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Sample records for adrenocorticotropic hormone release

  1. Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Suppresses Gonadotropin-Stimulated Estradiol Release from Zebrafish Ovarian Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Alsop, Derek; Ings, Jennifer S.; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2009-01-01

    While stress is known to impact reproductive performance, the pathways involved are not entirely understood. Corticosteroid effects on the functioning of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis are thought to be a key aspect of stress-mediated reproductive dysfunction. A vital component of the stress response is the pituitary secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), which binds to the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R) in the adrenal glands and activates cortisol biosynthesis. We recently reported MC2R mRNA abundance in fish gonads leading to the hypothesis that ACTH may be directly involved in gonadal steroid modulation. Using zebrafish (Danio rerio) ovarian follicles, we tested the hypothesis that acute ACTH stimulation modulates cortisol and estradiol (E2) secretion. ACTH neither affected cortisol nor unstimulated E2 release from ovarian follicles. However, ACTH suppressed human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated E2 secretion in a dose-related manner, with a maximum decrease of 62% observed at 1 I.U. ACTH mL−1. This effect of ACTH on E2 release was not observed in the presence of either 8-bromo-cAMP or forskolin, suggesting that the mechanism(s) involved in steroid attenuation was upstream of adenylyl cyclase activation. Overall, our results suggest that a stress-induced rise in plasma ACTH levels may initiate a rapid down-regulation of acute stimulated E2 biosynthesis in the zebrafish ovary, underscoring a novel physiological role for this pituitary peptide in modulating reproductive activity. PMID:19649243

  2. Ovine corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulation test in patients with chronic renal failure: pharmacokinetic properties, and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone and serum cortisol responses.

    PubMed

    Siamopoulos, K C; Eleftheriades, E G; Pappas, M; Sferopoulos, G; Tsolas, O

    1988-01-01

    The data on the status of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in haemodialysis (HD) patients are conflicting. Moreover, a state reminiscent of Cushing's syndrome has been reported in this group of patients. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), that is produced by the hypothalamus and modulates the secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), has been shown to be useful as a provocative test of the HPA axis. We investigated the effect of exogenous ovine CRH (oCRH) on plasma levels of ACTH and cortisol in 13 chronic HD patients. The plasma concentrations of immunoreactive CRH following oCRH administration were similar in patients and controls. In all patients, oCRH given intravenously as bolus injection caused a further increase in the already elevated levels of cortisol. The mean basal plasma levels of ACTH were within the normal range. There was, however, a blunted ACTH response to oCRH. We conclude that the HPA axis in chronic HD patients retains the ability to respond to exogenous oCRH. The patterns of the ACTH and cortisol response to this peptide resemble those observed in chronic stress (depression, anorexia nervosa). Besides, the kinetics of disappearance of oCRH indicate that the kidney may not be the major organ that metabolizes oCRH. PMID:2851525

  3. CXCL10/CXCR3 signaling mediates inhibitory action by interferon-gamma on CRF-stimulated adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kotaro; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Yoshida, Saishu; Higuchi, Masashi; Tateno, Kozue; Hasegawa, Rumi; Takigami, Shu; Ohsako, Shunji; Yashiro, Takashi; Kato, Takako; Kato, Yukio

    2016-05-01

    Secretion of hormones by the anterior pituitary gland can be stimulated or inhibited by paracrine factors that are produced during inflammatory reactions. The inflammation cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is known to inhibit corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-stimulated adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) release but its signaling mechanism is not yet known. Using rat anterior pituitary, we previously demonstrated that the CXC chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10), known as interferon-γ (IFN-γ) inducible protein 10 kDa, is expressed in dendritic cell-like S100β protein-positive (DC-like S100β-positive) cells and that its receptor CXCR3 is expressed in ACTH-producing cells. DC-like S100β-positive cells are a subpopulation of folliculo-stellate cells in the anterior pituitary. In the present study, we examine whether CXCL10/CXCR3 signaling between DC-like S100β-positive cells and ACTH-producing cells mediates inhibition of CRF-activated ACTH-release by IFN-γ, using a CXCR3 antagonist in the primary pituitary cell culture. We found that IFN-γ up-regulated Cxcl10 expression via JAK/STAT signaling and proopiomelanocortin (Pomc) expression, while we reconfirmed that IFN-γ inhibits CRF-stimulated ACTH-release. Next, we used a CXCR3 agonist in primary culture to analyze whether CXCL10 induces Pomc-expression and ACTH-release using a CXCR3 agonist in the primary culture. The CXCR3 agonist significantly stimulated Pomc-expression and inhibited CRF-induced ACTH-release, while ACTH-release in the absence of CRF did not change. Thus, the present study leads us to an assumption that CXCL10/CXCR3 signaling mediates inhibition of the CRF-stimulated ACTH-release by IFN-γ. Our findings bring us to an assumption that CXCL10 from DC-like S100β-positive cells acts as a local modulator of ACTH-release during inflammation. PMID:26572542

  4. Adrenocorticotropic hormone analog use for podocytopathies

    PubMed Central

    Filippone, Edward J; Dopson, Shirley J; Rivers, Denise M; Monk, Rebeca D; Udani, Suneel M; Jafari, Golriz; Huang, Solomon C; Melhem, Arafat; Assioun, Bassim; Schmitz, Paul G

    2016-01-01

    Background Adrenocorticotropic hormone is being increasingly studied for treatment of various glomerulopathies, most notably membranous nephropathy. Less data are available regarding its use in idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS) secondary to minimal change disease (MCD) or focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). We report here our experience with H.P. Acthar® Gel (repository corticotropin injection) as first-line or subsequent therapy in patients with INS. Methods Data were taken from three patients with MCD and ten patients with FSGS from around the US, who were treated with Acthar Gel as initial or subsequent therapy. Treatment was solely at the discretion of the primary nephrologist without a specific protocol. A complete response (CR) was defined as final urine protein-to-creatinine ratio <500 mg/g and a partial response (PR) as 50% decrease without rise of serum creatinine. Side effects and tolerability were noted. Results All three patients with MCD received Acthar Gel as second-line or later immunosuppressive (IS) therapy and all responded (one CR and two PRs). Two of the ten patients with FSGS received Acthar Gel as first-line IS therapy, while the other eight had failed multiple agents. Four of the ten patients with FSGS had responses, including two CRs and two PRs. The three patients with MCD tolerated therapy well without side effects. Five patients with FSGS tolerated therapy well, while five had various steroid-like side effects, resulting in therapy discontinuation in two patients. Conclusion Acthar Gel is a viable alternative IS agent for treatment of INS in patients intolerant or resistant to conventional therapy. More data are needed to better define its appropriate place. PMID:27418857

  5. Release of β-endorphin, adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol in response to machine milking of dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, E.; Medica, P.; Cravana, C.; Ferlazzo, A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study was undertaken with the objective to obtain insight into the dynamics of the release of β-endorphin, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol in response to machine milking in dairy cows. Materials and Methods: A total of 10 healthy multiparous lactating Italian Friesian dairy cows were used in the study. Animals were at the 4th-5th month of pregnancy and were submitted to machine milking 2 times daily. Blood samples were collected in the morning: In baseline conditions, immediately before milking and after milking; and in the early afternoon: In baseline conditions, before milking and after milking, for 2 consecutive days. Endocrine variables were measured in duplicate, using a commercial radioimmunoassay for circulating β-endorphin and ACTH concentrations and a competitive enzyme-linked immunoassay for cortisol concentration. Results: Data obtained showed a similar biphasic cortisol secretion of lactating dairy cows, with a significant increase of cortisol concentration after morning machine milking, at both the 1st and the 2nd day (p<0.05), and a decrease after afternoon machine milking at the 2nd day (p<0.01). One-way RM ANOVA showed significant effects of the machine milking on the cortisol changes, at both morning (f=22.96; p<0.001) and afternoon (f=15.10; p<0.01) milking, respectively. Two-way RM ANOVA showed a significant interaction between cortisol changes at the 1st and the 2nd day (f=7.94; p<0.0002), and between the sampling times (f=6.09; p<0.001). Conversely, no significant effects of the machine milking were observed on β-endorphin and ACTH changes, but only a moderate positive correlation (r=0.94; p<0.06) after milking stimuli. Conclusions: A wide range of cortisol concentrations reported in this study showed the complex dynamic patterns of the homeostatic mechanisms involved during machine milking in dairy cows, suggesting that β-endorphin and ACTH were not the main factors that caused the adrenocortical response

  6. 21 CFR 862.1025 - Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system. 862.1025 Section 862.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1025 - Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system. 862.1025 Section 862.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1025 - Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system. 862.1025 Section 862.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  9. 21 CFR 862.1025 - Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system. 862.1025 Section 862.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  10. 21 CFR 862.1025 - Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system. 862.1025 Section 862.1025 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical...

  11. Peripheral blood corticotropin-releasing factor, adrenocorticotropic hormone and cytokine (Interleukin Beta, Interleukin 6, tumor necrosis factor alpha) levels after high- and low-dose total-body irradiation in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Girinsky, T.A.; Pallardy, M.; Comoy, E.; Benassi, T.; Roger, R.; Ganem, G.; Socie, G.; Cossett, J.M.; Magdelenat, H.

    1994-09-01

    Total-body irradiation (TBI) induces an increase in levels of granulocytes and cortisol in blood. To explore the underlying mechanisms, we studied 26 patients who had TBI prior to bone marrow transplantation. Our findings suggest that only a high dose of TBI (10 Gy) was capable of activating the hypothalamopituitary area since corticotropin-releasing factor and blood adrenocorticotropic hormone levels increased at the end of the TBI. There was a concomitant increase in the levels of interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor in blood, suggesting that these cytokines might activate the hypothalamo-pituitary adrenal axis. Interleukin 1 was not detected. Since vascular injury is a common after radiation treatment, it is possible that interleukin 6 was secreted by endothelial cells. The exact mechanisms of the production of cyctokines induced by ionizing radiation remain to be determined. 25 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Successful treatment for adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia with laparoscopic adrenalectomy: a case series

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia, characterized by bilateral macronodular adrenal hypertrophy and autonomous cortisol production, is a rare cause of Cushing’s syndrome. Bilateral adrenalectomy is considered the standard treatment for adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia but obliges the patient to receive lifetime steroid replacement therapy subsequently, and may increase the patient’s risk of adrenal insufficiency. These circumstances require surgeons to carefully consider operative strategies on an individual basis. Case presentation We performed successful laparoscopic adrenalectomy on four patients with adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia. Computed tomography scans showed bilateral adrenal enlargement in all patients. Case 1: a 56-year-old Japanese woman presented with obvious Cushing’s symptoms during treatment for diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Case 2: a 37-year-old Japanese man also presented with Cushing’s symptoms during treatment for diabetes mellitus and hypertension. These patients were diagnosed as Cushing’s syndrome caused by adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia based on endocrinologic testing, and underwent bilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Case 3: an 80-year-old Japanese woman was hospitalized due to unusual weight gain and heightened general fatigue, and was diagnosed as Cushing’s syndrome caused by adrenocorticotropic hormone-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia. She underwent unilateral laparoscopic adrenalectomy due to high operative risk. Case 4: a 66-year-old Japanese man was discovered to have bilateral adrenal tumors on medical examination. He did not have Cushing’s symptoms and was diagnosed as subclinical Cushing’s syndrome due to suppressed adrenocorticotropic hormone serum levels and loss of cortisol circadian rhythm without abnormal levels of

  13. Hormonal regulation of focal adhesions in bovine adrenocortical cells: induction of paxillin dephosphorylation by adrenocorticotropic hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Vilgrain, I; Chinn, A; Gaillard, I; Chambaz, E M; Feige, J J

    1998-01-01

    A study of bovine adrenocortical cell shape on adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenge showed that the cells round up and develop arborized processes. This effect was found to be (1) specific for ACTH because angiotensin II and basic fibroblast growth factor have no effect; (2) mediated by a cAMP-dependent pathway because forskolin reproduces the effect of the hormone; (3) inhibited by sodium orthovanadate, a phosphotyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, but unchanged by okadaic acid, a serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor; and (4) correlated with a complete loss of focal adhesions. Biochemical studies of the focal-adhesion-associated proteins showed that pp125fak, vinculin (110 kDa) and paxillin (70 kDa) were detected in the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction from adrenocortical cells. During cell adhesion on fibronectin as substratum, two major phosphotyrosine-containing proteins of molecular masses 125 and 68 kDa were immunodetected in the same fraction. A dramatic decrease in the extent of tyrosine phosphorylation of these proteins was observed within 60 min after treatment with ACTH. No change in pp125fak tyrosine phosphorylation nor in Src activity was detected. In contrast, paxillin was found to be tyrosine-dephosphorylated in a time-dependent manner in ACTH-treated cells. Sodium orthovanadate completely prevented the effect of ACTH. These observations suggest a possible role for phosphotyrosine phosphatases in hormone-dependent cellular regulatory processes. PMID:9601084

  14. Early hyperbaric oxygen therapy inhibits aquaporin 4 and adrenocorticotropic hormone expression in the pituitary gland of rabbits with blast-induced craniocerebral injury★

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Jian; Liu, Jiachuan; Wang, Jinbiao; Zhang, Yongming; Wang, Chunlin; Yang, Yanyan; Sun, Wenjiang; Xu, Shaonian

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, rabbits were treated with hyperbaric oxygen for 1 hour after detonator-blast- induced craniocerebral injury. Immunohistochemistry showed significantly reduced aquaporin 4 expression and adrenocorticotropic hormone expression in the pituitary gland of rabbits with craniocerebral injury. Aquaporin 4 expression was positively correlated with adrenocorticotropic hormone expression. These findings indicate that early hyperbaric oxygen therapy may suppress adrenocorticotropic hormone secretion by inhibiting aquaporin 4 expression. PMID:25624795

  15. Severe Hypokalaemia, Hypertension, and Intestinal Perforation in Ectopic Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Karacaer, Cengiz; Açikgöz, Seyyid Bilal; Aydemir, Yusuf; Tamer, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome is a rare cause of the Cushing’s syndrome. The occurrence of the ectopic ACTH syndrome presenting with severe hypokalaemia, metabolic alkalosis, and hypertension has been highlighted in case reports. However, presentation with lower gastrointestinal perforation is not known. We report the case of a 70-year-old male patient with severe hypokalaemia, metabolic alkalosis, hypertension, and colonic perforation as manifestations of an ACTH-secreting small cell lung carcinoma. Ectopic ACTH syndrome should be kept in mind as a cause of hypokalaemia, hypertension, and intestinal perforation in patients with lung carcinoma. PMID:26894113

  16. Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater causing ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone-dependent Cushing's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    KATO, AKIHISA; HAYASHI, KAZUKI; NAITOH, ITARU; SENO, KYOJI; OKADA, YUKIKO; BAN, TESSHIN; KONDO, HIROMU; NISHI, YUJI; UMEMURA, SHUICHIRO; HORI, YASUKI; NATSUME, MAKOTO; JOH, TAKASHI

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) is rarely secreted by neuroendocrine tumors. Although neuroendocrine tumors may occur at any site in the gastrointestinal system, they very rarely occur in the ampulla of Vater and have a poor prognosis. The present study described the first Cushing's syndrome as a result of ectopic ACTH arising from the ampulla of Vater neuroendocrine carcinoma. A 69-year-old female was admitted with clinical features of Cushing's syndrome, confirmed biochemically by hypokalemia, and elevated levels of ACTH and cortisol. In further investigations, a tumor of the ampulla of Vater and liver metastases were detected. Pathological analysis of the biopsy confirmed a neuroendocrine carcinoma, which was immunohistochemically positive for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, cluster of differentiation 56 and ACTH. Therefore, the present study diagnosed a functional and metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater with ectopic ACTH production causing Cushing's syndrome. The patient succumbed to mortality 4 months later, despite administration of combined chemotherapy with irinotecan and cisplatin. PMID:27330779

  17. Ectopic Adrenocorticotropic Hormone-Secreting Bronchial Carcinoid Diagnosed by Balloon-Occluded Pulmonary Arterial Sampling.

    PubMed

    Yotsukura, Masaya; Kohno, Mitsutomo; Asakura, Keisuke; Kamiyama, Ikuo; Ohtsuka, Takashi; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Kurihara, Isao; Nakatsuka, Seishi; Asamura, Hisao

    2016-05-01

    We present the case of a 50-year-old man with Cushing syndrome caused by an ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting tumor. A small nodule was located in close association with the lateral segmental branch of the pulmonary artery in the left upper lobe. Blood samples were obtained from various branches of the pulmonary artery by balloon-occluded retrograde sampling for the measurement of location-specific serum ACTH levels. After confirmation that the pulmonary nodule was responsible for the increased ACTH secretion, lobectomy was performed. This report demonstrates the usefulness of balloon-occluded retrograde pulmonary arterial sampling for the preoperative diagnosis of an ACTH-producing tumor whose diagnosis is difficult to confirm. PMID:27106427

  18. Isolated double adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    PU, JIUJUN; WANG, ZHIMING; ZHOU, HUI; ZHONG, AILING; JIN, KAI; RUAN, LUNLIANG; YANG, GANG

    2016-01-01

    Only a few cases of double or multiple pituitary adenomas have previously been reported in the literature; however, isolated double adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenomas are even more rare. The present study reports a rare case of a 50-year-old female patient who presented with typical clinical features of Cushing's disease and was diagnosed with isolated double ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas. Endocrinological examination revealed an ACTH-producing pituitary adenoma, and preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a microadenoma with a lower intensity on the right side of the pituitary gland. The patient underwent endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery, which revealed another pituitary tumor in the left side of the pituitary gland. The two, clearly separated, pituitary adenomas identified in the same gland were completely resected. Immunohistochemistry and pathology revealed that the clearly separated double pituitary adenomas were positive for ACTH, thyroid-stimulating, growth and prolactin hormones. Postoperatively, the levels of ACTH and cortisol hormone decreased rapidly. The case reported in the present study is considerably rare, due to the presence of a second pituitary adenoma in the same gland, which was not detected by preoperative MRI scan, but was noticed during surgery. Intraoperative evaluation may be important in the identification of double or multiple pituitary adenomas. PMID:27347184

  19. Multiple Sclerosis, Relapses, and the Mechanism of Action of Adrenocorticotropic Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Amy Perrin; Ben-Zacharia, Aliza; Harris, Colleen; Smrtka, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Relapses in multiple sclerosis (MS) are disruptive and frequently disabling for patients, and their treatment is often a challenge to clinicians. Despite progress in the understanding of the pathophysiology of MS and development of new treatments for long-term management of MS, options for treating relapses have not changed substantially over the past few decades. Corticosteroids, a component of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis that modulate immune responses and reduce inflammation, are currently the mainstay of relapse treatment. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) gel is another treatment option. Although it has long been assumed that the efficacy of ACTH in treating relapses depends on the peptide’s ability to increase endogenous corticosteroid production, evidence from research on the melanocortin system suggests that steroidogenesis may only partly account for ACTH influences. Indeed, the melanocortin peptides [ACTH and α-, β-, γ-melanocyte-stimulating hormones (MSH)] and their receptors (Melanocortin receptors, MCRs) exert multiple actions, including modulation of inflammatory and immune mediator production. MCRs are widely distributed within the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues including immune cells (e.g., macrophages). This suggests that the mechanism of action of ACTH includes not only steroid-mediated indirect effects, but also direct anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating actions via the melanocortin system. An increased understanding of the role of the melanocortin system, particularly ACTH, in the immune and inflammatory processes underlying relapses may help to improve relapse management. PMID:23482896

  20. Metabolic responses to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) vary with life-history stage in adult male northern elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Ensminger, David C; Somo, Derek A; Houser, Dorian S; Crocker, Daniel E

    2014-08-01

    Strong individual and life-history variation in serum glucocorticoids has been documented in many wildlife species. Less is known about variation in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responsiveness and its impact on metabolism. We challenged 18 free-ranging adult male northern elephant seals (NES) with an intramuscular injection of slow-release adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) over 3 sample periods: early in the breeding season, after 70+ days of the breeding fast, and during peak molt. Subjects were blood sampled every 30 min for 2h post-injection. Breeding animals were recaptured and sampled at 48 h. In response to the ACTH injection, cortisol increased 4-6-fold in all groups, and remained elevated at 48 h in early breeding subjects. ACTH was a strong secretagogue for aldosterone, causing a 3-8-fold increase in concentration. Cortisol and aldosterone responses did not vary between groups but were correlated within individuals. The ACTH challenge produced elevations in plasma glucose during late breeding and molting, suppressed testosterone and thyroid hormone at 48 h in early breeding, and increased plasma non-esterified fatty acids and ketoacids during molting. These data suggest that sensitivity of the HPA axis is maintained but the metabolic impacts of cortisol and feedback inhibition of the axis vary with life history stage. Strong impacts on testosterone and thyroid hormone suggest the importance of maintaining low cortisol levels during the breeding fast. These data suggest that metabolic adaptations to extended fasting in NES include alterations in tissue responses to hormones that mitigate deleterious impacts of acute or moderately sustained stress responses. PMID:24798580

  1. Surgical treatment of ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome with intra-thoracic tumor

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Hang, Junbiao; Che, Jiaming; Chen, Zhongyuan; Qiu, Weicheng; Ren, Jian; Yang, Xiaoqing; Xiang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Background The study was to review the clinical manifestations and laboratory examinations of ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome, and to analyze the efficacy of surgical treatment. Methods The clinical data, surgical therapy, and outcome of 23 cases of ectopic ACTH syndrome accompanied by intra-thoracic tumors were reviewed. The tumors were removed from all the patients according to the principles of radical resection. Results The tumors were confirmed as associated with ectopic ACTH secretion in 19 cases. Hyperglycemia and hypokalemia were recovered, while plasma cortisol, plasma ACTH and 24-hour urinary free cortisol (UFC) levels were significantly reduced after surgery in these 19 cases. Recurrences of the disease were found in six cases during following-up, and five of them died. Conclusions The thoracic cavity should be a focus in routine examinations of patients with symptoms of Cushing’s syndrome (CS), because ectopic ACTH-producing tumors are commonly found in bronchus/lung and mediastinum. Despite the incidence of the pulmonary nodule secondary to opportunistic infection in some cases, surgery is still the first choice if the tumor is localized. The surgical procedure should be performed according to the principles in resection of lung cancer and mediastinal tumor. The surgical efficacy is significant for short-term periods; however, the recurrence of the disease in long-term periods is in great part related to distal metastasis or relapse of the tumor. PMID:27162663

  2. Comparison of Ultraviolet Photodissociation and Collision Induced Dissociation of Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robotham, Scott A.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2015-09-01

    In an effort to better characterize the fragmentation pathways promoted by ultraviolet photoexcitation in comparison to collision induced dissociation (CID), six adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) peptides in a range of charge states were subjected to 266 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD), 193 nm UVPD, and CID. Similar fragment ions and distributions were observed for 266 nm UVPD and 193 nm UVPD for all peptides investigated. While both UVPD and CID led to preferential cleavage of the Y-S bond for all ACTH peptides [except ACTH (1-39)], UVPD was far less dependent on charge state and location of basic sites for the production of C-terminal and N-terminal ions. For ACTH (1-16), ACTH (1-17), ACTH (1-24), and ACTH (1-39), changes in the distributions of fragment ion types ( a, b, c, x, y, z, and collectively N-terminal ions versus C-terminal ions) showed only minor changes upon UVPD for all charge states. In contrast, CID displayed significant changes in the fragment ion type distributions as a function of charge state, an outcome consistent with the dependence on the number and location of mobile protons that is not prominent for UVPD. Sequence coverages obtained by UVPD showed less dependence on charge state than those determined by CID, with the latter showing a consistent decrease in coverage as charge state increased.

  3. Cardiac vagal activation by adrenocorticotropic hormone treatment in infants with West syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Ayako; Hayano, Junichiro; Fujimoto, Shinji; Ando, Naoki; Mizuno, Kumiko; Kamei, Michi; Kobayashi, Satoru; Ishikawa, Tatsuya; Togari, Hajime

    2007-02-01

    West syndrome (WS) is a generalized epileptic syndrome of infancy and early childhood with various etiologies, and consists of a triad of infantile spasm, arrest or regress of psychomotor development and specific electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern of hypsarrhythmia. WS had been believed to be refractory, but recent evidence supports effectiveness of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) treatment. The ACTH treatment, however, has a problem that it is often accompanied by adverse autonomic symptoms. We therefore examined heart rate variability (HRV) for assessing cardiac autonomic functions in WS and prospectively observed the changes during ACTH treatment. We studied 15 patients with WS and 9 age-matched controls during sleep (EEG stage 2). Compared with controls, the patients with WS were greater in the low-frequency component (LF) of HRV, an index reflecting sympatho-vagal interaction (p = 0.02), but were comparable for high-frequency component (HF) and LF-to-HF ratio (LF/HF), indices reflecting cardiac vagal activity and sympathetic predominance, respectively. During ACTH treatment, heart rate decreased (p < 0.01), LF and HF increased (p < 0.01), and LF/HF did not differ significantly. These results indicate that WS might be accompanied by autonomic changes and that ACTH treatment enhances parasympathetic function and causes bradycardia. PMID:17287597

  4. [A Case of an Adrenocorticotropic Hormone-Producing Pituitary Adenoma Removed via Electromagnetic-Guided Neuroendoscopy].

    PubMed

    Tomita, Yusuke; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Terasaka, Tomohiro; Inagaki, Kenichi; Otsuka, Fumio; Date, Isao

    2016-06-01

    The use of navigation systems is safe and reliable for neurological surgery. We performed endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery to totally resect an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-producing pituitary adenoma associated with oculomotor nerve palsy. A 70-year-old woman developed right ptosis 4 months before admission. She developed anisocoria 2 months later and was referred to the department of neurology from clinic. Brain magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)showed an intrasellar tumor that partially invaded the right cavernous sinus, and she was then referred to our department. She exhibited a round face ("moon face") and central obesity. Laboratory test results showed a high urinary cortisol level and high serum ACTH level, and neither the serum cortisol nor ACTH level was suppressed by a low-dose dexamethasone test. We performed transsphenoidal surgery using high-dimensional endoscopy under electromagnetic navigation. The tumor invading the cavernous sinus was visualized via endoscopy and confirmed on navigation using a flexible needle probe. Postoperative MRI showed total removal of the tumor, and the serum ACTH level recovered to the normal range. The patient's right oculomotor palsy resolved within 1 week postoperatively. In summary, electromagnetic navigation was useful for total resection of a pituitary tumor invading the cavernous sinus, contributing to normalization of the ACTH level and improvement in neurological symptoms. PMID:27270145

  5. Adrenocorticotropic hormone gel in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus: A retrospective study of patients.

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao; Golubovsky, Josh; Hui-Yuen, Joyce; Shah, Ummara; Olech, Ewa; Lomeo, Rosalia; Singh, Vijay; Busch, Howard; Strandberg, Mary Jane; Strandberg, Kayla; Horowitz, Leslie; Askanase, Anca

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Acthar Gel is a long-acting formulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) with anti-inflammatory effects thought to be mediated in part through melanocortin receptor activation. This study was initiated to understand the role of Acthar Gel in SLE treatment in rheumatology practices. Methods: This is a retrospective case series of nine adult female patients treated with Acthar Gel for at least six months at five academic centers. Treating physicians completed a one-page questionnaire on lupus medications, disease activity, and outcomes. Clinical response was defined using SLEDAI 2K and improvement in the clinical manifestation(s) being treated. Results: The most common clinical SLE manifestations/indications requiring therapy with Acthar Gel were arthritis, rash, and inability to taper corticosteroids. The mean SLEDAI 2K score at baseline was 5.8 ± 5.0 (range 0-16). Six patients were concomitantly treated with corticosteroids (mean dose 18.3mg/day). All patients were on background SLE medications including immunosuppressives. Seven of nine patients had an overall improvement, with a decrease in SLEDAI 2K from 5.8 ± 5.0 at baseline to 3.5 ± 2.7 (range 0-8); four of five patients had improvement or resolution in arthritis, and one of two patients had resolution of inflammatory rash. Four patients discontinued corticosteroids and one patient tapered below 50% of the initial dose by 3 months of treatment with Acthar Gel. No adverse events were reported. Conclusions: This study suggests a role for Acthar Gel as an alternative to corticosteroids in the treatment of SLE. Acthar Gel appears to be safe and well-tolerated after 6 months of treatment, with a significant reduction in disease activity. PMID:27158444

  6. Isolated Adrenocorticotropic Hormone or Thyrotropin Deficiency Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Three Cases with Long-Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Cho-Ok; Kim, Yu Ji; Kim, Ji Hye

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the clinical features and long-term outcomes of isolated pituitary hormone deficiencies after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Such deficiencies typically present at time intervals after TBI, especially after mild injuries such as concussions, which makes their diagnosis difficult without careful history taking. It is necessary to improve diagnosis and prevent life threatening or morbid conditions such as those that may occur in deficiencies of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or thyroid-stimulating hormone (as known as thyrotropin, TSH), the two most important pituitary hormones in hypopituitarism treatment. Here, we report two cases of isolated ACTH deficiency and one case of isolated TSH deficiency. These patients presented at different time points after concussion and underwent long-term follow-ups. PMID:27169080

  7. Adrenocorticotropic hormone in serial cerebrospinal fluid in man - Subject to acute regulation by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system?

    PubMed

    Kellner, Michael; Wortmann, Viola; Salzwedel, Cornelie; Kober, Daniel; Petzoldt, Martin; Urbanowicz, Tatiana; Pulic, Mersija; Boelmans, Kai; Yassouridis, Alexander; Wiedemann, Klaus

    2016-05-30

    Acute regulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system has not been investigated in man. In a pilot study in healthy male volunteers we measured ACTH every twenty minutes in serial CSF for three hours after an intravenous placebo, hydrocortisone (100mg) or insulin (2mg/kg) injection. No acute inhibitory or stimulatory effects of these interventions were discovered. Our results corroborate previous findings in rhesus monkeys. The regulation of CSF ACTH and its potential relevance for behavioral alterations in health and disease (e.g. major depression or anorexia nervosa) in humans need further study. PMID:27031591

  8. Isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency associated with Hashimoto's disease and thyroid crisis triggered by head trauma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Tanei, Takafumi; Eguchi, Youko; Yamamoto, Yuka; Hirano, Masaki; Takebayashi, Shigenori; Nakahara, Norimoto

    2012-01-01

    A 47-year-old man presented to our hospital after suffering transient loss of consciousness and falling to the floor. On admission, his Glasgow Coma Scale score was 11 (E3V3M5), and he exhibited restlessness. Blood examination revealed hyperthyroidism. Computed tomography showed slight traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage. He developed fever and tachycardia, and was diagnosed with thyroid crisis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a brain contusion in the right frontal lobe, and encephalopathy signs in the right frontal and insular cortex. Immunocytochemical examinations suggested Hashimoto's disease, and hormone examinations revealed plasma levels were undetectably low of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and low of cortisol. Pituitary stimulation tests showed inadequate plasma ACTH and cortisol response, consistent with isolated ACTH deficiency (IAD). The final diagnosis was IAD associated with Hashimoto's disease. Hydrocortisone replacement therapy was continued, and the patient was nearly free from neurological deficits after 18 months. The neuroimaging abnormalities gradually improved with time. PMID:22278027

  9. Unusual suspects: pulmonary opportunistic infections masquerading as tumor metastasis in a patient with adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer.

    PubMed

    Chowdry, Rajasree P; Bhimani, Chandar; Delgado, Maria A; Lee, Daniel J; Dayamani, Priya; Sica, Gabriel L; Owonikoko, Taofeek K

    2012-11-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) are a rare group of neoplasms but with increasing incidence. The atypical complications that arise in the setting of functional endocrine tumors are underreported and therefore have not received sufficient attention and the necessary mention in the oncology literature. The clinical implications of these complications pose management challenges starting with the difficulty in establishing diagnosis, accurate staging and optimal treatment of the primary process. We present the case of a middle-aged woman diagnosed with adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing carcinoma arising from the pancreas whose case was complicated by excessive uncontrolled hypercortisolism and reactivation of pulmonary opportunistic infections that confounded her management. We believe that this case illustration will be of value to practicing oncologists and other groups of physicians who are called upon to participate in the multidisciplinary treatment of these relatively rare but highly challenging cases. PMID:23118805

  10. Unusual suspects: pulmonary opportunistic infections masquerading as tumor metastasis in a patient with adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing pancreatic neuroendocrine cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chowdry, Rajasree P.; Bhimani, Chandar; Delgado, Maria A.; Lee, Daniel J.; Dayamani, Priya; Sica, Gabriel L.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) are a rare group of neoplasms but with increasing incidence. The atypical complications that arise in the setting of functional endocrine tumors are underreported and therefore have not received sufficient attention and the necessary mention in the oncology literature. The clinical implications of these complications pose management challenges starting with the difficulty in establishing diagnosis, accurate staging and optimal treatment of the primary process. We present the case of a middle-aged woman diagnosed with adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing carcinoma arising from the pancreas whose case was complicated by excessive uncontrolled hypercortisolism and reactivation of pulmonary opportunistic infections that confounded her management. We believe that this case illustration will be of value to practicing oncologists and other groups of physicians who are called upon to participate in the multidisciplinary treatment of these relatively rare but highly challenging cases. PMID:23118805

  11. Efficacy and safety of adrenocorticotropic hormone treatment in glomerular diseases: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kittanamongkolchai, Wonngarm; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Zand, Ladan

    2016-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence that adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) may be effective in treating various forms of glomerular diseases. However, the efficacy of treatment and frequency of adverse effects associated with the use of ACTH in glomerular diseases are unknown. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature was performed. Methods A literature search was performed using Medline, Embase, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from inception through 18 July 2015. Studies assessing the efficacy and safety of ACTH treatment in adults with glomerular diseases were included. Results Of the 343 identified citations, 18 evaluated the drug efficacy and 12 evaluated the adverse effects. The most common glomerular diseases were membranous nephropathy (MN), primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and minimal change disease (MCD). The overall rate of complete remission in MN was 80% at 0–6 months, 69% at >6–12 months, 90% at >12–24 months and 95% beyond 24 months of follow-up. Fifty percent of primary FSGS and MCD patients treated with ACTH were in remission at 6 months, but the relapse rate was high after ACTH discontinuation (17%). Evidence of ACTH efficacy for other glomerular diseases was scarce. Edema was the most commonly reported adverse effect {incidence rate [IR] 0.10 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04–0.18]} followed by insomnia [IR 0.08 (95% CI 0.03–0.15)]. The dropout rate due to adverse events was 7%, mostly due to edema and weight gain. Conclusions ACTH is a well-tolerated therapy and is most promising when treating patients with MN. There may be a potential role for ACTH in patients with MCD and FSGS, but data are lacking. PMID:27274822

  12. Primary intracranial neuroendocrine tumor with ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome: A rare and complicated case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    LIU, HAILONG; ZHANG, MINGSHAN; WANG, XUAN; QU, YANMING; ZHANG, HONGWEI; YU, CHUNJIANG

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) and ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome are frequent in adult patients. However, primary intracranial NETs, exhibiting immunonegativity for ACTH, high serum ACTH level and treated with anterior skull base reconstruction, are rare and complicated. We herein present a case of a primary intracranial NET immunonegative for ACTH, resulting in ectopic ACTH syndrome. A 40-year-old woman presented with intermittent rhinorrhea, rapid weight gain, polydipsia, polyuria, hypertension, dimness, bilateral exophthalmus, diminution of vision in the left eye and pigmentation of the skin of the face and trunk. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed a sizeable enhancing tumor in the anterior cranial fossa, which infiltrated the sphenoid and ethmoid sinuses bilaterally, the left maxillary sinus and the nasal cavity. Abdominal CT scans revealed bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. The biochemical findings included hypokalemia and high glucose, cortisol, plasma ACTH, 24-h urinary free cortisol and testosterone levels. The neoplasm was exposed through a right frontal craniotomy, while anterior skull base reconstruction was performed during surgery. The intracranial surgery achieved gross removal of the tumor; however, part of the tumor remained in the nasal cavity. Histopathological examination of the surgical specimen confirmed the diagnosis of a low-grade small-cell NET, exhibiting immunonegativity for ACTH. A postoperative abdominal CT scan demonstrated bilateral regression of the adrenal gland hyperplasia and the serum ACTH level returned to normal after 16 days. To the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports of primary intracranial NETs, immunohistochemically negative for ACTH, resulting in ectopic ACTH syndrome. PMID:27330775

  13. A Case Report of Adrenocorticotropic Hormone to Treat Recurrent Focal Segmental Glomerular Sclerosis Post-Transplantation and Biomarker Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, Siddiq; Larson, Derek S.; Naimi, Nima; Ashraf, Muhammad; Culiberk, Nancy; Liapis, Helen; Wei, Changli; Reiser, Jochen; Brennan, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recurrent focal segmental glomerular sclerosis (rFSGS) in renal transplant recipients (RTR) is difficult to predict and treat. Early rFSGS is likely from circulating factors and preformed antibodies. Methods: We present the case of a 23-year-old white man who presented with rFSGS and acute renal failure, requiring dialysis 9-months after a 1-haplotype matched living-related transplant. We retrospectively analyzed serum samples from various clinical stages for rFSGS biomarkers: serum glomerular albumin permeability (Palb), soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) serum level with suPAR-β3 integrin signaling on human podocytes, and angiotensin II type I receptor-antibody (AT1R-Ab) titer. Results: All biomarkers were abnormal at 1-year pre-transplant prior to initiation of dialysis and at the time of transplant. After initiation of hemodialysis, β3 integrin activity on human podocytes, in response to patient serum, as well as AT1R-Ab were further elevated. At the time of biopsy-proven recurrence, all biomarkers were abnormally high. One week after therapy with aborted plasmapheresis (secondary to intolerance), and high dose steroids, the Palb and suPAR-β3 integrin activity remained significantly positive. After 12-weeks of treatment with high-dose steroids, rituximab, and galactose, the patient remained hemodialysis-dependent. Three-months after his initial presentation, we commenced adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH, Acthar® Gel), 80 units subcutaneously twice weekly. Four-weeks later, he was able to discontinue dialysis. After 8-months of maintenance ACTH therapy, his serum creatinine stabilized at 1.79 mg/dL with <1 g of proteinuria. Conclusion: ACTH therapy was associated with improvement in renal function within 4 weeks. The use of rFSGS biomarkers may aid in predicting development of rFSGS. PMID:25853133

  14. Pre-emptive oral dexmethorphan reduces fentanyl-induced cough as well as immediate postoperative adrenocortico-tropic hormone and growth hormone level

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Avik; Kundu, Asim Kumar; Ghosh, Sudipta; Choudhuri, Rajat; Bandopadhyay, Bijoy Kumar; Dasgupta, Sugata

    2011-01-01

    Background: Fentanyl-induced cough is not always benign and brief and can be remarkably troublesome, spasmodic, and explosive. Dextromethorphan, an opioid derivative with an antitussive action, may be effective in reducing the fentanyl-induced cough. Dextromethorphan, a N-methyl D aspartate receptor antagonist, may have some effect on diminishing the stress response to surgery. This study was undertaken to determine whether preoperative dextromethorphan could effectively attenuate its incidence, severity, and effect on postoperative stress hormone levels. Materials and Methods: Three hundred and twenty patients of American society of anesthesiologists I-II, aged 18–60 years, undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy or appendicectomy were randomly allocated into two groups (Group C, control; Group D, dextromethorphan) consisting of 160 patients each. Patients in Group D received dextromethorphan 40 mg orally and in Group C received placebo tablets 60 minutes before induction of anesthesia. The incidence of cough was recorded for 1 minute after fentanyl injection and graded as none (0), mild (1–2), moderate (3–5), and severe (>5 cough). Blood samples were collected for estimation of stress hormone levels before surgery and again at 1 hour and 24 hours postoperatively and compared. The appearance of adverse reactions was recorded. Results: The incidence of reflex fentanyl cough was lower in dextromethorphan group (3.9%) in comparison to placebo (59.8%). Five patients developed mild and one moderate cough in the dextromethorphan group. In the control group, 31 patients developed mild, 29 moderate, and 32 severe cough. The stress hormones were significantly higher at 1 hour and 24 hours postoperatively in both groups in comparison to its preoperative values. However, at 1 hour postoperatively, adrenocorticotropic hormone, epinephrine, and growth hormone values were significantly low in the dextromethorphan group (61.5 ± 21.1 pg/ ml, 142.1 ± 11.2 pg

  15. ACTH (Adrenocorticotropic Hormone) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease , also called primary adrenal insufficiency: decreased cortisol production due to adrenal gland damage Secondary adrenal insufficiency: decreased cortisol production because of pituitary dysfunction Hypopituitarism : pituitary dysfunction or ...

  16. Efficacy of single serum cortisol reading obtained between 9 AM and 10 AM as an index of adrenal function in children treated with glucocorticoids or synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone.

    PubMed

    Goto, Masahiro; Shibata, Nao; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2016-07-01

    To find a simple method to screen for iatrogenic childhood adrenal insufficiency, we retrospectively examined the results of CRH stimulation tests performed 212 times on 111 subjects (68 males; age at commencement of initial treatment ranged 0.0-19.8 yr; median age, 5.8 yr). Before the commencement of this study, 97 subjects had been treated with glucocorticoids and 14 subjects with West syndrome had been treated with synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone. Duration of the primary treatment ranged from 15 to 2150 days. CRH stimulation tests were conducted between 09:00 AM and 10:00 AM and peak cortisol values less than 15 µg/dL were considered indicative of adrenal insufficiency. The receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the optimal basal serum cortisol cut-off values when screening for adrenal suppression ranged from 5.35 to 5.80 µg/dL depending on the primary disease. All subjects having a serum cortisol value of less than 2.3 µg/dL had insufficient adrenal function while all subjects having greater than 11 µg/dL had intact adrenal function. We concluded that single serum cortisol values obtained between 09:00 AM and 10:00 AM had the potential to serve as an index of adrenal function in children treated with glucocorticoids or synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone. PMID:27507908

  17. Efficacy of single serum cortisol reading obtained between 9 AM and 10 AM as an index of adrenal function in children treated with glucocorticoids or synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Masahiro; Shibata, Nao; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. To find a simple method to screen for iatrogenic childhood adrenal insufficiency, we retrospectively examined the results of CRH stimulation tests performed 212 times on 111 subjects (68 males; age at commencement of initial treatment ranged 0.0–19.8 yr; median age, 5.8 yr). Before the commencement of this study, 97 subjects had been treated with glucocorticoids and 14 subjects with West syndrome had been treated with synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone. Duration of the primary treatment ranged from 15 to 2150 days. CRH stimulation tests were conducted between 09:00 AM and 10:00 AM and peak cortisol values less than 15 µg/dL were considered indicative of adrenal insufficiency. The receiver operating characteristic curve showed that the optimal basal serum cortisol cut-off values when screening for adrenal suppression ranged from 5.35 to 5.80 µg/dL depending on the primary disease. All subjects having a serum cortisol value of less than 2.3 µg/dL had insufficient adrenal function while all subjects having greater than 11 µg/dL had intact adrenal function. We concluded that single serum cortisol values obtained between 09:00 AM and 10:00 AM had the potential to serve as an index of adrenal function in children treated with glucocorticoids or synthetic adrenocorticotropic hormone. PMID:27507908

  18. Glucocorticoid stimulates expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone gene in human placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, B.G.; Emanuel, R.L.; Frim, D.M.; Majzoub, J.A. )

    1988-07-01

    Primary cultures of purified human cytotrophoblasts have been used to examine the expression of the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) gene in placenta. The authors report here that glucocorticoids stimulate placental CRH synthesis and secretion in primary cultures of human placenta. This stimulation is in contrast to the glucocorticoid suppression of CRH expression in hypothalamus. The positive regulation of CRH by glucocorticoids suggests that the rise in CRH preceding parturition could result from the previously described rise in fetal glucocorticoids. Furthermore, this increase in placental CRH could stimulate, via adrenocorticotropic hormone, a further rise in fetal glucocorticoids, completing a positive feedback loop that would be terminated by delivery.

  19. Effects of cortisol secreted via a 12-h infusion of adrenocorticotropic hormone on mineral homeostasis and bone metabolism in ovariectomized cows.

    PubMed

    Kim, D; Yamagishi, N; Devkota, B; Furuhama, K

    2012-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of endogenously secreted cortisol on mineral homeostasis and bone metabolism in cows, 4 ovariectomized Holstein cows were infused for 12 h with either an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) solution (0.5 mg/2 L isotonic NaCl solution per cow) or isotonic NaCl solution in a 2×2 crossover design. ACTH infusion stimulated cortisol secretion and increased plasma cortisol concentrations for 18 h (P<0.001), leading to an elevated plasma glucose concentration until 36 h (P<0.001). Plasma calcium and magnesium concentrations in ACTH-infused cows fluctuated within normal ranges, whereas hypophosphatemia was observed unequivocally. The biochemical bone resorption markers tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b and hydroxyproline decreased following ACTH infusion (P<0.001 and P=0.003, respectively). Similarly, the bone formation marker, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase, decreased continuously until 72 h after the ACTH infusion (P<0.001). These results demonstrate that increased secretion of cortisol via a 12-h ACTH infusion disrupted homeostasis of inorganic phosphate and suppressed bone metabolism in ovariectomized cows without involving gonadal steroid hormones. PMID:22591952

  20. Inhibition of Ubiquitin-specific Peptidase 8 Suppresses Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Production and Tumorous Corticotroph Cell Growth in AtT20 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Fang-Fang; Li, Yun-Feng; Chen, Yu-Fan; Jiang, Hong; Chen, Xiao; Zheng, Li-Li; Zhao, Yao; Wang, Wei-Qing; Ning, Guang; Bian, Liu-Guan; Sun, Qing-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Two recent whole-exome sequencing researches identifying somatic mutations in the ubiquitin-specific protease 8 (USP8) gene in pituitary corticotroph adenomas provide exciting advances in this field. These mutations drive increased epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and promote adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) production. This study was to investigate whether the inhibition of USP8 activity could be a strategy for the treatment of Cushing's disease (CD). Methods: The anticancer effect of USP8 inhibitor was determined by testing cell viability, colony formation, apoptosis, and ACTH secretion. The immunoblotting and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were conducted to explore the signaling pathway by USP8 inhibition. Results: Inhibition of USP8-induced degradation of receptor tyrosine kinases including EGFR, EGFR-2 (ERBB2), and Met leading to a suppression of AtT20 cell growth and ACTH secretion. Moreover, treatment with USP8 inhibitor markedly induced AtT20 cells apoptosis. Conclusions: Inhibition of USP8 activity could be an effective strategy for CD. It might provide a novel pharmacological approach for the treatment of CD. PMID:27569239

  1. Blood plasma collected after adrenocorticotropic hormone administration during the preovulatory period in the sow negatively affects in vitro fertilization by disturbing spermatozoa function.

    PubMed

    González, R; Kumaresan, A; Bergqvist, A S; Sjunnesson, Y C B

    2015-04-15

    Successful fertilization is essential for reproduction and might be negatively affected by stressful events, which could alter the environment where fertilization occurs. The aim of the study was to determine whether an altered hormonal profile in blood plasma caused by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) administration could affect in vitro fertilization in the pig model. In experiment 1, gametes were exposed for 24 hours to plasma from ACTH-treated, non-ACTH-treated sows, or medium with BSA. Fertilization, cleavage, and blastocyst rates were lower in the ACTH group compared with the no ACTH or BSA control groups (P < 0.01). In experiment 2, the exposure of matured oocytes for 1 hour before fertilization to the same treatments did not have an impact on their ability to undergo fertilization or on embryo development. In experiment 3, spermatozoa were incubated for 0, 1, 4, and 24 hours under the same conditions. There was no effect of treatment on sperm viability. The percentage of acrosome-reacted spermatozoa remained higher in the ACTH group compared with the non-ACTH-treated group through the incubation period (P < 0.001). Protein tyrosine phosphorylation (PTP) patterns were also affected by treatment (P < 0.001). The presence of an atypical PTP pattern was higher in the ACTH group at all the analyzed time points compared with the BSA and no ACTH groups (P < 0.001). In conclusion, this altered environment may not affect oocyte competence but might affect the sperm fertilizing ability through alterations in the acrosome reaction and correct sequence of PTP patterns. PMID:25623229

  2. Seasonal and sex differences in responsiveness to adrenocorticotropic hormone contribute to stress response plasticity in red-sided garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis).

    PubMed

    Dayger, Catherine A; Lutterschmidt, Deborah I

    2016-04-01

    As in many vertebrates, hormonal responses to stress vary seasonally in red-sided garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis). For example, males generally exhibit reduced glucocorticoid responses to a standard stressor during the spring mating season. We asked whether variation in adrenal sensitivity to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) explains why glucocorticoid responses to capture stress vary with sex, season and body condition in red-sided garter snakes. We measured glucocorticoids at 0, 1 and 4 h after injection with ACTH (0.1 IU g(-1)body mass) or vehicle in males and females during the spring mating season and autumn pre-hibernation period. Because elevated glucocorticoids can influence sex steroids, we also examined androgen and estradiol responses to ACTH. ACTH treatment increased glucocorticoids in both sexes and seasons. Spring-collected males had a smaller integrated glucocorticoid response to ACTH than autumn-collected males. The integrated glucocorticoid response to ACTH differed with sex during the spring, with males having a smaller glucocorticoid response than females. Although integrated glucocorticoid responses to ACTH did not vary with body condition, we observed an interaction among season, sex and body condition. In males, ACTH treatment did not alter androgen levels in either season, but androgen levels decreased during the sampling period. Similar to previous studies, plasma estradiol was low or undetectable during the spring and autumn, and therefore any effect of ACTH treatment on estradiol could not be determined. These data provide support for a mechanism that partly explains how the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis integrates information about season, sex and body condition: namely, variation in adrenal responsiveness to ACTH. PMID:26896543

  3. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and thyrotropin-releasing hormone in human and bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Amarant, T; Fridkin, M; Koch, Y

    1982-10-01

    Two hypothalamic peptide hormones, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) and thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), have been isolated from human milk and bovine colostrum. Acidified methanolic extracts, prepared from human milk, bovine colostrum and rat hypothalami, as well as synthetic LHRH and TRH markers were subjected to high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The eluates were tested for the presence of LHRH and TRH by specific radioimmunoassays. It was found that milk extracts contain significant amounts of LHRH (3.9 - 11.8 ng/ml) and TRH (0.16 - 0.34 ng/ml), which comigrate with the corresponding marker hormones and with those of hypothalamic origin. The HPLC-purified LHRH from both human and bovine milk was bioactive in a dose-response manner similar to synthetic LHRH. PMID:6816590

  4. Evaluation of Basal Serum Adrenocorticotropic Hormone and Cortisol Levels and Their Relationship with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Male Patients with Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Bo; She, Fei; Xie, Li-Fang; Yan, Wen-Hua; Ouyang, Jin-Zhi; Wang, Bao-An; Ma, Hang-Yun; Zang, Li; Mu, Yi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prolonged gonadal hormone deficiency in patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) may produce adverse effects on the endocrine homeostasis and metabolism. This study aimed to compare basal serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol levels between male IHH patients and healthy controls. Moreover, this study compared the basal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in patients with and without nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and also evaluated the relationship between basal HPA axis and NAFLD in male IHH patients. Methods: This was a retrospective case-control study involving 75 Chinese male IHH patients (mean age 21.4 ± 3.8 years, range 17–30 years) and 135 healthy controls after matching for gender and age. All subjects underwent physical examination and blood testing for serum testosterone, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, ACTH, and cortisol and biochemical tests. Results: Higher basal serum ACTH levels (8.25 ± 3.78 pmol/L vs. 6.97 ± 2.81 pmol/L) and lower cortisol levels (366.70 ± 142.48 nmol/L vs. 452.82 ± 141.53 nmol/L) were observed in male IHH patients than healthy subjects (all P <0.05). IHH patients also showed higher metabolism parameters and higher prevalence rate of NAFLD (34.9% vs. 4.4%) than the controls (all P < 0.05). Basal serum ACTH (9.91 ± 4.98 pmol/L vs. 7.60 ± 2.96 pmol/L) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (2123.7 ± 925.8 μg/L vs. 1417.1 ± 498.4 μg/L) levels were significantly higher in IHH patients with NAFLD than those without NAFLD (all P < 0.05). We also found that basal serum ACTH levels were positively correlated with NAFLD (r = 0.289, P <0.05) and triglyceride levels (r = 0.268, P < 0.05) in male IHH patients. Furthermore, NAFLD was independently associated with ACTH levels in male IHH patients by multiple linear regression analysis. Conclusions: The male IHH patients showed higher basal serum ACTH levels and lower cortisol levels than matched healthy

  5. Tipepidine, a non-narcotic antitussive, exerts an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test in adrenocorticotropic hormone-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Kawaura, Kazuaki; Ogata, Yukino; Honda, Sokichi; Soeda, Fumio; Shirasaki, Tetsuya; Takahama, Kazuo

    2016-04-01

    We investigated whether tipepidine exerts an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-treated rats, which is known as a treatment-resistant depression model, and we studied the pharmacological mechanisms of the effects of tipepidine. Male Wistar rats (5-7 weeks old) were used in this study. Tipepidine (20 and 40mg/kg, i.p.) decreased the immobility time in the forced swimming test in ACTH-treated rats. The anti-immobility effect of tipepidine was blocked by a catecholamine-depleting agent, alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (300mg/kg, s.c.), but not by a serotonin-depleting agent, p-chlorophenylalanine. The anti-immobility effect of tipepidine was also blocked by a dopamine D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390 (0.02mg/kg, s.c.) and an adrenaline α2 receptor antagonist, yohimbine (2mg/kg, i.p.). In microdialysis technique, tipepidine (40mg/kg, i.p.) increased the extracellular dopamine level of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in ACTH-treated rats. These results suggest that tipepidine exerts an antidepressant-like effect in the forced swimming test in ACTH-treated rats, and that the effect of tipepidine is mediated by the stimulation of dopamine D1 receptors and adrenaline α2 receptors. The results also suggest that an increase in the extracellular dopamine level in the NAc may be involved in the antidepressant-like effect of tipepidine in ACTH-treated rats. PMID:26738969

  6. Sources of variation in plasma corticosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone in the male northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis): I. Seasonal patterns and effects of stress and adrenocorticotropic hormone.

    PubMed

    Fokidis, H Bobby

    2016-09-01

    The secretion of steroids from the adrenal gland is a classic endocrine response to perturbations that can affect homeostasis. During an acute stress response, glucocorticoids (GC), such as corticosterone (CORT), prepare the metabolic physiology and cognitive abilities of an animal in a manner that promotes survival during changing conditions. Although GC functions during stress are well established, much less is understood concerning how adrenal androgens, namely dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) are influenced by stress. I conducted three field studies (one experimental and two descriptive) aimed at identifying how both CORT and DHEA secretion in free-living male northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis), vary during acute stress; across different circulations (brachial vs. jugular); in response to ACTH challenge; and during the annual cycle. As predicted, restraint stress increased plasma CORT, but unexpectedly DHEA levels decreased, but the latter effect was only seen for blood sampled from the jugular vein, and not the brachial. The difference in DHEA between circulations may result from increased neural uptake of DHEA during stress. Injection with exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) increased CORT concentrations, but failed to alter DHEA levels, thus suggesting ACTH is not a direct regulator of DHEA. Monthly field sampling revealed distinct seasonal patterns to both initial and restraint stress CORT and DHEA levels with distinct differences in the steroid milieu between breeding and non-breeding seasons. These data suggest that the CORT response to stress remains relatively consistent, but DHEA secretion is largely independent of the response by CORT. Although CORT functions have been well-studied in wild animals, little research exists for the role of DHEA and their variable relationship sets the stage for future experimental research addressing steroid stress responses. PMID:27255363

  7. Long-term bioeffects of 435-MHz radiofrequency radiation on selected blood-borne endpoints in cannulated rats. Volume 2. Plasma ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone) and plasma corticosterone. Final report, 20 August 1984-16 February 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Popovic, V.P.; Toler, J.C.; Bonasera, S.J.; Popovic, P.P.; Honeycutt, C.B.

    1987-08-01

    Two hundred adult male white rats with chronically implanted aortic cannulas were randomly divided into two groups. Animals in the first group were exposed to low-level (1.0 mW/cm2) pulsed-wave 435-MHz radiofrequency radiation (RFR) for approximately 22 h daily, 7 days each week, for 6 months. Animals in the second group were maintained under identical conditions, but were not radiated. The cannulas were used to draw microsamples (0.3 mL) of aortic blood from the unrestrained, unanesthetized rats on a cyclic schedule. Plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and plasma corticosterone concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassays hormone (ACTH) and plasma corticosterone concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassays. Statistical analysis of the results did not indicate increased plasma ACTH and plasma corticosterone concentrations in exposed animals when compared to sham-exposed animals. Exposure to this low-level radiofrequency environment did not induce stresses that were manifested as an alteration in plasma hormones.

  8. Concentrations of the adrenocorticotropic hormone, corticosterone and sex steroid hormones and the expression of the androgen receptor in the pituitary and adrenal glands of male turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) during growth and development.

    PubMed

    Kiezun, J; Kaminska, B; Jankowski, J; Dusza, L

    2015-01-01

    Androgens take part in the regulation of puberty and promote growth and development. They play their biological role by binding to a specific androgen receptor (AR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of AR mRNA and protein in the pituitary and adrenal glands, to localize AR protein in luteinizing hormone (LH)-producing pituitary and adrenocortical cells, to determine plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone and the concentrations of corticosterone, testosterone (T), androstenedione (A4) and oestradiol (E2) in the adrenal glands of male turkeys at the age of 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 28weeks. The concentrations of hormones and the expression of AR varied during development. The expression of AR mRNA and protein in pituitary increased during the growth. The increase of AR mRNA levels in pituitary occurred earlier than increase of AR protein. The percentage of pituitary cells expressing ARs in the population of LH-secreting cells increased in week 20. It suggests that AR expression in LH-producing pituitary cells is determined by the phase of development. The drop in adrenal AR mRNA and protein expression was accompanied by an increase in the concentrations of adrenal androgens. Those results could point to the presence of a compensatory mechanism that enables turkeys to avoid the potentially detrimental effects of high androgen concentrations. Our results will expand our knowledge of the role of steroids in the development of the reproductive system of turkeys from the first month of age until maturity. PMID:25776460

  9. Peripheral activities of growth hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Granata, R

    2016-07-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GHRH) is produced by the hypothalamus and stimulates GH synthesis and release in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition to its endocrine role, GHRH exerts a wide range of extrapituitary effects which include stimulation of cell proliferation, survival and differentiation, and inhibition of apoptosis. Accordingly, expression of GHRH, as well as the receptor GHRH-R and its splice variants, has been demonstrated in different peripheral tissues and cell types. Among the direct peripheral activities, GHRH regulates pancreatic islet and β-cell survival and function and endometrial cell proliferation, promotes cardioprotection and wound healing, influences the immune and reproductive systems, reduces inflammation, indirectly increases lifespan and adiposity and acts on skeletal muscle cells to inhibit cell death and atrophy. Therefore, it is becoming increasingly clear that GHRH exerts important extrapituitary functions, suggesting potential therapeutic use of the peptide and its analogs in a wide range of medical settings. PMID:26891937

  10. Naloxone does not Affect the Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone-Induced Inhibition of Luteinizing Hormone Secretion in Sheep.

    PubMed

    Naylor, A M; Porter, D W; Lincoln, D W

    1989-06-01

    Abstract Injection of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (21 pmol) into the third cerebral ventricle of long-term ovariectomized ewes caused a marked inhibition of luteinizing hormone secretion. Mean luteinizing hormone levels and luteinizing hormone pulse frequency were reduced significantly when compared with the control responses to saline (50 mul). A notable characteristic of the response was the delayed and sustained nature of the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-induced inhibition. In the presence of the opioid antagonist naloxone (4 +/- 25 mg iv), the central administration of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone still produced a marked inhibition of luteinizing hormone secretion. Again, mean luteinizing hormone levels and luteinizing hormone pulse frequency were reduced significantly. When naloxone was injected iv, there was a significant rise in mean luteinizing hormone levels as a consequence of an increase in pulse frequency (in four out of five ewes) and a significant increase in luteinizing hormone pulse amplitude. In conclusion, these data suggest that central opioid pathways sensitive to blockade by naloxone are not involved in the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-induced inhibition of luteinizing hormone release. Furthermore, in the long-term ovariectomized ewe, endogenous opioid peptides exert a tonic inhibitory influence on luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone/luteinizing hormone secretion. PMID:19210459

  11. Profiling of adrenocorticotropic hormone and arginine vasopressin in human pituitary gland and tumor thin tissue sections using droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS-MS.

    PubMed

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R; Changelian, Armen; Laws, Edward R; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y R; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2015-08-01

    Described here are the results from the profiling of the proteins arginine vasopressin (AVP) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from normal human pituitary gland and pituitary adenoma tissue sections, using a fully automated droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS-MS system for spatially resolved sampling, HPLC separation, and mass spectrometric detection. Excellent correlation was found between the protein distribution data obtained with this method and data obtained with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) chemical imaging analyses of serial sections of the same tissue. The protein distributions correlated with the visible anatomic pattern of the pituitary gland. AVP was most abundant in the posterior pituitary gland region (neurohypophysis), and ATCH was dominant in the anterior pituitary gland region (adenohypophysis). The relative amounts of AVP and ACTH sampled from a series of ACTH-secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenomas correlated with histopathological evaluation. ACTH was readily detected at significantly higher levels in regions of ACTH-secreting adenomas and in normal anterior adenohypophysis compared with non-secreting adenoma and neurohypophysis. AVP was mostly detected in normal neurohypophysis, as expected. This work reveals that a fully automated droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling system coupled to HPLC-ESI-MS-MS can be readily used for spatially resolved sampling, separation, detection, and semi-quantitation of physiologically-relevant peptide and protein hormones, including AVP and ACTH, directly from human tissue. In addition, the relative simplicity, rapidity, and specificity of this method support the potential of this basic technology, with further advancement, for assisting surgical decision-making. Graphical Abstract Mass spectrometry based profiling of hormones in human pituitary gland and tumor thin tissue sections. PMID:26084546

  12. Interactions of growth hormone secretagogues and growth hormone-releasing hormone/somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, G S; Bowers, C Y

    2001-02-01

    The class of novel synthetic compounds termed growth hormone secretagogues (GHSs) act in the hypothalamus through, as yet, unknown pathways. We performed physiologic and histochemical studies to further understand how the GHS system interacts with the well-established somatostatin (SRIF)/growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) neuroendocrine system for regulating pulsatile GH secretion. Comparison of the GH-releasing activities of the hexapeptide growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) and GHRH administered intravenously to conscious adult male rats showed that the pattern of GH responsiveness to GHRP-6 was markedly time-dependent, similar to that observed with GHRH. Immunoneutralization of endogenous SRIF reversed the blunted GH response to GHRP-6 at trough times, suggesting that GHRP-6 neither disrupts nor inhibits the cyclical release of endogenous hypothalamic SRIF. By striking contrast, passive immunization with anti-GHRH serum virtually obliterated the GH responses to GHRP-6, irrespective of the time of administration. These findings suggest that the GHSs do not act by altering SRIF release but, rather, stimulate GH release via GHRH-dependent pathways. Our dual chromogenic and autoradiographic in situ hybridization experiments revealed that a subpopulation of GHRH mRNA-containing neurons in the arcuate (Arc) nucleus and ventromedial nucleus (VMN) of the hypothalamus expressed the GHS receptor (GHS-R) gene. These results provide strong anatomic evidence that GHSs may directly stimulate GHRH release into hypophyseal portal blood, and thereby influence GH secretion, through interaction with the GHS-R on GHRH- containing neurons. Altogether, these findings support the notion that an additional neuroendocrine pathway may exist to regulate pulsatile GH secretion, possibly through the influence of the newly discovered GHS natural peptide, ghrelin. PMID:11322498

  13. Analogues of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone containing cytotoxic groups.

    PubMed Central

    Janáky, T; Juhász, A; Bajusz, S; Csernus, V; Srkalovic, G; Bokser, L; Milovanovic, S; Redding, T W; Rékási, Z; Nagy, A

    1992-01-01

    In an attempt to produce better cytotoxic analogues, chemotherapeutic antineoplastic radicals including an alkylating nitrogen mustard derivative of D-phenylalanine (D-melphalan), reactive cyclopropane, anthraquinone derivatives [2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone and the anticancer antibiotic doxorubicin], and an antimetabolite (methotrexate) were coupled to suitably modified agonists and antagonists of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH). Analogues with D-lysine6 and D-ornithine6 or N epsilon-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-lysine and N delta-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-ornithine were used as carriers for one or two cytotoxic moieties. The enhanced biological activities produced by the incorporation of D amino acids into position 6 of the agonistic analogues were further increased by the attachment of hydrophobic cytotoxic groups, resulting in compounds with 10-50 times higher activity than LH-RH. Most of the monosubstituted agonistic analogues showed high affinities for the membrane receptors of human breast cancer cells, while the receptor binding affinities of peptides containing two cytotoxic side chains were lower. Antagonistic carriers [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Trp3,Arg5,D-Lys6,D-Ala10] LH-RH [where Nal(2) is 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine], [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Trp3,Arg5,N epsilon-(2,3-diaminopropionyl)-D-Lys6,D-Ala10]LH-RH, and their D-Pal(3)3 homologs [Pal(3) is 3-(3-pyridyl)alanine] as well as [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(4Cl)2,D-Pal(3)3,Tyr5,N epsilon-(2,3-diamino-propionyl)-D-Lys6,D-Ala10]LH-RH were linked to cytotoxic compounds. The hybrid molecules inhibited ovulation in rats at doses of 10 micrograms and suppressed LH release in vitro. The receptor binding of cytotoxic analogues was decreased compared to the precursor peptides, although analogues with 2-(hydroxymethyl)anthraquinone hemiglutarate had high affinities. All of the cytotoxic analogues tested inhibited [3H]thymidine incorporation into DNA in cultures of human breast and prostate cancer cell lines

  14. Profiling of adrenocorticotropic hormone and arginine vasopressin in human pituitary gland and tumor thin tissue sections using droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling-HPLC–ESI-MS–MS

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R.; Changelian, Armen; Laws, Edward R.; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-18

    Described here are the results from the profiling of the proteins arginine vasopressin (AVP) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from normal human pituitary gland and pituitary adenoma tissue sections using a fully automated droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system for spatially resolved sampling, HPLC separation, and mass spectral detection. Excellent correlation was found between the protein distribution data obtained with this droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system and those data obtained with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) chemical imaging analyses of serial sections of the same tissue. The protein distributions correlated with the visible anatomic pattern of the pituitary gland. AVP was most abundant in the posterior pituitary gland region (neurohypophysis) and ATCH was dominant in the anterior pituitary gland region (adenohypophysis). The relative amounts of AVP and ACTH sampled from a series of ACTH secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenomas correlated with histopathological evaluation. ACTH was readily detected at significantly higher levels in regions of ACTH secreting adenomas and in normal anterior adenohypophysis compared to non-secreting adenoma and neurohypophysis. AVP was mostly detected in normal neurohypophysis as anticipated. This work demonstrates that a fully automated droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling system coupled to HPLC-ESI-MS/MS can be readily used for spatially resolved sampling, separation, detection, and semi-quantitation of physiologically-relevant peptide and protein hormones, such as AVP and ACTH, directly from human tissue. In addition, the relative simplicity, rapidity and specificity of the current methodology support the potential of this basic technology with further advancement for assisting surgical decision-making.

  15. Profiling of adrenocorticotropic hormone and arginine vasopressin in human pituitary gland and tumor thin tissue sections using droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling-HPLC–ESI-MS–MS

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R.; Changelian, Armen; Laws, Edward R.; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-18

    Described here are the results from the profiling of the proteins arginine vasopressin (AVP) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from normal human pituitary gland and pituitary adenoma tissue sections using a fully automated droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system for spatially resolved sampling, HPLC separation, and mass spectral detection. Excellent correlation was found between the protein distribution data obtained with this droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system and those data obtained with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) chemical imaging analyses of serial sections of the same tissue. The protein distributions correlated with the visible anatomic pattern of the pituitary gland.more » AVP was most abundant in the posterior pituitary gland region (neurohypophysis) and ATCH was dominant in the anterior pituitary gland region (adenohypophysis). The relative amounts of AVP and ACTH sampled from a series of ACTH secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenomas correlated with histopathological evaluation. ACTH was readily detected at significantly higher levels in regions of ACTH secreting adenomas and in normal anterior adenohypophysis compared to non-secreting adenoma and neurohypophysis. AVP was mostly detected in normal neurohypophysis as anticipated. This work demonstrates that a fully automated droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling system coupled to HPLC-ESI-MS/MS can be readily used for spatially resolved sampling, separation, detection, and semi-quantitation of physiologically-relevant peptide and protein hormones, such as AVP and ACTH, directly from human tissue. In addition, the relative simplicity, rapidity and specificity of the current methodology support the potential of this basic technology with further advancement for assisting surgical decision-making.« less

  16. Metabolism of growth hormone releasing peptides.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andreas; Delahaut, Philippe; Krug, Oliver; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2012-12-01

    New, potentially performance enhancing compounds have frequently been introduced to licit and illicit markets and rapidly distributed via worldwide operating Internet platforms. Developing fast analytical strategies to follow these new trends is one the most challenging issues for modern doping control analysis. Even if reference compounds for the active drugs are readily obtained, their unknown metabolism complicates effective testing strategies. Recently, a new class of small C-terminally amidated peptides comprising four to seven amino acid residues received considerable attention of sports drug testing authorities due to their ability to stimulate growth hormone release from the pituitary. The most promising candidates are the growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP)-1, -2, -4, -5, -6, hexarelin, alexamorelin, and ipamorelin. With the exemption of GHRP-2, the entity of these peptides represents nonapproved pharmaceuticals; however, via Internet providers, all compounds are readily available. To date, only limited information on the metabolism of these substances is available and merely one metabolite for GHRP-2 is established. Therefore, a comprehensive in vivo (po and iv administration in rats) and in vitro (with human serum and recombinant amidase) study was performed in order to generate information on urinary metabolites potentially useful for routine doping controls. The urine samples from the in vivo experiments were purified by mixed-mode cation-exchange solid-phase extraction and analyzed by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) separation followed by high-resolution/high-accuracy mass spectrometry. Combining the high resolution power of a benchtop Orbitrap mass analyzer for the first metabolite screening and the speed of a quadrupole/time-of-flight (Q-TOF) instrument for identification, urinary metabolites were screened by means of a sensitive full scan analysis and subsequently confirmed by high-accuracy product ion scan experiments. Two

  17. Glucoreceptors located in different areas mediate the hypoglycemia-induced release of growth hormone, prolactin, and adrenocorticotropin in man.

    PubMed

    Vigas, M; Tatár, P; Jurcovicová, J; Jezová, D

    1990-03-01

    In young male volunteers, the changes in growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release in response to insulin injection combined with the infusion of saline, glucose, and fructose were evaluated. Glucose infusion in a dose which prevented insulin hypoglycemia completely abolished endocrine responses. Infusion of fructose, which is known not to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), did not influence the GH release during hypoglycemia; however, it inhibited PRL secretion. The ACTH response was slightly attenuated and delayed, while the hypoglycemia-induced rise in cortisol levels was not modified by fructose infusion. These data indicate that the glucoreceptors mediating the signals for a complete counterregulatory neuroendocrine response are not located in a single brain structure. Stimuli for GH release are produced in areas of the central nervous system protected by the BBB, while those for PRL release are presumably present in structures not protected by the BBB. Glucoreceptors triggering ACTH release are located both inside and outside the BBB. PMID:2157998

  18. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone in the ovary.

    PubMed

    Metallinou, Chryssa; Asimakopoulos, Byron; Schröer, Andreas; Nikolettos, Nikos

    2007-12-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays a pivotal role in the physiology of reproduction in mammals. GnRH acts by binding to the GnRH receptor (GnRHR). In humans, only 1 conventional GnRH receptor subtype (type I GnRH receptor) has been found. In the human genome, 2 forms of GnRH have been identified, GnRH-I (mammal GnRH) and GnRH-II (chicken GnRH II). Both forms and their common receptor are expressed, apart from the hypothalamus, in various compartments of the human ovary. Gonadal steroids, gonadotropins, and GnRH itself controls the regulation of the GnRH/GnRHR system gene expression in the human ovary. The 2 types of GnRH acting paracrinally/autocrinally influence ovarian steroidogenesis, decrease the proliferation, and induce apoptosis of ovarian cells. In this review, the biology of GnRH/GnRHR system in humans, the potential roles of GnRH, and the direct effects of GnRH analogues in ovarian cells are discussed. PMID:18089592

  19. Regulation of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and luteinizing hormone secretion by hypothalamic amino acids.

    PubMed

    Donoso, A O; Seltzer, A M; Navarro, C E; Cabrera, R J; López, F J; Negro-Vilar, A

    1994-04-01

    1. The present review discusses the proposed roles of the amino acids glutamate and GABA in the central regulation of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) and in luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion. 2. Descriptions of the mechanisms of action of these neurotransmitters have focused on two diencephalic areas, namely, the preoptic-anterior hypothalamic area where the cell bodies of LHRH neurons are located, and the medial basal hypothalamus which contains the nerve endings of the LHRH system. Increasing endogenous GABA concentration by drugs, GABA agonists, or blockade of glutamatergic neurotransmission by selective antagonists in rats and non-human primates prevents ovulation and pulsatile LH release, and blunts the LH surges induced by estrogen or an estrogen-progesterone combination. In contrast, glutamate and different glutamate agonists such as NMDA, AMPA and kainate, can increase LHRH/LH secretion. 3. The simultaneous enhancement of glutamatergic activity and a decrease of GABAergic tone may positively influence the maturation of the pituitary-gonadal system in rats and non-human primates. Administration of glutamate receptor agonists has been shown to significantly advance the onset of puberty. Conversely, glutamate antagonists or increased endogenous GABA levels may delay the onset of puberty. The physiological regulation of LHRH/LH secretion may thus involve a GABA-glutamate interaction and a cooperative action of the various types of ionotropic glutamate receptors. 4. The inhibitory actions of GABA on LH release and ovulation may be exerted at the level of afferent nerve terminals that regulate LHRH secretion. A likely candidate is noradrenaline, as suggested by the synaptic connections between noradrenergic nerve terminals and GABAergic interneurons in the preoptic area. Recent experiments have provided complementary evidence for the physiological balance between inhibitory and excitatory transmission resulting in modulation of the action of

  20. Sellar gangliocytoma with adrenocorticotropic and prolactin adenoma.

    PubMed

    Kissiedu, Juliana O; Prayson, Richard A

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with weight gain, headaches, dizziness, erectile dysfunction and decreased libido. He was found to have elevated adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and prolactin serum levels. The imaging studies revealed a 1.4 cm sella/suprasellar mass which was compressing the optic chiasm. Histologic slides of the lesion showed a pituitary adenoma, marked by a proliferation of biphenotypic appearing cells, associated with a gangliocytoma, and marked by a proliferation of atypical appearing neuronal cells arranged against a glial-appearing background. Pituitary adenoma-gangliocytomas are benign combination tumors that rarely occur in the sellar region. Adenomas in this setting are sometimes functional, and rare patients with mixed adenomas (adenomas secreting more than one hormone) have been reported. To our knowledge, there has been only one other report of a combined ACTH and prolactin-producing adenoma with gangliocytoma, reported in a patient who also had acromegaly. In our patient, the immunohistochemical stains demonstrated that the bulk of the adenoma cells stained with prolactin antibody, and scattered clusters of cells within the adenoma stained positively for ACTH. The adenoma did not stain with antibodies to any of the other anterior pituitary hormones. Postoperatively, the elevated prolactin and ACTH levels returned to normal levels and there was no evidence of residual tumor. Adequate sampling and immunohistochemistry are important in rendering a correct diagnosis and in identifying the hormone status of mixed adenoma-gangliocytomas. PMID:26314658

  1. Luteinizing hormone release and androgen production of avian hybrids in response to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone injection.

    PubMed

    Mathis, G F; Burke, W H; McDougald, L R

    1983-04-01

    The levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and androgens were measured in sterile avian hybrids. Guinea fowl-chicken and peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids were bled before and after injection with LH- releasing hormone (LHRH). The preinjection LH levels for the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids were below or at the very lower limit of the assay sensitivity and the peafowl-guinea fowl hybrids averaged 1.3 ng/ml. Within 10 min after LHRH injection, LH had increased dramatically in both hybrids and then began to slowly decline. Androgen levels in the guinea fowl-chicken hybrids increased from 16.2 pg/ml to 95.2 pg/ml and continued to increase, reaching 287 pg/ml at the last bleeding 60 min after injection. PMID:6346309

  2. Oreochromis mossambicus (tilapia) corticotropin-releasing hormone: cDNA sequence and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    van Enckevort, F H; Pepels, P P; Leunissen, J A; Martens, G J; Wendelaar Bonga, S E; Balm, P H

    2000-02-01

    Although hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is involved in the stress response in all vertebrate groups, only a limited number of studies on this neuroendocrine peptide deals with non-mammalian neuroendocrine systems. We determined the cDNA sequence of the CRH precursor of the teleost Oreochromis mossambicus (tilapia) and studied the biological potency of the CRH peptide in a homologous teleost bioassay. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with degenerate and specific primers yielded fragments of tilapia CRH cDNA. Full-length CRH cDNA (988 nucleotides) was obtained by screening a tilapia hypothalamus cDNA library with the tilapia CRH PCR products. The precursor sequence (167 amino acids) contains a signal peptide, the CRH peptide and a motif conserved among all vertebrate CRH precursors. Tilapia CRH (41 aa) displays between 63% and 80% amino acid sequence identity to CRH from other vertebrates, whereas the degree of identity to members of the urotensin I/urocortin lineage is considerably lower. In a phylogenetic tree, based on alignment of all full CRH peptide precursors presently known, the three teleost CRH precursors (tilapia; sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka; white sucker, Catostomus commersoni) form a monophyletic group distinct from amphibian and mammalian precursors. Despite the differences between the primary structures of tilapia and rat CRH, maximally effective concentrations of tilapia and rat CRH were equally potent in stimulating adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and alpha-MSH release by tilapia pituitaries in vitro. The tilapia and salmon CRH sequences show that more variation exists between orthologous vertebrate CRH structures, and teleost CRHs in particular than previously recognized. Whether the structural differences reflect different mechanisms of action of this peptide in the stress response remains to be investigated. PMID:10718913

  3. Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome caused by neuroendocrine tumors of the thymus: 30-year experience with 16 patients at a single institute in the People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ye-ye; Li, Shan-qing; Liu, Hong-sheng; Qin, Ying-zhi; Li, Li; Huang, Cheng; Bi, Ya-lan; Meng, Yun-xiao; He, Jia; Zhou, Xiao-yun; Ma, Dong-jie

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Thymic neuroendocrine carcinomas (TNECs) are extremely uncommon. Certain cases of TNECs can produce the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cause ectopic ACTH syndrome (EAS). The current literature on this topic consists mainly of case reports, and therapeutic guidelines are lacking. The aim of this study was to discuss the diagnosis, surgical management, and prognosis of EAS caused by TNECs to improve clinical experience with this rare disease. Methods From June 1984 to June 2014, at the Peking Union Medical College Hospital, the surgical interventions and follow-up outcomes of 16 consecutive patients (eight men and eight women) with EAS caused by TNECs were retrospectively analyzed. Results The median age was 32.5 years (range: 13–47 years), and the median disease duration was 8.5 months (range: 1–150 months). All patients presented with clinical and biochemical evidence indicating a diagnosis of Cushing’s syndrome. Contrast-enhanced thoracic computed tomography scans were critical to locating the ACTH-producing tumor and evaluating the feasibility of resection. All patients underwent surgery. One patient died of septicemia in the intensive care unit 2 weeks after surgery. No other morbidity or mortality occurred during the perioperative period. The median overall survival (OS) was 41 months (95% CI: 30.3–51.7 months), and the progression-free survival was 28 months (95% CI: 21.6–34.3 months). Both overall survival (P=0.002) and progression-free survival (P=0.030) improved significantly after complete resection. Conclusion TNEC is an extremely aggressive disease that should be considered when treating patients with Cushing’s syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion. In particular, all suspected patients should undergo contrast-enhanced thoracic computed tomography scans to facilitate early diagnosis. The current first-line treatment is surgical resection, and complete resection is a favorable prognostic factor. However

  4. PEGylation of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRF) analogues.

    PubMed

    Esposito, P; Barbero, L; Caccia, P; Caliceti, P; D'Antonio, M; Piquet, G; Veronese, F M

    2003-09-26

    Synthetically produced GRF1-29 (Sermorelin) has an amino acid composition identical to the N-terminal 29 amino acids sequence of the natural hypothalamic GHRH1-44 (Figure 1). It maintains bioactivity in vitro and is almost equally effective in eliciting secretion of endogenous growth hormone in vivo. The main drawbacks associated with the pharmaceutical use of hGRF1-29 relate to its short half-life in plasma, about 10-20 min in humans, which is caused mostly by renal ultrafiltration and enzymatic degradation at the N terminus. PEGylation has been considered as one valid approach to obtain more stable forms of the peptide, with a longer in vivo half-life and ultimately with increased pharmacodynamic response along the somatotropic axis (endogenous GH, IGF-1 levels). Different PEGylated GRF conjugates were obtained and their bioactivity was tested in vitro and in vivo by monitoring endogenous growth hormone (GH) serum levels after intravenous (i.v.) injection in rats, and intravenous and subcutaneous (s.c.) injection in pigs. It was found that GRF-PEG conjugates are able to bind and activate the human GRF receptor, although with different potency. The effect of PEG molecular weight, number of PEG chains bound and position of PEGylation site on GRF activity were investigated. Mono-PEGylated isomers with a PEG5000 polymer chain linked to Lys 12 or Lys 21 residues, showed high biological activity in vitro, which is similar to that of hGRF1-29, and a higher pharmacodynamic response as compared to unmodified GRF molecule. PMID:14499707

  5. Mapping the human corticotropin releasing hormone binding protein gene (CRHBP) to the long arm of chromosome 5 (5q11.2-q13.3)

    SciTech Connect

    Vamvakopoulos, N.C.; Sioutopoulou, T.O.; Durkin, S.A.

