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Sample records for adrenocorticotropin hormone acth

  1. Small-cell Lung Cancer in a Young Adult Nonsmoking Patient with Ectopic Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) Production.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Masahiko; Fujisaka, Yasuhito; Tokioka, Satoshi; Hirai, Ai; Henmi, Yujiro; Inoue, Yosuke; Narabayashi, Ken; Yamano, Takeshi; Tamura, Yosuke; Egashira, Yutaro; Higuchi, Kazuhide

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome due to young small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is recognized as being extremely rare. We herein present the case of a 35-year-old nonsmoking man who presented with thirst and polyuria. Laboratory examinations showed hyperglycemia, hypokalemia and liver enzyme elevation. Imaging examinations revealed the presence of multiple liver tumors and lymph node swelling. The levels of serum neuroendocrine tumor markers were elevated. The patient was diagnosed with SCLC based on the pathological examination of a biopsy specimen from the right supraclavicular lymph node. The physical findings, including proximal myopathy, truncal obesity and pigmentation suggested high levels of glucocorticoids. An immunohistochemical examination of the tumor showed that it was positive for adrenocorticotropin (ACTH). An endocrinological investigation allowed for the definitive diagnosis of SCLC with ectopic ACTH production. PMID:27181543

  2. Plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) concentrations and clinical response in horses treated for equine Cushing's disease with cyproheptadine or pergolide.

    PubMed

    Perkins, G A; Lamb, S; Erb, H N; Schanbacher, B; Nydam, D V; Divers, T J

    2002-11-01

    Plasma ACTH levels have been variable in horses with a positive clinical response for therapy for equine Cushing's Disease (ECD). Therefore, our purpose was to determine the value of monitoring plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) levels during treatment of equine Cushing's disease (ECD) with either cyproheptadine (n = 32) or pergolide (n = 10). First, we validated the chemiluminescent ACTH assay (specificity, precision, accuracy, intra-assay and interassay variations) and tested methods of handling the whole blood from the time of collection to when the ACTH was assayed. The sensitivity and specificity of high plasma ACTH levels for detecting ECD was determined in a retrospective study on hospitalised horses (n = 68). Surveys were sent to veterinarians who submitted equine ACTH levels that were high initially and had at least 2 ACTH samples to determine the value of monitoring ACTH levels during therapy of ECD. The ACTH chemiluminescent assay was valid. The ACTH was stable when whole blood was collected and held in plastic tubes for 8 h before separating the plasma. The sensitivity and specificity of plasma ACTH levels for detecting ECD were 84% (n = 19,95% CI 60,97) and 78% (n = 49,95% CI 63,88), respectively. Treated horses generally showed a decrease in plasma ACTH. Plasma ACTH levels may be helpful when monitoring therapy of ECD, although improvement in clinical signs should be considered most important. There were no differences between cyproheptadine and pergolide in terms of improvements in any of the clinical signs.

  3. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone secretion by perifused pituitary and adrenal glands from rodents exposed to 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD).

    PubMed

    Pitt, J A; Buckalew, A R; House, D E; Abbott, B D

    2000-10-26

    Although in utero maternal stress has been shown to have lasting effects on rodent offspring, fetal effects of chemically-induced alterations of the maternal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) have not been well studied. This study examined the effects of in vivo 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure on pituitary-adrenal function in the male rat, pregnant female rat and pregnant female mouse. The secretion of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone (CORT) in pituitary and adrenal glands, respectively, was assessed in ex vivo perifusion cultures. Male and pregnant female (gestation day 8) Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged once with 10 microgram/kg TCDD, pregnant female mice once with 24 microgram/kg TCDD, and euthanized 10 days later. Hemi-pituitary (rat) or whole anterior pituitaries (mice) and right adrenal glands from the same animal were quartered, perifused under baseline and stimulated conditions. In both males and pregnant females, TCDD did not affect corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH)-stimulated ACTH secretion. Neither total pituitary ACTH nor plasma ACTH was altered in either sex or species by TCDD treatment. ACTH-stimulated CORT secretion was not affected by TCDD in either sex or species, and adrenal tissue and plasma CORT levels were unchanged in males and pregnant females by TCDD. However, the plasma ACTH:CORT ratio was decreased about 46% in male rats treated with TCDD. Plasma CORT levels were 23-fold higher and plasma ACTH levels were 1.5-fold higher in pregnant females than in male rats. In male versus female rats, adrenal CORT and anterior pituitary ACTH tissue levels were about 7.5- and 1.75-fold higher and ACTH, respectively. Female mouse adrenal tissue CORT was about 4-fold greater than female rat. The reduced plasma ACTH:CORT ratio in the male rat suggests that TCDD disturbs HPA function. Exposure of male rat to a 5-fold higher dose in earlier studies clearly demonstrated effects of TCDD on male rat HPA. The present

  4. 21 CFR 862.1025 - Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system... Test Systems § 862.1025 Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system. (a) Identification. An adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system is a device intended to measure adrenocorticotropic hormone in...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1025 - Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system... Test Systems § 862.1025 Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system. (a) Identification. An adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system is a device intended to measure adrenocorticotropic hormone in...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1025 - Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system... Test Systems § 862.1025 Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system. (a) Identification. An adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system is a device intended to measure adrenocorticotropic hormone in...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1025 - Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system... Test Systems § 862.1025 Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system. (a) Identification. An adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system is a device intended to measure adrenocorticotropic hormone in...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1025 - Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system... Test Systems § 862.1025 Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system. (a) Identification. An adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test system is a device intended to measure adrenocorticotropic hormone in...

  9. Adrenocorticotropin hormone 1-39 promotes proliferation and differentiation of oligodendroglial progenitor cells and protects from excitotoxic and inflammation-related damage.

    PubMed

    Benjamins, Joyce A; Nedelkoska, Liljana; Lisak, Robert P

    2014-10-01

    Oligodendroglia (OL) are highly susceptible to damage and, like neurons, are terminally differentiated. It is important to protect OL precursors (OPC) because they are reservoirs of differentiating cells capable of myelination following perinatal insult and remyelination in white matter diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). Patients with relapsing-remitting MS are commonly treated with high-dose corticosteroids (CS) when experiencing an exacerbation. Adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH), a primary component of another approved MS exacerbation treatment, is a melanocortin peptide that stimulates production of CS by the adrenals. Melanocortin receptors are also found in the central nervous system (CNS) and on immune cells. ACTH is produced within the CNS and may have CS-independent effects on glia. We found that ACTH 1-39 stimulated proliferation of OPC, and to a lesser extent astroglia (AS) and microglia (MG), in rat glial cultures. ACTH accelerated differentiation of PDGFRα(+) OPC to a later stage marked by galactolipid expression and caused greater expansion of OL myelin-like sheets compared with untreated cells. Protective effects of ACTH on OPC were assessed by treating cultures with selected toxic agents, with or without ACTH. At 200 nM, ACTH protected OPC from death induced by staurosporine, glutamate, NMDA, AMPA, kainate, quinolinic acid, H2 O2 , and slow NO release, but not against kynurenic acid or rapid NO release. These agents and ACTH were not toxic to AS or MG. Our findings indicate that ACTH 1-39 provides benefits by increasing the number of OPC, accelerating their development into mature OL, and reducing OPC death from toxic insults.

  10. Effects of sex and early maternal abuse on adrenocorticotropin hormone and cortisol responses to the corticotropin-releasing hormone challenge during the first 3 years of life in group-living rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    SANCHEZ, MAR M.; MCCORMACK, KAI; GRAND, ALISON P.; FULKS, RICHELLE; GRAFF, ANNE; MAESTRIPIERI, DARIO

    2014-01-01

    In this study we investigated the development of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis in 21 group-living rhesus monkeys infants that were physically abused by their mothers in the first few months of life and in 21 nonabused controls. Cortisol and adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) responses to a corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) challenge were assessed at 6-month intervals during the subjects’ first 3 years of life. Abused infants exhibited greater cortisol responses to CRH than controls across the 3 years. Abused infants also exhibited blunted ACTH secretion in response to CRH, especially at 6 months of age. Although there were no significant sex differences in abuse experienced early in life, females showed a greater cortisol response to CRH than males at all ages. There were no significant sex differences in the ACTH response to CRH, or significant interactions between sex and abuse in the ACTH or cortisol response. Our findings suggest that early parental maltreatment results in greater adrenocortical, and possibly also pituitary, responsiveness to challenges later in life. These long-term alterations in neuroendocrine function may be one the mechanisms through which infant abuse results in later psychopathologies. Our study also suggests that there are developmental sex differences in adrenal function that occur irrespective of early stressful experience. The results of this study can enhance our understanding of the long-term effects of child maltreatment as well as our knowledge of the development of the HPA axis in human and nonhuman primates. PMID:20102646

  11. Effects of sex and early maternal abuse on adrenocorticotropin hormone and cortisol responses to the corticotropin-releasing hormone challenge during the first 3 years of life in group-living rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Mar M; McCormack, Kai; Grand, Alison P; Fulks, Richelle; Graff, Anne; Maestripieri, Dario

    2010-01-01

    In this study we investigated the development of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in 21 group-living rhesus monkeys infants that were physically abused by their mothers in the first few months of life and in 21 nonabused controls. Cortisol and adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) responses to a corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) challenge were assessed at 6-month intervals during the subjects' first 3 years of life. Abused infants exhibited greater cortisol responses to CRH than controls across the 3 years. Abused infants also exhibited blunted ACTH secretion in response to CRH, especially at 6 months of age. Although there were no significant sex differences in abuse experienced early in life, females showed a greater cortisol response to CRH than males at all ages. There were no significant sex differences in the ACTH response to CRH, or significant interactions between sex and abuse in the ACTH or cortisol response. Our findings suggest that early parental maltreatment results in greater adrenocortical, and possibly also pituitary, responsiveness to challenges later in life. These long-term alterations in neuroendocrine function may be one the mechanisms through which infant abuse results in later psychopathologies. Our study also suggests that there are developmental sex differences in adrenal function that occur irrespective of early stressful experience. The results of this study can enhance our understanding of the long-term effects of child maltreatment as well as our knowledge of the development of the HPA axis in human and nonhuman primates.

  12. CXCL10/CXCR3 signaling mediates inhibitory action by interferon-gamma on CRF-stimulated adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kotaro; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Yoshida, Saishu; Higuchi, Masashi; Tateno, Kozue; Hasegawa, Rumi; Takigami, Shu; Ohsako, Shunji; Yashiro, Takashi; Kato, Takako; Kato, Yukio

    2016-05-01

    Secretion of hormones by the anterior pituitary gland can be stimulated or inhibited by paracrine factors that are produced during inflammatory reactions. The inflammation cytokine interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is known to inhibit corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-stimulated adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) release but its signaling mechanism is not yet known. Using rat anterior pituitary, we previously demonstrated that the CXC chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10), known as interferon-γ (IFN-γ) inducible protein 10 kDa, is expressed in dendritic cell-like S100β protein-positive (DC-like S100β-positive) cells and that its receptor CXCR3 is expressed in ACTH-producing cells. DC-like S100β-positive cells are a subpopulation of folliculo-stellate cells in the anterior pituitary. In the present study, we examine whether CXCL10/CXCR3 signaling between DC-like S100β-positive cells and ACTH-producing cells mediates inhibition of CRF-activated ACTH-release by IFN-γ, using a CXCR3 antagonist in the primary pituitary cell culture. We found that IFN-γ up-regulated Cxcl10 expression via JAK/STAT signaling and proopiomelanocortin (Pomc) expression, while we reconfirmed that IFN-γ inhibits CRF-stimulated ACTH-release. Next, we used a CXCR3 agonist in primary culture to analyze whether CXCL10 induces Pomc-expression and ACTH-release using a CXCR3 agonist in the primary culture. The CXCR3 agonist significantly stimulated Pomc-expression and inhibited CRF-induced ACTH-release, while ACTH-release in the absence of CRF did not change. Thus, the present study leads us to an assumption that CXCL10/CXCR3 signaling mediates inhibition of the CRF-stimulated ACTH-release by IFN-γ. Our findings bring us to an assumption that CXCL10 from DC-like S100β-positive cells acts as a local modulator of ACTH-release during inflammation.

  13. Corticotropin-releasing hormone, proopiomelanocortin, and glucocorticoid receptor gene expression in adrenocorticotropin-producing tumors in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Suda, T; Tozawa, F; Dobashi, I; Horiba, N; Ohmori, N; Yamakado, M; Yamada, M; Demura, H

    1993-01-01

    To differentiate between ectopic ACTH syndrome and Cushing's disease, gene expression of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), proopiomelanocortin (POMC), and glucocorticoid receptor was examined in 10 pituitary adenomas (Cushing's disease) and in 10 ectopic ACTH-producing tumors. CRH increased plasma ACTH levels in all patients with Cushing's disease and in five patients with ectopic ACTH syndrome whose tumors contained CRH and CRH mRNA. In five CRH nonresponders, CRH was not detected in tumors that contained no CRH mRNA or that contained only long-size CRH mRNA. Dexamethasone (Dex) decreased plasma ACTH levels in all patients with Cushing's disease and in three patients with ectopic ACTH-producing bronchial carcinoid. These tumors contained glucocorticoid receptor mRNA. CRH increased and Dex decreased ACTH release and POMC mRNA levels in pituitary adenoma and bronchial carcinoid cells. PMA increased POMC mRNA levels only in carcinoid cells. These results reveal characteristics of ectopic ACTH-producing tumors: long-size CRH mRNA and PMA-induced POMC gene expression. In addition, there are two ectopic ACTH syndrome subtypes: tumors containing ACTH with CRH (CRH responder) and tumors without CRH. Dex decreases ACTH release and POMC mRNA levels in some bronchial carcinoids. Therefore, CRH and Dex tests have limited usefulness in differentiating between Cushing's disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome. Images PMID:8254033

  14. Isolated Adrenocorticotropin Deficiency Concomitant with Graves' Disease: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Ohara, Nobumasa; Kaneko, Masanori; Kuriyama, Hideyuki; Sato, Kazuhiro; Katakami, Hideki; Oki, Yutaka; Kaneko, Kenzo; Kamoi, Kyuzi

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old Japanese woman with untreated Graves' hyperthyroidism developed glucocorticoid-induced adrenal insufficiency (AI) after a supraphysiological dose of prednisolone therapy for bronchial asthma. Days later, she had high plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels and was expected to recover from glucocorticoid-induced AI. Her plasma ACTH levels remained high over 3 months during a physiological dose of hydrocortisone replacement. However, she suffered a further decrease in her serum cortisol level and was diagnosed with isolated adrenocorticotropin deficiency (IAD), in which bioinactive ACTH likely caused the high ACTH value. IAD should be considered as an unusual disorder associated with Graves' disease, especially in older patients. PMID:27629962

  15. N-methyl-D-aspartate treatment increases circulating adrenocorticotropin and luteinizing hormone in the rat.

    PubMed

    Farah, J M; Rao, T S; Mick, S J; Coyne, K E; Iyengar, S

    1991-04-01

    Excitatory amino acids have been known to increase pituitary secretion of LH in vivo and are probably involved in the neuroendocrine regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. We have found that systemic administration of the excitatory amino acid agonist N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) evokes a transient and profound increase in circulating levels of ACTH as well. Treatment of adult male Long-Evans rats with NMDA (30 mg/kg, sc) maximally increased plasma ACTH and immunoreactive beta-endorphin from 7-15 min after injection, and levels of both remained significantly elevated until 60 min into the time course. Corresponding increases in corticosterone were observed 15 and 30 min after treatment, while LH, similar to other pituitary hormones, was increased from 7-30 min after NMDA. Stimulation of the pituitary-adrenal and pituitary-gonadal neuroendocrine axes by NMDA was monitored in subsequent studies by plasma ACTH and LH, respectively; both were increased in a dose-related manner after the administration of 3-60 mg/kg NMDA, although stimulation of ACTH (800%) was more pronounced than that of LH (200%). The increases in ACTH and LH due to NMDA were inhibited by pretreatment with the competitive NMDA antagonist (+/-)3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4- yl)propyl-1-phosphonic acid, CPP (6 and 10 mg/kg, ip, for 21 min); by contrast, dexamethasone pretreatment (50 micrograms/kg, ip, for 4 h) blocked only the NMDA-evoked increase in circulating ACTH. These findings indicate that an NMDA receptor mechanism might be involved in the acute activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in the rat.

  16. Influence of a prenatal stressor on ACTH-induced cortisol secretion in yearling Brahman heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to test whether prenatal stress affects postnatal adrenocortical responsiveness to exogenous adrenocorticotropin-releasing hormone (ACTH) in calves of Brahman cows transported for 2-hour periods at 60, 80, 100, 120, and 140 days of gestation. Prenatally stressed yearl...

  17. ACTH Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Clark, Adrian John; Forfar, Rachel; Hussain, Mashal; Jerman, Jeff; McIver, Ed; Taylor, Debra; Chan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) acts via a highly selective receptor that is a member of the melanocortin receptor subfamily of type 1 G protein-coupled receptors. The ACTH receptor, also known as the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), is unusual in that it is absolutely dependent on a small accessory protein, melanocortin receptor accessory protein (MRAP) for cell surface expression and function. ACTH is the only known naturally occurring agonist for this receptor. This lack of redundancy and high degree of ligand specificity suggests that antagonism of this receptor could provide a useful therapeutic aid and a potential investigational tool. Clinical situations in which this could be useful include (1) Cushing's disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome - especially while preparing for definitive treatment of a causative tumor, or in refractory cases, or (2) congenital adrenal hyperplasia - as an adjunct to glucocorticoid replacement. A case for antagonism in other clinical situations in which there is ACTH excess can also be made. In this article, we will explore the scientific and clinical case for an ACTH antagonist, and will review the evidence for existing and recently described peptides and modified peptides in this role. PMID:27547198

  18. ACTH Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Adrian John; Forfar, Rachel; Hussain, Mashal; Jerman, Jeff; McIver, Ed; Taylor, Debra; Chan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) acts via a highly selective receptor that is a member of the melanocortin receptor subfamily of type 1 G protein-coupled receptors. The ACTH receptor, also known as the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), is unusual in that it is absolutely dependent on a small accessory protein, melanocortin receptor accessory protein (MRAP) for cell surface expression and function. ACTH is the only known naturally occurring agonist for this receptor. This lack of redundancy and high degree of ligand specificity suggests that antagonism of this receptor could provide a useful therapeutic aid and a potential investigational tool. Clinical situations in which this could be useful include (1) Cushing’s disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome – especially while preparing for definitive treatment of a causative tumor, or in refractory cases, or (2) congenital adrenal hyperplasia – as an adjunct to glucocorticoid replacement. A case for antagonism in other clinical situations in which there is ACTH excess can also be made. In this article, we will explore the scientific and clinical case for an ACTH antagonist, and will review the evidence for existing and recently described peptides and modified peptides in this role. PMID:27547198

  19. Glucoreceptors located in different areas mediate the hypoglycemia-induced release of growth hormone, prolactin, and adrenocorticotropin in man.

    PubMed

    Vigas, M; Tatár, P; Jurcovicová, J; Jezová, D

    1990-03-01

    In young male volunteers, the changes in growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) release in response to insulin injection combined with the infusion of saline, glucose, and fructose were evaluated. Glucose infusion in a dose which prevented insulin hypoglycemia completely abolished endocrine responses. Infusion of fructose, which is known not to cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), did not influence the GH release during hypoglycemia; however, it inhibited PRL secretion. The ACTH response was slightly attenuated and delayed, while the hypoglycemia-induced rise in cortisol levels was not modified by fructose infusion. These data indicate that the glucoreceptors mediating the signals for a complete counterregulatory neuroendocrine response are not located in a single brain structure. Stimuli for GH release are produced in areas of the central nervous system protected by the BBB, while those for PRL release are presumably present in structures not protected by the BBB. Glucoreceptors triggering ACTH release are located both inside and outside the BBB. PMID:2157998

  20. The role of ACTH and glucocorticoids in nonenzymatic fibrinolysis during immobilization stress in animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudryashov, B. A.; Shapiro, F. B.; Lomovskaya, E. G.; Lyapina, L. A.

    1980-01-01

    The role of the altered hormonal status of an organism in the activation of the anticoagulative system during stress is investigated. The 30 minute immobilization stress was shown to raise significantly the nonenzymatic fibrinolytic activity of blood in rats. Combined with adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) the effect is still greater. Intravenous administration of 0.2 m1 0.01 percent solution of protamine sulphate prevented the nonenzymatic fibrinolysis induced by the stress. Administration of ACTH after protomine sulphate again raised the fibrinolysis. This suggests that ACTH stimulates the release of heparin.

  1. Effect of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and insulin on the phagocytic capacity of Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Köhidai, L; Lovas, B; Csaba, G

    1995-06-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and insulin negatively influenced the phagocytic activity of Tetrahymena. The two hormones had diverse effects after 4 hr of treatments on no-test-particle containing, "0-cells". At this time the number of "0 cells" was significantly lower in the ACTH-treated groups, while in the insulin-treated groups there was an increase of "0-cells" compared to the control and to the results of the starting experiment. Considering previous results, when small molecular weight hormones, if did at all, positively influenced phagocytosis in Tetrahymena, the experiments call the attention to the differences caused by the size of the signal molecules. In the light of the literary data on hormone effects to phagocytosis in mammals and men, the similarity of the effects in species being very far from each other in evolution, could be concluded.

  2. Radioimmunoassay of ACTH in plasma

    PubMed Central

    Berson, Solomon A.; Yalow, Rosalyn S.

    1968-01-01

    Techniques are described in detail for a radioimmunoassay of plasma adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) that is capable of detecting hormone in unextracted normal human plasma at 1:5 dilution under the conditions described. The sensitivity of the assay is at the level of 1 μμg/ml (equivalent to 0.014 mU/100 ml). In normal subjects ACTH concentrations averaged 22 μμg/ml (equivalent to 0.308 mU/100 ml) plasma at 8-10 a.m. In a smaller group the concentrations averaged 9.6 μμg/ml (equivalent to 0.134 mU/100 ml) at 10-11 p.m. Although a circadian rhythm in normal subjects was not always well marked throughout the daytime hours, plasma ACTH usually fell to its lowest value in the late evening. In hospital patients who were not acutely ill, concentrations were infrequently above 100 μμg/ml in the morning and usually fell to significantly lower levels in the late evening. Severely ill hospital patients occasionally exhibited a.m. concentrations above 200 μμg/ml. In a group of subjects showing frequent spiking of plasma 17-OHCS concentrations throughout the day parallel spiking of plasma ACTH as well was generally observed. Metyrapone produced marked increases in plasma ACTH within 24 hr in all cases and generally within 3-6 hr except when started late in the day. Dexamethasone brought about a persistent reduction in plasma ACTH in a patient under continued treatment with metyrapone. Hypoglycemia, electroshock, surgery under general anesthesia, histalog and vasopressin administration were usually followed by significant increases in plasma ACTH concentration. Prior administration of dexamethasone blocked the response to hypoglycemia. Marked elevations in plasma ACTH were observed in patients with adrenal insufficiency off steroid therapy, in Cushing's disease after adrenalectomy even in the presence of persistent hypercortisolemia, and in some untreated patients with Cushing's disease. Umbilical cord blood contained higher plasma ACTH concentrations than maternal blood at

  3. Adrenocorticotropin- and opiate-like hormones from pituitaries of the sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka.

    PubMed

    Ng, T B; Hon, W K; Idler, D R

    1987-04-01

    The pituitaries of vitellogenic sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) were extracted with a mixture of acetone, water, and hydrochloric acid. The precipitate which formed upon the addition of a copious volume of acetone to the extract, designated acid acetone powder, was subjected to salt fractionation and desalting, followed by ion-exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose. An unadsorbed fraction (S-1) and four adsorbed fractions (S-2, S-3, S-4 and S-5) were obtained. Adrenocorticotropic activity was detected in the fractions by their ability to stimulate isolated rat adrenal decapsular cells to produce corticosterone and by their immunoreactivities in an adrenocorticotropin-specific radioimmunoassay. The steroidogenic activities of all fractions, except S-4, were blocked by corticotropin inhibiting peptide. Opiate activity was detected in the fractions by their ability to inhibit the binding of either [3H]naloxone or (D-ala2, D-leu5)-[3H]enkephalin to rat brain membranes. There was a discrepancy in the potencies of the five fractions in the two opiate radioreceptor assays, indicating the presence of opiate peptides with different affinities of binding to the micron- and delta-opiate receptors of the rat brain. There was a separation between adrenocorticotropic and opiate receptor binding activities, suggesting that the activities were due to separate molecular entities. PMID:3038149

  4. Causal ACTH-Depot Therapy during Pregnancies following Infertility Treatment.

    PubMed

    Klimek, Rudolf; Klimek, Marek; Gralek, Peter; Jasiczek, Dariusz

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper was to confirm the efficacy of adrenocorticotropin depot (ACTH-depot) therapy in pregnancies with threatened miscarriage and preterm delivery through the desired stimulation of the adrenal glands controlled by the rest of organism. The activity of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis plays a key role in pregnancy. Such naturally stimulated endogenous corticosteroid hormones are free from unwanted side effects of their synthetics analogs. Low level of maternal blood ACTH and insufficient increase of induced by hypothalamic hormones oxytocinases (cystine-β-aminopeptidases) were indication to ACTH-depot therapy (0.5 mg/week) in our consecutive prospective studies. Contrary to antenatal use of synthetic corticosteroids, there are no temporal limits of this therapy, which has to be more often recommended into clinical prevention of fetal morbidity, treatment of premature delivery, and finally elimination of the newborn's mortality caused by the neuroendocrinological gestoses. PMID:22666262

  5. A novel mutation of the adrenocorticotropin receptor (ACTH-R) gene in a family with the syndrome of isolated glucocorticoid deficiency, but no ACTH-R abnormalities in two families with the triple A syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Tsigos, C.; Arai, K.; Latronico, A.C. ||

    1995-07-01

    Isolated glucocorticoid deficiency (IGD) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by primary adrenocortical insufficiency, usually without mineralocorticoid deficiency. Occasionally, the disorder is associated with alacrima and achalasia of the esophagus (triple A syndrome), suggesting potential heterogeneity in its etiology. Mutations in the ACTH receptor gene have been reported in several families with IGD. We have amplified and directly sequenced the entire intronless ACTH receptor gene in 1 other family with IGD and 2 famlies with triple A syndrome. The proband with IGD was a homozygote for an A {r_arrow}G substitution, changing tyrosine 254 to cysteine in the third extracellular loop of the receptor protein, probably interfering with ligand binding. Both of her parents were heterozygotes for this mutation, which was not detected in 100 normal alleles. No mutations were identified in the entire coding area of the ACTH receptor in the 2 families with triple A syndrome, supporting the idea of a developmental or postreceptor defect in this syndrome. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Role of ACTH and Other Hormones in the Regulation of Aldosterone Production in Primary Aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    El Ghorayeb, Nada; Bourdeau, Isabelle; Lacroix, André

    2016-01-01

    The major physiological regulators of aldosterone production from the adrenal zona glomerulosa are potassium and angiotensin II; other acute regulators include adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and serotonin. Their interactions with G-protein coupled hormone receptors activate cAMP/PKA pathway thereby regulating intracellular calcium flux and CYP11B2 transcription, which is the specific steroidogenic enzyme of aldosterone synthesis. In primary aldosteronism (PA), the increased production of aldosterone and resultant relative hypervolemia inhibits the renin and angiotensin system; aldosterone secretion is mostly independent from the suppressed renin-angiotensin system, but is not autonomous, as it is regulated by a diversity of other ligands of various eutopic or ectopic receptors, in addition to activation of calcium flux resulting from mutations of various ion channels. Among the abnormalities in various hormone receptors, an overexpression of the melanocortin type 2 receptor (MC2R) could be responsible for aldosterone hypersecretion in aldosteronomas. An exaggerated increase in plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) is found in patients with PA secondary either to unilateral aldosteronomas or bilateral adrenal hyperplasia (BAH) following acute ACTH administration compared to normal individuals. A diurnal increase in PAC in early morning and its suppression by dexamethasone confirms the increased role of endogenous ACTH as an important aldosterone secretagogue in PA. Screening using a combination of dexamethasone and fludrocortisone test reveals a higher prevalence of PA in hypertensive populations compared to the aldosterone to renin ratio. The variable level of MC2R overexpression in each aldosteronomas or in the adjacent zona glomerulosa hyperplasia may explain the inconsistent results of adrenal vein sampling between basal levels and post ACTH administration in the determination of source of aldosterone excess. In the rare cases of glucocorticoid remediable

  7. Role of ACTH and Other Hormones in the Regulation of Aldosterone Production in Primary Aldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    El Ghorayeb, Nada; Bourdeau, Isabelle; Lacroix, André

    2016-01-01

    The major physiological regulators of aldosterone production from the adrenal zona glomerulosa are potassium and angiotensin II; other acute regulators include adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and serotonin. Their interactions with G-protein coupled hormone receptors activate cAMP/PKA pathway thereby regulating intracellular calcium flux and CYP11B2 transcription, which is the specific steroidogenic enzyme of aldosterone synthesis. In primary aldosteronism (PA), the increased production of aldosterone and resultant relative hypervolemia inhibits the renin and angiotensin system; aldosterone secretion is mostly independent from the suppressed renin–angiotensin system, but is not autonomous, as it is regulated by a diversity of other ligands of various eutopic or ectopic receptors, in addition to activation of calcium flux resulting from mutations of various ion channels. Among the abnormalities in various hormone receptors, an overexpression of the melanocortin type 2 receptor (MC2R) could be responsible for aldosterone hypersecretion in aldosteronomas. An exaggerated increase in plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) is found in patients with PA secondary either to unilateral aldosteronomas or bilateral adrenal hyperplasia (BAH) following acute ACTH administration compared to normal individuals. A diurnal increase in PAC in early morning and its suppression by dexamethasone confirms the increased role of endogenous ACTH as an important aldosterone secretagogue in PA. Screening using a combination of dexamethasone and fludrocortisone test reveals a higher prevalence of PA in hypertensive populations compared to the aldosterone to renin ratio. The variable level of MC2R overexpression in each aldosteronomas or in the adjacent zona glomerulosa hyperplasia may explain the inconsistent results of adrenal vein sampling between basal levels and post ACTH administration in the determination of source of aldosterone excess. In the rare cases of glucocorticoid remediable

  8. Endocrine responses of healthy parrots to ACTH and thyroid stimulating hormone.

    PubMed

    Zenoble, R D; Kemppainen, R J; Young, D W; Clubb, S L

    1985-12-01

    Effects of exogenous ACTH on plasma corticosterone and cortisol concentrations and the effects of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) on plasma triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4) were determined in the following 3 species of parrots: red-lored Amazon (group 1), blue-fronted Amazon (group 2), and African gray (group 3). Each bird was given ACTH (0.125 mg/bird) IM, except for 3 to 4 birds in each group, which were given saline solution (controls). Blood samples were collected before and 90 minutes after ACTH stimulation. In group 1 (n = 12), mean plasma corticosterone concentrations increased significantly (P less than 0.001) from 1.06 microgram/dl (before ACTH) to 4.89 micrograms/dl (after ACTH); mean corticosterone concentrations increased in the control birds from 1.06 microgram/dl to 1.84 microgram/dl; and mean cortisol concentrations increased only slightly from 0.228 microgram/dl to 0.266 microgram/dl. In group 2 (n = 12), mean corticosterone concentrations increased significantly (P less than 0.001) from 2.09 micrograms/dl to 10.58 micrograms/dl; control mean corticosterone concentrations decreased slightly from 2.09 micrograms/dl to 1.77 microgram/dl; and mean cortisol concentrations increased from less than or equal to 0.16 microgram/dl to 0.266 microgram/dl. In group 3 (n = 12), mean plasma corticosterone concentrations increased significantly (P less than or equal to 0.001) from 2.33 micrograms/dl to 4.67 micrograms/dl; mean control plasma corticosterone concentrations decreased from 2.33 micrograms/dl to 1.68 microgram/dl; and plasma corticol concentrations were not detectable. Each bird was given TSH, IM (1 U/bird). Blood samples were collected before and 6 hours after TSH administration. Saline solution was not administered as controls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Cerebrospinal fluid immunoreactive corticotropin-releasing hormone and adrenocorticotropin secretion in Cushing's disease and major depression: potential clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Kling, M A; Roy, A; Doran, A R; Calabrese, J R; Rubinow, D R; Whitfield, H J; May, C; Post, R M; Chrousos, G P; Gold, P W

    1991-02-01

    To explore whether possible differences in central nervous system neuromodulators contribute to the differential presentation of affective symptomatology in Cushing's disease and major depression, we examined the levels of immunoreactive CRH and ACTH in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of 11 patients with Cushing's disease, a patient with ectopic ACTH secretion, 34 patients with major depression, and 60 healthy subjects. We elected to measure these peptides not only because both are classically involved in pituitary-adrenal regulation, but also because their primarily arousal-producing and anorexigenic behavioral effects in experimental animals suggest that they may play a role in the symptom complex of depressive syndromes. We also explored whether the CSF levels of these peptides were more helpful in determining the often difficult differential diagnosis between major depression and Cushing's disease than the plasma ACTH response to ovine CRH, a currently used but somewhat insensitive laboratory means of distinguishing these disorders. CSF levels of immunoreactive CRH and ACTH were significantly lower in Cushing's disease patients [21.9 +/- 2.7 and 15.4 +/- 1.8 pg/mL, (mean +/- SEM), respectively] compared to patients with major depression [38.4 +/- 2.3 pg/mL (P less than 0.01) and 24.5 +/- 1.6 pg/mL (P less than 0.01), respectively] and controls [38.4 +/- 1.6 pg/mL (P less than 0.001) and 26.3 +/- 1.1 pg/mL (P less than 0.001), respectively]. The coexistence of high plasma ACTH and low CSF ACTH in Cushing's disease yielded a CSF/plasma ACTH ratio consistently less than that in depressed patients, with only 2 of 31 subjects comprising both groups showing values that overlapped. In contrast, 9 of the combined patients showed ACTH responses to ovine CRH that overlapped. These data suggest that differences in centrally directed CRH secretion may account for the differential presentation of the dysphoric syndromes seen in major depression and Cushing's disease. Hence

  10. Changes in the hormone (ACTH, insulin,epinephrine) content of immune cells in children having acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL).

    PubMed

    Pállinger, Eva; Kovács, Gábor; Horváth, Zsuzsanna; Müller, Judit; Csaba, György

    2013-12-01

    Immune cells synthesize, store and secrete hormones, the level of which changes in ALL. In previous experiments the level of histamine, serotonin and triiodothyronine (T3)was studied, while at present that of ACTH, insulin and epinephrine, using flow cytometric analysis for the determination of cell subsets and detection of hormone content. The measurements were done in children at the time of diagnosis. ACTH was significantly elevated in each T cell subsets (total T, Th, Tc, activated T), while B and NK cells were not touched. The alterations in the insulin content (decrease in Tc and activated T cells) were uncertain, and NK cells contained significantly less insulin. The disease did not influence the cells' epinephrine content. There is not clear explanation for the importance of changes in the cells' hormone content, however, it is discussed in the text.

  11. Metabolic responses to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) vary with life-history stage in adult male northern elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Ensminger, David C; Somo, Derek A; Houser, Dorian S; Crocker, Daniel E

    2014-08-01

    Strong individual and life-history variation in serum glucocorticoids has been documented in many wildlife species. Less is known about variation in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responsiveness and its impact on metabolism. We challenged 18 free-ranging adult male northern elephant seals (NES) with an intramuscular injection of slow-release adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) over 3 sample periods: early in the breeding season, after 70+ days of the breeding fast, and during peak molt. Subjects were blood sampled every 30 min for 2h post-injection. Breeding animals were recaptured and sampled at 48 h. In response to the ACTH injection, cortisol increased 4-6-fold in all groups, and remained elevated at 48 h in early breeding subjects. ACTH was a strong secretagogue for aldosterone, causing a 3-8-fold increase in concentration. Cortisol and aldosterone responses did not vary between groups but were correlated within individuals. The ACTH challenge produced elevations in plasma glucose during late breeding and molting, suppressed testosterone and thyroid hormone at 48 h in early breeding, and increased plasma non-esterified fatty acids and ketoacids during molting. These data suggest that sensitivity of the HPA axis is maintained but the metabolic impacts of cortisol and feedback inhibition of the axis vary with life history stage. Strong impacts on testosterone and thyroid hormone suggest the importance of maintaining low cortisol levels during the breeding fast. These data suggest that metabolic adaptations to extended fasting in NES include alterations in tissue responses to hormones that mitigate deleterious impacts of acute or moderately sustained stress responses.

  12. Metabolic responses to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) vary with life-history stage in adult male northern elephant seals.

    PubMed

    Ensminger, David C; Somo, Derek A; Houser, Dorian S; Crocker, Daniel E

    2014-08-01

    Strong individual and life-history variation in serum glucocorticoids has been documented in many wildlife species. Less is known about variation in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis responsiveness and its impact on metabolism. We challenged 18 free-ranging adult male northern elephant seals (NES) with an intramuscular injection of slow-release adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) over 3 sample periods: early in the breeding season, after 70+ days of the breeding fast, and during peak molt. Subjects were blood sampled every 30 min for 2h post-injection. Breeding animals were recaptured and sampled at 48 h. In response to the ACTH injection, cortisol increased 4-6-fold in all groups, and remained elevated at 48 h in early breeding subjects. ACTH was a strong secretagogue for aldosterone, causing a 3-8-fold increase in concentration. Cortisol and aldosterone responses did not vary between groups but were correlated within individuals. The ACTH challenge produced elevations in plasma glucose during late breeding and molting, suppressed testosterone and thyroid hormone at 48 h in early breeding, and increased plasma non-esterified fatty acids and ketoacids during molting. These data suggest that sensitivity of the HPA axis is maintained but the metabolic impacts of cortisol and feedback inhibition of the axis vary with life history stage. Strong impacts on testosterone and thyroid hormone suggest the importance of maintaining low cortisol levels during the breeding fast. These data suggest that metabolic adaptations to extended fasting in NES include alterations in tissue responses to hormones that mitigate deleterious impacts of acute or moderately sustained stress responses. PMID:24798580

  13. Sensorimotor cortex ablation induces time-dependent response of ACTH cells in adult rats: behavioral, immunohistomorphometric and hormonal study.

    PubMed

    Lavrnja, Irena; Trifunovic, Svetlana; Ajdzanovic, Vladimir; Pekovic, Sanja; Bjelobaba, Ivana; Stojiljkovic, Mirjana; Milosevic, Verica

    2014-02-10

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a serious event with far reaching complications, including pituitary dysfunction. Pars distalis corticotropes (ACTH cells), that represent the active module of hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, seem to be affected as well. Since pituitary failure after TBI has been associated with neurobehavioral impairments the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of TBI on recovery of motor functions, morphology and secretory activity of ACTH cells in the pituitary of adult rats. Wistar male rats, initially exposed to sensorimotor cortex ablation (SCA), were sacrificed at the 2nd, 7th, 14th and 30th days post-surgery (dps). A beam walking test was used to evaluate the recovery of motor functions. Pituitary glands and blood were collected for morphological and hormonal analyses. During the first two weeks post-injury increased recovery of locomotor function was detected, reaching almost the control value at day 30. SCA induces significant increase of pituitary weights compared to their time-matched controls. The volume of ACTH-immunopositive cells was reduced at the 7th dps, while at the 14th dps their volume was enlarged, in comparison to corresponding sham controls. Volume density of ACTH cells was increased only at 14th dps, while at day 30 this increase was insignificant. The plasma level of ACTH transiently increased after the injury. The most pronounced changes were observed at the 7th and 14th dps, and were followed by decrease toward control levels at the 30th dps. Thus, temporal changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis after traumatic brain injury appear to correlate with the recovery process. PMID:24291385

  14. Endocrine and immunological responses to adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) administration in juvenile harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) during winter and summer.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Mandy J; Atkinson, Shannon

    2015-10-01

    There is increasing interest in measuring endocrine and immune parameters in free-ranging seals and sea lions, but there is a lack of understanding in how an acute stress response, often associated with capture and handling, influences these parameters of interest. The main objective of this study was to assess the impact of a simulated stressor on both endocrine and immune parameters. During two seasons, exogenous adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) was administered to seven female juvenile harbor seals and the response of several hormones (cortisol, aldosterone, total and free thyroxine and total triiodothyronine) and immunological parameters (total and differential leukocyte counts and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) proliferation) were assessed. Cortisol peaked at 165 min (winter 203.1±84.7 ng/ml; summer 205.3±65.7 ng/ml) and remained significantly elevated 240 min after ACTH infusion in both seasons. Aldosterone peaked at 90 min (winter 359.3±249.3 pg/ml; summer 294.1±83.7 pg/ml) and remained elevated 240 min after administration of ACTH in both seasons. An increase in circulating total white blood cells was driven primarily by the increase in neutrophils which occurred simultaneously with a decrease in lymphocytes leading to an overall increase in neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio. These findings demonstrate that a simulated stress response in juvenile harbor seals results in a predictable increase in both cortisol and aldosterone concentrations, and were associated with altered immunological parameters.

  15. Endocrine and immunological responses to adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) administration in juvenile harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) during winter and summer.

    PubMed

    Keogh, Mandy J; Atkinson, Shannon

    2015-10-01

    There is increasing interest in measuring endocrine and immune parameters in free-ranging seals and sea lions, but there is a lack of understanding in how an acute stress response, often associated with capture and handling, influences these parameters of interest. The main objective of this study was to assess the impact of a simulated stressor on both endocrine and immune parameters. During two seasons, exogenous adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) was administered to seven female juvenile harbor seals and the response of several hormones (cortisol, aldosterone, total and free thyroxine and total triiodothyronine) and immunological parameters (total and differential leukocyte counts and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) proliferation) were assessed. Cortisol peaked at 165 min (winter 203.1±84.7 ng/ml; summer 205.3±65.7 ng/ml) and remained significantly elevated 240 min after ACTH infusion in both seasons. Aldosterone peaked at 90 min (winter 359.3±249.3 pg/ml; summer 294.1±83.7 pg/ml) and remained elevated 240 min after administration of ACTH in both seasons. An increase in circulating total white blood cells was driven primarily by the increase in neutrophils which occurred simultaneously with a decrease in lymphocytes leading to an overall increase in neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio. These findings demonstrate that a simulated stress response in juvenile harbor seals results in a predictable increase in both cortisol and aldosterone concentrations, and were associated with altered immunological parameters. PMID:26086360

  16. Blood supply to the brain and. beta. -endorphin and acth levels under the influence of thyrotrophin releasing hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzoyan, R.S.; Ganshina, T.S.; Mirzoyan, R.A.; Ragimov, K.S.

    1985-08-01

    The authors studied beta-endorphin because of its possible mediator role in terms of the cerebrovascular effects of thyrotrophin releasing hormone (TRH), and also because of data in the literature on antagonistic relations between TRH and the endogenous opioid system of the brain. Beta-endorphin was determined by radioimmunoassay; its level was determined after its separation from the beta-lipotrophin fraction. The investigation showed that TRH has a marked depressant effect on cerebrovascular vasoconstrictor refleces. Elevation of the blood ACTH level causes an increase in BP and in the tone of the cerebral vessels. An absence of correlation between the beta-endorphin and ACTH levels in the blood and CSF under the influence of TRH is shown.

  17. Process irregularity of cortisol and adrenocorticotropin secretion in men with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Posener, Joel A; Charles DeBattista; Veldhuis, Johannes D; Province, Michael A; Williams, Gordon H; Schatzberg, Alan F

    2004-10-01

    Although evidence suggests that major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, research on basal HPA axis hormone levels in MDD patients has been inconclusive. Definitive characterization of basal cortisol and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) secretion may be important for understanding the pathophysiology of this disorder. In recent years, a new approach to the analysis of basal hormone secretion has been developed involving the approximate entropy (ApEn) statistic, which represents the degree of disorderliness or serial irregularity in a time series of hormone levels. ApEn has been shown to reflect the degree of coordination in integrated network systems and has provided new insights into the pathophysiology of a number of endocrine conditions. In the study reported here, 15 medication-free men with MDD and 15 healthy control men were admitted to a General Clinical Research Center and had blood sampled for cortisol and ACTH determinations every hour over a 24-h period. The cortisol and ACTH time series were characterized with a cosinor analysis and with analysis of ApEn. Depressed patients and control subjects did not differ significantly on any parameter derived from the cosinor analysis or on several other standard indices of basal hormone secretion. However, the depressed men had significantly increased cortisol ApEn and significantly decreased ACTH ApEn compared with the healthy subjects. The ApEn findings suggest a loss of regulatory control over cortisol secretion, and possibly increased cortisol feedback on the pituitary in the depressed patients. Together, these results are most consistent with a primary abnormality of the adrenal gland and suggest that further investigation of adrenal gland physiology may be informative for the pathophysiology of depression.

  18. The significance of ACTH for the process of formation of complex heparin compounds in the blood during immobilization stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudryashov, B. A.; Shapiro, F. B.; Lomovskaya, F. B.; Lyapina, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) was administered to rats at different times following adrenalectomy. Adrenocorticotropin caused a significant increase in the formation of heparin complexes even in the absence of stress factor. When ACTH secretion is blocked, immobilization stress is not accompanied by an increase in the process of complex formation. The effect of ACTH on the formation of heparin complexes was mediated through its stimulation of the adrenal cortex.

  19. Transport mechanism of a new behaviorally highly potent adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) analog, ebiratide, through the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Shimura, T; Tabata, S; Ohnishi, T; Terasaki, T; Tsuji, A

    1991-08-01

    The binding and internalization of a novel adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) analog having a potent neuromodulating effect, ebiratide (H-Met(O2)-Glu-His-Phe-D-Lys-Phe-NH(CH2)8NH2), by isolated bovine brain capillaries, were examined. Metabolism of [5-125I-His]ebiratide occurred during a 30-min incubation with bovine brain capillaries at 37 degrees C. In the presence of 20 mM EDTA, added to inhibit this metabolism, the medium, after 30 min of incubation, contained 82.3 +/- 0.5% of the unchanged ebiratide. The total binding and acid-resistant binding of [125I]ebiratide increased with time and reached an equilibrium at about 15 min. The total binding and acid-resistant binding at 30 min (as the cell/medium ratios corrected with [14C]sucrose) were 13.07 +/- 0.86 and 5.00 +/- 0.18 microliters/mg of protein, respectively. The acid-resistant binding showed significant dependence on temperature and medium osmolarity. The [125I]ebiratide binding was significantly inhibited by dansylcadaverine, an endocytosis inhibitor. The saturable acid-resistant binding was obtained by the addition of unlabeled ebiratide (100 nM-5 mM), and the maximal internalization capacity (Bmax) at 30 min was 144.2 pmol/mg of protein, with the half-saturation constant (KD) of 62.1 microM. The nonsaturable acid-resistant binding [cell/medium ratio in the presence of the unlabeled compound (1 mM or more)] was 2.2 microliters/mg of protein. The acid-resistant binding was significantly inhibited by human ACTH, poly-L-lysine, protamine and E-2078, a basic peptide, but was not inhibited by poly-L-glutamate, insulin or transferrin. These results demonstrate that ebiratide is transported through the blood-brain barrier via a basic peptide-specific absorptive-mediated endocytosis.

  20. In vivo and in vitro characterization of antalarmin, a nonpeptide corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) receptor antagonist: suppression of pituitary ACTH release and peripheral inflammation.

    PubMed

    Webster, E L; Lewis, D B; Torpy, D J; Zachman, E K; Rice, K C; Chrousos, G P

    1996-12-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) secreted from the hypothalamus is the major regulator of pituitary ACTH release and consequent glucocorticoid secretion. CRH secreted in the periphery also acts as a proinflammatory modulator. CRH receptors (CRH-R1, R2alpha, R2beta) exhibit a specific tissue distribution. Antalarmin, a novel pyrrolopyrimidine compound, displaced 12SI-oCRH binding in rat pituitary, frontal cortex and cerebellum, but not heart, consistent with antagonism at the CRHR1 receptor. In vivo antalarmnin (20 mg/kg body wt.) significantly inhibited CRH-stimulated ACTH release and carageenin-induced subcutaneous inflammation in rats. Antalarmin, or its analogs, hold therapeutic promise in disorders with putative CRH hypersecretion, such as melancholic depression and inflammatory disorders. PMID:8940412

  1. Effects of benzyl glucoside and chlorogenic acid from Prunus mume on adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and catecholamine levels in plasma of experimental menopausal model rats.

    PubMed

    Ina, Hiroji; Yamada, Kenji; Matsumoto, Kosai; Miyazaki, Toshio

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of benzyl beta-D-glucopyranoside (BG) and chlorogenic acid (CA), the constituents of the fruit of Prunus mume, for relieving tension in experimental menopausal model rats (M-rats) caused by ether stress, the effects of BG and CA on adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and catecholamine (adrenaline, noradrenaline, and dopamine) levels were examined in the plasma of M-rats. Caffeic acid, quinic acid, and rosmarinic acid, which are compounds structurally related to CA, were also examined. BG obviously recovered catecholamine levels decreased by ether stress and increased dopamine to high levels. On the other hand, CA significantly decreased the ACTH level increased by ether stress and showed the greatest effect of all compounds. These results suggest that BG and CA may contribute to relieving the tension in M-rats caused by ether stress.

  2. Interaction of adrenocorticotropin peptides with microheterogeneous systems--a fluorescence study.

    PubMed

    Romani, Ana Paula; Ito, Amando Siuiti

    2009-02-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) are peptides which present many physiological effects related to pigmentation, motor and sexual behavior, learning and memory, analgesia, anti-inflammatory and antipyretic processes. The 13 amino acid residues of alpha-MSH are the same initial sequence of ACTH and due to the presence of a tryptophan residue in position 9 of the peptide chain, fluorescence techniques could be used to investigate the conformational properties of the hormones in different environments and the mechanisms of interaction with biomimetic systems like sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) micelles, sodium dodecyl sulphate-poly(ethylene oxide) (SDS-PEO) aggregates and neutral polymeric micelles. In buffer solution, fluorescence parameters were typical of peptides containing tryptophan exposed to the aqueous medium and upon addition of surfactant and polymer molecules, the gradual change of those parameters demonstrated the interaction of the peptides with the microheterogeneous systems. From time-resolved experiments it was shown that the interaction proceeded with conformational changes in both peptides, and further information was obtained from quenching of Trp fluorescence by a family of N-alkylpyridinium ions, which possess affinity to the microheterogeneous systems dependent on the length of the alkyl chain. The quenching of Trp fluorescence was enhanced in the presence of charged micelles, compared to the buffer solution and the accessibility of the fluorophore to the quencher was dependent on the peptide and the alkylpyridinium: in ACTH(1-21) highest collisional constants were obtained using ethylpyridinium as quencher, indicating a location of the residue in the surface of the micelle, while in alpha-MSH the best quencher was hexylpyridinium, indicating insertion of the residue into the non-polar region of the micelles. The results had shown that the interaction between the peptides and the biomimetic systems

  3. ACTH (Adrenocorticotropic Hormone) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease , also called primary adrenal insufficiency: decreased cortisol production due to adrenal gland damage Secondary adrenal insufficiency: decreased cortisol production because of pituitary dysfunction Hypopituitarism : pituitary dysfunction or ...

  4. The influence of aspirin on exercise-induced changes in adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), cortisol and aldosterone (ALD) concentrations.

    PubMed

    Przybyłowski, Jan; Obodyński, Kazimierz; Lewicki, Czesław; Kuźniar, Jerzy; Zaborniak, Stanisław; Drozd, Sławomir; Czarny, Wojciech; Garmulewicz, Maciej

    2003-04-01

    The influence of aspirin (ASA) on the endocrinology system and prostaglandin (PGs) synthesis is not completely clear. The aim of the study was to estimate the influence of ASA on the changes in the concentration of ACTH, cortisol and aldosterone (ALD) induced by physical exercise. This study was conducted on 19 healthy students (age 21-23 years). They were subjected to intensive physical exercise on a cycle ergometer. On the day prior to the experiment, 12 subjects took two 0.5-g doses of ASA in a wafer, and another 0.5 g 3-4 h before the test on the day of the investigation (ASA group). The remaining seven subjects (control group) received placebo. Hematocrit, lactate concentration and concentrations of ACTH, cortisol and ALD were determined before exercise, after exercise, and after 30 min of recovery, in a blood sample taken from a cubital vein. Before exercise, the degree of platelet aggregation in response to arachidonic acid was estimated, in order to confirm the correct allocation to the two groups. Aggregation should only occur in the ASA group. ASA and control groups exercised for 30.3 (3.1) min and 30.2 (1.6) min, respectively. Maximal heart rate and lactate concentration were similar in both groups, as were the basal concentrations of ACTH and cortisol; the ALD concentration seemed lower in the ASA group, but the difference was not significant (p<0.1). In both groups after exercise ACTH, cortisol and ALD concentrations were significantly increased, however when compared to the control group, the increase of ACTH in the ASA group was significantly higher, and ALD increase significantly lower. After recovery there was a significant decrease in ACTH concentration, whereas the concentrations of ALD and cortisol did not change. The concentrations of cortisol in both groups after exercise and recovery were similar. That is most likely because the ACTH concentrations in the ASA and control groups were sufficient for almost maximal cortisol secretion. It is

  5. Modulation of adrenocorticotrophin hormone (ACTH)-induced expression of stress-related genes by PUFA in inter-renal cells from European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).

    PubMed

    Montero, Daniel; Terova, Genciana; Rimoldi, Simona; Tort, Lluis; Negrin, Davinia; Zamorano, María Jesús; Izquierdo, Marisol

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fatty acids have been shown to exert a clear effect on the stress response, modulating the release of cortisol. The role of fatty acids on the expression of steroidogenic genes has been described in mammals, but little is known in fish. The effect of different fatty acids on the release of cortisol and expression of stress-related genes of European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) head kidney, induced by a pulse of adenocorticotrophin hormone (ACTH), was studied. Tissue was maintained in superfusion with 60 min of incubation with EPA, DHA, arachidonic acid (ARA), linoleic acid or α-linolenic acid (ALA) during 490 min. Cortisol was measured by RIA. The quantification of stress-related genes transcripts was conducted by One-Step TaqMan real-time RT-PCR. There was an effect of the type of fatty acid on the ACTH-induced release of cortisol, values from ALA treatment being elevated within all of the experimental period. The expression of some steroidogenic genes, such as the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and c-fos, were affected by fatty acids, ALA increasing the expression of StAR after 1 h of ACTH stimulation whereas DHA, ARA and ALA increased the expression of c-fos after 20 min. ARA increased expression of the 11β-hydroxylase gene. Expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) was increased in all the experimental treatments except for ARA. Results corroborate previous studies of the effect of different fatty acids on the release of cortisol in marine fish and demonstrate that those effects are mediated by alteration of the expression of steroidogenic genes.

  6. Aberrant expression of glucagon receptors in adrenal glands of a patient with Cushing's syndrome and ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, Valeria; Redal, María Ana; Viale, María Lorena; Kahan, Mariano; Glerean, Mariela; Beskow, Axel; Fainstein Day, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) independent bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (AIMAH) is a rare cause of Cushing's syndrome, characterized by bilateral adrenal lesions and excess cortisol production despite ACTH suppression. Cortisol synthesis is produced in response to abnormal activation of G-protein-coupled receptors, such as gastric inhibitory peptide, vasopressin, beta adrenergic agonists, LH/hCG and serotonin receptors. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of glucagon receptors in adrenal glands from an AIMAH patient. A patient with ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome and bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia was screened for altered activation of adrenal receptors by physiological (mixed meal) and pharmacological (gonadotrophin releasing hormone, ACTH and glucagon) tests. The results showed abnormally high levels of serum cortisol after stimulation with glucagon. Hypercortisolism was successfully managed with ketoconazole treatment. Interestingly, a 4-month treatment with a somatostatin analogue (octreotide) was also able to reduce cortisol secretion. Finally, Cushing's syndrome was cured after bilateral adrenalectomy. Abnormal mRNA expression for glucagon receptor in the patient's adrenal glands was observed by Real-Time PCR procedure. These results strongly suggest that the mechanism of AIMAH causing Cushing's syndrome in this case involves the illicit activation of adrenal glucagon receptors. This is the first case reported of AIMAH associated with ectopic glucagon receptors.

  7. Adrenocorticotropin receptors: Functional expression from rat adrenal mRNA in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Mertz, L.M.; Catt, K.J. )

    1991-10-01

    The adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) receptor, which binds corticotropin and stimulates adenylate cyclase and steroidogenesis in adrenocortical cells, was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes microinjected with rat adrenal poly(A){sup +} RNA. Expression of the ACTH receptor in individual stage 5 and 6 oocytes was monitored by radioimmunoassay of ligand-stimulated cAMP production. Injection of 5-40 ng of adrenal mRNA caused dose-dependent increases in ACTH-responsive cAMP production. Size fractionation of rat adrenal poly(A){sup +}RNA by sucrose density-gradient centrifugation revealed that mRNA encoding the ACTH receptor was present in the 1.1-to 2.0-kilobase fraction. These data indicate that ACTH receptors can be expressed from adrenal mRNA in Xenopus oocytes and are fully functional in terms of ligand specificity and signal generation. The extracellular cAMP response to ACTH is a sensitive and convenient index of receptor expression. This system should permit more complete characterization and expression cloning of the ACTH receptor.

  8. Ectopic ACTH Production in Carcinoma of the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Gewirtz, George; Yalow, Rosalyn S.

    1974-01-01

    Immunoreactive ACTH was found in almost all tissue extracts of lung carcinoma from patients without clinical evidence of Cushing's syndrome; i.e. 14 of 15 primary tumors, nine of nine metastatic lymph nodes, and four of four metastatic liver nodules contained immunoreactive ACTH. The incidence of ACTH in extracts of other tumor types was much lower. Comparable normal tissues contained no detectable ACTH. Immunoreactive growth hormone, parathyroid hormone, or gastrin was not found in the same carcinoma tissue. The predominant form of ACTH in the tumor extracts was big ACTH. In pituitary extracts little ACTH predominated. 53% of 83 patients with lung carcinoma had afternoon plasma ACTH levels greater than 150 pg/ml; more than 90% of plasmas containing less than 150 pg/ml were obtained from patients who had received radiation therapy or chemotherapy. 31% of 45 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), 28% of 25 patients with other severe lung disease, and 6% of 33 controls had elevated values. Big ACTH predominated in the plasma of patients with lung carcinoma or COPD having elevated ACTH levels. Tissue from the lung of a smoking dog with atypical histologic changes contained immunoreactive ACTH, almost exclusively in the big form, while tissue from another smoking dog that was histologically normal contained no ACTH. Thus ACTH may be present even in precancerous lung lesions. These studies suggest that serial plasma ACTH levels may be of value in screening for, and/or management of, patients with carcinoma of the lung. PMID:4360854

  9. Identification of the novel autoantigen candidate Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor alpha in isolated adrenocorticotropin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Kiyota, Atsushi; Iwama, Shintaro; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Takeuchi, Seiji; Takagi, Hiroshi; Iwata, Naoko; Nakashima, Kohtaro; Suzuki, Haruyuki; Nishioka, Tomoki; Kato, Takuya; Enomoto, Atsushi; Arima, Hiroshi; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Oiso, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Isolated adrenocorticotropin deficiency (IAD) is characterized by low or absent adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) production. IAD is presumed to be caused in part by an autoimmune mechanism, and several lines of evidence have suggested the presence of anti-pituitary antibodies in IAD. However, the exact autoantigens remain unknown. The present study was designed to identify the autoantigen(s) in IAD using chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Rat anterior pituitary lysate was subjected to SDS-PAGE, and immunoblotting was performed using the sera from two patients with IAD and from a healthy subject. The bands detected by the patient serum samples, but not by the healthy subject sample, were excised, in-gel digested using trypsin, and subjected to LC-MS/MS analysis. On immunoblots, a 51-kDa band in the insoluble pellet was detected by the sera from the IAD patients but not from the healthy subject. Mass spectrometric analysis revealed the 51-kDa band contained Rab guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) alpha. Consistent with the mass spectrometric analysis, a recombinant full-length human Rab GDI alpha was recognized by the two IAD patient samples but not by the healthy subject sample using immunoblotting. In total, anti-Rab GDI alpha antibodies were detected in serum samples from three of five patients with IAD (60%) but were absent in 5 healthy subjects. In addition, Rab GDI alpha was expressed in the anterior pituitary. In conclusion, it appears that Rab GDI alpha is a candidate autoantigen involved in IAD, and that anti-Rab GDI alpha antibodies are present predominantly in patients with IAD.

  10. CORTICOTROPINS (ACTH)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Choh Hao; Fønss-Bech, Peter; Geschwind, Irving I.; Hayashida, Tetsuo; Hungerford, Gerald F.; Lostroh, Ardis J.; Lyons, William R.; Moon, Henry D.; Reinhardt, William O.; Sideman, Martin

    1957-01-01

    Purified α-corticotropin has been reported to exercise the following biological effects: (a) stimulation of the adrenal glands in normal and hypophysectomized rats, (b) production of blood eosinopenia in hypophysectomized rats, (c) maintenance of muscle glycogen in hypophysectomized rats, (d) inhibition of growth-promoting activity of somatotropin, (e) stimulation of melanocytes in the skin of frogs, (f) mobilization of fat into the liver of fasted mice, (g) stimulation of the accessory sex glands of castrated-hypophysectomized male rats, (h) induction of deciduoma formation in hypophysectomized-oophorectomized rats, and (i) elevation of the total red cell volume in hypophysectomized rats. α-Corticotropin has also been shown for the first time to act in synergism with lactogenic hormone as an essential galactopoietic hormone. The ability of α-corticotropin to elicit biological responses in the absence of the adrenal cortex is discussed. PMID:13416472

  11. Whole-body irradiation transiently diminishes the adrenocorticotropin response to recombinant human interleukin-1{alpha}

    SciTech Connect

    Perlstein, R.S.; Mehta, N.R.; Neta, R.; Whitnall, M.H.; Mougey, E.H.

    1995-03-01

    Recombinant human interleukin-1{alpha} (rhIL-1{alpha}) has significant potential as a radioprotector and/or treatment for radiation-induced hematopoietic injury. Both IL-1 and whole-body ionizing irradiation acutely stimulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. We therefore assessed the interaction of whole-body irradiation and rhIL-1{alpha} in altering the functioning of the axis in mice. Specifically, we determined the adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone responses to rhIL-1{alpha} administered just before and hours to days after whole-body or sham irradiation. Our results indicate that whole-body irradiation does not potentiate the rhIL-1{alpha}-induced increase in ACTH levels at the doses used. In fact, the rhIL-1{alpha}-induced increase in plasma ACTH is transiently impaired when the cytokine is administered 5 h after, but not 1 h before, exposure to whole-body irradiation. The ACTH response may be inhibited by elevated corticosterone levels after whole-body irradiation, or by other radiation-induced effects on the pituitary gland and hypothalamus. 36 refs., 3 figs.

  12. Modulation of ovine fetal adrenocorticotropin secretion by androstenedione and 17beta-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Saoud, C J; Wood, C E

    1997-04-01

    Parturition in sheep is initiated by increases in activity of the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. We have previously reported that cortisol negative feedback efficacy is decreased at the end of gestation. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that increasing plasma estrogen and/or androgen concentrations in the fetus might increase plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) concentration, either by stimulating ACTH secretion or by altering the negative feedback effect of cortisol on ACTH. Fetal sheep were chronically catheterized and treated with no steroid (control), 17beta-estradiol, or androstenedione (each approximately 0.24 mg/day). After catheterization and implantation of steroid pellet, fetuses were subjected to two short (10 min) periods of sodium nitroprusside-induced hypotension with or without pretreatment with intravenous infusion of hydrocortisone sodium succinate (0.5 microg/min) to test fetal ACTH responsiveness to stress and cortisol negative feedback efficacy. Estradiol treatment significantly increased basal plasma ACTH and cortisol concentrations relative to control fetuses but did not interfere with the inhibition of ACTH secretion by cortisol. Fetal plasma ACTH responses to hypotension were significantly suppressed approximately 60% in both control and estradiol-treated groups. Androstenedione treatment significantly increased basal fetal plasma ACTH and decreased basal fetal plasma cortisol concentration. Androstenedione did not alter stimulated levels of fetal ACTH but did block the inhibition of stimulated ACTH by cortisol. We conclude that increased fetal cortisol and ACTH secretion at the end of gestation may be due to the combined effects of the gonadal steroids in that estradiol increases basal plasma ACTH secretion while androstenedione reduces cortisol negative feedback efficacy.

  13. ACTH and. cap alpha. -melanotropin in central temperature control

    SciTech Connect

    Lipton, J.M.; Glyn, J.R.; Zimmer, J.A.

    1981-11-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and ..cap alpha..-melanotropin (..cap alpha..-MSH) occur in brain tissue known to be important to temperature control. These peptides cause hypothermia if they are injected centrally in sufficient doses, but they do not act on the central set point of temperature control. Instead they appear to inhibit central pathways for heat conservation and production. In addition to their hypothermic capability, these peptides are antipyretic when given centrally in doses that have no effect on normal body temperature. ACTH has previously been associated with fever reduction in both clinical and experimental studies, and it may be that endogenous central ACTH is important for limitation of maximal fever. The hypothermic and antipyretic effects of ACTH do not depend on stimulation of the adrenal cortex because they are also observed in adrenalectomized rabbits. Nor is the antipyretic effect limited to the rabbit inasmuch as a comparable effect has been demonstrated in the squirrel monkey. The two peptides may be involved in central mediation of normal thermoregulation and fever, perhaps limiting the febrile response and other rises in body temperature by acting as neurotransmitters or neuromodulators in central thermoregulatory pathways.

  14. ACTH stimulation test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Groot LJ, de Kretser DM, et al, eds. Endocrinology: Adult and Pediatric . 7th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 102. Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. ACTH stimulation test - diagnostic. In: ... . 13th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ...

  15. Hyperfunctioning unilateral adrenal macronodule in three patients with Cushing's disease: hormonal and imaging characterization.

    PubMed

    Abs, R; Nobels, F; Verhelst, J; Chanson, P; Mahler, C; Corthouts, B; Blockx, P; Beckers, A

    1993-10-01

    We aimed to investigate the dynamics of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and cortisol secretion in pituitary-dependent Cushing's syndrome with bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia presenting as a single adrenal macronodule, and to determine the imaging characteristics of this syndrome. Three female patients were studied. Plasma ACTH and serum cortisol secretion were studied by determining their rhythmicity and pulsatility and their responses to the administration of ovine corticotropin-releasing factor, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, metyrapone, tetracosactrin, insulin and dexamethasone. Techniques used to localize the anatomical lesion were bilateral simultaneous inferior petrosal sinus sampling, magnetic resonance examination of the pituitary, computed tomography (CT) scanning and [75Se]cholesterol scintigraphy of the adrenal glands. Plasma ACTH and serum cortisol levels were measured using a commercial radioimmunoassay and an immunoradiometric assay. The ACTH and cortisol pulse number and amplitude were calculated using established computer software. In all three patients ACTH and cortisol secretory dynamics fulfilled the requirements for diagnosis of pituitary-dependent Cushing's syndrome. A close relationship between ACTH and cortisol pulses also favored a pituitary dependency. Study of the amplitude of cortisol pulses classified two patients in the group of hypopulsatile Cushing's disease. Adrenal CT scanning demonstrated the presence of a large single nodule. [75Se]Cholesterol scintigraphy showed bilateral radionuclide uptake, although mostly localized over the adrenal nodule. All patients underwent successful trans-sphenoidal hypophysectomy. Over a period of 1 year, a slow shrinkage of the adrenal nodule was observed in two patients, while no change in volume was observed in one patient.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Implication of corticotropic hormone axis in eating behaviour pattern in obese and type 2 diabetic participants.

    PubMed

    Benbaibeche, Hassiba; Haffaf, El Mahdi; Kacimi, Ghouti; Oudjit, Brahim; Khan, Naim Akhtar; Koceïr, Elhadj Ahmed

    2015-04-28

    In Algeria, eating behaviour has been increasingly deviated from its traditional Mediterranean diet to modern fast food style. The present study examines the interactions between eating behaviour pattern (EBP), corticotropic hormone axis and the metabolic syndrome. Our Algerian population cohort comprised of 410 participants (130 obese, 170 type 2 diabetics and 110 healthy participants). The EBP was evaluated by the Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire test. The anthropometric and metabolic parameters (glucose, TAG, HDL, LDL and cholesterol) and the concentrations of hormones (insulin, adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH), cortisol and growth hormone) were determined by biometrics, spectrophotometry and RIA, respectively. Multivariate analyses showed a high correlation between the EBP and the metabolic syndrome, particularly between insulin-resistant state and hypertrophy of visceral adipose tissue. Compared with healthy participants, obese ones showed the hyperphagic type of EBP, i.e. disinhibition and hunger disorders. Conversely, the diabetics showed both the hypophagic and hyperphagic type of EBP. In diabetic and obese participants, cortisol and ACTH secretions were significantly altered, leading to metabolic disorders. The present study confirms the role of EBP in obesity and diabetes. PMID:25782454

  17. Isolated adrenocorticotropin deficiency presenting as primary infertility.

    PubMed

    Atkin, S L; Masson, E A; White, M C

    1995-06-01

    A 31 year old female presented with primary infertility and gave a two year history of amenorrhea without symptoms or signs of endocrine dysfunction. Examination was normal and investigation showed low oestradiol and progesterone levels with decreased LH pulsatility. The cortisol responses were impaired following hypoglycaemic stress and a short synacthen test, but the cortisol response to a prolonged synacthen test was normal. An inadequate ACTH response to CRF testing confirmed the diagnosis of isolated ACTH deficiency. Hydrocortisone therapy was followed by an ovulatory menstrual cycle. Amenorrhea again ensued following the reduction of the steroid dose and normal menses resumed on normal steroid replacement therapy. Six hourly gonadotrophin pulsatility showed a significant increase in both pulse amplitude and mean LH and FSH levels following steroid treatment. Isolated ACTH deficiency is a rare but treatable cause of hypogonadism and infertility, and this case gives further insight on the role of cortisol on the hypothalamo-pituitary gonadal axis.

  18. Adrenocorticotropin receptors in rat adrenal glomerulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Gallo-Payet, N; Escher, E

    1985-07-01

    The results presented here demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of ACTH receptors in the zona glomerulosa of adrenal glands. We obtained the surprising result that the glomerulosa cells carry a higher concentration of ACTH receptors than the fasciculata cells. The analog [Phe2,Nle4]ACTH was iodinated by the iodogen method and separated by HPLC; it was obtained carrier-free and has a specific activity of 600 muCi/micrograms, retaining full biological potency. After 30 min of incubation at 22 C for concentrations of 2 X 10(-11) M [125I]ACTH, specific binding values were 4.85 +/- 0.44% (n = 15) and 1.85 +/- 0.18% (n = 15), respectively, for 50,000 glomerulosa or fasciculata cells. For the glomerulosa, our results indicated a density of 6.5 X 10(4), receptors/cell of the high affinity type (Kd1 = 7.6 X 10(-11) M) and 1.0 X 10(6) receptors of the low affinity type (Kd2 = 1.2 X 10(-9) M). In the zona fasciculata, we found 7.2 X 10(3) receptors of high affinity (Kd1 = 1.1 X 10(-11) M) per cell and 6.3 X 10(5) of low affinity (Kd2 = 2.9 X 10(-9) M). The dissociation constant for the high affinity site of the glomerulosa cells was in excellent correlation with the half-maximal stimulation dose of ACTH for aldosterone and corticosterone (Kd1 = 7.6 X 10(-11) M vs. ED50 of 8 X 10(-11) and 3 X 10(-11) M). Results from primary cultures showed a decrease in binding capacity after 1 day in culture and then an increase to the initial value after 3 days in culture.

  19. Management of occult adrenocorticotropin-secreting bronchial carcinoids: limits of endocrine testing and imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Loli, P; Vignati, F; Grossrubatscher, E; Dalino, P; Possa, M; Zurleni, F; Lomuscio, G; Rossetti, O; Ravini, M; Vanzulli, A; Bacchetta, C; Galli, C; Valente, D

    2003-03-01

    The differential diagnosis and the identification of the source of ACTH in occult ectopic Cushing's syndrome due to a bronchial carcinoid still represents a challenge for the endocrinologist. We report our experience in six patients with occult bronchial carcinoid in whom extensive hormonal, imaging, and scintigraphic evaluation was performed. All patients presented with hypercortisolism associated with high plasma ACTH values. The CRH test and high dose dexamethasone suppression test suggested an ectopic source of ACTH in three of six patients. During bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling, none of the patients showed a central to peripheral ACTH gradient. At the time of diagnosis, none of the patients had radiological evidence of the ectopic source of ACTH, whereas pentetreotide scintigraphy identified the lesion in two of four patients. Finally, a chest computed tomography scan revealed the presence of a bronchial lesion in all patients, and pentetreotide scintigraphy identified four of six lesions. In all patients a bronchial carcinoid was found and removed. In one patient with scintigraphic evidence of residual disease after two operations, radioguided surgery, using a hand-held gamma probe after iv administration of radiolabeled pentetreotide, was performed; this allowed detection and removal of residual multiple mediastinal lymph node metastases. In conclusion, our data show that there is not a single endocrine test or imaging procedure accurate enough to diagnose and localize occult ectopic ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoids. Radioguided surgery appears to be promising in the presence of multiple tumor foci and previous incomplete removal of the tumor. PMID:12629081

  20. Management of occult adrenocorticotropin-secreting bronchial carcinoids: limits of endocrine testing and imaging techniques.

    PubMed

    Loli, P; Vignati, F; Grossrubatscher, E; Dalino, P; Possa, M; Zurleni, F; Lomuscio, G; Rossetti, O; Ravini, M; Vanzulli, A; Bacchetta, C; Galli, C; Valente, D

    2003-03-01

    The differential diagnosis and the identification of the source of ACTH in occult ectopic Cushing's syndrome due to a bronchial carcinoid still represents a challenge for the endocrinologist. We report our experience in six patients with occult bronchial carcinoid in whom extensive hormonal, imaging, and scintigraphic evaluation was performed. All patients presented with hypercortisolism associated with high plasma ACTH values. The CRH test and high dose dexamethasone suppression test suggested an ectopic source of ACTH in three of six patients. During bilateral inferior petrosal sinus sampling, none of the patients showed a central to peripheral ACTH gradient. At the time of diagnosis, none of the patients had radiological evidence of the ectopic source of ACTH, whereas pentetreotide scintigraphy identified the lesion in two of four patients. Finally, a chest computed tomography scan revealed the presence of a bronchial lesion in all patients, and pentetreotide scintigraphy identified four of six lesions. In all patients a bronchial carcinoid was found and removed. In one patient with scintigraphic evidence of residual disease after two operations, radioguided surgery, using a hand-held gamma probe after iv administration of radiolabeled pentetreotide, was performed; this allowed detection and removal of residual multiple mediastinal lymph node metastases. In conclusion, our data show that there is not a single endocrine test or imaging procedure accurate enough to diagnose and localize occult ectopic ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoids. Radioguided surgery appears to be promising in the presence of multiple tumor foci and previous incomplete removal of the tumor.

  1. Insulin-induced hypoglycemia activates the release of adrenocorticotropin predominantly via central and propranolol insensitive mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Kvetnanský, R; Kovács, K; Oprsalová, Z; Vigas, M; Makara, G B

    1987-01-01

    The dynamic patterns of pituitary-adrenocortical and sympatho-adrenal hormone responses to insulin hypoglycemia as well as the relative importance of central vs. peripheral control of hypoglycemia-induced ACTH secretion were evaluated. In conscious rats bearing indwelling cannulae, the changes in hormone concentrations after insulin injection were dependent on the changes in blood glucose levels with respect to both time course and magnitude. ACTH, corticosterone, epinephrine, and norepinephrine levels were found to be maximal at 60 min after 2.5 IU kg-1 insulin injected ip, whereas earlier (20 min) but smaller increases were obtained in response to 0.5 IU kg-1 insulin injected iv. In rats 6-7 days after lesions of the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH), the rise of ACTH during insulin hypoglycemia was markedly inhibited and corticosterone levels were significantly reduced. Simultaneously, the hypoglycemia-induced increase in plasma epinephrine was unchanged and that in plasma norepinephrine was significantly enhanced in rats with the MBH destroyed. The beta-adrenoreceptor blocker propranolol did not inhibit ACTH and corticosterone responses to hypoglycemia in either sham-operated or MBH-lesioned animals. We conclude that the main factors triggering ACTH release during insulin-induced hypoglycemia are of central rather than peripheral origin. The high concentrations of circulating catecholamines occurring during insulin hypoglycemia are not responsible for pituitary-adrenocortical activation by direct, beta-adrenoreceptor mediated action at the pituitary level. PMID:3023036

  2. ACTH Regulation of Adrenal SR-B1.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wen-Jun; Azhar, Salman; Kraemer, Fredric B

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal gland is one of the prominent sites for steroid hormone synthesis. Lipoprotein-derived cholesterol esters (CEs) delivered via SR-B1 constitute the dominant source of cholesterol for steroidogenesis, particularly in rodents. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulates steroidogenesis through downstream actions on multiple components involved in steroidogenesis. Both acute and chronic ACTH treatments can modulate SR-B1 function, including its transcription, posttranscriptional stability, phosphorylation and dimerization status, as well as the interaction with other protein partners, all of which result in changes in the ability of SR-B1 to mediate HDL-CE uptake and the supply of cholesterol for conversion to steroids. Here, we provide a review of the recent findings on the regulation of adrenal SR-B1 function by ACTH. PMID:27242666

  3. ACTH Regulation of Adrenal SR-B1

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Wen-Jun; Azhar, Salman; Kraemer, Fredric B.

