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Sample records for adrian proteomics myers

  1. Fort Myers Historical Museum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee County School District, Fort Myers, FL.

    Materials for secondary school students to supplement a tour of the Fort Myers (Florida) Historical Museum are presented. Background information on the history of Southwest Florida is provided, and the rest of the materials consist of specific questions and suggested class activities on many of the major actors and activities in the area's…

  2. Myers nominated to head USGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, Sarah

    2006-05-01

    U.S. President George W. Bush will nominate Mark Myers to be director of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the White House announced on 3 May. Myers most recently held the position of Alaska State Geologist and director of the State of Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Survey. Prior to that position, Myers headed the State of Alaska Division of Oil and Gas, the agency that oversees leases of state lands for oil and gas exploration.

  3. 33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a)(1) Regulated Area. The regulated area is formed...

  4. 33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a)(1) Regulated Area. The regulated area is formed...

  5. 33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a)(1) Regulated Area. The regulated area is formed...

  6. 33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a)(1) Regulated Area. The regulated area is formed...

  7. 33 CFR 100.736 - Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Annual Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.736 Section 100.736 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT... Fort Myers Beach air show; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a)(1) Regulated Area. The regulated area is formed...

  8. Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Hixson, Kim K.; Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2010-02-01

    Proteomics aims to characterize the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of proteins in biological systems, the protein response to environmental stimuli, and the differences in protein states between diseased and control biological systems. Mass spectrometry (MS) plays a crucial role in enabling the analysis of proteomes and typically is the method of choice for identifying proteins present in biological systems. Peptide (and consequently protein) identifications are made by comparing measured masses to calculated values obtained from genome data. Several methodologies based on MS have been developed for the analysis of proteomes. The complexity of the biological systems requires that the proteome be separated prior to analysis. Both gel based and liquid chromatography based separations have proven very useful in this regard. Typically, separated proteins are analyzed with MS either intact (top-down proteomics) or are digested into peptides (bottom-up) prior to MS analysis. Additionally, several procedures, with and without stable isotopic labeling, have been introduced to facilitate protein quantitation (e.g. characterize changes in protein abundances between given biological states).

  9. Adrian Stokes and the portrait of Melanie Klein.

    PubMed

    Sayers, Janet

    2015-08-01

    This paper focuses on the offer by the art writer Adrian Stokes to commission and pay for a portrait of the psychoanalyst Melanie Klein by the artist William Coldstream. It details some of the precursors of this offer in Stokes's preceding involvement first with Klein and then with Coldstream; her response to this offer; and its outcome and aftermath in Stokes's subsequent writing about Klein and Coldstream.

  10. Adrian Stokes and the portrait of Melanie Klein.

    PubMed

    Sayers, Janet

    2015-08-01

    This paper focuses on the offer by the art writer Adrian Stokes to commission and pay for a portrait of the psychoanalyst Melanie Klein by the artist William Coldstream. It details some of the precursors of this offer in Stokes's preceding involvement first with Klein and then with Coldstream; her response to this offer; and its outcome and aftermath in Stokes's subsequent writing about Klein and Coldstream. PMID:25989030

  11. Myers-Briggs typology and Jungian individuation.

    PubMed

    Myers, Steve

    2016-06-01

    Myers-Briggs typology is widely seen as equivalent to and representative of Jungian theory by the users of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and similar questionnaires. However, the omission of the transcendent function from the theory, and the use of typological functions as its foundation, has resulted in an inadvertent reframing of the process of individuation. This is despite some attempts to integrate individuation and typology, and reintroduce the transcendent function into Myers-Briggs theory. This paper examines the differing views of individuation in Myers-Briggs and Jungian theory, and some of the challenges of reconciling those differences, particularly in the context of normality. It proposes eight principles, drawn mainly from Jungian and classical post-Jungian work, that show how individuation as a process can be integrated with contemporary Myers-Briggs typology. These principles show individuation as being a natural process that can be encouraged outside of the analytic process. They make use of a wide range of opposites as well as typological functions, whilst being centred on the transcendent function. Central to the process is the alchemical image of the caduceus and a practical interpretation of the axiom of Maria, both of which Jung used to illustrate the process of individuation. PMID:27192365

  12. Myers-Briggs typology and Jungian individuation.

    PubMed

    Myers, Steve

    2016-06-01

    Myers-Briggs typology is widely seen as equivalent to and representative of Jungian theory by the users of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and similar questionnaires. However, the omission of the transcendent function from the theory, and the use of typological functions as its foundation, has resulted in an inadvertent reframing of the process of individuation. This is despite some attempts to integrate individuation and typology, and reintroduce the transcendent function into Myers-Briggs theory. This paper examines the differing views of individuation in Myers-Briggs and Jungian theory, and some of the challenges of reconciling those differences, particularly in the context of normality. It proposes eight principles, drawn mainly from Jungian and classical post-Jungian work, that show how individuation as a process can be integrated with contemporary Myers-Briggs typology. These principles show individuation as being a natural process that can be encouraged outside of the analytic process. They make use of a wide range of opposites as well as typological functions, whilst being centred on the transcendent function. Central to the process is the alchemical image of the caduceus and a practical interpretation of the axiom of Maria, both of which Jung used to illustrate the process of individuation.

  13. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy: engraving published by Myer, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Photocopy: engraving published by Myer, 1851 - United States General Post Office, Between Seventh, Eighth, E, & F Streets, Northwest, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  14. 33 CFR 100.717 - Annual Fort Myers Beach Offshore Grand Prix; Fort Myers, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...°58.30′ W). All coordinates referenced use datum: NAD 83. (b) Special local regulations. (1) No vessel... coordinates referenced use datum: NAD 83. (3) All vessel traffic, not involved with the Fort Myers Beach... clear of the racecourse. All coordinates referenced use datum: NAD 83. (4) All vessel traffic,...

  15. 33 CFR 100.717 - Annual Fort Myers Beach Offshore Grand Prix; Fort Myers, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...°58.30′ W). All coordinates referenced use datum: NAD 83. (b) Special local regulations. (1) No vessel... coordinates referenced use datum: NAD 83. (3) All vessel traffic, not involved with the Fort Myers Beach... clear of the racecourse. All coordinates referenced use datum: NAD 83. (4) All vessel traffic,...

  16. 33 CFR 100.717 - Annual Fort Myers Beach Offshore Grand Prix; Fort Myers, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...°58.30′ W). All coordinates referenced use datum: NAD 83. (b) Special local regulations. (1) No vessel... coordinates referenced use datum: NAD 83. (3) All vessel traffic, not involved with the Fort Myers Beach... clear of the racecourse. All coordinates referenced use datum: NAD 83. (4) All vessel traffic,...

  17. 33 CFR 100.717 - Annual Fort Myers Beach Offshore Grand Prix; Fort Myers, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...°58.30′ W). All coordinates referenced use datum: NAD 83. (b) Special local regulations. (1) No vessel... coordinates referenced use datum: NAD 83. (3) All vessel traffic, not involved with the Fort Myers Beach... clear of the racecourse. All coordinates referenced use datum: NAD 83. (4) All vessel traffic,...

  18. 33 CFR 100.717 - Annual Fort Myers Beach Offshore Grand Prix; Fort Myers, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...°58.30′ W). All coordinates referenced use datum: NAD 83. (b) Special local regulations. (1) No vessel... coordinates referenced use datum: NAD 83. (3) All vessel traffic, not involved with the Fort Myers Beach... clear of the racecourse. All coordinates referenced use datum: NAD 83. (4) All vessel traffic,...

  19. 8. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from blueprint at Fort Myer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from blueprint at Fort Myer Engineer Activity) 'Double set of Non-Commissioned Officers Qrs.' Quartermaster Generals Office, sheets 2 and 3, standard plan 23, June 1891, Lithographed on linen architectural drawing. 1 PLAN, 3 ELEVATIONS - Fort Myer, Non-Commissioned Officers Quarters, Washington Avenue between Johnson Lane & Custer Road, Arlington, Arlington County, VA

  20. 9. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from blueprint at Fort Myer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photocopy of architectural drawing (from blueprint at Fort Myer Engineer Activity) 'Double Set of Non-Commissioned Officers Qrs.' Quartermaster Generals Office, sheet 1 and unnumbered sheet, standard plan 23, June 1891. lithograph on linen architectural drawing 2. PLANS, 1 SECTION, 2 DETAILS - Fort Myer, Non-Commissioned Officers Quarters, Washington Avenue between Johnson Lane & Custer Road, Arlington, Arlington County, VA

  1. 78 FR 49470 - Adrian Jesus Reyna, Inmate Number #80629-280, FCI Bastrop, Federal Correctional Institution, P.O...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ..., 2012 (77 FR 49699 (August 16, 2012)), has continued the Regulations in effect under the International... Bureau of Industry and Security Adrian Jesus Reyna, Inmate Number 80629-280, FCI Bastrop, Federal..., in the U.S. District Court, Western District of Texas, Adrian Jesus Reyna (``Reyna'') was...

  2. Item Analysis of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sipps, Gary J.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    The current study explores the item structure of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). A factor analysis of responses of a large sample yielded six salient factors, four resembling the four scales of the MBTI. (Author/LMO)

  3. Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Profile and the Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hendrickson, Kent; Giesecke, Joan R.

    1994-01-01

    Describes how the University of Nebraska-Lincoln libraries used the Myers-Briggs Type Inventory (MBTI) as a way to understand the personality profile of the overall organization. The MBTI personality types of the library's 33 managers are summarized. Implications for managing the organization and specific approaches are discussed. (two references)…

  4. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and Career Obstacles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Charles C.; Woodward, Geoffrey A.

    1998-01-01

    Relationships between clients' Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) scores and their career obstacles were investigated. Uses of MBTI are presented briefly. Subjects (N=118) were seeking career counseling; counselors administering the tests and rating clients were blind to the hypothesis. Results of a regression analysis are presented and discussed.…

  5. Myers-Briggs Type Inventory Personality Preferences and Academic Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowenthal, Werner; Meth, Hilda

    1989-01-01

    A study to determine if there are any relationships between the Myers-Briggs Type Inventory personality preferences and academic performance in schools of pharmacy is discussed. Differences in academic performance that could be related to gender are reported. (Author/MLW)

  6. "Monsters'" Ink: How Walter Dean Myers Made "Frankenstein" Fun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Nathan

    2003-01-01

    Describes an effective but new twist on the use of young adult books as bridges to the classics. Considers how "Frankenstein" is a novel written for today. Aims for his students to see that literature can be a way to discuss important issues. Discusses how to bridge Walter Dean Myers' novel "Monster" to "Frankenstein." (SG)

  7. Anthropologist of Libraries: Jerome Myers--Brooklyn Public Library, NY

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Jerome Myers originally dreamt he would be a cultural anthropologist, but instead he ended up negotiating contracts for major publishers. When his librarian sister suggested that academic librarianship might be more satisfying, he signed up for Brooklyn Public Library's (BPL) librarian trainee program and enrolled in the library and information…

  8. An Assessment of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlyn, Marcia

    1977-01-01

    The Myers Briggs Type Indicator is a self-report inventory developed to measure variables in Carl Jung's personality typology. The four personality scales measured by the instrument, and the scoring process are described, and an extensive review of the intercorrelation, reliability, and validity research is presented. (Author/MV)

  9. Forced Relocation and Assimilation: Dillon Myer and the Native American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joe, Jennie R.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between Native Americans and the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) is ambivalent. Most BIA commissioners, like Dillon Myer, have been assimilationists who have tried to get the government "out of Indian business." Recent policies stressing self-determination are in jeopardy as pressure mounts for decreased federal domestic spending.…

  10. Myers-Perry black hole in an external gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolrahimi, Shohreh; Kunz, Jutta; Nedkova, Petya

    2015-03-01

    We obtain a new exact solution of the 5D Einstein equations in vacuum describing a distorted Myers-Perry black hole with a single angular momentum. Locally, the solution is interpreted as a black hole distorted by a stationary U (1 )×U (1 ) symmetric distribution of external matter. Technically, the solution is constructed by applying a twofold Bäcklund transformation on a 5D distorted Minkowski spacetime as a seed. The physical quantities of the solution are calculated, and a local Smarr-like relation on the black hole horizon is derived. It possesses the same form as the Smarr-like relation for the asymptotically flat Myers-Perry black hole. It is demonstrated that in contrast to the asymptotically flat Myers-Perry black hole, the ratio of the horizon angular momentum and the mass J2/M3 is unbounded, and can grow arbitrarily large. We study the properties of the ergoregion and the horizon surface. The external field does not influence the horizon topology. The horizon geometry however is distorted, and any regular axisymmetric geometry is possible.

  11. A Technical Review of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator(tm).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denham, Thomas J.

    This paper describes the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), developed by I. Myers and K. Briggs (1940s) to assess personality type. Based on Jungian theory, the MBTI has become a tool for identifying the 16 different patterns of action into which every person fits. The 16 personality types are based on patterns of: (1) extraversion-introversion;…

  12. 33 CFR 100.740 - Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.740 Section 100.740 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a) Regulated area. (1) The regulated...

  13. 33 CFR 100.740 - Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.740 Section 100.740 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a) Regulated area. (1) The regulated...

  14. 33 CFR 100.740 - Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.740 Section 100.740 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a) Regulated area. (1) The regulated...

  15. 33 CFR 100.740 - Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.740 Section 100.740 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a) Regulated area. (1) The regulated...

  16. 33 CFR 100.740 - Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL. 100.740 Section 100.740 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Annual Offshore Super Series Boat Race; Fort Myers Beach, FL. (a) Regulated area. (1) The regulated...

  17. Writing through the Labyrinth of Fears: The Legacy of Walter Dean Myers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatum, Alfred W.

    2015-01-01

    This commentary discusses the legacy of Walter Dean Myers in relationship to advancing writing as an intellectual tool of protection for black male teens. Multiple implications are provided for teachers who want to engage black male teens to write fearlessly to extend the legacy of Walter Dean Myers.

  18. Myers-Briggs® Preferences and Academic Success in the First College Semester

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanborn, Debra K.

    2013-01-01

    This research examined aspects of Myers-Briggs® preferences and academic success in the first college semester. Academic aptitude as measured by precollege characteristics of ACT and class rank, academic performance during the first semester of college, and Myers-Briggs preference were analyzed for their significance within a learning community at…

  19. Making Connections in the Life and Works of Walter Dean Myers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greever, Ellen A.; Austin, Patricia

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the life and works of acclaimed writer Walter Dean Myers. Describes his struggles growing up, his time in the army, his decision to become a writer, and the father/son relationships in his books. Discusses how Myers' concern for African-American heritage, identity, and pride led to biographies of Sarah Forbes and of Malcolm X. (SR)

  20. Self-Selection Patterns of College Roommates as Identified by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anchors, W. Scott; Hale, John, Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Investigated patterns and processes by which students (N=422) made unassisted roommate pairings within residence halls using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. Results indicated introverts, intuitives, feelers, and perceivers each tended to self-select. (BL)

  1. On advancing behavior analysis in the treatment and prevention of battering: Commentary on Myers

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Lizette; Calhoun, Karen

    1995-01-01

    Myers offers an important challenge to behavior analysts: eliminating the battering of women. In this commentary, we extend the conceptual model advocated by Myers, urge a bidirectional approach that focuses more on the battered woman and less on the battering man, caution against the indiscriminate use of marital therapy approaches, and argue that the most important contributions in the field may come from behavioral prevention rather than treatment interventions. PMID:16795879

  2. Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and dental school performance.

    PubMed

    Jones, A C; Courts, F J; Sandow, P L; Watson, R E

    1997-12-01

    The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) was administered to 256 dental students, representing four classes, at the University of Florida College of Dentistry. The results of this psychological instrument were then correlated with overall dental school performance based on results from the National Dental Board Examinations Part I and II (NB-I, NB-II), yearly class rank, and specific academic difficulties as measured by the Student Performance Evaluation Committee. Introverted students were found to display a significantly increased performance on NB-I (p = .038) and NB-II (p = .044). They were also found, however, to demonstrate a progressively lower class rank over the four-year period than extroverted students and were more likely to experience major academic difficulties as well. Judging and sensing individuals were found to earn a higher class rank over the four-year period than perceiving and intuitive students, respectively. Perceiving students were found to exhibit major difficulties or were placed on probation more often than judging individuals. These results may prove useful in counseling students to recognize potential problems before they commence their dental education or to anticipate and address specific weaknesses during the course of their education. PMID:9457134

  3. The coming of the electronic age to the Cambridge Physiological Laboratory: E.D. Adrian's valve amplifier in 1921.

    PubMed

    Bradley, J K; Tansey, E M

    1996-07-01

    E.D. Adrian, F.R.S. (1889-1975) was one of Britain's most distinguished neurophysiologists, who, during a long and productive lifetime, achieved most honours and distinctions available to a scientific man. These included the 1932 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine, shared with Sir Charles Sherrington, F.R.S., the Order of Merit (1942), and Presidency of the Royal Society (1950-55). His interest in the nervous system started at the beginning of his undergraduate career, much influenced by his Director of Studies, Keith Lucas, F.R.S. (1879-1916). Lucas, a skilled and imaginative neurophysiologist, was particularly renowned for his technical ability to design and build new equipment. In turn, his pupil's work on recording and analysing the electrical impulses in nervous tissue was also facilitated by the development of appropriate, sensitive instrumentation. This paper will describe Adrian's first use of valve amplifiers to enlarge the extremely small electrical signals then obtainable in the physiological laboratory, a development that epitomized the beginning of the electronic revolution in life sciences' laboratories.

  4. Use of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) with Physicians: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, David H.

    This document reviews the research on the use of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), with medical students and physicians. The MBTI is a paper-and-pencil instrument based on C. G. Jung's theory of personality typology. The introductory section of the review describes the MBTI and explains its dimensions (extroverted versus introverted, sensing…

  5. The Validity of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator for Predicting Expressed Marital Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglass, Frazier M., IV; Douglass, Robin

    1993-01-01

    Examined assertions made concerning Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) use with couples in marital therapy. Sixty-seven couples completed MBTI and questionnaire concerning marital problems. Results were not consistent with assertions found in MBTI literature. Few spouses in couples were same on all four preferences and number of opposite…

  6. Using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator in the Social Work Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviles, Christopher B.

    The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) is one of the most popular measures of personality available today and has been taken by over 12 million people. The MBTI has been successfully utilized for personal and marriage counseling, conflict and stress management, and understanding learning styles. It is perfect for the social work classroom because…

  7. Essentials of Myers-Briggs Type Indicator[R] Assessment. Essentials of Psychological Assessment Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quenk, Naomi L.

    This book provides step-by-step guidance on the administration, scoring, and interpretation of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator[R] (MBTI). The book also contains assessment of the test's strengths and weaknesses, advice on its clinical applications, and several case reports. The chapters are: (1) "Overview"; (2) "How To Administer the MBTI"; (3)…

  8. Teacher's Myers-Briggs Personality Profiles: Identifying Effective Teacher Personality Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rushton, Stephen; Morgan, Jackson; Richard, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The Myers-Briggs Type Inventory (MBTI) and Beiderman Risk Taking (BRT) scale were administered to 58 teachers living in the state of Florida, USA. These teachers are considered part of prestigious group of educators who were nominated into the Florida League of Teachers by their superintendents/directors. Descriptive data includes frequency and…

  9. Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Score Reliability across Studies: A Meta-Analytic Reliability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capraro, Robert M.; Capraro, Mary Margaret

    2002-01-01

    Submitted the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) to a descriptive reliability generalization analysis to characterize the variability of measurement error in MBTI scores across administrations. In general the MBTI and its scales yielded scores with strong internal consistency and test-retest reliability estimates. (SLD)

  10. Myers-Briggs Psychological Type and Achievement in Anatomy and Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harasym, P. H.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Results from the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) for 259 nursing students were compared with achievement on examinations in an anatomy and physiology course. Factor analysis demonstrated no relationship between examination scores and any of the individual personality traits purported to be measured by MBTI. Analysis of variance revealed no…

  11. Interpreting the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator to Help Clients in Understanding Their Strong Interest Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healy, Charles C.

    2000-01-01

    Scores of 370 adults on the Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) were correlated with General Occupational Theme (GOT) scores on the Strong Interest Inventory. Simple categorical MBTI scores were related modestly to Strong GOT scores as expected; individual continuous scores did not account for more variance in GOT than in categorical scores. (SK)

  12. Affirmative: In Support of Researching the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, John G.

    1989-01-01

    Updates 1985 review of Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) noting recent criterion-based assessments of the MBTI remain largely unsystematic theoretically but generally positive. Claims more methodologically sophisticated approaches have been developed. Concludes that it seems premature to reject the MBTI owing either to its dichotomous approach to…

  13. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator: A Measure for Individuals and Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaulley, Mary H.

    1990-01-01

    Describes Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). Looks at history and development of the MBTI, characteristics, scores, Jung's theory of lifelong development, the dynamic interaction of the four functions measured by the MBTI, the construction of the MBTI, use with groups, how to use type tables, and use of the MBTI in career counseling. (NB)

  14. Comparison of the Abbreviated and Original Versions of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Personality Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leiden, Lisa I.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    The responses of two classes of medical students on both the original and abbreviated versions of the Myer-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) are examined. The purpose was to identify the extent to which MBTI numerical scores and the MBTI personality types represented by the numerical scores are congruent between the forms.

  15. A Comparison of Competing Models Underlying Responses to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Stacy L.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Factor analysis of 1,030 adults' responses on the Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) were used to test 4 alternative models. Results support a four-factor structure similar to the original Jungian structure. Elimination of 12 MBTI items was recommended. (SK)

  16. Differences in Myers-Briggs Personality Types among High School Band, Orchestra, and Choir Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLellan, Christin Reardon

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore personality type differences among high school band, string orchestra, and choir students according to ensemble membership. Participants (N = 355) were high school students who had participated in their school's band, orchestra, or choir for 1 year or more. The author administered the Myers-Briggs Type…

  17. Utilizing the Myers-Briggs Personality Inventory in Employee Assistance Program Workplace Seminars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviles, Christopher B.

    Social work educators are being called upon more often to deliver employee workplace seminars for community agencies on a variety of topics ranging from burnout and stress management to improving workplace communication and managing workplace conflicts. One tool that addresses workplace communication is the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). It…

  18. 75 FR 37521 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Eton College Myers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Eton College Myers Collection at... 15, 2003 , I hereby determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Eton College...

  19. No ISCOs in Charged Myers Perry Spacetimes by Measuring Lyapunov Exponent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2015-01-01

    By computing coordinate time Lyapunov exponent, we prove that for more than four spacetime dimensions (N ≥ 3), there are no Innermost Stable Circular Orbit (ISCO) in charged Myers Perry blackhole spacetime.Using it, we show that the instability of equatorial circular geodesics, both massive and massless particles for such types of blackhole space-times.

  20. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator: A Resource for Developmental Advising.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Virginia N.; Carberry, Julie Dryden

    1984-01-01

    The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), a practical tool for helping students understand some of the dynamics of how they communicate and approach the decision making process, is described as an instrument that can be a valuable source of information for students and advisors. (Author/MLW)

  1. Important and Unimportant Organizational Communication: Public Employee Freedom of Speech after "Connick v. Myers."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Wayne C.

    A review of 16 Federal Court of Appeals cases indicates the impact of the "Connick v. Myers" case on the nature of freedom of speech in public organizations. The case involved the firing of an assistant district attorney for circulating a job satisfaction survey after she was transferred to a less desirable section of the courts. Since the 1983…

  2. Eysenck Personality Questionnaire and Jungian Myers-Briggs Type Indicator Correlation of Extraversion-Introversion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Robert S.; Kelly, Thomas J.

    1976-01-01

    C. G. Jung and H. J. Eysenck developed concepts of extraversion-introversion from radically different theoretical orientations. It is hypothesized that given the methods and content similarity of the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire and the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. Extraversion-Introversion scales of the inventories will be significantly…

  3. Enhancing Student Team Effectiveness: Application of Myers-Briggs Personality Assessment in Business Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amato, Christie H.; Amato, Louis H.

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the relationship between student perceptions of team learning experience and communication style. Student group learning perceptions were evaluated and team communication style was measured using dyads derived from Myers-Briggs personality profiles. Groups containing similar personalities were classified as compatible,…

  4. Failure of the Ingard-Myers boundary condition for a lined duct: an experimental investigation.

    PubMed

    Renou, Ygaäl; Aurégan, Yves

    2011-07-01

    This paper deals with experimental investigation of the lined wall boundary condition in flow duct applications such as aircraft engine systems or automobile mufflers. A first experiment, based on a microphone array located in the liner test section, is carried out in order to extract the axial wavenumbers with the help of an "high-accurate" singular value decomposition Prony-like algorithm. The experimental axial wavenumbers are then used to provide the lined wall impedance for both downstream and upstream acoustic propagation by means of a straightforward impedance education method involving the classical Ingard-Myers boundary condition. The results show that the Ingard-Myers boundary condition fails to predict with accuracy the acoustic behavior in a lined duct with flow. An effective lined wall impedance, valid whatever the direction of acoustic propagation, can be suitably found from experimental axial wavenumbers and a modified version of the Ingard-Myers condition with the form inspired from a previous theoretical study [Aurégan et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 109, 59-64 (2001)]. In a second experiment, the scattering matrix of the liner test section is measured and is then compared to the predicted scattering matrix using the multimodal approach and the lined wall impedances previously deduced. A large discrepancy is observed between the measured and the predicted scattering coefficients that confirms the poor accuracy provided from the Ingard-Myers boundary condition widely used in lined duct applications. PMID:21786877

  5. Personality Characteristics of South Korean Students with Visual Impairments Using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bak, Sunhi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The study presented here was designed to determine whether there were significant differences in the frequency and preference scores of personality functions and the frequency of personality types, as measured by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), by gender, school level, and level of visual function, of students with visual…

  6. Opposition from Christians to Myers-Briggs Personality Typing: An Analysis and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, John B.

    2007-01-01

    Myers-Briggs personality typing is widely used in the Christian church as an aid to individual self-understanding and spiritual formation. However, some Christian leaders have expressed doubt about its validity in understanding human personality and also opposition to its use in nurturing spiritual growth. The aim of the work reported was to…

  7. Survey of Librarians Using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (Form G Self-Scorable).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Alan

    A survey conducted in February 1990 asked 100 librarians to respond to a mailed Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), a widely used personality survey that determines Jungian personality types. The results of the MBTI can be applied to building work teams in the library. Forty-eight librarians responded to the survey. Their responses were tallied…

  8. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and the Teaching-Learning Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCaulley, Mary H.

    The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) was developed specifically to make possible the implementation of Carl Jung's theory of type and is concerned mainly with conscious elements of the personality. It assumes that to function well, an individual must have a well-developed system for perception and a well-developed system for making decisions or…

  9. The Complex and Elusive Nature of Religious Prosociality: Reply to Myers (2012) and Saroglou (2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galen, Luke W.

    2012-01-01

    This reply explores issues raised in comments by Myers (2012) and Saroglou (2012) on Galen (2012) regarding whether religiosity has any influence on prosociality. Areas of contention include (a) the distinction between religious belief and other influences, mainly the socialization effects of group behavior; (b) whether behavior largely restricted…

  10. Queens University of Charlotte--Myers Park Traditional Elementary School Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Suzanne E.; Wooten-Thornburg, Amy; Bonner, Paul; Boyd, Irma; Gerald, Jamie; Perkins, Shavonn; Mercer, Elizabeth; Hunter, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Great work can be accomplished with little budgets and big dreams and desires for increased student achievement. The focus of the Queens University of Charlotte and Myers Park Traditional School (MPTS) partnership was excellent teacher development that centered on learning as a community of teachers (both pre-service and in-service). What they…

  11. Team Building Using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator: Appreciating the Talents Within Your Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, Susan Robinson

    1995-01-01

    Describes the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (M-BTI), which evaluates people's preferences with regard to their involvement with the outside world, the way they receive information, the manner in which they make judgments, and their approach to interacting with the outside world. Discusses application of the M-BTI in community colleges for team…

  12. A Four Year Study of the Myers Center for Small Business. Pueblo Community College, April 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeiss, P. Anthony; Hallock, Richard G.

    In May 1983, Pueblo (Colorado) Community College (PCC) established the Myers Center for Small Business to assist entrepreneurs in the operation of existing businesses and the development of new ones. In March 1987, a study was conducted to determine whether the center had met its long-term goals; the number of new businesses started by center…

  13. Microsomal proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wong, Diana M; Adeli, Khosrow

    2009-01-01

    Proteomic profiling of subcellular compartments has many advantages over traditional proteomic approaches using whole cell lysates as it allows for detailed proteome analysis of a specific organelle and corresponding functional characteristics. The microsome is a critical, membranous compartment involved in the synthesis, sorting, and secretion of proteins as well as other metabolic functions. This chapter will describe detailed methods for the isolation of microsomal organelles including the ER, Golgi, and prechylomicron transport vesicle (PCTV), a recently identified vesicular system involved in intestinal lipoprotein assembly and secretion. Particular focus is given to the isolation of microsomes from primary hepatocytes and enterocytes freshly isolated from rodent liver and intestinal tissue, and their proteomic profiling using a combination of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry.

  14. Painleve-gullstrand-type Coordinates for the Five-dimensional Myers-Perry Black Hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finch, Tehani Kahi

    2013-01-01

    The Painleve-Gullstrand coordinates provide a convenient framework for presenting the Schwarzschild geometry because of their flat constant-time hypersurfaces, and the fact that they are free of coordinate singularities outside r=0. Generalizations of Painlev´e-Gullstrand coordinates suitable for the Kerr geometry have been presented by Doran and Nat´ario. These coordinate systems feature a time coordinate identical to the proper time of zero-angular-momentum observers that are dropped from infinity. Here, the methods of Doran and Nat´ario are extended to the five-dimensional rotating black hole found by Myers and Perry. The result is a new formulation of the Myers-Perry metric. The properties and physical significance of these new coordinates are discussed.

