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Sample records for adrenergic nerve endings

  1. Mechanism of nicotine-induced release of noradrenaline from adrenergic nerve endings

    PubMed Central

    Jayasundar, S.; Vohra, M.M.

    1977-01-01

    1 A study of the mechanism of release of [3H]-noradrenaline ([3H]-NA) by nicotine from isolated vas deferens of the rat was made using incubation media of different ionic composition. 2 Nicotine (20 μg/ml)-induced release of [3H]-NA was significantly potentiated in K+-free Krebs solution as compared to that in normal Krebs-Ringer solution. 3 Nicotine-induced release of [3H]-NA was significantly reduced in Na+-deficient Krebs solution (containing only 11 mM Na+) and was abolished in Na+-free Krebs solution. 4 In totally depolarized tissues, nicotine failed to cause an outflow of [3H]-NA but Ca2+ (5 mM) did so. 5 Nicotine required the presence of Ca2+ in the incubation medium to cause release of [3H]-NA from adrenergic nerve terminals, the magnitude of release being dependent upon the concentration of Ca2+. 6 Nicotine-induced release of [3H]-NA was demonstrated in high Ca2+, Na+-free Krebs solution in which all Na+ had been replaced with Ca2+. 7 It is concluded that nicotine increases the membrane permeability to both Na+ and Ca2+. It is also suggested that the increase in permeability to Ca2+ alone is not sufficient but a local depolarizing action of nicotine is necessary to cause release of noradrenaline from adrenergic nerve endings. PMID:922247

  2. Topical administration of adrenergic receptor pharmaceutics and nerve growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Steinle, Jena J

    2010-01-01

    Topical application of nerve growth factor (NGF) and adrenergic receptor pharmaceutics are currently in use for corneal ulcers and glaucoma. A recent interest in the neuroprotective abilities of NGF has led to a renewed interest in NGF as a therapeutic for retinal and choroidal diseases. NGF can promote cell proliferation through actions of the TrkA receptor or promote apoptosis through receptor p75NTR. This understanding has led to novel interest in the role of NGF for diseases of the posterior eye. The role of β-adrenergic receptor agonists and antagonists for treatments of glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, and their potential mechanisms of action, are still under investigation. This review discusses the current knowledge and applications of topical NGF and adrenergic receptor drugs for ocular disease. PMID:20668722

  3. Nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle.

    PubMed

    Amakiri, S F; Ozoya, S E; Ogunnaike, P O

    1978-01-01

    The nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle were studied using histological and histochemical techniques. Many nerve trunks and fibres were present in the reticular and papillary dermis in both hairy and non-hairy skin sites. In non-hairy skin locations such as the muzzle and lower lip, encapsulated endings akin to Krause and Ruffini end bulbs, which arise from myelinated nerve trunks situated lower down the dermis were observed at the upper papillary layer level. Some fibre trunks seen at this level extended upwards to terminate within dermal papillae as bulb-shaped longitudinally lamellated Pacinian-type endings, while other onion-shaped lamellated nerve structures were located either within dermal papillae or near the dermo-epidermal area. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. On hairy skin sites, however, organized nerve endings or intraepidermal nerve endings were not readily identifiable. PMID:76410

  4. Activity of the Adrenergic Nerve System in the Airways Permeability of Healthy Persons

    PubMed Central

    Gashi, Njazi; Islami, Pëllumb; Mustafa, Lirim; Maloku, Halit; Veseli, Arta; Islami, Hilmi

    2013-01-01

    Objective: In this work, role of the adrenergic nerve system (alpha1 and beta2) in adjustment of the bronchomotor tonus in healthy people was researched. Methods: Parameters of the lung function are determined by Body plethysmography. Raw and ITGV were registered and SRaw was calculated as well. Aerosolization is done with standard aerosolizing machines – Asema. Results: Results gained shows that following the blockade of beta-2 adrenergic receptor with Propranolol (20 mg–aerosol), stimulation of alpha adrenergic receptor with Oxedrine (120 mg-aerosol) and blockage of these receptors with Tolazoline (20 mg-aerosol), does not change significantly the bronchomotor tonus of the tracheobronchial tree (p > 0.1). Meanwhile, stimulation of the beta-2 adrenergic receptor with Hexoprenaline (2 inh × 0.2 mg) is associated with a significant increase of the peripheral resistance of the airways (p < 0.01). Conclusion: This suggests that the activity of the alpha1-adrenergic receptor, unlike the activity of the beta2-adrenergic receptor in the healthy people smooth musculature, is not significant and as such is insufficient to oppose to the tonic activities of the cholinergic system. PMID:24554803

  5. Adrenergic vasoconstriction in peripheral nerves of the rabbit

    SciTech Connect

    Selander, D.; Mansson, L.G.; Karlsson, L.; Svanvik, J.

    1985-01-01

    The blood flow in the sciatic nerve of the rabbit was estimated from the wash out of intraneurally injected /sup 133/Xe. To avoid diffusion of the tracer into the surrounding muscular tissue, the nerve was covered by a gas-tight plastic film. Using this technique, the basal blood flow in the sciatic nerve was estimated to 35 ml X min-1 X 100 g-1. It was found that intraarterial norepinephrine and electrical stimulation of the lumbar sympathetic chain strongly reduced the wash out of /sup 133/Xe, which only can be explained by a pronounced reduction of the blood flow in the nerve itself. The blood flow again increased within 4 min of stopping the infusion of norepinephrine or the sympathetic stimulation. The prolonged effect and higher neurotoxicity of local anesthetics containing adrenaline may be explained by an alpha receptor-mediated vasoconstriction of the microvessels of peripheral nerves.

  6. Central beta-adrenergic receptors mediate renal nerve activity during stress in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Koepke, J P; DiBona, G F

    1985-01-01

    The effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists (d,l-propranolol or timolol, 30 micrograms in 2 microL of isotonic saline) on the increased renal sympathetic nerve activity and decreased urinary sodium excretion (UNaV) responses to stressful environmental stimulation (air jet to head) in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were examined. Before i.c.v. d,l-propranolol or timolol, air stress increased renal activity (68% from 10.6 +/- 2.1 and 63% from 8.2 +/- 0.9 integrator resets/min respectively). In contrast, after i.c.v. d,l-propranolol or timolol in the same conscious SHR, air stress had no effect on renal sympathetic nerve activity (+7% from 8.1 +/- 1.7 and +7% from 5.5 +/- 1.0 integrator resets/min respectively). Air stress decreased UNaV in conscious SHR given i.c.v. saline vehicle (25% from 2.8 +/- 0.5 microEq/min/100 g body weight), but had no effect on effective renal plasma flow or glomerular filtration rate. In contrast, after i.c.v. d,l-propranolol or timolol, air stress had no effect on UNaV (0% from 2.8 +/- 0.5 and +9% from 3.3 +/- 0.3 microEq/min/100 g body weight respectively). Mean arterial pressure increased similarly during air stress with i.c.v. saline-vehicle or beta-adrenergic receptor antagonists. Intravenous administration of the same doses of d,l-propranolol or timolol did not prevent the increased renal sympathetic nerve activity or decreased UNaV responses resulting from air stress. These results suggest that central nervous system beta-adrenergic receptors mediate the increased renal sympathetic nerve activity and decreased UNaV responses resulting from stressful environmental stimulation in conscious SHR.

  7. RESOLUTION OF THREE DISTINCT POPULATIONS OF NERVE ENDINGS FROM RAT BRAIN HOMOGENATES BY ZONAL ISOPYCNIC CENTRIFUGATION

    PubMed Central

    Bretz, Ursula; Baggiolini, Marco; Hauser, Rolf; Hodel, Christian

    1974-01-01

    Conditions have been established for the fractionation of subcellular components of rat forebrain homogenates by zonal isopycnic equilibration in continuous sucrose density gradients using a B-XIV rotor. The fractions were analyzed biochemically and by ultra-structural morphometry. Starting from postnuclear supernates of forebrain homogenates, it has been possible to resolve three distinct populations of nerve endings from one another, as well as from free mitochondria and myelin fragments. The three types of nerve endings differ in their apparent specific gravity, their biochemical properties, and their ability selectively to accumulate exogenous transmitter substances in vitro. These three particle populations are likely to represent, in order of increasing modal equilibrium density, (a) cholinergic nerve endings, characterized by their high content of acetylcholine, (b) γ-amino butyric acid (GABA)-containing nerve endings with high glutamate decarboxylase activity and the ability to accumulate exogenous GABA, (c) adrenergic nerve endings that accumulate exogenous dopamine and noradrenaline and exhibit high monoamine oxidase activity. PMID:4363959

  8. Angiotensin and thromboxane in the enhanced renal adrenergic nerve sensitivity of acute renal failure.

    PubMed Central

    Robinette, J B; Conger, J D

    1990-01-01

    The roles of intrarenal angiotensin (A) and thromboxane (TX) in the vascular hypersensitivity to renal nerve stimulation (RNS) and paradoxical vasoconstriction to renal perfusion pressure (RPP) reduction in the autoregulatory range in 1 wk norepinephrine (NE)-induced acute renal failure (ARF) in rats were investigated. Renal blood flow (RBF) responses were determined before and during intrarenal infusion of an AII and TXA2 antagonist. Saralasin or SQ29548 alone partially corrected the slopes of RBF to RNS and RPP reduction in NE-ARF rats (P less than 0.02). Saralasin + SQ29548 normalized the RBF response to RNS. While combined saralasin + SQ29548 eliminated the vasoconstriction to RPP reduction, similar to the effect of renal denervation, appropriate vasodilatation was not restored. Renal vein norepinephrine efflux during RNS was disproportionately increased in NE-ARF (P less than 0.001) and was suppressed by saralasin + SQ29548 infusion (P less than 0.005). It is concluded that the enhanced sensitivity to RNS and paradoxical vasoconstriction to RPP reduction in 1 wk NE-ARF kidneys are the result of intrarenal TX and AII acceleration of neurotransmitter release to adrenergic nerve activity. PMID:2243129

  9. Identification of the origin of adrenergic and cholinergic nerve fibers within the superior hypogastric plexus of the human fetus

    PubMed Central

    Zaitouna, Mazen; Alsaid, Bayan; Diallo, Djibril; Benoit, Gérard; Bessede, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Nerve fibers contributing to the superior hypogastric plexus (SHP) and the hypogastric nerves (HN) are currently considered to comprise an adrenergic part of the autonomic nervous system located between vertebrae (T1 and L2), with cholinergic aspects originating from the second to fourth sacral spinal segments (S2, S3 and S4). The aim of this study was to identify the origin and the nature of the nerve fibers within the SHP and the HN, especially the cholinergic fibers, using computer-assisted anatomic dissection (CAAD). Serial histological sections were performed at the level of the lumbar spine and pelvis in five human fetuses between 14 and 30 weeks of gestation. Sections were treated with histological staining [hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and Masson's trichrome (TriM)] and with immunohistochemical methods to detect nerve fibers (anti-S100), adrenergic fibers (anti-TH), cholinergic fibers (anti-VAChT) and nitrergic fibers (anti-nNOS). The sections were then digitalized using a high-resolution scanner and the 3D images were reconstructed using winsurf software. These experiments revealed the coexistence of adrenergic and cholinergic fibers within the SHP and the HNs. One-third of these cholinergic fibers were nitrergic fibers [anti-VACHT (+)/anti-NOS (+)] and potentially pro-erectile, while the others were non-nitrergic [anti-VACHT (+)/anti-NOS (−)]. We found these cholinergic fibers arose from the lumbar nerve roots. This study described the nature of the SHP nerve fibers which gives a better understanding of the urinary and sexual dysfunctions after surgical injuries. PMID:23668336

  10. Identification of the origin of adrenergic and cholinergic nerve fibers within the superior hypogastric plexus of the human fetus.

    PubMed

    Zaitouna, Mazen; Alsaid, Bayan; Diallo, Djibril; Benoit, Gérard; Bessede, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Nerve fibers contributing to the superior hypogastric plexus (SHP) and the hypogastric nerves (HN) are currently considered to comprise an adrenergic part of the autonomic nervous system located between vertebrae (T1 and L2), with cholinergic aspects originating from the second to fourth sacral spinal segments (S2, S3 and S4). The aim of this study was to identify the origin and the nature of the nerve fibers within the SHP and the HN, especially the cholinergic fibers, using computer-assisted anatomic dissection (CAAD). Serial histological sections were performed at the level of the lumbar spine and pelvis in five human fetuses between 14 and 30 weeks of gestation. Sections were treated with histological staining [hematoxylin-eosin (HE) and Masson's trichrome (TriM)] and with immunohistochemical methods to detect nerve fibers (anti-S100), adrenergic fibers (anti-TH), cholinergic fibers (anti-VAChT) and nitrergic fibers (anti-nNOS). The sections were then digitalized using a high-resolution scanner and the 3D images were reconstructed using winsurf software. These experiments revealed the coexistence of adrenergic and cholinergic fibers within the SHP and the HNs. One-third of these cholinergic fibers were nitrergic fibers [anti-VACHT (+)/anti-NOS (+)] and potentially pro-erectile, while the others were non-nitrergic [anti-VACHT (+)/anti-NOS (-)]. We found these cholinergic fibers arose from the lumbar nerve roots. This study described the nature of the SHP nerve fibers which gives a better understanding of the urinary and sexual dysfunctions after surgical injuries.

  11. Opioid receptor types on adrenergic nerve terminals of rabbit ear artery.

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, H.; Hosoki, E.; Ishida, Y.; Moritoki, H.

    1985-01-01

    Methionine enkephalin, leucine enkephalin, [D-Ala2, D-Leu5] enkephalin, alpha-neoendorphin, beta-endorphin, dynorphin (1-13) and ethylketocyclazocine inhibited the contractions of rabbit ear artery ring segments elicited by transmural nerve stimulation at 8 Hz. Ethylketocyclazocine, dynorphin (1-13) and leucine enkephalin produced partial inhibition, their apparent intrinsic activities (alpha) being 0.57, 0.75 and 0.66, respectively. Morphine and normorphine, which are agonists at mu-receptors, did not inhibit the response of the artery. Naloxone antagonized the actions of opioids and ethylketocyclazocine, and was more effective against methionine enkephalin, leucine enkephalin and [D-Ala2, D-Leu5] enkephalin than against alpha-neoendorphin, ethylketocyclazocine and dynorphin (1-13). The pA2 values of naloxone against so-called delta-agonists were approx. 8.5, and against so-called kappa-agonists were approx. 7.7. The supposed kappa-antagonist, Mr2266, was more effective than naloxone in antagonizing the actions of alpha-neoendorphin, and the kappa-agonists dynorphin (1-13) and ethylketocyclazocine. The pA2 values of Mr2266 against kappa-agonists were 8.5-9.0, and against delta-agonists were 7.8 or less. The opioid peptides and opioids tested did not cause dilatation of the artery previously contracted with histamine. These results suggest that the opioid peptides and ethylketocyclazocine acted on opioid receptors at adrenergic nerve terminals in the ear artery. The opioid receptors appear to be of the delta- and kappa-types, not the mu-type. PMID:2998521

  12. Morphology of nerve endings in vocal fold of human newborn.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves da Silva Leite, Janaina; Costa Cavalcante, Maria Luzete; Fechine-Jamacaru, Francisco Vagnaldo; de Lima Pompeu, Margarida Maria; Leite, José Alberto Dias; Nascimento Coelho, Dulce Maria; Rabelo de Freitas, Marcos

    2016-10-01

    Sensory receptors are distributed throughout the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx. Laryngeal sensitivity is crucial for maintaining safe swallowing, thus avoiding silent aspiration. Morphologic description of different receptor types present in larynx vary because of the study of many different species, from mouse to humans. The most commonly sensory structures described in laryngeal mucosa are free nerve endings, taste buds, muscle spindles, glomerular and corpuscular receptors. This study aimed at describing the morphology and the distribution of nerve endings in premature newborn glottic region. Transversal serial frozen sections of the whole vocal folds of three newborns were analyzed using an immuno-histochemical process with a pan-neuronal marker anti-protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5). Imaging was done using a confocal laser microscope. Nerve fiber density in vocal cord was calculated using panoramic images in software Morphometric Analysis System v1.0. Some sensory structures, i.e. glomerular endings and intraepithelial free nerve endings were found in the vocal cord mucosa. Muscle spindles, complex nerve endings (Meissner-like, spherical, rectangular and growing) spiral-wharves nerve structures were identified in larynx intrinsic muscles. Nervous total mean density in vocal cord was similar in the three newborns, although they had different gestational age. The mean nerve fiber density was higher in the posterior region than anterior region of vocal cord. The present results demonstrate the occurrence of different morphotypes of sensory corpuscles and nerve endings premature newborn glottic region and provide information on their sensory systems.

  13. Nerve growth factor facilitates redistribution of adrenergic and non-adrenergic non-cholinergic perivascular nerves injured by phenol in rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Yokomizo, Ayako; Takatori, Shingo; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Goda, Mitsuhiro; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that nerve growth factor (NGF) facilitated perivascular sympathetic neuropeptide Y (NPY)- and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves injured by the topical application of phenol in the rat mesenteric artery. We also demonstrated that mesenteric arterial nerves were distributed into tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-, substance P (SP)-, and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-containing nerves, which had axo-axonal interactions. In the present study, we examined the effects of NGF on phenol-injured perivascular nerves, including TH-, NPY-, nNOS-, CGRP-, and SP-containing nerves, in rat mesenteric arteries in more detail. Wistar rats underwent the in vivo topical application of 10% phenol to the superior mesenteric artery, proximal to the abdominal aorta, under pentobarbital-Na anesthesia. The distribution of perivascular nerves in the mesenteric arteries of the 2nd to 3rd-order branches isolated from 8-week-old Wistar rats was investigated immunohistochemically using antibodies against TH-, NPY-, nNOS-, CGRP-, and SP-containing nerves. The topical phenol treatment markedly reduced the density of all nerves in these arteries. The administration of NGF at a dose of 20µg/kg/day with an osmotic pump for 7 days significantly increased the density of all perivascular nerves over that of sham control levels. These results suggest that NGF facilitates the reinnervation of all perivascular nerves injured by phenol in small resistance arteries.

  14. Nerve growth factor facilitates redistribution of adrenergic and non-adrenergic non-cholinergic perivascular nerves injured by phenol in rat mesenteric resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Yokomizo, Ayako; Takatori, Shingo; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Goda, Mitsuhiro; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that nerve growth factor (NGF) facilitated perivascular sympathetic neuropeptide Y (NPY)- and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves injured by the topical application of phenol in the rat mesenteric artery. We also demonstrated that mesenteric arterial nerves were distributed into tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-, substance P (SP)-, and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS)-containing nerves, which had axo-axonal interactions. In the present study, we examined the effects of NGF on phenol-injured perivascular nerves, including TH-, NPY-, nNOS-, CGRP-, and SP-containing nerves, in rat mesenteric arteries in more detail. Wistar rats underwent the in vivo topical application of 10% phenol to the superior mesenteric artery, proximal to the abdominal aorta, under pentobarbital-Na anesthesia. The distribution of perivascular nerves in the mesenteric arteries of the 2nd to 3rd-order branches isolated from 8-week-old Wistar rats was investigated immunohistochemically using antibodies against TH-, NPY-, nNOS-, CGRP-, and SP-containing nerves. The topical phenol treatment markedly reduced the density of all nerves in these arteries. The administration of NGF at a dose of 20µg/kg/day with an osmotic pump for 7 days significantly increased the density of all perivascular nerves over that of sham control levels. These results suggest that NGF facilitates the reinnervation of all perivascular nerves injured by phenol in small resistance arteries. PMID:26671004

  15. Morphology of nerve endings in vocal fold of human newborn.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves da Silva Leite, Janaina; Costa Cavalcante, Maria Luzete; Fechine-Jamacaru, Francisco Vagnaldo; de Lima Pompeu, Margarida Maria; Leite, José Alberto Dias; Nascimento Coelho, Dulce Maria; Rabelo de Freitas, Marcos

    2016-10-01

    Sensory receptors are distributed throughout the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx. Laryngeal sensitivity is crucial for maintaining safe swallowing, thus avoiding silent aspiration. Morphologic description of different receptor types present in larynx vary because of the study of many different species, from mouse to humans. The most commonly sensory structures described in laryngeal mucosa are free nerve endings, taste buds, muscle spindles, glomerular and corpuscular receptors. This study aimed at describing the morphology and the distribution of nerve endings in premature newborn glottic region. Transversal serial frozen sections of the whole vocal folds of three newborns were analyzed using an immuno-histochemical process with a pan-neuronal marker anti-protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5). Imaging was done using a confocal laser microscope. Nerve fiber density in vocal cord was calculated using panoramic images in software Morphometric Analysis System v1.0. Some sensory structures, i.e. glomerular endings and intraepithelial free nerve endings were found in the vocal cord mucosa. Muscle spindles, complex nerve endings (Meissner-like, spherical, rectangular and growing) spiral-wharves nerve structures were identified in larynx intrinsic muscles. Nervous total mean density in vocal cord was similar in the three newborns, although they had different gestational age. The mean nerve fiber density was higher in the posterior region than anterior region of vocal cord. The present results demonstrate the occurrence of different morphotypes of sensory corpuscles and nerve endings premature newborn glottic region and provide information on their sensory systems. PMID:27619029

  16. Comparison of bretylium and guanethidine: tolerance, and effects on adrenergic nerve function and responses to sympathomimetic amines

    PubMed Central

    Boura, A. L. A.; Green, A. F.

    1962-01-01

    Bretylium depresses the slope of regression lines relating frequency of sympathetic nerve stimulation to magnitude of contractions of the cat nictitating membrane. In contrast, guanethidine and reserpine preferentially abolish responses to low rates of nerve stimulation and cause a roughly parallel shift of the regression lines. The hypersensitivity of the nictitating membranes of cats to intravenous adrenaline or noradrenaline is far greater after a series of small daily doses of bretylium or guanethidine than after single large doses. The maximal sensitivity produced was similar to that after postganglionic sympathetic nerve section and exceeded that produced by ganglion blockade. The development of hypersensitivity to catechol amines is accompanied by some return of responses of the nictitating membranes to sympathetic nerve stimulation despite continued daily administration of bretylium or guanethidine. In cats given bretylium daily, responses to low rates of nerve stimulation become greater than in controls unless the dose of bretylium given subcutaneously is 50 mg/kg or more. When marked hypersensitivity to catechol amines has been produced by giving bretylium or guanethidine daily for 7 or 14 days, the sympathomimetic effects of these compounds are greater. Responses to intravenous dimethylphenylpiperazinium are also increased and the results suggest that even large daily doses of adrenergic neurone blocking agents do not appreciably impair the functioning of the adrenal medulla. The pressor effects of intravenous adrenaline, noradrenaline and dimethylphenylpiperazinium iodide increase less than the corresponding nictitating membrane responses. These results are discussed in relation to tolerance to adrenergic neurone blockade, and differences between the effects of bretylium and guanethidine found in man. Bretylium and guanethidine depress the slopes of the dose-response curves for the pressor and nictitating membrane contracting effects of tyramine. When

  17. PLURIVESICULAR SECRETORY PROCESSES AND NERVE ENDINGS IN THE PINEAL GLAND OF THE RAT

    PubMed Central

    De Robertis, Eduardo; de Iraldi, Amanda Pellegrino

    1961-01-01

    The pineal body of white normal rats, 1.5 to 3 months old, was studied under the electron microscope. A single type of parenchymal cell—the pinealocyte—is recognized as the main component of the tissue, and some of the structural characteristics of the nucleus and cytoplasm are described. The main morphological characteristic of the pinealocytes is represented by club-shaped perivascular expansions connected to the cell by thin pedicles. They are found lying in a large, clear space surrounding the blood capillaries. The name plurivesicular secretory processes is proposed, to emphasize the main structural feature and the probable function of these cellular expansions. A tubulofibrillar component is mainly found in the pedicle, and within the expansion there are numerous small mitochondria and densily packed vesicles of about 425 A. Two types of vesicles, one with a homogeneous content and another with a very dense osmium deposit, are described. Between the two types there are intermediary forms. In these processes, mitochondria show profound changes which may lead to complete vacuolization. The significance of this plurivesicular secretory component is discussed in the light of recent work on the biogenic amines of the pineal body and preliminary experiments showing the release of the vesicles containing dense granules after treatment with reserpine. These vesicles are interpreted as the site of storage of some of the biogenic amines. Bundles of unmyelinated nerve fibers and endings on large blood vessels which also contain a plurivesicular content are described and tentatively interpreted as adrenergic nerve terminals. PMID:13720811

  18. [Changes in adrenergic nerve plexuses of the heart during immobilization stress in the rat].

    PubMed

    Mar'ian, K L; Buniatian, A M

    1984-03-01

    Luminescent microscopical analysis on the state of the cardiac adrenergic neural apparatus under immobilization stress has been performed in 48 rats of August and Wistar strains. The rats of August strain demonstrate a high sensitivity to the stress: 40% of the animals died during the first 4-17 h of immobilization. Cryostate sections are treated in 2% glyoxylic acid and studied in the luminescent microscope. Quantitative analysis of density distribution of the adrenergic neural terminals is performed by means of dot nets. Decreasing luminescent brightness and decreasing density by 10-15% are noted in the right auricle, and by 30-34%--in the left ventricle, comparing to that of the control. In the animals died a sudden death these parameters are even stronger (28% and 54%, respectively). The data obtained correlate to the functional disturbances of the heart activity (fluctuations of the arterial pressure, disturbances of the rhythm, ECG changes). A suggestion is made that catecholamines content in the neural terminals of the heart is of certain importance in development of the cardiovascular disturbances under immobilization stress.

  19. Ultrastructure of free-ending nerve fibres in oesophageal epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Robles-Chillida, E M; Rodrigo, J; Mayo, I; Arnedo, A; Gómez, A

    1981-01-01

    For the first time, at the ultrastructural level, the existence of free-ending, intraepithelial nerve fibres has been demonstrated in the oesophagus wall of adult cats and monkeys. Their form, the way they penetrate the epithelium, their location within the epithelium and their relationships with neighbouring cells have been established. A sensory function is suggested for this type of ending. Images Figs. 1-4 Figs. 5-6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Figs. 14-15 Figs. 16-17 PMID:7333951

  20. Unilateral Multiple Facial Nerve Branch Reconstruction Using “End-to-side Loop Graft” Supercharged by Hypoglossal Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Ryo; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Niimi, Yosuke; Sakurai, Hiroyuki; Miyata, Mariko; Yamato, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Background: Extensive facial nerve defects between the facial nerve trunk and its branches can be clinically reconstructed by incorporating double innervation into an end-to-side loop graft technique. This study developed a new animal model to evaluate the technique’s ability to promote nerve regeneration. Methods: Rats were divided into the intact, nonsupercharge, and supercharge groups. Artificially created facial nerve defects were reconstructed with a nerve graft, which was end-to-end sutured from proximal facial nerve stump to the mandibular branch (nonsupercharge group), or with the graft of which other end was end-to-side sutured to the hypoglossal nerve (supercharge group). And they were evaluated after 30 weeks. Results: Axonal diameter was significantly larger in the supercharge group than in the nonsupercharge group for the buccal (3.78 ± 1.68 vs 3.16 ± 1.22; P < 0.0001) and marginal mandibular branches (3.97 ± 2.31 vs 3.46 ± 1.57; P < 0.0001), but the diameter was significantly larger in the intact group for all branches except the temporal branch. In the supercharge group, compound muscle action potential amplitude was significantly higher than in the nonsupercharge group (4.18 ± 1.49 mV vs 1.87 ± 0.37 mV; P < 0.0001) and similar to that in the intact group (4.11 ± 0.68 mV). Retrograde labeling showed that the mimetic muscles were double-innervated by facial and hypoglossal nerve nuclei in the supercharge group. Conclusions: Multiple facial nerve branch reconstruction with an end-to-side loop graft was able to achieve axonal distribution. Additionally, axonal supercharge from the hypoglossal nerve significantly improved outcomes. PMID:25426357

  1. Hormone release from isolated nerve endings of the rat neurohypophysis.

    PubMed Central

    Cazalis, M; Dayanithi, G; Nordmann, J J

    1987-01-01

    1. Isolated neurosecretory nerve endings were prepared from rat neurohypophyses. The amount of vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin released was measured by radioimmunoassay. 2. The amount of hormone release under resting conditions was not affected by external calcium (Ca2+o). Secretion decreased by ca. 50% when external sodium (Na+o) was replaced by choline or sucrose. 3. Ouabain did not modify the basal AVP release. 4. The Na+ ionophore monensin increased the release of AVP only in the presence of Na+o. This increase was maintained during prolonged exposure to the ionophore and occurred in the presence of Ca2+o only. 5. In the presence of Ca2+o, the amount of evoked hormone release was dependent on the external K+ concentration. Half-maximal activation was achieved with ca. 40 mM-K+. The K+-induced secretion was potentiated in Na+-free solution. 6. Prolonged 100 mM-K+-induced depolarization in the presence of Ca2+o gave rise to a large increase in hormone secretion which decreased with time (t1/2 = 2.5 min). The release could be reactivated after permeabilization of the nerve terminals in the presence of micromolar concentrations of Ca2+. 7. A stepwise paradigm in which Ko+ is incrementally increased to 25, 50, 75 and then 100 mM released more AVP than a prolonged exposure to 100 mM-K+. 8. Veratridine increased the amount of AVP released. This effect was considerably reduced in the absence of Nao+ and abolished in the presence of D600. 9. The depolarization-induced AVP release was blocked by different Ca2+-antagonists. Their effectiveness was nitrendipine = nicardipine greater than Cd2+ greater than Gd3+ greater than Co2+ = Mn2+. 10. The dihydropyridine Bay K 8644 potentiated both the basal and the K+-evoked AVP release. Its maximal effect was obtained with 25-50 mM-Ko+. 11. In conclusion, the isolated neurohypophysial terminals which have both Na+ and Ca2+ channels and release AVP and oxytocin upon depolarization might be an excellent system to study further the

  2. Fine morphological changes in the penicillate nerve endings of human hairy skin during prolonged itching.

    PubMed

    Cauna, N

    1977-05-01

    Morphological changes in cutaneous nerve endings were investigated electron microscopically in patients suffering from certain kinds of urticaria with associated itching and in normal skin in which wheals and local itching were induced either by application of nettle hairs or by intracutaneous injections of a timothy pollen extract. Skin samples were obtained with a high speed dermal punch without anesthesia from the wheal areas. It was found that some subepidermal free nerve endings derived from non-myelinated nerve fibers (penicillate endings) showed accumulations of extra-cytoplasmic glycogen which was localized in the distended spaces between the axolemma, the Schwann cell membrane and the nerve basement membrane. In some cases, the glycogen was found to be so abundant that it occupied most of the cross sectional area of the ending. No morphological changes were observed in the pappilary endings, in nerve endings of the hairs or in the autonomic terminals. The conducting segments of all cutaneous nerve fibers showed normal morphology. The unusual morphological changes that occur in some penicillate nerve endings during the wheal development indicate that these endings are involved in the skin reaction and therefore they may be the specific end organs that are associated with itch, at least in urticaria. PMID:869227

  3. Distribution of sensory nerve endings around the human sinus tarsi: a cadaver study.

    PubMed

    Rein, Susanne; Manthey, Suzanne; Zwipp, Hans; Witt, Andreas

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the pattern of sensory nerve endings and blood vessels around the sinus tarsi. The superficial and deep parts of the fat pads at the inferior extensor retinaculum (IER) as well as the subtalar joint capsule inside the sinus tarsi from 13 cadaver feet were dissected. The distribution of the sensory nerve endings and blood vessels were analysed in the resected specimens as the number per cm(2) after staining with haematoxylin-eosin, S100 protein, low-affinity neurotrophin receptor p75, and protein gene product 9.5 using the classification of Freeman and Wyke. Free nerve endings were the predominant sensory ending (P < 0.001). Ruffini and Golgi-like endings were rarely found and no Pacini corpuscles were seen. Significantly more free nerve endings (P < 0.001) and blood vessels (P = 0.01) were observed in the subtalar joint capsule than in the superficial part of the fat pad at the IER. The deep part of the fat pad at the IER had significantly more blood vessels than the superficial part of the fat pad at the IER (P = 0.012). Significantly more blood vessels than free nerve endings were seen in all three groups (P < 0.001). No significant differences in distribution were seen in terms of right or left side, except for free nerve endings in the superficial part of the fat pad at the IER (P = 0.003). A greater number of free nerve endings correlated with a greater number of blood vessels. The presence of sensory nerve endings between individual fat cells supports the hypothesis that the fat pad has a proprioceptive role monitoring changes and that it is a source of pain in sinus tarsi syndrome due to the abundance of free nerve endings.

  4. N-cadherin expression in palisade nerve endings of rat vellus hairs.

    PubMed

    Kaidoh, Toshiyuki; Inoué, Takao

    2008-02-01

    Palisade nerve endings (PNs) are mechanoreceptors around vellus hairs of mammals. Each lanceolate nerve ending (LN) of the PN is characterized by a sensory nerve ending symmetrically sandwiched by two processes of type II terminal Schwann cells (tSCIIs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the structural organization of the PN are poorly understood. Electron microscopy showed that adherens junctions appeared to adhere to the sensory nerve ending and tSCII processes, so we examined the location of the N-cadherin adhesion system in PNs of rat vellus hairs by using immunoelectron microscopy. N-cadherin localized near both ends of the cell boundary between sensory nerve ending and tSCII processes, which corresponded to the sites of adherens junctions. We further found cadherin-associated proteins, alpha- and beta-catenins, at the linings of adherens junctions. Three-dimensional reconstruction of immunoelectron microscopic serial thin sections showed four linear arrays of N-cadherin arranged longitudinally along the LN beneath the four longitudinal borders of two tSCII processes. In contrast, sensory nerve fibers just proximal to the LNs formed common unmyelinated nerve fibers, in which N-cadherin was located mainly at the mesaxon of type I terminal Schwann cells (tSCIs). These results suggest that the four linear arrays of N-cadherin-mediated junctions adhere the sensory nerve ending and tSCII processes side by side to form the characteristic structure of the LN, and the structural differences between the LNs and the proximal unmyelinated nerve fibers possibly are due to the difference in the pattern of N-cadherin expression between sensory nerve endings and tSCII or tSCI processes.

  5. Macrophage depletion lowers blood pressure and restores sympathetic nerve α2-adrenergic receptor function in mesenteric arteries of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Thang, Loc V; Demel, Stacie L; Crawford, Robert; Kaminski, Norbert E; Swain, Greg M; Van Rooijen, Nico; Galligan, James J

    2015-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that vascular macrophage infiltration and O2 (-) release impairs sympathetic nerve α2-adrenergic autoreceptor (α2AR) function in mesenteric arteries (MAs) of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. Male rats were uninephrectomized or sham operated (sham). DOCA pellets were implanted subcutaneously in uninephrectomized rats who were provided high-salt drinking water or high-salt water with apocynin. Sham rats received tap water. Blood pressure was measured using radiotelemetry. Treatment of sham and DOCA-salt rats with liposome-encapsulated clodronate was used to deplete macrophages. After 3-5, 10-13, and 18-21 days of DOCA-salt treatment, MAs and peritoneal fluid were harvested from euthanized rats. Norepinephrine (NE) release from periarterial sympathetic nerves was measured in vitro using amperometry with microelectrodes. Macrophage infiltration into MAs as well as TNF-α and p22(phox) were measured using immunohistochemistry. Peritoneal macrophage activation was measured by flow cytometry. O2 (-) was measured using dihydroethidium staining. Hypertension developed over 28 days, and apocynin reduced blood pressure on days 18-21. O2 (-) and macrophage infiltration were greater in DOCA-salt MAs compared with sham MAs after day 10. Peritoneal macrophage activation occurred after day 10 in DOCA-salt rats. Macrophages expressing TNF-α and p22(phox) were localized near sympathetic nerves. Impaired α2AR function and increased NE release from sympathetic nerves occurred in MAs from DOCA-salt rats after day 18. Macrophage depletion reduced blood pressure and vascular O2 (-) while restoring α2AR function in DOCA-salt rats. Macrophage infiltration into the vascular adventitia contributes to increased blood pressure in DOCA-salt rats by releasing O2 (-), which disrupts α2AR function, causing enhanced NE release from sympathetic nerves.

  6. Degeneration of proprioceptive sensory nerve endings in mice harboring amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-causing mutations.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Sydney K; Kemp, Zachary; Hatzipetros, Theo; Vieira, Fernando; Valdez, Gregorio

    2015-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that primarily targets the motor system. Although much is known about the effects of ALS on motor neurons and glial cells, little is known about its effect on proprioceptive sensory neurons. This study examines proprioceptive sensory neurons in mice harboring mutations associated with ALS, in SOD1(G93A) and TDP43(A315T) transgenic mice. In both transgenic lines, we found fewer proprioceptive sensory neurons containing fluorescently tagged cholera toxin in their soma five days after injecting this retrograde tracer into the tibialis anterior muscle. We asked whether this is due to neuronal loss or selective degeneration of peripheral nerve endings. We found no difference in the total number and size of proprioceptive sensory neuron soma between symptomatic SOD1(G93A) and control mice. However, analysis of proprioceptive nerve endings in muscles revealed early and significant alterations at Ia/II proprioceptive nerve endings in muscle spindles before the symptomatic phase of the disease. Although these changes occur alongside those at α-motor axons in SOD1(G93A) mice, Ia/II sensory nerve endings degenerate in the absence of obvious alterations in α-motor axons in TDP43(A315T) transgenic mice. We next asked whether proprioceptive nerve endings are similarly affected in the spinal cord and found that nerve endings terminating on α-motor neurons are affected during the symptomatic phase and after peripheral nerve endings begin to degenerate. Overall, we show that Ia/II proprioceptive sensory neurons are affected by ALS-causing mutations, with pathological changes starting at their peripheral nerve endings.

  7. Three dimensional observations of the palisade-shaped nerve endings of normal hair of rat's snout.

    PubMed

    Seguchi, H; Yagyu, Y; Kobayashi, T

    1989-01-01

    The nerve endings of normal hair of the rat's snout, partially digested with trypsin and hydrochloric acid, were studied by scanning electron microscopy. Each lanceolate structure measured ca. 10 microns in length and was arranged around the hair follicle. These palisade-shaped nerve endings were situated almost beneath the sebaceous glands, ran upward, parallel to the axis of the hair follicle, and terminated in pointed shape. 2 kinds of cells, Teloglia cell Type I showing flat profile, and Teloglia cell Type II showing spherical profile and possessing numerous caveolae in its surface were observed at the basal portion of the palisade-shaped endings. The axon was enclosed by Schwann cells in its course to the hair follicle, and was covered with Type I cells at the beginning, and with Type II cells at the end, and constituted the palisade-shaped nerve endings. The palisade structure in silver impregnated tissues observed by backscattered electron microscopy and X-ray analyzer was characterized as comprising neuronal elements. Cytochemically, the nerve endings showed cholinesterase and Mg-ATPase activities. They may be involved in the reception of the mechanical stimulation of the hair. The palisade nerve endings thus possessed appropriate 3-dimensional structure as mechanoreceptor.

  8. Sympathetic nerve activity in normal and cystic follicles from isolated bovine ovary: local effect of beta-adrenergic stimulation on steroid secretion

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cystic ovarian disease (COD) is an important cause of abnormal estrous behavior and infertility in dairy cows. COD is mainly observed in high-yielding dairy cows during the first months post-partum, a period of high stress. We have previously reported that, in lower mammals, stress induces a cystic condition similar to the polycystic ovary syndrome in humans and that stress is a definitive component in the human pathology. To know if COD in cows is also associated with high sympathetic activity, we studied isolated small antral (5mm), preovulatory (10mm) and cystic follicles (25mm). Cystic follicles which present an area 600 fold greater compared with preovulatory follicles has only 10 times less concentration of NE as compared with small antral and preovulatory follicles but they had 10 times more NE in follicular fluid, suggesting a high efflux of neurotransmitter from the cyst wall. This suggestion was reinforced by the high basal release of recently taken-up 3H-NE found in cystic follicles. While lower levels of beta-adrenergic receptor were found in cystic follicles, there was a heightened response to the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol and to hCG, as measured by testosterone secretion. There was however an unexpected capacity of the ovary in vitro to produce cortisol and to secrete it in response to hCG but not to isoproterenol. These data suggest that, during COD, the bovine ovary is under high sympathetic nerve activity that in addition to an increased response to hCG in cortisol secretion could participate in COD development. PMID:21575217

  9. Changes of epidermal mu-opiate receptor expression and nerve endings in chronic atopic dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Bigliardi-Qi, M; Lipp, B; Sumanovski, L T; Buechner, S A; Bigliardi, P L

    2005-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that neuropeptides such as a substance P, neurotrophins or beta-endorphin, an endogenous agonist for mu-opioid receptor, are involved in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis in which mental stress and scratching deteriorate the disease. mu-Opioid receptor, a G-protein-coupled receptor, can be downregulated and internalized by agonists and other factors in vitro. In this study, we investigated the regulation of mu-opioid receptor and nerve endings in atopic dermatitis patients. Skin biopsies from atopic dermatitis patients revealed a significant downregulation of mu-opiate receptor expression in epidermis of atopic dermatitis. Permeabilization of the skin showed that the receptor in keratinocytes from atopic dermatitis is internalized. The mRNA expression pattern of the mu-opiate receptor is different in epidermis taken from patients with chronic atopic dermatitis compared to normal skin. In atopic dermatitis, the mRNA is concentrated in the subcorneal layers of the epidermis and in normal skin in the suprabasal layers. Staining of the nerve endings using protein gene product 9.5 shows a different pattern of epidermal nerve endings in normal skin compared to atopic dermatitis. In normal skin, the epidermal nerve endings are rather thick. However, in atopic dermatitis, the epidermal nerve endings are thin and run straight through the epidermis. Based on these observations and combining the 'intensity' and 'pattern' hypothesis, we propose a new theory especially for histamine-unrelated, peripheral induction of chronic pruritus. We suggest that 'itch' is elicited in the epidermal unmyelinated nerve C-fibers and 'pain' in the dermal unmyelinated nerve fibers. The downregulation of the opioid receptor in the epidermis contributes to the chronic itching. We call this new hypothesis the 'layer hypothesis'.

  10. Intercellular junctions between palisade nerve endings and outer root sheath cells of rat vellus hairs.

    PubMed

    Kaidoh, T; Inoué, T

    2000-05-15

    Hair follicles have a longitudinal set of sensory nerve endings called palisade nerve endings (PN). We examined the junctional structures between the PN and outer root sheath (ORS) cells of hair follicles in the rat external ear. Transmission electron microscopy of serial thin sections showed that the processes of the ORS cells penetrated the basal lamina of the hair follicle, forming intercellular junctions with the PN (PN-ORS junctions). Two types of junctions were found: junctions between nerve endings and ORS cells (N-ORS junctions) and those between Schwann cell processes and ORS cells (S-ORS junctions). The N-ORS junctions had two subtypes: 1) a short process or small eminence of the ORS cell was attached to the nerve ending (type I); or 2) a process of the ORS cell was invaginated into the nerve ending (type II). The S-ORS junctions also had two subtypes: 1) a short process or small eminence of the ORS cell was abutted on the Schwann cell process (type I); or 2) a process of the ORS cell was invaginated into the Schwann cell process (type II). Vesicles, coated pits, coated vesicles, and endosomes were sometimes seen in nerve endings, Schwann cells, and ORS cells near the junctions. Computer-aided reconstruction of the serial thin sections displayed the three-dimensional structure of these junctions. These results suggested that the PN-ORS junctions provided direct relationships between the PN and ORS in at least four different patterns. The discovery of these junctions shows the PN-ORS relationship to be closer than previously realized. We speculate that these junctions may have roles in attachment of the PN to the ORS, contributing to increases in the sensitivity of the PN, and in chemical signaling between the PN and ORS.

  11. Expression of ENaC subunits in sensory nerve endings in the rat larynx.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshio; Taniguchi, Kazuyuki

    2006-07-24

    We investigated the expression of three subunits of epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), alphaENaC, betaENaC and gammaENaC, in the nodose ganglion and laryngeal mucosa of rat by RT-PCR analysis and immunohistochemistry. PCR products of predicted size for alphaENaC, betaENaC and gammaENaC subunits were amplified from extract of nodose ganglion. Immunohistochemically, nodose ganglion neurons of medium to large diameter were immunoreactive for alphaENaC, betaENaC and gammaENaC. In the deep region of laryngeal submucosal layer, thick nerve fibers without varicosities were immunoreactive for alphaENaC, betaENaC and gammaENaC. In the laryngeal mucosa, terminal arborizations of the nerve endings, that immunoreacted for alphaENaC, betaENaC and gammaENaC were scattered in the lamina propria just beneath the epithelia of epiglottis and laryngeal vestibule. Double immunofluorescence with calretinin revealed that they were laminar nerve endings. Some thick nerve fibers near the laryngeal taste buds were also immunoreactive for betaENaC and gammaENaC, but negative for alphaENaC. In the larynx, ENaC channels may play important roles in mechanotransduction in the laminar endings and in the mechano- and chemotransductions in the taste bud-associated nerve fibers. PMID:16725259

  12. Treatment of recurrent lingual nerve end-neuroma: A case report.

    PubMed

    Bellamy, Justin L; Steinbacher, Derek M; Debrux, J Cart; Magarakis, Michael; Rosson, Gedge D

    2013-10-01

    A neuroma is a collection of disorganized nerve sprouts emanating from an interruption of axonal continuity, forming within a collagen scar as the nerve attempts to regenerate. Lingual neuroma formation secondary to iatrogenic trauma to the tongue is likely not uncommon; however, we could not find a report in the literature of treatment of a distal tongue end-neuroma treated by resection and implantation into muscle. Here we describe a patient who experienced debilitating chronic tongue pain after excision of a benign mass. After failing conservative management, the patient was taken to the operating room where an end-neuroma of the lingual nerve was identified and successfully treated by excision and burying of the free proximal stump in the mylohyoid muscle. At 17 months postoperatively, she remains pain free without dysesthesias.

  13. Collateral sprouting of sensory axons after end-to-side nerve coaptation--a longitudinal study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Uros; Tomsic, Martin; Sketelj, Janez; Bajrović, Fajko F

    2007-02-01

    The end-to-side nerve coaptation is able to induce collateral sprouting of axons from the donor nerve and to provide functional reinnervation of the target tissue. Sensory axon sprouting and its effects on the donor nerve up to 9 months after the end-to-side nerve coaptation were studied in the rat. Peroneal, tibial and saphenous nerves were transected and ligated, and the distal stump of the transected peroneal nerve was sutured to the side of the uninjured sural nerve. The average skin area of the residual sensitivity to pinch due to the axons sprouting through the recipient peroneal nerve did not change statistically significantly between 4 and 9 months after surgery. Axon counting, measurements of compound action potentials and retrograde neuron labeling indicate that the sprouting of the myelinated sensory axons and unmyelinated axons through the recipient nerve was largely completed by 2 months and 4 months after the end-to-side nerve coaptation, respectively, and remained stable thereafter for at least 9 months. A decrease in the amplitude and area of the CAP of myelinated fibers, observed in the donor nerve up to 4 months after surgery, was probably due to mild degeneration of nerve fibers and a tendency of the diameter of myelinated axons to decline. However, no significant changes in functional, electrophysiological or morphological properties of the donor nerve could be observed at the end of the observational period, indicating that end-to-side nerve coaptation has no detrimental effect on the donor nerve on a long-term scale. PMID:17045263

  14. Free calcium concentration in brain nerve endings of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Orlov, S.N.; Pokudin, N.I.; Kravstov, G.M.; Postnov, Yu.V.; Okun', I.M.; Shukanova, N.A.; Rakovich, A.A.; Aksentsev, S.L.; Konev, S.V.

    1987-10-01

    The frequency of neurotransmitter release from the synaptic vesicles of nerve endings by exocytosis depends primarily on the free calcium concentration in the cytoplasm which is controlled by calcium transporting and calcium binding systems. In this paper, in an attempt to determine the state of these systems in primary hypertension and the effects of neurotransmitter release on the increased resistance in the peripheral circulatory system, the authors study the exchange, uptake, and concentration of calcium 45 cations by synaptosomes.

  15. Dynamic longitudinal investigation of individual nerve endings in the skin of anesthetized mice using in vivo two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuryev, Mikhail; Khiroug, Leonard

    2012-04-01

    Visualization of individual cutaneous nerve endings has previously relied on laborious procedures of tissue excision, fixation, sectioning and staining for light or electron microscopy. We present a method for non-invasive, longitudinal two-photon microscopy of single nerve endings within the skin of anesthetized transgenic mice. Besides excellent signal-to-background ratio and nanometer-scale spatial resolution, this method offers time-lapse ``movies'' of pathophysiological changes in nerve fine structure over minutes, hours, days or weeks. Structure of keratinocytes and dermal matrix is visualized simultaneously with nerve endings, providing clear landmarks for longitudinal analysis. We further demonstrate feasibility of dissecting individual nerve fibers with infra-red laser and monitoring their degradation and regeneration. In summary, our excision-free optical biopsy technique is ideal for longitudinal microscopic analysis of animal skin and skin innervations in vivo and can be applied widely in preclinical models of chronic pain, allergies, skin cancers and a variety of dermatological disorders.

  16. Two protein trafficking processes at motor nerve endings unveiled by botulinum neurotoxin E.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Gary; Wang, Jiafu; Chion, C K N Kwo; Aoki, K Roger; Dolly, J Oliver

    2007-01-01

    The unique ability of a family of botulinum neurotoxins to block neuroexocytosis specifically-by selective interaction with peripheral cholinergic nerve endings, endocytotic uptake, translocation to the cytosol, and enzymic cleavage of essential proteins-underlies their increasing therapeutic applications. Although clinical use of type A is most widespread due to its prolonged inactivation of the synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa, botulinum neurotoxin E cleaves this same target but at a different bond and exhibits faster onset of neuromuscular paralysis. Herein, insights were gained into the different dynamics of action of types A and E toxins, which could help in designing variants with new pharmacological profiles. Natural and recombinant type E dichain forms showed similar proteolytic and neuromuscular paralytic activities. The neuroparalysis induced by type E toxin was accelerated between 21 and 35 degrees C and attenuated by bafilomycin A1. Temperature elevation also revealed an unanticipated bipartite dose response indicative of two distinct internalization processes, one being independent of temperature and the other dependent. Although elevating the temperature also hastened intoxication by type A, a second uptake mechanism was not evident. Increasing the frequency of nerve stimulation raised the uptake of type E via both processes, but the enhanced trafficking through the temperature-dependent pathway was only seen at 35 degrees C. These novel observations reveal that two membrane retrieval mechanisms are operative at motor nerve terminals which type E toxin exploits to gain entry via an acidification-dependent step, whereas A uses only one.

  17. The enterotoxin of Clostridium perfringens type A binds to the presynaptic nerve endings in neuromuscular junctions of mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Senda, T; Sugimoto, N; Horiguchi, Y; Matsuda, M

    1995-04-01

    The enterotoxin of Clostridium perfringens type A, a channel-pore forming protein toxin, inhibited neuromuscular transmission in isolated mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparation at low concentrations of calcium. We investigated immunohistochemically the localization of the binding sites of the enterotoxin in the preparation under the conditions in which the enterotoxin reduced maximally the amplitudes of the twitch tension elicited by electrical stimulations to the phrenic nerve. Under the conditions, double immunohistochemical staining of the preparation with (1) rabbit anti-enterotoxin IgG-rhodamine-labeled goat anti-rabbit IgG and (2) mouse anti-synaptophysin (one of the synaptic vesicle-specific membrane proteins)-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled goat anti-mouse IgG showed that the enterotoxin binds specifically to most of the sites which were stained with anti-synaptophysin exactly in the same configurations having the shapes of the nerve endings in the endplates. The thin section electron micrographs of the enterotoxin-intoxicated preparation showed no alterations in the ultrastructure of the neuromuscular junction and the nerve endings filled with numerous synaptic vesicles. The present results, together with our previous electrophysiological findings, indicate that the enterotoxin binds specifically to the presynaptic nerve endings and inhibits neurotransmitter release at the neuromuscular junction.

  18. Temperature receptors in cutaneous nerve endings are thermostat molecules that induce thermoregulatory behaviors against thermal load

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    When skin temperature falls below a set-point, mammals experience “cold in the skin” and exhibit heat-seeking behaviors for error correction. Physiological thermostats should perform the behavioral thermoregulation, and it is important to identify the thermostats. A classical model of the sensory system states that thermoreceptors (e.g., thermoTRPs) in skin nerve endings are sensors that transform temperature into the firing rate codes that are sent to the brain, where the codes are decoded as “cold” by a labeled line theory. However, the view that the temperature code is transformed into “cold” (not temperature) is conflicting. Another model states that a thermostat exists in the brain based on the view that a skin thermo-receptor is a sensor. However, because animals have no knowledge of the principle of temperature measurement, the brain is unable to measure skin temperature with a thermometer calibrated based on a code table of each sensor in the skin. Thus, these old models cannot identify the thermostats. We have proposed a new model in which temperature receptors in a nerve ending are molecules of the thermostats. When skin temperature falls below a set-point, these molecules as a whole induce impulses as command signals sent to the brain, where these impulses activate their target neurons for “cold” and heat-seeking behaviors for error correction. Our study challenges the famous models that sensory receptor is a sensor and the brain is a code processor. PMID:27227048

  19. Temperature receptors in cutaneous nerve endings are thermostat molecules that induce thermoregulatory behaviors against thermal load.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    When skin temperature falls below a set-point, mammals experience "cold in the skin" and exhibit heat-seeking behaviors for error correction. Physiological thermostats should perform the behavioral thermoregulation, and it is important to identify the thermostats. A classical model of the sensory system states that thermoreceptors (e.g., thermoTRPs) in skin nerve endings are sensors that transform temperature into the firing rate codes that are sent to the brain, where the codes are decoded as "cold" by a labeled line theory. However, the view that the temperature code is transformed into "cold" (not temperature) is conflicting. Another model states that a thermostat exists in the brain based on the view that a skin thermo-receptor is a sensor. However, because animals have no knowledge of the principle of temperature measurement, the brain is unable to measure skin temperature with a thermometer calibrated based on a code table of each sensor in the skin. Thus, these old models cannot identify the thermostats. We have proposed a new model in which temperature receptors in a nerve ending are molecules of the thermostats. When skin temperature falls below a set-point, these molecules as a whole induce impulses as command signals sent to the brain, where these impulses activate their target neurons for "cold" and heat-seeking behaviors for error correction. Our study challenges the famous models that sensory receptor is a sensor and the brain is a code processor.

  20. Temperature receptors in cutaneous nerve endings are thermostat molecules that induce thermoregulatory behaviors against thermal load.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    When skin temperature falls below a set-point, mammals experience "cold in the skin" and exhibit heat-seeking behaviors for error correction. Physiological thermostats should perform the behavioral thermoregulation, and it is important to identify the thermostats. A classical model of the sensory system states that thermoreceptors (e.g., thermoTRPs) in skin nerve endings are sensors that transform temperature into the firing rate codes that are sent to the brain, where the codes are decoded as "cold" by a labeled line theory. However, the view that the temperature code is transformed into "cold" (not temperature) is conflicting. Another model states that a thermostat exists in the brain based on the view that a skin thermo-receptor is a sensor. However, because animals have no knowledge of the principle of temperature measurement, the brain is unable to measure skin temperature with a thermometer calibrated based on a code table of each sensor in the skin. Thus, these old models cannot identify the thermostats. We have proposed a new model in which temperature receptors in a nerve ending are molecules of the thermostats. When skin temperature falls below a set-point, these molecules as a whole induce impulses as command signals sent to the brain, where these impulses activate their target neurons for "cold" and heat-seeking behaviors for error correction. Our study challenges the famous models that sensory receptor is a sensor and the brain is a code processor. PMID:27227048

  1. Effects of free fatty acids, ethanol and development on gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate fluxes in rat nerve endings.

    PubMed

    Hitzemann, R; Mark, C; Panini, A

    1982-12-15

    The effects of type A (cis-unsaturated) and type B (trans-unsaturated and saturated) fatty acids, 1% and 3% ethanol (v/v), and development (7 days) on the thermodynamics of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport into cortical rat brain nerve endings were examined. The effects of the various manipulations, which are known to affect membrane fluidity, may be summarized. Three percent ethanol and oleic acid increased delta S degrees and delta S+ for glutamate transport and decreased delta H degrees and delta H+. Type B fatty acids had the opposite effects. In comparison to glutamate transport, GABA transport was less affected by the various manipulations and showed less specificity in terms of the fatty acid effects. Similarly, the effects of development on the thermodynamic parameters for glutamate and GABA transport were not consistent. Glutamate transport into 7-day nerve endings showed thermodynamic behavior similar to that seen when type A fatty acids were incorporated into adult nerve endings. In contrast, GABA transport into 7-day nerve endings had the character of adult nerve endings into which type B fatty acids were incorporated.

  2. Complement selectively elicits glutamate release from nerve endings in different regions of mammal central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Merega, Elisa; Di Prisco, Silvia; Lanfranco, Massimiliano; Severi, Paolo; Pittaluga, Anna

    2014-05-01

    Our study was aimed at investigating whether complement, a complex of soluble and membrane-associated serum proteins, could, in addition to its well-documented post-synaptic activity, also pre-synaptically affect the release of classic neurotransmitters in central nervous system (CNS). Complement (dilution 1 : 10 to 1 : 10000) elicited the release of preloaded [(3) H]-d-aspartate ([(3) H]d-ASP) and endogenous glutamate from mouse cortical synaptosomes in a dilution-dependent manner. It also evoked [(3) H]d-ASP release from mouse hippocampal, cerebellar, and spinal cord synaptosomes, as well as from rat and human cortical nerve endings, but left unaltered the release of GABA, [(3) H]noradrenaline or [(3) H]acetylcholine. Lowering external Na(+) (from 140 to 40 mM) or Ca(2+) (from 1.2 to 0.1 mM) ions prevented the 1 : 300 complement-evoked [(3) H]d-ASP release from mouse cortical synaptosomes. Complement-induced releasing effect was unaltered in synaptosomes entrapped with the Ca(2+) ions chelator 1,2-bis-(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N',N', tetra-acetic acid or with pertussis toxin. Nifedipine,/ω-conotoxin GVIA/ω-conotoxin MVIIC mixture as well as the vesicular ATPase blocker bafilomycin A1 were also inefficacious. The excitatory amino acid transporter blocker DL-threo-ß-benzyloxyaspartic acid, on the contrary, reduced the complement-evoked releasing effect in a concentration-dependent manner. We concluded that complement-induced releasing activity is restricted to glutamatergic nerve endings, where it was accounted for by carrier-mediated release. Our observations afford new insights into the molecular events accounting for immune and CNS crosstalk. We investigated whether complement, a complex of soluble and membrane-associated serum proteins, could pre-synaptically affect the release of classic neurotransmitters in the central nervous system (CNS). Our data provide evidence that complement-induced releasing activity is restricted to glutamatergic nerve endings

  3. Dynamic longitudinal investigation of individual nerve endings in the skin of anesthetized mice using in vivo two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yuryev, Mikhail; Khiroug, Leonard

    2012-04-01

    Visualization of individual cutaneous nerve endings has previously relied on laborious procedures of tissue excision, fixation, sectioning and staining for light or electron microscopy. We present a method for non-invasive, longitudinal two-photon microscopy of single nerve endings within the skin of anesthetized transgenic mice. Besides excellent signal-to-background ratio and nanometer-scale spatial resolution, this method offers time-lapse "movies" of pathophysiological changes in nerve fine structure over minutes, hours, days or weeks. Structure of keratinocytes and dermal matrix is visualized simultaneously with nerve endings, providing clear landmarks for longitudinal analysis. We further demonstrate feasibility of dissecting individual nerve fibers with infra-red laser and monitoring their degradation and regeneration. In summary, our excision-free optical biopsy technique is ideal for longitudinal microscopic analysis of animal skin and skin innervations in vivo and can be applied widely in preclinical models of chronic pain, allergies, skin cancers and a variety of dermatological disorders. PMID:22559685

  4. Influence of breaching the connective sheaths of the donor nerve on its myelinated sensory axons and on their sprouting into the end-to-side coapted nerve in the rat.

    PubMed

    Kovačič, Uroš; Zele, Tilen; Tomšič, Martin; Sketelj, Janez; Bajrović, Fajko F

    2012-12-10

    The influence of breaching the connective sheaths of the donor sural nerve on axonal sprouting into the end-to-side coapted peroneal nerve was examined in the rat. In parallel, the effect of these procedures on the donor nerve was assessed. The sheaths of the donor nerve at the coaptation site were either left completely intact (group A) or they were breached by epineurial sutures (group B), an epineurial window (group C), or a perineurial window (group D). In group A, the compound action potential (CAP) of sensory axons was detected in ~10% and 40% of the recipient nerves at 4 and 8 weeks, respectively, which was significantly less frequently than in group D at both recovery periods. In addition, the number of myelinated axons in the recipient nerve was significantly larger in group D than in other groups at 4 weeks. At 8 weeks, the number of axons in group A was only ~15% of the axon numbers in other groups (p<0.05). Focal subepineurial degenerative changes in the donor nerves were only seen after 4 weeks, but not later. The average CAP area and the total number of myelinated axons in the donor nerves were not different among the experimental groups. In conclusion, myelinated sensory axons are able to penetrate the epiperineurium of donor nerves after end-to-side nerve coaption; however, their ingrowth into recipient nerves is significantly enhanced by breaching the epiperineurial sheets at the coaptation site. Breaching does not cause permanent injury to the donor nerve.

  5. Mu-opiate receptor and Beta-endorphin expression in nerve endings and keratinocytes in human skin.

    PubMed

    Bigliardi-Qi, M; Sumanovski, L T; Büchner, S; Rufli, T; Bigliardi, P L

    2004-01-01

    We have previously shown that human epidermal keratinocytes express a functionally active micro-opiate receptor, which adds a new dimension to the recently developed research in neuroimmunodermatology and neurogenic inflammation in skin diseases. Human keratinocytes specifically bind and also produce beta-endorphin, the endogenous micro-opiate receptor ligand. Using confocal imaging microscopy, we could now demonstrate that micro-opiate receptors are not only expressed in keratinocytes, but also on unmyelinated peripheral nerve fibers in the dermis and epidermis. Some of the peripheral nerve fibers also express the ligand beta-endorphin. The keratinocytes positive for beta-endorphin staining are clustered around the terminal ends of the unmyelinated nerve fibers. Therefore the opiate receptor system seems to be crucial in the direct communication between nerves and skin. The keratinocytes can influence the unmyelinated nerve fibers in the epidermis directly via secreting beta-endorphin. On the other hand, nerve fibers can also secrete beta-endorphin and influence the migration, differentiation and probably also the cytokine production pattern of keratinocytes.

  6. Transcriptional Profiling of Cutaneous MRGPRD Free Nerve Endings and C-LTMRs

    PubMed Central

    Reynders, Ana; Mantilleri, Annabelle; Malapert, Pascale; Rialle, Stéphanie; Nidelet, Sabine; Laffray, Sophie; Beurrier, Corinne; Bourinet, Emmanuel; Moqrich, Aziz

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cutaneous C-unmyelinated MRGPRD+ free nerve endings and C-LTMRs innervating hair follicles convey two opposite aspects of touch sensation: a sensation of pain and a sensation of pleasant touch. The molecular mechanisms underlying these diametrically opposite functions are unknown. Here, we used a mouse model that genetically marks C-LTMRs and MRGPRD+ neurons in combination with fluorescent cell surface labeling, flow cytometry, and RNA deep-sequencing technology (RNA-seq). Cluster analysis of RNA-seq profiles of the purified neuronal subsets revealed 486 and 549 genes differentially expressed in MRGPRD-expressing neurons and C-LTMRs, respectively. We validated 48 MRGPD- and 68 C-LTMRs-enriched genes using a triple-staining approach, and the Cav3.3 channel, found to be exclusively expressed in C-LTMRs, was validated using electrophysiology. Our study greatly expands the molecular characterization of C-LTMRs and suggests that this particular population of neurons shares some molecular features with Aβ and Aδ low-threshold mechanoreceptors. PMID:25683706

  7. Tear fluid hyperosmolality increases nerve impulse activity of cold thermoreceptor endings of the cornea.

    PubMed

    Parra, Andres; Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Omar; Gallar, Juana; Belmonte, Carlos

    2014-08-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is a multifactorial disorder affecting the composition and volume of tears. DED causes ocular surface dryness, cooling, and hyperosmolality, leading ultimately to corneal epithelium damage and reduced visual performance. Ocular discomfort is the main clinical symptom in DED. However, the peripheral neural source of such unpleasant sensations is still unclear. We analyzed in excised, superfused mouse eyes, the effect of NaCl-induced hyperosmolality (325-1005 mOsm·kg(-1)) on corneal cold thermoreceptor and polymodal nociceptor nerve terminal impulse (NTI) activity. Osmolality elevations at basal corneal temperature (33.6°C) linearly increased the ongoing NTI frequency of cold thermoreceptors, at a mean rate of 0.34 imp·s(-1)/10 mOsm. This frequency increase became significant with osmolality values greater than 340 mOsm. Comparison of cold thermoreceptor activity increase induced by a dynamic temperature reduction of 1.8°C under iso- and hyperosmolal (360-mOsm) conditions provided evidence that more than 50% of the increased firing response was attributable to hyperosmolality. Comparatively, activation of corneal polymodal nociceptor endings by hyperosmolal solutions started with values of 600 mOsm and greater. Sensitization of polymodal nociceptors by continuous perfusion with an "inflammatory soup" (bradykinin, histamine, prostaglandin E2 [PGE2], serotonin, and adenosine triphosphate [ATP]) did not enhance their activation by hyperosmolal solutions. High osmolality also altered the firing pattern and shape of cold and polymodal NTIs, possibly reflecting disturbances in local membrane currents. Results strongly suggest that tear osmolality elevations in the range observed in DED predominantly excite cold thermoreceptors, supporting the hypothesis that dryness sensations experienced by these patients are due, at least in part, to an augmented activity of corneal cold thermoreceptors.

  8. Mephedrone does not damage dopamine nerve endings of the striatum, but enhances the neurotoxicity of methamphetamine, amphetamine, and MDMA.

    PubMed

    Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kane, Michael J; Briggs, Denise I; Francescutti, Dina M; Sykes, Catherine E; Shah, Mrudang M; Thomas, David M; Kuhn, Donald M

    2013-04-01

    Mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) is a β-ketoamphetamine stimulant drug of abuse with close structural and mechanistic similarities to methamphetamine. One of the most powerful actions associated with mephedrone is the ability to stimulate dopamine (DA) release and block its re-uptake through its interaction with the dopamine transporter (DAT). Although mephedrone does not cause toxicity to DA nerve endings, its ability to serve as a DAT blocker could provide protection against methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity like other DAT inhibitors. To test this possibility, mice were treated with mephedrone (10, 20, or 40 mg/kg) prior to each injection of a neurotoxic regimen of methamphetamine (four injections of 2.5 or 5.0 mg/kg at 2 h intervals). The integrity of DA nerve endings of the striatum was assessed through measures of DA, DAT, and tyrosine hydroxylase levels. The moderate to severe DA toxicity associated with the different doses of methamphetamine was not prevented by any dose of mephedrone but was, in fact, significantly enhanced. The hyperthermia caused by combined treatment with mephedrone and methamphetamine was the same as seen after either drug alone. Mephedrone also enhanced the neurotoxic effects of amphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine on DA nerve endings. In contrast, nomifensine protected against methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity. As mephedrone increases methamphetamine neurotoxicity, the present results suggest that it interacts with the DAT in a manner unlike that of other typical DAT inhibitors. The relatively innocuous effects of mephedrone alone on DA nerve endings mask a potentially dangerous interaction with drugs that are often co-abused with it, leading to heightened neurotoxicity.

  9. [Incidence of painful neuroma after end-to-end nerve suture wrapped into a collagen conduit. A prospective study of 185 cases].

    PubMed

    Thomsen, L; Schlur, C

    2013-10-01

    Three to 5% of the nerves directly and correctly sutured evolve towards significant neuropathy pain. The psychological, social and economic impact of such a consequence is very important. The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the incidence of the occurrence of a trigger zone or a neuroma, at 6months of maximum follow-up after direct nervous suture bushed in a type 1 collagen tube. Every patient taken care for a traumatic nervous injury from November 2008 to March 2012 was included in the study. The exclusion criteria were any replantation, nervous tissue defect and any distal nervous stump which could not technically be wrapped around. The only conduct used was made of collagen type 1 (Revolnerv(®), Orthomed™). All patients were examined after one, three and sixmonths for a clinical evaluation made by the same surgeon. The apparition of a trigger zone or a real neuroma was clinically assessed. One hundred and seventy-four patients for a total of 197 sutured nerves were included in the study. At the 6 months follow-up, 163 patients were evaluated for a total of 185 nerves. No patient suffered from a neuroma at this time. As the treatment of neuroma is very difficult, considering the cost and the results, wrapping direct end-to-end sutures by a collagen type 1 tube seems helping to prevent the appearance of a neuroma.

  10. Identification of Different Types of Spinal Afferent Nerve Endings That Encode Noxious and Innocuous Stimuli in the Large Intestine Using a Novel Anterograde Tracing Technique

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Nick J.; Kyloh, Melinda; Duffield, Michael

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, sensory stimuli in visceral organs, including those that underlie pain perception, are detected by spinal afferent neurons, whose cell bodies lie in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). One of the major challenges in visceral organs has been how to identify the different types of nerve endings of spinal afferents that transduce sensory stimuli into action potentials. The reason why spinal afferent nerve endings have been so challenging to identify is because no techniques have been available, until now, that can selectively label only spinal afferents, in high resolution. We have utilized an anterograde tracing technique, recently developed in our laboratory, which facilitates selective labeling of only spinal afferent axons and their nerve endings in visceral organs. Mice were anesthetized, lumbosacral DRGs surgically exposed, then injected with dextran-amine. Seven days post-surgery, the large intestine was removed. The characteristics of thirteen types of spinal afferent nerve endings were identified in detail. The greatest proportion of nerve endings was in submucosa (32%), circular muscle (25%) and myenteric ganglia (22%). Two morphologically distinct classes innervated myenteric ganglia. These were most commonly a novel class of intraganglionic varicose endings (IGVEs) and occasionally rectal intraganglionic laminar endings (rIGLEs). Three distinct classes of varicose nerve endings were found to innervate the submucosa and circular muscle, while one class innervated internodal strands, blood vessels, crypts of lieberkuhn, the mucosa and the longitudinal muscle. Distinct populations of sensory endings were CGRP-positive. We present the first complete characterization of the different types of spinal afferent nerve endings in a mammalian visceral organ. The findings reveal an unexpectedly complex array of different types of primary afferent endings that innervate specific layers of the large intestine. Some of the novel classes of nerve endings identified

  11. SEM and neurohistological observations of nerve endings in the middle region of the tongue of the collared peccary (Tayassu tajacu): a silver impregnation method.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, I; Guimarães, J P; Maia, M O; Santos, T C; Kfoury, J R; Boleta, S A; Almeida, S R Y; Righeti, M M; Miglino, M A

    2011-04-01

    The presence of lingual papillae and the nerve endings in the middle region of the tongue mucosa of collared peccary (Tayassu tajacu) were studied using scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy, based upon the silver impregnation method. The middle region of tongue mucosa revealed numerous filiform and fungiform papillae. The thick epithelial layer showed epithelial cells and a dense connective tissue layer containing nerve fibre bundles and capillaries. The sensory nerve endings, intensely stained by silver impregnation, were usually non-encapsulated and extended into the connective tissue of the filiform and fungiform papillae very close to the epithelial cells. In some regions, the sensory nerves fibres formed a dense and complex network of fine fibrils. The presence of these nerve fibrils may characterize the mechanisms of transmission of sensitive impulses to the tongue mucosa.

  12. Differential distribution of muscle and skin sympathetic nerve activity in patients with end-stage renal disease

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeanie; Campese, Vito M.; Nobakht, Niloofar; Middlekauff, Holly R.

    2008-01-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is characterized by resting sympathetic overactivity. Baseline muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), which is governed by baroreflexes and chemoreflexes, is elevated in ESRD. Whether resting skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), which is independent from baroreflex and chemoreflex control, is also elevated has never been reported in renal failure. The purpose of this study was to determine whether sympathetic overactivity of ESRD is generalized to include the skin distribution. We measured sympathetic nerve activity to both muscle and skin using microneurography in eight ESRD patients and eight controls. MSNA was significantly (P = 0.025) greater in ESRD (37.3 ± 3.6 bursts/min) when compared with controls (23.1 ± 4.4 bursts/min). However, SSNA was not elevated in ESRD (ESRD vs. controls, 17.6 ± 2.2 vs. 16.1 ± 1.7 bustst/min, P = 0.61). Similar results were obtained when MSNA was quantified as bursts per 100 heartbeats. We report the novel finding that although sympathetic activity directed to muscle is significantly elevated, activity directed to skin is not elevated in ESRD. The differential distribution of sympathetic outflow to the muscle vs. skin in ESRD is similar to the pattern seen in other disease states characterized by sympathetic overactivity such as heart failure and obesity. PMID:18845779

  13. Differential distribution of muscle and skin sympathetic nerve activity in patients with end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeanie; Campese, Vito M; Nobakht, Niloofar; Middlekauff, Holly R

    2008-12-01

    End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is characterized by resting sympathetic overactivity. Baseline muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), which is governed by baroreflexes and chemoreflexes, is elevated in ESRD. Whether resting skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA), which is independent from baroreflex and chemoreflex control, is also elevated has never been reported in renal failure. The purpose of this study was to determine whether sympathetic overactivity of ESRD is generalized to include the skin distribution. We measured sympathetic nerve activity to both muscle and skin using microneurography in eight ESRD patients and eight controls. MSNA was significantly (P = 0.025) greater in ESRD (37.3 +/- 3.6 bursts/min) when compared with controls (23.1 +/- 4.4 bursts/min). However, SSNA was not elevated in ESRD (ESRD vs. controls, 17.6 +/- 2.2 vs. 16.1 +/- 1.7 bustst/min, P = 0.61). Similar results were obtained when MSNA was quantified as bursts per 100 heartbeats. We report the novel finding that although sympathetic activity directed to muscle is significantly elevated, activity directed to skin is not elevated in ESRD. The differential distribution of sympathetic outflow to the muscle vs. skin in ESRD is similar to the pattern seen in other disease states characterized by sympathetic overactivity such as heart failure and obesity.

  14. Decreased intracellular calcium mediates the histamine H3-receptor-induced attenuation of norepinephrine exocytosis from cardiac sympathetic nerve endings

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Randi B.; Poonwasi, Kumar S.; Seyedi, Nahid; Wilson, Sandy J.; Lovenberg, Timothy W.; Levi, Roberto

    2002-01-01

    Activation of presynatic histamine H3 receptors (H3R) down-regulates norepinephrine exocytosis from cardiac sympathetic nerve terminals, in both normal and ischemic conditions. Analogous to the effects of α2-adrenoceptors, which also act prejunctionally to inhibit norepinephrine release, H3R-mediated antiexocytotic effects could result from a decreased Ca2+ influx into nerve endings. We tested this hypothesis in sympathetic nerve terminals isolated from guinea pig heart (cardiac synaptosomes) and in a model human neuronal cell line (SH-SY5Y), which we stably transfected with human H3R cDNA (SH-SY5Y-H3). We found that reducing Ca2+ influx in response to membrane depolarization by inhibiting N-type Ca2+ channels with ω-conotoxin (ω-CTX) greatly attenuated the exocytosis of [3H]norepinephrine from both SH-SY5Y and SH-SY5Y-H3 cells, as well as the exocytosis of endogenous norepinephrine from cardiac synaptosomes. Similar to ω-CTX, activation of H3R with the selective H3R-agonist imetit also reduced both the rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration (Cai) and norepinephrine exocytosis in response to membrane depolarization. The selective H3R antagonist thioperamide prevented this effect of imetit. In the parent SH-SY5Y cells lacking H3R, imetit affected neither the rise in Cai nor [3H]norepinephrine exocytosis, demonstrating that the presence of H3R is a prerequisite for a decrease in Cai in response to imetit and that H3R activation modulates norepinephrine exocytosis by limiting the magnitude of the increase in Cai. Inasmuch as excessive norepinephrine exocytosis is a leading cause of cardiac dysfunction and arrhythmias during acute myocardial ischemia, attenuation of norepinephrine release by H3R agonists may offer a novel therapeutic approach to this condition. PMID:11752397

  15. SEROTONIN BINDING TO NERVE-ENDING PARTICLES OF THE RAT BRAIN AND ITS INHIBITION BY LYSERGIC ACID DIETHYLAMIDE.

    PubMed

    MARCHBANKS, R M; ROSENBLATT, F; O'BRIEN, R D

    1964-05-29

    The binding of serotonin to nerve-ending particles and other preparations from rat brain has been examined. By investigating the amount bound as a function of serotonin concentration from 10(-7)M to 1O(-2)M, it was possible to identify three major components having K(assoc) (association constant) values of 2 x 10(6), 5 x 10(4), and 5 x 10(2). The component having the highest binding constant was not present in liver and appeared to be confined to the cortex and midbrain regions. This component is inhibited by d-lysergic acid diethylamide at low concentrations. Solubilization of this binding component has been achieved.

