancer gene therapy. In this manuscript, we review the promoters, vectors, and therapeutic genes that have been used for transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells, and discuss the prospects of such approaches for cancer gene therapy. PMID:19393703

  7. Mathematical Modeling of Tumor Cell Growth and Immune System Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihan, Fathalla A.; Safan, Muntaser; Abdeen, Mohamed A.; Abdel-Rahman, Duaa H.

    In this paper, we provide a family of ordinary and delay differential equations to describe the dynamics of tumor-growth and immunotherapy interactions. We explore the effects of adoptive cellular immunotherapy on the model and describe under what circumstances the tumor can be eliminated. The possibility of clearing the tumor, with a strategy, is based on two parameters in the model: the rate of influx of the effector cells, and the rate of influx of IL2. The critical tumor-growth rate, below which endemic tumor does not exist, has been found. One can use the model to make predictions about tumor-dormancy.

  8. Giant Cell Tumor of Tendon Sheath

    PubMed Central

    Briët, Jan Paul; Becker, Stéphanie JE; Oosterhoff, Thijs CH; Ring, David

    2015-01-01

    Background: Giant cell tumor of tendon sheath (GCTTS) is often thought of as a volar finger mass. We hypothesized that GCTTS are equally common on the dorsal and volar aspects of the hand. In addition, we hypothesized that there are no factors associated with the location (volar versus dorsal) and largest measured dimension of a GCTTS. Methods: A total of 126 patients with a pathological diagnosis of a GCTTS of the hand or finger were reviewed. Basic demographic and GCTTS specific information was obtained. Bivariable analyses were used to assess predicting factors for location (volar or dorsal side) and largest measured diameter of a GCTTS. Results: Seventy-two tumors (57%) were on the volar side of the hand, 47 (37%) were dorsal, 6 (4.8%) were both dorsal and volar, and one was midaxial (0.79%). The most common site of a GCTTS was the index finger (30%). There were no factors significantly associated with the location (volar or dorsal, n=119) of the GCTTS. There were also no factors significantly associated with a larger diameter of a GCTTS. Conclusions: A GCTTS was more frequently seen on the volar aspect of the hand. No significant factors associated with the location or an increased size of a GCTTS were found in this study. PMID:25692164

  9. Myeloid Cells as Targets for Therapy in Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Cotechini, Tiziana; Medler, Terry R; Coussens, Lisa M

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that cancer development ensues based on reciprocal interactions between genomically altered neoplastic cells and diverse populations of recruited "host" cells co-opted to support malignant progression. Among the host cells recruited into tumor microenvironments, several subtypes of myeloid cells, including macrophages, monocytes, dendritic cells, and granulocytes contribute to tumor development by providing tumor-promoting factors as well as a spectrum of molecules that suppress cytotoxic activities of T lymphocytes. Based on compelling preclinical data revealing that inhibition of critical myeloid-based programs leads to tumor suppression, novel immune-based therapies and approaches are now entering the clinic for evaluation. This review discusses mechanisms underlying protumorigenic programming of myeloid cells and discusses how targeting of these has potential to attenuate solid tumor progression via the induction and of mobilization CD8 cytotoxic T cell immunity. PMID:26222088

  10. Myeloid Cells as Targets for Therapy in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Cotechini, Tiziana; Medler, Terry R.; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that cancer development ensues based on reciprocal interactions between genomically altered neoplastic cells and diverse populations of recruited “host” cells co-opted to support malignant progression. Among the host cells recruited into tumor microenvironments, several subtypes of myeloid cells, including macrophages, monocytes, dendritic cells, and granulocytes contribute to tumor development by providing tumor-promoting factors as well as a spectrum of molecules that suppress cytotoxic activities of T lymphocytes. Based on compelling preclinical data revealing that inhibition of critical myeloid-based programs leads to tumor suppression, novel immune-based therapies and approaches are now entering the clinic for evaluation. This review discusses mechanisms underlying protumorigenic programming of myeloid cells and discusses how targeting of these has potential to attenuate solid tumor progression via the induction and of mobilization CD8+ cytotoxic T cell immunity. PMID:26222088

  11. A case series of two cases of juxta-adrenal schwannoma presenting as adrenal mass lesion and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Damodaran, Shivashankar; Mahimairaj, Griffin; Velaichamy, Kamaraj

    2015-01-01

    Schwannomas are rare tumors in the retroperitoneal location. They can pose a diagnostic dilemma when presenting as an adrenal mass lesion due to their imaging characteristics. We report two cases of juxta-adrenal schwannomas presenting as symptomatic adrenal mass lesions. In both the cases, the clinical examination and functional evaluation was unremarkable and the radiological examination revealed a mixed intense adrenal mass lesion in one case with predominantly hyperintense areas and a very hyperintense lesion in another, in T2-weighted images, mimicking a adrenocortical malignancy and a pheochromocytoma respectively. Both cases were treated by surgical excision. Histopathological examination established the correct diagnosis of schwannoma, which was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. Juxta-adrenal schwannoma is rare tumors of the retroperitoneum, which should also be borne in mind whenever encountering large nonsecreting adrenal tumors. We report a unique imaging characteristic, which helps in preoperative identification these rare lesions. PMID:25837378

  12. A case series of two cases of juxta-adrenal schwannoma presenting as adrenal mass lesion and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Shivashankar; Mahimairaj, Griffin; Velaichamy, Kamaraj

    2015-01-01

    Schwannomas are rare tumors in the retroperitoneal location. They can pose a diagnostic dilemma when presenting as an adrenal mass lesion due to their imaging characteristics. We report two cases of juxta-adrenal schwannomas presenting as symptomatic adrenal mass lesions. In both the cases, the clinical examination and functional evaluation was unremarkable and the radiological examination revealed a mixed intense adrenal mass lesion in one case with predominantly hyperintense areas and a very hyperintense lesion in another, in T2-weighted images, mimicking a adrenocortical malignancy and a pheochromocytoma respectively. Both cases were treated by surgical excision. Histopathological examination established the correct diagnosis of schwannoma, which was confirmed by immunohistochemical staining. Juxta-adrenal schwannoma is rare tumors of the retroperitoneum, which should also be borne in mind whenever encountering large nonsecreting adrenal tumors. We report a unique imaging characteristic, which helps in preoperative identification these rare lesions. PMID:25837378

  13. A Case Report of Adrenocortical Adenoma Mimicking Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia in a Young Girl.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Qingfeng; Lv, Zhibao; Xu, Weijue; Liu, Jiangbin; Wu, Yibo; Xi, Zhengjun

    2015-06-01

    Adrenal cortical tumors are rare in children. Secondary tumors associated with untreated congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) have also been reported in pediatric population. It is difficult for pediatricians to differentiate these 2 lesions.We described a 4.5-year-old girl who presented with symptoms and signs of virilization. Bone age was 9.5 years. Genetic analysis of CYP21A2 and CYP11B1 revealed a heterozygous mutation of CYP11B1 at c.1157C>T (A386V). No germline p53 gene mutation including R337H was detected.The patient was first misdiagnosed as CAH and treated with hydrocortisone for 3 months. Diagnosis of an adrenal cortical tumor was confirmed by laboratory data and abdominal computed tomography. After resection of the tumor, serum steroids normalized and clinical signs receded. The child received no additional treatment and remains disease free after 12 months of close observation. Histological examination showed neoplasia cells with predominantly eosinophilic cytoplasm and few atypical mitotic figures. The proliferation-associated Ki-67 index was <1% detected by immunohistochemistry.Neoplasm is a rare but significant cause of precocious puberty (PP). The possibility of neoplasms should always be considered early to avoid delayed cancer diagnosis and treatment in cases of PP. PMID:26107677

  14. Platelets surrounding primary tumor cells are related to chemoresistance.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Satoko; Miyashita, Tomoharu; Inokuchi, Masafumi; Hayashi, Hironori; Oyama, Katsunobu; Tajima, Hidehiro; Takamura, Hironori; Ninomiya, Itasu; Ahmed, A Karim; Harman, John W; Fushida, Sachio; Ohta, Tetsuo

    2016-08-01

    Platelets are crucial components of the tumor microenvironment that function to promote tumor progression and metastasis. In the circulation, the interaction between tumor cells and platelets increases invasiveness, protects tumor cells from shear stress and immune surveillance, and facilitates tumor cell extravasation to distant sites. However, the role and presence of platelets in the primary tumor have not been fully determined. Here, we investigated the presence of platelets around breast cancer primary tumor cells and the associations between these cells. We further investigated the associations among platelets, tumor cells, chemoresistance, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We retrospectively analyzed data from 74 patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)‑negative breast cancer who underwent biopsies before treatment and subsequent neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. In biopsy specimens, we evaluated the expression of platelet-specific markers and EMT markers using immunohistochemistry. The associations among the expression of platelet‑specific markers in biopsy specimens, EMT, response to neo‑adjuvant chemotherapy, and survival were analyzed. The presence of platelets was observed in 44 out of 74 (59%) primary breast cancer biopsy specimens. Platelet‑positive tumor cells showed EMT‑like morphological changes and EMT marker expression. Primary tumor cells associated with platelets were less responsive to neo‑adjuvant chemotherapy (pCR rate: 10 vs. 50%, respectively; p=0.0001). Platelets were an independent predictor of the response to chemotherapy upon multivariable analysis (p<0.0001). In conclusion, there was a significant association between platelets surrounding primary tumor cells in the biopsy specimens and the chemotherapeutic response in breast cancer. Platelets surrounding primary tumor cells may represent novel predictors of chemotherapeutic responses. PMID:27349611

  15. [Updated genomics of testicular germ cell tumor].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; He, An-bang; Cai, Zhi-ming; Wu, Song

    2015-04-01

    Testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) is a most common testicular malignancy with an increasing incidence, and its pathogenesis and mechanisms are not yet clear. The next generation sequencing has become the main tool to uncover the underlying mechanisms of TGCT. The differential gene expressions, gene mutation, predisposing gene-dominated signaling pathways, and changes of the relevant genes in the sex chromosome are largely involved in the occurrence and development of TGCT. Studies on the genomics of TGCT contribute a lot to identifying the pivotal pathogenic genes and paving a theoretical ground for the early screening and targeted therapy of TGCT. This paper summarizes the advances in the studies of the genomics of TGCT so as to reveal thetmechanisms of the disease at the genetic level. PMID:26027106

  16. Tumor-Initiating Cells and Methods of Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlatky, Lynn (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Provided herein are an isolated or enriched population of tumor initiating cells derived from normal cells, cells susceptible to neoplasia, or neoplastic cells. Methods of use of the cells for screening for anti-hyperproliferative agents, and use of the cells for animal models of hyperproliferative disorders including metastatic cancer, diagnostic methods, and therapeutic methods are provided.

  17. Ectopic thyroid tissue in the adrenal gland: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Casadei, Gian Piero; Bertarelli, Claudia; Giorgini, Eleonora; Cremonini, Nadia; de Biase, Dario; Tallini, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    Foci of ectopic thyroid tissue are uncommon. Most sites of thyroid ectopia are confined to the neck region. The presence of ectopic thyroid tissue outside the migration pathway of the primitive thyroid in other locations is exceptional. Given that any disease of the thyroid gland may also affect ectopic thyroid tissue, pathologists has to recognize benign or malignant conditions that may develop in the ectopic focus. We present the case of a 32-year-old woman with ectopic thyroid parenchyma in the adrenal gland. Clinically, postoperative thyroid ultrasound echography and computed tomography scans did not reveal any thyroid tumor. The ectopic tissue was a cyst bordered by mature follicular thyroid structures and was histologically benign, without the molecular alterations associated with malignant tumors of follicular cell derivation (BRAFV600E, N-RAS, H-RAS, K-RAS). Review of the literature reveals that adrenal ectopic thyroid tissue is nearly always cystic and has distinctive pathologic features. PMID:24997195

  18. Incidence and Cause of Hypertension During Adrenal Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakado, Koichiro Takaki, Haruyuki; Yamada, Tomomi; Yamanaka, Takashi; Uraki, Junji; Kashima, Masataka; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Takeda, Kan

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and cause of hypertension prospectively during adrenal radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods: For this study, approved by our institutional review board, written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients who received RFA for adrenal tumors (adrenal ablation) and other abdominal tumors (nonadrenal ablation) were included in this prospective study. Blood pressure was monitored during RFA. Serum adrenal hormone levels including epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, and cortisol levels were measured before and during RFA. The respective incidences of procedural hypertension (systolic blood pressure >200 mmHg) of the two patient groups were compared. Factors correlating with procedural systolic blood pressure were evaluated by regression analysis.ResultsNine patients underwent adrenal RFA and another 9 patients liver (n = 5) and renal (n = 4) RFA. Asymptomatic procedural hypertension that returned to the baseline by injecting calcium blocker was found in 7 (38.9%) of 18 patients. The incidence of procedural hypertension was significantly higher in the adrenal ablation group (66.7%, 6/9) than in the nonadrenal ablation group (11.1%, 1/9, P < 0.0498). Procedural systolic blood pressure was significantly correlated with serum epinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.68, P < 0.0001) and norepinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.72, P < 0.0001) levels during RFA. The other adrenal hormones did not show correlation with procedural systolic blood pressure. Conclusion: Hypertension occurs frequently during adrenal RFA because of the release of catecholamine.

  19. Dielectrophoretic Capture and Genetic Analysis of Single Neuroblastoma Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Erica L.; Rader, JulieAnn; Ruden, Jacob; Rappaport, Eric F.; Hunter, Kristen N.; Hallberg, Paul L.; Krytska, Kate; O’Dwyer, Peter J.; Mosse, Yael P.