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal gland is one of the prominent sites for steroid hormone synthesis. Lipoprotein-derived cholesterol esters (CEs) delivered via SR-B1 constitute the dominant source of cholesterol for steroidogenesis, particularly in rodents. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) stimulates steroidogenesis through downstream actions on multiple components involved in steroidogenesis. Both acute and chronic ACTH treatments can modulate SR-B1 function, including its transcription, posttranscriptional stability, phosphorylation and dimerization status, as well as the interaction with other protein partners, all of which result in changes in the ability of SR-B1 to mediate HDL-CE uptake and the supply of cholesterol for conversion to steroids. Here, we provide a review of the recent findings on the regulation of adrenal SR-B1 function by ACTH. PMID:27242666

  4. Naloxone inhibits and morphine potentiates. The adrenal steroidogenic response to ACTH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heybach, J. P.; Vernikos, J.

    1980-01-01

    The adrenal actions were stereospecific since neither the positve stereoisomer of morphine, nor that of naloxone, had any effect on the adrenal response to exogenous adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH). The administration of human beta endorphin to phyophysectomized rats had no effect on the adrenal corticosterone concentration nor did it alter the response of the adrenal gland to ACTH. These results indicate that morphine can potentiate the action of ACTH on the adrenal by a direct, stereospecific, dose dependent mechanism that is prevented by naloxone pretreatment and which may involve competition for ACTH receptors on the corticosterone secreting cells of the adrenal cortex.

  5. Lack of ACTH lowering effect of sodium valproate in patients with ACTH hypersecretion.

    PubMed

    Loli, P; Berselli, M E; Frascatani, F; Muratori, F; Tagliaferri, M

    1984-04-01

    The effect of an oral dose of 200 or 400 mg sodium valproate (DPA) on ACTH and cortisol secretion was assessed in 11 patients with Cushing's disease (3 bilaterally adrenalectomized), 3 patients with Nelson's syndrome and 6 patients with Addison's disease. In none of the patients examined DPA induced changes in ACTH (and cortisol) levels appreciably different from the fluctuations recorded after placebo administration. The effect of a long term administration of sodium valproate (600-1000 mg/day) was evaluated in 2 patients with active Cushing's disease and in 1 patient with Nelson's syndrome (3 weeks, 3, 9 months respectively); in the 2 patients with Cushing's disease ACTH and cortisol secretion, 17-hydroxy-corticosteroids (17-OHCS) urinary excretion did not change during DPA treatment. Similarly the cortisol response to hypoglycemia and the 17-OHCS urinary excretion after dexamethasone were not normalized. Long term DPA administration did not induce either clinical or hormonal modifications in the patient with Nelson's syndrome. These findings do not support the possibility that a deficiency of a GABAergic system plays a role in the pathogenesis of ACTH hypersecretion. DPA does not seem to be of therapeutical value in the medical management of Cushing's disease and Nelson's syndrome.

  6. Impact of Adiposity and Fat Distribution on the Dynamics of Adrenocorticotropin and Cortisol Rhythms.

    PubMed

    Roelfsema, Ferdinand; Pereira, Alberto M; Veldhuis, Johannes D

    2014-12-01

    Obesity impacts many hormonal systems, including pituitary hormones, as well as insulin and leptin. In this review we discuss articles which investigate the influence of obesity on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Different techniques have been used to assess the function of the HPA-axis in obesity, including measuring fasting and/or late evening levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and (free) cortisol in plasma and saliva, studying feedback with dexamethasone or cortisol, and evaluating responsiveness of the system to corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) or ACTH 1-29. In addition, more elaborate studies investigated 24-h secretion patterns, analyzed with deconvolution techniques to quantitate pulsatile secretion rates of cortisol and less often ACTH. Other investigators used timed infusions of labeled cortisol for the estimation of the 24-h secretion rate, clearance rate and distribution volume. Many studies relied on the 24-h urinary excretion of free cortisol, but for quantitation of the 24-h secretion, measurement of all cortisol-derived metabolites is required. Several studies have applied modern liquid chromatography-tandem-mass spectrometry techniques to measure these metabolites. The picture emerging from all these studies is that, first, ACTH secretion is amplified, likely via enhanced forward drive; and, second, serum cortisol levels are normal or even low, associated with a normal 24-h cortisol secretion per liter distribution volume determined by deconvolution, but enhanced when based on the increased total distribution volume associated with obesity. Increased cortisol secretion was also established by isotope dilution studies and reports based on the measurement of all urinary cortisol metabolites. The responsiveness of the adrenal gland to ACTH is diminished. The studies do not address quantitative aspects of cortisol-cortisone metabolism on individual organs, including liver, central and

  7. [Cushing syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion].

    PubMed

    Mendonça, B B; Madureira, G; Bloise, W; Albergaria, A; Halpern, A; Liberman, B; Villares, S M; Batista, M C; Avancini, V F; Nitterdorfi, C T

    1989-01-01

    The authors studied 8 patients (4 males and 4 females) with Cushing's syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion. Chronological age ranged from 15 to 45 years and duration of the disease ranged from 3 to 48 months. All patients presented typical signs of Cushing's syndrome, blood hypertension, and four of them had hyperpigmentation of the skin. Five patients had fasting hyperglycemia and all patients but one had serum hypokalemia (serum K = 2.2 to 3.9mEq/l). The circadian rhythm of cortisol was absent in all patients and basal cortisol levels were elevated in all patients but one. Basal ACTH levels evaluated in 7 patients were elevated in 6 (29 to 1050 pg/ml-MRC). One patient presented normal depression of urinary 17-OH after two days of dexamethasone and normal increase of urinary 17-OH and serum 11-dexycortisol after methyrapone. Four patients had carcinoid tumor (3 thymic and 1 bronchial), two had pancreatic islets cell tumors, one had bilateral pheochromocytoma and medular carcinoma of the thyroid, and one had oat cell carcinoma of the lung and medular carcinoma of the thyroid. Thoracic X-rays identified the ectopic ACTH secretion tumor in four cases, all confirmed by CT scan. Abdominal CT showed a difuse enlargement of the adrenals in seven cases and bilateral nodules in one case (pheochromocytomas). Six patients died within 3 years of the diagnosis. The authors concluded that clinical and hormonal findings could mislead the findings of ACTH ectopic secretion and Cushing's disease, and suggest that thoracic X-rays and CT scans of the skull, thorax, and abdome should be done in all cases of Cushing's syndrome. PMID:2559451

  8. [Neurotropic action of adrenocorticotropic hormone].

    PubMed

    Louis, J C; Anglard, P; Vincendon, G

    1986-02-01

    The adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) is produced within the cell body of hypothalamic neurons by proteolytic cleavage of its large precursor molecule, pro-opiomelanocortin. These neurons distribute ACTH-containing nerve endings throughout the central nervous system. ACTH is able to evoke motor and behavioural responses and to modify neuronal metabolism. Since ACTH has been shown to regulate glucose uptake and utilization, its implication in the adaptative response to stress situations, such as cerebral hypoxia, deserves further investigations. PMID:3008142

  9. ACTH producing pulmonary carcinoid and pituitary macroadenoma: a fortuitous association?

    PubMed

    Wong, M; Isa, S H Md; Kamaruddin, N A; Khalid, B A K

    2007-06-01

    We report a case of a 45 year-old man who presented initially with a non-functioning pituitary macroadenoma. A routine chest radiography done preoperatively revealed a right lung nodule which was confirmed by computed tomography (CT) of the thorax. Transfrontal hypophysectomy was performed while a conservative approach was taken for the lung nodule. Four years later, he presented acutely with adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) dependent Cushing's syndrome which resolved following a right lobectomy. Histological examination revealed an atypical carcinoid. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an ectopic ACTH secreting pulmonary carcinoid found in association with a non-functioning pituitary macroadenoma.

  10. EXPERIENCE WITH CORTISONE AND ACTH IN A PRIVATE CLINIC

    PubMed Central

    Krupp, Marcus A.; Saier, Milton; Keddie, Frances; Tanner, Ralph; Snell, A. M.

    1951-01-01

    Cortisone and ACTH are valuable agents for treating a large variety of diseases. In appropriate situations they may save life. It may be possible to prevent loss of vision in eye disease or permanent damage to important viscera in generalized disease. With ready access to these agents through the pharmacist, it is important to know that cortisone and ACTH can be used in office practice provided patients are selected carefully and followed frequently and closely. Strict observation of criteria for selection of patients limited the size of the series of patients reported upon, but by the same token the incidence of complications from therapy was exceptionally small. Every physician who elects to employ these potent hormones must become familiar with their physiological effects and with the various methods of exhibiting them. Some of these effects are noted in this paper, but the experiences reviewed here provide an incomplete picture of the wide application of cortisone and ACTH. PMID:14848715

  11. Mechanisms of inhibition of aldosterone secretion by adrenocorticotropin.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, G; Fujita, K; Catt, K J

    1981-02-01

    The mechanisms by which prolonged administration of ACTH causes a decrease in aldosterone secretion were studied in the rat. After 6 days of treatment with ACTH (2 U/day), blood corticosterone was elevated and plasma aldosterone was decreased in rats maintained on either a normal or low sodium diet. PRA was also decreased, probably secondary to increased sodium and/or fluid retention. In collagenase-dispersed glomerulosa cells from adrenals of ACTH-treated rats, angiotensin II receptors were markedly decreased, as were the in vitro aldosterone responses to angiotensin II, ACTH, 8-bromo-cAMP, and potassium. However, the production of deoxycorticosterone and precursor steroids was increased, indicating the presence of a block in the late aldosterone biosynthetic pathway. Measurement of the activity of biosynthetic enzymes of the steroidogenic pathway in isolated mitochondria revealed an 80% increase in side-chain cleavage enzyme in both glomerulosa and fasciculata mitochondria from ACTH-treated rats. Although ACTH injection also increased 11-hydroxylase activity in the fasciculata zone, this enzyme was reduced by 50% in capsular mitochondria. The 18-hydroxylase activity in adrenal capsular mitochondria was markedly decreased by ACTH treatment in both normal and sodium-restricted animals. The importance of ACTH-induced steroidogenesis in the development of altered glomerulosa cell function was indicated by the ability of aminoglutethimide to prevent the inhibitory effects of ACTH on angiotensin II receptors and PRA. It is likely that the observed inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system is responsible for the decrease in angiotensin II receptors and 18-hydroxylase, since both are highly dependent on the trophic effect of angiotensin II. The specific lesions produced in adrenal glomerulosa cells by long term ACTH treatment include decreased levels of angiotensin II receptors, 11-hydroxylase, and 18-hydroxylase. These changes are secondary to the suppression of renin

  12. Impact of ACTH Signaling on Transcriptional Regulation of Steroidogenic Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ruggiero, Carmen; Lalli, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    The trophic peptide hormone adrenocorticotropic (ACTH) stimulates steroid hormone biosynthesis evoking both a rapid, acute response and a long-term, chronic response, via the activation of cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling. The acute response is initiated by the mobilization of cholesterol from lipid stores and its delivery to the inner mitochondrial membrane, a process that is mediated by the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein. The chronic response results in the increased coordinated transcription of genes encoding steroidogenic enzymes. ACTH binding to its cognate receptor, melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), stimulates adenylyl cyclase, thus inducing cAMP production, PKA activation, and phosphorylation of specific nuclear factors, which bind to target promoters and facilitate coactivator protein recruitment to direct steroidogenic gene transcription. This review provides a general view of the transcriptional control exerted by the ACTH/cAMP system on the expression of genes encoding for steroidogenic enzymes in the adrenal cortex. Special emphasis will be given to the transcription factors required to mediate ACTH-dependent transcription of steroidogenic genes. PMID:27065945

  13. Occult secretion of acth and bilateral adrenalectomy: sometimes the messenger has to be shot.

    PubMed

    Chicharro, Sandra; Lecube, Albert; Mesa, Jordi

    2008-12-01

    Cushing's syndrome due to ectopic adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) secretion is infrequent, the most frequent cause being bronchial carcinoid; nevertheless, in a considerable proportion of cases (up to 16%), the origin of ACTH secretion is not found. Treatment of Cushing's syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion is surgical resection of the tumor. However, surgical excision is not always feasible, either because the tumor has not been located, or because it is unresectable; in these cases the question is when to carry out a bilateral adrenalectomy. We present a case of ACTH-dependent hypercortisolism, in which the ectopic origin of ACTH secretion was established from the results of complementary tests (suppression tests, petrosal sinus sampling, imaging); nevertheless, none of the imaging tests was able to identify the secreting tumor. Consequently, after a reasonable interval, a bilateral adrenalectomy was performed, with good clinical results.

  14. ACTH and beta-endorphin in transcendental meditation.

    PubMed

    Infante, J R; Peran, F; Martinez, M; Roldan, A; Poyatos, R; Ruiz, C; Samaniego, F; Garrido, F

    1998-06-01

    We have evaluated the effect of Transcendental Meditation (TM) on the hypothalamo-hypophyseal-adrenal axis diurnal rhythms through the determination of hormone levels. Blood samples were taken at 0900 hours. and at 2000 hours. These samples were taken from 18 healthy volunteers who regularly practice TM and from nine healthy non-meditators. Cortisol, beta-endorphin, and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were measured at both hours. TM practitioners showed no diurnal rhythm for ACTH and for beta-endorphin (ACTH, pg/mL, mean +/- SE; 13.8+/-1.2 - 12.1+/-1.5/beta-endorphin, pg/mL; 14.4+/-1.5 - 17.2+/-1.9, at 0900 hours and 2000 hours, respectively), in contrast to control subjects, who showed normal diurnal rhythm for these hormones and for cortisol (ACTH, pg/mL; 19.4+/-1.9 - 11.9+/-2.2/beta-endorphin, pg/mL; 25.4+/-1.7 - 17.7+/-1.1/Cortisol, ng/mL; 201.4+/-13.2 - 71.3+/-6.5, at 0900-2000 hours, respectively, p < 0.01 in the three cases). Practitioners of TM with similar anxiety levels to those of the control group showed a different pattern in the daytime secretion of pituitary hormones. TM thus appears to have a significant effect on the neuroendocrine axis. Because cortisol levels had a normal pattern in the TM group, these results may be due to a change in feedback sensitivity caused by this mental technique.

  15. The pituitary V3 vasopressin receptor and the corticotroph phenotype in ectopic ACTH syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Keyzer, Y; Lenne, F; Auzan, C; Jégou, S; René, P; Vaudry, H; Kuhn, J M; Luton, J P; Clauser, E; Bertagna, X

    1996-03-01

    Ectopic ACTH secretion occurs in highly differentiated and rather indolent tumors like bronchial carcinoids or, in contrast, in various types of aggressive and poorly differentiated neuroendocrine tumors. We explored this phenomenon using the recently cloned human pituitary V3 vasopressin receptor as an alternate molecular marker of the corticotroph phenotype. Expression of V3 receptor, corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) receptor, and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) genes was examined in tumors of pituitary and nonpituitary origin. A comparative RT-PCR approach revealed signals for both V3 receptor and CHR receptor mRNAs in 17 of 18 ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas, and 6 of 6 normal pituitaries; in six growth hormone- or prolactin-secreting adenomas, a very faint V3 receptor signal was observed in three cases, and CRH receptor signal was undetected in all. Six of eight bronchial carcinoids responsible for the ectopic ACTH syndrome had both POMC and V3 receptor signals as high as those in ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas; in contrast, no POMC signal and only a very faint V3 receptor signal were detected in six of eight nonsecreting bronchial carcinoids. Northern blot analysis showed V3 receptor mRNA of identical size in ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoids and pituitary tumors. Other types of nonpituitary tumors responsible for ectopic ACTH syndrome presented much lower levels of both POMC and V3 receptor gene expression than those found in ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoids. In contrast with the V3 receptor, CRH receptor mRNA was detected in the majority of neuroendocrine tumors irrespective of their POMC status. These results show that expression of the V3 receptor gene participates in the corticotroph phenotype. Its striking association with ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoids defines a subset of nonpituitary tumors in which ectopic POMC gene expression is but one aspect of a wider process of corticotroph cell differentiation, and opens new possibilities of

  16. Motion sickness susceptibility related to ACTH, ADH and TSH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, R. L.; Leach, C.; Homick, J. L.; Larochelle, F. T.

    1983-01-01

    The hypothesis that endogenous levels of certain hormones might be indicative of an individual's susceptibility to stressful motion is tested in a comparison of subjects classified as less prone to motion sickness with those of higher susceptibility. The levels of ACTH and vasopressin measured before exposure to stressful motion were twice as high in the less-suceptible group. No significant differences were noted in the levels of angiotensin, aldosterone, or TSH. The differences between the two groups were greater for a given hormone than for any of the changes induced by exposure to stressful motion.

  17. Responses of calves to injections of ACTH and their relationship with growth rate.

    PubMed

    Ramin, A G; Daniel, R C; Fenwick, D C; Verrall, R G

    1995-07-01

    A study was made of the effects of exogenous adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) on the levels of blood components in 109 dairy replacement calves and the statistical correlations between these effects and the growth rates of the calves from birth to six months. Blood samples were taken from a jugular vein before ACTH was injected and then at two, four, six and eight hours afterwards, and analysed for plasma cortisol concentration, total white cell counts, packed cell volume, haemoglobin, plasma glucose, sodium, potassium, magnesium and inorganic phosphorus, erythrocyte sodium, potassium and magnesium, serum ionised calcium and total protein and total plasma calcium concentration. The injection of 1.1 +/- 0.02 iu/kg of ACTH intramuscularly resulted in a peak plasma cortisol concentration after two hours which had not returned to normal after eight hours. It also resulted in leucocytosis, lymphopenia, neutrophilia, eosinopenia and hypophosphataemia; the mean changes were repeatable (P < 0.05) in 49 of the calves tested two months later. The weight gains to six months of age could be predicted from the degree of the changes in several blood constituents. Significant partial regression coefficients were found for the change in glucose concentration (0 to four hours), absolute neutrophil count (0 to two hours), absolute lymphocyte count (0 to four hours) and loge absolute eosinophil count (0 to two hours). The multiple regression sum of squares was highly significant (P < 0.0001), and the multiple coefficient of determination was 0.305. It was concluded that the changes in these blood components after an injection of ACTH might be used to predict the weight gains of dairy replacement calves.

  18. Naloxone inhibits and morphine potentiates the adrenal steroidogenic response to ACTH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heybach, J. P.; Vernikos, J.

    1981-01-01

    The administration of morphine to hypophysectomized rats potentiated the steroidogenic response of the adrenal cortex to exogenous adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) in a dose-dependent fashion. Conversely, the opiate antagonist naloxone inhibited the adrenal response to ACTH. Naloxone pretreatment also antagonized the potentiating effect of morphine on ACTH-induced steroidogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. Neither morphine nor naloxone, administered to hypophysectomized rats, had any direct effect on adrenal steroidogenesis. These adrenal actions were stereospecific since neither the (+)-stereoisomer of morphine, nor that or naloxone, had any effect on the adrenal response to ACTH. The administration of human beta-endorphin to hypophysectomized rats had no effect on the adrenal corticosterone concentration nor did it alter the response of the adrenal gland to ACTH. These results indicate that morphine can potentiate the action of ACTH on the adrenal by a direct, stereospecific, dose-dependent mechanism that is prevented by naloxone pretreatment and which may involve competition for ACTH receptors on the corticosterone-secreting cells of the adrenal cortex.

  19. A rare cause of Cushing's syndrome: an ACTH-secreting phaeochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Folkestad, Lars; Andersen, Marianne Skovsager; Nielsen, Anne Lerberg; Glintborg, Dorte

    2014-01-01

    Excess glucocorticoid levels cause Cushing's syndrome (CS) and may be due to pituitary, adrenal or ectopic tumours. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels are useful in identifying adrenal tumours. In rare cases, ACTH-producing phaeochromocytomas are the cause of CS. We present two cases of ACTH-secreting phaeochromocytoma as the underlying cause of CS. In both cases, female patients presented with the classical clinical signs of CS and an adrenal mass. High ACTH levels raised the suspicion of an ACTH-secreting phaeochromocytoma. The diagnosis was confirmed by urinary catecholamine levels and positive fluorine-18-L-dihydroxyphenylalanine (18F-DOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) CT (Case 1) and fluorodeoxyglucose PET-CT (Case 2). Both patients were treated with an α-blocker prior to surgical intervention. The two cases underline the importance of thorough diagnostic workup in patients with CS. An ACTH-secreting phaeochromocytoma should be checked for in patients with an adrenal mass and elevated ACTH levels. PMID:25297883

  20. A patient with isolated adrenocorticotropin deficiency presenting with repetitive oesophageal ulcer and stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Tamiya, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Akihisa; Mano, Shinya; Kamoshida, Toshiro; Hirai, Shinji; Chikatsu, Noriko; Oka, Yuji

    2010-01-01

    Isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) deficiency (IAD) is a potentially fatal condition that is difficult to diagnose. The authors diagnosed IAD in a patient who presented with recurrent oesophageal ulceration resulting in oesophageal stenosis. The recurrent oesophageal ulcers were due to frequent nausea and vomiting that were the presenting digestive symptoms of adrenal insufficiency. Severe hypoglycaemia during this patient's course suggested the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency. This case is educational because digestive symptoms are the most common symptoms in patients with adrenal insufficiency, but the diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency in such patients is not easy. PMID:22802481

  1. The Potential of ACTH in the Genesis of Primary Aldosteronism.

    PubMed

    Funder, John W

    2016-01-01

    Aldosterone is a homeostatic hormone, rising in volume depletion, sodium deficiency, and potassium loading, in response to angiotensin11 and elevation of plasma potassium. Pathophysiologically, in primary aldosteronism (PA) aldosterone levels are inappropriate for the patient's sodium and potassium status, and thus outside the normal feedback loop. ACTH is equivalent with A11 and [K(+)] in elevating aldosterone: its effects differ from those of the other secretagogues in four ways. First, it is not sustained; second, it raises aldosterone and cortisol secretion with equal potency; third, it is outside the normal feedback loops, reflecting the epithelial action of aldosterone; and finally its possible role in driving inappropriate aldosterone secretion (aka PA) is not widely recognized. Thirty years ago, it was shown that on a fixed sodium intake of 175 meq/day 36 of 100 unselected hypertensives, in whom PA has been excluded on contemporary criteria, had 24 h urinary aldosterone levels above the upper limit of normotensive controls. More recently, the dexamethasone enhanced fludrocortisone suppression test (FDST) showed 29% of unselected hypertensives to have plasma aldosterone concentrations above the upper limit of normotensive controls. In subjects negative for PA on the FDST, 27% were extremely hyper-responsive to ultra-low dose ACTH infusion; the remaining 73% showed minimal aldosterone elevation, as did normotensive controls: all three groups had negligible cortisol responses. On treadmill testing, no differences were found between groups in (minimally altered) ACTH and cortisol levels: hyper-responders to ultra-low ACTH, however, showed a major elevation in PAC. The implications of these studies, when validated, are substantial for PA, in that approximately half of hypertensive patients appear to show inappropriate aldosterone levels for their sodium status. The physiological role(s) of ACTH as an acute aldosterone secretagogue, and the mechanisms whereby

  2. The Potential of ACTH in the Genesis of Primary Aldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Funder, John W.

    2016-01-01

    Aldosterone is a homeostatic hormone, rising in volume depletion, sodium deficiency, and potassium loading, in response to angiotensin11 and elevation of plasma potassium. Pathophysiologically, in primary aldosteronism (PA) aldosterone levels are inappropriate for the patient’s sodium and potassium status, and thus outside the normal feedback loop. ACTH is equivalent with A11 and [K+] in elevating aldosterone: its effects differ from those of the other secretagogues in four ways. First, it is not sustained; second, it raises aldosterone and cortisol secretion with equal potency; third, it is outside the normal feedback loops, reflecting the epithelial action of aldosterone; and finally its possible role in driving inappropriate aldosterone secretion (aka PA) is not widely recognized. Thirty years ago, it was shown that on a fixed sodium intake of 175 meq/day 36 of 100 unselected hypertensives, in whom PA has been excluded on contemporary criteria, had 24 h urinary aldosterone levels above the upper limit of normotensive controls. More recently, the dexamethasone enhanced fludrocortisone suppression test (FDST) showed 29% of unselected hypertensives to have plasma aldosterone concentrations above the upper limit of normotensive controls. In subjects negative for PA on the FDST, 27% were extremely hyper-responsive to ultra-low dose ACTH infusion; the remaining 73% showed minimal aldosterone elevation, as did normotensive controls: all three groups had negligible cortisol responses. On treadmill testing, no differences were found between groups in (minimally altered) ACTH and cortisol levels: hyper-responders to ultra-low ACTH, however, showed a major elevation in PAC. The implications of these studies, when validated, are substantial for PA, in that approximately half of hypertensive patients appear to show inappropriate aldosterone levels for their sodium status. The physiological role(s) of ACTH as an acute aldosterone secretagogue, and the mechanisms whereby

  3. ACTH Modulates PTP-PEST Activity and Promotes Its Interaction With Paxillin.

    PubMed

    Gorostizaga, Alejandra Beatriz; Mori Sequeiros Garcia, M Mercedes; Acquier, Andrea B; Lopez-Costa, Juan J; Mendez, Carlos F; Maloberti, Paula M; Paz, Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) treatment has been proven to promote paxillin dephosphorylation and increase soluble protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) activity in rat adrenal zona fasciculata (ZF). Also, in-gel PTP assays have shown the activation of a 115-kDa PTP (PTP115) by ACTH. In this context, the current work presents evidence that PTP115 is PTP-PEST, a PTP that recognizes paxillin as substrate. PTP115 was partially purified from rat adrenal ZF and PTP-PEST was detected through Western blot in bioactive samples taken in each purification step. Immunohistochemical and RT-PCR studies revealed PTP-PEST expression in rat ZF and Y1 adrenocortical cells. Moreover, a PTP-PEST siRNA decreased the expression of this phosphatase. PKA phosphorylation of purified PTP115 isolated from non-ACTH-treated rats increased KM and VM . Finally, in-gel PTP assays of immunoprecipitated paxillin from control and ACTH-treated rats suggested a hormone-mediated increase in paxillin-PTP115 interaction, while PTP-PEST and paxillin co-localize in Y1 cells. Taken together, these data demonstrate PTP-PEST expression in adrenal ZF and its regulation by ACTH/PKA and also suggest an ACTH-induced PTP-PEST-paxillin interaction. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2170-2181, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Aging of the rat adrenocortical cell: response to ACTH and cyclic AMP in vitro.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S; Carsia, R V

    1983-03-01

    To study intrinsic age-related changes in adrenocortical steroid production, cells isolated from rats of different ages (3 to 24 months) were used. Acute (2 hour) corticosterone production in response to stimulation by adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) was measured by radioimmunoassay. With age, adrenocortical cells lose much of their ability to produce corticosterone in the absence or presence of ACTH or cAMP. The loss is progressive from 6 to 24 months of age. Analysis of the data suggests that from 6 to 12 months, an intracellular steroidogenic lesion develops; in addition there may be a loss in ACTH receptors on the plasma membrane. After 12 months these defects increase and are accompanied by a decrease in receptor sensitivity to ACTH.

  5. Cortisol and ACTH plasma levels in maternal filicides and violent psychiatric women.

    PubMed

    Spironelli, Chiara; Gradante, Federica; Gradante, Giuseppe; Angrilli, Alessandro

    2013-05-01

    Maternal filicide may be considered the result of significant interactions between increased individual vulnerability and overwhelming environmental stress. The present study examined whether the biological vulnerability to stress and psychotic depression in criminally insane filicidal women was associated with an imbalance of stress-related hormones. Early-morning plasma levels of hormones associated with depression and chronic stress, i.e., thyroid hormones, Cortisol and Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), were measured in 10 filicidal inpatients recovered in a high-security psychiatric hospital for the criminally insane and 10 matched psychiatric, non-filicidal, criminal mothers with comparable traumatic/abuse records. Filicidal mothers had higher than normative Cortisol levels and significantly higher ACTH levels than both the normative values and plasma levels of non-filicidal women. Levels of thyroid hormones fell within normal ranges, without between-groups differences. In addition, while psychiatric controls had the expected Cortisol-ACTH positive correlation, mothers who killed their children revealed no relationship between the two hormones. HPA in the group of filicide perpetrators was altered despite they had received antidepressant pharmacological treatment. The observed imbalance of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis indicates a possible filicides' reduced sensitivity of the adrenal glands to ACTH, probably due to the pre-hospitalization long-term affective stress which preceded child homicide. The results reveal the existence of large psycho-biological stress-sensitivity in filicides, and careful post-discharge psychiatric follow-up of such women is recommended. PMID:23375405

  6. Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    Hormones are your body's chemical messengers. They travel in your bloodstream to tissues or organs. They work ... glands, which are special groups of cells, make hormones. The major endocrine glands are the pituitary, pineal, ...

  7. Effects of ACTH on corticosteroid and progesterone levels in female baboons depending on the phase of the menstrual cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Todua, T.N.; Goncharov, N.P.; Katsiya, G.V.; Lapin, B.A.; Vorontsov, V.I.

    1986-01-01

    To study the effect of ACTH on the endocrine function of steroid producing glands depending on the level of sex hormones in the body, a comparative study of the dynamics of steroid hormones in the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle in response to a standard does of ACTH was undertaken in experiments on hamadryad baboons. Concentrations of corticosterone, 11-deoxycortisol, and progesterone were determined in duplicate samples of plasma by radioimmunoassay. It is shown that the sensitivity of the adrenals to a single injection of ACTH is independent of the phase of the menstrual cycle and the inhibitory effects of ACTH on progesterone secretion is exhibited only in the presence of an actively functioning corpus luteus of the ovary.

  8. Single-Session CT-Guided Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Bilateral Adrenal Gland Hyperplasia Due to Ectopic ACTH Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Asha; Shyn, Paul B; Vivian, Mark A; Ng, Ju-Mei; Tuncali, Kemal; Lorch, Jorchen H; Zaheer, Sarah N; Gordon, Michael S; Silverman, Stuart G

    2015-10-01

    Bilateral adrenalectomy is currently the only available treatment for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent Cushing's syndrome (ectopic ACTH syndrome) that is refractory to pharmacologic therapy. We describe two patients with refractory ectopic ACTH syndrome who were treated with CT-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of both hyperplastic adrenal glands in a single session: O ne was not a surgical candidate, and the other had undergone unsuccessful surgery. Following the procedure, both patients achieved substantial decreases in serum cortisol, symptomatic improvement, and decreased anti-hypertensive medication requirements.

  9. Single-Session CT-Guided Percutaneous Microwave Ablation of Bilateral Adrenal Gland Hyperplasia Due to Ectopic ACTH Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Sarma, Asha Shyn, Paul B.; Vivian, Mark A.; Ng, Ju-Mei; Tuncali, Kemal; Lorch, Jorchen H.; Zaheer, Sarah N.; Gordon, Michael S.; Silverman, Stuart G.

    2015-10-15

    Bilateral adrenalectomy is currently the only available treatment for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent Cushing’s syndrome (ectopic ACTH syndrome) that is refractory to pharmacologic therapy. We describe two patients with refractory ectopic ACTH syndrome who were treated with CT-guided percutaneous microwave ablation of both hyperplastic adrenal glands in a single session: One was not a surgical candidate, and the other had undergone unsuccessful surgery. Following the procedure, both patients achieved substantial decreases in serum cortisol, symptomatic improvement, and decreased anti-hypertensive medication requirements.

  10. Adrenocortical response to low-dose ACTH test in female patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Radikova, Zofia; Rovensky, Jozef; Vlcek, Miroslav; Penesova, Adela; Kerlik, Jana; Vigas, Milan; Imrich, Richard

    2008-12-01

    Alterations in adrenal steroid production have been suggested in females with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of the present study was to assess adrenocortical function in RA females. We examined 11 female RA patients (RA: age 30 +/- 2 years, BMI 21.0 +/- 0.7 kg/m(2)) and 10 matched healthy controls (C: age 31 +/- 1 years, BMI 21.6 +/- 0.6 kg/m(2)). Low-dose adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) test (i.v. bolus of 1 microg synthetic ACTH) was performed at 10.00 h with blood sampling every 15 min for 90 min. Cortisol, 17-OH-progesterone (17OHP), androstenedione (ASD), and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) were assayed in plasma. Baseline cortisol levels were higher in RA patients (RA: 385 +/- 38 versus C: 229 +/- 28 nmol/L, P= 0.007). In both study groups, ACTH administration increased all the four steroids measured (P < 0.001). Cortisol response to ACTH administration was diminished in RA patients when compared to controls (Delta(max): 284 +/- 24 in RA versus 424 +/- 31 nmol/L in C, P= 0.002). ACTH-induced maximal rise in plasma DHEA was significantly lower in RA patients when compared to controls (Delta(max): 2.59 +/- 0.68 in RA versus 5.57 +/- 1.25 ng/mL in C, P= 0.015). No significant between-groups differences were found in responses of ASD or 17OHP. The molar ratio of ASD:cortisol was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in RA patients at base line, but did not differ during ACTH test. After ACTH bolus, the cortisol:17OHP ratio decreased significantly in the RA group (P < 0.001), whereas there was no change in the control group. The present results show decreased secretion of cortisol and DHEA in RA patients in response to ACTH, suggesting a subtle HPA hypofunction at the adrenocortical level. PMID:19120158

  11. Physiological stress in captive Greater rheas (Rhea americana): highly sensitive plasma corticosterone response to an ACTH challenge.

    PubMed

    Lèche, Alvina; Busso, Juan M; Hansen, Cristian; Navarro, Joaquín L; Marín, Raúl H; Martella, Mónica B

    2009-06-01

    Up to the present no studies have been conducted either on baseline concentrations of adrenal hormones or on hormonal responses to stress in Greater rhea (Rhea americana) and most ratite species. The aims of this work were to assess the presence of corticosterone in plasma of Greater rhea, to validate a corticosterone (125)I-radioimmunoassay for determining corticosterone levels in plasma samples and to study the activation of the adrenal gland after an adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) challenge. Six captive Greater rhea juveniles of 10 months of age received an intravenous ACTH injection. Blood samples were taken at 0min (baseline pre-ACTH levels), and post-injection at 15, 30, 60min and at 24 and 48h. The high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of pooled plasma showed that corticosterone is the glucocorticoid found in the plasma of Greater rhea. Biochemical assays of standard validation (e.g., parallelism, exogenous corticosterone recovery) showed that measurements of corticosterone present in the plasma of the Greater rhea provided by commercial corticosterone (125)I-radioimmunoassay were accurate and precise. ACTH challenge induced a more than 40-fold increase in plasma corticosterone at 60min post-ACTH (from 4.0 to 166.5ng/ml, on average). The corticosterone response to ACTH in Greater rhea was higher than is usual in birds, an apparently typical characteristic of ratites.

  12. Effect of deafferentation of the rat tongue on plasma corticosterone, aldosterone, angiotensin and ACTH levels

    SciTech Connect

    Polyntsev, Yu.V.; Serova, O.N.

    1987-09-01

    The effect of deafferentation of the tongue on the plasma level of hormones involved in regulation of the sodium ion level -- aldosterone, corticosterone, ACTH, and angiotensin -- was studied. Plasma hormone levels were determined by radioimmunoassay. The results indicate the important role of orosensory and taste perception in the processes of regulation of the sodium balance in the body. The experiments in this study were conducted on rats.

  13. Increased vasopressin and adrenocorticotropin responses to stress in the midluteal phase of the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Altemus, M; Roca, C; Galliven, E; Romanos, C; Deuster, P

    2001-06-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that gonadal steroids modulate functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which has been closely linked to the pathophysiology of anxiety and depression. However, the effect of the natural menstrual cycle on HPA axis responsivity to stress has not been clearly described. In nine healthy women, metabolic and hormonal responses to treadmill exercise stress during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle, when gonadal steroid levels are low, were compared with responses in the midluteal phase of the cycle, when both progesterone and estrogen levels are relatively high. Exercise intensity was gradually increased over 20 min to reach 90% of each subject's maximal oxygen consumption during the final 5 min of exercise. Basal plasma lactate, glucose, ACTH, vasopressin, oxytocin, and cortisol levels were similar in the two cycle phases. However, in response to exercise stress, women in the midluteal phase had enhanced ACTH (P < 0.0001), vasopressin (P < 0.01), and glucose (P < 0.001) secretion. These findings suggest that relatively low levels of gonadal steroids during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle provide protection from the impact of stress on the HPA axis.

  14. Increased vasopressin and adrenocorticotropin responses to stress in the midluteal phase of the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Altemus, M; Roca, C; Galliven, E; Romanos, C; Deuster, P

    2001-06-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that gonadal steroids modulate functioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, which has been closely linked to the pathophysiology of anxiety and depression. However, the effect of the natural menstrual cycle on HPA axis responsivity to stress has not been clearly described. In nine healthy women, metabolic and hormonal responses to treadmill exercise stress during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle, when gonadal steroid levels are low, were compared with responses in the midluteal phase of the cycle, when both progesterone and estrogen levels are relatively high. Exercise intensity was gradually increased over 20 min to reach 90% of each subject's maximal oxygen consumption during the final 5 min of exercise. Basal plasma lactate, glucose, ACTH, vasopressin, oxytocin, and cortisol levels were similar in the two cycle phases. However, in response to exercise stress, women in the midluteal phase had enhanced ACTH (P < 0.0001), vasopressin (P < 0.01), and glucose (P < 0.001) secretion. These findings suggest that relatively low levels of gonadal steroids during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle provide protection from the impact of stress on the HPA axis. PMID:11397850

  15. ACTH adenomas transforming their clinical expression: report of 5 cases.

    PubMed

    Zoli, Matteo; Faustini-Fustini, Marco; Mazzatenta, Diego; Marucci, Gianluca; De Carlo, Eugenio; Bacci, Antonella; Pasquini, Ernesto; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Frank, Giorgio

    2015-02-01

    OBJECT Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) adenomas have been recognized as a more aggressive and invasive subtype of pituitary adenomas. An additional and clinically relevant peculiarity of these tumors is their ability to modify their clinical expression from a silent form to Cushing disease or vice versa. The aim of this study was to review a series of patients with pituitary adenomas and analyze the clinical implications of the transformation of clinical expression in 5 cases that showed this phenomenon. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed a series of patients with pituitary adenoma and collected clinical, biohumoral, and neuroradiological data of those who presented with a transformation from silent ACTH adenomas to functioning tumors or vice versa. In all the cases, preoperative assessment consisted of brain MRI, ophthalmological examination, and complete baseline endocrinological investigation. In patients with clinical and/or biochemical findings suspicious for Cushing syndrome, a low-dose dexamethasone suppression test was performed to rule in or out this diagnosis. Endocrinological evaluations were repeated 1 month after surgery, 3 months after surgery, and every 6 months or annually thereafter. Ophthalmological evaluations and brain MRIs were repeated after 3 months and then every 6 or 12 months thereafter. RESULTS Five patients (2 men and 3 women) included in this series had corticotropic tumors that showed transformation from an endocrinologically silent form to manifest Cushing disease and vice versa. The mean age at presentation was 40 years (range 18-51 years). In 3 of these patients, a transformation from silent to functioning ACTH adenoma with manifest Cushing disease occurred. In 1 patient, the authors observed the transition from a functioning to a silent adenoma with spontaneous resolution of hypercortisolism. Another patient's silent adenoma "shifted" to a functioning adenoma and then regressed back to a silent form with spontaneous

  16. An arachidonic acid-preferring acyl-CoA synthetase is a hormone-dependent and obligatory protein in the signal transduction pathway of steroidogenic hormones.

    PubMed

    Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Maloberti, Paula; Neuman, Isabel; Cano, Florencia; Castilla, Rocío; Castillo, Fernanda; Paz, Cristina; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2005-06-01

    We have described that, in adrenal and Leydig cells, the hormonal regulation of free arachidonic acid (AA) concentration is mediated by the concerted action of two enzymes: an acyl-CoA thioesterase (MTE-I or ARTISt) and an acyl-CoA synthetase (ACS4). In this study we analyzed the potential regulation of these proteins by hormonal action in steroidogenic cells. We demonstrated that ACS4 is rapidly induced by adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and cAMP in Y1 adrenocortical cells. The hormone and its second messenger increased ACS4 protein levels in a time and concentration dependent way. Maximal concentration of ACTH (10 mIU/ml) produced a significant effect after 15 min of treatment and exerted the highest increase (3-fold) after 30 min. Moreover, (35)S-methionine incorporation showed that the increase in ACS4 protein levels is due to an increase in the de novo synthesis of the protein. On the contrary MTE-I protein levels in Y1 and MA-10 cells did not change after steroidogenic stimuli. In contrast with the effect observed on protein levels, stimulation of both cell lines did not change ACS4 RNA levels during the first hour of treatment, indicating that the effect of both stimuli is exerted at the level of ACS4 protein synthesis.StAR protein induction has a key role on the activation of steroidogenesis since this protein increases the rate of the limiting step of the whole process. In agreement with the fact that the inhibition of ACS4 activity by triacsin C blocks cAMP-stimulated progesterone production by MA-10 Leydig cells, here we demonstrated that ACS4 inhibition also reduces StAR protein levels. Moreover, exogenous AA was able to overcome the effect of triacsin C on both events, StAR induction and steroidogenesis. These results were confirmed by experiments using ACS4-targeted siRNA which result in a reduction in both ACS4 and StAR protein levels. The concomitant decrease in steroid production was overcome by the addition of AA to the knocked-out cells. In summary

  17. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor with ectopic adrenocorticotropin production: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Patel, Forum B; Khagi, Simon; Daly, Kevin P; Lechan, Ronald M; Ummaritchot, Vorawan; Saif, Muhammad W

    2013-09-01

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs) entail a vast array of tumors, which can vary from benign neoplastic growths to rapidly aggressive malignancies. Such is the case with ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-producing p-NETs. These tumors have been found to be quite aggressive and a challenge to treat, especially due to the occurrence of metastatic disease even after resection of the primary tumor. We discuss the case of a 44-year-old female who initially presented with vague, non-specific symptoms, in which a malignant p-NET was found to be the cause of her clinical presentation. Although resection of the pancreatic mass was performed, the patient presented again with metastatic disease to the liver. PMID:24023341

  18. A case of ACTH-independent bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia and severe congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Suri, D; Alonso, M; Weiss, R E

    2006-11-01

    Cortisol secretion in ACTH independent bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (AIMAH) can be regulated by aberrant adrenal receptors. We describe a patient with Cushing's syndrome (CS) due to AIMAH and concomitant Class IV congestive heart failure (CHF). Clinical testing for the presence of aberrant receptors revealed a pronounced serum cortisol (257%) and aldosterone response (212%) to the administration of ACTH and a partial serum cortisol (35%) and aldosterone (106%) response to upright posture. This suggested the possible presence of aberrant hormone receptors for ACTH [melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2-R)], vasopressin, catecholamines or angiotensin II (AT-II) on the patient's adrenal glands. Adrenal tissue from the patient demonstrated an eight-fold increased expression of MC2-R compared to normal adrenal tissue. This increased expression was consistent with the increase in cortisol and aldosterone seen in response to exogenous ACTH. We propose that the severe CHF resulted in activation of the renin-angiotensin system, with an increased production of AT-II. The elevated circulating levels of AT-II may have led to increased expression of MC2-R on the patient's adrenal glands and increased responsiveness to ACTH. This unusual case of CS may elucidate a heretofore unknown mechanism for the development of AIMAH.

  19. Effects of breeding season, testosterone and ACTH on the corticosterone response of free-ranging male fence lizards (Sceloporus undulatus).

    PubMed

    Klukowski, Matthew

    2011-09-01

    An attenuated stress response during the breeding season has been reported for several vertebrate species, but the underlying physiological mechanism has received little attention, particularly in reptiles. Modulation could involve changes in the capacity of the adrenal gland to secrete glucocorticoids in addition to upstream changes in the pituitary or hypothalamus. In this study the magnitude of the corticosterone response to capture and confinement was compared between the breeding and postbreeding season in adult male eastern fence lizards, Sceloporus undulatus. Males were captured in both seasons and subjected to the identical stressor of 4h of confinement. Plasma corticosterone levels in response to confinement were significantly lower in the breeding than the postbreeding season. The effect of testosterone on the stress response was tested by experimentally elevating plasma testosterone levels via silastic implants in free-living males during the postbreeding season. Males with experimentally elevated testosterone exhibited significantly weaker corticosterone responses to 1h of confinement than sham-implanted males. Finally the capacity of the adrenal glands to secrete corticosterone during the breeding season was tested by challenging males with adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) injections. In spite of naturally suppressed corticosterone responses during the breeding season, males nonetheless responded robustly to ACTH. Altogether these results suggest that modulation resides upstream of the adrenal gland, as has been shown in some arctic-breeding avian species, and likely involves seasonal changes in testosterone levels.

  20. Hypothermic and antipyretic effects of ACTH (1-24) and alpha-melanotropin in guinea-pigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kandasamy, S. B.; Williams, B. A.

    1984-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular administration of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH 1-24) and alpha-melanotropin (alpha-MSH), peptides which occur naturally in brain induced dose-related hypothermia in guinea-pigs at room temperature (21 C) and also produced greater hypothermia at low (10 C) ambient temperature. However, when the experiments were repeated in a warm (30 C) environment, no effect on body temperature was observed. These results indicate that the peptides did not reduce the central set-point of temperature control. The hypothermia induced by ACTH and alpha-MSH was not mediated via histamine H1- or H2-receptors and serotonin since the H1-receptor antagonist, mepyramine, the H2-receptor antagonist, cimetidine, and the serotonin antagonist, methysergide, had no antagonistic effects. The peptides were antipyretic since they reduced pyrogen-induced-fever and hyperthermia due to prostaglandin E2, norepinephrine and dibutyryl cAMP, at a dose which did not affect normal body temperature. The powerful central effects of these peptides on normal body temperature, fever and hyperthermia, together with their presence of the brain regions important to temperature control, suggest that they participate in thermoregulation.

  1. Comparative analysis of plasma 17-hydroxyprogesterone and cortisol responses to ACTH in patients with various adrenal tumors before and after unilateral adrenalectomy.

    PubMed

    Tóth, M; Rácz, K; Adleff, V; Varga, I; Fütö, L; Jakab, C; Karlinger, K; Kiss, R; Gláz, E

    2000-05-01

    Patients with non-hyperfunctioning adrenal adenomas often have an increased plasma 17-hydroxyprogesterone response to ACTH stimulation. The effects of adrenal surgery on this abnormality have rarely been investigated. One hundred and sixty-one patients with unilateral adrenal tumors (non-hyperfunctioning adenomas, 78; cortisol-producing adenomas, 8; aldosterone-producing adenomas, 37; adrenal cysts, 12; pheochromocytomas, 26) were studied. Patients before and after adrenal surgery as well as 60 healthy subjects underwent an ACTH stimulation test using 2 mg synthetic ACTH(1-24) (Cortrosyn Depot, Organon). Basal and ACTH-stimulated plasma 17-hydroxyprogesterone and cortisol concentrations are reported. Before adrenal surgery, the basal plasma 17-hydroxyprogesterone concentrations were normal in patients with all types of tumors. However, the ACTH-stimulated plasma 17-hydroxyprogesterone levels were abnormally increased in 53% and 31% of patients with non-hyperfunctioning adenomas and aldosterone-producing adenomas, respectively. In addition, a few patients with adrenal cysts and pheochromocytomas also showed an increased ACTH-stimulated 17-hydroxyprogesterone response. After unilateral adrenalectomy, this hormonal abnormality disappeared in most, although not all patients with adrenal tumors. In patients with non-hyperfunctioning adrenal tumors, ACTH-stimulated plasma 17-hydroxyprogesterone and cortisol concentrations significantly correlated with the size of the tumors. These results firmly indicate that the tumoral mass itself may be responsible for the increased plasma 17-hydroxyprogesterone and cortisol responses after ACTH stimulation in patients with non-hyperfunctioning and hyperfunctioning adrenal adenomas. PMID:10882146

  2. Vasopressin and angiotensin II in reflex regulation of ACTH, glucocorticoids, and renin: effect of water deprivation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, V. L.; Keil, L. C.

    1992-01-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) and vasopressin participate in baroreflex regulation of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), glucocorticoid, and renin secretion. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this participation is enhanced in water-deprived dogs, with chronically elevated plasma ANG II and vasopressin levels, compared with water-replete dogs. The baroreflex was assessed by infusing increasing doses of nitroprusside (0.3, 0.6, 1.5, and 3.0 micrograms.kg-1.min-1) in both groups of animals. To quantitate the participation of ANG II and vasopressin, the dogs were untreated or pretreated with the competitive ANG II antagonist saralasin, a V1-vasopressin antagonist, or combined V1/V2-vasopressin antagonist, either alone or in combination. The findings were as follows. 1) Larger reflex increases in ANG II, vasopressin, and glucocorticoids, but not ACTH, were produced in water-deprived dogs compared with water-replete dogs. 2) ANG II blockade blunted the glucocorticoid and ACTH responses to hypotension in water-deprived dogs, but not water-replete dogs. In contrast, vasopressin blockade reduced the ACTH response only in water-replete dogs. 3) Vasopressin or combined vasopressin and ANG II blockade reduced the plasma level of glucocorticoids related either to the fall in arterial pressure or to the increase in plasma ACTH concentration in water-replete dogs, and this effect was enhanced in water-deprived dogs. 4) In both water-deprived and water-replete animals, saralasin and/or a V1-antagonist increased the renin response to hypotension, but a combined V1/V2-antagonist did not. These results reemphasize the importance of endogenous ANG II and vasopressin in the regulation of ACTH, glucocorticoid, and renin secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  3. Medullary nephrocalcinosis and pancreatic calcifications demonstrated by ultrasound and CT in infants after treatment with ACTH

    SciTech Connect

    Rausch, H.P.; Hanefield, F.; Kaufmann, B.J.

    1984-10-01

    Thirteen patients who had undergone prolonged adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) therapy for infantile spasms or encephalopathy were examined with sonography. Nine patients were seen to have appearances characteristic of medullary nephrocalcinosis. Five patients also showed a homogeneously increased echogenicity of the whole pancreas on sonography, and one of these showed increased density on computed tomography. Density measurements were in the range of calcific arterial within the papillae and pancreatic tissue. On abdominal survey radiographs, even in retrospect, no calcifications could be recognized.

  4. The role of ACTH and adrenal glucocorticoids in the salt appetite of wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus (L)).

    PubMed

    Blaine, E H; Covelli, M D; Denton, D A; Nelson, J F; Shulkes, A A

    1975-10-01

    The selective appetites of wild rabbits for 500 mEq/1 solutions of NaC1, KC1, MgC1(2), and CaC1(2) were studied in intact and adrenalectomized rabbits during daily treatment with either 4 IU long acting ACTH, 1.0 or 2.5 mg cortisol acetate, or 2.5 mg corticosterone. The animals were individually caged and external sodium balances performed. In intact rabbits, cortisol or corticosterone produced a significant stimulation of NaC1 appetite. The response to concurrent dosage of cortisol and corticosterone was less than half of that obtained with ACTH which produced a comparable alteration of blood glucocorticoid levels but a 10-fold increase in NaC1 intake. CaC1(2) intake was increased in intact rabbits by cortisol treatment but not by corticosterone or ACTH. Adrenalectomized rabbits maintained on daily steroid replacement therapy of 0.1 mg deoxycorticosterone acetate and 0.75 mg cortisone acetate showed a normal pattern of electolyte, food, and water intake. Under these conditions ACTH produced a 4-fold increase in NaC1 intake. Further addition of cortisol and corticosterone to steroid replacement therapy produced an increase in NaC1 intake comparable to their effect on normal rabbits. Thereupon supplementation with ACTH resulted in an increase to a level at least as great as that found in ACTH treated, normal rabbits. The effects of ACTH and glucocorticoids on NaC1 appetite were synergistic. Sodium balance showed that increases in NaC1 intake were not the result of the treatment initially producing a body sodium deficit, which was then corrected by increased intake. The results provide further evidence for the hypothesis that NaC1 appetite may be hormonally regulated, and demonstrate that ACTH is capable of stimulating NaC1 intake by a previously unsuspected non-adrenal pathway.

  5. Nur77 gene expression levels were involved in different ACTH-secretion autonomy between Cushing's disease and subclinical Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Yukiko; Kitamura, Tetsuhiro; Fukuhara, Atsunori; Mukai, Kosuke; Onodera, Toshiharu; Miyata, Yugo; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Oshino, Satoru; Saitoh, Youichi; Morii, Eiichi; Otsuki, Michio; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2016-06-30

    Cushing's disease (CD) and subclinical Cushing's disease (subCD) are both diseases caused by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenomas. However, ACTH autonomy in subCD is weaker than in CD and there are no Cushingoid features in subCD. The differences of molecular mechanisms in ACTH autonomy between CD and subCD have not yet been reported. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the differences in molecular mechanisms of ACTH-secretion autonomy between CD and subCD. The study included 23 patients [7 CD, 6 subCD, and 10 non-functioning pituitary tumors (NFTs)] who underwent transsphenoidal surgery at the Osaka University Hospital between December 2009 and October 2013. Using quantitative real-time PCR, various ACTH-related gene expressions in tumor tissues from CD, subCD, and NFT were measured such as pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), POMC transcription factor (Tpit, Pitx1, NeuroD1, and Nur77), POMC peptide processing enzymes (prohormone convertase: PC1/3 and PC2), and ACTH secretion-related factors (corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1: CRHR1 and glucocorticoid receptor α: GRα). Only Nur77 mRNA levels were significantly higher in CD than in subCD. Furthermore, we stained 6 CD and 6 subCD with anti-Nur77 antibody. All tumor samples from CD had Nur77 protein positive cells. On the other hand, Nur77 protein was expressed in only one tumor sample from subCD. This sample showed high expression of Nur77 mRNA. Nur77 is an important to regulate POMC transcription and negative-feedback by glucocorticoids. Nur77 gene expression levels might involve different autonomy of ACTH production between CD and subCD. PMID:27025408

  6. Nur77 gene expression levels were involved in different ACTH-secretion autonomy between Cushing's disease and subclinical Cushing's disease.

    PubMed

    Tabuchi, Yukiko; Kitamura, Tetsuhiro; Fukuhara, Atsunori; Mukai, Kosuke; Onodera, Toshiharu; Miyata, Yugo; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Oshino, Satoru; Saitoh, Youichi; Morii, Eiichi; Otsuki, Michio; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2016-06-30

    Cushing's disease (CD) and subclinical Cushing's disease (subCD) are both diseases caused by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenomas. However, ACTH autonomy in subCD is weaker than in CD and there are no Cushingoid features in subCD. The differences of molecular mechanisms in ACTH autonomy between CD and subCD have not yet been reported. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the differences in molecular mechanisms of ACTH-secretion autonomy between CD and subCD. The study included 23 patients [7 CD, 6 subCD, and 10 non-functioning pituitary tumors (NFTs)] who underwent transsphenoidal surgery at the Osaka University Hospital between December 2009 and October 2013. Using quantitative real-time PCR, various ACTH-related gene expressions in tumor tissues from CD, subCD, and NFT were measured such as pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), POMC transcription factor (Tpit, Pitx1, NeuroD1, and Nur77), POMC peptide processing enzymes (prohormone convertase: PC1/3 and PC2), and ACTH secretion-related factors (corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1: CRHR1 and glucocorticoid receptor α: GRα). Only Nur77 mRNA levels were significantly higher in CD than in subCD. Furthermore, we stained 6 CD and 6 subCD with anti-Nur77 antibody. All tumor samples from CD had Nur77 protein positive cells. On the other hand, Nur77 protein was expressed in only one tumor sample from subCD. This sample showed high expression of Nur77 mRNA. Nur77 is an important to regulate POMC transcription and negative-feedback by glucocorticoids. Nur77 gene expression levels might involve different autonomy of ACTH production between CD and subCD.

  7. Brain sites mediating corticosteroid feedback inhibition of stimulated ACTH secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, L.

    1989-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that the brain mediates stress-induced and circadian increases in ACTH secretion and that corticosteroid concentrations which normalize basal plasma ACTH are insufficient to normalize ACTH responses to circadian or stressful stimuli in adrenalectomized rats. To identify brain sites mediating corticosteroid inhibition of stimulated ACTH secretion, two approaches were used. The first compared brain ({sup 14}C)-2-deoxyglucose uptake in rats with differential ACTH responses to stress. Relative to sham-adrenalectomized (SHAM) rats, adrenalectomized rats replaced with low, constant corticosterone levels via a subcutaneous corticosterone pellet (B-PELLET) exhibited elevated and prolonged ACTH responses to a variety of stimuli. Adrenalectomized rate given a circadian corticosterone rhythm via corticosterone in their drinking water exhibited elevated ACTH levels immediately after stress, but unlike B-PELLET rats, terminated stress induced ACTH secretion normally relative to SHAMS. Therefore, the abnormal ACTH responses to stress in B-PELLET rats were due to the lack of both circadian variations and stress-induced increases in corticosterone. Hypoxia was selected as a standardized stimulus for correlating brain ({sup 14}C)-2-deoxyglucose uptake with ACTH secretion. In intact rats, increases in plasma ACTH and decreases in arterial PO{sub 2} correlated with the severity of hypoxia at arterial PCO{sub 2} below 60 mm Hg. Hypoxia PELLET vs. SHAM rats. However, in preliminary experiments, although hypoxia increased brain 2-deoxyglucose uptake in most brain regions, plasma ACTH correlated poorly with 2-deoxyglucose uptake at 12% and 10% O{sub 2}.

  8. Effects of ACTH, capture, and short term confinement on glucocorticoid concentrations in harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nilsson, P.B.; Hollmén, Tuula E.; Atkinson, S.; Mashburn, K.L.; Tuomi, P.A.; Esler, Daniel; Mulcahy, D.M.; Rizzolo, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about baseline concentrations of adrenal hormones and hormonal responses to stress in sea ducks, although significant population declines documented in several species suggest that sea ducks are exposed to increased levels of environmental stress. Such declines have been observed in geographically distinct harlequin duck populations. We performed an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenge to evaluate adrenal function and characterize corticosterone concentrations in captive harlequin ducks and investigated the effects of capture, surgery, and short term confinement on corticosterone concentrations in wild harlequin ducks. Harlequin ducks responded to the ACTH challenge with an average three-fold increase in serum corticosterone concentration approximately 90??min post injection, and a four- to five-fold increase in fecal glucocorticoid concentration 2 to 4??h post injection. Serum corticosterone concentrations in wild harlequin ducks increased within min of capture and elevated levels were found for several hours post capture, indicating that surgery and confinement maintain elevated corticosterone concentrations in this species. Mean corticosterone concentrations in wild harlequin ducks held in temporary captivity were similar to the maximum response levels during the ACTH challenge in captive birds. However, large variation among individuals was observed in responses of wild birds, and we found additional evidence suggesting that corticosterone responses varied between hatch year and after hatch year birds. ?? 2008.

  9. Analysis of the brain ACTH-immunoreactive peptide spectrum in inbred mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fedoseev, Yu.L.; Blednov, Yu.A.; Seredenin, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    Mice of the BALB/c (C) and C57BL/6 (B6) strains, characterized by high and low emotionality respectively in open field tests, have been shown to differ considerably in both the initial level and the time course of changes in the plasma ACTH concentration after exposure to stress in an open field and after administration of a benzodiazepine tranquilizer. The ACTH concentration in the pituitary gland of animals of these lines also differs. The ACTH molecule is known to contain regions with neurotropic activity. It can therefore be postulated that differences in the level of this hormone and the products of its bioconversion in the brain are an essential factor in the mechanisms of formation of the hereditary features of emotional behavior. In this first stage of this investigation, represented in this paper and undertaken to test this hypothesis, spectra of ACTH-immunoreactive peptides were studied in chromatographic fractions of an acid brain extract as well as in the blood plasma of mice belonging to B6 and C lines and their hybrids. The peptides were determined by radioimmunoassay.

  10. ACTH, corticosterone, and beta-endorphin in rat blood plasma after prolonged immobilization stress

    SciTech Connect

    Kiyatkin, E.A.; Amiragova, M.G.; Kushlinskii, N.E.; Polyntsev, Yu. V.

    1986-01-01

    To assess functional relations between changes in ACTH, beta-endorphin (BE), and corticosterone (CS) levels, plasma concentrations of these hormones were studied in rats during the development of prolonged immobilization stress. Plasma hormone concentrations were determined by radioimmunoassay. The results were analyzed by standard statistical methods on a microcomputer. A particular feature about the kit used to determine BE was the presence of 50% cross-reactivity of the antiserum against beta-lipotrophin. To determine CS a highly specific antiserum produced by a laboratory was used.

  11. Hypokalaemia: common but not always benign. Severe, persistent hypokalaemia secondary to ectopic ACTH from a carcinoid tumour

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Muhammad Muzaffar; John, Kurien

    2012-01-01

    Hypokalaemia is a common and often benign observation. There is usually an obvious underlying cause for the anomaly. However, hypokalaemia can very rarely be the sole presentation of a more sinister disease. A high index of suspicion and a systematic approach are therefore required to avoid delays in the management, especially in the context of presentation to a medical team. We present a case of a patient with severe and persistent hypokalaemia due to ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion secondary to a carcinoid tumour. The case report is followed by a brief discussion on the approach to the management of hypokalaemia and additional tests to confirm ectopic ACTH. PMID:23152181

  12. Effects of smoking on ACTH and cortisol secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Seyler, L.E. Jr.; Fertig, J.; Pomerleau, O.; Hunt, D.; Parker, K.

    1984-01-02

    The relationships among changes in plasma nicotine, ACTH, and cortisol secretion after smoking were investigated. Ten male subjects smoked cigarettes containing 2.87 mg nicotine and 0.48 mg nicotine. No rises in cortisol or ACTH were detected after smoking 0.48 mg nicotine cigarettes. Cortisol rises were significant in 11 of 15 instances after smoking 2.87 mg nicotine cigarattes, but ACTH rose significantly in only 5 of the 11 instances where cortisol increased. Each ACTH rise occurred in a subject who reported nausea and was observed to be pale, sweaty, and tachycardic. Peak plasma nicotine concentrations were not significantly different in sessions when cortisol rose with or without ACTH increases, but cortisol increases were significantly greater in nauseated than in non-nauseated smokers. This data suggest that smoking-induced nausea stimulates cortisol release by stimulating ACTH secretion and that cortisol secretion in non-nauseated smokers may occur through a non-ACTH mechanism.

  13. Muscle transcriptome response to ACTH administration in a free-ranging marine mammal

    PubMed Central

    Champagne, Cory D.; Preeyanon, Likit; Ortiz, Rudy M.; Crocker, Daniel E.

    2015-01-01

    While much of our understanding of stress physiology is derived from biomedical studies, little is known about the downstream molecular consequences of adaptive stress responses in free-living animals. We examined molecular effectors of the stress hormones cortisol and aldosterone in the northern elephant seal, a free-ranging study system in which extreme physiological challenges and cortisol fluctuations are a routine part of life history. We stimulated the neuroendocrine stress axis by administering exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and examined the resultant effects by measuring corticosteroid hormones, metabolites, and gene expression before, during, and following administration. ACTH induced an elevation in cortisol, aldosterone, glucose, and fatty acids within 2 h, with complete recovery observed within 24 h of administration. The global transcriptional response of elephant seal muscle tissue to ACTH was evaluated by transcriptomics and involved upregulation of a highly coordinated network of conserved glucocorticoid (GC) target genes predicted to promote metabolic substrate availability without causing deleterious effects seen in laboratory animals. Transcriptional recovery from ACTH was characterized by downregulation of GC target genes and restoration of cell proliferation, metabolism, and tissue maintenance pathways within 24 h. Differentially expressed genes included several adipokines not previously described in muscle, reflecting unique metabolic physiology in fasting-adapted animals. This study represents one of the first transcriptome analyses of cellular responses to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis stimulation in a free-living marine mammal and suggests that compensatory, tissue-sparing mechanisms may enable marine mammals to maintain cortisol and aldosterone sensitivity while avoiding deleterious long-term consequences of stress. PMID:26038394

  14. Muscle transcriptome response to ACTH administration in a free-ranging marine mammal.

    PubMed

    Khudyakov, Jane I; Champagne, Cory D; Preeyanon, Likit; Ortiz, Rudy M; Crocker, Daniel E

    2015-08-01

    While much of our understanding of stress physiology is derived from biomedical studies, little is known about the downstream molecular consequences of adaptive stress responses in free-living animals. We examined molecular effectors of the stress hormones cortisol and aldosterone in the northern elephant seal, a free-ranging study system in which extreme physiological challenges and cortisol fluctuations are a routine part of life history. We stimulated the neuroendocrine stress axis by administering exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and examined the resultant effects by measuring corticosteroid hormones, metabolites, and gene expression before, during, and following administration. ACTH induced an elevation in cortisol, aldosterone, glucose, and fatty acids within 2 h, with complete recovery observed within 24 h of administration. The global transcriptional response of elephant seal muscle tissue to ACTH was evaluated by transcriptomics and involved upregulation of a highly coordinated network of conserved glucocorticoid (GC) target genes predicted to promote metabolic substrate availability without causing deleterious effects seen in laboratory animals. Transcriptional recovery from ACTH was characterized by downregulation of GC target genes and restoration of cell proliferation, metabolism, and tissue maintenance pathways within 24 h. Differentially expressed genes included several adipokines not previously described in muscle, reflecting unique metabolic physiology in fasting-adapted animals. This study represents one of the first transcriptome analyses of cellular responses to hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis stimulation in a free-living marine mammal and suggests that compensatory, tissue-sparing mechanisms may enable marine mammals to maintain cortisol and aldosterone sensitivity while avoiding deleterious long-term consequences of stress. PMID:26038394

  15. Alpha-inhibin gene expression occurs in the ovine adrenal cortex, and is regulated by adrenocorticotropin.

    PubMed

    Crawford, R J; Hammond, V E; Evans, B A; Coghlan, J P; Haralambidis, J; Hudson, B; Penschow, J D; Richards, R I; Tregear, G W

    1987-10-01

    Inhibin is a glycoprotein hormone composed of two nonidentical subunits. It is produced by the ovary and testis and plays a vital role in gonadal function by inhibiting the secretion of FSH. More recently, additional activities associated with inhibin peptides have been identified. Inhibin heterodimers (alpha-beta) are reported to act directly on ovarian granulosa cells and inhibit estrogen production induced by FSH. Furthermore, homodimers of beta-inhibin subunits stimulate the secretion of FSH, an activity that is directly opposite to that of inhibin. Each of these inhibin-related activities are concerned with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. We have investigated further the complexity of inhibin activity by determining whether inhibin genes are expressed in nongonadal tissue. RNA hybridization experiments demonstrate that the alpha-inhibin gene is expressed in the sheep adrenal cortex and hybridization histochemistry shows that this gene is expressed in each of the functional zones within the cortex. Dot blot analysis showed that the level of alpha mRNA within the adrenal is influenced by ACTH, one of the major regulators of adrenal cortex function. These observations imply that there are inhibin-related peptides not directly associated with the gonads. beta-inhibin gene expression was not clearly detected in the adrenal and we conclude that if expression occurs then it does so at extremely low levels.

  16. [Evaluation of the accuracy of inferior petrosal sinus sampling in the differential diagnosis of ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Tóth, Miklós; Vajda, Zsolt; Görömbey, Zoltán; Molnár, Ferenc; Major, László; Toke, Judit; Szabolcs, István; Szücs, Nikolette; Kovács, László; Kiss, Róbert; Czirják, Sándor; Füto, László; Gláz, Edit; Góth, Miklós; Rácz, Károly

    2007-05-01

    The differentiation of adrenocorticotropic hormone producing pituitary adenoma (Cushing's disease) from the ectopic ACTH syndrome is always a complex and difficult task, and in rare cases it is not possible to differentiate between the two disorders, even with the use of dynamic endocrine tests and the most advanced imaging techniques. Inferior petrosal sinus sampling (IPSS) with subsequent ACTH measurements became the gold-standard method of the differential diagnostic process. 34 patients with ACTH dependent Cushing's syndrome in whom the source of ACTH secretion couldn't be identified unambiguously with imaging techniques and/or dynamic endocrine tests underwent altogether 41 IPSS between 1999 and 2005. The sensitivity of the method was calculated on the basis of 31 samplings of 25 patients who had definite endocrinological diagnosis confirmed by the recovery from Cushing's syndrome after surgical intervention and/or by histological examinations (22 patients with ACTH-producing pituitary adenoma and 3 patients with ectopic ACTH syndrome). As a result of IPSS, pituitary-dependent Cushing's disease was diagnosed with a baseline central to peripheral ACTH ratio of >2.0 or with a ratio of >3.0 after corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) administration. IPSS correctly identified ACTH-producing pituitary adenoma in 20 of 28 sampling procedures, with a sensitivity of 71.4%. Three patients had true negative and 8 had false negative results. There was no false positive result. Four of the 8 patients with false negative first sampling had a repeat sampling procedure leading to true positive result in each patient. In patients with Cushing's disease having true positive interventions, the basal and 5 minutes post-CRH ACTH concentrations were diagnostic in 14 and 19 cases, respectively. The sensitivity of IPSS within this series, reported for the first time from Hungary, was lower than it was found in much larger series published in international literature. In addition to

  17. Curcumin inhibits ACTH- and angiotensin II-stimulated cortisol secretion and Ca(v)3.2 current.

    PubMed

    Enyeart, Judith A; Liu, Haiyan; Enyeart, John J

    2009-08-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone and angiotensin II stimulate cortisol secretion from bovine adrenal zona fasciculata cells by the activation of adenylate cyclase and phospholipase C-coupled receptors. Curcumin (1- 20 muM), a compound found in the spice turmeric, inhibited cortisol secretion stimulated by ACTH, AngII, and 8CPT-cAMP. Curcumin also suppressed ACTH-stimulated increases in mRNAs coding for steroid acute regulatory protein and CYP11a1 steroid hydroxylase. In whole cell patch clamp recordings from AZF cells, curcumin at slightly higher concentrations also inhibited Ca(v)3.2 current. These results identify curcumin as an effective inhibitor of ACTH- and AngII-stimulated cortisol secretion. The inhibition of Ca(v)3.2 current by curcumin may contribute to its suppression of secretion.

  18. Chlorotriazine herbicides and metabolites activate an ACTH-dependent release of corticosterone in male Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Laws, Susan C; Hotchkiss, Michelle; Ferrell, Janet; Jayaraman, Saro; Mills, Lesley; Modic, Walker; Tinfo, Nicole; Fraites, Melanie; Stoker, Tammy; Cooper, Ralph

    2009-11-01

    Previously, we reported that atrazine (ATR) alters steroidogenesis in male Wistar rats resulting in elevated serum corticosterone (CORT), progesterone, and estrogens. The increase in CORT indicated that this chlorotriazine herbicide may alter the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. This study characterizes the temporal changes in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), CORT, and P4 in male Wistar rats following a single dose of ATR (0, 5, 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg), simazine (SIM; 188 mg/kg), propazine (PRO; 213 mg/kg), or primary metabolites, deisopropylatrazine (DIA; 4, 10, 40, 80, and 160 mg/kg), deethylatrazine (DEA; 173 mg/kg), and diamino-s-chlorotriazine (DACT; 3.37, 33.7, 67.5, and 135 mg/kg). The maximum dose for each chemical was the molar equivalent of ATR (200 mg/kg). Significant increases in plasma ACTH were observed within 15 min, following exposure to ATR, SIM, PRO, DIA, or DEA. Dose-dependent elevations in CORT and progesterone were also observed at 15 and 30 min post-dosing with these compounds indicating an activation of adrenal steroidogenesis. Measurement of the plasma concentrations of the parent compounds and metabolites confirmed that ATR, SIM, and PRO are rapidly metabolized to DACT. Although DACT had only minimal effects on ACTH and steroid release, dosing with this metabolite resulted in plasma DACT concentrations that were 60-fold greater than that observed following an equimolar dose of ATR and eightfold greater than equimolar doses of DIA or DEA, indicating that DACT is not likely the primary inducer of ACTH release. Thus, the rapid release of ACTH and subsequent activation of adrenal steroidogenesis following a single exposure to ATR, SIM, PRO, DIA, or DEA may reflect chlorotriazine-induced changes at the level of the brain and/or pituitary.

  19. Regulation of pro-adrenocorticotropin-endorphin synthesis and secretion in cultured neonatal rat anterior pituitary

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, S.M.; Mains, R.E. )

    1987-08-01

    Previous work demonstrated that newborn rat anterior pituitary corticotropes display processing patterns for pro-ACTH/endorphin that are different from the adult. The synthesis and release of beta-endorphin-related peptides was examined in dispersed cell and explant cultures of newborn anterior pituitary to investigate corticotrope development further. The temporal pattern of pro-ACTH/endorphin processing differed significantly from adult rat melanotropes and AtT-20 cells. While pro-ACTH/endorphin processing begins within 30 min of synthesis in adult melanotropes and AtT-20 cells, pulse-labeling of newborn corticotropes in culture indicated that pro-ACTH/endorphin remained uncleaved for at least 90 min after synthesis. With further incubation, there was a decrease in radioactivity associated with the precursor and an equivalent rise in the radioactivity associated with beta-endorphin and beta-lipotropin. However, unprocessed precursor still remained in the cultured newborn anterior pituitary cells after a 25-h chase. Although intact pro-ACTH/endorphin from newborn corticotropes was very long-lived, the precursor did undergo oligosaccharide maturation and became endoglycosidase H resistant within 1 h after synthesis. Similar to the adult, pro-ACTH/endorphin synthesis was doubled in cultures of newborn anterior pituitary chronically treated with 10 nM CRF resulting in a 3- to 4-fold stimulation of secretion over the basal rate. However, unlike the AtT-20 cell or adult rat corticotrope, the proteolytic processing of pro-ACTH/endorphin in the newborn corticotrope was altered by chronic secretagogue treatment; less pro-ACTH/endorphin was converted to beta-endorphin in secretagogue-treated corticotropes than in controls. Thus processing of pro-ACTH/endorphin in the corticotrope is not mature by birth and can be regulated by chronic CRF treatment.

  20. Direct measurement of the precursors of adrenocorticotropin in human plasma by two-site immunoradiometric assay

    SciTech Connect

    Crosby, S.R.; Stewart, M.F.; Ratcliffe, J.G.; White, A.

    1988-12-01

    An immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for the direct measurement of the precursors of ACTH in unextracted human plasma has been developed and evaluated clinically in normal subjects and patients with disorders of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. The IRMA is based on an iodinated monoclonal antibody to ACTH and a monoclonal antibody to gamma MSH coupled to Sephacryl S300. The assay detects only peptides containing both epitopes, i.e. POMC (31K) and pro-ACTH (22K). The reference standard was partially purified POMC from culture medium of human corticotroph adenoma cells. The detection limit (greater than +2.5SD of the 0 standard) was 2.0 pmol/L and the within-assay coefficient of variation was less than 10% between 29 and 2600 pmol/L. Plasma concentrations of ACTH precursor peptides in 11 normal subjects sampled at 0930 h ranged from 5-34 pmol/L. The concentrations in the patient groups studied were: 260-2300 pmol/L in 5 patients with the ectopic ACTH syndrome associated with small cell lung cancer, less than 2.0-104 pmol/L in 10 patients with pituitary-dependent Cushing's disease, 23 pmol/L in a patient with Nelson's syndrome, and 3.0-230 pmol/L in 5 patients with Addison's disease. We conclude that this IRMA offers a simple and reliable method for measuring ACTH precursors in unextracted plasma. The proportionately greater elevation of ACTH precursors compared to ACTH in patients with the ectopic ACTH syndrome associated with small cell lung cancer but not in pituitary-dependent Cushing's syndrome, suggests that this assay may be clinically useful.