  15. Relationship of Myers Briggs type indicator personality characteristics to suicidality in affective disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Janowsky, David S; Morter, Shirley; Hong, Liyi

    2002-01-01

    The current study characterized the Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) personality profiles of 64 suicidal and 30 non-suicidal psychiatric inpatients with affective disorder diagnoses. The MBTI divides individuals categorically into eight personality preferences (Extroverted and Introverted, Sensing and Intuitive, Thinking and Feeling, and Judging and Perceiving). Compared to the group of non-suicidal affective disorder patients, suicidal affective disorder patients were significantly more Introverted and Perceiving using ANCOVA analyses, and significantly more Introverted alone using Chi Square analyses. PMID:11755459

  16. Examination of the relationship between the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and empathetic response.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, S J; Stephens, J C; Chew, A L; Downs, E

    1992-06-01

    This study investigated the potential relationship between the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and level of empathetic responding. Analyses indicated that the Thinking-Feeling scale was significantly associated with ratings of empathy for 49 graduate students in counselor education. Sex and graduate grade point average were also related significantly to empathic responding. Results are discussed in terms of their significance for research. PMID:1608701

  17. Nanoscale Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolic, Nikola; Masselon, Christophe D.; Pasa-Tolic, Liljiana; Camp, David G.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2004-02-01

    This paper describes efforts to develop a liquid chromatography (LC)/mass spectrometry (MS) technology for ultra-sensitive proteomics studies, i.e. nanoscale proteomics. The approach combines high-efficiency nano-scale LC with advanced MS, including high sensitivity and high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS, to perform both single-stage MS and tandem MS (MS/MS) proteomic analyses. The technology developed enables large-scale protein identification from nanogram size proteomic samples and characterization of more abundant proteins from sub-picogram size complex samples. Protein identification in such studies using MS is feasible from <75 zeptomole of a protein, and the average proteome measurement throughput is >200 proteins/h and ~3 h/sample. Higher throughput (>1000 proteins/h) and more sensitive detection limits can be obtained using a “accurate mass and time” tag approach developed at our laboratory. These capabilities lay the foundation for studies from single or limited numbers of cells.

  18. Chlamydomonas proteomics.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Norbert; Atteia, Ariane; Decottignies, Paulette; Garin, Jérôme; Hippler, Michael; Kreimer, Georg; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Mittag, Maria; Wagner, Volker

    2009-06-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a biflagellate and photosynthetic unicellular alga that has long fascinated scientists because it combines characteristics of both plants and animals. Chlamydomonas offers the simplicity of a unicellular organism that is amenable to genetic screening, molecular, and biochemical approaches, as well as to transformation of its nuclear, plastid, or mitochondrial genomes. Over the past decade, proteomics based studies of Chlamydomonas have provided major research contributions in the areas of photosynthesis, molecular biology, and evolution. This review refers to technical and biological aspects of proteomics studies that have been recently performed on the C. reinhardtii model organism.

  19. Platelet proteomics.

    PubMed

    Zufferey, Anne; Fontana, Pierre; Reny, Jean-Luc; Nolli, Severine; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2012-01-01

    Platelets are small cell fragments, produced by megakaryocytes, in the bone marrow. They play an important role in hemostasis and diverse thrombotic disorders. They are therefore primary targets of antithrombotic therapies. They are implicated in several pathophysiological pathways, such as inflammation or wound repair. In blood circulation, platelets are activated by several pathways including subendothelial matrix and thrombin, triggering the formation of the platelet plug. Studying their proteome is a powerful approach to understand their biology and function. However, particular attention must be paid to different experimental parameters, such as platelet quality and purity. Several technologies are involved during the platelet proteome processing, yielding information on protein identification, characterization, localization, and quantification. Recent technical improvements in proteomics combined with inter-disciplinary strategies, such as metabolomic, transcriptomics, and bioinformatics, will help to understand platelets biological mechanisms. Therefore, a comprehensive analysis of the platelet proteome under different environmental conditions may contribute to elucidate complex processes relevant to platelet function regarding bleeding disorders or platelet hyperreactivity and identify new targets for antiplatelet therapy.

  20. What Is Cancer Proteomics?

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov The National Institutes of Health Clinical Proteomics Technologies for Cancer Contact Us Intranet Sign Up for ... of proteomics that involves the application of proteomic technologies on clinical specimens such as blood. Cancer, in ...

  1. 1919: psychology and psychoanalysis, Cambridge and London - Myers, Jones and MacCurdy.

    PubMed

    Forrester, John

    2008-01-01

    Viewing the reception of psychoanalysis in Britain from Cambridge, the paper examines the intertwining histories of the post-War British Psychological Society and the founding of the British Psycho-Analytical Society, following the initiatives of the two principal psychological entrepreneurs of the era, Charles Myers and Ernest Jones, Reforms in Cambridge in which psychoanalysis played a significant part are analysed, including the foundation of a Clinic for Nervous Diseases and the establishment of a separate Department of Experimental Psychology. The career of J. T. MacCurdy, Jones's student and Lecturer in Psychopathology at Cambridge, is discussed.

  2. Communicator image and Myers-Briggs Type Indicator extraversion-introversion.

    PubMed

    Opt, Susan K; Loffredo, Donald A

    2003-11-01

    This study is an examination of the relationship between communicator image and Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) dimensions of extraversion-introversion. The authors found that individuals who prefer extraversion tend to have a more positive communicator image than those who prefer introversion. The results of this study support other research results showing that personality preferences differ in communication behaviors and traits, which could have implications for the individual's comfort and success in society. Results of this research also support the contention that communication behavior has biological aspects. PMID:14992348

  3. The upper bound of radiation energy in the Myers-Perry black hole collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwak, Bogeun; Lee, Bum-Hoon

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the upper bound of the radiation energy in the head-on collision of two Myers-Perry black holes. Initially, the two black holes are far away from each other, and they become one black hole after the collision. We have obtained the upper bound of the radiation energy thermodynamically allowed in the process. The upper bound of the radiation energy is obtained in general dimensions. The radiation bound depends on the alignments of rotating axes for a given initial condition due to spin-spin interaction. We have found that the collision may not be occurred for a initially ultra-spinning black hole.

  4. Small deformations of extreme five dimensional Myers-Perry black hole initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaee, Aghil; Kunduri, Hari K.

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate the existence of a one-parameter family of initial data for the vacuum Einstein equations in five dimensions representing small deformations of the extreme Myers-Perry black hole. This initial data set has `' symmetry and preserves the angular momenta and horizon geometry of the extreme solution. Our proof is based upon an earlier result of Dain and Gabach-Clement concerning the existence of -invariant initial data sets which preserve the geometry of extreme Kerr (at least for short times). In addition, we construct a general class of transverse, traceless symmetric rank 2 tensors in these geometries.

  5. First Response to "The Teacher as a Service Professional," by Donald A. Myers: Don't Settle for a Booby Prize

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikula, John

    2008-01-01

    In this response to Donald A. Myers's "The Teacher as a Service Professional" (2008 [this issue]), the author suggests that teacher educators should not buy into Myers's concept because such would sell them short and be counterproductive to the advancement of the teaching profession. Teacher educators must not give up their struggle to advance the…

  6. The relationship between life satisfaction, self-consciousness, and the Myers-Briggs type inventory dimensions.

    PubMed

    Harrington, R; Loffredo, D A

    2001-07-01

    The study was an investigation of the relationship between psychological well-being, life satisfaction, self-consciousness, and the four Myers-Briggs Type Indicator dimensions (MBTI; I. B. Myers & M. H. McCaulley, 1985). The participants were 97 college students (79 women and 18 men whose mean age was 31.4 years). All the students were administered four instruments, the Psychological Well-Being Inventory (C. D. Ryff, 1989), the Satisfaction With Life Scale (E. Diener, R. A. Emmons, R. J. Larsen, & S. Griffin, 1985), the Self-Consciousness Scale-Revised (M. F. Scheier & C. S. Carver, 1985), and the MBTI (Form G Self-Scoring). MANOVAs revealed significant differences on three of the four dimensions of the MBTI with extraverts showing higher psychological well-being and life satisfaction and lower self-consciousness than introverts. Intuition types scored higher in psychological well-being and lower in self-consciousness than Sensing types. Judging types scored higher in psychological well-being than Perceiving types. Correlational analyses showed that most dimensions of psychological well-being were negatively related to self-consciousness. The relationship between life satisfaction and personality variables is discussed. PMID:11728065

  7. Re-Engineering Your Office Environment: Matching Careers and Personality via the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPherson, Bill

    1995-01-01

    Provides a summary of the research on the use of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) in the workplace with implications for the practical uses of the MBTI. Suggests using the MBTI to aid the office professional, office manager, and office employee in training, career counseling and planning, team building, organizational development, and…

  8. A Longitudinal Study of Learning Style Preferences on the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and Learning Style Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salter, Daniel W.; Evans, Nancy J.; Forney, Deanna S.

    2006-01-01

    The stability of learning style preferences, as measured by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and Learning Style Inventory (LSI), was examined using a configural frequency analysis of differences. Thirteen cohorts (222 graduate students) completed the instruments 3 times during their programs. Implications for use of learning style measures…

  9. Gathering the Force Fields of Energy in Student Affairs: Staff Development Using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNickle, Phyllis J.; Veltman, Gayle C.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses application of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) as a staff development tool at Wichita State University in Kansas. Describes procedure for implementing the MBTI in staff development and presents results from MBTI use with 39 staff members. Recommends that student affairs divisions at other institutions use the MBTI in staff…

  10. Harlem Connections: Teaching Walter Dean Myers'"Scorpions" with Paul Laurence Dunbar's "The Sport of the Gods."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Mark I.

    1999-01-01

    Describes how the author, in a course titled "Literature for Adolescents" paired Walter Dean Myers' 1988 young adult novel, "Scorpions," with Paul Laurence Dunbar's 1902 novel for adults, "The Sport of the Gods." Describes student readers' responses to the pair of books, which focus on the difficulties of growing up in Harlem. (SR)

  11. Water quality study at the Congaree Swamp National monument of Myers Creek, Reeves Creek and Toms Creek. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Rikard, M.

    1991-11-01

    The Congaree Swamp National Monument is one of the last significant near virgin tracts of bottom land hardwood forests in the Southeast United States. The study documents a water quality monitoring program on Myers Creek, Reeves Creek and Toms Creek. Basic water quality parameters were analyzed. High levels of aluminum and iron were found, and recommendations were made for further monitoring.

  12. A Review of the Myers-Briggs Type Inventory: A Potential Training Tool for Human Services Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviles, Christopher B.

    The Myers-Briggs Type Inventory (MBTI) can be helpful in personal, career, and marriage counseling; conflict and stress management; team building; and understanding managerial and learning styles. It has great potential to be utilized in human services organizations for training purposes because it offers a way to conceptualize employee…

  13. Log-Linear Techniques for the Analysis of Categorical Data: A Demonstration with the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salter, Daniel W.

    2003-01-01

    Log-linear analysis (LLA) techniques for categorical variables are demonstrated and evaluated using data from the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. Symmetrical LLA and asymmetrical LLA address questions of association and inference, respectively. Configural frequency analysis is examined as a strategy for whole types research. LLA approaches seem…

  14. The Multifactorial Nature of Extraversion-Introversion in the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and Eysenck Personality Inventory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sipps, Gary J.; Alexander, Ralph A.

    1987-01-01

    The construct validity of extraversion-introversion was explored, as measured by the Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and the Eysenck Personality Inventory. Findings supported the complexity of extraversion-introversion. Two MBTI scales, Extraversion Introversion and Judging Perceiving, were factorially valid measures of impulsivity…

  15. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator[R] and Mainstream Psychology: Analysis and Evaluation of an Unresolved Hostility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, John B.

    2012-01-01

    The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI[R]) is widely used as a staff-development tool in the business and voluntary sectors. Its Psychological Type approach is found to be a valuable aid to understanding self and others and thus to enhancing effective team-working. This continuing and growing popularity is surprising in view of the disdain with…

  16. Third Response to "The Teacher as a Service Professional," by Donald A. Myers: Defining "Professionalism" Does Not Make It So

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, W. Robert

    2008-01-01

    It has been generally accepted that teaching does not meet the criteria of a profession, at least as exemplified by the more mature professions of medicine and law (Abbott, 1988; Darling-Hammond & Youngs, 2002; Etzioni, 1969; Howsam, Corrigan, Denemark, & Nash, 1976). Teaching is most often referred to as a semiprofession; Myers's (2008 [this…

  17. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator as a Tool to Facilitate Learning Outcomes for Team Building in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Priscilla; Wood, Cindy; Thornton, Barry

    2007-01-01

    Globalization and domestic competition are forcing businesses to rethink the human resources utilization process, and one method for considering again this challenge is creating a team culture. One key to this process for human resources development is the understanding of how to create the most successful teams. The use of the Myers-Briggs Type…

  18. Comparing University Students and Community College Students Learning Styles and Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) Preferences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbster, Douglas L.; And Others

    This document reports on a study to determine if there is a pattern between specific learning styles and Myers-Briggs Type Indicator preferences. The learning style inventory used for the study, "The Teaching and Learning Styles Survey for Adolescents (TLC)," is based on Jungian style preferences--thinker, feeler, sensor, and intuitor--each of…

  19. Incremental Validity of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator in Predicting Academic Major Selection of Undecided University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulver, Chad A.; Kelly, Kevin R.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the incremental validity of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) as a predictor of academic major choice. Undecided university students were administered the MBTI and Strong Interest Inventory (SII). Their academic major choice was recorded at the end of their fourth semester and categorized as realistic, investigative,…

  20. Considering Personality Type in Adult Learning: Using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator in Instructor Preparation at PricewaterhouseCoopers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daisley, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the feasibility of using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) as a framework for instructor development in a professional services training environment. It explores the consistency of MBTI with common adult learning theory, addresses questions on MBTI's reliability and validity, and explores the applicability of MBTI to the…

  1. Bimodal score distributions and the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator: fact or artifact?

    PubMed

    Bess, Tammy L; Harvey, Robert J

    2002-02-01

    We examined Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) score distributions computed using item response theory (IRT) to assess the generalizability of earlier bimodality reports that have been cited in support of the "type" versus "trait" view of personality. Using the BILOG IRT program to score a sample of approximately 12,000 individuals who participated in leadership development programs, theta score distributions for the 4 dimensions of the MBTI computed using 10 (the BILOG default) versus 50 quadrature points were compared. Results indicated that past reports of bimodality were artifacts caused by BILOG's default use of a small number of quadrature points; when larger numbers of points were used, score distributions became strongly center-weighted. Although our findings are not supportive of the "type"-based hypothesis, the extremely high correlations between theta scores (rs > .996) suggest that no practical differences would be expected as a function of the number-of-quadrature-points decision. PMID:11936208

  2. Stable bound orbits in six-dimensional Myers-Perry black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igata, Takahisa

    2015-07-01

    The existence of stable bound orbits of test particles is one of the most characteristic properties in black hole spacetimes. In higher-dimensional black holes, due to the dependence of gravity on the spacetime dimensions, there is no stable bound orbit balanced by Newtonian gravitational monopole force and centrifugal force, although this balance occurs in the four-dimensional Kerr black hole. In this paper, however, the existence of stable bound orbits of massive and massless particles is shown in six-dimensional singly spinning Myers-Perry black holes with a value of the spin parameter larger than a critical value. The innermost stable bound orbits and the outermost stable bound orbits are found on the rotational axis.

  3. Lipolytic proteomics.

    PubMed

    Schittmayer, Matthias; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Activity-based proteomics (ABP) employs small molecular probes to specifically label sets of enzymes based on their shared catalytic mechanism. Given that the vast majority of lipases belong to the family of serine hydrolases and share a nucleophilic active-site serine as part of a catalytic triad, activity-based probes are ideal tools to study lipases and lipolysis. Moreover, the ability of ABP to highlight or isolate specific subproteomes results in a massive decrease of sample complexity. Thereby, in-depth analysis of enzymes of interest with mass spectrometry becomes feasible. In this review, we cover probe design, technological developments, and applications of ABP of lipases, as well as give an overview of relevant identified proteins.

  4. Affirming Psychological Science--For Students, Teachers, and the Larger World: An Interview With David G. Myers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Jr., Harold L.

    2005-01-01

    David G. Myers received a BA in chemistry, magna cum laude from Whitworth College and an MA and PhD in psychology from the University of Iowa. Since 1982 he has been the John Dirk Werkman Professor of Psychology at Hope College. He is best known for his authorship of Psychology (2004), now in its 7th edition, and Social Psychology (2005a), now in…

  5. Geodesic motion in equal angular momenta Myers-Perry-AdS spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delsate, Térence; Rocha, Jorge V.; Santarelli, Raphael

    2015-10-01

    We study the geodesic motion of massive and massless test particles in the background of equally spinning Myers-Perry-anti-de Sitter (AdS) black holes in five dimensions. By adopting a coordinate system that makes manifest the cohomogeneity-1 property of these spacetimes, the equations of motion simplify considerably. This allows us to easily separate the radial motion from the angular part and to obtain solutions for angular trajectories in a compact closed form. For the radial motion, we focus our attention on spherical orbits. In particular, we determine the timelike innermost stable circular orbits (ISCOs) for these asymptotically AdS spacetimes, as well as the location of null circular orbits. We find that the ISCO dives below the ergosurface for black holes rotating close to extremality and merges with the event horizon exactly at extremality, in analogy with the four-dimensional Kerr case. For sufficiently massive black holes in AdS, there exists a spin parameter range in which the background spacetime is stable against super-radiance and the ISCO lies inside the ergoregion. Our results for massless geodesics show that there are no stable circular null orbits outside the horizon, but there exist such orbits inside the horizon, as well as around overextremal spacetimes, i.e., naked singularities. We also discuss how these orbits deform from the static to the rotating case.

  6. Myers-Perry black holes with scalar hair and a mass gap: Unequal spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herdeiro, Carlos; Kunz, Jutta; Radu, Eugen; Subagyo, Bintoro

    2015-09-01

    We construct rotating boson stars and Myers-Perry black holes with scalar hair (MPBHsSH) as fully non-linear solutions of five dimensional Einstein gravity minimally coupled to a complex, massive scalar field. The MPBHsSH are, in general, regular on and outside the horizon, asymptotically flat, and possess angular momentum in a single rotation plane. They are supported by rotation and have no static limit. Such hairy BHs may be thought of as bound states of boson stars and singly spinning, vacuum MPBHs and inherit properties of both these building blocks. When the horizon area shrinks to zero, the solutions reduce to (in a single plane) rotating boson stars; but the extremal limit also yields a zero area horizon, as for singly spinning MPBHs. Similarly to the case of equal angular momenta, and in contrast to Kerr black holes with scalar hair, singly spinning MPBHsSH are disconnected from the vacuum black holes, due to a mass gap. We observe that for the general case, with two unequal angular momenta, the equilibrium condition for the existence of MPBHsSH is w =m1Ω1 +m2Ω2, where Ωi are the horizon angular velocities in the two independent rotation planes and w ,mi, i = 1 , 2, are the scalar field's frequency and azimuthal harmonic indices.

  7. The association between Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and Psychiatry as the specialty choice

    PubMed Central

    Richard, George; Durkin, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this pilot study is to examine the association between Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and prospective psychiatry residents. Methods Forty-six American medical schools were contacted and asked to participate in this study. Data were collected and an aggregated list was compiled that included the following information: date of MBTI administration, academic year, MBTI form/version, residency match information and student demographic information. The data includes 835 American medical students who completed the MBTI survey and matched into a residency training program in the United States. All analyses were performed using R 3.1.2. Results The probability of an introvert matching to a psychiatry residency is no different than that of an extravert (p= 0.30). The probability of an intuitive individual matching to a psychiatry residency is no different than that of a sensing type (p=0.20). The probability of a feeling type matching to a psychiatry residency is no different than that of a thinking type (p= 0.50). The probability of a perceiving type matching to a psychiatry residency is no different than that of a judging type (p= 0.60). Conclusions Further analyses may elicit more accurate information regarding the personality profile of prospective psychiatry residents. The improvement in communication, team dynamics, mentor-mentee relationships and reduction in workplace conflicts are possible with the awareness of MBTI personality profiles. PMID:26851600

  8. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 91-090-2175, Caisson Platoon, Ft Myer, Virginia

    SciTech Connect

    Echt, A.

    1992-01-01

    In response to a request from an industrial hygiene technician with the Walter Reed Army Medical Center, an investigation was made of possible hazardous working conditions at the Caisson Platoon (SIC-0752), Ft. Myer, Virginia. The Caisson Platoon had 34 horses used in ceremonies. Specific concern was expressed about exposure of soldiers to air contaminants while cleaning the stables, levelling the grain bin, and working in the tack room. Exposures experienced by blacksmiths in the execution of their duties were also monitored. The author concludes that soldiers dyeing leather in the tack room were exposed to methylene-chloride (75092) and 2-ethoxyethanol (110805) above the NIOSH recommended exposure limits. Soldiers cleaning the stables were not overexposed to nuisance dust or endotoxin. Soldiers involved in levelling grain in the grain bin were exposed to grain dust for a brief period of nearly 7 times the 8 hour recommended exposure limit of 4mg/cu m. The exposures in the tack room could be reduced through the substitution of less hazardous ingredients in leather dyes, lacquers, and spray paints or through the use of local exhaust ventilation. The grain dust exposure can be controlled through the use of engineering controls, such as a vibratory shaker applied to the outside of the bin thus eliminating the need to enter the grain bin to level the grain. Local exhaust ventilation should be provided for welding operations in the blacksmith shop.

  9. Role of Heavy Atom Tunneling in Myers-Saito Cyclization of Cyclic Enyne-Cumulene Systems.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Sharmistha; Datta, Ayan

    2016-02-11

    Direct dynamics calculation using canonical variational transtition state theory (CVT) inclusive of small curvature tunneling (SCT) reveals heavy atom tunneling in Myers-Saito cyclization of 10- and 9-membered cyclic enyne-cumulene systems like 1,6-didehydro[10]annulene and derivative of neocarzinostatin, respectively. The pure density functional theory functional, BLYP at a 6-31+G (d,p) basis set reproduce the observed reaction energies and barriers within 1.0 kcal/mol. The calculated rate constants of cyclization inclusive of heavy atom tunneling (k(CVT+SCT) = 3.26 × 10(-4) s(-1) at 222 K; t1/2 = 35 min) are in excellent agreement with experiments (t1/2 ∼ 21-31 min). Both primary and secondary kinetic isotope effect (KIE) become enhanced significantly upon inclusion of quantum mechanical tunneling. An Arrhenius plot of KIE shows measurable curvature at the experimental temperature of 222 K. The translation vector for the cyclization reactions in the transition-states (TS) show significant motion of primary and secondary carbon atoms explaining the origin of large KIE. PMID:26785136

  10. Advanced proteomic liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fang; Smith, Richard D.; Shen, Yufeng

    2012-10-26

    Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry is the predominant platform used to analyze proteomics samples consisting of large numbers of proteins and their proteolytic products (e.g., truncated polypeptides) and spanning a wide range of relative concentrations. This review provides an overview of advanced capillary liquid chromatography techniques and methodologies that greatly improve separation resolving power and proteomics analysis coverage, sensitivity, and throughput.

  11. Intravenous Micronutrient Therapy (Myers' Cocktail) for Fibromyalgia: A Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ather; Njike, Valentine Yanchou; Northrup, Veronika; Sabina, Alyse B.; Williams, Anna-Leila; Liberti, Lauren S.; Perlman, Adam I.; Adelson, Harry

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Intravenous micronutrient therapy (IVMT), and specifically the Myers' Cocktail, is a popular approach for treating fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) among complementary and alternative medicine practitioners, but its efficacy is uncertain. This trial assessed the feasibility, safety, and provided insights into the efficacy of this therapy. Design This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study. Locations The study locations were an academic research center, teaching hospital, and affiliated Integrative Medicine Center in Derby, CT. Subjects The subjects were 34 adults with American College of Rheumatology (ACR)-defined FMS. Intervention Subjects were randomly assigned either to treatment (weekly infusions of IVMT) or to placebo (weekly infusions of lactated Ringer's solution) for 8 weeks. Outcome measures Primary outcome was change in the Tender Point Index, assessed 8 and 12 weeks after initiation. Secondary measures included a Visual Analog Scale to assess global pain, and validated measures of physical function (Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire), mood (Beck Depression Index), and quality of life (Health Status Questionnaire 2.0). Results Clinically significant improvements were noted (of a magnitude similar to other effective interventions). However, in part because of the high placebo response and the small sample size, no statistically significant differences were seen between groups, in any outcome measure, at 8 and 16 weeks. Statistically significant within-group differences were seen in both the intervention and placebo groups, demonstrating a treatment effect for both IVMT and placebo. At 8 weeks, the IVMT group experienced significantly improved tender points, pain, depression, and quality of life directly following treatment (all p ≤ 0.02), while the placebo group experienced significantly improved tender points only (p ≤ 0.05). The treatment effects of IVMT persisted at 4 weeks postintervention for tender

  12. Examination of the relations of the Myers-Briggs type indicator and the NEO-4 Personality Inventory in a Polish sample.

    PubMed

    Klinkosz, Waldemar; Iskra, Justyna

    2010-10-01

    The present study was designed to replicate McCrae and Costa's research findings on the relation of NEO-4 domains with the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator scales in a Polish sample of 300 psychology student volunteers (175 women, 125 men). Their mean age was 22.3 yr. (SD = 4.5). Correlations for scores on the MBTI scales with NEO-4 domains ranged from .72 to .02 for Extraversion, from -.60 to -.16 for Openness to experience, from -.56 to -.04 for Agreeableness, and from .55 to -.07 for Conscientiousness. Two domains assessed with the NEO-4 correspond to preferences measured by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. PMID:21117485

  13. Proteomic Findings in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Deepanwita; Tackett, Alan J

    2016-01-01

    Although the emergence of proteomics as an independent branch of science is fairly recent, within a short period of time it has contributed substantially in various disciplines. The tool of mass spectrometry has become indispensable in the analysis of complex biological samples. Clinical applications of proteomics include detection of predictive and diagnostic markers, understanding mechanism of action of drugs as well as resistance mechanisms against them and assessment of therapeutic efficacy and toxicity of drugs in patients. Here, we have summarized the major contributions of proteomics towards the study of melanoma, which is a deadly variety of skin cancer with a high mortality rate. PMID:27274624

  14. Proteomics data repositories

    PubMed Central

    Riffle, Michael; Eng, Jimmy K.

    2010-01-01

    The field of proteomics, particularly the application of mass spectrometry analysis to protein samples, is well-established and growing rapidly. Proteomics studies generate large volumes of raw experimental data and inferred biological results. To facilitate the dissemination of these data, centralized data repositories have been developed that make the data and results accessible to proteomics researchers and biologists alike. This review of proteomics data repositories focuses exclusively on freely-available, centralized data resources that disseminate or store experimental mass spectrometry data and results. The resources chosen reflect a current “snapshot” of the state of resources available with an emphasis placed on resources that may be of particular interest to yeast researchers. Resources are described in terms of their intended purpose and the features and functionality provided to users. PMID:19795424

  15. Analyzing the Relationship of Strengths to Personality Preferences and Vocational Interests Utilizing Clifton StrengthsFinder, Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, and Strong Interest Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenck, Paulette M.

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the history of vocational psychology, career counselors have constantly searched for, devised, and implemented practices and techniques to best prepare clients for the world of work. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between strengths to personality preference and vocational interests utilizing the Myers-Briggs…

  16. The Relationship between Personality Type and Software Usability Using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and the Software Usability Measurement Inventory (SUMI)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsey, William H.

    2011-01-01

    The study attempted to determine if there is a relationship between user's psychological personality types, measured by the Myers Briggs Type Indicator[R] (MBTI[R]) and distinct measures of usability measured by the Software Usability Measurement Inventory (SUMI). The study was expected to provide an answer to the following basic research…

  17. Proteomics Research in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Davalieva, Katarina; Maleva Kostovska, Ivana; Dwork, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Despite intense scientific efforts, the neuropathology and pathophysiology of schizophrenia are poorly understood. Proteomic studies, by testing large numbers of proteins for associations with disease, may contribute to the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of schizophrenia. They may also indicate the types and locations of cells most likely to harbor pathological alterations. Investigations using proteomic approaches have already provided much information on quantitative and qualitative protein patterns in postmortem brain tissue, peripheral tissues and body fluids. Different proteomic technologies such as 2-D PAGE, 2-D DIGE, SELDI-TOF, shotgun proteomics with label-based (ICAT), and label-free (MSE) quantification have been applied to the study of schizophrenia for the past 15 years. This review summarizes the results, mostly from brain but also from other tissues and bodily fluids, of proteomics studies in schizophrenia. Emphasis is given to proteomics platforms, varying sources of material, proposed candidate biomarkers emerging from comparative proteomics studies, and the specificity of the putative markers in terms of other mental illnesses. We also compare proteins altered in schizophrenia with reports of protein or mRNA sequences that are relatively enriched in specific cell types. While proteomic studies of schizophrenia find abnormalities in the expression of many proteins that are not cell type-specific, there appears to be a disproportionate representation of proteins whose synthesis and localization are highly enriched in one or more brain cell type compared with other types of brain cells. Two of the three proteins most commonly altered in schizophrenia are aldolase C and glial fibrillary acidic protein, astrocytic proteins with entirely different functions, but the studies are approximately evenly divided with regard to the direction of the differences and the concordance or discordance between the two proteins. Alterations of common myelin

  18. Advanced proteomic liquid chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Fang; Smith, Richard D.; Shen, Yufeng

    2012-01-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry is the predominant platform used to analyze proteomics samples consisting of large numbers of proteins and their proteolytic products (e.g., truncated polypeptides) and spanning a wide range of relative concentrations. This review provides an overview of advanced capillary liquid chromatography techniques and methodologies that greatly improve separation resolving power and proteomics analysis coverage, sensitivity, and throughput. PMID:22840822

  19. Nanoscaled Proteomic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yan; Jia, Lee

    2013-09-01

    Global proteomics research is currently hampered by the extremely complexity of the proteome and the absence of techniques like the polymerase chain reaction in genomics which enables multiplication of a single protein molecule. Since all the existing analytical technologies cannot overcome the detection limit and the dynamic concentration barrier, development of improved analytical technologies at nanoscale, ideally those that could recognize single protein molecule in the presence of high abundant of others, is a high priority for proteomics. In this chapter, we will show the state-of-the-art of nanoproteomics, i.e., the application of nanotechnologies to proteomics. Various nanomaterials including carbon nanomaterials, magnetic nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles, polymer and copolymer nanoparticles, metal and metal oxide nanoparticles have been used to improve sensitivity, specificity, and repeatability of proteomic analysis especially when the multidimensional separation system coupled with MALDI-TOF-MS is used. Among them, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the two most important nanomaterials: while GNPs are frequently utilized for enzyme immobilization, high throughput bioassay, selection of target-peptides and target-protein, CNTs including single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and mutiple-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have wide applications to electronic sensor, sensitive immunodetection, nanobiocatalysis, affinity probes, MALDI matrices, protein digestion, peptides enrichment and analysis. In perspectives, a deep understanding of the structures and property of nanomaterials and interdisciplinary applications of nanotechnology to proteomics will certainly be revolutionary and intellectually rewarding.