    1995-01-01

    Unexpected stimulation or stress activates the heat shock protein (hsp) system at the cellular level and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis at the level of the whole organism. At the molecular level, these two systems communicate through the functional interaction between hsp90 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR). The corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) system regulates the mammalian stress response by coordinating the activity of the HPA axis. It consists of the 41-amino-acid-long principal hypothalamic secretagogue for pituitary adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), CRH, its receptor (CRHR), and its binding protein (CRHBP). Because of its central role in the coordination of stress response and whole body homeostasis, the CRH system has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neuroendocrine and psychiatric disease. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Clinical studies with d-Trp 6-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in anovulatory women.

    PubMed

    Jaramillo, C J; Charro-Salgado, A; Peréz-Infante, V; del Campo, G L; Botella-Llusiá, J; Coy, D H; Schally, A V

    1978-04-01

    Nine anovulatory patients with hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction were treated with d-Trp6-luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, an analog with far greater gonadotropin-releasing activity than luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. Four of eight patients, who were formerly unsuccessfully treated with clomiphene, human chorionic gonadotropin, and human menopausal gonadotropin, ovulated after treatment with the peptide alone or with peptide preceded by clomiphene, and three became pregnant. The ninth patient, who had amenorrhea and anovulation due to excessive loss of weight caused by anorexia nervosa, also ovulated after treatment with the analog. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of this potent analog for induction of ovulation and pregnancy and point favorably toward clinical applications. PMID:348500

  7. Effect of growth hormone-releasing factor on growth hormone release in children with radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Lustig, R.H.; Schriock, E.A.; Kaplan, S.L.; Grumbach, M.M.

    1985-08-01

    Five male children who received cranial irradiation for extrahypothalamic intracranial neoplasms or leukemia and subsequently developed severe growth hormone (GH) deficiency were challenged with synthetic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF-44), in an attempt to distinguish hypothalamic from pituitary dysfunction as a cause of their GH deficiency, and to assess the readily releasable GH reserve in the pituitary. In response to a pulse of GRF-44 (5 micrograms/kg intravenously), mean peak GH levels rose to values higher than those evoked by the pharmacologic agents L-dopa or arginine (6.4 +/- 1.3 ng/mL v 1.5 +/- 0.4 ng/mL, P less than .05). The peak GH value occurred at a mean of 26.0 minutes after administration of GRF-44. These responses were similar to those obtained in children with severe GH deficiency due to other etiologies (peak GH 6.3 +/- 1.7 ng/mL, mean 28.0 minutes). In addition, there was a trend toward an inverse relationship between peak GH response to GRF-44 and the postirradiation interval. Prolactin and somatomedin-C levels did not change significantly after the administration of a single dose of GRF-44. The results of this study support the hypothesis that cranial irradiation in children can lead to hypothalamic GRF deficiency secondary to radiation injury of hypothalamic GRF-secreting neurons. This study also lends support to the potential therapeutic usefulness of GRF-44 or an analog for GH deficiency secondary to cranial irradiation.

  8. Corticotropin-releasing hormone: Mediator of vertebrate life stage transitions?

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yugo; Grommen, Sylvia V H; De Groef, Bert

    2016-03-01

    Hormones, particularly thyroid hormones and corticosteroids, play critical roles in vertebrate life stage transitions such as amphibian metamorphosis, hatching in precocial birds, and smoltification in salmonids. Since they synergistically regulate several metabolic and developmental processes that accompany vertebrate life stage transitions, the existence of extensive cross-communication between the adrenal/interrenal and thyroidal axes is not surprising. Synergies of corticosteroids and thyroid hormones are based on effects at the level of tissue hormone sensitivity and gene regulation. In addition, in representative nonmammalian vertebrates, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) stimulates hypophyseal thyrotropin secretion, and thus functions as a common regulator of both the adrenal/interrenal and thyroidal axes to release corticosteroids and thyroid hormones. The dual function of CRH has been speculated to control or affect the timing of vertebrate life history transitions across taxa. After a brief overview of recent insights in the molecular mechanisms behind the synergic actions of thyroid hormones and corticosteroids during life stage transitions, this review examines the evidence for a possible role of CRH in controlling vertebrate life stage transitions. PMID:26874222

  9. Algorithmic complexity of growth hormone release in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Prank, K.; Wagner, M.; Brabant, G.

    1996-12-31

    Most hormones are secreted in an pulsatile rather than in a constant manner. This temporal pattern of pulsatile hormone release plays an important role in the regulation of cellular function and structure. In healthy humans growth hormone (GH) secretion is characterized by distinct pulses whereas patients bearing a GH producing tumor accompanied with excessive secretion (acromegaly) exhibit a highly irregular pattern of GH release. It has been hypothesized that this highly disorderly pattern of GH release in acromegaly arises from random events in the GH-producing tumor under decreased normal control of GH secretion. Using a context-free grammar complexity measure (algorithmic complexity) in conjunction with random surrogate data sets we demonstrate that the temporal pattern of GH release in acromegaly is not significantly different from a variety of stochastic processes. In contrast, normal subjects clearly exhibit deterministic structure in their temporal patterns of GH secretion. Our results support the hypothesis that GH release in acromegaly is due to random events in the GH-producing tumorous cells which might become independent from hypothalamic regulation. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  10. Effect of Chlorotriazine Pesticides on Gonadotrophin Releasing Hormone in the Neuronal GT1-7 Cell Line and Hypothalamic Explants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulates the release of pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone. These pituitary hormones are necessary for normal reproductive function in both males and females. It is well recognized that disruption of nor...

  11. Active immunization to luteinizing hormone releasing hormone to inhibit the induction of mammary tumors in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ravdin, P.M.; Jordan, V.C.

    1988-01-01

    Immunization of female rats with a bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugate results in suppression of dimethylbenzanthracene mammary tumor incidence. Tumor incidence was 1.3, and 1.29 tumors per rat in bovine serum albumin alone (n = 10) and unimmunized (n = 18) control groups, but no tumors were found in the bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugate immunized animals (n = 10). In a second experiment immunization with bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone releasing hormone conjugates reduced tumor incidence to 0.3 tumors per rat (n = 10) from the 1.2 tumors per animal seen in the control animals (n = 10) immunized with bovine serum albumin alone. Bovine serum albumin-luteinizing hormone immunization caused the production of anti-LHRH antibodies, an interruption of estrous cycles, lowered serum estradiol and progesterone levels, and atrophy of the ovaries and uteri. Immunization BSA-hormone conjugates is a novel anti-tumor strategy.

  12. Growth hormone releasing factor-like immunoreactivity in human milk.

    PubMed

    Werner, H; Amarant, T; Fridkin, M; Koch, Y

    1986-03-28

    The presence of immunoreactive growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) in human milk has been demonstrated. By using sequential high performance liquid chromatography, it has been shown that most of the immunoreactivity co-elutes with the synthetic, hypothalamic-like, GRF (1-40). The concentrations of GRF detected (between 152 and 432 pg GRF/ml milk) exceed several fold its values in plasma. PMID:3083812

  13. Rat growth-hormone release stimulators from fenugreek seeds.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sang Hee; Lee, Eun Ju; Kim, Ju Sun; Kang, Sam Sik; Ha, Hyekyung; Lee, Ho Young; Kim, Chungsook; Lee, Je-Hyun; Son, Kun Ho

    2008-09-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of MeOH extract from fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.) seeds resulted in the isolation of two rat growth-hormone release stimulators in vitro, fenugreek saponin I (1) and dioscin (9), along with two new, i.e., 2 and 3, and five known analogues, i.e., 4-8. The structures of the new steroidal saponins, fenugreek saponins I, II, and III (1-3, resp.), were determined as gitogenin 3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside, sarsasapogenin 3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside, and gitogenin 3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranoside, respectively. Fenugreek saponin I (1) and dioscin (9) caused ca. 12.5- and 17.7-fold stimulation of release, respectively, of rat growth hormone from rat pituitary cells, whereas gitogenin (5) showed moderate activity. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that steroidal saponins stimulate rat growth-hormone release in rat pituitary cells. PMID:18816528

  14. Immunoreactive luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in the seminal plasma and human semen parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, S.; Makino, T.; Iizuka, R.

    1985-04-01

    A luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH)-like substance has been detected in human seminal plasma by a radioimmunoassay (RIA) with a highly specific anti-LH-RH antiserum. The seminal samples - not only the plasma itself but also the sample extracted by an acid/alcohol method - showed satisfactory displacement curves in our RIA system. The relationship between fertility and the LH-RH values in the seminal plasma was studied by comparing the peptide levels with sperm concentration and motility. By these two parameters, 103 samples were divided into four groups. In the low-concentration groups (oligozoospermic patients), the hormonal concentrations differed significantly between those specimens demonstrating good and poor motility. These data suggest that this immunoreactive LH-RH may play a role in human spermatogenesis.

  15. Effects of chronic and subtoxic chlorobenzenes on adrenocorticotrophic hormone release.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Zsolt; Pálföldi, Regina; László, Anna; Radács, Marianna; Sepp, Krisztián; Hausinger, Péter; Tiszlavicz, László; Valkusz, Zsuzsanna; Gálfi, Márta

    2015-08-01

    Many environmental chemicals and pesticides have been found to alter neuroendocrine communication in exposed biological objects. The environmental loads have primary and secondary effects that can alter the homeostatic regulation potential. Since it is difficult to avoid human exposition, a potentially important area of research to develop in vivo and in vitro experimental models. In this context, the primary aim of this study was to demonstrate the effects of chlorobenzenes on adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) release. In our experimental study, male Wistar rats were exposed to 0.1, 1.0 and 10 μg/b.w. (body weight)kg of 1,2,4- trichlorobenzene and hexachlorobenzene (ClB) mix via gastric tube for 30, 60 or 90 days. At the endpoints of the experiment blood samples were taken and animals were decapitated. Primary, monolayer adenohypophysis cell cultures were prepared by enzymatic and mechanical digestion. The ACTH hormone content in serum and supernatant media was measured by immuno-chemiluminescence assay. The Mg(2+)-dependent ATPase activity was determined by modified method of Martin and Dotty. Significant differences were detected in the hormone release between the control and treated groups. The hormone release was enhanced characteristically in exposed groups depending upon the dose and duration of exposure. The Mg(2+)-ATPase activity enhanced after chronic and subtoxic ClB exposition. Light microscopy revealed that the adenohypophysis seemed to be more abundant. Results indicate that Wistar rats exposed to subtoxic ClB have direct and indirect effects on hypothalamus-hypophysis-adrenal axis. PMID:26257359

  16. Pituitary self-priming actions of gonadotropin-releasing hormone. Kinetics of estradiol's potentiating effects on gonadotropin-releasing hormone-facilitated luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone release in healthy postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, J D; Evans, W S; Rogol, A D; Kolp, L; Thorner, M O; Stumpf, P

    1986-06-01

    We examined the kinetically distinct characteristics of estradiol's effects upon pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) release in response to pulses of exogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in healthy postmenopausal individuals. The putative self-priming actions of GnRH on LH and FSH release were tested by intravenous injections of equal paired doses of GnRH (10 micrograms) before and after 1, 5, 10, and 30 d of pure estradiol-17 beta delivery via an intravaginal silastic ring. Self-priming actions of GnRH, as defined by heightened gonadotropin release in response to the second pulse of GnRH compared with the first, were completely absent in the hypoestrogenemic state. However, estradiol administration unmasked GnRH self-priming in a time-dependent fashion, with maximal expression after 5 and 10 d of steroid replacement, followed by attenuation by 30 d. Since estradiol's modulation of GnRH action was expressed differentially on LH and FSH release, we suggest that such facilitation of GnRH-stimulated pituitary LH and FSH release may provide an additional mechanism for dissociated secretion of gonadotropic hormones in health or disease. PMID:3086382

  17. Hedgehog signaling activation induces stem cell proliferation and hormone release in the adult pituitary gland

    PubMed Central

    Pyczek, Joanna; Buslei, Rolf; Schult, David; Hölsken, Annett; Buchfelder, Michael; Heß, Ina; Hahn, Heidi; Uhmann, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling is known to be essential during the embryonal development of the pituitary gland but the knowledge about its role in the adult pituitary and in associated tumors is sparse. In this report we investigated the effect of excess Hh signaling activation in murine pituitary explants and analyzed the HH signaling status of human adenopituitary lobes and a large cohort of pituitary adenomas. Our data show that excess Hh signaling led to increased proliferation of Sox2+ and Sox9+ adult pituitary stem cells and to elevated expression levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (Acth), growth hormone (Gh) and prolactin (Prl) in the adult gland. Inhibition of the pathway by cyclopamine reversed these effects indicating that active Hh signaling positively regulates proliferative processes of adult pituitary stem cells and hormone production in the anterior pituitary. Since hormone producing cells of the adenohypophysis as well as ACTH-, GH- and PRL-immunopositive adenomas express SHH and its target GLI1, we furthermore propose that excess HH signaling is involved in the development/maintenance of hormone-producing pituitary adenomas. These findings advance the understanding of physiological hormone regulation and may open new treatment options for pituitary tumors. PMID:27109116

  18. Hedgehog signaling activation induces stem cell proliferation and hormone release in the adult pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Pyczek, Joanna; Buslei, Rolf; Schult, David; Hölsken, Annett; Buchfelder, Michael; Heß, Ina; Hahn, Heidi; Uhmann, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling is known to be essential during the embryonal development of the pituitary gland but the knowledge about its role in the adult pituitary and in associated tumors is sparse. In this report we investigated the effect of excess Hh signaling activation in murine pituitary explants and analyzed the HH signaling status of human adenopituitary lobes and a large cohort of pituitary adenomas. Our data show that excess Hh signaling led to increased proliferation of Sox2(+) and Sox9(+) adult pituitary stem cells and to elevated expression levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (Acth), growth hormone (Gh) and prolactin (Prl) in the adult gland. Inhibition of the pathway by cyclopamine reversed these effects indicating that active Hh signaling positively regulates proliferative processes of adult pituitary stem cells and hormone production in the anterior pituitary. Since hormone producing cells of the adenohypophysis as well as ACTH-, GH- and PRL-immunopositive adenomas express SHH and its target GLI1, we furthermore propose that excess HH signaling is involved in the development/maintenance of hormone-producing pituitary adenomas. These findings advance the understanding of physiological hormone regulation and may open new treatment options for pituitary tumors. PMID:27109116

  19. Effects of retinoic acid on growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor gene expression and growth hormone secretion in rat anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Maliza, Rita; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Azuma, Morio; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2016-06-30

    Retinoic acid (RA) is an important signaling molecule in embryonic development and adult tissue. The actions of RA are mediated by the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR), which regulate gene expression. RAR and RXR are widely expressed in the anterior pituitary gland. RA was reported to stimulate growth hormone (GH) gene expression in the anterior pituitary cells. However, current evidence is unclear on the role of RA in gene expression of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (Ghrh-r), growth hormone secretagogue receptor (Ghs-r) and somatostatin receptors (Sst-rs). Using isolated anterior pituitary cells of rats, we examined the effects of RA on gene expression of these receptors and GH release. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA; 10(-6) M) for 24 h increased gene expression levels of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r; however, expressions of Sst-r2 and Sst-r5 were unchanged. Combination treatment with the RAR-agonist Am80 and RXR-agonist PA024 mimicked the effects of ATRA on Ghrh-r and Ghs-r gene expressions. Exposure of isolated pituitary cells to ATRA had no effect on basal GH release. In contrast, ATRA increased growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH)- and ghrelin-stimulated GH release from cultured anterior pituitary cells. Our results suggest that expressions of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r are regulated by RA through the RAR-RXR receptor complex and that RA enhances the effects of GHRH and ghrelin on GH release from the anterior pituitary gland. PMID:27052215

  20. Pulsatile Release of Parathyroid Hormone from an Implantable Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohua; Pettway, Glenda J.; McCauley, Laurie K.; Ma, Peter X.

    2007-01-01

    Intermittent (pulsatile) administration of parathyroid hormone (PTH) is known to improve bone micro-architecture, mineral density and strength. Therefore, daily injection of PTH has been clinically used for the treatment of osteoporosis. However, this regimen of administration is not convenient and is not a favorable choice of patients. In this study, an implantable delivery system has been developed to achieve pulsatile release of PTH. A well-defined cylindrical device was first fabricated with a biodegradable polymer, poly(lactic acid) (PLLA), using a reverse solid free form fabrication technique. Three-component polyanhydrides composed of sebacic acid, 1,3-bis(p-carboxyphenoxy) propane and poly(ethylene glycol) were synthesized and used as isolation layers. The polyanhydride isolation layers and PTH-loaded alginate layers were then stacked alternately within the delivery device. The gap between the stacked PTH-releasing core and the device frame was filled with PLLA to seal. Multi-pulse PTH release was achieved using the implantable device. The lag time between two adjacent pulses were modulated by the composition and the film thickness of the polyanhydride. The released PTH was demonstrated to be biologically active using an in vitro assay. Timed sequential release of multiple drugs has also been demonstrated. The implantable device holds promise for both systemic and local therapies. PMID:17576005

  1. Effects of plasmid-mediated growth hormone-releasing hormone in severely debilitated dogs with cancer.

    PubMed

    Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra; Hahn, Kevin A; King, Glen K; Cummings, Kathleen K; Carpenter, Robert H

    2002-12-01

    Cachexia is a common manifestation of late stage malignancy and is characterized by anemia, anorexia, muscle wasting, loss of adipose tissue, and fatigue. Although cachexia is disabling and can diminish the life expectancy of cancer patients, there are still no effective therapies for this condition. We have examined the feasibility of using a myogenic plasmid to express growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) in severely debilitated companion dogs with naturally occurring tumors. At a median of 16 days after intramuscular delivery of the plasmid, serum concentrations of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), a measure of GHRH activity, were increased in 12 of 16 dogs (P < 0.01). These increases ranged from 21 to 120% (median, 49%) of the pretreatment values and were generally sustained or higher on the final evaluation. Anemia resolved posttreatment, as indicated by significant increases in mean red blood cell count, hematocrit, and hemoglobin concentrations, and there was also a significant rise in the percentage of circulating lymphocytes. Treated dogs maintained their weights over the 56-day study and did not show any adverse effects from the GHRH gene transfer. We conclude that intramuscular injection of a GHRH-expressing plasmid is both safe and capable of stimulating the release of growth hormone and IGF-I in large animals. The observed anabolic responses to a single dose of this therapy might be beneficial in patients with cancer-associated anemia and cachexia. PMID:12498779

  2. Discovery of growth hormone-releasing hormones and receptors in nonmammalian vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Leo T. O.; Siu, Francis K. Y.; Tam, Janice K. V.; Lau, Ivy T. Y.; Wong, Anderson O. L.; Lin, Marie C. M.; Vaudry, Hubert; Chow, Billy K. C.

    2007-01-01

    In mammals, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is the most important neuroendocrine factor that stimulates the release of growth hormone (GH) from the anterior pituitary. In nonmammalian vertebrates, however, the previously named GHRH-like peptides were unable to demonstrate robust GH-releasing activities. In this article, we provide evidence that these GHRH-like peptides are homologues of mammalian PACAP-related peptides (PRP). Instead, GHRH peptides encoded in cDNAs isolated from goldfish, zebrafish, and African clawed frog were identified. Moreover, receptors specific for these GHRHs were characterized from goldfish and zebrafish. These GHRHs and GHRH receptors (GHRH-Rs) are phylogenetically and structurally more similar to their mammalian counterparts than the previously named GHRH-like peptides and GHRH-like receptors. Information regarding their chromosomal locations and organization of neighboring genes confirmed that they share the same origins as the mammalian genes. Functionally, the goldfish GHRH dose-dependently activates cAMP production in receptor-transfected CHO cells as well as GH release from goldfish pituitary cells. Tissue distribution studies showed that the goldfish GHRH is expressed almost exclusively in the brain, whereas the goldfish GHRH-R is actively expressed in brain and pituitary. Taken together, these results provide evidence for a previously uncharacterized GHRH-GHRH-R axis in nonmammalian vertebrates. Based on these data, a comprehensive evolutionary scheme for GHRH, PRP-PACAP, and PHI-VIP genes in relation to three rounds of genome duplication early on in vertebrate evolution is proposed. These GHRHs, also found in flounder, Fugu, medaka, stickleback, Tetraodon, and rainbow trout, provide research directions regarding the neuroendocrine control of growth in vertebrates. PMID:17283332

  3. Corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulates expression of leptin, 11beta-HSD2 and syncytin-1 in primary human trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The placental syncytiotrophoblast is the major source of maternal plasma corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in the second half of pregnancy. Placental CRH exerts multiple functions in the maternal organism: It induces the adrenal secretion of cortisol via the stimulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone, regulates the timing of birth via its actions in the myometrium and inhibits the invasion of extravillous trophoblast cells in vitro. However, the auto- and paracrine actions of CRH on the syncytiotrophoblast itself are unknown. Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is accompanied by an increase in placental CRH, which could be of pathophysiological relevance for the dysregulation in syncytialisation seen in IUGR placentas. Methods We aimed to determine the effect of CRH on isolated primary trophoblastic cells in vitro. After CRH stimulation the trophoblast syncytialisation rate was monitored via syncytin-1 gene expression and beta-hCG (beta-human chorionic gonadotropine) ELISA in culture supernatant. The expression of the IUGR marker genes leptin and 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11beta-HSD2) was measured continuously over a period of 72 h. We hypothesized that CRH might attenuate syncytialisation, induce leptin, and reduce 11beta-HSD2 expression in primary villous trophoblasts, which are known features of IUGR. Results CRH did not influence the differentiation of isolated trophoblasts into functional syncytium as determined by beta-hCG secretion, albeit inducing syncytin-1 expression. Following syncytialisation, CRH treatment significantly increased leptin and 11beta-HSD2 expression, as well as leptin secretion into culture supernatant after 48 h. Conclusion The relevance of CRH for placental physiology is underlined by the present in vitro study. The induction of leptin and 11beta-HSD2 in the syncytiotrophoblast by CRH might promote fetal nutrient supply and placental corticosteroid metabolism in the phase before labour induction. PMID

  4. Infundibular gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons are inhibited by direct opioid and autoregulatory synapses in juvenile monkeys.

    PubMed

    Thind, K K; Goldsmith, P C

    1988-03-01

    A consistent group of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) cell bodies occurs in the ventral hypothalamic tract at the infundibular lip (IL), just below the arcuate nucleus (ARC), at the site of the so-called GnRH 'pulse generator'. Immunocytochemical studies were performed to examine contacts between these GnRH neurons and nearby opioid peptide (OP) neurons in the ARC. Vibratome sections of the medial basal hypothalamus were obtained from colchicine-treated, perfusion-fixed juvenile female rhesus macaques. They were sequentially immunostained for GnRH using the peroxidase antiperoxidase (PAP) technique and for adrenocorticotropic hormone (to identify OP neurons) using colloidal gold. The PAP and colloidal gold markers could be clearly differentiated at both the light and electron microscopic levels. OP+ and GnRH+ neuronal cell bodies occurred close together in the ARC-IL region, sometimes within the same electron microscope grid square. At the electron microscopic level, OP+ axons formed symmetrical synapses with GnRH+ somata and proximal axons, suggesting a pronounced inhibitory influence on GnRH neuronal activity. Examples of OP+/GnRH+ axodendritic and dendrodendritic contacts were also observed. Furthermore, symmetrical synapses between GnRH+ axons and GnRH+ perikarya or dendrites were occasionally present. The data obtained here clearly indicate that direct OP inhibition of GnRH 'pulse generator' neurons occurs at the ARC-IL in juvenile primates. It is suggested that these OP neurons help mediate steroid-negative feedback at the hypothalamic level. Furthermore, it is suggested that OP/GnRH and GnRH/GnRH inhibitory contacts may play a role in maturation and control of reproductive function. PMID:2834660

  5. Intranasal treatment with luteinising hormone releasing hormone agonist in women with endometriosis.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, R W; Fraser, H M; Boyle, H

    1983-01-01

    An agonist analogue of luteinising hormone releasing hormone (buserelin) was successfully used to treat women with endometriosis. A dose of 200 micrograms administered intranasally thrice daily was found to be effective in five patients, in whom the endometriotic lesions resolved after six months' treatment. Failure occurred in a sixth patient, who received only 400 micrograms once daily. Anovulation was induced in all subjects together with suppression of menstruation after the first month of treatment. Symptoms of abdominal pain, dysmenorrhoea, and dyspareunia were relieved during treatment, and one previously infertile patient conceived within two months of stopping treatment. No side effects were reported with this dosage, and the results suggest a new form of treatment for patients with endometriosis. PMID:6416542

  6. Highly potent antagonists of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone free of edematogenic effects.

    PubMed Central

    Bajusz, S; Kovacs, M; Gazdag, M; Bokser, L; Karashima, T; Csernus, V J; Janaky, T; Guoth, J; Schally, A V

    1988-01-01

    To eliminate the undesirable edematogenic effect of the luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) antagonists containing basic D amino acids at position 6, exemplified by [Ac-D-Phe(pCl)1,2,D-Trp3,D-Arg6,D-Ala10]LH-RH [Phe(pCl) indicates 4-chlorophenylalanine], analogs with D-ureidoalkyl amino acids such as D-citrulline (D-Cit) or D-homocitrulline (D-Hci) at position 6 were synthesized and tested in several systems in vitro and in vivo. HPLC analysis revealed that the overall hydrophobicity of the D-Cit/D-Hci6 analogs was similar to that of the basic D-Arg6 antagonists. In vitro, most of the analogs completely inhibited LH-RH-mediated luteinizing hormone release in perfused rat pituitary cell systems at an antagonist to LH-RH molar ratio of 5:1. In vivo, the most active peptides, [Ac-D-Nal(2)1,D-Phe(pCl)2,D-Trp3,D-Cit6,D-Ala10]LH-RH [Nal(2) indicates 3-(2-naphthyl)alanine] and its D-Hci6 analog, caused 100% inhibition of ovulation in cycling rats in doses of 3 micrograms and suppressed the luteinizing hormone level in ovariectomized female rats for 47 hr when administered at doses of 25 micrograms. Characteristically, these peptides did not exert any edematogenic effects even at 1.5 mg/kg. These properties of the D-Cit/D-Hci6 antagonists may make them useful clinically. PMID:3278323

  7. The influence of photoperiod on gonadotrophin-releasing hormone stimulated luteinising hormone release in the anoestrous mare.

    PubMed

    Nequin, L G; King, S S; Matt, K S; Jurak, R C

    1990-09-01

    The transition from anoestrus to oestrus in mares is controlled by photoperiod. The present study examined whether additional daylength would accelerate the mares' response to gonadotrophin-releasing-hormone (GnRH). Nine anoestrous mares were placed under ambient or artificial long lighting on 7th January. The four month experimental period was divided into a three-day sequence which was repeated at 21 day intervals. Ovaries were palpated rectally on Day 1; saline was injected (1 ml intravenously [iv]) on Day 2; GnRH was administered (0.59 microgram/kg bodyweight iv) on Day 3. Blood was taken at -60, 0, 15, 30, 60 and 120 mins relative to saline or GnRH treatment. Serum luteinising hormone (LH) was determined by a homologous equine radioimmunoassay (RIA). Several criteria were employed to define a positive response to GnRH and the results were analysed by Fisher's exact probability test. Treatment with artificial light allowed a response to GnRH within six weeks whereas the mares in ambient lighting took 12 weeks to respond to GnRH. The advancement in the time of response to GnRH under the long photoperiod could be related to changes in pituitary LH content, accelerated follicular activity or alterations in other brain-pituitary hormone levels. PMID:2226401

  8. Effects of oral chlortetracycline and dietary protein level on plasma concentrations of growth hormone and thyroid hormones in beef steers before and after challenge with a combination of thyrotropin-releasing hormone and growth hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Rumsey, T S; McLeod, K; Elsasser, T H; Kahl, S; Baldwin, R L

    1999-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a subtherapeutic level of chlortetracycline (CTC) fed to growing beef steers under conditions of limited and adequate dietary protein on plasma concentrations of GH, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and thyroid hormones before and after an injection of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) + GHRH. Young beef steers (n = 32; average BW = 285 kg) were assigned to a 2x2 factorial arrangement of treatments of either a 10 or 13% crude protein diet (70% concentrate, 15% wheat straw, and 15% cottonseed hulls) and either a corn meal carrier or carrier + 350 mg of CTC daily top dressed on the diet. Steers were fed ad libitum amounts of diet for 56 d, and a jugular catheter was then placed in each steer in four groups (two steers from each treatment combination per group) during four consecutive days (one group per day). Each steer was injected via the jugular catheter with 1.0 microg/kg BW TRH + .1 microg/kg BW GHRH in 10 mL of saline at 0800. Blood samples were collected at -30, -15, 0, 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 45, 60, 120, 240, and 360 min after releasing hormone injection. Plasma samples were analyzed for GH, TSH, thyroxine (T4), and triiodothyronine (T3). After 84 d on trial, the steers were slaughtered and the pituitary and samples of liver were collected and analyzed for 5'-deiodinase activity. Feeding CTC attenuated the GH response to releasing hormone challenge by 26% for both area under the response curve (P<.03) and peak response (P<.10). Likewise, CTC attenuated the TSH response to releasing hormone challenge for area under the response curve by 16% (P<.10) and peak response by 33% (P<.02), and attenuated the T4 response for area under the curve by 12% (P<.08) and peak response by 14% (P<.04). Type II deiodinase activity in the pituitary was 36% less (P<.02) in CTC-fed steers than in steers not fed CTC. The results of this study are interpreted to suggest that feeding subtherapeutic levels of CTC to young

  9. Transplacental transfer of a growth hormone-releasing hormone peptide from mother to fetus in the rat.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies showed that when growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) was administered to either pregnant rats or pigs as a plasmid-mediated therapy, pituitary weight, somatotroph and lactotroph numbers, and postnatal growth rate of the offspring increased. To determine if these responses result...

  10. Thyroid hormones regulate levels of thyrotropin-releasing-hormone mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Koller, K.J.; Wolff, R.S.; Warden, M.K.; Zoeller, R.T.

    1987-10-01

    Cellular levels of messenger RNA encoding thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) were measured in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and the reticular nucleus of the thalamus in male rats after chemical thyroidectomy and thyroid hormone, replacement. TRH mRNA levels were measured by quantitative in situ hybridization histochemistry using a /sup 35/S-labeled synthetic 48-base oligodeoxynucleotide probe and quantitative autoradiography. Chemical thyroidectomy, produced by the administration of 6-(n-propyl)-2-thiouracil (PrSur), reduced plasma thyroxine below detection limits and significantly increased TRH mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus. Treatments with exogenous L-triiodothyronine (T/sub 3/) reduced TRH mRNA to the same level in both hypothyroid and euthyroid animals. Neither PrSur treatment nor T/sub 3/ replacement influenced TRH mRNA levels in the reticular nucleus of the thalamus. Blot hybridization analysis of electrophoretically fractionated total RNA from pituitaries of these animals indicated that thyrotropin-..beta.. mRNA levels were elevated after thyroidectomy and reduced by T/sub 3/ treatment, showing that the pituitary-thyroid axis was indeed stimulated by PrSur treatment. These results suggest that thyroid hormones are involved, either directly or indirectly, in regulating the biosynthesis of TRH in the thyrotropic center of the hypothalamus.

  11. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist-induced pituitary apoplexy

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Fergus; Navin, Patrick; Brett, Francesca; Dennedy, Michael C

    2016-01-01

    Summary Pituitary apoplexy represents an uncommon endocrine emergency with potentially life-threatening consequences. Drug-induced pituitary apoplexy is a rare but important consideration when evaluating patients with this presentation. We describe an unusual case of a patient with a known pituitary macroadenoma presenting with acute-onset third nerve palsy and headache secondary to tumour enlargement and apoplexy. This followed gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) agonist therapy used to treat metastatic prostate carcinoma. Following acute management, the patient underwent transphenoidal debulking of his pituitary gland with resolution of his third nerve palsy. Subsequent retrospective data interpretation revealed that this had been a secretory gonadotropinoma and GNRH agonist therapy resulted in raised gonadotropins and testosterone. Hence, further management of his prostate carcinoma required GNRH antagonist therapy and external beam radiotherapy. This case demonstrates an uncommon complication of GNRH agonist therapy in the setting of a pituitary macroadenoma. It also highlights the importance of careful, serial data interpretation in patients with pituitary adenomas. Finally, this case presents a unique insight into the challenges of managing a hormonal-dependent prostate cancer in a patient with a secretory pituitary tumour. Learning points While non-functioning gonadotropinomas represent the most common form of pituitary macroadenoma, functioning gonadotropinomas are exceedingly rare. Acute tumour enlargement, with potential pituitary apoplexy, is a rare but important adverse effect arising from GNRH agonist therapy in the presence of both functioning and non-functioning pituitary gonadotropinomas. GNRH antagonist therapy represents an alternative treatment option for patients with hormonal therapy-requiring prostate cancer, who also have diagnosed with a pituitary gonadotropinoma. PMID:27284452

  12. Thyroid Hormone and Estrogen Regulate Exercise-Induced Growth Hormone Release

    PubMed Central

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S. Silvestre, Diego H.; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response. PMID:25874614

  13. Thyroid hormone and estrogen regulate exercise-induced growth hormone release.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S Silvestre, Diego H; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade; Carvalho, Denise P; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response. PMID:25874614

  14. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Agonist Therapy and Obesity in Girls

    PubMed Central

    Shiasi Arani, Kobra; Heidari, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Depot preparations of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) are the gold standard drugs for the treatment of central precocious puberty. A concern about these drugs is obesity. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) therapy on body mass index (BMI) in girls with central precocious puberty (CPP). Patients and Methods: The girls with onset of puberty before eight years of age or menarche before nine years of age were studied. The weight, height, BMI, and pubertal stage were determined before and at sixth and 12th months of treatment. The GnRHa (Triptorelin) was administered intramuscularly for patients with rapidly progressive forms of CPP. Patients with slowly progressive forms of CPP were considered as control group. Results: From 110 subjects with CPP, 46 girls (41.8%) were considered as intervention and 64 (58.2%) as control groups. The mean age at initial visit was 7.46 ± 1.03 years. The BMI standard deviation scores in both groups was not significantly different at sixth and 12th months of treatment compared with baseline (P = 0.257 and P = 0.839, respectively). The prevalence of obesity was not significantly different between study groups at baseline and at and sixth and 12th months of therapy (P = 0.11, P = 0.068, and P = 0.052, respectively). Conclusions: The GnRHa therapy has no effect on BMI and the prevalence of obesity. PMID:26401141

  15. Inhibition by somatostatin (growth-hormone release-inhibiting hormone, GH-RIH) of gastric acid and pepsin and G-cell release of gastrin.

    PubMed Central

    Barros D'sa, A A; Bloom, S R; Baron, J H

    1978-01-01

    Somatostatin (cyclic growth-hormone release-inhibiting hormone--GH-RIH) was infused into dogs with gastric fistulae. Somatostatin inhibited gastric acid response to four gastric stimulants--insulin, food, histamine, and pentagastrin. Histamine- and pentagastrin-stimulated pepsins were inhibited similarly to inhibition of acid. Somatostatin inhibited the gastrin response to insulin and food. PMID:348581

  16. AGE-RELATED ALTERATIONS IN THE STIMULATED RELEASE IN VITRO OF CATECHOLAMINES AND LUTEINIZING HORMONE-RELEASING HORMONE FROM THE MALE RAT HYPOTHALAMUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Using an in vitro perifusion system, the present study investigated the possibility that alterations in catecholamine and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) secretion from the male rat mediobasal hypothalamus are present during the period of middle-age. The results indi...

  17. Lipopeptide antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone with improved antitumor activities.

    PubMed

    Zarandi, Marta; Varga, Jozsef L; Schally, Andrew V; Horvath, Judit E; Toller, Gabor L; Kovacs, Magdolna; Letsch, Markus; Groot, Kate; Armatis, Patricia; Halmos, Gabor

    2006-03-21

    Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) synthesized previously inhibit proliferation of various human cancers, but derivatisation with fatty acids could enhance their clinical efficacy. We synthesized a series of antagonists of GHRH(1-29)NH(2) acylated at the N terminus with monocarboxylic or alpha,omega-dicarboxylic acids containing six to sixteen carbon atoms. These peptides are analogs of prior potent antagonists JV-1-36, JV-1-38, and JV-1-65 with phenylacetyl group at their N terminus. Several new analogs, including MZ-J-7-46 and MZ-J-7-30, more effectively inhibited GHRH-induced GH release in vitro in a superfused rat pituitary system than their parent compound JV-1-36 and had increased binding affinities to rat pituitary GHRH receptors, but they showed weaker inhibition of GH release in vivo than JV-1-36. All antagonists acylated with fatty acids containing 8-14 carbon atoms inhibited the proliferation of MiaPaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro better than JV-1-36 or JV-1-65. GHRH antagonist MZ-J-7-114 (5 mug/day) significantly suppressed the growth of PC-3 human androgen-independent prostate cancers xenografted into nude mice and reduced serum IGF-I levels, whereas antagonist JV-1-38 had no effect at the dose of 10 mug/day. GHRH antagonists including MZ-J-7-46 and MZ-J-7-114 acylated with octanoic acid and MZ-J-7-30 and MZ-J-7-110 acylated with 1,12-dodecanedicarboxylic acid represent relevant improvements over earlier antagonists. These and previous results suggest that this class of GHRH antagonists might be effective in the treatment of various cancers. PMID:16537407

  18. Lipopeptide antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone with improved antitumor activities

    PubMed Central

    Zarandi, Marta; Varga, Jozsef L.; Schally, Andrew V.; Horvath, Judit E.; Toller, Gabor L.; Kovacs, Magdolna; Letsch, Markus; Groot, Kate; Armatis, Patricia; Halmos, Gabor

    2006-01-01

    Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) synthesized previously inhibit proliferation of various human cancers, but derivatisation with fatty acids could enhance their clinical efficacy. We synthesized a series of antagonists of GHRH(1-29)NH2 acylated at the N terminus with monocarboxylic or α,ω-dicarboxylic acids containing six to sixteen carbon atoms. These peptides are analogs of prior potent antagonists JV-1-36, JV-1-38, and JV-1-65 with phenylacetyl group at their N terminus. Several new analogs, including MZ-J-7-46 and MZ-J-7-30, more effectively inhibited GHRH-induced GH release in vitro in a superfused rat pituitary system than their parent compound JV-1-36 and had increased binding affinities to rat pituitary GHRH receptors, but they showed weaker inhibition of GH release in vivo than JV-1-36. All antagonists acylated with fatty acids containing 8–14 carbon atoms inhibited the proliferation of MiaPaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro better than JV-1-36 or JV-1-65. GHRH antagonist MZ-J-7-114 (5 μg/day) significantly suppressed the growth of PC-3 human androgen-independent prostate cancers xenografted into nude mice and reduced serum IGF-I levels, whereas antagonist JV-1-38 had no effect at the dose of 10 μg/day. GHRH antagonists including MZ-J-7-46 and MZ-J-7-114 acylated with octanoic acid and MZ-J-7-30 and MZ-J-7-110 acylated with 1,12-dodecanedicarboxylic acid represent relevant improvements over earlier antagonists. These and previous results suggest that this class of GHRH antagonists might be effective in the treatment of various cancers. PMID:16537407

  19. Stressor-responsive central nesfatin-1 activates corticotropin-releasing hormone, noradrenaline and serotonin neurons and evokes hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Natsu; Maejima, Yuko; Sedbazar, Udval; Ando, Akihiko; Kurita, Hideharu; Damdindorj, Boldbaatar; Takano, Eisuke; Gantulga, Darambazar; Iwasaki, Yusaku; Kurashina, Tomoyuki; Onaka, Tatsushi; Dezaki, Katsuya; Nakata, Masanori; Mori, Masatomo; Yada, Toshihiko

    2010-01-01

    A recently discovered satiety molecule, nesfatin-1, is localized in neurons of the hypothalamus and brain stem and colocalized with stress-related substances, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), oxytocin, proopiomelanocortin, noradrenaline (NA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of nesfatin-1 produces fear-related behaviors and potentiates stressor-induced increases in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone levels in rats. These findings suggest a link between nesfatin-1 and stress. In the present study, we aimed to further clarify the neuronal network by which nesfatin-1 could induce stress responses in rats. Restraint stress induced c-Fos expressions in nesfatin-1-immunoreactive neurons in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and supraoptic nucleus (SON) of the hypothalamus, and in the nucleus of solitary tract (NTS), locus coeruleus (LC) and dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) in the brain stem, without altering plasma nesfatin-1 levels. Icv nesfatin-1 induced c-Fos expressions in the PVN, SON, NTS, LC, DR and median raphe nucleus, including PVN-CRH, NTS-NA, LC-NA and DR-5-HT neurons. Nesfatin-1 increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in the CRH-immunoreactive neurons isolated from PVN. Icv nesfatin-1 increased plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels. These results indicate that the central nesfatin-1 system is stimulated by stress and activates CRH, NA and 5-HT neurons and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, evoking both central and peripheral stress responses. PMID:20966530

  20. Immunization against gonadotrophin-releasing hormone: histopathological and hormonal changes in the female rat.

    PubMed Central

    Okon, E.; Livni, N.; Koch, Y.

    1980-01-01

    Immunization of female rats against gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) resulted in cessation of the oestrus cycles, undetectable serum gonadotrophin levels and a reduction of pituitary gonadotrophin stores and of hypothalamic content of GnRH. Immunization abolished the post-ovariectomy rise in serum levels and in pituitary content of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) without affecting prolactin levels. This suggests that GnRH is involved in the regulation of synthesis as well as the secretion of LH and FSH. Histopathological changes were found in the pituitary, ovaries and uterus of the immunized rats. A marked reduction in the number of gonadotrophs as well as a small decrease in the size of other cells was observed in the pituitaries of rats having high anti-GnRH titres. Rats immunized 5 weeks before castration showed a marked reduction in the number and in the size of castration cells. The ovaries exhibited various degrees of atrophy which were correlated with the anti-GnRH titres. Rats with high anti-GnRH titres revealed extensive atrophy of stromal cells with disappearance of large follicles and corpora lutea; ovaries of rats with low titres of antibodies exhibited small corpora lutea and larger follicles, some of which were cystic. Uteri of rats having high titres of anti-GnRH were severely atrophied with cystic glandular dilation. Uteri of rats with low anti-GnRH titres showed squamous-cell metaplasia and fibrosis of the endometrial stroma. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 PMID:7006665

  1. Decreased hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone content and pituitary responsiveness in hypothyroidism.

    PubMed Central

    Katakami, H; Downs, T R; Frohman, L A

    1986-01-01

    The effects of thyroidectomy (Tx) and thyroxine replacement (T4Rx) on pituitary growth hormone (GH) secretion and hypothalamic GH-releasing hormone (GRH) concentration were compared to define the mechanism of hypothyroid-associated GH deficiency. Thyroidectomized rats exhibited a complete loss of pulsatile GH secretion with extensive reduction in GRH responsiveness and pituitary GH content. Cultured pituitary cells from Tx rats exhibited reduced GRH sensitivity, maximal GH responsiveness, and intracellular cyclic AMP accumulation to GRH, while somatostatin (SRIF) suppressive effects on GH secretion were increased. Hypothalamic GRH content was also markedly reduced. T4Rx completely restored hypothalamic GRH content and spontaneous GH secretion despite only partial recovery of pituitary GH content, GRH and SRIF sensitivity, and intracellular cyclic AMP response to GRH. The results indicate multiple effects of hypothyroidism on GH secretion and suggest that a critical role of T4 in maintaining normal GH secretion, in addition to restoring GH synthesis, is related to its effect on hypothalamic GRH. Images PMID:2871046

  2. Long-term effects of plasmid-mediated growth hormone releasing hormone in dogs.

    PubMed

    Tone, Catherine M; Cardoza, Dawn M; Carpenter, Robert H; Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra

    2004-05-01

    Geriatric and cancer-afflicted patients often experience decreased quality of life with cachexia, anemia, anorexia, and decreased activity level. We have studied the possibility that a myogenic plasmid that expresses growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) can prevent and/or treat these conditions. We administered plasmid to 17 geriatric and five cancer-afflicted companion dogs with an average age of 10.5+/-1.0 and 11.3+/-0.6 years at enrollment, respectively. Effects of the treatment were documented for at least 180 days post-treatment, with 10 animals followed for more than 1 year post-treatment, on average 444+/-40 days. Treated dogs showed increased IGF-I levels, and increases in scores for weight, activity level, exercise tolerance, and appetite. No adverse effects associated with the GHRH plasmid treatment were found. Most importantly, the overall assessment of the quality of life of the treated animals increased. Hematological parameters such as red blood cell count, hematocrit, and hemoglobin concentrations were improved and maintained within their normal ranges. We conclude that intramuscular injection of a GHRH-expressing plasmid is both safe and capable of improving the quality of life in animals for an extended period of time in the context of aging and disease. The observed anabolic and hematological responses to a single dose of this plasmid treatment may also be beneficial in geriatric patients or patients with cancer-associated anemia and/or cachexia. PMID:15073611

  3. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) polymorphisms associated with carcass traits of meat in Korean cattle

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Hyun Sub; Yoon, Du-Hak; Kim, Lyoung Hyo; Park, Byung Lae; Choi, Yoo Hyun; Chung, Eui Ryong; Cho, Yong Min; Park, Eng Woo; Cheong, Il-Cheong; Oh, Sung-Jong; Yi, Sung-Gon; Park, Taesung; Shin, Hyoung Doo

    2006-01-01

    Background Cold carcass weight (CW) and longissimus muscle area (EMA) are the major quantitative traits in beef cattle. In this study, we found several polymorphisms of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) gene and examined the association of polymorphisms with carcass traits (CW and EMA) in Korean native cattle (Hanwoo). Results By direct DNA sequencing in 24 unrelated Korean cattle, we identified 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms within the 9 kb full gene region, including the 1.5 kb promoter region. Among them, six polymorphic sites were selected for genotyping in our beef cattle (n = 428) and five marker haplotypes (frequency > 0.1) were identified. Statistical analysis revealed that -4241A>T showed significant associations with CW and EMA. Conclusion Our findings suggest that polymorphisms in GHRH might be one of the important genetic factors that influence carcass yield in beef cattle. Sequence variation/haplotype information identified in this study would provide valuable information for the production of a commercial line of beef cattle. PMID:16749938

  4. Interleukin 1. alpha. inhibits prostaglandin E sub 2 release to suppress pulsatile release of luteinizing hormone but not follicle-stimulating hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Rettori, V.; McCann, S.M. ); Gimeno, M.F. ); Karara, A. ); Gonzalez, M.C. )

    1991-04-01

    Interleukin 1{alpha} (IL-1{alpha}), a powerful endogenous pyrogen released from monocytes and macrophages by bacterial endotoxin, stimulates corticotropin, prolactin, and somatotropin release and inhibits thyrotropin release by hypothalamic action. The authors injected recombinant human IL-1{alpha} into the third cerebral ventricle, to study its effect on the pulsatile release of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) in conscious, freely moving, ovariectomized rats. Intraventricular injection of 0.25 pmol of IL-1{alpha} caused an almost immediate reduction of plasma LH concentration. To determine the mechanism of the suppression of LH release, mediobasal hypothalamic fragments were incubated in vitro with IL-1{alpha} (10 pM) and the release of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) and prostaglandin E{sub 2} into the medium was measured by RIA in the presence or absence of nonrepinephrine. 1{alpha} reduced basal LHRH release and blocked LHRH release induced by nonrepinephrine. In conclusion, IL-1{alpha} suppresses LH but not FSH release by an almost complete cessation of pulsatile release of LH in the castrated rat. The mechanism of this effect appears to be by inhibition of prostaglandin E{sub 2}-mediated release of LHRH.

  5. Agonist of growth hormone-releasing hormone reduces pneumolysin-induced pulmonary permeability edema

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Rudolf; Sridhar, Supriya; Rick, Ferenc G.; Gorshkov, Boris; Umapathy, Nagavedi S.; Yang, Guang; Oseghale, Aluya; Verin, Alexander D.; Chakraborty, Trinad; Matthay, Michael A.; Zemskov, Evgeny A.; White, Richard; Block, Norman L.; Schally, Andrew V.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive treatment with antibiotics in patients infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae induces release of the bacterial virulence factor pneumolysin (PLY). Days after lungs are sterile, this pore-forming toxin can still induce pulmonary permeability edema in patients, characterized by alveolar/capillary barrier dysfunction and impaired alveolar liquid clearance (ALC). ALC is mainly regulated through Na+ transport by the apically expressed epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and the basolaterally expressed Na+/K+-ATPase in type II alveolar epithelial cells. Because no standard treatment is currently available to treat permeability edema, the search for novel therapeutic candidates is of high priority. We detected mRNA expression for the active receptor splice variant SV1 of the hypothalamic polypeptide growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), as well as for GHRH itself, in human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HL-MVEC). Therefore, we have evaluated the effect of the GHRH agonist JI-34 on PLY-induced barrier and ALC dysfunction. JI-34 blunts PLY-mediated endothelial hyperpermeability in monolayers of HL-MVEC, in a cAMP-dependent manner, by means of reducing the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. In human airway epithelial H441 cells, PLY significantly impairs Na+ uptake, but JI-34 restores it to basal levels by means of increasing cAMP levels. Intratracheal instillation of PLY into C57BL6 mice causes pulmonary alveolar epithelial and endothelial hyperpermeability as well as edema formation, all of which are blunted by JI-34. These findings point toward a protective role of the GHRH signaling pathway in PLY-induced permeability edema. PMID:22308467

  6. Activation of the chicken gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor reduces gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Mamiko; Bédécarrats, Grégoy Y

    2010-06-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) is a hypothalamic peptide from the RFamide peptide family that has been identified in multiple avian species. Although GnIH has clearly been shown to reduce LH release from the anterior pituitary gland, its mechanism of action remains to be determined. The overall objectives of this study were (1) to characterize the GnIH receptor (GnIH-R) signaling pathway, (2) to evaluate potential interactions with gonadotropin releasing hormone type III receptor (GnRH-R-III) signaling, and (3) to determine the molecular mechanisms by which GnIH and GnRH regulate pituitary gonadotrope function during a reproductive cycle in the chicken. Using real-time PCR, we showed that in the chicken pituitary gland, GnIH-R mRNA levels fluctuate in an opposite manner to GnRH-R-III, with higher and lower levels observed during inactive and active reproductive stages, respectively. We demonstrated that the chicken GnIH-R signals by inhibiting adenylyl cyclase cAMP production, most likely by coupling to G(alphai). We also showed that this inhibition is sufficient to significantly reduce GnRH-induced cAMP responsive element (CRE) activation in a dose-dependent manner, and that the ratio of GnRH/GnIH receptors is a significant factor. We propose that in avian species, sexual maturation is characterized by a change in GnIH/GnRH receptor ratio, resulting in a switch in pituitary sensitivity from inhibitory (involving GnIH) to stimulatory (involving GnRH). In turn, decreasing GnIH-R signaling, combined with increasing GnRH-R-III signaling, results in significant increases in CRE activation, possibly initiating gonadotropin synthesis. PMID:20350548

  7. Effect of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) on acetylcholine release from different brain areas investigated by microdialysis.

    PubMed Central

    Giovannini, M. G.; Casamenti, F.; Nistri, A.; Paoli, F.; Pepeu, G.

    1991-01-01

    1. The effect of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) administration upon acetylcholine (ACh) release in freely moving rats was investigated by means of transversal microdialysis coupled to h.p.l.c. TRH administered either s.c. or via local perfusion increased the ACh release from cortex and hippocampus but not from the striatum. The increase in ACh release was maintained after 7 days of s.c. administration of TRH. 2. After s.c. injection of the neuropeptide, the increase in ACh release was dose-dependent and reached a maximum at 40 min after administration. The maximal percentage increases were 18, 52, 66 and 89% at doses of 1, 2.5, 5 and 10 mg kg-1 and 35, 48 and 54% at doses of 2.5, 5 and 10 mg kg-1 in the cortex and hippocampus, respectively. The effect of TRH was dependent on neuronal activity since it was completely inhibited by perfusion with tetrodotoxin (TTX), 5 X 10(-7) M. 3. Perfusion with TRH, 2.5 micrograms microliters-1, caused 198% and 150% increase in ACh release 60 and 80 min after the beginning of the perfusion in the cortex and hippocampus, respectively. After this initial peak, a 100% increase in ACh release persisted throughout the perfusion. 4. Systemic TRH administration was followed by marked hyperactivity and stereotyped behaviour that showed a time course shorter than that of the increase in ACh release. 5. These findings demonstrate that TRH exerts a strong stimulant action on cortical and hippocampal cholinergic pathways. PMID:1901747

  8. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) reverses hyperglycemia in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Luguang Luo, John Z.Q. Jackson, Ivor M.D.

    2008-09-12

    Hyperglycemia in thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) null mice indicates that TRH is involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Further, TRH levels in the pancreas peak during the stages of late embryonic and early neonatal {beta} cell development. These observations are consistent in linking TRH to islet cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we examined the effect of TRH administration in damaged pancreatic rat (streptozotocin, STZ) to determine whether TRH could improve damaged pancreatic {beta} cells function. We hypothesize that TRH is able to reverse STZ-induced hyperglycemia by increasing pancreatic islet insulin content, preventing apoptosis, and potentially induce islet regeneration. It was found that following intra-peritoneal (ip) injection, TRH (10 {mu}g/kg body weight (bwt)) reverses STZ (65 mg/kg bwt)-induced hyperglycemia (TRH given 3 days after STZ injection). Increased circulating insulin levels and insulin content in extracted pancreas suggests that TRH reversed STZ-induced hyperglycemia through improving pancreatic islet {beta} cell function. Further studies show a significantly lower level of apoptosis in islets treated with TRH as well as the presence of proliferation marker nestin and Brdu, suggesting that the TRH has the potential to prevent apoptosis and stimulate islet proliferation.

  9. Promoter polymorphisms regulating corticotrophin-releasing hormone transcription in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wagner, U; Wahle, M; Moritz, F; Wagner, U; Häntzschel, H; Baerwald, C G O

    2006-02-01

    To investigate whether polymorphisms in the corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) promoter are associated with altered CRH gene regulation, we studied the reactivity of three recently described promoter variants in vitro. The 3625 bp variants A1B1, A2B1 and A2B2 of the human CRH promoter were cloned in the 5' region to a luciferase reporter gene and transiently transfected into both mouse anterior pituitary cells AtT-20D16vF2 and pheochromocytoma cells PC12. Incubation with 8-Br-cAMP alone or in combination with cytokines significantly enhanced the promoter activity in both cell lines studied by up to 22-fold. However, dexamethasone antagonised cAMP effects on CRH expression in AtT-20 cells while showing no effect on PC12 cells, indicating that tissue-specific factors play a crucial role. Among the haplotypes studied, A1B1 exhibited the greatest reactivity on various stimuli. Electric mobility shift assay (EMSA) was performed to study whether the described polymorphic nucleotide sequences in the 5' region of the hCRH gene interfere with binding of nuclear proteins. A specific DNA protein complex was detected at position -2353 bp for the wild type sequence only, possibly interfering with a binding site for the activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Taken together, this is the first study to demonstrate that CRH promoter reactivity varies between the compound promoter alleles. PMID:16523405

  10. Pharmacological Chaperones for Misfolded Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Conn, P. Michael; Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo

    2011-01-01

    Structural alterations provoked by mutations or genetic variations in the gene sequence of G protein-coupled receptors may lead to abnormal function of the receptor molecule and, ultimately, to disease. While some mutations lead to changes in domains involved in agonist binding, receptor activation or coupling to effectors, others may cause misfolding and lead to retention/degradation of the protein molecule by the quality control system of the cell. Several strategies, including genetic, chemical and pharmacological approaches have been shown to rescue function of trafficking-defective misfolded G protein-coupled receptors. Among these, pharmacological strategies offer the most promising therapeutic tool to promote proper trafficking of misfolded proteins to the plasma membrane. Pharmacological chaperones or “pharmacoperones,” are small compounds that permeate the plasma membrane, enter cells, and bind selectively to misfolded proteins and correct folding allowing routing of the target protein to the plasma membrane, where the receptor may bind and respond to agonist stimulation. In this review we describe new therapeutic opportunities based on misfolding of otherwise functional human gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptors. This particular receptor is highly sensitive to single changes in chemical charge and its intracellular traffic is delicately balanced between expression at the plasma membrane or retention/degradation in the endoplasmic reticulum; it is, therefore, a particularly instructive model to understand both protein routing and the molecular mechanisms whereby pharmacoperones rescue misfolded intermediates or conformationally defective receptors. PMID:21907908

  11. Sympathomimetic pressor responses to thyrotropin-releasing hormone in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Mattila, J.; Bunag, R.D.

    1986-07-01

    Cardiovascular responses to centrally administered thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) were studied in urethan-anesthetized rats to allow continuous recording of attendant changes in sympathetic nerve activity. Intracerebroventricular infusions of TRH consistently increased not only blood pressure and heart rate, but also spike frequency in splanchnic, renal, or cervical sympathetic nerves. Parasympathetic inhibition seemed unlikely because TRH responses were unaltered by cholinergic blockade with atropine, and efferent vagal nerve firing, instead of being reduced, was actually increased by TRH. An increased secretion of endogenous vasopressin also appeared unlikely, since TRH responses were essentially unaffected by either hypophysectomy or pretreatment with a vasopressin antagonist. Inasmuch as pharmacological ganglion blockade with pentolinium eliminated increases in splanchnic nerve firing but reduced the attendant tachycardia by only 50%, residual tachycardia after ganglion blockade was considered partly due to persistent sympathetic cardioaccelerator tone. On the other hand, because pressor responses to TRH were always accompanied by increased sympathetic nerve firing and were completely abolished after pentolinium-induced ganglioplegia, they were attributed solely to sympathetic hyperactivity.

  12. Transdermal iontophoresis of gonadotropin releasing hormone (LHRH) and two analogues.

    PubMed

    Miller, L L; Kolaskie, C J; Smith, G A; Rivier, J

    1990-06-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH), as well as an antagonist [Ac-D2Nal,1 D4ClPhe,2 D3Pal,3 NicLys,5 DNicLys,6 ILys,8 DAla10] GnRH.HOAc (1) and a superagonist [DTrp6, Pro9-NHEt]GnRH (2), have been electrochemically driven across excised hairless mouse skin. Determined by HPLC analysis, the delivery rate from aqueous solution into isotonic saline at 0.5 mA cm-2 was as high as 19 nM cm-2 h-1 for 2. Because of its insolubility in water, analogue 1 could only be delivered from an acidic donor solution. Analogue 2 was also delivered in pulsatile fashion using current on/off cycles. For all three peptides, passive transport was negligible and stability is evident when in contact with the stratum corneum. Slow metabolism occurs when GnRH contacts the dermal side of hairless mouse skin. PMID:2203894

  13. Regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Helen H

    2007-09-01

    Reproductive function is influenced by several internal and external cues, which ultimately exert their effects on the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuron. As the final common pathway in the brain for regulating reproduction, GnRH neurons receive signals from multiple cell types, and alterations in GnRH production impact reproductive competence. Historically, the paucity of GnRH neurons and their scattered distribution in the brain have limited the study of GnRH gene expression. With transgenic technology, newer model systems (such as immortalized GnRH-expressing cell lines and GnRH-reporter gene transgenic mice) have been developed, making molecular studies possible. This article provides an update on the molecular mechanisms responsible for the regulation of GnRH gene expression, focusing on tissue-specific expression and transcriptional regulation. After an overview of GnRH gene structure, synthesis, and secretion, the model systems for studying GnRH neurons are examined. The molecular mechanisms that translate physiologic stimuli, such as nutritional status or stress, into changes in GnRH expression will be reviewed, concentrating on the regulatory regions within the GnRH gene promoter and the critical transcription factors. PMID:17710727

  14. The Effects of Gonadotrophin Releasing Hormone Administration in Early Postpartum Dairy Cows on Hormone Concentrations, Ovarian Activity and Reproductive Performance: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, K. E.

    1983-01-01

    Gonadotrophin releasing hormones have become widely used hormonal compounds in veterinary medicine, particularly with respect to bovine reproduction. The character and physiological actions of gonadotrophin releasing hormone are briefly reviewed and its clinical applications are summarized. The endocrinological research concerned with the use of gonadotrophin releasing hormone in the early postpartum period is discussed. Field trials which have been conducted to assess the effects of postpartum gonadotrophin releasing hormone administration on reproductive performance have varied widely in both design and interpretation of results. These experiments are reviewed, including the clinical trials using normal cows as well as those on cows with retained placenta. PMID:17422245

  15. Substantial expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor type I in human uveal melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Schally, Andrew V.; Block, Norman L; Dezso, Balazs; Olah, Gabor; Rozsa, Bernadett; Fodor, Klara; Buglyo, Armin; Gardi, Janos; Berta, Andras; Halmos, Gabor

    2013-01-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary intraocular malignancy in adults, with a very high mortality rate due to frequent liver metastases. Consequently, the therapy of uveal melanoma remains a major clinical challenge and new treatment approaches are needed. For improving diagnosis and designing a rational and effective therapy, it is essential to elucidate molecular characteristics of this malignancy. The aim of this study therefore was to evaluate as a potential therapeutic target the expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor in human uveal melanoma. The expression of LHRH ligand and LHRH receptor transcript forms was studied in 39 human uveal melanoma specimens by RT-PCR using gene specific primers. The binding charachteristics of receptors for LHRH on 10 samples were determined by ligand competition assays. The presence of LHRH receptor protein was further evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The expression of mRNA for type I LHRH receptor was detected in 18 of 39 (46%) of tissue specimens. mRNA for LHRH-I ligand could be detected in 27 of 39 (69%) of the samples. Seven of 10 samples investigated showed high affinity LHRH-I receptors. The specific presence of full length LHRH receptor protein was further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. A high percentage of uveal melanomas express mRNA and protein for type-I LHRH receptors. Our results support the merit of further investigation of LHRH receptors in human ophthalmological tumors. Since diverse analogs of LHRH are in clinical trials or are already used for the treatment of various cancers, these analogs could be considered for the LHRH receptor-based treatment of uveal melanoma. PMID:24077773

  16. Growth hormone responses to growth hormone-releasing hormone in Hand-Schüller-Christian Disease.

    PubMed

    Gelato, M C; Loriaux, D L; Merriam, G R

    1989-09-01

    Bolus doses of GH-releasing hormone (GHRH), 1 microgram/kg i.v., were given to two groups of adult patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD): 9 with Hand-Schüller-Christian disease (HSCD, presumed hypothalamic GHD) and 9 with idiopathic GHD (IGHD, etiology unknown). Six patients in each group were then given further GHRH doses daily for 5 days, and the GH responses to GHRH were measured over 3 h on day 1 and day 5. Plasma levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) were measured twice daily on days 1 and 5 during GHRH treatment. All patients with HSCD had measurable GH responses to the first dose of GHRH, with a mean peak response of 6.4 +/- 2.1 ng/ml (mean +/- SE). Only 5 of 9 patients with IGHD had GH responses above the detection limits of the assay; their mean peak response, 1.3 +/- 0.2 ng/ml, was significantly lower than the GH responses of the HSCD patients (p less than 0.05). Responses in both groups of patients were lower than those previously observed in normal adult men (35 +/- 8 ng/ml; p less than 0.01). Five days of daily stimulation with GHRH significantly (p less than 0.01) increased the GH response in both groups of patients. The rise was greater in patients with HSCD than with IGHD (HSCD, 5.1 +/- 2.5 ng/ml on day 1, vs. 12.0 +/- 6.8 ng/ml on day 5; IGHD, 1.4 +/- 0.3 ng/ml vs. 2.9 +/- 0.6 ng/ml).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2507952

  17. Corticotropin Releasing Hormone and Imaging, Rethinking the Stress Axis

    PubMed Central

    Contoreggi, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The stress system provides integration of both neurochemical and somatic physiologic functions within organisms as an adaptive mechanism to changing environmental conditions throughout evolution. In mammals and primates the complexity and sophistication of these systems has surpassed other species in triaging neurochemical and physiologic signaling to maximize chances of survival. Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) and its related peptides and receptors have been identified over the last three decades and are fundamental molecular initiators of the stress response. They are crucial in the top down regulatory cascade over a myriad of neurochemical, neuroendocrine and sympathetic nervous system events. From neuroscience, we’ve seen that stress activation impacts behavior, endocrine and somatic physiology and influences neurochemical events that one can capture in real time with current imaging technologies. To delineate these effects one can demonstrate how the CRH neuronal networks infiltrate critical cognitive, emotive and autonomic regions of the central nervous system (CNS) with somatic effects. Abundant preclinical and clinical studies show inter-regulatory actions of CRH with multiple neurotransmitters/peptides. Stress, both acute and chronic has epigenetic effects which magnify genetic susceptibilities to alter neurochemistry; stress system activation can add critical variables in design and interpretation of basic and clinical neuroscience and related research. This review will attempt to provide an overview of the spectrum of known functions and speculative actions of CRH and stress responses in light of imaging technology and its interpretation. Metabolic and neuroreceptor positron emission/single photon tomography (PET/SPECT), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), anatomic MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (pMRS) are technologies that can delineate basic mechanisms of neurophysiology and pharmacology

  18. Differential release of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in the amygdala during different types of stressors.

    PubMed

    Hand, Gregory A; Hewitt, Christopher B; Fulk, Laura J; Stock, Howard S; Carson, James A; Davis, J Mark; Wilson, Marlene A

    2002-09-13

    The purpose of this study was to determine if differences exist between the effects of acute treadmill running and restraint stress on corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) release within the amygdala of rats. Extracellular CRH immunoreactivity (CRH-IR) was measured in microdialysate collected from the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) during exposure to an inactivated treadmill (TC), during 1 h treadmill running to exhaustion (RUN), and 1 h restraint (RES). Extracellular CRH-IR increased from control levels during the first 20-min period for TC, RUN, and RES, with the largest increase during RES. During the second 20-min period, only RES maintained levels higher than control values. CRH release was higher than control during the third 20-min period of RES and RUN. A second experiment consisted of four groups of either cage controls (CC), TC, RUN, or RES. Immediately following the 60-min treatment, brains were removed and trunk blood collected for analysis of tissue CRH-IR and plasma corticosterone. While amygdala tissue CRH-IR was not different in the CC, TC and RUN rats, these groups had significantly lower levels than the RES animals. Hypothalamic tissue CRH-IR was not different between the CC and TC rats, but the levels were significantly higher in the RES and RUN rats than in the two control groups. Plasma corticosterone levels were elevated only in RES and RUN rats. Results from tissue analysis indicate that increased tissue CRH-IR in the amygdala and hypothalamus can be elicited by RES, while only the hypothalamus shows an increase following RUN. Further, extracellular CRH release in the CeA is increased throughout the period of RES, when rats are placed on the treadmill, and when the animals are approaching physical exhaustion. No increase is observed during the running period between placement on the treadmill and intense exertion. Overall, the data suggest that amygdala CRH release is regulated differently during treadmill running and restraint. PMID

  19. Synthesis and in vitro anti-cancer evaluation of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone-conjugated peptide.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xin; Qiu, Qianqian; Ma, Ke; Huang, Wenlong; Qian, Hai

    2015-11-01

    Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) is a decapeptide hormone released from the hypothalamus and shows high affinity binding to the LHRH receptors. It is reported that several cancer cells also express LHRH receptors such as breast, ovarian, prostatic, bladder and others. In this study, we linked B1, an anti-cancer peptide, to LHRH and its analogs to improve the activity against cancer cells with LHRH receptor. Biological evaluation revealed that TB1, the peptide contains triptorelin sequence, present favorable anti-cancer activity as well as plasma stability. Further investigations disclosed that TB1 trigger apoptosis by activating the mitochondria-cytochrome c-caspase apoptotic pathway, it also exhibited the anti-migratory effect on cancer cells. PMID:26058357

  20. ASSESSING OCCURRENCE, PERSISTENCE AND BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF HORMONES RELEASED FROM LIVESTOCK WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The project will determine the potential for environmental release of hormones under various waste management practices, degradation of hormones and associated activities in these practices, the persistence of residuals in transport from CAFOs, and the relative importance of d...

  1. Plasma luteinizing hormone concentration in mares treated with gondotropin-releasing hormone and estradiol.

    PubMed

    Garcia, M C; Ginther, O J

    1975-11-01

    Three experiments were performed to study the luteinizing hormone (LH) and ovulatory responses to various doses and methods of administration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in estrous pony mares and the influence of estradiol-17beta (E2-17beta) on LH response to GnRH treatment. In experiment 1, single injections of synthetic GnRH were subcutaneously given to 5 groups of estrous (day 2) mares (3 mares/group) on a body weight basis as follows: group A--isotonic saline solution; group B--GnRH, 0.14 mug/kg; group C--GnRH, 0.28 mug/kg; group D--KGnRH, 0.59 mug/kg; and group E--GnRH, 2.37 mug/kg. Significant increase of plasma LH concentration lasting for approximately 2 hours occurred only in mares of group E given the largest dose of GnRH (2.37 mug/kg). Plasma LH concentration increase at 1 hour after treatment approached significane (P less than 0.10) in mares of group D given the next smaller dose. In experiment 2, GnRH (2.37 mug/kg) was intravenously infused for 24 hours to a group of 6 mares (group F); 6 other mares (group G) were given saline solution infusion. Mean plasma LH concentration was increased at 3 hours, continued to increase until 6 hours, and remained at approximately the 6-hour concentration throughout the period of GnRH infusion. In the 3rd experiment, 3 groups of mares (4 mares/group) were subcutaneously given the following treatments on days 2 and 3 of estrus, respectively: group H--corn oil and saline solution; group I--corn oil and GnRH, 0.59 mug/kg; and group J--estradiol-17beta, 0.5 mg, and GnRH, 0.59 mug/kg. Plasma LH response was not seen in group H mares given corn oil and saline solution. Mean plasma LH concentration at 1 hour after administration of GnRH approached significance (P less than 0.10) in group I mares given corn oil and GnRH. For the mares in group J given E2-17beta and GnRH, E2-17beta pretreatment increased plasma LH after 24 horus; significnat increases of plasma LH concentration were seen from 1 to 6 hours after

  2. Dimerization of the thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor potentiates hormone-dependent receptor phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Song, Gyun Jee; Jones, Brian W; Hinkle, Patricia M

    2007-11-13

    The G protein-coupled thyrotropin (TSH)-releasing hormone (TRH) receptor forms homodimers. Regulated receptor dimerization increases TRH-induced receptor endocytosis. These studies test whether dimerization increases receptor phosphorylation, which could potentiate internalization. Phosphorylation at residues 355-365, which is critical for internalization, was measured with a highly selective phospho-site-specific antibody. Two strategies were used to drive receptor dimerization. Dimerization of a TRH receptor-FK506-binding protein (FKBP) fusion protein was stimulated by a dimeric FKBP ligand. The chemical dimerizer caused a large increase in TRH-dependent phosphorylation within 1 min, whereas a monomeric FKBP ligand had no effect. The dimerizer did not alter phoshorylation of receptors lacking the FKBP domain. Dimerization of receptors containing an N-terminal HA epitope also was induced with anti-HA antibody. Anti-HA IgG strongly increased TRH-induced phosphorylation, whereas monomeric Fab fragments had no effect. Anti-HA antibody did not alter phosphorylation in receptors lacking an HA tag. Furthermore, two phosphorylation-defective TRH receptors functionally complemented one another and permitted phosphorylation. Receptors with a D71A mutation in the second transmembrane domain do not signal, whereas receptors with four Ala mutations in the 355-365 region signal normally but lack phosphorylation sites. When D71A- and 4Ala-TRH receptors were expressed alone, neither underwent TRH-dependent phosphorylation. When they were expressed together, D71A receptor was phosphorylated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases in response to TRH. These results suggest that the TRH receptor is phosphorylated preferentially when it is in dimers or when preexisting receptor dimers are driven into microaggregates. Increased receptor phosphorylation may amplify desensitization. PMID:17989235

  3. Growth Hormone Response after Administration of L-dopa, Clonidine, and Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone in Children with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pueschel, Seigfried M.

    1993-01-01

    This study of eight growth-retarded children with Down's syndrome (aged 1 to 6.5 years) found that administration of growth hormone was more effective than either L-dopa or clonidine. Results suggest that children with Down's syndrome have both anatomical and biochemical hypothalamic derangements resulting in decreased growth hormone secretion and…

  4. Extrathyroidal release of thyroid hormones from thyroglobulin by J774 mouse macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Brix, K; Herzog, V

    1994-01-01

    Thyroglobulin appears in the circulation of vertebrates at species-specific concentrations. We have observed that the clearance of thyroglobulin from the circulation occurs in the liver by macrophages. Here we show that the thyroid hormones T3 and T4 were released by incubation of mouse macrophages (J774) with thyroglobulin. Thyroid hormone release was a fast process, with an initial rate of approximately 20 pmol T4/mg per min and approximately 0.6 pmol T3/mg per min, indicating that macrophages preferentially release T4. The bulk of released thyroid hormones appeared after 5 min of incubation of macrophages with thyroglobulin, whereas degradation of the protein was detectable only after several hours. During internalization of thyroglobulin, endocytic vesicles and endosomes were reached at 5 min and lysosomes at 60 min. T4 release started extracellularly by secreted proteases and continued along the endocytic pathway of thyroglobulin, whereas T3 release occurred mainly intracellularly when thyroglobulin had reached the lysosomes. This shows that the release of both hormones occurred at distinct cellular sites. Our in vitro observations suggest that macrophages in situ represent an extrathyroidal source for thyroid hormones from circulating thyroglobulin. Images PMID:8163643

  5. Homeostasis, thymic hormones and aging.

    PubMed

    Goya, R G; Bolognani, F

    1999-01-01

    The thymic-pituitary axis constitutes a bidirectional circuit where the ascending feedback loop is effected by thymic factors of epithelial origin. The aim of the present article is, first, to introduce the idea of an immune-neuroendocrine homeostatic network in higher animals. Next, the relevance of the thymus in this network and the possible role of this gland in the neuroendocrine imbalances associated with aging are discussed. A number of studies are next reviewed which show that the endocrine thymus produces several bioactive molecules, generally called thymic hormones, which in addition to possessing immunoregulatory properties are also active on nervous and endocrine circuits. In particular, the reported activities of thymosin fraction five, thymosin alpha 1 and thymosin beta 4 on beta-endorphin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, glucocorticoids, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and luteinizing hormone secretion in different animal and cell models are reviewed. The known hypophysiotropic actions of other thymic hormones like thymulin, homeostatic thymus hormone and thymus factor are also summarized, and the impact of aging on pituitary responsiveness to thymic hormones is discussed. As a conclusion, it is proposed that in addition to its central role in the regulation of the immune function, the thymus gland may extend its influence to nonimmunologic components of the body, including the neuroendocrine system. The early onset of thymus involution might, therefore, act as a triggering event which would initiate the gradual decline in homeostatic potential that characterizes the aging process. PMID:10202264

  6. Determinants of GH-releasing hormone and GH-releasing peptide synergy in men

    PubMed Central

    Veldhuis, Johannes D.; Bowers, Cyril Y.

