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Sample records for adrenoceptor agonist dexmedetomidine

  1. The alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist dexmedetomidine suppresses memory formation only at doses attenuating the perception of sensory input.

    PubMed

    van Oostrom, Hugo; Stienen, Peter J; Doornenbal, Arie; Hellebrekers, Ludo J

    2010-03-10

    It was investigated whether continuous rate infusion of the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist dexmedetomidine can suppress memory formation by mechanisms other than reducing perception of sensory input in a fear-conditioning paradigm. Different groups of rats infused with either saline or dexmedetomidine (2.0, 4.0 or 10.0microg/kg bolus, followed by 2.0, 4.0 or 10.0microg/kg/h continuous rate infusion respectively), were subjected to a somatosensory-evoked potential (SEP) fear-conditioning paradigm. This paradigm combined the pairing of an innoxious conditioned stimulus (CS) and a noxious unconditioned stimulus (US), of which the latter was used to generate the SEPs (training phase).The following day, the perception of the US during the training phase was assessed by presenting the CS only and subsequently scoring the resulting duration of freezing behaviour (testing phase). Freezing behaviour was reduced only in those groups which demonstrated reduced SEPs. Based on these findings, it is concluded that dexmedetomidine suppresses memory formation only at doses reducing central nervous system activity in response to sensory input.

  2. The effects of ethanol in combination with the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist dexmedetomidine and the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist atipamezole on brain monoamine metabolites and motor performance of mice.

    PubMed

    Idänpään-Heikkilä, J J; Björn, M; Seppälä, T

    1995-01-13

    The time course of the effects of ethanol alone and in combination with the selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist dexmedetomidine and the alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist atipamezole was studied in NIH-Swiss mice. Core body temperature, rotarod performance, motility and changes in the noradrenaline, dopamine, and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) metabolite contents of different brain parts (limbic forebrain, striatum, lower brainstem, the rest of the forebrain + midbrain and hypothalamus) were measured. Atipamezole (3 mg/kg) attenuated the hypothermia induced by either ethanol (3 g/kg) alone or ethanol in combination with dexmedetomidine (0.3 mg/kg). Atipamezole shortened the duration of the ethanol-impaired and ethanol + dexmedetomidine-impaired rotarod performance. Further, atipamezole prevented the decreased motility due to the combined treatment with ethanol and dexmedetomidine. Ethanol increased 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethylene glycol (MHPG), homovanillic acid (HVA) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) values. Dexmedetomidine alone decreased MHPG and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) concentrations and increased DOPAC and HVA values. Dexmedetomidine combined with ethanol resulted in a further increase in DOPAC and HVA values. Pharmacokinetic parameters did not contribute to this antagonism of ethanol's effects by atipamezole, nor did the antagonism observed in rotarod performance or hypothermia seem to correlate with the changes seen in the brain noradrenaline and dopamine or 5-HT metabolism. In conclusion, these findings suggest that several ethanol effects are not mediated via direct activation of alpha 2-adrenoceptors, even though some of ethanol's behavioral and physiological effects may be antagonized by coadministration of alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonists.

  3. Recent advances in the discovery of alpha1-adrenoceptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    The alpha(1) adrenoceptors are three of nine well-characterized receptors that are activated by epinephrine and norepinephrine. Agonists acting at the alpha(1) adrenoceptors produce numerous physiological effects, and are used therapeutically for several indications. Many known alpha(1) adrenoceptor agonists are alpha(1A) selective, but the discovery of highly selective alpha(1B) and alpha(1D) adrenoceptor agonists has proven to be an extremely difficult goal to achieve. This review will focus on recent advances in the discovery, development and clinical utility of subtype-specific alpha(1) agonists as well as contributions to our understanding of agonist-receptor interactions.

  4. Comparison of the mechanical hypoalgesic effects of five α2-adrenoceptor agonists in donkeys.

    PubMed

    Lizarraga, I; Janovyak, E

    2013-09-28

    Pharmacological pain management is necessary under many clinical situations, but in donkeys little information on analgesic drugs is available. This controlled, randomised, crossover, Latin-square, operator-blinded study aimed to assess and compare the hypoalgesic effects of intravenously administered saline and five α2-adrenoceptor agonists on mechanical nociceptive thresholds (MNT) in donkeys. Areas under the threshold change versus time curve values for 0-30, 30-60, 60-90 and 90-120 minutes postdrug administration were used to compare the effect of treatment. As compared with saline, which did not increase MNT, the overall degree of mechanical hypoalgesia induced by xylazine (1.1 mg/kg), detomidine (20 μg/kg), medetomidine (5 μg/kg) and dexmedetomidine (3.5 μg/kg) was limited to 0-60 minutes, and that of romifidine (100 μg/kg) to 0-120 minutes. Although there were no significant differences between the five α2-adrenoceptor agonists during the first 30 minutes postadministration, hypoalgesia induced by xylazine and dexmedetomidine was significantly less intense than that achieved by detomidine and/or romifidine from 30 to 60 minutes. Differences in the overall degree of hypoalgesia induced by each of the α2-adrenoceptor agonists may influence veterinary surgeons towards choosing a particular drug over others for a particular donkey patient.

  5. Alpha-adrenoceptor agonistic activity of oxymetazoline and xylometazoline.

    PubMed

    Haenisch, Britta; Walstab, Jutta; Herberhold, Stephan; Bootz, Friedrich; Tschaikin, Marion; Ramseger, René; Bönisch, Heinz

    2010-12-01

    Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline are both used as nasal mucosa decongesting α-adrenoceptor agonists during a common cold. However, it is largely unknown which of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes are actually present in human nasal mucosa, which are activated by the two alpha-adrenoceptor agonists and to what extent. Therefore, mRNA expression in human nasal mucosa of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes was studied. Furthermore, the affinity and potency of the imidazolines oxymetazoline and xylometazoline at these α-adrenoceptor subtypes were examined in transfected HEK293 cells. The rank order of mRNA levels of α-adrenoceptor subtypes in human nasal mucosa was: α(2A) > α(1A) ≥ α(2B) > α(1D) ≥ α(2C) > α(1B) . Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline exhibited in radioligand competition studies higher affinities than the catecholamines adrenaline and noradrenaline at most α-adrenoceptor subtypes. Compared to xylometazoline, oxymetazoline exhibited a significantly higher affinity at α(1A) - but a lower affinity at α(2B) -adrenoceptors. In functional studies in which adrenoceptor-mediated Ca(2+) signals were measured, both, oxymetazoline and xylometazoline behaved at α(2B) -adrenoceptors as full agonists but oxymetazoline was significantly more potent than xylometazoline. Furthermore, oxymetazoline was also a partial agonist at α(1A) -adrenoceptors; however, its potency was relatively low and it was much lower than its affinity. The higher potency at α(2B) -adrenoceptors, i.e. at receptors highly expressed at the mRNA level in human nasal mucosa, could eventually explain why in nasal decongestants oxymetazoline can be used in lower concentrations than xylometazoline.

  6. Alpha-adrenoceptor agonistic activity of oxymetazoline and xylometazoline.

    PubMed

    Haenisch, Britta; Walstab, Jutta; Herberhold, Stephan; Bootz, Friedrich; Tschaikin, Marion; Ramseger, René; Bönisch, Heinz

    2010-12-01

    Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline are both used as nasal mucosa decongesting α-adrenoceptor agonists during a common cold. However, it is largely unknown which of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes are actually present in human nasal mucosa, which are activated by the two alpha-adrenoceptor agonists and to what extent. Therefore, mRNA expression in human nasal mucosa of the six α-adrenoceptor subtypes was studied. Furthermore, the affinity and potency of the imidazolines oxymetazoline and xylometazoline at these α-adrenoceptor subtypes were examined in transfected HEK293 cells. The rank order of mRNA levels of α-adrenoceptor subtypes in human nasal mucosa was: α(2A) > α(1A) ≥ α(2B) > α(1D) ≥ α(2C) > α(1B) . Oxymetazoline and xylometazoline exhibited in radioligand competition studies higher affinities than the catecholamines adrenaline and noradrenaline at most α-adrenoceptor subtypes. Compared to xylometazoline, oxymetazoline exhibited a significantly higher affinity at α(1A) - but a lower affinity at α(2B) -adrenoceptors. In functional studies in which adrenoceptor-mediated Ca(2+) signals were measured, both, oxymetazoline and xylometazoline behaved at α(2B) -adrenoceptors as full agonists but oxymetazoline was significantly more potent than xylometazoline. Furthermore, oxymetazoline was also a partial agonist at α(1A) -adrenoceptors; however, its potency was relatively low and it was much lower than its affinity. The higher potency at α(2B) -adrenoceptors, i.e. at receptors highly expressed at the mRNA level in human nasal mucosa, could eventually explain why in nasal decongestants oxymetazoline can be used in lower concentrations than xylometazoline. PMID:20030735

  7. Tolerance with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists: time for reappraisal.

    PubMed Central

    Grove, A; Lipworth, B J

    1995-01-01

    1. In spite of the widespread use of beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists in the treatment of asthma controversy continues regarding their possible role in increasing asthma mortality and morbidity. There is however no evidence available to suggest that tolerance to the bronchodilator or anti-bronchoconstrictor effects of these drugs is responsible for the deleterious effects reported with the regular use of bronchodilators. 2. There is no conclusive evidence to suggest that tolerance develops to the bronchodilator effects of short-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. Tolerance does however appear to develop to the anti-bronchoconstrictor effects of these drugs. 3. With regard to the long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists, there is evidence to suggest that tolerance develops both to their anti-bronchoconstrictor, and bronchodilator effects. Tolerance was however demonstrated in the presence of improved symptom control, therefore the clinical relevance of this phenomenon is uncertain. 4. Systemic corticosteroids can modulate lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptor function both preventing, and reversing tolerance. The situation regarding the effects of systemic or inhaled corticosteroids on modulating bronchodilator responses in asthmatics is less clear. There is some evidence to suggest that inhaled corticosteroids are unable to prevent bronchodilator or systemic tolerance to long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. 5. On the basis of the current evidence, the British Thoracic Society guidelines for the management of asthma appear appropriate with regard to their recommendations for the use of long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. PMID:7742147

  8. Beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptor antagonist activities of ICI-215001, a putative beta 3-adrenoceptor agonist.

    PubMed Central

    Tesfamariam, B.; Allen, G. T.

    1994-01-01

    1. The present study was undertaken to characterize the beta 3-adrenoceptor agonist activity of ICI-215001 and to determine whether it exhibits additional activities on beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors in isolated spontaneously beating atrium, trachea and ileum of guinea-pig. 2. In guinea-pig atrium, isoprenaline, a non-selective beta-adrenoceptor agonist, caused concentration-dependent, positive chronotropic effects that were inhibited by atenolol, a selective beta 1-antagonist. ICI-215001 also competitively antagonized the increase in heart rate caused by isoprenaline. 3. ICI-215001 exhibited low intrinsic activity at increasing the beating rate of atrium and no activity on resting or induced tone of tracheal strips. 4. In strips of guinea-pig trachea, contracted submaximally with carbachol, isoprenaline, caused concentration-dependent relaxations. Both ICI-118551, a selective beta 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, and ICI-215001 competitively inhibited the relaxations caused by isoprenaline. 5. In isolated strips of guinea-pig ileum longitudinal smooth muscle contracted with histamine, isoprenaline and ICI-215001 caused relaxations which were inhibited by alprenolol, a beta-adrenoceptor antagonist with modest affinity for beta 3-adrenoceptors, but were resistant to ICI-118551 and atenolol. 6. These results indicate that ICI-215001 exhibits beta 3-adrenoceptor agonist activity as demonstrated by relaxations mediated via atypical beta-adrenoceptors in the longitudinal smooth muscle of guinea-pig ileum. Further, the studies demonstrate that ICI-215001 can act as an antagonist at beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors in situations where its intrinsic agonist activity is low. PMID:7913381

  9. ICI D7114: a novel selective adrenoceptor agonist of brown fat and thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Holloway, B R; Howe, R; Rao, B S; Stribling, D

    1992-01-01

    Increasing energy expenditure by treatment with thermogenic drugs is not new, but available drugs have suffered from the problem of lack of selectivity. In the last decade two key findings have allowed the development of selective thermogenic drugs that have promise in the treatment of obesity. 1) The recognition that brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays a role in compensatory increases in energy expenditure has allowed an approach directed at a target organ. 2) The demonstration showing that increases in the activity of BAT may be modulated by an atypical (beta 3) adrenoceptor has led to the development of a new peripherally acting beta-adrenoceptor agonist ICI D7114, which stimulates thermogenesis at doses that have little effect on beta 1 or beta 2 adrenoceptors. Treatment with the compound activates BAT and thermogenesis even in species and situations where the intrinsic capacity is low. 3) The compound has beneficial effects in animal models of obesity and disturbed glucose and lipid homeostasis. PMID:1345891

  10. The reassertion profiles of long acting β2-adrenoceptor agonists in the guinea pig isolated trachea and human recombinant β2-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed

    Patel, S; Summerhill, S; Stanley, M; Perros-Huguet, C; Trevethick, M A

    2011-04-01

    Long acting β(2)-adrenoceptor agonists as exemplified by salmeterol and formoterol, exhibit reassertion behaviour in isolated airway preparations. This phenomenon is the inhibition of relaxation by a β(2)-antagonist (e.g. sotalol), followed by the re-establishment of the relaxation when all drugs have been washed out and in the absence of any further agonist addition to the bathing solution. In this study we have compared the reassertion behaviour of salmeterol and formoterol with the new long acting β(2)-adrenoceptor agonists indacaterol, carmoterol and three Pfizer agonists (PF610,355, PF613,322, UK503590) in the guinea pig isolated trachea and in a novel assay developed in CHO cells expressing the recombinant human β(2)-adrenoceptor. The results obtained can be divided into two groups: salmeterol-like (persistent duration of action following agonist removal--coupled with reassertion behaviour), as exemplified by indacaterol, PF610,355, PF613,322 and UK503,590 and, formoterol-like (short duration of agonist action and little reassertion behaviour unless supramaximal concentrations are used), as exemplified by carmoterol. Results are discussed in the context of the two theories proposed to explain the long duration of action of salmeterol (binding to a specific 'exosite' of the β(2)-adrenoceptor) and formoterol (membrane deposition: micro-kinetic theory). Our data suggest that the micro-kinetic theory is an adequate explanation to explain the long duration of action of the β(2)-adrenoceptor agonists studied in these two assays, although with the current data set we cannot definitively exclude the 'exosite' theory. PMID:21134482

  11. Dexmedetomidine and clonidine induce long-lasting activation of the respiratory rhythm generator of neonatal mice: possible implication for critical care.

    PubMed

    Voituron, Nicolas; Hilaire, Gérard; Quintin, Luc

    2012-01-15

    Dexmedetomidine and clonidine are alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonists increasingly used in the critical care unit as sedative agents for their benzodiazepine-sparing effects and their limited depressing effect on breathing. However adverse effects on breathing have been also reported with alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonists and their central effects on the respiratory rhythm generator are poorly known. We therefore examined the effects of dexmedetomidine, clonidine, the alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine and the benzodiazepine midazolam on the activity of the isolated respiratory rhythm generator of neonatal mice using medullary preparations where the respiratory rhythm generator continued to function in vitro. For the first time, we showed that 5min bath applications of dexmedetomidine or clonidine activated the respiratory rhythm generator for periods over than 30min. Second, we showed that the long-lasting effect of dexmedetomidine implicated receptors other than alpha-2 adrenoceptors as it persisted after their blockade with yohimbine. Third, we reported that 5min bath applications of the benzodiazepine midazolam significantly depressed the respiratory rhythm generator, and that this depression was prevented by pre-treatment with either dexmedetomidine or clonidine. Although further experiments are still required to identify the mechanisms through which dexmedetomidine and clonidine activate the respiratory rhythm generator, our current in vitro results in neonatal mice support the use of dexmedetomidine and clonidine in the critical care unit.

  12. Current issues with beta2-adrenoceptor agonists: historical background.

    PubMed

    Tattersfield, Anne E

    2006-01-01

    The discovery that dessicated adrenal glands had beneficial effects in asthma arose in 1900 following a vogue for studying organotherapy at the end of the 19th century. The adrenal hormone adrenaline was found to have sympathomimetic properties and was isolated and synthesized in 1901. The first nonselective beta-agonist, isoproterenol, was isolated in 1940, followed by the development of selective beta2-agonists in the 1960s and the introduction of the long-acting beta2-agonists in the 1990s. The introduction of beta2-selectivity reduced adverse effects, as did developments in inhaler technology that allowed subjects to inhale much smaller doses of drug selectively to the airways. The beta2-agonists are some of the more important drugs to have been developed in the 20th century. Excessive doses can cause problems, and attempts to maximize the benefit from beta2-agonists and to reduce adverse effects has led to considerable epidemiological, clinical, and mechanistic research over the last 50 yr.

  13. Inflammation contributes to axon reflex vasodilatation evoked by iontophoresis of an α-1 adrenoceptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Peter D

    2011-01-20

    Iontophoresis of α(1)-adrenoceptor agonists in the human forearm evoke axon reflex vasodilatation, possibly due to an accumulation of inflammatory agents at the site of iontophoresis. To investigate this possibility, skin sites in the forearm of healthy participants were treated with an anti-inflammatory gel containing ibuprofen 5% before the iontophoresis of the α(1)-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine (350μA for 3min). Red cell flux was measured with laser Doppler flowmetry at the site of iontophoresis and 8mm away in the region of axon reflex vasodilatation. In additional experiments, skin sites were treated with the vasodilator sodium nitroprusside (to counteract vasoconstriction and disperse inflammatory mediators produced during the iontophoresis of phenylephrine); local anaesthetic agent (to determine whether the axon reflex to phenylephrine was neurally-mediated); or the α(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine (to investigate the specificity of the adrenergic axon reflex). Phenylephrine evoked marked vasodilatation 8mm from the site of iontophoresis whereas clonidine and saline-control did not (mean flux increase±S.E. 485±132% for phenylephrine; 44±24% for clonidine; 39±19% for saline-control; p<0.05 for phenylephrine versus control). Axon reflex vasodilatation to phenylephrine was unaffected by variations in blood flow at the site of phenylephrine iontophoresis, but was reduced by ibuprofen pretreatment and abolished by local anaesthetic pretreatment. These findings suggest that prostaglandin synthesis at the site of iontophoresis contributes to but does not account entirely for axon reflex vasodilatation to phenylephrine. Alpha-1 adrenoceptor mediation of axon reflexes could play a role in aberrant sensory-sympathetic coupling in neuro-inflammatory diseases.

  14. The acid metabolite of ZD7114 is a partial agonist of lipolysis mediated by the rat beta 3-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed

    Mayers, R M; Quayle, S P; Thompson, A J; Grant, T L; Holloway, B R

    1996-01-11

    Experiments were performed to characterise the lipolytic effects of the acid metabolite, ZM215001, ((S)-4-[2-hydroxy-3-phenoxy-propylamino-ethoxy] phenoxyacetic acid) of the putative beta 3-adrenoceptor agonist, ZD7114 ((S)-4-[2-hydroxy-3-phenoxy-propylamino-ethoxy]-N-(2-methoxyethyl) phenoxyacetamide) on isolated rat white adipocytes. ZM215001 was used for these studies since it is the predominant moiety after in vivo administration of ZD7114. The agonist properties of ZM215001 were assessed in comparison to the standard nonselective beta-adrenoceptor agonist (+/-)-isoprenaline and the beta 3-adrenoceptor-selective agonist BRL 37344. Isoprenaline, BRL 37344 and ZM215001 all stimulated the rate of free fatty acid release from isolated adipocytes with the order of potency being BRL > isoprenaline > ZM215001. The maximum effect of BRL 37344 was equivalent to that of isoprenaline, but ZM215001 achieved only 30% of the maximum isoprenaline response. ZM215001 competitively antagonised the lipolytic response to BRL 37344 (pA2 = 7.26), whereas the agonist effects of BRL 37344 were not antagonised competitively by the selective antagonists ICI 118551 and CGP 20712A, at concentrations which would be expected to block beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors respectively. These results indicate that ZM215001 has low intrinsic activity at the rat adipocyte beta 3-adrenoceptor, and is a partial agonist of lipolysis in rat white adipocytes. PMID:8720584

  15. β2-Adrenoceptor agonists as novel, safe and potentially effective therapies for Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    PubMed

    Bartus, Raymond T; Bétourné, Alexandre; Basile, Anthony; Peterson, Bethany L; Glass, Jonathan; Boulis, Nicholas M

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a chronic and progressive neuromuscular disease for which no cure exists and better treatment options are desperately needed. We hypothesize that currently approved β2-adrenoceptor agonists may effectively treat the symptoms and possibly slow the progression of ALS. Although β2-agonists are primarily used to treat asthma, pharmacologic data from animal models of neuromuscular diseases suggest that these agents may have pharmacologic effects of benefit in treating ALS. These include inhibiting protein degradation, stimulating protein synthesis, inducing neurotrophic factor synthesis and release, positively modulating microglial and systemic immune function, maintaining the structural and functional integrity of motor endplates, and improving energy metabolism. Moreover, stimulation of β2-adrenoceptors can activate a range of downstream signaling events in many different cell types that could account for the diverse array of effects of these agents. The evidence supporting the possible therapeutic benefits of β2-agonists is briefly reviewed, followed by a more detailed review of clinical trials testing the efficacy of β-agonists in a variety of human neuromuscular maladies. The weight of evidence of the potential benefits from treating these diseases supports the hypothesis that β2-agonists may be efficacious in ALS. Finally, ways to monitor and manage the side effects that may arise with chronic administration of β2-agonists are evaluated. In sum, effective, safe and orally-active β2-agonists may provide a novel and convenient means to reduce the symptoms of ALS and possibly delay disease progression, affording a unique opportunity to repurpose these approved drugs for treating ALS, and rapidly transforming the management of this serious, unmet medical need. PMID:26459114

  16. Effects of beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists on anti-IgE-induced contraction and smooth muscle reactivity in human airways.

    PubMed Central

    Gorenne, I; Labat, C; Norel, X; De Montpreville, V; Guillet, M C; Cavero, I; Brink, C

    1995-01-01

    1. The beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists, salbutamol, salmeterol and RP 58802 relaxed basal tone of human isolated bronchial smooth muscle. Salmeterol- and RP 58802-induced relaxations persisted for more than 4 h when the medium was constantly renewed after treatment. 2. Salbutamol, salmeterol and RP 58802 reversed histamine-induced contractions in human airways (pD2 values: 6.15 +/- 0.21, 6.00 +/- 0.19 and 6.56 +/- 0.12, respectively). 3. Anti-IgE-induced contractions were significantly inhibited immediately after pretreatment of preparations with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists (10 microM). However, when tissues were treated with beta 2-agonists and then washed for a period of 4 h, salmeterol was the only agonist which significantly inhibited the anti-IgE response. 4. Histamine response curves were shifted to the right immediately after pretreatment of tissues with the beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists (10 microM; 20 min), but maximal contractions were not affected. After a 4 h washing period, the histamine curves were not significantly different from controls. Concentration-effect curves to acetylcholine (ACh) or leukotriene C4 (LTC4) were not significantly modified after beta 2-agonist pretreatment. 5. These results suggest that beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists may prevent anti-IgE-induced contraction by inhibition of mediator release rather than alterations of those mechanisms involved in airway smooth muscle contraction. PMID:7780648

  17. Effects of long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists on mast cells of rat, guinea pig, and human.

    PubMed

    Lau, H Y; Wong, P L; Lai, C K; Ho, J K

    1994-10-01

    The effects of two recently developed long-acting beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists, formoterol and salmeterol, on mast cells from different sources were compared with those of the prototype short-acting analogue, salbutamol. With the exception of high concentrations of salmeterol (> 10(-5) M), none of the tested beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists inhibited the anti-IgE-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. In contrast, all three compounds dose dependently inhibited the immunologically induced histamine release from isolated lung mast cells of guinea pig and human at concentrations < or = 10(-5) M.

  18. Enhancement of 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose Metabolism in Rat Brain Frontal Cortex Using a β3 Adrenoceptor Agonist

    PubMed Central

    Mirbolooki, M. Reza; Schade, Kimberly N.; Constantinescu, Cristian C.; Pan, Min-Liang; Mukherjee, Jogeshwar

    2014-01-01

    We report the use of β3-adrenergic receptor mediated activation of rat brain frontal cortex using mirabegron (a selective β3-adrenoceptor agonist), measured by 18F-FDG PET/CT. Another β3-agonis t, CL 316,243, did not have this effect due to impermeability through the blood brain barrier (BBB), while atomoxetine, a norepinephrine transporter blocker, did increase 18F-FDG uptake in the frontal cortex. Mirabegron exhibited a dose-dependent increase in frontal cortex 18F-FDG uptake. These findings suggest a possible use of selective β3-adrenoceptor agonists in reversing regional glucose hypometabolism in the brain. PMID:25347981

  19. Inhibitory GTP binding protein G/sub i/ regulates US -adrenoceptor affinity towards US -agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Marbach, I.; Levitzki, A.

    1987-05-01

    Treatment of S-49 lymphoma cell membranes with pertussis toxin (PT) causes a three-fold reduction of US -adrenoceptor (US AR) affinity towards isoproterenol. A similar treatment with cholera toxin (CT) does not cause such a modulation. The effects were studied by the detailed analysis of SVI-cyanopindolol (CYP) binding curves in the absence and presence of increasing agonist concentrations. Thus, the authors were able to compare in detail the effects of G/sub s/ and G/sub i/ on the agonist-associated state of the US AR. In contrast to these findings, PT treatment does not have any effect on the displacement of SVI-CYP by (-)isoproterenol. These results demonstrate that the inhibitory GTP protein G/sub i/ modulates the US AR affinity towards US -agonists. This might be due to the association of G/sub i/ with the agonist-bound US AR x G/sub s/ x C complex within the membrane. This hypothesis, as well as others, is under investigation.

  20. The water diuretic effect of the alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist, AGN 190851, is species-dependent.

    PubMed

    Brooks, D P; Edwards, R M; Depalma, P D; Fredrickson, T A; Hieble, J P; Gellai, M

    1991-12-01

    The effect of the novel alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist, AGN 190851, was evaluated for its diuretic action in the rat, dog and cynomolgus monkey and its ability to inhibit vasopressin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in rat and dog cortical collecting tubules in vitro. The data indicate that in the rat, AGN 190851 resulted in a dose-dependent water diuresis, which was accompanied by an increase in blood pressure and osmolar clearance. In addition, AGN 190851 resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of vasopressin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in rat cortical collecting tubules in vitro. In contrast, AGN 190851 was unable to cause either a water diuresis in conscious dogs or inhibit vasopressin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in canine tissue in vitro. In the lightly anesthetized cynomolgus monkey, AGN 190851 also failed to alter renal function significantly. Administration of the vasopressin receptor antagonist, SK&F 105494, to either dogs or cynomolgus monkeys demonstrated that antagonism of the vasopressin V2 receptor could result in a brisk water diuresis in both species. The data demonstrate that alpha-2 adrenoceptors can functionally antagonize vasopressin antidiuretic activity in the rat, but not in the dog or cynomolgus monkey.

  1. Clinical use of the β3 adrenoceptor agonist mirabegron in patients with overactive bladder syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vij, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Mirabegron is a β3 adrenoceptor agonist licensed for the treatment of overactive bladder symptoms, such as urinary urgency or urgency incontinence. β3 adrenoceptor activation causes detrusor muscle relaxation, but mirabegron may also act by binding other targets in the bladder, and it may also reduce activity in sensory nerves. Phase III clinical trials (SCORPIO, ARIES, and CAPRICORN) evaluated mirabegron at various doses, demonstrating reduction from baseline to endpoint in mean incontinence episodes and mean number of micturitions per 24 h (coprimary endpoints), along with health-related quality of life and a range of secondary measures. Efficacy was seen in many patients who had previously discontinued antimuscarinic therapy on the grounds of lack of efficacy or poor tolerability. Treatment emergent adverse effects were documented in a long-term study (TAURUS), mostly being of mild or moderate severity. The most frequent adverse effects were hypertension, dry mouth, constipation, and headache, with a lower incidence of dry mouth than for the antimuscarinic active comparator. Efficacy and safety are not substantially different in older patients. A urodynamic safety study in men showed no consistent effect on voiding function, but a small increase in postvoid residual. Use of mirabegron in combination with α-adrenergic blockers does not appear to increase adverse effects. Dose reduction is needed in people with severe renal failure, or moderate hepatic failure. Dose adjustment is not needed in relation to food intake. Ongoing research is evaluating the potential for combination therapy with antimuscarinics. PMID:26425139

  2. Dexmedetomidine-Induced Contraction in the Isolated Endothelium-Denuded Rat Aorta Involves PKC-δ-mediated JNK Phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jongsun; Ok, Seong-Ho; Kim, Won Ho; Cho, Hyunhoo; Park, Jungchul; Shin, Il-Woo; Lee, Heon Keun; Chung, Young-Kyun; Choi, Mun-Jeoung; Kwon, Seong-Chun; Sohn, Ju-Tae

    2015-01-01

    Vasoconstriction mediated by the highly selective alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist dexmedetomidine leads to transiently increased blood pressure and severe hypertension. The dexmedetomidine-induced contraction involves the protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated pathway. However, the main PKC isoform involved in the dexmedetomidine-induced contraction remains unknown. The goal of this in vitro study was to examine the specific PKC isoform that contributes to the dexmedetomidine-induced contraction in the isolated rat aorta. The endothelium-denuded rat aorta was suspended for isometric tension recording. Dexmedetomidine dose-response curves were generated in the presence or absence of the following inhibitors: the pan-PKC inhibitor, chelerythrine; the PKC-α and -β inhibitor, Go6976; the PKC-α inhibitor, safingol; the PKC-β inhibitor, ruboxistaurin; the PKC-δ inhibitor, rottlerin; the c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor, SP600125; and the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor, ML-7 hydrochloride. Western blot analysis was used to examine the effect of rottlerin on dexmedetomidine-induced PKC-δ expression and JNK phosphorylation in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and to investigate the effect of dexmedetomidine on PKC-δ expression in VSMCs transfected with PKC-δ small interfering RNA (siRNA) or control siRNA. Chelerythrine as well as SP600125 and ML-7 hydrochloride attenuated the dexmedetomidine-induced contraction. Go6976, safingol, and ruboxistaurin had no effect on the dexmedetomidine-induced contraction, whereas rottlerin inhibited the dexmedetomidine-induced contraction. Dexmedetomidine induced PKC-δ expression, whereas rottlerin and PKC-δ siRNA transfection inhibited dexmedetomidine-induced PKC-δ expression. Dexmedetomidine also induced JNK phosphorylation, which was inhibited by rottlerin. Taken together, these results suggest that the dexmedetomidine-induced contraction involves PKC-δ-dependent JNK phosphorylation in the isolated rat aorta.

  3. Relationship between food intake and metabolic rate in rats treated with beta-adrenoceptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, J; Onai, T; York, D A; Bray, G A

    1994-06-01

    The purpose of the present experiment was to clarify the interaction between food intake and activity of the thermogenic component of the sympathetic nervous system by studying the dose response relationships of typical beta 1-, beta 2-, and beta 3-adrenoceptor agonists on oxygen consumption and food intake. The data showed that the ED50 for the effects of Dobutamine (beta 1), Clenbuterol (beta 2) and ICI D7114 (beta 3) agonists on food intake were 8.9, 0.041 and > 1.1 mumol/kg respectively whereas the ED50 values for stimulation of metabolic rate were 7.1, 1.3 and 0.11 mumole/kg respectively. The marked differences in ED50 values for suppression of food intake and stimulation of metabolic rate for both clenbuterol and ICI D7114 suggest that the regulation of feeding and of metabolic rate in response to these agonists are independent of each other. The experiments also identified that Clenbuterol activated a very sensitive beta 2-adrenergic system for the regulation of feeding behavior. PMID:7915938

  4. Asthma exacerbations during long term β agonist use: influence of β2 adrenoceptor polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, D; Drazen, J.; Herbison, G; Yandava, C.; Hancox, R.; Town, G

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Polymorphisms of the β2 adrenoceptor influence receptor function in vitro and asthma phenotypes in vivo. However, their importance in determining responses to inhaled β agonist treatment has not been clearly defined.
METHODS—In a retrospective analysis of previously published data we have examined relationships between polymorphisms at codons 16and 27 of the β2 adrenoceptor and clinical outcomes in a randomised, placebo controlled, crossover trial of regularly scheduled salbutamol and salmeterol in 115 patients with mild to moderate asthma. Genotyping was obtained for positions 16 and 27 in 108 and 107 patients, respectively. For position 16, 17 patients (16%) were homozygous Arg-Arg, 40 (37%) were heterozygous Arg-Gly, and 51 (47%) were homozygous Gly-Gly.
RESULTS—Within the homozygous Arg-16 group major exacerbations were more frequent during salbutamol treatment than with placebo (1.91(95% CI 1.07 to 3.12) per year versus 0.81 (95% CI 0.28 to 1.66) per year; p = 0.005). No significant treatment related differences occurred for heterozygous Arg-Gly patients (salbutamol 0.11 (95% CI 0.01 to 0.40), placebo 0.54 (95% CI 0.26 to 1.00) exacerbations per year) or homozygous Gly-16 patients (salbutamol 0.38 (95% CI 0.17 to 0.73), placebo 0.30 (95% CI 0.12 to 0.61) exacerbations per year). No adverse changes occurred for any position 16 subgroup with salmeterol. There was no significant relationship between position 27 genotypes and treatment related outcomes.
CONCLUSION—Homozygous Arg-16 patients are susceptible to clinically important increases in asthma exacerbations during chronic dosing with the short acting β2 agonist salbutamol.

 PMID:10950895

  5. The inhibitory effects of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists on gastrointestinal transit during croton oil-induced intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Pol, O.; Valle, L.; Ferrer, I.; Puig, M. M.

    1996-01-01

    1. The peripheral effects of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists were investigated in a model of intestinal inflammation induced by intragastric administration of croton oil (CO). Our hypothesis was that inflammation would 'sensitize' adrenoceptors in peripheral and/or central terminals of myenteric and submucous plexus neurones, and enhance systemic effects of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists. 2. Male swiss CD-1 mice, received intragastrically CO (0.05 ml), castor oil (CA, 0.1 ml) or saline (SS) 3 h before the study: gastrointestinal transit (GIT) was evaluated 20 min afterwards with a charcoal meal. The presence of inflammation was assessed by electron microscopy. 3. The intragastric administration of CA or CO caused an increase in GIT and weight loss, but only CO induced an inflammatory response. Both clonidine (imidazoline1/alpha(2)-agonist) and UK-14304 (alpha(2)-agonist) produced dose-related inhibitions of GIT in all groups. During inflammatory diarrhoea (CO), potencies of systemic (s.c.) clonidine and UK-14304 were significantly increased 3.5 and 2.1 times, respectively, while potencies remained unaltered in the presence of diarrhoea without inflammation (CA). The effects were reversed by administration (s.c.) of receptor-specific adrenoceptor antagonists, but not by naloxone. 4. Clonidine was 8.3 (SS) and 2.8 (CO) times more potent when administered intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.), than when administered s.c. Inflammation of the gut did not alter the potency of i.c.v. clonidine, demonstrating that enhanced effects of s.c. clonidine are mediated by peripheral receptors. During inflammation, i.c.v. efaroxan did not antagonize low doses of s.c. clonidine (ED20 and ED50S), but partially reversed ED80S, further supporting the peripheral effects of the agonists in CO treated animals. 5. The results demonstrate that inflammation of the gut enhances the potency of alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists by a peripheral mechanism. The results also suggest that the inflammatory

  6. Dexmedetomidine-Induced Contraction Involves CPI-17 Phosphorylation in Isolated Rat Aortas

    PubMed Central

    Ok, Seong-Ho; Kwon, Seong-Chun; Baik, Jiseok; Hong, Jeong-Min; Oh, Jiah; Han, Jeong Yeol; Sohn, Ju-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine, a highly selective α-2 adrenoceptor agonist, produces vasoconstriction, which leads to transiently increased blood pressure. The goal of this study was to investigate specific protein kinases and the associated cellular signal pathways responsible for the increased calcium sensitization induced by dexmedetomidine in isolated rat aortas, with a particular focus on phosphorylation-dependent inhibitory protein of myosin phosphatase (CPI-17). The effect of Y-27632 and chelerythrine on the dexmedetomidine-induced intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and tension were assessed using fura-2-loaded aortic strips. The effects of rauwolscine, Y-27632, chelerythrine, and ML-7 hydrochloride on the dexmedetomidine-induced phosphorylation of CPI-17 or of the 20-kDa regulatory light chain of myosin (MLC20) were investigated in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells. The effects of rauwolscine, Y-27632, and chelerythrine on the membrane translocation of Rho-kinase and protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation induced by dexmedetomidine were assessed. Y-27632 and chelerythrine each reduced the slopes of the [Ca2+]i-tension curves of dexmedetomidine-induced contraction, and Y-27632 more strongly reduced these slopes than did chelerythrine. Rauwolscine, Y-27632, chelerythrine, and ML-7 hydrochloride attenuated the dexmedetomidine-induced phosphorylation of CPI-17 and MLC20. Taken together, these results suggest that dexmedetomidine-induced contraction involves calcium sensitization, which appears to be mediated by CPI-17 phosphorylation via Rho-kinase or PKC. PMID:27706026

  7. Evaluation of Antinociceptive and Neurotoxic Effects of Intrathecal Dexmedetomidine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    İşgüzar, Özgü; Barış, Sibel; Bozkurt, Ayhan; Can, Bilge; Bilge, Sırrı; Türe, Hatice

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Dexmedetomidine has been reported to produce analgesia after intrathecal administration. In the present study the α2-adrenoceptor agonist dexmedetomidine was evaluated for its potential spinal neurotoxic effects. Material and Methods: Three days after intrathecal cannulation, rats were administered either dexmedetomidine (3 μg/30 μL, i.t.) or saline (30 μL, i.t.). Antinociceptive, sedative and motor effects of intrathecal administrations of dexmedetomidine or saline were evaluated during 90 min. The tail-flick and hot plate tests were used to assess the thermal nociceptive threshold. Seven days after drug administration, animals were sacrified and spinal cords were evaluated for histopathological changes by light microscopy. Results: Dexmedetomidine administered intrathecally produced antinociception. Antinociception was accompanied by immediate sedation and loss of placing-stepping reflexes that lasted over 40 min in all dexmedetomidine administered rats. In all rats, microscopic examination revealed mild gliosis and minimal infiltration of inflamatory r cells in posterior white matter. Mild (total score 4–6) histopathologic lesions were seen in four animals in dexmedetomidine adminisered rats, but there was no statistically significant difference when compared with the saline administered rats. Conclusion: We observed that intrathecal injections of dexmedetomidine at the dose of 3 μg/30 μL produce antinociception but did not cause any histopathological sign of injury in the spinal cord. PMID:25207033

  8. Safe Sedation and Hypnosis using Dexmedetomidine for Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery in a Prone Position

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine, an imidazoline compound, is a highly selective α2-adrenoceptor agonist with sympatholytic, sedative, amnestic, and analgesic properties. In order to minimize the patients' pain and anxiety during minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) when compared to conventional surgery under general anesthesia, an adequate conscious sedation (CS) or monitored anesthetic care (MAC) should be provided. Commonly used intravenous sedatives and hypnotics, such as midazolam and propofol, are not suitable for operations in a prone position due to undesired respiratory depression. Dexmedetomidine converges on an endogenous non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep-promoting pathway to exert its sedative effects. The great merit of dexmedetomidine for CS or MAC is the ability of the operator to recognize nerve damage during percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy, a representative MISS. However, there are 2 shortcomings for dexmedetomidine in MISS: hypotension/bradycardia and delayed emergence. Its hypotension/bradycardiac effects can be prevented by ketamine intraoperatively. Using atipamezole (an α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) might allow doctors to control the rate of recovery from procedural sedation in the future. MAC, with other analgesics such as ketorolac and opioids, creates ideal conditions for MISS. In conclusion, dexmedetomidine provides a favorable surgical condition in patients receiving MISS in a prone position due to its unique properties of conscious sedation followed by unconscious hypnosis with analgesia. However, no respiratory depression occurs based on the dexmedetomidine-related endogenous sleep pathways involves the inhibition of the locus coeruleus in the pons, which facilitates VLPO firing in the anterior hypothalamus. PMID:25317279

  9. Alpha-2A Adrenoceptor Agonist Guanfacine Restores Diuretic Efficiency in Experimental Cirrhotic Ascites: Comparison with Clonidine

    PubMed Central

    Sansoè, Giovanni; Aragno, Manuela; Mastrocola, Raffaella; Mengozzi, Giulio; Parola, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Background In human cirrhosis, adrenergic hyperfunction causes proximal tubular fluid retention and contributes to diuretic-resistant ascites, and clonidine, a sympatholytic drug, improves natriuresis in difficult-to-treat ascites. Aim To compare clonidine (aspecific α2-adrenoceptor agonist) to SSP-002021R (prodrug of guanfacine, specific α2A-receptor agonist), both associated with diuretics, in experimental cirrhotic ascites. Methods and Results Six groups of 12 rats were studied: controls (G1); controls receiving furosemide and potassium canrenoate (G2); rats with ascitic cirrhosis due to 14-week CCl4 treatment (G3); cirrhotic rats treated (over the 11th-14th CCl4 weeks) with furosemide and canrenoate (G4), furosemide, canrenoate and clonidine (G5), or diuretics and SSP002021R (G6). Three rats of each group had their hormonal status and renal function assessed at the end of 11th, 12th, 13th, and 14th weeks of respective treatments.Cirrhotic rats in G3 and G4 gained weight over the 12th-14th CCl4 weeks. In G4, brief increase in sodium excretion over the 11th-12th weeks preceded worsening of inulin clearance and natriuresis (diuretic resistance). In comparison with G4, the addition of clonidine (G5) or guanfacine (G6) to diuretics improved, respectively, sodium excretion over the 11th-12th CCl4 weeks, or GFR and electrolytes excretion over the 13th-14th CCl4 weeks. Natriuretic responses in G5 and G6 were accompanied by reduced catecholamine serum levels. Conclusions α2A-receptor agonists restore glomerular filtration rate and natriuresis, and delay diuretic-resistant ascites in experimental advanced cirrhosis. Clonidine ameliorates diuretic-dependent natriuresis just for a short time. PMID:27384184

  10. Inhibitory effect of beta3-adrenoceptor agonist in lower esophageal sphincter smooth muscle: in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Sarma, D N K; Banwait, Kuldip; Basak, Ashim; DiMarino, Anthony J; Rattan, Satish

    2003-01-01

    We investigated the effects of (R,R)-5-[2-[2-3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxyethyl] - amino]propyl] - 1,3 - benzodioxole - 2, 2 - dicarboxylate (CL 316243) (a typical beta3-agonist) on the spontaneously tonic smooth muscle of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES). Studies were carried out in smooth muscle strips and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of opossum LES. Isometric tension was recorded in the basal state and after CL 316243, and before and after beta3-antagonist (S)-N-[4-[2-[[3-[-(acetamidomethyl)phenoxy]-2-hydroxypropyl]amino]ethyl]phenyl]benzenesulfonamide (L 748337) and nonselective antagonist propranolol. In some experiments, the effects of nonadrenergic noncholinergic (NANC) nerve activation by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were also examined. The effects of CL 316243 were compared with those of nonselective beta-agonist isoproterenol. CL 316243 caused a concentration-dependent relaxation of the LES smooth muscle. The relaxant action of CL 316243 was determined to be directly at the smooth muscle because it remained unmodified by the neurotoxin tetrodotoxin and other neurohumoral antagonists, and also was observed in the SMCs. L 748337 selectively antagonized the relaxant effect of CL 316243 and, conversely, had no significant effect on the inhibitory actions of isoproterenol. CL 316243 (1 x 10(-8) M) caused an augmentation of NANC relaxation in the LES. Another beta3-agonist, (S)-4-[hydroxy-3-phenoxy-propylamino-ethoxy]-N-(2-methoxyethyl)-phenoxyacetamide (ZD 7114), also caused concentration-dependent full relaxation of the LES that was selectively antagonized by beta3-anatagonist 3-(2-ethylphenoxy)-1-[(1S)1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphth-1-ylaminol]-(2S)-2-propanol oxalate (SR 59230A). These studies defined the effects of characteristic inhibitory beta3-adrenoceptors in the spontaneously tonic LES smooth muscle and suggested a potential therapeutic role in the esophageal motility disorders characterized by hypertensive LES. PMID:12490574

  11. Biphasic effects of the beta-adrenoceptor agonist, BRL 37344, on glucose utilization in rat isolated skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Y. L.; Cawthorne, M. A.; Stock, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of the selective beta 3-adrenoceptor agonist, BRL 37344 (BRL) on glucose uptake and phosphorylation (i.e. glucose utilization; GU) and glycogen synthesis in rat isolated soleus and extensor digitorium longus (EDL) muscle preparations in vitro were investigated by use of 2-deoxy-[3H]-glucose (GU) and [U-14C]-glucose (glycogen synthesis). 2. Low concentrations of BRL (10(-11)-10(-9) M) significantly increased GU, with maximal increases of 30% in soleus and 24% in EDL at 10(-11) M. Neither the selective beta 1-adrenoceptor antagonist, atenolol (10(-8)-10(-6) M), nor the selective beta 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, ICI 118551 (10(-8)-10(-6) M) had any effect on the stimulation of GU induced by 10(-11) M BRL. 3. High concentrations of BRL (10(-6)-10(-5) M) caused significant inhibition (up to 30%) of GU in both soleus and EDL muscles. The inhibition of 10(-6) M BRL was blocked completely by 10(-6) and 10(-7) M ICI 118551 in soleus, and by 10(-6)-10(-8) M ICI 118551 in EDL; atenolol (10(-8)-10(6) M) had no effect. 4. Another selective beta 3-adrenoceptor agonist, CL 316,243, also caused a significant stimulation of muscle GU, with maximal increases of 43% at 10(-9) M in soleus and 45% at 10(-10) M in EDL. The stimulation of GU declined with further increases in the concentration of CL 316,243, but no inhibition of GU was seen, even at the highest concentration (10(-5) M) tested. 5. BRL at 10(-5) M inhibited completely insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis in both soleus and EDL, but this inhibitory effect of BRL was abolished by 10(-6) M ICI 118551. BRL at 10(-11) M (with or without 10(-6) M ICI 118551) had no effect on insulin-stimulated glycogen synthesis. 6. It is concluded that: (i) low (< nM) concentrations of BRL stimulate GU via an atypical beta-adrenoceptor that is resistant to conventional beta 1-adrenoceptor and beta 2-adrenoceptor antagonists; (ii) the stimulation of GU is negated by the activation of beta 2-adrenoceptors that occurs at higher (> n

  12. Agonist trafficking of Gi/o-mediated α2A-adrenoceptor responses in HEL 92.1.7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Kukkonen, Jyrki P; Jansson, Christian C; Åkerman, Karl E O

    2001-01-01

    The ability of 19 agonists to elevate Ca2+ and inhibit forskolin-induced cyclic AMP elevation through α2A-adrenoceptors in HEL 92.1.7 cells was investigated. Ligands of catecholamine-like- (five), imidazoline- (nine) and non-catecholamine-non-imidazoline-type (five) were included. The relative maximum responses were similar in both assays. Five ligands were full or nearly full agonists, six produced 20 – 70% of the response to a full agonist and the remaining eight gave lower responses (<20%) so that their potencies were difficult to evaluate. Marked differences in the potencies of the agonists with respect to the two measured responses were seen. The catecholamines were several times less potent in decreasing cyclic AMP than in increasing Ca2+, whereas the other, both imidazoline and ox-/thiazoloazepine ligands, were several times more potent with respect to the former than the latter response. For instance, UK14,304 was more potent than adrenaline with respect to the cyclic AMP response but less potent than adrenaline with respect to the Ca2+ response. All the responses were sensitive to pertussis toxin-pretreatment. Also the possible role of PLA2, β-adrenoceptors or ligand transport or metabolism as a source of error could be excluded. The results suggest that the active receptor states produced by catecholamines and the other agonists are markedly different and therefore have different abilities to activate different signalling pathways. PMID:11264241

  13. Beta-adrenoceptor agonist mediated relaxation of rat isolated resistance arteries: a role for the endothelium and nitric oxide.

    PubMed Central

    Graves, J.; Poston, L.

    1993-01-01

    1. Isoprenaline (10(-9)-10(-5) M) relaxed rat isolated mesenteric resistance arteries pre-contracted with K+ (30-60 mM) (p EC50 (M) 8.03 +/- 0.40; maximum relaxation 66.79 +/- 2.43%, n = 7). This relaxation was partially attenuated by the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor N omega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 10(-4) M). 2. The beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist, salbutamol (10(-9)-10(-5) M), produced a modest maximum relaxation (35.93 +/- 2.93%), which was not sensitive to L-NAME. 3. The beta 1-adrenoceptor agonist, dobutamine (10(-9)-10(-5) M), relaxed arteries precontracted with K+. This relaxation was abolished by L-NAME (10(-4) M) and also by propranolol (10(-6) M), but not affected by D-NAME (10(-4) M). The inhibition by L-NAME was partially reversed by L-arginine (10(-3) M). Removal of the endothelium severely attenuated relaxation to dobutamine. 4. Contractile responses to depolarizing K+ solutions were enhanced by the addition of L-NAME, and also by removal of the endothelium. 5. The above findings demonstrate that beta 1-adrenoceptor causes relaxation via NO release from the endothelium of rat mesenteric resistance arteries. In addition, contraction to K+ is modified by release of NO from the endothelium, possibly in response to tension development. PMID:8096781

  14. The effects of dexmedetomidine, an alpha 2 agonist, on learning and memory, assessed using passive avoidance and water maze tasks in rats.

    PubMed

    Sirviö, J; Riekkinen, P; Ekonsalo, T; Lammintausta, R; Riekkinen, P J

    1992-02-01

    The effects of dexmedetomidine, a specific and potent alpha 2 agonist, on the performance of rats in passive avoidance and water maze tasks were studied. Pre-training administration of subanaesthetic dose (9.0 micrograms/kg) of dexmedetomidine impaired the retention of the passive avoidance task (assessed 24 hr after training) but it did not affect the training of this task. Smaller doses (0.3, 0.9 and 3.0 micrograms/kg) did not affect the training or retention of this aversively motivated task. On the other hand, pre-training administration of 0.3 and 0.9 microgram/kg dexmedetomidine impaired the acquisition of the water maze task, whereas larger doses (3.0 and 9.0 micrograms/kg) had no significant effect on spatial learning. Pre-training administration of dexmedetomidine (0.3-9.0 micrograms/kg) increased swimming speed in rats. Only a large dose (300 micrograms/kg) of dexmedetomidine, administered immediately after training, impaired the retention of the passive avoidance task and the acquisition of the water maze task. These data agree with previous findings that pharmacological manipulation of the noradrenergic system affects the retention of aversively-motivated (passive avoidance) tasks. The present results suggest that the dose-response curve of dexmedetomidine for impairment of learning/memory differs between the passive avoidance and water maze tasks.

  15. β2-Adrenoceptor agonist-mediated inhibition of human airway smooth muscle cell proliferation: importance of the duration of β2-adrenoceptor stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Alastair G; Tomlinson, Paul R; Wilson, John W

    1997-01-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma has been ascribed to airway wall thickening as a result of smooth muscle proliferation and hypertrophy. We have previously shown that continuous exposure to the β2-adrenoceptor agonist, salbutamol inhibits mitogen-induced proliferation of airway smooth muscle cells. In the present study, the effects of variable durations and repeated periods of exposure to β2-adrenoceptor agonists on DNA synthesis in human cultured airway smooth muscle have been investigated to model some of the possible pharmacokinetic profiles of these agents following inhalation. DNA synthesis was measured by [3H]-thymidine incorporation. Shorter periods of exposure (up to 2.5 h) of airway smooth muscle cells to salbutamol (100 nM) commencing 30 min before thrombin (0.3 u ml−1) stimulation had no effect on the subsequent increase in [3H]-thymidine incorporation. However, inhibition by salbutamol was evident with a 4.5 h exposure and was maximal after an 8.5 h exposure. Similar patterns of results were observed when fenoterol (100 nM) was used in place of salbutamol as the β2-adrenoceptor agonist or when epidermal growth factor (300 pM) was used in place of thrombin as the mitogen. Salbutamol had no effect on thrombin-stimulated [3H]-leucine incorporation after 8.5 h of exposure, but a statistically significant effect was observed after 48 h of exposure. Experiments in which DNA synthesis was measured up to 52 h after the addition of thrombin indicated that exposure to salbutamol during the first 8 h of mitogen stimulation delayed rather than inhibited the DNA synthesis. Addition of salbutamol (100 nM) at different times either before or up to 24 h after the addition of thrombin indicated that [3H]-thymidine incorporation (measured between 24 and 28 h after thrombin) could be significantly attenuated when salbutamol was added as late as 18 h after the addition of thrombin. The effects of more prolonged exposure to

  16. Effects of ZD7114, a selective beta3-adrenoceptor agonist, on neuroendocrine mechanisms controlling energy balance.

    PubMed

    Savontaus, E; Pesonen, U; Rouru, J; Huupponen, R; Koulu, M

    1998-04-24

    Selective beta3-adrenoceptor agonists increase energy expenditure by increasing non-shivering thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate how changes in energy balance affect energy intake and interaction of peripheral metabolic feedback signals with central neuroendocrine mechanisms participating in the control of body energy balance. Expression of preproneuropeptide Y (preproNPY) mRNA in the arcuate nucleus and preprocorticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus were measured by in situ hybridisation technique after 1 day, 1 and 5 weeks of treatment with ZD7114 ((S)-4-[2-[(2-hydroxy-3-phenoxypropyl)amino]ethoxy]-N-(2-methoxyet hyl)phenoxyacetamide, 3 mg kg(-1) day(-1) in drinking water) in obese fa/fa Zucker rats. In addition, expression of leptin mRNA in epididymal fat and serum levels of leptin were analysed. Food intake, body weights, binding of GDP to brown adipose tissue mitochondria, plasma insulin and glucose were also measured. Treatment with ZD7114 significantly reduced weight gain and activated brown adipose tissue thermogenesis, but had no effect on food intake. Expressions of preproNPY or preproCRF mRNAs were similarly not changed by treatment with ZD7114. Furthermore, ZD7114 had no effect on plasma insulin or leptin and the expression of leptin mRNA in epididymal fat. However, statistically significant correlations were found between preproNPY and preproCRF mRNA expressions and brown fat thermogenic activity and plasma insulin levels in the ZD7114 treated rats, but not in the control rats. It is concluded that treatment with ZD7114 markedly activated brown fat thermogenesis, but did not affect neuropeptide Y (NPY) and CRF gene expression per se. However, the correlation analyses suggest that ZD7114 may modulate feedback connections of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis and plasma insulin with the hypothalamic neuroendocrine mechanisms integrating body energy balance. PMID:9653893

  17. β3-Adrenoceptor agonists for overactive bladder syndrome: Role of translational pharmacology in a repositioning clinical drug development project.

    PubMed

    Michel, Martin C; Korstanje, Cees

    2016-03-01

    β3-Adrenoceptor agonists were originally considered as a promising drug class for the treatment of obesity and/or type 2 diabetes. When these development efforts failed, they were repositioned for the treatment of the overactive bladder syndrome. Based on the example of the β3-adrenoceptor agonist mirabegron, but also taking into consideration evidence obtained with ritobegron and solabegron, we discuss challenges facing a translational pharmacology program accompanying clinical drug development for a first-in-class molecule. Challenges included generic ones such as ligand selectivity, species differences and drug target gene polymorphisms. Challenges that are more specific included changing concepts of the underlying pathophysiology of the target condition while clinical development was under way; moreover, a paucity of public domain tools for the study of the drug target and aspects of receptor agonists as drugs had to be addressed. Nonetheless, a successful first-in-class launch was accomplished. Looking back at this translational pharmacology program, we conclude that a specifically tailored and highly flexible approach is required. However, several of the lessons learned may also be applicable to translational pharmacology programs in other indications. PMID:26808167

  18. Decreased numbers of lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptors in pregnant women receiving beta 2-adrenergic agonist therapy.

    PubMed

    Santala, M; Saarikoski, S; Castrén, O

    1990-01-01

    Intravenous infusion of buphenine hydrochloride was administered on 4 successive days to 8 pregnant women with imminent preterm labor. Serial blood samples taken before and throughout the study were assayed for lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptor density and cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP). The lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptor density declined significantly (p less than 0.01) during the treatment. The plasma cAMP concentration was highest 4 h after commencement of infusion and decreased thereafter. Despite the decrease in lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptor density, the clinical response remained good and the parturients did not go into labor until several days after infusion was started.

  19. Effects of beta 2-agonist- and dexamethasone-treatment on relaxation and regulation of beta-adrenoceptors in human bronchi and lung tissue.

    PubMed

    Hauck, R W; Harth, M; Schulz, C; Präuer, H; Böhm, M; Schömig, A

    1997-08-01

    1. Long-term treatment with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists can lead to a decreased therapeutic efficacy of bronchodilatation in patients with obstructive pulmonary disease. In order to examine whether or not this is due to beta-adrenoceptor desensitization, human bronchial muscle relaxation was studied in isolated bronchial rings after pretreatment with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. Additionally, the influence of pretreatment with dexamethasone on desensitization was studied. 2. The effect of beta 2-agonist incubation alone and after coincubation with dexamethasone on density and affinity of beta-adrenoceptors was investigated by radioligand binding experiments. 3. In human isolated bronchi, isoprenaline induces a time- and concentration-dependent beta-adrenoceptor desensitization as judged from maximal reduction in potency by a factor of 7 and reduction of 73 +/- 4% in efficacy of isoprenaline to relax human bronchial smooth muscle. 4. After an incubation period of 60 min with 100 mumol l-1 terbutaline, a significant decline in its relaxing efficacy (81 +/- 8%) and potency (by a factor 5.5) occurred. 5. Incubation with 30 mumol l-1 isoprenaline for 60 min did not impair the maximal effect of a subsequent aminophylline response but led to an increase in potency (factor 4.4). 6. Coincubation of dexamethasone with isoprenaline (120 min; 30 mumol l-1) preserved the effect of isoprenaline on relaxation (129 +/- 15%). 7. In radioligand binding experiments, pretreatment of lung tissue for 60 min with isoprenaline (30 mumol l-1) resulted in a decrease in beta-adrenoceptor binding sites (Bmax) to 64 +/- 1.6% (P < 0.05), while the antagonist affinity (KD) for [3H]-CGP-12177 remained unchanged. 8. In contrast, radioligand binding studies on lung tissue pretreated with either dexamethasone (30 mumol l-1) or isoprenaline (30 mumol l-1) plus dexamethasone (30 mumol l-1) for 120 min did not lead to a significant change of Bmax (160 +/- 22.1% vs 142.3 +/- 28.7%) or KD (5.0 nmol l-1

  20. The long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist, indacaterol, enhances glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transcription in human airway epithelial cells in a gene- and agonist-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, T; Johnson, M; Newton, R; Giembycz, M A

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Inhaled glucocorticoid (ICS)/long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist (LABA) combination therapy is a recommended treatment option for patients with moderate/severe asthma in whom adequate control cannot be achieved by an ICS alone. Previously, we discovered that LABAs can augment dexamethasone-inducible gene expression and proposed that this effect may explain how these two drugs interact to deliver superior clinical benefit. Herein, we extended that observation by analysing, pharmacodynamically, the effect of the LABA, indacaterol, on glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-mediated gene transcription induced by seven ligands with intrinsic activity values that span the spectrum of full agonism to antagonism. Experimental Approach BEAS-2B human airway epithelial cells stably transfected with a 2× glucocorticoid response element luciferase reporter were used to model gene transcription together with an analysis of several glucocorticoid-inducible genes. Key Results Indacaterol augmented glucocorticoid-induced reporter activation in a manner that was positively related to the intrinsic activity of the GR agonist. This effect was demonstrated by an increase in response maxima without a change in GR agonist affinity or efficacy. Indacaterol also enhanced glucocorticoid-inducible gene expression. However, the magnitude of this effect was dependent on both the GR agonist and the gene of interest. Conclusions and Implications These data suggest that indacaterol activates a molecular rheostat, which increases the transcriptional competency of GR in an agonist- and gene-dependent manner without apparently changing the relationship between fractional GR occupancy and response. These findings provide a platform to rationally design ICS/LABA combination therapy that is based on the generation of agonist-dependent gene expression profiles in target and off-target tissues. PMID:25598440

  1. Human fat cell alpha-2 adrenoceptors. I. Functional exploration and pharmacological definition with selected alpha-2 agonists and antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Galitzky, J.; Mauriege, P.; Berlan, M.; Lafontan, M.

    1989-05-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate more fully the pharmacological characteristics of the human fat cell alpha-2 adrenoceptor. Biological assays were performed on intact isolated fat cells while radioligand binding studies were carried out with (/sup 3/H)yohimbine in membranes. These pharmacological studies brought: (1) a critical definition of the limits of the experimental conditions required for the exploration of alpha-2 adrenergic responsiveness on human fat cells and membranes; (2) an improvement in the pharmacological definition of the human fat cell postsynaptic alpha-2 adrenoceptor. Among alpha-2 agonists, UK-14,304 was the most potent and the relative order of potency was: UK-14,304 greater than p-aminoclonidine greater than clonidine = B-HT 920 greater than rilmenidine. For alpha-2 antagonists, the potency order was: yohimbine greater than idazoxan greater than SK F-86,466 much greater than benextramine; (3) a description of the impact of benextramine (irreversible alpha-1/alpha-2 antagonist) on human fat cell alpha-2 adrenergic receptors and on human fat cell function; the drug inactivates the alpha-2 adrenergic receptors with a minor impact on beta adrenergic receptors and without noticeable alterations of fat cell function as assessed by preservation of beta adrenergic and Al-adenosine receptor-mediated lipolytic responses; and (4) a definition of the relationship existing between alpha-2 adrenergic receptor occupancy, inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity and antilipolysis with full and partial agonists. The existence of a receptor reserve must be taken into account when evaluating alpha-2 adrenergic receptor distribution and regulation of human fat cells.

  2. Effects of α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine on swelling-activated chloride currents in human atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yetao; Du, Xinling

    2015-02-01

    Swelling-activated chloride currents (ICl.swell) play an important role in cardiac electrophysiology and arrhythmogenesis. However, the regulation of these currents has not been clarified to date. In this research, we focused on the function of phenylephrine, an α1-adrenoceptor agonist, in the regulation of I(Cl.swell) in human atrial myocytes. We recorded I(Cl.swell) evoked by a hypotonic bath solution with the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. We found that I(Cl.swell) increased over time, and it was difficult to achieve absolute steady state. Phenylephrine potentiated I(Cl.swell) from -1.00 ± 0.51 pA/pF at -90 mV and 2.58 ± 1.17 pA/pF at +40 mV to -1.46 ± 0.70 and 3.84 ± 1.67 pA/pF, respectively (P < 0.05, n = 6), and the upward trend in ICl.swell was slowed after washout. This effect was concentration-dependent, and the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin shifted the dose-effect curve rightward. Addition of prazosin or the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide (BIM) attenuated the effect of phenylephrine. The PKC activator phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) activated I(Cl.swell) from -1.69 ± 1.67 pA/pF at -90 mV and 5.58 ± 6.36 pA/pF at +40 mV to -2.41 ± 1.95 pA/pF and 7.05 ± 6.99 pA/pF, respectively (P < 0.01 at -90 mV and P < 0.05 at +40 mV; n = 6). In conclusion, the α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine augmented I(Cl.swell), a result that differs from previous reports in other animal species. The effect was attenuated by BIM and mimicked by PDBu, which indicates that phenylephrine might modulate I(Cl,swell) in a PKC-dependent manner.

  3. Rat white adipocytes activate p85/p110 PI3K and induce PM GLUT4 in response to adrenoceptor agonists or aluminum fluoride.

    PubMed

    Ohsaka, Y; Nomura, Y

    2016-03-01

    Adipocyte responses to adrenergic and ß-adrenoceptor(-AR) (adrenoceptor) regulation are not sufficiently understood, and information helpful for elucidating the adrenoceptor-responsive machinery is insufficient. Here we show by using immunoprecipitated kinase analysis with a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) p85 antibody that PI3K activation was induced by treatment with 10 or 100 µM norepinephrine (NE) for 15 min or with 10 mM aluminum fluoride (AF, a guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding (G) protein activator) for 20 min in white adipocytes (rat epididymal adipocytes) and that treatment with pertussis toxin (PTX, a G-protein inactivator) inhibited PI3K activation induced by the 20-min treatment with AF in the cells. In addition, western blot analysis revealed that glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) level in the adipocyte plasma membrane (PM) fraction was increased by treatment with 10 µM NE, 100 µM dobutamine (DOB, a ß1-AR agonist), or 0.1 µM CL316243 (CL, a ß3-AR agonist) for 30 min or with 10 mM AF for 20 min. NE or AF treatment triggered 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) uptake into adipocytes under the above conditions. Our results advance the understanding of responses to adrenoceptor regulation in white adipocytes and provide possible clues for clarifying the machinery involved in adrenergic and ß-AR responses in the cells. PMID:27030626

  4. ICI D7114 a novel selective beta-adrenoceptor agonist selectively stimulates brown fat and increases whole-body oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Holloway, B R; Howe, R; Rao, B S; Stribling, D; Mayers, R M; Briscoe, M G; Jackson, J M

    1991-09-01

    1. ICI D7114 is a novel, beta-adrenoceptor agonist which stimulates whole body oxygen consumption in conscious rats, cats and dogs and brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity in conscious rats. Treatment of rats with ICI D7114 stimulated oxygen consumption (ED50, 0.04 mg kg-1, p.o.) and BAT mitochondrial guanosine diphosphate (GDP)-binding (ED50, 0.15 mg kg-1, p.o.) with no chronotropic effects on the heart at these doses. 2. Reference beta-adrenoceptor agonists, isoprenaline and clenbuterol, also stimulated oxygen consumption and BAT activity but were less selective because they also produced effects on heart rate at these doses. 3. Treatment of conscious rats with ICI D7114 did not attenuate the chronotropic effects on the heart of a subsequent isoprenaline challenge. 4. Administration of ICI D7114 or of its acid metabolite had no effect in a cat soleus muscle model of tremor or on blood potassium levels in the conscious dog, indicating lack of effects at beta 2-adrenoceptors. 5. The results indicate that ICI D7114 may have activity at atypical beta-adrenoceptors in brown adipose tissue leading to increased whole body oxygen consumption. PMID:1686210

  5. ICI D7114 a novel selective beta-adrenoceptor agonist selectively stimulates brown fat and increases whole-body oxygen consumption.

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, B. R.; Howe, R.; Rao, B. S.; Stribling, D.; Mayers, R. M.; Briscoe, M. G.; Jackson, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    1. ICI D7114 is a novel, beta-adrenoceptor agonist which stimulates whole body oxygen consumption in conscious rats, cats and dogs and brown adipose tissue (BAT) activity in conscious rats. Treatment of rats with ICI D7114 stimulated oxygen consumption (ED50, 0.04 mg kg-1, p.o.) and BAT mitochondrial guanosine diphosphate (GDP)-binding (ED50, 0.15 mg kg-1, p.o.) with no chronotropic effects on the heart at these doses. 2. Reference beta-adrenoceptor agonists, isoprenaline and clenbuterol, also stimulated oxygen consumption and BAT activity but were less selective because they also produced effects on heart rate at these doses. 3. Treatment of conscious rats with ICI D7114 did not attenuate the chronotropic effects on the heart of a subsequent isoprenaline challenge. 4. Administration of ICI D7114 or of its acid metabolite had no effect in a cat soleus muscle model of tremor or on blood potassium levels in the conscious dog, indicating lack of effects at beta 2-adrenoceptors. 5. The results indicate that ICI D7114 may have activity at atypical beta-adrenoceptors in brown adipose tissue leading to increased whole body oxygen consumption. PMID:1686210

  6. Actions of the prototypical 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT at human alpha2-adrenoceptors: (+)8-OH-DPAT, but not (-)8-OH-DPAT is an alpha2B subtype preferential agonist.

    PubMed

    Heusler, Peter; Rauly-Lestienne, Isabelle; Tourette, Amélie; Tardif, Stéphanie; Ailhaud, Marie-Christine; Croville, Guillaume; Cussac, Didier

    2010-08-25

    8-OH-DPAT [8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin] is the prototypical agonist at serotonin 5-HT1A receptors; however, activity at other targets contributes to the functional effects of the compound as well. We examined the properties of 8-OH-DPAT and its enantiomers at recombinant human (h)alpha2-adrenoceptor subtypes, using a panel of radioligand binding and functional tests. In competition binding experiments using [3H]-RX821002, about 10-fold selectivity of (+)8-OH-DPAT for the halpha2B subtype (pKi about 7) over halpha2A- and halpha2C-adrenoceptors was observed. In contrast, the S(-) enantiomer of 8-OH-DPAT showed similar weak affinities for the three receptor subtypes (pKis<6). The binding affinity of (+)8-OH-DPAT at the halpha2B- and the halpha2A-adrenoceptor was found sensitive to GTPgammaS, a receptor/G protein-uncoupling agent, indicating agonist properties of the drug. Furthermore, using [35S]GTPgammaS binding determination at CHO-halpha2B or CHO-halpha2A cell membranes and G protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) current recordings in Xenopus oocytes expressing halpha2B, partial agonist activity of (+)8-OH-DPAT at the respective receptors was confirmed in these two different functional assays. Potency of (+)8-OH-DPAT for stimulation of [35S]GTPgammaS incorporation was lower at the halpha2A- than at the halpha2B-adrenoceptor, consistent with binding affinities. Thus, (+)8-OH-DPAT and, as a consequence, racemic (+/-)8-OH-DPAT are partial agonists at halpha2-adrenoceptors with selectivity for the halpha2B subtype, a property that might contribute to the effects of the compound described in native systems.

  7. The involvement of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in β2-adrenoceptor agonist-induced vasodilatation on rat diaphragmatic microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Han-Yu

    1997-01-01

    The effects of glibenclamide (GLB), a blocker of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, on diaphragmatic microcirculation in male Sprague-Dawley rats were assessed under basal conditions and after β2-adrenoceptor-agonist stimulation. In addition, forskolin was used to bypass β-adrenoceptors and GTP-binding proteins (G-protein) to explore the possible mechanism of GLB effects. For comparison, the relationships between KATP channel activity and cyclic GMP-mediated vasodilator responses to acetylcholine (ACh) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were also assessed. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anaesthetized with urethane and mechanically ventilated. The left hemi-diaphragm of each rat was prepared and microvascular blood flow (QLDF) was recorded with laser-Doppler flowmetry during continuous superfusion with bicarbonate-buffered, prewarmed Ringer solution. The drugs were topically applied to the surface of the hemi-diaphragm. Salbutamol (0.32–32 μM), terbutaline (0.32 μM–0.32 μM) and forskolin (0.32–10 μM) each elicited a concentration-dependent increase in QLDF. Baseline microvascular blood flow was unaffected by a 30 min suffusion of 1 μM GLB (295±51 mV vs 325±62 mV, P=0.738). The vasodilator response elicited by salbutamol (0.32 μM, 1 μM and 3.2 μM), was significantly attenuated by a 30 min superfusion with 1 μM GLB; this salbutamol-induced vasodilatation was mediated via an interaction with β-adrenoceptor receptors, as in other experiments it was greatly inhibited by 30-min superfusion with propranolol (10 μM). Similarly, following 30-min superfusion with GLB (1 μM), the terbutaline (1 μM, 3.2 μM and 10 μM)-induced vasodilator response was almost abolished and the vasodilator responses induced by incremental concentrations of forskolin (0.32 μM, 1 μM and 3.2 μM) were also significantly attenuated. Cromakalim (1.5 μM, 3 μM and 3.2 μM) produced an increase of QLDF in a dose-dependent manner

  8. Prolonged spinal analgesia in the rat with the alpha-adrenoceptor agonist oxymetazoline.

    PubMed

    Sherman, S; Loomis, C; Milne, B; Cervenko, F

    1987-08-01

    The acute intrathecal (i.t.) injection of 50, 100, 200, 250 and 300 nmol of oxymetazoline produced dose-dependent antinociception in rats assessed by tail flick and paw pressure tests. Significant antinociception was observed with all doses of oxymetazoline except 50 nmol in the paw pressure test. The ED50 values for i.t. oxymetazoline in the tail flick and paw pressure tests were 120 nmol (95% CI: 76-178 nmol) and 148 nmol (95% CI: 120-186 nmol), respectively. Oxymetazoline had a long duration of action; a single i.t. dose of 100 nmol significantly elevated tail flick latency and paw pressure threshold for 8 h. The alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine, given i.t. 1 h after oxymetazoline, attenuated the antinociceptive effect in a dose-dependent manner. Phentolamine (50 micrograms i.t.) produced almost complete antagonism in the tail flick and paw pressure tests. These data indicate that oxymetazoline produces long lasting antinociception in the rat following i.t. injection, and that the effect is mediated by alpha-adrenoceptors in the spinal cord.

  9. beta3-adrenoceptor agonist prevents alterations of muscle diacylglycerol and adipose tissue phospholipids induced by a cafeteria diet.

    PubMed

    Darimont, Christian; Turini, Marco; Epitaux, Micheline; Zbinden, Irène; Richelle, Myriam; Montell, Eulàlia; Ferrer-Martinez, Andreu; Macé, Katherine

    2004-08-17

    BACKGROUND: Insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet has been associated with alterations in lipid content and composition in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Administration of beta3-adrenoceptor (beta3-AR) agonists was recently reported to prevent insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet, such as the cafeteria diet. The objective of the present study was to determine whether a selective beta3-AR agonist (ZD7114) could prevent alterations of the lipid profile of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue lipids induced by a cafeteria diet. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats fed a cafeteria diet were treated orally with either the beta3-AR agonist ZD7114 (1 mg/kg per day) or the vehicle for 60 days. Rats fed a chow diet were used as a reference group. In addition to the determination of body weight and insulin plasma level, lipid content and fatty acid composition in gastronemius and in epididymal adipose tissue were measured by gas-liquid chromatography, at the end of the study. RESULTS: In addition to higher body weights and plasma insulin concentrations, rats fed a cafeteria diet had greater triacylglycerol (TAG) and diacylglycerol (DAG) accumulation in skeletal muscle, contrary to animals fed a chow diet. As expected, ZD7114 treatment prevented the excessive weight gain and hyperinsulinemia induced by the cafeteria diet. Furthermore, in ZD7114 treated rats, intramyocellular DAG levels were lower and the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly arachidonic acid, in adipose tissue phospholipids was higher than in animals fed a cafeteria diet. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that activation of the beta3-AR was able to prevent lipid alterations in muscle and adipose tissue associated with insulin resistance induced by the cafeteria diet. These changes in intramyocellular DAG levels and adipose tissue PL composition may contribute to the improved insulin sensitivity associated with beta3-AR activation. PMID:15507149

  10. β3-adrenoceptor agonist prevents alterations of muscle diacylglycerol and adipose tissue phospholipids induced by a cafeteria diet

    PubMed Central

    Darimont, Christian; Turini, Marco; Epitaux, Micheline; Zbinden, Irène; Richelle, Myriam; Montell, Eulàlia; Ferrer-Martinez, Andreu; Macé, Katherine

    2004-01-01

    Background Insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet has been associated with alterations in lipid content and composition in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Administration of β3-adrenoceptor (β3-AR) agonists was recently reported to prevent insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet, such as the cafeteria diet. The objective of the present study was to determine whether a selective β3-AR agonist (ZD7114) could prevent alterations of the lipid profile of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue lipids induced by a cafeteria diet. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats fed a cafeteria diet were treated orally with either the β3-AR agonist ZD7114 (1 mg/kg per day) or the vehicle for 60 days. Rats fed a chow diet were used as a reference group. In addition to the determination of body weight and insulin plasma level, lipid content and fatty acid composition in gastronemius and in epididymal adipose tissue were measured by gas-liquid chromatography, at the end of the study. Results In addition to higher body weights and plasma insulin concentrations, rats fed a cafeteria diet had greater triacylglycerol (TAG) and diacylglycerol (DAG) accumulation in skeletal muscle, contrary to animals fed a chow diet. As expected, ZD7114 treatment prevented the excessive weight gain and hyperinsulinemia induced by the cafeteria diet. Furthermore, in ZD7114 treated rats, intramyocellular DAG levels were lower and the proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly arachidonic acid, in adipose tissue phospholipids was higher than in animals fed a cafeteria diet. Conclusions These results show that activation of the β3-AR was able to prevent lipid alterations in muscle and adipose tissue associated with insulin resistance induced by the cafeteria diet. These changes in intramyocellular DAG levels and adipose tissue PL composition may contribute to the improved insulin sensitivity associated with β3-AR activation. PMID:15507149

  11. Dexmedetomidine Protects Rat Liver against Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury Partly by the α2A-Adrenoceptor Subtype and the Mechanism Is Associated with the TLR4/NF-κB Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiheng; Wu, Shan; Yu, Xiaofang; Zhou, Shaoli; Ge, Mian; Chi, Xinjin; Cai, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) signaling plays a dominant role in the pathogenesis of liver ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury. Dexmedetomidine (Dex) protects the liver against IR injury via α2-adrenoceptor activation, but the contribution of TLR4 signaling remains unknown. The authors aimed to examine whether pretreatment with Dex produces hepatic protection and investigate the influence of Dex on TLR4/NF-κB signaling. Dex was given via intraperitoneal injection 30 min prior to orthotopic autologous liver transplantation (OALT) in rats, and three α2-adrenoceptor antagonists including atipamezole (a nonselective α2 receptor blocker), ARC-239 (a specific α2B/C blocker) and BRL-44408 (a specific α2A blocker) were injected intraperitoneally 10 min before Dex administration. Histopathologic evaluation of the liver and the measurement of serum alanine aminotransferase activity, TLR4/NF-κB expression in the liver, and pro-inflammatory factors (serum tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and hepatic myeloperoxidase) concentrations were performed 8 h after OALT. Dex ameliorated liver injury after OALT probably by suppressing the TLR4/NF-κB pathway and decreasing inflammatory mediator levels. The protective effects of Dex were reversed by atipamezole and BRL-44408, but not by ARC-239, suggesting that these effects were mediated in part by the α2A subtype. In conclusion, Dex attenuates liver injury partly via the α2A-adrenoceptor subtype, and the mechanism is due to the suppression of the TLR4/NF-κB pathway. PMID:27347929

  12. Cardiovascular effects of KUR-1246, a new tetrahydronaphthalen derivative beta2-adrenoceptor agonist and a selective uterine relaxant.

    PubMed

    Furihata, Yoshio; Motokawa, Yoshiyuki; Murata, Satoshi; Kiguchi, Sumiyoshi; Kobayashi, Mamoru; Murakami, Makoto; Kojima, Masami; Yamamoto, Toshinori

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the cardiovascular effects of KUR-1246 (CAS 194785-31-4, (-)-bis(2-{[(2S)-2-({(2R)-2-hydroxy-2-[4-hydroxy-3-(2-hydroxyethyl) phenyl] ethyl}amino)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalen-7-yl]oxy}-N,N-dimethylacetamide)monosulfate), a new beta2-adrenoceptor agonist tocolytic agent. In conscious dogs, the intravenous administration of KUR-1246 at 0.1 and 1 microg/kg had no effects on blood pressure, heart rate or femoral artery blood flow. KUR-1246 at 10 and 100 microg/kg significantly decreased blood pressure and increased heart rate. In the electrocardiograms, KUR-1246 did not affect QT intervals or QTc. In addition, the cardiac effects of KUR-1246 were evaluated in in vitro electrophysiological studies. KUR-1246 at 10 micromol/L did not affect action potential parameters (the maximal upstroke velocity, resting membrane potential, action potential amplitude and action potential durations) in isolated papillary muscles of guinea pigs or in the human ether-a-go-go related gene (HERG) tail current recorded from stably transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. On the basis of these results, the effects of KUR-1246 in conscious dogs on the cardiovascular system appear to be limited to changes in blood pressure and heart rate. Therefore, KUR-1246 is unlikely to provoke ventricular arrhythmias by delaying the ventricular repolarization.

  13. Effect of dexmedetomidine on lung ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, LILI; LI, LI; SHEN, JINMEI; QI, ZEYOU; GUO, LIANG

    2014-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine, a specific selective α2-adrenergic agonist, does not only have the characteristics of being a sedative and analgesic, but also exhibits a protective role in brain ischemia-reperfusion injury and inhibits the inflammation in animals with sepsis. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether dexmedetomidine is capable of attenuating rat pulmonary damage induced by ischemia-reperfusion injury, which is a type of acute sterile lung injury. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into six groups: The sham-operated (sham) group, the lung ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) group, intravenous injection of dexmedetomidine 2.5 μg/kg/h (Dex2.5) or 5 μg/kg/h (Dex5) for 1 h prior to ischemia, combination of α2-adrenergic antagonist yohimbine prior to dexmedetomidine pre-treatment (Dex+Yoh) and pre-administration of yohimbine alone (Yoh) prior to ischemia. Lung injury was assessed by the histopathological changes, arterial blood gas, wet/dry (w/d) weight ratio and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity of the lung. The concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was measured by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The expression of toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) mRNA in the lung were determined by quantitative PCR, and phosphorylated levels of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 were determined by western blotting. Pre-treatment with dexmedetomidine significantly reduced the lung injury, w/d weight ratio and MPO activity, and decreased the concentration of TNF-α, IL-6 and MCP-1 in BALF compared with the I/R group. The expression of TLR4 and MyD88 mRNA and the levels of phosphorylated JNK and ERK1/2 in the lung tissue were markedly downregulated by intravenous injection of dexmedetomidne for 1 h prior to lung I/R. The protective effects of dexmedetomidine

  14. Urinary tract toxicity in rats following administration of beta 3-adrenoceptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Waghe, M; Westwood, R; Nunn, G; Kalinowski, A; Aldridge, A

    1999-01-01

    ZD7114, [(S)-4-[2-(2-hydroxy-3 phenoxypropylamine)ethoxy]-N-(2-methoxyethyl) phenoxyacetamide], and ZD2079, [(R)-N-(2-[4- (carboxymethyl)phenoxy]ethyl)-N-(beta-hydroxyphenethyl)ammonium chloride], are beta 3-adrenoceptor stimulants with selectivity for brown adipose tissue. ZD7144 is the hydrochloride salt of the S-enantiomer of the racemic amide ZD2079. They were developed as potential novel treatments for obesity and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. Male and female rats were dosed separately by gavage for a minimum of 28 days with 0, 10, 50, and 500 mg/kg/day of ZD7114 or with 0, 10, 30, and 150 mg/kg/day of ZD2079. Two further groups of male and female rats were dosed with 0 and 500 mg/kg/day of ZD7114 for 28 days and were then allowed a 6-wk, undosed withdrawal period. At high doses, both compounds caused urinary tract toxicity, which primarily affected the distal tubules and collecting ducts of the kidney via tubular necrosis. They also caused ureteric inflammation, cystitis, and accumulation of crystalline inclusions throughout the urinary tract. As a result of urinary tract toxicity, affected animals from one or both studies showed reduced red blood cell indices, lower platelet counts, and higher white cell counts. Blood chemistry revealed lower plasma concentrations of glucose (7.28 +/- 1.37 compared to 8.11 +/- 0.65 for the control) and total protein (63.42 +/- 3.65 compared to 69.17 +/- 3.24 for the control) and increased plasma urea (37.15 +/- 19.96 compared to 8.09 +/- 0.87 for the control). Urinalysis showed an increase in the number of crystals, blood, and protein. In the urinary tract, the severe crystalluria with accumulation of crystalline material indicated that this may have a role in the etiology of the target organ toxicity. Poor solubility of the compounds at normal urinary pH was considered a possible mechanism for the crystalluria. PMID:10207980

  15. Absorption, disposition, metabolism, and excretion of ritobegron (KUC-7483), a novel selective β3-adrenoceptor agonist, in rats.