  16. Physiological and Clinical Implications of Adrenergic Pathways at High Altitude.

    PubMed

    Richalet, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    The adrenergic system is part of a full array of mechanisms allowing the human body to adapt to the hypoxic environment. Triggered by the stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors, the adrenergic centers in the medulla are activated in acute hypoxia and augment the adrenergic drive to the organs, especially to the heart, leading to tachycardia. With prolonged exposure to altitude hypoxia, the adrenergic drive persists, as witnessed by elevated blood concentrations of catecholamines and nerve activity in adrenergic fibers. In response to this persistent stimulation, the pathways leading to the activation of adenylate cyclase are modified. A downregulation of β-adrenergic and adenosinergic receptors is observed, while muscarinic receptors are upregulated. The expression and activity of Gi and Gs proteins are modified, leading to a decreased response of adenylate cyclase activity to adrenergic stimulation. The clinical consequences of these cellular and molecular changes are of importance, especially for exercise performance and protection of heart function. The decrease in maximal exercise heart rate in prolonged hypoxia is fully accounted for the observed changes in adrenergic and muscarinic pathways. The decreased heart rate response to isoproterenol infusion is another marker of the desensitization of adrenergic pathways. These changes can be considered as mechanisms protecting the heart from a too high oxygen consumption in conditions where the oxygen availability is severely reduced. Similarly, intermittent exposure to hypoxia has been shown to protect the heart from an ischemic insult with similar mechanisms involving G proteins and downregulation of β receptors. Other pathways with G proteins are concerned in adaptation to hypoxia, such as lactate release by the muscles and renal handling of calcium. Altogether, the activation of the adrenergic system is useful for the acute physiological response to hypoxia. With prolonged exposure to hypoxia, the autonomous

  17. A comparative study of red and blue light-emitting diodes and low-level laser in regeneration of the transected sciatic nerve after an end to end neurorrhaphy in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Takhtfooladi, Mohammad Ashrafzadeh; Sharifi, Davood

    2015-12-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the effects of red and blue light-emitting diodes (LED) and low-level laser (LLL) on the regeneration of the transected sciatic nerve after an end-to-end neurorrhaphy in rabbits. Forty healthy mature male New Zealand rabbits were randomly assigned into four experimental groups: control, LLL (680 nm), red LED (650 nm), and blue LED (450 nm). All animals underwent the right sciatic nerve neurotmesis injury under general anesthesia and end-to-end anastomosis. The phototherapy was initiated on the first postoperative day and lasted for 14 consecutive days at the same time of the day. On the 30th day post-surgery, the animals whose sciatic nerves were harvested for histopathological analysis were euthanized. The nerves were analyzed and quantified the following findings: Schwann cells, large myelinic axons, and neurons. In the LLL group, as compared to other groups, an increase in the number of all analyzed aspects was observed with significance level (P < 0.05). This finding suggests that postoperative LLL irradiation was able to accelerate and potentialize the peripheral nerve regeneration process in rabbits within 14 days of irradiation.

  18. Purinergic nerves and receptors.

    PubMed

    Burnstock, G

    1980-01-01

    The presence of a non-cholinergic, non-adrenergic component in the vertebrate autonomic nervous system is now well established. Evidence that ATP is the transmitter released from some of these nerves (called "purinergic') includes: (a) synthesis and storage of ATP in nerves: (b) release of ATP from the nerves when they are stimulated; (c) exogenously applied ATP mimicking the action of nerve-released transmitter; (d) the presence of ectoenzymes which inactivate ATP; (e) drugs which produce similar blocking or potentiating effects on the response to exogenously applied ATP and nerve stimulation. A basis for distinguishing two types of purinergic receptors has been proposed according to four criteria: relative potencies of agonists, competitive antagonists, changes in levels of cAMP and induction of prostaglandin synthesis. Thus P1 purinoceptors are most sensitive to adenosine, are competitively blocked by methylxanthines and their occupation leads to changes in cAMP accumulation; while P2 purinoceptors are most sensitive to ATP, are blocked (although not competitively) by quinidine, 2-substituted imidazolines, 2,2'-pyridylisatogen and apamin, and their occupation leads to production of prostaglandin. P2 purinoceptors mediate responses of smooth muscle to ATP released from purinergic nerves, while P1 purinoceptors mediate the presynaptic actions of adenosine on adrenergic, cholinergic and purinergic nerve terminals. PMID:6108568

  19. Adjunctive vagus nerve stimulation for treatment-resistant bipolar disorder: managing device failure or the end of battery life.

    PubMed

    Pardo, José V

    2016-01-01

    The vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) device is used not only to treat refractory seizure disorders but also mood disorders; the latter indication received CE Mark approval in 2001 and Food and Drug Administration approval in 2005. Original estimates for the end of battery life (EOBL) were approximately 6-10 years. Many neuropsychiatric patients have or will soon face EOBL. A patient with severe, life-threatening, treatment-resistant bipolar disorder underwent 9 years of stable remission following 20 months of adjunctive VNS. The device ceased operation at EOBL. Because of logistical issues, re-initiation of VNS was delayed over several months. The patient relapsed with depression, mania and mixed states, and regained remission 17 months after device replacement. This case dictates prudence in managing stable patients in remission with VNS. If the device malfunctions, urgent surgical replacement is warranted with subsequent rapid titration to previous parameters as tolerated. Several months' delay may trigger relapse and prove difficult to re-establish remission. PMID:26951440

  20. Functional end-plate recovery in long-term botulinum toxin therapy of hemifacial spasm: a nerve conduction study.

    PubMed

    Butera, C; Guerriero, R; Amadio, S; Ungaro, D; Tesfaghebriel, H; Bianchi, F; Comi, G; Del Carro, U

    2013-02-01

    Botulinum toxin type-A is currently thought to be effective and safe for hemifacial spasm (HFS). The pre-synaptic block of acetylcholine release at the neuromuscular junction induces depression of orbicularis oculi muscle compound motor action potential (CMAP). The aim of our study was to evaluate at what extent end-plate functional recovery is possible even in botulinum toxin treatments lasting up to 15 years. We examined 81 outpatients with primary HFS (mean treatment duration = 7.2 ± 4.2 years) who underwent neurophysiologic study, once clinical effect of the previous treatment had vanished. The mean CMAP amplitude, mean rectified amplitude of response 1 (R1) of the blink reflex and area of response 2 (R2) of treated orbicularis oculi muscle were measured in comparison to the controlateral side. Mean amplitude of the above mentioned parameters was slightly lower (about 20%; p < 0.001) in the treated side at the end of the follow-up period (4.7 ± 1.7 months). The CMAP amplitude reduction weakly correlated with the interval from last treatment, while other neurophysiologic parameters did not change due to treatment duration or total toxin amount. Our study demonstrates that botulinum toxin affects compound motor action potential and blink-reflex responses for at least 4-5 months in HFS patients. The residual block is slight and does not increase with repeated injections after several years of treatment. Our study, beside confirming the long-term efficacy of botulinum toxin treatment for HFS, provides neurophysiologic evidence that therapeutic effect may be obtained without hindering the regenerative potential of the nerve-muscle complex.

  1. The cholinergic blocking action of adrenergic blocking agents in the pharmacological analysis of autonomic innervation

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Helen; Burnstock, G.; Campbell, G.; Jowett, Alison; O'Shea, Judith; Wood, Margaret

    1963-01-01

    The adrenergic blocking agents tolazoline, phentolamine, piperoxan, yohimbine, phenoxybenzamine, bretylium and guanethidine block the excitatory actions both of cholinergic nerves and of added acetylcholine on a variety of vertebrate smooth muscle preparations. These cholinergic blocking actions often occurred with concentrations lower than those required to block the response of the guinea-pig vas deferens to stimulation of the adrenergic hypogastric nerve. The anti-acetylcholine activities of these drugs have been studied in detail, using the guinea-pig rectum and the toad bladder as test organs. In preparations sensitive to eserine, the anticholinesterase actions of the drugs competed with their anti-acetylcholine actions, so that either potentiation or block of responses to acetylcholine and to cholinergic nerve stimulation occurred with different concentrations. The responses of the toad bladder to acetylcholine were not potentiated by eserine. This enabled the antagonism of acetylcholine by the anti-adrenergic drugs to be estimated without interference from their anticholinesterase activity. When blocking activity was assessed on guinea-pig rectum previously treated with dyflos, the results were qualitatively similar to those on the toad bladder. Phenoxybenzamine often completely blocks responses both to added acetylcholine and to cholinergic nerve stimulation in concentrations less than those required to block adrenergic nerves. Guanethidine and piperoxan also show strong cholinergic blocking activity. Bretylium, yohimbine, tolazoline and phentolamine were less potent. However, in concentrations required to block the effect on the vas deferens of hypogastric nerve stimulation, these drugs at least halved the effects of acetylcholine and often of cholinergic nerve stimulation. It is concluded that these adrenergic blocking agents cannot be used to distinguish conclusively between adrenergic and cholinergic nerves. For reliable analysis of autonomic

  2. Phorbol esters and adenosine affect the readily releasable neurotransmitter pool by different mechanisms at amphibian motor nerve endings.

    PubMed

    Searl, T J; Silinsky, E M

    2003-12-01

    Phorbol esters and adenosine have been proposed to interact at common sites downstream of calcium entry at amphibian motor nerve endings. We thus studied the actions and interactions of phorbol esters and adenosine using electrophysiological recording techniques in conjunction with both binomial statistical analysis and high-frequency stimulation at the amphibian neuromuscular junction. To begin this study, we confirmed previous observations that synchronous evoked acetylcholine (ACh) release (reflected as endplate potentials, EPPs) is well described by a simple binomial distribution. We then used binomial analysis to study the effects of the phorbol ester phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu, 100 nM) and adenosine (50 microM) on the binomial parameters n (the number of calcium charged ACh quanta available for release) and p (the average probability of release), where the mean level of evoked ACh release (m) = np. We found that PDBu increased m by increasing the parameter n whilst adenosine reduced m by reducing n; neither agent affected the parameter p. PDBu had no effect on either the potency or efficacy of the inhibition produced by adenosine. Subtle differences between these two agents were revealed by the patterns of EPPs evoked by high-frequency trains of stimuli. Phorbol esters increased ACh release during the early phase of stimulation but not during the subsequent plateau phase. The inhibitory effect of adenosine was maximal at the beginning of the train and was still present with reduced efficacy during the plateau phase. When taken together with previous findings, these present results suggest that phorbol esters increase the immediately available store of synaptic vesicles by increasing the number of primed vesicles whilst adenosine acts at a later stage of the secretory process to decrease the number of calcium-charged primed vesicles.

  3. 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone prevents while methylone enhances methamphetamine-induced damage to dopamine nerve endings: β-ketoamphetamine modulation of neurotoxicity by the dopamine transporter

    PubMed Central

    Anneken, John H.; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    Methylone, 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), and mephedrone are psychoactive ingredients of ‘bath salts’ and their abuse represents a growing public health care concern. These drugs are cathinone derivatives and are classified chemically as β-ketoamphetamines. Because of their close structural similarity to the amphetamines, methylone, MDPV, and mephedrone share most of their pharmacological, neurochemical, and behavioral properties. One point of divergence in their actions is the ability to cause damage to the CNS. Unlike methamphetamine, the β-ketoamphetamines do not damage dopamine (DA) nerve endings. However, mephedrone has been shown to significantly accentuate methamphetamine neurotoxicity. Bath salt formulations contain numerous different psychoactive ingredients, and individuals who abuse bath salts also coabuse other illicit drugs. Therefore, we have evaluated the effects of methylone, MDPV, mephedrone, and methamphetamine on DA nerve endings. The β-ketoamphetamines alone or in all possible two-drug combinations do not result in damage to DA nerve endings but do cause hyperthermia. MDPV completely protects against the neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine while methylone accentuates it. Neither MDPV nor methylone attenuates the hyperthermic effects of methamphetamine. The potent neuroprotective effects of MDPV extend to amphetamine-, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-, and MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. These results indicate that β-ketoamphetamine drugs that are non-substrate blockers of the DA transporter (i.e., MDPV) protect against methamphetamine neurotoxicity, whereas those that are substrates for uptake by the DA transporter and which cause DA release (i.e., methylone, mephedrone) accentuate neurotoxicity. PMID:25626880

  4. Gulf War illnesses are autoimmune illnesses caused by increased activity of the p38/MAPK pathway in CD4+ immune system cells, which was caused by nerve agent prophylaxis and adrenergic load.

    PubMed

    Moss, J I

    2013-12-01

    Sodium chloride intake might increase the risk for the development of autoimmune diseases by increasing the activity of the p38/MAPK pathway in CD4+ cells thereby producing pathogenic TH17 cells which are inflammatory. Two factors (muscarinic and beta adrenergic stimulation), already shown to potentiate each other's toxic effects in whole mice, and have combined amplified sub lethal effects on mouse T cells, can have the same effect on CD4+ signaling pathways as sodium chloride. Sick 1991 Gulf War veterans express elevated Th17 cytokine activity, and therefore may have autoimmune illnesses caused directly by the above mentioned exposures.

  5. Beta-adrenergic receptor sensitivity in subjects practicing transcendental meditation.

    PubMed

    Mills, P J; Schneider, R H; Hill, D; Walton, K G; Wallace, R K

    1990-01-01

    Several studies suggest that behavioral techniques such as meditation and relaxation may be associated with reduced end organ adrenergic receptor sensitivity. Thus far the evidence supporting this hypothesis has been indirect. We present preliminary findings showing reduced beta-adrenergic receptor sensitivity in a group of subjects practicing Transcendental Meditation. The meditation group (N = 10), compared to controls (N = 10), had a lower percentage of functional lymphocyte beta-adrenergic receptors (p = 0.009), but showed no difference in total receptor number or plasma catecholamines. There were no differences between the groups in Type A behavior, the Type A components, exercise, or family history of hypertension. The results provide some support for studies postulating that meditation is associated with reduced sympathetic adrenergic receptor sensitivity, and provide encouragement for the efficacy of receptor measurement in psychophysiology research.

  6. Cholinergic inhibition of adrenergic neurosecretion in the rabbit iris-ciliary body

    SciTech Connect

    Jumblatt, J.E.; North, G.T.

    1988-04-01

    The prejunctional effects of cholinergic agents on release of norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve endings were investigated in the isolated, superfused rabbit iris-ciliary body. Stimulation-evoked release of /sup 3/H-norepinephrine was inhibited by the cholinergic agonists methacholine, oxotremorine, muscarine, carbamylcholine and acetylcholine (plus eserine), but was unmodified by pilocarpine or nicotine. Agonist-induced inhibition was antagonized selectively by atropine, indicating a muscarinic response. Atropine alone markedly enhanced norepinephrine release, revealing considerable tonic activation of prejunctional cholinergic receptors in this system. Prejunctional inhibition by carbamylcholine was found to completely override the facilitative action of forskolin or 8-bromo-cyclic AMP on neurotransmitter release. Cholinergic and alpha 2-adrenergic effects on neurosecretion were non-additive, suggesting that the underlying receptors coexist at neurotransmitter release sites.

  7. cap alpha. -2 adrenergic receptor: a radiohistochemical study

    SciTech Connect

    Unnerstall, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    ..cap alpha..-2 adrenergic agents have been shown to influence blood pressure, heart rate and other physiological and behavioral functions through interactions with adrenergic pathways within the central nervous system. Pharmacologically relevant ..cap alpha..-1 adrenergic receptors were biochemically characterized and radiohistochemically analyzed in intact tissue sections of the rat and human central nervous system. The anatomical distribution of the ..cap alpha..-2 receptors, labeled with the agonist (/sup 3/H)para-aminoclonidine, verified the concept that ..cap alpha..-2 receptors are closely associated with adrenergic nerve terminals and that ..cap alpha..-2 agents can influence autonomic and endocrine function through an action in the central nervous system. Since ..cap alpha..-2 agonists can influence sympathetic outflow, ..cap alpha..-2 binding sites were closely analyzed in the intermediolateral cell column of the thoracic spinal cord. The transport of putative presynaptic ..cap alpha..-2 binding sites in the rat sciatic nerve was analyzed by light microscopic radiohistochemical techniques. Finally, in intact tissue section of the rat central nervous system, the biochemical characteristics of (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine binding were analyzed. Data were also shown which indicates that the synthetic ..cap alpha..-2 antagonist (/sup 3/H)RX781094 also binds to ..cap alpha..-2 receptors with high-affinity. Further, the distribution of (/sup 3/H)RX781094 binding sites in the rat central nervous system was identical to the distribution seen when using (/sup 3/H)para-aminoclonidine.

  8. The effect of cold storage on the adrenergic mechanisms of intestinal smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, K.; Kurahashi, K.; Mori, J.; Shibata, S.

    1972-01-01

    1. In the guinea-pig taenia caecum, fluorescent adrenergic fibres terminate in both muscle layers. The density of these fibres is greater in the taenia than in the underlying circular muscle layer. The myenteric plexus and individual ganglion cells are also densely innervated by intensely fluorescent adrenergic nerve fibres. 2. After three days of cold storage, the specific fluorescence disappeared from all tissue layers of the taenia caecum and smooth muscle fibres. In contrast, cholinesterase active substances were still demonstrable in all tissue layers even after seven days of cold storage but the density of these substances was decreased. 3. Cold storage (3-7 days) decreased the tissue noradrenaline content and did not modify the cholinesterase enzyme activity (4 days). 4. In cold stored strips, the inhibitory response to nicotine, 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium iodide (DMPP) or electrical transmural stimulation was abolished and enhancement of the contractile response occurred. Cold storage also inhibited the inhibitory action of tyramine. Similar results were observed after reserpine treatment. 5. In fresh taenia, the relaxation produced by nicotine, DMPP and electrical transmural stimulation was inhibited by adrenoceptor blocking agents and bretylium. In cold storage preparations, contraction produced by these stimuli was blocked by parasympathetic blocking agents and potentiated by anti-cholinesterase. These results indicate that the inhibitory response to these stimulants is mediated by stimulation of the adrenergic nerve system more than by non-adrenergic nerves; the excitatory effect is probably due to stimulation of cholinergic nerves. 6. These results suggest that the adrenergic mechanisms of the taenia caecum are more labile in cold storage than the cholinergic mechanisms. Thus, the inhibitory action of cold storage on the relaxation produced by nicotine, DMPP, and transmural stimulation is probably explained by selective physical degeneration of

  9. Epineurial Window Is More Efficient in Attracting Axons than Simple Coaptation in a Sutureless (Cyanoacrylate-Bound) Model of End-to-Side Nerve Repair in the Rat Upper Limb: Functional and Morphometric Evidences and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Papalia, Igor; Magaudda, Ludovico; Righi, Maria; Ronchi, Giulia; Viano, Nicoletta; Geuna, Stefano; Colonna, Michele Rosario

    2016-01-01

    End-to-side nerve coaptation brings regenerating axons from the donor to the recipient nerve. Several techniques have been used to perform coaptation: microsurgical sutures with and without opening a window into the epi(peri)neurial connective tissue; among these, window techniques have been proven more effective in inducing axonal regeneration. The authors developed a sutureless model of end-to-side coaptation in the rat upper limb. In 19 adult Wistar rats, the median and the ulnar nerves of the left arm were approached from the axillary region, the median nerve transected and the proximal stump sutured to the pectoral muscle to prevent regeneration. Animals were then randomly divided in two experimental groups (7 animals each, 5 animals acting as control): Group 1: the distal stump of the transected median nerve was fixed to the ulnar nerve by applying cyanoacrylate solution; Group 2: a small epineurial window was opened into the epineurium of the ulnar nerve, caring to avoid damage to the nerve fibres; the distal stump of the transected median nerve was then fixed to the ulnar nerve by applying cyanoacrylate solution. The grasping test for functional evaluation was repeated every 10–11 weeks starting from week-15, up to the sacrifice (week 36). At week 36, the animals were sacrificed and the regenerated nerves harvested and processed for morphological investigations (high-resolution light microscopy as well as stereological and morphometrical analysis). This study shows that a) cyanoacrylate in end-to-side coaptation produces scarless axon regeneration without toxic effects; b) axonal regeneration and myelination occur even without opening an epineurial window, but c) the window is related to a larger number of regenerating fibres, especially myelinated and mature, and better functional outcomes. PMID:26872263

  10. Autonomic innervation of the urogenital system: adrenergic and cholinergic elements.

    PubMed

    McConnell, J; Benson, G S; Wood, J G

    1982-01-01

    The major organs of the male urogenital (UG) system have been examined in various mammals, including man, using light and electron microscopic (EM) histochemical methods. For the light microscopic study, the urinary bladder, the vas deferens and the penis (corpora cavernosa and corpus spongiosum) were studied in the rat, cat, dog, monkey and man using a glyoxylic acid (GA) method modified for peripheral adrenergic nerve fibers, and a thiocholine method for acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Fine structural analysis was done on the vasa of rat, cat, monkey and man, and on the bladder and penis of cat, dog, monkey and man. Tissue was fixed in glutaraldehyde (GMO) as a control or in glutaraldehyde-dichromate (GDC) for the specific localization of norepinephrine (NE). All organs studied demonstrated numerous adrenergic nerve fibers throughout the muscular layers, in the connective tissue, and in the adventitia of most blood vessels. These fibers had a brilliant fluorescence when visualized with the GA method, and demonstrated many varicosities with small (400-600 A) and/or large (800-1200 A) granular vesicles in both control and GDC-fixed tissue examined with the EM. Evaluation of the vesicles with the analytical electron microscope (AEM) verified that those in the GDC-fixed tissue were chrome-positive, and, therefore, NE-containing. In the vas and penis, acetylcholinesterase(AChE)-positive nerve fibers were encountered less frequently at the light microscopic level than adrenergic fibers, and few typical cholinergic varicosities were seen in these organs with the EM. In the bladder, cholinergic nerves were seen with about the same frequency as adrenergic fibers in both light microscopic and EM preparations. Also observed frequently in each of the viscera were varicosities with large to very large (800-2000 A) granular vesicles of the kind presently hypothesized to be peptidergic or purinergic. Few varicosities of the type considered sensory, with large (800-1200 A) clear

  11. [Adrenergic receptors of blood platelets].

    PubMed

    Lanza, F; Cazenave, J P

    1987-01-01

    Blood platelets possess adrenergic receptors and are stimulated by adrenaline in the circulation. This review summarizes the state of knowledge of the pharmacology of adrenergic receptors and the biochemical mechanisms of platelet activation by adrenaline in various physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:2837727

  12. 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone prevents while methylone enhances methamphetamine-induced damage to dopamine nerve endings: β-ketoamphetamine modulation of neurotoxicity by the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Anneken, John H; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M

    2015-04-01

    Methylone, 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), and mephedrone are psychoactive ingredients of 'bath salts' and their abuse represents a growing public health care concern. These drugs are cathinone derivatives and are classified chemically as β-ketoamphetamines. Because of their close structural similarity to the amphetamines, methylone, MDPV, and mephedrone share most of their pharmacological, neurochemical, and behavioral properties. One point of divergence in their actions is the ability to cause damage to the CNS. Unlike methamphetamine, the β-ketoamphetamines do not damage dopamine (DA) nerve endings. However, mephedrone has been shown to significantly accentuate methamphetamine neurotoxicity. Bath salt formulations contain numerous different psychoactive ingredients, and individuals who abuse bath salts also coabuse other illicit drugs. Therefore, we have evaluated the effects of methylone, MDPV, mephedrone, and methamphetamine on DA nerve endings. The β-ketoamphetamines alone or in all possible two-drug combinations do not result in damage to DA nerve endings but do cause hyperthermia. MDPV completely protects against the neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine while methylone accentuates it. Neither MDPV nor methylone attenuates the hyperthermic effects of methamphetamine. The potent neuroprotective effects of MDPV extend to amphetamine-, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-, and MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. These results indicate that β-ketoamphetamine drugs that are non-substrate blockers of the DA transporter (i.e., MDPV) protect against methamphetamine neurotoxicity, whereas those that are substrates for uptake by the DA transporter and which cause DA release (i.e., methylone, mephedrone) accentuate neurotoxicity. METH (a) enters DA nerve endings via the DAT, causes leakage of DA into the cytoplasm and then into the synapse via DAT-mediated reverse transport. Methylone (METHY) and mephedrone (MEPH; b), like METH, are substrates for the DAT but release

  13. 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone prevents while methylone enhances methamphetamine-induced damage to dopamine nerve endings: β-ketoamphetamine modulation of neurotoxicity by the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Anneken, John H; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M

    2015-04-01

    Methylone, 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), and mephedrone are psychoactive ingredients of 'bath salts' and their abuse represents a growing public health care concern. These drugs are cathinone derivatives and are classified chemically as β-ketoamphetamines. Because of their close structural similarity to the amphetamines, methylone, MDPV, and mephedrone share most of their pharmacological, neurochemical, and behavioral properties. One point of divergence in their actions is the ability to cause damage to the CNS. Unlike methamphetamine, the β-ketoamphetamines do not damage dopamine (DA) nerve endings. However, mephedrone has been shown to significantly accentuate methamphetamine neurotoxicity. Bath salt formulations contain numerous different psychoactive ingredients, and individuals who abuse bath salts also coabuse other illicit drugs. Therefore, we have evaluated the effects of methylone, MDPV, mephedrone, and methamphetamine on DA nerve endings. The β-ketoamphetamines alone or in all possible two-drug combinations do not result in damage to DA nerve endings but do cause hyperthermia. MDPV completely protects against the neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine while methylone accentuates it. Neither MDPV nor methylone attenuates the hyperthermic effects of methamphetamine. The potent neuroprotective effects of MDPV extend to amphetamine-, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-, and MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. These results indicate that β-ketoamphetamine drugs that are non-substrate blockers of the DA transporter (i.e., MDPV) protect against methamphetamine neurotoxicity, whereas those that are substrates for uptake by the DA transporter and which cause DA release (i.e., methylone, mephedrone) accentuate neurotoxicity. METH (a) enters DA nerve endings via the DAT, causes leakage of DA into the cytoplasm and then into the synapse via DAT-mediated reverse transport. Methylone (METHY) and mephedrone (MEPH; b), like METH, are substrates for the DAT but release

  14. Activation of κ Opioid Receptors in Cutaneous Nerve Endings by Conorphin-1, a Novel Subtype-Selective Conopeptide, Does Not Mediate Peripheral Analgesia.

    PubMed

    Deuis, Jennifer R; Whately, Ella; Brust, Andreas; Inserra, Marco C; Asvadi, Naghmeh H; Lewis, Richard J; Alewood, Paul F; Cabot, Peter J; Vetter, Irina

    2015-10-21

    Selective activation of peripheral κ opioid receptors (KORs) may overcome the dose-limiting adverse effects of conventional opioid analgesics. We recently developed a vicinal disulfide-stabilized class of peptides with subnanomolar potency at the KOR. The aim of this study was to assess the analgesic effects of one of these peptides, named conorphin-1, in comparison with the prototypical KOR-selective small molecule agonist U-50488, in several rodent pain models. Surprisingly, neither conorphin-1 nor U-50488 were analgesic when delivered peripherally by intraplantar injection at local concentrations expected to fully activate the KOR at cutaneous nerve endings. While U-50488 was analgesic when delivered at high local concentrations, this effect could not be reversed by coadministration with the selective KOR antagonist ML190 or the nonselective opioid antagonist naloxone. Instead, U-50488 likely mediated its peripheral analgesic effect through nonselective inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels, including peripheral sensory neuron isoforms NaV1.8 and NaV1.7. Our study suggests that targeting the KOR in peripheral sensory nerve endings innervating the skin is not an alternative analgesic approach. PMID:26225903

  15. Mephedrone, an abused psychoactive component of 'bath salts' and methamphetamine congener, does not cause neurotoxicity to dopamine nerve endings of the striatum.

    PubMed

    Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kane, Michael J; Francescutti, Dina M; Sykes, Katherine E; Shah, Mrudang M; Mohammed, Abiy M; Thomas, David M; Kuhn, Donald M

    2012-03-01

    Mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) is a β-ketoamphetamine with close structural analogy to substituted amphetamines and cathinone derivatives. Abuse of mephedrone has increased dramatically in recent years and has become a significant public health problem in the United States and Europe. Unfortunately, very little information is available on the pharmacological and neurochemical actions of mephedrone. In light of the proven abuse potential of mephedrone and considering its similarity to methamphetamine and methcathinone, it is particularly important to know if mephedrone shares with these agents an ability to cause damage to dopamine nerve endings of the striatum. Accordingly, we treated mice with a binge-like regimen of mephedrone (4 × 20 or 40 mg/kg) and examined the striatum for evidence of neurotoxicity 2 or 7 days after treatment. While mephedrone caused hyperthermia and locomotor stimulation, it did not lower striatal levels of dopamine, tyrosine hydroxylase or the dopamine transporter under any of the treatment conditions used presently. Furthermore, mephedrone did not cause microglial activation in striatum nor did it increase glial fibrillary acidic protein levels. Taken together, these surprising results suggest that mephedrone, despite its numerous mechanistic overlaps with methamphetamine and the cathinone derivatives, does not cause neurotoxicity to dopamine nerve endings of the striatum.

  16. beta. -Adrenergic stimulation of brown adipocyte proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Geloeen, A.; Collet, A.J.; Guay, G.; Bukowiecki, L.J. Laboratoire de Thermoregulation et Metabolisme Energetique, Lyon )

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms of brown adipose tissue (BAT) growth were studied by quantitative photonic radioautography using tritiated thymidine to follow mitotic activity. To identify the nature of the adrenergic pathways mediating brown adipocyte proliferation and differentiation, the effects of cold exposure (4 days at 4{degree}C) on BAT growth were compared with those induced by treating rats at 25{degree}C with norepinephrine (a mixed agonist), isoproterenol (a {beta}-agonist), and phenylephrine (an {alpha}-agonist). Norepinephrine mimicked the effects of cold exposure, not only on the mitotic activity, but also on the distribution of the labeling among the various cellular types. Isoproterenol entirely reproduced the effects of norepinephrine both on the labeling index and on the cellular type labeling frequency. These results demonstrate that norepinephrine triggers a coordinated proliferation of brown adipocytes and endothelial cells in warm-exposed rats that is similar to that observed after cold exposure. They also suggest that cold exposure stimulates BAT growth by increasing the release of norepinephrine from sympathetic nerves and that the neurohormone activates mitoses in BAT precursor cells via {beta}-adrenergic pathways.

  17. Augmentation of partially regenerated nerves by end-to-side side-to-side grafting neurotization: experience based on eight late obstetric brachial plexus cases

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Objective The effect of end-to-side neurotization of partially regenerated recipient nerves on improving motor power in late obstetric brachial plexus lesions, so-called nerve augmentation, was investigated. Methods Eight cases aged 3 – 7 years were operated upon and followed up for 4 years (C5,6 rupture C7,8T1 avulsion: 5; C5,6,7,8 rupture T1 avulsion:1; C5,6,8T1 rupture C7 avulsion:1; C5,6,7 ruptureC8 T1 compression: one 3 year presentation after former neurotization at 3 months). Grade 1–3 muscles were neurotized. Grade0 muscles were neurotized, if the electromyogram showed scattered motor unit action potentials on voluntary contraction without interference pattern. Donor nerves included: the phrenic, accessory, descending and ascending loops of the ansa cervicalis, 3rd and 4th intercostals and contralateral C7. Results Superior proximal to distal regeneration was observed firstly. Differential regeneration of muscles supplied by the same nerve was observed secondly (superior supraspinatus to infraspinatus regeneration). Differential regeneration of antagonistic muscles was observed thirdly (superior biceps to triceps and pronator teres to supinator recovery). Differential regeneration of fibres within the same muscle was observed fourthly (superior anterior and middle to posterior deltoid regeneration). Differential regeneration of muscles having different preoperative motor powers was noted fifthly; improvement to Grade 3 or more occurred more in Grade2 than in Grade0 or Grade1 muscles. Improvements of cocontractions and of shoulder, forearm and wrist deformities were noted sixthly. The shoulder, elbow and hand scores improved in 4 cases. Limitations The sample size is small. Controls are necessary to rule out any natural improvement of the lesion. There is intra- and interobserver variability in testing muscle power and cocontractions. Conclusion Nerve augmentation improves cocontractions and muscle power in the biceps, pectoral muscles, supraspinatus

  18. On the adrenergic system of ganoid fish: the beluga, Huso huso (chondrostei).

    PubMed

    Balashov, N V; Fänge, R; Govyrin, V A; Leont'eva, G R; Nilsson, S; Prozorovskaya, M P

    1981-04-01

    The adrenergic system of the beluga, Huso huso, was studied by glyoxylic acid fluorescence histochemistry, analyses of catecholamine content in various organs and studies of the effects of acetylcholine and adrenaline on isolated strip preparations from blood vessels, spleen, atrium and ventricle. Chromaffin cells were found mainly in the walls of the posterior cardinal veins, and to some extent also in the wall of the celiaco-mesenteric artery. The plasma concentration of adrenaline was high enough to affect the contraction force of the isolated atrial and ventricular strips, thus adding an adrenergic component to a possible cholinergic inhibitory vagal control of the heart. Fluorescence histochemistry revealed no direct adrenergic innervation of the heart, but blood vessels in the heart and elsewhere received a rich supply of adrenergic nerve terminals. Adrenaline contracted the celiaco-mesenteric artery and the spleen, and produced positive inotropic effects on the paced atrial and ventricular strip preparations. Acetylcholine contracted the ventral aorta and the celiaco-mesenteric artery, and reduced the contraction force of paced ventricular and, especially, atrial preparations. It is concluded that the beluga has a well developed adrenergic system consisting of both chromaffin cells and adrenergic neurons with varicose nerve terminals of the type found in the higher vertebrates. PMID:7304205

  19. Optical Monitoring of Living Nerve Terminal Labeling in Hair Follicle Lanceolate Endings of the Ex Vivo Mouse Ear Skin

    PubMed Central

    Bewick, Guy S.; Banks, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    A novel dissection and recording technique is described for optical monitoring staining and de-staining of lanceolate terminals surrounding hair follicles in the skin of the mouse pinna. The preparation is simple and relatively fast, reliably yielding extensive regions of multiple labeled units of living nerve terminals to study uptake and release of styryl pyridinium dyes extensively used in studies of vesicle recycling. Subdividing the preparations before labeling allows test vs. control comparisons in the same ear from a single individual. Helpful tips are given for improving the quality of the preparation, the labeling and the imaging parameters. This new system is suitable for assaying pharmacologically and mechanically-induced uptake and release of these vital dyes in lanceolate terminals in both wild-type and genetically modified animals. Examples of modulatory influences on labeling intensity are given. PMID:27077818

  20. Optical Monitoring of Living Nerve Terminal Labeling in Hair Follicle Lanceolate Endings of the Ex Vivo Mouse Ear Skin.

    PubMed

    Bewick, Guy S; Banks, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    A novel dissection and recording technique is described for optical monitoring staining and de-staining of lanceolate terminals surrounding hair follicles in the skin of the mouse pinna. The preparation is simple and relatively fast, reliably yielding extensive regions of multiple labeled units of living nerve terminals to study uptake and release of styryl pyridinium dyes extensively used in studies of vesicle recycling. Subdividing the preparations before labeling allows test vs. control comparisons in the same ear from a single individual. Helpful tips are given for improving the quality of the preparation, the labeling and the imaging parameters. This new system is suitable for assaying pharmacologically and mechanically-induced uptake and release of these vital dyes in lanceolate terminals in both wild-type and genetically modified animals. Examples of modulatory influences on labeling intensity are given. PMID:27077818

  1. Adrenergic receptor subtypes in the cerebral circulation of newborn piglets

    SciTech Connect

    Wagerle, L.C.; Delivoria-Papadopoulos, M.

    1987-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the ..cap alpha..-adrenergic receptor subtype mediating cerebral vasoconstriction during sympathetic nerve stimulation in the newborn piglet. The effect of ..cap alpha../sub 1/- and ..cap alpha../sub 2/-antagonists prazosin and yohimbine on the cerebrovascular response to unilateral electrical stimulation (15 Hz, 15 V) of the superior cervical sympathetic trunk was studied in 25 newborn piglets. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured with tracer microspheres. Sympathetic stimulation decreased blood flow to the ipsilateral cerebrum hippocampus, choroid plexus, and masseter muscle. ..cap alpha../sub 1/-Adrenergic receptor blockade with prazosin inhibited the sympathetic vasoconstriction in the cerebrum, hippocampus, and masseter muscle and abolished it in the choroid plexus. ..cap alpha../sub s/-Adrenergic receptor blockade with yohimbine had no effect. Following the higher dose of yohimbine, however, blood flow to all brain regions was increased by approximately two-fold, possibly due to enhanced cerebral metabolism. These data demonstrate that vascular ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptors mediate vasoconstriction to neuroadrenergic stimulation in cerebral resistance vessels in the newborn piglet.

  2. Secreted Herpes Simplex Virus-2 Glycoprotein G Modifies NGF-TrkA Signaling to Attract Free Nerve Endings to the Site of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cabrera, Jorge Rubén; Viejo-Borbolla, Abel; Martinez-Martín, Nadia; Blanco, Soledad; Wandosell, Francisco; Alcamí, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 are highly prevalent viruses that cause a variety of diseases, from cold sores to encephalitis. Both viruses establish latency in peripheral neurons but the molecular mechanisms facilitating the infection of neurons are not fully understood. Using surface plasmon resonance and crosslinking assays, we show that glycoprotein G (gG) from HSV-2, known to modulate immune mediators (chemokines), also interacts with neurotrophic factors, with high affinity. In our experimental model, HSV-2 secreted gG (SgG2) increases nerve growth factor (NGF)-dependent axonal growth of sympathetic neurons ex vivo, and modifies tropomyosin related kinase (Trk)A-mediated signaling. SgG2 alters TrkA recruitment to lipid rafts and decreases TrkA internalization. We could show, with microfluidic devices, that SgG2 reduced NGF-induced TrkA retrograde transport. In vivo, both HSV-2 infection and SgG2 expression in mouse hindpaw epidermis enhance axonal growth modifying the termination zone of the NGF-dependent peptidergic free nerve endings. This constitutes, to our knowledge, the discovery of the first viral protein that modulates neurotrophins, an activity that may facilitate HSV-2 infection of neurons. This dual function of the chemokine-binding protein SgG2 uncovers a novel strategy developed by HSV-2 to modulate factors from both the immune and nervous systems. PMID:25611061

  3. Localization of beta and gamma subunits of ENaC in sensory nerve endings in the rat foot pad.

    PubMed

    Drummond, H A; Abboud, F M; Welsh, M J

    2000-11-24

    The molecular mechanisms underlying mechanoelectrical transduction and the receptors that detect light touch remain uncertain. Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans suggest that members of the DEG/ENaC cation channel family may be mechanoreceptors. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that subunits of the mammalian epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) family are expressed in touch receptors in rat hairless skin. We detected betaENaC and gammaENaC, but not alphaENaC transcripts in cervical and lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Using immunofluorescence, we found betaENaC and gammaENaC expressed in medium to large lumbar DRG neurons. Moreover, we detected these two subunits in Merkel cell-neurite complexes, Meissner-like corpuscles, and small lamellated corpuscles, specialized mechanosensory structures of the skin. Within these structures, betaENaC and gammaENaC were localized in the nerve fibers believed to contain the sensors responsive to mechanical stress. Thus beta and gammaENaC subunits are good candidates as components of the molecular sensor that detects touch. PMID:11082481

  4. The role of cyclic AMP and its protein kinase in mediating acetylcholine release and the action of adenosine at frog motor nerve endings.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsh, J. K.; Silinsky, E. M.; Solsona, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    1. The importance of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) and its protein kinase (protein kinase A, PKA) in promoting acetylcholine (ACh) release was studied at frog motor nerve endings. The effects of cyclic AMP-dependent protein phosphorylation on the action of adenosine receptor agonists were also investigated. 2. Cyclic AMP was delivered to a local region of the cytoplasm just beneath the plasma membrane of motor nerve endings using phospholipid vesicles (liposomes) as a vehicle. Cyclic AMP in liposomes produced a parallel reduction in the mean level of evoked ACh release (m) and spontaneous ACh release (miniature endplate potential frequency; m.e.p.p.f) in most experiments. These inhibitory effects of cyclic AMP on quantal ACh release resemble the action of adenosine. 3. The effects of global increases in cytoplasmic cyclic AMP concentrations using lipophilic cyclic AMP analogues were generally different from those observed with cyclic AMP. 8-(4-Chlorophenylthio) cyclic AMP (CPT cyclic AMP) produced approximately two fold increases in m and m.e.p.p.f. Dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db cyclic AMP) also increased m and m.e.p.p.f, with the effect on m being smaller and more variable. 4. All three cyclic AMP analogues reduced the effects of adenosine receptor agonists on spontaneous and evoked ACh release. 5. The roles of protein phosphorylation in mediating ACh release and the inhibitory effects of adenosine were studied with the protein kinase inhibitor H7. H7 (30-100 microM) produced no consistent effect on evoked or spontaneous ACh release. At these concentrations, however, H7 exerted an unfortunate inhibitory action on the nicotinic ACh receptor/ion channel.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2175231

  5. Search for a cardiac nociceptor: stimulation by bradykinin of sympathetic afferent nerve endings in the heart of the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Baker, D G; Coleridge, H M; Coleridge, J C; Nerdrum, T

    1980-01-01

    1. We have examined the effect of bradykinin on impulse traffic in sympathetic afferent fibres from the heart, great vessels and pleura, and have attempted to identify cardiac nociceptors that on the basis of their functional characteristics might have a role in the initiation of cardiac pain. 2. In anaesthetized cats, we recorded afferent impulses from 'single-fibre' slips of the left 2nd--5th thoracic rami communicantes and associated chain, and selected fibres arising from endings in the heart, great vessels, pericardium and pleura. We applied bradykinin solution (0 . 1--1 . 0 microgram/ml.) locally to the site of the ending; we also injected bradykinin (0 . 3--1 . 0 microgram/kg) into the left atrium. 3. Afferent endings excited by bradykinin (159 of 191 tested) were of two types. The larger group (140) were primarily mechanoreceptors with A delta of C fibres (mean conduction velocity, 7 . 5 +/- 0 . 6 m/sec). They were very sensitive to light touch. Those located in the heart, great vessels or overlying pleura had a cardiac rhythm of discharge and were stimulated by an increase in blood pressure or cardiac volume. 4. Bradykinin increased mechanoreceptor firing from 0 . 7 +/- to 5 . 0 +/- 0 . 3 (mean +/- S.E. of mean) impulses/sec. Some endings appeared to be stimulated directly by bradykinin, others sensitized by it so that they responded more vigorously to the pulsatile mechanical stimulation associated with the cardiac cycle. 5. The smaller group of eighteen endings, of which ten were in the left ventricle, were primarily chemosensitive. Most had C fibres, a few had A delta fibres (mean conduction velocity, 2 . 3 +/- 0 . 7 m/sec). They were insensitive to light touch. With one exception they never fired with a cardiac rhythm, and even large increases in aortic or left ventricular pressure had little effect on impulse frequency. 6. Chemosensitive endings were stimulated by bradykinin, impulse activity increasing from 0 . 6 to 15 . 6 +/- 1 . 3 impulses/sec and

  6. Functional differences between junctional and extrajunctional adrenergic receptor activation in mammalian ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Ajijola, Olujimi A.; Vaseghi, Marmar; Zhou, Wei; Yamakawa, Kentaro; Benharash, Peyman; Hadaya, Joseph; Lux, Robert L.; Mahajan, Aman

    2013-01-01

    Increased cardiac sympathetic activation worsens dispersion of repolarization and is proarrhythmic. The functional differences between intrinsic nerve stimulation and adrenergic receptor activation remain incompletely understood. This study was undertaken to determine the functional differences between efferent cardiac sympathetic nerve stimulation and direct adrenergic receptor activation in porcine ventricles. Female Yorkshire pigs (n = 13) underwent surgical exposure of the heart and stellate ganglia. A 56-electrode sock was placed over the ventricles to record epicardial electrograms. Animals underwent bilateral sympathetic stimulation (BSS) (n = 8) or norepinephrine (NE) administration (n = 5). Activation recovery intervals (ARIs) were measured at each electrode before and during BSS or NE. The degree of ARI shortening during BSS or NE administration was used as a measure of functional nerve or adrenergic receptor density. During BSS, ARI shortening was nonuniform across the epicardium (F value 9.62, P = 0.003), with ARI shortening greatest in the mid-basal lateral right ventricle and least in the midposterior left ventricle (LV) (mean normalized values: 0.9 ± 0.08 vs. 0.56 ± 0.08; P = 0.03). NE administration resulted in greater ARI shortening in the LV apex than basal segments [0.91 ± 0.04 vs. 0.63 ± 0.05 (averaged basal segments); P = 0.003]. Dispersion of ARIs increased in 50% and 60% of the subjects undergoing BSS and NE, respectively, but decreased in the others. There is nonuniform response to cardiac sympathetic activation of both porcine ventricles, which is not fully explained by adrenergic receptor density. Different pools of adrenergic receptors may mediate the cardiac electrophysiological effects of efferent sympathetic nerve activity and circulating catecholamines. PMID:23241324

  7. Effects of hemodialysis on macular and retinal nerve fiber layer thicknesses in non-diabetic patients with end stage renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Atilgan, Cemile U.; Guven, Dilek; Akarsu, Ozge P.; Sakaci, Tamer; Sendul, Selam Y.; Baydar, Yasemin; Atilgan, Kadir G.; Turker, Ibrahim C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the thicknesses of retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and macula by fourier-domain (FD) optical coherence tomography (OCT) in non-diabetic patients with end-stage-renal-failure (ESRF) undergoing hemodialysis (HD). Methods: This is a prospective and observational study. Both eyes of 20 patients receiving HD (group 1) and 34 control patients (group 2) were evaluated by FD-OCT. Macular and RNFL thicknesses were compared between groups and their correlation with age, duration of HD, and gender were examined. In group 1, macular and RNFL thicknesses were evaluated before and shortly after HD in the first day, first and sixth months. Results: In group 1, pre-HD temporal, inferior, average RNFL thicknesses were thinner than group 2. This thinning did not correlate with duration of HD, age and gender. Pre-HD macular thicknesses were thinner than group 2. These thinnings did not correlate with age, but the thinnings at superior, nasal and average thickness correlated negatively with duration of HD. Nasal, temporal, and average macular thicknesses were thinner in female patients. The thickenings of RNFL and macula that were observed in the after HD first day and first month did not showed consistency in the sixth month except superior quadrant RNFL. Conclusion: Macular and RNFL thicknesses of patients receiving HD were less than the normal population. Age has no effect on these thinnings. The duration of HD affects more than gender. Hemodialysis session causes a consistent increase in superior quadrant RNFL. PMID:27279510

  8. Ganglionic adrenergic action modulates ovarian steroids and nitric oxide in prepubertal rat.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Silvia Marcela; Casais, Marilina; Sosa, Zulema; Rastrilla, Ana María

    2006-08-01

    Both peripheral innervation and nitric oxide (NO) participate in ovarian steroidogenesis. The purpose of this work was to analyse the ganglionic adrenergic influence on the ovarian release of steroids and NO and the possible steroids/NO relationship. The experiments were carried out in the ex vivo coeliac ganglion-superior ovarian nerve (SON)-ovary system of prepubertal rats. The coeliac ganglion-SON-ovary system was incubated in Krebs Ringer-bicarbonate buffer in presence of adrenergic agents in the ganglionic compartment. The accumulation of progesterone, androstenedione, oestradiol and NO in the ovarian incubation liquid was measured. Norepinephrine in coeliac ganglion inhibited the liberation of progesterone and increased androstenedione, oestradiol and NO in ovary. The addition of alpha and beta adrenergic antagonists also showed different responses in the liberation of the substances mentioned before, which, from a physiological point of view, reveals the presence of adrenergic receptors in coeliac ganglion. In relation to propranolol, it does not revert the effect of noradrenaline on the liberation of progesterone, which leads us to think that it might also have a "per se" effect on the ganglion, responsible for the ovarian response observed for progesterone. Finally, we can conclude that the ganglionic adrenergic action via SON participates on the regulation of the prepubertal ovary in one of two ways: either increasing the NO, a gaseous neurotransmitter with cytostatic characteristics, to favour the immature follicles to remain dormant or increasing the liberation of androstenedione and oestradiol, the steroids necessary for the beginning of the near first estral cycle.

  9. Modification by choline of adrenergic transmission in rat mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Malik, K. U.; McGiff, J. C.

    1971-01-01

    1. The action of choline on the vasoconstrictor responses of the perfused mesenteric arteries of the rat to sympathetic nerve stimulation and to injected noradrenaline has been investigated. 2. The infusion of choline (500 μg/ml), for periods of 15 s, increased the response to sympathetic nerve stimulation, whereas the infusion of the same concentration for 20 min greatly reduced the response to nerve stimulation. Choline (up to 500 μg/ml), infused either for short or long periods, did not alter the response to injected noradrenaline. 3. The inhibitory action of choline on the response to nerve stimulation was abolished either by an increase in the calcium concentration from 1·8 to 5·4 mM or by simultaneous infusion of (+)-amphetamine or atropine. 4. The results suggest that choline in concentrations of 500 μg/ml has the same effect on adrenergic transmission in mesenteric arteries as acetylcholine at concentrations of 5 ng/ml. PMID:4339884

  10. Recent advances in research on nitrergic nerve-mediated vasodilatation.

    PubMed

    Toda, Noboru; Okamura, Tomio

    2015-06-01

    Cerebral vascular resistance and blood flow were widely considered to be regulated solely by tonic innervation of vasoconstrictor adrenergic nerves. However, pieces of evidence suggesting that parasympathetic nitrergic nerve activation elicits vasodilatation in dog and monkey cerebral arteries were found in 1990. Nitric oxide (NO) as a neurotransmitter liberated from parasympathetic postganglionic neurons decreases cerebral vascular tone and resistance and increases cerebral blood flow, which overcome vasoconstrictor responses to norepinephrine liberated from adrenergic nerves. Functional roles of nitrergic vasodilator nerves are found also in peripheral vasculature, including pulmonary, renal, mesenteric, hepatic, ocular, uterine, nasal, skeletal muscle, and cutaneous arteries and veins; however, adrenergic nerve-induced vasoconstriction is evidently greater than nitrergic vasodilatation in these vasculatures. In coronary arteries, neurogenic NO-mediated vasodilatation is not clearly noted; however, vasodilatation is induced by norepinephrine released from adrenergic nerves that activates β1-adrenoceptors. Impaired actions of NO liberated from the endothelium and nitrergic neurons are suggested to participate in cerebral hypoperfusion, leading to brain dysfunction, like that in Alzheimer's disease. Nitrergic neural dysfunction participates in impaired circulation in peripheral organs and tissues and also in systemic blood pressure increase. NO and vasodilator peptides, as sensory neuromediators, are involved in neurogenic vasodilatation in the skin. Functioning of nitrergic vasodilator nerves is evidenced not only in a variety of mammals, including humans and monkeys, but also in non-mammals. The present review article includes recent advances in research on the functional importance of nitrergic nerves concerning the control of cerebral blood flow, as well as other regions, and vascular resistance. Although information is still insufficient, the nitrergic nerve

  11. Detection of catecholamine and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) containing nerve endings in the median eminence and the organon vasculosum laminae terminalis by fluorescence histochemistry and immunohistochemistry on the same microscopic sections.

    PubMed

    Ibata, Y; Watanabe, K; Kinoshita, H; Kubo, S; Sano, Y; Sin, S; Hashimura, E; Imagawa, K

    1979-02-01

    Distribution of catecholamine (CA) and LH-RH nerve endings in the median eminence (ME) and the organon vasculosum laminae terminalis (OVLT) of the rat was investigated by application of fluorescence histochemistry and immunohistochemistry on the same sections of the tissue. In the ME, those two kinds of endings coexisted in the lateral portion of the middle part of ME, and in the wall of tuberoinfundibular sulcus, where they might be considered to have functional correlation. In the OVLT they were also distributed in fairly near distance, but they were not so closely associated as observed in the ME.

  12. Beta Adrenergic Receptors in Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sivamani, Raja K.; Lam, Susanne T.; Isseroff, R. Rivkah

    2007-01-01

    Synopsis Beta2 adrenergic receptors were identified in keratinocytes more than 30 years ago, but their function in the epidermis continues to be elucidated. Abnormalities in their expression, signaling pathway, or in the generation of endogenous catecholamine agonists by keratinocytes have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cutaneous diseases such as atopic dermatitis, vitiligo and psoriasis. New studies also indicate that the beta2AR also modulates keratinocyte migration, and thus can function to regulate wound re-epithelialization. This review focuses on the function of these receptors in keratinocytes and their contribution to cutaneous physiology and disease. PMID:17903623

  13. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    PubMed Central

    Arslantunali, D; Dursun, T; Yucel, D; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers) and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type) are being presented. PMID:25489251

  14. Nerve biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss of axon tissue Metabolic neuropathies Necrotizing vasculitis Sarcoidosis Risks Allergic reaction to the local anesthetic Discomfort ... Neurosarcoidosis Peripheral neuropathy Primary amyloidosis Radial nerve dysfunction Sarcoidosis Tibial nerve dysfunction Update Date 6/1/2015 ...

  15. Evidence that the human cutaneous venoarteriolar response is not mediated by adrenergic mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Shibasaki, M.; Yen, T. C.

    2002-01-01

    The venoarteriolar response causes vasoconstriction to skin and muscle via local mechanisms secondary to venous congestion. The purpose of this project was to investigate whether this response occurs through alpha-adrenergic mechanisms. In supine individuals, forearm skin blood flow was monitored via laser-Doppler flowmetry over sites following local administration of terazosin (alpha(1)-antagonist), yohimbine (alpha(2)-antagonist), phentolamine (non-selective alpha-antagonist) and bretylium tosylate (inhibits neurotransmission of adrenergic nerves) via intradermal microdialysis or intradermal injection. In addition, skin blood flow was monitored over an area of forearm skin that was locally anaesthetized via application of EMLA (2.5 % lidocaine (lignocaine) and 2.5 % prilocaine) cream. Skin blood flow was also monitored over adjacent sites that received the vehicle for the specified drug. Each trial was performed on a minimum of seven subjects and on separate days. The venoarteriolar response was engaged by lowering the subject's arm from heart level such that the sites of skin blood flow measurement were 34 +/- 1 cm below the heart. The arm remained in this position for 2 min. Selective and non-selective alpha-adrenoceptor antagonism and presynaptic inhibition of adrenergic neurotransmission did not abolish the venoarteriolar response. However, local anaesthesia blocked the venoarteriolar response without altering alpha-adrenergic mediated vasoconstriction. These data suggest that the venoarteriolar response does not occur through adrenergic mechanisms as previously reported. Rather, the venoarteriolar response may due to myogenic mechanisms associated with changes in vascular pressure or is mediated by a non-adrenergic, but neurally mediated, local mechanism.

  16. Histamine H(3) receptor-mediated modulation of perivascular nerve transmission in rat mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Sun, Pengyuan; Takatori, Shingo; Jin, Xin; Koyama, Toshihiro; Tangsucharit, Panot; Li, Simin; Zamami, Yoshito; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2011-03-25

    The rat mesenteric artery has been shown to be innervated by adrenergic vasoconstrictor nerves and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing (CGRPergic) vasodilator nerves. The present study was designed to investigate the involvement of histamine H(3) receptors in the neurotransmission of perivascular adrenergic and CGRPergic nerves. The mesenteric vascular beds without an endothelium isolated from male Wistar rats were perfused with Krebs solution and perfusion pressure was measured. In preparations with resting tension, the selective H(3) receptor agonist (R)-α-methylhistamine (α-methylhistamine; 10-100nM) significantly reduced periarterial nerve stimulation (2-8Hz)-induced vasoconstriction and noradrenaline release in the perfusate without an effect on the vasoconstriction induced by exogenously injected noradrenaline (0.5, 1.0nmol). In preparations with active tone produced by methoxamine (2μM) and in the presence of guanethidine (5μM), the periarterial nerve stimulation (1, 2Hz)-induced vasodilator response was inhibited by α-methylhistamine (0.1-1μM) perfusion without affecting vasodilation induced by exogenously injected CGRP (5pmol). Clobenpropit (histamine H(3) receptor antagonist, 1μM) canceled the α-methylhistamine-induced decrease in the periarterial nerve stimulation-induced vasoconstriction and noradrenaline release and periarterial nerve stimulation-induced vasodilation. These results suggest that the stimulation of H(3) receptors located in rat perivascular nerves inhibits presynaptically the neurotransmission of not only adrenergic nerves, but also CGRP nerves, by decreasing neurotransmitters.

  17. [Adrenergic beta-agonist intoxication].

    PubMed

    Carrola, Paulo; Devesa, Nuno; Silva, José Manuel; Ramos, Fernando; Alexandrino, Mário B; Moura, José J

    2003-01-01

    The authors describe two clinical cases (father and daughter), observed in the Hospital Urgency with distal tremors, anxiety, palpitations, nausea, headaches and dizziness, two hours after ingestión of cow liver. They also had leucocytosis (with neutrophylia), hypokalemia and hyperglycaemia. After treatment with potassium i.v. and propranolol, the symptoms disappeared. The symptoms recurred at home because the patients didn't take the prescribed medication and persisted for five days, with spontaneous disappearance. The serum of both patients revealed the presence of clenbuterol (65 hg/ml - father and 58 hg/ml - daughter). The animal's liver had a concentration of 1,42 mg/kg. Clenbuterol is a ß-adrenergic agonist with low specificity, with some veterinary indications. However, this substance has been illegally used as a growth's promotor. We intend to alert doctors for this problem, particularly those that work in the Urgency.

  18. Upregulation of α1-adrenoceptors on cutaneous nerve fibres after partial sciatic nerve ligation and in complex regional pain syndrome type II.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Peter D; Drummond, Eleanor S; Dawson, Linda F; Mitchell, Vanessa; Finch, Philip M; Vaughan, Christopher W; Phillips, Jacqueline K

    2014-03-01

    After peripheral nerve injury, nociceptive afferents acquire an abnormal excitability to adrenergic agents, possibly due to an enhanced expression of α1-adrenoceptors (α1-ARs) on these nerve fibres. To investigate this in the present study, changes in α1-AR expression on nerve fibres in the skin and sciatic nerve trunk were assessed using immunohistochemistry in an animal model of neuropathic pain involving partial ligation of the sciatic nerve. In addition, α1-AR expression on nerve fibres was examined in painful and unaffected skin of patients who developed complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) after a peripheral nerve injury (CRPS type II). Four days after partial ligation of the sciatic nerve, α1-AR expression was greater on dermal nerve fibres that survived the injury than on dermal nerve fibres after sham surgery. This heightened α1-AR expression was observed on nonpeptidergic nociceptive afferents in the injured sciatic nerve, dermal nerve bundles, and the papillary dermis. Heightened expression of α1-AR in dermal nerve bundles after peripheral nerve injury also colocalized with neurofilament 200, a marker of myelinated nerve fibres. In each patient examined, α1-AR expression was greater on nerve fibres in skin affected by CRPS than in unaffected skin from the same patient or from pain-free controls. Together, these findings provide compelling evidence for an upregulation of α1-ARs on cutaneous nociceptive afferents after peripheral nerve injury. Activation of these receptors by circulating or locally secreted catecholamines might contribute to chronic pain in CRPS type II.

  19. Selective α1-adrenergic blockade disturbs the regional distribution of cerebral blood flow during static handgrip exercise.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Igor A; Mattos, João D; Campos, Monique O; Machado, Alessandro C; Rocha, Marcos P; Rocha, Natalia G; Vianna, Lauro C; Nobrega, Antonio C L

    2016-06-01

    Handgrip-induced increases in blood flow through the contralateral artery that supplies the cortical representation of the arm have been hypothesized as a consequence of neurovascular coupling and a resultant metabolic attenuation of sympathetic cerebral vasoconstriction. In contrast, sympathetic restraint, in theory, inhibits changes in perfusion of the cerebral ipsilateral blood vessels. To confirm whether sympathetic nerve activity modulates cerebral blood flow distribution during static handgrip (SHG) exercise, beat-to-beat contra- and ipsilateral internal carotid artery blood flow (ICA; Doppler) and mean arterial pressure (MAP; Finometer) were simultaneously assessed in nine healthy men (27 ± 5 yr), both at rest and during a 2-min SHG bout (30% maximal voluntary contraction), under two experimental conditions: 1) control and 2) α1-adrenergic receptor blockade. End-tidal carbon dioxide (rebreathing system) was clamped throughout the study. SHG induced increases in MAP (+31.4 ± 10.7 mmHg, P < 0.05) and contralateral ICA blood flow (+80.9 ± 62.5 ml/min, P < 0.05), while no changes were observed in the ipsilateral vessel (-9.8 ± 39.3 ml/min, P > 0.05). The reduction in ipsilateral ICA vascular conductance (VC) was greater compared with contralateral ICA (contralateral: -0.8 ± 0.8 vs. ipsilateral: -2.6 ± 1.3 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1), P < 0.05). Prazosin was effective to induce α1-blockade since phenylephrine-induced increases in MAP were greatly reduced (P < 0.05). Under α1-adrenergic receptor blockade, SHG evoked smaller MAP responses (+19.4 ± 9.2, P < 0.05) but similar increases in ICAs blood flow (contralateral: +58.4 ± 21.5 vs. ipsilateral: +54.3 ± 46.2 ml/min, P > 0.05) and decreases in VC (contralateral: -0.4 ± 0.7 vs. ipsilateral: -0.4 ± 1.0 ml·min(-1)·mmHg(-1), P > 0.05). These findings indicate a role of sympathetic nerve activity in the regulation of cerebral blood flow distribution during SHG.

  20. Modification by Beta-Adrenergic Blockade of the Circulatory Responses to Acute Hypoxia in Man*

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, David W.; Kontos, Hermes A.; Raper, A. Jarrell; Patterson, John L.

    1967-01-01

    In 17 healthy men, beta-adrenergic blockade reduced significantly the tachycardia and the elevation of cardiac output associated with inhalation of 7.5% oxygen for 7 to 10 minutes. Hypoxia did not increase plasma concentrations of epinephrine or norepinephrine in six subjects. Furthermore, blockade of alpha and beta receptors in the forearm did not modify the vasodilation in the forearm induced by hypoxia, providing pharmacologic evidence that hypoxia of the degree and duration used was not associated with an increase in the concentrations of circulating catecholamines in man. Part of the increase in cardiac output and heart rate during acute hypoxia in man is produced by stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors, probably by cardiac sympathetic nerves. The mechanism of the vasodilation in the forearm during hypoxia remains uncertain. PMID:4381183

  1. Effectively Axonal-supercharged Interpositional Jump-Graft with an Artificial Nerve Conduit for Rat Facial Nerve Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Niimi, Yosuke; Takeuchi, Yuichi; Sasaki, Ryo; Watanabe, Yorikatsu; Yamato, Masayuki; Miyata, Mariko; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Interpositional jump graft (IPJG) is a nerve graft axonally supercharged from the hypoglossal nerve. However, for using the technique, an autologous nerve, which should contain the great auricular and sural nerves, must be obtained. Depending on the donor site, unavoidable issues such as nerve disorders and postoperative scarring may appear. To reduce the issues, in this study, the authors developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit and investigated the efficacy of an IPJG with an artificial nerve conduit in a rat facial nerve paresis model. Methods: A ligature clip was used to crush the facial nerve trunk, thereby creating a partial facial nerve paresis model. An artificial nerve conduit was then prepared with a 10-mm-long silicone tube containing 10 μL type I collagen and used to create an IPJG between the facial nerve trunk and the hypoglossal nerve (the silicone tube group). Thirteen weeks after the surgery, the outcome was histologically and physiologically compared with conventional IPJG with autograft using the great auricular nerve. Results: Retrograde tracer test confirmed a double innervation by the facial and hypoglossal nerve nuclei. In the autograft and silicone tube groups, the regeneration of myelinated axons was observed. Conclusion: In this study, the authors successfully developed an end-to-side neurorrhaphy technique with the recipient nerve and an artificial nerve conduit, and revealed that an IPJG in the conduit was effective in the rat facial nerve paresis model. PMID:26180717

  2. Vagal non-adrenergic inhibition of guinea-pig stomach

    PubMed Central

    Beani, L.; Bianchi, Clementina; Crema, A.

    1971-01-01

    1. The effect of vagal and sympathetic stimulation on the mechanical and electrical activity (intracellular recording) of the body of the guinea-pig stomach was investigated in vitro. 2. Following atropine, 1 × 10-6-1 × 10-7 g/ml., vagal responses were reversed from excitatory to inhibitory. 3. Sympathetic blockade, produced by α- and β-receptor antagonists and adrenergic neurone-blocking agents, reduced or abolished sympathetic, but not vagal inhibition. 4. Hexamethonium (5 × 10-5 g/ml.) reduced vagal relaxation to 11-30% according to the stimulation rate. The residual response was maintained in the presence of 5-hydroxytryptamine tachyphylaxis. 5. Many muscle cells were observed to be under the influence of both vagus and sympathetic nerves: the effect of sympathetic stimulation was always inhibitory in nature, but high stimulation rates were required. The effect of vagal stimulation was both excitatory and inhibitory even in the absence of atropine: low stimulation rates gave rise either to E.J.P.s (excitatory junctional potentials), often followed by spikes, or to I.J.P.s (inhibitory junctional potentials). 6. In some spontaneously firing cells the interruption of electrical activity produced by vagal stimulation at 2/sec and sympathetic stimulation at 20/sec was recorded for a long enough time to check the effect of guanethedine (5 × 10-6 g/ml.): the drug selectively blocked sympathetic inhibition. 7. The significance of the inhibitory non-adrenergic transmitter, released by the intramural neurones activated by preganglionic vagal fibres, is discussed. PMID:4398576

  3. Structure, function, and regulation of adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Strosberg, A. D.

    1993-01-01

    Adrenergic receptors for adrenaline and noradrenaline belong to the large multigenic family of receptors coupled to GTP-binding proteins. Three pharmacologic types have been identified: alpha 1-, alpha 2-, and beta-adrenergic receptors. Each of these has three subtypes, characterized by both structural and functional differences. The alpha 2 and beta receptors are coupled negatively and positively, respectively, to adenylyl cyclase via Gi or Gs regulatory proteins, and the alpha 1 receptors modulate phospholipase C via the Go protein. Subtype expression is regulated at the level of the gene, the mRNA, and the protein through various transcriptional and postsynthetic mechanisms. Adrenergic receptors constitute, after rhodopsin, one of the best studied models for the other receptors coupled to G proteins that are likely to display similar structural and functional properties. PMID:8401205

  4. Cadaveric nerve allotransplantation in the treatment of persistent thoracic neuralgia.

    PubMed

    Barbour, John R; Yee, Andrew; Moore, Amy M; Trulock, Elbert P; Buchowski, Jacob M; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2015-04-01

    When relief from neuralgia cannot be achieved with traditional methods, neurectomy may be considered to abate the stimulus, and primary opposition of the terminal nerve ending is recommended to prevent neuroma. Nerve repair with autograft is limited by autologous nerves available for large nerve defects. Cadaveric allografts provide an unlimited graft source without donor-site morbidities, but are rapidly rejected unless appropriate immunosuppression is achieved. An optimal treatment method for nerve allograft transplantation would minimize rejection while simultaneously permitting nerve regeneration. This report details a novel experience of nerve allograft transplantation using cadaveric nerve grafts to desensitize persistent postoperative thoracic neuralgia.

  5. The ultrastructure of the sensory nerve endings in the articular capsule of the knee joint of the domestic cat (Ruffini corpuscles and Pacinian corpuscles).

    PubMed Central

    Halata, Z

    1977-01-01

    Two types of mechanoreceptor have been found in the articular capsule of the knee joint of the domestic cat--Ruffini corpuscles and Pacinian corpuscles. Ruffini corpuscles are situated in the stratum fibrosum and consist of 2 to 6 cylinders. Each cylinder is made up of an afferent axon (diameter 3-4 micrometer), its swellings and terminal processes, Schwann cells enveloping the nerve swellings and terminal processes, endoneural connective tissue and a perineural capsule. The perineural capsule is incomplete in Ruffini corpuscles. The Pacinian corpuscles are 20 to 40 micrometer wide and 150-250 micrometer long. They are situated in groups of up to five at the boundary between the stratum synoviale and the stratum fibrosum. The afferent axon is myelinated (diameter 3-5 micrometer). Its terminal portion is inside the inner bulb which is formed of modified Schwann cells. Each corpuscle is enveloped by a perineural capsule (4-8 layers). The ultrastructure of the Pacinian corpuscles is compared with the ultrastructure of the skin receptors in the cat. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:604339

  6. Neuropathic Pain Phenotype Does Not Involve the NLRP3 Inflammasome and Its End Product Interleukin-1β in the Mice Spared Nerve Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Curto-Reyes, Verdad; Kirschmann, Guylène; Pertin, Marie; Drexler, Stephan K.; Decosterd, Isabelle; Suter, Marc R.

    2015-01-01

    The NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is one of the main sources of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and is involved in several inflammatory-related pathologies. To date, its relationship with pain has not been studied in depth. The aim of our study was to elucidate the role of NLRP3 inflammasome and IL-1β production on neuropathic pain. Results showed that basal pain sensitivity is unaltered in NLRP3-/- mice as well as responses to formalin test. Spared nerve injury (SNI) surgery induced the development of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in a similar way in both genotypes and did not modify mRNA levels of the NLRP3 inflammasome components in the spinal cord. Intrathecal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) injection increases apoptosis-associated speck like protein (ASC), caspase-1 and IL-1β expression in both wildtype and NLRP3-/- mice. Those data suggest that NLRP3 is not involved in neuropathic pain and also that other sources of IL-1β are implicated in neuroinflammatory responses induced by LPS. PMID:26218747

  7. Nerve conduction

    MedlinePlus

    ... fascicles) that contain hundreds of individual nerve fibers (neurons). Neurons consist of dendrites, axon, and cell body. The ... tree-like structures that receive signals from other neurons and from special sensory cells that sense the ...

  8. Early nerve ending rescue from oxidative damage and energy failure by L: -carnitine as post-treatment in two neurotoxic models in rat: recovery of antioxidant and reductive capacities.

    PubMed

    Elinos-Calderón, Diana; Robledo-Arratia, Yolanda; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José; Ali, Syed F; Santamaría, Abel

    2009-08-01

    Cell rescue is a primary need during acute and chronic insults to the central nervous system. Functional preservation during the early stages of toxicity in a given degenerative event may represent a significant amelioration of detrimental processes linked to neuronal cell loss. Excitotoxicity and depleted cellular energy are toxic events leading to cell death in several neurodegenerative disorders. In this work, the effects of the well-known antioxidant and energy precursor, L: -carnitine (L: -CAR), were tested as a post-treatment in two neurotoxic models under in vitro and in vivo conditions. The experimental models tested included: (1) a typical excitotoxic and pro-oxidant inducer, quinolinic acid (QUIN); and (2) a mitochondrial energy inhibitor, 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NP). For in vitro studies, increasing concentrations of L: -CAR (10-1,000 microM) were added to the isolated brain synaptosomes at different times (1, 3 and 6 h) after the incubation with toxins (100 microM QUIN and 1 mM 3-NP), and 30 min later, lipid peroxidation (LP) and mitochondrial dysfunction (MD) were evaluated. For in vivo purposes, L: -CAR (100 mg/kg, i.p.) was given to rats either as a single administration 120 min after the intrastriatal infusion of QUIN (240 nmol/microl) or 3-NP (500 nmol/microl), or for 7 consecutive days (starting 120 min post-lesion). LP and MD were evaluated 4 h and 7 days post-lesions in isolated striatal synaptosomes. Our results show that, despite some variations depending on the toxic model tested, the time of exposure, or the biomarker evaluated, nerve ending protection can be mostly achieved by L: -CAR within the first hours after the toxic insults started, suggesting that targeting the ongoing oxidative damage and/or energy depletion during the first stages of neurotoxic events is essential to rescue nerve endings.

  9. Modulation of the release of ( sup 3 H)norepinephrine from the base and body of the rat urinary bladder by endogenous adrenergic and cholinergic mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Somogyi, G.T.; de Groat, W.C. )

    1990-10-01

    Modulation of (3H)NE release was studied in rat urinary bladder strips prelabeled with (3H)NE. (3H)NE uptake occurred in strips from the bladder base and body, but was very prominent in the base where the noradrenergic innervation is most dense. Electrical field stimulation markedly increased (3H)NE outflow from the superfused tissue. The quantity of (3H)NE release was approximately equal during three consecutive periods of stimulation. Activation of presynaptic muscarinic receptors by 1.0 microM oxotremorine reduced (3H)NE release to 46% of the control. Atropine (1 microM) blocked the effect of oxotremorine and increased the release to 147% of predrug control levels. Activation of presynaptic alpha-2 adrenoceptors by 1 microM clonidine reduced (3H)NE release to 55% of control. Yohimbine blocked the action of clonidine and increased the release to 148% of control. The release of (3H)NE from the bladder base and body was increased by both 1 microM atropine (to 167% and 174% of control, respectively) and 1 microM yohimbine (to 286% and 425% of control, respectively). Atropine and yohimbine administered in combination had similar facilitatory effects as when administered alone. We conclude that the release of (3H)NE from adrenergic nerve endings in electrically stimulated bladder strips is modulated via endogenous transmitters acting on both muscarinic and alpha-2 adrenergic presynaptic receptors and that the latter provide the most prominent control.

  10. Successful obturator nerve repairing: Intraoperative sural nerve graft harvesting in endometrium cancer patient

    PubMed Central

    Harma, Müge; Sel, Görker; Açıkgöz, Bektaş; Harma, Mehmet İbrahim

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Intraoperative injury of obturator nerve is a rare complication of gynecologic surgeries, it has been reported especially in patients with endometriosis and genitourinary malignancies. Gynecologic patients undergoing open lymphadenectomy are at increased risk of obturator nerve injury. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 60-year-old woman with FIGO stage II Grade II endometrial adenocarcinoma underwent bilateral pelvic paraaortic lymphadenectomy. During right obturator lymph node dissection, the right obturator nerve was inadvertently transected with Harmonic scalpel sealing system. The graft was used to anastomose epyneurium of distal segment of obturator nerve to its counterpart in the proximal segment with 10–0 prolen suture. DISCUSSION In case of iatrogenic nerve transection, microsurgical end to end tension-free coaptation is advocated. In case of the obturator nerve is fixed and because of the thermal injury end to end alignment can not be achieved, nerve grafting is necessary. CONCLUSION According to our knowledge, successful immediate grafting of iatrogenically damaged obturator nerve during pelvic lymphadenectomy in our patient is the third report of such a case, but also it has a unique feature of being the first obturator nerve repairing case after dissected with tissue sealing system which causes large sealed area that does not make it possible to make end-to-end anastomosis without nerve harvesting. PMID:24814984

  11. Adrenergic lipolysis in guinea pig is not a beta 3-adrenergic response: comparison with human adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Carpéné, C; Castan, I; Collon, P; Galitzky, J; Moratinos, J; Lafontan, M

    1994-03-01

    beta 3-Adrenoceptor agonists are potent lipolytic activators in rats, but they are only weak stimulators in human adipocytes, indicating interspecies differences in the adrenergic regulation of lipid mobilization. Like human but not rat adipocytes, guinea pig fat cells were poorly responsive to the beta 3-agonists BRL-37344, CGP-12177, SR-58611, and ICI-215001, acid metabolite of ICI-D7114. In guinea pigs, the beta 1-agonist dobutamine was more lipolytic than the beta 2-agonist procaterol. Anatomic location of fat deposits was without major influence on the beta-adrenergic responsiveness. Weak responses to beta 3-agonists were found whatever the sex or the age (from 2 days to 16 mo) of the animals. Even in the interscapular brown adipose tissue, which is well known in rats for its beta 3-adrenergic responsiveness, a blunted response to BRL-37344 was observed. The alpha 2-adrenergic antilipolytic effect and receptor number were smaller in guinea pig than in human adipocytes, but the beta-adrenergic receptor number was similar in the two species. Thus guinea pig adipocytes resemble human fat cells when their weak beta 3-adrenergic responsiveness is considered. PMID:7909205

  12. Regulation and function of the alpha/sub 2/ adrenergic autoreceptor in the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Spengler, R.N.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether changes observed in the number of alpha/sub 2/ adrenergic receptors in the brain as measured by radioligand binding experiments reflect changes in the function of alpha/sub 2/ autoregulatory receptors which are located on noradrenergic nerve terminals. Inhibition by clonidine of field stimulated /sup 3/H-norepinephrine (/sup 3/H-NE) release from rat hippocampal slices before and after several drug treatments was analyzed to investigate changes in alpha/sub 2/ adrenergic receptor function. Clonidine in a concentration-dependent manner inhibited /sup 3/H-NE release. The effect of clonidine was blocked by the specific alpha/sub 2/ adrenergic receptor antagonist, idazoxan. The cumulative administration of clonidine generated a smooth and well-fitted log-concentration-effect curve. Results are presented which demonstrate that this technique can be employed to investigate the role of changes in the function of the alpha/sub 2/ autoregulatory receptor. The present investigation also examined representatives of four drug classes which have been shown to alter the specific binding of /sup 3/H-clonidine to neural membranes to determine whether changes in the alpha/sub 2/ autoregulatory receptor function also occur.