    2009-01-01

    Age, sex steroids, and abdominal-visceral fat (AVF) jointly affect pulsatile growth hormone (GH) secretion. Pulsatile GH secretion in turn is controlled by GH-releasing hormone (GHRH), GH-releasing peptide (GHRP), and somatostatin. Marked stimulation of pulsatile GH secretion is achieved via GHRH-GHRP synergy. Nonetheless, how key modulators of GH secretion, such as age, sex steroids, and body mass index, modify GHRH-GHRP synergy is not known. The present strategy was to 1) infuse GHRH and GHRP-2 simultaneously to evoke synergy and 2) downregulate the gonadal axis with leuprolide and then restore placebo (Pl) or testosterone (T) to clamp the sex steroid milieu. Forty-seven men [18–74 yr of age, T = 7–1,950 ng/dl, estradiol (E2) = 5–79 pg/ml, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I = 115–817 μg/l, AVF = 11–349 cm2] were studied. GHRH-GHRP synergy correlated negatively with age and AVF (both P < 0.001) and positively with IGF-I (P < 0.001) and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP)-3 (P = 0.031). Unstimulated basal (nonpulsatile) GH secretion correlated positively with T (P = 0.015) and E2 (P = 0.004) concentrations. Fasting pulsatile GH secretion varied negatively with age (P = 0.017) and positively with IGF-I (P = 0.002) and IGFBP-3 (P = 0.001). By stepwise forward-selection multivariate analyses, AVF, IGF-I, and IGFBP-3 together explained 60% of the variability in GHRH-GHRP synergy (P < 0.001), E2 accounted for 17% of the variability in basal GH secretion (P = 0.007), and IGF-I explained 20% of the variability in fasting pulsatile GH secretion (P = 0.002). In conclusion, a paradigm examining GHRH-GHRP synergy under a sex steroid clamp reveals highly selective control of basal, pulsatile, and synergistic peptide-driven GH secretion by AVF, E2, and IGF-I in healthy men. PMID:19240251

  7. Myogenic expression of an injectable protease-resistant growth hormone-releasing hormone augments long-term growth in pigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draghia-Akli, R.; Fiorotto, M. L.; Hill, L. A.; Malone, P. B.; Deaver, D. R.; Schwartz, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    Ectopic expression of a new serum protease-resistant porcine growth hormone-releasing hormone, directed by an injectable muscle-specific synthetic promoter plasmid vector (pSP-HV-GHRH), elicits growth in pigs. A single 10 mg intramuscular injection of pSP-HV-GHRH DNA followed by electroporation in three-week-old piglets elevated serum GHRH levels by twofold to fourfold, enhanced growth hormone secretion, and increased serum insulin-like growth factor-I by threefold to sixfold over control pigs. After 65 days the average body weight of the pigs injected with pSP-HV-GHRH was approximately 37% greater than the placebo-injected controls and resulted in a significant reduction in serum urea concentration, indicating a decrease in amino acid catabolism. Evaluation of body composition indicated a uniform increase in mass, with no organomegaly or associated pathology.

  8. The role of metabolic state and obestatin in control of chicken ovarian hormone release.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, Alexander V; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Grossmann, Roland

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the role and interrelationships between calorie restriction and obestatin in the control of hormone release by chicken ovarian tissue. For this purpose, we compared the release of progesterone (P), testosteron (T), estradiol (E), and arginine-vasotocin (AVT) by ovarian fragments isolated from chicken subjected and not subjested to food restriction, as well as the response of these ovarian fragments to obestatin additions.It was observed that food restriction promoted release of P, reduced output of T, but did not affect basal E and AVT release. Obestatin addition reduced E, promoted AVT, and did not alter P and T release by ovarian tissue isolated from ad libitum fed chicken. In ovarian fragments of fasted hens it reduced E, promoted T, and did not influence P and AVT release.The present observations demonstrate (1) that obestatin can directly control the release of avian ovarian hormones - regulators of reproduction, (2) that metabolic state can control the release of these hormones, and (3) metabolic state can alter the response of ovarian hormones to obestatin. PMID:27030691

  9. Differential Activation in Amygdala and Plasma Noradrenaline during Colorectal Distention by Administration of Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone between Healthy Individuals and Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yukari; Kanazawa, Motoyori; Kano, Michiko; Morishita, Joe; Hamaguchi, Toyohiro; Van Oudenhove, Lukas; Ly, Huynh Giao; Dupont, Patrick; Tack, Jan; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Tashiro, Manabu; Fukudo, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) often comorbids mood and anxiety disorders. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a major mediator of the stress response in the brain-gut axis, but it is not clear how CRH agonists change human brain responses to interoceptive stimuli. We tested the hypothesis that brain activation in response to colorectal distention is enhanced after CRH injection in IBS patients compared to healthy controls. Brain H215O- positron emission tomography (PET) was performed in 16 male IBS patients and 16 age-matched male controls during baseline, no distention, mild and intense distention of the colorectum using barostat bag inflation. Either CRH (2 μg/kg) or saline (1:1) was then injected intravenously and the same distention protocol was repeated. Plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), serum cortisol and plasma noradrenaline levels were measured at each stimulation. At baseline, CRH without colorectal distention induced more activation in the right amygdala in IBS patients than in controls. During intense distention after CRH injection, controls showed significantly greater activation than IBS patients in the right amygdala. Plasma ACTH and serum cortisol secretion showed a significant interaction between drug (CRH, saline) and distention. Plasma noradrenaline at baseline significantly increased after CRH injection compared to before injection in IBS. Further, plasma noradrenaline showed a significant group (IBS, controls) by drug by distention interaction. Exogenous CRH differentially sensitizes brain regions of the emotional-arousal circuitry within the visceral pain matrix to colorectal distention and synergetic activation of noradrenergic function in IBS patients and healthy individuals. PMID:27448273

  10. Differential Activation in Amygdala and Plasma Noradrenaline during Colorectal Distention by Administration of Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone between Healthy Individuals and Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yukari; Kanazawa, Motoyori; Kano, Michiko; Morishita, Joe; Hamaguchi, Toyohiro; Van Oudenhove, Lukas; Ly, Huynh Giao; Dupont, Patrick; Tack, Jan; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Tashiro, Manabu; Fukudo, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) often comorbids mood and anxiety disorders. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a major mediator of the stress response in the brain-gut axis, but it is not clear how CRH agonists change human brain responses to interoceptive stimuli. We tested the hypothesis that brain activation in response to colorectal distention is enhanced after CRH injection in IBS patients compared to healthy controls. Brain H215O- positron emission tomography (PET) was performed in 16 male IBS patients and 16 age-matched male controls during baseline, no distention, mild and intense distention of the colorectum using barostat bag inflation. Either CRH (2 μg/kg) or saline (1:1) was then injected intravenously and the same distention protocol was repeated. Plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), serum cortisol and plasma noradrenaline levels were measured at each stimulation. At baseline, CRH without colorectal distention induced more activation in the right amygdala in IBS patients than in controls. During intense distention after CRH injection, controls showed significantly greater activation than IBS patients in the right amygdala. Plasma ACTH and serum cortisol secretion showed a significant interaction between drug (CRH, saline) and distention. Plasma noradrenaline at baseline significantly increased after CRH injection compared to before injection in IBS. Further, plasma noradrenaline showed a significant group (IBS, controls) by drug by distention interaction. Exogenous CRH differentially sensitizes brain regions of the emotional-arousal circuitry within the visceral pain matrix to colorectal distention and synergetic activation of noradrenergic function in IBS patients and healthy individuals. PMID:27448273

  11. Prepro-thyrotropin releasing hormone 178-199 immunoreactivity is altered in the hypothalamus of the Wistar-Kyoto strain of rat.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Solberg, L C; Redei, E E; Handa, R J

    2001-09-21

    The rat prepro-thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) 178-199 is derived from prepro-TRH by the actions of the endopeptidases, prohormone convertase 1 (PC1) and PC2. PPTRH 178-199 attenuates the synthesis and secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from the anterior pituitary both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting an inhibitory action on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function. This peptide also acts centrally to increase activity and decrease anxiety related behaviors. To elucidate the involvement of this peptide in these functions, we have compared the expression of PPTRH 178-199, PPTRH mRNA, and PC1 and PC2 mRNAs in the Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and Wistar strains of rat. WKY rats have been shown to possess neuroendocrine abnormalities (HPA hyper-activity) and hyper-emotional behavioral characteristics. Immunohistochemical analysis of PPTRH 178-199 demonstrated significant strain differences in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus and the parastrial nucleus (PSN). WKY rats had significantly greater numbers of immunoreactive (IR) cell body profiles (P<0.0005) than Wistar rats in the PVN and a significantly lower fiber density (P<0.002) in the PSN. Levels of PPTRH, PC1, and PC2 mRNA were not different between strains in any brain region examined. These data suggest that altered levels of PPTRH 178-199 in WKY rats could cause, at least in part, the hyper-activity of the HPA axis and the hyper-emotional behavioral characteristics seen in this rat strain. Such data fit with the hypothesis that PPTRH 178-199 is involved in the regulation of the HPA axis and behavior. PMID:11549391

  12. Efficacy and Safety of Sustained-Release Recombinant Human Growth Hormone in Korean Adults with Growth Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngsook; Hong, Jae Won; Chung, Yoon-Sok; Kim, Sung-Woon; Cho, Yong-Wook; Kim, Jin Hwa; Kim, Byung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The administration of recombinant human growth hormone in adults with growth hormone deficiency has been known to improve metabolic impairment and quality of life. Patients, however, have to tolerate daily injections of growth hormone. The efficacy, safety, and compliance of weekly administered sustained-release recombinant human growth hormone (SR-rhGH, Declage™) supplement in patients with growth hormone deficiency were evaluated. Materials and Methods This trial is 12-week prospective, single-arm, open-label trial. Men and women aged ≥20 years with diagnosed growth hormone deficiency (caused by pituitary tumor, trauma and other pituitary diseases) were eligible for this study. Each subject was given 2 mg (6 IU) of SR-rhGH once a week, subcutaneously for 12 weeks. Efficacy and safety at baseline and within 30 days after the 12th injection were assessed and compared. Score of Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults (AGHDA score) for quality of life and serum IGF-1 level. Results The IGF-1 level of 108.67±74.03 ng/mL was increased to 129.01±68.37 ng/mL (p=0.0111) and the AGHDA QoL score was decreased from 9.80±6.51 to 7.55±5.76 (p<0.0001) at week 12 compared with those at baseline. Adverse events included pain, swelling, erythema, and warmth sensation at the administration site, but many adverse events gradually disappeared during the investigation. Conclusion Weekly administered SR-rhGH for 12 weeks effectively increased IGF-1 level and improved the quality of life in patients with GH deficiency without serious adverse events. PMID:24954335

  13. Space weightlessness and hormonal changes in human subjects and experimental animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindeland, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    Data from spaceflight and bed rest studies are briefly described and the difficulties in interpreting these results are discussed. Growth hormone, prolactin, adrenocorticotropic hormone, cortisol, insulin, aldosterone, and other hormones are addressed.

  14. Developmental changes in hypothalamic Kiss1 expression during activation of the pulsatile release of luteinising hormone in maturing ewe lambs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Onset of puberty is characterized by a marked increase in the frequency of release of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and luteinizing hormone (LH). The KISS1 gene plays a critical role in pubertal development and its product, kisspeptin, stimulates GnRH and LH release. In the study reported h...

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Signaling: Integrating Cyclic Nucleotides into the Network

    PubMed Central

    Perrett, Rebecca M.; McArdle, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is the primary regulator of mammalian reproductive function in both males and females. It acts via G-protein coupled receptors on gonadotropes to stimulate synthesis and secretion of the gonadotropin hormones luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone. These receptors couple primarily via G-proteins of the Gq/ll family, driving activation of phospholipases C and mediating GnRH effects on gonadotropin synthesis and secretion. There is also good evidence that GnRH causes activation of other heterotrimeric G-proteins (Gs and Gi) with consequent effects on cyclic AMP production, as well as for effects on the soluble and particulate guanylyl cyclases that generate cGMP. Here we provide an overview of these pathways. We emphasize mechanisms underpinning pulsatile hormone signaling and the possible interplay of GnRH and autocrine or paracrine regulatory mechanisms in control of cyclic nucleotide signaling. PMID:24312080

  16. Seasonal effect of gonadotrophin inhibitory hormone on gonadotrophin-releasing hormone-induced gonadotroph functions in the goldfish pituitary.

    PubMed

    Moussavi, M; Wlasichuk, M; Chang, J P; Habibi, H R

    2013-05-01

    We have shown that native goldfish gonadotrophin inhibitory hormone (gGnIH) differentially regulates luteinsing hormone (LH)-β and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-β expression. To further understand the functions of gGnIH, we examined its interactions with two native goldfish gonadotrophin-releasing hormones, salmon gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (sGnRH) and chicken (c)GnRH-II in vivo and in vitro. Intraperitoneal injections of gGnIH alone reduced serum LH levels in fish in early and mid gonadal recrudescence; this inhibition was also seen in fish co-injected with either sGnRH or cGnRH-II during early recrudescence. Injection of gGnIH alone elevated pituitary LH-β and FSH-β mRNA levels at early and mid recrudescence, and FSH-β mRNA at late recrudescence. Co-injection of gGnIH attenuated the stimulatory influences of sGnRH on LH-β in early recrudescence, and LH-β and FSH-β mRNA levels in mid and late recrudescence, as well as the cGnRH-II-elicited increase in LH-β, but not FSH-β, mRNA expression at mid and late recrudescence. sGnRH and cGnRH-II injection increased pituitary gGnIH-R mRNA expression in mid and late recrudescence but gGnIH reduced gGnIH-R mRNA levels in late recrudescence. gGnIH did not affect basal LH release from perifused pituitary cells and continual exposure to gGnIH did not alter the LH responses to acute applications of GnRH. However, a short 5-min GnIH treatment in the middle of a 60-min GnRH perifusion selectively reduced the cGnRH-II-induced release of LH. These novel results indicate that, in goldfish, gGnIH and GnRH modulate pituitary GnIH-R expression and gGnIH differentially affects sGnRH and cGnRH-II regulation of LH secretion and gonadotrophin subunit mRNA levels. Furthermore, these actions are manifested in a reproductive stage-dependent manner. PMID:23331955

  17. In vitro effect of. Delta. sup 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol to stimulate somatostatin release and block that of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone by suppression of the release of prostaglandin E sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Rettori, V.; Aguila, M.C.; McCann, S.M. ); Gimeno, M.F.; Franchi, A.M. )

    1990-12-01

    Previous in vivo studies have shown that {Delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the principal active ingredient in marijuana, can suppress both luteinizing hormone (LH) and growth hormone (GH) secretion after its injection into the third ventricle of conscious male rats. The present studies were deigned to determine the mechanism of these effects. Various doses of THC were incubated with either stalk median eminence fragments (MEs) or mediobasal hypothalamic (MBH) fragments in vitro. Although THC (10 nM) did not alter basal release of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) from MEs in vitro, it completely blocked the stimulatory action of dopamine or nonrepinephrine on LHRH release. The effective doses to block LHRH release were associated with a blockade of synthesis and release of prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) from MBH in vitro. In contrast to the suppressive effect of THC on LHRH release, somatostatin release from MEs was enhanced in a dose-related manner with a minimal effective dose of 1 nM. Since PGE{sub 2} suppresses somatostatin release, this enhancement may also be related to the suppressive effect of THC on PGE{sub 2} synthesis and release. The authors speculate that these actions are mediated by the recently discovered THC receptors in the tissue. The results indicate that the suppressive effect of THC on LH release is mediated by a blockade of LHRH release, whereas the suppressive effect of the compound on growth hormone release is mediated, at least in part, by a stimulation of somatostatin release.

  18. Insulin Augments Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Induction of Translation in LβT2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Navratil, Amy M.; Song, Hyunjin; Hernandez, Jeniffer B.; Cherrington, Brian D.; Santos, Sharon J.; Low, Janine M.; Do, Minh-Ha T.; Lawson, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The integrated signaling of insulin and gonadotropin-releasing hormone in the pituitary gonadotropes may have a profound bearing on reproductive function, although the cross-receptor signaling mechanisms are unclear. We demonstrate that the insulin receptor is constitutively localized to non-caveolar lipid raft microdomains in the pituitary gonadotrope cell line LβT2. The localization to rafts is consistent with similar localization of the GnRH receptor. Insulin receptor phosphorylation occurs in raft domains and activates the downstream signaling targets Insulin Receptor Substrate1 and Akt/Protein Kinase B. Although insulin alone does not strongly activate the extracellular signal-regulated kinase second messenger cascade, co-stimulation potentiates the phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase by gonadotropin-releasing hormone. The co-stimulatory effect of insulin and gonadotropin-releasing hormone is also evident in increased activation of cap-dependent translation. In contrast, co-stimulation attenuates Akt/Protein Kinase B activation. Our results show that both gonadotropin-releasing hormone and insulin are capable of mutually altering their respective regulatory signaling cascades. We suggest that this provides a mechanism to integrate neuropeptide and energy homeostatic signals to modulate reproductive function. PMID:19632296

  19. Bovine acute-phase response following different doses of corticotrophin-releasing hormone challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fourteen weaned Angus steers (BW = 191 ± 2.1 kg, age = 167 ± 4.7 d) fitted with an indwelling jugular catheter and a rectal temperature (RT) monitoring device were ranked by BW and assigned to receive 1 of 3 treatments (i.v.): 1) 0.1 ug of bovine corticotrophin-release hormone (CRH)/kg of BW (CRH1; ...

  20. INHIBIN INCREASES AND PROGESTERONE DECREASES RECEPTORS FOR GONADOTROPIN-RELEASING HORMONE IN OVINE PITUITARY CULTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of progesterone (P4) and inhibin on gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor number (GnRH-R) and binding affinity were investigated using ovine pituitary cells in culture. ollowing treatment with P4 or porcine inhibin, GnRH binding was analyzed using a radioligand-rece...

  1. USE OF PERIFUSION TO EVALUATE HORMONAL RELEASE IN VITRO FROM RAT PITUITARY AND HYPOTHALAMIC TISSUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of in vitro procedures in reproductive toxicology has permitted a direct assessment of hormonal release from isolated tissue and a means by which to determine, potential sites of toxicant insult. he present chapter describes a perifusion procedure that can be used to eval...

  2. Stimulating effect of glycoprotein hormone free alpha-subunit and daily gonadotropin releasing hormone treatment on prolactin release from 50-day ovine foetal pituitary explants.

    PubMed

    Chabot, V; Gauthier, C; Combarnous, Y; Taragnat, C

    2001-02-01

    The aim of our study was to determine whether free alpha of glycoprotein hormones (free alpha) plays a role in lactotroph function during early pituitary development in the sheep foetus. Detection and quantification of free alpha, luteinzing hormone beta-subunit (LHbeta) and prolactin immunolabelling were determined by immunocytochemistry at days 32, 37, 42, 50 and 63 of gestation. Free alpha- and LHbeta-containing cells were first detected in the ovine foetal pituitary gland on day 37 of gestation, while prolactin-containing cells were first identified on day 42. Analysis of serial sections suggested that free alpha immunoreactive cells were also LHbeta-positive, indicating that free alpha was mainly synthesized by gonadotrophs. In early foetal stages, free alpha occurred in the antero-medio ventral region of the pituitary gland, whereas prolactin-containing cells were more dorsally and more caudally localized. The free alpha-, LHbeta- and prolactin-immunostained area increased markedly between days 50 and 63 of gestation. To evaluate a possible functional relationship between gonadotrophs and lactotrophs, the effects of free alpha or gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) on prolactin release were assayed. Chronic treatment of pituitary explants from male and female 42-day-old ovine foetuses for 8 days with 10-9 or 10-7 M ovine free alpha did not affect prolactin release. By contrast, free alpha administration on pituitary explants from male and female 50-day-old foetuses resulted in enhanced prolactin release. At this age, a daily (2 h per day) treatment with 10-8 M GnRH had similar stimulatory effect to free alpha whereas a 'first day' treatment (24 h on the first day) reduced prolactin release throughout the culture in males and had no effect in females. These results indicate that, despite early detection of free alpha at day 37 in the ovine foetal pituitary, its stimulatory effect on prolactin release occurs from day 50 of gestation, corresponding to the

  3. The effect of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analog regime and stage of oocyte maturity for induced ovulation of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effective LHRHa (luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analog) dose based on the gonadal maturity of channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus to optimize channel x blue hybrid catfish production was evaluated in 4 trials (twice in early part of the season and twice in the peak spawning season) in a ...

  4. Effect of carp pituitary extract and luteinizing hormone releasing analog hormone on reproductive indices and spawning of 3-year-old channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of carp pituitary extract (CPE) and luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRHa) treatments to induce spawning in young-adult channel catfish undergoing first oogenesis just prior to the spawning season was evaluated in four commercial strains of channel catfish. Prior to injection of ...

  5. New insights on the role of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone agonists in premenopausal early breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Del Mastro, Lucia; Rossi, Giovanni; Lambertini, Matteo; Poggio, Francesca; Pronzato, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Luteinising hormone releasing hormone agonists (LH-RHa) are effective in the treatment of advanced endocrine-sensitive breast cancer in premenopausal patients, but their role in the adjuvant setting has remained controversial for a long time. Tamoxifen for 5 years has been traditionally considered the standard endocrine therapy for premenopausal patients and this is still valid for many patients. However, the recently reported SOFT trial has suggested that adding ovarian function suppression (OFS) to tamoxifen could improve DFS in women at sufficient risk to warrant adjuvant chemotherapy and who remained premenopausal after this therapy. The administration of an aromatase inhibitor plus OFS represents an additional therapeutic option for hormone-receptor positive premenopausal breast cancer patients, according to the combined analysis of the SOFT and TEXT trials. Temporary ovarian suppression induced by LH-RHa has been recognized as an effective strategy to preserve ovarian function from the toxic effects of chemotherapy and is now recommended in young breast cancer patients with endocrine-insensitive tumors. In this review, we discuss recent data on the role of LH-RHa in combination with tamoxifen or with an aromatase inhibitor, and we comment on its role as a strategy to preserve ovarian function in young patients candidates for adjuvant or neo-adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:26613834

  6. Gonadotrophin releasing hormone-based vaccine, an effective candidate for prostate cancer and other hormone-sensitive neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Junco, Jesús A; Basalto, Roberto; Fuentes, Franklin; Bover, Eddy; Reyes, Osvaldo; Pimentel, Eulogio; Calzada, Lesvia; Castro, Maria D; Arteaga, Niurka; López, Yovisleidis; Hernández, Héctor; Bringas, Ricardo; Garay, Hilda; Peschke, Peter; Bertot, José; Guillén, Gerardo

    2008-01-01

    Prostate growth, development, functions, and neoplastic transformation is androgen dependent. Estrogens have similar effects in the ovary and breast. Previous studies using gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH/LHRH) vaccines have shown the usefulness of immunization against this hormone in prostate (PC) and breast cancer (BC). We have synthesized a peptide mutated at position 6 and attached to the 830-844 tetanic toxoid (TT) helper T cell sequence in the same synthesis process. After repeated pig immunizations, we have demonstrated a vaccine that significantly decreased testes size (p < 0.001), prostate (p < 0.01), seminal vesicles (p < 0.01), and testosterone (T) castration [0.05 nM ml(-1) (p < 0. 01)]. Similar results were obtained in adult male and female healthy dogs and Macaca fascicularis models. These data indicate that this GnRHm1-TT vaccine is safe and able to induce significant tumor growth inhibition in the Dunning R3327-H rat androgen responsive prostate tumor model. In these rats, the immunization induced high anti-GnRH titers concomitant with T castration reduction (p < 0.01) in 90% of the animals tested. In addition, 70% of the responders exhibited tumor growth inhibition (p = 0.02) and a survival rate approximately three times longer that those of untreated rats. These data indicate that GnRHm1-TT vaccine may be a potential candidate in the treatment of PC, BC, and other hormone-dependent cancers. PMID:18497085

  7. Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone (GHRH) Signaling Modulates Intermittent Hypoxia-Induced Oxidative Stress and Cognitive Deficits In Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Deepti; Ramesh, Vijay; Li, Richard C.; Schally, Andrew V.; Gozal, David

    2013-01-01

    Intermittent hypoxia (IH) during sleep, such as occurs in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), leads to degenerative changes in the hippocampus, and is associated with spatial learning deficits in adult mice. In both patients and murine models of OSA, the disease is associated with suppression of growth hormone (GH) secretion, which is actively involved in the growth, development and function of the central nervous system (CNS). Recent work showed that exogenous GH therapy attenuated neurocognitive deficits elicited by IH during sleep in rats. Here we show that administration of the Growth Hormone Releasing Hormone (GHRH) agonist JI-34 attenuates IH-induced neurocognitive deficits, anxiety, and depression in mice along with reduction in oxidative stress markers such as MDA and 8-OHDG, and increases in HIF-1α DNA binding and up-regulation of IGF-1 and erythropoietin expression. In contrast, treatment with a GHRH antagonist (MIA-602) during intermittent hypoxia did not affect any of the IH-induced deleterious effects in mice. Thus, exogenous GHRH administered as the formulation of a GHRH agonist may provide a viable therapeutic intervention to protect IH-vulnerable brain regions from OSA-associated neurocognitive dysfunction. PMID:23815362

  8. Growth hormone (GH)–releasing hormone and GH secretagogues in normal aging: Fountain of Youth or Pool of Tantalus?

    PubMed Central

    Hersch, Elizabeth C; Merriam, George R

    2008-01-01

    Although growth hormone (GH) is primarily associated with linear growth in childhood, it continues to have important metabolic functions in adult life. Adult GH deficiency (AGHD) is a distinct clinical entity, and GH replacement in AGHD can improve body composition, strength, aerobic capacity, and mood, and may reduce vascular disease risk. While there are some hormone-related side effects, the balance of benefits and risks is generally favorable, and several countries have approved GH for clinical use in AGHD. GH secretion declines progressively and markedly with aging, and many age-related changes resemble those of partial AGHD. This suggests that replacing GH, or stimulating GH with GH-releasing hormone or a GH secretagogue could confer benefits in normal aging similar to those observed in AGHD – in particular, could reduce the loss of muscle mass, strength, and exercise capacity leading to frailty, thereby prolonging the ability to live independently. However, while most GH studies have shown body composition effects similar to those in AGHD, functional changes have been much less inconsistent, and older adults are more sensitive to GH side effects. Preliminary reports of improved cognition are encouraging, but the overall balance of benefits and risks of GH supplementation in normal aging remains uncertain. PMID:18488883

  9. Pulsatile growth hormone secretion in patients with acromegaly and normal men: the effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone infusion.

    PubMed

    Gelato, M C; Oldfield, E; Loriaux, D L; Merriam, G R

    1990-09-01

    Twenty-four GH secretory patterns were studied before and during continuous infusions of GHRH in six patients with active acromegaly and in six normal adult men. GH release was episodic in both groups. Control subjects showed a normal diurnal variation in GH release, with the majority of GH released at night (2200-0800 h); mean levels were 1.5 +/- 0.4 (SE) ng/mL (day) and 4.2 +/- 0.8 ng/mL (night). Acromegalics had no diurnal variation in GH; levels were 45.3 +/- 13.7 ng/mL (day) and 39.8 +/- 12.2 ng/mL (night). Acromegalics demonstrated an increased frequency of GH pulses compared to normals (11.8 +/- 0.8 vs. 2.2 +/- 0.3/24 h). During continuous 24-h infusions of GHRH, the normal subjects continued to show a diurnal variation in GH release, but GH pulse frequency increased to a rate (11.7 +/- 1.4 pulses/24 h) very similar to that of the patients with acromegaly. In contrast, GHRH infusion did not alter the GH pulse frequency in the acromegalics. GHRH increased the mean levels of GH in both groups (patients 80.2 +/- 20.3 vs. 41.0 +/- 12.1 ng/mL, x +/- SE. P less than 0.05; controls 10.2 +/- 2.0 vs. 3.33 +/- 0.5 ng/mL, P less than 0.01). Some of the patients with acromegaly showed a progressive decline in GH levels during the infusion period, suggesting desensitization or exhaustion of releaseable stores; however, GH levels remained above basal values in all patients. After the 24-h GHRH infusions, the GH response to a bolus of GHRH was diminished in the normal subjects (2.1 +/- 0.9 vs. 16.8 +/- 5 ng/mL, x +/- SE; P less than 0.01) but not in the acromegalic patients (30.2 +/- 8.9 vs. 35.5 +/- 12.5 ng/mL; NS). These results indicate that GH release is episodic under basal conditions and during continuous GHRH infusion in both acromegalic and normal subjects, indicating the importance of other modulators of GH release, such as somatostatin, which may remain pulsatile even in acromegaly. PMID:2118536

  10. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) as a diagnostic and research tool in gynecologic endocrinology.

    PubMed

    Taymor, M L; Thompson, I E; Berger, M J; Patton, W

    1974-11-15

    A study is reported on the effects of 150 mcg. of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH), administered iv to 48 women with 5 types of secondary oligoamenorrhea, on the serum follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH) Levels. At Time 0, patients with pituitary disease showed a markedly diminished LH response and patients with polycystic ovarian disease with enlarged ovaries showed a brisk, elevated LH response. FSH levels in patients with pituitary disease and polycystic ovarian disease showed a negligible rise at Time 0. 9 of 10 patients with pituitary disease and 5 of 9 patients with dietary amenorrhea had a low LH response 30 minutes after LH-RH administration. FSH response 60 minutes after injection in patients with pituitary disease and polycystic ovarian disease seemed to be lowered though too much overlap prevented a complete diagnosis. The conclusion of this initial study is that through baseline determinations of FSH and LH, along with a LH-RH stimulation test, useful data are provided for determining whether amenorrhea is due to ovarian or pituitary failure. A 2nd study evaluated the effects of 150 mcg of LH-RH administered iv before and after the im administration of various dosages of estrogen and progesterone to anovulatory women. A vigorous response in pituitary gonadotropin, particularly LH, was observed with LH-RH administered only. The effect with estrogen and progesterone was diminished pituitary response in terms of LH production. It is concluded that estrogen and progesterone exert a negative feedback effect on gonadotropin secretion at the hypothalamic and pituitary levels. PMID:4611213

  11. Evaluation of growth hormone release and human growth hormone treatment in children with cranial irradiation-associated short stature

    SciTech Connect

    Romshe, C.A.; Zipf, W.B.; Miser, A.; Miser, J.; Sotos, J.F.; Newton, W.A.

    1984-02-01

    We studied nine children who had received cranial irradiation for various malignancies and subsequently experienced decreased growth velocity. Their response to standard growth hormone stimulation and release tests were compared with that in seven children with classic GH deficiency and in 24 short normal control subjects. With arginine and L-dopa stimulation, six of nine patients who received radiation had a normal GH response (greater than 7 ng/ml), whereas by design none of the GH deficient and all of the normal children had a positive response. Only two of nine patients had a normal response to insulin hypoglycemia, with no significant differences in the mean maximal response of the radiation and the GH-deficient groups. Pulsatile secretion was not significantly different in the radiation and GH-deficient groups, but was different in the radiation and normal groups. All subjects in the GH-deficient and radiation groups were given human growth hormone for 1 year. Growth velocity increased in all, with no significant difference in the response of the two groups when comparing the z scores for growth velocity of each subject's bone age. We recommend a 6-month trial of hGH in children who have had cranial radiation and are in prolonged remission with a decreased growth velocity, as there is no completely reliable combination of GH stimulation or release tests to determine their response.

  12. The goldfish nervus terminalis: a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and molluscan cardioexcitatory peptide immunoreactive olfactoretinal pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Stell, W K; Walker, S E; Chohan, K S; Ball, A K

    1984-01-01

    Antisera to two putative neurotransmitters, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) and molluscan cardioexcitatory tetrapeptide (H-Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2; FMRF-amide), bind specifically to neurites in the inner nuclear and inner plexiform layers of the goldfish retina. Retrograde labeling showed that intraocular axon terminals originate from the nervus terminalis, whose cell bodies are located in the olfactory nerves. Double immunocytochemical and retrograde labeling showed that some terminalis neurons project to the retina; others may project only within the brain. All terminalis neurons having proven retinal projections were both LHRH- and FMRF-amide-immunoreactive. The activity of retinal ganglion cells was recorded with microelectrodes in isolated superfused goldfish retinas. In ON- and OFF-center double-color-opponent cells, micromolar FMRF-amide and salmon brain gonadotropin-releasing factor ( [Trp7, Leu8] LHRH) caused increased spontaneous activity in the dark, loss of light-induced inhibition, and increased incidence of light-entrained pulsatile response. The nervus terminalis is therefore a putatively peptidergic retinopetal projection. Sex-related olfactory stimuli may act through it, thereby modulating the output of ganglion cells responsive to color contrast. Images PMID:6199789

  13. Inhibition of growth of a prolactin and growth hormone-secreting pituitary tumor in rats by D-tryptophan-6 analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Aleman, I; Redding, T W; Schally, A V

    1985-01-01

    The effect of long-term administration of analogs of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) and somatostatin on the growth of the growth hormone (GH)- and prolactin (PRL)-secreting rat pituitary GH3 tumor was investigated. Daily administration of [D-Trp6]LH-RH (50 micrograms/day), early after inoculation of the GH3 tumor, inhibited tumor growth by more than 90% as compared to controls. Similarly, in two experiments, a single once-a-month injection of long-acting [D-Trp6]LH-RH microcapsules (in a dose calculated to release about 25 micrograms/day for 30 days) inhibited the growth of GH3 pituitary tumor by more than 50% 6 or 13 wk after transplantation, when the tumors were fully developed. Serum GH and PRL levels also were reduced markedly by treatment with [D-Trp6]LH-RH. On the other hand, the administration of an antagonistic analog of LH-RH, N-Ac-[D-Phe(4Cl)1,2, D-Trp3, D-Arg6, D-Ala10]LH-RH, did not significantly reduce the growth of this tumor, and the treatment with two different analogs of somatostatin, cyclo(Pro-Phe-D-Trp-Lys-Thr-Phe) and D-Phe-Cys-Phe-D-Trp-Lys-Thr-Cys-Thr NH2, appeared to enhance it. These results are in agreement with previous findings of growth inhibition of 7315a pituitary tumors with different hormone-secreting characteristics by agonistic analogs of LH-RH. The collective data from experimental work with rat pituitary tumor models support the contention that the use of [D-Trp6]LH-RH might be considered for the treatment of some patients with pituitary tumors who failed to respond to conventional therapy. PMID:2858096

  14. [Effect of gastrectomy on release of gut hormones].

    PubMed

    Misumi, A; Harada, K; Mizumoto, S; Yoshinaka, I; Maeda, M; Nakashima, Y; Ogawa, M

    1991-09-01

    We investigated the effect of gastrectomy on the digestive system in 87 postoperative long-term survivors under test meal or egg yolk load. After test meal, gastrin and secretin responses were decreased in each of groups of proximal gastrectomy (PG), distal gastrectomy with Billroth-I (DG-B1), that with Billroth-II (DG-B2), total gastrectomy with interposition (TG-I), and that with Roux-Y (TG-RY). However, sufficient acid-secretors after partial gastrectomy showed secretin responses comparable to controls. Furthermore, cases of total gastrectomy given betain-hydrochloride with test meal increased secretin responses. Serum glucose response was higher in the TG-RY group while insulin response was high in the TG-RY and DG-B2 groups, compared with controls. GLI response was high in all groups compared with controls. Postgastrectomy gallstone occurred in 11.6%. Yolk-induced contraction of the gallbladder was decreased, and CCK release increased, for several years postoperatively. Gallbladder contraction with CCK was reduced for one year postoperatively. The contraction was reduced in persons with gallstone than those without it. This study shows that the digestive function after gastrectomy depends on acidification and duodenal passage of food, and that reduced contraction with CCK plays an important role in hypokinesis of the gallbladder. PMID:1944181

  15. Production and characterization of antibodies to gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Hazum, E; Schvartz, I; Popliker, M

    1987-01-15

    Antibodies to the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor of bovine pituitary membranes have been raised in rabbits by immunization with affinity-purified receptor preparations. These antibodies did not compete with 125I-labeled GnRH analog (Buserelin) for binding to the receptors but did precipitate rat and bovine solubilized receptors labeled with 125I-Buserelin. Binding of the antibodies to the receptors was also demonstrated by immunoprecipitation of 125I-labeled purified receptors and photoaffinity-labeled receptors. The antibodies did not have a GnRH-like activity but rather inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, GnRH-stimulated luteinizing hormone release from cultured rat pituitary cells. In addition, the antibodies did not inhibit luteinizing hormone release stimulated by high K+ concentration. This suggests that the antibodies recognize domains of the receptor other than the binding site of the hormone and thereby inhibit the biological response. These GnRH receptor antibodies provide a useful tool for studying GnRH receptor structure, function, localization, and biosynthesis. PMID:3027055

  16. Sexual dimorphism of stress response and immune/ inflammatory reaction: the corticotropin releasing hormone perspective

    PubMed Central

    Vamvakopoulos, Nicholas V.

    1995-01-01

    This review higlghts key aspects of corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) biology of potential relevance to the sexual dimorphism of the stress response and immune/inflammatory reaction, and introduces two important new concepts based on the regulatory potential of the human (h) CRH gene: (1) a proposed mechanism to account for the tissue-specific antithetical responses of hCRH gene expression to glucocorticolds, that may also explain the frequently observed antithetical effects of chronic glucocorticoid administration in clinical practice and (2) a heuristic diagram to illustrate the proposed modulation of the stress response and immune/ inflammatory reaction by steroid hormones, from the perspective of the CRH system. PMID:18475634

  17. Differential involvement of signaling pathways in the regulation of growth hormone release by somatostatin and growth hormone-releasing hormone in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Qin, Chaobin; Zhang, Cong; Jia, Jirong; Sun, Caiyun; Li, Wensheng

    2014-02-15

    Somatostatin is the most effective inhibitor of GH release, and GHRH was recently identified as one of the primary GH-releasing factors in teleosts. In this study, we analyzed the possible intracellular transduction pathways that are involved in the mechanisms induced by SRIF and GHRH to regulate GH release. Using a pharmacological approach, the blockade of the PLC/IP/PKC pathway reversed the SRIF-induced inhibition of GH release but did not affect the GHRH-induced stimulation of GH release. Furthermore, SRIF reduced the GH release induced by two PKC activators. Inhibitors of the AC/cAMP/PKA pathway reversed both the SRIF- and GHRH-induced effects on GH release. Moreover, the GH release evoked by forskolin and 8-Br-cAMP were completely abolished by SRIF. The blockade of the NOS/NO pathway attenuated the GHRH-induced GH release but had minimal effects on the inhibitory actions of SRIF. In addition, inhibitors of the sGC/cGMP pathway did not modify the SRIF- or GHRH-induced regulation of GH release. Taken together, these findings indicate that the SRIF-induced inhibition of GH release is mediated by both the PLC/IP/PKC and the AC/cAMP/PKA pathways and not by the NOS/NO/sGC/cGMP pathway. In contrast, the GHRH-induced stimulation of GH secretion is mediated by both the AC/cAMP/PKA and the NOS/NO pathways and is independent of the sGC/cGMP pathway and the PLC/IP/PKC system. PMID:24183819

  18. Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) induced luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion from perifused equine pituitaries.

    PubMed

    Pinaud, M A; Roser, J F; Dybdal, N

    1991-07-01

    In vitro responsiveness of the horse anterior pituitary (AP) gonadotropes to single and multiple GnRH challenges was examined. The pituitaries were collected from reproductively sound mares in estrus (n = 5) and diestrus (n = 5). Uniform 0.5 mm AP slices were subdivided using a 3 mm biopsy punch and then bisected for use in the perifusion chamber. Four bisected sections per chamber were perifused at 0.5 ml/min at 37 C for 560 min in Medium 199 saturated with 95% 0(2)/5% CO2. Ten minute fractions were collected after an initial 2 hr equilibration period. Four different treatment regimes of GnRH (10(-10) M) were evaluated: (A) three consecutive 10 min GnRH pulses separated by 80 and 100 min, respectively; (B) a single 120 min GnRH infusion; (C) a 10 min GnRH pulse followed 80 min later by a 120 min GnRH infusion and (D) two 10 min GnRH pulses separated by 60 min followed 80 min later by a 120 min GnRH infusion. Estimated total pituitary LH content was higher in estrous than diestrus mares (p less than 0.05). The total amount of LH released in response to GnRH tended to be greater in estrus than diestrus (p less than 0.1), whereas the percentage of LH released in estrus and diestrus was similar. An increase in the area under the LH response curve was noted with each successive 10 min pulse of GnRH during both estrus and diestrus (p less than 0.05), demonstrating a self-priming effect of GnRH. In addition, a significant increase in the peak LH amplitude (p less than 0.05) and the slope to peak amplitude (p less than 0.05) were observed for the 120 min GnRH pulse in regime C and D indicating that prior exposure to short-term pulses of GnRH increased the acute LH secretory response. These results suggest that in the cycling mare (1) the responsiveness of the pituitary (amount of LH released as percent of total LH) is similar in both estrus and diestrus, however, the magnitude of the LH response (total microgram amount of LH released) differs with the stage of the estrous

  19. Influence of hormonal contraceptives on the pituitary response to LH/FSH-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Carol, W; Lauterbach, H; Klinger, G; Möller, R

    1978-03-01

    In the pre-ovulatory phase the absolute and relative LH increase was much greater than during the luteal phase and less pronounced in the early follicular phase of the normal cycle. FSH release was affected only during the pre-ovulatory period, where a retarded, 3- or 4-fold increase compared to basal levels was recorded. In the women taking oral contraceptives of the conventional type the first LH-RH test showed gonadotropin responses similar to those obtained during the luteal phase of the controls. The second test brought a significantly lower LH response, suggesting an increasing exogenous steroid inhibition at the pituitary level in the course of the therapeutic cycle. This inhibition seems to be reversed during the monthly tablet-free interval. A particularly small and retarded gonadotropin response was observed in patients taking Deposiston. These results are discussed as to their clinical significance. PMID:357145

  20. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  1. Effect of hypophysectomy and growth hormone replacement on hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing factor messenger ribonucleic Acid levels.

    PubMed

    Eccleston, L M; Powell, J F; Clayton, R N

    1991-12-01

    Abstract The mechanisms by which the pituitary gland, and growth hormone (GH) in particular, affect growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) gene expression have been addressed using the technique of in situ hybridization. Anatomically matched sections through the mediobasal hypothalamus of control and hypophysectomized male rats, with or without GH hormone replacement, were analysed to obtain information on GRF mRNA levels within the arcuate nucleus and around the ventromedial hypothalamus. Hypophysectomy resulted in a 70% increase in the amount of GRF mRNA per cell (P<0.001), within neurons in the arcuate nucleus. GH replacement and T4 replacement separately partially attenuated this increase (GH replacement P< 0.001 versus hypophysectomy, T4 replacement P<0.05 versus hypophysectomy). Additionally, after hypophysectomy there was an 80% increase in the number of cells expressing the GRF gene in neurons around the ventromedial hypothalamus, when compared to shamoperated controls (P<0.01). Both GH and T4 replacement separately partially attenuated this phenomenon (P<0.01 versus hypophysectomized animals). Hypothyroidism alone did not affect GRF mRNA levels in either the arcuate nucleus or in the area surrounding the ventromedial hypothalamus. These results show that hypophysectomy increases GRF mRNA levels in two separate ways: by increasing the amount of mRNA produced per cell within the arcuate nucleus, and by increasing the number of cells expressing the gene in the area surrounding the ventromedial hypothalamus. This increase in the number of GRF mRNA-containing cells after hypophysectomy could result from the recruitment of neurons which previously did not express the GRF gene, and may reflect the plasticity of the adult central nervous system in response to a changing endocrine environment. This could represent part of a sensor mechanism to drive the production of GRF in the arcuate nucleus in response to extreme disruption of the GRF/ GH feedback loop. PMID

  2. Pubertal development in the male pig: effects of treatment with a long-acting gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist on plasma luteinizing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone and testosterone.

    PubMed Central

    Trudeau, V L; Meijer, J C; Erkens, J H; van de Wiel, D F; Wensing, C J

    1992-01-01

    The effects of a long-acting gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist, [D-Trp6]-GnRH (GnRH-A) on developmental profiles of plasma luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulation hormone (FSH) and testosterone (T), and pituitary responsiveness to exogenous GnRH were studied in male Dutch Landrace x Large White crossbred pigs from 1 to 30 wk of age. Group 1 control animals (control; n = 12) were injected subcutaneously in the neck with vehicle at 1 and 16 wk of age. Group 2 animals (early treatment; n = 10) were injected with 600 micrograms [D-Trp6]-GnRH at 1 wk and with vehicle at 16 wk. Group 3 animals (late treatment; n = 8) were injected with vehicle and 3 mg GnRH-A at 1 and 16 wk, respectively. Group 4 animals (early plus late treatment; n = 9) were injected at both 1 and 16 wk with GnRH-A. Blood was collected by brachiocephalic puncture at weekly or biweekly intervals, and through brachiocephalic cannulae, to determine longitudinal profiles of LH, FSH and T, and plasma gonadotropin responses to intravenous injection of GnRH (0.1 microgram/kg), respectively. In control animals, LH and FSH declined over the first 5 wk of postnatal life and peaked again at 10-14 wk. Levels of both hormones were basal from 18 to 30 wk. Plasma T was high in the first week, declined progressively over the next few weeks and remained low until 24 wk when a transient increment was noted. The LH and FSH responses to acute GnRH stimulation were similar at 7 and 14 wk and declined significantly at 23 wk of age.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1534270

  3. Treatment of canine pyometra with the gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist acyline: a case series.

    PubMed

    Batista, Pablo R; Blanco, Paula G; Gobello, Cristina

    2015-03-01

    To describe the effect of the third-generation gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist acyline in the treatment of 4 diestrous bitches with the cystic endometrial hyperplasia-pyometra complex. The 4 bitches were treated with 330 μg/kg of subcutaneous acyline on day 0 and antibiotics, and followed up for 2 weeks. One closed-cervix case showed cervical dilatation 36 hours after treatment, and all the 4 animals showed resolution of clinical signs starting on day 3 posttreatment. Ultrasonographic uterine diameters and luminal contents decreased in the bitches having high progesterone serum concentrations before treatment but not in those with low levels. Serum progesterone importantly decreased from high to basal concentrations in the 3 "ultrasonographically cured" animals. No local or systemic side effects related to the treatment were observed. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist acyline may have a promising place for the medical treatment of cystic endometrial hyperplasia-pyometra complex in dogs. PMID:26041594

  4. Structural and Functional Divergence of Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone Receptors in Early Sarcopterygians: Lungfish and Xenopus

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Janice K. V.; Chow, Billy K. C.; Lee, Leo T. O.

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary trajectories of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor remain enigmatic since the discovery of physiologically functional GHRH-GHRH receptor (GHRHR) in non-mammalian vertebrates in 2007. Interestingly, subsequent studies have described the identification of a GHRHR2 in chicken in addition to the GHRHR and the closely related paralogous receptor, PACAP-related peptide (PRP) receptor (PRPR). In this article, we provide information, for the first time, on the GHRHR in sarcopterygian fish and amphibians by the cloning and characterization of GHRHRs from lungfish (P. dolloi) and X. laevis. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated structural resemblance of lungfish GHRHR to their mammalian orthologs, while the X. laevis GHRHR showed the highest homology to GHRHR2 in zebrafish and chicken. Functionally, lungfish GHRHR displayed high affinity towards GHRH in triggering intracellular cAMP and calcium accumulation, while X. laevis GHRHR2 was able to react with both endogenous GHRH and PRP. Tissue distribution analyses showed that both lungfish GHRHR and X. laevis GHRHR2 had the highest expression in brain, and interestingly, X. laevis GHRHR2 also had high abundance in the reproductive organs. These findings, together with previous reports, suggest that early in the Sarcopterygii lineage, GHRHR and PRPR have already established diverged and specific affinities towards their cognate ligands. GHRHR2, which has only been found in xenopus, zebrafish and chicken hitherto, accommodates both GHRH and PRP. PMID:23308232

  5. New therapeutic approach to heart failure due to myocardial infarction based on targeting growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schally, Andrew V.; Takeuchi, Lauro M.; Popovics, Petra; Jaszberenyi, Miklos; Vidaurre, Irving; Zarandi, Marta; Cai, Ren-Zhi; Block, Norman L.; Hare, Joshua M.; Rick, Ferenc G.

    2015-01-01

    Background We previously showed that growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) agonists are cardioprotective following myocardial infarction (MI). Here, our aim was to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo activities of highly potent new GHRH agonists, and elucidate their mechanisms of action in promoting cardiac repair. Methods and Results H9c2 cells were cultured in serum-free medium, mimicking nutritional deprivation. GHRH agonists decreased calcium influx and significantly improved cell survival. Rats with cardiac infarction were treated with GHRH agonists or placebo for four weeks. MI size was reduced by selected GHRH agonists (JI-38, MR-356, MR-409); this accompanied an increased number of cardiac c-kit+ cells, cellular mitotic divisions, and vascular density. One week post-MI, MR-409 significantly reduced plasma levels of IL-2, IL-6, IL-10 and TNF-α compared to placebo. Gene expression studies revealed favorable outcomes of MR-409 treatment partially result from inhibitory activity on pro-apoptotic molecules and pro-fibrotic systems, and by elevation of bone morphogenetic proteins. Conclusions Treatment with GHRH agonists appears to reduce the inflammatory responses post-MI and may consequently improve mechanisms of healing and cardiac remod eling by regulating pathways involved in fibrosis, apoptosis and cardiac repair. Patients with cardiac dysfunction could benefit from treatment with novel GHRH agonists. PMID:25797248

  6. Structural and functional divergence of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptors in early sarcopterygians: lungfish and Xenopus.

    PubMed

    Tam, Janice K V; Chow, Billy K C; Lee, Leo T O

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary trajectories of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor remain enigmatic since the discovery of physiologically functional GHRH-GHRH receptor (GHRHR) in non-mammalian vertebrates in 2007. Interestingly, subsequent studies have described the identification of a GHRHR(2) in chicken in addition to the GHRHR and the closely related paralogous receptor, PACAP-related peptide (PRP) receptor (PRPR). In this article, we provide information, for the first time, on the GHRHR in sarcopterygian fish and amphibians by the cloning and characterization of GHRHRs from lungfish (P. dolloi) and X. laevis. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic analyses demonstrated structural resemblance of lungfish GHRHR to their mammalian orthologs, while the X. laevis GHRHR showed the highest homology to GHRHR(2) in zebrafish and chicken. Functionally, lungfish GHRHR displayed high affinity towards GHRH in triggering intracellular cAMP and calcium accumulation, while X. laevis GHRHR(2) was able to react with both endogenous GHRH and PRP. Tissue distribution analyses showed that both lungfish GHRHR and X. laevis GHRHR(2) had the highest expression in brain, and interestingly, X. laevis(GHRHR2) also had high abundance in the reproductive organs. These findings, together with previous reports, suggest that early in the Sarcopterygii lineage, GHRHR and PRPR have already established diverged and specific affinities towards their cognate ligands. GHRHR(2), which has only been found in xenopus, zebrafish and chicken hitherto, accommodates both GHRH and PRP. PMID:23308232

  7. Inhibition of progesterone secretion during the luteal phase by two luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists in Macaca fascicularis.

    PubMed

    Raynaud, J P; Mary, I; Moguilewsky, M; Mouren, M; Labrie, F

    1980-12-01

    The administration of 200 microgram of the potent luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist [D-Leu6,des-Gly-NH2(10)]LHRH ethylamide on day 6 following the plasma estradiol peak to 11 female monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) during two consecutive menstrual cycles decreased plasma progesterone levels by 40.0% +/- 3.9% as compared with previous control cycles. The plasma estradiol profile and the cycle length were not affected significantly by the treatment. Similar results were obtained with 25 microgram of [D-Ser(TBU)6,des-Gly-NH2(10)]LHRH ethylamide administered to one monkey at the same period of the cycle, such treatment leading to a 41% inhibition of circulating progesterone levels. Although plasma progesterone levels were still reduced in the two post-treatment cycles in monkeys treated with the high dose (200 microgram) of [D-Leu6,des-Gly-NH2(10)]LHRH ethylamide, the recovery cycle was normal after the administration of a lower dose (25 microgram) of [D-Ser(TBU)6, des-Gly-NH2(10)] LHRH ethylamide. The M. fascicularis monkey thus appears as a valid model with which to study the inhibitory effects of LHRH agonists on luteal function. PMID:6778718

  8. Improvement of islet function in a bioartificial pancreas by enhanced oxygen supply and growth hormone releasing hormone agonist

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Barbara; Rotem, Avi; Schmid, Janine; Weir, Gordon C.; Colton, Clark K.; Brendel, Mathias D.; Neufeld, Tova; Block, Norman L.; Yavriyants, Karina; Steffen, Anja; Ludwig, Stefan; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Reichel, Andreas; Azarov, Dimitri; Zimermann, Baruch; Maimon, Shiri; Balyura, Mariya; Rozenshtein, Tania; Shabtay, Noa; Vardi, Pnina; Bloch, Konstantin; de Vos, Paul; Schally, Andrew V.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Barkai, Uriel

    2012-01-01

    Islet transplantation is a feasible therapeutic alternative for metabolically labile patients with type 1 diabetes. The primary therapeutic target is stable glycemic control and prevention of complications associated with diabetes by reconstitution of endogenous insulin secretion. However, critical shortage of donor organs, gradual loss in graft function over time, and chronic need for immunosuppression limit the indication for islet transplantation to a small group of patients. Here we present a promising approach to address these limitations by utilization of a macrochamber specially engineered for islet transplantation. The s.c. implantable device allows for controlled and adequate oxygen supply and provides immunological protection of donor islets against the host immune system. The minimally invasive implantable chamber normalized blood glucose in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rodents for up to 3 mo. Sufficient graft function depended on oxygen supply. Pretreatment with the growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) agonist, JI-36, significantly enhanced graft function by improving glucose tolerance and increasing β-cell insulin reserve in rats thereby allowing for a reduction of the islet mass required for metabolic control. As a result of hypervascularization of the tissue surrounding the device, no relevant delay in insulin response to glucose changes has been observed. Consequently, this system opens up a fundamental strategy for therapy of diabetes and may provide a promising avenue for future approaches to xenotransplantation. PMID:22393012

  9. Is radiation-induced ovarian failure in rhesus monkeys preventable by luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists?: Preliminary observations

    SciTech Connect

    Ataya, K.; Pydyn, E.; Ramahi-Ataya

    1995-03-01

    With the advent of cancer therapy, increasing numbers of cancer patients are achieving long term survival. Impaired ovarian function after radiation therapy has been reported in several studies. Some investigators have suggested that luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists (LHRHa) can prevent radiation-induced ovarian injury in rodents. Adult female rhesus monkeys were given either vehicle or Leuprolide acetate before, during, and after radiation. Radiation was given in a dose of 200 rads/day for a total of 4000 rads to the ovaries. Frequent serum samples were assayed for estradiol (E{sub 2}) and FSH. Ovariectomy was performed later. Ovaries were processed and serially sectioned. Follicle count and size distribution were determined. Shortly after radiation started, E{sub 2} dropped to low levels, at which it remained, whereas serum FSH level, which was low before radiation, rose soon after starting radiation. In monkeys treated with a combination of LHRHa and radiation, FSH started rising soon after the LHRHa-loaded minipump was removed (after the end of radiation). Serum E{sub 2} increased after the end of LHRHa treatment in the non-irradiated monkey, but not in the irradiated monkey. Follicle counts were not preserved in the LHRHa-treated monkeys that received radiation. The data demonstrated no protective effect of LHRHa treatment against radiation-induced ovarian injury in this rhesus monkey model. 58 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Central stimulation of hormone release and the proliferative response of lymphocytes in humans.

    PubMed

    Juránková, E; Jezová, D; Vigas, M

    1995-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) may communicate with the immune system by direct innervation of lymphoid organs and/or by neurotransmitters and changes in neuroendocrine functioning and hormone release. The consequences of selective transient changes in circulating hormones on immune functioning in humans have not yet been studied. To address this problem, the authors evaluated the lymphoproliferative responses to optimal and suboptimal concentrations of phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and pokeweek mitogen (PWM) under selective enhancement of circulating growth hormone, prolactin, or norepinephrine. The authors failed to demonstrate any effect of elevated growth hormone levels after clonidine challenge on the lymphoproliferative response to mitogens. Similarly, the results did not show any effect of elevated prolactin concentrations induced by domperidone administration on the immune test. Exposure of volunteers to cold resulted in elevation of plasma norepinephrine levels without changes in growth hormone, epinephrine, or cortisol secretion. Cold exposure induced elevation of plasma norepinephrine and reduction of the lymphoproliferative response to the suboptimal dosage of PHA. The reduction was significant 180 and 240 min after exposure. These results are indicative of a relationship between norepinephrine and immunity. PMID:8534322

  11. Relationships between hormone-induced calcium release and 86rubidium uptake stimulation in starfish oocytes.

    PubMed

    Guerrier, P; Moreau, M; Dorée, M

    1979-09-01

    86Rubidium+ uptake, but not 86Rubidium efflux, is strongly stimulated after addition of the meiosis inducing hormone 1-methyladenine (1-MeAde) to prophase blocked oocytes of the starfish Marthasterias glacialis. This stimulation is a transient process which does not require the continuous presence of 1-MeAde and is elicited within 1 minute of contact. 1-MeAde and its biologically active structural analogs fully stimulate Rb+ uptake at concentrations which are about two orders of magnitude lower than those required to trigger meiosis reinitiation but which already release underthreshold levels of Ca2+ from the inner part of the plasma membrane. External Ca2+ concentrations effective in triggering meiosis reinitiation also stimulate Rb+ influx, while drugs like D600, theophyllin and caffein which suppress the hormone induced Ca2+ release, simultaneously preclude the stimulation of Rb+ uptake. Dithiothreitol (DTT) which mimicks 1-MeAde action in releasing Ca2+ and inducing meiosis acts both on the efflux and on active and passive Rb+ influxes. Ouabain, the classical inhibitor of the Na+, K+ pump does not preclude meiosis reinitiation under the influence of 1-MeAde, its agonists of mimetics. It suppresses the active component of Rb+ uptake both in control or stimulate oocytes. When applied only in preincubation before starting the hormone treatment, it cannot however inhibit the stimulation of Rb+ uptake, while basal pump inhibition is preserved. These results demonstrate that stimulation of the active Rb+ or K+ transport is not indispensable to meiosis reinitiation. They suggest moreover that the hormone induced Ca2+ release from the plasma membrane may be responsible for unmasking new ouabain sensitive transport sites. PMID:515475

  12. Effects of ionizing radiation and pretreatment with (D-Leu6,des-Gly10) luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ethylamide on developing rat ovarian follicles

    SciTech Connect

    Jarrell, J.; YoungLai, E.V.; McMahon, A.; Barr, R.; O'Connell, G.; Belbeck, L.

    1987-10-01

    To assess the effects of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, (D-Leu6,des-Gly10) luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ethylamide, in ameliorating the damage caused by ionizing radiation, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist was administered to rats from day 22 to 37 of age in doses of 0.1, 0.4, and 1.0 microgram/day or vehicle and the rats were sacrificed on day 44 of age. There were no effects on estradiol, progesterone, luteinizing, or follicle-stimulating hormone, nor an effect on ovarian follicle numbers or development. In separate experiments, rats treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist in doses of 0.04, 0.1, 0.4, or 1.0 microgram/day were either irradiated or sham irradiated on day 30 and all groups sacrificed on day 44 of age. Irradiation produced a reduction in ovarian weight and an increase in ovarian follicular atresia. Pretreatment with the agonist prevented the reduction in ovarian weight and numbers of primordial and preantral follicles but not healthy or atretic antral follicles. Such putative radioprotection should be tested on actual reproductive performance.

  13. Increased activity of antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone substituted at positions 8, 9, and 10

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Jozsef L.; Schally, Andrew V.; Horvath, Judit E.; Kovacs, Magdolna; Halmos, Gabor; Groot, Kate; Toller, Gabor L.; Rekasi, Zoltan; Zarandi, Marta

    2004-01-01

    Antagonists of human growth hormone-releasing hormone (hGHRH) with increased potency and improved enzymatic and chemical stability are needed for potential clinical applications. We synthesized 21 antagonistic analogs of hGHRH(1-29)NH2, substituted at positions 8, 9, and 10 of the common core sequence {phenylacetyl-Tyr1, d-Arg2,28, para-chloro-phenylalanine 6, Arg9/homoarginine 9, Tyr10/O-methyltyrosine 10, α-aminobutyric acid 15, norleucine 27, Har29} hGHRH(1-29)NH2. Inhibitory effects on hGHRH-induced GH release were evaluated in vitro in a superfused rat pituitary system, as well as in vivo after i.v. injection into rats. The binding affinities of the peptides to pituitary GHRH receptors were also determined. Introduction of para-amidinophenylalanine 10 yielded antagonists JV-1-62 and -63 with the highest activities in vitro and lowest receptor dissociation constants (Ki = 0.057-0.062 nM). Antagonists JV-1-62 and -63 also exhibited the strongest effect in vivo, significantly (P < 0.05-0.001) inhibiting hGHRH-induced GH release for at least 1 h. Para-aminophenylalanine 10 and O-ethyltyrosine 10 substitutions yielded antagonists potent in vitro, but His10, 3,3′-diphenylalanine 10, 2-naphthylalanine 10, and cyclohexylalanine 10 modifications were detrimental. Antagonists containing citrulline 9 (in MZ-J-7-72), amidinophenylalanine 9 (in JV-1-65), His9, d-Arg9, citrulline 8, Ala8, d-Ala8, or α-aminobutyric acid 8 substituents also had high activity and receptor affinity in vitro. However, in vitro potencies of analogs with substitution in position 9 correlated poorly with acute endocrine effects in vivo, as exemplified by the weak and/or short inhibitory actions of antagonists JV-1-65 and MZ-J-7-72 on GH release in vivo. Nevertheless, antagonist JV-1-65 was more potent than JV-1-63 in tests on inhibition of the growth of human prostatic and lung cancer lines xenografted into nude mice. This indicates that oncological activity may be based on several mechanisms

  14. Pituitary response to thyrotropin releasing hormone in children with overweight and obesity.

    PubMed

    Rijks, Jesse; Penders, Bas; Dorenbos, Elke; Straetemans, Saartje; Gerver, Willem-Jan; Vreugdenhil, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations in the high normal range are common in children with overweight and obesity, and associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Prior studies aiming at unravelling the mechanisms underlying these high TSH concentrations mainly focused on factors promoting thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) production as a cause for high TSH concentrations. However, it is unknown whether TSH release of the pituitary in response to TRH is affected in children with overweight and obesity. Here we describe TSH release of the pituitary in response to exogenous TRH in 73 euthyroid children (39% males) with overweight or (morbid) obesity. Baseline TSH concentrations (0.9-5.5 mU/L) were not associated with BMI z score, whereas these concentrations were positively associated with TSH concentrations 20 minutes after TRH administration (r(2) = 0.484, p < 0.001) and the TSH incremental area under the curve during the TRH stimulation test (r(2) = 0.307, p < 0.001). These results suggest that pituitary TSH release in response to TRH stimulation might be an important factor contributing to high normal serum TSH concentrations, which is a regular finding in children with overweight and obesity. The clinical significance and the intermediate factors contributing to pituitary TSH release need to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:27485208

  15. Pituitary response to thyrotropin releasing hormone in children with overweight and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Rijks, Jesse; Penders, Bas; Dorenbos, Elke; Straetemans, Saartje; Gerver, Willem-Jan; Vreugdenhil, Anita

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) concentrations in the high normal range are common in children with overweight and obesity, and associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk. Prior studies aiming at unravelling the mechanisms underlying these high TSH concentrations mainly focused on factors promoting thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) production as a cause for high TSH concentrations. However, it is unknown whether TSH release of the pituitary in response to TRH is affected in children with overweight and obesity. Here we describe TSH release of the pituitary in response to exogenous TRH in 73 euthyroid children (39% males) with overweight or (morbid) obesity. Baseline TSH concentrations (0.9–5.5 mU/L) were not associated with BMI z score, whereas these concentrations were positively associated with TSH concentrations 20 minutes after TRH administration (r2 = 0.484, p < 0.001) and the TSH incremental area under the curve during the TRH stimulation test (r2 = 0.307, p < 0.001). These results suggest that pituitary TSH release in response to TRH stimulation might be an important factor contributing to high normal serum TSH concentrations, which is a regular finding in children with overweight and obesity. The clinical significance and the intermediate factors contributing to pituitary TSH release need to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:27485208

  16. Electrical synapses connect a network of gonadotropin releasing hormone neurons in a cichlid fish

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yunyong; Hu, Caroline K.; Huguenard, John R.; Fernald, Russell D.

    2015-01-01

    Initiating and regulating vertebrate reproduction requires pulsatile release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH1) from the hypothalamus. Coordinated GnRH1 release, not simply elevated absolute levels, effects the release of pituitary gonadotropins that drive steroid production in the gonads. However, the mechanisms underlying synchronization of GnRH1 neurons are unknown. Control of synchronicity by gap junctions between GnRH1 neurons has been proposed but not previously found. We recorded simultaneously from pairs of transgenically labeled GnRH1 neurons in adult male Astatotilapia burtoni cichlid fish. We report that GnRH1 neurons are strongly and uniformly interconnected by electrical synapses that can drive spiking in connected cells and can be reversibly blocked by meclofenamic acid. Our results suggest that electrical synapses could promote coordinated spike firing in a cellular assemblage of GnRH1 neurons to produce the pulsatile output necessary for activation of the pituitary and reproduction. PMID:25775522

  17. Circadian and sleep-dependent regulation of hormone release in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czeisler, C. A.; Klerman, E. B.

    1999-01-01

    Daily oscillations characterize the release of nearly every hormone. The circadian pacemaker, located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, generates circadian, approximately 24-hour rhythms in many physiologic functions. However, the observed hormonal oscillations do not simply reflect the output of this internal clock. Instead, daily hormonal profiles are the product of a complex interaction between the output of the circadian pacemaker, periodic changes in behavior, light exposure, neuroendocrine feedback mechanisms, gender, age, and the timing of sleep and wakefulness. The interaction of these factors can affect hormonal secretory pulse frequency and amplitude, with each endocrine system differentially affected by these factors. This chapter examines recent advances in understanding the effects on endocrine rhythms of a number of these factors. Sleep exerts a profound effect on endocrine secretion. Sleep is a dynamic process that is characterized by periodic changes in electrophysiologic activity. These electrophysiologic changes, which are used to mark the state and depth of sleep, are associated with periodic, short-term variations in hormonal levels. The secretion of hormones such as renin and human growth hormone are strongly influenced by sleep or wake state, while melatonin and cortisol levels are relatively unaffected by sleep or wake state. In addition, sleep is associated with changes in posture, behavior, and light exposure, each of which is known to affect endocrine secretion. Furthermore, the tight concordance of habitual sleep and wake times with certain circadian phases has made it difficult to distinguish sleep and circadian effects on these hormones. Specific protocols, designed to extract circadian and sleep information semi-independently, have been developed and have yielded important insights into the effects of these regulatory processes. These results may help to account for changes in endocrine rhythms observed in circadian

  18. Binding properties of solubilized gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor: role of carboxylic groups

    SciTech Connect

    Hazum, E.

    1987-11-03

    The interaction of /sup 125/I-buserelin, a superactive agonist of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), with solubilized GnRH receptor was studied. The highest specific binding of /sup 125/I-buserelin to solubilized GnRH receptor is evident at 4/sup 0/C, and equilibrium is reached after 2 h of incubation. The soluble receptor retained 100% of the original binding activity when kept at 4 or 22/sup 0/C for 60 min. Mono- and divalent cations inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, the binding of /sup 125/I-buserelin to solubilized GnRH receptor. Monovalent cations require higher concentrations than divalent cations to inhibit the binding. Since the order of potency with the divalent cations was identical with that of their association constants to dicarboxylic compounds, it is suggested that there are at least two carboxylic groups of the receptor that participate in the binding of the hormone. The carboxyl groups of sialic acid residues are not absolutely required for GnRH binding since the binding of /sup 125/I-buserelin to solubilized GnRH receptor was only slightly affected by pretreatment with neuraminidase and wheat germ agglutinin. The finding that polylysines stimulate luteinizing hormone (LH) release from pituitary cell cultures with the same efficacy as GnRH suggest that simple charge interactions can induce LH release. According to these results, the authors propose that the driving force for the formation of the hormone-receptor complex is an ionic interaction between the positively charged amino acid arginine in position 8 and the carboxyl groups in the binding site.

  19. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone activates KCa channels in gastric smooth muscle cells via intracellular Ca2+ release.

    PubMed

    Petkova-Kirova, P S; Lubomirov, L T; Gagov, H S; Kolev, V B; Duridanova, D B

    2001-03-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) is released in high concentrations into gastric juice, but its direct effect on gastric smooth muscles has not been studied yet. We undertook studies on TRH effect on gastric smooth muscle using contraction and patch clamp methods. TRH was found to inhibit both acetylcholine- and BaCl2-induced contractions of gastric strips. TRH, applied to single cells, inhibited the voltage-dependent Ca2+ currents and activated the whole-cell K+ currents. The TRH-induced changes in K+ currents and membrane potential were effectively abolished by inhibitors of either intracellular Ca2+ release channels or phospholipase C. Neither activators, nor blockers of protein kinase C could affect the action of TRH on K+ currents. In conclusion, TRH activates K+ channels via inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced release of Ca2+ in the direction to the plasma membrane, which in turn leads to stimulation of the Ca2+-sensitive K+ conductance, membrane hyperpolarization and relaxation. The data imply that TRH may act physiologically as a local modulator of gastric smooth muscle tone. PMID:11508821

  20. Novel microfabricated device to measure hormone/neurotransmitter release with millisecond temporal resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillis, Kevin D.; Chen, Peng; Xu, Bai; Tokranova, Natalya; Feng, Xiaojun; Castracane, James

    2002-06-01

    We are developing a novel readout for secretion of hormones and neurotransmitter on micro/nanofabricated chips. Traditional biochemical assays of signaling molecules secreted from cells are slow, cumbersome and have at best, a temporal resolution of several seconds. On the other hand, electrochemical measurement of hormone or transmitter secretion can obtain millisecond temporal resolution if the diffusion distance between the release site on the cell and the working electrode is within 1 micron. Carbon fiber microelectrodes can have millisecond time resolution, but can only measure release form a small fraction of the cell surface. We have fabricated arrays of Au electrodes in wells micromachined on the surface of silicon microchips. Each well/microelectrode roughly conforms to the shape of a single cell in order to capture release forma large fraction of the surface area of each cell with minimal diffusional delays. This paper will present details of the microfabrication process flow as well a initial results demonstrating millisecond-resolution measurement of catecholamine secretion form adrenal chromaffin cells. Our goal for this project is to develop enabling technology for massively parallel systems on a chip such as cell-based biosensors to detect neurotoxins and high-throughput assays of drugs that affect neurotransmitter release.

  1. Streptozotocin-induced diabetes blocks the positive feedback release of luteinizing hormone in the female rat.

    PubMed

    Kienast, S G; Fadden, C; Steger, R W

    1993-01-01

    The effects of streptozotocin-induced (STZ) diabetes on the release of gonadotropins was studied in female rats. In the first experiment, rats were ovariectomized and 2 days later were injected with STZ. Three weeks later rats were treated with estrogen and progesterone and blood samples were taken via intraatrial cannulae for luteinizing hormone (LH) assay. Afternoon surges of LH were seen in 4/5 control but 0/8 STZ rats. Pituitary responses to LH-releasing hormone in vitro did not differ. In the 2nd experiment, ovariectomized estrogen-primed rats were killed prior to and during a progesterone-induced LH surge. As in Experiment 1, STZ-treatment inhibited the LH surge but did not effect the afternoon rise in median eminence norepinephrine turnover which has previously been shown to be important in stimulating LH release. Turnover of norepinephrine in the anterior hypothalamus was depressed in the diabetic rats both prior to and during the expected time of the LH surge. Dopamine turnover was depressed in all three brain regions studied. It can be concluded that the positive feedback control of LH release is severely attenuated in diabetic rats but the mechanism explaining the loss is not clear. Diabetes-induced alterations in hypothalamic catecholamine metabolism may be involved but further work is needed to more carefully define these relationships. PMID:8221130

  2. Exogenous action of 5-lipoxygenase by its metabolites on luteinizing hormone release in rat pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Przylipiak, A; Kiesel, L; Habenicht, A J; Przylipiak, M; Runnebaum, B

    1990-02-12

    The stimulatory effect of exogenously administered potato 5-lipoxygenase (0.1-0.3 U/2 ml) on luteinizing hormone (LH) release was demonstrated in rat anterior pituitary cells in a superfusion system. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), an inhibitor of 5-lipoxygenase, abolished the effect of the enzyme on LH secretion. The secretory effect on LH after 5-lipoxygenase administration was biphasic and dependent on Ca2+ indicating that 5-lipoxygenase affects LH release through its oxygenation reaction. Another series of experiments demonstrated that activation of 5-lipoxygenase, expressed as production of leukotriene (LT) B4 and C4 (728 +/- 127 pg/10(6) cells and 178 +/- 23 pg/10(6) cells, respectively) occurs in rat pituitary cells after addition of Ca2+ ionophore A23187. However, LTB4 and LTC4 were not formed by pituitary cells that had previously been desensitized by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), the physiological ligand of LH release. These results are consistent with a role of 5-lipoxygenase metabolites in the mechanism of GnRH-induced LH secretion. PMID:2157615

  3. Effect of a bovine hypothalamic factor on the release and biosynthesis of growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, T; Sawano, S; Yamasaki, M

    1977-02-01

    Partial purification of growth hormone (GH)-releasing factor (GRF) by acid extraction followed by gel filtration on Sephadex G-25 has been attained from bovine hypothalami. When rat pituitaries were incubated in 2 ml Krebs Ringer-bicarbonate-glucose (KRBG) medium, a stimulatory effect of the GRF fraction on immunoreactive GH (IR-GH) release was observed, while that of the factor neither on GH synthesis nor release of the synthesized GH was demonstrated. Stimulation of the GH release was exerted maximally within 30 min of incubation. Cycloheximide and actinomycin D, at a concentration which inhibited protein and RNA synthesis to less than 5 and 20% of the control, respectively, were without effect on the stimulatory action of the factor on GH release. On the other hand, stimulation of GH synthesis was observed under incubation in 0.3 ml medium with the factor and enhancing effect of the factor on the IR-GH release was undetectable. These results suggest that stimulation of the release and synthesis of GH mediated by the hypothalamic GRF fraction is under influence of the pool size of incubation media. PMID:324757

  4. Tissue deiodinase activity during prolonged critical illness: effects of exogenous thyrotropin-releasing hormone and its combination with growth hormone-releasing peptide-2.

    PubMed

    Debaveye, Yves; Ellger, Björn; Mebis, Liese; Van Herck, Erik; Coopmans, Willy; Darras, Veerle; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2005-12-01

    Prolonged critical illness is characterized by reduced pulsatile TSH secretion, causing reduced thyroid hormone release and profound changes in thyroid hormone metabolism, resulting in low circulating T(3) and elevated rT(3) levels. To further unravel the underlying mechanisms, we investigated the effects of exogenous TRH and GH-releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2) in an in vivo model of prolonged critical illness. Burn-injured, parenterally fed rabbits were randomized to receive 4-d treatment with saline, 60 microg/kg.h GHRP-2, 60 microg/kg.h TRH, or 60 microg/kg.h TRH plus 60 microg/kg.h GHRP-2 started on d 4 of the illness (n = 8/group). The activities of the deiodinase 1 (D1), D2, and D3 in snap-frozen liver, kidney, and muscle as well as their impact on circulating thyroid hormone levels were studied. Compared with healthy controls, hepatic D1 activity in the saline-treated, ill animals was significantly down-regulated (P = 0.02), and D3 activity tended to be up-regulated (P = 0.06). Infusion of TRH and TRH plus GHRP-2 restored the catalytic activity of D1 (P = 0.02) and increased T(3) levels back within physiological range (P = 0.008). D3 activity was normalized by all three interventions, but only addition of GHRP-2 to TRH prevented the rise in rT(3) seen with TRH alone (P = 0.02). Liver D1 and D3 activity were correlated (respectively, positively and negatively) with the changes in circulating T(3) (r = 0.84 and r = -0.65) and the T(3)/rT(3) ratio (r = 0.71 and r = -0.60). We conclude that D1 activity during critical illness is suppressed and related to the alterations within the thyrotropic axis, whereas D3 activity tends to be increased and under the joint control of the somatotropic and thyrotropic axes. PMID:16150898

  5. Potentiation of mammary cancer inhibition by combination of antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone with docetaxel

    PubMed Central

    Buchholz, Stefan; Schally, Andrew V.; Engel, Jörg B.; Hohla, Florian; Heinrich, Elmar; Koester, Frank; Varga, Jozsef L.; Halmos, Gabor

    2007-01-01

    Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) are being developed for the treatment of various cancers. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of treatment with GHRH antagonist JMR-132 alone and in combination with docetaxel chemotherapy in nude mice bearing MX-1 human breast cancers. Specific high-affinity binding sites for GHRH were found on MX-1 tumor membranes using ligand competition assays with 125I-labeled GHRH antagonist JV-1-42. JMR-132 displaced radiolabeled JV-1-42 with an IC50 of 0.14 nM, indicating a high affinity of JMR-132 to GHRH receptors. Treatment of nude mice bearing xenografts of MX-1 with JMR-132 at 10 μg per day s.c. for 22 days significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited tumor volume by 62.9% and tumor weight by 47.8%. Docetaxel given twice at a dose of 20 mg/kg i.p. significantly reduced tumor volume and weight by 74.1% and 58.6%, respectively. Combination treatment with JMR-132 (10 μg/day) and docetaxel (20 mg/kg i.p.) led to growth arrest of most tumors as shown by an inhibition of tumor volume and weight by 97.7% and 95.6%, respectively (P < 0.001). Because no vital cancer cells were detected in some of the excised tumors, a total regression of the tumors was achieved in some cases. Treatment with JMR-132 also strongly reduced the concentration of EGF receptors in MX-1 tumors. Our results demonstrate that GHRH antagonists might provide a therapy for breast cancer and could be combined with docetaxel chemotherapy to enhance the efficacy of treatment. PMID:17261802

  6. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) antagonists inhibit the proliferation of androgen-dependent and -independent prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Letsch, Markus; Schally, Andrew V; Busto, Rebeca; Bajo, Ana M; Varga, Jozsef L

    2003-02-01

    The antiproliferative effects of an antagonist of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) JV-1-38 were evaluated in nude mice bearing s.c. xenografts of LNCaP and MDA-PCa-2b human androgen-sensitive and DU-145 androgen-independent prostate cancers. In the androgen-sensitive models, JV-1-38 greatly potentiated the antitumor effect of androgen deprivation induced by surgical castration, but was ineffective when given alone. Thus, in castrated animals bearing MDA-PCa-2b cancers, the administration of JV-1-38 for 35 days virtually arrested tumor growth (94% inhibition vs. intact control, P < 0.01; and 75% vs. castrated control, P < 0.05). The growth of LNCaP tumors was also powerfully suppressed by JV-1-38 combined with castration (83% inhibition vs. intact control, P < 0.01; and 68% vs. castrated control, P < 0.05). However, in androgen-independent DU-145 cancers, JV-1-38 alone could inhibit tumor growth by 57% (P < 0.05) after 45 days. In animals bearing MDA-PCa-2b and LNCaP tumors, the reduction in serum prostate-specific antigen levels, after therapy with JV-1-38, paralleled the decrease in tumor volume. Inhibition of MDA-PCa-2b and DU-145 cancers was associated with the reduction in the expression of mRNA and protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor. The mRNA expression for GHRH receptor splice variants was found in all these models of prostate cancer. Our results demonstrate that GHRH antagonists inhibit androgen-independent prostate cancers and, after combination with androgen deprivation, also androgen-sensitive tumors. Thus, the therapy with GHRH antagonist could be considered for the management of both androgen-dependent or -independent prostate cancers. PMID:12538852

  7. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) antagonists inhibit the proliferation of androgen-dependent and -independent prostate cancers

    PubMed Central

    Letsch, Markus; Schally, Andrew V.; Busto, Rebeca; Bajo, Ana M.; Varga, Jozsef L.