    PubMed

    Abe, Y; Ota, E; Endo, T; Murakami, M; Kobayashi, M

    2014-12-01

    The pharmacokinetic profile of ritobegron, a novel, selective β3-adrenoceptor agonist, was investigated in rats. Ritobegron, an ethyl ester prodrug of the active compound KUC-7322, or KUC-7322 itself was orally administered (10 mg/kg). Ethyl esterification resulted in a 10-fold increase in the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC(0-t)), as compared to KUC-7322. Following intravenous administration of KUC-7322 (1 mg/kg), total blood clearance was 1.36 L/h/kg, suggesting that intrinsic hepatic clearance is the rate-limiting step in KUC-7322 excretion. When ritobegron was orally administered (0.3, 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg), plasma concentrations of KUC-7322 rapidly increased and reached a maximum concentration (C(max)) at 0.25 to 0.31 h. KUC-7322 levels rapidly decreased, with a half-life (t 1/2) of 0.42 to 1.37 h thereafter. AUC(0-t) did not show a dose-dependent increase. The bioavailability of KUC-7322 was estimated to be 4%. Following oral administration of [14C]ritobegron (3 mg/kg), radioactivity concentrations in tissues rapidly increased and declined in parallel with changes in plasma concentration. In most of tissues, excluding the liver, kidney, urinary bladder, stomach and small intestine, radioactivity concentrations were lower than that in plasma. In plasma, bile, urine, and feces, KUC-7322 and its glucuronide, sulfate, and glutathione conjugates were detected. The glucuronide conjugate of KUC-7322 was the predominant metabolite in bile, plasma, and urine, and KUC-7322 was predominant in feces. Ritobegron was not detected in any of the samples. The cumulative excretion of radioactivity in urine and feces were 28.7% and 68.3% of the dose, respectively, up to 120 h after administration.

  16. Influence of β-adrenoceptor antagonists on the pharmacokinetics of rizatriptan, a 5-HT1B/1D agonist: differential effects of propranolol, nadolol and metoprolol

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Michael R; Sciberras, David; De Smet, Marina; Lowry, Richard; Tomasko, Lisa; Lee, Yih; Olah, Timothy V; Zhao, Jamie; Vyas, Kamlesh P; Halpin, Rita; Kari, Prasad H; James (deceased), Ian

    2001-01-01

    Aims Patients with migraine may receive the 5-HT1B/1D agonist, rizatriptan (5 or 10 mg), to control acute attacks. Patients with frequent attacks may also receive propranolol or other β-adrenoceptor antagonists for migraine prophylaxis. The present studies investigated the potential for pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic interaction between β-adrenoceptor blockers and rizatriptan. Methods Four double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized crossover investigations were performed in a total of 51 healthy subjects. A single 10 mg dose of rizatriptan was administered after 7 days' administration of propranolol (60 and 120 mg twice daily), nadolol (80 mg twice daily), metoprolol (100 mg twice daily) or placebo. Rizatriptan pharmacokinetics were assessed. In vitro incubations of rizatriptan and sumatriptan with various β-adrenoceptor blockers were performed in human S9 fraction. Production of the indole-acetic acid-MAO-A metabolite of each triptan was measured. Results Administration of rizatriptan during propranolol treatment (120 mg twice daily for 7.5 days) increased the AUC(0,∞) for rizatriptan by approximately 67% and the Cmax by approximately 75%. A reduction in the dose of propranolol (60 mg twice daily) and/or the incorporation of a delay (1 or 2 h) between propranolol and rizatriptan administration did not produce a statistically significant change in the effect of propranolol on rizatriptan pharmacokinetics. Administration of rizatriptan together with nadolol (80 mg twice daily) or metoprolol (100 mg twice daily) for 7 days did not significantly alter the pharmacokinetics of rizatriptan. No untoward adverse experiences attributable to the pharmacokinetic interaction between propranolol and rizatriptan were observed, and no subjects developed serious clinical, laboratory, or other significant adverse experiences during coadministration of rizatriptan with any of the β-adrenoceptor blockers. In vitro incubations showed that propranolol, but not other β-adrenoceptor

  17. Pharmacologic characterization of GSK-961081 (TD-5959), a first-in-class inhaled bifunctional bronchodilator possessing muscarinic receptor antagonist and β2-adrenoceptor agonist properties.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Sharath S; Hughes, Adam D; Chen, Yan; Steinfeld, Tod; Jasper, Jeffrey R; Lee, Tae-Weon; McNamara, Alexander; Martin, William J; Pulido-Rios, M Teresa; Mammen, Mathai

    2014-10-01

    The objective of the present studies was to characterize the pharmacologic properties of GSK-961081 [TD-5959; (R)-1-(3-((2-chloro-4-(((2-hydroxy-2-(8-hydroxy-2-oxo-1,2-dihydroquinolin-5-yl)ethyl)amino)methyl)-5-methoxyphenyl)amino)-3-oxopropyl) piperidin-4-yl [1,1'-biphenyl]-2-ylcarbamate], a novel first-in-class inhaled bifunctional compound possessing both muscarinic antagonist (MA) and β2-adrenoceptor agonist (BA) properties (MABA). In competition radioligand binding studies at human recombinant receptors, GSK-961081 displayed high affinity for hM2 (Ki = 1.4 nM), hM3 muscarinic receptors (Ki = 1.3 nM) and hβ2-adrenoceptors (Ki = 3.7 nM). GSK-961081 behaved as a potent hβ2-adrenoceptor agonist (EC50 = 0.29 nM for stimulation of cAMP levels) with 440- and 320-fold functional selectivity over hβ1- and hβ3-adrenoceptors, respectively. In guinea pig isolated tracheal tissues, GSK-961081 produced smooth muscle relaxation through MA (EC50 = 50.2 nM), BA (EC50=24.6 nM), and MABA (EC50 = 11 nM) mechanisms. In the guinea pig bronchoprotection assay, inhaled GSK-961081 produced potent, dose-dependent inhibition of bronchoconstrictor responses via MA (ED50 = 33.9 µg/ml), BA (ED50 = 14.1 µg/ml), and MABA (ED50 = 6.4 µg/ml) mechanisms. Significant bronchoprotective effects of GSK-961081 were evident in guinea pigs via MA, BA, and MABA mechanisms for up to 7 days after dosing. The lung selectivity index of GSK-961081 in guinea pigs was 55- to 110-fold greater than that of tiotropium with respect to systemic antimuscarinic antisialagogue effects and was 10-fold greater than that of salmeterol with respect to systemic β2-adrenoceptor hypotensive effects. These preclinical findings studies suggest that GSK-961081 has the potential to be a promising next-generation inhaled lung-selective bronchodilator for the treatment of airway diseases, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:25100753

  18. Dexmedetomidine pretreatment attenuates propofol‑induced neurotoxicity in neuronal cultures from the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yi; Hu, Junhua; Liang, Yubing; Zhong, Yuling; He, Dan; Qin, Yi; Li, Li; Chen, Jing; Xiao, Qiang; Xie, Yubo

    2016-10-01

    Propofol is widely used for the induction and maintenance of pediatric anesthesia. Previous studies have indicated that propofol can induce apoptosis, and damage cognitive and memory functions. Dexmedetomidine is a potent α‑2 adrenoceptor agonist with high selectivity. Previous observations have shown that dexmedetomidine exhibits anti‑apoptotic qualities. The present study evaluated the neuroprotective effects of dexmedetomidine pretreatment against propofol‑induced neurotoxicity in immature hippocampal neurons. The viability and apoptotic rate of the neurons were detected using a Cell Counting Kit‑8 assay and flow cytometry. The mRNA and protein expression levels of brain‑derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), B‑cell lymphoma‑2 (Bcl‑2) and phosphorylated‑cyclic‑AMP response element binding protein (p‑CREB) were detected using semiquantitative reverse transcription‑polymerase chain reaction and western blot analyses, respectively. These results showed that propofol exposure (100 µM; 3 h) reduced neuronal viability, induced cell apoptosis and decreased the expression levels of BDNF, Bcl‑2 and p‑CREB. Dexmedetomidine treatment (0.001‑100 µM) of the neurons prior to propofol exposure attenuated the propofol‑induced neuronal apoptosis and increased expression levels of BDNF, Bcl‑2 and p‑CREB compared with the propofol only group. In addition, dexmedetomidine at the highest concentration provided superior neuroprotection of neurons. These in vitro data indicated that dexmedetomidine exerted direct neuroprotective effects to prevent cultured hippocampal neuronal injury caused by propofol, accompanied by an increase in the levels of p‑CREB, Bcl‑2 and BDNF. PMID:27571870

  19. alpha-Adrenoceptors in the ventricular myocardium: clonidine, naphazoline and methoxamine as partial alpha-agonists exerting a competitive dualism in action to phenylephrine.

    PubMed

    Schümann, H J; Endoh, M

    1976-04-01

    Tha alpha-sympathomimetic agonists, clonidine, naphazoline, methoxamine, oxymetazoline and phenylephrine were used to further characterize the alpha-adrenoceptors mediating the positive inotropic effect in the isolated papillary muscle of the rabbit heart. The maximal inotropic effects of these amines were compared with the effect of isoprenaline and it was examined whether or not these amines compete for alpha-adrenoceptors. On the papillary muscle stimulated at 0.5 Hz, phenylephrine showed a high affinity (pD2 value=6.13) and produced the most pronounced intrinsic activity of the alpha-sympathomimetic amines. Therefore, the intrinsic activity of phenylephrine, in the presence of prindolol (3 X 10(-8) M), was used for comparison with those of the other alpha-agonists. Clonidine caused a positive inotropic effect: the intrinsic activity amounted to 0.32 of that of phenylephrine; the affinity was the highest among the amines tested (pD2 value=6.46); its effect was inhibited by 10(-6) M phentolamine. The affinity and the intrinsic activity of naphazoline were slightly lower than those of clonidine. Methoxamine showed a relatively high intrinsic activity (0.56) but the lowest affinity (4.68). Oxymetazoline did not cause any positive inotropic effect. Clonidine, naphazoline and oxymetazoline antagonized the positive inotropic effect of phenylephrine, mediated via the alpha-adrenocaptors in the presence of 3 X 10(-8) M prindolol, in a competitive manner. This observation suggests that these alpha-sympathomimetic amines compete with phenylephrine for the same receptor site. Thus the present results provide additional evidence for alpha-adrenoceptors mediating the positive inotropic actions of sympathomimetic amines in the rabbit papillary muscle.

  20. The β2-adrenoceptor agonist clenbuterol elicits neuroprotective, anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic actions in the kainic acid model of excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Lorna C; Ryan, Katie J; Griffin, Eadaoin W; Connor, Thomas J; Harkin, Andrew

    2010-11-01

    Excitotoxicity is a mechanism of neuronal cell death implicated in a range of neurodegenerative conditions. Systemic administration of the excitotoxin kainic acid (KA) induces inflammation and apoptosis in the hippocampus, resulting in neuronal loss. Evidence indicates that stimulation of glial β(2)-adrenoceptors has anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic properties that could result in neuroprotection. Consequently, in this study we examined the effect of the β(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clenbuterol on KA-induced inflammation, neurotrophic factor expression and apoptosis in the hippocampus. Clenbuterol (0.5mg/kg) was administered to rats one hour prior to KA (10mg/kg). Epileptic behaviour induced by KA was assessed for three hours following administration using the Racine scale. Twenty-four hours later TUNEL staining in the CA3 hippocampal subfield and hippocampal caspase-3 activity was assessed to measure KA-induced apoptosis. In addition, expression of inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IFN-γ), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), kynurenine pathway enzymes indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO), the microglial activation marker CD11b, and the neurotrophins BDNF and NGF were quantified in the hippocampus using real-time PCR. Whilst clenbuterol treatment did not significantly alter KA-induced epileptic behavior it ameliorated KA-induced apoptosis, and this neuroprotective effect was accompanied by reduced inflammatory cytokine expression, reduced expression of iNOS, IDO, KMO and CD11b, coupled with increased BDNF and NGF expression in KA-treated rats. In conclusion, the β(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clenbuterol has anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic actions and elicits a neuroprotective effect in the KA model of neurodegeneration. PMID:20599496

  1. Beta-Adrenoceptor agonists and other cAMP elevating agents suppress PAI-1 production of human adipocytes in primary culture.

    PubMed

    Gottschling-Zeller, H; Aprath, I; Skurk, T; Hauner, H

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies showed that catecholamines contribute to the regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression, at least in endothelial cells. Aim of this study was to examine the role of catecholamines on PAI-1 production by human adipocytes and, in particular, to clarify which adrenoceptor (AR) subtypes are involved. Addition of the unselective AR agonist isoproterenol led to a dose- and time-dependent suppression of PAI-1 mRNA and protein release in adipocytes from the subcutaneous and omental depot of obese subjects. A similar degree of suppression was observed in subcutaneous mammary adipocytes of lean women. This effect was mainly mediated via the beta2-adrenoceptor according to experiments using selective agonists. Moreover, addition of cAMP-elevating agents such as dibutyryl-cAMP, forskolin and the phosphodiesterase inhibitors isobutyl-methylxanthine and milrinone resulted in a reduction of PAI-1 of varying degrees. In conclusion, the results of this study support the assumption that catecholamines are able to down-regulate PAI-1 expression and secretion in human adipocytes via beta-adrenergic receptors.

  2. Potentiation of the anti-obesity effect of the selective beta 3-adrenoceptor agonist BRL 35135 in obese Zucker rats by exercise.

    PubMed Central

    Santti, E; Huupponen, R; Rouru, J; Hänninen, V; Pesonen, U; Jhanwar-Uniyal, M; Koulu, M

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of chronic treatments with a selective beta 3-adrenoceptor agonist and a selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist and their interactions with physical exercise training were studied in experimental obesity. 2. BRL 35135 (beta 3-agonist, 0.5 mg kg-1 day-1 p.o.), atipamezole (alpha 2-antagonist, 4.0 mg kg-1 day-1 p.o.) and placebo were given to genetically obese male Zucker rats. Half of the rats were kept sedentary whereas the other half were subjected to moderate treadmill exercise training. Body weight gain, cumulative food intake, the neuropeptide Y content of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, brown adipose tissue thermogenic activity (measured as GDP binding), plasma insulin and glucose levels were measured after 3 weeks' treatment and exercise. 3. Treatment with BRL 35135 reduced weight gain by 19%, increased brown adipose tissue thermogenic activity 45-fold and reduced plasma insulin by 50%. Atipamezole slightly increased food intake and neuropeptide Y content in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus but had no effect on the other measured parameters. Exercise alone had no effect on weight gain, food intake or thermogenic activity, whereas it reduced plasma insulin and glucose levels. 4. The effect of BRL 35135 on weight gain and thermogenic activity was significantly potentiated by exercise; the reduction in weight gain was 56% in comparison with 19% in sedentary animals. Food intake was significantly reduced in the BRL 35135-treated-exercise-trained animals, although neither beta 3-agonist nor exercise alone affected it.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7889277

  3. Effects of cyclooxygenase inhibition on vascular responses evoked in fingers of men and women by iontophoresis of α1- and α2-adrenoceptor agonists

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasa, Amar; Marshall, Janice M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In 10 men and nine women aged 20–23 years, we aimed to establish whether endogenous prostanoids synthesised by cyclooxygenase (COX) affect responses evoked in the finger by α1- or α2-adrenoceptor agonists. Cutaneous red cell flux (cRCF) was recorded in dorsal finger during iontophoresis of phenylephrine (PE) or clonidine (0.5 mm, seven 0.1 mA pulses followed by one 0.2 mA pulse: 30 s each at 60 s intervals) before and after the COX inhibitor aspirin (600 mg p.o.). In men, PE evoked a biphasic mean increase/decrease in cRCF before but a monophasic mean decrease in cRCF of 30–40% after aspirin (P < 0.05). In women in the low oestrogen (E2) phase of the menstrual cycle, PE evoked a decrease in cRCF (30–40%; P < 0.05) that was unchanged by aspirin, whereas in the high E2 phase, PE evoked no change before but a graded decrease in cRCF (30–40%; P < 0.05) after aspirin. Clonidine evoked a decrease in cRCF (∼30%; P < 0.05) in men before, but not after, aspirin. Clonidine evoked both increases and decreases in cRCF before and after aspirin in women in the low and high E2 phases (P > 0.05). We propose that finger vasoconstriction evoked by extraluminal α1-adrenoceptor stimulation is blunted by vasodilator COX products in young men and overcome by their action in women in the high, but not low E2, phase of the menstrual cycle. By contrast, α2-adrenoceptor stimulation evokes finger vasoconstriction that is mediated by vasoconstrictor COX products in young men, but evokes no consistent response in women in the low or high E2 phases of the menstrual cycle. PMID:21807614

  4. [beta]1-Adrenoceptor or [alpha]1-Adrenoceptor Activation Initiates Early Odor Preference Learning in Rat Pups: Support for the Mitral Cell/cAMP Model of Odor Preference Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Carolyn W.; Darby-King, Andrea; McCann, Jennifer; McLean, John H.

    2006-01-01

    We proposed that mitral cell [beta]1-adrenoceptor activation mediates rat pup odor preference learning. Here we evaluate [beta]1-, [beta]2-, [alpha]1-, and [alpha]2-adrenoceptor agonists in such learning. The [beta]1-adrenoceptor agonist, dobutamine, and the [alpha]1-adrenoceptor agonist, phenylephrine, induced learning, and both exhibited an…

  5. Involvement of Ca2+ Signaling in the Synergistic Effects between Muscarinic Receptor Antagonists and β2-Adrenoceptor Agonists in Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fukunaga, Kentaro; Kume, Hiroaki; Oguma, Tetsuya; Shigemori, Wataru; Tohda, Yuji; Ogawa, Emiko; Nakano, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    Long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs) and short-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonists (SABAs) play important roles in remedy for COPD. To propel a translational research for development of bronchodilator therapy, synergistic effects between SABAs with LAMAs were examined focused on Ca2+ signaling using simultaneous records of isometric tension and F340/F380 in fura-2-loaded tracheal smooth muscle. Glycopyrronium (3 nM), a LAMA, modestly reduced methacholine (1 μM)-induced contraction. When procaterol, salbutamol and SABAs were applied in the presence of glycopyrronium, relaxant effects of these SABAs are markedly enhanced, and percent inhibition of tension was much greater than the sum of those for each agent and those expected from the BI theory. In contrast, percent inhibition of F340/F380 was not greater than those values. Bisindolylmaleimide, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), significantly increased the relaxant effect of LAMA without reducing F340/F380. Iberiotoxin, an inhibitor of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa) channels, significantly suppressed the effects of these combined agents with reducing F340/F380. In conclusion, combination of SABAs with LAMAs synergistically enhances inhibition of muscarinic contraction via decreasing both Ca2+ sensitization mediated by PKC and Ca2+ dynamics mediated by KCa channels. PKC and KCa channels may be molecular targets for cross talk between β2-adrenoceptors and muscarinic receptors. PMID:27657061

  6. Insights on the role of boron containing moieties in the design of new potent and efficient agonists targeting the β2 adrenoceptor.

    PubMed

    Soriano-Ursúa, Marvin A; Arias-Montaño, José A; Correa-Basurto, José; Hernández-Martínez, Christian F; López-Cabrera, Yessica; Castillo-Hernández, Maria C; Padilla-Martínez, Itzia I; Trujillo-Ferrara, José G

    2015-02-15

    The development of β2 adrenoceptor (β2AR) agonists is of increasing interest because of their wide-ranging applications in medicine, particularly for the treatment of pulmonary diseases. Regarding the relaxation of smooth muscle that lines airways of mammals, some boron-containing adducts have demonstrated greater potency and efficacy compared to well-known boron-free compounds. We herein report the design and synthesis as well as the chemical and pharmacological characterization of a new boron-containing compound: ((R)-6-((S)-2-(tert-butylammonio)-1-hydroxyethyl)-2-hydroxy-2-isobutyl-4H-benzo[d][1,3,2] dioxaborinin-2-uide). Compared to its precursor (salbutamol), this compound induced relaxation of smooth muscle in guinea pig tracheal rings with greater potency and efficacy (EC50⩽28.02nM). Theoretical studies suggest the potential selectivity of this boron containing compound on the orthosteric site of beta adrenoceptors and/or signaling pathways, as well as the importance of the tetracoordinated boron atom in its structure for binding recognition properties.

  7. A Comparative Study of Dexmedetomidine and Midazolam in Reducing Delirium Caused by Ketamine

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajeev; Tripathi, Aditya Kumar; Mehta, Ranbeer Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Ketamine is a well known agent for sedation for short surgical procedures due to its very good analgesic action. But it has cardio stimulatory response and recovery from anaesthesia after Ketamine use is complicated by delirium and hallucination. In studies it is proved that these side effects can be reduced by premedication with benzodiazepines. The α2 adrenoceptor agonists are becoming popular for their properties like haemodynamic stability and reducing anaesthetic requirement. Aim This study was planned to see the effects of Dexmedetomidine on emergent reaction of Ketamine, when used as premedication agent with Ketamine for conducting short surgeries in adult patients. Materials and Methods Study was conducted in 90 ASA class I and II male and female patients of age between 18–40 undergoing short procedures like laparoscopic ligation, skin grafting, dilatation and curettage, endoscopic procedures, excision of small swelling, etc. Patients were randomly divided into three groups of 30 each as follows: Group K: after premedication with inj. glycopyrrolate 0.01mg/kg, inj. Ketamine 2mg/kg, Group M: after premedication with inj. glycopyrrolate 0.01mg/kg and inj midazolam 0.05mg/kg, inj. Ketamine 2mg/kg, Group D: after premedication with inj glycopyrrolate 0.01 mg/kg and inj. Dexmedetomidine 0.5μg/kg, Ketamine 2mg/kg was given. Observations were made for cardiovascular response to invasive procedure, post anaesthetic anxiety and delirium with help of Memorial Delirium Assessment scale (MDAS). Results Midazolam reduced delirium to a greater level, but in comparison to control group and midazolam group, dexmedetomidine reduced delirium to a much greater level (p-value<0.001). Postoperative pain was less in Dexmedetomidine group (p-value< 0.001). Conclusion Dexmedetomidine reduced delirium caused by Ketamine when used as a premedication agent. It produced more haemodynamic stable patients. Postoperative analgesia was also better. PMID:27656531

  8. The novel β3-adrenoceptor agonist mirabegron reduces carbachol-induced contractile activity in detrusor tissue from patients with bladder outflow obstruction with or without detrusor overactivity.

    PubMed

    Svalø, Julie; Nordling, Jørgen; Bouchelouche, Kirsten; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Korstanje, Cees; Bouchelouche, Pierre

    2013-01-15

    β(3)-Adrenoceptors are major players in detrusor relaxation and have been suggested as a new putative target for the treatment of overactive bladder syndrome. We determined the effects of mirabegron (YM178), a novel β(3)-adrenoceptor agonist, on carbachol-induced tone in isolated human detrusor preparations from patients with bladder outflow obstruction (BOO) with and without detrusor overactivity (DO), and from patients with normal bladder function. We compared the effects to those of isoprenaline, a non-selective β-adrenoceptor agonist. Detrusor specimens were obtained from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia undergoing cystoscopy and from patients undergoing radical prostatectomy/cystectomy (in total 33 donors). Detrusor contractility was evaluated by organ bath studies and strips were incubated with carbachol (1μM) to induce and enhance tension. Both mirabegron and isoprenaline reduced carbachol-induced tone in tissues from all groups. Isoprenaline decreased tension with higher potency than mirabegron in normal, BOO and BOO+DO detrusor strips with pIC(50) values of 7.49 ± 0.16 vs. 6.23 ± 0.26 (P=0.0002), 6.89 ± 0.34 vs. 6.04 ± 0.31 (P=0.01), and 6.57 ± 0.20 vs. 5.41 ± 0.08 (P<0.0001, n=4), respectively. The maximal relaxant effect of isoprenaline and mirabegron in the normal, BOO and BOO+DO detrusor was 37.7 ± 14.4% and 36.1 ± 23.3%, 14.4 ± 12.2% vs. 33.4 ± 21.0% and 18.3 ± 10.0% vs. 28.3 ± 12.2% (n=4, P>0.05), respectively. Mirabegron and isoprenaline reduced carbachol-induced tone in both normal bladders and obstructed bladder with and without DO. Isoprenaline had higher potency than mirabegron, but the efficacy of mirabegron effect was the same as that of isoprenaline. PMID:23246623

  9. Irreversible binding of a carbostyril-based agonist and antagonist to the β-adrenoceptor in DDT1 MF-2 cells and rat aorta

    PubMed Central

    Deyrup, Malgorzata D; Greco, Phillip G; Otero, Deborah H; Dennis, Donn M; Gelband, Craig H; Baker, Stephen P

    1998-01-01

    The chemoreactive ligands 5(2-(((1′-(4′-isothiocyanatophenylamino)thiocarbonyl)-amino)-2-methyl-propyl)amino-2-hydroxypropoxy)-3,4-dihydrocarbostyril (DCITC) and 8-hydroxy-5(2-(((1′-(4′-isothiocya-natophenylamino)thiocarbonyl)amino)-2-methylprop-2-yl)amino-1-hydroxyethyl)-carbostyril (HCITC)were synthesized and shown to be potent irreversible antagonist and agonist ligands, respectively, for the β-adrenoceptor in DDT1 MF-2 (DDT) cells and the rat isolated aorta.In DDT cell membranes DCITC and HCITC inhibited (−)[125I]-iodocyanopindolol (CYP) binding to the β-adrenoceptor with IC50 values of 1.1 and 18 nM, respectively. (−)-Isoprenaline inhibited [125I]-CYP binding with an IC50 of 355 nM. Pretreatment of membranes with either chemoreactive ligand produced a time- and concentration-dependent decrease in the β-adrenoceptor content, indicating irreversible receptor binding. DCITC at concentrations up to 10 μM did not stimulate cyclic AMP accumulation in DDT cells nor did it amplify forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation.In the rat isolated aorta, DCITC (0.1 μM) did not affect either the phenylephrine-mediated tissue contraction or the acetylcholine-mediated relaxation. DCITC attenuated the maximal (−)-isoprenaline-mediated relaxation of a phenylephrine contracted aorta in a concentration-dependent manner and shifted the dose-response curves for (−)-isoprenaline to the right. The DCITC-induced decrease in maximal response was not reversed by extensive tissue washing. By use of the operational model of agonism, the calculated dissociation constant for (−)-isoprenaline ws 286 nM and the estimated receptor reserve for this agonist was 23% at the maximal response.HCITC and (−)-isoprenaline stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in DDT cells with pD2 values (negative logarithm to base 10 of EC50) of 7.95 and 7.97, respectively, and both mediated the same maximal stimulation. In the rat isolated aorta, HCITC produced a concentration

  10. Influence of circulating alpha adrenoceptor agonists on lung function in patients with exercise induced asthma and healthy subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Larsson, K; Martinsson, A; Hjemdahl, P

    1986-01-01

    The influence of circulating noradrenaline (in this context primarily a non-selective alpha agonist) and the alpha 1 selective agonist phenylephrine on bronchial tone, blood pressure, and heart rate was studied in eight patients with exercise induced asthma and eight age and sex matched controls. All subjects refrained from taking treatment for at least one week before the trial. The agonists were infused intravenously in stepwise increasing doses of 0.04, 0.085, 0.17, and 0.34 micrograms/kg a minute for noradrenaline and 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0 micrograms/kg a minute for phenylephrine. At the highest dose the plasma concentration of noradrenaline was about 30 nmol/l, resembling the concentrations found during intense exercise, and that of phenylephrine was about 400 nmol/l. Both agonists caused dose dependent and similar increases in blood pressure in the two groups. Despite clearcut cardiovascular effects (systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased by about 40-50/25-30 mm Hg), neither agonist altered lung function, as assessed by measurements of specific airway compliance (sGaw), peak expiratory flow (PEF), or end expiratory flow rate, in either group. It is concluded that circulating alpha agonists, whether alpha 1 selective (phenylephrine) or non-selective (noradrenaline), fail to alter basal bronchial tone in patients with exercise induced asthma or in healthy subjects. PMID:3787535

  11. Renal effects of dexmedetomidine during coronary artery bypass surgery: a randomized placebo-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dexmedetomidine, an alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist, has been evaluated as an adjunct to anesthesia and for the delivery of sedation and perioperative hemodynamic stability. It provokes dose-dependent and centrally-mediated sympatholysis. Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) with extracorporeal circulation is a stressful procedure increasing sympathetic nervous system activity which could attenuate renal function due the interrelation of sympathetic nervous system, hemodynamics and renal function. We tested the hypothesis that dexmetomidine would improve kidney function in patients undergoing elective CABG during the first two postoperative days. Methods This was a double-blind, randomized, parallel-group study. Patients with normal renal function and scheduled for elective CABG were randomized to placebo or to infusion of dexmedetomidine to achieve a pseudo steady-state plasma concentration of 0.60 ng/ml. The infusion was started after anesthesia induction and continued until 4 h after surgery. The primary endpoint was creatinine clearance. Other variables included urinary creatinine and output, fractional sodium and potassium excretion, urinary potassium, sodium and glucose, serum and urinary osmolality and plasma catecholamine concentrations. The data were analyzed with repeated-measures ANOVA or Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test. Results Sixty-six of 87 randomized patients were evaluable for analysis. No significant between-group differences were recorded for any indices of renal function except for a mean 74% increase in urinary output with dexmedetomidine in the first 4 h after insertion of a urinary catheter (p < 0.001). Confidence interval examination revealed that the sample size was large enough for the no-difference statement for creatinine clearance. Conclusions Use of intravenous dexmedetomidine did not alter renal function in this cohort of relatively low-risk elective CABG patients but was associated with an increase in urinary output. This study

  12. The β2-adrenoceptor agonist formoterol improves structural and functional regenerative capacity of skeletal muscles from aged rat at the early stages of postinjury.

    PubMed

    Conte, Talita C; Silva, Lucila H; Silva, Meiricris T; Hirabara, Sandro M; Oliveira, Antonio C; Curi, Rui; Moriscot, Anselmo S; Aoki, Marcelo S; Miyabara, Elen H

    2012-05-01

    Skeletal muscles from old rats fail to completely regenerate following injury. This study investigated whether pharmacological stimulation of β2-adrenoceptors in aged muscles following injury could improve their regenerative capacity, focusing on myofiber size recovery. Young and aged rats were treated with a subcutaneous injection of β2-adrenergic agonist formoterol (2 μg/kg/d) up to 10 and 21 days after soleus muscle injury. Formoterol-treated muscles from old rats evaluated at 10 and 21 days postinjury showed reduced inflammation and connective tissue but a similar number of regenerating myofibers of greater caliber when compared with their injured controls. Formoterol minimized the decrease in tetanic force and increased protein synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin phosphorylation in old muscles at 10 days postinjury. Our results suggest that formoterol improves structural and functional regenerative capacity of regenerating skeletal muscles from aged rats by increasing protein synthesis via mammalian target of rapamycin activation. Furthermore, formoterol may have therapeutic benefits in recovery following muscle damage in senescent individuals.

  13. Induction of regulator of G-protein signaling 2 expression by long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonists and glucocorticoids in human airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Holden, Neil S; George, Tresa; Rider, Christopher F; Chandrasekhar, Ambika; Shah, Suharsh; Kaur, Manminder; Johnson, Malcolm; Siderovski, David P; Leigh, Richard; Giembycz, Mark A; Newton, Robert

    2014-01-01

    In asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) multiple mediators act on Gαq-linked G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to cause bronchoconstriction. However, acting on the airway epithelium, such mediators may also elicit inflammatory responses. In human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells (bronchial epithelium + adenovirus 12-SV40 hybrid), regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS) 2 mRNA and protein were synergistically induced in response to combinations of long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist (LABA) (salmeterol, formoterol) plus glucocorticoid (dexamethasone, fluticasone propionate, budesonide). Equivalent responses occurred in primary human bronchial epithelial cells. Concentrations of glucocorticoid plus LABA required to induce RGS2 expression in BEAS-2B cells were consistent with the levels achieved therapeutically in the lungs. As RGS2 is a GTPase-activating protein that switches off Gαq, intracellular free calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) flux was used as a surrogate of responses induced by histamine, methacholine, and the thromboxane receptor agonist U46619 [(Z)-7-[(1S,4R,5R,6S)-5-[(E,3S)-3-hydroxyoct-1-enyl]-3-oxabicyclo[2.2.1]heptan-6-yl]hept-5-enoic acid]. This was significantly attenuated by salmeterol plus dexamethasone pretreatment, or RGS2 overexpression, and the protective effect of salmeterol plus dexamethasone was abolished by RGS2 RNA silencing. Although methacholine and U46619 induced interleukin-8 (IL-8) release and this was inhibited by RGS2 overexpression, the repression of U46619-induced IL-8 release by salmeterol plus dexamethasone was unaffected by RGS2 knockdown. Given a role for Gαq-mediated pathways in inducing IL-8 release, we propose that RGS2 acts redundantly with other effector processes to repress IL-8 expression. Thus, RGS2 expression is a novel effector mechanism in the airway epithelium that is induced by glucocorticoid/LABA combinations. This could contribute to the efficacy of glucocorticoid/LABA combinations in asthma and

  14. The beta 3-adrenoceptor agonist ICI-D7114 is not as efficient on reinduction of uncoupling protein mRNA in sheep as it is in dogs and smaller species.

    PubMed

    Nouguès, J; Reyne, Y; Champigny, O; Holloway, B; Casteilla, L; Ricquier, D

    1993-09-01

    Adipose tissue in newborn lambs is brown, but within a few days it is transformed into white adipose tissue. In the same way, preadipocytes cultured in serum-free chemically defined medium achieve full differentiation and express uncoupling protein (UCP), a marker of brown adipose tissue, when isolated from perirenal adipose tissue of the newborn, whereas they no longer express UCP when isolated from older lambs. The effects of a chronic stimulation of adipose tissue by novel beta 3-adrenoceptor agonist (ICI D7114) on the maintenance after birth and on the reinduction in older lambs of UCP mRNA in adipose tissue were studied. Treatment of newborn lambs with this agonist for 25 d maintained a slight level of UCP mRNA in perirenal and pericardiac, but not in omental and inguinal, adipose tissue depots. Preadipocytes isolated from perirenal adipose tissue of treated animals differentiated, in vitro, into adipocytes, but no UCP mRNA could be detected either in the absence or in the presence of the beta 3-adrenoceptor agonist in the culture medium. Treatment of 1-mo-old lambs with ICI D7114 for 12 d restored UCP mRNA in perirenal and pericardiac adipose tissues of two of four treated lambs, but at a much lower level than in the same tissues at birth. In both experiments, the final BW and the ADG of lambs treated with ICI D7114 were not statistically different from controls. These results are quite different from those obtained with the same beta 3-adrenoceptor agonist in dogs and rodents. PMID:8104921

  15. Involvement of medial prefrontal cortex alpha-2 adrenoceptors on memory acquisition deficit induced by arachidonylcyclopropylamide, a cannabinoid CB1 receptor agonist, in rats; possible involvement of Ca2+ channels.

    PubMed

    Beiranvand, Afsaneh; Nasehi, Mohammad; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Moghaddasi, Mehrnoush

    2016-09-01

    Functional interactions between cannabinoid and alpha-2 adrenergic systems in cognitive control in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) seem possible. The present study evaluated the possible role of alpha-2 adrenoceptors of the prefrontal cortex on effect of arachidonylcyclopropylamide (ACPA), a cannabinoid CB1 receptor (CB1R) agonist, in adult male Wistar rats. The animals were bilaterally implanted with chronic cannulae in the mPFC, trained in a step-through task, and tested 24 h after training to measure step-through latency. Results indicate that pre-training microinjection of ACPA (0.05 and 0.5 μg/rat) and clonidine (alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist; 1 and 2 μg/rat) reduce memory acquisition. Pre-training subthreshold dose of clonidine (0.5 µg/rat) restored memory-impairing effect of ACPA (0.05 and 0.5 µg/rat). On the other hand, pre-training administration of the alpha-2 adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine in all doses used (0.5, 1, and 2 μg/rat) did not affect memory acquisition by itself, while a subthreshold dose of yohimbine (2 µg/rat) potentiated memory impairment induced by ACPA (0.005 µg/rat). Finally, a subthreshold dose of SKF96365 (a Ca(2+) channel blocker) blocked clonidine and yohimbine effect of memory responses induced by ACPA. In conclusion, these data indicate that mPFC alpha-2 adrenoceptors play an important role in ACPA-induced amnesia and Ca(2+) channels have a critical role this phenomenon. PMID:27317021

  16. Clonidine, an alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist relieves mechanical allodynia in oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic mice; potentiation by spinal p38 MAPK inhibition without motor dysfunction and hypotension.

    PubMed

    Yeo, Ji-Hee; Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kim, Sol-Ji; Oh, Seog-Bae; Lee, Jang-Hern; Beitz, Alvin J; Roh, Dae-Hyun

    2016-05-15

    Cancer chemotherapy with platinum-based antineoplastic agents including oxaliplatin frequently results in a debilitating and painful peripheral neuropathy. We evaluated the antinociceptive effects of the alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist, clonidine on oxaliplatin-induced neuropathic pain. Specifically, we determined if (i) the intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of clonidine reduces mechanical allodynia in mice with an oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy and (ii) concurrent inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity by the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580 enhances clonidine's antiallodynic effect. Clonidine (0.01-0.1 mg kg(-1), i.p.), with or without SB203580(1-10 nmol, intrathecal) was administered two weeks after oxaliplatin injection(10 mg kg(-1), i.p.) to mice. Mechanical withdrawal threshold, motor coordination and blood pressure were measured. Postmortem expression of p38 MAPK and ERK as well as their phosphorylated forms(p-p38 and p-ERK) were quantified 30 min or 4 hr after drug injection in the spinal cord dorsal horn of treated and control mice. Clonidine dose-dependently reduced oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia and spinal p-p38 MAPK expression, but not p-ERK. At 0.1 mg kg(-1), clonidine also impaired motor coordination and decreased blood pressure. A 10 nmol dose of SB203580 alone significantly reduced mechanical allodynia and p-p38 MAPK expression, while a subeffective dose(3 nmol) potentiated the antiallodynic effect of 0.03 mg kg(-1) clonidine and reduced the increased p-p38 MAPK. Coadministration of SB203580 and 0.03 mg kg(-1) clonidine decreased allodynia similar to that of 0.10 mg kg(-1) clonidine, but without significant motor or vascular effects. These findings demonstrate that clonidine treatment reduces oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. The concurrent administration of SB203580 reduces the dosage requirements for clonidine, thereby alleviating allodynia without producing undesirable motor or cardiovascular effects.

  17. Blood flow in histamine- and allergen-induced weal and flare responses, effects of an H1 antagonist, alpha-adrenoceptor agonist and a topical glucocorticoid.

    PubMed

    Hammarlund, A; Olsson, P; Pipkorn, U

    1990-01-01

    Allergen has previously been shown to induce a continuous increase in local dermal blood flow after a prick test in allergic subjects, whereas histamine induced, initially, similar peak increases in blood flow of much shorter duration. Blood flow changes induced by histamine and allergen have now been evaluated (i) after pretreatment with a local corticosteroid cream, clobetasole-17-propionate; (ii) after oral administration of the H1-antihistamine loratadine; and (iii) after oral pretreatment with the alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist pseudoephedrine. Blinded placebo-controlled designs were used in the substudies. Laser doppler flowmetry was used for non-invasive recording of changes in local blood flow intermittently for 24 h after the topical corticosteroid, 6 h for the substudies on loratadine and pseudoephedrine. The size of the immediate weal and flare reactions, as well as late phase reactions, were also determined. Pretreatment with clobetasole-17-propionate cream on the skin for 1 week prior to prick tests did not affect the blood flow response elicited by histamine or allergen, in either the initial part (up to 1 h) or the protracted 24 h determinations. The size of the weal and flare reactions decreased. Loratadine and pseudoephedrine did not reduce the initial allergen-induced increase in blood flow, while lower blood flow compared with placebo pretreatment was noted for the protracted (1-6 h) determinations. Blood flow changes after histamine were unaffected. The histamine-induced weal and flare was inhibited by loratadine more effectively than the corresponding allergen-induced reaction. The weal and flare reactions after histamine and allergen were not changed after pseudoephedrine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Ageing influences the effect of pre-hypoxic administration of clonidine, an alpha₂-adrenoceptor agonist, on post-hypoxic vasomotricity.

    PubMed

    Gourdin, M J; Ponchau, O; Jamart, J; De Kock, M

    2012-04-01

    In a previous study, we showed that clonidine, an α₂-adrenoceptor agonist, administered prior to hypoxia improves post-hypoxic contractility (PC) and endothelium-dependent dilatation (PED) in isolated young rat aortas. These effects were not investigated in old rats. Ageing influences vascular physiology and modifies the response to vasoactive drugs. Some drugs, such as simvastatin, improve endothelial function, a pivotal component of vascular homeostasis. This study intends to investigate the effect of pre-hypoxic clonidine administration on post-hypoxic vasomotricity in old rats with or without simvastatin. Isolated aortic rings from young and old rats were submitted to hypoxia/reoxygenation (20 min/40 min). For each aorta ring from one rat, clonidine (10⁻⁵ M) was administered in two randomised baths and washed out before hypoxia; two other baths constituted the control group. In some experiments, the old rats were treated with simvastatin (10 mg x kg⁻¹ x day⁻¹) 3 days prior to hypoxia. PED and PC were assessed in all baths. Clonidine enhances PED in young rats (p<0.001) but decreases it in old rats (p=0.038). In young rats, clonidine improves PC (p<0.001), but this effect is not present in old rats (p=0.339). Without endothelium, clonidine does not influence PC in young rats (p= 0.687) but decreases it in old rats (p<0.001). In the simvastatin group, clonidine improves PED (p<0.001) but does not influence PC (p=0.203). In young rats, clonidine increases PED and PC, while it decreases PED and does not influence PC in old rats. With simvastatin, clonidine improves PED but does not influence PC. PMID:22653903

  19. In vitro inhibition and induction of human cytochrome P450 enzymes by mirabegron, a potent and selective β3-adrenoceptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Takusagawa, Shin; Miyashita, Aiji; Iwatsubo, Takafumi; Usui, Takashi

    2012-12-01

    The potential for mirabegron, a β(3)-adrenoceptor agonist for the treatment of overactive bladder, to cause drug-drug interactions via inhibition or induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes was investigated in vitro. Mirabegron was shown to be a time-dependent inhibitor of CYP2D6 in the presence of NADPH as the IC(50) value in human liver microsomes decreased from 13 to 4.3 μM after 30-min pre-incubation. Further evaluation indicated that mirabegron may act partly as an irreversible or quasi-irreversible metabolism-dependent inhibitor of CYP2D6. Therefore, the potential of mirabegron to inhibit the metabolism of CYP2D6 substrates in vivo cannot be excluded. Mirabegron was predicted not to cause clinically significant metabolic drug-drug interactions via inhibition of CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2E1, or CYP3A4/5 because the IC(50) values for these enzymes both with and without pre-incubation were >100 μM (370 times maximum human plasma concentration [C(max)]). Whereas positive controls (100 µM omeprazole and 10 µM rifampin) caused the anticipated CYP induction, the highest concentration of mirabegron (10 µM; 37 times plasma C(max)) had minimal effect on CYP1A2 and CYP3A4/5 activity, and CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 mRNA levels in freshly isolated human hepatocytes, suggesting that mirabegron is not an inducer of these enzymes.

  20. Regulation of UCP gene expression in brown adipocytes differentiated in primary culture. Effects of a new beta-adrenoceptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Champigny, O; Holloway, B R; Ricquier, D

    1992-07-01

    Primary cultures of precursor cells from mouse and rat brown adipose tissue (BAT) were used to study the effect of a new beta-agonist (ICI D7114) on the uncoupling protein (UCP) gene expression. ICI 215001 (the active metabolite of D7114) increased the expression of UCP and its mRNA in brown adipocytes differentiating in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. This stimulating effect was not inhibited by propranolol, a non-specific beta-antagonist, but was partially reduced by bupranolol, a beta 3-antagonist. No expression of UCP mRNA was ever induced by ICI 215001 in white adipocytes differentiated in vitro. It was concluded that the drug could affect the brown adipose cells through a beta 3-pathway. It could clearly modulate the expression of UCP in brown adipocytes differentiated in vitro, but was not able by itself to turn on the gene. PMID:1355051

  1. Characterization of contractile adrenoceptors in the human umbilical artery.

    PubMed

    Bodelsson, G; Stjernquist, M

    1995-08-25

    Adrenoceptors mediating contraction in ring segments of human umbilical arteries from normal term pregnancies were investigated in vitro. Contraction was elicited by (order of potency indicated): noradrenaline = the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist oxymetazoline > the alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. The alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin antagonized the contraction elicited by noradrenaline and phenylephrine. The alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist rauwolscine antagonized the contraction elicited by noradrenaline and oxymetazoline. Oxymetazoline had an efficacy 5 times higher than that of noradrenaline and the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist methysergide antagonized the contraction elicited by oxymetazoline. It is suggested that the contractile adrenoceptors in the human umbilical artery consist of both alpha 1 and alpha 2 subtypes. Furthermore, the contractile effect of oxymetazoline seems to be mediated via both alpha 2-adrenoceptors and 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors.

  2. Duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion in man. Stimulation by acid and inhibition by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine.

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, L; Flemström, G

    1989-01-01

    A multi-channel small diameter tube was used to study the secretion of bicarbonate by 3 cm long segments of the proximal duodenum isolated between balloons. The tube had an outer diameter of 5.3 mm and two central and four smaller, peripheral channels. Measurements of infused phenol red, 14C-PEG and vitamin B12 and of trypsin activity were performed to rule out contamination of the perfusate by gastric and pancreatic secretions. Basal secretion of bicarbonate by the duodenal mucosa in healthy subjects varied between 135 and 220 mumol/cm of intestine per hour. Perfusion of the lumen with acid (100 mM HCl for five minutes) increased the secretion to greater than 400 mumol/cm/h and the alpha 2-adrenoreceptor agonist clonidine (150 micrograms iv) decreased the HCO3- secretion by 70 mumol/cm/h. Clonidine simultaneously reduced the mean arterial blood pressure and plasma noradrenaline concentration, but did not affect the plasma glucose or adrenaline concentration. Duodenal bicarbonate secretion is important in the protection of this mucosa against acid discharged from the stomach. Increased sympathetic activity may, by inhibiting the bicarbonate secretion, decrease the protection in proximal duodenum in man and facilitate ulceration. Images Fig. 2 PMID:2558985

  3. The efficacy and tolerability of mirabegron, a β3 adrenoceptor agonist, in patients with symptoms of overactive bladder

    PubMed Central

    Thiagamoorthy, Ganesh; Kotes, Stephanie; Zacchè, Martino; Cardozo, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Mirabegron, is the only β-3 adrenoreceptor (AR) agonist available for the treatment of overactive bladder (OAB). To assess the efficacy and tolerability of this novel drug therapy, two phase II and six phase III Astellas-sponsored trials have been conducted with over 10,500 adults with OAB recruited. Of these, seven were randomized, double blind, 12-week placebo controlled studies and the other was for 12 months and not placebo controlled. The evidence described would suggest that mirabegron is as efficacious as most antimuscarinics, including tolterodine extended release (ER) 4 mg, compared with placebo with regard to objective measures such as reduction in number of voids per 24 hours, mean volume per void, mean number of episodes of general urinary incontinence, urgency urinary incontinence and urgency per 24 hours; and subjective measures such as severity of urgency, patient perception of bladder condition and validated continence quality of life questionnaires. Regarding tolerability, these data would suggest that patients taking mirabegron suffer a similar rate of adverse effects as those taking placebo alone, whereas the rate in those taking antimuscarinics is greater. Thus mirabegron presents a safe and effective alternative treatment to antimuscarinics for patients with OAB symptoms. Patients who may particularly benefit from mirabegron include those who are unsuitable for antimuscarinics or who have previously struggled with antimuscarinic side effects. PMID:26834839

  4. Effects of the ß2-Adrenoceptor Agonist, Albuterol, in a Mouse Model of Anti-MuSK Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Ghazanfari, Nazanin; Morsch, Marco; Tse, Nigel; Reddel, Stephen W.; Phillips, William D.

    2014-01-01

    The β2-adrenergic receptor agonist, albuterol, has been reported beneficial in treating several forms of congenital myasthenia. Here, for the first time, we examined the potential benefit of albuterol in a mouse model of anti-Muscle Specific Kinase (MuSK) myasthenia gravis. Mice received 15 daily injections of IgG from anti-MuSK positive patients, which resulted in whole-body weakness. At neuromuscular junctions in the tibialis anterior and diaphragm muscles the autoantibodies caused loss of postsynaptic acetylcholine receptors, and reduced the amplitudes of the endplate potential and spontaneous miniature endplate potential in the diaphragm muscle. Treatment with albuterol (8 mg/kg/day) during the two-week anti-MuSK injection series reduced the degree of weakness and weight loss, compared to vehicle-treated mice. However, the compound muscle action potential recorded from the gastrocnemius muscle displayed a decremental response in anti-MuSK-injected mice whether treated with albuterol or vehicle. Ongoing albuterol treatment did not increase endplate potential amplitudes compared to vehicle-treated mice nor did it prevent the loss of acetylcholine receptors from motor endplates. On the other hand, albuterol treatment significantly reduced the degree of fragmentation of endplate acetylcholine receptor clusters and increased the extent to which the remaining receptor clusters were covered by synaptophysin-stained nerve terminals. The results provide the first evidence that short-term albuterol treatment can ameliorate weakness in a robust mouse model of anti-MuSK myasthenia gravis. The results also demonstrate that it is possible for albuterol treatment to reduce whole-body weakness without necessarily reversing myasthenic impairment to the structure and function of the neuromuscular junction. PMID:24505322

  5. CL316,243, a selective β3-adrenoceptor agonist, activates protein translation through mTOR/p70S6K signaling pathway in rat skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Miniaci, Maria Concetta; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Santamaria, Rita; Irace, Carlo; Cantalupo, Anna; Cirino, Giuseppe; Scotto, Pietro

    2013-04-01

    Functional β3-adrenoceptors have been found in skeletal muscle where they mediate metabolic oxidation and glucose utilization. Whether β3-adrenoceptors (ARs) also play any role in muscle protein metabolism still remains uncertain. By using rat L6 myocyte cultures, we found that CL316,243, a β3-AR selective agonist, at the concentration of 10(-6) M for 24 h, induced a significant increase of skeletal muscle constitutive proteins such as H- and L-myosin and β-actin. Such effect was correlated to an increased expression of phosphorylated p70(S6K) that was significantly inhibited by β3-AR antagonist, SR 59230A, but not by β2-AR antagonist, ICI-118,551. The CL316,243-induced activation of p70(S6K) was markedly inhibited by wortmannin, a PI3K inhibitor, and rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mTOR, suggesting a critical involvement of the PI3K-mTOR-p70(S6K) signaling cascade in the anabolic response of L6 cells to β3-AR agonist. Taken together, these results suggest that stimulation of β3-AR in skeletal muscle cells activates a specific signaling pathway leading to protein synthesis and, eventually, muscle growth. PMID:23334408

  6. Intestinal absorption mechanism of mirabegron, a potent and selective β₃-adrenoceptor agonist: involvement of human efflux and/or influx transport systems.

    PubMed

    Takusagawa, Shin; Ushigome, Fumihiko; Nemoto, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Yutaka; Li, Qun; Kerbusch, Virginie; Miyashita, Aiji; Iwatsubo, Takafumi; Usui, Takashi

    2013-05-01

    Mirabegron, a weak-basic compound, is a potent and selective β3-adrenoceptor agonist for the treatment of overactive bladder. Mirabegron extended release formulation shows dose-dependent oral bioavailability in humans, which is likely attributable to saturation of intestinal efflux abilities leading to higher absorption with higher doses. This study evaluated the membrane permeability of mirabegron and investigated the involvement of human intestinal transport proteins in the membrane permeation of mirabegron. Transcellular transport and cellular/vesicular uptake assays were performed using Caco-2 cells and/or human intestinal efflux (P-glycoprotein [P-gp], breast cancer resistance protein [BCRP], and multidrug resistance associated protein 2 [MRP2]) and influx (peptide transporter 1 [PEPT1], OATP1A2, and OATP2B1) transporter-expressing cells, vesicles, or Xenopus laevis oocytes. The absorptive permeability coefficients of mirabegron in Caco-2 cells (1.68-1.83 × 10(-6) cm/s) at the apical and basal pH of 6.5 and 7.4, respectively, were slightly higher than those of nadolol (0.97-1.41 × 10(-6) cm/s), a low permeability reference standard, but lower than those of metoprolol and propranolol (both ranged from 8.49 to 11.6 × 10(-6) cm/s), low/high permeability boundary reference standards. Increasing buffer pH at the apical side from 5.5 to 8.0 gradually increased the absorptive permeation of mirabegron from 0.226 to 1.66 × 10(-6) cm/s, but was still less than the value in the opposite direction (11.0-14.2 × 10(-6) cm/s). The time- and concentration-dependent transport of mirabegron was observed in P-gp-expressing cells and OATP1A2-expressing oocytes with apparent Km values of 294 and 8.59 μM, respectively. In contrast, no clear BCRP-, MRP2-, PEPT1-, or OATP2B1-mediated uptake of mirabegron was observed in their expressing vesicles or cells. These findings suggest that mirabegron has low-to-moderate membrane permeability and P-gp is likely to be involved in its

  7. Sedation with dexmedetomidine in the intensive care setting

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Anthony T; Murphy, Claire V

    2011-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α-2 agonist that produces sedation and analgesia without compromising the respiratory drive. Use of dexmedetomidine as a sedative in the critically ill is associated with fewer opioid requirements compared with propofol and a similar time at goal sedation compared with benzodiazepines. Dexmedetomidine may produce negative hemodynamic effects including lower mean heart rates and potentially more bradycardia than other sedatives used in the critically ill. Recent studies have demonstrated that dexmedetomidine is safe at higher dosages, but more studies are needed to determine whether the efficacy of dexmedetomidine is dose dependent. In addition, further research is required to define dexmedetomidine’s role in the care of delirious critically ill patients, as many, but not all, studies have indicated favorable outcomes. PMID:27147855

  8. Dexmedetomidine-induced contraction involves phosphorylation of caldesmon by JNK in endothelium-denuded rat aortas.

    PubMed

    Baik, Jiseok; Ok, Seong-Ho; Cho, Hyunhoo; Yu, Jongsun; Kim, Woochan; Nam, In-Koo; Choi, Mun-Jeoung; Lee, Heon-Keun; Sohn, Ju-Tae

    2014-01-01

    Caldesmon, an inhibitory actin binding protein, binds to actin and inhibits actin-myosin interactions, whereas caldesmon phosphorylation reverses the inhibitory effect of caldesmon on actin-myosin interactions, potentially leading to enhanced contraction. The goal of this study was to investigate the cellular signaling pathway responsible for caldesmon phosphorylation, which is involved in the regulation of the contraction induced by dexmedetomidine (DMT), an alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonist, in endothelium-denuded rat aortas. SP600125 (a c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase [JNK] inhibitor) dose-response curves were generated in aortas that were pre-contracted with DMT or phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu), a protein kinase C (PKC) activator. Dose-response curves to the PKC inhibitor chelerythrine were generated in rat aortas pre-contracted with DMT. The effects of SP600125 and rauwolscine (an alpha-2 adrenoceptor inhibitor) on DMT-induced caldesmon phosphorylation in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) were investigated by western blot analysis. PDBu-induced caldesmon and DMT-induced PKC phosphorylation in rat aortic VSMCs was investigated by western blot analysis. The effects of GF109203X (a PKC inhibitor) on DMT- or PDBu-induced JNK phosphorylation in VSMCs were assessed. SP600125 resulted in the relaxation of aortas that were pre-contracted with DMT or PDBu, whereas rauwolscine attenuated DMT-induced contraction. Chelerythrine resulted in the vasodilation of aortas pre-contracted with DMT. SP600125 and rauwolscine inhibited DMT-induced caldesmon phosphorylation. Additionally, PDBu induced caldesmon phosphorylation, and GF109203X attenuated the JNK phosphorylation induced by DMT or PDBu. DMT induced PKC phosphorylation in rat aortic VSMCs. These results suggest that alpha-2 adrenoceptor-mediated, DMT-induced contraction involves caldesmon phosphorylation that is mediated by JNK phosphorylation by PKC.

  9. Effect of dexmedetomidine and cold stress in a rat model of neuropathic pain: Role of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α.

    PubMed

    Farghaly, Hanan Sayed M; Mahmoud, Ahmed Mostafa; Abdel-Sater, Khaled A

    2016-04-01

    Dexmedetomidine (Dex) is a novel Alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist. It decreases sympathetic tone and attenuates the stress responses to anesthesia and surgery. People exposed to cold suffer unpleasant thermal pain, which is experienced as stress and causes the release of noradrenaline from the sympathetic terminals. The present study investigated the effects of cold stress and dexmedetomidine on chronic constriction injury (CCI) model of the sciatic nerve in rats. Sixty four male Wistar rats were divided into seven groups of eight rats each: repeated cold stress (RCS) group, sham RCS group, CCI group, sham CCI group, Dex-treated group received a single dose of Dex (5 μg/kg), CCI+Dex group, CCI+RCS group. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor- alpha (TNF-α) levels in the serum were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The mean body weight of CCI, RCS, CCI+RCS, CCI+Dex and RCS+Dex groups decreased significantly compared with pre-values. Dexmedetomidine and CCI caused significant changes of the systolic, diastolic and mean blood pressure. Both RCS and CCI groups showed significant decreased of reaction time in the hot plate test. The RCS and CCI groups demonstrated a significant mechanical hyperalgesia, while pain threshold was increased in the RCS+Dex group. A significant decrease of serum IL-6 and TNF-α was demonstrated in CCI+RCS and CCI+Dex groups. The therapeutic effectiveness of dexmedetomidine in neuropathic pain may be through inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines, primarily IL-6 and TNF-α. Moreover, cold stress may result in increased resistance to neuropathic pain. PMID:26896779

  10. Anesthetic management of a pituitary tumor resection with dexmedetomidine.

    PubMed

    Brady, Tim

    2010-04-01

    Dexmedetomidine (Precedex, Hospira, Lake Forest, Illinois), an alpha-2 agonist, mainly is used for sedating mechanically ventilated uncooperative patients in the intensive care setting. It also is being used by anesthesia providers for multiple purposes, including cardiothoracic surgeries, neurological surgeries, and awake-fiberoptic intubations and for patients with a high risk for airway obstruction. This article reports the investigation of the off-label use of dexmedetomidine as an anesthetic adjunct for a transsphenoidal pituitary tumor resection in an adult. The dexmedetomidine infusion not only provided the patient with added sedation but also decreased the need for narcotics and volatile agents while providing hemodynamic stability.

  11. Beta-adrenoceptor blocking effects of a selective beta 2-agonist, mabuterol, on the isolated, blood-perfused right atrium of the dog.

    PubMed Central

    Akahane, K.; Furukawa, Y.; Ogiwara, Y.; Haniuda, M.; Chiba, S.

    1989-01-01

    1. Effects of (+/-)-1-(4-amino-3-chloro-5-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-2-tert.- butylamino-ethanol hydrochloride (mabuterol) on pacemaker activity and atrial contractility were investigated in the isolated and blood-perfused right atrium of the dog. 2. Mabuterol, injected into the sinus node artery of the isolated atrium, dose-dependently increased atrial rate and contractile force at doses of 0.01-10 nmol but the responses to over 10 nmol of mabuterol gradually decreased and mabuterol at higher doses induced biphasic cardiac responses, i.e., negative followed by positive cardiac responses. 3. The maximal increases in atrial rate and contractile force induced by mabuterol were 41.4% and 12.9%, respectively, of the maximal chronotropic and inotropic effects of isoprenaline. 4. Positive chronotropic and inotropic responses to mabuterol were dose-dependently inhibited by a selective beta 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, ICI 118,551. These responses were only slightly attenuated by atenolol. 5. Mabuterol (1-300 nmol) dose-dependently inhibited both dobutamine- and procaterol-induced positive chronotropic and inotropic responses. 6. These results indicate that mabuterol causes weak positive chronotropic and inotropic effects on the perfused canine right atrium by activating beta 2-adrenoceptors, and that higher concentrations non-selectively block both beta 1-and beta 2-adrenoceptors. PMID:2474351

  12. Extended Infusion of Dexmedetomidine to an Infant at Sixty Times the Intended Rate

    PubMed Central

    Max, Bryan A.; Mason, Keira P.

    2010-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α2 adrenergic agonist which has recently been approved in the United States for procedural sedation in adults. This report describes an infant who inadvertently received an intravenous infusion of dexmedetomidine at a rate which was 60 times greater than intended. We describe the hemodynamic, respiratory, and sedative effects of this overdose. PMID:20885920

  13. Cardiac electrophysiological effects of selective adrenoceptor stimulation and their possible roles in arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Vaughan Williams, E M

    1985-01-01

    The selective alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists St 587 and BHT 933, respectively, and the antagonists prazosin (alpha 1) and WY 25309 (alpha 2) have been used in combination with the selective beta 2-adrenoceptor agonist pirbuterol, and the antagonists atenolol (beta 1) and ICI 118551 (beta 2), to analyse the effects of individual types of adrenoceptor stimulation in various parts of the rabbit heart. In the sinus node, beta 1-, but not beta 2-adrenoceptor stimulation increased the fast phase of depolarisation. Both beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptor stimulation increased the slope of the slow diastolic depolarisation, accelerated repolarisation, and increased maximum diastolic potential. Beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptor stimulation also accelerated repolarisation in Purkinje cells and papillary muscle. After blockade of both beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors, alpha 1-adrenoceptor stimulation caused bradycardia, owing exclusively to delayed repolarisation. Alpha 2-adrenoceptor stimulation had no effect. Beta 1-, but not beta 2-adrenoceptor stimulation augmented peak contractions three- to fivefold, and reduced the time-to-peak tension. In contrast, alpha 1-adrenoceptor stimulation only moderately (up to 47%) increased peak tension, but increased time-to-peak and duration of contractions. The results would be consistent with beta 1-adrenoceptor stimulation increasing inward calcium current, and with stimulation of alpha 1-adrenoceptors delaying the decline of [Ca]i rather than increasing its magnitude. Both beta 1- and beta 2-stimulation increased repolarising current, but alpha 1-stimulation decreased it.

  14. Cardiac Arrest in a Heart Transplant Patient Receiving Dexmedetomidine During Cardiac Catheterization.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Lawrence Israel; Miyamoto, Shelley D; Stenquist, Scott; Twite, Mark David

    2016-06-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α-2 agonist with a sedative and cardiopulmonary profile that makes it an attractive anesthetic in pediatric cardiac patients. Cardiac transplant patients may suffer from acute cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system and, therefore, are at an increased risk of the electrophysiological effect of dexmedetomidine. We present such a patient who had a cardiac arrest while receiving dexmedetomidine during cardiac catheterization. Because acute cellular rejection of the cardiac conduction system is difficult to diagnose, dexmedetomidine should be used with caution in pediatric heart transplant patients. PMID:26721807

  15. A Full Pharmacological Analysis of the Three Turkey β-Adrenoceptors and Comparison with the Human β-Adrenoceptors

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jillian G.

    2010-01-01

    Background There are three turkey β-adrenoceptors: the original turkey β-adrenoceptor from erythrocytes (tβtrunc, for which the X-ray crystal structure has recently been determined), tβ3C and tβ4C-receptors. This study examined the similarities and differences between these avian receptors and mammalian receptors with regards to binding characteristics and functional high and low affinity agonist conformations. Methodology/Principal Findings Stable cell lines were constructed with each of the turkey β-adrenoceptors and 3H-CGP12177 whole cell binding, CRE-SPAP production and 3H-cAMP accumulation assays performed. It was confirmed that the three turkey β-adrenoceptors are distinct from each other in terms of amino acid sequence and binding characteristics. The greatest similarity of any of the turkey β-adrenoceptors to human β-adrenoceptors is between the turkey β3C-receptor and the human β2-adrenoceptor. There are pharmacologically distinct differences between the binding of ligands for the tβtrunc and tβ4C and the human β-adrenoceptors (e.g. with CGP20712A and ICI118551). The tβtrunc and tβ4C-adrenoceptors appear to exist in at least two different agonist conformations in a similar manner to that seen at both the human and rat β1-adrenoceptor and human β3-adrenoceptors. The tβ3C-receptor, similar to the human β2-adrenoceptor, does not, at least so far, appear to exist in more than one agonist conformation. Conclusions/Significance There are several similarities, but also several important differences, between the recently crystallised turkey β-adrenoceptor and the human β-adrenoceptors. These findings are important for those the field of drug discovery using the recently structural information from crystallised receptors to aid drug design. Furthermore, comparison of the amino-acid sequence for the turkey and human adrenoceptors may therefore shed more light on the residues involved in the existence of the secondary β-adrenoceptor

  16. The effects of 2 μg and 4 μg doses of dexmedetomidine in combination with intrathecal hyperbaric bupivacaine on spinal anesthesia and its postoperative analgesic characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Yektaş, Abdulkadir; Belli, Enver

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the postoperative analgesic characteristics and side effects of two different doses of intrathecal dexmedetomidine in combination with hyperbaric bupivacaine, and to evaluate the effects of these combinations on spinal anesthesia. METHODS: After obtaining approval from the local ethics committee, 60 male patients who were undergoing inguinal surgery and were classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status class I were included in the study. The present study was conducted in 2003 in a military hospital with a capacity of 100 beds. The patients were randomly assigned to three groups of 20 patients: group 1, 0.5 mL saline added to 3 mL (15 mg) hyperbaric bupivacaine; and groups 2 and 3, 2 μg dexme-detomidine and 4 μg dexmedetomidine added to 3 mL (15 mg) hyperbaric bupivacaine, respectively. Medications were administered by intrathecal injection in a total volume of 3.5 mL. The postoperative analgesic characteristics, effects on spinal anesthesia and side effects were recorded. RESULTS: Demographic characteristics were similar among the groups. The mean (± SD) time to onset of pain was 220.75±112.7 min in group 1, 371.5±223.5 min in group 2 and 1042.50±366.78 min in group 3. Time to first pain sensation in group 3 was significantly longer than that in groups 1 and 2 (P<0.001). CONCLUSION: Two different doses of dexmedetomidine, an α2-adrenoceptor agonist with analgesic effects, resulted in an increased duration of analgesia and efficacy, decreased postoperative analgesic use and was associated with no notable adverse effects. PMID:24527467

  17. The in vivo efficacy and side effect pharmacology of GS-5759, a novel bifunctional phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor and long-acting β 2-adrenoceptor agonist in preclinical animal species.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Michael; Tannheimer, Stacey L; Gentzler, Terry T; Cui, Zhi-Hua; Sorensen, Eric A; Hartsough, Kimberly C; Kim, Musong; Purvis, Lafe J; Barrett, Edward G; McDonald, Jacob D; Rudolph, Karin; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Kuehl, Philip J; Royer, Christopher M; Baker, William R; Phillips, Gary B; Wright, Clifford D

    2014-08-01

    Bronchodilators are a central therapy for symptom relief in respiratory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma, with inhaled β 2-adrenoceptor agonists and anticholinergics being the primary treatments available. The present studies evaluated the in vivo pharmacology of (R)-6-[[3-[[4-[5-[[2-Hydroxy-2-(8-hydroxy-2-oxo-1,2-dihydroquinolin-5-yl)ethyl]amino]pent-1-ynyl]phenyl]carbamoyl]phenyl]sulfonyl]-4-[(3-methoxyphenyl)amino]-8-methylquinoline-3-carboxamide (GS-5759), a novel bifunctional compound with both phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor and long-acting β 2-adrenoceptor agonist (LABA) activity, which has been optimized for inhalation delivery. GS-5759 dose-dependently inhibited pulmonary neutrophilia in a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) aerosol challenge model of inflammation in rats with an ED50 ≤ 10 μg/kg. GS-5759 was also a potent bronchodilator with an ED50 of 0.09 μg/kg in guinea pigs and 3.4 μg/kg in dogs after methylcholine (MCh) and ragweed challenges respectively. In cynomolgus monkeys, GS-5759 was dosed as a fine-particle dry powder and was efficacious in the same dose range in both MCh and LPS challenge models, with an ED50 = 70 μg/kg for bronchodilation and ED50 = 4.9 μg/kg for inhibition of LPS-induced pulmonary neutrophilia. In models to determine therapeutic index (T.I.), efficacy for bronchodilation was evaluated against increased heart rate and GS-5759 had a T.I. of 700 in guinea pigs and >31 in dogs. In a ferret model of emesis, no emesis was seen at doses several orders of magnitude greater than the ED50 observed in the rat LPS inflammation model. GS-5759 is a bifunctional molecule developed for the treatment of COPD, which has both bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory activity and has the potential for combination as a triple therapy with a second compound, within a single inhalation device.

  18. Interaction of the alpha-adrenoceptor agonist oxymetazoline with serotonin 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B, 5-HT1C and 5-HT1D receptors.

    PubMed

    Schoeffter, P; Hoyer, D

    1991-04-17

    Oxymetazoline was recognized with nanomolar affinity by 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D binding sites and mimicked the effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine with about the same potency and intrinsic activity as the endogenous amine in the corresponding functional tests. At 5-HT1C receptors, oxymetazoline behaved as a mixed agonist-antagonist. Clonidine had minimal activity. Methiothepin antagonized the effects of oxymetazoline (7.4 less than pKB less than 8.8). Thus, oxymetazoline is a full and potent agonist at 5-HT1A, 5-HT1B and 5-HT1D receptors and a partial agonist at 5-HT1C receptors.

  19. The effect of urapidil, an alpha-1 adrenoceptor antagonist and a 5-HT1A agonist, on the vascular tone of the porcine coronary and pulmonary arteries, the rat aorta and the human pulmonary artery.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Claire; Auger, Cyril; Diemunsch, Pierre; Schini-Kerth, Valérie

    2016-05-15

    Urapidil (Eupressyl(®)) an antihypertensive drug acting as an α1 antagonist and a 5-HT1A agonist, may be of special interest in the treatment of hypertension associated with preeclamptic toxaemia and hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial vasoconstriction. However, the effect of urapidil on vascular tone has been poorly investigated. Vascular reactivity was evaluated using pulmonary and coronary arteries from 36 pigs, aortae from 22 rats and 9 human pulmonary artery samples suspended in organ chambers. Concentration-relaxation curves either to urapidil, 5-HT, or the 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT were constructed after pre-contraction of rings. Pig pulmonary and coronary artery rings were contracted with U46619, a thromboxane mimetic, rat aortic rings with either endothelin-1 or phenylephrine, and human pulmonary artery rings with U46619 or phenylephrine. Urapidil markedly inhibited phenylephrine-induced contractions in rat aortic rings with and without endothelium with a more pronounced effect observed in rings without endothelium. Both 5-HT and 8-OH-DPAT failed to induce relaxation in rat aortic rings with an intact endothelium. 5-HT, but not urapidil and 8-OH-DPAT, induced a concentration-dependent relaxation in the porcine coronary and pulmonary artery rings with an intact endothelium (P<0.05). 5-HT and phenylephrine but not urapidil caused concentration-dependent contractions in human pulmonary artery rings. The present findings, while confirming that urapidil is a potent inhibitor of α1-adrenoceptor-induced contraction, do not support the role of 5-HT1A receptor activation in the control of the vascular tone of the different types of arteries tested in response to urapidil. In addition, they indicate that urapidil seems to preferentially target arteries with endothelial dysfunction.

  20. Involvement of α2- and β2-adrenoceptors on breast cancer cell proliferation and tumour growth regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pérez Piñero, C; Bruzzone, A; Sarappa, MG; Castillo, LF; Lüthy, IA

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE β-Adrenoceptors are expressed in human and experimental animal breast cancer cells. However, the effect of the agonists and antagonists reported on cell proliferation and tumour growth was paradoxical, precluding their utilization as possible adjuvant therapy, mainly in the cases of refractory tumours. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH β-Adrenoceptor expression was analysed by immunofluorescence and RT-PCR. Cell proliferation was assessed by [3H]-thymidine incorporation, tumour growth by measuring with a calliper and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation by Western blotting. KEY RESULTS β2-Adrenoceptor expression was confirmed in the mouse and human cells tested. Cell proliferation was increased by adrenaline (by α2-adrenoceptor action) and decreased in every tested cell line by the β-adrenoceptor agonist isoprenaline and the β2-adrenoceptor agonist salbutamol. Isoprenaline and salbutamol reduced tumour growth in every tumour tested (mouse C4-HD and CC4-3-HI and human IBH-4, IBH-6 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines growing as xenografts in nude mice). These effects were reversed by the β-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol. The α2-adrenoceptor antagonist rauwolscine and the β2-adrenoceptor agonist salbutamol were equally effective in diminishing tumour growth. ERK 1/2 activation analysed in IBH-4 tumours correlated with tumour growth, with the β-adrenoceptor agonists decreasing its activation. Inhibition of ERK 1/2 phosphorylation in vitro was mainly mediated by the PKA pathway. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS In our experimental models, the β-adrenoceptor agonists inhibited breast cancer cell proliferation and tumour growth, probably mediated by inhibition of ERK 1/2 phosphorylation. The β-adrenoceptor agonists were as effective as the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist rauwolscine, providing possible novel adjuvant treatments for breast cancer. PMID:22122228

  1. Molecular and functional characteristics of β3-adrenoceptors in late pregnant mouse uterus: a comparison with β2-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Parida, Subhashree; Uttam Singh, Thakur; Ravi Prakash, Vellanki; Mishra, Santosh K

    2013-01-30

    β(3)-adrenoceptor is a potential target for uterine relaxant drugs for the treatment of preterm labor. Mouse is an ideal experimental model for preterm labor. However, there is limited information on the molecular and functional characteristics of β(3)-adrenoceptors in mouse uterus. Therefore, the current study was undertaken to characterize the β(3)-adrenoceptors in late pregnant mouse uterus by molecular and functional experiments and to compare their expression and function with the β(2)-adrenoceptors. Using RT-PCR, we demonstrated the presence of β(3)-adrenoceptor mRNA in the mouse uterus. Accordingly, selective β(3)-adrenoceptor agonist SAR150640 (ethyl-4-{trans-4-[((2S)-2-hydroxy-3-{4-hydroxy-3[(methylsulfonyl)amino]-phenoxy}propyl)amino]cyclohexyl}benzoate hydrochloride) caused concentration-dependent relaxation of the isolated tissue. SR59230A (1 μM), a selective antagonist of β(3)-adrenoceptors, antagonized the relaxant response to SAR150640. Using real-time PCR we found that in comparison to β(3)-adrenoceptor mRNA, β(2)-adrenoceptor mRNA is predominantly expressed in the late pregnant mouse uterus. We then assessed the comparative efficiency of different β-adrenoceptor agonists, such as SAR150640, salbutamol and isoprenaline to relax the tissue. SAR150640 (pD(2) 6.64±0.21, E(max) 104.9±7.95), salbutamol (pD(2) 8.57±0.062, E(max) 103.1±3.22) and isoprenaline (pD(2) 9.48±0.084, E(max) 102.9±5.18) caused concentration-dependent inhibition of uterine rhythmic contractions. While the maximal relaxation to these agonists was comparable, the order of potency was isoprenaline>salbutamol>SAR. These results suggest that β(3)-adrenoceptor mRNA is present in the pregnant mouse uterus and is functionally active. The predominance of β(2)- over β(3)-adrenoceptor expression may explain variable potency amongst the β-adrenoceptor agonists.

  2. Molecular and functional characteristics of β3-adrenoceptors in late pregnant mouse uterus: a comparison with β2-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Parida, Subhashree; Uttam Singh, Thakur; Ravi Prakash, Vellanki; Mishra, Santosh K

    2013-01-30

    β(3)-adrenoceptor is a potential target for uterine relaxant drugs for the treatment of preterm labor. Mouse is an ideal experimental model for preterm labor. However, there is limited information on the molecular and functional characteristics of β(3)-adrenoceptors in mouse uterus. Therefore, the current study was undertaken to characterize the β(3)-adrenoceptors in late pregnant mouse uterus by molecular and functional experiments and to compare their expression and function with the β(2)-adrenoceptors. Using RT-PCR, we demonstrated the presence of β(3)-adrenoceptor mRNA in the mouse uterus. Accordingly, selective β(3)-adrenoceptor agonist SAR150640 (ethyl-4-{trans-4-[((2S)-2-hydroxy-3-{4-hydroxy-3[(methylsulfonyl)amino]-phenoxy}propyl)amino]cyclohexyl}benzoate hydrochloride) caused concentration-dependent relaxation of the isolated tissue. SR59230A (1 μM), a selective antagonist of β(3)-adrenoceptors, antagonized the relaxant response to SAR150640. Using real-time PCR we found that in comparison to β(3)-adrenoceptor mRNA, β(2)-adrenoceptor mRNA is predominantly expressed in the late pregnant mouse uterus. We then assessed the comparative efficiency of different β-adrenoceptor agonists, such as SAR150640, salbutamol and isoprenaline to relax the tissue. SAR150640 (pD(2) 6.64±0.21, E(max) 104.9±7.95), salbutamol (pD(2) 8.57±0.062, E(max) 103.1±3.22) and isoprenaline (pD(2) 9.48±0.084, E(max) 102.9±5.18) caused concentration-dependent inhibition of uterine rhythmic contractions. While the maximal relaxation to these agonists was comparable, the order of potency was isoprenaline>salbutamol>SAR. These results suggest that β(3)-adrenoceptor mRNA is present in the pregnant mouse uterus and is functionally active. The predominance of β(2)- over β(3)-adrenoceptor expression may explain variable potency amongst the β-adrenoceptor agonists. PMID:23219791

  3. Isoproterenol Acts as a Biased Agonist of the Alpha-1A-Adrenoceptor that Selectively Activates the MAPK/ERK Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Copik, Alicja. J.; Baldys, Aleksander; Nguyen, Khanh; Sahdeo, Sunil; Ho, Hoangdung; Kosaka, Alan; Dietrich, Paul J.; Fitch, Bill; Raymond, John R.; Ford, Anthony P. D. W.; Button, Donald; Milla, Marcos E.

    2015-01-01

    The α1A-AR is thought to couple predominantly to the Gαq/PLC pathway and lead to phosphoinositide hydrolysis and calcium mobilization, although certain agonists acting at this receptor have been reported to trigger activation of arachidonic acid formation and MAPK pathways. For several G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) agonists can manifest a bias for activation of particular effector signaling output, i.e. not all agonists of a given GPCR generate responses through utilization of the same signaling cascade(s). Previous work with Gαq coupling-defective variants of α1A-AR, as well as a combination of Ca2+ channel blockers, uncovered cross-talk between α1A-AR and β2-AR that leads to potentiation of a Gαq-independent signaling cascade in response to α1A-AR activation. We hypothesized that molecules exist that act as biased agonists to selectively activate this pathway. In this report, isoproterenol (Iso), typically viewed as β-AR-selective agonist, was examined with respect to activation of α1A-AR. α1A-AR selective antagonists were used to specifically block Iso evoked signaling in different cellular backgrounds and confirm its action at α1A-AR. Iso induced signaling at α1A-AR was further interrogated by probing steps along the Gαq /PLC, Gαs and MAPK/ERK pathways. In HEK-293/EBNA cells transiently transduced with α1A-AR, and CHO_α1A-AR stable cells, Iso evoked low potency ERK activity as well as Ca2+ mobilization that could be blocked by α1A-AR selective antagonists. The kinetics of Iso induced Ca2+ transients differed from typical Gαq- mediated Ca2+ mobilization, lacking both the fast IP3R mediated response and the sustained phase of Ca2+ re-entry. Moreover, no inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation could be detected in either cell line after stimulation with Iso, but activation was accompanied by receptor internalization. Data are presented that indicate that Iso represents a novel type of α1A-AR partial agonist with signaling bias toward MAPK

  4. Cytokine-Induced Loss of Glucocorticoid Function: Effect of Kinase Inhibitors, Long-Acting β2-Adrenoceptor Agonist and Glucocorticoid Receptor Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Christopher F.; Shah, Suharsh; Miller-Larsson, Anna; Giembycz, Mark A.; Newton, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Acting on the glucocorticoid receptor (NR3C1), glucocorticoids are widely used to treat inflammatory diseases. However, glucocorticoid resistance often leads to suboptimal asthma control. Since glucocorticoid-induced gene expression contributes to glucocorticoid activity, the aim of this study was to use a 2×glucocorticoid response element (GRE) reporter and glucocorticoid-induced gene expression to investigate approaches to combat cytokine-induced glucocorticoid resistance. Pre-treatment with tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) or interleukin-1β inhibited dexamethasone-induced mRNA expression of the putative anti-inflammatory genes RGS2 and TSC22D3, or just TSC22D3, in primary human airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells, respectively. Dexamethasone-induced DUSP1 mRNA was unaffected. In human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells, dexamethasone-induced TSC22D3 and CDKN1C expression (at 6 h) was reduced by TNF pre-treatment, whereas DUSP1 and RGS2 mRNAs were unaffected. TNF pre-treatment also reduced dexamethasone-dependent 2×GRE reporter activation. This was partially reversed by PS-1145 and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor VIII, inhibitors of IKK2 and JNK, respectively. However, neither inhibitor affected TNF-dependent loss of dexamethasone-induced CDKN1C or TSC22D3 mRNA. Similarly, inhibitors of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, phosphoinositide 3-kinase or protein kinase C pathways failed to attenuate TNF-dependent repression of the 2×GRE reporter. Fluticasone furoate, fluticasone propionate and budesonide were full agonists relative to dexamethasone, while GSK9027, RU24858, des-ciclesonide and GW870086X were partial agonists on the 2×GRE reporter. TNF reduced reporter activity in proportion with agonist efficacy. Full and partial agonists showed various degrees of agonism on RGS2 and TSC22D3 expression, but were equally effective at inducing CDKN1C and DUSP1, and did not affect the repression of CDKN1C or TSC22D3 expression by TNF. Finally

  5. Alpha1a-Adrenoceptor Genetic Variant Triggers Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Hyperproliferation and Agonist Induced Hypertrophy via EGFR Transactivation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Gradinaru, Irina; Babaeva, Ekaterina; Schwinn, Debra A; Oganesian, Anush

    2015-01-01

    α1a Adrenergic receptors (α1aARs) are the predominant AR subtype in human vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). α1aARs in resistance vessels are crucial in the control of blood pressure, yet the impact of naturally occurring human α1aAR genetic variants in cardiovascular disorders remains poorly understood. To this end, we present novel findings demonstrating that 3D cultures of vascular SMCs expressing human α1aAR-247R (247R) genetic variant demonstrate significantly increased SMC contractility compared with cells expressing the α1aAR-WT (WT) receptor. Stable expression of 247R genetic variant also triggers MMP/EGFR-transactivation dependent serum- and agonist-independent (constitutive) hyperproliferation and agonist-dependent hypertrophy of SMCs. Agonist stimulation reduces contractility Using pathway-specific inhibitors we determined that the observed hyperproliferation of 247R-expressing cells is triggered via β-arrestin1/Src/MMP-2/EGFR/ERK-dependent mechanism. MMP-2-specific siRNA inhibited 247R-triggered hyperproliferation indicating MMP-2 involvement in 247R-triggered hyperproliferation in SMCs. β-arrestin1-specific shRNA also inhibited 247R-triggered hyperproliferation but did not affect hypertrophy in 247R-expressing SMCs, indicating that agonist-dependent hypertrophy is independent of β-arrestin1. Our data reveal that in different cardiovascular cells the same human receptor genetic variant can activate alternative modulators of the same signaling pathway. Thus, our findings in SMCs demonstrate that depending on the type of cells expressing the same receptor (or receptor variant), different target-specific inhibitors could be used to modulate aberrant hyperproliferative or hypertrophic pathways in order to restore normal phenotype.

  6. ATP-sensitive K+ channels in smooth muscle cells of guinea-pig mesenteric lymphatics: role in nitric oxide and β-adrenoceptor agonist-induced hyperpolarizations

    PubMed Central

    von der Weid, Pierre-Yves

    1998-01-01

    Intracellular microelectrode recordings were performed to investigate the membrane K+ conductances involved in smooth muscle hyperpolarization of lymphatic vessels in the guinea-pig mesentery. Nitric oxide (NO), released either by the endothelium after acetylcholine (ACh; 10 μM) stimulation or by sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 50–100 μM), hyperpolarized lymphatic smooth muscle. These responses were inhibited with the guanylyl cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole [4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 10 μM). ACh and SNP-induced hyperpolarizations were inhibited (by about 90%) upon application of the ATP-sensitive K+(KATP) channel blocker, glibenclamide (10 μM), or with 4-aminopyridine (2.5 mM), but were not affected by the Ca2+-activated K+ channels blocker, penitrem A (100 nM). Hyperpolarization caused by the K+ channel opener, cromakalim (0.1–10 μM), isoprenaline (0.1 μM) or forskolin (0.5 μM) were all significantly blocked by glibenclamide. Hyperpolarization evoked by ACh and SNP were inhibited with N-[2-(p-bromociannamylamino)-ethyl]-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide-dichloride (H89, 10 μM), suggesting the involvement of cyclic AMP dependent protein kinase (PKA). These results suggest that KATP channels play a central role in lymphatic smooth muscle hyperpolarization evoked by a NO-induced increase in cyclic GMP synthesis, as well as by β-adrenoceptor-mediated production of cyclic AMP. Interestingly, both pathways lead to KATP channels opening through the activation of PKA. PMID:9776338

  7. Treatment of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome with and without Dexmedetomidine

    PubMed Central

    Beg, Muna; Fisher, Sara; Siu, Dana; Rajan, Sudhir; Troxell, Lawrence; Liu, Vincent X

    2016-01-01

    Context: Studies suggest that dexmedetomidine—an intravenous central-acting α2-adrenergic agonist that effectively reduces anxiety among critically ill patients—is being used in patients with severe alcohol withdrawal. However, evidence supporting its use is limited, and it is not approved for this indication. Objective: To assess the effect of dexmedetomidine on severe alcohol withdrawal symptoms and to compare its use with benzodiazepines alone. Design: A retrospective, cohort study of 77 patients admitted to the adult medical intensive care unit with severe alcohol withdrawal between January 1, 2009, and October 31, 2013. Main Outcome Measures: The difference in lorazepam equivalents and Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment for Alcohol scores in the 24 hours before and after initiation of dexmedetomidine therapy. Results: The frequency of dexmedetomidine use increased dramatically between 2009 and 2013 (16.7% vs 82.4%; p = 0.01). Initiation of dexmedetomidine therapy was associated with significant improvements in Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment for Alcohol scores over corresponding 24-hour intervals (14.5 vs 8.5; p < 0.01). Benzodiazepine use also decreased, but the difference was not statistically significant at 24 hours (p = 0.10). Dexmedetomidine was well tolerated, requiring discontinuation of therapy in only 4 patients (10.5%). Dexmedetomidine use was also associated with significantly longer hospitalizations (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine initiation was associated with a reduction in short-term alcohol withdrawal symptoms in patients in the intensive care unit, with only a few patients experiencing adverse events. However, its use was also associated with longer hospitalizations. Further research is necessary to evaluate whether dexmedetomidine is efficacious or cost-effective in severe alcohol withdrawal. PMID:27168398

  8. Design and synthesis of novel alpha(1)(a) adrenoceptor-selective antagonists. 2. Approaches to eliminate opioid agonist metabolites via modification of linker and 4-methoxycarbonyl-4-phenylpiperidine moiety.