  20. Collaborations in Proteomics Research - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), through the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR), has signed two Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) in the sharing of proteomics reagents and protocols

  1. Case study: technology initiative led to advanced lead optimization screening processes at Bristol-Myers Squibb, 2004-2009.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Litao; Cvijic, Mary Ellen; Lippy, Jonathan; Myslik, James; Brenner, Stephen L; Binnie, Alastair; Houston, John G

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we review the key solutions that enabled evolution of the lead optimization screening support process at Bristol-Myers Squibb (BMS) between 2004 and 2009. During this time, technology infrastructure investment and scientific expertise integration laid the foundations to build and tailor lead optimization screening support models across all therapeutic groups at BMS. Together, harnessing advanced screening technology platforms and expanding panel screening strategy led to a paradigm shift at BMS in supporting lead optimization screening capability. Parallel SAR and structure liability relationship (SLR) screening approaches were first and broadly introduced to empower more-rapid and -informed decisions about chemical synthesis strategy and to broaden options for identifying high-quality drug candidates during lead optimization.

  2. Proteomics analysis of human oligodendroglioma proteome.

    PubMed

    Khaghani-Razi-Abad, Solmaz; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Pooladi, Mehdi; Entezari, Maliheh; Kazemi, Elham

    2015-09-10

    Proteomics analyses enable the identification and quantitation of proteins. From a purely clinical perspective, the application of proteomics based on innovations, may greatly affect the future management of malignant brain tumors. This optimism is based on four main reasons: diagnosis, prognosis, selection of targeted therapy based on molecular profile of the brain tumor and monitoring therapeutic response, or resistance. We extracted the proteins of tumor and normal brain tissues, and then evaluated the protein purity by Bradford test. In this study, we separated the proteins by two-dimensional (2DG) gel electrophoresis methods. Then spots were analyzed, compared using statistical data and specific software and were identified by pH isoelectric, molecular weights and data banks. The protein profiles were determined using 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry approaches. Simple statistical tests were used to establish a putative hierarchy in which the change in protein level was ranked according to a cut-off point with p<0.05. The 2D gel showed a total of 1328 spots among which 157 spots were under-expressed and 276 spots were overexpressed. Most proteins are subjects to post-translational modifications, where amino acid residues may be chemically modified or conjugated by small proteins like ubiquitin. Proteomics is a powerful way to identifying multiple proteins which are altered following a neuropharmacological intervention in a CNS disease. PMID:26002447

  3. Proteomic Assessment of Poultry Spermatozoa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully characterizing the protein composition of spermatozoa is the first step in utilizing proteomics to delineate the function of sperm proteins. To date, sperm proteome maps have been partially developed for the human, mouse, rat, bull and several invertebrates. Here we report the first proteomic...

  4. Beer and wort proteomics.

    PubMed

    Iimure, Takashi; Kihara, Makoto; Sato, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Proteome analysis provides a way to identify proteins related to the quality traits of beer. A number of protein species in beer and wort have been identified by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis combined with enzyme digestion such as trypsin, followed by mass spectrometry analyses and/or liquid chromatography mass/mass spectrometry. In addition, low molecular weight polypeptides in beer have been identified by the combination of non-enzyme digestion and mass analyses. These data sets of various molecular weight polypeptides (i.e., proteomes) provide a platform for analyzing protein functions in beer. Several novel proteins related to beer quality traits such as foam stability and haze formation have been identified by analyzing these proteomes. Some of the proteins have been applied to the development of efficient protein or DNA markers for trait selection in malting barley breeding. In this chapter, recent proteome studies of beer and wort are reviewed, and the methods and protocols of beer and wort proteome analysis are described.

  5. The Cysteine Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Chandler, Joshua D.; Jones, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    The cysteine (Cys) proteome is a major component of the adaptive interface between the genome and the exposome. The thiol moiety of Cys undergoes a range of biologic modifications enabling biological switching of structure and reactivity. These biological modifications include sulfenylation and disulfide formation, formation of higher oxidation states, S-nitrosylation, persulfidation, metallation, and other modifications. Extensive knowledge about these systems and their compartmentalization now provides a foundation to develop advanced integrative models of Cys proteome regulation. In particular, detailed understanding of redox signaling pathways and sensing networks is becoming available to discriminate network structures. This research focuses attention on the need for atlases of Cys modifications to develop systems biology models. Such atlases will be especially useful for integrative studies linking the Cys proteome to imaging and other omics platforms, providing a basis for improved redox-based therapeutics. Thus, a framework is emerging to place the Cys proteome as a complement to the quantitative proteome in the omics continuum connecting the genome to the exposome. PMID:25843657

  6. Environmental proteomics and metallomics.

    PubMed

    López-Barea, Juan; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis

    2006-04-01

    Monitoring environmental pollution using biomarkers requires detailed knowledge about the markers, and many only allow a partial assessment of pollution. New proteomic methods (environmental proteomics) can identify proteins that, after validation, might be useful as alternative biomarkers, although this approach also has its limitations, derived mainly from their application to non-model organisms. Initial studies using environmental proteomics were carried out in animals exposed to model pollutants, and led to the concept of protein expression signatures. Experiments have been carried out in model organisms (yeast, Arabidopsis, rat cells, or mice) exposed to model contaminants. Over the last few years, proteomics has been applied to organisms from ecosystems with different pollution levels, forming the basis of an environmental branch in proteomics. Another focus is connected with the presence of metals bound to biomolecules, which adds an additional dimension to metal-biomolecule and metalloprotein characterization - the field of metallomics. The metallomic approach considers the metallome: a whole individual metal or metalloid species within a cell or tissue. A metallomic analytical approach (MAA) is proposed as a new tool to study and identify metalloproteins.

  7. Blood-related proteomics.

    PubMed

    Liumbruno, Giancarlo; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Grazzini, Giuliano; Zolla, Lello

    2010-01-01

    Blood-related proteomics is an emerging field, recently gaining momentum. Indeed, a wealth of data is now available and a plethora of groups has contributed to add pieces to the jigsaw puzzle of protein complexity within plasma and blood cells. In this review article we purported to sail across the mare magnum of the actual knowledge in this research endeavour. The main strides in proteomic investigations on red blood cells, platelets, plasma and white blood cells are hereby presented in a chronological order. Moreover, a glance is given at prospective studies which promise to shift the focus of attention from the end product to its provider, the donor, in a sort of Kantian "Copernican revolution". A well-rounded portrait of the usefulness of proteomics in blood-related research is accurately given. In particular, proteomic tools could be adopted to follow the main steps of the blood-banking production processes (a comparison of collection methods, pathogen inactivation techniques, storage protocols). Thus proteomics has been recently transformed from a mere basic-research extremely-expensive toy into a dramatically-sensitive and efficient eye-lens to either delve into the depths of the molecular mechanisms of blood and blood components or to establish quality parameters in the blood-banking production chain totally anew. PMID:19567275

  8. Proteomics in alcohol research.

    PubMed

    Anni, Helen; Israel, Yedy

    2002-01-01

    The proteome is the complete set of proteins in an organism. It is considerably larger and more complex than the genome--the collection of genes that encodes these proteins. Proteomics deals with the qualitative and quantitative study of the proteome under physiological and pathological conditions (e.g., after exposure to alcohol, which causes major changes in numerous proteins of different cell types). To map large proteomes such as the human proteome, proteins from discrete tissues, cells, cell components, or biological fluids are first separated by high-resolution two-dimensional electrophoresis and multidimensional liquid chromatography. Then, individual proteins are identified by mass spectrometry. The huge amount of data acquired using these techniques is analyzed and assembled by fast computers and bioinformatics tools. Using these methods, as well as other technological advances, alcohol researchers can gain a better understanding of how alcohol globally influences protein structure and function, protein-protein interactions, and protein networks. This knowledge ultimately will assist in the early diagnosis and prognosis of alcoholism and the discovery of new drug targets and medications for treatment.

  9. Establishing Substantial Equivalence: Proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovegrove, Alison; Salt, Louise; Shewry, Peter R.

    Wheat is a major crop in world agriculture and is consumed after processing into a range of food products. It is therefore of great importance to determine the consequences (intended and unintended) of transgenesis in wheat and whether genetically modified lines are substantially equivalent to those produced by conventional plant breeding. Proteomic analysis is one of several approaches which can be used to address these questions. Two-dimensional PAGE (2D PAGE) remains the most widely available method for proteomic analysis, but is notoriously difficult to reproduce between laboratories. We therefore describe methods which have been developed as standard operating procedures in our laboratory to ensure the reproducibility of proteomic analyses of wheat using 2D PAGE analysis of grain proteins.

  10. The proteomics quantification dilemma.

    PubMed

    Jungblut, Peter R

    2014-07-31

    Proteomics is dominated today by the protein expression discourse, which favorites the bottom-up approach because of its high throughput and its high sensitivity. For quantification this proceeding is misleading, if a protein is present with more than one protein species in the sample to be analyzed. The protein speciation discourse considers this more realistic situation and affords the top-down procedures or at least a separation of the protein species in advance to identification and quantification. Today all of the top-down procedures are one order of magnitude less sensitive than the bottom-up ones. To increase sensitivity and to increase throughput are major challenges for proteomics of the next years. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 20years of Proteomics in memory of Viatliano Pallini. Guest Editors: Luca Bini, Juan J. Calvete, Natacha Turck, Denis Hochstrasser and Jean-Charles Sanchez. PMID:24681132

  11. High-Throughput Proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhaorui; Wu, Si; Stenoien, David L.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2014-06-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based high-throughput proteomics is the core technique for large-scale protein characterization. Due to the extreme complexity of proteomes, sophisticated separation techniques and advanced MS instrumentation have been developed to extend coverage and enhance dynamic range and sensitivity. In this review, we discuss the separation and prefractionation techniques applied for large-scale analysis in both bottom-up (i.e., peptide-level) and top-down (i.e., protein-level) proteomics. Different approaches for quantifying peptides or intact proteins, including label-free and stable-isotope-labeling strategies, are also discussed. In addition, we present a brief overview of different types of mass analyzers and fragmentation techniques as well as selected emerging techniques.

  12. Proteomics: capacity versus utility.

    PubMed

    Harry, J L; Wilkins, M R; Herbert, B R; Packer, N H; Gooley, A A; Williams, K L

    2000-04-01

    Until recently scientists studied genes or proteins one at a time. With improvements in technology, new tools have become available to study the complex interactions that occur in biological systems. Global studies are required to do this, and these will involve genomic and proteomic approaches. High-throughput methods are necessary in each case because the number of genes and proteins in even the simplest of organisms are immense. In the developmental phase of genomics, the emphasis was on the generation and assembly of large amounts of nucleic acid sequence data. Proteomics is currently in a phase of technological development and establishment, and demonstrating the capacity for high throughput is a major challenge. However, funding bodies (both in the public and private sector) are increasingly focused on the usefulness of this capacity. Here we review the current state of proteome research in terms of capacity and utility.

  13. Biophotonics applied to proteomics.

    PubMed

    Faupel, Michel; Bonenfant, Débora; Schindler, Patrick; Bertrand, Eric; Mueller, Dieter; Stoeckli, Markus; Bitsch, Francis; Rohner, Tatiana; Staab, Dieter; Van Oostrum, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Since the completion of the human genome sequencing, our understanding of gene and protein function and their involvement in physiopathological states has increased dramatically, partly due to technological developments in photonics. Photonics is a very active area where new developments occur on a weekly basis, while established tools are adapted to fulfill the needs of other disciplines like genomics and proteomics. Biophotonics emerged at the interface of photonics and biology as a very straightforward and efficient approach to observe and manipulate living systems. In this chapter, we review the current applications of photonics and imaging to proteomics from 2D gels analysis to molecular imaging.

  14. Pressurized Pepsin Digestion in Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    López-Ferrer, Daniel; Petritis, Konstantinos; Robinson, Errol W.; Hixson, Kim K.; Tian, Zhixin; Lee, Jung Hwa; Lee, Sang-Won; Tolić, Nikola; Weitz, Karl K.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Smith, Richard D.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2011-01-01

    Integrated top-down bottom-up proteomics combined with on-line digestion has great potential to improve the characterization of protein isoforms in biological systems and is amendable to high throughput proteomics experiments. Bottom-up proteomics ultimately provides the peptide sequences derived from the tandem MS analyses of peptides after the proteome has been digested. Top-down proteomics conversely entails the MS analyses of intact proteins for more effective characterization of genetic variations and/or post-translational modifications. Herein, we describe recent efforts toward efficient integration of bottom-up and top-down LC-MS-based proteomics strategies. Since most proteomics separations utilize acidic conditions, we exploited the compatibility of pepsin (where the optimal digestion conditions are at low pH) for integration into bottom-up and top-down proteomics work flows. Pressure-enhanced pepsin digestions were successfully performed and characterized with several standard proteins in either an off-line mode using a Barocycler or an on-line mode using a modified high pressure LC system referred to as a fast on-line digestion system (FOLDS). FOLDS was tested using pepsin and a whole microbial proteome, and the results were compared against traditional trypsin digestions on the same platform. Additionally, FOLDS was integrated with a RePlay configuration to demonstrate an ultrarapid integrated bottom-up top-down proteomics strategy using a standard mixture of proteins and a monkey pox virus proteome. PMID:20627868

  15. The Role of the Myers-Briggs Personality Type and Emotional Intelligence in Marital Satisfaction among Married Female Students at Tehran University.

    PubMed

    Shirzad, Galin

    2016-01-01

    The present descriptive correlational study was conducted to predict the role of emotional intelligence and the Myers-Briggs personality type in marital satisfaction in married female students Tehran University in 2015. The study population consisted of all the married female students at Tehran University who visited Iran MBTI center between 22.04.2015 and 21.06.2015. A total of 140 students were selected as the study samples. Data were collected using the Myer-Briggs Type Indicator, the Bar-On Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire and the Enrich Marital Satisfaction Scale and were then analyzed in SPSS-20 using the multivariate regression analysis. The results obtained showed that emotional intelligence (interpersonal and intra-personal skills) and personality type (extraverted and structured) can predict marital satisfaction. PMID:27302443

  16. Supporting open access to clinical trial data for researchers: The Duke Clinical Research Institute-Bristol-Myers Squibb Supporting Open Access to Researchers Initiative.

    PubMed

    Pencina, Michael J; Louzao, Darcy M; McCourt, Brian J; Adams, Monique R; Tayyabkhan, Rehbar H; Ronco, Peter; Peterson, Eric D

    2016-02-01

    There are growing calls for sponsors to increase transparency by providing access to clinical trial data. In response, Bristol-Myers Squibb and the Duke Clinical Research Institute have collaborated on a new initiative, Supporting Open Access to Researchers. The aim is to facilitate open sharing of Bristol-Myers Squibb trial data with interested researchers. Key features of the Supporting Open Access to Researchers data sharing model include an independent review committee that ensures expert consideration of each proposal, stringent data deidentification/anonymization and protection of patient privacy, requirement of prespecified statistical analysis plans, and independent review of manuscripts before submission for publication. We believe that these approaches will promote open science by allowing investigators to verify trial results as well as to pursue interesting secondary uses of trial data without compromising scientific integrity. PMID:26856217

  17. Xylem sap proteomics.

    PubMed

    de Bernonville, Thomas Dugé; Albenne, Cécile; Arlat, Matthieu; Hoffmann, Laurent; Lauber, Emmanuelle; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Proteomic analysis of xylem sap has recently become a major field of interest to understand several biological questions related to plant development and responses to environmental clues. The xylem sap appears as a dynamic fluid undergoing changes in its proteome upon abiotic and biotic stresses. Unlike cell compartments which are amenable to purification in sufficient amount prior to proteomic analysis, the xylem sap has to be collected in particular conditions to avoid contamination by intracellular proteins and to obtain enough material. A model plant like Arabidopsis thaliana is not suitable for such an analysis because efficient harvesting of xylem sap is difficult. The analysis of the xylem sap proteome also requires specific procedures to concentrate proteins and to focus on proteins predicted to be secreted. Indeed, xylem sap proteins appear to be synthesized and secreted in the root stele or to originate from dying differentiated xylem cells. This chapter describes protocols to collect xylem sap from Brassica species and to prepare total and N-glycoprotein extracts for identification of proteins by mass spectrometry analyses and bioinformatics.

  18. “Seed Proteomics"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteomic analysis of seeds encounters some specific problems that do not impinge on analyses of other plant cells, tissues, or organs. There are anatomic considerations. Seeds comprise the seed coat, the storage organ(s), and the embryonic axis. Are these to be studied individually or as a compo...

  19. Proteomics of extremophiles.

    PubMed

    Burg, Dominic; Ng, Charmaine; Ting, Lily; Cavicchioli, Ricardo

    2011-08-01

    Functional genomic approaches, such as proteomics, greatly enhance the value of genome sequences by providing a global level assessment of which genes are expressed, when genes are expressed and at what cellular levels gene products are synthesized. With over 1000 complete genome sequences of different microorganisms available, and DNA sequencing for environmental samples (metagenomes) producing vast amounts of gene sequence data, there is a real opportunity and a clear need to generate associated functional genomic data to learn about the source microorganisms. In contrast to the technological advances that have led to the accelerated rate and ease at which DNA sequence data can be generated, mass spectrometry based proteomics remains a technically sophisticated and exacting science. In recognition of the need to make proteomics more accessible to a growing number of environmental microbiologists so that the 'functional genomics gap' may be bridged, this review strives to demystify proteomic technologies and describe ways in which they have been applied, and more importantly, can be applied to study the physiology and ecology of extremophiles.

  20. Genomes to Proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Panisko, Ellen A.; Grigoriev, Igor; Daly, Don S.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Baker, Scott E.

    2009-03-01

    Biologists are awash with genomic sequence data. In large part, this is due to the rapid acceleration in the generation of DNA sequence that occurred as public and private research institutes raced to sequence the human genome. In parallel with the large human genome effort, mostly smaller genomes of other important model organisms were sequenced. Projects following on these initial efforts have made use of technological advances and the DNA sequencing infrastructure that was built for the human and other organism genome projects. As a result, the genome sequences of many organisms are available in high quality draft form. While in many ways this is good news, there are limitations to the biological insights that can be gleaned from DNA sequences alone; genome sequences offer only a bird's eye view of the biological processes endemic to an organism or community. Fortunately, the genome sequences now being produced at such a high rate can serve as the foundation for other global experimental platforms such as proteomics. Proteomic methods offer a snapshot of the proteins present at a point in time for a given biological sample. Current global proteomics methods combine enzymatic digestion, separations, mass spectrometry and database searching for peptide identification. One key aspect of proteomics is the prediction of peptide sequences from mass spectrometry data. Global proteomic analysis uses computational matching of experimental mass spectra with predicted spectra based on databases of gene models that are often generated computationally. Thus, the quality of gene models predicted from a genome sequence is crucial in the generation of high quality peptide identifications. Once peptides are identified they can be assigned to their parent protein. Proteins identified as expressed in a given experiment are most useful when compared to other expressed proteins in a larger biological context or biochemical pathway. In this chapter we will discuss the automatic

  1. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 86-018-1758, Robbins and Myers, Incorporated, Moyno Products Division, Springfield, Ohio. [Vitiligo

    SciTech Connect

    O'Malley, M.A.; Mathias, C.G.T.

    1986-12-01

    In response to a request from Robbins and Myers, Inc., an investigation was made of a possible health hazard at its Moyno Products Division, Springfield, Ohio. A case of vitiligo, possibly related to working with rubber products in pump manufacture was identified by a dermatologist. Uncured and cured rubber was found to contain 2,4-di-tertiary-butyl-phenol (DTBP) (0.01 to 0.03%) and para-tertiary-butyl-phenol (too low to quantitate). This class of compounds has been associated with vitiligo. Medical survey and examinations revealed four cases of active vitiligo. Its presence was significantly associated with highest exposure to rubber. Rubber department workers had a 22-fold higher risk for the condition compared to other employees. Comparing the four observed cases with an expected 1.1 cases (Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) yielded a standardized morbidity ratio of 3.6. The authors conclude that exposure to DTBP in rubber is the cause of vitiligo in these workers. Recommendations include testing rubber samples for contaminants, modification of work practices, and medical screening of exposed workers.

  2. The Human Eye Proteome Project: perspectives on an emerging proteome.

    PubMed

    Semba, Richard D; Enghild, Jan J; Venkatraman, Vidya; Dyrlund, Thomas F; Van Eyk, Jennifer E

    2013-08-01

    There are an estimated 285 million people with visual impairment worldwide, of whom 39 million are blind. The pathogenesis of many eye diseases remains poorly understood. The human eye is currently an emerging proteome that may provide key insight into the biological pathways of disease. We review proteomic investigations of the human eye and present a catalogue of 4842 nonredundant proteins identified in human eye tissues and biofluids to date. We highlight the need to identify new biomarkers for eye diseases using proteomics. Recent advances in proteomics do now allow the identification of hundreds to thousands of proteins in tissues and fluids, characterization of various PTMs and simultaneous quantification of multiple proteins. To facilitate proteomic studies of the eye, the Human Eye Proteome Project (HEPP) was organized in September 2012. The HEPP is one of the most recent components of the Biology/Disease-driven Human Proteome Project (B/D-HPP) whose overarching goal is to support the broad application of state-of-the-art measurements of proteins and proteomes by life scientists studying the molecular mechanisms of biological processes and human disease. The large repertoire of investigative proteomic tools has great potential to transform vision science and enhance understanding of physiology and disease processes that affect sight.

  3. Proteome research in food science.

    PubMed

    Pischetsrieder, Monika; Baeuerlein, Rainer

    2009-09-01

    The proteome is the totality of proteins present in a biological sample. In contrast to the static genome, the proteome is highly dynamic, influenced by the genome and many external factors, such as the state of development, tissue type, metabolic state, and various interactions. Thus, the proteome reflects very closely the biological (and chemical) processes occurring in a system. For proteome analysis, gel based and shotgun methods are most widely applied. Because of the potential to generate a systematic view of protein composition and biological as well as chemical interactions, the application of proteome analysis in food science is steadily growing. This tutorial review introduces several fields in food science, where proteomics has been successfully applied: analysis of food composition, safety assessment of genetically modified food, the search for marker proteins for food authentication, identification of food allergens, systematic analysis of the physiological activity of food, analysis of the effects of processing on food proteins and the improvement of food quality.

  4. Proteomics Discovery of Disease Biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Ahram, Mamoun; Petricoin, Emanuel F

    2008-01-01

    Recent technological developments in proteomics have shown promising initiatives in identifying novel biomarkers of various diseases. Such technologies are capable of investigating multiple samples and generating large amount of data end-points. Examples of two promising proteomics technologies are mass spectrometry, including an instrument based on surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization, and protein microarrays. Proteomics data must, however, undergo analytical processing using bioinformatics. Due to limitations in proteomics tools including shortcomings in bioinformatics analysis, predictive bioinformatics can be utilized as an alternative strategy prior to performing elaborate, high-throughput proteomics procedures. This review describes mass spectrometry, protein microarrays, and bioinformatics and their roles in biomarker discovery, and highlights the significance of integration between proteomics and bioinformatics.

  5. Proteomics of the Lysosome

    PubMed Central

    Lübke, Torben; Lobel, Peter; Sleat, David

    2009-01-01

    Defects in lysosomal function have been associated with numerous monogenic human diseases typically classified as lysosomal storage diseases. However, there is increasing evidence that lysosomal proteins are also involved in more widespread human diseases including cancer and Alzheimer disease. Thus, there is a continuing interest in understanding the cellular functions of the lysosome and an emerging approach to this is the identification of its constituent proteins by proteomic analyses. To date, the mammalian lysosome has been shown to contain ~ 60 soluble luminal proteins and ~25 transmembrane proteins. However, recent proteomic studies based upon affinity purification of soluble components or subcellular fractionation to obtain both soluble and membrane components suggest that there may be many more of both classes of protein resident within this organelle than previously appreciated. Discovery of such proteins has important implications for understanding the function and the dynamics of the lysosome but can also lead the way towards the discovery of the genetic basis for human diseases of hitherto unknown etiology. Here, we describe current approaches to lysosomal proteomics and data interpretation and review the new lysosomal proteins that have recently emerged from such studies. PMID:18977398

  6. The proteome of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Nascimento, Juliana M; Martins-de-Souza, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    On observing schizophrenia from a clinical point of view up to its molecular basis, one may conclude that this is likely to be one of the most complex human disorders to be characterized in all aspects. Such complexity is the reflex of an intricate combination of genetic and environmental components that influence brain functions since pre-natal neurodevelopment, passing by brain maturation, up to the onset of disease and disease establishment. The perfect function of tissues, organs, systems, and finally the organism depends heavily on the proper functioning of cells. Several lines of evidence, including genetics, genomics, transcriptomics, neuropathology, and pharmacology, have supported the idea that dysfunctional cells are causative to schizophrenia. Together with the above-mentioned techniques, proteomics have been contributing to understanding the biochemical basis of schizophrenia at the cellular and tissue level through the identification of differentially expressed proteins and consequently their biochemical pathways, mostly in the brain tissue but also in other cells. In addition, mass spectrometry-based proteomics have identified and precisely quantified proteins that may serve as biomarker candidates to prognosis, diagnosis, and medication monitoring in peripheral tissue. Here, we review all data produced by proteomic investigation in the last 5 years using tissue and/or cells from schizophrenic patients, focusing on postmortem brain tissue and peripheral blood serum and plasma. This information has provided integrated pictures of the biochemical systems involved in the pathobiology, and has suggested potential biomarkers, and warrant potential targets to alternative treatment therapies to schizophrenia. PMID:27336025

  7. Relationship between DHI production values and Myers-Briggs type indicator as a measure of management ability.

    PubMed

    Young, A J; Walters, J L

    2002-08-01

    Associations between owners' Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) preferences (E = extraversion vs. I = introversion; S = sensing vs. N = intuition; T = thinking vs F = feeling; J = judging vs. P = perceiving) and 21 Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) production variables were determined on 60 farms. Of 60 dairy farmers participating, 51 were from Holstein farms (85%) and nine from farms with other breeds, primarily Jersey. Cows were milked either twice (n = 44 herds, 73%) or three times (n = 16) per day. Farmers were evenly split between the "E" and "I" dimension, whereas 93% of the farmers were "S," 75% "T," and 62% "J.". Individuals with a preference for the "I" dimension were associated with higher peak and mature equivalent milk yield than those individuals with a preference for the "E" dimension. The "T" and "J" dimensions had a significantly higher percentage of the herd with records usable by USDA and a lower percentage of animals pregnant by the goal set by the dairy producer than the "F" and "P" dimensions. Herds managed by individuals with a combination preference of "E" and "P" produced 7 to 10 kg of 3.5% FCM/cow per day less or 1,820 to 2,752 kg/ cow RHA ECM less than other combinations of the "E-I" and "J-P" dimensions. Those herds also had longer days dry and a lower percentage of records usable by USDA, suggesting that the "E-P" preference is less favorably associated to those measures of herd performance. The MBTI had limited association with many DHI production variables, but relationships to measures of labor and business management should be examined. PMID:12214998

  8. Relationship between DHI production values and Myers-Briggs type indicator as a measure of management ability.

    PubMed

    Young, A J; Walters, J L

    2002-08-01

    Associations between owners' Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) preferences (E = extraversion vs. I = introversion; S = sensing vs. N = intuition; T = thinking vs F = feeling; J = judging vs. P = perceiving) and 21 Dairy Herd Improvement (DHI) production variables were determined on 60 farms. Of 60 dairy farmers participating, 51 were from Holstein farms (85%) and nine from farms with other breeds, primarily Jersey. Cows were milked either twice (n = 44 herds, 73%) or three times (n = 16) per day. Farmers were evenly split between the "E" and "I" dimension, whereas 93% of the farmers were "S," 75% "T," and 62% "J.". Individuals with a preference for the "I" dimension were associated with higher peak and mature equivalent milk yield than those individuals with a preference for the "E" dimension. The "T" and "J" dimensions had a significantly higher percentage of the herd with records usable by USDA and a lower percentage of animals pregnant by the goal set by the dairy producer than the "F" and "P" dimensions. Herds managed by individuals with a combination preference of "E" and "P" produced 7 to 10 kg of 3.5% FCM/cow per day less or 1,820 to 2,752 kg/ cow RHA ECM less than other combinations of the "E-I" and "J-P" dimensions. Those herds also had longer days dry and a lower percentage of records usable by USDA, suggesting that the "E-P" preference is less favorably associated to those measures of herd performance. The MBTI had limited association with many DHI production variables, but relationships to measures of labor and business management should be examined.

  9. Molecular Biologist's Guide to Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Paul R.; Haystead, Timothy A. J.

    2002-01-01

    The emergence of proteomics, the large-scale analysis of proteins, has been inspired by the realization that the final product of a gene is inherently more complex and closer to function than the gene itself. Shortfalls in the ability of bioinformatics to predict both the existence and function of genes have also illustrated the need for protein analysis. Moreover, only through the study of proteins can posttranslational modifications be determined, which can profoundly affect protein function. Proteomics has been enabled by the accumulation of both DNA and protein sequence databases, improvements in mass spectrometry, and the development of computer algorithms for database searching. In this review, we describe why proteomics is important, how it is conducted, and how it can be applied to complement other existing technologies. We conclude that currently, the most practical application of proteomics is the analysis of target proteins as opposed to entire proteomes. This type of proteomics, referred to as functional proteomics, is always driven by a specific biological question. In this way, protein identification and characterization has a meaningful outcome. We discuss some of the advantages of a functional proteomics approach and provide examples of how different methodologies can be utilized to address a wide variety of biological problems. PMID:11875127

  10. Proteome Studies of Filamentous Fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Scott E.; Panisko, Ellen A.

    2011-04-20

    The continued fast pace of fungal genome sequence generation has enabled proteomic analysis of a wide breadth of organisms that span the breadth of the Kingdom Fungi. There is some phylogenetic bias to the current catalog of fungi with reasonable DNA sequence databases (genomic or EST) that could be analyzed at a global proteomic level. However, the rapid development of next generation sequencing platforms has lowered the cost of genome sequencing such that in the near future, having a genome sequence will no longer be a time or cost bottleneck for downstream proteomic (and transcriptomic) analyses. High throughput, non-gel based proteomics offers a snapshot of proteins present in a given sample at a single point in time. There are a number of different variations on the general method and technologies for identifying peptides in a given sample. We present a method that can serve as a “baseline” for proteomic studies of fungi.