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the diversity of cells that escape the primary tumor and seed micrometastases remains rudimentary, and approaches for studying circulating and disseminated tumor cells have been limited by low throughput and sensitivity, reliance on single parameter sorting, and a focus on enumeration rather than phenotypic and genetic characterization. Here, we utilize a highly sensitive microfluidic and dielectrophoretic approach for the isolation and genetic analysis of individual tumor cells. We employed fluorescence labeling to isolate 208 single cells from spiking experiments conducted with 11 cell lines, including 8 neuroblastoma cell lines, and achieved a capture sensitivity of 1 tumor cell per 106 white blood cells (WBCs). Sample fixation or freezing had no detectable effect on cell capture. Point mutations were accurately detected in the whole genome amplification product of captured single tumor cells but not in negative control WBCs. We applied this approach to capture 144 single tumor cells from 10 bone marrow samples of patients suffering from neuroblastoma. In this pediatric malignancy, high-risk patients often exhibit wide-spread hematogenous metastasis, but access to primary tumor can be difficult or impossible. Here, we used flow-based sorting to pre-enrich samples with tumor involvement below 0.02%. For all patients for whom a mutation in the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase gene had already been detected in their primary tumor, the same mutation was detected in single cells from their marrow. These findings demonstrate a novel, non-invasive, and adaptable method for the capture and genetic analysis of single tumor cells from cancer patients. PMID:25133137

  20. Antitumor efficacy of vaccinia virus-modified tumor cell vaccine

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, T.; Wang, D.Q.; Maru, M.; Nakajima, K.; Kato, S.; Kurimura, T.; Wakamiya, N. )

    1990-11-01

    The antitumor efficacies of vaccinia virus-modified tumor cell vaccines were examined in murine syngeneic MH134 and X5563 tumor cells. UV-inactivated vaccinia virus was inoculated i.p. into C3H/HeN mice that had received whole body X-irradiation at 150 rads. After 3 weeks, the vaccines were administered i.p. 3 times at weekly intervals. One week after the last injection, mice were challenged i.p. with various doses of syngeneic MH134 or X5563 viable tumor cells. Four methods were used for preparing tumor cell vaccines: X-ray irradiation; fixation with paraformaldehyde for 1 h or 3 months; and purification of the membrane fraction. All four vaccines were effective, but the former two vaccines were the most effective. A mixture of the membrane fraction of untreated tumor cells and UV-inactivated vaccinia virus also had an antitumor effect. These results indicate that vaccine with the complete cell structure is the most effective. The membrane fraction of UV-inactivated vaccinia virus-absorbed tumor cells was also effective. UV-inactivated vaccinia virus can react with not only intact tumor cells but also the purified membrane fraction of tumor cells and augment antitumor activity.

  1. Inhibition of /sup 22/Na influx by tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants and binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine in bovine adrenal medullary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arita, M.; Wada, A.; Takara, H.; Izumi, F.

    1987-10-01

    In bovine adrenal medullary cells we investigated the effects of antidepressants on ionic channels and secretion of catecholamines. Tricyclic (imipramine, amitriptyline and nortriptyline) and tetracyclic (maprotiline and mianserin) antidepressants inhibited carbachol-induced influx of /sup 22/Na, /sup 45/Ca and secretion of catecholamines (IC50, 14-96 microM). Influx of /sup 22/Na, /sup 45/Ca and secretion of catecholamines due to veratridine also were inhibited by these drugs (IC50, 10-17 microM). However, antidepressants did not suppress high concentration of K-induced 45Ca influx and catecholamine secretion, suggesting that antidepressants do not inhibit voltage-dependent Ca channels. (/sup 3/H)Imipramine bound specifically to adrenal medullary cells. Binding was saturable, reversible and with two different equilibrium dissociation constants (13.3 and 165.0 microM). Tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants competed for the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine at the same concentrations as they inhibited /sup 22/Na influx caused by carbachol or veratridine. Carbachol, d-tubocurarine, hexamethonium, tetrodotoxin, veratridine and scorpion venom did not inhibit the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine. These results suggest that tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants bind to two populations of binding sites which are functionally associated with nicotinic receptor-associated ionic channels and with voltage-dependent Na channels, and inhibit Na influx. Inhibition of Na influx leads to the reduction of Ca influx and catecholamine secretion caused by carbachol or veratridine.

  2. A Rare Cause of Prepubertal Gynecomastia: Sertoli Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Dursun, Fatma; Su Dur, Şeyma Meliha; Şahin, Ceyhan; Kırmızıbekmez, Heves; Karabulut, Murat Hakan; Yörük, Asım

    2015-01-01

    Prepubertal gynecomastia due to testis tumors is a very rare condition. Nearly 5% of the patients with testicular mass present with gynecomastia. Sertoli cell tumors are sporadic in 60% of the reported cases, while the remaining is a component of multiple neoplasia syndromes such as Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and Carney complex. We present a 4-year-old boy with gynecomastia due to Sertoli cell tumor with no evidence of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome or Carney complex. PMID:26366315

  3. A Study of CD45RA+ Depleted Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors and Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-15

    Ewing Sarcoma; Gastrointestinal Tumor; Germ Cell Tumor; Hepatic Tumor; Lymphoma; Wilms Tumor; Rhabdoid Tumor; Clear Cell Carcinoma; Renal Cell Carcinoma; Melanoma; Neuroblastoma; Rhabdomyosarcoma; Non-rhabdomyosarcoma

  4. Multiple Subsets of Brain Tumor Initiating Cells Coexist in Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Rennert, Robert C; Achrol, Achal S; Januszyk, Michael; Kahn, Suzana A; Liu, Tiffany T; Liu, Yi; Sahoo, Debashis; Rodrigues, Melanie; Maan, Zeshaan N; Wong, Victor W; Cheshier, Samuel H; Chang, Steven D; Steinberg, Gary K; Harsh, Griffith R; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2016-06-01

    Brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs) are self-renewing multipotent cells critical for tumor maintenance and growth. Using single-cell microfluidic profiling, we identified multiple subpopulations of BTICs coexisting in human glioblastoma, characterized by distinct surface marker expression and single-cell molecular profiles relating to divergent bulk tissue molecular subtypes. These data suggest BTIC subpopulation heterogeneity as an underlying source of intra-tumoral bulk tissue molecular heterogeneity, and will support future studies into BTIC subpopulation-specific therapies. Stem Cells 2016;34:1702-1707. PMID:26991945

  5. Identifying cancer origin using circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Si-Hong; Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Chou, Teh-Ying; Pang, See-Tong; Lin, Po-Hung; Tsai, Chun-Ming; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have become an established clinical evaluation biomarker. CTC count provides a good correlation with the prognosis of cancer patients, but has only been used with known cancer patients, and has been unable to predict the origin of the CTCs. This study demonstrates the analysis of CTCs for the identification of their primary cancer source. Twelve mL blood samples were equally dispensed on 6 CMx chips, microfluidic chips coated with an anti-EpCAM-conjugated supported lipid bilayer, for CTC capture and isolation. Captured CTCs were eluted to an immunofluorescence (IF) staining panel consisting of 6 groups of antibodies: anti-panCK, anti-CK18, anti-CK7, anti-TTF-1, anti-CK20/anti-CDX2, and anti-PSA/anti-PSMA. Cancer cell lines of lung (H1975), colorectal (DLD-1, HCT-116), and prostate (PC3, DU145, LNCaP) were selected to establish the sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing CTCs from lung, colorectal, and prostate cancer. Spiking experiments performed in 2mL of culture medium or whole blood proved the CMx platform can enumerate cancer cells of lung, colorectal, and prostate. The IF panel was tested on blood samples from lung cancer patients (n = 3), colorectal cancer patients (n = 5), prostate cancer patients (n = 5), and healthy individuals (n = 12). Peripheral blood samples found panCK+ and CK18+ CTCs in lung, colorectal, and prostate cancers. CTCs expressing CK7+ or TTF-1+, (CK20/ CDX2)+, or (PSA/ PSMA)+ corresponded to lung, colorectal, or prostate cancer, respectively. In conclusion, we have designed an immunofluorescence staining panel to identify CTCs in peripheral blood to correctly identify cancer cell origin. PMID:26828696

  6. Identifying cancer origin using circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Si-Hong; Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Chou, Teh-Ying; Pang, See-Tong; Lin, Po-Hung; Tsai, Chun-Ming; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-04-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have become an established clinical evaluation biomarker. CTC count provides a good correlation with the prognosis of cancer patients, but has only been used with known cancer patients, and has been unable to predict the origin of the CTCs. This study demonstrates the analysis of CTCs for the identification of their primary cancer source. Twelve mL blood samples were equally dispensed on 6 CMx chips, microfluidic chips coated with an anti-EpCAM-conjugated supported lipid bilayer, for CTC capture and isolation. Captured CTCs were eluted to an immunofluorescence (IF) staining panel consisting of 6 groups of antibodies: anti-panCK, anti-CK18, anti-CK7, anti-TTF-1, anti-CK20/anti-CDX2, and anti-PSA/anti-PSMA. Cancer cell lines of lung (H1975), colorectal (DLD-1, HCT-116), and prostate (PC3, DU145, LNCaP) were selected to establish the sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing CTCs from lung, colorectal, and prostate cancer. Spiking experiments performed in 2mL of culture medium or whole blood proved the CMx platform can enumerate cancer cells of lung, colorectal, and prostate. The IF panel was tested on blood samples from lung cancer patients (n = 3), colorectal cancer patients (n = 5), prostate cancer patients (n = 5), and healthy individuals (n = 12). Peripheral blood samples found panCK(+) and CK18(+) CTCs in lung, colorectal, and prostate cancers. CTCs expressing CK7(+) or TTF-1(+), (CK20/ CDX2)(+), or (PSA/ PSMA)(+) corresponded to lung, colorectal, or prostate cancer, respectively. In conclusion, we have designed an immunofluorescence staining panel to identify CTCs in peripheral blood to correctly identify cancer cell origin. PMID:26828696

  7. MOLECULAR AND CYTOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF LUNG TUMOR CELL LINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have measured the levels of amplification of oncogenes and tumor marker genes or other genes of interest in nine human lung tumor cell lines in comparison to normal human bronchial epithelial cells or normal blood lymphocytes to test the hypothesis that aberrant amplification ...

  8. Intraorbital Granular Cell Tumor Ophthalmologic and Radiologic Findings

    PubMed Central

    de la Vega, Gabriela; Villegas, Victor M; Velazquez, Jose; Barrios, Mirelys; Murray, Timothy G; Elhammady, Mohamed Samy

    2015-01-01

    Granular cell tumor is a rare soft tissue neoplasm that commonly affects the head and neck regions. We describe a case of a granular cell tumor of the orbit including its clinical presentation, histopathology, and magnetic resonance imaging findings. PMID:25963156

  9. Malignant mast cell tumor in an African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris).

    PubMed

    Raymond, J T; White, M R; Janovitz, E B

    1997-01-01

    In November 1995, a malignant mast cell tumor (mastocytoma) was diagnosed in an adult African hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) from a zoological park (West Lafayette, Indiana, USA). The primary mast cell tumor presented as a firm subcutaneous mass along the ventrum of the neck. Metastasis to the right submandibular lymph node occurred. PMID:9027702

  10. Therapeutic attack of hypoxic cells of solid tumors: presidential address.

    PubMed

    Sartorelli, A C

    1988-02-15

    Hypoxic cells of solid tumors are relatively resistant to therapeutic assault. Studies have demonstrated that oxygen-deficient tumor cells exist in an environment conducive to reductive reactions making hypoxic cells particularly sensitive to bioreductive alkylating agents. Mitomycin C, the prototype bioreductive alkylating agent available for clinical use, is capable of preferentially killing oxygen-deficient cells both in vitro and in vivo. This phenomenon is at least in part the result of differences in the uptake and metabolism of mitomycin C by hypoxic and oxygenated tumor cells, with the ultimate critical lesion being the cross-linking of DNA by the mitomycin antibiotic. The combination of mitomycin C with X-irradiation, to attack hypoxic and oxygenated tumor cell populations, respectively, has led to enhanced antitumor effects in mice bearing solid tumor implants and in patients with cancer of the head and neck. More efficacious kill of hypoxic tumor cells may be possible by the use of dicoumarol in combination with mitomycin or by the use of the related antibiotic porfiromycin. The findings support the use of an agent with specificity for hypoxic tumor cells in potentially curative regimens for solid tumors. PMID:3123053

  11. Malignant giant cell tumor of soft parts in a mare

    PubMed Central

    Marryatt, Paige A.