  13. Morphological studies of the vestibular nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstroem, B.

    1973-01-01

    The anatomy of the intratemporal part of the vestibular nerve in man, and the possible age related degenerative changes in the nerve were studied. The form and structure of the vestibular ganglion was studied with the light microscope. A numerical analysis of the vestibular nerve, and caliber spectra of the myelinated fibers in the vestibular nerve branches were studied in individuals of varying ages. It was found that the peripheral endings of the vestibular nerve form a complicated pattern inside the vestibular sensory epithelia. A detailed description of the sensory cells and their surface organelles is included.

  14. alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptor mechanisms in spontaneous contractile activity of rat ileal longitudinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Roland; Rickenbacher, Andreas; Shaw, Sidney; Balsiger, Bruno M

    2005-02-01

    Gastrointestinal motility is influenced by adrenergic modulation. Our aim was to identify specific subtypes of adrenergic receptors involved in inhibitory mechanisms that modulate gut smooth muscle contractile activity. Muscle strips of rat ileal longitudinal muscle were evaluated for spontaneous contractile activity and for equimolar dose-responses (10(-7) to 3 x 10(-5) M) to the adrenergic agents norepinephrine (nonselective agonist), phenylephrine (alpha(1)-agonist), clonidine (alpha(2)-agonist), prenalterol (beta(1)-agonist), ritodrine (beta(2)-agonist), and ZD7114 (beta(3)-agonist) in the presence and absence of tetrodotoxin (nonselective nerve blocker). Norepinephrine (3 x 10(-5) M) inhibited 65 +/- 6% (mean +/- SEM) of spontaneous contractile activity. The same molar dose of ritodrine, phenylephrine, or ZD7114 resulted in less inhibition (46 +/- 7%, 31 +/- 5%, and 39 +/- 3%, respectively; P < 0.05). The calculated molar concentration of ZD7114 needed to induce 50% inhibition was similar to that of norepinephrine, whereas higher concentrations of phenylephrine or ritodrine were required. Clonidine and prenalterol had no effect on contractile activity. Blockade of intramural neural transmission by tetrodotoxin affected the responses to ritodrine and phenylephrine (but not to norepinephrine or ZD7114), suggesting that these agents exert part of their effects via neurally mediated enteric pathways. Our results suggest that adrenergic modulation of contractile activity in the rat ileum is mediated primarily by muscular beta(3)-, beta(2)-, and alpha(1)-receptor mechanisms; the latter two also involve neural pathways. PMID:15694819

  15. Selective β2-adrenergic Antagonist Butoxamine Reduces Orthodontic Tooth Movement.

    PubMed

    Sato, T; Miyazawa, K; Suzuki, Y; Mizutani, Y; Uchibori, S; Asaoka, R; Arai, M; Togari, A; Goto, S

    2014-08-01

    Recently, involvement of the sympathetic nervous system in bone metabolism has attracted attention. β2-Adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) is presented on osteoblastic and osteoclastic cells. We previously demonstrated that β-AR blockers at low dose improve osteoporosis with hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system via β2-AR blocking, while they may have a somewhat inhibitory effect on osteoblastic activity at high doses. In this study, the effects of butoxamine (BUT), a specific β2-AR antagonist, on tooth movement were examined in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) showing osteoporosis with hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system. We administered BUT (1 mg/kg) orally, and closed-coil springs were inserted into the upper-left first molar. After sacrifice, we calculated the amount of tooth movement and analyzed the trabecular microarchitecture and histomorphometry. The distance in the SHR control was greater than that in the Wistar-Kyoto rat group, but no significant difference was found in the SHR treated with BUT compared with the Wistar-Kyoto rat control. Analysis of bone volume per tissue volume, trabecular number, and osteoclast surface per bone surface in the alveolar bone showed clear bone loss by an increase of bone resorption in SHR. In addition, BUT treatment resulted in a recovery of alveolar bone loss. Furthermore, TH-immunoreactive nerves in the periodontal ligament were increased by tooth movement, and BUT administration decreased TH-immunoreactive nerves. These results suggest that BUT prevents alveolar bone loss and orthodontic tooth movement via β2-AR blocking.

  16. Peripheral Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal cord. Like static on a telephone line, peripheral nerve disorders distort or interrupt the messages between the brain ... body. There are more than 100 kinds of peripheral nerve disorders. They can affect one nerve or many nerves. ...

  17. Nerve biopsy (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Nerve biopsy is the removal of a small piece of nerve for examination. Through a small incision, a sample ... is removed and examined under a microscope. Nerve biopsy may be performed to identify nerve degeneration, identify ...

  18. Effect of oblique nerve grafting on peripheral nerve regeneration in rats.

    PubMed

    Kotulska, Katarzyna; Marcol, Wiesław; Larysz-Brysz, Magdalena; Tendera, Zofia; Malinowska-Kołodziej, Izabela; Slusarczyk, Wojciech; Jedrzejowska-Szypułka, Halina; Lewin-Kowalik, Joanna

    2006-01-01

    Current methods of peripheral nerve repair are to rejoin cut nerve stumps directly or to bridge large gaps with autologous nerve grafts. In both cases the surface of nerve stump endings is typically cut perpendicularly to the long axis of the nerve. The outcome of such operations, however, is still not satisfactory. In this study, we examine the effect of oblique nerve cutting and grafting on morphological as well as functional features of regeneration. In adult rats, sciatic nerve was cut and rejoined either directly or using an autologous graft, at 90 degrees or 30 degrees angle. Functional regeneration was assessed by walking track analysis during 12-week follow-up. Afterwards muscle weight was measured and histological studies were performed. The latter included nerve fibers and Schwann cells counting, as well as visualization of scar formation and epineural fibrosis. Nerves cut obliquely and rejoined showed better functional recovery than perpendicularly transected. Similar effect was observed after oblique grafting when compared to perpendicular one. Numbers of nerve fibers growing into the distal stump of the nerve as well as the number of Schwann cells were significantly higher in obliquely than in perpendicularly operated nerves. Moreover, growing axons were arranged more regularly following oblique treatment. These data indicate that joining or grafting the nerve stumps at acute angle is a more profitable method of nerve repair than the standard procedure performed at right angle. PMID:17066410

  19. Hypersomnolence with beta-adrenergic blockers.

    PubMed

    Thachil, J; Zeller, J R; Kochar, M S

    1987-11-01

    An elderly, mildly demented, hypertensive male patient developed hypersomnolence on administration of propranolol for treatment of hypertension; no other cause for hypersomnolence was detected. Upon replacement of propranolol with atenolol, he felt better but continued to be quite somnolent. When atenolol was discontinued, he reported to have lack of sleep. On readministration of subtherapeutic doses of the same beta-adrenergic blocking agents, he once again experienced excessive sleepiness. By discontinuing beta-blocking agents and introducing captopril, he felt much better, became pleasant and talkative, and blood pressure was well controlled. Beta antagonists are important drugs in the management of many cardiovascular problems. Propranolol, a lipophilic beta-blocking agent, and atenolol, a hydrophilic beta-blocking agent, are two of the major agents currently used clinically in the United States. Numerous neuropsychiatric side-effects of the beta-adrenergic blocking drugs have been reported, but hypersomnolence is not readily recognized as one of them. PMID:3665616

  20. Electrical Stimulation Decreases Coupling Efficiency Between Beta-Adrenergic Receptors and Cyclic AMP Production in Cultured Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.

    1999-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells in culture is an effective way to simulate the effects of muscle contraction and its effects on gene expression in muscle cells. Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor and its coupling to cyclic AMP synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this project was to determine if electrical stimulation altered the beta-adrenergic response in muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for seven days in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional two days at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. At the end of this two-day stimulation period, beta-adrenergic receptor population was measured by the binding of tritium-labeled CGP-12177 to muscle cells, and coupling to cAMP synthesis was measured by Radioimmunoassay (RIA) after treating the cells for 10 min with the potent (beta)AR agonist, isoproterenol. The number of beta adrenergic receptors and the basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP were not affected by electrical stimulation. However, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately 50%. Thus, an enhanced level of contraction reduces the coupling efficiency of beta-adrenergic receptors for cyclic AMP production.

  1. Probing of β-adrenergic receptors by novel fluorescent β-adrenergic blockers

    PubMed Central

    Atlas, Daphne; Levitzki, Alexander

    1977-01-01

    The synthesis of two high-affinity fluorescent β-adrenergic blockers is described: dl-N1-[2-hydroxy-3-(1-naphthyloxy)propyl]-N2-(9-acridyl)-1,2-propanediamine (9-aminoacridylpropanolol, 9-AAP) and dl-N-[2-hydroxy-3-(1-naphthyloxy)propyl]-N′-dansylethylenediamine (dansyl analogue of propranolol, DAPN). Both 9-AAP and DAPN inhibit competitively the l-epinephrine-dependent adenylate cyclase activity [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] in turkey erythrocyte membranes without affecting the fluoride-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. Similarly, 9-AAP and DAPN inhibit in a competitive manner the binding of [125I]-iodohydroxybenzylpindolol to these β-adrenergic receptors. The two fluorescent β-adrenergic blockers 9-AAP and DAPN probe specifically β-adrenergic receptors in the central nervous system as well as in other organs when injected into rats. The fluorescence pattern can be monitored by fluorescence microscopy performed on cryostat slices of these organs. The appearance of the characteristic fluorescence pattern can be blocked in a stereospecific fashion by a prior injection of l-propranolol and not by a prior injection of d-propranolol. These compounds therefore offer a powerful means to map β-adrenergic receptors in vivo. The stereospecific displacement of 9-AAP from the β-adrenergic receptors of turkey erythrocyte membranes by l-propranolol and by l-epinephrine can be detected in vitro using front-face fluorescence. The potential use of these compounds to probe β-receptors in vitro and in vivo is discussed. Images PMID:23531

  2. Homologous beta-adrenergic desensitization in isolated rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    García-Sáinz, J A; Michel, B

    1987-01-01

    Hepatocytes from hypothyroid rats have a marked beta-adrenergic responsiveness. Preincubation of these hepatocytes with isoprenaline induced a time-dependent and concentration-dependent desensitization of the beta-adrenergic responsiveness without altering that to glucagon (homologous desensitization). The desensitization was evidenced both in the cyclic AMP accumulation and in the stimulation of ureagenesis induced by the beta-adrenergic agonists. Under the same conditions, preincubation with glucagon induced no desensitization. Propranolol was also unable to induce desensitization, but blocked that induced by isoprenaline. Pertussis-toxin treatment did not alter the homologous beta-adrenergic desensitization induced by isoprenaline. PMID:2825633

  3. Sympathetic nerve stimulation induces local endothelial Ca2+ signals to oppose vasoconstriction of mouse mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Nausch, Lydia W. M.; Bonev, Adrian D.; Heppner, Thomas J.; Tallini, Yvonne; Kotlikoff, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    It is generally accepted that the endothelium regulates vascular tone independent of the activity of the sympathetic nervous system. Here, we tested the hypothesis that the activation of sympathetic nerves engages the endothelium to oppose vasoconstriction. Local inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)-mediated Ca2+ signals (“pulsars”) in or near endothelial projections to vascular smooth muscle (VSM) were measured in an en face mouse mesenteric artery preparation. Electrical field stimulation of sympathetic nerves induced an increase in endothelial cell (EC) Ca2+ pulsars, recruiting new pulsar sites without affecting activity at existing sites. This increase in Ca2+ pulsars was blocked by bath application of the α-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin or by TTX but was unaffected by directly picospritzing the α-adrenergic receptor agonist phenylephrine onto the vascular endothelium, indicating that nerve-derived norepinephrine acted through α-adrenergic receptors on smooth muscle cells. Moreover, EC Ca2+ signaling was not blocked by inhibitors of purinergic receptors, ryanodine receptors, or voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, suggesting a role for IP3, rather than Ca2+, in VSM-to-endothelium communication. Block of intermediate-conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels, which have been shown to colocalize with IP3 receptors in endothelial projections to VSM, enhanced nerve-evoked constriction. Collectively, our results support the concept of a transcellular negative feedback module whereby sympathetic nerve stimulation elevates EC Ca2+ signals to oppose vasoconstriction. PMID:22140050

  4. Chronic sympathetic innervation of islets in transgenic mice results in differential desensitization of alpha-adrenergic inhibition of insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Grodsky, G M; Ma, Y H; Edwards, R H

    1997-01-01

    The effects of chronic sympathetic hyperinnervation on pancreatic beta-cell insulin secretion were investigated utilizing the in vitro perfused pancreas from transgenic mice. These mice exhibit islet hyperinnervation of sympathetic neurons resulting from overexpression of nerve growth factor in their beta-cells (1). The goal was to determine whether sympathetic hyperinnervation increased classic alpha-adrenergic inhibition of beta-cell insulin secretion or, in contrast, down-regulated beta-cell sensitivity to adrenergic input resulting in enhanced insulin secretion. Both fasting and fed blood sugars and pancreatic insulin content were normal in the transgenics. Response of the transgenic perfused pancreas to low glucose (7 mM) was primarily first phase and normal whereas high glucose (22 mM) caused enhanced, rather than reduced, insulin secretion of both first and second phases. The alpha-antagonist, phentolamine, caused a six-fold increase in glucose-stimulated insulin secretion from the control pancreas, an effect that was blunted for the transgenic pancreas. A similarly blunted response to phentolamine occurred when this agent was superimposed on a combined glucose-forskolin stimulus. (The positive effect on insulin secretion by phentolamine in normal beta-cell preparations has arguably been ascribed to non-specific ionic effects.) Therefore, as a test of possible changes in the ATP regulated K+ channel or the linked Ca++ channels, glyburide was perfused during glucose stimulation. Insulin secretion in response to glyburide was increased two fold in the control pancreas. However, with the transgenic pancreas, in contrast to the enhanced response to glucose, the effect of glyburide was almost completely inhibited. It is concluded that: 1) chronic adrenergic hyperinnervation results in enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by desensitization of a major alpha-adrenergic inhibitory site(s); and 2) adrenergic hyperinnervation acts directly or indirectly on

  5. Has iprindole an alpha adrenergic activity?

    PubMed

    Ganry, H; Bourin, M

    1993-05-01

    1. Acute administration of iprindole potentiated the toxicity of 1-norepinephrine and increased the intensity of oxotremorine-induced tremors. 2. On the forced swimming test combination iprindole with imipramine reduced the duration of immobility. 3. The action of yohimbine on the locomotor activity was antagonized by a pre-injection of iprindole. 4. Iprindole increased and prolonged exophthalmia and loss of righting reflex induced by xylazine. 5 All these results seems indicate that iprindole has an indirect alpha 1 and alpha 2 adrenergic activity.

  6. Agonistic autoantibodies to the α(1) -adrenergic receptor and the β(2) -adrenergic receptor in Alzheimer's and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Karczewski, P; Hempel, P; Kunze, R; Bimmler, M

    2012-05-01

    Although primary causes of Alzheimer's and vascular dementia are unknown, the importance of preceding vascular lesions is widely accepted. Furthermore, there is strong evidence for the involvement of autoimmune mechanisms. Here, we report the presence of agonistic autoantibodies directed at adrenergic receptors in the circulation of patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's and vascular dementia. In 59% of these patients, agonistic autoantibodies against the α(1) -adrenergic receptor and the β(2) -adrenergic receptor were identified. The majority of positive patients (66%) contained both types of autoantibodies in combination. In a control group of patients with neurological impairments others than Alzheimer's and vascular dementia, only 17% were found to harbour these autoantibodies. The autoantibodies to the α(1) -adrenergic receptor interacted preferably with the extracellular loop1 of the receptor. They were further studied in IgG preparations from the column regenerate of a patient who underwent immunoadsorption. The α(1) -adrenergic receptor autoantibodies specifically bound to the extracellular loop1 peptide of the receptor with an apparent EC(50) value of 30 nm. They mobilized intracellular calcium in a clonal cell line expressing the human form of the α(1) -adrenergic receptor. Our data support the notion that autoimmune mechanisms play a significant role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's and vascular dementia. We suggest that agonistic autoantibodies to the α(1) -adrenergic and the β(2) -adrenergic receptor may contribute to vascular lesions and increased plaque formation.

  7. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Wei-ling; Qiu, Long-hai; Lian, Jia-yan; Li, Jia-chun; Hu, Jun; Liu, Xiao-lin

    2016-01-01

    Vascularization of acellular nerves has been shown to contribute to nerve bridging. In this study, we used a 10-mm sciatic nerve defect model in rats to determine whether cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of injured acellular nerves. The rat nerve defects were treated with acellular nerve grafting (control group) alone or acellular nerve grafting combined with intraperitoneal injection of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (experimental group). As shown through two-dimensional imaging, the vessels began to invade into the acellular nerve graft from both anastomotic ends at day 7 post-operation, and gradually covered the entire graft at day 21. The vascular density, vascular area, and the velocity of revascularization in the experimental group were all higher than those in the control group. These results indicate that cartilage oligomeric matrix protein enhances the vascularization of acellular nerves. PMID:27127495

  8. Nerve Impulses in Plants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blatt, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    Summarizes research done on the resting and action potential of nerve impulses, electrical excitation of nerve cells, electrical properties of Nitella, and temperature effects on action potential. (GS)

  9. Adrenergic regulation of innate immunity: a review

    PubMed Central

    Scanzano, Angela; Cosentino, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system has a major role in the brain-immune cross-talk, but few information exist on the sympathoadrenergic regulation of innate immune system. The aim of this review is to summarize available knowledge regarding the sympathetic modulation of the innate immune response, providing a rational background for the possible repurposing of adrenergic drugs as immunomodulating agents. The cells of immune system express adrenoceptors (AR), which represent the target for noradrenaline and adrenaline. In human neutrophils, adrenaline and noradrenaline inhibit migration, CD11b/CD18 expression, and oxidative metabolism, possibly through β-AR, although the role of α1- and α2-AR requires further investigation. Natural Killer express β-AR, which are usually inhibitory. Monocytes express β-AR and their activation is usually antiinflammatory. On murine Dentritic cells (DC), β-AR mediate sympathetic influence on DC-T cells interactions. In human DC β2-AR may affect Th1/2 differentiation of CD4+ T cells. In microglia and in astrocytes, β2-AR dysregulation may contribute to neuroinflammation in autoimmune and neurodegenerative disease. In conclusion, extensive evidence supports a critical role for adrenergic mechanisms in the regulation of innate immunity, in peripheral tissues as well as in the CNS. Sympathoadrenergic pathways in the innate immune system may represent novel antiinflammatory and immunomodulating targets with significant therapeutic potential. PMID:26321956

  10. Differences in affinity of cardiac beta-adrenergic receptors for (3H)dihydroalprenolol

    SciTech Connect

    Muntz, K.H.; Calianos, T.A.; Vandermolen, D.T.; Willerson, J.T.; Buja, L.M.

    1986-03-01

    We performed quantitative light microscopic autoradiography of (3H)dihydroalprenolol (DHA) binding to frozen sections of canine myocardium to test the hypothesis that there are differences in the density or affinity of beta-adrenergic receptors on various tissue compartments. In one study, with concentrations of (3H)DHA from 0.34 to 5.1 nM, specific binding to cardiac myocytes was saturable, whereas nonspecific binding was linear with ligand concentration. Arterioles had more specific grain counts than muscle cells (P less than 0.0001), and Scatchard analysis showed that the arterioles had a much higher affinity for (3H)DHA than myocytes. In a second study with lower concentrations of (3H)DHA (0.19-1.98 nM), binding to the arterioles saturated, whereas binding to the cardiac myocytes did not. Specific binding to arterioles was significantly higher (P less than 0.0001) than binding to myocytes at all concentrations of (3H)DHA. The dissociation constants for the subendocardial and subepicardial myocytes were 1.57 and 1.71 nM, respectively, while the dissociation constant for the arterioles was 0.26 nM. The maximum number of binding sites was 911 grains/0.9 X 10(-2) mm2 for subepicardial myocytes, 936 for subendocardial myocytes, and 986 for arterioles. The large nerves accompanying an epicardial artery also demonstrated specific (3H)DHA binding. Thus this study has demonstrated major differences in the distribution and affinity of beta-adrenergic receptors, which may help to explain various physiological responses to beta-adrenergic stimulation.

  11. Impaired increases in skin sympathetic nerve activity contribute to age-related decrements in reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Greaney, Jody L; Stanhewicz, Anna E; Kenney, W Larry; Alexander, Lacy M

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction is impaired in older adults; however, the relative roles of altered skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) and end-organ peripheral vascular responsiveness are unclear. We hypothesized that in older adults whole-body cooling would elicit a blunted SSNA response and cutaneous adrenergic responsiveness would be reduced. Twelve young adults (Y; 24 ± 1 years) and 12 older adults (O; 57 ± 2 years) participated in two protocols. In Protocol 1, SSNA (peroneal microneurography) and red cell flux in the affected dermatome (laser Doppler flowmetry; dorsum of foot) were measured during whole-body cooling (mean skin temperature (Tsk) 30.5°C; water-perfused suit). Mental stress was performed at mean Tsk 34.0°C (thermoneutral) and at 30.5°C. In Protocol 2, an intradermal microdialysis fibre was placed in the skin of the lateral calf for graded infusions of noradrenaline (norepinephrine) (NA; 10−12 to 10−2 m). Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC = flux/mean arterial pressure) was expressed as a change from baseline (ΔCVCbase). Vasoconstriction was attenuated in O. SSNA increased significantly during cooling in Y (+184 ± 37%; P < 0.05) but not O (+51 ± 12%; P > 0.05). Mental stress at Tsk 30.5°C further increased SSNA in both groups. There was no age-related difference in adrenergic responsiveness to exogenous NA (logEC50: −6.41 ± 0.24 in Y, −6.37 ± 0.25 in O; P > 0.05). While the SSNA response to whole-body cooling is impaired with ageing, SSNA can be further increased by a non-thermoregulatory stimulus. Cutaneous adrenergic sensitivity is not reduced in O. These findings suggest that alterations in afferent signalling or central processing likely contribute to blunted SSNA responses to cooling and subsequent impairments in reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction in ageing. Key points The reduction in skin blood flow during whole-body cooling is impaired in healthy older adults. However, the

  12. MELANOPHORE BANDS AND AREAS DUE TO NERVE CUTTING, IN RELATION TO THE PROTRACTED ACTIVITY OF NERVES

    PubMed Central

    Parker, G. H.

    1941-01-01

    1. When appropriate chromatic nerves are cut caudal bands, cephalic areas, and the pelvic fins of the catfish Ameiurus darken. In pale fishes all these areas will sooner or later blanch. By recutting their nerves all such blanched areas will darken again. 2. These observations show that the darkening of caudal bands, areas, and fins on cutting their nerves is not due to paralysis (Brücke), to the obstruction of central influences such as inhibition (Zoond and Eyre), nor to vasomotor disturbances (Hogben), but to activities emanating from the cut itself. 3. The chief agents concerned with the color changes in Ameiurus are three: intermedin from the pituitary gland, acetylcholine from the dispersing nerves (cholinergic fibers), and adrenalin from the concentrating nerves (adrenergic fibers). The first two darken the fish; the third blanches it. In darkening the dispersing nerves appear to initiate the process and to be followed and substantially supplemented by intermedin. 4. Caudal bands blanch by lateral invasion, cephalic areas by lateral invasion and internal disintegration, and pelvic fins by a uniform process of general loss of tint equivalent to internal disintegration. 5. Adrenalin may be carried in such an oil as olive oil and may therefore act as a lipohumor; it is soluble in water and hence may act as a hydrohumor. In lateral invasion (caudal bands, cephalic areas) it probably acts as a lipohumor and in internal disintegration (cephalic areas, pelvic fins) it probably plays the part of a hydrohumor. 6. The duration of the activity of dispersing nerves after they had been cut was tested by means of the oscillograph, by anesthetizing blocks, and by cold-blocks. The nerves of Ameiurus proved to be unsatisfactory for oscillograph tests. An anesthetizing block, magnesium sulfate, is only partly satisfactory. A cold-block, 0°C., is successful to a limited degree. 7. By means of a cold-block it can be shown that dispersing autonomic nerve fibers in Ameiurus can

  13. Cholinergic and adrenergic influence on the teleost heart in vivo.

    PubMed

    Axelsson, M; Ehrenström, F; Nilsson, S

    1987-01-01

    The tonical cholinergic and adrenergic influence on the heart rate was investigated in vivo in seven species of marine teleosts (pollack, Pollachius pollachius; cuckoo wrasse, Labrus mixtus; ballan wrasse, Labrus berggylta; five-bearded rockling, Ciliata mustela; tadpole fish, Raniceps raninus; eel-pout, Zoarces viviparus and short-spined sea scorpion, Myoxocephalus scor pius) during rest and, in two of the species (P. pollachius and L. mixtus), also during moderate swimming exercise in a Blazka-type swim tunnel. Ventral aortic blood pressure and heart rate were recorded via a catheter implanted in an afferent branchial artery, and the influence of the cholinergic and adrenergic tonus on the heart rate was assessed by injection of atropine and sotalol respectively. During rest the adrenergic tonus was higher than the cholinergic tonus in all species except L. berggylta, where the reverse was true. In P. pollachius and L. mixtus, exercise appeared to produce a lowering of the cholinergic tonus on the heart and, possibly, a slight increase of the adrenergic tonus. The nature of the adrenergic tonus (humoral or neural) is not clear, but the low plasma concentrations of catecholamines both during rest and exercise could be interpreted in favour of a mainly neural adrenergic tonus on the teleost heart. These experiments are compatible with the view that both a cholinergic inhibitory tonus and an adrenergic excitatory tonus are general features in the control of the teleost heart in vivo, both at rest and during moderate swimming exercise.

  14. Impaired cardiac energy metabolism in embryos lacking adrenergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Baker, Candice N; Gidus, Sarah A; Price, George F; Peoples, Jessica N R; Ebert, Steven N

    2015-03-01

    As development proceeds from the embryonic to fetal stages, cardiac energy demands increase substantially, and oxidative phosphorylation of ADP to ATP in mitochondria becomes vital. Relatively little, however, is known about the signaling mechanisms regulating the transition from anaerobic to aerobic metabolism that occurs during the embryonic period. The main objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that adrenergic hormones provide critical stimulation of energy metabolism during embryonic/fetal development. We examined ATP and ADP concentrations in mouse embryos lacking adrenergic hormones due to targeted disruption of the essential dopamine β-hydroxylase (Dbh) gene. Embryonic ATP concentrations decreased dramatically, whereas ADP concentrations rose such that the ATP/ADP ratio in the adrenergic-deficient group was nearly 50-fold less than that found in littermate controls by embryonic day 11.5. We also found that cardiac extracellular acidification and oxygen consumption rates were significantly decreased, and mitochondria were significantly larger and more branched in adrenergic-deficient hearts. Notably, however, the mitochondria were intact with well-formed cristae, and there was no significant difference observed in mitochondrial membrane potential. Maternal administration of the adrenergic receptor agonists isoproterenol or l-phenylephrine significantly ameliorated the decreases in ATP observed in Dbh-/- embryos, suggesting that α- and β-adrenergic receptors were effective modulators of ATP concentrations in mouse embryos in vivo. These data demonstrate that adrenergic hormones stimulate cardiac energy metabolism during a critical period of embryonic development. PMID:25516547

  15. Cocaine downregulates beta-adrenergic receptors in pregnant sheep myometrium.

    PubMed

    Wang, F L; Gauvin, J M; Dombrowski, M P; Smith, Y R; Christopher, K A; Hurd, W W

    1996-01-01

    Cocaine abuse is associated with premature labor. Although cocaine is known to competitively inhibit beta-adrenergic receptor binding, cocaine's effect on receptor downregulation is uncertain. This study was designed to determine the in vitro effect of cocaine on downregulation of beta-adrenergic receptors in pregnant myometrium. Pregnant sheep myometrium was incubated with either cocaine, isoproterenol, or a cocaine metabolite, benzoylecgonine. Membrane fractions were assayed for beta-adrenergic receptors using (125I)-cyanopindolol and the beta 2-adrenergic antagonist ICI 118,551. We found that cocaine (10(-6) to 10(-4) mol/L), but not benzoylecgonine, downregulated both beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptors, but did not further augment receptor downregulation by isoproterenol. The 46% decrease in beta-adrenergic receptors seen after exposure to cocaine was similar to the 53% decrease seen after isoproterenol. We hypothesize downregulation of beta-adrenergic receptors by cocaine may play a role in the association of cocaine abuse with premature labor.

  16. Secondary optic nerve tumors.

    PubMed

    Christmas, N J; Mead, M D; Richardson, E P; Albert, D M

    1991-01-01

    Secondary tumors of the optic nerve are more common than primary optic nerve tumors. The involvement of the optic nerve may arise from direct invasion from intraocular malignancies, from hematopoietic malignancy, from meningeal carcinomatosis, or from distant primary tumors. Orbital tumors rarely invade the optic nerve, and brain tumors involve it only in their late stages.

  17. The insula modulates arousal-induced reluctance to try novel tastes through adrenergic transmission in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Sebastián; Diaz-Galarce, Raúl; Jerez-Baraona, Juan Manuel; Quintana-Donoso, Daisy; Moraga-Amaro, Rodrigo; Stehberg, Jimmy

    2015-01-01

    Reluctance to try novel tastes (neophobia) can be exacerbated in arousing situations, such as when children are under social stress or in rodents, when the new taste is presented in a high arousal context (HA) compared to a low arousal context (LA). The present study aimed at determining whether adrenergic transmission at the Insula regulates the reluctance to try novel tastes induced by arousing contexts. To this end, a combination of systemic and intra-insular manipulations of adrenergic activity was performed before the novel taste (saccharin 0.1%) was presented either in LA or HA contexts in rats. Our results show that systemic adrenergic activity modulates reluctance to try novel tastes. Moreover, intra-insular microinjections of propranolol or norepinephrine (NE) were found to modulate the effects of arousing contexts on reluctance to try novel tastes. Finally, intra-insular propranolol blocked epinephrine-induced increased reluctance, while intra-insular NE blocked oral propranolol-induced decreases in reluctance and increased the reluctance to try novel tastes presented in low arousing contexts. In conclusion, our results suggest that the insula is a critical site for regulating the effects of arousal in the reluctance to try novel tastes via the adrenergic system. PMID:26175672

  18. Adrenergic receptors in human fetal liver membranes.

    PubMed

    Falkay, G; Kovács, L

    1990-01-01

    The adrenergic receptor binding capacities in human fetal and adult livers were measured to investigate the mechanism of the reduced alpha-1 adrenoreceptor response of the liver associated with a reciprocal increase in beta-adrenoreceptor activity in a number of conditions. Alpha-1 and beta-adrenoreceptor density were determined using 3H-prazosin and 3H-dihydroalprenolol, respectively, as radioligand. Heterogenous populations of beta-adrenoreceptors were found in fetal liver contrast to adult. Decreased alpha-1 and increased beta-receptor density were found which may relate to a decreased level in cellular differentiation. These findings may be important for the investigation of perinatal hypoglycaemia of newborns after treatment of premature labour with beta-mimetics. This is the first demonstration of differences in the ratio of alpha-1 and beta-adrenoceptors in human fetal liver.

  19. Involvement of the orexin system in sympathetic nerve regulation.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Manabu; Ohba, Takayoshi; Kushikata, Testuya; Niwa, Hidetoshi; Kurose, Akira; Imaizumi, Tadaatsu; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Yanagisawa, Teruyuki; Nakaji, Shigeyuki; Ono, Kyoichi; Hirota, Kazuyoshi

    2015-05-15

    Orexin, also known as hypocretin, is a secreted neuropeptide implicated in the regulation of sleep and food intake. In the present study, we examined the importance of orexin in regulation of the sympathetic nervous system using an orexin/ataxin-3 transgenic (OXTg) rat, which has a minimal number of orexin neurons. RT-PCR analysis identified expression of prepro-orexin and orexin receptor-1 (OX1R) in the superior cervical ganglion (SCG), and expression of another receptor (OX2R) was marginal in the wild-type rat. The orexin/ataxin-3 transgenic rat showed increased expression of OX1R and OX2R, whereas expression of prepro-orexin was undetectable, suggesting a compensatory increase in both receptors. In the ECG recording (R-R interval), orexin/ataxin-3 transgenic rats showed decreased responsiveness to the β-adrenergic blocker propranolol. Furthermore, OXTg rats had deteriorated R-R interval regulation, indicating involvement of the orexin system in sympathetic nerve regulation. This was accompanied by decreased baroreflex and responsiveness to β-adrenergic blocker in blood pressure recording, also suggesting involvement of the orexin system in sympathetic nerve regulation. Histological examination revealed hypotrophic changes in the transgenic heart, suggesting involvement of the orexin system in cardiac development. Taken together, our present results indicate involvement of the orexin system in sympathetic nerve control.

  20. [Anatomical study of the cavernous nerve in relation to nerve sparing operation].

    PubMed

    Hanawa, K

    1994-08-01

    Recently, nerve sparing radical prostatectomy has became widely considered as the primary goal for maintaining a high standard of quality of life (QOL). However, anatomical localization of the cavernous nerve has not yet been precisely clarified in terms of the terminal end in the corpus cavernous penis distal to the urogenital membrane. Here in attempt to demonstrate the precise localization of the cavernous nerve, in six adult male cadaver. The cavernous nerves ran between the prostatic capsule and the prostatic fascia, through the capsule of the seminal vesicle. The nerves penetrated the membranous urethra at 8 mm from the margin of the urethra at the position of 5 and 7 o'clock. Therefore, the following procedures are critical to achieve successful nerve sparing: 1) meticulous division of the seminal-vesicle, 2) precise separation of the neurovascular bundle between the prostatic capsule and fascia, and 3) the careful transaction of the membranous urethra.

  1. Introduction: peripheral nerve surgery--biology, entrapment, and injuries.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Allan H; Elias, W Jeffrey; Midha, Rajiv

    2009-02-01

    Surgery aimed at repairing damaged peripheral nerves has a long history. Refuting the time-honored nihilism of Hippocrates and Galen that an injured nerve cannot regain function, a few adventurous medieval surgeons attempted to repair severed nerves. However, the ability of a peripheral nerve repair to restore function was not generally accepted until 1800. Neurosurgeons, beginning with Harvey Cushing, have had an interest in repairing damaged peripheral nerves. Significant progress in the treatment of peripheral nerve injuries resulted from experience with the numerous injuries that occurred during World Wars I and II. Surgeons steadily defined the anatomy of peripheral nerves and developed techniques for decompressing and repairing peripheral nerves. Kline and Dejonge developed an intraoperative electrophysiological technique for detecting axons regenerating across a damaged segment of nerve. In the second 2 decades of the 20th century, distal nerve transfers were rediscovered whereby the proximal end of a less essential nerve is used to reinnervate the distal end of a nerve, providing a more vital function. PMID:19435439

  2. New approaches to bridge nerve gaps: development of a novel drug-delivering nerve conduit.

    PubMed

    Lin, Keng-Min; Sant, Himanshu J; Gale, Bruce K; Agarwal, Jayant P

    2012-01-01

    Contemporary bridging techniques for repairing nerve gaps caused by trauma require autologous nerve grafts, which are difficult to harvest and handle and result in significant donor site deficit. Several nerve conduits with axon growth-enhancing potential have been proposed, developed and tested over the past fifteen years. In this work, prototypes of a nerve conduit designed to bridge large nerve gaps (≥10mm) end-to-end were incorporated with concentric drug reservoirs for constant and controlled drug delivery to enhance axon growth. These devices were designed, fabricated and tested in vitro in amber glass vials with bovine serum albumin in order to determine the drug release kinetics for future application. Our devices have shown the capability to deliver the drug of interest over a 6-day period.

  3. Pharmacologic specificity of alpha-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Petrash, A.; Bylund, D.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have defined alpha-2 adrenergic receptor subtypes in human and rat tissues using prazosin as a subtype selective drug. Prazosin has a lower affinity (250 nM) at alpha-2A receptor and a higher affinity (5 nM) at alpha-2B receptors. In order to determine if other adrenergic drugs are selective for one or the other subtypes, the authors performed (/sup 3/H)yohimbine inhibition experiments with various adrenergic drugs in tissues containing alpha-2A, alpha-2B or both subtypes. Oxymetazoline, WB4101 and yohimbine were found to be 80-, 20- and 10-fold more potent at alpha-2A receptors than at alpha-2B receptors. Phentolamine, adazoxan, (+)- and (-)-mianserin, clonidine, (+)-butaclamol, (-)- and (+)-norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and thioridazine were found to have equal affinities for the two subtypes. These results further validate the subdivision of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors into alpha-2A and alpha-2B subtypes.

  4. Rabbit alveolar beta-adrenergic receptors increase with gestational age.

    PubMed

    Lewis, V; Goldfien, A C; Day, J P; Roberts, J M

    1990-01-01

    Pulmonary beta-adrenergic receptors, which mediate the actions of endogenous catecholamines, increase before birth, an important step in pulmonary maturation. This increase, which occurs primarily in the alveoli, may be hastened by corticosteroids. However, because the lung is composed of more than 40 cell types, we asked whether the normal distribution of beta-adrenergic receptors changes with gestational age in a way that seems physiologically relevant. We compared lungs from fetal rabbits at 26 and 31 days' gestation with lungs from adult rabbits by autoradiography with 125iodocyanopindolol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist. While the total silver grain concentration increased during gestation, the greatest proportional increase occurred in the alveoli. We conclude that pulmonary beta-adrenergic receptor concentration increases during gestation and that this increase is most dramatic for alveoli. This pattern is consistent with that previously observed after treatment of fetal rabbits in utero with corticosteroids.

  5. Optical Biopsy of Peripheral Nerve Using Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy: A New Tool for Nerve Surgeons?

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Joseph C; Curtin, Catherine M

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries remain a challenge for reconstructive surgeons with many patients obtaining suboptimal results. Understanding the level of injury is imperative for successful repair. Current methods for distinguishing healthy from damaged nerve are time consuming and possess limited efficacy. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is an emerging optical biopsy technology that enables dynamic, high resolution, sub-surface imaging of live tissue. Porcine sciatic nerve was either left undamaged or briefly clamped to simulate injury. Diluted fluorescein was applied topically to the nerve. CLE imaging was performed by direct contact of the probe with nerve tissue. Images representative of both damaged and undamaged nerve fibers were collected and compared to routine H&E histology. Optical biopsy of undamaged nerve revealed bands of longitudinal nerve fibers, distinct from surrounding adipose and connective tissue. When damaged, these bands appear truncated and terminate in blebs of opacity. H&E staining revealed similar features in damaged nerve fibers. These results prompt development of a protocol for imaging peripheral nerves intraoperatively. To this end, improving surgeons' ability to understand the level of injury through real-time imaging will allow for faster and more informed operative decisions than the current standard permits. PMID:26430636

  6. Using Eggshell Membrane as Nerve Guide Channels in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Farjah, Gholam Hossein; Heshmatian, Behnam; Karimipour, Mojtaba; Saberi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): The aim of this study was to evaluate the final outcome of nerve regeneration across the eggsell membrane (ESM) tube conduit in comparison with autograft. Materials and Methods: Thirty adult male rats (250-300 g) were randomized into (1) ESM conduit, (2) autograft, and (3) sham surgery groups. The eggs submerged in 5% acetic acid. The decalcifying membranes were cut into four pieces, rotated over the teflon mandrel and dried at 37°C. The left sciatic nerve was surgically cut. A 10-mm nerve segment was cut and removed. In the ESM group, the proximal and distal cut ends of the sciatic nerve were telescoped into the nerve guides. In the autograft group, the 10 mm nerve segment was reversed and used as an autologous nerve graft. All animals were evaluated by sciatic functional index (SFI) and electrophysiology testing. Results: The improvement in SFI from the first to the last evalution in ESM and autograft groups were evaluated. On days 49 and 60 post-operation, the mean SFI of ESM group was significantly greater than the autograft group (P< 0.05). On day 90, the mean nerve conduction velocity (NCV) of ESM group was greater than autograft group, although the difference was not statistically significant (P> 0.05). Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that ESM effectively enhances nerve regeneration and promotes functional recovery in injured sciatic nerve of rat. PMID:24106593

  7. Effects of intranasal cocaine on sympathetic nerve discharge in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, T N; Grayburn, P A; Snyder, R W; Hansen, J; Chavoshan, B; Landau, C; Lange, R A; Hillis, L D; Victor, R G

    1997-01-01

    Cocaine-induced cardiovascular emergencies are mediated by excessive adrenergic stimulation. Animal studies suggest that cocaine not only blocks norepinephrine reuptake peripherally but also inhibits the baroreceptors, thereby reflexively increasing sympathetic nerve discharge. However, the effect of cocaine on sympathetic nerve discharge in humans is unknown. In 12 healthy volunteers, we recorded blood pressure and sympathetic nerve discharge to the skeletal muscle vasculature using intraneural microelectrodes (peroneal nerve) during intranasal cocaine (2 mg/kg, n = 8) or lidocaine (2%, n = 4), an internal local anesthetic control, or intravenous phenylephrine (0.5-2.0 microg/kg, n = 4), an internal sympathomimetic control. Experiments were repeated while minimizing the cocaine-induced rise in blood pressure with intravenous nitroprusside to negate sinoaortic baroreceptor stimulation. After lidocaine, blood pressure and sympathetic nerve discharge were unchanged. After cocaine, blood pressure increased abruptly and remained elevated for 60 min while sympathetic nerve discharge initially was unchanged and then decreased progressively over 60 min to a nadir that was only 2+/-1% of baseline (P < 0.05); however, plasma venous norepinephrine concentrations (n = 5) were unchanged up to 60 min after cocaine. Sympathetic nerve discharge fell more rapidly but to the same nadir when blood pressure was increased similarly with phenylephrine. When the cocaine-induced increase in blood pressure was minimized (nitroprusside), sympathetic nerve discharge did not decrease but rather increased by 2.9 times over baseline (P < 0.05). Baroreflex gain was comparable before and after cocaine. We conclude that in conscious humans the primary effect of intranasal cocaine is to increase sympathetic nerve discharge to the skeletal muscle bed. Furthermore, sinoaortic baroreflexes play a pivotal role in modulating the cocaine-induced sympathetic excitation. The interplay between these

  8. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    PubMed

    Collins, K; Storey, M; Peterson, K; Nutter, P

    1988-01-01

    In brief: Nerve injuries in athletes may be serious and may delay or prevent an athlete's return to his or her sport. Over a two-year period, the authors evaluated the condition of 65 patients who had entrapments of a nerve or nerve root, documented with electromyography. They describe four case histories: Two patients had radial nerve entrapments, one caused by baseball pitching and the other by kayaking; one football player had combined suprascapular neuropathy and upper trunk brachial plexopathy; and one patient had carpal tunnel syndrome of a median nerve secondary to rowing. Sports-related peripheral nerve lesions of the lower extremity were not seen during the study period. Based on a literature review, the nerve injuries discussed represent the spectrum of nerve entrapments likely to be seen in US clinics. The authors conclude that peripheral nerve lesions should be considered in the differential diagnosis of sports injuries, particularly at the shoulder, elbow, and wrist.

  9. Monovalent cation and amiloride analog modulation of adrenergic ligand binding to the unglycosylated alpha 2B-adrenergic receptor subtype

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.L.; Seibert, K.; Brandon, S.; Cragoe, E.J. Jr.; Limbird, L.E. )

    1991-04-01

    The unglycosylated alpha 2B subtype of the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor found in NG-108-15 cells possesses allosteric regulation of adrenergic ligand binding by monovalent cations and 5-amino-substituted amiloride analogs. These findings demonstrate that allosteric modulation of adrenergic ligand binding is not a property unique to the alpha 2A subtype. The observation that amiloride analogs as well as monovalent cations can modulate adrenergic ligand binding to the nonglycosylated alpha 2B subtype indicates that charge shielding due to carbohydrate moieties does not play a role in this allosteric modulation but, rather, these regulatory effects result from interactions of cations and amiloride analogs with the protein moiety of the receptor. Furthermore, the observation that both alpha 2A and alpha 2B receptor subtypes are modulated by amiloride analogs suggests that structural domains that are conserved between the two are likely to be involved in this allosteric modulation.

  10. Neuropeptide Y as a presynaptic modulator of norepinephrine release from the sympathetic nerve fibers in the pig pineal gland.

    PubMed

    Ziółkowska, N; Lewczuk, B; Przybylska-Gornowicz, B

    2015-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) released from the sympathetic nerve endings is the main neurotransmitter controlling melatonin synthesis in the mammalian pineal gland. Although neuropeptide Y (NPY) co-exists with NE in the pineal sympathetic nerve fibers it also occurs in a population of non-adrenergic nerve fibers located in this gland. The role of NPY in pineal physiology is still enigmatic. The present study characterizes the effect of NPY on the depolarization-evoked 3H-NE release from the pig pineal explants. The explants of the pig pineal gland were loaded with 3H-NE in the presence of pargyline and superfused with Tyrode medium. They were exposed twice to the modified Tyrode medium containing 60 mM of K+ to evoke the 3H-NE release via depolarization. NPY, specific agonists of Y1- and Y2- receptors and pharmacologically active ligands of α2-adrenoceptors were added to the medium before and during the second depolarization. The radioactivity was measured in medium fractions collected every 2 minutes during the superfusion. NPY (0.1-10 μM) significantly decreased the depolarization-induced 3H-NE release. Similar effect was observed after the treatment with Y2-agonist: NPY13-36, but not with Y1-agonist: [Leu31,Pro34]-NPY. The tritium overflow was lower in the explants exposed to the 5 μM NPY and 1 μM rauwolscine than to rauwolscine only. The effects of 5 μM NPY and 0.05 μM UK 14,304 on the depolarization-evoked 3H-NE release were additive. The results show that NPY is involved in the regulation of NE release from the sympathetic terminals in the pig pineal gland, inhibiting this process via Y2-receptors.

  11. β-adrenergic antagonists influence abdominal aorta contractility by mechanisms not involving β-adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Hauzer, Willy; Bujok, Jolanta; Czerski, Albert; Rusiecka, Agnieszka; Pecka, Ewa; Gnus, Jan; Zawadzki, Wojciech; Witkiewicz, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    β-adrenergic receptors (β-AR) are widely distributed in the cardiovascular system, where they considerably contribute to the control of its functions. β-blockers are commonly used in the treatment of disorders of the circulatory system. They act primarily by inhibiting cardiac β-receptors. However, there are also reports of pleiotropic action of β-blockers as well as of new compounds created to study β3 adrenergic receptors. The study aimed to investigate additional mechanisms of action of β-AR inhibitors in the rabbit abdominal aorta with emphasis on their action on α-adrenergic receptors and calcium influx. Responses to propranolol, betaxolol, metoprolol and SR59230A were evaluated in phenylephrine and PGF(2alpha) precontracted aortic rings. The effect of propranolol on the phenylephrine concentration-contraction curve was examined. Propranolol (≥ 10 μM) and SR59230A (≥ 0.1 μM) induced relaxations in phenylephrine-precontracted rings, while betaxolol and metoprolol had little effect. The β-AR inhibitors produced further contraction of tissues preincubated with PGF(2alpha), excluding SR59230A, which after initial contraction, elicited marked relaxation at a concentration above 1 ĕM. 100 μM of propranolol caused a significant rightward shift of the concentration-contraction curve to phenylephrine with no reduction in the maximum response. Incubation of aortic rings in phentolamine reduced the maximal contraction to propranolol; verapamil pretreatment by contrast enhanced contractile response. In conclusion, SR59230A and propranolol most probably act as α1-AR competitive antagonists in the presence of phenylephrine in rabbit abdominal aortic rings. After α-ARs blockade, propranolol exerts a weak relaxing activity connected with Ca2+ channel inactivation. SR59230A at a high concentration acts on the rabbit aorta by an additional mechanism needing further investigation.

  12. Common peroneal nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    ... toe-out movements Tests of nerve activity include: Electromyography (EMG, a test of electrical activity in muscles) Nerve ... Peroneal neuropathy. In: Preston DC, Shapiro BE, eds. Electromyography and Neuromuscular Disorders . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; ...

  13. Nerve conduction velocity

    MedlinePlus

    ... to measure the speed of the nerve signals. Electromyography (recording from needles placed into the muscles) is ... Often, the nerve conduction test is followed by electromyography (EMG). In this test, needles are placed into ...

  14. Electromechanical Nerve Stimulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Supplee, Frank H., Jr.; Prass, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    Nerve stimulator applies and/or measures precisely controlled force and/or displacement to nerve so response of nerve measured. Consists of three major components connected in tandem: miniature probe with spherical tip; transducer; and actuator. Probe applies force to nerve, transducer measures force and sends feedback signal to control circuitry, and actuator positions force transducer and probe. Separate box houses control circuits and panel. Operator uses panel to select operating mode and parameters. Stimulator used in research to characterize behavior of nerve under various conditions of temperature, anesthesia, ventilation, and prior damage to nerve. Also used clinically to assess damage to nerve from disease or accident and to monitor response of nerve during surgery.

  15. Nerve Injuries in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Kathryn; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Over a two-year period this study evaluated the condition of 65 athletes with nerve injuries. These injuries represent the spectrum of nerve injuries likely to be encountered in sports medicine clinics. (Author/MT)

  16. Trends in the design of nerve guidance channels in peripheral nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chiono, Valeria; Tonda-Turo, Chiara

    2015-08-01

    The current trend of peripheral nerve tissue engineering is the design of advanced nerve guidance channels (NGCs) acting as physical guidance for regeneration of nerves across lesions. NGCs should present multifunctional properties aiming to direct the sprouting of axons from the proximal nerve end, to concentrate growth factors secreted by the injured nerve ends, and to reduce the ingrowth of scar tissue into the injury site. A critical aspect in the design of NGCs is conferring them the ability to provide topographic, chemotactic and haptotactic cues that lead to functional nerve regeneration thus increasing the axon growth rate and avoiding or minimizing end-organ (e.g. muscle) atrophy. The present work reviews the recent state of the art in NGCs engineering and defines the external guide and internal fillers structural and compositional requirements that should be satisfied to improve nerve regeneration, especially in the case of large gaps (>2 cm). Techniques for NGCs fabrication were described highlighting the innovative approaches direct to enhance the regeneration of axon stumps compared to current clinical treatments. Furthermore, the possibility to apply stem cells as internal cues to the NGCs was discussed focusing on scaffold properties necessary to ensure cell survival. Finally, the optimized features for NGCs design were summarized showing as multifunctional cues are needed to produce NGCs having improved results in clinics.

  17. Sciatic nerve repair using adhesive bonding and a modified conduit

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiangdang; Cai, Hongfei; Hao, Yongyu; Sun, Geng; Song, Yaoyao; Chen, Wen

    2014-01-01

    When repairing nerves with adhesives, most researchers place glue directly on the nerve stumps, but this method does not fix the nerve ends well and allows glue to easily invade the nerve ends. In this study, we established a rat model of completely transected sciatic nerve injury and repaired it using a modified 1 cm-length conduit with inner diameter of 1.5 mm. Each end of the cylindrical conduit contains a short linear channel, while the enclosed central tube protects the nerve ends well. Nerves were repaired with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate and suture, which complement the function of the modified conduit. The results demonstrated that for the same conduit, the average operation time using the adhesive method was much shorter than with the suture method. No significant differences were found between the two groups in sciatic function index, motor evoked potential latency, motor evoked potential amplitude, muscular recovery rate, number of medullated nerve fibers, axon diameter, or medullary sheath thickness. Thus, the adhesive method for repairing nerves using a modified conduit is feasible and effective, and reduces the operation time while providing an equivalent repair effect. PMID:25206861

  18. Calcium Signaling in Mitral Cell Dendrites of Olfactory Bulbs of Neonatal Rats and Mice during Olfactory Nerve Stimulation and Beta-Adrenoceptor Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yuan, Qi; Mutoh, Hiroki; Debarbieux, Franck; Knopfel, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Synapses formed by the olfactory nerve (ON) provide the source of excitatory synaptic input onto mitral cells (MC) in the olfactory bulb. These synapses, which relay odor-specific inputs, are confined to the distally tufted single primary dendrites of MCs, the first stage of central olfactory processing. Beta-adrenergic modulation of electrical…

  19. Aged adrenal medullary tissue survives intraocular grafting, forms nerve fibers and responds to nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Strömberg, I; Ebendal, T

    1989-06-01

    Adrenal medullary tissue from aged (24 months old) and young adult (2 months old) rats was grafted to the anterior chamber of the eye of previously sympathectomized animals. Nerve growth factor (NGF) was administered by weekly bilateral intraocular injections. Five weeks postgrafting, irides were prepared as whole mounts and processed for Falck-Hillarp histochemistry for visualization of catecholamines. NGF appeared to partially prevent the reduction in volume that both old and young grafts underwent. In the presence of NGF, an extensive, dense fiber network, closely resembling the normal adrenergic innervation, was formed in the host irides by grafts from aged donors. The area of outgrowth from aged transplants without NGF treatment was as large as with NGF treatment but less dense. The reinnervation of irides by NGF-treated young adult grafts occupied a similar area as that seen with aged grafts, but the pattern of innervation was irregular, particularly close to the transplants. Transplants from young adult donors without NGF treatment generated a sparse, limited network of nerves in the irides. All grafts were tyrosine hydroxylase-, adrenaline-, and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase-immunoreactive in about the same proportion of cells, but the grafts from the young donors were smaller in size. We concluded that the ability of chromaffin cells to transform toward a neuronal phenotype, produce nerve fibers, and respond to exogenous NGF is maintained in aged adrenals. PMID:2754763

  20. Multifunctional Silk Nerve Guides for Axon Outgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tupaj, Marie C.

    Peripheral nerve regeneration is a critical issue as 2.8% of trauma patients present with this type of injury, estimating a total of 200,000 nerve repair procedures yearly in the United States. While the peripheral nervous system exhibits slow regeneration, at a rate of 0.5 mm -- 9 mm/day following trauma, this regenerative ability is only possible under certain conditions. Clinical repairs have changed slightly in the last 30 years and standard methods of treatment include suturing damaged nerve ends, allografting, and autografting, with the autograft the gold standard of these approaches. Unfortunately, the use of autografts requires a second surgery and there is a shortage of nerves available for grafting. Allografts are a second option however allografts have lower success rates and are accompanied by the need of immunosuppressant drugs. Recently there has been a focus on developing nerve guides as an "off the shelf" approach. Although some natural and synthetic guidance channels have been approved by the FDA, these nerve guides are unfunctionalized and repair only short gaps, less than 3 cm in length. The goal of this project was to identify strategies for functionalizing peripheral nerve conduits for the outgrowth of neuron axons in vitro . To accomplish this, two strategies (bioelectrical and biophysical) were indentified for increasing axon outgrowth and promoting axon guidance. Bioelectrical strategies exploited electrical stimulation for increasing neurite outgrowth. Biophysical strategies tested a range of surface topographies for axon guidance. Novel methods were developed for integrating electrical and biophysical strategies into silk films in 2D. Finally, a functionalized nerve conduit system was developed that integrated all strategies for the purpose of attaching, elongating, and guiding nervous tissue in vitro. Future directions of this work include silk conduit translation into a rat sciatic nerve model in vivo for the purpose of repairing long

  1. Epidermal adrenergic signaling contributes to inflammation and pain sensitization in a rat model of complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenwu; Shi, Xiaoyou; Wang, Liping; Guo, Tianzhi; Wei, Tzuping; Cheng, Kejun; Rice, Kenner C; Kingery, Wade S; Clark, J David

    2013-08-01

    In many patients, the sympathetic nervous system supports pain and other features of complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS). Accumulating evidence suggests that interleukin (IL)-6 also plays a role in CRPS, and that catecholamines stimulate production of IL-6 in several tissues. We hypothesized that norepinephrine acting through specific adrenergic receptors expressed on keratinocytes stimulates the production of IL-6 and leads to nociceptive sensitization in a rat tibial fracture/cast model of CRPS. Our approach involved catecholamine depletion using 6-hydroxydopamine or, alternatively, guanethidine, to explore sympathetic contributions. Both agents substantially reduced nociceptive sensitization and selectively reduced the production of IL-6 in skin. Antagonism of IL-6 signaling using TB-2-081 also reduced sensitization in this model. Experiments using a rat keratinocyte cell line demonstrated relatively high levels of β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) expression. Stimulation of this receptor greatly enhanced IL-6 expression when compared to the expression of IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, or nerve growth factor. Stimulation of the cells also promoted phosphorylation of the mitogen-activated protein kinases P38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase. Based on these in vitro results, we returned to animal testing and observed that the selective β2-AR antagonist butoxamine reduced nociceptive sensitization in the CRPS model, and that local injection of the selective β2-AR agonist terbutaline resulted in mechanical allodynia and the production of IL-6 in the cells of the skin. No increases in IL-1β, TNF-α, or nerve growth factor levels were seen, however. These data suggest that in CRPS, norepinephrine released from sympathetic nerve terminals stimulates β2-ARs expressed on epidermal keratinocytes, resulting in local IL-6 production, and ultimately, pain sensitization.

  2. Successful Reconstruction of Nerve Defects Using Distraction Neurogenesis with a New Experimental Device

    PubMed Central

    Yousef, Mohamed Abdelhamid Ali; Dionigi, Paolo; Marconi, Stefania; Calligaro, Alberto; Cornaglia, Antonia Icaro; Alfonsi, Enrico; Auricchio, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Repair of peripheral nerve injuries is an intensive area of challenge and research in modern reconstructive microsurgery. Intensive research is being carried out to develop effective alternatives to the standard nerve autografting, avoiding its drawbacks. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a newly designed mechanical device for the reconstruction of the sciatic nerve in rats in comparison to nerve autografting and to assess the pain during the period of distraction neurogenesis. Methods: Fourteen Sprague Dawley rats were used and randomly assigned into 2 groups with 7 rats in each group; group A (Nerve Autografting group) in which a 10-mm segment of the sciatic nerve was resected and rotated 180 degrees, then primary end-to-end neurorrhaphy was performed in the reverse direction; group B (Nerve Lengthening group) in which the mechanical device was inserted after surgical resection of 10 mm of the sciatic nerve, then secondary end-to-end neurorrhaphy was performed after completing the nerve lengthening. Thirteen weeks later, assessment of the functional sciatic nerve recovery using static sciatic index (SSI) was performed. Furthermore, fourteen weeks after the nerve resection, assessment of the nerve regeneration with electrophysiological study and histological analysis were performed. Also, gastrocnemius wet weight was measured. For pain assessment in group B, Rat Grimace Scale (RGS) score was used. Results: Significantly better functional recovery rate (using the SSI) was reported in the nerve lengthening group in comparison to autografting group. Also, a statistically significant higher nerve conduction velocity was detected in the nerve lengthening group. On histological analysis of the distal nerve section at 3 mm distal to the nerve repair site, significant myelin sheath thickness was detected in the nerve lengthening group. Discussion: Distraction neurogenesis with the new experimental device is a reliable therapeutic

  3. A bioengineered peripheral nerve construct using aligned peptide amphiphile nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Yalom, Anisa; Berns, Eric J.; Stephanopoulos, Nicholas; McClendon, Mark T.; Segovia, Luis A.; Spigelman, Igor; Stupp, Samuel I.; Jarrahy, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries can result in lifelong disability. Primary coaptation is the treatment of choice when the gap between transected nerve ends is short. Long nerve gaps seen in more complex injuries often require autologous nerve grafts or nerve conduits implemented into the repair. Nerve grafts, however, cause morbidity and functional loss at donor sites, which are limited in number. Nerve conduits, in turn, lack an internal scaffold to support and guide axonal regeneration, resulting in decreased efficacy over longer nerve gap lengths. By comparison, peptide amphiphiles (PAs) are molecules that can self-assemble into nanofibers, which can be aligned to mimic the native architecture of peripheral nerve. As such, they represent a potential substrate for use in a bioengineered nerve graft substitute. To examine this, we cultured Schwann cells with bioactive PAs (RGDS-PA, IKVAV-PA) to determine their ability to attach to and proliferate within the biomaterial. Next, we devised a PA construct for use in a peripheral nerve critical sized defect model. Rat sciatic nerve defects were created and reconstructed with autologous nerve, PLGA conduits filled with various forms of aligned PAs, or left unrepaired. Motor and sensory recovery were determined and compared among groups. Our results demonstrate that Schwann cells are able to adhere to and proliferate in aligned PA gels, with greater efficacy in bioactive PAs compared to the backbone-PA alone. In vivo testing revealed recovery of motor and sensory function in animals treated with conduit/PA constructs comparable to animals treated with autologous nerve grafts. Functional recovery in conduit/PA and autologous graft groups was significantly faster than in animals treated with empty PLGA conduits. Histological examinations also demonstrated increased axonal and Schwann cell regeneration within the reconstructed nerve gap in animals treated with conduit/PA constructs. These results indicate that PA nanofibers may

  4. Adrenergic Metabolic and Hemodynamic Effects of Octopamine in the Liver

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Andrea Luiza; de Paula, Mariana Nascimento; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Vilela, Vanessa Rodrigues; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar

    2013-01-01

    The fruit extracts of Citrus aurantium (bitter orange) are traditionally used as weight-loss products and as appetite suppressants. A component of these extracts is octopamine, which is an adrenergic agent. Weight-loss and adrenergic actions are always related to metabolic changes and this work was designed to investigate a possible action of octopamine on liver metabolism. The isolated perfused rat liver was used to measure catabolic and anabolic pathways and hemodynamics. Octopamine increased glycogenolysis, glycolysis, oxygen uptake, gluconeogenesis and the portal perfusion pressure. Octopamine also accelerated the oxidation of exogenous fatty acids (octanoate and oleate), as revealed by the increase in 14CO2 production derived from 14C labeled precursors. The changes in glycogenolysis, oxygen uptake and perfusion pressure were almost completely abolished by α1-adrenergic antagonists. The same changes were partly sensitive to the β-adrenergic antagonist propranolol. It can be concluded that octopamine accelerates both catabolic and anabolic processes in the liver via adrenergic stimulation. Acceleration of oxygen uptake under substrate-free perfusion conditions also means acceleration of the oxidation of endogenous fatty acids, which are derived from lipolysis. All these effects are compatible with an overall stimulating effect of octopamine on metabolism, which is compatible with its reported weight-loss effects in experimental animals. PMID:24196353

  5. Adrenal medullary regulation of rat renal cortical adrenergic receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaresan, P.R.; Guarnaccia, M.M.; Izzo, J.L. Jr. )

    1987-11-01

    The role of the adrenal medulla in the regulation of renal cortical adrenergic receptors was investigated in renal cortical particular fractions from control rats and rats 6 wk after adrenal demedullation. The specific binding of ({sup 3}H)prazosin, ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine, and ({sup 125}I)iodocyanopindolol were used to quantitate {alpha}{sub 1}-, {alpha}{sub 2}-, and {beta}-adrenergic receptors, respectively. Adrenal demedullation increased the concentration of all three groups of renal adrenergic receptors; maximal number of binding sites (B{sub max}, per milligram membrane protein) for {alpha}{sub 1}-, and {alpha}{sub 2}-, and {beta}-adrenergic receptors were increased by 22, 18.5, and 25%, respectively. No differences were found in the equilibrium dissociation constants (K{sub D}) for any of the radioligands. Plasma corticosterone and plasma and renal norepinephrine levels were unchanged, whereas plasma epinephrine was decreased 72% by adrenal demedullation, renal cortical epinephrine was not detectable in control or demedullated animals. The results suggest that, in the physiological state, the adrenal medulla modulates the number of renal cortical adrenergic receptors, presumably through the actions of a circulating factor such as epinephrine.

  6. Distal nerve entrapment following nerve repair.

    PubMed

    Schoeller, T; Otto, A; Wechselberger, G; Pommer, B; Papp, C

    1998-04-01

    Failure of nerve repair or poor functional outcome after reconstruction can be influenced by various causes. Besides improper microsurgical technique, fascicular malalignment and unphysiologic tension, we found in our clinical series that a subclinical nerve compression distal to the repair site can seriously impair regeneration. We concluded that the injured nerve, whether from trauma or microsurgical intervention, could be more susceptible to distal entrapment in the regenerative stage because of its disturbed microcirculation, swelling and the increase of regenerating axons followed by increased nerve volume. In two cases we found the regenerating nerve entrapped at pre-existing anatomical sites of narrowing resulting in impaired functional recovery. In both cases the surgical therapy was decompression of the distal entrapped nerve and this was followed by continued regeneration. Thorough clinical and electrophysiologic follow-up is necessary to detect such adverse compression effects and to distinguish between the various causes of failed regeneration. Under certain circumstances primary preventive decompression may be beneficial if performed at the time of nerve coaptation.

  7. Neuroma-in-continuity of the median nerve managed by nerve expansion and direct suture with vein conduit.

    PubMed

    Jeudy, J; Raimbeau, G; Rabarin, F; Fouque, P A; Saint-Cast, Y; Césari, B; Bigorre, N

    2014-06-01

    Autologous nerve grafting is the current standard for bridging large gaps in major sensory and motor nerves. It allows both function and pain improvement with predictable results. Clinical observations of nerve elongation caused by tumours have prompted experimental animal studies of induced gradual elongation of the nerve stump proximal to the gap. This technique allows direct suturing of the two nerve ends to bridge the gap. Here, we describe a case of neuroma-in-continuity of the median nerve managed by resection and direct suture after nerve elongation with a tissue expander. We are not aware of similar reported cases. Secondary repair 3 years after the initial injury improved the pain and hypersensitivity and restored a modest degree of protective sensory function (grade S1).

  8. Regenerative scaffold electrodes for peripheral nerve interfacing.

    PubMed

    Clements, Isaac P; Mukhatyar, Vivek J; Srinivasan, Akhil; Bentley, John T; Andreasen, Dinal S; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2013-07-01

    Advances in neural interfacing technology are required to enable natural, thought-driven control of a prosthetic limb. Here, we describe a regenerative electrode design in which a polymer-based thin-film electrode array is integrated within a thin-film sheet of aligned nanofibers, such that axons regenerating from a transected peripheral nerve are topographically guided across the electrode recording sites. Cultures of dorsal root ganglia were used to explore design parameters leading to cellular migration and neurite extension across the nanofiber/electrode array boundary. Regenerative scaffold electrodes (RSEs) were subsequently fabricated and implanted across rat tibial nerve gaps to evaluate device recording capabilities and influence on nerve regeneration. In 20 of these animals, regeneration was compared between a conventional nerve gap model and an amputation model. Characteristic shaping of regenerated nerve morphology around the embedded electrode array was observed in both groups, and regenerated axon profile counts were similar at the eight week end point. Implanted RSEs recorded evoked neural activity in all of these cases, and also in separate implantations lasting up to five months. These results demonstrate that nanofiber-based topographic cues within a regenerative electrode can influence nerve regeneration, to the potential benefit of a peripheral nerve interface suitable for limb amputees. PMID:23033438

  9. Electrophysiology of corneal cold receptor nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Carr, Richard W; Brock, James A

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms of sensory transduction in the fine nerve terminals of free nerve endings supplied by Adelta and C sensory axons are largely a matter of speculation. This is because the nerve terminals are small and inaccessible, particularly in intact tissues like skin. However, some of the difficulties associated with investigating the physiology of fine nerve terminals have recently been overcome using an in vitro preparation of the guinea-pig cornea that allows nerve terminal impulses (NTIs) to be recorded extracellularly from single polymodal and cold receptor nerve terminals. For cold receptors, the rate of spontaneously occurring NTIs is increased during cooling and decreased during heating. In addition, heating and cooling differentially modulate the shape of the recorded NTI. At the same temperature, NTIs are larger in amplitude and faster in time course during heating than those during cooling. The differential effect of heating and cooling on NTI shape is not considered to result simply from the temperature dependence of voltage-activated conductance kinetics or activity dependent changes in membrane excitability. Instead, changes in NTI shape may reflect changes in nerve terminal membrane potential that underlie the process of thermal transduction.

  10. Mechanisms of alpha 1-adrenergic vascular desensitization in conscious dogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiuchi, K.; Vatner, D. E.; Uemura, N.; Bigaud, M.; Hasebe, N.; Hempel, D. M.; Graham, R. M.; Vatner, S. F.

    1992-01-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of alpha 1-adrenergic vascular desensitization, osmotic minipumps containing either saline (n = 9) or amidephrine mesylate (AMD) (n = 9), a selective alpha 1-adrenergic receptor agonist, were implanted subcutaneously in dogs with chronically implanted arterial and right atrial pressure catheters and aortic flow probes. After chronic alpha 1-adrenergic receptor stimulation, significant physiological desensitization to acute AMD challenges was observed, i.e., pressor and vasoconstrictor responses to the alpha 1-adrenergic agonist were significantly depressed (p < 0.01) compared with responses in the same dogs studied in the conscious state before pump implantation. However, physiological desensitization to acute challenges of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine (NE) (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) in the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade was not observed for either mean arterial pressure (MAP) (30 +/- 7 versus 28 +/- 5 mm Hg) or total peripheral resistance (TPR) (29.8 +/- 4.9 versus 28.9 +/- 7.3 mm Hg/l per minute). In the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor plus ganglionic blockade after AMD pump implantation, physiological desensitization to NE was unmasked since the control responses to NE (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) before the AMD pumps were now greater (p < 0.01) than after chronic AMD administration for both MAP (66 +/- 5 versus 32 +/- 2 mm Hg) and TPR (42.6 +/- 10.3 versus 23.9 +/- 4.4 mm Hg/l per minute). In the presence of beta-adrenergic receptor, ganglionic, plus NE-uptake blockade after AMD pump implantation, desensitization was even more apparent, since NE (0.1 micrograms/kg per minute) induced even greater differences in MAP (33 +/- 5 versus 109 +/- 6 mm Hg) and TPR (28.1 +/- 1.8 versus 111.8 +/- 14.7 mm Hg/l per minute). The maximal force of contraction induced by NE in the presence or absence of endothelium was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) in vitro in mesenteric artery rings from AMD pump dogs

  11. Adrenergic receptors on cerebral microvessels in control and Parkinsonian subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Cash, R.; Lasbennes, F.; Sercombe, R.; Seylaz, J.; Agid, Y.

    1985-08-12

    The binding of adrenergic ligands (/sup 3/H-prazosin, /sup 3/H-clonidine, /sup 3/H-dihydroalprenolol) was studied on a preparation of cerebral microvessels in the prefrontal cortex and putamen of control and Parkinsonian subjects. The adrenergic receptor density in microvessels of control patients was less than 0.5% and 3.3% respectively of the total binding. A significant decrease in the number of alpha-1 binding sites was observed on microvessels in the putamen of patients with Parkinson's disease. 22 references, 2 tables.

  12. Changes of lymphocyte beta-adrenergic receptors after surgical stress.

    PubMed

    Eandi, M; Buraglio, M; Arduino, C; Viano, I; Sansalvadore, G; Arbinolo, M A

    1984-01-01

    In this study the authors' purpose was to observe the effects of surgical stress on the number of lymphocyte beta-adrenergic receptors in hypertensive and normotensive subjects. It was noticed that after surgery a significant reduction occurred in the number of binding sites of lymphocytes of both hypertensive and normotensive subjects. The time course of recovery to the pre-operative values of binding sites varied between the two groups, being slower in normotensive than in hypertensive patients. This might suggest a different pattern of regulation of the beta-adrenergic receptor between hypertensive and normotensive subjects.

  13. Beta-adrenergic receptor sensitivity, autonomic balance and serotonergic activity in practitioners of Transcendental Meditation

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.A.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate the acute autonomic effects of the Transcendental Meditation Program (TM) and resolve the conflict arising from discrepant neurochemical and psychophysiological data. Three experimental investigations were performed. The first examined beta{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors (AR's) on peripheral blood lymphocytes, via (I{sup 125})iodocyanopindolol binding, in 10 male mediating and 10 age matched non-meditating control subjects, to test the hypothesis that the long-term practice of TM and the TM Sidhi Program (TMSP) reduces end organ sensitivity to adrenergic agonists. The second investigated respiratory sinus arrhythmia (an indirect measure of cardiac Parasympathetic Nervous System tone), and skin resistance (a measure of Sympathetic Nervous System tone) during periods of spontaneous respiratory apneusis, a phenomenon occurring during TM that is known to mark the subjective experience of transcending. The third was within subject investigation of the acute effects of the TMSP on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) activity. Platelet 5-HT was assayed by high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, plasma prolactin (PL) and lutenizing hormone (LH) by radioimmunoassay, tryptophan by spectrofluorimetry, and alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (AGP, a modulator of 5-HT uptake) by radial immunodiffusion assay.

  14. Effect of adrenergic stimulation on cutaneous microcirculation immediately after surgical adventitiectomy in a rat skin flap model.