  11. Proteomics research in India: an update.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Panga Jaipal; Atak, Apurva; Ghantasala, Saicharan; Kumar, Saurabh; Gupta, Shabarni; Prasad, T S Keshava; Zingde, Surekha M; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2015-09-01

    After a successful completion of the Human Genome Project, deciphering the mystery surrounding the human proteome posed a major challenge. Despite not being largely involved in the Human Genome Project, the Indian scientific community contributed towards proteomic research along with the global community. Currently, more than 76 research/academic institutes and nearly 145 research labs are involved in core proteomic research across India. The Indian researchers have been major contributors in drafting the "human proteome map" along with international efforts. In addition to this, virtual proteomics labs, proteomics courses and remote triggered proteomics labs have helped to overcome the limitations of proteomics education posed due to expensive lab infrastructure. The establishment of Proteomics Society, India (PSI) has created a platform for the Indian proteomic researchers to share ideas, research collaborations and conduct annual conferences and workshops. Indian proteomic research is really moving forward with the global proteomics community in a quest to solve the mysteries of proteomics. A draft map of the human proteome enhances the enthusiasm among intellectuals to promote proteomic research in India to the world.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India.

  12. Proteomics research in India: an update.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Panga Jaipal; Atak, Apurva; Ghantasala, Saicharan; Kumar, Saurabh; Gupta, Shabarni; Prasad, T S Keshava; Zingde, Surekha M; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2015-09-01

    After a successful completion of the Human Genome Project, deciphering the mystery surrounding the human proteome posed a major challenge. Despite not being largely involved in the Human Genome Project, the Indian scientific community contributed towards proteomic research along with the global community. Currently, more than 76 research/academic institutes and nearly 145 research labs are involved in core proteomic research across India. The Indian researchers have been major contributors in drafting the "human proteome map" along with international efforts. In addition to this, virtual proteomics labs, proteomics courses and remote triggered proteomics labs have helped to overcome the limitations of proteomics education posed due to expensive lab infrastructure. The establishment of Proteomics Society, India (PSI) has created a platform for the Indian proteomic researchers to share ideas, research collaborations and conduct annual conferences and workshops. Indian proteomic research is really moving forward with the global proteomics community in a quest to solve the mysteries of proteomics. A draft map of the human proteome enhances the enthusiasm among intellectuals to promote proteomic research in India to the world.This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India. PMID:25868663

  13. A comparison of music education and music therapy majors: personality types as described by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and demographic profiles.

    PubMed

    Steele, Anita Louise; Young, Sylvester

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop both personality and demographic profiles for students who are interested in majoring in music education or music therapy. Two primary questions were addressed in the study: (a) Are there similarities and differences in the personality types of music education and music therapy majors as measured by the Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI )? (b) Are there similarities and differences in demographic characteristics of music education and music therapy majors in regard to (i) principal instrument studied in college, (ii) grade point average, (iii) scholarship awards, (iv) high school participation in private study and (v) ensembles, (vi) church/community participation, and (vii) volunteerism in high school?

  14. Proteome complexity and the forces that drive proteome imbalance.

    PubMed

    Harper, J Wade; Bennett, Eric J

    2016-01-01

    The cellular proteome is a complex microcosm of structural and regulatory networks that requires continuous surveillance and modification to meet the dynamic needs of the cell. It is therefore crucial that the protein flux of the cell remains in balance to ensure proper cell function. Genetic alterations that range from chromosome imbalance to oncogene activation can affect the speed, fidelity and capacity of protein biogenesis and degradation systems, which often results in proteome imbalance. An improved understanding of the causes and consequences of proteome imbalance is helping to reveal how these systems can be targeted to treat diseases such as cancer. PMID:27629639

  15. The seed nuclear proteome

    PubMed Central

    Repetto, Ombretta; Rogniaux, Hélène; Larré, Colette; Thompson, Richard; Gallardo, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the regulatory networks coordinating seed development will help to manipulate seed traits, such as protein content and seed weight, in order to increase yield and seed nutritional value of important food crops, such as legumes. Because of the cardinal role of the nucleus in gene expression, sub-proteome analyses of nuclei from developing seeds were conducted, taking advantage of the sequences available for model species. In this review, we discuss the strategies used to separate and identify the nuclear proteins at a stage when the seed is preparing for reserve accumulation. We present how these data provide an insight into the complexity and distinctive features of the seed nuclear proteome. We discuss the presence of chromatin-modifying enzymes and proteins that have roles in RNA-directed DNA methylation and which may be involved in modifying genome architecture in preparation for seed filling. Specific features of the seed nuclei at the transition between the stage of cell divisions and that of cell expansion and reserve deposition are described here which may help to manipulate seed quality traits, such as seed weight. PMID:23267364

  16. Immunocapture strategies in translational proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Fredolini, Claudia; Byström, Sanna; Pin, Elisa; Edfors, Fredrik; Tamburro, Davide; Iglesias, Maria Jesus; Häggmark, Anna; Hong, Mun-Gwan; Uhlen, Mathias; Nilsson, Peter; Schwenk, Jochen M

    2016-01-01

    Aiming at clinical studies of human diseases, antibody-assisted assays have been applied to biomarker discovery and toward a streamlined translation from patient profiling to assays supporting personalized treatments. In recent years, integrated strategies to couple and combine antibodies with mass spectrometry-based proteomic efforts have emerged, allowing for novel possibilities in basic and clinical research. Described in this review are some of the field’s current and emerging immunocapture approaches from an affinity proteomics perspective. Discussed are some of their advantages, pitfalls and opportunities for the next phase in clinical and translational proteomics. PMID:26558424

  17. Ovarian Cancer Proteomic, Phosphoproteomic, and Glycoproteomic Data Released - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have just released a comprehensive dataset of the proteomic analysis of high grade serous ovarian tumor samples,

  18. University studies science course selection and academic achievement in relation to the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skauge, Suzanne Elizabeth

    This research conducted at a southern regional university studied general education (University Studies - US) science course selection and academic success in US science in relation to Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) preference categories (SF, ST, NF and NT). Additionally, differences in type preferences among students with mathematics and/or reading competency were explored. Data was examined for 755 students enrolled in the freshman success seminar course between Fall 1989 and Spring 1995 who had completed the MBTI test as part of that class. US science courses examined were grouped by science study: earth science, biology, chemistry and physics. Academic success was defined as a grade of "C" or higher and proficiency criteria were dictated by the university catalog. The study's nonparametric test results did not find any significant differences between MBTI type preferences and the two main areas of focus, US science course selection and academic success in US science courses. However, significant proportional differences were found between type preferences in relation to student reading competency (sig. = .03), as well as, reading competency and academic success in science (sig. = .04) even though fairly weak relationships existed between the variables with contingency coefficients of .11 and .10 respectively. All other relationships tested proved not significant. Each type's course selection closely reflected the overall sample: Earth Science 52.3%, Biology 34%, Chemistry 7.5% and Physics 6.1%. Nearly one-fifth (19.7%) of the sample were not successful in their selected science course. Less than two-fifths (37.7%) of student sample were not mathematics and/or reading competent. Academically in science intuitive types tended to do better than sensing types and feeling types tended to better than thinking types (NF 2.41, NT 2.36, SF 2.29 and ST 2.23). Further analysis found the TF preference scale contributed more toward the significant differences in reading

  19. A guide to the Proteomics Identifications Database proteomics data repository.

    PubMed

    Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Côté, Richard; Reisinger, Florian; Foster, Joseph M; Mueller, Michael; Rameseder, Jonathan; Hermjakob, Henning; Martens, Lennart

    2009-09-01

    The Proteomics Identifications Database (PRIDE, www.ebi.ac.uk/pride) is one of the main repositories of MS derived proteomics data. Here, we point out the main functionalities of PRIDE both as a submission repository and as a source for proteomics data. We describe the main features for data retrieval and visualization available through the PRIDE web and BioMart interfaces. We also highlight the mechanism by which tailored queries in the BioMart can join PRIDE to other resources such as Reactome, Ensembl or UniProt to execute extremely powerful across-domain queries. We then present the latest improvements in the PRIDE submission process, using the new easy-to-use, platform-independent graphical user interface submission tool PRIDE Converter. Finally, we speak about future plans and the role of PRIDE in the ProteomExchange consortium.

  20. The rigorous bound on the transmission probability for massless scalar field of non-negative-angular-momentum mode emitted from a Myers-Perry black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ngampitipan, Tritos; Boonserm, Petarpa; Chatrabhuti, Auttakit; Visser, Matt

    2016-06-01

    Hawking radiation is the evidence for the existence of black hole. What an observer can measure through Hawking radiation is the transmission probability. In the laboratory, miniature black holes can successfully be generated. The generated black holes are, most commonly, Myers-Perry black holes. In this paper, we will derive the rigorous bounds on the transmission probabilities for massless scalar fields of non-negative-angular-momentum modes emitted from a generated Myers-Perry black hole in six, seven, and eight dimensions. The results show that for low energy, the rigorous bounds increase with the increase in the energy of emitted particles. However, for high energy, the rigorous bounds decrease with the increase in the energy of emitted particles. When the black holes spin faster, the rigorous bounds decrease. For dimension dependence, the rigorous bounds also decrease with the increase in the number of extra dimensions. Furthermore, as comparison to the approximate transmission probability, the rigorous bound is proven to be useful.

  1. Proteomics of early zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Link, Vinzenz; Shevchenko, Andrej; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2006-01-01

    Background Zebrafish (D. rerio) has become a powerful and widely used model system for the analysis of vertebrate embryogenesis and organ development. While genetic methods are readily available in zebrafish, protocols for two dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis and proteomics have yet to be developed. Results As a prerequisite to carry out proteomic experiments with early zebrafish embryos, we developed a method to efficiently remove the yolk from large batches of embryos. This method enabled high resolution 2D gel electrophoresis and improved Western blotting considerably. Here, we provide detailed protocols for proteomics in zebrafish from sample preparation to mass spectrometry (MS), including a comparison of databases for MS identification of zebrafish proteins. Conclusion The provided protocols for proteomic analysis of early embryos enable research to be taken in novel directions in embryogenesis. PMID:16412219

  2. Proteomics in Rheumatoid Arthritis Research

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yune-Jung; Chung, Min Kyung; Hwang, Daehee

    2015-01-01

    Although rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease, diagnosis of RA is currently based on clinical manifestations, and there is no simple, practical assessment tool in the clinical field to assess disease activity and severity. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the discovery of new diagnostic RA biomarkers that can assist in evaluating disease activity, severity, and treatment response. Proteomics, the large-scale study of the proteome, has emerged as a powerful technique for protein identification and characterization. For the past 10 years, proteomic techniques have been applied to different biological samples (synovial tissue/fluid, blood, and urine) from RA patients and experimental animal models. In this review, we summarize the current state of the application of proteomics in RA and its importance in identifying biomarkers and treatment targets. PMID:26330803

  3. Proteomics: Technology Development and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, Arul

    2009-01-01

    Technology development in and the application of proteomics are emerging areas among the chemical engineers and others who presented at the 2008 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) Annual Meeting. Overall, the centennial meeting offered a broad current perspective on the discipline of chemical engineering as it enters its second century. Biomedical and biochemical engineering continue to grow as important facets of the discipline. Within these, the value and applicability of proteomics were demonstrated in a number of interesting presentations. This year, as in the recent past, the AIChE Annual meeting was held in conjunction with the American Electrophoresis Society (AES) Annual Meeting. AES presenters offered further academic and industrial viewpoints on the still-developing role of proteomics and proteomic technologies in biological and clinical analyses. PMID:19210124

  4. Proteomics of Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    PubMed Central

    González-Fernández, Raquel; Prats, Elena; Jorrín-Novo, Jesús V.

    2010-01-01

    Plant pathogenic fungi cause important yield losses in crops. In order to develop efficient and environmental friendly crop protection strategies, molecular studies of the fungal biological cycle, virulence factors, and interaction with its host are necessary. For that reason, several approaches have been performed using both classical genetic, cell biology, and biochemistry and the modern, holistic, and high-throughput, omic techniques. This work briefly overviews the tools available for studying Plant Pathogenic Fungi and is amply focused on MS-based Proteomics analysis, based on original papers published up to December 2009. At a methodological level, different steps in a proteomic workflow experiment are discussed. Separate sections are devoted to fungal descriptive (intracellular, subcellular, extracellular) and differential expression proteomics and interactomics. From the work published we can conclude that Proteomics, in combination with other techniques, constitutes a powerful tool for providing important information about pathogenicity and virulence factors, thus opening up new possibilities for crop disease diagnosis and crop protection. PMID:20589070

  5. Plant secretome proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Alexandersson, Erik; Ali, Ashfaq; Resjö, Svante; Andreasson, Erik

    2013-01-01

    The plant secretome refers to the set of proteins secreted out of the plant cell into the surrounding extracellular space commonly referred to as the apoplast. Secreted proteins maintain cell structure and acts in signaling and are crucial for stress responses where they can interact with pathogen effectors and control the extracellular environment. Typically, secreted proteins contain an N-terminal signal peptide and are directed through the endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi pathway. However, in plants many proteins found in the secretome lack such a signature and might follow alternative ways of secretion. This review covers techniques to isolate plant secretomes and how to identify and quantify their constituent proteins. Furthermore, bioinformatical tools to predict secretion signals and define the putative secretome are presented. Findings from proteomic studies and important protein families of plant secretomes, such as proteases and hydrolases, are highlighted. PMID:23378846

  6. Imaging beyond the proteome

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pamela V.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2013-01-01

    Imaging technologies developed in the early 20th century achieved contrast solely by relying on macroscopic and morphological differences between the tissues of interest and the surrounding tissues. Since then, there has been a movement toward imaging at the cellular and molecular level in order to visualize biological processes. This rapidly growing field is known as molecular imaging. In the last decade, many methodologies for imaging proteins have emerged. However, most of these approaches cannot be extended to imaging beyond the proteome. Here, we highlight some of the recently developed technologies that enable imaging of non-proteinaceous molecules in the cell: lipids, signalling molecules, inorganic ions, glycans, nucleic acids, small-molecule metabolites, and protein post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and methylation. PMID:22801420

  7. Spectral library searching in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Griss, Johannes

    2016-03-01

    Spectral library searching has become a mature method to identify tandem mass spectra in proteomics data analysis. This review provides a comprehensive overview of available spectral library search engines and highlights their distinct features. Additionally, resources providing spectral libraries are summarized and tools presented that extend experimental spectral libraries by simulating spectra. Finally, spectrum clustering algorithms are discussed that utilize the same spectrum-to-spectrum matching algorithms as spectral library search engines and allow novel methods to analyse proteomics data.

  8. The Succinated Proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Merkley, Eric D.; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Baynes, John; Frizell, Norma

    2014-03-30

    Succination is a chemical modification of cysteine in protein by the Krebs cycle intermediate, fumarate, yielding S-(2-succino)cysteine (2SC). Intracellular fumarate concentration and succination of proteins are increased by hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane, in concert with mitochondrial, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress in adipocytes grown in high glucose medium and in adipose tissue in obesity and diabetes. Increased succination of proteins is also detected in the kidney of a fumarase conditional knock-out mouse which develops renal tumors. Keap1, the gatekeeper of the antioxidant response, was identified as a major succinated protein in renal cancer cells, suggesting that succination may play a role in activation of the antioxidant response. A wide range of proteins is subject to succination, including enzymes, adipokines, cytoskeletal proteins and ER chaperones with functional cysteine residues. There is also significant overlap between succinated and glutathionylated proteins, and with proteins containing cysteine residues that are readily oxidized to the sulfenic (cysteic) acid. Succination of adipocyte proteins is inhibited by uncouplers, which discharge the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) and by ER stress inhibitors. 2SC serves as a biomarker of mitochondrial stress or dysfunction in chronic diseases, such as obesity, diabetes and cancer, and recent studies suggest that succination is a mechanistic link between mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative and ER stress, and cellular progression toward apoptosis. In this article, we review the history of the succinated proteome and the challenges associated with measuring this non-enzymatic post-translational modification of proteins by proteomics approaches.

  9. The proteome of human saliva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Timothy J.

    2013-05-01

    Human saliva holds tremendous potential for transforming disease and health diagnostics given its richness of molecular information and non-invasive collection. Enumerating its molecular constituents is an important first step towards reaching this potential. Among the molecules in saliva, proteins and peptides arguably have the most value: they can directly indicate biochemical functions linked to a health condition/disease state, and they are attractive targets for biomarker assay development. However, cataloging and defining the human salivary proteome is challenging given the dynamic, chemically heterogeneous and complex nature of the system. In addition, the overall human saliva proteome is composed of several "sub-proteomes" which include: intact full length proteins, proteins carrying post-translational modifications (PTMs), low molecular weight peptides, and the metaproteome, derived from protein products from nonhuman organisms (e.g. microbes) present in the oral cavity. Presented here will be a summary of communal efforts to meet the challenge of characterizing the multifaceted saliva proteome, focusing on the use of mass spectrometry as the proteomic technology of choice. Implications of these efforts to characterize the salivary proteome in the context of disease diagnostics will also be discussed.

  10. Enabling Proteomics Discovery Through Visual Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Havre, Susan L.; Singhal, Mudita; Payne, Deborah A.; Lipton, Mary S.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.

    2005-05-01

    With the completion of the Human Genome Project and the sequencing of large genomes, proteomics is the new big challenge. A proteome is the collection of all the proteins present in an organism at a given moment. Unlike the genome, the proteome is dynamic, changing continuously in response to tens of thousands of intra- and extra-cellular environmental signals. Proteomics is the study of proteomes under different conditions—for example, over time, under different environments, or in different disease states. Because proteins are the key actors in cellular processes and proteomics is the study of not one or two proteins at a time but whole proteomes, proteomics has a key role in revealing the complex processes of cells at a global or systems level. There are several high-throughput proteomics techniques; all generate data faster than the data can currently be analyzed. The tremendous size and complexity of the high-throughput experimental data make it very difficult to process and interpret. The success of proteomics will rely on high-throughput experimental techniques coupled with sophisticated visual analysis and data mining methods. This article presents the motivation for developing visual analysis tools for proteomic data and demonstrates their application to proteomics research with a visualization tool named Peptide Permutation and Protein Prediction, or PQuad. PQuad is a functioning visual analytic tool in operation at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the study of systems biology. PQuad supports the exploration of proteins identified by proteomic techniques in the context of supplemental biological information.

  11. Consolidation of proteomics data in the Cancer Proteomics database.

    PubMed

    Arntzen, Magnus Ø; Boddie, Paul; Frick, Rahel; Koehler, Christian J; Thiede, Bernd

    2015-11-01

    Cancer is a class of diseases characterized by abnormal cell growth and one of the major reasons for human deaths. Proteins are involved in the molecular mechanisms leading to cancer, furthermore they are affected by anti-cancer drugs, and protein biomarkers can be used to diagnose certain cancer types. Therefore, it is important to explore the proteomics background of cancer. In this report, we developed the Cancer Proteomics database to re-interrogate published proteome studies investigating cancer. The database is divided in three sections related to cancer processes, cancer types, and anti-cancer drugs. Currently, the Cancer Proteomics database contains 9778 entries of 4118 proteins extracted from 143 scientific articles covering all three sections: cell death (cancer process), prostate cancer (cancer type) and platinum-based anti-cancer drugs including carboplatin, cisplatin, and oxaliplatin (anti-cancer drugs). The detailed information extracted from the literature includes basic information about the articles (e.g., PubMed ID, authors, journal name, publication year), information about the samples (type, study/reference, prognosis factor), and the proteomics workflow (Subcellular fractionation, protein, and peptide separation, mass spectrometry, quantification). Useful annotations such as hyperlinks to UniProt and PubMed were included. In addition, many filtering options were established as well as export functions. The database is freely available at http://cancerproteomics.uio.no.

  12. Proteomic analysis and discovery using affinity proteomics and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Niclas; Wingren, Christer; Mattsson, Mikael; James, Peter; O'Connell, David; Nilsson, Fredrik; Cahill, Dolores J; Borrebaeck, Carl A K

    2011-10-01

    Antibody-based microarrays are a rapidly evolving affinity-proteomic methodology that recently has shown great promise in clinical applications. The resolution of these proteomic analyses is, however, directly related to the number of data-points, i.e. antibodies, included on the array. Currently, this is a key bottleneck because of limited availability of numerous highly characterized antibodies. Here, we present a conceptually new method, denoted global proteome survey, opening up the possibility to probe any proteome in a species-independent manner while still using a limited set of antibodies. We use context-independent-motif-specific antibodies directed against short amino acid motifs, where each motif is present in up to a few hundred different proteins. First, the digested proteome is exposed to these antibodies, whereby motif-containing peptides are enriched, which then are detected and identified by mass spectrometry. In this study, we profiled extracts from human colon tissue, yeast cells lysate, and mouse liver tissue to demonstrate proof-of-concept.

  13. Proteomics in evolutionary ecology.

    PubMed

    Baer, B; Millar, A H

    2016-03-01

    Evolutionary ecologists are traditionally gene-focused, as genes propagate phenotypic traits across generations and mutations and recombination in the DNA generate genetic diversity required for evolutionary processes. As a consequence, the inheritance of changed DNA provides a molecular explanation for the functional changes associated with natural selection. A direct focus on proteins on the other hand, the actual molecular agents responsible for the expression of a phenotypic trait, receives far less interest from ecologists and evolutionary biologists. This is partially due to the central dogma of molecular biology that appears to define proteins as the 'dead-end of molecular information flow' as well as technical limitations in identifying and studying proteins and their diversity in the field and in many of the more exotic genera often favored in ecological studies. Here we provide an overview of a newly forming field of research that we refer to as 'Evolutionary Proteomics'. We point out that the origins of cellular function are related to the properties of polypeptide and RNA and their interactions with the environment, rather than DNA descent, and that the critical role of horizontal gene transfer in evolution is more about coopting new proteins to impact cellular processes than it is about modifying gene function. Furthermore, post-transcriptional and post-translational processes generate a remarkable diversity of mature proteins from a single gene, and the properties of these mature proteins can also influence inheritance through genetic and perhaps epigenetic mechanisms. The influence of post-transcriptional diversification on evolutionary processes could provide a novel mechanistic underpinning for elements of rapid, directed evolutionary changes and adaptations as observed for a variety of evolutionary processes. Modern state-of the art technologies based on mass spectrometry are now available to identify and quantify peptides, proteins, protein

  14. Proteomic approaches to bacterial differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Norbeck, Angela D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Elias, Dwayne A.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-12-01

    While genomic approaches have been applied for the detection and identification of individual bacteria within microbial communities, analogous proteomics approaches have been effectively precluded due to their inherent complexity. An in silico assessment of peptides that could potentially be present in the proteomes of artificial simple and complex communities was performed to evaluate the effect of proteome complexity on species detection. A mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach was employed to experimentally detect and validate the predicted tryptic peptides initially identified as distinctive within the simple community. An assessment of peptide distinctiveness and the potential for mapping to a particular bacterium within a community was made throughout each step of the study. A second in silico assessment of peptide distinctiveness for a complex community of 25 microorganisms was conducted to investigate the levels of instrumental performance that would be required to experimentally detect these peptides, as well as how performance varied with complexity (e.g., the number of different microorganisms). The experimental data for a simple community showed that it is feasible to predict, observe, and to quantify distinctive peptides from one organism in the presence of at least a 100-fold greater abundance of another, thus yielding putative markers for identifying a bacterium of interest. This work represents a first step towards quantitative proteomic characterization of complex microbial communities and the possible development of community wide markers of perturbations to such communities.

  15. The proteome browser web portal.

    PubMed

    Goode, Robert J A; Yu, Simon; Kannan, Anitha; Christiansen, Jeffrey H; Beitz, Anthony; Hancock, William S; Nice, Edouard; Smith, A Ian

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, the Human Proteome Organization launched the Human Proteome Project (HPP), aimed at identifying and characterizing the proteome of the human body. To support complete coverage, one arm of the project will take a gene- or chromosomal-centric strategy (C-HPP) aimed at identifying at least one protein product from each protein-coding gene. Despite multiple large international biological databases housing genomic and protein data, there is currently no single system that integrates updated pertinent information from each of these data repositories and assembles the information into a searchable format suitable for the type of global proteomics effort proposed by the C-HPP. We have undertaken the goal of producing a data integration and analysis software system and browser for the C-HPP effort and of making data collections from this resource discoverable through metadata repositories, such as Australian National Data Service's Research Data Australia. Here we present our vision and progress toward the goal of developing a comprehensive data integration and analysis software tool that provides a snapshot of currently available proteomic related knowledge around each gene product, which will ultimately assist in analyzing biological function and the study of human physiology in health and disease.

  16. Proteomic insights into floral biology.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaobai; Jackson, Aaron; Xie, Ming; Wu, Dianxing; Tsai, Wen-Chieh; Zhang, Sheng

    2016-08-01

    The flower is the most important biological structure for ensuring angiosperms reproductive success. Not only does the flower contain critical reproductive organs, but the wide variation in morphology, color, and scent has evolved to entice specialized pollinators, and arguably mankind in many cases, to ensure the successful propagation of its species. Recent proteomic approaches have identified protein candidates related to these flower traits, which has shed light on a number of previously unknown mechanisms underlying these traits. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of the latest advances in proteomic research in floral biology according to the order of flower structure, from corolla to male and female reproductive organs. It summarizes mainstream proteomic methods for plant research and recent improvements on two dimensional gel electrophoresis and gel-free workflows for both peptide level and protein level analysis. The recent advances in sequencing technologies provide a new paradigm for the ever-increasing genome and transcriptome information on many organisms. It is now possible to integrate genomic and transcriptomic data with proteomic results for large-scale protein characterization, so that a global understanding of the complex molecular networks in flower biology can be readily achieved. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics--a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock. PMID:26945514

  17. Proteome of Hydra Nematocyst*

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Prakash G.; Beckmann, Anna; Warnken, Uwe; Schnölzer, Martina; Schüler, Andreas; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Holstein, Thomas W.; Özbek, Suat

    2012-01-01

    Stinging cells or nematocytes of jellyfish and other cnidarians represent one of the most poisonous and sophisticated cellular inventions in animal evolution. This ancient cell type is unique in containing a giant secretory vesicle derived from the Golgi apparatus. The organelle structure within the vesicle comprises an elastically stretched capsule (nematocyst) to which a long tubule is attached. During exocytosis, the barbed part of the tubule is accelerated with >5 million g in <700 ns, enabling a harpoon-like discharge (Nüchter, T., Benoit, M., Engel, U., Ozbek, S., and Holstein, T. W. (2006) Curr. Biol. 16, R316–R318). Hitherto, the molecular components responsible for the organelle's biomechanical properties were largely unknown. Here, we describe the proteome of nematocysts from the freshwater polyp Hydra magnipapillata. Our analysis revealed an unexpectedly complex secretome of 410 proteins with venomous and lytic but also adhesive or fibrous properties. In particular, the insoluble fraction of the nematocyst represents a functional extracellular matrix structure of collagenous and elastic nature. This finding suggests an evolutionary scenario in which exocytic vesicles harboring a venomous secretome assembled a sophisticated predatory structure from extracellular matrix motif proteins. PMID:22291027

  18. High-throughput proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesley, Scott A.; Nasoff, Marc; Kreusch, Andreas; Spraggon, Glen

    2001-04-01

    Proteomics has become a major focus as researchers attempt to understand the vast amount of genomic information. Protein complexity makes identifying and understanding gene function inherently difficult. The challenge of studying proteins in a global way is driving the development of new technologies for systematic and comprehensive analysis of protein structure and function. We are addressing this challenge through instrumentation and approaches to rapidly express, purify, crystallize, and mutate large numbers of human gene products. Our approach applies the principles of HTS technologies commonly used in pharmaceutical development. Genes are cloned, expressed, and purified in parallel to achieve a throughput potential of hundreds per day. Our instrumentation allows us to produce tens of milligrams of protein from 96 separate clones simultaneously. Purified protein is used for several applications including a high-throughput crystallographic screening approach for structure determination using automated image analysis. To further understand protein function, we are integrating a mutagenesis and screening approach. By combining these key technologies, we hope to provide a fundamental basis for understanding gene function at the protein level.

  19. A comparison of music education and music therapy majors: personality types as described by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and demographic profiles.

    PubMed

    Steele, Anita Louise; Young, Sylvester

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop both personality and demographic profiles for students who are interested in majoring in music education or music therapy. Two primary questions were addressed in the study: (a) Are there similarities and differences in the personality types of music education and music therapy majors as measured by the Myers Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI )? (b) Are there similarities and differences in demographic characteristics of music education and music therapy majors in regard to (i) principal instrument studied in college, (ii) grade point average, (iii) scholarship awards, (iv) high school participation in private study and (v) ensembles, (vi) church/community participation, and (vii) volunteerism in high school? PMID:18447572

  20. Separability of the massive Dirac equation in 5-dimensional Myers-Perry black hole geometry and its relation to a rank-three Killing-Yano tensor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Shuangqing

    2008-09-15

    The Dirac equation for the electron around a five-dimensional rotating black hole with two different angular momenta is separated into purely radial and purely angular equations. The general solution is expressed as a superposition of solutions derived from these two decoupled ordinary differential equations. By separating variables for the massive Klein-Gordon equation in the same spacetime background, I derive a simple and elegant form for the Staeckel-Killing tensor, which can be easily written as the square of a rank-three Killing-Yano tensor. I have also explicitly constructed a symmetry operator that commutes with the scalar Laplacian by using the Staeckel-Killing tensor, and the one with the Dirac operator by the Killing-Yano tensor admitted by the five-dimensional Myers-Perry metric, respectively.