  1. Cushing's syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion.

    PubMed

    Cieszyński, Łukasz; Berendt-Obołończyk, Monika; Szulc, Michał; Sworczak, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) is defined as a constellation of clinical signs and symptoms occurring due to hypercortisolism. Cortisol excess may be endogenous or exogenous. The most common cause of CS is glucocorticoid therapy with supraphysiological (higher than in the case of substitution) doses used in various diseases (e.g. autoimmune). One possible CS cause is ectopic (extra-pituitary) ACTH secretion (EAS) by benign or malignant tumours. Since its first description in 1963, EAS aetiology has changed, i.e. as well as small cell lung cancer (SCLC), higher incidence in other malignancies has been reported. Ectopic ACTH secretion symptoms are usually similar to hypercortisolism symptoms due to other causes. A clinical suspicion of CS requires laboratory investigations. There is no single and specific laboratory test for making a CS diagnosis, and therefore multiple dynamic tests should be ordered. A combination of multiple laboratory noninvasive and invasive tests gives 100% sensitivity and 98% specificity for EAS diagnosis. If the EAS is caused by localised malignancy, surgery is the optimal treatment choice. Radical tumour excision may be performed in 40% of patients, and 80% of them are cured of the disease. The authors present an interesting clinical case of EAS, which is always a huge diagnostic challenge for clinicians. (Endokrynol Pol 2016; 67 (4): 458-464). PMID:27387249

  2. CRH stimulation of corticosteroids production in melanocytes is mediated by ACTH.

    PubMed

    Slominski, Andrzej; Zbytek, Blazej; Szczesniewski, Andrzej; Semak, Igor; Kaminski, Jan; Sweatman, Trevor; Wortsman, Jacobo

    2005-04-01

    The response to systemic stress is organized along the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA), whereas the response to a peripheral stress (solar radiation) is mediated by epidermal melanocytes (cells of neural crest origin) responsible for the pigmentary reaction. Melanocytes express proopiomelanocortin (POMC), corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), and CRH receptor-1 (CRH-R1) and can produce corticosterone. In the present study, incubation of normal epidermal melanocytes with CRH was found to trigger a functional cascade structured hierarchically and arranged along the same algorithm as in the HPA axis: CRH activation of CRH-R1 stimulated cAMP accumulation and increased POMC gene expression and production of ACTH. CRH and ACTH also enhanced production of cortisol and corticosterone, and cortisol production was also stimulated by progesterone. The chemical identity of the cortisol was confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS2) with [corrected] mass spectrometry-mass spectrometry analyses. POMC gene silencing abolished the stimulatory effect of CRH on corticosteroid synthesis, indicating that this is indirect and mediated via production of ACTH. Thus the melanocyte response to CRH is highly organized along the same functional hierarchy as the HPA axis. This pattern demonstrates the fractal nature of the response to stress with similar activation sequence at the single-cell and whole body levels. PMID:15572653

  3. Ectopic Cushing’s syndrome due to retroperitoneal ACTH-producing paragangliomas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fan; Wang, Xiangyu; Wang, Yang; Meng, Hui; Hou, Xinguo; Zhu, Yaofeng; Gao, Wei; Jiang, Xuewen; Chen, Shouzhen; Zhang, Zhaocun; Zou, Zhichuan; He, Tianyi; Yang, Yue; Zhu, Kejia; Wang, Yong; Liu, Yaxiao; Cui, Jianfeng; Shi, Benkang; Yin, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Extra-adrenal pheochromocytomas, or paragangliomas, are rare tumours that derive from extra-adrenal chromaffin cells. Cushing’s syndrome (CS) caused by paragangliomas is extremely rare. We report a 53-year-old man with hypertension, diabetes, and symptoms of hypokalemia. Computer tomography (CT) revealed two retroperitoneal masses and bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. Together with the laboratory examinations, ectopic CS caused by multiple paragangliomas was highly suspected. The patient underwent resections of retroperitoneal tumours, left kidney, and left adrenal; postoperative histopathology confirmed two paragangliomas that were both positively stained for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). He got clinical and biochemical recoveries without any recurrent evidence at the nine-month followup.

  4. Ectopic Cushing’s syndrome due to retroperitoneal ACTH-producing paragangliomas

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Fan; Wang, Xiangyu; Wang, Yang; Meng, Hui; Hou, Xinguo; Zhu, Yaofeng; Gao, Wei; Jiang, Xuewen; Chen, Shouzhen; Zhang, Zhaocun; Zou, Zhichuan; He, Tianyi; Yang, Yue; Zhu, Kejia; Wang, Yong; Liu, Yaxiao; Cui, Jianfeng; Shi, Benkang; Yin, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Extra-adrenal pheochromocytomas, or paragangliomas, are rare tumours that derive from extra-adrenal chromaffin cells. Cushing’s syndrome (CS) caused by paragangliomas is extremely rare. We report a 53-year-old man with hypertension, diabetes, and symptoms of hypokalemia. Computer tomography (CT) revealed two retroperitoneal masses and bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. Together with the laboratory examinations, ectopic CS caused by multiple paragangliomas was highly suspected. The patient underwent resections of retroperitoneal tumours, left kidney, and left adrenal; postoperative histopathology confirmed two paragangliomas that were both positively stained for adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). He got clinical and biochemical recoveries without any recurrent evidence at the nine-month followup. PMID:27695589

  5. Postovulatory effect of repeated intravenous administration of ACTH on the contractile activity of the oviduct, ova transport and endocrine status of recently ovulated and unrestrained sows.

    PubMed

    Mwanza, A M; Madej, A; Kindahl, H; Lundeheim, N; Einarsson, S

    2000-11-01

    The effect of repeated intravenous administration of ACTH (Synacthen depot) on the contractile activity of the oviduct, ova transport and endocrine status was studied in 11 Swedish crossbred (Landrace x Yorkshire) multiparous sows. In the second estrus after weaning, the ACTH group (Group A, n=6) sows were administered 0.01 mg/kg body weight of ACTH every 6 h commencing 4 to 8 h after ovulation, whereas the control group (Group C, n=5) sows were administered saline solution. Immediately after standing estrus, a Millar pressure transducer was placed about 3 cm into the isthmus via a laparotomy. Blood samples for hormonal analyses and pressure recordings of the oviduct were collected from all sows until slaughter. After slaughter, the genital tract opposite to the side with the transducer was retrieved, and 3 equal isthmic segments and the first third of the uterine horn portion adjacent to the UTJ were flushed separately for ova recovery. Cortisol levels were significantly (P<0.05) elevated after ACTH administration. Progesterone and PGF2alpha metabolite levels were significantly (P<0.05) elevated only after the first ACTH administration. No significant differences (P>0.05) were seen in the mean pressure and frequencies of phasic pressure fluctuations either before or after every ACTH administration between Groups A and C. No significant difference (P>0.05) was seen in the proportion of ova recovered in the different segments between Groups A and C. It can be concluded from the present study that the administration of ACTH (0.01 mg/kg body weight) to sows at 4 to 8 h after ovulation, and after each subsequent ACTH administration, elevates cortisol levels, whereas progesterone and PGF2alpha metabolite levels are elevated only after the first treatment, and that this has no effect on the mean isthmic pressure, the frequency of phasic pressure fluctuations or ova transport. PMID:11192189

  6. ATRAZINE DOES NOT INDUCE GASTROINTESTINAL DISCOMFORT (PICA) IN RATS AT DOSES THAT INCREASE ACTH ANDCORTICOSTERONE RELEASE AND CAUSE CONDITIONED TASTE AVERSION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous work has shown that a single oral administration of atrazine (ATR), a chlorotriazine herbicide, induces dose-dependent increases in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and serum corticosterone (CORT), with a LOEL of 12.5mg/kg. The mechanism for these effects is unk...

  7. Comparisons of synthetic 1-18 ACTH (Organon 2001) and 1-39 ACTH of animal origin in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Danowski, T S; Fisher, E R; Robinson, S M

    The studies in human subjects herein reported provide data on the relative effects of 1-18 ACTH (Organon 2001) and commercial 1-39 ACTH of animal origin on plasma cortisol, serum non-esterified fatty acids, and certain urinary steroids.

  8. Comparisons of synthetic 1-18 ACTH (Organon 2001) and 1-39 ACTH of animal origin in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Danowski, T S; Fisher, E R; Robinson, S M

    1976-01-01

    The studies in human subjects herein reported provide data on the relative effects of 1-18 ACTH (Organon 2001) and commercial 1-39 ACTH of animal origin on plasma cortisol, serum non-esterified fatty acids, and certain urinary steroids.

  9. The effects of stress on plasma ACTH and corticosterone in young and aging pregnant rats and their fetuses

    SciTech Connect

    Erisman, S. ); Carnes, M. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison ); Takahashi, L.K.; Lent, S.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Compared to younger rats, old rats exhibit prolonged elevations of plasma ACTH and corticosterone (CORT) in response to stress. In addition, CORT crosses the placenta. To investigate whether fetuses of older rats may be exposed to higher concentrations of CORT during development than fetuses of young rats, we compared the effects of stress on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function in young and aging pregnant rats and their 19-day-old fetuses. The plasma of the mothers and fetuses was assayed for ACTH and CORT by radioimmunoassay. Both young and aging pregnant rats showed a significant increase in plasma ACTH and CORT immediately after exposure to stress. However, aging rats had more prolonged elevation of ACTH and CORT than young rats. This suggests that, like old male rats, aging pregnant rats have an alteration in feedback inhibition of the HPA axis. Prolonged elevation of CORT was also seen in fetuses of aging mothers. These results have important implications concerning the effects of stress during pregnancy at different maternal ages, and for the potential deleterious consequences of prolonged prenatal elevation in stress hormones on the offspring of aging females.

  10. Effects of pramipexole on the duration of immobility during the forced swim test in normal and ACTH-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Kouhei; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Miyaoka, Junya; Kawasaki, Hiromu; Asanuma, Masato; Sendo, Toshiaki; Gomita, Yutaka

    2009-07-01

    The dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist pramipexole has clinically been proven to improve depression or treatment-resistant depression. However, the involvement of the dopamine receptor system on the effect of pramipexole on depression remains unclear. We examined the influence of pramipexole on the duration of immobility during the forced swim test in normal and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-treated rats and further analyzed the possible role of dopamine receptors in this effect. Additionally, the mechanism by which pramipexole acts in this model was explored specifically in relation to the site of action through the use of microinjections into the intramedial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Pramipexole (0.3-1 mg/kg) significantly decreased the duration of immobility in normal and ACTH-treated rats. This effect was blocked by L-741,626, a D2 receptor antagonist, and nafadotride, a D3 receptor antagonist, in normal rats. Furthermore, infusions of pramipexole into the intranucleus accumbens, but not the medial prefrontal cortex, decreased the immobility of normal and ACTH-treated rats during the forced swim test. Taken together, the results of these experiments suggested that pramipexole, administered into the intranucleus accumbens rather than the medial prefrontal cortex, exerted an antidepressant-like effect on ACTH-treated rats via the dopaminergic system. The immobility-decreasing effect of pramipexole may be mediated by dopamine D2 and D3 receptors.

  11. Generalised hyperpigmentation caused by ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome with recurrent thymic neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hye-Rim; Won, Chong Hyun; Chang, Sung Eun; Lee, Mi Woo; Choi, Jee Ho; Moon, Kee Chan

    2015-05-01

    Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome is a rare cause of generalised hyperpigmentation. The clinical features are due to the excessive ectopic secretion of adenocorticotropin by diverse neuroendocrine or non-endocrine tumours. Here, we describe a rare case of ectopic ACTH syndrome developing from recurring thymic neuroendocrine carcinoma, which first presented as generalised hyperpigmentation.

  12. A morphometric analysis of adrenocortical actin localized by immunoelectron microscopy: the effect of adrenocorticotropin.

    PubMed

    Loesser, K E; Malamed, S

    1987-10-01

    The localization of actin and the effect of ACTH on its concentration was examined in freshly isolated rat adrenocortical cells. Lowicryl K4M-embedded cells were used for the immunoelectron localization of actin; gold was used as a label for immunoreactive sites. Actin was at least 4 times as concentrated at the cortical cytoplasm as in the lipid droplets and at least 5 times as concentrated in the microvilli as in the lipid droplets. ACTH stimulation approximately doubled the concentration of actin in the cortical cytoplasm and increased by 50% the concentration of actin in the microvilli. The microvillar contribution to the cell surface area was 40% higher in ACTH-stimulated cells than it was in unstimulated cells. These results provide quantitative evidence suggesting that actin and the microvilli participate in steroid secretion by the adrenocortical cell.

  13. Apomorphine injection stimulates beta-endorphin, adrenocorticotropin, and cortisol release in healthy man.

    PubMed

    Jezova, D; Vigas, M

    1988-01-01

    The effect of single injections of a dopaminergic agonist, apomorphine, on pituitary-adrenocortical function was investigated in healthy adult men by the measurement of plasma ACTH, beta-endorphin, cortisol and GH immunoreactivities. Single, subcutaneous injection of a subemetic dose of apomorphine (0.75 mg) resulted in a pronounced increase in plasma concentrations of GH, as well as ACTH, beta-endorphin, and cortisol, without induction of any serious adverse drug effects. These findings were confirmed in two separate experiments. PMID:2853401

  14. GIP-dependent adrenal Cushing's syndrome with incomplete suppression of ACTH.

    PubMed

    Croughs, R J; Zelissen, P M; van Vroonhoven, T J; Hofland, L J; N'Diaye, N; Lacroix, A; de Herder, W W

    2000-02-01

    ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome may be due to the development of ectopic hormone receptors in adrenal tissue. Thus, in food-dependent Cushing's syndrome the adrenals aberrantly express receptors for gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP). We present the case of a 60-year-old woman with food-dependent Cushing's syndrome whose cortisol levels increased after stimulation with CRH. In this patient with Cushing's syndrome the finding of low basal plasma cortisol levels in the late night and early morning as well as a paradoxical rise of plasma cortisol during a 7-h infusion with dexamethasone (carried out without any restriction in food intake), suggested that cortisol production was stimulated at times of food intake. Hourly measurements of plasma cortisol for 48 h revealed prominent meal-related peaks. A plasma cortisol response, elicited by oral glucose administration, could be prevented by octreotide. Plasma ACTH was low or undetectable. CRH administration was followed by a ACTH response from 3 to 16 ng/l and a plasma cortisol response from 230 to 680 nmol/l. Octreotide treatment for nearly five months induced a partial clinical and biochemical remission. Total bilateral adrenalectomy was performed. The left adrenal was grossly enlarged (7 x 5.5 x 4 cm) and the right adrenal was slightly enlarged (6 x 4 x 1.8 cm). Microscopy revealed bilateral nodular hyperplasia. Cell suspensions of adrenal tissue from the patient did respond in a dose-dependent fashion to stimulation with GIP and were very sensitive to stimulation with synthetic ACTH1-24. However, CRH had no significant effect on cortisol production in vitro. Using RT-PCR amplification and cDNA hybridization, GIP receptor was found to be overexpressed in the left and right adrenal tissues from this patient as compared to adrenal tissues from a normal individual or from non GIP-dependent adrenal Cushing's syndrome. There was no evidence of presence of adrenal CRH receptors. Thus, in this patient with food

  15. Severe Hypokalaemia, Hypertension, and Intestinal Perforation in Ectopic Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Tezcan; Karacaer, Cengiz; Açikgöz, Seyyid Bilal; Aydemir, Yusuf; Tamer, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome is a rare cause of the Cushing's syndrome. The occurrence of the ectopic ACTH syndrome presenting with severe hypokalaemia, metabolic alkalosis, and hypertension has been highlighted in case reports. However, presentation with lower gastrointestinal perforation is not known. We report the case of a 70-year-old male patient with severe hypokalaemia, metabolic alkalosis, hypertension, and colonic perforation as manifestations of an ACTH-secreting small cell lung carcinoma. Ectopic ACTH syndrome should be kept in mind as a cause of hypokalaemia, hypertension, and intestinal perforation in patients with lung carcinoma. PMID:26894113

  16. ACTH stimulation test in the captive cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Köster, L S; Schoeman, J P; Meltzer, D G A

    2007-09-01

    Serum cortisol response was assessed in 8 captive cheetahs, of varying ages, after the intravenous administration of 500 microg of tetracosactide (Synacthen Depot, Novartis, Kempton Park) while maintained under general anaesthesia. In addition, 8 cheetahs were anaesthetised and given an equal volume of saline in order to establish baseline cortisol concentrations at similar stages of anaesthesia. A significant difference in the median cortisol concentration measured over time was found following ACTH administration in the ACTH group (P < 0.001). There was no difference between the median cortisol concentrations in the ACTH group at time-points 120, 150 and 180 min after ACTH stimulation (P = 0.867). Thus it appears appropriate to collect serum 120 to 180 min after tetracosactide administration to assess maximal stimulation of the adrenal in the cheetah. No statistically significant rise was seen in the anaesthetised control group following the injection of saline (P = 0.238).

  17. Surgical management of the ectopic ACTH syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, C J; Joplin, G F; Welbourn, R B

    1982-01-01

    Most patients with extra-pituitary ACTH-secreting tumors die from carcinoma, but a few can benefit from operation. Of 96 patients with Cushing's syndrome, 11 probably had such tumors. There were three modes of presentation: (1) three had malignant tumors with visceral metastases initially. One (bronchial carcinoid) died without operation. Two with carcinoma (thyroid medullary and islet-cell) underwent adrenalectomy with remission, but died soon. (2) three had apparently benign tumors initially. One (appendicular carcinoid) underwent appendectomy and one (bronchial carcinoid with hilar node metastases) underwent lobectomy. Both had rapid remissions. The third (pheochromocytoma) died after resection of the tumor. (3) five patients had no obvious tumors and underwent adrenalectomy with remission. In one a benign bronchial carcinoid was removed later. Four others remain well, but without localizing signs of tumor. The main biochemical features in all were hypokalemic alkalosis and very high urinary excretion of free cortisol. Seven of the eight patients without visceral metastases are in remission from one to 15 years after operation. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:6287949

  18. Nucleus accumbens deep-brain stimulation efficacy in ACTH-pretreated rats: alterations in mitochondrial function relate to antidepressant-like effects

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Y; McGee, S; Czeczor, J K; Walker, A J; Kale, R P; Kouzani, A Z; Walder, K; Berk, M; Tye, S J

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has a critical role in the pathophysiology of mood disorders and treatment response. To investigate this, we established an animal model exhibiting a state of antidepressant treatment resistance in male Wistar rats using 21 days of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) administration (100 μg per day). First, the effect of ACTH treatment on the efficacy of imipramine (10 mg kg−1) was investigated alongside its effect on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) mitochondrial function. Second, we examined the mood-regulatory actions of chronic (7 day) high-frequency nucleus accumbens (NAc) deep-brain stimulation (DBS; 130 Hz, 100 μA, 90 μS) and concomitant PFC mitochondrial function. Antidepressant-like responses were assessed in the open field test (OFT) and forced swim test (FST) for both conditions. ACTH pretreatment prevented imipramine-mediated improvement in mobility during the FST (P<0.05). NAc DBS effectively improved FST mobility in ACTH-treated animals (P<0.05). No improvement in mobility was observed for sham control animals (P>0.05). Analyses of PFC mitochondrial function revealed that ACTH-treated animals had decreased capacity for adenosine triphosphate production compared with controls. In contrast, ACTH animals following NAc DBS demonstrated greater mitochondrial function relative to controls. Interestingly, a proportion (30%) of the ACTH-treated animals exhibited heightened locomotor activity in the OFT and exaggerated escape behaviors during the FST, together with general hyperactivity in their home-cage settings. More importantly, the induction of this mania-like phenotype was accompanied by overcompensative increased mitochondrial respiration. Manifestation of a DBS-induced mania-like phenotype in imipramine-resistant animals highlights the potential use of this model in elucidating mechanisms of mood dysregulation. PMID:27327257

  19. Nucleus accumbens deep-brain stimulation efficacy in ACTH-pretreated rats: alterations in mitochondrial function relate to antidepressant-like effects.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; McGee, S; Czeczor, J K; Walker, A J; Kale, R P; Kouzani, A Z; Walder, K; Berk, M; Tye, S J

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has a critical role in the pathophysiology of mood disorders and treatment response. To investigate this, we established an animal model exhibiting a state of antidepressant treatment resistance in male Wistar rats using 21 days of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) administration (100 μg per day). First, the effect of ACTH treatment on the efficacy of imipramine (10 mg kg(-1)) was investigated alongside its effect on the prefrontal cortex (PFC) mitochondrial function. Second, we examined the mood-regulatory actions of chronic (7 day) high-frequency nucleus accumbens (NAc) deep-brain stimulation (DBS; 130 Hz, 100 μA, 90 μS) and concomitant PFC mitochondrial function. Antidepressant-like responses were assessed in the open field test (OFT) and forced swim test (FST) for both conditions. ACTH pretreatment prevented imipramine-mediated improvement in mobility during the FST (P<0.05). NAc DBS effectively improved FST mobility in ACTH-treated animals (P<0.05). No improvement in mobility was observed for sham control animals (P>0.05). Analyses of PFC mitochondrial function revealed that ACTH-treated animals had decreased capacity for adenosine triphosphate production compared with controls. In contrast, ACTH animals following NAc DBS demonstrated greater mitochondrial function relative to controls. Interestingly, a proportion (30%) of the ACTH-treated animals exhibited heightened locomotor activity in the OFT and exaggerated escape behaviors during the FST, together with general hyperactivity in their home-cage settings. More importantly, the induction of this mania-like phenotype was accompanied by overcompensative increased mitochondrial respiration. Manifestation of a DBS-induced mania-like phenotype in imipramine-resistant animals highlights the potential use of this model in elucidating mechanisms of mood dysregulation. PMID:27327257

  20. Effects of imipramine and bupropion on the duration of immobility of ACTH-treated rats in the forced swim test: involvement of the expression of 5-HT2A receptor mRNA.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Fujitani, Yoshika; Kitagawa, Kouhei; Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Sagara, Hidenori; Kawasaki, Hiromu; Shibata, Kazuhiko; Sendo, Toshiaki; Gomita, Yutaka

    2008-02-01

    We examined the effect of chronic administration of imipramine and bupropion, monoamine reuptake inhibitors, on the duration of immobility in the forced swim test and serotonin (5-HT)(2A) receptor function in the form of 5-HT(2A) receptor mRNA levels in rats chronically treated with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). The immobility-decreasing effect of bupropion without imipramine did not influence the chronic ACTH treatment. The effect on the expression of 5-HT(2A) receptor mRNA of chronic ACTH treatment was decreased by bupropion, but not imipramine. These results suggest that bupropion has the effect of reducing immobility time in the forced swim test in the tricyclic antidepressant-resistant depressive model induced by chronic ACTH treatment in rats, and that decreased 5-HT(2A) receptor mRNA levels may be involved in this phenomenon.

  1. ACTH administration during formation of preovulatory follicles impairs steroidogenesis and angiogenesis in association with ovulation failure in lactating cows.

    PubMed

    Biran, D; Braw-Tal, R; Gendelman, M; Lavon, Y; Roth, Z

    2015-10-01

    Ovulation failure, follicular persistence, and formation of follicular cysts are known to impair dairy cow fertility. Although the underlying mechanism is not entirely clear, stress-induced alteration in adrenal hormone secretion can cause these ovarian pathologies. Six synchronized lactating cows were scanned daily by ultrasound, and plasma samples were taken throughout the estrous cycle. Treatment cows (n = 3) were administered with ACTH analog every 12 h from day 15 to day 21 of the cycle to induce formation of follicular cysts. Ovaries were collected at the slaughterhouse on day 23 of the cycle before appearance of follicular pathologies. Control cows (n = 3) were administered placebo, resynchronized, and administered PGF2α on day 6 of the new cycle to induce development of a preovulatory follicle. Follicular fluid was aspirated from the preovulatory follicles of each group to determine their steroid milieu. Slices were taken from the follicular wall for total messenger (m) RNA isolation and semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Administration of ACTH increased (P < 0.02) plasma cortisol concentration and reduced (P < 0.01) milk production. Androstenedione and estradiol concentrations in the follicular fluids were lower (P < 0.05) in ACTH-treated follicles than those in controls. The mRNA expression of luteinizing hormone receptor, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, cytochrome P450 aromatase (P450arom), and cytochrome P450 17α-hydroxylase (P450c17) were lower (P < 0.02) in the ACTH-treated vs control cows. On the other hand, the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and cytochrome P450 side-chain cleavage did not differ between groups. In addition, mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)120 and VEGF164 was higher (P < 0.01) in control than in ACTH-treated follicles, but that for angiopoietin-1 and 2 did not differ between groups. Findings indicated that ACTH administration throughout

  2. Sodium salicylate augments the plasma adrenocorticotropin and cortisol responses to insulin hypoglycemia in man.

    PubMed

    Halter, J B; Metz, S A

    1982-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that prostaglandins attenuate neuroendocrine responses to changes in circulating glucose levels in man, we studied the effects of sodium salicylate (SS), a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor, on the plasma ACTH and cortisol responses to insulin hypoglycemia. Six normal men were given insulin (0.05 U/kg, iv) on 2 different days during the infusion of either SS (40 mg/min) or saline. Compared to the saline control, SS had no significant effect on either the rate of fall of plasma glucose after insulin or the glucose nadir (mean +/- SEM, 33 +/- 3 vs. 36 +/- 3 mg/dl; P = NS). Peak ACTH levels after insulin were higher during SS compared to those during saline in all six subjects (316 +/- 95 vs. 102 +/- 26 pg/ml; P less than 0.05), and SS had a clear effect to increase both the overall ACTH response (F = 21.3; P less than 0.01, by analysis of variance) and the plasma cortisol response (F = 6.72; P less than 0.05, by analysis of variance). The most striking example of this effect of SS occurred in one subject whose peak plasma ACTH was only 44 pg/ml during saline but reached 750 pg/ml during SS despite an identical fall of plasma glucose to 42 mg/dl. Augmentation of the ACTH and cortisol responses to insulin hypoglycemia may be the result of an alteration by SS of recognition of glucose levels by glucose-sensitive cells of the brain, and effect which could be due to the inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. PMID:6274894

  3. Comparison of the effect of hormones on the hormone synthesis of Tetrahymena in medium or salt solution.

    PubMed

    Csaba, G; Lajkó, Eszter; Pállinger, Eva

    2010-11-01

    Tetrahymena pyriformis was maintained in TYM (tryptone-yeast medium) as well as in Losina salt solution. One hour treatment of 10⁻¹⁵ M histamine, serotonin or insulin was given before the histamine, serotonin, triiodothyronine and adrenocorticotropin contents of the cells were measured by flow cytometry after immunocytochemical staining. Maintenance in salt solution increased the hormone level in the cells, and use of the treatment hormone treatments further increased the endogenous hormone content relative to that in medium. The cells in salt mimic better the natural conditions, which means that the effects of hormones under more natural conditions are expressed to a greater extent than the exogenously given hormones in TYM typically used under laboratory conditions. Intercellular hormonal communication between the cells of a Tetrahymena population might assist in the survival of the individual cells.

  4. A case of insulin and ACTH co-secretion by a neuroendocrine tumour

    PubMed Central

    Solomou, S; Khan, R; Propper, D; Berney, D; Druce, M

    2014-01-01

    Summary A 33-year-old male was diagnosed with a metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma of uncertain primary. He defaulted from follow-up without therapy and some months later developed episodic severe hypoglycaemia, which was found to be associated with inappropriately elevated insulin and C-peptide levels. It was considered likely that the neuroendocrine tumour was the source of the insulin secretion. Diazoxide and somatostatin analogue were used to control hypoglycaemia. Much later in the course of the disease, he developed metabolic derangement, increased skin pigmentation and psychological disturbance, without frankly Cushingoid physical findings. Investigations revealed highly elevated cortisol levels (the levels having previously been normal) with markedly raised ACTH levels, consistent with the co-secretion of ACTH and insulin by the tumour. Treatment with metyrapone improved his psychological state and electrolyte imbalance. Unfortunately, despite several cycles of first-, second- and third-line chemotherapy from the start of the first hormonal presentation onwards, imaging revealed widespread progressive metastatic disease and the patient eventually passed away. This case highlights the importance of keeping in mind the biochemical heterogeneity of endocrine tumours during their treatment. Learning points The clinical presentation of insulin-secreting tumours includes symptoms of neuroglycopaenia and sympathetic overstimulation.Tumour-associated hypoglycaemia can be due to pancreatic insulinomas, and although ectopic hormone production occurs in a number of tumours, ectopic secretion of insulin is rare.A possible switch in the type of hormone produced can occur during the growth and progression of neuroendocrine tumours and, when treating neuroendocrine tumours, it is important to keep in mind their biochemical heterogeneity. PMID:24683485

  5. Effects of ACTH, epinephrine and Met-enkephalin on brain beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity, and of ACTH, epinephrine, Met-enkephalin and naloxone on retention, in normal and in protein-malnourished rats.

    PubMed

    Perry, M L; Netto, C A; Izquierdo, I

    1990-01-01

    Rats raised and maintained on a normal-protein diet (25% protein) responded to the ip administration of ACTH-(1-24), epinephrine or Met-enkephalin with a decrease in hypothalamic beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity, which is attributable to a release of this substance. This effect was not seen in rats raised and maintained on a low-protein diet (8% protein). In the normal animals, the pre-test administration of ACTH, epinephrine or Met-enkephalin and the post-training administration of naloxone enhanced retention-test performance of a step-down inhibitory avoidance task. These behavioral effects were absent in the protein-malnourished rats. Previous studies have shown that the behavioral effect of post-training naloxone is secondary to the release of brain beta-endorphin during training, and that the pre-test effect of the hormones is due to a release of brain beta-endorphin induced by the substances themselves. Since it is not likely that the differences were caused by hyperreactivity to the aversive stimuli employed, the suggested interpretation is that protein-malnourished rats present a dysfunction in the brain beta-endorphin system which renders it unresponsive not only to novel training experiences, but also to the pre-test retrieval enhancing effects of ACTH, epinephrine and Met-enkephalin.

  6. Do stress hormones connect environmental effects with behavior in the forced swim test?

    PubMed

    Pintér, Ottó; Domokos, Ágnes; Mergl, Zsuzsa; Mikics, Éva; Zelena, Dóra

    2011-01-01

    Forced swim test (FST) is a widely used test for antidepressant development. Depression is a stress related disease, as hormones of the stress-axis can modify mood. However it is not clear, how the appearance of depressive-like behavior (floating) in FST is connected with changes in the stress-hormone levels. We hypothesized, that different manipulations would alter the behavior through changes in stress-hormone levels. First the effect of environmental alterations was studied. Increasing water-temperature enhanced floating time together with a decrease in adrenocorticotropin levels. During the dark phase of the day rats spent more time with floating independently from the actual lighting. Neither the phase nor the actual lighting had significant effect on adrenocorticotropin concentrations with higher corticosterone levels during the dark phase. At greater water depth rats float less but the size of animals had no effect. Water depth did not influence adrenocorticotropin and corticosterone responses, but the size of the rats significantly affected both factors. Secondly, administration of imipramine reduced floating and adrenocorticotropin level without affecting corticosterone. Despite the known connection between depression and stress we did not find a correlation between floating behavior and hormone levels. As an alternative mechanism imipramine-induced heart rate and core body temperature decrease was found by telemetric approach. This study is the first summary in rats examining the effect of wide range of environmental alterations during FST. It seems likely that both brain monoamines and stress-axis take part in the development of depression, but these pathways are regulated independently.

  7. Do stress hormones connect environmental effects with behavior in the forced swim test?

    PubMed

    Pintér, Ottó; Domokos, Ágnes; Mergl, Zsuzsa; Mikics, Éva; Zelena, Dóra

    2011-01-01

    Forced swim test (FST) is a widely used test for antidepressant development. Depression is a stress related disease, as hormones of the stress-axis can modify mood. However it is not clear, how the appearance of depressive-like behavior (floating) in FST is connected with changes in the stress-hormone levels. We hypothesized, that different manipulations would alter the behavior through changes in stress-hormone levels. First the effect of environmental alterations was studied. Increasing water-temperature enhanced floating time together with a decrease in adrenocorticotropin levels. During the dark phase of the day rats spent more time with floating independently from the actual lighting. Neither the phase nor the actual lighting had significant effect on adrenocorticotropin concentrations with higher corticosterone levels during the dark phase. At greater water depth rats float less but the size of animals had no effect. Water depth did not influence adrenocorticotropin and corticosterone responses, but the size of the rats significantly affected both factors. Secondly, administration of imipramine reduced floating and adrenocorticotropin level without affecting corticosterone. Despite the known connection between depression and stress we did not find a correlation between floating behavior and hormone levels. As an alternative mechanism imipramine-induced heart rate and core body temperature decrease was found by telemetric approach. This study is the first summary in rats examining the effect of wide range of environmental alterations during FST. It seems likely that both brain monoamines and stress-axis take part in the development of depression, but these pathways are regulated independently. PMID:21505269

  8. Stimulation of corticosterone secretion in vitro by brief ACTH exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, L.D.; Tam, B.; Greer, M.A.

    1986-06-01

    The authors examined the relationship between ACTH concentration and exposure duration on stimulation of corticosterone (B) secretion in vitro using perifused enzymatically dispersed rat adrenocortical cells. A modular perifusion apparatus was used that permitted evaluation of 20-24 cell chambers per experimental session. In expt 1,20-1000 pg/ml concentrations of synthetic ACTH-(1-24) were presented to cells for 1 min. In expt 2, 100 pg ACTH-(1-24) was presented to adrenal cells in five dose-duration regimens ranging from 5 pg/min for 20 min to 100 pg/min for 1 min. Perifusal rate was 1 ml/min in all sessions. B was determined by radioimmunoassay. In expt 1 (constant-duration paradigm), 1-min presentation of ACTH-(1-24) produced log-linear dose-response effects across these concentrations. In expt 2 (constant-mass paradigm), identical masses administered in different dose-duration regimens had different steroidogenic efficacies: low-dose long-duration regimens provoked greater total release than high-dose short-duration regimens. Overall, every dose-duration regimen was associated with stimulation of B secretion. These results indicate that 1) very brief exposure to physiological concentrations of ACTH-(1-24) is a significant stimulus for corticosteroid secretion; 2) variations in the dose-duration regimen over the physiological range modifies both the maximum rate of secretion and the duration of secretion, but not the response latency; and 3) ACTH-(1-24) presentation mass is not the sole determinant of B secretion.

  9. Quantifying Pituitary-Adrenal Dynamics and Deconvolution of Concurrent Cortisol and Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Data by Compressed Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Faghih, Rose T.; Dahleh, Munther A.; Adler, Gail K.; Klerman, Elizabeth B.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-01-01

    Pulsatile release of cortisol from the adrenal glands is governed by pulsatile release of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from the anterior pituitary. In return, cortisol has a negative feedback effect on ACTH release. Simultaneous recording of ACTH and cortisol is not typical, and determining the number, timing, and amplitudes of pulsatile events from simultaneously recorded data is challenging because of several factors: (I) stimulator ACTH pulse activity, (II) kinematics of ACTH and cortisol, (III) the sampling interval, and (IV) the measurement error. We model ACTH and cortisol secretion simultaneously using a linear differential equations model with Gaussian errors and sparse pulsatile events as inputs to the model. We propose a novel framework for recovering pulses and parameters underlying the interactions between ACTH and cortisol. We recover the timing and amplitudes of pulses using compressed sensing, and employ generalized cross validation for determining the number of pulses. We analyze serum ACTH and cortisol levels sampled at 10-minute intervals over 24 hours from 10 healthy women. We recover physiologically plausible timing and amplitudes for these pulses and model the feedback effect of cortisol. We recover 15 to 18 pulses over 24 hours, which is highly consistent with the results of another cortisol data analysis approach. Modeling the interactions between ACTH and cortisol allows for accurate quantification of pulsatile events, and normal and pathological states. This could lay the basis for a more physiologically-based approach for administering cortisol therapeutically. The proposed approach can be adapted to deconvolve other pairs of hormones with similar interactions. PMID:25935025

  10. Pre- and postnatally administered ACTH, Organon 2766 and CRF facilitate or inhibit active avoidance task performance in young adult mice.

    PubMed

    Honour, L C; White, M H

    1988-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of learning/memory-related neuropeptides on behavioral task performance in later life. A 1 mg/kg dosage of adrenocorticotropic hormone 4-9, Organon 2766, ACTH/MSH 4-10, ACTH 1-24, CRF, or diluent was subcutaneously injected into either pregnant females or into newborn pups during specific neural developmental windows. Each of the progeny was trained in an active-avoidance task and tested for acquisition on postpartum days 35-37. The mice were then tested for memory task performance and reacquisition on days 42-44 postpartum using the identical experimental paradigm as that used in the training sessions. Prenatal treatment with these memory-related neuropeptides resulted in significant facilitation of learning/memory task performance in male and female mice treated with Organon 2766 (p less than 0.001), and a significant inhibition of learning/memory task performance in males and females treated with ACTH 1-24 (p less than 0.01). Additional sex-specific performance facilitations and inhibitions resulted from the pre- or postnatal administration of the various neuropeptides used in this study. These results suggest that neuropeptides, when available in increased amounts during specific neural developmental windows, can significantly improve or suppress related behavioral performance capability in later life.

  11. Expression of melanocortin receptors in human prostate cancer cell lines: MC2R activation by ACTH increases prostate cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Hafiz, Saly; Dennis, John C; Schwartz, Dean; Judd, Robert; Tao, Ya-Xiong; Khazal, Kamel; Akingbemi, Benson; Mo, Xiu-Lei; Abdel-Mageed, Asim B; Morrison, Edward; Mansour, Mahmoud

    2012-10-01

    The melanocortin receptors (MCRs 1-5) are G protein coupled-receptors (GPCRs) that regulate food intake, inflammation, skin pigmentation, sexual function and steroidogenesis. Their peptide ligands, the melanocortins, are α-, β- and γ-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) all of which are secreted from the anterior pituitary gland under hypothalamic control. MC2R binds ACTH but has no affinity for the other melanocortins and is, thereby, pharmacologically different from MCRs that bind those ligands. Evidence suggests that elevated GPCRs transactivate the androgen receptor (AR), the critical mediator of prostate cell growth, and consequently promote prostate cancer cell proliferation. It may be that reduced central melanocortin signaling is coincidental with reversal of prostate cancer cachexia, but no data are available on the expression of, or the role for, MCRs in prostate cancer. Here, we show that MCR (1-5) mRNAs are expressed in androgen-dependent LNCaP and androgen-independent PC3 and DU-145 human prostate cancer cell lines. Further, MC2R, the specific target of ACTH, is expressed in LNCaP, PC3 and DU-145 cells. Among the several synthetic MCR peptide ligands that we used, only ACTH promoted concentration-dependent cell proliferation in the three cell lines as shown by MTT cell proliferation assay. In LNCaP cells, the effect was additive with testosterone stimulation and was partially blunted with SHU9119, a non-selective MCR antagonist. In the same cells, ACTH induced cAMP production and increased AR nuclear labeling in immunocytochemical assays. Our observations suggest that MC2R is involved in prostate carcinogenesis and that targeting MC2R signaling may provide a novel avenue in prostate carcinoma treatment. PMID:22842514

  12. Estimating adrenal cortical function in dogs with ACTH.

    PubMed

    Osbaldiston, G W; Greve, T

    1978-07-01

    The peripheral blood response to intramuscular injection of 10 units ACTH in dogs was investigated because no experimental evidence for the standardization of this procedure for clinical use was available. Following the injection of ACTH in sodium chloride solution, neutrophilia, monocytosis, eosinopenia, and lymphopenia occurred. With the exception of eosinopenia, the greatest change in the concentration of each cell type in peripheral blood occurred between 2 and 4 hours post injection. The maximum change in eosinophil numbers occurred between 4 and 6 hours post injection. When all cell types were considered, 4 hours post injection was the most suitable time to measure the cellular response in peripheral blood in dogs which respond to ACTH. The data indicate that change in the ratio of neutrophils to lymphocytes (N/L) prior to and at 2 to 4 hours after ACTH injection in normal dogs was a sensitive index of response and occured sooner than eosinopenia. The extent of change in the N/L ratio was such that accuracy in interpretation could be obtained by counting as few as 40 cells.

  13. Effects of bupropion on the forced swim test and release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens in ACTH-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Yagi, Takahiko; Kitagawa, Kouhei; Shinomiya, Kazuaki; Kawasaki, Hiromu; Asanuma, Masato; Gomita, Yutaka

    2010-08-01

    The dopamine reuptake inhibitor bupropion has clinically been proven to improve depression and treatment-resistant depression. We examined its influence on the duration of immobility during the forced swim test in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-treated rats and further analyzed the possible role of dopamine receptors in this effect. Additionally, the mechanism by which bupropion acts in this model was explored specifically in relation to the site of action through the use of microinjections into the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Bupropion significantly decreased the duration of immobility in normal and ACTH-treated rats. This effect was blocked by D2 and D3 receptor antagonists in normal rats. Furthermore, infusions of bupropion into the nucleus accumbens, but not medial prefrontal cortex, decreased the immobility of normal and ACTH-treated rats during the forced swim test. Bupropion treatment plus repeated ACTH treatment significantly increased the extracellular dopamine concentration. These findings suggest the antidepressant-like effect of bupropion to be related to levels of dopamine in the rat nucleus accumbens.

  14. Neuroendocrine carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater causing ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone-dependent Cushing's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    KATO, AKIHISA; HAYASHI, KAZUKI; NAITOH, ITARU; SENO, KYOJI; OKADA, YUKIKO; BAN, TESSHIN; KONDO, HIROMU; NISHI, YUJI; UMEMURA, SHUICHIRO; HORI, YASUKI; NATSUME, MAKOTO; JOH, TAKASHI

    2016-01-01

    Ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) is rarely secreted by neuroendocrine tumors. Although neuroendocrine tumors may occur at any site in the gastrointestinal system, they very rarely occur in the ampulla of Vater and have a poor prognosis. The present study described the first Cushing's syndrome as a result of ectopic ACTH arising from the ampulla of Vater neuroendocrine carcinoma. A 69-year-old female was admitted with clinical features of Cushing's syndrome, confirmed biochemically by hypokalemia, and elevated levels of ACTH and cortisol. In further investigations, a tumor of the ampulla of Vater and liver metastases were detected. Pathological analysis of the biopsy confirmed a neuroendocrine carcinoma, which was immunohistochemically positive for chromogranin A, synaptophysin, cluster of differentiation 56 and ACTH. Therefore, the present study diagnosed a functional and metastatic neuroendocrine carcinoma of the ampulla of Vater with ectopic ACTH production causing Cushing's syndrome. The patient succumbed to mortality 4 months later, despite administration of combined chemotherapy with irinotecan and cisplatin. PMID:27330779

  15. Adrenocorticotrophic hormone and dexamethasone failed to affect milk yield in dairy goats: comparative aspects.

    PubMed

    Shamay; Mabjeesh; Shapiro; Silanikove

    2000-11-01

    The ability of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH; single i.v. injection of 2.5IU/kg BW) and dexamethasone (single i.m. injection of 36mg/kg BW) to affect milk production was studied in mid-lactating Israeli Saanen goats. None of these treatments produced changes in milk yield and composition of the goats. The effects of ACTH on blood cortisol levels, and the effects of ACTH and dexamethasone on blood plasma concentrations of glucose, however, were consistent with previous reports in goats and cows. These responses suggest that ACTH and dexamethasone treatments produced their expected glucocorticoid effects. It is suggested that obstructing the axis: stress-ACTH-glucocorticoid-down regulation of milk yield, which was demonstrated in dairy cows, reflects the adaptation of goats to harsh conditions, and the selection pressure to produce milk under conditions which are considered stressful for other ruminants. PMID:11024343

  16. Quantification and characterization of ACTH-related peptides produced by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, G.M.; Maimon, J.; Schneider, B.S. )

    1991-04-01

    The authors have used a sensitive radioimmunoassay to quantify and characterize PBMC-associated immunoreactive ACTH (ACTH-IR). Mean ACTH content of freshly isolated human PBMCs was 3.8 {plus minus} 0.72 pg (SEM) per 10(6) cells. During 3 days of incubation ACTH-IR in conditioned media of control PBMCs increased significantly, p less than 0.02. Gel filtration chromatography revealed a minor peak of ACTH-IR coeluting with ACTH (1-39) and a major peak coeluting with ACTH (11-24). Treatment with 15 nM CRH did not alter the amount of ACTH-IR secreted or its gel pattern. Synthetic ACTH (11-24), was radioiodinated and was used for binding experiments that demonstrated specific high- and low-affinity binding sites for ACTH (11-24) on a human T cell line. These results add support for a role of ACTH and related peptides in immune regulatory systems and suggest that cell-specific post-translational processing of PBMC may generate an expanding number of biologically active moieties.

  17. Limited Diagnostic Utility of Plasma Adrenocorticotropic Hormone for Differentiation between Adrenal Cushing Syndrome and Cushing Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hong, A Ram; Kim, Jung Hee; Hong, Eun Shil; Kim, I Kyeong; Park, Kyeong Seon; Ahn, Chang Ho; Kim, Sang Wan; Shin, Chan Soo

    2015-01-01

    Background Measurement of the plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level has been recommended as the first diagnostic test for differentiating between ACTH-independent Cushing syndrome (CS) and ACTH-dependent CS. When plasma ACTH values are inconclusive, a differential diagnosis of CS can be made based upon measurement of the serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) level and results of the high-dose dexamethasone suppression test (HDST). The aim of this study was to assess the utility of plasma ACTH to differentiate adrenal CS from Cushing' disease (CD) and compare it with that of the HDST results and serum DHEA-S level. Methods We performed a retrospective, multicenter study from January 2000 to May 2012 involving 92 patients with endogenous CS. The levels of plasma ACTH, serum cortisol, 24-hour urine free cortisol (UFC) after the HDST, and serum DHEA-S were measured. Results Fifty-seven patients had adrenal CS and 35 patients had CD. The area under the curve of plasma ACTH, serum DHEA-S, percentage suppression of serum cortisol, and UFC after HDST were 0.954, 0.841, 0.950, and 0.997, respectively (all P<0.001). The cut-off values for plasma ACTH, percentage suppression of serum cortisol, and UFC after HDST were 5.3 pmol/L, 33.3%, and 61.6%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of plasma ACTH measurement were 84.2% and 94.3%, those of serum cortisol were 95.8% and 90.6%, and those of UFC after the HDST were 97.9% and 96.7%, respectively. Conclusion Significant overlap in plasma ACTH levels was seen between patients with adrenal CS and those with CD. The HDST may be useful in differentiating between these forms of the disease, especially when the plasma ACTH level alone is not conclusive. PMID:26248856

  18. Testosterone, estradiol, ACTH and musical, spatial and verbal performance.

    PubMed

    Hassler, M; Gupta, D; Wollmann, H

    1992-01-01

    Testosterone, estradiol, and ACTH were determined in blood serum of 26 healthy males aged 19.16 and of 25 healthy females aged 18.77 years on average, and results were correlated with test scores of three spatial tests, a verbal fluency measure, and a test measuring general musical ability. In addition, hemispheric lateralization for verbal material and handedness was assessed. While testosterone and estradiol alone were not significantly related to any of the cognitive or musical tests, testosterone/estradiol ratio was significantly negatively correlated with spatial tests, and ACTH was significantly positively correlated with spatial and musical tests. Correlations were stronger in females than in males. The laterality index was significantly negatively correlated with testosterone in males indicating that right hemisphere involvement in verbal processing was associated with high testosterone levels.

  19. Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Suppresses Gonadotropin-Stimulated Estradiol Release from Zebrafish Ovarian Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Alsop, Derek; Ings, Jennifer S.; Vijayan, Mathilakath M.

    2009-01-01

    While stress is known to impact reproductive performance, the pathways involved are not entirely understood. Corticosteroid effects on the functioning of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis are thought to be a key aspect of stress-mediated reproductive dysfunction. A vital component of the stress response is the pituitary secretion of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), which binds to the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R) in the adrenal glands and activates cortisol biosynthesis. We recently reported MC2R mRNA abundance in fish gonads leading to the hypothesis that ACTH may be directly involved in gonadal steroid modulation. Using zebrafish (Danio rerio) ovarian follicles, we tested the hypothesis that acute ACTH stimulation modulates cortisol and estradiol (E2) secretion. ACTH neither affected cortisol nor unstimulated E2 release from ovarian follicles. However, ACTH suppressed human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG)-stimulated E2 secretion in a dose-related manner, with a maximum decrease of 62% observed at 1 I.U. ACTH mL−1. This effect of ACTH on E2 release was not observed in the presence of either 8-bromo-cAMP or forskolin, suggesting that the mechanism(s) involved in steroid attenuation was upstream of adenylyl cyclase activation. Overall, our results suggest that a stress-induced rise in plasma ACTH levels may initiate a rapid down-regulation of acute stimulated E2 biosynthesis in the zebrafish ovary, underscoring a novel physiological role for this pituitary peptide in modulating reproductive activity. PMID:19649243

  20. Treadmill exercise training and estradiol increase plasma ACTH and prolactin after novel footshock.

    PubMed

    White-Welkley, J E; Warren, G L; Bunnell, B N; Mougey, E H; Meyerhoff, J L; Dishman, R K

    1996-03-01

    We examined whether rats that were treadmill exercise trained (Tr) or chronically immobilized (CI) had similar responses by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) cortical axis to acute stress and whether the HPA responses interacted with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. After 6 wk (1 h/day, 6 days/wk) of Tr or CI, plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone ([ACTH]), [prolactin], and [corticosterone] were measured after familiar (treadmill running or immobilization) or novel (footshock) stress. Ovariectomized Sprague-Dawley females (n = 72) were implanted with capsules containing estradiol benzoate (E2) and randomly assigned in a 2-group (E2 vs. no E2) x 3 treatment (Tr vs. CI vs. sedentary) x 4 acute stressor [footshock vs. treadmill running (Run) vs. immobilization (Im) vs. no stress] x 3 recovery time (1 vs. 15 vs. 30 min) mixed-model analysis of variance. E2 capsules were removed from one-half of the animals 48 h before the first stressor session. After 10 min of acute stress, blood was drawn from a jugular catheter at 1, 15, and 30 min of recovery. [ACTH] and [prolactin] after footshock were higher in Tr rats with E2 compared with CI and sedentary rats without E2; recovery levels for sedentary animals were higher after Run compared with Im. The elevation in [corticosterone] from minute 1 to 15 of recovery was higher after the familiar Run and Im conditions. Our findings are consistent with an increased responsiveness of the HPA axis to novel footshock after treadmill exercise training that is additionally modulated by the HPG axis.

  1. ACTH-like peptides increase pain sensitivity and antagonize opiate analgesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heybach, J. P.; Vernikos, J.

    1981-01-01

    The role of the pituitary and of ACTH in pain sensitivity was investigated in the rat. Pain sensitivity was assessed by measuring paw-lick and jump latencies in response to being placed on a grid at 55 C. Hypophysectomy reduced pain sensitivity, and this effect was reversed by the intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of the opiate antagonist naloxone. Similarly, the analgesia produced by a dose of morphine was antagonized by the administration of ACTH or alpha-MSH. The peripheral injection of ACTH or alpha-MSH in normal rats did not increase pain sensitivity. However, ACTH administered ICV increased pain sensivity within 10 min. The results indicate that the pituitary is the source of an endogenous opiate antagonist and hyperalgesic factor and that this factor is ACTH or an ACTH-like peptide. This activity resides in the N-terminal portion of the ACTH molecule since ACTH sub 4-10 is not active in this respect, nor does this activity require a free N-terminal serine since alpha-MSH appears to be almost as potent as the ACTH sub 1-24 peptide. It is concluded that ACTH-like peptides of pituitary origin act as endogenous hyperalgesic and opiate antagonistic factors.

  2. Corticotropin (ACTH) regulates alternative RNA splicing in Y1 mouse adrenocortical tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Schimmer, Bernard P; Cordova, Martha

    2015-06-15

    The stimulatory effect of ACTH on gene expression is well documented and is thought to be a major mechanism by which ACTH maintains the functional and structural integrity of the gland. Previously, we showed that ACTH regulates the accumulation of over 1200 transcripts in Y1 adrenal cells, including a cluster with functions in alternative splicing of RNA. On this basis, we postulated that some of the effects of ACTH on the transcription landscape of Y1 cells are mediated by alternative splicing. In this study, we demonstrate that ACTH regulates the alternative splicing of four transcripts - Gnas, Cd151, Dab2 and Tia1. Inasmuch as alternative splicing potentially affects transcripts from more than two-thirds of the mouse genome, we suggest that these findings are representative of a genome-wide effect of ACTH that impacts on the mRNA and protein composition of the adrenal cortex.

  3. Adrenal insufficiency in a child following unilateral excision of a dual-hormone secreting phaeochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Sjoeholm, Annika; Li, Cassandra; Leem, Chaey; Lee, Aiden; Stack, Maria P; Hofman, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    Summary Phaeochromocytomas are a rare clinical entity, with dual hormone-secreting lesions particularly uncommon, seen in <1%. ACTH is the most common hormone co-produced, and is potentially lethal if not diagnosed. We present the case of a previously well 10-year-old boy, who presented acutely with a hypertensive crisis and was found to have a unilateral, non-syndromic phaeochromocytoma. Medical stabilization of his hypertension was challenging, and took 3 weeks to achieve, before proceeding to unilateral adrenalectomy. Post-operatively the child experienced severe fatigue and was subsequently confirmed to have adrenal insufficiency. He improved markedly with hydrocortisone replacement therapy, which is ongoing 6 months post-operatively. In retrospect this likely represents unrecognized, sub-clinical ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome secondary to an ACTH/or precursor dual-hormone secreting phaeochromocytoma. At follow-up, his hypertension had resolved, there was no biochemical evidence of recurrence of the phaeochromocytoma, and genetic analysis was indicative of a sporadic lesion. Learning points Dual hormone secreting phaeochromocytomas with ACTH/or a precursor may cause secondary adrenal insufficiency following surgical removal.The concurrent features of Cushing's syndrome can be mild and easily overlooked presenting diagnostic and management pitfalls.As concomitant syndromes of hormone excess are rare in phaeochromocytomas; the diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion.Serial/diurnal cortisol levels, ACTH measurement +/− low dose dexamethasone suppression (when clinically stable, appropriate adrenergic blockade in place, and well supervised), can all be considered as needed. PMID:26113981

  4. Inhibitory effect of cyproheptadine on ACTH secretion in patients with Addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Loli, P; Frascatani, F; Gelli, D; Maggioni, M; Muratori, F; Ronzoni, M

    1983-01-01

    In 14 patients with Addison's disease plasma levels of ACTH were studied after administration of a single oral dose (16 mg) of cyproheptadine. The drug administration was followed by an inhibition of ACTH release. These results support the view that cyproheptadine may exert an inhibitory effect on ACTH secretion in subjects whose corticosteroid feedback mechanism is normal. We hypothesize that the effect of cyproheptadine might be related to its anti-serotonin or anti-histaminergic action.

  5. The central anorexigenic mechanism of adrenocorticotropic hormone involves the caudal hypothalamus in chicks.

    PubMed

    Shipp, Steven L; Yi, Jiaqing; Dridi, Sami; Gilbert, Elizabeth R; Cline, Mark A

    2015-10-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), consisting of 39 amino acids, is most well-known for its involvement in an organism's response to stress. It also participates in satiety, as exogenous ACTH causes decreased food intake in rats. However, its anorexigenic mechanism is not well understood in any species and its effect on appetite is not reported in the avian class. Thus, the present study was designed to evaluate central ACTH's effect on food intake and to elucidate the mechanism mediating this response using broiler chicks. Chicks that received intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of 1, 2, or 4 nmol of ACTH reduced food intake, under both ad libitum and 180 min fasted conditions. Water intake was also reduced in ACTH-injected chicks under both feeding conditions, but when measured without access to feed it was not affected. Blood glucose was not affected in either feeding condition. Following ACTH injection, c-Fos immunoreactivity was quantified in key appetite-associated hypothalamic nuclei including the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), dorsomedial hypothalamus, lateral hypothalamus (LH), arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the parvo- and magno-cellular portions of the paraventricular nucleus. ACTH-injected chicks had increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in the VMH, LH, and ARC. Hypothalamus was collected at 1h post-injection, and real-time PCR performed to measure mRNA abundance of some appetite-associated factors. Neuropeptide Y, pro-opiomelanocortin, glutamate decarboxylase 1, melanocortin receptors 2-5, and urocortin 3 mRNA abundance was not affected by ACTH treatment. However, expression of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), urotensin 2 (UT), agouti-related peptide (AgRP), and orexin (ORX), and melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R) mRNA decreased in the hypothalamus of ACTH-injected chicks. In conclusion, ICV ACTH causes decreased food intake in chicks, and is associated with VMH, LH, and ARC activation, and a decrease in hypothalamic mRNA abundance of CRF, UT, AgRP, ORX

  6. Demonstration by transfection studies that mutations in the adrenocorticotropin receptor gene are one cause of the hereditary syndrome of glucocorticoid deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Naville, D.; Barjhoux, L.; Jaillard, C.

    1996-04-01

    The hereditary syndrome of unresponsiveness to ACTH is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by low levels of serum cortisol and high levels of plasma ACTH. There is no cortisol response to exogenous ACTH. Recent cloning of the human ACTH receptor gene has enabled us to study this gene in patients with glucocorticoid deficiency. By using the PCR to amplify the coding sequence of the ACTH receptor gene, we identified three mutations in two unrelated patients. One mutation present in homozygous form converted the negatively charged Asp{sup 107}, located in the third transmembrane domain, to an uncharged Asn residue. The second patient was a compound heterozygote: the paternal allele contained a one-nucleotide insertion leading to a stop codon within the third extracellular loop, and the maternal allele contained a point mutation converting Cys{sup 235} to Phe, also in the third extracellular loop. Normal and mutant ACTH receptor genes were expressed in the M3 cell line, and intracellular cAMP production in response to ACTH was measured. For the mutant receptors, no response to physiological ACTH concentrations was detected, suggesting an impaired binding of ACTH to the receptors and/or an altered coupling to the adenylate cyclase effector. 24 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. The adrenocortical response of greater sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) to capture, ACTH injection, and confinement, as measured in fecal samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jankowski, M.D.; Wittwer, D.J.; Heisey, D.M.; Franson, J.C.; Hofmeister, E.K.

    2009-01-01

    Investigators of wildlife populations often utilize demographic indicators to understand the relationship between habitat characteristics and population viability. Assessments of corticosterone may enable earlier detection of populations at risk of decline because physiological adjustments to habitat disturbance occur before reproductive diminutions. Noninvasive methods to accomplish these assesments are important in species of concern, such as the greater sage grouse (GRSG). Therefore, we validated a radioimmunoassay that measures immunoreactive corticosterone metabolites (ICM) in fecal samples and used it to characterize the adrenocortical response of 15 GRSG exposed to capture, intravenous injection of 50 IU/kg adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) or saline, and 22 h of confinement. Those animals injected with ACTH exhibited a more sustained (P = 0.0139) and less variable (P = 0.0012) response than those injected with saline, indicating different levels of adrenocortical activity. We also found that potential field-collection protocols of fecal samples did not alter ICM concentrations: samples held at 4??C for up to 16 h contained similar levels of ICM as those frozen (-20??C) immediately. This study demonstrates a multiphasic adrenocortical response that varied with the level of stimulation and indicates that the assay used to measure this phenomenon is applicable for studies of wild GRSG. ?? 2009 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.

  8. The adrenocortical response of greater sage grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) to capture, ACTH injection, and confinement, as measured in fecal samples.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, M D; Wittwer, D J; Heisey, D M; Franson, J C; Hofmeister, E K

    2009-01-01

    Investigators of wildlife populations often utilize demographic indicators to understand the relationship between habitat characteristics and population viability. Assessments of corticosterone may enable earlier detection of populations at risk of decline because physiological adjustments to habitat disturbance occur before reproductive diminutions. Noninvasive methods to accomplish these assessments are important in species of concern, such as the greater sage grouse (GRSG). Therefore, we validated a radioimmunoassay that measures immunoreactive corticosterone metabolites (ICM) in fecal samples and used it to characterize the adrenocortical response of 15 GRSG exposed to capture, intravenous injection of 50 IU/kg adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) or saline, and 22 h of confinement. Those animals injected with ACTH exhibited a more sustained (P = 0.0139) and less variable (P = 0.0012) response than those injected with saline, indicating different levels of adrenocortical activity. We also found that potential field-collection protocols of fecal samples did not alter ICM concentrations: samples held at 4 degrees C for up to 16 h contained similar levels of ICM as those frozen (-20 degrees C) immediately. This study demonstrates a multiphasic adrenocortical response that varied with the level of stimulation and indicates that the assay used to measure this phenomenon is applicable for studies of wild GRSG.

  9. Imitation, social facilitation, and the effects of ACTH 4-10 on rats' bar-pressing behavior.

    PubMed

    Henning, J M; Zentall, T R

    1981-03-01

    The effects of ACTH 4-10 on rats' imitation learning was examined during the acquisition and extinction of a bar-press response for water reinforcement. Rats were exposed to either a bar-pressing conspecific (OB), an experimentally naive conspecific (ON), or an empty box (OE) during bar-press acquisition. In a factorial design, each rat was then exposed to one of the same three conditions during extinction. An 80 mcg dose of ACTH 4-10 was administered to half of the rats in each group prior to observation. Performance differences during acquisition were generally small, but significant performance differences during extinction were found. Social facilitation was indicated by the finding that rats extinguished in the presence of a conspecific exhibited significantly greater resistance to extinction than rats extinguished in the presence of an empty box. An imitation effect was also found. Rats that observed a bar-pressing conspecific during both acquisition and extinction (group OB-OB) showed significantly greater resistance top extinction than did groups OB-ON, CB-OE, or OE-OE. There were no significant effects of the hormone, however, relative to saline controls. PMID:6263117

  10. The Adrenocortical Response of Greater Sage Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) to Capture, ACTH Injection, and Confinement, as Measured in Fecal Samples

    PubMed Central

    Jankowski, M. D.; Wittwer, D. J.; Heisey, D. M.; Franson, J. C.; Hofmeister, E. K.

    2009-01-01

    Investigators of wildlife populations often utilize demographic indicators to understand the relationship between habitat characteristics and population viability. Assessments of corticosterone may enable earlier detection of populations at risk of decline because physiological adjustments to habitat disturbance occur before reproductive diminutions. Noninvasive methods to accomplish these assesments are important in species of concern, such as the greater sage grouse (GRSG). Therefore, we validated a radioimmunoassay that measures immunoreactive corticosterone metabolites (ICM) in fecal samples and used it to characterize the adrenocortical response of 15 GRSG exposed to capture, intravenous injection of 50 IU/kg adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) or saline, and 22 h of confinement. Those animals injected with ACTH exhibited a more sustained (P = 0.0139) and less variable (P = 0.0012) response than those injected with saline, indicating different levels of adrenocortical activity. We also found that potential field-collection protocols of fecal samples did not alter ICM concentrations: samples held at 4°C for up to 16 h contained similar levels of ICM as those frozen (−20°C) immediately. This study demonstrates a multiphasic adrenocortical response that varied with the level of stimulation and indicates that the assay used to measure this phenomenon is applicable for studies of wild GRSG. PMID:19199814

  11. Radioimmunoassay for. gamma. -melanocyte stimulating hormone

    SciTech Connect

    Shibasaki, T.; Ling, N.; Guillemin, R.

    1980-05-26

    A specific radioimmunoassay for ..gamma..-melanocyte stimulating hormone-like peptides was developed. An antiserum raised in rabbit to synthetic bovine ..gamma../sub 3/-MSH, one of the possible ..gamma..-MSH peptides, specifically recognizes the portion between His/sup 5/ and Arg/sup 14/ of ..gamma../sub 3/-MSH without significant cross-reaction with other synthetic ..gamma..-MSH-like peptides, ..cap alpha..-, ..beta..-MSH, adrenocorticotropin, and ..beta..-endorphin. The usable range of this RIA is 10 pg to 600 pg of synthetic ..gamma../sub 3/-MSH. Three immunoreactive ..gamma..-MSH peaks were thus found in gel permeation chromatography of the whole bovine pituitary extract.

  12. Hormone levels

    MedlinePlus

    Blood or urine tests can determine the levels of various hormones in the body. This includes reproductive hormones, thyroid hormones, adrenal hormones, pituitary hormones, and many others. For more information, see: ...

  13. Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome and multiple pituitary hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Birrell, G; Lampe, A; Richmond, S; Bruce, S N; Gécz, J; Lower, K; Wright, M; Cheetham, T D

    2003-12-01

    We describe two brothers with Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome and the 22A-->T (Lys8X) PHF6 mutation, who presented with the symptoms and signs of multiple pituitary hormone deficiency. Biochemical investigations and radiology confirmed growth hormone (GH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) as well as gonadotrophin deficiency. They were also found to have optic nerve hypoplasia. This family suggests that the BFL gene product may play an important role in midline neuro-development including the hypothalamo-pituitary axis.

  14. Comparison of Ultraviolet Photodissociation and Collision Induced Dissociation of Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robotham, Scott A.; Brodbelt, Jennifer S.

    2015-09-01

    In an effort to better characterize the fragmentation pathways promoted by ultraviolet photoexcitation in comparison to collision induced dissociation (CID), six adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) peptides in a range of charge states were subjected to 266 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD), 193 nm UVPD, and CID. Similar fragment ions and distributions were observed for 266 nm UVPD and 193 nm UVPD for all peptides investigated. While both UVPD and CID led to preferential cleavage of the Y-S bond for all ACTH peptides [except ACTH (1-39)], UVPD was far less dependent on charge state and location of basic sites for the production of C-terminal and N-terminal ions. For ACTH (1-16), ACTH (1-17), ACTH (1-24), and ACTH (1-39), changes in the distributions of fragment ion types ( a, b, c, x, y, z, and collectively N-terminal ions versus C-terminal ions) showed only minor changes upon UVPD for all charge states. In contrast, CID displayed significant changes in the fragment ion type distributions as a function of charge state, an outcome consistent with the dependence on the number and location of mobile protons that is not prominent for UVPD. Sequence coverages obtained by UVPD showed less dependence on charge state than those determined by CID, with the latter showing a consistent decrease in coverage as charge state increased.

  15. Ethanol induction of steroidogenesis in rat adrenal and brain is dependent upon pituitary ACTH release and de novo adrenal StAR synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Kevin N.; Kumar, Sandeep; O'Buckley, Todd K.; Porcu, Patrizia; Morrow, A. Leslie

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms of ethanol actions that produce its behavioral sequelae involve the synthesis of potent GABAergic neuroactive steroids, specifically the GABAergic metabolites of progesterone, (3α,5α)-3-hydroxypregnan-20-one (3α,5α-THP), and deoxycorticosterone, (3α,5α)-3,21-dihydroxypregnan-20-one. We investigated the mechanisms that underlie the effect of ethanol on adrenal steroidogenesis. We found that ethanol effects on plasma pregnenolone, progesterone, 3α,5α-THP and cortical 3α,5α-THP are highly correlated, exhibit a threshold of 1.5 g/kg, but show no dose dependence. Ethanol increases plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), adrenal steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), and adrenal StAR phosphorylation, but does not alter levels of other adrenal cholesterol transporters. The inhibition of ACTH release, de novo adrenal StAR synthesis or cytochrome P450 side chain cleavage activity prevents ethanol-induced increases in GABAergic steroids in plasma and brain. ACTH release and de novo StAR synthesis are independently regulated following ethanol administration and both are necessary, but not sufficient, for ethanol-induced elevation of plasma and brain neuroactive steroids. As GABAergic steroids contribute to ethanol actions and ethanol sensitivity, the mechanisms of this effect of ethanol may be important factors that contribute to the behavioral actions of ethanol and risk for alcohol abuse disorders. PMID:20021565

  16. The effects of fasting and refeeding on adrenal cortex morphometry and serum concentrations of ACTH and corticosterone in young and old male rats.

    PubMed

    Kmiec, Z; Pokrywka, L; Kotlarz, G; Mysliwski, A

    2006-11-01

    The impairment of homeostatic mechanisms in ageing becomes often apparent upon physiological or pathological stimulation. We have previously shown that fasting and refeeding revealed the existence of age-related changes of carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Because fuel metabolism is partially controlled by corticosteroids we decided to determine the effects of refeeding on adrenal gland morphometry, ACTH, and corticosterone serum levels in young (5 mo) and (20 mo) old male Wistar rats. Fasting for 48 h did not change serum ACTH and corticosterone in both age groups. ACTH level did not change after 24 h of refeeding in young and old rats. However, in old, but not young animals, refeeding resulted in the decrease of corticosterone serum concentration. The relative weight of adrenal gland (% of body weight) did not change significantly with age (p=0.05). Fasting for 48 h induced in old rats but not in young ones increase of relative adrenal weight, and the volume of the reticular zone. Refeeding reduced adrenal volume, fascicular zone and reticular zone. Refeeding for 24 h decreased the total volume of adrenal gland of old rats due to a decline of the volumes of fascicular and reticular zones. In young rats refeeding reduced the volume of reticular zone. It is concluded that refeeding revealed ageing-dependent decline in the secretion of corticosterone, the key hormone of prolonged stress response.

  17. Use of radioguided surgery with [111In]-pentetreotide in the management of an ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoid causing ectopic Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grossrubatscher, E; Vignati, F; Dalino, P; Possa, M; Belloni, P A; Vanzulli, A; Bramerio, M; Marocchi, A; Rossetti, O; Zurleni, F; Loli, P

    2005-01-01

    Intraoperative [111In]-pentetreotide scintigraphy with a hand-held gamma detector probe has recently been proposed to increase the intraoperative detection rate of small neuroendocrine tumors and their metastases. We report a case of a 28-yr-old woman with ectopic Cushing's syndrome due to an ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoid, in whom the use of radioguided surgery improved disease management. At presentation, radiolabeled pentetreotide scintigraphy was the only procedure able to detect the ectopic source of ACTH. After radiologic confirmation, the patient underwent removal of a bronchial carcinoid, with disease persistence. After surgery, pentetreotide scintigraphy showed pathologic uptake in the mediastinum not previously detected at surgery and only subsequently confirmed by radiologic studies. Despite a second thoracic exploration, hormonal, scintigraphic, and radiological evidence of residual disease persisted. Radioguided surgery was then performed using a hand-held gamma probe 48 h after iv administration of a tracer dose of radiolabeled [111In-DTPA-D-Phe1]-pentetreotide, which permitted detection and removal of multiple residual mediastinal lymph node metastases. Clinical and radiologic cure, with no evidence of tracer uptake at pentetreotide scintigraphy, was subsequently observed. The use of an intraoperative gamma counter appears a promising procedure in the management of metastatic ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoids. PMID:15816375

  18. Use of radioguided surgery with [111In]-pentetreotide in the management of an ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoid causing ectopic Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grossrubatscher, E; Vignati, F; Dalino, P; Possa, M; Belloni, P A; Vanzulli, A; Bramerio, M; Marocchi, A; Rossetti, O; Zurleni, F; Loli, P

    2005-01-01

    Intraoperative [111In]-pentetreotide scintigraphy with a hand-held gamma detector probe has recently been proposed to increase the intraoperative detection rate of small neuroendocrine tumors and their metastases. We report a case of a 28-yr-old woman with ectopic Cushing's syndrome due to an ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoid, in whom the use of radioguided surgery improved disease management. At presentation, radiolabeled pentetreotide scintigraphy was the only procedure able to detect the ectopic source of ACTH. After radiologic confirmation, the patient underwent removal of a bronchial carcinoid, with disease persistence. After surgery, pentetreotide scintigraphy showed pathologic uptake in the mediastinum not previously detected at surgery and only subsequently confirmed by radiologic studies. Despite a second thoracic exploration, hormonal, scintigraphic, and radiological evidence of residual disease persisted. Radioguided surgery was then performed using a hand-held gamma probe 48 h after iv administration of a tracer dose of radiolabeled [111In-DTPA-D-Phe1]-pentetreotide, which permitted detection and removal of multiple residual mediastinal lymph node metastases. Clinical and radiologic cure, with no evidence of tracer uptake at pentetreotide scintigraphy, was subsequently observed. The use of an intraoperative gamma counter appears a promising procedure in the management of metastatic ACTH-secreting bronchial carcinoids.

  19. Uptake and release of adrenal ascorbic acid in the guinea pig after injection of ACTH

    SciTech Connect

    Kipp, D.E.; Rivers, J.M.

    1987-09-01

    The effect of a single injection of ACTH (3 IU/100 g body weight) on the distribution of ascorbic acid (AA) and radiolabeled AA in 20 tissues was studied in adult male guinea pigs consuming 500 mg AA/kg diet. Saline- or ACTH-injected animals were simultaneously injected with (1-/sup 14/C)AA, and killed at 0.5, 1, 2, 4 and 6 h after injection. There was no significant difference between treatments in the weight of any tissue over the 6-h experimental period. As anticipated, the concentration of AA in the adrenals of animals injected with ACTH was 33% of that of animals injected with saline at 4 h. Unexpectedly, the concentration of radiolabeled AA in the adrenals at 0.5 h after ACTH injection was 172% of that after saline injection. The concentration of radiolabeled AA in the adrenal of the saline-injected animals increased slowly over time to reach a level similar to that of ACTH-injected animals by 6 h. There was no effect of ACTH on the level of AA or uptake in any of the other tissues examined. These results demonstrate that a single dose of ACTH markedly influences the retention of AA in the adrenal gland without similarly altering retention of AA in other tissues. Furthermore, ACTH treatment causes both accelerated uptake and release of AA into the adrenals.

  20. Lycopene and Beta-Carotene Induce Growth Inhibition and Proapoptotic Effects on ACTH-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leite de Oliveira, Felipe; Soares, Nathália; de Mattos, Rômulo Medina; Hecht, Fábio; Dezonne, Rômulo Sperduto; Vairo, Leandro; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli dos Santos; Gomes, Flávia Carvalho Alcântara; de Carvalho, Denise Pires; Gadelha, Mônica R.; Nasciutti, Luiz Eurico; Miranda-Alves, Leandro

    2013-01-01

    Pituitary adenomas comprise approximately 10–15% of intracranial tumors and result in morbidity associated with altered hormonal patterns, therapy and compression of adjacent sella turcica structures. The use of functional foods containing carotenoids contributes to reduce the risk of chronic diseases such as cancer and vascular disorders. In this study, we evaluated the influence of different concentrations of beta-carotene and lycopene on cell viability, colony formation, cell cycle, apoptosis, hormone secretion, intercellular communication and expression of connexin 43, Skp2 and p27kip1 in ACTH-secreting pituitary adenoma cells, the AtT20 cells, incubated for 48 and 96 h with these carotenoids. We observed a decrease in cell viability caused by the lycopene and beta-carotene treatments; in these conditions, the clonogenic ability of the cells was also significantly decreased. Cell cycle analysis revealed that beta-carotene induced an increase of the cells in S and G2/M phases; furthermore, lycopene increased the proportion of these cells in G0/G1 while decreasing the S and G2/M phases. Also, carotenoids induced apoptosis after 96 h. Lycopene and beta-carotene decreased the secretion of ACTH in AtT20 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Carotenoids blocked the gap junction intercellular communication. In addition, the treatments increased the expression of phosphorylated connexin43. Finally, we also demonstrate decreased expression of S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) and increased expression of p27kip1 in carotenoid-treated cells. These results show that lycopene and beta-carotene were able to negatively modulate events related to the malignant phenotype of AtT-20 cells, through a mechanism that could involve changes in the expression of connexin 43, Skp2 and p27kip1; and suggest that these compounds might provide a novel pharmacological approach to the treatment of Cushing’s disease. PMID:23667519

  1. Adrenocorticotropin-dependent precocious puberty of testicular origin in a boy with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita due to a novel mutation in the DAX1 gene.

    PubMed

    Domenice, S; Latronico, A C; Brito, V N; Arnhold, I J; Kok, F; Mendonca, B B

    2001-09-01

    Primary adrenal insufficiency is a rare condition in pediatric age, and its association with precocious sexual development is very uncommon. We report a 2-yr-old Brazilian boy with DAX1 gene mutation whose first clinical manifestation was isosexual gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty. He presented with pubic hair, enlarged penis and testes, and advanced bone age. T levels were elevated, whereas basal and GnRH-stimulated LH levels were compatible with a prepubertal pattern. Chronic GnRH agonist therapy did not reduce T levels, supporting the diagnosis of gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty. Testotoxicosis was ruled out after normal sequencing of exon 11 of the LH receptor gene. At age 3 yr he developed clinical and hormonal features of severe primary adrenal insufficiency. The entire coding region of the DAX1 gene was analyzed through direct sequencing. A nucleotide G insertion between nucleotides 430 and 431 in exon 1, resulting in a novel frameshift mutation and a premature stop codon at position 71 of DAX-1, was identified. Surprisingly, steroid replacement therapy induced a clear decrease in testicular size and T levels to the prepubertal range. These findings suggest that chronic excessive ACTH levels resulting from adrenal insufficiency may stimulate Leydig cells and lead to gonadotropin-independent precocious puberty in some boys with DAX1 gene mutations. PMID:11549627

  2. Additive effect of ketoconazole and octreotide in the treatment of severe adrenocorticotropin-dependent hypercortisolism.