    PubMed

    Lecoq, Jean-Pierre H; Joris, Jean L; Nelissen, Xavier P; Lamy, Maurice L; Heymans, Olivier Y

    2008-01-01

    Chronic sympathetic denervation leads to the development of supersentivity to adrenergic agents. Free flap surgery results in the disruption of the autonomic nerve fibers running along the anastomosed vessels. We therefore investigated the early effect of surgical sympathectomy on the reactivity of cutaneous microcirculation challenged to adrenergic agents. Two epigastric flaps were elevated and exposed in 15 rats. On the right flap (Side A), a circular adventitiectomy of the feeder vessels was realized to provide surgical sympathectomy. On the left flap (Side N), vessels were kept intact. The following drugs were then given intravenously successively: phenylephrine (10 and 15 microg kg(-1)), norepinephrine (10 microg kg(-1)), prazocin (1 mg kg(-1)) followed by norepinephrine (10 microg kg(-1)). Cutaneous microcirculation was assessed using Laser-Doppler Flowmeters simultaneously on the two flaps after each drug administration. Mean arterial pressure was also measured. On side N, phenylephrine and norepinephrine resulted in a transient increase in cutaneous microcirculation followed by a more prolonged reduction. On side A, only the initial increase was observed, which was greater and longer as compared with side N, and paralleled the increase in mean arterial pressure. After prazocin pre-treatment, norepinephrine produced a transient increase in cutaneous microcirculation similar on both sides, and parallel to the changes in arterial pressure. No decrease in cutaneous microcirculation was observed. Immediately after surgical adventitiectomy, the vasoconstriction produced by alpha-adrenergic agents is prevented. No denervation-induced hypersentivity is observed. Surgical sympathectomy might protect cutaneous flaps from vasoconstriction induced by endogenous catecholamines release. PMID:18623150

  15. Adrenergic regulation of ovarian androgen biosynthesis is mediated via beta 2-adrenergic theca-interstitial cell recognition sites.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, E R; Jimenez, J L; Payne, D W; Adashi, E Y

    1988-04-01

    Acting alone or in concert with pituitary gonadotropins, catecholamines have recently been shown to enhance androgen production by ovarian theca-interstitial cells. It is the objective of the in vitro studies reported herein to further characterize this catecholaminergic activity as well as to type and subtype the putative adrenergic recognition sites mediating this phenomenon. Treatment of collagenase-processed whole ovarian dispersates or highly enriched (greater than 90%) theca-interstitial cells from immature rats with norepinephrine (10(-6) M) resulted in a 2.0-fold increment in the accumulation of androsterone (3 alpha-hydroxy-5 alpha-androstane-17-one), the main androgenic steroid identified in culture medium by HPLC. Qualitatively similar stimulation was obtained using beta (isoproterenol)- but not alpha (methoxamine)-selective adrenergic agonists. Moreover, combined treatment with both norepinephrine (10(-6) M) and hCG (1 ng/ml) unmasked a synergistic interaction subject to stereospecific blockade by beta (propranolol)- but not alpha (phentolamine)-selective adrenergic antagonists. Further probing with subtype-selective adrenergic ligands revealed terbutaline (a beta 2-selective agonist) to enhance androgen biosynthesis, with dobutamine (a beta 1-selective agonist) having little or no effect. Moreover, a beta 2 (ICI-118406)- but not a beta 1 (ICI-89406)-selective adrenergic antagonist yielded dose-dependent inhibition of the isoproterenol effect. Unaccounted for by either enhanced cellular growth or an alteration of the overall steroidogenic pattern, catecholaminergically stimulated androgen biosynthesis proved time and dose dependent but independent of the hCG dose (0.1-10 ng/ml) employed. Binding of [125I]iodocyanopindolol to highly enriched theca-interstitial cells proved stereoselective and saturable, displaying a single class (Hill coefficient = 0.96 +/- 0.01) of high affinity (Kd = 5.6 X 10(-11) M), low capacity (1219 +/- 317 sites/cell) binding

  16. The Furcal Nerve Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Dabke, Harshad V.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical sciatica and discrepancy between clinical presentation and imaging findings is a dilemma for treating surgeon in management of lumbar disc herniation. It also constitutes ground for failed back surgery and potential litigations thereof. Furcal nerve (Furcal = forked) is an independent nerve with its own ventral and dorsal branches (rootlets) and forms a link nerve that connects lumbar and sacral plexus. Its fibers branch out to be part of femoral and obturator nerves in-addition to the lumbosacral trunk. It is most commonly found at L4 level and is the most common cause of atypical presentation of radiculopathy/sciatica. Very little is published about the furcal nerve and many are unaware of its existence. This article summarizes all the existing evidence about furcal nerve in English literature in an attempt to create awareness and offer insight about this unique entity to fellow colleagues/professionals involved in spine care. PMID:25317309

  17. Restoration of auditory nerve synapses in cats by cochlear implants.

    PubMed

    Ryugo, D K; Kretzmer, E A; Niparko, J K

    2005-12-01

    Congenital deafness results in abnormal synaptic structure in endings of the auditory nerve. If these abnormalities persist after restoration of auditory nerve activity by a cochlear implant, the processing of time-varying signals such as speech would likely be impaired. We stimulated congenitally deaf cats for 3 months with a six-channel cochlear implant. The device used human speech-processing programs, and cats responded to environmental sounds. Auditory nerve fibers exhibited a recovery of normal synaptic structure in these cats. This rescue of synapses is attributed to a return of spike activity in the auditory nerve and may help explain cochlear implant benefits in childhood deafness. PMID:16322457

  18. Sympathetic Nervous System Control of Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Oxidative Stress in Liver through α-Adrenergic Signaling.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jung-Chun; Peng, Yi-Jen; Wang, Shih-Yu; Lai, Mei-Ju; Young, Ton-Ho; Salter, Donald M; Lee, Herng-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    In addition to being the primary organ involved in redox cycling, the liver is one of the most highly innervated tissues in mammals. The interaction between hepatocytes and sympathetic, parasympathetic, and peptidergic nerve fibers through a variety of neurotransmitters and signaling pathways is recognized as being important in the regulation of hepatocyte function, liver regeneration, and hepatic fibrosis. However, less is known regarding the role of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) in modulating the hepatic response to oxidative stress. Our aim was to investigate the role of the SNS in healthy and oxidatively stressed liver parenchyma. Mice treated with 6-hydroxydopamine hydrobromide were used to realize chemical sympathectomy. Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) injection was used to induce oxidative liver injury. Sympathectomized animals were protected from CCl4 induced hepatic lipid peroxidation-mediated cytotoxicity and genotoxicity as assessed by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal levels, morphological features of cell damage, and DNA oxidative damage. Furthermore, sympathectomy modulated hepatic inflammatory response induced by CCl4-mediated lipid peroxidation. CCl4 induced lipid peroxidation and hepatotoxicity were suppressed by administration of an α-adrenergic antagonist. We conclude that the SNS provides a permissive microenvironment for hepatic oxidative stress indicating the possibility that targeting the hepatic α-adrenergic signaling could be a viable strategy for improving outcomes in patients with acute hepatic injury.

  19. DNA encoding an. alpha. sub 2B -adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Weinshank, R.L.; Hartig, P.R.

    1991-10-01

    This paper describes an isolated nucleic acid molecule encoding a human alpha 2B-adrenergic receptor. This patent also describes an isolated nucleic acid molecule, wherein the isolated nucleic acid molecule is a DNA molecule and a mammalian cell comprising the DNA molecule.

  20. Molecular characterization of an. alpha. sub 2B -adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, J.K.; Dewan Zeng; D'Angelo, D.D.; Tucker, A.L.; Zhihong Lu; Barber, C.M.; Lynch, K.R. )

    1990-02-26

    {alpha}{sub 2}-Adrenergic receptors comprise a heterogeneous population based on pharmacologic and molecular evidence. The authors have isolated a cDNA clone (pRNG{alpha}2) encoding a previously undescribed third subtype of an {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptor from a rat kidney cDNA library. The library was screened with an oligonucleotide encoding a highly conserved region found in all biogenic amine receptors described to date. The deduced amino acid sequence displays many features of G-protein coupled receptors with exception of the absence of the consensus N-linked glycosylation site at the amino terminus. Membranes prepared from COS-1 cells transfected with pRNG{alpha}2 display high affinity and saturable binding to {sup 3}H-rauwolscine (K{sub d}=2 nM).Competition curve data analysis shows that pRNG{alpha}2 protein binds to a variety of adrenergic drugs with the following rank order of potency: yohimbine {ge} cholorpromazine > prazosin {ge} clonidine > norepinephrine {ge} oxymetazoline. pRNG{alpha}2 RNA accumulates in both adult rat kidney and rat neonatal lung (predominant species is 4.0 kb). They conclude that pRNG{alpha}2 likely represents a cDNA for the {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor.

  1. Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, K.; Vaughn, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists presumably exert their physiological action on skeletal muscle cells through the bAR. Since the signal generated by the bAR is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in primary chicken muscle cell cultures to determine if artificial elevation of intracellular cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter the population of bAR expressed on the surface of muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were employed for the experiments because muscle cells have attained a steady state with respect to muscle protein metabolism at this stage. Cells were treated with 0-10 uM forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the 1, 2, and 3 day treatment intervals, the concentration of cAMP and the bAR population were measured. Receptor population was measured in intact muscle cell cultures as the difference between total binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 and non-specific binding of [H-3]CGP-12177 in the presence of 1 uM propranolol. Intracellular cAMP concentration was measured by radioimmunoassay. The concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in (beta)AR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 50% at 10 uM. This increase in (beta)AR population was apparent after only 1 day of treatment, and the pattern of increase was maintained for all 3 days of the treatment period. Thus, increasing the intracellular concentration of cAMP leads to up-regulation of (beta)AR population. Clenbuterol and isoproterenol gave similar effects on bAR population. The effect of forskolin on the quantity and apparent synthesis rate of the heavy chain of myosin (mhc) were also investigated. A maximum increase of 50% in the quantity of mhc was observed at 0.2 UM forskolin, but higher concentrations of forskolin reduced the quantity of mhc back to control levels.

  2. Inferior alveolar nerve repositioning.

    PubMed

    Louis, P J

    2001-09-01

    Nerve repositioning is a viable alternative for patients with an atrophic edentulous posterior mandible. Patients, however, should be informed of the potential risks of neurosensory disturbance. Documentation of the patient's baseline neurosensory function should be performed with a two-point discrimination test or directional brush stroke test preoperatively and postoperatively. Recovery of nerve function should be expected in 3 to 6 months. The potential for mandibular fracture when combining nerve repositioning with implant placement also should be discussed with the patient. This can be avoided by minimizing the amount of buccal cortical plate removal during localization of the nerve and maintaining the integrity of the inferior cortex of the mandible. Additionally, avoid overseating the implant, thus avoiding stress along the inferior border of the mandible. The procedure does allow for the placement of longer implants, which should improve implant longevity. Patients undergoing this procedure have expressed overall satisfaction with the results. Nerve repositioning also can be used to preserve the inferior alveolar nerve during resection of benign tumors or cysts of the mandible. This procedure allows the surgeon to maintain nerve function in situations in which the nerve would otherwise have to be resected. PMID:11665379

  3. Cryotherapy and nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Drez, D; Faust, D C; Evans, J P

    1981-01-01

    Ice application is one of the most extensively used treatments for athletic injuries. Frostbite is a recognized danger. Five cases of nerve palsy resulting from ice application are reported here. These palsies were temporary. They usually resolve spontaneously without any significant sequelae. This complication can be avoided by not using ice for more than 30 minutes and by guarding superficial nerves in the area.

  4. Imaging the cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Parry, Andrew T; Volk, Holger A

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of the normal course of the cranial nerves (CN) is essential when interpreting images of patients with cranial neuropathies. CN foramina are depicted best using computed X-ray tomography, but the nerves are depicted best using magnetic resonance imaging. The function and anatomy of the CN in the dog are reviewed and selected examples of lesions affecting the CN are illustrated.

  5. [Sciatic nerve intraneural perineurioma].

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Benjamin; Poussange, Nicolas; Le Collen, Philippe; Fabre, Thierry; Vital, Anne; Lepreux, Sébastien

    2015-12-01

    Intraneural perineurioma is a benign tumor developed from the perineurium and responsible for localized nerve hypertrophy. This uncommon tumor is characterized by a proliferation of perineural cells with a "pseudo-onion bulb" pattern. We report a sciatic nerve intraneural perineurioma in a 39-year-old patient. PMID:26586011

  6. Optic Nerve Decompression

    MedlinePlus

    ... canals). The optic nerve is the “nerve of vision” and extends from the brain, through your skull, and into your eye. A ... limited to, the following: loss of vision, double vision, inadequate ... leakage of brain fluid (CSF), meningitis, nasal bleeding, infection of the ...

  7. Ulnar nerve tuberculoma.

    PubMed

    Ramesh Chandra, V V; Prasad, Bodapati Chandramowliswara; Varaprasad, Gangumolu

    2013-01-01

    The authors report a very rare case of tuberculoma involving the ulnar nerve. The patient, a 7-year-old girl, presented with swelling over the medial aspect of her right forearm just below the elbow joint, with features of ulnar nerve palsy, including paresthesias along the little and ring fingers and claw hand deformity. There was a history of trauma and contact with a contagious case of tuberculosis. There were no other signs of tuberculosis. At surgical exploration the ulnar nerve was found to be thickened, and on opening the sheath there was evidence of caseous material enclosed in a fibrous capsule compressing and displacing the nerve fibers. The lesion, along with the capsule, was subtotally removed using curettage, and a part of the capsule that was densely adherent to the nerve fibers was left in the patient. Histopathological examination of the specimen was consistent with tuberculoma. The patient received adequate antitubercular treatment and showed significant improvement.

  8. Peripheral nerve stimulation: definition.

    PubMed

    Abejón, David; Pérez-Cajaraville, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Recently, there has been a tremendous evolution in the field of neurostimulation, both from the technological point of view and from development of the new and different indications. In some areas, such as peripheral nerve stimulation, there has been a boom in recent years due to the variations in the surgical technique and the improved results documented by in multiple published papers. All this makes imperative the need to classify and define the different types of stimulation that are used today. The confusion arises when attempting to describe peripheral nerve stimulation and subcutaneous stimulation. Peripheral nerve stimulation, in its pure definition, involves implanting a lead on a nerve, with the aim to produce paresthesia along the entire trajectory of the stimulated nerve.

  9. Sympathetic β-adrenergic mechanism in pudendal inhibition of nociceptive and non-nociceptive reflex bladder activity.

    PubMed

    Kadow, Brian T; Lyon, Timothy D; Zhang, Zhaocun; Lamm, Vladimir; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2016-07-01

    This study investigated the role of the hypogastric nerve and β-adrenergic mechanisms in the inhibition of nociceptive and non-nociceptive reflex bladder activity induced by pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS). In α-chloralose-anesthetized cats, non-nociceptive reflex bladder activity was induced by slowly infusing saline into the bladder, whereas nociceptive reflex bladder activity was induced by replacing saline with 0.25% acetic acid (AA) to irritate the bladder. PNS was applied at multiple threshold (T) intensities for inducing anal sphincter twitching. During saline infusion, PNS at 2T and 4T significantly (P < 0.01) increased bladder capacity to 184.7 ± 12.6% and 214.5 ± 10.4% of the control capacity. Propranolol (3 mg/kg iv) had no effect on PNS inhibition, but 3-[(2-methyl-4-thiazolyl)ethynyl]pyridine (MTEP; 1-3 mg/kg iv) significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the inhibition. During AA irritation, the control bladder capacity was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced to ∼22% of the saline control capacity. PNS at 2T and 4T significantly (P < 0.01) increased bladder capacity to 406.8 ± 47% and 415.8 ± 46% of the AA control capacity. Propranolol significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the bladder capacity to 276.3% ± 53.2% (at 2T PNS) and 266.5 ± 72.4% (at 4T PNS) of the AA control capacity, whereas MTEP (a metabotropic glutamate 5 receptor antagonist) removed the residual PNS inhibition. Bilateral transection of the hypogastric nerves produced an effect similar to that produced by propranolol. This study indicates that hypogastric nerves and a β-adrenergic mechanism in the detrusor play an important role in PNS inhibition of nociceptive but not non-nociceptive reflex bladder activity. In addition to this peripheral mechanism, a central nervous system mechanism involving metabotropic glutamate 5 receptors also has a role in PNS inhibition. PMID:27170683

  10. Anabolic action of parathyroid hormone regulated by the β2-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Hanyu, Ryo; Wehbi, Vanessa L; Hayata, Tadayoshi; Moriya, Shuichi; Feinstein, Timothy N; Ezura, Yoichi; Nagao, Masashi; Saita, Yoshitomo; Hemmi, Hiroaki; Notomi, Takuya; Nakamoto, Tetsuya; Schipani, Ernestina; Takeda, Shu; Kaneko, Kazuo; Kurosawa, Hisashi; Karsenty, Gerard; Kronenberg, Henry M; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Noda, Masaki

    2012-05-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH), the major calcium-regulating hormone, and norepinephrine (NE), the principal neurotransmitter of sympathetic nerves, regulate bone remodeling by activating distinct cell-surface G protein-coupled receptors in osteoblasts: the parathyroid hormone type 1 receptor (PTHR) and the β(2)-adrenergic receptor (β(2)AR), respectively. These receptors activate a common cAMP/PKA signal transduction pathway mediated through the stimulatory heterotrimeric G protein. Activation of β(2)AR via the sympathetic nervous system decreases bone formation and increases bone resorption. Conversely, daily injection of PTH (1-34), a regimen known as intermittent (i)PTH treatment, increases bone mass through the stimulation of trabecular and cortical bone formation and decreases fracture incidences in severe cases of osteoporosis. Here, we show that iPTH has no osteoanabolic activity in mice lacking the β(2)AR. β(2)AR deficiency suppressed both iPTH-induced increase in bone formation and resorption. We showed that the lack of β(2)AR blocks expression of iPTH-target genes involved in bone formation and resorption that are regulated by the cAMP/PKA pathway. These data implicate an unexpected functional interaction between PTHR and β(2)AR, two G protein-coupled receptors from distinct families, which control bone formation and PTH anabolism. PMID:22538810

  11. Effects of serotonin and some other neurohumoral agents on adrenergic neurotransmission in spontaneously hypertensive rat vasculature.

    PubMed

    Kubo, T; Su, C

    1983-01-01

    The effects of serotonin (5HT), acetylcholine (ACh), histamine and dopamine on the pressor responses of the mesenteric vasculature were examined in view of their potential role in neuromodulation. The responses to periarterial sympathetic nerve stimulation (NS, 8 Hz, 2 msec, 30 sec) and to exogenous norepinephrine (NE, 0.2 nmol) were compared between spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and the control Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY). In both WKY and SHR, ACh (3-30 nM), histamine (0.3-3 microM) and dopamine (0.3 microM) attenuated the NS-induced vasoconstrictor response as much as the NE-induced response, indicative of predominance of postsynaptic inhibition. 5HT (10-100 nM) potentiated the vasoconstrictor responses to NS significantly less than that to NE in WKY, suggestive of presynaptic inhibition. Such difference was absent in SHR. These results suggest that the presynaptic inhibition of vascular adrenergic neurotransmission by 5HT is diminished in SHR, and this may contribute to the elevated blood pressure.

  12. Intraparotid facial nerve neurofibroma.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M J; Babyak, J W; Kartush, J M

    1987-02-01

    Neurogenic neoplasms of the intraparotid facial nerve are uncommon and are usually diagnosed intraoperatively by tissue biopsy. Fifty-six cases of primary neurogenic neoplasms involving the facial nerve have been reported. The majority of these have been schwannomas. A case of a solitary neurofibroma involving the main trunk of the facial nerve is presented. Schwannomas and neurofibromas have distinct histological features which must be considered prior to the management of these tumors. The management of neurogenic tumors associated with normal facial function is a particularly difficult problem. A new approach for the diagnosis and management of neurogenic neoplasms is described utilizing electroneurography. PMID:3807626

  13. Radial Nerve Tendon Transfers.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Andre Eu-Jin; Etcheson, Jennifer; Yao, Jeffrey

    2016-08-01

    Radial nerve palsy typically occurs as a result of trauma or iatrogenic injury and leads to the loss of wrist extension, finger extension, thumb extension, and a reduction in grip strength. In the absence of nerve recovery, reconstruction of motor function involves tendon transfer surgery. The most common donor tendons include the pronator teres, wrist flexors, and finger flexors. The type of tendon transfer is classified based on the donor for the extensor digitorum communis. Good outcomes have been reported for most methods of radial nerve tendon transfers as is typical for positional tendon transfers not requiring significant power. PMID:27387076

  14. Peripheral Nerve Injury: Principles for Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    M.F, Griffin; M, Malahias; S, Hindocha; Khan, Wasim S

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral Nerve Injuries are one of the most common causes of hand dysfunction caused by upper limb trauma but still current management has remained suboptimal. This review aims to explain the traditional view of pathophysiology of nerve repair and also describe why surgical management is still inadequate in using the new biological research that has documented the changes that occur after the nerve injury, which, could cause suboptimal clinical outcomes. Subsequently presentation and diagnosis will be described for peripheral nerve injuries. When traditional surgical repair using end-to-end anastomosis is not adequate nerve conduits are required with the gold standard being the autologous nerve. Due to associated donor site morbidity and poor functional outcome documented with autologous nerve repair several new advancements for alternatives to bridge the gap are being investigated. We will summarise the new and future advancements of non-biological and biological replacements as well as gene therapy, which are being considered as the alternatives for peripheral nerve repair. PMID:25067975

  15. Peripheral nerve injury: principles for repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    M F, Griffin; M, Malahias; S, Hindocha; Khan, Wasim S

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral Nerve Injuries are one of the most common causes of hand dysfunction caused by upper limb trauma but still current management has remained suboptimal. This review aims to explain the traditional view of pathophysiology of nerve repair and also describe why surgical management is still inadequate in using the new biological research that has documented the changes that occur after the nerve injury, which, could cause suboptimal clinical outcomes. Subsequently presentation and diagnosis will be described for peripheral nerve injuries. When traditional surgical repair using end-to-end anastomosis is not adequate nerve conduits are required with the gold standard being the autologous nerve. Due to associated donor site morbidity and poor functional outcome documented with autologous nerve repair several new advancements for alternatives to bridge the gap are being investigated. We will summarise the new and future advancements of non-biological and biological replacements as well as gene therapy, which are being considered as the alternatives for peripheral nerve repair. PMID:25067975

  16. Intraparotid Neurofibroma of the Facial Nerve: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nofal, Ahmed-Abdel-Fattah; El-Anwar, Mohammad-Waheed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Intraparotid neurofibromas of the facial nerve are extremely rare and mostly associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Case Report: This is a case of a healthy 40-year-old man, which underwent surgery for a preoperatively diagnosed benign parotid gland lesion. After identification of the facial nerve main trunk, a single large mass (6 x 3 cm) incorporating the upper nerve division was observed. The nerve portion involved in the mass could not be dissected and was inevitably sacrificed with immediate neuroraphy of the upper division of the facial nerve with 6/0 prolene. The final histopathology revealed the presence of a neurofibroma. Complete left side facial nerve paralysis was observed immediately postoperatively but the function of the lower half was returned within 4 months and the upper half was returned after 1 year. Currently, after 3 years of follow up, there are no signs of recurrence and normal facial nerve function is observed. Conclusion: Neurofibroma should be considered as the diagnosis in a patient demonstrating a parotid mass. In cases where it is diagnosed intraoperatively, excision of part of the nerve with the mass will be inevitable though it can be successfully repaired by end to end anastomosis. PMID:27602341

  17. Intraparotid Neurofibroma of the Facial Nerve: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nofal, Ahmed-Abdel-Fattah; El-Anwar, Mohammad-Waheed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Intraparotid neurofibromas of the facial nerve are extremely rare and mostly associated with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Case Report: This is a case of a healthy 40-year-old man, which underwent surgery for a preoperatively diagnosed benign parotid gland lesion. After identification of the facial nerve main trunk, a single large mass (6 x 3 cm) incorporating the upper nerve division was observed. The nerve portion involved in the mass could not be dissected and was inevitably sacrificed with immediate neuroraphy of the upper division of the facial nerve with 6/0 prolene. The final histopathology revealed the presence of a neurofibroma. Complete left side facial nerve paralysis was observed immediately postoperatively but the function of the lower half was returned within 4 months and the upper half was returned after 1 year. Currently, after 3 years of follow up, there are no signs of recurrence and normal facial nerve function is observed. Conclusion: Neurofibroma should be considered as the diagnosis in a patient demonstrating a parotid mass. In cases where it is diagnosed intraoperatively, excision of part of the nerve with the mass will be inevitable though it can be successfully repaired by end to end anastomosis.

  18. The effect of adrenergic blockade on blushing and facial flushing.

    PubMed

    Drummond, P D

    1997-03-01

    The effect of adrenergic blockade on vascular responses in the forehead was assessed during stressful mental arithmetic, singing, and moderate exercise in 21 frequent blushers and 21 infrequent blushers. Adrenergic antagonists were introduced into a small site on the forehead by iontophoresis, and vascular responses were monitored bilaterally with laser Doppler flowmetry. Beta blockade prevented increases in blood flow in infrequent blushers during mental arithmetic and partially inhibited vasodilatation during singing, indicating minor participation of beta-adrenoceptors in blushing. Alpha blockade did not affect blushing but augmented vasodilatation during exercise. Despite higher ratings of self-consciousness in frequent than in infrequent blushers, vascular responses were similar in both groups. Thus, blushing propensity does not appear to be related to the density of alpha- or beta-adrenoceptors in facial vessels and may have a psychological basis. PMID:9090265

  19. High Ulnar Nerve Injuries: Nerve Transfers to Restore Function.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Jennifer Megan M

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are challenging problems. Nerve transfers are one of many options available to surgeons caring for these patients, although they do not replace tendon transfers, nerve graft, or primary repair in all patients. Distal nerve transfers for the treatment of high ulnar nerve injuries allow for a shorter reinnervation period and improved ulnar intrinsic recovery, which are critical to function of the hand. PMID:27094893

  20. Beta 2-adrenergic receptors are colocalized and coregulated with "whisker barrels" in rat somatosensory cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Vos, P; Kaufmann, D; Hand, P J; Wolfe, B B

    1990-01-01

    Autoradiography has been used to visualize independently the subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors in rat somatosensory cortex. Beta 2-Adrenergic receptors, but not beta 1-adrenergic receptors colocalize with "whisker barrels" in this tissue. Thus, each whisker sends a specific multisynaptic pathway to the somatosensory cortex that can be histochemically visualized and only one subtype of beta-adrenergic receptor is specifically associated with this cortical representation. Additionally, neonatal lesion of any or all of the whisker follicles results in loss of the corresponding barrel(s) as shown by histochemical markers. This loss is paralleled by a similar loss in the organization of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in the somatosensory cortex. Other results indicate that these beta 2-adrenergic receptors are not involved in moment-to-moment signal transmission in this pathway and, additionally, are not involved in a gross way in the development of whisker-barrel array. Images PMID:2164222

  1. Promoting peripheral nerve regeneration with biodegradable poly (DL-lactic acid) films

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruijun; Chen, Lei; Fu, Jinling; Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Shuang; Pan, Yuehai

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration and repair of peripheral nerve injury has always been a major problem in the clinic. The conventional technique based on suturing the nerve ends to each other coupled with the implantation of nerve conduits outside is associated with postoperative adhesions and scar problems. Recently, a novel biodegradable poly (DL-lactic acid) (PDLLA) film has been introduced. This novel anti-adhesion film has a porous structure with better mechanical properties, better flexibility, and more controllable degradation as compared to traditional non-porous nerve conduits. However, little is known about the effects of such PDLLA films on regeneration and repair of peripheral nerve injury in vivo. In this study, we evaluated the effects of PDLLA films implantation after sciatic nerve transection and anastomosis on subsequent sciatic nerve regeneration in vivo, using a rat sciatic nerve injury model. Sciatic nerve transection surgery coupled with direct suturing only, suturing and wrapping with traditional nerve conduits, or suturing and wrapping with PDLLA films was performed on adult Wistar rats. The additional wrapping with PDLLA films inhibited the nerve adhesion after 12 weeks recovery from surgery. It also increased the compound muscle action potentials and tibialis and gastrocnemius muscle wet weight ratio following 8 weeks recovery from surgery. Regenerated nerve fibers were relatively straight and the aligned structure was complete in rats with implantations of PDLLA films. The results suggested that PDLLA films can improve the nutritional status in the muscles innervated by the damaged nerves and promote nerve regeneration in vivo. PMID:26339372

  2. Adrenergic and noradrenergic regulation of poultry behavior and production.

    PubMed

    Dennis, R L

    2016-07-01

    Norepinephrine and epinephrine (noradrenaline and adrenaline) are integral in maintaining behavioral and physiological homeostasis during both aversive and rewarding events. They regulate the response to stressful stimuli through direct activation of adrenergic receptors in the central and sympathetic nervous systems, hormonal activity and through the interaction of the brain, gut, and microbiome. The multiple functions of these catecholamines work synergistically to prepare an individual for a "fight or flight" response. However, hyper-reactivity of this system can lead to increased fearfulness and aggression, decreased health and productivity, and a reduction in overall well-being. Behaviors, such as aggression and certain fear-related behaviors, are a serious problem in the poultry industry that can lead to injury and cannibalism. For decades, catecholamines have been used as a measure of stress in animals. However, few studies have specifically targeted the adrenergic systems as means to reduce behaviors that are damaging or maladapted to their rearing environments and improve animal well-being. This article attempts to address our current understanding of specific, adrenergic-regulated behaviors that impact chicken well-being and production. PMID:27345328

  3. Facial Nerve Neuroma Management

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Peter C.; Osguthorpe, J. David

    1998-01-01

    Three facial nerve neuromas were identified in the academic year 1994-1995. Each case illustrates different management dilemmas. One patient with a grade III facial nerve palsy had a small geniculate ganglion neuroma with the dilemma of decompression versus resection clear nerve section margins. The second patient underwent facial neuroma resection with cable graft reconstruction, but the permanent sections were positive. The last patient had a massive neuroma in which grafting versus other facial reconstructive options were considered. These three cases illustrate some of the major controversies in facial nerve neuroma management. We discuss our decision-making plan and report our results. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17171043

  4. Diabetes and nerve damage

    MedlinePlus

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  5. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Howland, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The vagus nerve is a major component of the autonomic nervous system, has an important role in the regulation of metabolic homeostasis, and plays a key role in the neuroendocrine-immune axis to maintain homeostasis through its afferent and efferent pathways. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) refers to any technique that stimulates the vagus nerve, including manual or electrical stimulation. Left cervical VNS is an approved therapy for refractory epilepsy and for treatment resistant depression. Right cervical VNS is effective for treating heart failure in preclinical studies and a phase II clinical trial. The effectiveness of various forms of non-invasive transcutaneous VNS for epilepsy, depression, primary headaches, and other conditions has not been investigated beyond small pilot studies. The relationship between depression, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, and heart disease might be mediated by the vagus nerve. VNS deserves further study for its potentially favorable effects on cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, metabolic, and other physiological biomarkers associated with depression morbidity and mortality. PMID:24834378

  6. Sacral nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Matzel, K E; Stadelmaier, U; Besendörfer, M

    2004-01-01

    The current concept of recruiting residual function of an inadequate pelvic organ by electrostimulation involves stimulation of the sacral spinal nerves at the level of the sacral canal. The rationale for applying SNS to fecal incontinence was based on clinical observations of its effect on bowel habits and anorectal continence function in urologic patients (increased anorectal angulation and anal canal closure pressure) and on anatomic considerations: dissection demonstrated a dual peripheral nerve supply of the striated pelvic floor muscles that govern these functions. Because the sacral spinal nerve site is the most distal common location of this dual nerve supply, stimulating here can elicit both functions. Since the first application of SNS in fecal incontinence in 1994, this technique has been improved, the patient selection process modified, and the spectrum of indications expanded. At present SNS has been applied in more than 1300 patients with fecal incontinence limited.

  7. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many of these diseases are genetic. Sometimes the cause is a medical ...

  8. Damaged axillary nerve (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Conditions associated with axillary nerve dysfunction include fracture of the humerus (upper arm bone), pressure from casts or splints, and improper use of crutches. Other causes include systemic disorders that cause neuritis (inflammation of ...

  9. Iatrogenic accessory nerve injury.

    PubMed Central

    London, J.; London, N. J.; Kay, S. P.

    1996-01-01

    Accessory nerve injury produces considerable disability. The nerve is most frequently damaged as a complication of radical neck dissection, cervical lymph node biopsy and other surgical procedures. The problem is frequently compounded by a failure to recognise the error immediately after surgery when surgical repair has the greatest chance of success. We present cases which outline the risk of accessory nerve injury, the spectrum of clinical presentations and the problems produced by a failure to recognise the deficit. Regional anatomy, consequences of nerve damage and management options are discussed. Diagnostic biopsy of neck nodes should not be undertaken as a primary investigation and, when indicated, surgery in this region should be performed by suitably trained staff under well-defined conditions. Awareness of iatrogenic injury and its consequences would avoid delays in diagnosis and treatment. Images Figure 2 PMID:8678450

  10. Femoral nerve dysfunction

    MedlinePlus

    Neuropathy - femoral nerve; Femoral neuropathy ... Craig EJ, Clinchot DM. Femoral neuropathy. In: Frontera WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD Jr, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation: Musculoskeletal Disorders, Pain, and Rehabilitation . 3rd ...

  11. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get it. ... change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. Controlling ...

  12. Lower cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Batra, Kiran; Blitz, Ari M; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-02-01

    Imaging evaluation of cranial neuropathies requires thorough knowledge of the anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic features of the cranial nerves, as well as detailed clinical information, which is necessary for tailoring the examinations, locating the abnormalities, and interpreting the imaging findings. This article provides clinical, anatomic, and radiological information on lower (7th to 12th) cranial nerves, along with high-resolution magnetic resonance images as a guide for optimal imaging technique, so as to improve the diagnosis of cranial neuropathy.

  13. The Role of Alpha-2 Adrenergic Receptors in Anti-ulcer Activity.

    PubMed

    Suleyman, Halis

    2012-04-01

    Although peptic ulcer disease has long been recognized, the proposed mechanisms of its etiopathogenesis change every year. This review shows that gastric ulcers have a significant relationship with alpha-2 adrenergic receptors. The aggravating factors of gastric ulcer formation have been reported to act by blocking alpha-2 adrenergic receptors, whereas drugs possessing anti-ulcer activity have been shown to ensure gastric protection by stimulating the alpha-2 adrenergic receptors. The data derived from the literature indicate the likelihood that any drug or substance selectively stimulating the alpha-2 adrenergic receptors may possess anti-ulcer activity.

  14. β2-adrenergic signal transduction plays a detrimental role in subchondral bone loss of temporomandibular joint in osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Kai; Niu, Li-Na; Li, Qi-hong; Ren, Gao-tong; Zhao, Chang-ming; Liu, Yun-dong; Tay, Franklin R.; Wang, Mei-qing

    2015-01-01

    The present study tested whether activation of the sympathetic tone by aberrant joint loading elicits abnormal subchondral bone remodeling in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis. Abnormal dental occlusion was created in experimental rats, which were then intraperitoneally injected by saline, propranolol or isoproterenol. The norepinephrine contents, distribution of sympathetic nerve fibers, expression of β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) and remodeling parameters in the condylar subchondral bone were investigated. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from condylar subchondral bones were harvested for comparison of their β-ARs, pro-osteoclastic gene expressions and pro-osteoclastic function. Increases in norepinephrine level, sympathetic nerve fiber distribution and β2-AR expression were observed in the condylar subchondral bone of experimental rats, together with subchondral bone loss and increased osteoclast activity. β-antagonist (propranolol) suppressed subchondral bone loss and osteoclast hyperfunction while β-agonist (isoproterenol) exacerbated those responses. MSCs from experimental condylar subchondral bone expressed higher levels of β2-AR and RANKL; norepinephrine stimulation further increased their RANKL expression and pro-osteoclastic function. These effects were blocked by inhibition of β2-AR or the PKA pathway. RANKL expression by MSCs decreased after propranolol administration and increased after isoproterenol administration. It is concluded that β2-AR signal-mediated subchondral bone loss in TMJ osteoarthritisis associated with increased RANKL secretion by MSCs. PMID:26219508

  15. β2-Adrenergic signal transduction plays a detrimental role in subchondral bone loss of temporomandibular joint in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Kai; Niu, Li-Na; Li, Qi-hong; Ren, Gao-tong; Zhao, Chang-ming; Liu, Yun-dong; Tay, Franklin R; Wang, Mei-qing

    2015-07-29

    The present study tested whether activation of the sympathetic tone by aberrant joint loading elicits abnormal subchondral bone remodeling in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) osteoarthritis. Abnormal dental occlusion was created in experimental rats, which were then intraperitoneally injected by saline, propranolol or isoproterenol. The norepinephrine contents, distribution of sympathetic nerve fibers, expression of β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) and remodeling parameters in the condylar subchondral bone were investigated. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from condylar subchondral bones were harvested for comparison of their β-ARs, pro-osteoclastic gene expressions and pro-osteoclastic function. Increases in norepinephrine level, sympathetic nerve fiber distribution and β2-AR expression were observed in the condylar subchondral bone of experimental rats, together with subchondral bone loss and increased osteoclast activity. β-antagonist (propranolol) suppressed subchondral bone loss and osteoclast hyperfunction while β-agonist (isoproterenol) exacerbated those responses. MSCs from experimental condylar subchondral bone expressed higher levels of β2-AR and RANKL; norepinephrine stimulation further increased their RANKL expression and pro-osteoclastic function. These effects were blocked by inhibition of β2-AR or the PKA pathway. RANKL expression by MSCs decreased after propranolol administration and increased after isoproterenol administration. It is concluded that β2-AR signal-mediated subchondral bone loss in TMJ osteoarthritisis associated with increased RANKL secretion by MSCs.

  16. A Follicle Rupture Assay Reveals an Essential Role for Follicular Adrenergic Signaling in Drosophila Ovulation.

    PubMed

    Deady, Lylah D; Sun, Jianjun

    2015-10-01

    Ovulation is essential for the propagation of the species and involves a proteolytic degradation of the follicle wall for the release of the fertilizable oocyte. However, the precise mechanisms for regulating these proteolytic events are largely unknown. Work from our lab and others have shown that there are several parallels between Drosophila and mammalian ovulation at both the cellular and molecular levels. During ovulation in Drosophila, posterior follicle cells surrounding a mature oocyte are selectively degraded and the residual follicle cells remain in the ovary to form a corpus luteum after follicle rupture. Like in mammals, this rupturing process also depends on matrix metalloproteinase 2 (Mmp2) activity localized at the posterior end of mature follicles, where oocytes exit. In the present study, we show that Mmp2 activity is regulated by the octopaminergic signaling in mature follicle cells. Exogenous octopamine (OA; equivalent to norepinephrine, NE) is sufficient to induce follicle rupture when isolated mature follicles are cultured ex vivo, in the absence of the oviduct or ovarian muscle sheath. Knocking down the alpha-like adrenergic receptor Oamb (Octoampine receptor in mushroom bodies) in mature follicle cells prevents OA-induced follicle rupture ex vivo and ovulation in vivo. We also show that follicular OA-Oamb signaling induces Mmp2 enzymatic activation but not Mmp2 protein expression, likely via intracellular Ca2+ as the second messenger. Our work develops a novel ex vivo follicle rupture assay and demonstrates the role for follicular adrenergic signaling in Mmp2 activation and ovulation in Drosophila, which is likely conserved in other species.

  17. [Antifibrillatory activity of dipeptide antagonist of nerve growth factor].

    PubMed

    Kryzhanovskiĭ, S A; Stoliarchuk, V N; Vititnova, M B; Tsorin, I B; Pekel'dina, E S; Gudasheva, T A

    2012-01-01

    In experiments on anesthetized rats were assessed antifibrillatoty action of dipeptide GK-1. This compound is the fragment of fourth loop of nerve growth factor (NGF) and manifests antagonistic activity in respect to TrkA receptor, that specified for NGF. It is shown that this compound is able to significantly increase the threshold of electrical fibrillation of the heart and its effectiveness is not inferior to the reference antiarrhythmics I and III class on Vaughan Williams classification. However, unlike the latter, antifibrillatory action of dipeptide GK-1 was delayed and realized within 40-60 minutes after its administration. It is discussed possible mechanisms underlying antifibrillatory action of dipeptide GK-1, that, to some extent, may be associated with its ability to change the reactivity of beta-adrenergic structures of the heart.

  18. Facial Nerve Trauma: Evaluation and Considerations in Management

    PubMed Central

    Gordin, Eli; Lee, Thomas S.; Ducic, Yadranko; Arnaoutakis, Demetri

    2014-01-01

    The management of facial paralysis continues to evolve. Understanding the facial nerve anatomy and the different methods of evaluating the degree of facial nerve injury are crucial for successful management. When the facial nerve is transected, direct coaptation leads to the best outcome, followed by interpositional nerve grafting. In cases where motor end plates are still intact but a primary repair or graft is not feasible, a nerve transfer should be employed. When complete muscle atrophy has occurred, regional muscle transfer or free flap reconstruction is an option. When dynamic reanimation cannot be undertaken, static procedures offer some benefit. Adjunctive tools such as botulinum toxin injection and biofeedback can be helpful. Several new treatment modalities lie on the horizon which hold potential to alter the current treatment algorithm. PMID:25709748

  19. [Morphologic aspects of the vestibular nerve of the chinchilla].

    PubMed

    Gómez Martínez, J; Suárez Nieto, C; Tolivia Fernández, J; Navarro Incio, A; Díaz Fernández, C; González del Rey Rodríguez, C

    1990-01-01

    A quantitative study was made of the number of fibers, their diameters and patterns of distribution in 14 ampullar nerves of chinchilla. The nerves were processed for osmium staining, embedded in plastic and cut serially in 1-micron-thick sections for histologic evaluation. Quantitative evaluation of nerve-fiber characteristics was made with the aid of a laboratory computer and specific programs. The number of the nerve fibers ranged between 1,877 and 2,175. The diameters of the fibers could be as large as 8 microns. The fibers between 2 and 2.5 microns were the most abundant, representing 29.6% of the fiber population. The distribution of fibers in the cristae was size-dependent: 80% of the thin fibers were located at the ends of the nerves, while most of the thick fibers were distributed through the central and intermediate areas. PMID:2076312

  20. Ionic channels and hormone release from peptidergic nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Lemos, J R; Nordmann, J J

    1986-09-01

    Although there is considerable evidence that depolarization of nerve cell terminals leads to the entry of Ca2+ and to the secretion of neurohormones and neurotransmitters, the details of how ionic currents control the release of neuroactive substances from nerve terminals are unknown. The small size of most nerve terminals has precluded direct analysis of membrane ionic currents and their influence on secretion. We now report that it is possible, using patch-clamp techniques, to study stimulus--secretion coupling in isolated peptidergic nerve terminals. Sinus gland terminals from Cardisoma are easily isolated following collagenase treatment and appear morphologically and electrically very similar to non-dissociated nerve endings. We have observed two types of single-channel currents not previously described. The first ('f') channel is activated by intracellular Na+ and the second ('s') by intracellular Ca2+. Both show little selectivity between Na+ and K+. In symmetrical K+, these cation channels have mean conductances of 69 and 213 pS, respectively. Furthermore, at least three types of Ca2+ channels can be reconstituted from nerve terminal membranes prepared from sinus glands. Nerve terminals can also be isolated from the rat neural lobe. These neurosecretosomes release oxytocin and vasopressin, in response to membrane depolarization, only in the presence of external Ca2+. The depolarization of the nerve endings is associated with an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration and this increase, measured using a fluorescent indicator, is abolished by Ca2+ channel blockers. Channels similar in their properties to the f and s channels also exist in rat neural lobe endings. Since these channels have not been found in other neurones or neuronal structures they may be unique to peptidergic nerve terminals.

  1. Communications Between the Facial Nerve and the Vestibulocochlear Nerve, the Glossopharyngeal Nerve, and the Cervical Plexus.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Song, Ju Sung; Yang, Su Cheol

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this review is to elucidate the communications between the facial nerves or facial nerve and neighboring nerves: the vestibulocochlear nerve, the glossopharyngeal nerve, and the cervical plexus.In a PubMed search, 832 articles were searched using the terms "facial nerve and communication." Sixty-two abstracts were read and 16 full-text articles were reviewed. Among them, 8 articles were analyzed.The frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the vestibulocochlear nerve was the highest (82.3%) and the frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the glossopharyngeal nerve was the lowest (20%). The frequency of communication between the facial nerve and the cervical plexus was 65.2 ± 43.5%. The frequency of communication between the cervical branch and the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve was 24.7 ± 1.7%.Surgeons should be aware of the nerve communications, which are important during clinical examinations and surgical procedures of the facial nerves such as those communications involved in facial reconstructive surgery, neck dissection, and various nerve transfer procedures.

  2. Effects of Intrinsic and Extrinsic Cardiac Nerves on Atrial Arrhythmia in Experimental Pulmonary Artery Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qingyan; Deng, Hongping; Jiang, Xuejun; Dai, Zixuan; Wang, Xiaozhan; Wang, Xule; Guo, Zongwen; Hu, Wei; Yu, Shengbo; Yang, Bo; Tang, Yanhong; Huang, Congxin

    2015-11-01

    Atrial arrhythmia, which includes atrial fibrillation (AF) and atrial flutter (AFL), is common in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), who often have increased sympathetic nerve activity. Here, we tested the hypothesis that autonomic nerves play important roles in vulnerability to AF/AFL in PAH. The atrial effective refractory period and AF/AFL inducibility at baseline and after anterior right ganglionated plexi ablation were determined during left stellate ganglion stimulation or left renal sympathetic nerve stimulation in beagle dogs with or without PAH. Then, sympathetic nerve, β-adrenergic receptor densities and connexin 43 expression in atrial tissues were assessed. The sum of the window of vulnerability to AF/AFL was increased in the right atrium compared with the left atrium at baseline in the PAH dogs but not in the controls. The atrial effective refractory period dispersion was increased in the control dogs, but not in the PAH dogs, during left stellate ganglion stimulation. The voltage thresholds for inducing AF/AFL during anterior right ganglionated plexi stimulation were lower in the PAH dogs than in the controls. The AF/AFL inducibility was suppressed after ablation of the anterior right ganglionated plexi in the PAH dogs. The PAH dogs had higher sympathetic nerve and β1-adrenergic receptor densities, increased levels of nonphosphorylated connexin 43, and heterogeneous connexin 43 expression in the right atrium when compared with the control dogs. The anterior right ganglionated plexi play important roles in the induction of AF/AFL. AF/AFL induction was associated with right atrium substrate remodeling in dogs with PAH.

  3. Molecular and pharmacological characteristics of the gerbil α(1a)-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Witt, Kelly M; Bockman, Charles S; Dang, Herbert K; Gruber, Daniel D; Wangemann, Philine; Scofield, Margaret A

    2012-01-01

    The spiral modiolar artery supplies blood and essential nutrients to the cochlea. Our previous functional study indicates the α(1A)-adrenergic receptor subtype mediates vasoconstriction of the gerbil spiral modiolar artery. Although the gerbil cochlea is often used as a model in hearing research, the molecular and pharmacological characteristics of the cloned gerbil α(1a)-adrenergic receptor have not been determined. Thus we cloned, expressed and characterized the gerbil α(1a)-adrenergic receptor and then compared its molecular and pharmacological properties to those of other mammalian α(1a)-adrenergic receptors. The cDNA clone contained 1404 nucleotides, which encoded a 467 amino acid peptide with a deduced sequence having 96.8, 96.4 and 91.6% identity to rat, mouse and human α(1a)-receptors, respectively. We transiently transfected the α(1a)-adrenergic receptor into COS-1 cells and determined its pharmacological characteristics by [(3)H]prazosin binding. Unlabeled prazosin had a K(i) of 0.89±0.1nM. The α(1A)-adrenergic receptor-selective antagonists, 5-methylurapidil and WB-4101, bound with high affinity and had K(i) values of 4.9±1 and 1.0±0.1nM, respectively. BMY-7378, an α(1D)-adrenergic receptor-selective antagonist, bound with low affinity (260±60nM). The 91.6% amino acid sequence identity and K(i)s of the cloned gerbil α(1a)-adrenergic receptor are similar to those of the human α(1a)-adrenergic receptor clone. These results show that the gerbil α(1a)-adrenergic receptor is representative of the human α(1a)-adrenergic receptor, lending validity to the use of the gerbil spiral modiolar artery as a model in studies of vascular disorders of the cochlea.

  4. Regulation of subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors in rat brain following treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.W.; Wolfe, B.B.; Molinoff, P.B.

    1989-07-01

    The technique of quantitative autoradiography has been used to localize changes in the densities of subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors in rat brain following treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine. Previously reported increases in the density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors in the cerebral cortex were confirmed. The anatomical resolution of autoradiography made it possible to detect changes in the density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in the cortex and in a number of other brain regions. The density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors increased from 30 to 50% depending on the region of the cortex being examined. The increase in the somatomotor cortex was greater than that in the frontal or occipital cortex. The increase in the density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in the cortex was not as widespread as that of beta 1-adrenergic receptors and occurred primarily in frontal cortex, where the density of receptors increased by 40%. The densities of both beta 1- and beta 2-adrenergic receptors increased in a number of forebrain, thalamic, and midbrain structures. Selective changes in the density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors were observed in the superficial gray layer of the superior colliculus and in the amygdala. The density of beta 2-adrenergic receptors increased in the caudate-putamen, the substantia nigra, and the lateral and central nuclei of the thalamus, whereas the density of beta 1-adrenergic receptors did not change in these regions. The densities of both subtypes of beta-adrenergic receptors increased in the hippocampus, the cerebellum, the lateral posterior nucleus of the thalamus, and the dorsal lateral geniculate.

  5. Acellular Nerve Allografts in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Amy M.; MacEwan, Matthew; Santosa, Katherine B.; Chenard, Kristofer E.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Johnson, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Processed nerve allografts offer a promising alternative to nerve autografts in the surgical management of peripheral nerve injuries where short deficits exist. Methods Three established models of acellular nerve allograft (cold-preserved, detergent-processed, and AxoGen® -processed nerve allografts) were compared to nerve isografts and silicone nerve guidance conduits in a 14 mm rat sciatic nerve defect. Results All acellular nerve grafts were superior to silicone nerve conduits in support of nerve regeneration. Detergent-processed allografts were similar to isografts at 6 weeks post-operatively, while AxoGen®-processed and cold-preserved allografts supported significantly fewer regenerating nerve fibers. Measurement of muscle force confirmed that detergent-processed allografts promoted isograft-equivalent levels of motor recovery 16 weeks post-operatively. All acellular allografts promoted greater amounts of motor recovery compared to silicone conduits. Conclusions These findings provide evidence that differential processing for removal of cellular constituents in preparing acellular nerve allografts affects recovery in vivo. PMID:21660979

  6. Polymer scaffolds with preferential parallel grooves enhance nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Mobasseri, Atefeh; Faroni, Alessandro; Minogue, Ben M; Downes, Sandra; Terenghi, Giorgio; Reid, Adam J

    2015-03-01

    We have modified the surface topography of poly ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) and polylactic acid (PLA) blended films to improve cell proliferation and to guide the regeneration of peripheral nerves. Films with differing shaped grooves were made using patterned silicon templates, sloped walls (SL), V-shaped (V), and square-shaped (SQ), and compared with nongrooved surfaces with micropits. The solvent cast films were tested in vitro using adult adipose-derived stem cells differentiated to Schwann cell-like cells. Cell attachment, proliferation, and cell orientation were all improved on the grooved surfaces, with SL grooves giving the best results. We present in vivo data on Sprague-Dawley rat sciatic nerve injury with a 10-mm gap, evaluating nerve regeneration at 3 weeks across a polymer nerve conduit modified with intraluminal grooves (SL, V, and SQ) and differing wall thicknesses (70, 100, 120, and 210 μm). The SL-grooved nerve conduit showed a significant improvement over the other topographical-shaped grooves, while increasing the conduit wall thickness saw no positive effect on the biological response of the regenerating nerve. Furthermore, the preferred SL-grooved conduit (C) with 70 μm wall thickness was compared with the current clinical gold standard of autologous nerve graft (Ag) in the rat 10-mm sciatic nerve gap model. At 3 weeks postsurgery, all nerve gaps across both groups were bridged with regenerated nerve fibers. At 16 weeks, features of regenerated axons were comparable between the autograft (Ag) and conduit (C) groups. End organ assessments of muscle weight, electromyography, and skin reinnervation were also similar between the groups. The comparable experimental outcome between conduit and autograft, suggests that the PCL/PLA conduit with inner lumen microstructured grooves could be used as a potential alternative treatment for peripheral nerve repair. PMID:25435096

  7. Polymer Scaffolds with Preferential Parallel Grooves Enhance Nerve Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Mobasseri, Atefeh; Faroni, Alessandro; Minogue, Ben M.; Downes, Sandra; Reid, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    We have modified the surface topography of poly ɛ-caprolactone (PCL) and polylactic acid (PLA) blended films to improve cell proliferation and to guide the regeneration of peripheral nerves. Films with differing shaped grooves were made using patterned silicon templates, sloped walls (SL), V-shaped (V), and square-shaped (SQ), and compared with nongrooved surfaces with micropits. The solvent cast films were tested in vitro using adult adipose-derived stem cells differentiated to Schwann cell-like cells. Cell attachment, proliferation, and cell orientation were all improved on the grooved surfaces, with SL grooves giving the best results. We present in vivo data on Sprague-Dawley rat sciatic nerve injury with a 10-mm gap, evaluating nerve regeneration at 3 weeks across a polymer nerve conduit modified with intraluminal grooves (SL, V, and SQ) and differing wall thicknesses (70, 100, 120, and 210 μm). The SL-grooved nerve conduit showed a significant improvement over the other topographical-shaped grooves, while increasing the conduit wall thickness saw no positive effect on the biological response of the regenerating nerve. Furthermore, the preferred SL-grooved conduit (C) with 70 μm wall thickness was compared with the current clinical gold standard of autologous nerve graft (Ag) in the rat 10-mm sciatic nerve gap model. At 3 weeks postsurgery, all nerve gaps across both groups were bridged with regenerated nerve fibers. At 16 weeks, features of regenerated axons were comparable between the autograft (Ag) and conduit (C) groups. End organ assessments of muscle weight, electromyography, and skin reinnervation were also similar between the groups. The comparable experimental outcome between conduit and autograft, suggests that the PCL/PLA conduit with inner lumen microstructured grooves could be used as a potential alternative treatment for peripheral nerve repair. PMID:25435096

  8. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    PubMed

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  9. Collateral development and spinal motor reorganization after nerve injury and repair

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Youlai; Zhang, Peixun; Han, Na; Kou, Yuhui; Yin, Xiaofeng; Jiang, Baoguo

    2016-01-01

    Functional recovery is often unsatisfactory after severe extended nerve defects or proximal nerve trunks injuries repaired by traditional repair methods, as the long regeneration distance for the regenerated axons to reinnervate their original target end-organs. The proximal nerve stump can regenerate with many collaterals that reinnervate the distal stump after peripheral nerve injury, it may be possible to use nearby fewer nerve fibers to repair more nerve fibers at the distal end to shorten the regenerating distance. In this study, the proximal peroneal nerve was used to repair both the distal peroneal and tibial nerve. The number and location of motor neurons in spinal cord as well as functional and morphological recovery were assessed at 2 months, 4 months and 8 months after nerve repair, respectively. Projections from the intact peroneal and tibial nerves were also studied in normal animals. The changes of motor neurons were assessed using the retrograde neurotracers FG and DiI to backlabel motor neurons that regenerate axons into two different pathways. To evaluate the functional recovery, the muscle forces and sciatic function index were examined. The muscles and myelinated axons were assessed using electrophysiology and histology. The results showed that all labeled motor neurons after nerve repair were always confined within the normal peroneal nerve pool and nearly all the distribution of motor neurons labeled via distal different nerves was disorganized as compared to normal group. However, there was a significant decline in the number of double labeled motor neurons and an obvious improvement with respect to the functional and morphological recovery between 2 and 8 months. In addition, the tibial/peroneal motor neuron number ratio at different times was 2.11±0.05, 2.13±0.08, 2.09±0.12, respectively, and was close to normal group (2.21±0.09). Quantitative analysis showed no significant morphological differences between myelinated nerve fibers

  10. Adrenergic signaling and oxidative stress: a role for sirtuins?

    PubMed Central

    Corbi, Graziamaria; Conti, Valeria; Russomanno, Giusy; Longobardi, Giancarlo; Furgi, Giuseppe; Filippelli, Amelia; Ferrara, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    The adrenergic system plays a central role in stress signaling and stress is often associated with increased production of ROS. However, ROS overproduction generates oxidative stress, that occurs in response to several stressors. β-adrenergic signaling is markedly attenuated in conditions such as heart failure, with downregulation and desensitization of the receptors and their uncoupling from adenylyl cyclase. Transgenic activation of β2-adrenoceptor leads to elevation of NADPH oxidase activity, with greater ROS production and p38MAPK phosphorylation. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase or ROS significantly reduced the p38MAPK signaling cascade. Chronic β2-adrenoceptor activation is associated with greater cardiac dilatation and dysfunction, augmented pro-inflammatory and profibrotic signaling, while antioxidant treatment protected hearts against these abnormalities, indicating ROS production to be central to the detrimental signaling of β2-adrenoceptors. It has been demonstrated that sirtuins are involved in modulating the cellular stress response directly by deacetylation of some factors. Sirt1 increases cellular stress resistance, by an increased insulin sensitivity, a decreased circulating free fatty acids and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), an increased activity of AMPK, increased activity of PGC-1a, and increased mitochondrial number. Sirt1 acts by involving signaling molecules such P-I-3-kinase-Akt, MAPK and p38-MAPK-β. βAR stimulation antagonizes the protective effect of the AKT pathway through inhibiting induction of Hif-1α and Sirt1 genes, key elements in cell survival. More studies are needed to better clarify the involvement of sirtuins in the β-adrenergic response and, overall, to better define the mechanisms by which tools such as exercise training are able to counteract the oxidative stress, by both activation of sirtuins and inhibition of GRK2 in many cardiovascular conditions and can be used to prevent or treat diseases such as heart failure

  11. Mechanisms of postspaceflight orthostatic hypotension: low alpha1-adrenergic receptor responses before flight and central autonomic dysregulation postflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meck, Janice V.; Waters, Wendy W.; Ziegler, Michael G.; deBlock, Heidi F.; Mills, Paul J.; Robertson, David; Huang, Paul L.

    2004-01-01

    Although all astronauts experience symptoms of orthostatic intolerance after short-duration spaceflight, only approximately 20% actually experience presyncope during upright posture on landing day. The presyncopal group is characterized by low vascular resistance before and after flight and low norepinephrine release during orthostatic stress on landing day. Our purpose was to determine the mechanisms of the differences between presyncopal and nonpresyncopal groups. We studied 23 astronauts 10 days before launch, on landing day, and 3 days after landing. We measured pressor responses to phenylephrine injections; norepinephrine release with tyramine injections; plasma volumes; resting plasma levels of chromogranin A (a marker of sympathetic nerve terminal release), endothelin, dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG, an intracellular metabolite of norepinephrine); and lymphocyte beta(2)-adrenergic receptors. We then measured hemodynamic and neurohumoral responses to upright tilt. Astronauts were separated into two groups according to their ability to complete 10 min of upright tilt on landing day. Compared with astronauts who were not presyncopal on landing day, presyncopal astronauts had 1). significantly smaller pressor responses to phenylephrine both before and after flight; 2). significantly smaller baseline norepinephrine, but significantly greater DHPG levels, on landing day; 3). significantly greater norepinephrine release with tyramine on landing day; and 4). significantly smaller norepinephrine release, but significantly greater epinephrine and arginine vasopressin release, with upright tilt on landing day. These data suggest that the etiology of orthostatic hypotension and presyncope after spaceflight includes low alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor responsiveness before flight and a remodeling of the central nervous system during spaceflight such that sympathetic responses to baroreceptor input become impaired.

  12. Mapping Neuronal Activation and the Influence of Adrenergic Signaling during Contextual Memory Retrieval

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wei-Ping; Guzowski, John F.; Thomas, Steven A.

    2005-01-01

    We recently described a critical role for adrenergic signaling in the hippocampus during contextual and spatial memory retrieval. To determine which neurons are activated by contextual memory retrieval and its sequelae in the presence and absence of adrenergic signaling, transcriptional imaging for the immediate-early gene "Arc" was used in…

  13. Antagonism of Lateral Amygdala Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors Facilitates Fear Conditioning and Long-Term Potentiation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lazzaro, Stephanie C.; Hou, Mian; Cunha, Catarina; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Cain, Christopher K.

    2010-01-01

    Norepinephrine receptors have been studied in emotion, memory, and attention. However, the role of alpha1-adrenergic receptors in fear conditioning, a major model of emotional learning, is poorly understood. We examined the effect of terazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, on cued fear conditioning. Systemic or intra-lateral amygdala…

  14. Crystal structure of the β2 adrenergic receptor-Gs protein complex

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Søren G.F.; DeVree, Brian T; Zou, Yaozhong; Kruse, Andrew C; Chung, Ka Young; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Chae, Pil Seok; Pardon, Els; Calinski, Diane; Mathiesen, Jesper M; Shah, Syed T.A.; Lyons, Joseph A; Caffrey, Martin; Gellman, Samuel H; Steyaert, Jan; Skiniotis, Georgios; Weis, William I; Sunahara, Roger K; Kobilka, Brian K

    2011-12-07

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are responsible for the majority of cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters as well as the senses of sight, olfaction and taste. The paradigm of GPCR signalling is the activation of a heterotrimeric GTP binding protein (G protein) by an agonist-occupied receptor. The β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) activation of Gs, the stimulatory G protein for adenylyl cyclase, has long been a model system for GPCR signalling. Here we present the crystal structure of the active state ternary complex composed of agonist-occupied monomeric β2AR and nucleotide-free Gs heterotrimer. The principal interactions between the β2AR and Gs involve the amino- and carboxy-terminal α-helices of Gs, with conformational changes propagating to the nucleotide-binding pocket. The largest conformational changes in the β2AR include a 14Å outward movement at the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane segment 6 (TM6) and an α-helical extension of the cytoplasmic end of TM5. The most surprising observation is a major displacement of the α-helical domain of Gαs relative to the Ras-like GTPase domain. This crystal structure represents the first high-resolution view of transmembrane signalling by a GPCR.

  15. Adrenergic Drugs Blockers or Enhancers for Cognitive Decline ? What to Choose for Alzheimer's Disease Patients?

    PubMed

    Femminella, Grazia D; Leosco, Dario; Ferrara, Nicola; Rengo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The adrenergic system has an important role in normal central nervous system function as well as in brain disease. The locus coeruleus, the main source of norepinephrine in brain, is involved in the regulation of learning and memory, reinforcement of sleep-wake cycle and synaptic plasticity. In Alzheimer's disease, locus coeruleus degeneration is observed early in the course of the disease, years before the onset of clinical cognitive signs, with neurofibrillary detected at the stage of mild cognitive impairment, preceding amyloid deposition. Thus, in the last years, a great interest has grown in evaluating the possibility of central adrenergic system modulation as a therapeutic tool in Alzheimer's disease. However, evidences do not show univocal results, with some studies suggesting that adrenergic stimulation might be beneficial in Alzheimer's Disease and some others favoring adrenergic blockade. In this review, we summarize data from both hypothesis and describe the pathophysiological role of the adrenergic system in neurodegeneration. PMID:27189470

  16. Phospholemman is a negative feed-forward regulator of Ca2+ in β-adrenergic signaling, accelerating β-adrenergic inotropy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jason H; Saucerman, Jeffrey J

    2012-05-01

    Sympathetic stimulation enhances cardiac contractility by stimulating β-adrenergic signaling and protein kinase A (PKA). Recently, phospholemman (PLM) has emerged as an important PKA substrate capable of regulating cytosolic Ca(2+) transients. However, it remains unclear how PLM contributes to β-adrenergic inotropy. Here we developed a computational model to clarify PLM's role in the β-adrenergic signaling response. Simulating Na(+) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) clamps, we identify an effect of PLM phosphorylation on SR unloading as the key mechanism by which PLM confers cytosolic Ca(2+) adaptation to long-term β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) stimulation. Moreover, we show that phospholamban (PLB) opposes and overtakes these actions on SR load, forming a negative feed-forward loop in the β-adrenergic signaling cascade. This network motif dominates the negative feedback conferred by β-AR desensitization and accelerates β-AR-induced inotropy. Model analysis therefore unmasks key actions of PLM phosphorylation during β-adrenergic signaling, indicating that PLM is a critical component of the fight-or-flight response.

  17. Mutated human beta3-adrenergic receptor (Trp64Arg) lowers the response to beta3-adrenergic agonists in transfected 3T3-L1 preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kimura, K; Sasaki, N; Asano, A; Mizukami, J; Kayahashi, S; Kawada, T; Fushiki, T; Morimatsu, M; Yoshida, T; Saito, M

    2000-03-01

    Wild-type or mutated human beta3-adrenergic receptor (Trp64Arg) cDNAs were stably expressed in mouse 3T3-L1 cells. Saturation binding study using a beta-adrenergic ligand revealed that there was no significant difference in the receptor density and the equilibrium dissociation constant between the two cell lines. However, the ability of the mutant beta3-adrenergic receptor to accumulate cyclic AMP (cAMP) in response to isoproterenol was much reduced and Kact for cAMP accumulation was lowered as compared to the wild type receptor. The amount of alpha subunit of stimulatory GTP-binding protein (GSalpha) and adenylyl cyclase activity in response to forskolin were not different in the two cell lines. The responses of the mutant receptor to epinephrine, norepinephrine and L-755,507, a highly specific agonist for human beta3-adrenergic receptor, were also reduced, but the reduction of Kact for L-755,507 was more evident than other agonists tested. The cAMP accumulation in response to some conventional beta3 agonists was less than 10% of that to isoproterenol even in the cells expressing the wild type receptor. These results suggest that the Trp64Arg mutant beta3-adrenergic receptor has less ability to stimulate adenylyl cyclase, and that lipolytic activity through the beta3-adrenergic receptor by catecholamines in subjects carrying this mutation might be suppressed. PMID:10786926

  18. Spatial heterogeneity of blood flow in the dog heart. II. Temporal stability in response to adrenergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Deussen, A; Flesche, C W; Lauer, T; Sonntag, M; Schrader, J

    1996-07-01

    The effects of adrenergic stimulation on local myocardial blood flow in the left ventricle were studied in 13 anaesthetized Beagle dogs using the tracer microsphere technique. Adrenergic stimulation was induced by intravenous infusion of orciprenaline (1-2 microg kg-1 min-1) over 15 min or by electrical stimulation of the left ansa subclavia (10 Hz, 1 ms, 4-8 V) over 5 min. Local myocardial blood flow was analysed in 256 samples with an average (+/-SD) mass of 318+/-49 mg from the left ventricular myocardium using a standardized dissection procedure. Orciprenaline increased the average myocardial blood flow from 0.85+/-0.18 to 1.73+/-0.27 ml min-1 g-1, while oxygen consumption and the pressure-rate product increased by 129 and 119% respectively. The coefficients of variation of local myocardial blood flow, a measure of spatial blood flow heterogeneity, were 0.21 and 0.18 under control and orciprenaline respectively. Except for a slight transmural gradient (endomyocardium/epimyocardium flow ratio 1.19) myocardial blood flow did not exhibit significant spatial gradients. Stimulation with orciprenaline increased the average blood flow in all regions of the left ventricle by comparable extents. However, local blood flow during orciprenaline was significantly lower in samples from regions which had a lower blood flow under resting control conditions. A significant positive relationship was obtained between local myocardial blood flow under resting conditions and orciprenaline (r=0.45+/-0.18). Moreover, after recovery from orciprenaline stimulation (i.e. 40-112 min after the end of orciprenaline infusion) local myocardial blood flow exhibited a high degree of correlation with local flow before orciprenaline (r=0.71+/-0.08). Comparable results were obtained with electrical stimulation of the left ansa subclavia. For the comparison stimulation vs. control, the correlation coefficient of local blood flow was 0.52+/-0.04 and for recovery vs. control 0.77+/-0.06. From these

  19. Adrenergic deficiency leads to impaired electrical conduction and increased arrhythmic potential in the embryonic mouse heart.

    PubMed

    Baker, Candice; Taylor, David G; Osuala, Kingsley; Natarajan, Anupama; Molnar, Peter J; Hickman, James; Alam, Sabikha; Moscato, Brittany; Weinshenker, David; Ebert, Steven N

    2012-07-01

    To determine if adrenergic hormones play a critical role in the functional development of the cardiac pacemaking and conduction system, we employed a mouse model where adrenergic hormone production was blocked due to targeted disruption of the dopamine β-hydroxylase (Dbh) gene. Immunofluorescent histochemical evaluation of the major gap junction protein, connexin 43, revealed that its expression was substantially decreased in adrenergic-deficient (Dbh-/-) relative to adrenergic-competent (Dbh+/+ and Dbh+/-) mouse hearts at embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5), whereas pacemaker and structural protein staining appeared similar. To evaluate cardiac electrical conduction in these hearts, we cultured them on microelectrode arrays (8×8, 200 μm apart). Our results show a significant slowing of atrioventricular conduction in adrenergic-deficient hearts compared to controls (31.4±6.4 vs. 15.4±1.7 ms, respectively, p<0.05). To determine if the absence of adrenergic hormones affected heart rate and rhythm, mouse hearts from adrenergic-competent and deficient embryos were cultured ex vivo at E10.5, and heart rates were measured before and after challenge with the β-adrenergic receptor agonist, isoproterenol (0.5 μM). On average, all hearts showed increased heart rate responses following isoproterenol challenge, but a significant (p<0.05) 225% increase in the arrhythmic index (AI) was observed only in adrenergic-deficient hearts. These results show that adrenergic hormones may influence heart development by stimulating connexin 43 expression, facilitating atrioventricular conduction, and helping to maintain cardiac rhythm during a critical phase of embryonic development.

  20. Peripheral nerve response to injury.

    PubMed

    Steed, Martin B

    2011-03-01

    Oral and maxillofacial surgeons caring for patients who have sustained a nerve injury to a branch of the peripheral trigeminal nerve must possess a basic understanding of the response of the peripheral nerves to trauma. The series of events that subsequently take place are largely dependent on the injury type and severity. Regeneration of the peripheral nerve is possible in many instances and future manipulation of the regenerative microenvironment will lead to advances in the management of these difficult injuries.

  1. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  2. Optic Nerve Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the occipital lobe (the part of the brain that interprets vision) like a cable wire. What is optic nerve ... nystagmus. In older patients, peripheral vision and color vision assessment ... around the brain and spinal cord (hydrocephalus) may prevent further optic ...

  3. Fine structure of vesiculated nerve profiles in the human lumbar facet joint.

    PubMed Central

    Vandenabeele, F; Creemers, J; Lambrichts, I; Robberechts, W

    1995-01-01

    The ultrastructural features of vesiculated nerve profiles were examined within a perivascular plexus of unmyelinated nerve fibres around small arteries and arterioles in the posterior facet joint capsule. Such profiles were exclusively observed in the dense fibrous layer and the adjacent part of the subintimal layer. The ligamentum flavum lacked any type of innervation. The vesiculated nerve profiles were tentatively classified on the basis of the fine structural appearances of their vesicular content. Two major types of nerve profiles could readily be distinguished in the capsular tissue. Both displayed a variable number of mitochondria, neurotubules and neurofilaments. The first type, containing predominantly small vesicles with an electron-dense granule or core, was frequently encountered and considered to be adrenergic in function. Profiles similar in morphology were also observed in the synovial plical tissue. A second type of profile, found in the joint capsule, contained varying proportions of small agranular (clear) vesicles and mitochondria. Some of these profiles exhibited an accumulation of mitochondria and were considered to be sensory in function. Nerve profiles filled with predominantly small flattened vesicles were occasionally encountered. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8586567

  4. Optimum Topical Delivery of Adrenergic Agonists to Oral Mucosa Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Soref, Cheryl M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Identify an orotopical vehicle to deliver an α-adrenergic vasoconstrictor to submucosal vasculature that is readily palatable to cancer/bone marrow transplant patients that suppresses chemo-radiotherapy-associated oral mucositis. Methods A [3H] norepinephrine ligand binding assay was developed to quantify receptor binding in hamster oral mucosa. Vehicle components (alcohols, polyols, cellulose, PVP) were tested versus [3H] norepinephrine binding. Vehicle refinement was also done to mask phenylephrine bitter taste and achieve human subject acceptance. The optimized vehicle was tested with α-adrenergic active agents to suppress radiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. Results The ligand binding assay quantified dose- and time-dependent, saturable binding of [3H] norepinephrine. An ethanol:glycerol:propylene glycol:water (6:6:8:80) vehicle provided the best delivery and binding. Further vehicle modification (flavoring and sucralose) yielded a vehicle with excellent taste scores in humans. Addition of phenylephrine, norepinephrine or epinephrine to the optimized vehicle and painting into mouse mouths 20 min before 19 Gy irradiation conferred significant suppression of the weight loss (P < 0.001) observed in mice who received oral vehicle. Conclusion We identified a highly efficient vehicle for the topical delivery of phenylephrine to the oral mucosa of both hamster and human subjects. This will enable its testing to suppress oral mucositis in an upcoming human clinical trial. PMID:25079392

  5. Vascular adrenergic receptor responses in skeletal muscle in myotonic dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Mechler, F.; Mastaglia, F.L.

    1981-02-01

    The pharmacological responses of vascular adrenergic receptors to intravenously administered epinephrine, phentolamine, and propranolol were assessed by measuring muscle blood flow (MBF) changes in the tibialis anterior muscle using the xenon 133 clearance technique and were compared in 8 normal subjects and 11 patients with myotonic dystrophy. In cases with advanced involvement of the muscle, the resting MBF was reduced and was not significantly altered by epinephrine before or after alpha- or beta-receptor blockade. In patients in whom the tibialis anterior muscle was normal or only minimally affected clinically, a paradoxical reduction in the epinephrine-induced increase in MBF was found after alpha blockade by phentolamine, and the epinephrine-induced MBF increase was not completely blocked by propranolol as in the normal subjects. These findings point to functional alteration in the properties of vascular adrenergic receptors in muscle in myotonic dystrophy. While this may be another manifestation of a widespread cell membrane defect in the disease, the possibility that the changes are secondary to the myotonic state cannot be excluded.

  6. The Principles of Ligand Specificity on beta-2-adrenergic receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chan, H. C. Stephen; Filipek, Slawomir; Yuan, Shuguang

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are recognized as one of the largest families of membrane proteins. Despite sharing a characteristic seven-transmembrane topology, G protein-coupled receptors regulate a wide range of cellular signaling pathways in response to various physical and chemical stimuli, and prevail as an important target for drug discovery. Notably, the recent progress in crystallographic methods led to a breakthrough in elucidating the structures of membrane proteins. The structures of β2-adrenergic receptor bound with a variety of ligands provide atomic details of the binding modes of agonists, antagonists and inverse agonists. In this study, we selected four representative molecules from each functional class of ligands and investigated their impacts on β2-adrenergic receptor through a total of 12 × 100 ns molecular dynamics simulations. From the obtained trajectories, we generated molecular fingerprints exemplifying propensities of protein-ligand interactions. For each functional class of compounds, we characterized and compared the fluctuation of the protein backbone, the volumes in the intracellular pockets, the water densities in the receptors, the domain interaction networks as well as the movements of transmembrane helices. We discovered that each class of ligands exhibits a distinct mode of interactions with mainly TM5 and TM6, altering the shape and eventually the state of the receptor. Our findings provide insightful prospective into GPCR targeted structure-based drug discoveries. PMID:27703221

  7. Pharmacogenetics of beta2 adrenergic receptor agonists in asthma management.

    PubMed

    Ortega, V E

    2014-07-01

    Beta2 (β2) adrenergic receptor agonists (beta agonists) are a commonly prescribed treatment for asthma despite the small increase in risk for life-threatening adverse responses associated with long-acting beta agonist (LABA). The concern for life-threatening adverse effects associated with LABA and the inter-individual variability of therapeutic responsiveness to LABA-containing combination therapies provide the rationale for pharmacogenetic studies of beta agonists. These studies primarily evaluated genes within the β2-adrenergic receptor and related pathways; however, recent genome-wide studies have identified novel loci for beta agonist response. Recent studies have identified a role for rare genetic variants in determining beta agonist response and, potentially, the risk for rare, adverse responses to LABA. Before genomics research can be applied to the development of genetic profiles for personalized medicine, it will be necessary to continue adapting to the analysis of an increasing volume of genetic data in larger cohorts with a combination of analytical methods and in vitro studies.

  8. Myocardial adrenergic responsiveness after lethal and nonlethal doses of endotoxin

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, R.E.; Lang, C.H.; McDonough, K.H.

    1987-02-01

    A dose-dependent impairment of intrinsic myocardial performance has been observed following in vivo administration of endotoxin. The present study reports a dose-dependent increase in plasma catecholamines following endotoxin (ET) that may impair ..beta..-adrenergic responsiveness. Hearts were removed from pentobarbital-anesthetized rats 4 h after a bolus injection of saline or ET and were studied as isolated cell preparations following collagenase digestion. Responsiveness of isoproterenol-stimulated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation in myocytes prepared from hearts of animals injected with 10 and 100 ..mu..g ET was decreased when compared with control rats and was significantly blunted in myocytes prepared from animals receiving 1000 ..mu..g ET. Similar sensitivities of the cAMP system existed, as judged by similar half-maximum effective concentration values. cAMP accumulation in the presence of 1 ..mu..M forskolin was depressed in myocytes from the 1000-..mu..g ET animals; ..beta..-adrenergic receptor density was decreased 25% in myocytes from high-dose ET animals when compared with control animals. This was accompanied by a nonsignificant reduction in the affinity of binding sites for (+/-)(/sup 3/H)CGP 12177. The blunted myocyte hormonal responsiveness following ET challenge appears to be related to the decreased activity of the adenylate cyclase that may be attributed to alterations in both receptor density and in the adenylate cyclase itself.

  9. The role of α-adrenergic receptors in mediating beat-by-beat sympathetic vascular transduction in the forearm of resting man.

    PubMed

    Fairfax, Seth T; Holwerda, Seth W; Credeur, Daniel P; Zuidema, Mozow Y; Medley, John H; Dyke, Peter C; Wray, D Walter; Davis, Michael J; Fadel, Paul J

    2013-07-15

    Sympathetic vascular transduction is commonly understood to act as a basic relay mechanism, but under basal conditions, competing dilatory signals may interact with and alter the ability of sympathetic activity to decrease vascular conductance. Thus, we determined the extent to which spontaneous bursts of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) mediate decreases in forearm vascular conductance (FVC) and the contribution of local α-adrenergic receptor-mediated pathways to the observed FVC responses. In 19 young men, MSNA (microneurography), arterial blood pressure and brachial artery blood flow (duplex Doppler ultrasound) were continuously measured during supine rest. These measures were also recorded in seven men during intra-arterial infusions of normal saline, phentolamine (PHEN) and PHEN with angiotensin II (PHEN+ANG). The latter was used to control for increases in resting blood flow with α-adrenergic blockade. Spike-triggered averaging was used to characterize beat-by-beat changes in FVC for 15 cardiac cycles following each MSNA burst and a peak response was calculated. Following MSNA bursts, FVC initially increased by +3.3 ± 0.3% (P = 0.016) and then robustly decreased to a nadir of -5.8 ± 1.6% (P < 0.001). The magnitude of vasoconstriction appeared graded with the number of consecutive MSNA bursts; while individual burst size only had a mild influence. Neither PHEN nor PHEN+ANG infusions affected the initial rise in FVC, but both infusions significantly attenuated the subsequent decrease in FVC (-2.1 ± 0.7% and -0.7 ± 0.8%, respectively; P < 0.001 vs. normal saline). These findings indicate that spontaneous MSNA bursts evoke robust beat-by-beat decreases in FVC that are exclusively mediated via α-adrenergic receptors.