    2003-01-01

    Two subcutaneous masses were removed from the elbow of a mare. Histologically they were composed of islands of polygonal to plump spindlelioid cells with large nuclei, coarsely stippled chromatin, and eosinophilic cytoplasm. Findings were diagnostic for a malignant giant cell tumor of soft parts, a rare tumor with a fair prognosis. PMID:14524631

  12. Targeted delivery of let-7b to reprogramme tumor-associated macrophages and tumor infiltrating dendritic cells for tumor rejection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen; Gan, Jingjing; Long, Ziyan; Guo, Guangxing; Shi, Xiafei; Wang, Chunming; Zang, Yuhui; Ding, Zhi; Chen, Jiangning; Zhang, Junfeng; Dong, Lei

    2016-06-01

    Both tumor associated macrophages (TAMs) and tumor infiltrating dendritic cells (TIDCs) are important components in the tumor microenvironment that mediate tumor immunosuppression and promote cancer progression. Targeting these cells and altering their phenotypes may become a new strategy to recover their anti-tumor activities and thereby restore the local immune surveillance against tumor. In this study, we constructed a nucleic acid delivery system for the delivery of let-7b, a synthetic microRNA mimic. Our carrier has an affinity for the mannose receptors on TAMs/TIDCs and is responsive to the low-pH tumor microenvironment. The delivery of let-7b could reactivate TAMs/TIDCs by acting as a TLR-7 agonist and suppressing IL-10 production in vitro. In a breast cancer mouse model, let-7b delivered by this system efficiently reprogrammed the functions of TAMs/TIDCs, reversed the suppressive tumor microenvironment, and inhibited tumor growth. Taken together, this strategy, designed based upon TAMs/TIDCs-targeting delivery and the dual biological functions of let-7b (TLR-7 ligand and IL-10 inhibitor), may provide a new approach for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26994345

  13. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein gene expression, steroid-hormone secretion and proliferative activity of adrenocortical cells in the presence of proteasome inhibitors: in vivo studies on the regenerating rat adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Rucinski, Marcin; Tortorella, Cinzia; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Nowak, Magdalena; Nussdorfer, Gastone G; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2008-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that proteasome inhibitors promote the accumulation of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) in cultured rat adrenocortical cells. Unexpectedly, this response was associated with a moderate lowering in the corticosterone secretion and proliferation rate of cultured cells. Hence, we studied the effects of proteasome inhibitors MG115 and MG132 on the secretion and proliferative activity of the regenerating adrenal cortex in rats 5 days after surgery. Animals were given two subcutaneous injections of 0.15 or 1.5 nmol/100 g of inhibitors 24 and 12 h before decapitation. Real-time PCR and Western blotting showed that StAR expression, both mRNA and protein, was markedly lower in regenerating adrenals than in the intact gland of sham-operated rats. Neither MG115 nor MG132 affected StAR expression in regenerating gland. Inhibitors induced a slight decrease in the plasma concentrations of aldosterone and corticosterone, but did not significantly alter metaphase index of the regenerating adrenal cortex. Our findings provide the first evidence that down-regulation of StAR occurs during the early stages of adrenal regeneration. Moreover, this suggests that the steroidogenic pathway is more sensitive to proteasome inhibitors than that regulating proliferative activity of regenerating adrenal cortex in the rat. PMID:18425351

  14. Oncogenic KRAS Regulates Tumor Cell Signaling via Stromal Reciprocation

    PubMed Central

    Tape, Christopher J.; Ling, Stephanie; Dimitriadi, Maria; McMahon, Kelly M.; Worboys, Jonathan D.; Leong, Hui Sun; Norrie, Ida C.; Miller, Crispin J.; Poulogiannis, George; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Jørgensen, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Summary Oncogenic mutations regulate signaling within both tumor cells and adjacent stromal cells. Here, we show that oncogenic KRAS (KRASG12D) also regulates tumor cell signaling via stromal cells. By combining cell-specific proteome labeling with multivariate phosphoproteomics, we analyzed heterocellular KRASG12D signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells. Tumor cell KRASG12D engages heterotypic fibroblasts, which subsequently instigate reciprocal signaling in the tumor cells. Reciprocal signaling employs additional kinases and doubles the number of regulated signaling nodes from cell-autonomous KRASG12D. Consequently, reciprocal KRASG12D produces a tumor cell phosphoproteome and total proteome that is distinct from cell-autonomous KRASG12D alone. Reciprocal signaling regulates tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis and increases mitochondrial capacity via an IGF1R/AXL-AKT axis. These results demonstrate that oncogene signaling should be viewed as a heterocellular process and that our existing cell-autonomous perspective underrepresents the extent of oncogene signaling in cancer. Video Abstract PMID:27087446

  15. Oncogenic KRAS Regulates Tumor Cell Signaling via Stromal Reciprocation.

    PubMed

    Tape, Christopher J; Ling, Stephanie; Dimitriadi, Maria; McMahon, Kelly M; Worboys, Jonathan D; Leong, Hui Sun; Norrie, Ida C; Miller, Crispin J; Poulogiannis, George; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Jørgensen, Claus

    2016-05-01

    Oncogenic mutations regulate signaling within both tumor cells and adjacent stromal cells. Here, we show that oncogenic KRAS (KRAS(G12D)) also regulates tumor cell signaling via stromal cells. By combining cell-specific proteome labeling with multivariate phosphoproteomics, we analyzed heterocellular KRAS(G12D) signaling in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) cells. Tumor cell KRAS(G12D) engages heterotypic fibroblasts, which subsequently instigate reciprocal signaling in the tumor cells. Reciprocal signaling employs additional kinases and doubles the number of regulated signaling nodes from cell-autonomous KRAS(G12D). Consequently, reciprocal KRAS(G12D) produces a tumor cell phosphoproteome and total proteome that is distinct from cell-autonomous KRAS(G12D) alone. Reciprocal signaling regulates tumor cell proliferation and apoptosis and increases mitochondrial capacity via an IGF1R/AXL-AKT axis. These results demonstrate that oncogene signaling should be viewed as a heterocellular process and that our existing cell-autonomous perspective underrepresents the extent of oncogene signaling in cancer. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27087446

  16. Targeting Mitochondrial Function to Treat Quiescent Tumor Cells in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaonan; de Milito, Angelo; Olofsson, Maria Hägg; Gullbo, Joachim; D’Arcy, Padraig; Linder, Stig

    2015-01-01

    The disorganized nature of tumor vasculature results in the generation of microenvironments characterized by nutrient starvation, hypoxia and accumulation of acidic metabolites. Tumor cell populations in such areas are often slowly proliferating and thus refractory to chemotherapeutical drugs that are dependent on an active cell cycle. There is an urgent need for alternative therapeutic interventions that circumvent growth dependency. The screening of drug libraries using multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) or glucose-starved tumor cells has led to the identification of several compounds with promising therapeutic potential and that display activity on quiescent tumor cells. Interestingly, a common theme of these drug screens is the recurrent identification of agents that affect mitochondrial function. Such data suggest that, contrary to the classical Warburg view, tumor cells in nutritionally-compromised microenvironments are dependent on mitochondrial function for energy metabolism and survival. These findings suggest that mitochondria may represent an “Achilles heel” for the survival of slowly-proliferating tumor cells and suggest strategies for the development of therapy to target these cell populations. PMID:26580606

  17. Cancer stem cells and the tumor microenvironment: interplay in tumor heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Albini, Adriana; Bruno, Antonino; Gallo, Cristina; Pajardi, Giorgio; Noonan, Douglas M.; Dallaglio, Katiuscia

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Tumor cells able to recapitulate tumor heterogeneity have been tracked, isolated and characterized in different tumor types, and are commonly named Cancer Stem Cells or Cancer Initiating Cells (CSC/CIC). CSC/CIC are disseminated in the tumor mass and are resistant to anti-cancer therapies and adverse conditions. They are able to divide into another stem cell and a “proliferating” cancer cell. They appear to be responsible for disease recurrence and metastatic dissemination even after apparent eradication of the primary tumor. The modulation of CSC/CIC activities by the tumor microenvironment (TUMIC) is still poorly known. CSC/CIC may mutually interact with the TUMIC in a special and unique manner depending on the TUMIC cells or proteins encountered. The TUMIC consists of extracellular matrix components as well as cellular players among which endothelial, stromal and immune cells, providing and responding to signals to/from the CSC/CIC. This interplay can contribute to the mechanisms through which CSC/CIC may reside in a dormant state in a tissue for years, later giving rise to tumor recurrence or metastasis in patients. Different TUMIC components, including the connective tissue, can differentially activate CIC/CSC in different areas of a tumor and contribute to the generation of cancer heterogeneity. Here, we review possible networking activities between the different components of the tumor microenvironment and CSC/CIC, with a focus on its role in tumor heterogeneity and progression. We also summarize novel therapeutic options that could target both CSC/CIC and the microenvironment to elude resistance mechanisms activated by CSC/CIC, responsible for disease recurrence and metastases. PMID:26291921

  18. Cancer stem cells and the tumor microenvironment: interplay in tumor heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Albini, Adriana; Bruno, Antonino; Gallo, Cristina; Pajardi, Giorgio; Noonan, Douglas M; Dallaglio, Katiuscia

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells able to recapitulate tumor heterogeneity have been tracked, isolated and characterized in different tumor types, and are commonly named Cancer Stem Cells or Cancer Initiating Cells (CSC/CIC). CSC/CIC are disseminated in the tumor mass and are resistant to anti-cancer therapies and adverse conditions. They are able to divide into another stem cell and a "proliferating" cancer cell. They appear to be responsible for disease recurrence and metastatic dissemination even after apparent eradication of the primary tumor. The modulation of CSC/CIC activities by the tumor microenvironment (TUMIC) is still poorly known. CSC/CIC may mutually interact with the TUMIC in a special and unique manner depending on the TUMIC cells or proteins encountered. The TUMIC consists of extracellular matrix components as well as cellular players among which endothelial, stromal and immune cells, providing and responding to signals to/from the CSC/CIC. This interplay can contribute to the mechanisms through which CSC/CIC may reside in a dormant state in a tissue for years, later giving rise to tumor recurrence or metastasis in patients. Different TUMIC components, including the connective tissue, can differentially activate CIC/CSC in different areas of a tumor and contribute to the generation of cancer heterogeneity. Here, we review possible networking activities between the different components of the tumor microenvironment and CSC/CIC, with a focus on its role in tumor heterogeneity and progression. We also summarize novel therapeutic options that could target both CSC/CIC and the microenvironment to elude resistance mechanisms activated by CSC/CIC, responsible for disease recurrence and metastases. PMID:26291921

  19. Solid tumor therapy by selectively targeting stromal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shihui; Liu, Jie; Ma, Qian; Cao, Liu; Fattah, Rasem J; Yu, Zuxi; Bugge, Thomas H; Finkel, Toren; Leppla, Stephen H

    2016-07-12

    Engineered tumor-targeted anthrax lethal toxin proteins have been shown to strongly suppress growth of solid tumors in mice. These toxins work through the native toxin receptors tumor endothelium marker-8 and capillary morphogenesis protein-2 (CMG2), which, in other contexts, have been described as markers of tumor endothelium. We found that neither receptor is required for tumor growth. We further demonstrate that tumor cells, which are resistant to the toxin when grown in vitro, become highly sensitive when implanted in mice. Using a range of tissue-specific loss-of-function and gain-of-function genetic models, we determined that this in vivo toxin sensitivity requires CMG2 expression on host-derived tumor endothelial cells. Notably, engineered toxins were shown to suppress the proliferation of isolated tumor endothelial cells. Finally, we demonstrate that administering an immunosuppressive regimen allows animals to receive multiple toxin dosages and thereby produces a strong and durable antitumor effect. The ability to give repeated doses of toxins, coupled with the specific targeting of tumor endothelial cells, suggests that our strategy should be efficacious for a wide range of solid tumors. PMID:27357689

  20. Rare Presentation of Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors Mimicking Bifocal Germ Cell Tumors: 2 Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Phuakpet, Kamon; Larouche, Valerie; Hawkins, Cynthia; Huang, Annie; Tabori, Uri; Bartels, Ute K; Bouffet, Eric

    2016-03-01

    Bifocal pineal and suprasellar tumors have only been described in the context of germ cell tumors in the pediatric age group. We report 2 patients with radiologic findings of bifocal pineal and suprasellar lesions, with a histologic diagnosis of supratentorial primitive neuroectodermal tumor. The absence of diabetes insipidus and other endocrine abnormalities was noteworthy in both cases. This observation challenges previous reports on the pathognomonic value of this clinico-radiologic entity. PMID:26241725

  1. Recruitment of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Into Prostate Tumors Promotes Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Younghun; Kim, Jin Koo; Shiozawa, Yusuke; Wang, Jingcheng; Mishra, Anjali; Joseph, Jeena; Berry, Janice E.; McGee, Samantha; Lee, Eunsohl; Sun, Hongli; Wang, Jianhua; Jin, Taocong; Zhang, Honglai; Dai, Jinlu; Krebsbach, Paul H.; Keller, Evan T.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Taichman, Russell S.

    2013-01-01

    Tumors recruit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to facilitate healing, which induces their conversion into cancer-associated fibroblasts that facilitate metastasis. However, this process is poorly understood on the molecular level. Here we show that the CXCR6 ligand CXCL16 facilitates MSC or Very Small Embryonic-Like (VSEL) cells recruitment into prostate tumors. CXCR6 signaling stimulates the conversion of MSCs into cancer-associated fibroblasts, which secrete stromal-derived factor-1, also known as CXCL12. CXCL12 expressed by cancer-associated fibroblasts then binds to CXCR4 on tumor cells and induces an epithelial to mesenchymal transition, which ultimately promotes metastasis to secondary tumor sites. Our results provide the molecular basis for MSC recruitment into tumors and how this process leads to tumor metastasis. PMID:23653207

  2. Tumor-stem cells interactions by fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meleshina, Aleksandra V.; Cherkasova, Elena I.; Sergeeva, Ekaterina; Turchin, Ilya V.; Kiseleva, Ekaterina V.; Dashinimaev, Erdem B.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Zagaynova, Elena V.

    2013-02-01

    Recently, great deal of interest is investigation the function of the stem cells (SC) in tumors. In this study, we studied «recipient-tumor- fluorescent stem cells » system using the methods of in vivo imaging and laser scanning microscopy (LSM). We used adipose-derived adult stem (ADAS) cells of human lentiviral transfected with the gene of fluorescent protein Turbo FP635. ADAS cells were administrated into nude mice with transplanted tumor HeLa Kyoto (human cervical carcinoma) at different stages of tumor growth (0-8 days) intravenously or into tumor. In vivo imaging was performed on the experimental setup for epi - luminescence bioimaging (IAP RAS, Nizhny Novgorod). The results of the imaging showed localization of fluorophore tagged stem cells in the spleen on day 5-9 after injection. The sensitivity of the technique may be improved by spectral separation autofluorescence and fluorescence of stem cells. We compared the results of in vivo imaging and confocal laser scanning microscopy (LSM 510 META, Carl Zeiss, Germany). Internal organs of the animals and tumor tissue were investigated. It was shown that with i.v. injection of ADAS, bright fluorescent structures with spectral characteristics corresponding to TurboFP635 protein are locally accumulated in the marrow, lungs and tumors of animals. These findings indicate that ADAS cells integrate in the animal body with transplanted tumor and can be identified by fluorescence bioimaging techniques in vivo and ex vivo.