    PubMed

    Murali Dhar, T G; Nagarathnam, D; Marzabadi, M R; Lagu, B; Wong, W C; Chiu, G; Tyagarajan, S; Miao, S W; Zhang, F; Sun, W; Tian, D; Shen, Q; Zhang, J; Wetzel, J M; Forray, C; Chang, R S; Broten, T P; Schorn, T W; Chen, T B; O'Malley, S; Ransom, R; Schneck, K; Bendesky, R; Harrell, C M; Vyas, K P

    1999-11-18

    We have previously described compound 1a as a high-affinity subtype selective alpha(1a) antagonist. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of compound 1a showed its major metabolite to be a mu-opioid agonist, 4-methoxycarbonyl-4-phenylpiperidine (3). Several dihydropyrimidinone analogues were synthesized with the goal of either minimizing the formation of 3 by modification of the linker or finding alternative piperidine moieties which when cleaved as a consequence of metabolism would not give rise to mu-opioid activity. Modification of the linker gave several compounds with good alpha(1a) binding affinity (K(i) = < 1 nM) and selectivity (>300-fold over alpha(1b) and alpha(1d)). In vitro analysis in the microsomal assay revealed these modifications did not significantly affect N-dealkylation and the formation of the piperidine 3. The second approach, however, yielded several piperidine replacements for 3, which did not show significant mu-opioid activity. Several of these compounds maintained good affinity at the alpha(1a) adrenoceptor and selectivity over alpha(1b) and alpha(1d). For example, the piperidine fragments of (+)-73 and (+)-83, viz. 4-cyano-4-phenylpiperidine and 4-methyl-4-phenylpiperidine, were essentially inactive at the mu-opioid receptor (IC(50) > 30 microM vs 3 microM for 3). Compounds (+)-73 and (+)-83 were subjected to detailed in vitro and in vivo characterization. Both these compounds, in addition to their excellent selectivity (>880-fold) over alpha(1b) and alpha(1d), also showed good selectivity over several other recombinant human G-protein coupled receptors. Compounds (+)-73 and (+)-83 showed good functional potency in isolated human prostate tissues, with K(b)s comparable to their in vitro alpha(1a) binding data. In addition, compound (+)-73 also exhibited good uroselectivity (DBP K(b)/IUP K(b) > 20-fold) in the in vivo experiments in dogs, similar to 1a.

  9. Distribution and function of peripheral alpha-adrenoceptors in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Ruffolo, R R

    1985-05-01

    alpha-Adrenoceptors may be subdivided based on their anatomical distribution within the synapse. Presynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors are generally of the alpha 2-subtype and modulate neurotransmitter liberation via a negative feedback mechanism. Postsynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors are usually of the alpha 1-subtype and mediate the response of the effector organ. Although this "anatomical" subclassification is generally applicable, many exceptions exist. A more useful classification of alpha-adrenoceptor subtypes is based on a pharmacological characterization in which selective agonists and antagonists are used. Peripheral alpha-adrenoceptors are critical in the regulation of the cardiovascular system. Postsynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors in arteries and veins represent a mixed population of alpha 1/alpha 2-adrenoceptors, with both subtypes mediating vasoconstriction. In the peripheral arterial circulation, postsynaptic vascular alpha 1-adrenoceptors are found in the adrenergic neuroeffector junction, whereas postsynaptic vascular alpha 2-adrenoceptors are located extrajunctionally. In the venous circulation, it appears that alpha 2-adrenoceptors may be predominantly junctional, whereas alpha 1-adrenoceptors may be predominantly extrajunctional. It has been proposed that junctional alpha-adrenoceptors will respond predominantly to norepinephrine liberated from sympathetic neurons, whereas extrajunctional alpha-adrenoceptors likely respond to circulating catecholamines. The functional role of extrajunctional alpha-adrenoceptors may be more important in disease states such as hypertension and congestive heart failure where circulating levels of catecholamines may be high and contribute to the maintenance of elevated vascular resistance. alpha 2-Adrenoceptors are also associated with the intima and may play a role in the release of an endogenous relaxing factor from the endothelium.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2989947

  10. Beta-adrenoceptors in obstetrics and gynecology.

    PubMed

    Modzelewska, Beata

    2016-01-01

    One hundred and twenty years after the description of extracts from the adrenal medulla, the use of beta-blockers and beta-agonists evolved from antianginal drugs and tocolytics to ligand-directed signaling. Beta-blockers in the fields of obstetrics and gynecology have so far been limited to the consideration of continuing treatment of disorders of the cardiovascular system and other dysfunctions that started before pregnancy. Studies in recent years have shown that beta-adrenoceptor signaling might be crucial in carcinogenesis and metastasis, apoptosis and anoikis. On the other hand, the use of beta-adrenoceptor agonists in tocolysis is, as yet, the primary method for inhibiting premature uterine contractions. Unfortunately, the efficacy of current pharmacological treatment for the management of preterm labor is regularly questioned. Moreover, studies related to non-pregnant myometrium performed to date indicate that the rhythmic contractions of the uterus are required for menstruation and have an important role in human reproduction. In turn, abnormal uterine contractility has been linked to dysmenorrhea, a condition associated with painful uterine cramping. The benefits of the use of beta2-adrenoceptor agonists in dysmenorrhea are still unclear and should be balanced against a wide range of adverse effects recognized with this class of medication. The ideal tocolytic agent is one which is effective for the pregnant or non-pregnant woman but has no side effects on either the woman or the baby. Looking to the future with both caution and hope, the potential metamorphosis of beta3-adrenoceptor agonists from experimental tools into therapeutic drugs for tocolysis warrants attention. PMID:27442692

  11. Beta-adrenoceptors in obstetrics and gynecology.

    PubMed

    Modzelewska, Beata

    2016-01-01

    One hundred and twenty years after the description of extracts from the adrenal medulla, the use of beta-blockers and beta-agonists evolved from antianginal drugs and tocolytics to ligand-directed signaling. Beta-blockers in the fields of obstetrics and gynecology have so far been limited to the consideration of continuing treatment of disorders of the cardiovascular system and other dysfunctions that started before pregnancy. Studies in recent years have shown that beta-adrenoceptor signaling might be crucial in carcinogenesis and metastasis, apoptosis and anoikis. On the other hand, the use of beta-adrenoceptor agonists in tocolysis is, as yet, the primary method for inhibiting premature uterine contractions. Unfortunately, the efficacy of current pharmacological treatment for the management of preterm labor is regularly questioned. Moreover, studies related to non-pregnant myometrium performed to date indicate that the rhythmic contractions of the uterus are required for menstruation and have an important role in human reproduction. In turn, abnormal uterine contractility has been linked to dysmenorrhea, a condition associated with painful uterine cramping. The benefits of the use of beta2-adrenoceptor agonists in dysmenorrhea are still unclear and should be balanced against a wide range of adverse effects recognized with this class of medication. The ideal tocolytic agent is one which is effective for the pregnant or non-pregnant woman but has no side effects on either the woman or the baby. Looking to the future with both caution and hope, the potential metamorphosis of beta3-adrenoceptor agonists from experimental tools into therapeutic drugs for tocolysis warrants attention.

  12. Effect of chronic treatment with ICI D7114, a selective beta 3-adrenoceptor agonist, on macronutrient selection and brown adipose tissue thermogenesis in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Santti, E; Rouvari, T; Rouru, J; Huupponen, R; Koulu, M

    1994-01-01

    ICI D7114 is a selective beta 3-agonist which stimulates brown adipose tissue thermogenesis. In the present study the effects of 18 days treatment with ICI D7114 (2 mg/kg/day orally) on macronutrient selection and brown adipose tissue thermogenesis were investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were maintained on a free-feeding self-selection paradigm with three pure macronutrient diets of carbohydrate, fat and protein. Treatment with ICI D7114 did not change the macronutrient selection or total calories consumed by the rats. To monitor the thermogenic activation of brown adipose tissue the binding of [3H]GDP to brown adipose tissue mitochondria was measured. The treatment with ICI D7114 increased the binding of GDP both when expressed as total binding per lobe (P < 0.001) and per mg of protein (P < 0.01). It is concluded that ICI D7114, used in doses affecting brown adipose tissue thermogenesis, does not change the macronutrient selection or total energy intake in Sprague-Dawley rats. PMID:7800658

  13. alpha(1)-Adrenoceptors augment thermal hyperalgesia in mildly burnt skin.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Peter D

    2009-03-01

    The effect of the alpha(1)-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine on sensitivity to heat was investigated at three sites of mild burn injury in the cutaneous forearm of 19 healthy participants. Two of the sites were pre-treated with the alpha(1)-antagonist terazosin, to determine whether the effect of phenylephrine was mediated by alpha(1)-adrenoceptors. Terazosin was administered before the burn injury at one site, and after the burn injury at the other site. In another 15 participants, the nociceptive effect of the alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonist clonidine was investigated with and without prior treatment with the alpha(2)-antagonist rauwolscine. Drugs were introduced into the skin by iontophoresis, and burns were induced by heating the skin to 48 degrees C for 2min. Heat pain thresholds to a temperature ramp (0.5 degrees C/s), and heat pain ratings to a thermal stimulus (45 degrees C, 7s), were determined before and after the administration of each drug. Thermal hyperalgesia provoked by phenylephrine was inhibited by terazosin administered after the burn injury, but not by terazosin administered before the burn injury. However, neither alpha(2)-adrenoceptor stimulation nor blockade affected sensitivity to heat in the mildly burnt skin. These findings suggest that stimulation of cutaneous alpha(1)-adrenoceptors increased the excitability of heat-sensitized nociceptive afferents. As terazosin was more effective when administered in burnt skin, an inflammatory response induced by the burn injury may have facilitated access of adrenergic agents to alpha(1)-adrenoceptors.

  14. Effect of beta-adrenoceptors on the behaviour induced by the neuropeptide glutamic acid isoleucine amide.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Borzone, Mariela E; Attademo, Andrés; Baiardi, Gustavo; Celis, María Ester

    2007-07-30

    Excessive grooming behaviour is induced by intracerebroventricular injections of the neuropeptide glutamic acid isoleucine amide (neuropeptide-EI), via the activation of A-10 dopaminergic neurons and the noradrenergic system. Our object was to study the latter system involved in these behaviours, using male Wistar rats weighing 250-300 g with i.c.v. implants. The results show that all the adrenoceptor antagonists "per se" do not affect excessive grooming behaviour or motor activity. Intracerebroventricular administration of propranolol, a general beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, before neuropeptide-EI, inhibited the induced excessive grooming behaviour in a dose dependent manner. Metoprolol, a beta(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, also blocked this behaviour. However, intracerebroventricular injections of phentolamine, an alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist, and ((+/-)-1-[2,3-(Dihydro-7-methyl-1H-inden-4-yl)oxy]-3-[(1-methylethyl)amino]-2-butanol), a beta(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist, had no effect on the behaviour induced by neuropeptide-EI induced behaviour for any of the doses tested. On the other hand, isoproterenol, a general beta-adrenoceptor agonist and dobutamine, a beta(1)-adrenoceptor agonist, both elicited similar behaviours as those induced by neuropeptide-EI. These results support the hypothesis that a relationship exists between neuropeptide-EI and beta-adrenoceptors, more specifically the beta(1)-adrenoceptor, as found with other similar endogenous peptides such as neurotensin, cholecystin, substance P and alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone. Hence, neuropeptide-EI could probably be exerting a neuromodulating effect on the central nervous system.

  15. Effects of (−)-RO363 at human atrial β-adrenoceptor subtypes, the human cloned β3-adrenoceptor and rodent intestinal β3-adrenoceptors

    PubMed Central

    Molenaar, Peter; Sarsero, Doreen; Arch, Jonathan R S; Kelly, John; Henson, Sian M; Kaumann, Alberto J

    1997-01-01

    Chronic treatment of patients with β-blockers causes atrial inotropic hyperresponsiveness through β2-adrenoceptors, 5-HT4 receptors and H2-receptors but apparently not through β1-adrenoceptors despite data claiming an increased β1-adrenoceptor density from homogenate binding studies. We have addressed the question of β1-adrenoceptor sensitivity by determining the inotropic potency and intrinsic activity of the β1-adrenoceptor selective partial agonist (−)-RO363 and by carrying out both homogenate binding and quantitative β-adrenoceptor autoradiography in atria obtained from patients treated or not treated with β-blockers. In the course of the experiments it became apparent that (−)-RO363 also may cause agonistic effects through the third atrial β-adrenoceptor. To assess whether (−)-RO363 also caused agonistic effects through β3-adrenoceptors we studied its relaxant effects in rat colon and guinea-pig ileum, as well as receptor binding and adenylyl cyclase stimulation of chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing human β3-adrenoceptors. β-Adrenoceptors were labelled with (−)-[125I]-cyanopindolol. The density of both β1- and β2-adrenoceptors was unchanged in the 2 groups, as assessed with both quantitative receptor autoradiography and homogenate binding. The affinities of (−)-RO363 for β1-adrenoceptors (pKi=8.0–7.7) and β2-adrenoceptors (pKi=6.1–5.8) were not significantly different in the two groups. (−)-RO363 increased atrial force with a pEC50 of 8.2 (β-blocker treated) and 8.0 (non-β-blocker treated) and intrinsic activity with respect to (−)-isoprenaline of 0.80 (β-blocker treated) and 0.54 (non-β-blocker treated) (P<0.001) and with respect to Ca2+ (7 mM) of 0.65 (β-blocker treated) and 0.45 (non-β-blocker treated) (P<0.01). The effects of (−)-RO363 were resistant to antagonism by the β2-adrenoceptor antagonist, ICI 118,551 (50 nM). The effects of 0.3–10 nM (−)-RO363 were antagonized by 3–10 nM of the

  16. Defining the Role of Dexmedetomidine in the Prevention of Delirium in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, S.; Muzyk, A. J.; Bucklin, M. H.; Brudney, S.; Gagliardi, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine is a highly selective α2 agonist used as a sedative agent. It also provides anxiolysis and sympatholysis without significant respiratory compromise or delirium. We conducted a systematic review to examine whether sedation of patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) with dexmedetomidine was associated with a lower incidence of delirium as compared to other nondexmedetomidine sedation strategies. A search of PUBMED, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews yielded only three trials from 1966 through April 2015 that met our predefined inclusion criteria and assessed dexmedetomidine and outcomes of delirium as their primary endpoint. The studies varied in regard to population, comparator sedation regimen, delirium outcome measure, and dexmedetomidine dosing. All trials are limited by design issues that limit our ability definitively to conclude that dexmedetomidine prevents delirium. Evidence does suggest that dexmedetomidine may allow for avoidance of deep sedation and use of benzodiazepines, factors both observed to increase the risk for developing delirium. Our assessment of currently published literature highlights the need for ongoing research to better delineate the role of dexmedetomidine for delirium prevention. PMID:26576429

  17. Biased β2-adrenoceptor signalling in heart failure: pathophysiology and drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Woo, Anthony Yiu-Ho; Song, Ying; Xiao, Rui-Ping; Zhu, Weizhong

    2015-12-01

    The body is constantly faced with a dynamic requirement for blood flow. The heart is able to respond to these changing needs by adjusting cardiac output based on cues emitted by circulating catecholamine levels. Cardiac β-adrenoceptors transduce the signal produced by catecholamine stimulation via Gs proteins to their downstream effectors to increase heart contractility. During heart failure, cardiac output is insufficient to meet the needs of the body; catecholamine levels are high and β-adrenoceptors become hyperstimulated. The hyperstimulated β1-adrenoceptors induce a cardiotoxic effect, which could be counteracted by the cardioprotective effect of β2-adrenoceptor-mediated Gi signalling. However, β2-adrenoceptor-Gi signalling negates the stimulatory effect of the Gs signalling on cardiomyocyte contraction and further exacerbates cardiodepression. Here, further to the localization of β1- and β2-adrenoceptors and β2-adrenoceptor-mediated β-arrestin signalling in cardiomyocytes, we discuss features of the dysregulation of β-adrenoceptor subtype signalling in the failing heart, and conclude that Gi-biased β2-adrenoceptor signalling is a pathogenic pathway in heart failure that plays a crucial role in cardiac remodelling. In contrast, β2-adrenoceptor-Gs signalling increases cardiomyocyte contractility without causing cardiotoxicity. Finally, we discuss a novel therapeutic approach for heart failure using a Gs-biased β2-adrenoceptor agonist and a β1-adrenoceptor antagonist in combination. This combination treatment normalizes the β-adrenoceptor subtype signalling in the failing heart and produces therapeutic effects that outperform traditional heart failure therapies in animal models. The present review illustrates how the concept of biased signalling can be applied to increase our understanding of the pathophysiology of diseases and in the development of novel therapies.

  18. From Bench to Bedside and Back Again: A Personal Journey with Dexmedetomidine.

    PubMed

    Maze, Mervyn

    2016-09-01

    Dexmedetomidine Diminishes Halothane Anesthetic Requirements in Rats Through a Postsynaptic Alpha 2 Adrenergic Receptor. By Segal IS, Vickery RG, Walton JK, Doze VA, and Maze M. ANESTHESIOLOGY 1988; 125:590-4. Abstract reprinted with permission.The effect of 4(5)-[1-(2,3-dimethylphenyl)ethyl]imidazole (medetomidine), the α2 adrenergic agonist, on anesthetic requirements was investigated in rats anesthetized with halothane. Halothane MAC was determined before and after either dexmedetomidine (D-enantiomer) or levomedetomidine (L-enantiomer) 10, 30, and 100 μg/kg, or vehicle intraperitoneally. There was a dose-dependent increase in MAC with the D-, but not the L-, stereoisomer. At the highest dose of dexmedetomidine (100 μg/kg), halothane could be discontinued for up to 30 min with no response to tail clamping. To determine whether α2 adrenoreceptors mediated this effect of dexmedetomidine on MAC, cohorts of rats were pretreated with idazoxan, 10 mg/kg intraperitoneally, a highly selective α2 antagonist. This completely prevented the reduction of MAC caused by dexmedetomidine. To determine whether the reduction of MAC caused by dexmedetomidine was mediated in part through either opiate or adenosine receptors, groups of rats were pretreated with either naltrexone, 5 mg/kg intraperitoneally, an opiate antagonist, or 8-phenyltheophylline, 2.5 mg/kg intraperitoneally, an A1 adenosine antagonist. These two pretreatments did not alter the reduction of MAC by dexmedetomidine. To determine whether postsynaptic mechanisms mediate the anesthetic effect of dexmedetomidine, rats were depleted of central catecholamine stores with either n-(2-chloroethyl)-n-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine or reserpine and α-methyl-para-tyrosine, and MAC was determined before and after each dose of dexmedetomidine. While the catecholamine-depleted rats had a lower basal MAC than the vehicle controls, there was still a profound reduction in halothane MAC after administration of

  19. Mediation of most atypical effects by species homologues of the beta 3-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed Central

    Blin, N.; Nahmias, C.; Drumare, M. F.; Strosberg, A. D.

    1994-01-01

    1. A wide panel of compounds acting on beta-adrenoceptors active either in mammalian heart or in rodent digestive tract and adipose tissues, were investigated for their effects on Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with the human or murine beta 3-adrenoceptor gene. 2. The beta 3-agonists, bucindolol, CGP 12177A and pindolol exhibited the highest binding affinities; BRL 37344, LY 79771, ICI 201651 and SR 58611A presented high potencies in stimulating adenylyl cyclase; bupranolol appeared as the most efficient beta 3-antagonist. 3. This pharmacological analysis further established that the beta 3-adrenoceptor is the prototype of the adipose tissue atypical beta-adrenoceptor, since these receptors share a number of pharmacological properties which differ strikingly from those of beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors: low affinities for conventional beta-adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists, high potencies for novel compounds active in adipose tissues, partial agonistic activities for several beta 1/beta 2-antagonists. 4. Although the pharmacological profiles of the human and murine beta 3-receptor were very similar, some quantitative or even qualitative differences were observed for particular compounds such as propranolol, which exhibited weak and partial agonistic effects at the human beta 3-receptors and antagonistic effects at the murine beta 3-receptors. These differences may result from key amino-acid substitutions between the human and the murine beta 3-receptor sequences, which may alter the binding site or signal processing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7921620

  20. Comparison of intranasal dexmedetomidine and dexmedetomidine-ketamine for premedication in pediatrics patients: A randomized double-blind study

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Ravi; Santhosh, M.C.B.; Annigeri, Venkatesh M.; Rao, Raghavendra P.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Goal of premedication in pediatric anesthesia are relieving pre and postoperative anxiety, good parental separation, and smooth induction of anesthesia. Anxiety can produce aggressive reactions, increased distress, increased postoperative pain and postoperative agitation. The benzodiazepine, midazolam, is the most frequently used premedication in pediatric anesthesia. Midazolam has a number of beneficial effects when used as premedication in children: Sedation, fast onset, and limited duration of action. Though midazolam has a number of beneficial effects, it is far from an ideal premedicant having untoward side effects such as paradoxical reaction, respiratory depression, cognitive impairment, amnesia, and restlessness. Dexmedetomidine is a newer α-2-agonist, which can be used as premedicant. Aims: To compare the level of sedation, parental separation, mask acceptance, postoperative recovery of intranasal premedication with dexmedetomidine and dexmedetomidine-ketamine combination in pediatric patients. Settings and Design: Prospective randomized double-blind study. Subjects and Methods: After written informed consent from the patient's parents or legal guardian, 54 children of American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II, aged between 1 and 6 years, scheduled to undergo elective minor surgery were enrolled. In group D patient received 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine intranasally and in group DK received 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine and 2 mg/kg ketamine intranasally. Patients were assessed every 10 min for the level of sedation, parenteral separation, heart rate, and oxygen saturation by an independent observer. Mask acceptance and postoperative agitation were noted using an appropriate scale. Statistical Analysis Used: Pearson Chi-square analysis to determine differences between two groups with respect to separation anxiety and acceptance of the anesthesia mask. Percentages used to represent frequencies. The level of significance was set at P< 0

  1. Alloimmune IgG binds and modulates cardiac beta-adrenoceptor activity.

    PubMed Central

    Sterin-Borda, L; Cremaschi, G; Pascual, J; Genaro, A; Borda, E

    1984-01-01

    Purified IgG from murine alloimmune sera directed against class I products from the major histocompatibility complex of the mouse, could bind to the beta-adrenoceptors and stimulate contractile activity of myocardium. Immune IgG inhibited the binding of (-) 3H-DHA to beta-adrenoceptors of mouse myocardial membranes behaving as a competitive inhibitor. Moreover, immune IgG induced positive inotropic and chronotropic effects on isolated mouse atria. These effects could be blocked by beta-adrenoceptors antagonists. Data prove that immune IgG directed against specific alloantigens are able to recognize the beta-adrenoceptors and mimic the stimulation of the beta-adrenoceptor agonist. PMID:6090043

  2. Comparison of the beta-adrenoceptor affinity and selectivity of cetamolol, atenolol, betaxolol, and ICI-118,551.

    PubMed

    Rimele, T J; Henry, D E; Giesa, F R; Buckley, S K; Geiger, G; Heaslip, R J; Lee, D K; Grimes, D

    1988-08-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the quantitative differences in the beta 1- vs. beta 2-adrenoceptor affinity and selectivity of cetamolol and its enantiomers to the reference compounds atenolol, betaxolol, and ICI-118,551, using isolated tissues obtained from the dog, guinea pig, and rat. Cetamolol antagonized the beta-adrenoceptor-mediated responses induced by isoproterenol, epinephrine, norepinephrine, and salbutamol, in tissues from both the dog and guinea pig, in a concentration-dependent manner. For a given tissue, the beta-adrenoceptor antagonist activity of cetamolol (measured as a pA2 or pKB value) was independent of the agonist used. In the dog tissues, cetamolol was more potent at inhibiting responses in the coronary artery (beta 1-adrenoceptors) than in the saphenous vein (beta 2-adrenoceptors). In the guinea pig tissues, the potency of cetamolol was approximately the same in the trachea (mixed beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors) and atria (predominately beta 1-adrenoceptors), but lower in the soleus muscle (beta 2-adrenoceptors). Studies with the S-(-) and R-(+) enantiomers of cetamolol demonstrated that the S-(-) enantiomer was approximately 100-fold more potent at beta 1-adrenoceptors than the R-(+) enantiomer. In rat brain, cetamolol displaced [3H]-dihydroalprenolol bound to homogenates of cortex (beta 1-adrenoceptor binding sites) and cerebellum (beta 2-adrenoceptor binding sites). The potency of cetamolol at beta 1-adrenoceptors was found to be similar to that of betaxolol but greater than that of atenolol. However, the magnitude of the beta 1-adrenoceptor selectivity displayed by atenolol and betaxolol was greater than that displayed by cetamolol. In contrast, ICI-118,551 was found to possess potent and selective affinity for beta 2-adrenoceptors.

  3. Lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptors and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate during and after normal pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    von Mandach, U.; Gubler, H. P.; Engel, G.; Huch, R.; Huch, A.

    1993-01-01

    1. The beta 2-sympathomimetics, used to inhibit preterm labour, bind predominantly to beta 2-adrenoceptors, activating adenylate cyclase to form adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP), a messenger substance which inhibits the enzyme cascade triggering smooth muscle contraction. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP formation can be used as markers of beta 2-adrenergic effect. 2. The present study addresses the influence of pregnancy on the beta-adrenoceptor system. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) in circulating lymphocytes were determined at three points in gestation (16, 29 and 37 weeks) and 9 weeks post partum in 22 normal pregnancies. (-)-[125Iodo]-cyanopindolol was used as the ligand to identify a homogeneous population of beta 2-adrenoceptors on lymphocytes. B- and T-cell fractions were estimated from the same samples. 3. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density decreased significantly during gestation until week 37 (P < 0.01), then increased post partum (P < 0.005). Cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) were significantly lower after 16 weeks of gestation than post partum (P < 0.05). 4. The results, which cannot be explained in terms of a shift in the lymphocyte (B- and T-cell) ratio, indicate that beta-adrenoceptor density and function are reduced in normal pregnancy and only return to normal post partum. These findings may be of significance in devising future tocolytic therapy with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. PMID:8383562

  4. Dexmedetomidine attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment through antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptosis in aging rat

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoning; Zhao, Binjiang; Li, Xue

    2015-01-01

    As a kind of α2 adrenergic receptor agonists, dexmedetomidine generates sedation, anti-anxiety and anesthesia effects by hyperpolarizing noradrenergic nerve cells in locus coeruleus. This study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective of dexmedetomidine attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment, and the possible underlying mechanism in aging rat. Firstly, we used isoflurane-induced aging rat model to analyze the therapeutical effect of dexmedetomidine on cognitive impairment. Next, commercial ELISA kits were used to analyze tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), methane dicarboxylic aldehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and caspase-3 levels. In addition, Western blotting was used to detect the protein expression of P38 MAPK, PTEN and phosphorylation-Akt (p-Akt) expression. Our results showed that the neuroprotective of dexmedetomidine significantly attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aging rat. Moreover, dexmedetomidine significantly inhibited these TNF-α, IL-1β, MDA, SOD and caspase-3 activities in isoflurane-induced aging rat. Meanwhile, the neuroprotective effects of dexmedetomidine on isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment significantly suppressed Bcl-xL/Bad rate, P38 MAPK and PTEN protein expression and activated p-Akt protein expression in aging rat. Collectively, neuroprotective effect of dexmedetomidine attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment through antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptosis in aging rat. PMID:26770320

  5. Influence of β2-adrenoceptor gene polymorphisms on β2-adrenoceptor-mediated responses in human lung mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Kay, L J; Rostami-Hodjegan, A; Suvarna, S K; Peachell, P T

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: Previous studies have shown that β 2-adrenoceptor-mediated responses in human lung mast cells are highly variable. The aims of the present study were to establish whether polymorphisms of the β 2-adrenoceptor gene (ADRB2) influence this variability in (a) β 2-adrenoceptor-mediated inhibition and (b) desensitization of β 2-adrenoceptor-mediated responses in human lung mast cells. Experimental approach: Mast cells were isolated from human lung tissue. The inhibitory effects of the β-adrenoceptor agonist, isoprenaline (10−10–10−5 M), on IgE-mediated histamine release from mast cells were determined (n=92). Moreover, the inhibitory effects of isoprenaline were evaluated following a desensitizing treatment involving long-term (24 h) incubation of mast cells with isoprenaline (10−6 M) (n=65). A potential influence of polymorphisms on these functional responses was determined by genotyping 11 positions, in the promoter and coding regions, of ADRB2 previously reported as polymorphic. Key results: There was no influence of any of the polymorphic positions of ADRB2 on the potency of isoprenaline to inhibit histamine release from mast cells with the exception of position 491C>T (Thr164Ile). There was no influence of any of the polymorphic positions of ADRB2 on the extent of desensitization of the isoprenaline-mediated response following a desensitizing treatment except for position 46G>A (Gly16Arg). Analyses at the haplotype level indicated that there was no influence of haplotype on β 2-adrenoceptor-mediated responses in mast cells. Conclusions and implications: These data indicate that certain polymorphisms in ADRB2 influence β 2-adrenoceptor-mediated responses in human lung mast cells. PMID:17643132

  6. Dexmedetomidine Infusion to Control Agitation due to Anticholinergic Toxidromes in Adolescents, a Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ada; Tobias, Joseph D.

    2015-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α2-adrenergic agonist approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the sedation of adults who are intubated on mechanical ventilation and in non-intubated adults who are undergoing surgical procedures. However, it has also recently become a commonly used sedative agent in varied clinical settings for the pediatric patient as well. We present the use of dexmedetomidine for sedation in a unique clinical scenario, the severely agitated and combative patient following the intentional misuse of anticholinergic drugs. Its applications in this situation are discussed, and previous reports in the literature are reviewed. PMID:26380573

  7. [alpha]2A-Adrenoceptor Stimulation Improves Prefrontal Cortical Regulation of Behavior through Inhibition of cAMP Signaling in Aging Animals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verduzco, Luis; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Arnsten, Amy F. T.; Ramos, Brian P.; Stark, David

    2006-01-01

    The working-memory functions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) are improved by stimulation of postsynaptic, [alpha]2A-adrenoceptors, especially in aged animals with PFC cognitive deficits. Thus, the [alpha]2A-adrenoceptor agonist, guanfacine, greatly improves working-memory performance in monkeys and rats following systemic administration or…

  8. Event-related Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of a Low Dose of Dexmedetomidine that Impairs Long-term Memory

    PubMed Central

    Hayama, Hiroki R.; Drumheller, Kristin. M.; Mastromonaco, Mark; Reist, Christopher; Cahill, Lawrence F.; Alkire, Michael. T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Work suggests the amnesia of Dexmedetomidine (an α2-adrenergic agonist) is caused by a failure of information to be encoded into long-term memory and that dexmedetomidine might differentially affect memory for emotionally arousing material. We investigated these issues in humans using event-related neuroimaging to reveal alterations in brain activity and subsequent memory effects associated with drug exposure. Methods Forty-eight healthy volunteers received a computer-controlled infusion of either placebo or low-dose dexmedetomidine (target = 0.15ng/ml plasma) during neuroimaging while they viewed and rated 80 emotionally arousing (e.g., graphic war wound) and 80 nonarousing neutral (e.g., cup) pictures for emotional arousal content. Long-term picture memory was tested 4 days later without neuroimaging. Imaging data were analyzed for drug effects, emotional processing differences and memory related changes with statistical parametric mapping-8. Results Dexmedetomidine impaired overall (mean ± SEM) picture memory (Placebo: 0.58 ± 0.03 vs. a dexmedetomidine: 0.45 ± 0.03, p = 0.001), but did not differentially modulate memory as a function of item arousal. Arousing pictures were better remembered for both groups. Dexmedetomidine had regionally heterogeneous effects on brain activity, primarily decreasing it in the cortex while increasing it in thalamic and posterior hippocampal regions. Nevertheless, a single subsequent memory effect for item memory common to both groups was identified only in the left hippocampus/amygdala. Much of this effect was found to be larger for the placebo than dexmedetomidine group. Conclusion Dexmedetomidine impaired long-term picture memory, but did not disproportionately block memory for emotionally arousing items. The memory impairment on dexmedetomidine corresponds with a weakened hippocampal subsequent memory effect. PMID:22929730

  9. The role of adenylyl cyclase isoform 6 in β-adrenoceptor signalling in murine airways

    PubMed Central

    Birrell, Mark A; Bonvini, Sara J; Wortley, Michael A; Buckley, James; Yew-Booth, Liang; Maher, Sarah A; Dale, Nicole; Dubuis, Eric D; Belvisi, Maria G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Adenylyl cyclase (AC) is a key signalling enzyme for many GPCRs and catalyses the conversion of ATP to cAMP which, in turn, is a crucial determinant of many biological responses. β-Adrenoceptor agonists are prescribed as bronchodilators for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and it is commonly assumed that they elicit their actions via AC-dependent production of cAMP. However, empirical evidence in support of this is lacking and the exact mechanism by which these drugs acts remains elusive. This is partly due to the existence of at least 10 different isoforms of AC and the absence of any truly selective pharmacological inhibitors. Here, we have used genetically modified mice and model systems to establish the role of AC isoforms in the airway responses to β-adrenoceptor agonists. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Receptors mediating responses to β-adrenoceptor agonists in airway smooth muscle (ASM) and sensory nerve were identified in isolated tissue systems. Expression of mRNA for the AC isoforms in ASM and neurones was determined by qPCR. Functional responses were assessed in AC isoform KO mice and wild-type controls. KEY RESULTS Airway and vagal tissue expressed mRNA for various isoforms of AC. AC6 was the most prominent isoform. Responses to β-adrenoceptor agonists in tissues from AC6 KO mice were virtually abolished. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS AC6 played a critical role in relaxation of ASM to β1-adrenoceptor agonists and in modulation of sensory nerves by β1-3-adrenoceptor agonists. These results further unravel the signalling pathway of this extensively prescribed class of medicine. PMID:25205328

  10. A circulating IgG in Chagas' disease which binds to beta-adrenoceptors of myocardium and modulates their activity.

    PubMed Central

    Borda, E; Pascual, J; Cossio, P; De La Vega, M; Arana, R; Sterin-Borda, L

    1984-01-01

    It has been shown that sera from chagasic patients with positive EVI serology could act in co-operation with complement or normal human lymphocytes as a partial beta-adrenoceptor agonist increasing the contractile tension and frequency of isolated rat atria, as occurs with IgG purified from chagasic serum. In this paper we demonstrated that IgG present in chagasic patients sera could bind to the beta-adrenoceptors of the heart and stimulate contractile activity of myocardium. The positive inotropic and chronotropic effect could be blocked by the specific beta 1-adrenoceptor antagonist but not by the beta 2-adrenoceptor antagonist. Chagasic IgG inhibited the binding of (-) 3H-DHA to beta-adrenoceptors of purified rat myocardial membranes behaving as non-competitive inhibitors. The reactivity of chagasic serum or IgG with beta 1-adrenoceptor was lost after absorptions with turkey red blood cells. In contrast, guinea-pig red blood cells were unable to remove the beta 1 reactivity of chagasic serum or chagasic IgG. This supports the specificity of beta 1-adrenoceptors of the chagasic IgG and the independence of beta 1-adrenoceptor reactivity in relation to the EVI system. Clinical specificity of the beta 1-adrenoceptor reactivity seems rather high in Chagas' disease since it was lacking in 14 individuals with other cardiopathies, such as ischaemic and rheumatic heart disease, even after heart surgery. PMID:6088139

  11. Dexmedetomidine inhibits vasoconstriction via activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nong, Lidan; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Deng, Chunyu; Mao, Songsong; Li, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Despite the complex vascular effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX), its actions on human pulmonary resistance arteries remain unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEX inhibits vascular tension in human pulmonary arteries through the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediated production of nitric oxide (NO). Pulmonary artery segments were obtained from 62 patients who underwent lung resection. The direct effects of DEX on human pulmonary artery tension and changes in vascular tension were determined by isometric force measurements recorded on a myograph. Arterial contractions caused by increasing concentrations of serotonin with DEX in the presence or absence of L-NAME (endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) as antagonists were also measured. DEX had no effect on endothelium-intact pulmonary arteries, whereas at concentrations of 10–8~10–6 mol/L, it elicited contractions in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX (0.3, 1, or 3×10–9 mmol/L) inhibited serotonin-induced contraction in arteries with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME and yohimbine abolished DEX-induced inhibition, whereas indomethacin had no effect. No inhibitory effect was observed in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX-induced inhibition of vasoconstriction in human pulmonary arteries is mediated by NO production induced by the activation of endothelial α2-adrenoceptor and nitric oxide synthase.

  12. Dexmedetomidine inhibits vasoconstriction via activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Nong, Lidan; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Deng, Chunyu; Mao, Songsong; Li, Haifeng

    2016-01-01

    Despite the complex vascular effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX), its actions on human pulmonary resistance arteries remain unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEX inhibits vascular tension in human pulmonary arteries through the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediated production of nitric oxide (NO). Pulmonary artery segments were obtained from 62 patients who underwent lung resection. The direct effects of DEX on human pulmonary artery tension and changes in vascular tension were determined by isometric force measurements recorded on a myograph. Arterial contractions caused by increasing concentrations of serotonin with DEX in the presence or absence of L-NAME (endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) as antagonists were also measured. DEX had no effect on endothelium-intact pulmonary arteries, whereas at concentrations of 10–8~10–6 mol/L, it elicited contractions in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX (0.3, 1, or 3×10–9 mmol/L) inhibited serotonin-induced contraction in arteries with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME and yohimbine abolished DEX-induced inhibition, whereas indomethacin had no effect. No inhibitory effect was observed in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX-induced inhibition of vasoconstriction in human pulmonary arteries is mediated by NO production induced by the activation of endothelial α2-adrenoceptor and nitric oxide synthase. PMID:27610030

  13. Dexmedetomidine inhibits vasoconstriction via activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Nong, Lidan; Ma, Jue; Zhang, Guangyan; Deng, Chunyu; Mao, Songsong; Li, Haifeng; Cui, Jianxiu

    2016-09-01

    Despite the complex vascular effects of dexmedetomidine (DEX), its actions on human pulmonary resistance arteries remain unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that DEX inhibits vascular tension in human pulmonary arteries through the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) mediated production of nitric oxide (NO). Pulmonary artery segments were obtained from 62 patients who underwent lung resection. The direct effects of DEX on human pulmonary artery tension and changes in vascular tension were determined by isometric force measurements recorded on a myograph. Arterial contractions caused by increasing concentrations of serotonin with DEX in the presence or absence of L-NAME (endothelial nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) and indomethacin (cyclooxygenase inhibitor) as antagonists were also measured. DEX had no effect on endothelium-intact pulmonary arteries, whereas at concentrations of 10(-8)~10(-6) mol/L, it elicited contractions in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX (0.3, 1, or 3×10(-9) mmol/L) inhibited serotonin-induced contraction in arteries with intact endothelium in a dose-dependent manner. L-NAME and yohimbine abolished DEX-induced inhibition, whereas indomethacin had no effect. No inhibitory effect was observed in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries. DEX-induced inhibition of vasoconstriction in human pulmonary arteries is mediated by NO production induced by the activation of endothelial α2-adrenoceptor and nitric oxide synthase. PMID:27610030

  14. Role of alpha-1 adrenoceptor subtypes mediating constriction of the rabbit ear thermoregulatory microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Silver, W P; Koman, L A; Strandhoy, J W; Rosencrance, E; Gordon, S; Smith, T L

    2000-01-01

    An acute in vivo preparation of the microvasculature of the rabbit ear was used to evaluate the functional role of alpha1 (alpha1)-adrenoceptor subtypes in thermoregulatory microcirculation. The effect of alpha1-adrenoceptor subtype blockade on phenylephrine-induced vasoconstriction was assessed with the alpha1A, alpha1B, and alpha1D-adrenoceptor-selective antagonists 5-methyl-urapidil (10(-8) M), chloroethylclonidine (10(-5) M), and 8-[2-[4(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl]ethyl]-8-azaspirol[4.5]deca ne-7,9-dione dihydrochloride (BMY7378) (10(-6) M), respectively. The results demonstrated that pretreatment of the ear microvasculature with 5-methyl-urapidil or BMY7378 shifted the phenylephrine concentration-response curve rightward and significantly changed the log of the phenylephrine concentration, causing half-maximum stimulation (EC50) in arterioles (p < 0.05). BMY7378 shifted the phenylephrine concentration-response curve of the arteriovenous anastomoses about 100-fold rightward (p < 0.05). All three alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonists eliminated the vasoconstrictive effects of phenylephrine on venules. The results indicate that the ear microvasculature has a heterogenous distribution of alpha1-adrenoceptor subtypes. The alpha1A and alpha1D-adrenoceptor subtypes appear to have a greater influence on constrictive function in arterioles, whereas the alpha1D-adrenoceptor is the dominant constrictor of arteriovenous anastomoses. In general, the alpha1-adrenoceptor does not play a major vasoconstrictor role in venules. Chloroethylclonidine, an irreversible alpha1B-adrenoceptor antagonist, induced contractile responses in the ear microvasculature, probably due to its alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist effects. This study extended our understanding of the adrenergic receptor control mechanisms of a cutaneous thermoregulatory end organ characterized by two parallel perfusion circuits providing nutritional and thermoregulatory functions. PMID:10716292

  15. Comparison of the Effects of Dexmedetomidine and Remifentanil on Cognition State After Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Poorzamany Nejat Kermany, Mahtab; Dahi, Mastaneh; Yamini Sharif, Reyhaneh; Radpay, Badiozaman

    2016-01-01

    Background Dexmedetomidine is a potent and highly specific α2-adrenoreceptor agonist that induces sedative and analgesic effects over a short-term period. As a result of these benefits, dexmedetomidine may be a better alternative than other available drugs for keeping the patient’s cognition state in an acceptable condition after outpatient ophthalmic surgeries. Objectives This randomized study was conducted to compare the sedative effects of dexmedetomidine and remifentanil on the cognitive state of patients who have undergone cataract surgery. Patients and Methods A total of 100 patients who were candidates for cataract surgery under local anesthesia received either dexmedetomidine (50 patients; D group) or remifentanil (50 patients; R group) in a double-blind, randomized study. The baseline cardiovascular status and mini mental state examination (MMSE) score for each patient were recorded. As a loading dose, dexmedetomidine (0.5 µg/kg) and remifentanil (0.1 µg/kg) were infused at 10 minutes and 5 minutes before topical anesthesia, respectively. Subsequently, the maintenance dose was administered at 0.2 µg/kg/hour and 0.05 µg/kg/minutes in the D and R groups, respectively. The surgical procedure was begun when the bispectral index (BIS) reached 70 - 80. MMSE test was done at a postanesthetic care unit (PACU) 120 minutes after the discontinuation of the drug. Results There was no statistically significant difference between the MMSE scores of the two groups before surgery (P = 0.6), but the MMSE test conducted at the PACU revealed significantly better cognitive outcomes in the D group than in the R group in patients younger and older than 65 years (P = 0.03 and P = 0.0001, respectively). Conclusions This study revealed that dexmedetomidine may be a suitable agent for sedation in cataract surgery because it results in a more favorable postoperative cognitive status than remifentanil. Likewise, dexmedetomidine had no significant adverse effects on

  16. Effect of dexmedetomidine on diseased coronary vessel diameter and myocardial protection in percutaneous coronary interventional patients

    PubMed Central

    Kundra, Tanveer Singh; Nagaraja, P. S; Singh, Naveen G.; Dhananjaya, Manasa; Sathish, N; Manjunatha, N

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Dexmedetomidine is an alpha-2 agonist used for conscious sedation. It has also been shown to have a myocardial protective effect in off-pump coronary artery bypass patients. The aim of the study was to assess the effect of dexmedetomidine for myocardial protection in percutaneous coronary interventional patients. Methodology: A total of 60 patients (group dexmedetomidine, n = 30 and group normal saline, n = 30) were enrolled in the study. Dexmedetomidine infusion (1 mcg/kg) over 15 min was given as a loading dose after coronary angiography in group dexmedetomidine (D) while normal saline was given in the control group (C) and later maintenance infusion was started at 0.5 mcg/kg/h in both the groups. Coronary vessel diameter was noted before (T0) and after (T1) loading dose of dexmedetomidine/saline in each group. Troponin T (Trop T) values were noted at baseline (T0), 6 h (T2), 12 h (T3) and 24 h (T4) after starting the loading dose. Hemodynamic variables (heart rate [HR] and blood pressure) were monitored at T0, T1, and at regular intervals till 2 h postprocedure. Results: Coronary vessel diameter and HR significantly decreased in group D as compared to control group (P < 0.05) whereas the decrease in Trop T at 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h were not statistically significant between the two groups. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine decreases the coronary vessel diameter, but maintains the myocardial oxygen demand-supply ratio by decreasing the HR. The decrease in Trop T is statistically insignificant at the doses used. PMID:27397441

  17. Roles of β- and α2-adrenoceptors within the central nucleus of the amygdala in the visceral pain-induced aversion in rats.

    PubMed

    Deyama, Satoshi; Takishita, Azusa; Tanimoto, Sachi; Ide, Soichiro; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Satoh, Masamichi; Minami, Masabumi

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the roles of β- and α(2)-adrenoceptors within the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) in the negative affective and sensory components of visceral pain in rats. We observed a dose-dependent reduction of intraperitoneal acetic acid-induced conditioned place aversion by bilateral injections of timolol, a β-adrenoceptor antagonist, or clonidine, an α(2)-adrenoceptor agonist, without reducing writhing behaviors. These data suggest a pivotal role of intra-CeA adrenoceptors in the negative affective, but not sensory, component of visceral pain.

  18. A Role for Presynaptic alpha(sub 2)-Adrenoceptors in Angiotensin 2-Induced Drinking in Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fregly, Melvin J.; Rowland, Neil E.; Greenleaf, John E.

    1984-01-01

    Studies from this laboratory have shown that either central or peripheral administration of clonidine, the alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor agonist, can attenuate a variety of dipsogenic stimuli in rats. Further, yohimbine and tolazoline, alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor antagonists, augment the drinking response to both peripherally administered isoproterenol and angiotensin 2. Studies reported here establish a dose-inhibition relationship between the dose of clonidine administered (2 to 32 micrograms/kg) intracerebroventricularly (IVT) and inhibition of the drinking response to peripherally administered angiotensin 2 (200 micrograms/kg, SC). DI(sub 50) was approximately 4 micrograms/kg. Yohimbine (300 micrograms/kg, SC) reversed the antidipsogenic effect of centrally administered clonidine (32 micrograms/kg, IVT) on angiotensin 2-induced (200 micrograms/kg, SC) water intake. Phenylephrine, an alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor agonist, administered IVT (40 and 80 micrograms/kg) also inhibited angiotensin 2-induced drinking in a dose-related fashion. The antidipsogenic effect of phenylephfine (80 micrograms/kg) was blocked by administration of yohimbine (100 micrograms/kg, SC). Thus, this effect of phenylephrine most likely occurs by way of alpha(sub 2)- adrenoceptors. These results support a role for the pre-synaptic alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptor in the mediation of drinking in rats. Activation of alpha(sub 2)-adrenoceptors is accompanied by reduced water intake while inhibition of these receptors enhances water intake.

  19. Differences between the third cardiac beta-adrenoceptor and the colonic beta 3-adrenoceptor in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Kaumann, A. J.; Molenaar, P.

    1996-01-01

    1. The heart of several species including man contains atypical beta-adrenoceptors, in addition to coexisting beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors. We now asked the question whether or not the third cardiac beta-adrenoceptor is identical to the putative beta 3-adrenoceptor. We compared the properties of the third cardiac beta-adrenoceptor with those of beta 3-adrenoceptors in isolated tissues of the rat. To study the third cardiac beta-adrenoceptor we used spontaneously beating right atria, paced left atria and paced left ventricular papillary muscles. As a likely model for putative beta 3-adrenoceptors we studied atypical beta-adrenoceptors of the colonic longitudinal muscle precontracted with 30 mM KCl. We used beta 3-adrenoceptor-selective agonists, antagonists and non-conventional partial agonists (ie high-affinity blockers of both beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors know to exert also stimulant effects through beta 3-adrenoceptors). 2. The non-conventional partial agonist (-)-CGP 12177 caused positive chronotropic effects in right atria (pD2 = 7.3) and positive inotropic effects in left atria (pD2 = 7.5). The stimulant effects of (-)-CGP 12177 were resistant to blockade by 200 nM-2 microM (-)-propranolol and 3 microM ICI 118551 (a beta 2-selective antagonist) but antagonized by 1 microM (-)-bupranolol (pKB = 6.4-6.8), 3 microM CGP 20712A (a beta 1-selective antagonist) (pKB = 6.3-6.4) and 6.6 microM SR 59230A (a beta 3-selective antagonist, pKB = 5.1-5.4). 3. The non-conventional partial agonist cyanopindolol caused positive chronotropic effects in right atria (pD2 = 7.7) and positive inotropic effects in left atria (pD2 = 7.1). The stimulant effects of cyanopindolol were resistant to blockade by 200 nM (-)-propranolol but antagonized by 1 microM (-)-bupranolol (pKB = 6.8-7.1). 4. Neither (-)-CGP 12177 nor cyanopindolol caused stimulant effects in papillary muscles at concentrations between 0.2 nM and 20 microM. 5. In the presence of 200 nM (-)-propranolol the beta 3

  20. Evidence for beta3-adrenoceptor subtypes in relaxation of the human urinary bladder detrusor: analysis by molecular biological and pharmacological methods.

    PubMed

    Takeda, M; Obara, K; Mizusawa, T; Tomita, Y; Arai, K; Tsutsui, T; Hatano, A; Takahashi, K; Nomura, S

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to confirm the presence of beta3-adrenoceptor subtype in the relaxation of human urinary bladder detrusor tissue by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR); direct sequencing of the PCR product, in situ hybridization; and isometric contraction. Using reverse transcription-PCR, the mRNAs of three receptor subtypes (beta1, beta2, and beta3) were expressed in the human urinary bladder detrusor tissue. Direct sequencing of the PCR product of the above beta3-adrenoceptor revealed no mutation in the amplified regions. In situ hybridization with digoxygenin-labeled oligonucleotide probe revealed the presence of the mRNA of beta3-adrenoceptor subtype in the smooth muscle of the urinary bladder. The relaxant effects of isoproterenol (a nonselective beta-adrenoceptor agonist); ZD7114, BRL37344, and CGP12177A (putative selective beta3-adrenoceptor agonists); and SR59230A (a putative selective beta3-adrenoceptor antagonist) were tested using an isometric contraction technique. Isoproterenol in either the presence or absence of both atenolol (a beta1-adrenoceptor-selective antagonist) and butoxamine (a beta2-adrenoceptor-selective antagonist) revealed a relaxant effect on the carbachol-induced contraction of the human urinary bladder detrusor. Both BRL37344 and CGP12177A also revealed relaxant effects on the human urinary bladder detrusor, but ZD7114 did not elicit any relaxation. These results suggest that beta3-adrenoceptor may have some role in urine storage in the human urinary bladder. PMID:10027879

  1. Comparison of dexmedetomidine and clonidine as an adjuvant to ropivacaine for epidural anesthesia in lower abdominal and lower limb surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Arunkumar, Sruthi; Hemanth Kumar, V.R; Krishnaveni, N.; Ravishankar, M.; Jaya, Velraj; Aruloli, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The quality and duration of analgesia is improved when a local anesthetic is combined with alpha 2 adrenergic agonist. Though, the effects of clonidine on local anesthetics have been extensively studied, there are limited studies demonstrating the effects of epidural dexmedetomidine on local anesthetics. The aim of our study is to compare the effect of clonidine and dexmedetomidine when used as an adjuvant to epidural ropivacaine in lower abdominal and lower limb surgeries. Materials and Methods: Patients were randomized into two groups-group ropivacaine with clonidine (RC) received 15 ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 1 μg/kg clonidine and group ropivacaine with dexmedetomidine (RD) received 15 ml of 0.75% ropivacaine with 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine epidurally. Onset of sensory analgesia using cold swab, onset of motor blockade using Bromage scale, time to 2 dermatome regression of sensory level, time to first demand for analgesia, sedation using Ramsay sedation scale, intra operative hemodynamic parameters and complications were assessed. Results: The onset (RD-8.53 ± 1.81, RC-11.93 ± 1.96) and duration of sensory blockade (RD-316 ± 31.5, RC-281 ± 37, sedation were found to be significantly better in the dexmedetomidine group. No significant difference was found in terms of onset of motor blockade and hemodynamic changes. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine at doses of 1 μg/kg is an effective adjuvant to ropivacaine for epidural anesthesia, which is comparable to clonidine. PMID:26543457

  2. Sedative effects of dexmedetomidine, dexmedetomidine-pethidine and dexmedetomidine-butorphanol in cats.

    PubMed

    Nagore, L; Soler, C; Gil, L; Serra, I; Soler, G; Redondo, J I

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical effects of dexmedetomidine, both alone and combined with pethidine or butorphanol, in cats. A prospective randomized blind study was performed. Thirty cats were randomly assigned to three groups of 10 animals: D: dexmedetomidine (20 μg/kg IM); DP: dexmedetomidine (10 μg/kg IM) and pethidine (2.5 mg/kg IM); DB: dexmedetomidine (10 μg/kg IM) and butorphanol (0.4 mg/kg IM). Quality of sedation, analgesia, muscle relaxation and the possibility of performing some clinical procedures were compared using a multifactorial scale. Sedation, analgesia and muscle relaxation increased progressively over time and did not differ in the three protocols. The three protocols facilitated the completion of several clinical procedures. The clinical variables studied showed a similar behaviour in the three protocols and remained close to the baseline, except for a drop in heart rate in protocol D. In conclusion, dexmedetomidine, either alone or combined with pethidine or butorphanol, offers suitable sedation, analgesia and relaxation to perform various clinical procedures in cats.

  3. Potentiation of Glibenclamide Hypoglycaemia in Mice by MK-467, a Peripherally Acting Alpha2-Adrenoceptor Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Ruohonen, Suvi T; Ranta-Panula, Ville; Bastman, Sanna; Chrusciel, Paulina; Scheinin, Mika; Streng, Tomi

    2015-12-01

    Pharmacological antagonism and genetic depletion of pancreatic α2A-adrenoceptors increase insulin secretion in mice and enhance the insulinotropic action of glibenclamide, a representative of the sulphonylurea class of insulin secretagogues used in the therapy of type 2 diabetes. Antagonism of α2-adrenoceptors in the central nervous system (CNS) causes tachycardia and hypertension, making generalized α2-adrenoceptor blockade unfavourable for clinical use despite its potential to decrease blood glucose levels. The purpose of this study was to test the acute effects of the peripherally acting α2-adrenoceptor antagonist MK-467 alone and in combination with glibenclamide in non-diabetic C57BL/6N mice. Cardiovascular safety was assessed in freely moving mice with radiotelemetry. Dose-dependent decreases in blood glucose and increases in plasma insulin concentrations were seen with the combination of MK-467 and glibenclamide; the combinations were much more potent than glibenclamide or MK-467 alone. Furthermore, MK-467 had no effect on mean arterial pressure or heart rate in freely moving mice and did not prevent the centrally mediated hypotensive effect of the α2-adrenoceptor agonist medetomidine. Thus, peripheral blockade of α2-adrenoceptors does not evoke the same cardiovascular adverse effects as antagonism of CNS α2-adrenoceptors. The current results indicate that the combined use of small doses of a peripherally acting α2-adrenoceptor antagonist with a sulphonylurea drug could provide a novel option for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, especially in patients with increased tonic α2-adrenoceptor-mediated inhibition of insulin secretion.

  4. Dual aminergic regulation of central beta adrenoceptors. Effect of atypical antidepressants and 5-hydroxytryptophan

    SciTech Connect

    Manier, D.H.; Gillespie, D.D.; Sulser, F.

    1989-06-01

    Nonlinear regression analysis of agonist competition binding curves reveals that the (/sup 3/H)-dihydroalprenolol-labeled receptor population with low affinity for isoproterenol is increased by p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) and this increase is abolished by 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) in vivo. Desipramine (DMI) decreased the beta adrenoceptor population with high agonist affinity to the same degree in PCPA-treated animals as in control animals, thus explaining the reported discrepancy between beta adrenoceptor number and responsiveness of the beta adrenoceptor-coupled adenylate cyclase system. Mianserin also selectively reduced the beta adrenoceptor population with high agonist affinity in membrane preparations of normal animals, whereas fluoxetine selectively abolished the upregulation of the low affinity sites in reserpinized animals and had no effect on either receptor population from brain of normal animals. The results emphasize the importance of nonlinear regression analysis of agonist competition binding for the interpretation of drug action and encourage the pursuit of the molecular neurobiology of the serotonin (5-HT)/norepinephrine (NE) link in brain.

  5. A comparison of midazolam and dexmedetomidine for the recovery of serotonin syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Takashi; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Kaminaga, Satomi; Kadono, Takao; Yamanaka, Daiki; Iwata, Hideki; Eguchi, Satoru; Yokoyama, Masataka

    2015-08-01

    Serotonin syndrome is a drug-related toxicity caused by excess serotonin within the central nervous system. We recently encountered a case of serotonin syndrome that developed in the early postoperative period that was successfully treated with intravenous dexmedetomidine. Although the prescriptive literature has commonly recommended sedation with benzodiazepines for controlling agitation in serotonin syndrome, the effectiveness of dexmedetomidine has also been reported in several clinical conditions. In the present study, we conducted a reverse translational experiment to compare the efficacy of dexmedetomidine and midazolam, at equi-sedative doses, on serotonergic toxicity-like responses in rats. Animals were subcutaneously injected with 0.75 mg/kg 8-OH-DPAT, a full 5-HT1A agonist. 8-OH-DPAT-treated rats showed serotonin syndrome-like behaviors (low body posture, forepaw treading), hyperlocomotion, and decreased body temperature, which were completely inhibited by pretreatment with WAY 100635, a selective 5-HT1A antagonist (n = 8). Intramuscular injection of midazolam (1.0 mg/kg) or dexmedetomidine (0.01 mg/kg), which comparably induced observable signs of sedation, was tested in the present study. Concomitant treatment with midazolam significantly attenuated the hyperlocomotion, but failed to affect traditional serotonin syndrome behaviors and body temperature in 8-OH-DPAT-treated rats (n = 8). On the other hand, concomitant treatment with dexmedetomidine significantly attenuated all of these parameters (n = 8). The present case and related reverse translational experiment demonstrate that dexmedetomidine may be more beneficial for the treatment of serotonin syndrome compared to the current recommended treatment with benzodiazepines. PMID:25596946

  6. Clinical pharmacology of β3-adrenoceptors

    PubMed Central

    LIPWORTH, BRIAN J.

    1996-01-01

    1An atypical non β1/β2-adrenoceptor (AR) subtype (β3-AR) has been identified which is selectively stimulated by a group of ligands which mediate lipolytic and thermic responses in brown and white adipose tissue. 2Molecular studies have shown that β3-AR in man are mainly expressed in visceral adipocytes, and to a lesser extent in gall-bladder and colon. In vitro studies with β3-AR agonists have shown activity at other sites including skeletal muscle and myocardium. 3Regulation of β3-AR may differ from β1/β2-AR subtypes in that continuous agonist exposure does not result in receptor down-regulation. 4A polymorphism of the human β3-AR gene (Trp64Arg) has been identified which is associated with obesity, insulin resistance and an earlier onset of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Studies are required to establish whether expression of the mutant gene results in altered metabolic responses to β3-AR stimulation in man. 5There is accumulating evidence to support a therapeutic role of β3-AR agonists in NIDDM because of anti-obesity and anti-diabetic activity, as a consequence of thermogenic effects as well as increased insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance. 6Selectivity studies with BRL35135 and isoprenaline in humans have demonstrated a β3-AR mediated component to thermogenesis which is dissociated from β1/β2-mediated effects on carbohydrate and fat metabolism. Similar studies have suggested a functional β3-AR mediating cardiac but not airway responses in humans. An evaluation of β3-AR agonists in irritable bowel syndrome may be warranted in view of colonic antimotility properties in vitro. PMID:8877018

  7. Zeneca ZD7114 acts as an antagonist at beta 3-adrenoceptors in rat isolated ileum.

    PubMed Central

    Growcott, J. W.; Holloway, B.; Green, M.; Wilson, C.

    1993-01-01

    1. The relaxant effects of Zeneca ZD7114, BRL37344 (putative beta 3-adrenoceptor agonists) and various phenylethylamine-based agonists were studied in isolated ileum of the rat where tone was increased with carbachol (0.5 microM). Agonist-induced relaxation.was measured under equilibrium conditions with alpha-, beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors inhibited. 2. Relaxant responses were obtained to isoprenaline, noradrenaline, and BRL37344, although, the efficacy of this latter agent was significantly.lower than that of isoprenaline. Salbutamol caused weak relaxation (< 20%) at high concentrations (10 microM) and ZD7114 was without significant relaxant effect even at high concentrations (10 microM). 3. Relaxant responses to isoprenaline and BRL37344 were weakly antagonized by high concentrations of (+/-)-propranolol (10 and 100 microM) yielding pKB values of 5.7 with isoprenaline as the agonist and 5.5 with BRL37344 as the agonist. 4. The non-selective beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, (+/-)-alprenolol (1-100 microM) caused competitive antagonism of the relaxant responses to isoprenaline (pA2 value = 6.5). A similar pKB value was obtained when BRL37344 was used as the agonist (6.4). 5. Relaxant effects of isoprenaline and BRL37344 were also antagonized by ZD7114 (1-100 microM) yielding pA2 and pKB values of 6.3 and 6.7 respectively. 6. The low potencies of (+/-)-propranolol and (+/-)-alprenolol as antagonists of the relaxant responses to isoprenaline and BRL37344 indicate that both the agonists and antagonists employed in the current study may interact with beta 3-adrenoceptors in the rat isolated ileum.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7905770

  8. Investigation of the distribution and function of α-adrenoceptors in the sheep isolated internal anal sphincter

    PubMed Central

    Rayment, SJ; Eames, T; Simpson, JAD; Dashwood, MR; Henry, Y; Gruss, H; Acheson, AG; Scholefield, JH; Wilson, VG

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE We have investigated the distribution of α-adrenoceptors in sheep internal anal sphincter (IAS), as a model for the human tissue, and evaluated various imidazoline derivatives for potential treatment of faecal incontinence. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Saturation and competition binding with 3H-prazosin and 3H-RX821002 were used to confirm the presence and density of α-adrenoceptors in sheep IAS, and the affinity of imidazoline compounds at these receptors. A combination of in vitro receptor autoradiography and immunohistochemistry was used to investigate the regional distribution of binding sites. Contractile activity of imidazoline-based compounds on sheep IAS was assessed by isometric tension recording. KEY RESULTS Saturation binding confirmed the presence of both α1- and α2-adrenoceptors, and subsequent characterization with sub-type-selective agents, identified them as α1A- and α2D-adrenoceptor sub-types. Autoradiographic studies with 3H-prazosin showed a positive association of α1-adrenoceptors with immunohistochemically identified smooth muscle fibres. Anti-α1-adrenoceptor immunohistochemistry revealed similar distributions of the receptor in sheep and human IAS. The imidazoline compounds caused concentration-dependent contractions of the anal sphincter, but the maximum responses were less than those elicited by l-erythro-methoxamine, a standard non-imidazoline α1-adrenoceptor agonist. Prazosin (selective α1-adrenoceptor antagonist) significantly reduced the magnitude of contraction to l-erythro-methoxamine at the highest concentration used. Both prazosin and RX811059 (a selective α2-adrenoceptor antagonist) reduced the potency (pEC50) of clonidine. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS This study shows that both α1- and α2-adrenoceptors are expressed in the sheep IAS, and contribute (perhaps synergistically) to contractions elicited by various imidazoline derivatives. These agents may prove useful in the treatment of faecal incontinence

  9. A long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist increases the expression of muscarine cholinergic subtype‑3 receptors by activating the β2-adrenoceptor cyclic adenosine monophosphate signaling pathway in airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Hua; Wu, Song-Ze; Wang, Gang; Huang, Ni-Wen; Liu, Chun-Tao

    2015-06-01

    The persistent administration of β2‑adrenergic (β2AR) agonists has been demonstrated to increase the risk of severe asthma, partly due to the induction of tolerance to bronchoprotection via undefined mechanisms. The present study investigated the potential effect of the long‑acting β2‑adrenergic agonist, formoterol, on the expression of muscarinic M3 receptor (M3R) in rat airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Primary rat ASMCs were isolated and characterized following immunostaining with anti‑α‑smooth muscle actin antibodies. The protein expression levels of M3R and phospholipase C‑β1 (PLCβ1) were characterized by western blot analysis and the production of inositol 1,4,5‑trisphosphate (IP3) was determined using an enzyme‑linked immunosorbent assay. Formoterol increased the protein expression of M3R in rat ASMCs in a time‑ and dose‑dependent manner, which was significantly inhibited by the β2AR antagonist, ICI118,551 and the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) inhibitor, SQ22,536. The increased protein expression of M3R was positively correlated with increased production of PLCβ1 and IP3. Furthermore, treatment with the glucocorticoid, budesonide, and the PLC inhibitor, U73,122, significantly suppressed the formoterol‑induced upregulated protein expression levels of M3R and PLCβ1 and production of IP3. The present study demonstrated that formoterol mediated the upregulation of M3R in the rat ASMCs by activating the β2AR‑cAMP signaling pathway, resulting in increased expression levels of PLCβ1 and IP3, which are key to inducing bronchoprotection tolerance. Administration of glucocorticoids or a PLC antagonist prevented formoterol‑induced bronchoprotection tolerance by suppressing the protein expression of M3R. PMID:25672589

  10. A long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist increases the expression of muscarine cholinergic subtype-3 receptors by activating the β2-adrenoceptor cyclic adenosine monophosphate signaling pathway in airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YUAN-HUA; WU, SONG-ZE; WANG, GANG; HUANG, NI-WEN; LIU, CHUN-TAO

    2015-01-01

    The persistent administration of β2-adrenergic (β2AR) agonists has been demonstrated to increase the risk of severe asthma, partly due to the induction of tolerance to bronchoprotection via undefined mechanisms. The present study investigated the potential effect of the long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist, formoterol, on the expression of muscarinic M3 receptor (M3R) in rat airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Primary rat ASMCs were isolated and characterized following immunostaining with anti-α-smooth muscle actin antibodies. The protein expression levels of M3R and phospholipase C-β1 (PLCβ1) were characterized by western blot analysis and the production of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Formoterol increased the protein expression of M3R in rat ASMCs in a time- and dose-dependent manner, which was significantly inhibited by the β2AR antagonist, ICI118,551 and the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) inhibitor, SQ22,536. The increased protein expression of M3R was positively correlated with increased production of PLCβ1 and IP3. Furthermore, treatment with the glucocorticoid, budesonide, and the PLC inhibitor, U73,122, significantly suppressed the formoterol-induced upregulated protein expression levels of M3R and PLCβ1 and production of IP3. The present study demonstrated that formoterol mediated the upregulation of M3R in the rat ASMCs by activating the β2AR-cAMP signaling pathway, resulting in increased expression levels of PLCβ1 and IP3, which are key to inducing bronchoprotection tolerance. Administration of glucocorticoids or a PLC antagonist prevented formoterol-induced bronchoprotection tolerance by suppressing the protein expression of M3R. PMID:25672589

  11. Pharmacological evidence for the presence of functional beta(3)-adrenoceptors in rat retinal blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Mori, Asami; Miwa, Tomoyo; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether stimulation of beta(3)-adrenoceptors dilates rat retinal blood vessels and how diabetes affects the vasodilator responses. Images of ocular fundus were captured with an original high-resolution digital fundus camera in vivo. The retinal vascular responses were evaluated by measuring diameter of retinal blood vessels contained in the digital images. Both systemic blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were continuously recorded. The beta(3)-adrenoceptor agonist CL316243 (0.3-10 microg/kg/min, i.v.) increased diameter of retinal arterioles (at 10 microg/kg/min, a 31% increase) and decreased mean blood pressure (at 10 microg/kg/min, a 21% decrease) in a dose-dependent manner. CL316243 produced a small but significant increase in HR (at 10 microg/kg/min, a 9% increase). Both SR59230A (1 mg/kg, i.v.) and L-748337 (50 microg/kg, i.v.), beta(3)-adrenoceptor antagonists, significantly prevented CL316243-induced retinal vasodilator responses. Similar observations were made with another beta(3)-adrenoceptor agonist, BRL37344. The beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonist salbutamol also increased diameter of retinal arterioles (at 10 microg/kg/min, a 43% increase), whereas the drug produced greater decrease in blood pressure (at 10 microg/kg/min, a 46% decrease) and increase in HR (at 10 microg/kg/min, a 16% increase), compared with beta(3)-adrenoceptor agonists. The retinal vasodilator responses to CL316243 and BRL37344 observed under blockade of beta(1)/beta(2)-adrenoceptors with propranolol (2 mg/kg, i.v. bolus followed by 100 microg/kg/min infusion) were unaffected 2 weeks after induction of diabetes by the combination of streptozotocin treatment and D: -glucose feeding. On the other hand, the vasodilator responses to salbutamol of retinal arterioles were significantly reduced in diabetic rats. These results suggest that stimulation of beta(3)-adrenoceptors causes the vasodilation of retinal arterioles in vivo and the vasodilator responses are

  12. Dexmedetomidine as an anesthetic adjuvant in laparoscopic surgery: An observational study using entropy monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Ghodki, Poonam S; Thombre, Shalini K; Sardesai, Shalini P; Harnagle, Kalpana D

    2012-01-01

    Background: Dexmedetomidine is a highly selective α2 agonist with properties of sedation, analgesia and anxiolysis, making it an ideal anesthetic adjuvant. Using an anesthetic adjuvant that decreases requirement of anesthetics and analgesics may predispose the patient to awareness. We monitored the depth of anesthesia (DOA) using entropy to avoid unwanted awareness under anesthesia. Materials and Methods: 30 patients, American Society of Anesthesiologists grade I and II, aged between 18 to 50 years of either gender undergoing laparoscopic surgeries under general anesthesia were studied. Loading dose infusion of dexmedetomidine was started 1 mcg/kg for 15 minutes and patients were premedicated. Routine induction with propofol and fentanyl was carried out, and maintenance infusion of dexmedetomidine 0.2 mcg/kg/hr was given. Patients were monitored with standard monitoring, and in addition, the DOA was monitored with entropy. Results: A 62.5% reduction (0.75 mg/kg) in the induction dose of propofol was observed, with a 30% less end-tidal concentration of isoflurane requirement for maintenance of anesthesia, while maintaining the adequate DOA. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine is an effective anesthetic adjuvant that can be safely used in laparoscopy without the fear of awareness under anesthesia. PMID:22869940

  13. Zeneca ZD7114 acts as an antagonist at beta 3-adrenoceptors in rat isolated ileum.

    PubMed

    Growcott, J W; Holloway, B; Green, M; Wilson, C

    1993-12-01

    1. The relaxant effects of Zeneca ZD7114, BRL37344 (putative beta 3-adrenoceptor agonists) and various phenylethylamine-based agonists were studied in isolated ileum of the rat where tone was increased with carbachol (0.5 microM). Agonist-induced relaxation.was measured under equilibrium conditions with alpha-, beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors inhibited. 2. Relaxant responses were obtained to isoprenaline, noradrenaline, and BRL37344, although, the efficacy of this latter agent was significantly.lower than that of isoprenaline. Salbutamol caused weak relaxation (< 20%) at high concentrations (10 microM) and ZD7114 was without significant relaxant effect even at high concentrations (10 microM). 3. Relaxant responses to isoprenaline and BRL37344 were weakly antagonized by high concentrations of (+/-)-propranolol (10 and 100 microM) yielding pKB values of 5.7 with isoprenaline as the agonist and 5.5 with BRL37344 as the agonist. 4. The non-selective beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, (+/-)-alprenolol (1-100 microM) caused competitive antagonism of the relaxant responses to isoprenaline (pA2 value = 6.5). A similar pKB value was obtained when BRL37344 was used as the agonist (6.4). 5. Relaxant effects of isoprenaline and BRL37344 were also antagonized by ZD7114 (1-100 microM) yielding pA2 and pKB values of 6.3 and 6.7 respectively. 6. The low potencies of (+/-)-propranolol and (+/-)-alprenolol as antagonists of the relaxant responses to isoprenaline and BRL37344 indicate that both the agonists and antagonists employed in the current study may interact with beta 3-adrenoceptors in the rat isolated ileum. Contrary to the previous findings in guinea-pig ileum, where BRL37344 and ZD7114 were full agonists, in the current study, BRL37344 was a partial agonist and ZD7114 an antagonist at the beta 3-adrenoceptor in rat ileum. PMID:7905770

  14. Modulation of nerve-evoked contractions by β3-adrenoceptor agonism in human and rat isolated urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Rouget, Céline; Rekik, Moèz; Camparo, Philippe; Botto, Henry; Rischmann, Pascal; Lluel, Philippe; Palea, Stefano; Westfall, Timothy D

    2014-02-01

    Activation of β3-adrenoceptors has been shown to have a direct relaxant effect on urinary bladder smooth muscle from both rats and humans, however there are very few studies investigating the effects of β3-adrenoceptor agonists on nerve-evoked bladder contractions. Therefore in the current study, the role of β3-adrenoceptors in modulating efferent neurotransmission was evaluated. The effects of β3-adrenoceptor agonism on neurogenic contractions induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were compared with effects on contractions induced by exogenous acetylcholine (Ach) and αβ-methylene adenosine triphosphate (αβ-meATP) in order to determine the site of action. Isoproterenol inhibited EFS-induced neurogenic contractions of human bladder (pD2=6.79; Emax=65%). The effect of isoproterenol was selectively inhibited by the β3-adrenoceptor antagonist L-748,337 (pKB=7.34). Contractions induced by exogenous Ach (0.5-1μM) were inhibited 25% by isoproterenol (3μM) while contractions to 10Hz in the same strip were inhibited 67%. The selective β3-adrenoceptor agonist CL-316,243 inhibited EFS-induced neurogenic contractions of rat bladder (pD2=7.83; Emax=65%). The effects of CL-316,243 were inhibited in a concentration dependent manner by L-748,337 (pA2=6.42). Contractions induced by exogenous Ach and αβ-meATP were significantly inhibited by CL-316,243, 29% and 40%, respectively. These results demonstrate that the activation of β3-adrenoceptors inhibits neurogenic contractions of both rat and human urinary bladder. Contractions induced by exogenously applied parasympathetic neurotransmitters are also inhibited by β3-agonism however the effect is clearly less than on neurogenic contractions (particularly in human), suggesting that in addition to a direct effect on smooth muscle, activation of prejunctional β3-adrenoceptors may inhibit neurotransmitter release.

  15. Beta-adrenoceptor dysfunction after inhibition of NO synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, E. J.; Johnson, A. K.; Lewis, S. J.

    2000-01-01

    G(s) protein-coupled beta-adrenoceptors rapidly desensitize on exposure to agonists in reconstituted membrane preparations, whereas rapid tachyphylaxis to beta-adrenoceptor-mediated vasodilation does not readily occur in vivo. This study examined the possibility that endothelium-derived nitrosyl factors prevent the rapid desensitization of beta-adrenoceptors in the vascular smooth muscle of resistance arteries in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. The fall in mean arterial blood pressure and in hindquarter vascular resistance produced by the beta-adrenoceptor agonist isoproterenol (ISO, 0.1 to 10 microg/kg IV) was slightly but significantly smaller in rats treated with the NO synthase inhibitor N:(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, 100 micromol/kg IV) than in saline-treated rats. The ISO-induced fall in mesenteric resistance was similar in L-NAME-treated and in saline-treated rats. The fall in hindquarter vascular resistance and in mesenteric resistance produced by ISO (8 x 10 microg/kg IV) was subject to tachyphylaxis on repeated injection in rats treated with L-NAME (100 micromol/kg IV) but not in rats treated with saline. Injections of L-S:-nitrosocysteine (1200 nmol/kg IV), a lipophobic S:-nitrosothiol, before each injection of ISO (10 microg/kg IV) prevented tachyphylaxis to ISO in L-NAME-treated rats. The vasodilator effects of ISO (0.1 to 10 microg/kg IV) in L-NAME-treated rats that received 8 injections of ISO (10 microg/kg IV) were markedly smaller than in L-NAME-treated rats that received 8 injections of saline. These results indicate that (1) the vasodilator actions of ISO in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats only minimally involve the release of endothelium-derived nitrosyl factors, (2) the effects of ISO are subject to development of tachyphylaxis in L-NAME-treated rats, and (3) tachyphylaxis to ISO is prevented by L-S:-nitrosocysteine. These findings suggest that endothelium-derived nitrosyl factors may prevent desensitization of beta-adrenoceptors

  16. Alpha2 adrenoceptors regulate proliferation of human intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Schaak, S; Cussac, D; Cayla, C; Devedjian, J; Guyot, R; Paris, H; Denis, C

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS—Previous studies on rodents have suggested that catecholamines stimulate proliferation of the intestinal epithelium through activation of α2 adrenoceptors located on crypt cells. The occurrence of this effect awaits demonstration in humans and the molecular mechanisms involved have not yet been elucidated. Here, we examined the effect of α2 agonists on a clone of Caco2 cells expressing the human α2A adrenoceptor.
METHODS—Cells were transfected with a bicistronic plasmid containing the α2C10 and neomycin phosphotransferase genes. G418 resistant clones were assayed for receptor expression using radioligand binding. Receptor functionality was assessed by testing its ability to couple Gi proteins and to inhibit cAMP production. Mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation was followed by western blot, and cell proliferation was estimated by measuring protein and DNA content.
RESULTS—Permanent transfection of Caco2 cells allowed us to obtain a clone (Caco2-3B) expressing α2A adrenoceptors at a density similar to that found in normal human intestinal epithelium. Caco2-3B retained morphological features and brush border enzyme expression characteristic of enterocytic differentiation. The receptor was coupled to Gi2/Gi3 proteins and its stimulation caused marked diminution of forskolin induced cAMP production. Treatment of Caco2-3B with UK14304 (α2 agonist) induced a rapid increase in the phosphorylation state of MAPK, extracellular regulated protein kinase 1 (Erk1), and 2 (Erk2). This event was totally abolished in pertussis toxin treated cells and in the presence of kinase inhibitors (genistein or PD98059). It was unaffected by protein kinase C downregulation but correlated with a transient increase in Shc tyrosine phosphorylation. Finally, sustained exposure of Caco2-3B to UK14304 resulted in modest but significant acceleration of cell proliferation. None of these effects was observed in the parental cell line Caco2.

  17. Analysis of agonist dissociation constants as assessed by functional antagonism in guinea pig left atria

    SciTech Connect

    Molenaar, P.; Malta, E.

    1986-04-01

    In electrically driven guinea pig left atria, positive inotropic responses to (-)-isoprenaline and the selective beta 1-adrenoceptor agonist RO363 were obtained in the absence and in the presence of the functional antagonists adenosine, carbachol, gallopamil, nifedipine, and Ro 03-7894. Each of the functional antagonists reduced the maximum response to both agonists and produced nonparallel rightward shifts in the cumulative concentration effect curves. For both agonists, dissociation constants (KA) were calculated using the equation described by Furchgott (1966) for irreversible antagonism. For RO363, which is a partial agonist with high agonist activity, the equations outlined for functional interaction by Mackay (1981) were also employed to calculate KA values. The KA values obtained by each method were compared with the dissociation constants (KD) for the two agonists determined from their ability to displace the radioligand (-)-(/sup 125/I)iodocyanopindolol from beta 1-adrenoceptors in guinea pig left atrial membrane preparations. The estimates of KA varied substantially from KD values. The KD values were taken as more accurate estimates of the true values for the dissociation constants because a high degree of correlation exists between pKD and pD2 values for a number of other beta-adrenoceptor agonists that behave as partial agonists and between pKD and pKB values for a number of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists. Thus, it appears that there are serious limitations in the current theory for using functional antagonism as a means of obtaining agonist dissociation constants.