    PubMed

    Vignati, F; Loli, P

    1996-08-01

    Over the last few years ketoconazole and octreotide have been employed in the treatment of pituitary-dependent or ectopic Cushing's syndrome. In four patients (two men and two women, aged 25-64 yr) with severe ACTH-dependent hypercortisolism in whom medical treatment with ketoconazole showed limited effectiveness and/or tolerability, we tried the association with octreotide. In all patients ketoconazole (200-1000 mg) induced a marked decrease in urinary free cortisol (UFC) excretion, but normalization could not be achieved. After ketoconazole discontinuation, three patients received octreotide alone (300-1500 micrograms/day, sc). This drug caused a dramatic decrease in UFC excretion, although not normalization; in all patients, escape from treatment occurred. Combined treatment was carried out for 10-180 days. Urinary cortisol excretion normalized and remained steadily within normal limits in three of four patients in whom normal UFC excretion had never been attained with both single drug regimens; in the fourth patient, UFC excretion decreased to levels lower than those achieved with ketoconazole or octreotide alone. The association with octreotide allowed a reduction in the daily dose of ketoconazole in three patients. Consistent with the steady reduction of cortisol production, a striking clinical improvement occurred in all patients after starting combined treatment. The normalization of UFC in three of four patients treated with both agents suggests that this approach may be useful in the long term treatment of severe forms of hypercortisolism of both pituitary and ectopic origin. In contrast to the limited effectiveness of each drug taken singularly at the same or higher doses, the association of the two drugs had an additive effect in the attainment of normal urinary cortisol excretion.

  3. Primary intracranial neuroendocrine tumor with ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone syndrome: A rare and complicated case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    LIU, HAILONG; ZHANG, MINGSHAN; WANG, XUAN; QU, YANMING; ZHANG, HONGWEI; YU, CHUNJIANG

    2016-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) and ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) syndrome are frequent in adult patients. However, primary intracranial NETs, exhibiting immunonegativity for ACTH, high serum ACTH level and treated with anterior skull base reconstruction, are rare and complicated. We herein present a case of a primary intracranial NET immunonegative for ACTH, resulting in ectopic ACTH syndrome. A 40-year-old woman presented with intermittent rhinorrhea, rapid weight gain, polydipsia, polyuria, hypertension, dimness, bilateral exophthalmus, diminution of vision in the left eye and pigmentation of the skin of the face and trunk. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed a sizeable enhancing tumor in the anterior cranial fossa, which infiltrated the sphenoid and ethmoid sinuses bilaterally, the left maxillary sinus and the nasal cavity. Abdominal CT scans revealed bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. The biochemical findings included hypokalemia and high glucose, cortisol, plasma ACTH, 24-h urinary free cortisol and testosterone levels. The neoplasm was exposed through a right frontal craniotomy, while anterior skull base reconstruction was performed during surgery. The intracranial surgery achieved gross removal of the tumor; however, part of the tumor remained in the nasal cavity. Histopathological examination of the surgical specimen confirmed the diagnosis of a low-grade small-cell NET, exhibiting immunonegativity for ACTH. A postoperative abdominal CT scan demonstrated bilateral regression of the adrenal gland hyperplasia and the serum ACTH level returned to normal after 16 days. To the best of our knowledge, there are no previous reports of primary intracranial NETs, immunohistochemically negative for ACTH, resulting in ectopic ACTH syndrome. PMID:27330775

  4. Seasonal and sex differences in responsiveness to adrenocorticotropic hormone contribute to stress response plasticity in red-sided garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis).

    PubMed

    Dayger, Catherine A; Lutterschmidt, Deborah I

    2016-04-01

    As in many vertebrates, hormonal responses to stress vary seasonally in red-sided garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis parietalis). For example, males generally exhibit reduced glucocorticoid responses to a standard stressor during the spring mating season. We asked whether variation in adrenal sensitivity to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) explains why glucocorticoid responses to capture stress vary with sex, season and body condition in red-sided garter snakes. We measured glucocorticoids at 0, 1 and 4 h after injection with ACTH (0.1 IU g(-1)body mass) or vehicle in males and females during the spring mating season and autumn pre-hibernation period. Because elevated glucocorticoids can influence sex steroids, we also examined androgen and estradiol responses to ACTH. ACTH treatment increased glucocorticoids in both sexes and seasons. Spring-collected males had a smaller integrated glucocorticoid response to ACTH than autumn-collected males. The integrated glucocorticoid response to ACTH differed with sex during the spring, with males having a smaller glucocorticoid response than females. Although integrated glucocorticoid responses to ACTH did not vary with body condition, we observed an interaction among season, sex and body condition. In males, ACTH treatment did not alter androgen levels in either season, but androgen levels decreased during the sampling period. Similar to previous studies, plasma estradiol was low or undetectable during the spring and autumn, and therefore any effect of ACTH treatment on estradiol could not be determined. These data provide support for a mechanism that partly explains how the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis integrates information about season, sex and body condition: namely, variation in adrenal responsiveness to ACTH. PMID:26896543

  5. Effect of ACTH on plasma corticosterone and cortisol in eagles and condors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zenoble, R.D.; Kemppainen, R.J.; Young, D.W.; Carpenter, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of ACTH on plasma corticosterone and cortisol was determined in 12 eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and in 6 Andean condors (Vultur gryphus). In all raptors, the concentration of plasma corticosterone was substantially greater than that of cortisol. After ACTH administration, the eagles had a marked increase (P less than 0.001) in plasma corticosterone concentrations, but not in plasma cortisol. Administration of saline solution did not induce increased plasma corticosterone concentrations in the eagles. The condors had a smaller increase (P less than 0.002) in plasma corticosterone concentrations after ACTH administration, as compared with that of the eagles. However, administration of saline solution in 2 condors resulted in an increase in corticosterone similar to the increase after ACTH administration. In the condor, a stress-related release of endogenous ACTH may have an effect similar to that induced by exogenously administered ACTH. Plasma cortisol concentrations did not increase significantly after administration of ACTH or saline solution in either raptor species.

  6. Control of ACTH secretion by excitatory amino acids: functional significance and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Jezova, Daniela

    2005-12-01

    The involvement of excitatory amino acids in the control of ACTH release is well established. Activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors has a stimulatory effect on ACTH release, while the role of metabotropic receptors is not yet understood in detail. Glutamatergic regulation of ACTH release has a clear significance for the stress response and neuroendocrine functions during development. A dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis has been reported in several psychiatric and neurological disorders. So far, only fractional indices on the clinical importance of the interaction between glutamate and ACTH secretion have been obtained in both preclinical and clinical studies. Some antidepressant drugs, such as tianeptine, which were found to modulate ACTH release, appear to interfere with brain glutamatergic system. Changes in ACTH and cortisol release may be of importance for mood stabilizing effects of antiepileptic drugs modulating glutamate release, such as lamotrigine. Brain glutamate and HPA axis interaction seems to be of importance in alcohol and drug abuse. Little information is available on ACTH release in response to glutamate-modulating drugs used in the treatment of schizophrenia and Alzheimer disease. Nevertheless, pharmacological interventions influencing interaction between glutamate and the HPA axis are promising treatment possibilities in psychiatry and neurology.

  7. Isolated double adrenocorticotropic hormone-secreting pituitary adenomas: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    PU, JIUJUN; WANG, ZHIMING; ZHOU, HUI; ZHONG, AILING; JIN, KAI; RUAN, LUNLIANG; YANG, GANG

    2016-01-01

    Only a few cases of double or multiple pituitary adenomas have previously been reported in the literature; however, isolated double adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenomas are even more rare. The present study reports a rare case of a 50-year-old female patient who presented with typical clinical features of Cushing's disease and was diagnosed with isolated double ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas. Endocrinological examination revealed an ACTH-producing pituitary adenoma, and preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a microadenoma with a lower intensity on the right side of the pituitary gland. The patient underwent endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal surgery, which revealed another pituitary tumor in the left side of the pituitary gland. The two, clearly separated, pituitary adenomas identified in the same gland were completely resected. Immunohistochemistry and pathology revealed that the clearly separated double pituitary adenomas were positive for ACTH, thyroid-stimulating, growth and prolactin hormones. Postoperatively, the levels of ACTH and cortisol hormone decreased rapidly. The case reported in the present study is considerably rare, due to the presence of a second pituitary adenoma in the same gland, which was not detected by preoperative MRI scan, but was noticed during surgery. Intraoperative evaluation may be important in the identification of double or multiple pituitary adenomas. PMID:27347184

  8. Hormonal effects on Tetrahymena: change in case of combined treatment.

    PubMed

    Csaba, G; Lajkó, Eszter; Pállinger, Eva

    2010-12-01

    In order to approach their natural conditions, populations of Tetrahymena were kept in Losina-Losinky's salt solution for 1 h, than in the tryptone+yeast medium. During this time they were treated with histamine, serotonin or insulin, or with the combinations of these hormones. Effect of the combined treatments on the production of serotonin (5HT), or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or triiodothyronine (T₃) by the cells was compared to the effect of single-hormone treatments. Significant differences were seen between the results obtained following the single or combined treatments. There was no summation of the effects, however an elevation or diminution of the hormone production was observed after the combined treatment, as compared with the untreated controls or with the use of one of the hormones in the samples. The experiments demonstrate that there is a hormonal regulation between the Tetrahymena cells and the hormones influence each other's effect. PMID:21183424

  9. Control of Stress-Induced ACTH Secretion by Vasopressin and CRH: Additional Evidence.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Adriana T; Tufik, Sergio; Troncone, Lanfranco R P

    2016-01-01

    Vasopressin and CRH have complementary roles in the secretion of ACTH following different stress modalities. The concomitant use of V1b and CRF1 receptor antagonists completely inhibits ACTH secretion in response to different stress modalities. The combination of the CRF1 antagonist SSR125543 with the V1b antagonist SSR149415 effectively suppressed plasma ACTH 1.30 h after injection in rats stressed by ether vapor inhalation for 1 min, restraint stress for 1 h or forced swimming for 5 min. The duration of the effect was also studied. The CRF1 antagonist effectively suppressed ACTH secretion in restraint stress, while the V1b antagonist was effective against ether inhalation. Both antagonists were necessary to block the forced swimming stress response. SSR125543 induced a prolonged effect and can be used in a model of prolonged HPA axis blockade. PMID:27221315

  10. Hormones, nicotine, and cocaine: clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Mello, Nancy K

    2010-06-01

    Nicotine and cocaine each stimulate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and -gonadal axis hormones, and there is increasing evidence that the hormonal milieu may modulate the abuse-related effects of these drugs. This review summarizes some clinical studies of the acute effects of cigarette smoking or IV cocaine on plasma drug and hormone levels and subjective effects ratings. The temporal covariance between these dependent measures was assessed with a rapid (2 min) sampling procedure in nicotine-dependent volunteers or current cocaine users. Cigarette smoking and IV cocaine each stimulated a rapid increase in LH and ACTH, followed by gradual increases in cortisol and DHEA. Positive subjective effects ratings increased immediately after initiation of cigarette smoking or IV cocaine administration. However, in contrast to cocaine's sustained positive effects (<20 min), ratings of "high" and "rush" began to decrease within one or two puffs of a high-nicotine cigarette while nicotine levels were increasing. Peak nicotine levels increased progressively after each of three successive cigarettes smoked at 60 min intervals, but the magnitude of the subjective effects ratings and peak ACTH and cortisol levels diminished. Only DHEA increased consistently after successive cigarettes. The possible influence of neuroactive hormones on nicotine dependence and cocaine abuse and the implications for treatment of these addictive disorders are discussed.

  11. Exogenous adrenocorticotrophic hormone does not elicit a salt appetite in growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Jankevicius, M L; Widowski, T M

    2003-02-01

    In rodents, rabbits, and sheep, exogenous adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) leads to a marked increase in sodium appetite. It has been suggested that if pigs show a similar response to stress, an appetite for salt could increase their attraction to blood and contribute to the development of tail biting. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of ACTH on salt appetite in growing pigs. Individually housed Yorkshire pigs (45 kg) were divided into three groups of four. Group 1 had free access to water, 0.5 M NaCl, and 0.5 M KCl solutions; Group 2 to water, 0.5, and 0.25 M NaCl solutions; Group 3 to water, 0.25, and 0.125 M NaCl solutions. Intramuscular injection of long-acting synthetic ACTH (50 IU twice daily for 5 days) did not elicit increases in intakes of any of the available salt solutions compared to pretreatment intakes. However, there was a 1.6-fold increase in both water and feed intake during ACTH treatment. ACTH treatment also stimulated significant increases in salivary cortisol concentrations. Although increases in salivary cortisol concentrations and in water and feed intake indicate that there were physiological responses to the treatment, exogenous ACTH given for 5 days did not elicit a sodium appetite in growing pigs. These findings do not support the notion that a stress-induced salt appetite serves as an underlying mechanism for tail biting. PMID:12576126

  12. [Effects of transcutaneous nerve stimulation on the plasma and CSF concentrations of beta-endorphin and the plasma concentrations of ACTH, cortisol and prolactin in hysterectomized women with postoperative pain].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, E; Meizoso, M J; Garabal, M; Fernández, M P; Rodríguez-Buján, L; Belmonte, A

    1992-01-01

    Plasmatic and cerebrospinal fluid levels of beta-endorphin and plasmatic concentration of ACTH, cortisol, and prolactin were investigated in 10 healthy volunteers free of pain and in a group of 38 patients who presented moderate or intense postoperative pain. The analgesic technique was transcutaneous neural stimulation. In 28 patients the stimulation was delivered at 40-80 Hz (high frequency) whereas in the remaining 10 patients it was administered in a placebo form. Measurements of hormone concentrations were performed using radioimmunoassay techniques. In patients free of pain hormone analysis was done at once, whereas in patients with pain this analysis was performed before and one hour after transcutaneous neural stimulation. We compared data obtained in control subjects with data collected in patients before and one hour after high frequency and placebo transcutaneous neural stimulation. Levels of beta-endorphin were comparable in patients with and without pain. However, ACTH, cortisol, and prolactin were increased in patients with pain. High frequency stimulation induced greater beta-endorphin levels than placebo neural stimulation and slightly lower concentration of prolactin. There were no significant differences in ACTH and cortisol levels.

  13. Adrenocorticotropin receptor/melanocortin receptor-2 maps within a reported susceptibility region for bipolar illness on chromosome 18

    SciTech Connect

    Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Yoon, Sung W.; Goldin, L.R.

    1995-08-14

    We have examined the possible linkage of adrenocorticotropin receptor/melanocortin receptor-2 (ACTHR/MC-2) to a reported putative susceptibility locus for bipolar illness (BP) in 20 affected pedigrees. Initially, allelic variants of the gene were identified by polymerase chain reaction-single stranded conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) and the gene was genetically mapped using both the Centre d`Etudes du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) pedigrees and the BP pedigrees used in this study. We found that the ACTHR/MC-2 gene maps between D18S53 and D18S66. These loci span a region of chromosome 18 which, in a previous study revealed a putative predisposing locus to BP through nonparametric methods of analyses, although affected sib-pair (ASP) method revealed an increase in allele sharing among ill individuals, P=0.023. Since this receptor is within a potential linkage region, ACTHR/MC-2 could be considered a candidate gene for BP. 22 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Ca2+ and K+ channels of normal human adrenal zona fasciculata cells: Properties and modulation by ACTH and AngII

    PubMed Central

    Enyeart, Judith A.

    2013-01-01

    In whole cell patch clamp recordings, we found that normal human adrenal zona fasciculata (AZF) cells express voltage-gated, rapidly inactivating Ca2+ and K+ currents and a noninactivating, leak-type K+ current. Characterization of these currents with respect to voltage-dependent gating and kinetic properties, pharmacology, and modulation by the peptide hormones adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and AngII, in conjunction with Northern blot analysis, identified these channels as Cav3.2 (encoded by CACNA1H), Kv1.4 (KCNA4), and TREK-1 (KCNK2). In particular, the low voltage–activated, rapidly inactivating and slowly deactivating Ca2+ current (Cav3.2) was potently blocked by Ni2+ with an IC50 of 3 µM. The voltage-gated, rapidly inactivating K+ current (Kv1.4) was robustly expressed in nearly every cell, with a current density of 95.0 ± 7.2 pA/pF (n = 64). The noninactivating, outwardly rectifying K+ current (TREK-1) grew to a stable maximum over a period of minutes when recording at a holding potential of −80 mV. This noninactivating K+ current was markedly activated by cinnamyl 1-3,4-dihydroxy-α-cyanocinnamate (CDC) and arachidonic acid (AA) and inhibited almost completely by forskolin, properties which are specific to TREK-1 among the K2P family of K+ channels. The activation of TREK-1 by AA and inhibition by forskolin were closely linked to membrane hyperpolarization and depolarization, respectively. ACTH and AngII selectively inhibited the noninactivating K+ current in human AZF cells at concentrations that stimulated cortisol secretion. Accordingly, mibefradil and CDC at concentrations that, respectively, blocked Cav3.2 and activated TREK-1, each inhibited both ACTH- and AngII-stimulated cortisol secretion. These results characterize the major Ca2+ and K+ channels expressed by normal human AZF cells and identify TREK-1 as the primary leak-type channel involved in establishing the membrane potential. These findings also suggest a model for cortisol

  15. Reset of feedback in the adrenocortical system: an apparent shift in sensitivity of adrenocorticotropin to inhibition by corticosterone between morning and evening.

    PubMed

    Akana, S F; Cascio, C S; Du, J Z; Levin, N; Dallman, M F

    1986-11-01

    There is evidence in man and rats that higher circulating levels of glucocorticoids are required to normalize basal unstimulated ACTH levels at the peak of the circadian rhythm than at the trough. To explore this phenomenon, we tested the inhibitory effect of constant levels of corticosterone on plasma ACTH in the morning (AM) and evening (PM) in young male rats implanted with fused pellets of corticosterone-cholesterol at the time of adrenalectomy (ADX+B) and studied 5 days later. There was a marked shift of the plasma corticosterone-ACTH inhibition curve to the right between AM and PM, demonstrating that the efficacy of corticosterone feedback inhibition of ACTH is less in the PM. Comparison of plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels during 24 h in sham-adrenalectomized rats (SHAM-ADX), adrenalectomized rats (ADX), and ADX+B revealed constantly low ACTH in SHAM-ADX, constantly high ACTH in ADX, and biphasic ACTH levels in ADX+B. Corticosterone levels were biphasic in SHAM-ADX and were constant in the other two groups. These results again showed a shift in corticosterone feedback efficacy as a function of the time of day and also suggested that basal ACTH secretion is maintained in the low normal range in intact rats because of the marked diurnal rhythm in corticosterone. The sensitivity of the pituitary ACTH response to exogenous CRF did not change between AM and PM in either intact or ADX+B showing that the shift in feedback sensitivity to corticosterone does not reside in the pituitary. The response of the entire adrenocortical system to histamine stress was shown to be equivalent in both the AM and PM, suggesting that feedback sensitivity of the entire system to corticosterone does not change as a function of the time of day. We conclude from these results that there is an apparent diurnal change in ACTH sensitivity to corticosterone feedback that can be defined operationally as reset. We believe that the site of feedback being tested shifts solely from the

  16. Relation of inflammation and liver function with the plasma cortisol response to adrenocorticotropin in early lactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Trevisi, E; Bertoni, G; Lombardelli, R; Minuti, A

    2013-09-01

    In this study we examined the relationship between cortisol and inflammatory status in early lactating dairy cows after a stimulation test of the adrenal cortex. Twenty-four cows were grouped into quartiles (6 cows per each quartile) in accordance with the liver activity index (based on plasma concentration of negative acute phase proteins in early lactation); the quartiles were lower (LO; cows with the lowest liver functionality), intermediate lower, intermediate upper, and upper (UP; cows with the highest liver functionality). Each cow was injected i.v. with 20 µg of a synthetic analog of ACTH at 35 d in milk (DIM). Blood samples were taken to assess inflammatory status, and at 0, 30, and 60 min after ACTH challenge to measure total cortisol. The free cortisol fraction was analyzed in the LO and UP quartiles and the bound cortisol fraction was estimated as the difference between total and free cortisol. The LO, in comparison with the other quartiles, suffered a more severe inflammatory status, with the highest values of haptoglobin, reactive oxygen metabolites, and total nitric oxide metabolites and the lowest concentration of direct or indirect markers of negative acute phase proteins. The cows in the LO quartile had the highest values of plasma nonesterified fatty acids and β-hydroxybutyrate at 7 DIM, suggesting a more severe body lipid mobilization. The LO quartile cows showed the highest frequency of health problems and the lowest milk yield in the first 35 DIM. Thirty minutes after the ACTH treatment, the concentration of total cortisol was lower in LO in comparison to other groups. Similarly, the bound cortisol fraction was lower in LO versus UP. The adrenal response appeared inversely related with health status after calving (e.g., lower in LO cows, experiencing the most severe inflammatory status). The lower increase in cortisol after the ACTH challenge in cows with greater inflammation (LO quartile) seems a consequence of the lower availability of

  17. Blood plasma collected after adrenocorticotropic hormone administration during the preovulatory period in the sow negatively affects in vitro fertilization by disturbing spermatozoa function.

    PubMed

    González, R; Kumaresan, A; Bergqvist, A S; Sjunnesson, Y C B

    2015-04-15

    Successful fertilization is essential for reproduction and might be negatively affected by stressful events, which could alter the environment where fertilization occurs. The aim of the study was to determine whether an altered hormonal profile in blood plasma caused by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) administration could affect in vitro fertilization in the pig model. In experiment 1, gametes were exposed for 24 hours to plasma from ACTH-treated, non-ACTH-treated sows, or medium with BSA. Fertilization, cleavage, and blastocyst rates were lower in the ACTH group compared with the no ACTH or BSA control groups (P < 0.01). In experiment 2, the exposure of matured oocytes for 1 hour before fertilization to the same treatments did not have an impact on their ability to undergo fertilization or on embryo development. In experiment 3, spermatozoa were incubated for 0, 1, 4, and 24 hours under the same conditions. There was no effect of treatment on sperm viability. The percentage of acrosome-reacted spermatozoa remained higher in the ACTH group compared with the non-ACTH-treated group through the incubation period (P < 0.001). Protein tyrosine phosphorylation (PTP) patterns were also affected by treatment (P < 0.001). The presence of an atypical PTP pattern was higher in the ACTH group at all the analyzed time points compared with the BSA and no ACTH groups (P < 0.001). In conclusion, this altered environment may not affect oocyte competence but might affect the sperm fertilizing ability through alterations in the acrosome reaction and correct sequence of PTP patterns.

  18. Single-Cell Phenotypic Characterization of Human Pituitary GHomas and Non-Functioning Adenomas Based on Hormone Content and Calcium Responses to Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones.

    PubMed

    Senovilla, Laura; Núñez, Lucía; de Campos, José María; de Luis, Daniel A; Romero, Enrique; García-Sancho, Javier; Villalobos, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Human pituitary tumors are generally benign adenomas causing considerable morbidity due to excess hormone secretion, hypopituitarism, and other tumor mass effects. Pituitary tumors are highly heterogeneous and difficult to type, often containing mixed cell phenotypes. We have used calcium imaging followed by multiple immunocytochemistry to type growth hormone secreting (GHomas) and non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs). Individual cells were typed for stored hormones and calcium responses to classic hypothalamic releasing hormones (HRHs). We found that GHomas contained growth hormone cells either lacking responses to HRHs or responding to all four HRHs. However, most GHoma cells were polyhormonal cells responsive to both thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and GH-releasing hormone. NFPAs were also highly heterogeneous. Some of them contained ACTH cells lacking responses to HRHs or polyhormonal gonadotropes responsive to LHRH and TRH. However, most NFPAs were made of cells storing no hormone and responded only to TRH. These results may provide new insights on the ontogeny of GHomas and NFPAs.

  19. Cortisol secretion after adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) and Dexamethasone tests in healthy female and male dogs

    PubMed Central

    Pessina, Paula; Fernández-Foren, Andrea; Cueto, Enrique; Delucchi, Luis; Castillo, Victor; Meikle, Ana

    2009-01-01

    Background For the conclusive diagnosis of Cushing's Syndrome, a stimulating ACTH test or a low suppressive Dexamethasone test is used. Reports in other species than the dog indicate that plasma cortisol concentration after ACTH administration is affected by gender. We investigated the effect of gender on the cortisol response to ACTH and Dexamethasone tests in dogs. Methods Seven healthy adult Cocker Spaniels (4 females and 3 males) were assigned to a two by two factorial design: 4 dogs (2 females and 2 males) received IV Dexamethasone 0.01 mg/kg, while the other 3 dogs received an IV saline solution (control group). Two weeks later the treatments were reversed. After one month, ACTH was given IV (250 μg/animal) to 4 dogs (2 female and 2 males) while the rest was treated with saline solution (control group). Cortisol concentrations were determined by a direct solid-phase radioimmunoassay and cholesterol and triglycerides by commercial kits. Results and Discussion No effect of treatment was observed in metabolite concentrations, but females presented higher cholesterol concentrations. ACTH-treated dogs showed an increase in cortisol levels in the first hour after sampling until 3 hours post injection. Cortisol concentrations in Dexamethasone-treated dogs decreased one hour post injection and remained low for 3 hours, thereafter cortisol concentrations increased. The increase in cortisol levels from one to two hours post ACTH injection was significantly higher in females than males. In Dexamethasone-treated males cortisol levels decreased one hour post injection up to 3 hours; in females the decrease was more pronounced and prolonged, up to 5 hours post injection. Conclusion We have demonstrated that cortisol response to ACTH and Dexamethasone treatment in dogs differs according to sex. PMID:19686591

  20. Glucocorticoid Fast Feedback Inhibition of Stress-Induced ACTH Secretion in the Male Rat: Rate Independence and Stress-State Resistance.

    PubMed

    Osterlund, Chad D; Rodriguez-Santiago, Mariana; Woodruff, Elizabeth R; Newsom, Ryan J; Chadayammuri, Anjali P; Spencer, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    Normal glucocorticoid secretion is critical for physiological and mental health. Glucocorticoid secretion is dynamically regulated by glucocorticoid-negative feedback; however, the mechanisms of that feedback process are poorly understood. We assessed the temporal characteristics of glucocorticoid-negative feedback in vivo using a procedure for drug infusions and serial blood collection in unanesthetized rats that produced a minimal disruption of basal ACTH plasma levels. We compared the negative feedback effectiveness present when stress onset coincides with corticosterone's (CORT) rapidly rising phase (30 sec pretreatment), high plateau phase (15 min pretreatment), or restored basal phase (60 min pretreatment) as well as effectiveness when CORT infusion occurs after the onset of stress (5 min poststress onset). CORT treatment prior to stress onset acted remarkably fast (within 30 sec) to suppress stress-induced ACTH secretion. Furthermore, fast feedback induction did not require rapid increases in CORT at the time of stress onset (hormone rate independent), and those feedback actions were relatively long lasting (≥15 min). In contrast, CORT elevation after stress onset produced limited and delayed ACTH suppression (stress state resistance). There was a parallel stress-state resistance for CORT inhibition of stress-induced Crh heteronuclear RNA in the paraventricular nucleus but not Pomc heteronuclear RNA in the anterior pituitary. CORT treatment did not suppress stress-induced prolactin secretion, suggesting that CORT feedback is restricted to the control of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis elements of a stress response. These temporal, stress-state, and system-level features of in vivo CORT feedback provide an important physiological context for ex vivo studies of molecular and cellular mechanisms of CORT-negative feedback. PMID:27145013

  1. Glucocorticoid Fast Feedback Inhibition of Stress-Induced ACTH Secretion in the Male Rat: Rate Independence and Stress-State Resistance.

    PubMed

    Osterlund, Chad D; Rodriguez-Santiago, Mariana; Woodruff, Elizabeth R; Newsom, Ryan J; Chadayammuri, Anjali P; Spencer, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    Normal glucocorticoid secretion is critical for physiological and mental health. Glucocorticoid secretion is dynamically regulated by glucocorticoid-negative feedback; however, the mechanisms of that feedback process are poorly understood. We assessed the temporal characteristics of glucocorticoid-negative feedback in vivo using a procedure for drug infusions and serial blood collection in unanesthetized rats that produced a minimal disruption of basal ACTH plasma levels. We compared the negative feedback effectiveness present when stress onset coincides with corticosterone's (CORT) rapidly rising phase (30 sec pretreatment), high plateau phase (15 min pretreatment), or restored basal phase (60 min pretreatment) as well as effectiveness when CORT infusion occurs after the onset of stress (5 min poststress onset). CORT treatment prior to stress onset acted remarkably fast (within 30 sec) to suppress stress-induced ACTH secretion. Furthermore, fast feedback induction did not require rapid increases in CORT at the time of stress onset (hormone rate independent), and those feedback actions were relatively long lasting (≥15 min). In contrast, CORT elevation after stress onset produced limited and delayed ACTH suppression (stress state resistance). There was a parallel stress-state resistance for CORT inhibition of stress-induced Crh heteronuclear RNA in the paraventricular nucleus but not Pomc heteronuclear RNA in the anterior pituitary. CORT treatment did not suppress stress-induced prolactin secretion, suggesting that CORT feedback is restricted to the control of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis elements of a stress response. These temporal, stress-state, and system-level features of in vivo CORT feedback provide an important physiological context for ex vivo studies of molecular and cellular mechanisms of CORT-negative feedback.

  2. Catheterization during adrenal vein sampling for primary aldosteronism: failure to use (1-24) ACTH may increase apparent failure rate.

    PubMed

    Kline, Gregory A; So, Benny; Dias, Valerian C; Harvey, Adrian; Pasieka, Janice L

    2013-07-01

    "Successful" adrenal vein catheterization in primary aldosteronism (PA) is often defined by a ratio of >3:1 of cortisol in the adrenal vein vs the inferior vena cava. Non-use of corticotropin (ACTH) during sampling may increase the apparent failure rate of adrenal vein catheterization due to lower cortisol levels. A retrospective study was performed on all patients with confirmed unilateral PA between June 2005 and August 2011. Adrenal vein sampling (AVS) included simultaneous bilateral baseline samples with repeat sampling 15 minutes after intravenous infusion of 250 μg of Cortrosyn (ACTH-S). Successful catheter placement was judged as adrenal cortisol:IVC cortisol of >3:1, applied to both baseline and ACTH-S samples and lateralization of aldosteronism was judged as normalized aldosterone/cortisol (A/C) ratio >3 times the contralateral A/C ratio. In ACTH-S samples, 94% of right-sided catheterizations were biochemically successful with 100% success on the left. Among baseline samples, only 47% of right- and 44% of left-sided samples met the 3:1 cortisol criteria. However, 95% of apparent "failed" baseline cortisol sets still showed lateralization of A/C ratios that matched the ultimate pathology. Non-ACTH-stimulated samples may be incorrectly judged as failed catheter placement when a 3:1 ratio is used. ACTH-stimulated sampling is the preferred means to confirm catheterization during AVS.

  3. Characterization of a novel ACTH inducible cytochrome P-450 from rat adrenal microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, S.A.; Marcus, C.M.; Jefcoate, C.R. )

    1990-02-26

    In rat adrenal cortex 7,12 dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) causes massive necrosis that is dependent of ACTH. This is related to an ACTH inducible adrenal microsomal cytochrome P-450 that catalyzes hydrocarbon metabolism. Rat adrenal microsomes, catalyze the formation of DMBA 3,4 diol a precursor of the bay region reactive electrophile DMBA 3,4 diol 1,2 oxide. Both DMBA metabolism and a 57Kd protein have disappeared from microsomes 30 days after hypophysectomy, but are restored by 14 days treatment with ACTH. Dexamethasone which fully suppresses ACTH only partially suppresses this activity. The 57 Kd protein was partially purified to a single major band in one step from solubilized microsomes by h.p.l.c. chromatography using detergent elution from a novel column that mimics phospholipid membranes. This preparation exhibits a specific content of 2 nm P-450/mg protein and a turnover number of 1,500pm DMBA/nm P-450/minutes. A polyclonal antisera raised against this preparation provides a single western blot corresponding to the 57Kd ACTH sensitive protein. This antibody did not blot microsomal P-450 c21, nor did selected antibodies from known families react with this adrenal P-450 protein, suggesting substantial sequence differences from known P-450's.

  4. Cadmium effects on hypothalamic activity and pituitary hormone secretion in the male.

    PubMed

    Lafuente, A; Esquifino, A I

    1999-11-22

    Cadmium specifically modify amine metabolism at the central nervous system and pituitary hormone secretions. Thus, the physiological functions controlled by these hormones can be modulated by cadmium. This xenobiotic is associated with deleterious effects on the gonadal function and with changes in the secretory pattern of other pituitary hormones like prolactin, ACTH, GH or TSH. The observed changes in pituitary hormone secretion do not correlate with the modifications of central nervous system metabolism of the neurotransmitters involved in their regulation. The accumulative data indicates the existence of a disruption in the regulatory mechanisms of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. The physiological significance of these effects remains to be elucidated.

  5. [Influence of prolonged treatment with octreotide on GH, IGF I, insulin, ACTH, cortisol, T3, T4 and TSH secretion in a case of congenital chylothorax].

    PubMed

    Bagnoli, F; Badii, S; Conte, M L; Toti, M S; De Felice, C; Bellieni, C V; Borlini, G; Tomasini, B; Zani, S

    2010-08-01

    Congenital chylothorax is a rare condition characterized by the accumulation of lymph fluid in the pleural space that causes respiratory and circulatory dysfunctions, immune deficiencies, hypoalbuminemia, electrolyte imbalance and alterations of the coagulation. Mortality rates are elevated and can rise to 50%. Therapy consists in conservative treatment based on thoracic drainage combined with total parenteral nutrition or use of low-fat high-protein diet supplemented with medium chain triglycerides. In case of failure surgical intervention may be considered. During the last years some authors have experienced the use of octreotide with doubtful results. In no case the drug impact on insulin, GH and cortisol secretion in neonatal age has been investigated and only in one case the effect on thyroid hormones has been assessed. We report the case of a 36-week baby with congenital chylothorax treated with octreotide for 42 days. The drug was well tolerated but hormonal level measurements showed a deep depression of insulin secretion unaccompanied by alterations of glucose levels. Levels of GH and TSH showed only a transitory decrease. ACTH and cortisol remained normal. At 5 months, the measurements of hormonal levels did not show significant alterations. It is not possible to determine if such a drug played an essential role in the solution of the pleural effusion, but it is important to emphasize that a prolonged treatment with octreotide has not caused, in our case, persistent hormonal alterations. PMID:20940674

  6. Hormonal changes in antiorthostatic rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popovic, V.; Popovic, P.; Honeycutt, C.

    1982-01-01

    Hypokinesia, especially hypokinesia with negative tilt ('antiorthostatic hypokinesia'), mimics some of the effects of weightlessness. It is shown that cardiac output is increased during early exposure of rats to antiorthostatic hypokinesia. The increase of the stroke volume and of the cardiac output observed in the antiorthostatic hypokinetic rats is probably the consequence of a blood volume shift toward the chest brought forth by head-down positioning of the animals. It is also possible that struggling of the animals to escape from the harness and an increased metabolism contribute to the elevation of cardiac output. In order to study this hypothesis 'stress hormones' were measured in the antiorthostatic rats. Plasma levels of ACTH, corticosterone and prolactin were measured in the arterial blood (0.3 ml) sampled before, during and after hypokinesia from chronic aortic cannulas of the rats.

  7. Pituitary and adrenal hormone responses to pharmacological, physical, and psychological stimulation in habitual smokers and nonsmokers.

    PubMed

    Kirschbaum, C; Scherer, G; Strasburger, C J

    1994-10-01

    Hormone responses to injection of corticotropin-releasing hormone following bicycle ergometry and psychological stress were studied in ten habitual smokers and ten nonsmokers. Compared to injection of saline, significant increases were found in adrenocorticotropin, prolactin, growth hormone, total serum cortisol, and salivary cortisol under all three stimulations except for salivary cortisol under ergometry. Furthermore, the smokers showed significant elevations of all five hormones investigated following the smoking of two cigarettes of the subject's preferred brand. Comparisons of hormone responses between smokers and nonsmokers revealed a general trend towards stronger responses in nonsmokers. However, due to the small number of subjects investigated and considerable variation in the individual hormone responses these differences reached statistical significance only for growth hormone responses following ergometry and salivary cortisol responses after psychological stress. In addition, the circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol was measured on two occasions between 9 a.m. and 9 p.m. in the subject's natural environment. The typical circadian pattern of decreasing cortisol levels was observed, with no significant differences between smokers and nonsmokers. We conclude that chronic nicotine consumption may lead to lower responses of multiple hormones not only to nicotine but to a variety of stimuli, and that these alterations do not necessarily affect unstimulated circadian profiles of free cortisol. PMID:7865987

  8. Ectopic ACTH Production Leading to Diagnosis of Underlying Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Matheny, Leslee N; Wilson, Jessica R; Baum, Howard B A

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) has been described as a source of ectopic ACTH secretion in patients with Cushing's syndrome. This is an infrequent association, occurring in less than 1% of MTC cases. Among these, it is even more unusual for an initial diagnosis of hypercortisolism to lead to the discovery of underlying MTC. Here we present a case of a patient with weakness, diarrhea, and hypokalemia who was found first to have Cushing's syndrome and later diagnosed with metastatic MTC. The patient was treated initially with oral agents to control his hypercortisolism, then with an etomidate infusion after experiencing intestinal perforation. He also received vandetanib therapy targeting his underlying malignancy, as this has been shown to reverse clinical signs of Cushing's syndrome in patients with MTC and subsequent ectopic ACTH secretion. Bilateral adrenalectomy was ultimately required. Medullary thyroid carcinoma should be considered in patients presenting with Cushing's syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion, and a multimodality treatment approach is often required. PMID:27141514

  9. [ACTH's ectopic secretion in a patient with precedents of Cushing's disease].

    PubMed

    Dal Verme, Agustín; Cejas, Carlos; Margan, Mercedes; Siguelboim, Daniel; Canosa, Victoria; Peralta, Christian

    2015-01-01

    A 54-year-old man, with a history of Cushing's disease diagnosed 32 years earlier, presented with edema, asthenia and general malaise. Abnormal laboratory studies depicted hypokalemia and metabolic alkalosis. A CT scan of the chest revealed a 3×3 cm tumor in the anterior mediastinum. The pathology was consistent with a thymic carcinoid. These findings led to a diagnosis of biochemical Cushing's syndrome secondary to ectopic secretion of ACTH. Thus, this patient suffered twice of Cushing's syndrome. The first instance was the consequence of an ACTH--secreting pituitary adenoma and the second of an ectopic secretion of ACTH. To the best of our knowledge this is the first such case reported in the medical literature.

  10. Repeatability of the ACTH stimulation test as reflected by salivary cortisol response in healthy horses.

    PubMed

    Scheidegger, M D; Gerber, V; Ramseyer, A; Schüpbach-Regula, G; Bruckmaier, R M; van der Kolk, J H

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to further characterize the ACTH stimulation test as reflected by salivary cortisol response and to measure the short- and long-term repeatability of it in healthy horses as a tool to assess the capacity of the adrenal cortex to secrete cortisol. Nineteen healthy horses were subjected to 3 ACTH stimulation tests. Intervals were 2 wk and 5 mo between the first and second and the second and third tests, respectively. A dose of 1-μg/kg BW synthetic ACTH was injected intravenously. Saliva samples were collected at baseline and at 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 min after administration for cortisol measurements using a competitive enzyme immunoassay. A repeated measures ANOVA was used to compare values within and among horses. Mean ± SD total increase in cortisol concentrations integrated over the entire sampling period was 34.5 ± 11.0 ng/mL. The highest measured concentration at a single time point was 9.7 ± 2.7 ng/mL and was reached after 122 ± 22 min. For the short- and long-term repeatability, intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.90 and 0.33, respectively. The 3 ACTH stimulation tests results differed significantly among (P < 0.00001) but not within (P = 0.538) individual horses. The Freiberger stallions had a higher salivary cortisol baseline concentration and a lower response to ACTH stimulation as compared with Warmblood mares and geldings. The present study confirmed that the administration of ACTH in healthy horses reliably stimulates the salivary secretion of cortisol and shows that the test is repeatable in the short- and long-term. PMID:27565229

  11. Synthetic ACTH in High Risk Patients with Idiopathic Membranous Nephropathy: A Prospective, Open Label Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    van de Logt, Anne-Els; Beerenhout, Charles H.; Brink, Hans S.; van de Kerkhof, Jos J.; Wetzels, Jack F.; Hofstra, Julia M.

    2015-01-01

    New therapeutic agents are warranted in idiopathic membranous nephropathy. Synthetic ACTH may be advantageous with reported remission rates up to 85% and few side effects. We conducted a prospective open label cohort study from 2008 till 2010 (NCT00694863). We prospectively selected patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy and high risk for progression (defined as βeta-2-microglobulin (β2m) excretion of >500 ng/min). For comparison, we selected matched historical controls treated with cyclophosphamide. The prospectively selected patients received intramuscular injections of synthetic ACTH during 9 months (maximal dose 1 mg twice a week). The primary endpoints concerned the feasibility and incidence of remissions as a primary event. Secondary endpoints included side effects of treatment and the incidence of remissions and relapses at long-term follow-up. Twenty patients (15 men) were included (age 54±14 years, serum creatinine 104 μmol/l [IQR 90–113], urine protein:creatinine ratio 8.7 g/10 mmol creatinine [IQR 4.3–11.1]). Seventeen patients (85%) completed treatment. 97% of injections were administered correctly. Cumulative remission rate was 55% (complete remission in 4 patients, partial remission 7 patients). In a group of historical controls treated with cyclophosphamide and steroids, 19 of 20 patients (95%) developed a remission (complete remission in 13 patients, partial remission in 6 patients) (p<0.01). The main limitation of our study is its small size and the use of a historical control group. We show that treatment with intramuscular injections of synthetic ACTH is feasible. Our data suggest that synthetic ACTH is less effective than cyclophosphamide in inducing a remission in high risk patients with idiopathic membranous nephropathy. The use of synthetic ACTH was also associated with many adverse events. Therefore, we advise against synthetic ACTH as standard treatment in membranous nephropathy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  12. Effects of bupropion and pramipexole on cell proliferation in the hippocampus of adrenocorticotropic hormone-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Onoue, Yuka; Kuwatsuka, Keiko; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Asanuma, Masato; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Sendo, Toshiaki

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine reuptake inhibitor bupropion and dopamine D2/3 receptor agonist pramipexole have been clinically proven to improve both depression and treatment-resistant depression. We examined its influence on the duration of immobility during the forced swim test in adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-treated rats and further analyzed the possible role of the dopamine nerve system in this effect. Bupropion and pramipexole significantly decreased the duration of immobility in normal and ACTH-treated rats. We previously demonstrated that the chronic administration of ACTH caused a significant decrease in hippocampal cell proliferation and neurogenesis. In this study, we used the mitotic marker 5-bromo-2'-deoxyridine to investigate the effects of bupropion and pramipexole on cell proliferation in the subgranular zone of the hippocampal dentate gyrus following chronic treatment with ACTH. The ACTH treatment for 14 d decreased adult hippocampal cell proliferation. The chronic administration of bupropion for 14 d blocked the loss of cell proliferation resulting from the chronic treatment with ACTH, whereas pramipexole did not. The administration of bupropion may have treatment-resistant antidepressive properties, which may be partly attributed to the normalization of hippocampal cell proliferation.

  13. Loss of sensitivity to ACTH of adrenocortical cells isolated from maturing domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Carsia, R V; Scanes, C G; Malamed, S

    1985-07-01

    Maturation of domestic fowl corticosteroidogenesis was evaluated using purified adrenocortical cells. Basal corticosterone production decreased steadily from 2 days to 26 weeks after hatching. However, maximally stimulated corticosterone production was not changed. In contrast, the half-maximal steroidogenic concentrations (ED50 values or effective doses for 50% maximal effect) of ACTH analogs increased approximately 40 times by 26 weeks, but the ED50 values of 8-bromo-cyclic AMP and pregnenolone were not changed. This suggests that adrenocortical cell sensitivity to ACTH decreases with maturation of the domestic fowl.

  14. Skeletal receptors for steroid-family regulating glycoprotein hormones: A multilevel, integrated physiological control system.

    PubMed

    Blair, Harry C; Robinson, Lisa J; Sun, Li; Isales, Carlos; Davies, Terry F; Zaidi, Mone

    2011-12-01

    Pituitary glycoprotein hormone receptors, including ACTH-R, TSH-R, and FSH-R, occur in bone. Their skeletal expression reflects that central endocrine control is evolutionarily recent. ACTH receptors, in osteoblasts or the adrenal cortex, drive VEGF synthesis. VEGF is essential to maintain vasculature. In bone, ACTH suppression by glucocorticoids can cause osteonecrosis. TSH receptors occur on osteoblasts and osteoclasts, in both cases reducing activity. Thus, TSH directly reduces skeletal turnover, consistent with evolutionary adaptation to stress. FSH receptors accelerate bone resorption, whereas estrogen promotes bone formation, the forces usually balancing. With ovarian failure, low estrogen with high FSH causes rapid bone loss. The skeletal FSH effect in the menopause seems paradoxical, but it is a logical adaptation in lactation, where prolonged FSH elevation also occurs. In addition to receptors, there is some synthesis of pituitary glycoproteins at distributed sites; this is not well studied, but it may further modify the paradigm of central endocrine regulation.

  15. Efficacy and safety of adrenocorticotropic hormone treatment in glomerular diseases: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kittanamongkolchai, Wonngarm; Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Zand, Ladan

    2016-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence that adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) may be effective in treating various forms of glomerular diseases. However, the efficacy of treatment and frequency of adverse effects associated with the use of ACTH in glomerular diseases are unknown. A systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature was performed. Methods A literature search was performed using Medline, Embase, Google Scholar and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from inception through 18 July 2015. Studies assessing the efficacy and safety of ACTH treatment in adults with glomerular diseases were included. Results Of the 343 identified citations, 18 evaluated the drug efficacy and 12 evaluated the adverse effects. The most common glomerular diseases were membranous nephropathy (MN), primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and minimal change disease (MCD). The overall rate of complete remission in MN was 80% at 0–6 months, 69% at >6–12 months, 90% at >12–24 months and 95% beyond 24 months of follow-up. Fifty percent of primary FSGS and MCD patients treated with ACTH were in remission at 6 months, but the relapse rate was high after ACTH discontinuation (17%). Evidence of ACTH efficacy for other glomerular diseases was scarce. Edema was the most commonly reported adverse effect {incidence rate [IR] 0.10 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04–0.18]} followed by insomnia [IR 0.08 (95% CI 0.03–0.15)]. The dropout rate due to adverse events was 7%, mostly due to edema and weight gain. Conclusions ACTH is a well-tolerated therapy and is most promising when treating patients with MN. There may be a potential role for ACTH in patients with MCD and FSGS, but data are lacking. PMID:27274822

  16. Effects of adrenocorticotropic hormone challenge and age on hair cortisol concentrations in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    González-de-la-Vara, Marcela del Rosario; Valdez, Ricardo Arturo; Lemus-Ramirez, Vicente; Vázquez-Chagoyán, Juan Carlos; Villa-Godoy, Alejandro; Romano, Marta C

    2011-07-01

    Dairy cattle suffer stress from management and production; contemporary farming tries to improve animal welfare and reduce stress. Therefore, the assessment of long-term hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function using non-invasive techniques is useful. The aims in this study were: to measure cortisol concentration in cow and calves hair by radioimmunoassay (RIA), to test cortisol accumulation in bovine hair after adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenges, and determine the influence of hair color on cortisol concentrations. Fifteen Holstein heifers were allotted to 3 groups (n = 5 each): in control group (C), just the hair was sampled; in the saline solution group (SS), IV saline solution was administered on days 0, 7, and 14; and the ACTH group was challenged 3 times with ACTH (0.15 UI per kg of body weight) on days 0, 7, and 14. Serum samples from the SS and ACTH groups were obtained 0, 60 and 90 min post-injection. Serum cortisol concentration was greater 60 and 90 min after injection with ACTH. Hair was clipped on days 0, 14, 28, and 44. Hair cortisol was methanol extracted and measured by RIA. Hair cortisol was preserved for 11 mo. Hair cortisol concentrations in the ACTH group were greater than in the saline and control groups on days 14 and 28, but not on day 44. Concentrations were greater in calves than in cows and greater in white hair than in black hair. Cortisol accumulated in bovine hair after ACTH challenges, but the concentration was affected by both age and hair color. If hair color effects are taken into account, assessing cortisol concentration in hair is a potentially useful non-invasive method for assessing stress in cattle.

  17. Effects of adrenocorticotropic hormone challenge and age on hair cortisol concentrations in dairy cattle

    PubMed Central

    del Rosario González-de-la-Vara, Marcela; Valdez, Ricardo Arturo; Lemus-Ramirez, Vicente; Vázquez-Chagoyán, Juan Carlos; Villa-Godoy, Alejandro; Romano, Marta C.

    2011-01-01

    Dairy cattle suffer stress from management and production; contemporary farming tries to improve animal welfare and reduce stress. Therefore, the assessment of long-term hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function using non-invasive techniques is useful. The aims in this study were: to measure cortisol concentration in cow and calves hair by radioimmunoassay (RIA), to test cortisol accumulation in bovine hair after adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenges, and determine the influence of hair color on cortisol concentrations. Fifteen Holstein heifers were allotted to 3 groups (n = 5 each): in control group (C), just the hair was sampled; in the saline solution group (SS), IV saline solution was administered on days 0, 7, and 14; and the ACTH group was challenged 3 times with ACTH (0.15 UI per kg of body weight) on days 0, 7, and 14. Serum samples from the SS and ACTH groups were obtained 0, 60 and 90 min post-injection. Serum cortisol concentration was greater 60 and 90 min after injection with ACTH. Hair was clipped on days 0, 14, 28, and 44. Hair cortisol was methanol extracted and measured by RIA. Hair cortisol was preserved for 11 mo. Hair cortisol concentrations in the ACTH group were greater than in the saline and control groups on days 14 and 28, but not on day 44. Concentrations were greater in calves than in cows and greater in white hair than in black hair. Cortisol accumulated in bovine hair after ACTH challenges, but the concentration was affected by both age and hair color. If hair color effects are taken into account, assessing cortisol concentration in hair is a potentially useful non-invasive method for assessing stress in cattle. PMID:22210998

  18. Bilateral and simultaneous venous sampling of inferior petrosal sinuses for ACTH and PRL determination: preoperative localization of ACTH-secreting microadenomas.

    PubMed

    Vignati, F; Berselli, M E; Scialfa, G; Boccardi, E; Loli, P

    1989-04-01

    We report our experience on venous sampling of the inferior petrosal sinuses for basal and CRH-stimulated ACTH and PRL gradients in 8 patients with surgically proven Cushing's disease who had normal preoperative neuroradiological studies. In 7 patients basal plasma ACTH concentrations in the inferior petrosal sinus ipsilateral to the tumor were higher than in the contralateral sinus; the gradients were enhanced by oCRH administration. In one out of two patients who had previously undergone unsuccessful pituitary microsurgery, neither basal nor oCRH-induced ACTH increases led to correct localization of the microadenoma within the pituitary. In 4 out of 7 patients basal serum PRL concentrations in the inferior petrosal sinus ipsilateral to the tumor were higher than in the contralateral; only two out of 4 showed an increase in PRL levels after oCRH injection. Our study confirms that simultaneous and bilateral venous sampling of inferior petrosal sinuses is a valuable means to identify the site of microadenomas in patients with Cushing's disease without neuroradiological evidence of the tumor. This procedure may give misleading results in patients previously operated on. Unilateral or predominant increases of PRL concentration during catheterization of the inferior petrosal sinuses, when present, always lateralize to the side of the corticotroph adenoma, providing a possible additional signal of the presence of the tumor.

  19. Effects of cocaine and corticotropin-releasing factor on pulsatile ACTH and cortisol release in ovariectomized rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Sarnyai, Z; Mello, N K; Mendelson, J H; Nguyen, P H; Erös-Sarnyai, M

    1995-09-01

    Cocaine stimulates ACTH secretion by a corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-dependent mechanism in male rats, rhesus monkeys, and humans. To determine the generality of this effect, we examined the effects of acute cocaine administration on the pulsatile release of ACTH and cortisol in three ovariectomized (OVX) rhesus monkeys and compared its effects to stimulation with CRF. Venous blood samples were collected at 2-min intervals for 60 min before and after iv administration of cocaine (0.4 and 0.8 mg/kg) and CRF (1.0 and 10 micrograms/kg). Cluster analysis procedures were used to evaluate the pulsatile characteristics of ACTH and cortisol release. After placebo administration, an ACTH pulse frequency of 3 peaks/h was detected. After cocaine administration, plasma cocaine levels peaked at 92 +/- 3.0 and 201 +/- 60 ng/mL within 2 min. However, in contrast to normal intact males, cocaine did not stimulate the pulsatile release of ACTH in OVX females. Cocaine (0.4 mg/kg) decreased ACTH incremental peak height and valley levels compared with pre-cocaine values, and a higher dose of cocaine produced no changes in ACTH release. Bolus injection of a low dose of CRF (1.0 micrograms/kg, iv) significantly increased ACTH incremental peak height (P < 0.05), and a higher dose of CRF (10 micrograms/kg) increased ACTH peak amplitude, percentage increase in peak amplitude, area under the peaks, and incremental peak heights as well as ACTH valley level and nadir (10 micrograms/kg, iv) (P < 0.05). ACTH pulse frequency did not change after CRF or cocaine administration. Pulsatile release of cortisol was 2.7 peaks/h under placebo conditions and did not change after cocaine or CRF administration. Cortisol pulse amplitude was increased after low and high doses of CRF. High doses of CRF (10 micrograms/kg) also increased the mean level of cortisol valleys. In summary, we found that CRF but not cocaine stimulated pulsatile ACTH and cortisol release in OVX rhesus monkeys. The profound ACTH

  20. Repeated administrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone during late gestation in pigs: maternal cortisol response and effects on fetal HPA axis and brain neurotransmitter systems.

    PubMed

    Otten, W; Kanitz, E; Tuchscherer, M; Brüssow, K-P; Nürnberg, G

    2008-02-01

    The present study examined the effects of repeated adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) administrations to sows during late gestation on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis and brain neurotransmitter systems in their fetuses. ACTH (100 IU per animal, Synacthen Depot, n=6) or saline (n=5) was administered intramuscularly to sows every 2nd day from gestational day (GD) 85 to GD 101. Blood samples were taken from sows repeatedly within 12h after ACTH application on GD 85 and GD 101. On GD 105, fetuses were recovered under general anaesthesia for the collection of blood and brain samples. Plasma cortisol concentrations in sows increased significantly within 2h after ACTH application and returned to control levels after 10h post-application, showing a similar response at the beginning and at the end of the 16-day stimulation period. On GD 101, a significant increase of plasma glucose and insulin concentrations was found in sows after administration of ACTH and after a following feeding time. Number and body weight of fetuses were not affected by the maternal ACTH treatment. Cortisol concentrations in the umbilical vein were significantly decreased in fetuses from ACTH sows and a similar trend was observed in the umbilical artery and in the vena cava cranialis. Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) binding in hippocampus and hypothalamus did not differ between treatments. However, in hippocampus, serotonergic activity was increased in fetuses from ACTH-treated mothers as shown by significantly elevated 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels. In conclusion, repeated administrations of ACTH during late gestation resulted in a reproducible cortisol response of sows and reduced cortisol concentrations in the fetal umbilical vein after the treatment period. Although the number of sows used in this experiment was low and differences between treatments were limited these findings indicate that excessive glucocorticoid exposure during gestation alters serotonergic activity in

  1. Hormonal responses of metoclopramide-treated subjects experiencing nausea or emesis during parabolic flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, Randall L.

    1987-01-01

    The concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), vasopressin (AVP), epinephrine (EPI), and norepinephrine (NE) in 22 subjects administered 10 to 20 mg of metoclopramide prior to parabolic flight are measured. The effect of metoclopramide on motion sickness is examined. It is observed that metoclopramide is ineffective in the modulation of motion sickness due to stressful linear and angular acceleration and orbital flight, and it does not affect serum hormones prior to parabolic flight. It is detected that the serum level of AVP declines following emesis induced by parabolic flight and stressful angular acceleration; the serum levels of ACTH and EPI are elevated by parabolic flight and stressful angular acceleration; and serum NE is significantly elevated immediately following emesis. The possible roles of these hormones in the etiology of space motion sickness are discussed.

  2. Gradual loss of ACTH due to a novel mutation in LHX4: comprehensive mutation screening in Japanese patients with congenital hypopituitarism.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Masaki; Ishii, Tomohiro; Inokuchi, Mikako; Amano, Naoko; Narumi, Satoshi; Asakura, Yumi; Muroya, Koji; Hasegawa, Yukihiro; Adachi, Masanori; Hasegawa, Tomonobu

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in transcription factors genes, which are well regulated spatially and temporally in the pituitary gland, result in congenital hypopituitarism (CH) in humans. The prevalence of CH attributable to transcription factor mutations appears to be rare and varies among populations.This study aimed to define the prevalence of CH in terms of nine CH-associated genes among Japanese patients. We enrolled 91 Japanese CH patients for DNA sequencing of POU1F1, PROP1, HESX1, LHX3, LHX4, SOX2, SOX3, OTX2, and GLI2. Additionally, gene copy numbers for POU1F1, PROP1, HESX1, LHX3, and LHX4 were examined by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. The gene regulatory properties of mutant LHX4 proteins were characterized in vitro. We identified two novel heterozygous LHX4 mutations, namely c.249-1G>A, p.V75I, and one common POU1F1 mutation, p.R271W. The patient harboring the c.249-1G>A mutation exhibited isolated growth hormone deficiency at diagnosis and a gradual loss of ACTH, whereas the patient with the p.V75I mutation exhibited multiple pituitary hormone deficiency. In vitro experiments showed that both LHX4 mutations were associated with an impairment of the transactivation capacities of POU1F1 andαGSU, without any dominant-negative effects. The total mutation prevalence in Japanese CH patients was 3.3%. This study is the first to describe, a gradual loss of ACTH in a patient carrying an LHX4 mutation. Careful monitoring of hypothalamic-pituitary -adrenal function is recommended for CH patients with LHX4 mutations.

  3. Corticotropin (ACTH)-reactive immunoglobulins in adolescents in relation to antisocial behavior and stress-induced cortisol response. The TRAILS study.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Johanna M; Fetissov, Serguei O; Legrand, Romain; Claeyssens, Sophie; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Verhulst, Frank C; Van Oort, Floor V A

    2013-12-01

    Elevated levels of corticotropin (ACTH)-reactive immunoglobulins (ACTH IgG) were found in males with conduct disorder, suggesting their involvement in the biology of antisocial behavior. We first aimed to confirm these findings in a large general population sample of adolescents. Secondly, we studied the association between ACTH IgG levels and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis response to stress. Free and total ACTH IgG levels were measured in sera of 1230 adolescents (15-18 years). HPA axis activity was determined by measuring salivary cortisol before, during, and after a social stress test. Antisocial behavior was assessed using the Antisocial Behavior Questionnaire. ACTH peptide and IgG affinity kinetics for ACTH were assayed in a subsample of 90 adolescents selected for high or low ACTH IgG levels. In boys, higher total ACTH IgG levels were associated with higher antisocial behavior scores (β=1.05, p=0.04), especially at high levels of free ACTH IgG. In girls, antisocial behavior was associated with low free ACTH IgG levels (β=-0.20, p=0.04). Stress-induced cortisol release was associated with free ACTH IgG in boys (βareaunderthecurve=-0.67, p<0.01), and with total ACTH IgG in girls (βrecovery=0.84, p=0.05). The affinity kinetics assay showed that ACTH IgG association rates were lower in both boys and girls with high ACTH IgG levels. These data show that ACTH IgG levels are related to antisocial behavior and HPA axis response to stress in adolescents. The mechanisms behind these associations, including different ACTH binding properties of IgG in subjects with antisocial behavior, deserve further attention.

  4. [A Case of an Adrenocorticotropic Hormone-Producing Pituitary Adenoma Removed via Electromagnetic-Guided Neuroendoscopy].

    PubMed

    Tomita, Yusuke; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Terasaka, Tomohiro; Inagaki, Kenichi; Otsuka, Fumio; Date, Isao

    2016-06-01

    The use of navigation systems is safe and reliable for neurological surgery. We performed endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery to totally resect an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-producing pituitary adenoma associated with oculomotor nerve palsy. A 70-year-old woman developed right ptosis 4 months before admission. She developed anisocoria 2 months later and was referred to the department of neurology from clinic. Brain magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)showed an intrasellar tumor that partially invaded the right cavernous sinus, and she was then referred to our department. She exhibited a round face ("moon face") and central obesity. Laboratory test results showed a high urinary cortisol level and high serum ACTH level, and neither the serum cortisol nor ACTH level was suppressed by a low-dose dexamethasone test. We performed transsphenoidal surgery using high-dimensional endoscopy under electromagnetic navigation. The tumor invading the cavernous sinus was visualized via endoscopy and confirmed on navigation using a flexible needle probe. Postoperative MRI showed total removal of the tumor, and the serum ACTH level recovered to the normal range. The patient's right oculomotor palsy resolved within 1 week postoperatively. In summary, electromagnetic navigation was useful for total resection of a pituitary tumor invading the cavernous sinus, contributing to normalization of the ACTH level and improvement in neurological symptoms.

  5. [A Case of an Adrenocorticotropic Hormone-Producing Pituitary Adenoma Removed via Electromagnetic-Guided Neuroendoscopy].

    PubMed

    Tomita, Yusuke; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Terasaka, Tomohiro; Inagaki, Kenichi; Otsuka, Fumio; Date, Isao

    2016-06-01

    The use of navigation systems is safe and reliable for neurological surgery. We performed endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery to totally resect an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-producing pituitary adenoma associated with oculomotor nerve palsy. A 70-year-old woman developed right ptosis 4 months before admission. She developed anisocoria 2 months later and was referred to the department of neurology from clinic. Brain magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)showed an intrasellar tumor that partially invaded the right cavernous sinus, and she was then referred to our department. She exhibited a round face ("moon face") and central obesity. Laboratory test results showed a high urinary cortisol level and high serum ACTH level, and neither the serum cortisol nor ACTH level was suppressed by a low-dose dexamethasone test. We performed transsphenoidal surgery using high-dimensional endoscopy under electromagnetic navigation. The tumor invading the cavernous sinus was visualized via endoscopy and confirmed on navigation using a flexible needle probe. Postoperative MRI showed total removal of the tumor, and the serum ACTH level recovered to the normal range. The patient's right oculomotor palsy resolved within 1 week postoperatively. In summary, electromagnetic navigation was useful for total resection of a pituitary tumor invading the cavernous sinus, contributing to normalization of the ACTH level and improvement in neurological symptoms. PMID:27270145

  6. Isolated Adrenocorticotropic Hormone or Thyrotropin Deficiency Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Three Cases with Long-Term Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Cho-Ok; Kim, Yu Ji; Kim, Ji Hye

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the clinical features and long-term outcomes of isolated pituitary hormone deficiencies after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Such deficiencies typically present at time intervals after TBI, especially after mild injuries such as concussions, which makes their diagnosis difficult without careful history taking. It is necessary to improve diagnosis and prevent life threatening or morbid conditions such as those that may occur in deficiencies of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) or thyroid-stimulating hormone (as known as thyrotropin, TSH), the two most important pituitary hormones in hypopituitarism treatment. Here, we report two cases of isolated ACTH deficiency and one case of isolated TSH deficiency. These patients presented at different time points after concussion and underwent long-term follow-ups. PMID:27169080

  7. Influence of trifluoperazine on ACTH- or angiotensin-stimulated mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid secretion in man.

    PubMed

    Zofková, I; Hampl, R

    1987-08-01

    During stimulation of adrenocortical secretion the calcium--calmodulin system is activated to a different extent, depending on the secretagogue substance. In the submitted paper the influence of therapeutic doses of the calmodulin inhibitor, trifluoperazine, on aldosterone and cortisol secretion stimulated by ACTH or by activation of endogenous angiotensin by furosemide was investigated in healthy subjects. Trifluoperazine already in amounts of 6 mg/day administered for one week inhibited the "basal" aldosterone secretion assessed in a vertical position (p less than 0.01) and ACTH stimulated secretion (during the 30th minute p less than 0.05). The basal aldosterone secretion assessed in a horizontal position was not affected by trifluoperazine, similarly as it did not affect the secretory response to endogenous angiotensin activated by furosemide, regardless whether a dose of 6 mg or 12 mg/day was used. ACTH stimulated cortisol blood levels were after trifluoperazine insignificantly but constantly lower throughout the test, while they were not altered by trifluoperazine in the furosemide test. The plasma calcium level was not significantly affected by trifluoperazine. It may be concluded that trifluoperazine alters ACTH stimulated mineralocorticoid secretion, while it does not influence angiotensin stimulated secretion. The revealed differences in adrenocortical response to trifluoperazine in vivo cannot be explained merely by a different sensitivity of the calcium-calmodulin system to stimulation by two different secretagogues, but by interaction of some regulatory mechanisms influenced by trifluoperazine with adrenocortical secretion.

  8. Acute effects of ACTH on dissociated adrenocortical cells: quantitative changes in mitochondria and lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Zoller, L C; Malamed, S

    1975-08-01

    To study the role of certain organelles in steroidogenesis, dissociated rat adrenocortical cells were incubated for two hours with ACTH at a concentration that induces a high level of steroid production. Sections of ACTH treated and untreated cells were photographed in the electron microscope, and morphometric analysis was undertaken to assess possible ACTH-induced changes in total cell volume, volume density and numerical denisty of lipid droplets and mitochondria. There was no change in total cell volume. Lipid droplet volume density and numerical density decreased. Mitochondrial volume density did not change, but numerical density increased. The decrease in lipid droplet volume density indicates a rapid depletion of cholesterol for steroid production. This depletion is almost entirely due to the disappearance of lipid droplets, rather than to an overall diminution in their size, as shown by the decrease in lipid droplet numerical density. The mitochondrial data suggest that the adrenocortical cell has an adedquate mitochondrial apparatus to respond to acute ACTH stimulation with increased steroid output without an increase inmitochondrial volume.

  9. Phase-Dependent Shifting of the Adrenal Clock by Acute Stress-Induced ACTH.

    PubMed

    Engeland, William C; Yoder, J Marina; Karsten, Carley A; Kofuji, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal cortex has a molecular clock that generates circadian rhythms in glucocorticoid production, yet it is unclear how the clock responds to acute stress. We hypothesized that stress-induced ACTH provides a signal that phase shifts the adrenal clock. To assess whether acute stress phase shifts the adrenal clock in vivo in a phase-dependent manner, mPER2:LUC mice on a 12:12-h light:dark cycle underwent restraint stress for 15 min or no stress at zeitgeber time (ZT) 2 (early subjective day) or at ZT16 (early subjective night). Adrenal explants from mice stressed at ZT2 showed mPER2:LUC rhythms that were phase-advanced by ~2 h, whereas adrenals from mice stressed at ZT16 showed rhythms that were phase-delayed by ~2 h. The biphasic response was also observed in mice injected subcutaneously either with saline or with ACTH at ZT2 or ZT16. Blockade of the ACTH response with the glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, prevented restraint stress-induced phase shifts in the mPER2:LUC rhythm both at ZT2 and at ZT16. The finding that acute stress results in a phase-dependent shift in the adrenal mPER2:LUC rhythm that can be blocked by dexamethasone indicates that stress-induced effectors, including ACTH, act to phase shift the adrenal clock rhythm. PMID:27445984

  10. Short-term effects of ACTH on protein synthesis in adrenal cortex cells of young rats.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, M C; Magalhães, M M; Cimbra, A

    1975-11-19

    Two units of ACTH were administered intraperitoneally to young 20 gm-rats which received an intravenous injection of L-leucine-3H thirteen min later. ACTH-injected rats, and control rats which received the isotope alone, were killed at 2-, 10-, 30- and 60-min intervals. Electron microscope autoradiographs in control animals showed strong amino-acid uptake at pulse time (2-min) in the cytoplasm of adrenal zona fasciculata cells. Label was shared between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, and a lower but still considerable uptake was seen in nucleoli. At first chase time interval (10-min) cytoplasmic labelling declined, while nuclear and nucleolar labelling increased, both changing little thereafter, and there was a 10-30 min Golgi peak. ACTH administration provoked an overall increase in amino-acid incorporation into cytoplasm, nucleus and nucleolus at pulse time, with no changes in the distribution of the reactions among organelles. Intensification of labelling was most evident over nucleoli, the grain density of which was four-times as high as in controls. The short-term increase in ER and mitochondrial protein synthesis observed after ACTH injections was considered to be consistent with the hypothesis that most newly-formed proteins in these cells may be involved in the regulation of steroidogenesis. The marked increase in nucleolar labelling suggested the presence of proteins involved in RNA synthesis.

  11. Phase-Dependent Shifting of the Adrenal Clock by Acute Stress-Induced ACTH

    PubMed Central

    Engeland, William C.; Yoder, J. Marina; Karsten, Carley A.; Kofuji, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal cortex has a molecular clock that generates circadian rhythms in glucocorticoid production, yet it is unclear how the clock responds to acute stress. We hypothesized that stress-induced ACTH provides a signal that phase shifts the adrenal clock. To assess whether acute stress phase shifts the adrenal clock in vivo in a phase-dependent manner, mPER2:LUC mice on a 12:12-h light:dark cycle underwent restraint stress for 15 min or no stress at zeitgeber time (ZT) 2 (early subjective day) or at ZT16 (early subjective night). Adrenal explants from mice stressed at ZT2 showed mPER2:LUC rhythms that were phase-advanced by ~2 h, whereas adrenals from mice stressed at ZT16 showed rhythms that were phase-delayed by ~2 h. The biphasic response was also observed in mice injected subcutaneously either with saline or with ACTH at ZT2 or ZT16. Blockade of the ACTH response with the glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, prevented restraint stress-induced phase shifts in the mPER2:LUC rhythm both at ZT2 and at ZT16. The finding that acute stress results in a phase-dependent shift in the adrenal mPER2:LUC rhythm that can be blocked by dexamethasone indicates that stress-induced effectors, including ACTH, act to phase shift the adrenal clock rhythm. PMID:27445984

  12. Retrospective evaluation of sex hormones and steroid hormone intermediates in dogs with alopecia.

    PubMed

    Frank, Linda A; Hnilica, Keith A; Rohrbach, Barton W; Oliver, Jack W

    2003-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if there are specific steroid hormone aberrations associated with suspect endocrine alopecias in dogs in whom hypothyroidism and hyperadrenocorticism have been excluded. Steroid hormone panels submitted to the UTCVM endocrinology laboratory over a 7.5-year period (783 samples) from dogs with alopecia were reviewed. During this period, 276 dogs met the criteria for inclusion and were comprised of 54 different breeds. Approximately 73% of dogs had at least one baseline or post-ACTH stimulation steroid hormone intermediate greater than the normal range. The most frequent hormone elevation noted was for progesterone (57.6% of samples). When compared with normal dogs, oestradiol was significantly greater in Keeshond dogs and progesterone was significantly greater in Pomeranian and Siberian Husky dogs. Not all individual dogs had hormone abnormalities. Chow Chow, Samoyed and Malamute dogs had the greatest percentage of normal steroid hormone intermediates of the dogs in this study. Baseline cortisol concentrations were significantly correlated with progesterone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) and androstenedione. Results of this study suggest that the pathomechanism of the alopecia, at least for some breeds, may not relate to steroid hormone intermediates and emphasizes the need for breed specific normals.

  13. Fountain of steroid from an ectopic ACTH-producing tumour

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Tom Edward Ngo; Jimeno, Cecilia Alegado

    2013-01-01

    This case is of a 39-year-old Filipino woman who within 2 months developed, Cushing's features she had no known comorbidities and no history of steroid intake. The patient also presented with hyperpigmentation of knuckles and toes, metabolic alkalosis and persistent hypokalaemia noted as proximal muscle weakness. The patient was referred to our institution for acutely worsening behavioural and psychiatric changes. Work-up for endogenous Cushing's syndrome revealed a significant adrenocorticotropic hormone production from an ectopic source. Further imaging was requested to locate the tumour, but the patient eventually succumbed to the drastic complications of hypercortisolism. On autopsy, the patient was found to have an ectopic well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumour located at the pancreatic head with metastasis to the right hepatic lobe. PMID:23861274

  14. Neuroendocrine ACTH-Producing Tumor of the Thymus—Experience with 12 Patients over 25 Years

    PubMed Central

    Neary, Nicola M.; Lopez-Chavez, Ariel; Abel, Brent S.; Boyce, Alison M.; Schaub, Nicholas; Kwong, King; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Moran, Cesar A.; Giaccone, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Context: ACTH-producing neuroendocrine tumor (NET) of the thymus is a rare cause of Cushing's syndrome (CS). The literature consists mainly of isolated case reports. Patients: We studied 12 cases (eight males and four females) diagnosed between 1986 and 2010 with CS and thymic NET who underwent surgical resection. Main Outcome Measures: We measured time from onset of CS to diagnosis of thymic NET, tumor size, histological grade, time to recurrence, and survival and performed a meta-analysis of other published cases of CS associated with thymic NET. Results: Eleven of 12 patients presented with classic features of CS at a median age of 21 yr (range, 7–51). Four were children. The 24-h urine free cortisol was greater than 16-fold of normal, and biochemical testing was consistent with ectopic ACTH production in all 11. Another patient presenting with pulmonary embolus had a thymic mass and was later diagnosed with CS. All patients underwent thymectomy, and nine of 10 tumors exhibited positive ACTH immunochemistry. Median tumor diameter was 5 cm (range, 1–11.5). Six patients recurred 20–28 months after surgery with metastases to mediastinal lymph nodes (n = 5), bone (n = 5), liver (n = 1), parotid gland (n = 1), and breast (n = 1). Four of five patients treated with radiation therapy also received chemotherapy. All recurrent patients received ketoconazole; four later underwent bilateral adrenalectomy. Six recurrent patients died 22–90 months (median, 57) after thymectomy. At last review, six patients were alive 14–90 months (median, 49) after thymectomy. These data are similar to those from the meta-analysis. Conclusions: Thymic ACTH-producing NET is an aggressive disease that should be considered in CS with ectopic ACTH secretion, particularly in younger patients. PMID:22508705

  15. Melanocortin receptor agonist ACTH 1-39 protects rat forebrain neurons from apoptotic, excitotoxic and inflammation-related damage.

    PubMed

    Lisak, Robert P; Nedelkoska, Liljana; Bealmear, Beverly; Benjamins, Joyce A

    2015-11-01

    Patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) are commonly treated with high doses of intravenous corticosteroids (CS). ACTH 1-39, a member of the melanocortin family, stimulates production of CS by the adrenals, but melanocortin receptors are also found in the central nervous system (CNS) and on immune cells. ACTH is produced within the CNS and may have direct protective effects on glia and neurons independent of CS. We previously reported that ACTH 1-39 protected oligodendroglia (OL) and their progenitors (OPC) from a panel of excitotoxic and inflammation-related agents. Neurons are the most vulnerable cells in the CNS. They are terminally differentiated, and sensitive to inflammatory and excitotoxic insults. For potential therapeutic protection of gray matter, it is important to investigate the direct effects of ACTH on neurons. Cultures highly enriched in neurons were isolated from 2-3 day old rat brain. After 4-7 days in culture, the neurons were treated for 24h with selected toxic agents with or without ACTH 1-39. ACTH 1-39 protected neurons from death induced by staurosporine, glutamate, NMDA, AMPA, kainate, quinolinic acid, reactive oxygen species and, to a modest extent, from rapidly released NO, but did not protect against kynurenic acid or slowly released nitric oxide. Our results show that ACTH 1-39 protects neurons in vitro from several apoptotic, excitotoxic and inflammation-related insults.

  16. Stress hormones enhance retrieval of fear conditioning acquired either one day or many months before.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, L A; Barros, D M; Medina, J H; Izquierdo, I

    2002-05-01

    It has been known for years that systemic administration of the stress hormones, adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH), lysine-vasopressin, adrenaline, or beta-endorphin, enhances retrieval of aversive behaviours acquired one or a few days before. Here we show that the pre-test i.p. injection of the hormones in rats can also enhance retrieval when given months after the original training. The effectiveness of the treatments changed with time. When animals were tested 3 months after training the hormones enhanced retrieval only at doses five times higher than those needed 1 day after training. Between 6 and 9 months from training the hormones either lost their effect (vasopressin, beta-endorphin) or actually inhibited retrieval (ACTH, adrenaline). The effects of the hormones cannot be explained by a decrease in locomotor activity: none of the treatments had such an effect, as measured in an open field. However, when the animals were tested between 12 and 19 months after training, the hormones once again became as effective as they had been 1 day after training. This was so in spite of the fact that control retention levels became very low with age, probably as a result of extinction. The oscillation of the sensitivity of retrieval to the hormones does not appear to depend on changes in anxiety levels with ageing or to effects of the hormones on locomotor activity.