  1. Proteomics technology in systems biology.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeffrey C; Figeys, Daniel

    2006-08-01

    It has now become apparent that a full understanding of a biological process (e.g. a disease state) is only possible if all biomolecular interactions are taken into account. Systems biology works towards understanding the intricacies of cellular life through the collaborative efforts of biologists, chemists, mathematicians and computer scientists and recently, a number of laboratories around the world have embarked upon such research agendas. The fields of genomics and proteomics are foundational in systems biology studies and a great deal of research is currently being conducted in each worldwide. Moreover, many technological advances (particularly in mass spectrometry) have led to a dramatic rise in the number of proteomic studies over the past two decades. This short review summarizes a selection of technological innovations in proteomics that contribute to systems biology studies. PMID:16880956

  2. Proteomic Analysis of Menstrual Blood*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Heyi; Zhou, Bo; Prinz, Mechthild; Siegel, Donald

    2012-01-01

    Menstruation is the expulsion of the endometrial lining of the uterus following a nearly month long preparation for embryo implantation and pregnancy. Increasingly, the health of the endometrium is being recognized as a critical factor in female fertility, and proteomes and transcriptomes from endometrial biopsies at different stages of the menstrual cycle have been studied for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes (1 Kao, L. C., et al. 2003 Endocrinology 144, 2870–2881; Strowitzki, Tet al. 2006 Hum. Reprod. Update 12, 617–630; DeSouza, L., et al. 2005 Proteomics 5, 270–281). Disorders of the uterus ranging from benign to malignant tumors, as well as endometriosis, can cause abnormal menstrual bleeding and are frequently diagnosed through endometrial biopsy (Strowitzki, Tet al. 2006 Hum. Reprod. Update 12, 617–630; Ferenczy, A. 2003 Maturitas 45, 1–14). Yet the proteome of menstrual blood, an easily available noninvasive source of endometrial tissue, has yet to be examined for possible causes or diagnoses of infertility or endometrial pathology. This study employed five different methods to define the menstrual blood proteome. A total of 1061 proteins were identified, 361 were found by at least two methods and 678 were identified by at least two peptides. When the menstrual blood proteome was compared with those of circulating blood (1774 proteins) and vaginal fluid (823 proteins), 385 proteins were found unique to menstrual blood. Gene ontology analysis and evaluation of these specific menstrual blood proteins identified pathways consistent with the processes of the normal endometrial cycle. Several of the proteins unique to menstrual blood suggest that extramedullary uterine hematopoiesis or parenchymal hemoglobin synthesis may be occurring in late endometrial tissue. The establishment of a normal menstrual blood proteome is necessary for the evaluation of its usefulness as a diagnostic tool for infertility and uterine pathologies. Identification of

  3. Advances of Proteomic Sciences in Dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Khurshid, Zohaib; Zohaib, Sana; Najeeb, Shariq; Zafar, Muhammad Sohail; Rehman, Rabia; Rehman, Ihtesham Ur

    2016-01-01

    Applications of proteomics tools revolutionized various biomedical disciplines such as genetics, molecular biology, medicine, and dentistry. The aim of this review is to highlight the major milestones in proteomics in dentistry during the last fifteen years. Human oral cavity contains hard and soft tissues and various biofluids including saliva and crevicular fluid. Proteomics has brought revolution in dentistry by helping in the early diagnosis of various diseases identified by the detection of numerous biomarkers present in the oral fluids. This paper covers the role of proteomics tools for the analysis of oral tissues. In addition, dental materials proteomics and their future directions are discussed. PMID:27187379

  4. Microbial proteomics: the quiet revolution

    SciTech Connect

    Seraphin, Bertrand; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2012-01-01

    Technological developments in DNA sequencing and their application to study thousands of microbial genomes or even microbial ecosystems still today often make the headlines of general newspapers and scientific journals. These revolutionary changes are hiding another revolution that is unfolding more quietly in the background: the development of microbial proteomics to study genome expression products. It is important to recognize that while DNA sequencing reveals extensive details about the genomic potential of an organism or community, proteomic measurements reveal the functional gene products that are present and operational under specific environmental conditions, and thus perhaps better characterize the critical biomolecules that execute the life processes (enzymes, signaling, structural factors, etc.).

  5. Wheat proteomics: proteome modulation and abiotic stress acclimation

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Kamal, Abu H. M.; Hossain, Zahed

    2014-01-01

    Cellular mechanisms of stress sensing and signaling represent the initial plant responses to adverse conditions. The development of high-throughput “Omics” techniques has initiated a new era of the study of plant molecular strategies for adapting to environmental changes. However, the elucidation of stress adaptation mechanisms in plants requires the accurate isolation and characterization of stress-responsive proteins. Because the functional part of the genome, namely the proteins and their post-translational modifications, are critical for plant stress responses, proteomic studies provide comprehensive information about the fine-tuning of cellular pathways that primarily involved in stress mitigation. This review summarizes the major proteomic findings related to alterations in the wheat proteomic profile in response to abiotic stresses. Moreover, the strengths and weaknesses of different sample preparation techniques, including subcellular protein extraction protocols, are discussed in detail. The continued development of proteomic approaches in combination with rapidly evolving bioinformatics tools and interactive databases will facilitate understanding of the plant mechanisms underlying stress tolerance. PMID:25538718

  6. What is Proteomics? - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The term "proteome" refers to the entire complement of proteins, including the modifications made to a particular set of proteins, produced by an organism or a cellular system. This will vary with time and distinct requirements, such as stresses, that a cell or organism undergoes.

  7. Proteomics Funding Opportunity - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    To expand the understanding of how cells sense and respond to changes in their physical environment, the NCI is seeking to perform proteomic assays on the panel of cell lines grown on a variety of substrates. These assays will provide insight into changes in protein levels or phosphorylation changes that could reflect the activity of mechano-transduction pathways.

  8. The speciation of the proteome

    PubMed Central

    Jungblut, Peter R; Holzhütter, Hermann G; Apweiler, Rolf; Schlüter, Hartmut

    2008-01-01

    Introduction In proteomics a paradox situation developed in the last years. At one side it is basic knowledge that proteins are post-translationally modified and occur in different isoforms. At the other side the protein expression concept disclaims post-translational modifications by connecting protein names directly with function. Discussion Optimal proteome coverage is today reached by bottom-up liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. But quantification at the peptide level in shotgun or bottom-up approaches by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry is completely ignoring that a special peptide may exist in an unmodified form and in several-fold modified forms. The acceptance of the protein species concept is a basic prerequisite for meaningful quantitative analyses in functional proteomics. In discovery approaches only top-down analyses, separating the protein species before digestion, identification and quantification by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis or protein liquid chromatography, allow the correlation between changes of a biological situation and function. Conclusion To obtain biological relevant information kinetics and systems biology have to be performed at the protein species level, which is the major challenge in proteomics today. PMID:18638390

  9. Periodontal Proteomics: Wonders Never Cease!

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Harpreet Singh; Kapoor, Shalini; Saksena, Neha

    2013-01-01

    Proteins are vital parts of living organisms, as they are integral components of the physiological metabolic pathways of cells. Periodontal tissues comprise multicompartmental groups of interacting cells and matrices that provide continuous support, attachment, proprioception, and physical protection for the teeth. The proteome map, that is, complete catalogue of the matrix and cellular proteins expressed in alveolar bone, cementum, periodontal ligament, and gingiva, is to be explored for more in-depth understanding of periodontium. The ongoing research to understand the signalling pathways that allow cells to divide, differentiate, and die in controlled manner has brought us to the era of proteomics. Proteomics is defined as the study of all proteins including their relative abundance, distribution, posttranslational modifications, functions, and interactions with other macromolecules, in a given cell or organism within a given environment and at a specific stage in the cell cycle. Its application to periodontal science can be used to monitor health status, disease onset, treatment response, and outcome. Proteomics can offer answers to critical, unresolved questions such as the biological basis for the heterogeneity in gingival, alveolar bone, and cemental cell populations. PMID:24490073

  10. The proteome of human retina

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pingbo; Dufresne, Craig; Turner, Randi; Ferri, Sara; Venkatraman, Vidya; Karani, Rabia; Lutty, Gerard A.; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.; Semba, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    The retina is a delicate tissue that detects light, converts photochemical energy into neural signals, and transmits the signals to the visual cortex of the brain. A detailed protein inventory of the proteome of the normal human eye may provide a foundation for new investigations into both the physiology of the retina and the pathophysiology of retinal diseases. To provide an inventory, proteins were extracted from five retinas of normal eyes and fractionated using SDS-PAGE. After in-gel digestion, peptides were analyzed in duplicate using LC-MS/MS on an Orbitrap Elite mass spectrometer. A total of 3,436 non-redundant proteins were identified in the human retina, including 20 unambiguous protein isoforms, of which 8 have not previously been demonstrated to exist at the protein level. The proteins identified in the retina included most of the enzymes involved in the visual cycle and retinoid metabolism. One hundred and fifty-eight proteins that have been associated with age-related macular degeneration were identified in the retina. The MS proteome database of the human retina may serve as a valuable resource for future investigations of retinal biology and disease. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD001242. PMID:25407473

  11. Proteomics of foodborne bacterial pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter focuses on recent research on foodborne bacterial pathogens that use mass spectrometry-based proteomic techniques as well as protein microarrays. Mass spectrometry ionization techniques (e.g. electrospray ionization and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization), analyzers (e.g. ion ...

  12. CPTAC Releases Largest-Ever Breast Cancer Proteome Dataset - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) scientists have released a dataset of proteins and phophorylated phosphopeptides identified through deep proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of breast tumor samples, previously genomically analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).

  13. NCI Launches Proteomics Assay Portal - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In a paper recently published by the journal Nature Methods, Investigators from the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (NCI-CPTAC) announced the launch of a proteomics Assay Portal for multiple reaction monitoring-mass

  14. Proteomics Data on UCSC Genome Browser - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium scientists are working together with the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genomics Institute to provide public access to cancer proteomics data.

  15. Recent advances in chemical proteomics: exploring the post-translational proteome.

    PubMed

    Tate, Edward W

    2008-11-01

    Identification and quantification of multiple proteins from complex mixtures is a central theme in post-genomic biology. Despite recent progress in high-throughput proteomics, proteomic analysis of post-translationally modified (PTM) proteins remains particularly challenging. This mini-review introduces the emerging field of chemical proteomics and reviews recent advances in chemical proteomic technology that are offering striking new insights into the functional biology of post-translational modification.

  16. Exploring the potential of public proteomics data

    PubMed Central

    Vaudel, Marc; Verheggen, Kenneth; Csordas, Attila; Ræder, Helge; Berven, Frode S.; Martens, Lennart; Vizcaíno, Juan A.

    2015-01-01

    In a global effort for scientific transparency, it has become feasible and good practice to share experimental data supporting novel findings. Consequently, the amount of publicly available MS‐based proteomics data has grown substantially in recent years. With some notable exceptions, this extensive material has however largely been left untouched. The time has now come for the proteomics community to utilize this potential gold mine for new discoveries, and uncover its untapped potential. In this review, we provide a brief history of the sharing of proteomics data, showing ways in which publicly available proteomics data are already being (re‐)used, and outline potential future opportunities based on four different usage types: use, reuse, reprocess, and repurpose. We thus aim to assist the proteomics community in stepping up to the challenge, and to make the most of the rapidly increasing amount of public proteomics data. PMID:26449181

  17. 78 FR 14304 - Adrian Vela: Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... aspects of purchasing, importing, processing, packing, selling, and exporting seafood products. Beginning... wholesaler based in Keene, NH, which in turn sold the shrimp to a supermarket chain headquartered in Landover... engaged in an offense that involved the sale and purchase of, the offer of sale and purchase of, and...

  18. Proteomics and Ovarian Cancer: Integrating Proteomics Information Into Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Hays, John L.; Kim, Geoffrey; Giuroiu, Iulia; Kohn, Elise C.

    2010-01-01

    The power of proteomics allows unparalleled opportunity to query the molecular mechanisms of a malignant cell and the tumor microenvironment in patients with ovarian cancer and other solid tumors. This information has given us insight into the perturbations of signaling pathways within tumor cells and has aided the discovery of new drug targets for the tumor and possible prognostic indicators of outcome and disease response to therapy. Proteomics analysis of serum and ascites has also given us sources with which to discover possible early markers for the presence of new disease and for the progression of established cancer throughout the course of treatment. Unfortunately, this wealth of information has yielded little to date in changing the clinical care of these patients from a diagnostic, prognostic, or treatment perspective. The rational examination and translation of proteomics data in the context of past clinical trials and the design of future clinical trials must occur before we can march forward into the future of personalized medicine. PMID:20561909

  19. Characterization of the porcine synovial fluid proteome and a comparison to the plasma proteome

    PubMed Central

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Barnaby, Omar; Steen, Hanno; Stensballe, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fluid is present in all joint cavities, and protects the articular cartilage surfaces in large by lubricating the joint, thus reducing friction. Several studies have described changes in the protein composition of synovial fluid in patients with joint disease. However, the protein concentration, content, and synovial fluid volume change dramatically during active joint diseases and inflammation, and the proteome composition of healthy synovial fluid is incompletely characterized. We performed a normative proteomics analysis of porcine synovial fluid, and report data from optimizing proteomic methods to investigate the proteome of healthy porcine synovial fluid (Bennike et al., 2014 [1]). We included an evaluation of different proteolytic sample preparation techniques, and an analysis of posttranslational modifications with a focus on glycosylation. We used pig (Sus Scrofa) as a model organism, as the porcine immune system is highly similar to human and the pig genome is sequenced. Furthermore, porcine model systems are commonly used large animal models to study several human diseases. In addition, we analyzed the proteome of human plasma, and compared the proteomes to the obtained porcine synovial fluid proteome. The proteome of the two body fluids were found highly similar, underlining the detected plasma derived nature of many synovial fluid components. The healthy porcine synovial fluid proteomics data, human rheumatoid arthritis synovial fluid proteomics data used in the method optimization, human plasma proteomics data, and search results, have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000935. PMID:26543887

  20. Proteomic approaches in research of cyanobacterial photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Battchikova, Natalia; Angeleri, Martina; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2015-10-01

    Oxygenic photosynthesis in cyanobacteria, algae, and plants is carried out by a fabulous pigment-protein machinery that is amazingly complicated in structure and function. Many different approaches have been undertaken to characterize the most important aspects of photosynthesis, and proteomics has become the essential component in this research. Here we describe various methods which have been used in proteomic research of cyanobacteria, and demonstrate how proteomics is implemented into on-going studies of photosynthesis in cyanobacterial cells.

  1. Biospecimen Solicitation - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    A funding opportunity in support of the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) seeks to prospectively procure tumor samples, collected for proteomics investigation.

  2. Proteomics of Leaf Tissues from Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Yang, Xiaohan; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Tuskan, Gerald A; Lankford, Patricia K; Shah, Manesh B; Jawdy, Sara; Gunter, Lee E; Engle, Nancy L

    2010-01-01

    Trees of the genus Populus are farmed commercially for wood and fiber, and are a potential bioenergy crop. As a scientific model organism, P. trichocarpa was the first forest tree for which the genome sequence has been determined. Knowledge of the Populus proteome will provide a deeper understanding of gene expression patterns in various tissues of the plant. To build on our previous profile of the proteome of xylem tissue in Populus (Kalluri et al., Proteomics 2009, 9, 4871), we are currently developing methods for studying the proteome of Populus leaves.

  3. Informatics solutions for high-throughput proteomics.

    PubMed

    Topaloglou, Thodoros

    2006-06-01

    The success of mass-spectrometry-based proteomics as a method for analyzing proteins in biological samples is accompanied by challenges owning to demands for increased throughput. These challenges arise from the vast volume of data generated by proteomics experiments combined with the heterogeneity in data formats, processing methods, software tools and databases that are involved in the translation of spectral data into relevant and actionable information for scientists. Informatics aims to provide answers to these challenges by transferring existing solutions from information management to proteomics and/or by generating novel computational methods for automation of proteomics data processing.

  4. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Human Nucleolus.

    PubMed

    Bensaddek, Dalila; Nicolas, Armel; Lamond, Angus I

    2016-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed spectacular progress in the field of mass spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative proteomics, including advances in instrumentation, chromatography, sample preparation methods, and experimental design for multidimensional analyses. It is now possible not only to identify most of the protein components of a cell proteome in a single experiment, but also to describe additional proteome dimensions, such as protein turnover rates, posttranslational modifications, and subcellular localization. Furthermore, by comparing the proteome at different time points, it is possible to create a "time-lapse" view of proteome dynamics. By combining high-throughput quantitative proteomics with detailed subcellular fractionation protocols and data analysis techniques it is also now possible to characterize in detail the proteomes of specific subcellular organelles, providing important insights into cell regulatory mechanisms and physiological responses. In this chapter we present a reliable workflow and protocol for MS-based analysis and quantitation of the proteome of nucleoli isolated from human cells. The protocol presented is based on a SILAC analysis of human MCF10A-Src-ER cells with analysis performed on a Q-Exactive Plus Orbitrap MS instrument (Thermo Fisher Scientific). The subsequent chapter describes how to process the resulting raw MS files from this experiment using MaxQuant software and data analysis procedures to evaluate the nucleolar proteome using customized R scripts. PMID:27576725

  5. Proteomic biomarkers in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Pastor, M D; Nogal, A; Molina-Pinelo, S; Carnero, A; Paz-Ares, L

    2013-09-01

    The correct understanding of tumour development relies on the comprehensive study of proteins. They are the main orchestrators of vital processes, such as signalling pathways, which drive the carcinogenic process. Proteomic technologies can be applied to cancer research to detect differential protein expression and to assess different responses to treatment. Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer-related death in the world. Mostly diagnosed at late stages of the disease, lung cancer has one of the lowest 5-year survival rates at 15 %. The use of different proteomic techniques such as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), isotope labelling (ICAT, SILAC, iTRAQ) and mass spectrometry may yield new knowledge on the underlying biology of lung cancer and also allow the development of new early detection tests and the identification of changes in the cancer protein network that are associated with prognosis and drug resistance. PMID:23606351

  6. Brucella proteomes--a review.

    PubMed

    DelVecchio, Vito G; Wagner, Mary Ann; Eschenbrenner, Michel; Horn, Troy A; Kraycer, Jo Ann; Estock, Frank; Elzer, Phil; Mujer, Cesar V

    2002-12-20

    The proteomes of selected Brucella spp. have been extensively analyzed by utilizing current proteomic technology involving 2-DE and MALDI-MS. In Brucella melitensis, more than 500 proteins were identified. The rapid and large-scale identification of proteins in this organism was accomplished by using the annotated B. melitensis genome which is now available in the GenBank. Coupled with new and powerful tools for data analysis, differentially expressed proteins were identified and categorized into several classes. A global overview of protein expression patterns emerged, thereby facilitating the simultaneous analysis of different metabolic pathways in B. melitensis. Such a global characterization would not have been possible by using time consuming and traditional biochemical approaches. The era of post-genomic technology offers new and exciting opportunities to understand the complete biology of different Brucella species.

  7. Human Saliva Proteome and Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Hu, S.; Li, Y.; Wang, J.; Xie, Y.; Tjon, K.; Wolinsky, L.; Loo, R.R.O.; Loo, J.A.; Wong, D.T.

    2007-01-01

    This paper tests the hypothesis that salivary proteins and their counterpart mRNAs co-exist in human whole saliva. Global profiling of human saliva proteomes and transcriptomes by mass spectrometry (MS) and expression microarray technologies, respectively, revealed many similarities between saliva proteins and mRNAs. Of the function-known proteins identified in saliva, from 61 to 70% were also found present as mRNA transcripts. For genes not detected at both protein and mRNA levels, we made further efforts to determine if the counterpart is present. Of 19 selected genes detected only at the protein level, the mRNAs of 13 (68%) genes were found in saliva by RT-PCR. In contrast, of many mRNAs detected only by microarrays, their protein products were found in saliva, as reported previously by other investigators. The saliva transcriptome may provide preliminary insights into the boundary of the saliva proteome. PMID:17122167

  8. A visual approach to proteomics.

    PubMed

    Nickell, Stephan; Kofler, Christine; Leis, Andrew P; Baumeister, Wolfgang

    2006-03-01

    Cryo-electron tomography is an emerging imaging technique that has unique potential for molecular cell biology. At the present resolution of 4-5 nm, large supramolecular structures can be studied in unperturbed cellular environments and, in the future, it will become possible to map molecular landscapes inside cells in a more comprehensive manner. 'Visual proteomics' aims to complement and extend mass-spectrometry-based inventories, and to provide a quantitative description of the macromolecular interactions that underlie cellular functions.

  9. Recent developments in quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Becker, Christopher H; Bern, Marshall

    2011-06-17

    Proteomics is the study of proteins on a large scale, encompassing the many interests scientists and physicians have in their expression and physical properties. Proteomics continues to be a rapidly expanding field, with a wealth of reports regularly appearing on technology enhancements and scientific studies using these new tools. This review focuses primarily on the quantitative aspect of protein expression and the associated computational machinery for making large-scale identifications of proteins and their post-translational modifications. The primary emphasis is on the combination of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) methods and associated tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Tandem mass spectrometry, or MS/MS, involves a second analysis within the instrument after a molecular dissociative event in order to obtain structural information including but not limited to sequence information. This review further focuses primarily on the study of in vitro digested proteins known as bottom-up or shotgun proteomics. A brief discussion of recent instrumental improvements precedes a discussion on affinity enrichment and depletion of proteins, followed by a review of the major approaches (label-free and isotope-labeling) to making protein expression measurements quantitative, especially in the context of profiling large numbers of proteins. Then a discussion follows on the various computational techniques used to identify peptides and proteins from LC-MS/MS data. This review article then includes a short discussion of LC-MS approaches to three-dimensional structure determination and concludes with a section on statistics and data mining for proteomics, including comments on properly powering clinical studies and avoiding over-fitting with large data sets.

  10. Recent Developments in Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Christopher H.; Bern, Marshall

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics is the study of proteins on a large scale, encompassing the many interests scientists and physicians have in their expression and physical properties. Proteomics continues to be a rapidly expanding field, with a wealth of reports regularly appearing on technology enhancements and scientific studies using these new tools. This review focuses primarily on the quantitative aspect of protein expression and the associated computational machinery for making large-scale identifications of proteins and their post-translational modifications. The primary emphasis is on the combination of liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) methods and associated tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Tandem mass spectrometry, or MS/MS, involves a second analysis within the instrument after a molecular dissociative event in order to obtain structural information including but not limited to sequence information. This review further focuses primarily on the study of in vitro digested proteins known as bottom-up or shotgun proteomics. A brief discussion of recent instrumental improvements precedes a discussion on affinity enrichment and depletion of proteins, followed by a review of the major approaches (label-free and isotope-labeling) to making protein expression measurements quantitative, especially in the context of profiling large numbers of proteins. Then a discussion follows on the various computational techniques used to identify peptides and proteins from LC-MS/MS data. This review article then includes a short discussion of LC-MS approaches to three-dimensional structure determination and concludes with a section on statistics and data mining for proteomics, including comments on properly powering clinical studies and avoiding over-fitting with large data sets. PMID:20620221

  11. Proteomics: analytical tools and techniques.

    PubMed

    MacCoss, M J; Yates, J R

    2001-09-01

    Scientists have long been interested in measuring the effects of different stimuli on protein expression and metabolism. Analytical methods are being developed for the automated separation, identification, and quantitation of all of the proteins within the cell. Soon, investigators will be able to observe the effects of an experiment on every protein (as opposed to a selected few). This review presents a discussion of recent technological advances in proteomics in addition to exploring current methodological limitations.

  12. [Variability of healthy human proteome].

    PubMed

    Pakharukova, N A; Pastushkova, L Kh; Moshkovskiĭ, S A; Larina, I M

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to analyze investigations devoted to characteristic of protein variability and diversity of their posttranslational modifications in healthy humans. The numerous researches have demonstrated that proteomic profile has a considerable both intra- and inter-individual variability, and quite often normal variability of some proteins can be comparable to changes observed in pathological processes. Results obtained by our research group have confirmed high intra-individual variability of serum low-molecular subproteome of healthy volunteers, certified by a special medial committee. Proteins characterized by high variability in normal conditions (e.g. haptoglobin--0-40 mg/ml; lysozyme--0,01-0,1 mg/ml; C-reactive protein--0,01-0,3 mg/ml) should be excluded from the list of potential biomarkers. On the contrary, proteins and peptides characterized by insignificant dispersion in healthy population (such as albumin--coefficient of variation (CV) 9%; transferrin--CV14%; C3c complement--CV 17%, alpha-1 acid glycoprotein--CV 21%, alpha2-macroglobulin--CV 20%; transthyretin fragment--CV 28,3% and beta-chain alpha2-HS-glycoprotein--CV 29,7%) can provide us with important information about state of health. Thus investigations of plasticity in proteomic profiles of healthy humans will help to correct reference intervals used in clinical proteomics. PMID:23289293

  13. Human saliva proteome: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, Timothy J.

    2014-06-01

    Human saliva contains a rich mixture of biomolecules. Proteins are a major component of this mixture. Given their role as the molecular effectors within biological systems, ranging from catalysis to transport to structure, proteins have great potential as biomarkers of health and disease. The ability to collect these salivary biomarkers easily using non-invasive means makes saliva proteins even more attractive for diagnostic applications. Thousands of proteins are now to be known to be present in human saliva - discovered using proteomic technologies. Emerging technologies are now making it possible to go beyond large-scale cataloging of salivary proteins. These include approaches to catalog protein contributions from the community of microorganisms residing in the oral cavity (metaproteomics) that may reflect the health state of the human host. New mass spectrometry-based proteomics methods are also emerging, shifting the emphasis from large-scale discovery experiments to hypothesis-driven assays for profiling proteins of interest within saliva, enabling validation of their association with specific health conditions. This paper provides a brief overview of efforts to catalog the proteome of human saliva. Recent developments making possible characterization of the metaproteome of human saliva will be discussed, and technologies driving new mass spectrometry-based assays for targeted analysis of proteins within complex samples, such as saliva.

  14. Proteomic Investigations into Hemodialysis Therapy.

    PubMed

    Bonomini, Mario; Sirolli, Vittorio; Pieroni, Luisa; Felaco, Paolo; Amoroso, Luigi; Urbani, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    The retention of a number of solutes that may cause adverse biochemical/biological effects, called uremic toxins, characterizes uremic syndrome. Uremia therapy is based on renal replacement therapy, hemodialysis being the most commonly used modality. The membrane contained in the hemodialyzer represents the ultimate determinant of the success and quality of hemodialysis therapy. Membrane's performance can be evaluated in terms of removal efficiency for unwanted solutes and excess fluid, and minimization of negative interactions between the membrane material and blood components that define the membrane's bio(in)compatibility. Given the high concentration of plasma proteins and the complexity of structural functional relationships of this class of molecules, the performance of a membrane is highly influenced by its interaction with the plasma protein repertoire. Proteomic investigations have been increasingly applied to describe the protein uremic milieu, to compare the blood purification efficiency of different dialyzer membranes or different extracorporeal techniques, and to evaluate the adsorption of plasma proteins onto hemodialysis membranes. In this article, we aim to highlight investigations in the hemodialysis setting making use of recent developments in proteomic technologies. Examples are presented of why proteomics may be helpful to nephrology and may possibly affect future directions in renal research. PMID:26690416

  15. Protein Neighbors and Proximity Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Johanna S.; Li, Xue-Wen; Perrett, Sarah; Lilley, Kathryn S.; Jackson, Antony P.

    2015-01-01

    Within cells, proteins can co-assemble into functionally integrated and spatially restricted multicomponent complexes. Often, the affinities between individual proteins are relatively weak, and proteins within such clusters may interact only indirectly with many of their other protein neighbors. This makes proteomic characterization difficult using methods such as immunoprecipitation or cross-linking. Recently, several groups have described the use of enzyme-catalyzed proximity labeling reagents that covalently tag the neighbors of a targeted protein with a small molecule such as fluorescein or biotin. The modified proteins can then be isolated by standard pulldown methods and identified by mass spectrometry. Here we will describe the techniques as well as their similarities and differences. We discuss their applications both to study protein assemblies and to provide a new way for characterizing organelle proteomes. We stress the importance of proteomic quantitation and independent target validation in such experiments. Furthermore, we suggest that there are biophysical and cell-biological principles that dictate the appropriateness of enzyme-catalyzed proximity labeling methods to address particular biological questions of interest. PMID:26355100

  16. CMPD: cancer mutant proteome database.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Jung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Yeh, Yuan-Ming; Julie Chu, Lichieh; Chen, Ting-Wen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Cheng-Yang; Gan, Ruei-Chi; Liu, Hsuan; Tang, Petrus

    2015-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing, which centres on the protein coding regions of disease/cancer associated genes, represents the most cost-effective method to-date for deciphering the association between genetic alterations and diseases. Large-scale whole exome/genome sequencing projects have been launched by various institutions, such as NCI, Broad Institute and TCGA, to provide a comprehensive catalogue of coding variants in diverse tissue samples and cell lines. Further functional and clinical interrogation of these sequence variations must rely on extensive cross-platforms integration of sequencing information and a proteome database that explicitly and comprehensively archives the corresponding mutated peptide sequences. While such data resource is a critical for the mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of exomic variants, no database is currently available for the collection of mutant protein sequences that correspond to recent large-scale genomic data. To address this issue and serve as bridge to integrate genomic and proteomics datasets, CMPD (http://cgbc.cgu.edu.tw/cmpd) collected over 2 millions genetic alterations, which not only facilitates the confirmation and examination of potential cancer biomarkers but also provides an invaluable resource for translational medicine research and opportunities to identify mutated proteins encoded by mutated genes.

  17. CMPD: cancer mutant proteome database

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Po-Jung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Yeh, Yuan-Ming; Julie Chu, Lichieh; Chen, Ting-Wen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Cheng-Yang; Gan, Ruei-Chi; Liu, Hsuan; Tang, Petrus

    2015-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing, which centres on the protein coding regions of disease/cancer associated genes, represents the most cost-effective method to-date for deciphering the association between genetic alterations and diseases. Large-scale whole exome/genome sequencing projects have been launched by various institutions, such as NCI, Broad Institute and TCGA, to provide a comprehensive catalogue of coding variants in diverse tissue samples and cell lines. Further functional and clinical interrogation of these sequence variations must rely on extensive cross-platforms integration of sequencing information and a proteome database that explicitly and comprehensively archives the corresponding mutated peptide sequences. While such data resource is a critical for the mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of exomic variants, no database is currently available for the collection of mutant protein sequences that correspond to recent large-scale genomic data. To address this issue and serve as bridge to integrate genomic and proteomics datasets, CMPD (http://cgbc.cgu.edu.tw/cmpd) collected over 2 millions genetic alterations, which not only facilitates the confirmation and examination of potential cancer biomarkers but also provides an invaluable resource for translational medicine research and opportunities to identify mutated proteins encoded by mutated genes. PMID:25398898

  18. Forensic Proteomics of Poxvirus Production

    SciTech Connect

    Wunschel, David S.; Tulman, Edan; Engelmann, Heather E.; Clowers, Brian H.; Geary, Steven J.; Robinson, Aaron C.; Liao, Xiaofen

    2013-08-27

    The field of microbial forensics has recently sought to develop methods to discern biological signatures to indicate production methods for biological agents. Viral agents have received less attention to date. Their obligate propagation in living cells makes purification from cellular material a challenge. This leads to potential carryover of protein-rich signature of their production system. Here we have explored a proteomic analysis of Vaccinia virus as a model poxvirus system in which to compare samples of virus propagated in different cell lines and subjected to different purification schemes. The proteomic data sets indicated viral, host cell and culture medium proteins, and several layers of data analysis were applied to build confidence in the peptide identification and capture information on the taxonomic utility of each. The analysis showed clear shifts in protein profiles with virus purification, with successive gradient purification steps showing different levels of viral protein enrichment. Peptides from cellular proteins, including those present in purified virus preparations, provided signatures which enabled discrimination of cell line substrates, including distinguishing between cells derived from different primate species. The ability to discern multiple aspects of viral production demonstrates the potential value of proteomic analysis as tool for microbial forensics.

  19. Applications of Proteomic Technologies to Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    Proteomics is the large-scale study of gene expression at the protein level. This cutting edge technology has been extensively applied to toxicology research recently. The up-to-date development of proteomics has presented the toxicology community with an unprecedented opportunit...