    2003-01-01

    The antiproliferative effects of an antagonist of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) JV-1-38 were evaluated in nude mice bearing s.c. xenografts of LNCaP and MDA-PCa-2b human androgen-sensitive and DU-145 androgen-independent prostate cancers. In the androgen-sensitive models, JV-1-38 greatly potentiated the antitumor effect of androgen deprivation induced by surgical castration, but was ineffective when given alone. Thus, in castrated animals bearing MDA-PCa-2b cancers, the administration of JV-1-38 for 35 days virtually arrested tumor growth (94% inhibition vs. intact control, P < 0.01; and 75% vs. castrated control, P < 0.05). The growth of LNCaP tumors was also powerfully suppressed by JV-1-38 combined with castration (83% inhibition vs. intact control, P < 0.01; and 68% vs. castrated control, P < 0.05). However, in androgen-independent DU-145 cancers, JV-1-38 alone could inhibit tumor growth by 57% (P < 0.05) after 45 days. In animals bearing MDA-PCa-2b and LNCaP tumors, the reduction in serum prostate-specific antigen levels, after therapy with JV-1-38, paralleled the decrease in tumor volume. Inhibition of MDA-PCa-2b and DU-145 cancers was associated with the reduction in the expression of mRNA and protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor. The mRNA expression for GHRH receptor splice variants was found in all these models of prostate cancer. Our results demonstrate that GHRH antagonists inhibit androgen-independent prostate cancers and, after combination with androgen deprivation, also androgen-sensitive tumors. Thus, the therapy with GHRH antagonist could be considered for the management of both androgen-dependent or -independent prostate cancers. PMID:12538852

  8. Treatment of nitrosamine-induced pancreatic tumors in hamsters with analogs of somatostatin and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Paz-Bouza, J.I.; Redding, T.W.; Schally, A.V.

    1987-02-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma was induced in female Syrian golden hamsters by injecting N-nitrosobis(2-oxopropyl)amine (BOP) once a week at a dose of 10 mg per kg of body weight for 18 weeks. Hamsters were then treated with somatostatin analog (RC-160) or with (6-D-tryptophan)luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ((D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH) delayed delivery systems. After 18 weeks of BOP administration, the hamsters were divided into three groups of 10-20 animals each. Group I consisted of untreated controls, group II was injected with RC-160, and group III was injected with (D-Trp/sub 2/)LH-RH. A striking decrease in tumor weight and volume was obtained in animals treated with (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH or with the somatostatin analog RC-160. After 45 days of treatment with either analog, the survival rate was significantly higher in groups II and III (70%), as compared with the control group (35%). The studies, done by light microscopy, high-resolution microscopy, and electron microscopy, showed a decrease in the total number of cancer cells and changes in the epithelium, connective tissue, and cellular organelles in groups II and III treated with the hypothalamic analogs as compared to controls. These results in female hamsters with induced ductal pancreatic tumors confirm and extend the authors findings, obtained in male animals with transplanted tumors, that (D-Trp/sub 6/)LH-RH and somatostatin analogs inhibit the growth of pancreatic cancers.

  9. Effect of permeation enhancer pretreatment on the iontophoresis of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) through human epidermal membrane (HEM).

    PubMed

    Smyth, Hugh D C; Becket, Gordon; Mehta, Samir

    2002-05-01

    A 2 x 2 factorial design was performed to determine the effect of a permeation enhancer (oleic acid/propylene glycol), iontophoresis (2 V), and the combination of the two treatments on the permeation enhancement of a model peptide, LHRH (luteinizing hormone releasing hormone), through human epidermal membrane (HEM). In parallel studies, TEAB (tetraethylammonium bromide, a small ionic solute) and sucrose (an electroosmotic flow marker) were also investigated. Structural changes in the HEM were monitored via conductance measurements, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and infrared (IR) spectroscopy experiments. LHRH enhancement due to enhancer in combination with iontophoresis (I + E; 29.5 times passive permeability, P), was greater than during iontophoresis alone (I; 14.3) and enhancer treatment alone (E; 3.5). I + E had an additive effect of I and E, indicating the mechanisms of action of the individual enhancement strategies were likely to be located at different sites in the skin. Also, no synergistic enhancement was observed with I + E for either TEAB or sucrose. For TEAB, permeability enhancement due to I (approximately 1400) was much higher than that due to E (14.9), and no additive effect could be detected. For sucrose, E had no effect on either passive or iontophoretic permeability, eliminating the possibility that electroosmosis could explain increases in LHRH permeability. Evidence of synergy between E and I was found, with conductance measurements indicating that I + E synergistically increased the membrane permeability to conducting ions (Na+ and Cl-). It appears these pathways were not available for transport for the solutes used in the current study. DSC and IR investigations showed significant changes in stratum corneum lipid structure following E treatment but not following I. These findings probably arise from the localized action of iontophoresis compared with the bulk action of enhancer. In summary, increased LHRH delivery through HEM in

  10. Ability of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone-Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin 40 binding to LHRH receptor on human liver cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Shou-Liang; Zhao, Gang; Zhao, Hong-Guang; Lü, Wen-Tian; Liu, Guang-Wei; Zhu, Ping

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the ability of recombinant toxin luteinizing hormone releasing hormone-Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin 40 (LHRH-PE40) and LHRH binding to LHRH receptor (LHRHR) on the membrane surface of human liver cancer HEPG cells. METHODS: LHRH was labeled by using 125I with enzymatic reaction. The affinity and receptor volume of LHRH-PE40 and LHRH binding to LHRHR on the membrane surface of human liver cancer cells were measured with radioligand receptor assay. RESULTS: The specific activity of LHRH labeled with 125I was 2.7 × 104 kBq/μL, and its radiochemical purity reached to 99.2%-99.7%. The binding of 125I to LHRH was maximal for 240 min in the warm cultivation, and this binding was stabilized. The inhibiting rates of 125I-LHRH and LHRH on the proliferation of human liver cancer HEPG cells were not significantly different. On the basis of the saturation curve of 125I-LHRH binding to the membrane LHRHR of HEPG cells, 125I-LHRH of 1 × 105 cpm was selected for radioligand receptor assay. The affinity constants (Kd) of LHRH-PE40 and LHRH binding to the membrane LHRHR of HEPG cells were 0.43 ± 0.12 nmol/L and 4.86 ± 1.47 nmol/L, respectively, and their receptor volumes were 0.37 ± 0.15 μmol/g and 0.42 ± 0.13 μmol/g, respectively. The binding of LHRH-PE40 to the membrane protein of normal liver cells was not observed. CONCLUSION: The recombinant toxin LHRH-PE40 binding to the membrane surface of LHRHR of human liver cancer HEPG cells was very strong, while the specific binding of it to normal liver cells was not observed. The results provide an important experimental basis for the clinical application of LHRH-PE. PMID:15334689

  11. Hypothalamic multiunit activity and pulsatile luteinizing hormone release in the castrated male rat.

    PubMed

    Goubillon, M L; Kaufman, J M; Thalabard, J C

    1995-11-01

    Using chronically implanted microelectrodes, multiunit electrical activity (MUA) was recorded from the arcuate nucleus of freely moving gonadectomized male rats. Intermittent increases in MUA activity (MUA volleys) closely associated with luteinizing hormone pulses measured in the peripheral circulation were observed, which confirms that this experimental approach can be used for monitoring the activity of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone-associated hypothalamic pulse generator in the male rat. The mean MUA volley frequency was 22.2 min (range 13-38 min), whereas the mean MUA volley duration was 2.7 +/- 0.8 min (standard deviation). In addition to a large inter-individual variability. MUA volley intervals also showed an important intra-individual variability. This observation suggests that, beside the mean frequency of pulse generator activation, the degree of variability in gonadotropin-releasing hormone-associated pulse generator activity might be an additional relevant parameter in the characterization of the reproductive function in the male rat. PMID:7581989

  12. Protective effect of Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone agonist in bacterial toxin-induced pulmonary barrier dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Czikora, Istvan; Sridhar, Supriya; Gorshkov, Boris; Alieva, Irina B.; Kasa, Anita; Gonzales, Joyce; Potapenko, Olena; Umapathy, Nagavedi S.; Pillich, Helena; Rick, Ferenc G.; Block, Norman L.; Verin, Alexander D.; Chakraborty, Trinad; Matthay, Michael A.; Schally, Andrew V.; Lucas, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Antibiotic treatment of patients infected with G− or G+ bacteria promotes release of the toxins lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and pneumolysin (PLY) in their lungs. Growth Hormone-releasing Hormone (GHRH) agonist JI-34 protects human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HL-MVEC), expressing splice variant 1 (SV-1) of the receptor, from PLY-induced barrier dysfunction. We investigated whether JI-34 also blunts LPS-induced hyperpermeability. Since GHRH receptor (GHRH-R) signaling can potentially stimulate both cAMP-dependent barrier-protective pathways as well as barrier-disruptive protein kinase C pathways, we studied their interaction in GHRH agonist-treated HL-MVEC, in the presence of PLY, by means of siRNA-mediated protein kinase A (PKA) depletion. Methods: Barrier function measurements were done in HL-MVEC monolayers using Electrical Cell substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) and VE-cadherin expression by Western blotting. Capillary leak was assessed by Evans Blue dye (EBD) incorporation. Cytokine generation in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was measured by multiplex analysis. PKA and PKC-α activity were assessed by Western blotting. Results: GHRH agonist JI-34 significantly blunts LPS-induced barrier dysfunction, at least in part by preserving VE-cadherin expression, while not affecting inflammation. In addition to activating PKA, GHRH agonist also increases PKC-α activity in PLY-treated HL-MVEC. Treatment with PLY significantly decreases resistance in control siRNA-treated HL-MVEC, but does so even more in PKA-depleted monolayers. Pretreatment with GHRH agonist blunts PLY-induced permeability in control siRNA-treated HL-MVEC, but fails to improve barrier function in PKA-depleted PLY-treated monolayers. Conclusions: GHRH signaling in HL-MVEC protects from both LPS and PLY-mediated endothelial barrier dysfunction and concurrently induces a barrier-protective PKA-mediated and a barrier-disruptive PKC-α-induced pathway in the presence of PLY, the

  13. Physiologic responses following gonadotropin-releasing hormone immunization in intact male dogs.

    PubMed

    Donovan, C E; Greer, M; Kutzler, M A

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the use of a commercial gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) vaccine as a method of temporary and reversible immunocastration in intact male dogs. Four privately owned dogs were vaccinated twice at 4-week intervals. Blood samples were collected at 0, 4, 12 and 20 weeks following the initial vaccination. These samples were analysed for GnRH antibody titres, luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone concentrations. Scrotal measurements were made at the time of sample collection, and testicular volume was calculated using the formula of an ellipsoid. As a result of vaccination, dogs displayed an elevated GnRH antibody titre, decreased LH and testosterone concentrations and decreased testicular volume, which reversed by the end of the study period. Therefore, these results suggest that immunizing against GnRH may be a possible choice for temporary and reversible immunocastration. PMID:23279550

  14. Molecular analysis of the koala reproductive hormones and their receptors: gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH), follicle-stimulating hormone β and luteinising hormone β with localisation of GnRH.

    PubMed

    Busby, E R; Soeta, S; Sherwood, N M; Johnston, S D

    2014-12-01

    During evolution, reproductive hormones and their receptors in the brain-pituitary-gonadal axis have been altered by genetic mechanisms. To understand how the neuroendocrine control of reproduction evolved in mammals, it is important to examine marsupials, the closest group to placental mammals. We hypothesised that at least some of the hormones and receptors found in placental mammals would be present in koala, a marsupial. We examined the expression of koala mRNA for the reproductive molecules. Koala cDNAs were cloned from brain for gonadotrophin-releasing hormones (GnRH1 and GnRH2) or from pituitary for GnRH receptors, types I and II, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)β and luteinising hormone (LH)β, and from gonads for FSH and LH receptors. Deduced proteins were compared by sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis with those of other vertebrates. In conclusion, the koala expressed mRNA for these eight putative reproductive molecules, whereas at least one of these molecules is missing in some species in the amniote lineage, including humans. In addition, GnRH1 and 2 are shown by immunohistochemistry to be expressed as proteins in the brain. PMID:25200132

  15. Hormone release and behavior during suckling and milking in Gir, Gir x Holstein, and Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Negrão, J A

    2008-03-01

    There are several different milking management systems in Latin America, because Gir cattle are reputed to be easily stressed and not well adapted to machine-milking. This paper, therefore, provides an overview of hormone release and behavior during suckling and milking in Gir cows and their cross-bred offspring. Several experiments were performed to study oxytocin release during exclusive suckling or exclusive hand- and machine-milking, oxytocin, and prolactin release during a mixed suckling-milking system and oxytocin release after weaning. Cortisol concentrations and behavior were also examined. Concentration of oxytocin, released during suckling, and both types of milking were high, but the maximum concentration measured during suckling was significantly greater than that observed during exclusive milking. In the mixed suckling-milking system, the greatest oxytocin and prolactin releases were measured during suckling. Cortisol concentrations measured before, during, and after milking demonstrated that Gir x Holstein and Holstein cows were not stressed. On the other hand, although Gir had greater concentrations of cortisol, the percentage of residual milk for Gir cows was less than for dairy cows exposed to different stressful situations. In general, Gir cows and their crossbred offspring adapted to machine-milking, although these breeds can react negatively to milkers. Gir, Gir x Holstein, and Holstein cows all had similar cortisol levels during and after milking. PMID:17878278

  16. Synthesis and biological evaluation of antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone with high and protracted in vivo activities

    PubMed Central

    Varga, József L.; Schally, Andrew V.; Csernus, Valér J.; Zarándi, Márta; Halmos, Gábor; Groot, Kate; Rékási, Zoltán

    1999-01-01

    Some antagonists of human growth hormone-releasing hormone (hGH-RH) synthesized previously were shown to inhibit in vivo proliferation of various human cancers in nude mice. However, the activity of these analogs requires an increase to assure clinical efficacy. In an attempt to prepare hGH-RH antagonists with a high and protracted activity, we synthesized and biologically tested 22 antagonistic analogs of hGH-RH(1–29)NH2. The ability of the antagonists to inhibit hGH-RH-induced GH release was evaluated in vitro in a superfused rat pituitary system, as well as in vivo after i.v. injection into rats. The binding affinity of the peptides to GH-RH receptors also was determined. All antagonistic analogs had the common core sequence [PhAc-Tyr1,d-Arg2, Phe(4-Cl)6 (para-chlorophenylalanine), Abu15 (α-aminobutyric acid),Nle27]hGH-RH(1–29)NH2 and contained Arg, d-Arg, homoarginine (Har), norleucine (Nle), and other substitutions. The following analogs were determined to have a high and/or protracted antagonistic activity: [PhAc-Tyr1,d-Arg2,Phe(4-Cl)6,Arg9,Abu15,Nle27,d-Arg29]hGH-RH(1–29)NH2 (JV-1–10), [PhAc-Tyr1,d-Arg2,Phe(4-Cl)6,Abu15,Nle27,d-Arg28,Har29]hGH-RH(1–29)NH2 (MZ-6–55), [PhAc-Tyr1,d-Arg2,Phe(4-Cl)6,Arg9,Abu15,Nle27,d-Arg28,Har29]hGH-RH(1–29)NH2 (JV-1–36), and [PhAc-Tyr1,d-Arg2,Phe(4-Cl)6,Har9,Tyr(Me)10,Abu15,Nle27,d-Arg28,Har29]hGH-RH(1–29)NH2 (JV-1–38). Among the peptides tested, analog JV-1–36 showed the highest GH-RH antagonistic activity in vitro and also induced a strong and prolonged inhibition of GH release in vivo for at least 30 min. The antagonist JV-1–38 was slightly less potent than JV-1–36 both in vitro and in vivo but proved to be very long-acting in vivo, suppressing the GH-RH-induced GH release even after 60 min. High and protracted in vivo activities of these antagonists indicate an improvement over earlier GH-RH analogs. Some of these hGH-RH antagonists could find clinical applications in the treatment of cancers

  17. Childhood lead toxicity and impaired release of thyrotropin-stimulating hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Huseman, C.A.; Moriarty, C.M.; Angle, C.R.

    1987-04-01

    Decreased stature of children is epidemiologically associated with increased blood lead independent of multiple socioeconomic and nutritional variables. Since endocrine dysfunction occurs in adult lead workers, they studied two girls, 2 years of age, before and after calcium disodium edetate chelation for blood leads (PbB) of 19-72 ..mu..g/dl. The height of both children had crossed from the 50th to below the 10th percentile during the course of chronic lead toxicity. Basal free T/sub 4/, T/sub 4/, T/sub 3/, cortisol, somatomedin C, and sex steroids were normal. A decrease in the growth hormone response and elevation of basal prolcatin and gonadotropins were noted in one. Both children demonstrated blunted thyrotropin-stimulating hormone (TSH) responses to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in six of seven challenges. This prompted in vitro studies of cultured cells from rat pituitarities. After incubation of pituitary cells with 0.1-10 ..mu..M Pb/sup 2 +/ for 2 hr, followed by the addition of TRH, there was a dose-dependent inhibition of TSH release Lead did not interfere with the assay of TSH. To investigate the interaction of lead and calcium, /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ kinetic analyses were done on rat pituitary slices after 1 hr incubation with 1.0 ..mu..M lead. The impaired late efflux was consistent with a decrease in the size and exchangeability of the tightly bound pool of intracellular microsomal or mitochondrial calcium. The rat pituitary cell model provides a model for the decreased TSH release of lead poisoning, supports the biological plausibility of a neuroendocrine effect on growth, and suggests that interference with calcium-mediated intracellular responses is a basic mechanism of lead toxicity.

  18. Ovarian and hormonal responses of cows to treatment with an analogue of gonadotrophin releasing hormone and prostaglandin F2 alpha.

    PubMed

    Peters, A R; Ward, S J; Warren, M J; Gordon, P J; Mann, G E; Webb, R

    1999-03-27

    Blood samples were taken from 11 cows and their ovaries were scanned by ultrasound at least daily. Around day 5 of an induced cycle, they were injected with 10 micrograms buserelin, an analogue of gonadotrophin releasing hormone, and on day 12 they received 0.5 mg cloprostenol, an analogue of prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha). Two days later six of the cows (the treated group) received a second injection of 10 micrograms buserelin, but the remaining five received no further treatment (control group). The dominant, that is, the largest follicle in each cow disappeared after the first buserelin injection and was replaced by a new one which grew synchronously in all the cows until after the treatment with PGF2 alpha. Ovulation occurred significantly earlier after PGF2 alpha in the treated group than in the control group (72 to 96 hours v 96 to 120 hours; P < 0.05). Plasma progesterone concentrations then increased more rapidly in the treated group than in the control group and were significantly higher on days 3 and 4 after ovulation (P < 0.05). PMID:10230012

  19. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... the foods you eat Sexual function Reproduction Mood Endocrine glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, thymus, thyroid, adrenal ...

  20. Identification of the growth hormone-releasing hormone analogue [Pro1, Val14]-hGHRH with an incomplete C-term amidation in a confiscated product.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Simone; Deventer, Koen; Van Eenoo, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a modified version of the 44 amino acid human growth hormone-releasing hormone (hGHRH(1-44)) containing an N-terminal proline extension, a valine residue in position 14, and a C-terminus amidation (sequence: PYADAIFTNSYRKVVLGQLSARKLLQDIMSRQQGESNQERGARARL-NH2 ) has been identified in a confiscated product by liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry (LC-HRMS). Investigation of the product suggests also an incomplete C-term amidation. Similarly to other hGHRH analogues, available in black markets, this peptide can potentially be used as performance-enhancing drug due to its growth hormone releasing activity and therefore it should be considered as a prohibited substance in sport. Additionally, the presence of partially amidated molecule reveals the poor pharmaceutical quality of the preparation, an aspect which represents a big concern for public health as well. PMID:25283153

  1. Biodegradable polymeric microspheres with "open/closed" pores for sustained release of human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong Kee; Chung, Hyun Jung; Park, Tae Gwan

    2006-05-15

    A new approach for attaining sustained release of protein is introduced, involving a pore-closing process of preformed porous PLGA microspheres. Highly porous biodegradable poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres were fabricated by a single water-in-oil emulsion solvent evaporation technique using Pluronic F127 as an extractable porogen. Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) was incorporated into porous microspheres by a simple solution dipping method. For their controlled release, porous microspheres containing hGH were treated with water-miscible solvents in aqueous phase for production of pore-closed microspheres. These microspheres showed sustained release patterns over an extended period; however, the drug loading efficiency was extremely low. To overcome the drug loading problem, the pore-closing process was performed in an ethanol vapor phase using a fluidized bed reactor. The resultant pore-closed microspheres exhibited high protein loading amount as well as sustained rhGH release profiles. Also, the released rhGH exhibited structural integrity after the treatment. PMID:16542746

  2. Lymphocyte subset distribution and natural killer activity in growth hormone deficiency before and during short-term treatment with growth hormone releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Kiess, W; Malozowski, S; Gelato, M; Butenand, O; Doerr, H; Crisp, B; Eisl, E; Maluish, A; Belohradsky, B H

    1988-07-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell activity was assessed in the peripheral blood of 20 patients with growth hormone (GH) deficiency due to a hypothalamic deficit of GH-releasing hormone (GHRH). All patients failed to respond to at least two provocative tests of GH secretion (GH below 7 ng/ml) but responded to a single GHRH iv bolus injection (1 microgram/kg body wt). In 14 of the 20 patients (20 determinations), lymphocyte subsets were also measured; in all patients the distribution of lymphocyte subsets was within the normal range. More importantly, NK cell activity in the 20 patients was significantly lower than in controls (P less than 0.01). To assess the in vivo effect of GH and GHRH on NK activity and lymphocyte subset distribution, immunologic tests were performed (i) before and after a single iv bolus injection of GHRH (1 microgram/kg body wt) in six patients; (ii) before and after 3 weeks of GHRH treatment (3-9 micrograms/kg body wt, one to four times daily) in five patients; and (iii) after 6 weeks of GH treatment (5 IU sc every alternate day) in one patient. Neither NK activity nor the distribution of lymphocyte subsets was altered during short-term GHRH administration. In conclusion, low NK activity is found in GH-deficient patients, and short-term administration of GH or GHRH fails to restore this immunological abnormality. This result suggests that the hypothalamus may be a regulator of NK activity in the human and that patients with hypothalamic deficiencies should be monitored for the development of discrete immunodeficiencies. PMID:3133146

  3. Pregnancy rates to timed artificial insemination in dairy cows treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone or porcine luteinizing hormone.

    PubMed

    Colazo, M G; Gordon, M B; Rajamahendran, R; Mapletoft, R J; Ambrose, D J

    2009-07-15

    We compared the effects of porcine luteinizing hormone (pLH) versus gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) on ovulatory response and pregnancy rate after timed artificial insemination (TAI) in 605 lactating dairy cows. Cows (mean+/-SEM: 2.4+/-0.08 lactations, 109.0+/-2.5 d in milk, and 2.8+/-0.02 body condition score) at three locations were assigned to receive, in a 2x2 factorial design, either 100 microg GnRH or 25mg pLH im on Day 0, 500 microg cloprostenol (PGF) on Day 7, and GnRH or pLH on Day 9, with TAI 14 to 18h later. Ultrasonographic examinations were performed in a subset of cows on Days 0, 7, 10, and 11 to determine ovulations, presence of corpus luteum, and follicle diameter and in all cows 32 d after TAI for pregnancy determination. In 35 cows, plasma progesterone concentrations were determined 0, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 12 d after ovulation. The proportion of noncyclic cows and cows with ovarian cysts on Day 0 were 12% and 6%, respectively. Ovulatory response to first treatment was 62% versus 44% for pLH and GnRH and 78% versus 50% for noncyclic and cyclic cows (P<0.01). Location, ovulatory response to first pLH or GnRH, cyclic status, presence of an ovarian cyst, and preovulatory follicle size did not affect pregnancy rate. Plasma progesterone concentrations after TAI did not differ among treatments. Pregnancy rate to TAI was greater (P<0.01) in the GnRH/PGF/pLH group (42%) than in the other three groups (28%, 30%, and 26% for GnRH/PGF/GnRH, pLH/PGF/GnRH, and pLH/PGF/pLH, respectively). Although only 3% of cows given pLH in lieu of GnRH on Day 9 lost their embryo versus 7% in those subjected to a conventional TAI using two GnRH treatments, the difference was not statistically significant. In summary, pLH treatment on Day 0 increased ovulatory response but not pregnancy rate. Cows treated with GnRH/PGF/pLH had the highest pregnancy rate to TAI, but progesterone concentrations after TAI were not increased. In addition, preovulatory follicle diameter did not

  4. Preparation and characterization of luteinising-hormone releasing hormone nanoliposomal microbubbles specifically targeting ovarian cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinyi; Liu, Sisun; Zhu, Yuanfang; Zhang, Liping; Li, Wenjuan; Wang, Fen; Huang, Shuying

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare luteinizing-hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) nanoliposomal microbubbles specifically targeting ovarian cancer cells. The lyophilization/sonication method was used to prepare non-targeting nanoliposomal microbubbles (N-N-Mbs). Using the biotin-avidin bridge method, conjugated LHRH antibodies to N-N-Mbs generated LHRH nanoliposomal microbubbles (LHRH-N-Mbs) specifically targeting ovarian cancer cells. The morphology and physicochemical properties of the microbubbles was detected using an optical microscope and zeta detector. The binding affinity between the secondary antibody and LHRH-N-Mbs or N-N-Mbs was determined by flow cytometry. The binding of LHRH-N-Mb to human ovarian cancer cells (OVCAR-3) was detected by light microscopy. The rounded and uniformly distributed N-N-Mbs and LHRH-N-Mbs were successfully generated. The particle size ranged from 295-468 nm with a mean of 360 nm for N-N-Mbs or 369-618 nm with a mean of 508 nm for LHRH-N-Mbs. There was a significant difference in size between the two groups (P<0.05), although the surface potential of the two microbubbles remained the same (-14.6 mV). Following being kept at room temperature for 14 days, no significant difference in the physicochemical properties of the LHRH-N-Mbs was detected compared with that of freshly prepared microbubbles. The secondary antibody binding rate of LHRH-N-Mbs and N-N-Mbs was 75.6 and 0.83%, respectively. Furthermore, the formation of a rosette-like structure surrounding OVCAR-3 cells was observed after the cells were incubated with LHRH-N-Mbs, whereas pre-incubation with LHRH antibody blocked this rosette formation. In conclusion, LHRH-N-Mbs specifically targeting ovarian cancer cells were successfully prepared through biotin-avidin mediation and the lyophilization/sonication method. The key feature of LHRH-N-Mbs is their small size, stability and high efficiency in targeting human OVCAR-3 cells in vitro. PMID:24805264

  5. Use of a gonadotrophin-releasing hormone vaccine in headshaking horses.

    PubMed

    Pickles, K J; Berger, J; Davies, R; Roser, J; Madigan, J E

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of a gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) vaccine in the treatment of headshaking in horses. Fifteen geldings received two doses of the GnRH vaccine four weeks apart. Serum was collected before and after vaccination to measure concentrations of luteinising hormone (LH) (10 horses) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) (six horses). Owners recorded the frequency of seven common headshaking behaviours using a visual analogue scale (VAS) before vaccination and at two, four, eight, 12, 16 and 20 weeks after vaccination. Serum LH (P=0.008) and FSH (P=0.03) concentrations decreased significantly following vaccination. Although approximately one-third of the owners reported a subjective improvement in headshaking, serial scoring did not indicate a reduction in headshaking behaviours following vaccination with a commercial GnRH vaccine. Vaccination reactions were observed in four of 15 horses (27 per cent), including one case of severe, presumed immune-mediated, myositis. PMID:21257532

  6. Multifollicular ovaries: clinical and endocrine features and response to pulsatile gonadotropin releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Adams, J; Franks, S; Polson, D W; Mason, H D; Abdulwahid, N; Tucker, M; Morris, D V; Price, J; Jacobs, H S

    By means of pelvic ultrasonography, a multifollicular ovarian appearance was observed in women with weight-loss-related amenorrhoea. Multifollicular ovaries (MFO) are normal in size or slightly enlarged and filled by six or more cysts 4-10 mm in diameter; in contrast to women with polycystic ovaries (PCO), stroma is not increased. Unlike PCO patients, women with MFO were not hirsute and serum concentrations of luteinising hormone and follicle stimulating hormone were normal and decreased, respectively. The uterus was small indicating oestrogen deficiency. In MFO, treatment with gonadotropin releasing hormone (LHRH) induced ovulation in 83% of cycles and there were seven pregnancies in 8 women; in PCO, only 40% of cycles were ovulatory and there were eleven pregnancies (8 women) but six of these aborted. In MFO ovarian morphology reverted to normal in ovulatory cycles, whereas in PCO the polycystic pattern persisted despite the presence of a dominant follicle. MFO may represent a normal ovarian response to weight-related hypothalamic disturbance of gonadotropin control. PMID:2867389

  7. Zebrafish adult-derived hypothalamic neurospheres generate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Campos, Christian; Letelier, Joaquín; Ceriani, Ricardo; Whitlock, Kathleen E

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a hypothalamic decapeptide essential for fertility in vertebrates. Human male patients lacking GnRH and treated with hormone therapy can remain fertile after cessation of treatment suggesting that new GnRH neurons can be generated during adult life. We used zebrafish to investigate the neurogenic potential of the adult hypothalamus. Previously we have characterized the development of GnRH cells in the zebrafish linking genetic pathways to the differentiation of neuromodulatory and endocrine GnRH cells in specific regions of the brain. Here, we developed a new method to obtain neural progenitors from the adult hypothalamus in vitro. Using this system, we show that neurospheres derived from the adult hypothalamus can be maintained in culture and subsequently differentiate glia and neurons. Importantly, the adult derived progenitors differentiate into neurons containing GnRH and the number of cells is increased through exposure to either testosterone or GnRH, hormones used in therapeutic treatment in humans. Finally, we show in vivo that a neurogenic niche in the hypothalamus contains GnRH positive neurons. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that neurospheres can be derived from the hypothalamus of the adult zebrafish and that these neural progenitors are capable of producing GnRH containing neurons. PMID:26209533

  8. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in psychiatry: from stress to psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Claes, Stephan J

    2004-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) plays a central role in the adaptation of the organism to stress. It serves as the main regulating hormone of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis, which is activated within seconds after exposure to acute stress. Furthermore, it acts as a neurotransmitter in numerous other brain regions. Globally, CRH leads to a number of metabolic, neuroendocrine and autonomic adaptations, which are vitally important for an adequate reaction to acute stress, but can lead to pathological somatic and psychological effects in chronic stress situations. The adequate functioning of CRH is a delicate equilibrium, which can be permanently disturbed by early experiences of physical or sexual abuse, leading to psychopathology in adulthood. This review discusses the physiological functions of CRH as the stress response hormone. Subsequently, the emerging data on the disruptive effects of early trauma on the CRH system are summarized. The third part is devoted to CRH and HPA axis abnormalities in major depression and other psychiatric disorders. This rapidly accumulating evidence will change our understanding of psychopathology, and might challenge the established classification of psychiatric disorders. PMID:15000347

  9. Zebrafish adult-derived hypothalamic neurospheres generate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Campos, Christian; Letelier, Joaquín; Ceriani, Ricardo; Whitlock, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a hypothalamic decapeptide essential for fertility in vertebrates. Human male patients lacking GnRH and treated with hormone therapy can remain fertile after cessation of treatment suggesting that new GnRH neurons can be generated during adult life. We used zebrafish to investigate the neurogenic potential of the adult hypothalamus. Previously we have characterized the development of GnRH cells in the zebrafish linking genetic pathways to the differentiation of neuromodulatory and endocrine GnRH cells in specific regions of the brain. Here, we developed a new method to obtain neural progenitors from the adult hypothalamus in vitro. Using this system, we show that neurospheres derived from the adult hypothalamus can be maintained in culture and subsequently differentiate glia and neurons. Importantly, the adult derived progenitors differentiate into neurons containing GnRH and the number of cells is increased through exposure to either testosterone or GnRH, hormones used in therapeutic treatment in humans. Finally, we show in vivo that a neurogenic niche in the hypothalamus contains GnRH positive neurons. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that neurospheres can be derived from the hypothalamus of the adult zebrafish and that these neural progenitors are capable of producing GnRH containing neurons. PMID:26209533

  10. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone, estradiol, and inhibin regulation of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone surges: implications for follicle emergence and selection in heifers.

    PubMed

    Haughian, James M; Ginther, O J; Diaz, Francisco J; Wiltbank, Milo C

    2013-06-01

    Mechanisms regulating gonadotropin surges and gonadotropin requirements for follicle emergence and selection were studied in heifers. Experiment 1 evaluated whether follicular inhibins regulate the preovulatory luteinizing hormone (LH)/follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) surges elicited by gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) injection (Hour = 0) and the subsequent periovulatory FSH surge. Treatments included control (n = 6), steroid-depleted bovine follicular fluid (bFF) at Hour -4 (n = 6), and bFF at Hour 6 (n = 6). Gonadotropins in blood were assessed hourly from Hours -6 to 36, and follicle growth tracked by ultrasound. Consistent with inhibin independence, bFF at Hour -4 did not impact the GnRH-induced preovulatory FSH surge, whereas treatment at Hour 6 delayed onset of the periovulatory FSH surge and impeded growth of a new follicular wave. Experiment 2 examined GnRH and estradiol (E2) regulation of the periovulatory FSH surge. Treatment groups were control (n = 8), GnRH-receptor antagonist (GnRHr-ant, n = 8), and E2 + GnRHr-ant (n = 4). GnRHr-ant (acyline) did not reduce the concentrations of FSH during the periovulatory surge and early follicle development (<7.0 mm) was unaffected, although subsequent growth of a dominant follicle (>8.0 mm) was prevented by GnRHr-ant. Addition of E2 delayed both the onset of the periovulatory FSH surge and emergence of a follicular wave. Failure to select a dominant follicle in the GnRHr-ant group was associated with reduced concentrations of LH but not FSH. Maximum diameter of F1 in controls (13.3 ± 0.5 mm) was greater than in both GnRHr-ant (7.7 ± 0.3 mm) and E2 + GnRHr-ant (6.7 ± 0.8 mm) groups. Results indicated that the periovulatory FSH surge stems from removal of negative stimuli (follicular E2 and inhibin), but is independent of GnRH stimulation. Emergence and early growth of follicles (until about 8 mm) requires the periovulatory FSH surge but not LH pulses. However, follicular deviation and late-stage growth of

  11. Influence of thyrotrophin-releasing hormone on thermoregulation in newborn lambs.

    PubMed

    Bird, J A; Clarke, L; Symonds, M E

    1998-01-01

    This study examined the effect of thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH) administration on thermoregulation in the newborn. Twin lambs were either delivered near-term by caesarean section or born vaginally at term. Colonic temperature, O2 consumption, CO2 production, breathing and heart rates, plus plasma thyroid hormone and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations and thermogenic activity (i.e. GDP binding) of brown adipose tissue (BAT) were measured. In caesarean section delivered lambs colonic temperature decreased rapidly after birth, a response that was greater in the group designated for TRH treatment, in which colonic temperature fell to below 36.0 degrees C at 80 min of life, prior to TRH administration. At this age colonic temperature had been restored to a mean of 38.70 degrees C in controls. TRH had no influence on the composition or thermogenic activity of BAT. The incidence of shivering was not influenced by TRH, but treated lambs maintained a higher rate of O2 consumption and ventilation compared with controls after colonic temperature had been restored to 38.56 degrees C. TRH appeared to promote fat oxidation as O2 consumption remained unchanged and CO2 production declined by a greater rate in treated lambs, resulting in a lower respiratory quotient compared to controls. Heart rate and plasma concentrations of NEFA increased following TRH administration although this did not result in values greater than controls. Normothermic lambs born vaginally had BAT with a greater thermogenic activity, higher plasma thyroid hormone and NEFA concentrations compared with caesarean section delivered lambs, but a thermogenic response was not observed to TRH despite a rise in thyroid hormone concentrations. In conclusion, TRH can improve thermoregulation, an effect that could be linked to an increase in fat oxidation. PMID:9458943

  12. Prepubertal increases in gonadotropin-releasing hormone mRNA, gonadotropin-releasing hormone precursor, and subsequent maturation of precursor processing in male rats.

    PubMed Central

    Dutlow, C M; Rachman, J; Jacobs, T W; Millar, R P

    1992-01-01

    Changes in gonadotropins and gonadal steroids during sexual maturation in rats and humans are well documented but little is known about hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) gene expression in relation to these events. This study measured hypothalamic proGnRH mRNA, GnRH precursor, and fully processed GnRH from postnatal day 8 until day 62 in male rats. GnRH precursor increased on day 22, reached a peak on day 24, declined on day 25 and returned to infantile levels by day 28. A secondary rise in precursor occurred at about day 40 when testosterone levels increased. GnRH mRNA increased on day 22 and remained elevated over the study period to day 26. GnRH increased on day 24 and remained at this level until a secondary rise occurred coincident with the testosterone rise at about day 40. The ratio of GnRH precursor to GnRH was high until day 24 and was low from day 26 onwards, reflecting a maturation of the processing enzyme system between these 2 d. Thus, an abrupt increase in GnRH gene transcription (mRNA) occurs early in juvenile male rats (day 22), well before the onset of puberty. An increase in GnRH precursor accompanies these early changes and this is followed by the maturation of processing as evidenced by the rapid decline of precursor and increase in GnRH from day 24 onward. Images PMID:1469100

  13. The hypothalamic-pituitary response in SLE. Regulation of prolactin, growth hormone and cortisol release.

    PubMed

    Rovenský, J; Blazícková, S; Rauová, L; Jezová, D; Koska, J; Lukác, J; Vigas, M

    1998-01-01

    It has been suggested that neuroendocrine regulation plays an important role in the pathogenesis and activation of autoimmune diseases. The aim of this investigation was to clarify the hypothalamic-pituitary response to a well-defined stimulus under standardised conditions in patients with SLE. Plasma concentrations of prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH) and cortisol were determined in venous blood drawn through an indwelling cannula during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia (0.1 U/kg b.w., i.v.) in ten patients and in 12 age-, gender- and weight-matched healthy subjects. Basal PRL concentrations were higher in patients vs healthy controls (12 vs 6 ng/ml, P < 0.01), though still within the physiological range. Insulin-induced plasma PRL and GH were significantly increased both in patients and healthy subjects; however, the increments or areas under the curves were not different in the two groups. Plasma cortisol response showed moderate attenuation in patients. Sensitivity of pituitary lactotrothrops to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) administration (200 microg, i.v.) was the same in patients and control subjects. In SLE patients with low activity of the disease the sensitivity of pituitary PRL release to TRH administration remained unchanged. The hypothalamic response to stress stimulus (hypoglycaemia) was comparable in patients and healthy subjects. PMID:9736325

  14. Neither bST nor Growth Hormone Releasing Factor Alter Expression of Thyroid Hormone Receptors in Liver and Mammary Tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physiological effects of thyroid hormones are mediated primarily by binding of triiodothyronine, to specific nuclear receptors. It has been hypothesized that organ-specific changes in production of triiodothyronine from its prohormone, thyroxine, target the action of thyroid hormones to the mammary...

  15. A novel GABA-mediated corticotropin-releasing hormone secretory mechanism in the median eminence

    PubMed Central

    Kakizawa, Keisuke; Watanabe, Miho; Mutoh, Hiroki; Okawa, Yuta; Yamashita, Miho; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Itoi, Keiichi; Suda, Takafumi; Oki, Yutaka; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2016-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which is synthesized in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, plays an important role in the endocrine stress response. The excitability of CRH neurons is regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)–containing neurons projecting to the PVN. We investigated the role of GABA in the regulation of CRH release. The release of CRH was impaired, accumulating in the cell bodies of CRH neurons in heterozygous GAD67-GFP (green fluorescent protein) knock-in mice (GAD67+/GFP), which exhibited decreased GABA content. The GABAA receptor (GABAAR) and the Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter (NKCC1), but not the K+-Cl− cotransporter (KCC2), were expressed in the terminals of the CRH neurons at the median eminence (ME). In contrast, CRH neuronal somata were enriched with KCC2 but not with NKCC1. Thus, intracellular Cl− concentrations ([Cl−]i) may be increased at the terminals of CRH neurons compared with concentrations in the cell body. Moreover, GABAergic terminals projecting from the arcuate nucleus were present in close proximity to CRH-positive nerve terminals. Furthermore, a GABAAR agonist increased the intracellular calcium (Ca2+) levels in the CRH neuron terminals but decreased the Ca2+ levels in their somata. In addition, the increases in Ca2+ concentrations were prevented by an NKCC1 inhibitor. We propose a novel mechanism by which the excitatory action of GABA maintains a steady-state CRH release from axon terminals in the ME. PMID:27540587

  16. A novel GABA-mediated corticotropin-releasing hormone secretory mechanism in the median eminence.

    PubMed

    Kakizawa, Keisuke; Watanabe, Miho; Mutoh, Hiroki; Okawa, Yuta; Yamashita, Miho; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Itoi, Keiichi; Suda, Takafumi; Oki, Yutaka; Fukuda, Atsuo

    2016-08-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which is synthesized in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of the hypothalamus, plays an important role in the endocrine stress response. The excitability of CRH neurons is regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing neurons projecting to the PVN. We investigated the role of GABA in the regulation of CRH release. The release of CRH was impaired, accumulating in the cell bodies of CRH neurons in heterozygous GAD67-GFP (green fluorescent protein) knock-in mice (GAD67(+/GFP)), which exhibited decreased GABA content. The GABAA receptor (GABAAR) and the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC1), but not the K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (KCC2), were expressed in the terminals of the CRH neurons at the median eminence (ME). In contrast, CRH neuronal somata were enriched with KCC2 but not with NKCC1. Thus, intracellular Cl(-) concentrations ([Cl(-)]i) may be increased at the terminals of CRH neurons compared with concentrations in the cell body. Moreover, GABAergic terminals projecting from the arcuate nucleus were present in close proximity to CRH-positive nerve terminals. Furthermore, a GABAAR agonist increased the intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) levels in the CRH neuron terminals but decreased the Ca(2+) levels in their somata. In addition, the increases in Ca(2+) concentrations were prevented by an NKCC1 inhibitor. We propose a novel mechanism by which the excitatory action of GABA maintains a steady-state CRH release from axon terminals in the ME. PMID:27540587

  17. Sex differences in plasma corticosterone release in undisturbed chickens (Gallus gallus) in response to arginine vasotocin and corticotropin releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Madison, F N; Jurkevich, A; Kuenzel, W J

    2008-02-01

    In birds, two neuropeptides, corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasotocin (AVT), are major regulators of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) during the stress response. In birds, however, the relative efficacy of CRH and AVT to stimulate the HPA axis in males and females remains unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the time course of CORT release following central CRH and AVT administration to male and female chickens. Chickens were fitted with a stainless steel cannula surgically implanted in the lateral ventricle and a catheter chronically inserted in the jugular vein. Birds were housed individually in cages behind a one-way glass partition and unnecessary noise was avoided during the sampling period. Each bird received a single 5.0microtracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of either saline (SAL), AVT (10 and 100pmol), or CRH (10 and 100pmol). Blood was sampled remotely every 15min for 2h and plasma CORT was determined by radioimmunoassay. There was a significant increase in plasma CORT concentration in males injected with 100pmol AVT beginning at 15min post-injection through 2h compared with SAL injected birds. In males, injection of 100pmol CRH was significantly more effective in releasing CORT compared to an equal molar concentration of AVT or SAL. In females, ICV injection of 100pmol AVT induced moderate increase in CORT levels. In contrast, 100pmol CRH significantly increased plasma CORT compared to SAL injected controls but the CORT response was nearly 50% less than that obtained in males. PMID:17936761

  18. Normal or induced secretory patterns of luteinising hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone in anoestrous gonadotrophin-releasing hormone-immunised and cyclic control heifers.

    PubMed

    Prendiville, D J; Enright, W J; Crowe, M A; Finnerty, M; Roche, J F

    1996-12-16

    The objective was to determine the effect of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH), GnRH analogue (GnRH-A) or oestradiol administration on luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) release in GnRH-immunised anoestrous and control cyclic heifers. Thirty-two heifers (477 +/- 7.1 kg) were immunised against either human serum albumin (HSA; controls; n = 8), or a HSA-GnRH conjugate. On day 70 after primary immunisation, control heifers (n = 4 per treatment; day 3 of cycle) received either (a) 2.5 micrograms GnRH or (b) 2.5 micrograms of GnRH-A (Buserelin) and GnRH-immunised heifers (blocked by GnRH antibody titre; n = 6 per treatment) received either (c) saline, (d) 2.5 micrograms GnRH, (e) 25 micrograms GnRH or (f) 2.5 micrograms GnRH-A, intravenously. On day 105, 1 mg oestradiol was injected (intramuscularly) into control (n = 6) and GnRH-immunised anoestrous heifers with either low (13.4 +/- 1.9% binding at 1:640; n = 6) or high GnRH antibody titres (33.4 +/- 4.8% binding; n = 6). Data were analysed by ANOVA. Mean plasma LH and FSH concentrations on day 69 were higher (P < 0.05) in control than in GnRH-immunised heifers (3.1 +/- 0.16 vs. 2.5 +/- 0.12 ng LH ml-1 and 22.5 +/- 0.73 vs. 17.1 +/- 0.64 ng FSH ml-1, respectively). The number of LH pulses was higher (P < 0.05) in control than in GnRH-immunised heifers on day 69 (3.4 +/- 0.45 and 1.0 +/- 0.26 pulses per 6 h, respectively). On day 70, 2.5 micrograms GnRH increased (P < 0.05) LH concentrations in control but not in GnRH-immunised heifers, while both 25 micrograms GnRH and 2.5 micrograms GnRH-A increased (P < 0.05) LH concentrations in GnRH-immunised heifers, and 2.5 micrograms GnRH-A increased LH in controls. FSH was increased (P < 0.05) in GnRH-immunised heifers following 25 micrograms GnRH and 2.5 micrograms GnRH-A. Oestradiol challenge increased (P < 0.05) LH concentrations during the 13-24 h period after challenge with a greater (P < 0.05) increase in control than in Gn

  19. Relaxin-3 stimulates the neuro-endocrine stress axis via corticotrophin-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    McGowan, B M; Minnion, J S; Murphy, K G; Roy, D; Stanley, S A; Dhillo, W S; Gardiner, J V; Ghatei, M A; Bloom, S R

    2014-05-01

    Relaxin-3 is a member of the insulin superfamily. It is expressed in the nucleus incertus of the brainstem, which has projections to the hypothalamus. Relaxin-3 binds with high affinity to RXFP1 and RXFP3. RXFP3 is expressed within the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), an area central to the stress response. The physiological function of relaxin-3 is unknown but previous work suggests a role in appetite control, stimulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and stress. Central administration of relaxin-3 induces c-fos expression in the PVN and increases plasma ACTH levels in rats. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of central administration of human relaxin-3 (H3) on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in male rodents in vivo and in vitro. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v) administration of H3 (5 nmol) significantly increased plasma corticosterone at 30 min following injection compared with vehicle. Intra-PVN administration of H3 (1.8-1620 pmol) significantly increased plasma ACTH at 1620 pmol H3 and corticosterone at 180-1620 pmol H3 at 30 min following injection compared with vehicle. The stress hormone prolactin was also significantly raised at 15 min post-injection compared with vehicle. Treatment of hypothalamic explants with H3 (10-1000 nM) stimulated the release of corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin (AVP), but H3 had no effect on the release of ACTH from in vitro pituitary fragments. These results suggest that relaxin-3 may regulate the HPA axis, via hypothalamic CRH and AVP neurons. Relaxin-3 may act as a central signal linking nutritional status, reproductive function and stress. PMID:24578294

  20. Mink aging is associated with a reduction in ovarian hormone release and the response to FSH and ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, Alexander V; Mertin, Dušan; Süvegová, Karina; Lauričik, Jozef; Morovič, Martin; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Kotwica, Jan

    2016-09-15

    The endocrine mechanisms of mink ovarian hormones release and reproductive aging are poorly investigated. The aims of our study were to: (1) identify hormones produced by mink ovaries (the steroids progesterone [P] and estradiol [E], the peptide hormone oxytocin [OT], and the prostaglandin F [PGF] and prostaglandin E [PGE]); (2) examine the effect of FSH and ghrelin on the release of the hormones listed previously; and (3) understand whether these hormones can be involved in the control of mink reproductive aging, i.e., whether aging can be associated with changes (a) in the basal release of P, E, OT, PGF, or PGE and (b) their response to FSH and ghrelin. Fragments of ovaries of young (yearlings) and old (3-5 years of age) minks were cultured with and without FSH and ghrelin (0, 1, 10, or 100 ng/mL), and the release of hormones was analyzed by EIA/RIA. We found that isolated ovaries were able to release P, E, OT, PGF, and PGE, and the levels of P produced in the ovaries of old animals were lower than those produced in the ovaries of young animals, whereas the levels of other hormones did not differ. FSH was able to stimulate P and E and suppress OT and PGF and did not affect PGE release. Aging was associated with the inhibition of the effect of FSH on ovarian P and E, the appearance of the inhibitory action of FSH on OT, and the disappearance of this action on ovarian PGF. PGE was not affected by FSH, irrespective of animal age. Ghrelin was able to promote E (but not P) and suppress OT, PGF, and PGE output. Aging was associated with the appearance of an inhibitory influence of ghrelin on ovarian OT and PGE and with the disappearance of this influence on PGF output. Aging did not affect the action of ghrelin on ovarian P and E. Our observations (1) confirm the production of P and E and show that OT, PGF, and PGE are released from mink ovaries, (2) confirm the involvement of FSH and demonstrate the involvement of ghrelin in the control of mink ovarian hormone

  1. Human growth hormone (GH)-releasing factor stimulates and somatostatin inhibits the release of rat GH variants.

    PubMed

    Yokoya, S; Friesen, H G

    1986-11-01

    Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) was used for the analysis of proteins secreted by male rat pituitary cells in monolayer culture in the presence of 10 nM human GH-releasing factor (hGRF) or 30 nM somatostatin (SRIF) or in the absence of these factors. More than 300 medium proteins were reproducibly detected either by fluorographic autoradiography or by silver staining. Immunoreactivity of each protein was examined after 2D PAGE followed by Western blotting and immunostaining with affinity-purified antirat GH (rGH) antibody. While there was a cluster of immunoreactive spots in the GH dimer range (40,000-50,000 mol wt), at least 16 medium proteins of mol wt 22,000 or less were also stained. Among these 16 proteins the release of 15 was stimulated and the release of 14 was inhibited by hGRF and SRIF, respectively. On the other hand, there were 3 proteins of approximate mol wt 16,000 whose secretion was regulated in a coordinate manner as rGH by the hypothalamic factors but which did not cross-react with anti-rGH antibodies. The increase or decrease in the radioactivity of each protein spot obtained from media after pituitary cells were incubated with [35S]methionine and hypothalamic factors was analyzed statistically. A pulse-chase study suggested that at least 7 of the hormonally regulated proteins, including rGH, were synthesized very rapidly. Finally, the 2D PAGE analysis of cell-free translation products of messenger RNA derived from male rat anterior pituitaries revealed the presence of about 40 rGH-immunoreactive proteins which included pre-GH. These data suggest that there are multiple forms of rGH-variants or rGH-related proteins. The biological significance(s) of all the rGH immunoreactive proteins and of the GRF- and SRIF-regulated pituitary proteins remains unclear. It is evident that a number of these proteins are synthesized and released rapidly by pituitary cells in culture. Furthermore, the presence of multiple genes for

  2. Expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor and effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue on proliferation of cultured gastric smooth muscle cells of rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; He, Hong-Xuan; Sun, Xu-De; Zhao, Jing; Liu, Li-Hong; Huang, Wei-Quan; Zhang, Rong-Qing

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor and the effects of GnRH analog (alarelin) on proliferation of cultured gastric smooth muscle cells (GSMC) of rats. METHODS: Immunohistochemical ABC methods and in situ hybridization methods were used to dectect protein and mRNA expression of GnRH receptor in GSMC, respectively. Techniques of cell culture, OD value of MTT test, measure of 3H-TdR incorporation, average fluorescent values of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and flow cytometric DNA analysis were used in the experiment. RESULTS: The cultured GSMC of rats showed immunoreactivity for GnRH receptor; positive staining was located in cytoplasm. GnRH receptor mRNA hybridized signals were also detected in cytoplasm. When alarelin (10-9, 10-7, 10-5 mol/L) was administered into the medium and incubated for 24 h, OD value of MTT, 3H-TdR incorporation and average fluorescent values of PCNA all decreased significantly as compared with the control group (P < 0.05). The maximum inhibitory effect on cell proliferation was achieved a concentration of 10-5 mol/L and it acted in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometric DNA analysis revealed that alarelin could significantly enhance ratio of G1 phase and decrease ratio of S phase of GSMC of rats (P < 0.05).The maximum inhibitory effect on ratio of S phase was at the concentration of 10-5 mol/L and also acted in a dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that GnRH receptor can be expressed by GSMC of rats. GnRH analogue can directly inhibit proliferation and DNA synthesis of rat GSMC through GnRH receptors. PMID:15188505

  3. Neurotrophic effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone on neurite extension and neuronal migration of embryonic gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in chick olfactory nerve bundle culture.

    PubMed

    Kanaho, Yoh-Ichiro; Enomoto, Masahiro; Endo, Daisuke; Maehiro, Sayaka; Park, Min Kyun; Murakami, Shizuko

    2009-08-01

    Hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons play a pivotal role in regulating the reproductive function of vertebrates. These neurons are known to originate in the olfactory placode and migrate along olfactory-related axons to reach the forebrain during embryonic development. Although GnRH is suggested to be secreted during such migration, its physiological significance is unknown. This point is difficult to explore in vivo because recent studies suggest that GnRH is an important factor for normal brain development and that modification of the embryonic GnRH system by exogenous GnRH analogue or genetic methods would result in dysgenesis of the brain. Therefore, to study the role of GnRH in the migratory process of GnRH neurons, we established an in vitro chick embryonic olfactory nerve bundle explant model. Embryonic day 7.5-8 olfactory nerve bundles were cultured in a mixture of Matrigel and collagen gel. At day 3 of culture, GnRH neurons extended their unbranched neurites and migrated out from both edges of the explant. The nature of neurite extension and migratory behavior of GnRH neurons was well maintained in the gel containing 25% Matrigel and 50% collagen. With this culture system, we examined the effect of GnRH on the migrating GnRH neurons. Cetrorelix, a GnRH antagonist, was found to inhibit significantly neurite growth and neuronal migration of GnRH neurons, the effects of which were repressed by the addition of chicken GnRH-I. These results suggest that GnRH functions as one of the regulating factors of GnRH neuronal development by promoting neurite extension and neuronal migration. PMID:19301422

  4. Fish oil enhances intestinal barrier function and inhibits corticotropin-releasing hormone/corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 signalling pathway in weaned pigs after lipopolysaccharide challenge.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huiling; Liu, Yulan; Chen, Shaokui; Wang, Xiuying; Pi, Dingan; Leng, Weibo; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Jing; Kang, Ping

    2016-06-01

    Stress induces injury in intestinal barrier function in piglets. Long-chain n-3 PUFA have been shown to exhibit potential immunomodulatory and barrier protective effects in animal models and clinical trials. In addition, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH)/CRH receptor (CRHR) signalling pathways play an important role in stress-induced alterations of intestinal barrier function. We hypothesised that fish oil could affect intestinal barrier function and CRH/CRHR signalling pathways. In total, thirty-two weaned pigs were allocated to one of four treatments. The experiment consisted of a 2×2 factorial design, and the main factors included immunological challenge (saline or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) and diet (5 % maize oil or 5 % fish oil). On d 19 of the trial, piglets were treated with saline or LPS. At 4 h after injection, all pigs were killed, and the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), liver, spleen and intestinal samples were collected. Fish oil decreased bacterial translocation incidence and the number of translocated micro-organisms in the MLN. Fish oil increased intestinal claudin-1 protein relative concentration and villus height, as well as improved the intestinal morphology. In addition, fish oil supplementation increased intestinal intraepithelial lymphocyte number and prevented elevations in intestinal mast cell and neutrophil numbers induced by LPS challenge. Moreover, fish oil tended to decrease the mRNA expression of intestinal CRHR1, CRH and glucocorticoid receptors. These results suggest that fish oil supplementation improves intestinal barrier function and inhibits CRH/CRHR1 signalling pathway and mast cell tissue density. PMID:27080003

  5. Alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and in levels of proopiomelanocortin and corticotropin-releasing hormone-receptor 1 mRNAs in the pituitary and hypothalamus of the rat during chronic 'binge' cocaine and withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Spangler, Rudolph; Schlussman, Stefan D; Ho, Ann; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2003-02-28

    Tolerance to the stimulatory effects of cocaine on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis develops after chronic 'binge' cocaine exposure in the rat. This blunting of HPA axis activity in response to cocaine is associated with a cocaine-induced reduction of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA level in the hypothalamus. There is limited information about the effects of withdrawal from chronic cocaine on HPA activity. The present studies were undertaken to determine levels of the HPA hormones adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone across 10 days of withdrawal following chronic 'binge' pattern cocaine administration (3 x 15 mg/kg/day at hourly intervals) for 14 days. Male Fischer rats showed a significantly attenuated HPA axis response to chronic 'binge' pattern cocaine administration 30 min after the last injection on the 14th day, as measured by both plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels at the nadir time point. Twenty-four hours following the final administration of 'binge' cocaine (the 1st day of withdrawal), a significant elevation of plasma ACTH levels and a modest, but significant, elevation of plasma corticosterone levels were found at the nadir time point. This acute withdrawal-related activation of the hormones of the HPA axis was no longer found on the 10th day of withdrawal. In the anterior pituitary, levels of both proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and CRH-receptor 1 (R1) mRNAs were significantly higher than saline controls on the 14th day of chronic 'binge' cocaine and were at control levels on the 4th day of withdrawal. In the neurointermediate lobe of the pituitary, a sustained reduction in POMC mRNA levels was observed on the 3rd, 7th and 14th day of chronic 'binge' cocaine, but POMC mRNA was at control levels by the 4th day of withdrawal. In the hypothalamus, POMC mRNA levels showed a transient decrease on the 1st day of 'binge' cocaine with no change during chronic 'binge' cocaine or its withdrawal. CRH mRNA levels in the

  6. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) requirement in Clostridium difficile toxin A-mediated intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Pauline M.; Gay, Jerome; Mykoniatis, Andreas; Pan, Amy; O'Brien, Michael; Brown, Daniel; Karalis, Katia; Pothoulakis, Charalabos

    2004-01-01

    Clostridium difficile, the causative agent of antibiotic-associated colitis, mediates inflammatory diarrhea by releasing toxin A, a potent 308-kDa enterotoxin. Toxin A-induced inflammatory diarrhea involves many steps, including mucosal release of substance P (SP) corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and neutrophil transmigration. Here we demonstrate that, compared with wild type, mice genetically deficient in CRH (Crh-/-) have dramatically reduced ileal fluid secretion, epithelial cell damage, and neutrophil transmigration 4 h after intraluminal toxin A administration. This response is associated with diminished mucosal activity of the neutrophil enzyme myeloperoxidase compared with that of wildtype mice. In wild-type mice, toxin A stimulates an increase in intestinal SP content compared with buffer administration. In contrast, toxin A administration in Crh-/- mice fails to result in an increased SP content. Moreover, immunohistochemical experiments showed that CRH and SP are colocalized in some enteric nerves of wild-type mice, and this colocalization is more evident after toxin A administration. These results provide direct evidence for a major proinflammatory role for CRH in the pathophysiology of enterotoxin-mediated inflammatory diarrhea and indicate a SP-linked pathway. PMID:15159534

  7. Towards more physiological manipulations of hormones in field studies: comparing the release dynamics of three kinds of testosterone implants, silastic tubing, time-release pellets and beeswax.

    PubMed

    Quispe, Rene; Trappschuh, Monika; Gahr, Manfred; Goymann, Wolfgang

    2015-02-01

    Hormone manipulations are of increasing interest in the areas of physiological ecology and evolution, because hormones are mediators of complex phenotypic changes. Often, however, hormone manipulations in field settings follow the approaches that have been used in classical endocrinology, potentially using supra-physiological doses. To answer ecological and evolutionary questions, it may be important to manipulate hormones within their physiological range. We compare the release dynamics of three kinds of implants, silastic tubing, time-release pellets, and beeswax pellets, each containing 3mg of testosterone. These implants were placed into female Japanese quail, and plasma levels of testosterone measured over a period of 30 days. Testosterone in silastic tubing led to supraphysiological levels. Also, testosterone concentrations were highly variable between individuals. Time-release pellets led to levels of testosterone that were slightly supraphysiological during the first days. Over the period of 30 days, however, testosterone concentrations were more consistent. Beeswax implants led to a physiological increase in testosterone and a relatively constant release. The study demonstrated that hormone implants in 10mm silastic tubing led to a supraphysiological peak in female quail. Thus, the use of similar-sized or even larger silastic implants in males or in other smaller vertebrates needs careful assessment. Time-release pellets and beeswax implants provide a more controlled release and degrade within the body. Thus, it is not necessary to recapture the animal to remove the implant. We propose beeswax implants as an appropriate procedure to manipulate testosterone levels within the physiological range. Hence, such implants may be an effective alternative for field studies. PMID:25623144

  8. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone treatment induces follicular growth and ovulation in seasonally anestrous mares.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A L

    1987-06-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulse infusion to stimulate follicular development and induce ovulation in seasonally anestrous standardbred mares. Seventeen mares were selected for use in this experiment, on the basis of a previous normal reproductive history, and were housed under a photoperiod of 8L:16D beginning one week prior to the start of the experiment (second week in January). Mares were infused with 20 micrograms (n = 7) or 2 micrograms (n = 6) GnRH/h, or were subjected to photoperiod treatment only (controls, n = 4). Serum concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), and progesterone did not vary, and neither significant follicular development nor ovulation was observed in any control mare throughout the experimental period (greater than 60 days). By contrast, both groups of GnRH-treated mares showed elevated serum concentrations of LH and FSH within one day after the start of infusion. Mares infused with 20 micrograms GnRH/h had at least one follicle greater than or equal to 25 mm in 7.4 +/- 1.3 (mean +/- SEM) days following the start of infusion, and ovulated in 12.0 +/- 0.7 days. In the 2-microgram-GnRH/h treatment group, a 25-mm follicle was detected in 5.7 +/- 0.7 days, and ovulation occurred after 10.0 +/- 0.3 days of infusion. Ovulation in every instance was followed by a functional luteal phase, as indicated by the profiles of progesterone secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3113502

  9. Gastric motor effects of ghrelin and growth hormone releasing peptide 6 in diabetic mice with gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wen-Cai; Wang, Zhi-Gang; Wang, Wei-Gang; Yan, Jun; Zheng, Qi

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the potential therapeutic significance of ghrelin and growth hormone releasing peptide 6 (GHRP-6) in diabetic mice with gastric motility disorders. METHODS: A diabetic mouse model was established by intraperitoneal (ip) injection of alloxan. Diabetic mice were injected ip with ghrelin or GHRP-6 (20-200 μg/kg), and the effects on gastric emptying were measured after intragastric application of phenol red. The effect of atropine, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) or D-Lys3-GHRP-6 (a growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) antagonist) on the gastroprokinetic effect of ghrelin or GHRP-6 (100 μg/kg) was also investigated. The effects of ghrelin or GHRP-6 (0.01-10 μmol/L) on spontaneous or carbachol-induced contractile amplitude were also investigated in vitro, in gastric fundic circular strips taken from diabetic mice. The presence of growth hormone secretagogue receptor 1a transcripts in the fundic strips of diabetic mice was detected by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). RESULTS: We established a diabetic mouse model with delayed gastric emptying. Ghrelin and GHRP-6 accelerated gastric emptying in diabetic mice with gastroparesis. In the presence of atropine or L-NAME, which delayed gastric emptying, ghrelin and GHRP-6 (100 μg/kg) failed to accelerate gastric emptying. D-Lys3-GHRP-6 also delayed gastric emptying induced by the GHS-R agonist. Ghrelin and GHRP-6 increased the carbachol-induced contractile amplitude in gastric fundic strips taken from diabetic mice. RT-PCR confirmed the presence of GHS-R mRNA in the strip preparations. CONCLUSION: Ghrelin and GHRP-6 increase gastric emptying in diabetic mice with gastroparesis, perhaps by activating peripheral cholinergic pathways in the enteric nervous system. PMID:18322959

  10. Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) affects gene expression in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, LuGuang; Yano, Naohiro

    2005-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), originally identified as a hypothalamic hormone, is expressed in the pancreas. The peptide has been shown to control glycemia, although the role of TRH in the pancreas has not yet been clarified. In quiescent INS-1 cells (rat immortalized beta-cell line), 200 nM of TRH for 24 hours significantly increased insulin levels in the culture medium and in cell extracts. In studies with gene array technology where about 60% to 75% of the 1081 genes were detected, TRH significantly stimulated multiple groups of gene expressions, including G-protein-coupled receptor and related signaling, such as insulin secretion, endoplasmic reticulum traffic mechanisms, cell-cycle regulators, protein turnover factors, DNA recombination, and growth factors. Noticeably, TRH suppressed the genes of proapoptotic Bcl-2-associated protein X, Bcl-xL/ Bcl-2-associated death promoter, and Fas. The multiple gene expressions in response to TRH in pancreatic cells suggest that the changed microenvironment brought about by TRH may influence beta-cellfunction. PMID:16392621

  11. Androgen receptor repression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone gene transcription via enhancer 1.

    PubMed

    Brayman, Melissa J; Pepa, Patricia A; Mellon, Pamela L

    2012-11-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) plays a major role in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and synthesis and secretion of GnRH are regulated by gonadal steroid hormones. Disruptions in androgen levels are involved in a number of reproductive defects, including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and polycystic ovarian syndrome. Androgens down-regulate GnRH mRNA synthesis in vivo and in vitro via an androgen receptor (AR)-dependent mechanism. Methyltrienolone (R1881), a synthetic AR agonist, represses GnRH expression through multiple sites in the proximal promoter. In this study, we show AR also represses GnRH transcription via the major enhancer (GnRH-E1). A multimer of the -1800/-1766 region was repressed by R1881 treatment. Mutation of two bases, -1792 and -1791, resulted in decreased basal activity and a loss of AR-mediated repression. AR bound to the -1796/-1791 sequence in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, indicating a direct interaction with DNA or other transcription factors in this region. We conclude that AR repression of GnRH-E1 acts via multiple AR-responsive regions, including the site at -1792/-1791. PMID:22877652

  12. Induction of ovulation in anestrous mares with pulsatile administration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Johnson, A L

    1986-05-01

    Four seasonally anestrous mares (Standardbred), housed under a nonstimulatory photoperiod of 8 hours light:16 hours dark, were administered gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in a pulsatile pattern (50 or 250 micrograms of GnRH/hour) for 8 to 18 days during February and March 1985. Treatment with GnRH, irrespective of dose or month, induced an increase in serum luteinizing hormone from a mean pretreatment value typical of anestrus (0.58 +/- 0.02 ng/ml +/- SE) to 10.84 +/- 1.27 ng/ml on day 8 of GnRH treatment. Ovulation in the 4 mares occurred 8.8 +/- 0.7 days after the initiation of pulsatile GnRH administration. In each instance, ovulation was followed by a functional corpus luteum, as indicated by a luteal phase (defined as the number of days on which serum levels of progesterone were greater than 1.0 ng/ml) which lasted 14.5 +/- 0.6 days. These results indicate that infusion of GnRH in a pulsatile pattern is effective in inducing follicular development and ovulation in anestrous mares in the absence of a stimulatory photoperiod. PMID:3521408

  13. Enzymatic tracer damage during the gonadotropin releasing hormone radioimmunoassay: analytical and immunological assessment

    SciTech Connect

    O'Conner, J.L.; Lapp, C.A.; Clary, A.R.

    1985-09-23

    Hypothalamic supernatants from 60 day female rats were fractionated from Sephadex G-200 columns. The radioimmunoassay (RIA) for gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) detected an apparently cross-reacting high molecular weight substance. The substance caused apparent displacement of iodinated GnRH binding in dose response fashion; however, no biological activity was observed in pituitary cell cultures. In order to determine whether the depressed binding might be caused by enzymatic degradation of iodinated GnRH during the RIA incubation, iodinated GnRH was preincubated under RIA conditions with either buffer or increasing concentrations of the GnRH cross-reacting material. Aliquots were subjected to polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) and the gels slices counted. Identical aliquots were subsequently used as iodinated hormone in the RIA of known quantities of synthetic GnRH. Tracer damage during the RIA-like preincubation period was reflected in the subsequent PAGE studies as decreased counts per minute in the intact GnRH peak and in the RIA studies as over-estimated quantification of the GnRH standards. This report describes such damage during the GnRH RIA and the data misinterpretations which result. 30 references, 6 figures, 1 table.

  14. Characterization and gestational regulation of corticotropin-releasing hormone messenger RNA in human placenta.

    PubMed Central

    Frim, D M; Emanuel, R L; Robinson, B G; Smas, C M; Adler, G K; Majzoub, J A

    1988-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), a hypothalamic neuropeptide involved in the regulation of ACTH secretion, has been detected by RIA in extracts of human placenta. We wished to determine whether this immunoreactive substance is a product of CRH gene expression in the placenta. We have found authentic human CRH (hCRH) mRNA in human placental tissue that is similar in size to hypothalamic CRH mRNA. Furthermore, the transcriptional initiation site for placental hCRH mRNA is identical to that previously predicted for hypothalamic hCRH mRNA, 23-26 nucleotides downstream from a canonical promoter element. Placental hCRH mRNA increases more than 20-fold in the 5 wk preceding parturition, in parallel with a rise in placental hCRH peptide content. These data strongly suggest that the hCRH gene is expressed in the placenta and that this expression changes dramatically during gestation. Images PMID:3260606

  15. Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH)--a novel olfactory stimulant in fish.

    PubMed

    Andersen, O; Døving, K B

    1991-08-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the putative role of the gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH or LHRH) as an olfactory stimulant in fish. We report for the first time extreme sensitivity of the olfactory organ in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to GnRH. Recordings of the electroolfactogram (EOG) showed an electrophysiological response to 10(-16) M GnRH four times the amplitude of the response to a fresh water control stimulus. By stimulating the olfactory epithelium with several GnRH analogs and fragments of the decapeptide, the biologically active region of GnRH could be partly elucidated. The response profile of GnRH differed from that of the positive control odorant L-alanine, suggesting that separate receptors or receptor cells are involved. We propose that this potent odorant may act as a reproductive pheromone in fish. PMID:1912479

  16. [Effect of trimebutine on the plasma postprandial release of gastrointestinal hormones in the dog].

    PubMed

    Poitras, P; Hondé, C; Goyer, R; Junien, J L; Pascaud, X; Greenberg, G R

    1987-01-01

    The injection of trimebutine induces in the dog an increase of plasma motilin during the fasting period as well as after a meal. We studied the effect of trimebutine on several gastrointestinal hormones released into the circulation by the ingestion of a meal. The intravenous administration of trimebutine (10 mg/kg/h) in 4 dogs abolished the postprandial increase in plasma gastrin, pancreatic polypeptide, insulin, glucagon and GIP. Trimebutine could therefore, by its effects on various regulatory peptides, influence several digestive functions. Its mode of action could probably involves complex mechanisms, including paradoxical effects. The possibility that motilin is a mediator of the trimebutine effect on small bowel smooth muscle is discussed. PMID:3301510

  17. Effect of thyrotrophin releasing hormone on opiate receptors of the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Balashov, A.M.; Shchurin, M.R.

    1987-01-01

    It has recently been shown that the hypothalamic thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) has the properties of a morphine antagonist, blocking its inhibitory action on respiration and, to a lesser degree, its analgesic action. This suggests that the antagonistic effects of TRH are mediated through its interaction with opiate receptors. The aim of this paper is to study this hypothesis experimentally. Tritium-labelled enkephalins in conjunction with scintillation spectroscopy were used to assess the receptor binding behavior. The results indicate the existence of interconnections between the opiate systems and TRH. Although it is too early to reach definite conclusions on the mechanisms of this mutual influence and its physiological significance it can be tentatively suggested that TRH abolishes the pharmacological effects of morphine by modulating the functional state of opiate reception.

  18. Regulation of the Hypothalamic Thyrotropin Releasing Hormone (TRH) Neuron by Neuronal and Peripheral Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Nillni, Eduardo A.

    2010-01-01

    The hypothalamic pituitary thyroid (HPT) axis plays a critical role in mediating changes in metabolism and thermogenesis. Thus, the central regulation of the thyroid axis by Thyrotropin Releasing Hormone (TRH) neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) is of key importance for the normal function of the axis under different physiological conditions including cold stress and changes in nutritional status. Before the TRH peptide becomes biologically active, a series of tightly regulated processes occur including the proper folding of the prohormone for targeting to the secretory pathway, its post-translational processing, and targeting of the processed peptides to the secretory granules near the plasma membrane of the cell ready for secretion. Multiple inputs coming from the periphery or from neurons present in different areas of the brain including the hypothalamus are responsible for the activation or inhibition of the TRH neuron and in turn affect the output of TRH and the set point of the axis. PMID:20074584

  19. Do analogues of gonadotrophin releasing hormone influence follicular fluid steroid levels, oocyte maturity and fertilization rates?

    PubMed

    Tavmergen, E; Tavmergen, E N; Capanoğlu, R

    1992-04-01

    One-hundred-and-twelve samples of follicular fluid from 32 patients undergoing in-vitro fertilization and embryo transfer were analysed in this study. The follicular fluids were analysed for any relationships between oestradiol, progesterone and 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone levels, the progesterone/oestradiol and 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone/oestradiol ratios and oocyte maturity and fertilization rates. In Group A, consisting of women who used analogues of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone during ovarian stimulation with human menopausal gonadotrophin, the progesterone/oestradiol ratio rose in parallel with the fertilization rate (P less than 0.05). Group B comprised patients treated with human menopausal gonadotrophin alone. No significant relationship was found between the other parameters, oocyte maturation and fertilization rates in either group. PMID:1387881

  20. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Stimulate Aldosterone Production in a Subset of Aldosterone-Producing Adenoma

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, Rui; Oki, Kenji; Yoneda, Masayasu; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E.; Ohno, Haruya; Kobuke, Kazuhiro; Itcho, Kiyotaka; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We aimed to detect novel genes associated with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) and elucidate the mechanisms underlying aldosterone production. Microarray analysis targeting GPCR-associated genes was conducted using APA without known mutations (APA-WT) samples (n = 3) and APA with the KCNJ5 mutation (APA-KCNJ5; n = 3). Since gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GNRHR) was the highest expression in APA-WT by microarray analysis, we investigated the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation on aldosterone production. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay results revealed higher GNRHR expression levels in APA-WT samples those in APA-KCNJ5 samples (P < 0.05). LHCGR levels were also significantly elevated in APA-WT samples, and there was a significant and positive correlation between GNRHR and LHCGR expression in all APA samples (r = 0.476, P < 0.05). Patients with APA-WT (n = 9), which showed higher GNRHR and LHCGR levels, had significantly higher GnRH-stimulated aldosterone response than those with APA-KCNJ5 (n = 13) (P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis revealed that the presence of the KCNJ5 mutation was linked to GNRHR mRNA expression (β = 0.94 and P < 0.01). HAC15 cells with KCNJ5 gene carrying T158A mutation exhibited a significantly lower GNRHR expression than that in control cells (P < 0.05). We clarified increased expression of GNRHR and LHCGR in APA-WT, and the molecular analysis including the receptor expression associated with clinical findings of GnRH stimulation. PMID:27196470

  1. Central estrogen action sites involved in prepubertal restraint of pulsatile luteinizing hormone release in female rats

    PubMed Central

    UENOYAMA, Yoshihisa; TANAKA, Akira; TAKASE, Kenji; YAMADA, Shunji; PHENG, Vutha; INOUE, Naoko; MAEDA, Kei-ichiro; TSUKAMURA, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine estrogen feedback action sites to mediate prepubertal restraint of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)/luteinizing hormone (LH) release in female rats. Wistar-Imamichi strain rats were ovariectomized (OVX) and received a local estradiol-17β (estradiol) or cholesterol microimplant in several brain areas, such as the medial preoptic area (mPOA), paraventricular nucleus, ventromedial nucleus and arcuate nucleus (ARC), at 20 or 35 days of age. Six days after receiving the estradiol microimplant, animals were bled to detect LH pulses at 26 or 41 days of age, representing the pre- or postpubertal period, respectively. Estradiol microimplants in the mPOA or ARC, but not in other brain regions, suppressed LH pulses in prepubertal OVX rats. Apparent LH pulses were found in the postpubertal period in all animals bearing estradiol or cholesterol implants. It is unlikely that pubertal changes in responsiveness to estrogen are due to a change in estrogen receptor (ER) expression, because the number of ERα-immunoreactive cells and mRNA levels of Esr1, Esr2 and Gpr30 in the mPOA and ARC were comparable between the pre- and postpubertal periods. In addition, kisspeptin or GnRH injection overrode estradiol-dependent prepubertal LH suppression, suggesting that estrogen inhibits the kisspeptin-GnRH cascade during the prepubertal period. Thus, estrogen-responsive neurons located in the mPOA and ARC may play key roles in estrogen-dependent prepubertal restraint of GnRH/LH secretion in female rats. PMID:26004302

  2. Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Stimulate Aldosterone Production in a Subset of Aldosterone-Producing Adenoma.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Rui; Oki, Kenji; Yoneda, Masayasu; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Ohno, Haruya; Kobuke, Kazuhiro; Itcho, Kiyotaka; Kohno, Nobuoki

    2016-05-01

    We aimed to detect novel genes associated with G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) and elucidate the mechanisms underlying aldosterone production.Microarray analysis targeting GPCR-associated genes was conducted using APA without known mutations (APA-WT) samples (n = 3) and APA with the KCNJ5 mutation (APA-KCNJ5; n = 3). Since gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GNRHR) was the highest expression in APA-WT by microarray analysis, we investigated the effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation on aldosterone production.The quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay results revealed higher GNRHR expression levels in APA-WT samples those in APA-KCNJ5 samples (P < 0.05). LHCGR levels were also significantly elevated in APA-WT samples, and there was a significant and positive correlation between GNRHR and LHCGR expression in all APA samples (r = 0.476, P < 0.05). Patients with APA-WT (n = 9), which showed higher GNRHR and LHCGR levels, had significantly higher GnRH-stimulated aldosterone response than those with APA-KCNJ5 (n = 13) (P < 0.05). Multiple regression analysis revealed that the presence of the KCNJ5 mutation was linked to GNRHR mRNA expression (β = 0.94 and P < 0.01). HAC15 cells with KCNJ5 gene carrying T158A mutation exhibited a significantly lower GNRHR expression than that in control cells (P < 0.05).We clarified increased expression of GNRHR and LHCGR in APA-WT, and the molecular analysis including the receptor expression associated with clinical findings of GnRH stimulation. PMID:27196470

  3. Pathology, Pathogenesis and Therapy of Growth Hormone (GH)-producing Pituitary Adenomas: Technical Advances in Histochemistry and Their Contribution

    PubMed Central

    Osamura, Robert Y.; Egashira, Noboru; Kajiya, Hanako; Takei, Mao; Tobita, Maya; Miyakoshi, Takashi; Inomoto, Chie; Takekoshi, Susumu; Teramoto, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-producing adenomas (GHomas) are one of the most frequently-occurring pituitary adenomas. Differentiation of hormone-producing cells in the pituitary gland is regulated by transcription factors and co-factors. The transcription factors include Pit-1, Prop-1, NeuroD1, Tpit, GATA-2, SF-1. Aberrant expression of transcription factors such as Pit-1 results in translineage expression of GH in adrenocorticotropic hormone-producing adenomas (ACTHomas). This situation has been substantiated by GFP-Pit-1 transfection expression in the AtT20 cell line. Experimentally, GHomas have been induced in GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) or Prop-1 transgenic animals. Immunohistochemical detection of somatostatin receptor (SSTR2a) has recently emphasized their role in the response of GHomas to somatostatin analogue therapy. In this review, the advances in technology and their contribution to cell biology and medical practice are discussed. PMID:19759870

  4. Antagonistic actions of analogs related to growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) on receptors for GHRH and vasoactive intestinal peptide on rat pituitary and pineal cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rekasi, Zoltan; Varga, Jozsef L.; Schally, Andrew V.; Halmos, Gabor; Groot, Kate; Czompoly, Tamas

    2000-01-01

    Peptide analogs of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) can potentially interact with vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors (VPAC1-R and VPAC2-R) because of the structural similarities of these two hormones and their receptors. We synthesized four new analogs related to GHRH (JV-1–50, JV-1–51, JV-1–52, and JV-1–53) with decreased GHRH antagonistic activity and increased VIP antagonistic potency. To characterize various peptide analogs for their antagonistic activity on receptors for GHRH and VIP, we developed assay systems based on superfusion of rat pituitary and pineal cells. Receptor-binding affinities of peptides to the membranes of these cells were also evaluated by radioligand competition assays. Previously reported GHRH antagonists JV-1–36, JV-1–38, and JV-1–42 proved to be selective for GHRH receptors, because they did not influence VIP-stimulated VPAC2 receptor-dependent prolactin release from pituitary cells or VPAC1 receptor-dependent cAMP efflux from pinealocytes but strongly inhibited GHRH-stimulated growth hormone (GH) release. Analogs JV-1–50, JV-1–51, and JV-1–52 showed various degrees of VPAC1-R and VPAC2-R antagonistic potency, although also preserving a substantial GHRH antagonistic effect. Analog JV-1–53 proved to be a highly potent VPAC1 and VPAC2 receptor antagonist, devoid of inhibitory effects on GHRH-evoked GH release. The antagonistic activity of these peptide analogs on processes mediated by receptors for GHRH and VIP was consistent with the binding affinity. The analogs with antagonistic effects on different types of receptors expressed on tumor cells could be utilized for the development of new approaches to treatment of various human cancers. PMID:10655511

  5. Hormonal regulation of rat hypothalamic neuropeptide mRNAs: effect of hypophysectomy and hormone replacement on growth-hormone-releasing factor, somatostatin and the insulin-like growth factors.