  3. Genetic traits for hematogeneous tumor cell dissemination in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Joosse, Simon A; Pantel, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Metastatic relapse in patients with solid tumors is the consequence of cancer cells that disseminated to distant sites, adapted to the new microenvironment, and escaped systemic adjuvant therapy. There is increasing evidence that hematogeneous dissemination starts at an early stage of cancer progression with single tumor cells or cell clusters leaving the primary site and entering the blood circulation. These circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can extravasate into secondary tissues where they become disseminated tumor cells (DTCs). Patients might relapse years after initial resection of the primary tumor when DTCs become overt metastases. Current diagnostic strategies for stratification of therapies against metastatic cells focus on the primary tumor tissue. This approach is based on the availability of stored primary tumors obtained at primary surgery, but it ignores that the DTCs might have evolved over years, which can affect the antimetastatic drug response. However, taking biopsies from metastatic tissues is an invasive procedure, and multiple metastases located at different sites in an individual patient show marked genomic heterogeneity. Thus, capturing CTCs from the peripheral blood as a "liquid biopsy" has obvious advantages in particular when repeated sampling is required for monitoring therapies in cancer patients. However, the biology behind tumor cell dissemination and its contribution to metastatic progression in cancer patients is still subject to controversial discussions. This manuscript reviews current theories on the genetic traits behind the spread of CTCs and progression of DTCs into overt metastases. PMID:26931653

  4. Targeted Proapoptotic Peptides Depleting Adipose Stromal Cells Inhibit Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Daquinag, Alexes C; Tseng, Chieh; Zhang, Yan; Amaya-Manzanares, Felipe; Florez, Fernando; Dadbin, Ali; Zhang, Tao; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2016-02-01

    Progression of many cancers is associated with tumor infiltration by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). Adipose stromal cells (ASC) are MSC that serve as adipocyte progenitors and endothelium-supporting cells in white adipose tissue (WAT). Clinical and animal model studies indicate that ASC mobilized from WAT are recruited by tumors. Direct evidence for ASC function in tumor microenvironment has been lacking due to unavailability of approaches to specifically inactivate these cells. Here, we investigate the effects of a proteolysis-resistant targeted hunter-killer peptide D-WAT composed of a cyclic domain CSWKYWFGEC homing to ASC and of a proapoptotic domain KLAKLAK2. Using mouse bone marrow transplantation models, we show that D-WAT treatment specifically depletes tumor stromal and perivascular cells without directly killing malignant cells or tumor-infiltrating leukocytes. In several mouse carcinoma models, targeted ASC cytoablation reduced tumor vascularity and cell proliferation resulting in hemorrhaging, necrosis, and suppressed tumor growth. We also validated a D-WAT derivative with a proapoptotic domain KFAKFAK2 that was found to have an improved cytoablative activity. Our results for the first time demonstrate that ASC, recruited as a component of tumor microenvironment, support cancer progression. We propose that drugs targeting ASC can be developed as a combination therapy complementing conventional cancer treatments. PMID:26316391

  5. Biodegradable polymeric micelle-encapsulated doxorubicin suppresses tumor metastasis by killing circulating tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Senyi; Wu, Qinjie; Zhao, Yuwei; Zheng, Xin; Wu, Ni; Pang, Jing; Li, Xuejing; Bi, Cheng; Liu, Xinyu; Yang, Li; Liu, Lei; Su, Weijun; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Changyang

    2015-03-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) play a crucial role in tumor metastasis, but it is rare for any chemotherapy regimen to focus on killing CTCs. Herein, we describe doxorubicin (Dox) micelles that showed anti-metastatic activity by killing CTCs. Dox micelles with a small particle size and high encapsulation efficiency were obtained using a pH-induced self-assembly method. Compared with free Dox, Dox micelles exhibited improved cytotoxicity, apoptosis induction, and cellular uptake. In addition, Dox micelles showed a sustained release behavior in vitro, and in a transgenic zebrafish model, Dox micelles exhibited a longer circulation time and lower extravasation from blood vessels into surrounding tissues. Anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities of Dox micelles were investigated in transgenic zebrafish and mouse models. In transgenic zebrafish, Dox micelles inhibited tumor growth and prolonged the survival of tumor-bearing zebrafish. Furthermore, Dox micelles suppressed tumor metastasis by killing CTCs. In addition, improved anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities were also confirmed in mouse tumor models, where immunofluorescent staining of tumors indicated that Dox micelles induced more apoptosis and showed fewer proliferation-positive cells. There were decreased side effects in transgenic zebrafish and mice after administration of Dox micelles. In conclusion, Dox micelles showed stronger anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities and decreased side effects both in vitro and in vivo, which may have potential applications in cancer therapy.

  6. Thymus-derived rather than tumor-induced regulatory T cells predominate in brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wainwright, Derek A.; Sengupta, Sadhak; Han, Yu; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly malignant brain tumor with an average survival time of 15 months. Previously, we and others demonstrated that CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) infiltrate human GBM as well as mouse models that recapitulate malignant brain tumors. However, whether brain tumor-resident Tregs are thymus-derived natural Tregs (nTregs) or induced Tregs (iTregs), by the conversion of conventional CD4+ T cells, has not been established. To investigate this question, we utilized the i.c. implanted GL261 cell-based orthotopic mouse model, the RasB8 transgenic astrocytoma mouse model, and a human GBM tissue microarray. We demonstrate that Tregs in brain tumors are predominantly thymus derived, since thymectomy, prior to i.c. GL261 cell implantation, significantly decreased the level of Tregs in mice with brain tumors. Accordingly, most Tregs in human GBM and mouse brain tumors expressed the nTreg transcription factor, Helios. Interestingly, a significant effect of the brain tumor microenvironment on Treg lineage programming was observed, based on higher levels of brain tumor-resident Tregs expressing glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor and CD103 and lower levels of Tregs expressing CD62L and CD45RB compared with peripheral Tregs. Furthermore, there was a higher level of nTregs in brain tumors that expressed the proliferative marker Ki67 compared with iTregs and conventional CD4+ T cells. Our study demonstrates that future Treg-depleting therapies should aim to selectively target systemic rather than intratumoral nTregs in brain tumor-specific immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:21908444

  7. Thymus-derived rather than tumor-induced regulatory T cells predominate in brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Derek A; Sengupta, Sadhak; Han, Yu; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2011-12-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly malignant brain tumor with an average survival time of 15 months. Previously, we and others demonstrated that CD4(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) infiltrate human GBM as well as mouse models that recapitulate malignant brain tumors. However, whether brain tumor-resident Tregs are thymus-derived natural Tregs (nTregs) or induced Tregs (iTregs), by the conversion of conventional CD4(+) T cells, has not been established. To investigate this question, we utilized the i.c. implanted GL261 cell-based orthotopic mouse model, the RasB8 transgenic astrocytoma mouse model, and a human GBM tissue microarray. We demonstrate that Tregs in brain tumors are predominantly thymus derived, since thymectomy, prior to i.c. GL261 cell implantation, significantly decreased the level of Tregs in mice with brain tumors. Accordingly, most Tregs in human GBM and mouse brain tumors expressed the nTreg transcription factor, Helios. Interestingly, a significant effect of the brain tumor microenvironment on Treg lineage programming was observed, based on higher levels of brain tumor-resident Tregs expressing glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor and CD103 and lower levels of Tregs expressing CD62L and CD45RB compared with peripheral Tregs. Furthermore, there was a higher level of nTregs in brain tumors that expressed the proliferative marker Ki67 compared with iTregs and conventional CD4(+) T cells. Our study demonstrates that future Treg-depleting therapies should aim to selectively target systemic rather than intratumoral nTregs in brain tumor-specific immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:21908444

  8. Regulation of cytochrome b5 gene transcription by Sp3, GATA-6, and steroidogenic factor 1 in human adrenal NCI-H295A cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ningwu; Dardis, Andrea; Miller, Walter L

    2005-08-01

    Sex steroid synthesis requires the 17,20 lyase activity of P450c17, which is enhanced by cytochrome b5, acting as an allosteric factor to promote association of P450c17 with its electron donor, P450 oxidoreductase. Cytochrome b5 is preferentially expressed in the fetal adrenal and postadrenarchal adrenal zona reticularis; the basis of this tissue-specific, developmentally regulated transcription of the b5 gene is unknown. We found b5 expression in all cell lines tested, including human adrenal NCI-H295A cells, where its mRNA is reduced by cAMP and phorbol ester. Multiple sites, between -83 and -122 bp upstream from the first ATG, initiate transcription. Deletional mutagenesis localized all detectable promoter activity within -327/+15, and deoxyribonuclease I footprinting identified protein binding at -72/-107 and -157/-197. DNA segments -65/-40, -114/-70 and -270/-245 fused to TK32/Luc yielded significant activity, and mutations in their Sp sites abolished that activity; electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) showed that Sp3, but not Sp1, binds to these Sp sites. Nuclear factor 1 (NF-1) and GATA-6, but not GATA-4 bind to the NF-1 and GATA sites in -157/-197. In Drosophila S2 cells, Sp3 increased -327/Luc activity 58-fold, but Sp1 and NF-1 isoforms were inactive. Mutating the three Sp sites ablated activity without or with cotransfection of Sp1/Sp3. In NCI-H295A cells, mutating the three Sp sites reduced activity to 39%; mutating the Sp, GATA, and NF-1 sites abolished activity. In JEG-3 cells, GATA-4 was inactive, GATA-6 augmented -327/Luc activity to 231% over the control, and steroidogenic factor 1 augmented activity to 655% over the control; these activities required the Sp and NF-1 sites. Transcription of cytochrome b5 shares many features with the regulation of P450c17, whose activity it enhances. PMID:15831526

  9. Immune signature of tumor infiltrating immune cells in renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Geissler, Katharina; Fornara, Paolo; Lautenschläger, Christine; Holzhausen, Hans-Jürgen; Seliger, Barbara; Riemann, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated immune cells have been discussed as an essential factor for the prediction of the outcome of tumor patients. Lymphocyte-specific genes are associated with a favorable prognosis in colorectal cancer but with poor survival in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Flow cytometric analyses combined with immunohistochemistry were performed to study the phenotypic profiles of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and the frequency of T cells and macrophages in RCC lesions. Data were correlated with clinicopathological parameters and survival of patients. Comparing oncocytoma and clear cell (cc)RCC, T cell numbers as well as activation-associated T cell markers were higher in ccRCC, whereas the frequency of NK cells was higher in oncocytoma. An intratumoral increase of T cell numbers was found with higher tumor grades (G1:G2:G3/4 = 1:3:4). Tumor-associated macrophages slightly increased with dedifferentiation, although the macrophage-to-T cell ratio was highest in G1 tumor lesions. A high expression of CD57 was found in T cells of early tumor grades, whereas T cells in dedifferentiated RCC lesions expressed higher levels of CD69 and CTLA4. TIL composition did not differ between older (>70 y) and younger (<58 y) patients. Enhanced patients’ survival was associated with a higher percentage of tumor infiltrating NK cells and Th1 markers, e.g. HLA-DR+ and CXCR3+ T cells, whereas a high number of T cells, especially with high CD69 expression correlated with a worse prognosis of patients. Our results suggest that immunomonitoring of RCC patients might represent a useful tool for the prediction of the outcome of RCC patients. PMID:25949868

  10. NKT cells as an ideal anti-tumor immunotherapeutic.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Shin-Ichiro; Shimizu, Kanako; Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Kunii, Naoki; Nakayama, Toshinori; Motohashi, Shinichiro; Taniguchi, Masaru

    2013-01-01

    Human natural killer T (NKT) cells are characterized by their expression of an invariant T cell antigen receptor α chain variable region encoded by a Vα24Jα18 rearrangement. These NKT cells recognize α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) in conjunction with the MHC class I-like CD1d molecule and bridge the innate and acquired immune systems to mediate efficient and augmented immune responses. A prime example of one such function is adjuvant activity: NKT cells augment anti-tumor responses because they can rapidly produce large amounts of IFN-γ, which acts on NK cells to eliminate MHC negative tumors and also on CD8 cytotoxic T cells to kill MHC positive tumors. Thus, upon administration of α-GalCer-pulsed DCs, both MHC negative and positive tumor cells can be effectively eliminated, resulting in complete tumor eradication without tumor recurrence. Clinical trials have been completed in a cohort of 17 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancers and 10 cases of head and neck tumors. Sixty percent of advanced lung cancer patients with high IFN-γ production had significantly prolonged median survival times of 29.3 months with only the primary treatment. In the case of head and neck tumors, 10 patients who completed the trial all had stable disease or partial responses 5 weeks after the combination therapy of α-GalCer-DCs and activated NKT cells. We now focus on two potential powerful treatment options for the future. One is to establish artificial adjuvant vector cells containing tumor mRNA and α-GalCer/CD1d. This stimulates host NKT cells followed by DC maturation and NK cell activation but also induces tumor-specific long-term memory CD8 killer T cell responses, suppressing tumor metastasis even 1 year after the initial single injection. The other approach is to establish induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells that can generate unlimited numbers of NKT cells with adjuvant activity. Such iPS-derived NKT cells produce IFN-γ in vitro and in vivo upon

  11. X-ray sensitivity of human tumor cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Nove, J.; Little, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    Clonally-derived cells from ten human malignant tumors considered radiocurable (breast, neuroblastoma, medulloblastoma) or non-radiocurable (osteosarcoma, hypernephroma, glioblastoma, melanoma) were studied in cell culture and their in vitro x-ray survival curve parameters determined (anti n, D/sub 0/). There were no significant differences among the tumor cell lines suggesting that survival parameters in vitro do not explain differences in clinical radiocurability. Preliminary investigation with density inhibited human tumor cells indicate that such an approach may yield information regarding inherent cellular differences in radiocurability.