  20. Global Proteome Analysis of Leptospira interrogans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Comparative global proteome analyses were performed on Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni grown under conventional in vitro conditions and those mimicking in vivo conditions (iron limitation and serum presence). Proteomic analyses were conducted using iTRAQ and LC-ESI-tandem mass spectrometr...

  1. Proteomics: Protein Identification Using Online Databases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eurich, Chris; Fields, Peter A.; Rice, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Proteomics is an emerging area of systems biology that allows simultaneous study of thousands of proteins expressed in cells, tissues, or whole organisms. We have developed this activity to enable high school or college students to explore proteomic databases using mass spectrometry data files generated from yeast proteins in a college laboratory…

  2. Endosperm and Amyloplast Proteomes of Wheat Grain

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advances in proteomics and genomics have improved our understanding of the gluten proteins, a complex and functionally important protein group. Proteomic approaches also have been used to identify other proteins that may play roles in wheat flour functionality, to assign genes for gluten proteins to...

  3. Centennial Paper: Proteomics in animal science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteomics holds significant promise as a method for advancing animal science research. The use of this technology in animal science is still in its infancy. The ability of proteomics to simultaneously identify and quantify potentially thousands of proteins is unparalleled. In this review, we wil...

  4. The promise of proteomics in animal science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteomics hold significant promise as a method for advancing animal science research. The use of this technology in animal science is still in its infancy. The ability of proteomics to simultaneously identify and quantify potentially thousands of proteins is unparalleled. In this review, we will...

  5. Structural characterization of the human proteome.

    PubMed

    Müller, Arne; MacCallum, Robert M; Sternberg, Michael J E

    2002-11-01

    This paper reports an analysis of the encoded proteins (the proteome) of the genomes of human, fly, worm, yeast, and representatives of bacteria and archaea in terms of the three-dimensional structures of their globular domains together with a general sequence-based study. We show that 39% of the human proteome can be assigned to known structures. We estimate that for 77% of the proteome, there is some functional annotation, but only 26% of the proteome can be assigned to standard sequence motifs that characterize function. Of the human protein sequences, 13% are transmembrane proteins, but only 3% of the residues in the proteome form membrane-spanning regions. There are substantial differences in the composition of globular domains of transmembrane proteins between the proteomes we have analyzed. Commonly occurring structural superfamilies are identified within the proteome. The frequencies of these superfamilies enable us to estimate that 98% of the human proteome evolved by domain duplication, with four of the 10 most duplicated superfamilies specific for multicellular organisms. The zinc-finger superfamily is massively duplicated in human compared to fly and worm, and occurrence of domains in repeats is more common in metazoa than in single cellular organisms. Structural superfamilies over- and underrepresented in human disease genes have been identified. Data and results can be downloaded and analyzed via web-based applications at http://www.sbg.bio.ic.ac.uk.

  6. European and international collaboration in affinity proteomics.

    PubMed

    Stoevesandt, Oda; Taussig, Michael J

    2012-06-15

    In affinity proteomics, specific protein-binding molecules (a.k.a. binders), principally antibodies, are applied as reagents in proteome analysis. In recent years, advances in binder technologies have created the potential for an unprecedented view on protein expression and distribution patterns in plasma, cells and tissues and increasingly on protein function. Particular strengths of affinity proteomics methods include detecting proteins in their natural environments of cell or tissue, high sensitivity and selectivity for detection of low abundance proteins and exploiting binding actions such as functional interference in living cells. To maximise the use and impact of affinity reagents, it will be essential to create comprehensive, standardised binder collections. With this in mind, the EU FP7 programme AFFINOMICS (http://www.affinomics.org), together with the preceding EU programmes ProteomeBinders and AffinityProteome, aims to extend affinity proteomics research by generating a large-scale resource of validated protein-binding molecules for characterisation of the human proteome. Activity is directed at producing binders to about 1000 protein targets, primarily in signal transduction and cancer, by establishing a high throughput, coordinated production pipeline. An important aspect of AFFINOMICS is the development of highly efficient recombinant selection methods, based on phage, cell and ribosome display, capable of producing high quality binders at greater throughput and lower cost than hitherto. The programme also involves development of innovative and sensitive technologies for specific detection of target proteins and their interactions, and deployment of binders in proteomics studies of clinical relevance. The need for such binder generation programmes is now recognised internationally, with parallel initiatives in the USA for cancer (NCI) and transcription factors (NIH) and within the Human Proteome Organisation (HUPO). The papers in this volume of New

  7. Accurate Mass Measurements in Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tao; Belov, Mikhail E.; Jaitly, Navdeep; Qian, Weijun; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-08-01

    To understand different aspects of life at the molecular level, one would think that ideally all components of specific processes should be individually isolated and studied in details. Reductionist approaches, i.e., studying one biological event at a one-gene or one-protein-at-a-time basis, indeed have made significant contributions to our understanding of many basic facts of biology. However, these individual “building blocks” can not be visualized as a comprehensive “model” of the life of cells, tissues, and organisms, without using more integrative approaches.1,2 For example, the emerging field of “systems biology” aims to quantify all of the components of a biological system to assess their interactions and to integrate diverse types of information obtainable from this system into models that could explain and predict behaviors.3-6 Recent breakthroughs in genomics, proteomics, and bioinformatics are making this daunting task a reality.7-14 Proteomics, the systematic study of the entire complement of proteins expressed by an organism, tissue, or cell under a specific set of conditions at a specific time (i.e., the proteome), has become an essential enabling component of systems biology. While the genome of an organism may be considered static over short timescales, the expression of that genome as the actual gene products (i.e., mRNAs and proteins) is a dynamic event that is constantly changing due to the influence of environmental and physiological conditions. Exclusive monitoring of the transcriptomes can be carried out using high-throughput cDNA microarray analysis,15-17 however the measured mRNA levels do not necessarily correlate strongly with the corresponding abundances of proteins,18-20 The actual amount of functional proteins can be altered significantly and become independent of mRNA levels as a result of post-translational modifications (PTMs),21 alternative splicing,22,23 and protein turnover.24,25 Moreover, the functions of expressed

  8. Toxic metal proteomics: reaction of the mammalian zinc proteome with Cd²⁺.

    PubMed

    Namdarghanbari, Mohammad Ali; Bertling, Joseph; Krezoski, Susan; Petering, David H

    2014-07-01

    The hypothesis was tested that Cd(2+) undergoes measureable reaction with the Zn-proteome through metal ion exchange chemistry. The Zn-proteome of pig kidney LLC-PK1 cells is relatively inert to reaction with competing ligands, including Zinquin acid, EDTA, and apo-metallothionein. Upon reaction of Cd(2+) with the Zn-proteome, Cd(2+) associates with the proteome and near stoichiometric amounts of Zn(2+) become reactive with these chelating agents. The results strongly support the hypothesis that Cd(2+) displaces Zn(2+) from native proteomic binding sites resulting in the formation of a Cd-proteome. Mobilized Zn(2+) becomes adventitiously bound to proteome and available for reaction with added metal binding ligands. Cd-proteome and Zn-metallothionein readily exchange metal ions, raising the possibility that this reaction restores functionality to Cd-proteins. In a parallel experiment, cells were exposed to Cd(2+) and pyrithione briefly to generate substantial proteome-bound Cd(2+). Upon transition to a Cd(2+) free medium, the cells generated new metallothionein protein over time that bound most of the proteomic Cd(2+) as well as additional Zn(2+). PMID:24529759

  9. The International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP): a teaching tool box for the proteomics community.

    PubMed

    James, Peter

    2011-09-01

    The most critical functions of the various proteomics organisations are the training of young scientists and the dissemination of information to the general scientific community. The education committees of the Human Proteome Organisation (HUPO) and the European Proteomics Association (EuPA) together with their national counterparts are therefore launching the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme to meet these needs. The programme is being led by Peter James (Sweden), Thierry Rabilloud (France) and Kazuyuki Nakamura (Japan). It involves collaboration between the leading proteomics journals: Journal of Proteome Research, Journal of Proteomics, Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, and Proteomics. The overall level is aimed at Masters/PhD level students who are starting out their research and who would benefit from a solid grounding in the techniques used in modern protein-based research. The tutorial program will cover core techniques and basics as an introduction to scientists new to the field. At a later stage the programme may be expanded with a series of more advanced topics focussing on the application of proteomics techniques to biological problem solving. The entire series of articles and slides will be made freely available for teaching use at the Journals and Organisations homepages and at a special website, www.proteomicstutorials.org.

  10. Which one is preferred: Myers-Saito cyclization of ene-yne-allene or Garratt-Braverman cyclization of conjugated bisallenic sulfone? A theoretical and experimental study.

    PubMed

    Basak, Amit; Das, Sanket; Mallick, Dibyendu; Jemmis, Eluvathingal D

    2009-11-01

    A competitive scenario between Myers-Saito (MS) and Garratt-Braverman (GB) cyclization has been created in a molecule. High-level computations indicate a preference for GB over MS cyclization. The activation energies for the rate-determining steps of the GB and MS cyclizations were found to be the same (24.4 kcal/mol) at the B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory; thus, from the kinetic point of view, both reactions are feasible. However, the main biradical intermediate GB2 of the GB reaction is 6.2 kcal/mol lower in energy than the biradical MS2, which is the main intermediate of MS reaction, so GB cyclization is thermodynamically favored over MS cyclization. To verify the prediction by computational techniques, bisenediynyl sulfones 1-4 and bisenediynyl sulfoxide 17 were synthesized. Under basic conditions, these molecules isomerized to a system possessing both the ene-yne-allene and the bisallenic sulfone. The isolation of only one product, identified as the corresponding naphthalene- or benzene-fused sulfone 8-11, indicated the occurrence of GB cyclization as the sole reaction pathway. No product corresponding to the MS cyclization pathway could be isolated. Though the theoretical prediction showed a preference for the GB pathway over the MS pathway, the exclusive preference for GB over MS cyclization is very striking. Further analysis showed that the intramolecular self-quenching nature of the GB pathway may play an important role in the complete preference for this reaction. Apart from the mechanistic studies, these sulfones showed DNA cleavage activity that had an inverse relation with the reactivity order. Our findings are important for the design of artificial DNA-cleaving agents.

  11. Characterizing the successful student in general chemistry and physical science classes in terms of Jung's personality types as identified by the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Wayne David

    1998-11-01

    A student's success in a science class can depend upon previous experiences, motivation, and the level of interest in the subject. Since psychological type is intrinsic to a person's whole being, it can be influential upon the student's motivation and interests. Thus, a study of student psychological types versus the level of success in a class, as measured by a percentage, has potential to uncover certain personality characteristics which may be helpful to or which may hinder a student's learning environment. This study was initiated, using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, to evaluate any correlation between a student's personality type and his/her performance in a science class. A total of 1041 students from three classes: Chemistry 121/122, Chemistry 112, Physical Science 100, volunteered for the study. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to determine the levels of significance among sixteen personality types' averages. The results reveal that for the Chemistry 1121/122 course, the average score of the INTJ personality type was 5.1 to 12.6 points higher than every other personality type. The ANOVA identifies 3 personality types with averages significantly below the INTJ at the p < 0.05 significance level. The ANOVA analysis for the Chemistry 112 course identified significances between student scores at p = 0.08. The significance level for the differences among scores for the Physical Science 100 course was determined at a level of p = 0.02. Significance levels for p < 0.05 and <0.01 were identified between several groups in this course. The data suggest, that although personality type may not predict a particular student's success in a science class, students with certain personality traits may be favored in a chemistry class due the structure of the instruction and the presentation of the subject matter.

  12. Legume proteomics: Progress, prospects, and challenges.

    PubMed

    Rathi, Divya; Gayen, Dipak; Gayali, Saurabh; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    Legumes are the major sources of food and fodder with strong commercial relevance, and are essential components of agricultural ecosystems owing to their ability to carry out endosymbiotic nitrogen fixation. In recent years, legumes have become one of the major choices of plant research. The legume proteomics is currently represented by more than 100 reference maps and an equal number of stress-responsive proteomes. Among the 48 legumes in the protein databases, most proteomic studies have been accomplished in two model legumes, soybean, and barrel medic. This review highlights recent contributions in the field of legume proteomics to comprehend the defence and regulatory mechanisms during development and adaptation to climatic changes. Here, we attempted to provide a concise overview of the progress in legume proteomics and discuss future developments in three broad perspectives: (i) proteome of organs/tissues; (ii) subcellular compartments; and (iii) spatiotemporal changes in response to stress. Such data mining may aid in discovering potential biomarkers for plant growth, in general, apart from essential components involved in stress tolerance. The prospect of integrating proteome data with genome information from legumes will provide exciting opportunities for plant biologists to achieve long-term goals of crop improvement and sustainable agriculture.

  13. Visualizing Meta-Features in Proteomic Maps

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The steps of a high-throughput proteomics experiment include the separation, differential expression and mass spectrometry-based identification of proteins. However, the last and more challenging step is inferring the biological role of the identified proteins through their association with interaction networks, biological pathways, analysis of the effect of post-translational modifications, and other protein-related information. Results In this paper, we present an integrative visualization methodology that allows combining experimentally produced proteomic features with protein meta-features, typically coming from meta-analysis tools and databases, in synthetic Proteomic Feature Maps. Using three proteomics analysis scenarios, we show that the proposed visualization approach is effective in filtering, navigating and interacting with the proteomics data in order to address visually challenging biological questions. The novelty of our approach lies in the ease of integration of any user-defined proteomic features in easy-to-comprehend visual representations that resemble the familiar 2D-gel images, and can be adapted to the user's needs. The main capabilities of the developed VIP software, which implements the presented visualization methodology, are also highlighted and discussed. Conclusions By using this visualization and the associated VIP software, researchers can explore a complex heterogeneous proteomics dataset from different perspectives in order to address visually important biological queries and formulate new hypotheses for further investigation. VIP is freely available at http://pelopas.uop.gr/~egian/VIP/index.html. PMID:21798033

  14. Proteomic analysis of Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Baycin-Hizal, Deniz; Tabb, David L; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Chen, Lily; Lewis, Nathan E; Nagarajan, Harish; Sarkaria, Vishaldeep; Kumar, Amit; Wolozny, Daniel; Colao, Joe; Jacobson, Elena; Tian, Yuan; O'Meally, Robert N; Krag, Sharon S; Cole, Robert N; Palsson, Bernhard O; Zhang, Hui; Betenbaugh, Michael

    2012-11-01

    To complement the recent genomic sequencing of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, proteomic analysis was performed on CHO cells including the cellular proteome, secretome, and glycoproteome using tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) of multiple fractions obtained from gel electrophoresis, multidimensional liquid chromatography, and solid phase extraction of glycopeptides (SPEG). From the 120 different mass spectrometry analyses generating 682,097 MS/MS spectra, 93,548 unique peptide sequences were identified with at most 0.02 false discovery rate (FDR). A total of 6164 grouped proteins were identified from both glycoproteome and proteome analysis, representing an 8-fold increase in the number of proteins currently identified in the CHO proteome. Furthermore, this is the first proteomic study done using the CHO genome exclusively, which provides for more accurate identification of proteins. From this analysis, the CHO codon frequency was determined and found to be distinct from humans, which will facilitate expression of human proteins in CHO cells. Analysis of the combined proteomic and mRNA data sets indicated the enrichment of a number of pathways including protein processing and apoptosis but depletion of proteins involved in steroid hormone and glycosphingolipid metabolism. Five-hundred four of the detected proteins included N-acetylation modifications, and 1292 different proteins were observed to be N-glycosylated. This first large-scale proteomic analysis will enhance the knowledge base about CHO capabilities for recombinant expression and provide information useful in cell engineering efforts aimed at modifying CHO cellular functions. PMID:22971049

  15. Proteomics: methodologies and applications in oncology.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Bradly G

    2008-04-01

    Few technological developments have created as much excitement and skepticism as proteomics over their potential to change clinical diagnostic and prognostic procedures. Proteomics concerns itself with the characterization and function of all cellular proteins, the ultimate determinants of cellular function. As such, it represents the end result of all mechanisms of gene regulation and thus offers tremendous potential for characterizing biology. In much the same way as what has occurred with the genome, the scientific community is coming to grips with the fact that the proteome, although enormously complex, is finite. It is conceivable that we will learn the identity of all possible proteins, including all posttranslational modifications. The rate of protein discovery continues to accelerate in large part because of improvements in mass spectrometry-based technologies coupled with improved genomic databases and bioinformatic tools. In addition, there is reason to believe that proteomics is on the verge of moving from a methodology that requires repeated proteome "discovery" to one that can more systematically profile proteomes. This review discusses current proteomic-based technologies and the efforts of scientists to move them into the clinic for use in patients treated with radiotherapy and other modalities.

  16. Proteomics of the periconception milieu.

    PubMed

    Fazeli, Alireza; Moein Vaziri, Najmeh; Holt, William Vincent

    2015-02-01

    There is increasing realisation that human health status in adulthood depends critically upon environmental conditions pertaining around the time of conception and during pregnancy. Poor maternal diet or adverse environmental conditions around the periconception period somehow induces the resultant embryo to adapt predictively in order to survive this level of stress for the whole of its life. However, if there is a mismatch between expectation and reality, where the conditions during later life are better than expected, things go wrong and the adult suffers a range of illnesses, including diabetes, heart disease, hypertension and stroke. Understanding the molecular signals that direct the early embryo to adopt appropriate adaptations to suit its future life would be extremely valuable. However, although it appears to be an ideal task for proteomic applications, there are technical, ethical and practical limitations to what can be achieved with the current framework of proteomic technology. Here, we review what has been achieved to date, explain some of the experimental problems and suggest some strategies for taking this field forward.

  17. Brain Proteomics of Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Dwivedi, Sutopa B.; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Kumar, Praveen; Kim, Min-Sik; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Getnet, Derese; Ahiakonu, Priscilla; De, Gourav; Nair, Bipin; Gowda, Harsha; Prasad, T.S. Keshava; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Anopheles gambiae has a well-adapted system for host localization, feeding, and mating behavior, which are all governed by neuronal processes in the brain. However, there are no published reports characterizing the brain proteome to elucidate neuronal signaling mechanisms in the vector. To this end, a large-scale mapping of the brain proteome of An. gambiae was carried out using high resolution tandem mass spectrometry, revealing a repertoire of >1800 proteins, of which 15% could not be assigned any function. A large proportion of the identified proteins were predicted to be involved in diverse biological processes including metabolism, transport, protein synthesis, and olfaction. This study also led to the identification of 10 GPCR classes of proteins, which could govern sensory pathways in mosquitoes. Proteins involved in metabolic and neural processes, chromatin modeling, and synaptic vesicle transport associated with neuronal transmission were predominantly expressed in the brain. Proteogenomic analysis expanded our findings with the identification of 15 novel genes and 71 cases of gene refinements, a subset of which were validated by RT-PCR and sequencing. Overall, our study offers valuable insights into the brain physiology of the vector that could possibly open avenues for intervention strategies for malaria in the future. PMID:24937107

  18. Bioinformatic challenges in targeted proteomics.

    PubMed

    Reker, Daniel; Malmström, Lars

    2012-09-01

    Selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry is an emerging targeted proteomics technology that allows for the investigation of complex protein samples with high sensitivity and efficiency. It requires extensive knowledge about the sample for the many parameters needed to carry out the experiment to be set appropriately. Most studies today rely on parameter estimation from prior studies, public databases, or from measuring synthetic peptides. This is efficient and sound, but in absence of prior data, de novo parameter estimation is necessary. Computational methods can be used to create an automated framework to address this problem. However, the number of available applications is still small. This review aims at giving an orientation on the various bioinformatical challenges. To this end, we state the problems in classical machine learning and data mining terms, give examples of implemented solutions and provide some room for alternatives. This will hopefully lead to an increased momentum for the development of algorithms and serve the needs of the community for computational methods. We note that the combination of such methods in an assisted workflow will ease both the usage of targeted proteomics in experimental studies as well as the further development of computational approaches. PMID:22866949

  19. Neural Stem Cells (NSCs) and Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Shoemaker, Lorelei D.; Kornblum, Harley I.

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) can self-renew and give rise to the major cell types of the CNS. Studies of NSCs include the investigation of primary, CNS-derived cells as well as animal and human embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived sources. NSCs provide a means with which to study normal neural development, neurodegeneration, and neurological disease and are clinically relevant sources for cellular repair to the damaged and diseased CNS. Proteomics studies of NSCs have the potential to delineate molecules and pathways critical for NSC biology and the means by which NSCs can participate in neural repair. In this review, we provide a background to NSC biology, including the means to obtain them and the caveats to these processes. We then focus on advances in the proteomic interrogation of NSCs. This includes the analysis of posttranslational modifications (PTMs); approaches to analyzing different proteomic compartments, such the secretome; as well as approaches to analyzing temporal differences in the proteome to elucidate mechanisms of differentiation. We also discuss some of the methods that will undoubtedly be useful in the investigation of NSCs but which have not yet been applied to the field. While many proteomics studies of NSCs have largely catalogued the proteome or posttranslational modifications of specific cellular states, without delving into specific functions, some have led to understandings of functional processes or identified markers that could not have been identified via other means. Many challenges remain in the field, including the precise identification and standardization of NSCs used for proteomic analyses, as well as how to translate fundamental proteomics studies to functional biology. The next level of investigation will require interdisciplinary approaches, combining the skills of those interested in the biochemistry of proteomics with those interested in modulating NSC function. PMID:26494823

  20. Neural Stem Cells (NSCs) and Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Shoemaker, Lorelei D; Kornblum, Harley I

    2016-02-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) can self-renew and give rise to the major cell types of the CNS. Studies of NSCs include the investigation of primary, CNS-derived cells as well as animal and human embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived sources. NSCs provide a means with which to study normal neural development, neurodegeneration, and neurological disease and are clinically relevant sources for cellular repair to the damaged and diseased CNS. Proteomics studies of NSCs have the potential to delineate molecules and pathways critical for NSC biology and the means by which NSCs can participate in neural repair. In this review, we provide a background to NSC biology, including the means to obtain them and the caveats to these processes. We then focus on advances in the proteomic interrogation of NSCs. This includes the analysis of posttranslational modifications (PTMs); approaches to analyzing different proteomic compartments, such the secretome; as well as approaches to analyzing temporal differences in the proteome to elucidate mechanisms of differentiation. We also discuss some of the methods that will undoubtedly be useful in the investigation of NSCs but which have not yet been applied to the field. While many proteomics studies of NSCs have largely catalogued the proteome or posttranslational modifications of specific cellular states, without delving into specific functions, some have led to understandings of functional processes or identified markers that could not have been identified via other means. Many challenges remain in the field, including the precise identification and standardization of NSCs used for proteomic analyses, as well as how to translate fundamental proteomics studies to functional biology. The next level of investigation will require interdisciplinary approaches, combining the skills of those interested in the biochemistry of proteomics with those interested in modulating NSC function. PMID:26494823

  1. Selected reaction monitoring applied to proteomics.

    PubMed

    Gallien, Sebastien; Duriez, Elodie; Domon, Bruno

    2011-03-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) performed on triple quadrupole mass spectrometers has been the reference quantitative technique to analyze small molecules for several decades. It is now emerging in proteomics as the ideal tool to complement shotgun qualitative studies; targeted SRM quantitative analysis offers high selectivity, sensitivity and a wide dynamic range. However, SRM applied to proteomics presents singularities that distinguish it from small molecules analysis. This review is an overview of SRM technology and describes the specificities and the technical aspects of proteomics experiments. Ongoing developments aiming at increasing multiplexing capabilities of SRM are discussed; they dramatically improve its throughput and extend its field of application to directed or supervised discovery experiments.

  2. Optimal isolation of mitochondria for proteomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Stimpson, Scott E; Coorssen, Jens R; Myers, Simon J

    2015-04-15

    Considering the key role of mitochondria in cellular (dys)functions, we compared a standard isolation protocol, followed by lysis in urea/detergent buffer, with a commercially available isolation buffer that rapidly yields a mitochondrial protein fraction. The standard protocol yielded significantly better overall resolution and coverage of both the soluble and membrane mitochondrial proteomes; although the kit was faster, it resulted in recovery of only approximately 56% of the detectable proteome. The quality of "omic" analysis depends on sample handling; for large-scale protein studies, well-resolved proteomes are highly dependent on the purity of starting material and the rigor of the extraction protocol. PMID:25596337

  3. Accounting for population variation in targeted proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Grant M.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Rodriguez, Larissa M.; Wu, Chaochao; MacLean, Brendan; Smith, Richard D.; MacCoss, Michael; Payne, Samuel H.

    2014-01-03

    Individual proteomes typically differ from the reference human proteome at ~10,000 single amino acid variants. When viewed at the population scale, this individual variation results in a wide variety of protein sequences. In targeted proteomics experiments, such variability would confound accurate protein quantification. To facilitate researchers in identifying target peptides with high variability within the human population we have created the Population Variation plug-in for Skyline, which provides easy access to the polymorphisms stored in dbSNP. Given a set of peptides, the tool reports minor allele frequency for common polymorphisms. We highlight the importance of considering genetic variation by applying the tool to public datasets.

  4. Affinity Proteomics in the mountains: Alpbach 2015.

    PubMed

    Taussig, Michael J

    2016-09-25

    The 2015 Alpbach Workshop on Affinity Proteomics, organised by the EU AFFINOMICS consortium, was the 7th workshop in this series. As in previous years, the focus of the event was the current state of affinity methods for proteome analysis, including complementarity with mass spectrometry, progress in recombinant binder production methods, alternatives to classical antibodies as affinity reagents, analysis of proteome targets, industry focus on biomarkers, and diagnostic and clinical applications. The combination of excellent science with Austrian mountain scenery and winter sports engender an atmosphere that makes this series of workshops exceptional. The articles in this Special Issue represent a cross-section of the presentations at the 2015 meeting. PMID:27118167

  5. Trends in mass spectrometry instrumentation for proteomics.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard D

    2002-12-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a primary tool for proteomics because of its capabilities for rapid and sensitive protein identification and quantitation. It is now possible to identify thousands of proteins from microgram sample quantities in a single day and to quantify relative protein abundances. However, the need for increased capabilities for proteome measurements is immense and is now driving both new strategies and instrument advances. These developments include those based on integration with multi-dimensional liquid separations and high accuracy mass measurements and promise more than order of magnitude improvements in sensitivity, dynamic range and throughput for proteomic analyses in the near future.

  6. Proteomics/genomics and signaling in lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wollscheid, Bernd; Watts, Julian D; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2004-06-01

    Recent technological advances in genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics have offered new insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie lymphocyte signaling and function, and the development of new tools in these areas has opened up new avenues for biological investigation. By adding a quantitative dimension to lymphocyte proteome profiling, molecular machines and spatiotemporal regulatory processes can now be analyzed using such discovery-driven approaches. Biologists employing genomic and proteomic tools are gathering data at increasing speed and their struggle to extract maximal biological information is helped by new software tools that enable the detailed comparison of multiple datasets.

  7. The disulfide proteome and other reactive cysteine proteomes: analysis and functional significance.

    PubMed

    Lindahl, Marika; Mata-Cabana, Alejandro; Kieselbach, Thomas

    2011-06-15

    Ten years ago, proteomics techniques designed for large-scale investigations of redox-sensitive proteins started to emerge. The proteomes, defined as sets of proteins containing reactive cysteines that undergo oxidative post-translational modifications, have had a particular impact on research concerning the redox regulation of cellular processes. These proteomes, which are hereafter termed "disulfide proteomes," have been studied in nearly all kingdoms of life, including animals, plants, fungi, and bacteria. Disulfide proteomics has been applied to the identification of proteins modified by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species under stress conditions. Other studies involving disulfide proteomics have addressed the functions of thioredoxins and glutaredoxins. Hence, there is a steadily growing number of proteins containing reactive cysteines, which are probable targets for redox regulation. The disulfide proteomes have provided evidence that entire pathways, such as glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the Calvin-Benson cycle, are controlled by mechanisms involving changes in the cysteine redox state of each enzyme implicated. Synthesis and degradation of proteins are processes highly represented in disulfide proteomes and additional biochemical data have established some mechanisms for their redox regulation. Thus, combined with biochemistry and genetics, disulfide proteomics has a significant potential to contribute to new discoveries on redox regulation and signaling.

  8. The Mitochondrial Proteome and Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Sarah E.; Mootha, Vamsi K.

    2015-01-01

    For nearly three decades, the sequence of the human mitochondrial genome (mtDNA) has provided a molecular framework for understanding maternally inherited diseases. However, the vast majority of human mitochondrial disorders are caused by nuclear defects, which is not surprising since the mtDNA encodes only 13 proteins. Advances in genomics, mass spectrometry, and computation have only recently made it possible to systematically identify the complement of over 1,000 proteins that comprise the mammalian mitochondrial proteome. Here, we review recent progress in characterizing the mitochondrial proteome and highlight insights into its complexity, tissue heterogeneity, evolutionary origins, and biochemical versatility. We then discuss how this proteome is being used to discover the genetic basis of respiratory chain disorders as well as to expand our definition of mitochondrial disease. Finally, we explore future prospects and challenges for using the mitochondrial proteome as a foundation for systems analysis of the organelle. PMID:20690818

  9. Characterization of individual mouse cerebrospinal fluid proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Angel, Thomas E.; Chavkin, Charles; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-03-20

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) offers key insight into the status of the central nervous system. Characterization of murine CSF proteomes can provide a valuable resource for studying central nervous system injury and disease in animal models. However, the small volume of CSF in mice has thus far limited individual mouse proteome characterization. Through non-terminal CSF extractions in C57Bl/6 mice and high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of individual murine samples, we report the most comprehensive proteome characterization of individual murine CSF to date. Utilizing stringent protein inclusion criteria that required the identification of at least two unique peptides (1% false discovery rate at the peptide level) we identified a total of 566 unique proteins, including 128 proteins from three individual CSF samples that have been previously identified in brain tissue. Our methods and analysis provide a mechanism for individual murine CSF proteome analysis.

  10. Proteomics of aluminum tolerance in plants.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lu; Lan, Ping; Shen, Ren Fang; Li, Wen Feng

    2014-03-01

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is a major constraint for plant root development and growth as well as crop yield in acidic soils, which constitute approximately 40% of the potentially arable lands worldwide. The mechanisms of Al tolerance in plants are not well understood. As a whole systems approach, proteomic techniques have proven to be crucial as a complementary strategy to explore the mechanism in Al toxicity. Review here focuses on the potential of proteomics to unravel the common and plant species-specific changes at proteome level under Al stress, via comparative analysis of the Al-responsive proteins uncovered by recent proteomic studies using 2DE. Understanding the mechanisms of Al tolerance in plants is critical to generate Al resistance crops for developing sustainable agriculture practices, thereby contributing to food security worldwide.