    PubMed

    Wood, T L; Berelowitz, M; Gelato, M C; Roberts, C T; LeRoith, D; Millard, W J; McKelvy, J F

    1991-03-01

    Hormonal feedback regulation of hypothalamic peptides putatively involved in growth hormone (GH) regulation has been studied by measurement of steady-state mRNA levels in male hypophysectomized rats with or without thyroid hormone, corticosterone, testosterone or GH replacement. Hypothalamic GH-releasing factor (GRF) mRNA levels increased progressively following hypophysectomy to 420% of sham levels after 15 days while hypothalamic insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNA levels decreased to less than 40% of sham levels. Whole hypothalamic somatostatin mRNA levels were not significantly different from sham. One week of continuous GH infusion restored hypothalamic IGF-I mRNA to levels (95%) indistinguishable from those in sham-operated controls but had no effect on either IGF-II or GRF mRNA. Thyroid hormone, corticosterone and testosterone treatment without GH had no effect on the hypophysectomy-induced reduction of either IGF-I or IGF-II mRNA levels but reversed the elevation of GRF mRNA. We conclude that hypothalamic IGF-I may be involved in GH feedback regulation and thus may function as a hypothalamic modulator of GH. In contrast, IGF-II may be regulated by one of the pituitary trophic hormones but not by GH or the target hormones tested. Finally, hypothalamic GRF mRNA regulation appears to be complex and may include target hormone feedback. PMID:1674982

  6. Brain evoked responses, a bioassay for central actions of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH 1-39) and corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) in humans.

    PubMed

    Born, J; Seidel, E; Pietrowsky, R; Fehm, H L

    1991-03-01

    Blood borne hormones of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis form an afferent humoral system modulating a great variety of brain functions. In humans, bioassays consistently reflecting central nervous system actions have not been developed, so far. The present experiments are part of a series of studies which have been conducted to demonstrate the afferent influences of ACTH and CRH on brain activity by recording of auditory event-related brain potentials (ERPs) in healthy human subjects. In a double-blind within-subject comparison in 12 healthy male students, influences of 4 U ACTH and 100 micrograms CRH (infused within 2 h; the infusion starting 1 h prior to ERP recordings) were compared with the effects of a placebo infusion. Influences of the hormones were tested for the early, brain stem generated ERP components (BAEPs) and for the late components of the ERP associated with cortical stimulus processing. ACTH and CRH showed no consistent effect on BAEPs. ACTH, but not CRH, significantly reduced amplitudes of late ERP components, in particular, the Nd and P3 components which are considered signs of selective attention. These results are consistent with findings from previous studies demonstrating impaired ERP signs of selective attention in humans after administration of the 4-10 fragment of ACTH which lacks the peripheral adrenocorticotropic activity. Together with these foregoing studies, results from the present experiments further establish ERP methodology as a sensitive bioassay for CNS actions of hormones in humans. PMID:1650750

  7. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone in mulberry cells of Saccoglossus and Ptychodera (Hemichordata: Enteropneusta).

    PubMed

    Cameron, C B; Mackie, G O; Powell, J F; Lescheid, D W; Sherwood, N M

    1999-04-01

    Mulberry cells are epidermal gland cells bearing a long basal process resembling a neurite and are tentatively regarded as neurosecretory cells. They occur scattered through the ectoderm of the proboscis, collar, and anterior trunk regions of the acorn worms Saccoglossus, usually in association with concentrations of nervous tissue. They contain secretion granules that appear from electron micrographs to be released to the exterior. The granules are immunoreactive with antisera raised against mammalian and salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). Similar results were obtained with another enteropneust, Ptychodera bahamensis, using antisera raised against tunicate-1 and mammalian GnRH. Mulberry cells were not found in either Cephalodiscus or Rhabdopleura (Hemichordata: Pterobranchia). Extracts of tissues from 4200 Saccoglossus contain an area of immunoreactive GnRH that is detected by an antiserum raised against lamprey GnRH when characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay. This is the first report of the occurrence of GnRH in hemichordates, probably the most primitive group clearly belonging to the chordate lineage. The physiological function of GnRH in enteropneusts is unknown, but an exocrine function appears more likely than an endocrine or neurotransmitter role. PMID:10094853

  8. Development of an Immortalised, Post-Pubertal Gonadotrophon-Releasing Hormone Neuronal Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, A.; Ng, Y.; Divall, S. A.; Singh, S. P.; Radovick, S.

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is important in reproduction, although some of the mechanisms for its synthesis and release remain elusive. Progress in understanding the GnRH neurone has been hampered by the limited number and diffuse distribution of the neurone in the mammalian brain. Several stable GnRH-expressing cell lines have been developed using in vivo expression of the simian virus 40 T Antigen (TAg), and they have been helpful for the study of gene expression and neuronal function. However, expression of an immortalising gene may interfere with normal cellular function. We developed a novel GnRH-secreting cell line transgenic mouse model suitable for targeted transformation in post-pubertal mice using a tetracycline-regulated TAg transgene. This clonal cell line, GRT, expresses neuronal markers and GnRH. GRT cells grown in medium containing tetracycline-free serum express increasing mRNA levels of GnRH associated with declining levels of TAg expression. The novelty and ultimately the usefulness of this cell line is that TAg expression, which could affect the GnRH neuronal phenotype, can be regulated by tetracycline. PMID:18624926

  9. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone regulates spine density via its regulatory role in hippocampal estrogen synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Prange-Kiel, Janine; Jarry, Hubertus; Schoen, Michael; Kohlmann, Patrick; Lohse, Christina; Zhou, Lepu; Rune, Gabriele M.

    2008-01-01

    Spine density in the hippocampus changes during the estrus cycle and is dependent on the activity of local aromatase, the final enzyme in estrogen synthesis. In view of the abundant gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRH-R) messenger RNA expression in the hippocampus and the direct effect of GnRH on estradiol (E2) synthesis in gonadal cells, we asked whether GnRH serves as a regulator of hippocampal E2 synthesis. In hippocampal cultures, E2 synthesis, spine synapse density, and immunoreactivity of spinophilin, a reliable spine marker, are consistently up-regulated in a dose-dependent manner at low doses of GnRH but decrease at higher doses. GnRH is ineffective in the presence of GnRH antagonists or aromatase inhibitors. Conversely, GnRH-R expression increases after inhibition of hippocampal aromatase. As we found estrus cyclicity of spine density in the hippocampus but not in the neocortex and GnRH-R expression to be fivefold higher in the hippocampus compared with the neocortex, our data strongly suggest that estrus cycle–dependent synaptogenesis in the female hippocampus results from cyclic release of GnRH. PMID:18227283

  10. GABA Regulates Corticotropin Releasing Hormone Levels in the Paraventricular Nucleus of the Hypothalamus in Newborn Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stratton, Matthew S.; Searcy, Brian T.; Tobet, Stuart A.

    2011-01-01

    The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) is a major regulator of stress responses via release of Corticotropin Releasing Hormone (CRH) to the pituitary gland. Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is characteristic of individuals with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Postmortem data from individuals diagnosed with MDD show increased levels of CRH mRNA and CRH immunoreactive neurons in the PVN. In the current study, an immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis revealed increased levels of CRH in the PVN of newborn mice lacking functional GABAB receptors. There was no difference in the total number of CRH immunoreactive cells. By contrast, there was a significant increase in the amount of CRH immunoreactivity per cell. Interestingly, this increase in CRH levels in the GABAB receptor R1 subunit knockout was limited to the rostral PVN. While GABAergic regulation of the HPA axis has been previously reported in adult animals, this study provides evidence of region-specific GABA modulation of immunoreactive CRH in newborns. PMID:21236282

  11. Aging influences steroid hormone release by mink ovaries and their response to leptin and IGF-I

    PubMed Central

    Sirotkin, Alexander V.; Mertin, Dušan; Süvegová, Karin; Harrath, Abdel Halim; Kotwica, Jan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of our study was to understand whether ovarian steroid hormones, and their response to the metabolic hormones leptin and IGF-I leptin, could be involved in the control of mink reproductive aging via changes in basal release of ovarian progesterone and estradiol. For this purpose, we compared the release of progesterone and estradiol by ovarian fragments isolated from young (yearlings) and old (3-5 years of age) minks cultured with and without leptin and IGF-I (0, 1, 10 or 100 ng/ml). We observed that isolated ovaries of older animals produced less progesterone but not less estradiol than the ovaries of young animals. Leptin addition stimulated estradiol release by the ovarian tissue of young animals but inhibited it in older females. Leptin did not influence progesterone output by the ovaries of either young or older animals. IGF-I inhibited estradiol output in young but not old animals, whereas progesterone release was inhibited by IGF-I irrespective of the animal age. Our observations demonstrate the involvement of both leptin and IGF-I in the control of mink ovarian steroid hormones release. Furthermore, our findings suggest that reproductive aging in minks can be due to (a) reduction in basal progesterone release and (b) alterations in the response of estradiol but not of progesterone to leptin and IGF-I. PMID:26794607

  12. Sexually dimorphic stress and innate immunological responses of Brahman cattle following an intravenous corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to characterize potential sexually dimorphic stress and immunological responses following corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) challenge. Six female (heifers) and five male (bulls) Brahman calves (264 ± 12 days of age) were challenged with 0.5 micrograms of CRH/kg body weig...

  13. Effect of gonadotropin-releasing hormone II receptor (GnRHR-II) knockdown on testosterone secretion in the boar

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unlike the classical gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-I), the second mammalian GnRH isoform (GnRH-II; His5, Trp7, Tyr8) is a poor stimulator of gonadotropin secretion. In addition, GnRH-II is ubiquitously expressed, with transcript levels highest in tissues outside of the brain. A receptor speci...

  14. Serotonin and acetylcholine affect the release of prolactin and growth hormone from pituitary glands of domestic fowl in vitro in the presence of hypothalamic tissue.

    PubMed

    Hall, T R; Harvey, S; Chadwick, A

    1984-04-01

    Anterior pituitary glands from broiler fowl were incubated alone or with hypothalamic tissue in medium containing either serotonin or serotoninergic drugs, acetylcholine or cholinergic drugs, and the release of prolactin (Prl) and growth hormone (GH) measured by homologous radioimmunoassays. The neurotransmitters and drugs affected the release of hormones from the pituitary gland only when hypothalamic tissue was also present. Serotonin and its agonist quipazine stimulated the release of Prl and inhibited release of GH in a concentration-related manner. The antagonist methysergide blocked the effects of serotonin and quipazine on Prl. Acetylcholine and its agonist pilocarpine also stimulated release of Prl and inhibited release of GH in a concentration-related manner. Atropine blocked these responses. The results show that serotonin and acetylcholine affect pituitary hormone secretion by acting on the hypothalamus. They may stimulate the secretion of a Prl releasing hormone and somatostatin. PMID:6144226

  15. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor mRNA expression by human pituitary tumors in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, J M; Klibanski, A

    1994-01-01

    An important question in the pathogenesis and regulation of human gonadotroph adenomas is whether heterogeneous gonadotropin responses to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) are due to dysregulation of GnRH receptor biosynthesis and/or cell-signaling pathways. We investigated gonadotropin responsiveness to pulsatile GnRH in 13 gonadotroph adenomas. All tumors had evidence of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) beta and alpha subunit biosynthesis using reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR) techniques. Four tumors significantly increased gonadotropin and/or free subunit secretion during pulsatile 10(-8) M GnRH administration. The GnRH antagonist Antide (10(-6) to 10(-8) M) blocked secretory increases in all GnRH-responsive tumors. Gonadotropin and/or free subunit secretion increased after 60 mM KCl, confirming that GnRH nonresponsiveness was not due to intracellular gonadotropin depletion. We hypothesized that GnRH nonresponsiveness in these tumors may be due to GnRH receptor (GnRH-Rc) biosynthetic defects. RTPCR analyses detected GnRH-Rc transcripts only in responsive tumors and normal human pituitary. This is the first demonstration of a cell-surface receptor biosynthetic defect in human pituitary tumors. We conclude (a) one third of gonadotroph tumors respond to pulsatile GnRH in vitro, (b) GnRH-Rc mRNA is detected in human gonadotroph adenomas and predicts GnRH responsiveness, and (c) GnRH-Rc biosynthetic defects may underlie GnRH nonresponsiveness in gonadotroph tumors. Images PMID:8200967

  16. Influence of exogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormone on seasonal reproductive behavior of the coyote (Canis latrans).

    PubMed

    Carlson, D A; Gese, E M

    2009-10-01

    Wild Canis species such as the coyote (C. latrans) express a suite of reproductive traits unusual among mammals, including perennial pair-bonds and paternal care of the young. Coyotes also are monestrous, and both sexes are fertile only in winter; thus, they depend upon social and physiologic synchrony for successful reproduction. To investigate the mutability of seasonal reproduction in coyotes, we attempted to evoke an out-of-season estrus in October using one of two short-acting gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agents: (1) a GnRH analogue, deslorelin (6-D-tryptophan-9-(N-ethyl-L-prolinamide)-10-deglycinamide), 2.1mg pellet sc; or (2) gonadorelin, a GnRH (5-oxoPro-His-Trp-Ser-Tyr-Gly-Leu-Arg-Pro-GlyNH(2)) porcine hypothalamic extract, 2.0 microg/kg im once daily for 3 consecutive days. A transient increase in serum concentrations of estradiol and progesterone (1 and 2 wk, respectively) was detected after treatment with deslorelin but not gonadorelin. Also, socio-sexual behaviors reminiscent of winter mating (including courtship, mate-guarding, precoital mounts, and copulatory ties) were observed among the deslorelin group. During the subsequent breeding season (January and February), however, preovulatory courtship behavior and olfactory sampling appeared suppressed; emergence of mounts and copulations were delayed in both deslorelin and gonadorelin treatment groups. Furthermore, whereas 8 of 12 females treated in October ovulated and produced healthy litters in the spring, 4 naïve coyotes failed to copulate or become pregnant. Thus, perturbation of hormones prior to ovulation in species with complex mating behaviors may disrupt critical intrapair relationships, even if fertility is not impaired physiologically. PMID:19631975

  17. GATA2 Mediates Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone-Induced Transcriptional Activation of the Thyrotropin β Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ohba, Kenji; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Matsushita, Akio; Iwaki, Hiroyuki; Matsunaga, Hideyuki; Suzuki, Shingo; Ishizuka, Keiko; Misawa, Hiroko; Oki, Yutaka; Nakamura, Hirotoshi

    2011-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) activates not only the secretion of thyrotropin (TSH) but also the transcription of TSHβ and α-glycoprotein (αGSU) subunit genes. TSHβ expression is maintained by two transcription factors, Pit1 and GATA2, and is negatively regulated by thyroid hormone (T3). Our prior studies suggest that the main activator of the TSHβ gene is GATA2, not Pit1 or unliganded T3 receptor (TR). In previous studies on the mechanism of TRH-induced activation of the TSHβ gene, the involvements of Pit1 and TR have been investigated, but the role of GATA2 has not been clarified. Using kidney-derived CV1 cells and pituitary-derived GH3 and TαT1 cells, we demonstrate here that TRH signaling enhances GATA2-dependent activation of the TSHβ promoter and that TRH-induced activity is abolished by amino acid substitution in the GATA2-Zn finger domain or mutation of GATA-responsive element in the TSHβ gene. In CV1 cells transfected with TRH receptor expression plasmid, GATA2-dependent transactivation of αGSU and endothelin-1 promoters was enhanced by TRH. In the gel shift assay, TRH signal potentiated the DNA-binding capacity of GATA2. While inhibition by T3 is dominant over TRH-induced activation, unliganded TR or the putative negative T3-responsive element are not required for TRH-induced stimulation. Studies using GH3 cells showed that TRH-induced activity of the TSHβ promoter depends on protein kinase C but not the mitogen-activated protein kinase, suggesting that the signaling pathway is different from that in the prolactin gene. These results indicate that GATA2 is the principal mediator of the TRH signaling pathway in TSHβ expression. PMID:21533184

  18. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog buserelin causes neuronal loss in rat gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Sand, Elin; Voss, Ulrikke; Hammar, Oskar; Alm, Ragnar; Fredrikson, Gunilla Nordin; Ohlsson, Bodil; Ekblad, Eva

    2013-03-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogs are given to women undergoing in vitro fertilization. Case reports describing the development of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction and auto-antibodies against GnRH after such treatment suggest a strong association between intestinal dysfunction and GnRH analogs. No experimental model for studying such a relationship is currently at hand. Our main goal was to investigate possible enteric neurodegeneration and titers of GnRH antibodies in response to repeated administration of the GnRH analog buserelin in rat. Rats were treated for 1-4 sessions with daily subcutaneous injections of buserelin or saline for 5 days, followed by 3 weeks of recovery. Buserelin treatment caused significant loss of submucous and myenteric neurons in the fundus, ileum, and colon. The loss of enteric neurons can, at least partly, be explained by increased apoptosis. No GnRH- or GnRH-receptor-immunoreactive (IR) enteric neurons but numerous luteinizing hormone (LH)-receptor-IR neurons were detected. After buserelin treatment, the relative number of enteric LH-receptor-IR neurons decreased, whereas that of nitric-oxide-synthase-IR neurons increased. No intestinal inflammation or increased levels of circulating interleukins/cytokines were noted in response to buserelin treatment. Serum GnRH antibody titers were undetectable or extremely low in all rats. Thus, repeated administrations of buserelin induce neurodegeneration in rat gastrointestinal tract, possibly by way of LH-receptor hyperactivation. The present findings suggest that enteric neurodegenerative effects of GnRH analog treatment in man can be mimicked in rat. However, in contrast to man, no production of GnRH auto-antibodies has been noted in rat. PMID:23254679

  19. Effect of priming injections of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone on spermiation and ovulation in Gϋnther's Toadlet, Pseudophryne guentheri

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In the majority of vertebrates, gametogenesis and gamete-release depend on the pulsatile secretion of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) from the hypothalamus. Studies attempting to artificially stimulate ovulation and spermiation may benefit from mimicking the naturally episodic secretion of LHRH by administering priming injections of a synthetic analogue (LHRHa). This study investigated the impact of low-dose priming injections of LHRHa on gamete-release in the Australian toadlet Pseudophryne guentheri. Methods Toadlets were administered a single dose of two micrograms per. gram LHRHa without a priming injection (no priming), or preceded by one (one priming) or two (two priming) injections of 0.4 micrograms per. gram LHRHa. Spermiation responses were evaluated at 3, 7 and 12 hrs post hormone administration (PA), and sperm number and viability were quantified using fluorescent microscopy. Oocyte yields were evaluated by stripping females at 10-11 hrs PA. A sub-sample of twenty eggs per female was then fertilised (with sperm obtained from testis macerates) and fertilisation success determined. Results No priming induced the release of the highest number of spermatozoa, with a step-wise decrease in the number of spermatozoa released in the one and two priming treatments respectively. Peak sperm-release occurred at 12 hrs PA for all priming treatments and there was no significant difference in sperm viability. Females in the control treatment failed to release oocytes, while those administered an ovulatory dose without priming exhibited a poor ovulatory response. The remaining two priming treatments (one and two priming) successfully induced 100% of females to expel an entire clutch. Oocytes obtained from the no, or two priming treatments all failed to fertilise, however oocytes obtained from the one priming treatment displayed an average fertilisation success of 97%. Conclusion Spermiation was most effectively induced in male P. guentheri by

  20. Controlled release of the pineal hormone melatonin from hydroxypropylmethylcellulose/sodium alginate matrices in aqueous media containing dioctyl sulfosuccinate.

    PubMed

    Vlachou, Marilena; Tsiakoulia, Athanasia; Eikosipentaki, Aphrodite

    2007-06-01

    An investigation of the controlled release profile of mono-layered formulations of the hormone melatonin in modified aqueous media is described. The tablets used were comprised of hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC K15M) and sodium alginate with melatonin (fully soluble in the dioctyl sulfosuccinate (DSS) containing simulated intestinal solution). Three different sets of tablets (diameters 7.5, 10.0 and 13.0 mm) were tested with respect to the influence of their sizes on the hormone's release; the general trend observed was that tablets with larger surface area values had lower % release. A decrease in the value of W(o), obtained from the ratio [H(2)O]/[DSS], results to the predominance of DSS conformers in the aqueous media, which are less likely to solubilize melatonin effectively. PMID:17630926

  1. A Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Agonist Model Demonstrates That Nocturnal Hot Flashes Interrupt Objective Sleep

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, Hadine; Crawford, Sybil; Economou, Nicole; Kim, Semmie; Regan, Susan; Hall, Janet E.; White, David

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Sleep interruption is often reported by women with hot flashes and night sweats (or vasomotor symptoms, VMS). Although women report that VMS awaken them, polysomnography (PSG) studies have not consistently supported this contention. Design: We mimicked menopause using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) to investigate whether VMS increase awakenings and wake after sleep onset (WASO). VMS, serum estradiol, and at-home PSGs (two pretreatment, two posttreatment) were measured before and after 4 weeks on GnRHa. Regression models were used to determine the effect of increasing VMS frequency on awakenings and WASO, as measured objectively and subjectively. Participants: Twenty-nine healthy women (mean 27.3 y). Setting: Academic medical center. Interventions: Depot GnRHa (leuprolide 3.75-mg). Results: Serum estradiol was rapidly and uniformly suppressed on GnRHa. Persistent VMS were reported by 69% of women. The number of nighttime VMS correlated directly with the degree of sleep disturbance. Each additional reported nighttime VMS was associated with a 62% increase from baseline in PSG-measured WASO (P = 0.007), a 3% increase in awakenings (P = 0.05), and 6% increase in %N1 sleep (P = 0.02). Nighttime VMS were also associated with increased perceived WASO (312%; P = 0.02), awakenings (16%; P = 0.007), Insomnia Severity Index (P = 0.03), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (P = 0.03) scores, and decreased perceived sleep efficiency (P = 0.01). Objectively recorded nighttime VMS correlated with PSG-measured WASO (rs = 0.45, P = 0.02). Conclusions: This menopause model demonstrates that nighttime vasomotor symptoms correlate with increased sleep fragmentation. These findings are consistent with a specific contribution of vasomotor symptoms to polysomnography-measured sleep interruption suggesting that nighttime vasomotor symptoms interrupt sleep in the setting of menopause. Citation: Joffe H; Crawford S; Economou N; Kim S; Regan S; Hall JE; White D. A

  2. Cytoskeletal reorganization dependence of signaling by the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Lindsay; Pawson, Adam J; Millar, Robert P; Maudsley, Stuart

    2004-01-16

    Activation of classical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) like the mammalian gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) typically stimulates heterotrimeric G protein molecules that subsequently activate downstream effectors. Receptor activation of heterotrimeric G protein pathways primarily controls intermediary cell metabolism by elevation or diminution of soluble cytoplasmic second messenger molecules. We have demonstrated here that stimulation of the GnRHR also results in a dramatic change in both cell adhesion and superstructural morphology. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor activation rapidly increases the capacity of HEK293 cells expressing the GnRHR to remain matrix-adherent in the face of fluid insults. Coinciding with this profound elevation in matrix adherence, we demonstrated a GnRH-induced alteration in both cell morphology and the de novo generation of polymerized actin structures. GnRH induction of cytoskeletal remodeling was correlated with significant increases in the tyrosine phosphorylation status of a series of cytoskeletal associated proteins, e.g. focal adhesion kinase (FAK), c-Src, and microtubule-associated protein kinase (MAPK or ERK1/2). The activation of the distal downstream effector ERK1/2 was demonstrated to be sensitive to the disrupters of cytoskeletal rearrangement, cytochalasin D and latrunculin B. In addition to the sensitivity of ERKs to cytoskeletal integrity, GnRH-induced FAK and c-Src kinase activation were sensitive to these agents and the fibronectin-integrin antagonistic RGDS peptide. Activation of ERK was dependent on its protein-protein assembly with FAK and c-Src at focal adhesion complexes. Induction of the cell remodeling event leading to this signaling complex assembly occurred primarily via GnRHR activation of the monomeric G protein Rac but not RhoA. These findings demonstrated a clear divergence of GnRHR signaling via the Rac monomeric G protein focal adhesion signaling complex assembly and

  3. Difference in growth hormone response to growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) testing following GHRH subacute treatment in normal aging and growth hormone-deficient adults: possible perspectives for therapeutic use of GHRH or its analogs in elderly subjects?

    PubMed

    Iovino, M; Triggiani, V; Giagulli, V A; Iovine, N; Licchelli, B; Resta, F; Sabbà, C; Tafaro, E; Solimando, A; Tommasicchio, A; Guastamacchia, E

    2011-06-01

    The somatotroph axis function shows a decline in the elderly (somatopause). In particular growth hormone (GH) response to GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) is reduced in aged man but less than that observed in GH-deficient adults (GHDAs). Plasma GH response to GHRH (1 µg/kg BW) was significantly lower in four GHDAs than in seven healthy aged men 30, 60, and 90 min after acute GHRH administration. To verify whether a priming regimen might be able to increase the reduced GH response to GHRH, both healthy aged men and GHDA patients underwent repetitive administration of GHRH (100 µg GHRH intravenously as a single morning dose, every 2 days for 12 days). After the GHRH-priming regimen, plasma GH values 30, 60, and 90 min after the acute GHRH test were significantly higher than values at the corresponding time points before priming regimen in healthy aged men but not in GHDA patients. These findings confirmed that somatotroph cells become less sensitive to GHRH with normal aging and demonstrate that repetitive administration of GHRH restores the attenuated response only in healthy aged men but not in GHDA patients. This could support the possible use of GHRH or its analogs instead of recombinant human GH in elderly patients with the advantage of preserving the endogenous pulses of GH with the secretion of the different isoforms of GH. However, concerns arise about the possible role of these molecules in tumorigenesis and tumor growth promotion. PMID:20843274

  4. Lead (Pb) alters the norepinephrine-induced secretion of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone from the median eminence of adult male rats in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bratton, G.R.; Hiney, J.K.; Dees, W.L. )

    1994-01-01

    In the present study, the authors evaluated the in vitro effects of lead (Pb) on basal and stimulated luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) and Prostaglandin E[sub 2] (PGE[sub 2]) secretion. Median eminences (ME) were removed from brains of adult male rats and preincubated for 15 minutes in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate glucose buffer in an atmosphere of 95% O[sub 2]-5% CO[sub 2]. These media were discarded and all MEs were subjected to one of the following experiments. In Experiment 1, all MEs were incubated for 30 minutes in medium only. These media were collected and replaced with medium only (controls) or with medium containing Pb doses ranging from 5 to 20 [mu]M. After this 60-minute incubation, media were collected, then replaced with new medium containing 60 [mu]M norepinephrine (NE), or NE plus each dose of Pb, then incubated for a final 30-minute period. Experiment 2 was conducted as above, except PGE[sub 2] (2.8 [mu]M) replaced the NE. In both experiments, the amounts of LHRH released was measured by RIA. In experiment 3, NE was again used for the challenge; however, this time, the amount of PGE[sub 2] released was measured by RIA. Results indicate that Pb did not alter basal LHRH release, but compared with controls, significantly blocked NE-induced LHRH release in a dose-related manner. Conversely, Pb had no effect on the PGE[sub 2]-induced release of LHRH. Additionally, Pb did not alter basal PGE[sub 2] release; however, it significantly blocked the NE-induced release of PGE[sub 2]. Since NE-induced LHRH release is mediated by PGE[sub 2], these results support the hypothesis that Pb is capable of altering the hypothalamus and suggest that this effect is due, at least in part, to the diminished PGE[sub 2] synthesis/release within the ME, resulting in diminished LHRH secretion.

  5. Control of thyrotropin glycosylation in normal rat pituitary cells in culture: effect of thyrotropin-releasing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Ponsin, G.; Mornex, R.

    1983-08-01

    Regulation of glycosylation of TSH was studied in primary cultures of normal rat pituitary cells. (3H)Glucosamine or (3H)proline incorporation into immunoprecipitable TSH and trichloroacetic acid-precipitable proteins was measured after incubation periods ranging from 4-72 h. TSH release was assessed by RIA of TSH in the medium. TRH (30 nM) specifically increased the glycosylation of TSH despite the fact that it did not stimulate (3H)proline incorporation into the hormone even after 72 h of continuous labeling. The TRH-stimulated (3H)glucosamine-labeled TSH was completely recovered in the incubation medium. Effective concentrations of TRH were in the same range as those necessary for stimulation of TSH release (10(-10) - 10(-6) M). Somatostatin (50 nM) and T3 (10 microM) antagonized TRH effects on both TSH release and glycosylation. Stages of TSH glycosylation were discriminated by the addition to the culture medium of tunicamycin (10 micrograms/ml) or monensin (25 microM), which are known to inhibit core and terminal glycosylation of proteins, respectively. Medium (3H)glucosamine-labeled TSH was fully glycosylated, whereas a large part of the intracellular hormone was only core glycosylated. This suggests that terminal glycosylation of TSH could be related to hormone secretion. TRH stimulated essentially only terminal glycosylation of TSH. No alteration of core glycosylation of the hormone was observed after TRH treatment. The stimulating effect of TRH on terminal glycosylation of TSH is probably related to its ability to stimulate hormone release.

  6. Kisspeptin and Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neuronal Excitability: Molecular Mechanisms Driven by 17β-Estradiol.

    PubMed

    Rønnekleiv, Oline K; Zhang, Chunguang; Bosch, Martha A; Kelly, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Kisspeptin is a neuropeptide that signals via a Gαq-coupled receptor, GPR54, in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons and is essential for pubertal maturation and fertility. Kisspeptin depolarizes and excites GnRH neurons primarily through the activation of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) channels and the inhibition of K+ channels. The gonadal steroid 17β-estradiol (E2) upregulates not only kisspeptin (Kiss1) mRNA but also increases the excitability of the rostral forebrain Kiss1 neurons. In addition, a primary postsynaptic action of E2 on GnRH neurons is to upregulate the expression of channel transcripts that orchestrate the downstream signaling of kisspeptin in GnRH neurons. These include not only TRPC4 channels but also low-voltage-activated T-type calcium channels and high-voltage-activated L-, N- and R-type calcium channel transcripts. Moreover, E2 has direct membrane-initiated actions to alter the excitability of GnRH neurons by enhancing ATP-sensitive potassium channel activity, which is critical for maintaining GnRH neurons in a hyperpolarized state for the recruitment of T-type calcium channels that are important for burst firing. Therefore, E2 modulates the excitability of GnRH neurons as well as of Kiss1 neurons by altering the expression and/or function of ion channels; moreover, kisspeptin provides critical excitatory input to GnRH neurons to facilitate burst firing activity and peptide release. PMID:25612870

  7. Cadmium exerts toxic effects on ovarian steroid hormone release in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenchang; Pang, Fen; Huang, Yaqing; Yan, Ping; Lin, Wei

    2008-11-10

    This study examined the toxic effects of cadmium on the function of sexual hormone release in the ovaries of rats and the mechanism of this dysregulation. In vivo, adult female rats were randomly assigned to four groups based on weight. Cadmium was given ip 5 days/week for 6 weeks at doses of 1.0, 0.5, 0.25 and 0mg/kg. Following euthanasia, the ovaries were removed and placed into culture medium for 3h. The levels of progesterone (P) and estadiol (E) in the culture medium were then measured by radioimmunoassay. In vitro studies were done using the ovaries of adult rats in different stages of estrous (proestrus, estrus, metestrus and diestrus). Individual ovaries were collected, placed into culture medium and exposed to 0, 0.1, 1, or 2mM of CdCl(2) for 3h, at which time the levels of P and E in the ovary culture serum were determined by radioimmunoassay. The in vivo results showed that the levels of P and E in the ovary culture serum (5.3+/-1.4 ng/ml and 1.4+/-0.4 pg/ml, respectively) decreased significantly in the high dose group compared to the control (9.2+/-0.9 ng/ml and 3.9+/-0.7 pg/ml, respectively). In vitro, there were significant differences in P and E in between the different concentrations of cadmium and also between the different stages of the estrous cycle. These data suggest that cadmium can inhibit P and E release in ovaries. This may represent an important mechanism of endocrine disruption. PMID:18708132

  8. Signaling Responses to Pulsatile Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone in LβT2 Gonadotrope Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Rie; Mistry, Devendra; Webster, Nicholas J. G.

    2010-01-01

    The hypothalamic neuropeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is secreted in a pulsatile fashion by hypothalamic neurons, and alterations in pulse frequency and amplitude differentially regulate gonadotropin synthesis and release. In this study, we investigated the kinetics of Gs and Gq signaling in response to continuous or pulsatile GnRH using fluorescence resonance energy transfer reporters in live mouse LβT2 gonadotrope cells. cAMP and protein kinase A-dependent reporters showed a rapid but transient increase in fluorescence resonance energy transfer signal with increasing doses of constant GnRH, and in contrast diacylglycerol (DAG) and calcium reporters showed a rapid and sustained signal. Multiple pulses of GnRH caused multiple pulses of cAMP and protein kinase A activation without desensitization, but the DAG and calcium reporters were rapidly desensitized resulting in inhibition of calcium and DAG responses. At the transcriptional level, both a cAMP-dependent cAMP-response element reporter and a DAG/calcium-dependent AP-1 reporter showed a pulse frequency-dependent increase in luciferase activity. However, constant GnRH stimulation gave very little cAMP-response element activation but very strong AP-1 activation. Based on these data, we propose that both the GnRH-R-Gs and Gq pathways are responsive to pulses of GnRH, but only the Gq pathway is responsive to constant GnRH. Furthermore, the Gq pathway is subject to desensitization with multiple GnRH pulses, but the Gs pathway is not. PMID:20406815

  9. Three gonadotropin-releasing hormone genes in one organism suggest novel roles for an ancient peptide.

    PubMed Central

    White, S A; Kasten, T L; Bond, C T; Adelman, J P; Fernald, R D

    1995-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is known and named for its essential role in vertebrate reproduction. Release of this decapeptide from neurons in the hypothalamus controls pituitary gonadotropin levels which, in turn, regulate gonadal state. The importance of GnRH is underscored by its widespread expression and conservation across vertebrate taxa: five amino acids are invariant in all nine known forms, whereas two others show only conservative changes. In most eutherian mammals, only one form, expressed in the hypothalamus, is thought to exist, although in a recent report, antibody staining in developing primates suggests an additional form. In contrast, multiple GnRH forms and expression loci have been reported in many non-mammalian vertebrates. However, evidence based on immunological discrimination does not always agree with analysis of gene expression, since GnRH forms encoded by different genes may not be reliably distinguished by antibodies. Here we report the expression of three distinct GnRH genes in a teleost fish brain, including the sequence encoding a novel GnRH preprohormone. Using in situ hybridization, we show that this form is found only in neurons that project to the pituitary and exhibit changes in soma size depending on social and reproductive state. The other two GnRH genes are expressed in other, distinct cell populations. All three genes share the motif of encoding a polypeptide consisting of GnRH and a GnRH-associated peptide. Whereas the GnRH moiety is highly conserved, the GnRH-associated peptides are not, reflecting differential selective pressure on different parts of the gene. GnRH forms expressed in nonhypothalamic regions may serve to coordinate reproductive activities of the animal. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7667296

  10. Effects of inorganic and organic manganese supplementation on gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I and follicle-stimulating hormone expression and reproductive performance of broiler breeder hens.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jingjing; Tian, Chuanhuan; Zhu, Yongwen; Zhang, Liyang; Lu, Lin; Luo, Xugang

    2014-04-01

    Manganese is an essential microelement. Manganese deficiency affects reproduction performance and reproductive hormones in layers. However, little is known about its effects and the possible mechanism in regulating reproduction in broiler breeder hens. In the current study, broiler breeder hens at peak production were fed with diets supplemented with 0, 120, or 240 mg of Mn/kg as MnSO4 or Mn proteinate for 13 wk. Manganese supplementation did not alter egg laying rate, egg weight, fertility, hatchability, or hatchling weight over a 13-wk trial period. However, 240 mg of Mn/kg supplementation significantly increased serum Mn (P < 0.05). Manganese supplements increased the eggshell breaking strength (P < 0.05) without affecting the eggshell thickness. There was no difference in serum cholesterol and estradiol. Expression of follicle-stimulating hormone) and gonadotropin-releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I) genes was significantly elevated by 240 mg of Mn/kg (P < 0.05). Furthermore, inorganic Mn supplementation doubled GnRH-I expression compared with supplementation with the organic form (P < 0.05), although serum Mn was comparable between these 2 supplements. No obvious difference was shown in gene expression of luteinizing hormone, prolactin, GnRH-I receptor, inducible NO synthase, and dopamine receptor D1 in the pituitary as well as tyrosine hydroxylase and inducible NO synthase in the hypothalamus. This suggests that dietary Mn supplementation could improve eggshell quality in the long term. The central mechanism of nontoxic high doses of Mn suggested the transcriptional activation of GnRH-I and follicle-stimulating hormone genes. The central effect of inorganic Mn activating GnRH-I genes compared with the reduced effect by organic Mn could possibly be due to a decreased capacity of the latter passing through the blood-brain barrier. PMID:24706974

  11. A Randomised Comparison Evaluating Changes in Bone Mineral Density in Advanced Prostate Cancer: Luteinising Hormone-releasing Hormone Agonists Versus Transdermal Oestradiol

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Ruth E.; Kynaston, Howard G.; Alhasso, Abdulla A.; Duong, Trinh; Paez, Edgar M.; Jovic, Gordana; Scrase, Christopher D.; Robertson, Andrew; Cafferty, Fay; Welland, Andrew; Carpenter, Robin; Honeyfield, Lesley; Abel, Richard L.; Stone, Michael; Parmar, Mahesh K.B.; Abel, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Luteinising hormone-releasing hormone agonists (LHRHa), used as androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in prostate cancer (PCa) management, reduce serum oestradiol as well as testosterone, causing bone mineral density (BMD) loss. Transdermal oestradiol is a potential alternative to LHRHa. Objective To compare BMD change in men receiving either LHRHa or oestradiol patches (OP). Design, setting, and participants Men with locally advanced or metastatic PCa participating in the randomised UK Prostate Adenocarcinoma TransCutaneous Hormones (PATCH) trial (allocation ratio of 1:2 for LHRHa:OP, 2006–2011; 1:1, thereafter) were recruited into a BMD study (2006–2012). Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scans were performed at baseline, 1 yr, and 2 yr. Interventions LHRHa as per local practice, OP (FemSeven 100 μg/24 h patches). Outcome measurements and statistical analysis The primary outcome was 1-yr change in lumbar spine (LS) BMD from baseline compared between randomised arms using analysis of covariance. Results and limitations A total of 74 eligible men (LHRHa 28, OP 46) participated from seven centres. Baseline clinical characteristics and 3-mo castration rates (testosterone ≤1.7 nmol/l, LHRHa 96% [26 of 27], OP 96% [43 of 45]) were similar between arms. Mean 1-yr change in LS BMD was −0.021 g/cm3 for patients randomised to the LHRHa arm (mean percentage change −1.4%) and +0.069 g/cm3 for the OP arm (+6.0%; p < 0.001). Similar patterns were seen in hip and total body measurements. The largest difference between arms was at 2 yr for those remaining on allocated treatment only: LS BMD mean percentage change LHRHa −3.0% and OP +7.9% (p < 0.001). Conclusions Transdermal oestradiol as a single agent produces castration levels of testosterone while mitigating BMD loss. These early data provide further supporting evidence for the ongoing phase 3 trial. Patient summary This study found that prostate cancer patients treated with transdermal oestradiol

  12. Identification of a novel interaction between corticotropin releasing hormone (Crh) and macroautophagy.

    PubMed

    Giannogonas, Panagiotis; Apostolou, Athanasia; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Theocharis, Stamatis; Macari, Sofia A; Psarras, Stelios; Garbis, Spiros D; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Karalis, Katia P

    2016-01-01

    In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), compromised restitution of the epithelial barrier contributes to disease severity. Owing to the complexity in the pathogenesis of IBD, a variety of factors have been implicated in its progress. In this study, we report a functional interaction between macroautophagy and Corticotropin Releasing Hormone (Crh) in the gut. For this purpose we used DSS colitis model on Crh -/- or wild-type (wt) with pharmacological inhibition of autophagy. We uncovered sustained basal autophagy in the gut of Crh -/- mice, which persisted over the course of DSS administration. Autophagy inhibition resulted in partial rescue of Crh -/- mice, while it increased the expression of Crh in the wt gut. Similarly, Crh deficiency was associated with sustained activation of base line autophagy. In vitro models of amino acid deprivation- and LPS-induced autophagy confirmed the in vivo findings. Our results indicate a novel role for Crh in the intestinal epithelium that involves regulation of autophagy, while suggesting the complementary action of the two pathways. These data suggest the intriguing possibility that targeting Crh stimulation in the intestine may provide a novel therapeutic approach to support the integrity of the epithelial barrier and to protect from chronic colitis. PMID:26987580

  13. Fetal exposure to placental corticotropin-releasing hormone (pCRH) programs developmental trajectories.

    PubMed

    Sandman, Curt A

    2015-10-01

    The maternal endocrine stress system is profoundly altered during the course of human pregnancy. The human placenta expresses the genes for CRH as early as the seventh week of gestation and it is the expotential increase in placental CRH (pCRH) over the course of human gestation that is responsible for the greatest modification in the maternal stress system. The bi-directional placental release of hormones into the maternal and fetal compartments has profound influences for both. The influential Fetal Programming model predicted that early or fetal exposures to maternal signals of threat or adverse conditions have lifelong consequences for health outcomes. A basic assumption of this model was that developing organisms play a dynamic role in their own construction. Data are reviewed and new data are presented that elevated pCRH over the course of human gestation plays a fundamental role in the organization of the fetal nervous system, modifies birth phenotype (the timing of the onset of spontaneous labor and delivery), and influences developmental, temperamental and metabolic trajectories. Evidence for sex differences and conserved function across species is presented. Finally, a model is presented that proposes several pathways that pCRH can program risk for health and disease. PMID:25841879

  14. Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone Loaded and Chitosan Engineered Polymeric Nanoparticles: Towards Effective Delivery of Neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sarabjit; Bhararia, Avani; Sharma, Krishna; Mittal, Sherry; Jain, Rahul; Wangoo, Nishima; Sharma, Rohit K

    2016-05-01

    Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone (TRH), a tripeptide amide with molecular formula L-pGlu-L-His-L- Pro-NH2, is used in the treatment of brain/spinal injury and certain central nervous system (CNS) disorders, including schizophrenia, Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, depression, shock and ischemia due to its profound effects on the CNS. However, TRH's therapeutic activity is severely hampered because of instability and hydrophilicity owing to its peptidic nature which results into ineffective penetration into the blood brain barrier. In the present study, we report the synthesis and stability studies of novel chitosan engineered TRH encapsulated poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) based nanoformulation. The aim of such an encapsulation is to allow effective delivery of TRH in biological systems as the peptidase degrade naked TRH. The synthesis of TRH was carried out manually in solution phase followed by its encapsulation using PLGA to form polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) via nanoprecipitation technique. Different parameters such as type of organic phase, concentration of stabilizer, ratio of organic phase and aqueous phase, rate of addition of organic phase were optimized, tested and evaluated for particle size, encapsulation efficiency, and stability of NPs. The TRH-PLGA NPs were then surface modified with chitosan to achieve positive surface charge rendering them potential membrane penetrating agents. PLGA, PLGA-TRH, Chitosan-PLGA and Chitosan-PLGA-TRH NPs were characterized and analyzed using Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS), Transmissiom Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Infra-red spectroscopic techniques. PMID:27483926

  15. Gonadotropin releasing hormone and brooding behavior in the native Thai hen.

    PubMed

    Chaiyachet, Orn-anong; Chokchaloemwong, Duangsuda; Prakobsaeng, Nattiya; Sartsoongnoen, Natagarn; Kosonsiriluk, Sunantha; Chaiseha, Yupaporn

    2013-07-01

    Changes in the number of hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone-I (GnRH-I) neurons within the Nucleus commissurae pallii (nCPa) were associated with the reproductive cycle of native Thai chickens. In order to further understand the association of GnRH-I in the regulation of brooding behavior in this bird, the native Thai chickens were divided into two groups; chick-rearing (R) and non-chick-rearing (NR) hens. Numbers of visible of GnRH-I-immunoreactive (GnRH-I-ir) neurons in the hypothalamus of R and NR hens were compared utilizing immunohistochemistry. Numbers of visible GnRH-I-ir neurons within the Nucleus anterior medialis hypothalami, Nucleus suprachaiasmaticus, pars medialis, Nucleus septalis lateralis, Nucleus paraventricularis magnocellularis, and Regio lateralis hypothalami areas were observed in both groups, but no differences were seen between R and NR hens. The number of visible GnRH-I neurons in the nCPa was higher (P<0.05) in the NR than in R hens, and increased in NR hens by day 14 after chick removal. These findings suggest, for the first time, an association of the GnRH system with brooding behavior in continuously breeding birds. Furthermore, the expression of brooding behavior of native Thai chickens might be regulated, in part, by GnRH-I neurons in the nCPa. PMID:23466257

  16. Improvement of first-service pregnancy rate in cows with gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog.

    PubMed

    Nakao, T; Narita, S; Tanaka, K; Hara, H; Shirakawa, J; Noshiro, H; Saga, N; Tsunoda, N; Kawata, K

    1983-07-01

    The effect of an intramuscular injection of a new analog of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), fertirelin, on the first-service pregnancy rate in cows was investigated by a double blind experiment. A total of 1,194 cows was injected intramuscularly either with 100 mug of GnRH or placebo (physiological saline solution) at the time of first insemination postpartum. Pregnancy rate (number of cows calved/ number of cows serviced) was 57.2 % in 605 cows treated with GnRH, while the performance was 49.7 % in 589 cows of the placebo group. The difference of pregnancy rates in both groups was significant (P<0.05). GnRH injected at insemination was effective, especially in cows at the first and third lactations, cows at 101 days postpartum or later, cows with daily milk yield of 26-30 kg, and also in cows from the area where a regional average fertility was relatively low. PMID:16725838

  17. Structural study of human growth hormone-releasing factor fragment (1?29) by vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, P.; Molina, M.; Lasagabaster, A.

    1995-05-01

    The conformational structure of fragment 1-29 of human growth hormone releasing factor, hGHRF (1-29), in aqueous solution and in the solid state is investigated by infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The polypeptide backbone is found to be unordered in the solid state. However, the spectra of the peptide prepared as 5% (w/w) aqueous solutions show that approximately 28% of the peptide is involved in intermolecular β-sheet aggregation. The remainder of the peptide exists largely as disordered and β-sheet conformations with a small portion of α-helices. Tyrosine residues are found to be exposed to the solvent. The secondary structures are quantitatively examined through infrared spectroscopy, the conformational percentages being near those obtained by HONDAet al. [ Biopolymers31, 869 (1991)] using circular dichroism. The fast hydrogen/deuterium exchange in peptide groups and the absence of any NMR sign indicative of ordered structure [ G. M. CLOREet al., J. Molec. Biol.191, 553 (1986)] support that the solution conformations of the non-aggregated peptide interconvert in dynamic equilibrium. Some physiological advantages that may derive from this conformational flexibility are also discussed

  18. Electromembrane extraction of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists from plasma and wastewater samples.

    PubMed

    Nojavan, Saeed; Bidarmanesh, Tina; Mohammadi, Ali; Yaripour, Saeid

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, for the first time electromembrane extraction followed by high performance liquid chromatography coupled with ultraviolet detection was optimized and validated for quantification of four gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist anticancer peptides (alarelin, leuprolide, buserelin and triptorelin) in biological and aqueous samples. The parameters influencing electromigration were investigated and optimized. The membrane consists 95% of 1-octanol and 5% di-(2-ethylhexyl)-phosphate immobilized in the pores of a hollow fiber. A 20 V electrical field was applied to make the analytes migrate from sample solution with pH 7.0, through the supported liquid membrane into an acidic acceptor solution with pH 1.0 which was located inside the lumen of hollow fiber. Extraction recoveries in the range of 49 and 71% within 15 min extraction time were obtained in different biological matrices which resulted in preconcentration factors in the range of 82-118 and satisfactory repeatability (7.1 < RSD% < 19.8). The method offers good linearity (2.0-1000 ng/mL) with estimation of regression coefficient higher than 0.998. The procedure allows very low detection and quantitation limits of 0.2 and 0.6 ng/mL, respectively. Finally, it was applied to determination and quantification of peptides in human plasma and wastewater samples and satisfactory results were yielded. PMID:26799761

  19. Identification of a novel interaction between corticotropin releasing hormone (Crh) and macroautophagy

    PubMed Central

    Giannogonas, Panagiotis; Apostolou, Athanasia; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Theocharis, Stamatis; Macari, Sofia A.; Psarras, Stelios; Garbis, Spiros D.; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Karalis, Katia P.

    2016-01-01

    In inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), compromised restitution of the epithelial barrier contributes to disease severity. Owing to the complexity in the pathogenesis of IBD, a variety of factors have been implicated in its progress. In this study, we report a functional interaction between macroautophagy and Corticotropin Releasing Hormone (Crh) in the gut. For this purpose we used DSS colitis model on Crh −/− or wild-type (wt) with pharmacological inhibition of autophagy. We uncovered sustained basal autophagy in the gut of Crh −/− mice, which persisted over the course of DSS administration. Autophagy inhibition resulted in partial rescue of Crh −/− mice, while it increased the expression of Crh in the wt gut. Similarly, Crh deficiency was associated with sustained activation of base line autophagy. In vitro models of amino acid deprivation- and LPS-induced autophagy confirmed the in vivo findings. Our results indicate a novel role for Crh in the intestinal epithelium that involves regulation of autophagy, while suggesting the complementary action of the two pathways. These data suggest the intriguing possibility that targeting Crh stimulation in the intestine may provide a novel therapeutic approach to support the integrity of the epithelial barrier and to protect from chronic colitis. PMID:26987580

  20. Development of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-Secreting Neurons from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Lund, Carina; Pulli, Kristiina; Yellapragada, Venkatram; Giacobini, Paolo; Lundin, Karolina; Vuoristo, Sanna; Tuuri, Timo; Noisa, Parinya; Raivio, Taneli

    2016-08-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons regulate human puberty and reproduction. Modeling their development and function in vitro would be of interest for both basic research and clinical translation. Here, we report a three-step protocol to differentiate human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into GnRH-secreting neurons. Firstly, hPSCs were differentiated to FOXG1, EMX2, and PAX6 expressing anterior neural progenitor cells (NPCs) by dual SMAD inhibition. Secondly, NPCs were treated for 10 days with FGF8, which is a key ligand implicated in GnRH neuron ontogeny, and finally, the cells were matured with Notch inhibitor to bipolar TUJ1-positive neurons that robustly expressed GNRH1 and secreted GnRH decapeptide into the culture medium. The protocol was reproducible both in human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, and thus provides a translational tool for investigating the mechanisms of human puberty and its disorders. PMID:27426041

  1. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone targeting for gonadotroph ablation: an approach to non-surgical sterilization.

    PubMed

    Struthers, R S

    2012-08-01

    Surgical sterilization is the mainstay of dog and cat population control, but its use is still often limited by the costs and effort involved, especially in developing countries. An ideal non-surgical sterilant that is safe, effective, permanent, administered as a single injection and capable of being manufactured inexpensively could have a significant impact on the world-wide dog and cat overpopulation problem. One approach towards developing such an agent is the targeting of pituitary gonadotrophic cells with cytotoxic agents using gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). GnRH is a peptide that binds to high-affinity receptors selectively expressed on gonadotrophs and some types of cancers. Both small molecules and proteins have been conjugated to GnRH analogues to generate targeted cytotoxic and imaging agents. Although most of these efforts have focused on development of human cancer therapeutics, available reproductive studies in rats and dogs suggest that current compounds do not have sufficient therapeutic windows for complete gonadotroph ablation, in part owing to poor stability of peptide targeting sequences. The only reported longer-term study of gonadotroph ablation in dogs reported suppression of serum testosterone for 8 months, but endocrine function then recovered, raising important questions about the mechanism of reproductive suppression and its recovery. Although studies to date suggest that this is a potentially attractive approach to non-surgical sterilization, ideal agents are yet to be developed, and important mechanistic questions remain to be answered. PMID:22827376

  2. Antibodies Against Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone in Patients with Posterior Laryngitis

    PubMed Central

    Pendleton, Hillevi; Alm, Ragnar; Nordin Fredrikson, Gunilla; Ohlsson, Bodil

    2013-01-01

    Patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders express antibodies against gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in serum. One common cause of posterior laryngitis (PL) is extra-esophageal reflux, but a functional etiology has also been suggested. The aim of this study was to scrutinize patients with PL with regard to the presence of GnRH antibodies and to examine the association between antibodies and symptoms and reflux. Consecutive PL patients were included after examination. Serum was analyzed for the presence of antibodies using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method and expressed as relative units (RU). Two age- and gender-matched healthy subjects per case served as controls. The prevalence of IgM GnRH antibodies in patients was 35% compared with 28% in controls (P = 0.06), with higher levels in patients (0.8 (0.3–2.2) RU) than in controls (0.2 (0.1–0.6) RU) (P = 0.007). The corresponding IgG antibody prevalences were 43% and 4%, respectively (P = 0.001), with no difference in levels (P = 0.70). There was no association between antibodies and clinical findings. PMID:23400339

  3. Spinal cord thyrotropin releasing hormone receptors of morphine tolerant-dependent and abstinent rats

    SciTech Connect

    Rahmani, N.H.; Gulati, A.; Bhargava, H.N. )

    1990-07-01

    The effect of chronic administration of morphine and its withdrawal on the binding of 3H-(3-MeHis2)thyrotropin releasing hormone (3H-MeTRH) to membranes of the spinal cord of the rat was determined. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with either 6 placebo or 6 morphine pellets (each containing 75-mg morphine base) during a 7-day period. Two sets of animals were used. In one, the pellets were left intact at the time of sacrificing (tolerant-dependent) and in the other, the pellets were removed 16 hours prior to sacrificing (abstinent rats). In placebo-pellet-implanted rats, 3H-MeTRH bound to the spinal cord membranes at a single high affinity binding site with a Bmax of 21.3 +/- 1.6 fmol/mg protein, and an apparent dissociation constant Kd of 4.7 +/- 0.8 nM. In morphine tolerant-dependent or abstinent rats, the binding constants of 3H-MeTRH to spinal cord membranes were unaffected. Previous studies from this laboratory indicate that TRH can inhibit morphine tolerance-dependence and abstinence processes without modifying brain TRH receptors. Together with the present results, it appears that the inhibitory effect of TRH on morphine tolerance-dependence and abstinence is probably not mediated via central TRH receptors but may be due to its interaction with other neurotransmitter systems.

  4. Autoradiographic localization of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) receptors in the central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Manaker, S.

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative autoradiography was used to examine the distribution of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) receptors in the rat and human central nervous system (CNS). The binding of (/sup 3/H)-3-methyl-histidine/sup 2/-TRH ((/sup 3/H)-MeTRH) to TRH receptors was saturable, of a high affinity (K/sub d/ = 5 nM), and specific for TRH analogs. Studies with neurotoxins ibotenic acid and 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) suggest that TRH receptors within the amygdala are predominantly located on cell bodies, and not nerve terminals. Finally, an examination was made of the concentrations of TRH receptors in spinal cords of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a degenerative disease of the motor neurons located in Lamina IX. Large decreases in TRH receptors were noted in ALS spinal cords, when compared to non-neurological controls, probably reflecting the loss of motor neurons. In addition, decreases in the TRH receptor concentration of Lamina II were observed. This finding may reflect the sensitivity of neurons throughout the CNS to the pathophysiologic mechanisms of neuronal degeneration which cause ALS.

  5. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone modulates cholesterol synthesis and steroidogenesis in SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Fabiana; Sturli, Niccolò; Cungi, Maria Chiara; Morello, Matteo; Villanelli, Fabio; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Finocchi, Claudia; Peri, Alessandro; Serio, Mario; Danza, Giovanna

    2011-04-01

    Neurosteroids are involved in Central Nervous System development, brain functionality and neuroprotection but little is known about regulators of their biosynthesis. Recently gonadotropins, Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone (GnRH) and their receptors have been localized in different brain regions, such as hippocampus and cortex. Using human neuronal-like cells we found that GnRH up-regulates the expression of key genes of cholesterol and steroid synthesis when used in a narrow range around 1.0 nM. The expression of Hydroxysterol D24-reductase (seladin-1/DHCR24), that catalyzes the last step of cholesterol biosynthesis, is increased by 50% after 90 min of incubation with GnRH. StAR protein and P450 side chain cleavage (P450scc) are up-regulated by 3.3 times after 90 min and by 3.5 times after 3 h, respectively. GnRH action is mediated by LH and 1.0 nM GnRH enhances the expression of LHβ as well. A two fold increase of cell cholesterol is induced after 90 min of GnRH incubation and 17β-estradiol (E2) production is increased after 24, 48 and 72 h. These data indicate for the first time that GnRH regulates both cholesterol and steroid biosynthesis in human neuronal-like cells and suggest a new physiological role for GnRH in the brain. PMID:21296663

  6. Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone (TRH) Promotes Wound Re-Epithelialisation in Frog and Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-You; Emelianov, Vladimir; Paredes, Roberto; Debus, Sebastian; Augustin, Matthias; Funk, Wolfgang; Amaya, Enrique; Kloepper, Jennifer E.; Hardman, Matthew J.; Paus, Ralf

    2013-01-01

    There remains a critical need for new therapeutics that promote wound healing in patients suffering from chronic skin wounds. This is, in part, due to a shortage of simple, physiologically and clinically relevant test systems for investigating candidate agents. The skin of amphibians possesses a remarkable regenerative capacity, which remains insufficiently explored for clinical purposes. Combining comparative biology with a translational medicine approach, we report the development and application of a simple ex vivo frog (Xenopus tropicalis) skin organ culture system that permits exploration of the effects of amphibian skin-derived agents on re-epithelialisation in both frog and human skin. Using this amphibian model, we identify thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) as a novel stimulant of epidermal regeneration. Moving to a complementary human ex vivo wounded skin assay, we demonstrate that the effects of TRH are conserved across the amphibian-mammalian divide: TRH stimulates wound closure and formation of neo-epidermis in organ-cultured human skin, accompanied by increased keratinocyte proliferation and wound healing-associated differentiation (cytokeratin 6 expression). Thus, TRH represents a novel, clinically relevant neuroendocrine wound repair promoter that deserves further exploration. These complementary frog and human skin ex vivo assays encourage a comparative biology approach in future wound healing research so as to facilitate the rapid identification and preclinical testing of novel, evolutionarily conserved, and clinically relevant wound healing promoters. PMID:24023889

  7. Control of puberty onset and fertility by gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons.

    PubMed

    Herbison, Allan E

    2016-08-01

    The gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuronal network generates pulse and surge modes of gonadotropin secretion critical for puberty and fertility. The arcuate nucleus kisspeptin neurons that innervate the projections of GnRH neurons in and around their neurosecretory zone are key components of the pulse generator in all mammals. By contrast, kisspeptin neurons located in the preoptic area project to GnRH neuron cell bodies and proximal dendrites and are involved in surge generation in female rodents (and possibly other species). The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis develops embryonically but, apart from short periods of activation immediately after birth, remains suppressed through a combination of gonadal and non-gonadal mechanisms. At puberty onset, the pulse generator reactivates, probably owing to progressive stimulatory influences on GnRH neurons from glial and neurotransmitter signalling, and the re-emergence of stimulatory arcuate kisspeptin input. In females, the development of pulsatile gonadotropin secretion enables final maturation of the surge generator that ultimately triggers the first ovulation. Representation of the GnRH neuronal network as a series of interlocking functional modules could help conceptualization of its functioning in different species. Insights into pulse and surge generation are expected to aid development of therapeutic strategies ameliorating pubertal disorders and infertility in the clinic. PMID:27199290

  8. IGSF10 mutations dysregulate gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuronal migration resulting in delayed puberty.

    PubMed

    Howard, Sasha R; Guasti, Leonardo; Ruiz-Babot, Gerard; Mancini, Alessandra; David, Alessia; Storr, Helen L; Metherell, Lousie A; Sternberg, Michael Je; Cabrera, Claudia P; Warren, Helen R; Barnes, Michael R; Quinton, Richard; de Roux, Nicolas; Young, Jacques; Guiochon-Mantel, Anne; Wehkalampi, Karoliina; André, Valentina; Gothilf, Yoav; Cariboni, Anna; Dunkel, Leo

    2016-01-01

    Early or late pubertal onset affects up to 5% of adolescents and is associated with adverse health and psychosocial outcomes. Self-limited delayed puberty (DP) segregates predominantly in an autosomal dominant pattern, but the underlying genetic background is unknown. Using exome and candidate gene sequencing, we have identified rare mutations in IGSF10 in 6 unrelated families, which resulted in intracellular retention with failure in the secretion of mutant proteins. IGSF10 mRNA was strongly expressed in embryonic nasal mesenchyme, during gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neuronal migration to the hypothalamus. IGSF10 knockdown caused a reduced migration of immature GnRH neurons in vitro, and perturbed migration and extension of GnRH neurons in a gnrh3:EGFP zebrafish model. Additionally, loss-of-function mutations in IGSF10 were identified in hypothalamic amenorrhea patients. Our evidence strongly suggests that mutations in IGSF10 cause DP in humans, and points to a common genetic basis for conditions of functional hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). While dysregulation of GnRH neuronal migration is known to cause permanent HH, this is the first time that this has been demonstrated as a causal mechanism in DP‡. PMID:27137492

  9. The role of limited proteolysis of thyrotropin-releasing hormone in thermoregulation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, C.

    1982-01-01

    Cyclo (His-Pro) is a biologiclly active cyclic dipeptide derived from thyrotropin-releasing hormone by its limited proteolysis. We have developed a specific radioimmunoassay for this cyclic peptide and shown its presence throughout rat and monkey brains. The normal rat brain concentration of cyclo (His-Pro) ranged from 35-61 pmols/brain. The elution profiles of rat brain cyclo (His-Pro)-like immunoreactivity and synthetic radioactive cyclo (His-Pro) following gel filtration, ion-exchange chromatography and high pressure liquid chromatography were similar. An analysis of the regional distribution of cyclo (His-Pro) and TRH in rat and monkey brains exhibited no apparent precursor-product relationship. Studies on the neuroanatomic sites for the thermoregulatory effects of cyclo (His-Pro) suggested that the neural loci responsible for cyclo (His-Pro)-induced hypothermia resides within POA/AHA. The endogenous levels of brain cyclo (His-Pro) were elevated when rats were made either hypothyroid by surgical thyroidectomy or forced to drink alcohol for six weeks. These studies demonstrate that cyclo (His-Pro) is present throughout the central nervous system in physiologically relevant concentrations which can be modified by appropriate physiological and pharamacological manipulations. These data in conjunction with earlier reports of multiple biological activities of exogenous cyclo (His-Pro), suggest that endogenous cyclo (His-Pro) is a biological active peptide and it may play a neurotransmitter or neuromodulator role in the central nervous system.

  10. Influences of peripheral adrenocorticotropin 1-39 (ACTH) and human corticotropin releasing hormone (h-CRH) on human auditory evoked potentials (AEP).

    PubMed

    Born, J; Bathelt, B; Pietrowsky, R; Pauschinger, P; Fehm, H L

    1990-01-01

    Hormones of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis have been considered to form part of an efferent humoral system modulating central nervous stimulus processing. The present experiments were designed to compare the effects of iv bolus administrations of placebo, porcine ACTH 1-39 (1.5 U) and h-CRH (25 micrograms) on auditory evoked potentials (AEPs) in healthy men. Also, cardiovascular parameters, cortisol and self-reported mood were assessed. ACTH significantly reduced the amplitude of the N1 component of the AEP; P1 and P2 remained unchanged. The selective reduction of N1 amplitude defies an interpretation of the changes in terms of a reduced stimulus-induced cortical arousal following ACTH; the ACTH-induced changes may rather indicate an influence on frontocortical functions of directing attention. The effect of ACTH on N1 cannot be attributed to its adrenocorticotropic action or to cardiovascular changes, but appears to represent an intrinsic extraadrenal influence of the hormone. The data do not provide evidence for effects of h-CRH on central nervous stimulus processing in humans, after peripheral administration. PMID:2160665

  11. Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GH-RH) enhance tumour growth inhibition induced by androgen deprivation in human MDA-Pca-2b prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Letsch, M; Schally, A V; Stangelberger, A; Groot, K; Varga, J L

    2004-02-01

    In the present study, we investigated whether the growth hormone-releasing hormone (GH-RH) antagonist JV-1-38 could enhance the effects of androgen deprivation produced by the anti-androgen Flutamide and luteinising hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) agonist Decapeptyl in an experimental model of human androgen-sensitive MDA PCa 2b prostate carcinoma implanted subcutaneously (s.c.) into nude mice. We also evaluated by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) the effects of combined treatment on the mRNA expression for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and measured serum PSA levels. In experiment 1, GH-RH antagonist JV-1-38 greatly inhibited tumour growth in combination with Decapeptyl, but was ineffective when given alone. Thus, combined therapy with JV-1-38 at 20 microg/day and Decapeptyl microcapsules releasing 12.5 microg/day for 29 days inhibited significantly (P<0.01) MDA PCa 2b tumour growth by 65%, compared with controls. Combined treatment also significantly (P<0.05) decreased serum PSA levels by 52% and reduced tumour weight by 54% vs. controls. In experiment 2, GH-RH antagonist JV-1-38 at 20 microg/day likewise showed powerful growth inhibitory effects when combined with Flutamide (25 mg/kg/day) for 21 days. Combined treatment with JV-1-38 and slow-release pellets of Flutamide significantly (P<0.001) inhibited tumour growth by 61% versus controls, and was significantly (P<0.05) more effective than Flutamide or JV-1-38 alone. Combination therapy also reduced significantly (P<0.001) tumour weight and serum PSA levels by 59 and 47%, respectively. The mRNA expression for PSA in MDA PCa 2b tumours was not changed by JV-1-38, Decapeptyl and Flutamide alone or in their respective combinations. Our findings suggest that GH-RH antagonists could enhance the tumour inhibitory effects of androgen deprivation for the primary therapy of patients with advanced prostate carcinoma. PMID:14746863

  12. Growth hormone-releasing hormone resistance in pseudohypoparathyroidism type ia: new evidence for imprinting of the Gs alpha gene.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Giovanna; Maghnie, Mohamad; Weber, Giovanna; De Menis, Ernesto; Brunelli, Valeria; Cappa, Marco; Loli, Paola; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Spada, Anna

    2003-09-01

    Heterozygous inactivating mutations in the Gs alpha gene cause Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy. Consistent with the observation that only maternally inherited mutations lead to resistance to hormone action [pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia (PHP Ia)], recent studies provided evidence for a predominant maternal origin of Gs alpha transcripts in endocrine organs, such as thyroid, gonad, and pituitary. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of pituitary resistance to hypothalamic hormones acting via Gs alpha-coupled receptors in patients with PHP Ia. Six of nine patients showed an impaired GH responsiveness to GHRH plus arginine, consistent with a complete GH deficiency (GH peak from 2.6-8.6 microg/liter, normal > 16.5), and partial (GH peak 13.9 and 13.6 microg/liter) and normal responses were found in two and one patient, respectively. Accordingly, IGF-I levels were below and in the low-normal range in seven and two patients. All patients had a normal cortisol response to 1 microg ACTH test, suggesting a normal corticotroph function that was confirmed by a normal ACTH and cortisol response to CRH test in three patients. In conclusion, we report that in addition to PTH and TSH resistance, patients with PHP Ia display variable degrees of GHRH resistance, consistent with Gs alpha imprinting in human pituitary. PMID:12970263

  13. Bed rest suppresses bioassayable growth hormone release in response to muscle activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCall, G. E.; Goulet, C.; Grindeland, R. E.; Hodgson, J. A.; Bigbee, A. J.; Edgerton, V. R.

    1997-01-01

    Hormonal responses to muscle activity were studied in eight men before (-13 or -12 and -8 or -7 days), during (2 or 3, 8 or 9, and 13 or 14 days) and after (+2 or +3 and +10 or +11 days) 17 days of bed rest. Muscle activity consisted of a series of unilateral isometric plantar flexions, including 4 maximal voluntary contractions (MVCs), 48 contractions at 30% MVC, and 12 contractions at 80% MVC, all performed at a 4:1-s work-to-rest ratio. Blood was collected before and immediately after muscle activity to measure plasma growth hormone by radioimmunoassay (IGH) and by bioassay (BGH) of tibia epiphyseal cartilage growth in hypophysectomized rats. Plasma IGH was unchanged by muscle activity before, during, or after bed rest. Before bed rest, muscle activity increased (P < 0.05) BGH by 66% at -13 or -12 days (2,146 +/- 192 to 3,565 +/- 197 microg/l) and by 92% at -8 or -7 days (2,162 +/- 159 to 4,161 +/- 204 microg/l). After 2 or 3 days of bed rest, there was no response of BGH to the muscle activity, a pattern that persisted through 8 or 9 days of bed rest. However, after 13 or 14 days of bed rest, plasma concentration of BGH was significantly lower after than before muscle activity (2,594 +/- 211 to 2,085 +/- 109 microg/l). After completion of bed rest, muscle activity increased BGH by 31% at 2 or 3 days (1,807 +/- 117 to 2,379 +/- 473 microg/l; P < 0.05), and by 10 or 11 days the BGH response was similar to that before bed rest (1,881 +/- 75 to 4,160 +/- 315 microg/l; P < 0.05). These data demonstrate that the ambulatory state of an individual can have a major impact on the release of BGH, but not IGH, in response to a single bout of muscle activity.

  14. Identification of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor orthologue in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Vadakkadath Meethal, Sivan; Gallego, Miguel J; Haasl, Ryan J; Petras, Stephen J; Sgro, Jean-Yves; Atwood, Craig S

    2006-01-01

    Background The Caenorhabditis elegans genome is known to code for at least 1149 G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), but the GPCR(s) critical to the regulation of reproduction in this nematode are not yet known. This study examined whether GPCRs orthologous to human gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) exist in C. elegans. Results Our sequence analyses indicated the presence of two proteins in C. elegans, one of 401 amino acids [GenBank: NP_491453; WormBase: F54D7.3] and another of 379 amino acids [GenBank: NP_506566; WormBase: C15H11.2] with 46.9% and 44.7% nucleotide similarity to human GnRHR1 and GnRHR2, respectively. Like human GnRHR1, structural analysis of the C. elegans GnRHR1 orthologue (Ce-GnRHR) predicted a rhodopsin family member with 7 transmembrane domains, G protein coupling sites and phosphorylation sites for protein kinase C. Of the functionally important amino acids in human GnRHR1, 56% were conserved in the C. elegans orthologue. Ce-GnRHR was actively transcribed in adult worms and immunoanalyses using antibodies generated against both human and C. elegans GnRHR indicated the presence of a 46-kDa protein, the calculated molecular mass of the immature Ce-GnRHR. Ce-GnRHR staining was specifically localized to the germline, intestine and pharynx. In the germline and intestine, Ce-GnRHR was localized specifically to nuclei as revealed by colocalization with a DNA nuclear stain. However in the pharynx, Ce-GnRHR was localized to the myofilament lattice of the pharyngeal musculature, suggesting a functional role for Ce-GnRHR signaling in the coupling of food intake with reproduction. Phylogenetic analyses support an early evolutionary origin of GnRH-like receptors, as evidenced by the hypothesized grouping of Ce-GnRHR, vertebrate GnRHRs, a molluscan GnRHR, and the adipokinetic hormone receptors (AKHRs) and corazonin receptors of arthropods. Conclusion This is the first report of a GnRHR orthologue in C. elegans, which shares significant

  15. Familial idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency not linked to gene for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in Brazilian kindred

    SciTech Connect

    Faraco, J.; Francke, U.; Toledo, S.

    1994-09-01

    Familial idiopathic gonadotropin deficiency (FIGD) is an autosomal recessive disorder which results in failure to develop secondary sexual characteristics. The origin is a hypothalamic defect resulting in insufficient secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone GnRH (also called LHRH, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone) and follicle-stimuating hormone (FSH). FIGD has been determined to be a separate entity from Kallmann syndrome which presents with hypogonadism as well as anosmia. The FIGD phenotype appears to be analogous to the phenotype of the hpg (hypogonadal) mouse. Because the hpg phenotype is the result of a structurally abnormal GnRH gene, we have studied the GnRH gene in individuals from a previously reported Brazilian FIGD family. An informative dimorphic marker in the signal peptide sequence of the GnRH gene allowed assessment of linkage between the disease gene and the GnRH locus in this pedigree. We have concluded that the GnRH locus is not linked to the disease-causing mutation in these hypogonadal individuals. Recent evidence suggests that neuropeptide Y (NPY) may play a role in the initiation of puberty. We hypothesize that mutations in NPY may result in failure to secrete GnRH. We have characterized three diallelic frequent-cutter restriction fragment length polymorphisms within the human NPY locus, and are currently using these markers to determine if the NPY gene is linked to, and possibly the site of the disease mutation in this kindred.

  16. Leptin directly acts within the hypothalamus to stimulate gonadotropin-releasing hormone secretion in vivo in rats

    PubMed Central

    Watanobe, Hajime

    2002-01-01

    It is still not known whether leptin, an adipocyte-derived hormone, acts directly within the hypothalamus to stimulate the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-luteinizing hormone (LH) system. In order to address this question, the present study examined the effects of direct intrahypothalamic perfusions with leptin on the in vivo release of GnRH in ovarian steroid-primed ovariectomized rats utilizing the push-pull perfusion technique. Both α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and neuropeptide Y were also measured in the hypothalamic perfusates. In normally fed animals, the leptin infusion was without effect on the release of these three hypothalamic peptides and also without effect on plasma LH and prolactin (PRL), whether leptin was infused into the medial preoptic area (where the majority of GnRH neuronal cell bodies exist) or the median eminence-arcuate nucleus complex (where axon terminals of GnRH neurons are located). In contrast, in 3-day fasted rats leptin was effective in stimulating the secretion of GnRH, α-MSH, and LH, regardless of the site of perfusion. These three hormones were increased in a temporal order of α-MSH, GnRH and LH. Irrespective of the site of perfusion, leptin was without effect on the release of neuropeptide Y. Only when leptin was infused into the median eminence-arcuate nucleus complex was PRL secretion also stimulated, although its onset was 1 h behind that of LH. The leptin-induced elevations of GnRH, α-MSH, LH and PRL were all dose-dependently stimulated by subnormal (1.0 ng ml−1) and normal (3.0 ng ml−1) concentrations of leptin, but at higher concentrations (10 ng ml−1) it did not produce additional effects. Leptin infusion into the anterior hypothalamic area, a control site equidistant from both the medial preoptic area and the median eminence-arcuate nucleus complex, did not produce a significant change in any of the hormones in either the fed or fasted rats. These results demonstrate for the first time that

  17. Frequency-Dependent Regulation of Follicle-Stimulating Hormone β by Pulsatile Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Is Mediated by Functional Antagonism of bZIP Transcription Factors ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ciccone, Nick A.; Xu, Shuyun; Lacza, Charlemagne T.; Carroll, Rona S.; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2010-01-01

    Oscillatory synthesis and secretion of the gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH), under the control of pulsatile hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), is essential for normal reproductive development and fertility. The molecular mechanisms by which various patterns of pulsatile GnRH regulate gonadotrope responsiveness remain poorly understood. In contrast to the α and LHβ subunit genes, FSHβ subunit transcription is preferentially stimulated at low rather than high frequencies of pulsatile GnRH. In this study, mutation of a cyclic AMP response element (CRE) within the FSHβ promoter resulted in the loss of preferential GnRH stimulation at low pulse frequencies. We hypothesized that high GnRH pulse frequencies might stimulate a transcriptional repressor(s) to attenuate the action of CRE binding protein (CREB) and show that inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) fulfills such a role. ICER was not detected under basal conditions, but pulsatile GnRH stimulated ICER to a greater extent at high than at low pulse frequencies. ICER binds to the FSHβ CRE site to reduce CREB occupation and abrogates both maximal GnRH stimulation and GnRH pulse frequency-dependent effects on FSHβ transcription. These data suggest that ICER production antagonizes the stimulatory action of CREB to attenuate FSHβ transcription at high GnRH pulse frequencies, thereby playing a critical role in regulating cyclic reproductive function. PMID:20008557

  18. Stimulation of cholesterol side-chain cleavage by a luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone (luliberin) agonist (ICI 118630) in rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, M H; Cooke, B A

    1983-01-01

    The action of a luliberin (luteinizing-hormone-releasing hormone) agonist (ICI 118630) and lutropin (luteinizing hormone) on the activity of the cytochrome P-450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme in rat Leydig cells has been investigated. This has been carried out by studying the metabolism of exogenous (22R)-22- and 25-hydroxycholesterol to testosterone. It was found that both hydroxycholesterols increased testosterone production to higher levels than achieved by lutropin alone. Addition of luliberin agonist but not lutropin was found to increase further the metabolism of the hydroxycholesterol to testosterone; this occurred in the presence of saturating and subsaturating levels of the hydroxycholesterols. This effect of luliberin agonist was potentiated in the presence of lutropin. The protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, inhibited the luliberin agonist-induced stimulation of the hydroxycholesterol metabolism. At low calcium levels (1.1 microM), testosterone production was increased by addition of (22R)-22-hydroxycholesterol but the luliberin agonist effect was negated. The calmodulin inhibitor trifluoperazine inhibited (22R)-22-hydroxycholesterol-stimulated steroidogenesis and negated the luliberin agonist effect. These results indicate that luliberin agonist specifically increases the synthesis of the cytochrome P-450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme in rat testis Leydig cells. PMID:6230077

  19. Evidence that copper-amino acid complexes are potent stimulators of the release of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone from isolated hypothalamic granules.