  12. Naloxone inhibits and morphine potentiates. The adrenal steroidogenic response to ACTH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heybach, J. P.; Vernikos, J.

    1980-01-01

    The adrenal actions were stereospecific since neither the positve stereoisomer of morphine, nor that of naloxone, had any effect on the adrenal response to exogenous adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH). The administration of human beta endorphin to phyophysectomized rats had no effect on the adrenal corticosterone concentration nor did it alter the response of the adrenal gland to ACTH. These results indicate that morphine can potentiate the action of ACTH on the adrenal by a direct, stereospecific, dose dependent mechanism that is prevented by naloxone pretreatment and which may involve competition for ACTH receptors on the corticosterone secreting cells of the adrenal cortex.

  13. Regulatory T cells actively infiltrate metastatic brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Adam Quasar; Rolle, Cleo E; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2009-06-01

    Regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+FoxP3+, Treg) have been shown to play a major role in suppression of the immune response to malignant gliomas. In this study, we investigated the kinetics of Treg infiltration in metastatic brain tumor models, including melanoma, breast and colon cancers. Our data indicate that both CD4+ and Treg infiltration are significantly increased throughout the time of metastatic tumor progression. These findings were recapitulated in human CNS tumor samples of metastatic melanoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma. Collectively, these data support investigating immunotherapeutic strategies targeting Treg in metastatic CNS tumors. PMID:19424570

  14. Ovarian Tumor Cells Studied Aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    In August 2001, principal investigator Jeanne Becker sent human ovarian tumor cells to the International Space Station (ISS) aboard the STS-105 mission. The tumor cells were cultured in microgravity for a 14 day growth period and were analyzed for changes in the rate of cell growth and synthesis of associated proteins. In addition, they were evaluated for the expression of several proteins that are the products of oncogenes, which cause the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells. This photo, which was taken by astronaut Frank Culbertson who conducted the experiment for Dr. Becker, shows two cell culture bags containing LN1 ovarian carcinoma cell cultures.

  15. Malignant phyllodes tumors display mesenchymal stem cell features and aldehyde dehydrogenase/disialoganglioside identify their tumor stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although breast phyllodes tumors are rare, there is no effective therapy other than surgery. Little is known about their tumor biology. A malignant phyllodes tumor contains heterologous stromal elements, and can transform into rhabdomyosarcoma, liposarcoma and osteosarcoma. These versatile properties prompted us to explore their possible relationship to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and to search for the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in phyllodes tumors. Methods Paraffin sections of malignant phyllodes tumors were examined for various markers by immunohistochemical staining. Xenografts of human primary phyllodes tumors were established by injecting freshly isolated tumor cells into the mammary fat pad of non-obese diabetic-severe combined immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice. To search for CSCs, xenografted tumor cells were sorted into various subpopulations by flow cytometry and examined for their in vitro mammosphere forming capacity, in vivo tumorigenicity in NOD-SCID mice and their ability to undergo differentiation. Results Immunohistochemical analysis revealed the expression of the following 10 markers: CD44, CD29, CD106, CD166, CD105, CD90, disialoganglioside (GD2), CD117, Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH), and Oct-4, and 7 clinically relevant markers (CD10, CD34, p53, p63, Ki-67, Bcl-2, vimentin, and Globo H) in all 51 malignant phyllodes tumors examined, albeit to different extents. Four xenografts were successfully established from human primary phyllodes tumors. In vitro, ALDH+ cells sorted from xenografts displayed approximately 10-fold greater mammosphere-forming capacity than ALDH- cells. GD2+ cells showed a 3.9-fold greater capacity than GD2- cells. ALDH+/GD2+cells displayed 12.8-fold greater mammosphere forming ability than ALDH-/GD2- cells. In vivo, the tumor-initiating frequency of ALDH+/GD2+ cells were up to 33-fold higher than that of ALDH+ cells, with as few as 50 ALDH+/GD2+ cells being sufficient for engraftment. Moreover, we

  16. Hypoxic cell turnover in different solid tumor lines

    SciTech Connect

    Ljungkvist, Anna S.E. . E-mail: a.ljungkvist@rther.umcn.nl; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Rijken, Paulus F.J.W.; Begg, Adrian C.; Raleigh, James A.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: Most solid tumors contain hypoxic cells, and the amount of tumor hypoxia has been shown to have a negative impact on the outcome of radiotherapy. The efficacy of combined modality treatments depends both on the sequence and timing of the treatments. Hypoxic cell turnover in tumors may be important for optimal scheduling of combined modality treatments, especially when hypoxic cell targeting is involved. Methods and Materials: Previously we have shown that a double bioreductive hypoxic marker assay could be used to detect changes of tumor hypoxia in relation to the tumor vasculature after carbogen and hydralazine treatments. This assay was used in the current study to establish the turnover rate of hypoxic cells in three different tumor models. The first hypoxic marker, pimonidazole, was administered at variable times before tumor harvest, and the second hypoxic marker, CCI-103F, was injected at a fixed time before harvest. Hypoxic cell turnover was defined as loss of pimonidazole (first marker) relative to CCI-103F (second marker). Results: The half-life of hypoxic cell turnover was 17 h in the murine C38 colon carcinoma line, 23 h and 49 h in the human xenograft lines MEC82 and SCCNij3, respectively. Within 24 h, loss of pimonidazole-stained areas in C38 and MEC82 occurred concurrent with the appearance of pimonidazole positive cell debris in necrotic regions. In C38 and MEC82, most of the hypoxic cells had disappeared after 48 h, whereas in SCCNij3, viable cells that had been labeled with pimonidazole were still observed after 5 days. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates that the double hypoxia marker assay can be used to study changes in both the proportion of hypoxic tumor cells and their lifespan at the same time. The present study shows that large differences in hypoxic cell turnover rates may exist among tumor lines, with half-lives ranging from 17-49 h.

  17. Dendritic cells loaded with apoptotic antibody-coated tumor cells provide protective immunity against B-cell lymphoma in vivo.

    PubMed

    Franki, Suzanne N; Steward, Kristopher K; Betting, David J; Kafi, Kamran; Yamada, Reiko E; Timmerman, John M

    2008-02-01

    The in vitro priming of tumor-specific T cells by dendritic cells (DCs) phagocytosing killed tumor cells can be augmented in the presence of antitumor monoclonal antibody (mAb). We investigated whether DCs phagocytosing killed lymphoma cells coated with tumor-specific antibody could elicit antitumor immunity in vivo. Irradiated murine 38C13 lymphoma cells were cocultured with bone marrow-derived DCs in the presence or absence of tumor-specific mAb. Mice vaccinated with DCs cocultured with mAb-coated tumor cells were protected from tumor challenge (60% long-term survival), whereas DCs loaded with tumor cells alone were much less effective. The opsonized whole tumor cell-DC vaccine elicited significantly better tumor protection than a traditional lymphoma idiotype (Id) protein vaccine, and in combination with chemotherapy could eradicate preexisting tumor. Moreover, the DC vaccine protected animals from both wild-type and Id-negative variant tumor cells, indicating that Id is not a major target of the induced tumor immunity. Protection was critically dependent upon CD8(+) T cells, with lesser contribution by CD4(+) T cells. Importantly, opsonized whole tumor cell-DC vaccination did not result in tissue-specific autoimmunity. Since opsonized whole tumor cell-DC and Id vaccines appear to target distinct tumor antigens, optimal antilymphoma immunity might be achieved by combining these approaches. PMID:17993615

  18. Tumor cell lysates as immunogenic sources for cancer vaccine design

    PubMed Central

    González, Fermín E; Gleisner, Alejandra; Falcón-Beas, Felipe; Osorio, Fabiola; López, Mercedes N; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio

    2015-01-01

    Autologous dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) are a promising immunological tool for cancer therapy. These stimulate the antitumor response and immunological memory generation. Nevertheless, many patients remain refractory to DC approaches. Antigen (Ag) delivery to DCs is relevant to vaccine success, and antigen peptides, tumor-associated proteins, tumor cells, autologous tumor lysates, and tumor-derived mRNA have been tested as Ag sources. Recently, DCs loaded with allogeneic tumor cell lysates were used to induce a potent immunological response. This strategy provides a reproducible pool of almost all potential Ags suitable for patient use, independent of MHC haplotypes or autologous tumor tissue availability. However, optimizing autologous tumor cell lysate preparation is crucial to enhancing efficacy. This review considers the role of cancer cell-derived lysates as a relevant source of antigens and as an activating factor for ex vivo therapeutic DCs capable of responding to neoplastic cells. These promising therapies are associated with the prolonged survival of advanced cancer patients. PMID:25625929

  19. Tumor cell lysates as immunogenic sources for cancer vaccine design.

    PubMed

    González, Fermín E; Gleisner, Alejandra; Falcón-Beas, Felipe; Osorio, Fabiola; López, Mercedes N; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Autologous dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) are a promising immunological tool for cancer therapy. These stimulate the antitumor response and immunological memory generation. Nevertheless, many patients remain refractory to DC approaches. Antigen (Ag) delivery to DCs is relevant to vaccine success, and antigen peptides, tumor-associated proteins, tumor cells, autologous tumor lysates, and tumor-derived mRNA have been tested as Ag sources. Recently, DCs loaded with allogeneic tumor cell lysates were used to induce a potent immunological response. This strategy provides a reproducible pool of almost all potential Ags suitable for patient use, independent of MHC haplotypes or autologous tumor tissue availability. However, optimizing autologous tumor cell lysate preparation is crucial to enhancing efficacy. This review considers the role of cancer cell-derived lysates as a relevant source of antigens and as an activating factor for ex vivo therapeutic DCs capable of responding to neoplastic cells. These promising therapies are associated with the prolonged survival of advanced cancer patients. PMID:25625929

  20. Thoracic Presentations of Small Round Blue Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Annalice; Pfeifer, Kyle; Chen, Peter; Kalra, Vivek; Shin, Myung Soo

    2016-01-01

    The term “small round blue cell” is frequently used as a cursory radiologic pathological correlation of aggressive tumors throughout the body. We present a pictorial essay of common and uncommon subtypes of small round blue cell tumors in the chest illustrating the characteristic radiologic findings of each lesion. In addition, we review the pathologic findings of each tumor subtype with characteristic hematoxylin- and eosin-stained photomicrographs and immunohistochemical and molecular studies. Represented tumors include small cell carcinoma, Ewing sarcoma, extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma, embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, desmoplastic small round cell tumor, and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder. Understanding and ability to recognize these lesions are essential to broaden the radiologist's differential diagnosis and help guide patient care. PMID:27403403

  1. Adjuvants for enhancing the immunogenicity of whole tumor cell vaccines.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Cheryl Lai-Lai; Kandalaft, Lana E; Coukos, George

    2011-01-01

    Whole tumor cell lysates can serve as excellent multivalent vaccines for priming tumor-specific CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Whole cell vaccines can be prepared with hypochlorous acid oxidation, UVB-irradiation and repeat cycles of freeze and thaw. One major obstacle to successful immunotherapy is breaking self-tolerance to tumor antigens. Clinically approved adjuvants, including Montanide™ ISA-51 and 720, and keyhole-limpet proteins can be used to enhance tumor cell immunogenicity by stimulating both humoral and cellular anti-tumor responses. Other potential adjuvants, such as Toll-like receptor agonists (e.g., CpG, MPLA and PolyI:C), and cytokines (e.g., granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor), have also been investigated. PMID:21557641

  2. High risk of adrenal toxicity of N1-desoxy quinoxaline 1,4-dioxide derivatives and the protection of oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPC) in the inhibition of the expression of aldosterone synthetase in H295R cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu; Yang, Chunhui; Ihsan, Awais; Luo, Xun; Guo, Pu; Cheng, Guyue; Dai, Menghong; Chen, Dongmei; Liu, Zhenli; Yuan, Zonghui

    2016-02-01

    Quinoxaline 1,4-dioxide derivatives (QdNOs) with a wide range of biological activities are used in animal husbandry worldwide. It was found that QdNOs significantly inhibited the gene expression of CYP11B1 and CYP11B2, the key aldosterone synthases, and thus reduced aldosterone levels. However, whether the metabolites of QdNOs have potential adrenal toxicity and the role of oxidative stress in the adrenal toxicity of QdNOs remains unclear. The relatively new QdNOs, cyadox (CYA), mequindox (MEQ), quinocetone (QCT) and their metabolites, were selected for elucidation of their toxic mechanisms in H295R cells. Interestingly, the results showed that the main toxic metabolites of QCT, MEQ, and CYA were their N1-desoxy metabolites, which were more harmful than other metabolites and evoked dose and time-dependent cell damage on adrenal cells and inhibited aldosterone production. Gene and protein expression of CYP11B1 and CYP11B2 and mRNA expression of transcription factors, such as NURR1, NGFIB, CREB, SF-1, and ATF-1, were down regulated by N1-desoxy QdNOs. The natural inhibitors of oxidant stress, oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPC), could upregulate the expression of diverse transcription factors, including CYP11B1 and CYP11B2, and elevated aldosterone levels to reduce adrenal toxicity. This study demonstrated for the first time that N1-desoxy QdNOs have the potential to be the major toxic metabolites in adrenal toxicity, which may shed new light on the adrenal toxicity of these fascinating compounds and help to provide a basic foundation for the formulation of safety controls for animal products and the design of new QdNOs with less harmful effects. PMID:26802905