  17. Habituation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis hormones to repeated homotypic stress and subsequent heterotypic stressor exposure in male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Babb, Jessica A; Masini, Cher V; Day, Heidi E W; Campeau, Serge

    2014-05-01

    Understanding potential sex differences in repeated stress-induced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis habituation could provide insight into the sex-biased prevalence of certain affective disorders such as anxiety and depression. Therefore in these studies, male and female rats were exposed to 30 min of either audiogenic or restraint stress daily for 10 days in order to determine whether sex regulates the extent to which HPA axis hormone release is attenuated upon repeated homotypic stressor presentation. In response to the initial exposure, both stressors robustly increased plasma concentrations of both adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone (CORT) in both sexes. Acutely, females displayed higher ACTH and CORT concentrations following restraint stress, whereas males exhibited higher hormone concentrations following loud noise stress. HPA axis hormone responses to both stressors decreased incrementally over successive days of exposure to each respective stressor. Despite the differential effect of sex on acute hormone responses, the extent to which HPA axis hormone response was attenuated did not differ between male and female animals following either stressor. Furthermore, ACTH and CORT responses to a novel environment were not affected by prior exposure to stress of either modality in either male or female rats. These experiments demonstrate that despite the acute stress response, male and female rats exhibit similar habituation of HPA axis hormones upon repeated homotypic stressor presentations, and that exposure to repeated stress does not produce exaggerated HPA axis hormone responses to a novel environment in either female or male rats.

  18. Severe hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis and hypertension in a 54 year old male with ectopic ACTH syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Valles, Miguel Angel; Palafox-Cazarez, Asael; Paredes-Avina, Jose Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Ectopic ACTH syndrome is a rare cause of Cushing's syndrome accounting for about 15% of all cases. Small cell lung cancer and bronchial carcinoids account for about half of the cases. Malignant neoplasm has rapid and more aggressive metabolic effects. We report a 54-year-old male patient with phenotypic features of Cushing's syndrome with severe hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hypertension and altered mental status as manifestations of an ACTH-secreting small cell carcinoma from the lung. Ectopic ACTH syndrome should be highly considered in patients with hypertension and severe hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, especially when a lung mass is discovered. PMID:19829770

  19. Severe hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis and hypertension in a 54 year old male with ectopic ACTH syndrome: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Palafox-Cazarez, Asael; Paredes-Avina, Jose Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Ectopic ACTH syndrome is a rare cause of Cushing’s syndrome accounting for about 15% of all cases. Small cell lung cancer and bronchial carcinoids account for about half of the cases. Malignant neoplasm has rapid and more aggressive metabolic effects. We report a 54-year-old male patient with phenotypic features of Cushing’s syndrome with severe hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hypertension and altered mental status as manifestations of an ACTH-secreting small cell carcinoma from the lung. Ectopic ACTH syndrome should be highly considered in patients with hypertension and severe hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis, especially when a lung mass is discovered. PMID:19829770

  20. Chronic Hormonal Imbalance and Adipose Redistribution Is Associated with Hypothalamic Neuropathology following Blast Exposure.

    PubMed

    VandeVord, Pamela J; Sajja, Venkata Siva Sai Sujith; Ereifej, Evon; Hermundstad, Amy; Mao, Shijie; Hadden, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    Endocrine disorders have been shown to be a consequence of blast traumatic brain injury in soldiers returning from military conflicts. Hormone deficiency and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) dysfunction can lead to symptoms such as fatigue, anxiety, irritability, insomnia, sexual dysfunction, and decreased quality of life. Given these changes following blast exposure, the current study focused on investigating chronic pathology within the hypothalamus following blast, in addition to systemic effects. An established rodent model of blast neurotrauma was used to induce mild blast-induced neurotrauma. Adipose tissue, blood, and brain samples were collected at one and three months following a single blast exposure. Adipose tissue and blood were evaluated for changes in ACTH, adiponectin, C-reactive protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein, interleukin (IL)-1β, and leptin. The hypothalamus was evaluated for injury using immunohistochemical techniques. The results demonstrated that the weight of the blast animals was significantly less, compared with the sham group. The slower rate of increase in their weight was associated with changes in ACTH, IL-1β, and leptin levels. Further, histological analysis indicated elevated levels of cleaved caspase-3 positive cells within the hypothalamus. The data suggest that long-term outcomes of brain injury occurring from blast exposure include dysfunction of the hypothalamus, which leads to compromised hormonal function, elevated biological stress-related hormones, and subsequent adipose tissue remodeling.

  1. Hormonal regulation of colour change in eyes of a cryptic fish.

    PubMed

    Sköld, Helen Nilsson; Yngsell, Daniel; Mubashishir, Muhmd; Wallin, Margareta

    2015-01-16

    Colour change of the skin in lower vertebrates such as fish has been a subject of great scientific and public interest. However, colour change also takes place in eyes of fish and while an increasing amount of data indicates its importance in behaviour, very little is known about its regulation. Here, we report that both eye and skin coloration change in response to white to black background adaptation in live sand goby Pomatoschistus minutes, a bentic marine fish. Through in vitro experiments, we show that noradrenaline and melanocyte concentrating hormone (MCH) treatments cause aggregation of pigment organelles in the eye chromatophores. Daylight had no aggregating effect. Combining forskolin to elevate intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) with MCH resulted in complete pigment dispersal and darkening of the eyes, whereas combining prolactin, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) or melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) with MCH resulted in more yellow and red eyes. ACTH and MSH also induced dispersal in the melanophores, resulting in overall darker eyes. By comparing analysis of eyes, skin and peritoneum, we conclude that the regulation pattern is similar between these different tissues in this species which is relevant for the cryptic life strategy of this species. With the exception of ACTH which resulted in most prominent melanophore pigment dispersal in the eyes, all other treatments provided similar results between tissue types. To our knowledge, this is the first study that has directly analysed hormonal regulation of physiological colour change in eyes of fish.

  2. Evaluation of Basal Serum Adrenocorticotropic Hormone and Cortisol Levels and Their Relationship with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Male Patients with Idiopathic Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Bo; She, Fei; Xie, Li-Fang; Yan, Wen-Hua; Ouyang, Jin-Zhi; Wang, Bao-An; Ma, Hang-Yun; Zang, Li; Mu, Yi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prolonged gonadal hormone deficiency in patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) may produce adverse effects on the endocrine homeostasis and metabolism. This study aimed to compare basal serum adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol levels between male IHH patients and healthy controls. Moreover, this study compared the basal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in patients with and without nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and also evaluated the relationship between basal HPA axis and NAFLD in male IHH patients. Methods: This was a retrospective case-control study involving 75 Chinese male IHH patients (mean age 21.4 ± 3.8 years, range 17–30 years) and 135 healthy controls after matching for gender and age. All subjects underwent physical examination and blood testing for serum testosterone, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, ACTH, and cortisol and biochemical tests. Results: Higher basal serum ACTH levels (8.25 ± 3.78 pmol/L vs. 6.97 ± 2.81 pmol/L) and lower cortisol levels (366.70 ± 142.48 nmol/L vs. 452.82 ± 141.53 nmol/L) were observed in male IHH patients than healthy subjects (all P <0.05). IHH patients also showed higher metabolism parameters and higher prevalence rate of NAFLD (34.9% vs. 4.4%) than the controls (all P < 0.05). Basal serum ACTH (9.91 ± 4.98 pmol/L vs. 7.60 ± 2.96 pmol/L) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (2123.7 ± 925.8 μg/L vs. 1417.1 ± 498.4 μg/L) levels were significantly higher in IHH patients with NAFLD than those without NAFLD (all P < 0.05). We also found that basal serum ACTH levels were positively correlated with NAFLD (r = 0.289, P <0.05) and triglyceride levels (r = 0.268, P < 0.05) in male IHH patients. Furthermore, NAFLD was independently associated with ACTH levels in male IHH patients by multiple linear regression analysis. Conclusions: The male IHH patients showed higher basal serum ACTH levels and lower cortisol levels than matched healthy

  3. The cortisol response to ACTH in pigs, heritability and influence of corticosteroid-binding globulin.

    PubMed

    Larzul, C; Terenina, E; Foury, A; Billon, Y; Louveau, I; Merlot, E; Mormede, P

    2015-12-01

    In the search for biological basis of robustness, this study aimed (i) at the determination of the heritability of the cortisol response to ACTH in juvenile pigs, using restricted maximum likelihood methodology applied to a multiple trait animal model, and (ii) at the study of the relationships between basal and stimulated cortisol levels with corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), IGF-I and haptoglobin, all important players in glucose metabolism and production traits. At 6 weeks of age, 298 intact male and female piglets from 30 litters (30 dams and 30 boars) were injected with 250 µg ACTH(1-24) (Synacthen). Blood was taken before ACTH injection to measure basal levels of cortisol, glucose, CBG, IGF-I and haptoglobin, and 60 min later to measure stimulated cortisol levels and glucose. Cortisol increased 2.8-fold after ACTH injection, with a high correlation between basal and stimulated levels (phenotypic correlation, r p=0.539; genetic correlation, r g=0.938). Post-ACTH cortisol levels were highly heritable (h 2=0.684) and could therefore be used for genetic selection of animals with a more reactive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis. CBG binding capacity correlated with cortisol levels measured in basal conditions in males only. No correlation was found between CBG binding capacity and post-ACTH cortisol levels. Basal IGF-I concentration was positively correlated with BW at birth and weaning, and showed a high correlation with CBG binding capacity with a strong sexual dimorphism, the correlation being much higher in males than in females. Basal haptoglobin concentrations were negatively correlated with CBG binding capacity and IGF-I concentrations. Complex relationships were also found between circulating glucose levels and these different variables that have been shown to be related to glucose resistance in humans. These data are therefore valuable for the genetic selection of animals to explore the consequences on production and robustness traits, but

  4. The cortisol response to ACTH in pigs, heritability and influence of corticosteroid-binding globulin.

    PubMed

    Larzul, C; Terenina, E; Foury, A; Billon, Y; Louveau, I; Merlot, E; Mormede, P

    2015-12-01

    In the search for biological basis of robustness, this study aimed (i) at the determination of the heritability of the cortisol response to ACTH in juvenile pigs, using restricted maximum likelihood methodology applied to a multiple trait animal model, and (ii) at the study of the relationships between basal and stimulated cortisol levels with corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG), IGF-I and haptoglobin, all important players in glucose metabolism and production traits. At 6 weeks of age, 298 intact male and female piglets from 30 litters (30 dams and 30 boars) were injected with 250 µg ACTH(1-24) (Synacthen). Blood was taken before ACTH injection to measure basal levels of cortisol, glucose, CBG, IGF-I and haptoglobin, and 60 min later to measure stimulated cortisol levels and glucose. Cortisol increased 2.8-fold after ACTH injection, with a high correlation between basal and stimulated levels (phenotypic correlation, r p=0.539; genetic correlation, r g=0.938). Post-ACTH cortisol levels were highly heritable (h 2=0.684) and could therefore be used for genetic selection of animals with a more reactive hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis. CBG binding capacity correlated with cortisol levels measured in basal conditions in males only. No correlation was found between CBG binding capacity and post-ACTH cortisol levels. Basal IGF-I concentration was positively correlated with BW at birth and weaning, and showed a high correlation with CBG binding capacity with a strong sexual dimorphism, the correlation being much higher in males than in females. Basal haptoglobin concentrations were negatively correlated with CBG binding capacity and IGF-I concentrations. Complex relationships were also found between circulating glucose levels and these different variables that have been shown to be related to glucose resistance in humans. These data are therefore valuable for the genetic selection of animals to explore the consequences on production and robustness traits, but

  5. Gonadotrophin-releasing activity of neurohypophysial hormones: II. The pituitary oxytocin receptor mediating gonadotrophin release differs from that of corticotrophs.

    PubMed

    Evans, J J; Catt, K J

    1989-07-01

    Neurohypophysial hormones stimulate gonadotrophin release from dispersed rat anterior pituitary cells in vitro, acting through receptors distinct from those which mediate the secretory response to gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH). The LH response to oxytocin was not affected by the presence of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, methyl isobutylxanthine, but was diminished in the absence of extracellular calcium and was progressively increased as the calcium concentration in the medium was raised to normal. In addition, the calcium channel antagonist, nifedipine, suppressed oxytocin-stimulated secretion of LH. It is likely that the mechanisms of LH release induced by GnRH and neurohypophysial hormones are similar, although stimulation of gonadotrophin secretion is mediated by separate receptor systems. Oxytocin was more active than vasopressin in releasing LH, but less active in releasing ACTH. The highly selective oxytocin agonist, [Thr4,Gly7]oxytocin, elicited concentration-dependent secretion of LH but had little effect on corticotrophin secretion. The neurohypophysial hormone antagonist analogues, [d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)2]vasopressin, [d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)2,Orn8]vasotocin and [d(CH2)5D-Tyr(Et)2Val4,Cit8]vasopressin, inhibited the LH response to both oxytocin and vasopressin. However, [d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)2]vasopressin was much less effective in inhibiting the ACTH response to the neurohypophysial hormones, and [d(CH2)5Tyr-(Me)2,Orn8]vasotocin and [d(CH2)5D-Tyr(Et)2,Val4,Cit8]vasopressin exhibited no inhibitory activity against ACTH release. Thus, agonist and antagonist analogues of neurohypophysial hormones display divergent activities with regard to LH and ACTH responses, and the neuropeptide receptor mediating gonadotroph activation is clearly different from that on the corticotroph. Whereas the corticotroph receptor is a vasopressin-type receptor an oxytocin-type receptor is responsible for gonadotrophin release by neurohypophysial hormones.

  6. The role of inferior petrosal sinus sampling in ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome: review and joint opinion statement by members of the Italian Society for Endocrinology, Italian Society for Neurosurgery, and Italian Society for Neuroradiology.

    PubMed

    Pecori Giraldi, Francesca; Cavallo, Luigi Maria; Tortora, Fabio; Pivonello, Rosario; Colao, Annamaria; Cappabianca, Paolo; Mantero, Franco

    2015-02-01

    In the management of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent Cushing's syndrome, inferior petrosal sinus sampling (IPSS) provides information for the endocrinologist, the neurosurgeon, and the neuroradiologist. To the endocrinologist who performs the etiological diagnosis, results of IPSS confirm or exclude the diagnosis of Cushing's disease with 80%-100% sensitivity and over 95% specificity. Baseline central-peripheral gradients have suboptimal accuracy, and stimulation with corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), possibly desmopressin, has to be performed. The rationale for the use of IPSS in this context depends on other diagnostic means, taking availability of CRH and reliability of dynamic testing and pituitary imaging into account. As regards the other specialists, the neuroradiologist may collate results of IPSS with findings at imaging, while IPSS may prove useful to the neurosurgeon to chart a surgical course. The present review illustrates the current standpoint of these 3 specialists on the role of IPSS. PMID:25639323

  7. The role of inferior petrosal sinus sampling in ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome: review and joint opinion statement by members of the Italian Society for Endocrinology, Italian Society for Neurosurgery, and Italian Society for Neuroradiology.

    PubMed

    Pecori Giraldi, Francesca; Cavallo, Luigi Maria; Tortora, Fabio; Pivonello, Rosario; Colao, Annamaria; Cappabianca, Paolo; Mantero, Franco

    2015-02-01

    In the management of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent Cushing's syndrome, inferior petrosal sinus sampling (IPSS) provides information for the endocrinologist, the neurosurgeon, and the neuroradiologist. To the endocrinologist who performs the etiological diagnosis, results of IPSS confirm or exclude the diagnosis of Cushing's disease with 80%-100% sensitivity and over 95% specificity. Baseline central-peripheral gradients have suboptimal accuracy, and stimulation with corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), possibly desmopressin, has to be performed. The rationale for the use of IPSS in this context depends on other diagnostic means, taking availability of CRH and reliability of dynamic testing and pituitary imaging into account. As regards the other specialists, the neuroradiologist may collate results of IPSS with findings at imaging, while IPSS may prove useful to the neurosurgeon to chart a surgical course. The present review illustrates the current standpoint of these 3 specialists on the role of IPSS.

  8. Comparative stereological studies on the effects of long term CRF and ACTH treatment on the cortex of the suprarenal gland.

    PubMed

    Miśkowiak, B; Kasprzak, A; Malendowicz, L K

    1986-06-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate by means of stereological and biochemical methods the effects of long-term CRF administration on the cortex of the suprarenal gland of adult male rats and to compare these effects with those of ACTH. Both CRF (administered into the lateral ventricle of the brain) and ACTH resulted after 8 days in an increase in weight of the suprarenal gland. Both treatments increased the volume of individual adrenocortical zones and the average volume of adrenocortical cells as well as enhancing the total number of parenchymal cells in the paired glands. There was also no significant difference in those functional parameters studied of the adrenocortical cells of CRF- and ACTH-treated rats. Thus, long term treatment of adult male rats with CRF evoked adrenocortical changes similar to those observed after ACTH administration.

  9. Neonatal isolated ACTH deficiency (IAD): a potentially life-threatening but treatable cause of neonatal cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Alsaleem, Mahdi; Saadeh, Lina; Misra, Amrit; Madani, Shailender

    2016-01-01

    Isolated ACTH deficiency (IAD) is a rare cause of neonatal cholestasis and hypoglycaemia. This diagnosis has a 20% mortality potential if unrecognised. We describe a case of an infant presenting with cholestatic jaundice and hypoglycaemia. The patient had laboratory findings suggestive of IAD, which was later confirmed with molecular genetic testing. One of the mutations this patient had is a new finding. The patient was started on glucocorticoid replacement therapy after which his bilirubin and glucose levels normalised. PMID:27535729

  10. Hormonal and metabolic evaluation of adrenal incidentalomas.

    PubMed

    Wagnerova, H; Dudasova, D; Lazurova, I

    2009-01-01

    The biochemical and hormonal data in patients with adrenal incidentalomas were evaluated to compare the differences between adrenal adenomas and other benign lesions and to find the relationship between metabolic parameters and adrenal hormones. Ninety two patients (29men, age 20-90 years) with incidentally discovered unilateral or bilateral adrenal masses detected on CT were included in this study for the reasons others than adrenal pathology. Glycemia, cholesterolemia, triglyceridemia, hormonal evaluation including plasma ACTH, plasma aldosterone, plasma renin acitivity, overnight dexametasone test, ACTH test, free plasma metanephrines, urinary catecholamines were determined. In the group of patients with adrenal masses the prevalence of arterial hypertension was three fold higher, the prevalence of DM was approximately five fold higher and the prevalence of the overweight and obesity two fold higher than is reported in the general population. The most frequent adrenal masses were nonfunctional masses, the occurence of functional lesions was as follows: steroid enzymopathies (an exaggerated response of 17-OHP indicating a possible 21-hydroxylase deficiency), subclinical Cushing syndrome, primary aldosteronism and pheochromocytoma (5%, 2%, 2% and 1% respectively). There were no significant differences in evaluated data between patients with adenomas and hyperplasia and also no significant difference in evaluated data between lesions smaller than 3 cm and lesions greater than 3 cm. We did not find any correlations between plasma cortisol and lipid values. In this study we confirmed a higher prevalence of symptoms characteristic for different metabolic syndromes in these patients with adrenal incidentalomas, which indicate systematic screening for the metabolic syndrome including evaluation of the insuline resistance in this patients. PMID:19728761

  11. Ectopic ACTH Production Leading to Diagnosis of Underlying Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Matheny, Leslee N.; Wilson, Jessica R.; Baum, Howard B. A.

    2016-01-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) has been described as a source of ectopic ACTH secretion in patients with Cushing’s syndrome. This is an infrequent association, occurring in less than 1% of MTC cases. Among these, it is even more unusual for an initial diagnosis of hypercortisolism to lead to the discovery of underlying MTC. Here we present a case of a patient with weakness, diarrhea, and hypokalemia who was found first to have Cushing’s syndrome and later diagnosed with metastatic MTC. The patient was treated initially with oral agents to control his hypercortisolism, then with an etomidate infusion after experiencing intestinal perforation. He also received vandetanib therapy targeting his underlying malignancy, as this has been shown to reverse clinical signs of Cushing’s syndrome in patients with MTC and subsequent ectopic ACTH secretion. Bilateral adrenalectomy was ultimately required. Medullary thyroid carcinoma should be considered in patients presenting with Cushing’s syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion, and a multimodality treatment approach is often required. PMID:27141514

  12. Adrenal Function Testing Following Hormone Therapy for Infantile Spasms: Case Series and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Mytinger, John R.; Bowden, Sasigarn A.

    2015-01-01

    Prednisolone and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) are “hormone” therapies for infantile spasms. There is limited data on the occurrence of decreased adrenal reserve or signs of clinical adrenal insufficiency after hormone therapy. This is a retrospective medical record review of patients referred to our Infantile Spasms Program. Our standardized infantile spasms management guideline began in September 2012 and initially included a post-hormone laboratory assessment of adrenal function. Medical records were assessed for hormone treatments, adrenal function testing, and signs of adrenal insufficiency. Forty-two patients who received one or both hormone therapies met inclusion criteria. A post-hormone laboratory assessment of adrenal function was done in 14 patients. Of these 14 patients, 2 had an abnormal laboratory assessment of adrenal function, both by adrenal stimulation testing – one after ACTH and one after prednisolone. One patient received hydrocortisone replacement and the other received stress dose hydrocortisone as needed; neither patient developed signs of adrenal insufficiency. Another patient treated with both types of hormone therapy in tandem, who did not have a post-hormone laboratory assessment, developed signs of mild adrenal insufficiency and required replacement hydrocortisone. Our study suggests that adrenal suppression can occur after modern hormone therapy regimens. We found two patients with abnormal adrenal function testing after hormone therapy and another patient with signs adrenal insufficiency. Given the seriousness of adrenal crisis, caregiver education on the signs of adrenal insufficiency is critical. Greater vigilance may be indicated in patients receiving both types of hormone therapy in tandem. Although a routine post-hormone laboratory assessment of adrenal function may not be feasible in all patients, replacement or stress dose hydrocortisone is necessary for all patients with suspected adrenal insufficiency. PMID

  13. Role of ACTH in the Interactive/Paracrine Regulation of Adrenal Steroid Secretion in Physiological and Pathophysiological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Hervé; Thomas, Michaël; Duparc, Céline; Bertherat, Jérôme; Louiset, Estelle

    2016-01-01

    In the normal human adrenal gland, steroid secretion is regulated by a complex network of autocrine/paracrine interactions involving bioactive signals released by endothelial cells, nerve terminals, chromaffin cells, immunocompetent cells, and adrenocortical cells themselves. ACTH can be locally produced by medullary chromaffin cells and is, therefore, a major mediator of the corticomedullary functional interplay. Plasma ACTH also triggers the release of angiogenic and vasoactive agents from adrenocortical cells and adrenal mast cells and, thus, indirectly regulates steroid production through modulation of the adrenal blood flow. Adrenocortical neoplasms associated with steroid hypersecretion exhibit molecular and cellular defects that tend to reinforce the influence of paracrine regulatory loops on corticosteroidogenesis. Especially, ACTH has been found to be abnormally synthesized in bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia responsible for hypercortisolism. In these tissues, ACTH is detected in a subpopulation of adrenocortical cells that express gonadal markers. This observation suggests that ectopic production of ACTH may result from impaired embryogenesis leading to abnormal maturation of the adrenogonadal primordium. Globally, the current literature indicates that ACTH is a major player in the autocrine/paracrine processes occurring in the adrenal gland in both physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27489549

  14. Is Prolactin Measurement of Value during Inferior Petrosal Sinus Sampling in Patients with ACTH-dependent Cushing’s Syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, S. T.; Nieman, L. K.

    2014-01-01

    Inferior petrosal sinus sampling (IPSS) is considered the gold standard test to distinguish between Cushing’s disease (CD) and ectopic ACTH syndrome (EAS). Anomalous venous drainage, abnormal venous anatomy and lack of expertise can lead to false-negative IPSS results and thereby misclassification of patients with ACTH-dependent Cushing’s syndrome. Prolactin measurement during IPSS can improve diagnostic accuracy and decrease false negative results. A baseline prolactin inferior petrosal sinus to peripheral (IPS/P) ratio (ipsilateral to the dominant post-CRH ACTH IPS/P ratio) of 1.8 or more suggests successful catheterization during IPSS. Prolactin-normalized ACTH IPS/P ratios can then be used to differentiate between a pituitary and ectopic source of ACTH. Values ≤ 0.7 are suggestive of EAS and those ≥ 1.3 are indicative of CD but the implication of values between 0.7 and 1.3 remains unclear and needs further investigation. Larger prospective studies are also needed for further evaluation of the role of contralateral prolactin IPS/P ratios, post-CRH prolactin values and prolactin-adjusted ACTH inter-sinus ratios for tumor localization in CD. PMID:23887034

  15. Role of ACTH in the Interactive/Paracrine Regulation of Adrenal Steroid Secretion in Physiological and Pathophysiological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Hervé; Thomas, Michaël; Duparc, Céline; Bertherat, Jérôme; Louiset, Estelle

    2016-01-01

    In the normal human adrenal gland, steroid secretion is regulated by a complex network of autocrine/paracrine interactions involving bioactive signals released by endothelial cells, nerve terminals, chromaffin cells, immunocompetent cells, and adrenocortical cells themselves. ACTH can be locally produced by medullary chromaffin cells and is, therefore, a major mediator of the corticomedullary functional interplay. Plasma ACTH also triggers the release of angiogenic and vasoactive agents from adrenocortical cells and adrenal mast cells and, thus, indirectly regulates steroid production through modulation of the adrenal blood flow. Adrenocortical neoplasms associated with steroid hypersecretion exhibit molecular and cellular defects that tend to reinforce the influence of paracrine regulatory loops on corticosteroidogenesis. Especially, ACTH has been found to be abnormally synthesized in bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia responsible for hypercortisolism. In these tissues, ACTH is detected in a subpopulation of adrenocortical cells that express gonadal markers. This observation suggests that ectopic production of ACTH may result from impaired embryogenesis leading to abnormal maturation of the adrenogonadal primordium. Globally, the current literature indicates that ACTH is a major player in the autocrine/paracrine processes occurring in the adrenal gland in both physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27489549

  16. [Steroid hormones: their physiological role and diagnostic value during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Shmagel', K V; Chereshnev, V A

    2004-01-01

    Steroid hormones play a key role in the beginning, development and termination of gestation. This reveiw is devoted for physiological effects of estrogens, progesterone, cortisole, ACTH, CRH in various pregnancy events: implantation, fetus development, maternal adaptation and birth initiation. Priority is fixed for estrogens--steroids that vastly increase maternal circulating blood value, induce progesterone action on uterus, regulate fetal "hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical" axis, control free cortisole level in feminine blood. Diagnostic criterions of steroid hormone determination durijng pregnancy are presented. To day unconjugated estriol is the only steroid hormone that implicated in total pregnancy screening programs. Its concentration reduction has been noted in pregnancies with Dawn syndrome, some child enzyme defetcs, intrauterine growth retardation and fetal death incidents.

  17. The prolonged stimulatory effect of ACTH on 11 beta-hydroxylation, and its contribution to the steroidogenic potency of adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed

    Lambert, F; Lammerant, J; Kolanowski, J

    1984-04-01

    The mechanism of the prolonged stimulatory influence of corticotropin (ACTH) on the capacity of adrenocortical cells to produce cortisol in response to ACTH and more specifically the role of 11 beta-hydroxylation, was studied on guinea-pig adrenocortical cells dispersed from control and ACTH-treated animals. As a result of the previous in vivo exposure to ACTH, the net maximal production of glucocorticoids in response to ACTH (by 10(5) cells and 2 h incubation) increased from 660 +/- 33.9 ng (control group) to 1105 +/- 117.9 ng for cells from ACTH-treated animals (P less than 0.001), whereas the apparent affinity of the steroidogenic response remained unchanged. In addition there occurred an increased conversion of exogenous pregnenolone into cortisol by cells from ACTH-treated animals, indicating a prolonged stimulatory influence of ACTH on the post-pregnenolone pathway of cortisol biosynthesis. The activity of 11 beta-hydroxylation step was therefore examined by incubating the adrenocortical cells from control and ACTH-treated animals in the presence of increasing amounts of 11-deoxycortisol. The maximal capacity of 11-deoxycortisol conversion into cortisol was increased as a result of the in vivo exposure to ACTH, averaging 3423 +/- 211 ng cortisol formed from 5 micrograms 11-deoxycortisol by 10(5) cells from ACTH-treated animals vs 2074 +/- 185 ng for cells from control guinea-pigs (P less than 0.001). However, the conversion of lower amounts of 11-deoxycortisol into cortisol, reproducing quantitatively the maximal effect of ACTH on cortisol biosynthesis, was only barely increased in cells from ACTH-treated animals (P greater than 0.05). Therefore it was concluded that ACTH increases in a lasting way not only the overall steroidogenic capacity of adrenocortical cells but also the maximal efficiency of 11 beta-hydroxylation. Since the latter effect cannot account quantitatively for the magnitude of the lasting effect of ACTH on the maximal capacity of

  18. Chronic ethanol consumption depresses hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function in aged rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, C.J.; Bestervelt, L.L.; Mousigian, C.A.; Maimansomsuk, P.; Yong Cai; Piper, W.N. )

    1991-01-01

    In separate experiments, nine (n=20) and fifteen (n=12) month old rats were treated with either 6% ethanol or 12% sucrose in the drinking water to examine the effect of chronic ethanol consumption on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis of aged rats. Blood was collected and plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone were determined by radioimmunoassay. Adrenal glands were cleaned, quartered and used to test in vitro responsiveness to ACTH. Anterior pituitary glands from all 15 month old rats and one half of the nine month old rats were collected, frozen and extracted for measurement of tissue ACTH concentration. The remaining anterior pituitary glands from the nine month old rats were challenged with corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) to test in vitro responsiveness. In nine month old rats, chronic ethanol consumption decreased plasma ACTH and corticosterone. Pituitary ACTH concentrations were unchanged in treated nine month old rats, but the amount of pituitary ACTH released in response to CRH was decreased in rats consuming ethanol. In vitro responsiveness of the adrenal gland to ACTH in nine month old rats consuming ethanol was unchanged. Plasma ACTH and corticosterone concentrations were also decreased in 15 month old rats chronically consuming ethanol. No differences were noted in responsiveness of the adrenal gland or in the amount of pituitary ACTH due to ethanol consumptions in 15 month old rats.

  19. Hedgehog signaling activation induces stem cell proliferation and hormone release in the adult pituitary gland

    PubMed Central

    Pyczek, Joanna; Buslei, Rolf; Schult, David; Hölsken, Annett; Buchfelder, Michael; Heß, Ina; Hahn, Heidi; Uhmann, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Hedgehog (HH) signaling is known to be essential during the embryonal development of the pituitary gland but the knowledge about its role in the adult pituitary and in associated tumors is sparse. In this report we investigated the effect of excess Hh signaling activation in murine pituitary explants and analyzed the HH signaling status of human adenopituitary lobes and a large cohort of pituitary adenomas. Our data show that excess Hh signaling led to increased proliferation of Sox2+ and Sox9+ adult pituitary stem cells and to elevated expression levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (Acth), growth hormone (Gh) and prolactin (Prl) in the adult gland. Inhibition of the pathway by cyclopamine reversed these effects indicating that active Hh signaling positively regulates proliferative processes of adult pituitary stem cells and hormone production in the anterior pituitary. Since hormone producing cells of the adenohypophysis as well as ACTH-, GH- and PRL-immunopositive adenomas express SHH and its target GLI1, we furthermore propose that excess HH signaling is involved in the development/maintenance of hormone-producing pituitary adenomas. These findings advance the understanding of physiological hormone regulation and may open new treatment options for pituitary tumors. PMID:27109116

  20. Growth Hormone

    MedlinePlus

    ... the dose of glucose. Growth hormone stimulates the production of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) . ... regular intervals for years afterward to monitor GH production and to detect tumor recurrence. Other blood tests ...

  1. Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... based lubricants include petroleum jelly, baby oil, or mineral oil. Oil-based types should not be used ... caused by low levels of these hormones. Hysterectomy: Removal of the uterus. Menopause: The time in a ...

  2. Effects of mastoparan upon the late stages of the ACTH secretory pathway of AtT-20 cells.

    PubMed Central

    McFerran, B. W.; Guild, S. B.

    1995-01-01

    1. The mouse AtT-20/D16-16 anterior pituitary tumour cell line was used as a model system for the study of the effects of mastoparan upon the late stages of the adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) secretory pathway. 2. Mastoparan (10(-8)-10(-5) M), an activator of heterotrimeric guanosine 5'-triphosphate binding proteins (G-proteins), stimulated ACTH secretion from electrically-permeabilized AtT-20 cells in a concentration-dependent manner in the effective absence of calcium ions with a threshold of 10(-6) M. Guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP-gamma-S) (10(-8)-10(-4) M) also stimulated ACTH secretion from electrically-permeabilized AtT-20 cells in a concentration-dependent manner in the effective absence of calcium ions with a threshold of 10(-6) M. This GTP-gamma-S-evoked secretion is consistent with previous studies which demonstrated that a G-protein, termed GE, mediates calcium evoked ACTH secretion from AtT-20 cells. GTP-gamma-S-evoked secretion however was not as great as that obtained in response to mastoparan. 3. Both mastoparan (10(-5) M) and GTP-gamma-S (10(-4) M) stimulated ACTH secretion from electrically-permeabilized AtT20 cells in a time-dependent manner. A time of 30 min was adopted as the standard incubation period for the study of both mastoparan and GTP-gamma-S-stimulated ACTH secretion from permeabilized AtT-20 cells. 4. Mastoparan (10(-8)-10(-5) M) stimulated ACTH secretion from permeabilized AtT-20 cells to the same extent in the presence and absence of the protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, chelerythrine chloride (10(-5) M).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7582493

  3. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to acute psychosocial stress: Effects of biological sex and circulating sex hormones.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Mary Ann C; Mahon, Pamela B; McCaul, Mary E; Wand, Gary S

    2016-04-01

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis influences the risk for developing stress-related disorders. Sex-dependent differences in the HPA axis stress response are believed to contribute to the different prevalence rates of stress-related disorders found in men and women. However, studies examining the HPA axis stress response have shown mixed support for sex differences, and the role of endogenous sex hormones on HPA axis response has not been adequately examined in humans. This study utilized the largest sample size to date to analyze the effects of biological sex and sex hormones on HPA axis social stress responses. Healthy, 18- to 30- year-old community volunteers (N=282) completed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), a widely used and well-validated stress-induction laboratory procedure. All women (n=135) were tested during the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle (when progesterone levels are most similar to men). Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol measures were collected at multiple points throughout pre- and post-TSST. Testosterone and progesterone (in men) and progesterone and estradiol (in women) were determined pre-TSST. Following the TSST, men had greater ACTH and cortisol levels than women. Men had steeper baseline-to-peak and peak-to-end ACTH and cortisol response slopes than women; there was a trend for more cortisol responders among men than women. Testosterone negatively correlated with salivary cortisol response in men, while progesterone negatively correlated with ACTH and cortisol responses in women. These data confirm that men show more robust activation of the HPA axis response to the TSST than do women in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Testosterone results suggest an inhibitory effect on HPA axis reactivity in men. Progesterone results suggest an inhibitory effect on HPA axis reactivity in women. Future work is needed to explain why men mount a greater ACTH and cortisol response to the

  4. Elevations in plasmatic titers of corticosterone and aldosterone, in the absence of changes in ACTH, testosterone, or glial fibrillary acidic protein, 72 h following D,L-fenfluramine or D-fenfluramine administration to rats.

    PubMed

    Williams, M T; Morford, L L; McCrea, A E; Inman-Wood, S L; Vorhees, C V

    2001-01-01

    Studies in both humans and animals demonstrate that D,L- and D-fenfluramine (D,L-FEN and D-FEN, respectively) can activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis following an acute dose. No data exist showing a prolonged effect of either drug, although two studies have hinted at increased adrenal activity. There are also considerable differences in the literature pertaining to the neurotoxic effects of D,L- and D-FEN. Some possible explanations for these differences include: activation of different neurotransmitter systems, the temperature at which the animals were maintained during exposure, or the substance sampled in each study. We investigated the effects of either D,L-FEN or D-FEN on pituitary, adrenal, and gonadal hormones 72 h after drug exposure. Furthermore, using a dosing regimen adapted from studies on methamphetamine (e.g., four times every 2 h in a single day) known to produce elevations in glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) under hyperthermic conditions, we examined the effects of D- and D,L-FEN (15 mg/kg, four times) on GFAP content when the animals were dosed at ambient temperatures of 21 or 32 degrees C. Approximately fivefold increases of corticosterone and threefold increases of aldosterone were found 72 h later under resting conditions following both D- and D,L-FEN. Nonetheless, when animals were dosed with D-FEN at 32 degrees C, no significant elevation in corticosterone was detected. No effect was observed for ACTH, testosterone, or GFAP following D- or D,L-FEN treatment. These data suggest that: (1) FEN treatment causes prolonged elevations in adrenal cortical hormones; (2) FEN-treated animals displayed hormonal characteristics similar to animals undergoing a chronic stressor as suggested by no difference in ACTH titers; (3) D,L-FEN treatment or D-FEN treatment (as reported previously) is not similar to other substituted amphetamines in that it does not increase GFAP, even under hyperthermic conditions.

  5. Effects of RXR Agonists on Cell Proliferation/Apoptosis and ACTH Secretion/Pomc Expression

    PubMed Central

    Saito-Hakoda, Akiko; Uruno, Akira; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Shimizu, Kyoko; Parvin, Rehana; Kudo, Masataka; Saito-Ito, Takako; Sato, Ikuko; Kogure, Naotaka; Suzuki, Dai; Shimada, Hiroki; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Fujiwara, Ikuma; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Iwasaki, Yasumasa; Kure, Shigeo; Ito, Sadayoshi; Sugawara, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Various retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonists have recently been developed, and some of them have shown anti-tumor effects both in vivo and in vitro. However, there has been no report showing the effects of RXR agonists on Cushing’s disease, which is caused by excessive ACTH secretion in a corticotroph tumor of the pituitary gland. Therefore, we examined the effects of synthetic RXR pan-agonists HX630 and PA024 on the proliferation, apoptosis, ACTH secretion, and pro-opiomelanocortin (Pomc) gene expression of murine pituitary corticotroph tumor AtT20 cells. We demonstrated that both RXR agonists induced apoptosis dose-dependently in AtT20 cells, and inhibited their proliferation at their higher doses. Microarray analysis identified a significant gene network associated with caspase 3 induced by high dose HX630. On the other hand, HX630, but not PA024, inhibited Pomc transcription, Pomc mRNA expression, and ACTH secretion dose-dependently. Furthermore, we provide new evidence that HX630 negatively regulates the Pomc promoter activity at the transcriptional level due to the suppression of the transcription factor Nur77 and Nurr1 mRNA expression and the reduction of Nur77/Nurr1 heterodimer recruiting to the Pomc promoter region. We also demonstrated that the HX630-mediated suppression of the Pomc gene expression was exerted via RXRα. Furthermore, HX630 inhibited tumor growth and decreased Pomc mRNA expression in corticotroph tumor cells in female nude mice in vivo. Thus, these results indicate that RXR agonists, especially HX630, could be a new therapeutic candidate for Cushing’s disease. PMID:26714014

  6. The effect of ACTH upon faecal glucocorticoid excretion in the koala.

    PubMed

    Davies, Nicole; Gillett, Amber; McAlpine, Clive; Seabrook, Leonie; Baxter, Greg; Lunney, Daniel; Bradley, Adrian

    2013-10-01

    Environmental changes result in physiological responses of organisms, which can adversely affect population dynamics and reduce resistance to disease. These changes are expressed in chronic levels of stress. The measurement of glucocorticoid (GC) concentrations in faeces is a non-invasive method for monitoring stress in wildlife. The metabolism and excretion of steroids differ significantly between species and, as a consequence, non-invasive methods must be physiologically validated for each species. Koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus) are declining in numbers through much of their range. The role of chronic stress in koala populations has not been identified. Prior to the assessment of faecal GC concentrations in wild koala populations, the excretion timing and concentrations of GCs need to be determined. In this study, we assessed a method for identifying and measuring the concentrations of GC metabolites in faecal pellets of captive koalas following ACTH treatment. The results show that an elevation of plasma cortisol concentrations, using sustained release of ACTH, results in elevated concentrations of faecal cortisol/cortisol metabolites. Taking into account the excretion time lag, an increase in faecal cortisol metabolite concentrations corresponds to the release of GCs from the adrenal cortex as early as 36 h before faecal pellet collection. The calculations of steroid partitioning of plasma cortisol showed that the ACTH-stimulated values were significantly different from the control values for the concentrations of free, corticosteroid-binding globulin-bound and albumin-bound cortisol. This study validates the use of faecal cortisol analysis to assess the activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis in freshly collected koala faecal pellets and indicates that the method should be suitable to assess the adrenocortical status of koalas in wild populations.

  7. Drug-induced suppression of ACTH secretion does not promote anti-depressive or anxiolytic effects.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Adriana de Toledo; Homem, Karen Silvia de Carvalho; Suchecki, Deborah; Tufik, Sergio; Troncone, Lanfranco Ranieri Paolo

    2014-05-15

    Mammals respond to a real or perceived stress in an integrated physiological and psychological fashion. Psychiatric disorders like major depression and anxiety have been associated to stressful events. In a previous study we demonstrated that the stress-induced ACTH secretion can be robustly inhibited by the concurrent use of CRF1 (CP154,526 - Pfizer) and V1B (SSR149415 - Sanofi-Aventis) non-peptide antagonists. A proof of mechanism was offered by substituting CP154,526 by SSR125543 and obtaining the same results on three stress models: forced swimming, ether vapor inhalation and restraint. SSR125543 effectively blocked only restraint stress-induced ACTH secretion. We then challenged the hypothesis that the concurrent use of both antagonists would have a potent effect on behavioral models of anxiety and depression. Decreasing doses (30-0.1 mg/kg s.c.) of both drugs were tested in three behavioral models: Porsolt forced swimming test, elevated plus maze and social interaction. Results showed that these drugs had no effect on anxiety models (plus maze and social interaction) but significantly reduced immobility time in the forced swimming test, suggesting anti-depressive action in a dose-range from 1 to 30 mg/kg, not different from the reported in the literature referring to one drug or the other. This negates the proposed hypothesis of summation/potentiation of effects as observed in stress-induced ACTH secretion. These results point toward the involvement of extra-hypothalamic sites for the anti-depressive effects. Recent Phase II clinical research on anti-depressive effects of these drugs has failed rising strong criticisms against the predictive value of behavioral tests currently employed. PMID:24569014

  8. Infundibular neurons of the human hypothalamus simultaneously reactive with antisera against endorphins, ACTH, MSH and beta-LPH.

    PubMed

    Bugnon, C; Bloch, B; Lenys, D; Fellmann, D

    1979-06-27

    In man, discrete neurons of the infundibular (arcuate) nucleus contain compounds that can be stained with anti-endorphin (alpha and beta), anti-ACTH, anti-MSH (alpha and beta) and anti-beta-LPH immune sera (I.S.). In the fetus, certain neurons stain with anti-beta-endorphin or anti((17--39)ACTH starting from the 11th week of fetal life. At the ultrastructural level, these neurons contain elementary granules that are immunoreactive with anti-beta-endorphin. In the adult, neurons immunoreactive with anti-beta-endorphin are found in the infundibular nucleus. Their axonal fibers terminate around blood vessels in the neurovascular zone and in the pituitary stalk, or establish contacts with non-immunoreactive perikarya of the infundibular nucleus. These neurons can be stained with anti(17--39)ACTH and anti-beta-endorphin I.S. The most reactive are also stained moderately with anti-alpha-MSH, anti-beta-MSH, anti-beta-LPH, anti-alpha-endorphin, or anti(1--24)ACTH I.S. These results indicate that, in man, compound(s) identical with or immunologically related to endorphins, beta-LPH, ACTH and MSH are secreted by certain hypothalamic neurons. These agents probably originate from a common precursor molecula similar to the so-called pro-opiocortin.

  9. ACTH-induced caveolin-1 tyrosine phosphorylation is related to podosome assembly in Y1 adrenal cells.

    PubMed

    Colonna, Cecilia; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2005-04-01

    Y1 adrenocortical cells respond to ACTH with a characteristic rounding-up that facilitates cAMP signaling, critical for transport of cholesterol to the mitochondria and increase in steroid secretion. We here demonstrate that caveolin-1 participates in coupling activation of protein kinase A (PKA) to the control of cell shape. ACTH/8-Br-cAMP induced reorganization of caveolin-1-positive structures in correlation with the cellular rounding-up. Concomitant with this change, there was an increase in the phosphorylation of caveolin-1 (Tyr-14) localized at focal adhesions (FA) with reorganization of FA to rounded, ringlike structures. Colocalization with phalloidin showed that phosphocaveolin is present at the edge of actin filaments and that after ACTH stimulation F-actin dots at the cell periphery become surrounded by phosphocaveolin-1. These observations along with electron microscopy studies revealed these structures as podosomes. Podosome assembly was dependent on both PKA and tyrosine kinase activities because their formation was impaired after treatment with specific inhibitors [myristoylated PKI (mPKI) or PP2, respectively] previous to ACTH/8-Br-cAMP stimulation. These results show for the first time that ACTH induces caveolin-1 phosphorylation and podosome assembly in Y1 cells and support the view that the morphological and functional responses to PKA activation in steroidogenic cells are related to cytoskeleton dynamics.

  10. ACTH-induced caveolin-1 tyrosine phosphorylation is related to podosome assembly in Y1 adrenal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Colonna, Cecilia . E-mail: ccolonna@fmed.uba.ar; Podesta, Ernesto J.

    2005-04-01

    Y1 adrenocortical cells respond to ACTH with a characteristic rounding-up that facilitates cAMP signaling, critical for transport of cholesterol to the mitochondria and increase in steroid secretion. We here demonstrate that caveolin-1 participates in coupling activation of protein kinase A (PKA) to the control of cell shape. ACTH/8-Br-cAMP induced reorganization of caveolin-1-positive structures in correlation with the cellular rounding-up. Concomitant with this change, there was an increase in the phosphorylation of caveolin-1 (Tyr-14) localized at focal adhesions (FA) with reorganization of FA to rounded, ringlike structures. Colocalization with phalloidin showed that phosphocaveolin is present at the edge of actin filaments and that after ACTH stimulation F-actin dots at the cell periphery become surrounded by phosphocaveolin-1. These observations along with electron microscopy studies revealed these structures as podosomes. Podosome assembly was dependent on both PKA and tyrosine kinase activities because their formation was impaired after treatment with specific inhibitors [myristoylated PKI (mPKI) or PP2, respectively] previous to ACTH/8-Br-cAMP stimulation. These results show for the first time that ACTH induces caveolin-1 phosphorylation and podosome assembly in Y1 cells and support the view that the morphological and functional responses to PKA activation in steroidogenic cells are related to cytoskeleton dynamics.

  11. Role of endotoxin and interleukin-1 in modulating ACTH, LH and sex steroid secretion.

    PubMed

    Rivier, C

    1990-01-01

    We have shown that the endotoxin LPS acted both at the level of the brain and the gonads to stimulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal, and inhibit the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal, axis. Exogenously administered IL-1 mimics most of the effects of LPS on pituitary activity. In addition, antibodies against IL-1 receptors can interfere with LPS-induced ACTH secretion. These results suggest that at least part of the ability of LPS to alter endocrine functions appears to depend upon endogenous interleukin-1.

  12. Effect of naltrexone treatment on the treadmill exercise-induced hormone release in amenorrheic women.

    PubMed

    Botticelli, G; Bacchi Modena, A; Bresciani, D; Villa, P; Aguzzoli, L; Florio, P; Nappi, R E; Petraglia, F; Genazzani, A R

    1992-12-01

    The effect of an acute physical stress on hormone secretions before and after a 10-day naltrexone treatment in untrained healthy and amenorrheic women was investigated. Plasma levels of pituitary (LH, FSH, prolactin, GH, ACTH, beta-endorphin) and adrenal (cortisol, androstenedione, testosterone) hormones were measured at rest and in response to 60 min of physical exercise. The test was done both before and after a 10-day naltrexone (50 mg/day) treatment. Graded levels of treadmill exercise (50, 70 and 90% of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2) every 20 min) was used as physical stressor. While mean +/- SE plasma LH levels in control women were higher than in amenorrheic patients and increased following the naltrexone treatment (p < 0.01), no significant differences of basal plasma hormonal levels were observed between amenorrheic and eumenorrheic women, both before and after naltrexone treatment. Physical exercise at 90% VO2 induced a significant increase in plasma GH, ACTH, beta-endorphin, cortisol, androstenedione and testosterone levels in controls before naltrexone treatment (p < 0.01). The mean increase in plasma androstenedione and testosterone levels in control women was significantly higher after naltrexone treatment (p < 0.01). In amenorrheic patients before naltrexone, physical exercise induced an increase in plasma prolactin and GH levels, but not in plasma ACTH, beta-endorphin, cortisol, testosterone and androstenedione. After naltrexone treatment, the exercise induced a significant plasma ACTH, beta-endorphin and cortisol levels, while the increase of plasma prolactin levels was significantly higher than before treatment (p < 0.01).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1291596

  13. The hormonal system of the unicellular Tetrahymena: a review with evolutionary aspects.

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2012-06-01

    The unicellular ciliate, Tetrahymena has receptors for hormones of the higher ranked animals, these hormones (e.g. insulin, triiodothyronine, ACTH, histamine, etc.) are also produced by it and it has signal pathways and second messengers for signal transmission. These components are chemically and functionally very similar to that of mammalian ones. The exogenously given hormones regulate different functions, as movement, phagocytosis, chemotaxis, cell growth, secretion, excretion and the cells' own hormone production. The receptors are extremely sensitive, certain hormones are sensed (and response is provoked) at 10-21 M concentration, which makes likely that the function could work by the effect of hormones produced by the Tetrahymena itself. The signal reception is selective, it can differentiate between closely related hormones. The review is listing the hormones produced by the Tetrahymena, the receptors which can receive signals and the signal pathways and second messengers as well, as the known effects of mammalian hormones to the life functions of Tetrahymena. The possible and justified role of hormonal system in the Tetrahymena as a single cell and inside the Tetrahymena population, as a community is discussed. The unicellular hormonal system and mammalian endocrine system are compared and evolutionary conclusions are drawn.

  14. Involvement of multiple protein kinase C isozymes in the ACTH secretory pathway of AtT-20 cells.

    PubMed Central

    McFerran, B. W.; MacEwan, D. J.; Guild, S. B.

    1995-01-01

    1. The mouse AtT-20/D16-16 anterior pituitary tumour cell line was used as a model system for the study of protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated enhancement of calcium- and guanine nucleotide-evoked adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) secretion. 2. A profile of the PKC isozymes present in AtT-20 cells was obtained by Western blotting analysis and it was found that AtT-20 cells express the alpha, beta, epsilon and zeta isoforms of PKC. 3. PKC isozymes were activated by the use of substances reported to activate particular isoforms of the enzyme. The effects of these substances were investigated in both intact and electrically-permeabilized cells. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, EC50 = 1 +/- 0.05 nM, which activates all isozymes of PKC, except the zeta isozyme), thymeleatoxin (TMX, EC50 = 10 +/- 0.5 nM, which activates the alpha, beta and gamma isozymes) and 12-deoxyphorbol 13-phenylacetate 20-acetate (dPPA, EC50 = 3 +/- 0.5 nM, a beta 1-selective isozyme activator) all stimulated ACTH secretion from intact cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Maximal TMX stimulated ACTH secretion was of a similar degree to that obtained in response to PMA but maximal dPPA-stimulated ACTH secretion was only 60-70% of that obtained in response to PMA or TMX. 4. Calcium stimulated ACTH secretion from electrically-permeabilized cells over the concentration-range of 100 nM to 10 microM. PMA (100 nM), TMX (100 nM) but not dPPA (100 nM) enhanced the amount of ACTH secreted at every concentration of calcium investigated.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 1 PMID:7670732

  15. Elevation of plasma glucose, alanine, and urea levels by mammalian ACTH in the American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana).

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, E J; deRoos, R

    1985-08-01

    The effects of a single infusion of mammalian ACTH on plasma glucose, alanine, urea, and lactate were determined in the American bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana). The ACTH (10 U/250 g body wt) was administered, and serial blood samples were collected via a nonocclusive cannula chronically placed in the right truncus arteriosus. Plasma metabolite levels were estimated by standard enzymatic techniques. The plasma metabolites declined following the surgery to levels that were relatively stable by postoperative Day 2. The levels did not vary significantly for the remainder of the 3- or 4-day pretreatment period and in the control bullfrogs during the 48-hr experiments. Plasma glucose levels were essentially unchanged from the time-zero levels at 6 hr following ACTH infusion. Plasma glucose levels subsequently increased to levels that were approximately 24% greater than the control levels by 24 hr and then declined to near control levels by 48 hr. Plasma alanine increased to levels that were approximately 60% greater than the control levels by 12 hr after ACTH treatment and returned to essentially the time-zero levels by 24 hr. Plasma urea rose to levels that were approximately 110% greater than the control levels by 45 min after ACTH infusion, but urea returned to essentially the time-zero levels by 1.5 through 3 hr. Plasma urea increased again to levels that were approximately 90% greater than the control levels by 6 hr and returned to essentially the initial levels by 24 hr. Plasma lactate levels were not significantly influenced by ACTH treatment. The results suggest that a function of the bullfrog hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis is to regulate gluconeogenesis from alanine, and probably other glucogenic amino acids.

  16. A Novel Medical Treatment of Cushing's Due to Ectopic ACTH in a Patient With Neurofibromatosis Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Bano, Gul; Mir, Farheen; Beharry, Nigel; Wilson, Philip; Hodgson, Shirley; Schey, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    A 64-year-old male presented with neurofibromatosis 1 and Cushing’s syndrome. Clinically he was over weight, depressed with extensive skin bruising and hypertension. His 24 hours urinary metanephrines, urinary 5HIAA, gut peptides and chromgranin levels were normal. His renal function and renal MRI scan was also normal. His cortisol failed to suppress on overnight dexamethsone suppression test. His low dose dexamethasone suppression with CRH stimulation showed failure of suppression of cortisol to < 50 nmol/L and ACTH was measurable at 10 ng/L on day 3. There was no response of ACTH or cortisol to CRH stimulation. His ACTH precursors were high at 126 pmol/L consistent with defective pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) processing suggesting an ectopic source of ACTH production. The MRI scan of his pituitary and CT scan of the adrenal glands was normal. His octreotide scan was negative. The source of his ectopic ACTH was most likely a large retroperitoneal plexiform neurofibroma seen on CT abdomen that had undergone malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour transformation on histology. He was a poor surgical risk for tumour debulking procedure. In view of the available literature and role of c-kit signalling in neurofibromatosis, he was treated with Imitinib. Four months after the treatment his Cushings had resolved on biochemical testing. After a year his plexiform neurofibroma has not increased in size. To our knowledge, this is the first case of NF1 associated with clinical and biochemical features of Cushing’s secondary to ectopic ACTH due to MPNST in a plexiform neurofibroma and its resolution on treatment with imatinib. PMID:23853621

  17. A Novel Medical Treatment of Cushing's Due to Ectopic ACTH in a Patient With Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    PubMed

    Bano, Gul; Mir, Farheen; Beharry, Nigel; Wilson, Philip; Hodgson, Shirley; Schey, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    A 64-year-old male presented with neurofibromatosis 1 and Cushing's syndrome. Clinically he was over weight, depressed with extensive skin bruising and hypertension. His 24 hours urinary metanephrines, urinary 5HIAA, gut peptides and chromgranin levels were normal. His renal function and renal MRI scan was also normal. His cortisol failed to suppress on overnight dexamethsone suppression test. His low dose dexamethasone suppression with CRH stimulation showed failure of suppression of cortisol to < 50 nmol/L and ACTH was measurable at 10 ng/L on day 3. There was no response of ACTH or cortisol to CRH stimulation. His ACTH precursors were high at 126 pmol/L consistent with defective pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) processing suggesting an ectopic source of ACTH production. The MRI scan of his pituitary and CT scan of the adrenal glands was normal. His octreotide scan was negative. The source of his ectopic ACTH was most likely a large retroperitoneal plexiform neurofibroma seen on CT abdomen that had undergone malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumour transformation on histology. He was a poor surgical risk for tumour debulking procedure. In view of the available literature and role of c-kit signalling in neurofibromatosis, he was treated with Imitinib. Four months after the treatment his Cushings had resolved on biochemical testing. After a year his plexiform neurofibroma has not increased in size. To our knowledge, this is the first case of NF1 associated with clinical and biochemical features of Cushing's secondary to ectopic ACTH due to MPNST in a plexiform neurofibroma and its resolution on treatment with imatinib.

  18. Cushing's storm secondary to a rare case of ectopic ACTH secreting metastatic breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bucciarelli, Maura; Lee, Ya-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Summary Ectopic ACTH secretion from breast cancer is extremely rare. We report a case of a 30-year-old woman with a history of breast cancer, who presented with psychosis and paranoid behaviour. CT of the head showed white matter disease consistent with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES). Despite using mifepristone with multiple antihypertensives including lisinopril, spironolactone and metoprolol, she was hypertensive. Transaminitis did not allow mifepristone dose escalation and ketoconazole utilization. Etomidate infusion at a non-sedating dose in the intensive care unit controlled her hypertension and cortisol levels. She was transitioned to metyrapone and spironolactone. She was discharged from the hospital on metyrapone with spironolactone and underwent chemotherapy. She died 9 months later after she rapidly redeveloped Cushing's syndrome and had progressive metastatic breast cancer involving multiple bones, liver and lungs causing respiratory failure. Learning points Cushing's syndrome from ectopic ACTH secreting breast cancer is extremely rare.Cushing's syndrome causing psychosis could be multifactorial including hypercortisolism and PRES.Etomidate at non-sedating doses in intensive care setting can be effective to reduce cortisol production followed by transition to oral metyrapone. PMID:26525183

  19. Adrenocortical responses to ACTH in neonatal rats: effect of hypoxia from birth on corticosterone, StAR, and PBR.

    PubMed

    Raff, Hershel; Hong, Julie J; Oaks, Martin K; Widmaier, Eric P

    2003-01-01

    The adrenocortical response to hypoxia may be a critical component of the adaptation to this common neonatal stress. Little is known about adrenal function in vivo in hypoxic neonates. The purpose of this study was to evaluate adrenocortical responses to ACTH in suckling rat pups exposed to hypoxia from birth to 5-7 days of age compared with normoxic controls. We also evaluated potential cellular controllers of steroidogenic function in situ. In 7-day-old pups at 0800, hypoxia from birth resulted in increased basal (12.2 +/- 1.4 ng/ml; n = 12) and ACTH-stimulated (94.0 +/- 9.4 ng/ml; n = 14) corticosterone levels compared with normoxic controls (basal = 8.3 +/- 0.5 ng/ml; n = 11; stimulated = 51.3 +/- 3.8 ng/ml; n = 8). This augmentation occurred despite no significant difference in plasma ACTH levels in normoxic vs. hypoxic pups before (85 +/- 4 vs. 78 +/- 8 pg/ml) or after (481 +/- 73 vs. 498 +/- 52 pg/ml) porcine ACTH injection (20 microg/kg). This effect was similar in the afternoon at 6 days of age and even greater at 5 days of age at 0800. The aldosterone response to ACTH was not augmented by exposure to hypoxia from birth. Adrenocortical hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha mRNA was undetectable by RT-PCR. Steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein in adrenal subcapsules (zona fasciculata/reticularis) was augmented by exposure to hypoxia; this effect was greatest at 5 days of age. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) protein was also increased at 6 and 7 days of age in pups exposed to hypoxia from birth. We conclude that hypoxia from birth results in an augmentation of the corticosterone but not aldosterone response to ACTH. This effect appears to be mediated at least in part by an increase in controllers of mitochondrial cholesterol transport (StAR and PBR) and to occur independently of measurable changes in endogenous plasma ACTH. The augmentation of the corticosterone response to acute increases in ACTH in hypoxic pups is likely to be an

  20. The effects of physical therapeutic agents on serum levels of stress hormones in patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Tönük, Şükrü Burak; Serin, Erdinc; Ayhan, Fikriye Figen; Yorgancioglu, Zeynep Rezan

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the effects of physical agents on the levels of stress hormones in patients with osteoarthritis (OA).Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, hot packs, and therapeutic ultrasound were applied to the lumbar region and knees of patients with OA. Blood samples were taken for the measurement of the serum levels of glucose, insulin (INS), growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), cortisol (COR), and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) immediately before and after the 1st session, to investigate the acute effects of those physical agents on the endocrine system. The hormone levels were also measured every 5 sessions in a total of 10 sessions. The treatment response was also evaluated by using the visual analogue scale (VAS), Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) throughout the therapy period.After the 1st session, there was a decrease in INS levels and a mild decrease in PRL levels (P = 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Throughout the 10-session therapy period, the INS levels increased, whereas the ACTH and COR levels decreased (P < 0.05 for all). The VAS-spine, RMDQ, VAS-knee, and WOMAC scores decreased (P = 0.001 for VAS-spine and P < 0.001 for all others). A positive correlation was detected between the changes in serum COR and WOMAC-pain score (P < 0.05).Although the combination therapy caused changes in INS level accompanied with steady glucose levels, the application of physical agents did not adversely affect the hormone levels. The decrease in ACTH and COR levels may be attributed to the analgesic effect of agents and may be an indicator of patient comfort through a central action. PMID:27583888

  1. The effects of physical therapeutic agents on serum levels of stress hormones in patients with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tönük, Şükrü Burak; Serin, Erdinc; Ayhan, Fikriye Figen; Yorgancioglu, Zeynep Rezan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the effects of physical agents on the levels of stress hormones in patients with osteoarthritis (OA). Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, hot packs, and therapeutic ultrasound were applied to the lumbar region and knees of patients with OA. Blood samples were taken for the measurement of the serum levels of glucose, insulin (INS), growth hormone (GH), prolactin (PRL), cortisol (COR), and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) immediately before and after the 1st session, to investigate the acute effects of those physical agents on the endocrine system. The hormone levels were also measured every 5 sessions in a total of 10 sessions. The treatment response was also evaluated by using the visual analogue scale (VAS), Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC) throughout the therapy period. After the 1st session, there was a decrease in INS levels and a mild decrease in PRL levels (P = 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively). Throughout the 10-session therapy period, the INS levels increased, whereas the ACTH and COR levels decreased (P < 0.05 for all). The VAS-spine, RMDQ, VAS-knee, and WOMAC scores decreased (P = 0.001 for VAS-spine and P < 0.001 for all others). A positive correlation was detected between the changes in serum COR and WOMAC-pain score (P < 0.05). Although the combination therapy caused changes in INS level accompanied with steady glucose levels, the application of physical agents did not adversely affect the hormone levels. The decrease in ACTH and COR levels may be attributed to the analgesic effect of agents and may be an indicator of patient comfort through a central action. PMID:27583888

  2. High-Cholesterol Diet Disrupts the Levels of Hormones Derived from Anterior Pituitary Basophilic Cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Zhang, X; Liu, Z; Yuan, Z; Song, Y; Shao, S; Zhou, X; Yan, H; Guan, Q; Gao, L; Zhang, H; Zhao, J

    2016-03-01

    Emerging evidence shows that elevated cholesterol levels are detrimental to health. However, it is unclear whether there is an association between cholesterol and the pituitary. We investigated the effects of a high-cholesterol diet on pituitary hormones using in vivo animal studies and an epidemiological study. In the animal experiments, rats were fed a high-cholesterol or control diet for 28 weeks. In rats fed the high-cholesterol diet, serum levels of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH; also known as thyrotrophin), luteinising hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) produced by the basophilic cells of the anterior pituitary were elevated in a time-dependent manner. Among these hormones, TSH was the first to undergo a significant change, whereas adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), another hormone produced by basophilic cells, was not changed significantly. As the duration of cholesterol feeding increased, cholesterol deposition increased gradually in the pituitary. Histologically, basophilic cells, and especially thyrotrophs and gonadotrophs, showed an obvious increase in cell area, as well as a potential increase in their proportion of total pituitary cells. Expression of the β-subunit of TSH, FSH and LH, which controls hormone specificity and activity, exhibited a corresponding increase. In the epidemiological study, we found a similar elevation of serum TSH, LH and FSH and a decrease in ACTH in patients with hypercholesterolaemia. Significant positive correlations existed between serum total cholesterol and TSH, FSH or LH, even after adjusting for confounding factors. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that the high-cholesterol diet affected the levels of hormones derived from anterior pituitary basophilic cells. This phenomenon might contribute to the pituitary functional disturbances described in hypercholesterolaemia.

  3. Hormone impostors

    SciTech Connect

    Colborn, T.; Dumanoski, D.; Myers, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    This article discusses the accumulating evidence that some synthetic chemicals disrupt hormones in one way or another. Some mimic estrogen and others interfere with other parts of the body`s control or endocrine system such as testosterone and thyroid metabolism. Included are PCBs, dioxins, furans, atrazine, DDT. Several short sidebars highlight areas where there are or have been particular problems.

  4. Effects of (+)-8-OH-DPAT on the duration of immobility during the forced swim test and hippocampal cell proliferation in ACTH-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Ayaka; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Miyazaki, Ikuko; Asanuma, Masato; Sendo, Toshiaki

    2014-07-01

    In the present study, we examined the effect of ACTH on the immobilization of rats in the forced swim test and hippocampal cell proliferation after administration of the 5-HT1A receptor agonist, R-(+)-8-hydroxy-2-di-n-propylamino tetralin ((+)-8-OH-DPAT). Chronic treatment with (+)-8-OH-DPAT (0.01-0.1 mg/kg, s.c.) significantly decreased the duration of immobility in saline- and ACTH-treated rats. Chronic administration of ACTH caused a significant decrease in hippocampal cell proliferation. However, (+)-8-OH-DPAT significantly normalized cell proliferation in ACTH-treated rats. We then investigated the effects of (+)-8-OH-DPAT on the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and cyclin D1 (elements of cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB)-BDNF and Wnt signaling pathways, respectively) in the hippocampus of saline- and ACTH-treated rats. ACTH treatment significantly decreased the expression of cyclin D1, while treatment with (+)-8-OH-DPAT normalized the expression of cyclin D1 in ACTH-treated rats. However, the expression of BDNF did not change in either saline- or ACTH-treated rats. These findings suggest that the antidepressant effects of (+)-8-OH-DPAT in treatment-resistant animals may be attributed to an enhancement of hippocampal cell proliferation, at least in part due to an enhancement of cyclin D1 expression.

  5. Glucocorticosteroid concentrations in feces and hair of captive caribou and reindeer following adrenocorticotropic hormone challenge.

    PubMed

    Ashley, N T; Barboza, P S; Macbeth, B J; Janz, D M; Cattet, M R L; Booth, R K; Wasser, S K

    2011-07-01

    Climate change and industrial development are contributing to synchronous declines in Rangifer populations across the Arctic. Chronic stress has been implicated as a proximate factor associated with decline in free-ranging populations, but its role in Rangifer is unspecified. Analysis of glucocorticosteroid (GC) concentration in feces, and more recently in hair, is a non-invasive method for monitoring stress in wildlife. Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) released from the pituitary gland stimulates GC release from the adrenals and can be administered to reflect adrenal activation. In this study, we assessed concentrations of GC metabolites in feces and cortisol in hair of Alaskan caribou (Rangifer tarandus granti) and reindeer (R. t. tarandus) following ACTH treatment. We predicted that ACTH challenge would increase concentrations of fecal GCs, but not hair cortisol because steroid deposited into the hair shaft occurs over an extended period of time (months) and is likely insensitive to acute adrenal stimulation. Adult caribou (n=10; mean age, 6.5 years old) exhibited a peak increase in fecal GCs 8h following a 2 IU/kg dose of ACTH compared to pre-injection concentrations. In contrast, sub-adult reindeer (n=10, 0.8 years old) elicited a diminished response to the same dose. Quadrupling the dose (8 IU/kg) prolonged the fecal GC response in female reindeer, but male reindeer were unresponsive. Hair cortisol was unaffected by a single ACTH challenge. Further investigation is required to ascertain whether subspecific differences in adrenal sensitivity are attributed to age or sex differences, or historical selective pressures from semi-domestication and/or sedentary life cycle in reindeer.

  6. Types of hormone therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of hormone therapy; Hormone replacement therapy - types; Menopause - types of hormone therapy; HT - types; Menopausal hormone ... Menopause symptoms include: Hot flashes Night sweats Sleep problems Vaginal dryness Anxiety Moodiness Less interest in sex ...

  7. Growth hormone-releasing hormone resistance in pseudohypoparathyroidism type ia: new evidence for imprinting of the Gs alpha gene.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Giovanna; Maghnie, Mohamad; Weber, Giovanna; De Menis, Ernesto; Brunelli, Valeria; Cappa, Marco; Loli, Paola; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Spada, Anna

    2003-09-01

    Heterozygous inactivating mutations in the Gs alpha gene cause Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy. Consistent with the observation that only maternally inherited mutations lead to resistance to hormone action [pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia (PHP Ia)], recent studies provided evidence for a predominant maternal origin of Gs alpha transcripts in endocrine organs, such as thyroid, gonad, and pituitary. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of pituitary resistance to hypothalamic hormones acting via Gs alpha-coupled receptors in patients with PHP Ia. Six of nine patients showed an impaired GH responsiveness to GHRH plus arginine, consistent with a complete GH deficiency (GH peak from 2.6-8.6 microg/liter, normal > 16.5), and partial (GH peak 13.9 and 13.6 microg/liter) and normal responses were found in two and one patient, respectively. Accordingly, IGF-I levels were below and in the low-normal range in seven and two patients. All patients had a normal cortisol response to 1 microg ACTH test, suggesting a normal corticotroph function that was confirmed by a normal ACTH and cortisol response to CRH test in three patients. In conclusion, we report that in addition to PTH and TSH resistance, patients with PHP Ia display variable degrees of GHRH resistance, consistent with Gs alpha imprinting in human pituitary. PMID:12970263

  8. Growth hormone-releasing hormone resistance in pseudohypoparathyroidism type ia: new evidence for imprinting of the Gs alpha gene.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Giovanna; Maghnie, Mohamad; Weber, Giovanna; De Menis, Ernesto; Brunelli, Valeria; Cappa, Marco; Loli, Paola; Beck-Peccoz, Paolo; Spada, Anna

    2003-09-01

    Heterozygous inactivating mutations in the Gs alpha gene cause Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy. Consistent with the observation that only maternally inherited mutations lead to resistance to hormone action [pseudohypoparathyroidism type Ia (PHP Ia)], recent studies provided evidence for a predominant maternal origin of Gs alpha transcripts in endocrine organs, such as thyroid, gonad, and pituitary. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of pituitary resistance to hypothalamic hormones acting via Gs alpha-coupled receptors in patients with PHP Ia. Six of nine patients showed an impaired GH responsiveness to GHRH plus arginine, consistent with a complete GH deficiency (GH peak from 2.6-8.6 microg/liter, normal > 16.5), and partial (GH peak 13.9 and 13.6 microg/liter) and normal responses were found in two and one patient, respectively. Accordingly, IGF-I levels were below and in the low-normal range in seven and two patients. All patients had a normal cortisol response to 1 microg ACTH test, suggesting a normal corticotroph function that was confirmed by a normal ACTH and cortisol response to CRH test in three patients. In conclusion, we report that in addition to PTH and TSH resistance, patients with PHP Ia display variable degrees of GHRH resistance, consistent with Gs alpha imprinting in human pituitary.

  9. Flow cytometry analysis of hormone receptors on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to identify stress-induced neuroendocrine effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meehan, R. T.

    1986-01-01

    Understanding the role of circulating peptide hormones in the pathogenesis of space-flight induced disorders would be greatly facilitated by a method which monitors chronic levels of hormones and their effects upon in vivo cell physiology. Single and simultaneous multiparameter flow cytometry analysis was employed to identify subpopulations of mononuclear cells bearing receptors for ACTH, Endorphin, and Somatomedin-C using monoclonal antibodies and monospecific antisera with indirect immunofluorescence. Blood samples were obtained from normal donors and subjects participating in decompression chamber studies (acute stress), medical student academic examination (chronic stress), and a drug study (Dexamethasone). Preliminary results indicate most ACTH and Endorphin receptor positive cells are monocytes and B-cells, exhibit little diurnal variation but the relative percentages of receptor positive cells are influenced by exposure to various stressors and ACTH inhibition. This study demonstrates the capability of flow cytometry analysis to study cell surface hormone receptor regulation which should allow insight into neuroendocrine modulation of the immune and other cellular systems during exposure to stress or microgravity.

  10. The effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide on adrenal steroid hormone secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-immunoreactive nerve fibers have been demonstrated in the rat adrenal cortex in close association with zona glomerulosa cells. We have studied the effects of VIP on steroid hormone secretion from the outer zones of the normal rat adrenal cortex. Intact capsule-glomerulosa preparations, consisting of the capsule, zona glomerulosa, and a small portion of the zona fasciculata were perifused in vitro. The secretory responsiveness was assessed by measuring aldosterone and corticosterone release following stimulation with the physiological secretagogues ACTH and angiotensin II. The distribution of adrenal VIP receptors was assessed by in vitro autoradiography of {sup 125}I-VIP binding. {sup 125}I-VIP (0.75 and 2.0 nM) binding was concentrated in the capsule and zone glomerulosa, coincident with the distribution of VIP nerve fibers which aborize extensively in this region. The specificity of this binding was demonstrated using unlabelled VIP, ACTH and angiotensin II.

  11. Angiotensin II in the brain and pituitary: contrasting roles in the regulation of adenohypophyseal secretion.

    PubMed

    Ganong, W F

    1989-01-01

    Angiotensin II (AII) is present in gonadotropes in rats, and there are AII receptors on lactotropes and corticotropes. AII may be a paracrine mediator that stimulates the secretion of prolactin and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) at the level of the pituitary, but additional research is needed to define its exact role. Angiotensinogen may also reach the gonadotropes via a paracrine route. On the other hand, there is considerable evidence that brain AII stimulates the secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) by increasing the secretion of LH-releasing hormone, and that this effect is due to AII-mediated release of norepinephrine from noradrenergic nerve terminals in the preoptic region of the hypothalamus. In addition, brain AII inhibits the secretion of prolactin, probably by increasing the release of dopamine into the portal hypophyseal vessels. Circulating AII stimulates the secretion of a third anterior pituitary hormone, ACTH, by acting on one or more of the circumventricular organs to increase the secretion of corticotropin-releasing hormone.

  12. [Effect of dalargin on the content of endorphins, leucine-enkephalin ACTH and corticosterone of the blood of stressed rats].

    PubMed

    Bobkov, A I; Polonskiĭ, V M; Vinogradov, V A; Demina, D G; Smagin, V G

    1985-12-01

    Stress caused by acute cysteamine duodenal ulcer was induced in Wistar male rats. All the endogenous opioides under study were involved in the stress-reaction mechanism. Protective dalargin (synthetic enkephalin analogue) administration revealed a tendency towards normalization of endorphin, L-enkephalin and ACTH blood levels.