    PubMed

    Barnea, A; Cho, G

    1984-09-01

    Chelated copper has been previously shown to stimulate the release of LHRH from isolated hypothalamic granules. In this study, we evaluated the chelator specificity, the kinetic constants, and the characteristics of copper interaction with LHRH granules. LHRH granules were isolated from the median eminence area of adult male rats and then incubated in a buffered medium at 37 C. Release of LHRH into the incubation medium was assessed by RIA of LHRH remaining in the granules after incubation. It was found that CuHistidine (CuHis) as well as CuCysteine markedly stimulated LHRH release from the isolated granules, release being 56% and 63%, respectively, of the total LHRH content of granules incubated in buffer alone. In contrast, neither CuGly-His-Lys nor CuBSA stimulated LHRH release. The CuHis-stimulated release of LHRH was a saturable function of the concentration of CuHis. The Michaelis-Menten constants of this release process were estimated; the apparent Km for copper was found to be 4 microM, and the maximal velocity was 65% of the granule content of LHRH released in 5 min. In addition, we noted that CuHis-stimulated release of LHRH, assessed 6 min after CuHis, was completely abolished when dithiothreitol (DTT) was added immediately after CuHis, partially abolished when added 1 or 2 min after CuHis, and not affected at all when added 3 min after CuHis. This time course of DTT inhibition of LHRH release suggests that a period of 2-3 min of copper interaction with the granules is required for the 6-min manifestation of copper action. Furthermore, this DTT-inhibitable interaction of copper did not occur when granules were incubated at 4 C. In summary the findings that copper, chelated to putative circulating chelators, markedly stimulates LHRH release and that the apparent Km of 4 microM for copper in this process is within the concentration range for the physiological action of copper support the proposal that blood-borne copper can interact rapidly with the LHRH

  20. A comparison of human chorionic gonadotropin and luteinizing hormone releasing hormone on the induction of spermiation and amplexus in the American toad (Anaxyrus americanus)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Captive breeding programs for endangered amphibian species often utilize exogenous hormones for species that are difficult to breed. The purpose of our study was to compare the efficacy of two different hormones at various concentrations on sperm production, quantity and quality over time in order to optimize assisted breeding. Methods Male American toads (Anaxyrus americanus) were divided into three separate treatment groups, with animals in each group rotated through different concentrations of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analog (LHRH; 0.1, 1.0, 4.0 and 32 micrograms/toad), human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG; 50, 100, 200, and 300 IU), or the control over 24 hours. We evaluated the number of males that respond by producing spermic urine, the sperm concentration, percent motility, and quality of forward progression. We also evaluated the effects of hCG and LHRH on reproductive behavior as assessed by amplexus. Data were analyzed using the Generalized Estimating Equations incorporating repeated measures over time and including the main effects of treatment and time, and the treatment by time interaction. Results The hormone hCG was significantly more effective at stimulating spermiation in male Anaxyrus americanus than LHRH and showed a dose-dependent response in the number of animals producing sperm. At the most effective hCG dose (300 IU), 100% of the male toads produced sperm, compared to only 35% for the best LHRH dose tested (4.0 micrograms). In addition to having a greater number of responders (P < 0.05), the 300 IU hCG treatment group had a much higher average sperm concentration (P < 0.05) than the treatment group receiving 4.0 micrograms LHRH. In contrast, these two treatments did not result in significant differences in sperm motility or quality of forward progressive motility. However, more males went into amplexus when treated with LHRH vs. hCG (90% vs. 75%) by nine hours post-administration. Conclusion There is a clear

  1. Luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone targeted poly(methyl vinyl ether maleic acid) nanoparticles for doxorubicin delivery to MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Varshosaz, Jaleh; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali; Ghazzavi, Jila

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to design a targeted anti-cancer drug delivery system for breast cancer. Therefore, doxorubicin (DOX) loaded poly(methyl vinyl ether maleic acid) nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by ionic cross-linking method using Zn(2+) ions. To optimise the effect of DOX/polymer ratio, Zn/polymer ratio, and stirrer rate a full factorial design was used and their effects on particle size, zeta potential, loading efficiency (LE, %), and release efficiency in 72 h (RE72, %) were studied. Targeted NPs were prepared by chemical coating of tiptorelin/polyallylamin conjugate on the surface of NPs by using 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) carboiimid HCl as cross-linking agent. Conjugation efficiency was measured by Bradford assay. Conjugated triptorelin and targeted NPs were studied by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The cytotoxicity of DOX loaded in targeted NPs and non-targeted ones were studied on MCF-7 cells which overexpress luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptors and SKOV3 cells as negative LHRH receptors using Thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay. The best results obtained from NPs prepared by DOX/polymer ratio of 5%, Zn/polymer ratio of 50%, and stirrer rate of 960 rpm. FTIR spectrum confirmed successful conjugation of triptorelin to NPs. The conjugation efficiency was about 70%. The targeted NPs showed significantly less IC50 for MCF-7 cells compared to free DOX and non-targeted NPs. PMID:27463791

  2. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone 2 suppresses food intake in the zebrafish, Danio rerio.

    PubMed

    Nishiguchi, Ryo; Azuma, Morio; Yokobori, Eri; Uchiyama, Minoru; Matsuda, Kouhei

    2012-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is an evolutionarily conserved neuropeptide with 10 amino acid residues, of which several structural variants exist. A molecular form known as GnRH2 ([His(5) Trp(7) Tyr(8)]GnRH, also known as chicken GnRH II) is widely distributed in vertebrates except for rodents, and has recently been implicated in the regulation of feeding behavior in goldfish. However, the influence of GnRH2 on feeding behavior in other fish has not yet been studied. In the present study, therefore, we investigated the role of GnRH2 in the regulation of feeding behavior in a zebrafish model, and examined its involvement in food intake after intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration. ICV injection of GnRH2 at 0.1 and 1 pmol/g body weight (BW) induced a marked decrease of food consumption in a dose-dependent manner during 30 min after feeding. Cumulative food intake was significantly decreased by ICV injection of GnRH2 at 1 pmol/g BW during the 30-min post-treatment observation period. The anorexigenic action of GnRH2 was completely blocked by treatment with the GnRH type I receptor antagonist Antide at 25 pmol/g BW. We also examined the effect of feeding condition on the expression level of the GnRH2 transcript in the hypothalamus. Levels of GnRH2 mRNA obtained from fish that had been provided excess food for 7 days were higher than those in fish that had been fed normally. These results suggest that, in zebrafish, GnRH2 acts as an anorexigenic factor, as is the case in goldfish. PMID:23087673

  3. INVESTIGATIONS INTO THE MECHANISM OF REDUCTION OF ETHANOL SLEEP BY THYROTROPIN - RELEASING HORMONE (TRH)1

    PubMed Central

    COTT, JERRY M.; BREESE, GEORGE R.; COOPER, BARRETT R.; BARLOW, T. STEVEN; PRANGE, ARTHUR J.

    2010-01-01

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), administered intraperitoneally, was found to antagonize ethanol-induced sleep and hypothermia in mice without affecting brain ethanol content. This reduction of the actions of ethanol was also apparent after oral or intracisternal administration of TRH. In addition, TRH reduced ethanol-induced sleep in rats, hamsters, gerbils and guinea pigs. Evidence that the pituitary-thyroid axis is not necessary for the effects of TRH was provided by observations that hypophysectomy did not reduce TRH antagonism of ethanol narcosis and findings that neither triiodothyronine nor thyrotropin mimicked its action. Certain analogs of TRH, which have little effect on the pituitary, were also found to antagonize ethanol-induced sleep and hypothermia. Pretreatment with the antiadrenergic drugs, α-methyltyrosine, phentolamine and propranolol did pot antagonize the ability of TRH to reduce sleep induced by ethanol. However, after intracisternal administration of atropine methyl nitrate, TRH no longer caused a significant reduction of sleep, even though TRH antagonism of the ethanol-induced hypothermia was still apparent. In contrast, central administration of other anticholinergic drugs, such as d-tubocurarine and hexamethonium, reduced ethanol-induced sleep and this effect was additive with TRH. Carbachol also reduced ethanol sleeping time and this effect was also blocked by atropine methyl nitrate. The antagonism of ethanol-induced sleep by dibutyryl cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate was significantly reduced but not blocked by atropine methyl nitrate. Results provide evidence that TRH has a direct extrapituitary action on brain and that both TRH and ethanol may interact with central cholinergic systems. PMID:177753

  4. Chronic exposure to hypergravity affects thyrotropin-releasing hormone levels in rat brainstem and cerebellum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daunton, N. G.; Tang, F.; Corcoran, M. L.; Fox, R. A.; Man, S. Y.

    1998-01-01

    In studies to determine the neurochemical mechanisms underlying adaptation to altered gravity we have investigated changes in neuropeptide levels in brainstem, cerebellum, hypothalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and cerebral cortex by radioimmunoassay. Fourteen days of hypergravity (hyperG) exposure resulted in significant increases in thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) content of brainstem and cerebellum, but no changes in levels of other neuropeptides (beta-endorphin, cholecystokinin, met-enkephalin, somatostatin, and substance P) examined in these areas were found, nor were TRH levels significantly changed in any other brain regions investigated. The increase in TRH in brainstem and cerebellum was not seen in animals exposed only to the rotational component of centrifugation, suggesting that this increase was elicited by the alteration in the gravitational environment. The only other neuropeptide affected by chronic hyperG exposure was met-enkephalin, which was significantly decreased in the cerebral cortex. However, this alteration in met-enkephalin was found in both hyperG and rotation control animals and thus may be due to the rotational rather than the hyperG component of centrifugation. Thus it does not appear as if there is a generalized neuropeptide response to chronic hyperG following 2 weeks of exposure. Rather, there is an increase only of TRH and that occurs only in areas of the brain known to be heavily involved with vestibular inputs and motor control (both voluntary and autonomic). These results suggest that TRH may play a role in adaptation to altered gravity as it does in adaptation to altered vestibular input following labyrinthectomy, and in cerebellar and vestibular control of locomotion, as seen in studies of ataxia.

  5. Elevated Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone in Human Pregnancy Increases the Risk of Postpartum Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Ilona S.; Glynn, Laura M.; Schetter, Christine Dunkel; Hobel, Calvin J.; Chicz-DeMet, Aleksandra; Sandman, Curt A.

    2009-01-01

    Context Postpartum depression (PPD) is common and has serious implications for the mother and her newborn. A possible link between placental corticotropin-releasing hormone (pCRH) and PPD incidence has been discussed, but there is a lack of empirical evidence. Objective To determine whether accelerated pCRH increases throughout pregnancy are associated with PPD symptoms. Design Pregnant women were recruited into this longitudinal cohort study. Blood samples were obtained at 15, 19, 25, 31 and 37 weeks gestational age (GA) for assessment of pCRH, cortisol and ACTH. Depressive symptoms were assessed with a standardized questionnaire at the last four pregnancy visits and postpartum. Setting Subjects were recruited from two Southern California Medical Centers, and visits were conducted in university research laboratories. Participants 100 adult women with a singleton pregnancy. Main Outcome Measure PPD symptoms were assessed 8.7 weeks (SD = 2.94 wks) after delivery with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Results Sixteen women developed PPD symptoms. At 25 weeks GA, pCRH was a strong predictor of PPD symptoms (R2 = .21, β = .46, p < .001), an effect that remained significant after controlling for prenatal depressive symptoms. No significant associations were found for cortisol and ACTH. Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analyses revealed that pCRH at 25 weeks GA is a useful diagnostic test (area under the curve = .78, p = .001). Sensitivity (.75) and specificity (.74) at the ideal cut-off point (56.86 pg/ml pCRH) were high. Growth curve analyses indicated that pCRH trajectories in women with PPD symptoms are significantly accelerated between 23 and 26 weeks GA. Conclusion There is a critical period in mid-pregnancy during which pCRH is a sensitive and specific early diagnostic test for PPD symptoms. If replicated, these results have implications for identification and treatment of pregnant women at risk of PPD. PMID:19188538

  6. Excitation of locus coeruleus noradrenergic neurons by thyrotropin-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Hitoshi; Nakahata, Yoshihisa; Eto, Kei; Nabekura, Junichi

    2009-12-01

    Locus coeruleus (LC) noradrenergic neurons are implicated in a variety of functions including the regulation of vigilance and the modulation of sensory processing. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) is an endogenous neuropeptide that induces a variety of behavioural changes including arousal and antinociception. In the present study, we explored whether the activity of LC noradrenergic neurons is modulated by TRH. Using current-clamp recording from isolated rat LC neurons, we found that TRH increased the firing rate of spontaneous action potentials. The TRH action was mimicked by TRH analogues including taltirelin and TRH-gly. In voltage-clamp recording at a holding potential of 50 mV, TRH produced an inward current associated with a decrease in the membrane K+ conductance. This current was inhibited by the TRH receptor antagonist chlordiazepoxide. Following inhibition of the pH-sensitive K+ conductance by extracellular acidification, the TRH response was fully inhibited. The TRH-induced current was also inhibited by the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U-73122, but not by the protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine nor by chelation of intracellular Ca2+ by BAPTA. The recovery from the facilitatory action of TRH on the spike frequency was markedly inhibited by a high concentration of wortmannin. These results suggest that TRH activates LC noradrenergic neurons by decreasing an acid-sensitive K+ conductance via PLC-mediated hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. The present findings demonstrate that TRH activates LC neurons and characterize the underlying signalling mechanisms. The action of TRH on LC neurons may influence a variety of CNS functions related to the noradrenergic system which include arousal and analgesia. PMID:19840999

  7. Characterization and validation of bovine gonadotripin releasing hormone receptor (GNRHR) polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Lirón, J P; Prando, A; Ripoli, M V; Rogberg-Muñoz, A; Posik, D M; Baldo, A; Peral-García, P; Giovambattista, G

    2011-12-01

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone and its receptor (GNRHR) play a critical role in sexual differentiation and reproduction. Available evidence shows a strong genetic component in the timing of puberty. In bovines, there are significant differences within and among beef breeds in the time when bulls reach puberty. Despite its economic importance, there are not many SNPs or genetic markers associated with this characteristic. The aims of the study were to identify DNA polymorphism in the bovine GNRHR by re-sequencing analysis, determine haplotype phases, and perform a population study in a selected tag SNP in six breeds. Eight SNPs were detected, including: one in the Upstream Regulatory Region (URR), five in the coding regions, and two in non-coding regions. This polymorphism level corresponds to one variant every 249.4bp and a global nucleotide diversity of 0.385. Two haplogroups comprising nine haplotypes and two linkage blocks were detected. Despite 5 tag SNPs were required to capture all variability, just one SNP allowed to define both haplogroups, and only two SNPs were needed to differentiate the most common haplotypes. An additional taq SNP was necessary to identify both URR variants. Allele-frequency analysis of a selected taq SNP among breeds showed a geographical cline. European Bos taurus breeds had lower frequencies of the C allele than B. indicus type cattle, while Creole cattle and Wagyu breeds had intermediate frequency. There was a significant correlation between frequency profile and timing of puberty among the studied breeds, which seems to suggest that genetic variation within bovine GNRHR gene could explain at least part of the reported variability. PMID:21030057

  8. Divergent evolution of two corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) genes in teleost fishes

    PubMed Central

    Grone, Brian P.; Maruska, Karen P.

    2015-01-01

    Genome duplication, thought to have happened twice early in vertebrate evolution and a third time in teleost fishes, gives rise to gene paralogs that can evolve subfunctions or neofunctions via sequence and regulatory changes. To explore the evolution and functions of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), we searched sequenced teleost genomes for CRH paralogs. Our phylogenetic and synteny analyses indicate that two CRH genes, crha and crhb, evolved via duplication of crh1 early in the teleost lineage. We examined the expression of crha and crhb in two teleost species from different orders: an African cichlid, Burton's mouthbrooder, (Astatotilapia burtoni; Order Perciformes) and zebrafish (Danio rerio; Order Cypriniformes). Furthermore, we compared expression of the teleost crha and crhb genes with the crh1 gene of an outgroup to the teleost clade: the spotted gar (Lepisosteus oculatus). In situ hybridization for crha and crhb mRNA in brains and eyes revealed distinct expression patterns for crha in different teleost species. In the cichlid, crha mRNA was found in the retina but not in the brain. In zebrafish, however, crha mRNA was not found in the retina, but was detected in the brain, restricted to the ventral hypothalamus. Spotted gar crh1 was found in the retina as well as the brain, suggesting that the ancestor of teleost fishes likely had a crh1 gene expressed in both retina and brain. Thus, genome duplication may have freed crha from constraints, allowing it to evolve distinct sequences, expression patterns, and likely unique functions in different lineages. PMID:26528116

  9. Information Transfer in Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone (GnRH) Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Kathryn L.; Perrett, Rebecca M.; Voliotis, Margaritis; Bowsher, Clive; Pope, George R.; Pham, Thanh; Caunt, Christopher J.; Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; McArdle, Craig A.

    2016-01-01

    Cell signaling pathways are noisy communication channels, and statistical measures derived from information theory can be used to quantify the information they transfer. Here we use single cell signaling measures to calculate mutual information as a measure of information transfer via gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptors (GnRHR) to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) or nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT). This revealed mutual information values <1 bit, implying that individual GnRH-responsive cells cannot unambiguously differentiate even two equally probable input concentrations. Addressing possible mechanisms for mitigation of information loss, we focused on the ERK pathway and developed a stochastic activation model incorporating negative feedback and constitutive activity. Model simulations revealed interplay between fast (min) and slow (min-h) negative feedback loops with maximal information transfer at intermediate feedback levels. Consistent with this, experiments revealed that reducing negative feedback (by expressing catalytically inactive ERK2) and increasing negative feedback (by Egr1-driven expression of dual-specificity phosphatase 5 (DUSP5)) both reduced information transfer from GnRHR to ERK. It was also reduced by blocking protein synthesis (to prevent GnRH from increasing DUSP expression) but did not differ for different GnRHRs that do or do not undergo rapid homologous desensitization. Thus, the first statistical measures of information transfer via these receptors reveals that individual cells are unreliable sensors of GnRH concentration and that this reliability is maximal at intermediate levels of ERK-mediated negative feedback but is not influenced by receptor desensitization. PMID:26644469

  10. Noradrenaline concentrations in the hypothalamus of anoestrus ewes following the ram-induced luteinizing hormone release.

    PubMed

    Fabre-Nys, Claude; Kendrick, Keith M

    2015-05-01

    Sheep are seasonal breeders, but exposure of anoestrus ewes to rams results in a rapid increase in luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion, eventually leading to surge in LH. Although LH secretion is known to be under the control of many neurotransmitters, noradrenaline (NA) is of particular importance for the LH surge in induced ovulators, although little is known about its role in LH secretion induced by males in spontaneous ovulators. To address this question, anoestrus ewes fitted with guide-tubes in the medial preoptic area (MPOA) or the ventromedial hypothalamus were subjected to microdialysis and blood sampling every 15 min for an hour before and 2 h after exposure to rams, and the concentrations of LH, monoamine and amino acid transmitters were measured. In ewes implanted in the posterior MPOA that responded to the ram by an increase in LH pulses, NA concentrations changed after exposure to the ram (P<0.018) and were higher at 15 (P<0.054) and 45 min (P<0.03) after male introduction than before. By contrast, no change in NA could be detected in ewes implanted in the same region, but not responding to the ram, or in those showing increased LH pulsatility, but implanted in the anterior MPOA or in the ventromedial hypothalamus. No changes were observed in other neurotransmitters or when the ewes were exposed to male odour alone. These results suggest that NA release in the posterior MPOA is selectively involved in the triggering of LH secretion by rams in anoestrus ewes. PMID:25839177

  11. Influence of thyrotropin-releasing hormone and catecholaminergic interactions on CNS ethanol sensitivity.

    PubMed

    French, T A; Masserano, J M; Weiner, N

    1993-02-01

    The role of catecholamine neuronal systems in mediating the analeptic and thermogenic effects of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) was examined in long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice. TRH [0.1 to 40 micrograms, intracerebroventricularly (icv)] was associated with a reduction in the sleep times of LS mice, but no dose of TRH had any effect on sleep times of SS mice. However, TRH (20 micrograms, icv) produced a 1.0 degree to 1.5 degrees C attenuation of the ethanol-induced hypothermia in both LS and SS mice. TRH did not change the rate of ethanol elimination in either line of mice, suggesting that the reduction in LS sleep times and attenuation of LS and SS hypothermia were due to decreased CNS ethanol sensitivity rather than an increase in the rate of ethanol metabolism. TRH (20 micrograms, icv) given alone produced an activation of central and peripheral catecholamine systems in LS, but not SS mice, as reflected by an increase in the in vivo tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity in the brain and adrenal gland. TRH, given with ethanol, prevented or attenuated ethanol-induced decreases in the brain and adrenal gland in vivo TH activity in LS mice but not SS mice. Thus, there was an association between the ability of TRH to produce an activation of catecholamine neuronal systems (increased rate of catecholamine biosynthesis) and the analeptic action of TRH to reduce the CNS depressant effects of ethanol (decreased sleep times).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8095774

  12. Effect of rovatirelin, a novel thyrotropin-releasing hormone analog, on the central noradrenergic system.

    PubMed

    Ijiro, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Kayo; Ogata, Masanori; Inada, Hiroyuki; Kiguchi, Sumiyoshi; Maruyama, Kazuyasu; Nabekura, Junichi; Kobayashi, Mamoru; Ishibashi, Hitoshi

    2015-08-15

    Rovatirelin ([1-[-[(4S,5S)-(5-methyl-2-oxo oxazolidin-4-yl) carbonyl]-3-(thiazol-4-yl)-l-alanyl]-(2R)-2-methylpyrrolidine) is a novel synthetic agent that mimics the actions of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH). The aim of this study was to investigate the electrophysiological and pharmacological effects of rovatirelin on the central noradrenergic system and to compare the results with those of another TRH mimetic agent, taltirelin, which is approved for the treatment of spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) in Japan. Rovatirelin binds to the human TRH receptor with higher affinity (Ki=702nM) than taltirelin (Ki=3877nM). Rovatirelin increased the spontaneous firing of action potentials in the acutely isolated noradrenergic neurons of rat locus coeruleus (LC). The facilitatory action of rovatirelin on the firing rate in the LC neurons was inhibited by the TRH receptor antagonist, chlordiazepoxide. Reduction of the extracellular pH increased the spontaneous firing of LC neurons and rovatirelin failed to increase the firing frequency further, indicating an involvement of acid-sensitive K+ channels in the rovatirelin action. In in vivo studies, oral administration of rovatirelin increased both c-Fos expression in the LC and extracellular levels of noradrenaline (NA) in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of rats. Furthermore, rovatirelin increased locomotor activity. The increase in NA level and locomotor activity by rovatirelin was more potent and longer acting than those by taltirelin. These results indicate that rovatirelin exerts a central nervous system (CNS)-mediated action through the central noradrenergic system, which is more potent than taltirelin. Thus, rovatirelin may have an orally effective therapeutic potential in patients with SCD. PMID:26142830

  13. Corticotropin-releasing hormone family evolution: five ancestral genes remain in some lineages.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, João C R; Bergqvist, Christina A; Félix, Rute C; Larhammar, Dan

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of the peptide family consisting of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and the three urocortins (UCN1-3) has been puzzling due to uneven evolutionary rates. Distinct gene duplication scenarios have been proposed in relation to the two basal rounds of vertebrate genome doubling (2R) and the teleost fish-specific genome doubling (3R). By analyses of sequences and chromosomal regions, including many neighboring gene families, we show here that the vertebrate progenitor had two peptide genes that served as the founders of separate subfamilies. Then, 2R resulted in a total of five members: one subfamily consists of CRH1, CRH2, and UCN1. The other subfamily contains UCN2 and UCN3. All five peptide genes are present in the slowly evolving genomes of the coelacanth Latimeria chalumnae (a lobe-finned fish), the spotted gar Lepisosteus oculatus (a basal ray-finned fish), and the elephant shark Callorhinchus milii (a cartilaginous fish). The CRH2 gene has been lost independently in placental mammals and in teleost fish, but is present in birds (except chicken), anole lizard, and the nonplacental mammals platypus and opossum. Teleost 3R resulted in an additional surviving duplicate only for crh1 in some teleosts including zebrafish (crh1a and crh1b). We have previously reported that the two vertebrate CRH/UCN receptors arose in 2R and that CRHR1 was duplicated in 3R. Thus, we can now conclude that this peptide-receptor system was quite complex in the ancestor of the jawed vertebrates with five CRH/UCN peptides and two receptors, and that crh and crhr1 were duplicated in the teleost fish tetraploidization. PMID:27220618

  14. Effects of an agonist of gonadotropin-releasing hormone on ovarian follicles in cattle.

    PubMed

    Macmillan, K L; Thatcher, W W

    1991-12-01

    Three experiments were conducted to examine effects of Buserelin, a potent agonist of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, on characteristics of ovarian follicles in cycling cows and heifers. In experiment 1, heifers were injected once with 10 micrograms Buserelin on Day 11, 12, or 13 of the estrous cycle (estrus = Day 0), or once with 20 micrograms of Buserelin on Day 12. Additionally, two groups were injected with a luteolytic dose of prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) on Day 13 preceded with or without a Buserelin injection (10 micrograms) on Day 12. A control group did not receive a Buserelin injection. Ovaries were recovered and weighed after animals were slaughtered on Day 15. Follicle diameters were measured with calipers. Follicles for all experiments were classified as small (class 1: 3-5 mm diameter), medium (class 2: 6-9 mm), or large (class 3: greater than 9 mm). Heifers receiving only Buserelin had an increased number of medium-sized follicles compared to controls. Buserelin injection administered 24 h before PGF2 alpha reduced the decline in the average weight of the ovaries containing the corpus luteum (7.8 g for Buserelin before PGF2 alpha vs. 6.7 g for no Buserelin before PGF2 alpha). Buserelin pretreatment appeared to delay or prevent complete luteolysis by the injected PGF2 alpha. In experiment 2, 0, or 10 micrograms Buserelin was injected on Day 12 and follicle development was monitored by ultrasonography in situ from Day 12 to estrus. Follicles also were classified as clear or cloudy; cloudy was associated with flocculent material in the follicular fluid or with an indistinct follicular wall.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1805991

  15. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurosecretory system of the jerboa (Jaculus orientalis) and its seasonal variations.

    PubMed

    El Ouezzani, S; Tramu, G; Magoul, R

    2000-12-01

    The distribution of cells expressing gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) immunoreactivity was examined in the brain of adult jerboa during two distinct periods of the reproductive cycle. During spring-summer, when the jerboa is sexually active, a high density of cell bodies and fibres immunoreactive (IR) for GnRH was observed at the level of separation of the frontal lobes, in the medial septal nucleus (MS) and in the diagonal band of Broca (DBB), in the preoptic area (POA), in the organum vasculosum laminae terminalis (OVLT), in the retrochiasmatic area and hypothalamus. In autumn, when the jerboa is sexually inactive, GnRH-immunoreactivity was less intense than during spring-summer. In the POA, we noted a 55% decrease in the number of GnRH containing cells with no change in cell numbers in the MS-DBB. Furthermore, a lower density of GnRH immunopositive axon fibres is observed in all the previously mentioned structures and the immunoreaction intensity was very weak particularly within the median eminence and OVLT. Independently of the season, the GnRH immunoreactivity within neurones and fibres was similar in jerboas living in captivity and in jerboas living in their natural biotope. The effects of photoperiod on the density of POA-GnRH and arcuate nucleus beta-endorphin-containing cells were studied in jerboas maintained in long day [(LD) 16-h light, 8-h dark] and short day [(SD) 8-h light, 16-h dark] for 8 weeks. In the POA, the GnRH-IR cell number was not significantly altered by the photoperiod. Similarly, in the mediobasal hypothalamus, the number of beta-endorphin-IR neurones was not affected by such a parameter. Consequently, the GnRH seasonal variations cannot be correlated to changes in the photoperiod alone. PMID:11106979

  16. Inhibition of thyrotropin response to TSH-releasing hormone by thyroxine in hypothyroid rats

    SciTech Connect

    Boado, R.J.; Zaninovich, A.A.; Ulloa, E.R.; Fernandez Pol, J.A.

    1985-05-01

    Pharmacological amounts of throxine (T4) can inhibit the thyrotropin (TSH) response to TSH-releasing hormone (TRH) before its conversion to triiodothyronine (T3) in the hypophysis of euthyroid rate. The present work tested physiological doses of T4 in hypothyroid rats. Rats were treated with iopanoic acid (IOP) 5 mg/100 g BW 24, 12 and 1.5 hours preceding the study, to prevent intrapituitary conversion of T4 to T3. Nonradioactive T4 was injected iv at time 0. At 20 min a 1 ..mu..g/100 g BW dose of TRH was injected iv. Blood samples were drawn at times 0, 20, and 30 min for determination by radioimmunoassay of plasma T4, T3, and TSH. In untreated rats basal TSH was 1450 +- 200 (SEM) ..mu..U/ml. At 20 min it was 105 +- 12% the basal value and at 30 min (10 min post-TRH) plasma TSH rose to 165 +- 14%. In T4-treated rats, those injected with IOP or with the vehicle alone both had the TSH response suppressed. IOP reduced intrapitutiary T3 from 4.6 +- 2.4 to 0.5 +- 0.2 fmol/min/gland. Thirty min. following the iv injection of 150 ..mu..Ci of double-labeled /sup 125/I-T4, the in vitro cytoplasmic radioactivity in control rats was 1.3 +- 0.13 x 10-/sup 2/% of the injected dose (75% T4, 17% T3), while in nuclei it was 4.2 +- 3.6 x 10-/sup 3/% (5l% T4, 28% T3). The injection of 25 ..mu..g of nonradioactive T4 decreased /sup 125/I-T4 in cytoplasm with no changes in nuclei. These findings suggest an intrinsic capacity of T4 to control TRH stimulation of TSH through binding to cytoplasmic receptors.

  17. Brain receptors for thyrotropin releasing hormone in morphine tolerant-dependent rats

    SciTech Connect

    Bhargava, H.N.; Das, S.

    1986-03-01

    The effect of chronic treatment of rats with morphine and its subsequent withdrawal on the brain receptors for thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) labeled with /sup 3/H-(3MeHis/sup 2/)TRH (MeTRH). Male Sprague Dawley rats were implanted with 4 morphine pellets (each containing 75 mg morphine base) during a 3-day period. Placebo pellet implanted rats served as controls. Both tolerance to and dependence on morphine developed as a result of this procedure. For characterization of brain TRH receptors, the animals were sacrificed 72 h after the implantation of first pellet. In another set of animals the pellets were removed and were sacrificed 24 h later. The binding of /sup 3/H-MeTRH to membranes prepared from brain without the cerebellum was determined. /sup 3/H-MeTRH bound to brain membranes prepared from placebo pellet implanted rats at a single high affinity site with a B/sub max/ value of 33.50 +/- 0.97 fmol/mg protein and a K/sub d/ of 5.18 +/- 0.21 nM. Implantation of morphine pellets did not alter the B/sub max/ value of /sup 3/H-MeTRH but decreased the K/sub d/ value significantly. Abrupt or naloxone precipitated withdrawal of morphine did not alter B/sub max/ or the K/sub d/ values. The binding of /sup 3/H-MeTRH to brain areas was also determined. The results suggest that the development of tolerance to morphine is associated with enhanced sensitivity of brain TRH receptors, however abrupt withdrawal of morphine does not change the characteristics of brain TRH receptors.

  18. Synthesis, Receptor Binding, and CNS Pharmacological Studies of New Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone (TRH) Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Monga, Vikramdeep; Meena, Chhuttan L.; Rajput, Satyendra; Pawar, Chandrashekhar; Sharma, Shyam S.; Lu, Xinping; Gershengorn, Marvin C.

    2012-01-01

    As part of our search for selective and CNS-active thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) analogues, we synthesized a set of 44 new analogues in which His and pGlu residues were modified or replaced. The analogues were evaluated as agonists at TRH-R1 and TRH-R2 in cells in vitro, and in vivo in mice for analeptic and anticonvulsant activities. Several analogues bound to TRH-R1 and TRH-R2 with good to moderate affinities, and are full agonists at both receptor subtypes. Specifically, analogue 21 a (R = CH3) exhibited binding affinities (Ki values) of 0.17 μM for TRH-R1 and 0.016 μM for TRH-R2; it is 10-fold less potent than TRH in binding to TRH-R1 and equipotent with TRH in binding to TRH-R2. Compound 21 a, the most selective agonist, activated TRH-R2 with a potency (EC50 value) of 0.0021 μM, but activated TRH-R1 at EC50 = 0.05 μM, and exhibited 24-fold selectivity for TRH-R2 over TRH-R1. The newly synthesized TRH analogues were also evaluated in vivo to assess their potencies in antagonism of barbiturate-induced sleeping time, and several analogues displayed potent analeptic activity. Specifically, analogues 21 a,b and 22 a,b decreased sleeping time by nearly 50 % more than TRH. These analogues also displayed potent anticonvulsant activity and provided significant protection against PTZ-induced seizures, but failed to provide any protection in MES-induced seizures at 10 μmol kg−1. The results of this study provide evidence that TRH analogues that show selectivity for TRH-R2 over TRH-R1 possess potent CNS activity. PMID:21302359

  19. Radioimmunoassay for 6-D-tryptophan analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone: measurement of serum levels after administration of long-acting microcapsule formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Mason-Garcia, M.; Vigh, S.; Comaru-Schally, A.M.; Redding, T.W.; Somogyvari-Vigh, A.; Horvath, J.; Schally, A.V.

    1985-03-01

    A sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay for (6-D-tryptophan)luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone ((D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH) was developed and used for following the rate of liberation of (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH from a long-acting delivery systems based on a microcapsule formulation. Rabbit antibodies were generated against (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH conjugated to bovine serum albumin with glutaraldehyde. Crossreactivity with LH-RH was less than 1%; there was no significant cross-reactivity with other peptides. The minimal detectable dose of (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH was 2 pg per tube. In tra- and interassay coefficients of variation were 8% and 10%, respectively. The radioimmunoassay was suitable for direct determination of (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH in serum, permitting the study of blood levels of the analog after single injections into normal men and after one-a-month administration of microcapsules to rats. In men, 90 min after subcutaneous injection of 250 ..mu..g of the peptide, serum (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH rose to 6-12 ng/ml. Luteinizing hormone was increased 90 min and 24 hr after the administration of the analog. Several batches of microcapsules were tested in rats and the rate of release of (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH was followed. The improved batch of microcapsules of (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH increased serum concentrations of the analog for 30 days or longer after intramuscular injection.

  20. Role of female sex hormones in neuronal nitric oxide release and metabolism in rat mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Minoves, Nuria; Balfagón, Gloria; Ferrer, Mercedes

    2002-09-01

    This study examines the effects of female sex hormones on the vasoconstrictor response to electrical field stimulation (EFS), as well as the modulation of this response by neuronal NO. For this purpose, segments of denuded superior mesenteric artery from ovariectomized (OvX) female Sprague-Dawley rats and from control rats (in oestrus phase) were used. EFS induced frequency-dependent contractions, which were greater in segments from OvX rats than in those from control rats. The NO synthase inhibitor N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester strengthened EFS-elicited contractions to a greater extent in arteries from OvX rats than in those from control rats. Similar results were observed with the preferential neuronal NO synthase inhibitor 7-nitroindazole. The sensorial neurotoxin capsaicin did not modify EFS-induced contractions in segments from either group. In noradrenaline-precontracted segments, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) induced concentration-dependent relaxation, which was greater in segments from control rats than in those from OvX rats. 8-Bromo-cGMP induced similar concentration-dependent relaxation in noradrenaline-precontracted segments from both OvX and control rats. Diethyldithiocarbamate, a superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibitor, reduced the relaxation induced by SNP in segments from both groups of rats. SOD, a superoxide anion scavenger, enhanced the relaxation induced by SNP in segments from OvX rats, but did not modify it in segments from control rats. EFS induced NO(-)(2) formation, which was greater in segments from OvX than in those from control rats, and pretreatment with tetrodotoxin, a blocker of nerve impulse propagation, abolished release in both cases. These results suggest that EFS induces greater neuronal NO release in mesenteric segments from OvX rats than in those from control rats and, although NO metabolism is also higher, the contribution of net neuronal NO in the vasomotor response to EFS is greater in segments from OvX rats than in those

  1. The thyrotropin-releasing hormone gene is regulated by thyroid hormone at the level of transcription in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sugrue, Michelle L; Vella, Kristen R; Morales, Crystal; Lopez, Marisol E; Hollenberg, Anthony N

    2010-02-01

    The expression of the TRH gene in the paraventricular nucleus (PVH) of the hypothalamus is required for the normal production of thyroid hormone (TH) in rodents and humans. In addition, the regulation of TRH mRNA expression by TH, specifically in the PVH, ensures tight control of the set point of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis. Although many studies have assumed that the regulation of TRH expression by TH is at the level of transcription, there is little data available to demonstrate this. We used two in vivo model systems to show this. In the first model system, we developed an in situ hybridization (ISH) assay directed against TRH heteronuclear RNA to measure TRH transcription directly in vivo. We show that in the euthyroid state, TRH transcription is present both in the PVH and anterior/lateral hypothalamus. In the hypothyroid state, transcription is activated in the PVH only and can be shut off within 5 h by TH. In the second model system, we employed transgenic mice that express the Cre recombinase under the control of the genomic region containing the TRH gene. Remarkably, TH regulates Cre expression in these mice in the PVH only. Taken together, these data affirm that TH regulates TRH at the level of transcription in the PVH only and that genomic elements surrounding the TRH gene mediate its regulation by T(3). Thus, it should be possible to identify the elements within the TRH locus that mediate its regulation by T(3) using in vivo approaches. PMID:20032051

  2. The effect of dietary monensin on th luteinizing hormone response of prepuberal heifers given a multiple gonadotropin-releasing hormone challenge.

    PubMed

    Randel, R D; Rhodes, R C

    1980-10-01

    Ten prepuberal Simmental X Brahman-Hereford heifers (average weight 208 +/- 4 kg) were randomly assigned to receive either 2.7 kg/head/day of ground milo containing 0 mg monensin sodium (C) or 2.7 kg/head/day of ground milo containing 200 mg monensin sodium (M). Both groups of animals (n = 5) received Coastal bermudagrass hay ad libitum throughout the trial. On day 21 of the feeding period all heifers were fitted with jugular cannulas. Immediately after cannulation, the heifers were injected IM with 100 microgram of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and blood was collected every 10 min for 4 hours. Four hours after the first GnRH challenge, a second 100-microgram GnRH injection was administered, and blood samples were collected at 10-min intervals for an additional 5 hours. Serum was stored at -20 C until radioimmunoassayed for luteinizing hormone (LH). The amount of LH released after each GnRH injection was greater in the heifers fed M than in the controls (P less than .05). Peak LH after the first GnRH challenge was greater (P less than .05) in heifers fed M than in controls. The area under th first GnRH induced LH curve tended (P less than .20) to be greater for the M group than for the controls. Peak LH concentration was greater in heifers fed M than in control heifers, as the duration (P less than .05) and area under the second GnRH-induced LH curve. In prepuberal heifers, dietary monensin appears to increase hypophyseal capability of releasing LH after a first and second GnRH challenge. PMID:7007307

  3. Protective effects of analogs of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone against x-radiation-induced testicular damage in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Schally, A.V.; Paz-Bouza, J.I.; Schlosser, J.V.; Karashima, T.; Debeljuk, L.; Gandle, B.; Sampson, M.

    1987-02-01

    Possible protective effects of the agonist (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH and antagonist N-Ac(D-Phe(pCl)/sup 1,2/,D-Trp/sup 3/,D-Arg/sup 6/,D-Ala/sup 10/)LH-RH against testicular damage caused by x-radiation were investigated in rats. Three months after being subjected to x-irradiation of the testes with 415 or 622 rads, control rats showed marked reduction in the weights of the testes and elevated levels of LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), indicating tubular damage. Histological studies demonstrated that, in testes of rats given 415 rads, most seminiferous tubules had only Sertoli cells and no germinal cells, and, in the group give 622 rads, the depression of spermatogenesis was even more marked. Rats pretreated for 50 days with LH-RH antagonist showed a complete recovery of testicular weights and spermatogenesis 3 months after 415 rads and showed partial recovery after 622 rads, and LH and FSH levels returned to normal in both of these groups. Three experiments were also carried out in which the rats were pretreated for 1-2 months with long-acting microcapsules of the agonist (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH. Some rats were then subjected to gonadal irradiation with 415 or 622 rads and allowed a recovery period of 2-4 months. On the basis of testicular weights, histology, and gonadotropin levels, it could be concluded that the agonist (D-Trp/sup 6/)LH-RH did not protect the rat testes exposed to 622 rads and, at most, only partially protected against 415 rads. These results suggest that pretreatment with LH-RH antagonists and possibly agonists, might decrease the testicular damage caused by radiation and accelerate the recovery of reproductive functions.

  4. Differential involvement of phosphoinositide 3-kinase in gonadotrophin-releasing hormone actions in gonadotrophs and somatotrophs of goldfish, Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, Joshua G; Stafford, James L; Yu, Yi; Chang, John P

    2011-08-01

    In goldfish, two endogenous gonadotrophin-releasing hormones (GnRHs) [salmon (s)GnRH and chicken (c)GnRH-II] control maturational gonadotrophin-II [lutenising hormone (LH)] and growth hormone (GH) secretion via Ca(2+)-dependent intracellular signalling pathways. We investigated the involvement of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) in GnRH-evoked LH and GH release and associated intracellular Ca(2+) increases ([Ca(2+)](i) ) in goldfish gonadotrophs and somatotrophs. Immunoreactive PI3K p85α, the predominant regulatory subunit for class IA PI3Ks, was detected in goldfish pituitary tissue extracts and both endogenous GnRH isoforms increased phosphorylation of PI3K p85α in excised pituitary fragments. sGnRH- and cGnRH-II-elicited LH release responses from primary cultures of pituitary cells and [Ca(2+)](i) increases in identified gonadotrophs were significantly reduced in the presence of PI3K inhibitors wortmannin (100 nm) and LY294002 (10 μm). Unexpectedly, wortmannin and LY294002 inhibited GnRH-evoked GH release but only attenuated the [Ca(2+)](i) response in identified somatotrophs to cGnRH-II, and not sGnRH. On the other hand, Ca(2+) ionophore-evoked LH and GH secretion remained unaltered in the presence of the PI3K inhibitors, suggesting that general decreases in the releasable hormone pool or sensitivity to [Ca(2+)](i) changes did not underlie the ability of wortmannin and LY294002 to reduce the actions of GnRH. These results provide the first evidence for the presence and involvement of PI3K in GnRH-induced LH and GH release in any primary pituitary cell system. In gonadotrophs, the inhibitory action of PI3K on both sGnRH and cGnRH-II involves the attenuation of their evoked [Ca(2+)](i); in contrast, GnRH isoform-specific effects occur in somatotrophs. PMID:21649760

  5. Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Receptor 2 Gene Variants in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Komuro, Hazuki; Sato, Naoko; Sasaki, Ayaka; Suzuki, Naoki; Kano, Michiko; Tanaka, Yukari; Yamaguchi-Kabata, Yumi; Kanazawa, Motoyori; Warita, Hitoshi; Aoki, Masashi; Fukudo, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Background Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) plays an important role in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and regulates the stress response through two CRH receptors (R1 and R2). Previously, we reported that a CRHR1 gene polymorphism (rs110402, rs242924, and rs7209436) and haplotypes were associated with IBS. However, the association between the CRHR2 gene and IBS was not investigated. We tested the hypothesis that genetic polymorphisms and haplotypes of CRHR2 are associated with IBS pathophysiology and negative emotion in IBS patients. Methods A total of 142 IBS patients and 142 healthy controls participated in this study. Seven single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the CRHR2 gene (rs4722999, rs3779250, rs2240403, rs2267710, rs2190242, rs2284217, and rs2284220) were genotyped. Subjects' psychological states were evaluated using the Perceived-Stress Scale, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Self-Rating Depression Scale. Results We found that rs4722999 and rs3779250, located in intronic region, were associated with IBS in terms of genotype frequency (rs4722999: P = 0.037; rs3779250: P = 0.017) and that the distribution of the major allele was significantly different between patients and controls. There was a significant group effect (controls vs. IBS), and a CRHR2 genotype effect was observed for three psychological scores, but the interaction was not significant. We found a haplotype of four SNPs (rs4722999, rs3779250, rs2240403, and rs2267710) and two SNPs (rs2284217 and rs2284220) in strong linkage disequilibrium (D′ > 0.90). We also found that haplotypes of the CRHR2 gene were significantly different between IBS patients and controls and that they were associated with negative emotion. Conclusion Our findings support the hypothesis that genetic polymorphisms and haplotypes of CRHR2 are related to IBS. In addition, we found associations between CRHR2 genotypes and haplotypes and negative emotion in IBS patients and controls

  6. Effects of treadmill running on brain activation and the corticotropin-releasing hormone system.

    PubMed

    Timofeeva, Elena; Huang, Qingling; Richard, Denis

    2003-06-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of treadmill running on the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), CRH receptor type 1 (CRH-R1) and CRH-binding protein (CRH-BP) in the brain of rats that were killed either at rest, immediately after 60 min of treadmill running, or 180 min following a 60-min session of intensive exercise. The expression of the neuronal activity marker c-FOS was also determined in the three conditions of this study. The levels of c-FOS mRNA immediately following running were high in the cortex, caudate-putamen, lateral septum, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, dorsal and medial thalamus, hypothalamus, pontine nuclei, locus coeruleus and hypoglossal nucleus. In most brain regions investigated, excluding the locus coeruleus and the cingulate cortex, c-FOS mRNA expression returned to control levels after 2 h of recovery. The highest concentration of cells co-expressing the protein Fos and CRH mRNA neurons was found in the parvocellular part of the paraventricular nucleus, which also expressed CRH heteronuclear RNA and CRH-R1 mRNA. The medial preoptic area (MPOA), the medial mammillary nucleus and the posterior hypothalamic as well as the somatosensory cortex, the medial geniculate nucleus, the reticulotegmental nucleus, and Barrington's nucleus also co-expressed Fos and CRH mRNA. The expression of CRH-BP gene was induced in the MPOA following running. In summary, the present study demonstrates that treadmill running leads to a strong expression of c-FOS mRNA that is widely distributed throughout the brain. c-FOS mRNA was found in structures of the somatosensory and somatomotor systems, indicating that these regions were activated during exercise. The pattern of distribution of c-FOS mRNA showed similarities with that triggered by neurogenic and systemic stresses. The present results also indicate that treadmill running can strongly activate the hypophysiotropic CRH system, which suggests, in agreement with the pattern of c

  7. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone in winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus): molecular characterization, distribution and effects of fasting.

    PubMed

    Tuziak, Sarah M; Volkoff, Hélène

    2013-04-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is primarily related to reproductive processes in vertebrates. However other physiological roles, including functions in food intake regulation and energy status, have been demonstrated for GnRH in animals. The ten amino acid active peptide is relatively conserved throughout chordates, more specifically in fish species. Teleosts generally have at least two variants of GnRH present in their genomes. GnRH2 (commonly termed chicken-GnRH) is common to all fish, whereas other prevalent forms include GnRH1 and/or GnRH3 (also known as salmon-GnRH). The mRNAs of all three forms were identified in winter flounder (Pseudopleuronectes americanus). Winter flounder GnRH1 appears to be ubiquitously and strongly expressed throughout the brain. GnRH2 mRNA is highly expressed in the optic tectum/thalamus. Finally, GnRH3 mRNA is expressed throughout the brain, but not in the pituitary, with apparent highest expression in the telencephalon/preoptic area. Flounder GnRH1 mRNA is found in most peripheral tissues examined, including the foregut, midgut and gonads. GnRH2 mRNA appears to be expressed throughout the periphery, with apparent highest transcript expression in male gonads. Finally, winter flounder GnRH3 transcript is found at low levels in the skin, heart, and gonads. The effect of fasting on the expression of each of the three isoforms was assessed. Fasting reduces GnRH2 and GnRH3 mRNA expression in the optic tectum/thalamus and hypothalamus, and telencephalon/preoptic area, respectively, compared with fed fish. GnRH1 mRNA expression does not appear to be altered by feeding status. GnRH mRNAs do not seem to regulate food intake peripherally through the gut based on our preliminary findings. Our preliminary results suggest that the GnRH system could play a central role in food intake regulation of winter flounder. PMID:23298570

  8. Kisspeptin depolarizes gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons through activation of TRPC-like cationic channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunguang; Roepke, Troy A; Kelly, Martin J; Rønnekleiv, Oline K

    2008-04-23

    Kisspeptin and its cognate receptor, GPR54, are critical for reproductive development and for the regulation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion. Although kisspeptin has been found to depolarize GnRH neurons, the underlying ionic mechanism has not been elucidated. Presently, we found that kisspeptin depolarized GnRH neurons in a concentration-dependent manner with a maximum depolarization of 22.6 +/- 0.6 mV and EC(50) of 2.8 +/- 0.2 nM. Under voltage-clamp conditions, kisspeptin induced an inward current of 18.2 +/- 1.6 pA (V(hold) = -60 mV) that reversed near -115 mV in GnRH neurons. The more negative reversal potential than E(K)(+) (-90 mV) was caused by the concurrent inhibition of barium-sensitive, inwardly rectifying (Kir) potassium channels and activation of sodium-dependent, nonselective cationic channels (NSCCs). Indeed, reducing extracellular Na(+) (to 5 mM) essentially eliminated the kisspeptin-induced inward current. The current-voltage relationships of the kisspeptin-activated NSCC currents exhibited double rectification with negative slope conductance below -40 mV in the majority of the cells. Pharmacological examination showed that the kisspeptin-induced inward currents were blocked by TRPC (canonical transient receptor potential) channel blockers 2-APB (2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate), flufenamic acid, SKF96365 (1-[beta-[3-(4-methoxyphenyl)propoxy]-4-methoxyphenethyl]-1H-imidazole hydrochloride), and Cd(2+), but not by lanthanum (100 microM). Furthermore, single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that TRPC1, TRPC3, TRPC4, TRPC5, TRPC6, and TRPC7 subunits were expressed in GnRH neurons. Therefore, it appears that kisspeptin depolarizes GnRH neurons through activating TRPC-like channels and, to a lesser extent, inhibition of Kir channels. These actions of kisspeptin contribute to the pronounced excitation of GnRH neurons that is critical for mammalian reproduction. PMID:18434521

  9. Maternal Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Levels during Pregnancy and Offspring Adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Gillman, Matthew W.; Rich-Edwards, Janet W.; Huh, Susanna; Majzoub, Joseph A.; Oken, Emily; Taveras, Elsie M.; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective Animal models suggest that fetal exposure to glucocorticoids can program adiposity, especially central adiposity, later in life. We examined associations of maternal corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) levels in the late 2nd trimester of pregnancy, a marker of fetal glucocorticoid exposure, with child adiposity at age 3 years. Research Methods and Procedures We analyzed data from 199 participants in Project Viva, a prospective cohort study of pregnant women and their children, At age 3 years, the main outcomes were age-sex-specific BMI z score and the sum of subscapular (SS) and triceps (TR) skinfold thicknesses to represent overall adiposity, and ratio of SS to TR (SS:TR) to represent central adiposity. Results Mean (standard deviation) maternal 2nd trimester log CRH was 4.94 (0.56) pg/mL. At age 3, mean (standard deviation) for BMI z score was 0.52 (1.02); for SS + TR, 16.51 (3.94) mm; and for SS:TR, 0.67 (0.17). Log CRH was mildly inversely correlated with birth weight (r = −0.08), chiefly because of its association with length of gestation (r = −0.21) rather than fetal growth (r = −0.004). After adjustment for sociodemographic factors, maternal smoking, BMI, and gestational weight gain, fetal growth, length of gestation, breastfeeding duration, and (for SS:TR only) child’s 3-year BMI, each increment of 1 unit of log CRH was associated with a reduction in BMI z score [−0.43; 95% confidence interval (CI), −0.73, −0.14; p = 0.004] and possible reduction in SS + TR (−1.10; 95% CI, −2.33, 0.14; p = 0.08). In contrast, log CRH was associated with higher SS:TR (0.07; 95% CI, 0.02, 0.13; p = 0.007). Discussion Fetal exposure to glucocorticoids, although associated with an overall decrease in body size, may cause an increase in central adiposity. PMID:17030976

  10. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone accelerates fetal mouse lung ultrastructural maturation via stimulation of extra thyroidal pathway.

    PubMed

    Ansari, M A; Demello, D E; Polk, D H; Devaskar, U P

    1997-11-01

    Maternal administration of TSH-releasing hormone (TRH) in the euthyroid mouse accelerates fetal lung ultrastructural maturation. However, the mechanism(s) of TRH in fetal lung development remains unclear; it could be due to its neuroendocrine and/or neurotransmitter effects. Although the neuroendocrine effect of TRH is mediated via stimulation of the fetal pituitary-thyroid axis, the neurotransmitter effect is mediated via stimulation of fetal autonomic nervous system activity. In the hyt/hyt mouse there is a point mutation in the beta subunit of the TSH receptor in the thyroid gland of the Balb-c mouse. In these mice TSH does not bind to its receptors, leading ultimately to the development of primary hypothyroidism, which is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. A maturational delay in the lung ultrastructure of the hyt/hyt mouse fetus has been observed. This investigation was undertaken to study the effect of maternal TRH treatment on lung ultrastructural maturation in the hyt/hyt mouse fetus. If the effect of TRH is mediated via stimulation of fetal pituitary-thyroid axis, TRH treatment should not enhance lung maturity in the hyt/hyt fetus and vice versa. Adult hyt/hyt mice made euthyroid by triiodothyronine supplementation were mated to carry hyt/hyt pups. Saline or TRH (0.4 or 0.6 mg/kg/dose) was administered to the mother (i.p.) on d 16 and 17 (b.i.d.) and on d 18 of pregnancy 1 h before killing (term, approximately 20 d). The fetal lung electron micrographs were subjected to ultrastructural morphometric analysis of the number of lamellar bodies and glycogen/nuclear ratio in type II cells, and the alveolar/parenchymal ratio by Chalkley point counting with an interactive computerized image analyzer (Optimas, Bioscan). Fetal lungs exposed to the lower dose of TRH (n = 7) showed no significant difference in their ultrastructural maturation when compared with saline-treated controls (n = 5). However, fetal lungs exposed to a higher dose of TRH (n = 6

  11. Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone Agonist Overuse: Urologists’ Response to Reimbursement and Characteristics Associated with Persistent Overuse

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Shellie D.; Nielsen, Matthew E.; Carpenter, William R.; Jackson, George L.; Wheeler, Stephanie B.; Liu, Huan; Weinberger, Morris

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Medicare reimbursement cuts have been associated with declining Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone (GnRH) agonist overuse in localized prostate cancer. Medical school affiliation and foreign training have been associated with persistent overuse. However, physician-level prescribing changes and the practice type of persistent overusers have not been examined. We sought to describe physician-level changes in GnRH agonist overuse and test the association of time in practice and solo practice type with GnRH agonist overuse. METHODS We matched American Medical Association physician data for 2,138 urologists to SEER–Medicare data for 12,943 men diagnosed with early stage and lower grade adenocarcinoma of the prostate between 2000 and 2007. We conducted a population-based, retrospective study using multi-level modeling to control for patient and provider characteristics. RESULTS Three distinct patterns of GnRH agonist overuse were observed. Urologists’ time in practice was not associated with GnRH agonist overuse (OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.75–1.05).However, solo practice type (OR 1.65; 95% CI 1.34–2.02), medical school affiliation (OR 0.65; 95% CI 0.55–0.77), and patient race were. Compared to non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks (OR 1.76; 95% CI 1.37–2.27), Hispanics (OR 1.41; 95% CI 1.12–1.79) and men of “other” race (OR 1.44; 95% CI 1.04–1.99) had greater odds of receiving unnecessary GnRH agonists. CONCLUSIONS GnRH agonist overuse remains high among some urologists who may be professionally isolated and difficult to reach. These urologists treat more vulnerable populations, which may contribute to health disparities in prostate cancer treatment quality. Nonetheless, these findings provide guidance to develop interventions to address overuse in prostate cancer. PMID:25849354

  12. Total Androgen Blockade Versus a Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone Agonist Alone in Men With High-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Nanda, Akash; Moran, Brian J.; Braccioforte, Michelle H.; Dosoretz, Daniel; Salenius, Sharon; Katin, Michael; Ross, Rudi; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To assess whether short-course total androgen blockade vs. a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist alone affects the risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) in men with localized but high-risk disease treated with radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort comprised 628 men with T1-T4, N0, M0 prostate cancer with high-risk disease (prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL, Gleason score >=8, or clinical category >=T3) treated with 45 Gy of external beam radiotherapy followed by a brachytherapy boost in addition to receiving a median of 4.3 (interquartile range [IQR], 3.6-6.4) months of hormonal blockade with an LHRH agonist plus an antiandrogen or monotherapy with an LHRH agonist. Fine and Gray's multivariable regression analysis was used to determine whether combination androgen suppression therapy (AST) vs. monotherapy affected the risk of PCSM, adjusting for treatment year, duration of AST, age, and known prognostic factors. Results: After a median follow-up of 4.9 (IQR, 3.5-6.5) years, men receiving combination AST had a lower risk of PCSM than those treated with monotherapy (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 0.18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.04-0.90; p = 0.04). An increasing prostate-specific antigen level (AHR, 2.70; 95% CI, 1.64-4.45; p < 0.001) and clinical category T3/4 disease (AHR, 29.6; 95% CI, 2.88-303.5; p = 0.004) were also associated with an increased risk of PCSM. Conclusions: In men with localized but high-risk prostate cancer treated with external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy, short-course AST with an LHRH agonist plus an antiandrogen is associated with a decreased risk of PCSM when compared with monotherapy with an LHRH agonist.

  13. Suppression of growth hormone (GH) secretion by a selective GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) antagonist. Direct evidence for involvement of endogenous GHRH in the generation of GH pulses.

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, C A; Friberg, R D; Barkan, A L

    1993-01-01

    To study the potential involvement of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) in the generation of growth hormone (GH) pulses in humans we have used a competitive antagonist to the GHRH receptor, (N-Ac-Tyr1,D-Arg2)GHRH(1-29)NH2(GHRH-Ant). Six healthy young men were given a bolus injection of GHRH-Ant 400 micrograms/kg body wt or vehicle at 2200 h and nocturnal GH concentrations were assessed by every 10-min blood sampling until 0800 h. Integrated total and pulsatile GH secretion were suppressed during GHRH-Ant treatment by 40 +/- 6 (SE) % and 75 +/- 5%, respectively. GHRH-Ant suppressed maximum (7.6 +/- 2.2 vs 1.8 +/- 0.5 micrograms/liter; P < 0.001) and mean (3.3 +/- 1.0 vs 1.1 +/- 0.2 micrograms/liter; P = 0.02) GH pulse amplitudes. There was no change in integrated nonpulsatile GH levels, pulse frequency, or interpulse GH concentration. GHRH-Ant 400 micrograms/kg also suppressed the GH responses to intravenous boluses of GHRH 0.33 micrograms/kg given 1, 6, 12, and 24 h later by 95, 81, 59, and 4%, respectively. In five healthy men, the responses to 10-fold larger GHRH boluses (3.3 micrograms/kg) were suppressed by 82 and 0%, 1 and 6 h after GHRH-Ant 400 micrograms/kg, respectively. These studies provide the first direct evidence that endogenous GHRH participates in the generation of spontaneous GH pulses in humans. PMID:8349808

  14. Lateral hypothalamic orexin and melanin-concentrating hormone neurons provide direct input to gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in the human.

    PubMed

    Skrapits, Katalin; Kanti, Vivien; Savanyú, Zsófia; Maurnyi, Csilla; Szenci, Ottó; Horváth, András; Borsay, Beáta Á; Herczeg, László; Liposits, Zsolt; Hrabovszky, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Hypophysiotropic projections of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-synthesizing neurons form the final common output way of the hypothalamus in the neuroendocrine control of reproduction. Several peptidergic neuronal systems of the medial hypothalamus innervate human GnRH cells and mediate crucially important hormonal and metabolic signals to the reproductive axis, whereas much less is known about the contribution of the lateral hypothalamic area to the afferent control of human GnRH neurons. Orexin (ORX)- and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-synthesizing neurons of this region have been implicated in diverse behavioral and autonomic processes, including sleep and wakefulness, feeding and other functions. In the present immunohistochemical study, we addressed the anatomical connectivity of these neurons to human GnRH cells in post-mortem hypothalamic samples obtained from autopsies. We found that 38.9 ± 10.3% and 17.7 ± 3.3% of GnRH-immunoreactive (IR) perikarya in the infundibular nucleus of human male subjects received ORX-IR and MCH-IR contacts, respectively. On average, each 1 mm segment of GnRH dendrites received 7.3 ± 1.1 ORX-IR and 3.7 ± 0.5 MCH-IR axo-dendritic appositions. Overall, the axo-dendritic contacts dominated over the axo-somatic contacts and represented 80.5 ± 6.4% of ORX-IR and 76.7 ± 4.6% of MCH-IR inputs to GnRH cells. Based on functional evidence from studies of laboratory animals, the direct axo-somatic and axo-dendritic input from ORX and MCH neurons to the human GnRH neuronal system may convey critical metabolic and other homeostatic signals to the reproducive axis. In this study, we also report the generation and characterization of new antibodies for immunohistochemical detection of GnRH neurons in histological sections. PMID:26388735

  15. Lateral hypothalamic orexin and melanin-concentrating hormone neurons provide direct input to gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in the human

    PubMed Central

    Skrapits, Katalin; Kanti, Vivien; Savanyú, Zsófia; Maurnyi, Csilla; Szenci, Ottó; Horváth, András; Borsay, Beáta Á.; Herczeg, László; Liposits, Zsolt; Hrabovszky, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Hypophysiotropic projections of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-synthesizing neurons form the final common output way of the hypothalamus in the neuroendocrine control of reproduction. Several peptidergic neuronal systems of the medial hypothalamus innervate human GnRH cells and mediate crucially important hormonal and metabolic signals to the reproductive axis, whereas much less is known about the contribution of the lateral hypothalamic area to the afferent control of human GnRH neurons. Orexin (ORX)- and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-synthesizing neurons of this region have been implicated in diverse behavioral and autonomic processes, including sleep and wakefulness, feeding and other functions. In the present immunohistochemical study, we addressed the anatomical connectivity of these neurons to human GnRH cells in post-mortem hypothalamic samples obtained from autopsies. We found that 38.9 ± 10.3% and 17.7 ± 3.3% of GnRH-immunoreactive (IR) perikarya in the infundibular nucleus of human male subjects received ORX-IR and MCH-IR contacts, respectively. On average, each 1 mm segment of GnRH dendrites received 7.3 ± 1.1 ORX-IR and 3.7 ± 0.5 MCH-IR axo-dendritic appositions. Overall, the axo-dendritic contacts dominated over the axo-somatic contacts and represented 80.5 ± 6.4% of ORX-IR and 76.7 ± 4.6% of MCH-IR inputs to GnRH cells. Based on functional evidence from studies of laboratory animals, the direct axo-somatic and axo-dendritic input from ORX and MCH neurons to the human GnRH neuronal system may convey critical metabolic and other homeostatic signals to the reproducive axis. In this study, we also report the generation and characterization of new antibodies for immunohistochemical detection of GnRH neurons in histological sections. PMID:26388735

  16. Efficacy of corifollitropin alfa followed by recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone in a gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist protocol for Korean women undergoing assisted reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyo Young; Lee, Min Young; Jeong, Hyo Young; Rho, Yong Sook; Song, Sang Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist protocol using corifollitropin alfa in women undergoing assisted reproduction. Methods Six hundred and eighty-six in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF)/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) cycles were analyzed. In 113 cycles, folliculogenesis was induced with corifollitropin alfa and recombinant follicle stimulating hormone (rFSH), and premature luteinizing hormone (LH) surges were prevented with a GnRH antagonist. In the control group (573 cycles), premature LH surges were prevented with GnRH agonist injection from the midluteal phase of the preceding cycle, and ovarian stimulation was started with rFSH. The treatment duration, quality of oocytes and embryos, number of embryo transfer (ET) cancelled cycles, risk of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), and the chemical pregnancy rate were evaluated in the two ovarian stimulation protocols. Results There were no significant differences in age and infertility factors between treatment groups. The treatment duration was shorter in the corifollitropin alfa group than in the control group. Although not statistically significant, the mean numbers of matured (86.8% vs. 85.1%) and fertilized oocytes (84.2% vs. 83.1%), good embryos (62.4% vs. 60.3%), and chemical pregnancy rates (47.2% vs. 46.8%) were slightly higher in the corifollitropin alfa group than in the control group. In contrast, rates of ET cancelled cycles and the OHSS risk were slightly lower in the corifollitropin alfa group (6.2% and 2.7%) than in the control group (8.2% and 3.5%), although these differences were also not statistically significant. Conclusion Although no significant differences were observed, the use of corifollitropin alfa seems to offer some advantages to patients because of its short treatment duration, safety, lower ET cancellation rate and reduced risk of OHSS. PMID:26161335

  17. Hormonal induction of spawning in 4 species of frogs by coinjection with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist and a dopamine antagonist

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background It is well known that many anurans do not reproduce easily in captivity. Some methods are based on administration of mammalian hormones such as human chorionic gonadotropin, which are not effective in many frogs. There is a need for simple, cost-effective alternative techniques to induce spawning. Methods Our new method is based on the injection of a combination of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist and a dopamine antagonist. We have named this formulation AMPHIPLEX, which is derived from the combination of the words amphibian and amplexus. This name refers to the specific reproductive behavior of frogs when the male mounts and clasps the female to induce ovulation and to fertilize the eggs as they are laid. Results We describe the use of the method and demonstrate its applicability for captive breeding in 3 different anuran families. We tested several combinations of GnRH agonists with dopamine antagonists using Lithobates pipiens. The combination of des-Gly10, D-Ala6, Pro-LHRH (0.4 microrams/g body weight) and metoclopramide (10 micrograms/g BWt. MET) was most effective. It was used in-season, after short-term captivity and in frogs artificially hibernated under laboratory conditions. The AMPHIPLEX method was also effective in 3 Argentinian frogs, Ceratophrys ornata, Ceratophrys cranwelli and Odontophrynus americanus. Conclusion Our approach offers some advantages over other hormonally-based techniques. Both sexes are injected only once and at the same time, reducing handling stress. AMPHIPLEX is a new reproductive management tool for captive breeding in Anura. PMID:20398399

  18. Polymorphisms of the porcine cathepsins, growth hormone-releasing hormone and leptin receptor genes and their association with meat quality traits in Ukrainian Large White breed.

    PubMed

    Balatsky, Viktor; Bankovska, Irina; Pena, Ramona N; Saienko, Artem; Buslyk, Tetyana; Korinnyi, Sergii; Doran, Olena

    2016-06-01

    Cathepsins, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) and leptin receptor (LEPR) genes have been receiving increasing attention as potential markers for meat quality and pig performance traits. This study investigated the allele variants in four cathepsin genes (CTSB, CTSK, CTSL, CTSS), GHRH and LEPR in pure-bred Ukrainian Large White pigs and evaluated effects of the allele variants on meat quality characteristics. The study was conducted on 72 pigs. Genotyping was performed using PCR-RFLP technique. Meat quality characteristics analysed were intramuscular fat content, tenderness, total water content, ultimate pH, crude protein and ashes. A medium level of heterozygosity values was established for GHRH and LEPR genes which corresponded to very high levels of informativeness indexes. Cathepsins CTSL, CTSB and CTSK had a low level of heterozygosity, and CTSS did not segregate in this breed. Association studies established that intramuscular fat content and tenderness were affected by the allele variance in GHRH and LEPR but not by CTSB and CTSL genes. The GHRH results could be particularly relevant for the production of lean prime cuts as the A allele is associated with both, a lower meat fat content and better tenderness values, which are two attributes highly regarded by consumers. Results of this study suggest that selective breeding towards GHRH/AA genotype would be particularly useful for improving meat quality characteristics in the production systems involving lean Large White lines, which typically have less than 2 % intramuscular fat content. PMID:27075656

  19. Identification of major urinary metabolites of nafarelin acetate, a potent agonist of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone, in the rhesus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, R.L.; Chaplin, M.D.

    1985-09-01

    Nafarelin acetate (less than Glu-His-Trp-Ser-Tyr-3-(2-naphthyl)-D-Ala-Leu-Arg-Pro-Gly-NH2) is a potent agonistic analogue of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. After a single iv administration of nafarelin acetate (with UC label at C-3 of 3-(2-naphthyl)-D-Ala) to female rhesus monkeys, about 80% of the radioactivity was eliminated in urine. Five major radioactive urinary metabolites were isolated and purified by reversed phase HPLC. Four of these metabolites, identified by amino acid analysis, were short peptides: the 5-10-hexapeptide amide, the 6-10-pentapeptide amide, the 5-7-tripeptide, and the 6-7-dipeptide. The fifth metabolite, which accounted for about 15% of the radioactivity administered, was shown by NMR and mass spectrometry to be 2-naphthylacetic acid. A possible pathway of its formation is by oxidative deamination of 3-(2-napthyl)-D-Ala to give the corresponding alpha-keto acid, followed by oxidative decarboxylation of the alpha-keto acid. These five metabolites together accounted for about 70% of the radioactivity recovered in the urine of rhesus monkeys, or more than half of the radioactivity in the administered dose. Nafarelin acetate was also present in small amounts. Several of these metabolites were also present in plasma of the rhesus monkey.

  20. Developments in human growth hormone preparations: sustained-release, prolonged half-life, novel injection devices, and alternative delivery routes

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yunpeng; Xu, Mingxin; Yuan, Minglu; Liu, Zhenguo; Yuan, Weien

    2014-01-01

    Since the availability of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) enabled the application of human growth hormone both in clinical and research use in the 1980s, millions of patients were prescribed a daily injection of rhGH, but noncompliance rates were high. To address the problem of noncompliance, numerous studies have been carried out, involving: sustained-release preparations, prolonged half-life derivatives, new injectors that cause less pain, and other noninvasive delivery methods such as intranasal, pulmonary and transdermal deliveries. Some accomplishments have been made and launched already, such as the Nutropin Depot® microsphere and injectors (Zomajet®, Serojet®, and NordiFlex®). Here, we provide a review of the different technologies and illustrate the key points of these studies to achieve an improved rhGH product. PMID:25114523

  1. Juvenile hormone analog enhances calling behavior, mating success, and quantity of volatiles released by Anastrepha obliqua (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    PubMed

    Chacón-Benavente, Roxana; López-Guillen, Guillermo; Hernández, Emilio; Rojas, Julio C; Malo, Edi A

    2013-04-01

    The application of a juvenile hormone analog, methoprene, to newly emerged adult males reduced the time required for sexual maturation and enhanced mating success in several species of tephritid fruit flies. In this work, we investigated the effect of topical methoprene application on West Indian fruit fly, Anastrepha obliqua (Macquart), male calling, mating, and volatile release. Males treated with topical methoprene exhibited sexual maturation and reproductive behavior 2 d earlier when compared with control males treated with acetone. Methoprene-treated males began calling and mating at 4 d old, whereas control males did not call and mate until 6 d old. The gas chromotography-mass spectrometry analysis of volatiles showed that during calling A. obliqua males consistently released four compounds; three of them were identified as (Z)-3-nonenol, (Z,E)-α-farnesene, (E,E)-α-farnesene, and a fourth compound with the appearance of a farnesene isomer. Both treated and control males released the same compounds, although treated males started to release volatiles before that control males. The results are discussed in view of possible methoprene application with the aim of reducing costs in fly emergence and release facilities before eventual release of A. obliqua in the field, thus improving the sterile insect technique. PMID:23575016

  2. Effect of long-term infusion of an LH-releasing hormone agonist on testicular function in bulls.

    PubMed

    von Rechenberg, W; Sandow, J; Klatt, P

    1986-05-01

    Continuous administration of LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists is an effective method of suppressing testosterone secretion in the male. The effect of the LH-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist, buserelin, administered to bulls by constant infusion from osmotic minipumps was studied. In one experiment with four treated and one control bull, 109 micrograms buserelin/day were administered for 22 days. Immediately after implantation, serum testosterone concentrations rose from below 35 nmol/l to 35-105 nmol/l, and all four buserelin-infused bulls showed increased testosterone secretion during the treatment period. After removal of the minipumps, testosterone concentrations decreased to pretreatment levels. In a second experiment bulls were infused for 42 days (four treated and one control), and identical results were obtained. Testosterone secretion was stimulated (52-87 nmol/l serum) during the entire treatment period. These results demonstrate that conditions for stimulation of the pituitary-testicular axis may vary between species. Infusion of low doses of LHRH-agonists in bulls has an extended stimulatory effect without immediate desensitization of gonadotrophin release. PMID:3086475

  3. Substance P (SP) induces expression of functional corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 (CRHR-1) in human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Asadi, Shahrzad; Alysandratos, Konstantinos-Dionysios; Angelidou, Asimenia; Miniati, Alexandra; Sismanopoulos, Nikolaos; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Zhang, Bodi; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2012-02-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is secreted under stress and regulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. However, CRH is also secreted outside the brain where it exerts proinflammatory effects through activation of mast cells, which are increasingly implicated in immunity and inflammation. Substance P (SP) is also involved in inflammatory diseases. Human LAD2 leukemic mast cells express only CRHR-1 mRNA weakly. Treatment of LAD2 cells with SP (0.5-2 μM) for 6 hours significantly increases corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 (CRHR-1) mRNA and protein expression. Addition of CRH (1 μM) to LAD2 cells, which are "primed" with SP for 48 hours and then washed, induces synthesis and release of IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) 24 hours later. These effects are blocked by pretreatment with an NK-1 receptor antagonist. Treatment of LAD2 cells with CRH (1 μM) for 6 hours induces gene expression of NK-1 as compared with controls. However, repeated stimulation of mast cells with CRH (1 μM) leads to downregulation of CRHR-1 and upregulation in NK-1 gene expression. These results indicate that SP can stimulate mast cells and also increase expression of functional CRHR-1, whereas CRH induces NK-1 gene expression. These results may explain CRHR-1 and NK-1 expression in lesional skin of psoriatic patients. PMID:22089831

  4. Combination of long-acting microcapsules of the D-tryptophan-6 analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone with chemotherapy: investigation in the rat prostate cancer model.

    PubMed Central

    Schally, A V; Redding, T W

    1985-01-01

    The effect of combining hormonal treatment consisting of long-acting microcapsules of the agonist [D-Trp6]LH-RH (the D-tryptophan-6 analog of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone) with the chemotherapeutic agent cyclophosphamide was investigated in the Dunning R-3327H rat prostate cancer model. Microcapsules of [D-Trp6]LH-RH formulated from poly(DL-lactide-co-glycolide) and calculated to release a controlled dose of 25 micrograms/day were injected intramuscularly once a month. Cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan) (5 mg/kg of body weight) was injected intraperitoneally twice a week. When the therapy was started 90 days after tumor transplantation--at the time that the cancers were well developed-and was continued for 2 months, tumor volume was significantly reduced by the microcapsules or Cytoxan given alone. The combination of these two agents similarly inhibited tumor growth but did not show a synergistic effect. In another study, the treatment was started 2 months after transplantation, when the developing tumors measured 60-70 mm3. Throughout the treatment period of 100 days, the microcapsules of [D-Trp6]LH-RH reduced tumor volume more than Cytoxan did, and the combination of the two drugs appeared to completely arrest tumor growth. Tumor weights also were diminished significantly in all experimental groups, the decrease in weight being smaller in the Cytoxan-treated group than in rats that received the microcapsules. The combination of Cytoxan plus the microcapsules was 10-100 times more effective than the single agents in reducing tumor weights. In both experiments, testes and ventral prostate weights were significantly diminished, serum testosterone was suppressed to undetectable levels, and prolactin values were reduced by administration of microcapsules of [D-Trp6]LH-RH alone or in combination with Cytoxan. These results in rats suggest that combined administration of long acting microcapsules of [D-Trp6]LH-RH with a chemotherapeutic agent, started soon after the

  5. Degarelix monotherapy compared with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists plus anti-androgen flare protection in advanced prostate cancer: an analysis of two randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, Peter; Damber, Jan-Erik; Malmberg, Anders; Persson, Bo-Eric; Klotz, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess differences in efficacy outcomes between luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonist plus antiandrogen (AA) flare protection and monotherapy with the gonadotrophin-releasing hormone antagonist degarelix in patients with prostate cancer. Methods: Data from 1455 patients were pooled from two prospective, phase III randomized 1-year clinical trials of degarelix versus LHRH agonist with or without AA. The AA bicalutamide was administered at the investigator’s discretion. Adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using a Cox proportional hazards regression model and a conditional logistic regression model was used for a case-control analysis of odds ratios (ORs). Results: Patients received degarelix monotherapy (n = 972) or LHRH agonist (n = 483) of whom 57 also received AA. Overall, prostate-specific antigen progression-free survival (PSA PFS) was improved with degarelix versus LHRH agonist + AA (Cox proportional hazards regression model-adjusted HR for PSA PFS failure was 0.56 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.33–0.97, p = 0.038]). To compensate for a higher proportion of patients with metastases, Gleason score 7–10, and PSA >20 ng/ml in the LHRH agonist + AA group, a case-control analysis using a conditional logistic regression model was utilized. This resulted in an OR for PSA PFS of 0.42 (95% CI 0.20–0.89; p = 0.023) in the overall population, and 0.35 (95% CI 0.13–0.96; p = 0.042) in patients with PSA >50 ng/ml at baseline, when treated with degarelix versus LHRH agonists + AA. There were a small number of deaths, 1.9% with degarelix and 7% with LHRH agonists + AA (case-control analysis OR = 0.37; p = 0.085). Conclusions: Degarelix monotherapy produced a more favorable effect on PSA PFS outcomes than a LHRH agonist + AA flare protection therapy in patients with prostate cancer when a case-control analysis was used to compensate for differences between treatment groups. PMID:27034720

  6. Thyroid organotypic rat and human cultures used to investigate drug effects on thyroid function, hormone synthesis and release pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Vickers, Alison E.M.; Heale, Jason; Sinclair, John R.; Morris, Stephen; Rowe, Josh M.; Fisher, Robyn L.