  3. Mixed ovarian germ cell tumor composed of immature teratoma, yolk sac tumor and embryonal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhou, Feng; Qian, Zhida; Qing, Jiale; Zhao, Mengdam; Huang, Lili

    2014-11-01

    We report the case of a 19-year-old woman experiencing lower abdominal distension and pain. Laboratory tests indicated elevated serum levels of Alpha-Fetoprotein (AFP) and human Chorionic Gonadotropin (hCG). A large mass was detected in the abdomen by physical examination and by transvaginal ultrasonography. Exploratory laparotomy was performed, and a smooth-surfaced, spherical, solid tumor was found on the left ovary, measuring 11.5 x 9.9 x 6.9 cm. Histological evaluation revealed that the tumor consisted of a combination of immature teratoma, Yolk Sac Tumor, and embryonal carcinoma; this is a very rare combination in mixed germ cell tumors. PMID:25518772

  4. Circulating tumor cells in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, Rachel; Pailler, Emma; Billiot, Fanny; Drusch, Françoise; Barthelemy, Amélie; Oulhen, Marianne; Besse, Benjamin; Soria, Jean-Charles; Farace, Françoise; Vielh, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have emerged as potential biomarkers in several cancers such as colon, prostate, and breast carcinomas, with a correlation between CTC number and patient prognosis being established by independent research groups. The detection and enumeration of CTCs, however, is still a developing field, with no universal method of detection suitable for all types of cancer. CTC detection in lung cancer in particular has proven difficult to perform, as CTCs in this type of cancer often present with nonepithelial characteristics. Moreover, as many detection methods rely on the use of epithelial markers to identify CTCs, the loss of these markers during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in certain metastatic cancers can render these methods ineffective. The development of personalized medicine has led to an increase in the advancement of molecular characterization of CTCs. The application of techniques such as FISH and RT-PCR to detect EGFR, HER2, and KRAS abnormalities in lung, breast, and colon cancer, for example, could be used to characterize CTCs in real time. The use of CTCs as a 'liquid biopsy' is therefore an exciting possibility providing information on patient prognosis and treatment efficacy. This review summarizes the state of CTC detection today, with particular emphasis on lung cancer, and discusses the future applications of CTCs in helping the clinician to develop new strategies in patient treatment. PMID:23207444

  5. Genetic background affects susceptibility to tumoral stem cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    García-Ramírez, Idoia; Ruiz-Roca, Lucía; Martín-Lorenzo, Alberto; Blanco, Óscar; García-Cenador, María Begoña; García-Criado, Francisco Javier; Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2013-01-01

    The latest studies of the interactions between oncogenes and its target cell have shown that certain oncogenes may act as passengers to reprogram tissue-specific stem/progenitor cell into a malignant cancer stem cell state. In this study, we show that the genetic background influences this tumoral stem cell reprogramming capacity of the oncogenes using as a model the Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice, where the type of tumor they develop, chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), is a function of tumoral stem cell reprogramming. Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice containing FVB genetic components were significantly more resistant to CML. However, pure Sca1-BCRABLp210 FVB mice developed thymomas that were not seen in the Sca1-BCRABLp210 mice into the B6 background. Collectively, our results demonstrate for the first time that tumoral stem cell reprogramming fate is subject to polymorphic genetic control. PMID:23839033

  6. Plasma-activated medium induced apoptosis on tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Masaru; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Kano, Hiroyuki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2013-09-01

    The non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP) has attracted attention in cancer therapy. In this study, the fresh medium was treated with our developed NEAPP, ultra-high electron density (approximately 2 × 1016 cm-3). The medium called the plasma-activated medium (PAM) killed not normal cells but tumor cells through induction of apoptosis. Cell proliferation assays showed that the tumor cells were selectively killed by the PAM. Those cells induced apoptosis using an apoptotic molecular marker, cleaved Caspase3/7. The molecular mechanisms of PAM-mediated apoptosis in the tumor cells were also found that the PAM downregulated the expression of AKT kinase, a marker molecule in a survival signal transduction pathway. These results suggest that PAM may be a promising tool for tumor therapy by downregulating the survival signals in cancers.

  7. Tumor and Endothelial Cell Hybrids Participate in Glioblastoma Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    El Hallani, Soufiane; Colin, Carole; El Houfi, Younas; Boisselier, Blandine; Marie, Yannick; Ravassard, Philippe; Labussière, Marianne; Mokhtari, Karima; Thomas, Jean-Léon; Delattre, Jean-Yves; Eichmann, Anne; Sanson, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Background. Recently antiangiogenic therapy with bevacizumab has shown a high but transient efficacy in glioblastoma (GBM). Indeed, GBM is one of the most angiogenic human tumors and endothelial proliferation is a hallmark of the disease. We therefore hypothesized that tumor cells may participate in endothelial proliferation of GBM. Materials and Methods. We used EGFR FISH Probe to detect EGFR amplification and anti-CD31, CD105, VE-cadherin, and vWF to identify endothelial cells. Endothelial and GBM cells were grown separately, labeled with GFP and DsRed lentiviruses, and then cocultured with or without contact. Results. In a subset of GBM tissues, we found that several tumor endothelial cells carry EGFR amplification, characteristic of GBM tumor cells. This observation was reproduced in vitro: when tumor stem cells derived from GBM were grown in the presence of human endothelial cells, a fraction of them acquired endothelial markers (CD31, CD105, VE-cadherin, and vWF). By transduction with GFP and DsRed expressing lentiviral vectors, we demonstrate that this phenomenon is due to cell fusion and not transdifferentiation. Conclusion. A fraction of GBM stem cells thus has the capacity to fuse with endothelial cells and the resulting hybrids may participate in tumor microvascular proliferation and in treatment resistance. PMID:24868550

  8. Acute adrenal crisis

    MedlinePlus

    ... cortisol and adrenaline are released in response to stress . Cortisol production is regulated by the pituitary gland. This ... adrenal crisis include: Dehydration Infection and other physical ... medicines such as prednisone or hydrocortisone Surgery Trauma

  9. Tumor-derived factors modulating dendritic cell function.

    PubMed

    Zong, Jinbao; Keskinov, Anton A; Shurin, Galina V; Shurin, Michael R

    2016-07-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play unique and diverse roles in the tumor occurrence, development, progression and response to therapy. First of all, DC can actively uptake tumor-associated antigens, process them and present antigenic peptides to T cells inducing and maintaining tumor-specific T cell responses. DC interaction with different immune effector cells may also support innate antitumor immunity, as well as humoral responses also known to inhibit tumor development in certain cases. On the other hand, DC are recruited to the tumor site by specific tumor-derived and stroma-derived factors, which may also impair DC maturation, differentiation and function, thus resulting in the deficient formation of antitumor immune response or development of DC-mediated tolerance and immune suppression. Identification of DC-stimulating and DC-suppressing/polarizing factors in the tumor environment and the mechanism of DC modulation are important for designing effective DC-based vaccines and for recovery of immunodeficient resident DC responsible for maintenance of clinically relevant antitumor immunity in patients with cancer. DC-targeting tumor-derived factors and their effects on resident and administered DC in the tumor milieu are described and discussed in this review. PMID:26984847

  10. Galectin-3 Determines Tumor Cell Adaptive Strategies in Stressed Tumor Microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Andrade, Luciana Nogueira de Sousa; Bustos, Silvina Odete; Chammas, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-3 is a member of the β-galactoside-binding lectin family, whose expression is often dysregulated in cancers. While galectin-3 is usually an intracellular protein found in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm, under certain conditions, galectin-3 can be secreted by an yet unknown mechanism. Under stressing conditions (e.g., hypoxia and nutrient deprivation) galectin-3 is upregulated, through the activity of transcription factors, such as HIF-1α and NF-κB. Here, we review evidence that indicates a positive role for galectin-3 in MAPK family signal transduction, leading to cell proliferation and cell survival. Galectin-3 serves as a scaffold protein, which favors the spatial organization of signaling proteins as K-RAS. Upon secretion, extracellular galectin-3 interacts with a variety of cell surface glycoproteins, such as growth factor receptors, integrins, cadherins, and members of the Notch family, among other glycoproteins, besides different extracellular matrix molecules. Through its ability to oligomerize, galectin-3 forms lectin lattices that act as scaffolds that sustain the spatial organization of signaling receptors on the cell surface, dictating its maintenance on the plasma membrane or their endocytosis. Galectin-3 induces tumor cell, endothelial cell, and leukocyte migration, favoring either the exit of tumor cells from a stressed microenvironment or the entry of endothelial cells and leukocytes, such as monocytes/macrophages into the tumor organoid. Therefore, galectin-3 plays homeostatic roles in tumors, as (i) it favors tumor cell adaptation for survival in stressed conditions; (ii) upon secretion, galectin-3 induces tumor cell detachment and migration; and (iii) it attracts monocyte/macrophage and endothelial cells to the tumor mass, inducing both directly and indirectly the process of angiogenesis. The two latter activities are potentially targetable, and specific interventions may be designed to counteract the protumoral role of extracellular

  11. Galectin-3 Determines Tumor Cell Adaptive Strategies in Stressed Tumor Microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Cardoso, Ana Carolina Ferreira; Andrade, Luciana Nogueira de Sousa; Bustos, Silvina Odete; Chammas, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Galectin-3 is a member of the β-galactoside-binding lectin family, whose expression is often dysregulated in cancers. While galectin-3 is usually an intracellular protein found in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm, under certain conditions, galectin-3 can be secreted by an yet unknown mechanism. Under stressing conditions (e.g., hypoxia and nutrient deprivation) galectin-3 is upregulated, through the activity of transcription factors, such as HIF-1α and NF-κB. Here, we review evidence that indicates a positive role for galectin-3 in MAPK family signal transduction, leading to cell proliferation and cell survival. Galectin-3 serves as a scaffold protein, which favors the spatial organization of signaling proteins as K-RAS. Upon secretion, extracellular galectin-3 interacts with a variety of cell surface glycoproteins, such as growth factor receptors, integrins, cadherins, and members of the Notch family, among other glycoproteins, besides different extracellular matrix molecules. Through its ability to oligomerize, galectin-3 forms lectin lattices that act as scaffolds that sustain the spatial organization of signaling receptors on the cell surface, dictating its maintenance on the plasma membrane or their endocytosis. Galectin-3 induces tumor cell, endothelial cell, and leukocyte migration, favoring either the exit of tumor cells from a stressed microenvironment or the entry of endothelial cells and leukocytes, such as monocytes/macrophages into the tumor organoid. Therefore, galectin-3 plays homeostatic roles in tumors, as (i) it favors tumor cell adaptation for survival in stressed conditions; (ii) upon secretion, galectin-3 induces tumor cell detachment and migration; and (iii) it attracts monocyte/macrophage and endothelial cells to the tumor mass, inducing both directly and indirectly the process of angiogenesis. The two latter activities are potentially targetable, and specific interventions may be designed to counteract the protumoral role of extracellular

  12. Ovarian thecal metaplasia of the adrenal gland in association with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wassal, Eslam Y; Habra, Mouhammed Amir; Vicens, Rafael; Rao, Priya; Elsayes, Khaled M

    2014-12-28

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth syndrome associated with increased risk to develop malignancies including adrenocortical carcinoma. Ovarian thecal metaplasia of the adrenal gland is a rare tumor-like mesenchymal lesion in BWS patients that lacks detailed radiological description. We report a 17-year-old female patient with BWS, associated with bilateral Wilms tumor, hepatic hemangiomatosis, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor, and a phyllodes tumor of the right breast. Surveillance abdominal ultrasound identified a right adrenal mass that was further characterized by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Radiologically, this mass displayed features that overlap with adrenocortical carcinoma and pheochromocytoma but after pathological examination this proved to be an ovarian thecal metaplasia of the adrenal gland. Adrenal masses in BWS should raise the suspicion for adrenocortical carcinoma though other adrenal tumors including ovarian thecal metaplasia can be seen in these patients. PMID:25550997

  13. Cimetidine induces apoptosis of human salivary gland tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Masakatsu; Tanaka, Shin; Suzuki, Seiji; Kusama, Kaoru; Kaneko, Tadayoshi; Sakashita, Hideaki

    2007-03-01

    It has been reported that cimetidine, a histamine type-2 receptor (H2R) antagonist, inhibits the growth of glandular tumors such as colorectal cancer. However, its effects against salivary gland tumors are still unknown. We demonstrated previously that human salivary gland tumor (HSG) cells spontaneously express the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and also that HSG cell proliferation could be controlled via a homophilic (NCAM-NCAM) binding mechanism and that NCAM may be associated with perineural invasion by malignant salivary gland tumors. In the present study, we investigated the effects of cimetidine via the expression of NCAM on tumor growth and perineural/neural invasion in salivary gland tumor cells. Expression of both NCAM mRNA and protein was found to decrease in a dose-dependent manner upon treatment with cimetidine for 24 h. The MTT assay and confocal laser microscopy clearly showed that HSG cells underwent apoptosis after treatment with cimetidine. Activation of caspases 3, 7, 8 and 9 was observed in HSG cells after cimetidine treatment, thus confirming that the apoptosis was induced by the activated caspases. Apaf-1 activity was also detected in HSG cells in a dose-dependent manner after treatment with cimetidine. We also found that the cimetidine-mediated down-regulation of NCAM expression in HSG cells did not occur via blocking of the histamine receptor, even though H2R expression was observed on HSG cells, as two other H2R antagonists, famotidine and ranitidine, did not show similar effects. We demonstrated for the first time that cimetidine can induce significant apoptosis of salivary gland tumor cells, which express NCAM, at least in part by down-regulation of NCAM expression on the cells. These findings suggest that the growth, development and perineural/neural invasion of salivary gland tumor cells can be blocked by cimetidine administration through down-regulation of NCAM expression, as well as induction of apoptosis. PMID:17273750