  10. AB257. The study of the influence of the changes in alpha 1-adrenergic receptor and NGF on the diabetic urethral function

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shouzhen; Wang, Wenfu; Zhu, Kejia; Zhang, Dongqing; Wang, Yong; Shi, Benkang

    2016-01-01

    Background To study the influence of the changes in the α1-adrenergic receptor and NGF/ProNGF pathway on the diabetic urethral function. Methods A total of 20 female Wistar rats were divided into two groups equally at random. Urethral function was examined by recordings of bladder pressure and urethral perfusion pressure (UPP). The expression of α1-adrenergic receptor in the urethra was measured via RT-qPCR and ELISA method. The expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the urethra was measured via RT-qPCR and ELISA method. The expression of proNGF, P75NTR and sortilin in the urethra was measured by western blotting. Results The lowest urethral pressure (UPP nadir) during urethral relaxation was higher in diabetic rats. The UPP nadir and baseline UPP in diabetic rats was significantly decreased by intravenous administration of the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist (tamsulosin). The α1a and α1d adrenergic receptor in the urethra of the diabetic group was significantly increased via RT-qPCR and western blotting (P<0.05). The RT-qPCR and ELISA studies showed a significant decrease of NGF and the western blotting studies showed a significant increase of proNGF (P<0.05). There was a statistical decrease of the P75NTR in the urethras of diabetic rats (P<0.05) and no significant difference concerning sortilin between two groups (P>0.05). Conclusions The increase in the expression of α1-adrenoceptor and changes of the NGF/ProNGF pathway in the diabetic urethral was a possible mechanism of the diabetic urethral dysfunction.

  11. Decellularisation and histological characterisation of porcine peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Zilic, Leyla; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul; Haycock, John W

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries affect a large proportion of the global population, often causing significant morbidity and loss of function. Current treatment strategies include the use of implantable nerve guide conduits (NGC's) to direct regenerating axons between the proximal and distal ends of the nerve gap. However, NGC's are limited in their effectiveness at promoting regeneration Current NGCs are not suitable as substrates for supporting either neuronal or Schwann cell growth, as they lack an architecture similar to that of the native extracellular matrix (ECM) of the nerve. The aim of this study was to create an acellular porcine peripheral nerve using a novel decellularisation protocol, in order to eliminate the immunogenic cellular components of the tissue, while preserving the three-dimensional histoarchitecture and ECM components. Porcine peripheral nerve (sciatic branches were decellularised using a low concentration (0.1%; w/v) sodium dodecyl sulphate in conjunction with hypotonic buffers and protease inhibitors, and then sterilised using 0.1% (v/v) peracetic acid. Quantitative and qualitative analysis revealed a ≥95% (w/w) reduction in DNA content as well as preservation of the nerve fascicles and connective tissue. Acellular nerves were shown to have retained key ECM components such as collagen, laminin and fibronectin. Slow strain rate to failure testing demonstrated the biomechanical properties of acellular nerves to be comparable to fresh controls. In conclusion, we report the production of a biocompatible, biomechanically functional acellular scaffold, which may have use in peripheral nerve repair. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2041-2053. © 2016 The Authors. Biotechnology and Bioengineering published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26926914

  12. Effect of Increased Cyclic AMP Concentration on Muscle Protein Synthesis and Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, R. B.; Vaughn, J. R.; Bridge, K. Y.; Smith, C. K.

    1998-01-01

    Analogies of epinephrine are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle when fed to animals. These compounds presumably exert their physiological action through interaction with the P-adrenergic receptor. Since the intracellular signal generated by the Beta-adrenergic receptor is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in cell culture to determine if artificial elevation of cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter muscle protein metabolism and P-adrenergic receptor expression. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were treated with 0.2-30 micrometers forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the treatment period, both the concentration of cAMP and the quantity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) were measured. Concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. In contrast, the quantity of MHC was increased approximately 50% above control cells at 0.2 micrometers forskolin, but exhibited a gradual decline at higher levels of forskolin so that the quantity of MHC in cells treated with 30 micrometers forskolin was not significantly different from controls. Curiously, the intracellular concentration of cAMP which elicited the maximum increase in the quantity of MHC was only 40% higher than cAMP concentration in control cells.

  13. Facial nerve dissection by use of acoustic (loudspeaker) facial EMG monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kinney, S E; Prass, R

    1986-11-01

    The development of the surgical microscope in 1953, and the subsequent development of microsurgical instrumentation, signaled the beginning of modern-day acoustic neuroma surgery. Preservation of facial nerve function and total tumor removal is the goal of all acoustic neuroma surgery. The refinement of the translabyrinthine removal of acoustic neuromas by Dr. William House significantly improved preservation of facial nerve function. This is made possible by the anatomic identification of the facial nerve at the lateral end of the internal auditory canal. When the surgery is accomplished from a suboccipital or retrosigmoid approach, the facial nerve may be identified at the brain stem or within the internal auditory canal. Identifying the facial nerve from the posterior approach is not as anatomically precise as from the lateral approach through the labyrinth. The use of a facial nerve stimulator can greatly facilitate identification of the facial nerve in these procedures.

  14. Thermogenic responsiveness to nonspecific beta-adrenergic stimulation is not related to genetic variation in codon 16 of the beta2-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Bell, Christopher; Stob, Nicole R; Seals, Douglas R

    2006-04-01

    Stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors (beta-AR) by the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) modulates energy expenditure (EE), but substantial interindividual variability is observed. We determined whether the thermogenic response to beta-AR stimulation is related to genetic variation in codon 16 of the beta(2)-AR, a biologically important beta-AR polymorphism, and whether differences in SNS activity (i.e., the stimulus for agonist-promoted downregulation) are involved. The increase in EE (DeltaEE, indirect calorimetry, ventilated hood) above resting EE in response to nonspecific beta-AR stimulation [iv isoproterenol: 6, 12, and 24 ng/kg fat-free mass (FFM)/min] was measured in 46 healthy adult humans [Arg16Arg: 9 male, 7 female, 48 +/- 5 yr; Arg16Gly: 11 male, 4 female, 53 +/- 5 yr; Gly16Gly: 3 male, 12 female, 48 +/- 5 yr (means +/- SE)]. Neither FFM-adjusted baseline resting EE (P = 0.83) nor the dose of isoproterenol required to increase EE 10% above resting (P = 0.87) differed among the three groups (Arg16Arg: 5,409 +/- 209 kJ/day, 11.2 +/- 2.1 ng x kg FFM(-1) x min(-1); Arg16Gly: 5,367 +/- 272 kJ/day, 11.1 +/- 2.1 ng x kg FFM(-1) x min(-1); Gly16Gly: 5,305 +/- 159 kJ/day, 10.5 +/- 1.4 ng x kg FFM(-1) x min(-1)). Consistent with this, muscle sympathetic nerve activity and plasma norepinephrine concentrations were not different among the groups. Group differences in sex composition did not influence the results. Our findings indicate that the thermogenic response to nonspecific beta-AR stimulation, an important mechanistic component of overall beta-AR modulation of EE, is not related to this beta(2)-AR polymorphism in healthy humans. This may be explained in part by a lack of association between this gene variant and tonic SNS activity.

  15. Interactive effect of beta-adrenergic stimulation and mechanical stretch on low-frequency oscillations of ventricular action potential duration in humans.

    PubMed

    Pueyo, Esther; Orini, Michele; Rodríguez, José F; Taggart, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Ventricular repolarization dynamics are crucial to arrhythmogenesis. Low-frequency oscillations of repolarization have recently been reported in humans and the magnitude of these oscillations proposed to be a strong predictor of sudden cardiac death. Available evidence suggests a role of the sympathetic nervous system. We have used biophysically detailed models integrating ventricular electrophysiology, calcium dynamics, mechanics and β-adrenergic signaling to investigate the underlying mechanisms. The main results were: (1) Phasic beta-adrenergic stimulation (β-AS) at a Mayer wave frequency between 0.03 and 0.15Hz resulted in a gradual decrease of action potential (AP) duration (APD) with concomitant small APD oscillations. (2) After 3-4minutes of phasic β-AS, the mean APD adapted and oscillations of APD became apparent. (3) Phasic changes in haemodynamic loading at the same Mayer wave frequency (a known accompaniment of enhanced sympathetic nerve activity), simulated as variations in the sarcomere length, also induced APD oscillations. (4) The effect of phasic β-AS and haemodynamic loading on the magnitude of APD oscillations was synergistic. (5) The presence of calcium overload and reduced repolarization reserve further enhanced the magnitude of APD oscillations and was accompanied by afterdepolarizations and/or spontaneous APs. In conclusion, low-frequency oscillations of repolarization recently reported in humans were induced by phasic β-AS and phasic mechanical loading, which acted synergistically, and were greatly enhanced by disease-associated conditions, leading to arrhythmogenic events. PMID:27178727

  16. T-Tubular Electrical Defects Contribute to Blunted β-Adrenergic Response in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Crocini, Claudia; Coppini, Raffaele; Ferrantini, Cecilia; Yan, Ping; Loew, Leslie M; Poggesi, Corrado; Cerbai, Elisabetta; Pavone, Francesco S; Sacconi, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of the β-adrenergic signalling, structural remodelling, and electrical failure of T-tubules are hallmarks of heart failure (HF). Here, we assess the effect of β-adrenoceptor activation on local Ca(2+) release in electrically coupled and uncoupled T-tubules in ventricular myocytes from HF rats. We employ an ultrafast random access multi-photon (RAMP) microscope to simultaneously record action potentials and Ca(2+) transients from multiple T-tubules in ventricular cardiomyocytes from a HF rat model of coronary ligation compared to sham-operated rats as a control. We confirmed that β-adrenergic stimulation increases the frequency of Ca(2+) sparks, reduces Ca(2+) transient variability, and hastens the decay of Ca(2+) transients: all these effects are similarly exerted by β-adrenergic stimulation in control and HF cardiomyocytes. Conversely, β-adrenergic stimulation in HF cells accelerates a Ca(2+) rise exclusively in the proximity of T-tubules that regularly conduct the action potential. The delayed Ca(2+) rise found at T-tubules that fail to conduct the action potential is instead not affected by β-adrenergic signalling. Taken together, these findings indicate that HF cells globally respond to β-adrenergic stimulation, except at T-tubules that fail to conduct action potentials, where the blunted effect of the β-adrenergic signalling may be directly caused by the lack of electrical activity. PMID:27598150

  17. Purification and reconstitution of the human platelet. cap alpha. /sub 2/-adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J.W.; Cerione, R.A.; Nakata, H.; Benovic, J.L.; DeMarinis, R.M.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.

    1986-05-01

    Human platelet ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors have been purified approx.80,000 fold to apparent homogeneity by a five step chromatographic procedure. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of radioiodinated protein from purified receptor preparations shows a single major band of M/sub r/ 64,000. The competitive binding of ligands to the purified receptor protein shows the proper ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic specificity. The ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor contains an essential sulfhydryl residues. Thus, exposure of the purified receptor to the sulfhydryl specific reagent, phenylmercuric chloride (PMC), resulted in a 80% loss of binding activity. This loss of binding activity was prevented when exposure to PMC was done in the presence of ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic ligands and it was reversed by subsequent exposure to dithiothreitol. Partial proteolysis of purified ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors was obtained with S. aureus V-8 protease, ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin and papain. In a comparison with purified ..beta../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors no common partial proteolytic products were found. Partially purified preparations of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor were successfully reconstituted into phospholipid vesicles with the inhibitory guanyl nucleotide-binding regulatory protein, N/sub i/. In these reconstituted preparations, epinephrine could stimulate, and phentolamine could block, the GTPase activity of N/sub i/.

  18. T-Tubular Electrical Defects Contribute to Blunted β-Adrenergic Response in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Crocini, Claudia; Coppini, Raffaele; Ferrantini, Cecilia; Yan, Ping; Loew, Leslie M.; Poggesi, Corrado; Cerbai, Elisabetta; Pavone, Francesco S.; Sacconi, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of the β-adrenergic signalling, structural remodelling, and electrical failure of T-tubules are hallmarks of heart failure (HF). Here, we assess the effect of β-adrenoceptor activation on local Ca2+ release in electrically coupled and uncoupled T-tubules in ventricular myocytes from HF rats. We employ an ultrafast random access multi-photon (RAMP) microscope to simultaneously record action potentials and Ca2+ transients from multiple T-tubules in ventricular cardiomyocytes from a HF rat model of coronary ligation compared to sham-operated rats as a control. We confirmed that β-adrenergic stimulation increases the frequency of Ca2+ sparks, reduces Ca2+ transient variability, and hastens the decay of Ca2+ transients: all these effects are similarly exerted by β-adrenergic stimulation in control and HF cardiomyocytes. Conversely, β-adrenergic stimulation in HF cells accelerates a Ca2+ rise exclusively in the proximity of T-tubules that regularly conduct the action potential. The delayed Ca2+ rise found at T-tubules that fail to conduct the action potential is instead not affected by β-adrenergic signalling. Taken together, these findings indicate that HF cells globally respond to β-adrenergic stimulation, except at T-tubules that fail to conduct action potentials, where the blunted effect of the β-adrenergic signalling may be directly caused by the lack of electrical activity. PMID:27598150

  19. β-adrenergic receptor responsiveness in aging heart and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Nicola; Komici, Klara; Corbi, Graziamaria; Pagano, Gennaro; Furgi, Giuseppe; Rengo, Carlo; Femminella, Grazia D.; Leosco, Dario; Bonaduce, Domenico

    2014-01-01

    Elderly healthy individuals have a reduced exercise tolerance and a decreased left ventricle inotropic reserve related to increased vascular afterload, arterial-ventricular load mismatching, physical deconditioning and impaired autonomic regulation (the so called “β-adrenergic desensitization”). Adrenergic responsiveness is altered with aging and the age-related changes are limited to the β-adrenergic receptor density reduction and to the β-adrenoceptor-G-protein(s)-adenylyl cyclase system abnormalities, while the type and level of abnormalities change with species and tissues. Epidemiological studies have shown an high incidence and prevalence of heart failure in the elderly and a great body of evidence correlate the changes of β-adrenergic system with heart failure pathogenesis. In particular it is well known that: (a) levels of cathecolamines are directly correlated with mortality and functional status in heart failure, (b) β1-adrenergic receptor subtype is down-regulated in heart failure, (c) heart failure-dependent cardiac adrenergic responsiveness reduction is related to changes in G proteins activity. In this review we focus on the cardiovascular β-adrenergic changes involvement in the aging process and on similarities and differences between aging heart and heart failure. PMID:24409150

  20. Progesterone prevents linkage of rabbit myometrial alpha 2-adrenergic receptors to inhibition of adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y Y; Riemer, R K; Goldfien, A; Roberts, J M

    1989-04-01

    The uterine response to adrenergic stimulation is determined by the hormonal milieu. This response is particularly well characterized in the rabbit. In this species, as in humans, the response of the uterus to sympathetic stimulation is alpha-adrenergically mediated contraction with elevated circulating estrogen. However, with progesterone predominance, similar stimulation inhibits uterine contractions, a response mediated by beta-adrenergic receptors acting through their second message, cyclic adenosine monophosphate. We studied the mechanisms by which sex steroids regulate myometrial adrenergic responses. In this study, we questioned whether part of the effect of sex steroids could be explained by an alteration of the coupling of the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor to the inhibition of adenylate cyclase. We found that in the progesterone-treated rabbit, although alpha 2-receptors are present, they are not linked to inhibition of cyclic adenosine monophosphate synthesis. The net synthesis of cyclic adenosine monophosphage in response to endogenous catecholamines is determined by their activation of beta-adrenergic receptors to increase and alpha 2-receptors to decrease cyclic adenosine monophosphate formation. Thus the uncoupling of alpha 2-receptors contributes to increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate in myometrium of progesterone-treated animals consistent with the reported predominance of beta-adrenergic contractile responses in this setting.

  1. Synaptic vesicle generation from central nerve terminal endosomes.

    PubMed

    Kokotos, Alexandros C; Cousin, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Central nerve terminals contain a small number of synaptic vesicles (SVs) that must sustain the fidelity of neurotransmission across a wide range of stimulation intensities. For this to be achieved, nerve terminals integrate a number of complementary endocytosis modes whose activation spans the breadth of these neuronal stimulation patterns. Two such modes are ultrafast endocytosis and activity-dependent bulk endocytosis, which are triggered by stimuli at either end of the physiological range. Both endocytosis modes generate endosomes directly from the nerve terminal plasma membrane, before the subsequent production of SVs from these structures. This review will discuss the current knowledge relating to the molecular mechanisms involved in the generation of SVs from nerve terminal endosomes, how this relates to other mechanisms of SV production and the functional role of such SVs.

  2. Ultrasound of Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Suk, Jung Im; Walker, Francis O.; Cartwright, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, neuromuscular ultrasound has emerged as a useful tool for the diagnosis of peripheral nerve disorders. This article reviews sonographic findings of normal nerves including key quantitative ultrasound measurements that are helpful in the evaluation of focal and possibly generalized peripheral neuropathies. It also discusses several recent papers outlining the evidence base for the use of this technology, as well as new findings in compressive, traumatic, and generalized neuropathies. Ultrasound is well suited for use in electrodiagnostic laboratories where physicians, experienced in both the clinical evaluation of patients and the application of hands-on technology, can integrate findings from the patient’s history, physical examination, electrophysiological studies, and imaging for diagnosis and management. PMID:23314937

  3. Sensory Recovery Outcome after Digital Nerve Repair in Relation to Different Reconstructive Techniques: Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Petra; Harder, Yves; Kern, Yasmin; Paprottka, Philipp M.; Machens, Hans-Günther; Lohmeyer, Jörn A.

    2013-01-01

    Good clinical outcome after digital nerve repair is highly relevant for proper hand function and has a significant socioeconomic impact. However, level of evidence for competing surgical techniques is low. The aim is to summarize and compare the outcomes of digital nerve repair with different methods (end-to-end and end-to-side coaptations, nerve grafts, artificial conduit-, vein-, muscle, and muscle-in-vein reconstructions, and replantations) to provide an aid for choosing an individual technique of nerve reconstruction and to create reference values of standard repair for nonrandomized clinical studies. 87 publications including 2,997 nerve repairs were suitable for a precise evaluation. For digital nerve repairs there was practically no particular technique superior to another. Only end-to-side coaptation had an inferior two-point discrimination in comparison to end-to-end coaptation or nerve grafting. Furthermore, this meta-analysis showed that youth was associated with an improved sensory recovery outcome in patients who underwent digital replantation. For end-to-end coaptations, recent publications had significantly better sensory recovery outcomes than older ones. Given minor differences in outcome, the main criteria in choosing an adequate surgical technique should be gap length and donor site morbidity caused by graft material harvesting. Our clinical experience was used to provide a decision tree for digital nerve repair. PMID:23984064

  4. Differential sensitivity to detergents of actin cytoskeleton from nerve endings.

    PubMed

    Cubí, Roger; Matas, Lluís A; Pou, Marta; Aguilera, José; Gil, Carles

    2013-11-01

    Detergent-resistant membranes (DRM), an experimental model used to study lipid rafts, are typically extracted from cells by means of detergent treatment and subsequent ultracentrifugation in density gradients, Triton X-100 being the detergent of choice in most of the works. Since lipid rafts are membrane microdomains rich in cholesterol, depletion of this component causes solubilization of DRM with detergent. In previous works from our group, the lack of effect of cholesterol depletion on DRM solubilization with Triton X-100 was detected in isolated rat brain synaptosomes. In consequence, the aim of the present work is to explore reasons for this observation, analyzing the possible role of the actin cytoskeleton, as well as the use of an alternative detergent, Brij 98, to overcome the insensitivity to Triton X-100 of cholesterol-depleted DRM. Brij 98 yields Brij-DRM that are highly dependent on cholesterol, since marker proteins (Flotillin-1 and Thy-1), as well as actin, appear solubilized after MCD treatment. Pretreatment with Latrunculin A results in a significant increase in Flotillin-1, Thy-1 and actin solubilization by Triton X-100 after cholesterol depletion. Studies with transmission electron microscopy show that combined treatment with MCD and Latrunculin A leads to a significant increase in solubilization of DRM with Triton X-100. Thus, Triton-DRM resistance to cholesterol depletion can be explained, at least partially, thanks to the scaffolding action of the actin cytoskeleton, without discarding differential effects of Brij 98 and Triton X-100 on specific membrane components. In conclusion, the detergent of choice is important when events that depend on the actin cytoskeleton are going to be studied.

  5. Cranial Nerve II: Vision.

    PubMed

    Gillig, Paulette Marie; Sanders, Richard D

    2009-09-01

    This article contains a brief review of the anatomy of the visual system, a survey of diseases of the retina, optic nerve and lesions of the optic chiasm, and other visual field defects of special interest to the psychiatrist. It also includes a presentation of the corticothalamic mechanisms, differential diagnosis, and various manifestations of visual illusions, and simple and complex visual hallucinations, as well as the differential diagnoses of these various visual phenomena. PMID:19855858

  6. [Suprascapular nerve entrapment].

    PubMed

    Fansa, H; Schneider, W

    2003-03-01

    Isolated compression of the suprascapular nerve is a rare entity, that is seldom considered in differential diagnosis of shoulder pain. Usually atrophy of supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles is present, resulting in weakened abduction and external rotation of the shoulder. Mostly the patients do not note the paresis, but complain about a dull and burning pain over the dorsal shoulder region. In a proximal lesion (at level of the superior transverse scapular ligament) electromyography reveals changes in both muscles, while in a distal lesion (spinoglenoidal notch) only the infraspinatus shows a pathology. From 1996 to 2001 we diagnosed an isolated suprascapular entrapment in nine patients. Seven patients were operated: The ligament was removed and the nerve was neurolysed. The average age was 36 years. All patients showed pathological findings in electrophysiological and clinical examination. Five patients had an atrophy of both scapula muscles, two showed only infraspinatus muscle atrophy (one with a ganglion in the distal course of the nerve). Six patients were followed up. All showed an improvement. Pain disappeared and all patients were able to return to work and sport activities. Electrophysiological examination one year after operation revealed normal nerve conduction velocity. The number of motor units, however, showed a reduction by half compared to the healthy side. Lesions without history of trauma are usually caused by repetitive motion or posture. Weight lifting, volley ball and tennis promote the entrapment. Rarely a lesion (either idiopathic or due to external compression) is described for patients who underwent surgery. Patients with a ganglion or a defined cause of compression should be operated, patients who present without a distinct reason for compression should firstly be treated conservatively. Physiotherapy, antiphlogistic medication and avoiding of the pain triggering motion can improve the symptoms. However, if muscle atrophy is evident

  7. Peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndromes.

    PubMed

    Küçükali, Cem Ismail; Kürtüncü, Murat; Akçay, Halil İbrahim; Tüzün, Erdem; Öge, Ali Emre

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve hyperexcitability (PNH) syndromes can be subclassified as primary and secondary. The main primary PNH syndromes are neuromyotonia, cramp-fasciculation syndrome (CFS), and Morvan's syndrome, which cause widespread symptoms and signs without the association of an evident peripheral nerve disease. Their major symptoms are muscle twitching and stiffness, which differ only in severity between neuromyotonia and CFS. Cramps, pseudomyotonia, hyperhidrosis, and some other autonomic abnormalities, as well as mild positive sensory phenomena, can be seen in several patients. Symptoms reflecting the involvement of the central nervous system occur in Morvan's syndrome. Secondary PNH syndromes are generally seen in patients with focal or diffuse diseases affecting the peripheral nervous system. The PNH-related symptoms and signs are generally found incidentally during clinical or electrodiagnostic examinations. The electrophysiological findings that are very useful in the diagnosis of PNH are myokymic and neuromyotonic discharges in needle electromyography along with some additional indicators of increased nerve fiber excitability. Based on clinicopathological and etiological associations, PNH syndromes can also be classified as immune mediated, genetic, and those caused by other miscellaneous factors. There has been an increasing awareness on the role of voltage-gated potassium channel complex autoimmunity in primary PNH pathogenesis. Then again, a long list of toxic compounds and genetic factors has also been implicated in development of PNH. The management of primary PNH syndromes comprises symptomatic treatment with anticonvulsant drugs, immune modulation if necessary, and treatment of possible associated dysimmune and/or malignant conditions. PMID:25719304

  8. Optic nerve hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Savleen; Jain, Sparshi; Sodhi, Harsimrat B. S.; Rastogi, Anju; Kamlesh

    2013-01-01

    Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH) is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65%) than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED). PMID:24082663

  9. Impaired chronotropic response to exercise in mice lacking catecholamines in adrenergic cells.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xuping; Liu, Fujun; Gu, Yusu; Lu, Chuanyi M; Ziegler, Michael G

    2008-12-01

    To define the in vivo role of adrenergic catecholamines (CAs), we generated a mouse model whereby tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) was knocked out (KO) in phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase-expressing cells. These adrenergic specific TH-KO mice were viable and grossly normal. Their resting heart rate and blood pressure, as monitored by telemetry, were unchanged. However, when challenged with treadmill exercise, their chronotropic responses were significantly reduced by 14% compared to wild-type mice. Thus, our data suggest that adrenergic CA is required for normal chronotropic responses to stress, but not required for prenatal and postnatal development or normal cardiovascular function at rest.

  10. Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors: targets for agonist drugs to treat heart failure.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Brian C; O'Connell, Timothy D; Simpson, Paul C

    2011-10-01

    Evidence from cell, animal, and human studies demonstrates that α1-adrenergic receptors mediate adaptive and protective effects in the heart. These effects may be particularly important in chronic heart failure, when catecholamine levels are elevated and β-adrenergic receptors are down-regulated and dysfunctional. This review summarizes these data and proposes that selectively activating α1-adrenergic receptors in the heart might represent a novel and effective way to treat heart failure. This article is part of a special issue entitled "Key Signaling Molecules in Hypertrophy and Heart Failure."

  11. Synthesis and pharmacological characterization of beta2-adrenergic agonist enantiomers: zilpaterol.

    PubMed

    Kern, Christopher; Meyer, Thorsten; Droux, Serge; Schollmeyer, Dieter; Miculka, Christian

    2009-03-26

    The beta-adrenergic agonist 1 (zilpaterol) is used as production enhancer in cattle. Binding experiments of separated enantiomers on recombinant human beta(2)-adrenergic and mu-opioid receptors and functional studies showed that the (-)-1 enantiomer accounts for essentially all the beta(2)-adrenergic agonist activity and that it exhibits less affinity toward the mu-opioid receptor than (+)-1, which is a mu-opioid receptor antagonist. X-ray crystallography revealed the absolute configuration of (-)-1 to be 6R,7R.

  12. Effect of loading on the development of nerve fibers around oral implants in the dog mandible.

    PubMed

    Wada, S; Kojo, T; Wang, Y H; Ando, H; Nakanishi, E; Zhang, M; Fukuyama, H; Uchida, Y

    2001-06-01

    Occlusal forces cause stress which morphologically affects the supporting tissues of implants. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of occlusal forces on the distribution of neurofilament protein (NFP)-positive nerve fibers in the tissue of peri-implant bone. The bilateral 2nd, 3rd and 4th mandibular premolars and the 1st molars were extracted from three mongrel dogs. After 4 months of healing, 4 screw-type implants were inserted in the oral cavity. Three months after insertion, the implants on the molar site were loaded by occlusal forces, while those on the premolar site were unloaded. After a further 3 months, the dogs were sacrificed, and specimens were prepared for immunohistochemical NFP-positive staining by the labeled-streptavidin-biotin method. Many NFP-positive nerve fibers were found in the tissues of the loaded site when compared with the unloaded site. These fibers were localized in both the bone marrow space and in the peri-implant fibrous tissue. They had two types of nerve endings: simple free nerve endings, and nerve endings with tree-like ramifications. The present results suggest that loading by occlusal force causes an increase in the number of NFP-positive nerve fibers, many of which have free nerve endings in the peri-implant tissue. The possible role of these NFP-positive nerve fibers is discussed. PMID:11359478

  13. β1-adrenergic receptor antagonists signal via PDE4 translocation.

    PubMed

    Richter, Wito; Mika, Delphine; Blanchard, Elise; Day, Peter; Conti, Marco

    2013-03-01

    It is generally assumed that antagonists of Gs-coupled receptors do not activate cAMP signalling, because they do not stimulate cAMP production via Gs-protein/adenylyl cyclase activation. Here, we report a new signalling pathway whereby antagonists of β1-adrenergic receptors (β1ARs) increase cAMP levels locally without stimulating cAMP production directly. Binding of antagonists causes dissociation of a preformed complex between β1ARs and Type-4 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE4s). This reduces the local concentration of cAMP-hydrolytic activity, thereby increasing submembrane cAMP and PKA activity. Our study identifies receptor/PDE4 complex dissociation as a novel mechanism of antagonist action that contributes to the pharmacological properties of β1AR antagonists and might be shared by other receptor subtypes.

  14. Agonist-Directed Desensitization of the β2-Adrenergic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Goral, Vasiliy; Jin, Yan; Sun, Haiyan; Ferrie, Ann M.; Wu, Qi; Fang, Ye

    2011-01-01

    The β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) agonists with reduced tachyphylaxis may offer new therapeutic agents with improved tolerance profile. However, receptor desensitization assays are often inferred at the single signaling molecule level, thus ligand-directed desensitization is poorly understood. Here we report a label-free biosensor whole cell assay with microfluidics to determine ligand-directed desensitization of the β2AR. Together with mechanistic deconvolution using small molecule inhibitors, the receptor desensitization and resensitization patterns under the short-term agonist exposure manifested the long-acting agonism of salmeterol, and differentiated the mechanisms of agonist-directed desensitization between a full agonist epinephrine and a partial agonist pindolol. This study reveals the cellular mechanisms of agonist-selective β2AR desensitization at the whole cell level. PMID:21541288

  15. Leutropin/beta-adrenergic receptor chimeras bind choriogonadotropin and adrenergic ligands but are not expressed at the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Moyle, W R; Bernard, M P; Myers, R V; Marko, O M; Strader, C D

    1991-06-15

    In some G-protein-coupled receptors (e.g. beta-adrenergic receptor (beta 2 AR)), the ligand-binding pocket is contained within the hydrophobic transmembrane domain. In others (e.g. luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR)), the relative roles of the extracellular N-terminal domain and the transmembrane region in hormone binding are unknown. To study the roles of these domains, we prepared vectors encoding the rat LHR N-terminal domain alone (L- -), the LHR N-terminal domain fused to the transmembrane and C-terminal domains of the vesicular stomatitis virus-G protein (LVV), the LHR N-terminal domain fused to the transmembrane and C-terminal domains of the hamster beta 2 AR (LAA), and the beta 2 AR N-terminal domain fused to the transmembrane and C-terminal domains of the rat LHR (ALL). Membrane preparations obtained from COS-7 cells expressing the beta 2 AR or LAA bound the beta-adrenergic antagonist 125I-cyanopindolol with equal affinity, confirming the observation that the beta 2 AR transmembrane domain forms the hormone-binding site. Membranes from COS-7 cells transfected with LHR bound 125I-human choriomic gonadotropin (hCG). However, membranes from LAA-, L(- -)-, and LVV-transfected cells had low capacity to bind 125I-hCG unless they were solubilized with Triton X-100. The affinity of the detergent-solubilized receptors for 125I-hCG was similar to that of the LHR. We were unable to detect binding of 125I-hCG to ALL in the presence or absence of detergent. These observations suggest that, whereas the transmembrane region of the beta 2 AR is sufficient to bind adrenergic ligands, the N-terminal region of the LHR is required for binding of hCG. Although the N terminus of the LHR is sufficient to bind hCG, both the N terminus and the transmembrane domains of the LHR are required for receptor expression on the cell surface.

  16. [Electrical nerve stimulation for plexus and nerve blocks].

    PubMed

    Birnbaum, J; Klotz, E; Bogusch, G; Volk, T

    2007-11-01

    Despite the increasing use of ultrasound, electrical nerve stimulation is commonly used as the standard for both plexus and peripheral nerve blocks. Several recent randomized trials have contributed to a better understanding of physiological and clinical correlations. Traditionally used currents and impulse widths are better defined in relation to the distance between needle tip and nerves. Commercially available devices enable transcutaneous nerve stimulation and provide new opportunities for the detection of puncture sites and for training. The electrically ideal position of the needle usually is defined by motor responses which can not be interpreted without profound anatomical knowledge. For instance, interscalene blocks can be successful even after motor responses of deltoid or pectoral muscles. Infraclavicular blocks should be aimed at stimulation of the posterior fascicle (extension). In contrast to multiple single nerve blocks, axillary single-shot blocks more commonly result in incomplete anaesthesia. Blockade of the femoral nerve can be performed without any nerve stimulation if the fascia iliaca block is used. Independently of the various approaches to the sciatic nerve, inversion and plantar flexion are the best options for single-shot blocks. Further clinical trials are needed to define the advantages of stimulating catheters in continuous nerve blocks.

  17. Optic Nerve Sheath Mechanics in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raykin, Julia; Forte, Taylor E.; Wang, Roy; Feola, Andrew; Samuels, Brian; Myers, Jerry; Nelson, Emily; Gleason, Rudy; Ethier, C. Ross

    2016-01-01

    Visual Impairment Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome is a major concern in current space medicine research. While the exact pathology of VIIP is not yet known, it is hypothesized that the microgravity-induced cephalad fluid shift increases intracranial pressure (ICP) and drives remodeling of the optic nerve sheath. To investigate this possibility, we are culturing optic nerve sheath dura mater samples under different pressures and investigating changes in tissue composition. To interpret results from this work, it is essential to first understand the biomechanical response of the optic nerve sheath dura mater to loading. Here, we investigated the effects of mechanical loading on the porcine optic nerve sheath.Porcine optic nerves (number: 6) were obtained immediately after death from a local abattoir. The optic nerve sheath (dura mater) was isolated from the optic nerve proper, leaving a hollow cylinder of connective tissue that was used for biomechanical characterization. We developed a custom mechanical testing system that allowed for unconfined lengthening, twisting, and circumferential distension of the dura mater during inflation and under fixed axial loading. To determine the effects of variations in ICP, the sample was inflated (0-60 millimeters Hg) and circumferential distension was simultaneously recorded. These tests were performed under variable axial loads (0.6 grams - 5.6 grams at increments of 1 gram) by attaching different weights to one end of the dura mater. Results and Conclusions: The samples demonstrated nonlinear behavior, similar to other soft connective tissue (Figure 1). Large increases in diameter were observed at lower transmural pressures (approximately 0 to 5 millimeters Hg), whereas only small diameter changes were observed at higher pressures. Particularly interesting was the existence of a cross-over point at a pressure of approximately 11 millimeters Hg. At this pressure, the same diameter is obtained for all axial loads applied

  18. Sciatic nerve repair with tissue engineered nerve: Olfactory ensheathing cells seeded poly(lactic-co-glygolic acid) conduit in an animal model

    PubMed Central

    Tan, C W; Ng, M H; Ohnmar, H; Lokanathan, Y; Nur-Hidayah, H; Roohi, S A; Ruszymah, BHI; Nor-Hazla, M H; Shalimar, A; Naicker, A S

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aim: Synthetic nerve conduits have been sought for repair of nerve defects as the autologous nerve grafts causes donor site morbidity and possess other drawbacks. Many strategies have been investigated to improve nerve regeneration through synthetic nerve guided conduits. Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) that share both Schwann cell and astrocytic characteristics have been shown to promote axonal regeneration after transplantation. The present study was driven by the hypothesis that tissue-engineered poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) seeded with OECs would improve peripheral nerve regeneration in a long sciatic nerve defect. Materials and Methods: Sciatic nerve gap of 15 mm was created in six adult female Sprague-Dawley rats and implanted with PLGA seeded with OECs. The nerve regeneration was assessed electrophysiologically at 2, 4 and 6 weeks following implantation. Histopathological examination, scanning electron microscopic (SEM) examination and immunohistochemical analysis were performed at the end of the study. Results: Nerve conduction studies revealed a significant improvement of nerve conduction velocities whereby the mean nerve conduction velocity increases from 4.2 ΁ 0.4 m/s at week 2 to 27.3 ΁ 5.7 m/s at week 6 post-implantation (P < 0.0001). Histological analysis revealed presence of spindle-shaped cells. Immunohistochemical analysis further demonstrated the expression of S100 protein in both cell nucleus and the cytoplasm in these cells, hence confirming their Schwann-cell-like property. Under SEM, these cells were found to be actively secreting extracellular matrix. Conclusion: Tissue-engineered PLGA conduit seeded with OECs provided a permissive environment to facilitate nerve regeneration in a small animal model. PMID:24379458

  19. Effect of Collateral Sprouting on Donor Nerve Function After Nerve Coaptation: A Study of the Brachial Plexus

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Paweł; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Dzięgiel, Piotr; Puła, Bartosz; Wrzosek, Marcin; Bocheńska, Aneta; Gosk, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the donor nerve from the C7 spinal nerve of the rabbit brachial plexus after a coaptation procedure. Assessment was performed of avulsion of the C5 and C6 spinal nerves treated by coaptation of these nerves to the C7 spinal nerve. Material/Methods After nerve injury, fourteen rabbits were treated by end-to-side coaptation (ETS), and fourteen animals were treated by side-to-side coaptation (STS) on the right brachial plexus. Electrophysiological and histomorphometric analyses and the skin pinch test were used to evaluate the outcomes. Results There was no statistically significant difference in the G-ratio proximal and distal to the coaptation in the ETS group, but the differences in the axon, myelin sheath and fiber diameters were statistically significant. The comparison of the ETS and STS groups distal to the coaptation with the controls demonstrated statistically significant differences in the fiber, axon, and myelin sheath diameters. With respect to the G-ratio, the ETS group exhibited no significant differences relative to the control, whereas the G-ratio in the STS group and the controls differed significantly. In the electrophysiological study, the ETS and STS groups exhibited major changes in the biceps and subscapularis muscles. Conclusions The coaptation procedure affects the histological structure of the nerve donor, but it does not translate into changes in nerve conduction or the sensory function of the limb. The donor nerve lesion in the ETS group is transient and has minimal clinical relevance. PMID:26848925

  20. Nerve Cross-Bridging to Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Model of Delayed Nerve Repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB) nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP) nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1) CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2) CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE), respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays. PMID:26016986

  1. Age-dependent changes in expression of alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptors in rat myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Schaffer, W.; Williams, R.S.

    1986-07-16

    The expression of alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptors within ventricular myocardium of rats ranging in age from 21 days of fetal life to 24 months after birth was measured from (/sup 125/I) 2-(..beta.. hydroxy phenyl) ethylaminomethyl tetralone binding isotherms. No difference was observed in binding affinity between any of the age groups studied. The number of alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptors was found to be 60-120% higher in membranes from fetal or immature rats up to 25 days of age when compared with adult animals. The increased expression of alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptors in the developing heart relative to that observed in adult heart is consistent with the hypothesis that alpha/sub 1/-adrenergic receptor stimulation may modulate protein synthesis and growth in mammalian myocardium.

  2. Alpha 2 adrenergic receptors in hyperplastic human prostate: identification and characterization using (/sup 3/H) rauwolscine

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, E.; Lepor, H.

    1986-05-01

    (/sup 3/H)Rauwolscine ((/sup 3/H)Ra), a selective ligand for the alpha 2 adrenergic receptor, was used to identify and characterize alpha 2 adrenergic receptors in prostate glands of men with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Specific binding of (/sup 3/H)Ra to prostatic tissue homogenates was rapid and readily reversible by addition of excess unlabelled phentolamine. Scatchard analysis of saturation experiments demonstrates a single, saturable class of high affinity binding sites (Bmax = 0.31 +/- 0.04 fmol./microgram. DNA, Kd = 0.9 +/- 0.11 nM.). The relative potency of alpha adrenergic drugs (clonidine, alpha-methylnorepinephrine and prazosin) in competing for (/sup 3/H)Ra binding sites was consistent with the order predicted for an alpha 2 subtype. The role of alpha 2 adrenergic receptors in normal prostatic function and in men with bladder outlet obstruction secondary to BPH requires further investigation.

  3. Dissociation between renin and arterial pressure responses to beta-adrenergic blockade in human essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bravo, E L; Tarazi, R C; Dustan, H P; Lewis, J W

    1975-06-01

    Studies were carried out in 69 patients with essential hypertension to examine the relationship between changes in plasma renin activity (PRA) and arterial pressure (BP) in response to a beta-adrenergic blocking agent, propranolol. PRA had no consistent relationship with BP during treatment, either in patients receiving propranolol alone (r = 0.12) or in those receiving a combination of diuretics and propranolol (r = 0.18). Furthermore, long-term beta-adrenergic blockade failed to inhibit increases of PRA induced by diuretics or rapid sodium depletion. These results indicate that (1) beta-adrenergic blockade can reduce BP by mechanisms other than PRA suppression; and (2) the beta-adrenergic nervous system is important, but not essential, for renin release. PMID:236841

  4. Dihydrotestosterone decreases beta-adrenergic receptor binding in the fetal rabbit lung.

    PubMed

    Moawad, A H; River, L P; River, J M

    1988-07-01

    Tritium-labeled dihydroalprenolol was used to quantify the beta-adrenergic receptor sites in day 30 fetal rabbit lung tissue. Each of the fetuses of New Zealand White rabbits on day 28 of gestation was injected with dihydrotestosterone (2.0 micrograms) in one horn of the uterus and 10% ethanol in normal saline (the solvent) in the contralateral one. The animals were sacrificed 48 hours later and the fetal lung tissue was assayed. Dihydrotestosterone decreased the beta-adrenergic receptor site number in the treatment group compared with the control group (86 versus 111 fmol/mg protein, p less than 0.05 by paired t-test). In the presence of dihydrotestosterone, beta-adrenergic receptor binding is inhibited in the preterm fetal rabbit. This effect may be implicated in the beta-adrenergic mediation of phospholipid synthesis and/or release by fetal alveolar cells.

  5. Perinatal taurine exposure programs patterns of autonomic nerve activity responses to tooth pulp stimulation in adult male rats

    PubMed Central

    Khimsuksri, Sawita; Wyss, J. Michael; Thaeomor, Atcharaporn; Paphangkorakit, Jarin; Jirakulsomchok, Dusit; Roysommuti, Sanya

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal taurine excess or deficit influences adult health and disease, especially relative to the autonomic nervous system. This study tests the hypothesis that perinatal taurine exposure influences adult autonomic nervous system control of arterial pressure in response to acute electrical tooth pulp stimulation. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were fed normal rat chow with 3% β-alanine (taurine depletion, TD), 3% taurine (taurine supplementation, TS) or water alone (control, C) from conception to weaning. Their male offspring were fed normal rat chow and tap water throughout the experiment. At 8–10 weeks of age, blood chemistry, arterial pressure, heart rate and renal sympathetic nerve activity were measured in anesthetized rats. Age, body weight, mean arterial pressure, heart rate, plasma electrolytes, blood urea nitrogen, plasma creatinine and plasma cortisol were not significantly different among the three groups. Before tooth pulp stimulation, low (0.3–0.5 Hz) and high frequency (0.5–4.0 Hz) power spectral densities of arterial pressure were not significantly different among groups, while the power spectral densities of renal sympathetic nerve activity were significantly decreased in TD compared to control rats. Tooth pulp stimulation did not change arterial pressure, heart rate, renal sympathetic nerve and arterial pressure power spectral densities in the 0.3–4.0 Hz spectrum or renal sympathetic nerve firing rate in any group. In contrast, perinatal taurine imbalance disturbed very low frequency power spectral densities of both arterial pressure and renal sympathetic nerve activity (below 0.1 Hz), both before and after the tooth pulp stimulation. The power densities of TS were most sensitive to ganglionic blockade and central adrenergic inhibition, while those of TD were sensitive to both central and peripheral adrenergic inhibition. The present data indicate that perinatal taurine imbalance can lead to aberrant autonomic nervous system responses in

  6. [Imaging anatomy of cranial nerves].

    PubMed

    Hermier, M; Leal, P R L; Salaris, S F; Froment, J-C; Sindou, M

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the cranial nerves is mandatory for optimal radiological exploration and interpretation of the images in normal and pathological conditions. CT is the method of choice for the study of the skull base and its foramina. MRI explores the cranial nerves and their vascular relationships precisely. Because of their small size, it is essential to obtain images with high spatial resolution. The MRI sequences optimize contrast between nerves and surrounding structures (cerebrospinal fluid, fat, bone structures and vessels). This chapter discusses the radiological anatomy of the cranial nerves.

  7. Somatostatinergic nerves in the cervical spinal cord of the monkey.

    PubMed

    Burnweit, C; Forssmann, W G

    1979-08-01

    Somatostatinergic nerves in the spinal cord of the monkey were investigated utilizing immunohistochemistry with various antibodies against synthetic somatostatin. In contrast to earlier investigations, it is shown that somatostatinergic nerve endings occur in most of the areas of the grey matter of the spinal cord. The somatostatinergic axons are, however, characteristically distributed in three main regions: (1) Densely-packed endings are seen in lamina II of the substantia gelatinosa, forming a crescent-shaped pattern in the columna dorsalis. Somatostatin immunoreactivity is also seen in lamina I and in the Lissauer tract. (2) A fine network of fibers is observed around the central canal; the endings are concentrated on special cell bodies. Some single perikarya are also stained in this region. (3) A loose network of single fibers is found ending on perikarya of the columna lateralis or ventralis. The perikarya of the nerve axons, with the exception of those terminating in the columna dorsalis, have as yet not been identified. In order to better understand the somatostatinergic system of the spinal cord, these newly-detected somatostatinergic nerves must be studied and their exact pathways analyzed.

  8. Does Pulsed Magnetic Field Therapy Influence Nerve Regeneration in the Median Nerve Model of the Rat?

    PubMed Central

    Beck-Broichsitter, Benedicta E.; Lamia, Androniki; Fregnan, Federica; Smeets, Ralf; Becker, Stephan T.; Sinis, Nektarios

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of pulsed magnetic field therapy on peripheral nerve regeneration after median nerve injury and primary coaptation in the rat. Both median nerves were surgically exposed and denervated in 24 female Wistar rats. A microsurgical coaptation was performed on the right side, whereas on the left side a spontaneous healing was prevented. The study group underwent a daily pulsed magnetic field therapy; the other group served as a control group. The grasping force was recorded 2 weeks after the surgical intervention for a period of 12 weeks. The right median nerve was excised and histologically examined. The histomorphometric data and the functional assessments were analyzed by t-test statistics and one-way ANOVA. One-way ANOVA indicated a statistically significant influence of group affiliation and grasping force (P = 0.0078). Grasping strength was higher on a significant level in the experimental group compared to the control group permanently from the 9th week to the end of the study. T-test statistics revealed a significantly higher weight of the flexor digitorum sublimis muscle (P = 0.0385) in the experimental group. The histological evaluation did not reveal any statistically significant differences concerning the histomorphometric parameters. Our results suggest that the pulsed magnetic field therapy has a positive influence on the functional aspects of neural regeneration. More studies are needed to precisely evaluate and optimize the intensity and duration of the application. PMID:25143937

  9. Nerve-pulse interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    Some recent experimental and theoretical results on mechanisms through which individual nerve pulses can interact are reviewed. Three modes of interactions are considered: (1) interaction of pulses as they travel along a single fiber which leads to velocity dispersion; (2) propagation of pairs of pulses through a branching region leading to quantum pulse code transformations; and (3) interaction of pulses on parallel fibers through which they may form a pulse assembly. This notion is analogous to Hebb's concept of a cell assembly, but on a lower level of the neural hierarchy.

  10. The effect of CA1 α2 adrenergic receptors on memory retention deficit induced by total sleep deprivation and the reversal of circadian rhythm in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Norozpour, Yaser; Nasehi, Mohammad; Sabouri-Khanghah, Vahid; Torabi-Nami, Mohammad; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-09-01

    The α2 adrenergic receptors which abundantly express in the CA1 region of the hippocampus play an important role in the regulation of sleep and memory retention processes. Based on the available evidence, the aim of our study was to investigate consequences of the activation and deactivation of CA1 α2 adrenergic receptors (by clonidine and yohimbine, respectively) on the impairment of memory retention induced by total sleep deprivation (TSD) and the reversal of circadian rhythm (RCR) in a rat model. To this end, the water box apparatus and passive avoidance task were in turn used to induce sleep deprivation and assess memory retention. Our findings suggested that TSD (for 24 and 36, but not 12h) and RCR (12h/day for 3 consecutive days) impair memory function. The post-training intra-CA1 administration of yohimbine (α2 adrenergic receptor antagonist) on its own, at the dose of 0.1μg/rat, decreased the step-through latency and locomotor activity in the TSD- sham treated but not undisturbed sleep rats. Unlike yohimbine, clonidine (α2 adrenergic receptor agonist), in all applied doses (0.001, 0.01 and 0.1μg/rat), failed to induce such an effect. While the subthreshold dose of yohimbine (0.001μg/rat) abrogated the impairment of memory retention induced by the 24-h TSD, it could potentiate the impairment of memory retention induced by 36-h TSD, suggesting the modulatory effect of yohimbine. Moreover, the subthreshold dose of clonidine (0.1μg/rat) restored the memory retention deficit in TSD rats (24 and 36h). On the other hand, the subthreshold dose of clonidine (0.1μg/rat), but not yohimbine (0.001μg/rat) restored the memory retention deficit in RCR rats. Such interventions however did not alter the locomotor activity. The above observations proposed that CA1 α2 adrenergic receptors play a potential role in memory retention deficits induced by TSD and RCR. PMID:27291858

  11. Responses of nerve fibres of the rat saphenous nerve neuroma to mechanical and chemical stimulation: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Luis; Gallar, Juana; Pozo, Miguel Angel; Belmonte, Carlos

    2000-01-01

    The response of neuroma nerve endings to different stimuli was studied in a saphenous nerve neuroma preparation in vitro. Electrical activity was recorded from 141 single fibres dissected of saphenous nerve. One-third (27 %) displayed spontaneous activity. Based on their response to mechanical and chemical stimuli, neuroma nerve fibres were classified as mechanosensory fibres (47.5 %), mechanically insensitive chemosensory fibres (17.0 %), polymodal nociceptor fibres (28.4 %) and unresponsive fibres (7.1 %). Mechanosensory and polymodal neuroma endings responded to von Frey hair stimulation either with a few impulses (phasic units) or a sustained discharge (tonic units). Polymodal units were additionally activated by at least one of the following stimuli: acidic solutions; a combination of bradykinin, prostaglandin E2, serotonin, substance P and histamine (all at 1 μM) plus 7 mm KCl (inflammatory soup); 600 mm NaCl and capsaicin. Low pH solutions increased the firing discharge of polymodal endings proportionally to the proton concentration. The ‘inflammatory soup’ evoked a firing response characterized by the absence of tachyphylaxis, which appeared when its components were applied separately. Both stimuli sensitized polymodal fibres to mechanical stimulation. Hypertonic NaCl (600 mm) and capsaicin (3.3 mm) induced a prolonged discharge that outlasted the stimulus duration. Mechanically insensitive chemosensory neuroma fibres exhibited responses to chemical stimuli analogous to polymodal fibres. They became mechanically sensitive after chemical stimulation. These findings show that neuroma nerve endings in the rat saphenous nerve neuroma in vitro are functionally heterogeneous and exhibit properties reminiscent of those in intact mechanosensory, polymodal and ‘silent’ nociceptor sensory afferents, including their sensitization by algesic chemicals. PMID:10970431

  12. Alterations in ovine myometrial beta-adrenergic cascade do not mediate tachyphylaxis to ritodrine.

    PubMed

    Daftary, A; Chiao, J P; Caritis, S N

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine in vivo the dose response relationship between beta-adrenergic receptor (BAR) agonist concentration and various elements of the BAR cascade: receptor density, hormone-stimulable adenylyl cyclase activity, and contraction inhibition. A previously described, chronically-catheterized ovine model was used. Ritodrine was infused continuously over 24 h in 22 mixed-breed sheep. Each animal received a single, constant infusion rate. Myometrial biopsies were obtained before and after the drug infusions. BAR density was determined using tritiated dihydroalprenolol. Adenylyl cyclase activity was determined using the Gilman competitive protein-binding assay. Intermittent oxytocin boluses were given into the maternal aorta and contractile response was determined. Infusion rates of 0.06-4.0 micrograms/kg/min yielded steady-state ritodrine serum concentrations of 5-168 ng/ml. No significant correlation was found between the ritodrine concentration and the magnitude of decrease in BAR density. Significant correlations existed, however, between the ritodrine concentration and both the magnitude of decrease in adenylyl cyclase activity and the loss of contraction inhibition. There was no correlation noted between the BAR cascade alterations and the loss of contraction inhibition. Despite significant reductions in receptor density (down regulation) and dose-related reductions in hormone-stimulable adenylyl cyclase activity (uncoupling), ritodrine at low concentrations was still able to inhibit oxytocin-induced contractions, i.e., tachyphylaxis did not occur. Tachyphylaxis appeared to correlate only with the serum ritodrine concentration. Hence, alterations in the BAR cascade do not necessarily equate with a loss of end-organ response (tachyphylaxis). Previous concepts based on in vitro studies about the interaction of the BAR agonist with its receptor, the subsequent generation of intracellular messengers, and the resultant end

  13. Defective adrenergic responses in patients with arsenic-induced peripheral vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chih-Hung; Chang, Huoy-Rou; Chen, Jau-Shiuh; Chen, Gwo-Shing; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2007-01-01

    Blackfoot disease is an endemic arsenic-induced peripheral vascular disease in southern Taiwan. The main pathologic feature is atherosclerosis, which may relate to imbalances of the adrenergic system. The purpose of this study is to investigate the peripheral adrenergic responses of patients with blackfoot disease. Eight patients with blackfoot disease and four age-matched healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Baseline cutaneous perfusion was measured with a laser Doppler flowmeter. The response of alpha-adrenoceptors in the cutaneous microcirculation was assessed with laser Doppler flowmetry with iontophoresis of phenylephrine into the nailfold. In vitro binding with (125)I-cyanopindolol determined beta-adrenoceptor density in lymphocytes. The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level at baseline and after isoproterenol stimulation reflects lymphocyte beta-adrenergic responsiveness. Results revealed persistently decreased skin perfusion in patients with blackfoot disease. In contrast, there was a transient decrease in skin perfusion in healthy controls after iontophoresis of phenylephrine. Both beta-2 receptor density and isoproterenol-stimulated cAMP levels in lymphocytes decreased. Increased peripheral alpha-adrenergic response and decreased beta-2-adrenergic response are related to increased vascular tone and result in atherosclerosis. Our findings of accentuated alpha-adrenergic response in microcirculation and decreased lymphocyte beta-2-adrenoceptor response play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis in blackfoot disease.

  14. Adrenergic DNA damage of embryonic pluripotent cells via β2 receptor signalling.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fan; Ding, Xu-Ping; An, Shi-Min; Tang, Ya-Bin; Yang, Xin-Jie; Teng, Lin; Zhang, Chun; Shen, Ying; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Zhu, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic pluripotent cells are sensitive to genotoxicity though they need more stringent genome integrity to avoid compromising multiple cell lineages and subsequent generations. However it remains unknown whether the cells are susceptible to adrenergic stress which can induce somatic cell genome lesion. We have revealed that adrenergic stress mediators cause DNA damage of the cells through the β2 adrenergic receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signalling pathway involving an induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. The adrenergic stress agonists adrenaline, noradrenaline, and isoprenaline caused DNA damage and apoptosis of embryonic stem (ES) cells and embryonal carcinoma stem cells. The effects were mimicked by β2 receptor-coupled signalling molecules and abrogated by selective blockade of β2 receptors and inhibition of the receptor signalling pathway. RNA interference targeting β2 receptors of ES cells conferred the cells the ability to resist the DNA damage and apoptosis. In addition, adrenergic stimulation caused a consistent accumulation of ROS in the cells and the effect was abrogated by β2 receptor blockade; quenching of ROS reversed the induced DNA damage. This finding will improve the understanding of the stem cell regulatory physiology/pathophysiology in an adrenergic receptor subtype signalling mechanism. PMID:26516061

  15. Analysis of adrenergic regulation of melatonin synthesis in Siberian hamster pineal emphasizes the role of HIOMT.

    PubMed

    Ceinos, R M; Chansard, M; Revel, F; Calgari, C; Míguez, J M; Simonneaux, V

    2004-01-01

    Seasonal variations of environmental factors are translated into annual fluctuations in synthesis and release of melatonin, which in turn acts as a neuroendocrine messenger for the synchronization of annual functions. So far, most studies performed to understand the regulation of melatonin synthesis have used the non seasonal laboratory rat. It was demonstrated that nocturnal melatonin synthesis depends on alpha- and beta-adrenergic activation of the enzyme arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase (AA-NAT). In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of melatonin synthesis in the Siberian hamster, a seasonal species with marked photoperiodic variation in melatonin peak duration and amplitude. A beta-adrenergic receptor agonist alone markedly stimulated AA-NAT activity and melatonin synthesis and release. An alpha-adrenergic receptor agonist, while having no effect per se, potentiated the beta-adrenergic stimulation of AA-NAT activity both in vitro and in vivo. Strikingly, the potentiation of AA-NAT activity did not result in a potentiation of melatonin synthesis, suggesting that the rate of melatonin production is limited downstream in the metabolic pathway, most probably at the level of hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase (HIOMT). HIOMT presented a constitutively high activity that was not acutely (within hours) stimulated by beta-adrenergic agonist, but was rather up-regulated by chronic application of the agonist. This long-term beta-adrenergic regulation may explain the reported large photoperiodic variation of HIOMT activity that drives the photoperiodic variation in melatonin peak.

  16. α(1D)-Adrenergic receptors constitutive activity and reduced expression at the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    García-Sáinz, J Adolfo; Romero-Ávila, M Teresa; Medina, Luz Del Carmen

    2010-01-01

    Adrenergic receptors are a heterogeneous family of the G protein-coupled receptors that mediate the actions of adrenaline and noradrenaline. Adrenergic receptors comprise three subfamilies (α(1), α(2), and β, with three members each) and the α(1D)-adrenergic receptor is one of the members of the α(1) subfamily with some interesting traits. The α(1D)-adrenergic receptor is difficult to express, seems predominantly located intracellularly, and exhibits constitutive activity. In this chapter, we will describe in detail the conditions and procedures used to determine changes in intracellular free calcium concentration which has been instrumental to define the constitutive activity of these receptors. Taking advantage of the fact that truncation of the first 79 amino acids of α(1D)-adrenergic receptors markedly increased their membrane expression, we were able to show that constitutive activity is present in receptors truncated at the amino and carboxyl termini, which indicates that such domains are dispensable for this action. Constitutive activity could be observed in cells expressing either the rat or human α(1D)-adrenergic receptor orthologs. Such constitutive activity has been observed in native rat arteries and we will discuss the possible functional implications that it might have in the regulation of blood pressure.

  17. Adrenergic DNA damage of embryonic pluripotent cells via β2 receptor signalling

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Fan; Ding, Xu-Ping; An, Shi-Min; Tang, Ya-Bin; Yang, Xin-Jie; Teng, Lin; Zhang, Chun; Shen, Ying; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Zhu, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic pluripotent cells are sensitive to genotoxicity though they need more stringent genome integrity to avoid compromising multiple cell lineages and subsequent generations. However it remains unknown whether the cells are susceptible to adrenergic stress which can induce somatic cell genome lesion. We have revealed that adrenergic stress mediators cause DNA damage of the cells through the β2 adrenergic receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signalling pathway involving an induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. The adrenergic stress agonists adrenaline, noradrenaline, and isoprenaline caused DNA damage and apoptosis of embryonic stem (ES) cells and embryonal carcinoma stem cells. The effects were mimicked by β2 receptor-coupled signalling molecules and abrogated by selective blockade of β2 receptors and inhibition of the receptor signalling pathway. RNA interference targeting β2 receptors of ES cells conferred the cells the ability to resist the DNA damage and apoptosis. In addition, adrenergic stimulation caused a consistent accumulation of ROS in the cells and the effect was abrogated by β2 receptor blockade; quenching of ROS reversed the induced DNA damage. This finding will improve the understanding of the stem cell regulatory physiology/pathophysiology in an adrenergic receptor subtype signalling mechanism. PMID:26516061

  18. Immunoanalogue of vertebrate beta-adrenergic receptor in the unicellular eukaryote Paramecium.

    PubMed

    Wiejak, Jolanta; Surmacz, Liliana; Wyroba, Elzbieta

    2002-01-01

    Cell fractionation, SDS-PAGE, quantitative Western blot, confocal immunolocalization and immunogold labelling were performed to find an interpretation of the physiological response of the unicellular eukaryote Paramecium to beta-adrenergic ligands. The 69 kDa polypeptide separated by SDS-PAGE in S2 and P2 Paramecium subcellular fractions cross-reacted with antibody directed against human beta2-adrenergic receptor. This was detected by Western blotting followed by chemiluminescent detection. Quantitative image analysis showed that beta-selective adrenergic agonist (-)-isoproterenol--previously shown to enhance phagocytic activity--evoked redistribution of the adrenergic receptor analogue from membraneous (P2) to cytosolic (S2) fraction. The relative increase in immunoreactive band intensity in S2 reached 80% and was paralleled by a 59% decrease in P2 fraction. Confocal immunofluorescence revealed beta2-adrenergic receptor sites on the cell surface and at the ridge of the cytopharynx--where nascent phagosomes are formed. This localization was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. These results indicate that the 69 kDa Paramecium polypeptide immunorelated to vertebrate beta2-adrenergic receptor appeared in this evolutionary ancient cell as a nutrient receptor.

  19. beta. -adrenergic relaxation of smooth muscle: differences between cells and tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Scheid, C.R.

    1987-09-01

    The present studies were carried out in an attempt to resolve the controversy about the Na/sup +/ dependence of ..beta..-adrenergic relaxation in smooth muscle. Previous studies on isolated smooth muscle cells from the toad stomach had suggested that at least some of the actions of ..beta..-adrenergic agents, including a stimulatory effect on /sup 45/Ca efflux, were dependent on the presence of a normal transmembrane Na/sup +/ gradient. Studies by other investigators using tissues derived from mammalian sources had suggested that the relaxing effect of ..beta..-adrenergic agents was Na/sup +/ independent. Uncertainty remained as to whether these discrepancies reflected differences between cells and tissues or differences between species. Thus, in the present studies, the authors utilized both tissues and cells from the same source, the stomach muscle of the toad Bufo marinus, and assessed the Na/sup +/ dependence of ..beta..-adrenergic relaxation. They found that elimination of a normal Na/sup +/ gradient abolished ..beta..-adrenergic relaxation of isolated cells. In tissues, however, similar manipulations had no effect on relaxation. The reasons for this discrepancy are unclear but do not appear to be attributable to changes in smooth muscle function following enzymatic dispersion. Thus the controversy concerning the mechanisms of ..beta..-adrenergic relaxation may reflect inherent differences between tissues and cells.

  20. End-to-End Commitment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newcomb, John

    2004-01-01

    The end-to-end test would verify the complex sequence of events from lander separation to landing. Due to the large distances involved and the significant delay time in sending a command and receiving verification, the lander needed to operate autonomously after it separated from the orbiter. It had to sense conditions, make decisions, and act accordingly. We were flying into a relatively unknown set of conditions-a Martian atmosphere of unknown pressure, density, and consistency to land on a surface of unknown altitude, and one which had an unknown bearing strength.

  1. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres containing three neurotrophic factors promote sciatic nerve repair after injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qun; Li, Zhi-yue; Zhang, Ze-peng; Mo, Zhou-yun; Chen, Shi-jie; Xiang, Si-yu; Zhang, Qing-shan; Xue, Min

    2015-01-01

    A variety of neurotrophic factors have been shown to repair the damaged peripheral nerve. However, in clinical practice, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are all peptides or proteins that may be rapidly deactivated at the focal injury site; their local effective concentration time following a single medication cannot meet the required time for spinal axons to regenerate and cross the glial scar. In this study, we produced polymer sustained-release microspheres based on the polylactic-co-glycolic acid copolymer; the microspheres at 300-μm diameter contained nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Six microspheres were longitudinally implanted into the sciatic nerve at the anastomosis site, serving as the experimental group; while the sciatic nerve in the control group was subjected to the end-to-end anastomosis using 10/0 suture thread. At 6 weeks after implantation, the lower limb activity, weight of triceps surae muscle, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the maximum amplitude were obviously better in the experimental group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, more regenerating nerve fibers were observed and distributed in a dense and ordered manner with thicker myelin sheaths in the experimental group. More angiogenesis was also visible. Experimental findings indicate that polylactic-co-glycolic acid composite microspheres containing nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor can promote the restoration of sciatic nerve in rats after injury. PMID:26604912

  2. Angiogenesis in tissue-engineered nerves evaluated objectively using MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-kui; Wang, Ya-xian; Xue, Cheng-bin; Li, Zhen-mei-yu; Huang, Jing; Zhao, Ya-hong; Yang, Yu-min; Gu, Xiao-song

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a key process in regenerative medicine generally, as well as in the specific field of nerve regeneration. However, no convenient and objective method for evaluating the angiogenesis of tissue-engineered nerves has been reported. In this study, tissue-engineered nerves were constructed in vitro using Schwann cells differentiated from rat skin-derived precursors as supporting cells and chitosan nerve conduits combined with silk fibroin fibers as scaffolds to bridge 10-mm sciatic nerve defects in rats. Four weeks after surgery, three-dimensional blood vessel reconstructions were made through MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning, and parameter analysis of the tissue-engineered nerves was performed. New blood vessels grew into the tissue-engineered nerves from three main directions: the proximal end, the distal end, and the middle. The parameter analysis of the three-dimensional blood vessel images yielded several parameters, including the number, diameter, connection, and spatial distribution of blood vessels. The new blood vessels were mainly capillaries and microvessels, with diameters ranging from 9 to 301 μm. The blood vessels with diameters from 27 to 155 μm accounted for 82.84% of the new vessels. The microvessels in the tissue-engineered nerves implanted in vivo were relatively well-identified using the MICROFIL perfusion and micro-CT scanning method, which allows the evaluation and comparison of differences and changes of angiogenesis in tissue-engineered nerves implanted in vivo. PMID:26981108

  3. Polylactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres containing three neurotrophic factors promote sciatic nerve repair after injury.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qun; Li, Zhi-Yue; Zhang, Ze-Peng; Mo, Zhou-Yun; Chen, Shi-Jie; Xiang, Si-Yu; Zhang, Qing-Shan; Xue, Min

    2015-09-01

    A variety of neurotrophic factors have been shown to repair the damaged peripheral nerve. However, in clinical practice, nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor are all peptides or proteins that may be rapidly deactivated at the focal injury site; their local effective concentration time following a single medication cannot meet the required time for spinal axons to regenerate and cross the glial scar. In this study, we produced polymer sustained-release microspheres based on the polylactic-co-glycolic acid copolymer; the microspheres at 300-μm diameter contained nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Six microspheres were longitudinally implanted into the sciatic nerve at the anastomosis site, serving as the experimental group; while the sciatic nerve in the control group was subjected to the end-to-end anastomosis using 10/0 suture thread. At 6 weeks after implantation, the lower limb activity, weight of triceps surae muscle, sciatic nerve conduction velocity and the maximum amplitude were obviously better in the experimental group than in the control group. Compared with the control group, more regenerating nerve fibers were observed and distributed in a dense and ordered manner with thicker myelin sheaths in the experimental group. More angiogenesis was also visible. Experimental findings indicate that polylactic-co-glycolic acid composite microspheres containing nerve growth factor, neurotrophin-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor can promote the restoration of sciatic nerve in rats after injury.

  4. Reanimation of reversible facial paralysis by the double innervation technique using an intraneural-dissected sural nerve graft.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Koichi; Hosokawa, Ko; Yano, Kenji

    2010-06-01

    In treating reversible facial paralysis, cross-facial nerve grafting offers voluntary and emotional reanimation. In contrast, rapid re-innervation and strong neural stimulation can be obtained with hypoglossal-facial nerve crossover. In this article, we describe the method of a combination of these techniques as a one-stage procedure. A 39-year-old man presented with facial paralysis due to nerve avulsion within the stylomastoid foramen. The sural nerve was harvested and two branches were created at its distal end by intraneural dissection. One branch was anastomosed to the contralateral facial nerve, and the other branch was used for hypoglossal-facial nerve crossover, followed by connecting the proximal stump of the graft to the trunk of the paralysed facial nerve in an end-to-end fashion. At 9 months postoperatively, almost complete facial symmetry and co-ordinated movements of the mimetic muscles were obtained with no obvious tongue atrophy. Since our method can efficiently gather neural inputs from the contralateral facial nerve and the ipsilateral hypoglossal nerve, it may become a good alternative for reanimation of reversible facial paralysis when the ipsilateral facial nerve is not available.

  5. Functions of the Renal Nerves.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepke, John P.; DiBona, Gerald F.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses renal neuroanatomy, renal vasculature, renal tubules, renin secretion, renorenal reflexes, and hypertension as related to renal nerve functions. Indicates that high intensitites of renal nerve stimulation have produced alterations in several renal functions. (A chart with various stimulations and resultant renal functions and 10-item,…

  6. Sports and peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Hirasawa, Y; Sakakida, K

    1983-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is one of the serious complications of athletic injuries; however, they have rarely been reported. According to the report by Takazawa et al., there were only 28 cases of peripheral nerve injury among 9,550 cases of sports injuries which had been treated in the previous 5 years at the clinic of the Japanese Athletic Association. The authors have encountered 1,167 cases of peripheral nerve injury during the past 18 years. Sixty-six of these cases were related to sports (5.7%). The nerves most frequently involved were: brachial plexus, radial nerve, ulnar, peroneal, and axillary nerves (in their order of frequency). The most common causes of such injuries were mountain climbing, gymnastics, and baseball. More often, peripheral nerve injury seemed to be caused by continuous compression and repeated trauma to the involved nerve. Usually it appeared as an entrapment neuropathy and the symptoms could be improved by conservative treatment. Some of the cases were complicated by fractures and surgical exploration became necessary. Results of treatment produced excellent to good improvement in 87.9% of the cases. With regard to compartment syndrome, the authors stress the importance of early and precise diagnosis and a fasciotomy.

  7. Changes in nerve- and endothelium-mediated contractile tone of the corpus cavernosum in a mouse model of pre-mature ageing.

    PubMed

    Lafuente-Sanchis, A; Triguero, D; Garcia-Pascual, A

    2014-07-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is very prevalent in the older population, although the ageing-related mechanisms involved in the development of ED are poorly understood. We propose that age-induced differences in nerve- and endothelium-mediated smooth muscle contractility in the corpus cavernosum (CC) could be found between a senescent-accelerated mouse prone (SAMP8) and senescent-accelerated mouse resistant (SAMR1) strains. We analysed the changes in muscle tension induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS) or agonist addition 'in vitro', assessing nerve density (adrenergic, cholinergic and nitrergic), the expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), cGMP accumulation and the distribution of interstitial cells (ICs) by immunofluorescence. We observed no change in both the nerve-dependent adrenergic excitatory contractility at physiological levels of stimulation and in the nitrergic inhibitory response in SAMP8 animals. Unlike cholinergic innervation, the density of adrenergic and nitrergic nerves increased in SAMP8 mice. In contrast, smooth muscle sensitivity to exogenous noradrenaline (NA) was slightly reduced, whereas cGMP accumulation in response to EFS and DEA/NO, and relaxations to DEA/NO and sildenafil, were not modified. No changes in the expression of eNOS and in the distribution of vimentin-positive ICs were detected in the aged animals. The ACh induced atropine-sensitive biphasic endothelium-dependent responses involved relaxation at low concentrations that turned into contractions at the highest doses. CC relaxation was mainly because of the production of NO together with some relaxant prostanoid, which did not change in SAMP8 animals. In contrast, the contractile component was considerably higher in the aged animals and it was completely inhibited by indomethacin. In conclusion, a clear imbalance towards enhanced production of contractile prostanoids from the endothelium may contribute to ED in the elderly. On the basis of these data, we

  8. Ultrasonographic Evaluation of Peripheral Nerves.

    PubMed

    Ali, Zarina S; Pisapia, Jared M; Ma, Tracy S; Zager, Eric L; Heuer, Gregory G; Khoury, Viviane

    2016-01-01

    There are a variety of imaging modalities for evaluation of peripheral nerves. Of these, ultrasonography (US) is often underused. There are several advantages of this imaging modality, including its cost-effectiveness, time-efficient assessment of long segments of peripheral nerves, ability to perform dynamic maneuvers, lack of contraindications, portability, and noninvasiveness. It can provide diagnostic information that cannot be obtained by electrophysiologic or, in some cases, magnetic resonance imaging studies. Ideally, the neurosurgeon can use US as a diagnostic adjunct in the preoperative assessment of a patient with traumatic, neoplastic, infective, or compressive nerve injury. Perhaps its most unique use is in intraoperative surgical planning. In this article, a brief description of normal US nerve anatomy is presented followed by a description of the US appearance of peripheral nerve disease caused by trauma, tumor, infection, and entrapment.

  9. Teeth and tooth nerves.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, C; Fried, K; Tuisku, F; Johansson, C S

    1995-02-01

    (1) Although our knowledge on teeth and tooth nerves has increased substantially during the past 25 years, several important issues remain to be fully elucidated. As a result of the work now going on at many laboratories over the world, we can expect exciting new findings and major break-throughs in these and other areas in a near future. (2) Dentin-like and enamel-like hard tissues evolved as components of the exoskeletal bony armor of early vertebrates, 500 million years ago, long before the first appearance of teeth. It is possible that teeth developed from tubercles (odontodes) in the bony armor. The presence of a canal system in the bony plates, of tubular dentin, of external pores in the enamel layer and of a link to the lateral line system promoted hypotheses that the bony plates and tooth precursors may have had a sensory function. The evolution of an efficient brain, of a head with paired sense organs and of toothed jaws concurred with a shift from a sessile filter-feeding life to active prey hunting. (3) The wide spectrum of feeding behaviors exhibited by modern vertebrates is reflected by a variety of dentition types. While the teeth are continuously renewed in toothed non-mammalian vertebrates, tooth turnover is highly restricted in mammals. As a rule, one set of primary teeth is replaced by one set of permanent teeth. Since teeth are richly innervated, the turnover necessitates a local neural plasticity. Another factor calling for a local plasticity is the relatively frequent occurrence of age-related and pathological dental changes. (4) Tooth development is initiated through interactions between the oral epithelium and underlying neural crest-derived mesenchymal cells. The interactions are mediated by cell surface molecules, extracellular matrix molecules and soluble molecules. The possibility that the initiating events might involve a neural component has been much discussed. With respect to mammals, the experimental evidence available does not

  10. Platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in major depressive disorder. Binding of tritiated clonidine before and after tricyclic antidepressant drug treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Sevilla, J.A.; Zis, A.P.; Hollingsworth, P.J.; Greden, J.F.; Smith, C.B.

    1981-12-01

    The specific binding of tritiated (3H)-clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor agonist, to platelet membranes was measured in normal subjects and in patients with major depressive disorder. The number of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors from the depressed group was significantly higher than that found in platelets obtained from the control population. Treatment with tricyclic antidepressant drugs led to significant decreases in the number of platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptors. These results support the hypothesis that the depressive syndrome is related to an alpha 2-adrenergic receptor supersensitivity and that the clinical effectiveness of tricyclic antidepressant drugs is associated with a decrease in the number of these receptors.

  11. Cloning and expression of a human kidney cDNA for an /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor subtype

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J.W.; Kobilka, T.S.; Yang-Feng, T.L.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; Kobilka, B.K.

    1988-09-01

    An /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor subtype has been cloned from a human kidney cDNA library using the gene for the human platelet /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor as a probe. The deduced amino acid sequence resembles the human platelet /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor and is consistent with the structure of other members of he family of guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled receptors. The cDNA was expressed in a mammalian cell line (COS-7), and the /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic ligand (/sup 3/H)rauwolscine was bound. Competition curve analysis with a variety of adrenergic ligands suggests that this cDNA clone represents the /alpha//sub 2/B-adrenergic receptor. The gene for this receptor is on human chromosome 4, whereas the gene for the human platelet /alpha//sub 2/-adrenergic receptor (/alpha//sub 2/A) lies on chromosome 10. This ability to express the receptor in mammalian cells, free of other adrenergic receptor subtypes, should help in developing more selective /alpha/-adrenergic ligands.