    2012-04-01

    Drug induced thyroid effects were evaluated in organotypic models utilizing either a rat thyroid lobe or human thyroid slices to compare rodent and human response. An inhibition of thyroid peroxidase (TPO) function led to a perturbation in the expression of key genes in thyroid hormone synthesis and release pathways. The clinically used thiourea drugs, methimazole (MMI) and 6-n-propyl-2-thioruacil (PTU), were used to evaluate thyroid drug response in these models. Inhibition of TPO occurred early as shown in rat thyroid lobes (2 h) and was sustained in both rat (24–48 h) and human (24 h) with ≥ 10 μM MMI. Thyroid from rats treated with single doses of MMI (30–1000 mg/kg) exhibited sustained TPO inhibition at 48 h. The MMI in vivo thyroid concentrations were comparable to the culture concentrations (∼ 15–84 μM), thus demonstrating a close correlation between in vivo and ex vivo thyroid effects. A compensatory response to TPO inhibition was demonstrated in the rat thyroid lobe with significant up-regulation of genes involved in the pathway of thyroid hormone synthesis (Tpo, Dio1, Slc5a5, Tg, Tshr) and the megalin release pathway (Lrp2) by 24 h with MMI (≥ 10 μM) and PTU (100 μM). Similarly, thyroid from the rat in vivo study exhibited an up-regulation of Dio1, Slc5a5, Lrp2, and Tshr. In human thyroid slices, there were few gene expression changes (Slc5a5, ∼ 2-fold) and only at higher MMI concentrations (≥ 1500 μM, 24 h). Extended exposure (48 h) resulted in up-regulation of Tpo, Dio1 and Lrp2, along with Slc5a5 and Tshr. In summary, TPO was inhibited by similar MMI concentrations in rat and human tissue, however an increased sensitivity to drug treatment in rat is indicated by the up-regulation of thyroid hormone synthesis and release gene pathways at concentrations found not to affect human tissue. -- Highlights: ► Novel model of rat thyroid or human thyroid slices to evaluate pathways of injury. ► TPO inhibition by MMI or PTU altered

  7. Modulation of pancreatic islets-stress axis by hypothalamic releasing hormones and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Janine; Ludwig, Barbara; Schally, Andrew V.; Steffen, Anja; Ziegler, Christian G.; Block, Norman L.; Koutmani, Yassemi; Brendel, Mathias D.; Karalis, Katia P.; Simeonovic, Charmaine J.; Licinio, Julio; Ehrhart-Bornstein, Monika; Bornstein, Stefan R.

    2011-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), primarily characterized as neuroregulators of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, directly influence tissue-specific receptor-systems for CRH and GHRH in the endocrine pancreas. Here, we demonstrate the expression of mRNA for CRH and CRH-receptor type 1 (CRHR1) and of protein for CRHR1 in rat and human pancreatic islets and rat insulinoma cells. Activation of CRHR1 and GHRH-receptor significantly increased cell proliferation and reduced cell apoptosis. CRH stimulated both cellular content and release of insulin in rat islet and insulinoma cells. At the ultrastructural level, CRHR1 stimulation revealed a more active metabolic state with enlarged mitochondria. Moreover, glucocorticoids that promote glucose production are balanced by both 11b-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11β-HSD) isoforms; 11β-HSD–type-1 and 11β-HSD–type-2. We demonstrated expression of mRNA for 11β-HSD-1 and 11β-HSD-2 and protein for 11β-HSD-1 in rat and human pancreatic islets and insulinoma cells. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that stimulation of CRHR1 and GHRH-receptor affects the metabolism of insulinoma cells by down-regulating 11β-HSD-1 and up-regulating 11β-HSD-2. The 11β-HSD enzyme activity was analyzed by measuring the production of cortisol from cortisone. Similarly, activation of CRHR1 resulted in reduced cortisol levels, indicating either decreased 11β-HSD-1 enzyme activity or increased 11β-HSD-2 enzyme activity; thus, activation of CRHR1 alters the glucocorticoid balance toward the inactive form. These data indicate that functional receptor systems for hypothalamic-releasing hormone agonists exist within the endocrine pancreas and influence synthesis of insulin and the pancreatic glucocorticoid shuttle. Agonists of CRHR1 and GHRH-receptor, therefore, may play an important role as novel therapeutic tools in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. PMID:21825133

  8. Identification and distribution of gonadotropin-releasing hormone-like peptides in the brain of horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Huiyang; Li, Linming; Ye, Haihui; Feng, Biyun; Li, Shaojing

    2013-03-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a crucial peptide for the regulation of reproduction. Using immunological techniques, we investigated the presence of GnRH in horseshoe crab Tachypleus tridentatus. Octopus GnRH-like immunoreactivity, tunicate GnRH-like immunoreactivity, and lamprey GnRH-I-like immunoreactivity were detected in the neurons and fibers of the protocerebrum. However, no mammal GnRH-like immunoreactivity or lamprey GnRH-III-like immunoreactivity was observed. Our results suggest that a GnRH-like factor, an ancient peptide, existed in the brain of T. tridentatus and may be involved in the reproductive endocrine system.

  9. Feedback effects of estradiol and progesterone on ovulation and fertility of dairy cows after gonadotropin-releasing hormone-induced release of luteinizing hormone.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, J S; Pulley, S L

    2016-04-01

    An experiment was conducted with the objective to determine the effects of estradiol, progesterone, presence of a corpus luteum (CL), and size of a dominant follicle on the characteristics and patterns of GnRH-induced LH release and subsequent ovulation during a timed artificial insemination (TAI) program, or a combination of these. In 70 lactating dairy cows, a total of 163 blood collection periods resulting in a GnRH-induced LH release were analyzed. Concentrations of LH were measured in hourly samples (0 through 6 h after GnRH) during each of the blood collection periods, whereas concentrations of progesterone and estradiol were measured in the sample before GnRH treatment (0 h). Measures of LH included time to LH peak concentration during the 6-h blood collection period, the 2 largest concentrations of LH, mean, and variance of the 6 LH concentrations under each LH curve. Individual and combination effects of CL presence and a dominant follicle≤or >13.5mm, in addition to individual and combination effects of progesterone: low (<0.45 ng/mL; n=83), medium (0.53 to 2.41 ng/mL; n=25), and high (2.66 to 10.7 ng/mL; n=55), and estradiol: low (<4.0 pg/mL; n=89) and high (≥4.0 pg/mL; n=74) were independent variables in models to determine their influence on characteristics of LH and ovulation. Injections of GnRH induced LH release during 6 h after each of 163 injections. Measures of GnRH-induced LH concentration were inhibited at greater concentrations of progesterone and in the presence of a CL. In contrast, GnRH-induced LH concentrations were increased when estradiol was ≥4.0 pg/mL, but relatively unaffected by the size of the dominant follicle. Furthermore, resulting incidences of ovulation were decreased at greater progesterone concentrations and presence of a CL, and increased at greater estradiol concentrations and presence of follicles >13.5mm. In cows with or without a CL, the presence of a follicle >13.5mm did not increase mean LH concentration or

  10. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone II receptor (GnRHR-II) knockdown reduces testis size and decreases testosterone secretion during pubertal development in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The second mammalian isoform of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH-II) functions quite differently from the classical form (GnRH-I) as it is a poor stimulator of gonadotropin release. Unlike most species, a functional GnRHR-II has been identified in swine. Our laboratory detected GnRHR-IIs on Leyd...

  11. Tissue-specific hormonal profiling during dormancy release in macaw palm seeds.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Leonardo M; Garcia, Queila S; Müller, Maren; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2015-04-01

    Little is known about the control exerted by hormones in specific tissues during germination and post-germinative development in monocot seeds, whose embryos have complex structures and can remain dormant for long periods of time. Here the tissue-specific hormonal profile of macaw palm (Acrocomia aculeata) seeds overcoming dormancy and seedling during initial development was examined. Endogenous hormonal concentrations were determined in the cotyledonary petiole, haustorium, operculum, endosperm adjacent to the embryo and peripheral endosperm of dry dormant seeds, imbibed seeds trapped in phase I of germination, and germinating (phase 2 and phase 3) seeds 2, 5, 10 and 15 days after sowing. Evaluations were performed on seeds treated for overcoming dormancy by removal of the operculum and by immersion in a gibberellic acid (GA3 ) solution. Removal of the operculum effectively helped in overcoming dormancy, which was associated with the synthesis of active gibberellins (GAs) and cytokinins (CKs), as well as reductions of abscisic acid (ABA) in the cotyledonary petiole. In imbibed seeds trapped in phase I of germination, exogenous GA3 caused an increase in active GAs in the cotyledonary petiole and operculum and reduction in ABA in the operculum. Initial seedling development was associated with increases in the CK/auxin ratio in the haustorium and GA levels in the endosperm which is possibly related to the mobilization of metabolic reserves. Increases in salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) concentrations were associated with the development of the vegetative axis. Hormones play a crucial tissue-specific role in the control of dormancy, germination and initial development of seedlings in macaw palm, including a central role not only for GAs and ABA, but also for CKs and other hormones. PMID:25174374

  12. Experiment K-7-22: Growth Hormone Regulation Synthesis and Secretion in Microgravity. Part 2; Hypothalamic Growth Hormone-Releasing Factor, Somatostatin Immunoreactivity, and Messenger RNA Levels in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawchenko, P. E.; Arias, C.; Krasnov, I.; Grindeland, R. E.; Vale, W.

    1994-01-01

    Immunohistochemical analyses of hypothalamic hormones carried out on tissue from rats flown on an earlier flight (Cosmos 1887) suggested preferential effects on hypophysiotropic principles involved in the regulation of growth hormone secretion and synthesis. We found that staining in the median eminence for peptides that provide both stimulatory (growth hormone-releasing factor, or GRF) and inhibitory (somatostatin, SS) influences on growth hormone secretion were depressed in flight animals relative to synchronous controls, while staining for other neuroendocrine peptides, cortocotropin-releasing factor and arginine vasopressin, were similar in these two groups. While this suggests some selective impact of weightlessness on the two principal central nervous system regulators of growth hormone dynamics, the fact that both GRF- and SS-immunoreactivity (IR) appeared affected in the same direction is somewhat problematic, and makes tentative any intimation that effects on CNS control mechanisms may be etiologically significant contributors to the sequelae of reduced growth hormone secretion seen in prolonged space flight. To provide an additional, and more penetrating, analysis we attempted in hypothalamic material harvested from animals flown on Cosmos 2044 to complement immunohistochemical analyses of GRF and SS staining with quantitative, in situ assessments of messenger RNAs encoding the precursors for both these hormones.

  13. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone 1 directly affects corpora lutea lifespan in Mediterranean buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) during diestrus: presence and in vitro effects on enzymatic and hormonal activities.

    PubMed

    Zerani, Massimo; Catone, Giuseppe; Maranesi, Margherita; Gobbetti, Anna; Boiti, Cristiano; Parillo, Francesco

    2012-08-01

    The expression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH) receptor (GNRHR) and the direct role of GNRH1 on corpora lutea function were studied in Mediterranean buffalo during diestrus. Immunohistochemistry evidenced at early, mid, and late luteal stages the presence of GNRHR only in large luteal cells and GNRH1 in both small and large luteal cells. Real-time PCR revealed GNRHR and GNRH1 mRNA at the three luteal stages, with lowest values in late corpora lutea. In vitro corpora lutea progesterone production was greater in mid stages and lesser in late luteal phases, whereas prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2alpha) increased from early to late stages, and PGE2 was greater in the earlier-luteal phase. Cyclooxygenase 1 (prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 1; PTGS1) activity did not change during diestrus, whereas PTGS2 increased from early to late stages, and PGE2-9-ketoreductase (PGE2-9-K) was greater in late corpora lutea. PTGS1 activity was greater than PTGS2 in early corpora lutea and lesser in late luteal phase. In corpora lutea cultured in vitro, the GNRH1 analog (buserelin) reduced progesterone secretion and increased PGF2alpha secretion as well as PTGS2 and PGE2-9-K activities at mid and late stages. PGE2 release and PTGS1 activity were increased by buserelin only in late corpora lutea. These results suggest that GNRH is expressed in all luteal cells of buffalo, whereas GNRHR is only expressed in large luteal phase. Additionally, GNRH directly down-regulates corpora lutea progesterone release, with the concomitant increases of PGF2alpha production and PTGS2 and PGE2-9-K enzymatic activities. PMID:22592497

  14. Ethanol blocks the cold-induced increase in thyrotropin-releasing hormone mRNA in paraventricular nuclei but not the cold-induced increase in thyrotropin.

    PubMed

    Zoeller, R T; Rudeen, P K

    1992-05-01

    The effects of a single intraperitoneal injection of ethanol (3 g/kg b.wt.) on the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid system was explored as a possible explanation of the hypothermic effect of ethanol. Serum thyroid hormones were significantly reduced by ethanol injection, but ethanol did not affect the cold-induced increase in serum thyroid hormones or thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Since cold-exposure stimulates serum levels of TSH and thyroid hormones by stimulating thyroid-releasing hormone (TRH) release from neurons of the PVN, these findings demonstrate that ethanol did not block pituitary response to TRH or thyroid response to TSH. Paradoxically, ethanol increased cellular levels of TRH mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), and blocked the cold-induced increase in TRH mRNA, suggesting that ethanol uncouples the regulation of TRH gene expression from the regulation of TRH release specifically in neurons of the PVN. Measurements of the effects of ethanol on TRH mRNA in thalamus, and beta-actin, vasopressin, somatostatin and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) mRNAs in the PVN in addition to TRH mRNA revealed very specific effects of ethanol on the TRH neuronal system. PMID:1352612

  15. Beneficial effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone agonists on rat INS-1 cells and on streptozotocin-induced NOD/SCID mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xianyang; Cui, Tengjiao; He, Jinlin; Wang, Haibo; Cai, Renzhi; Popovics, Petra; Vidaurre, Irving; Sha, Wei; Schmid, Janine; Ludwig, Barbara; Block, Norman L.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Schally, Andrew V.

    2015-01-01

    Agonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) have been previously reported to promote growth, function, and engraftment of islet cells following transplantation. Here we evaluated recently synthesized GHRH agonists on the proliferation and biological functions of rat pancreatic β-cell line (INS-1) and islets. In vitro treatment of INS-1 cells with GHRH agonists increased cell proliferation, the expression of cellular insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1), and GHRH receptor, and also stimulated insulin secretion in response to glucose challenge. Exposure of INS-1 cells to GHRH agonists, MR-356 and MR-409, induced activation of ERK and AKT pathways. Agonist MR-409 also significantly increased the levels of cellular cAMP and the phosphorylation of cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in INS-1 cells. Treatment of rat islets with agonist, MR-409 significantly increased cell proliferation, islet size, and the expression of insulin. In vivo daily s.c. administration of 10 μg MR-409 for 3 wk dramatically reduced the severity of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetes in nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice. The maximal therapeutic benefits with respect to the efficiency of engraftment, ability to reach normoglycemia, gain in body weight, response to high glucose challenge, and induction of higher levels of serum insulin and IGF1 were observed when diabetic mice were transplanted with rat islets preconditioned with GHRH agonist, MR-409, and received additional treatment with MR-409 posttransplantation. This study provides an improved approach to the therapeutic use of GHRH agonists in the treatment of diabetes mellitus. PMID:26474831

  16. Evidence that cells expressing luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone mRNA in the mouse are derived from progenitor cells in the olfactory placode

    SciTech Connect

    Wray, S.; Grant, P.; Gainer, H. )

    1989-10-01

    In situ hybridization histochemistry and immunocytochemistry were used to study the prenatal expression of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) cells in the mouse. Cells expressing LHRH mRNA and peptide product were first detected on embryonic day 11.5 (E11.5) in the olfactory pit. On E12.5, the majority of LHRH cells were located on tracks extending from the olfactory pit to the base of the telencephalon. From E12.5 to E15.5, LHRH cells were detected in a rostral-to-caudal gradient in forebrain areas. Prior to E12.5, cells expressing LHRH mRNA were not detected in forebrain areas known to contain LHRH cells in postnatal animals. Quantitation of cells expressing LHRH mRNA showed that the number of labeled cells on E12.5 (approximately 800) equaled the number of LHRH cells in postnatal animals, but more than 90% of these cells were located in nasal regions. Between E12.5 and E15.5, the location of LHRH cells shifted. The number of LHRH cells in the forebrain increased, while the number of LHRH cells in nasal regions decreased over this same period. These findings establish that cells first found in the olfactory pit and thereafter in forebrain areas express the LHRH gene and correspond to the position of LHRH immunopositive cells found at these developmental times. To further examine the ontogeny of the LHRH system, immunocytochemistry in combination with (3H)thymidine autoradiography was used to determine when LHRH cells left the mitotic cycle. We show that LHRH neurons exhibit a discrete time of birth, suggesting that they arise as a single neuronal population between E10.0 and E11.0. Postnatal LHRH neurons were birth-dated shortly after differentiation of the olfactory placode and before LHRH mRNA was expressed in cells in the olfactory pit.

  17. Qualitative identification of growth hormone-releasing hormones in human plasma by means of immunoaffinity purification and LC-HRMS/MS.

    PubMed

    Knoop, Andre; Thomas, Andreas; Fichant, Eric; Delahaut, Philippe; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2016-05-01

    The use of growth hormone-releasing hormones (GHRHs) is prohibited in sports according to the regulations of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). The aim of the present study was to develop a method for the simultaneous detection of four different GHRHs and respective metabolites from human plasma by means of immunoaffinity purification and subsequent nano-ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-high resolution/high accuracy (tandem) mass spectrometry. The target analytes included Geref (Sermorelin), CJC-1293, CJC-1295, and Egrifta (Tesamorelin) as well as two metabolites of Geref and CJC-1293, which were captured from plasma samples using a polyclonal GHRH antibody in concert with protein A/G monolithic MSIA™ D.A.R.T.'S® (Disposable Automation Research Tips) prior to separation and detection. The method was fully validated and found to be fit for purpose considering the parameters specificity, linearity, recovery (19-37%), lower limit of detection (<50 pg/mL), imprecision (<20%), and ion suppression/enhancement effects. The analytes' stability and metabolism were elucidated using in vitro and in vivo approaches. EDTA blood samples were collected from rats 2, 4, and 8 h after intravenous administration of GHRH (one compound per test animal). All intact substances were detected for at least 4 h but no anticipated metabolite was confirmed in laboratory rodents' samples; conversely, a Geref metabolite (GHRH3-29) was found in a human plasma sample collected after subcutaneous injection of the drug to a healthy male volunteer. The obtained results demonstrate that GHRHs are successfully detected in plasma using an immunoaffinity-mass spectrometry-based method, which can be applied to sports drug testing samples. Further studies are however required and warranted to account for potential species-related differences in metabolism and elimination of the target analytes. PMID:26879649

  18. A role for mitogen-activated protein kinase in mediating activation of the glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit promoter by gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

    PubMed Central

    Roberson, M S; Misra-Press, A; Laurance, M E; Stork, P J; Maurer, R A

    1995-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) interacts with a G protein-coupled receptor and increases the transcription of the glycoprotein hormone alpha-subunit gene. We have explored the possibility that mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) plays a role in mediating GnRH effects on transcription. Activation of the MAPK cascade by an expression vector for a constitutively active form of the Raf-1 kinase led to stimulation of the alpha-subunit promoter in a concentration-dependent manner. GnRH treatment was found to increase the phosphorylation of tyrosine residues of MAPK and to increase MAPK activity, as determined by an immune complex kinase assay. A reporter gene assay using the MAPK-responsive, carboxy-terminal domain of the Elk1 transcription factor was also consistent with GnRH-induced activation of MAPK. Interference with the MAPK pathway by expression vectors for kinase-defective MAPKs or vectors encoding MAPK phosphatases reduced the transcription-stimulating effects of GnRH. The DNA sequences which are required for responses to GnRH include an Ets factor-binding site. An expression vector for a dominant negative form of Ets-2 was able to reduce GnRH effects on expression of the alpha-subunit gene. These findings provide evidence that GnRH treatment leads to activation of the MAPK cascade in gonadotropes and that activation of MAPK contributes to stimulation of the alpha-subunit promoter. It is likely that an Ets factor serves as a downstream transcriptional effector of MAPK in this system. PMID:7791760

  19. Effects of growth hormone-releasing hormone on sleep and brain interstitial fluid amyloid-β in an APP transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Fan; Zhang, Tony J.; Mahan, Thomas E.; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by impairment of cognitive function, extracellular amyloid plaques, intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, and synaptic and neuronal loss. There is substantial evidence that the aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ) in the brain plays a key role in the pathogenesis of AD and that Aβ aggregation is a concentration dependent process. Recently, it was found that Aβ levels in the brain interstitial fluid (ISF) are regulated by the sleep-wake cycle in both humans and mice; ISF Aβ is higher during wakefulness and lower during sleep. Intracerebroventricular infusion of orexin increased wakefulness and ISF Aβ levels, and chronic sleep deprivation significantly increased Aβ plaque formation in amyloid precursor protein transgenic (APP) mice. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is a well-documented sleep regulatory substance which promotes non-rapid eye movement sleep. GHRHRlit/lit mice that lack functional GHRH receptor have shorter sleep duration and longer wakefulness during light periods. The current study was undertaken to determine whether manipulating sleep by interfering with GHRH signaling affects brain ISF Aβ levels in APPswe/PS1ΔE9 (PS1APP) transgenic mice that overexpress mutant forms of APP and PSEN1 that cause autosomal dominant AD. We found that intraperitoneal injection of GHRH at dark onset increased sleep and decreased ISF Aβ and that delivery of a GHRH antagonist via reverse-microdialysis suppressed sleep and increased ISF Aβ. The diurnal fluctuation of ISF Aβ in PS1APP/GHRHRlit/lit mice was significantly smaller than that in PS1APP/GHRHRlit/+ mice. However despite decreased sleep in GHRHR deficient mice, this was not associated with an increase in Aβ accumulation later in life. One of several possibilities for the finding is the fact that GHRHR deficient mice have GHRH-dependent but sleep-independent factors which protect against Aβ deposition. PMID:25218899

  20. Cytoplasmic kinases downstream of GPR30 suppress gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced luteinizing hormone secretion from bovine anterior pituitary cells

    PubMed Central

    RUDOLF, Faidiban O.; KADOKAWA, Hiroya

    2015-01-01

    GPR30 is known as a membrane receptor for picomolar concentrations of estradiol. The GPR30-specific agonist G1 causes a rapid, non-genomic suppression of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-induced luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion from bovine anterior pituitary (AP) cells. A few studies have recently clarified that protein kinase A (PKA) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) might be involved in cytoplasmic signaling pathways of GPR30 in other cells. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that PKA and ERK kinase (MEK) are important cytoplasmic mediators for GPR30-associated non-genomic suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion from bovine AP cells. Bovine AP cells (n = 8) were cultured for 3 days under steroid-free conditions. The AP cells were previously treated for 30 min with one of the following: 5000 nM of PKA inhibitor (H89), 1000 nM of MEK inhibitor (U0126), or a combination of H89 and U0126. Next, the AP cells were treated with 0.01 nM estradiol for 5 min before GnRH stimulation. Estradiol treatment without inhibitor pretreatment significantly suppressed GnRH-induced LH secretion (P < 0.01). In contrast, estradiol treatment after pretreatment with H89, U0126 or their combination had no suppressive effect on GnRH-induced LH secretion. The inhibitors also inhibited the G1 suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion. Therefore, these data supported the hypothesis that PKA and MEK (thus, also pERK) are the intracellular mediators downstream of GPR30 that induce the non-genomic suppression of GnRH-induced LH secretion from bovine AP cells by estradiol or G1. PMID:26522383

  1. Controlled release of human growth hormone fused with a human hybrid Fc fragment through a nanoporous polymer membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eung-Sam; Jang, Do Soo; Yang, Seung Yun; Lee, Mi Nam; Jin, Kyeong Sik; Cha, Hyung Jin; Kim, Jin Kon; Sung, Young Chul; Choi, Kwan Yong

    2013-05-01

    Nanotechnology has been applied to the development of more effective and compatible drug delivery systems for therapeutic proteins. Human growth hormone (hGH) was fused with a hybrid Fc fragment containing partial Fc domains of human IgD and IgG4 to produce a long-acting fusion protein. The fusion protein, hGH-hyFc, resulted in the increase of the hydrodynamic diameter (ca. 11 nm) compared with the diameter (ca. 5 nm) of the recombinant hGH. A diblock copolymer membrane with nanopores (average diameter of 14.3 nm) exhibited a constant release rate of hGH-hyFc. The hGH-hyFc protein released in a controlled manner for one month was found to trigger the phosphorylation of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) in human B lymphocyte and to exhibit an almost identical circular dichroism spectrum to that of the original hGH-hyFc, suggesting that the released fusion protein should maintain the functional and structural integrity of hGH. Thus, the nanoporous release device could be a potential delivery system for the long-term controlled release of therapeutic proteins fused with the hybrid Fc fragment.Nanotechnology has been applied to the development of more effective and compatible drug delivery systems for therapeutic proteins. Human growth hormone (hGH) was fused with a hybrid Fc fragment containing partial Fc domains of human IgD and IgG4 to produce a long-acting fusion protein. The fusion protein, hGH-hyFc, resulted in the increase of the hydrodynamic diameter (ca. 11 nm) compared with the diameter (ca. 5 nm) of the recombinant hGH. A diblock copolymer membrane with nanopores (average diameter of 14.3 nm) exhibited a constant release rate of hGH-hyFc. The hGH-hyFc protein released in a controlled manner for one month was found to trigger the phosphorylation of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) in human B lymphocyte and to exhibit an almost identical circular dichroism spectrum to that of the original hGH-hyFc, suggesting that the released fusion protein should maintain the functional and

  2. Effect of intravenous bovine growth hormone or human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor on milk production and plasma hormones and metabolites in sheep.

    PubMed

    Hart, I C; Chadwick, P M; James, S; Simmonds, A D

    1985-05-01

    Although it is well known that exogenous bovine GH (bGH) increases milk yield in ruminants it has not been possible to determine whether an increase in endogenous GH secretion has the same effect. The recent isolation of human pancreatic GH-releasing factor (hpGRF-44) has enabled this comparison of the effects of bGH and hpGRF-44 on milk production in sheep. Three pairs of Dorset ewes underwent three 4-day treatments according to a Latin square design. Treatment 1 involved: 2-hourly i.v. injections (approximately 3.0 ml) of bGH (15 micrograms/kg; 1.8 units/mg); treatment 2: 2-hourly i.v. injections (approximately 3.0 ml) of hpGRF-44 (0.6 microgram/kg); treatment 3: 2-hourly i.v. injections (3.0 ml) of the vehicle. Treatment periods were separated by 10 days. Sheep were milked twice daily and the milk was analysed for fat, protein and lactose. Blood samples (5.0 ml) were taken before and at 15, 45, 75 and 100 min after every third injection throughout the 4 days. Plasma was analysed for insulin, glucose, urea and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA). The changes in plasma GH stimulated by hpGRF-44 were consistent and repeatable throughout the 4 days of treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3921646

  3. Noradrenergic regulation of hypothalamic cells that produce growth hormone-releasing hormone and somatostatin and the effect of altered adiposity in sheep.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, J; Manley, T R; Yue, Q; Namavar, M R; Clarke, I J

    2005-06-01

    The growth hormone (GH) axis is sensitive to alteration in body weight and there is evidence that central noradrenergic systems regulate neurones that produce growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) and somatostatin (SRIF). This study reports semiquantitative estimates of the noradrenergic input to neuroendocrine GHRH and SRIF neurones in the sheep of different body weights. We also studied the effects of altered body weight on expression of dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), the enzyme that produces noradrenalin from dopamine. Ovariectomised ewes were made Lean (39.6 +/- 2.6 kg; Mean +/- SEM) by dietary restriction, whereas Normally Fed animals (61.2 +/- 0.8 kg) were maintained on a regular diet. Brains were perfused for immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation. The Mean +/- SEM number of GHRH-immunoreactive (-IR) cells was lower in Normally Fed (65 +/- 7) than in Lean (115 +/- 14) animals, whereas the number of SRIF-IR cells was similar in the two groups (Normally Fed, 196 +/- 17; Lean 230 +/- 21). Confocal microscopic analysis revealed that the percentage of GHRH-IR cells (Normally Fed 36 +/- 1.5% versus Lean 32 +/- 4.6%) and percentage of SRIF-IR cells (Normally Fed 30 +/- 40.4% versus Lean 32 +/- 2.3%) contacted by noradrenergic fibres did not change with body weight. FluoroGold retrograde tracer injections confirmed that noradrenergic projections to the arcuate nucleus are from ventrolateral medulla and noradrenergic projections to periventricular nucleus arise from the ventrolateral medulla, nucleus of solitary tract, locus coeruleus (LC) and the parabrachial nucleus (PBN). DBH expressing cells were identified using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridisation and the level of expression (silver grains/cell) quantified by image analysis. The number of DBH cells was similar in Normally Fed and Lean animals, but the level of expression/cell was lower (P < 0.02) in the PBN and LC of Lean animals. These results provide an anatomical basis for the

  4. Identification of a New Exo-Endocytic Mechanism Triggered by Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone in Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Balseiro-Gomez, Santiago; Flores, Juan A; Acosta, Jorge; Ramirez-Ponce, M Pilar; Ales, Eva

    2015-09-01

    The key role of mast cells (MC), either in development of inflammatory pathologies or in response to environmental stress, has been widely reported in recent years. Previous studies have described the effects of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), which is released from inflamed tissues by cellular stress signals, on MC degranulation, a process possibly driven by selective secretion of mediators (piecemeal degranulation). In this study, we introduce a novel granular exo-endocytic pathway induced by CRH on peritoneal MC. We found that CRH triggers substantial exocytosis, which is even stronger than that induced by Ag stimulation and is characterized by large quantal size release events. Membrane fluorescence increases during stimulation in the presence of FM1-43 dye, corroborating the strength of this exocytosis, given that discrete upward fluorescence steps are often observed and suggesting that secretory granules are preferentially released by compound exocytosis. Additionally, the presence of a depot of large tubular organelles in the cytoplasm suggests that the exocytotic process is tightly coupled to a fast compound endocytosis. This CRH-stimulated mechanism is mediated through activation of adenylate cyclase and an increase of cAMP and intracellular Ca(2+), as evidenced by the fact that the effect of CRH is mimicked by forskolin and 8-bromo-cAMP. Thus, these outcomes constitute new evidence for the critical role of MC in pathophysiological conditions within a cellular stress environment and an alternative membrane trafficking route mediated by CRH. PMID:26202981

  5. Synchronic release of two hormonal contraceptives for about one month from the PLGA microspheres: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Zhang, Zhijun; Zheng, Yan; Chen, Dawei; Zhang, Qiang

    2008-08-01

    A controlled drug release system based on the injectable PLGA microspheres loaded with gestodene and ethinyl estradiol was prepared and evaluated for the feasibility of monthly synchronic delivery of the two hormonal contraceptives. The scanning electron microscopy, light-scattering analyzer and gel permeation chromatography were used to study the morphology, particle size and molecular weight of the polymer microspheres, respectively. HPLC was utilized to determine the drug loading and the drug released, while a LC-MS-MS system was employed to analyze the plasma drug concentration. Result indicated that the PLGA particles obtained were spherical and appropriate in size. The formulation was stable during the test period. In vitro drug release from the microspheres for both drugs was sustained for about 30 days mostly by the diffusion mechanism. The plasma drug concentration-time profiles of the drug-loaded microspheres were relatively smooth after subcutaneous injection to rats for about 1-month, compared with that for drug suspension. In vitro and in vivo correlation was established. One of the most important facts is the synchronicity of the two contraceptives both in the release kinetics in vitro and the pharmacokinetic behaviors in vivo. Therefore, the synchronic delivery of two contraceptives is achieved for about 1 month by using the injectable PLGA-based microspheres. PMID:18539353

  6. Neuronal Gonadotrophin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) and Astrocytic Gonadotrophin Inhibitory Hormone (GnIH) Immunoreactivity in the Adult Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ferris, J K; Tse, M T; Hamson, D K; Taves, M D; Ma, C; McGuire, N; Arckens, L; Bentley, G E; Galea, L A M; Floresco, S B; Soma, K K

    2015-10-01

    Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotrophin inhibitory hormone (GnIH) are neuropeptides secreted by the hypothalamus that regulate reproduction. GnRH receptors are not only present in the anterior pituitary, but also are abundantly expressed in the hippocampus of rats, suggesting that GnRH regulates hippocampal function. GnIH inhibits pituitary gonadotrophin secretion and is also expressed in the hippocampus of a songbird; its role outside of the reproductive axis is not well established. In the present study, we employed immunohistochemistry to examine three forms of GnRH [mammalian GnRH-I (mGnRH-I), chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II) and lamprey GnRH-III (lGnRH-III)] and GnIH in the adult rat hippocampus. No mGnRH-I and cGnRH-II+ cell bodies were present in the hippocampus. Sparse mGnRH-I and cGnRH-II+ fibres were present within the CA1 and CA3 fields of the hippocampus, along the hippocampal fissure, and within the hilus of the dentate gyrus. No lGnRH-III was present in the rodent hippocampus. GnIH-immunoreactivity was present in the hippocampus in cell bodies that resembled astrocytes. Males had more GnIH+ cells in the hilus of the dentate gyrus than females. To confirm the GnIH+ cell body phenotype, we performed double-label immunofluorescence against GnIH, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and NeuN. Immunofluorescence revealed that all GnIH+ cell bodies in the hippocampus also contained GFAP, a marker of astrocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that GnRH does not reach GnRH receptors in the rat hippocampus primarily via synaptic release. By contrast, GnIH might be synthesised locally in the rat hippocampus by astrocytes. These data shed light on the sites of action and possible functions of GnRH and GnIH outside of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. PMID:26258544

  7. Immunocytochemical and pharmacological evidence for an intrinsic cholinomimetic system modulating prolactin and growth hormone release in rat pituitary.

    PubMed

    Carmeliet, P; Denef, C

    1988-08-01

    Pituitary cells were cultured as three-dimensional reaggregates in serum-free chemically defined medium supplemented with different concentrations of dexamethasone. Immunostaining of the cells using a polyclonal antiserum and three monoclonal antibodies raised against choline acetyl transferase (CAT), revealed the presence of CAT immunoreactivity in 4-10% of anterior pituitary cells depending on the antibody used. CAT immunoreactivity was also found in freshly dispersed anterior pituitary cells. CAT-immunoreactive cells could be enriched on BSA and Percoll gradients and codistributed with ACTH-immunoreactive cells in these gradients. Perifusion of the aggregates with the potent muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine (Atr) resulted in a dose-dependent (0.1-100 nM) increase in both basal PRL and GH secretion; the response was dependent on the dexamethasone concentration in the culture medium. A similar response to Atr was observed in organ-cultured pituitaries. The specificity of the Atr effect was supported by the findings that the potent and highly specific muscarinic receptor blocker dexetimide showed a similar action, whereas its inactive enantiomer levetimide and the nicotinic receptor blocker hexamethonium failed to do so. Two other muscarinic antagonists, benzatropine and pirenzepine, showed a dose-dependent hormone-releasing action similar to that of Atr, but were less potent than the latter. Pirenzepine was only effective at high molar concentrations, suggesting that an M2 muscarinic receptor subtype was mediating the present phenomenon. Atr also potentiated GH release stimulated by the beta-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol and PRL release stimulated by vasoactive intestinal peptide, but had no effect on GRF-stimulated GH release. The choline uptake blocker hemicholinium abolished the effect of Atr on GH and PRL release. These data suggest that certain pituitary cells can express CAT activity and that these cells exert a tonic inhibitory activity on GH and

  8. Relationship between nitric oxide- and calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways in growth hormone release from dispersed goldfish pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, John P; Sawisky, Grant R; Davis, Philip J; Pemberton, Joshua G; Rieger, Aja M; Barreda, Daniel R

    2014-09-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) and Ca(2+) are two of the many intracellular signal transduction pathways mediating the control of growth hormone (GH) secretion from somatotropes by neuroendocrine factors. We have previously shown that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) elicits Ca(2+) signals in identified goldfish somatotropes. In this study, we examined the relationships between NO- and Ca(2+)-dependent signal transduction mechanisms in GH secretion from primary cultures of dispersed goldfish pituitary cells. Morphologically identified goldfish somatotropes stained positively for an NO-sensitive dye indicating they may be a source of NO production. In 2h static incubation experiments, GH release responses to the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-d,l-penicillamine (SNAP) were attenuated by CoCl2, nifedipine, verapamil, TMB-8, BHQ, and KN62. In column perifusion experiments, the ability of SNP to induce GH release was impaired in the presence of TMB-8, BHQ, caffeine, and thapsigargin, but not ryanodine. Caffeine-elicited GH secretion was not affected by the NO scavenger PTIO. These results suggest that NO-stimulated GH release is dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) availability and voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channels, as well as intracellular Ca(2+) store(s) that possess BHQ- and/or thapsigargin-inhibited sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases, as well as TMB-8- and/or caffeine-sensitive, but not ryanodine-sensitive, Ca(2+)-release channels. Calmodulin kinase-II also likely participates in NO-elicited GH secretion but caffeine-induced GH release is not upstream of NO production. These findings provide insights into how NO actions many integrate with Ca(2+)-dependent signalling mechanisms in goldfish somatotropes and how such interactions may participate in the GH-releasing actions of regulators that utilize both NO- and Ca(2+)-dependent transduction pathways. PMID:25038498

  9. Suppression in the secretion of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone, and ovarian follicle development in heifers continuously infused with a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist.

    PubMed

    Gong, J G; Campbell, B K; Bramley, T A; Gutierrez, C G; Peters, A R; Webb, R

    1996-07-01

    A novel experimental model was developed in cattle to investigate the requirement for FSH and LH during ovarian follicle growth and development. On Day 5 of the estrous cycle, 7 heifers were each implanted with an osmotic minipump containing a GnRH agonist (GnRHa), Buserelin (release rate, 2.5 micrograms/h). Another 7 heifers served as controls. Each minipump was replaced 28 days later with a second pump, which was left in place for a further 20 days. Blood samples were collected daily throughout the experimental period, and frequent samples were also collected on both days of minipump insertion and at 10 days after insertion of the second pump. The ovaries of all heifers were scanned daily by real-time ultrasonography to monitor follicular dynamics. All controls displayed 2 or 3 waves of FSH and follicular development per estrous cycle during the experiment. Insertion of the first minipump produced a large LH and FSH surge and induced ovulation in all 7 animals. Within 8 days of the start of treatment, serum LH concentrations fell to basal levels; they then remained constant at this level throughout the infusion period, only beginning to recover 4-5 days after the termination of infusion. After the initial increase, FSH returned to basal levels before showing a normal wave that was coincident with the emergence, growth, and regression of a dominant follicle. However, despite the peak levels of FSH, dominant follicles from the next wave failed to grow beyond 7-9 mm; they remained at this size for 3 wk until 3-4 days after insertion of the second minipump, when FSH fell precipitously to reach low levels that were maintained throughout the remainder of the infusion. After this fall in FSH concentrations, these follicles regressed rapidly, and no antral follicles > 4 mm were detected until after the termination of treatment. Thereafter, FSH concentrations increased significantly; the increase was accompanied by the emergence of a follicular wave and development of a

  10. Differential expression of three types of gonadotropin-releasing hormone genes during the spawning season in grass puffer, Takifugu niphobles.

    PubMed

    Shahjahan, Md; Hamabata, Tomoko; Motohashi, Eiji; Doi, Hiroyuki; Ando, Hironori

    2010-05-15

    Grass puffer, Takifugu niphobles, has unique spawning behavior; spawning occurs on beach only for several days around new moon and full moon from spring to early summer. To investigate the role of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in the reproductive function, genes encoding three types of GnRHs, namely seabream GnRH (sbGnRH), chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II) and salmon GnRH (sGnRH), were cloned and changes in their mRNA amounts were examined over the spawning season. In addition, changes in the pituitary gonadotropin subunit mRNAs and the plasma steroid hormones were examined over the spawning season. Fishes were assessed at four reproductive stages, i.e., in December (early maturation), in April (maturing), in May (spawning), and in July (post-spawning). Moreover, spawning fish just after releasing eggs and sperm were taken at a spawning bed. The amounts of sbGnRH mRNA were substantially elevated in May and the spawning fish in both sexes, concomitant with considerable elevations of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone beta subunit mRNAs and plasma estradiol-17beta (E(2)) and testosterone (T) levels. There were strong positive correlations between the sbGnRH mRNA and the plasma E(2) and T levels over the spawning season in both sexes. The amounts of cGnRH-II mRNA showed no noticeable changes except for an increase in the post-spawning females. The amounts of sGnRH mRNA in the males were significantly increased in May, but they were low in the spawning males. In the females, sGnRH mRNA increased from the maturing stage and reached a maximum in the post-spawning stage, in which a positive correlation with the plasma cortisol levels was observed. These specific changes suggest that the expression of three types of GnRH genes is differentially regulated during the spawning season, and sex steroids may be important for the differential expression of GnRH genes. PMID:20138178

  11. Non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy compared with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists or surgical castration monotherapy for advanced prostate cancer: a Cochrane systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kunath, Frank; Grobe, Henrik R; Rücker, Gerta; Motschall, Edith; Antes, Gerd; Dahm, Philipp; Wullich, Bernd; Meerpohl, Joerg J

    2015-07-01

    To assess the effects of non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy compared with luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone agonists or surgical castration monotherapy for treating advanced hormone-sensitive stages of prostate cancer. We searched the Cochrane Prostatic Diseases and Urologic Cancers Group Specialized Register (PROSTATE), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science with Conference Proceedings, three trial registries and abstracts from three major conferences to 23 December 2013, together with reference lists, and contacted selected experts in the field and manufacturers. We included randomized controlled trials comparing non-steroidal antiandrogen monotherapy with medical or surgical castration monotherapy for men in advanced hormone-sensitive stages of prostate cancer. Two review authors independently examined full-text reports, identified relevant studies, assessed the eligibility of studies for inclusion, extracted data and assessed risk of bias as well as quality of evidence according to the GRADE working group guidelines. We used Review Manager 5.2 for data synthesis and the fixed-effect model as primary analysis (when heterogeneity was low with I(2) < 50%); we used a random-effects model when confronted with substantial or considerable heterogeneity (when I(2) ≥50%). A total of 11 studies involving 3060 randomly assigned participants were included in the present review. Use of non-steroidal antiandrogens resulted in lower overall survival times (hazard ratio [HR] 1.24, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05-1.48, six studies, 2712 participants) and greater clinical progression (1 year: risk ratio [RR] 1.25, 95% CI 1.08-1.45, five studies, 2067 participants; 70 weeks: RR 1.26, 95% CI 1.08-1.45, six studies, 2373 participants; 2 years: RR 1.14, 95% CI 1.04-1.25, three studies, 1336 participants), as well as treatment failure (1 year: RR 1.19, 95% CI 1.02-1.38, four studies, 1539 participants; 70 weeks: RR 1

  12. Changes in gonadotropin-releasing hormone and gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene expression after an increase in carbon monoxide concentration in the cavernous sinus of male wild boar and pig crossbread.

    PubMed

    Romerowicz-Misielak, M; Tabecka-Lonczynska, A; Koziol, K; Gilun, P; Stefanczyk-Krzymowska, S; Och, W; Koziorowski, M

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies indicate that there are at least a few regulatory systems involved in photoperiodic synchronisation of reproductive activity, which starts with the retina and ends at the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) pulse generator. Recently we have shown indicated that the amount of carbon monoxide (CO) released from the eye into the ophthalmic venous blood depends on the intensity of sunlight. The aim of this study was to test whether changes in the concentration of carbon monoxide in the ophthalmic venous blood may modulate reproductive activity, as measured by changes in GnRH and GnRH receptor gene expression. The animal model used was mature male swine crossbred from wild boars and domestic sows (n = 48). We conducted in vivo experiments to determine the effect of increased CO concentrations in the cavernous sinus of the mammalian perihypophyseal vascular complex on gene expression of GnRH and GnRH receptors as well as serum luteinizing hormone (LH) levels. The experiments were performed during long photoperiod days near the summer solstice (second half of June) and short photoperiod days near the winter solstice (second half of December). These crossbred swine demonstrated a seasonally-dependent marked variation in GnRH and GnRH receptor gene expression and systemic LH levels in response to changes in CO concentration in ophthalmic venous blood. These results seem to confirm the hypothesis of humoral phototransduction as a mechanism for some of bright light's effects in animal chronobiology and the effect of CO on GnRH and GnRH receptor gene expression. PMID:27512004

  13. Effects of handling and vehicle injections on adrenocorticotropic and corticosterone concentrations in Sprague-Dawley compared with Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Deutsch-Feldman, Molly; Picetti, Roberto; Seip-Cammack, Katharine; Zhou, Yan; Kreek, Mary Jeanne

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a key factor in the trajectory of the addiction-like cycle (a pattern of behavior characterized by escalating drug use, withdrawal, and relapse) in preclinical and clinical studies. Concentrations of HPA hormones change in laboratory animals in response to standard experimental procedures, including handling and vehicle injections. We compared HPA activity in adult male Lewis (inbred) and Sprague-Dawley (outbred) rats, 2 common strains in rodent models of addiction, after different schedules of handling and saline injections, to explore the extent to which HPA responses differ by strain and whether interindividual differences underlie addiction vulnerability. The 4 treatment conditions were no, short, or long handling and saline injections. In handled groups, rats were handled for 1 to 2 min for 3 times daily and were euthanized after 7 d (short handling) or 14 d (long handling). The injection schedule in the saline injection group mimicked that in a model of binge-like cocaine exposure. Across all treatment groups, concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone were higher in Sprague-Dawley than in Lewis rats. In Sprague-Dawley rats, corticosterone concentrations decreased after continued handling but remained constant in Lewis rats. Interindividual variability in hormone levels was greater in Sprague-Dawley than Lewis rats, although corticosterone variability decreased after continued handling. Prolactin did not differ between groups of either Sprague-Dawley and Lewis rats before or after handling. This study underscores the importance of prolonged handling before experimenter-provided drug-administration paradigms and of strain-associated differences that may affect study outcomes. PMID:25651089

  14. Inhibition of parathyroid hormone release by maitotoxin, a calcium channel activator

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, L.A.; Yasumoto, T.; Aurbach, G.D.

    1989-01-01

    Maitotoxin, a toxin derived from a marine dinoflagellate, is a potent activator of voltage-sensitive calcium channels. To further test the hypothesis that inhibition of PTH secretion by calcium is mediated via a calcium channel we studied the effect of maitotoxin on dispersed bovine parathyroid cells. Maitotoxin inhibited PTH release in a dose-dependent fashion, and inhibition was maximal at 1 ng/ml. Chelation of extracellular calcium by EGTA blocked the inhibition of PTH by maitotoxin. Maitotoxin enhanced the effects of the dihydropyridine calcium channel agonist (+)202-791 and increased the rate of radiocalcium uptake in parathyroid cells. Pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates and inactivates a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein that interacts with calcium channels in the parathyroid cell, did not affect the inhibition of PTH secretion by maitotoxin. Maitotoxin, by its action on calcium channels allows entry of extracellular calcium and inhibits PTH release. Our results suggest that calcium channels are involved in the release of PTH. Inhibition of PTH release by maitotoxin is not sensitive to pertussis toxin, suggesting that maitotoxin may act distal to the site interacting with a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein, or maitotoxin could interact with other ions or second messengers to inhibit PTH release.

  15. Hormonal Regulation of Organic and Phosphoric Acid Release by Barley Aleurone Layers and Scutella.

    PubMed Central

    Drozdowicz, Y. M.; Jones, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    The release of acid from the aleurone layer and scutellum of barley (Hordeum vulgare L. cv Himalaya) was investigated. Aleurone layers isolated from mature barley grains acidify the external medium by releasing organic and phosphoric acids. Gibberellic acid and abscisic acid stimulate acid release 2-fold over control tissue incubated in 10 mM CACl2. Gibberellic acid causes medium acidification by stimulating the release of phosphoric and citric acids, whereas abscisic acid stimulates the release of malic acid. The accumulation of these acids in the incubation medium buffers the medium against changes in pH, particularly between pH 4 and 5. The amounts of amino acids that accumulate in the medium are low (2-12 nmol/layer) compared to other organic and phosphoric acids (100-500 nmol/layer). The scutellum does not play a major role in medium acidification but participates in the uptake of organic acids. The organic acid composition of the starchy endosperm changes after 3 d of imbibition; malic, succinic, and lactic acids decrease, whereas citric and phosphoric acids remain unchanged or increase. These results indicate that during postgerminative growth, the acidity of the starchy endosperm is maintained by acid production by the aleurone layer. PMID:12228509

  16. Changes in brain mRNA levels of gonadotropin-releasing hormone, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide, and somatostatin during ovulatory luteinizing hormone and growth hormone surges in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Canosa, Luis Fabián; Stacey, Norm; Peter, Richard Ector

    2008-12-01

    In goldfish, circulating LH and growth hormone (GH) levels surge at the time of ovulation. In the present study, changes in gene expression of salmon gonadotropin-releasing hormone (sGnRH), chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II), somatostatin (SS) and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) were analyzed during temperature- and spawning substrate-induced ovulation in goldfish. The results demonstrated that increases in PACAP gene expression during ovulation are best correlated with the GH secretion profile. These results suggest that PACAP, instead of GnRH, is involved in the control of GH secretion during ovulation. Increases of two of the SS transcripts during ovulation are interpreted as the activation of a negative feedback mechanism triggered by high GH levels. The results showed a differential regulation of sGnRH and cGnRH-II gene expression during ovulation, suggesting that sGnRH controls LH secretion, whereas cGnRH-II correlates best with spawning behavior. This conclusion is further supported by the finding that nonovulated fish induced to perform spawning behavior by prostaglandin F2alpha treatment increased cGnRH-II expression in both forebrain and midbrain, but decreased sGnRH expression in the forebrain. PMID:18815210

  17. Role of Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone Stimulation Test in Diagnosing Gonadotropin Deficiency in Both Males and Females with Delayed Puberty

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qi-Hong; Zheng, Yu; Zhang, Xiao-Lin; Mu, Yi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background: Delayed puberty can result either from constitutional delay of growth and puberty (CDP) or idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH). Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulation test has been generally accepted as a current method for diagnosing delayed puberty. The objective of this research was to assess the cut-off values and the efficacy of GnRH stimulation test in the diagnosis of delayed puberty in both males and females. Methods: A study of 91 IHH, 27 CDP patients, 6 prepubertal children, and 20 pubertal adults was undertaken. Blood samples were obtained at 0, 30, 60, and 120 min after GnRH administration and the levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were measured. For each parameter, the sensitivities and specificities were estimated, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed. Results: The ROC curves indicated that a serum basal LH <0.6 IU/L or peak LH <9.74 IU/L resulted in moderate sensitivity (73.8% or 80.0%) and specificity (90.9% or 86.4%) in the diagnosis of HH in males. Serum basal LH <0.85 IU/L or basal FSH <2.43 IU/L resulted in moderate sensitivity (80.0% or 100.0%) and specificity (75.0% or 50.0%) in the diagnosis of HH in females. Conclusions: Our data suggest that isolated use of the gonadorelin stimulation test is almost sufficient to discriminate between HH and CDP in males, but unnecessary in females. The most useful predictor is serum basal or peak LH to differentiate these two disorders in males, but serum basal LH or FSH in females. PMID:26365959

  18. Overexpression of the growth-hormone-releasing hormone gene in acromegaly-associated pituitary tumors. An event associated with neoplastic progression and aggressive behavior.

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, K.; Kovacs, K.; Stefaneanu, L.; Scheithauer, B.; Killinger, D. W.; Lioyd, R. V.; Smyth, H. S.; Barr, A.; Thorner, M. O.; Gaylinn, B.; Laws, E. R.

    1997-01-01

    The clinical behavior of growth hormone (GH)-producing pituitary tumors is known to vary greatly; however, the events underlying this variability remain poorly understood. Herein we demonstrate that tumor overexpression of the GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) gene is one prognostically informative event associated with the clinical aggressiveness of somatotroph pituitary tumors. Accumulation of GHRH mRNA transcripts was demonstrated in 91 of a consecutive series of 100 somatotroph tumors by in situ hybridization; these findings were corroborated by Northern analysis and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and protein translation was confirmed by Western blotting. By comparison, transcript accumulation was absent or negligibly low in 30 normal pituitary glands. GHRH transcripts were found to preferentially accumulate among clinically aggressive tumors. Specifically, GHRH mRNA signal intensity was 1) linearly correlated with Ki-67 tumor growth fractions (r = 0.71; P < 0.001), 2) linearly correlated with preoperative serum GH levels (r = 0.56; p = 0.01), 3) higher among invasive tumors (P < 0.001), and 4) highest in those tumors in which post-operative remission was not achieved (P < 0.001). Using multivariate logistic regression, a model of postoperative remission likelihood was derived wherein remission was defined by the single criterion of suppressibility of GH levels to less than 2 ng/ml during an oral glucose tolerance test. In this outcome model, GHRH mRNA signal intensity proved to be the most important explanatory variable overall, eclipsing any and all conventional clinicopathological predictors as the single most significant predictor of postoperative remission; increases in GHRH mRNA signal were associated with marked declines in remission likelihood. The generalizability of this outcome model was further validated by the model's significant performance in predicting postoperative remission in a random sample of 30 somatotroph tumors treated at

  19. Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH) in the songbird hippocampus: regional and sex differences in adult zebra finches.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Nicolette; Ferris, Jennifer K; Arckens, Lutgarde; Bentley, George E; Soma, Kiran K

    2013-08-01

    Hypothalamic gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH) are vital to reproduction in all vertebrates. These neuropeptides are also present outside of the hypothalamus, but the roles of extra-hypothalamic GnRH and GnIH remain enigmatic and widely underappreciated. We used immunohistochemistry and PCR to examine whether multiple forms of GnRH (chicken GnRH-I (GnRH1), chicken GnRH-II (GnRH2) and lamprey GnRH-III (GnRH4)) and GnIH are present in the hippocampus (Hp) of adult zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). Using immunohistochemistry, we provide evidence that GnRH1, GnRH2 and GnRH4 are present in hippocampal cell bodies and/or fibers and that GnIH is present in hippocampal fibers only. There are regional differences in hippocampal GnRH immunoreactivity, and these vary across the different forms of GnRH. There are also sex differences in hippocampal GnRH immunoreactivity, with generally more GnRH1 and GnRH2 in the female Hp. In addition, we used PCR to examine the presence of GnRH1 mRNA and GnIH mRNA in micropunches of Hp. PCR and subsequent product sequencing demonstrated the presence of GnRH1 mRNA and the absence of GnIH mRNA in the Hp, consistent with the pattern of immunohistochemical results. To our knowledge, this is the first study in any species to systematically examine multiple forms of GnRH in the Hp or to quantify sex or regional differences in hippocampal GnRH. Moreover, this is the first demonstration of GnIH in the avian Hp. These data shed light on an important issue: the sites of action and possible functions of GnRH and GnIH outside of the HPG axis. PMID:23727031

  20. Blood supply to the brain and. beta. -endorphin and acth levels under the influence of thyrotrophin releasing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzoyan, R.S.; Ganshina, T.S.; Mirzoyan, R.A.; Ragimov, K.S.

    1985-08-01

    The authors studied beta-endorphin because of its possible mediator role in terms of the cerebrovascular effects of thyrotrophin releasing hormone (TRH), and also because of data in the literature on antagonistic relations between TRH and the endogenous opioid system of the brain. Beta-endorphin was determined by radioimmunoassay; its level was determined after its separation from the beta-lipotrophin fraction. The investigation showed that TRH has a marked depressant effect on cerebrovascular vasoconstrictor refleces. Elevation of the blood ACTH level causes an increase in BP and in the tone of the cerebral vessels. An absence of correlation between the beta-endorphin and ACTH levels in the blood and CSF under the influence of TRH is shown.

  1. Prolonged stimulation of corticosterone secretion by corticotropin-releasing hormone in rats exhibiting high preference for dietary fat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herminghuysen, D.; Plaisance, K.; Pace, R. M., III; Prasad, C.

    1998-01-01

    Through the secretion of corticosterone, the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is thought to play an important role in the regulation of caloric intake and dietary fat preference. In an earlier study, we demonstrated a positive correlation between urinary corticosterone output and dietary fat preference. Furthermore, dietary fat preference was augmented following chronic but not acute hypercorticosteronemia produced by exogenous corticosterone administration. These observations led us to explore whether the HPA axis of rats exhibiting high preference for fat may have exaggerated sensitivity to corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). The results of these studies show a delayed and blunted but more prolonged corticosterone response to CRH in the fat-preferring rats compared with that of the carbohydrate-preferring rats.

  2. Interaction between a growth-hormone releasing hexapeptide and phospholipids spread as monolayers at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Issaurat, B; Teissié, J

    1988-10-20

    The interaction between a growth-hormone releasing hexapeptide and phospholipids was studied on mixed monolayers models by means of surface fluorescence. When in a monolayer this hexapeptide which contains two tryptophan molecules was observed to fluoresce. Isothermal compression experiments showed that the complex was destroyed upon compression in the case of phosphatidylethanolamine. With phosphatidylglycerol it was observed to be stable but a dramatic reversible decrease in emission was observed at high surface pressure. This is indicative of a reversible change in the organization of the peptide-phospholipid complex. These observations indicate that, in the complex, hydrophobic interactions were weak but electrostatic ones, when present, were strong enough to maintain the GHRP attached to the monolayer and not to destabilize it. The integrity of the lipid monolayer appeared not to be affected by the peptide. PMID:3179304

  3. The effect of an extended artificial photoperiod and gonadotrophin-releasing hormone infusions in inducing fertile oestrus in anoestrous mares.

    PubMed

    Lowis, T C; Hyland, J H

    1991-12-01

    The occurrence of fertile oestrus early in the breeding season is of paramount importance to the Thoroughbred industry to facilitate early conception. This paper compares 2 techniques for inducing fertile oestrus in anoestrous mares using either an extended photoperiod alone or together with gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) infusions. Eleven mares were placed under conditions of 16 h light and 8 h darkness and 5 of these were implanted with osmotic minipumps delivering approximately 100 ng GnRH/kg/h for 28 days (treated mares). The treated mares ovulated 27.7 days earlier than and conceived 32 days earlier than the 6 mares not given GnRH. GnRH-induced ovulations were followed by a competent luteal phase. The combination of GnRH pumps implanted 2 weeks before commencement of service together with extended photoperiod from July 1 has promise in assisting the stud breeder to improve reproductive efficiency on commercial stud farms. PMID:1807248

  4. Glucose-induced incretin hormone release and inactivation are differently modulated by oral fat and protein in mice.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, P Thomas; Winzell, Maria Sörhede; Deacon, Carolyn F; Larsen, Marianne O; Jelic, Katarina; Carr, Richard D; Ahrén, Bo

    2006-07-01

    Monounsaturated fatty acids, such as oleic acid (OA), and certain milk proteins, especially whey protein (WP), have insulinotropic effects and can reduce postprandial glycemia. This effect may involve the incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). To explore this, we examined the release and inactivation of GIP and GLP-1 after administration of glucose with or without OA or WP through gastric gavage in anesthetized C57BL/6J mice. Insulin responses to glucose (75 mg) were 3-fold augmented by addition of WP (75 mg; P < 0.01), which was associated with enhanced oral glucose tolerance (P < 0.01). The insulin response to glucose was also augmented by addition of OA (34 mg; P < 0.05) although only 1.5-fold and with no associated increase in glucose elimination. The slope of the glucose-insulin curve was increased by OA (1.7-fold; P < 0.05) and by WP (4-fold; P < 0.01) compared with glucose alone, suggesting potentiation of glucose-stimulated insulin release. WP increased GLP-1 secretion (P < 0.01), whereas GIP secretion was unaffected. OA did not affect GIP or GLP-1 secretion. Nevertheless, WP increased the levels of both intact GIP and intact GLP-1 (both P < 0.01), and OA increased the levels of intact GLP-1 (P < 0.05). WP inhibited dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity in the proximal small intestine by 50% (P < 0.05), suggesting that luminal degradation of WP generates small fragments, which are substrates for dipeptidyl peptidase IV and act as competitive inhibitors. We therefore conclude that fat and protein may serve as exogenous regulators of secretion and inactivation of the incretin hormones with beneficial influences on glucose metabolism. PMID:16627575

  5. A dual challenge of corticotropin releasing hormone and vasopressin alters immune cell profiles in beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The duration and magnitude of cortisol release can have different effects on the immune response. Over the last decade, studies have suggested that acute stress, when cortisol is elevated for a short duration of time, can be immuno-stimulatory rather than immuno-suppressive. This study was designed ...

  6. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase mediates gonadotropin subunit gene expression and LH release responses to endogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormones in goldfish.

    PubMed

    Klausen, Christian; Booth, Morgan; Habibi, Hamid R; Chang, John P

    2008-08-01

    The possible involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in mediating the stimulatory actions of two endogenous goldfish gonadotropin-releasing hormones (salmon (s)GnRH and chicken (c)GnRH-II) on gonadotropin synthesis and secretion was examined. Western blot analysis revealed the presence of ERK and phosphorylated (p)ERK in goldfish brain, pituitary, liver, ovary, testis and muscle tissue extracts, as well as extracts of dispersed goldfish pituitary cells and HeLa cells. Interestingly, a third ERK-like immunoreactive band of higher molecular mass was detected in goldfish tissue and pituitary cell extracts in addition to the ERK1-p44- and ERK2-p42-like immunoreactive bands. Incubation of primary cultures of goldfish pituitary cells with either a PKC-activating 4beta-phorbol ester (TPA) or a synthetic diacylglycerol, but not a 4alpha-phorbol ester, elevated the ratio of pERK/total (t)ERK for all three ERK isoforms. The stimulatory effects of TPA were attenuated by the PKC inhibitor GF109203X and the MEK inhibitor PD98059. sGnRH and cGnRH-II also elevated the ratio of pERK/tERK for all three ERK isoforms, in a time-, dose- and PD98059-dependent manner. In addition, treatment with PD98059 reduced the sGnRH-, cGnRH-II- and TPA-induced increases in gonadotropin subunit mRNA levels in Northern blot studies and sGnRH- and cGnRH-II-elicited LH release in cell column perifusion studies with goldfish pituitary cells. These results indicate that GnRH and PKC can activate ERK through MEK in goldfish pituitary cells. More importantly, the present study suggests that GnRH-induced gonadotropin subunit gene expression and LH release involve MEK/ERK signaling in goldfish. PMID:18558406

  7. Central administration of corticotropin-releasing hormone alters downstream movement in an artificial stream in juvenile chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha).

    PubMed

    Clements, Shaun; Schreck, Carl B

    2004-05-15

    We evaluated the effect of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) on spatial distribution and downstream movement in an artificial stream in juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during the period when the fish were able to tolerate seawater. An intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of CRH (500 ng) to hatchery fish significantly increased the proportion of fish that were distributed downstream of a mid-stream release site. A second group of hatchery fish were given ICV injections of saline (control) or CRH (500 ng) and released near the top of the stream. The time taken to enter a trap at the lower end of the stream was recorded. In all cases the groups given CRH had a higher proportion of fish that did not enter the trap within 60 min of release. However, in those fish that did enter the trap, treatment with CRH increased the speed of downstream movement to this point relative to control fish. Wild sub-yearling Chinook salmon were captured during their downstream migration to the estuary and given ICV injections of saline or CRH (500 ng) either 2, 3, or 7 days after transport from the river. As with hatchery fish, a significantly higher proportion of wild fish that were administered CRH did not enter the trap at the lower end of the stream. The mean time of passage for control fish decreased on each successive day (day 2 > day 3 > day 7). In contrast, the mean passage time of the wild fish that were given CRH was relatively constant through time, and was only significantly faster than control fish on day 2. The current study provides evidence that CRH alters the downstream movement of juvenile Chinook in a simulated stream environment, and produces behavioral effects similar to those of juvenile salmonids that are stressed during their downstream migration. PMID:15094330

  8. Exclusion of growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone gene mutations in familial isolated GH deficiency by linkage and single strand conformation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Perez Jurado, L.A.; Francke, U.; Phillips, J.A. III

    1994-03-01

    The molecular basis and the locus responsible for most familial cases of isolated GH deficiency (IGHD) are still unknown. The GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) gene has been evaluated as a possible candidate in 23 unrelated families with IGHD, 14 of whom were classified as having autosomal recessive IGHD type IB and 9 of whom had autosomal dominant IGHD type II. Three highly polymorphic microsatellites (dinucleotide repeats), mapped close to GHRH on chromosome 20 by previous linkage studies, were analyzed as markers for the GHRH locus. All available family members were genotyped for D20S44 [no recombination with GHRH at a LOD (logarithm of the odds) score of 3.6]. Noninformative families were also genotyped for D20S45 and/or D20S54 (located at {approximately} 1 and 3 centiMorgan of genetic distance from GHRH, respectively). Twenty families were informative for linkage analysis with 1 or more of these markers. They found at least 1 obligate recombinant with discordance between phenotype and genotype in 19 of the 23 families (83%). There is only a very small chance (1-3% or less) that the discordances observed are due to recombination between the GHRH locus and the marker tested. Concordant segregation was seen in only 1 type IB family (4%). When probands from this and the 3 noninformative families were screened for sequence variants in the 5 exons of the GHRH gene by single strand conformation analysis, no abnormal patterns were observed. They conclude that mutations responsible for IGHD are not within or near the structural gene for GHRH on chromosome 20 in the 23 families studied. As linkage to the GH-1 gene has also been previously excluded in 65% of these families, mutations in a locus or loci unlinked to GH-1 and GHRH must be responsible for the majority of these IGHD families. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Ambient temperature and the pituitary hormone responses to exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Bridge, M W; Weller, A S; Rayson, M; Jones, D A

    2003-09-01

    Pituitary hormones have an important role during exercise yet relatively little is known about the stimulus for their release. Body temperature progressively increases during prolonged steady-state exercise in the heat and we have investigated the role that this may play in the release of prolactin, growth hormone and cortisol (as an indicator of adrenocorticotropic hormone) into the circulation. Fit young male subjects exercised at 73% V(O2,max) until volitional fatigue at 20 degrees C and at 35 degrees C (30% relative humidity at both temperatures). Rectal temperature and mean skin temperature were monitored and blood samples analysed for lactate, glucose, cortisol, growth hormone and prolactin concentrations. During the first 20 min, core temperature rose continuously and to a similar extent at both temperatures, while mean skin temperature was approximately 4 degrees C lower during exercise in the cool. Blood glucose concentration was essentially constant throughout the period of exercise while lactate concentration increased in the first 10 min and then remained constant with very similar changes in the two exercise conditions. Prolactin and growth hormone concentrations both increased during the exercise period while the concentration of cortisol declined slightly before rising slightly over the 40 min period. Prolactin release was significantly greater when exercise was carried out in the heat while there was no difference in the release of growth hormone or cortisol in the two conditions. When plotted as a function of rectal temperature, growth hormone concentration showed a linear relationship which was the same at ambient temperatures of 35 degrees C and 20 degrees C. Prolactin concentration had a curvilinear relationship with rectal temperature and this differed markedly at the two ambient temperatures. Cortisol concentration showed no dependence on any measure of body temperature. Our results are consistent with some aspect of body temperature being a

  10. Pulsatile growth hormone release in Turner's syndrome and short normal children.

    PubMed

    Ghizzoni, L; Lamborghini, A; Ziveri, M; Volta, C; Panza, C; Balestrazzi, P; Bernasconi, S

    1990-09-01

    To determine whether the quantitative and qualitative aspects of GH secretion in girls with Turner's syndrome are similar to those of short-normal children we studied the 24-h GH secretion of 10 patients with Turner's syndrome and 9 short-normal children with comparable auxological features. GH profiles, obtained by 30-min sampling, were analysed by the Pulsar programme. The pulsatile GH release over the 24 h in Turner's syndrome was similar to that in normal children. However, when the GH release over the 12 day and night hours were separately analysed, only normal children showed a night-time increase in the sum of peak amplitudes. Moreover, patients with Turner's syndrome had significantly decreased number and frequency of peaks in the night-time compared with short children. In short-normal children but not in Turner's syndrome, height velocity was related to the 24-h integrated concentration of GH, area under the curve over zero-line and over baseline, sum of peak areas, and amplitudes. Night-time GH area over zero-line and over baseline, mean peak amplitude, height area, sum of peak area and amplitudes were positively correlated with height velocity in short children, whereas in Turner's syndrome height velocity was related to daytime parameters only. In conclusion, girls with Turner's syndrome have a discrete pattern of pulsatile GH release. However, the relation of GH secretion to growth in these patients, is uncertain. PMID:2239077

  11. Impaired beta-endorphin response to human corticotropin-releasing hormone in obese children.

    PubMed

    Bernasconi, S; Petraglia, F; Iughetti, L; Marcellini, C; Lamborghini, A; Facchinetti, F; Genazzani, A R

    1988-09-01

    In order to evaluate the secretion of beta-endorphin in obese children and adolescents, we measured plasma beta-endorphin, ACTH and cortisol levels before and following administration of CRH (1 microgram/kg). Fourteen normal weight and 22 obese subjects (weight excess ranging from 30 to 98%) were studied. Plasma hormone levels were measured by radioimmunoassay directly in plasma (cortisol, ACTH) and after silicic acid extraction and Sephadex G-75 column chromatography (beta-endorphin). Basal beta-endorphin levels in obese children were significantly higher than in controls (14.7 +/- 1.8 vs 6.0 +/- 0.6 pmol/l; mean +/- SEM). No differences were found in basal ACTH and cortisol levels. CRH administration significantly increased beta-endorphin, ACTH and cortisol levels in normal subjects and ACTH and cortisol levels in obese subjects. Plasma beta-endorphin levels in obese children and adolescents did not show any significant increment. These data confirm the higher than normal beta-endorphin plasma levels in obese subjects in childhood and demonstrate that CRH is unable to increase beta-endorphin levels, suggesting an impairment of the hypothalamo-pituitary control mechanisms or an extra-anterior pituitary source. PMID:2842994

  12. Pharmacodynamic evaluation of a PEGylated analogue of human growth hormone releasing factor in rats and pigs.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, M; Louveau, I; Esposito, P; Bertolino, M; Canali, S

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the in vivo efficacy of monoPEGylated GRF(1-29)NH(2) having one PEG(5000) chains attached to either lysine 12 or 21 as compared to the GRF(1-29)NH(2) in rats and pigs. This analogue termed GRF-1PEG(5000) was tested after a single intravenous administration in rats and after a single intravenous or subcutaneous injection in pigs. After 1 h administration, GH concentrations returned to values close to controls in the group of rats injected with GRF(1-29)NH(2). In animals injected with the same dose of GRF-1PEG(5000), the AUC values corresponding to the whole period 0.5-48 h and particularly to the 0.5-8 h period were higher than in the placebo or in the GRF(1-29)NH(2) groups. Interestingly, two additional peaks were observed at about 6 and 8 h following administration. An increase in the response of the endogenous GH peaks was also observed in pigs administered GRF-1PEG(5000) by intravenous route. When GRF-1PEG(5000) was administered subcutaneously to pigs, a significant increase, as compared to placebo and GRF(1-29)NH(2,) in both GH and IGF-I levels was observed. This new analogue might find therapeutic application in paediatric growth hormone deficiency or in aging. PMID:15125884

  13. Electron Capture Dissociation of Divalent Metal-adducted Sulfated N-Glycans Released from Bovine Thyroid Stimulating Hormone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wen; Håkansson, Kristina

    2013-11-01

    Sulfated N-glycans released from bovine thyroid stimulating hormone (bTSH) were ionized with the divalent metal cations Ca2+, Mg2+, and Co by electrospray ionization (ESI). These metal-adducted species were subjected to infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) and electron capture dissociation (ECD) and the corresponding fragmentation patterns were compared. IRMPD generated extensive glycosidic and cross-ring cleavages, but most product ions suffered from sulfonate loss. Internal fragments were also observed, which complicated the spectra. ECD provided complementary structural information compared with IRMPD, and all observed product ions retained the sulfonate group, allowing sulfonate localization. To our knowledge, this work represents the first application of ECD towards metal-adducted sulfated N-glycans released from a glycoprotein. Due to the ability of IRMPD and ECD to provide complementary structural information, the combination of the two strategies is a promising and valuable tool for glycan structural characterization. The influence of different metal ions was also examined. Calcium adducts appeared to be the most promising species because of high sensitivity and ability to provide extensive structural information.

  14. Electron Capture Dissociation of Divalent Metal-adducted Sulfated N-Glycans Released from Bovine Thyroid Stimulating Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen; Håkansson, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    Sulfated N-glycans released from bovine thyroid stimulating hormone (bTSH) were ionized with the divalent metal cations Ca2+, Mg2+, and Co by electrospray ionization (ESI). These metal-adducted species were subjected to infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) and electron capture dissociation (ECD) and the corresponding fragmentation patterns were compared. IRMPD generated extensive glycosidic and cross-ring cleavages, but most product ions suffered from sulfonate loss. Internal fragments were also observed, which complicated the spectra. ECD provided complementary structural information compared with IRMPD, and all observed product ions retained the sulfonate group, allowing sulfonate localization. To our knowledge, this work represents the first application of ECD towards metal-adducted sulfated N-glycans released from a glycoprotein. Due to the ability of IRMPD and ECD to provide complementary structural information, the combination of the two strategies is a promising and valuable tool for glycan structural characterization. The influence of different metal ions was also examined. Calcium adducts appeared to be the most promising species because of high sensitivity and ability to provide extensive structural information. PMID:23982932

  15. Substance P (SP) induces expression of functional corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor-1 (CRHR-1) in human mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Asadi, Shahrzad; Alysandratos, Konstantinos-Dionysios; Angelidou, Asimenia; Miniati, Alexandra; Sismanopoulos, Nikolaos; Vasiadi, Magdalini; Zhang, Bodi; Kalogeromitros, Dimitrios; Theoharides, Theoharis C.

    2012-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is secreted under stress and regulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. However, CRH is also secreted outside the brain where it exerts pro-inflammatory effects through activation of mast cells, which are increasingly implicated in immunity and inflammation. Substance P (SP) is also involved in inflammatory diseases. Human LAD2 leukemic mast cells express only CRHR-1 mRNA weakly. Treatment of LAD2 cells with SP (0.5–2 µM) for 6 hr significantly increases CRHR-1 mRNA and protein expression. Addition of CRH (1 µM) to LAD2 cells “primed” with SP for 48 hr and then washed, induces synthesis and release of IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) 24 hr later. These effects are blocked by pretreatment with an NK-1 receptor antagonist. Treatment of LAD2 cells with CRH (1 µM) for 6 hr induces gene expression of NK-1 as compared to controls. However, repeated stimulation of mast cells with CRH (1 µM) leads to downregulation of CRHR-1 and upregulation in NK-1 gene expression. These results indicate that SP can stimulate mast cells and also increase expression of functional CRHR-1, while CRH induces NK-1 gene expression. These results may explain CRHR-1 and NK-1 expression in lesional skin of psoriatic patients. PMID:22089831

  16. IN VITRO AND IN VIVO TEMPORAL ASPECTS OF ACTH SECRETION: STIMULATORY ACTIONS OF CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING HORMONE AND VASOPRESSIN IN CATTLE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the temporal aspects associated with corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and vasopressin (VP) stimulated bovine adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) secretion in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro studies, bovine anterior pituitary glands were enzymaticall...

  17. Nanoliposomal Growth Hormone and Sodium Nitrite Release from Silicone Fibers Reduces Thrombus Formation Under Flow.

    PubMed

    Salehi-Nik, Nasim; Amoabediny, Ghassem; Banikarimi, Seyedeh Parnian; Pouran, Behdad; Malaie-Balasi, Zahra; Zandieh-Doulabi, Behrouz; Klein-Nulend, Jenneke

    2016-08-01

    Biocompatibility of artificial lungs can be improved by endothelialization of hollow fibers. Bioavailability of growth-inducing and anti-thrombotic agents on the hollow fiber-blood interface inhibits thrombosis. We investigated if nanoliposomal growth-inducing growth hormone (nGH) and anti-thrombotic sodium nitrite (nNitrite) incorporation into collagen-coating on silicone hollow fibers improves blood biocompatibility by increasing endothelial cell growth and nitrite bioavailability under flow. Nitrite production rate was assessed under varying flow conditions. Finite element (FE) modeling was used to simulate nitrite transport within the parallel-plate flow chamber, and nitrite bioavailability on the fiber-blood interface at 1-30 dyn/cm(2) shear stress. Endothelial cell number on fibers coated with nNitrite-nGH-collagen conjugate was 1.5-fold higher than on collagen-coated fibers. For collagen-coated fibers, nitrite production reached a maximum at 18 dyn/cm(2) shear stress. When fibers were coated with nNitrite-nGH-collagen conjugate, nitrite production increased continuously by increasing shear stress. FE modeling revealed that nitrite concentrations at the fiber-blood interface were affected by shear stress-induced nitrite production, and diffusion/convection-induced nitrite removal. Highest nitrite concentrations and lowest thrombus deposition were observed on fibers coated with nNitrite-nGH-collagen conjugate exposed to 6-12 dyn/cm(2) shear stress. In conclusion, our results suggest that nNitrite-nGH-Col conjugate coatings promote endothelialization of silicone hollow fibers in biohybrid artificial lungs. PMID:26762283

  18. Nitric oxide mediates gonadotropin-releasing hormone effects on frog pituitary.

    PubMed

    Gobbetti, A; Zerani, M

    1998-06-01

    We studied the possible role of nitric oxide (NO) in GnRH-induced gonadotropin secretion in the female water frog, Rana esculenta. During pre-reproduction, pre-ovulation, ovulation, post-ovulation, refractory, recovery and hibernation, pituitaries were incubated with medium-alone, GnRH, NO donor (NOd), NO synthase inhibitor (NOSi), cyclic GMP analogue (cGMPa), soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor (sGCi), GnRH plus NOSi, GnRH plus sGCi, and NOd plus sGCi. Because antisera raised against gonadotropins are not available for this species, we measured these hormones indirectly through their effects on ovarian progesterone secretion. The ovaries were superfused with the pituitaries pre-incubated as reported above. In addition, NOS activity and cGMP levels were determined in the pre-incubated pituitaries. Those pre-incubated with medium-alone and with GnRH increased progesterone secretion during pre-reproduction, pre-ovulation, ovulation and recovery; the increase induced by GnRH was higher than that induced by medium-alone during pre-reproduction, pre-ovulation and recovery. NOd and cGMPa increased progesterone in all considered reproductive phases except ovulation; the increase induced by NOd and cGMP was higher than that induced by medium-alone during pre-reproduction, pre-ovulation and recovery. NOS activity was highest during ovulation and lowest during post-ovulation, refractory and hibernation. GnRH increased NOS activity during pre-reproduction, pre-ovulation and recovery. Cyclic GMP levels were highest during ovulation and lowest during post-ovulation, refractory and hibernation. GnRH increased cGMP levels during pre-reproduction, pre-ovulation and recovery, NOd during all considered reproductive phases. These results suggest that NO mediates basal and GnRH-induced gonadotropin secretion in female Rana esculenta. PMID:9688343

  19. Nicotine excites corticotropin-releasing hormone mRNA-expressing neuron in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus in vitro in rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Bai-Ri; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Chu, Chun-Ping; Cui, Xun; Qiu, De-Lai

    2016-05-25

    Nicotine is known to modulate the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis by stimulating corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) release from the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). However, the mechanism by which nicotine affects the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis by modulating PVN CRH neuronal activity is currently unclear. Here, we examined the effects of nicotine on PVN CRH-mRNA-expressing neurons in vitro in rats by whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, biocytin staining, and single-cell reverse transcription-multiplex PCR techniques. Of the 146 PVN putative parvocellular neurons, 17.1% (25/146) coexpressed GAPDH mRNA and CRH mRNA. Under current-clamp recording conditions, application of nicotine (1 μM) induced excitation in 92% (23/25) PVN CRH-mRNA-expressing neurons, which showed a significant increase in the spike firing rate accompanied by a depolarization of the membrane potential. Nicotine induced an increase in the spike firing rate of PVN CRH-mRNA-expressing neurons in a concentration-dependent manner. The half-effective concentration (EC50) of nicotine for increasing the spike firing rate of PVN CRH-mRNA-expressing neurons was 1.6 μM. Extracellular application of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (1 mM) abolished the nicotine-induced excitation of PVN CRH-mRNA-expressing neurons. Moreover, application of nicotine induced a significant increase in the spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents frequency, but without significantly altering the spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents amplitude of the CRH-mRNA-expressing neurons. Biocytin staining confirmed that the nicotine-sensitive CRH-mRNA-expressing neurons were located in the PVN parvocellular division. These results indicated that extracellular administration of nicotine indirectly excited PVN CRH-mRNA-expressing neurons, suggesting that nicotine modulated PVN CRH secretion by enhancement of both the presynaptic action potential drive and

  20. The effect of neosurugatoxin on the release of neurohypophysial hormones by nicotine, hypotension and an osmotic stimulus in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Bisset, G. W.; Fairhall, K. M.; Tsuji, K.