  18. Pharmacological study of atypical beta-adrenoceptors in rat esophageal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Lezama, E J; Konkar, A A; Salazar-Bookaman, M M; Miller, D D; Feller, D R

    1996-07-11

    The chemical specificity for the beta-adrenoceptor mediated relaxation of rat esophageal smooth muscle was evaluated using selective and non-selective beta-adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists. Pindolol, ICI 89,406, ICI 118551 [erythro-1-(7-methylindan-4-yloxy)-3-(isopropylamine)-but an-2-ol] and the beta-adrenoceptor alkylating agent, pindobind, produced only small rightward shifts in the concentration-response curves of (-)-isoprenaline and (-)-trimetoquinol in this preparation. Rank order potency (pD2 values) of agonists was: (+/-)-trimetoquinol [1-(3',4',5'-trimethoxybenzyl)-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3, 4-tetrahydroisoquinoline] (8.34) = (-)-trimetoquinol (8.26) = BRL 37344 [(R* R*)-(+/-)-4-[2'-2-hydroxy 2-(3-chlorophenyl)ethylamino]propyl] phenoxyacetic acid] (8.16) = ICID7114 [(S)-4-(2-hydroxy- 3-phenoxy-propylamino-ethoxy)-N-(2-methoxyethyl) phenoxyacetamide] (8.03) > or = (-)-isoprenaline (7.82) > 3',5'-diiodotrimetoquinol [1-(3',5'-diiodo-4'-methoxybenzyl)-6, 7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline] (7.28) > 3'-iodotrimetoquinol [1-(3'-iodo-4',5'-dimethoxybenzyl)-6, 7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline] (7.04) > ractopamine (6.84) = 5,8-difluorotrimetoquinol [5,8-difluoro-6,7-dihydroxy-1- (3',4',5'-trimethoxybenzyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline] (6.82) > 8-fluorotrimetoquinol [6,7-dihydroxy-8-fluoro-1-(3',4',5'- trimethoxybenzyl)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline] (6.56) > or = (-)-noradrenaline (6.46) > or = (-)-adrenaline (6.36) > (+/-)-noradrenaline (6.24) > (+/-)-adrenaline (6.00) > clenbuterol (5.83) > (-)-1-benzyl-6, 7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (5.75). Isomeric activity ratios of trimetoquinol isomers [(-)-(S)- > > (+)-(R)-] in esophageal smooth muscle in the presence and absence of 1 microM pindolol were 1995- and 2951-fold, respectively; and were much greater than those in rat atria (282-fold) and rat trachea (107-fold). The atypical beta/beta 3-adrenoceptor partial agonist, ICI D7114, produced concentration-dependent rightward

  19. Effect of dexmedetomidine bolus dose on isoflurane consumption in surgical patients under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Muniyappa, Reshma B.; Rajappa, Geetha C.; Govindswamy, Suresh; Thamanna, Prathima P.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Various adjuvants have been introduced to decrease the dose of volatile agents and their side effects. Dexmedetomidine a potent alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonist is one such agent. Our objective is to assess the effect of preanesthetic dexmedetomidine on isoflurane consumption and its effect on intraoperative hemodynamic stability and recovery profile. Setting and Design: This prospective, randomized controlled, double-blind study was done in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients were randomly allocated into two groups. Group 1 received saline infusion and Group 2 received dexmedetomidine infusion in a dose of 1 μg/kg over 10 min given 15 min before induction. Vital parameters and bispectral index (BIS) values were noted throughout the surgery. Patients were induced and intubated as per the standard protocol and maintained with N2O: O2 = 1:1 mixture at 2 L/min and isoflurane concentration adjusted to achieve BIS values of 45–60. Demographic profile, hemodynamic variables, total isoflurane consumption, and recovery profile data were collected. Statistics: Independent t-test and Mann–Whitney U-test were used to compare the average anesthetic consumption, hemodynamics, and recovery profile between two groups. Results: End-tidal concentration and total isoflurane consumption in Group 2 were 0.56 ± 0.11 and 10.69 ± 3.01 mL, respectively, with P < 0.001 which was statistically significant compared to Group 1 which were 0.76 ± 0.14 and 13.76 ± 3.84 mL. Postintubation and intraoperative mean arterial pressure values were significantly lower in dexmedetomidine group with P < 0.001. Conclusion: Preanesthetic bolus dose of dexmedetomidine is a useful adjuvant to reduce isoflurane consumption. PMID:27746567

  20. Comparison of the antagonistic activity of tamsulosin and doxazosin at vascular alpha 1-adrenoceptors in humans.

    PubMed

    Harada, K; Ohmori, M; Fujimura, A

    1996-11-01

    alpha 1-Adrenoceptor blockers such as prazosin and doxazosin are used to treat hypertension as well as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), whereas the new alpha 1-adrenoceptor blocker tamsulosin is used only for BPH and does not reduce blood pressure at the doses used to relax prostatic smooth muscle. In contrast to prazosin, tamsulosin has a higher affinity for prostatic than vascular alpha 1-adrenoceptors in vitro. The functional correlate of this observation in humans is the subject of this study. The alpha 1-adrenoceptor blockade by oral tamsulosin (0.2 mg), doxazosin (1 mg) or placebo on finger tip vascular and dorsal hand venous alpha 1-adrenoceptors stimulated by cold treatment (immersion in ice water) and the alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine, was thus studied in a 3-way crossover study in eight, healthy, male adults. Finger tip vasoconstriction after cold stimulation was assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry. A linear variable differential transformer was used to assess the drug effect on phenylephrine-induced venoconstriction. All study parameters were assessed at around 2 and 3.5 h after oral intake of doxazosin and tamsulosin respectively. The drug plasma levels were not significantly different. No significant differences were found for blood pressure or heart rate in the three treatments in supine and erect position. The reduction in finger tip blood flow after cold stimulation was significantly smaller after doxazosin treatment (P < 0.01) than after tamsulosin or placebo, whereas there was no significant difference between tamsulosin and placebo treatments. The infusion rate of phenylephrine producing a half-maximum venoconstriction was significantly larger after doxazosin than after tamsulosin (P < 0.05) or placebo (P < 0.01), whereas there was again no significant difference between tamsulosin and placebo treatments. The data suggest that, at doses producing equal plasma levels after single oral doses in human subjects, the blocking activity

  1. Dexmedetomidine as an Anesthetic Adjuvant in Cardiac Surgery: a Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Brandão, Paulo Gabriel Melo; Lobo, Francisco Ricardo; Ramin, Serginando Laudenir; Sakr, Yasser; Machado, Mauricio Nassau; Lobo, Suzana Margareth

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: α-2-agonists cause sympathetic inhibition combined with parasympathetic activation and have other properties that could be beneficial during cardiac anesthesia. We evaluated the effects of dexmedetomidine as an anesthetic adjuvant compared to a control group during cardiac surgery. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from all adult patients (> 18 years old) undergoing cardiac surgery. Patients were divided into two groups, regarding the use of dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant intraoperatively (DEX group) and a control group who did not receive α-2-agonist (CON group). RESULTS: A total of 1302 patients who underwent cardiac surgery, either coronary artery bypass graft or valve surgery, were included; 796 in the DEX group and 506 in the CON group. Need for reoperation (2% vs. 2.8%, P=0.001), type 1 neurological injury (2% vs. 4.7%, P=0.005) and prolonged hospitalization (3.1% vs. 7.3%, P=0.001) were significantly less frequent in the DEX group than in the CON group. Thirty-day mortality rates were 3.4% in the DEX group and 9.7% in the CON group (P<0.001). Using multivariable Cox regression analysis with in hospital death as the dependent variable, dexmedetomidine was independently associated with a lower risk of 30-day mortality (odds ratio [OR]=0.39, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.24-0.65, P≤0.001). The Logistic EuroSCORE (OR=1.05, 95% CI: 1.02-1.10, P=0.004) and age (OR=1.03, 95% CI: 1.01-1.06, P=0.003) were independently associated with a higher risk of 30-day mortality. CONCLUSION: Dexmedetomidine used as an anesthetic adjuvant was associated with better outcomes in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft and valve surgery. Randomized prospective controlled trials are warranted to confirm our results. PMID:27737403

  2. β2-agonist therapy in lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Mario; Page, Clive P; Rogliani, Paola; Matera, M Gabriella

    2013-04-01

    β2-Agonists are effective bronchodilators due primarily to their ability to relax airway smooth muscle (ASM). They exert their effects via their binding to the active site of β2-adrenoceptors on ASM, which triggers a signaling cascade that results in a number of events, all of which contribute to relaxation of ASM. There are some differences between β2-agonists. Traditional inhaled short-acting β2-agonists albuterol, fenoterol, and terbutaline provide rapid as-needed symptom relief and short-term prophylactic protection against bronchoconstriction induced by exercise or other stimuli. The twice-daily β2-agonists formoterol and salmeterol represent important advances. Their effective bronchodilating properties and long-term improvement in lung function offer considerable clinical benefits to patients. More recently, a newer β2-agonist (indacaterol) with a longer pharmacodynamic half-life has been discovered, with the hopes of achieving once-daily dosing. In general, β2-agonists have an acceptable safety profile, although there is still controversy as to whether long-acting β2-agonists may increase the risk of asthma mortality. In any case, they can induce adverse effects, such as increased heart rate, palpitations, transient decrease in PaO2, and tremor. Desensitization of β2-adrenoceptors that occurs during the first few days of regular use of β2-agonist treatment may account for the commonly observed resolution of the majority of these adverse events after the first few doses. Nevertheless, it can also induce tolerance to bronchoprotective effects of β2-agonists and has the potential to reduce bronchodilator sensitivity to them. Some novel once-daily β2-agonists (olodaterol, vilanterol, abediterol) are under development, mainly in combination with an inhaled corticosteroid or a long-acting antimuscarinic agent. PMID:23348973

  3. Perioperative Use of Dexmedetomidine is Associated with Decreased Incidence of Ventricular and Supraventricular Tachyarrhythmias after Congenital Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chrysostomou, Constantinos; Sanchez-de-Toledo, Joan; Wearden, Peter; Jooste, Edmund H; Lichtenstein, Steven E; Callahan, Patrick M; Suresh, Tunga; O’Malley, Elizabeth; Shiderly, Dana; Haney, Jamie; Yoshida, Masahiro; Orr, Richard; Munoz, Ricardo; Morell, Victor O

    2012-01-01

    Background Postoperative tachyarrhythmias remain a common complication after congenital cardiac surgery. A recent case-series has shown that dexmedetomidine, an alpha-2 adrenoreceptor agonist can have a therapeutic role in supraventricular tachyarrhythmias for either cardioversion to sinus rhythm or heart rate control. The present study was performed to determine if routine perioperative use of dexmedetomidine can decrease the incidence of supraventricular and ventricular tachyarrhythmias. Methods Prospective cohort study of pediatric patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgery. Thirty-two patients who were initiated on dexmedetomidine infusion (DEX-group) before surgery were compared with 20 patients who did not receive dexmedetomidine (control-group). Results Dexmedetomidine was started after anesthesia induction and continued through surgery and postoperative period for 38±4 hours at a mean dose of 0.76 ±0.04 mcg/kg/hr. Ten patients in control-group and 2 in DEX-group (p=0.001) had a total of 16 episodes of tachyarrhythmias. The incidence of ventricular tachycardia was 25% vs.0% (p=0.01) and of supraventricular arrhythmias 25% vs. 6% (p=0.05) in the control and DEX-group respectively. Two patients in the control-group and 1 in the Dex-group had transient complete heart block. Control-group had a higher heart rate 141 ± 5 vs.127 ±3 bpm (p=0.03), more sinus tachycardia episodes 40% vs. 6% (p=0.008), required more antihypertensives with nitroprusside 20 ± 7 vs.4 ± 1 mcg/kg (p=0.004) and nicardipine 13 ± 5 vs.2 ± 1 mcg/kg (p=0.02) and required more fentanyl 39 ± 8 vs.19 ± 3 mcg/kg (p=0.005). Conclusions Perioperative use of dexmedetomidine is associated with significantly decreased incidence of ventricular and supraventricular tachyarrhythmias without significant adverse effects. PMID:21871284

  4. Atypical cardiostimulant β-adrenoceptor in the rat heart: stereoselective antagonism by bupranolol but lack of effect by some bupranolol analogues

    PubMed Central

    Malinowska, Barbara; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna; Flau, Karsten; Godlewski, Grzegorz; Kozłowska, Hanna; Kathmann, Markus; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2003-01-01

    Atypical β-adrenoceptors resistant to propranolol, but blocked by bupranolol, increase contractile force and/or frequency of the heart in humans and rats. We compared the potencies of the enantiomers of bupranolol and examined the possible effects of seven bupranolol analogues including bevantolol (BEV) at this receptor in pithed and vagotomized rats.CGP 12177, an agonist of the atypical β-adrenoceptor, increased heart rate dose-dependently. Its dose–response curve was shifted to the right by S-(−)-bupranolol 10 μmol kg−1 by a factor of 8.4, but not affected by the same dose of R-(+)-bupranolol.Desmethylbupranolol and compounds BK-21, BK-22, BK-23 and BK-25 also increased heart rate dose-dependently. The β1-adrenoceptor antagonist CGP 20712 given in combination with the β2-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI 118,551 (0.1 μmol kg−1 each) reduced the positive chronotropic action of the five bupranolol analogues without affecting that of CGP 12177. The potencies of the bupranolol analogues to increase heart rate were correlated (r=0.91, P<0.05) with their affinities for β1-adrenoceptor binding sites in rat brain cortex membranes labelled with [3H]CGP 12177 (in the presence of ICI 118,551).BK-26 and BEV, 10 μmol kg−1 each, had only minor effects on heart rate by themselves and did not antagonize the effect of CGP 12177. However, at 1 μmol kg−1, they antagonized the increase in heart rate elicited by the β1-adrenoceptor agonist prenalterol.In conclusion, bupranolol is a stereoselective antagonist at the atypical cardiostimulant β-adrenoceptor. The effects of the bupranolol analogues are related to the activation or blockade of β1-adrenoceptors, but not of atypical β-adrenoceptors. PMID:12922943

  5. Atypical cardiostimulant beta-adrenoceptor in the rat heart: stereoselective antagonism by bupranolol but lack of effect by some bupranolol analogues.

    PubMed

    Malinowska, Barbara; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna; Flau, Karsten; Godlewski, Grzegorz; Kozłowska, Hanna; Kathmann, Markus; Schlicker, Eberhard

    2003-08-01

    1. Atypical beta-adrenoceptors resistant to propranolol, but blocked by bupranolol, increase contractile force and/or frequency of the heart in humans and rats. We compared the potencies of the enantiomers of bupranolol and examined the possible effects of seven bupranolol analogues including bevantolol (BEV) at this receptor in pithed and vagotomized rats. 2. CGP 12177, an agonist of the atypical beta-adrenoceptor, increased heart rate dose-dependently. Its dose-response curve was shifted to the right by S-(-)-bupranolol 10 micro mol kg(-1) by a factor of 8.4, but not affected by the same dose of R-(+)-bupranolol. 3. Desmethylbupranolol and compounds BK-21, BK-22, BK-23 and BK-25 also increased heart rate dose-dependently. The beta(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist CGP 20712 given in combination with the beta(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist ICI 118,551 (0.1 micro mol kg(-1) each) reduced the positive chronotropic action of the five bupranolol analogues without affecting that of CGP 12177. The potencies of the bupranolol analogues to increase heart rate were correlated (r=0.91, P<0.05) with their affinities for beta(1)-adrenoceptor binding sites in rat brain cortex membranes labelled with [(3)H]CGP 12177 (in the presence of ICI 118,551). 4. BK-26 and BEV, 10 micro mol kg(-1) each, had only minor effects on heart rate by themselves and did not antagonize the effect of CGP 12177. However, at 1 micro mol kg(-1), they antagonized the increase in heart rate elicited by the beta(1)-adrenoceptor agonist prenalterol. 5. In conclusion, bupranolol is a stereoselective antagonist at the atypical cardiostimulant beta-adrenoceptor. The effects of the bupranolol analogues are related to the activation or blockade of beta(1)-adrenoceptors, but not of atypical beta-adrenoceptors.

  6. PDE2 activity differs in right and left rat ventricular myocardium and differentially regulates β2 adrenoceptor-mediated effects

    PubMed Central

    Soler, Fernando; Fernández-Belda, Francisco; Pérez-Schindler, Joaquín; Handschin, Christoph; Fuente, Teodomiro

    2015-01-01

    The important regulator of cardiac function, cAMP, is hydrolyzed by different cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs), whose expression and activity are not uniform throughout the heart. Of these enzymes, PDE2 shapes β1 adrenoceptor-dependent cardiac cAMP signaling, both in the right and left ventricular myocardium, but its role in regulating β2 adrenoceptor-mediated responses is less well known. Our aim was to investigate possible differences in PDE2 transcription and activity between right (RV) and left (LV) rat ventricular myocardium, as well as its role in regulating β2 adrenoceptor effects. The free walls of the RV and the LV were obtained from Sprague–Dawley rat hearts. Relative mRNA for PDE2 (quantified by qPCR) and PDE2 activity (evaluated by a colorimetric procedure and using the PDE2 inhibitor EHNA) were determined in RV and LV. Also, β2 adrenoceptor-mediated effects (β2-adrenoceptor agonist salbutamol + β1 adrenoceptor antagonist CGP-20712A) on contractility and cAMP concentrations, in the absence or presence of EHNA, were studied in the RV and LV. PDE2 transcript levels were less abundant in RV than in LV and the contribution of PDE2 to the total PDE activity was around 25% lower in the microsomal fraction of the RV compared with the LV. β2 adrenoceptor activation increased inotropy and cAMP levels in the LV when measured in the presence of EHNA, but no such effects were observed in the RV, either in the presence or absence of EHNA. These results indicate interventricular differences in PDE2 transcript and activity levels, which may distinctly regulate β2 adrenoceptor-mediated contractility and cAMP concentrations in the RV and in the LV of the rat heart. PMID:25432985

  7. Postsynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors, calcium mobilization and (/sup 3/H), 4-dihydropyridine binding in vascular smooth muscle of rat tail artery

    SciTech Connect

    Su, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    Pharmacologic characterization of post-synaptic ..cap alpha..-adrenoceptors in rat tail artery was examined by using selective agonists and antagonists. In this tissue, the ..cap alpha..-adrenoceptor agonists employed all produced concentration-dependent mechanical responses with rank order of potency, clonidine > norepinephrine > norepinephrine > phenylephrine > UK > 14304 > B-HT 920. This order of agonists activities not consistent with a simple classification into ..cap alpha../sub 1/- and ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptors in the rat tail artery. Antagonism by prazosin and yohimbine of phenylephrine, norepinephrine and clonidine responses did not reveal the anticipated discrimination between ..cap alpha../sub 1/- and ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptors. Potassium depolarization-induced responses were very sensitive to antagonism by the Ca/sup 2 +/ antagonists nifedipine and D 600. The sensitivity sequence of ..cap alpha..-adrenoceptor agonist induced responses to nifedipine and D 600 is H-HT 920 (> clonidine) > phenylephrine > norepinephrine. This disagrees with the thesis that ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptor mediated responses in vascular smooth muscle are more sensitive than are ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenoceptor mediated responses to Ca/sup 2 +/ channel antagonists. Radioligand binding studies of (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine and (/sup 3/H)Bay K 8644 to microsomal preparations of tail artery membrane a single set of high affinity binding sites and there is a good correlation between the pharmacological potencies and binding affinities of these agents. In addition, study of the displacement of (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine by Bay K 8644 revealed IC/sub 50/ and K/sub l/ values which are in approximate accord with those determined for pharmacologic experiments.

  8. Pindolol--the pharmacology of a partial agonist.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, B J; Menninger, K; Bertholet, A

    1982-01-01

    1 Pindolol is a non-selective beta-adrenoceptor blocking agent; its affinity to adrenoceptors in guinea pig atria (beta 1) is not significantly different from that in guinea pig trachea (beta 1 + beta 2) and canine vascular smooth muscle (beta 2). 2 Pindolol displays a striking diversity of agonist activities in isolated tissues. Stimulant effects correspond to 40--50% of the maximum effects of isoprenaline in isolated kitten atria and guinea pig trachea and to only 10% in guinea pig atria. Effects in canine isolated mesenteric vessels are those of a full agonist, maximum responses equaling those of isoprenaline. These findings suggest that the stimulant effects of pindolol are exerted principally on beta 2-adrenoceptors. 3 Cardiac stimulation produced by pindolol in the dog is sufficient to compensate for the cardiac depression resulting from blockade of beta-adrenoceptors in the heart. Reductions in cardiac output and compensatory increases in total peripheral resistance do not occur or are much smaller than those produced by beta-adrenoceptor blocking agents lacking sympathomimetic activity. 4 Pindolol-induced relaxation of bronchial smooth muscle prevents or minimizes the bronchoconstrictor effects of injected spasmogens in the cat. 5 Pindolol has marked vasodilator activity, small doses reducing femoral and mesenteric vascular resistance by approximately 30%. Doses comparable to those used in hypertensive patients lower blood pressure by 20 mmHg in non-anaesthetized dogs. PMID:7049208

  9. Effect of intravenous dexmedetomidine on spinal anaesthesia with 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine in lower abdominal surgeries: A prospective randomized control study

    PubMed Central

    Santpur, Madhavi Unmesh; Kahalekar, Govind Marutrao; Saraf, Nowreen; Losari, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    Background: Regional anesthesia is the preferred technique for most of lower abdominal and lower limb surgeries. For decades, lignocaine had been the local anesthetic of choice for spinal anesthesia. Recent studies show that intravenous clonidine and dexmedetomidine can prolong the duration of the spinal anesthesia. Dexmedetomidine is a more suitable adjuvant compared to clonidine due to its more selective α2A receptor agonist activity. Aim: The study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of intravenous administration of dexmedetomidine on spinal anesthesia with 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine in lower abdominal surgeries. Study Design: Prospective randomized, double-blind control study. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients of American Society of Anaesthesiologists Grades I and II, 20–60 years age, undergoing lower abdominal surgeries under spinal anesthesia were randomized into two groups by computer-generated table. Group 1: Bupivacaine and dexmedetomidine group; and Group 2: Bupivacaine and saline group. Spinal anesthesia was given with 15 mg of 0.5% bupivacaine. Patients in Group 1 received dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg over 20 min followed by 0.5 μg/kg/h, intravenously till the end of surgery. Patients in Group 2 received normal saline. Observations were analyzed using Student's unpaired t-test. Results: The mean duration of analgesia in group 1 was 219.7 ± 2.55 minutes and in group 2 was 150.2 ± 5.7 minutes. The prolongation in duration of analgesia in dexmedetomidine group was statistically significant. The mean durations of motor blockade in Group 1 and Group 2 were 189.6 ± 2.14 and 158.2 ± 5.31 min, respectively. Conclusion: Intravenous dexmedetomidine is useful to maintain hemodynamic stability and prolong spinal analgesia. PMID:27746540

  10. Adrenergic Inhibition with Dexmedetomidine to Treat Stress Cardiomyopathy during Alcohol Withdrawal: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Zachary M.; Alonso, Alvaro; Kennedy, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Stress (Takotsubo) cardiomyopathy is a form of reversible left ventricular dysfunction with a heightened risk of ventricular arrhythmia thought to be caused by high circulating catecholamines. We report a case of stress cardiomyopathy that developed during severe alcohol withdrawal successfully treated with dexmedetomidine. The case involves a 53-year-old man with a significant history of alcohol abuse who presented to a teaching hospital with new-onset seizures. His symptoms of acute alcohol withdrawal were initially treated with benzodiazepines, but the patient later developed hypotension, and stress cardiomyopathy was suspected based on ECG and echocardiographic findings. Adjunctive treatment with the alpha-2-adrenergic agonist, dexmedetomidine, was initiated to curtail excessive sympathetic outflow of the withdrawal syndrome, thereby targeting the presumed pathophysiology of the cardiomyopathy. Significant clinical improvement was observed within one day of initiation of dexmedetomidine. These findings are consistent with other reports suggesting that sympathetic dysregulation during alcohol withdrawal produces ideal pathobiology for stress cardiomyopathy and leads to ventricular arrhythmogenicity. Stress cardiomyopathy should be recognized as a complication of alcohol withdrawal that significantly increases cardiac-related mortality. By helping to correct autonomic dysregulation of the withdrawal syndrome, dexmedetomidine may be useful in the treatment of stress-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:27006838

  11. Comparison of dexmedetomidine/fentanyl with midazolam/fentanyl combination for sedation and analgesia during tooth extraction.

    PubMed

    Yu, C; Li, S; Deng, F; Yao, Y; Qian, L

    2014-09-01

    Dexmedetomidine is an α2-adrenergic receptor agonist that causes minimal respiratory depression compared with alternative drugs. This study investigated whether combined dexmedetomidine/fentanyl offered better sedation and analgesia than midazolam/fentanyl in dental surgery. Sixty patients scheduled for unilateral impacted tooth extraction were randomly assigned to receive either dexmedetomidine and fentanyl (D/F) or midazolam and fentanyl (M/F). Recorded variables were patient preoperative anxiety scores, vital signs, visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores, Observer's Assessment of Alertness/Sedation Scale (OAAS) scores after drug administration, surgeon and patient degree of satisfaction, and the duration of analgesia after surgery. The OAAS scores were significantly lower for patients administered D/F compared to those who received M/F. The duration of analgesia after the surgical procedure was significantly longer in patients who received D/F (5.3 h) than in those who received M/F (4.1 h; P=0.017). The number of surgeons satisfied with the level of sedation/analgesia provided by D/F was significantly higher than for M/F (P=0.001). Therefore, dexmedetomidine/fentanyl appears to provide better sedation, stable haemodynamics, surgeon satisfaction, and postoperative analgesia than midazolam/fentanyl during office-based unilateral impacted tooth extraction.

  12. Intravenous Dexmedetomidine Provides Superior Patient Comfort and Tolerance Compared to Intravenous Midazolam in Patients Undergoing Flexible Bronchoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Goneppanavar, Umesh; Magazine, Rahul; Periyadka Janardhana, Bhavya; Krishna Achar, Shreepathi

    2015-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine, an α2 agonist, has demonstrated its effectiveness as a sedative during awake intubation, but its utility in fiberoptic bronchoscopy (FOB) is not clear. We evaluated the effects of midazolam and dexmedetomidine on patient's response to FOB. The patients received either midazolam, 0.02 mg/kg (group M, n = 27), or dexmedetomidine, 1 µg/kg (group D, n = 27). A composite score of five different parameters and a numerical rating scale (NRS) for pain intensity and distress were used to assess patient response during FOB. Patients rated the quality of sedation and level of discomfort 24 h after the procedure. Ease of bronchoscopy, rescue medication requirement, and haemodynamic variables were noted. Ideal or acceptable composite score was observed in 15 and 26 patients, respectively, in group M (14.48 ± 3.65) and group D (9.41 ± 3.13), p < 0.001. NRS showed that 11 patients in group M had severe pain and discomfort as compared to one patient with severe pain and two with severe discomfort in group D during the procedure, p < 0.001. Rescue midazolam requirement was significantly higher in group M (p = 0.023). We conclude that during FOB, under topical airway anaesthesia, IV dexmedetomidine (1 µg/kg) provides superior patient comfort and tolerance as compared to IV midazolam (0.02 mg/kg). PMID:26543645

  13. The antiallodynic action of nortriptyline and terbutaline is mediated by β(2) adrenoceptors and δ opioid receptors in the ob/ob model of diabetic polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Choucair-Jaafar, Nada; Salvat, Eric; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José; Barrot, Michel

    2014-02-10

    Peripheral polyneuropathy is a frequent complication of diabetes. One of its consequences is neuropathic pain which is often chronic and difficult to treat. This pain management classically involves anticonvulsant drugs or tricyclic antidepressant drugs (TCA). We have previously shown that β2 adrenoceptors and δ opioid receptors are critical for TCA action in a traumatic model of neuropathic pain. In the present work, we used the obese leptin deficient mice (ob/ob) which are a genetic model of type 2 diabetes in order to study the treatment of diabetic polyneuropathy. ob/ob mice with hyperglycemia develop tactile bilateral allodynia. We investigated the action of the TCA nortriptyline and the β2 adrenoceptor agonist terbutaline on this neuropathic allodynia. The consequences of acute and chronic treatments were tested, and mechanical allodynia was assessed by using von Frey hairs. Chronic but not acute treatment with nortriptyline alleviates allodynia caused by the diabetic neuropathy. This effect depends on β2 adrenoceptors but not on α2 adrenoceptors, as shown by the blockade with repeated co-administration of the β2 adrenoceptor antagonist ICI118551 but not with repeated co-administration of the α2 adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine. Direct stimulation of β2 adrenoceptors appears sufficient to relieve allodynia, as shown with chronic terbutaline treatment. δ but not mu opioid receptors seem important to these action since acute naltrindole, but not acute naloxonazine, reverses the effect of chronic nortriptyline or terbutaline treatment.

  14. Effects of dexmedetomidine on perioperative monitoring parameters and recovery in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chavan, Shirishkumar G.; Shinde, Gourish P.; Adivarekar, Swati P.; Gujar, Sandhya H.; Mandhyan, Surita

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dexmedetomidine, an α2 agonist, when used as an adjuvant in general anesthesia attenuates stress response to various noxious stimuli, maintains perioperative hemodynamic stability and provides sedation without adversely affecting recovery in postoperative period. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients were randomly divided into two groups of 30 each. In Group A, dexmedetomidine was given intravenously as loading dose of 1 μg/kg over 10 min, and normal saline was given in Group B patients. After induction with propofol, in Group A, dexmedetomidine was given as infusion at a dose of 0.2–0.8 μg/kg/h. Sevoflurane was used as inhalation agent in both groups. Perioperative monitoring parameters were recorded. Postoperative sedation and recovery were assessed. Statistical Analysis Used: Demographic data were analyzed using Pearson's Chi-square test. Changes in the heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (BP) and diastolic BP were analyzed using unpaired t-test and Mann–Whitney rank sum test was used to calculate “P” value wherever (Shapiro–Wilk)/normality test gave ambiguous results. Results: Dexmedetomidine significantly attenuates stress response at intubation with lesser increase in HR (86.00 ± 5.16 vs. 102.97 ± 7.07/min.), mean BP (95.78 ± 5.35 vs. 110.18 ± 5.35) as compared to the control group (P < 0.05). After pneumoperitoneum, HR was 85.07 ± 6.23 versus 107.10 ± 4.98, mean BP was 98.98 ± 10.16 versus 118.54 ± 6.27 (P < 0.05). Thus maintains intraoperative hemodynamic stability. Postoperatively, the test group showed no statistically significant difference in the extubation time (7.00 ± 0.58 vs. 6.74 ± 0.73) and response to oral commands (8.78 ± 0.72 vs. 8.66 ± 0.73) (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine attenuates various stress responses during surgery and maintains the hemodynamic stability when used as an adjuvant in general anesthesia and dexmedetomidine does not delay recovery. PMID:27212761

  15. Dexmedetomidine combined with midazolam vs. dexmedetomidine alone for sedation during spinal anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Douk-Keun; Ban, Jong-Seouk; Lee, Sang-Gon; Lee, Ji-Hyang

    2016-01-01

    Background Dexmedetomidine is a useful sedative agent for spinal anesthesia. However, it has been reported that dexmedetomidine decreases heart rate in a dose-dependent manner. In the current study, we compared the administration of a bolus dose of midazolam and bolus loading of dexmedetomidine over 10 min with the goal of identifying an additional method of sedation. Methods Ninety patients classified as American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I–II who were undergoing spinal anesthesia were divided into two groups. In the midazolam and dexmedetomidine combined group (group MD), 10 min after bolus loading of 0.05 mg/kg midazolam, 0.5 µg/kg/h dexmedetomidine was continuously infused. In the dexmedetomidine group (group D), 1 µg/kg dexmedetomidine was infused over 10 min, and then 0.5 µg/kg/h dexmedetomidine was continuously infused. Results At 10 min, the sedation depth of the two groups was almost equal. In both groups, the bispectral index was within the optimal score range of 55–80 and the Ramsay Sedation Scale score was within the optimal range of 3–5. Satisfaction with sedation for both patient and surgeon did not differ between the two groups. At 10 min, heart rate was significantly lower (P < 0.010) in group D and mean blood pressure was significantly lower (P < 0.010) in group MD. The prevalence of bradycardia, hypotension, and hypoxia did not differ statistically between the two groups (P = 0.714, P = 0.089, P = 0.495, respectively). Conclusions Midazolam bolus and dexmedetomidine continuous infusion (the regimen of group MD) may be an additional sedation method for patients who have severe bradycardia. PMID:27703624

  16. Comparison between two doses of dexmedetomidine added to bupivacaine for caudal analgesia in paediatric infraumbilical surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Meenakshi Karuppiah, Niveditha Padma; Shetty, Sumalatha R; Patla, Krishna Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Caudal block (CB) with adjuvants is routinely used in children for anaesthesia. We evaluated the efficacy of the α2 adrenergic agonist, dexmedetomidine at two different doses as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in CB. Methods: This study was conducted on ninety children. Control group BD0 received 0.25% bupivacaine 1 ml/kg, whereas, the study groups BD1 and BD2 received 1 μg/kg and 2 μg/kg dexmedetomidine, respectively, with 0.25% bupivacaine 1 ml/kg as a single shot CB. Adequacy of the block, haemodynamic changes, duration of analgesia and side effects were compared. Analysis of Variance was used for between-group comparisons of numerical variables. Student's t-test and Mann–Whitney U-test were used for quantitative data. Results: The demography was comparable. Anal sphincter 5 min after administration of the CB was relaxed in 89.3%, 82.1% and 75% of cases in BD0, BD1 and BD2 groups, respectively. The sphincter was relaxed at the end of surgery in all the cases. Comparable haemodynamics was noted with significantly prolonged duration of analgesia in the groups BD1 (964.2 ± 309 min) and BD2 (1152.6 ± 380.4 min) compared to control (444.6 ± 179.4 min). While no complications were encountered in groups BD0 and BD1, bradycardia was observed in four cases of BD2 group with accompanied hypotension in one of them. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to bupivacaine improves the quality of CB, provides good operating conditions and increases the duration of post-operative analgesia. We conclude that 1 μg/kg is as effective as 2 μg/kg of dexmedetomidine and with a better safety profile. PMID:27330203

  17. Low-dose epidural dexmedetomidine improves thoracic epidural anaesthesia for nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Zeng, X Z; Xu, Y M; Cui, X G; Guo, Y P; Li, W Z

    2014-03-01

    Thoracic epidural anaesthesia alone is an applied technique of anaesthesia for nephrectomy which has both advantages and limitations. Dexmedetomidine is a highly selective alpha2-adrenoreceptor agonist which has both central and peripheral analgesic properties. Forty patients undergoing nephrectomy were enrolled in this clinical trial and allocated randomly to two groups, a control group (C group) and a dexmedetomidine group (D group). The C group received epidural 0.75% levobupivacaine 12 ml with 1 ml of isotonic sodium chloride solution, while the D group received epidural 0.75% levobupivacaine 12 ml with 1 ml (0.5 µg/kg) of dexmedetomidine. Haemodynamic changes, onset time and duration of sensory and motor block, muscle relaxation score, verbal rating score for pain, sedation score and the total postoperative analgesic consumption were evaluated. Sensory blockade duration was longer in the D group than in the C group (P=0.01). The incidence of motor block and the muscle relaxation score were significantly higher in the D group compared with the C group (P=0.01). Compared with the C group, pain scores were significantly lower in the first four postoperative hours in the D group (two hours rest P=0.038; two hours activity P=0.009; four hours rest P=0.044; four hours activity P=0.003). The total amount of flurbiprofen analgesic was significantly lower in the D group compared with the C group (P=0.03). Epidural dexmedetomidine 0.5 µg/kg appears to intensify thoracic epidural anaesthesia with levobupivacaine.

  18. Noradrenergic modulation of respiratory motor output during tadpole development: Role of alpha-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Stéphanie; Kinkead, Richard

    2006-09-01

    Noradrenaline (NA) is an important modulator of respiratory activity. Results from in vitro studies using immature rodents suggest that the effects exerted by NA change during development, but these investigations have been limited to neonatal stages. To address this issue, we used in vitro brainstem preparations of an ectotherm, Rana catesbeiana, at three developmental stages: pre-metamorphic tadpoles, metamorphic tadpoles and fully mature adult bullfrogs. We first compared the effects of NA bath application (0.02-10 micromol l(-1)) on brainstem preparations from both pre-metamorphic (Taylor-Köllros stages VII-XI) and metamorphic tadpoles (TK stages XVIII-XXIII) and adult frogs. The fictive lung ventilation frequency response to NA application was both dose- and stage-dependent. Although no net change was observed in the pre-metamorphic group, NA application decreased fictive lung burst frequency in preparations from more mature animals. These effects were attenuated by application of alpha-adrenoceptor antagonists. Conversely, NA application elicited dose- and stage-dependent increases in fictive buccal ventilation frequency. We then assessed the contribution of alpha-adrenoceptors towards these responses by applying specific agonists (alpha1: phenylephrine; alpha2: clonidine; concentration range from 10 to 200 micromol l(-1) for both). Of the two agonists used, only phenylephrine application consistently mimicked the lung burst frequency response observed during NA application in each stage group. However, both agonists decreased buccal burst frequency, thus suggesting that other (beta) adrenoceptor types mediate this response. We conclude that modulation of both buccal and lung-related motor outputs change during development. NA modulation affects both types of respiratory activities in a distinct fashion, owing to the different adrenoceptor type involved.

  19. Peripheral vascular effects of beta-adrenoceptor blockade: comparison of two agents.

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, E D; Maltz, M B; Smith, R E; Bowcock, S A; Watkins, C J; Camm, A J

    1987-01-01

    1. The effects of atenolol (100 mg), a beta 1-adrenoceptor blocker, and bevantolol (200 mg) were compared on heart rate, blood pressure, lung function and on the peripheral circulation in normal volunteers before and after isoprenaline infusion. Recordings were obtained 2 and 24 h following a single dose and 24 h after continuous dosage for 7 days. 2. The effect of atenolol on the blockade of beta-adrenergic stimuli, as measured by the ability to reduce isoprenaline-induced tachycardia, was greater than that of bevantolol. Though both drugs achieved a similar reduction in systolic pressure there was a significantly greater reduction in diastolic pressure with bevantolol. The lung function tests gave similar results to those with other beta-adrenoceptor blockers. 3. Atenolol produced a fall in peripheral blood flow consistent with unopposed peripheral alpha-adrenoceptor stimulation. The effect of bevantolol differs from that of atenolol, an initial fall in peripheral blood flow being followed by a rapid recovery to baseline or greater. This effect may be due to partial alpha-adrenoceptor agonist activity. PMID:2889459

  20. Peripheral vascular effects of beta-adrenoceptor blockade: comparison of two agents.

    PubMed

    Cooke, E D; Maltz, M B; Smith, R E; Bowcock, S A; Watkins, C J; Camm, A J

    1987-09-01

    1. The effects of atenolol (100 mg), a beta 1-adrenoceptor blocker, and bevantolol (200 mg) were compared on heart rate, blood pressure, lung function and on the peripheral circulation in normal volunteers before and after isoprenaline infusion. Recordings were obtained 2 and 24 h following a single dose and 24 h after continuous dosage for 7 days. 2. The effect of atenolol on the blockade of beta-adrenergic stimuli, as measured by the ability to reduce isoprenaline-induced tachycardia, was greater than that of bevantolol. Though both drugs achieved a similar reduction in systolic pressure there was a significantly greater reduction in diastolic pressure with bevantolol. The lung function tests gave similar results to those with other beta-adrenoceptor blockers. 3. Atenolol produced a fall in peripheral blood flow consistent with unopposed peripheral alpha-adrenoceptor stimulation. The effect of bevantolol differs from that of atenolol, an initial fall in peripheral blood flow being followed by a rapid recovery to baseline or greater. This effect may be due to partial alpha-adrenoceptor agonist activity.

  1. α1-Adrenoceptors relate Ca(2+) modulation and protein secretions in rat lacrimal gland.

    PubMed

    Ikeda-Kurosawa, Chika; Higashio, Hironori; Nakano, Masato; Okubo, Masatoshi; Satoh, Yoh-Ichi; Kurosaka, Daijiro; Saino, Tomoyuki

    2015-01-01

    Noradrenaline (NA) is a catecholamine with multiple roles including as a hormone and a neurotransmitter. Cellular secretory activities are enhanced by adrenergic stimuli as well as by cholinergic stimuli. The present study aimed to determine which adrenoceptors play a role in controlling intracellular calcium ion ([Ca(2+)]i) level in acinar cells of rat lacrimal glands. Expression of mRNA for adrenoceptor subtypes in the acinar cells was assessed using RT-PCR. All types except α2c, β1, and β3 were detected. NA induced a [Ca(2+)]i increase with a biphasic pattern in the acinar cells. Removal of extracellular Ca(2+) and use of Ca(2+)-channel blockers did not inhibit the NA-induced [Ca(2+)]i increases. In contrast, U73122 and suramin almost blocked these increases. The α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine induced a strong increase in [Ca(2+)]i. However, clonidine and isoproterenol failed to induce a [Ca(2+)]i increase. The peroxidase activity was quantified as a measure of mucin secretion. Ca(2+)-dependent exocytotic secretion of peroxidase was detected in rat lacrimal glands. The RT-PCR results showed that MUC1, MUC4, MUC5AC, MUC5B, and MUC16 were expressed in acinar cells. These findings indicated that NA activates α1-adrenoceptors, which were found to be the main receptors in Ca(2+)-related cell homeostasis and protein (including mucin) secretion in lacrimal glands. PMID:26700590

  2. Interaction of berberine with human platelet. alpha. sub 2 adrenoceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Hui, Ka Kit; Yu, Jun Liang; Chan, Wai Fong A.; Tse, E. )

    1991-01-01

    Berberine was found to inhibit competitively the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)-yohimbine. The displacement curve was parallel to those of clonidine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, with the rank order of potency (IC{sub 50}) being clonidine {gt} epinephrine {gt} norepinephrine (14.5 {mu}M) = berberine. Increasing concentrations of berberine from 0.1 {mu}M to 10 {mu}M inhibited ({sup 3}H)-yohimbine binding, shifting the saturation binding curve to the right without decreasing the maximum binding capacity. In platelet cyclic AMP accumulation experiments, berberine at concentrations of 0.1 {mu}M to 0.1 mM inhibited the cAMP accumulation induced by 10 {mu}M prostaglandin E{sub 1} in a dose dependent manner, acting as an {alpha}{sub 2} adrenoceptor agonist. In the presence of L-epinephrine, berberine blocked the inhibitory effect of L-epinephrine behaving as an {alpha}{sub 2} adrenoceptor antagonist.

  3. Dexmedetomidine for Sedation during Withdrawal of Support

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Chris; Tamburro, Robert F; Ceneviva, Gary D

    2015-01-01

    Agents used to control end-of-life suffering are associated with troublesome side effects. The use of dexmedetomidine for sedation during withdrawal of support in pediatrics is not yet described. An adolescent female with progressive and irreversible pulmonary deterioration was admitted. Despite weeks of therapy, she did not tolerate weaning of supplemental oxygen or continuous bilevel positive airway pressure. Given her condition and the perception that she was suffering, the family requested withdrawal of support. Despite opioids and benzodiazepines, she appeared to be uncomfortable after support was withdrawn. Ketamine was initiated. Relief from ketamine was brief, and its use was associated with a “wide-eyed” look that was distressing to the family. Ketamine was discontinued and a dexmedetomidine infusion was initiated. The patient’s level of comfort improved greatly. The child died peacefully 24 hours after initiating dexmedetomidine from her underlying disease rather than the effects of the sedative. PMID:26339188

  4. Inhibitory effects of SR 58611A on canine colonic motility: evidence for a role of beta 3-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed Central

    De Ponti, F; Cosentino, M; Costa, A; Girani, M; Gibelli, G; D'Angelo, L; Frigo, G; Crema, A

    1995-01-01

    1. In order to clarify whether atypical or beta 3-adrenoceptors can modulate canine colonic motility in vivo, we studied the effects of SR 58611A (a selective agonist for atypical beta-adrenoceptors) alone and after pretreatment with beta-adrenoceptor antagonists on colonic motility in the conscious dog. The gastrocolonic response (postprandial increase in motility) was monitored by means of electrodes and strain-gauge force transducers chronically implanted along the distal colon. In some experiments, heart rate was also measured. The possible role of beta 3-adrenoceptors in mediating the effects of SR 58611A was also tested in vitro in circular muscle strips taken from the canine distal colon. 2. Intravenous infusion of SR 58611A, ritodrine or isoprenaline at doses inducing the same degree of tachycardia inhibited the gastrocolonic response to a different extent, with SR 58611A and ritodrine being more effective than isoprenaline. 3. In a dose-response study, SR 58611A was more potent in inhibiting colonic motility than in inducing tachycardia: the ED35 values for inhibition of colonic motility and induction of tachycardia were 23 and 156 micrograms kg-1, i.v., respectively. 4. The inhibitory effect of SR 58611A 100 micrograms kg-1, i.v., on the gastrocolonic response was reversed by alprenolol (non-selective beta-adrenoceptor antagonist), but resistant to CGP 20712A (beta 1-adrenoceptor antagonist) or ICI 118551 (beta 2-adrenoceptor antagonist). 5. In vitro, SR 58611A concentration-dependently relaxed circular muscle strips, an effect that was competitively antagonized by alprenolol with a pA2 value of 7.1, but resistant to CGP 20712A (100 nM), ICI 118551 (100 nM) or tetrodotoxin (1 microM).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7606348

  5. Functional evidence equating the pharmacologically-defined alpha 1A- and cloned alpha 1C-adrenoceptor: studies in the isolated perfused kidney of rat.

    PubMed Central

    Blue, D. R.; Bonhaus, D. W.; Ford, A. P.; Pfister, J. R.; Sharif, N. A.; Shieh, I. A.; Vimont, R. L.; Williams, T. J.; Clarke, D. E.

    1995-01-01

    1. The present study characterizes and classifies alpha 1-adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstriction in the isolated perfused kidney of rat using quantitative receptor pharmacology and compares the results to radioligand binding studies (made in cloned alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes, native alpha 1A-adrenoceptors in submaxillary gland of rat, and alpha 1A-adrenoceptors in several other tissues of rat). 2. Concentration-effect curves to noradrenaline in the presence of 5-methyl-urapidil were biphasic, indicating alpha 1-adrenoceptor heterogeneity. The alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtype mediating the first phase (low affinity for 5-methyl-urapidil) could not be 'isolated' for detailed pharmacological characterization but was defined by a sensitivity to inhibition by chloroethylclonidine and an inability of methoxamine to activate the site. Additionally, vasoconstriction mediated by this alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtype or subtypes was abolished by nitrendipine (1 microM), thereby allowing characterization of the second, high affinity site for 5-methyl-urapidil. 3. The following antagonists interacted competitively with noradrenaline at the alpha 1-adrenoceptor for which 5-methyl-urapidil exhibits high affinity (pKB value): WB 4101 (10.3) > prazosin (9.5) approximately HV 723 (9.3) approximately 5-methyl-urapidil (9.2) > phenotolamine (8.6) > spiperone (pA2 = 8.1) approximately oxymetazoline (7.9). In contrast, insurmountable antagonism was seen with S(+)- and R(-)-niguldipine, the S(+)-isomer being approximately 30 fold more potent than the R(-)-isomer. Receptor protection experiments indicated that S(+)-niguldipine interacted directly with alpha 1-adrenoceptors. Dehydroniguldipine acted as a competitive antagonist (pKB = 9.0). Thus, the results with antagonists define the alpha 1-adrenoceptor as an alpha 1A-adrenoceptor. 4. An agonist 'fingerprint' was constructed in the presence of nitrendipine to define further the alpha 1A-adrenoceptor. The following order and relativity of

  6. β1- and β2-Adrenoceptor polymorphisms and cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Leineweber, Kirsten; Heusch, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    β1- and β2-Adrenoceptors (AR) play a pivotal role in the regulation of cardiovascular function. Both β-AR subtypes are polymorphic: two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been described for the β1- (Ser49Gly, Arg389Gly) and four for the β2-AR (Arg-19Cys, Arg16Gly, Gln27Glu, Thr164Ile), and they are possibly of functional relevance. In recombinant cell systems, Gly49-β1-AR are more susceptible to agonist-promoted down-regulation than Ser49-β1-AR, whereas Arg389-β1-AR are three to four times more responsive to agonist-evoked stimulation than Gly389-β1-AR. With respect to β2-AR, the Cys-19 variant is associated with greater β2-AR expression than the Arg-19 variant; Gly16-β2-AR are more susceptible, whereas Glu27-β2-AR are almost resistant to agonist-promoted down-regulation; Thr164-β2-AR are three to four times more responsive to agonist-evoked stimulation than Ile164-β2-AR. Several studies addressed potential phenotypic consequences of these SNPs in vivo by influencing and/or contributing to the pathophysiology of cardiovascular/pulmonary diseases such as hypertension, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias or asthma. At present, it appears that these β-AR SNPs are very likely not disease-causing genes but possibly predictive for the responsiveness to agonists and antagonists. Patients carrying one or two alleles of the Gly389-β1-AR are poor or non-responders to agonists and antagonists, whereas patients homozygous for the Arg389-β1-AR are good responders. Subjects carrying the Ile164-β2-AR exhibit blunted responses to β2-AR stimulation. Asthma patients carrying the Arg16-Gln27-Thr164-β2-AR haplotype who receive regularly short- or long-acting β2-AR agonists are rather susceptible to agonist-induced desensitization and in consequence exhibit reduced bronchodilating and -protective effects and/or increased asthma exacerbations. The clinical relevance of these findings is still under debate. PMID:19422376

  7. 21 CFR 522.558 - Dexmedetomidine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dexmedetomidine. 522.558 Section 522.558 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS...) Limitations. Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. (2)...

  8. The alpha 2-adrenoceptors of the human retinoblastoma cell line (Y79) may represent an additional example of the alpha 2C-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed Central

    Gleason, M. M.; Hieble, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    1. In agreement with the literature, correlation of the ability of a series of agonists and antagonists to displace [3H]-rauwolscine binding shows the alpha 2-adrenoceptors of HT29 cells, NG108-15 cells, OK cells and homogenates of rat sublingual gland to represent four distinct subtypes. 2. [3H]-rauwolscine also bound with high affinity (KD = 0.30 +/- 0.10 mM) to a human retinoblastoma cell line (Y79). Specific binding represents 73% of total binding, and a Bmax of 38 +/- 1 fmol mg-1 protein was determined. 3. Correlation of antagonist affinities against [3H]-rauwolscine with corresponding values in the other four tissue sources showed the Y79 cells to resemble most closely the OK cells, the prototype example of an alpha 2C-adrenoceptor, with a correlation coefficient of 0.90 and a regression slope of 1.01 being obtained for 10 antagonists in these two systems. 4. Comparison of KD values for [3H]-rauwolscine also showed a similarity between the OK cells (0.19 +/- 0.07 nM) and Y79 cells. 5. These data suggest that the human retinoblastoma cell line may represent an additional example of the alpha 2C-adrenoceptor subtype. PMID:1358385

  9. Effects of Dexmedetomidine and Ketamine-Dexmedetomidine with and without Buprenorphine on Corticoadrenal Function in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    González-Gil, Alfredo; Villa, Alberto; Millán, Pilar; Martínez-Fernández, Leticia; Illera, Juan Carlos

    2015-05-01

    Anesthetics may influence adrenal function and consequently alter serum glucocorticoid concentrations, leading to erroneous interpretations of results from anesthetized rabbits. However, decreases in glucocorticoid concentrations may be advantageous in protocols designed to minimize the stress response to surgery. This study characterized the variations in adrenocortical function based on changes in corticosterone and cortisol levels after various doses and combinations of dexmedetomidine, ketamine, and buprenorphine. Each rabbit received all treatments with a minimal interexperiment interval of 10 d. Rabbits were allocated to 7 groups (n = 10 per group) and received either 1 mL saline solution; dexmedetomidine at 0.05, 0.15, or 0.25 mg/kg; ketamine (35 mg/kg) and dexmedetomidine (0.25 mg/kg) without or with buprenorphine (0.03 mg/kg); or ketamine (35 mg/kg) and buprenorphine (0.03 mg/kg). Blood was sampled before drug administration and at 10, 30, 60, and 120 min and 24 h afterward. Serum glucocorticoid levels fell in all treatment groups except the one receiving ketamine-dexmedetomidine; in that group, serum glucocorticoids increased. Rabbits that received ketamine-dexmedetomidine-buprenorphine had the lowest serum glucocorticoid levels overall. In conclusion, dexmedetomidine reduces glucocorticoid secretion in rabbits but, when combined with ketamine, increases corticosterone and cortisol levels as well as heart and respiratory rates. The addition of buprenorphine to the ketamine-dexmedetomidine mixture reduces serum glucocorticoid levels. The influence of anesthetic drugs should be considered when designing a protocol to minimize the glucocorticoid response to surgery or when measuring glucocorticoid levels in rabbits.

  10. Characteristics of cyanopindolol analogues active at the beta 3-adrenoceptor in rat ileum.

    PubMed Central

    Hoey, A. J.; Jackson, C. M.; Pegg, G. G.; Sillence, M. N.

    1996-01-01

    1. Cyanopindolol (CYP) is a potent antagonist at the beta 3-adrenoceptor in rat ileum. Several analogues of CYP and pindolol were synthesized that also produced antagonist effects at the beta 3-adrenoceptor. However, at high concentrations, these compounds appear to act as "partial agonists'. This study was conducted to determine the structural requirements of CYP analogues necessary for antagonist activity and to examine the possibility that the agonist effects of CYP and its analogues may occur through a mechanism independent of beta-adrenoceptor activation. 2. Analogues of CYP and pindolol were tested for antagonist activity in rat ileum in which the beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptors were blocked. Fourteen compounds were tested against (-)-isoprenaline, and four of the more potent analogues were then tested against BRL 37344. The two most potent antagonists were CYP and iodocyanopindolol. The pKb values (negative log of equilibrium dissociation constant) obtained against (-)-isoprenaline were significantly higher than those obtained against BRL 37344, but the cause of this difference is not known. 3. Several structural requirements were determined for antagonist activity. Modification at the carbon atom alpha to the secondary amine caused the antagonist potency to fall as the level of saturation was reduced. Thus, a quaternary carbon group, such as t-butyl, produced the most potent antagonist. Substitution with a large moiety such as a cyclohexyl or benzyl group reduced antagonist activity, probably due to steric hindrance. Inclusion of an electron-withdrawing group, such as a cyano or ethylester moiety, alpha to the indole nitrogen, also increased the potency. Iodination of CYP and ethylesterpindolol at the 3-position of the indole ring did not increase antagonist potency. In contrast, iodination of the almost inactive analogues produced a significant increase in potency, suggesting that a beneficial electronic effect on the indole ring imparted by the iodo

  11. Evaluation of the effects of a specific alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, atipamezole, on alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptor subtype binding, brain neurochemistry and behaviour in comparison with yohimbine.

    PubMed

    Haapalinna, A; Viitamaa, T; MacDonald, E; Savola, J M; Tuomisto, L; Virtanen, R; Heinonen, E

    1997-11-01

    In the present study we evaluated the alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptor subtype binding, central alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist potency, as well as effects on brain neurochemistry and behavioural pharmacology of two alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonists, atipamezole and yohimbine. Atipamezole had higher selectivity for alpha 2- vs. alpha 1-adrenoceptors than yohimbine regardless of the subtypes studied. Both compounds had comparable affinity for the alpha 2A-, alpha 2C- and alpha 2B-adrenoceptors, but yohimbine had significantly lower affinity for the alpha 2D-subtype. This may account for the fact that significantly higher doses of yohimbine than atipamezole were needed for reversal of alpha 2-agonist (medetomidine)-induced effects in rats (mydriasis) and mice (sedation and hypothermia). The effect on central monoaminergic activity was estimated by measuring the concentrations of transmitters and their main metabolites in whole brain homogenate. At equally effective alpha 2-antagonising doses in the rat mydriasis model, both drugs stimulated central noradrenaline turnover (as reflected by increase in metabolite levels) to the same extent. Atipamezole increased dopaminergic activity only slightly, whereas yohimbine elevated central dopamine but decreased central 5-hydroxytryptamine turnover rates. In behavioural tests, atipamezole (0.1-10 mg/kg) did not affect motor activity but stimulated food rewarded operant (FR-10) responding (0.03-3 mg/kg) whereas yohimbine both stimulated (1 mg/kg) and decreased (> or = 3 mg/kg) behaviour in a narrow dose range in these tests. In the staircase test, both antagonists increased neophobia, but in the two compartment test only yohimbine (> or = 3 mg/kg) decreased exploratory behaviour. The dissimilar effects of the antagonists on neurochemistry and behaviour are thought to be caused by non alpha 2-adrenoceptor properties of yohimbine. In conclusion, the alpha 2-antagonist atipamezole blocked all alpha 2-adrenoceptor subtypes at low

  12. Influences of the endothelium and hypoxia on alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptor-mediated responses in the rabbit isolated pulmonary artery.

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, M. R.; McCulloch, K. M.; McGrath, J. C.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of the inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, N omega-nitro-L-arginine methylester (L-NAME, 10(-4) M), mechanical disruption of the endothelium and hypoxia on contraction to noradrenaline (alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist), phenylephrine (alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist) and UK 14304 (alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist) were compared in the rabbit isolated pulmonary artery. The effects of the selective antagonists rauwolscine (10(-6) M, alpha 2-adrenoceptors) and prazosin (10(-7) M, alpha 1-adrenoceptors) on the contractions to noradrenaline before and after exposure to L-NAME were also assessed. 2. Noradrenaline, phenylephrine and UK 14304 all produced concentration-dependent increases in vascular tone. The responses to noradrenaline were sensitive to both rauwolscine and prazosin (effect of prazosin >> rauwolscine). L-NAME increased the potency of both noradrenaline and UK 14304, and also the maximum tension achieved. It had no effect on the responses to phenylephrine. After L-NAME, contractions to noradrenaline, although still sensitive to both rauwolscine and prazosin, were now more sensitive to inhibition by rauwolscine. 3. Endothelium removal augmented the potency and maximum contractions to noradrenaline, phenylephrine and UK 14304. 4. Hypoxia decreased both the potency of phenylephrine and its maximum contractile response, but increased the maximum response to noradrenaline without effecting responses to UK 14304. 5. In conclusion, in the rabbit pulmonary artery, augmentation of contractile responses to noradrenaline by L-NAME involves a potentiation of alpha 2-adrenoceptor-mediated contraction probably through an effect on the synthesis of endothelium-derived nitric oxide.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8094023

  13. Immobilization of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) with dexmedetomidine, tiletamine, and zolazepam.

    PubMed

    Teisberg, Justin E; Farley, Sean D; Nelson, O Lynne; Hilderbrand, Grant V; Madel, Michael J; Owen, Patricia A; Erlenbach, Joy A; Robbins, Charles T

    2014-01-01

    Safe and effective immobilization of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) is essential for research and management. Fast induction of anesthesia, maintenance of healthy vital rates, and predictable recoveries are priorities. From September 2010 to May 2012, we investigated these attributes in captive and wild grizzly bears anesthetized with a combination of a reversible α2 agonist (dexmedetomidine [dexM], the dextrorotatory enantiomer of medetomidine) and a nonreversible N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) agonist and tranquilizer (tiletamine and zolazepam [TZ], respectively). A smaller-than-expected dose of the combination (1.23 mg tiletamine, 1.23 mg zolazepam, and 6.04 µg dexmedetomidine per kg bear) produced reliable, fast ataxia (3.7 ± 0.5 min, x̄±SE) and workable anesthesia (8.1 ± 0.6 min) in captive adult grizzly bears. For wild bears darted from a helicopter, a dose of 2.06 mg tiletamine, 2.06 mg zolazepam, and 10.1 µg dexmedetomidine/kg produced ataxia in 2.5 ± 0.3 min and anesthesia in 5.5 ± 1.0 min. Contrary to published accounts of bear anesthesia with medetomidine, tiletamine, and zolazepam, this combination did not cause hypoxemia or hypoventilation, although mild bradycardia (<50 beats per min) occurred in most bears during the active season. With captive bears, effective dose rates during hibernation were approximately half those during the active season. The time to first signs of recovery after the initial injection of dexMTZ was influenced by heart rate (P<0.001) and drug dose (P<0.001). Intravenous (IV) injection of the reversal agent, atipamezole, significantly decreased recovery time (i.e., standing on all four feet and reacting to the surrounding environment) relative to intramuscular injection. Recovery times (25 ± 8 min) following IV injections of the recommended dose of atipamezole (10 µg/µg of dexmedetomidine) and half that dose (5 µg/µg) did not differ. However, we recommend use of the full dose based on the appearance of a more complete

  14. Immobilization of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) with dexmedetomidine, tiletamine, and zolazepam.

    PubMed

    Teisberg, Justin E; Farley, Sean D; Nelson, O Lynne; Hilderbrand, Grant V; Madel, Michael J; Owen, Patricia A; Erlenbach, Joy A; Robbins, Charles T

    2014-01-01

    Safe and effective immobilization of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) is essential for research and management. Fast induction of anesthesia, maintenance of healthy vital rates, and predictable recoveries are priorities. From September 2010 to May 2012, we investigated these attributes in captive and wild grizzly bears anesthetized with a combination of a reversible α2 agonist (dexmedetomidine [dexM], the dextrorotatory enantiomer of medetomidine) and a nonreversible N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) agonist and tranquilizer (tiletamine and zolazepam [TZ], respectively). A smaller-than-expected dose of the combination (1.23 mg tiletamine, 1.23 mg zolazepam, and 6.04 µg dexmedetomidine per kg bear) produced reliable, fast ataxia (3.7 ± 0.5 min, x̄±SE) and workable anesthesia (8.1 ± 0.6 min) in captive adult grizzly bears. For wild bears darted from a helicopter, a dose of 2.06 mg tiletamine, 2.06 mg zolazepam, and 10.1 µg dexmedetomidine/kg produced ataxia in 2.5 ± 0.3 min and anesthesia in 5.5 ± 1.0 min. Contrary to published accounts of bear anesthesia with medetomidine, tiletamine, and zolazepam, this combination did not cause hypoxemia or hypoventilation, although mild bradycardia (<50 beats per min) occurred in most bears during the active season. With captive bears, effective dose rates during hibernation were approximately half those during the active season. The time to first signs of recovery after the initial injection of dexMTZ was influenced by heart rate (P<0.001) and drug dose (P<0.001). Intravenous (IV) injection of the reversal agent, atipamezole, significantly decreased recovery time (i.e., standing on all four feet and reacting to the surrounding environment) relative to intramuscular injection. Recovery times (25 ± 8 min) following IV injections of the recommended dose of atipamezole (10 µg/µg of dexmedetomidine) and half that dose (5 µg/µg) did not differ. However, we recommend use of the full dose based on the appearance of a more complete

  15. Ontogeny of the rat hepatic adrenoceptors

    SciTech Connect

    McMillian, M.K.

    1985-01-01

    Hepatic alpha-1, alpha-2, and beta-2 adrenoceptors were characterized during development of the rat through Scatchard analysis of (/sup 3/H)-prazosin, (/sup 3/H)-rauwolscine and (/sup 125/I)-pindolol binding to washed particle membrane preparations. Major changes in adrenoceptor number occur shortly before birth and at weaning. The fetal rat liver is characterized by a large number of alpha-2 adrenoceptors which falls 10-20 fold at birth. The number of hepatic beta adrenoceptors decreases 30-50% during the third week after birth increases slightly at weaning, then decreases gradually in the adult. Hepatic alpha-1 adrenoceptor number increases 3-5 fold at weaning to become the predominant adrenoceptor in the adult rat liver. The basis for the fall in alpha-2 number at birth remains unclear. The fall in beta receptor number at the end of the second week post-natally appears dependent on increased insulin and corticosterone secretion as well as increased NE release form nerve terminals. The basis for the increase in beta number at weaning and the sex-dependent loss of beta function but not receptor number in the adult rat remains unknown. The dramatic increases in alpha-1 number and function at weaning are dependent on increased adrenocortical secretion, adrenalectomy prevents the normal. This effect of adrenocorticoids might be mediated through glycogen, as glycogen depletion during fasting decreases alpha-1 receptor number and function at weaning are dependent on increased adrenocortical secretion, adrenalectomy prevents the normal. This effect of adrenocorticoids might be mediated through glycogen, as glycogen depletion during fasting decreases alpha-1 receptor number and function. These findings suggest that hepatic adrenoceptor number adapts from the low carbohydrate diet of the suckling rat to the high carbohydrate diet of the adult at weaning.

  16. Accumbal noradrenaline that contributes to the alpha-adrenoceptor-mediated release of dopamine from reserpine-sensitive storage vesicles in the nucleus accumbens is derived from alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine-sensitive pools.

    PubMed

    Verheij, M M M; Cools, A R

    2009-04-01

    Alpha-adrenoceptors in the nucleus accumbens are known to inhibit accumbal dopamine release from reserpine-sensitive pools. The aim of this study was to test our previously reported hypothesis that accumbal noradrenaline that controls the dopamine release from these storage vesicles is derived from alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine-sensitive pools. The sensitivity of accumbal alpha-adrenoceptors to noradrenergic agents depends on the amount of noradrenaline that is available in the synapse. In case the synaptic noradrenaline levels decrease, the conformation of alpha-adrenoceptors changes into a state that makes these receptors more sensitive to its agonists. The effects of alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine, respectively reserpine, on the alpha-adrenoceptor-agonist-induced changes of accumbal dopamine release were investigated. Alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine, but not reserpine, made accumbal postsynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors more sensitive to phenylephrine. These results indicate that noradrenaline that inhibits the release of dopamine from reserpine-sensitive storage vesicles, via stimulation of accumbal postsynaptic alpha-adrenoceptors, is derived from alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine-sensitive pools. The clinical impact of these data is discussed.

  17. Assessment of beta-adrenoceptor selectivity of a new beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, bisoprolol, in man.

    PubMed Central

    Tattersfield, A E; Cragg, D J; Bacon, R J

    1984-01-01

    Bisoprolol is a new beta-adrenoceptor antagonist which has shown beta-adrenoceptor selectivity in studies in isolated tissues. Bronchial and cardiac beta-adrenoceptor blockade were assessed in eight normal subjects before and after oral ingestion of placebo, bisoprolol 20 and 40 mg, metoprolol 200 mg and propranolol 80 mg in random order. Bronchial beta-adrenoceptor blockade was assessed as the displacement of the bronchodilator dose-response curve to inhaled isoprenaline after each beta-adrenoceptor blocking drug compared to placebo and expressed as the dose ratio. Bronchodilatation was measured as change in specific airway conductance (sGaw) in the body plethysmograph. Cardiac beta-adrenoceptor blockade was assessed as the percentage reduction in exercise heart rate during the fifth minute of exercise at 70% of the subject's maximum work rate. Bisoprolol 20 and 40 mg caused a 24 and 25% reduction in exercise heart rate respectively, compared to 26% with metoprolol 200 mg and 20% with propranolol 80 mg. The dose ratios for the airway dose-response curves for the four beta-adrenoceptor blocking drugs were 1.04 and 3.4 for bisoprolol 20 and 40 mg, 1.4 for metoprolol 200 mg and 30 for propranolol 80 mg. Both doses of bisoprolol produced considerably less bronchial beta-adrenoceptor blockade than propranolol 80 mg despite causing a greater reduction in exercise heart rate. Bisoprolol 20 mg caused a similar amount of bronchial beta-adrenoceptor blockade and a similar reduction in exercise heart rate as metoprolol 200 mg, confirming that it is cardio-selective in man. PMID:6148959

  18. Interaction among mu-opioid receptors and alpha 2-adrenoceptors on SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lameh, J; Eiger, S; Sadée, W

    1992-09-01

    The clonal human neuroblastoma cell line SK-N-SH-SY5Y was previously shown to express mu-opioid and alpha 2-adrenoceptors which are both negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase. Because of the potential use of alpha 2-agonists in the treatment of narcotic dependence, we tested the interactions among he alpha 2-agonists, clonidine and norepinephrine, and morphine on AC in SH-SY5Y cells. Pretreatment with retinoic acid resulting in partial neuronal differentiation greatly enhanced the cells' sensitivity towards adenylyl cyclase stimulation by prostaglandin E1, and its inhibition by morphine and alpha 2-agonists. Norepinephrine (EC50 = 69 nM) maximally inhibited prostaglandin E1-stimulated cAMP accumulation (by approximately 83%), and the alpha 2-agonist yohimbine reversed these effects. Clonidine (EC50 = 32 nM) was a partial agonist, with 50 to 60% maximal inhibition. The combined effects of morphine (maximum approximately 70% inhibition) and norepinephrine exceeded the effect of either agent alone, yielding more than 90% inhibition of prostaglandin E1-stimulated cAMP accumulation. As previously reported for morphine, only a partial tolerance was observed for adenylyl cyclase inhibition by norepinephrine. Further, no cross-tolerance was observed between clonidine and morphine. The combined results indicate that mu-opioid receptors and an alpha 2-adrenoceptor subtype are colocalized on the same cells in SH-SY5Y culture, which hence serves as a model to study opioid-alpha 2-adrenergic interactions.

  19. β-Adrenoceptor-mediated Relaxation of Urinary Bladder Muscle in β2-Adrenoceptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Propping, Stefan; Lorenz, Kristina; Michel, Martin C.; Wirth, Manfred P.; Ravens, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: In order to characterize the β-adrenoceptor (AR) subtypes involved in agonist-stimulated relaxation of murine urinary bladder we studied the effects of (-)-isoprenaline and CL 316,243 on tonic contraction and spontaneous contractions in detrusor strips of wild-type (WT) and β2-AR knockout (β2-AR KO) mice. Materials and Methods: Urinary bladders were isolated from male WT and β2-AR KO mice. β-AR subtype expression was determined with quantitative real-time PCR. Intact muscle strips pre-contracted with KCl (40 mM) were exposed to cumulatively increasing concentrations of (-)-isoprenaline or β3-AR agonist CL 316,243 in the presence and absence of the subtype-selective β-AR blockers CGP 20712A (β1-ARs), ICI 118,551 (β2-ARs), and L748,337 (β3-ARs). Results: Quantitative real-time PCR confirmed lack of β2-AR expression in bladder tissue from β2-AR KO mice. In isolated detrusor strips, pre-contraction with KCl increased basal tone and enhanced spontaneous activity significantly more in β2-AR KO than in WT. (-)-Isoprenaline relaxed tonic tension and attenuated spontaneous activity with similar potency, but the concentrations required were two orders of magnitude higher in β2-AR KO than WT. The concentration-response curves (CRCs) for relaxation were not affected by CGP 20712A (300 nM), but were shifted to the right by ICI 118,551 (50 nM) and L748,337 (10 μM). The -logEC50 values for (-)-isoprenaline in WT and β2-AR KO tissue were 7.98 and 6.00, respectively, suggesting a large receptor reserve of β2-AR. (-)-CL 316,243 relaxed detrusor and attenuated spontaneous contractions from WT and β2-AR KO mice with a potency corresponding to the drug’s affinity for β3-AR. L743,337 shifted the CRCs to the right. Conclusion: Our findings in β2-AR KO mice suggest that there is a large receptor reserve for β2-AR in WT mice so that this β-AR subtype will mediate relaxation of tone and attenuation of spontaneous activity under physiological

  20. Positive inotropic effects mediated by alpha 1 adrenoceptors in intact human subjects.

    PubMed

    Curiel, R; Pérez-González, J; Brito, N; Zerpa, R; Téllez, D; Cabrera, J; Curiel, C; Cubeddu, L

    1989-10-01

    The role of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors (adrenoceptors) on cardiac contractility was investigated in human subjects. The effect of methoxamine, a selective alpha-adrenoceptor agonist, and angiotensin II, on cardiac contractility was determined by means of noninvasive assessment of the slope of the end-systolic pressure (ESP)/end-systolic dimension (ESD) relationship. The slope (m) of this ratio was significantly higher with methoxamine (17.0; SD = 9.0 mm Hg/mm) than with angiotensin II (4.8; SD = 1.9 mm Hg/mm) (p less than 0.05). Slopes with methoxamine were higher when heart rates (HRs) were reflexly reduced, and were significantly diminished when reflex bradycardia was prevented by atropine (p less than 0.05) or atrial pacing (p less than 0.01). Previous treatment with propranolol did not modify m values with methoxamine (m = 15.5; SD = 4.4 mm Hg/mm). Phentolamine, given at peak methoxamine effect, did not consistently modify m values, resulting in an average slope not significantly different from that obtained with methoxamine alone. However, the addition of phentolamine did not cause an increase in ESDs at each level of ESP with respect to methoxamine. In the same subjects, infusion of phentolamine after angiotensin did not modify ESDs at comparable ESP levels. These findings suggest the existence of a positive inotropic effect mediated by alpha 1 adrenoceptors in the intact human heart.

  1. The efficacy and safety of epidural dexmedetomidine and clonidine with bupivacaine in patients undergoing lower limb orthopedic surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Safiya I; Mahesh, Sarala B

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Alpha (α-2) adrenergic agonists have both analgesic and sedative properties when used as an adjuvant in regional anesthesia. A prospective randomized double-blind study was carried out to evaluate the efficacy of epidural route and to compare the efficacy and clinical profile of dexmedetomidine and clonidine as an adjuvant to bupivacaine with special emphasis on their quality of analgesia, sedation and the ability to provide the smooth intra-operative and postoperative course. Material and Methods: The study was conducted in prospective, randomized and double-blind manner. It included 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists Class I and II patients undergoing lower limb surgery under epidural anesthesia. Patients were randomly divided into Group A receiving 0.5% isobaric bupivacaine 15 ml with dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg and Group B receiving 0.5% isobaric bupivacaine 15 ml with clonidine 2 μg/kg epidurally. Onset and duration of sensory and motor blocks, duration of analgesia, sedation, and adverse effects were assessed. Results: Demographic data, surgical characteristics cardio-respiratory parameters, side-effect profile were comparable and statistically not significant in both the groups. However, sedation scores with dexmedetomidine were better than clonidine and turned out to be statistically significant. The onset times for sensory and motor blocks were significantly shorter in Group A as compared to Group B. The duration of analgesia and motor block was significantly longer in A Group as compared to Group B. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine is a superior neuraxial adjuvant to bupivacaine when compared to clonidine for early onset of analgesia, superior intra-operative analgesia, stable cardio-respiratory parameters, prolonged postoperative analgesia and providing patient comfort. PMID:27275050

  2. Bidirectional counter-regulation of human lung mast cell and airway smooth muscle β2-adrenoceptors

    PubMed Central

    Newby, Chris; Amrani, Yassine; Bradding, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Human lung mast cells (HLMCs) play a central role in asthma pathogenesis through their relocation to the airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundles. β2 adrenoceptor (β2-AR)-agonists are used to relieve bronchoconstriction in asthma, but may reduce asthma control, particularly when used as monotherapy. We hypothesised that HLMC and human ASM cell (HASMC) responsiveness to β2-AR agonists would be attenuated when HLMCs are in contact with HASMCs. Cells were cultured in the presence of the short-acting β2-agonist albuterol, and the long-acting β2-agonists formoterol and olodaterol. Constitutive and FcεRI-dependent HLMC histamine release, HASMC contraction, and β2-AR phosphorylation at tyrosine 350 (Tyr350) were assessed. Constitutive HLMC histamine release was increased in HLMC-HASMC co-culture and this was enhanced by β2-AR agonists. Inhibition of FcεRI-dependent HLMC mediator release by β2-agonists was greatly reduced in HLMC-HASMC co-culture. These effects were reversed by neutralisation of stem cell factor (SCF) or cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1). β2-AR agonists did not prevent HASMC contraction when HLMCs were present, but this was reversed by fluticasone. β2-AR phosphorylation at Tyr350 occurred within 5 minutes in both HLMCs and HASMCs when the cells were co-cultured, and was inhibited by neutralising SCF or CADM1. HLMC interactions with HASMCs via CADM1 and Kit inhibit the potentially beneficial effects of β2-AR agonists on these cells via phosphorylation of the β2-AR. These results may explain the potentially adverse effects of β2-ARs agonists when used for asthma therapy. Targeting SCF and CADM1 may enhance β2-AR efficacy, particularly in corticosteroid-resistant patients. PMID:26608913

  3. α2C-Adrenoceptors modulate L-DOPA uptake in opossum kidney cells and in the mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    Moura, Eduardo; Silva, Elisabete; Serrão, Maria Paula; Afonso, Joana; Kozmus, Carina Esteves Pinto; Vieira-Coelho, Maria Augusta

    2012-10-01

    Targeted deletion or selective pharmacological inhibition of α(2C)-adrenoceptors in mice results in increased brain tissue levels of dopamine and its precursor l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA), without significant changes in l-DOPA synthesis. l-DOPA uptake is considered the rate-limiting step in dopamine synthesis in the kidney. Since α(2C)-adrenoceptors may influence the transport of l-DOPA, we investigated the effect of α(2C)-adrenoceptor activation on l-DOPA uptake in a kidney cell line (opossum kidney cells). l-DOPA and dopamine kidney tissue levels in α(2C)-adrenoceptor knockout (α(2C)KO) mice and in mice treated with the selective α(2C)-adrenoceptor antagonist JP-1302 were also evaluated. The α(2)-adrenoceptor agonist medetomidine (0.1-1,000 nM) produced a concentration-dependent decrease in l-DOPA uptake in opossum kidney cells (IC(50): 2.5 ± 0.5 nM and maximal effect: 28 ± 5% of inhibition). This effect was abolished by a preincubation with JP-1302 (300 nM). Furthermore, the effect of medetomidine (100 nM) was abolished by a preincubation with U-0126 (10 μM), a MEK1/2 inhibitor. Kidney tissue levels of l-DOPA were significantly higher in α(2C)KO mice compared with wild-type mice (wild-type mice: 58 ± 2 pmol/g tissue and α(2C)KO mice: 81 ± 15 pmol/g tissue, P < 0.05) and in mice treated with JP-1302 (3 μmol/kg body wt) compared with control mice (control mice: 62 ± 2 pmol/g tissue and JP-1302-treated mice: 75 ± 1 pmol/g tissue, P < 0.05), both without significant changes in dopamine kidney tissue levels. However, mice treated with JP-1302 on a high-salt diet presented significantly higher dopamine levels in the kidney and urine compared with control animals on a high-salt diet. In conclusion, in a kidney cell line, α(2C)-adrenoceptor activation inhibits l-DOPA uptake, and in mice, deletion or blockade of α(2C)-adrenoceptors increases l-DOPA kidney tissue levels.

  4. Postsynaptic alpha 2-adrenoceptors mediate melanosome aggregation in melanophores of the white-spotted rabbitfish (Siganus canaliculatus).

    PubMed

    Amiri, M H

    2009-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to study the nature of neuro-melanophore junction in the white-spotted rabbit fish Siganus canaliculatus. In vitro experiments using split fin preparation indicated that melanophores of S. canaliculatus are highly responsive to potassium ions and adrenergic agonists. Potassium ions and the adrenergic agonists induced prompt melanosome aggregation that could be competitively blocked by yohimbine (alpha-2 specific adrenergic antagonist) and phentolamine (non-specific alpha adrenergic antagonist). The melanophore responses to repeated potassium stimulation (up to 20 stimuli) did not show any sign of fatigue. However, statistically significant enhancement was observed in responses to potassium that followed the first five stimulations. Adrenergic agonists acted in a time and concentration-dependent manner and their relative potency had the following rank order: clonidine (alpha-2 specific agonist) > norepinephrine (non-specific adrenergic agonist) > phenylephrine (alpha-1 specific agonist) > methoxamine (alpha-1-specific agonist). Yohimbine exerted a more potent inhibiting effect on norepinephrine induced melanosome aggregation compared to phentolamine. Prazosine (alpha-1 specific antagonist) had no effect on such aggregation. Chemically denervated melanophores displayed hypersensitivity to alpha-adrenergic agonists but were refractive to potassium ion stimulation. The refractivity of denervated melanophores to potassium indicates the effect of potassium ion is not direct on melanophores but it is rather through depolarization effect of potassium on the neuro-melanophore peripheral sympathetic fibers and hence release of norepinephrine. In denervated melanophores, similar to intact melanophores, only phentolamine and yohimbine but not prazosine, significantly inhibited melanosome aggregation effect of norepinephrine, indicating that norepinephrine effect is through postsynaptic alpha-2 adrenoceptors. The present data demonstrate

  5. Contractions mediated by alpha 1-adrenoceptors and P2-purinoceptors in a cat colon circular muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Venkova, K.; Milne, A.; Krier, J.

    1994-01-01

    1. The postjunctional excitatory and inhibitory effects of adrenoceptor and purinoceptor agonists and antagonists were studied in circular smooth muscle strips of cat colon. 2. In the presence of tetrodotoxin (0.5 microM), noradrenaline caused contraction or relaxation of circular smooth muscle at resting tension or with raised tone, respectively. The noradrenaline-evoked contractions were potentiated and the noradrenaline-evoked relaxations were antagonized by propranolol (1 microM), suggesting beta-adrenoceptor involvement. 3. At resting tension, noradrenaline, adrenaline and the selective alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist, phenylephrine, caused concentration-dependent contractile responses, with EC50 values of 1.8 +/- 0.2 microM, 1.9 +/- 0.4 microM and 4.3 +/- 1.7 microM, respectively. The EC50 values and the amplitude of maximal responses were not significantly different from one another. Clonidine (0.1-500 microM), a selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, was not effective. 4. Prazosin (0.1-9 microM), competitively antagonized the contractile effects of noradrenaline with an estimated pA2 value of 6.93 and a slope of 1.07 +/- 0.03. The Kb values, estimated from a single shift (0.1 microM prazosin) of the concentration-response curves to noradrenaline, adrenaline and phenylephrine were 92.8 +/- 9.3 nM, 108.7 +/- 6.4 nM and 18.4 +/- 3.1 nM, respectively. 5. At resting tension, adenosine 5' triphosphate (ATP, 5-1000 microM), alpha,beta-methylene adenosine 5'-triphosphate (alpha,beta-MeATP, 0.05-50 microM), beta,gamma-methylene adenosine 5'-triphosphate (beta,gamma-MeATP, 0.5-100 microM), and 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-triphosphate (2-MeSATP, 1-500 microM) caused concentration-dependent contractions with EC50 values of 60.5 +/- 15.9 microM, 0.7 +/- 0.1 microM, 7.6 +/- 0.1 microM and 25.3 +/- 12.8 microM, respectively.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7952886

  6. Behaviour of beta 2-adrenoceptors on lymphocytes under continuous and pulsatile tocolysis with Fenoterol.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Rhode, Peter; Brunke, Björn; Schröer, Heinrich; Obert, Kirstin; Schlegel, Kerstin; Sturm, Gerhard; Schulz, Klaus-Dieter; von Wichert, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The present study investigates the population of beta 2-receptors on lymphocytes in pregnant women with premature labor between the 29th and 34th week of pregnancy. The population of receptors on lymphocytes correlates with that on the myometrium, which is not accessible for study during pregnancy. Fourteen patients received a pulsatile tocolysis, while ten women received a continuous tocolysis with Fenoterol. Assuming an equal population of receptors in both groups before commencement of therapy, the numbers of receptors in the patients with continuous tocolysis fell to about 35% of the initial value after 72 hours. Under pulsatile tocolysis, the numbers of receptors remained unchanged for a period of three days and was still only just below 70% of the initial value by the seventh day. Our data demonstrate that continuous administration of the short-acting beta 2-agonist Fenoterol resulted in a substantial loss of beta 2-adrenoceptors on lymphocytes. In contrast, intermittent administration of the same beta 2-adrenergic agonist prevented the onset of receptor down-regulation in pregnant women with preterm labor. Further studies are required to investigate the impact of the decreased loss of beta 2-adrenoceptor density on the good clinical experience with intermittent tocolysis.