  12. Peripheral nerve blocks for distal extremity surgery.

    PubMed

    Offierski, Chris

    2013-10-01

    Peripheral nerve block is well suited for distal extremity surgery. Blocking the nerves at the distal extremity is easily done. It does not require ultrasound or stimulators to identify the nerve. Blocking nerves in the distal extremity is safe with low risk of toxicity. The effect of the nerve block is limited to the distribution of the nerve. The distal nerves in the lower extremity are sensory branches of the sciatic nerve. This provides a sensory block only. This has the advantage of allowing the patient to actively contract tendons in the foot and ambulate more quickly after surgery. PMID:24093651

  13. Novel proteins associated with human dilated cardiomyopathy: selective reduction in α(1A)-adrenergic receptors and increased desensitization proteins.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ting; Moravec, Christine S; Perez, Dianne M

    2013-04-01

    Abstract Therapeutics to treat human heart failure (HF) and the identification of proteins associated with HF are still limited. We analyzed α(1)-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtypes in human HF and performed proteomic analysis on more uniform samples to identify novel proteins associated with human HF. Six failing hearts with end-stage dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and four non-failing heart controls were subjected to proteomic analysis. Out of 48 identified proteins, 26 proteins were redundant between samples. Ten of these 26 proteins were previously reported to be associated with HF. Of the newly identified proteins, we found several muscle proteins and mitochondrial/electron transport proteins, while novel were functionally similar to previous reports. However, we also found novel proteins involved in functional classes such as β-oxidation and G-protein coupled receptor signaling and desensitization not previously associated with HF. We also performed radioligand-binding studies on the heart samples and not only confirmed a large loss of β(1)-ARs in end-stage DCM, but also found a selective decrease in the α(1A)-AR subtype not previously reported. We have identified new proteins and functional categories associated with end-stage DCM. We also report that similar to the previously characterized loss of β(1)-AR in HF, there is also a concomitant loss of α(1A)-ARs, which are considered cardioprotective proteins.

  14. Adrenergic signaling in teleost fish liver, a challenging path.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Elena; Moon, Thomas W

    2016-09-01

    Adrenergic receptors or adrenoceptors (ARs) belong to the huge family of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that have been well characterized in mammals primarily because of their importance as therapeutic drug targets. ARs are found across vertebrates and this review examines the path to identify and characterize these receptors in fish with emphasis on hepatic metabolism. The absence of reliable and specific pharmacological agents led investigators to define the fish hepatic AR system as relying solely on a β2-AR, cAMP-dependent signaling transduction pathway. The use of calcium-radiometric imaging, purified membranes for ligand-binding studies, and perifused rather than static cultured fish hepatocytes, unequivocally demonstrated that both α1- and β2-AR signaling systems existed in the fish liver consistent with studies in mammals. Additionally, the use of molecular tools and phylogenetic analysis clearly demonstrated the existence of multiple AR-types and -subtypes in hepatic and other tissues of a number of fish species. This review also examines the use of β-blockers as pharmaceuticals and how these drugs that are now in the aquatic environment may be impacting aquatic species including fish and some invertebrates. Clearly there is a large conservation of structure and function within the AR system of vertebrates but there remain a number of key questions that need to be addressed before a clear understanding of these systems can be resolved. PMID:26482086

  15. Postnatal development of adrenergic responsiveness in the rabbit heart.

    PubMed

    Feng, Z P; Dryden, W F; Gordon, T

    1989-08-01

    It is uncertain how changes in the beta-adrenoceptor population influence the contractility of developing heart. To resolve this we have examined postnatal developmental changes in the adrenergic responsiveness of the rabbit heart. The inotropic effect of isoproterenol on isolated left ventricular papillary muscles from rabbits aged 3, 21, and 90 days was compared with the relative number of beta-adrenoceptors at each age measured using [3H]dihydroalprenolol ([3H]DHA) as the specific ligand. The maximum tension developed in response to isoproterenol increases from 37 +/- 7 to 175 +/- 33% above control twitch tension between 3 and 21 days of age; this is followed by a decrease to 68 +/- 12% in the young adult. During this period of development, there is a decline in EC50 towards increased sensitivity. These differences are partially accounted for by an increase in the numbers of specific [3H]DHA binding sites from 17.3 +/- 2.3 to 56.6 +/- 9.9 fmol/mg wet tissue weight from 3 to 21 days, and a subsequent decrease to 32 +/- 4.5 fmol/mg tissue in the young adult. The proportionally larger increase in contractility compared with the number of beta-adrenoceptor binding sites during the first 3 weeks of life is discussed in terms of the developmental changes in the efficacy of coupling between receptor occupancy and contraction.

  16. Adrenergic signaling in teleost fish liver, a challenging path.

    PubMed

    Fabbri, Elena; Moon, Thomas W

    2016-09-01

    Adrenergic receptors or adrenoceptors (ARs) belong to the huge family of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that have been well characterized in mammals primarily because of their importance as therapeutic drug targets. ARs are found across vertebrates and this review examines the path to identify and characterize these receptors in fish with emphasis on hepatic metabolism. The absence of reliable and specific pharmacological agents led investigators to define the fish hepatic AR system as relying solely on a β2-AR, cAMP-dependent signaling transduction pathway. The use of calcium-radiometric imaging, purified membranes for ligand-binding studies, and perifused rather than static cultured fish hepatocytes, unequivocally demonstrated that both α1- and β2-AR signaling systems existed in the fish liver consistent with studies in mammals. Additionally, the use of molecular tools and phylogenetic analysis clearly demonstrated the existence of multiple AR-types and -subtypes in hepatic and other tissues of a number of fish species. This review also examines the use of β-blockers as pharmaceuticals and how these drugs that are now in the aquatic environment may be impacting aquatic species including fish and some invertebrates. Clearly there is a large conservation of structure and function within the AR system of vertebrates but there remain a number of key questions that need to be addressed before a clear understanding of these systems can be resolved.

  17. Optodynamic simulation of β-adrenergic receptor signalling

    PubMed Central

    Siuda, Edward R.; McCall, Jordan G.; Al-Hasani, Ream; Shin, Gunchul; Il Park, Sung; Schmidt, Martin J.; Anderson, Sonya L.; Planer, William J.; Rogers, John A.; Bruchas, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Optogenetics has provided a revolutionary approach to dissecting biological phenomena. However, the generation and use of optically active GPCRs in these contexts is limited and it is unclear how well an opsin-chimera GPCR might mimic endogenous receptor activity. Here we show that a chimeric rhodopsin/β2 adrenergic receptor (opto-β2AR) is similar in dynamics to endogenous β2AR in terms of: cAMP generation, MAP kinase activation and receptor internalization. In addition, we develop and characterize a novel toolset of optically active, functionally selective GPCRs that can bias intracellular signalling cascades towards either G-protein or arrestin-mediated cAMP and MAP kinase pathways. Finally, we show how photoactivation of opto-β2AR in vivo modulates neuronal activity and induces anxiety-like behavioural states in both fiber-tethered and wireless, freely moving animals when expressed in brain regions known to contain β2ARs. These new GPCR approaches enhance the utility of optogenetics and allow for discrete spatiotemporal control of GPCR signalling in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26412387

  18. Adrenergic activation attenuates astrocyte swelling induced by hypotonicity and neurotrauma.

    PubMed

    Vardjan, Nina; Horvat, Anemari; Anderson, Jamie E; Yu, Dou; Croom, Deborah; Zeng, Xiang; Lužnik, Zala; Kreft, Marko; Teng, Yang D; Kirov, Sergei A; Zorec, Robert

    2016-06-01

    Edema in the central nervous system can rapidly result in life-threatening complications. Vasogenic edema is clinically manageable, but there is no established medical treatment for cytotoxic edema, which affects astrocytes and is a primary trigger of acute post-traumatic neuronal death. To test the hypothesis that adrenergic receptor agonists, including the stress stimulus epinephrine protects neural parenchyma from damage, we characterized its effects on hypotonicity-induced cellular edema in cortical astrocytes by in vivo and in vitro imaging. After epinephrine administration, hypotonicity-induced swelling of astrocytes was markedly reduced and cytosolic 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) was increased, as shown by a fluorescence resonance energy transfer nanosensor. Although, the kinetics of epinephrine-induced cAMP signaling was slowed in primary cortical astrocytes exposed to hypotonicity, the swelling reduction by epinephrine was associated with an attenuated hypotonicity-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) excitability, which may be the key to prevent astrocyte swelling. Furthermore, in a rat model of spinal cord injury, epinephrine applied locally markedly reduced neural edema around the contusion epicenter. These findings reveal new targets for the treatment of cellular edema in the central nervous system. PMID:27018061

  19. Pharmacogenetics of the β2-Adrenergic Receptor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Victor E.; Hawkins, Gregory A.; Peters, Stephen P.; Bleecker, Eugene R.

    2009-01-01

    Asthma is a complex genetic disease with multiple genetic and environmental determinants contributing to the observed variability in response to common anti-asthma therapies. Asthma pharmacogenetic research has focused on multiple candidate genes including the β2-adrenergic receptor gene (ADRβ2) and its effect on individual responses to beta agonist therapy. At present, knowledge about the effects of ADRβ2 variation on therapeutic responses is evolving and should not alter current Asthma Guideline approaches consisting of the use of short acting beta agonists for as-needed symptom based therapy and the use of a regular long-acting beta agonist in combination with inhaled corticosteroid therapy for optimal control of asthma symptoms in those asthmatics who are not controlled on inhaled corticosteroid alone. This approach is based upon studies showing a consistent pharmacogenetic response to regular use of short acting beta agonists (SABA) and less consistent findings in studies evaluating long acting beta agonist (LABA). While emerging pharmacogenetic studies are provocative and should lead to functional approaches, conflicting data with responses to LABA therapy may be caused by factors that include small sample sizes of study populations and differences in experimental design that may limit the conclusions that may be drawn from these clinical trials at the present time. PMID:17996583

  20. Molecular evolution of the mammalian alpha 2B adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Ole; Willemsen, Diederik; Ursing, Björn M; Arnason, Ulfur; de Jong, Wilfried W

    2002-12-01

    The alpha 2B adrenergic receptor (A2AB) is a heptahelical G protein-coupled receptor for catecholamines. We compared the almost complete coding region (about 1,175 bp) of the A2AB gene from 48 mammalian species, including eight newly determined sequences, representing all the 18 eutherian and two marsupial orders. Comparison of the encoded proteins reveals that residues thought to be involved in agonist binding are highly conserved, as are the regions playing a role in G protein-coupling. The three extracellular loops are generally more variable than the transmembrane domains and two of the intracellular loops, indicating a lower functional constraint. However, the greatest variation is observed in the very long, third intracellular loop, where only a few residues and a polyglutamyl tract are preserved. Although this polyglutamyl domain displays a great variation in length, its presence in all described A2ABs confirms its proposed role in agonist-dependent phosphorylation of the third intracellular loop. Phylogenetic analyses of the A2AB data set, including Bayesian methods, recognized the superordinal clades Afrotheria, Laurasiatheria, and Euarchontoglires, in agreement with recent molecular evidence, albeit with lower support. Within Afrotheria, A2AB strongly supports the paenungulate clade and the association of the continental African otter shrew with Malagasy tenrecs. Among Laurasiatheria, A2AB confirms the nesting of whales within the artiodactyls, as a sister group to hippopotamus. Within the Euarchontoglires, there is constant support for rodent monophyly. PMID:12446807

  1. Modulation of haemocyte phagocytic and antibacterial activity by alpha-adrenergic receptor in scallop Chlamys farreri.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi; Jiang, Qiufeng; Wang, Mengqiang; Yue, Feng; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Leilei; Li, Fengmei; Liu, Rui; Song, Linsheng

    2013-09-01

    The adrenergic receptors are a class of G protein-coupled receptors, through which norepinephrine and epinephrine trigger the second messenger to modulate the immune response in immunocytes of vertebrate. In the present study, a gene coding the homologue of α-adrenergic receptor was identified from scallop Chlamys farreri (designated CfαAR). Its deduced protein comprised 318 amino acids, and contained a conserved 7tm_1 domain. After CfαAR protein was expressed in the HEK293 cells, the stimulation of octopamine, tyramine, epinephrine and isoprenaline (β-adrenergic receptor agonist) did not change significantly the intracellular cAMP concentration, whereas the stimulation of norepinephrine and phenylephrine (α-adrenergic receptor agonist) lowered significantly the cAMP level to 0.52 and 0.84 pmol μl(-1) (P < 0.05), respectively. The CfαAR transcripts were ubiquitously detected in the tested tissues including haemocytes, adductor muscle, kidney, hepatopancreas, gill, gonad and mantle, with the highest expression in the gill. The expression level of CfαAR mRNA decreased significantly (0.21-fold, P < 0.05) at 3 h after the challenge of bacteria Vibrio anguillarum. Then, it began to increase (4.74-fold, P < 0.05) at 12 h, and reached the highest level (4.92-fold, P < 0.05) at 24 h after bacteria challenge. The addition of α-adrenergic receptor agonist to the primary scallop haemocytes repressed significantly the increase of phagocytic and antibacterial activity induced by LPS stimulation, while the induction was reverted by the addition of α-adrenergic receptor antagonist. These results collectively suggested that α-adrenergic receptor could be regulated dynamically in the transcriptional level during the immune response, and it could modulate the haemocyte phagocytic and antibacterial function through the second messenger cAMP, which might be requisite for pathogen elimination and the homeostasis maintenance in scallop.

  2. Ghrelin-induced hypophagia is mediated by the β2 adrenergic receptor in chicken.

    PubMed

    Zendehdel, Morteza; Hassanpour, Shahin

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of intracerebroventricular injection of metoprolol (a β1 adrenergic receptor antagonist), ICI 118,551 (a β2 adrenergic receptor antagonist), and SR 59230R (a β3 adrenergic receptor antagonist) on ghrelin-induced food and water intake by 3-h food-deprived (FD3) cockerels. The chickens were randomly allocated to 4 treatment groups with 8 replicates in each group. A cannula was surgically implanted into the lateral ventricle of the brain. In experiment 1, chickens received the β1 adrenergic receptor antagonist (24 nmol) before injection of the ghrelin (0.6 nmol). In experiment 2, chickens received the β2 adrenergic receptor antagonist (5 nmol) before injection of the ghrelin (0.6 nmol). In experiment 3, birds were injected with ghrelin (0.6 nmol) after the β3 adrenergic receptor antagonist (20 nmol). Cumulative food and water intake were recorded 3-h post injection and analyzed by two-way analysis of variance. According to the results, ghrelin injection reduced food and water intake by broiler cockerels (p≤0.05). The effect of ghrelin on food intake was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with the β2 receptor antagonist (p≤0.05). Furthermore, the β2 receptor antagonist had no effect on water intake induced by ghrelin. Also, pretreatment with the β1 and β3 receptors antagonists had no effect on ghrelin-induced food and water intake. These results suggest that the effect of ghrelin on cumulative food intake by cockerels is mediated via β2 adrenergic receptors.

  3. β-Adrenergic-stimulated macrophages: Comprehensive localization in the M1-M2 spectrum.

    PubMed

    Lamkin, Donald M; Ho, Hsin-Yun; Ong, Tiffany H; Kawanishi, Carly K; Stoffers, Victoria L; Ahlawat, Nivedita; Ma, Jeffrey C Y; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Cole, Steve W; Sloan, Erica K

    2016-10-01

    β-Adrenergic signaling can regulate macrophage involvement in several diseases and often produces anti-inflammatory properties in macrophages, which are similar to M2 properties in a dichotomous M1 vs. M2 macrophage taxonomy. However, it is not clear that β-adrenergic-stimulated macrophages may be classified strictly as M2. In this in vitro study, we utilized recently published criteria and transcriptome-wide bioinformatics methods to map the relative polarity of murine β-adrenergic-stimulated macrophages within a wider M1-M2 spectrum. Results show that β-adrenergic-stimulated macrophages did not fit entirely into any one pre-defined category of the M1-M2 spectrum but did express genes that are representative of some M2 side categories. Moreover, transcript origin analysis of genome-wide transcriptional profiles located β-adrenergic-stimulated macrophages firmly on the M2 side of the M1-M2 spectrum and found active suppression of M1 side gene transcripts. The signal transduction pathways involved were mapped through blocking experiments and bioinformatics analysis of transcription factor binding motifs. M2-promoting effects were mediated specifically through β2-adrenergic receptors and were associated with CREB, C/EBPβ, and ATF transcription factor pathways but not with established M1-M2 STAT pathways. Thus, β-adrenergic-signaling induces a macrophage transcriptome that locates on the M2 side of the M1-M2 spectrum but likely accomplishes this effect through a signaling pathway that is atypical for M2-spectrum macrophages. PMID:27485040

  4. Alpha-adrenergic stimulation of thermogenesis in a rat kangaroo (Marsupialia, Bettongia gaimardi).

    PubMed

    Ye, J M; Edwards, S J; Rose, R W; Steen, J T; Clark, M G; Colquhoun, E Q

    1996-09-01

    The Tasmanian bettong (Bettongia gaimardi) is a small rat kangaroo without detectable brown adipose tissue (BAT). In view of our previous findings of norepinephrine-mediated increase in O2 consumption (Vo2) in the perfused hindlimb of this species, the present study examined the effect of alpha-adrenoceptors on the thermogenesis of conscious bettongs at rest by infusing adrenergic agents via an indwelling catheter in the tail vein. The resting Vo2 was 22.9 +/- 1.9 mmol.kg-1.h-1. Norepinephrine (10-80 micrograms.kg-1.min-1) stimulated Vo2 in a dose-dependent manner with the maximal increment of 46.7%. Naphazoline (an alpha 1,alpha 2-adrenergic agonist) and phenylephrine (an alpha 1-adrenergic agonist) also elicited increases in Vo2 with maximal values of 29.6 and 34.8%, respectively. In contrast, the alpha 2-adrenergic agonist clonidine had no significant effects. Both alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockers were used to antagonize the submaximal increase in Vo2 elicited by norepinephrine. As a dose of 10 micrograms.kg-1.min-1, the alpha-adrenergic blocker phentolamine abolished the effects of naphazoline and phenylephrine and reduced norepinephrine-induced Vo2 by 45.5%. The beta-adrenergic blocker propranolol inhibited the norepinephrine-induced Vo2 by 58.8% at 20 micrograms.kg-1.min-1. A combination of the two antagonists blocked 82.5% of the norepinephrine-induced Vo2. Pretreatment of the animal with indomethacin (1 mg/kg), a known inhibitor of prostaglandin cyclooxygenase, had no effect on phenylephrine-elicited Vo2. Taken together, these results indicate that alpha 1-adrenoceptors are directly involved in norepinephrine-induced thermogenesis in non-BAT tissue(s).

  5. Species differences in the localization and number of CNS beta adrenergic receptors: Rat versus guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Booze, R.M.; Crisostomo, E.A.; Davis, J.N.

    1989-06-01

    The localization and number of beta adrenergic receptors were directly compared in the brains of rats and guinea pigs. The time course of association and saturability of (125I)cyanopindolol (CYP) binding to slide-mounted tissue sections was similar in rats (Kd = 17 pM) and guinea pigs (Kd = 20 pM). The beta-1 and beta-2 receptor subtypes were examined through the use of highly selective unlabeled receptor antagonists, ICI 118,551 (50 nM) and ICI 89,406 (70 nM). Dramatic species differences between rats and guinea pigs were observed in the neuroanatomical regional localization of the beta adrenergic receptor subtypes. For example, in the thalamus prominent beta-1 and beta-2 receptor populations were identified in the rat; however, the entire thalamus of the guinea pig had few, if any, beta adrenergic receptors of either subtype. Hippocampal area CA1 had high levels of beta-2 adrenergic receptors in both rats and guinea pigs but was accompanied by a widespread distribution of beta-2 adrenergic receptors only in rats. Quantitative autoradiographic analyses of 25 selected neuroanatomical regions (1) confirmed the qualitative differences in CNS beta adrenergic receptor localization, (2) determined that guinea pigs had significantly lower levels of beta adrenergic receptors than rats and (3) indicated a differential pattern of receptor subtypes between the two species. Knowledge of species differences in receptor patterns may be useful in designing effective experiments as well as in exploring the relationships between receptor and innervation patterns. Collectively, these data suggest caution be used in extrapolation of the relationships of neurotransmitters and receptors from studies of a single species.

  6. Recent advances in nerve tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bill G X; Quigley, Anita F; Myers, Damian E; Wallace, Gordon G; Kapsa, Robert M I; Choong, Peter F M

    2014-04-01

    Nerve injury secondary to trauma, neurological disease or tumor excision presents a challenge for surgical reconstruction. Current practice for nerve repair involves autologous nerve transplantation, which is associated with significant donor-site morbidity and other complications. Previously artificial nerve conduits made from polycaprolactone, polyglycolic acid and collagen were approved by the FDA (USA) for nerve repair. More recently, there have been significant advances in nerve conduit design that better address the requirements of nerve regrowth. Innovations in materials science, nanotechnology, and biology open the way for the synthesis of new generation nerve repair conduits that address issues currently faced in nerve repair and regeneration. This review discusses recent innovations in this area, including the use of nanotechnology to improve the design of nerve conduits and to enhance nerve regeneration.

  7. Adrenalectomy mediated alterations in adrenergic activation of adenylate cyclase in rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    El-Refai, M.; Chan, T.

    1986-05-01

    Adrenalectomy caused a large increase in the number of ..beta..-adrenergic binding sites on liver plasma membranes as measured by /sup 125/I-iodocyanopindolol (22 and 102 fmol/mg protein for control and adrenalectomized (ADX) rats). Concomitantly an increase in the number of binding sites for /sup 3/H-yohimbine was also observed (104 and 175 fmol/mg protein for control and adx membranes). Epinephrine-stimulated increase in cyclic AMP accumulation in isolated hepatocytes were greater in cells from ADX rats. This increase in ..beta..-adrenergic mediated action was much less than what may be expected as a result of the increase in the ..beta..-adrenergic binding in ADX membranes. In addition phenoxybenzamine (10 ..mu..M) further augmented this action of epinephrine in both control and ADX cells. To test the hypothesis that the increase in the number of the inhibitory ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors in adrenalectomy is responsible for the muted ..beta..-adrenergic response, the authors injected rats with pertussis toxin (PT). This treatment may cause the in vivo ribosylation of the inhibitory binding protein (Ni). Adenylate cyclase (AC) activity in liver plasma membranes prepared from treated and untreated animals was measured. In contrast with control rats, treatment of ADX rats with PT resulted in a significant increase in the basal activity of AC (5.5 and 7.7 pmol/mg protein/min for untreated and treated rats respectively). Isoproterenol (10 ..mu..M), caused AC activity to increase to 6.5 and 8.4 pmol/mg protein/min for membranes obtained from ADX untreated and ADX treated rats respectively. The ..cap alpha..-adrenergic antagonists had no significant effect on the ..beta..-adrenergic-mediated activation of AC in liver plasma membranes from PT treated control and ADX rats. The authors conclude that the ..beta..-adrenergic activation of AC is attenuated by Ni protein both directly and as a result of activation of ..cap alpha..-adrenergic receptors.

  8. Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor.

    PubMed

    James, Aaron W; Shurell, Elizabeth; Singh, Arun; Dry, Sarah M; Eilber, Fritz C

    2016-10-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is the sixth most common type of soft tissue sarcoma. Most MPNSTs arise in association with a peripheral nerve or preexisting neurofibroma. Neurofibromatosis type is the most important risk factor for MPNST. Tumor size and fludeoxyglucose F 18 avidity are among the most helpful parameters to distinguish MPNST from a benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor. The histopathologic diagnosis is predominantly a diagnosis of light microscopy. Immunohistochemical stains are most helpful to distinguish high-grade MPNST from its histologic mimics. Current surgical management of high-grade MPNST is similar to that of other high-grade soft tissue sarcomas. PMID:27591499

  9. alpha-1 Adrenergic receptors stimulation induces the proliferation of neural progenitor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hiramoto, Takeshi; Ihara, Yoshiaki; Watanabe, Yasuhiro

    2006-11-01

    The proliferation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs) is regulated by classical neurotransmitters such as dopamine, serotonin and acetylcholine, via its own receptors. Previous studies have reported that the depletion of L-norepinephrine decreases the proliferation of NPCs in the adult rat hippocampus and it has been suggested that L-norepinephrine regulates the proliferation of NPCs. However, it remains unknown whether or not adrenergic receptors are involved in the increased proliferation of NPCs. In the present study, an MTT cell proliferation assay was carried out in order to investigate the roles played by adrenergic receptors in the proliferation of NPCs. We demonstrated that L-epinephrine enhanced the proliferation of embryonic NPCs in vitro. In addition, the alpha-1 adrenergic receptor agonist L-phenylephrine was found to enhance the proliferation of NPCs, whereas an alpha-adrenergic antagonist and selective alpha-1 antagonists significantly inhibited cell proliferation increases induced by L-epinephrine and L-phenylephrine. These results suggest that stimulation with alpha-1 adrenergic receptors induces the proliferation of embryonic NPCs.

  10. Effects of adrenergic agents on the expression of zebrafish (Danio rerio) vitellogenin Ao1

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Naida; Jin Xia; He Jiangyan; Yin Zhan

    2009-07-01

    Teleost vitellogenins (VTGs) are large multidomain apolipoproteins, traditionally considered to be estrogen-responsive precursors of the major egg yolk proteins, expressed and synthesized mainly in hepatic tissue. The inducibility of VTGs has made them one of the most frequently used in vivo and in vitro biomarkers of exposure to estrogen-active substances. A significant level of zebrafish vtgAo1, a major estrogen responsive form, has been unexpectedly found in heart tissue in our present studies. Our studies on zebrafish cardiomyopathy, caused by adrenergic agonist treatment, suggest a similar protective function of the cardiac expressed vtgAo1. We hypothesize that its function is to unload surplus intracellular lipids in cardiomyocytes for 'reverse triglyceride transportation' similar to that found in lipid transport proteins in mammals. Our results also demonstrated that zebrafish vtgAo1 mRNA expression in heart can be suppressed by both {alpha}-adrenergic agonist, phenylephrine (PE) and {beta}-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol (ISO). Furthermore, the strong stimulation of zebrafish vtgAo1 expression in plasma induced by the {beta}-adrenergic antagonist, MOXIsylyl, was detected by Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA). Such stimulation cannot be suppressed by taMOXIfen, an antagonist to estrogen receptors. Thus, our present data indicate that the production of teleost VTG in vivo can be regulated not only by estrogenic agents, but by adrenergic signals as well.

  11. Impact of the Tamsulosin in Alpha Adrenergic Receptor of Airways at Patients with Increased Bronchial Reactibility

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Lirim; Ilazi, Ali; Dauti, Arta; Islami, Pellumb; Kastrati, Bashkim; Islami, Hilmi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In this work, effect of tamsulosin as antagonist of alpha1A and alpha1B adrenergic receptor and effect of agonists of beta2 adrenergic receptor–salbutamol in patients with increased bronchial reactibility was studied. Methods: Parameters of the lung function are determined with Body plethysmography six (6) hours after administration of tamsulosin. Raw and ITGV were registered and specific resistance (SRaw) was calculated as well. Tamsulosin was administered in per os manner as a preparation in the shape of the capsules with a brand name of “Prolosin”, produced by Niche Generics Limited, Hitchin, Herts. Results: After six (6) hours of administration of tamsulosin, results gained indicate that blockage of alpha1A and alpha1B-adrenergic receptor (0.8 mg per os) has not changed significantly (p > 0.1) the bronchomotor tonus of tracheobronchial tree in comparison to the check-up that has inhaled salbutamol agonist of adrenergic beta2 receptor (2 inh. x 0.2 mg), (p < 0.05). Blood pressure suffered no significant decrease following administration of the 0.8 mg dose of tamsulosin. Conclusion: This suggests that even after six hours of administration of tamsulosin, and determining of lung function parameters, the activity of alpha1A and alpha1B-adrenergic receptor in the smooth bronchial musculature has not changed in patients with increased bronchial reactibility. PMID:26543414

  12. Variation in Lingual Nerve Course: A Human Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Amery, Samah M.; Nambiar, Phrabhakaran; Naidu, Murali

    2016-01-01

    The lingual nerve is a terminal branch of the mandibular nerve. It is varied in its course and in its relationship to the mandibular alveolar crest, submandibular duct and also the related muscles in the floor of the mouth. This study aims to understand the course of the lingual nerve from the molar area until its insertion into the tongue muscle. This cadaveric research involved the study of 14 hemi-mandibles and consisted of two parts: (i) obtaining morphometrical measurements of the lingual nerve to three landmarks on the alveolar ridge, and (b) understanding non-metrical or morphological appearance of its terminal branches inserting in the ventral surface of the tongue. The mean distance between the fourteen lingual nerves and the alveolar ridge was 12.36 mm, and they were located 12.03 mm from the lower border of the mandible. These distances were varied when near the first molar (M1), second molar (M2) and third molar (M3). The lingual nerve coursed on the floor of the mouth for approximately 25.43 mm before it deviated toward the tongue anywhere between the mesial of M1 and distal of M2. Thirteen lingual nerves were found to loop around the submandibular duct for an average distance of 6.92 mm (95% CI: 5.24 to 8.60 mm). Their looping occurred anywhere between the M2 and M3. In 76.9% of the cases the loop started around the M3 region and the majority (69.2%) of these looping ended at between the first and second molars and at the lingual developmental groove of the second molar. It gave out as many as 4 branches at its terminal end at the ventral surface of the tongue, with the presence of 2 branches being the most common pattern. An awareness of the variations of the lingual nerve is important to prevent any untoward complications or nerve injury and it is hoped that these findings will be useful for planning of surgical procedures related to the alveolar crest, submandibular gland/ duct and surrounding areas. PMID:27662622

  13. Stereotactic radiotherapy using Novalis for skull base metastases developing with cranial nerve symptoms.

    PubMed

    Mori, Yoshimasa; Hashizume, Chisa; Kobayashi, Tatsuya; Shibamoto, Yuta; Kosaki, Katsura; Nagai, Aiko

    2010-06-01

    Skull base metastases are challenging situations because they often involve critical structures such as cranial nerves. We evaluated the role of stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) which can give high doses to the tumors sparing normal structures. We treated 11 cases of skull base metastases from other visceral carcinomas. They had neurological symptoms due to cranial nerve involvement including optic nerve (3 patients), oculomotor (3), trigeminal (6), abducens (1), facial (4), acoustic (1), and lower cranial nerves (1). The interval between the onset of cranial nerve symptoms and Novalis SRT was 1 week to 7 months. Eleven tumors of 8-112 ml in volume were treated by Novalis SRT with 30-50 Gy in 10-14 fractions. The tumors were covered by 90-95% isodose. Imaging and clinical follow-up has been obtained in all 11 patients for 5-36 months after SRT. Seven patients among 11 died from primary carcinoma or other visceral metastases 9-36 months after Novalis SRT. All 11 metastatic tumors were locally controlled until the end of the follow-up time or patient death, though retreatment for re-growth was done in 1 patient. In 10 of 11 patients, cranial nerve deficits were improved completely or partially. In some patients, the cranial nerve symptoms were relieved even during the period of fractionated SRT. Novalis SRT is thought to be safe and effective treatment for skull base metastases with involvement of cranial nerves and it may improve cranial nerve symptoms quickly.

  14. Anandamide induces endothelium-dependent vasoconstriction and CGRPergic nerve-mediated vasodilatation in the rat mesenteric vascular bed.

    PubMed

    Tamaki, Chihiro; Nawa, Hideki; Takatori, Shingo; Oda, Sakiko; Sendo, Toshiaki; Zamami, Yoshito; Kawasaki, Hiromu

    2012-01-01

    An endogenous cannabinoid anandamide (N-arachidonoylethanolamide) has been shown to cause vasodilatation in vitro and a brief vasoconstriction followed by prolonged depressor response in vivo. This study investigated the vascular effects of anandamide and underlying mechanisms in rat mesenteric vascular beds. In preparations with an intact endothelium and active tone, anandamide at low concentrations (0.1 - 1 nM) caused a concentration-dependent decrease in perfusion pressure due to vasodilatation, but at high concentrations (10 nM - 1 µM) elicited an initial and sharp increase in perfusion pressure due to vasoconstriction followed by long-lasting vasodilatation in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment with SR141716A [cannabinoid-1 (CB(1))-receptor antagonist] blunted both the vasoconstrictor and vasodilator responses. Also, removal of the endothelium and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor), but not adrenergic denervation with 6-hydoxydopamine (adrenergic neurotoxin), markedly inhibited the vasoconstrictor response to anandamide, while these treatments did not affect vasodilatation. The vasodilatation, but not vasoconstriction, in response to anandamide was markedly attenuated by capsazepine [selective antagonist for transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1)], pretreatment with capsaicin [calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)ergic-nerve depletor], or cold-storage denervation. These results suggest that in rat mesenteric vascular beds, anandamide causes CB(1)-receptor- and prostanoid-mediated endothelium-dependent vasoconstriction and perivascular capsaicin-sensitive CGRPergic nerve-mediated vasodilatation.

  15. Motor and sensory nerve conduction velocities in Yucatan minipigs.

    PubMed

    Hort-Legrand, C; Noah, L; Mériguet, E; Mésangeau, D

    2006-01-01

    Motor and/or sensory conduction velocities are used to assess peripheral nervous system disorders. Although the miniature pig represents a model of choice for long-term pharmacological experimentation, no study has so far been reported on this model in relation to the measurement of nerve conduction velocities. We developed the present technique and applied it to 34 3-18-month-old Yucatan minipigs. Motor and sensory conduction velocities were measured using the anterior tibial nerve and the internal plantar nerve, a branch of the posterior tibial nerve, respectively. The nerve conduction velocity data of motor (MNCV) and sensory (SNCV) nerves, together with the amplitude of the sensory nerve signal, were logarithmically dependent on the age of the tested animals (r(2)=0.92, 0.81 and 0.76, respectively). The mean values of MNCV and SNCV were 70.9 +/- 1.1 and 67.9 +/- 0.2 m/s, respectively, at the age of 16 months for these miniature pigs. In order to validate this model, we compared it with other known models when the velocities reached a plateau at the end of the study. These values were found to be higher than those in humans or rats, but are comparable to those of the baboon, one of the best large animal models for human pathologies. Because the physiology and metabolism of the minipig resemble those of humans, and due to its long lifetime, this animal represents a good model for studying the development of neuropathology.

  16. Nanostructured Guidance for Peripheral Nerve Injuries: A Review with a Perspective in the Oral and Maxillofacial Area

    PubMed Central

    Sivolella, Stefano; Brunello, Giulia; Ferrarese, Nadia; Puppa, Alessandro Della; D’Avella, Domenico; Bressan, Eriberto; Zavan, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Injury to peripheral nerves can occur as a result of various surgical procedures, including oral and maxillofacial surgery. In the case of nerve transaction, the gold standard treatment is the end-to-end reconnection of the two nerve stumps. When it cannot be performed, the actual strategies consist of the positioning of a nerve graft between the two stumps. Guided nerve regeneration using nano-structured scaffolds is a promising strategy to promote axon regeneration. Biodegradable electrospun conduits composed of aligned nanofibers is a new class of devices used to improve neurite extension and axon outgrowth. Self assembled peptide nanofibrous scaffolds (SAPNSs) demonstrated promising results in animal models for central nervous system injuries, and, more recently, for peripheral nerve injury. Aims of this work are (1) to review electrospun and self-assembled nanofibrous scaffolds use in vitro and in vivo for peripheral nerve regeneration; and (2) its application in peripheral nerve injuries treatment. The review focused on nanofibrous scaffolds with a diameter of less than approximately 250 nm. The conjugation in a nano scale of a natural bioactive factor with a resorbable synthetic or natural material may represent the best compromise providing both biological and mechanical cues for guided nerve regeneration. Injured peripheral nerves, such as trigeminal and facial, may benefit from these treatments. PMID:24562333

  17. Solitary fibrous tumour of the vagus nerve.

    PubMed

    Scholsem, Martin; Scholtes, Felix

    2012-04-01

    We describe the complete removal of a foramen magnum solitary fibrous tumour in a 36-year-old woman. It originated on a caudal vagus nerve rootlet, classically described as the 'cranial' accessory nerve root. This ninth case of immunohistologically confirmed cranial or spinal nerve SFT is the first of the vagus nerve.

  18. Management of traumatic facial nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Greywoode, Jewel D; Ho, Hao H; Artz, Gregory J; Heffelfinger, Ryan N

    2010-12-01

    Management of facial nerve injuries requires knowledge and skills that should be in every facial plastic surgeon's armamentarium. This article will briefly review the anatomy of the facial nerve, discuss the assessment of facial nerve injury, and describe the management of facial nerve injury after soft tissue trauma. PMID:21086238

  19. Laminin-based Nanomaterials for Peripheral Nerve Tissue Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neal, Rebekah Anne

    Peripheral nerve transection occurs commonly in traumatic injury, causing motor and sensory deficits distal to the site of injury. One option for surgical repair is the nerve conduit. Conduits currently on the market are hollow tubes into which the nerve ends are sutured. Although these conduits fill the gap, they often fail due to the slow rate of regeneration over long gaps. To facilitate increased speed of regeneration and greater potential for functional recovery, the ideal conduit should provide biochemically relevant signals and physical guidance cues, thus playing an active role in peripheral nerve regeneration. In this dissertation, I fabricated laminin-1 and laminin-polycaprolactone (PCL) blend nanofibers that mimic the geometry and functionality of the peripheral nerve basement membrane. These fibers resist hydration in aqueous media and require no harsh chemical crosslinkers. Adhesion and differentiation of both neuron-like and neuroprogenitor cells is improved on laminin nanofibrous meshes over two-dimensional laminin substrates. Blend meshes with varying laminin content were characterized for composition, tensile properties, degradation rates, and bioactivity in terms of cell attachment and axonal elongation. I have established that 10% (wt) laminin content is sufficient to retain the significant neurite-promoting effects of laminin critical in peripheral nerve repair. In addition, I utilized modified collector plate design to manipulate electric field gradients during electrospinning for the fabrication of aligned nanofibers. These aligned substrates provide enhanced directional guidance cues to the regenerating axons. Finally, I replicated the clinical problem of peripheral nerve transection using a rat tibial nerve defect model for conduit implantation. When the lumens of conduits were filled with nanofiber meshes of varying laminin content and alignment, I observed significant recovery of sensory and motor function over six weeks. This recovery was

  20. Beta-2-adrenergic receptor polymorphisms in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Steagall, Wendy K.; Barrow, Bethany J.; Glasgow, Connie G.; Mendoza, Jennifer Woo; Ehrmantraut, Mary; Lin, Jing-Ping; Insel, Paul A.; Moss, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Cystic fibrosis (CF), an autosomal recessive disease affecting the lung, pancreas, gut, liver, and reproductive tract, is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, which encodes a cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′ monophosphate-regulated chloride channel. The variability of disease progression among patients with CF suggests effects of genetic modifiers of disease. Beta-2 adrenergic receptors (β2AR), which are abundant in airway epithelial cells, accelerate the formation of cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′ monophosphate, which can modulate CFTR activity and affect smooth muscle contractility. We tested the hypothesis that genetic variants of the β2AR gene, which have been shown to influence receptor desensitization, are more frequent in patients than in controls. Methods We genotyped 130 adult CF patients and 1 : 1 age-matched, sex-matched, and ethnicity-matched normal volunteers for Gly16Arg and Gln27Glu β2AR. Results We found that CF patients were more likely than controls to be Gly16 homozygotes (48 and 32%, respectively) (P < 0.01) and Glu27 homozygotes (29 and 10%, respectively) (P < 0.01). Conclusions Our results, showing a higher frequency of Gly16 and Glu27 β2AR alleles in adult CF patients than in the control population, contrast with data from children with CF, who are reported to have lower frequency of Gly16 and similar frequency of G1u27, and with data from young adults with CF, who showed no differences in frequencies of β2AR variants. The Gly16Glu27 variant of β2AR may have properties that lead to enhanced β2AR function, resulting in the upregulation of CFTR activity and the improvement of CF disease. PMID:17502834

  1. Nerve Transfers for the Restoration of Wrist, Finger, and Thumb Extension After High Radial Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Pet, Mitchell A; Lipira, Angelo B; Ko, Jason H

    2016-05-01

    High radial nerve injury is a common pattern of peripheral nerve injury most often associated with orthopedic trauma. Nerve transfers to the wrist and finger extensors, often from the median nerve, offer several advantages when compared to nerve repair or grafting and tendon transfer. In this article, we discuss the forearm anatomy pertinent to performing these nerve transfers and review the literature surrounding nerve transfers for wrist, finger, and thumb extension. A suggested algorithm for management of acute traumatic high radial nerve palsy is offered, and our preferred surgical technique for treatment of high radial nerve palsy is provided. PMID:27094891

  2. [Nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy].

    PubMed

    Okada, K; Tada, M; Nakano, A; Konno, T

    1988-04-01

    The neuroanatomy of the pelvic space was studied in order to clarify the course of cavernous nerves responsible for erectile function. The cavernous nerves travel along the dorsolateral portion at the base toward the apex of the prostate, then penetrate urogenital diaphragm at the lateral aspect of the membranous urethra. According to the anatomical findings, nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy was performed through the antegrade approach in 28 patients with prostate cancer. No significant surgical complications were encountered in the present series. Of the 28, evaluable cases were limited to 22 in terms of erection. Fifteen patients (68%) recovered their erectile function after nerve-sparing surgery. Therefore, the present surgical technique seems to be effective for the preservation of male sexual function following radical pelvic surgery.

  3. Schwannomatosis of Cervical Vagus Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Sasi, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical vagal schwannoma is a rare entity among lesions presenting as a neck mass. They are usually slow-growing benign lesions closely associated with the vagus nerve. They are usually solitary and asymptomatic. Multiple schwannomas occurring in patients without neurofibromatosis (NF) are rare and have recently been referred to as schwannomatosis. Here, we present a case of a neck mass that had imaging features suggestive of vagal schwannoma and was operated upon. Intraoperatively, it was discovered to be a case of multiple vagal cervical schwannoma, all directly related to the right vagus nerve, and could be resected from the nerve in toto preserving the function of the vagus nerve. Final HPR confirmed our pre-op suspicion of vagal schwannomatosis.

  4. Ion Channels in Nerve Membranes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenstein, Gerald

    1976-01-01

    Discusses research that indicates that nerve membranes, which play a key role in the conduction of impulses, are traversed by protein channels with ion pathways opened and closed by the membrane electric field. (Author/MLH)

  5. Role of sensory nerves in the cutaneous vasoconstrictor response to local cooling in humans.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Gary J; Traeger, J Andrew; Tang, Tri; Kosiba, Wojciech A; Zhao, Kun; Johnson, John M

    2007-07-01

    Local cooling (LC) causes a cutaneous vasoconstriction (VC). In this study, we tested whether there is a mechanism that links LC to VC nerve function via sensory nerves. Six subjects participated. Local skin and body temperatures were controlled with Peltier probe holders and water-perfused suits, respectively. Skin blood flow at four forearm sites was monitored by laser-Doppler flowmetry with the following treatments: untreated control, pretreatment with local anesthesia (LA) blocking sensory nerve function, pretreatment with bretylium tosylate (BT) blocking VC nerve function, and pretreatment with both LA and BT. Local skin temperature was slowly reduced from 34 to 29 degrees C at all four sites. Both sites treated with LA produced an increase in cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) early in the LC process (64 +/- 55%, LA only; 42 +/- 14% LA plus BT; P < 0.05), which was absent at the control and BT-only sites (5 +/- 8 and 6 +/- 8%, respectively; P > 0.05). As cooling continued, there were significant reductions in CVC at all sites (P < 0.05). At control and LA-only sites, CVC decreased by 39 +/- 4 and 46 +/- 8% of the original baseline values, which were significantly (P < 0.05) more than the reductions in CVC at the sites treated with BT and BT plus LA (-26 +/- 8 and -22 +/- 6%). Because LA affected only the short-term response to LC, either alone or in the presence of BT, we conclude that sensory nerves are involved early in the VC response to LC, but not for either adrenergic or nonadrenergic VC with longer term LC.

  6. Neuromuscular junction integrity after chronic nerve compression injury.

    PubMed

    Mozaffar, Tahseen; Strandberg, Erika; Abe, Kazuko; Hilgenberg, Lutz G; Smith, Martin A; Gupta, Ranjan

    2009-01-01

    Chronic nerve compression injuries (CNC) are progressive demyelinating disorders characterized by a gradual decline of the nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in the affected nerve region. CNC injury induces a robust Schwann cell response with axonal sprouting, but without morphologic evidence of axonal injury. We hypothesize that early CNC injury occurs without damage to neuromuscular junction of motor axons. A well-established animal model was used to assess for damage to motor axons. As sprouting is considered a hallmark of regeneration during and after axonal degeneration and sprouting was confirmed visually at 2 weeks in CNC animals, we assessed for axonal degeneration in motor nerves after CNC by evaluating the integrity of the neuromuscular junction. NCV exhibited a gradual progressive decline consistent with the human condition. Compound motor action potential amplitudes decreased slightly immediately and plateaued, indicating that there was not sustained and increasing axonal loss. Sprouting was confirmed using immunofluorescence and by an increase in number of unmyelinated axons and Remak bundles. Blind analysis of the neuromuscular junction showed no difference between control and CNC images, indicating that there was no evidence for end-unit axonal loss in the soleus muscle. Because the progressive decline in NCV was not paired with a similar progressive decline in amplitude, it is likely that axonal loss is not responsible for slowing of action potentials. Blind analysis of the neuromuscular junction provides further evidence that the axonal sprouting seen early after CNC injury is not a consequence of axonal degeneration in the motor nerves. PMID:18655131

  7. Biosynthesis and transport of gangliosides in peripheral nerve

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, A.J.; Tipnis, U.R.; Hofteig, J.H.; Warner, J.K.

    1984-01-01

    Radiolabelled glucosamine was injected into L-7 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of rabbits. At several different times after injection DRG, lumbosacral trunks (LST) and sciatic nerves (SN) were removed and gangliosides extracted. Two and 3 weeks after injection the amounts of radioactivity in the ganglioside fractions of LST and SN were significantly higher than at days 1 and 2. The TCA soluble radioactivity decreased dramatically over the same time period. Colchicine prevented the appearance of radiolabelled lipid in LST and SN. From these experiments the authors conclude that some ganglioside is synthesized in the neuronal cell bodies of DRG and transported in the axons of the sciatic nerve. In another experiment the sciatic nerve was transected and ends separated to prevent regeneration. There was no difference in the amount of radiolabelled ganglioside that was isolated from DRG or LST of transected nerves compared with control nerves. The behavior of several potential acid soluble contaminants was studied in several steps used to isolate gangliosides. Of those studied only CMP-NeuAc could cause significant contamination of the final ganglioside preparation.

  8. Optic Nerve Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Schumann, Paul; Kokemüller, Horst; Tavassol, Frank; Lindhorst, Daniel; Lemound, Juliana; Essig, Harald; Rücker, Martin; Gellrich, Nils-Claudius

    2013-01-01

    Orbital and anterior skull base surgery is generally performed close to the prechiasmatic visual pathway, and clear strategies for detecting and handling visual pathway damage are essential. To overcome the common problem of a missed clinical examination because of an uncooperative or unresponsive patient, flash visual evoked potentials and electroretinograms should be used. These electrophysiologic examination techniques can provide evidence of intact, pathologic, or absent conductivity of the visual pathway when clinical assessment is not feasible. Visual evoked potentials and electroretinograms are thus essential diagnostic procedures not only for primary diagnosis but also for intraoperative evaluation. A decision for or against treatment of a visual pathway injury has to be made as fast as possible due to the enormous importance of the time elapsed with such injuries; this can be achieved additionally using multislice spiral computed tomography. The first-line conservative treatment of choice for such injuries is megadose methylprednisolone therapy. Surgery is used to decompress the orbital compartment by exposure of the intracanalicular part of the optic nerve in the case of optic canal compression. Modern craniomaxillofacial surgery requires detailed consideration of the diagnosis and treatment of traumatic visual pathway damage with the ultimate goal of preserving visual acuity. PMID:24436741

  9. [Beta]-Adrenergic Receptors in the Insular Cortex are Differentially Involved in Aversive vs. Incidental Context Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Maria Isabel; Sabath, Elizabeth; Nunez-Jaramillo, Luis; Puron-Sierra, Liliana

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this research was to determine the effects of [beta]-adrenergic antagonism in the IC before or after inhibitory avoidance (IA) training or context pre-exposure in a latent inhibition protocol. Pretraining intra-IC infusion of the [beta]-adrenergic antagonist propranolol disrupted subsequent IA retention and impaired latent inhibition…

  10. Mechanisms of trigeminal nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Ziccardi, V B; Assael, L A

    2001-09-01

    Injuries to the trigeminal nerve branches are a known and accepted risk in oral and maxillofacial surgery. It is prudent for the practitioner to explain the risks to patients as part of the informed consent process and to recognize and document the presence of nerve injury postoperatively. Patients should be referred to a surgeon experienced in microsurgical techniques in a timely fashion for evaluation and possible surgical intervention if an injury is not resolving.

  11. Effect of age on upregulation of the cardiac adrenergic beta receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Tumer, N.; Houck, W.T.; Roberts, J.

    1990-03-01

    Radioligand binding studies were performed to determine whether upregulation of postjunctional beta receptors occurs in sympathectomized hearts of aged animals. Fischer 344 rats 6, 12, and 24 months of age (n = 10) were used in these experiments. To produce sympathectomy, rats were injected with 6-hydroxydopamine hydrobromide (6-OHDA; 2 x 50 mg/kg iv) on days 1 and 8; the animals were decapitated on day 15. The depletion of norepinephrine in the heart was about 86% in each age group. 125I-Iodopindolol (IPIN), a beta adrenergic receptor antagonist, was employed to determine the affinity and total number of beta adrenergic receptors in the ventricles of the rat heart. The maximal number of binding sites (Bmax) was significantly elevated by 37%, 48%, and 50% in hearts from sympathectomized 6-, 12-, and 24-month-old rats, respectively. These results indicate that beta receptor mechanisms in older hearts can respond to procedures that cause upregulation of the beta adrenergic receptors.

  12. Characterization of. cap alpha. /sub 2/-adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Nasseri, A.

    1987-01-01

    The properties of /sup 3/H-RX 781094 binding sites and the receptors inhibiting norepinephrine (NE) release and cyclic AMP accumulation in rat cerebral cortex were compared. /sup 3/H-RX 781094, a new ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptor antagonist radioligand, labelled a homogeneous population of binding sites at 37/sup 0/C with the pharmacological specificity expected of ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors. Gpp(NH)p and NaCl decreased the potencies of agonists at /sup 3/H-RX 781094 binding sites 3-22 fold. Antagonists blocked the inhibition of potassium-evoked tritium release from cortical slices preloaded with /sup 3/H-NE by exogenous NE with potencies similar to those observed in competition for specific /sup 3/H-RX 781094 binding sites. EEDQ, an irreversible ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic receptors and determine whether there was a receptor reserve for the inhibition of tritium release.

  13. Alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in the medial preoptic area are involved in the induction of sleep.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Velayudhan Mohan; Vetrivelan, Ramalingam; Mallick, Hruda Nanda

    2006-08-01

    This paper reviews the recent studies that led to the conclusion that the noradrenergic neurons projecting to the medial preoptic area (mPOA) are hypnogenic and that they mediate this action through alpha(1) adrenergic receptors. Microinjection of noradrenaline (NA) into the mPOA induced arousal. Studies using alpha(2) adrenergic drugs showed that the arousal induced by intrapreoptic injection of NA was due to its action on presynaptic alpha(2) adrenergic receptors. A combination of lesion and chemical stimulation techniques demonstrated that when NA acted on the postsynaptic alpha(1 )receptors in the mPOA, it induced sleep. Intrapreoptic injection of alpha(1) agonist, methoxamine could induce sleep, when the hypothermia, which was simultaneously produced, was behaviorally compensated for by the animal. Increased arousal produced by the destruction of noradrenergic fibers in the mPOA further confirmed the hypnogenic role of these fibers.

  14. Structure-guided development of dual β2 adrenergic/dopamine D2 receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Weichert, Dietmar; Stanek, Markus; Hübner, Harald; Gmeiner, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Aiming to discover dual-acting β2 adrenergic/dopamine D2 receptor ligands, a structure-guided approach for the evolution of GPCR agonists that address multiple targets was elaborated. Starting from GPCR crystal structures, we describe the design, synthesis and biological investigation of a defined set of compounds leading to the identification of the benzoxazinone (R)-3, which shows agonist properties at the adrenergic β2 receptor and substantial G protein-promoted activation at the D2 receptor. This directed approach yielded molecular probes with tuned dual activity. The congener desOH-3 devoid of the benzylic hydroxyl function was shown to be a β2 adrenergic antagonist/D2 receptor agonist with Ki values in the low nanomolar range. The compounds may serve as a promising starting point for the investigation and treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:27132867

  15. [Peripheral Nerve Injuries in Sports].

    PubMed

    Tettenborn, B; Mehnert, S; Reuter, I

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries due to sports are relatively rare but the exact incidence is not known due to a lack of epidemiological studies. Particular sports activities tend to cause certain peripheral nerve injuries including direct acute compression or stretching, repetitive compression and stretching over time, or another mechanism such as ischemia or laceration. These nerve lesions may be severe and delay or preclude the athlete's return to sports, especially in cases with delayed diagnosis. Repetitive and vigorous use or overuse makes the athlete vulnerable to disorders of the peripheral nerves, and sports equipment may cause compression of the nerves. Depending on etiology, the treatment is primarily conservative and includes physiotherapy, modification of movements and sports equipment, shoe inserts, splinting, antiphlogistic drugs, sometimes local administration of glucocorticoids or, lately, the use of extracorporeal shock waves. Most often, cessation of the offending physical activity is necessary. Surgery is only indicated in the rare cases of direct traumatic nerve injury or when symptoms are refractory to conservative therapy. Prognosis mainly depends on the etiology and the available options of modifying measures.This article is based on the publications "Reuter I, Mehnert S. Engpasssyndrome peripherer Nerven bei Sportlern". Akt Neurol 2012;39:292-308 and Sportverl Sportschad 2013;27:130-146. PMID:27607069

  16. Noninvasive imaging of peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Rangavajla, Gautam; Mokarram, Nassir; Masoodzadehgan, Nazanin; Pai, S Balakrishna; Bellamkonda, Ravi V

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of peripheral nerve imaging extend the capabilities of imaging modalities to assist in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with peripheral nerve maladies. Methods such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its derivative diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), ultrasound (US) and positron emission tomography (PET) are capable of assessing nerve structure and function following injury and relating the state of the nerve to electrophysiological and histological analysis. Of the imaging methods surveyed here, each offered unique and interesting advantages related to the field. MRI offered the opportunity to visualize immune activity on the injured nerve throughout the course of the regeneration process, and DTI offered numerical characterization of the injury and the ability to develop statistical bases for diagnosing injury. US extends imaging to the treatment phase by enabling more precise analgesic applications following surgery, and PET represents a novel method of assessing nerve injury through analysis of relative metabolism rates in injured and healthy tissue. Exciting new possibilities to enhance and extend the abilities of imaging methods are also discussed, including innovative contrast agents, some of which enable multimodal imaging approaches and present opportunities for treatment application. PMID:25766202

  17. Beta-adrenergic-regulated phosphorylation of the skeletal muscle Ca(V)1.1 channel in the fight-or-flight response.

    PubMed

    Emrick, Michelle A; Sadilek, Martin; Konoki, Keiichi; Catterall, William A

    2010-10-26

    Ca(V)1 channels initiate excitation-contraction coupling in skeletal and cardiac muscle. During the fight-or-flight response, epinephrine released by the adrenal medulla and norepinephrine released from sympathetic nerves increase muscle contractility by activation of the β-adrenergic receptor/cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway and up-regulation of Ca(V)1 channels in skeletal and cardiac muscle. Although the physiological mechanism of this pathway is well defined, the molecular mechanism and the sites of protein phosphorylation required for Ca(V)1 channel regulation are unknown. To identify the regulatory sites of phosphorylation under physiologically relevant conditions, Ca(V)1.1 channels were purified from skeletal muscle and sites of phosphorylation on the α1 subunit were identified by mass spectrometry. Two phosphorylation sites were identified in the proximal C-terminal domain, serine 1575 (S1575) and threonine 1579 (T1579), which are conserved in cardiac Ca(V)1.2 channels (S1700 and T1704, respectively). In vitro phosphorylation revealed that Ca(V)1.1-S1575 is a substrate for both cAMP-dependent protein kinase and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, whereas Ca(V)1.1-T1579 is a substrate for casein kinase 2. Treatment of rabbits with isoproterenol to activate β-adrenergic receptors increased phosphorylation of S1575 in skeletal muscle Ca(V)1.1 channels in vivo, and treatment with propranolol to inhibit β-adrenergic receptors reduced phosphorylation. As S1575 and T1579 in Ca(V)1.1 channels and their homologs in Ca(V)1.2 channels are located at a key regulatory interface between the distal and proximal C-terminal domains, it is likely that phosphorylation of these sites in skeletal and cardiac muscle is directly involved in calcium channel regulation in response to the sympathetic nervous system in the fight-or-flight response.

  18. Cloning and expression of a rat brain. alpha. sub 2B -adrenergic receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Flordellis, C.S.; Handy, D.E.; Bresnahan, M.R.; Zannis, V.I.; Gavras, H. )

    1991-02-01

    The authors isolated a cDNA clone (RB{alpha}{sub 2B}) and its homologous gene (GR{alpha}{sub 2B}) encoding an {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype by screening a rat brain cDNA and a rat genomic library. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that both clones code for a protein of 458 amino acids, which is 87% homologous to the human kidney glycosylated adrenergic receptor ({alpha}{sub 2}-C4) and divergent from the rat kidney nonglycosylated {alpha}{sub 2B} subtype (RNG{alpha}{sub 2}). Transient expression of RB{alpha}{sub 2B} in COS-7 cells resulted in high-affinity saturable binding for ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine and a high receptor number in the membranes of transfected COS-7 cells. Pharmacological analysis demonstrated that the expressed receptor bound adrenergic ligands with the following order of potency: rauwolscine {gt} yohimbine {gt} prazosin {gt} oxymetazoline, with a prazosin-to-oxymetazoline K{sub i} ratio of 0.34. This profile is characteristic of the {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype. Blotting analysis of rat brain mRNA gave one major and two minor mRNA species, and hybridization with strand-specific probes showed that both DNA strands of GR{alpha}{sub 2B} may be transcriptionally active. These findings show that rat brain expresses an {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptor subtype that is structurally different from the rat kidney nonglycosylated {alpha}{sub 2B} subtype. Thus the rat expresses at least two divergent {alpha}{sub 2B}-adrenergic receptors.

  19. Antihypertensive effect of alpha- and beta-adrenergic blockade in obese and lean hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Wofford, M R; Anderson, D C; Brown, C A; Jones, D W; Miller, M E; Hall, J E

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of the adrenergic system in mediating hypertension in obese and lean patients. Thirteen obese, hypertensive patients with a body mass index (BMI) > or =28 kg/m2 (obese) and nine lean patients with a BMI < or =25 kg/m2 (lean) were recruited. After a 1-week washout period, participants underwent daytime ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). Participants were then treated with the alpha-adrenergic antagonist doxazosin, titrating to 4 mg QHS in 1 week. In the next week, the beta-adrenergic antagonist atenolol was added at an initial dose of 25 mg/day and titrated to 50 mg/day within 1 week. One month after the addition of atenolol, all patients underwent a second ABPM session. There were no differences between the obese and lean subjects in baseline systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP), or mean arterial pressures (MAP) measured by office recording or ABPM. However, obese subjects had higher heart rates than lean subjects (87.5+/-2.4 v 76.8+/-4.9 beats/min). After 1 month of treatment with the adrenergic blockers, obese patients had a significantly lower SBP (130.0+/-2.5 v 138.9+/-2.1 mm Hg, P = .02) and MAP (99.6+/-2.3 v 107.0+/-1.5 mm Hg, P = .02) than lean patients. Obese patients also tended to have a lower DBP than lean patients (84.3+/-2.5 v 90.9+/-1.6 mm Hg, P = .057), but there was no significant difference in heart rate after 1 month of adrenergic blockade. These results indicate that blood pressure is more sensitive to adrenergic blockade in obese than in lean hypertensive patients and suggest that increased sympathetic activity may be an important factor in the maintenance of hypertension in obesity.

  20. Beta(2)-adrenergic receptor regulates cardiac fibroblast autophagy and collagen degradation.

    PubMed

    Aránguiz-Urroz, Pablo; Canales, Jimena; Copaja, Miguel; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Vicencio, Jose Miguel; Carrillo, Constanza; Lara, Hernán; Lavandero, Sergio; Díaz-Araya, Guillermo

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a physiological degradative process key to cell survival during nutrient deprivation, cell differentiation and development. It plays a major role in the turnover of damaged macromolecules and organelles, and it has been involved in the pathogenesis of different cardiovascular diseases. Activation of the adrenergic system is commonly associated with cardiac fibrosis and remodeling, and cardiac fibroblasts are key players in these processes. Whether adrenergic stimulation modulates cardiac fibroblast autophagy remains unexplored. In the present study, we aimed at this question and evaluated the effects of b(2)-adrenergic stimulation upon autophagy. Cultured adult rat cardiac fibroblasts were treated with agonists or antagonists of beta-adrenergic receptors (b-AR), and autophagy was assessed by electron microscopy, GFP-LC3 subcellular distribution, and immunowesternblot of endogenous LC3. The predominant expression of b(2)-ARs was determined and characterized by radioligand binding assays using [(3)H]dihydroalprenolol. Both, isoproterenol and norepinephrine (non-selective b-AR agonists), as well as salbutamol (selective b(2)-AR agonist) increased autophagic flux, and these effects were blocked by propanolol (b-AR antagonist), ICI-118,551 (selective b(2)-AR antagonist), 3-methyladenine but not by atenolol (selective b(1)-AR antagonist). The increase in autophagy was correlated with an enhanced degradation of collagen, and this effect was abrogated by the inhibition of autophagic flux. Overall, our data suggest that b(2)-adrenergic stimulation triggers autophagy in cardiac fibroblasts, and that this response could contribute to reduce the deleterious effects of high adrenergic stimulation upon cardiac fibrosis. PMID:20637865

  1. Palisade endings are present in canine extraocular muscles and have a cholinergic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Rungaldier, Stefanie; Pomikal, Christine; Streicher, Johannes; Blumer, Roland

    2009-11-20

    Classical proprioceptors, like Golgi tendon organs and muscle spindles are absent in the extraocular muscles (EOMs) of most mammals. Instead, a nerve end organ was detected in the EOMs of each species including sheep, cat, rabbit, rat, monkey, and human examined so far: the palisade ending. Until now no clear evidence appeared that palisade endings are also present in canine EOMs. Here, we analyzed dog EOMs by confocal laser scanning microscopy, 3D reconstruction, and transmission electron microscopy. In EOM wholemount preparations stained with antibodies against neurofilament and synaptophysin we could demonstrate typical palisade endings. Nerve fibers coming from the muscle extend into the tendon. There, the nerve fibers turn 180 degrees and return to branch into preterminal axons which establish nerve terminals around a single muscle fiber tip. Fine structural analysis revealed that each palisade ending in dog EOMs establish nerve terminals on the tendon. In some palisade endings we found nerve terminals contacting the muscle fiber as well. Such neuromuscular contacts have a basal lamina in the synaptic cleft. By using an antibody against choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) we proved that canine palisade endings are ChAT-immunoreactive. This study shows that palisade endings are present in canine EOMs. In line with prior findings in cat and monkey, palisade endings in dog have a cholinergic phenotype.

  2. Cranial Nerve Schwannomas: Diagnostic Imaging Approach.

    PubMed

    Skolnik, Aaron D; Loevner, Laurie A; Sampathu, Deepak M; Newman, Jason G; Lee, John Y; Bagley, Linda J; Learned, Kim O

    2016-01-01

    Schwannomas are benign nerve sheath tumors that may arise along the complex course of the cranial nerves (CNs), anywhere in the head and neck. Sound knowledge of the CN anatomy and imaging features of schwannomas is paramount for making the correct diagnosis. In this article, we review approaches to diagnosing CN schwannomas by describing their imaging characteristics and the associated clinical presentations. Relevant anatomic considerations are highlighted by using illustrative examples and key differential diagnoses categorized according to regions, which include the anterior skull base, orbit, cavernous sinus, basal cisterns, and neck. The clinical presentations associated with CN schwannomas vary and range from no symptoms to symptoms caused by mass effect or CN deficits. Individuals with the inherited disorder neurofibromatosis type 2 are predisposed to multiple schwannomas. When a lesion follows the course of a CN, the radiologist's roles are to confirm the imaging features of schwannoma and exclude appropriate differential considerations. The characteristic imaging features of CN schwannomas reflect their slow growth as benign neoplasms and include circumscribed margins, displacement of local structures, and smooth expansion of osseous foramina. These neoplasms exhibit various degrees of solid enhancement, often with internal cystic spaces on magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomographic (CT) images and heterogeneous high signal intensity specifically on T2-weighted MR images. Clinical and/or imaging evidence of end-organ compromise of the involved CN may exist and aid in the identification of the nerve of origin. With a detailed understanding of the course of the CNs, the diagnostic features of CN schwannomas, and the correlation between these data and the associated clinical presentations of these tumors, the radiologist can have a key role in the diagnosis of CN schwannomas and the treatment planning for affected patients. (©)RSNA, 2016. PMID

  3. Effect of Ginkgo biloba extract on beta-adrenergic receptors in different rat brain regions.

    PubMed

    Hadjiivanova, Ch I; Petkov, V V

    2002-08-01

    The effect of oral administration of Ginkgo biloba extract at a dose of 90 mg/kg for 7 consecutive days on rat brain beta-adrenergic receptors in the frontal cortex, hippocampus, striatum and hypothalamus was studied. Ginkgo biloba treatment induced a significant decrease in the density (B(max)) of beta-adrenoreceptors in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. It has been suggested that modulation of the beta-adrenergic system is implicated in the favourable effects of Ginkgo biloba extracts on learning and memory.

  4. Adrenergic regulation of cellular plasticity in brown, beige/brite and white adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Ramseyer, Vanesa D; Granneman, James G

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of brown adipose tissue in adult humans along with the recognition of adipocyte heterogeneity and plasticity of white fat depots has renewed the interest in targeting adipose tissue for therapeutic benefit. Adrenergic activation is a well-established means of recruiting catabolic adipocyte phenotypes in brown and white adipose tissues. In this article, we review mechanisms of brown adipocyte recruitment by the sympathetic nervous system and by direct β-adrenergic receptor activation. We highlight the distinct modes of brown adipocyte recruitment in brown, beige/brite, and white adipose tissues, UCP1-independent thermogenesis, and potential non-thermogenic, metabolically beneficial effects of brown adipocytes.

  5. Beta 2-adrenergic agonist as adjunct therapy to levodopa in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Alexander, G M; Schwartzman, R J; Nukes, T A; Grothusen, J R; Hooker, M D

    1994-08-01

    We studied the effect of the beta 2-adrenergic agonist albuterol on Parkinson's disease (PD) patients receiving chronic levodopa treatment. The albuterol-treated patients demonstrated reduced parkinsonian symptoms and an increased ability to tap their index finger between two points 20 cm apart, and were able to perform a "walk test" in 70% of their control time. Three patients currently on chronic albuterol therapy still show amelioration of their parkinsonian symptoms, and two have reduced their daily levodopa dose. This study suggests that beta 2-adrenergic agonists as adjunct therapy to levodopa may be beneficial in PD.

  6. Inhaled adrenergics and anticholinergics in obstructive lung disease: do they enhance mucociliary clearance?

    PubMed

    Restrepo, Ruben D

    2007-09-01

    Pulmonary mucociliary clearance is an essential defense mechanism against bacteria and particulate matter. Mucociliary dysfunction is an important feature of obstructive lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, cystic fibrosis, and bronchiectasis. This dysfunction in airway clearance is associated with accelerated loss of lung function in patients with obstructive lung disease. The involvement of the cholinergic and adrenergic neural pathways in the pathophysiology of mucus hypersecretion suggests the potential therapeutic role of bronchodilators as mucoactive agents. Although anticholinergics and adrenergic agonist bronchodilators have been routinely used, alone or in combination, to enhance mucociliary clearance in patients with obstructive lung disease, the existing evidence does not consistently show clinical effectiveness.

  7. Beta-adrenergic stimulation of phagocytosis in the unicellular eukaryote Paramecium aurelia.

    PubMed

    Wyroba, E

    1989-08-01

    Bete-adrenergic agonists isoproterenol and norepinephrine enhanced phagocytosis in Paramecium. Stimulation was stereospecific, dose-dependent and inhibited by the beta-agonists propranolol and alprenolol. Phorbol ester and forskolin potentiated the stimulatory effect of catecholamines on Paramecium phagocytosis. The dansyl analogue of propranolol (DAPN) was used for fluorescent visualization of the beta-adrenergic receptor sites in Paramecium which have been found to be localized at the cell membrane and within the membrane of the nascent digestive vacuoles. The appearance of the characteristic fluorescent pattern has been blocked by 1-propranolol.

  8. β-Adrenergic response is counteracted by extremely-low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields in beating cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Cornacchione, Marisa; Pellegrini, Manuela; Fassina, Lorenzo; Mognaschi, Maria Evelina; Di Siena, Sara; Gimmelli, Roberto; Ambrosino, Paolo; Soldovieri, Maria Virginia; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Gianfrilli, Daniele; Isidori, Andrea M; Lenzi, Andrea; Naro, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    Proper β-adrenergic signaling is indispensable for modulating heart frequency. Studies on extremely-low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field (ELF-PEMF) effects in the heart beat function are contradictory and no definitive conclusions were obtained so far. To investigate the interplay between ELF-PEMF exposure and β-adrenergic signaling, cultures of primary murine neonatal cardiomyocytes and of sinoatrial node were exposed to ELF-PEMF and short and long-term effects were evaluated. The ELF-PEMF generated a variable magnetic induction field of 0-6mT at a frequency of 75Hz. Exposure to 3mT ELF-PEMF induced a decrease of contraction rate, Ca(2+) transients, contraction force, and energy consumption both under basal conditions and after β-adrenergic stimulation in neonatal cardiomyocytes. ELF-PEMF exposure inhibited β-adrenergic response in sinoatrial node (SAN) region. ELF-PEMF specifically modulated β2 adrenergic receptor response and the exposure did not modify the increase of contraction rate after adenylate cyclase stimulation by forskolin. In HEK293T cells transfected with β1 or β2 adrenergic receptors, ELF-PEMF exposure induced a rapid and selective internalization of β2 adrenergic receptor. The β-adrenergic signaling, was reduced trough Gi protein by ELF-PEMF exposure since the phosphorylation level of phospholamban and the PI3K pathway were impaired after isoproterenol stimulation in neonatal cardiomyocytes. Long term effects of ELF-PEMF exposure were assessed in cultures of isolated cardiomyocytes. ELF-PEMF counteracts cell size increase, the generation of binucleated of cardiomyocytes and prevents the up-regulation of hypertrophic markers after β-adrenergic stimulation, indicating an inhibition of cell growth and maturation. These data show that short and long term exposure to ELF-PEMF induces a reduction of cardiac β-adrenergic response at molecular, functional and adaptative levels.

  9. Postsynaptic alpha-2 adrenergic receptors are critical for the antidepressant-like effects of desipramine on behavior.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han-Ting; Whisler, Lisa R; Huang, Ying; Xiang, Yang; O'Donnell, James M

    2009-03-01

    The antidepressant desipramine inhibits the reuptake of norepinephrine (NE), leading to activation of both pre- and postsynaptic adrenergic receptors, including alpha-1, alpha-2, beta-1, and beta-2 subtypes. However, it is not clear which adrenergic receptors are involved in mediating its antidepressant effects. Treatment of mice with desipramine (20 mg/kg, i.p.) produced an antidepressant-like effect, as evidenced by decreased immobility in the forced-swim test; this was antagonized by pretreatment with the alpha-2 adrenergic antagonist idazoxan (0.1-2.5 mg/kg, i.p.). Similarly, idazoxan, administered peripherally (0.5-2.5 mg/kg, i.p.) or centrally (1-10 microg, i.c.v.), antagonized the antidepressant-like effect of desipramine in rats responding under a differential-reinforcement-of-low-rate (DRL) 72-s schedule, ie, decreased response rate and increased reinforcement rate. By contrast, pretreatment with the beta-adrenergic antagonists propranolol and CGP-12177 or the alpha-1 adrenergic antagonist prazosin did not alter the antidepressant-like effect of desipramine on DRL behavior. The lack of involvement of beta-adrenergic receptors in mediating the behavioral effects of desipramine was confirmed using knockout lines. In the forced-swim test, the desipramine-induced decrease in immobility was not altered in mice deficient in beta-1, beta-2, or both beta-1 and beta-2 adrenergic receptors. In addition, desipramine (3-30 mg/kg) produced an antidepressant-like effect on behavior under a DRL 36-s schedule in mice deficient in both beta-1 and beta-2 adrenergic receptors. As antagonism of presynaptic alpha-2 adrenergic receptors facilitates NE release, which potentiates the effects of desipramine, the present results suggest that postsynaptic alpha-2 adrenergic receptors play an important role in its antidepressant effects.

  10. β-Adrenergic response is counteracted by extremely-low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic fields in beating cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Cornacchione, Marisa; Pellegrini, Manuela; Fassina, Lorenzo; Mognaschi, Maria Evelina; Di Siena, Sara; Gimmelli, Roberto; Ambrosino, Paolo; Soldovieri, Maria Virginia; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Gianfrilli, Daniele; Isidori, Andrea M; Lenzi, Andrea; Naro, Fabio

    2016-09-01

    Proper β-adrenergic signaling is indispensable for modulating heart frequency. Studies on extremely-low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field (ELF-PEMF) effects in the heart beat function are contradictory and no definitive conclusions were obtained so far. To investigate the interplay between ELF-PEMF exposure and β-adrenergic signaling, cultures of primary murine neonatal cardiomyocytes and of sinoatrial node were exposed to ELF-PEMF and short and long-term effects were evaluated. The ELF-PEMF generated a variable magnetic induction field of 0-6mT at a frequency of 75Hz. Exposure to 3mT ELF-PEMF induced a decrease of contraction rate, Ca(2+) transients, contraction force, and energy consumption both under basal conditions and after β-adrenergic stimulation in neonatal cardiomyocytes. ELF-PEMF exposure inhibited β-adrenergic response in sinoatrial node (SAN) region. ELF-PEMF specifically modulated β2 adrenergic receptor response and the exposure did not modify the increase of contraction rate after adenylate cyclase stimulation by forskolin. In HEK293T cells transfected with β1 or β2 adrenergic receptors, ELF-PEMF exposure induced a rapid and selective internalization of β2 adrenergic receptor. The β-adrenergic signaling, was reduced trough Gi protein by ELF-PEMF exposure since the phosphorylation level of phospholamban and the PI3K pathway were impaired after isoproterenol stimulation in neonatal cardiomyocytes. Long term effects of ELF-PEMF exposure were assessed in cultures of isolated cardiomyocytes. ELF-PEMF counteracts cell size increase, the generation of binucleated of cardiomyocytes and prevents the up-regulation of hypertrophic markers after β-adrenergic stimulation, indicating an inhibition of cell growth and maturation. These data show that short and long term exposure to ELF-PEMF induces a reduction of cardiac β-adrenergic response at molecular, functional and adaptative levels. PMID:27418252

  11. Regulation of β-adrenergic control of heart rate by GTP-cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) and tetrahydrobiopterin

    PubMed Central

    Adlam, David; Herring, Neil; Douglas, Gillian; De Bono, Joseph P.; Li, Dan; Danson, Edward J.; Tatham, Amy; Lu, Cheih-Ju; Jennings, Katie A.; Cragg, Stephanie J.; Casadei, Barbara; Paterson, David J.; Channon, Keith M.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Clinical markers of cardiac autonomic function, such as heart rate and response to exercise, are important predictors of cardiovascular risk. Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is a required cofactor for enzymes with roles in cardiac autonomic function, including tyrosine hydroxylase and nitric oxide synthase. Synthesis of BH4 is regulated by GTP cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH), encoded by GCH1. Recent clinical studies report associations between GCH1 variants and increased heart rate, but the mechanistic importance of GCH1 and BH4 in autonomic function remains unclear. We investigate the effect of BH4 deficiency on the autonomic regulation of heart rate in the hph-1 mouse model of BH4 deficiency. Methods and results In the hph-1 mouse, reduced cardiac GCH1 expression, GTPCH enzymatic activity, and BH4 were associated with increased resting heart rate; blood pressure was not different. Exercise training decreased resting heart rate, but hph-1 mice retained a relative tachycardia. Vagal nerve stimulation in vitro induced bradycardia equally in hph-1 and wild-type mice both before and after exercise training. Direct atrial responses to carbamylcholine were equal. In contrast, propranolol treatment normalized the resting tachycardia in vivo. Stellate ganglion stimulation and isoproterenol but not forskolin application in vitro induced a greater tachycardic response in hph-1 mice. β1-adrenoceptor protein was increased as was the cAMP response to isoproterenol stimulation. Conclusion Reduced GCH1 expression and BH4 deficiency cause tachycardia through enhanced β-adrenergic sensitivity, with no effect on vagal function. GCH1 expression and BH4 are novel determinants of cardiac autonomic regulation that may have important roles in cardiovascular pathophysiology. PMID:22241166

  12. Inhibition of α-adrenergic tone disturbs the distribution of blood flow in the exercising human limb.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Ilkka; Wendelin-Saarenhovi, Maria; Kaskinoro, Kimmo; Knuuti, Juhani; Scheinin, Mika; Kalliokoski, Kari K

    2013-07-15

    The role of neuronal regulation of human cardiovascular function remains incompletely elucidated, especially during exercise. Here we, by positron emission tomography, monitored tissue-specific blood flow (BF) changes in nine healthy young men during femoral arterial infusions of norepinephrine (NE) and phentolamine. At rest, the α-adrenoceptor agonist NE reduced BF by ~40%, similarly in muscles (from 3.2 ± 1.9 to 1.4 ± 0.3 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1) in quadriceps femoris muscle), bone (from 1.1 ± 0.4 to 0.5 ± 0.2 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1)) and adipose tissue (AT) (from 1.2 ± 0.7 to 0.7 ± 0.3 ml·min(-1)·100 g(-1)). During exercise, NE reduced exercising muscle BF by ~16%. BF in AT was reduced similarly as rest. The α-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine increased BF similarly in the different muscles and other tissues of the limb at rest. During exercise, BF in inactive muscle was increased 3.4-fold by phentolamine compared with exercise without drug, but BF in exercising muscles was not influenced. Bone and AT (P = 0.055) BF were also increased by phentolamine in the exercise condition. NE increased and phentolamine decreased oxygen extraction in the limb during exercise. We conclude that inhibition of α-adrenergic tone markedly disturbs the distribution of BF and oxygen extraction in the exercising human limb by increasing BF especially around inactive muscle fibers. Moreover, although marked functional sympatholysis also occurs during exercise, the arterial NE infusion that mimics the exaggerated sympathetic nerve activity commonly seen in patients with cardiovascular disease was still capable of directly limiting BF in the exercising leg muscles.