    1992-01-01

    1. Experiments were carried out to test whether neosurugatoxin (NSTX) which blocks autonomic ganglia also acts centrally, like hexamethonium, on nicotinic cholinoceptors involved in the neural control of release of vasopressin and oxytocin from the neurohypophysis. 2. In the water-loaded rat under ethanol anaesthesia, nicotine 100 micrograms i.v. produced a pressor and an antidiuretic response accompanied by an increase in the urinary excretion of vasopressin and of oxytocin-like radioimmunoreactivity (OLRI). This indicates release of both vasopressin and oxytocin. 3. Under conditions in which tachyphylaxis was avoided, NSTX, 80 ng i.c.v., caused a prolonged inhibition of the release of both hormones by nicotine. 4. NSTX i.c.v. caused some reduction in the pressor response to nicotine. It is suggested that this response involves both central and peripheral stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system and that the central component is blocked by neosurugatoxin. 5. Muscarine, 40 ng i.c.v., produced a pressor and an antidiuretic response with increased urinary excretion of vasopressin and OLRI. All these effects were blocked by atropine but were not inhibited by NSTX. 6. Sodium nitroprusside (SN), 200 micrograms i.v., and hypertonic saline (HS; 1.54 M NaCl solution) 4 microliters i.c.v., both produced antidiuretic responses accompanied by increased urinary excretion of vasopressin and OLRI. The ratio of the excretion of vasopressin to that of OLRI was 5.1 +/- 1.3 (mean +/- s.e.: n = 8) for SN and 1.2 +/- 0.24 (mean +/- s.e.: n = 6) for HS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1504751

  1. Actions and Interactions of Alcohol and Transforming Growth Factor ß1 on Prepubertal Hypothalamic Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Vinod K.; Hiney, Jill K.; Dees, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol (ALC) diminishes gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion and delays puberty. Glial transforming growth factor ß1 (TGFß1) plays a role in glial-neuronal communications facilitating prepubertal GnRH secretion. We assessed the effects of acute ALC administration on TGFß1-induced GnRH gene expression in the brain preoptic area (POA), and release of the peptide from the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH). Furthermore, we assessed actions and interactions of TGFβ1 and ALC on an adhesion/signaling gene family involved in glial-neuronal communications. Methods Prepubertal female rats were administered ALC or water via gastric gavage at 0730 h. At 0900 h saline or TGFβ1 (100ng/3μl) was administered into the third ventricle. At 1500 h the POA was removed and frozen for gene expression analysis and repeated for protein assessments. In another experiment, the MBH was removed from ALC-free rats. After equilibration, tissues were incubated in Locke’s medium only or medium containing TGFß1 with or without 50 mM ALC for measurement of GnRH peptide released in vitro. Results TGFβ1 induced GnRH gene expression in the POA and this effect was blocked by ALC. We also described the presence and responsiveness of the TGFβ1 receptor in the POA and showed that acute ALC exposure not only altered the TGFß1 induced increase in TGFß-R1 protein expression but also the activation of receptor associated proteins, Smad2 and Smad3, key downstream components of the TGFß1 signaling pathway. Assessment of an adhesion/signaling family consisting of glial RPTPβ and neuronal Caspr1 and contactin showed that the neuronal components were induced by TGFβ1 and that ALC blocked these effects. Finally, TGFß1 was shown to induce release of the GnRH peptide in vitro, an action that was blocked by ALC. Conclusion We have demonstrated glial-derived TGFß1 induces GnRH gene expression in the POA, and stimulates release of the peptide from the MBH; actions necessary for

  2. Interaction of growth hormone-releasing hormone with the insulin-like growth-factors during prenatal development in the rat.

    PubMed

    Spatola, E; Pescovitz, O H; Marsh, K; Johnson, N B; Berry, S A; Gelato, M C

    1991-09-01

    The placenta is a chimeric organ that produces all the components of the hypothalamic-pituitary GH axis. We propose that placental GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) stimulates placental GH-like hormones which in turn stimulate production of the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), IGF-I and IGF-II, and these placental IGFs are important for growth and development of the placenta as well as the fetus. To test this hypothesis, pregnant rats were given either GHRH antisera or preimmune sera ip from days 7-19 of gestation. Fetuses were killed on day 19, and IGF-I and IGF-II tissue and serum concentrations in the mother and fetus were measured by RIA. IGF-II receptor content was measured by Western analysis. IGF-I and IGF-II messenger (m) RNA levels were measured in the placentas as well as in the fetal livers. The GHRH antibody titer was highest at day 19 of gestation but continued to be present through day 20 of postnatal development. Although placental weights did not differ, antibody-treated animals had higher placental IGF-I and IGF-II levels (I, 108 +/- 6 (SD); II, 126 +/- 5 ng/g, respectively) vs. control animals (I, 88 +/- 2.5 (SD); II, 48 +/- 11 ng/g) in pooled specimens. The IGF-II receptor was also up-regulated in placentas from antibody-treated mothers. The fetuses of antibody-treated (A) mothers were larger than the controls (C) (A, 2.615 g; C, 2.49 g, P less than 0.05). Levels of both IGFs were significantly increased in livers of antibody treated fetuses (IGF-I: A, 15 +/- 1 (SD); C, 12 +/- 0.8 ng/g; and IGF-II: A, 295 +/- 10 (SD); C, 233 +/- 10 (SD) ng/g). In addition, the concentration of the IGF-II receptor in liver of antibody-treated fetuses was also increased. Further, pooled fetal sera from antibody-treated fetuses had higher levels of IGF-II than controls (A, 950 ng/ml; C, 700 ng/ml), and the circulating IGF-II receptor was increased as measured by Western analysis. In the liver, IGF-II mRNA levels of antibody-treated fetuses were increased to 117% of

  3. Hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor neurons fire in synchrony with the female reproductive cycle

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Christian; Tong, Tong; Petitjean, Hugues; Blum, Thomas; Peron, Sophie; Mai, Oliver; Schmitz, Frank; Boehm, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) controls mammalian reproduction via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (hpg) axis, acting on gonadotrope cells in the pituitary gland that express the GnRH receptor (GnRHR). Cells expressing the GnRHR have also been identified in the brain. However, the mechanism by which GnRH acts on these potential target cells remains poorly understood due to the difficulty of visualizing and identifying living GnRHR neurons in the central nervous system. We have developed a mouse strain in which GnRHR neurons express a fluorescent marker, enabling the reliable identification of these cells independent of the hormonal status of the animal. In this study, we analyze the GnRHR neurons of the periventricular hypothalamic nucleus in acute brain slices prepared from adult female mice. Strikingly, we find that the action potential firing pattern of these neurons alternates in synchrony with the estrous cycle, with pronounced burst firing during the preovulatory period. We demonstrate that GnRH stimulation is sufficient to trigger the conversion from tonic to burst firing in GnRHR neurons. Furthermore, we show that this switch in the firing pattern is reversed by a potent GnRHR antagonist. These data suggest that endogenous GnRH acts on GnRHR neurons and triggers burst firing in these cells during late proestrus and estrus. Our data have important clinical implications in that they indicate a novel mode of action for GnRHR agonists and antagonists in neurons of the central nervous system that are not part of the classical hpg axis. PMID:26063780

  4. 60 YEARS OF NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY: TRH, the first hypophysiotropic releasing hormone isolated: control of the pituitary-thyroid axis.

    PubMed

    Joseph-Bravo, Patricia; Jaimes-Hoy, Lorraine; Uribe, Rosa-María; Charli, Jean-Louis

    2015-08-01

    This review presents the findings that led to the discovery of TRH and the understanding of the central mechanisms which control hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis (HPT) activity. The earliest studies on thyroid physiology are now dated a century ago when basal metabolic rate was associated with thyroid status. It took over 50 years to identify the key elements involved in the HPT axis. Thyroid hormones (TH: T4 and T3) were characterized first, followed by the semi-purification of TSH whose later characterization paralleled that of TRH. Studies on the effects of TH became possible with the availability of synthetic hormones. DNA recombinant techniques facilitated the identification of all the elements involved in the HPT axis, including their mode of regulation. Hypophysiotropic TRH neurons, which control the pituitary-thyroid axis, were identified among other hypothalamic neurons which express TRH. Three different deiodinases were recognized in various tissues, as well as their involvement in cell-specific modulation of T3 concentration. The role of tanycytes in setting TRH levels due to the activity of deiodinase type 2 and the TRH-degrading ectoenzyme was unraveled. TH-feedback effects occur at different levels, including TRH and TSH synthesis and release, deiodinase activity, pituitary TRH-receptor and TRH degradation. The activity of TRH neurons is regulated by nutritional status through neurons of the arcuate nucleus, which sense metabolic signals such as circulating leptin levels. Trh expression and the HPT axis are activated by energy demanding situations, such as cold and exercise, whereas it is inhibited by negative energy balance situations such as fasting, inflammation or chronic stress. New approaches are being used to understand the activity of TRHergic neurons within metabolic circuits. PMID:26101376

  5. Growth Hormone Releasing Peptide-2 Attenuation of Protein Kinase C-Induced Inflammation in Human Ovarian Granulosa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Yi-Ning; Sun, David; Peng, Yen-Chun; Wu, Yuh-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) are two important inflammatory mediators in ovulation. Ghrelin may modulate inflammatory signaling via growth hormone secretagogue receptors. We investigated the role of ghrelin in KGN human ovarian granulosa cells using protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12, 13-didecanoate (PDD) and synthetic ghrelin analog growth hormone releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2). GHRP-2 attenuated PDD-induced expression of protein and mRNA, the promoter activity of COX-2 and IL-8 genes, and the secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and IL-8. GHRP-2 promoted the degradation of PDD-induced COX-2 and IL-8 proteins with the involvement of proteasomal and lysosomal pathways. PDD-mediated COX-2 production acts via the p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathways; PDD-mediated IL-8 production acts via the p38, JNK and ERK pathways. GHRP-2 reduced the PDD-induced phosphorylation of p38 and JNK and activator protein 1 (AP-1) reporter activation and PDD-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation and reporter activation. The inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) and protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A) reduced the inhibitory effect of GHRP-2 on PDD-induced COX-2 and IL-8 expression. Our findings demonstrate an anti-inflammatory role for ghrelin (GHRP-2) in PKC-mediated inflammation of granulosa cells, at least in part, due to its inhibitory effect on PKC-induced activation of p38, JNK and NF-κB, possibly by targeting to MKP-1 and PP2A. PMID:27548147

  6. Corticotropin releasing hormone is a promising candidate gene for marbling and subcutaneous fat depth in beef cattle.

    PubMed

    Wibowo, Tito A; Michal, Jennifer J; Jiang, Zhihua

    2007-10-01

    The gene corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) is mapped on bovine chromosome 14 (BTA14), where more than 30 fat-related quantitative trait loci (QTLs) have been reported in dairy and beef cattle. The gene product regulates secretion of adrenocorticotrophin hormone, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and multiple hypothalamic functions; therefore, we hypothesized that CRH is a promising candidate gene for beef marbling score (BMS) and subcutaneous fat depth (SFD) in a Wagyu x Limousin F2 population. Two pairs of primers were designed and a total of 5 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified: g.9657C>T, c.10718G>C, c.10841G>A, c.10893A>C, and c.10936G>C (AAFC03076794.1). Among the 4 cSNPs, c.10718G>C, c.10841G>A, and c.10936G>C are missense mutations leading to amino acid changes from arginine to proline, from serine to asparagine, and from aspartic acid to histidine, respectively. These 5 SNPs were genotyped on ~250 F2 progeny, but only 4 were selected as tagging SNPs for association analysis because no historical recombination was observed between c.10718G>C and c.10893A>C. Statistical analysis showed that g.9657C>T, c.10718G>C, and c.10936G>C and their haplotypes had significant effects on SFD, but only c.10936G>C was significantly associated with BMS. The SNP in the promoter (g.9657C>T) led to gain/loss of a CpG site and 4 potential regulatory binding sites. Different haplotypes among the 4 cSNPs significantly affected mRNA secondary structures but were not associated with phenotypes. Overall, our results provide further evidence that CRH is a promising candidate gene for a concordant QTL related to lipid metabolism in mammals. PMID:18059556

  7. Gradual reduction of testosterone using a gonadotropin-releasing hormone vaccination delays castration resistance in a prostate cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Barranco, Jesús A. Junco; Millar, Robert P.; Fuentes, Franklin; Bover, Eddy; Pimentel, Eulogio; Basulto, Roberto; Calzada, Lesvia; Morán, Rolando; Rodríguez, Ayni; Garay, Hilda; Reyes, Osvaldo; Castro, Maria D.; Bringas, Ricardo; Arteaga, Niurka; Toudurí, Henio; Rabassa, Mauricio; Fernández, Yairis; Serradelo, Andrés; Hernández, Eduardo; Guillén, Gerardo E.

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study aimed to design a novel prostate cancer vaccine, the authors of the present study demonstrated the advantage of combining the adjuvants Montanide ISA 51 with very small size proteoliposomes (VSSP) to promote a significant humoral immune response to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in healthy animals. The present study compared the efficacy of this vaccine formulation versus the standard treatment currently available in terms of preventing the development of tumors in DD/S mice injected with Shionogi carcinoma (SC) 115 cells. The results demonstrated that 5 non-vaccinated control mice exhibited a fast tumor growth, and succumbed to the disease within 19–31 days. Mice immunized with the GnRH/Montanide ISA 51/VSSP vaccine exhibited a moderate decline in testosterone levels that was associated with a decrease in anti-GnRH antibody titers, which lead to a sustained tumor growth inhibition. In total, 2 mice in the immunized group exhibited complete remission of the tumor for the duration of the present study. In addition, castrated mice, which were used as a control for standard hormonal therapy, exhibited an accelerated decrease in tumor size. However, tumor relapse was observed between days 50 and 54, and between days 65 and 85, following the injection of SC 155 cells. Therefore, these mice were sacrificed at day 90. The present study concludes that the slow and moderate reduction of testosterone levels observed using the GnRH-based vaccine may delay the appearance of castration resistance in a Shionogi prostate cancer model. These findings suggest that this vaccine may be used to delay castration resistance in patients with prostate cancer. PMID:27446378

  8. Long-term, low-dose lead exposure alters the gonadotropin-releasing hormone system in the male rat.

    PubMed Central

    Sokol, Rebecca Z; Wang, Saixi; Wan, Yu-Jui Y; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Gentzschein, Elisabet; Chapin, Robert E

    2002-01-01

    Lead is a male reproductive toxicant. Data suggest that rats dosed with relatively high levels of lead acetate for short periods of time induced changes in the hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) at the molecular level, but these changes were attenuated with increased concentration of exposure. The current study evaluated whether exposure to low levels of lead acetate over longer periods of time would produce a similar pattern of adaptation to toxicity at the molecular and biologic levels. Adult 100-day-old Sprague-Dawley male rats were dosed with 0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.3% lead acetate in water. Animals were killed after 1, 4, 8, and 16 weeks of treatment. Luteinzing hormone (LH) and GnRH levels were measured in serum, and lead levels were quantified in whole blood. Hypothalamic GnRH mRNA levels were also quantified. We found no significant differences in serum LH and GnRH among the groups of animals treated within each time period. A significant dose-related increase of GnRH mRNA concentrations with lead dosing occurred in animals treated for 1 week. Animals treated for more than 1 week also exhibited a significant increase in GnRH mRNA, but with an attenuation of the increase at the higher concentrations of lead with increased duration of exposure. We conclude that the signals within and between the hypothalamus and pituitary gland appear to be disrupted by long-term, low-dose lead exposure. PMID:12204820

  9. Concurrent Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Agonist Administration with Chemotherapy Improves Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Responses in Young Premenopausal Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee Jeong; Yoon, Tae-In; Chae, Hee Dong; Kim, Jeong Eun; Chae, Eun Young; Yu, Jong Han; Sohn, Guiyun; Ko, Beom Seok; Lee, Jong Won; Son, Byung Ho

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to determine the oncologic efficacy of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist treatment concurrent with chemotherapy in a neoadjuvant setting. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on 332 cases of invasive breast cancer in patients who were <40 years old at diagnosis and received GnRH agonists concurrent with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (GnRH agonist group) or neoadjuvant chemotherapy alone (neochemotherapy-alone group) from December 2010 to September 2014. Pathologic complete response rates (pCR) and Ki-67 changes were evaluated between the two groups. Results Median age was 32±3.9 and 36±3.0 years in the GnRH agonist group and neochemotherapy-alone group, respectively (p<0.001). After adjustment for tumor size, grade, lymph node metastasis, hormone receptor (HR) status, and chemotherapy regimen, the GnRH agonist group exhibited a higher pCR rate with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.98 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37-6.34) and a greater decrease in Ki-67 expression after treatment (p=0.05) than the neochemotherapy-alone group. For HR-negative tumors, the GnRH agonist group showed a higher pCR rate (multivariate OR, 3.50; 95% CI, 1.37-8.95) and a greater decrease in Ki-67 expression (p=0.047). For HR-positive breast cancer, the pCR rate, change in Ki-67 index, and clinical response were higher, and preoperative endocrine prognostic index scores were lower, in the GnRH agonist group, but these did not reach statistical significance. Conclusion Concurrent administration of GnRH agonists during neoadjuvant chemotherapy improved pCR rates and suppressed Ki-67 expression, especially in HR-negative tumors. PMID:26770243

  10. In vitro fertility rate of 129 strain is improved by buserelin (gonadotropin-releasing hormone) administration prior to superovulation.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, K; Sztein, J M

    2012-10-01

    The 129 mice are well recognized for their low fertility and it is speculated that this lack of fertility may be due to the oocyte condition. In this study we investigated superovulation regimens for the 129S1/SvImJ mouse strain to improve the oocyte quality and fertility rate of in vitro fertilization (IVF). Female mice were divided into four groups based on hormone and timing of injection. Group 1 received pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG) and 48 h later human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG); using the same dose, group 2 received hCG 52 h post-PMSG and group 3, 55 h post-PMSG. Group 4 received buserelin (gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist [GnRH]) followed 24 h later by PMSG and then hCG 55 h post-PMSG. IVF was performed using 129S1/SvImJ oocytes and sperm; C57BL/6J sperm with 129S1/SvImJ oocytes was used as fertility control. The IVF fertility rate was 1% (Groups 1 and 2), 17% (Group 3) and 55% (Group 4) for 129 oocytes fertilized with 129 sperm. For 129 oocytes fertilized with C57BL/6J sperm, the fertility rate was 5% (Group 1), 10% (Group 2), 40% (Group 3) and 59% (Group 4). These results suggest that extending the interval time between PMSG and hCG and giving GnRH in addition to the standard PMSG and hCG treatments can improve IVF fertility rate of 129S1/SvImJ mouse strains significantly. PMID:23097563

  11. Androgen inhibits the increases in hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and CRH-immunoreactivity following gonadectomy.

    PubMed

    Bingaman, E W; Magnuson, D J; Gray, T S; Handa, R J

    1994-03-01

    To characterize the effect of androgens on the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis we examined the regulation of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) following gonadectomy and hormone replacement. Three-month-old male Fischer 344 (F344) rats were gonadectomized (GDX) or sham GDX. Control animals remained intact. Animals were sacrificed 1, 4, 7, 10, or 21 days following surgery. GDX rats had significantly elevated (p < 0.05) levels of hypothalamic CRH 21 days after surgery compared to intact and sham-operated rats. In a second study, 3-month-old male F344 rats were GDX and treated with the non-aromatizable androgen, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), using a Silastic capsule containing crystalline DHT propionate subcutaneously implanted in each animal's back. Control animals were GDX and sham-treated or left intact (INT). Three weeks following gonadectomy, CRH levels in the hypothalamus of GDX rats showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) compared to intact animals. DHT treatment, beginning at the time of gonadectomy prevented this increase. CRH or arginine vasopressin (AVP) immunoreactivity was examined using immunocytochemistry. The number of CRH-immunoreactive (IR) cells in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of GDX, DHT-treated animals was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) compared to GDX rats. No differences were seen between treatment groups in CRH-IR cell numbers in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis or the central amygdaloid nucleus or in AVP-IR cell numbers in the PVN. These data demonstrate that long-term castration increases hypothalamic CRH content and CRH-IR cell numbers in the PVN by removal of an androgen-dependent repression. PMID:8159272

  12. Inhibitory effect of chicken gonadotropin-releasing hormone II on food intake in the goldfish, Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Kouhei; Nakamura, Kouta; Shimakura, Sei-Ichi; Miura, Tohru; Kageyama, Haruaki; Uchiyama, Minoru; Shioda, Seiji; Ando, Hironori

    2008-06-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is an evolutionarily conserved neuropeptide with 10 amino acid residues, which possesses some structural variants. A molecular form known as chicken GnRH II ([His(5) Trp(7) Tyr(8)] GnRH, cGnRH II) is widely distributed in vertebrates, and has recently been implicated in the regulation of sexual behavior and food intake in an insectivore, the musk shrew. However, the influence of cGnRH II on feeding behavior has not yet been studied in model animals such as rodents and teleost fish. In this study, therefore, we investigated the role of cGnRH II in the regulation of feeding behavior in the goldfish, and examined its involvement in food intake after intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration. ICV-injected cGnRH II at graded doses, from 0.1 to 10 pmol/g body weight (BW), induced a decrease of food consumption in a dose-dependent manner during 60 min after treatment. Cumulative food intake was significantly decreased by ICV injection of cGnRH II at doses of 1 and 10 pmol/g BW during the 60-min post-treatment observation period. ICV injection of salmon GnRH ([Trp(7) Leu(8)] GnRH, sGnRH) at doses of 0.1-10 pmol/g BW did not affect food intake. The anorexigenic action of cGnRH II was completely blocked by treatment with the GnRH type I receptor antagonist, Antide. However, the anorexigenic action of cGnRH II was not inhibited by treatment with the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) 1/2 receptor antagonist, *-helical CRH((9-41)), and the melanocortin 4 receptor antagonist, HS024. These results suggest that, in the goldfish, cGnRH II, but not sGnRH, acts as an anorexigenic factor, as is the case in the musk shrew, and that the anorexigenic action of cGnRH II is independent of CRH- and melanocortin-signaling pathways. PMID:18342861

  13. Retrograde Endocannabinoid Signaling Reduces GABAergic Synaptic Transmission to Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Imre; Kalló, Imre; Deli, Levente; Vida, Barbara; Hrabovszky, Erik; Fekete, Csaba; Moenter, Suzanne M.; Watanabe, Masahiko; Liposits, Zsolt

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoids suppress fertility via reducing hypothalamic GnRH output. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptor (GABAA-R)-mediated transmission is a major input to GnRH cells that can be excitatory. We hypothesized that cannabinoids act via inhibiting GABAergic input. We performed loose-patch electrophysiological studies of acute slices from adult male GnRH-green fluorescent protein transgenic mice. Bath application of type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) agonist WIN55,212 decreased GnRH neuron firing rate. This action was detectable in presence of the glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid but disappeared when bicuculline was also present, indicating GABAA-R involvement. In immunocytochemical experiments, CB1-immunoreactive axons formed contacts with GnRH neurons and a subset established symmetric synapses characteristic of GABAergic neurotransmission. Functional studies were continued with whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology in presence of tetrodotoxin. WIN55,212 decreased the frequency of GABAA-R-mediated miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs) (reflecting spontaneous vesicle fusion), which was prevented with the CB1 antagonist AM251, indicating collectively that activation of presynaptic CB1 inhibits GABA release. AM251 alone increased mPSC frequency, providing evidence that endocannabinoids tonically inhibit GABAA-R drive onto GnRH neurons. Increased mPSC frequency was absent when diacylglycerol lipase was blocked intracellularly with tetrahydrolipstatin, showing that tonic inhibition is caused by 2-arachidonoylglycerol production of GnRH neurons. CdCl2 in extracellular solution can maintain both action potentials and spontaneous vesicle fusion. Under these conditions, when endocannabinoid-mediated blockade of spontaneous vesicle fusion was blocked with AM251, GnRH neuron firing increased, revealing an endogenous endocannabinoid brake on GnRH neuron firing. Retrograde endocannabinoid signaling may represent an important mechanism under physiological and

  14. Ca2+-Activated K+ Channels in Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone-Stimulated Mouse Gonadotrophs

    PubMed Central

    Waring, Dennis W.; Turgeon, Judith L.

    2009-01-01

    GnRH receptor activation elicits release of intracellular Ca2+, which leads to secretion and also activates Ca2+-activated ion channels underlying membrane voltage changes. The predominant Ca2+-activated ion channels in rat and mouse gonadotrophs are Ca2+-activated K+ channels. To establish the temporal relationship between GnRH-induced changes in intracellular [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]i) and membrane current (Im), and to identify specific Ca2+-activated K+ channels linking GnRH-induced increase in [Ca2+]i to changes in plasma membrane electrical activity, we used single female mouse gonadotrophs in the perforated patch configuration of the patch-clamp technique, which preserves signaling pathways. Simultaneous measurement of [Ca2+]i and Im in voltage-clamped gonadotrophs revealed that GnRH stimulates an increase in [Ca2+]i that precedes outward Im, and that activates two kinetically distinct currents identified, using specific toxin inhibitors, as small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (SK) current (ISK) and large (big) conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) current (IBK). We show that the apamin-sensitive current has an IC50 of 69 pM, consistent with the SK2 channel subtype and confirmed by immunocytochemistry. The magnitude of the SK current response to GnRH was attenuated by 17β-estradiol (E2) pretreatment. Iberiotoxin, an inhibitor of BK channels, completely blocked the residual apamin-insensitive outward Im, substantiating that IBK is a component of the GnRH-induced outward Im. In contrast to its suppression of ISK, E2 pretreatment augmented peak IBK. SK or BK channel inhibition modulated GnRH-stimulated LH secretion, implicating a role for these channels in gonadotroph function. In summary, in mouse gonadotrophs the GnRH-stimulated increase in [Ca2+]i activates ISK and IBK, which are differentially regulated by E2 and which may be targets for E2 positive feedback in LH secretion. PMID:19106218

  15. Effects of 31 kDa bovine inhibin on FSH and LH in rat pituitary cells in vitro: antagonism of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonists.

    PubMed

    Farnworth, P G; Robertson, D M; de Kretser, D M; Burger, H G

    1988-11-01

    The effects of 31 kDa bovine inhibin on the release of FSH and LH stimulated by gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) or its agonist analogue buserelin have been studied using 5-day-old cultures of pituitary cells prepared from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Exposure of cultures to increasing concentrations of inhibin for 3 days before and during a 4-h stimulation with GnRH resulted in the progressive suppression of both basal and stimulated gonadotrophin release. At the highest inhibin concentrations FSH release was abolished (inhibin median inhibitory concentration (IC50) = 0.15 U/ml) whereas LH release was suppressed by 75% (IC50 = 0.93 U/ml). To correct for the reduced size of the FSH pool resulting from inhibin pretreatment, the amount of FSH or LH released by an agonist was expressed as a proportion of the total hormone available for release in each case. Following this adjustment, concentrations of inhibin producing maximal effects increased the GnRH median effective concentration for FSH release 4.1-fold and that for LH release 2.2-fold, with inhibin IC50 values of 0.45 and 0.32 U/ml respectively. Inhibin also suppressed the maximum proportion of both FSH and LH that excess GnRH released in 4 h by 36%, with IC50 values of 0.53 and 0.76 U/ml respectively. These effects were not changed by reduction of the inhibin pretreatment period from 3 days to 1 day or by exclusion of inhibin during the stimulation period. After a 3-day pretreatment, inhibin inhibited gonadotrophin release by buserelin less effectively than that by GnRH, but the pattern of antagonism was the same.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3143796

  16. Occurrence of D-aspartic acid and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid in rat neuroendocrine tissues and their role in the modulation of luteinizing hormone and growth hormone release.

    PubMed

    D'Aniello, A; Di Fiore, M M; Fisher, G H; Milone, A; Seleni, A; D'Aniello, S; Perna, A F; Ingrosso, D

    2000-04-01

    Using two specific and sensitive fluorometric/HPLC methods and a GC-MS method, alone and in combination with D-aspartate oxidase, we have demonstrated for the first time that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), in addition to D-aspartate (D-Asp), is endogenously present as a natural molecule in rat nervous system and endocrine glands. Both of these amino acids are mostly concentrated at nmol/g levels in the adenohypophysis, hypothalamus, brain, and testis. The adenohypophysis maximally showed the ability to accumulate D-Asp when the latter is exogenously administered. In vivo experiments, consisting of the i.p. injection of D-Asp, showed that D-Asp induced both growth hormone and luteinizing hormone (LH) release. However, in vitro experiments showed that D-Asp was able to induce LH release from adenohypophysis only when this gland was co-incubated with the hypothalamus. This is because D-Asp also induces the release of GnRH from the hypothalamus, which in turn is directly responsible for the D-Asp-induced LH secretion from the pituitary gland. Compared to D-Asp, NMDA elicits its hormone release action at concentrations approximately 100-fold lower than D-Asp. D-AP5, a specific NMDA receptor antagonist, inhibited D-Asp and NMDA hormonal activity, demonstrating that these actions are mediated by NMDA receptors. NMDA is biosynthesized from D-Asp by an S-adenosylmethionine-dependent enzyme, which we tentatively denominated as NMDA synthase. PMID:10744627

  17. Histamine released from epidermal keratinocytes plays a role in α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone-induced itching in mice.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kyoko; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Yoshihisa, Yoko; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2015-11-01

    Sunburn, wound repair, and chronic renal failure with hemodialysis are usually accompanied by both pigmentation and itching. Proopiomelanocortin-derived α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is produced in response to external stimuli, such as UV irradiation, and is involved in cutaneous pigmentation. However, it is unclear whether α-MSH is also involved in the itching. We therefore investigated whether α-MSH elicited itch-related responses in mice. We found that an intradermal injection of α-MSH induced hind-paw scratching, an itch-related response, in mice. The α-MSH-induced scratching was inhibited by the μ-opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone and the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine. In mast cell-deficient mice, α-MSH also elicited scratching, which was inhibited by terfenadine. The immunoreactivity for l-histidine decarboxylase, a key enzyme required for the production of histamine, histamine, and the melanocortin 1 and 5 receptors were shown in not only mast cells but also keratinocytes in murine skin. In addition to the expression of l-histidine decarboxylase and melanocortin 1 and 5 receptors, the mouse keratinocyte cell lines (Pam212) also showed immunoreactivity for l-histidine decarboxylase, histamine, and melanocortin 1 and 5 receptors. The application of α-MSH induced the release of histamine from Pam212 cells. These findings indicate that α-MSH may play an important role in the itching associated with pigmented cutaneous lesions and that the histamine released from keratinocytes is involved in this α-MSH-induced itching. PMID:26358220

  18. The increase in the number of spines on the gonadotropin-releasing hormone neuron across pubertal development in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Songzi; Takumi, Ken; Iijima, Norio; Ozawa, Hitoshi

    2016-05-01

    The onset of puberty is initiated by an increase in the release of the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) from GnRH neurons in the hypothalamus. However, the precise mechanism that leads to the activation of GnRH neurons at puberty remains controversial. Spines are small protrusions on the surface of dendrites that normally receive excitatory inputs. In this study, we analyzed the number and morphology of spines on GnRH neurons to investigate changes in synaptic inputs across puberty in rats. For morphological estimation, we measured the diameter of the head (DH) of each spine and classified them into small-type (DH < 0.65 μm), large-type (DH > 0.65 μm) and giant-type (DH > 0.9 μm). The greatest number of spines was observed at the proximal dendrite within 50 μm of the soma. At the soma and proximal dendrite, the number of spines was greater in adults than in juveniles in both male and female individuals. Classification of spines revealed that the increase in spine number was due to increases in large- and giant-type spines. To further explore the relationship between spines on GnRH neurons and pubertal development, we next analyzed adult rats neonatally exposed to estradiol benzoate, in which puberty onset and reproductive functions are disrupted. We found a decrease in the number of all types of spines. These results suggest that GnRH neurons become to receive more and greater excitatory inputs on the soma and proximal dendrites as a result of the changes that occur at puberty and that alteration to spines plays a pivotal role in normal pubertal development. PMID:26667127

  19. Histone Deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) Participates in the Down-Regulation of Corticotropin Releasing Hormone Gene (crh) Expression

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Lydia; Foradori, Chad D.; Lalmansingh, Avin S.; Sharma, Dharmendra; Handa, Robert J.; Uht, Rosalie M.

    2011-01-01

    The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH) plays a central role in regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Medial parvocellular neurons of the PVH (mpPVH) integrate sensory and humoral inputs to maintain homeostasis. Humeral inputs include glucocorticoids secreted by the adrenals, which down-regulate HPA activation. A primary glucocorticoid target is the population of mpPVH neurons that synthesize and secrete corticotropin-releasing factors, the most potent of which is corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). Although CRH gene (crh) expression is known to be down-regulated by glucocorticoids, the mechanisms by which this process occurs are still poorly understood. To begin this study we postulated that glucocorticoid repression of crh involves HDAC recruitment to the region of the crh proximal promoter. To evaluate this hypothesis, we treated hypothalamic cells that express CRH with the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA). As predicted, treatment with TSA led to increased CRH mRNA levels and crh promoter activity. Although co-treatment with Dex (10−7 M) reduced the TSA effect on mRNA levels, it failed to reduce promoter activity; however co-transfection of HDAC1 but not 3 restored Dex inhibition. A distinction between HDAC1 and 3 was also apparent with respect to crh promoter occupancy. Dex led to increased HDAC1 but not HDAC3 occupancy. In vivo studies revealed that CRH-immunoreactive (-ir) neurons contained HDAC1- and HDAC3-ir. Collectively, these data point to a role for HDAC1 in the physiologic regulation of crh. PMID:21463644

  20. Histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) participates in the down-regulation of corticotropin releasing hormone gene (crh) expression.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lydia; Foradori, Chad D; Lalmansingh, Avin S; Sharma, Dharmendra; Handa, Robert J; Uht, Rosalie M

    2011-08-01

    The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH) plays a central role in regulating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Medial parvocellular neurons of the PVH (mpPVH) integrate sensory and humoral inputs to maintain homeostasis. Humoral inputs include glucocorticoids secreted by the adrenals, which down-regulate HPA activation. A primary glucocorticoid target is the population of mpPVH neurons that synthesize and secrete corticotropin-releasing factors, the most potent of which is corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). Although CRH gene (crh) expression is known to be down-regulated by glucocorticoids, the mechanisms by which this process occurs are still poorly understood. To begin this study we postulated that glucocorticoid repression of crh involves HDAC recruitment to the region of the crh proximal promoter. To evaluate this hypothesis, we treated hypothalamic cells that express CRH with the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA). As predicted, treatment with TSA led to increased CRH mRNA levels and crh promoter activity. Although co-treatment with Dex (10(-7)M) reduced the TSA effect on mRNA levels, it failed to reduce promoter activity; however co-transfection of HDAC1 but not 3 restored Dex inhibition. A distinction between HDAC1 and 3 was also apparent with respect to crh promoter occupancy. Dex led to increased HDAC1 but not HDAC3 occupancy. In vivo studies revealed that CRH-immunoreactive (-ir) neurons contained HDAC1- and HDAC3-ir. Collectively, these data point to a role for HDAC1 in the physiologic regulation of crh. PMID:21463644

  1. Dopamine D1 and corticotrophin-releasing hormone type-2α receptors assemble into functionally interacting complexes in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Fuenzalida, J; Galaz, P; Araya, K A; Slater, P G; Blanco, E H; Campusano, J M; Ciruela, F; Gysling, K

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Dopamine and corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH; also known as corticotrophin-releasing factor) are key neurotransmitters in the interaction between stress and addiction. Repeated treatment with cocaine potentiates glutamatergic transmission in the rat basolateral amygdala/cortex pathway through a synergistic action of D1-like dopamine receptors and CRH type-2α receptors (CRF2α receptors). We hypothesized that this observed synergism could be instrumented by heteromers containing the dopamine D1 receptor and CRF2α receptor. Experimental Approach D1/CRF2α receptor heteromerization was demonstrated in HEK293T cells using co-immunoprecipitation, BRET and FRET assays, and by using the heteromer mobilization strategy. The ability of D1 receptors to signal through calcium, when singly expressed or co-expressed with CRF2α receptors, was evaluated by the calcium mobilization assay. Key Results D1/CRF2α receptor heteromers were observed in HEK293T cells. When singly expressed, D1 receptors were mostly located at the cell surface whereas CRF2α receptors accumulated intracellularly. Interestingly, co-expression of both receptors promoted D1 receptor intracellular and CRF2α receptor cell surface targeting. The heteromerization of D1/CRF2α receptors maintained the signalling through cAMP of both receptors but switched D1 receptor signalling properties, as the heteromeric D1 receptor was able to mobilize intracellular calcium upon stimulation with a D1 receptor agonist. Conclusions and Implications D1 and CRF2α receptors are capable of heterodimerization in living cells. D1/CRF2α receptor heteromerization might account, at least in part, for the complex physiological interactions established between dopamine and CRH in normal and pathological conditions such as addiction, representing a new potential pharmacological target. PMID:25073922

  2. Review of outcomes after cessation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist treatment of girls with precocious puberty.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Paul; Silverman, Lawrence A; Geffner, Mitchell E; Neely, E Kirk; Gould, Errol; Danoff, Theodore M

    2014-03-01

    Although gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists (GnRHa) have been the standard of care of central precocious puberty (CPP) management for many years, there are still questions about the long-term consequences of treatment. With increased utilization of GnRHa treatment, it is now possible to assess posttreatment outcomes in the immediate posttreatment period and into adulthood. This literature review reports on the long-term effects of GnRHa therapy in girls with CPP after therapy has been discontinued. Published reports confirm the reversibility of hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis suppression in females after cessation of GnRHa therapy, with the majority of patients achieving ovulatory menstrual cycles of normal timing and duration. GnRHa therapy does not appear to induce polycystic ovary syndrome or have long-term negative repercussions on either bone mineral density or body composition. Evidence is currently insufficient to identify agent-specific differences in outcomes, reproductive function, and health of offspring. PMID:24719967

  3. A Phenotypic High Throughput Screening Assay for the Identification of Pharmacoperones for the Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emery; Spicer, Timothy; Chase, Peter; Scampavia, Louis; Janovick, Jo Ann

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We describe a phenotypic high throughput screening (HTS) calcium flux assay designed to identify pharmacoperones for the gonadotropin releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR). Pharmacoperones are target-specific, small molecules that diffuse into cells, rescue misfolded protein mutants, and restore them to function. Rescue is based on correcting the trafficking of mutants that would otherwise be retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and unable to function correctly. This approach identifies drugs with a significant degree of novelty, relying on cellular mechanisms that are not currently exploited. Development of such assays is important, since the extensive use of agonist/antagonist screens alone means that useful chemical structures may be present in existing libraries but have not been previously identified using existing methods. Our assay utilizes cell lines stably expressing a GnRHR mutant under the control of a tetracycline (OFF) transactivator. This allows us to quantitate the level of functional and properly trafficked G protein coupled receptors present in each test well. Furthermore, since we are able to turn receptor expression on and off, we can rapidly eliminate the majority of false positives from our screening results. Our data show that this approach is likely to be successful in identifying hits from large chemical libraries. PMID:24831790

  4. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist trigger: the way to eliminate ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome--a 20-year experience.

    PubMed

    Kol, Shahar; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2010-11-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) trigger instead of human chorionic gonadotropin in the context of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) prevention has been used for >20 years. In its first decade it did not gain popularity because it cannot work in GnRHa-based ovarian stimulation protocols. The introduction of GnRH antagonists has revolutionized our ability to eliminate OHSS completely because patients at high risk for OHSS can be triggered with GnRHa. This has been documented in randomized prospective studies, in which none of the patients randomized to the agonist trigger arm developed OHSS. In other words, GnRHa proved to be a potent tool that, truly remarkably, never fails. Although there is some debate concerning the clinical outcome of these cycles, data so far indicate that aggressive luteal support can ensure a good outcome. Moreover, the large number of frozen embryos in these cycles results in excellent per-oocyte retrieval pregnancy rates. In summary, GnRHa ovulatory trigger is the ultimate tool for complete OHSS prevention. GnRH antagonist-based ovarian stimulation protocols should be considered in OHSS high-risk patients so GnRHa trigger can be used if needed. PMID:21082509

  5. Effects of acute and chronic ketoconazole administration on hypothalamo--pituitary--adrenal axis activity and brain corticotropin-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Smagin, Gennady N; Goeders, Nick E

    2004-11-01

    We have been investigating the effects of ketoconazole on cocaine reward in rats for several years now. However, we recently confirmed that ketoconazole-induced changes in cocaine self-administration and reinstatement do not always correspond with decreases in plasma corticosterone, which suggests that other mechanisms must be underlying the behavioral effects that we observe. This experiment was therefore designed to determine the effects of acute, repeated and chronic ketoconazole administration on corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) content in hypothalamic and extra-hypothalamic brain sites in rats following the same dosing regimen that we use in our behavioral studies. Although ketoconazole significantly increased the concentration of ACTH in trunk blood, there were no significant effects on plasma cortisol, corticosterone or testosterone. There was also a significant increase in CRH content in the median eminence after the acute administration of ketoconazole that just failed to reach statistical significance following repeated or chronic administration. However, acute, repeated and chronic treatment with ketoconazole each significantly increased CRH content in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPC), but did not consistently affect the peptide in any other brain region studied. Since the MPC and CRH have been implicated in the neurobiology of cocaine, CRH-induced alterations in dopaminergic neurotransmission may play an important role in this peptide's effects on cocaine responsiveness. Taken together with the results from previous studies, these data suggest that ketoconazole may affect cocaine reward, at least in part, through interactions with dopamine and CRH within the MPC. PMID:15288701

  6. Molecular cloning and brain distribution of three types of gonadotropin-releasing hormone from mummichog Fundulus heteroclitus.

    PubMed

    Ohkubo, M; Aranishi, F; Shimizu, A

    2010-02-01

    Complementary DNAs encoding gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) precursors were cloned from the mummichog Fundulus heteroclitus brain, showing that this species has three GnRH forms, i.e. medaka Oryzias latipes GnRH (mdGnRH), chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II) and Atlantic salmon Salmo salar GnRH (sGnRH). The F. heteroclitus prepro GnRHs have common structural architectures of vertebrate GnRHs, consisting of the signal peptide, 10 amino acids of mature peptide, GKR sequence and GnRH-associated peptide (GAP). Phylogenetic analysis of fish prepro GnRHs showed that F. heteroclitus mdGnRH is a homologue of sbGnRHs and mdGnRHs of other acanthopterygian. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that mdGnRH was abundantly expressed in the olfactory bulb and in olfactory lobe areas and is expressed in the pituitary. The cGnRH-II was mainly expressed in the midbrain and interbrain areas, and the sGnRH was expressed not only in the olfactory bulb but also in other regions of the brain. These results suggest that the mdGnRH is involved in the stimulation of gonadotrophs in the pituitary, whereas cGnRH-II and sGnRH are involved in neurotransmission and neuromodulation. PMID:20738714

  7. Corticotropin Releasing Hormone and Urocortin 3 Stimulate Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression through the cAMP/CREB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Sang Hoon; Ma, Elise L; Lee, Yunna; Taché, Yvette; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Im, Eunok

    2015-10-23

    Colonic epithelium is the first line of defense against various pathological offenses in the gut. Previous studies have shown that the peptides of the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) family modulate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A production in other cells. Here we sought to investigate whether CRH and urocortin (Ucn) 3 regulate VEGF-A secretion in colonocytes through CRH receptors and to elucidate the underlying mechanism of action. CRH and Ucn 3 significantly increased the expression levels of VEGF-A mRNA and protein through CRH receptor 1 and 2, respectively, in human colonic epithelial cells and primary mouse intestinal epithelial cells. Underlying mechanisms involve activation of adenylyl cyclase with subsequent increase of intracellular cAMP level and increased DNA binding activity of transcription factor CREB on VEGF-A promoter region. Finally, genetic deficiency of CREB decreased intestinal inflammation and VEGF-A expression in a dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis model. These results show that activation of CRH receptors by CRH ligands stimulates VEGF-A expression in intestinal epithelial cells through the cAMP/CREB pathway. Since VEGF-A boosts inflammatory responses through angiogenesis, these data suggest that CREB may be a key effector of CRH and Ucn 3-dependent inflammatory angiogenesis. PMID:26350463

  8. Growth Hormone-Releasing Peptide 6 Enhances the Healing Process and Improves the Esthetic Outcome of the Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza Marí, Yssel; Fernández Mayola, Maday; Aguilera Barreto, Ana; García Ojalvo, Ariana; Bermúdez Alvarez, Yilian; Mir Benítez, Ana Janet; Berlanga Acosta, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    In addition to its cytoprotective effects, growth hormone-releasing peptide 6 (GHRP-6) proved to reduce liver fibrotic induration. CD36 as one of the GHRP-6 receptors appears abundantly represented in cutaneous wounds granulation tissue. The healing response in a scenario of CD36 agonistic stimulation had not been previously investigated. Excisional full-thickness wounds (6 mmØ) were created in the dorsum of Wistar rats and topically treated twice a day for 5 days. The universal model of rabbit's ears hypertrophic scars was implemented and the animals were treated daily for 30 days. Treatments for both species were based on a CMC jelly composition containing GHRP-6 400 μg/mL. Wounds response characterization included closure dynamic, RT-PCR transcriptional profile, histology, and histomorphometric procedures. The rats experiment indicated that GHRP-6 pharmacodynamics involves attenuation of immunoinflammatory mediators, their effector cells, and the reduction of the expression of fibrotic cytokines. Importantly, in the hypertrophic scars rabbit's model, GHRP-6 intervention dramatically reduced the onset of exuberant scars by activating PPARγ and reducing the expression of fibrogenic cytokines. GHRP-6 showed no effect on the reversion of consolidated lesions. This evidence supports the notion that CD36 is an active and pharmacologically approachable receptor to attenuate wound inflammation and accelerate its closure so as to improve wound esthetic. PMID:27200188

  9. Effects of a commercial canine gonadotropin releasing hormone vaccine on estrus suppression and estrous behavior in mares.

    PubMed

    Donovan, C E; Hazzard, T; Schmidt, A; LeMieux, J; Hathaway, F; Kutzler, M A

    2013-11-01

    We investigated the effect of immunization against gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) using a commercial canine GnRH vaccine on estrus suppression and unwanted estrous behavior in mares. In experiment 1, mares were immunized (n = 6) twice with vaccine (5 mL) given intramuscularly 4 weeks apart or received a control diluent (n = 5). Transrectal ultrasonographic examination of the reproductive tracts was performed three days a week for 40 weeks after initial vaccination. Blood samples were collected weekly for GnRH antibody titer and progesterone concentration determination. In experiment 2, privately-owned mares (n = 12) were immunized twice with vaccine (1 mL) given intramuscularly 4 weeks apart. Blood samples were collected prior to each vaccination as well as 12 and 20 weeks after initial treatment, and transrectal ultrasonographic examinations of the reproductive tracts were performed 12 weeks after the first vaccination. Vaccinated mares in experiment 1 responded with a GnRH antibody titer, progesterone concentrations significantly lower than controls, and cessation of ovarian activity. Vaccinated mares in experiment 2 also responded with a GnRH antibody titer, progesterone concentrations that remained basal for the duration of the study, and cessation of ovarian activity. Owners of vaccinated mares in experiment 2 reported that the number of unwanted estrous behaviors present before vaccination significantly decreased following vaccination. In conclusion, GnRH immunization using a canine GnRH vaccine is an effective method for suppressing estrus and unwanted estrous behavior. PMID:24083943

  10. PET study in a patient with spinocerebellar degeneration before and after long-term administration of thyrotropin releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Tanji, H; Nagasawa, H; Hayashi, T; Onodera, H; Fujiwara, T; Itoh, M; Ido, T; Itoyama, Y

    1996-01-01

    We studied the chronic effect of thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) in a patient with spinocerebellar degeneration by measuring cerebral metabolic rate for glucose (CMRG1c) using 2-[18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18FDG) and positron emission tomography (PET). A 56-year-old female, who had suffered from progressive ataxia for 2 years, was treated by intravenous administration of 2 mg TRH for 3 weeks, and CMRG1c of the brain was measured before and after treatment. CMRG1c was markedly decreased in the cerebellum and there was no significant difference before and after the treatment, i.e. mean CMRG1c values were 4.92 and 4.90 mg/100 g/min, and the ratios of the cerebellum versus the frontal cortex were 0.50 and 0.51, respectively. The degree of disequilibrium of her body examined with stabilography became better by the 19th day and further improved by the 26th day after the start of TRH treatment. Based on the present study we conclude that long-term administration of TRH did not improve CMRG1c in the cerebellum, but evidently improved the sway of gravity center by stabilography. We speculate that the chronic effect of TRH was not necessarily due to an improvement of cerebellar function, because TRH receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous system. PMID:24487517

  11. Cloning, expression, and purification of a highly immunogenic recombinant gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) chimeric peptide.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinshu; Zhu, Zheng; Duan, Peng; Li, Wenjia; Zhang, Yin; Wu, Jie; Hu, Zhuoyi; Roque, Rouel S; Liu, Jingjing

    2006-12-01

    To design an anti-gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) vaccine capable of eliciting strong immunogenicity, a gene fragment encoding a chimeric peptide was constructed using polymerase chain reaction and ligated into a novel expression vector for recombinant expression in a T7 RNA polymerase-based expression system. The chimeric peptide called GnRH3-hinge-MVP contained three linear repeats of GnRH (GnRH3), a fragment of the human IgG1 hinge region, and a T-cell epitope of measles virus protein (MVP). The expression plasmid contained the GnRH3-hinge-MVP construct ligated to its fusion partner (AnsB-C) via an unique acid labile Asp-Pro linker. The recombinant fusion protein was expressed in an inclusion body in Escherichia coli under IPTG or lactose induction and the target peptide was easily purified using washing of urea and ethanol precipitation. The target chimeric peptide was isolated from the fusion partner following acid hydrolysis and purified using DEAE-Sephacel chromatography. The purified GnRH3-hinge-MVP was determined to be highly homogeneous by IEF analysis and the N-terminal sequencing. Further, immunization of female mice with the recombinant chimeric peptide resulted in generation of high-titer antibodies specific for GnRH. The results showed that GnRH3-hinge-MVP could be considered as a candidate anti-GnRH vaccine. PMID:17064933

  12. Isolation and characterization of the corticotropin-releasing factor-related diuretic hormone receptor in Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Ri; Zandawala, Meet; Lange, Angela B; Orchard, Ian

    2016-09-01

    Rhodnius prolixus, the vector of human Chagas disease, is a hemipteran insect that undergoes rapid post-feeding diuresis following ingestion of a blood meal that can be up to 10 times its initial body weight. Corticotropin-releasing factor-related diuretic hormone (Rhopr-CRF/DH) and serotonin are neurohormones that are synergistic in increasing rates of fluid secretion by Malpighian tubules during this rapid post-feeding diuresis. A Rhopr-CRF/DH receptor transcript has now been isolated and characterized from fifth instar R. prolixus. The receptor is a family B1 (secretin) G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and was deorphaned in a heterologous cellular system using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells stably expressing a promiscuous G-protein (Gα16). This assay was also used to demonstrate the presence of Rhopr-CRF/DH in the haemolymph of R. prolixus in response to blood-gorging. Two additional cell lines were used in this heterologous assay to verify that the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) pathway and not the inositol triphosphate (IP3) pathway was stimulated upon activation of the receptor. Lastly, quantitative PCR demonstrated strong receptor expression in digestive tissues, upper Malpighian tubules and reproductive tissues. Identification of the Rhopr-CRF/DH receptor now provides tools for a more detailed understanding into the precise coordination of diuresis and other physiological processes in R. prolixus. PMID:27237375

  13. Associations between Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone-Related Genes and Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Ayaka; Sato, Naoko; Suzuki, Naoki; Kano, Michiko; Tanaka, Yukari; Kanazawa, Motoyori; Aoki, Masashi; Fukudo, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional disorder with distinct features of stress-related pathophysiology. A key mediator of the stress response is corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). Although some candidate genes have been identified in stress-related disorders, few studies have examined CRH-related gene polymorphisms. Therefore, we tested our hypothesis that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CRH-related genes influence the features of IBS. Methods: In total, 253 individuals (123 men and 130 women) participated in this study. They comprised 111 IBS individuals and 142 healthy controls. The SNP genotypes in CRH (rs28364015 and rs6472258) and CRH-binding protein (CRH-BP) (rs10474485) were determined by direct sequencing and real-time polymerase chain reaction. The emotional states of the subjects were evaluated using the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Perceived Stress Scale, and the Self-rating Depression Scale. Results: Direct sequencing of the rs28364015 SNP of CRH revealed no genetic variation among the study subjects. There was no difference in the genotype distributions and allele frequencies of rs6472258 and rs10474485 between IBS individuals and controls. However, IBS subjects with diarrhea symptoms without the rs10474485 A allele showed a significantly higher emotional state score than carriers. Conclusions: These results suggest that the CRH and CRH-BP genes have no direct effect on IBS status. However, the CRH-BP SNP rs10474485 has some effect on IBS-related emotional abnormalities and resistance to psychosocial stress. PMID:26882083

  14. Synthesis and biology of ring-modified l-Histidine containing thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) analogues.

    PubMed

    Meena, Chhuttan L; Thakur, Avinash; Nandekar, Prajwal P; Sharma, Shyam S; Sangamwar, Abhay T; Jain, Rahul

    2016-03-23

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) analogues bearing halogen groups (Cl, Br and I) at the C-2 and/or C-5 position, and the alkyl group (CH3, C2H5, C3H7, CH2C6H5) at the N-1 position of the imidazole ring of the central histidine residue were synthesized and evaluated for the receptor binding, calcium mobilization (FLIPR), and IP-1 assay at the HEK mTRHR1 and HEK mTRHR2 expressing cell lines. The most promising analogue 7k showed 925-fold selectivity for HEK mTRH-R2 receptor subtype in the IP-1 assay, 272-fold selectivity for HEK mTRH-R2 receptor subtype in the FLIPR assay, and 21-fold receptor binding specificity at HEK TRH-R2 receptor subtype. The peptide 7k was evaluated in vitro in a brain membrane competitive binding assay, and for stability analysis in the presence of TRH-DE, in vivo. The analogue 7k showed decrease in the sleeping time by more than 76% in a pentobarbital-induced sleeping assay, and showed comparatively less elevation in the TSH level in the blood, in vivo. The computational homology modeling of TRH-R1 and TRH-R2 and docking study with the most potent peptide 7k provide impetus to design CNS specific TRH analogues. PMID:26854379

  15. Local corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) signals to its receptor CRHR1 during postnatal development of the mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Isabella; Bhullar, Paramjit K; Tepe, Burak; Ortiz-Guzman, Joshua; Huang, Longwen; Herman, Alexander M; Chaboub, Lesley; Deneen, Benjamin; Justice, Nicholas J; Arenkiel, Benjamin R

    2016-01-01

    Neuropeptides play important physiological functions during distinct behaviors such as arousal, learning, memory, and reproduction. However, the role of local, extrahypothalamic neuropeptide signaling in shaping synapse formation and neuronal plasticity in the brain is not well understood. Here, we characterize the spatiotemporal expression profile of the neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and its receptor CRHR1 in the mouse OB throughout development. We found that CRH-expressing interneurons are present in the external plexiform layer, that its cognate receptor is expressed by granule cells, and show that both CRH and CRHR1 expression enriches in the postnatal period when olfaction becomes important towards olfactory-related behaviors. Further, we provide electrophysiological evidence that CRHR1-expressing granule cells functionally respond to CRH ligand, and that the physiological circuitry of CRHR1 knockout mice is abnormal, leading to impaired olfactory behaviors. Together, these data suggest a physiologically relevant role for local CRH signaling towards shaping the neuronal circuitry within the mouse OB. PMID:25224546

  16. The gene for the neuropeptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone is expressed in the mammary gland of lactating rats.

    PubMed Central

    Palmon, A; Ben Aroya, N; Tel-Or, S; Burstein, Y; Fridkin, M; Koch, Y

    1994-01-01

    The high concentration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) in milk of several species implies that the mammary gland is either a site of synthesis for this neuropeptide or that it is efficiently concentrated from plasma by this organ. By PCR amplification of mammary gland cDNA, we have demonstrated expression of the mRNA for GnRH. The GnRH mRNA was present in the mammary gland of pregnant and lactating rats but not of virgin rats, implying that expression of the GnRH gene is activated during pregnancy, probably by prolactin. In contrast, actin mRNA was evident in all the preparations of mammary glands. Since GnRH is also known to be synthesized by the placenta, it is likely that the placenta and the mammary gland are complementary units by which the mother exercises control over the development and the metabolism of the infant during pregnancy as well as after parturition. In addition, GnRH synthesized by the mammary gland may also affect the mother by a paracrine and/or an endocrine mechanism. Images PMID:8197170

  17. Successful pregnancy after treatment of deep adenomyosis with cytoreductive surgery and subsequent gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist: a case report.

    PubMed

    Huang, W H; Yang, T S; Yuan, C C

    1998-12-01

    Adenomyosis is a common pathologic finding significantly related to the menstrual and reproductive characteristics of women. Although noted during younger reproductive years, it usually presents in women over 35 years of age. For those with a strong desire to preserve fertility, there is presently no uniform agreement on the most appropriate therapeutic methods to manage the condition. Herein, we present a case of long-term secondary infertility with successful pregnancy after treatment of deep adenomyosis with cytoreductive surgery and a subsequent six-month course of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) therapy. For those who want to conceive, early combined GnRHa therapy immediately following cytoreductive surgery and a delay of four to six months before attempting to fall pregnant is advisable. This is because adenomyosis tends to recur rapidly and the myometrium can be significantly disrupted during surgery. The major obstetric complications, such as uterine atony, rupture or placenta accreta, do not increase with adenomyosis during pregnancy. Although two events of threatened abortion and one of preterm labor were encountered during the pregnancy course, a healthy 2,900-g female was delivered by low transverse cesarean section at term. A cesarean section was performed because of previous large cytoreductive surgery. In contrast to GnRHa therapy alone, we report an effective alternative to hysterectomy in order to maintain fertility and achieve successful pregnancy. PMID:9884446

  18. Brainstem Neuronal and Behavioral Activation by Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Depend on the Behavioral State of the Animal

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Catherine S.; Rose, James D.

    2011-01-01

    Central administration of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is known to enhance locomotion across a wide range of vertebrates, including the roughskin newt, Taricha granulosa. The present study aimed to identify the CRH effects on locomotor-controlling medullary neurons that underlie the peptide’s behavioral stimulating actions. Single neurons were recorded from the rostral medullary reticular formation before and after intraventricular infusion of CRH in freely behaving newts and newts paralyzed with a myoneural blocking agent. In behaving newts, most medullary neurons showed increased firing 3-23 min after CRH infusion. Decreases in firing were less common. Of particular importance was the finding that in behaving newts, medullary neurons showed a cyclic firing pattern that was strongly associated with an increase in the incidence of walking bouts, an effect blocked by pretreatment with the CRH antagonist, alpha-helical CRH and not seen following vehicle administration. In contrast, the majority of medullary neurons sampled in immobilized newts lacked temporal cyclicity in their firing patterns following intraventricular infusion of CRH. That is, there was no evidence for a fictive locomotor activity pattern. Our results indicate that the actual expression of locomotion is a critical factor in regulating the behavior-activating effects of CRH and underscore the importance of using an awake, unrestrained animal for analysis of a hormone’s neurobehavioral actions. PMID:22137972

  19. Immunocytochemical localization of gonadotropin-releasing hormones in the brain of a viviparous caecilian amphibian, Typhlonectes natans (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    Ebersole, T J; Boyd, S K

    2000-01-01

    The molecular forms and brain distribution of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) have been well studied in the amphibian orders Urodela (salamanders and newts) and Anura (frogs and toads). In the order Gymnophiona (caecilians), however, few species have been investigated. Antibodies against different molecular forms of GnRH were used to immunohistochemically localize the GnRH-containing neurons in the brain of the caecilian, Typhlonectes natans which differs from most other amphibians in that it is viviparous. An antibody selective for mammalian GnRH recognized cell bodies predominantly in the septo-preoptic area but only with occasional cell bodies in the lateral hypothalamus and ventral thalamic eminence. Thick, prominent fibers in the septal region and fibers within the terminal nerve were also labeled. An antibody selective for chicken-II GnRH labeled a population of cell bodies in the dorsal hypothalamus, ventral thalamus and midbrain tegmentum. Thin fibers projected laterally from these cells. An antibody specific for salmon GnRH did not label cell bodies but did show intense terminal field immunoreactivity. The brain of this caecilian, therefore, contains three antigenically distinct forms of GnRH. The mammalian and chicken-II GnRH peptides have been shown in other amphibians but the distribution of cells and fibers was unique in this caecilian. PMID:10773622

  20. Evidence that a decrease in opioid tone may evoke preovulatory luteinizing hormone release in the rat.

    PubMed

    Allen, L G; Kalra, S P

    1986-06-01

    We have assessed the effects on LH release of prolonged naloxone (NAL) treatment before the critical period on proestrus. When LH secretion was monitored at 5-min intervals immediately after the start of continuous NAL infusion (2 mg/0.6 ml saline X h iv) at 1000 h, two types of responses were observed. In three of six rats, a small increase (1-2 ng rat LHRH-2/ml) during the first hour was followed by a sharp rise to 4-5 ng/ml in the second hour and a gradual return to baseline levels (0.5-1.00 ng/ml) in the third hour of infusion. In the remaining rats, LH responses were small with peak levels reaching 2 ng/ml range. When the effects were monitored 1 h after starting NAL infusion at 1000 h, the LH response was improved. Peak LH levels observed shortly before or after 1200 h varied between 4-14 ng/ml and in some rats the levels were comparable to those seen normally in the afternoon of proestrus (9-24 ng/ml). However, delaying the start of NAL infusion to 1200 h produced LH surges before 1400 h, with peak levels (27.5 +/- 5.5 ng/ml) in the range of normal preovulatory LH surges (peak levels 16.6 +/- 2.5 ng/ml), followed by a steady decrease in LH secretion. Additionally, sc NAL pellets implanted at 0930 h provoked premature LH hypersecretion with a temporal pattern (0930-1430 h) and magnitude (peak levels, 26.3 +/- 4.3 ng/ml between 1100-1200 h) comparable to the normal preovulatory LH surge observed after 1330 h. Since NAL is believed to antagonize the inhibitory effects of endogenous opioids on LH secretion, the results of this study imply that a sustained restraint on this inhibitory opioid tone can elicit the LH surge before the critical period on proestrus. These findings are in accord with our thesis that the neural clock that normally triggers the preovulatory LH surge may transiently decrease the inhibitory opioid tone to allow expression of crucial neural events which culminate in preovulatory LH secretion. PMID:3698918

  1. Effects of treatment of anestrous dairy cows with gonadotropin-releasing hormone, prostaglandin, and progesterone.

    PubMed

    McDougall, S

    2010-05-01

    Cows anestrous at the start of a seasonal breeding period have lesser probability of breeding, lesser conception rates, and a longer interval to conception than cycling herdmates. Historically, treatment included estradiol benzoate, which is no longer available. Consequently, alternative programs are required. Hence, a study was undertaken to assess new treatment regimens for these cows. The presence or absence of a corpus luteum was determined using ultrasonography in cows (n=2,222 from 12 herds) that were not detected in estrus by 9 d before the start of breeding. Cows were then randomly assigned to one of 4 treatments within each herd. Treatments were (1) 100 microg of gonadorelin, followed 7 d later by 500 microg of sodium cloprostenol, followed 54 to 56h later by 100 microg of gonadorelin, followed by fixed-time artificial insemination at 13 to 18h after the final GnRH injection (Ovsynch); (2) as for (1) but with placement of an intravaginal progesterone (P4)-releasing insert between the initial GnRH and PGF(2alpha) (Ovsynch-56+P4); (3) as for (2) but with the final GnRH treatment delayed until 71h after PGF(2alpha) and P4 insert removal with fixed-time artificial insemination 0 to 5h after GnRH treatment and with insemination of those cows detected in estrus before the second GnRH injection (Cosynch-72+P4); and (4) untreated controls (control). Day 0 was defined as the day of the second GnRH injection. Milk samples were collected from 154 and 152 cows from the Ovsynch and Ovsynch-56+P4 treatments, respectively, at d 0, 7, and 14 for P4 concentration determination. This was to test the hypothesis that inclusion of P4 would result in a greater proportion of cows having normal luteal function after treatment in these 2 groups that differed only in the inclusion of P4 in the Ovsynch-56+P4 treatment. All treatments resulted in shorter intervals from first day of breeding to conception compared with the controls. The Ovsynch-56+P4 treatment resulted in start of

  2. Immunohistochemical evidence for the involvement of gonadotropin releasing hormone in neuroleptic and cataleptic effects of haloperidol in mice.

    PubMed

    Fegade, Harshal A; Umathe, Sudhir N

    2016-04-01

    Blockade of dopamine D2 receptor by haloperidol is attributed for neuroleptic and cataleptic effects; and also for the release of gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) from the hypothalamus. GnRH agonist is reported to exhibit similar behavioural effects as that of haloperidol, and pre-treatment with GnRH antagonist is shown to attenuate the effects of haloperidol, suggesting a possibility that GnRH might mediate the effects of haloperidol. To substantiate such possibility, the influence of haloperidol on GnRH immunoreactivity (GnRH-ir) in the brain was studied in vehicle/antide pre-treated mice by peroxidase-antiperoxidase method. Initially, an earlier reported antide-haloperidol interaction in rat was confirmed in mice, wherein haloperidol (250μg/kg, i.p.) exhibited suppression of conditioned avoidance response (CAR) on two-way shuttle box, and induced catalepsy in bar test; and pre-treatment with antide (50μg/kg, s.c., GnRH antagonist) attenuated both effects of haloperidol. Immunohistochemical study was carried out to identify GnRH-ir in the brain, isolated 1h after haloperidol treatment to mice pre-treated with vehicle/antide. The morphometric analysis of microphotographs of brain sections revealed that haloperidol treatment increased integrated density units of GnRH-ir in various regions of the limbic system. Considering basal GnRH-ir in vehicle treated group as 100%, the increase in GnRH-ir after haloperidol treatment was by 100.98% in the medial septum; 54.26% in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis; 1152.85% in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus; 120.79% in the preoptic area-organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis and 138.82% in the arcuate nucleus. Antide did not influence basal and haloperidol induced increase in GnRH-ir in any of the regions. As significant increase in GnRH-ir after haloperidol treatment was observed in such regions of the brain which are reported to directly or indirectly communicate with the hippocampus and basal

  3. Effects of withholding feed on thyrotropin-releasing hormone stimulation test results and effects of combined testing on oral sugar test and thyrotropin-releasing hormone stimulation test results in horses.

    PubMed

    Restifo, Melissa M; Frank, Nicholas; Hermida, Pilar; Sanchez-Londoño, Alfredo

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess effects of withholding feed on thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) stimulation test results used in diagnosis of pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction in horses and determine effects of combined testing on results of the TRH stimulation test and the oral sugar test (OST) used in diagnosis of equine metabolic syndrome. ANIMALS 30 adult horses. PROCEDURES All horses underwent TRH stimulation tests under fed and nonfed conditions, an OST alone, and an OST combined with TRH stimulation testing. For TRH stimulation tests, plasma ACTH concentrations were measured before (baseline) and 10 minutes after (poststimulation) IV TRH administration. For the OST, plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured before (baseline) and 60 and 90 minutes after oral corn syrup administration. For combined testing, the TRH stimulation test was initiated immediately after 60-minute posttreatment sample collection for the OST. Results were compared among methods by Wilcoxon matched-pairs, signed rank tests, paired t tests, and Bland-Altman analysis. RESULTS Feeding conditions did not affect median ACTH concentrations when TRH stimulation tests were performed alone. Median baseline ACTH concentration did not differ between TRH stimulation tests performed alone (under fed or nonfed conditions) and those combined with OSTs. Median poststimulation ACTH concentration was significantly lower for combined tests than for solitary TRH stimulation tests. Mean 60-minute plasma glucose concentration was significantly lower for solitary OSTs than for combined tests, but this difference could not be attributed to TRH administration. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Combined testing in the manner described impacted ACTH concentrations during TRH stimulation tests and is not recommended at this time. PMID:27347827

  4. Relative effectiveness of carp pituitary extract, luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analog LHRHa injections and LHRHa implants for producing hybrid catfish fry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adoption of the hybrid catfish (channel catfish, Ictalruus punctatus, female x blue catfish, I. furcatus, male) is increasing in the catfish industry. The most effective way to produce fry is hormone induced spawning of females coupled with hand stripping and in vitro fertilization. The success of...

  5. The gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist protocol--the protocol of choice for the polycystic ovary syndrome patient undergoing controlled ovarian stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kol, Shahar; Homburg, Roy; Alsbjerg, Birgit; Humaidan, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) patients are prone to develop ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS), a condition which can be minimized or completely eliminated by the use of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) trigger. In this commentary paper, we maintain that the gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist protocol should be the protocol of choice for the PCOS patient undergoing ovarian stimulation with gonadotropins for in vitro fertilization. If an excessive ovarian response is encountered, the clinician will always have two options: either to trigger final oocyte maturation with a bolus of GnRHa and supplement the luteal phase with a small bolus of human chorionic gonadotropin in addition to the standard luteal phase support and transfer in the fresh cycle or, alternatively, to trigger with GnRHa and perform a total freeze, resulting in a complete elimination of OHSS and high ongoing pregnancy rates in the subsequent frozen-thawed transfer cycles. PMID:22428986

  6. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone and gonadal steroids regulate transcription factor mRNA expression in primary pituitary and immortalized gonadotrope cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weiming; Grafer, Constance M; Kim, Jonathan; Halvorson, Lisa M

    2015-03-01

    Hormonal regulation of pituitary gonadotropin gene expression has been attributed to gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-mediated stimulation of immediate early gene expression and gonadal steroid interactions with their respective nuclear receptors. A number of orphan nuclear receptors including steroidogenic factor 1, liver receptor homologue 1, dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1, and chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factors I/II as well as the GATA family members, GATA2 and GATA4, have also been implicated in transcriptional regulation of the gonadotropin genes. We hypothesized that hormonally mediated changes in these latter transcription factors may provide an additional mechanism for mediating hormonal effects beyond the more classically appreciated pathways. In these studies, we demonstrate significant regulation of orphan nuclear receptor and GATA messenger RNA levels by GnRH, dihydrotestosterone, estradiol, and progesterone in both cultured primary pituitary cells and gonadotrope-derived cell line, LβT2. These results advance our understanding of the complex mechanisms by which GnRH and steroid hormones achieve precise regulation of anterior pituitary function. PMID:25563755

  7. Serotonin interferes with Ca2+ and PKC signaling to reduce gonadotropin-releasing hormone-stimulated GH secretion in goldfish pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yi; Wong, Anderson O L; Chang, John P

    2008-10-01

    In goldfish, two endogenous gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH), salmon GnRH (sGnRH) and chicken GnRH-II (cGnRH-II), are thought to stimulate growth hormone (GH) release via protein kinase C (PKC) and subsequent increases in intracellular Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)](i)). In contrast, the signaling mechanism for serotonin (5-HT) inhibition of GH secretion is still unknown. In this study, whether 5-HT inhibits GH release by actions at sites along the PKC and Ca(2+) signal transduction pathways leading to hormone release were examined in primary cultures of goldfish pituitary cells. Under static incubation and column perifusion conditions, 5-HT reduced basal, as well as sGnRH- and cGnRH-II-stimulated, GH secretion. 5-HT also suppressed GH responses to two PKC activators but had no effect on the GH-releasing action of the Ca(2+) ionophore ionomycin. Ca(2+)-imaging studies with identified somatotropes revealed that 5-HT did not alter basal [Ca(2+)](i) but attenuated the magnitude of the [Ca(2+)](i) responses to the two GnRHs. Prior treatment with 5-HT and cGnRH-II reduced the magnitude of the [Ca(2+)](i) responses induced by depolarizing levels of K(+). Similar inhibition, however, was not observed with prior treatment of 5-HT and sGnRH. These results suggest that 5-HT, by direct actions at the somatotrope level, interferes with PKC and Ca(2+) signaling pathways to reduce the GH-releasing effect of GnRH. 5-HT action may occur at the level of PKC activation or its downstream signaling events prior to the subsequent rise in [Ca(2+)](i.). The differential Ca(2+) responses by depolarizing doses of K(+) is consistent with our previous findings that sGnRH and cGnRH-II are coupled to overlapping and yet distinct Ca(2+)-dependent mechanisms. PMID:18723020

  8. The effect of endotoxin administration on the secretory dynamics of oxytocin in follicular phase mares: relationship to stress axis hormones.

    PubMed

    Alexander, S L; Irvine, C H G

    2002-07-01

    The primary aim of this study was to define the secretory dynamics of oxytocin and vasopressin in pituitary venous effluent from ambulatory horses during acute endotoxaemia, a stimulus that may release both hormones. Our secondary aim was to investigate the role of oxytocin in regulating adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion by comparing oxytocin, vasopressin, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and ACTH secretory profiles during endotoxaemia and by monitoring the ACTH response to oxytocin administration. Pituitary venous blood was collected nonsurgically continuously and divided into 1-min segments from eight follicular phase mares. Four mares were sampled for 30 min before and 3.5 h after receiving an i.v. infusion of bacterial endotoxin (TOX). Four control mares were sampled for 2.5 h without infusion of TOX. Another three follicular phase mares were given 5 U of oxytocin to replicate the peak response to TOX and pituitary blood collected every 1 min for 10 min before and 15 min after injection. Endotoxin raised the secretion rates of all hormones measured. All hormones were released episodically throughout the experiment, with TOX increasing the amplitude of peaks in each hormone. Peaks in oxytocin and vasopressin were coincident in each treated mare. Similarly, ACTH peaks were coincident with peaks of oxytocin and vasopressin in each treated mare, and with peaks of CRH in three mares. However, oxytocin administration did not affect ACTH secretion. We conclude that during endotoxaemia in horses: (i) oxytocin and vasopressin are secreted synchronously; (ii) oxytocin is unlikely to be acting as an ACTH secretagogue since inducing peak oxytocin concentrations observed during TOX does not raise ACTH; and therefore (iii) the close relationship between oxytocin and ACTH secretion is circumstantial and due to the fact that oxytocin secretion is concurrent with that of vasopressin, a proven ACTH secretagogue in horses. PMID:12121490

  9. Induction of spermatogenesis and fertility in hypogonadotropic azoospermic men by intravenous pulsatile gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH).

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, Z; Makler, A; Frisch, L; Brandes, J M

    1988-06-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) has only recently become a helpful tool in the medication of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH). Two azoospermic patients with HH who had previously been treated with hCG/hMG because of delayed puberty and each of whom had fathered a child after previous gonadotropin therapy were referred due to secondary failure of hCG/hMG treatment to induce spermatogenesis and fertility. A pulse study where blood was drawn every 15 minutes for LH, FSH and PRL RIAs was performed in each patient, and afterwards a bolus of i.v. GnRH was injected to assess gonadotropin responsiveness. A portable GnRH pump was connected to each patient so that it administered 5-20 micrograms of GnRH i.v. every 89 minutes. Spermatogenesis was first detected after 42 and 78 days respectively in the 2 treated HH men and 4 1/2 months from the start of treatment their wives became pregnant. No thrombophlebitis or other complications of the i.v. therapy occurred. In the case of the first patient, the semen was washed and concentrated and intra-uterine inseminations were carried out in an attempt to shorten the time needed to achieve fertility. The first pregnancy was successfully terminated at 38 weeks with the delivery of 2 heterozygotic normal male babies. The second pregnancy ended in spontaneous delivery of a healthy female. We conclude that i.v. pulsatile, intermittent GnRH administration is a safe, efficient and highly successful means of treating azoospermic men with HH. PMID:3055820

  10. Androgen-dependent somatotroph function in a hypogonadal adolescent male: evidence for control of exogenous androgens on growth hormone release

    SciTech Connect

    Mauras, N.; Blizzard, R.M.; Rogol, A.D.

    1989-03-01

    A 14(10/12)-year-old white male with primary gonadal failure following testicular irradiation for acute lymphocytic leukemia was evaluated for poor growth. He had received 2400 rad of prophylactic cranial irradiation. The growth velocity had decelerated from 7 to 3.2 cm/yr over 3 years. His bone age was 12(0/12) years (by TW2-RUS), and his peak growth hormone (GH) response to provocative stimuli was 1.4 ng/mL. The 24-hour GH secretion was studied by drawing blood every 20 minutes for 24 hours. The resulting GH profile was analyzed by a computerized pulse detection algorithm, CLUSTER. Timed serum GH samples were also obtained after a 1 microgram/kg IV bolus injection of the GH releasing factor (GRH). The studies showed a flat 24-hour profile and a peak GH response to GRH of 3.9 ng/ml. Testosterone enanthate treatment was started, 100 mg IM every 4 weeks. Ten months after the initiation of therapy the calculated growth rate was 8.6 cm/yr. The 24-hour GH study and GRH responses were repeated at the time, showing a remarkably normal 24-hour GH secretory pattern and a peak GH response to GRH of 14.4 ng/mL. Testosterone therapy was discontinued, and 4 months later similar studies were repeated. A marked decrease in the mean 24-hour GH secretion and mean peak height occurred, but with maint