  11. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | About

    Cancer.gov

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  12. Analysis of soybean seed proteins using proteomics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This editorial elaborates on investigations consisting of different proteomics technologies and their application to biological sciences. In addition, different classes of soybean seed proteins are discussed. This information will be useful to scientists in obtaining a greater understanding of the...

  13. Networks in proteomics analysis of cancer.

    PubMed

    Goh, Wilson Wen Bin; Wong, Limsoon

    2013-12-01

    Proteomics provides direct biological information on proteins but is still a limited platform. Borrowing from genomics, its cancer-specific applications can be broadly categorized as (1) pure diagnostics, (2) biomarkers, (3) identification of root causes and (4) identification of cancer-specific network rewirings. Biological networks capture complex relationships between proteins and provide an appropriate means of contextualization. While playing significantly larger roles, especially in 1 and 3, progress in proteomics-specific network-based methods is lagging as compared to genomics. Rapid hardware advances and improvements in proteomic identification and quantification have given rise to much better quality data alongside advent of new network-based analysis methods. However, a tighter integration between analytics and hardware is still essential for network analysis to play more significant roles in proteomics analysis.

  14. Drug target identification and quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    He, Tao; Jin Kim, Yeoun; Heidbrink, Jenny L; Moore, Paul A; Ruben, Steven M

    2006-10-01

    The emerging technologies in proteomic analysis provide great opportunity for the discovery of novel therapeutic drug targets for unmet medical needs through delivering of key information on protein expression, post-translational modifications and protein-protein interactions. This review presents a summary of current quantitative proteomic concepts and mass spectrometric technologies, which enable the acceleration of target discovery. Examples of the strategies and current technologies in the target identification/validation process are provided to illustrate the successful application of proteomics in target identification, in particular for monoclonal antibody therapies. Current bottlenecks and future directions of proteomic studies for target and biomarker identification are also discussed to better facilitate the application of this technology.

  15. The Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer | Partners

    Cancer.gov

    An objective of the Reagents and Resources component of NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer Initiative is to generate highly characterized monoclonal antibodies to human proteins associated with cancer.

  16. Unexpected features of the dark proteome.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, Nelson; Heinrich, Julian; Stolte, Christian; Sabir, Kenneth S; Buckley, Michael J; Tabor, Bruce; Signal, Beth; Gloss, Brian S; Hammang, Christopher J; Rost, Burkhard; Schafferhans, Andrea; O'Donoghue, Seán I

    2015-12-29

    We surveyed the "dark" proteome-that is, regions of proteins never observed by experimental structure determination and inaccessible to homology modeling. For 546,000 Swiss-Prot proteins, we found that 44-54% of the proteome in eukaryotes and viruses was dark, compared with only ∼14% in archaea and bacteria. Surprisingly, most of the dark proteome could not be accounted for by conventional explanations, such as intrinsic disorder or transmembrane regions. Nearly half of the dark proteome comprised dark proteins, in which the entire sequence lacked similarity to any known structure. Dark proteins fulfill a wide variety of functions, but a subset showed distinct and largely unexpected features, such as association with secretion, specific tissues, the endoplasmic reticulum, disulfide bonding, and proteolytic cleavage. Dark proteins also had short sequence length, low evolutionary reuse, and few known interactions with other proteins. These results suggest new research directions in structural and computational biology. PMID:26578815

  17. Unexpected features of the dark proteome.

    PubMed

    Perdigão, Nelson; Heinrich, Julian; Stolte, Christian; Sabir, Kenneth S; Buckley, Michael J; Tabor, Bruce; Signal, Beth; Gloss, Brian S; Hammang, Christopher J; Rost, Burkhard; Schafferhans, Andrea; O'Donoghue, Seán I

    2015-12-29

    We surveyed the "dark" proteome-that is, regions of proteins never observed by experimental structure determination and inaccessible to homology modeling. For 546,000 Swiss-Prot proteins, we found that 44-54% of the proteome in eukaryotes and viruses was dark, compared with only ∼14% in archaea and bacteria. Surprisingly, most of the dark proteome could not be accounted for by conventional explanations, such as intrinsic disorder or transmembrane regions. Nearly half of the dark proteome comprised dark proteins, in which the entire sequence lacked similarity to any known structure. Dark proteins fulfill a wide variety of functions, but a subset showed distinct and largely unexpected features, such as association with secretion, specific tissues, the endoplasmic reticulum, disulfide bonding, and proteolytic cleavage. Dark proteins also had short sequence length, low evolutionary reuse, and few known interactions with other proteins. These results suggest new research directions in structural and computational biology.

  18. Proteomics in the genome engineering era.

    PubMed

    Vandemoortele, Giel; Gevaert, Kris; Eyckerman, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Genome engineering experiments used to be lengthy, inefficient, and often expensive, preventing a widespread adoption of such experiments for the full assessment of endogenous protein functions. With the revolutionary clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 technology, genome engineering became accessible to the broad life sciences community and is now implemented in several research areas. One particular field that can benefit significantly from this evolution is proteomics where a substantial impact on experimental design and general proteome biology can be expected. In this review, we describe the main applications of genome engineering in proteomics, including the use of engineered disease models and endogenous epitope tagging. In addition, we provide an overview on current literature and highlight important considerations when launching genome engineering technologies in proteomics workflows.

  19. Bioinformatic analysis of proteomics data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Most biochemical reactions in a cell are regulated by highly specialized proteins, which are the prime mediators of the cellular phenotype. Therefore the identification, quantitation and characterization of all proteins in a cell are of utmost importance to understand the molecular processes that mediate cellular physiology. With the advent of robust and reliable mass spectrometers that are able to analyze complex protein mixtures within a reasonable timeframe, the systematic analysis of all proteins in a cell becomes feasible. Besides the ongoing improvements of analytical hardware, standardized methods to analyze and study all proteins have to be developed that allow the generation of testable new hypothesis based on the enormous pre-existing amount of biological information. Here we discuss current strategies on how to gather, filter and analyze proteomic data sates using available software packages. PMID:25033288

  20. Collaboration - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Despite great strides in proteomics and the growing number of articles citing the discovery of potential biomarkers, the actual rate of introduction of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved protein analytes has been relatively unchanged over the past 10 years. One of reasons for the lack of new protein-based biomarkers approved has been a lack of information and understanding by the proteomics research community to the regulatory process used by the FDA.

  1. Proteogenomics Dashboard for the Human Proteome Project.

    PubMed

    Tabas-Madrid, Daniel; Alves-Cruzeiro, Joao; Segura, Victor; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Vialas, Vital; Prieto, Gorka; García, Carlos; Corrales, Fernando J; Albar, Juan Pablo; Pascual-Montano, Alberto

    2015-09-01

    dasHPPboard is a novel proteomics-based dashboard that collects and reports the experiments produced by the Spanish Human Proteome Project consortium (SpHPP) and aims to help HPP to map the entire human proteome. We have followed the strategy of analog genomics projects like the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE), which provides a vast amount of data on human cell lines experiments. The dashboard includes results of shotgun and selected reaction monitoring proteomics experiments, post-translational modifications information, as well as proteogenomics studies. We have also processed the transcriptomics data from the ENCODE and Human Body Map (HBM) projects for the identification of specific gene expression patterns in different cell lines and tissues, taking special interest in those genes having little proteomic evidence available (missing proteins). Peptide databases have been built using single nucleotide variants and novel junctions derived from RNA-Seq data that can be used in search engines for sample-specific protein identifications on the same cell lines or tissues. The dasHPPboard has been designed as a tool that can be used to share and visualize a combination of proteomic and transcriptomic data, providing at the same time easy access to resources for proteogenomics analyses. The dasHPPboard can be freely accessed at: http://sphppdashboard.cnb.csic.es.

  2. Proteomics boosts translational and clinical microbiology.

    PubMed

    Del Chierico, F; Petrucca, A; Vernocchi, P; Bracaglia, G; Fiscarelli, E; Bernaschi, P; Muraca, M; Urbani, A; Putignani, L

    2014-01-31

    The application of proteomics to translational and clinical microbiology is one of the most advanced frontiers in the management and control of infectious diseases and in the understanding of complex microbial systems within human fluids and districts. This new approach aims at providing, by dedicated bioinformatic pipelines, a thorough description of pathogen proteomes and their interactions within the context of human host ecosystems, revolutionizing the vision of infectious diseases in biomedicine and approaching new viewpoints in both diagnostic and clinical management of the patient. Indeed, in the last few years, many laboratories have matured a series of advanced proteomic applications, aiming at providing individual proteome charts of pathogens, with respect to their morph and/or cell life stages, antimicrobial or antimycotic resistance profiling, epidemiological dispersion. Herein, we aim at reviewing the current state-of-the-art on proteomic protocols designed and set-up for translational and diagnostic microbiological purposes, from axenic pathogens' characterization to microbiota ecosystems' full description. The final goal is to describe applications of the most common MALDI-TOF MS platforms to advanced diagnostic issues related to emerging infections, increasing of fastidious bacteria, and generation of patient-tailored phylotypes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Trends in Microbial Proteomics.

  3. Affordable proteomics: the two-hybrid systems.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Marc

    2003-06-01

    Numerous proteomic methodologies exist, but most require a heavy investment in expertise and technology. This puts these approaches out of reach for many laboratories and small companies, rarely allowing proteomics to be used as a pilot approach for biomarker or target identification. Two proteomic approaches, 2D gel electrophoresis and the two-hybrid systems, are currently available to most researchers. The two-hybrid systems, though accommodating to large-scale experiments, were originally designed as practical screens, that by comparison to current proteomics tools were small-scale, affordable and technically feasible. The screens rapidly generated data, identifying protein interactions that were previously uncharacterized. The foundation for a two-hybrid proteomic investigation can be purchased as separate kits from a number of companies. The true power of the technique lies not in its affordability, but rather in its portability. The two-hybrid system puts proteomics back into laboratories where the output of the screens can be evaluated by researchers with experience in the particular fields of basic research, cancer biology, toxicology or drug development.

  4. [Progress in stable isotope labeled quantitative proteomics methods].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuan; Shan, Yichu; Zhang, Lihua; Zhang, Yukui

    2013-06-01

    Quantitative proteomics is an important research field in post-genomics era. There are two strategies for proteome quantification: label-free methods and stable isotope labeling methods which have become the most important strategy for quantitative proteomics at present. In the past few years, a number of quantitative methods have been developed, which support the fast development in biology research. In this work, we discuss the progress in the stable isotope labeling methods for quantitative proteomics including relative and absolute quantitative proteomics, and then give our opinions on the outlook of proteome quantification methods.

  5. Data from proteomic characterization and comparison of mammalian milk fat globule proteomes by iTRAQ analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongxin; Zheng, Nan; Zhao, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yangdong; Han, Rongwei; Ma, Lu; Zhao, Shengguo; Li, Songli; Guo, Tongjun; Wang, Jiaqi

    2015-06-01

    Milk fat globules memebrane (MFGM)-enriched proteomes from Holstein, Jersey, yak, buffalo, goat, camel, horse, and human were extracted and identified by an iTRAQ quantification proteomic approach. Proteomes data were analyzed by bioinformatic and multivariate statistical analysis and used to present the characteristic traits of the MFGM proteins among the studied mammals. The data of this study are also related to the research article "Proteomic characterization and comparison of mammalian milk fat globule proteomes by iTRAQ analysis" in the Journal of Proteomics [1]. PMID:26217709

  6. Rapid development of proteomics in China: from the perspective of the Human Liver Proteome Project and technology development.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Xu, ZhongWei; Zhai, LinHui; Li, YanChang; Fan, FengXu; Zheng, JunJie; Xu, Ping; He, FuChu

    2014-12-01

    Proteomics focuses on the systematic identification and quantification of entire proteomes and interpretation of proteins' biological functions. During the last decade, proteomics in China has grown much faster than other research fields in the life sciences. At the beginning of the second decade of the 21(st) century, the rapid development of high-resolution and high-speed mass spectrometry makes proteomics a powerful tool to study the mechanisms underlying physiological/pathological processes in organisms. This article provides a brief overview of proteomics technology development and representative scientific progress of the Human Liver Proteome Project (HLPP) in China over the past three years.

  7. Optimizing Algorithm Choice for Metaproteomics: Comparing X!Tandem and Proteome Discoverer for Soil Proteomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, K. S.; Kim, E. H.; Jones, R. M.; de Leon, K. C.; Woodcroft, B. J.; Tyson, G. W.; Rich, V. I.

    2014-12-01

    The growing field of metaproteomics links microbial communities to their expressed functions by using mass spectrometry methods to characterize community proteins. Comparison of mass spectrometry protein search algorithms and their biases is crucial for maximizing the quality and amount of protein identifications in mass spectral data. Available algorithms employ different approaches when mapping mass spectra to peptides against a database. We compared mass spectra from four microbial proteomes derived from high-organic content soils searched with two search algorithms: 1) Sequest HT as packaged within Proteome Discoverer (v.1.4) and 2) X!Tandem as packaged in TransProteomicPipeline (v.4.7.1). Searches used matched metagenomes, and results were filtered to allow identification of high probability proteins. There was little overlap in proteins identified by both algorithms, on average just ~24% of the total. However, when adjusted for spectral abundance, the overlap improved to ~70%. Proteome Discoverer generally outperformed X!Tandem, identifying an average of 12.5% more proteins than X!Tandem, with X!Tandem identifying more proteins only in the first two proteomes. For spectrally-adjusted results, the algorithms were similar, with X!Tandem marginally outperforming Proteome Discoverer by an average of ~4%. We then assessed differences in heat shock proteins (HSP) identification by the two algorithms by BLASTing identified proteins against the Heat Shock Protein Information Resource, because HSP hits typically account for the majority signal in proteomes, due to extraction protocols. Total HSP identifications for each of the 4 proteomes were approximately ~15%, ~11%, ~17%, and ~19%, with ~14% for total HSPs with redundancies removed. Of the ~15% average of proteins from the 4 proteomes identified as HSPs, ~10% of proteins and spectra were identified by both algorithms. On average, Proteome Discoverer identified ~9% more HSPs than X!Tandem.

  8. Characterization of the Mouse Brain Proteome Using Global Proteomic Analysis Complemented with Cysteinyl-Peptide Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haixing; Qian, Wei-Jun; Chin, Mark H.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Barry, Richard C.; Liu, Tao; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Mottaz, Heather M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Camp, David G.; Khan, Arshad H.; Smith, Desmond J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Given the growing interest in applying genomic and proteomic approaches for studying the mammalian brain using mouse models, we hereby present a global proteomic approach for analyzing brain tissue and for the first time a comprehensive characterization of the whole mouse brain proteome. Preparation of the whole brain sample incorporated a highly efficient cysteinyl-peptide enrichment (CPE) technique to complement a global enzymatic digestion method. Both the global and the cysteinyl-enriched peptide samples were analyzed by SCX fractionation coupled with reversed phase LC-MS/MS analysis. A total of 48,328 different peptides were confidently identified (>98% confidence level), covering 7792 non-redundant proteins (∼34% of the predicted mouse proteome). 1564 and 1859 proteins were identified exclusively from the cysteinyl-peptide and the global peptide samples, respectively, corresponding to 25% and 31% improvements in proteome coverage compared to analysis of only the global peptide or cysteinyl-peptide samples. The identified proteins provide a broad representation of the mouse proteome with little bias evident due to protein pI, molecular weight, and/or cellular localization. Approximately 26% of the identified proteins with gene ontology (GO) annotations were membrane proteins, with 1447 proteins predicted to have transmembrane domains, and many of the membrane proteins were found to be involved in transport and cell signaling. The MS/MS spectrum count information for the identified proteins was used to provide a measure of relative protein abundances. The mouse brain peptide/protein database generated from this study represents the most comprehensive proteome coverage for the mammalian brain to date, and the basis for future quantitative brain proteomic studies using mouse models. The proteomic approach presented here may have broad applications for rapid proteomic analyses of various mouse models of human brain diseases. PMID:16457602

  9. The Escherichia coli Peripheral Inner Membrane Proteome*

    PubMed Central

    Papanastasiou, Malvina; Orfanoudaki, Georgia; Koukaki, Marina; Kountourakis, Nikos; Sardis, Marios Frantzeskos; Aivaliotis, Michalis; Karamanou, Spyridoula; Economou, Anastassios

    2013-01-01

    Biological membranes are essential for cell viability. Their functional characteristics strongly depend on their protein content, which consists of transmembrane (integral) and peripherally associated membrane proteins. Both integral and peripheral inner membrane proteins mediate a plethora of biological processes. Whereas transmembrane proteins have characteristic hydrophobic stretches and can be predicted using bioinformatics approaches, peripheral inner membrane proteins are hydrophilic, exist in equilibria with soluble pools, and carry no discernible membrane targeting signals. We experimentally determined the cytoplasmic peripheral inner membrane proteome of the model organism Escherichia coli using a multidisciplinary approach. Initially, we extensively re-annotated the theoretical proteome regarding subcellular localization using literature searches, manual curation, and multi-combinatorial bioinformatics searches of the available databases. Next we used sequential biochemical fractionations coupled to direct identification of individual proteins and protein complexes using high resolution mass spectrometry. We determined that the proposed cytoplasmic peripheral inner membrane proteome occupies a previously unsuspected ∼19% of the basic E. coli BL21(DE3) proteome, and the detected peripheral inner membrane proteome occupies ∼25% of the estimated expressed proteome of this cell grown in LB medium to mid-log phase. This value might increase when fleeting interactions, not studied here, are taken into account. Several proteins previously regarded as exclusively cytoplasmic bind membranes avidly. Many of these proteins are organized in functional or/and structural oligomeric complexes that bind to the membrane with multiple interactions. Identified proteins cover the full spectrum of biological activities, and more than half of them are essential. Our data suggest that the cytoplasmic proteome displays remarkably dynamic and extensive communication with

  10. Defining the human gallbladder proteome by transcriptomics and affinity proteomics.

    PubMed

    Kampf, Caroline; Mardinoglu, Adil; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Danielsson, Angelika; Nielsen, Jens; Pontén, Fredrik; Uhlen, Mathias

    2014-11-01

    Global protein analysis of human gallbladder tissue is vital for identification of molecular regulators and effectors of its physiological activity. Here, we employed a genome-wide deep RNA sequencing analysis in 28 human tissues to identify the genes overrepresented in the gallbladder and complemented it with antibody-based immunohistochemistry in 48 human tissues. We characterized human gallbladder proteins and identified 140 gallbladder-specific proteins with an elevated expression in the gallbladder as compared to the other analyzed tissues. Five genes were categorized as enriched, with at least fivefold higher levels in gallbladder, 60 genes were categorized as group enriched with elevated transcript levels in gallbladder shared with at least one other tissue and 75 genes were categorized as enhanced with higher expression than the average expression in other tissues. We explored the localization of the genes within the gallbladder through cell-type specific antibody-based protein profiling and the subcellular localization of the genes through immunofluorescent-based profiling. Finally, we revealed the biological processes and metabolic functions carried out by these genes through the use of GO, KEGG Pathway, and HMR2.0 that is compilation of the human metabolic reactions. We demonstrated the results of the combined analysis of the transcriptomics and affinity proteomics.

  11. Characterization of the Asia Oceania Human Proteome Organisation Membrane Proteomics Initiative Standard using SDS-PAGE shotgun proteomics.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lifeng; Kapp, Eugene A; McLauchlan, Danyl; Jordan, T William

    2011-11-01

    Although there are now multiple methods for the analysis of membrane proteomes, there is relatively little systematic characterization of proteomic workflows for membrane proteins. The Asia Oceania Human Proteome Organisation (AOHUPO) has therefore embarked on a Membrane Proteomics Initiative (MPI) using a large range of workflows. Here, we describe the characterization of the MPI mouse liver microsomal membrane Standard using SDS-PAGE prior to in-gel tryptic digestion and LC-ESI-MS/MS. The Na(2) CO(3) wash followed by SDS-PAGE prior to in-gel tryptic digestion and LC-MS/MS strategy was effective for the detection of membrane proteins with 47.1% of the identified proteins being transmembrane proteins. Gene Ontology term enrichment analysis showed that biological processes involving transport, lipid metabolism, cell communication, cell adhesion, and cellular component organization were significantly enriched. Comparison of the present data with the previously published reports on mouse liver proteomes confirmed that the MPI Standard provides an excellent resource for the analysis of membrane proteins in the AOHUPO MPI.

  12. Letter from the Director - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI’s Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer (CPTC) initiative is focused on developing a better understanding of cancer biology through the proteomic interrogation of genomically characterized tumors from sources such as The Cancer Genome Atlas.

  13. Progress through Collaboration - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), through the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR), has signed two Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) in the areas of sharing proteomics reagents and protocols and also in regulatory science.

  14. Integrated Proteomic Approaches for Understanding Toxicity of Environmental Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    To apply quantitative proteomic analysis to the evaluation of toxicity of environmental chemicals, we have developed an integrated proteomic technology platform. This platform has been applied to the analysis of the toxic effects and pathways of many important environmental chemi...

  15. Role of Proteomics in the Development of Personalized Medicine.

    PubMed

    Jain, Kewal K

    2016-01-01

    Advances in proteomic technologies have made import contribution to the development of personalized medicine by facilitating detection of protein biomarkers, proteomics-based molecular diagnostics, as well as protein biochips and pharmacoproteomics. Application of nanobiotechnology in proteomics, nanoproteomics, has further enhanced applications in personalized medicine. Proteomics-based molecular diagnostics will have an important role in the diagnosis of certain conditions and understanding the pathomechanism of disease. Proteomics will be a good bridge between diagnostics and therapeutics; the integration of these will be important for advancing personalized medicine. Use of proteomic biomarkers and combination of pharmacoproteomics with pharmacogenomics will enable stratification of clinical trials and improve monitoring of patients for development of personalized therapies. Proteomics is an important component of several interacting technologies used for development of personalized medicine, which is depicted graphically. Finally, cancer is a good example of applications of proteomic technologies for personalized management of cancer.

  16. Director's Update - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (NCI-CPTAC) has recently begun the proteomic interrogation of genomically-characterized tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas.

  17. Proteomics for everyday use: activities of the HUPO Brain Proteome Project during the 5th HUPO World Congress.

    PubMed

    Hamacher, Michael; Stephan, Christian; Eisenacher, Martin; van Hall, Andre; Marcus, Katrin; Martens, Lennart; Park, Young Mok; Gutstein, Howard B; Herberg, Friedrich; Meyer, Helmut E

    2007-04-01

    Long Beach hosted this year's annual congress of the Human Proteome Organisation (HUPO). In addition to the numerous sessions, talks and poster presentations organized by HUPO itself, several events were arranged by the HUPO initiatives. The Brain Proteome Project (HUPO BPP) was very active, initiating three pre-congress workshops: (i) the kick-off meeting of the EU-funded ProDaC consortium (Proteomics Data Collection) that is aiming at the bioinformatics Standardization in the proteomics field; (ii) the workshop "Standardization Issues in Proteomics: Perspectives from Vendors" giving an overview about the lessons learned by proteomics industrial partners; (iii) the 6th HUPO BPP Workshop "New Proteomics Approaches for further HUPO BPP Studies" offering new concepts for brain-related proteomics studies.

  18. Advances take stage - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    Regulatory advances in proteomics will be taking center stage at a Symposia scheduled to occur at the 2011 American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC) Annual Meeting. The symposium entitled "Enabling Translational Proteomics with NCI's Clinical Proteomic Technologies for Cancer" is scheduled for July 25, 2011 at AACC's annual Meeting.

  19. Tumor Cold Ischemia - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    In a recently published manuscript in the journal of Molecular and Cellular Proteomics, researchers from the National Cancer Institutes (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) investigated the effect of cold ischemia on the proteome of fresh frozen tumors.

  20. Caenorhabditis elegans proteomics comes of age.

    PubMed

    Shim, Yhong-Hee; Paik, Young-Ki

    2010-02-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans, a free-living soil nematode, is an ideal model system for studying various physiological problems relevant to human diseases. Despite its short history, C. elegans proteomics is receiving great attention in multiple research areas, including the genome annotation, major signaling pathways (e.g. TGF-beta and insulin/IGF-1 signaling), verification of RNA interference-mediated gene targeting, aging, disease models, as well as peptidomic analysis of neuropeptides involved in behavior and locomotion. For example, a proteome-wide profiling of developmental and aging processes not only provides basic information necessary for constructing a molecular network, but also identifies important target proteins for chemical modulation. Although C. elegans has a simple body system and neural circuitry, it exhibits very complicated functions ranging from feeding to locomotion. Investigation of these functions through proteomic analysis of various C. elegans neuropeptides, some of which are not found in the predicted genome sequence, would open a new field of peptidomics. Given the importance of nematode infection in plants and mammalian pathogenesis pathways, proteomics could be applied to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying plant- or animal-nematode pathogenesis and to identify novel antinematodal drugs. Thus, C. elegans proteomics, in combination of other molecular, biological and genetic techniques, would provide a versatile new tool box for the systematic analysis of gene functions throughout the entire life cycle of this nematode. PMID:20029841

  1. A Cell-type-resolved Liver Proteome*

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Chen; Li, Yanyan; Guo, Feifei; Jiang, Ying; Ying, Wantao; Li, Dong; Yang, Dong; Xia, Xia; Liu, Wanlin; Zhao, Yan; He, Yangzhige; Li, Xianyu; Sun, Wei; Liu, Qiongming; Song, Lei; Zhen, Bei; Zhang, Pumin; Qian, Xiaohong; Qin, Jun; He, Fuchu

    2016-01-01

    Parenchymatous organs consist of multiple cell types, primarily defined as parenchymal cells (PCs) and nonparenchymal cells (NPCs). The cellular characteristics of these organs are not well understood. Proteomic studies facilitate the resolution of the molecular details of different cell types in organs. These studies have significantly extended our knowledge about organogenesis and organ cellular composition. Here, we present an atlas of the cell-type-resolved liver proteome. In-depth proteomics identified 6000 to 8000 gene products (GPs) for each cell type and a total of 10,075 GPs for four cell types. This data set revealed features of the cellular composition of the liver: (1) hepatocytes (PCs) express the least GPs, have a unique but highly homogenous proteome pattern, and execute fundamental liver functions; (2) the division of labor among PCs and NPCs follows a model in which PCs make the main components of pathways, but NPCs trigger the pathways; and (3) crosstalk among NPCs and PCs maintains the PC phenotype. This study presents the liver proteome at cell resolution, serving as a research model for dissecting the cell type constitution and organ features at the molecular level. PMID:27562671

  2. Proteomic profile of dormant Trichophyton Rubrum conidia

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Wenchuan; Liu, Tao; Li, Rui; Yang, Jian; Wei, Candong; Zhang, Wenliang; Jin, Qi

    2008-01-01

    Background Trichophyton rubrum is the most common dermatophyte causing fungal skin infections in humans. Asexual sporulation is an important means of propagation for T. rubrum, and conidia produced by this way are thought to be the primary cause of human infections. Despite their importance in pathogenesis, the conidia of T. rubrum remain understudied. We intend to intensively investigate the proteome of dormant T. rubrum conidia to characterize its molecular and cellular features and to enhance the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Results The proteome of T. rubrum conidia was analyzed by combining shotgun proteomics with sample prefractionation and multiple enzyme digestion. In total, 1026 proteins were identified. All identified proteins were compared to those in the NCBI non-redundant protein database, the eukaryotic orthologous groups database, and the gene ontology database to obtain functional annotation information. Functional classification revealed that the identified proteins covered nearly all major biological processes. Some proteins were spore specific and related to the survival and dispersal of T. rubrum conidia, and many proteins were important to conidial germination and response to environmental conditions. Conclusion Our results suggest that the proteome of T. rubrum conidia is considerably complex, and that the maintenance of conidial dormancy is an intricate and elaborate process. This data set provides the first global framework for the dormant T. rubrum conidia proteome and is a stepping stone on the way to further study of the molecular mechanisms of T. rubrum conidial germination and the maintenance of conidial dormancy. PMID:18578874

  3. Post-harvest proteomics and food security.

    PubMed

    Pedreschi, Romina; Lurie, Susan; Hertog, Maarten; Nicolaï, Bart; Mes, Jurriaan; Woltering, Ernst

    2013-06-01

    To guarantee sufficient food supply for a growing world population, efforts towards improving crop yield and plant resistance should be complemented with efforts to reduce post-harvest losses. Post-harvest losses are substantial and occur at different stages of the food chain in developed and developing countries. In recent years, a substantially increasing interest can be seen in the application of proteomics to understand post-harvest events. In the near future post-harvest proteomics will be poised to move from fundamental research to aiding the reduction of food losses. Proteomics research can help in reducing food losses through (i) identification and validation of gene products associated to specific quality traits supporting marker-assisted crop improvement programmes, (ii) delivering markers of initial quality that allow optimisation of distribution conditions and prediction of remaining shelf-life for decision support systems and (iii) delivering early detection tools of physiological or pathogen-related post-harvest problems. In this manuscript, recent proteomics studies on post-harvest and stress physiology are reviewed and discussed. Perspectives on future directions of post-harvest proteomics studies aiming to reduce food losses are presented.

  4. Mass spectrometry in food proteomics: a tutorial.

    PubMed

    Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Muccilli, Vera; Saletti, Rosaria; Foti, Salvatore

    2014-09-01

    In the last decades, the continuous and rapid evolution of proteomic approaches has provided an efficient platform for the characterization of food-derived proteins. Particularly, the impressive increasing in performance and versatility of the MS instrumentation has contributed to the development of new analytical strategies for proteins, evidencing how MS arguably represents an indispensable tool in food proteomics. Investigation of protein composition in foodstuffs is helpful for understanding the relationship between the protein content and the nutritional and technological properties of foods, the production of methods for food traceability, the assessment of food quality and safety, including the detection of allergens and microbial contaminants in foods, or even the characterization of genetically modified products. Given the high variety of the food-derived proteins and considering their differences in chemical and physical properties, a single proteomic strategy for all purposes does not exist. Rather, proteomic approaches need to be adapted to each analytical problem, and development of new strategies is necessary in order to obtain always the best results. In this tutorial, the most relevant aspects of MS-based methodologies in food proteomics will be examined, and their advantages and drawbacks will be discussed.