  7. Characterization of β-adrenoceptors in urinary bladder: comparison between rat and rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Oshita, Masafumi; Hiraoka, Yasuko; Watanabe, Yoshinari

    1997-01-01

    β-Adrenoceptor subtypes in rat and rabbit urinary bladder were investigated in functional experiments by use of several agonists and antagonists. All agonists tested produced concentration-dependent relaxation, but the relative potencies varied between both species: BRL  37344 (pD2:8.0)>isoprenaline (7.3)>adrenaline (6.7)=noradrenaline (6.6) in rat bladder, and isoprenaline (8.7)=adrenaline (8.5)>noradrenaline (7.7)=BRL  37344 (7.4) in rabbit bladder. The relaxation response to isoprenaline in rat bladder was relatively resistant to propranolol and ICI  118551, and the slopes of Schild plot for both antagonists were different from unity. The apparent pKB values estimated by single concentrations of propranolol (1, 10 μM) and ICI  118551(10 μM) were 6.6 and 5.4, respectively. On the other hand, the relaxation response to isoprenaline in rabbit bladder was antagonized by lower concentrations (1 nM–100 nM) of propranolol and ICI  118551 in a competitive manner, resulting in pA2 values of 8.7 and 8.6, respectively. These results suggest species-heterogeneity of β-adrenoceptors in urinary bladder; β3 and β2 subtypes in rat and β2 subtype in rabbit. PMID:9422819

  8. Interactions of the alpha2A-adrenoceptor with multiple Gi-family G-proteins: studies with pertussis toxin-resistant G-protein mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Wise, A; Watson-Koken, M A; Rees, S; Lee, M; Milligan, G

    1997-01-01

    The alpha2A-adrenoceptor is the prototypic example of the family of G-protein-coupled receptors which function by activation of 'Gi-like' pertussis toxin-sensitive G-proteins. A number of members of this subfamily of G-proteins are often co-expressed in a single cell type. To examine the interaction of this receptor with individual Gi-family G-proteins the porcine alpha2A-adrenoceptor was transiently transfected into COS-7 cells either alone or with each of wild-type Gi1alpha, Gi2alpha and Gi3alpha or mutations of each of these G-proteins in which the cysteine residue which is the target for pertussis toxin-catalysed ADP-ribosylation was exchanged for a glycine residue. The alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist UK14304 stimulated both high-affinity GTPase activity and the binding of guanosine 5'-[gamma-35thio]-triphosphate (GTP[35S]), when expressed without any additional G-protein. These effects were greatly reduced by pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin. Co-expression of each of the wild-type Gi-like G-protein alpha-subunits resulted in enhanced agonist activation of the cellular G-protein population which was fully prevented by pretreatment with pertussis toxin. Co-expression of the receptor along with the cysteine-to-glycine mutations of Gi1alpha, Gi2alpha and Gi3alpha resulted in agonist stimulation of these G-proteins, which was as great as that of the wild type proteins, but now the agonist stimulation produced over that due to the activation of endogenously expressed Gi-like G-proteins was resistant to pertussis toxin treatment. The Cys --> Gly mutations of Gi1alpha, Gi2alpha and Gi3alpha were each also able to limit agonist-mediated stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity. The degree of agonist-mediated activation of the pertussis toxin-resistant mutant of Gi1alpha was correlated highly both with the level of expression of this G-protein and with the level of expression of the alpha2A-adrenoceptor. Half-maximal stimulation of high-affinity GTPase

  9. The influence of hormonal and neuronal factors on rat heart adrenoceptors

    PubMed Central

    Kunos, George; Mucci, Lucia; O'Regan, Seana

    1980-01-01

    1 The influence of hormonal and neuronal factors on adrenoceptors mediating increased cardiac force and rate of contraction were studied in rat isolated atria. The pharmacological properties of these receptors were deduced from the relative potencies of agonists and from the effects of selective α- and β-adrenoceptor antagonists. The numbers and affinities of α- and β-adrenoceptors were also determined by radioligand binding to ventricular membrane fragments. 2 Hypophysectomy reduced the inotropic potency of isoprenaline and increased the potency of phenylephrine and methoxamine in left atria. The effect of phenylephrine was inhibited by propranolol less effectively and by phentolamine or phenoxybenzamine more effectively in hypophysectomized than in control rats. The difference in block was smaller at low than at high antagonist concentrations. Similar but smaller changes were observed for chronotropic responses of right atria. 3 The decreased β- and increased α-receptor response after hypophysectomy was similar to that observed earlier in thyroidectomized rats (Kunos, 1977). These changes developed slowly after hypophysectomy (>2 weeks), they were both reversed within 2 days of thyroxine treatment (0.2 mg/kg daily), but were not affected by cortisone treatment (50 mg/kg every 12 h for 4 days). 4 Treatment of hypophysectomized rats for 2 days with thyroxine increased the density of [3H]-dihydroalprenolol ([3H]-DHA) binding sites from 27.5 ± 2.7 to 45.5 ± 5.7 fmol/mg protein and decreased the density of [3H]-WB-4101 binding sites from 38.7 ± 3.1 to 18.7 ± 2.5 fmol/mg protein. The affinity of either type of binding site for agonists or antagonist was not significantly altered by thyroxine treatment and the sum total of α1- and β-receptors remained the same. 5 Sympathetic denervation of thyroidectomized rats by 6-hydroxydopamine increased the inotropic potency of isoprenaline and noradrenaline and the blocking effect of propranolol, and decreased the

  10. Conformationally selective RNA aptamers allosterically modulate the β2-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed

    Kahsai, Alem W; Wisler, James W; Lee, Jungmin; Ahn, Seungkirl; Cahill Iii, Thomas J; Dennison, S Moses; Staus, Dean P; Thomsen, Alex R B; Anasti, Kara M; Pani, Biswaranjan; Wingler, Laura M; Desai, Hemant; Bompiani, Kristin M; Strachan, Ryan T; Qin, Xiaoxia; Alam, S Munir; Sullenger, Bruce A; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2016-09-01

    G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligands function by stabilizing multiple, functionally distinct receptor conformations. This property underlies the ability of 'biased agonists' to activate specific subsets of a given receptor's signaling profile. However, stabilizing distinct active GPCR conformations to enable structural characterization of mechanisms underlying GPCR activation remains difficult. These challenges have accentuated the need for receptor tools that allosterically stabilize and regulate receptor function through unique, previously unappreciated mechanisms. Here, using a highly diverse RNA library combined with advanced selection strategies involving state-of-the-art next-generation sequencing and bioinformatics analyses, we identify RNA aptamers that bind a prototypical GPCR, the β2-adrenoceptor (β2AR). Using biochemical, pharmacological, and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that these aptamers bind with nanomolar affinity at defined surfaces of the receptor, allosterically stabilizing active, inactive, and ligand-specific receptor conformations. The discovery of RNA aptamers as allosteric GPCR modulators significantly expands the diversity of ligands available to study the structural and functional regulation of GPCRs. PMID:27398998

  11. Ultrasound-guided femoro-sciatic nerve block for post-operative analgesia after below knee orthopaedic surgeries under subarachnoid block: Comparison between clonidine and dexmedetomidine as adjuvants to levobupivacaine

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Sudarshan Kumar; Verma, Ravinder Kumar; Rana, Shelly; Singh, Jai; Gupta, Bhanu; Singh, Yuvraj

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The advent of ultrasonographic-guided techniques has led to increased interest in femoro-sciatic nerve block (FSNB) for lower limb surgeries. α2-agonists have been used recently as adjuvants to local anaesthetics in nerve blocks. We aimed to compare equal doses of clonidine or dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to levobupivacaine in FSNB for post-operative analgesia. Methods: Ninety patients scheduled to undergo below knee orthopaedic surgeries under subarachnoid block were divided into three groups: Group LL (n = 30) patients received 38 mL of 0.125% levobupivacaine with 2 mL normal saline, Group LD (n = 30) patients received 38 mL of 0.125% levobupivacaine with 0.5 μg/kg dexmedetomidine and Group LC (n = 30) received 38 mL of 0.125% levobupivacaine with 0.5 μg/kg clonidine in saline to make total drug volume of 40 mL. The primary and secondary outcome variables were duration of analgesia and rescue analgesic requirement, verbal rating score respectively. Continuous variables were analysed with analysis of variance or the Kruskal–Wallis test on the basis of data distribution. Categorical variables were analysed with the contingency table analysis and the Fisher's exact test. Results: Duration of analgesia was prolonged with dexmedetomidine (10.17 ± 2.40 h) and clonidine (7.31 ± 1.76 h) as compared to control (4.16 ± 1.04 h, P = 0.00). Significantly lower pain scores were observed in dexmedetomidine group as compared to clonidine up to 8 h post-operatively. Conclusion: Equal doses of clonidine or dexmedetomidine added to levobupivacaine prolonged the duration of analgesia, decreased requirement of rescue analgesia. Dexmedetomidine delays the requirement of rescue analgesics with better pain scores as compared to clonidine. PMID:27512164

  12. Neuronal ensembles sufficient for recovery sleep and the sedative actions of α2 adrenergic agonists.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhe; Ferretti, Valentina; Güntan, İlke; Moro, Alessandro; Steinberg, Eleonora A; Ye, Zhiwen; Zecharia, Anna Y; Yu, Xiao; Vyssotski, Alexei L; Brickley, Stephen G; Yustos, Raquel; Pillidge, Zoe E; Harding, Edward C; Wisden, William; Franks, Nicholas P

    2015-04-01

    Do sedatives engage natural sleep pathways? It is usually assumed that anesthetic-induced sedation and loss of righting reflex (LORR) arise by influencing the same circuitry to lesser or greater extents. For the α2 adrenergic receptor agonist dexmedetomidine, we found that sedation and LORR were in fact distinct states, requiring different brain areas: the preoptic hypothalamic area and locus coeruleus (LC), respectively. Selective knockdown of α2A adrenergic receptors from the LC abolished dexmedetomidine-induced LORR, but not sedation. Instead, we found that dexmedetomidine-induced sedation resembled the deep recovery sleep that follows sleep deprivation. We used TetTag pharmacogenetics in mice to functionally mark neurons activated in the preoptic hypothalamus during dexmedetomidine-induced sedation or recovery sleep. The neuronal ensembles could then be selectively reactivated. In both cases, non-rapid eye movement sleep, with the accompanying drop in body temperature, was recapitulated. Thus, α2 adrenergic receptor-induced sedation and recovery sleep share hypothalamic circuitry sufficient for producing these behavioral states.

  13. Neuronal ensembles sufficient for recovery sleep and the sedative actions of α2 adrenergic agonists

    PubMed Central

    Güntan, İlke; Moro, Alessandro; Steinberg, Eleonora A.; Ye, Zhiwen; Zecharia, Anna Y.; Yu, Xiao; Vyssotski, Alexei L.; Brickley, Stephen G.; Yustos, Raquel; Pillidge, Zoe E.; Harding, Edward C.; Wisden, William; Franks, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Do sedatives engage natural sleep pathways? It is usually assumed that anesthetic-induced sedation and loss-of-righting-reflex (LORR) arise by influencing the same circuitry to lesser or greater extents. For the α2 adrenergic receptor agonist dexmedetomidine, we find that sedation and LORR are in fact distinct states, requiring different brain areas, the preoptic hypothalamic area and locus coeruleus (LC) respectively. Selective knockdown of α2A adrenergic receptors from the LC abolished dexmedetomidine-induced LORR, but not sedation. Instead, we found that dexmedetomidine-induced sedation resembles the deep recovery sleep that follows sleep deprivation. We used TetTag-pharmacogenetics in mice to functionally mark neurons activated in the preoptic hypothalamus during dexmedetomidine-induced sedation or recovery sleep. The neuronal ensembles could then be selectively reactivated. In both cases NREM sleep, with the accompanying drop in body temperature, was recapitulated. Thus α2 adrenergic receptor-induced sedation and recovery sleep share hypothalamic circuitry sufficient for producing these behavioral states. PMID:25706476

  14. Intravenous labetolol in treating hypertensive crisis following dexmedetomidine infusion for procedural sedation.

    PubMed

    Muthiah, Thilaka; Moni, Amarnath; Mathews, Lailu; Balaji, Sudarshan

    2016-03-01

    Dexmedetomidine is widely used for procedural sedation because of its unique combination of sedation, analgesia, and anxiolysis with minimal respiratory depression. Transient hypertension has been reported during the use of dexmedetomidine which is usually benign and is taken over by the hypotensive response on continuing the infusion. We report a case of hypertensive crisis following dexmedetomidine infusion used for procedural sedation, necessitating discontinuation of the infusion and treatment of hypertension. The dilemmas involved in treating hypertension caused by dexmedetomidine are discussed.

  15. Long-term nitric oxide deficiency causes muscarinic supersensitivity and reduces β3-adrenoceptor-mediated relaxation, causing rat detrusor overactivity

    PubMed Central

    Mónica, F Z T; Bricola, A A O; Báu, F R; Freitas, L L Lopes; Teixeira, S A; Muscará, M N; Abdalla, F M F; Porto, C S; De Nucci, G; Zanesco, A; Antunes, E

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Overactive bladder is a complex and widely prevalent condition, but little is known about its physiopathology. We have carried out morphological, biochemical and functional assays to investigate the effects of long-term nitric oxide (NO) deficiency on muscarinic receptor and β-adrenoceptor modulation leading to overactivity of rat detrusor muscle. Experimental approach: Male Wistar rats received Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) in drinking water for 7–30 days. Functional responses to muscarinic and β-adrenoceptor agonists were measured in detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) strips in Krebs–Henseleit solution. Measurements of [3H]inositol phosphate, NO synthase (NOS) activity, [3H]quinuclidinyl benzilate ([3H]QNB) binding and bladder morphology were also performed. Key results: Long-term L-NAME treatment significantly increased carbachol-induced DSM contractile responses after 15 and 30 days; relaxing responses to the β3-adrenoceptor agonist BRL 37-344 were significantly reduced at 30 days. Constitutive NOS activity in bladder was reduced by 86% after 7 days and maintained up to 30 days of L-NAME treatment. Carbachol increased sixfold the [3H]inositol phosphate in bladder tissue from rats treated with L-NAME. [3H]QNB was bound with an apparent KD twofold higher in bladder membranes after L-NAME treatment compared with that in control. No morphological alterations in DSM were found. Conclusions and implications: Long-term NO deficiency increased rat DSM contractile responses to a muscarinic agonist, accompanied by significantly enhanced KD values for muscarinic receptors and [3H]inositol phosphate accumulation in bladder. This supersensitivity for muscarinic agonists along with reductions of β3-adrenoceptor-mediated relaxations indicated that overactive DSM resulted from chronic NO deficiency. PMID:18297104

  16. A comparison of dexmedetomidine plus ketamine combination with dexmedetomidine alone for awake fiberoptic nasotracheal intubation: A randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Sunil Kumar; Joshiraj, Bandi; Chaudhary, Lalita; Hayaran, Nitin; Kaur, Manpreet; Jain, Aruna

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: We designed a study to compare the effectiveness of dexmedetomidine plus ketamine combination with dexmedetomidine alone in search of an ideal sedation regime, which would achieve better intubating conditions, hemodynamic stability, and sedation for awake fiberoptic nasotracheal intubation. Materials and Methods: A total of 60 adult patients of age group 18-60 years with American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II posted for elective surgery under general anesthesia were randomly divided into two groups of 30 each in this prospective randomized controlled double-blinded study. Groups I and II patients received a bolus dose of dexmedetomidine at 1 mcg/kg over 10 min followed by a continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine at 0.5 mcg/kg/h. Upon completion of the dexmedetomidine bolus, Group I patients received 15 mg of ketamine and an infusion of ketamine at 20 mg/h followed by awake fiberoptic nasotracheal intubation, while Group II patients upon completion of dexmedetomidine bolus received plain normal saline instead of ketamine. Hemodynamic variables like heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP), oxygen saturation, electrocardiogram changes, sedation score (modified Observer assessment of alertness/sedation score), intubation score (vocal cord movement and coughing), grimace score, time taken for intubation, amount of lignocaine used were noted during the course of study. Patient satisfaction score and level of recall were assessed during the postoperative visit the next day. Results: Group I patients maintained a stable HR and MAP (<10% fall when compared with the baseline value). Sedation score (3.47 vs. 3.93) and patient satisfaction score were better in Group I patients. There was no significant difference in intubation scores, grimace scores, oxygen saturation and level of recall when compared between the two groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: The use of dexmedetomidine plus ketamine combination in awake fiberoptic nasotracheal

  17. Pressor Response to Noradrenaline in the Setting of Septic Shock: Anything New under the Sun—Dexmedetomidine, Clonidine? A Minireview

    PubMed Central

    Géloën, A.; Pichot, C.; Leroy, S.; Julien, C.; Ghignone, M.; May, C. N.; Quintin, L.

    2015-01-01

    Progress over the last 50 years has led to a decline in mortality from ≈70% to ≈20% in the best series of patients with septic shock. Nevertheless, refractory septic shock still carries a mortality close to 100%. In the best series, the mortality appears related to multiple organ failure linked to comorbidities and/or an intense inflammatory response: shortening the period that the subject is exposed to circulatory instability may further lower mortality. Treatment aims at reestablishing circulation within a “central” compartment (i.e., brain, heart, and lung) but fails to reestablish a disorganized microcirculation or an adequate response to noradrenaline, the most widely used vasopressor. Indeed, steroids, nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, or donors have not achieved overwhelming acceptance in the setting of septic shock. Counterintuitively, α2-adrenoceptor agonists were shown to reduce noradrenaline requirements in two cases of human septic shock. This has been replicated in rat and sheep models of sepsis. In addition, some data show that α2-adrenoceptor agonists lead to an improvement in the microcirculation. Evidence-based documentation of the effects of alpha-2 agonists is needed in the setting of human septic shock. PMID:26783533

  18. The effects of SB 216469, an antagonist which discriminates between the alpha 1A-adrenoceptor and the human prostatic alpha 1-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed Central

    Chess-Williams, R.; Chapple, C. R.; Verfurth, F.; Noble, A. J.; Couldwell, C. J.; Michel, M. C.

    1996-01-01

    1. The affinity of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist SB 216469 (also known as REC 15/2739) has been determined at native and cloned alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes by radioligand binding and at functional alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes in isolated tissues. 2. In radioligand binding studies with [3H]-prazosin, SB 216469 had a high affinity at the alpha 1A-adrenoceptors of the rat cerebral cortex and kidney (9.5-9.8) but a lower affinity at the alpha 1B-adrenoceptors of the rat spleen and liver (7.7-8.2). 3. At cloned rat alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes transiently expressed in COS-1 cells and also at cloned human alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes stably transfected in Rat-1 cells, SB 216469 exhibited a high affinity at the alpha 1a-adrenoceptors (9.6-10.4) with a significantly lower affinity at the alpha 1b-adrenoceptor (8.0-8.4) and an intermediate affinity at the alpha 1d-adrenoceptor (8.7-9.2). 4. At functional alpha 1-adrenoceptors, SB 216469 had a similar pharmacological profile, with a high affinity at the alpha 1A-adrenoceptors of the rat vas deferens and anococcygeus muscle (pA2 = 9.5-10.0), a low affinity at the alpha 1B-adrenoceptors of the rat spleen (6.7) and guinea-pig aorta (8.0), and an intermediate affinity at the alpha 1D-adrenoceptors of the rat aorta (8.8). 5. Several recent studies have concluded that the alpha 1-adrenoceptor present in the human prostate has the pharmacological characteristics of the alpha 1A-adrenoceptor subtype. However, the affinity of SB 216469 at human prostatic alpha 1-adrenoceptors (pA2 = 8.1) determined in isolated tissue strips, was significantly lower than the values obtained at either the cloned alpha 1a-adrenoceptors (human, rat, bovine) or the native alpha 1A-adrenoceptors in radioligand binding and functional studies in the rat. 6. Our results with SB 216469, therefore, suggest that the alpha 1-adrenoceptor mediating contractile responses of the human prostate has properties which distinguish it from the cloned alpha 1a-adrenoceptor

  19. Caveolae Contribute to the Apoptosis Resistance Induced by the α1A-Adrenoceptor in Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Katsogiannou, Maria; Boustany, Charbel El; Gackiere, Florian; Delcourt, Philippe; Athias, Anne; Mariot, Pascal; Dewailly, Etienne; Jouy, Nathalie; Lamaze, Christophe; Bidaux, Gabriel; Mauroy, Brigitte; Prevarskaya, Natalia; Slomianny, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Background During androgen ablation prostate cancer cells' growth and survival become independent of normal regulatory mechanisms. These androgen-independent cells acquire the remarkable ability to adapt to the surrounding microenvironment whose factors, such as neurotransmitters, influence their survival. Although findings are becoming evident about the expression of α1A-adrenoceptors in prostate cancer epithelial cells, their exact functional role in androgen-independent cells has yet to be established. Previous work has demonstrated that membrane lipid rafts associated with key signalling proteins mediate growth and survival signalling pathways in prostate cancer cells. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to analyze the membrane topology of the α1A-adrenoceptor we explored its presence by a biochemical approach in purified detergent resistant membrane fractions of the androgen-independent prostate cancer cell line DU145. Electron microscopy observations demonstrated the colocalisation of the α1A-adrenoceptor with caveolin-1, the major protein component of caveolae. In addition, we showed that agonist stimulation of the α1A-adrenoceptor induced resistance to thapsigargin-induced apoptosis and that caveolin-1 was necessary for this process. Further, immunohistofluorescence revealed the relation between high levels of α1A-adrenoceptor and caveolin-1 expression with advanced stage prostate cancer. We also show by immunoblotting that the TG-induced apoptosis resistance described in DU145 cells is mediated by extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK). Conclusions/Significance In conclusion, we propose that α1A-adrenoceptor stimulation in androgen-independent prostate cancer cells via caveolae constitutes one of the mechanisms contributing to their protection from TG-induced apoptosis. PMID:19763272

  20. The activation of α1-adrenoceptors is implicated in the antidepressant-like effect of creatine in the tail suspension test.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Mauricio P; Pazini, Francis L; Oliveira, Ágatha; Bettio, Luis E B; Rosa, Julia M; Machado, Daniele G; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2013-07-01

    The antidepressant-like activity of creatine in the tail suspension test (TST) was demonstrated previously by our group. In this study we investigated the involvement of the noradrenergic system in the antidepressant-like effect of creatine in the mouse TST. In the first set of experiments, creatine administered by i.c.v. route (1 μg/site) decreased the immobility time in the TST, suggesting the central effect of this compound. The anti-immobility effect of peripheral administration of creatine (1 mg/kg, p.o.) was prevented by the pretreatment of mice with α-methyl-p-tyrosine (100 mg/kg, i.p., inhibitor of tyrosine hydroxylase), prazosin (1 mg/kg, i.p., α1-adrenoceptor antagonist), but not by yohimbine (1 mg/kg, i.p., α2-adrenoceptor antagonist). Creatine (0.01 mg/kg, subeffective dose) in combination with subeffective doses of amitriptyline (1 mg/kg, p.o., tricyclic antidepressant), imipramine (0.1 mg/kg, p.o., tricyclic antidepressant), reboxetine (2 mg/kg, p.o., selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor) or phenylephrine (0.4 μg/site, i.c.v., α1-adrenoceptor agonist) reduced the immobility time in the TST as compared with either drug alone. These results indicate that the antidepressant-like effect of creatine is likely mediated by an activation of α1-adrenoceptor and that creatine produces synergistic effects in the TST with antidepressants that modulate noradrenaline transporter, suggesting that an improvement in the response to the antidepressant therapy may occur when creatine is combined with these antidepressants. Furthermore, the synergistic effect of creatine (0.01 mg/kg, p.o.) and reboxetine (2 mg/kg, p.o.) combination was abolished by the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin, indicating that the antidepressant-like effect of combined therapy is likely mediated by an activation of α1-adrenoceptor.

  1. A Comparison of the Anorectic Effect and Safety of the Alpha2-Adrenoceptor Ligands Guanfacine and Yohimbine in Rats with Diet-Induced Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Magdalena; Knutelska, Joanna; Bednarski, Marek; Nowiński, Leszek; Zygmunt, Małgorzata; Mordyl, Barbara; Głuch-Lutwin, Monika; Kazek, Grzegorz; Sapa, Jacek; Pytka, Karolina

    2015-01-01

    The search for drugs with anorectic activity, acting within the adrenergic system has attracted the interest of researchers. Partial α2-adrenoceptor agonists might offer the potential for effective and safe treatment of obesity. We compared the effectiveness and safety of α2-adrenoceptor ligands in reducing body mass. We also analyzed if antagonist and partial agonists of α2-adrenoceptor––yohimbine and guanfacine––act similarly, and determined which course of action is connected with anorectic activity. We tested intrinsic activity and effect on the lipolysis of these compounds in cell cultures, evaluated their effect on meal size, body weight in Wistar rats with high-fat diet-induced obesity, and determined their effect on blood pressure, heart rate, lipid profile, spontaneous locomotor activity, core temperature and glucose, as well as glycerol and cortisol levels. Both guanfacine and yohimbine showed anorectic activity. Guanfacine was much more effective than yohimbine. Both significantly reduced the amount of intraperitoneal adipose tissue and had a beneficial effect on lipid profiles. Decreased response of α2A-adrenoceptors and partial stimulation of α2B-receptors seem to be responsible for the anorectic action of guanfacine. The stimulation of α1-adrenoceptors by guanfacine is responsible for cardiovascular side effects but may also be linked with improved anorexic effect. α1-adrenoceptor blockade is connected with the side effects of yohimbine, but it is also associated with the improvement of lipid profiles. Guanfacine has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat hypertension and conduct disorder, but as it reduces body weight, it is worth examining its effectiveness and safety in models of obesity. PMID:26506439

  2. Apparent lack of beta 3-adrenoceptors and of insulin regulation of glucose transport in brown adipose tissue of guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Himms-Hagen, J; Triandafillou, J; Begin-Heick, N; Ghorbani, M; Kates, A L

    1995-01-01

    Norepinephrine-induced thermogenesis was substantial in adipocytes from brown adipose tissue (BAT) of cold-acclimated guinea pigs but absent in adipocytes from BAT of warm-acclimated guinea pigs. There was no thermogenic response to any beta 3-adrenergic agonist (CL-316,243, ZD-7114, BRL-28410, CGP-12177). The receptor was characterized as a beta 1-adrenoceptor. Adrenergic agonists stimulated adenylate cyclase in membranes from BAT of both warm- and cold-acclimated guinea pigs also via a beta 1-adrenoceptor; beta 3-adrenergic agonists had no effect. Glucose transport by brown adipocytes from warm-acclimated guinea pigs was not stimulated by either norepinephrine or insulin. Cold acclimation induced the appearance of stimulation of glucose transport by norepinephrine in association with the appearance of a large capacity for thermogenesis, but there was little improvement in response to insulin. GLUT4 was present in membranes from BAT of both warm- and cold-acclimated guinea pigs. Insulin is known to have an antilipolytic effect on both BAT and white adipose tissue of guinea pigs. Thus there is a selective lack of insulin-regulated glucose transport that is not improved by cold acclimation. Guinea pigs may have a mutated component of the translocation mechanism for GLUT4. beta 3-Adrenoceptors appear to be absent in brown adipocytes of adult guinea pigs, as in white adipocytes of guinea pigs, yet are known to be present in the gut. Tissue-specific expression of beta 3-adrenergic receptors in guinea pigs may differ from that in rats, in which receptors are expressed in the adipose tissues and gut. PMID:7840345

  3. Lymphocyte beta-2-adrenoceptors and plasma catecholamines in fetal hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Santala, M; Saarikoski, S; Castrén, O; Parviainen, M

    1990-01-01

    Conclusive evidence has been furnished that the beta 2-adrenoceptor density in circulating lymphocytes is related to that of beta 2-adrenoceptors in tissues from the same subjects. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of fetal hypoxia on lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptor density. The material consisted of 8 hypoxic newborns, 4 delivered by vacuum extraction and 4 by Caesarean section, after approximately 10 h parturition. The control group consisted of 8 vaginally delivered newborns without hypoxia. Umbilical plasma adrenaline and noradrenaline were significantly elevated in the hypoxic newborns. Their lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptor density was lower (p less than 0.01) than that in the controls. A plausible explanation for this finding might be downregulation of beta 2-adrenoceptors because of elevated plasma catecholamine level.

  4. Pharmacology of alpha-adrenoceptors in male sexual function.

    PubMed

    Rampin, O

    1999-01-01

    Data issued from morphological and physiological experiments suggests that the noradrenergic system, through ascending pathways to the brain and descending pathways to the spinal cord, may regulate male sexual functions. Adrenoceptors have been shown to be present in the brain and spinal cord of animals and humans. The activity of spinal preganglionic neurons is modulated by noradrenaline. Pharmacological approaches aiming at selectively targeting alpha1- or alpha2-adrenoceptors have been conducted in patients with erectile dysfunction or in monkeys and rats in a variety of tests. Briefly, conclusions arising from these studies are: activation of alpha1-adrenoceptors facilitates copulation, where activation of alpha2-adrenoceptors inhibits copulation. alpha2-adrenoceptors antagonists like yohimbine facilitate sexual behavior, reducing ejaculation latency in male rats and increasing their sexual motivation. Furthermore, yohimbine induces copulation in rats either castrated or sexually naive. In contrast, activation of alpha1-adrenoceptors depresses sexual responses in another context, i.e. reflexive erections. Activation of alpha2-adrenoceptors activates reflexive erections in rats, and alpha2-adrenoceptors antagonists (yohimbine) inhibit them. Today's challenge is to separate the effects of any drug acting at the level of the alpha-adrenoceptors on the central vs. peripheral control of sexual functions, on the brain vs. spinal cord control of the same functions, and the search for any specialization of alpha-adrenoceptors subtypes in a given sexual function. Treatment of sexual dysfunctions in man (e.g. ejaculation) focusing on the spinal cord as a pharmacological target should also be expanded. Finally, considering the similarities between neural networks controlling male and female sexual functions, the treatment of female sexual dysfunction with comparable pharmacological approaches should be evaluated. PMID:10393482

  5. Beta2-adrenoceptor genotype and function affect hemodynamic profile heterogeneity in postural tachycardia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Giris; Garland, Emily M; Costa, Fernando; Stein, C Michael; Xie, Hong-Guang; Robertson, Rose Marie; Biaggioni, Italo; Robertson, David

    2006-03-01

    Previous studies suggest that the beta2-adrenoceptor functions abnormally in patients with postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) and may contribute to their altered hemodynamic profile. To test the hypothesis that the beta2-adrenoceptor response is decreased in POTS, we studied: (1) the arterial vasodilation response to the beta agonist, isoproterenol, and (2) the distribution of common polymorphisms (codons 16 and 27) of the gene coding the receptor (beta2-AR) in a large population with POTS. We measured plasma catecholamines and monitored hemodynamics and changes in forearm and leg blood flow to incremental doses of intraarterial isoproterenol in 9 patients with POTS compared with 8 healthy subjects. For polymorphism assessment we collected DNA from 57 patients with POTS and compared with 67 age-sex matched healthy subjects. Circulating catecholamines were significantly higher in POTS subjects compared with controls. Intrabrachial and intrafemoral isoproterenol infusion elicited a dose-dependent increase in blood flow. In healthy subjects, blood flow increased (mean+/-SEM) 400+/-70% in the forearm and 170+/-40% in the leg, but only 280+/-60% in forearms and 120+/-20% in legs of patients with POTS (ANOVA for both P<0.001). The genotype and allele distributions for codons 16 and 27 beta2-AR variants were not different in the 2 groups. However, the blood pressure and plasma norepinephrine levels diverged in patients according to their genotype. Patients with Gly16Gly and patients with Glu27Glu had lower plasma catecholamines and higher supine and upright blood pressure, compared with other genotypes. Therefore, both decreased beta2-adrenoceptor-related vasodilation and beta2-AR polymorphisms may contribute to the hemodynamic diversity of patients with POTS.

  6. Cardiac responses to β-adrenoceptor stimulation is partly dependent on mitochondrial calcium uniporter activity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sada, E; Silva-Platas, C; Villegas, C A; Rivero, S L; Willis, B C; García, N; Garza, J R; Oropeza-Almazán, Y; Valverde, C A; Mazzocchi, G; Zazueta, C; Torre-Amione, G; García-Rivas, G

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Despite the importance of mitochondrial Ca2+ to metabolic regulation and cell physiology, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate Ca2+ entry into the mitochondria. Accordingly, we established a system to determine the role of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter in an isolated heart model, at baseline and during increased workload following β-adrenoceptor stimulation. Experimental Approach Cardiac contractility, oxygen consumption and intracellular Ca2+ transients were measured in ex vivo perfused murine hearts. Ru360 and spermine were used to modify mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter activity. Changes in mitochondrial Ca2+ content and energetic phosphate metabolite levels were determined. Key Results The addition of Ru360, a selective inhibitor of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, induced progressively and sustained negative inotropic effects that were dose-dependent with an EC50 of 7 μM. Treatment with spermine, a uniporter agonist, showed a positive inotropic effect that was blocked by Ru360. Inotropic stimulation with isoprenaline elevated oxygen consumption (2.7-fold), Ca2+-dependent activation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (5-fold) and mitochondrial Ca2+ content (2.5-fold). However, in Ru360-treated hearts, this parameter was attenuated. In addition, β-adrenoceptor stimulation in the presence of Ru360 did not affect intracellular Ca2+ handling, PKA or Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent PK signalling. Conclusions and Implications Inhibition of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter decreases β-adrenoceptor response, uncoupling between workload and production of energetic metabolites. Our results support the hypothesis that the coupling of workload and energy supply is partly dependent on mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter activity. PMID:24628066

  7. In vivo effect of tramadol on locus coeruleus neurons is mediated by alpha2-adrenoceptors and modulated by serotonin.

    PubMed

    Berrocoso, Esther; Micó, Juan Antonio; Ugedo, Luisa

    2006-07-01

    Tramadol is a centrally-acting analgesic endowed with opioid, noradrenergic and serotonergic properties. Various data suggest that, in addition to its analgesic effect, tramadol may have antidepressant and anxiolytic-like effects. This study investigates, through single-unit extracellular recording techniques, the in vivo effects of tramadol on locus coeruleus (LC) neurons and its possible effects on alpha(2)-adrenoceptors, opioid receptors and the 5-HT system. Tramadol produced a dose-dependent and complete inhibition of LC activity (ED(50)=2.1mg/kg). This inhibitory effect was prevented and reversed by the selective alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist, idazoxan, but not by the opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone. The inhibition of the synthesis of 5-HT by p-chlorophenylalanine and the pre-administration of the 5-HT(1A) receptor agonist, 8-OH-DPAT at 40microg/kg, caused a significant potentiation of the tramadol effect decreasing the ED(50) by 53% and 67% respectively. Lower doses of 8-OH-DPAT, of 1 and 4microg/kg, did not significantly modify the tramadol effect. In summary, the results indicate that tramadol elicits an inhibitory effect on LC neurons in vivo through alpha(2)-adrenoceptors. Moreover, this effect is modulated by the 5-HT system and particularly by 5-HT(1A) receptors.

  8. Intranasally Administered Adjunctive Dexmedetomidine Reduces Perioperative Anesthetic Requirements in General Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiang; Hang, Li-Hua; Wang, Hong; Shao, Dong-Hua; Xu, Yi-Guo; Cui, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Intranasal dexmedetomidine is an effective sedative for premedication and is regularly used to reduce preoperative tension and anxiety in children. This study aimed to assess the effect of intranasally adjunctive dexmedetomidine on perioperative sedative and analgesic requirements in adults. Materials and Methods Patients were randomly divided into four groups to receive preoperative administration of saline, intranasal dexmedetomidine 1 µg/kg and 2 µg/kg, and intravenous dexmedetomidine 1 µg/kg, respectively. Propofol and remifentanil were target-controlled infused to maintain intraoperative bispectral index at 45–55 and blood pressure at baseline value±20%. Sufentanil was administered to maintain postoperative visual analogue scale ≤3. Perioperative anesthetics requirements were compared using nonparametric tests. Results Intranasal dexmedetomidine significantly attenuated propofol requirements for anesthesia induction and maintenance in a dose-dependent manner. Patients given intranasal dexmedetomidine 2 µg/kg required less remifentanil for anesthesia maintenance. The first postoperative request for sufentanil analgesia was delayed in patients given intranasal dexmedetomidine 2 µg/kg. The anesthetics-sparing effect of intranasal dexmedetomidine was significantly weaker than intravenous dexmedetomidine at the same dose of 1 µg/kg. The incidences of adverse events, including hemodynamic instability and delayed recovery, were comparable with and without intranasal dexmedetomidine. Conclusion Intranasal administration of dexmedetomidine can reduce perioperative anesthetic requirements, and a dose of dexmedetomidine 2 µg/kg produces a better effect in adults. The anesthetics-sparing effect of intranasal dexmedetomidine 1 µg/kg is less than that with the same intravenous dose of dexmedetomidine. PMID:27189297

  9. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Dexmedetomidine-Induced Electroencephalogram Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez, Rafael; Rhee, James; Pavone, Kara J.; Hobbs, Lauren E.; Purdon, Patrick L.; Brown, Emery N.

    2016-01-01

    An improved understanding of the neural correlates of altered arousal states is fundamental for precise brain state targeting in clinical settings. More specifically, electroencephalogram recordings are now increasingly being used to relate drug-specific oscillatory dynamics to clinically desired altered arousal states. Dexmedetomidine is an anesthetic adjunct typically administered in operating rooms and intensive care units to produce and maintain a sedative brain state. However, a high-density electroencephalogram characterization of the neural correlates of the dexmedetomidine-induced altered arousal state has not been previously accomplished. Therefore, we administered dexmedetomidine (1mcg/kg bolus over 10 minutes, followed by 0.7mcg/kg/hr over 50 minutes) and recorded high-density electroencephalogram signals in healthy volunteers, 18–36 years old (n = 8). We analyzed the data with multitaper spectral and global coherence methods. We found that dexmedetomidine was associated with increased slow-delta oscillations across the entire scalp, increased theta oscillations in occipital regions, increased spindle oscillations in frontal regions, and decreased beta oscillations across the entire scalp. The theta and spindle oscillations were globally coherent. During recovery from this state, these electroencephalogram signatures reverted towards baseline signatures. We report that dexmedetomidine-induced electroencephalogram signatures more closely approximate the human sleep onset process than previously appreciated. We suggest that these signatures may be targeted by real time visualization of the electroencephalogram or spectrogram in clinical settings. Additionally, these signatures may aid the development of control systems for principled neurophysiological based brain-state targeting. PMID:27711165

  10. Clinical evaluation of the effect of intravenous dexmedetomidine on the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation in patients undergoing thyroid surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Rashmi, H. D.; Komala, H. K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The procedures in anesthesia such as laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation are the most important skills to be mastered by an anesthesiologist. However, they produce marked cardiovascular responses such as hypertension and tachycardia. Various drugs have been used to suppress this response. One of those is a novel centrally acting α2 agonist - dexmedetomidine. It has numerous uses in anesthesia as it is having sedative, analgesic, hypnotic, and opioid sparing effects. It is also known to suppress the hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and intubation. Aims: This study is aimed to know the effect of intravenous dexmedetomidine 0.6 μg/kg body weight on hemodynamic response to laryngoscopy and endotracheal intubation in patients undergoing thyroid surgeries. Setting and Design: Sixty patients of American Society of Anaesthesiologist health status class I and II scheduled for thyroid surgery under general anesthesia were considered in this prospective randomized controlled double-blind study. The study population was randomly divided into two groups with 30 patients in each group using sealed envelopes containing the name of the group and patient is asked to pick up the envelope. Materials and Methods: Sixty euthyroid patients, scheduled for thyroid surgeries was randomly divided into two groups with 30 patients in each group. Group A (n = 30) received injection dexmedetomidine 0.6 μg/kg body weight and Group B (n = 30) received 10 ml of normal saline. Heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded at regular intervals after intubation. Results: Statistically significant decrease in HR, SBP, DBP, and MAP were observed in Group A after intubation when compared to Group B. Conclusion: We conclude that dexmedetomidine 0.6 μg/kg body weight obtunds the hemodynamic responses to laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation in patients undergoing thyroid surgeries. PMID:27746537

  11. Alpha 1-adrenoceptors mediating contraction in arteries of normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rats are of the alpha 1D or alpha 1A subtypes.

    PubMed

    Villalobos-Molina, R; Ibarra, M

    1996-03-18

    Alpha 1-Adrenoceptor subtypes mediating contraction in carotid, aorta, mesenteric and caudal arteries from both Wistar Kyoto (WKY) normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats were investigated by using the alpha 1A-adrenoceptor agonist methoxamine and antagonized with selective, competitive antagonists WB-4101, 5-methyl urapidil or BMY 7378 (8-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl)ethyl)-8-azaspiro(4,5)decane -7,9-dione dihydrochloride). Isometric tension changes were recorded after methoxamine addition to the arterial rings, and the effects of the antagonists determined. All the antagonists shifted to the right the concentration-response curve to methoxamine. pA2 values indicate that all arteries but caudal express the alpha 1D-adrenoceptor subtype, since BMY 7378 values were high in these arteries. Due to the high pA2 values for 5-methyl urapidil and WB-4101 and the low values for BMY 7378 we conclude that the tail artery expresses the alpha 1A and not the alpha 1B subtype. No differences were found between both strains of rats, suggesting that hypertension does not modify the alpha 1-adrenoceptors in conductance arteries. PMID:8846824

  12. ATP is not involved in α1-adrenoceptor-mediated vasoconstriction in resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Angus, James A; Wright, Christine E

    2015-12-15

    Recent publications suggest that α1-adrenoceptor stimulation by exogenous agonists such as phenylephrine in resistance arteries cause contraction through the release of ATP from within the vascular smooth muscle cells. This ATP exits the cell through pannexin-1 channels to act back "autocrine-like" on P2 receptors on the smooth muscle that cause the contraction. In this work we directly test this hypothesis by using a selective P2X1 purinoceptor antagonist NF449 (1-10µM) against phenylephrine and ATP concentration-response curves in small mesenteric arteries of the rat and thoracodorsal arteries of the mouse. We show that NF449 is a simple competitive antagonist of ATP with a pKB of 6.43 and 6.41 in rat and mouse arteries, respectively, but did not antagonise phenylephrine concentration-response curves. This work cautions against the growing overstated role of the reputed pannexin-1/ATP release axis following α1-adrenoceptor activation in small resistance arteries.

  13. Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine Promotes Postoperative Analgesia in Patients After Abdominal Colectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Dong-Jian; Qi, Bin; Tang, Gang; Li, Jin-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Surgery-induced acute postoperative pain may lead to prolonged convalescence. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on postoperative analgesia following abdominal colectomy surgeries. Eighty patients scheduled for abdominal colectomy surgery under general anesthesia were divided into 2 groups, which were maintained using propofol/remifentanil/dexmedetomidine (PRD) or propofol/remifentanil/saline (PRS). During surgery, patients in the PRD group had a lower bispectral index (BIS) value, which indicated a deeper anesthetic state, and a higher sedation score right after extubation than patients in the PRS group. During the first 24 hours post surgery, PRD patients consumed less morphine in patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and had a lower score in the visual analog scale (VAS) testing than their controls from the PRS group. Intraoperative administration of dexmedetomidine appears to promote the analgesic property of morphine-based PCA in patients after abdominal colectomy. PMID:26376397

  14. Ligand-regulated oligomerization of β2-adrenoceptors in a model lipid bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Juan José; Deupi, Xavier; Pardo, Leonardo; Yao, Xiao Jie; Velez-Ruiz, Gisselle A; DeVree, Brian T; Sunahara, Roger K; Kobilka, Brian K

    2009-01-01

    The β2-adrenoceptor (β2AR) was one of the first Family A G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) shown to form oligomers in cellular membranes, yet we still know little about the number and arrangement of protomers in oligomers, the influence of ligands on the organization or stability of oligomers, or the requirement for other proteins to promote oligomerization. We used fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) to characterize the oligomerization of purified β2AR site-specifically labelled at three different positions with fluorophores and reconstituted into a model lipid bilayer. Our results suggest that the β2AR is predominantly tetrameric following reconstitution into phospholipid vesicles. Agonists and antagonists have little effect on the relative orientation of protomers in oligomeric complexes. In contrast, binding of inverse agonists leads to significant increases in FRET efficiencies for most labelling pairs, suggesting that this class of ligand promotes tighter packing of protomers and/or the formation of more complex oligomers by reducing conformational fluctuations in individual protomers. The results provide new structural insights into β2AR oligomerization and suggest a possible mechanism for the functional effects of inverse agonists. PMID:19763081

  15. Membrane Potential Controls the Efficacy of Catecholamine-induced β1-Adrenoceptor Activity.

    PubMed

    Birk, Alexandra; Rinne, Andreas; Bünemann, Moritz

    2015-11-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are membrane-located proteins and, therefore, are exposed to changes in membrane potential (V(M)) in excitable tissues. These changes have been shown to alter receptor activation of certain Gi-and Gq-coupled GPCRs. By means of a combination of whole-cell patch-clamp and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) in single cells, we demonstrate that the activation of the Gs-coupled β1-adrenoreceptor (β1-AR) by the catecholamines isoprenaline (Iso) and adrenaline (Adr) is regulated by V(M). This voltage-dependence is also transmitted to G protein and arrestin 3 signaling. Voltage-dependence of β2-AR activation, however, was weak compared with β1-AR voltage-dependence. Drug efficacy is a major target of β1-AR voltage-dependence as depolarization attenuated receptor activation, even under saturating concentrations of agonists, with significantly faster kinetics than the deactivation upon agonist withdrawal. Also the efficacy of the endogenous full agonist adrenaline was reduced by depolarization. This is a unique finding since reports of natural full agonists at other voltage-dependent GPCRs only show alterations in affinity during depolarization. Based on a Boltzmann function fit to the relationship of V(M) and receptor-arrestin 3 interaction we determined the voltage-dependence with highest sensitivity in the physiological range of membrane potential. Our data suggest that under physiological conditions voltage regulates the activity of agonist-occupied β1-adrenoceptors on a very fast time scale.

  16. Prevention of neutrophil extravasation by α2-adrenoceptor-mediated endothelial stabilization.

    PubMed

    Herrera-García, Ada María; Domínguez-Luis, María Jesús; Arce-Franco, María; Armas-González, Estefanía; Álvarez de La Rosa, Diego; Machado, José David; Pec, Martina K; Feria, Manuel; Barreiro, Olga; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Díaz-González, Federico

    2014-09-15

    Adrenergic receptors are expressed on the surface of inflammation-mediating cells, but their potential role in the regulation of the inflammatory response is still poorly understood. The objectives of this work were to study the effects of α2-adrenergic agonists on the inflammatory response in vivo and to determine their mechanism of action. In two mouse models of inflammation, zymosan air pouch and thioglycolate-induced peritonitis models, the i.m. treatment with xylazine or UK14304, two α2-adrenergic agonists, reduced neutrophil migration by 60%. The α2-adrenergic antagonist RX821002 abrogated this effect. In flow cytometry experiments, the basal surface expression of L-selectin and CD11b was modified neither in murine nor in human neutrophils upon α2-agonist treatment. Similar experiments in HUVEC showed that UK14304 prevented the activation-dependent upregulation of ICAM-1. In contrast, UK14304 augmented electrical resistance and reduced macromolecular transport through a confluent HUVEC monolayer. In flow chamber experiments, under postcapillary venule-like flow conditions, the pretreatment of HUVECs, but not neutrophils, with α2-agonists decreased transendothelial migration, without affecting neutrophil rolling. Interestingly, α2-agonists prevented the TNF-α-mediated decrease in expression of the adherens junctional molecules, VE-cadherin, β-catenin, and plakoglobin, and reduced the ICAM-1-mediated phosphorylation of VE-cadherin by immunofluorescence and confocal analysis and Western blot analysis, respectively. These findings indicate that α2-adrenoceptors trigger signals that protect the integrity of endothelial adherens junctions during the inflammatory response, thus pointing at the vascular endothelium as a therapeutic target for the management of inflammatory processes in humans.

  17. Oral transmucosal administration of dexmedetomidine for sedation in 4 dogs.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Anne E; Bennett, Sara L

    2015-11-01

    Injectable dexmedetomidine (DM) is widely used for sedation, restraint, anxiolysis, and analgesia in veterinary medicine. Oral transmucosal dexmedetomidine (OTM DM) has been evaluated in horses, cats, and humans, but not in dogs. In this case series, OTM DM (mean dose of 32.6 μg/kg body weight) was given in the buccal pouch to 4 aggressive dogs in a hospital setting. Two of the dogs were subsequently euthanized, and in the other 2, sedation was reversed with atipamezole. Satisfactory sedation was achieved in all cases. PMID:26538668

  18. Oral transmucosal administration of dexmedetomidine for sedation in 4 dogs

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Anne E.; Bennett, Sara L.

    2015-01-01

    Injectable dexmedetomidine (DM) is widely used for sedation, restraint, anxiolysis, and analgesia in veterinary medicine. Oral transmucosal dexmedetomidine (OTM DM) has been evaluated in horses, cats, and humans, but not in dogs. In this case series, OTM DM (mean dose of 32.6 μg/kg body weight) was given in the buccal pouch to 4 aggressive dogs in a hospital setting. Two of the dogs were subsequently euthanized, and in the other 2, sedation was reversed with atipamezole. Satisfactory sedation was achieved in all cases. PMID:26538668

  19. Recruitment of β-Arrestin 1 and 2 to the β2-Adrenoceptor: Analysis of 65 Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Littmann, Timo; Göttle, Martin; Reinartz, Michael T.; Kälble, Solveig; Wainer, Irving W.; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2015-01-01

    Beyond canonical signaling via Gαs and cAMP, the concept of functional selectivity at β2-adrenoceptors (β2ARs) describes the ability of adrenergic drugs to stabilize ligand-specific receptor conformations to initiate further signaling cascades comprising additional G-protein classes or β-arrestins (βarr). A set of 65 adrenergic ligands including 40 agonists and 25 antagonists in either racemic or enantiopure forms was used for βarr recruitment experiments based on a split-luciferase assay in a cellular system expressing β2AR. Many agonists showed only (weak) partial agonism regarding βarr recruitment. Potencies and/or efficacies increased depending on the number of chirality centers in (R) configuration; no (S)-configured distomer was more effective at inducing βarr recruitment other than the eutomer. βarr2 was recruited more effectively than βarr1. The analysis of antagonists revealed no significant effects on βarr recruitment. Several agonists showed preference for activation of Gαs GTPase relative to βarr recruitment, and no βarr-biased ligand was identified. In conclusion: 1) agonists show strong bias for Gαs activation relative to βarr recruitment; 2) agonists recruit βarr1 and βarr2 with subtle differences; and 3) there is no evidence for βarr recruitment by antagonists. PMID:26306764

  20. Presynaptic alpha-2 adrenoceptor activation and coupling of the receptor-presynaptic effector system in the perfused rat heart: affinity and efficacy of phenethylamines and imidazoline derivatives.

    PubMed

    Fuder, H; Braun, H J; Schimkus, R

    1986-04-01

    The right sympathetic nerves of perfused rat hearts were stimulated in the presence of inhibitors of neuronal and extraneuronal uptake and propranolol. The inhibition by alpha adrenoceptor agonists of stimulation-evoked (10 pulses, 0.1 Hz) [3H]norepinephrine (NE) overflow into the perfusate was taken as a parameter of presynaptic adrenoceptor activation. Under the present conditions, autoinhibition of NE release is not activated by endogenous NE as evident from ineffectiveness of adrenoceptor antagonists in facilitating evoked [3H]NE overflow. The potency (EC50, -log10), affinity (agonist-presynaptic receptor dissociation constant KA, -log10) and relative efficacies (RE) were determined for phenethylamines (NE or alpha-methylepinephrine) and for imidazoline derivatives. NE (-log EC50, 7.76) was 0.88 log units more potent than alpha-methylepinephrine (-log EC50, 6.88) and about the same difference was observed for the -log KA values (5.92 vs. 4.75). RE were similar (NE, 100%; alpha methylepinephrine, 98%) and 22- to 50-fold higher than efficacies of imidazoline derivatives. Hydroxylations in positions 3 and 4 of the phenyl moiety of phenylaminoimidazoline (-log EC50, less than 5; -log KA, less than 5; RE, less than 1%) resulted in a marked increase in potency (-log EC50, 8.32) of the resulting dihydroxyphenylaminoimidazoline due to a high affinity (-log KA, 8.22) at a low efficacy (2% of NE). In contrast, hydroxylation in positions 3 and 4 of the phenyl ring of tolazoline (no agonist activity under the present conditions; antagonist affinity constant from the literature, 6.4-6.6) produced dihydroxytolazoline, a moderately potent agonist (-log EC50, 7.25) with an efficacy of 3.5% at an affinity (-log KA, 6.92) not much different from that of tolazine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. The relationship between the MMP system, adrenoceptors and phosphoprotein phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Rietz, A; Spiers, JP

    2012-01-01

    The MMPs and their inhibitors [tissue inhibitor of MMPs (TIMPs) ] form the mainstay of extracellular matrix homeostasis. They are expressed in response to numerous stimuli including cytokines and GPCR activation. This review highlights the importance of adrenoceptors and phosphoprotein phosphatases (PPP) in regulating MMPs in the cardiovascular system, which may help explain some of the beneficial effects of targeting the adrenoceptor system in tissue remodelling and will establish emerging crosstalk between these three systems. Although α- and β-adrenoceptor activation increases MMP but decreases TIMP expression, MMPs are implicated in the growth stimulatory effects of adrenoceptor activation through transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor. Furthermore, they have recently been found to catalyse the proteolysis of β-adrenoceptors and modulate vascular tone. While the mechanisms underpinning these effects are not well defined, reversible protein phosphorylation by kinases and phosphatases may be key. In particular, PPP (Ser/Thr phosphatases) are not only critical in resensitization and internalization of adrenoceptors but also modulate MMP expression. The interrelationship is complex as isoprenaline (ISO) inhibits okadaic acid [phosphoprotein phosphatase type 1/phosphoprotein phosphatase type 2A (PP2A) inhibitor]-mediated MMP expression. While this may be simply due to its ability to transiently increase PP2A activity, there is evidence for MMP-9 that ISO prevents okadaic acid-mediated expression of MMP-9 through a β-arrestin, NF-κB-dependent pathway, which is abolished by knock-down of PP2A. It is essential that crosstalk between MMPs, adrenoceptors and PPP are investigated further as it will provide important insight into how adrenoceptors modulate cardiovascular remodelling, and may identify new targets for pharmacological manipulation of the MMP system. PMID:22364165

  2. α1-Adrenoceptors in the hippocampal dentate gyrus involved in learning-dependent long-term potentiation during active-avoidance learning in rats.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jing; Zhan, Su-Yang; Li, Guang-Xie; Wang, Dan; Li, Ying-Shun; Jin, Qing-Hua

    2016-11-01

    The hippocampus is the key structure for learning and memory in mammals and long-term potentiation (LTP) is an important cellular mechanism responsible for learning and memory. The influences of norepinephrine (NE) on the modulation of learning and memory, as well as LTP, through β-adrenoceptors are well documented, whereas the role of α1-adrenoceptors in learning-dependent LTP is not yet clear. In the present study, we measured extracellular concentrations of NE in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) region using an in-vivo brain microdialysis and high-performance liquid chromatography techniques during the acquisition and extinction of active-avoidance behavior in freely moving conscious rats. Next, the effects of prazosin (an antagonist of α1-adrenoceptor) and phenylephrine (an agonist of the α1-adrenoceptor) on amplitudes of field excitatory postsynaptic potential were measured in the DG region during the active-avoidance behavior. Our results showed that the extracellular concentration of NE in the DG was significantly increased during the acquisition of active-avoidance behavior and gradually returned to the baseline level following extinction training. A local microinjection of prazosin into the DG significantly accelerated the acquisition of the active-avoidance behavior, whereas a local microinjection of phenylephrine retarded the acquisition of the active-avoidance behavior. Furthermore, in all groups, the changes in field excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude were accompanied by corresponding changes in active-avoidance behavior. Our results suggest that NE activation of α1-adrenoceptors in the hippocampal DG inhibits active-avoidance learning by modulation of synaptic efficiency in rats.

  3. α1-Adrenoceptors in the hippocampal dentate gyrus involved in learning-dependent long-term potentiation during active-avoidance learning in rats.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jing; Zhan, Su-Yang; Li, Guang-Xie; Wang, Dan; Li, Ying-Shun; Jin, Qing-Hua

    2016-11-01

    The hippocampus is the key structure for learning and memory in mammals and long-term potentiation (LTP) is an important cellular mechanism responsible for learning and memory. The influences of norepinephrine (NE) on the modulation of learning and memory, as well as LTP, through β-adrenoceptors are well documented, whereas the role of α1-adrenoceptors in learning-dependent LTP is not yet clear. In the present study, we measured extracellular concentrations of NE in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) region using an in-vivo brain microdialysis and high-performance liquid chromatography techniques during the acquisition and extinction of active-avoidance behavior in freely moving conscious rats. Next, the effects of prazosin (an antagonist of α1-adrenoceptor) and phenylephrine (an agonist of the α1-adrenoceptor) on amplitudes of field excitatory postsynaptic potential were measured in the DG region during the active-avoidance behavior. Our results showed that the extracellular concentration of NE in the DG was significantly increased during the acquisition of active-avoidance behavior and gradually returned to the baseline level following extinction training. A local microinjection of prazosin into the DG significantly accelerated the acquisition of the active-avoidance behavior, whereas a local microinjection of phenylephrine retarded the acquisition of the active-avoidance behavior. Furthermore, in all groups, the changes in field excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude were accompanied by corresponding changes in active-avoidance behavior. Our results suggest that NE activation of α1-adrenoceptors in the hippocampal DG inhibits active-avoidance learning by modulation of synaptic efficiency in rats. PMID:27603730

  4. Comparison of block characteristics of spinal anesthesia following intravenous dexmedetomidine and clonidine

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Akansha; Agrawal, Sanjay; Payal, Yashwant S

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Different routes of administration of α2 adrenergic receptor agonists have been found to prolong the duration of spinal block. Material and Methods: One hundred and twenty patients, aged 18-60 years, of ASA physical status I or II posted for elective fixation of fractures of lower limb under spinal anesthesia were selected. Spinal anesthesia was administered with 2.5 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine mixed with 10 μg fentanyl. The patients were randomized to receive intravenous (IV) dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg/h for 15 min followed by infusion of 0.3 μg/kg/h (Group I), IV Clonidine 2 μg/kg/h for 15 min followed by infusion of 0.5 μg kg/h (Group II) or 15 ml of normal saline for 15 min followed by infusion at 50 ml/h (Group III). Motor and sensory blockade was evaluated using bromage score and pin prick method respectively. Results: The median block height in all groups was T8. Time to achieve block height was fastest in Group I. Time of regression of sensory block to T12/L1 dermatome was 230.75 ± 21.25 min (Group I), 196.25 ± 20.27 min (Group II) and 163.88 ± 15.46 min (Group III) respectively. Regression of motor blocks to Bromage 0/1 was 274 ± 21.25 min, 234.25 ± 32.41 min and 130.12 ± 20.70 min in Groups I, II and III respectively. Bradycardia was seen in one patient in Group I and two patients in Group II. Hypotension was seen in five patients in Group I and seven patients in Group II. First requirement for postoperative analgesic was after 353.13 ± 39.60 min, 314.38 ± 30.64 min and 193.25 ± 17.74 min in Groups I, II and III respectively. Conclusion: IV α2 agonists are useful adjuvants for prolongation of the duration of spinal block. IV dexmedetomidine produces a better clinical profile compared to clonidine. PMID:27625482

  5. Comparison of block characteristics of spinal anesthesia following intravenous dexmedetomidine and clonidine

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Akansha; Agrawal, Sanjay; Payal, Yashwant S

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Different routes of administration of α2 adrenergic receptor agonists have been found to prolong the duration of spinal block. Material and Methods: One hundred and twenty patients, aged 18-60 years, of ASA physical status I or II posted for elective fixation of fractures of lower limb under spinal anesthesia were selected. Spinal anesthesia was administered with 2.5 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine mixed with 10 μg fentanyl. The patients were randomized to receive intravenous (IV) dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg/h for 15 min followed by infusion of 0.3 μg/kg/h (Group I), IV Clonidine 2 μg/kg/h for 15 min followed by infusion of 0.5 μg kg/h (Group II) or 15 ml of normal saline for 15 min followed by infusion at 50 ml/h (Group III). Motor and sensory blockade was evaluated using bromage score and pin prick method respectively. Results: The median block height in all groups was T8. Time to achieve block height was fastest in Group I. Time of regression of sensory block to T12/L1 dermatome was 230.75 ± 21.25 min (Group I), 196.25 ± 20.27 min (Group II) and 163.88 ± 15.46 min (Group III) respectively. Regression of motor blocks to Bromage 0/1 was 274 ± 21.25 min, 234.25 ± 32.41 min and 130.12 ± 20.70 min in Groups I, II and III respectively. Bradycardia was seen in one patient in Group I and two patients in Group II. Hypotension was seen in five patients in Group I and seven patients in Group II. First requirement for postoperative analgesic was after 353.13 ± 39.60 min, 314.38 ± 30.64 min and 193.25 ± 17.74 min in Groups I, II and III respectively. Conclusion: IV α2 agonists are useful adjuvants for prolongation of the duration of spinal block. IV dexmedetomidine produces a better clinical profile compared to clonidine.

  6. Beta-adrenoceptor changes in mononuclear leukocytes during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Nwosu, U C; Rice, P J

    1995-06-01

    Leukocyte beta 2-adrenoceptors mirror similar receptors in the uterus. This study examined changes in beta 2-adrenoceptors and in cAMP production during pregnancy using peripheral mononuclear leukocytes isolated from 17 pregnant women and 5 nonpregnant controls. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density was determined by 125I-pindolol binding. cAMP production under basal and stimulated (10 microM isoproterenol) conditions was determined by radioimmunoassay. Groups were compared by unpaired t test. There was a nonsignificant decrease in the density of beta-adrenoceptors during pregnancy. While basal cAMP production was unchanged during pregnancy, stimulated cAMP production was decreased (44% of control, P < 0.001; 95% CI 33%-56%). Stimulated cAMP production per receptor was lower in leukocytes from pregnant women and was not a constant relationship, but was increased markedly in leukocytes having fewer than 400 beta-adrenoceptor sites per cell. There are significant changes in the coupling of beta-adrenoceptors to cAMP production during pregnancy without changes in beta-receptor density, affinity, or basal cAMP production.

  7. Study of Use of Dexmedetomidine for Regional Anesthesia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Patients Scheduled for Upper Extremity Surgeries (Vascular Occlusion Syndrome, Acute Compartment Syndrome, Capral Tunnell Syndrome Etc.); Will Participate in the Study.; Focus of the Study is to Determine:; the Optimal Dose of Dexmedetomidine Added to Lidocaine; for Infra- and Supra-clavicular Brachial Plexus Block.

  8. Hemodynamic characteristics of midazolam, propofol, and dexmedetomidine in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Frölich, Michael A.; Arabshahi, Ali; Katholi, Charles; Prasain, Jeevan; Barnes, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective To study the effect of intravenous (IV) sedation on blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), and respiratory rates (RR) to determine if IV sedatives differ with respect to their effect on BP, HR, and RR. Design Prospective, randomized, single-blinded, placebo-controlled study. Setting Monitored patient care room at a clinical research center. Subjects 60 healthy ASA physical status 1 volunteers. Interventions Subjects were randomized to receive, in increasing doses, one of three IV sedatives: propofol, midazolam, or dexmedetomidine; or saline control. Measurements Blood pressure (systolic, diastolic), HR, and RR were recorded. Main Results A significant dose-dependent BP reduction occurred with dexmedetomidine and, to a lesser degree, with propofol; and there was good agreement of predicted versus measured drug concentrations for all sedatives. Blood pressure and HR of participants who received midazolam did not change. Conclusions When administered in sedative doses, dexmedetomidine and, to a lesser extent, midazolam, reduces BP in a dose-dependent fashion. Dexmedetomidine also reduces HR. Midazolam does not affect BP or HR. PMID:21570617

  9. Predictors of dexmedetomidine-associated hypotension in critically ill patients

    PubMed Central

    Gerlach, Anthony T.; Blais, Danielle M.; Jones, G. Morgan; Burcham, Pamela K.; Stawicki, Stanislaw P.; Cook, Charles H.; Murphy, Claire V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dexmedetomidine is commonly used for sedation in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU), and its use may be associated with hypotension. We sought to determine predictors of dexmedetomidine-associated hypotension. Methods: Retrospective, single-center study of 283 ICU patients in four adults ICUs over a 12 month period. Univariate analyses were performed to determine factors associated with dexmedetomidine-related hypotension. Risk factors significant at the 0.20 level in the univariate analysis were considered for inclusion into a step-wise multiple logistical regression model. Results: Hypotension occurred in 121 (42.8%) patients with a median mean arterial pressure (MAP) nadir of 54 mmHg. Univariate analyses showed an association between hypotension and age (P = 0.03), Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score (P = 0.02), baseline MAP (<0.001), admission to the cardiothoracic ICU (P = 0.05), history of coronary artery disease (P = 0.02), and postcardiac surgery (P = 0.0009). Admission to the medical ICU was associated with a decrease in development in hypotension (P = 0.03). There was a trend for hypotension with weight (P = 0.09) and history of congestive heart failure (P = 0.12) Only MAP prior to initiation (odds ratio [OR] 0.97, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.95–0.99; P < 0.0001), APACHE II scores (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.01–1.12; P = 0.017), and history of coronary artery disease (OR 0.48, 95% CI 0.26–0.90, P = 0.022) were independently associated with hypotension by multivariable analysis. Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine-associated hypotension is common. Preexisting low blood pressure, history of coronary artery disease, and higher acuity were identified as independent risk factors for dexmedetomidine-associated hypotension. PMID:27722111

  10. Possible dopaminergic stimulation of locus coeruleus alpha1-adrenoceptors involved in behavioral activation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yan; Quartermain, David; Dunn, Adrian J; Weinshenker, David; Stone, Eric A

    2008-07-01

    alpha(1)-Adrenoceptors of the locus coeruleus (LC) have been implicated in behavioral activation in novel surroundings, but the endogenous agonist that activates these receptors has not been established. In addition to the canonical activation of alpha(1)-receptors by norepinephrine (NE), there is evidence that dopamine (DA) may also activate certain brain alpha(1)-receptors. This study examined the contribution of DA to exploratory activity in a novel cage by determining the effect of infusion of various dopaminergic and adrenergic drugs into the mouse LC. It was found that the D2/D3 agonist, quinpirole, which selectively blocks the release of CNS DA, produced a dose-dependent and virtually complete abolition of exploration and all movement in the novel cage test. The quinpirole-induced inactivity was significantly attenuated by coinfusion of DA but not by the D1 agonist, SKF38390. Furthermore, the DA attenuation of quinpirole inactivity was blocked by coinfusion of the alpha(1)-adrenergic receptor antagonist, terazosin, but not by the D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390. LC infusions of either quinpirole or terazosin also produced profound inactivity in DA-beta-hydroxylase knockout (Dbh -/-) mice that lack NE, indicating that their behavioral effects were not due to an alteration of the release or action of LC NE. Measurement of endogenous DA, NE, and 5HT and their metabolites in the LC during exposure to the novel cage indicated an increase in the turnover of DA and NE but not 5HT. These results indicate that DA is a candidate as an endogenous agonist for behaviorally activating LC alpha(1)-receptors and may play a role in the activation of this nucleus by novel surroundings. PMID:18435418

  11. Clinical implications of recent insights into the structural biology of beta2 adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Amezcua-Gutierrez, Marcos Antonio; Cipres-Flores, Fabiola Jimena; Trujillo-Ferrara, Jose Guadalupe; Soriano-Ursua, Marvin Antonio

    2012-09-01

    Analysis of the crystal structure of beta-2 adrenoceptors (β2ARs) is providing new insights into the functioning of this receptor and perhaps of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) as a whole. This class of receptors represents the target of at least a third of the drugs on the market and plays an essential role in the study of therapetic drug-response. Among GPCRs, the β2AR is the best understood in terms of function, expression and activation. Regarding the interaction of β2ARs with a specific ligand, polymorphisms, conformational changes and stereoselectivity are important factors. Agonist affinity for β2ARs is influenced by the polymorphisms of these receptors, which in some cases appear to affect susceptibility to disorders. Conformational changes that take place upon the approach of a given ligand, as well as the stereoselectivity of this class of receptors can modify the intrinsic activity of β2ARs (and certainly of other receptors as well). Hence, a deepening understanding of these factors can provide new data on affinity and specifically the key residues involved in recognition of β2AR agonists. The deepening the understanding of the factors involved in ligand affinity for β2ARs will assist in the development of β2AR agonists that are more selective and potent, and that have longer term action. Not only are β2AR agonists employed as therapeutic agents, but also in diagnosis. Currently, the main clinical application of targeting human β2ARs is to treat asthma with bronchodilators. However, they are also used to treat other maladies in their acute or chronic forms, including heart conditions, metabolic disorders and muscle wasting. This review shows the scope and the possible future clinical implications of data from structures of β2ARs.

  12. Pharmacological activity of (-)-discretamine, a novel vascular alpha-adrenoceptor and 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist, isolated from Fissistigma glaucescens.

    PubMed

    Ko, F N; Yu, S M; Su, M J; Wu, Y C; Teng, C M

    1993-10-01

    1. The pharmacological activity of (-)-discretamine, isolated from Fissistigma glaucescens, was determined in rat isolated thoracic aorta, cardiac tissues and ventricular myocytes and guinea-pig isolated trachea. 2. (-)-Discretamine was found to be an alpha 1-adrenoceptor blocking agent in rat thoracic aorta as revealed by its competitive antagonism of noradrenaline (pA2 = 7.20 +/- 0.10)- or phenylephrine (pA2 = 7.60 +/- 0.09)-induced vasoconstriction. It was as potent as phentolamine (pA2 = 7.51 +/- 0.10), but was more potent than yohimbine (pA2 = 6.18 +/- 0.06). Removal of endothelium significantly increased the antagonistic potency of (-)-discretamine on noradrenaline (pA2 = 7.52 +/- 0.09)- or phenylephrine (pA2 = 7.90 +/- 0.09)-induced vasoconstriction. 3. (-)-Discretamine was also an alpha 2-adrenoceptor blocking agent (pA2 = 6.30 +/- 0.15) and a 5-hydroxytryptamine antagonist (pA2 = 6.87 +/- 0.06), both in rat aorta denuded of endothelium. 4. (-)-Discretamine protected alpha-adrenoceptors from alkylation by the irreversible blocking agent, phenoxybenzamine. 5. [3H]-inositol monophosphate formation caused by noradrenaline (3 microM) in rat thoracic aorta was suppressed by (-)-discretamine (10 and 30 microM) and prazosin (3 microM). 6. A high concentration of (-)-discretamine (30 microM) did not affect the contraction induced by the thromboxane receptor agonist U-46619, prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha), angiotensin II, high K+ or endothelin in rat aorta denuded of endothelium. Neither cyclic AMP nor cyclic GMP content of rat thoracic aorta was changed by (-)-discretamine. 7. Contraction of guinea-pig trachea caused by histamine, leukotriene C4 or carbachol was not affected by (-)-discretamine (30 microM). (-)-Discretamine also did not block beta l- or beta2-adrenoceptor-mediated responses induced by isoprenaline in rat right atria and guinea-pig trachea.8. A voltage clamp study in rat ventricular single myocytes revealed that sodium inward current, slow

  13. Estrogen reduces beta-adrenoceptor-mediated cAMP production and the concentration of the guanyl nucleotide-regulatory protein, Gs, in rabbit myometrium.

    PubMed

    Riemer, R K; Wu, Y Y; Bottari, S P; Jacobs, M M; Goldfien, A; Roberts, J M

    1988-04-01

    The uterine contractile response to adrenergic agonists or sympathetic stimulation is influenced dramatically by the hormonal milieu. Rabbit uterine contraction is mediated by alpha 1-adrenoceptors, whereas relaxation in response to the same stimulus is mediated by beta 2-adrenoceptors. Whether uterine contractility is increased or decreased by adrenergic stimulation is determined by the gonadal steroids estrogen and progesterone: uterine contraction prevails in the estrogen-dominant or the ovariectomized animal, but in the progesterone-dominant rabbit, uterine relaxation is observed. In previous studies, we have demonstrated that changes in the concentration or agonist affinity of these adrenoceptors cannot account for the changes in contractile response. In the present studies, we tested whether sex steroids might alter beta-adrenergic response by acting on events distal to receptor occupancy, and whether this could explain the conversion of contractile response. We found that myometrial cAMP generation is potently stimulated by beta-agonists in progesterone-treated and also in ovariectomized animals, but this stimulation is absent after estrogen treatment. Similar, but smaller, changes were observed for cAMP generation in response to prostaglandin E2 and forskolin. Stimulation of adenylate cyclase in uterine particulates by agents which act on the guanyl nucleotide-sensitive stimulatory transducer, Gs, is unchanged after estrogen treatment. However, specific labeling of Gs catalyzed by cholera toxin is reduced in membrane particulates from estrogen-treated animals. Recombination of extracts of uterine membranes from the differently treated animals also suggested qualitative differences in Gs. We conclude that at least one component of the adenylate cyclase cascade beyond the beta-adrenoceptor, i.e., Gs, is a target for ovarian steroids; estrogen reduces Gs labeling and beta-adrenoceptor-mediated cAMP production. However, uterine Gs labeling and cAMP production

  14. Analysis of the activity of alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists in rat aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Graaf, P. H.; Shankley, N. P.; Black, J. W.

    1996-01-01

    plot slope parameters for the other antagonists were not significantly different from unity. 5. In the absence of evidence to suggest that the deviations from simple competitive antagonism were due to failure to satisfy basic experimental conditions for quantitative analysis, an attempt was made to see whether the data could be accounted for by an existing two-receptor model (Furchgott, 1981). The goodness-of-fit obtained with the two-receptor model was significantly better than that obtained with the one-receptor model. Furthermore, with the exception of the data obtained with phentolamine, the pKB estimates for the two receptors were independent of whether NA or PE was used as agonist. 6. To determine which alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes may be associated with those defined by the two receptor model, the mean pKB estimates obtained from the two-receptor model fit were compared with affinities measured by Laz et al. (1994) for rat cloned alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes expressed in COS-7 cells. The sum of squared differences of the data points from the line of identity was smallest for both pKB1 and pKB2 in the case of the alpha 1a/d-adrenoceptor (now referred to as alpha 1d-adrenoceptor; Hieble et al., 1995). Therefore, the complexity exposed in this study may be due to the expression of closely-related forms of the alpha 1d-adrenoceptor. However, relatively good matches were also found between pKB1 and alpha 1c and between pKB2 and alpha 1b. Therefore, on the basis of these data, it is not possible to rule out the involvement of all three alpha 1-adrenoceptors. The conflicting reports concerning the characteristics of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor population mediating contraction of the rat aorta may, at least in part, be due to the lack of highly selective ligands and to between-assay variation in the expression of multiple alpha 1-adrenoceptors. PMID:8735631

  15. alpha2-Adrenergic agonists antagonise the anxiolytic-like effect of antidepressants in the four-plate test in mice.

    PubMed

    Massé, Fabienne; Hascoët, Martine; Bourin, Michel

    2005-10-14

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and serotonin/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) has been reported to be efficient in anxiety disorders. Some animal models have demonstrated an anxiolytic-like effect following acute administration, however, it is not yet known how noradrenergic receptors are implicated in the therapeutic effects of antidepressants (ADs) in anxiety. The effects of two alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists (clonidine, guanabenz) on anxiolytic-like effect of two SSRIs (paroxetine and citalopram) and two SNRIs (venlafaxine and milnacipran) were evaluated in the four-plate test (FPT) in mice. Paroxetine (4 mg/kg), citalopram (8 mg/kg), venlafaxine (8 mg/kg), and milnacipran (8 mg/kg) administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) increased the number of punishments accepted by mice in the FPT. Clonidine (0.0039-0.5 mg/kg) and guanabenz (0.03-0.5mg/kg) had no effect on the number of punishments accepted by mice. Clonidine (0.03 and 0.06 mg/kg) and guanabenz (0.125 and 0.5 mg/kg) (i.p. -45 min) reversed the anti-punishment effect of paroxetine, citalopram, venlafaxine and milnacipran (i.p. -30 min). But if the antidepressants are administered 45 min before the test and alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists 30 min before the test, alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists failed to alter the anti-punishment effect of antidepressants. The results of this present study indicate that alpha(2)-adrenoceptor agonists antagonise the anxiolytic-like effect of antidepressants in mice when they are administered 15 min before the administration of antidepressant suggesting a close inter-regulation between noradrenergic and serotoninergic system in the mechanism of SSRIs and SNRIs in anxiety-like behaviour.

  16. Clinical efficacy of dexmedetomidine versus propofol in children undergoing magnetic resonance imaging: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hongwei; Yang, Liu; Wang, Xiangrui; Zhu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine, as a sole or combinable sedative, has served in pediatric sedation undergoing MRI. However, clinical effects of dexmedetomidine are still controversial. This meta-analysis was to assess the effects between dexmedetomidine and propofol in children undergoing MRI, especially outcomes and adverse events of patients. Multiple Electronic Database searched including MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane library, and updated to April 2015. All statistical analysis utilized review manager to perform, the Cochrane collaboration's software preparation and maintenance of Cochrane systematic reviews. Five trials with a total of 337 patients were included. Compared with propofol group, dexmedetomidine significantly increased the recovery time (WMD: 10.70 min; 95% CI: 4.26-17.13; P = 0.001). The duration of sedation did not appear to decrease for the patients who received dexmedetomidine than for those who received propofol (WMD: 19.96 min; 95% CI: -4.12-44.04; P = 0.1). There were statistically significant increased in the pediatric anesthesia emergence Delirium scores of 5-min after awakening (WMD: 2.40; 95% CI: 1.00 to 3.81; P = 0.0008) and 10-min after awakening (WMD: 3.06; 95% CI: 1.81 to 4.31; P < 0.00001) in patients who were treated with dexmedetomidine than propofol. Improved the prognosis of patients, nonetheless, dexmedetomidine must have an indispensable role to undergoing pediatric MRI scanning. Compared with propofol, however, dexmedetomidine did not induce the duration of sedation and might lead to a longer recovery time.

  17. Comparison of Intravenous Dexmedetomidine and Midazolam for Bispectral Index-Guided Sedation During Spinal Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Youn Yi; Lee, Dongchul; Jung, Wol Seon; Cho, Noo Ree; Kwak, Hyun Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the high frequency of hypotension during spinal anesthesia with proper sedation, no previous report has compared the hemodynamic effects of dexmedetomidine and midazolam sedation during spinal anesthesia. We compared the effects of bispectral index (BIS)-guided intravenous sedation using midazolam or dexmedetomidine on hemodynamics and recovery profiles in patients who underwent spinal anesthesia. Material/Methods One hundred and sixteen adult patients were randomly assigned to receive either midazolam (midazolam group; n=58) or dexmedetomidine (dexmedetomidine group; n=58) during spinal anesthesia. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures; heart rates; peripheral oxygen saturations; and bispectral index scores were recorded during surgery, and Ramsay sedation scores and postanesthesia care unit (PACU) stay were monitored. Results Hypotension occurred more frequently in the midazolam group (P<0.001) and bradycardia occurred more frequently in the dexmedetomidine group (P<0.001). Mean Ramsay sedation score was significantly lower in the dexmedetomidine group after arrival in the PACU (P=0.025) and PACU stay was significantly longer in the dexmedetomidine group (P=0.003). Conclusions BIS-guided dexmedetomidine sedation can attenuate intraoperative hypotension, but induces more bradycardia, prolongs PACU stay, and delays recovery from sedation in patients during and after spinal anesthesia as compared with midazolam sedation. PMID:27701366

  18. Oral dexmedetomidine for preoperative sedation in an adult uncooperative autistic patient.

    PubMed

    Konia, Mojca Remskar

    2016-11-01

    We describe preoperative sedation with oral dexmedetomidine 5 mcg/kg in an uncooperative adult with autism and developmental delay. The sedation with oral dexmedetomidine achieved good sedation level (Ramsey 4-5), allowing for calm transfer of the patient to the operating room and uneventful induction of anesthesia. PMID:27687341

  19. Proliferation in cardiac fibroblasts induced by β1-adrenoceptor autoantibody and the underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lv, Tingting; Du, Yunhui; Cao, Ning; Zhang, Suli; Gong, Yulin; Bai, Yan; Wang, Wen; Liu, Huirong

    2016-01-01

    Chronic sustained stimulation of β-adrenoceptor is closely related to cardiac fibrosis which is bad for cardiac function. Growing evidence showed that the high prevalence of β1-adrenoceptor autoantibody (β1-AA) in the sera of patients with various types of cardiovascular diseases decreased cardiac function. In the current study, we demonstrated that β1-AA impaired the cardiac function evaluated by echocardiography and that β1-AA triggered cardiac fibrosis in terms of increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin as the marker of myofibroblast and collagen deposition in a passive β1-AA immunized mice model during 16 weeks. Further, we showed that β1-AA activated β1-AR/cAMP/PKA pathway and promoted proliferation in primary cardiac fibroblasts through specific binding to β1-AR but not to β2-AR. Moreover, β1-AA was also likely to promote proliferation in cardiac fibroblasts through activating p38MAPK and ERK1/2 as p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580 and ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 partially reversed the proliferative effect. The persistent activating signalling of PKA and P38MAPK in 1 h induced by β1-AA was associated with lacking agonist-induced desensitization phenomena. The conditioned medium from β1-AA-stimulated cardiac fibroblasts induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, which indicated that β1-AA changed the secretion of cardiac fibroblasts contributing to cardiac injury. These findings will contribute to our understanding of the pathological mechanisms of β1-AA. PMID:27577254

  20. Proliferation in cardiac fibroblasts induced by β1-adrenoceptor autoantibody and the underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Tingting; Du, Yunhui; Cao, Ning; Zhang, Suli; Gong, Yulin; Bai, Yan; Wang, Wen; Liu, Huirong

    2016-01-01

    Chronic sustained stimulation of β-adrenoceptor is closely related to cardiac fibrosis which is bad for cardiac function. Growing evidence showed that the high prevalence of β1-adrenoceptor autoantibody (β1-AA) in the sera of patients with various types of cardiovascular diseases decreased cardiac function. In the current study, we demonstrated that β1-AA impaired the cardiac function evaluated by echocardiography and that β1-AA triggered cardiac fibrosis in terms of increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin as the marker of myofibroblast and collagen deposition in a passive β1-AA immunized mice model during 16 weeks. Further, we showed that β1-AA activated β1-AR/cAMP/PKA pathway and promoted proliferation in primary cardiac fibroblasts through specific binding to β1-AR but not to β2-AR. Moreover, β1-AA was also likely to promote proliferation in cardiac fibroblasts through activating p38MAPK and ERK1/2 as p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580 and ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 partially reversed the proliferative effect. The persistent activating signalling of PKA and P38MAPK in 1 h induced by β1-AA was associated with lacking agonist-induced desensitization phenomena. The conditioned medium from β1-AA-stimulated cardiac fibroblasts induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, which indicated that β1-AA changed the secretion of cardiac fibroblasts contributing to cardiac injury. These findings will contribute to our understanding of the pathological mechanisms of β1-AA. PMID:27577254

  1. Selective central alpha-2 adrenoceptor control of regional haemodynamic responses to air jet stress in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kapusta, D R; Knardahl, S; Koepke, J P; Johnson, A K; DiBona, G F

    1989-03-01

    The role of central nervous system alpha 2-adrenoceptors in the regulation of peripheral sympathetic outflow to regional vascular resistance beds during environmental stress was examined in conscious chronically instrumented spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). SHR were instrumented with pulsed Doppler flow probes on the renal and mesenteric arteries and the lower abdominal aorta. The mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate and regional vascular resistance responses to air jet stress were determined before and after cumulative administration of the alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, guanabenz, into the lateral cerebral ventricle in doses of 5 and 25 micrograms. Compared with intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of isotonic saline vehicle which did not affect baseline systemic and regional haemodynamic measurements, guanabenz produced significant decreases in baseline MAP and heart rate but did not affect regional vascular resistances. During air jet stress, the characteristic pattern of the classic defense reaction with an increase in MAP, heart rate, renal and mesenteric vascular resistances and a decrease in hindquarters vascular resistance was observed and was not affected by i.c.v. administration of isotonic saline vehicle. Guanabenz did not affect the MAP, heart rate or renal vascular resistance responses to air jet stress. The air jet stress-induced increase in mesenteric vascular resistance was reduced by 25 micrograms guanabenz. The air jet stress-induced decrease in hindquarters vascular resistance was converted to an increase by 25 micrograms guanabenz. These results demonstrate that the regulation of environmental stress-stimulated sympathetic neural outflow to different vascular beds may be independently controlled by central nervous system alpha 2-adrenoceptors.

  2. alpha2 adrenoceptors are involved in the regulation of the gripping-induced immobility episodes in taiep rats.

    PubMed

    Eguibar, José R; Cortés, Ma Del Carmen; Valencia, Jaime; Arias-Montaño, José A

    2006-10-01

    In 1989 Holmgren et al. (Holmgren et al. 1989 Lab Anim Sci 39:226-228) described a new mutant rat that developed a progressive motor disturbance during its lifespan. The syndrome is characterized by a tremor in the hind limbs followed by ataxia, episodes of tonic immobility, epilepsy, and paralysis. The acronym of these symptoms (taiep) became the name of this autosomic, recessive mutant rat. The taiep rats are neurological mutant animals with a hypomyelination, followed by a progressive demyelination process. At 7-8 months of age, taiep rats develop immobility episodes (IEs) characterized by a cortical desynchronization, associated with the theta rhythm in the hippocampus and changes of the nucal electromyogram (EMG), whose pattern is like rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep. These rats also show an altered sleep pattern with an equal REM sleep distribution. This study analyzed therole of alpha(2) adrenoceptors in the expression of gripping-induced IEs in 8-month-old male taiep rats. The alpha(2) adrenoceptor agonists clonidine and xylacine increased the frequency of gripping-induced IEs whereas the alpha(2) antagonists yohimbine and idazoxandecreased or prevented such episodes. These findings correlate with the pharmacological observations in narcoleptic dogs and humans in which alpha(2) adrenergic mechanisms are involved in the modulation of cataplexy. Unexpectedly, the repetitive administration of clonidine resulted in jumping behavior, indicative of phasic activation of extensor musculature. Taken together, our results show that alpha(2) adrenoceptors are involved in the modulation in gripping-induced IEs and after the administration of several doses of clonidine produced phasic motor activation.

  3. Noradrenergic influences in the basolateral amygdala on inhibitory avoidance memory are mediated by an action on α2-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Ferry, Barbara; Parrot, Sandrine; Marien, Marc; Lazarus, Christine; Cassel, Jean-Christophe; McGaugh, James L

    2015-01-01

    The role of norepinephrine (NE) in the consolidation of inhibitory avoidance learning (IA) in rats is known to involve α1- and β-adrenoceptor systems in the basolateral nucleus of the amygdala (BLA). However, the amygdala also contains α2-adrenoceptor subtypes, and local microinfusions of the selective α2-adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan and agonist UK 14,304 respectively into the BLA enhance and inhibit IA performances when administered before acquisition. The present study investigated whether the effects of idazoxan and UK 14,304 on IA were associated with changes in NE release within the BLA before and after one-trial inhibitory avoidance training. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were unilaterally implanted with a microdialysis probe in the BLA and were administered idazoxan (0.1mM) or UK 14,304 (10 μM) by retrodialysis infusion 15 min before the acquisition of IA. Dialysates were collected every 15 min for analysis of NE. Retrodialysis of idazoxan potentiated the release of NE induced by footshock application, whereas UK 14,304 decreased NE release to the extent that the footshock failed to induce any measurable effect on NE levels. Idazoxan infusion enhanced IA retention tested 24h later and this effect was directly related to the level of NE release in the BLA measured during IA acquisition. In contrast, the infusion of UK 14,304 did not modify IA performances in comparison to control animals, possibly due to compensatory activity of the contralateral BLA. These results are consistent with previous evidence that amygdala NE is involved in modulating memory consolidation, and provide evidence for an involvement of presynaptic α2-autoceptors in the BLA in this process.

  4. Pharmacological activity of (-)-discretamine, a novel vascular alpha-adrenoceptor and 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist, isolated from Fissistigma glaucescens.