  13. The Role of ACTH and Corticosteroids for Sepsis and Septic Shock: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Annane, Djillali

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a common disorder associated with high morbidity and mortality. It is now defined as an abnormal host response to infection, resulting in life-threatening dysfunction of organs. There is evidence from in vitro and in vivo experiments in various animal models and in patients that endotoxin or sepsis may directly and indirectly alter the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal response to severe infection. These alterations may include necrosis or hemorrhage or inflammatory mediator-mediated decreased ACTH synthesis, steroidogenesis, cortisol delivery to tissues, clearance from plasma, and decreased sensitivity of tissues to cortisol. Disruption of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis may translate in patients with sepsis into cardiovascular and other organ dysfunction, and eventually an increase in the risk of death. Exogenous administration of corticosteroids at moderate dose, i.e., <400 mg of hydrocortisone or equivalent for >96 h, may help reversing sepsis-associated shock and organ dysfunction. Corticosteroids may also shorten the duration of stay in the ICU. Except for increased blood glucose and sodium levels, treatment with corticosteroids was rather well tolerated in the context of clinical trials. The benefit of treatment on survival remains controversial. Based on available randomized controlled trials, the likelihood of survival benefit is greater in septic shock versus sepsis patients, in sepsis with acute respiratory distress syndrome or with community-acquired pneumonia versus patients without these conditions, and in patients with a blunted cortisol response to 250 μg of ACTH test versus those with normal response. PMID:27379022

  14. Cushing's syndrome secondary to ectopic ACTH secretion: The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ejaz, Shamim; Vassilopoulou-Sellin, Rena; Busaidy, Naifa L.; Hu, Mimi I.; Waguespack, Steven G.; Jimenez, Camilo; Ying, Anita K.; Cabanillas, Maria; Abbara, Maher; Habra, Mouhammed Amir

    2011-01-01

    Background Cushing's syndrome (CS) secondary to ectopic ACTH secretion (EAS) has been described in association with a variety of tumors. The current experience with this syndrome is based on a few case series and individual case reports. Limited data are available about the tumors associated with CS-EAS in cancer center setting. This report describes CS-EAS at MD Anderson Cancer Center to further enhance our understanding and management of this syndrome. Methods This is a retrospective review for 43 patients with CS-EAS who were diagnosed between 1979 and 2009 at our institution. Results Different neuroendocrine tumors were associated with CS-EAS. Twenty one patients (48.9%) had tumors located in the chest cavity with bronchial carcinoid and small cell lung cancer representing the two most common causes. The ACTH source remained occult in 4 patients (9.3 %) despite extensive work-up. Clinical presentation was variable and the classical features of CS were not evident in some patients. Death occurred in 27 patients (62.8%) and the median overall survival was 32.2 months. Major morbidities included new onset or worsening hyperglycemia (77%), symptomatic venous thromboembolism (14%) and infections (23%). Conclusions In CS-EAS cases seen at a comprehensive cancer center, tumors originating in the chest cavity were the leading tumors associated with this syndrome. We suspect that CS-EAS is underreported because of the atypical presentation in some cases. Thus, we suggest careful evaluation of patients with neuroendocrine tumors to avoid missing co-existing CS-EAS. PMID:21412758

  15. Single-Cell Phenotypic Characterization of Human Pituitary GHomas and Non-Functioning Adenomas Based on Hormone Content and Calcium Responses to Hypothalamic Releasing Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Senovilla, Laura; Núñez, Lucía; de Campos, José María; de Luis, Daniel A.; Romero, Enrique; García-Sancho, Javier; Villalobos, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Human pituitary tumors are generally benign adenomas causing considerable morbidity due to excess hormone secretion, hypopituitarism, and other tumor mass effects. Pituitary tumors are highly heterogeneous and difficult to type, often containing mixed cell phenotypes. We have used calcium imaging followed by multiple immunocytochemistry to type growth hormone secreting (GHomas) and non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs). Individual cells were typed for stored hormones and calcium responses to classic hypothalamic releasing hormones (HRHs). We found that GHomas contained growth hormone cells either lacking responses to HRHs or responding to all four HRHs. However, most GHoma cells were polyhormonal cells responsive to both thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and GH-releasing hormone. NFPAs were also highly heterogeneous. Some of them contained ACTH cells lacking responses to HRHs or polyhormonal gonadotropes responsive to LHRH and TRH. However, most NFPAs were made of cells storing no hormone and responded only to TRH. These results may provide new insights on the ontogeny of GHomas and NFPAs. PMID:26106585

  16. Ewes With Divergent Cortisol Responses to ACTH Exhibit Functional Differences in the Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) Axis.

    PubMed

    Hewagalamulage, Sakda D; Clarke, Iain J; Rao, Alexandra; Henry, Belinda A

    2016-09-01

    Within any population, the cortisol response to ACTH covers a considerable range. High responders (HRs) exhibit a greater cortisol secretory response to stress or ACTH, compared with individuals classified as low cortisol responders (LRs). We administered ACTH (0.2 μg/kg, iv) to 160 female sheep and selected subpopulations of animals as LR and HR. In the present study, we aimed to characterize the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis in HR and LR and to identify factors that underlie the differing cortisol responses to ACTH. Hypothalami, pituitaries, and adrenals were collected from nonstressed HR and LR ewes. Expression of genes for CRH, arginine vasopressin (AVP), oxytocin, glucocorticoid receptor, and mineralocorticoid receptor were measured by in situ hybridization in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) gene expression was measured in the anterior pituitary. Expression of CRH, AVP, and POMC was higher in HR, with no differences in either glucocorticoid receptor or mineralocorticoid receptor expression. Oxytocin expression was greater in LR. In the adrenal gland, real-time PCR analysis indicated that expression of the ACTH receptor and a range of steroidogenic enzymes was similar in HR and LR. Adrenal weights, the cortex to medulla ratio and adrenal cortisol content were also similar in LR and HR. In conclusion, LR and HR display innate differences in the steady-state expression of CRH, AVP, oxytocin, and POMC, indicating that selection for cortisol responsiveness identifies distinct subpopulations that exhibit innate differences in the gene expression/function of hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis markers. PMID:27414744

  17. High-end normal adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol levels are associated with specific cardiovascular risk factors in pediatric obesity: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, and in particular cortisol, has been reported to be involved in obesity-associated metabolic disturbances in adults and in selected populations of adolescents. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between morning adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol levels and cardiovascular risk factors in overweight or obese Caucasian children and adolescents. Methods This cross-sectional study of 450 obese children and adolescents (aged 4 to 18 years) was performed in a tertiary referral center. ACTH, cortisol, cardiovascular risk factors (fasting and post-challenge glucose, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, triglycerides, and hypertension) and insulin resistance were evaluated. All analyses were corrected for confounding factors (sex, age, puberty, body mass index), and odds ratios were determined. Results ACTH and cortisol levels were positively associated with systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides, fasting glucose and insulin resistance. Cortisol, but not ACTH, was also positively associated with LDL-cholesterol. When adjusted for confounding factors, an association between ACTH and 2 h post-oral glucose tolerance test glucose was revealed. After stratification according to cardiovascular risk factors and adjustment for possible confounding factors, ACTH levels were significantly higher in subjects with triglycerides ≥90th percentile (P <0.02) and impaired fasting glucose or glucose tolerance (P <0.001). Higher cortisol levels were found in subjects with blood pressure ≥95th percentile and LDL-cholesterol ≥90th percentile. Overall, the highest tertiles of ACTH (>5.92 pmol/l) and cortisol (>383.5 nmol/l) although within the normal range were associated with increases in cardiovascular risk factors in this population. Conclusions In obese children and adolescents, high morning ACTH and cortisol levels are associated

  18. Size reduction of an ACTH-secreting pituitary macroadenoma in Nelson's syndrome by sodium valproate: effect of withdrawal and re-institution of treatment.

    PubMed

    Loli, P; Berselli, M E; Vignati, F; De Grandi, C; Tagliaferri, M

    1988-11-01

    We describe herein the reduction in the size of an ACTH-secreting pituitary macroadenoma in a patient with Nelson's syndrome during chronic administration of sodium valproate, and the changes in tumour volume after withdrawal and re-institution of treatment. The patient had elevated plasma ACTH levels (1123-1255 pmol/l), which increased markedly after CRH stimulation. A first 4-month course of sodium valproate administration (600 mg/day, orally) was started. Plasma ACTH fell to 550-726 pmol/l with persistence of responsiveness to CRH; brain computed tomography showed a clearcut reduction of tumour size. One month after drug withdrawal, the tumour volume appeared unchanged and plasma ACTH values ranged between 374 and 440 pmol/l. One and a half year after drug withdrawal, a brain computed tomography showed re-expansion of the pituitary adenoma with evidence of suprasellar extension, which had never been seen previously. Plasma ACTH ranged between 113 and 199 pmol/l. A second course of sodium valproate was started; after three months, a brain computed tomography documented clearcut reduction of tumour volume from a suprasellar extension to a partially empty pituitary fossa. Plasma ACTH ranged from 396 to 542 pmol/l with persistence of responsiveness to CRH. The present report documents for the first time the reduction of tumour size in a patient with an ACTH-secreting macroadenoma by chronic administration of sodium valproate.

  19. Analysis of ACTH-related and CLIP-related peptides partially purified from the pituitary of the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri.

    PubMed

    Dores, R M; Adamczyk, D L; Joss, J M

    1990-07-01

    Acid extracts of individual lungfish pituitaries were fractionated by gel filtration on a Sephadex G-75 column and aliquots of column fractions were screened with a heterologous ACTH(1-39) radioimmunoassay (RIA). Two major, incompletely separated, peaks of ACTH-related immunoreactivity were detected. These peaks of ACTH-related material were resolved by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and were designated Peak A and Peak B. Peak A had a retention time more hydrophilic than synthetic human CLIP [ACTH(18-39)], whereas Peak B had a retention time similar to, but not identical with, human ACTH(1-39). Further analysis indicated that Peak A had an apparent molecular weight of 2.5K and an isoelectric point of 4.3. Based on these characteristics, Peak A would appear to be lungfish CLIP. Peak B had an apparent molecular weight of 4.5K. Based on chromatographic and immunological properties, Peak B would appear to be lungfish ACTH. The detection of these lungfish peptides by heterologous RIA indicates a high degree of primary sequence homology between lungfish and tetrapod ACTH-related polypeptides.

  20. Growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, Martin; Strasburger, Christian J

    2010-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) is a proteohormone secreted by the pituitary gland. It acts through binding to the hGH receptor, inducing either direct effects or initiating the production of insulin-like growth-factor I (IGF-I), the most important mediator of hGH effects. Growth hormone is primarily known to promote longitudinal growth in children and adolescents, but has also various important metabolic functions throughout adult life. Effects of hGH on the adult organism are well established from studies with recombinant growth hormone (rhGH) therapy in growth hormone deficient subjects. In this particular group of patients, replacement of hGH leads to increased lipolysis and lean body mass, decreased fat mass, improvements in VO(2max), and maximal power output. Although extrapolation from these findings to the situation in well trained healthy subjects is impossible, and controlled studies in healthy subjects are scarce, abuse of hGH seems to be popular among athletes trying to enhance physical performance. Detection of the application of rhGH is difficult, especially because the amino acid sequence of rhGH is identical to the major 22,000 Da isoform of hGH normally secreted by the pituitary. Furthermore, some physiological properties of hGH secretion also hindered the development of a doping test: secreted in a pulsatile manner, it has a very short half-life in circulation, which leads to highly variable serum levels. Concentration alone therefore cannot prove the exogenous administration of hGH.Two approaches have independently been developed for the detection of hGH doping: The so-called "marker approach" investigates changes in hGH-dependent parameters like IGF-I or components of bone and collagen metabolism, which are increased after hGH injection. In contrast, the so-called "isoform approach" directly analyses the spectrum of molecular isoforms in circulation: the pituitary gland secretes a spectrum of homo- and heterodimers and - multimers of a variable

  1. Dephosphorylation/inactivation of tyrosine hydroxylase at the median eminence of the hypothalamus is required for suckling-induced prolactin and adrenocorticotrop hormone responses.

    PubMed

    Fehér, Pálma; Oláh, Márk; Bodnár, Ibolya; Hechtl, Dániel; Bácskay, Ildikó; Juhász, Béla; Nagy, György M; Vecsernyés, Miklós

    2010-04-29

    We have recently found that dopamine (DA) released from terminals of the hypothalamic neuroendocrine dopamine (NEDA) neurons plays a role not only in prolactin (PRL), but also in adrenocorticotrop hormone (ACTH) secretion, without having any influence on alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) release in lactating dams. The aim of our present studies was to further investigate this DAerg regulation of ACTH using consecutively applied physiological stimulation (suckling) and pharmacological inhibition of the rate-limiting enzyme of DA synthesis (tyrosine hydroxylase, TH) by alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (alpha-MpT) that acutely affect secretion of these pituitary hormones during lactation. Following 4h separation period, two experimental groups were formed. In the first group, lactating rats were assembled with their litters for 60 min prior to alpha-MpT. In the second group, the alpha-MpT was injected first and 60 min later suckling stimulus was applied. Plasma samples were taken in every 15 min during the 90 min experimental period. Concentrations of plasma PRL, ACTH and alpha-MSH were measured by specific RIAs. Both stimuli applied in the first sequence, significantly elevated plasma PRL and ACTH levels in separated lactating dams, without having any effect on alpha-MSH secretion. Suckling applied in the first sequence was able to block the alpha-MpT-induced elevation of ACTH secretion, while PRL response was also significantly attenuated. alpha-MpT pretreatment prevented both PRL and ACTH responses to suckling stimulus. Investigating the dephosphorylation/inactivation of TH in the arcuate nucleus-ME (TIDA) regions, no pTH-immunoreactive perikarya or terminals can be found in continuously suckled dams. In contrast, after 4h separation of the mothers from their litters, pTH-immunoreactivity can be clearly visualized in the external zone of ME. In alpha-MpT pretreated mothers following 4h separation no pTH positive terminals are visible. No changes in the TH

  2. [Incretin hormones].

    PubMed

    Cáp, J

    2011-04-01

    Incretin hormones are peptides that are secreted from endocrine cell of gastrointestinal tract after nutrient ingestion and stimulate insulin secretion. Glucosodependent Insulinotropic Peptide--GIP is released from K-cells of duodenum and proximal jejunum, recently GIP synthesis has been proved in pancreatic alpha cells. Besides the incretin effect causes GIP increased lipogenesis and decreased lipolysis in fat tissue, increased bone formation and decreased resorption and has protective and proliferative effect on CNS neurons. Both GIP agonists (to treat diabetes) and antagonist (to treat obesity) are being studied. Another incretin hormone is derived in intestinal I-cells by posttranslational processing of proglucagon--glucagon-like peptides 1 and 2 (GLP-1 and GLP-2). GLP-1 stimulates insuline production and inhibits glucagon secretion, exerts proliferative and antiapoptotic effect on beta-cells. Via receptors on vagal nerve and central mechanisms decreases food intake and decreases body weight. By deceleration of gastric emptying it attenuates increases in meal-associated blood glucose levels. It exerts cardioprotective effects. GLP-1 receptors have been proved in liver recently but decreased liver glucose production and increased glucose uptake by liver and muscle are mediated indirectly by altering insulin and glucagons levels. GLP-2 stimulates enterocytes proliferation, up-regulates intestinal nutrient transport, improves intestinal barrier function, and inhibits gastric and intestinal motility. GLP-2 also reduces bone resorption. PMID:21612069

  3. The effects of hypokalaemia on the hormone exocytosis in adenohypophysis and prolactinoma cell culture model systems.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Z; Pálföldi, R; László, A; Radács, M; László, M; Hausinger, P; Tiszlavicz, L; Rázga, Z; Valkusz, Z; Gálfi, M

    2014-11-01

    The extracellular ion milieu determines the exocytosis mechanism that is coupled to spontaneous electrical activity. The K(+) ion plays crucial role in this mechanism: as the potassium current is associated with membrane hyperpolarization and hormone release through protein cascade activation. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the response mechanisms of normal adenohypophysis and adenohypophyseal prolactinoma cell populations at different extracellular K(+) levels with an otherwise isoionic milieu of all other essential ions. We focused on prolactin (PRL) and adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) release.In our experimental study, female Wistar rats (n=20) were treated with estrone-acetate (150 μg/kg b.w./week) for 6 months to induce prolactinomas in the adenohypophysis. Primary, monolayer cell cultures were prepared by enzymatic and mechanical digestion. PRL and ACTH hormone presence was measured by radioimmunoassay or immuno-chemiluminescence assay. Immunocytochemistry was used to assess the apoptotic cells.Differences between the effects of hypokalaemia on normal adenohypophysis cultures and prolactinoma cell populations were investigated. Significant alteration (p<0.001, n=10) in hormone exocytosis was detected in K(+) treated adenohypophyseal and prolactinoma cell cultures compared to untreated groups. Immunocyto-chemistry showed that Bcl-2 expression was reduced under hypokalaemic conditions.The decrease in hormone exocytosis was tightly correlated to the extracellular K(+) in both cell types, leading to the conclusion that external K(+) may be the major factor for the inhibition of hormone release. The significant increase in hormone content in supernatant media suggests that hypokalaemia may play important role in apoptosis.

  4. Profiling of adrenocorticotropic hormone and arginine vasopressin in human pituitary gland and tumor thin tissue sections using droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling-HPLC–ESI-MS–MS

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R.; Changelian, Armen; Laws, Edward R.; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-18

    Described here are the results from the profiling of the proteins arginine vasopressin (AVP) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from normal human pituitary gland and pituitary adenoma tissue sections using a fully automated droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system for spatially resolved sampling, HPLC separation, and mass spectral detection. Excellent correlation was found between the protein distribution data obtained with this droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system and those data obtained with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) chemical imaging analyses of serial sections of the same tissue. The protein distributions correlated with the visible anatomic pattern of the pituitary gland. AVP was most abundant in the posterior pituitary gland region (neurohypophysis) and ATCH was dominant in the anterior pituitary gland region (adenohypophysis). The relative amounts of AVP and ACTH sampled from a series of ACTH secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenomas correlated with histopathological evaluation. ACTH was readily detected at significantly higher levels in regions of ACTH secreting adenomas and in normal anterior adenohypophysis compared to non-secreting adenoma and neurohypophysis. AVP was mostly detected in normal neurohypophysis as anticipated. This work demonstrates that a fully automated droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling system coupled to HPLC-ESI-MS/MS can be readily used for spatially resolved sampling, separation, detection, and semi-quantitation of physiologically-relevant peptide and protein hormones, such as AVP and ACTH, directly from human tissue. In addition, the relative simplicity, rapidity and specificity of the current methodology support the potential of this basic technology with further advancement for assisting surgical decision-making.

  5. Profiling of adrenocorticotropic hormone and arginine vasopressin in human pituitary gland and tumor thin tissue sections using droplet-based liquid-microjunction surface-sampling-HPLC–ESI-MS–MS

    DOE PAGES

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Calligaris, David; Feldman, Daniel R.; Changelian, Armen; Laws, Edward R.; Santagata, Sandro; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.; Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2015-06-18

    Described here are the results from the profiling of the proteins arginine vasopressin (AVP) and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from normal human pituitary gland and pituitary adenoma tissue sections using a fully automated droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system for spatially resolved sampling, HPLC separation, and mass spectral detection. Excellent correlation was found between the protein distribution data obtained with this droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling-HPLC-ESI-MS/MS system and those data obtained with matrix assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) chemical imaging analyses of serial sections of the same tissue. The protein distributions correlated with the visible anatomic pattern of the pituitary gland.more » AVP was most abundant in the posterior pituitary gland region (neurohypophysis) and ATCH was dominant in the anterior pituitary gland region (adenohypophysis). The relative amounts of AVP and ACTH sampled from a series of ACTH secreting and non-secreting pituitary adenomas correlated with histopathological evaluation. ACTH was readily detected at significantly higher levels in regions of ACTH secreting adenomas and in normal anterior adenohypophysis compared to non-secreting adenoma and neurohypophysis. AVP was mostly detected in normal neurohypophysis as anticipated. This work demonstrates that a fully automated droplet-based liquid microjunction surface sampling system coupled to HPLC-ESI-MS/MS can be readily used for spatially resolved sampling, separation, detection, and semi-quantitation of physiologically-relevant peptide and protein hormones, such as AVP and ACTH, directly from human tissue. In addition, the relative simplicity, rapidity and specificity of the current methodology support the potential of this basic technology with further advancement for assisting surgical decision-making.« less

  6. Hormone Replacement Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... before and during menopause, the levels of female hormones can go up and down. This can cause ... hot flashes and vaginal dryness. Some women take hormone replacement therapy (HRT), also called menopausal hormone therapy, ...

  7. Growth hormone test

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003706.htm Growth hormone test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The growth hormone test measures the amount of growth hormone in ...

  8. Effects of withholding feed on thyrotropin-releasing hormone stimulation test results and effects of combined testing on oral sugar test and thyrotropin-releasing hormone stimulation test results in horses.

    PubMed

    Restifo, Melissa M; Frank, Nicholas; Hermida, Pilar; Sanchez-Londoño, Alfredo

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess effects of withholding feed on thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) stimulation test results used in diagnosis of pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction in horses and determine effects of combined testing on results of the TRH stimulation test and the oral sugar test (OST) used in diagnosis of equine metabolic syndrome. ANIMALS 30 adult horses. PROCEDURES All horses underwent TRH stimulation tests under fed and nonfed conditions, an OST alone, and an OST combined with TRH stimulation testing. For TRH stimulation tests, plasma ACTH concentrations were measured before (baseline) and 10 minutes after (poststimulation) IV TRH administration. For the OST, plasma glucose and insulin concentrations were measured before (baseline) and 60 and 90 minutes after oral corn syrup administration. For combined testing, the TRH stimulation test was initiated immediately after 60-minute posttreatment sample collection for the OST. Results were compared among methods by Wilcoxon matched-pairs, signed rank tests, paired t tests, and Bland-Altman analysis. RESULTS Feeding conditions did not affect median ACTH concentrations when TRH stimulation tests were performed alone. Median baseline ACTH concentration did not differ between TRH stimulation tests performed alone (under fed or nonfed conditions) and those combined with OSTs. Median poststimulation ACTH concentration was significantly lower for combined tests than for solitary TRH stimulation tests. Mean 60-minute plasma glucose concentration was significantly lower for solitary OSTs than for combined tests, but this difference could not be attributed to TRH administration. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Combined testing in the manner described impacted ACTH concentrations during TRH stimulation tests and is not recommended at this time. PMID:27347827

  9. Metabolic effects of cortisol, ACTH, adrenalin and insulin in the marsupial sugar glider, Petaurus breviceps.

    PubMed

    Bradley, A J; Stoddart, D M

    1990-11-01

    The effects of cortisol, ACTH, adrenalin and insulin on indices of carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism were investigated in the conscious marsupial sugar glider Petaurus breviceps. Short-term i.v. infusion of cortisol at dose rates of 0.02, 0.2 and 1.0 mg/kg per h caused the plasma glucose concentration to rise sharply from the normal range of 3.3-4.4 to 8.1-8.7 mmol/l at the end of the infusion period without significant alteration in plasma free fatty acid (FFA), amino acid or urea concentrations. Infusions of ACTH at dose rates of 0.02, 0.06 and 0.45 IU/kg per h caused a similar rise in plasma glucose concentration; however, this was now accompanied by an elevation in plasma FFA concentration, but again without significant changes in either plasma amino acid or urea concentrations. Infusion of adrenalin at 10 micrograms/kg per h caused an increase in the plasma concentrations of both glucose and FFA. Intravenous injections of 0.15 IU insulin/kg caused a rapid and marked decrease in the plasma glucose concentration within 30 min and an increase in the plasma free cortisol concentration. Associated with this change was a marked rise in the plasma concentration of both FFA and free cortisol. The rise in free cortisol was, however, significantly reduced by infusion of glucose. Pretreatment with five daily i.m. injections of 1 mg cortisol acetate/kg, which produced an increase in plasma free cortisol concentration to near the maximum of the physiological range, caused a marked reduction in insulin sensitivity. Cortisol pretreatment caused an increase in the plasma FFA and amino acid concentrations. Petaurus breviceps is highly sensitive to the metabolic effects of glucocorticoids and is similar in this respect to the brush-tailed possum Trichosurus vulpecula. The interactive effects between insulin and glucocorticoids on carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism in Petaurus breviceps are similar to those shown by Trichosurus vulpecula and some eutherian mammals

  10. Metabolic effects of cortisol, ACTH, adrenalin and insulin in the marsupial sugar glider, Petaurus breviceps.

    PubMed

    Bradley, A J; Stoddart, D M

    1990-11-01

    The effects of cortisol, ACTH, adrenalin and insulin on indices of carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism were investigated in the conscious marsupial sugar glider Petaurus breviceps. Short-term i.v. infusion of cortisol at dose rates of 0.02, 0.2 and 1.0 mg/kg per h caused the plasma glucose concentration to rise sharply from the normal range of 3.3-4.4 to 8.1-8.7 mmol/l at the end of the infusion period without significant alteration in plasma free fatty acid (FFA), amino acid or urea concentrations. Infusions of ACTH at dose rates of 0.02, 0.06 and 0.45 IU/kg per h caused a similar rise in plasma glucose concentration; however, this was now accompanied by an elevation in plasma FFA concentration, but again without significant changes in either plasma amino acid or urea concentrations. Infusion of adrenalin at 10 micrograms/kg per h caused an increase in the plasma concentrations of both glucose and FFA. Intravenous injections of 0.15 IU insulin/kg caused a rapid and marked decrease in the plasma glucose concentration within 30 min and an increase in the plasma free cortisol concentration. Associated with this change was a marked rise in the plasma concentration of both FFA and free cortisol. The rise in free cortisol was, however, significantly reduced by infusion of glucose. Pretreatment with five daily i.m. injections of 1 mg cortisol acetate/kg, which produced an increase in plasma free cortisol concentration to near the maximum of the physiological range, caused a marked reduction in insulin sensitivity. Cortisol pretreatment caused an increase in the plasma FFA and amino acid concentrations. Petaurus breviceps is highly sensitive to the metabolic effects of glucocorticoids and is similar in this respect to the brush-tailed possum Trichosurus vulpecula. The interactive effects between insulin and glucocorticoids on carbohydrate, fat and protein metabolism in Petaurus breviceps are similar to those shown by Trichosurus vulpecula and some eutherian mammals

  11. Alterations in hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal/thyroid axes and gonadotropin-releasing hormone in the patients with primary insomnia: a clinical research.

    PubMed

    Xia, Lan; Chen, Gui-Hai; Li, Zhi-Hua; Jiang, Song; Shen, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    The hypothalamus-pituitary-target gland axis is thought to be linked with insomnia, yet there has been a lack of further systematic studies to prove this. This study included 30 patients with primary insomnia (PI), 30 patients with depression-comorbid insomnia (DCI), and 30 healthy controls for exploring the alterations in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal/thyroid axes' hormones and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index was used to evaluate sleep quality in all subjects. The serum concentrations of corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH), thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH), GnRH, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), cortisol, total triiodothyronine (TT3), and total thyroxine (TT4) in the morning (between 0730 h and 0800 h) were detected. Compared to the controls, all hormonal levels were elevated in the insomniacs, except ACTH and TSH in the PI group. Compared to the DCI patients, the PI patients had higher levels of CRH, cortisol, TT3, and TT4 but lower levels of TRH, GnRH, and ACTH. Spearman's correlation analysis indicated that CRH, TRH, GnRH, TSH, cortisol, TT4, and TT3 were positively correlated with the severity of insomnia. The linear regression analysis showed that only CRH, GnRH, cortisol, and TT3 were affected by the PSQI scores among all subjects, and only CRH was included in the regression model by the "stepwise" method in the insomnia patients. Our results indicated that PI patients may have over-activity of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal/thyroid axes and an elevated level of GnRH in the morning.

  12. Deciding about hormone therapy

    MedlinePlus

    HRT - deciding; Estrogen replacement therapy - deciding; ERT- deciding; Hormone replacement therapy - deciding; Menopause - deciding; HT - deciding; Menopausal hormone therapy - deciding; MHT - deciding

  13. The Insect Prothoracic Gland as a Model for Steroid Hormone Biosynthesis and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Ou, Qiuxiang; Zeng, Jie; Yamanaka, Naoki; Brakken-Thal, Christina; O'Connor, Michael B; King-Jones, Kirst

    2016-06-28

    Steroid hormones are ancient signaling molecules found in vertebrates and insects alike. Both taxa show intriguing parallels with respect to how steroids function and how their synthesis is regulated. As such, insects are excellent models for studying universal aspects of steroid physiology. Here, we present a comprehensive genomic and genetic analysis of the principal steroid hormone-producing organs in two popular insect models, Drosophila and Bombyx. We identified 173 genes with previously unknown specific expression in steroid-producing cells, 15 of which had critical roles in development. The insect neuropeptide PTTH and its vertebrate counterpart ACTH both regulate steroid production, but molecular targets of these pathways remain poorly characterized. Identification of PTTH-dependent gene sets identified the nuclear receptor HR4 as a highly conserved target in both Drosophila and Bombyx. We consider this study to be a critical step toward understanding how steroid hormone production and release are regulated in all animal models. PMID:27320926

  14. The Insect Prothoracic Gland as a Model for Steroid Hormone Biosynthesis and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Ou, Qiuxiang; Zeng, Jie; Yamanaka, Naoki; Brakken-Thal, Christina; O'Connor, Michael B; King-Jones, Kirst

    2016-06-28

    Steroid hormones are ancient signaling molecules found in vertebrates and insects alike. Both taxa show intriguing parallels with respect to how steroids function and how their synthesis is regulated. As such, insects are excellent models for studying universal aspects of steroid physiology. Here, we present a comprehensive genomic and genetic analysis of the principal steroid hormone-producing organs in two popular insect models, Drosophila and Bombyx. We identified 173 genes with previously unknown specific expression in steroid-producing cells, 15 of which had critical roles in development. The insect neuropeptide PTTH and its vertebrate counterpart ACTH both regulate steroid production, but molecular targets of these pathways remain poorly characterized. Identification of PTTH-dependent gene sets identified the nuclear receptor HR4 as a highly conserved target in both Drosophila and Bombyx. We consider this study to be a critical step toward understanding how steroid hormone production and release are regulated in all animal models.

  15. Noninvasive measurement of steroid hormones in zebrafish holding-water.

    PubMed

    Félix, Ana S; Faustino, Ana I; Cabral, Eduarda M; Oliveira, Rui F

    2013-03-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) has recently emerged as a new animal model in neuroendocrinology and behavior (e.g., stress physiology and ecotoxicology studies). In these areas, the concentrations of steroid hormones in the blood are often used to study the endocrinological status of individuals. However, due to the small body size of zebrafish, blood sampling is difficult to perform and the amount of plasma obtained per sample for assaying hormones is very small (ca. 1-5 μL), and therefore most studies have been using whole-body hormone concentrations, which implies sacrificing the individuals and hampers sequential sampling of the same individual. Here a noninvasive method to assay steroid hormones from zebrafish holding-water, based on the fact that steroids are released into the fish holding-water through the gills by passive diffusion, is validated. Cortisol and the androgen 11-ketotestosterone (KT) were measured in water samples and compared to plasma levels in the same individuals. Cortisol released to holding-water correlates positively with plasma concentrations, but there was a lack of correlation between KT water and circulating levels. However, KT levels showed a highly significant sex difference that can be used to noninvasively sex individuals. An ACTH challenge test demonstrated that an induced increase in circulating cortisol concentration can be reliably detected in holding-water levels, hence attesting the responsiveness of holding-water levels to fluctuations in circulating levels. PMID:23445429

  16. Noninvasive Measurement of Steroid Hormones in Zebrafish Holding-Water

    PubMed Central

    Félix, Ana S.; Faustino, Ana I.; Cabral, Eduarda M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Zebrafish (Danio rerio) has recently emerged as a new animal model in neuroendocrinology and behavior (e.g., stress physiology and ecotoxicology studies). In these areas, the concentrations of steroid hormones in the blood are often used to study the endocrinological status of individuals. However, due to the small body size of zebrafish, blood sampling is difficult to perform and the amount of plasma obtained per sample for assaying hormones is very small (ca. 1–5 μL), and therefore most studies have been using whole-body hormone concentrations, which implies sacrificing the individuals and hampers sequential sampling of the same individual. Here a noninvasive method to assay steroid hormones from zebrafish holding-water, based on the fact that steroids are released into the fish holding-water through the gills by passive diffusion, is validated. Cortisol and the androgen 11-ketotestosterone (KT) were measured in water samples and compared to plasma levels in the same individuals. Cortisol released to holding-water correlates positively with plasma concentrations, but there was a lack of correlation between KT water and circulating levels. However, KT levels showed a highly significant sex difference that can be used to noninvasively sex individuals. An ACTH challenge test demonstrated that an induced increase in circulating cortisol concentration can be reliably detected in holding-water levels, hence attesting the responsiveness of holding-water levels to fluctuations in circulating levels. PMID:23445429

  17. The effect of adrenal steroids, corticotropin, and growth hormone on resistance to experimental infections.

    PubMed

    KASS, E H; LUNDGREN, M M; FINLAND, M

    1954-01-01

    Cortisone acetate, hydrocortisone, and hydrocortisone acetate depress the resistance of mice to pneumococcal and influenza viral infections, although hydrocortisone acetate is somewhat less effective than the free alcohol, when given subcutaneously. Pituitary adrenocorticotropin, even in highly purified form and in oil and beeswax, does not significantly alter the resistance of mice to these experimental infections, even when given in doses which may cause profound eosinopenia, lymphopenia, and weight loss, and which are at the limit of tolerance of the animals. Corticosterone depresses resistance to pneumococcal infections significantly, but fails to alter resistance to influenza viral infections. The findings suggest that murine adrenals may produce one of the known adrenal steroids such as corticosterone along with another steroid, or may produce a steroid other than cortisone, hydrocortisone, or corticosterone. When resistance is decreased by adrenal steroids, survival time is invariably shortened, and the effect of the steroid hormones is frequently demonstrable within the 1st day after infection with pneumococci, making it unlikely that the depression of resistance that is seen is primarily due to depression of antibody formation. A single dose of 5 mg. of cortisone may cause depression of resistance and may decrease the survival time for 3 to 6 days afterward. Growth hormone (somatotropic hormone) in highly purified form, and in the doses used, did not overcome the weight loss induced by cortisone, but the animals treated with growth hormone and cortisone regained their lost weight more rapidly than those receiving cortisone alone. Growth hormone alone caused a slight increase in the rate of gain in weight over controls. Growth hormone alone did not increase resistance to infection, and did not increase the survival time, in mice infected with either pneumococci or influenza virus. Growth hormone in various dosages failed to overcome the effect of cortisone

  18. THE EFFECT OF ADRENAL STEROIDS, CORTICOTROPIN, AND GROWTH HORMONE ON RESISTANCE TO EXPERIMENTAL INFECTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Kass, Edward H.; Lundgren, Marguerite M.; Finland, Maxwell

    1954-01-01

    Cortisone acetate, hydrocortisone, and hydrocortisone acetate depress the resistance of mice to pneumococcal and influenza viral infections, although hydrocortisone acetate is somewhat less effective than the free alcohol, when given subcutaneously. Pituitary adrenocorticotropin, even in highly purified form and in oil and beeswax, does not significantly alter the resistance of mice to these experimental infections, even when given in doses which may cause profound eosinopenia, lymphopenia, and weight loss, and which are at the limit of tolerance of the animals. Corticosterone depresses resistance to pneumococcal infections significantly, but fails to alter resistance to influenza viral infections. The findings suggest that murine adrenals may produce one of the known adrenal steroids such as corticosterone along with another steroid, or may produce a steroid other than cortisone, hydrocortisone, or corticosterone. When resistance is decreased by adrenal steroids, survival time is invariably shortened, and the effect of the steroid hormones is frequently demonstrable within the 1st day after infection with pneumococci, making it unlikely that the depression of resistance that is seen is primarily due to depression of antibody formation. A single dose of 5 mg. of cortisone may cause depression of resistance and may decrease the survival time for 3 to 6 days afterward. Growth hormone (somatotropic hormone) in highly purified form, and in the doses used, did not overcome the weight loss induced by cortisone, but the animals treated with growth hormone and cortisone regained their lost weight more rapidly than those receiving cortisone alone. Growth hormone alone caused a slight increase in the rate of gain in weight over controls. Growth hormone alone did not increase resistance to infection, and did not increase the survival time, in mice infected with either pneumococci or influenza virus. Growth hormone in various dosages failed to overcome the effect of cortisone

  19. THE INTRACELLULAR LOCALIZATION OF PITUITARY THYROTROPIC HORMONE

    PubMed Central

    Greenspan, Francis S.; Hargadine, Judy R.

    1965-01-01

    The intracellular localization of a bovine anterior pituitary preparation of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) was studied in guinea pigs and dogs. The preparation was administered intravascularly or applied directly to tissue sections. TSH was detected by an indirect technique utilizing bovine TSH antiserum and fluorescein-labeled anti-rabbit globulin; the presence of TSH in the tissue was indicated by fluorescence when the tissue was examined under the microscope with an ultraviolet light source. After either intravascular administration or direct application of the TSH preparation, striking fluorescence was found in the nuclei of the thyroid cells and to a lesser degree in the nuclei of retro-orbital fat tissue and kidney tubules in both species studied. A little fluorescence was also seen in spleen tissue. No fluorescence was noted in comparable tissues removed from control animals injected with bovine albumin or globulin or when the tissues were treated with the fluorescein-labeled globulin alone. Fluorescence was also noted in the nuclei of adrenal cells treated with unabsorbed antiserum, but this was greatly diminished when antiserum absorbed with crystalline ACTH was used. The positive reactions were all markedly decreased when the tissues were treated with antisera absorbed with the original TSH preparation. Fluorescence was noted in the cytoplasm of pituitary tissue from both treated and control animals, suggesting a cross-reaction between the bovine pituitary antisera and guinea pig or dog hypophysis. The indirect technique seems to be highly satisfactory for demonstration of the pitiutary hormone within the cell. In addition, the demonstration of immunologically active anterior pituitary TSH bound to cell nuclei offers a clue to the site of action of this hormone. PMID:5323607

  20. Hormones in the immune system and their possible role. A critical review.

    PubMed

    Csaba, György

    2014-09-01

    Immune cells synthesize, store and secrete hormones, which are identical with the hormones of the endocrine glands. These are: the POMC hormones (ACTH, endorphin), the thyroid system hormones (TRH, TSH, T3), growth hormone (GH), prolactin, melatonin, histamine, serotonin, catecholamines, GnRH, LHRH, hCG, renin, VIP, ANG II. This means that the immune cells contain all of the hormones, which were searched at all and they also have receptors for these hormones. From this point of view the immune cells are similar to the unicells (Tetrahymena), so it can be supposed that these cells retained the properties characteristic at a low level of phylogeny while other cells during the evolution accumulated to form endocrine glands. In contrast to the glandular endocrine cells, immune cells are polyproducers and polyreceivers. As they are mobile cells, they are able to transport the stored hormone to different places (packed transport) or attracted by local factors, accumulate in the neighborhood of the target, synthesizing and secreting hormones locally. This is taking place, e.g. in the case of endorphin, where the accumulating immune cells calms pain caused by the inflammation. The targeted packed transport is more economical than the hormone-pouring to the blood circulation of glandular endocrines and the targeting also cares the other receptor-bearing cells timely not needed the effect. Mostly the immune-effects of immune-cell derived hormones were studied (except endorphin), however, it is not exactly cleared, while the system could have scarcely studied important roles in other cases. The evolutionary aspects and the known as well, as possible roles of immune-endocrine system and their hormones are listed and discussed.

  1. Adrenocorticotropic hormone and cortisol levels in relation to inflammatory response and disease severity in children with meningococcal disease.

    PubMed

    van Woensel, J B; Biezeveld, M H; Alders, A M; Eerenberg, A J; Endert, E; Hack, E C; von Rosenstiel, I A; Kuijpers, T W

    2001-12-15

    This prospective observational study investigated the relationship of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to inflammatory markers and to disease severity in children with meningococcal disease. In total, 32 children were studied: 10 with distinct meningococcal meningitis (MM), 10 with MM and septic shock, and 12 with fulminant meningococcal septicemia (FMS). Levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and IL-10 were lowest in the MM group and dramatically elevated in the FMS group. Cortisol and C-reactive protein levels were highest in the MM group and relatively low in the FMS group. Levels of ACTH and inflammatory markers decreased within the first 24 h of admission, but cortisol levels did not fluctuate. Cortisol was significantly inversely correlated with IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 (P < or =.04). These results suggest that the adrenal reserve in children is insufficient to handle the extreme conditions and stress associated with severe meningococcal disease.

  2. Plasma. beta. -endorphin and stress hormone levels during adaptation and stress

    SciTech Connect

    Lishmanov, Yu.B.; Trifonova, Zh.V.; Tsibin, A.N.; Maslova, L.V.; Dement'eva, L.A.

    1987-09-01

    This paper describes a comparative study of ..beta..-endorphin and stress hormone levels in the blood plasma of rats during stress and adaptation. Immunoreactive ..beta..-endorphin in the blood plasma was assayed by means of a kit after preliminary isolation of the ..beta..-endorphin fraction by affinity chromatography on sepharose; ACTH was assayed with a kit and cortisol, insulin, thyroxine and tri-iodothyronine by means of kits from Izotop. Determination of plasma levels of ..beta..-endorphin and other opioids could evidently be an important method of assessing the state of resistance of the organism to stress.

  3. Hormones talking

    PubMed Central

    Marsch-Martínez, Nayelli; Reyes-Olalde, J. Irepan; Ramos-Cruz, Daniela; Lozano-Sotomayor, Paulina; Zúñiga-Mayo, Victor M.; de Folter, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The proper development of fruits is important for the sexual reproduction and propagation of many plant species. The fruit of Arabidopsis derives from the fertilized gynoecium, which initiates at the center of the flower and obtains its final shape, size, and functional tissues through progressive stages of development. Hormones, specially auxins, play important roles in gynoecium and fruit patterning. Cytokinins, which act as counterparts to auxins in other plant tissues, have been studied more in the context of ovule formation and parthenocarpy. We recently studied the role of cytokinins in gynoecium and fruit patterning and found that they have more than one role during gynoecium and fruit patterning. We also compared the cytokinin response localization to the auxin response localization in these organs, and studied the effects of spraying cytokinins in young flowers of an auxin response line. In this addendum, we discuss further the implications of the observed results in the knowledge about the relationship between cytokinins and auxins at the gynoecium. PMID:23072997

  4. The Effects of Smoked Nicotine on Measures of Subjective states and Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Hormones in Women during the Follicular and Luteal Phases of the Menstrual Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Goletiani, Nathalie V.; Siegel, Arthur J.; Lukas, Scott E.; Hudson, James I.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the acute effects of cigarette smoking on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) hormones and subjective states as a function of the menstrual cycle in nicotine-dependent women. Methods Seventeen healthy nicotine-dependent women were studied during the follicular and/or luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Due to observation of a possible bimodal distribution of progesterone levels within the luteal phase group, we performed a set of a posteriori analyses. Therefore, we divided the luteal group into a low progesterone and a high progesterone groups. Results Smoked nicotine activated HPA, measured by ACTH, cortisol, and DHEA response and affected subjective states in both follicular and luteal phases, with increased “High”, “Rush”, and decreased “Craving”. The HPA stimulation revealed a blunting of ACTH response. There was only modest evidence for a blunting of subjective state responses in the luteal phase. However upon post hoc analyses, the high progesterone luteal group showed a marked blunting of measures of subjective states and a blunted ACTH response. Examining the association between hormone and measures of subjective states revealed tentative associations of ACTH stimulation with increased “Rush” and “Craving”, and DHEA stimulation with increased “Craving”. Conclusions This pilot study suggests that menstrual cycle phase differences in progesterone levels may attenuate nicotine’s addictive effects via diminution of its reinforcing properties, and augmentation of its aversive effects interfering with the pleasure associated with cigarette smoking. PMID:25783522

  5. Localization of the genes encoding the melanocortin-2 (Adrenocorticotropic hormone) and melanocortin-3 receptors to chromosomes 18p11. 2 and 20q13. 2-q13. 3 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Gantz, I.; Tashiro, Takao; Konda, Yoshitaka; Shimoto, Yoshimasa; Miwa, Hiroto; Munzert, G.; Barcroft, C.; Glover, T.; Yamada, Tadataka )

    1993-10-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and [alpha]-, [beta]-, and [gamma]-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) are products of propiomelanocortin post-translational processing. These compounds are collectively labeled as melanocortins (MC). Aside from their established effects on the regulation of the adrenal cortex (ACTH) and melanocytes ([alpha]-MSH), the melanocortins have been implicated in a broad array of physiological events. Melanocortins mediate their effects through cell membrane receptors belonging to the superfamily of seven transmembrane G-protein-linked receptors. Using the technique of polymerase chain reaction with primers based on conserved areas of the seven transmembrane G-protein-linked receptor family, the authors recently isolated an [open quotes]orphan[close quotes] subfamily of this receptor group. Within the past year, two of these receptors were identified as specific for [alpha]-MSH (MC1) and ACTH (MC2). They have recently described a third melanocortin receptor (MC3) that appears to recognize the core heptapeptide sequence of melanocortins with equal potency and efficacy and identified its presence in the brain, placenta, and gut. Using the FISH technique, they localized the ACTH and the melanocortin-3 receptors to chromosome loci 18p11.2 and 20q12.3-q13.2, respectively. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Circadian variations in plasma levels of hypophyseal, adrenocortical and testicular hormones in men infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Villette, J M; Bourin, P; Doinel, C; Mansour, I; Fiet, J; Boudou, P; Dreux, C; Roue, R; Debord, M; Levi, F

    1990-03-01

    Alterations in the circadian time structure of the secretion of several hormones were investigated in 13 male patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Seven were asymptomatic (classified CDC II, according to the criteria of the Atlanta Centers for Disease Control), and 6 had acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (CDC IV). Ten healthy males volunteered as controls. Plasma levels of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and its sulfate (DHEA-S), cortisol, testosterone, ACTH, and beta-endorphin were determined by RIA in blood samples obtained every 4 h from 0830-0830 h the next morning. Data were analyzed both by two-way analysis of variance and the cosinor method. Circadian rhythms were statistically validated for each of the six hormones in each of the three groups of subjects. Compared with the control subjects, mesors (24-h adjusted means) were significantly higher for cortisol and lower for DHEA, DHEA-S, and ACTH (P less than 0.001 for all four hormones) in all HIV-infected patients. Plasma testosterone mesors were similar in controls and CDC II patients, but decreased significantly in the CDC IV patient group (P less than 0.05). Analysis of the circadian rhythms of plasma hormone levels clearly indicated an altered adrenal hormonal state in HIV-infected male patients, even during the asymptomatic period of the infection. For instance, plasma cortisol at 0430 h was more than twice as high in HIV-infected patients as it was in time-qualified controls. Although patients already had elevated plasma cortisol and lowered adrenal androgen levels at this stage, hypogonadism was not observed, as gauged by plasma testosterone concentrations. We speculate that the primary hormonal defect in HIV-infected patients is increased cortisol secretion resulting from circadian-varying stimulation of the adrenal cortex by a factor other than pituitary ACTH. This factor might be a stimulating substance secreted primarily by infected immune cells. Excess cortisol would lower

  7. Effects of Electromagnetic Radiation Exposure on Stress-Related Behaviors and Stress Hormones in Male Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Seyed Mohammad; Sahraei, Hedayat; Yaghmaei, Parichehreh; Tavakoli, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that electromagnetic waves, as the one of the most important physical factors, may alter cognitive and non-cognitive behaviors, depending on the frequency and energy. Moreover, non-ionizing radiation of low energy waves e.g. very low frequency waves could alter this phenomenon via alterations in neurotransmitters and neurohormones. In this study, short, medium, and long-term exposure to the extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) (1 and 5 Hz radiation) on behavioral, hormonal, and metabolic changes in male Wistar rats (250 g) were studied. In addition, changes in plasma concentrations for two main stress hormones, noradrenaline and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were evaluated. ELF-EMF exposure did not alter body weight, and food and water intake. Plasma glucose level was increased and decreased in the groups which exposed to the 5 and 1Hz wave, respectively. Plasma ACTH concentration increased in both using frequencies, whereas nor-adrenaline concentration showed overall reduction. At last, numbers of rearing, sniffing, locomotor activity was increased in group receiving 5 Hz wave over the time. In conclusions, these data showed that the effects of 1 and 5 Hz on the hormonal, metabolic and stress-like behaviors may be different. Moreover, the influence of waves on stress system is depending on time of exposure. PMID:25489427

  8. Effects of electromagnetic radiation exposure on stress-related behaviors and stress hormones in male wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Seyed Mohammad; Sahraei, Hedayat; Yaghmaei, Parichehreh; Tavakoli, Hassan

    2014-11-01

    Studies have demonstrated that electromagnetic waves, as the one of the most important physical factors, may alter cognitive and non-cognitive behaviors, depending on the frequency and energy. Moreover, non-ionizing radiation of low energy waves e.g. very low frequency waves could alter this phenomenon via alterations in neurotransmitters and neurohormones. In this study, short, medium, and long-term exposure to the extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) (1 and 5 Hz radiation) on behavioral, hormonal, and metabolic changes in male Wistar rats (250 g) were studied. In addition, changes in plasma concentrations for two main stress hormones, noradrenaline and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were evaluated. ELF-EMF exposure did not alter body weight, and food and water intake. Plasma glucose level was increased and decreased in the groups which exposed to the 5 and 1Hz wave, respectively. Plasma ACTH concentration increased in both using frequencies, whereas nor-adrenaline concentration showed overall reduction. At last, numbers of rearing, sniffing, locomotor activity was increased in group receiving 5 Hz wave over the time. In conclusions, these data showed that the effects of 1 and 5 Hz on the hormonal, metabolic and stress-like behaviors may be different. Moreover, the influence of waves on stress system is depending on time of exposure.

  9. Hormone therapy in acne.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi, Chembolli

    2013-01-01

    Underlying hormone imbalances may render acne unresponsive to conventional therapy. Relevant investigations followed by initiation of hormonal therapy in combination with regular anti-acne therapy may be necessary if signs of hyperandrogenism are present. In addition to other factors, androgen-stimulated sebum production plays an important role in the pathophysiology of acne in women. Sebum production is also regulated by other hormones, including estrogens, growth hormone, insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1, glucocorticoids, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and melanocortins. Hormonal therapy may also be beneficial in female acne patients with normal serum androgen levels. An understanding of the sebaceous gland and the hormonal influences in the pathogenesis of acne would be essential for optimizing hormonal therapy. Sebocytes form the sebaceous gland. Human sebocytes express a multitude of receptors, including receptors for peptide hormones, neurotransmitters and the receptors for steroid and thyroid hormones. Various hormones and mediators acting through the sebocyte receptors play a role in the orchestration of pathogenetic lesions of acne. Thus, the goal of hormonal treatment is a reduction in sebum production. This review shall focus on hormonal influences in the elicitation of acne via the sebocyte receptors, pathways of cutaneous androgen metabolism, various clinical scenarios and syndromes associated with acne, and the available therapeutic armamentarium of hormones and drugs having hormone-like actions in the treatment of acne.

  10. Hormone-induced intercellular signal transfer dissociates cyclic AMP- dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    We used co-cultures of porcine ovarian granulosa cells and mouse adrenocortical tumor cells (Y-1) to examine the kinetics of contact- dependent intercellular signal transfer and to assess the molecular mechanisms employed by this process. Exposure to follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) caused cAMP-dependent protein kinase dissociation in granulosa cells and, with time, in Y-1 cells if, and only if, they contacted a responding granulosa cell. Y-1 cells close to a granulosa cell but not touching it failed to respond similarly. In reciprocal experiments, co-cultures were stimulated with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Y-1 cells dissociated protein kinase as did granulosa cells in contact with Y-1 cells; however, granulosa cells that were not in contact with Y-1 cells failed to respond to the hormone. Fluorogenic steroids were secreted by Y-1 cells cultured alone and stimulated with ACTH, but were not secreted by cultures exposed to FSH. Neither hormone caused fluorogenic steroid production by granulosa cells. On the other hand these steroids were secreted in co-cultures stimulated with ACTH and to a lesser degree in co-cultures exposed to FSH. Autoradiography revealed that I125-FSH bound only to granulosa cells, never to Y-1 cells, even if they were in contact with an ovarian cell. The possibility of cell fusion was tested by experiments in which Y-1 cell membranes were labeled with cationized ferritin. These cells were then placed in co-culture with ovarian granulosa cells that had previously been allowed to ingest latex spheres. At regions of gap junctions between Y-1 and granulosa cells ferritin remained attached to the adrenal cell membrane and was never observed to migrate to the granulosa cell membrane. From these data, we conclude that hormone specific stimulation of one cell type leads to protein kinase dissociation in heterotypic partners only if they contact a hormone responsive cell. This signal transfer is bidirectional, exhibits temporal kinetics and

  11. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to acute psychosocial stress: Effects of biological sex and circulating sex hormones.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Mary Ann C; Mahon, Pamela B; McCaul, Mary E; Wand, Gary S

    2016-04-01

    Dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis influences the risk for developing stress-related disorders. Sex-dependent differences in the HPA axis stress response are believed to contribute to the different prevalence rates of stress-related disorders found in men and women. However, studies examining the HPA axis stress response have shown mixed support for sex differences, and the role of endogenous sex hormones on HPA axis response has not been adequately examined in humans. This study utilized the largest sample size to date to analyze the effects of biological sex and sex hormones on HPA axis social stress responses. Healthy, 18- to 30- year-old community volunteers (N=282) completed the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), a widely used and well-validated stress-induction laboratory procedure. All women (n=135) were tested during the follicular phase of their menstrual cycle (when progesterone levels are most similar to men). Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and cortisol measures were collected at multiple points throughout pre- and post-TSST. Testosterone and progesterone (in men) and progesterone and estradiol (in women) were determined pre-TSST. Following the TSST, men had greater ACTH and cortisol levels than women. Men had steeper baseline-to-peak and peak-to-end ACTH and cortisol response slopes than women; there was a trend for more cortisol responders among men than women. Testosterone negatively correlated with salivary cortisol response in men, while progesterone negatively correlated with ACTH and cortisol responses in women. These data confirm that men show more robust activation of the HPA axis response to the TSST than do women in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. Testosterone results suggest an inhibitory effect on HPA axis reactivity in men. Progesterone results suggest an inhibitory effect on HPA axis reactivity in women. Future work is needed to explain why men mount a greater ACTH and cortisol response to the

  12. Relaxin-3 stimulates the neuro-endocrine stress axis via corticotrophin-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    McGowan, B M; Minnion, J S; Murphy, K G; Roy, D; Stanley, S A; Dhillo, W S; Gardiner, J V; Ghatei, M A; Bloom, S R

    2014-05-01

    Relaxin-3 is a member of the insulin superfamily. It is expressed in the nucleus incertus of the brainstem, which has projections to the hypothalamus. Relaxin-3 binds with high affinity to RXFP1 and RXFP3. RXFP3 is expressed within the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), an area central to the stress response. The physiological function of relaxin-3 is unknown but previous work suggests a role in appetite control, stimulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and stress. Central administration of relaxin-3 induces c-fos expression in the PVN and increases plasma ACTH levels in rats. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of central administration of human relaxin-3 (H3) on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in male rodents in vivo and in vitro. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v) administration of H3 (5 nmol) significantly increased plasma corticosterone at 30 min following injection compared with vehicle. Intra-PVN administration of H3 (1.8-1620 pmol) significantly increased plasma ACTH at 1620 pmol H3 and corticosterone at 180-1620 pmol H3 at 30 min following injection compared with vehicle. The stress hormone prolactin was also significantly raised at 15 min post-injection compared with vehicle. Treatment of hypothalamic explants with H3 (10-1000 nM) stimulated the release of corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin (AVP), but H3 had no effect on the release of ACTH from in vitro pituitary fragments. These results suggest that relaxin-3 may regulate the HPA axis, via hypothalamic CRH and AVP neurons. Relaxin-3 may act as a central signal linking nutritional status, reproductive function and stress.

  13. Tyrphostin-23 enhances steroid-hormone secretion from dispersed human and rat adrenocrotical cells.

    PubMed

    Andreis, P G; Neri, G; Tortorella, C; Gottardo, L; Nussdorfer, G G

    2000-08-01

    Tyrphostin-23 is commonly used as inhibitor of tyrosine kinase (TK). We found that tyrphostin-23 concentration-dependently increased basal steroid-hormone secretion from dispersed human and rat adrenocortical cells, the maximal effective concentration being 10(-5) M. Tyrphostin-23 (10(-5) M) enhanced 10(-9) M angiotensin-II- and endothelin-1-stimulated secretion of human and rat adrenocortical cells, but not the secretory response to 10(-9) M ACTH However, it increased the response to lower concentrations (10(-12) or 10(-11) M) of ACTH. The secretagogue effect of tyrphostin-23 on dispersed rat adrenocortical cells was abolished by either the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ-22536 (10(-4) M) or the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H-89 (10(-5) M). Tyrphostin-23 (10(-5) M) raised basal cyclic-AMP release by dispersed rat adrenocortical cells, but in the presence of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX, 10(-3) M) it was ineffective. Both tyrphostin-23 and IBMX increased cyclic-AMP release by rat adrenocortical cells in response to 10(-10) M ACTH, and their effects were not additive. Taken together, our findings suggest that tyrphostin-23, acting as an inhibitor of phosphodiesterases in adrenocortical cells, increases the intracellular concentration of cyclic-AMP available for PKA activation thereby stimulating steroid-hormone secretion. They also stress that caution must be used in interpreting the results of studies aimed at investigating the possible cross-talk between adenylate cyclase- and TK-dependent signaling cascades. PMID:11019898

  14. Diurnal ACTH and plasma cortisol variations in healthy dogs and in those with pituitary-dependent Cushing's syndrome before and after treatment with retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Castillo, V A; Cabrera Blatter, M F; Gómez, N V; Sinatra, V; Gallelli, M F; Ghersevich, M C

    2009-04-01

    Daytime variations in ACTH and plasma cortisol were studied in healthy dogs and in dogs with pituitary-dependent hypercortisolism (PDH), before and after treatment with retinoic acid. In control dogs ACTH showed a higher concentration at 8.00 AM and between 2.00 and 6.00 PM, with the lowest concentration registered at 10.00 AM (p<0.05 vs. 8.00 AM and 2.00 PM and p<0.01 vs. 4.00 PM). Cortisol did not show significant differences. In dogs with PDH, ACTH was lower at 8.00 AM (ACTH: p<0.01 vs. 2.00 and 4.00 PM; and p<0.05 vs. 6.00 PM). The lowest cortisol concentration was registered at 8.00 AM and 8.00 PM and the highest at 4.00 PM (p<0.05 vs. 8.00 AM and p<0.01 vs. 8.00 PM). After treatment, the lowest ACTH concentration was registered at 10.00 AM (p<0.01 vs. 2.00 and 4.00 PM). To conclude, the adrenal is desensitized in PDH possibly showing negative in diagnostic tests.

  15. Modification of urinary secretion of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and serum ACTH concentration following repetitive parabolic flights.

    PubMed

    Nomura, J; Arase, Y; Sugaya, S; Moriya, T; Chen, Z; Takahashi, S; Kita, K; Kikuno, K; Nomura, F; Suzuki, N

    2001-07-01

    It is important to clarify the molecular mechanisms of physiological responses of the human body to changes in gravity. Previous reports demonstrated that gravity-changing stress increases the human urinary concentration of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). However, it has yet to be clarified whether repetitive parabolic flight modulates the urinary concentration of 8-OHdG after exposure to gravity-changing stress. In the present study, the effects of the number of previous experiences with parabolic flight on urinary excretion of 8-OHdG and concentration of serum ACTH were examined in 12 healthy volunteers.

  16. Metastatic islet cell tumor with ACTH, gastrin, and glucagon secretion. Clinical and pathologic studies with multiple therapies.

    PubMed

    Lokich, J; Bothe, A; O'Hara, C; Federman, M

    1987-06-15

    A patient with metastatic islet cell carcinoma demonstrated multiple clinical syndromes simultaneously with secretion of ACTH, gastrin, glucagon, and serotonin. Hepatic arterial embolization resulted in an initial decrease in all secretory products, which was sustained for glucagon and serotonin. Recrudescence of the Cushings and Zollinger-Ellison syndrome was managed by surgical extirpation of the primary tumor and regional metastases as well as bilateral adrenalectomy. Electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry of the primary tumor and the metastatic lesions revealed the presence of multiple types of granules within single cells and, different patterns of secretory profiles in different tumor sites.

  17. Growth hormone deficiency - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... the same age. The child will have normal intelligence in most cases. In older children, puberty may ... hormones cause the body to make. Tests can measure these growth factors. Accurate growth hormone deficiency testing ...

  18. Hormone Health Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cuidadores Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types of ... Health Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types of ...

  19. Hormones and Obesity

    MedlinePlus

    ... y Cuidadores Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ... Women's Health Hormones and Health Journey Through the Endocrine System Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Endocrine Glands and Types ...

  20. Hormones and Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Fact Sheet Hormones and Hypertension What is hypertension? Hypertension, or chronic (long-term) high blood pressure, is a main cause of ... tobacco, alcohol, and certain medications play a part. Hormones made in the kidneys and in blood vessels ...

  1. ADH (Antidiuretic Hormone) Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Also known as: Vasopressin; AVP Formal name: Antidiuretic Hormone; Arginine Vasopressin Related tests: Osmolality , BUN , Creatinine , Sodium , ... should know? How is it used? The antidiuretic hormone (ADH) test is used to help detect, diagnose, ...

  2. Menopause and Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women Menopause and Hormones: Common Questions Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... reproduction and distribution. Learn More about Menopause and Hormones Menopause--Medicines to Help You Links to other ...

  3. [Stimulus of the hypophyseal-adrenocortical axis with corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Evidence for activation of the immune-neuroendocrine system].

    PubMed

    Lewi, D S; Kater, C E; Moreira, A C

    1995-01-01

    Ten-20% of patients with AIDS may present clinical evidence of primary or secondary adrenal insufficiency. PURPOSE--To evaluate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (HPAA) with CRH in patients with AIDS. METHODS--We studied 20 patients with AIDS and 17 normal subjects (NS) with exogenous ACTH (cosyntropin, 250 micrograms IV bolus) followed one week later by ovine corticotropin releasing hormone (oCRH 1 microgram/kg BW IV bolus). Basal and 60' cortisol (micrograms/dL) were determined in the former whereas ACTH (pg/mL) and cortisol were measured every 15-30' for 2 hours in the latter. RESULTS--Basal and peak values (mean +/- SD) of ACTH and cortisol for both tests were: cosyntropin test (AIDS x NS): basal cortisol 22.5 +/- 7.1 x 10.6 +/- 3.6 (p < 0.01), peak 36.0 +/- 12.8 x 28.3 +/- 7.6 (p < 0.05); oCRH test: basal ACTH 42.2 +/- 33.5 x 28.9 +/- 12.7 (NS), peak 104.7 +/- 62.2 x 59.3 +/- 17.6 (p < 0.05); basal cortisol 19.7 +/- 9.0 x 10.1 +/- 3.4 (p < 0.01), peak 27.5 +/- 8.9 x 18.3 +/- 5.1 (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION--AIDS patients had elevated basal and CRH stimulated ACTH levels and an intact glucocorticoid pathway with elevated basal and peak cortisol levels to both stimulation tests. This situation is probably due to the stressful disease condition, where lymphokines may play a role activating the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. PMID:8520591

  4. Aging changes in hormone production

    MedlinePlus

    The endocrine system is made up of organs and tissues that produce hormones. Hormones are natural chemicals produced in one ... hormones that control the other structures in the endocrine system. The amount of these regulating hormones stays about ...

  5. [Growth hormone treatment update].

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    Short stature in children is a common cause for referral to pediatric endocrinologists, corresponding most times to normal variants of growth. Initially growth hormone therapy was circumscribed to children presenting growth hormone deficiency. Since the production of recombinant human hormone its use had spread to other pathologies.

  6. The effect of Hoe-427 (an ACTH sub 4-9 analog) on free-choice ethanol consumption in male and female rats

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, S.; Maickel, R.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Ethanol consummatory patterns of individual male and female rats and the effects of Hoe-427 (Ebiratide), and ACTH{sub 4-9} analog, thereon, were studied in a test system using 24 hour, two-bottle free choice consumption between 0.2% saccharin and 10% ethanol in 0.2% saccharin. Single, daily i.p. doses of either ACTH{sub 4-10} or its analog resulted in a significant reduction of daily ethanol consumption with no effects on saccharin consumption. After 4 days of treatment, male rats consistently exhibited a rebound increase in ethanol consumption; this effect was not seen in females. The daily ethanol consummatory patterns of the female animals seemed to exhibit a 4-6 day cyclic rhythymicity, suggesting an interaction with estrous cycles. These results support a role for ACTH{sub 4-10} in the initiation of ethanol consummatory behavior in rats and suggests the existence of sex differences in this phenomenon.

  7. Effect of salinity changes on olfactory memory-related genes and hormones in adult chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta.

    PubMed

    Kim, Na Na; Choi, Young Jae; Lim, Sang-Gu; Jeong, Minhwan; Jin, Deuk-Hee; Choi, Cheol Young

    2015-09-01

    Studies of memory formation have recently concentrated on the possible role of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NRs). We examined changes in the expression of three NRs (NR1, NR2B, and NR2C), olfactory receptor (OR), and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) in chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR) during salinity change (seawater→50% seawater→freshwater). NRs were significantly detected in the diencephalon and telencephalon and OR was significantly detected in the olfactory epithelium. The expression of NRs, OR, and ACTH increased after the transition to freshwater. We also determined that treatment with MK-801, an antagonist of NRs, decreased NRs in telencephalon cells. In addition, a reduction in salinity was associated with increased levels of dopamine, ACTH, and cortisol (in vivo). Reductions in salinity evidently caused NRs and OR to increase the expression of cortisol and dopamine. We concluded that memory capacity and olfactory imprinting of salmon is related to the salinity of the environment during the migration to spawning sites. Furthermore, salinity affects the memory/imprinting and olfactory abilities, and cortisol and dopamine is also related with olfactory-related memories during migration.

  8. Hypothalamic-pituitary hormones during critical illness: a dynamic neuroendocrine response.

    PubMed

    Langouche, Lies; Van den Berghe, Greet

    2014-01-01

    Independent of the underlying condition, critical illness is characterized by a uniform dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-peripheral axes. In most axes a clear biphasic pattern can be distinguished. The acute phase of critical illness is characterized by low peripheral effector hormone levels such as T3, IGF-1 and testosterone, despite an actively secreting pituitary. The adrenal axis with high cortisol levels in the presence of low ACTH levels is a noteworthy exception. In the prolonged phase of critical illness, low peripheral effector hormone levels coincide with a uniform suppression of the neuroendocrine axes, predominantly of hypothalamic origin. The severity of the alterations in the different neuroendocrine axes is associated with a high risk of morbidity and mortality, but it remains unknown whether the observed changes are cause or consequence of adverse outcome. Several studies have identified therapeutic potential of hypothalamic releasing factors, but clinical outcome remains to be investigated with sufficiently powered randomized controlled trials.

  9. Neonatal ACTH administration elicits long-term changes in forebrain monoamine innervation. Subsequent disruptions in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and gonadal function.

    PubMed

    Alves, S E; Akbari, H M; Anderson, G M; Azmitia, E C; McEwen, B C; Strand, F L

    1997-04-24

    The findings from this study demonstrated that the manipulation of the HPA system resulting from ACTH administration during neonatal development produces long-term, differential effects, not only on adrenocortical activity, but also on the activity and integrity of the forebrain monoamine systems. Increased concentrations of the monoamines within the forebrain regions studied at days 7 and 15, suggest a hastened maturation of these neural systems in animals neonatally treated with ACTH. The observed neurochemical alterations in these animals at one year are suggestive of an accelerated aging in the monoamine systems. A further consequence of these disturbances during development is an altered functioning of the HPG axis, as demonstrated by a delayed onset of puberty as previously reported, as well as significantly decreased proestrus plasma estradiol. Although deficits in sexual behavior also existed, it seems probable that these behavioral changes are a manifestation of altered neural systems regulating the ability to cope with a novel stimulus or situation, rather than a disruption of the "feminization" of the brain during sexual differentiation. This is in contrast to the male rat which exhibits permanent deficits in male typical sexual behavior following developmental ACTH treatment. The clinical relevance of these findings may be extensive. Perinatal exposure to events or agents that markedly increase ACTH and the corticosteroids may cause significant immediate and long-term changes in central monoamine functioning. These changes may constitute some of the most deleterious effects of stress exposure in infants and children. The alterations may be especially devastating in individuals with predispositions to stress-sensitive disorders such as anxiety, depression, and Tourette's syndrome. Finally, the use of ACTH in the treatment of infantile spasms may need to be reassessed in light of the possible long-term effects of ACTH on central monoamine functioning.

  10. Ovarian localization of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (11βHSD): effects of ACTH stimulation and its relationship with bovine cystic ovarian disease.

    PubMed

    Amweg, A N; Salvetti, N R; Stangaferro, M L; Paredes, A H; Lara, H H; Rodríguez, F M; Ortega, H H

    2013-10-01

    Cystic ovarian disease (COD) is an important cause of infertility in cattle, and ACTH has been involved in regulatory mechanisms related to ovarian function associated with ovulation, steroidogenesis, and luteal function. Here, we examined the localization of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11βHSD1) and 11βHSD2 proteins in the ovary of healthy cows and animals with spontaneous and ACTH-induced COD and the in vitro response of the follicular wall exposed to ACTH. After stimulation by ACTH, we documented changes in 11βHSD expression and cortisol secretion by the follicular wall of large antral and follicular cysts. Follicular cysts showed a higher constitutive expression of both enzymes, whereas ACTH induced an increase in 11βHSD1 in tertiary follicles and follicular cysts and a decrease in 11βHSD2 in follicular cysts. Moderate expression of 11βHSD1 was observed by immunohistochemistry in granulosa of control animals, with an increase (P < 0.05) from primary to secondary, tertiary, and atretic follicles. The level of immunostaining in theca interna was lower than that in granulosa. The expression of 11βHSD2 was lower in the granulosa of primary follicles than in that of secondary, tertiary, and atretic follicles and was lower in the theca interna than in the granulosa. In ACTH-induced and spontaneously occurring follicular cysts, differences from controls were observed only in the expression of 11βHSD1 in the granulosa, being higher (P < 0.05) than in tertiary follicles. These findings indicate that follicular cysts may be exposed to high local concentrations of active glucocorticoids and indicate a local role for cortisol in COD pathogenesis and in regulatory mechanisms of ovarian function.

  11. Phenotype-Genotype Association Analysis of ACTH-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma and Its Molecular Link to Patient Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Renzhi; Yang, Yakun; Sheng, Miaomiao; Bu, Dechao; Huang, Fengming; Liu, Xiaohai; Zhou, Cuiqi; Dai, Congxin; Sun, Bowen; Zhu, Jindong; Qiao, Yi; Yao, Yong; Zhu, Huijuan; Lu, Lin; Pan, Hui; Feng, Ming; Deng, Kan; Xing, Bing; Lian, Wei; Zhao, Yi; Jiang, Chengyu

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH)-secreting pituitary adenoma, also known as Cushing disease (CD), is rare and causes metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis due to hypercortisolism. However, the molecular pathogenesis of CD is still unclear because of a lack of human cell lines and animal models. Here, we study 106 clinical characteristics and gene expression changes from 118 patients, the largest cohort of CD in a single-center. RNA deep sequencing is used to examine genotypic changes in nine paired female ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas and adjacent nontumorous pituitary tissues (ANPT). We develop a novel analysis linking disease clinical characteristics and whole transcriptomic changes, using Pearson Correlation Coefficient to discover a molecular network mechanism. We report that osteoporosis is distinguished from the phenotype and genotype analysis. A cluster of genes involved in osteoporosis is identified using Pearson correlation coefficient analysis. Most of the genes are reported in the bone related literature, confirming the feasibility of phenotype-genotype association analysis, which could be used in the analysis of almost all diseases. Secreted phosphoprotein 1 (SPP1), collagen type I α 1 chain (COL1A1), 5′-nucleotidase ecto (NT5E), HtrA serine peptidase 1 (HTRA1) and angiopoietin 1 (ANGPT1) and their signalling pathways are shown to be involved in osteoporosis in CD patients. Our discoveries provide a molecular link for osteoporosis in CD patients, and may open new potential avenues for osteoporosis intervention and treatment. PMID:27690016

  12. A connection between extracellular matrix and hormonal signals during the development of the human fetal adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Chamoux, E; Otis, M; Gallo-Payet, N

    2005-10-01

    The human adrenal cortex, involved in adaptive responses to stress, body homeostasis and secondary sexual characters, emerges from a tightly regulated development of a zone-specific secretion pattern during fetal life. Its development during fetal life is critical for the well being of pregnancy, the initiation of delivery, and even for an adequate adaptation to extra-uterine life. As early as from the sixth week of pregnancy, the fetal adrenal gland is characterized by a highly proliferative zone at the periphery, a concentric migration accompanied by cell differentiation (cortisol secretion) and apoptosis in the central androgen-secreting fetal zone. After birth, a strong reorganization occurs in the adrenal gland so that it better fulfills the newborn's needs, with aldosterone production in the external zona glomerulosa, cortisol secretion in the zona fasciculata and androgens in the central zona reticularis. In addition to the major hormonal stimuli provided by angiotensin II and adrenocorticotropin, we have tested for some years the hypotheses that such plasticity may be under the control of the extracellular matrix. A growing number of data have been harvested during the last years, in particular about extracellular matrix expression and its putative role in the development of the human adrenal cortex. Laminin, collagen and fibronectin have been shown to play important roles not only in the plasticity of the adrenal cortex, but also in cell responsiveness to hormones, thus clarifying some of the unexplained observations that used to feed controversies. PMID:16172742

  13. The effect of stress and stress hormones on dynamic colour-change in a sexually dichromatic Australian frog.

    PubMed

    Kindermann, Christina; Narayan, Edward J; Wild, Francis; Wild, Clyde H; Hero, Jean-Marc

    2013-06-01

    Rapid colour changes in vertebrates have fascinated biologists for centuries, herein we demonstrate dynamic colour change in an anuran amphibian, the stony creek frog (Litoria wilcoxii), which turns from brown to bright (lemon) yellow during amplexus. We show this by comparing the colour of baseline (unpaired males) and amplecting (paired) males. We also investigate the possible role of stress and stress hormones on this colour change. Frogs were subjected to four different levels of stressors (handling, toe-clipping, saline injection and adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH] injection) and the colour change was measured using digital photography. A comparison of baseline colour and stress hormone (corticosterone) levels was also conducted to give further insight to this topic. From the images, the Red Blue Green (RGB) colour values were calculated, and a principal components analysis (PCA) was used to create a single colour metric (the major axis) as an index of colour in the visible spectrum. A moderate stressor (toe-clipping) led to a significant change in colour (within 10 min) similar to that of amplecting males. Surprisingly, neither a mild stressor (handling and saline injection) nor the maximum stressor (handling and ACTH injection) led to a lightening response. This study confirms that the dynamic male colour change in this species in response to medium stressors adds new knowledge to the understanding of the functional mechanisms of dynamic colour change in amphibians.

  14. Was sind hormone?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlson, P.

    1982-01-01

    Historically, the meaning of the term hormone has changed during the last decades. Morphological studies of secreting cells lead Feyrter to the concept of paracrine action of some hormones. While endocrine regulators are blood-borne, paracrine messengers reach their target cells through the diffusion in the intracellular space. Though it is rather difficult to draw a line between true hormones and hormone-like substances, valid definitions for endocrine and paracrine regulatory systems can be given. The term ‘hormonal control’ should be restricted to endocrine systems. For effectors acting by paracrine mechanisms, the term paramone is proposed in this article.

  15. Regulation of rat adrenal vasoactive intestinal peptide content: effects of adrenocorticotropic hormone treatment and changes in dietary sodium intake.

    PubMed

    Hinson, J P; Renshaw, D; Carroll, M; Kapas, S

    2001-09-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is well established as a paracrine regulator of adrenal function. It is present in nerves supplying the adrenal cortex, although previous studies have found that the amount of VIP in the outer zones of the rat adrenal is not affected by ligating the splanchnic nerve supplying the adrenal gland. The present studies were designed to investigate the mechanisms involved in regulating the VIP content of the rat adrenal gland. This study examined the effects of changes in electrolyte balance and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) administration on the adrenal content of VIP as measured by radioimmunoassay. Rats on a low sodium diet had a significantly increased capsular/zona glomerulosa immunoreactive VIP (irVIP) level, while rats on a high sodium diet had suppressed levels relative to controls. Changes in dietary sodium did not affect inner zone/medullary VIP content. Administration of ACTH caused a decrease in irVIP levels in the capsular/zona glomerulosa portion of the adrenal gland but had no effect on the inner zone/medulla. Analysis of mRNA encoding VIP revealed a large increase in expression of VIP in the sodium-deplete group compared with the control, with no change in VIP expression in the sodium-loaded group. ACTH treatment was found to significantly decrease VIP mRNA levels in the capsular portion. Neither ACTH treatment nor changes in sodium intake affected inner zones/medullary VIP message. These data suggest that VIP in the capsule and zona glomerulosa region of the adrenal cortex is regulated in response to the physiological status of the animal, with changes in capsular/zona glomerulosa VIP correlating with changes in zona glomerulosa function.