  13. Electrophysiological evaluation of nerve function in inferior alveolar nerve injury: relationship between nerve action potentials and histomorphometric observations.

    PubMed

    Murayama, M; Sasaki, K; Shibahara, T

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to improve the accuracy of diagnosis of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) injury by determining degrees of nerve disturbance using the sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) and sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV). Crush and partial and complete nerve amputation injuries were applied to the IAN of rabbits, then SNAPs and histomorphometric observations were recorded at 1, 5, and 10 weeks. For crush injury, most nerves were smaller in diameter at 5 weeks than at 1 week, however after 10 weeks, extensive nerve regeneration was observed. The SNAP showed a decrease in SCV at weeks 1 and 5, followed by an increase at week 10. For partial nerve amputation, small to medium-sized nerve fibres were observed at weeks 1 and 5, then larger nerves were seen at week 10. Minimal changes in SCV were observed at weeks 1 and 5, however SCV increased at week 10. For complete nerve amputation, nerve fibres were sparse at week 1, but gradual nerve regeneration was observed at weeks 5 and 10. SNAPs were detectable from week 10, however the SCV was extremely low. This study showed SCV to be an effective factor in the evaluation of nerve injury and regeneration. PMID:26433750

  14. Occurrence, distribution and origin of peptide-containing nerves of guinea-pig and rat male genitalia and the effects of denervation on sperm characteristics.

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, T L; Hodson, N P; Blank, M A; Watson, P F; Mulderry, P K; Bishop, A E; Gu, J; Bloom, S R; Polak, J M

    1986-01-01

    A systematic immunohistochemical and radio-immunological survey of the occurrence, distribution and origin of the peptidergic nerve supply in guinea-pig and rat male genitalia is presented. Neuropeptide Y (NPY), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI), substance P and CGRP were detected in the genital organs of both species. The densities and distribution patterns of the peptidergic nerves were compared with those of the adrenergic nerves, as revealed by antibodies raised against dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (D beta H) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), and the general neuronal component, as revealed by antibodies raised against neurofilament proteins (NF). Bilateral transection of the hypogastric nerves, in the guinea-pig, resulted in a decrease of substance P-containing nerves in the vas deferens and of NPY-, PHI- and VIP-containing nerves in the seminal vesicle. Unilateral disconnection of the pelvic nerves caused a decrease of VIP, PHI, substance P and CGRP nerve supply in the ipsilateral vas deferens and cauda epididymidis in the guinea-pig. A marked reduction of noradrenergic and NPY-containing nerves was observed in the vas deferens and sexual accessory glands of rats, chemically sympathectomised by chronic injection of low doses of guanethidine. Conversely, increase of substance P and CGRP immunoreactivities were observed, particularly in the vas deferens. After guanethidine, the cauda epididymidis and vas deferens were distended with spermatozoa, suggesting paralysis of the ducts. Spermatozoa had a decreased percentage of attached cytoplasmic droplets, indicating prolonged retention in the ducts. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:3693101

  15. Hyposensitivity to nerve stimulation in portal hypertensive rats: role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Sieber, C C; Sumanovski, L T; Moll-Kaufmann, C; Stalder, G A

    1997-11-01

    Portal hypertension goes along with vascular hyporeactivity, partly mediated by nitric oxide (NO). Interactions between the adrenergic nervous system and NO in portal hypertension are undetermined. We tested (1) whether superior mesenteric arterial beds of portal hypertensive rats have an altered sensitivity to periarterial nerve stimulation (PNS) and (2) the role of NO in modulating nerve-stimulated responses. Vasopressor responses to PNS (Hz, 2-32) were similar in preparations of partial portal vein-ligated (PVL, n = 12) and control (CON, n = 12) rats (60.0 +/- 6.7 and 47.8 +/- 6.1 CmH2O respectively) for 24 Hz (NS), but sensitivity of vessels of portal hypertensive animals displayed a significant rightward shift [Hz needed for 50% of maximal response (HZ50) being 15.5 +/- 0.4 and 12.9 +/- 0.6 for PVL and CON respectively, P < 0.001]. NO formation inhibition by N omega-nitro-L-arginine (10(-4) mol L-1) significantly increased responses to PNS (P < 0.05), the absolute values for 24 Hz being 101.4 +/- 11.7 cmH2O for PVL (n = 8) and 86.4 +/- 11.4 cmH2O for CON (n = 7) (NS). NO formation inhibition reversed the hyposensitivity in preparations of PVL, Hz50 being 13.9 +/- 0.5 and 13.2 +/- 0.2 for PVL and CON respectively (NS). Adrenergic receptor antagonism with prazosin (10(-7) mol L-1) and yohimbine (10(-6) mol L-1) inhibited PNS-mediated vasopressor reactivity (n = 6 per group, P < 0.001), confirming the nervous origin of vasoconstrictor responses. It is concluded that (1) portal hypertension goes along with a significant hyposensitivity to PNS and (2) this hyposensitivity is reversed by NO-formation inhibition PMID:9395785

  16. Hyposensitivity to nerve stimulation in portal hypertensive rats: role of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Sieber, C C; Sumanovski, L T; Moll-Kaufmann, C; Stalder, G A

    1997-11-01

    Portal hypertension goes along with vascular hyporeactivity, partly mediated by nitric oxide (NO). Interactions between the adrenergic nervous system and NO in portal hypertension are undetermined. We tested (1) whether superior mesenteric arterial beds of portal hypertensive rats have an altered sensitivity to periarterial nerve stimulation (PNS) and (2) the role of NO in modulating nerve-stimulated responses. Vasopressor responses to PNS (Hz, 2-32) were similar in preparations of partial portal vein-ligated (PVL, n = 12) and control (CON, n = 12) rats (60.0 +/- 6.7 and 47.8 +/- 6.1 CmH2O respectively) for 24 Hz (NS), but sensitivity of vessels of portal hypertensive animals displayed a significant rightward shift [Hz needed for 50% of maximal response (HZ50) being 15.5 +/- 0.4 and 12.9 +/- 0.6 for PVL and CON respectively, P < 0.001]. NO formation inhibition by N omega-nitro-L-arginine (10(-4) mol L-1) significantly increased responses to PNS (P < 0.05), the absolute values for 24 Hz being 101.4 +/- 11.7 cmH2O for PVL (n = 8) and 86.4 +/- 11.4 cmH2O for CON (n = 7) (NS). NO formation inhibition reversed the hyposensitivity in preparations of PVL, Hz50 being 13.9 +/- 0.5 and 13.2 +/- 0.2 for PVL and CON respectively (NS). Adrenergic receptor antagonism with prazosin (10(-7) mol L-1) and yohimbine (10(-6) mol L-1) inhibited PNS-mediated vasopressor reactivity (n = 6 per group, P < 0.001), confirming the nervous origin of vasoconstrictor responses. It is concluded that (1) portal hypertension goes along with a significant hyposensitivity to PNS and (2) this hyposensitivity is reversed by NO-formation inhibition

  17. Electrical stimulation accelerates axonal and functional peripheral nerve regeneration across long gaps.

    PubMed

    Haastert-Talini, Kirsten; Schmitte, Ruth; Korte, Nele; Klode, Dorothee; Ratzka, Andreas; Grothe, Claudia

    2011-04-01

    Short-term low-frequency electrical stimulation (ESTIM) of proximal peripheral nerve stumps prior to end-to-end coaptation or tubular bridging of small distances has been reported to increase preferential motor reinnervation and functional motor recovery in animal models and human patients undergoing carpal tunnel release surgery. We investigated the effects of ESTIM on regeneration across rat sciatic nerve gaps, which exceed distances that allow spontaneous regeneration. Three different reconstruction approaches were combined with ESTIM in the experimental groups. Nerve gaps (13 mm) were bridged using (I) nerve autotransplantation, (II) transplantation of differentially filled silicone tubes, or (III) transplantation of tubular grafts containing fibroblast growth factor-2 overexpressing Schwann cells (SCs) for gene therapy. The regeneration outcome was followed for up to 8 weeks, and functionally as well as histomorphometrically analyzed in comparison to non-stimulated control groups. Combining ESTIM with nerve autotransplantation significantly increased the nerve fiber density in the regenerated nerve, and the grade of functional recovery as detected by electrodiagnostic recordings from the gastrocnemius muscle. The combination of ESTIM with transplantation of naïve SCs increased the regeneration of gap-bridging nerve tissue. Although macroscopic tissue regeneration was not further improved after combining ESTIM with FGF-2(21/23-kD) gene therapy, the latter resulted in a high rate of regenerated nerves that functionally reconnected to the target muscle. Based on our results, brief ESTIM shows high potential to accelerate axonal as well as functional (motor and sensory) outcomes in the clinical setting of peripheral nerve gap reconstruction in human patients. PMID:21265597

  18. The Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor in the Rabbit Heart.

    PubMed

    Thomas, R Croft; Cowley, Patrick M; Singh, Abhishek; Myagmar, Bat-Erdene; Swigart, Philip M; Baker, Anthony J; Simpson, Paul C

    2016-01-01

    The alpha-1A-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtype is associated with cardioprotective signaling in the mouse and human heart. The rabbit is useful for cardiac disease modeling, but data on the alpha-1A in the rabbit heart are limited. Our objective was to test for expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart. By quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR) on mRNA from ventricular myocardium of adult male New Zealand White rabbits, the alpha-1B was 99% of total alpha-1-AR mRNA, with <1% alpha-1A and alpha-1D, whereas alpha-1A mRNA was over 50% of total in brain and liver. Saturation radioligand binding identified ~4 fmol total alpha-1-ARs per mg myocardial protein, with 17% alpha-1A by competition with the selective antagonist 5-methylurapidil. The alpha-1D was not detected by competition with BMY-7378, indicating that 83% of alpha-1-ARs were alpha-1B. In isolated left ventricle and right ventricle, the selective alpha-1A agonist A61603 stimulated a negative inotropic effect, versus a positive inotropic effect with the nonselective alpha-1-agonist phenylephrine and the beta-agonist isoproterenol. Blood pressure assay in conscious rabbits using an indwelling aortic telemeter showed that A61603 by bolus intravenous dosing increased mean arterial pressure by 20 mm Hg at 0.14 μg/kg, 10-fold lower than norepinephrine, and chronic A61603 infusion by iPRECIO programmable micro Infusion pump did not increase BP at 22 μg/kg/d. A myocardial slice model useful in human myocardium and an anthracycline cardiotoxicity model useful in mouse were both problematic in rabbit. We conclude that alpha-1A mRNA is very low in rabbit heart, but the receptor is present by binding and mediates a negative inotropic response. Expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart differ from mouse and human, but the vasopressor response is similar to mouse. PMID:27258143

  19. The Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor in the Rabbit Heart

    PubMed Central

    Myagmar, Bat-Erdene; Swigart, Philip M.; Baker, Anthony J.; Simpson, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    The alpha-1A-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtype is associated with cardioprotective signaling in the mouse and human heart. The rabbit is useful for cardiac disease modeling, but data on the alpha-1A in the rabbit heart are limited. Our objective was to test for expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart. By quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR) on mRNA from ventricular myocardium of adult male New Zealand White rabbits, the alpha-1B was 99% of total alpha-1-AR mRNA, with <1% alpha-1A and alpha-1D, whereas alpha-1A mRNA was over 50% of total in brain and liver. Saturation radioligand binding identified ~4 fmol total alpha-1-ARs per mg myocardial protein, with 17% alpha-1A by competition with the selective antagonist 5-methylurapidil. The alpha-1D was not detected by competition with BMY-7378, indicating that 83% of alpha-1-ARs were alpha-1B. In isolated left ventricle and right ventricle, the selective alpha-1A agonist A61603 stimulated a negative inotropic effect, versus a positive inotropic effect with the nonselective alpha-1-agonist phenylephrine and the beta-agonist isoproterenol. Blood pressure assay in conscious rabbits using an indwelling aortic telemeter showed that A61603 by bolus intravenous dosing increased mean arterial pressure by 20 mm Hg at 0.14 μg/kg, 10-fold lower than norepinephrine, and chronic A61603 infusion by iPRECIO programmable micro Infusion pump did not increase BP at 22 μg/kg/d. A myocardial slice model useful in human myocardium and an anthracycline cardiotoxicity model useful in mouse were both problematic in rabbit. We conclude that alpha-1A mRNA is very low in rabbit heart, but the receptor is present by binding and mediates a negative inotropic response. Expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart differ from mouse and human, but the vasopressor response is similar to mouse. PMID:27258143

  20. Topotecan Delivery to the Optic Nerve after Ophthalmic Artery Chemosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Taich, Paula; Requejo, Flavio; Asprea, Marcelo; Sgroi, Mariana; Gobin, Pierre; Abramson, David H.; Chantada, Guillermo; Schaiquevich, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Extraocular retinoblastoma is a major challenge worldwide, especially in developing countries. Current treatment involves the administration of systemic chemotherapy combined with radiation, but there is a clear need for improvement of chemotherapy bioavailability in the optic nerve. Our aim was to study the ophthalmic artery chemosurgery (OAC) local route for drug delivery assessing ocular and optic nerve exposure to chemotherapy and to compare it to exposure after intravenous infusion (IV) of the same dose in an animal model. Topotecan was used as a prototype drug that is active in retinoblastoma and based on the extensive knowledge of its pharmacokinetics in preclinical and clinical settings. Five Landrace pigs received 4mg of topotecan via OAC as performed in retinoblastoma patients. At the end of the infusion, the eyes were enucleated, the optic nerve and retina were dissected, and the vitreous and plasma were separated. After recovery and a wash-out period, the animals received a 30-min IV infusion of topotecan (4 mg). The remaining eye was enucleated and tissues and fluids were separated. All samples were stored until quantitation using HPLC. A significantly higher concentration of topotecan in the optic nerve, vitreous, and retina was obtained in eyes after OAC compared to IV infusion (p<0.05). The median (range) ratio between topotecan concentration attained after OAC to IV infusion in the optic nerve, retina and vitreous was 84(54–668), 143(49–200) and 246(56–687), respectively. However, topotecan systemic exposure after OAC and IV infusion remained comparable (p>0.05). The median optic nerve-to-plasma ratio after OAC and IV was 44 and 0.35, respectively. Topotecan OAC delivery attained an 80-fold higher concentration in the optic nerve compared to the systemic infusion of the same dose with similar plasma concentrations in a swine model. Patients with retinoblastoma extension into the optic nerve may benefit from OAC for tumor burden by increased

  1. Cranial Nerves IX, X, XI, and XII

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Richard D.

    2010-01-01

    This article concludes the series on cranial nerves, with review of the final four (IX–XII). To summarize briefly, the most important and common syndrome caused by a disorder of the glossopharyngeal nerve (craniel nerve IX) is glossopharyngeal neuralgia. Also, swallowing function occasionally is compromised in a rare but disabling form of tardive dyskinesia called tardive dystonia, because the upper motor portion of the glossopharyngel nerve projects to the basal ganglia and can be affected by lesions in the basal ganglia. Vagus nerve funtion (craniel nerve X) can be compromised in schizophrenia, bulimia, obesity, and major depression. A cervical lesion to the nerve roots of the spinal accessory nerve (craniel nerve XI) can cause a cervical dystonia, which sometimes is misdiagnosed as a dyskinesia related to neuroleptic use. Finally, unilateral hypoglossal (craniel nerve XII) nerve palsy is one of the most common mononeuropathies caused by brain metastases. Supranuclear lesions of cranial nerve XII are involved in pseudobulbar palsy and ALS, and lower motor neuron lesions of cranial nerve XII can also be present in bulbar palsy and in ALS patients who also have lower motor neuron involvement. This article reviews these and other syndromes related to cranial nerves IX through XII that might be seen by psychiatry. PMID:20532157

  2. Histamine H3-Receptor Signaling in Cardiac Sympathetic Nerves: Identification of a Novel MAPK-PLA2-COX-PGE2-EP3R Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Levi, Roberto; Seyedi, Nahid; Schaefer, Ulrich; Estephan, Rima; Mackins, Christina J.; Tyler, Eleanor; Silver, Randi B.

    2007-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the histamine H3-receptor (H3R)-mediated attenuation of norepinephrine (NE) exocytosis from cardiac sympathetic nerves results not only from a Gαi-mediated inhibition of the adenylyl cyclase-cAMP-PKA pathway, but also from a Gβγi-mediated activation of the MAPK-PLA2 cascade, culminating in formation of an arachidonate metabolite with anti-exocytotic characteristics (e.g., PGE2). We report in Langendorff-perfused guinea-pig hearts and isolated sympathetic nerve endings (cardiac synaptosomes), H3R-mediated attenuation of K+-induced NE exocytosis was prevented by MAPK and PLA2 inhibitors, and by cyclooxygenase and EP3-receptor (EP3R) antagonists. Moreover, H3R activation resulted in MAPK phosphorylation in H3R-transfected SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, and in PLA2 activation and PGE2 production in cardiac synaptosomes; H3R-induced MAPK phosphorylation was prevented by an anti-βγ peptide. Synergism between H3R and EP3R agonists (i.e., imetit and sulprostone, respectively) suggested PGE2 may be a downstream effector of the anti-exocytotic effect of H3R activation. Furthermore, the anti-exocytotic effect of imetit and sulprostone was potentiated by the N-type Ca2+-channel antagonist ω-conotoxin GVIA, and prevented by an anti-Gβγ peptide. Our findings suggest an EP3R Gβγi-induced decrease in Ca2+ influx through N-type Ca2+-channels is involved in PGE2/EP3R-mediated attenuation of NE exocytosis elicited by H3R activation. Conceivably, activation of the Gβγi subunit of H3R and EP3R may also inhibit Ca2+ entry directly, independent of MAPK intervention. As heart failure, myocardial ischemia and arrhythmic dysfunction are associated with excessive local NE release, attenuation of NE release by H3R activation is cardioprotective. Thus, the uncovering of a novel H3R signaling pathway may ultimately bear therapeutic significance in hyper-adrenergic states. PMID:17266940

  3. Rehabilitation of the trigeminal nerve

    PubMed Central

    Iro, Heinrich; Bumm, Klaus; Waldfahrer, Frank

    2005-01-01

    When it comes to restoring impaired neural function by means of surgical reconstruction, sensory nerves have always been in the role of the neglected child when compared with motor nerves. Especially in the head and neck area, with its either sensory, motor or mixed cranial nerves, an impaired sensory function can cause severe medical conditions. When performing surgery in the head and neck area, sustaining neural function must not only be highest priority for motor but also for sensory nerves. In cases with obvious neural damage to sensory nerves, an immediate neural repair, if necessary with neural interposition grafts, is desirable. Also in cases with traumatic trigeminal damage, an immediate neural repair ought to be considered, especially since reconstructive measures at a later time mostly require for interposition grafts. In terms of the trigeminal neuralgia, commonly thought to arise from neurovascular brainstem compression, a pharmaceutical treatment is considered as the state of the art in terms of conservative therapy. A neurovascular decompression of the trigeminal root can be an alternative in some cases when surgical treatment is sought after. Besides the above mentioned therapeutic options, alternative treatments are available. PMID:22073060

  4. Retinal and optic nerve diseases.

    PubMed

    Margalit, Eyal; Sadda, Srinivas R

    2003-11-01

    A variety of disease processes can affect the retina and/or the optic nerve, including vascular or ischemic disease, inflammatory or infectious disease, and degenerative disease. These disease processes may selectively damage certain parts of the retina or optic nerve, and the specific areas that are damaged may have implications for the design of potential therapeutic visual prosthetic devices. Outer retinal diseases include age-related macular degeneration, pathologic myopia, and retinitis pigmentosa. Although the retinal photoreceptors may be lost, the inner retina is relatively well-preserved in these diseases and may be a target for retinal prosthetic devices. Inner retinal diseases include retinal vascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinal venous occlusive disease, and retinopathy of prematurity. Other retinal diseases such as ocular infections (retinitis, endophthalmitis) may affect all retinal layers. Because the inner retinal cells, including the retinal ganglion cells, may be destroyed in these diseases (inner retinal or whole retinal), prosthetic devices that stimulate the inner retina may not be effective. Common optic nerve diseases include glaucoma, optic neuritis, and ischemic optic neuropathy. Because the ganglion cell nerve fibers themselves are damaged, visual prosthetics for these diseases will need to target more distal portions of the visual pathway, such as the visual cortex. Clearly, a sound understanding of retinal and optic nerve disease pathophysiology is critical for designing and choosing the optimal visual prosthetic device.

  5. Changes in the Distribution of Periodontal Nerve Fibers during Dentition Transition in the Cat.

    PubMed

    Miki, Koji; Honma, Shiho; Ebara, Satomi; Kumamoto, Kenzo; Murakami, Shinya; Wakisaka, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    The periodontal ligament has a rich sensory nerve supply which originates from the trigeminal ganglion and trigeminal mesencephalic nucleus. Although various types of mechanoreceptors have been reported in the periodontal ligament, the Ruffini ending is an essential one. It is unknown whether the distribution of periodontal nerve fibers in deciduous teeth is identical to that in permanent teeth or not. Moreover, morphological changes in the distribution of periodontal nerve fibers during resorption of deciduous teeth and eruption of successional permanent teeth in diphyodont animals have not been reported in detail. Therefore, in this study, we examined changes in the distribution of periodontal nerve fibers in the cat during changes in dentition (i.e., deciduous, mixed and permanent dentition) by immunohistochemistry of protein gene product 9.5. During deciduous dentition, periodontal nerve fibers were concentrated at the apical portion, and sparsely distributed in the periodontal ligament of deciduous molars. During mixed dentition, the periodontal nerve fibers of deciduous molars showed degenerative profiles during resorption. In permanent dentition, the periodontal nerve fibers of permanent premolars, the successors of deciduous molars, increased in number. Similar to permanent premolars, the periodontal nerve fibers of permanent molars, having no predecessors, increased in number, and were densely present in the apical portion. The present results indicate that the distribution of periodontal nerve fibers in deciduous dentition is almost identical to that in permanent dentition although the number of periodontal nerve fibers in deciduous dentition was low. The sparse distribution of periodontal nerve fibers in deciduous dentition agrees with clinical evidence that children are less sensitive to tooth stimulation than adults.

  6. Five Roots Pattern of Median Nerve Formation.

    PubMed

    Natsis, Konstantinos; Paraskevas, George; Tzika, Maria

    2016-01-01

    An unusual combination of median nerve's variations has been encountered in a male cadaver during routine educational dissection. In particular, the median nerve was formed by five roots; three roots originated from the lateral cord of the brachial plexus joined individually the median nerve's medial root. The latter (fourth) root was united with the lateral (fifth) root of the median nerve forming the median nerve distally in the upper arm and not the axilla as usually. In addition, the median nerve was situated medial to the brachial artery. We review comprehensively the relevant variants, their embryologic development and their potential clinical applications. PMID:27131354

  7. Bioactive poly(L-lactic acid) conduits seeded with Schwann cells for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Evans, Gregory R D; Brandt, Keith; Katz, Steven; Chauvin, Priscilla; Otto, Lisa; Bogle, Melissa; Wang, Bao; Meszlenyi, Rudolph K; Lu, Lichun; Mikos, Antonios G; Patrick, Charles W

    2002-02-01

    This study attempted to enhance the efficacy of peripheral nerve regeneration using our previously tested poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) conduits by incorporating them with allogeneic Schwann cells (SCs). The SCs were harvested, cultured to obtain confluent monolayers and two concentrations (1 x 10(4) and 1 x 10(6) SC/ml) were combined with a collagen matrix (Vitrogen) and injected into the PLLA conduits. The conduits were then implanted into a 12 mm right sciatic nerve defect in rats. Three control groups were used: isografts, PLLA conduits filled with collagen alone and empty silicone tubes. The sciatic functional index (SFI) was calculated monthly through four months. At the end of second and fourth months, the gastrocnemius muscle was harvested and weighed for comparison and the graft conduit and distal nerve were harvested for histomorphologic analysis. The mean SFI demonstrated no group differences from isograft control. By four months, there was no significant difference in gastrocnemius muscle weight between the experimental groups compared to isograft controls. At four months, the distal nerve demonstrated a statistically lower number of axons mm2 for the high and low SC density groups and collagen control. The nerve fiber density was significantly lower in all of the groups compared to isograft controls by four months. The development of a "bioactive" nerve conduit using tissue engineering to replace autogenous nerve grafts offers a potential approach to improved patient care. Although equivalent nerve regeneration to autografts was not achieved, this study provides promising results for further investigation.

  8. Dephosphorylation of the beta 2-adrenergic receptor and rhodopsin by latent phosphatase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, S.D.; Fong, Y.L.; Benovic, J.L.; Sibley, D.R.; Caron, M.G.; Lefkowitz, R.J.

    1988-06-25

    Recent evidence suggests that the function of receptors coupled to guanine nucleotide regulatory proteins may be controlled by highly specific protein kinases, e.g. rhodopsin kinase and the beta-adrenergic receptor kinase. In order to investigate the nature of the phosphatases which might be involved in controlling the state of receptor phosphorylation we studied the ability of four highly purified well characterized protein phosphatases to dephosphorylate preparations of rhodopsin or beta 2-adrenergic receptor which had been highly phosphorylated by beta-adrenergic receptor kinase. These included: type 1 phosphatase, calcineurin phosphatase, type 2A phosphatase, and the high molecular weight latent phosphatase 2. Under conditions in which all the phosphatases could dephosphorylate such common substrates as (/sup 32/P)phosphorylase a and (/sup 32/P)myelin basic protein at similar rates only the latent phosphatase 2 was active on the phosphorylated receptors. Moreover, a latent phosphatase activity was found predominantly in a sequestered membrane fraction of frog erythrocytes. This parallels the distribution of a beta-adrenergic receptor phosphatase activity recently described in these cells. These data suggest a potential role for the latent phosphatase 2 as a specific receptor phosphatase.

  9. Effects of thyroid hormone on. beta. -adrenergic responsiveness of aging cardiovascular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujimoto, G.; Hashimoto, K.; Hoffman, B.B.

    1987-03-01

    The authors have compared the effects of ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation on the heart and peripheral vasculature of young (2-mo-old) and older (12-mo-old) rats both in the presence and absence of triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/)-induced hyperthyroidism. The hemodynamic consequences of T/sub 3/ treatment were less prominent in the aged hyperthyroid rats compared with young hyperthyroid rats (both in intact and pithed rats). There was a decrease in sensitivity of chronotropic responsiveness to isoproterenol in older pithed rats, which was apparently reversed by T/sub 3/ treatment. The number and affinity of myocardial ..beta..-adrenergic receptor sites measured by (/sup 125/I)cyanopindolol were not significantly different in young and older control rats; also, ..beta..-receptor density increased to a similar extent in both young and older T/sub 3/-treated rats. The ability of isoproterenol to relax mesenteric arterial rings, markedly blunted in older rats, was partially restored by T/sub 3/ treatment without their being any change in isoproterenol-mediated relaxation in the arterial preparation from young rats. The number and affinity of the ..beta..-adrenergic receptors measured in the mesenteric arteries was unaffected by either aging or T/sub 3/ treatment. The data suggest that effects of thyroid hormone and age-related alterations of cardiovascular responsiveness to ..beta..-adrenergic stimulation are interrelated in a complex fashion with a net result that the hyperkinetic cardiovascular manifestations in hyperthyroidism are attenuated in the older animals.

  10. Protein phosphorylation in isolated human adipocytes - Adrenergic control of the phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase

    SciTech Connect

    Smiley, R.M. Columbia Univ College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY ); Paul, S.; Browning, M.D.; Leibel, R.L.; Hirsch, J. )

    1990-01-01

    The effect of adrenergic agents on protein phosphorylation in human adipocytes was examined. Freshly isolated human fat cells were incubated with {sup 32}PO{sub 4} in order to label intracellular ATP, then treated with a variety of adrenergic and other pharmacologic agents. Treatment with the {beta}-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol led to a significant increase in phosphate content of at least five protein bands (M{sub r} 52, 53, 63, 67, 84 kDa). The increase in phosphorylation was partially inhibited by the {alpha}-2 agonist clonidine. Epinephrine, a combined {alpha} and {beta} agonist, was less effective at increasing phosphate content of the proteins than was isoproterenol. Neither insulin nor the {alpha}-1 agonist phenylephrine had any discernible effect on the pattern of protein phosphorylation. The 84 kDa phosphorylated peptide band appears to contain hormone-sensitive lipase, a key enzyme in the lipolytic pathway which is activated by phosphorylation. These results are somewhat different than previously reported results for rat adipocytes, and represent the first report of overall pattern and adrenergic modulation of protein phosphorylation in human adipocytes.

  11. β-Adrenergic receptor signaling and modulation of long-term potentiation in the mammalian hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    O'Dell, Thomas J.; Connor, Steven A.; Guglietta, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Encoding new information in the brain requires changes in synaptic strength. Neuromodulatory transmitters can facilitate synaptic plasticity by modifying the actions and expression of specific signaling cascades, transmitter receptors and their associated signaling complexes, genes, and effector proteins. One critical neuromodulator in the mammalian brain is norepinephrine (NE), which regulates multiple brain functions such as attention, perception, arousal, sleep, learning, and memory. The mammalian hippocampus receives noradrenergic innervation and hippocampal neurons express β-adrenergic receptors, which are known to play important roles in gating the induction of long-lasting forms of synaptic potentiation. These forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) are believed to importantly contribute to long-term storage of spatial and contextual memories in the brain. In this review, we highlight the contributions of noradrenergic signaling in general and β-adrenergic receptors in particular, toward modulating hippocampal LTP. We focus on the roles of NE and β-adrenergic receptors in altering the efficacies of specific signaling molecules such as NMDA and AMPA receptors, protein phosphatases, and translation initiation factors. Also, the roles of β-adrenergic receptors in regulating synaptic “tagging” and “capture” of LTP within synaptic networks of the hippocampus are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and cellular bases of noradrenergic signaling will enrich our grasp of how the brain makes new, enduring memories, and may shed light on credible strategies for improving mental health through treatment of specific disorders linked to perturbed memory processing and dysfunctional noradrenergic synaptic transmission. PMID:26286656

  12. The functional role of the alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in cerebral blood flow regulation.

    PubMed

    Purkayastha, Sushmita; Raven, Peter B

    2011-09-01

    Cerebral vasculature is richly innervated by the α-1 adrenergic receptors similar to that of the peripheral vasculature. However, the functional role of the α-1adrenergic receptors in cerebral blood flow (CBF) regulation is yet to be established. The traditional thinking being that during normotension and normocapnia sympathetic neural activity does not play a significant role in CBF regulation. Reports in the past have stated that catecholamines do not penetrate the blood brain barrier (BBB) and therefore only influence cerebral vessels from outside the BBB and hence, have a limited role in CBF regulation. However, with the advent of dynamic measurement techniques, beat-to-beat CBF assessment can be done during dynamic changes in arterial blood pressure. Several studies in the recent years have reported a functional role of the α-1adrenergic receptors in CBF regulation. This review focuses on the recent developments on the role of the sympathetic nervous system, specifically that of the α-1 adrenergic receptors in CBF regulation.

  13. α1-Adrenergic receptors mediate coordinated Ca2+ signaling of cortical astrocytes in awake, behaving mice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fengfei; O'Donnell, John; Thrane, Alexander S; Zeppenfeld, Douglas; Kang, Hongyi; Xie, Lulu; Wang, Fushun; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2013-12-01

    Astrocyte Ca2+ signals in awake behaving mice are widespread, coordinated and differ fundamentally from the locally restricted Ca2+ transients observed ex vivo and in anesthetized animals. Here we show that the synchronized release of norepinephrine (NE) from locus coeruleus (LC) projections throughout the cerebral cortex mediate long-ranging Ca2+ signals by activation of astrocytic α1-adrenergic receptors. When LC output was triggered by either physiological sensory (whisker) stimulation or an air-puff startle response, astrocytes responded with fast Ca2+ transients that encompassed the entire imaged field (positioned over either frontal or parietal cortex). The application of adrenergic inhibitors, including α1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin, potently suppressed both evoked, as well as the frequently observed spontaneous astroglial Ca2+ signals. The LC-specific neurotoxin N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine (DSP-4), which reduced cortical NE content by >90%, prevented nearly all astrocytic Ca2+ signals in awake mice. The observations indicate that in adult, unanesthetized mice, astrocytes do not respond directly to glutamatergic signaling evoked by sensory stimulation. Instead astrocytes appear to be the primary target for NE, with astrocytic Ca2+ signaling being triggered by the α1-adrenergic receptor. In turn, astrocytes may coordinate the broad effects of neuromodulators on neuronal activity.

  14. β-adrenergic signaling regulates evolutionarily derived sleep loss in the Mexican cavefish.

    PubMed

    Duboué, Erik R; Borowsky, Richard L; Keene, Alex C

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is a fundamental behavior exhibited almost universally throughout the animal kingdom. The required amount and circadian timing of sleep differs greatly between species in accordance with habitats and evolutionary history. The Mexican blind cavefish, Astyanax mexicanus, is a model organism for the study of adaptive morphological and behavioral traits. In addition to loss of eyes and pigmentation, cave populations of A. mexicanus exhibit evolutionarily derived sleep loss and increased vibration attraction behavior, presumably to cope with a nutrient-poor environment. Understanding the neural mechanisms of evolutionarily derived sleep loss in this system may reveal critical insights into the regulation of sleep in vertebrates. Here we report that blockade of β-adrenergic receptors with propranolol rescues the decreased-sleep phenotype of cavefish. This effect was not seen with α-adrenergic antagonists. Treatment with selective β1-, β2-, and β3-antagonists revealed that the increased sleep observed with propranolol could partially be explained via the β1-adrenergic system. Morphological analysis of catecholamine circuitry revealed conservation of gross catecholaminergic neuroanatomy between surface and cave morphs. Taken together, these findings suggest that evolutionarily derived changes in adrenergic signaling underlie the reduced sleep of cave populations. PMID:22922609

  15. β-adrenergic signaling regulates evolutionarily derived sleep loss in the Mexican cavefish.

    PubMed

    Duboué, Erik R; Borowsky, Richard L; Keene, Alex C

    2012-01-01

    Sleep is a fundamental behavior exhibited almost universally throughout the animal kingdom. The required amount and circadian timing of sleep differs greatly between species in accordance with habitats and evolutionary history. The Mexican blind cavefish, Astyanax mexicanus, is a model organism for the study of adaptive morphological and behavioral traits. In addition to loss of eyes and pigmentation, cave populations of A. mexicanus exhibit evolutionarily derived sleep loss and increased vibration attraction behavior, presumably to cope with a nutrient-poor environment. Understanding the neural mechanisms of evolutionarily derived sleep loss in this system may reveal critical insights into the regulation of sleep in vertebrates. Here we report that blockade of β-adrenergic receptors with propranolol rescues the decreased-sleep phenotype of cavefish. This effect was not seen with α-adrenergic antagonists. Treatment with selective β1-, β2-, and β3-antagonists revealed that the increased sleep observed with propranolol could partially be explained via the β1-adrenergic system. Morphological analysis of catecholamine circuitry revealed conservation of gross catecholaminergic neuroanatomy between surface and cave morphs. Taken together, these findings suggest that evolutionarily derived changes in adrenergic signaling underlie the reduced sleep of cave populations.

  16. Effects of Adrenergic Blockade on Postpartum Adaptive Responses Induced by Labor Contractions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, April E.; Mills, N. A.; Lam, K. P.; Hayes, L. E.; Bowley, Susan M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Prenatal exposure to labor contractions augments the expression of postnatal adaptive responses in newborn rats. Near-term rat fetuses exposed prenatally to simulated labor contractions and delivered by cesarean section breath and attach to nipples at greater frequencies than non-stimulated fetuses. Plasma NE (norepinephrine) and EPI (epinephrine) was significantly elevated in newborn rats exposed to vaginal birth or simulated labor contractions (compressions) with cesarean delivery as compared to non-compressed fetuses. In the present study, we investigated adrenergic mechanisms underlying labor-induced postnatal adaptive responses. Following spinal transection of late pregnant rat dams, fetuses were administered neurogenic or non-neurogenic adrenergic blockade: 1) bretylium (10 mg/kg sc) to prevent sympathetic neuronal release, 2) hexamethonium (30 mg/kg) to produce ganglionic blockade, 3) phenoxybenzanune (10mg/kg sc), an a- adrenergic receptor antagonist, 4) ICI-118551, 10 mg/kg sc), a b receptor antagonist, or 5) vehicle alone. Fetuses were either compressed (C) or non-compressed (NC) prior to cesarean delivery. a- and b- adrenergic antagonists reduced respiration and nipple attachment rates while sympathetic and vehicle alone did not. These results provide additional support for the hypothesis that adaptive neonatal effects of labor contractions are mediated by adrenal and extra-adrenal catecholamines.

  17. Induction of functional beta-adrenergic receptors in HeLa cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tallman, J F; Smith, C C; Henneberry, R C

    1977-01-01

    HeLa cells contain beta-adrenergic receptors that are characterized by specific binding of I[3H]dihydroalprenolol, increased 3':5'-cyclic AMP production in intact cells after incubation with l-isoproterenol, and increased adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] activity in the presence of l-isoproterenol. After cells were cultured with butyrate, the number of beta-adrenergic receptors, cyclic AMP production in intact cells, and adenylate cyclase activation by l-isoproterenol were increased severalfold over those of untreated cells. The increase involved the induction of synthesis of new receptor molecules with identical affinities for l-[3H]-dihydroalprenolol; all three processes were blocked by cycloheximide and actinomycin D. This induction was relatively specific for butyric acid and only the closely related short-chain fatty acids, propionic and valeric acids, were capable of partially inducing the same effect. In contrast to induction of beta-adrenergic binding sites, there was no increase in basal or fluoride-activated adenylate cyclase activity, indicating that the beta-adrenergic receptor and adenylate cyclase and different molecules that may be controlled separately. PMID:191837

  18. Modulation of nicotinic receptor channels by adrenergic stimulation in rat pinealocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jin-Young; Jung, Seung-Ryoung; Hille, Bertil

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin secretion from the pineal gland is triggered by norepinephrine released from sympathetic terminals at night. In contrast, cholinergic and parasympathetic inputs, by activating nicotinic cholinergic receptors (nAChR), have been suggested to counterbalance the noradrenergic input. Here we investigated whether adrenergic signaling regulates nAChR channels in rat pinealocytes. Acetylcholine or the selective nicotinic receptor agonist 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium iodide (DMPP) activated large nAChR currents in whole cell patch-clamp experiments. Norepinephrine (NE) reduced the nAChR currents, an effect partially mimicked by a β-adrenergic receptor agonist, isoproterenol, and blocked by a β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, propranolol. Increasing intracellular cAMP levels using membrane-permeable 8-bromoadenosine (8-Br)-cAMP or 5,6-dichlorobenzimidazole riboside-3′,5′-cyclic monophosphorothioate (cBIMPS) also reduced nAChR activity, mimicking the effects of NE and isoproterenol. Further, removal of ATP from the intracellular pipette solution blocked the reduction of nAChR currents, suggesting involvement of protein kinases. Indeed protein kinase A inhibitors, H-89 and Rp-cAMPS, blocked the modulation of nAChR by adrenergic stimulation. After the downmodulation by NE, nAChR channels mediated a smaller Ca2+ influx and less membrane depolarization from the resting potential. Together these results suggest that NE released from sympathetic terminals at night attenuates nicotinic cholinergic signaling. PMID:24553185

  19. Alpha-1, alpha-2, and beta adrenergic signal transduction in cultured uterine myocytes.

    PubMed

    Phillippe, M; Saunders, T; Bangalore, S

    1990-04-01

    The following studies were undertaken to develop a cultured uterine myocyte model which would allow further clarification of the adrenergic signal transduction mechanisms utilized by these myocytes. After mechanical removal of the endometrium, rabbit uterine myocytes were isolated by an overnight enzymatic disaggregation using collagenase and DNase I. The isolated myocytes were maintained in culture in 75-cm2 flasks containing Waymouth's MB 751/1 medium-10% fetal bovine serum along with 10(-8) M estradiol, penicillin, streptomycin, and Fungizone. The phase contrast and electron micrographic appearance of these cells was consistent with that previously reported for smooth muscle myocytes in culture. Immunocytochemical studies utilizing monoclonal anti-alpha-smooth muscle actin antibodies confirmed the presence of smooth muscle actin in these cultured myocytes. Western blot studies similarly confirmed the presence of alpha-smooth muscle actin in rabbit myometrial tissue and the cultured myocytes, both the primary and F1 generation. After prelabeling the myocytes with [3H]inositol, adrenergic stimulation experiments demonstrated alpha-1 receptor mediated stimulation of inositol phosphates. Beta receptor stimulation experiments confirmed cAMP production in these cultured myocytes, and the ability of clonidine, an alpha-2 agonist, to inhibit forskolin stimulated cAMP production confirmed the presence of functional alpha-2 adrenergic receptors in these myocytes. In conclusion, these cultured rabbit uterine myocytes have provided an in vitro model which can be utilized to further clarify the adrenergic receptor signal transduction mechanisms in genital tract smooth muscle.

  20. Facial nerve paralysis in children.

    PubMed

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-12-16

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  1. Facial nerve paralysis in children

    PubMed Central

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology. PMID:26677445

  2. Facial nerve paralysis in children.

    PubMed

    Ciorba, Andrea; Corazzi, Virginia; Conz, Veronica; Bianchini, Chiara; Aimoni, Claudia

    2015-12-16

    Facial nerve palsy is a condition with several implications, particularly when occurring in childhood. It represents a serious clinical problem as it causes significant concerns in doctors because of its etiology, its treatment options and its outcome, as well as in little patients and their parents, because of functional and aesthetic outcomes. There are several described causes of facial nerve paralysis in children, as it can be congenital (due to delivery traumas and genetic or malformative diseases) or acquired (due to infective, inflammatory, neoplastic, traumatic or iatrogenic causes). Nonetheless, in approximately 40%-75% of the cases, the cause of unilateral facial paralysis still remains idiopathic. A careful diagnostic workout and differential diagnosis are particularly recommended in case of pediatric facial nerve palsy, in order to establish the most appropriate treatment, as the therapeutic approach differs in relation to the etiology.

  3. Embryonic anastomosis between hypoglossal nerves.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, J F; Mérida-Velasco, J R; Verdugo-López, S; Sanz-Casado, J V; Jiménez-Collado, J

    2009-12-01

    This article presents two cases of anastomosis of hypoglossal nerves in the suprahyoid region in human embryos of CR length 10.75 and 17.5 mm. This variation was studied in two human specimens at this stage of development and compared with the normal arrangement of the hypoglossal nerves in embryos at the same stage. The anastomotic branches were of similar caliber to the main trunks. In both cases the anastomosis was located dorsal to the origin of the geniohyoid muscles and caudal to the genioglossus muscles, lying transversally over the cranial face of the body of the hyoid bone anlage. The anastomosis formed a suprahyoid nerve chiasm on the midline in the embryo of 10.75 mm CR length.

  4. β-adrenergic receptor mediation of stress-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine-induced conditioned place preference in mice: roles for β1 and β2 adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Vranjkovic, Oliver; Hang, Shona; Baker, David A; Mantsch, John R

    2012-08-01

    Stress can trigger the relapse of drug use in recovering cocaine addicts and reinstatement in rodent models through mechanisms that may involve norepinephrine release and β-adrenergic receptor activation. The present study examined the role of β-adrenergic receptor subtypes in the stressor-induced reinstatement of extinguished cocaine-induced (15 mg/kg i.p.) conditioned place preference in mice. Forced swim (6 min at 22°C) stress or activation of central noradrenergic neurotransmission by administration of the selective α(2) adrenergic receptor antagonist 2-[(4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazol-2-yl)methyl]-2,3-dihydro-1-methyl-1H-isoindole (BRL-44,408) (10 mg/kg i.p.) induced reinstatement in wild-type, but not β- adrenergic receptor-deficient Adrb1/Adrb2 double-knockout, mice. In contrast, cocaine administration (15 mg/kg i.p.) resulted in reinstatement in both wild-type and β-adrenergic receptor knockout mice. Stress-induced reinstatement probably involved β(2) adrenergic receptors. The β(2) adrenergic receptor antagonist -(isopropylamino)-1-[(7-methyl-4-indanyl)oxy]butan-2-ol (ICI-118,551) (1 or 2 mg/kg i.p.) blocked reinstatement by forced swim or BRL-44,408, whereas administration of the nonselective β-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol (2 or 4 mg/kg i.p.) or the β(2) adrenergic receptor-selective agonist clenbuterol (2 or 4 mg/kg i.p.) induced reinstatement. Forced swim-induced, but not BRL-44,408-induced, reinstatement was also blocked by a high (20 mg/kg) but not low (10 mg/kg) dose of the β(1) adrenergic receptor antagonist betaxolol, and isoproterenol-induced reinstatement was blocked by pretreatment with either ICI-118,551 or betaxolol, suggesting a potential cooperative role for β(1) and β(2) adrenergic receptors in stress-induced reinstatement. Overall, these findings suggest that targeting β-adrenergic receptors may represent a promising pharmacotherapeutic strategy for preventing drug relapse, particularly in cocaine addicts whose drug use

  5. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 interactions with adrenergic and dopaminergic systems in mucosal protection in stress.

    PubMed

    Sikirić, P; Mazul, B; Seiwerth, S; Grabarević, Z; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Jagić, V; Turković, B; Rotkvić, I; Mise, S; Zoricić, I; Jurina, L; Konjevoda, P; Hanzevacki, M; Gjurasin, M; Separović, J; Ljubanović, D; Artuković, B; Bratulić, M; Tisljar, M; Miklić, P; Sumajstorcić, J

    1997-03-01

    Since superior protection against different gastrointestinal and liver lesions and antiinflammatory and analgesic activities were noted for pentadecapeptide BPC (an essential fragment of an organoprotective gastric juice protein named BPC), the beneficial mechanism of BPC 157 and its likely interactions with other systems were studied. Hence its beneficial effects would be abolished by adrenal gland medullectomy, the influence of different agents affecting alpha, beta, and dopamine receptors on BPC 157 gastroprotection in 48 h restraint stress was further investigated. Animals were pretreated (1 hr before stress) with saline (controls) or BPC 157 (dissolved in saline) (10 microg or 10 ng/kg body wt intraperitoneally or intragastrically) applied either alone to establish basal conditions or, when manipulating the adrenergic or dopaminergic system, a simultaneous administration was carried out with various agents with specific effects on adrenergic or dopaminergic receptors [given in milligrams per kilogram intraperitoneally except for atenolol, which was given subcutaneously] phentolamine (10.0), prazosin (0.5), yohimbine (5.0), clonidine (0.1) (alpha-adrenergic domain), propranolol (1.0), atenolol (20.0) (beta-adrenergic domain), domperidone (5.0), and haloperidol (5.0) (peripheral/central dopamine system). Alternatively, agents stimulating adrenergic or dopaminergic systems--adrenaline (5.0) or bromocriptine (10.0)--were applied. A strong protection, noted following intragastric or intraperitoneal administration of BPC 157, was fully abolished by coadministration of phentolamine, clonidine, and haloperidol, and consistently not affected by prazosin, yohimbine, or domperidone. Atenolol abolished only intraperitoneal BPC 157 protection, whereas propranolol affected specifically intragastric BPC 157 protection. Interestingly, the severe course of lesion development obtained in basal conditions, unlike BPC 157 gastroprotection, was not influenced by the application of

  6. Rehabilitation of peripheral nerve injuries.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Michael D; Shannon, Steven

    2002-02-01

    Traumatic injuries to peripheral nerves pose complex challenges to both military and civilian physicians. Treatment of nerve injuries must consider all aspects of the inherent disability. Pain control is of paramount importance. Little will be accomplished until pain is brought down to tolerable levels. Rehabilitation needs to be instituted as first-line treatment. Focus must be first placed on protection of the affected area from complications stemming from disuse and immobility and then on enhancement of strength, flexibility, sensory discrimination, and dexterity. Early intervention sets the stage for optimal physiologic and functional recovery. PMID:11878078

  7. Nerve lesioning with direct current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravid, E. Natalie; Shi Gan, Liu; Todd, Kathryn; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-02-01

    Spastic hypertonus (muscle over-activity due to exaggerated stretch reflexes) often develops in people with stroke, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and spinal cord injury. Lesioning of nerves, e.g. with phenol or botulinum toxin is widely performed to reduce spastic hypertonus. We have explored the use of direct electrical current (DC) to lesion peripheral nerves. In a series of animal experiments, DC reduced muscle force by controlled amounts and the reduction could last several months. We conclude that in some cases controlled DC lesioning may provide an effective alternative to the less controllable molecular treatments available today.

  8. Peripheral nerve disease in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Klein, Autumn

    2013-06-01

    Neuropathies during pregnancy and the postpartum period are common and are usually due to compression around pregnancy and childbirth. The most common peripheral neuropathies are Bell's palsy, carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), and lower extremity neuropathies. Although most neuropathies are usually reversible, associated disabilities or morbidities can limit functioning and require therapy. Nerve conduction study tests and imaging should only be considered if symptoms are unusual or prolonged. Some neuropathies may be associated with preeclampsia or an inherent underlying neuropathy that increases the risk of nerve injury. All neuropathies in pregnancy should be followed as some may be persistent and require follow-up. PMID:23563878

  9. Pudendal but not tibial nerve stimulation inhibits bladder contractions induced by stimulation of pontine micturition center in cats.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Timothy D; Ferroni, Matthew C; Kadow, Brian T; Slater, Richard C; Zhang, Zhaocun; Chang, Victor; Lamm, Vladimir; Shen, Bing; Wang, Jicheng; Roppolo, James R; de Groat, William C; Tai, Changfeng

    2016-02-15

    This study examined the possibility that pudendal nerve stimulation (PNS) or tibial nerve stimulation (TNS) inhibits the excitatory pathway from the pontine micturition center (PMC) to the urinary bladder. In decerebrate cats under α-chloralose anesthesia, electrical stimulation of the PMC (40 Hz frequency, 0.2-ms pulse width, 10-25 s duration) using a microelectrode induced bladder contractions >20 cmH2O amplitude when the bladder was filled to 60-70% capacity. PNS or TNS (5 Hz, 0.2 ms) at two and four times the threshold (2T and 4T) to induce anal or toe twitch was applied to inhibit the PMC stimulation-induced bladder contractions. Propranolol, a nonselective β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, was administered intravenously (1 mg/kg i.v.) to determine the role of sympathetic pathways in PNS/TNS inhibition. PNS at both 2T and 4T significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the amplitude and area under the curve of the bladder contractions induced by PMC stimulation, while TNS at 4T facilitated the bladder contractions. Propranolol completely eliminated PNS inhibition and TNS facilitation. This study indicates that PNS, but not TNS, inhibits PMC stimulation-induced bladder contractions via a β-adrenergic mechanism that may occur in the detrusor muscle as a result of reflex activity in lumbar sympathetic nerves. Neither PNS nor TNS activated a central inhibitory pathway with synaptic connections to the sacral parasympathetic neurons that innervate the bladder. Understanding the site of action involved in bladder neuromodulation is important for developing new therapies for bladder disorders. PMID:26676253

  10. Nonrecurrent Laryngeal Nerve in the Era of Intraoperative Nerve Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Gurleyik, Gunay

    2016-01-01

    Nonrecurrent laryngeal nerve (non-RLN) is an anatomical variation increasing the risk of vocal cord palsy. Prediction and early identification of non-RLN may minimize such a risk of injury. This study assessed the effect of intraoperative neuromonitoring (IONM) on the detection of non-RLN. A total of 462 (236 right) nerves in 272 patients were identified and totally exposed, and all intraoperative steps of IONM were sequentially applied on the vagus nerve (VN) and RLN. Right predissection VN stimulation at a distal point did not create a sound signal in three cases (3/236; 1.27%). Proximal dissection of the right VN under IONM guidance established a proximal point, creating a positive signal. The separation point of non-RLN from VN was discovered in all three patients. Non-RLNs were exposed from separation to laryngeal entry. Positive IONM signals were obtained after resection of thyroid lobes, and postoperative period was uneventful in patients with non-RLN. Absence of distal VN signal is a precise predictor of the non-RLN. IONM-guided proximal dissection of the right VN leads to identification of the non-RLN. The prediction of non-RLN by the absence of the VN signal at an early stage of surgery may prevent or minimize the risk of nerve injury.

  11. Astrocytic β2 Adrenergic Receptor Gene Deletion Affects Memory in Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Cathy Joanna; Demol, Frauke; Bauwens, Romy; Kooijman, Ron; Massie, Ann; Villers, Agnès; Ris, Laurence; De Keyser, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that the astrocytic adrenergic signalling enhances glycogenolysis which provides energy to be transported to nearby cells and in the form of lactate. This energy source is important for motor and cognitive functioning. While it is suspected that the β2-adrenergic receptor on astrocytes might contribute to this energy balance, it has not yet been shown conclusively in vivo. Inducible astrocyte specific β2-adrenergic receptor knock-out mice were generated by crossing homozygous β2-adrenergic receptor floxed mice (Adrb2flox) and mice with heterozygous tamoxifen-inducible Cre recombinase-expression driven by the astrocyte specific L-glutamate/L-aspartate transporter promoter (GLAST-CreERT2). Assessments using the modified SHIRPA (SmithKline/Harwell/Imperial College/Royal Hospital/Phenotype Assessment) test battery, swimming ability test, and accelerating rotarod test, performed at 1, 2 and 4 weeks, 6 and 12 months after tamoxifen (or vehicle) administration did not reveal any differences in physical health or motor functions between the knock-out mice and controls. However deficits were found in the cognitive ability of aged, but not young adult mice, reflected in impaired learning in the Morris Water Maze. Similarly, long-term potentiation (LTP) was impaired in hippocampal brain slices of aged knock-out mice maintained in low glucose media. Using microdialysis in cerebellar white matter we found no significant differences in extracellular lactate or glucose between the young adult knock-out mice and controls, although trends were detected. Our results suggest that β2-adrenergic receptor expression on astrocytes in mice may be important for maintaining cognitive health at advanced age, but is dispensable for motor function. PMID:27776147

  12. α1B-adrenergic receptors differentially associate with Rab proteins during homologous and heterologous desensitization.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Badillo, Jean A; Sánchez-Reyes, Omar B; Alfonzo-Méndez, Marco A; Romero-Ávila, M Teresa; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Internalization of G protein-coupled receptors can be triggered by agonists or by other stimuli. The process begins within seconds of cell activation and contributes to receptor desensitization. The Rab GTPase family controls endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, and endosomal fusion. Among their remarkable properties is the differential distribution of its members on the surface of various organelles. In the endocytic pathway, Rab 5 controls traffic from the plasma membrane to early endosomes, whereas Rab 4 and Rab 11 regulate rapid and slow recycling from early endosomes to the plasma membrane, respectively. Moreover, Rab 7 and Rab 9 regulate the traffic from late endosomes to lysosomes and recycling to the trans-Golgi. We explore the possibility that α1B-adrenergic receptor internalization induced by agonists (homologous) and by unrelated stimuli (heterologous) could involve different Rab proteins. This possibility was explored by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using cells coexpressing α1B-adrenergic receptors tagged with the red fluorescent protein, DsRed, and different Rab proteins tagged with the green fluorescent protein. It was observed that when α1B-adrenergic receptors were stimulated with noradrenaline, the receptors interacted with proteins present in early endosomes, such as the early endosomes antigen 1, Rab 5, Rab 4, and Rab 11 but not with late endosome markers, such as Rab 9 and Rab 7. In contrast, sphingosine 1-phosphate stimulation induced rapid and transient α1B-adrenergic receptor interaction of relatively small magnitude with Rab 5 and a more pronounced and sustained one with Rab 9; interaction was also observed with Rab 7. Moreover, the GTPase activity of the Rab proteins appears to be required because no FRET was observed when dominant-negative Rab mutants were employed. These data indicate that α1B-adrenergic receptors are directed to different endocytic vesicles depending on the desensitization type (homologous vs

  13. Differential alterations in cardiac adrenergic signaling in chronic hypoxia or norepinephrine infusion.

    PubMed

    León-Velarde, F; Bourin, M C; Germack, R; Mohammadi, K; Crozatier, B; Richalet, J P

    2001-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE)-induced desensitization of the adrenergic receptor pathway may mimic the effects of hypoxia on cardiac adrenoceptors. The mechanisms involved in this desensitization were evaluated in male Wistar rats kept in a hypobaric chamber (380 Torr) and in rats infused with NE (0.3 mg. kg(-1). h(-1)) for 21 days. Because NE treatment resulted in left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy, whereas hypoxia resulted in right (RV) hypertrophy, the selective hypertrophic response of hypoxia and NE was also evaluated. In hypoxia, alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors (AR) density increased by 35%, only in the LV. In NE, alpha(1)-AR density decreased by 43% in the RV. Both hypoxia and NE decreased beta-AR density. No difference was found in receptor apparent affinity. Stimulated maximal activity of adenylate cyclase decreased in both ventricles with hypoxia (LV, 41%; RV, 36%) but only in LV with NE infusion (42%). The functional activities of G(i) and G(s) proteins in cardiac membranes were assessed by incubation with pertussis toxin (PT) and cholera toxin (CT). PT had an important effect in abolishing the decrease in isoproterenol-induced stimulation of adenylate cyclase in hypoxia; however, pretreatment of the NE ventricle cells with PT failed to restore this stimulation. Although CT attenuates the basal activity of adenylate cyclase in the RV and the isoproterenol-stimulated activity in the LV, pretreatment of NE or hypoxic cardiac membranes with CT has a less clear effect on the adenylate cyclase pathway. The present study has demonstrated that 1) NE does not mimic the effects of hypoxia at the cellular level, i.e., hypoxia has specific effects on cardiac adrenergic signaling, and 2) changes in alpha- and beta-adrenergic pathways are chamber specific and may depend on the type of stimulation (hypoxia or adrenergic).

  14. Beta 2-adrenergic receptor regulation of human neutrophil function is sexually dimorphic.

    PubMed

    de Coupade, Catherine; Gear, Robert W; Dazin, Paul F; Sroussi, Herve Y; Green, Paul G; Levine, Jon D

    2004-12-01

    While the mechanisms underlying the marked sexual dimorphism in inflammatory diseases are not well understood, the sexually dimorphic sympathoadrenal axis profoundly affects the inflammatory response. We tested whether adrenergic receptor-mediated activation of human neutrophil function is sexually dimorphic, since neutrophils provide the first line of defense in the inflammatory response. There was a marked sexual dimorphism in beta(2)-adrenergic receptor binding, using the specific beta(2)-adrenergic receptor ligand, [(3)H]-dihydroalprenolol, with almost three times more binding sites on neutrophils from females (20,878 +/- 2470) compared to males (7331 +/- 3179). There was also a marked sexual dimorphism in the effects of isoprenaline, a beta-adrenergic receptor agonist, which increased nondirected locomotion (chemokinesis) in neutrophils obtained from females, while having no effect on neutrophils from males. Isoprenaline stimulated the release of a chemotactic factor from neutrophils obtained from females, but not from males. This chemotactic factor acts on the G protein-coupled CXC chemokine receptor 2 (CXCR2) chemokine receptor, since an anti-CXCR2 antibody and the selective nonpeptide CXCR2 antagonist SB225002, inhibited chemotaxis produced by this factor. While interleukin- (IL-) 8 is a principal CXCR2 ligand, isoprenaline did not produce an increase in IL-8 release from neutrophils. IL-8-induced chemotaxis was inhibited in a sexually dimorphic manner by isoprenaline, which also stimulated release of a mediator from neutrophils that induced chemotaxis, that was inhibited by anti-CXCR2 antibodies. These findings indicate an important role for adrenergic receptors in the modulation of neutrophil trafficking, which could contribute to sex-differences in the inflammatory response. PMID:15477226

  15. α1B-Adrenergic Receptors Differentially Associate with Rab Proteins during Homologous and Heterologous Desensitization

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Badillo, Jean A.; Sánchez-Reyes, Omar B.; Alfonzo-Méndez, Marco A.; Romero-Ávila, M. Teresa; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; García-Sáinz, J. Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Internalization of G protein-coupled receptors can be triggered by agonists or by other stimuli. The process begins within seconds of cell activation and contributes to receptor desensitization. The Rab GTPase family controls endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, and endosomal fusion. Among their remarkable properties is the differential distribution of its members on the surface of various organelles. In the endocytic pathway, Rab 5 controls traffic from the plasma membrane to early endosomes, whereas Rab 4 and Rab 11 regulate rapid and slow recycling from early endosomes to the plasma membrane, respectively. Moreover, Rab 7 and Rab 9 regulate the traffic from late endosomes to lysosomes and recycling to the trans-Golgi. We explore the possibility that α1B-adrenergic receptor internalization induced by agonists (homologous) and by unrelated stimuli (heterologous) could involve different Rab proteins. This possibility was explored by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using cells coexpressing α1B-adrenergic receptors tagged with the red fluorescent protein, DsRed, and different Rab proteins tagged with the green fluorescent protein. It was observed that when α1B-adrenergic receptors were stimulated with noradrenaline, the receptors interacted with proteins present in early endosomes, such as the early endosomes antigen 1, Rab 5, Rab 4, and Rab 11 but not with late endosome markers, such as Rab 9 and Rab 7. In contrast, sphingosine 1-phosphate stimulation induced rapid and transient α1B-adrenergic receptor interaction of relatively small magnitude with Rab 5 and a more pronounced and sustained one with Rab 9; interaction was also observed with Rab 7. Moreover, the GTPase activity of the Rab proteins appears to be required because no FRET was observed when dominant-negative Rab mutants were employed. These data indicate that α1B-adrenergic receptors are directed to different endocytic vesicles depending on the desensitization type (homologous vs

  16. α1B-adrenergic receptors differentially associate with Rab proteins during homologous and heterologous desensitization.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Badillo, Jean A; Sánchez-Reyes, Omar B; Alfonzo-Méndez, Marco A; Romero-Ávila, M Teresa; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Internalization of G protein-coupled receptors can be triggered by agonists or by other stimuli. The process begins within seconds of cell activation and contributes to receptor desensitization. The Rab GTPase family controls endocytosis, vesicular trafficking, and endosomal fusion. Among their remarkable properties is the differential distribution of its members on the surface of various organelles. In the endocytic pathway, Rab 5 controls traffic from the plasma membrane to early endosomes, whereas Rab 4 and Rab 11 regulate rapid and slow recycling from early endosomes to the plasma membrane, respectively. Moreover, Rab 7 and Rab 9 regulate the traffic from late endosomes to lysosomes and recycling to the trans-Golgi. We explore the possibility that α1B-adrenergic receptor internalization induced by agonists (homologous) and by unrelated stimuli (heterologous) could involve different Rab proteins. This possibility was explored by Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) using cells coexpressing α1B-adrenergic receptors tagged with the red fluorescent protein, DsRed, and different Rab proteins tagged with the green fluorescent protein. It was observed that when α1B-adrenergic receptors were stimulated with noradrenaline, the receptors interacted with proteins present in early endosomes, such as the early endosomes antigen 1, Rab 5, Rab 4, and Rab 11 but not with late endosome markers, such as Rab 9 and Rab 7. In contrast, sphingosine 1-phosphate stimulation induced rapid and transient α1B-adrenergic receptor interaction of relatively small magnitude with Rab 5 and a more pronounced and sustained one with Rab 9; interaction was also observed with Rab 7. Moreover, the GTPase activity of the Rab proteins appears to be required because no FRET was observed when dominant-negative Rab mutants were employed. These data indicate that α1B-adrenergic receptors are directed to different endocytic vesicles depending on the desensitization type (homologous vs

  17. Evidence that the extraocular motor nuclei innervate monkey palisade endings.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Lars; May, Paul J; Pastor, Angel M; Streicher, Johannes; Blumer, Roland

    2011-02-01

    Palisade endings are found in the extraocular muscles (EOMs) of almost every mammalian species, including primates. These nerve specializations surrounding the muscle fiber insertion have been postulated to be the proprioceptors of the EOMs. However, it was recently demonstrated that palisade endings have a cholinergic nature, which reopened the question of whether palisade endings are motor or sensory structures. In this work, we examined whether the cell bodies of palisade endings lie in EOM motor nuclei by injecting an anterograde tracer, biotinylated dextran amine, into the abducens nucleus of a macaque monkey. Tracer visualization in the lateral rectus muscle was combined with choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and α-bungarotoxin staining. Analysis of the samples was performed by conventional light microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. About 30% of the nerve fibers innervating the muscle were tracer positive. These were ChAT positive as well. Tracer positive nerve fibers established motor contacts on singly and multiply innervated muscle fibers, which were confirmed by α-bungarotoxin staining. At the transition between muscle and distal tendon, we found palisade endings that contained tracer. Palisade endings exhibited the classic morphology: axons arising from the muscle extend onto the tendon, then turn back 180° and terminate in a cuff of terminals around an individual muscle fiber tip. This finding suggests that the cell bodies of palisade endings lie in the EOM motor nuclei, which complements prior studies demonstrating a cholinergic, and possibly motor, phenotype for palisade endings.

  18. Proximal Sciatic Nerve Intraneural Ganglion Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Karin R.; Wilson, Dianne; Boland, Michael; Fee, Dominic B.

    2009-01-01

    Intraneural ganglion cysts are nonneoplastic, mucinous cysts within the epineurium of peripheral nerves which usually involve the peroneal nerve at the knee. A 37-year-old female presented with progressive left buttock and posterior thigh pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a sciatic nerve mass at the sacral notch which was subsequently revealed to be an intraneural ganglion cyst. An intraneural ganglion cyst confined to the proximal sciatic nerve has only been reported once prior to 2009. PMID:20069041

  19. Patterned substrates and methods for nerve regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Mallapragada, Surya K.; Heath, Carole; Shanks, Howard; Miller, Cheryl A.; Jeftinija, Srdija

    2004-01-13

    Micropatterned substrates and methods for fabrication of artificial nerve regeneration conduits and methods for regenerating nerves are provided. Guidance compounds or cells are seeded in grooves formed on the patterned substrate. The substrates may also be provided with electrodes to provide electrical guidance cues to the regenerating nerve. The micropatterned substrates give physical, chemical, cellular and/or electrical guidance cues to promote nerve regeneration at the cellular level.

  20. Mechanisms of insulin action on sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muntzel, Martin S.; Anderson, Erling A.; Johnson, Alan Kim; Mark, Allyn L.

    1996-01-01

    Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia may contribute to the development of arterial hypertension. Although insulin may elevate arterial pressure, in part, through activation of the sympathetic nervous system, the sites and mechanisms of insulin-induced sympathetic excitation remain uncertain. While sympathoexcitation during insulin may be mediated by the baroreflex, or by modulation of norepinephrine release from sympathetic nerve endings, it has been shown repeatedly that insulin increases sympathetic outflow by actions on the central nervous system. Previous studies employing norepinephrine turnover have suggested that insulin causes sympathoexcitation by acting in the hypothalamus. Recent experiments from our laboratory involving direct measurements of regional sympathetic nerve activity have provided further evidence that insulin acts in the central nervous system. For example, administration of insulin into the third cerebralventricle increased lumbar but not renal or adrenal sympathetic nerve activity in normotensive rats. Interestingly, this pattern of regional sympathetic nerve responses to central neural administration of insulin is similar to that seen with systemic administration of insulin. Further, lesions of the anteroventral third ventricle hypothalamic (AV3V) region abolished increases in sympathetic activity to systemic administration of insulin with euglycemic clamp, suggesting that AV3V-related structures are critical for insulin-induced elevations in sympathetic outflow.

  1. A model for intersegmental coordination in the leech nerve cord.

    PubMed

    Pearce, R A; Friesen, W O

    1988-01-01

    The neuronal circuits that generate swimming movements in the leech were simulated by a chain of coupled harmonic oscillators. Our model incorporates a gradient of rostrocaudally decreasing cycle periods along the oscillator chain, a finite conduction delay for coupling signals, and multiple coupling channels connecting each pair of oscillators. The interactions mediated by these channels are characterized by sinusoidal phase response curves. Investigations of this model were carried out with the aid of a digital computer and the results of a variety of manipulations were compared with data from analogous physiological experiments. The simulations reproduced many aspects of intersegmental coordination in the leech, including the findings that: 1) phase lags between adjacent ganglia are larger near the caudal than the rostral end of the leech nerve cord; 2) intersegmental phase lags increase as the number of ganglia in nerve cord preparations is reduced; 3) severing one of the paired lateral connective nerves can reverse the phase lag across the lesion and 4) blocking synaptic transmission in midganglia of the ventral nerve cord reduces phase lags across the block.

  2. Effect of Artificial Nerve Conduit Vascularization on Peripheral Nerve in a Necrotic Bed

    PubMed Central

    Iijima, Yuki; Murayama, Akira; Takeshita, Katsushi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Several types of artificial nerve conduit have been used for bridging peripheral nerve gaps as an alternative to autologous nerves. However, their efficacy in repairing nerve injuries accompanied by surrounding tissue damage remains unclear. We fabricated a novel nerve conduit vascularized by superficial inferior epigastric (SIE) vessels and evaluated whether it could promote axonal regeneration in a necrotic bed. Methods: A 15-mm nerve conduit was implanted beneath the SIE vessels in the groin of a rat to supply it with blood vessels 2 weeks before nerve reconstruction. We removed a 13-mm segment of the sciatic nerve and then pressed a heated iron against the dorsal thigh muscle to produce a burn. The defects were immediately repaired with an autograft (n = 10), nerve conduit graft (n = 8), or vascularized nerve conduit graft (n = 8). Recovery of motor function was examined for 18 weeks after surgery. The regenerated nerves were electrophysiologically and histologically evaluated. Results: The vascularity of the nerve conduit implanted beneath the SIE vessels was confirmed histologically 2 weeks after implantation. Between 14 and 18 weeks after surgery, motor function of the vascularized conduit group was significantly better than that of the nonvascularized conduit group. Electrophysiological and histological evaluations revealed that although the improvement did not reach the level of reinnervation achieved by an autograft, the vascularized nerve conduit improved axonal regeneration more than did the conduit alone. Conclusion: Vascularization of artificial nerve conduits accelerated peripheral nerve regeneration, but further research is required to improve the quality of nerve regeneration. PMID:27257595

  3. An anatomical study of porcine peripheral nerve and its potential use in nerve tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Zilic, Leyla; Garner, Philippa E; Yu, Tong; Roman, Sabiniano; Haycock, John W; Wilshaw, Stacy-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Current nerve tissue engineering applications are adopting xenogeneic nerve tissue as potential nerve grafts to help aid nerve regeneration. However, there is little literature that describes the exact location, anatomy and physiology of these nerves to highlight their potential as a donor graft. The aim of this study was to identify and characterise the structural and extracellular matrix (ECM) components of porcine peripheral nerves in the hind leg. Methods included the dissection of porcine nerves, localisation, characterisation and quantification of the ECM components and identification of nerve cells. Results showed a noticeable variance between porcine and rat nerve (a commonly studied species) in terms of fascicle number. The study also revealed that when porcine peripheral nerves branch, a decrease in fascicle number and size was evident. Porcine ECM and nerve fascicles were found to be predominately comprised of collagen together with glycosaminoglycans, laminin and fibronectin. Immunolabelling for nerve growth factor receptor p75 also revealed the localisation of Schwann cells around and inside the fascicles. In conclusion, it is shown that porcine peripheral nerves possess a microstructure similar to that found in rat, and is not dissimilar to human. This finding could extend to the suggestion that due to the similarities in anatomy to human nerve, porcine nerves may have utility as a nerve graft providing guidance and support to regenerating axons. PMID:26200940

  4. Overview of Optic Nerve Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... pathways to the brain results in loss of vision. At a structure in the brain called the optic chiasm, each optic nerve splits, ... both eyes, and the left side of the brain receives information from the right visual field of both eyes. ... occurs. Resources ...

  5. Ending a Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ending a Pregnancy Ending a Pregnancy What is abortion? Abortion means ending a pregnancy early. In some cases, ... This is called a miscarriage, or a spontaneous abortion. In other cases, a woman chooses to end ...

  6. Cryoanalgesia for painful peripheral nerve lesions.

    PubMed

    Wang, J K

    1985-06-01

    Twelve patients with chronically painful peripheral nerve lesions were treated with cryoanalgesia. The pain was relieved in 6 patients for 1-12 months. Although the pain eventually recurred, the patients resumed normal activities during remission. It is necessary to improve the techniques of nerve localization and to determine the proper mode of nerve freezing. PMID:2995903

  7. Altered peripheral nerve function resulting from haemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Stanley, E; Brown, J C; Pryor, J S

    1977-01-01

    The amplitudes of muscle and nerve action potentials evoked median nerve stimulation were recorded just before and immediately after haemodialysis. These revealed a growht of action potential amplitude during dialysis. It is suggested that some component of the defective peripheral nerve function that inevitably accompanies uraemia is temporarily improved during dialysis. PMID:845605

  8. Trigeminal nerve: Anatomic correlation with MR imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Pech, P.; Pojunas, K.W.; Kilgore, D.P.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1986-06-01

    Through correlation with cryomicrotic sections, the appearance of the trigeminal nerve and its branches on magnetic resonance images is described in healthy individuals and in patients with tumors involving this nerve. Coronal images are best for defining the different parts of the nerve and for making a side-to-side comparison. Sagittal images are useful to demonstrate tumors involving the Gasserian ganglion.

  9. 21 CFR 882.5275 - Nerve cuff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nerve cuff. 882.5275 Section 882.5275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES NEUROLOGICAL DEVICES Neurological Therapeutic Devices § 882.5275 Nerve cuff. (a) Identification. A nerve...

  10. Ephaptic coupling of myelinated nerve fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binczak, S.; Eilbeck, J. C.; Scott, A. C.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical predictions of a simple myelinated nerve fiber model are compared with theoretical results in the continuum and discrete limits, clarifying the nature of the conduction process on an isolated nerve axon. Since myelinated nerve fibers are often arranged in bundles, this model is used to study ephaptic (nonsynaptic) interactions between impulses on parallel fibers, which may play a functional role in neural processing.