    PubMed Central

    Ko, F. N.; Yu, S. M.; Su, M. J.; Wu, Y. C.; Teng, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    1. The pharmacological activity of (-)-discretamine, isolated from Fissistigma glaucescens, was determined in rat isolated thoracic aorta, cardiac tissues and ventricular myocytes and guinea-pig isolated trachea. 2. (-)-Discretamine was found to be an alpha 1-adrenoceptor blocking agent in rat thoracic aorta as revealed by its competitive antagonism of noradrenaline (pA2 = 7.20 +/- 0.10)- or phenylephrine (pA2 = 7.60 +/- 0.09)-induced vasoconstriction. It was as potent as phentolamine (pA2 = 7.51 +/- 0.10), but was more potent than yohimbine (pA2 = 6.18 +/- 0.06). Removal of endothelium significantly increased the antagonistic potency of (-)-discretamine on noradrenaline (pA2 = 7.52 +/- 0.09)- or phenylephrine (pA2 = 7.90 +/- 0.09)-induced vasoconstriction. 3. (-)-Discretamine was also an alpha 2-adrenoceptor blocking agent (pA2 = 6.30 +/- 0.15) and a 5-hydroxytryptamine antagonist (pA2 = 6.87 +/- 0.06), both in rat aorta denuded of endothelium. 4. (-)-Discretamine protected alpha-adrenoceptors from alkylation by the irreversible blocking agent, phenoxybenzamine. 5. [3H]-inositol monophosphate formation caused by noradrenaline (3 microM) in rat thoracic aorta was suppressed by (-)-discretamine (10 and 30 microM) and prazosin (3 microM). 6. A high concentration of (-)-discretamine (30 microM) did not affect the contraction induced by the thromboxane receptor agonist U-46619, prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha), angiotensin II, high K+ or endothelin in rat aorta denuded of endothelium. Neither cyclic AMP nor cyclic GMP content of rat thoracic aorta was changed by (-)-discretamine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7902181

  5. Role of calcium in the interaction of alpha and beta adrenoceptor-mediated renin release in isolated, constant pressure perfused rabbit kidneys.

    PubMed

    Opgenorth, T J; Zehr, J E

    1983-10-01

    These experiments were designed to study the role of calcium in the modulation of renin secretion by alpha and beta adrenoceptors. Rabbit kidneys were isolated and single-pass perfused with a modified Ringer's solution. Renal perfusion pressure was precisely controlled by an electronic servocontrol system. Tubular events were minimized by ligation of the ureter before initiating the studies. Under these conditions the predominant factor modifying renin secretion was assumed to originate directly on the juxtaglomerular cells. Isoproterenol infused at 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0 nM/min/g of kidney weight increased renin secretion in a dose-dependent manner whereas phenylephrine infused at identical molar doses did not. In addition, phenylephrine (5.0 nM/min/g of kidney weight) blocked the usual response to isoproterenol. Removal of calcium from the perfusing medium had no effect on either the response to isoproterenol or the lack of a response to phenylephrine. On the other hand, when calcium is removed from the perfusate or when D-600, a calcium channel blocker, is added to calcium-containing medium, phenylephrine failed to block the usual response to isoproterenol. We conclude that the suppression of beta adrenoceptor stimulation of renin release by alpha adrenoceptor agonists is calcium dependent by a final mechanism as yet undefined, but probably involving movement of calcium into the juxtaglomerular cells.

  6. Αlpha 2a-Adrenoceptor Gene Expression and Early Life Stress-Mediated Propensity to Alcohol Drinking in Outbred Rats

    PubMed Central

    Comasco, Erika; Todkar, Aniruddha; Granholm, Linnea; Nilsson, Kent W.; Nylander, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Stressful events early in life, later high alcohol consumption and vulnerability to alcohol use disorder (AUD) are tightly linked. Norepinephrine is highly involved in the stress response and the α2A-adrenoceptor, which is an important regulator of norepinephrine signalling, is a putative target in pharmacotherapy of AUD. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of early-life stress and adult voluntary alcohol drinking on the α2A-adrenoceptor. The relative expression and promoter DNA methylation of the Adra2a gene were measured in the hypothalamus, a key brain region in stress regulation. A well-characterized animal model of early-life stress was used in combination with an episodic voluntary drinking in adulthood. Alcohol drinking rats with a history of early-life stress had lower Adra2a expression than drinking rats not exposed to stress. Alcohol intake and Adra2a gene expression were negatively correlated in high-drinking animals, which were predominantly rats subjected to early-life stress. The results provide support for a link between early-life stress, susceptibility for high alcohol consumption, and low Adra2a expression in the hypothalamus. These findings can increase our understanding of the neurobiological basis for vulnerability to initiate risk alcohol consumption and individual differences in the response to α2A-adrenoceptor agonists. PMID:26121187

  7. The Effect of Pre-Emptive Dexmedetomidine on the Incidence of Post-Thoracotomy Pain Syndrome in Patients Undergoing Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Jabbary Moghaddam, Morteza; Barkhori, Ali; Mirkheshti, Alireza; Hashemian, Morteza; Amir Mohajerani, Seyed

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-thoracotomy pain syndrome (PTPS) is pain that recurs or persists along a thoracotomy incision for at least two months following surgery. Dexmedetomidine (dex) is an α-2 agonist that also has analgesic, sedative-hypnotic, and sympatholytic properties. Objectives To determine the effect of pre-emptive dexmedetomidine on the incidence of PTPS in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Patients and Methods This randomized clinical trial enrolled 104 candidates for elective coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) and randomly assigned them to either a dex group or a control group. In the dex group, dexmedetomidine 0.5 µg/kg/hour was infused from the initiation of anesthesia until postoperative extubation in the intensive-care unit. Two months after surgery, the patients were contacted by telephone and interviewed to determine the presence of pain at the thoracotomy scars. Results Fifty-four patients were placed in the control group, and 50 patients were assigned to the dex group. The age, sex, and body mass index were not significantly different between the two groups of study (P > 0.05). The incidence of PTPS was 11/50 (22%) patients in the dex group and 28/54 patients (52%) in the control group. A chi-square test revealed a significant difference in the incidence of PTPS after two months between the dex and control groups (P = 0.032). Conclusions PTPS is a common problem following CABG, and pre-emptive therapy with dex may decrease neuropathic pain. PMID:27660748

  8. The effect of dexmedetomidine added to preemptive (2% lignocaine with adrenaline) infiltration on intraoperative hemodynamics and postoperative pain after ambulatory maxillofacial surgeries under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Debabrata; Das, Anjan; Chhaule, Subinay; Halder, Partha Sarathi; Paul, Joydip; RoyBasunia, Sandip; Chattopadhyay, Surajit; Mandal, Subrata Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lignocaine + adrenaline; a local anesthetic agent; frequently used for perilesional infiltration, maintains the stable hemodynamics and decreases the postoperative pain after maxillofacial surgery. α2 agonists have peripheral analgesic effects. This prospective study was to evaluate the effectiveness of perilesional dexmedetomidine administered preincisionally in addition to conventional lignocaine adrenaline combinations for reconstructive maxillofacial surgery in an ambulatory care setting. Materials and Methods: 76, American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II patients scheduled for unilateral traumatic maxillofacial surgeries were randomly allocated into group DL (n = 38) receiving 15 cc of 2% lignocaine + adrenaline (1:200,000) mixed with 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine and group PL receiving 15 cc of 2% lignocaine + adrenaline with normal saline (placebo) via local wound infiltration 5 min prior to skin incision. Perioperative hemodynamics, time to first analgesic use, total analgesic need, bleeding, and side effects were recorded for each patient. Results: Dosage of supplemental propofol; total perioperative, postoperative, and postanesthesia care unit (PACU) fentanyl consumption was significantly lower (P = 0.0001, P= 0.0001, P= 0.0001, P= 0.004, respectively) in dexmedetomine treated group than placebo. Rescue analgesic requirement was significantly earlier in group PL than group DL. Group DL patients suffered from significantly less (P = 0.02) bleeding and surgeon's satisfaction score was also high in this group. Discharge from PACU was significantly earlier in group DL. Intraoperative hemodynamic parameters were significantly lower in group DL (P < 0.05) without any appreciable side effects. Conclusion: Thus, prior dexmedetomidine local infiltration at the site of maxillofacial trauma has significantly reduced bleeding from wound site; perioperative fentanyl, propofol consumption, and subsequently ensured earlier discharge from PACU, better surgeon

  9. β2-Adrenoceptor gene variation and systemic vasodilatation during ganglionic blockade

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Christiane; Schroeder, Darrell R; Nicholson, Wayne T; Hart, Emma C; Curry, Timothy B; Penheiter, Alan R; Turner, Stephen T; Joyner, Michael J; Eisenach, John H

    2010-01-01

    Regional infusions of β2-adrenoceptor (ADRB2) agonist have generally shown that individuals homozygous for Gly16 produces greater vasodilatation than those homozygous for Arg16. Systemic infusions have shown an opposite effect on systemic vascular resistance (SVR), possibly confounded by baroreflexes or interactions between single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) positions 16 and 27. We tested the hypothesis that ADRB2 gene variation would influence the SVR response to ADRB2 agonist terbutaline (Terb) during ganglionic blockade. Forty healthy young adults were recruited according to the double homozygous haplotypes: Arg16 + Gln27 (n = 13), the rare Gly16 + Gln27 (n = 6), and Gly16 + Glu27 (n = 21). Arterial pressure was measured by brachial arterial catheter, and cardiac output by acetylene breathing. Lymphocytes were sampled for ex vivo analysis of ADRB2 density and binding conformation. Following baroreflex ablation with trimethaphan (3–7 mg min−1), continuous phenylephrine was titrated to restore blood pressure to baseline. Terb was infused i.v. at 33 and 67 ng kg−1 min−1 for 15 min/dose. There was partial evidence to suggest a main effect of haplotype on the change in SVR (P = 0.06). For SNP position 16, the highest dose of Terb produced lower SVR in Gly16 (mean ± s.e.m.: 7.5 ± 0.4) vs. Arg16 (8.9 ± 0.7 units; P = 0.03). Lymphocyte ADRB2 binding conformation was similar but receptor density was greater in Gly16 vs. Arg16 (P = 0.05). We conclude that during ganglionic blockade, the SVR response to systemic ADRB2 agonist is suggestive of augmented ADRB2 function in Gly16 + Glu27 homozygotes, with greater influence from Gly16, providing further evidence that ADRB2 gene variation influences vasodilatation. PMID:20519311

  10. Differential phosphorylation, desensitization, and internalization of α1A-adrenoceptors activated by norepinephrine and oxymetazoline.

    PubMed

    Akinaga, Juliana; Lima, Vanessa; Kiguti, Luiz Ricardo de Almeida; Hebeler-Barbosa, Flávia; Alcántara-Hernández, Rocío; García-Sáinz, J Adolfo; Pupo, André Sampaio

    2013-04-01

    Loss of response on repetitive drug exposure (i.e., tachyphylaxis) is a particular problem for the vasoconstrictor effects of medications containing oxymetazoline (OXY), an α1-adrenoceptor (AR) agonist of the imidazoline class. One cause of tachyphylaxis is receptor desensitization, usually accompanied by phosphorylation and internalization. It is well established that α1A-ARs are less phosphorylated, desensitized, and internalized on exposure to the phenethylamines norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine, or phenylephrine (PE) than are the α1B and α1D subtypes. However, here we show in human embryonic kidney-293 cells that the low-efficacy agonist OXY induces G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2-dependent α1A-AR phosphorylation, followed by rapid desensitization and internalization (∼40% internalization after 5 minutes of stimulation), whereas phosphorylation of α1A-ARs exposed to NE depends to a large extent on protein kinase C activity and is not followed by desensitization, and the receptors undergo delayed internalization (∼35% after 60 minutes of stimulation). Native α1A-ARs from rat tail artery and vas deferens are also desensitized by OXY, but not by NE or PE, indicating that this property of OXY is not limited to recombinant receptors expressed in cell systems. The results of the present study are clearly indicative of agonist-directed α1A-AR regulation. OXY shows functional selectivity relative to NE and PE at α1A-ARs, leading to significant receptor desensitization and internalization, which is important in view of the therapeutic vasoconstrictor effects of this drug and the varied biologic process regulated by α1A-ARs.

  11. Physiological and biochemical variables in captive tigers (Panthera tigris) immobilised with dexmedetomidine and ketamine or dexmedetomidine, midazolam and ketamine.

    PubMed

    Clark-Price, S C; Lascola, K M; Schaeffer, D J

    2015-12-01

    Physiological and biochemical variables in captive tigers (Panthera tigris) immobilised with dexmedetomidine and ketamine or dexmedetomidine, midazolam and ketamine were evaluated. Thirty tigers received either dexmedetomidine (0.025 mg/kg) and ketamine (3 mg/kg) (group DK) or dexmedetomidine (0.0125 mg/kg), midazolam (0.1 mg/kg) and ketamine (3 mg/kg) (group DMK). Heart rate, SPO2 and blood pressure were measured at five-minute intervals. Arterial pH, PO2, PCO2, glucose, K+ and arterial and venous lactate were measured at 15 and 45 minutes after immobilisation. A generalised linear mixed model was used for statistical comparison. There was no difference within or between groups at any time point for any measured variable. Measured PO2 was 73.2±17.5 mm Hg and SPO2 was 88.9±10.8 per cent. Systolic, mean and diastolic blood pressures were 170.5±48.4, 138.9±41.8 and 121.8±37.2 mm Hg, respectively. Venous lactate was higher than arterial lactate within groups at each time point. Seizure-like behaviour was observed in 25 per cent of tigers in group DK but not in group DMK. The addition of midazolam into a protocol for immobilisation of tigers did not result in a difference in any of the measured variables but may have prevented the development of seizure-like behaviour.

  12. Physiological and biochemical variables in captive tigers (Panthera tigris) immobilised with dexmedetomidine and ketamine or dexmedetomidine, midazolam and ketamine.

    PubMed

    Clark-Price, S C; Lascola, K M; Schaeffer, D J

    2015-12-01

    Physiological and biochemical variables in captive tigers (Panthera tigris) immobilised with dexmedetomidine and ketamine or dexmedetomidine, midazolam and ketamine were evaluated. Thirty tigers received either dexmedetomidine (0.025 mg/kg) and ketamine (3 mg/kg) (group DK) or dexmedetomidine (0.0125 mg/kg), midazolam (0.1 mg/kg) and ketamine (3 mg/kg) (group DMK). Heart rate, SPO2 and blood pressure were measured at five-minute intervals. Arterial pH, PO2, PCO2, glucose, K+ and arterial and venous lactate were measured at 15 and 45 minutes after immobilisation. A generalised linear mixed model was used for statistical comparison. There was no difference within or between groups at any time point for any measured variable. Measured PO2 was 73.2±17.5 mm Hg and SPO2 was 88.9±10.8 per cent. Systolic, mean and diastolic blood pressures were 170.5±48.4, 138.9±41.8 and 121.8±37.2 mm Hg, respectively. Venous lactate was higher than arterial lactate within groups at each time point. Seizure-like behaviour was observed in 25 per cent of tigers in group DK but not in group DMK. The addition of midazolam into a protocol for immobilisation of tigers did not result in a difference in any of the measured variables but may have prevented the development of seizure-like behaviour. PMID:26626504

  13. Dexmedetomidine in Postoperative Analgesia in Patients Undergoing Hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Chunguang; Chi, Meiying; Zhang, Yanwei; Zhang, Zongwang; Qi, Feng; Liu, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Both dexmedetomidine and sufentanil modulate spinal analgesia by different mechanisms, and yet no human studies are available on their combination for analgesia during the first 72 hours after abdominal hysterectomy. This CONSORT-prospective, randomized, double-blinded, controlled trial sought to evaluate the safety and efficacy of the combination of dexmedetomidine and sufentanil in intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for 72 hours after abdominal hysterectomy. Ninety women undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy were divided into 3 equal groups that received sufentanil (Group C; 0.02 μg/kg/h), sufentanil plus dexmedetomidine (Group D1; 0.02 μg/kg/h, each), or sufentanil (0.02 μg/kg/h) plus dexmedetomidine (0.05 μg/kg/h) (Group D2) for 72 hours after surgery in this double-blinded, randomized study. The primary outcome measure was the postoperative sufentanil consumption, whereas the secondary outcome measures were pain intensity (visual analogue scale), requirement of narcotic drugs during the operation, level of sedation, Bruggrmann comfort scale, and concerning adverse effects. The postoperative sufentanil consumption was significantly lower in Groups D1 and D2 than in Group C during the observation period (P < 0.05), but lower in Group D2 than in Group D1 at 24, 48, and 72 hours after surgery (P < 0.05). The heart rate after intubation and incision was lower in Groups D1 and D2 than in Group C (P < 0.05). On arrival at the recovery room, Groups D1 and D2 had lower mean blood pressure than Group C (P < 0.05). The intraoperative requirement of sevoflurane was 30% lesser in Groups D1 and D2 than in Group C. The sedation levels were greater in Groups D1 and D2 during the first hour (P < 0.05). Compared with Groups C and D1, Group D2 showed lower levels of the overall incidence of nausea and vomiting (P < 0.05). Among the tested PCA options, the addition of dexmedetomidine (0.05 μg/kg/h) and sufentanil (0

  14. In vitro studies of release of adenine nucleotides and adenosine from rat vascular endothelium in response to alpha 1-adrenoceptor stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Shinozuka, K; Hashimoto, M; Masumura, S; Bjur, R A; Westfall, D P; Hattori, K

    1994-01-01

    1. Noradrenaline-induced release of endogenous adenine nucleotides (ATP, ADP, AMP) and adenosine from both rat caudal artery and thoracic aorta was characterized, using high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. 2. Noradrenaline, in a concentration-dependent manner, increased the overflow of ATP and its metabolites from the caudal artery. The noradrenaline-induced release of adenine nucleotides and adenosine from the caudal artery was abolished by bunazosin, an alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist, but not by idazoxan, an alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist. Clonidine, an alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, contracted caudal artery smooth muscle but did not induce release of adenine nucleotides or adenosine. 3. Noradrenaline also significantly increased the overflow of ATP and its metabolites from the thoracic aorta in the rat; however, the amount of adenine nucleotides and adenosine released from the aorta was considerably less than that released from the caudal artery. 4. Noradrenaline significantly increased the overflow of ATP and its metabolites from cultured endothelial cells from the thoracic aorta and caudal artery. The amount released from the cultured endothelial cells from the thoracic aorta and caudal artery. The amount released from the cultured endothelial cells from the aorta was also much less than that from cultured endothelial cells from the caudal artery. In cultured smooth muscle cells from the caudal artery, a significant release of ATP or its metabolites was not observed. 5. These results suggest that there are vascular endothelial cells that are able to release ATP by an alpha 1-adrenoceptor-mediated mechanism, but that these cells are not homogeneously distributed in the vasculature. PMID:7889273

  15. Prevalence of Delirium and Coma In Mechanically Ventilated Patients Sedated With Dexmedetomidine or Propofol

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yi Kai (Johnny); Wang, Shan; Lam, Timothy S.; Hanna, Adel; DeMuro, Jonas P.; Calixte, Rose; Brathwaite, Collin E.M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prevalence of delirium and coma in mechanically ventilated patients sedated with dexmedetomidine or propofol alone; to evaluate the hospital length of stay for both treatment groups; and to evaluate the level of sedation, adverse effects, and hospital outcomes. Methods: Medical records were reviewed retrospectively for patients who were admitted to the medical or surgical intensive care units (ICUs) in a 591-bed teaching hospital and who received either dexmedetomidine or propofol alone for 24 hours or more for sedation. Results: A total of 111 patients were included in the study, with 56 patients in the dexmedetomidine group and 55 patients in the propofol group. Results of the analysis showed that the propofol group had a higher prevalence of coma (43.6% versus 12.5%; P < 0.001). Dexmedetomidine patients had a longer median hospital length of stay of 23.5 days (interquartile range [IQR], 11.5–39.5 days) versus 15.0 days (IQR, 7.0–24.0 days; P = 0.01). The rates of delirium were similar in both groups, with 16% in dexmedetomidine-treated patients versus 20% in propofol-treated patients (P = 0.63). Conclusion: No difference in the prevalence of delirium was found when comparing the dexmedetomidine- and propofol-treated groups. Propofol was associated with more coma and oversedation; dexmedetomidine was associated with longer time to extubation, longer length of stay in the ICU, and longer hospital length of stay. PMID:27408521

  16. Pharmacological Profiles of Alpha 2 Adrenergic Receptor Agonists Identified Using Genetically Altered Mice and Isobolographic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fairbanks, Carolyn A.; Stone, Laura S.; Wilcox, George L.

    2009-01-01

    Endogenous, descending noradrenergic fibers convey powerful analgesic control over spinal afferent circuitry mediating the rostrad transmission of pain signals. These fibers target alpha 2 adrenergic receptors (α2ARs) on both primary afferent terminals and secondary neurons, and their activation mediates substantial inhibitory control over this transmission, rivaling that of opioid receptors which share similar a similar pattern of distribution. The terminals of primary afferent nociceptive neurons and secondary spinal dorsal horn neurons express α2AAR and α2CAR subtypes, respectively. Spinal delivery of these agents serves to reduce their side effects, which are mediated largely at supraspinal sites, by concentrating the drugs at the spinal level. Targeting these spinal α2ARs with one of five selective therapeutic agonists, clonidine, dexmedetomidine, brimonidine, ST91 and moxonidine, produces significant antinociception that can work in concert with opioid agonists to yield synergistic antinociception. Application of several genetically altered mouse lines had facilitated identification of the primary receptor subtypes that likely mediate the antinociceptive effects of these agents. This review provides first an anatomical description of the localization of the three subtypes in the central nervous system, second a detailed account of the pharmacological history of each of these six primary agonists, and finally a comprehensive report of the specific interactions of other GPCR agonists with each of the six principal α2AR agonists featured. PMID:19393691

  17. Effects of selective antagonism of beta-adrenoceptor sub-types on responses to isoprenaline in rat distal colon in vitro.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, A; Lamont, M

    1993-12-01

    1. The effects of the beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptor selective antagonists, CGP 20712A and ICI 118551 respectively, on responses to isoprenaline-induced relaxation of rat distal colon were investigated in order to determine the contributions of these subtypes to relaxation. In addition, the properties of ICI D7114, a novel putative stimulant of atypical beta-adrenoceptors, were investigated. Our preliminary experiments with ICI D7114 showed that this compound lacked agonist activity in rat distal colon and in fact antagonized responses to isoprenaline. We therefore studied the antagonism of isoprenaline by ICI D7114 in more detail. 2. Longitudinal segments of rat distal colon were suspended in Krebs solution at 37 degrees C for isometric recording. The Krebs solution contained EDTA (23 microM) and prazosin (0.1 microM) and was gassed with 95/5% O2/CO2. After an initial equilibration period, reproducible contractions to a submaximal concentration of methacholine (1 microM) were obtained before carrying out a concentration-response curve (CRC) to isoprenaline in a non-cumulative manner. Four consecutive CRCs to isoprenaline were carried out in each tissue with a 1 h interval between each curve. Antagonists were present in increasing concentrations during the intervals between CRCs. Control tissues received no antagonists to allow estimation of the magnitude of time-dependent changes. 3. Isoprenaline produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of methacholine-induced contractions. CRCs to isoprenaline were reproducible with no significant time-dependent changes. Propranolol produced no shift of the isoprenaline CRC at 0.01 microM and a 5 fold shift at 0.1 microM. No further shift was observed with 1 microM. CGP 20712A had no effect on the CRC to isoprenaline at 0.1, 1 and 3 microM. ICI118551 produced little or no shift at 0.1 microM and a six fold shift with 1 microM. No further shift was observed with 3 microM. ICI D7114 produced a concentration-dependent parallel

  18. Physiologic and serum biochemistry values in free-ranging Hoffmann's two-toed (Choloepus hoffmanni) and brown-throated three-toed (Bradypus variegatus) sloths immobilized using dexmedetomidine and ketamine.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Matthew E; Cole, Gretchen A; Vaughan, Christopher; Sladky, Kurt K

    2013-09-01

    Dexmedetomidine, a highly selective alpha-2 adrenergic agonist and dextrorotary enantiomer of medetomidine, was combined with ketamine and used to immobilize 14 free-ranging Choloepus hoffmanni (Hoffmann's two-toed sloths) and 11 Bradypus variegatus (brown-throated three-toed sloths) in Upala, Costa Rica. Following intramuscular injection of ketamine (2.1 mg/kg) and dexmedetomidine (11 microg/kg), heart rate, respiratory rate, and indirect systolic blood pressure were measured every 5 min for a total of 25 min. An iStat (CG8+) was used to evaluate serum biochemical and hematologic values during anesthesia. After 30 min of anesthesia, atipamezole (0.13 mg/kg) was administered intramuscularly, which resulted in rapid and smooth recoveries. Mean heart rate and respiratory rate remained unchanged in both C. hoffmanni and B. variegatus over time. Progressive decreases in mean indirect systolic blood pressure were documented in both species. Results of this study suggest a combination of dexmedetomidne and ketamine is a safe and effective anesthetic protocol for use in free-ranging C. hoffmanni and B. variegatus. Similar to other alpha-2 adrenergic agonist-based immobilization protocols, close monitoring of cardiovascular and respiratory parameters are recommended. This study also provides serum biochemical and hematologic data in free-ranging C. hoffmanni and B. variegatus.

  19. Physiologic and serum biochemistry values in free-ranging Hoffmann's two-toed (Choloepus hoffmanni) and brown-throated three-toed (Bradypus variegatus) sloths immobilized using dexmedetomidine and ketamine.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Matthew E; Cole, Gretchen A; Vaughan, Christopher; Sladky, Kurt K

    2013-09-01

    Dexmedetomidine, a highly selective alpha-2 adrenergic agonist and dextrorotary enantiomer of medetomidine, was combined with ketamine and used to immobilize 14 free-ranging Choloepus hoffmanni (Hoffmann's two-toed sloths) and 11 Bradypus variegatus (brown-throated three-toed sloths) in Upala, Costa Rica. Following intramuscular injection of ketamine (2.1 mg/kg) and dexmedetomidine (11 microg/kg), heart rate, respiratory rate, and indirect systolic blood pressure were measured every 5 min for a total of 25 min. An iStat (CG8+) was used to evaluate serum biochemical and hematologic values during anesthesia. After 30 min of anesthesia, atipamezole (0.13 mg/kg) was administered intramuscularly, which resulted in rapid and smooth recoveries. Mean heart rate and respiratory rate remained unchanged in both C. hoffmanni and B. variegatus over time. Progressive decreases in mean indirect systolic blood pressure were documented in both species. Results of this study suggest a combination of dexmedetomidne and ketamine is a safe and effective anesthetic protocol for use in free-ranging C. hoffmanni and B. variegatus. Similar to other alpha-2 adrenergic agonist-based immobilization protocols, close monitoring of cardiovascular and respiratory parameters are recommended. This study also provides serum biochemical and hematologic data in free-ranging C. hoffmanni and B. variegatus. PMID:24063084

  20. Antidepressants suppress neuropathic pain by a peripheral β2-adrenoceptor mediated anti-TNFα mechanism.

    PubMed

    Bohren, Yohann; Tessier, Luc-Henri; Megat, Salim; Petitjean, Hugues; Hugel, Sylvain; Daniel, Dorothée; Kremer, Mélanie; Fournel, Sylvie; Hein, Lutz; Schlichter, Rémy; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José; Yalcin, Ipek; Barrot, Michel

    2013-12-01

    Neuropathic pain is pain arising as a direct consequence of a lesion or disease affecting the somatosensory system. It is usually chronic and challenging to treat. Some antidepressants are first-line pharmacological treatments for neuropathic pain. The noradrenaline that is recruited by the action of the antidepressants on reuptake transporters has been proposed to act through β2-adrenoceptors (β2-ARs) to lead to the observed therapeutic effect. However, the complex downstream mechanism mediating this action remained to be identified. In this study, we demonstrate in a mouse model of neuropathic pain that an antidepressant's effect on neuropathic allodynia involves the peripheral nervous system and the inhibition of cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) production. The antiallodynic action of nortriptyline is indeed lost after peripheral sympathectomy, but not after lesion of central descending noradrenergic pathways. More particularly, we report that antidepressant-recruited noradrenaline acts, within dorsal root ganglia, on β2-ARs expressed by non-neuronal satellite cells. This stimulation of β2-ARs decreases the neuropathy-induced production of membrane-bound TNFα, resulting in relief of neuropathic allodynia. This indirect anti-TNFα action was observed with the tricyclic antidepressant nortriptyline, the selective serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor venlafaxine and the β2-AR agonist terbutaline. Our data revealed an original therapeutic mechanism that may open novel research avenues for the management of painful peripheral neuropathies. PMID:23978467

  1. Different changes of plasma membrane beta-adrenoceptors in rat heart after chronic administration of propranolol, atenolol and bevantolol.

    PubMed

    Horinouchi, Takahiro; Morishima, Shigeru; Tanaka, Takashi; Suzuki, Fumiko; Tanaka, Yoshio; Koike, Katsuo; Miwa, Soichi; Muramatsu, Ikunobu

    2007-07-12

    Recently, tissue segment binding method with a hydrophilic radioligand [(3)H]-CGP12177 was developed to detect plasma membrane beta-adrenoceptors in rat heart (Horinouchi et al., 2006). In the present study, propranolol (40 mg kg(-1) day(-1)), atenolol (40 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) and bevantolol (200 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) were administered to rats for 6 weeks, and the changes of plasma membrane beta-adrenoceptors and their mRNA expression in rat ventricle were examined. Chronic administration of propranolol increased the beta(1)-adrenoceptors but decreased the beta(2)-adrenoceptors without changing total amount of plasma membrane beta-adrenoceptors. Atenolol increased both plasma membrane beta(1)- and beta(2)-adrenoceptors, whereas bevantolol had no effect on the beta-adrenoceptor density and their subtype proportions. In contrast, the density of beta-adrenoceptors detected in conventional homogenate binding study was extremely low (approximately 60% of plasma membrane beta-adrenoceptors detected with the tissue segment binding method) and the effects of chronic administration of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists were not necessarily in accord with those at the plasma membrane beta-adrenoceptors. The mRNA levels of beta(1)- and beta(2)-adrenoceptors were not altered by propranolol treatment, while beta(1)-adrenoceptor mRNA significantly decreased after administration of atenolol or bevantolol without changing the level of beta(2)-adrenoceptor mRNA. The present binding study with intact tissue segments clearly shows that the plasma membrane beta(1)- and beta(2)-adrenoceptors of rat heart, in contrast to the homogenate binding sites and the mRNA levels, are differently affected by chronic treatment with three beta-adrenoceptor antagonists; up- and down-regulations of beta(1)- and beta(2)-adrenoceptors, respectively, by propranolol, and up-regulation of both the subtypes by atenolol, but no significant change in both the subtypes by bevantolol.

  2. Arginine‐16 β2 adrenoceptor genotype predisposes to exacerbations in young asthmatics taking regular salmeterol

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, C N A; Lipworth, B J; Lee, S; Ismail, T; Macgregor, D F; Mukhopadhyay, S

    2006-01-01

    Background The homozygous presence of the arginine‐16 variant of the β2 adrenoceptor gene ADRB2 reverses the benefits from the regular use of short acting β2 agonists in asthmatic adults compared with the homozygous glycine‐16 genotype. We studied the effect of this polymorphic variation on asthma exacerbations in children and young adults and its relation to long acting β2 agonists. Methods A cross‐sectional survey was undertaken using electronic records, direct interviews, and genotype determination of position 16 and 27 of the ADRB2 gene in DNA from mouthwash samples of 546 children and young asthmatics attending paediatric and young adult asthma clinics in Tayside, Scotland during 2004–5. The primary outcome measure was asthma exacerbations over the previous 6 months. Results There was an increased hazard of asthma exacerbations across all treatment steps of the British Thoracic Society (BTS) asthma guidelines when the homozygous genotypes Arg/Arg and Gly/Gly were compared (OR 2.05, 95% CI 1.19 to 3.53, p = 0.010), particularly in patients treated with salmeterol (OR 3.40, 95% CI 1.19 to 9.40, p = 0.022). The Glu27Gln polymorphism had no significant effect on asthma exacerbations in any treatment group. Conclusions The arginine‐16 genotype of ADRB2 predisposes to exacerbations in asthmatic children and young adults, particularly in those exposed to regular salmeterol. This may be explained by genotype selective salmeterol induced downregulation and impaired receptor coupling, and associated subsensitivity of the response. PMID:16772309

  3. Hippocampal α-adrenoceptors involve in the effect of histamine on spatial learning.

    PubMed

    Torkaman-Boutorabi, Anahita; Danyali, Fatemeh; Oryan, Shahrbanoo; Ebrahimi-Ghiri, Mohaddeseh; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-04-22

    Spatial learning is a model of higher human cognitive functions which is used for studying animal behavior. Histaminergic and noradrenergic systems play a modulatory role in learning and memory. The present study aimed to test the effects of α-adrenoceptor agonist/antagonist microinjection into the CA1 region of dorsal hippocampus on histamine-induced spatial learning facilitation in the water maze task. Pre-training intra-CA1 microinjection of α1- or α2-adrenergic agonist, phenylephrine (0.0025μg/rat) or clonidine (0.05μg/rat) decreased traveled distance and escape latency at the start of the training phase, suggesting a spatial learning facilitation; while the higher dose of the drugs (phenylephrine 0.005μg/rat, clonidine 0.2 and 0.5μg/rat) increased the performance level at the end of the training phase, indicating a water maze spatial acquisition impairment. However, α1-receptor antagonist, prazosin (1μg/rat) impaired spatial learning; α2-receptor antagonist, yohimbine (0.25μg/rat) facilitated spatial acquisition. Moreover, pre-training intra-CA1 microinjection of a subthreshold dose of phenylephrine (0.001μg/rat) reversed histamine response, while ineffective dose co-administration of clonidine (0.1μg/rat) potentiated histamine (0.01μg/rat) response. Subthreshold dose of prazosin or yohimbine did not alter histamine response. Bilateral infusion of histamine (0.05μg/rat) facilitated spatial learning by itself. Furthermore, the drug's injections had no effect on swimming speed on the training days of MWM. These results suggest that α-adrenergic receptors of the dorsal hippocampal CA1 regions may play an important role in histamine-induced facilitation of spatial acquisition.

  4. Dexmedetomidine induces conditioned place preference in rats: Involvement of opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Uskur, Tuğçe; Barlas, M Aydın; Akkan, A Gökhan; Shahzadi, Andleeb; Uzbay, Tayfun

    2016-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine (DEX) is an alpha-2 adrenergic agonist drug recently introduced to anesthesia practice. Certain agents used in anesthesia practice have been associated with abuse and addiction problems; however, few studies have investigated the role of DEX on addictive processes. Here, the effects and possible mechanisms of action of DEX on conditioned place preference (CPP), a model used for measuring the rewarding effects of drug abuse in rats, was investigated. The CPP apparatus was considered "biased" as the animals preferred the grid side to the mesh side. Male Wistar albino rats weighing 250-300 g were divided into several groups, including control (saline), morphine (10mg/kg), DEX (2.5-20 μg/kg), naloxone alone (0.5mg/kg) and a combination (0.5mg/kg naloxone plus 20 μg/kg DEX) (n=7-8 for each group). The CPP effects of morphine, DEX, saline and the combination were evaluated. All the drug and saline administrations except naloxone were performed by intraperitoneal (ip) injections. Naloxone was injected subcutaneously (sc) when given alone or in combination with DEX. Morphine (10mg/kg) and DEX (5-20 μg/kg) produced CPP that were statistically significant relative to saline-injected rats. DEX-induced CPP was significantly reversed by pretreatment with naloxone, an opioid antagonist. Naloxone alone treatment did not cause any significant effect on CPP. Our results suggest that DEX produces CPP effects similar to morphine in rats and that opioidergic mechanism may be responsible for DEX-induced CPP. Thus, DEX might have the potential to be addictive, and this possibility should be considered during clinical application of this drug. PMID:26376284

  5. Selectivity of bevantolol hydrochloride towards alpha- and beta-adrenoceptor subtypes in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Takita, M; Kigoshi, S; Muramatsu, I

    1992-02-01

    Selectivity of bevantolol hydrochloride (NC-1400) towards alpha- and beta-adrenoceptor subtypes of rat cerebral cortex was examined in binding experiments and compared with propranolol. Bevantolol biphasically displaced the 3H-dihydroalprenolol binding. The affinity of bevantolol to beta 1-adrenoceptor was equal to that of propranolol. Bevantolol displaced 3H-prazosin binding monophasically but not 3H-p-aminoclonidine binding. These results suggest that bevantolol is a beta 1-adrenoceptor antagonist with a relatively high affinity to alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes.

  6. Lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptor density during menstrual cycle and pregnancy, in delivery and puerperium.

    PubMed

    Santala, M; Vilska, S; Saarikoski, S; Castrén, O

    1990-01-01

    Lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptor density was determined in 11 women during the normal menstrual cycle and 15 women during normal pregnancy. No significant difference in lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptor density was established in this follow-up study during the menstrual cycle or pregnancy. Lower lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptor density was established just after delivery and in puerperium compared with that during pregnancy. It is likely that the high catecholamine concentration during parturition together with the duration of labour and delivery caused down-regulation of the beta 2-adrenoceptors. In puerperium the irregular day-rhythm and the stress of caring for the newborn may also have an effect.

  7. 75 FR 60307 - Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Dexmedetomidine

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-30

    ... general anesthesia in cats. DATES: This rule is effective September 30, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION... dexmedetomidine hydrochloride injectable solution as a preanesthetic to general anesthesia in cats. The... dental procedures; and as a preanesthetic to general anesthesia. * * * * * Dated: September 24,...

  8. [Indications of dexmedetomidine in the current sedoanalgesia tendencies in critical patients].

    PubMed

    Romera Ortega, M A; Chamorro Jambrina, C; Lipperheide Vallhonrat, I; Fernández Simón, I

    2014-01-01

    Recently, dexmedetomidine has been marketed in Spain and other European countries. The published experience regarding its use has placed dexmedetomidine on current trends in sedo-analgesic strategies in the adult critically ill patient. Dexmedetomidine has sedative and analgesic properties, without respiratory depressant effects, inducing a degree of depth of sedation in which the patient can open its eyes to verbal stimulation, obey simple commands and cooperate in nursing care. It is therefore a very useful drug in patients who can be maintained on mechanical ventilation with these levels of sedation avoiding the deleterious effects of over or infrasedation. Because of its effects on α2-receptors, it's very useful for the control and prevention of tolerance and withdrawal to other sedatives and psychotropic drugs. The use of dexmedetomidine has been associated with lower incidence of delirium when compared with other sedatives. Moreover, it's a potentially useful drug for sedation of patients in non-invasive ventilation.

  9. [Indications of dexmedetomidine in the current sedoanalgesia tendencies in critical patients].

    PubMed

    Romera Ortega, M A; Chamorro Jambrina, C; Lipperheide Vallhonrat, I; Fernández Simón, I

    2014-01-01

    Recently, dexmedetomidine has been marketed in Spain and other European countries. The published experience regarding its use has placed dexmedetomidine on current trends in sedo-analgesic strategies in the adult critically ill patient. Dexmedetomidine has sedative and analgesic properties, without respiratory depressant effects, inducing a degree of depth of sedation in which the patient can open its eyes to verbal stimulation, obey simple commands and cooperate in nursing care. It is therefore a very useful drug in patients who can be maintained on mechanical ventilation with these levels of sedation avoiding the deleterious effects of over or infrasedation. Because of its effects on α2-receptors, it's very useful for the control and prevention of tolerance and withdrawal to other sedatives and psychotropic drugs. The use of dexmedetomidine has been associated with lower incidence of delirium when compared with other sedatives. Moreover, it's a potentially useful drug for sedation of patients in non-invasive ventilation. PMID:23683866

  10. Infusions of alpha-2 noradrenergic agonists and antagonists into the amygdala: effects on kindling.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, M R; Corcoran, M E

    1993-12-31

    We reported previously that activation of alpha-2 adrenoceptors with infusions of clonidine into the amygdala/pyriform region is sufficient to retard kindling. To characterize further the involvement in kindling of alpha-2 receptors in the amygdala/pyriform, we exposed rats to unilateral intraamygdaloid infusions of a variety of noradrenergic drugs followed by either low-frequency stimulation of the amygdala, to induce rapid kindling, or conventional high-frequency stimulation. Infusions and electrical stimulation were administered once every 48 h. The prophylactic effects of clonidine were blocked by simultaneous infusion of idazoxan, an alpha-2 adrenergic antagonist, which suggests strongly that these effects were produced at an alpha-2 receptor. Intraamygdaloid infusions of xylazine, another alpha-2 agonist, also significantly retarded low-frequency kindling. Unexpectedly, intraamygdaloid infusions of the alpha-2 antagonists idazoxan, yohimbine, and SK&F 104856 failed to accelerate kindling. Infusion of the alpha-1 antagonist corynanthine also failed to affect kindling. We propose that the alpha-2 adrenoceptors in the amygdala/pyriform region contribute to the prophylactic effects of systemically administered clonidine and that the facilitation of kindling observed after systemic administration of alpha-2 antagonists may be due to blockade of alpha-2 adrenoceptors outside of the amygdala/pyriform region.

  11. The Influence of Perioperative Dexmedetomidine on Patients Undergoing Cardiac Surgery: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Jun; Qian, Ju; Cheng, Hao; Ji, Fuhai; Liu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of dexmedetomidine may have benefits on the clinical outcomes of cardiac surgery. We conducted a meta-analysis comparing the postoperative complications in patients undergoing cardiac surgery with dexmedetomidine versus other perioperative medications to determine the influence of perioperative dexmedetomidine on cardiac surgery patients. Methods Randomized or quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing outcomes in patients who underwent cardiac surgery with dexmedetomidine, another medication, or a placebo were retrieved from EMBASE, PubMed, the Cochrane Library, and Science Citation Index. Results A total of 1702 patients in 14 studies met the selection criteria among 1,535 studies that fit the research strategy. Compared to other medications, dexmedetomidine has combined risk ratios of 0.28 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.15, 0.55, P = 0.0002) for ventricular tachycardia, 0.35 (95% CI 0.20, 0.62, P = 0.0004) for postoperative delirium, 0.76 (95% CI 0.55, 1.06, P = 0.11) for atrial fibrillation, 1.08 (95% CI 0.74, 1.57, P = 0.69) for hypotension, and 2.23 (95% CI 1.36, 3.67, P = 0.001) for bradycardia. In addition, dexmedetomidine may reduce the length of intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital stay. Conclusions This meta-analysis revealed that the perioperative use of dexmedetomidine in patients undergoing cardiac surgery can reduce the risk of postoperative ventricular tachycardia and delirium, but may increase the risk of bradycardia. The estimates showed a decreased risk of atrial fibrillation, shorter length of ICU stay and hospitalization, and increased risk of hypotension with dexmedetomidine. PMID:27049318

  12. Comparison of efficacy of prophylactic ketamine and dexmedetomidine on postoperative bladder catheter-related discomfort

    PubMed Central

    Akça, Başak; Aydoğan-Eren, Emel; Canbay, Özgür; Karagöz, Ayşe Heves; Üzümcügil, Filiz; Ankay-Yilbaş, Aysun; Çelebi, Nalan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the effects of prophylactic ketamine and dexmedetomidine on postoperative bladder catheter-related discomfort/pain in patients undergoing cystoscopy. Methods: This prospective study was conducted on 75 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) I-II patients between 18-75 years of age and undergoing cystoscopy between November 2011 and June 2012 at Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. Patients were randomly assigned to one of the 3 groups to receive 1 µ/kg dexmedetomidine, 250 µ/kg intravenous ketamine, or normal saline. All patients were questioned regarding probe-related discomfort, patient satisfaction, and pain at the end of the operation 0 (t0) and 15 (t1), 60 (t2), 120 (t3), and 360 (t4) minutes postoperatively. Evaluations were performed in person at the post-anesthesia care unit, or in ambulatory surgery rooms, or by phone calls. Results: Pain incidence in the dexmedetomidine and ketamine groups (p=0.042) was significantly lower than that in the control group (p=0.044). The sedation scores recorded at t0 in the dexmedetomidine and ketamine groups (p=0.004) were significantly higher than that of the control group (p=0.017). Patient groups were similar regarding the rate of hallucinations experienced at t1, no patients experienced hallucinations at t2, t3, or t4. Significantly more patients experienced hallucinations at t0 in the ketamine group than in the dexmedetomidine group (p=0.034) and the control group (p=0.005). Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine and ketamine had similar analgesic effects in preventing catheter-related pain; however, dexmedetomidine had a more acceptable side effect profile. To identify the optimal doses of dexmedetomidine and ketamine, more large-scale interventional studies are needed. PMID:26739975

  13. Changes in intraocular pressure following administration of suxamethonium and endotracheal intubation: Influence of dexmedetomidine premedication

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Chandan Kumar; Ray, Manjushree; Sen, Anjana; Hajra, Bimal; Mukherjee, Dipankar; Ghanta, Anil Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Background: Use of suxamethonium is associated with an increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) and may be harmful for patients with penetrating eye injuries. The purpose of our study was to observe the efficacy of dexmedetomidine for prevention of rise in IOP associated with the administration of suxamethonium and endotracheal intubation. Methods: Sixty-six American Society of Anaesthesiologists I or II patients undergoing general anaesthesia for non-ophthalmic surgery were included in this randomized, prospective, clinical study. Patients were allocated into three groups to receive 0.4 μg/kg dexmedetomidine (group D4), 0.6 μg/kg dexmedetomidine (group D6) or normal saline (group C) over a period of 10 min before induction. IOP, heart rate and mean arterial pressure were recorded before and after the premedication, after induction, after suxamethonium injection and after endotracheal intubation. Results: Fall in IOP was observed following administration of dexmedetomidine. IOP increased in all three groups after suxamethonium injection and endotracheal intubation, but it never crossed the baseline value in group D4 as well as in group D6. Fall in mean arterial pressure was noticed after dexmedetomidine infusion, especially in the D6 group. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine (0.6 μg/kg as well as 0.4 μg/kg body weight) effectively prevents rise of IOP associated with administration of suxamethonium and endotracheal intubation. However, dexmedetomidine 0.6 μg/kg may cause significant hypotension. Thus, dexmedetomidine 0.4 μg/kg may be preferred for prevention of rise in IOP. PMID:22223900

  14. Clinical efficacy of dexmedetomidine versus propofol in children undergoing magnetic resonance imaging: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hongwei; Yang, Liu; Wang, Xiangrui; Zhu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine, as a sole or combinable sedative, has served in pediatric sedation undergoing MRI. However, clinical effects of dexmedetomidine are still controversial. This meta-analysis was to assess the effects between dexmedetomidine and propofol in children undergoing MRI, especially outcomes and adverse events of patients. Multiple Electronic Database searched including MEDLINE, Embase and the Cochrane library, and updated to April 2015. All statistical analysis utilized review manager to perform, the Cochrane collaboration's software preparation and maintenance of Cochrane systematic reviews. Five trials with a total of 337 patients were included. Compared with propofol group, dexmedetomidine significantly increased the recovery time (WMD: 10.70 min; 95% CI: 4.26-17.13; P = 0.001). The duration of sedation did not appear to decrease for the patients who received dexmedetomidine than for those who received propofol (WMD: 19.96 min; 95% CI: -4.12-44.04; P = 0.1). There were statistically significant increased in the pediatric anesthesia emergence Delirium scores of 5-min after awakening (WMD: 2.40; 95% CI: 1.00 to 3.81; P = 0.0008) and 10-min after awakening (WMD: 3.06; 95% CI: 1.81 to 4.31; P < 0.00001) in patients who were treated with dexmedetomidine than propofol. Improved the prognosis of patients, nonetheless, dexmedetomidine must have an indispensable role to undergoing pediatric MRI scanning. Compared with propofol, however, dexmedetomidine did not induce the duration of sedation and might lead to a longer recovery time. PMID:26550100

  15. Lateral paracapsular GABAergic synapses in the basolateral amygdala contribute to the anxiolytic effects of beta 3 adrenoceptor activation.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Yuval; Ariwodola, Olusegun J; Chappell, Ann M; Yorgason, Jordan T; Weiner, Jeff L

    2010-08-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) is known to play an integral role in the neurobiological response to stress. Exposure to stressful stimuli increases NE levels in brain regions that regulate stress and anxiety, like the basolateral amygdala (BLA). NE is thought to increase excitability in these areas through alpha- and beta-adrenoceptors (ARs), leading to increased anxiety. Surprisingly, recent studies have shown that systemic beta 3-AR agonist administration decreases anxiety-like behaviors, suggesting that beta 3-ARs may inhibit excitability in anxiety-related brain regions. Therefore, in this study we integrated electrophysiological and behavioral approaches to test the hypothesis that the anxiolytic effects of beta 3-AR agonists may be mediated by an increase in BLA GABAergic inhibition. We examined the effect of a selective beta 3-AR agonist, BRL37344 (BRL), on GABAergic synapses arising from local circuit interneurons and inhibitory synapses originating from a recently described population of cells called lateral paracapsular (LPCS) interneurons. Surprisingly, BRL selectively enhanced LPCS-evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) with no effect on local GABAergic inhibition. BRL also had no effect on glutamatergic synaptic excitation within the BLA. BRL potentiation of LPCS eIPSCs was blocked by the selective beta 3-AR antagonist, SR59230A, or by intracellular dialysis of Rp-CAMPS (cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor), and this enhancement was not associated with any changes in spontaneous IPSCs or LPCS paired-pulse ratio. BRL also increased the amplitude of unitary LPCS IPSCs (uIPSCs) with no effect on uIPSC failure rate. Finally, bilateral BLA microinjection of BRL reduced anxiety-like behaviors in an open-field assay and the elevated plus-maze. Collectively, these data suggest that beta 3-AR activation selectively enhances LPCS, but not local, BLA GABAergic synapses, and that increases in LPCS-mediated inhibition may contribute to the anxiolytic profile of

  16. The relative contribution of affinity and efficacy to agonist activity: organ selectivity of noradrenaline and oxymetazoline with reference to the classification of drug receptors.

    PubMed

    Kenakin, T P

    1984-01-01

    Oxymetazoline demonstrated a pronounced organ selectivity, when compared to noradrenaline, by being a potent full agonist in rat anococcygeus muscle and a partial agonist in rat vas deferens. Responses of rat anococcygeus muscles to oxymetazoline were relatively more sensitive to antagonism by phenoxybenzamine (Pbz) an alkylating alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist. Therefore, although oxymetazoline was more potent than noradrenaline in this tissue, after Pbz (0.3 microM for 10 min), the responses to oxymetazoline were completely inhibited while those to noradrenaline were only partially inhibited. Schild analysis with phentolamine, corynanthine, prazosin and yohimbine indicated no alpha-adrenoceptor heterogeneity within the rat anococcygeus muscle or between this tissue and rat vas deferens. Measurement of agonist Kd values and Schild analysis of oxymetazoline antagonism of responses to noradrenaline (after alkylation) confirmed the homogeneity of alpha-adrenoceptors with respect to these two agonists. The above profiles of activity would be predicted if oxymetazoline had a higher affinity but lower efficacy than noradrenaline. Experimentally this was confirmed when it was found that oxymetazoline had 5 times the affinity but 0.2 to 0.3 times the efficacy of noradrenaline. These results serve as a caveat to the use of selective receptor desensitization and/or selective receptor alkylation (or protection from alkylation) as means of differentiating drug receptors. Theoretical modelling and these experimental results indicate that high affinity/low efficacy agonists are much more sensitive to receptor coupling. The implications for therapeutic selectivity could be important in that high affinity/low efficacy agonists theoretically have a much greater potential for organ selectivity.

  17. Localization of α-adrenoceptors: JR Vane Medal Lecture

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, John C

    2015-01-01

    This review is based on the JR Vane Medal Lecture presented at the BPS Winter Meeting in December 2011 by J.C. McGrath. A recording of the lecture is included as supporting information. It covers his laboratory's work from 1990 to 2010 on the localization of vascular α1-adrenoceptors in native tissues, mainly arteries. Main points: (i) α1-adrenoceptors are present on several cell types in arteries, not only on medial smooth muscle, but also on adventitial, endothelial and nerve cells; (ii) all three receptor subtypes (α1A, α1B, α1D) are capable of binding ligands at the cell surface, strongly indicating that they are capable of function and not merely expressed. (iii) all of these cell types can take up an antagonist ligand into the intracellular compartments to which endocytosing receptors move; (iv) each individual subtype can exist at the cell surface and intracellularly in the absence of the other subtypes. As functional pharmacological experiments show variations in the involvement of the different subtypes in contractions of different arteries, it is concluded that the presence and disposition of α1-adrenoceptors in arteries is not a simple guide to their involvement in function. Similar locations of the subtypes, even in different cell types, suggest that differences between the distribution of subtypes in model systems do not directly correlate with those in native tissues. This review includes a historical summary of the alternative terms used for adrenoceptors (adrenergic receptors, adrenoreceptors) and the author's views on the use of colours to illustrate different items, given his partial colour-blindness. PMID:25377869

  18. Altered β1−3-adrenoceptor influence on α2-adrenoceptor-mediated control of catecholamine release and vascular tension in hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Torill

    2015-01-01

    α2- and β-adrenoceptors (AR) reciprocally control catecholamine release and vascular tension. Disorders in these functions are present in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). The present study tested if α2AR dysfunctions resulted from altered α2AR/βAR interaction. Blood pressure (BP) was recorded through a femoral artery catheter and cardiac output by an ascending aorta flow probe. Total peripheral vascular resistance (TPR) was calculated. Norepinephrine release was stimulated by a 15-min tyramine-infusion, which allows presynaptic release-control to be reflected as differences in overflow to plasma. Surgical stress activated some secretion of epinephrine. L-659,066 (α2AR-antagonist) enhanced norepinephrine overflow in normotensive controls (WKY) but not SHR. Nadolol (β1+2) and ICI-118551 (β2), but not atenolol (β1) or SR59230A [β(3)/1L] prevented this increase. All βAR antagonists allowed L-659,066 to augment tyramine-induced norepinephrine overflow in SHR and epinephrine secretion in both strains. Inhibition of cAMP-degradation with milrinone and β3AR agonist (BRL37344) enhanced the effect of L-659,066 on release of both catecholamines in SHR and epinephrine in WKY. β1/2AR antagonists and BRL37344 opposed the L-659,066-dependent elimination of the TPR-response to tyramine in WKY. α2AR/βAR antagonists had little influence on the TPR-response in SHR. Milrinone potentiated the L-659,066-dependent reduction of the TPR-response to tyramine. Conclusions: β2AR activity was a required substrate for α2AR auto inhibition of norepinephrine release in WKY. β1+2AR opposed α2AR inhibition of norepinephrine release in SHR and epinephrine secretion in both strains. βAR-α2AR reciprocal control of vascular tension was absent in SHR. Selective agonist provoked β3AR-Gi signaling and influenced the tyramine-induced TPR-response in WKY and catecholamine release in SHR. PMID:25941491

  19. Structural flexibility of the Gαs α-helical domain in the β2-adrenoceptor Gs complex

    PubMed Central

    Westfield, Gerwin H.; Rasmussen, Søren G. F.; Su, Min; Dutta, Somnath; DeVree, Brian T.; Chung, Ka Young; Calinski, Diane; Velez-Ruiz, Gisselle; Oleskie, Austin N.; Pardon, Els; Chae, Pil Seok; Liu, Tong; Li, Sheng; Woods, Virgil L.; Steyaert, Jan; Kobilka, Brian K.; Sunahara, Roger K.; Skiniotis, Georgios

    2011-01-01

    The active-state complex between an agonist-bound receptor and a guanine nucleotide-free G protein represents the fundamental signaling assembly for the majority of hormone and neurotransmitter signaling. We applied single-particle electron microscopy (EM) analysis to examine the architecture of agonist-occupied β2-adrenoceptor (β2AR) in complex with the heterotrimeric G protein Gs (Gαsβγ). EM 2D averages and 3D reconstructions of the detergent-solubilized complex reveal an overall architecture that is in very good agreement with the crystal structure of the active-state ternary complex. Strikingly however, the α-helical domain of Gαs appears highly flexible in the absence of nucleotide. In contrast, the presence of the pyrophosphate mimic foscarnet (phosphonoformate), and also the presence of GDP, favor the stabilization of the α-helical domain on the Ras-like domain of Gαs. Molecular modeling of the α-helical domain in the 3D EM maps suggests that in its stabilized form it assumes a conformation reminiscent to the one observed in the crystal structure of Gαs-GTPγS. These data argue that the α-helical domain undergoes a nucleotide-dependent transition from a flexible to a conformationally stabilized state. PMID:21914848

  20. Safety and Effectiveness of Dexmedetomidine in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (SAD–PICU)

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Laura; Kendrick, Jennifer; Carr, Roxane

    2013-01-01

    Background: Critically ill children require sedation for comfort and to facilitate mechanical ventilation and interventions. Dexmedetomidine is a newer sedative with little safety data in pediatrics, particularly for therapy lasting longer than 48 h. Objective: To quantify the frequency of adverse events and withdrawal syndromes associated with dexmedetomidine and to describe the use of this drug for continuous sedation in critically ill children. Methods: In this retrospective study of patients who received dexmedetomidine for sedation in the pediatric intensive care unit, adverse events were assessed with the Naranjo scale to determine the likelihood of association with dexmedetomidine. Interventions in response to adverse events were also recorded. Results: One hundred and forty-four patients (median age 34 months, range 0 – 17.7 years) who underwent a total of 153 treatment courses were included. The mean infusion rate of dexmedetomidine was 0.42 μg/kg per hour (standard deviation 0.17 μg/kg per hour, range 0.05–2 μg/kg per hour). The median duration of therapy was 20.50 h (range 0.75–854.75 h), and 70 infusions (46%) lasted more than 24 h. At least one adverse event was observed in 115 (75%) of the treatment courses. Hypotension (81 [53%]) and bradycardia (38 [25%]) were the most common adverse events and were deemed “probably” attributable to dexmedetomidine in 17 (11%) and 9 (6%) of the treatment courses, respectively. In 55 of the 66 treatment courses with infusions lasting longer than 24 h for which post-infusion data were available, at least one withdrawal symptom was observed; agitation (41 [62%]) and hypertension (22 [33%]) were the most common withdrawal symptoms. Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine was commonly administered for longer than 24 h in the authors’ institution. Dexmedetomidine was generally well tolerated; however, the majority of patients experienced withdrawal symptoms. Patients receiving dexmedetomidine for more than 24 h should

  1. Bronchial and cardiac beta-adrenoceptor blockade--a comparison of atenolol, acebutolol and labetalol.

    PubMed Central

    Gribbin, H R; Mackay, A D; Baldwin, C J; Tattersfield, A E

    1981-01-01

    Bronchial and cardiac beta-adrenoceptor blockade have been compared in six normal subjects after three beta-adrenoceptor antagonists. Single and double doses of atenolol (50 and 100 mg), acebutolol (100 and 200 mg) and labetalolol (150 and 300 mg) were studied on separate occasions. 2 Salbutamol airway dose-response curves were obtained by measuring the airway response as the change in specific airway conductance (sGaw) after increasing doses of inhaled salbutamol. Bronchial beta-adrenoceptor blockade was assessed after each drug as the dose of salbutamol needed to cause a 50% increase in sGaw (sGaw D50). 3 Cardiac beta-adrenoceptor blockade was assessed after the same doses of each beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, by measuring the percentage reduction in exercise heart rate from control, after exercise for 5 min at 70% of the subject's maximum work rate. 4 Atenolol 50 and 100 mg caused least bronchial beta-adrenoceptor blockade and the greatest reduction in exercise heart rate. 5 Acebutolol 100 and 200 mg and labetalol 150 and 300 mg produced more bronchial beta-adrenoceptor blockade than atenolol. 6 With this approach new beta-adrenoceptor antagonists can be assessed without putting asthmatic patients at risk. PMID:6264936

  2. Expanding role of alpha adrenoceptor blockade in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kirby, R S

    1998-09-01

    This review analyses the expanding role of alpha adrenoceptor blockers in the treatment of BPH and examines the rationale for their use. The safety and efficacy of currently available alpha adrenoceptor blockers is reviewed, with emphasis on the most extensively studied agent, doxazosin. Like other alpha adrenoceptor blockers, doxazosin improves both symptoms of BPH and urinary flow rates by a statistically significant effect compared with placebo. Doxazosin also significantly reduces blood pressure in the 30% of BPH sufferers who also have hypertension; furthermore, there is a beneficial effect on lipid metabolism, which may translate into a reduced risk of coronary heart disease. It is concluded that existing alpha adrenoceptor blockers constitute a valuable adjunct to other BPH therapies, and further refinement of alpha adrenoceptor selectivity based on the alpha-1A subtype in the near future promises even better targeted alpha blockade.

  3. Effect of different beta-adrenergic agonists on the intestinal absorption of galactose and phenylalanine.

    PubMed

    Díez-Sampedro, A; Pérez, M; Cobo, M T; Martínez, J A; Barber, A

    1998-08-01

    Nutrient transport across the mammalian small intestine is regulated by several factors, including intrinsic and extrinsic neural pathways, paracrine modulators, circulating hormones and luminal agents. Because beta-adrenoceptors seem to regulate gastrointestinal functions such as bicarbonate and acid secretion, intestinal motility and gastrointestinal mucosal blood flow, we have investigated the effects of different beta-adrenergic agonists on nutrient absorption by the rat jejunum in-vitro. When intestinal everted sacs were used the beta2-agonist salbutamol had no effect either on galactose uptake by the tissue or mucosal-to-serosal flux whereas mixed beta1- and beta2-agonists (isoproterenol and orciprenaline) and beta3-agonists (BRL 35135, Trecadrine, ICI 198157 and ZD 7114) inhibited galactose uptake and transfer of D-galactose from the mucosal-to-serosal media across the intestinal wall (although the inhibiting effects of isoproterenol and Trecadrine were not statistically significant). In intestinal everted rings both Trecadrine and BRL 35135 clearly reduced galactose uptake, the effect being a result of inhibition of the phlorizin-sensitive component. Total uptake of phenylalanine by the intestinal rings was also reduced by those beta3-adrenergic agonists. These results suggest that beta1- and beta3-adrenergic receptors could be involved in the regulation of intestinal active transport of sugars and amino acids. PMID:9751456

  4. Dexmedetomidine infusion for analgesia up to 48 hours after lung surgery performed by lateral thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Kate B.; Leeper, Barbara; Hamman, Baron L.; Hebeler, Robert F.; Henry, A. Carl; Kourlis, Harry; Wood, Richard E.; Stecher, Jack A.; Hein, H. A. Tillmann

    2014-01-01

    Patients undergoing a lateral thoracotomy for pulmonary resection have moderate to severe pain postoperatively that is often treated with opioids. Opioid side effects such as respiratory depression can be devastating in patients with already compromised respiratory function. This prospective double-blinded clinical trial examined the analgesic effects and safety of a dexmedetomidine infusion for postthoracotomy patients when administered on a telemetry nursing floor, 24 to 48 hours after surgery, to determine if the drug's known early opioid-sparing properties were maintained. Thirty-eight thoracotomy patients were administered dexmedetomidine intraoperatively and overnight postoperatively and then randomized to receive placebo or dexmedetomidine titrated from 0.1 to 0.5 μg·kg·h−1 the day following surgery for up to 24 hours on a telemetry floor. Opioids via a patient-controlled analgesia pump were available for both groups, and vital signs including transcutaneous carbon dioxide, pulse oximetry, respiratory rate, and pain and sedation scores were monitored. The dexmedetomidine group used 41% less opioids but achieved pain scores equal to those of the placebo group. The mean heart rate and systolic blood pressure were lower in the dexmedetomidine group but sedation scores were better. The mean respiratory rate and oxygen saturation were similar in the two groups. Mild hypercarbia occurred in both groups, but periods of significant respiratory depression were noted only in the placebo group. Significant hypotension was noted in one patient in the dexmedetomidine group in conjunction with concomitant administration of a beta-blocker agent. The placebo group reported a higher number of opioid-related adverse events. In conclusion, the known opioid-sparing properties of dexmedetomidine in the immediate postoperative period are maintained over 48 hours. PMID:24381392

  5. The myocardial protective effect of dexmedetomidine in high-risk patients undergoing aortic vascular surgery

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Rabie; Zohry, Gomaa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to assess the effect of dexmedetomidine in high-risk patients undergoing aortic vascular surgery. Design: A randomized prospective study. Setting: Cairo University, Egypt. Materials and Methods: The study included 150 patients undergoing aortic vascular surgery. Intervention: The patients were classified into two groups (n = 75). Group D: The patients received a loading dose of 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine over 15 min before induction and maintained as an infusion of 0.3 μg/kg/h to the end of the procedure. Group C: The patients received an equal volume of normal saline. The medication was prepared by the nursing staff and given to anesthetist blindly. Measurements: The monitors included the heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, central venous pressure, electrocardiogram (ECG), serum troponin I level, end-tidal sevoflurane, and total dose of morphine in addition transthoracic echocardiography to the postoperative in cases with elevated serum troponin I level. Main Results: The dexmedetomidine decreased heart rate and minimized the changes in blood pressure compared to control group (P < 0.05). Furthermore, it decreased the incidence of myocardial ischemia reflected by troponin I level, ECG changes, and the development of new regional wall motion abnormalities (P < 0.05). Dexmedetomidine decreased the requirement for nitroglycerin and norepinephrine compared to control group (P < 0.05). The incidence of hypotension and bradycardia was significantly higher with dexmedetomidine (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The dexmedetomidine is safe and effective in patients undergoing aortic vascular surgery. It decreases the changes in heart rate and blood pressure during the procedures. It provides cardiac protection in high-risk patients reflected by decreasing the incidence of myocardial ischemia and serum level of troponin. The main side effects of dexmedetomidine were hypotension and bradycardia. PMID:27716690

  6. Comparison of Dexmedetomidine and Remifentanil on Airway Reflex and Hemodynamic Changes during Recovery after Craniotomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyunzu; Min, Kyeong Tae; Lee, Jeong Rim; Ha, Sang Hee; Lee, Woo Kyung; Seo, Jae Hee

    2016-01-01

    Purpose During emergence from anesthesia for a craniotomy, maintenance of hemodynamic stability and prompt evaluation of neurological status is mandatory. The aim of this prospective, randomized, double-blind study was to compare the effects of dexmedetomidine and remifentanil on airway reflex and hemodynamic change in patients undergoing craniotomy. Materials and Methods Seventy-four patients undergoing clipping of unruptured cerebral aneurysm were recruited. In the dexmedetomidine group, patients were administered dexmedetomidine (0.5 µg/kg) for 5 minutes, while the patients of the remifentanil group were administered remifentanil with an effect site concentration of 1.5 ng/mL until endotracheal extubation. The incidence and severity of cough and hemodynamic variables were measured during the recovery period. Hemodynamic variables, respiration rate, and sedation scale were measured after extubation and in the post-anesthetic care unit (PACU). Results The incidence of grade 2 and 3 cough at the point of extubation was 62.5% in the dexmedetomidine group and 53.1% in the remifentanil group (p=0.39). Mean arterial pressure (p=0.01) at admission to the PACU and heart rate (p=0.04 and 0.01, respectively) at admission and at 10 minutes in the PACU were significantly lower in the dexmedetomidine group. Respiration rate was significantly lower in the remifentanil group at 2 minutes (p<0.01) and 5 minutes (p<0.01) after extubation. Conclusion We concluded that a single bolus of dexmedetomidine (0.5 µg/kg) and remifentanil infusion have equal effectiveness in attenuating coughing and hemodynamic changes in patients undergoing cerebral aneurysm clipping; however, dexmedetomidine leads to better preservation of respiration. PMID:27189295

  7. Functional contribution of α1D-adrenoceptors in the renal vasculature of left ventricular hypertrophy induced with isoprenaline and caffeine in Wistar-Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ashfaq; Sattar, Munavvar A; Rathore, Hassaan A; Abdulla, Mohammad H; Khan, Safia A; Abdullah, Nor A; Kaur, Gurjeet; Johns, Edward J

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the role of α1D-adrenoceptor in the modulation of renal haemodynamics in rats with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). LVH was established in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats with isoprenaline (5.0 mg · (kg body mass)(-1), by subcutaneous injection every 72 h) and caffeine (62 mg · L(-1) in drinking water, daily for 14 days). Renal vasoconstrictor responses were measured for noradrenaline (NA), phenylephrine (PE), and methoxamine (ME) before and immediately after low or high dose intrarenal infusions of BMY 7378, a selective α1D-adrenoceptor blocker. The rats with LVH had higher mean arterial blood pressure and circulating NA levels, but lower renal cortical blood perfusion compared with the control group (all P < 0.05). In the LVH group, the magnitude of the renal vasoconstrictor response to ME was blunted, but not the response to NA or PE (P < 0.05), compared with the control group (LVH vs. C, 38% vs. 50%). The magnitude of the drop in the vasoconstrictor responses to NA, PE, and ME in the presence of a higher dose of BMY 7378 was significantly greater in the LVH group compared with the control group (LVH vs. C, 45% vs. 25% for NA, 52% vs. 33% for PE, 66% vs. 53% for ME, all P < 0.05). These findings indicate an impaired renal vasoconstrictor response to adrenergic agonists during LVH. In addition, the α1D-adrenoceptor subtype plays a key role in the modulation of vascular responses in this diseased state. PMID:25403946

  8. Functional contribution of α1D-adrenoceptors in the renal vasculature of left ventricular hypertrophy induced with isoprenaline and caffeine in Wistar-Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Ashfaq; Sattar, Munavvar A; Rathore, Hassaan A; Abdulla, Mohammad H; Khan, Safia A; Abdullah, Nor A; Kaur, Gurjeet; Johns, Edward J

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the role of α1D-adrenoceptor in the modulation of renal haemodynamics in rats with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). LVH was established in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats with isoprenaline (5.0 mg · (kg body mass)(-1), by subcutaneous injection every 72 h) and caffeine (62 mg · L(-1) in drinking water, daily for 14 days). Renal vasoconstrictor responses were measured for noradrenaline (NA), phenylephrine (PE), and methoxamine (ME) before and immediately after low or high dose intrarenal infusions of BMY 7378, a selective α1D-adrenoceptor blocker. The rats with LVH had higher mean arterial blood pressure and circulating NA levels, but lower renal cortical blood perfusion compared with the control group (all P < 0.05). In the LVH group, the magnitude of the renal vasoconstrictor response to ME was blunted, but not the response to NA or PE (P < 0.05), compared with the control group (LVH vs. C, 38% vs. 50%). The magnitude of the drop in the vasoconstrictor responses to NA, PE, and ME in the presence of a higher dose of BMY 7378 was significantly greater in the LVH group compared with the control group (LVH vs. C, 45% vs. 25% for NA, 52% vs. 33% for PE, 66% vs. 53% for ME, all P < 0.05). These findings indicate an impaired renal vasoconstrictor response to adrenergic agonists during LVH. In addition, the α1D-adrenoceptor subtype plays a key role in the modulation of vascular responses in this diseased state.

  9. Long-Acting Beta Agonists Enhance Allergic Airway Disease

    PubMed Central

    Knight, John M.; Mak, Garbo; Shaw, Joanne; Porter, Paul; McDermott, Catherine; Roberts, Luz; You, Ran; Yuan, Xiaoyi; Millien, Valentine O.; Qian, Yuping; Song, Li-Zhen; Frazier, Vincent; Kim, Choel; Kim, Jeong Joo; Bond, Richard A.; Milner, Joshua D.; Zhang, Yuan; Mandal, Pijus K.; Luong, Amber; Kheradmand, Farrah

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most common of medical illnesses and is treated in part by drugs that activate the beta-2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) to dilate obstructed airways. Such drugs include long acting beta agonists (LABAs) that are paradoxically linked to excess asthma-related mortality. Here we show that LABAs such as salmeterol and structurally related β2-AR drugs such as formoterol and carvedilol, but not short-acting agonists (SABAs) such as albuterol, promote exaggerated asthma-like allergic airway disease and enhanced airway constriction in mice. We demonstrate that salmeterol aberrantly promotes activation of the allergic disease-related transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in multiple mouse and human cells. A novel inhibitor of STAT6, PM-242H, inhibited initiation of allergic disease induced by airway fungal challenge, reversed established allergic airway disease in mice, and blocked salmeterol-dependent enhanced allergic airway disease. Thus, structurally related β2-AR ligands aberrantly activate STAT6 and promote allergic airway disease. This untoward pharmacological property likely explains adverse outcomes observed with LABAs, which may be overcome by agents that antagonize STAT6. PMID:26605551

  10. Effect of conventional (mixed beta 1/beta 2) and novel (beta 3) adrenergic agonists on thermoregulatory behavior.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, H J; Stock, M J

    1991-10-01

    The effects of submaximal and maximal thermogenic doses of isoproterenol (ISO) on operant thermoregulatory responses in a cold (-8 degrees C) environment were tested in lean (+/?) Zucker rats trained to barpress for radiant heat. Contrary to expectations, ISO rats pressed for twice as much exogenous heat as controls, but showed a smaller rise in colonic temperature. Conversely, a beta 3-selective adrenergic agonist (RO40-2148) decreased the requirement for exogenous heat and produced larger rises in colonic temperature. RO40-2148 and another beta 3-agonist (ICI D7114) produced similar responses in obese (fa/fa) Zucker rats, but tests with ISO were terminated because it caused profound, and lethal hypothermia. The hypothermic effects of ISO on colonic temperature were also observed in Sprague-Dawley rats at room temperature (22 degrees C), whereas RO40-2148 produced hyperthermia. These results provide behavioral evidence for the high thermogenic selectivity of these novel adrenergic agonists and support the existence of an atypical beta 3-adrenoceptor. The hypothermic effects of ISO are presumed to be due to actions on beta 1- and/or beta 2-adrenoceptors. PMID:1687163

  11. Protection by dexamethasone of the functional desensitization to β2-adrenoceptor-mediated responses in human lung mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Lee K; Drury, Duncan E J; Dummer, Jack F; Ghahramani, Parviz; Schleimer, Robert P; Peachell, Peter T

    1997-01-01

    The β-adrenoceptor agonist, isoprenaline, inhibited the IgE-mediated release of histamine from human lung mast cells (HLMC) in a dose-dependent manner. Maximal inhibitory effects were obtained with 0.1 μM isoprenaline. However, the inhibition of histamine release from HLMC by isoprenaline (0.1 μM) was highly variable ranging from 33 to 97% inhibition (mean, 59±3%, n=27). Long-term (24 h) incubation of HLMC with isoprenaline led to a subsequent reduction in the ability of a second exposure of isoprenaline to inhibit IgE-mediated histamine release from HLMC. The impairment in the ability of isoprenaline (0.1 μM) to inhibit histamine release following desensitizing conditions (1 μM isoprenaline for 24 h) was highly variable amongst HLMC preparations ranging from essentially negligible levels of desensitization in some preparations to complete abrogation of the inhibitory response in others (mean, 65±6% desensitization, n=27). The ability of HLMC to recover from desensitization was investigated. Following desensitizing conditions (1 μM isoprenaline for 24 h), HLMC were washed and incubated for 24 h in buffer and the effectiveness of isoprenaline (0.1 μM) to inhibit IgE-mediated histamine release from HLMC was assessed. The extent of recovery was highly variable with some HLMC preparations failing to recover and others displaying a complete restoration of responsiveness to isoprenaline (mean, 40±6% recovery, n=23). The effects of the glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, were also investigated. Long-term (24–72 h) treatments with dexamethasone (0.1 μM) had no effect on IgE-mediated histamine release from HLMC. Additionally, long-term (24–72 h) treatments with dexamethasone (0.1 μM) had no effect on the effectiveness of isoprenaline to inhibit histamine release. However, long-term (24–72 h) treatments with dexamethasone (0.1 μM) protected against the functional desensitization induced by incubation (24 h) of HLMC with

  12. Efficacy of dexmedetomidine on postoperative nausea and vomiting: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiao; Zhou, Miao; Feng, Jiao-Jiao; Wu, Liang; Fang, Shang-Ping; Ge, Xin-Yu; Sun, Hai-Jing; Ren, Peng-Cheng; Lv, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a frequent complication in postoperative period. The aim of the current meta-analysis was to assess the efficacy of dexmedetomidine on PONV. Methods: Two researchers independently searched PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The meta-analysis was performed with Review Manager. Results: Eighty-two trials with 6,480 patients were included in this meta-analysis. Dexmedetomidine reduced postoperative nausea (Risk Ratio (RR) = 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.50 to 0.73) and vomiting (RR = 0.48, 95% CI: 0.36 to 0.64) compared with placebo, with an effective dose of 0.5 ug/kg (RR = 0.46, 95% CI: 0.34 to 0.62) and 1.0 ug/kg (RR = 0.29, 95% CI: 0.12 to 0.75), respectively. The antiemetic effect can only be achieved intravenously, not epidurally or intrathecally. The efficacy of dexmedetomidine was similar to that of widely used agents, such as propofol, midazolam etc., but better than opioid analgesics. Moreover, application of dexmedetomidine reduced intraoperative requirement of fentanyl (Standard Mean Difference = -1.91, 95% CI: -3.20 to -0.62). Conclusions: The present meta-analysis indicates that dexmedetomidine shows superiority to placebo, but not to all other anesthetic agents on PONV. And this efficacy may be related to a reduced consumption of intraoperative opioids. PMID:26550123

  13. Comparison of Dexmedetomidine-Ketamine with Isoflurane for Anesthesia of Chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera).

    PubMed

    Fox, Lana; Snyder, Lindsey Bc; Mans, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare isoflurane with a combination of dexmedetomidine and ketamine, administered intramuscularly, for anesthesia in chinchillas (Chinchilla lanigera). In a prospective, complete crossover study, adult chinchillas (n = 8; age, 2 to 5 y) were anesthetized with a combination of dexmedetomidine (0.015 mg/kg IM) and ketamine (4 mg/kg IM). Atipamezole (0.15 mg/kg) was injected subcutaneously 45 min after dexmedetomidine-ketamine administration. For comparison, anesthesia also was induced and maintained with isoflurane in 100% oxygen, delivered by facemask. Anesthetic and physiologic parameters were recorded during each anesthesia, including various reflexes, heart rate, respiratory rate, body temperature, and SpO2. Food intake, fecal output, and body weight were recorded daily for 6 d after each anesthetic trial. Induction time, heart rate, respiratory rate, and body temperature did not differ significantly between the 2 anesthetic protocols. Recovery times were shorter and SpO2 was higher in animals that received isoflurane delivered in 100% oxygen. Food intake and fecal output were reduced in the dexmedetomidine-ketamine group for as long as 3 d after anesthesia, whereas isoflurane had no signifcant effect on food intake or fecal output. Both anesthetic protocols provided effective anesthesia in chinchillas. However, when anesthetized with dexmedetomidine-ketamine, chinchillas received room air and became hypoxemic. Future studies are needed to evaluate the effect of oxygen supplementation on anesthetic recovery and on the recovery of food intake and fecal output in chinchillas. PMID:27177565

  14. Dexmedetomidine Increases Tau Phosphorylation Under Normothermic Conditions In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Whittington, Robert A.; Virág, László; Gratuze, Maud; Petry, Franck R.; Noël, Anastasia; Poitras, Isabelle; Truchetti, Geoffrey; Marcouiller, François; Papon, Marie-Amélie; Khoury, Noura El; Wong, Kevin; Bretteville, Alexis; Morin, Françoise; Planel, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    There is developing interest in the potential association between anesthesia and the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Several anesthetics have thus been demonstrated to induce tau hyperphosphorylation, an effect mostly mediated by anesthesia-induced hypothermia. Here, we tested the hypothesis that acute normothermic administration of dexmedetomidine, an intravenous sedative used in intensive care units, would result in tau hyperphosphorylation in vivo and in vitro. When administered to non-transgenic mice, dexmedetomidine induced tau hyperphosphorylation persisting up to 6h in the hippocampus for the AT8 epitope. Pretreatment with atipamezole, a highly specific α2-adrenergic receptor (α2-AR) antagonist, blocked dexmedetomidine-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. Furthermore, dexmedetomidine dose-dependently increased tau phosphorylation at AT8 in SH-SY5Y cells, impaired mice spatial memory in the Barnes maze, and promoted tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation in transgenic hTau mice. These findings suggest that dexmedetomidine: i) increases tau phosphorylation, in vivo and in vitro, in the absence of anesthetic-induced hypothermia and through α2-AR activation, ii) promotes tau aggregation in a mouse model of tauopathy, and iii) impacts spatial reference memory. PMID:26058840

  15. Cardiovascular effects of bevantolol, a selective beta 1-adrenoceptor antagonist with a novel pharmacological profile.

    PubMed Central

    Dukes, I. D.; Vaughan Williams, E. M.

    1985-01-01

    Bevantolol was more potent in blocking the chronotropic than the hypotensive effects of isoprenaline in pithed rats. Bevantolol itself induced bradycardia, so that it was not possible to estimate the pA2 from nonparallel dose-response curves relating isoprenaline concentration to tachycardia. Bevantolol caused hypertension in pithed rats, an effect attenuated by phentolamine, implying that bevantolol may be an alpha-adrenoceptor agonist. Bevantolol potentiated the pressor effects of noradrenaline, the maximum potentiation equalling that produced by prior chemical sympathectomy with guanethidine, implying that bevantolol may block noradrenaline uptake. In isolated atria bevantolol-induced bradycardia was associated with a positive shift in take-off potential, a reduction in the maximum rate of depolarization (Vmax), and a lengthening of action potential duration (APD). No change in the slope of the slow diastolic depolarization occurred except at the highest concentration (18 mumol l(-1). In atrial and ventricular muscle bevantolol reduced Vmax and overshoot potential, implying reduction of fast inward sodium current (Class I antiarrhythmic action). In pithed rats bevantolol lengthened the P-R interval in the ECG, and produced atrioventricular (A-V) block, and bundle-branch block. In isolated A-V nodal preparations, intranodal conduction time was greatly increased, implying restriction of inward current through calcium channels responsible for nodal depolarization. Bevantolol had no negative inotropic effect in pithed rats, or in isolated atria, and did not alter the positive inotropic effect of raised extracellular calcium concentration, implying absence of restriction of current through calcium channels controlling contraction of the myocardium. Images Figure 1 PMID:2858236

  16. Cardiovascular effects of bevantolol, a selective beta 1-adrenoceptor antagonist with a novel pharmacological profile.

    PubMed

    Dukes, I D; Vaughan Williams, E M

    1985-02-01

    Bevantolol was more potent in blocking the chronotropic than the hypotensive effects of isoprenaline in pithed rats. Bevantolol itself induced bradycardia, so that it was not possible to estimate the pA2 from nonparallel dose-response curves relating isoprenaline concentration to tachycardia. Bevantolol caused hypertension in pithed rats, an effect attenuated by phentolamine, implying that bevantolol may be an alpha-adrenoceptor agonist. Bevantolol potentiated the pressor effects of noradrenaline, the maximum potentiation equalling that produced by prior chemical sympathectomy with guanethidine, implying that bevantolol may block noradrenaline uptake. In isolated atria bevantolol-induced bradycardia was associated with a positive shift in take-off potential, a reduction in the maximum rate of depolarization (Vmax), and a lengthening of action potential duration (APD). No change in the slope of the slow diastolic depolarization occurred except at the highest concentration (18 mumol l(-1). In atrial and ventricular muscle bevantolol reduced Vmax and overshoot potential, implying reduction of fast inward sodium current (Class I antiarrhythmic action). In pithed rats bevantolol lengthened the P-R interval in the ECG, and produced atrioventricular (A-V) block, and bundle-branch block. In isolated A-V nodal preparations, intranodal conduction time was greatly increased, implying restriction of inward current through calcium channels responsible for nodal depolarization. Bevantolol had no negative inotropic effect in pithed rats, or in isolated atria, and did not alter the positive inotropic effect of raised extracellular calcium concentration, implying absence of restriction of current through calcium channels controlling contraction of the myocardium.

  17. Activation of the beta-adrenoceptor-protein kinase A signaling pathway within the ventral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis mediates the negative affective component of pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Deyama, Satoshi; Katayama, Takahiro; Ohno, Atsushi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji; Yamaguchi, Taku; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro; Minami, Masabumi

    2008-07-30

    Pain is an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience. The neural systems underlying the sensory component of pain have been studied extensively, but we are only beginning to understand those underlying its affective component. The bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) has been implicated in stress responses and negative affective states, such as anxiety, fear, and aversion. Recently, we demonstrated the crucial role of the BNST in the negative affective component of pain using the conditioned place aversion (CPA) test. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of the beta-adrenoceptor-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway within the BNST, in particular, within the ventral part of the BNST (vBNST), in pain-induced aversion in male Sprague Dawley rats. In vivo microdialysis showed that extracellular noradrenaline levels within the vBNST were significantly increased by intraplantar formalin injection. Using the CPA test, we found that intra-vBNST injection of timolol, a beta-adrenoceptor antagonist, dose-dependently attenuated the intraplantar-formalin-induced CPA (F-CPA) without reducing nociceptive behaviors. Experiments with subtype-selective antagonists demonstrated the essential role of beta(2)-adrenoceptors in F-CPA. Intra-vBNST injection of isoproterenol, a beta-adrenoceptor agonist, dose-dependently produced CPA even in the absence of noxious stimulation. This isoproterenol-induced CPA was reversed by the coinjection of Rp-cyclic adenosine monophosphorothioate (Rp-cAMPS), a selective PKA inhibitor. Furthermore, intra-vBNST injection of Rp-cAMPS dose-dependently attenuated the F-CPA. Together, these results suggest that PKA activation within the vBNST via the enhancement of beta-adrenergic transmission is important for the negative affective component of pain.