  16. Human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Strobl, J S; Thomas, M J

    1994-03-01

    The study of human growth hormone is a little more than 100 years old. Growth hormone, first identified for its dramatic effect on longitudinal growth, is now known to exert generalized effects on protein, lipid, and carbohydrate metabolism. Additional roles for growth hormone in human physiology are likely to be discovered in the areas of sleep research and reproduction. Furthermore, there is some indication that growth hormone also may be involved in the regulation of immune function, mental well-being, and the aging process. Recombinant DNA technology has provided an abundant and safe, albeit expensive, supply of human growth hormone for human use, but the pharmacological properties of growth hormone are poor. Most growth hormone-deficient individuals exhibit a secretory defect rather than a primary defect in growth hormone production, however, and advances in our understanding of the neuroendocrine regulation of growth hormone secretion have established the basis for the use of drugs to stimulate release of endogenously synthesized growth hormone. This promises to be an important area for future drug development. PMID:8190748

  17. Role of Protein Phosphorylation and Tyrosine Phosphatases in the Adrenal Regulation of Steroid Synthesis and Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Gorostizaga, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana F; Mori Sequeiros García, M Mercedes; Maloberti, Paula M; Orlando, Ulises D; Mele, Pablo G; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2016-01-01

    In adrenocortical cells, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) promotes the activation of several protein kinases. The action of these kinases is linked to steroid production, mainly through steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), whose expression and activity are dependent on protein phosphorylation events at genomic and non-genomic levels. Hormone-dependent mitochondrial dynamics and cell proliferation are functions also associated with protein kinases. On the other hand, protein tyrosine dephosphorylation is an additional component of the ACTH signaling pathway, which involves the "classical" protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), such as Src homology domain (SH) 2-containing PTP (SHP2c), and members of the MAP kinase phosphatase (MKP) family, such as MKP-1. PTPs are rapidly activated by posttranslational mechanisms and participate in hormone-stimulated steroid production. In this process, the SHP2 tyrosine phosphatase plays a crucial role in a mechanism that includes an acyl-CoA synthetase-4 (Acsl4), arachidonic acid (AA) release and StAR induction. In contrast, MKPs in steroidogenic cells have a role in the turn-off of the hormonal signal in ERK-dependent processes such as steroid synthesis and, perhaps, cell proliferation. This review analyzes the participation of these tyrosine phosphates in the ACTH signaling pathway and the action of kinases and phosphatases in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and steroid production. In addition, the participation of kinases and phosphatases in the signal cascade triggered by different stimuli in other steroidogenic tissues is also compared to adrenocortical cell/ACTH and discussed.

  18. Role of Protein Phosphorylation and Tyrosine Phosphatases in the Adrenal Regulation of Steroid Synthesis and Mitochondrial Function.

    PubMed

    Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Gorostizaga, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana F; Mori Sequeiros García, M Mercedes; Maloberti, Paula M; Orlando, Ulises D; Mele, Pablo G; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J

    2016-01-01

    In adrenocortical cells, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) promotes the activation of several protein kinases. The action of these kinases is linked to steroid production, mainly through steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), whose expression and activity are dependent on protein phosphorylation events at genomic and non-genomic levels. Hormone-dependent mitochondrial dynamics and cell proliferation are functions also associated with protein kinases. On the other hand, protein tyrosine dephosphorylation is an additional component of the ACTH signaling pathway, which involves the "classical" protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), such as Src homology domain (SH) 2-containing PTP (SHP2c), and members of the MAP kinase phosphatase (MKP) family, such as MKP-1. PTPs are rapidly activated by posttranslational mechanisms and participate in hormone-stimulated steroid production. In this process, the SHP2 tyrosine phosphatase plays a crucial role in a mechanism that includes an acyl-CoA synthetase-4 (Acsl4), arachidonic acid (AA) release and StAR induction. In contrast, MKPs in steroidogenic cells have a role in the turn-off of the hormonal signal in ERK-dependent processes such as steroid synthesis and, perhaps, cell proliferation. This review analyzes the participation of these tyrosine phosphates in the ACTH signaling pathway and the action of kinases and phosphatases in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and steroid production. In addition, the participation of kinases and phosphatases in the signal cascade triggered by different stimuli in other steroidogenic tissues is also compared to adrenocortical cell/ACTH and discussed. PMID:27375556

  19. [The effect of low doses of nakom on the hormonal secretion of the hypothalamo-hypophyseal-adrenal system in patients with infantile cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Brin, I L; Mashilov, K V

    1996-01-01

    The levels of hormones of hypothalamo-hypophyseal-adrenal system were measured in 14 10-14 year old children with infantile cerebral paralysis (ICP) with central catecholaminergic motor insufficiency. Contents of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), hydrocortisone (HC), somatotropic hormone, prolactin (P) were examined before and during Nacome administration (62.5 mg once daily in the morning). 110 patients of the same age with ICP and 18 children with acquired encephalopathy (EP) formed the control group. The elevations of ACTH, HC and P were revealed in spastic forms of ICP. Meanwhile nearly normal hormonal levels were observed in hyperkinetic forms of ICP and EP. The more pronounced effect was noted in "dopamine-dependent" children in which the drug's administration resulted in normalization of clinical and biochemical indices. Hyperkinetic phenomena revealed the connection between the character of neuromotor dyskinesias and the state of hypothalamo-hypophyseal-adrenal axis which is regulated by dopamine. The data obtained show hypofunction of dopaminergic neurotransmitter cerebral systems in patients with ICP that plays important pathogenetic role in development of disease with systemic manifestations. PMID:9281279

  20. Effect of concanavalin A (Con-A) on the hormone production of the unicellular Tetrahymena and the immune cells of the rat. A comparative study.

    PubMed

    Csaba, György; Pállinger, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Tetrahymena populations were treated with 10(-15) g ml(-1) or 10(-6) g ml(-1) concanavalin-A (Con-A) in tryptone-yeast medium for 1 h. Rat peritoneal immune cells (mast cells, lymphocytes, monocyte-granulocyte group) were also treated with 10(-6) g ml(-1) Con-A, for 1 h. The cells' hormone (ACTH, histamine, serotonin, endorphin, triiodothyronine (T(3))) content was measured by using immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry. The extremely low dose of Con-A universally and significantly elevated the hormone contents, while the result of higher dose was uncertain. In the immune cells, Con-A significantly decreased the ACTH level in each cell type and histamine level in mast cells. The results demonstrate the very high sensitivity of Tetrahymena receptors for a non-hormone (lectin) molecule, which can bind to the insulin receptors and mimics the effect of insulin. The results also show that Tetrahymena receptors are more sensitive to lower concentrations of molecules than to higher ones. The universal hormone-production stimulating effect of Con-A-which is observed in Tetrahymena-is specified in rat.

  1. Influence of adrenocorticotrophin hormone challenge and external factors (age, sex, and body region) on hair cortisol concentration in Canada lynx (Lynx canadensis).

    PubMed

    Terwissen, C V; Mastromonaco, G F; Murray, D L

    2013-12-01

    Land use changes are a significant factor influencing the decline of felid populations. However, additional research is needed to better understand how these factors influence populations in the wild. Hormone analysis can provide valuable information on the basic physiology and overall health of an animal, and enzyme immunoassays (EIA) are generally used for hair hormone analysis but must first be validated for the substrate of choice and species of interest. To date, hormone assays from hair have not been validated for Felidae, despite that the method holds considerable promise for non-invasive sampling of free-ranging animals. We sought to: (1) evaluate whether increased adrenocorticotrophin hormone (ACTH) during the period of hair growth results in elevated hair cortisol; (2) validate the enzyme immunoassay used; and (3) identify any variations in hair cortisol between age, sex and body regions, using Canada lynx. We quantified hair cortisol concentrations in captive animals through an ACTH challenge and collected samples from legally harvested lynx to compare variability between body regions. An EIA was validated for the analysis of hair cortisol. Lynx (n=3) had a qualitative increase in hair cortisol concentration following an ACTH challenge in captive animals (20 IU/kg of body weight weekly for 5 weeks), thereby supporting the use of an EIA to quantify cortisol values in hair. Based on our analysis of sampled lynx pelts, we found that hair cortisol did not vary between age and sex, but varied within the foot/leg region to a greater extent than between individuals. We recommend that future studies identify a standardized location for hair cortisol sampling.

  2. Lower birth weight and attenuated adrenocortical response to ACTH in offspring from sows that orally received cortisol during gestation.

    PubMed

    Kranendonk, Godelieve; Hopster, Hans; Fillerup, Maaike; Ekkel, E Dinand; Mulder, Eduard J H; Wiegant, Victor M; Taverne, Marcel A M

    2006-03-01

    Prenatal stress is known to affect several offspring characteristics, but its effects depend among other factors on the period of gestation in which it is applied. In the present study, oral administration of hydrocortisone-acetate (HCA) was used to elevate cortisol concentrations in pregnant sows to levels also observed after psychological stress. HCA was administered during three different periods of gestation (115 days in pigs): period 1: 21-50 (P1, n = 10), period 2: 51-80 (P2, n = 10) and period 3: 81-110 (P3, n = 10) days after insemination. Control sows (n = 11) received vehicle from 21-110 days after insemination. When P1-, P2- and P3-sows did not receive HCA, they also received vehicle. During gestation, weekly saliva samples were taken from the sows to determine salivary cortisol concentrations. Treatment effects on sow, litter and piglet characteristics were determined. In addition, two female piglets per litter were subjected to an ACTH-challenge test at 6 weeks of age to determine the adrenocortical response to ACTH. Pigs were slaughtered at 6 months of age and slaughter weight, back fat thickness and percentage of lean meat were analysed. During the period of treatment with HCA, salivary cortisol concentrations were increased in P1-, P2- and P3-sows compared to control sows (P < 0.01). The total number of piglets born per litter did not differ among treatment groups (P > 0.30), but pooled HCA-litters had a higher percentage of live born piglets (P < 0.05) and fewer mummies than control litters (P < 0.05). Gestation length did not differ among treatment groups (P = 0.21), but did affect treatment effects on birth weight. Overall, HCA-piglets weighed less at birth, and remained lighter until weaning (P < 0.05). The salivary cortisol concentrations after i.m. injection of ACTH (2.5 IU/kg) were lower in P1- and P3-piglets compared to control piglets. At slaughter, HCA-treatment indirectly decreased lean meat percentage and increased back fat thickness. In

  3. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis and Its Association with Adrenal Insufficiency: Assessment with the Low-Dose ACTH Stimulation Test

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, René; Rendon, Adrian; Barrera-Sánchez, Maximiliano; Carlos-Reyna, Kevin Erick Gabriel; Álvarez-Villalobos, Neri Alejandro; González-Saldivar, Gloria; González-González, José Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Background. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is a major public health care concern that affects the life of millions of people around the world. The association of tuberculosis and adrenal insufficiency is well known; however, it is thought to be less prevalent every time. A spike in TB incidence and a lack of evidence of this association in patients with MDR-TB call for reassessment of an illness (adrenal dysfunction) that if not diagnosed could seriously jeopardize patients' health. Objective. To determine the prevalence of adrenocortical insufficiency in patients with MDR-TB using the low-dose (1 μg) ACTH stimulation test at baseline and at 6–12 months of follow-up after antituberculosis treatment and culture conversion. Methods. A total of 48 men or women, aged ≥18 years (HIV-negative patients diagnosed with pulmonary MDR-TB) were included in this prospective observational study. Blood samples for serum cortisol were taken at baseline and 30 and 60 minutes after 1 μg ACTH stimulation at our tertiary level university hospital before and after antituberculosis treatment. Results. Forty-seven percent of subjects had primary MDR-TB; 43.8% had type 2 diabetes; none were HIV-positive. We found at enrollment 2 cases (4.2%) of adrenal insufficiency taking 500 nmol/L as the standard cutoff point value and 4 cases (8.3%) alternatively, using 550 nmol/L. After antituberculosis intensive phase drug-treatment and a negative mycobacterial culture (10.2 ± 3.6 months) adrenocortical function was restored in all cases. Conclusions. In patients with MDR-TB, using the low-dose ACTH stimulation test, a low prevalence of mild adrenal insufficiency was observed. After antituberculosis treatment adrenal function was restored in all cases. Given the increasing and worrying epidemic of MDR-TB these findings have important clinical implications that may help clinicians and patients make better decisions when deciding to test for adrenocortical dysfunction or

  4. Hormones and endometrial carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Areege; Tempest, Nicola; Parkes, Christina; Alnafakh, Rafah; Makrydima, Sofia; Adishesh, Meera; Hapangama, Dharani K

    2016-02-01

    Endometrial cancer (EC) is the commonest gynaecological cancer in the Western World with an alarmingly increasing incidence related to longevity and obesity. Ovarian hormones regulate normal human endometrial cell proliferation, regeneration and function therefore are implicated in endometrial carcinogenesis directly or via influencing other hormones and metabolic pathways. Although the role of unopposed oestrogen in the pathogenesis of EC has received considerable attention, the emerging role of other hormones in this process, such as androgens and gonadotropin-releasing hormones (GnRH) is less well recognised. This review aims to consolidate the current knowledge of the involvement of the three main endogenous ovarian hormones (oestrogens, progesterone and androgens) as well as the other hormones in endometrial carcinogenesis, to identify important avenues for future research. PMID:26966933

  5. Systemic hormonal and physiological abnormalities in anxiety disorders.

    PubMed

    Cameron, O G; Nesse, R M

    1988-01-01

    Among the studies of systemic hormonal and physiological abnormalities associated with anxiety disorders, the most consistent and extensive findings suggest (a) peripheral adrenergic hyperactivity (including increases in norepinephrine but not epinephrine) and functional dysregulation, (b) increased incidence of mitral valve prolapse in panic patients, and (c) normal suppressibility of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal cortical endocrine system with dexamethasone in panic patients. Other less-certain findings include (a) increased circulating concentrations of plasma ACTH and/or cortisol, and prolactin, in panic patients, (b) increased platelet monoamine oxidase activity in generalized anxiety and/or panic patients, (c) decreased gonadal axis activity in some anxious individuals, (d) decreased nighttime melatonin plasma concentrations in panic patients, and (e) peripheral alpha 2 and beta-adrenoreceptor down-regulation, with normal serotonin binding parameters. These findings, taken together, provide tentative support for dysfunction in adrenergic and GABAergic central nervous system mechanisms in people with anxiety disorders. Abnormal anxiety and normal stress both show evidence of adrenergic hyperactivity; however, there appear to be differences in hormonal profiles, especially the apparent lack of increase of epinephrine during panic attacks, as well as differences in the reactivity of the system, and in the "trigger" mechanisms which determine when the response occurs.

  6. Headaches and hormones.

    PubMed

    Pakalnis, Ann; Gladstein, Jack

    2010-06-01

    It is clear that hormones play an important role in modulating and exacerbating headaches. From an epidemiologic standpoint, we know that before puberty, incidence of new headache is similar for boys and girls. By age 18, however, most new cases of migraine occur in young women. The role of sex hormones in headache is described in the context of pubertal development. Obesity and Pseudotumor also impact headache through hormonal influences. Menstrual migraine will often present in the teenage years. Oral contraceptives may worsen or ameliorate headache. This article will introduce these concepts and help the reader become familiar with the role of hormones in headache.

  7. Allgrove Syndrome: Adrenal Insufficiency with Hypertensive Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Aftab, Sommayya; Manzoor, Jaida; Talat, Nabila; Khan, Hafiz Sajid; Subhanie, Maroof; Khalid, Nauman Abbas

    2016-09-01

    Allgrove syndrome or triple-Asyndrome is a rare familial multisystem autosomal recessive disorder. It is characterised by triad of alacrima, achalasia and adrenal insufficiency due to adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) resistance. If it is associated with autonomic dysfunction, it is termed as 4-Asyndrome. This syndrome is caused by a mutation in the Achalasia - Addisonism - Alacrima (AAAS) gene on chromosome 12q13 encoding the nuclear pore protein ALADIN. A5-year boy presented with history of fits and altered sensorium for one day. He also had increased pigmentation of body and persistent vomiting since six months of age. Laboratory investigations and imaging revealed alacrimia, achalasia and adrenal insufficiency due to ACTH resistance. He had episodes of hypertensive crises, for which he was thoroughly investigated and it was found to be due to autonomic instability. Based on clinical findings and investigations he was diagnosed as case of Allgrove syndrome or 4-Asyndrome with autonomic dysfunction. PMID:27671188

  8. Oxytocin Increases the Influence of Public Service Advertisements

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pei-Ying; Grewal, Naomi Sparks; Morin, Christophe; Johnson, Walter D.; Zak, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a neurophysiologic model of effective public service advertisements (PSAs) and reports two experiments that test the model. In Experiment 1, we show that after watching 16 PSAs participants who received oxytocin, compared to those given a placebo, donated to 57% more causes, donated 56% more money, and reported 17% greater concern for those in the ads. In Experiment 2, we measured adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) and oxytocin levels in blood before and after participants watched a PSA. As predicted by the model, donations occurred when participants had increases in both ACTH and oxytocin. Our results indicate that PSAs with social content that cause OT release will be more effective than those that do not. Our results also explain why some individuals do not respond to PSAs. PMID:23460821

  9. Morphological changes in the small intestine of the fetal pig after prenatal stimulation of the sow with ACTH.

    PubMed

    Connell, B J; Bate, L A; Ireland, W; Acorn, R

    1995-04-01

    Twelve pregnant primiparous sows were catheterized on day 102 of gestation and randomly allocated to receive ACTH (days 112-113 of gestation [2d], days 105-parturition [10d]) or saline. At parturition the 3rd, 4th, 6th and 7th piglet born alive were sacrificed either at birth or at 6 h. The later group was fed bovine colostrum through a stomach tube at 30 min, 2 and 4 h of life. Following sacrifice, the small intestine of each piglet was excised, extended and measured. Piglets from sows in the 2d group tended to be heavier with longer small intestines than either the control or 10d groups. When the small intestine length was expressed as a function of body weight, the 10d group had the greatest ratio, suggesting that the pre-parturition maintenance of elevated cortisol levels either enhanced small intestine growth or attenuated overall weight gain. Two types of enterocyte granules were described at the level of the electron microscope: granular and opaque. Opaque granules from piglets born to sows in the 2d treatment group had both a lower volume fraction and were fewer per unit area when compared to those of either the saline or 10d treatments. The process of macromolecule uptake from the intestinal lumen appeared to have been interfered with as a result of an acute prenatal stimulation with ACTH. The above results suggest that in piglets, the level of circulating cortisol differentially controls the processes of IgG absorption, enterocyte replacement and small intestine growth through separate mechanisms. Further, these processes can be manipulated in the prenatal piglet.

  10. Interaction between Dax-1 and steroidogenic factor-1 in vivo: increased adrenal responsiveness to ACTH in the absence of Dax-1.

    PubMed

    Babu, Poda Suresh; Bavers, David L; Beuschlein, Felix; Shah, Sonalee; Jeffs, Baxter; Jameson, J Larry; Hammer, Gary D

    2002-02-01

    Two nuclear receptors, dosage-sensitive sex reversal adrenal hypoplasia congenita, critical region on the X chromosome gene-1 (Dax-1) and steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1), are required for adrenal development and function. In vitro assays suggest that Dax-1 represses SF-1 mediated transcription. In this study, we generated SF-1(+/-): Dax-1(-/Y) mice to examine the role of Dax-1 in SF-1-dependent steroidogenesis in vivo. While the SF-1 expression was impaired in SF-1(+/-) mice, there was no change in Dax-1 expression in SF-1(+/-) mice and no change in SF-1 expression in Dax-1(-/Y) mice. SF-1(+/-) mice had small adrenal glands with adrenal hypoplasia and cellular hypertrophy. The loss of Dax-1 in SF-1(+/-): Dax-1(-/Y) mice reversed the decreased adrenal weight and histological abnormalities observed in SF-1(+/-) mice. SF-1(+/-) mice had elevated ACTH and the lowest corticosterone following restraint stress. In contrast, Dax-1(-/Y) mice had elevated corticosterone and decreased ACTH. Adrenal responsiveness (ACTH/corticosterone) was highest in Dax-1(-/Y) mice, intermediate in WT and SF-1(+/-): Dax-1(-/Y) mice, and lowest in SF-1(+/-) mice. In accordance with these findings, ACTH stimulation testing resulted in the highest levels of corticosterone in the Dax-1(-/Y) mice. Protein levels of P450c21 and the ACTH receptor were increased in Dax-1(-/Y) mice and intermediate in SF-1(+/-): Dax-1(-/Y) mice following chronic food deprivation. These results are consistent with a model in which Dax-1 functions to inhibit SF-1-mediated steroidogenesis in vivo. PMID:11796523

  11. The Value of Somatostatin Receptor Imaging with In-111 Octreotide and/or Ga-68 DOTATATE in Localizing Ectopic ACTH Producing Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Gözde Özkan, Zeynep; Kuyumcu, Serkan; Balköse, Deniz; Özkan, Berker; Aksakal, Nihat; Yılmaz, Ebru; Şanlı, Yasemin; Türkmen, Cüneyt; Aral, Ferihan; Adalet, Işık

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to evaluate the value of somatostatin receptor imaging (SRI) with In-111 octreotide and Ga-68 DOTATATE in localizing ectopic ACTH producing tumors. Methods: Nineteen patients who had In-111 octreotide somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) and/or Ga-68 DOTATATE PET-CT to localize ectopic ACTH producing tumors between the years 2000 and 2012 were included retrospectively in our study. The results of SRI were compared with clinical onset, radiological findings and surgical data of the patients. Results: Sixteen In-111 octreotide SRS and five Ga-68 DOTATATE PET-CT were performed in 19 patients. In eight out of 19 patients, ectopic ACTH secretion site could be detected. In five patients, SRS showed pathologic uptake. In four of these patients, surgery revealed pulmonary carcinoid tumors and in one patient pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor. In one patient, Ga-68 DOTATATE PET-CT revealed pathologic uptake in lung nodule which came out to be pulmonary carcinoid tumor. In another patient who had resection of metastases of atypical carcinoid tumor prior to scans, new metastatic foci were detected both with SRS and Ga-68 DOTATATE PET-CT imaging. In one patient, although SRS was negative, CT which was performed three years later showed a lung nodule diagnosed as pulmonary carcinoid tumor. In 11 patients, ectopic ACTH secretion site could not be detected. In 10 of those patients, scintigraphic and radiological imaging did not show any lesions and in one patient, Ga-68 DOTATATE PET-CT was false positive. Conclusion: SRI has a complementary role with radiological imaging in localizing ectopic ACTH secretion sites. PET-CT imaging with Ga-68 peptide conjugates is a promising new modality for this indication. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24003397

  12. Suckling and salsolinol attenuate responsiveness of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to stress: focus on catecholamines, corticotrophin-releasing hormone, adrenocorticotrophic hormone, cortisol and prolactin secretion in lactating sheep.

    PubMed

    Hasiec, M; Tomaszewska-Zaremba, D; Misztal, T

    2014-12-01

    In mammals, the responsiveness of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to stress is reduced during lactation and this mainly results from suckling by the offspring. The suckling stimulus causes a release of the hypothalamic 1-metyl-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (salsolinol) (a derivative of dopamine), one of the prolactin-releasing factors. To investigate the involvement of salsolinol in the mechanism suppressing stress-induced HPA axis activity, we conducted a series of experiments on lactating sheep, in which they were treated with two kinds of isolation stress (isolation from the flock with lamb present or absent), combined with suckling and/or i.c.v infusion of salsolinol and 1-methyl-3,4-dihydro-isoqinoline (1-MeDIQ; an antagonistic analogue of salsolinol). Additionally, a push-pull perfusion of the infundibular nucleus/median eminence (IN/ME) and blood sample collection with 10-min intervals were performed during the experiments. Concentrations of perfusate corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and catecholamines (noradrenaline, dopamine and salsolinol), as well as concentrations of plasma adenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), cortisol and prolactin, were assayed. A significant increase in perfusate noradrenaline, plasma ACTH and cortisol occurred in response to both kinds of isolation stress. Suckling and salsolinol reduced the stress-induced increase in plasma ACTH and cortisol concentrations. Salsolinol also significantly reduced the stress-induced noradrenaline and dopamine release within the IN/ME. Treatment with 1-MeDIQ under the stress conditions significantly diminished the salsolinol concentration and increased CRH and cortisol concentrations. Stress and salsolinol did not increase the plasma prolactin concentration, in contrast to the suckling stimulus. In conclusion, salsolinol released in nursing sheep may have a suppressing effect on stress-induced HPA axis activity and peripheral prolactin does not appear to participate in

  13. Somatostatin-14 and somatostatin-28 pretreatment down-regulate somatostatin-14 receptors and have biphasic effects on forskolin-stimulated cyclic adenosine, 3',5'-monophosphate synthesis and adrenocorticotropin secretion in mouse anterior pituitary tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Heisler, S; Srikant, C B

    1985-07-01

    Activation of somatostatin-14 (S-14) receptors on mouse AtT-20 pituitary tumor cells by S-14 or somatostatin-28 (S-28) inhibits forskolin-stimulated cAMP synthesis and ACTH secretion. In this study, the effects of prolonged exposure of cells to S-14 or S-28 was found to reduce, in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion, the density of S-14 receptors without affecting the affinity of these sites for [125I]Tyr11-S-14. This response was rapidly reversible after removal of peptide from incubation media. Additionally, S-14 and S-28 pretreatment also resulted in a time-dependent sensitizing effect on forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation and ACTH secretion which preceded S-14 receptor down-regulation. Enhancement of the forskolin response was concentration dependent, with maximal effects observed at 10(-8) M with either peptide. Higher pretreatment concentrations of S-14 resulted in an abolition of the enhanced biological response to forskolin; pretreatment with S-28 (10(-6) M) depressed forskolin- and (-)isoproterenol-induced cAMP formation below levels observed in nonpretreated cells. The enhancing effect of S-14 and S-28 required new protein synthesis, since it was partially blocked by cycloheximide; the depressor effect was independent of new protein synthesis. Both the enhanced and depressed forskolin responses after peptide pretreatment were reversible after withdrawal of S-14 or S-28; normalization of the forskolin response (cAMP formation and ACTH secretion) followed the return to control levels of S-14 receptor density. Pretreatment of cells with 10(-8) M or 10(-6) M S-28 increased and decreased, respectively, the ACTH secretory response to agonists which act in the absence of prior cAMP synthesis such as 8-bromo-cAMP, A-23187, and phorbol ester. The data suggest that S-14 receptor down-regulation is not causally associated with the sensitizing effects of S-14 and S-28 on adenylate cyclase and that the S-14 receptor may be also coupled to other effector

  14. [Glutamate neurotransmission, stress and hormone secretion].

    PubMed

    Jezová, D; Juránková, E; Vigas, M

    1995-11-01

    Glutamate neurotransmission has been investigated in relation to several physiological processes (learning, memory) as well as to neurodegenerative and other disorders. Little attention has been paid to its involvement in neuroendocrine response during stress. Penetration of excitatory amino acids from blood to the brain is limited by the blood-brain barrier. As a consequence, several toxic effects but also bioavailability for therapeutic purposes are reduced. A free access to circulating glutamate is possible only in brain structures lacking the blood-brain barrier or under conditions of its increased permeability. Excitatory amino acids were shown to stimulate the pituitary hormone release, though the mechanism of their action is still not fully understood. Stress exposure in experimental animals induced specific changes in mRNA levels coding the glutamate receptor subunits in the hippocampus and hypothalamus. The results obtained with the use of glutamate receptor antagonists indicate that a number of specific receptor subtypes contribute to the stimulation of ACTH release during stress. The authors provided also data on the role of NMDA receptors in the control of catecholamine release, particularly in stress-induced secretion of epinephrine. These results were the first piece of evidence on the involvement of endogenous excitatory amino acids in neuroendocrine activation during stress. Neurotoxic effects of glutamate in animals are well described, especially after its administration in the neonatal period. In men, glutamate toxicity and its use as a food additive are a continuous subject of discussions. The authors found an increase in plasma cortisol and norepinephrine, but not epinephrine and prolactin, in response to the administration of a high dose of glutamate. It cannot be excluded that these effects might be induced even by lower doses in situations with increased vulnerability to glutamate action (age, individual variability). (Tab. 1, Fig. 6, Ref. 44

  15. Effects of simultaneous combined exposure to CDMA and WCDMA electromagnetic fields on serum hormone levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yeung Bae; Choi, Hyung-Do; Kim, Byung Chan; Pack, Jeong-Ki; Kim, Nam; Lee, Yun-Sil

    2013-05-01

    Despite more than a decade of research on the endocrine system, there have been no published studies about the effects of concurrent exposure of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) on this system. The present study investigated the several parameters of the endocrine system including melatonin, thyroid stimulating hormone, stress hormone and sex hormone after code division multiple access (CDMA, 849 MHz) and wideband code division multiple access (WCDMA, 1.95 GHz) signals for simultaneous exposure in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to RF-EMF signals for 45 min/day, 5 days/week for up to 8 weeks. The whole-body average specific absorption rate (SAR) of CDMA or WCDMA was 2.0 W/kg (total 4.0 W/kg). At 4 and 8 weeks after the experiment began, each experimental group's 40 rats (male 20, female 20) were autopsied. Exposure for 8 weeks to simultaneous CDMA and WCDMA RF did not affect serum levels in rats of melatonin, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxin (T4), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and sex hormones (testosterone and estrogen) as assessed by the ELISA method.

  16. Studies on the functional relationship between thyroid, adrenal and gonadal hormones.

    PubMed

    Tohei, Atsushi

    2004-02-01

    In order to clarify the functional relationship between thyroid, adrenal and gonadal hormones, hypothyroidism was induced by administration of thiuoracil in adult male and female rats, and the effects of hypothyroidism on the adrenal and the gonadal axes were investigated in the present study. 1. The functional relationship between thyroid and adrenal hormones: Adrenal weights and corticosterone were lowered, whereas the secretion of ACTH, corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) increased in hypothyroid rats compared to euthyroid rats. These results indicate that hypothyroidism causes adrenal dysfunction directly and results in hypersecretion of CRH and AVP from the hypothalamus. 2. The functional relationship between thyroid and gonadal hormones: The pituitary response to LHRH was lowered, whereas the testicular response to hCG was not changed in hypothyroid rats. Hypothyroidism suppressed copulatory behavior in male rats. These results suggest that hypothyroidism probably causes dysfunction in gonadal axis at the hypothalamic-pituitary level in male rats. In adult female rats, hypothyroidism inhibited the follicular development accompanied estradiol secretion, whereas plasma concentrations of progesterone and prolactin (PRL) increased in hypothyroid female rats. Hypothyroidism significantly increased the pituitary content of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) though it did not affect dopamine synthesis. These results suggest that hypothyroidism increases pituitary content of VIP and this increased level of VIP likely affects PRL secretion in a paracrine or autocrine manner. In female rats, inhibition of gonadal function in hypothyroid rats mediated by hyperprolactinemia in addition to hypersecretion of endogenous CRH.

  17. [Immunocytochemical observation of adenohypophysis in a human growth hormone (hGH) gene transgenic mouse].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, S; Sasaki, F; Tojo, H; Matsuzawa, A

    1993-07-01

    Adenohypophysis was immunocytochemically examined in an infertile female transgenic (Tg) mouse which carried human growth hormone (hGH) gene and had a high circulating level of hGH. No GH positive cells were detected. This confirmed the extrahypophyseal (ectopic) production of hGH and was coincident with the disappearance of parenchymal cells showing affinity to azocarmine in Azan staining. The normal frequency of ACTH positive cells was in accordance with the previous suggestion based on the changes found in zona fasciculata cells of the adrenal cortex. Most interesting findings were the detection of many PRL positive cells and the ovarian histology with nearly normal characteristics except for the presence of thick capsule and interstitial gland-like structure composed of large and light cells. Ovarian histology was also clearly different among individual Tg mice, even though they stemmed from the same line or progenitors, and had a similar phenotype. The current immunocytochemical observation well documented the changes revealed with Azan staining in the adenohypophysis about GH but not about PRL or ACTH. Thus, the immunocytochemical analysis of the adenohypophysis will provide useful methodology in assessment of endocrinological circumstances of Tg mice.

  18. Inhibition of Ubiquitin-specific Peptidase 8 Suppresses Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Production and Tumorous Corticotroph Cell Growth in AtT20 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Fang-Fang; Li, Yun-Feng; Chen, Yu-Fan; Jiang, Hong; Chen, Xiao; Zheng, Li-Li; Zhao, Yao; Wang, Wei-Qing; Ning, Guang; Bian, Liu-Guan; Sun, Qing-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Background: Two recent whole-exome sequencing researches identifying somatic mutations in the ubiquitin-specific protease 8 (USP8) gene in pituitary corticotroph adenomas provide exciting advances in this field. These mutations drive increased epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and promote adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) production. This study was to investigate whether the inhibition of USP8 activity could be a strategy for the treatment of Cushing's disease (CD). Methods: The anticancer effect of USP8 inhibitor was determined by testing cell viability, colony formation, apoptosis, and ACTH secretion. The immunoblotting and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction were conducted to explore the signaling pathway by USP8 inhibition. Results: Inhibition of USP8-induced degradation of receptor tyrosine kinases including EGFR, EGFR-2 (ERBB2), and Met leading to a suppression of AtT20 cell growth and ACTH secretion. Moreover, treatment with USP8 inhibitor markedly induced AtT20 cells apoptosis. Conclusions: Inhibition of USP8 activity could be an effective strategy for CD. It might provide a novel pharmacological approach for the treatment of CD. PMID:27569239

  19. The impact of acute stress on hormones and cytokines, and how their recovery is affected by music-evoked positive mood

    PubMed Central

    Koelsch, Stefan; Boehlig, Albrecht; Hohenadel, Maximilian; Nitsche, Ines; Bauer, Katrin; Sack, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Stress and recovery from stress significantly affect interactions between the central nervous system, endocrine pathways, and the immune system. However, the influence of acute stress on circulating immune-endocrine mediators in humans is not well known. Using a double-blind, randomized study design, we administered a CO2 stress test to n = 143 participants to identify the effects of acute stress, and recovery from stress, on serum levels of several mediators with immune function (IL-6, TNF-α, leptin, and somatostatin), as well as on noradrenaline, and two hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis hormones (ACTH and cortisol). Moreover, during a 1 h-recovery period, we repeatedly measured these serum parameters, and administered an auditory mood-induction protocol with positive music and a neutral control stimulus. The acute stress elicited increases in noradrenaline, ACTH, cortisol, IL-6, and leptin levels. Noradrenaline and ACTH exhibited the fastest and strongest stress responses, followed by cortisol, IL-6 and leptin. The music intervention was associated with more positive mood, and stronger cortisol responses to the acute stressor in the music group. Our data show that acute (CO2) stress affects endocrine, immune and metabolic functions in humans, and they show that mood plays a causal role in the modulation of responses to acute stress. PMID:27020850

  20. The impact of acute stress on hormones and cytokines, and how their recovery is affected by music-evoked positive mood.

    PubMed

    Koelsch, Stefan; Boehlig, Albrecht; Hohenadel, Maximilian; Nitsche, Ines; Bauer, Katrin; Sack, Ulrich

    2016-03-29

    Stress and recovery from stress significantly affect interactions between the central nervous system, endocrine pathways, and the immune system. However, the influence of acute stress on circulating immune-endocrine mediators in humans is not well known. Using a double-blind, randomized study design, we administered a CO2 stress test to n = 143 participants to identify the effects of acute stress, and recovery from stress, on serum levels of several mediators with immune function (IL-6, TNF-α, leptin, and somatostatin), as well as on noradrenaline, and two hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis hormones (ACTH and cortisol). Moreover, during a 1 h-recovery period, we repeatedly measured these serum parameters, and administered an auditory mood-induction protocol with positive music and a neutral control stimulus. The acute stress elicited increases in noradrenaline, ACTH, cortisol, IL-6, and leptin levels. Noradrenaline and ACTH exhibited the fastest and strongest stress responses, followed by cortisol, IL-6 and leptin. The music intervention was associated with more positive mood, and stronger cortisol responses to the acute stressor in the music group. Our data show that acute (CO2) stress affects endocrine, immune and metabolic functions in humans, and they show that mood plays a causal role in the modulation of responses to acute stress.

  1. SPECTROPHOTOMETRY OF THE PERIODIC ACID-SCHIFF REACTION WITH PITUITARY HORMONES IN VITRO AND IN HISTOLOGICAL SECTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Fand, Sally B.; Thorell, Bo

    1962-01-01

    The spectral light absorption of the in vitro periodic acid-Schiff reactions of 4 purified pituitary hormones is described. The absorption spectra present a maximum between 560 and 565 mµ. The color developed conforms with Beer's law for the ranges of concentration examined. The different hormones exhibit different chromogenicity per unit of biological activity: the color produced by 1 unit of FSH is equivalent to approximately 2 of TSH, 4 of LH, and 30 of ACTH. Microspectrophotometric measurements of the PAS-positive structures in histological sections of the human pituitary give absorption curves with shapes similar to those obtained in vitro, although quantitative differences exist. It is concluded that under the proper experimental conditions microspectra of the pituitary structures might, in the future, prove to give a quantitative measure of aldehyde groups generated from glycoprotein tropins by periodate oxidation. PMID:13891517

  2. Growth Hormone Promotes Lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Banziger-Tobler, Nadja Erika; Halin, Cornelia; Kajiya, Kentaro; Detmar, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The lymphatic system plays an important role in inflammation and cancer progression, although the molecular mechanisms involved are poorly understood. As determined using comparative transcriptional profiling studies of cultured lymphatic endothelial cells versus blood vascular endothelial cells, growth hormone receptor was expressed at much higher levels in lymphatic endothelial cells than in blood vascular endothelial cells. These findings were confirmed by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analyses. Growth hormone induced in vitro proliferation, sprouting, tube formation, and migration of lymphatic endothelial cells, and the mitogenic effect was independent of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 or -3 activation. Growth hormone also inhibited serum starvation-induced lymphatic endothelial cell apoptosis. No major alterations of lymphatic vessels were detected in the normal skin of bovine growth hormone-transgenic mice. However, transgenic delivery of growth hormone accelerated lymphatic vessel ingrowth into the granulation tissue of full-thickness skin wounds, and intradermal delivery of growth hormone resulted in enlargement and enhanced proliferation of cutaneous lymphatic vessels in wild-type mice. These results identify growth hormone as a novel lymphangiogenic factor. PMID:18583315

  3. Increased immunoreactive 11-ketotestosterone concentrations in sheep feces after acth challenge.

    PubMed

    Sid-Ahmed, Omer; Arias, Nino; Palme, Rupert; Möstl, Erich

    2013-06-01

    11-Oxoetiocholanolone and related substances are important metabolites of cortisol and are excreted via feces in ruminants. To investigate whether 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) or its immunoreactive metabolites are formed and excreted in ruminant feces, an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was developed and validated. The antibody was raised in rabbits against 11-KT-3-CMO:bovine serum albumin with biotinylated 11-KT as a label. The assay showed a sensitivity of 0.3 pg/well. To validate the assay biologically, 6 rams were injected with a synthetic analogue of the adrenocorticotropic hormone (Synacthen, 2 µg/kg body wt). An aliquot was collected of each fecal portion spontaneously defecated 8 h before Synacthen injection to 24 h after injection and stored at -20 °C until analysis. Samples (0.5 g) were extracted using 80% methanol and immunoreactive metabolites measured using the 11-KT EIA and an already established 11,17-dioxoandrostane (11,17-DOA) EIA. High-performance liquid chromatography separation revealed no peak in the same elution position as authentic 11-KT; therefore, reacting substances were referred to as 11-KT equivalents. In the case of 11-KT immunoreactive substances, the values increased from baseline (median, 136 ng/g feces) to a peak concentration (median, 424 ng/g) 10 to 14 h after Synacthen injection and declined afterwards. Concentrations of 11,17-DOA showed the same pattern, but the values were 2 to 4 times higher. From this data, the authors conclude that 11-KT-like substances, specifically C19 O3 -androgens with a 17ß-hydroxy group, were present in the feces. These substances originate from the adrenals and are most likely cortisol metabolites. PMID:23404733

  4. Sex hormone-related and growth hormone-related alopecias.

    PubMed

    Schmeitzel, L P

    1990-11-01

    Canine endocrine dermatoses are characterized by bilateral symmetrical alopecia. Although growth hormone-related and sex hormone-related dermatoses are less common than hypothyroidism and hyperadrenocorticism, they are important causes of hormonal skin disease. Several new syndromes associated with growth and sex hormones recently have been described.

  5. Association of PCB, PBDE and PCDD/F body burdens with hormone levels for children in an e-waste dismantling area of Zhejiang Province, China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peiwei; Lou, Xiaoming; Ding, Gangqiang; Shen, Haitao; Wu, Lizhi; Chen, Zhijian; Han, Jianlong; Han, Guangen; Wang, Xiaofeng

    2014-11-15

    Increased electronic waste (e-waste) has raised public concerns regarding exposure to numerous toxic contaminants, particularly polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). In China, the body burdens of PCBs, PBDEs and PCDD/Fs are associated with thyroid hormones in populations from e-waste dismantling sites; however, it is unclear whether this association occurs in children. In this study, we determined the serum levels of PCBs, PBDEs and PCDD/Fs and the endocrine hormones including free triiodothyronine (FT3), total triiodothyronine (TT3), free thyroxine (FT4), total thyroxine (TT4), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol and growth hormone (GH) in 21 children from an e-waste dismantling area and 24 children from a control area. The results showed that the mean levels of ∑PCBs and ∑PBDEs in the exposure group were significantly higher than in the control group (40.56 and 32.09 ng g(-1) lipid vs. 20.69 and 8.43 ng g(-1) lipid, respectively, p<0.01 for each), and the mean level of ∑PCDD/Fs in the exposure group was higher than in the control group, but the difference was not significant (206.17 vs. 160.27 pg g(-1) lipid, p>0.05). For the endocrine hormones, we did not find significant differences between the exposed and control groups, although the mean levels of FT3, TT3, TT4, ACTH, cortisol and GH were higher, whereas the mean levels of FT4 and TSH were lower in the exposed group. The mean level of ∑PBDEs was positively correlated with the mean levels of ∑PCBs (r=0.60, p<0.05) and ∑PCDD/Fs (r=0.61, p<0.05). Furthermore, the mean level of ∑PBDEs was positively correlated with ACTH (r=0.61, p<0.05). In conclusion, our data suggested that exposure to e-waste dismantling environment increased the body burdens of PCBs and PBDEs in local children and that these contaminants released from the e-waste might contribute to

  6. Opposite regulation of thrombospondin-1 and corticotropin-induced secreted protein/thrombospondin-2 expression by adrenocorticotropic hormone in adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed

    Lafeuillade, B; Pellerin, S; Keramidas, M; Danik, M; Chambaz, E M; Feige, J J

    1996-04-01

    Corticotropin-induced secreted protein (CISP) is a trimeric glycoprotein secreted by primary cultures of bovine adrenortical cells in response to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). This protein was recently purified in our laboratory, and its N-terminal amino-acid sequence revealed a significant similarity with thrombospondin-2 (TSP2). We report here the nucleotide sequence of a 386 bp RT-PCR fragment specific for CISP. The deduced protein sequence shares 84% identity with the N-terminal portion of mature human TSP2, suggesting that CISP is its bovine counterpart. Northern analysis of adrenocortical cell RNA using the above cDNA fragment as a probe revealed a 6.0 kb CISP/TSP2 mRNA whose abundance was increased nearly fivefold following a 24 h cell treatment with 10(-7) M ACTH. Under the same conditions, the expression of TSP1 mRNA was reduced by tenfold. The protein levels of TSP1 and CISP/TSP2 varied accordingly with their respective mRNA levels, as shown by immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence experiments. Taken together, these data show that ACTH induces a dramatic shift in the pattern of adrenocortical cell thrombospondin expression from TSP1 to CISP/TSP2. This observation suggests that these two members of the thrombospondin family exert distinct biological functions in the adrenal cortex. This hypothesis is further supported by the observation that anti-CISP antibodies inhibit the maintenance of the morphological changes of bovine adrenocortical cells induced by ACTH, whereas anti-TSP1 antibodies do not. PMID:8698834

  7. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are two types of bioidentical hormone products: • Pharmaceutical products. These products have been approved by the ... made products. These are made in a compounding pharmacy (a pharmacy that mixes medications according to a ...

  8. Bioidentical Hormones and Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... There are two types of bioidentical hormone products: Pharmaceutical products . These products have been approved by the ... made products. These are made in a compounding pharmacy(a pharmacy that mixes medications according to a ...

  9. Endocrine Glands & Their Hormones

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home » Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules » Anatomy & Physiology » Endocrine System » Endocrine Glands & Their Hormones Cancer Registration & Surveillance Modules Anatomy & Physiology Intro to the Human Body Body Functions & Life Process Anatomical Terminology Review Quiz ...

  10. Thyroid Hormone Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... is to closely replicate normal thyroid functioning. Pure, synthetic thyroxine (T4) works in the same way as ... needing thyroid hormone replacement (see Hypothyroidism brochure ). Pure synthetic thyroxine (T4), taken once daily by mouth, successfully ...

  11. Presence of ACTH and beta-endorphin immunoreactive molecules in the freshwater snail Planorbarius corneus (L.) (Gastropoda, Pulmonata) and their possible role in phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, E; Petraglia, F; Montagnani, G; Cossarizza, A; Monti, D; Franceschi, C

    1990-01-01

    The presence of ACTH and beta-endorphin immunoreactive molecules in the cell-free hemolymph and in the hemocytes of the freshwater snail Planorbarius corneus were demonstrated by immunocytochemistry and RIA tests. Only spreading phagocytic hemocytes were positive, in contrast with other hemocytes devoid of phagocytic activity, i.e., round hemocytes. These data were confirmed by flow cytometry. Another cell type with marked phagocytic activity, i.e., digestive cells of digestive gland, were also positive to anti-ACTH. Corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactive molecules were found in the cell-free hemolymph and hemocytes, by RIA. Our data suggest that cells with phagocytic activity, the oldest immune response, may represent a suitable model to unravel the tangled web of the common ancestor of the immune and the neuroendocrine systems.

  12. [Advances in hormonal contraception].

    PubMed

    Villanueva Egan, Luis Alberto; Pichardo Cuevas, Mauricio

    2007-01-01

    This review provides an update regarding newer options in hormonal contraception that include the progestin-releasing intrauterine system, the contraceptive patch and ring, the single rod progestin-releasing implant, extended and emergency oral contraception and recent advances in hormonal male contraception. These methods represent a major advancement in this field, allowing for the development of more acceptable, safety and effective birth control regimens.

  13. Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Fridlyand, Leonid E.; Tamarina, Natalia A.; Schally, Andrew V.; Philipson, Louis H.

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is produced by the hypothalamus and stimulates growth hormone synthesis and release in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition, GHRH is an important regulator of cellular functions in many cells and organs. Expression of GHRH G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GHRHR) has been demonstrated in different peripheral tissues and cell types, including pancreatic islets. Among the peripheral activities, recent studies demonstrate a novel ability of GHRH analogs to increase and preserve insulin secretion by beta-cells in isolated pancreatic islets, which makes them potentially useful for diabetes treatment. This review considers the role of GHRHR in the beta-cell and addresses the unique engineered GHRH agonists and antagonists for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We discuss the similarity of signaling pathways activated by GHRHR in pituitary somatotrophs and in pancreatic beta-cells and possible ways as to how the GHRHR pathway can interact with glucose and other secretagogues to stimulate insulin secretion. We also consider the hypothesis that novel GHRHR agonists can improve glucose metabolism in Type 2 diabetes by preserving the function and survival of pancreatic beta-cells. Wound healing and cardioprotective action with new GHRH agonists suggest that they may prove useful in ameliorating certain diabetic complications. These findings highlight the future potential therapeutic effectiveness of modulators of GHRHR activity for the development of new therapeutic approaches in diabetes and its complications. PMID:27777568

  14. Parallel stimulation of ACTH, beta-LPH + beta-endorphin and alpha-MSH release by alpha-adrenergic agents in rat anterior pituitary cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Raymond, V; Lépine, J; Giguère, V; Lissitzky, J C; Côté, J; Labrie, F

    1981-06-01

    Characteristics of the alpha-adrenergic stimulation of ACTH, beta-endorphin + beta-LPH and alpha-MSH release were studied in rat anterior pituitary cells in primary culture. Parallel changes of ACTH, beta-endorphin + beta-LPH and alpha-MSh release were found under all stimulatory and inhibitory conditions by natural and synthetic catecholamine agonists and antagonists. (-)Epinephrine and (-)norepinephrine lead to a 8--10-fold stimulation of peptide release at ED50 values of 20 and 90 nM, respectively. The stereoselectivity of the alpha-adrenergic stimulatory action on peptide release is indicated by a 100-fold higher activity of (-)- than (+)norepinephrine while (-)epinephrine is 10 times more potent than the corresponding (+) stereoisomer. The involvement of a typical alpha-adrenergic mechanism in the control of release of ACTH, beta-endorphin and related peptides in rat anterior pituitary gland is indicated by the following order of potency of a series of catecholaminergic agents (ED50 values): (-)epinephrine (20 nM) greater than (-)norepinephrine (90 nm) greater than phenylephrine (400 nM) greater than isoproterenol (6000 nM). The stimulatory effect of (-)epinephrine or phenylephrine is completely reversed by low concentrations of the alpha-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine while the beta-adrenergic antagonist propranolol has no effect up to 10 muM. Beside providing an easily accessible pure population of post-synaptic alpha-adrenergic receptors having potential applications as a model for other less accessible alpha-adrenergic brain systems, the present data suggest the possibility of the direct involvement of a catecholamine in the physiological control of ACTH secretion in the rat anterior pituitary gland.

  15. Investigation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) by 1 microg ACTH test and metyrapone test in patients with primary fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Calis, M; Gökçe, C; Ates, F; Ulker, S; Izgi, H B; Demir, H; Kirnap, M; Sofuoglu, S; Durak, A C; Tutus, A; Kelestimur, F

    2004-01-01

    Primary fibromyalgia syndrome (PFS) is characterized by widespread chronic pain that affects the musculoskeletal system, fatigue, anxiety, sleep disturbance, headache and postural hypotension. The pathophysiology of PFS is unknown. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis seems to play an important role in PFS. Both hyperactivity and hypoactivity of the HPA axis have been reported in patients with PFS. In this study we assessed the HPA axis by 1 microg ACTH stimulation test and metyrapone test in 22 patients with PFS and in 15 age-, sex-, and body mass index (BMI)- matched controls. Metyrapone (30 mg/kg) was administered orally at 23:00 h and blood was sampled at 08:30 h the following morning for 11-deoxycortisol. ACTH stimulation test was carried out by using 1 microg (iv) ACTH as a bolus injection after an overnight fast, and blood samples were drawn at 0, 30 and 60 min. Peak cortisol level (659.4 +/- 207.2 nmol/l) was lower in the patients with PFS than peak cortisol level (838.7 +/- 129.6 nmol/l) in the control subjects (p < 0.05). Ten patients (45%) with PFS had peak cortisol responses to 1 microg ACTH test lower than the lowest peak cortisol detected in healthy controls. After metyrapone test 11-deoxycortisol level was 123.7 +/- 26 nmol/l in patients with PFS and 184.2 +/- 17.3 nmol/l in the controls (p < 0.05). Ninety five percent of the patients with PFS had lower 11-deoxycortisol level after metyrapone than the lowest 11-deoxycortisol level after metyrapone detected in healthy controls. We also compared the adrenal size of the patients with that of the healthy subjects and we found that the adrenal size between the groups was similar. This study clearly shows that HPA axis is underactivated in PFS, rather than overactivated. PMID:15053242

  16. Treatment with thyroid hormone.

    PubMed

    Biondi, Bernadette; Wartofsky, Leonard

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid hormone deficiency can have important repercussions. Treatment with thyroid hormone in replacement doses is essential in patients with hypothyroidism. In this review, we critically discuss the thyroid hormone formulations that are available and approaches to correct replacement therapy with thyroid hormone in primary and central hypothyroidism in different periods of life such as pregnancy, birth, infancy, childhood, and adolescence as well as in adult patients, the elderly, and in patients with comorbidities. Despite the frequent and long term use of l-T4, several studies have documented frequent under- and overtreatment during replacement therapy in hypothyroid patients. We assess the factors determining l-T4 requirements (sex, age, gender, menstrual status, body weight, and lean body mass), the major causes of failure to achieve optimal serum TSH levels in undertreated patients (poor patient compliance, timing of l-T4 administration, interferences with absorption, gastrointestinal diseases, and drugs), and the adverse consequences of unintentional TSH suppression in overtreated patients. Opinions differ regarding the treatment of mild thyroid hormone deficiency, and we examine the recent evidence favoring treatment of this condition. New data suggesting that combined therapy with T3 and T4 could be indicated in some patients with hypothyroidism are assessed, and the indications for TSH suppression with l-T4 in patients with euthyroid multinodular goiter and in those with differentiated thyroid cancer are reviewed. Lastly, we address the potential use of thyroid hormones or their analogs in obese patients and in severe cardiac diseases, dyslipidemia, and nonthyroidal illnesses.

  17. NFKB2 mutation in common variable immunodeficiency and isolated adrenocorticotropic hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chuan; Wang, Fen; Tong, Anli; Zhang, Xiao-Qian; Song, Hong-Mei; Liu, Zheng-Yin; Lyu, Wei; Liu, Yue-Hua; Xia, Wei-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) with central adrenal insufficiency is a recently defined clinical syndrome caused by mutations in the nuclear factor kappa-B subunit 2 (NFKB2) gene. We present the first case of NFKB2 mutation in Asian population. Methods and Results An 18-year-old Chinese female with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) deficiency was admitted due to adrenal crisis and pneumonia. She had a history of recurrent respiratory infections since childhood and ectodermal abnormalities were noted during physical examination. Immunologic tests revealed panhypogammaglobulinemia and deficient natural killer (NK)-cell function. DNA sequencing of NFKB2 identified a heterozygous nonsense mutation (c.2563 A>T, p.855: Lys>∗) in the patient but not her parents. Conclusion Clinicians should be alert to comorbidities of adrenal insufficiency and ectodermal dysplasia in CVID patients as these might suggest a rare hereditary syndrome caused by NFKB2 mutation. PMID:27749582

  18. Selected hormonal and immunological responses to strenuous live-fire firefighting drills.

    PubMed

    Smith, D L; Petruzzello, S J; Chludzinski, M A; Reed, J J; Woods, J A

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of strenuous live-fire firefighting drills and a 90 min recovery period on selected hormonal, immunological and psychological variables. Apparently healthy, male, professional firefighters (n = 11) performed three trials of standardized firefighting tasks in a live-fire training structure. There was significant leukocytosis immediately post firefighting activity that persisted following recovery, although there was a variable response among the leukocyte subsets. Most notable was the decrease in number and percentage of lymphocytes following 90 min of recovery. Plasma levels of ACTH and cortisol were significantly elevated post firefighting activity and cortisol remained elevated following 90 min of recovery. Elevated cortisol immediately following activity was related to reduced feelings of energy. These data demonstrate the magnitude of the physiological and psychological disruption following strenuous firefighting activity and suggest that immune function may be altered following such activity. This is a finding that may have practical consequences for this group of first responders.

  19. [Paraneoplastic hormonal syndromes].

    PubMed

    Forga, L; Anda, E; Martínez de Esteban, J P

    2005-01-01

    We can define paraneoplastic syndromes as a combination of effects occurring far from the original location of the tumour and independently from the local repercussion of its metastases. Paraneoplastic hormonal syndromes depend on the secretion of hormonal peptides or their precursors, cytokines and, more rarely, thyroidal hormones and Vitamin D, which act in an endocrine, paracrine or autocrine way. Sometimes, paraneoplastic syndromes can be more serious than the consequences of the primary tumour itself and can precede, develop in parallel, or follow the manifestations of this tumour. It is important to recognise a paraneoplastic hormonal syndrome for several reasons, amongst which we would draw attention to three: 1) It can lead to the diagnosis of a previously undetected, underlying malign or benign neoplasia; 2) It can dominate the clinical picture and thus lead to errors with respect to the origin and type of primary tumour; and 3) It can follow the clinical course of the underlying tumour and thus be useful for monitoring its evolution. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the development of these syndromes are not well-known, but it is believed that they might be inherent to the mutations responsible for the primary tumour or depend on epigenetic factors such as methylation. In this review, we consider the following paraneoplastic hormonal syndromes: malign hypercalcaemia, hyponatraemia (inappropiate secretion of the antidiuretic hormone), ectopic Cushing's syndrome, ectopic acromegaly, hypoglycaemia due to tumours different from those of the islet cells and paraneoplastic gynaecomastia; we make a brief final reference to other hormones (calcitonin, somatostatin, and VIP). PMID:16155618

  20. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions.

  1. Reproductive hormones and bone.

    PubMed

    Nicks, Kristy M; Fowler, Tristan W; Gaddy, Dana

    2010-06-01

    Hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulates secretion of pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), which directly regulate ovarian function. Pituitary FSH can modulate osteoclast development, and thereby influence bone turnover. Pituitary oxytocin and prolactin effects on the skeleton are not merely limited to pregnancy and lactation; oxytocin stimulates osteoblastogenesis and bone formation, whereas prolactin exerts skeletal effects in an age-dependent manner. Cyclic levels of inhibins and estrogen suppress FSH and LH, respectively, and also suppress bone turnover via their suppressive effects on osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation. However, continuous exposure to inhibins or estrogen/androgens is anabolic for the skeleton in intact animals and protects against gonadectomy-induced bone loss. Alterations of one hormone in the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis influence other bone-active hormones in the entire feedback loop in the axis. Thus, we propose that the action of the HPG axis should be extended to include its combined effects on the skeleton, thus creating the HPG skeletal (HPGS) axis.

  2. Plant peptide hormone signalling.

    PubMed

    Motomitsu, Ayane; Sawa, Shinichiro; Ishida, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-receptor-based cell-to-cell communication system is one of the most important molecular bases for the establishment of complex multicellular organisms. Plants have evolved highly complex intercellular communication systems. Historical studies have identified several molecules, designated phytohormones, that function in these processes. Recent advances in molecular biological analyses have identified phytohormone receptors and signalling mediators, and have led to the discovery of numerous peptide-based signalling molecules. Subsequent analyses have revealed the involvement in and contribution of these peptides to multiple aspects of the plant life cycle, including development and environmental responses, similar to the functions of canonical phytohormones. On the basis of this knowledge, the view that these peptide hormones are pivotal regulators in plants is becoming increasingly accepted. Peptide hormones are transcribed from the genome and translated into peptides. However, these peptides generally undergo further post-translational modifications to enable them to exert their function. Peptide hormones are expressed in and secreted from specific cells or tissues. Apoplastic peptides are perceived by specialized receptors that are located at the surface of target cells. Peptide hormone-receptor complexes activate intracellular signalling through downstream molecules, including kinases and transcription factors, which then trigger cellular events. In this chapter we provide a comprehensive summary of the biological functions of peptide hormones, focusing on how they mature and the ways in which they modulate plant functions. PMID:26374891

  3. Hormonal control of euryhalinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takei, Yoshio; McCormick, Stephen D.; McCormick, Stephen D.; Farrell, Anthony Peter; Brauner, Colin J.

    2013-01-01

    Hormones play a critical role in maintaining body fluid balance in euryhaline fishes during changes in environmental salinity. The neuroendocrine axis senses osmotic and ionic changes, then signals and coordinates tissue-specific responses to regulate water and ion fluxes. Rapid-acting hormones, e.g. angiotensins, cope with immediate challenges by controlling drinking rate and the activity of ion transporters in the gill, gut, and kidney. Slow-acting hormones, e.g. prolactin and growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1, reorganize the body for long-term acclimation by altering the abundance of ion transporters and through cell proliferation and differentiation of ionocytes and other osmoregulatory cells. Euryhaline species exist in all groups of fish, including cyclostomes, and cartilaginous and teleost fishes. The diverse strategies for responding to changes in salinity have led to differential regulation and tissue-specific effects of hormones. Combining traditional physiological approaches with genomic, transcriptomic, and proteomic analyses will elucidate the patterns and diversity of the endocrine control of euryhalinity.

  4. Thyroid hormone resistance.

    PubMed

    Olateju, Tolulope O; Vanderpump, Mark P J

    2006-11-01

    Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited syndrome of reduced end-organ responsiveness to thyroid hormone. Patients with RTH have elevated serum free thyroxine (FT4) and free triiodothyronine (FT3) concentrations and normal or slightly elevated serum thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) level. Despite a variable clinical presentation, the common characteristic clinical features are goitre but an absence of the usual symptoms and metabolic consequences of thyroid hormone excess. Patients with RTH can be classified on clinical grounds alone into either generalized resistance (GRTH), pituitary resistance (PRTH) or combined. Mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor (TR) beta gene are responsible for RTH and 122 different mutations have now been identified belonging to 300 families. With the exception of one family found to have complete deletion of the TRbeta gene, all others have been demonstrated to have minor alterations at the DNA level. The differential diagnosis includes a TSH-secreting pituitary adenoma and the presence of endogenous antibodies directed against thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3). Failure to differentiate RTH from primary thyrotoxicosis has resulted in the inappropriate treatment of nearly one-third of patients. Although occasionally desirable, no specific treatment is available for RTH; however, the diagnosis allows appropriate genetic counselling. PMID:17132274

  5. [Hormones and hair growth].

    PubMed

    Trüeb, R M

    2010-06-01

    With respect to the relationship between hormones and hair growth, the role of androgens for androgenetic alopecia (AGA) and hirsutism is best acknowledged. Accordingly, therapeutic strategies that intervene in androgen metabolism have been successfully developed for treatment of these conditions. Clinical observations of hair conditions involving hormones beyond the androgen horizon have determined their role in regulation of hair growth: estrogens, prolactin, thyroid hormone, cortisone, growth hormone (GH), and melatonin. Primary GH resistance is characterized by thin hair, while acromegaly may cause hypertrichosis. Hyperprolactinemia may cause hair loss and hirsutism. Partial synchronization of the hair cycle in anagen during late pregnancy points to an estrogen effect, while aromatase inhibitors cause hair loss. Hair loss in a causal relationship to thyroid disorders is well documented. In contrast to AGA, senescent alopecia affects the hair in a diffuse manner. The question arises, whether the hypothesis that a causal relationship exists between the age-related reduction of circulating hormones and organ function also applies to hair and the aging of hair.

  6. Replacement therapy with DHEA plus corticosteroids in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases--substitutes of adrenal and sex hormones.

    PubMed

    Straub, R H; Schölmerich, J; Zietz, B

    2000-01-01

    A dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis was found in animal models of chronic inflammatory diseases, and the defect was located in more central portions of the HPA axis. This defect of neuroendocrine regulatory mechanisms contributes to the onset of the model disease. Since these first observations in animal models were made, evidence has accumulated that the possible defect in the HPA axis in humans is more distal to the hypothalamus or pituitary gland: In chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, an alteration of the HPA stress response results in inappropriately low cortisol secretion in relation to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) secretion. Furthermore, it has recently been shown that the serum levels of another adrenal hormone, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), were significantly lower after ACTH stimulation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis without prior corticosteroids than in healthy controls. These studies clearly indicate that chronic inflammation alters, particularly, the adrenal response. However, at this point, the reason for the specific alteration of adrenal function in relation to pituitary function remains to be determined. Since one of the down-regulated adrenal hormones, DHEA, is an inhibitor of cytokines due to an inhibition of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) activation, low levels of this hormone may be deleterious in chronic inflammatory diseases. We have recently demonstrated that DHEA is a potent inhibitor of IL-6, which confirmed an earlier study in mice. Since IL-6 is an important factor for B lymphocyte differentiation, the missing down-regulation of this cytokine, and others such as TNF, may be a significant risk factor in rheumatic diseases. Since in these patients, administration of prednisolone or the chronic inflammatory process itself alters adrenal function, endogenous adrenal hormones in relation to proinflammatory cytokines change. Furthermore, these mechanisms may also lead to

  7. Hormonal therapy for epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Scott J; Harden, Cynthia L

    2011-08-01

    In 2011, there are greater than 20 antiepileptic medications available. These medications work by modulating neuronal excitability. Reproductive hormones have been found to have a role in the pathogenesis and treatment of seizures by also altering neuronal excitability, especially in women with catamenial epilepsy. The female reproductive hormones have in general opposing effects on neuronal excitability; estrogens generally impart a proconvulsant neurophysiologic tone, whereas the progestogens have anticonvulsant effects. It follows then that fluctuations in the levels of serum progesterone and estrogen throughout a normal reproductive cycle bring about an increased or decreased risk of seizure occurrence based upon the serum estradiol/progesterone ratio. Therefore, using progesterone, its metabolite allopregnanolone, or other hormonal therapies have been explored in the treatment of patients with epilepsy. PMID:21451944

  8. Bioidentical hormone therapy.

    PubMed

    Files, Julia A; Ko, Marcia G; Pruthi, Sandhya

    2011-07-01

    The change in hormonal milieu associated with perimenopause and menopause can lead to a variety of symptoms that can affect a woman's quality of life. Postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) is an effective, well-tolerated treatment for these symptoms. However, combined HT consisting of conjugated equine estrogen and medroxyprogesterone acetate has been associated with an increased number of health risks when compared with conjugated equine estrogen alone or placebo. As a result, some women are turning to alternative hormonal formulations known as compounded bioidentical HT because they perceive them to be a safer alternative. This article defines compounded bioidentical HT and explores the similarities and differences between it and US Food and Drug Administration-approved HT. We will examine the major claims made by proponents of compounded bioidentical HT and recommend strategies for management of patients who request bioidentical HT from physicians.

  9. Conditional steroidogenic cell-targeted deletion of TSPO unveils a crucial role in viability and hormone-dependent steroid formation

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jinjiang; Campioli, Enrico; Midzak, Andrew; Culty, Martine; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-01-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO) is a key member of the mitochondrial cholesterol transport complex in steroidogenic tissues. To assess the function of TSPO, we generated two lines of Cre-mediated Tspo conditional knockout (cKO) mice. First, gonadal somatic cell-targeting Amhr2-Cre mice were crossed with Tspo-floxed mice to obtain F1 Tspo Amhr2 cKO mice (Tspofl/fl;Amhr2-Cre/+). The unexpected Mendelian ratio of 4.4% cKO mice was confirmed by genotyping of 12.5-day-postcoitum (dpc) embryos. As Amhr2-Cre is expressed in gonads at 12.5 dpc, these findings suggest preimplantation selection of embryos. Analysis of expression databases revealed elevated levels of Amhr2 in two- and eight-cell zygotes, suggesting ectopic Tspo silencing before the morula stage and demonstrating elevated embryonic lethality and involvement of TSPO in embryonic development. To circumvent this issue, steroidogenic cell-targeting Nr5a1-Cre mice were crossed with Tspo-floxed mice. The resulting Tspofl/fl;Nr5a1-Cre/+ mice were born at a normal Mendelian ratio. Nr5a1-driven Tspo cKO mice exhibited highly reduced Tspo levels in adrenal cortex and gonads. Treatment of mice with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) resulted in increased circulating testosterone levels despite extensive lipid droplet depletion. In contrast, Nr5a1-driven Tspo cKO mice lost their ability to form corticosterone in response to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Important for ACTH-dependent steroidogenesis, Mc2r, Stard1, and Cypa11a1 levels were unaffected, whereas Scarb1 levels were increased and accumulation of lipid droplets was observed, indicative of a blockade of cholesterol utilization for steroidogenesis. TSPO expression in the adrenal medulla and increased epinephrine production were also observed. In conclusion, TSPO was found necessary for preimplantation embryo development and ACTH-stimulated steroid biosynthesis. PMID:26039990

  10. Conditional steroidogenic cell-targeted deletion of TSPO unveils a crucial role in viability and hormone-dependent steroid formation.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jinjiang; Campioli, Enrico; Midzak, Andrew; Culty, Martine; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2015-06-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO) is a key member of the mitochondrial cholesterol transport complex in steroidogenic tissues. To assess the function of TSPO, we generated two lines of Cre-mediated Tspo conditional knockout (cKO) mice. First, gonadal somatic cell-targeting Amhr2-Cre mice were crossed with Tspo-floxed mice to obtain F1 Tspo Amhr2 cKO mice (Tspo(fl/fl);Amhr2-Cre(/+)). The unexpected Mendelian ratio of 4.4% cKO mice was confirmed by genotyping of 12.5-day-postcoitum (dpc) embryos. As Amhr2-Cre is expressed in gonads at 12.5 dpc, these findings suggest preimplantation selection of embryos. Analysis of expression databases revealed elevated levels of Amhr2 in two- and eight-cell zygotes, suggesting ectopic Tspo silencing before the morula stage and demonstrating elevated embryonic lethality and involvement of TSPO in embryonic development. To circumvent this issue, steroidogenic cell-targeting Nr5a1-Cre mice were crossed with Tspo-floxed mice. The resulting Tspo(fl/fl);Nr5a1-Cre(/+) mice were born at a normal Mendelian ratio. Nr5a1-driven Tspo cKO mice exhibited highly reduced Tspo levels in adrenal cortex and gonads. Treatment of mice with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) resulted in increased circulating testosterone levels despite extensive lipid droplet depletion. In contrast, Nr5a1-driven Tspo cKO mice lost their ability to form corticosterone in response to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). Important for ACTH-dependent steroidogenesis, Mc2r, Stard1, and Cypa11a1 levels were unaffected, whereas Scarb1 levels were increased and accumulation of lipid droplets was observed, indicative of a blockade of cholesterol utilization for steroidogenesis. TSPO expression in the adrenal medulla and increased epinephrine production were also observed. In conclusion, TSPO was found necessary for preimplantation embryo development and ACTH-stimulated steroid biosynthesis.

  11. Adrenocorticotrophic Hormone Levels in Ground Based Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, B. O.

    1972-01-01

    Baseline values of immunoreactive ACTH were established in the normal healthy adult. Normal levels of ACTH secretion were determined for both the male and the female in circulating plasma and serum. The data obtained in these studies are particularly significant in that the sampling was carefully controlled; only healthy employed individuals of both sexes were tested in a routine work situation that would not be considered conducive to stress. It has been found that alterations in the classically described circadian rhythm of ACTH secretion can occur when activities (such as work/rest cycles) are imposed on the individual studied. These changes can be demonstrated even when there is no appreciable change noted in the rhythm of hydrocortisone secretion.

  12. Male hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, E

    2010-01-01

    The principle of hormonal male contraception based on suppression of gonadotropins and spermatogenesis has been established over the last three decades. All hormonal male contraceptives use testosterone, but only in East Asian men can testosterone alone suppress spermatogenesis to a level compatible with contraceptive protection. In Caucasians, additional agents are required of which progestins are favored. Current clinical trials concentrate on testosterone combined with norethisterone, desogestrel, etonogestrel, DMPA, or nestorone. The first randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial performed by the pharmaceutical industry demonstrated the effectiveness of a combination of testosterone undecanoate and etonogestrel in suppressing spermatogenesis in volunteers. PMID:20839093

  13. Effect of chronic treatment with the antidepressant tianeptine on the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    PubMed

    Delbende, C; Tranchand Bunel, D; Tarozzo, G; Grino, M; Oliver, C; Mocaër, E; Vaudry, H

    1994-01-14

    The effects of acute and chronic administration of tianeptine, a novel antidepressant agent, on the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis were studied in the adult male rat. A single injection of tianeptine did not alter the activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis. In contrast, chronic administration of tianeptine (10 mg/kg twice a day for 15 days) induced a significant decrease in the concentration of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in the hypothalamus and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) in the anterior lobe of the pituitary. Chronic tianeptine treatment did not modify CRF levels in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and did not alter alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and beta-endorphin levels in the neurointermediate lobe of the pituitary. Using the in situ hybridization technique, we observed that chronic administration of tianeptine did not modify CRF mRNA levels in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. The effect of chronic tianeptine treatment on the neuroendocrine response to stress was also investigated. Tube restraint stress for 30 min induced a significant depletion of hypothalamic CRF and a substantial increase of plasma ACTH and corticosterone. Tianeptine abolished the stress-induced reduction of hypothalamic CRF concentration and markedly reduced the stress-induced increase in plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels. Taken together, these results suggest that tianeptine acts primarily at the level of the hypothalamus: (1) in unstressed rats, tianeptine reduces hypothalamic CRF and pituitary ACTH contents; (2) in stressed animals, tianeptine attenuates the activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis.

  14. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer On This Page What are hormones? How do ... sensitive breast cancer: Adjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer : Research has shown that women treated for early- ...

  15. Luteinizing hormone (LH) blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ICSH - blood test; Luteinizing hormone - blood test; Interstitial cell stimulating hormone - blood test ... to temporarily stop medicines that may affect the test results. Be sure to tell your provider about ...

  16. Side Effects of Hormone Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men Living with Prostate Cancer Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Side Effects Urinary Dysfunction Bowel Dysfunction Erectile Dysfunction Loss of Fertility Side Effects of Hormone Therapy Side Effects of Chemotherapy Side Effects: When ...

  17. Head-up tilt and lower body suction: comparison of hormone responses in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Hinghofer-Szalkay, H G; Vigas, M; Sauseng-Fellegger, G; König, E M; Lichardus, B; Jezová, D

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare, in the same subjects, hormonal responses to 30-min head-up tilt (HUT) and lower body suction (LBNP) of different intensity (24 degrees and 70 degrees, and 15 and 35 mm Hg, respectively). Basal pooled individual data from -10 min (n = 32) were within normal reference limits: norepinephrine (NE) averaged 318 +/- 23 pg/ml; epinephrine, 34.0 +/- 5.5 pg/ml; plasma renin activity (PRA), 0.72 +/- 0.08 ng ATII/ml/h; aldosterone, 164 +/- 20 pg/ml; atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), 29.9 +/- 2.0 pg/ml; cGMP, 6.29 +/- 0.59 mmol/l; cortisol, 95.7 +/- 5.8 ng/ml; and ACTH, 50.3 +/- 2.6 pg/ml. The low-level stimuli failed to induce consistent changes in hormone levels. From the onset of the stimulus (minute 0) to its termination (minute 30), norepinephrine (NE) increased by 101% with LBNP-35, and by 70% with HUT70, respectively. The NE increase with LBNP-35 was higher (p < 0.05) than with HUT70. Epinephrine rose with HUT70 (by 162%) only. PRA increased by 157% with LBNP-35, and by 119% with HUT70, respectively; these responses were not significantly different. Aldosterone rose equally (by 85 and 89%) with LBNP-35 and HUT70 but not with the low-level stimuli. No consistent changes were observed in ANP, c-GMP or ACTH concentrations. Cortisol values fell during the LBNP and HUT24 situations but rose transiently after HUT70. We conclude that the hormones investigated respond differently to head-up posture and lower body suction and in a specific manner. Greater effects of high-level stimuli (HUT70, LBNP-35) were noted as compared to low-level stimuli (HUT24, LBNP-15). The application of combined sets of models stimulating the cardiovascular system may aid in the analysis of responses of hormonal systems in man. PMID:9085364

  18. Protein tyrosine phosphatases regulate arachidonic acid release, StAR induction and steroidogenesis acting on a hormone-dependent arachidonic acid-preferring acyl-CoA synthetase.

    PubMed

    Cano, Florencia; Poderoso, Cecilia; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Castilla, Rocío; Maloberti, Paula; Castillo, Fernanda; Neuman, Isabel; Paz, Cristina; Podestá, Ernesto J

    2006-06-01

    The activation of the rate-limiting step in steroid biosynthesis, that is the transport of cholesterol into the mitochondria, is dependent on PKA-mediated events triggered by hormones like ACTH and LH. Two of such events are the protein tyrosine dephosphorylation mediated by protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) and the release of arachidonic acid (AA) mediated by two enzymes, ACS4 (acyl-CoA synthetase 4) and Acot2 (mitochondrial thioesterase). ACTH and LH regulate the activity of PTPs and Acot2 and promote the induction of ACS4. Here we analyzed the involvement of PTPs on the expression of ACS4. We found that two PTP inhibitors, acting through different mechanisms, are both able to abrogate the hormonal effect on ACS4 induction. PTP inhibitors also reduce the effect of cAMP on steroidogenesis and on the level of StAR protein, which facilitates the access of cholesterol into the mitochondria. Moreover, our results indicate that exogenous AA is able to overcome the inhibition produced by PTP inhibitors on StAR protein level and steroidogenesis. Then, here we describe a link between PTP activity and AA release, since ACS4 induction is under the control of PTP activity, being a key event for AA release, StAR induction and steroidogenesis.

  19. Thyroid hormones and bone development.

    PubMed

    Combs, C E; Nicholls, J J; Duncan Bassett, J H; Williams, G R

    2011-03-01

    Thyroid hormones are critical determinants of postnatal skeletal development. Thyroid hormone deficiency or excess in children results in severe abnormalities of linear growth and bone maturation. These clinical observations have been recapitulated in mutant mice and these models have facilitated studies of the mechanisms of thyroid hormone action in the developing skeleton. In this review, we consider in detail the direct and indirect effects of thyroid hormone on bone and the molecular mechanisms involved.

  20. [Hormonal contraception in autoimmpne diseases].