  11. Detection of peripheral nerve pathology

    PubMed Central

    Seelig, Michael J.; Baker, Jonathan C.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Pestronk, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare accuracy of ultrasound and MRI for detecting focal peripheral nerve pathology, excluding idiopathic carpal or cubital tunnel syndromes. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of patients referred for neuromuscular ultrasound to identify patients who had ultrasound and MRI of the same limb for suspected brachial plexopathy or mononeuropathies, excluding carpal/cubital tunnel syndromes. Ultrasound and MRI results were compared to diagnoses determined by surgical or, if not performed, clinical/electrodiagnostic evaluation. Results: We identified 53 patients who had both ultrasound and MRI of whom 46 (87%) had nerve pathology diagnosed by surgical (n = 39) or clinical/electrodiagnostic (n = 14) evaluation. Ultrasound detected the diagnosed nerve pathology (true positive) more often than MRI (43/46 vs 31/46, p < 0.001). Nerve pathology was correctly excluded (true negative) with equal frequency by MRI and ultrasound (both 6/7). In 25% (13/53), ultrasound was accurate (true positive or true negative) when MRI was not. These pathologies were typically (10/13) long (>2 cm) and only occasionally (2/13) outside the MRI field of view. MRI missed multifocal pathology identified with ultrasound in 6 of 7 patients, often (5/7) because pathology was outside the MRI field of view. Conclusions: Imaging frequently detects peripheral nerve pathology and contributes to the differential diagnosis in patients with mononeuropathies and brachial plexopathies. Ultrasound is more sensitive than MRI (93% vs 67%), has equivalent specificity (86%), and better identifies multifocal lesions than MRI. In sonographically accessible regions ultrasound is the preferred initial imaging modality for anatomic evaluation of suspected peripheral nervous system lesions. PMID:23553474

  12. Tyr199 in transmembrane domain 5 of the beta2-adrenergic receptor interacts directly with the pharmacophore of a unique fluorenone-based antagonist.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Z; Thiriot, D S; Ruoho, A E

    2001-01-01

    Mutagenesis of the beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2AR) has suggested that amino acids in transmembrane domain 5 (TMD 5) play an important role in the interaction of the receptor with the catechol end of adrenergic agonists. However, little direct biochemical evidence for the interaction of any beta2AR agonist or antagonist with TMD 5 has been reported. To identify receptor amino acids that contribute to the beta2AR antagonist binding site, we identified the precise amino acid photoinsertion site of a novel carazolol-like fluorenone antagonist photoaffinity label, [125I]iodoaminoflisopolol ([125I]IAmF). A unique property of this photolabel is that the photoreactive centre is also the binding pharmacophore, which corresponds to the catechol end of related beta2AR agonists. [125I]IAmF specifically photolabels membrane-bound and purified beta2AR from a baculovirus/Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm) ('Sf9') expression system. When the photolabelled beta2AR was cleaved by trypsin or Factor Xa, 30 kDa labelled peptides were generated. On the basis of concanavalin A binding and amino acid sequencing, these contain the N-terminus of the beta2AR, including TMDs 1-5. Further cleavage of the 30 kDa peptides with endoproteinase Lys-C generated a 4 kDa labelled peptide with an N-terminal amino acid sequence between TMDs 4 and 5. Radiosequencing of this peptide demonstrated that the precise [125I]IAmF photoinsertion site was Tyr(199) in TMD 5. Since the photoreactive centre and the binding pharmacophore of IAmF are the same, these data demonstrate that Tyr(199) interacts with the planar fluorenone moiety of a carazolol-like beta2AR antagonist, and contributes significant new information regarding the binding site for beta2AR antagonists. PMID:11237852

  13. Characterization of a beta-adrenergically inhibited K+ current in rat cardiac ventricular cells.

    PubMed Central

    Scamps, F

    1996-01-01

    1. The electrophysiological properties and beta-adrenergic regulation of a non-inactivating K+ current were studied using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique (22 +/- 2 degrees C) in adult rat ventricular cells. 2. In the presence of 4-aminopyridine, an inhibitor of the rapidly inactivating current, the depolarization-activated current consisted only of a slowly decaying outward current (IK). The presence of a non-inactivating current (ISS) was revealed when analysing inactivation curves. 3. IK and ISS were both sensitive to 50 mM tetraethylammonium and 10 mM 4-aminopyridine inhibition. IK was totally blocked by 100 microM clofilium, while ISS was not inhibited but rather enhanced by this class III anti-arrhythmic agent. 4. Unlike IK, ISS was only slightly decreased by depolarizing prepulses and it did not show time-dependent inactivation when measured during 500 ms depolarizations. 5. ISS was decreased by the beta-adrenergic agonist isoprenaline (1 microM). Forskolin (10 microM) mimicked the effects of isoprenaline. The non-specific beta-adrenergic antagonist, propranolol (3 microM), and a specific beta 1-adrenergic antagonist, CGP 20712A (0.3 microM), both prevented the effects of isoprenaline. Cell perfusion with 100 microM PKI6-22, a peptide inhibitor of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase, reduced or abolished the effects of isoprenaline. 6. The dose-response curve for the inhibition of ISS by isoprenaline was positioned to the left of that for the calcium current. The threshold dose and the dose giving 50% of the maximal effect were, respectively, 0.1 and 0.21 nM for ISS and 1 and 4.3 nM for ICa. 7. In view of the high sensitivity of ISS to isoprenaline, its possible physiological effect was evaluated on action potential duration during beta-adrenergic stimulation. At 1 nM, a concentration that did not increase ICa, isoprenaline induced a significant prolongation of action potential duration as a consequence of ISS inhibition. With 1 microM isoprenaline

  14. Response of the Adrenergic System After Provoked Bronchoconstriction in Patients with Bronchial Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Islami, Hilmi; Ilazi, Ali; Gashi, Nijazi; Mustafa, Lirim; Maloku, Halit; Jashanica, Adelina

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In this paper, effect of the Tolazoline as antagonist of the alpha-2 adrenergic receptors in patients with bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive bronchitis was studied, and also the effect of stimulation with Hexoprenaline of beta-2 adrenergic receptor after bronchi-constriction caused with Propranolol, and Acetylcholine. Methods: Lung function parameters are determined with Body plethysmography. In patients with bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive bronchitis was registered resistance (Raw), was determined the amount of intrathoracic gas volume (ITGV), and specific resistance was calculated as well (SRaw). Aerosolization was done with standard aerosolizing machine-Asema. Results: The study included a total of 21 patients. Two hours after the inhalation of Propranolol, in experimental group, it was applied the blocker of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors (Tolazoline 20 mg / ml with inhalator ways), which did not cause changes in bronchomotor tonus of tracheobronchial system (p > 1.0). Meanwhile, at the same patient, stimulation of beta-2 adrenergic receptor with Hexoprenaline (2 inh x 0.2 mg) is associated with a significant decrease of the specific resistance of airways (SRaw, p < 0.01). Control group results show that after bronchi-constriction caused by Propranolol-aerosol (20 mg / ml) in patients with bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive bronchitis, an increase of specific resistance in airways was caused (SRaw, p < 0.01), which confirms the presence of hyper-reactive bronco-constrictor effects intermediated by vagal ways. Two hours after Propranolol, inhaled Hexorenaline has blocked the action of Propranolol, but not entirely. Furthermore, two hours after acetylcholine-aerosol (1 mg /ml) was applied, inhaled Ipratropium (2 inh x 1 mg) has fully blocked the action of chemical bronchoconstrictor mediators, causing a decline of specific resistance in the airways (SRaw; p < 0.01). Conclusion: This suggests that primary mechanism, which would cause

  15. Application of implantable wireless biomicrosystem for monitoring nerve impedance of rat after sciatic nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Ting; Peng, Chih-Wei; Chen, Lung-Tai; Lin, Wen-Shan; Chu, Chun-Hsun; Chen, Jia-Jin Jason

    2013-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is usually applied percutaneously for facilitating peripheral nerve regeneration. However, few studies have conducted long-term monitoring of the condition of nerve regeneration. This study implements an implantable biomicrosystem for inducing pulse current for aiding nerve repair and monitoring the time-course changes of nerve impedance for assessing nerve regeneration in sciatic nerve injury rat model. For long-term implantation, a transcutaneous magnetic coupling technique is adopted for power and data transmission. For in vivo study, the implanted module was placed in the rat's abdomen and the cuff electrode was wrapped around an 8-mm sciatic nerve gap of the rat for nerve impedance measurement for 42 days. One group of animals received monophasic constant current via the cuff electrode and a second group had no stimulation between days 8-21. The nerve impedance increased to above 150% of the initial value in the nerve regeneration groups with and without stimulation whereas the group with no nerve regeneration increased to only 113% at day 42. The impedance increase in nerve regeneration groups can be observed before evident functional recovery. Also, the nerve regeneration group that received electrical stimulation had relatively higher myelinated fiber density than that of no stimulation group, 20686 versus 11417 fiber/mm (2). The developed implantable biomicrosystem is proven to be a useful experimental tool for long-term stimulation in aiding nerve fiber growth as well as impedance assessment for understanding the time-course changes of nerve regeneration. PMID:23060343

  16. Inferior alveolar and lingual nerve imaging.

    PubMed

    Miloro, Michael; Kolokythas, Antonia

    2011-03-01

    At present, there are no objective testing modalities available for evaluation of iatrogenic injury to the terminal branches of the trigeminal nerve, making such clinical diagnosis and management complicated for the oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Several imaging modalities can assist in the preoperative risk assessment of the trigeminal nerve as related to commonly performed procedures in the vicinity of the nerve, mostly third molar surgery. This article provides a review of all available imaging modalities and their clinical application relative to preoperative injury risk assessment of the inferior alveolar nerve and lingual nerve, and postinjury and postsurgical repair recovery status.

  17. [Axon-reflex based nerve fiber function assessment in the detection of autonomic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Siepmann, T; Illigens, B M-W; Reichmann, H; Ziemssen, T

    2014-10-01

    Axon-reflex-based tests of peripheral small nerve fiber function including techniques to quantify vasomotor and sudomotor responses following acetylcholine iontophoresis are used in the assessment of autonomic neuropathy. However, the established axon-reflex-based techniques, laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) to assess vasomotor function and quantitative sudomotor axon-reflex test (QSART) to measure sudomotor function, are limited by technically demanding settings as well as interindividual variability and are therefore restricted to specialized clinical centers. New axon-reflex tests are characterized by quantification of axon responses with both temporal and spatial resolution and include "laser Doppler imaging (LDI) axon-reflex flare area test" to assess vasomotor function, the quantitative direct and indirect test of sudomotor function (QDIRT) to quantify sudomotor function, as well as the quantitative pilomotor axon-reflex test (QPART), a technique to measure pilomotor nerve fiber function using adrenergic cutaneous stimulation through phenylephrine iontophoresis. The effectiveness of new axon-reflex tests in the assessment of neuropathy is currently being investigated in clinical studies.

  18. Designing ideal conduits for peripheral nerve repair

    PubMed Central

    de Ruiter, Godard C. W.; Malessy, Martijn J. A.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Windebank, Anthony J.; Spinner, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Nerve tubes, guides, or conduits are a promising alternative for autologous nerve graft repair. The first biodegradable empty single lumen or hollow nerve tubes are currently available for clinical use and are being used mostly in the repair of small-diameter nerves with nerve defects of < 3 cm. These nerve tubes are made of different biomaterials using various fabrication techniques. As a result these tubes also differ in physical properties. In addition, several modifications to the common hollow nerve tube (for example, the addition of Schwann cells, growth factors, and internal frameworks) are being investigated that may increase the gap that can be bridged. This combination of chemical, physical, and biological factors has made the design of a nerve conduit into a complex process that demands close collaboration of bioengineers, neuroscientists, and peripheral nerve surgeons. In this article the authors discuss the different steps that are involved in the process of the design of an ideal nerve conduit for peripheral nerve repair. PMID:19435445

  19. Redistribution of voltage-gated sodium channels after nerve decompression contributes to relieve neuropathic pain in chronic constriction injury.

    PubMed

    Tseng, To-Jung; Hsieh, Yu-Lin; Ko, Miau-Hwa; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2014-11-17

    Nerve decompression is an important therapeutic strategy to relieve neuropathic pain and promote the peripheral nerve regeneration. To address these issues, we investigated the effects of nerve decompression on relief of neuropathic pain behaviors, redistribution of voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), and skin reinnervation with chronic constriction injury (CCI). At post-operative week (POW) 4, animals were divided into a decompression group, in which the ligatures were removed, and a CCI group, in which the ligatures remained. Thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia at POW 8 had distinct reductions in decompression group compared to CCI group. At that time in CCI group, morphological evidence of pan VGSCs (Pan Nav) and isoforms of VGSCs (Nav1.6, Nav1.9, except for Nav1.8) were shown the widely distribution along the injured sciatic nerve. All of the VGSCs in decompression group became clustering around the node of Ranvier, similar to the pattern of control sciatic nerve at POW 8. Skin reinnervation was demonstrated by epidermal nerve density (END) for protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5)-immunoreactive (IR) nerve fibers and a significant difference between groups only at POW 24 (p=0.01). Growth-associated protein 43 (GAP-43) is participated in the nerve fiber growth and sprouting, a difference in END for GAP-43-IR nerve fibers at POW 24 between groups were also significant (p=0.02). These observations demonstrated that nerve decompression was accompanied with the disappearance of neuropathic pain behaviors after CCI. Morphological studies provided the evidence that redistribution of VGSCs along the injured sciatic nerve but still with an incomplete skin reinnervation. These significant findings demonstrated a role of VGSCs in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain, and gave an approaching in pharmacological basis of therapeutics. PMID:25038561

  20. Parotid lymphangioma associated with facial nerve paralysis.

    PubMed

    Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Tani, Akiko; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Omori, Koichi

    2014-10-01

    Parotid lymphangioma is a relatively rare disease that is usually detected in infancy or early childhood, and which has typical features. Clinical reports of facial nerve paralysis caused by lymphangioma, however, are very rare. Usually, facial nerve paralysis in a child suggests malignancy. Here we report a very rare case of parotid lymphangioma associated with facial nerve paralysis. A 7-year-old boy was admitted to hospital with a rapidly enlarging mass in the left parotid region. Left peripheral-type facial nerve paralysis was also noted. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging also revealed multiple cystic lesions. Open biopsy was undertaken in order to investigate the cause of the facial nerve paralysis. The histopathological findings of the excised tumor were consistent with lymphangioma. Prednisone (40 mg/day) was given in a tapering dose schedule. Facial nerve paralysis was completely cured 1 month after treatment. There has been no recurrent facial nerve paralysis for eight years.

  1. Evidence-based outcomes following inferior alveolar and lingual nerve injury and repair: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kushnerev, E; Yates, J M

    2015-10-01

    The inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) and lingual (LN) are susceptible to iatrogenic surgical damage. Systematically review recent clinical evidence regarding IAN/LN repair methods and to develop updated guidelines for managing injury. Recent publications on IAN/LN microsurgical repair from Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library databases were screened by title/abstract. Main texts were appraised for exclusion criteria: no treatment performed or results provided, poor/lacking procedural description, cohort <3 patients. Of 366 retrieved papers, 27 were suitable for final analysis. Treatment type for injured IANs/LNs depended on injury type, injury timing, neurosensory disturbances and intra-operative findings. Best functional nerve recovery occurred after direct apposition and suturing if nerve ending gaps were <10 mm; larger gaps required nerve grafting (sural/greater auricular nerve). Timing of microneurosurgical repair after injury remains debated. Most authors recommend surgery when neurosensory deficit shows no improvement 90 days post-diagnosis. Nerve transection diagnosed intra-operatively should be repaired in situ; minor nerve injury repair can be delayed. No consensus exists regarding optimal methods and timing for IAN/LN repair. We suggest a schematic guideline for treating IAN/LN injury, based on the most current evidence. We acknowledge that additional RCTs are required to provide definitive confirmation of optimal treatment approaches. PMID:26059454

  2. Nerves as embodied metaphor in the Canada/Mexico seasonal agricultural workers program.

    PubMed

    Mysyk, Avis; England, Margaret; Gallegos, Juan Arturo Avila

    2008-01-01

    This article examines nerves among participants in the Canada/Mexico Seasonal Agricultural Workers Program (C/MSAWP). Based on in-depth interviews with 30 Mexican farm workers in southwestern Ontario, we demonstrate that nerves embodies the distress of economic need, relative powerlessness, and the contradictions inherent in the C/MSAWP that result in various life's lesions. We also explore their use of the nerves idiom as an embodied metaphor for their awareness of the breakdown in self/society relations and, in certain cases, of the lack of control over even themselves. This article contributes to that body of literature that locates nerves at the "normal" end of the "normal/abnormal" continuum of popular illness categories because, despite the similarities in symptoms of nerves among Mexican farm workers and those of anxiety and/or mood disorders, medicalization has not occurred. If nerves has not been medicalized among Mexican farm workers, neither has it given rise to resistance to their relative powerlessness as migrant farm workers. Nonetheless, nerves does serve as an effective vehicle for expressing their distress within the context of the C/MSAWP.

  3. Novel use of biodegradable casein conduits for guided peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hsiang, Shih-Wei; Tsai, Chin-Chuan; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Ho, Tin-Yun; Yao, Chun-Hsu; Chen, Yueh-Sheng

    2011-11-01

    Recent advances in nerve repair technology have focused on finding more biocompatible, non-toxic materials to imitate natural peripheral nerve components. In this study, casein protein cross-linked with naturally occurring genipin (genipin-cross-linked casein (GCC)) was used for the first time to make a biodegradable conduit for peripheral nerve repair. The GCC conduit was dark blue in appearance with a concentric and round lumen. Water uptake, contact angle and mechanical tests indicated that the conduit had a high stability in water and did not collapse and cramped with a sufficiently high level of mechanical properties. Cytotoxic testing and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labelling assay showed that the GCC was non-toxic and non-apoptotic, which could maintain the survival and outgrowth of Schwann cells. Non-invasive real-time nuclear factor-κB bioluminescence imaging accompanied by histochemical assessment showed that the GCC was highly biocompatible after subcutaneous implantation in transgenic mice. Effectiveness of the GCC conduit as a guidance channel was examined as it was used to repair a 10 mm gap in the rat sciatic nerve. Electrophysiology, labelling of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the lumbar spinal cord, and histology analysis all showed a rapid morphological and functional recovery for the disrupted nerves. Therefore, we conclude that the GCC can offer great nerve regeneration characteristics and can be a promising material for the successful repair of peripheral nerve defects.

  4. Ketoprofen combined with artery graft entubulization improves functional recovery of transected peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Rahim; Mehrtash, Moein; Nikonam, Nima; Mehrtash, Moied; Amini, Keyvan

    2014-12-01

    The objective was to assess the local effect of ketoprofen on sciatic nerve regeneration and functional recovery. Eighty healthy male white Wistar rats were randomized into four experimental groups of 20 animals each: In the transected group (TC), the left sciatic nerve was transected and nerve cut ends were fixed in the adjacent muscle. In the treatment group the defect was bridged using an artery graft (AG/Keto) filled with 10 microliter ketoprofen (0.1 mg/kg). In the artery graft group (AG), the graft was filled with phosphated-buffer saline alone. In the sham-operated group (SHAM), the sciatic nerve was exposed and manipulated. Each group was subdivided into four subgroups of five animals each and regenerated nerve fibres were studied at 4, 8, 12 and 16 weeks post operation. Behavioural testing, sciatic nerve functional study, gastrocnemius muscle mass and morphometric indices showed earlier regeneration of axons in AG/Keto than in AG group (p < 0.05). Immunohistochemical study clearly showed more positive location of reactions to S-100 in AG/Keto than in AG group. When loaded in an artery graft, ketoprofen improved functional recovery and morphometric indices of the sciatic nerve. Local usage of this easily accessible therapeutic medicine is cost saving and avoids the problems associated with systemic administration.

  5. Nerves as embodied metaphor in the Canada/Mexico seasonal agricultural workers program.

    PubMed

    Mysyk, Avis; England, Margaret; Gallegos, Juan Arturo Avila

    2008-01-01

    This article examines nerves among participants in the Canada/Mexico Seasonal Agricultural Workers Program (C/MSAWP). Based on in-depth interviews with 30 Mexican farm workers in southwestern Ontario, we demonstrate that nerves embodies the distress of economic need, relative powerlessness, and the contradictions inherent in the C/MSAWP that result in various life's lesions. We also explore their use of the nerves idiom as an embodied metaphor for their awareness of the breakdown in self/society relations and, in certain cases, of the lack of control over even themselves. This article contributes to that body of literature that locates nerves at the "normal" end of the "normal/abnormal" continuum of popular illness categories because, despite the similarities in symptoms of nerves among Mexican farm workers and those of anxiety and/or mood disorders, medicalization has not occurred. If nerves has not been medicalized among Mexican farm workers, neither has it given rise to resistance to their relative powerlessness as migrant farm workers. Nonetheless, nerves does serve as an effective vehicle for expressing their distress within the context of the C/MSAWP. PMID:18958786

  6. Comparative study of peripheral neuropathy and nerve regeneration in NOD and ICR diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Homs, Judit; Ariza, Lorena; Pagès, Gemma; Verdú, Enrique; Casals, Laura; Udina, Esther; Chillón, Miguel; Bosch, Assumpció; Navarro, Xavier

    2011-09-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse was suggested as an adequate model for diabetic autonomic neuropathy. We evaluated sensory-motor neuropathy and nerve regeneration following sciatic nerve crush in NOD males rendered diabetic by multiple low doses of streptozotocin, in comparison with similarly treated Institute for Cancer Research (ICR) mice, a widely used model for type I diabetes. Neurophysiological values for both strains showed a decline in motor and sensory nerve conduction velocity at 7 and 8 weeks after induction of diabetes in the intact hindlimb. However, amplitudes of compound muscle and sensory action potentials (CMAPs and CNAPs) were significantly reduced in NOD but not in ICR diabetic mice. Morphometrical analysis showed myelinated fiber loss in highly hyperglycemic NOD mice, but no significant changes in fiber size. There was a reduction of intraepidermal nerve fibers, more pronounced in NOD than in ICR diabetic mice. Interestingly, aldose reductase and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activities were increased already at 1 week of hyperglycemia, persisting until the end of the experiment in both strains. Muscle and nerve reinnervation was delayed in diabetic mice following sciatic nerve crush, being more marked in NOD mice. Thus, diabetes of mid-duration induces more severe peripheral neuropathy and slower nerve regeneration in NOD than in ICR mice.

  7. cAMP-synthesis in a medullary thyroid carcinoma cell line: response to adrenergic agents and prostaglandines.

    PubMed

    Mertens, P R; Goretzki, P E; Keck, E

    1999-01-01

    Calcitonin secretion by C-cells is mediated through intracellular 3'5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and calcium signaling. Calcitonin release stimulation tests may take advantage of both signaling cascades in screening for medullary thyroid carcinomas (MTC). To elucidate the regulation of the adenylyl cyclase system we have determined cAMP levels of a calcitonin-expressing MTC cell line (RG) after exposure to adrenergic agents and prostaglandines. In early passages (20-30) cAMP concentrations were significantly elevated in RG cells after exposure to beta-adrenergic agents and prostaglandines E1 and E2. In advanced passages (60-80) the beta-adrenergic response was no longer detectable and adrenergic receptors were uncoupled from the adenylyl cyclase complex; while the effect of prostaglandines E1 and E2 remained unaffected. Preincubation with dexamethasone, in a process requiring protein new synthesis, re-established the adrenergic response in later passages, indicating that RG cells dedifferentiated in culture over time. Our in vitro findings suggest that MTC cell dedifferentiation may be accompanied by adrenergic receptor-uncoupling from the adenylate cyclase system and that this process may be reversed by dexamethasone incubation.

  8. A role for alpha-adrenergic receptors in extinction of conditioned fear and cocaine conditioned place preference.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, Rick E; Lattal, K Matthew

    2010-04-01

    Previous work has demonstrated an important role for adrenergic receptors in memory processes in fear and drug conditioning paradigms. Recent studies have also demonstrated alterations in extinction in these paradigms using drug treatments targeting beta- and alpha2-adrenergic receptors, but little is known about the role of alpha-adrenergic receptors in extinction. The current study examined whether antagonism of alpha-adrenergic receptors would impair the consolidation of extinction in fear and cocaine conditioned place preference paradigms. After contextual fear conditioning, injections of the alpha-adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin (1.0 or 3.0 mg/kg) following nonreinforced context exposures slowed the loss of conditioned freezing over the course of 5 extinction sessions (Experiment 1). After cocaine place conditioning, prazosin had no effect on the rate of extinction over 8 nonreinforced test sessions. Following postextinction reconditioning, however, prazosin-treated mice showed a robust place preference, but vehicle-treated mice did not, suggesting that prazosin reduced the persistent effects of extinction (Experiment 2). These results confirm the involvement of the alpha-adrenergic receptor in extinction processes in both appetitive and aversive preparations.

  9. Linking physiological and cellular responses to thermal stress: β-adrenergic blockade reduces the heat shock response in fish.

    PubMed

    Templeman, Nicole M; LeBlanc, Sacha; Perry, Steve F; Currie, Suzanne

    2014-08-01

    When faced with stress, animals use physiological and cellular strategies to preserve homeostasis. We were interested in how these high-level stress responses are integrated at the level of the whole animal. Here, we investigated the capacity of the physiological stress response, and specifically the β-adrenergic response, to affect the induction of the cellular heat shock proteins, HSPs, following a thermal stress in vivo. We predicted that blocking β-adrenergic stimulation during an acute heat stress in the whole animal would result in reduced levels of HSPs in red blood cells (RBCs) of rainbow trout compared to animals where adrenergic signaling remained intact. We first determined that a 1 h heat shock at 25 °C in trout acclimated to 13 °C resulted in RBC adrenergic stimulation as determined by a significant increase in cell swelling, a hallmark of the β-adrenergic response. A whole animal injection with the β2-adrenergic antagonist, ICI-118,551, successfully reduced this heat-induced RBC swelling. The acute heat shock caused a significant induction of HSP70 in RBCs of 13 °C-acclimated trout as well as a significant increase in plasma catecholamines. When heat-shocked fish were treated with ICI-118,551, we observed a significant attenuation of the HSP70 response. We conclude that circulating catecholamines influence the cellular heat shock response in rainbow trout RBCs, demonstrating physiological/hormonal control of the cellular stress response.

  10. Up-regulation of guinea pig myometrial beta-adrenergic receptors by intrauterine estradiol and progesterone pellets.

    PubMed

    Hatjis, C G; Koritnik, D R; Grogan, D M

    1989-03-01

    The effect of intrauterine implantation of 17 beta-estradiol and progesterone on the concentration and affinity of myometrial beta-adrenergic receptor were studied in nonpregnant, previously oophorectomized guinea pigs receiving intrauterine implants of either 17 beta-estradiol, progesterone, a combination of the two hormones, or placebo for 7 days. Myometrial beta-adrenergic receptors were characterized by use of (-)-iodine 125-cyanopindolol as the specific beta-adrenergic receptor ligand. On comparison with the control group, administration of 17 beta-estradiol or progesterone resulted in a severalfold increase in the concentration (Bmax) of myometrial beta-adrenergic receptor and a lesser but significant increase in the dissociation constant, KD. Although a combination of 17 beta-estradiol and progesterone treatment increased the concentration and the dissociation constant of beta-adrenergic receptors, it did not result in any synergistic or additive effect. We conclude that intrauterine administration of these sex steroid hormones, directly or indirectly, modulates myometrial beta-adrenergic receptor concentrations and affinity.

  11. Caspase-3 dependent nitrergic neuronal apoptosis following cavernous nerve injury is mediated via RhoA and ROCK activation in major pelvic ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Johanna L.; Matsui, Hotaka; Sopko, Nikolai A.; Liu, Xiaopu; Weyne, Emmanuel; Albersen, Maarten; Watson, Joseph W.; Hoke, Ahmet; Burnett, Arthur L.; Bivalacqua, Trinity J.

    2016-01-01

    Axonal injury due to prostatectomy leads to Wallerian degeneration of the cavernous nerve (CN) and erectile dysfunction (ED). Return of potency is dependent on axonal regeneration and reinnervation of the penis. Following CN injury (CNI), RhoA and Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) increase in penile endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Previous studies indicate that nerve regeneration is hampered by activation of RhoA/ROCK pathway. We evaluated the role of RhoA/ROCK pathway in CN regulation following CNI using a validated rat model. CNI upregulated gene and protein expression of RhoA/ROCK and caspase-3 mediated apoptosis in the major pelvic ganglion (MPG). ROCK inhibitor (ROCK-I) prevented upregulation of RhoA/ROCK pathway as well as activation of caspase-3 in the MPG. Following CNI, there was decrease in the dimer to monomer ratio of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) protein and lowered NOS activity in the MPG, which were prevented by ROCK-I. CNI lowered intracavernous pressure and impaired non-adrenergic non-cholinergic-mediated relaxation in the penis, consistent with ED. ROCK-I maintained the intracavernous pressure and non-adrenergic non-cholinergic-mediated relaxation in the penis following CNI. These results suggest that activation of RhoA/ROCK pathway mediates caspase-3 dependent apoptosis of nitrergic neurons in the MPG following CNI and that ROCK-I can prevent post-prostatectomy ED. PMID:27388816

  12. Caspase-3 dependent nitrergic neuronal apoptosis following cavernous nerve injury is mediated via RhoA and ROCK activation in major pelvic ganglion.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Johanna L; Matsui, Hotaka; Sopko, Nikolai A; Liu, Xiaopu; Weyne, Emmanuel; Albersen, Maarten; Watson, Joseph W; Hoke, Ahmet; Burnett, Arthur L; Bivalacqua, Trinity J

    2016-01-01

    Axonal injury due to prostatectomy leads to Wallerian degeneration of the cavernous nerve (CN) and erectile dysfunction (ED). Return of potency is dependent on axonal regeneration and reinnervation of the penis. Following CN injury (CNI), RhoA and Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) increase in penile endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Previous studies indicate that nerve regeneration is hampered by activation of RhoA/ROCK pathway. We evaluated the role of RhoA/ROCK pathway in CN regulation following CNI using a validated rat model. CNI upregulated gene and protein expression of RhoA/ROCK and caspase-3 mediated apoptosis in the major pelvic ganglion (MPG). ROCK inhibitor (ROCK-I) prevented upregulation of RhoA/ROCK pathway as well as activation of caspase-3 in the MPG. Following CNI, there was decrease in the dimer to monomer ratio of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) protein and lowered NOS activity in the MPG, which were prevented by ROCK-I. CNI lowered intracavernous pressure and impaired non-adrenergic non-cholinergic-mediated relaxation in the penis, consistent with ED. ROCK-I maintained the intracavernous pressure and non-adrenergic non-cholinergic-mediated relaxation in the penis following CNI. These results suggest that activation of RhoA/ROCK pathway mediates caspase-3 dependent apoptosis of nitrergic neurons in the MPG following CNI and that ROCK-I can prevent post-prostatectomy ED.

  13. Cardiac beta-adrenergic receptors and coronary hemodynamics in the conscious dog during hypoxic hypoxia.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, H. H.; Stone, H. L.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanisms by which acute hypoxia (10% and 5% oxygen) mediates changes in coronary blood flow and cardiac function were investigated in the conscious dog. When the dogs breathed hypoxic gas mixtures through a tracheostomy, both arterial and coronary sinus oxygen tensions were significantly decreased. With 5% oxygen, there were significant increases in heart rate (25%), maximum left ventricular dP/dt (39%), left circumflex coronary artery blood flow (163%), and left ventricular oxygen consumption (52%), which were attenuated by beta-adrenergic blockage with propranolol. When electrical pacing was used to keep the ventricular rate constant during hypoxia, there was no significant difference in coronary blood flow before and after beta blockade. Beta-adrenergic receptor activity in the myocardium participates in the integrated response to hypoxia although it may not cause active vasodilation of the coronary vessels.

  14. Adrenergic regulation of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 leads to enhanced macrophage recruitment and ovarian carcinoma growth.

    PubMed

    Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N; Gonzalez-Villasana, Vianey; Nagaraja, Archana S; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Sadaoui, Nouara C; Stone, Rebecca L; Matsuo, Koji; Dalton, Heather J; Previs, Rebecca A; Jennings, Nicholas B; Dorniak, Piotr; Hansen, Jean M; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Cole, Steve W; Lutgendorf, Susan K; Sood, Anil K; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2015-02-28

    Increased adrenergic signaling facilitates tumor progression, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We examined factors responsible for stress-mediated effects on monocyte/macrophage recruitment into the tumor microenvironment, and the resultant effects on tumor growth. In vitro, MCP1 was significantly increased after catecholamine exposure, which was mediated by cAMP and PKA. Tumor samples from mice subjected to daily restraint stress had elevated MCP1 gene and protein levels, increased CD14+ cells, and increased infiltration of CD68+ cells. hMCP1 siRNA-DOPC nanoparticles significantly abrogated daily restraint stress-induced tumor growth and inhibited infiltration of CD68+ and F4/80+ cells. In ovarian cancer patients, elevated peripheral blood monocytes and tumoral macrophages were associated with worse overall survival. Collectively, we demonstrate that increased adrenergic signaling is associated with macrophage infiltration and mediated by tumor cell-derived MCP1 production. PMID:25738355

  15. Regional fat loss from the thigh in obese women after adrenergic modulation.

    PubMed

    Greenway, F L; Bray, G A

    1987-01-01

    Beta-adrenergic stimulation and alpha 2-adrenergic inhibition increase lipolysis from fat cells. Twenty-eight obese women were placed on a calorie-restricted diet and one of five treatments was applied to one thigh three to five times per week for four weeks: (1) isoproterenol injections; (2) cream containing colforsin (forskolin), aminophylline, and yohimbine; (3) yohimbine cream; (4) colforsin cream; or (5) aminophylline cream. The opposite thigh was treated with a placebo (injection or cream). The treated thighs lost significantly more girth after treatment, both by injection and by cream. No adverse reactions were attributable to either the cream or the injections. It is concluded that local fat reduction from the thigh can be safely accomplished. PMID:2894247

  16. Altered hepatic vasopressin and alpha 1-adrenergic receptors after chronic endotoxin infusion

    SciTech Connect

    Roth, B.L.; Spitzer, J.A.

    1987-05-01

    Sepsis and septic shock are complicated by a number of hemodynamic and metabolic aberrations. These include catecholamine refractoriness and altered glucose metabolism. Recently, a nonshock rat model of continuous endotoxin infusion via an implanted osmotic pump was developed that reproduces some of the metabolic and cardiovascular findings of human sepsis. By using this model, we have found a decreased number of hepatic plasma membrane alpha 1-adrenergic and (Arg8)vasopressin receptors in rats continuously infused with endotoxin. There was a significant decrease in (/sup 3/H)prazosin (35 +/- 7%) and (/sup 3/H) (Arg8)vasopressin (43 +/- 8%) receptors after 30 h of continuous endotoxin infusion with no change in affinity. The ability of norepinephrine to form the high-affinity complex with alpha 1-adrenergic receptors was not altered after chronic endotoxin infusion. The results are consistent with the concept that alterations in receptor number might underlie certain of the metabolic consequences of chronic sepsis.

  17. Does adrenergic activity suppress insulin secretion during surgery? A clinical experiment with halothane anesthesia.

    PubMed Central

    Aärimaa, M; Syvälahti, E; Ovaska, J

    1978-01-01

    Peroperative inhibition of insulin release is widely attributed to increased alpha-adrenergic activity. To test this hypothesis serum insulin and glucose concentrations were measured at short intervals in 11 patients who underwent major surgery. Five patients were anesthetized with halothane and six with general anesthesia without halothane. The results were similar in both patient groups; halothane had no effect on insulin. This suggests that suppression of insulin under operations is probably not due to activation of the alpha-adrenergic receptors of the pancreatic beta-cells. The authors propose that suppression of insulin secretion during surgery may be caused by adrenaline, which, in competing for the glucose receptors, insensitizes the pancreatic beta-cells. PMID:202205

  18. Historical Overview of the Effect of β-Adrenergic Agonists on Beef Cattle Production

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Bradley J.; Smith, Stephen B.; Chung, Ki Yong

    2014-01-01

    Postnatal muscle hypertrophy of beef cattle is the result of enhanced myofibrillar protein synthesis and reduced protein turnover. Skeletal muscle hypertrophy has been studied in cattle fed β-adrenergic agonists (β-AA), which are receptor-mediated enhancers of protein synthesis and inhibitors of protein degradation. Feeding β-AA to beef cattle increases longissimus muscle cross-sectional area 6% to 40% compared to non-treated cattle. The β-AA have been reported to improve live animal performance, including average daily gain, feed efficiency, hot carcass weight, and dressing percentage. Treatment with β-AA increased mRNA concentration of the β2 or β1-adrenergic receptor and myosin heavy chain IIX in bovine skeletal muscle tissue. This review will examine the effects of skeletal muscle and adipose development with β-AA, and will interpret how the use of β-AA affects performance, body composition, and growth in beef cattle. PMID:25050012

  19. Adrenergic regulation of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 leads to enhanced macrophage recruitment and ovarian carcinoma growth.

    PubMed

    Armaiz-Pena, Guillermo N; Gonzalez-Villasana, Vianey; Nagaraja, Archana S; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Sadaoui, Nouara C; Stone, Rebecca L; Matsuo, Koji; Dalton, Heather J; Previs, Rebecca A; Jennings, Nicholas B; Dorniak, Piotr; Hansen, Jean M; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Cole, Steve W; Lutgendorf, Susan K; Sood, Anil K; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2015-02-28

    Increased adrenergic signaling facilitates tumor progression, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We examined factors responsible for stress-mediated effects on monocyte/macrophage recruitment into the tumor microenvironment, and the resultant effects on tumor growth. In vitro, MCP1 was significantly increased after catecholamine exposure, which was mediated by cAMP and PKA. Tumor samples from mice subjected to daily restraint stress had elevated MCP1 gene and protein levels, increased CD14+ cells, and increased infiltration of CD68+ cells. hMCP1 siRNA-DOPC nanoparticles significantly abrogated daily restraint stress-induced tumor growth and inhibited infiltration of CD68+ and F4/80+ cells. In ovarian cancer patients, elevated peripheral blood monocytes and tumoral macrophages were associated with worse overall survival. Collectively, we demonstrate that increased adrenergic signaling is associated with macrophage infiltration and mediated by tumor cell-derived MCP1 production.

  20. Expression of two alpha 2-adrenergic receptor subtypes in human placenta: evidence from direct binding studies.

    PubMed

    Falkay, G; Kovács, L

    1994-09-01

    Adrenergic receptors may play an important role for mediating a variety of metabolic and haemodynamic effects of catecholamines including placental blood flow. The alpha-adrenergic receptors of the human placenta were characterized in vitro by the use of [3H]rauwolscine and [3H]prazosin as radioligands. Saturation experiments would suggest that the alpha-adrenoceptors in the human placenta are alpha 2. Comparative binding studies were performed, using recently synthesized compounds (Beecham Pharmaceuticals, UK) selective for alpha 2A (BRL-44408) and alpha 2B (BRL-41992) subtypes. The results indicate that human placenta contains at least two pharmacologically distinct alpha 2-adrenoceptor subtypes with approximately 60 per cent alpha 2A and 40 per cent alpha 2B receptors. In contrast with the pattern of increasing beta-adrenoceptor density, the concentration of alpha 2-adrenoceptors in term placentae is significantly lower than in placentae from the first trimester.

  1. Correlation between beta- and alpha-adrenergic receptor concentrations in human placenta.

    PubMed

    Falkay, G; Melis, K; Kovács, L

    1994-05-01

    alpha 2- and beta-adrenergic receptors in human placental membranes have been investigated using the radioligands [3H]-RX 821002 and [3H]-dihydroalprenolol, respectively. The specific binding of the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist RX 821002 confirms the presence of an alpha 2-adrenoceptor in the human placenta, which has been characterized previously with [3H]-rauwolscine. The major finding presented here is a correlation between the alpha 2- and beta-adrenergic receptor concentrations (r = 0.765) in the human placenta at term. It is suggested that the alpha 2/beta adrenoceptor balance may play an important role in regulation of the vascular bed of the placenta. Determination of the alpha 2/beta ratio may help towards an understanding of the contractility of the placental vascular muscles.

  2. An unusual presentation of whiplash injury: long thoracic and spinal accessory nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Omar, N.; Srinivasan, M. S.

    2007-01-01

    Whiplash injuries from motor vehicle accidents are very common. The usual presentation and course of this condition normally results in resolution of symptoms within a few weeks. Brachial plexus traction injuries without any bone or joint lesion of the cervical spine have been reported before. We report a case where a gentleman was involved in a rear end vehicle collision, sustained a whiplash injury and was later found to have a long thoracic nerve palsy and spinal accessory nerve palsy. Although isolated injuries of both nerves following a whiplash injury have been reported, combined injury of the two nerves following a whiplash injury is very uncommon and is being reported for the first time. PMID:17587067

  3. Pleiotrophin and peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, Li; Jianghai, Chen; Juan, Liu; Hao, Kang

    2009-10-01

    The proto-oncogene pleiotrophin, discovered in 1989, was considered as a multifunctional growth factor, which played an important role in tumor occurrence, development, and central nervous system. The latest research showed that pleiotrophin signal pathway probably participated in neural repair after peripheral nerve injury, especially in the following critical points, such as the protection of spinal cord neuron, the promotion of the speed of neuron axon regeneration, the guidance of neuron axon regeneration, skeleton muscle reinnervation, and so on. It potentially plays a key role in the guidance of neural axon regeneration in peripheral nervous system and muscle reinnervation. With the deepening of related researches, pleiotrophin gene would become a controllable target for improving the repairing effect of peripheral nerve injury and reconstruction of the neuromuscular junction.

  4. Complement components of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid influence the microenvironment of nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guang-shuai; Li, Qing-feng; Dong, Ming-min; Zan, Tao; Ding, Shuang; Liu, Lin-bo

    2016-01-01

    Nerve regeneration conditioned fluid is secreted by nerve stumps inside a nerve regeneration chamber. A better understanding of the proteinogram of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid can provide evidence for studying the role of the microenvironment in peripheral nerve regeneration. In this study, we used cylindrical silicone tubes as the nerve regeneration chamber model for the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation proteomics technology and western blot analysis confirmed that there were more than 10 complement components (complement factor I, C1q-A, C1q-B, C2, C3, C4, C5, C7, C8β and complement factor D) in the nerve regeneration conditioned fluid and each varied at different time points. These findings suggest that all these complement components have a functional role in nerve regeneration. PMID:27212935

  5. Alcohol neurolysis of digital nerves

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Garrett K.; Burnett, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol neurolysis is a well-established treatment in chronic pain management, often used in cases of intractable cancer-related pain that is refractory to other management therapies. We describe a 76-year-old woman with chronic toe neuritis who failed multiple treatments, including oral and topical analgesics, nerve blocks, and radiofrequency ablations. Alcohol neurolysis was performed via digit block of the toe resulting in 100% pain relief. PMID:27365891

  6. Exogenous nerve growth factor protects the hypoglossal nerve against crush injury

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-yuan; Wang, Zhong-chao; Wang, Pin; Lan, Yu-yan; Tu, Ling

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that sensory nerve damage can activate the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, but whether the same type of nerve injury after exercise activates the p38MAPK pathway remains unclear. Several studies have demonstrated that nerve growth factor may play a role in the repair process after peripheral nerve injury, but there has been little research focusing on the hypoglossal nerve injury and repair. In this study, we designed and established rat models of hypoglossal nerve crush injury and gave intraperitoneal injections of exogenous nerve growth factor to rats for 14 days. p38MAPK activity in the damaged neurons was increased following hypoglossal nerve crush injury; exogenous nerve growth factor inhibited this increase in acitivity and increased the survival rate of motor neurons within the hypoglossal nucleus. Under transmission electron microscopy, we found that the injection of nerve growth factor contributed to the restoration of the morphology of hypoglossal nerve after crush injury. Our experimental findings indicate that exogenous nerve growth factor can protect damaged neurons and promote hypoglossal nerve regeneration following hypoglossal nerve crush injury. PMID:26889186

  7. The longitudinal epineural incision and complete nerve transection method for modeling sciatic nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xing-long; Wang, Pei; Sun, Bo; Liu, Shi-bo; Gao, Yun-feng; He, Xin-ze; Yu, Chang-yu

    2015-01-01

    Injury severity, operative technique and nerve regeneration are important factors to consider when constructing a model of peripheral nerve injury. Here, we present a novel peripheral nerve injury model and compare it with the complete sciatic nerve transection method. In the experimental group, under a microscope, a 3-mm longitudinal incision was made in the epineurium of the sciatic nerve to reveal the nerve fibers, which were then transected. The small, longitudinal incision in the epineurium was then sutured closed, requiring no stump anastomosis. In the control group, the sciatic nerve was completely transected, and the epineurium was repaired by anastomosis. At 2 and 4 weeks after surgery, Wallerian degeneration was observed in both groups. In the experimental group, at 8 and 12 weeks after surgery, distinct medullary nerve fibers and axons were observed in the injured sciatic nerve. Regular, dense myelin sheaths were visible, as well as some scarring. By 12 weeks, the myelin sheaths were normal and intact, and a tight lamellar structure was observed. Functionally, limb movement and nerve conduction recovered in the injured region between 4 and 12 weeks. The present results demonstrate that longitudinal epineural incision with nerve transection can stably replicate a model of Sunderland grade IV peripheral nerve injury. Compared with the complete sciatic nerve transection model, our method reduced the difficulties of micromanipulation and surgery time, and resulted in good stump restoration, nerve regeneration, and functional recovery. PMID:26692866

  8. Modeling beta-adrenergic control of cardiac myocyte contractility in silico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saucerman, Jeffrey J.; Brunton, Laurence L.; Michailova, Anushka P.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; McCullough, A. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The beta-adrenergic signaling pathway regulates cardiac myocyte contractility through a combination of feedforward and feedback mechanisms. We used systems analysis to investigate how the components and topology of this signaling network permit neurohormonal control of excitation-contraction coupling in the rat ventricular myocyte. A kinetic model integrating beta-adrenergic signaling with excitation-contraction coupling was formulated, and each subsystem was validated with independent biochemical and physiological measurements. Model analysis was used to investigate quantitatively the effects of specific molecular perturbations. 3-Fold overexpression of adenylyl cyclase in the model allowed an 85% higher rate of cyclic AMP synthesis than an equivalent overexpression of beta 1-adrenergic receptor, and manipulating the affinity of Gs alpha for adenylyl cyclase was a more potent regulator of cyclic AMP production. The model predicted that less than 40% of adenylyl cyclase molecules may be stimulated under maximal receptor activation, and an experimental protocol is suggested for validating this prediction. The model also predicted that the endogenous heat-stable protein kinase inhibitor may enhance basal cyclic AMP buffering by 68% and increasing the apparent Hill coefficient of protein kinase A activation from 1.0 to 2.0. Finally, phosphorylation of the L-type calcium channel and phospholamban were found sufficient to predict the dominant changes in myocyte contractility, including a 2.6x increase in systolic calcium (inotropy) and a 28% decrease in calcium half-relaxation time (lusitropy). By performing systems analysis, the consequences of molecular perturbations in the beta-adrenergic signaling network may be understood within the context of integrative cellular physiology.

  9. beta2-adrenergic receptor polymorphisms and salbutamol-stimulated energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Oomen, J M; van Rossum, C T M; Hoebee, B; Saris, W H M; van Baak, M A

    2005-04-01

    The beta-adrenergic system is involved in the control of energy metabolism and expenditure. The beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2-AR) gene shows polymorphisms that have been associated with obesity in several studies. In vitro and in vivo studies suggest differences in beta2-AR-mediated function between these polymorphisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of genetic variation in codon 16 of the beta2-AR gene on energy metabolism in humans. Thirty-four subjects were recruited [Gly16Gly (n = 13), Gly16Arg (n = 16), or Arg16Arg (n = 5)]. The beta2-AR was stimulated with two doses of salbutamol (50 and 100 ng/kg fat-free mass per minute) after blockade of the beta1-adrenergic receptors with atenolol. Energy expenditure and plasma substrate and hormone concentrations were measured. The increase in energy expenditure (DeltaEE) was significantly different among groups in which the Arg16Arg group showed the lowest increase (P < 0.05 vs. Gly carriers). In a multiple regression model, variations in the increase in nonesterified fatty acid concentration during salbutamol infusion (partial r = 0.51) and the polymorphism contributed significantly to the variation in DeltaEE. Thirty-five percent of the variation in DeltaEE was explained by these two factors. We conclude that subjects with the Arg16Arg polymorphism of the beta2-AR gene have a reduced thermogenic response to beta2-adrenergic stimulation. Although this relatively small study needs confirmation, the findings support a role for this polymorphism in the development and maintenance of overweight and obesity.

  10. Genetics of β2-Adrenergic Receptors and the Cardiopulmonary Response to Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Eric M.; Johnson, Bruce D.; Joyner, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Exercise elicits a number of physiologic responses to increase oxygen delivery to working muscles. The β2-adrenergic receptors (ADRB2) play a role in the cardiopulmonary response to exercise. This review is focused on how the gene that encodes the ADRB2 influences the cardiopulmonary response to exercise. In addition, we discuss possible interactions between ADRB2 and other genes important in exercise performance. PMID:18362692

  11. Greater Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Mediated Vasodilation in Women Using Oral Contraceptives

    PubMed Central

    Limberg, Jacqueline K.; Peltonen, Garrett L.; Johansson, Rebecca E.; Harrell, John W.; Kellawan, Jeremy M.; Eldridge, Marlowe W.; Sebranek, Joshua J.; Walker, Benjamin J.; Schrage, William G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: β-adrenergic receptors play an important role in mitigating the pressor effects of sympathetic nervous system activity in young women. Based on recent data showing oral contraceptive use in women abolishes the relationship between muscle sympathetic nervous system activity and blood pressure, we hypothesized forearm blood flow responses to a β-adrenergic receptor agonist would be greater in young women currently using oral contraceptives (OC+, n = 13) when compared to those not using oral contraceptives (OC–, n = 10). Methods: Women (18–35 years) were studied during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle (days 1–5) or placebo phase of oral contraceptive use. Forearm blood flow (FBF, Doppler ultrasound) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP, brachial arterial catheter) were measured at baseline and during graded brachial artery infusion of the β-adrenergic receptor agonist, Isoproterenol (ISO), as well as Acetylcholine (ACH, endothelium-dependent vasodilation) and Nitroprusside (NTP, endothelium-independent vasodilation). Forearm vascular conductance was calculated (FVC = FBF/MAP, ml/min/100 mmHg) and the rise in FVC from baseline during infusion quantified vasodilation (ΔFVC = FVCinfusion − FVCbaseline). Results: ISO increased FVC in both groups (p < 0.01) and ISO-mediated ΔFVC was greater in OC+ compared to OC– (Main effect of group, p = 0.02). Expressing data as FVC and FBF resulted in similar conclusions. FVC responses to both ACH and NTP were also greater in OC+ compared to OC–. Conclusions: These data are the first to demonstrate greater β-adrenergic receptor-mediated vasodilation in the forearm of women currently using oral contraceptives (placebo phase) when compared to those not using oral contraceptives (early follicular phase), and suggest oral contraceptive use influences neurovascular control. PMID:27375493

  12. Hypoxia increases exercise heart rate despite combined inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors.

    PubMed

    Siebenmann, C; Rasmussen, P; Sørensen, H; Bonne, T C; Zaar, M; Aachmann-Andersen, N J; Nordsborg, N B; Secher, N H; Lundby, C

    2015-06-15

    Hypoxia increases the heart rate response to exercise, but the mechanism(s) remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that the tachycardic effect of hypoxia persists during separate, but not combined, inhibition of β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors. Nine subjects performed incremental exercise to exhaustion in normoxia and hypoxia (fraction of inspired O2 = 12%) after intravenous administration of 1) no drugs (Cont), 2) propranolol (Prop), 3) glycopyrrolate (Glyc), or 4) Prop + Glyc. HR increased with exercise in all drug conditions (P < 0.001) but was always higher at a given workload in hypoxia than normoxia (P < 0.001). Averaged over all workloads, the difference between hypoxia and normoxia was 19.8 ± 13.8 beats/min during Cont and similar (17.2 ± 7.7 beats/min, P = 0.95) during Prop but smaller (P < 0.001) during Glyc and Prop + Glyc (9.8 ± 9.6 and 8.1 ± 7.6 beats/min, respectively). Cardiac output was enhanced by hypoxia (P < 0.002) to an extent that was similar between Cont, Glyc, and Prop + Glyc (2.3 ± 1.9, 1.7 ± 1.8, and 2.3 ± 1.2 l/min, respectively, P > 0.4) but larger during Prop (3.4 ± 1.6 l/min, P = 0.004). Our results demonstrate that the tachycardic effect of hypoxia during exercise partially relies on vagal withdrawal. Conversely, sympathoexcitation either does not contribute or increases heart rate through mechanisms other than β-adrenergic transmission. A potential candidate is α-adrenergic transmission, which could also explain why a tachycardic effect of hypoxia persists during combined β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptor inhibition.

  13. Muscarinic cholinergic and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in the epithelium and muscularis of the human ileum

    SciTech Connect

    Lepor, H.; Rigaud, G.; Shapiro, E.; Baumann, M.; Kodner, I.J.; Fleshman, J.W. )

    1990-04-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the binding and functional properties of muscarinic cholinergic (MCh) and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors in the human ileum to provide insight into pharmacologic strategies for managing urinary and fecal incontinence after bladder and rectal replacement with intestinal segments. MCh and alpha 2-adrenergic binding sites were characterized in the epithelium and muscularis of eight human ileal segments with 3H-N-methylscopolamine and 3H-rauwolscine, respectively. The dissociation constant for 3H-N-methylscopolamine in the epithelium and muscularis was 0.32 +/- 0.07 nmol/L and 0.45 +/- 0.10 nmol/L, respectively (p = 0.32). The MCh receptor content was approximately eightfold greater in the muscularis compared with the epithelium (p = 0.008). The dissociation constant for 3H-rauwolscine in the muscularis and epithelium was 2.55 +/- 0.42 nmol/L and 2.03 +/- 0.19 nmol/L, respectively (p = 0.29). The alpha 2-adrenoceptor density was twofold greater in the epithelium compared with the muscularis (p = 0.05). Noncumulative concentration-response experiments were performed with carbachol, an MCh agonist, and UK-14304, a selective alpha 2-adrenergic agonist. The epithelium did not contract in the presence of high concentrations of carbachol and UK-14304. The muscularis preparations were responsive only to carbachol. The muscularis contains primarily MCh receptors mediating smooth muscle contraction. The alpha 2-adrenoceptors are localized primarily to the epithelium and may regulate water secretion in the intestine. The distribution and functional properties of ileal MCh and alpha 2-adrenergic receptors provide a theoretic basis for the treatment of incontinence after bladder and rectal replacement with intestinal segments.

  14. Non-co-ordinate development of beta-adrenergic receptors and adenylate cyclase in chick heart.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, R W; Galper, J B; Neer, E J; Smith, T W

    1982-01-01

    We have studied the properties of beta-adrenergic receptors and of their interaction with adenylate cyclase in the chick myocardium during embryogenesis. Between 4.5 and 7.5 days in ovo the number of receptors determined by (-)-[3H]dihydroalprenolol ([3H]DHA) binding is constant at approx. 0.36 pmol of receptor/mg of protein. By day 9 the density decreases significantly to 0.22 pmol of receptor/mg of protein. At day 12.5--13.5 the number was 0.14--0.18 pmol of receptor/mg of protein. This number did not change further up to day 16. The same results were obtained with guanosine 5'-[beta, gamma-imido]triphosphate (p[NH]ppG) added to the assay mixtures. There was no significant change in receptor affinity for the antagonist [3H]DHA between days 5.5 and 13. Despite the decrease in numbers of beta-adrenergic receptors, there was no change in basal, p[NH]ppG-, isoprenaline- or isoprenaline-plus-p[NH]ppG-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity between days 3 and 12 of development. We conclude that beta-adrenergic receptors and adenylate cyclase are not co-ordinately regulated during early embryonic development of the chick heart. Some of the beta-adrenergic receptors present very early in the ontogeny of cardiac tissue appear not to be coupled to adenylate cyclase since their loss is not reflected in decreased activation of the enzyme. PMID:6289805

  15. Binding properties of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex: similarity to smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Minneman, K.P.

    1983-12-01

    The characteristics of alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex were examined using the radioiodinated alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonist ((/sup 125/I)BE). (/sup 125/I)BE labeled a single class of high-affinity binding sites in a particulate fraction of rat cerebral cortex with mass action kinetics and a KD of 57 pM. The binding of (/sup 125/I)BE was inhibited by various alpha adrenergic receptor antagonists, partial agonists and full agonists. The potency of these compounds in competing for the (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites suggested that (/sup 125/I)BE was labeling alpha-1 adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex. In the absence of a physiological concentration of NaCl in the assay medium there was a small (20%) decrease in the density of (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites with no effect on the KD value. The absence of NaCl also caused a 4-fold increase in the potency of norepinephrine in competing for (/sup 125/I)BE binding sites. All drugs competed for (/sup 125/I) BE binding sites with Hill coefficients greater than 0.86, except for oxymetazoline which had a Hill coefficient of 0.77. Scatchard analysis of specific (/sup 125/I)BE binding in the presence of various competing drugs showed that the inhibition by both agonists and antagonists was purely competitive, but the inhibition by oxymetazoline was complex. Treatment of the particulate fraction of rat cerebral cortex with 0.2 to 200 nM phenoxybenzamine for 10 min caused a dose-dependent decrease in the density of (/sup 125/I) BE binding sites which could be mostly blocked by the presence of norepinephrine during the phenoxybenzamine exposure.

  16. A meta-analysis of the effects of β-adrenergic blockers in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaojian; Shen, Chengwu; Zhai, Shujun; Liu, Yukun; Yue, Wen-Wei; Han, Li

    2016-01-01

    Adrenergic β-blockers are drugs that bind to, but do not activate β-adrenergic receptors. Instead they block the actions of β-adrenergic agonists and are used for the treatment of various diseases such as cardiac arrhythmias, angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, hypertension, headache, migraines, stress, anxiety, prostate cancer, and heart failure. Several meta-analysis studies have shown that β-blockers improve the heart function and reduce the risks of cardiovascular events, rate of mortality, and sudden death through chronic heart failure (CHF) of patients. The present study identified results from recent meta-analyses of β-adrenergic blockers and their usefulness in CHF. Databases including Medline/Embase/Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and PubMed were searched for the periods May, 1985 to March, 2011 and June, 2013 to August, 2015, and a number of studies identified. Results of those studies showed that use of β-blockers was associated with decreased sudden cardiac death in patients with heart failure. However, contradictory results have also been reported. The present meta-analysis aimed to determine the efficacy of β-blockers on mortality and morbidity in patients with heart failure. The results showed that mortality was significantly reduced by β-blocker treatment prior to the surgery of heart failure patients. The results from the meta-analysis studies showed that β-blocker treatment in heart failure patients correlated with a significant decrease in long-term mortality, even in patients that meet one or more exclusion criteria of the MERIT-HF study. In summary, the findings of the current meta-analysis revealed beneficial effects different β-blockers have on patients with heart failure or related heart disease. PMID:27703506

  17. Suspected postprandial hypoglycemia is associated with beta-adrenergic hypersensitivity and emotional distress.

    PubMed

    Berlin, I; Grimaldi, A; Landault, C; Cesselin, F; Puech, A J

    1994-11-01

    Suspected postprandial (reactive or idiopathic) hypoglycemia is characterized by predominantly adrenergic symptoms appearing after meals rich in carbohydrates and by their rare association with low blood glucose level (< 2.77 mmol/L). We studied heart rate, blood pressure, plasma insulin, C-peptide, and catecholamine responses during a 5-h oral glucose tolerance test in eight patients with suspected postprandial hypoglycemia and eight age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched healthy controls. We also evaluated beta-adrenergic sensitivity by using the isoproterenol sensitivity test. Psychological profile was assessed by the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90R) self-report symptom inventory. Patients with suspected postprandial hypoglycemia had higher beta-adrenergic sensitivity (defined as the dose of isoproterenol required to increase the resting heart rate by 25 beats/min) than controls (mean +/- SEM, 0.8 +/- 0.13 vs. 1.86 +/- 0.25 microgram isoproterenol; P = 0.002). After administration of glucose (75 g) blood glucose, plasma C-peptide, plasma epinephrine, and plasma norepinephrine responses were identical in the two groups, but plasma insulin was higher in the patients (group effect, P = 0.02; group by time interaction, P = 0.0001). Both heart rate and systolic blood pressure were significantly higher (but remained in the normal range) after glucose administration in patients with suspected postprandial hypoglycemia than in controls (group by time interactions, P = 0.004 and 0.0007, respectively). After glucose intake, seven patients had symptoms (palpitations, headache, tremor, generalized sweating, hunger, dizziness, sweating of the palms, flush, nausea, and fatigue), whereas in the control group, one subject reported flush and another palpitations, tremor, and hunger. Analysis of the SCL-90R questionnaire revealed that patients had emotional distress and significantly higher anxiety, somatization, depression, and obsessive-compulsive scores than controls. We may

  18. Ontogeny of fetal adenylate cyclase; mechanisms for regulation of beta-adrenergic receptors.

    PubMed

    Maier, J A; Roberts, J M; Jacobs, M M

    1989-11-01

    Transmembrane second messenger signalling systems regulate differentiation, growth and homeostatic responses during fetal development. The beta-adrenergic adenylate cyclase system is the best studied of these and has been used as a model to investigate the control of developmental processes. In tissues such as lung, heart and parotid, beta-adrenergic responsiveness of adenylate cyclase increases during development. In the developing fetal lung beta-receptor concentration increases during gestation or after glucocorticoid treatment, but cannot fully explain enhanced adrenergic responsiveness. To probe developmental and hormonal effects on beta-receptor function, we asked if advancing gestation or glucocorticoid treatment alters beta-receptor-Gs interactions in fetal rabbit lung membrane particulates. Before 25 days gestation, 1-isoproterenol competes for 3H-dihydroalprenolol (DHA), a radiolabelled beta-antagonist, with a single low affinity, later in gestation, high and low affinities of isoproterenol for the beta-receptor are present which can be shifted to the lower affinity by addition of guanyl nucleotide. High affinity binding is precociously induced in 25 days--fetal lung particulates as early as 3 h after maternal betamethasone treatment, but beta-adrenoreceptor concentration in treated fetuses was increased over controls only after 24 h of treatment. Cholera toxin catalyzed ADP ribosylation of membrane particulates showed cholera toxin substrate (Gs) was not altered by glucocorticoid treatment. Stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity with isoproterenol (100mM) and GTP (100mM) resulted in no incremental increase over that produced by GTP (100mM) alone in glucocorticoid treated or control particulates, either early or late in gestation. These data demonstrate that beta-receptor-Gs interactions are not sufficient to produce full agonist responses. Although both beta-adrenergic receptors and Gs are present in fetal rabbit lung early in gestation, interaction

  19. Suspected postprandial hypoglycemia is associated with beta-adrenergic hypersensitivity and emotional distress.

    PubMed

    Berlin, I; Grimaldi, A; Landault, C; Cesselin, F; Puech, A J

    1994-11-01

    Suspected postprandial (reactive or idiopathic) hypoglycemia is characterized by predominantly adrenergic symptoms appearing after meals rich in carbohydrates and by their rare association with low blood glucose level (< 2.77 mmol/L). We studied heart rate, blood pressure, plasma insulin, C-peptide, and catecholamine responses during a 5-h oral glucose tolerance test in eight patients with suspected postprandial hypoglycemia and eight age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched healthy controls. We also evaluated beta-adrenergic sensitivity by using the isoproterenol sensitivity test. Psychological profile was assessed by the Symptom Checklist (SCL-90R) self-report symptom inventory. Patients with suspected postprandial hypoglycemia had higher beta-adrenergic sensitivity (defined as the dose of isoproterenol required to increase the resting heart rate by 25 beats/min) than controls (mean +/- SEM, 0.8 +/- 0.13 vs. 1.86 +/- 0.25 microgram isoproterenol; P = 0.002). After administration of glucose (75 g) blood glucose, plasma C-peptide, plasma epinephrine, and plasma norepinephrine responses were identical in the two groups, but plasma insulin was higher in the patients (group effect, P = 0.02; group by time interaction, P = 0.0001). Both heart rate and systolic blood pressure were significantly higher (but remained in the normal range) after glucose administration in patients with suspected postprandial hypoglycemia than in controls (group by time interactions, P = 0.004 and 0.0007, respectively). After glucose intake, seven patients had symptoms (palpitations, headache, tremor, generalized sweating, hunger, dizziness, sweating of the palms, flush, nausea, and fatigue), whereas in the control group, one subject reported flush and another palpitations, tremor, and hunger. Analysis of the SCL-90R questionnaire revealed that patients had emotional distress and significantly higher anxiety, somatization, depression, and obsessive-compulsive scores than controls. We may

  20. The nerves of the accessory pancreatic ducts of the common starling (Sturnus vulgaris): an ultrastructural and light microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, R M; Kendall, M D

    1984-01-01

    An ultrastructural and light microscopic study was undertaken to examine the nerves of the accessory pancreatic ducts of the starling (Sturnus vulgaris), previously noted (Vinnicombe, 1982) to have a particularly dense innervation. Large numbers of nerves were found in the ducts, predominantly in the lamina propria, and all contained exclusively unmyelinated axons. Probable neuron cell bodies were observed in the smooth muscle layer, but not in the lamina propria. Schwann cells invested all the axons, and these displayed terminal swellings in a 'synapse en passage' arrangement. The nerves of the lamina propria were most numerous in the region immediately beneath the epithelium and were present in the epithelial folds. One axon was observed to have penetrated the epithelial basal lamina and to lie between two epithelial cells. Examination of the terminal profiles and their contained synaptic vesicles showed the innervation to have probable pain afferent, cholinergic, adrenergic and perhaps peptidergic components. The results of this study were compared with reports on pancreatic duct innervation in other species, mostly as parts of wider studies on pancreatic innervation. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6490527

  1. Treatment of Chronic Plantar Heel Pain With Radiofrequency Neural Ablation of the First Branch of the Lateral Plantar Nerve and Medial Calcaneal Nerve Branches.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Aydın; Koca, Tuba Tulay; Utkan, Ali; Sevimli, Resit; Akel, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    From March 2012 to February 2013, 37 patients experiencing plantar heel pain for ≥6 months despite treatment with physical therapy and other conservative treatment modalities were followed up. If neurogenic heel pain originating from the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve was present, with or without the medial calcaneal nerve, diagnostic nerve blocks to these nerves were performed for confirmation. If the pain was determined to be of neurogenic origin, radiofrequency neural ablation (RFNA) was applied to the corresponding sensory nerve endings. Pain was evaluated using the visual analog scale, and patients were followed for at least one year. A total of 41 feet from 37 patients (30 [81.1%] females, 7 [18.9%] males; mean age, 50.7 ± 1.6 years; mean body mass index, 30.6 ± 0.7 kg/m(2)) were included. The mean visual analog scale scores improved significantly from 1 to 6 to 12 months after the procedure relative to before the procedure, with 88% of all patients rating the treatment as either very successful or successful at 12 months postoperatively. RFNA applied to both the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve and the medial calcaneal nerve sensory branches (16 [39%] feet) and only the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve sensory branches (25 [61%] feet) showed similarly high levels of success. Of the 41 feet, 28 [68.3%] had received extracorporeal shockwave therapy, 35 [85.4%] had received steroid injections, and 22 [53.7%] had received both extracorporeal shockwave therapy and steroid injections before RFNA as an index procedure. All were unresponsive to these previous treatments. In contrast, almost all (88%) were treated successfully with RFNA. Despite a high incidence of neurologic variations, with a precise diagnosis and good application of the technique using the painful points, chronic plantar heel pain can be treated successfully with RFNA.

  2. Treatment of Chronic Plantar Heel Pain With Radiofrequency Neural Ablation of the First Branch of the Lateral Plantar Nerve and Medial Calcaneal Nerve Branches.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Aydın; Koca, Tuba Tulay; Utkan, Ali; Sevimli, Resit; Akel, İbrahim

    2016-01-01

    From March 2012 to February 2013, 37 patients experiencing plantar heel pain for ≥6 months despite treatment with physical therapy and other conservative treatment modalities were followed up. If neurogenic heel pain originating from the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve was present, with or without the medial calcaneal nerve, diagnostic nerve blocks to these nerves were performed for confirmation. If the pain was determined to be of neurogenic origin, radiofrequency neural ablation (RFNA) was applied to the corresponding sensory nerve endings. Pain was evaluated using the visual analog scale, and patients were followed for at least one year. A total of 41 feet from 37 patients (30 [81.1%] females, 7 [18.9%] males; mean age, 50.7 ± 1.6 years; mean body mass index, 30.6 ± 0.7 kg/m(2)) were included. The mean visual analog scale scores improved significantly from 1 to 6 to 12 months after the procedure relative to before the procedure, with 88% of all patients rating the treatment as either very successful or successful at 12 months postoperatively. RFNA applied to both the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve and the medial calcaneal nerve sensory branches (16 [39%] feet) and only the first branch of the lateral plantar nerve sensory branches (25 [61%] feet) showed similarly high levels of success. Of the 41 feet, 28 [68.3%] had received extracorporeal shockwave therapy, 35 [85.4%] had received steroid injections, and 22 [53.7%] had received both extracorporeal shockwave therapy and steroid injections before RFNA as an index procedure. All were unresponsive to these previous treatments. In contrast, almost all (88%) were treated successfully with RFNA. Despite a high incidence of neurologic variations, with a precise diagnosis and good application of the technique using the painful points, chronic plantar heel pain can be treated successfully with RFNA. PMID:27073185

  3. Sympathetic sprouting near sensory neurons after nerve injury occurs preferentially on spontaneously active cells and is reduced by early nerve block

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wenrui; Strong, Judith Ann; Li, Huiqing; Zhang, Jun-Ming

    2006-01-01

    Some chronic pain conditions are maintained or enhanced by sympathetic activity. In animal models of pathological pain, abnormal sprouting of sympathetic fibers around large- and medium-size sensory neurons is observed in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Large and medium size cells are also more likely to be spontaneously active, suggesting that sprouting may be related to neuron activity. We previously showed that sprouting could be reduced by systemic or locally applied lidocaine. In the complete sciatic nerve transection model in rats, spontaneous activity initially originates in the injury site; later, the DRG become the major source of spontaneous activity. In this study, spontaneous activity reaching the DRG soma was reduced by early nerve blockade (local perfusion of the transected nerve with TTX for the first 7 days after injury). This significantly reduced sympathetic sprouting. Conversely, increasing spontaneous activity by local nerve perfusion with K+ channel blockers increased sprouting. The hyperexcitability and spontaneous activity of DRG neurons observed in this model were also significantly reduced by early nerve blockade. These effects of early nerve blockade on sprouting, excitability, and spontaneous activity were all observed 4 to 5 weeks after the end of early nerve blockade, indicating that the early period of spontaneous activity in the injured nerve is critical for establishing the more long-lasting pathologies observed in the DRG. Individual spontaneously active neurons, labeled with fluorescent dye, were 5–6 times more likely than quiescent cells to be co-localized with sympathetic fibers, suggesting a highly localized correlation of activity and sprouting. PMID:17065247

  4. Effects of trifluoperazine on beta-adrenergic responses of rat papillary muscle: related to calmodulin?

    PubMed

    Aass, H; Skomedal, T; Osnes, J B

    1983-10-01

    The beta-adrenergic stimulation of cardiac contraction and relaxation is related to an augmented Ca++ oscillation mediated by cAMP. This Ca++ mobilization may secondarily involve calmodulin in a way modulating the mechanical responses. We tested this possibility by studying interferences of trifluoperazine (which is able to block Ca++-calmodulin) with beta-adrenergic responses in rat heart papillary muscles. Trifluoperazine up to 10(-5) mol/l did not change the basal function. 10(-5) mol/l trifluoperazine augmented the contractile response to isoprenaline above 10(-7) mol/l. The inotropic effects of isoprenaline below 10(-7) mol/l and of the partial beta-agonist prenalterol were not influenced by trifluoperazine. 10(-5) mol/l trifluoperazine attenuated the stimulation of initial relaxation by isoprenaline in the entire concentration range. Thus this beta-adrenergic response was more sensitive to trifluoperazine than the contractile response. But trifluoperazine only slightly and non-significantly attenuated the stimulation of initial relaxation by prenalterol. From experiments on broken cell preparations the present results can be explained in terms of calmodulin blockade and thus inhibition of Ca++ efflux across the sarcolemma and of Ca++ uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Trifluoperazine effects unrelated to calmodulin can hardly account for the results. Thus a full beta-agonist can apparently mobilize enough Ca++ to activate calmodulin systems important for the final effects on the contraction-relaxation cycle.

  5. Alpha adrenergic modulation of the Na/sup +/ pump of canine vascular smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Navran, S.S.; Adair, S.E.; Allen, J.C.; Seidel, C.L.

    1986-03-01

    Some vasoactive agents, eg. beta adrenergic agonists and forskolin, stimulate the Na/sup 7/ pump by a cAMP- dependent mechanism. The authors have now demonstrated that phenylephrine (PE) stimulates the Na/sup 7/ pump in intact blood vessels as quantitated by an increased ouabain-sensitive /sup 86/Rb uptake. The stimulation is dose-dependent (ED/sub 50/, 3 x 10/sup -6/M) and blocked by phentolamine (I/sub 50/, 10/sup -7/M), prazosin (I/sub 50/, 10/sup -8/M) yohimbine (I/sub 50/, 10/sup -6/M) or elevated intracellular Na/sup +/. These data suggest that the Na/sup +/ pump stimulation is mediated through alpha/sub 1/ receptors which produce an influx of extracellular Na/sup +/. In vascular smooth muscle cell cultures PE stimulates the Na/sup +/ pump, but only when cells have been deprived of fetal calf serum (FCS). Since FCS is known to stimulate Na/sup +/influx, in the continuous presence of FCS, these cells may already be Na/sup +/-loaded and therefore refractory to further stimulation by alpha-adrenergic agents. Unlike those vasorelaxants whose mechanism involves stimulation of the Na/sup +/ pump, alpha adrenergic agents are vasoconstrictors and therefore the role of Na/sup +/ pump stimulation in this case may be as a mechanism of feedback inhibition of contractility.

  6. Sulfhydryl group of the canine cardiac beta-adrenergic receptor observed in the absence of hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, W.L.; Venter, J.C.

    1985-05-06

    Canine cardiac beta-adrenergic receptors contain a free sulfhydryl group in the adrenergic ligand binding site. (/sup 125/I)-Iodohydroxybenzylpindolol ((/sup 125/I)-IHYP) binding to cardiac beta-receptors was inhibitied 80% by treatment with 1 mM p-chloromercuribenzoic acid (pCMB). Occupation of the beta-receptors by an antagonist prior to treatment with pCMB prevented this effect suggesting that a sulfhydryl group is present in or near the ligand binding site of the cardiac beta-receptor. In the presence of agonists, the sensitivity of cardiac beta-receptors to pCMB was increased. Incubation of isoproterenol-occupied cardiac beta-receptors with 0.25 mM pCMB, which had no effect on the unoccupied receptors, resulted in a 57% inhibition of (/sup 125/I)-IHYP binding measured after extensive washing to remove bound agonist. The ability of isoproterenol to increase the reactivity of cardiac beta-adrenergic receptors supports the hypothesis that agonists produce a conformational change upon binding. 13 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  7. AHNAK deficiency promotes browning and lipolysis in mice via increased responsiveness to β-adrenergic signalling.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jae Hoon; Lee, Seo Hyun; Kim, Yo Na; Kim, Il Yong; Kim, Youn Ju; Kyeong, Dong Soo; Lim, Hee Jung; Cho, Soo Young; Choi, Junhee; Wi, Young Jin; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Bae, Yun Soo; Seong, Je Kyung

    2016-03-18

    In adipose tissue, agonists of the β3-adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) regulate lipolysis, lipid oxidation, and thermogenesis. The deficiency in the thermogenesis induced by neuroblast differentiation-associated protein AHNAK in white adipose tissue (WAT) of mice fed a high-fat diet suggests that AHNAK may stimulate energy expenditure via development of beige fat. Here, we report that AHNAK deficiency promoted browning and thermogenic gene expression in WAT but not in brown adipose tissue of mice stimulated with the ADRB3 agonist CL-316243. Consistent with the increased thermogenesis, Ahnak(-/-) mice exhibited an increase in energy expenditure, accompanied by elevated mitochondrial biogenesis in WAT depots in response to CL-316243. Additionally, AHNAK-deficient WAT contained more eosinophils and higher levels of type 2 cytokines (IL-4/IL-13) to promote browning of WAT in response to CL-316243. This was associated with enhanced sympathetic tone in the WAT via upregulation of adrb3 and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in response to β-adrenergic activation. CL-316243 activated PKA signalling and enhanced lipolysis, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase and release of free glycerol in Ahnak(-/-) mice compared to wild-type mice. Overall, these findings suggest an important role of AHNAK in the regulation of thermogenesis and lipolysis in WAT via β-adrenergic signalling.

  8. Effect of repeated treatment with tianeptine and fluoxetine on the central alpha(1)-adrenergic system.

    PubMed

    Rogóz, Z; Skuza, G; Dlaboga, D; Maj, J; Dziedzicka-Wasylewska, M