  18. Characterization of rat cerebral cortical beta adrenoceptor subtypes using (-)-( sup 125 I)-iodocyanopindolol

    SciTech Connect

    Tiong, A.H.; Richardson, J.S. )

    1990-01-01

    (-)-(125I)-Iodocyanopindolol (-(ICYP)), used to characterize beta adrenoceptors on membrane preparations from rat cerebral cortex, was shown to have affinity for both beta adrenoceptors and serotonin receptors. Therefore, 10 microM serotonin was added to the assays to prevent (-)ICYP binding to serotonin receptors. Under these conditions, (-)ICYP binding to the cortical membrane preparation was reversible and saturable, and the association reaction was very slow. The dissociation reaction was also very slow, and revealed two affinity states corresponding to a high and a low affinity state. Scatchard analysis showed a single class of binding sites with an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) of 20.7 pM, and a maximal density of binding sites (Bmax) of 95.1 fmol/mg membrane protein. Displacement binding analyses revealed a potency series of (-) isoproterenol greater than (-) epinephrine equal to (-) norepinephrine, suggesting a predominance of the beta 1 adrenoceptor subtype. Detailed competition ligand binding studies with the selective beta 1 adrenoceptor antagonist ICI-89406 and the selective beta 2 adrenoceptor antagonist ICI-118551, showed that about 70% of the beta adrenoceptor population in the rat cortex is of the beta 1 subtype with the remainder being of the beta 2 subtype. We conclude that since (-)ICYP binds to both beta adrenoceptors and serotonin receptors, it is important to prevent the binding of (-)ICYP to serotonin receptors by adding a suppressing ligand like excess cold serotonin when assaying beta adrenoceptors. We have presented the first such characterization of rat cerebral cortical beta adrenoceptors with (-)ICYP in this study.

  19. Dexmedetomidine versus midazolam for sedation during endoscopy: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, FAN; SUN, HAO-RUI; ZHENG, ZE-BING; LIAO, REN; LIU, JIN

    2016-01-01

    Patients undergoing endoscopy frequently require sedation, which commonly includes the administration of midazolam or dexmedetomidine. Previous meta-analyses have mainly focused on comparing the effects of these two drugs in intensive care unit patients. In the present study, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared the sedative and clinical effectiveness of these two drugs in patients undergoing endoscopy were searched in a number of databases. The meta-analysis showed that dexmedetomidine demonstrated a significantly lower rate of respiratory depression and adverse events compared with those presented upon midazolam administration. A significant difference was also observed in the sedation potency of the sedatives. The current controlled data suggest that dexmedetomidine may be an alternative to midazolam in the sedation for endoscopy. However, more high-quality and well-designed studies are required to further evaluate this conclusion. PMID:27284342

  20. Dexmedetomidine controls twitch-convulsive syndrome in the course of uremic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Nomoto, Koichi; Scurlock, Corey; Bronster, David

    2011-12-01

    An 85 year old man with a history of chronic renal insufficiency was admitted to the cardiothoracic intensive care unit after aortic valve replacement. His postoperative course was marked by acute oliguric renal failure for high blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and acute hyperactive delirium. At this time he also developed tremors with muscle twitching; he received no other form of sedatives. A neurology consult made the diagnosis of twitch-convulsive syndrome associated with uremic encephalopathy. While the patient was receiving the dexmedetomidine infusion, the signs of the twitch-convulsive syndrome, particularly the twitching and tremors, disappeared. Within 30 minutes of the end of the dexmedetomidine infusion, symptoms of the twitch-convulsive syndrome returned, manifesting as acute tremulousness. After several dialysis treatments, his BUN decreased and the dexmedetomidine was weaned, without return of the symptoms of twitch-convulsive syndrome. PMID:22137518

  1. Using AAV vectors expressing the β2-adrenoceptor or associated Gα proteins to modulate skeletal muscle mass and muscle fibre size

    PubMed Central

    Hagg, Adam; Colgan, Timothy D.; Thomson, Rachel E.; Qian, Hongwei; Lynch, Gordon S.; Gregorevic, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Anabolic β2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) agonists have been proposed as therapeutics for treating muscle wasting but concerns regarding possible off-target effects have hampered their use. We investigated whether β2-AR-mediated signalling could be modulated in skeletal muscle via gene delivery to the target tissue, thereby avoiding the risks of β2-AR agonists. In mice, intramuscular administration of a recombinant adeno-associated virus-based vector (rAAV vector) expressing the β2-AR increased muscle mass by >20% within 4 weeks. This hypertrophic response was comparable to that of 4 weeks’ treatment with the β2-AR agonist formoterol, and was not ablated by mTOR inhibition. Increasing expression of inhibitory (Gαi2) and stimulatory (GαsL) G-protein subunits produced minor atrophic and hypertrophic changes in muscle mass, respectively. Furthermore, Gαi2 over-expression prevented AAV:β2-AR mediated hypertrophy. Introduction of the non-muscle Gαs isoform, GαsXL elicited hypertrophy comparable to that achieved by AAV:β2-AR. Moreover, GαsXL gene delivery was found to be capable of inducing hypertrophy in the muscles of mice lacking functional β1- and β2-ARs. These findings demonstrate that gene therapy-based interventions targeting the β2-AR pathway can promote skeletal muscle hypertrophy independent of ligand administration, and highlight novel methods for potentially modulating muscle mass in settings of disease. PMID:26972746

  2. High-speed gas chromatography in doping control: fast-GC and fast-GC/MS determination of beta-adrenoceptor ligands and diuretics.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, Claudio; Bicchi, Carlo; Di Stilo, Antonella; Salomone, Alberto; Vincenti, Marco

    2006-12-01

    In official doping controls, about 300 drugs and metabolites have to be screened for each sample. Moreover, the number of determinations to be routinely processed increases continuously as the number of both samples and potential illicit drugs keeps growing. As a consequence, increasingly specific, sensitive, and, above all, fast methods for doping controls are needed. The present study presents an efficient fast-GC/MS approach to the routine screening of two different classes of doping agents, namely beta-adrenoceptor ligands and diuretics (belonging to the S3, P2, and S5 groups of the WADA list of prohibited substances). Narrow bore columns (100 mm id) of different lengths and coated with apolar stationary phases were successfully used to separate the derivatized analytes; preliminary experiments (results not shown) showed better performances with OV-1701 for the separation of beta-adrenoceptor ligands. On the same stationary phase some diuretics required too high a temperature or a long isothermal time for elution, in which case a DB1-MS column was preferred. Two methods of sample preparation, derivatization, and analysis were used on aqueous standard mixtures of, respectively, (i) eight beta-adrenoceptor ligands, including five beta-antagonists (acebutolol, alprenolol, atenolol, metoprolol, pindolol) and three beta2-agonists (salbutamol, clenbuterol, terbutaline) and (ii) seventeen diuretic drugs (acetazolamide, althiazide, bendroflumethiazide, bumethanide, canrenone, chlorothiazide, chlortalidone, clopamide, ethacrinic acid, furosemide, hydrochlorothiazide, hydroflumethiazide, indapamide, indomethacine, spironolactone, triamterene, trichloromethiazide) and one masking agent (probenecid). The mixture of beta-adrenoceptor ligand derivatives was efficiently separated in about 5.6 min, while the one of 18 diuretics and masking agents required less than 5 min for analysis. Limits of detection were from 1 microg/L for pindolol, ethacrinic acid, furosemide

  3. Beta 3-adrenoceptor in rat aorta: molecular and biochemical characterization and signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rautureau, Yohann; Toumaniantz, Gilles; Serpillon, Sabrina; Jourdon, Philippe; Trochu, Jean-Noël; Gauthier, Chantal

    2002-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that β3-adrenoceptor (β3-AR) stimulation induces endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in rat aorta through the activation of an endothelial NO synthase associated with an increase in intracellular cGMP. The aim of the present study was to localise β3-AR to confirm our functional study and to complete the signalling pathway of β3-AR in rat aorta. By RT–PCR, we have detected β3-AR transcripts both in aorta and in freshly isolated endothelial cells. The absence of markers for adipsin or hormone-sensitive lipase in endothelial cells excluded the presence of β3-AR from adipocytes. The localization of β3-AR in aortic endothelial cells was confirmed by immunohistochemistry using a rat β3-AR antibody. To identify the G protein linked to β3-AR, experiments were performed in rat pre-treated with PTX (10 μg kg−1), a Gi/0 protein inhibitor. The blockage of Gi/0 protein by PTX was confirmed by the reduction of vasorelaxation induced by UK 14304, a selective α2-AR agonist. The cumulative concentration-response curve for SR 58611A, a β3-AR agonist, was not significantly modified on aorta rings from PTX pre-treated rats. At the same level of contraction, the relaxations induced by 10 μM SR 58611A were significantly reduced in 30 mM-KCl pre-constricted rings (Emax=16.7±8.4%, n=5), in comparison to phenylephrine (0.3 μM) pre-constricted rings (Emax=49.11±11.0%, n=5, P<0.05). In addition, iberotoxin (0.1 μM), glibenclamide (1 μM) and 4-aminopyridine (1 mM), selective potassium channels blockers of KCa, KATP, and Kv respectively, decreased the SR 58611A-mediated relaxation. We conclude that β3-AR is preferentially expressed in rat aortic endothelial cells. β3-AR-mediated aortic relaxation is independent of Gi/0 proteins stimulation, but results from the activation of several potassium channels, KCa, KATP, and Kv. PMID:12208771

  4. Functional and molecular characterization of beta-adrenoceptors in the internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Sandeep; Kazerounian, Shiva; Banwait, Kuldip; Schulz, Stephanie; Waldman, Scott A; Rattan, Satish

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to characterize different beta-adrenoceptors (beta-ARs) and determine their role in the spontaneously tonic smooth muscle of the internal anal sphincter (IAS). The beta-AR subtypes in the opossum IAS were investigated by functional in vitro, radioligand binding, Western blot, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) studies. ZD 7114 [(S)-4-[2-hydroxy-3-phenoxypropylaminoethoxy]-N-(2-methoxyethyl)phenoxyacetamide], a selective beta(3)-AR agonist, caused a potent and concentration-dependent relaxation of the IAS smooth muscle that was antagonized by the beta(3)-AR antagonist SR 59230A [1-(2-ethylphenoxy)-3-[[(1S)-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-1-naphthalenyl]amino]-(2S)-2-propanol hydrochloride]. Conversely, the IAS smooth muscle relaxation caused by beta(1)- and beta(2)-AR agonists (xamoterol and procaterol, respectively) was selectively antagonized by their respective antagonists CGP 20712 [(+/-)-2-hydroxy-5-[2-[[2-hydroxy-3-[4-[1-methyl-4-(trifluoromethyl)-1H-imidazol-2-yl]phenoxy]propyl]amino]ethoxy]-benzamide methanesulfonate salt] and ICI 118551. Saturation binding of [(125)I]iodocyanopindolol to beta-AR subtypes revealed the presence of a high-affinity site (K(d1) = 96.4 +/- 8.7 pM; B(max1) = 12.5 +/- 0.6 fmol/mg protein) and a low-affinity site (K(d2) = 1.96 +/- 1.7 nM; B(max2) = 58.7 +/- 4.3 fmol/mg protein). Competition binding with selective beta-AR antagonists revealed that the high-affinity site correspond to beta(1)/beta(2)-AR and the low affinity site to beta(3)-AR. Receptor binding data suggest the predominant presence of beta(3)-AR over beta(1)/beta(2)-AR. Western blot studies identified beta(1)-, beta(2)-, and beta(3)-AR subtypes. The presence of beta(1)-, beta(2)-, and beta(3)-ARs was further demonstrated by mRNA analysis using RT-PCR. The studies demonstrate a comprehensive functional and molecular characterization of beta(1)-, beta(2)-, and beta(3)-ARs in IAS smooth muscle. These studies may have

  5. Involvement of β3-adrenoceptors in the inhibitory control of cholinergic activity in human bladder: Direct evidence by [(3)H]-acetylcholine release experiments in the isolated detrusor.

    PubMed

    D' Agostino, Gianluigi; Maria Condino, Anna; Calvi, Paolo

    2015-07-01

    Bladder overactivity (OAB) is a multifactorial bladder disorder that requires therapeutics superior to the current pharmacological treatment with muscarinic antagonists. β3-adrenoceptor (β3-ADR) agonists represent a novel promising approach that differently addresses the parasympathetic pathway, but the clinical efficacy of these drugs has not been fully elucidated to date. Therefore, we aimed to study the pharmacological mechanisms activated by β3-ADR agonists at muscular and neural sites in the isolated human bladder. Detrusor smooth muscle strips obtained from male patients undergoing total cystectomy were labelled with tritiated choline and stimulated with electrical field stimulation (EFS). EFS produced smooth muscle contraction and simultaneous acetylcholine ([(3)H]-ACh) release, which mostly reflects the neural origin of acetylcholine. Isoprenaline (INA), BRL37344 and mirabegron inhibited the EFS-evoked contraction and [(3)H]-ACh release in a concentration-dependent manner, yielding concentration-response curves (CRCs) that were shifted to the right by the selective β3-ADR antagonists L-748,337 and SR59230A. Based on the agonist potency estimates (pEC50) and apparent affinities (pKb) of antagonists evaluated from the CRCs of agonists, our data confirm the occurrence of β3-ADRs at muscle sites. Moreover, our data are consistent with the presence of inhibitory β3-ADRs that are functionally expressed at the neural site. Taken together, these findings elucidate the mechanisms activated by β3-ADR agonists because neural β3-ADRs participate in the inhibition of detrusor motor drive by reducing the amount of acetylcholine involved in the cholinergic pathway. PMID:25861936

  6. Discontinuation of prolonged infusions of dexmedetomidine in critically ill children with heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Burbano, Nelson H.; Otero, Andrea V.; Berry, Donald E.; Orr, Richard A.; Munoz, Ricardo A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To describe changes in hemodynamic variables, sedation and pain score after discontinuation of prolonged infusions of dexmedetomidine in a pediatric population of critically ill cardiac patients. Methods Retrospective case series of patients who received continuous infusions of dexmedetomidine for longer than 3 days in a pediatric cardiac intensive care unit from 2008 to 2010. Results Sixty-two patients, age 5.2 months (range 0.3 months – 17 years) and weight 5.1 kg (range 2.2–84 kg), were included. Thirty-nine patients (63%) were <1 year of age. Median duration of dexmedetomidine infusion was 5.8 days (range 4–26 days) and median infusion dose was 0.71 μg/kg/hr (range 0.2–2.1 μg/kg/hr). Median weaning time and dose at discontinuation were 43 hours (range 0–189 hours) and 0.2 μg/kg/hr (range 0.1–1.3 μg/kg/hr). Tachycardia, transient hypertension and agitation were observed in 27%, 35% and 27% of patients. Episodes of tachycardia were more frequent in children >1 year of age (61% vs. 8%, p < .001), patients who received dexmedetomidine for 4 days when compared to those who received 5 days or longer (48% vs. 17%, p = .011) and patients whose infusion was discontinued abruptly (42% vs. 14%, p = .045). Tachyarrhythmias were seen in 9 patients (15%) after discontinuation of the dexmedetomidine infusion. Adequate sedation and analgesia scores at the moment of infusion discontinuation were seen in 90% and 88%, of patients respectively. Conclusions Our study suggests that tachycardia, transient hypertension and agitation are frequently observed in pediatric cardiac intensive care unit patients after discontinuing prolonged dexmedetomidine infusions. PMID:22160200

  7. Hypnotic Hypersensitivity to Volatile Anesthetics and Dexmedetomidine in Dopamine β-Hydroxylase Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Frances Y.; Hanna, George M.; Han, Wei; Mardini, Feras; Thomas, Steven A.; Wyner, Abraham J.; Kelz, Max B.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Multiple lines of evidence suggest that the adrenergic system can modulate sensitivity to anesthetic-induced immobility and anesthetic-induced hypnosis as well. However, several considerations prevent the conclusion that the endogenous adrenergic ligands norepinephrine and epinephrine alter anesthetic sensitivity. METHODS Using dopamine β-hydroxylase (Dbh−/−) mice genetically engineered to lack the adrenergic ligands and their siblings with normal adrenergic levels, we test the contribution of the adrenergic ligands upon volatile anesthetic induction and emergence. Moreover, we investigate the effects of intravenous dexmedetomidine in adrenergic-deficient mice and their siblings using both righting reflex and processed electroencephalographic measures of anesthetic hypnosis. RESULTS We demonstrate that the loss of norepinephrine and epinephrine and not other neuromodulators copackaged in adrenergic neurons is sufficient to cause hypersensitivity to induction of volatile anesthesia. However, the most profound effect of adrenergic deficiency is retarding emergence from anesthesia, which takes two to three times as long in Dbh−/− mice for sevoflurane, isoflurane, and halothane. Having shown that Dbh−/− mice are hypersensitive to volatile anesthetics, we further demonstrate that their hypnotic hypersensitivity persists at multiple doses of dexmedetomidine. Dbh−/− mice exhibit up to 67% shorter latencies to loss of righting reflex and up to 545% longer durations of dexmedetomidine-induced general anesthesia. Central rescue of adrenergic signaling restores control-like dexmedetomidine sensitivity. A novel continuous electroencephalographic analysis illustrates that the longer duration of dexmedetomidine-induced hypnosis is not due to a motor confound, but occurs because of impaired anesthetic emergence. CONCLUSIONS Adrenergic signaling is essential for normal emergence from general anesthesia. Dexmedetomidine-induced general anesthesia does

  8. Comparison between propofol and dexmedetomidine on depth of anesthesia: A prospective randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Uddalak; Mallik, Suchismita; Ghosh, Sarmila; Bhattacharya, Susmita; Bisai, Subrata; Biswas, Hirak

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims: Intravenous agents such as propofol are commonly used to maintain adequate depth of anesthesia. Dexmedetomidine which has an anesthetic sparing effect is being considered for maintaining intraoperative depth of anesthesia. We hypothesized to compare the effect of dexmedetomidine on depth of anesthesia with propofol and evaluated whether dexmedetomidine can be used as sole anesthetic agent in maintaining depth of anesthesia. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients of ASA PS I, 18-65 years of age, scheduled for laparotomy under general anesthesia were randomly divided into two groups of 30 each. Group A received propofol 1 mg/kg bolus followed by infusion (50 mcg/kg/min) and Group B received dexmedetomidine 1 mcg/kg bolus followed by infusion (0.5 mcg/kg/h). Both the groups were administered standard general anesthesia with routine monitoring along with Bispectral index (BIS) and values were recorded at intervals of 10 min. In all patients Ramsay sedation score was recorded after extubation and they were assessed for recall of intraoperative events using Modified Brice questionnaire. Results: Heart rate and mean arterial pressure were less in Group B than Group A. Intraoperative BIS values were significantly lower in Group B (P < 0.0001). Although sedation score was more in Group B it did not prolong recovery. No recall was found in any patient. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine was comparable with propofol in maintaining anesthesia and it can produce better control of hemodynamics and BIS value. Thus dexmedetomidine can be used as the sole maintenance anesthetic agent. PMID:25425783

  9. Evaluation of the pharmacological selectivity profile of alpha 1 adrenoceptor antagonists at prostatic alpha 1 adrenoceptors: binding, functional and in vivo studies.

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, B. A.; Miller, A. M.; Williamson, I. J.; O'Connell, J.; Chalmers, D. H.; Naylor, A. M.

    1996-01-01

    1. The profile of a range of alpha 1 adrenoceptor antagonists was determined in vitro against cloned human alpha 1A, alpha 1B and alpha 1D adrenoceptors and against noradrenaline-mediated contractions of rat aorta and human prostate. The in vivo profile of compounds was determined in an anaesthetized dog model which allowed the simultaneous assessment of antagonist potency against phenylephrine-mediated increases in blood pressure and prostatic pressure. 2. The quinazoline antagonists, prazosin, doxazosin and alfuzosin displayed high affinity but were non selective for the three cloned human alpha 1 adrenoceptors. Indoramin and SNAP 1069 showed selectivity for alpha 1A and alpha 1B adrenoceptors relative to the alpha 1D subtype. Rec 15/2739, WB 4101, SL 89,0591, (+)- and (-)- tamsulosin showed selectivity for alpha 1A and alpha 1D adrenoceptors relative to the alpha 1B subtype. RS 17053 showed high affinity and selectivity for alpha 1A adrenoceptors (pKi 8.6) relative to alpha 1B (pKi = 7.3) and alpha 1D (pKi = 7.1) subtypes. 3. (+)-Tamsulosin, (-)-tamsulosin, SL 89,0591, Rec 15/2739, SNAP 1069 and RS 17053 appeared to act as competitive antagonists of noradrenaline-mediated contractions of rat aorta yielding pA2 affinity estimates which were similar to binding affinities at cloned human alpha 1D adrenoceptors. The following rank order was obtained: prazosin = (-)-tamsulosin > doxazosin > SL 89,0591 = (+)-tamsulosin > Rec 15/2739 > RS 17053 = SNAP 1069. 4. (-)-Tamsulosin was a very potent, insurmountable antagonist of noradrenaline-mediated contractions of human prostate, yielding an approximate pA2 estimate of 9.8 at 1 nM. The corresponding (+)-enantiomer was 30 fold weaker. SL 89,0591, SNAP 1069 and Rec 15/2739 yielded pA2 estimates which compared well with their alpha 1A binding affinities. The affinity estimate for prazosin on human prostate was lower than the corresponding binding affinity determined at alpha 1A adrenoceptors and RS 17053 was a very weak

  10. (+/-)-1-[[2-(3,4-Dimethoxphenyl)ethyl]amino]-3-(3-methylphenoxy)-2- propanol hydrochloride (bevantolol, NC-1400) as a beta 1-selective adrenoceptor blocker with alpha 1-adrenoceptor blocking activity.

    PubMed

    Takayanagi, I; Kizawa, Y; Iwasaki, S; Nakagoshi, A

    1987-01-01

    Blocking activities of alpha- and beta-adrenoceptors by (+/-)-1-[[2-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-ethyl]amino]-3-(3-methylphenoxy)-2 -propanol hydrochloride (NC-1400) were tested on the isolated muscles, comparing with those of labetalol and atenolol. In blocking the beta 1-adrenoceptor, NC-1400 was slightly more potent than labetalol and atenolol. NC-1400 was about 1/10th as potent as labetalol and about ten times as potent as atenolol in blocking the beta 2-receptor. NC-1400 was beta 1-adrenoceptor selective. NC-1400 was about 1/30th as potent as labetalol in blocking the alpha 1-receptor. NC-1400 did not interact with the alpha 2-adrenoceptor in concentrations up to 10(-5) M. The present results indicate that NC-1400 is the selective beta 1-adrenoceptor blocker with some blocking activity of alpha 1-adrenoceptors.

  11. Mode of delivery and lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptor density in parturients and newborns.

    PubMed

    Santala, M

    1989-01-01

    Twenty-six women with uncomplicated pregnancy at term were selected for the study. Nine had spontaneous vaginal delivery without medication, 8 elective caesarean section under epidural and 9 under general anaesthesia. The results clearly demonstrate that newborns have lower lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptor density than their mothers. In vaginally delivered newborns the lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptor density was 38%, in the caesarean section group with general anaesthesia 27%, and with epidural anaesthesia 22% lower than in the corresponding mother group. Vaginally delivered newborns have lower lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptor density than those delivered by caesarean section. A plausible explanation is the down-regulation of the beta 2-adrenoceptors during labour and delivery.

  12. Effects of antiprogestogen (RU-486) treatment on myometrial and cervical alpha and beta-adrenoceptors in pregnant rabbits.

    PubMed

    Falkay, G

    1990-11-01

    Oestrogen and progesterone influence myometrial and cervical responses at different levels of the mechanisms regulating uterine contractility. One of these mechanisms could involve alterations in the adrenoceptor concentrations. This study was undertaken to assess the effects of treatment with the antiprogestogen RU-486 on the concentrations of alpha- and beta-adrenoceptors in pregnant rabbit myometrial and cervical membranes by means of a radioligand binding technique. The probable relative oestrogen dominance due to the antiprogestogen treatment selectively decreased the alpha 2-adrenoceptor subtype in the cervix, where an alpha-adrenoceptor dominance was found on day 27 of pregnancy. The results indicate a heterologous regulation of alpha-adrenoceptors by sex steroids, i.e. suppression of the alpha 2-adrenoceptor concentration by antiprogestogen treatment.

  13. ( sup 3 H)rauwolscine binding to myometrial. alpha. sub 2 -adrenoceptors in pregnant guinea pig

    SciTech Connect

    Arkinstall, S.J.; Jones, C.T. )

    1988-09-01

    Uterine sympathetic nerves can exert an excitatory influence in late pregnancy and during parturition. Neuronal norepinephrine release is increased at these times and a diminished {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenoceptor-mediated prejunctional inhibition could account for this. To assess whether an altered receptor population may contribute, ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine was used to measure {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenoceptors in myometrial membranes at time intervals throughout pregnancy. High affinity ({sup 3}H)rauwolscine binding yielded linear Scatchard plots that in nonpregnant myometrium indicated a maximum binding density B{sub max} of 217 {plus minus} 42.4 fmol/mg protein. {alpha}{sub 2}-Adrenoceptor density was increased twofold at midpregnancy (31 days) and thereafter fell sharply by up to 90% toward term (67 {plus minus} 2 days). When uterine growth is accounted for and data are expressed in terms of total myometrial population, {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenoceptor number was eightfold (midpregnancy) and fourfold (term) greater than the nonpregnant value of 804 {plus minus} 322.4 fmol/uterus. {alpha}{sub 2}-Adrenoceptors were also found to bind dopamine with high affinity. These observations could indicate a pregnancy-related change in uterine sympathetic autoinhibitory capacity and, since {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenoceptors appear also to be located postjunctionally, explain in part reports of altered myometrial responsiveness to norepinephrine infusion and also the uterotonic actions of dopamine.

  14. COMPARISON OF TWO α2-ADRENERGIC AGONISTS ON URINE CONTAMINATION OF SEMEN COLLECTED BY ELECTROEJACULATION IN CAPTIVE AND SEMI-FREE-RANGING CHEETAH (ACINONYX JUBATUS).

    PubMed

    Marrow, Judilee C; Woc-Colburn, Margarita; Hayek, Lee-Ann C; Marker, Laurie; Murray, Suzan

    2015-06-01

    Alpha2-adrenergic agonists are used to immobilize many veterinary species, but use has been infrequently linked to urine contamination of semen collected via electroejaculation. The objective of the study was to compare the α2-agonists medetomidine and dexmedetomidine on urine contamination of semen in anesthetized cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) during electroejaculation procedures. From 2009-2012, a retrospective medical record review revealed 21 anesthesia events in 12 adult male cheetahs. Animals were immobilized with combinations of Telazol® (2.33±0.43 mg/kg) and ketamine (2.38±1 mg/kg); Telazol (1.17±0.14 mg/kg), ketamine (1.17±0.14 mg/kg), and medetomidine (0.012±0.0017 mg/kg); or Telazol (1.59±0.1 mg/kg), ketamine (1.59±0.1 mg/kg) and dexmedetomidine (0.01±0.001 mg/kg). Semen was successfully collected in all animals; four animals anesthetized with medetomidine had urine contamination (P=0.037). Medetomidine may contribute to urine contamination; however, further investigation is needed to determine significance in cheetahs.

  15. Identification and characterization of (/sup 3/H)-rauwolscine binding to alpha2-adrenoceptors in the canine saphenous vein

    SciTech Connect

    Gout, B.

    1988-01-01

    The biochemical exploration of the alpha2-adrenergic receptors was investigated in the canine saphenous vein using the highly selective alpha2-adrenergic antagonist rauwolscine as a tritiated ligand. Following an enzymatic digestive pretreatment, the authors isolated a purified smooth muscle cell membranes fraction from saphenous veins in quantity sufficient to permit them to study the venous alpha2-adrenoreceptor content. The binding of tritiated rauwolscine was rapid, specific, saturable and reversible. The presence of high affinity sites with a density of binding Bmax of 125.2 /+ -/ 43.1 fmol/mg protein was demonstrated on a unique class of non interacting sites. The kinetically derived Kd was 1.28 nM, in good agreement with the value obtained from saturation isotherms. The pharmacological profile of these sites was assessed by the comparison of the potency of alpha-adrenergic agonists and antagonists to inhibit 1 nM (/sup 3/H)-rauwolscine. Their efficacy was respectively: rauwolscine > phentolamine > RX 781094 > clonidine >> prazosin > (-)-phenylephrine > (-)-noradrenaline. The results showed that (/sup 3/H)-rauwolscine bound specifically to sites in their membranal preparation, which had the pharmacological characteristics of the alpha2-adrenoceptors. The correlation between biochemical and pharmacological data revealed the usefulness of binding methods in the further study of adrenergic mechanisms in the canine saphenous vein.

  16. A Novel Structural Framework for α1A/D-Adrenoceptor Selective Antagonists Identified Using Subtype Selective Pharmacophores

    PubMed Central

    Stoddart, Emily S.; Senadheera, Sevvandi; MacDougall, Iain J. A.; Griffith, Renate; Finch, Angela M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study four and five-feature pharmacophores for selective antagonists at each of the three α1-adrenoceptor (AR) subtypes were used to identify novel α1-AR subtype selective compounds in the National Cancer Institute and Tripos LeadQuest databases. 12 compounds were selected, based on diversity of structure, predicted high affinity and selectivity at the α1D- subtype compared to α1A- and α1B-ARs. 9 out of 12 of the tested compounds displayed affinity at the α1A and α1D -AR subtypes and 6 displayed affinity at all three α1-AR subtypes, no α1B-AR selective compounds were identified. 8 of the 9 compounds with α1-AR affinity were antagonists and one compound displayed partial agonist characteristics. This virtual screening has successfully identified an α1A/D-AR selective antagonist, with low µM affinity with a novel structural scaffold of a an isoquinoline fused three-ring system and good lead-like qualities ideal for further drug development. PMID:21572949

  17. Beta-adrenoceptor-mediated vasodilation of retinal blood vessels is reduced in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Taisuke; Sato, Ayumi; Mori, Asami; Saito, Maki; Sakamoto, Kenji; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effects of epinephrine and dopamine on retinal blood vessels in streptozotocin (STZ, 80 mg/kg, i.p.)-treated rats and age-matched control rats to determine whether diabetes mellitus alters the retinal vascular responses to circulating catecholamines. Experiments were performed 6-8 weeks after treatment with STZ or the vehicle. The fundus images were captured with the digital fundus camera system for small animals we developed and diameters of retinal blood vessels contained in the digital images were measured. Epinephrine increased the diameters of retinal blood vessels, but the vasodilator responses were reduced in diabetic rats. Dopamine produced a biphasic retinal vascular response with an initial vasoconstriction followed by a vasodilation. The vasoconstrictor effects of dopamine on retinal arterioles were enhanced in diabetic rats, whereas the difference between the two groups was abolished by treatment with propranolol. The vasodilator effect of isoproterenol, but not of the activator of adenylyl cyclase colforsin, on retinal blood vessels was reduced in diabetic rats. No difference in vasoconstriction of retinal blood vessels to phenylephrine between non-diabetic and diabetic rats was observed. The vasodilator responses of retinal blood vessels to 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenylpiperazinium, a ganglionic nicotinic receptor agonist, were also attenuated in diabetic rats. These results suggest that diabetes mellitus alters the retinal vascular responses to circulating catecholamines and the impairment of vasodilator responses mediated by beta-adrenoceptors contributes to the alteration.

  18. In vivo binding in rat brain and radiopharmaceutical preparation of radioiodinated HEAT, an alpha-1 adrenoceptor ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Couch, M.W.; Greer, D.M.; Thonoor, C.M.; Williams, C.M.

    1988-03-01

    In vivo binding of (/sup 125/I)-2-(beta-(3-iodo-4-hydroxyphenyl)ethylaminomethyl tetralone) ((/sup 125/I)HEAT) to alpha-1 adrenoceptors in the rat brain was determined over 4 hr. Uptake in the thalamus and frontal cortex was approximately 0.1% injected dose per gram tissue. Thalamus/cerebellum ratios of 10:1 and frontal cortex/cerebellum ratios of 5:1 were found at 4 hr. Pretreatment with prazosin, an alpha-1 antagonist, completely inhibited the accumulation of (/sup 125/I)HEAT in thalamus and frontal cortex; yet uptake of radioactivity was not significantly affected by antagonists and agonists for other receptors classes (propranolol, beta-1; apomorphine, D-1; spiperone, D-2). Binding of (/sup 125/I)HEAT is saturable. At 4 hr, (/sup 125/I)HEAT or (/sup 123/I)HEAT was shown to be the only radioactive material in rat thalamus and frontal cortex. Iodine-123 HEAT and (/sup 125/I)HEAT were synthesized as radiopharmaceuticals within 3 hr in 99% radiochemical purity.

  19. Localization and changes in distribution of brain alpha 2- and beta-adrenoceptors in response to acclimation state in the American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana).

    PubMed

    Bachman, G L; Uhlén, S; Herman, C A

    1998-05-01

    Alpha (alpha)- and beta (beta)-adrenoceptors regulate physiological processes in vertebrates. This study determined the location of alpha 2- and beta-adrenoceptors in the brain of the American bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana, using autoradiography. As the density of receptors may be affected by environmental temperature, a comparative numerical analysis of adrenoceptors in the areas of localization with respect to warm and cold acclimation was also carried out. Areas of greatest concentration of alpha 2-adrenoceptors were the accessory olfactory bulb, medial pallium, and olfactory bulb. Adrenoceptor numbers were significantly decreased in the accessory olfactory bulb and medial pallium in cold-acclimated animals. beta-adrenoceptors were localized in the thalamus, cerebellum, medial pallium, and amygdala/ striatum. Cold acclimation decreased adrenoceptor density in medial pallium and torus semicircularis and increased adrenoceptor density in the thalamus and hypothalamic preoptic areas. Among the alpha 2- and beta-adrenoceptors, only four regions of overlap existed, the medial pallium, hypothalamic preoptic area, optic tract, and isthmic tegmentum. Otherwise, where there were alpha 2-adrenoceptors, there were few or no beta-adrenoceptors. No alpha 2- or beta-adrenoceptors were found in the pituitary and optic chiasm. The distribution of adrenoceptors in particular areas of the brain may have functional significance with respect to physiological changes which occur in response to hibernation.

  20. Restricting mobility of Gsalpha relative to the beta2-adrenoceptor enhances adenylate cyclase activity by reducing Gsalpha GTPase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Wenzel-Seifert, K; Lee, T W; Seifert, R; Kobilka, B K

    1998-01-01

    The beta2-adrenoceptor (beta2AR) activates the G-protein Gsalpha to stimulate adenylate cyclase (AC). Fusion of the beta2AR C-terminus to the N-terminus of Gsalpha (producing beta2ARGsalpha) markedly increases the efficiency of receptor/G-protein coupling compared with the non-fused state. This increase in coupling efficiency can be attributed to the physical proximity of receptor and G-protein. To determine the optimal length for the tether between receptor and G-protein we constructed fusion proteins from which 26 [beta2AR(Delta26)Gsalpha] or 70 [beta2AR(Delta70)Gsalpha] residues of the beta2AR C-terminus had been deleted and compared the properties of these fusion proteins with the previously described beta2ARGsalpha. Compared with beta2ARGsalpha, basal and agonist-stimulated GTP hydrolysis was markedly decreased in beta2AR(Delta70)Gsalpha, whereas the effect of the deletion on binding of guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S]) was relatively small. Surprisingly, deletions did not alter the efficiency of coupling of the beta2AR to Gsalpha as assessed by GTP[S]-sensitive high-affinity agonist binding. Moreover, basal and ligand-regulated AC activities in membranes expressing beta2AR(Delta70)Gsalpha and beta2AR(Delta26)Gsalpha were higher than in membranes expressing beta2ARGsalpha. These findings suggest that restricting the mobility of Gsalpha relative to the beta2AR results in a decrease in G-protein inactivation by GTP hydrolysis and thereby enhanced activation of AC. PMID:9729456

  1. High-throughput screening with a miniaturized radioligand competition assay identifies new modulators of human α2-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Fallarero, Adyary; Pohjanoksa, Katariina; Wissel, Gloria; Parkkisenniemi-Kinnunen, Ulla-Mari; Xhaard, Henri; Scheinin, Mika; Vuorela, Pia

    2012-12-18

    Human α(2)-adrenoceptors (α(2)-ARs) are rhodopsin-like G-protein coupled receptors, and potential drug targets. The three different human α(2)-AR subtypes α(2A), α(2B) and α(2C) are widely distributed in tissues, but so far only a few subtype-selective ligands have been identified. In this project, we set off to conduct a large chemical screen for activity on the human α(2B)-AR and studied the selectivity of the active compounds towards the human α(2A)- and α(2C)-AR subtypes. We employed a radioligand competition binding assay that was optimized and miniaturized into a robotic environment. Membrane fractions containing recombinant human receptor subtypes were prepared from stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines. Initially identified hits were followed up and characterized, and chemoinformatics tools were applied to gain better understanding of the relevance of the results. After a primary screen against α(2B)-AR, 176 compounds of the 17,952 included in the library were declared as active at 10 μM, of which 89 compounds were further selected for potency and affinity determinations using the three human α(2)-AR subtypes. One of the identified positive hits was 2″,2″″-Bisepigallocatechin digallate, which was found to have high affinity at all three human α(2)-AR subtypes. This represents the first non-protonable molecule identified as able to interact with these receptors. Additionally, results obtained with a functional assay (agonist-induced stimulation of [(35)S]GTPγS binding) supported the identification of another positive hit, lysergol, as a partial agonist of the human α(2)-AR subtypes. The dataset of confirmed active chemical species represents a readily available, high quality source for follow-up studies. Altogether, these results provide novel research approaches for drug discovery of modulators of the α(2)-AR subtypes.

  2. Tyrosine 308 Is Necessary for Ligand-directed Gs Protein-biased Signaling of β2-Adrenoceptor*

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Anthony Yiu-Ho; Jozwiak, Krzysztof; Toll, Lawrence; Tanga, Mary J.; Kozocas, Joseph A.; Jimenez, Lucita; Huang, Ying; Song, Ying; Plazinska, Anita; Pajak, Karolina; Paul, Rajib K.; Bernier, Michel; Wainer, Irving W.; Xiao, Rui-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Interaction of a given G protein-coupled receptor to multiple different G proteins is a widespread phenomenon. For instance, β2-adrenoceptor (β2-AR) couples dually to Gs and Gi proteins. Previous studies have shown that cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of β2-AR causes a switch in receptor coupling from Gs to Gi. More recent studies have demonstrated that phosphorylation of β2-AR by G protein-coupled receptor kinases, particularly GRK2, markedly enhances the Gi coupling. We have previously shown that although most β2-AR agonists cause both Gs and Gi activation, (R,R′)-fenoterol preferentially activates β2-AR-Gs signaling. However, the structural basis for this functional selectivity remains elusive. Here, using docking simulation and site-directed mutagenesis, we defined Tyr-308 as the key amino acid residue on β2-AR essential for Gs-biased signaling. Following stimulation with a β2-AR-Gs-biased agonist (R,R′)-4′-aminofenoterol, the Gi disruptor pertussis toxin produced no effects on the receptor-mediated ERK phosphorylation in HEK293 cells nor on the contractile response in cardiomyocytes expressing the wild-type β2-AR. Interestingly, Y308F substitution on β2-AR enabled (R,R′)-4′-aminofenoterol to activate Gi and to produce these responses in a pertussis toxin-sensitive manner without altering β2-AR phosphorylation by PKA or G protein-coupled receptor kinases. These results indicate that, in addition to the phosphorylation status, the intrinsic structural feature of β2-AR plays a crucial role in the receptor coupling selectivity to G proteins. We conclude that specific interactions between the ligand and the Tyr-308 residue of β2-AR stabilize receptor conformations favoring the receptor-Gs protein coupling and subsequently result in Gs-biased agonism. PMID:24831005

  3. Cardiovascular effects of the novel histamine H2 receptor agonist amthamine: interaction with the adrenergic system.

    PubMed

    Coruzzi, G; Gambarelli, E; Bertaccini, G; Timmerman, H

    1996-03-01

    The cardiovascular effects of the new histamine H2 receptor agonist amthamine were studied in the anaesthetized rat, with particular reference to a possible interaction with the adrenergic system. Amthamine (0.03-3 mumol/kg i.v.) caused vasodepressor responses which were antagonized by famotidine (3 mumol/kg i.v.). At higher doses (30-100 mumol/kg i.v.), amthamine induced a modest increase in the mean arterial pressure, which was significantly enhanced by the blockade of H2 receptors and significantly reduced by the alpha 2 adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine (1 mumol/kg i.v.). The vasopressor response to amthamine was not modified in rats pre-treated with reserpine or 6-hydroxydopamine, and was only minimally modified in adrenalectomized animals, thus suggesting a predominant interaction with postjunctional alpha 2 adrenoceptors in the vascular muscle. The H2 receptor agonist dimaprit (0.3-100 mumol/kg i.v.) caused a reduction in arterial pressure, which was antagonized by famotidine, no pressor response being unmasked. Dimaprit (0.1-30 mumol/kg i.v.) did not modify heart rate but caused a modest bradycardia at 100 mumol/kg i.v. Amthamine (1-100 mumol/kg i.v.) induced a dose-dependent tachycardia, which was only partially (approximately 20%) reduced by famotidine and was totally blocked by propranolol (0.3 mg/kg i.v.). This effect was significantly reduced in rats pre-treated with reserpine or 6-hydroxydopamine and was further reduced by cocaine, thus suggesting a tyramine-like action of amthamine. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that the H2 receptor agonist amthamine can also interact with the adrenergic system when used at doses higher than those necessary to activate H2 receptors. Whereas the increase in blood pressure induced by amthamine seems to be mainly mediated by a direct activation of postjunctional alpha 2 adrenoceptors, the increase in heart rate is predominantly due to neuronal release of catecholamines. These effects should be considered when

  4. Alpha adrenoceptors in the rabbit ear thermoregulatory microcirculation.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Koman, L A; Smith, B P; Gordon, E S; Smith, T L

    1998-03-01

    The rabbit ear microcirculation was analyzed in a chronic unanesthetized model to evaluate alpha adrenergic microvascular control in a thermoregulatory end organ. This model allowed direct measurement of microcirculatory responses without the effects of anesthetics or inflammatory responses induced by acute surgical intervention. The ipsilateral facial artery was catheterized for drug injections into the experimental ear. Microvascular diameter changes following stimulation or blockade of adrenoceptor (AR) subtypes were observed directly through a chronic microvascular chamber implanted in the rabbit ear. Vascular alpha1- and alpha2-ARs appear to be distributed differently across the arterioles and AVAs of the rabbit ear. Both alpha1- and alpha2-ARs appear to contribute to vasoconstriction of AVAs in the conscious rabbit ear. In contrast, alpha1-AR's (vs alpha2-ARs) appear to predominate in adrenergically mediated sympathetic vasoconstriction of arterioles. PMID:9521886

  5. A natural history of "agonist".

    PubMed

    Russo, Ruth

    2002-01-01

    This paper constructs a brief history of the biochemical term agonist by exploring the multiple meanings of the root agôn in ancient Greek literature and describing how agonist first appeared in the scientific literature of the 20th century in the context of neurophysiologists' debates about the existence and properties of cellular receptors. While the narrow scientific definition of agonist may appear colorless and dead when compared with the web of allusions spun by the ancient Greek agôn, the scientific power and creativity of agonist actually resides precisely in its exact, restricted meaning for biomedical researchers.

  6. 78 FR 25182 - New Animal Drugs; Dexmedetomidine; Lasalocid; Melengestrol; Monensin; and Tylosin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Parts 522 and 558 New Animal Drugs; Dexmedetomidine..., Technical Amendment. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending the animal drug regulations to reflect approval actions for new animal drug applications and abbreviated new animal...

  7. Dexmedetomidine premedication for fiberoptic intubation in patients of temporomandibular joint ankylosis: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kumkum; Jain, Manish; Gupta, Prashant K.; Rastogi, Bhawna; Saxena, Sanjeev K.; Manngo, Aman

    2012-01-01

    Background: Fiberoptic intubation is the gold standard technique for difficult airway management in patients of temporomandibular joint. This study was aimed to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of dexmedetomidine as premedication with propofol infusion for fiberoptic intubation. Methods: Consent was obtained from 46 adult patients of temporomandibular joint ankylosis, scheduled for gap arthroplasty. They were enrolled for thisdouble-blind, randomized, prospective clinical trial with two treatment groups – Group D and Group P, of 23 patients each. Group D patients had received premedication of dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg infused over 10 min followed by sedative propofol infusion and the control Group P patients were given only propofol infusion to achieve sedation. Condition achieved at endoscopy, intubating conditions, hemodynamic changes and postoperative events were evaluated as primary outcome. Results: The fiberoptic intubation was successful with satisfactory endoscopic and intubating condition in all patients. Dexmedetomidine premedication has provided satisfactory conditions for fiberoptic intubation and attenuated the hemodynamic response of fiberoptic intubation than the propofol group. Conclusion: Fiberoptic intubation was found to be easier with dexmedetomidine premedication along with sedative infusion of propofol with complete amnesia of the procedure, hemodynamic stability and preservation of patent airway. PMID:23162393

  8. Echocardiographic evaluation of the effects of dexmedetomidine on cardiac function during total intravenous anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Lee, S H; Choi, Y S; Hong, G R; Oh, Y J

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of dexmedetomidine on biventricular systolic and diastolic function using transoesophageal echocardiography. Cardiac function was assessed in 30 healthy patients who received total intravenous anaesthesia with propofol and remifentanil. The echocardiographic examinations were performed just before and 20, 40 and 60 min after dexmedetomidine or saline administration. Patients who received dexmedetomidine, compared with saline after 20 min, had a lower mean (SD) heart rate (56.7 (5.2) vs. 67.1 (7.1) beats.min(-1) ), higher systolic blood pressure (125.7 (18.9) vs. 109 (7.9) mmHg), and lower cardiac output (2.9 (0.5) vs. 3.7 (1.0) l.min(-1) ), respectively (all p < 0.05). In contrast, no changes were observed in biventricular systolic and diastolic indices in either group, and there were no inter-group differences at any time point. Dexmedetomidine, as an adjuvant to total intravenous anaesthesia, does not impair biventricular systolic and diastolic function in healthy patients, but decreases cardiac output by reducing heart rate.

  9. Dexmedetomidine protects from post-myocardial ischaemia reperfusion lung damage in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Kip, Gülay; Çelik, Ali; Bilge, Mustafa; Alkan, Metin; Kiraz, Hasan Ali; Özer, Abdullah; Şıvgın, Volkan; Erdem, Özlem; Arslan, Mustafa; Kavutçu, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    Objective Diabetic complications and lipid peroxidation are known to have a close association. Lipid peroxidation commonly occurs at sites exposed to ischaemia, but distant organs and tissues also get damaged during ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R). Some of these targets are vital organs, such as the lung, liver, and kidney; the lung is the most frequently affected. The aim of our study was to investigate the effects of dexmedetomidine on I/R damage in lung tissue and on the oxidant/anti-oxidant system in diabetic rats. Material and methods Diabetes was induced with streptozotocin (55 mg/kg) in 18 Wistar Albino rats, which were then randomly divided into three groups (diabetes control (DC), diabetes plus ischaemia-reperfusion (DIR), and diabetes plus dexmedetomidine-ischaemia/reperfusion (DIRD)) after the effects of diabetes were clearly evident. The rats underwent a left thoracotomy and then ischaemia was produced in the myocardium muscle by a left anterior descending artery ligation for 30 min in the DIR and DIRD groups. I/R was performed for 120 min. The DIRD group received a single intraperitoneal dose of dexmedetomidine (100 µg/kg); the DIR group received no dexmedetomidine. Group DC was evaluated as the diabetic control group and also included six rats (C group) in which diabetes was not induced. These mice underwent only left thoracotomy and were closed without undergoing myocardial ischaemia. Histopathological changes, activities of catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase anti-oxidant enzymes, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were evaluated in the lung tissues of all rats. Results Neutrophil infiltration/aggregation was higher in the DIR group than in the C, DC, and DIRD groups (p=0.001, p=0.013, and p=0.042, respectively). The lung injury score was significantly higher in the DIR group than in the C and DC groups (p<0.0001 and p=0.024, respectively). The levels of MDA were significantly higher in the DIR group than in the C and DIRD groups. CAT activity

  10. A Comparison of Propofol- and Dexmedetomidine-induced Electroencephalogram Dynamics Using Spectral and Coherence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Akeju, Oluwaseun; Pavone, Kara J.; Westover, M. Brandon; Vazquez, Rafael; Prerau, Michael J.; Harrell, Priscilla G.; Hartnack, Katharine E.; Rhee, James; Sampson, Aaron L.; Habeeb, Kathleen; Lei, Gao; Pierce, Eric T.; Walsh, John L.; Brown, Emery N.; Purdon, Patrick L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Electroencephalogram patterns observed during sedation with dexmedetomidine appear similar to those observed during general anesthesia with propofol. This is evident with the occurrence of slow (0.1–1 Hz), delta (1–4 Hz), propofol-induced alpha (8–12 Hz), and dexmedetomidine-induced spindle (12–16 Hz) oscillations. However, these drugs have different molecular mechanisms and behavioral properties, and are likely accompanied by distinguishing neural circuit dynamics. Methods We measured 64-channel electroencephalogram under dexmedetomidine (n = 9) and propofol (n = 8) in healthy volunteers, 18–36 years of age. We administered dexmedetomidine with a 1mcg/kg loading bolus over 10 minutes, followed by a 0.7mcg/kg/hr infusion. For propofol, we used a computer controlled infusion to target the effect-site concentration gradually from and 0 µg/mL to 5 µg/mL. Volunteers listened to auditory stimuli and responded by button-press to determine unconsciousness. We analyzed the electroencephalogram using multitaper spectral and coherence analysis. Results Dexmedetomidine was characterized by spindles with maximum power and coherence at ~13 Hz, (mean±std; power, −10.8dB±3.6; coherence, 0.8±0.08), while propofol was characterized with frontal alpha oscillations with peak frequency at ~11 Hz (power, 1.1dB±4.5; coherence, 0.9±0.05). Notably, slow oscillation power during a general anesthetic state under propofol (power, 13.2dB±2.4) was much larger than during sedative states under both propofol (power, −2.5dB±3.5) and dexmedetomidine (power, −0.4dB±3.1). Conclusion Our results indicate that dexmedetomidine and propofol place patients into different brain states, and suggests that propofol enables a deeper state of unconsciousness by inducing large amplitude slow oscillations that produce prolonged states of neuronal silence. PMID:25187999

  11. Dexmedetomidine Acts via the JAK2/STAT3 Pathway to Attenuate Isoflurane-Induced Neurocognitive Deficits in Senile Mice

    PubMed Central

    Si, Yanna; Zhang, Yuan; Han, Liu; Chen, Lihai; Xu, Yajie; Sun, Fan; Ji, Muhuo; Yang, Jianjun; Bao, Hongguang

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies showed that isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits could be alleviated by dexmedetomidine in young animal subjects. In the current study, we examine whether dexmedetomidine could also alleviate isoflurane-induced cognitive deficits in senile animals. Methods Senile male C57BL/6 mice (20 months) received dexmedetomidine (50 μg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle 30 minutes prior to isoflurane exposure (1.3% for 4 h). Cognitive function was assessed 19 days later using a 5-day testing regimen with Morris water maze. Some subjects also received pretreatment with α2 adrenoreceptor antagonist atipamezole (250 μg/kg, i.p.), JAK2 inhibitor AG490 (15 mg/kg i.p.) or STAT3 inhibitor WP1066 (40 mg/kg i.p.) 30 minutes prior to dexmedetomidine. Results Isoflurane exposure increased and reduced the time spent in the quadrant containing the target platform in training sessions. The number of crossings over the original target quadrant was also decreased. Dexmedotomidine attenuated such effects. Effects of dexmedotomidine were reduced by pretreatment with atipamezole, AG490 and WP1066. Increased phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 in the hippocampus induced by isoflurane was augmented by dexmedetomidine. Effects of dexmedetomidine on JAK2/STAT3 phosphorylation were attenuated by atipamezole, AG490 and WP1066. Isoflurane promoted neuronal apoptosis and increased the expression of cleaved caspase-3 and BAD, and reduced Bcl-2 expression. Attenuation of such effects by dexmedotomidine was partially blocked by atipamezole, AG490 and WP1066. Conclusion Dexmedetomidine could protect against isoflurane-induced spatial learning and memory impairment in senile mice by stimulating the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway. Such findings encourage the use of dexmedetomidine in geriatric patients receiving isoflurane anesthesia. PMID:27768775

  12. Curcumin and dexmedetomidine prevents oxidative stress and renal injury in hind limb ischemia/reperfusion injury in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Karahan, M A; Yalcin, S; Aydogan, H; Büyükfirat, E; Kücük, A; Kocarslan, S; Yüce, H H; Taskın, A; Aksoy, N

    2016-06-01

    Curcumin and dexmedetomidine have been shown to have protective effects in ischemia-reperfusion injury on various organs. However, their protective effects on kidney tissue against ischemia-reperfusion injury remain unclear. We aimed to determine whether curcumin or dexmedetomidine prevents renal tissue from injury that was induced by hind limb ischemia-reperfusion in rats. Fifty rats were divided into five groups: sham, control, curcumin (CUR) group (200 mg/kg curcumin, n = 10), dexmedetomidine (DEX) group (25 μg/kg dexmedetomidine, n = 10), and curcumin-dexmedetomidine (CUR-DEX) group (200 mg/kg curcumin and 25 μg/kg dexmedetomidine). Curcumin and dexmedetomidine were administered intraperitoneally immediately after the end of 4 h ischemia, just 5 min before reperfusion. The extremity re-perfused for 2 h and then blood samples were taken and total antioxidant capacity (TAC), total oxidative status (TOS) levels, and oxidative stress index (OSI) were measured, and renal tissue samples were histopathologically examined. The TAC activity levels in blood samples were significantly lower in the control than the other groups (p < 0.01 for all comparisons). The TOS activity levels in blood samples were significantly higher in Control group and than the other groups (p <  0.01 for all comparison). The OSI were found to be significantly increased in the control group compared to others groups (p < 0.001 for all comparisons). Histopathological examination revealed less severe lesions in the sham, CUR, DEX, and CUR-DEX groups, compared with the control group (p < 0.01). Rat hind limb ischemia-reperfusion causes histopathological changes in the kidneys. Curcumin and dexmedetomidine administered intraperitoneally was effective in reducing oxidative stress and renal histopathologic injury in an acute hind limb I/R rat model. PMID:26983591

  13. Monoamine receptor agonists, acting preferentially at presynaptic autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, downregulate the cell fate adaptor FADD in rat brain cortex.

    PubMed

    García-Fuster, M Julia; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-02-01

    FADD is a crucial adaptor of death receptors that can engage apoptosis or survival actions (e.g. neuroplasticity) through its phosphorylated form (p-FADD). Although FADD was shown to participate in receptor mechanisms related to drugs of abuse, little is known on its role in the signaling of classic neurotransmitters (dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin) in brain. This study assessed the modulation of FADD (and p-FADD/FADD ratio, as an index of neuroplasticity) and FLIP-L (a neuroprotective FADD interacting partner), as well as the role of MEK-ERK signaling, after activation of monoamine auto/heteroreceptors by selective agonists in rat cortex. Acute depletion of monoamines with reserpine, but not with AMPT or PCPA, reduced FADD (28%) and increased p-FADD/FADD ratio (1.34-fold). Activation of presynaptic α2A-adrenoceptors (UK-14304 and clonidine), 5-HT1A receptors (8-OH-DPAT), and D2 dopamine receptor (bromocriptine) dose-dependently decreased FADD (up to 54%) and increased p-FADD (up to 29%) and p-FADD/FADD ratios (up to 2.93-fold), through specific receptor mechanisms. Activation of rat 5-HT1B autoreceptor in axon terminals by CP-94253 did not modulate FADD forms. Activation of postsynaptic D1 dopamine receptor by SKF-81297 also reduced FADD (25%) and increased p-FADD (32%). Disruption of MEK-ERK activation with SL327 did not modify clonidine (α2A-adrenoceptor)-induced FADD inhibition, indicating that agonist effect was not dependent on ERK signaling. The various monoamine receptor agonists and antagonists did not alter FLIP-L content, or the activation of executioner caspase-3 and PARP-1 cleavage, indicating that the agonists attenuated apoptotic signals and promoted neuroplasticity through FADD regulation. These novel results indicate that inhibition of pro-apoptotic FADD adaptor could function as a common signaling step in the initial activation of monoamine receptors in the brain.

  14. Monoamine receptor agonists, acting preferentially at presynaptic autoreceptors and heteroreceptors, downregulate the cell fate adaptor FADD in rat brain cortex.

    PubMed

    García-Fuster, M Julia; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-02-01

    FADD is a crucial adaptor of death receptors that can engage apoptosis or survival actions (e.g. neuroplasticity) through its phosphorylated form (p-FADD). Although FADD was shown to participate in receptor mechanisms related to drugs of abuse, little is known on its role in the signaling of classic neurotransmitters (dopamine, noradrenaline, and serotonin) in brain. This study assessed the modulation of FADD (and p-FADD/FADD ratio, as an index of neuroplasticity) and FLIP-L (a neuroprotective FADD interacting partner), as well as the role of MEK-ERK signaling, after activation of monoamine auto/heteroreceptors by selective agonists in rat cortex. Acute depletion of monoamines with reserpine, but not with AMPT or PCPA, reduced FADD (28%) and increased p-FADD/FADD ratio (1.34-fold). Activation of presynaptic α2A-adrenoceptors (UK-14304 and clonidine), 5-HT1A receptors (8-OH-DPAT), and D2 dopamine receptor (bromocriptine) dose-dependently decreased FADD (up to 54%) and increased p-FADD (up to 29%) and p-FADD/FADD ratios (up to 2.93-fold), through specific receptor mechanisms. Activation of rat 5-HT1B autoreceptor in axon terminals by CP-94253 did not modulate FADD forms. Activation of postsynaptic D1 dopamine receptor by SKF-81297 also reduced FADD (25%) and increased p-FADD (32%). Disruption of MEK-ERK activation with SL327 did not modify clonidine (α2A-adrenoceptor)-induced FADD inhibition, indicating that agonist effect was not dependent on ERK signaling. The various monoamine receptor agonists and antagonists did not alter FLIP-L content, or the activation of executioner caspase-3 and PARP-1 cleavage, indicating that the agonists attenuated apoptotic signals and promoted neuroplasticity through FADD regulation. These novel results indicate that inhibition of pro-apoptotic FADD adaptor could function as a common signaling step in the initial activation of monoamine receptors in the brain. PMID:25286119

  15. Efficacy of dexmedetomidine on postoperative nausea and vomiting: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiao; Zhou, Miao; Feng, Jiao-Jiao; Wu, Liang; Fang, Shang-Ping; Ge, Xin-Yu; Sun, Hai-Jing; Ren, Peng-Cheng; Lv, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a frequent complication in postoperative period. The aim of the current meta-analysis was to assess the efficacy of dexmedetomidine on PONV. Methods: Two researchers independently searched PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for randomized controlled trials (RCTs). The meta-analysis was performed with Review Manager. Results: Eighty-two trials with 6,480 patients were included in this meta-analysis. Dexmedetomidine reduced postoperative nausea (Risk Ratio (RR) = 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.50 to 0.73) and vomiting (RR = 0.48, 95% CI: 0.36 to 0.64) compared with placebo, with an effective dose of 0.5 μg/kg (RR = 0.46, 95% CI: 0.34 to 0.62) and 1.0 μg/kg (RR = 0.29, 95% CI: 0.12 to 0.75), respectively. The antiemetic effect can only be achieved intravenously, not epidurally or intrathecally. The efficacy of dexmedetomidine was similar to that of widely used agents, such as propofol, midazolam etc., but better than opioid analgesics. Moreover, application of dexmedetomidine reduced intraoperative requirement of fentanyl (Standard Mean Difference = -1.91, 95% CI: -3.20 to -0.62). Conclusions: The present meta-analysis indicates that dexmedetomidine shows superiority to placebo, but not to all other anesthetic agents on PONV. And this efficacy may be related to a reduced consumption of intraoperative opioids. PMID:26309498

  16. Effects of Lidocaine, Dexmedetomidine or Their Combination on the Minimum Alveolar Concentration of Sevoflurane in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    MORAN-MUÑOZ, Rafael; IBANCOVICHI, J. A.; Gutierrez-BLANCO, Eduardo; ACEVEDO-ARCIQUE, Carlos M.; Victoria MORA, J. Mauro; TENDILLO, Francisco J.; SANTOS-GONZALEZ, Martin; YAMASHITA, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to determine the effects of lidocaine (LIDO) and dexmedetomidine (DEX) or their combination (LIDO–DEX), administered by constant-rate infusion (CRI), on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane in dogs. Seven healthy mongrel dogs were used with a 2-week washout interval between treatments in this study. Anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with sevoflurane in oxygen, and MAC of sevoflurane was determined after 90 min equilibration period in the dogs (SEV-MACBASAL). Then, sevoflurane MAC was determined again in the dogs after 45 min equilibration period of one of the following treatments: an intravenous loading dose of lidocaine 2 mg/kg followed by 6 mg/kg/hr CRI (SEV-MACLIDO); an intravenous loading dose of dexmedetomidine 2 µg/kg followed by 2 µg/kg/hr CRI (SEV-MACDEX); or their combination (SEV-MACLIDO-DEX). These SEV-MACs were determined in duplicate. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and post hoc Tuckey test when appropriate. The SEV-MACBASAL was 1.82 ± 0.06%, SEV-MACLIDO was 1.38 ± 0.08%, SEV-MACDEX was 1.22 ± 0.10%, and SEV-MACLIDO-DEX was 0.78 ± 0.06%. The CRI administration of lidocaine, dexmedetomidine and their combination produced a significant reduction in the MAC of sevoflurane by 26.1 ± 9.0% (P<0.0001), 43.7 ± 11.8% (P<0.0002) and 54.4 ± 9.8% (P<0.0001), respectively. The MAC reduction was significantly greater after the CRI combination of lidocaine and dexmedetomidine when compared with lidocaine CRI (P<0.0001) or dexmedetomidine CRI treatments (P<0.025). PMID:24572631

  17. Effect of dexmedetomidine hydrochloride on tiletamine hydrochloride-zolazepam hydrochloride anesthesia in alpacas.

    PubMed

    Seddighi, Reza; Odoi, Agricola; Doherty, Thomas J

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of IM administration of a tiletamine hydrochloride-zolazepam hydrochloride (TZ) combination with either dexmedetomidine hydrochloride or saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (SS) on the motor response to claw clamping, selected cardiorespiratory variables, and quality of recovery from anesthesia in alpacas. ANIMALS 5 adult sexually intact male alpacas. PROCEDURES Each alpaca was given the TZ combination (2 mg/kg) with dexmedetomidine (5 [D5], 10 [D10], 15 [D15], or 20 [D20] µg/kg) or SS IM at 1-week intervals (5 experiments); motor response to claw clamping was assessed, and characteristics of anesthesia, recovery from anesthesia, and selected cardiorespiratory variables were recorded. RESULTS Mean ± SEM duration of lack of motor response to claw clamping was longest when alpacas received treatments D15 (30.9 ± 5.9 minutes) and D20 (40.8 ± 5.9 minutes). Duration of lateral recumbency was significantly longer with dexmedetomidine administration. The longest time (81.3 ± 10.4 minutes) to standing was observed when alpacas received treatment D20. Following treatment SS, 4 alpacas moved in response to claw clamping at the 5-minute time point. Heart rate decreased from pretreatment values in all alpacas when dexmedetomidine was administered. Treatments D10, D15, and D20 decreased Pao2, compared with treatment SS, during the first 15 minutes. During recovery, muscle stiffness and multiple efforts to regain a sternal position were observed in 3 SS-treated and 1 D5-treated alpacas; all other recoveries were graded as excellent. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In TZ-anesthetized alpacas, dexmedetomidine (10, 15, and 20 µg/kg) administered IM increased the duration of lack of motor response to claw clamping, compared with the effect of SS. PMID:27668576

  18. Intravenous dexmedetomidine versus propofol for intraoperative moderate sedation during spinal anesthesia: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Pratibha Jain; Dubey, Kamta Prasad; Sahare, Kamal Kishore; Agrawal, Amit

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: There has been a paradigm shift of focus toward quality of spinal anesthesia with sedation being an integral aspect of this regional anesthesia technique. Thus, this study was designed to compare efficacy of intravenous dexmedetomidine and propofol for moderate sedation during spinal anesthesia. Material and Methods: A total of 120 patients of age group 18-60 years of American Society of Anesthesiologists grade I & II, posted for surgeries under spinal anesthesia were randomly divided in to three groups (n = 40 each); Group D received infusion of dexmedetomidine 1 μg/kg over 10 min followed by maintenance infusion of 0.5 μg/kg/h. Group P received infusion of propofol 6 mg/kg/h for 10 min followed by the infusion maintenance of 2.5 mg/kg/h. Group C (control group) received normal saline. Level of sedation (using observer's assessment of alertness/sedation score), pain intensity (by visual analogue scale), onset and recovery from sedation, hemodynamic changes, and overall patient's satisfaction were assessed. Results: The onset and recovery from sedation were significantly earlier with propofol (15.57 ± 1.89 min vs. 27.06 ± 2.26 min; P < 0.001) however intraoperative sedation (level 4), and overall patient's satisfaction was significantly better with dexmedetomidine group (p < 0.05). Duration of postoperative analgesia was significantly prolonged with dexmedetomidine (225.53 ± 5.61 min vs. 139.60 ± 3.03 min; P = 0.0013). Mean heart rate and blood pressure were significantly lower in the propofol group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine with its stable cardio-respiratory profile, better sedation, overall patient's satisfaction, and analgesia could be a valuable adjunct for intraoperative sedation during spinal anesthesia. PMID:27275058

  19. COMPARISON BETWEEN DEXMEDETOMIDINE-S-KETAMINE AND MIDAZOLAM-S-KETAMINE IN IMMOBILIZATION OF ONCILLA (LEOPARDUS TIGRINUS).

    PubMed

    Lima, Caio Filipe da Motta; Cortopassi, Silvia Renata Gaido; de Moura, Claudio Alves; de Mattos, Ewaldo; das Candeias, Isis Zanini; Pedron, Bruno Gregnanin; Teixeira, Rodrigo Hidalgo Friciello; Dias Neto, Ramiro das Neves

    2016-03-01

    Established immobilization protocols are required for safe procedures on wildlife and zoo animals. This study evaluated the cardiovascular, respiratory, and anesthetic effects of dexmedetomidine (40 μg/kg) with S-ketamine (5 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) with S-ketamine (5 mg/kg) in 12 specimens of oncilla (Leopardus tigrinus) at Quinzinho de Barros Municipal Zoo Park in Sorocaba, São Paulo, Brazil, between January and March 2010. Each animal underwent both protocols, totaling 24 anesthetic procedures. The dexmedetomidine-S-ketamine group (DK) showed a decrease in heart rate compared to initial values and significantly lower heart rate and oxyhemoglobin saturation values compared to Midazolam-S-Ketamine Group (MK). Four animals in DK had episodes of sinus pauses. Systemic blood pressure, respiratory frequency, and rectal temperature showed no significant differences between groups. The dexmedetomidine-S-ketamine group showed a greater degree of muscle relaxation and allowed for more thorough and longer oral evaluations. The dexmedetomidine-S-ketamine group had a shorter period of recumbency, longer period to return of muscle tone, and shorter recovery time. Two animals in MK did not reach recumbency. The dexmedetomidine-S-ketamine group had better qualities of induction and recovery. It may be concluded that both protocols can be safely used in oncillas. Midazolam-S-ketamine promotes effective chemical restraint for quick and minimally invasive procedures and dexmedetomidine-S-ketamine promotes effective chemical restraint for prolonged and more invasive procedures.

  20. Premedication effect of dexmedetomidine and alfentanil on seizure time, recovery duration, and hemodynamic responses in electroconvulsive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Moshiri, Esmail; Modir, Hesameddin; Bagheri, Niknam; Mohammadbeigi, Abolfazl; Jamilian, Hamidreza; Eshrati, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment for many mental disorders, especially severe and persistent depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia. The aim of this study is to compare the effect of dexmedetomidine and alfentanil on agitation, satisfaction, seizure duration, and patients hemodynamic after ECT. Materials and Methods: In a three phase crossover randomized clinical trial, 75 patients aged between 18 and 50 years and candidate for ECT were enrolled and assigned into three groups (25 patients in each group). All patients, respectively, took premedication of dexmedetomidine, alfentanil, or saline in three consecutive phases. Patients received 0.5 μg/kg dexmedetomidine, 10 μg/kg alfentanil or normal saline intravenously, 10 min before induction. Finally, seizure and recovery duration, satisfaction and agitation score, and hemodynamic parameters were evaluated. Results: There was no significant difference about seizure duration, agitation score, and hemodynamic parameters between groups but recovery duration was significantly lower in the control group than dexmedetomidine (P = 0.016) and alfentanil group (P = 0.0001). Patients’ satisfaction was significantly higher in intervention groups (alfentanil and dexmedetomidine groups) (P = 0.0001). Conclusion: Given the equal effects of alfentanil and dexmedetomidine, it seems that choosing one of these two drugs for premedication of patients undergoing ECT is appropriate. Drug choice is influenced by numerous factors such as accessibility of each drug and the dominance of anesthesiologist and psychiatrist. PMID:27052067

  1. Dexmedetomidine Inhibits Maturation and Function of Human Cord Blood-Derived Dendritic Cells by Interfering with Synthesis and Secretion of IL-12 and IL-23

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gong; Le, Yuan; Zhou, Lei; Gong, Li; Li, Xiaoxiao; Li, Yunli; Liao, Qin; Duan, Kaiming; Tong, Jianbin; Ouyang, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Aims To investigate the effects and underlying mechanism of dexmedetomidine on the cultured human dendritic cells (DCs). Methods Human DCs and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) were obtained from human cord blood mononuclear cells by density gradient centrifugation. Cultured DCs were divided into three groups: dexmedetomidine group, dexmedetomidine plus yohimbine (dexmedetomidine inhibitor) group and control group. DCs in the three groups were treated with dexmedetomidine, dexmedetomidine plus yohimbine and culture medium, respectively. After washing, the DCs were co-incubated with cultured CTLs. The maturation degree of DCs was evaluated by detecting (1) the ratios of HLA-DR-, CD86-, and CD80-positive cells (flow cytometry), and (2) expression of IL-12 and IL-23 (PCR and Elisa). The function of DCs was evaluated by detecting the proliferation (MTS assay) and cytotoxicity activity (the Elisa of IFN-γ) of CTLs. In addition, in order to explore the mechanisms of dexmedetomidine modulating DCs, α2-adrenergic receptor and its downstream signals in DCs were also detected. Results The ratios of HLA-DR-, CD86-, and CD80-positive cells to total cells were similar among the three groups (P>0.05). Compared to the control group, the protein levels of IL-12 and IL-23 in the culture medium and the mRNA levels of IL-12 p35, IL-12 p40 and IL-23 p19 in the DCs all decreased in dexmedetomidine group (P<0.05). In addition, the proliferation of CTLs and the secretion of IFN-γ also decreased in the dexmedetomidine group, compared with the control group (P<0.05). Moreover, these changes induced by dexmedetomidine in the dexmedetomidine group were reversed by α2-adrenergic receptor inhibitor yohimbine in the dexmedetomidine plus yohimbine group. It was also found the decrease of mRNA levels of IL-12 p35, IL-12 p40 and IL-23 p19 in the dexmedetomidine group could be reversed by ERK1/2 or AKT inhibitors. Conclusion Dexmedetomidine could negatively modulate human immunity by inhibiting

  2. Beta-adrenoceptor subtype dependence of chronotropy in mouse embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Ali, N N; Xu, X; Brito-Martins, M; Poole-Wilson, P A; Harding, S E; Fuller, S J

    2004-11-01

    Cardiomyocytes derived from embryonic stem cells (ESCM) have potential both as an experimental model for investigating cardiac physiology and as a source for tissue repair. For both reasons it is important to characterise the responses of these cells, and one of the key modulators of contraction is the beta-adrenergic system. We therefore undertook a detailed study of the response of the spontaneous beating rate of ESCM to beta-adrenoceptor (betaAR) stimulation. Embryoid bodies (EBs) were generated from murine ES line E14Tg2a by the hanging drop method, followed by plating. Spontaneously beating areas were seen starting from 9-14 days after differentiation: the experiments described here were performed on EBs between developmental day 19 and 48. Beating cell layers were seeded with charcoal to allow tracking of movement by a video-edge detection system. Experiments were performed in physiological medium containing 1 mM Ca2+ at 37 degrees C. Isoprenaline (Iso) increased beating rate with an EC50 value of 52 nM. Iso (0.3 microM) increased basal rate from 67 +/- 7 beats per minute (bpm) to 138 +/- 18 bpm, P < 0.001, n = 22. At earlier developmental time points the response to Iso was not maintained through 5 min exposure; this spontaneous desensitisation only being observed before day 36. A repeat application of Iso after a wash period of 20 min produced reproducible effects on beating rate. Subtype dependence of the betaAR response was determined by comparing an initial response with a second in the presence of selective beta1- or beta2AR antagonists. In the presence of the specific beta1AR-blocker CGP 20712A (300 nM) the increase in rate with Iso was reduced from 207 +/- 42% of basal to 128 +/- 13%, P < 0.01. With the beta2AR-blocker ICI 118,551 (50 nM) there was no significant change in Iso response. Exposure to the muscarinic agonist, carbachol (10 microM), inhibited the increase in frequency mediated by isoprenaline, but had mixed stimulatory and inhibitory

  3. Reduced beta 2-adrenoceptor sensitivity in normal pregnancy but not in pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nisell, H; Martinsson, A; Hjemdahl, P

    1988-01-01

    beta 2-Adrenoceptors on lymphocytes from healthy nonpregnant and pregnant women and patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) were studied in vitro by a radioligand binding technique (125I-hydroxybenzylpindolol) and related to in vivo responses to infused adrenaline. Healthy pregnant women had significantly fewer beta 2-adrenoceptor binding sites than nonpregnant controls (47.1 +/- 5.6 vs. 73.6 +/- 10.5 fmol X mg-1 protein), PIH patients displaying intermediate values. Adrenaline-induced increases in plasma cyclic AMP (a beta 2-mediated in vivo response) also tended to be reduced during normal pregnancy. The systemic vasodilatation evoked by intravenously infused adrenaline and the density of lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptor binding sites were positively related in the nonpregnant controls (r = 0.50), but inversely related in both the pregnant controls (r = -0.40) and the PIH patients (r = -0.70). These regression lines differed significantly. The present results indicate a reduction of beta 2-adrenoceptor function during normal pregnancy, which is less pronounced in PIH, as well as an altered relationship between beta 2-mediated vasodilator responses and densities of beta 2-adrenoceptors on lymphocytes during pregnancy.

  4. Effects of 5-HT-receptor and alpha 2-adrenoceptor ligands on the haemodynamic response to acute central hypovolaemia in conscious rabbits.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, R. G.; Haynes, J. M.; Ludbrook, J.

    1993-01-01

    1. We set out to elucidate the pharmacological mechanisms by which alpha 2-adrenoceptor and 5-HT-receptor ligands affect the haemodynamic response to acute central hypovolaemia in conscious rabbits. 2. Acute central hypovolaemia was produced by inflating an inferior vena caval cuff so that cardiac output fell at a constant rate of approximately 8.5% of its baseline level per min. 3. Drugs were administered into the fourth cerebral ventricle in either 154 mM NaCl (saline) or 20% w/v 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CDX). After vehicle treatments, the haemodynamic response to acute central hypovolaemia had the usual two phases. During Phase I, systemic vascular conductance fell in proportion to cardiac output so that mean arterial pressure fell by only 8 mmHg. Phase II commenced when cardiac output had fallen to approximately 60% of its baseline level, when vascular conductance rose abruptly and arterial pressure fell to < or = 40 mmHg. The haemodynamic response was not dependent on the vehicle used (saline or beta-CDX). 4. Methysergide delayed the occurrence of Phase II in a dose-dependent manner, and prevented it at a dose of 30- 600 nmol (geometric mean = 186 nmol). The effects and potency of methysergide were not dependent on the vehicle used, indicating that beta-CDX can be used as a vehicle for fourth ventricular administration of lipophilic drugs to conscious rabbits. Clonidine (10 nmol) reversed the effects of a critical dose of methysergide. 5. Phase II was also prevented by 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (5-HT1A-selective agonist, geometric mean critical dose (range) = 13.1 (10-30) nmol), sumatriptan (5-HT1D-selective agonist, 72.1 (10-300) nmol), mesulergine (5-HT2/1C-selective antagonist, 173 (30-1000) nmol), idazoxan (alpha 2-adrenoceptor-selective antagonist, 548 (100-3000) nmol), and mianserin (5-HT2/1C-selective antagonist, 548 (100-3000) nmol). It was not affected by MDL 72222 (5-HT3-selective antagonist, 300 nmol) or ketanserin (5-HT2

  5. Effects of Clonidine on Withdrawal From Long-term Dexmedetomidine in the Pediatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Nicholas M.; Simone, Shari; Walker, L. Kyle; Morgan, Jill A.; Parbuoni, Kristine A.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare withdrawal symptoms among pediatric intensive care patients receiving clonidine to those not receiving clonidine while being weaned from long-term dexmedetomidine. METHODS: This retrospective analysis evaluated Withdrawal Assessment Tool-1 (WAT-1) scores and hemodynamic parameters in pediatric patients on dexmedetomidine for 5 days or longer between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2012. The primary objective was to compare withdrawal symptoms based on the number of elevated WAT-1 scores among patients on clonidine to those not on clonidine, while being weaned from long-term dexmedetomidine. The secondary objective was to describe withdrawal symptoms associated with long-term dexmedetomidine use. RESULTS: Nineteen patients (median age, 1.5 years; interquartile range [IQR], 0.67–3.3) received 20 treatment courses of dexmedetomidine for at least 5 days. Clonidine was received by patients during 12 of the treatment courses. The patients in the clonidine group had an average of 0.8 (range, 0–6) elevated WAT-1 scores 24 hours post wean compared to an average of 3.2 (0–8) elevated WAT-1 scores in the no clonidine group (p = 0.49). There were no significant difierences between prewean and postwean systolic or diastolic blood pressures among the 2 groups. The average heart rate during the postwean period was 112 beats per minute (bpm) (range, 88.5–151.5) in the clonidine group compared to 138.4 bpm (range, 117.8–168.3) in the no clonidine group (p = 0.003). In the clonidine group, the mean change in heart rate postwean compared to prewean was an increase of 3.6 bpm (range, −39.6 to 47.5), compared to a mean increase of 29.9 bpm (range, 5.5–74.7) in the no clonidine group (p = 0.042). CONCLUSIONS: There was no difierence in WAT-1 scores between groups, with the clonidine group displaying a trend towards fewer elevated WAT-1 scores during the 24 hours post dexmedetomidine wean. Patients who received clonidine had significantly lower heart

  6. A pharmacodynamic study on clenbuterol-induced toxicity: beta1- and beta2-adrenoceptors involvement in guinea-pig tachycardia in an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Mazzanti, Gabriela; Di Sotto, Antonella; Daniele, Claudia; Battinelli, Lucia; Brambilla, Gianfranco; Fiori, Maurizio; Loizzo, Stefano; Loizzo, Alberto

    2007-09-01

    Beta(2)-receptor adrenergic agonists as clenbuterol and analogues are illegally used as growth promoters in cattle, in Europe, as well as in other countries. Following consumption of meat or liver, intoxication cases were described, and cardiovascular toxic effects (tachycardia, hypertension) were of clinical relevance. Therefore, we investigated whether heart rate increase induced by clenbuterol could depend upon stimulation of beta(1)- and/or beta(2)-adrenergic receptors, and in which ratio. We used in vitro guinea-pig atria, a model in which beta(1)-/beta(2)-receptors ratio is similar to that found in men. In our experiments both beta(1)- and beta(2)-receptors contributed to clenbuterol-induced heart rate increase, but with a different potency. The selective beta(2)-antagonist ICI-118,551 competitively antagonized responses to clenbuterol with high affinity (pA(2) 9.47+/-0.28, SchildSlope 0.98+/-0.20 not significantly different from unity, K(B) 0.34 nM). The selective beta(1)-antagonist atenolol antagonized clenbuterol with a relatively lower affinity (pA(2)=7.59+/-0.14), the SchildSlope=1.97+/-0.33 was significantly different from unity (P<0.05). Results show that clenbuterol stimulates guinea-pig heart rate by acting chiefly on beta(2)-adrenoceptor, although responses to clenbuterol apparently are mediated by an inter-play between both beta-adrenoceptors. Further experiments are necessary to understand which beta-adrenergic antagonists are of effectiveness to counteract cardiovascular effects in case of intoxication following clenbuterol, or other beta-adrenergic stimulants.

  7. Effects of selective antagonism of beta-adrenoceptor sub-types on responses to isoprenaline in rat distal colon in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, A.; Lamont, M.