    PubMed

    Matyszkiewicz, Anna; Jach, Robert; Rajtar-Ciosek, Agnieszka; Basta, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    The onset and the course of autoimmune diseases is influenced among other factors by the sex hormones. Hormonal contraception might affect the course of the autoimmune disease. The paper summarises the manner of save application of hormonal contraception in patients with autoimmune disease. PMID:27526427

  1. Hormonal Control of Fetal Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Paul S.; Nicoll, Charles S.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes recent research on hormonal control of fetal growth, presenting data obtained using a new method for studying the area. Effects of endocrine ablations and congenital deficiencies, studies of hormone/receptor levels, in-vitro techniques, hormones implicated in promoting fetal growth, problems with existing methodologies, and growth of…

  2. Increased corticosteroid binding capacity of plasma albumin but not of corticosteroid-binding globulin caused by ACTH-induced changes in free fatty acid concentrations in snowshoe hares and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, R; Tinnikov, A A

    1998-01-01

    Free fatty acids (FFAs) are rapidly mobilized by ACTH and have been shown to be potent endogenous modulators of steroid-protein interactions. We increased FFA in lagomorphs by ACTH and then separated the transient increase in glucocorticoid binding capacity of plasma into that accounted for by changes in binding to albumin and to corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG). Sequential injections of dexamethasone and ACTH into both snowshoe hares and laboratory rabbits resulted in the rapid mobilization of FFA only after the ACTH injection. The maximum corticosteroid binding capacity increase paralleled that of the FFA increase in both species. In rabbits, CBG levels remained constant over the duration of the experiment. Corticosterone binding by rabbit albumin increased in a dose-dependent fashion in response to increases in FFA (oleic and linoleic acid) concentrations. Finally, by stimulating FFA release in snowshoe hares with ACTH and separating the increase in corticosteroid binding capacity through selective denaturing of CBG by heat, we determined that the increase in plasma binding capacity was a response to changes in binding by albumin, not CBG. Thus FFA released in response to stressors in lagomorphs may effect short-term increases in steroid binding.

  3. Distribution of LPXRFa, a gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone ortholog peptide, and LPXRFa receptor in the brain and pituitary of the tilapia.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Satoshi; Sivalingam, Mageswary; Biran, Jakob; Golan, Matan; Anthonysamy, Rachel Shalini; Levavi-Sivan, Berta; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2016-10-01

    In vertebrates, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), respectively, regulate reproduction in positive and negative manners. GnIH belongs to the LPXRFa family of peptides previously identified in mammalian and nonmammalian vertebrates. Studying the detailed distribution of LPXRFa as well as its receptor (LPXRFa-R) in the brain and pituitary is important for understanding their multiple action sites and potential functions. However, the distribution of LPXRFa and LPXRFa-R has not been studied in teleost species, partially because of the lack of fish-specific antibodies. Therefore, in the present study, we generated specific antibodies against LPXRFa and its receptor from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus), and examined their distributions in the brain and pituitary by immunohistochemistry. Tilapia LPXRFa-immunoreactive neurons lie in the posterior ventricular nucleus of the caudal preoptic area, whereas LPXRFa-R-immunoreactive cells are distributed widely. Double immunofluorescence showed that neither LPXRFa-immunoreactive fibers nor LPXRFa-R is closely associated or coexpressed with GnRH1, GnRH3, or kisspeptin (Kiss2) neurons. In the pituitary, LPXRFa fibers are closely associated with gonadotropic endocrine cells [expressing luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)], with adrenocorticomelanotropic cells [corticotropin (ACTH) and α-melanotropin (α-MSH)], and with somatolactin endocrine cells. In contrast, LPXRFa-R are expressed only in LH, ACTH, and α-MSH cells. These results suggest that LPXRFa and LPXRFa-R signaling acts directly on the pituitary cells independent from GnRH or kisspeptin and could play multiple roles in reproductive and nonreproductive functions in teleosts. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2753-2775, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26917324

  4. Thyroid Hormone and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Safer, Joshua D.

    2013-01-01

    Although thyroid hormone is one of the most potent stimulators of growth and metabolic rate, the potential to use thyroid hormone to treat cutaneous pathology has never been subject to rigorous investigation. A number of investigators have demonstrated intriguing therapeutic potential for topical thyroid hormone. Topical T3 has accelerated wound healing and hair growth in rodents. Topical T4 has been used to treat xerosis in humans. It is clear that the use of thyroid hormone to treat cutaneous pathology may be of large consequence and merits further study. This is a review of the literature regarding thyroid hormone action on skin along with skin manifestations of thyroid disease. The paper is intended to provide a context for recent findings of direct thyroid hormone action on cutaneous cells in vitro and in vivo which may portend the use of thyroid hormone to promote wound healing. PMID:23577275

  5. Acne: hormonal concepts and therapy.

    PubMed

    Thiboutot, Diane

    2004-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is the most common skin condition observed in the medical community. Although we know that hormones are important in the development of acne, many questions remain unanswered regarding the mechanisms by which hormones exert their effects. Androgens such as dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and testosterone, the adrenal precursor dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), estrogens such as estradiol, and other hormones, including growth hormone and insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), may be important in acne. It is not known whether these hormones are taken up from the serum by the sebaceous gland, whether they are produced locally within the gland, or whether a combination of these processes is involved. Finally, the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which these hormones exert their influence on the sebaceous gland have not been fully elucidated. Hormonal therapy is an option in women with acne not responding to conventional treatment or with signs of endocrine abnormalities. PMID:15556729

  6. Hormones in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pratap; Magon, Navneet

    2012-01-01

    The endocrinology of human pregnancy involves endocrine and metabolic changes that result from physiological alterations at the boundary between mother and fetus. Progesterone and oestrogen have a great role along with other hormones. The controversies of use of progestogen and others are discussed in this chapter. Progesterone has been shown to stimulate the secretion of Th2 and reduces the secretion of Th1 cytokines which maintains pregnancy. Supportive care in early pregnancy is associated with a significant beneficial effect on pregnancy outcome. Prophylactic hormonal supplementation can be recommended for all assisted reproduction techniques cycles. Preterm labor can be prevented by the use of progestogen. The route of administration plays an important role in the drug's safety and efficacy profile in different trimesters of pregnancy. Thyroid disorders have a great impact on pregnancy outcome and needs to be monitored and treated accordingly. Method of locating review: Pubmed, scopus PMID:23661874

  7. Biosimilar growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Saenger, Paul

    2012-01-01

    As the first wave of biopharmaceuticals is expiring, biosimilars or follow-on -protein products (FOPP's) have emerged. Biosimilar drugs are cheaper than the originator/comparator drug. The regulatory foundation for these products is more advanced and better codified in Europe than in the US. Biosimilar soamtropin has been approved in both the US and Europe. The scientific viability of biosimilar drugs and especially growth hormone has been proven by several rigorously conducted clinical trials. Efficacy and safety data (growth rates, IGF-1 generation) for up to 7 y for pediatric indications measure up favorably to previously approved growth hormones which served as reference comparators. The Obama Administration appears to be committed to establish innovative pathways for the approval of biologics and biosimilars in the US. The cost savings in health care expenditures will be substantial as the global sales of biologics have reached $ 93 billion in 2009.

  8. ACTH blood test

    MedlinePlus

    ... early in the morning. This is important, because cortisol level varies throughout the day. You may also ... results. These medicines include glucocorticoids such as prednisone, hydrocortisone, or dexamethasone.

  9. Role of the ACTH test and estimation of a safe dose for high potency steroids in vitiligo: A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente-García, Alberto; Gómez-Flores, Minerva; Mancillas-Adame, Leonardo; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Welsh-Lozano, Oliverio; Pérez, Jesús Zacarías Villarreal; González-González, José Gerardo; Lavalle-González, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Background: Topical corticosteroids are used as first line of therapy for vitiligo, although side effects such as adrenal insufficiency are possible. Objectives: To establish the role of ACTH test before, during, and after treatment with high potency topical steroids; to determine if adrenal insufficiency occurs secondary to the use of high potency topical steroids in patients with vitiligo and intact cutaneous barrier; and also to determine response to treatment and side effects. Materials and Methods: Forty-four adults with non-segmental vitiligo affecting 20% or less of the body surface area were included and randomized to receive topical clobetasol propionate 0.05% cream (group 1) or placebo (group 2) for 12 weeks, with a maximum dose of 50 g per week. The placebo group was crossed over after week 6 and started on clobetasol until completion of the study. Serum cortisol levels with the 1 μg ACTH test were determined at baseline and on weeks 6 and 12. Results: No adrenal insufficiency was detected nor statistical significance was achieved when comparing cortisol levels between and within the groups at baseline and weeks 6 and 12. Group 1 had a better response to therapy but with more side effects. Conclusions: Doses of 50 g or less per week of clobetasol during a period of 12 weeks are safe on adult vitiligo patients, although local side effects are possible. Repigmentation rates were incomplete with single steroid therapy, making combined therapy a better option. PMID:24860741

  10. A comparative study by age and gender of the pituitary adenoma and ACTH and alpha-MSH secretion in dogs with pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism.

    PubMed

    Gallelli, M F; Cabrera Blatter, M F; Castillo, V

    2010-02-01

    Pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism (PDH) is frequent in dogs. Little is known about its presentation in different age groups and its characteristics. Dividing the population under study (n=107) into three age groups we observed that 11.2% were young, 51.4% adults and 37.4% aged. Using magnetic resonance, pituitary tumours were intra-sellar (IS) in 30.8% and extra-sellar (ES) in 62.6% and the pars intermedia (PI) was affected in 6.5%. ES are predominant in females and IS in males (p<0.0001). In the adult-aged population, the ES and PI are predominant, while in the young, the IS predominate (p<0.0001). ACTH concentration was greater in the ES vs. IS (p<0.05). alpha-MSH did not present significant differences according to tumour size, showing a negative correlation (r=-0.47; p<0.01) vs. ACTH. Differences in adenoma size according to gender and their age-related frequency of apparition could be because of different origins of the corticotrophinoma.

  11. Clinical management of critically ill patients with Cushing's disease due to ACTH-secreting pituitary macroadenomas: effectiveness of presurgical treatment with pasireotide.

    PubMed

    Cannavo, S; Messina, E; Albani, A; Ferrau, F; Barresi, V; Priola, S; Esposito, F; Angileri, F

    2016-06-01

    The management of critically ill Cushing's disease (CD) patients is extremely challenging. Pasireotide is indicated for the treatment of CD patients when pituitary surgery is unfeasible or has not been curative, but no data are available about the use of this drug as pre-operative treatment in critically ill patients. We report the effects of presurgical pasireotide therapy in CD patients in whom hypercortisolism caused life-threatening hypokalemia, alkalosis, and cardio-respiratory complications precluding surgical approach. Clinical, biochemical, and radiological data of two critically ill patients with ACTH-secreting pituitary macroadenoma, before and during first-line presurgical pasireotide treatment (600 μg s.c. bid). During the first 21 days of treatment, pasireotide therapy induced a rapid, partial decrease of plasma ACTH, serum cortisol, and urinary free cortisol levels, with the consequent normalization of serum potassium concentration and arterial blood gases parameters, in both the patients. They did not experience unmanageable side effects and underwent endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery after 4 weeks of effective treatment. Pre-operative MRI evaluation did not show pituitary tumor shrinkage. Surgical cure of CD was obtained in the first patient, while debulking allowed the pharmacological control of hypercortisolism in the second case. We suggest that pasireotide can induce a rapid improvement of clinical and metabolic conditions in critically ill CD patients in whom surgical approach is considered hazardous and need to be delayed.

  12. Cyclic AMP in female mouse brain is altered by the adrenocorticotropic hormone(4-9) analogue organon 2766.

    PubMed

    Schneider, D R; Felt, B T; Murphy, S; Goldman, H

    1981-09-01

    Cyclic AMP content was determined in 12 brain regions of young adult female mice at 30 min and at 24 h following an intraperitoneal injection of the tri-substituted adrenocorticotropic hormone(4-9) [ACTH(4-9)] analogue Organon 2766 [ORG 2766]. Animals were killed by focused 3.5 kW microwave radiation applied for 350 ms. Unlike previously reported responses in male mice, at 30 min post-injection there were no detectable differences in cyclic AMP content between the placebo and ORG 2766-treated animals. By contrast, 24 h after injection, the content of cyclic AMP was changed significantly in 8 of the 12 brain regions examined: medulla-pons, septal area, thalamus, hypothalamus, hippocampus, olfactory bulb, and parietal and occipital cortices. In most of the regions examined, differences consisted of 50% or greater reductions of tissue cyclic AMP content. The changes were unrelated to the estrus cycle of these animals.

  13. Cortisol and ACTH response to oral dexamethasone in obesity and effects of sex, body fat distribution, and dexamethasone concentrations: a dose-response study.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, Renato; Ambrosi, Bruno; Armanini, Decio; Cavagnini, Francesco; Uberti, Ettore Degli; Del Rio, Graziano; de Pergola, Giovanni; Maccario, Mauro; Mantero, Franco; Marugo, Mario; Rotella, Carlo Maria; Vettor, Roberto

    2002-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the abdominal obesity phenotype may be associated with multiple alterations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity in both sexes. Our hypothesis is that the lack of adequate cortisol suppression after the dexamethasone test may constitute an indirect marker of HPA axis hyperactivity in the presence of the abdominal obesity phenotype. A total of 34 normal-weight (13 men and 21 women) and 87 obese (36 men and 51 women), healthy, nondepressed subjects therefore underwent four different dexamethasone suppression tests randomly performed at varying intervals of at least 1 wk between each test. After a standard overnight 1-mg dexamethasone test, which served as a reference, three other tests were randomly performed at 1-wk intervals by administering 0.0035, 0.0070, and 0.015 mg oral dexamethasone per kilogram of body weight overnight. Blood samples were obtained for cortisol, ACTH, and dexamethasone. Results were analyzed separately in men and women as well as in normal-weight [body mass index (BMI) < or = 25 kg/m(2)] and overweight or obese (BMI > 25 kg/m(2)) subjects. The waist circumference and the waist to hip ratio (WHR) were used as markers of body fat distribution. After the standard 1-mg test, cortisol suppression was greater than 90% in all subjects. However, after each test, obese women had significantly higher values of percent cortisol and percent ACTH suppression than normal-weight women without any difference between obese and normal-weight men. Considering the response to the three variable-dose tests, a clear dose- response pattern (P < 0.001 for trend analysis) in percent cortisol and percent ACTH suppression was found in all subjects. After each test men had significantly higher dexamethasone levels than women, regardless of BMI. However, obese women, but not men, had significantly higher dexamethasone levels after each test than their normal-weight counterpart. Plasma dexamethasone

  14. Inhibition of hormone-stimulated lipolysis by clofibrate. A possible mechanism for its hypolipidemic action.

    PubMed Central

    D'Costa, M A; Angel, A

    1975-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism of the antilipolytic action of clofibrate (p-chlorophenoxyisobutyrate). Clofibrate, in the dose range of 10-80 mg/199 ml, inhibited the initial rate of norepinephrine-stimulated lipolysis 17-44 percent in isolated rat fat cells. At a dose corresponding to therapeutic levels in vivo (10 mg/100 ml) clofibrate also inhibited hormone-stimulated lipolysis by 20-30 percent in fragments of human subcutaneous fat. Inhibition of lipolysis by clofibrate occurred at all concentrations of norepinephrine and ACTH (0.02-0.1 mug/ml) but did not occur with equilipolytic concentrations of dibutyryl cyclic AMP, suggesting a proximal site of action on the lipolytic sequence. Clofibrate reduced by 60 percent (315plus or minus40 vs. 120plus or minus25 pmol/g lipid; meanplus or minusSEM) the norepinephrine-stimulated initial rise in cyclic AMP, measured 10 min after addition of hormone. Because the antilipolytic effect occurred in the presence of glucose and without altering cellular ATP levels, the reduction in intracellular cyclic AMP levels could not be attributed to uncoupling of oxidative metabolism or to secondary effects of free fatty acid accumulation. In the secondary effects of free fatty acid accumulation. In the presence of procaine-HC1, which blocks hormone-stimulated lipolysis without inhibiting cyclic AMP accumulation, addition of clofibrate prevented the hormone-stimulated rise in cyclic AMP. Clofibrate did not affect the activity of the low-Km 3',5'-cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase in norepinephrine-stimulated adipocytes. These data suggest that the antilipolytic effect of clofibrate is due to its suppression of cyclic AMP production by inhibition of adenylate cyclase. The drug's hypolipidemic action may in part be explained by its antilipolytic effect, which deprives the liver of free fatty acid substrate for lipoprotein synthesis. Images PMID:162783

  15. Elevated Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone in Human Pregnancy Increases the Risk of Postpartum Depressive Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Ilona S.; Glynn, Laura M.; Schetter, Christine Dunkel; Hobel, Calvin J.; Chicz-DeMet, Aleksandra; Sandman, Curt A.

    2009-01-01

    Context Postpartum depression (PPD) is common and has serious implications for the mother and her newborn. A possible link between placental corticotropin-releasing hormone (pCRH) and PPD incidence has been discussed, but there is a lack of empirical evidence. Objective To determine whether accelerated pCRH increases throughout pregnancy are associated with PPD symptoms. Design Pregnant women were recruited into this longitudinal cohort study. Blood samples were obtained at 15, 19, 25, 31 and 37 weeks gestational age (GA) for assessment of pCRH, cortisol and ACTH. Depressive symptoms were assessed with a standardized questionnaire at the last four pregnancy visits and postpartum. Setting Subjects were recruited from two Southern California Medical Centers, and visits were conducted in university research laboratories. Participants 100 adult women with a singleton pregnancy. Main Outcome Measure PPD symptoms were assessed 8.7 weeks (SD = 2.94 wks) after delivery with the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Results Sixteen women developed PPD symptoms. At 25 weeks GA, pCRH was a strong predictor of PPD symptoms (R2 = .21, β = .46, p < .001), an effect that remained significant after controlling for prenatal depressive symptoms. No significant associations were found for cortisol and ACTH. Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analyses revealed that pCRH at 25 weeks GA is a useful diagnostic test (area under the curve = .78, p = .001). Sensitivity (.75) and specificity (.74) at the ideal cut-off point (56.86 pg/ml pCRH) were high. Growth curve analyses indicated that pCRH trajectories in women with PPD symptoms are significantly accelerated between 23 and 26 weeks GA. Conclusion There is a critical period in mid-pregnancy during which pCRH is a sensitive and specific early diagnostic test for PPD symptoms. If replicated, these results have implications for identification and treatment of pregnant women at risk of PPD. PMID:19188538

  16. Effects of corticotropin-releasing hormone on proopiomelanocortin derivatives and monocytic HLA-DR expression in patients with septic shock.

    PubMed

    Matejec, Reginald; Kayser, Friederike; Schmal, Frauke; Uhle, Florian; Bödeker, Rolf-Hasso; Maxeiner, Hagen; Kolbe, Julia Anna

    2013-09-01

    Little is known about interactions between immune and neuro-endocrine systems in patients with septic shock. We therefore evaluated whether the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and/or proopiomelanocortin (POMC) derivatives [ACTH, β-endorphin (β-END), β-lipotropin (β-LPH), α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) or N-acetyl-β-END (Nac-β-END)] have any influences on monocyte deactivation as a major factor of immunosuppression under septic shock conditions. Sixteen patients with septic shock were enrolled in a double-blind, cross-over and placebo controlled clinical study; 0.5μg/(kgbodyweighth) CRH (or placebo) were intravenously administered for 24h. Using flow cytometry we investigated the immunosuppression in patients as far as related to the loss of leukocyte surface antigen-DR expression on circulating monocytes (mHLA-DR). ACTH, β-END immunoreacive material (IRM), β-LPH IRM, α-MSH and Nac-β-END IRM as well as TNF-α and mHLA-DR expression were determined before, during and after treatment with CRH (or placebo). A significant correlation between plasma concentration of α-MSH and mHLA-DR expression and an inverse correlation between mHLA-DR expression and TNF-α plasma level were found. Additionally, a significant increase of mHLA-DR expression was observed 16h after starting the CRH infusion; 8h later, the mHLA-DR expression had decreased again. Our results indicate that the up-regulation of mHLA-DR expression after CRH infusion is not dependent on the release of POMC derivatives. From the correlation between plasma concentration of α-MSH and mHLA-DR expression, we conclude that in patients with septic shock the down-regulation of mHAL-DR expression is accompanied by the loss of monocytic release of α-MSH into the cardiovascular compartment. PMID:23891702

  17. Subjective Sleep Quality and hormonal modulation in long-term yoga practitioners.

    PubMed

    Vera, Francisca M; Manzaneque, Juan M; Maldonado, Enrique F; Carranque, Gabriel A; Rodriguez, Francisco M; Blanca, Maria J; Morell, Miguel

    2009-07-01

    Yoga represents a fascinating mind-body approach, wherein body movements (asana), breathing exercises (pranayama) and meditation are integrated into a single multidimensional practice. Numerous beneficial mental and physical effects have been classically ascribed to this holistic ancient method. The purpose of the present study has been to examine the effects of long-term yoga practice on Subjective Sleep Quality (SSQ) and on several hormonal parameters of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Twenty-six subjects (16 experimental and 10 controls) were recruited to be part of the study. Experimental subjects were regular yoga practitioners with a minimum of 3 years of practice. Blood samples for the quantification of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEA-S) were drawn from all subjects. Likewise, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was employed to assess SSQ. As statistical analysis, Mann-Whitney U-test was performed. The yoga group displayed lower PSQI scores and higher blood cortisol levels than control subjects. Therefore, it can be concluded that long-term yoga practice is associated with significant psycho-biological differences, including better sleep quality as well as a modulatory action on the levels of cortisol. These preliminary results suggest interesting clinical implications which should be further researched.

  18. [Anti-depressive mechanism of Fufang Chaigui prescription based on neuroendocrine hormone and metabolomic correlation analysis].

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Liu, Huan; Chen, Jian-li; Gao, Xiao-xia; Zhou, Yu-zhi; Tian, Jun-sheng; Qin, Xue-mei

    2015-10-01

    To elucidate the anti-depressive effect of Fufang Chaigui prescription and its mechanism and investigate its effect on neuroendocrine hormone, rats were included into a chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) model for 28 d, and drugs were administered at the same time. During the period, rats' behaviors were observed and the blood was collected by using ELISA to determine representative hormone concentrations of HPAA, HPTA and HPGA. The changes in endogenous metabolites were analyzed by using H NMR metabolomics to seek the potential biomarkers. Results showed Fufang Chaigui prescription could improve the behaviors of CUMS rats obviously, increase contents of ACTH, CORT, T₃and decrease contents of TSH and TESTO and regulate the levels of lactate, α-glucose, choline, N-acetylglycoprotein, trimethylamine oxide and leucine to get closer to the contents of control group. The results of correlation analysis indicated that HPTA was associated with glycometabolism, amino acid metabolism and choline metabolism. And HPAA was related to glycometabolism and amino acid metabolism. However, HPGA was only correlated with glycometabolism. In conclusion, Fufang Chaigui prescription could show an obvious anti-depressive effect and its underlying mechanism might involve regulations of neuroendocrine function and pathways of glycometabolism, amino acid metabolism and choline metabolism. PMID:27062831

  19. Glucocorticoids Regulate the Metabolic Hormone FGF21 in a Feed-Forward Loop

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rucha; Bookout, Angie L.; Magomedova, Lilia; Owen, Bryn M.; Consiglio, Giulia P.; Shimizu, Makoto; Zhang, Yuan; Mangelsdorf, David J.; Kliewer, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    Hormones such as fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) and glucocorticoids (GCs) play crucial roles in coordinating the adaptive starvation response. Here we examine the interplay between these hormones. It was previously shown that FGF21 induces corticosterone levels in mice by acting on the brain. We now show that this induces the expression of genes required for GC synthesis in the adrenal gland. FGF21 also increases corticosterone secretion from the adrenal in response to ACTH. We further show that the relationship between FGF21 and GCs is bidirectional. GCs induce Fgf21 expression in the liver by acting on the GC receptor (GR). The GR binds in a ligand-dependent manner to a noncanonical GR response element located approximately 4.4 kb upstream of the Fgf21 transcription start site. The GR cooperates with the nuclear fatty acid receptor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α, to stimulate Fgf21 transcription. GR and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α ligands have additive effects on Fgf21 expression both in vivo and in primary cultures of mouse hepatocytes. We conclude that FGF21 and GCs regulate each other's production in a feed-forward loop and suggest that this provides a mechanism for bypassing negative feedback on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to allow sustained gluconeogenesis during starvation. PMID:25495872

  20. Thyroid Hormone, Cancer, and Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hung-Yun; Chin, Yu-Tan; Yang, Yu-Chen S H; Lai, Husan-Yu; Wang-Peng, Jacqueline; Liu, Leory F; Tang, Heng-Yuan; Davis, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid hormones play important roles in regulating normal metabolism, development, and growth. They also stimulate cancer cell proliferation. Their metabolic and developmental effects and growth effects in normal tissues are mediated primarily by nuclear hormone receptors. A cell surface receptor for the hormone on integrin [alpha]vβ3 is the initiation site for effects on tumor cells. Clinical hypothyroidism may retard cancer growth, and hyperthyroidism was recently linked to the prevalence of certain cancers. Local levels of thyroid hormones are controlled through activation and deactivation of iodothyronine deiodinases in different organs. The relative activities of different deiodinases that exist in tissues or organs also affect the progression and development of specific types of cancers. In this review, the effects of thyroid hormone on signaling pathways in breast, brain, liver, thyroid, and colon cancers are discussed. The importance of nuclear thyroid hormone receptor isoforms and of the hormone receptor on the extracellular domain of integrin [alpha]vβ3 as potential cancer risk factors and therapeutic targets are addressed. We analyze the intracellular signaling pathways activated by thyroid hormones in cancer progression in hyperthyroidism or at physiological concentrations in the euthyroid state. Determining how to utilize the deaminated thyroid hormone analog (tetrac), and its nanoparticulate derivative to reduce risks of cancer progression, enhance therapeutic outcomes, and prevent cancer recurrence is also deliberated. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1221-1237, 2016. PMID:27347891

  1. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Androgen deprivation therapy; ADT; Androgen suppression therapy; Combined androgen blockade ... Androgens cause prostate cancer cells to grow. Hormone therapy for prostate cancer lowers the effect level of ...

  2. Neuroendocrine and reproductive consequences of overexpression of growth hormone in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Bartke, A; Cecim, M; Tang, K; Steger, R W; Chandrashekar, V; Turyn, D

    1994-09-01

    Availability of recombinant growth hormone (GH) and development of long-acting formulations of this material will undoubtedly lead to widespread use of GH in animal industry and in medicine. GH can act, directly or indirectly, on multiple targets, but its influence on the reproductive system and on the hormonal control of reproduction is poorly understood. Overexpression of GH genes in transgenic animals provides a unique opportunity to study the effects of long-term GH excess. Transgenic mice overexpressing bovine, ovine, or rat GH (hormones with actions closely resembling, if not identical to, those of endogenous [mouse] GH), exhibit enhancement of growth, increased adult body size, and reduced life-span as well as a number of endocrine and reproductive abnormalities. Ectopic overexpression of bovine GH (bGH) driven by metallothionein or phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase promoters is associated with altered activity of hypothalamic neurons which produce somatostatin, loss of adenohypophyseal GH releasing hormone (GHRH) receptors, and suppression of endogenous (mouse) GH release. Elevation of plasma levels of GH (primarily bGH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) in these transgenic mice leads to increases in the number of hepatic GH and prolactin (PRL) receptors, in the serum levels of GH-binding protein (GHBP), in the percent of GHBP complexed with GH, and in the circulating insulin levels. In addition, plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone levels are elevated. Plasma levels of luteinizing hormone (LH), as well as its synthesis and release, are not consistently affected, but follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels are suppressed, apparently due to pre- and post-translational effects. Pituitary lactotrophs exhibit characteristics of chronic enhancement of secretory activity, and plasma PRL levels are elevated. Prolactin responses to mating or to pharmacological blockade of dopamine synthesis are abnormal. Reproductive life span and

  3. Hypothalamic-pituitary axis remains intact after interferon-alpha treatment in hematologic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kauppila, M; Koskinen, P; Remes, K; Viikari, J; Irjala, K

    1997-09-01

    Many endocrinologic disturbances have been reported during and after interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) treatment. These disturbances have often been caused by autoantibodies. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate whether IFN-alpha causes hormonal changes and if it is necessary to search for such disturbances routinely. Ten patients with hematologic malignancies were examined before and after 4 months of IFN-alpha treatment. Pituitary function was tested by hypothalamic releasing hormones (thyrotropin-releasing hormone, TRH, growth hormone-releasing hormone, GHRH, gonadotropin-releasing hormone, GnRH). The adrenal glands were tested with the adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) test. The human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) test was performed on the men (n = 4). The IFN treatment was well tolerated, and no long-term hormonal side effects were found. The testosterone/sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) index tended to improve. There were no significant differences between the hormone responses before and after IFN-alpha treatment. We conclude that the hypothalamic-pituitary axis remains intact after IFN-alpha treatment. There is no need to follow patients endocrinologically if the patients are not predisposed by autoantibodies.

  4. [Hormone replacement therapy--growth hormone, melatonin, DHEA and sex hormones].

    PubMed

    Fukai, Shiho; Akishita, Masahiro

    2009-07-01

    The ability to maintain active and independent living as long as possible is crucial for the healthy longevity. Hormones responsible for some of the manifestations associated with aging are growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), melatonin, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), sex hormones and thyroid hormones. These hormonal changes are associated with changes in body composition, visceral obesity, muscle weakness, osteoporosis, urinary incontinence, loss of cognitive functioning, reduction in well being, depression, as well as sexual dysfunction. With the prolongation of life expectancy, both men and women today live the latter third life with endocrine deficiencies. Hormone replacement therapy may alleviate the debilitating conditions of secondary partial endocrine deficiencies by preventing or delaying some aspects of aging.

  5. Extrapituitary growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Harvey, S

    2010-12-01

    Pituitary somatotrophs secrete growth hormone (GH) into the bloodstream, to act as a hormone at receptor sites in most, if not all, tissues. These endocrine actions of circulating GH are abolished after pituitary ablation or hypophysectomy, indicating its pituitary source. GH gene expression is, however, not confined to the pituitary gland, as it occurs in neural, immune, reproductive, alimentary, and respiratory tissues and in the integumentary, muscular, skeletal, and cardiovascular systems, in which GH may act locally rather than as an endocrine. These actions are likely to be involved in the proliferation and differentiation of cells and tissues prior to the ontogeny of the pituitary gland. They are also likely to complement the endocrine actions of GH and are likely to maintain them after pituitary senescence and the somatopause. Autocrine or paracrine actions of GH are, however, sometimes mediated through different signaling mechanisms to those mediating its endocrine actions and these may promote oncogenesis. Extrapituitary GH may thus be of physiological and pathophysiological significance.

  6. Sex Hormones and Tendon.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Mette; Kjaer, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The risk of overuse and traumatic tendon and ligament injuries differ between women and men. Part of this gender difference in injury risk is probably explained by sex hormonal differences which are specifically distinct during the sexual maturation in the teenage years and during young adulthood. The effects of the separate sex hormones are not fully elucidated. However, in women, the presence of estrogen in contrast to very low estrogen levels may be beneficial during regular loading of the tissue or during recovering after an injury, as estrogen can enhance tendon collagen synthesis rate. Yet, in active young female athletes, physiological high concentration of estrogen may enhance the risk of injuries due to reduced fibrillar crosslinking and enhanced joint laxity. In men, testosterone can enhance tendon stiffness due to an enhanced tendon collagen turnover and collagen content, but testosterone has also been linked to a reduced responsiveness to relaxin. The present chapter will focus on sex difference in tendon injury risk, tendon morphology and tendon collagen turnover, but also on the specific effects of estrogen and androgens. PMID:27535256

  7. Bovine Parathyroid Hormone: Amino Acid Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, H. Bryan; Ronan, Rosemary

    1970-01-01

    Bovine parathyroid hormone has been isolated in homogeneous form, and its complete amino acid sequence determined. The bovine hormone is a single chain, 84 amino acids long. It contains amino-terminal alanine, and carboxyl-terminal glutamine. The bovine parathyroid hormone is approximately three times the length of the newly discovered hormone, thyrocalcitonin, whose action is reciprocal to parathyroid hormone. Images PMID:5275384

  8. A Histopathological Study of Multi-hormone Producing Proliferative Lesions in Estrogen-induced Rat Pituitary Prolactinoma

    PubMed Central

    Takekoshi, Susumu; Yasui, Yuzo; Inomoto, Chie; Kitatani, Kanae; Nakamura, Naoya; Osamura, Robert Yoshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    Rats with estrogen-induced prolactin-producing pituitary adenoma (E2-PRLoma) have been employed as an animal model of human PRL-producing pituitary adenoma in a large number of studies. Presently, we found that long-term administration of estrogen to SD rats resulted in the development of E2-PRLomas, some of which included multi-hormone producing nodules. We herein report results of histopathological analyses of these lesions. PRLoma models were created in female SD rats by 22 weeks or longer administration of a controlled-release preparation of estradiol at a dose of 10 mg/kg/2 weeks. Ten of the 11 PRLoma model rats had proliferative nodular lesions composed of large eosinophilic cells like gonadotrophs inside the PRLoma. These lesions were positive for PRL, TSHβ, and α subunits and were negative for GH, LHβ, ACTH, and S-100. Double immunostaining revealed that these large eosinophilic cells showed coexpression of PRL and TSHβ, PRL and α subunits, and TSHβ and α subunits. Those results clarified that long-term estrogen administration to female SD rats induced multi-hormone producing neoplastic pituitary nodules that expressed PRL, TSHβ, and α subunits. We studied these neoplastic nodules obtained by laser microdissection to acquire findings similar to those of the immuno­histochemical analysis. We consider that this animal model is useful for pathogenesis analyses and therapeutic agent development concerning human multi-hormone producing pituitary adenomas. PMID:25392569

  9. Sources of variation in plasma corticosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone in the male northern cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis): I. Seasonal patterns and effects of stress and adrenocorticotropic hormone.

    PubMed

    Fokidis, H Bobby

    2016-09-01

    The secretion of steroids from the adrenal gland is a classic endocrine response to perturbations that can affect homeostasis. During an acute stress response, glucocorticoids (GC), such as corticosterone (CORT), prepare the metabolic physiology and cognitive abilities of an animal in a manner that promotes survival during changing conditions. Although GC functions during stress are well established, much less is understood concerning how adrenal androgens, namely dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) are influenced by stress. I conducted three field studies (one experimental and two descriptive) aimed at identifying how both CORT and DHEA secretion in free-living male northern cardinals (Cardinalis cardinalis), vary during acute stress; across different circulations (brachial vs. jugular); in response to ACTH challenge; and during the annual cycle. As predicted, restraint stress increased plasma CORT, but unexpectedly DHEA levels decreased, but the latter effect was only seen for blood sampled from the jugular vein, and not the brachial. The difference in DHEA between circulations may result from increased neural uptake of DHEA during stress. Injection with exogenous adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) increased CORT concentrations, but failed to alter DHEA levels, thus suggesting ACTH is not a direct regulator of DHEA. Monthly field sampling revealed distinct seasonal patterns to both initial and restraint stress CORT and DHEA levels with distinct differences in the steroid milieu between breeding and non-breeding seasons. These data suggest that the CORT response to stress remains relatively consistent, but DHEA secretion is largely independent of the response by CORT. Although CORT functions have been well-studied in wild animals, little research exists for the role of DHEA and their variable relationship sets the stage for future experimental research addressing steroid stress responses. PMID:27255363

  10. Hormonal Programming Across the Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Tobet, Stuart A; Lara, Hernan E; Lucion, Aldo B; Wilson, Melinda E; Recabarren, Sergio E; Paredes, Alfonso H

    2013-01-01

    Hormones influence countless biological processes across the lifespan, and during developmental sensitive periods hormones have the potential to cause permanent tissue-specific alterations in anatomy and physiology. There are numerous critical periods in development wherein different targets are affected. This review outlines the proceedings of the Hormonal Programming in Development session at the US-South American Workshop in Neuroendocrinology in August 2011. Here we discuss how gonadal hormones impact various biological processes within the brain and gonads during early development and describe the changes that take place in the aging female ovary. At the cellular level, hormonal targets in the brain include neurons, glia, or vasculature. On a genomic/epigenomic level, transcription factor signaling and epigenetic changes alter the expression of hormone receptor genes across development and following ischemic brain insult. In addition, organizational hormone exposure alters epigenetic processes in specific brain nuclei and may be a mediator of sexual differentiation of the neonatal brain. During development of the ovary, exposure to excess gonadal hormones leads to polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Exposure to excess androgens during fetal development also has a profound effect on the development of the male reproductive system. In addition, increased sympathetic nerve activity and stress during early life have been linked to PCOS symptomology in adulthood. Finally, we describe how age-related decreases in fertility are linked to high levels of nerve growth factor (NGF), which enhances sympathetic nerve activity and alters ovarian function. PMID:22700441

  11. Recent advances in hormonal contraception

    PubMed Central

    Li, HW Raymond

    2010-01-01

    This report reviews some of the new studies regarding new hormonal contraceptive formulations (e.g., Yaz, Qlaira®, extended-cycle or continuous combined contraceptives, subcutaneous depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, and ulipristal acetate as an emergency contraceptive). Recent data on the relationship between hormonal contraceptive use and bone health are also reviewed. PMID:21173872

  12. [Do hormones determine our fate?].

    PubMed

    Vermeulen, A

    1994-01-01

    The hormonal system is a communication system between cells and organs. Hence it is not surprising that it influences almost all physiological functions and, at least partially, our behaviour and fate. The sexual phenotype is determined by the sex hormones. Normally, the phenotype is in accordance with gonadal and genetic sex, but occasionally, as a consequence of enzymatic defects in the biosynthesis of sex hormones or of androgen resistance, gonadal and genetic sex are in discordance with the phenotype, the latter determining generally the civil sex and the sex of rearing. Whereas the gender role is generally determined by the sex of rearing and the phenotype, itself under hormonal influence, homo- and transsexuality constitute notorious exceptions to this rule. Although several authors consider homo- and transsexuality to be the consequence of an impairment in androgenic impregnation in the perinatal period, there are at present no convincing arguments for an hormonal origin for either homo- or transsexuality, although such a possibility can't be excluded either. Besides their role in psychosexual behaviour, sex hormones play also a role in our life expectancy. Indeed, although maximal life expectancy of man is genetically determined, a major determinant of individual life expectancy is cardiovascular pathology. The latter is partly responsible for the difference in life expectancy between men and women, cardiovascular mortality increasing rapidly at menopause and being halved by oestrogen replacement therapy. Also atherogenesis as such is, to a large extend, under hormonal control. Indeed insulin resistance and hyperinsulinism, which develop as a corollary of the aging process, is an important cause of atherosclerosis as well as of hypertension. Other hormones also play an important role in our behaviour. We can mention here the role of the thyroid hormones in the physical and mental development of children as well as in the regression of the intellectual

  13. Types of Cancer Treatment: Hormone Therapy

    Cancer.gov

    Describes how hormone therapy slows or stops the growth of breast and prostate cancers that use hormones to grow. Includes information about the types of hormone therapy and side effects that may happen.

  14. Growth hormone stimulation test - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone (GH) is a protein hormone released from the anterior pituitary gland under the control of the hypothalamus. ... performed on infants and children to identify human growth hormone (hGH) deficiency as a cause of growth retardation. ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Conditions isolated growth hormone deficiency isolated growth hormone deficiency Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... PDF Open All Close All Description Isolated growth hormone deficiency is a condition caused by a severe ...

  16. Quo vadis plant hormone analysis?

    PubMed

    Tarkowská, Danuše; Novák, Ondřej; Floková, Kristýna; Tarkowski, Petr; Turečková, Veronika; Grúz, Jiří; Rolčík, Jakub; Strnad, Miroslav

    2014-07-01

    Plant hormones act as chemical messengers in the regulation of myriads of physiological processes that occur in plants. To date, nine groups of plant hormones have been identified and more will probably be discovered. Furthermore, members of each group may participate in the regulation of physiological responses in planta both alone and in concert with members of either the same group or other groups. The ideal way to study biochemical processes involving these signalling molecules is 'hormone profiling', i.e. quantification of not only the hormones themselves, but also their biosynthetic precursors and metabolites in plant tissues. However, this is highly challenging since trace amounts of all of these substances are present in highly complex plant matrices. Here, we review advances, current trends and future perspectives in the analysis of all currently known plant hormones and the associated problems of extracting them from plant tissues and separating them from the numerous potentially interfering compounds.

  17. What Are the Symptoms of Pituitary Tumors?

    MedlinePlus

    ... woman who is not pregnant or breastfeeding Adrenocorticotropic Hormone (ACTH) Too much adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) may cause: ... with weight gain in children Irregular menses Growth Hormone Too much growth hormone may cause: Headache Some ...

  18. Observations on the effects of vibration and noise on plasma ACTH and zinc levels, pregnancy and respiration rate in the guineapig.

    PubMed

    Bailey, K J; Stephens, D B; Delaney, C E

    1986-04-01

    The responses of female guineapigs to vibration and noise were examined with the use of an apparatus designed to simulate transport. Peak levels of plasma ACTH and zinc concentrations were attained after 4 min of exposure to vibration and 80-90 dB of noise. The respiration rate, normally around 90/min, was increased to 103/min when the animals were moved (while still in their cages) to the experimental area; it rose to 129/min when the apparatus was switched on to expose the animals to vibration and noise. Those left adjacent to the apparatus and exposed to noise alone elevated their respiration rates to 115/min. Respiration rates returned to normal within 2.5 h. There was no apparent effect on the maintenance of pregnancy, gestation length, litter size or post-partum growth of the young born to guineapigs exposed to this vibration and noise for a period of 1 h at mid-term.

  19. Transcription of (pro)renin mRNA in the rat adrenal cortex, and the effects of ACTH treatment and a low sodium diet.

    PubMed

    Ho, M M; Vinson, G P

    1998-05-01

    Transcription of the (pro)renin gene in the adult rat adrenal gland was studied by non-isotopic in situ hybridization. In glands from control (untreated) animals, transcription was relatively sparse, and occurred mostly in the outer zona fasciculata. Treatment with ACTH increased the apparent signal in both the glomerulosa and in fasciculata zones. A low sodium diet initially enhanced the transcription signal specifically in the glomerulosa, but as the regime was extended from 5 days to more than 2 weeks, the signal was also increased dramatically in the zona reticularis. The results emphasize the potential importance of the intraglandular renin-angiotensin system, particularly under conditions of chronic stimulation. They also suggest that angiotensin II, as well as being the major regulator of the glomerulosa, may also have some role in inner adrenocortical zone functions.

  20. Growth hormone neurosecretory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bercu, B B; Diamond, F B

    1986-08-01

    The basis for understanding clinical disorders in the neuroregulation of GH secretion is derived from the complexity of the CNS-hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Studies in animals and humans demonstrate an anatomic, physiological and pharmacological evidence for neurosecretory control over GH secretion including neurohormones (GRH, somatostatin), neurotransmitters (dopaminergic, adrenergic, cholinergic, serotonergic, histaminergic, GABAergic), and neuropeptides (gut hormones, opioids, CRH, TRH, etc). The observation of a defect in the neuroregulatory control of GH secretion in CNS-irradiated humans and animals led to the hypothesis of a disorder in neurosecretion, GHND, as a cause for short stature. We speculate that in this heterogeneous group of children a disruption in the neurotransmitter-neurohormonal functional pathway could modify secretion ultimately expressed as poor growth velocity and short stature.

  1. Role of Protein Phosphorylation and Tyrosine Phosphatases in the Adrenal Regulation of Steroid Synthesis and Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Cristina; Cornejo Maciel, Fabiana; Gorostizaga, Alejandra; Castillo, Ana F.; Mori Sequeiros García, M. Mercedes; Maloberti, Paula M.; Orlando, Ulises D.; Mele, Pablo G.; Poderoso, Cecilia; Podesta, Ernesto J.

    2016-01-01

    In adrenocortical cells, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) promotes the activation of several protein kinases. The action of these kinases is linked to steroid production, mainly through steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), whose expression and activity are dependent on protein phosphorylation events at genomic and non-genomic levels. Hormone-dependent mitochondrial dynamics and cell proliferation are functions also associated with protein kinases. On the other hand, protein tyrosine dephosphorylation is an additional component of the ACTH signaling pathway, which involves the “classical” protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), such as Src homology domain (SH) 2-containing PTP (SHP2c), and members of the MAP kinase phosphatase (MKP) family, such as MKP-1. PTPs are rapidly activated by posttranslational mechanisms and participate in hormone-stimulated steroid production. In this process, the SHP2 tyrosine phosphatase plays a crucial role in a mechanism that includes an acyl-CoA synthetase-4 (Acsl4), arachidonic acid (AA) release and StAR induction. In contrast, MKPs in steroidogenic cells have a role in the turn-off of the hormonal signal in ERK-dependent processes such as steroid synthesis and, perhaps, cell proliferation. This review analyzes the participation of these tyrosine phosphates in the ACTH signaling pathway and the action of kinases and phosphatases in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and steroid production. In addition, the participation of kinases and phosphatases in the signal cascade triggered by different stimuli in other steroidogenic tissues is also compared to adrenocortical cell/ACTH and discussed. PMID:27375556

  2. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein in eels: cDNA cloning and effects of ACTH and seawater transfer on its mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-You; Inoue, Koji; Takei, Yoshio

    2003-02-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is a key molecule for steroid production by translocating cholesterol from the outer to inner mitochondrial membrane. Two cDNAs of different length encoding StAR was cloned from the head kidney of the eel (Anguilla japonica). In the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of the longer cDNA, two putative polyadenylation signals were found. The shorter one differed from the longer one solely by the lack of middle of 3'-UTR including the first polyadenylation signal. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) that differentiates the two mRNAs showed that the ratio of the two was highly variable among individuals, and no preferential expression was detected between freshwater and seawater eels. The predicted protein consists of 285 amino acid residues with 64-83% identity to other StARs thus far obtained. RT-PCR analyses revealed that eel StAR mRNA was expressed abundantly in the head kidney and gonad, and faintly in the brain; but no expression was detected in the gill, heart, liver, intestine, kidney and skeletal muscle. Plasma cortisol concentration increased, but StAR mRNA content in the head kidney did not change, 3 and 24 h after transfer of freshwater eels to seawater, indicating that the transcriptional regulation of StAR may not be involved in cortisol production after seawater transfer. However, ACTH elevated both plasma cortisol and StAR mRNA levels in the head kidney 1.5 and 4.5 h after injection. Thus, the steroidogenic effect of ACTH is mediated by increased StAR production as observed in mammals. PMID:12655184

  3. Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein in eels: cDNA cloning and effects of ACTH and seawater transfer on its mRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-You; Inoue, Koji; Takei, Yoshio

    2003-02-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is a key molecule for steroid production by translocating cholesterol from the outer to inner mitochondrial membrane. Two cDNAs of different length encoding StAR was cloned from the head kidney of the eel (Anguilla japonica). In the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of the longer cDNA, two putative polyadenylation signals were found. The shorter one differed from the longer one solely by the lack of middle of 3'-UTR including the first polyadenylation signal. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) that differentiates the two mRNAs showed that the ratio of the two was highly variable among individuals, and no preferential expression was detected between freshwater and seawater eels. The predicted protein consists of 285 amino acid residues with 64-83% identity to other StARs thus far obtained. RT-PCR analyses revealed that eel StAR mRNA was expressed abundantly in the head kidney and gonad, and faintly in the brain; but no expression was detected in the gill, heart, liver, intestine, kidney and skeletal muscle. Plasma cortisol concentration increased, but StAR mRNA content in the head kidney did not change, 3 and 24 h after transfer of freshwater eels to seawater, indicating that the transcriptional regulation of StAR may not be involved in cortisol production after seawater transfer. However, ACTH elevated both plasma cortisol and StAR mRNA levels in the head kidney 1.5 and 4.5 h after injection. Thus, the steroidogenic effect of ACTH is mediated by increased StAR production as observed in mammals.

  4. Hormonal adaptation to real and simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Strollo, F; Strollo, G; More, M; Bollanti, L; Ciarmatori, A; Longo, E; Quintiliani, R; Mambro, A; Mangrossa, N; Ferretti, C

    1998-07-01

    The authors provide an overview of relevant results from endocrine studies in astronauts before, during, and after space flight. The hormonal systems examined are the water-electrolyte regulation, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis, the growth hormone-insulin like growth factor 1-prolactin system, hormones which affect bone turnover, the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis, and the endocrine pancreas. Hormones studied include renin, aldosterone, vasopressin, atrial natriuretic factor, cortisol, testosterone, lutenizing hormone, prolactin, growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin, glucose, T4, thyroid stimulating hormone, calcitonin, active D3, and parathyroid hormone.

  5. Nicotine self-administration diminishes stress-induced norepinephrine secretion but augments adrenergic-responsiveness in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and enhances adrenocorticotropic hormone and corticosterone release

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Guoliang; Sharp, Burt M.

    2010-01-01

    Chronic nicotine self-administration augments the thalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) responses to stress. Altered neuropeptide expression within corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) contributes to this enhanced HPA response to stress. Herein, we determined the role of norepinephrine, a primary regulator of CRF neurons, in the responses to footshock during nicotine self-administration. On day 12-15 of self-administration, microdialysis showed nicotine reduced PVN norepinephrine release by footshock (<50% of saline). Yet, the reduction in footshock-induced adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone secretion due to intra-PVN prazosin (α1 adrenergic antagonist) was significantly greater in rats self-administering nicotine (2-fold) than saline. Additionally, PVN phenylephrine (α1 agonist) stimulated ACTH and corticosterone release to a similar extent in unstressed rats self-administering nicotine or saline. Nicotine self-administration also decreased footshock-induced c-Fos expression in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS)-A2/C2 catecholaminergic neurons that project to the PVN. Therefore, footshock-induced NTS activation and PVN norepinephrine input are both attenuated by nicotine self-administration, yet PVN CRF neurons are more responsive to α1 stimulation, but only during stress. This plasticity in noradrenergic regulation of PVN CRF neurons provides a new mechanism contributing to the HPA sensitization to stress by nicotine self-administration and smoking. PMID:20028457

  6. Effect of space flights on plasma hormone levels in man and in experimental animal.

    PubMed

    Macho, L; Kvetnansky, R; Vigas, M; Nemeth, S; Popova, I; Tigranian, R A; Noskov, V B; Serova, L; Grigoriev, I A

    1991-01-01

    An important increase of plasma hormone levels like insulin, TSH and aldosterone was observed in human subjects after space flights, however in the changes of plasma content of ACTH, cortisol, adrenaline and noradrenaline the individual variations were observed in relation to number and duration of space flight. For evaluation of the effects of these changes in plasma hormone levels on metabolic processes also the experiments with small animals subjected to space flights on a board of biosatellite of Cosmos series were running. An elevation of plasma levels of corticosterone, adrenaline, noradrenaline and insulin was found in rats after the space flights of duration from 7 to 20 days. It was demonstrated, that the increase of corticosterone in plasma is followed by the activation of enzymes involved in the amino acid metabolism in rat liver (tyrosine aminotransferase, tryptophanpyrolase, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase). After a short recovery period (2 to 6 days) the plasma corticosterone concentration and also the activity of liver enzymes returned to control levels. The exposition of animals to stress stimuli during this revcovery period showed higher response of corticosterone levels in flight rats as compared to intact controls. The increase of plasma catecholamine levels was not followed by elevation of lipolysis in adipose tissue. This is due to lower response of adipose tissue to catecholamine because a decrease of the stimulation of lipolysis by noradrenaline was observed in animals after space flight. The increase of insulin was not followed by adequate decrease of glucose concentration suggesting a disturbances in glucose utilization similarly as in cosmonauts after a long-term space flight. These results showed that changes in plasma hormone levels, observed after space flight, affected the regulation of metabolic processes in tissues. PMID:11537112

  7. Effect of space flights on plasma hormone levels in man and in experimental animal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macho, L.; Kvetňanský, R.; Vigaš, M.; Németh, S.; Popova, I.; Tigranian, R. A.; Noskov, V. B.; Serova, L.; Grigoriev, I. A.

    An important increase of plasma hormone levels like insulin, TSH and aldosterone was observed in human subjects after space flights, however in the changes of plasma content of ACTH, cortisol, adrenaline and noradrenaline the individual variations were observed in relation to number and duration of space flight. For evaluation of the effects of these changes in plasma hormone levels on metabolic processes also the experiments with small animals subjected to space flights on a board of biosatellite of Cosmos series were running. An elevation of plasma levels of corticosterone, adrenaline, noradrenaline and insulin was found in rats after the space flights of duration from 7 to 20 days. It was demonstrated, that the increase of corticosterone in plasma is followed by the activation of enzymes involved in the aminoacid metabolism in rat liver (tyrosine aminotransferase, tryptophanpyrolase, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase). After a short recovery period (2 to 6 days) the plasma corticosterone concentration and also the activity of liver enzymes returned to control levels. The exposition of animals to stress stimuli during this recovery period showed higher response of corticosterone levels in flight rats as compared to intact controls. The increase of plasma catecholamine levels was not followed by elevation of lipolysis in adipose tissue. This is due to lower response of adipose tissue to catecholamine because a decrease of the stimulation of lipolysis by noradrenaline was observed in animals after space flight. The increase of insulin was not followed by adequate decrease of glucose concentration suggesting a disturbances in glucose utilization similarly as in cosmonauts after a long-term space flight. These results showed that changes in plasma hormone levels, observed after space flight, affected the regulation of metabolic processes in tissues.

  8. Complex assembly on the human CYP17 promoter

    PubMed Central

    Sewer, Marion B.; Jagarlapudi, Srinath

    2009-01-01

    Optimal steroid hormone biosynthesis occurs via the integration of multiple regulatory processes, one of which entails a coordinate increase in the transcription of all genes required for steroidogenesis. In the human adrenal cortex adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) activates a signaling cascade that promotes the dynamic assembly of protein complexes on the promoters of steroidogenic genes. For CYP17, multiple transcription factors, including steroidogenic factor-1 (SF-1), GATA-6, and sterol regulatory binding protein 1 (SREBP1), are recruited to the promoter during activated transcription. The ability of these factors to increase CYP17 mRNA expression requires the formation of higher order coregulatory complexes, many of which contain enzymatic activities that post-translationally modify both the transcription factors and histones. We discuss the mechanisms by which transcription factors and coregulatory proteins regulate CYP17 transcription and summarize the role of kinases, phosphatases, acetyltransferases, and histone deacetylases in controlling CYP17 mRNA expression. PMID:19007851

  9. Therapeutic Effects of Pre-Gelatinized Maca (Lepidium Peruvianum Chacon) used as a Non-Hormonal Alternative to HRT in Perimenopausal Women - Clinical Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, H. O.; Reich-Bilinska, H.; Mscisz, A.; Kedzia, B.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Roots of cruciferous plant Lepidium peruvianum Chacon cultivated in high plateaus of Andes and known under its common name Maca, have been traditionally-used as an energizing vegetable with therapeutic properties for both men and women. Maca has been recognized by natives of Peru as herbal remedy helping to treat conditions affecting menopausal women. Objective: The effects of Pre-Gelatinized Organic Maca (Maca-GO) on quantitative physiological responses and alleviation of symptoms contributing to menopausal discomfort in perimenopausal women was examined. Methods: In this, four months, double blind, crossover, randomized pilot trial, monthly measurements of the following blood serum constituents were taken: Estrogen (E2), Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH), Luteinizing Hormone (LH) and Progesterone (PGS), Cortisol (CT), Adrenocorticotropic Hormone (ACTH), Thyroid Hormones (TSH, T3, T4), minerals (Ca, K, Fe) and lipid profile (Triglicerides, Total Cholesterol, LDL, HDL). In monthly interviews conducted by gynecologist, body weight and blood pressure were registered and Menopausal Index according to Kupperman’s was determined. Toxicity of Maca -GO determined on rats showed its safe use at the level of 7.5mg/kg body weight. A group of 20 women (aged 41-50 years), who fulfilled criteria of being in perimenopausal stage (E2 above 40pg/ml and FSH below 30IU/ml), were randomly allocated to two even groups, one receiving for two months Maca-GO and the other Placebo capsules followed by a crossover with treatment change for another two months period. All participants signed informed consent to participate. Two 500mg hard capsules with Maca-GO or Placebo were self-administered by participants twice daily with meals (total 2g/day). Results: Two months administration of Maca-GO significantly alleviated symptoms of discomfort observed in majority of women involved in the study (74%-87%) as assessed by Kupperman’s Menopausal index. This was associated with

  10. Beta-endorphin and arginine vasopressin following stressful sensory stimuli in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, Randall L.

    1992-01-01

    This experimentation partially defines, for the first time, the response of beta-endorphin (ENDO) in man during tests designed to elicit nausea and motion sickness. These responses are similar to those associated with arginine vasopressin (AVP) and adreno-corticotropin (ACTH) to the extent that all hormones rise in response to motion sickness (p less than 0.003). Repeated exposure diminished motion-induced release of ENDO (p less than 0.005) and AVP (p less than 0.004) despite a three-fold increase in resistance to motion stimuli. Higher post-stress levels of AVP (p less than 0.04) and ACTH (p less than 0.02) were correlated with greater resistance to motion sickness. These data support the hypothesis that release of AVP is a significant link between stressful motion and motion-induced nausea and other autonomic system changes. Further, resistant individual apparently can tolerate higher peripheral levels of AVP before nausea results. Peripheral release of ENDO and ACTH may follow release of AVP; however, given the extensive and complex functional interactions that exist between AVP and the opiate systems, it is not yet possible to define a clear role for ENDO in the etiology of motion sickness.

  11. Vasopressin deficiency diminishes acute and long-term consequences of maternal deprivation in male rat pups.

    PubMed

    Zelena, Dóra; Stocker, Berhard; Barna, István; Tóth, Zsuzsanna E; Makara, Gábor B

    2015-01-01

    Early life events have special importance in the development as postnatal environmental alterations may permanently affect the lifetime vulnerability to diseases. For the interpretation of the long-term consequences it is important to understand the immediate effects. As the role of vasopressin in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation as well as in affective disorders seem to be important we addressed the question whether the congenital lack of vasopressin will modify the stress reactivity of the pups and will influence the later consequences of single 24h maternal deprivation (MD) on both stress-reactivity and stress-related behavioral changes. Vasopressin-producing (di/+) and deficient (di/di) Brattleboro rat were used. In 10-day-old pups MD induced a remarkable corticosterone rise in both genotypes without adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) increase in di/di rats. Studying the later consequences at around weaning (25-35-day-old rats) we found somatic and hormonal alterations (body weight reduction, dysregulation of the stress axis) which were not that obvious in di/di rats. The more anxious state of MD rats was not detectable in di/di rats both at weaning and in adulthood (7-12-week-old). The lack of vasopressin abolished all chronic stress and anxiety-like tendencies both at weaning and in adulthood probably as a consequence of reduced ACTH rise immediately after MD in pups. This finding suggests that postnatal stress-induced ACTH rise may have long-term developmental consequences.

  12. Plant hormone signaling lightens up: integrators of light and hormones.

    PubMed

    Lau, On Sun; Deng, Xing Wang

    2010-10-01

    Light is an important environmental signal that regulates diverse growth and developmental processes in plants. In these light-regulated processes, multiple hormonal pathways are often modulated by light to mediate the developmental changes. Conversely, hormone levels in plants also serve as endogenous cues in influencing light responsiveness. Although interactions between light and hormone signaling pathways have long been observed, recent studies have advanced our understanding by identifying signaling integrators that connect the pathways. These integrators, namely PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR 3 (PIF3), PIF4, PIF3-LIKE 5 (PIL5)/PIF1 and LONG HYPOCOTYL 5 (HY5), are key light signaling components and they link light signals to the signaling of phytohormones, such as gibberellin (GA), abscisic acid (ABA), auxin and cytokinin, in regulating seedling photomorphogenesis and seed germination. This review focuses on these integrators in illustrating how light and hormone interact.

  13. Hormone signaling in plant development.

    PubMed

    Durbak, Amanda; Yao, Hong; McSteen, Paula

    2012-02-01

    Hormone signaling plays diverse and critical roles during plant development. In particular, hormone interactions regulate meristem function and therefore control formation of all organs in the plant. Recent advances have dissected commonalities and differences in the interaction of auxin and cytokinin in the regulation of shoot and root apical meristem function. In addition, brassinosteroid hormones have recently been discovered to regulate root apical meristem size. Further insights have also been made into our understanding of the mechanism of crosstalk among auxin, cytokinin, and strigolactone in axillary meristems.

  14. Gut hormones in tropical malabsorption.

    PubMed Central

    Besterman, H S; Cook, G C; Sarson, D L; Christofides, N D; Bryant, M G; Gregor, M; Bloom, S R

    1979-01-01

    Concentrations of various gut hormones were measured after a test breakfast in eight patients with severe tropical malabsorption and 12 controls. The patients with tropical malabsorption had greatly raised basal plasma motilin and enteroglucagon concentrations, but their postprandial release of both gastric inhibitory polypeptide and insulin was significantly reduced. The pattern of gut hormone release differed from that found in coeliac disease. The measurement of gut hormones, each of which has a specific site and function, thus throws new light on the pathophysiology of tropical malabsorption and may suggest approaches of treatment. PMID:519400

  15. Immunohistochemical mapping of pro-opiomelanocortin- and pro-dynorphin-derived peptides in the alpaca (Lama pacos) diencephalon.

    PubMed

    Manso, B; Sánchez, M L; Medina, L E; Aguilar, L A; Díaz-Cabiale, Z; Narváez, J A; Coveñas, R

    2014-09-01

    Using an indirect immunoperoxidase technique, we studied the distribution of cell bodies and fibres containing non-opioid peptides (adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH), alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone) and opioid peptides (beta-endorphin (1-27), alpha-neo-endorphin, leucine-enkephalin) in the alpaca diencephalon. No immunoreactive cell bodies containing ACTH were found. Perikarya containing the other four peptides were observed exclusively in the hypothalamus and their distribution was restricted. Perikarya containing alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone or alpha-neo-endorphin showed a more widespread distribution than those containing leucine-enkephalin or beta-endorphin (1-27). Cell bodies containing pro-opiomelanocortin-derived peptides were observed in the arcuate nucleus, anterior and lateral hypothalamic areas and in the ventromedial and supraoptic hypothalamic nuclei, whereas perikarya containing alpha-neo-endorphin (a pro-dynorphin-derived peptide) were found in the arcuate nucleus, dorsal and lateral hypothalamic areas, and in the paraventricular, ventromedial and supraoptic hypothalamic nuclei. Immunoreactive cell bodies containing leucine-enkephalin were found in the lateral hypothalamic area and in the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus. Immunoreactive fibres expressing pro-opiomelanocortin-derived peptides were more numerous than those expressing pro-dynorphin-derived peptides. A close anatomical relationship was observed: in all the diencephalic nuclei in which beta-endorphin (1-27)-immunoreactive fibres were found, fibres containing alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone or alpha-neo-endorphin were also observed. Fibres containing beta-endorphin (1-27), alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone or alpha-neo-endorphin were widely distributed throughout the diencephalon, but fibres containing ACTH or leucine-enkephalin showed a moderate distribution. The distribution of the five peptides studied here is also compared with that reported previously in

  16. Examining the role of endogenous orexins in hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis endocrine function using transient dual orexin receptor antagonism in the rat.

    PubMed

    Steiner, Michel A; Sciarretta, Carla; Brisbare-Roch, Catherine; Strasser, Daniel S; Studer, Rolf; Jenck, Francois

    2013-04-01

    The orexin neuropeptide system regulates wakefulness and contributes to physiological and behavioral stress responses. Moreover, a role for orexins in modulating hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity has been proposed. Brain penetrating dual orexin receptor (OXR) antagonists such as almorexant decrease vigilance and have emerged as a novel therapeutic class for the treatment of insomnia. Almorexant was used here as a pharmacological tool to examine the role of endogenous orexin signaling in HPA axis endocrine function under natural conditions. After confirming the expression of prepro-orexin and OXR-1 and OXR-2 mRNA in hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal glands, the effects of systemic almorexant were investigated on peripheral HPA axis hormone release in the rat under baseline, stress and pharmacological challenge conditions. Almorexant did not alter basal or stress-induced corticosterone release despite affecting wake and sleep stages (detected by radiotelemetric electroencephalography/electromyography) during the stress exposure. Moreover, almorexant did not affect the release of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone at different time points along the diurnal rhythm, nor corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH)- and ACTH-stimulated neuroendocrine responses, measured in vivo under stress-free conditions. These results illustrate that dual OXR antagonists, despite modulating stress-induced wakefulness, do not interfere with endocrine HPA axis function in the rat. They converge to suggest that endogenous orexin signaling plays a minor role in stress hormone release under basal conditions and under challenge.

  17. Specific involvement of gonadal hormones in the functional maturation of growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) neurons.

    PubMed

    Gouty-Colomer, Laurie-Anne; Méry, Pierre-François; Storme, Emilie; Gavois, Elodie; Robinson, Iain C; Guérineau, Nathalie C; Mollard, Patrice; Desarménien, Michel G

    2010-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is the key hormone involved in the regulation of growth and metabolism, two functions that are highly modulated during infancy. GH secretion, controlled mainly by GH releasing hormone (GHRH), has a characteristic pattern during postnatal development that results in peaks of blood concentration at birth and puberty. A detailed knowledge of the electrophysiology of the GHRH neurons is necessary to understand the mechanisms regulating postnatal GH secretion. Here, we describe the unique postnatal development of the electrophysiological properties of GHRH neurons and their regulation by gonadal hormones. Using GHRH-eGFP mice, we demonstrate that already at birth, GHRH neurons receive numerous synaptic inputs and fire large and fast action potentials (APs), consistent with effective GH secretion. Concomitant with the GH secretion peak occurring at puberty, these neurons display modifications of synaptic input properties, decrease in AP duration, and increase in a transient voltage-dependant potassium current. Furthermore, the modulation of both the AP duration and voltage-dependent potassium current are specifically controlled by gonadal hormones because gonadectomy prevented the maturation of these active properties and hormonal treatment restored it. Thus, GHRH neurons undergo specific developmental modulations of their electrical properties over the first six postnatal weeks, in accordance with hormonal demand. Our results highlight the importance of the interaction between the somatotrope and gonadotrope axes during the establishment of adapted neuroendocrine functions.

  18. Hormonal Regulation of Leaf Abscission

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, William P.

    1968-01-01

    A review is given of the progress made during the last 6 years in elucidating the nature, locus of action, and transport properties of the endogenous hormones that control leaf abscission. PMID:16657014

  19. Menopausal Hormone Therapy and Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... both combination and estrogen-alone hormone use made mammography less effective for the early detection of breast ... such as a reduction in the use of mammography, may also have contributed to this decline ( 15 ). ...

  20. Sex Hormones and Immune Dimorphism

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Aruna; Sekhon, Harmandeep Kaur; Kaur, Gurpreet

    2014-01-01

    The functioning of the immune system of the body is regulated by many factors. The abnormal regulation of the immune system may result in some pathological conditions. Sex hormones of reproductive system are one of the major factors that regulate immune system due to the presence of hormone receptors on immune cells. The interaction of sex hormones and immune cells through the receptors on these cells effect the release of cytokines which determines the proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of different types of immunocytes and as a result the outcome of inflammatory or autoimmune diseases. The different regulations of sex hormones in both sexes result in immune dimorphism. In this review article the mechanism of regulation of immune system in different sexes and its impact are discussed. PMID:25478584

  1. [Hormone therapy through changing times].

    PubMed

    Reuter, Miriam; Fassnacht, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Despite several studies in the last years, only women with menopausal symptoms who desire therapy are treated. There is still no recommendation for menopausale hormone therapy for primary prevention of diseases such as coronary artery disease, osteoporosis or depression. The risk of thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and stroke is elevated especially for elderly women with oral hormone therapy. Benefits may exceed risks in younger, early-menopausal women, for whom hormone therapy may be prescribed more liberally. Systemic hormone therapy is for vasomotor symptoms, local therapy for the genitourinary syndrome of menopause. Choice of formulation depends on the individual risk due to symptoms and favours of the patients. With moderate to high cardiovascular risk profile, a transdermal route of estrogen application - in women with an intact uterus in combination with micronized progesterone - seems to be the best option.

  2. Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... agonists , which are sometimes called LHRH analogs, are synthetic proteins that are structurally similar to LHRH and ... gland to stop producing luteinizing hormone, which prevents testosterone from being produced. Treatment with an LHRH agonist ...

  3. Thyroid Hormone and Vascular Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ichiki, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism affect the cardiovascular system. Hypothyroidism is known to be associated with enhanced atherosclerosis and ischemic heart diseases. The accelerated atherosclerosis in the hypothyroid state has been traditionally ascribed to atherogenic lipid profile, diastolic hypertension, and impaired endothelial function. However, recent studies indicate that thyroid hormone has direct anti-atherosclerotic effects, such as production of nitric oxide and suppression of smooth muscle cell proliferation. These data suggest that thyroid hormone inhibits atherogenesis through direct effects on the vasculature as well as modification of risk factors for atherosclerosis. This review summarizes the basic and clinical studies on the role of thyroid hormone in vascular remodeling. The possible application of thyroid hormone mimetics to the therapy of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis is also discussed. PMID:26558400

  4. Network Identification of Hormonal Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Vis, Daniel J.; Westerhuis, Johan A.; Hoefsloot, Huub C. J.; Roelfsema, Ferdinand; van der Greef, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Relations among hormone serum concentrations are complex and depend on various factors, including gender, age, body mass index, diurnal rhythms and secretion stochastics. Therefore, endocrine deviations from healthy homeostasis are not easily detected or understood. A generic method is presented for detecting regulatory relations between hormones. This is demonstrated with a cohort of obese women, who underwent blood sampling at 10 minute intervals for 24-hours. The cohort was treated with bromocriptine in an attempt to clarify how hormone relations change by treatment. The detected regulatory relations are summarized in a network graph and treatment-induced changes in the relations are determined. The proposed method identifies many relations, including well-known ones. Ultimately, the method provides ways to improve the description and understanding of normal hormonal relations and deviations caused by disease or treatment. PMID:24852517

  5. Ghrelin: much more than a hunger hormone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ghrelin is a multifaceted gut hormone that activates its receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Ghrelin's hallmark functions are its stimulatory effects on growth hormone release, food intake and fat deposition. Ghrelin is famously known as the 'hunger hormone'. However, ample recen...

  6. Restraint effects on stress-related hormones and blood natural killer cell cytotoxicity in pigs with a mutated ryanodine receptor.

    PubMed

    Ciepielewski, Z M; Stojek, W; Glac, W; Wrona, D

    2013-05-01

    A mutation in the ryanodine receptor gene (RYR1) of the calcium release channel is responsible for increased stress susceptibility in pigs. In the present study, the relation of a mutation in RYR1 with the neuroendocrine (stress-related hormone) response and the immune defense represented by natural killer cell cytotoxicity (NKCC) during a 4-h restraint and recovery phase in 60 male pigs was investigated. Blood samples were collected from pigs previously divided into RYR1 genotypes (nn, Nn, NN), based on PCR amplification and restriction analyses. The blood samples collected during the restraint and recovery phases of the experiment were used to determine NKCC ((51)Cr-release assay), large granular lymphocyte number (hematologic method), and plasma concentrations of prolactin (PRL), GH, ACTH, and cortisol (COR) (by specific RIA). The greatest degree of NKCC response (P < 0.05) to restraint stress relative to controls was observed for the stress-susceptible homozygote group (nn). Measures of stress-related hormones were positively correlated with NKCC during the entire experimental period (P < 0.001 for all investigated hormones) in the nn group. Immunostimulatory effects in the early (0-60 min) phase of restraint were associated with increased hormone responses, especially PRL and GH. In the late (180-240 min) phase of stress and the recovery phase (480 min), a decrease in immune response was accompanied by an elevated COR response in all RYR1 genotypes. Moreover, divergent responses of both PRL (greatest in nn, P < 0.001) and GH (greatest in NN, P < 0.001) to the 4-h restraint were observed. Our results suggest that stress-susceptible RYR1-mutated homozygotes develop a greater level of immune defense, including cytotoxic activity of NK cells, and accompanied by more pronounced stress-induced changes in neuroendocrine response than stress-resistant heterozygous (Nn) and homozygous (NN) pigs.

  7. Short-term effects of cortisol implantation on blood biochemistry and thyroid hormones in previtellogenic great sturgeon Huso huso.

    PubMed

    Poursaeid, Samaneh; Falahatkar, Bahram; Van Der Kraak, Glen

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the effects of implanted cortisol on various aspects of intermediary metabolism of great sturgeon, Huso huso. Prior to experimentation all fish were examined using an endoscope to observe the stage of ovarian development. Subsequently, the 3-year-old female fish in the previtellogenic stage (mean body weight of 6759±53.2g) were intraperitoneally implanted with cocoa butter pellets containing cortisol to mimic the effects of chronic stress. The implant doses were 0 (C0; as control), 5 (C5) and 50 (C50) mg cortisol/kg body weight. Blood samples were taken every seven days during the four weeks of the experiment and analyzed for cortisol, glucose, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), total protein, total lipid, triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4), cholesterol and triglyceride content. Growth was reduced in all experimental groups and was not affected by cortisol treatment. Surprisingly, serum cortisol levels were higher in the C5 group than in the C50 throughout the experiment. A significant increase in glucose levels was observed in the cortisol-implanted fish from day 14 onwards. The high dose of cortisol elicited a significant increase in serum T3 and T4 levels. Fish implanted with the high cortisol dose also showed increases in serum ACTH, total lipid and cholesterol levels throughout a 28-day experimental period. The present study reveals that the negative effects of endoscopic surgery remain for at least four weeks and that a sustained-release implant of cortisol to mimic the effects of chronic stress affects metabolic responses. Since the adverse effects of endoscopic surgery on sturgeon welfare can be amplified by cortisol, special attention should be paid to the potential effects of chronic stress on sturgeon in culture.

  8. Effect of acute ether stress on monoamine metabolism in median eminence and discrete hypothalamic nuclei of the rat brain and on anterior pituitary hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Johnston, C A; Spinedi, E J; Negro-Vilar, A

    1985-07-01

    This study was designed to correlate the endocrine responses elicited by acute ether stress with the changes in metabolism of several monoamines in discrete nuclei of the rat brain. Concentrations of norepinephrine (NE), dopamine (DA), and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) and also of the specific metabolites of NE, DA, and 5-HT, 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethylene glycol, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and 5-hydroxyindole-3-acetic acid, respectively, were concurrently measured in microdissected nuclei using high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. The ratio of the metabolites to their respective amines was used as an estimate of the metabolism of NE, DA, and 5-HT. Acute exposure to ether vapors induced, within 5-15 min, large increments in plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), beta-endorphin, and prolactin (PRL), and decrements in the levels of plasma growth hormone (GH). Significant increases in NE metabolism were observed in the rostral (ANr) and caudal (ANc) divisions of the arcuate nucleus, as well as in the paraventricular (PVN) and dorsomedial nuclei, 15 min after ether stress. A significant decrease in 5-HT metabolism was observed in the PVN, supraoptic nucleus, and ANc, whereas significant increases in 5-HT metabolism were detected in the suprachiasmatic nucleus and ANr. DA metabolism selectively increased in the ANr. The present results indicate that the acute changes in ACTH, beta-endorphin, PRL, and GH release induced by ether exposure are temporally correlated with increases in NE metabolism in many hypothalamic nuclei; a selective increase in DA metabolism restricted to the ANr, and differential effects on 5-HT metabolism, probably reflecting selective activation or inhibition of different populations of 5-HT neurons.

  9. Differential Activation in Amygdala and Plasma Noradrenaline during Colorectal Distention by Administration of Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone between Healthy Individuals and Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yukari; Kanazawa, Motoyori; Kano, Michiko; Morishita, Joe; Hamaguchi, Toyohiro; Van Oudenhove, Lukas; Ly, Huynh Giao; Dupont, Patrick; Tack, Jan; Yamaguchi, Takuhiro; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Tashiro, Manabu; Fukudo, Shin

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) often comorbids mood and anxiety disorders. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a major mediator of the stress response in the brain-gut axis, but it is not clear how CRH agonists change human brain responses to interoceptive stimuli. We tested the hypothesis that brain activation in response to colorectal distention is enhanced after CRH injection in IBS patients compared to healthy controls. Brain H215O- positron emission tomography (PET) was performed in 16 male IBS patients and 16 age-matched male controls during baseline, no distention, mild and intense distention of the colorectum using barostat bag inflation. Either CRH (2 μg/kg) or saline (1:1) was then injected intravenously and the same distention protocol was repeated. Plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), serum cortisol and plasma noradrenaline levels were measured at each stimulation. At baseline, CRH without colorectal distention induced more activation in the right amygdala in IBS patients than in controls. During intense distention after CRH injection, controls showed significantly greater activation than IBS patients in the right amygdala. Plasma ACTH and serum cortisol secretion showed a significant interaction between drug (CRH, saline) and distention. Plasma noradrenaline at baseline significantly increased after CRH injection compared to before injection in IBS. Further, plasma noradrenaline showed a significant group (IBS, controls) by drug by distention interaction. Exogenous CRH differentially sensitizes brain regions of the emotional-arousal circuitry within the visceral pain matrix to colorectal distention and synergetic activation of noradrenergic function in IBS patients and healthy individuals. PMID:27448273

  10. Differential Activation in Amygdala and Plasma Noradrenaline during Colorectal Distention by Administration of Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone between Healthy Individuals and Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

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