  14. Culture and Isolation of Brain Tumor Initiating Cells.

    PubMed

    Vora, Parvez; Venugopal, Chitra; McFarlane, Nicole; Singh, Sheila K

    2015-01-01

    Brain tumors are typically composed of heterogeneous cells that exhibit distinct phenotypic characteristics and proliferative potentials. Only a relatively small fraction of cells in the tumor with stem cell properties, termed brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs), possess an ability to differentiate along multiple lineages, self-renew, and initiate tumors in vivo. This unit describes protocols for the culture and isolation BTICs. We applied culture conditions and assays originally used for normal neural stem cells (NSCs) in vitro to a variety of brain tumors. Using fluorescence-activated cell sorting for the neural precursor cell surface marker CD133/CD15, BTICs can be isolated and studied prospectively. Isolation of BTICs from GBM bulk tumor will enable examination of dissimilar morphologies, self-renewal capacities, tumorigenicity, and therapeutic sensitivities. As cancer is also considered a disease of unregulated self-renewal and differentiation, an understanding of BTICs is fundamental to understanding tumor growth. Ultimately, it will lead to novel drug discovery approaches that strategically target the functionally relevant BTIC population. PMID:26237571

  15. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Cascalló, Manel; Alemany, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Cell transduction in vitro is only the first step toward proving that a genetherapy vector can be useful to treat tumors. However, tumor targeting in vivo is now the milestone for gene therapy to succeed against disseminated cancer. Therefore, most valuable information is obtained from studies of vector biodistribution. Owing to the hepatotropism of adenoviral vectors, a particularly important parameter is the tumor/liver ratio. This ratio can be given at the level of gene expression if the amount of transgene expression is measured. To optimize the targeting, however, the levels of viral particles that reach the tumor compared to other organs must be studied. Most of this chapter deals with methods to quantify the virus fate in tumor-bearing animals. We present a radioactive labeling method that can be used to study biodistribution. After a small section dealing with tumor models, we describe methods to quantify different parameters related to adenovirus-mediated tumor targeting. PMID:14970588

  16. Circulating Tumor Cell Composition in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bublitz, Kira; Lazaridis, Lazaros; Goergens, André; Giebel, Bernd; Schuler, Martin; Hoffmann, Andreas-Claudius

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Due to their minimal-invasive yet potentially current character circulating tumor cells (CTC) might be useful as a “liquid biopsy” in solid tumors. However, successful application in metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) has been very limited so far. High plasticity and heterogeneity of CTC morphology challenges currently available enrichment and detection techniques with EpCAM as the usual surface marker being underrepresented in mRCC. We recently described a method that enables us to identify and characterize non-hematopoietic cells in the peripheral blood stream with varying characteristics and define CTC subgroups that distinctly associate to clinical parameters. With this pilot study we wanted to scrutinize feasibility of this approach and its potential usage in clinical studies. Experimental Design Peripheral blood was drawn from 14 consecutive mRCC patients at the West German Cancer Center and CTC profiles were analyzed by Multi-Parameter Immunofluorescence Microscopy (MPIM). Additionally angiogenesis-related genes were measured by quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Results We detected CTC with epithelial, mesenchymal, stem cell-like or mixed-cell characteristics at different time-points during anti-angiogenic therapy. The presence and quantity of N-cadherin-positive or CD133-positive CTC was associated with inferior PFS. There was an inverse correlation between high expression of HIF1A, VEGFA, VEGFR and FGFR and the presence of N-cadherin-positive and CD133-positive CTC. Conclusions Patients with mRCC exhibit distinct CTC profiles that may implicate differences in therapeutic outcome. Prospective evaluation of phenotypic and genetic CTC profiling as prognostic and predictive biomarker in mRCC is warranted. PMID:27101285

  17. Adrenal myelolipoma: Controversies in its management

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Vasanth G.; Thota, Anuroop; Shankar, Ravi; Desai, Mallikarjun G.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal myelolipomas (AMLs) are rare, benign neoplasms of the adrenal gland with varied clinical presentations. The rarity of these tumors precludes any case-controlled or randomized study into their management. The available literature is limited to case reports and short series from referral centers. This review is an effort to put the available literature into perspective such that clinical decision making can be done with some clarity. The PubMed and Cochrane databases were searched with key words Adrenal Myelolipoma, Adrenal Incidentaloma (AI) and Adrenal Collision Tumor (ACT). From over 1300 search results, 547 relevant publications dating from 1954 to 2014 were reviewed. Details of about 1231 AMLs in the indexed literature were analyzed. Increasing usage of imaging studies has significantly increased the discovery of AMLs. Although AMLs are benign tumors, those measuring larger than 6 cm are prone to rupture and hemorrhage. Thorough endocrine work-up may benefit a selected group of patients, especially those who are hypertensive, diabetic/pre-diabetic, young patients (<50 years) and those with bilateral AML. Regular observation is needed for AML patients who are being treated non-operatively, as many of them may require surgery during follow-up. Although the AACE/AAES guidelines for AI (2009) exclude AML from mandatory metabolic work-up for a newly discovered AI, we feel that a significant number of patients with AML would benefit from metabolic work-up. In the literature, endocrine dysfunction in AML is 7% as compared with 11% in AI. Endocrine dysfunction in AML is probably underdiagnosed. PMID:25878407

  18. Extra-Adrenal Myelolipoma Containing Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma/Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Komal; Sidhu, Jagmohan

    2016-01-01

    Myelolipoma is a benign tumor consisting of mature fat interspersed with hematopoietic elements resembling bone marrow. The vast majority occurs within the adrenal glands, but several cases of extra-adrenal myelolipomas (EAMLs) have been reported. We report a case of a 64-year-old male who presented with complaint of lower abdominal discomfort. CT scan of abdomen and pelvis showed a 6 cm × 5 cm, well-circumscribed, predominantly fatty mass in the presacral region. Histological examination of the pelvic mass revealed a myelolipoma heavily infiltrated by small lymphoid cell aggregates with immunophenotypic features of small lymphocytic lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia (SLL/CLL). Review of the literature revealed that there is only one published report of SLL/CLL involving a myelolipoma, which was also an extra-adrenal myelolipoma, and, therefore, our case is the second case of a SLL/CLL involving a myelolipoma that is an extra-adrenal myelolipoma. Extra-adrenal myelolipomas seem to the preferred myelolipomas for involvement by SLL/CLL. PMID:27119033

  19. Revisiting autophagy addiction of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Nyfeler, Beat; Eng, Christina H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Inhibition of autophagy has been widely explored as a potential therapeutic intervention for cancer. Different factors such as tumor origin, tumor stage and genetic background can define a tumor's response to autophagy modulation. Notably, tumors with oncogenic mutations in KRAS were reported to depend on macroautophagy in order to cope with oncogene-induced metabolic stress. Our recent report details the unexpected finding that autophagy is dispensable for KRAS-driven tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Additionally, we clarify that the antitumorigenic effects of chloroquine, a frequently used nonspecific inhibitor of autophagy, are not connected to the inhibition of macroautophagy. Our data suggest that caution should be exercised when using chloroquine and its analogs to decipher the roles of autophagy in cancer. PMID:27097231

  20. NK Cells and γδ T Cells Mediate Resistance to Polyomavirus–Induced Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rabinarayan; Chen, Alex T.; Welsh, Raymond M.; Szomolanyi-Tsuda, Eva

    2010-01-01

    NK and γδ T cells can eliminate tumor cells in many experimental models, but their effect on the development of tumors caused by virus infections in vivo is not known. Polyomavirus (PyV) induces tumors in neonatally infected mice of susceptible strains and in adult mice with certain immune deficiencies, and CD8+ αβ T cells are regarded as the main effectors in anti-tumor immunity. Here we report that adult TCRβ knockout (KO) mice that lack αβ but have γδ T cells remain tumor-free after PyV infection, whereas TCRβ×δ KO mice that lack all T cells develop tumors. In addition, E26 mice, which lack NK and T cells, develop the tumors earlier than TCRβ×δ KO mice. These observations implicate γδ T and NK cells in the resistance to PyV-induced tumors. Cell lines established from PyV-induced tumors activate NK and γδ T cells both in culture and in vivo and express Rae-1, an NKG2D ligand. Moreover, these PyV tumor cells are killed by NK cells in vitro, and this cytotoxicity is prevented by treatment with NKG2D-blocking antibodies. Our findings demonstrate a protective role for NK and γδ T cells against naturally occurring virus-induced tumors and suggest the involvement of NKG2D-mediated mechanisms. PMID:20523894

  1. [Addison's disease : Primary adrenal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Pulzer, A; Burger-Stritt, S; Hahner, S

    2016-05-01

    Adrenal insufficiency, a rare disorder which is characterized by the inadequate production or absence of adrenal hormones, may be classified as primary adrenal insufficiency in case of direct affection of the adrenal glands or secondary adrenal insufficiency, which is mostly due to pituitary or hypothalamic disease. Primary adrenal insufficiency affects 11 of 100,000 individuals. Clinical symptoms are mainly nonspecific and include fatigue, weight loss, and hypotension. The diagnostic test of choice is dynamic testing with synthetic ACTH. Patients suffering from chronic adrenal insufficiency require lifelong hormone supplementation. Education in dose adaption during physical and mental stress or emergency situations is essential to prevent life-threatening adrenal crises. Patients with adrenal insufficiency should carry an emergency card and emergency kit with them. PMID:27129928

  2. Significance of DNA quantification in testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Codesal, J; Paniagua, R; Regadera, J; Fachal, C; Nistal, M

    1991-01-01

    A cytophotometric quantification of DNA in tumor cells was performed in histological sections of orchidectomy specimens from 36 men with testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT), 7 of them showing more than one tumor type. Among the variants of seminoma (classic and spermatocytic) the lowest DNA content were in spermatocytic seminoma. With respect to non-seminomatous tumors (yolk sac tumor, embryonal carcinoma, teratoma, and choriocarcinoma), choriocarcinomas showed the highest DNA content, and the lowest value was found in teratomas. No significant differences were found between the average DNA content of seminomas (all types) and non-seminomatous tumors (all types). Both embryonal carcinoma and yolk sac tumor showed similar DNA content when they were the sole tumor and when they were found associated with other tumors. In this study, except for the 4 cases of teratoma and the case of spermatocytic seminoma, all TGCT examined did not show modal values of DNA content in the diploid range. Such an elevated frequency of aneuploidism in these tumors may be helpful for their diagnosis. PMID:1666273

  3. Molecular Connections between Cancer Cell Metabolism and the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Justus, Calvin R.; Sanderlin, Edward J.; Yang, Li V.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells preferentially utilize glycolysis, instead of oxidative phosphorylation, for metabolism even in the presence of oxygen. This phenomenon of aerobic glycolysis, referred to as the “Warburg effect”, commonly exists in a variety of tumors. Recent studies further demonstrate that both genetic factors such as oncogenes and tumor suppressors and microenvironmental factors such as spatial hypoxia and acidosis can regulate the glycolytic metabolism of cancer cells. Reciprocally, altered cancer cell metabolism can modulate the tumor microenvironment which plays important roles in cancer cell somatic evolution, metastasis, and therapeutic response. In this article, we review the progression of current understandings on the molecular interaction between cancer cell metabolism and the tumor microenvironment. In addition, we discuss the implications of these interactions in cancer therapy and chemoprevention. PMID:25988385

  4. Eosinophilic and granular cell tumors of the breast.

    PubMed

    Damiani, S; Dina, R; Eusebi, V

    1999-05-01

    Eosinophilic and granular cell tumors of the breast are a heterogeneous group encompassing both epithelial and mesenchymal lesions. A granular appearance of the cytoplasm may be caused by the accumulation of secretory granules, mitochondria, or lysosomes. In the breast, mucoid carcinomas, carcinomas showing apocrine differentiation, and neuroendocrine carcinomas are well known entities, while tumors with oncocytic and acinic cell differentiation have been only recently recognized. An abundance of lysosomes is characteristic of Schwannian granular cell neoplasms, but smooth muscle cell tumors also may have this cytoplasmic feature. Awareness of all these possibilities when granular cells are found in breast lesions improves diagnostic accuracy and helps to avoid misdiagnosis of both benign lesions and malignant tumors. PMID:10452577

  5. Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Possible Culprits in Solid Tumors?

    PubMed Central

    Johann, Pascal David; Müller, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    The clinical use of bone marrow derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) in different settings ranging from tissue engineering to immunotherapies has prompted investigations on the properties of these cells in a variety of other tissues. Particularly the role of MSCs in solid tumors has been the subject of many experimental approaches. While a clear phenotypical distinction of tumor associated fibroblasts (TAFs) and MSCs within the tumor microenvironment is still missing, the homing of bone marrow MSCs in tumor sites has been extensively studied. Both, tumor-promoting and tumor-inhibiting effects of BM-MSCs have been described in this context. This ambiguity requires a reappraisal of the different studies and experimental methods employed. Here, we review the current literature on tumor-promoting and tumor-inhibiting effects of BM-MSCs with a particular emphasis on their interplay with components of the immune system and also highlight a potential role of MSCs as cell of origin for certain mesenchymal tumors. PMID:26273308

  6. Non-functioning adrenal adenomas discovered incidentally on computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mitnick, J.S.; Bosniak, M.A.; Megibow, A.J.; Naidich, D.P.