    1993-01-01

    1. The effects of the beta 1- and beta 2-adrenoceptor selective antagonists, CGP 20712A and ICI 118551 respectively, on responses to isoprenaline-induced relaxation of rat distal colon were investigated in order to determine the contributions of these subtypes to relaxation. In addition, the properties of ICI D7114, a novel putative stimulant of atypical beta-adrenoceptors, were investigated. Our preliminary experiments with ICI D7114 showed that this compound lacked agonist activity in rat distal colon and in fact antagonized responses to isoprenaline. We therefore studied the antagonism of isoprenaline by ICI D7114 in more detail. 2. Longitudinal segments of rat distal colon were suspended in Krebs solution at 37 degrees C for isometric recording. The Krebs solution contained EDTA (23 microM) and prazosin (0.1 microM) and was gassed with 95/5% O2/CO2. After an initial equilibration period, reproducible contractions to a submaximal concentration of methacholine (1 microM) were obtained before carrying out a concentration-response curve (CRC) to isoprenaline in a non-cumulative manner. Four consecutive CRCs to isoprenaline were carried out in each tissue with a 1 h interval between each curve. Antagonists were present in increasing concentrations during the intervals between CRCs. Control tissues received no antagonists to allow estimation of the magnitude of time-dependent changes. 3. Isoprenaline produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of methacholine-induced contractions. CRCs to isoprenaline were reproducible with no significant time-dependent changes. Propranolol produced no shift of the isoprenaline CRC at 0.01 microM and a 5 fold shift at 0.1 microM. No further shift was observed with 1 microM.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8306100

  8. Pharmacologically distinct phenotypes of α1B-adrenoceptors: variation in binding and functional affinities for antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Yoshiki, Hatsumi; Uwada, Junsuke; Anisuzzaman, Abu Syed Md; Umada, Hidenori; Hayashi, Ryoji; Kainoh, Mie; Masuoka, Takayoshi; Nishio, Matomo; Muramatsu, Ikunobu

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose The pharmacological properties of particular receptors have recently been suggested to vary under different conditions. We compared the pharmacological properties of the α1B-adrenoceptor subtype in various tissue preparations and under various conditions. Experimental Approach [3H]-prazosin binding to α1B-adrenoceptors in rat liver (segments, dispersed hepatocytes and homogenates) was assessed and the pharmacological profiles were compared with the functional and binding profiles in rat carotid artery and recombinant α1B-adrenoceptors. Key Results In association and saturation-binding experiments with rat liver, binding affinity for [3H]-prazosin varied significantly between preparations (KD value approximately ten times higher in segments than in homogenates). The binding profile for various drugs in liver segments also deviated from the representative α1B-adrenoceptor profile observed in liver homogenates and recombinant receptors. L-765,314 and ALS-77, selective antagonists of α1B-adrenoceptors, showed high binding and antagonist affinities in liver homogenates and recombinant α1B-adrenoceptors. However, binding affinities for both ligands in the segments of rat liver and carotid artery were 10 times lower, and the antagonist potencies in α1B-adrenoceptor-mediated contractions of carotid artery were more than 100 times lower than the representative α1B-adrenoceptor profile. Conclusions and Implications In contrast to the consistent profile of recombinant α1B-adrenoceptors, the pharmacological profile of native α1B-adrenoceptors of rat liver and carotid artery varied markedly under various receptor environments, showing significantly different binding properties between intact tissues and homogenates, and dissociation between functional and binding affinities. In addition to conventional ‘subtype’ characterization, ‘phenotype’ pharmacology must be considered in native receptor evaluations in vivo and in future

  9. Comparison of dexmedetomidine with fentanyl for maintenance of intraoperative hemodynamics in hypertensive patients undergoing major surgery: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Bilgi, Kanchan V.; Vasudevan, Arumugam; Bidkar, Prasanna Udupi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study was to study and compare the effects of intravenous dexmedetomidine and fentanyl on intraoperative hemodynamics, opioid consumption, and recovery characteristics in hypertensive patients. Methods: Fifty-seven hypertensive patients undergoing major surgery were randomized into two groups, Group D (dexmedetomidine, n = 29) and Group F (fentanyl, n = 28). The patients received 1 μg/kg of either dexmedetomidine or fentanyl, followed by 0.5 μg/kg/h infusion of the same drug, followed by a standard induction protocol. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressures (MAPs), end-tidal isoflurane concentration, and use of additional fentanyl and vasopressors were recorded throughout. Results: Both dexmedetomidine and fentanyl caused significant fall in HR and MAP after induction and dexmedetomidine significantly reduced the induction dose of thiopentone (P = 0.026). After laryngoscopy and intubation, patients in Group D experienced a fall in HR and a small rise in MAP (P = 0.094) while those in Group F showed significant rise in HR (P = 0.01) and MAP (P = 0.004). The requirement of isoflurane and fentanyl boluses was significantly less in Group D. The duration of postoperative analgesia was longer in Group D (P = 0.015) with significantly lower postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Infusion of dexmedetomidine in hypertensive patients controlled the sympathetic stress response better than fentanyl and provided stable intraoperative hemodynamics. It reduced the dose of thiopentone, requirement of isoflurane and fentanyl boluses. The postoperative analgesia was prolonged, and incidence of PONV was less in patients who received dexmedetomidine. PMID:27212770

  10. Effects of the menstrual cycle on bispectral index and anesthetic requirement in patients with preoperative intravenous dexmedetomidine following propofol induction

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaomin; Wang, Tingting; Huang, Shaoqiang

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have suggested that the menstrual cycle has the impact on sedation. No previous study has evaluated the effects of the menstrual cycle on sedation level and propofol requirement with preoperative intravenous dexmedetomidine. Sixty-four adult fertile women receiving general anesthesia for elective gynecologic surgery were included in the study. Patients were classified into four groups on the basis of the phase of menstrual cycle and whether infused dexmedetomidine preoperatively: Group FS: the follicular phase (days 8-12) and preoperative intravenous normal saline; Group FD: the follicular phase (days 8-12) and preoperative intravenous dexmedetomidine; Group LS: the luteal phase (days 20-24) and normal saline; Group LD: the luteal phase (days 20-24) and dexmedetomidine. The patients were infused respectively dexmedetomidine at 0, 1.0, 0 and 1.0 μg/kg over 10 min, and then propofol TCI, which was administered with target plasma concentration at 4.0 μg/ml. BIS, heart rate, MAP were recorded until BIS to 50. In the LD group, the descent range of the BIS values was significantly sharpest among the four groups at loss of eyelash reflex. From propofol administered to loss of eyelash reflex and BIS values reach to 50, propofol requirements were significantly least and duration were shortest in the LD group among the four groups. Menstrual cycle phases affect the sedation of propofol induction with preoperative intravenous dexmedetomidine, which is deeper in the luteal phase. We should cautious of excessive sedation by propofol anesthesia with preoperative dexmedetomidine in the luteal phase. PMID:25664087

  11. Further characterization of presynaptic beta-adrenoceptors in guinea-pig pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed

    Misu, Y; Kuwahara, M; Kaiho, M; Kubo, T

    1983-07-22

    Presynaptic beta-adrenoceptors were further characterized in spiral strips of guinea-pig pulmonary arteries preloaded with [3H]norepinephrine. l-Metoprolol (3 X 10(-6) M) inhibited isoproterenol (3 X 10(-7) M)-induced increases in 3H efflux by transmural field stimulation, whereas the d-isomer produced no inhibition. However, IPS 339, H 35/25, butoxamine and metoprolol (3 X 10(-6) M) antagonized salbutamol (3 X 10(-7) M)-induced increases in the parameter, whereas acebutolol, bevantolol and practolol (3 X 10(-6) M) produced no antagonism. Presynaptic beta-adrenoceptors in guinea-pig pulmonary arteries appear to have characteristics similar to those postsynaptic classical beta-adrenoceptors.

  12. Regression of Intracranial Meningioma during Treatment with α1-Adrenoceptor Blocker

    PubMed Central

    Hoegestoel, Einar August; Berg-Johnsen, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Background Regression of meningioma has been reported after hemorrhage or hormonal withdrawal. Here, we report a case of an incidentally diagnosed meningioma that regressed in association with α1-adrenoceptor antagonist. Case report A 59-year old male patient with an incidentally diagnosed lateral sphenoid wing meningioma was followed with serial magnetic resonance imaging. The tumor with a maximum diameter of 43 mm showed progressive regression, and after 3 years the size was reduced to 22% of the initial volume. During follow-up the patient was treated with an α1-adrenoceptor antagonist (tamsulosin) for benign prostatic hyperplasia. Possible mechanisms are discussed, including our main hypothesis of reduced mitogenic effects through phospholipase C-signal transduction. Conclusion This is the first report of regression of an incidentally diagnosed meningioma associated with α1-adrenoceptor antagonist treatment. PMID:27175325

  13. Effects of chronic delta-9-THC treatment on cardiac beta-adrenoceptors in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, E.B.; Seifen, E.; Kennedy, R.H.; Kafiluddi, R.; Paule, M.G.; Scallet, A.C.; Ali, S.F.; Slikker, W. Jr.

    1987-10-01

    This study was designed to determine if chronic treatment with delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) alters cardiac beta-adrenoceptors in the rat. Following daily oral administration of 10 or 20 mg/kg THC or an equivalent volume of control solvent for 90 days, rats were sacrificed, and sarcolemmal membranes were prepared from ventricular myocardium. Beta-adrenoceptor density and binding affinity estimated with (-)(/sup 3/H)dihydroalprenolol; a beta-adrenergic antagonist, were not significantly affected by treatment with THC when compared to vehicle controls. These results suggest that the tolerance to cardiovascular effects of THC which develops during chronic exposure in the rat is not associated with alterations in cardiac beta-adrenoceptors as monitored by radiolabeled antagonist binding.

  14. Alpha 1D- and alpha 1A-adrenoceptors mediate contraction in rat renal artery.

    PubMed

    Villalobos-Molina, R; López-Guerrero, J J; Ibarra, M

    1997-03-19

    To investigate the alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtype(s) mediating contraction in rat renal artery, we have compared the effect of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists, 5-methylurapidil, BMY 7378 (8-(2-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl) ethyl) 8-azaspiro (4.5) decane-7,9-dione 2HCl) and chloroethylclonidine on functional responses to noradrenaline. A clear blockade by chloroethylclonidine (10(-4) M) of noradrenaline-induced contraction was observed and, along with this effect. pKB values of 9.12 and 8.40 for BMY 7378 and 9.75 and 10.06 for 5-methylurapidil were obtained, indicating that the renal artery expresses the alpha 1D-adrenoceptor subtype as the one involved in contraction and not only the alpha 1A subtype as has been reported. PMID:9098691

  15. Relation of central alpha-adrenoceptor and other receptors to the control of renin secretion.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    1983-02-01

    The location and nature of the receptors in the brain on which clonidine acts to decrease renin secretion have been investigated in dogs. Clonidine was injected into the vertebral and carotid arteries, and its effects were compared with those of norepinephrine and epinephrine when injected into the third ventricle. It was also injected intravenously (IV) after transection of the brain stem and following treatment with intraventricular 6-hydroxydopamine. The results suggest that the renin-regulating receptors are located in the brain stem in a region different from the receptors mediating the depressor response, that they are alpha 2-adrenoceptors, and that they are postsynaptic in location. Central alpha 1-adrenoceptors appear to mediate increased renin secretion. Central serotonergic receptors also mediate increased renin secretion, but it is not known how the alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptors interact with the serotonergic systems.

  16. Pediatric awake craniotomy for seizure focus resection with dexmedetomidine sedation-a case report.

    PubMed

    Sheshadri, Veena; Chandramouli, B A

    2016-08-01

    Resection of lesions near the eloquent cortex of brain necessitates awake craniotomy to reduce the risk of permanent neurologic deficits during surgery. There are limited reports of anesthetic management of awake craniotomy in pediatric patients. This report is on use of dexmedetomidine sedation for awake craniotomy in a 11-year-old child, without any airway adjuncts throughout the procedure. Dexmedetomidine infusion administered at a dosage of 0.2 to 0.7μg kg(-1) h(-1) provided adequate sedation for the entire procedure. There were no untoward incidents or any interference with electrocorticography, intraoperative stimulation, and functional mapping. Adequate preoperative visits and counseling of patient and parents regarding course and nature of events along with well-planned intraoperative management are of utmost importance in a pediatric age group for successful intraoperative awake craniotomy. PMID:27290976

  17. Pediatric awake craniotomy for seizure focus resection with dexmedetomidine sedation-a case report.

    PubMed

    Sheshadri, Veena; Chandramouli, B A

    2016-08-01

    Resection of lesions near the eloquent cortex of brain necessitates awake craniotomy to reduce the risk of permanent neurologic deficits during surgery. There are limited reports of anesthetic management of awake craniotomy in pediatric patients. This report is on use of dexmedetomidine sedation for awake craniotomy in a 11-year-old child, without any airway adjuncts throughout the procedure. Dexmedetomidine infusion administered at a dosage of 0.2 to 0.7μg kg(-1) h(-1) provided adequate sedation for the entire procedure. There were no untoward incidents or any interference with electrocorticography, intraoperative stimulation, and functional mapping. Adequate preoperative visits and counseling of patient and parents regarding course and nature of events along with well-planned intraoperative management are of utmost importance in a pediatric age group for successful intraoperative awake craniotomy.

  18. Effect of freezing and ultrasonication on the density of human lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Santala, M; Castrén, O; Saarikoski, S; Penttilä, I

    1989-06-01

    In this study 21 pregnant volunteers were divided into three equal groups; blood samples were taken from each, and after isolation of the lymphocytes the cell suspensions were divided into two equal samples. The density of beta 2-adrenoceptor in intact lymphocytes was compared with the receptor density for lymphocytes stored 7 days or 19 days at -70 degrees C and with cells disrupted by ultrasonication. Storage by lymphocytes at -70 degrees C for 7 days to 19 days decreased the beta 2-adrenoceptor density by 20% and 37%, respectively; ultrasonication decreased the density by 65%.

  19. Dexmedetomidine-fentanyl versus propofol-fentanyl in flexible bronchoscopy: A randomized study

    PubMed Central

    YUAN, FENG; FU, HONGGUANG; YANG, PENGJU; SUN, KAI; WU, SHUBIAO; LV, MIAOMIAO; DONG, ZHENZHEN; DONG, TIELI

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a combination of dexmedetomidine and fentanyl on peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2) and hemodynamic stability in patients undergoing flexible bronchoscopy. One hundred patients undergoing elective flexible bronchoscopy were randomized into either a propofol-fentanyl group (PF group; n=50) or a dexmedetomidine-fentanyl group (DF group; n=50). SpO2 values, heart rate (HR), systolic and diastolic blood pressure (SBP and DBP), patients' cough scores and discomfort scores as determined by patients and bronchoscopists, levels of sedation, number of times that additional lidocaine was required, elapsed time until recovery, and adverse events were recorded. The mean SpO2 values in the DF group were significantly higher than those in the PF group (P<0.01), and HR, SBP and DBP were significantly lower in the DF group than in the PF group (P<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of cough scores or discomfort scores, sedation levels, or number of times that additional lidocaine was required (P>0.05). Elapsed time until recovery in the DF group was significantly longer than in the PF group (P=0.002). The incidence of hypoxemia was significantly lower in the DF group than in the PF group (P=0.027), but the incidence of bradycardia was significantly higher in the DF group than in the PF group (P=0.037). Dexmedetomidine-fentanyl was superior to propofol-fentanyl in providing satisfactory SpO2. Furthermore, dexmedetomidine-fentanyl attenuated hemodynamic responses during bronchoscopy and maintained hemodynamic stability in the early stage of the procedure. PMID:27347086

  20. Prevention of sevoflurane related emergence agitation in children undergoing adenotonsillectomy: A comparison of dexmedetomidine and propofol

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Monaz Abdulrahman; Abdellatif, Ashraf Abualhasan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Emergence agitation (EA) in children is increased after sevoflurane anesthesia. Propofol and dexmedetomidine have been used for prophylactic treatment with controversial results. The aim of the present study was to compare the effect of a single dose of propofol or dexmedetomidine prior to termination of sevoflurane-based anesthesia on the incidence and severity of EA in children. Methods: One hundred and twenty children, American Society of Anesthesiologists I-II, 2-6 years old undergoing adenotonsillectomy under sevoflurane based anesthesia were enrolled in the study. Children were randomly allocated to one of the three equal groups: (Group C) received 10 ml saline 0.9%, (Group P) received propofol 1 mg/kg or (group D) received dexmedetomidine 0.3 ug/kg-1. The study drugs were administered 5 min before the end of surgery. In post anesthesia care unit (PACU), the incidence of EA was assessed with Aonos four point scale and the severity of EA was assessed with pediatric anesthesia emergence delirium scale upon admission (T0), after 5 min (T5), 15 min (T15) and 30 min (T30). Extubation time, emergence time, duration of PACU stay and pain were assessed. Results: The incidence and severity of EA were lower in group P and group D compared to group C at T0, T5 and T15. The incidence and severity of EA in group P were significantly higher than group D at the same times. The incidence and severity of EA decreased significantly over time in all groups. The modified Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario Pain Scale was significantly lower in group D compared to group C and group P. Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine 0.3 ug/kg1 was more effective than propofol 1 mg/kg in decreasing the incidence and severity of EA, when administered 5 min before the end of surgery in children undergoing adenotonsillectomy under sevoflurane anesthesia. PMID:24015133

  1. Dexmedetomidine for antiemesis in gynecologic surgery: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Wei-Guo; Ge, Xin-Yu; Zhu, Hai; Liang, Xiao; Gong, Hong-Xia; Zhong, Ming; Xiao, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a common complication after gynecological surgeries. This meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of dexmedetomidine on PONV after gynecological surgeries. Methods: Three main electronic databases including Pub Med, Embase and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were searched by two researchers independently. The metaanalysis was completed using Review Manager. Results: Eleven RCTs with 692 patients were included in this metaanalysis. Dexmedetomidine a bridged postoperative nausea [Risk Ratio (RR)=0.59, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.44 to 0.79] and vomiting [RR=0.48, 95% CI: 0.36 to 0.64] compared with placebo. Despite of higher incidence of intra operative bradycardia [RR 2.87, 95% CI 1.08 to 7.58] and hypotension [RR 4.26, 95% CI 1.43 to 12.69], we found significant decrease in postoperative shivering [RR 0.23, 95% CI 0.13 to 0.40] and pruritus [RR 0.40, 95% CI 0.17 to 0.93] in dexmedetomidine group, as well as the pain scores [standard mean difference (SMD)-0.96, 95% CI-1.37 to-0.54]. Significant reductions in the need for intraoperative fentanyl (RR 0.10, 95% CI 0.01-0.76, I2 0%), antiemetic (RR 0.62, 95% CI 0.39-0.99, I2 0%) and postoperative analgesic (RR 0.18, 95% CI 0.08-0.42, I2 0%) were also elicited. Conclusions: The current meta-analysis exhibits that dexmedetomidine is superiority to placebo in attenuating the incidence of PONV, postoperative shivering, pruritus, as well as the pain scores in patients undergoing gynecological surgeries. Still, the potential cardiovascular complications should be taken seriously. PMID:26628940

  2. Effects of Intraoperative Dexmedetomidine on Postoperative Pain in Highly Nicotine-Dependent Patients After Thoracic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Xingzhi; Zhang, Ping; Lu, Sufen; Zhang, Zongwang; Yu, Ailan; Liu, Donghua; Wu, Shanshan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the effects of intraoperative dexmedetomidine on pain in highly nicotine-dependent patients after thoracic surgery. Highly nicotine-dependent men underwent thoracic surgery and received postoperative patient-controlled intravenous analgesia with sufentanil. In dexmedetomidine group (experimental group, n = 46), dexmedetomidine was given at a loading dose of 1 μg/kg for 10 minutes, followed by continuous infusion at 0.5 μg/kg/h until 30 minutes before the end of surgery. The saline group (control group, n = 48) received the same volume of saline. General anesthesia was administered via a combination of inhalation and intravenous anesthetics. If necessary, patients were administered a loading dose of sufentanil by an anesthesiologist immediately after surgery (0 hours). Patient-controlled analgesia was started when the patient's resting numerical rating scale (NRS) score was less than 4. Resting and coughing NRS scores and sufentanil dosage were recorded 0, 1, 4 hours, and every 4 hours until 48 hours after surgery. Dosages of other rescue analgesics were converted to the sufentanil dosage. Surgical data, adverse effects, and degree of satisfaction were obtained. Cumulative sufentanil dosage, resting NRS, and coughing NRS in the first 24 hours after surgery and heart rate were lower in the experimental compared with the control group (P <0.05). No patient experienced sedation or respiratory depression. Frequency of nausea and vomiting and degree of satisfaction were similar in both groups. Intraoperative dexmedetomidine was associated with reduced resting and coughing NRS scores and a sufentanil-sparing effect during the first 24 hours after thoracic surgery. PMID:27258524

  3. Comparative Evaluation of Remifentanil and Dexmedetomidine in General Anesthesia for Cesarean Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chengwen; Li, Yandong; Wang, Kun; Kong, Xiangang

    2015-01-01

    Background Use of remifentanil and dexmedetomidine in general anesthesia for cesarean section have been described. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of remifentanil and dexmedetomidine on maternal hemodynamics and bispectral index, and neonatal outcomes in elective caesarean delivery. Material/Methods Forty-four women undergoing elective cesarean delivery with ASA I or II and term or near-term singleton pregnancies were randomly assigned to receive remifentanil at a loading dose of 2 μg/kg over 10 min followed by a continuous infusion of 2 μg/kg/h until about 6 min before fetal delivery (Group REM), or dexmedetomidine at a loading dose of 0.4 μg/kg over 10 min followed by a continuous infusion of 0.4 μg/kg/h until about 6 min before fetal delivery (Group DEX). Maternal hemodynamics and BIS values were recorded. Neonatal effects were assessed using Apgar scores and umbilical cord blood gas analysis. Results Mean arterial pressure (MAP) increased after intubation in both groups, and the change magnitude of the MAP was higher in Group DEX (P<0.05). Patients in Group DEX had a lower BIS value at recovery and consumed less propofol during surgery (P<0.05). The incidences of neonatal resuscitation at 1 min were 81.8% in Group REM and 54.5% in Group DEX (P=0.052). There was no significant difference in either group in Apgar scores at 1 and 5 min and umbilical cord blood gas values. Conclusions Both remifentanil and dexmedetomidine are effective to blunt hemodynamic responses to intubation and also seem safe for neonates at the administrated doses, but remifentanil still has the potential to cause neonatal transient respiratory depression. PMID:26638888

  4. Comparative efficacy of intravenous dexmedetomidine, clonidine, and tramadol in postanesthesia shivering

    PubMed Central

    Sahi, Shikha; Singh, Mirley Rupinder; Katyal, Sunil

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Postanesthesia shivering continues to be a major challenge in the perioperative care. We compared the efficacy of tramadol, clonidine, and dexmedetomidine in preventing postoperative shivering and its potential adverse effects in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia. Material and Methods: One hundred and twenty American Society of Anesthesiologists I and II patients scheduled for elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy under general anesthesia were divided into four equal groups. Group 1 received clonidine 2 μg/kg, Group 2 received tramadol 1 mg/kg, Group 3 received dexmedetomidine 1 mcg/kg all intravenous diluted in NS to 5 ml, and Group 4 received NS intravenous 5 ml. Parameters analysed included postoperative blood pressure (BP), pulse rate, respiratory rate (RR), arterial saturation, and tympanic membrane temperature. Patients were observed for shivering episodes, sedation, pain, respiratory depression, nausea, and vomiting. Analysis of variance, Tukey's post-hoc comparison, Chi-square test and Bonferroni post-hoc comparison test were performed using SPSS (Statistical analysis by Statistical Package of Social Sciences of Microsoft Windows) Statistics (version 16.0). Results: The incidence of shivering was 10, 3.3, 13.3 and 40% in Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 respectively. Patients who were given tramadol had significantly less shivering than patients in clonidine and dexmedetomidine groups (P < 0.01). Conclusion: All the three drugs were effective in preventing postoperative shivering. However, tramadol has been found to be more efficacious in preventing postoperative shivering. PMID:27275057

  5. Conscious sedation using dexmedetomidine for percutaneous transcatheter closure of atrial septal defects: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Pushkar Mahendra; Umbarkar, Sanjeeta R.; Sarkar, Manjula S.; Lohiya, Rishi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine safety and feasibility of conscious sedation using dexmedetomidine for transcatheter atrial septal defect (ASD) device closure. Materials and Methods: A retrospective institutional review of transcatheter ASD device closure without endotracheal intubation over 18 months. The protocol included topical oropharyngeal anesthesia using lignocaine followed by dexmedetomidine bolus 1 μg/kg intravenously over 10 min and maintenance dose 0.2–0.7 μg/kg/h. Ramsay sedation score 2–3 was maintained. Patients were analyzed regarding demographic profile, device size, procedure time, anesthesia time, recovery time, hospital stay, and any hemodynamic or procedural complications. Results: A total of 43 patients with mean age 31.56 ± 13.74 years (range: 12–56 years) were analyzed. Mean anesthesia duration was 71.75 + 21.08 min. Mean recovery time was 7.6 ± 3.01 min. 16 females and one male patient required additional propofol with a mean dose of 30.8 ± 10.49 mg. No hemodynamic instability was noted. No patient required general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation. The procedure was successful in 93.02% of patients. Four patients developed atrial fibrillation. All patients were satisfied. Conclusion: Conscious sedation using dexmedetomidine is a safe and effective anesthetic technique for percutaneous ASD closure. PMID:27397450

  6. Lidocaine, Dexmedetomidine and Their Combination Reduce Isoflurane Minimum Alveolar Concentration in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo-Arcique, Carlos M.; Ibancovichi, José A.; Chavez, Julio R.; Gutierrez-Blanco, Eduardo; Moran-Muñoz, Rafael; Victoria-Mora, José M.; Tendillo-Cortijo, Francisco; Santos-González, Martín; Sanchez-Aparicio, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    The effects of intravenous (IV) lidocaine, dexmedetomidine and their combination delivered as a bolus followed by a constant rate infusion (CRI) on the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane (MACISO) in dogs were evaluated. Seven healthy adult dogs were included. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane. For each dog, baseline MAC (MACISO/BASAL) was determined after a 90-minute equilibration period. Thereafter, each dog received one of the following treatments (loading dose, CRI): lidocaine 2 mg kg−1, 100 µg kg−1 minute−1; dexmedetomidine 2 µg kg−1, 2 µg kg−1 hour−1; or their combination. MAC was then determined again after 45- minutes of treatment by CRI. At the doses administered, lidocaine, dexmedetomidine and their combination significantly reduced MACISO by 27.3% (range: 12.5–39.2%), 43.4% (33.3–53.3%) and 60.9% (46.1–78.1%), respectively, when compared to MACISO/BASAL. The combination resulted in a greater MACISO reduction than the two drugs alone. Their use, at the doses studied, provides a clinically important reduction in the concentration of ISO during anaesthesia in dogs. PMID:25232737

  7. Does dexmedetomidine reduce secondary damage after spinal cord injury? An experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Cemek, Mustafa; Eser, Olcay; Altunbaş, Korhan; Buyukokuroglu, Mehmet Emin; Cosar, Murat; Baş, Orhan; Ela, Yuksel; Fidan, Huseyin

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to investigate the possible protective effect of dexmedetomidine (DEX) on traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Twenty-two New Zealand rabbits were divided into three groups: sham (no drug or operation, n = 6), Control [SCI + single dose of 1 mL saline intraperitoneally (i.p), after trauma; n = 8] and DEX (SCI + 1 μg/kg dexmedetomidine in 1 mL, i.p, after trauma, n = 8). Laminectomy was performed at T10 and balloon angioplasty catheter was applied extradurally. Four and 24 h after surgery, rabbits were evaluated by an independent observer according to the Tarlov scoring system. Blood, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), tissue samples from spinal cord were taken for biochemical and histopathological evaluations. After 4 h of SCI, all animals in control or DEX treated groups became paraparesic. On the other hand, 24 h after SCI, partial improvements were observed in both control and DEX treated groups. Traumatic SCI leads to increase in the lipid peroxidation and decreases enzymatic or nonenzymatic endogenous antioxidative defense systems. Again, SCI leads to apoptosis in spinal cord. DEX treatment slightly prevented lipid peroxidation and augmented endogenous antioxidative defense systems in CSF or spinal cord tissue, but failed to prevent apoptosis or neurodeficit after traumatic SCI. Therefore, it could be suggested that treatment with dexmedetomidine does not produce beneficial results in SCI. PMID:19130093

  8. The Effect of Dexmedetomidine on Lumbar Epidural Injection for Failed Back Surgery Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Maseeh, Sadik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Failed back surgery syndrome is a chronic pain condition requiring rapid, effective, and efficient management. This study evaluates the effect of adding dexmedetomidine to lumbar epidural steroids in patients with failed back surgery syndrome. Methods. Fifty patients suffering from failed back surgery syndrome were randomly assigned to one of two groups, receiving an epidural injection of 20 mL of either a mixture of betamethasone (14 mg) and bupivacaine 0.5 mg (group C) or a mixture of betamethasone (14 mg), bupivacaine 0.5 mg, and dexmedetomidine (0.5 μg/kg) (group D) adjusted to the volume with normal saline. The effect was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS), analgesic requirement, and Oswestry disability index 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks after injection. Results. VAS and ibuprofen consumption showed a significant reduction in group D. The Oswestry disability index was significantly improved in group D. There were no records of hypotension, bradycardia, sedation, or hypoxemia in both groups. Conclusion. The present study demonstrated potential safe and effective usage of adding dexmedetomidine to epidural steroid to control pain in patients with failed back surgery syndrome. PMID:27630712

  9. The Effect of Dexmedetomidine on Lumbar Epidural Injection for Failed Back Surgery Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eskandr, Ashraf; Abdel Maseeh, Sadik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Failed back surgery syndrome is a chronic pain condition requiring rapid, effective, and efficient management. This study evaluates the effect of adding dexmedetomidine to lumbar epidural steroids in patients with failed back surgery syndrome. Methods. Fifty patients suffering from failed back surgery syndrome were randomly assigned to one of two groups, receiving an epidural injection of 20 mL of either a mixture of betamethasone (14 mg) and bupivacaine 0.5 mg (group C) or a mixture of betamethasone (14 mg), bupivacaine 0.5 mg, and dexmedetomidine (0.5 μg/kg) (group D) adjusted to the volume with normal saline. The effect was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS), analgesic requirement, and Oswestry disability index 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks after injection. Results. VAS and ibuprofen consumption showed a significant reduction in group D. The Oswestry disability index was significantly improved in group D. There were no records of hypotension, bradycardia, sedation, or hypoxemia in both groups. Conclusion. The present study demonstrated potential safe and effective usage of adding dexmedetomidine to epidural steroid to control pain in patients with failed back surgery syndrome. PMID:27630712

  10. The Effect of Dexmedetomidine on Lumbar Epidural Injection for Failed Back Surgery Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abdel Maseeh, Sadik

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Failed back surgery syndrome is a chronic pain condition requiring rapid, effective, and efficient management. This study evaluates the effect of adding dexmedetomidine to lumbar epidural steroids in patients with failed back surgery syndrome. Methods. Fifty patients suffering from failed back surgery syndrome were randomly assigned to one of two groups, receiving an epidural injection of 20 mL of either a mixture of betamethasone (14 mg) and bupivacaine 0.5 mg (group C) or a mixture of betamethasone (14 mg), bupivacaine 0.5 mg, and dexmedetomidine (0.5 μg/kg) (group D) adjusted to the volume with normal saline. The effect was evaluated using visual analogue scale (VAS), analgesic requirement, and Oswestry disability index 2 weeks, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks after injection. Results. VAS and ibuprofen consumption showed a significant reduction in group D. The Oswestry disability index was significantly improved in group D. There were no records of hypotension, bradycardia, sedation, or hypoxemia in both groups. Conclusion. The present study demonstrated potential safe and effective usage of adding dexmedetomidine to epidural steroid to control pain in patients with failed back surgery syndrome.

  11. Oral ketamine and dexmedetomidine in adults' burns wound dressing--A randomized double blind cross over study.

    PubMed

    Kundra, Pankaj; Velayudhan, Savitri; Krishnamachari, Srinivasan; Gupta, Suman Lata

    2013-09-01

    Study was designed to compare analgesic efficacy and side effects of oral dexmedetomidine and ketamine in adults for burn wound dressing. Sixty healthy adults with thermal burns with burn area (20-50%) were randomly assigned into 2 groups. In Group K 5mg/kg ketamine and in Group D 4 mcg/kg dexmedetomidine was given orally. Patients crossed over to the other group the following day. Visual analogue score, sedation score, haemodynamic parameters were recorded from 30min after drug administration to 2h after procedure. Patients' preference was also recorded. Mean VAS score was significantly reduced from baseline in both the groups at all time points (P<0.05). Pain relief in Group K (overall mean VAS 2.6±0.6cm) was significantly better when compared to Group D (overall mean VAS 3.8±0.8cm). Patients in group K were significantly more sedated (median 3) when compared to group D (median 2), P<0.05. Delirium and excessive salivation were significant complications observed with ketamine. More patients preferred ketamine (63.3%) than dexmedetomidine (36.7%), P<0.05. Oral ketamine and dexmedetomidine produced significant pain relief during burns wound dressing. Oral ketamine produced significantly better pain relief than dexmedetomidine but was associated with delirium and excessive salivation.

  12. Determination of dexmedetomidine in children's plasma by ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry and application to pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hua-Cheng; Sun, Wei; Wang, Cheng-Yu; Ying, Wei-Yang; Zheng, Li-Dan; Zeng, Rui-Feng; Wang, Zhe; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2016-06-15

    A rapid, sensitive, and selective ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) was developed and validated for the determination and pharmacokinetic investigation of dexmedetomidine in children's plasma. Sample preparation was accomplished through a simple one-step deproteinization procedure with 0.2mL of acetonitrile to a 0.1mL plasma sample. Plasma samples were separated by UPLC on an Acquity UPLC BEH C18 column using a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile-0.1% formic acid in water with gradient elution. The total run time was 3.1min and the elution of dexmedetomidine was at 1.24min. The detection was performed on a triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometer in the multiple reaction-monitoring mode using the respective transitions m/z 201.3→95.1 for dexmedetomidine and m/z 204.2→98.0 for the internal standard, respectively. The calibration curve was linear over the range of 0.05-10ng/mL with a lower limit of quantitation of 0.05ng/mL. Mean recovery rate of dexmedetomidine in plasma was in the range of 86.7-89.1%. Intra-day and inter-day precision were both <11.6%. This method was successfully applied in pharmacokinetic study after commencement of 1.0μg/kg dexmedetomidine infusion in children. PMID:27179189

  13. Preventive effects of dexmedetomidine on the liver in a rat model of acid-induced acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sen, Velat; Güzel, Abdulmenap; Şen, Hadice Selimoğlu; Ece, Aydın; Uluca, Unal; Söker, Sevda; Doğan, Erdal; Kaplan, İbrahim; Deveci, Engin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether dexmedetomidine improves acute liver injury in a rat model. Twenty-eight male Wistar albino rats weighing 300-350 g were allocated randomly to four groups. In group 1, normal saline (NS) was injected into the lungs and rats were allowed to breathe spontaneously. In group 2, rats received standard ventilation (SV) in addition to NS. In group 3, hydrochloric acid was injected into the lungs and rats received SV. In group 4, rats received SV and 100 µg/kg intraperitoneal dexmedetomidine before intratracheal HCl instillation. Blood samples and liver tissue specimens were examined by biochemical, histopathological, and immunohistochemical methods. Acute lung injury (ALI) was found to be associated with increased malondialdehyde (MDA), total oxidant activity (TOA), oxidative stress index (OSI), and decreased total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Significantly decreased MDA, TOA, and OSI levels and significantly increased TAC levels were found with dexmedetomidine injection in group 4 (P < 0.05). The highest histologic injury scores were detected in group 3. Enhanced hepatic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and reduced CD68 expression were found in dexmedetomidine group compared with the group 3. In conclusion, the presented data provide the first evidence that dexmedetomidine has a protective effect on experimental liver injury induced by ALI. PMID:25165710

  14. Comparison of an intraoperative infusion of dexmedetomidine or remifentanil on perioperative haemodynamics, hypnosis and sedation, and postoperative pain control.

    PubMed

    Jung, H S; Joo, J D; Jeon, Y S; Lee, J A; Kim, D W; In, J H; Rhee, H Y; Choi, J W

    2011-01-01

    This prospective, randomized, double-blind study compared the effects of dexmedetomidine and remifentanil on haemodynamic stability, sedation and postoperative pain control in the postanaesthetic care unit (PACU). Fifty consecutive patients scheduled for total laparoscopic hysterectomy were randomly assigned to receive infusions of either dexmedetomidine (1 μg/kg) i.v. over 10 min followed by 0.2 - 0.7 μg/kg per h continuous i.v. infusion or remifentanil (0.8 - 1.2 μg/kg) i.v. over 1 min followed by 0.05 - 0.1 μg/kg i.v. per min, starting at the end of surgery to the time in the PACU. Modified observer's assessment of alertness scores were significantly lower in the dexmedetomidine group than in the remifentanil group at 0, 5 and 10 min after arrival in the PACU. Blood pressure and heart rate in the dexmedetomidine group were significantly lower than that recorded in the remifentanil group in the PACU. Dexmedetomidine, at the doses used in this study, had a significant advantage over remifentanil in terms of postoperative haemodynamic stability. PMID:22117991

  15. Chemically Homogenous Compounds with Antagonistic Properties at All α1-Adrenoceptor Subtypes but not β1-Adrenoceptor Attenuate Adrenaline-Induced Arrhythmia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pytka, Karolina; Lustyk, Klaudia; Żmudzka, Elżbieta; Kotańska, Magdalena; Siwek, Agata; Zygmunt, Małgorzata; Dziedziczak, Agnieszka; Śniecikowska, Joanna; Olczyk, Adrian; Gałuszka, Adam; Śmieja, Jarosław; Waszkielewicz, Anna M.; Marona, Henryk; Filipek, Barbara; Sapa, Jacek; Mogilski, Szczepan

    2016-01-01

    Studies proved that among all α1-adrenoceptors, cardiac myocytes functionally express only α1A- and α1B-subtype. Scientists indicated that α1A-subtype blockade might be beneficial in restoring normal heart rhythm. Therefore, we aimed to determine the role of α1-adrenoceptors subtypes (i.e., α1A and α1B) in antiarrhythmic effect of six structurally similar derivatives of 2-methoxyphenylpiperazine. We compared the activity of studied compounds with carvedilol, which is β1- and α1-adrenoceptors blocker with antioxidant properties. To evaluate the affinity for adrenergic receptors, we used radioligand methods. We investigated selectivity at α1-adrenoceptors subtypes using functional bioassays. We tested antiarrhythmic activity in adrenaline-induced (20 μg/kg i.v.), calcium chloride-induced (140 and 25 mg/kg i.v.) and barium chloride-induced (32 and 10 mg/kg i.v.) arrhythmia models in rats. We also evaluated the influence of studied compounds on blood pressure in rats, as well as lipid peroxidation. All studied compounds showed high affinity toward α1-adrenoceptors but no affinity for β1 receptors. Biofunctional studies revealed that the tested compounds blocked α1A-stronger than α1B-adrenoceptors, but except for HBK-19 they antagonized α1A-adrenoceptor weaker than α1D-subtype. HBK-19 showed the greatest difference in pA2 values—it blocked α1A-adrenoceptors around seven-fold stronger than α1B subtype. All compounds showed prophylactic antiarrhythmic properties in adrenaline-induced arrhythmia, but only the activity of HBK-16, HBK-17, HBK-18, and HBK-19 (ED50 = 0.18–0.21) was comparable to that of carvedilol (ED50 = 0.36). All compounds reduced mortality in adrenaline-induced arrhythmia. HBK-16, HBK-17, HBK-18, and HBK-19 showed therapeutic antiarrhythmic properties in adrenaline-induced arrhythmia. None of the compounds showed activity in calcium chloride- or barium chloride-induced arrhythmias. HBK-16, HBK-17, HBK-18, and HBK-19 decreased heart

  16. Chemically Homogenous Compounds with Antagonistic Properties at All α1-Adrenoceptor Subtypes but not β1-Adrenoceptor Attenuate Adrenaline-Induced Arrhythmia in Rats.

    PubMed

    Pytka, Karolina; Lustyk, Klaudia; Żmudzka, Elżbieta; Kotańska, Magdalena; Siwek, Agata; Zygmunt, Małgorzata; Dziedziczak, Agnieszka; Śniecikowska, Joanna; Olczyk, Adrian; Gałuszka, Adam; Śmieja, Jarosław; Waszkielewicz, Anna M; Marona, Henryk; Filipek, Barbara; Sapa, Jacek; Mogilski, Szczepan

    2016-01-01

    Studies proved that among all α1-adrenoceptors, cardiac myocytes functionally express only α1A- and α1B-subtype. Scientists indicated that α1A-subtype blockade might be beneficial in restoring normal heart rhythm. Therefore, we aimed to determine the role of α1-adrenoceptors subtypes (i.e., α1A and α1B) in antiarrhythmic effect of six structurally similar derivatives of 2-methoxyphenylpiperazine. We compared the activity of studied compounds with carvedilol, which is β1- and α1-adrenoceptors blocker with antioxidant properties. To evaluate the affinity for adrenergic receptors, we used radioligand methods. We investigated selectivity at α1-adrenoceptors subtypes using functional bioassays. We tested antiarrhythmic activity in adrenaline-induced (20 μg/kg i.v.), calcium chloride-induced (140 and 25 mg/kg i.v.) and barium chloride-induced (32 and 10 mg/kg i.v.) arrhythmia models in rats. We also evaluated the influence of studied compounds on blood pressure in rats, as well as lipid peroxidation. All studied compounds showed high affinity toward α1-adrenoceptors but no affinity for β1 receptors. Biofunctional studies revealed that the tested compounds blocked α1A-stronger than α1B-adrenoceptors, but except for HBK-19 they antagonized α1A-adrenoceptor weaker than α1D-subtype. HBK-19 showed the greatest difference in pA2 values-it blocked α1A-adrenoceptors around seven-fold stronger than α1B subtype. All compounds showed prophylactic antiarrhythmic properties in adrenaline-induced arrhythmia, but only the activity of HBK-16, HBK-17, HBK-18, and HBK-19 (ED50 = 0.18-0.21) was comparable to that of carvedilol (ED50 = 0.36). All compounds reduced mortality in adrenaline-induced arrhythmia. HBK-16, HBK-17, HBK-18, and HBK-19 showed therapeutic antiarrhythmic properties in adrenaline-induced arrhythmia. None of the compounds showed activity in calcium chloride- or barium chloride-induced arrhythmias. HBK-16, HBK-17, HBK-18, and HBK-19 decreased heart

  17. beta2 adrenoceptor gene polymorphisms in cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    PubMed

    Büscher, Rainer; Eilmes, Katrin Jennifer; Grasemann, Hartmut; Torres, Brian; Knauer, Nicola; Sroka, Karin; Insel, Paul A; Ratjen, Felix

    2002-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis membrane conductance regulator can be activated through beta2-adrenoceptor (beta2AR) stimulation. We tested the hypothesis that coding sequence polymorphisms in the beta2AR gene contribute to the disease state in patients with cystic fibrosis. The Arg16Gly, Gln27Glu, and Thr164Ile beta2AR polymorphisms were studied by specific polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis in 126 cystic fibrosis patients. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced in cystic fibrosis patients carrying the Gly16 allele in either homozygous or heterozygous form (Gly16Gly + Arg16Gly) compared to patients homozygous for the Arg16 allele (60.3 +/- 3.5% versus 75.7 +/- 4.9% predicted). Similarly, forced vital capacity and flows at lower lung volumes were significantly (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01) lower in cystic fibrosis patients carrying the Gly16 allele. In addition, the Gly16 allele was associated with a greater 5 year decline in pulmonary function (P < 0.01). Bronchodilator responses to albuterol were not significantly different between the groups. The Thr164Ile variant was found in four patients; these patients had markedly reduced pulmonary function. Isoproterenol-stimulated cyclic AMP formation was significantly blunted in cystic fibrosis patients carrying either the Gly16 allele or Thr164Ile genotype compared to cystic fibrosis patients homozygous for the respective Arg16 alleles. These data provide the first evidence suggesting that polymorphisms of the beta2AR gene contribute to clinical severity and disease progression in cystic fibrosis.

  18. MH-3: evidence for non-competitive antagonism towards the low-affinity site of β1-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Schlicker, Eberhard; Pędzińska-Betiuk, Anna; Kozłowska, Hanna; Szkaradek, Natalia; Żelaszczyk, Dorota; Baranowska-Kuczko, Marta; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna; Marona, Henryk; Malinowska, Barbara

    2014-08-01

    β-Adrenoceptor antagonists are important drugs for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and some of those drugs also block the so-called low-affinity site of β1-adrenoceptors although at much higher concentrations. This low-affinity site, also identified in vivo and in human tissue, may come into play under certain pathophysiological situations including arrhythmias. The aim of our study was to determine the potency of 14 compounds chemically related to bupranolol or bevantolol and two xanthone derivatives at the low-affinity site of the β1-adrenoceptor. The potency of the compounds at the low- and high-affinity site of β1-adrenoceptors (β1L and β1H; both increasing heart rate) was compared in the pithed rat. One compound was also studied in the isolated rat heart and its α1-adrenolytic effect determined in the isolated rat mesenteric artery. In the pithed rat, four compounds blocked the β1L-adrenoceptor at a ≥10-fold lower potency than the β1H-adrenoceptor whereas the xanthone derivative (-)-MH-3 was equipotent. In the spontaneously beating right atrium (-)-MH-3 was a non-competitive antagonist of comparable potency at either receptor; its apparent pD'2 value for the β1L-adrenoceptor ranged from 5.6 to 6.4 under various conditions, including the Langendorff preparation. Its apparent pA2 at the α1-adrenoceptor in the mesenteric artery was 8.4. (-)-MH-3 is the first compound with virtually the same potency at the low- and high-affinity site of β1-adrenoceptors in vivo; it appears to be a non-competitive antagonist at either site in vitro.

  19. Agonist-trafficking and hallucinogens.

    PubMed

    González-Maeso, Javier; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2009-01-01

    Seven transmembrane domain receptors, also termed G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), represent the most common molecular target for therapeutic drugs. The generally accepted pharmacological model for GPCR activation is the ternary complex model, in which GPCRs exist in a dynamic equilibrium between the active and inactive conformational states. However, the demonstration that different agonists sometimes elicit a different relative activation of two signaling pathways downstream of the same receptor has led to a revision of the ternary complex model. According to this agonist- trafficking model, agonists stabilize distinct activated receptor conformations that preferentially activate specific signaling pathways. Hallucinogenic drugs and non-hallucinogenic drugs represent an attractive experimental system with which to study agonist-trafficking of receptor signaling. Thus many of the behavioral responses induced by hallucinogenic drugs, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD), psilocybin or mescaline, depend on activation of serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptors (5-HT2ARs). In contrast, this neuropsychological state in humans is not induced by closely related chemicals, such as lisuride or ergotamine, despite their similar in vitro activity at the 5-HT2AR. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge, as well as unresolved questions, regarding agonist-trafficking and the mechanism of action of hallucinogenic drugs.

  20. Role of nitric oxide/cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP in beta3 adrenoceptor-chronotropic response.

    PubMed

    Sterin-Borda, Leonor; Bernabeo, Gustavo; Ganzinelli, Sabrina; Joensen, Lilian; Borda, Enri

    2006-04-01

    In this study we determine different signaling pathways involved in beta(3) adrenoceptor (beta(3)-AR) dependent frequency stimulation in isolated rodent atria. Promiscuous coupling between different G-proteins and beta(3)-AR could explain the multiple functional effects of beta(3)-AR stimulation. We examine the mechanisms and functional consequences of dual adenylate cyclase and guanylate cyclase pathways coupling to beta(3)-AR in isolated rodent atria. The beta(3)-AR selective agonists ZD 7114 and ICI 215001 stimulated in a dose-dependent manner the contraction frequency that significantly correlated with cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation. Inhibition of adenylate cyclase shifted the chronotropic effect to the right. On the other hand, the ZD 7114 activity on frequency was enhanced by the inhibition of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and soluble guanylate cyclase. This countervailing negative chronotropic nitric oxide-cyclic GMP (NO-cGMP) significantly correlated with the increase on NOS activity and cGMP accumulation. Current analysis showed a negative cross talk between cAMP chronotropic and NO-cGMP effects by inhibition of phospholipase C (PLC), calcium/calmodulin (CaM), protein kinase C (PKC), NOS isoforms and Gi-protein on the effects of beta(3)-AR stimulation. RT-PCR detected both eNOS and nNOS in isolated rat atria. NOS isoforms performed independently. Only nNOS participated in limiting the effect of beta(3)-AR stimulation. In eNOS-KO (eNOS-/-) mice the chronotropic effect of beta(3)-AR agonists did not differ from wild type (WT) mice atria, but it was increased by the inhibition of nNOS activity. Our results suggest that the increase in frequency by beta(3)-AR activation on isolated rodent atria is associated to a parallel increases in cAMP. The nNOS-cGMP pathway negatively modulates beta(3)-AR activation. Multiple signal transduction pathways between G-protein and beta(3)-AR may protect myocardium from catecholamine-induced cardiotoxic effects. PMID:16510153

  1. Insular cortex alpha1-adrenoceptors modulate the parasympathetic component of the baroreflex in unanesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Alves, Fernando H F; Crestani, Carlos C; Resstel, Leonardo B M; Correa, Fernando M A

    2009-10-27

    The insular cortex (IC) has been reported to modulate the cardiac parasympathetic activity of the baroreflex in unanesthetized rats. However, which neurotransmitters are involved in this modulation is still unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the possible involvement of local IC-noradrenergic neurotransmission in modulating reflex bradycardiac responses. Bilateral microinjection of the selective alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist WB4101 (15 nmol/100 nL), into the IC of male Wistar rats, increased the gain of reflex bradycardia in response to mean arterial pressure (MAP) increases evoked by intravenous infusion of phenylephrine. However, bilateral microinjection of equimolar doses of either the selective alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist RX821002 or the non-selective beta-adrenoceptor antagonist propranolol into the IC did not affect the baroreflex response. No effects were observed in basal MAP or heart rate values after bilateral microinjection of noradrenergic antagonists into the IC, thus suggesting no tonic influence of IC-noradrenergic neurotransmission on resting cardiovascular parameters. In conclusion, these data provide evidence that local IC-noradrenergic neurotransmission has an inhibitory influence on baroreflex responses to blood pressure increase evoked by phenylephrine infusion through activation of alpha(1)-adrenoceptors. PMID:19686710

  2. Effects of Synephrine and B-Phenethylamine on Human a-Adrenoceptor Subtypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synephrine and B-phenethylamine are structurally related to ephedrine. In this study, the effects of synephrine and B-phenethylamine are investigated on a-adrenoceptor (a-AR) subtypes expressed in human embroyonic kidney (HEK293) or Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, and compared to that of 1R,2S-no...

  3. No evidence of the existence of beta adrenoceptors in human sperm using radioligand binding technique.

    PubMed

    Falkay, G; Bozóki, Z; Szöllösi, J; Kovács, L

    1989-01-01

    The investigations were carried out on 20 freshly ejaculated and pooled samples of human semen with normozoospermia and motility of 70-80%. In the present study no difference was found between total and non-specific binding to semen membranes using [3H]-dihydroalprenolol (DHA) as a radioligand. Our results suggest that beta adrenoceptors could not be found in human sperm.

  4. The Effects of Dexmedetomidine on Myocardial Function Assessed by Tissue Doppler Echocardiography During General Anesthesia in Patients With Diastolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Su Hyun; Na, Sungwon; Kim, Namo; Ban, Min Gi; Shin, Sung Eui; Oh, Young Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dexmedetomidine is a commonly used sedative and adjuvant agent to general anesthesia. The present was designed to evaluate the effects of dexmedetomidine on myocardial function by using tissue Doppler echocardiography during general anesthesia in patients with diastolic dysfunction. Forty patients undergoing orthostatic surgery with ejection fraction preserved diastolic dysfunction grade 2 or 3 were randomly allocated to the Control and Dex group (n = 20, each). In the Dex group, dexmedetomidine was given as an initial loading dose of 1.0 μg/kg over 10 minutes followed by a maintenance dose of 0.5 μg/kg/h. The ratio of peak early diastolic transmitral or transtricuspid inflow velocity to early diastolic mitral or tricuspid annular velocity (LV or RV E/e′) and left or right ventricular myocardial performance index (LV or RV MPI) were measured at before and after the administration dexmedetomidine or saline. The Dex group showed significant decrease of heart rate (P = 0.038), and increase of mean blood pressure (P < 0.001), LV E/e′ (P = 0.025), and LV MPI (P < 0.001) compared to those of the Control group on a linear mixed model analysis. Also, the Dex group showed significant increase of RV E/e′ (P < 0.001) and RV MPI (P = 0.028) compared to those of the Control group. Intraoperative dexmedetomidine administration during general anesthesia was appeared to deteriorate biventricular function in patients with diastolic dysfunction. We suggest careful consideration and a need for reducing dosage when administrating dexmedetomidine in patients with diastolic dysfunction. PMID:26871847

  5. Dexmedetomidine is Associated with an Increased Incidence of Bradycardia in Patients with Trisomy 21 After Surgery for Congenital Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Kentaro; Ninomiya, Yumiko; Shiokawa, Naohiro; Hazeki, Daisuke; Eguchi, Taisuke; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate adverse cardiac events using dexmedetomidine in infants with trisomy 21 and those without (controls) and examined potential risk factors in infants after cardiovascular surgery. We conducted a single-center retrospective cohort study. The medical records of 124 consecutive infants who had undergone cardiovascular surgery between April 1, 2013, and October 31, 2015, were enrolled. Clinical characteristics, usage of dexmedetomidine, and perioperative medications were analyzed. Adverse cardiac events were assessed with the Naranjo score and World Health Organization-The Uppsala Monitoring Centre (WHO-UMC) criteria. In total, 124 consecutive infants (30 patients and 94 controls) met the inclusion criteria. Eight of 30 (26.7 %) patients with trisomy 21 and 12 of 94 (12.8 %) controls experienced adverse cardiac events (i.e., hypotension, transient hypertension, and bradycardia) during dexmedetomidine with median Naranjo score of 6, and causality categories of WHO-UMC criteria were "certain" or "probable." Of those, the incidence of bradycardia occurred at a higher rate in patients with trisomy 21 than in controls (P = 0.011). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence of trisomy 21 was an independent risk factor for adverse cardiac events of dexmedetomidine after cardiovascular surgery (odds ratio 4.10, 95 % CI 1.17-11.19, P = 0.006). Dexmedetomidine is associated with an increased incidence of bradycardia in patients with trisomy 21 after surgery for congenital heart disease. Physicians using dexmedetomidine should know a great deal about the characteristics of patients with trisomy 21, and hemodynamic monitoring should be closely observed. PMID:27272693

  6. Protective effects of dexmedetomidine combined with flurbiprofen axetil on remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zenggui; Wu, Weilan; Wu, Xiaodan; Lei, Hongyi; Gong, Cansheng; Xu, Shiyuan

    2016-01-01

    High dosages of intra-operative remifentanil are associated with opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of combined dexmedetomidine and flurbiprofen axetil treatment on remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia. Patients with an American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status of I–II who were diagnosed with hysteromyoma and scheduled for laparoscopic assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH) were randomly divided into three groups. Group hyperalgesia (Group H, n=29) received intra-operative remifentanil, Group hyperalgesia and dexmedetomidine (Group HD, n=28) received remifentanil and a continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine, and Group hyperalgesia, dexmedetomidine and flurbiprofen axetil (Group HDF, n=29) received remifentanil, flurbiprofen axetil and dexmedetomidine. Mechanical pain thresholds were measured during the preoperative visit and postoperatively at 1, 6 and 24-h time points. Visual analog scale (VAS) scores, time to analgesic requirement, total sufentanil consumption and side effects were assessed postoperatively. Mechanical pain threshold at the incision site was significantly lower in Group H compared with Groups HD and HDF (both P<0.05), and significantly higher in Group HDF than in Group HD (P<0.05). The area of secondary hyperalgesia at the incision site was greater in Group H than in the other two groups (both P<0.05), and significantly smaller in Group HDF compared with Group HD (P<0.05). VAS scores and total sufentanil consumption were significantly higher in Group H compared with the other two groups (both P<0.05), and were significantly lower in Group HDF compared with Group HD (P<0.05). Dexmedetomidine combined with flurbiprofen axetil exhibits synergetic effects in the prevention of remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia in patients undergoing LAVH. PMID:27698764

  7. Protective effects of dexmedetomidine combined with flurbiprofen axetil on remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zenggui; Wu, Weilan; Wu, Xiaodan; Lei, Hongyi; Gong, Cansheng; Xu, Shiyuan

    2016-01-01

    High dosages of intra-operative remifentanil are associated with opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of combined dexmedetomidine and flurbiprofen axetil treatment on remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia. Patients with an American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status of I–II who were diagnosed with hysteromyoma and scheduled for laparoscopic assisted vaginal hysterectomy (LAVH) were randomly divided into three groups. Group hyperalgesia (Group H, n=29) received intra-operative remifentanil, Group hyperalgesia and dexmedetomidine (Group HD, n=28) received remifentanil and a continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine, and Group hyperalgesia, dexmedetomidine and flurbiprofen axetil (Group HDF, n=29) received remifentanil, flurbiprofen axetil and dexmedetomidine. Mechanical pain thresholds were measured during the preoperative visit and postoperatively at 1, 6 and 24-h time points. Visual analog scale (VAS) scores, time to analgesic requirement, total sufentanil consumption and side effects were assessed postoperatively. Mechanical pain threshold at the incision site was significantly lower in Group H compared with Groups HD and HDF (both P<0.05), and significantly higher in Group HDF than in Group HD (P<0.05). The area of secondary hyperalgesia at the incision site was greater in Group H than in the other two groups (both P<0.05), and significantly smaller in Group HDF compared with Group HD (P<0.05). VAS scores and total sufentanil consumption were significantly higher in Group H compared with the other two groups (both P<0.05), and were significantly lower in Group HDF compared with Group HD (P<0.05). Dexmedetomidine combined with flurbiprofen axetil exhibits synergetic effects in the prevention of remifentanil-induced hyperalgesia in patients undergoing LAVH.

  8. Dexmedetomidine Injection during Strabismus Surgery Reduces Emergence Agitation without Increasing the Oculocardiac Reflex in Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ah-Young; Baik, Ji-Seok; Kim, Jin Hee; Hwang, Jung- Won; Jeon, Young-Tae

    2016-01-01

    Objective Dexmedetomidine is known to reduce the incidence of emergence agitation, which is a common complication after inhalational anesthesia like sevoflurane or desflurane in children. However, the dose of dexmedetomidine used for this purpose is reported variously and the most effective dose is not known. In this study, we tried to find the most effective dose of dexmedetomidine to reduce the incidence of emergence agitation in children undergoing strabismus surgery without the complications like oculocardiac reflex (OCR) or postoperative vomiting. Methods We randomized 103 pediatric patients aged 2–6 years and undergoing elective strabismus surgery into four groups. Anesthesia was induced with sevoflurane and maintained with desflurane. At the start of induction, dexmedetomidine, delivered at 0.25, 0.5, or 1 μg/kg, or saline was infused intravenously in the D0.25, D0.5, D1 groups, respectively. The primary outcome measure was the incidence of emergence agitation and the secondary outcome measure was the incidence of intraoperative OCR, postoperative vomiting, and desaturation events. Results The incidence of emergence agitation was 60, 48, 44, and 21% (P = 0.005) and the incidence of intraoperative OCR was 36, 36, 36, and 37% (P = 0.988) in the control, D0.25, D0.5, and D1 groups, respectively. And, postoperative vomiting rate and desaturation events were low in the all groups. Conclusion Dexmedetomidine decreased the incidence of emergence agitation without increasing intraoperative oculocardiac reflex. Dexmedetomidine delivered at 1 μg/kg was more effective at reducing emergence agitation than lower doses in children undergoing strabismus surgery under desflurane anesthesia. Trial Registration Clinical Research Information Service KCT0000141 PMID:27617832

  9. Binding of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists to rat and rabbit lung: special reference to levobunolol.

    PubMed

    Quast, U; Vollmer, K O

    1984-01-01

    Binding of 3H-dihydroalprenolol (3H-DHA) to beta-adrenoceptors in homogenates from rat and rabbit lung was homogeneous and of high affinity (KD = 0.6 and 1.1 nmol/l at 20 degrees C; 1.1 and 2.2 nmol/l at 37 degrees C). The beta 1-selective antagonists betaxolol, metoprolol, bevantolol and acebutolol displaced 3H-DHA in a biphasic manner. From these data, the beta-adrenoceptor subtype distribution in rat lung homogenates was estimated to be 80% beta 2 (at 20 and 37 degrees C) as compared to 25% beta 2 in rabbit lung homogenates. In general, binding of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists (selective and nonselective) was slightly (less than 2 X) weaker in rabbit than in rat lung homogenates. In rat lung, binding of cardioselective beta-blockers to beta 1-receptors seemed to be more temperature-sensitive than binding to beta 2-receptors or binding of nonselective beta-blockers. Levobunolol, a potent non-cardioselective beta-blocker in pharmacological experiments, displaced 3H-DHA in a homogeneous manner (indicative of non-selectivity). In rat lung homogenates KD values were 0.8 nmol/l at 20 degrees C and 2.1 nmol/l at 37 degrees C. Similar values were found for the metabolites dihydrolevobunolol and hydroxylevobunolol. Surprisingly, d-bunolol, the dextrarotatory enantiomer of bunolol, showed a biphasic displacement curve, the fraction of high affinity sites being 83% in rat lung homogenates and 23% in rabbit lung. This ratio of sites is expected for a beta 2-adrenoceptor preferring ligand. High affinity binding (i.e. supposedly binding to beta 2-receptors) was about 50 times weaker than binding of levobunolol, in agreement with known stereospecificity of beta-adrenoceptor binding.

  10. A study of presynaptic alpha2-autoreceptors in alpha2A/D-, alpha2B- and alpha2C-adrenoceptor-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Trendelenburg, A U; Klebroff, W; Hein, L; Starke, K

    2001-08-01

    The function of presynaptic alpha2-autoreceptors was studied in the hippocampus, occipito-parietal cortex, atria and vas deferens of NMRI mice, mice in which the alpha2A/D-, the alpha2B- or alpha2c-adrenoceptor gene had been disrupted (alpha2A/DKO, alpha2BKO and alpha2CKO, respectively), and the wildtype mice from which the knockout animals had been generated. Tissue pieces were preincubated with 3H-noradrenaline and then superfused and stimulated electrically. The alpha2-adrenoceptor agonist medetomidine reduced the electrically evoked overflow of tritium in all tissues from all mouse strains (stimulation with single pulses or single high-frequency pulse trains, called POPs, i.e. pulse patterns leading to minimal autoinhibition). The effects of medetomidine did not differ in NMRI, wildtype, alpha2BKO and alpha2CKO mice but were greatly reduced in alpha2A/DKO brain preparations and to a lesser extent in alpha2A/DKO atria and vasa deferentia. Six drugs were tested as antagonists against medetomidine. Their pKd values indicated that the hippocampal and occipito-parietal alpha2-autoreceptors in NMRI and wildtype mice were alpha2D (the rodent variant of the alpha2A/D-adrenoceptor) whereas the atrial and vas deferens alpha2-autoreceptors in NMRI and wildtype mice could not be identified with a single alpha2 subtype. Deletion of the alpha2A/D gene changed the pKd values in all tissues so that they now reflected alpha2C properties, whereas deletion of the alpha2C gene changed the pKd values in atria and vasa deferentia so that they now had alpha2D properties (as they had in NMRI and wildtype brain preparations). Autoinhibition by released noradrenaline was created using trains of up to 64 pulses or up to 4 POPs, and the overflow-enhancing effect of the alpha2 antagonist rauwolscine was determined. Results did not differ, irrespective of whether preparations were obtained from NMRI, wildtype, alpha2BKO or alpha2CKO mice: the overflow of tritium elicited by p pulses or POPs

  11. Selective increase of alpha 1-adrenoceptors and muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex after chronic haloperidol.

    PubMed

    Pazo, J H; Levi de Stein, M; Jerusalinsky, D; Novas, M L; Raskovsky, S; Tumilasci, O R; Medina, J H; De Robertis, E

    1987-06-30

    The effect of chronic administration of haloperidol on alpha 1-, alpha 2-, and beta-adrenoceptors, cholinergic muscarinic, GABAA and benzodiazepine receptors in the cerebral cortex of the rat was investigated. Doses of 0.3 and 2 mg/kg of haloperidol during 7 days increased markedly the density of alpha 1-adrenoceptors without changes in affinity. The alpha 2- and beta-adrenoceptors were not modified after neuroleptic administration. The number of muscarinic receptors were also increased after haloperidol treatment (2 mg/kg/day). However, the GABAA and benzodiazepine binding sites remained unchanged. In the brainstem an increment in the alpha 1-, but not the beta-adrenoceptors was observed. The well known increase in the dopamine receptors in the striatum was confirmed. These observations demonstrate a multireceptor effect of haloperidol in the cerebral cortex.

  12. Photoaffinity labeling of human platelet and rabbit kidney. cap alpha. -adrenoceptors with (/sup 3/H)SKF 102229

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J.W.; Raymond, J.R.; Lefkowitz, R.J.; DeMarinis, R.M.

    1986-06-13

    A newly developed ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenergic photoaffinity ligand, 3-methyl-6-chloro-9-azido-1H-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-3-benzazepine (SKF 102229), has been radiolabeled with tritium to a specific activity of approx. 80 Ci/mmol. Using membranes prepared from human platelets and from rabbit kidney, ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptors have been covalently labeled following photolysis in the presence of (/sup 3/H)SKF 102229. As determined by SDS-PAGE, the apparent molecular weight of ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptors from both of these tissues was 64,000. The yield of covalent insertion of (/sup 3/H)SKF 102229 into the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptor was very good. Thus, following photolysis up to 90% of the ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptors could be irreversibly labeled with (/sup 3/H)SKF 102229.

  13. The effects of oral AH 5158, a combined α and β-adrenoceptor antagonist, in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Richards, D. A.; Woodings, E. P.; Stephens, M. D. B.; Maconochie, J. G.

    1974-01-01

    1 In healthy male volunteers after single oral doses, AH 5158 produced inhibition of exercise induced tachycardia, falls in systolic and diastolic pressure at rest and in response to exercise, which are probably related to combined β- and α-adrenoceptor antagonism. 2 At increasing doses from 100 mg to 400 mg there exists a dose related antagonistic effect, though the dominant effect of β-adrenoceptor antagonism is more easily demonstrable than is α antagonism. 3 As indicated by the pattern of pharmacological effects, absorption of the oral drug is good and the duration of action of a 400 mg dose is approximately 8 hours. 4 Despite being administered in β-adrenoceptor blocking doses, AH 5158 had no adverse effects upon peak expiratory flow at rest or in response to exercise. 5 It is concluded that the pharmacological profile of this combined α- and β-adrenoceptor antagonism suggests a potential therapeutic role as an antihypertensive drug. PMID:22454938

  14. β-Adrenoceptor activation depresses brain inflammation and is neuroprotective in lipopolysaccharide-induced sensitization to oxygen-glucose deprivation in organotypic hippocampal slices

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Inflammation acting in synergy with brain ischemia aggravates perinatal ischemic brain damage. The sensitizing effect of pro-inflammatory exposure prior to hypoxia is dependent on signaling by TNF-α through TNF receptor (TNFR) 1. Adrenoceptor (AR) activation is known to modulate the immune response and synaptic transmission. The possible protective effect of α˜ and β˜AR activation against neuronal damage caused by tissue ischemia and inflammation, acting in concert, was evaluated in murine hippocampal organotypic slices treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and subsequently subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD). Method Hippocampal slices from mice were obtained at P6, and were grown in vitro for 9 days on nitrocellulose membranes. Slices were treated with β1(dobutamine)-, β2(terbutaline)-, α1(phenylephrine)- and α2(clonidine)-AR agonists (5 and 50 μM, respectively) during LPS (1 μg/mL, 24 h) -exposure followed by exposure to OGD (15 min) in a hypoxic chamber. Cell death in the slice CA1 region was assessed by propidium iodide staining of dead cells. Results Exposure to LPS + OGD caused extensive cell death from 4 up to 48 h after reoxygenation. Co-incubation with β1-agonist (50 μM) during LPS exposure before OGD conferred complete protection from cell death (P < 0.001) whereas the β2-agonist (50 μM) was partially protective (p < 0.01). Phenylephrine was weakly protective while no protection was attained by clonidine. Exposure to both β1- and β2-agonist during LPS exposure decreased the levels of secreted TNF-α, IL-6 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and prevented microglia activation in the slices. Dobutamine remained neuroprotective in slices exposed to pure OGD as well as in TNFR1-/- and TNFR2-/- slices exposed to LPS followed by OGD. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that activation of both β1- and β2-receptors is neuroprotective and may offer mechanistic insights valuable for development of neuro-protective strategies

  15. The α1 adrenoceptors in ventrolateral orbital cortex contribute to the expression of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization in rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lai; Zhu, Yuan-Mei; Zhang, Yu-Xiang; Liang, Feng; Li, Teng; Gao, Hong-Yu; Huo, Fu-Quan; Yan, Chun-Xia

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of microinjection of benoxathian, selective α1 adrenoceptor antagonist, into the ventrolateral orbital cortex (VLO) on morphine-induced behavioral sensitization and its underlying molecular mechanism in rats. A single morphine treatment protocol was used in establishing the behavioral sensitization model. The effect of bilateral intra-VLO benoxathian injection on locomotor activity was examined and the protein expression levels of α1 adrenoceptors and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the VLO were detected after locomotor test. The results showed that a single injection of morphine could induce behavioral sensitization by a low challenge dosage of morphine after a 7-days drug free period. Benoxathian significantly suppressed the expression but not the development of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. Morphine treatment significantly elicited ERK phosphorylation and downregulated the expression level of α1 adrenoceptors in the VLO. In addition, intra-VLO benoxathian injection enhanced the expression levels of α1 adrenoceptors and phosphorylated ERK. These results suggest that α1 adrenoceptors in the VLO are involved in regulating the expression of morphine-induced behavioral sensitization. The effect of decreased locomotor activity by blocking α1 adrenoceptors might be associated with activation of ERK in the VLO.

  16. Evidence for an age-dependent functional expression of alpha 1D-adrenoceptors in the rat vasculature.

    PubMed

    Ibarra, M; Terrón, J A; López-Guerrero, J J; Villalobos-Molina, R

    1997-03-19

    The role of the alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes, and their possible change with maturation, in alpha 1-adrenoceptor-induced pressor responses in the rat has not been established. Thus, the effects of the alpha 1D-, alpha 1A/1D- and alpha 1B/1D-adrenoceptor antagonists, BMY 7378 (8-(2-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)-1-piperazinyl)ethyl) 8-azaspiro (4.5) decane-7,9-dione 2HCl), 5-methyl-urapidil and chloroethylclonidine, respectively, on the pressor responses induced by phenylephrine in 1- and 5-month-old pithed rats were investigated. The pressor responses induced by phenylephrine were competitively antagonized by both BMY 7378 and chloroethylclonidine in 5-month-old, but not in young immature animals; in marked contrast, 5-methylurapidil antagonized with similar potency the phenylephrine-induced pressor responses in animals of both ages. The present pharmacological data suggest that functional expression of alpha 1D-adrenoceptors in the rat resistance vessels increases with age; alpha 1A-, but not alpha 1B- or alpha 1D-adrenoceptors, seem to predominate in immature animals. These findings represent the first evidence that age-related changes in functional alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes occur in the systemic vasculature in vivo. PMID:9098690

  17. Observed drug-receptor association rates are governed by membrane affinity: the importance of establishing "micro-pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships" at the β2-adrenoceptor.

    PubMed

    Sykes, David A; Parry, Cheryl; Reilly, John; Wright, Penny; Fairhurst, Robin A; Charlton, Steven J

    2014-04-01

    Current pharmacological models for determining affinity and kinetics of drugs for membrane receptors assume the interacting molecules are homogeneously distributed in the bulk aqueous phase. The phospholipid membrane can, however, provide a second compartment into which drugs can partition, particularly lipophilic/basic compounds. In this study we measured the phospholipid affinity and receptor binding kinetics of several clinically relevant β2-adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists and demonstrated that the degree of phospholipid interaction directly affects the observed kinetic association rate (k on) and dissociation constant (Kd), but not the dissociation rate (k off) from the target, by concentrating drug in the local environment around the receptor. When the local drug concentration was accounted for, the k on was comparable across the cohort and the corrected Kd was directly related to the k off. In conclusion, we propose a new approach to determining the pharmacology of drugs for membrane targets that accounts for differences in local drug concentration brought about by direct affinity for phospholipids, establishing "micro-pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationships" for drugs.

  18. Comparison of Intrathecal Dexmedetomidine with Morphine as Adjuvants in Cesarean Sections.

    PubMed

    Qi, Xiaofei; Chen, Daili; Li, Gehui; Huang, Xiaolei; Li, Yuantao; Wang, Xiaoguang; Li, Yong

    2016-09-01

    To compare the effects of intrathecal dexmedetomidine and intrathecal morphine as supplements to bupivacaine in cesarean sections under spinal anesthesia. Full-term parturients (n=120) undergoing elective cesarean sections under spinal anesthesia were randomly allocated into three groups: Group B received 10 mg bupivacaine, Group BD received 10 mg bupivacaine plus 5 µg dexmedetomidine, and Group BM received 10 mg bupivacaine plus 100 µg morphine. The onset and regression time of sensory and motor blockade, postoperative analgesia, and side effects were recorded. Group BD showed quicker onset time and a longer sensory and motor blockade than other groups (BD vs. B and BD vs. BM, p<0.05). The mean time of sensory regression to the S1 segment was 253.21±42.79 min in group BD, 192.50±40.62 min in group BM and 188.33±37.62 min in group B (p<0.001). Group BD showed an analgesia duration (time to requirement of first rescue analgesic) (17.59±6.23 h) similar to that of group BM (16.78±5.90 h) but longer than that of group B (3.53±1.68 h) (p<0.001). The incidence of pruritus was significantly higher in group BM compared with groups BD and B (p<0.001). Less shivering was observed in group BD than in groups BM and B (p=0.009). So intrathecal dexmedetomidine (5 µg) prolonged the motor and sensory blockade, provided a similar analgesic effect and reduced pruritus and shivering compared with morphine (100 µg) in cesarean sections. PMID:27349272

  19. Safety and effectiveness using dexmedetomidine versus propofol TCI sedation during oesophagus interventions: a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Endoscopic treatment of early neoplastic lesions in oesophagus has evolved as a valid and less invasive alternative to surgical resection. These endoscopic interventions are minimal invasive treatment options usually done with sedation on an outpatient basis. The aim of this trial is to determine the safety and effectiveness of dexmedetomidine sedation compared to the standard used propofol TCI sedation during endoscopic oesophageal interventions. Methods The study will be performed as a randomized controlled trial. The first 64 consenting patients will be randomized to either the propofol or the dexmedetomidine group. Following endoscopy patients and gastroenterologists have to fill in questionnaires (PSSI, CSSI) (see abbreviations) about their sedation experiences. Additionally, patients have to accomplish the Trieger test before and after the procedure. Patient monitoring includes time adapted HR, SO2, ECG, NIBP, exCO2, NICO, sweat conductance measurement, OAA/S, and the Aldrete score. Effectiveness of sedation, classified by satisfaction levels and pain and sedation score measured by questionnaires is the primary outcome parameter. Respiratory and hemodynamic complications are surrogate parameters for the secondary outcome parameter “safety”. Discussion The acceptance level among patients after propofol sedation is high. Dexmedetomidine is a relatively new representative for procedural sedation. Has this new form of conscious sedation the potential to be safer and more effective for patients and endoscopists than propofol during endoscopic oesophageal interventions? Trial registration This trial is registered in the ISRCTN Register (ISRCTN 68599804). It will be conducted in accordance with the protocol and in compliance with the moral, ethical, and scientific principles governing clinical research as set out in the Declaration of Helsinki (1989) and Good Clinical Practice (GCP). The Departments of Anesthesiology and Gastroenterology & Hepatology

  20. Beta-Adrenoceptor Activation Reduces Both Dermal Microvascular Endothelial Cell Migration via a cAMP-Dependent Mechanism and Wound Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, Andrew P; Fox, James M; Pullar, Christine E

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential process during tissue regeneration; however, the amount of angiogenesis directly correlates with the level of wound scarring. Angiogenesis is lower in scar-free foetal wounds while angiogenesis is raised and abnormal in pathophysiological scarring such as hypertrophic scars and keloids. Delineating the mechanisms that modulate angiogenesis and could reduce scarring would be clinically useful. Beta-adrenoceptors (β-AR) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) expressed on all skin cell-types. They play a role in wound repair but their specific role in angiogenesis is unknown. In this study, a range of in vitro assays (single cell migration, scratch wound healing, ELISAs for angiogenic growth factors and tubule formation) were performed with human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) to investigate and dissect mechanisms underpinning β-AR-mediated modulation of angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membranes (CAM) and murine excisional skin wounds. β-AR activation reduced HDMEC migration via cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent and protein kinase A (PKA)-independent mechanisms as demonstrated through use of an EPAC agonist that auto-inhibited the cAMP-mediated β-AR transduced reduction in HDMEC motility; a PKA inhibitor was, conversely, ineffective. ELISA studies demonstrated that β-AR activation reduced pro-angiogenic growth factor secretion from HDMECs (fibroblast growth factor 2) and keratinocytes (vascular endothelial growth factor A) revealing possible β-AR-mediated autocrine and paracrine anti-angiogenic mechanisms. In more complex environments, β-AR activation delayed HDMEC tubule formation and decreased angiogenesis both in the CAM assay and in murine excisional skin wounds in vivo. β-AR activation reduced HDMEC function in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo; therefore, β-AR agonists could be promising anti-angiogenic modulators in skin. J. Cell. Physiol. 230: 356–365, 2015. © 2014 The Authors. Journal

  1. Human Serotonin 5-HT2C G Protein-Coupled Receptor Homology Model from the β2 Adrenoceptor Structure: Ligand Docking and Mutagenesis Studies

    PubMed Central

    RDOVA-SINTJAGO, TANIA CÓ; VILLA, NANCY; CANAL, CLINTON; BOOTH, RAYMOND

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) 5HT2C G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) is proposed as novel pharmacotherapy for obesity and neuropsychiatric disorders. In contrast, activation of the 5-HT2A and 5-HT2B GPCRs is associated with untoward hallucinogenic and cardiopulmonary effects, respectively. There is no crystal structure available to guide design of 5-HT2C receptor-specific ligands. For this reason, a homology model of the 5-HT2C receptor was built based on the crystal structure of the human β2 adrenoceptor GPCR to delineate molecular determinants of ligand–receptor interactions for drug design purposes. Computational and experimental studies were carried out to validate the model. Binding of N(CH3)2-PAT [(1R, 3S)-(−)-trans-1-phenyl-3-N,N-dimethylamino-1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene], a novel 5-HT2C agonist/5-HT2A/2B inverse agonist, and its secondary [NH(CH3)-PAT] and primary (NH2-PAT) amine analogs were studied at the 5-HT2C wild type (WT) and D3.32A, S3.36A, and Y7.43A 5-HT2C point-mutated receptors. Reference ligands included the tertiary amines lisuride and mesulergine and the primary amine 5-HT. Modeling results indicated that 5-HT2C residues D3.32, S3.36, and Y7.43 play a role in ligand binding. Experimental ligand binding results with WT and point-mutated receptors confirmed the impact of D3.32, S3.36, and Y7.43 on ligand affinity. PMID:24244046

  2. Functional and molecular evidence for β1-, β2- and β3-adrenoceptors in human colon

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, S J; Papaioannou, M; Evans, B A; Summers, R J

    1997-01-01

    Relaxation of carbachol pre-contracted human colonic muscle to (–)-isoprenaline was examined in circular, longitudinal and taenia coli preparations to determine the β-adrenoceptor subtypes involved. β1-, β2- and β3-Adrenoceptor mRNAs were also measured in colonic muscle and mucosa.(–)-Isoprenaline caused relaxation of longitudinal smooth muscle preparations with pEC50=7.39±0.12, and this response was inhibited by both propranolol (0.1 μM, pKB 8.55±0.12) and the selective β1-antagonist, CGP 20712A (0.1 μM, pKB 8.80±0.20), while the selective β2-antagonist, ICI 118551 (0.1 μM) failed to inhibit isoprenaline relaxation consistently.(–)-Isoprenaline caused relaxation of taenia coli with a pEC50 of 6.70±0.17. Propranolol (0.1 μM), CGP 20712A (0.1 μM) and ICI 118551 (0.1 μM) inhibited the isoprenaline response with similar low affinities (pKB values 7.93, 7.71 and 7.54, respectively). Carbachol pre-contracted circular smooth muscle preparations failed to relax consistently to isoprenaline and these responses were not characterized.β1- and β2-Adrenoceptor mRNAs were present in circular/longitudinal muscle samples and taenia coli samples, and lower levels were detected in mucosa. β3-mRNA was also present in both muscle preparations but was not detected in human colonic mucosa.In summary, β1-adrenoceptors are the predominant subtype mediating isoprenaline-induced relaxation of the thin longitudinal smooth muscle of human colon, while β3-receptors do not appear to be involved in these responses. However, β3-adrenoceptors may play a role in relaxation of the taenia coli as conventional antagonist affinities are low. β3-Adrenoceptor mRNA was present in taenia coli and circular/longitudinal smooth muscle but absent from human colonic mucosa. PMID:9113375

  3. Dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to levobupivacaine in supraclavicular brachial plexus block: A novel anesthetic approach

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arvinder Pal; Mahindra, Malika; Gupta, Ruchi; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh

    2016-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: Supplementation of dexmedetomidine produces a dose-dependent sedation, anxiolysis and analgesia without respiratory depression. This study was conducted to evaluate the possible effect of dexmedetomidine as an adjuvant to levobupivacaine for supraclavicular brachial plexus block in upper limb surgery. Settings and Design: Tertiary care institute, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, a placebo-controlled study. Materials and Methods: After obtaining Ethical Committee approval, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted on sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II patients in the age group of 18–60 years, divided randomly into two groups, Group I received 30 ml of 0.5% levobupivacaine with 1 ml of isotonic sodium chloride solution and Group II received 30 ml of 0.5% levobupivacaine and 1 ml (100 mcg) of dexmedetomidine for supraclavicular brachial plexus block. The onset and duration of sensory and motor blockade, duration of analgesia (DOA) and any adverse effects were noted. At the end of the study, data were compiled and analyzed using appropriate statistical tests. The value of P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Demographic profile was comparable in both the groups. The time to onset of sensory and motor block was 10.54 ± 2.333 min and 12.21 ± 2.529 min in Group I while it was 3.24 ± 0.951 min and 2.83 ± 1.197 min in Group II, respectively. The duration of sensory and motor block was 7.79 ± 2.007 h and 9.18 ± 1.701 h in Group I, and it was 16.31 ± 2.606 h and 17.52 ± 2.098 h in Group II, respectively. The DOA was 678.68 ± 20.492 min in Group I and 1273.79 ± 83.139 min in Group II. On statistical comparison, these values were highly significant (P < 0.001). Side effects such as nausea, vomiting, hypoxemia, pruritis, or urinary retention were not observed in either of the groups. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine shortens the onset time for sensory and motor block

  4. Dexmedetomidine and fentanyl combination for procedural sedation in a case of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kulshrestha, Ashish; Bajwa, Sukhminder Jit Singh; Singh, Amarjit; Kapoor, Vinod

    2011-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy, an X-linked disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness, is the most common muscular dystrophy among children leading to death before the end of third decade. Anesthesia in such patients pose a great challenge due to various complications associated with it. The dreaded metabolic and clinical complications occur due to various inhalational anesthetics and succinylcholine in this subset of patients. We are reporting a child with diagnosed Duchenne muscular dystrophy who underwent excision of dentigerous cyst in oral cavity under procedural sedation with combination of dexmedetomidine and fentanyl and thus administration of general anesthesia was avoided. PMID:25885395

  5. A comparison of single dose dexmedetomidine with propofol for the prevention of emergence delirium after desflurane anaesthesia in children.

    PubMed

    Makkar, J K; Bhatia, N; Bala, I; Dwivedi, D; Singh, P M

    2016-01-01

    Emergence delirium is a common problem in children recovering from general anaesthesia. We performed a study comparing emergence characteristics in 100 patients who were randomly allocated to receive either 0.3 μg.kg(-1) dexmedetomidine, 1 mg.kg(-1) propofol or saline 0.9% and undergoing infra-umbilical surgery. The Pediatric Anesthesia Emergence Delirium scale was used to grade emergence delirium. Emergence delirium occurred in 9.4% of children in the dexmedetomidine group compared with 13.9% in the propofol group and 40.6% in the control group (p = 0.004). In the dexmedetomidine group, sedation occurred in 62.5% of children at 10 min after transfer to the recovery area, compared with 44.4% in the propofol group and 12.5% in the control group (p = 0.010). We conclude that dexmedetomidine significantly reduced the incidence of emergence delirium but this was at the expense of a greater incidence of sedation in the recovery period. PMID:26444149

  6. Clinicophysiological and haemodynamic effects of fentanyl with xylazine, medetomidine and dexmedetomidine in isoflurane-anaesthetised water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis).

    PubMed

    Singh, Gyan D; Kinjavdekar, Prakash; Amarpal; Aithal, Hari P; Pawde, Abhijeet M; Zama, Malik M S; Singh, Jasmeet; Tiwary, Ramesh

    2013-03-18

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the sedative, analgesic and clinical effects of xylazine, medetomidine and dexmedetomidine with fentanyl as pre-anaesthetics in water buffaloes and to compare the dose-sparing effect of xylazine, medetomidine and dexmedetomidine on thiopental for induction and isoflurane for maintenance of anaesthesia in water buffaloes. Six male water buffaloes randomly received intravenous fentanyl (5.0 µg/kg body weight) and xylazine (0.05 mg/kg body weight), fentanyl (5.0 µg/kg body weight) and medetomidine (2.5 µg/kg body weight), fentanyl (5.0 µg/kg body weight) and dexmedetomidine (5.0 µg/kg body weight) at weekly intervals in groups I1, I2 and I3, respectively. After 15 min, the animals were restrained in right lateral recumbency and anaesthesia was induced by 5% thiopental sodium administered intravenously. The intubated animal was connected to the large animal anaesthesia machine and isoflurane in 100% oxygen (5 L/min) was insufflated for 60 min. The treatments were compared by clinicophysiological, haematobiochemical and haemodynamic parameters. Fentanyl-medetomidine and fentanyl-dexmedetomidine produced more cardiovascular depression during the pre-anaesthetic period but less depression of cardio-respiratory dynamics in the post induction and maintenance period. Quicker recovery was recorded in I2 and I3 groups. A lower dose of thiopental was required in group I3 (4.33 mg/kg ± 0.66 mg/kg) than in groups I2 (4.41 mg/kg ± 0.98 mg/kg) and I1 (4.83 mg/kg ± 0.79 mg/kg). The dose of isoflurane was less in group I3 (45.50 mL ± 5.45 mL) than in group I1 and I2 (48.66 mL ± 5.10 mL and 48.00 mL ± 6.38 mL). Better anaesthesia was recorded with fentanyl-dexmedetomidine-thiopental-isoflurane (group I3) than with fentanyl-medetomidine-thiopental-isoflurane (group I2) and fentanyl-xylazine-thiopental-isoflurane (group I1). Fentanyl-medetomidine and fentanyl-dexmedetomidine were better pre-anaesthetic agents in comparison to

  7. Novel diazabicycloalkane delta opioid agonists.

    PubMed

    Loriga, Giovanni; Lazzari, Paolo; Manca, Ilaria; Ruiu, Stefania; Falzoi, Matteo; Murineddu, Gabriele; Bottazzi, Mirko Emilio Heiner; Pinna, Giovanni; Pinna, Gérard Aimè

    2015-09-01

    Here we report the investigation of diazabicycloalkane cores as potential new scaffolds for the development of novel analogues of the previously reported diazatricyclodecane selective delta (δ) opioid agonists, as conformationally constrained homologues of the reference δ agonist (+)-4-[(αR)-α((2S,5R)-4-allyl-2,5-dimethyl-1-piperazinyl)-3-methoxybenzyl]-N,N-diethylbenzamide (SNC80). In