    1983-08-01

    Eighteen patients with unilateral non-metastatic non-functioning adrenal masses were studied with computed tomography (CT). Pathological examination in cases revealed benign adrenal adenomas. The others were followed up with serial CT scans and found to show no change in tumor size over a period of six months to three years. On the basis of these findings, the authors suggest certain criteria of a benign adrenal mass, including (a) diameter less than 5 cm, (b) smooth contour, (c) well-defined margin, and (d) no change in size on follow-up. Serial CT scanning can be used as an alternative to surgery in the management of many of these patients.

  7. Primary Adrenal Lymphoma Possibly Associated With Epstein-Barr Virus Reactivation Due to Immunosuppression Under Methotrexate Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ohkura, Yu; Shindoh, Junichi; Haruta, Shusuke; Kaji, Daisuke; Ota, Yasunori; Fujii, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Masaji; Watanabe, Goro; Matsuda, Masamichi

    2015-08-01

    Primary adrenal lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD) is an extremely rare disease that is widely known to be associated with methotrexate (MTX) use in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).A 70-year-old man was incidentally found to have a tumor at the dorsal part of the liver in a medical check-up. He had a history of RA treated with MTX. Abdominal ultrasonography demonstrated a low echoic mass (30 mm in diameter) at the dorsal part of the liver, located close to the inferior vena cava. Preoperative differential diagnoses included intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, adrenal tumor, and hepatic malignant lymphoma, but no definitive diagnosis was reached. On exploratory laparotomy, the tumor seemed to be derived from the right adrenal gland and adhered tightly to segment 7 of the liver. Therefore, right adrenectomy with partial resection of segment 7 of the liver was performed. Pathological findings revealed diffuse inflammatory cell infiltration with a population of small atypical lymphoid cells, with positive immunohistochemical evidence for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Final diagnosis was primary adrenal iatrogenic EBV-positive LPD, classified as "other iatrogenic immunodeficiency-associated LPDs: Hodgkin-like lesions."In this report, we described the possibility of the spontaneous healing of MTX-associated LPD (MTX-LPD) before treatment and the importance of doubting MTX-LPD and doing immunostaining to necrotic tissue. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MTX-related EBV-positive LPD, Hodgkin-like lesion, of the unilateral adrenal gland in patient with RA. PMID:26252293

  8. Primary Adrenal Lymphoma Possibly Associated With Epstein–Barr Virus Reactivation Due to Immunosuppression Under Methotrexate Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ohkura, Yu; Shindoh, Junichi; Haruta, Shusuke; Kaji, Daisuke; Ota, Yasunori; Fujii, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Masaji; Watanabe, Goro; Matsuda, Masamichi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Primary adrenal lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD) is an extremely rare disease that is widely known to be associated with methotrexate (MTX) use in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A 70-year-old man was incidentally found to have a tumor at the dorsal part of the liver in a medical check-up. He had a history of RA treated with MTX. Abdominal ultrasonography demonstrated a low echoic mass (30 mm in diameter) at the dorsal part of the liver, located close to the inferior vena cava. Preoperative differential diagnoses included intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma, adrenal tumor, and hepatic malignant lymphoma, but no definitive diagnosis was reached. On exploratory laparotomy, the tumor seemed to be derived from the right adrenal gland and adhered tightly to segment 7 of the liver. Therefore, right adrenectomy with partial resection of segment 7 of the liver was performed. Pathological findings revealed diffuse inflammatory cell infiltration with a population of small atypical lymphoid cells, with positive immunohistochemical evidence for Epstein–Barr virus (EBV). Final diagnosis was primary adrenal iatrogenic EBV-positive LPD, classified as “other iatrogenic immunodeficiency-associated LPDs: Hodgkin-like lesions.” In this report, we described the possibility of the spontaneous healing of MTX-associated LPD (MTX-LPD) before treatment and the importance of doubting MTX-LPD and doing immunostaining to necrotic tissue. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MTX-related EBV-positive LPD, Hodgkin-like lesion, of the unilateral adrenal gland in patient with RA. PMID:26252293

  9. Engineered three-dimensional microfluidic device for interrogating cell-cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Hockemeyer, K.; Janetopoulos, C.; Terekhov, A.; Hofmeister, W.; Vilgelm, A.; Costa, Lino; Wikswo, J. P.; Richmond, A.

    2014-01-01

    Stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment play a key role in the metastatic properties of a tumor. It is recognized that cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and endothelial cells secrete factors capable of influencing tumor cell migration into the blood or lymphatic vessels. We developed a microfluidic device that can be used to image the interactions between stromal cells and tumor cell spheroids in a three dimensional (3D) microenvironment while enabling external control of interstitial flow at an interface, which supports endothelial cells. The apparatus couples a 200-μm channel with a semicircular well to mimic the interface of a blood vessel with the stroma, and the design allows for visualization of the interactions of interstitial flow, endothelial cells, leukocytes, and fibroblasts with the tumor cells. We observed that normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs) contribute to the “single file” pattern of migration of tumor cells from the spheroid in the 3D microenvironment. In contrast, CAFs induce a rapid dispersion of tumor cells out of the spheroid with migration into the 3D matrix. Moreover, treatment of tumor spheroid cultures with the chemokine CXCL12 mimics the effect of the CAFs, resulting in similar patterns of dispersal of the tumor cells from the spheroid. Conversely, addition of CXCL12 to co-cultures of NAFs with tumor spheroids did not mimic the effects observed with CAF co-cultures, suggesting that NAFs produce factors that stabilize the tumor spheroids to reduce their migration in response to CXCL12. PMID:25379090

  10. Engineered three-dimensional microfluidic device for interrogating cell-cell interactions in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Hockemeyer, K; Janetopoulos, C; Terekhov, A; Hofmeister, W; Vilgelm, A; Costa, Lino; Wikswo, J P; Richmond, A

    2014-07-01

    Stromal cells in the tumor microenvironment play a key role in the metastatic properties of a tumor. It is recognized that cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and endothelial cells secrete factors capable of influencing tumor cell migration into the blood or lymphatic vessels. We developed a microfluidic device that can be used to image the interactions between stromal cells and tumor cell spheroids in a three dimensional (3D) microenvironment while enabling external control of interstitial flow at an interface, which supports endothelial cells. The apparatus couples a 200-μm channel with a semicircular well to mimic the interface of a blood vessel with the stroma, and the design allows for visualization of the interactions of interstitial flow, endothelial cells, leukocytes, and fibroblasts with the tumor cells. We observed that normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs) contribute to the "single file" pattern of migration of tumor cells from the spheroid in the 3D microenvironment. In contrast, CAFs induce a rapid dispersion of tumor cells out of the spheroid with migration into the 3D matrix. Moreover, treatment of tumor spheroid cultures with the chemokine CXCL12 mimics the effect of the CAFs, resulting in similar patterns of dispersal of the tumor cells from the spheroid. Conversely, addition of CXCL12 to co-cultures of NAFs with tumor spheroids did not mimic the effects observed with CAF co-cultures, suggesting that NAFs produce factors that stabilize the tumor spheroids to reduce their migration in response to CXCL12. PMID:25379090

  11. Dendritic cells loaded with apoptotic antibody-coated tumor cells provide protective immunity against B-cell lymphoma in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Franki, Suzanne N.; Steward, Kristopher K.; Betting, David J.; Kafi, Kamran; Yamada, Reiko E.

    2008-01-01

    The in vitro priming of tumor-specific T cells by dendritic cells (DCs) phagocytosing killed tumor cells can be augmented in the presence of antitumor monoclonal antibody (mAb). We investigated whether DCs phagocytosing killed lymphoma cells coated with tumor-specific antibody could elicit antitumor immunity in vivo. Irradiated murine 38C13 lymphoma cells were cocultured with bone marrow–derived DCs in the presence or absence of tumor-specific mAb. Mice vaccinated with DCs cocultured with mAb-coated tumor cells were protected from tumor challenge (60% long-term survival), whereas DCs loaded with tumor cells alone were much less effective. The opsonized whole tumor cell–DC vaccine elicited significantly better tumor protection than a traditional lymphoma idiotype (Id) protein vaccine, and in combination with chemotherapy could eradicate preexisting tumor. Moreover, the DC vaccine protected animals from both wild-type and Id-negative variant tumor cells, indicating that Id is not a major target of the induced tumor immunity. Protection was critically dependent upon CD8+ T cells, with lesser contribution by CD4+ T cells. Importantly, opsonized whole tumor cell–DC vaccination did not result in tissue-specific autoimmunity. Since opsonized whole tumor cell–DC and Id vaccines appear to target distinct tumor antigens, optimal antilymphoma immunity might be achieved by combining these approaches. PMID:17993615

  12. Marijuana use and testicular germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Trabert, Britton; Sigurdson, Alice J.; Sweeney, Anne M.; Strom, Sara S.; McGlynn, Katherine A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Since the early 1970's the incidence of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) in the U.S. has been increasing, however, potential environmental exposures accounting for this rise have not been identified. A prior study reported a significant association among frequent and long-term current users of marijuana and TGCT risk. We aimed to evaluate the relationship of marijuana use and TGCT in a hospital-based case-control study conducted at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. Methods TGCT cases diagnosed between January 1990 and October 1996 (n=187) and male friend controls (n=148) were enrolled in the study. All participants were between the ages of 18 and 50 at the time of cases' diagnosis and resided in Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, or Oklahoma. Associations of marijuana use and TGCT were estimated using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for age, race, prior cryptorchidism, cigarette smoking and alcohol intake. Results Overall, TGCT cases were more likely to be frequent marijuana users (daily or greater) than were controls [OR: 2.2, 95% CI: 1.0, 5.1]. In the histologic-specific analyses nonseminoma cases were significantly more likely than controls to be frequent users [OR: 3.1, 95% CI: 1.2, 8.2] and long-term users (10+ years) [OR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.0, 6.1]. Discussion Our finding of an association between frequent marijuana use and TGCT, particularly among men with nonseminoma, is consistent with the findings of a previous report. Additional studies of marijuana use and TGCT are warranted, especially studies evaluating the role of endocannabinoid signaling and cannabinoid receptors in TGCT. PMID:20925043

  13. In vivo imaging of tumor vascular endothelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Dawen; Stafford, Jason H.; Zhou, Heling; Thorpe, Philip E.

    2013-02-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS), normally restricted to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, becomes exposed on the outer surface of viable (non-apoptotic) endothelial cells in tumor blood vessels, probably in response to oxidative stresses present in the tumor microenvironment. In the present study, we optically imaged exposed PS on tumor vasculature in vivo using PGN635, a novel human monoclonal antibody that targets PS. PGN635 F(ab')2 was labeled with the near infrared (NIR) dye, IRDye 800CW. Human glioma U87 cells or breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells were implanted subcutaneously or orthotopically into nude mice. When the tumors reached ~5 mm in diameter, 800CW- PGN635 was injected via a tail vein and in vivo dynamic NIR imaging was performed. For U87 gliomas, NIR imaging allowed clear detection of tumors as early as 4 h later, which improved over time to give a maximal tumor/normal ratio (TNR = 2.9 +/- 0.5) 24 h later. Similar results were observed for orthotopic MDA-MB-231 breast tumors. Localization of 800CW-PGN635 to tumors was antigen specific since 800CW-Aurexis, a control probe of irrelevant specificity, did not localize to the tumors, and pre-administration of unlabeled PGN635 blocked the uptake of 800CW-PGN635. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed that 800CW-PGN635 was binding to PS-positive tumor vascular endothelium. Our studies suggest that tumor vasculature can be successfully imaged in vivo to provide sensitive tumor detection.

  14. Targeting Tumor Vasculature Endothelial Cells and Tumor Cells for Immunotherapy of Human Melanoma in a Mouse Xenograft Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Sun, Ying; Garen, Alan

    1999-07-01

    An immunotherapy treatment for cancer that targets both the tumor vasculature and tumor cells has shown promising results in a severe combined immunodeficient mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. The treatment involves systemic delivery of an immunoconjugate molecule composed of a tumor-targeting domain conjugated to the Fc effector domain of human IgG1. The effector domain induces a cytolytic immune response against the targeted cells by natural killer cells and complement. Two types of targeting domains were used. One targeting domain is a human single-chain Fv molecule that binds to a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the surface of most human melanoma cells. Another targeting domain is factor VII (fVII), a zymogen that binds with high specificity and affinity to the transmembrane receptor tissue factor (TF) to initiate the blood coagulation cascade. TF is expressed by endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature but not the normal vasculature, and also by many types of tumor cells including melanoma. Because the binding of a fVII immunoconjugate to TF might cause disseminated intravascular coagulation, the active site of fVII was mutated to inhibit coagulation without affecting the affinity for TF. The immunoconjugates were encoded as secreted molecules in a replication-defective adenovirus vector, which was injected into the tail vein of severe combined immunodeficient mice. The results demonstrate that a mutated fVII immunoconjugate, administered separately or together with a single-chain Fv immunoconjugate that binds to the tumor cells, can inhibit the growth or cause regression of an established human tumor xenograft. This procedure could be effective in treating a broad spectrum of human solid tumors that express TF on vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells.

  15. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression in solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Collart, F.R.; Chubb, C.B.; Mirkin, B.L.; Huberman, E.

    1992-07-10

    IMP dehydrogenase, a regulatory enzyme of guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, may play a role in cell proliferation and malignancy. To assess this possibility, we examined IMP dehydrogenase expression in a series of human solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines in comparison with their normal counterparts. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression was observed in brain tumors relative to normal brain tissue and in sarcoma