  5. Post-harvest proteomics and food security.

    PubMed

    Pedreschi, Romina; Lurie, Susan; Hertog, Maarten; Nicolaï, Bart; Mes, Jurriaan; Woltering, Ernst

    2013-06-01

    To guarantee sufficient food supply for a growing world population, efforts towards improving crop yield and plant resistance should be complemented with efforts to reduce post-harvest losses. Post-harvest losses are substantial and occur at different stages of the food chain in developed and developing countries. In recent years, a substantially increasing interest can be seen in the application of proteomics to understand post-harvest events. In the near future post-harvest proteomics will be poised to move from fundamental research to aiding the reduction of food losses. Proteomics research can help in reducing food losses through (i) identification and validation of gene products associated to specific quality traits supporting marker-assisted crop improvement programmes, (ii) delivering markers of initial quality that allow optimisation of distribution conditions and prediction of remaining shelf-life for decision support systems and (iii) delivering early detection tools of physiological or pathogen-related post-harvest problems. In this manuscript, recent proteomics studies on post-harvest and stress physiology are reviewed and discussed. Perspectives on future directions of post-harvest proteomics studies aiming to reduce food losses are presented. PMID:23483703

  6. Pathway and network analysis in proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaogang; Hasan, Mohammad Al; Chen, Jake Yue

    2014-12-01

    Proteomics is inherently a systems science that studies not only measured protein and their expressions in a cell, but also the interplay of proteins, protein complexes, signaling pathways, and network modules. There is a rapid accumulation of Proteomics data in recent years. However, Proteomics data are highly variable, with results sensitive to data preparation methods, sample condition, instrument types, and analytical methods. To address the challenge in Proteomics data analysis, we review current tools being developed to incorporate biological function and network topological information. We categorize these tools into four types: tools with basic functional information and little topological features (e.g., GO category analysis), tools with rich functional information and little topological features (e.g., GSEA), tools with basic functional information and rich topological features (e.g., Cytoscape), and tools with rich functional information and rich topological features (e.g., PathwayExpress). We first review the potential application of these tools to Proteomics; then we review tools that can achieve automated learning of pathway modules and features, and tools that help perform integrated network visual analytics.

  7. Empirical Bayes Analysis of Quantitative Proteomics Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Margolin, Adam A.; Ong, Shao-En; Schenone, Monica; Gould, Robert; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Carr, Steven A.; Golub, Todd R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Advances in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have enabled the incorporation of proteomic data into systems approaches to biology. However, development of analytical methods has lagged behind. Here we describe an empirical Bayes framework for quantitative proteomics data analysis. The method provides a statistical description of each experiment, including the number of proteins that differ in abundance between 2 samples, the experiment's statistical power to detect them, and the false-positive probability of each protein. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed 2 types of mass spectrometric experiments. First, we showed that the method identified the protein targets of small-molecules in affinity purification experiments with high precision. Second, we re-analyzed a mass spectrometric data set designed to identify proteins regulated by microRNAs. Our results were supported by sequence analysis of the 3′ UTR regions of predicted target genes, and we found that the previously reported conclusion that a large fraction of the proteome is regulated by microRNAs was not supported by our statistical analysis of the data. Conclusions/Significance Our results highlight the importance of rigorous statistical analysis of proteomic data, and the method described here provides a statistical framework to robustly and reliably interpret such data. PMID:19829701

  8. Methods for Proteomic Analysis of Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Daifeng; Jarrett, Harry W.; Haskins, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Investigation of the transcription factor (TF) proteome presents challenges including the large number of low abundance and post-translationally modified proteins involved. Specialized purification and analysis methods have been developed over the last decades which facilitate the study of the TF proteome and these are reviewed here. Generally applicable proteomics methods that have been successfully applied are also discussed. TFs are selectively purified by affinity techniques using the DNA response element (RE) as the basis for highly specific binding, and several agents have been discovered that either enhance binding or diminish non-specific binding. One such affinity method called “trapping” enables purification of TFs bound to nM concentrations and recovery of TF complexes in a highly purified state. The electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) is the most important assay of TFs because it provides both measures of the affinity and amount of the TF present. Southwestern (SW) blotting and DNA-protein crosslinking (DPC) allow in vitro estimates of DNA-binding-protein mass, while chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) allows confirmation of promoter binding in vivo. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis methods (2-DE), and 3-DE methods which combines EMSA with 2-DE, allow further resolution of TFs. The synergy of highly selective purification and analytical strategies has led to an explosion of knowledge about the TF proteome and the proteomes of other DNA- and RNA-binding proteins. PMID:19726046

  9. Pathway and Network Analysis in Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaogang; Hasan, Mohammad Al; Chen, Jake Yue

    2014-01-01

    Proteomics is inherently a systems science that studies not only measured protein and their expressions in a cell, but also the interplay of proteins, protein complexes, signaling pathways, and network modules. There is a rapid accumulation of Proteomics data in recent years. However, Proteomics data are highly variable, with results being sensitive to data preparation methods, sample condition, instrument types, and analytical method. To address this challenge in Proteomics data analysis, we review common approaches developed to incorporate biological function and network topological information. We categorize existing tools into four categories: tools with basic functional information and little topological features (e.g., GO category analysis), tools with rich functional information and little topological features (e.g., GSEA), tools with basic functional information and rich topological features (e.g., Cytoscape), and tools with rich functional information and rich topological features (e.g., PathwayExpress). We review the general application potential of these tools to Proteomics. In addition, we also review tools that can achieve automated learning of pathway modules and features, and tools that help perform integrated network visual analytics. PMID:24911777

  10. PROTEOMICS in aquaculture: applications and trends.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Pedro M; Silva, Tomé S; Dias, Jorge; Jessen, Flemming

    2012-07-19

    Over the last forty years global aquaculture presented a growth rate of 6.9% per annum with an amazing production of 52.5 million tonnes in 2008, and a contribution of 43% of aquatic animal food for human consumption. In order to meet the world's health requirements of fish protein, a continuous growth in production is still expected for decades to come. Aquaculture is, though, a very competitive market, and a global awareness regarding the use of scientific knowledge and emerging technologies to obtain a better farmed organism through a sustainable production has enhanced the importance of proteomics in seafood biology research. Proteomics, as a powerful comparative tool, has therefore been increasingly used over the last decade to address different questions in aquaculture, regarding welfare, nutrition, health, quality, and safety. In this paper we will give an overview of these biological questions and the role of proteomics in their investigation, outlining the advantages, disadvantages and future challenges. A brief description of the proteomics technical approaches will be presented. Special focus will be on the latest trends related to the aquaculture production of fish with defined nutritional, health or quality properties for functional foods and the integration of proteomics techniques in addressing this challenging issue.

  11. [Proteomic biomarkers in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Bandrés, Sara; Durán, Raquel; Barrero, Francisco; Ramírez, Manuel; Vives, Francisco

    2014-02-16

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that affects movement and is caused by the death of the dopaminergic neurons in the compact part of the substantia nigra. Its diagnosis is essentially clinical, but although the signs and symptoms of PD are well known, the rate of diagnostic error is relatively high. It is estimated that 10-30% of patients initially diagnosed with PD are later reclassified. This disease has a high prevalence beyond the age of 60, and one of its biggest problems is that it is diagnosed when the degenerative process is already at a very advanced stage. Therefore, it is necessary to look for other biomarkers that make it possible to carry out an early diagnosis of PD, follow up its development, distinguish it from other related pathologies (parkinsonisms) and help monitor the effect of novel therapies. The fact that there are mutations that lead to PD, as well as polygenetic combinations that can act as risk factors, suggests the possibility of measuring the proteins resulting from the expression of these genes in peripheral tissues. And once their sensitivity and specificity have been proved they could be used as biomarkers for PD, even in the early phases of the disease. The aim of this work is to focus on a detailed review of the main candidate proteomic biomarkers researched to date by discussing the most recent literature.

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Hair Follicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishioka, Noriaki; Terada, Masahiro; Yamada, Shin; Seki, Masaya; Takahashi, Rika; Majima, Hideyuki J.; Higashibata, Akira; Mukai, Chiaki

    2013-02-01

    Hair root cells actively divide in a hair follicle, and they sensitively reflect physical conditions. By analyzing the human hair, we can know stress levels on the human body and metabolic conditions caused by microgravity environment and cosmic radiation. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has initiated a human research study to investigate the effects of long-term space flight on gene expression and mineral metabolism by analyzing hair samples of astronauts who stayed in the International Space Station (ISS) for 6 months. During long-term flights, the physiological effects on astronauts include muscle atrophy and bone calcium loss. Furthermore, radiation and psychological effects are important issue to consider. Therefore, an understanding of the effects of the space environment is important for developing countermeasures against the effects experienced by astronauts. In this experiment, we identify functionally important target proteins that integrate transcriptome, mineral metabolism and proteome profiles from human hair. To compare the protein expression data with the gene expression data from hair roots, we developed the protein processing method. We extracted the protein from five strands of hair using ISOGEN reagents. Then, these extracted proteins were analyzed by LC-MS/MS. These collected profiles will give us useful physiological information to examine the effect of space flight.

  13. The Tetrahymena thermophila phagosome proteome.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Mary Ellen; DeSouza, Leroi V; Samaranayake, Haresha; Pearlman, Ronald E; Siu, K W Michael; Klobutcher, Lawrence A

    2006-12-01

    In vertebrates, phagocytosis occurs mainly in specialized cells of the immune system and serves as a primary defense against invading pathogens, but it also plays a role in clearing apoptotic cells and in tissue remodeling during development. In contrast, unicellular eukaryotes, such as the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila, employ phagocytosis to ingest and degrade other microorganisms to meet their nutritional needs. To learn more about the protein components of the multistep process of phagocytosis, we carried out an analysis of the Tetrahymena phagosome proteome. Tetrahymena cells were fed polystyrene beads, which allowed for the efficient purification of phagosomes. The protein composition of purified phagosomes was then analyzed by multidimensional separation coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 453 peptides were identified that resulted in the identification of 73 putative phagosome proteins. Twenty-eight of the proteins have been implicated in phagocytosis in other organisms, indicating that key aspects of phagocytosis were conserved during evolution. Other identified proteins have not previously been associated with phagocytosis, including some of unknown function. Live-cell confocal fluorescence imaging of Tetrahymena strains expressing green fluorescent protein-tagged versions of four of the identified phagosome proteins provided evidence that at least three of the proteins (including two with unknown functions) are associated with phagosomes, indicating that the bulk of the proteins identified in the analyses are indeed phagosome associated.

  14. Making proteomics data accessible and reusable: Current state of proteomics databases and repositories

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Alpi, Emanuele; Wang, Rui; Hermjakob, Henning; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Compared to other data-intensive disciplines such as genomics, public deposition and storage of MS-based proteomics, data are still less developed due to, among other reasons, the inherent complexity of the data and the variety of data types and experimental workflows. In order to address this need, several public repositories for MS proteomics experiments have been developed, each with different purposes in mind. The most established resources are the Global Proteome Machine Database (GPMDB), PeptideAtlas, and the PRIDE database. Additionally, there are other useful (in many cases recently developed) resources such as ProteomicsDB, Mass Spectrometry Interactive Virtual Environment (MassIVE), Chorus, MaxQB, PeptideAtlas SRM Experiment Library (PASSEL), Model Organism Protein Expression Database (MOPED), and the Human Proteinpedia. In addition, the ProteomeXchange consortium has been recently developed to enable better integration of public repositories and the coordinated sharing of proteomics information, maximizing its benefit to the scientific community. Here, we will review each of the major proteomics resources independently and some tools that enable the integration, mining and reuse of the data. We will also discuss some of the major challenges and current pitfalls in the integration and sharing of the data. PMID:25158685

  15. Making proteomics data accessible and reusable: current state of proteomics databases and repositories.

    PubMed

    Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Alpi, Emanuele; Wang, Rui; Hermjakob, Henning; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio

    2015-03-01

    Compared to other data-intensive disciplines such as genomics, public deposition and storage of MS-based proteomics, data are still less developed due to, among other reasons, the inherent complexity of the data and the variety of data types and experimental workflows. In order to address this need, several public repositories for MS proteomics experiments have been developed, each with different purposes in mind. The most established resources are the Global Proteome Machine Database (GPMDB), PeptideAtlas, and the PRIDE database. Additionally, there are other useful (in many cases recently developed) resources such as ProteomicsDB, Mass Spectrometry Interactive Virtual Environment (MassIVE), Chorus, MaxQB, PeptideAtlas SRM Experiment Library (PASSEL), Model Organism Protein Expression Database (MOPED), and the Human Proteinpedia. In addition, the ProteomeXchange consortium has been recently developed to enable better integration of public repositories and the coordinated sharing of proteomics information, maximizing its benefit to the scientific community. Here, we will review each of the major proteomics resources independently and some tools that enable the integration, mining and reuse of the data. We will also discuss some of the major challenges and current pitfalls in the integration and sharing of the data.

  16. Proteomics in Argentina - limitations and future perspectives: A special emphasis on meat proteomics.

    PubMed

    Fadda, Silvina; Almeida, André M

    2015-11-01

    Argentina is one of the most relevant countries in Latin America, playing a major role in regional economics, culture and science. Over the last 80 years, Argentinean history has been characterized by several upward and downward phases that had major consequences on the development of science in the country and most recently on proteomics. In this article, we characterize the evolution of Proteomics sciences in Argentina over the last decade and a half. We describe the proteomics publication output of the country in the framework of the regional and international contexts, demonstrating that Argentina is solidly anchored in a regional context, showing results similar to other emergent and Latin American countries, albeit still far from the European, American or Australian realities. We also provide a case-study on the importance of Proteomics to a specific sector in the area of food science: the use of bacteria of technological interest, highlighting major achievements obtained by Argentinean proteomics scientists. Finally, we provide a general picture of the endeavors being undertaken by Argentinean Proteomics scientists and their international collaborators to promote the Proteomics-based research with the new generation of scientists and PhD students in both Argentina and other countries in the Southern cone.

  17. University of Victoria Genome British Columbia Proteomics Centre Partners with CPTAC - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    University of Victoria Genome British Columbia Proteomics Centre, a leader in proteomic technology development, has partnered with the U.S. National Cancer Institute (NCI) to make targeted proteomic assays accessible to the community through NCI’s CPTAC Assay Portal.

  18. Systems proteomics of liver mitochondria function.

    PubMed

    Williams, Evan G; Wu, Yibo; Jha, Pooja; Dubuis, Sébastien; Blattmann, Peter; Argmann, Carmen A; Houten, Sander M; Amariuta, Tiffany; Wolski, Witold; Zamboni, Nicola; Aebersold, Ruedi; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-06-10

    Recent improvements in quantitative proteomics approaches, including Sequential Window Acquisition of all Theoretical Mass Spectra (SWATH-MS), permit reproducible large-scale protein measurements across diverse cohorts. Together with genomics, transcriptomics, and other technologies, transomic data sets can be generated that permit detailed analyses across broad molecular interaction networks. Here, we examine mitochondrial links to liver metabolism through the genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome of 386 individuals in the BXD mouse reference population. Several links were validated between genetic variants toward transcripts, proteins, metabolites, and phenotypes. Among these, sequence variants in Cox7a2l alter its protein's activity, which in turn leads to downstream differences in mitochondrial supercomplex formation. This data set demonstrates that the proteome can now be quantified comprehensively, serving as a key complement to transcriptomics, genomics, and metabolomics--a combination moving us forward in complex trait analysis. PMID:27284200

  19. Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Léger, Thibaut; Garcia, Camille; Videlier, Mathieu; Camadro, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Label-free bottom-up shotgun MS-based proteomics is an extremely powerful and simple tool to provide high quality quantitative analyses of the yeast proteome with only microgram amounts of total protein. Although the experimental design of this approach is rather straightforward and does not require the modification of growth conditions, proteins or peptides, several factors must be taken into account to benefit fully from the power of this method. Key factors include the choice of an appropriate method for the preparation of protein extracts, careful evaluation of the instrument design and available analytical capabilities, the choice of the quantification method (intensity-based vs. spectral count), and the proper manipulation of the selected quantification algorithm. The elaboration of this robust workflow for data acquisition, processing, and analysis provides unprecedented insight into the dynamics of the yeast proteome. PMID:26483028

  20. Integrated Analysis of Transcriptomic and Proteomic Data

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Saad; Pal, Ranadip

    2013-01-01

    Until recently, understanding the regulatory behavior of cells has been pursued through independent analysis of the transcriptome or the proteome. Based on the central dogma, it was generally assumed that there exist a direct correspondence between mRNA transcripts and generated protein expressions. However, recent studies have shown that the correlation between mRNA and Protein expressions can be low due to various factors such as different half lives and post transcription machinery. Thus, a joint analysis of the transcriptomic and proteomic data can provide useful insights that may not be deciphered from individual analysis of mRNA or protein expressions. This article reviews the existing major approaches for joint analysis of transcriptomic and proteomic data. We categorize the different approaches into eight main categories based on the initial algorithm and final analysis goal. We further present analogies with other domains and discuss the existing research problems in this area. PMID:24082820

  1. A Review: Proteomics in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ze-Tan; Liang, Zhong-Guo; Zhu, Xiao-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Although radiotherapy is generally effective in the treatment of major nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), this treatment still makes approximately 20% of patients radioresistant. Therefore, the identification of blood or biopsy biomarkers that can predict the treatment response to radioresistance and that can diagnosis early stages of NPC would be highly useful to improve this situation. Proteomics is widely used in NPC for searching biomarkers and comparing differentially expressed proteins. In this review, an overview of proteomics with different samples related to NPC and common proteomics methods was made. In conclusion, identical proteins are sorted as follows: Keratin is ranked the highest followed by such proteins as annexin, heat shock protein, 14-3-3σ, nm-23 protein, cathepsin, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins, enolase, triosephosphate isomerase, stathmin, prohibitin, and vimentin. This ranking indicates that these proteins may be NPC-related proteins and have potential value for further studies. PMID:26184160

  2. Complementary Proteomic Analysis of Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Greco, Todd M.; Miteva, Yana; Conlon, Frank L.; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2013-01-01

    Proteomic characterization of protein complexes leverages the versatile platform of liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to elucidate molecular and cellular signaling processes underlying the dynamic regulation of macromolecular assemblies. Here, we describe a complementary proteomic approach optimized for immunoisolated protein complexes. As the relative complexity, abundance, and physiochemical properties of proteins can vary significantly between samples, we have provided (1) complementary sample preparation workflows, (2) detailed steps for HPLC and mass spectrometric method development, and (3) a bioinformatic workflow that provides confident peptide/protein identification paired with unbiased functional gene ontology analysis. This protocol can also be extended for characterization of larger complexity samples from whole cell or tissue Xenopus proteomes. PMID:22956100

  3. Selected reaction monitoring applied to proteomics.

    PubMed

    Gallien, Sebastien; Duriez, Elodie; Domon, Bruno

    2011-03-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) performed on triple quadrupole mass spectrometers has been the reference quantitative technique to analyze small molecules for several decades. It is now emerging in proteomics as the ideal tool to complement shotgun qualitative studies; targeted SRM quantitative analysis offers high selectivity, sensitivity and a wide dynamic range. However, SRM applied to proteomics presents singularities that distinguish it from small molecules analysis. This review is an overview of SRM technology and describes the specificities and the technical aspects of proteomics experiments. Ongoing developments aiming at increasing multiplexing capabilities of SRM are discussed; they dramatically improve its throughput and extend its field of application to directed or supervised discovery experiments. PMID:21394846

  4. Anthelmintic metabolism in parasitic helminths: proteomic insights.

    PubMed

    Brophy, Peter M; MacKintosh, Neil; Morphew, Russell M

    2012-08-01

    Anthelmintics are the cornerstone of parasitic helminth control. Surprisingly, understanding of the biochemical pathways used by parasitic helminths to detoxify anthelmintics is fragmented, despite the increasing global threat of anthelmintic resistance within the ruminant and equine industries. Reductionist biochemistry has likely over-estimated the enzymatic role of glutathione transferases in anthelmintic metabolism and neglected the potential role of the cytochrome P-450 superfamily (CYPs). Proteomic technologies offers the opportunity to support genomics, reverse genetics and pharmacokinetics, and provide an integrated insight into both the cellular mechanisms underpinning response to anthelmintics and also the identification of biomarker panels for monitoring the development of anthelmintic resistance. To date, there have been limited attempts to include proteomics in anthelmintic metabolism studies. Optimisations of membrane, post-translational modification and interaction proteomic technologies in helminths are needed to especially study Phase I CYPs and Phase III ABC transporter pumps for anthelmintics and their metabolites.

  5. Interaction proteomics of synapse protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Klemmer, Patricia; Smit, August B.

    2010-01-01

    The brain integrates complex types of information, and executes a wide range of physiological and behavioral processes. Trillions of tiny organelles, the synapses, are central to neuronal communication and information processing in the brain. Synaptic transmission involves an intricate network of synaptic proteins that forms the molecular machinery underlying transmitter release, activation, and modulation of transmitter receptors and signal transduction cascades. These processes are dynamically regulated and underlie neuroplasticity, crucial to learning and memory formation. In recent years, interaction proteomics has increasingly been used to elucidate the constituents of synaptic protein complexes. Unlike classic hypothesis-based assays, interaction proteomics detects both known and novel interactors without bias. In this trend article, we focus on the technical aspects of recent proteomics to identify synapse protein complexes, and the complementary methods used to verify the protein–protein interaction. Moreover, we discuss the experimental feasibility of performing global analysis of the synapse protein interactome. PMID:20361179

  6. Unexpected features of the dark proteome

    PubMed Central

    Perdigão, Nelson; Heinrich, Julian; Stolte, Christian; Sabir, Kenneth S.; Buckley, Michael J.; Tabor, Bruce; Signal, Beth; Gloss, Brian S.; Hammang, Christopher J.; Rost, Burkhard; Schafferhans, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We surveyed the “dark” proteome–that is, regions of proteins never observed by experimental structure determination and inaccessible to homology modeling. For 546,000 Swiss-Prot proteins, we found that 44–54% of the proteome in eukaryotes and viruses was dark, compared with only ∼14% in archaea and bacteria. Surprisingly, most of the dark proteome could not be accounted for by conventional explanations, such as intrinsic disorder or transmembrane regions. Nearly half of the dark proteome comprised dark proteins, in which the entire sequence lacked similarity to any known structure. Dark proteins fulfill a wide variety of functions, but a subset showed distinct and largely unexpected features, such as association with secretion, specific tissues, the endoplasmic reticulum, disulfide bonding, and proteolytic cleavage. Dark proteins also had short sequence length, low evolutionary reuse, and few known interactions with other proteins. These results suggest new research directions in structural and computational biology. PMID:26578815

  7. Multi-dimensional Liquid Chromatography in Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiang; Fang, Aiqin; Riley, Catherine P.; Wang, Mu; Regnier, Fred E.; Buck, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Proteomics is the large-scale study of proteins, particularly their expression, structures and functions. This still-emerging combination of technologies aims to describe and characterize all expressed proteins in a biological system. Because of upper limits on mass detection of mass spectrometers, proteins are usually digested into peptides and the peptides are then separated, identified and quantified from this complex enzymatic digest. The problem in digesting proteins first and then analyzing the peptide cleavage fragments by mass spectrometry is that huge numbers of peptides are generated that overwhelm direct mass spectral analyses. The objective in the liquid chromatography approach to proteomics is to fractionate peptide mixtures to enable and maximize identification and quantification of the component peptides by mass spectrometry. This review will focus on existing multidimensional liquid chromatographic (MDLC) platforms developed for proteomics and their application in combination with other techniques such as stable isotope labeling. We also provide some perspectives on likely future developments. PMID:20363391

  8. Label-Free Quantitative Proteomics in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Léger, Thibaut; Garcia, Camille; Videlier, Mathieu; Camadro, Jean-Michel

    2016-01-01

    Label-free bottom-up shotgun MS-based proteomics is an extremely powerful and simple tool to provide high quality quantitative analyses of the yeast proteome with only microgram amounts of total protein. Although the experimental design of this approach is rather straightforward and does not require the modification of growth conditions, proteins or peptides, several factors must be taken into account to benefit fully from the power of this method. Key factors include the choice of an appropriate method for the preparation of protein extracts, careful evaluation of the instrument design and available analytical capabilities, the choice of the quantification method (intensity-based vs. spectral count), and the proper manipulation of the selected quantification algorithm. The elaboration of this robust workflow for data acquisition, processing, and analysis provides unprecedented insight into the dynamics of the yeast proteome.

  9. Biomarker discovery of nasopharyngeal carcinoma by proteomics.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Liang; Xiao, Ta; Wang, Zhi-Ming; Cho, William C S; Xiao, Zhi-Qiang

    2014-04-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is one of the most common malignant tumors in southern China and southern Asia, and poses one of the most serious public health problems in these areas. Early diagnosis, predicting metastasis, recurrence, prognosis and therapeutic response of NPC remain a challenge. Discovery of diagnostic and predictive biomarkers is an ideal way to achieve these objectives. Proteomics has great potential in identifying cancer biomarkers. Comparative proteomics has identified a large number of potential biomarkers associated with NPC, although the clinical performance of such biomarkers needs to be further validated. In this article, we review the latest discovery and progress of biomarkers for early diagnosis, predicting metastasis, recurrence, prognosis and therapeutic response of NPC, inform the readers of the current status of proteomics-based NPC biomarker findings and suggest avenues for future work.

  10. Systems proteomics of liver mitochondria function.

    PubMed

    Williams, Evan G; Wu, Yibo; Jha, Pooja; Dubuis, Sébastien; Blattmann, Peter; Argmann, Carmen A; Houten, Sander M; Amariuta, Tiffany; Wolski, Witold; Zamboni, Nicola; Aebersold, Ruedi; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-06-10

    Recent improvements in quantitative proteomics approaches, including Sequential Window Acquisition of all Theoretical Mass Spectra (SWATH-MS), permit reproducible large-scale protein measurements across diverse cohorts. Together with genomics, transcriptomics, and other technologies, transomic data sets can be generated that permit detailed analyses across broad molecular interaction networks. Here, we examine mitochondrial links to liver metabolism through the genome, transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome of 386 individuals in the BXD mouse reference population. Several links were validated between genetic variants toward transcripts, proteins, metabolites, and phenotypes. Among these, sequence variants in Cox7a2l alter its protein's activity, which in turn leads to downstream differences in mitochondrial supercomplex formation. This data set demonstrates that the proteome can now be quantified comprehensively, serving as a key complement to transcriptomics, genomics, and metabolomics--a combination moving us forward in complex trait analysis.

  11. Profiling of the cell surface proteome.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jun Ho; Hanash, Samir

    2003-10-01

    The in depth-mining of the proteome necessitates the comprehensive analysis of proteins in individual subcellular compartments to uncover interesting patterns of protein expression that include assessment of protein location, trafficking and of post-translational modifications that are location specific. One of the compartments of substantial interest from a diagnostic and therapeutic point of view is the plasma membrane which contains intrinsic membrane proteins and other proteins expressed on the cell surface. Technologies are currently available for the comprehensive profiling of the cell surface proteome that rely on protein tagging of intact cells. Studies are emerging that point to unexpected patterns of expression of specific proteins on the cell surface, with a common occurrence of proteins previously considered to occur predominantly in other compartments, notably the endoplasmic reticulum. The profiling of the cell surface and plasma membrane proteomes will likely provide novel insights and uncover disease related alterations. PMID:14625857

  12. New challenges for proteomics technologies: a mini perspective review

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Robinson, Errol W.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-10-10

    Proteomics technologies have experienced rapid advances over the last decade to identify or quantify thousands of proteins per sample, typically in a few hours, enabling proteomics applications in environmental, biological, medical, and clinical research. A number of publications have reviewed advances in proteomic technologies and applications. This short review focuses first on a discussion of sensitivity in bottom-up (i.e. digested protein) proteomics and approaches for characterization of small cell populations, and secondly on protein separations for top-down (i.e. intact protein) proteomics including discussions of key technical challenges where recent advances are elucidating specific functions of proteins in biological processes.

  13. Controlled vocabularies and ontologies in proteomics: overview, principles and practice.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Gerhard; Jones, Andrew R; Binz, Pierre-Alain; Deutsch, Eric W; Orchard, Sandra; Montecchi-Palazzi, Luisa; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Hermjakob, Henning; Oveillero, David; Julian, Randall; Stephan, Christian; Meyer, Helmut E; Eisenacher, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of controlled vocabularies (CVs) and ontologies especially in the area of proteomics, primarily related to the work of the Proteomics Standards Initiative (PSI). It describes the relevant proteomics standard formats and the ontologies used within them. Software and tools for working with these ontology files are also discussed. The article also examines the "mapping files" used to ensure correct controlled vocabulary terms that are placed within PSI standards and the fulfillment of the MIAPE (Minimum Information about a Proteomics Experiment) requirements. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics in the Post-Identification Era. Guest Editors: Martin Eisenacher and Christian Stephan. PMID:23429179

  14. Unraveling pancreatic islet biology by quantitative proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jianying; Dann, Geoffrey P.; Liew, Chong W.; Smith, Richard D.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.; Qian, Weijun

    2011-08-01

    The pancreatic islets of Langerhans play a critical role in maintaining blood glucose homeostasis by secreting insulin and several other important peptide hormones. Impaired insulin secretion due to islet dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis underlying both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Over the past 5 years, emerging proteomic technologies have been applied to dissect the signaling pathways that regulate islet functions and gain an understanding of the mechanisms of islet dysfunction relevant to diabetes. Herein, we briefly review some of the recent quantitative proteomic studies involving pancreatic islets geared towards gaining a better understanding of islet biology relevant to metabolic diseases.

  15. [Beyond the genome to the proteome].

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Osamu

    2005-03-01

    The sequence of the human genome has been decoded and a post-genome era is now beginning. This is the start of the protein/peptide era. Working in the fundamental research division of a pharmaceutical company and being engaged in studies on the research and development of new drugs based upon genomic information, it was clear to me that genomic information was useful, significant and indispensable in driving forward to new drug discovery. However, it is also true that we need more than that. I have faced multiple barriers in pursuing genomic information alone. There are numerous dead-end stories in genome-based new drug discovery and in many cases, those hurdles are very hard to get over. What approach can be a breakthrough of this bottleneck? I believe that one answer is research into proteins. The proteome describes all the proteins within an organism. The proteome analysis research field promises a bright future for the discovery of new drugs, diagnosis and therapeutics. I believe the mass spectrometer(MS) will be a key instrument in this research. The contribution of mass spectrometry was recently recognized in the Nobel Prize for Chemistry 2002, for 'the discovery of Soft Laser Desorption/Ionization' awarded to Mr. Koichi Tanaka. There is no doubt that the MS will play an essential role in accelerating proteome analysis. However, the present proteome analysis technology has not yet reached a sufficient scientific level. Further improvements of both hardware and software are necessary. For the hardware, improvements in sensitivity, accuracy and high-throughput, in addition to equipment for ultra-micro analysis applied to the analysis of the proteome should be addressed. Regarding software, we need to develop new chemistries for proteome analyses and propose original, user-friendly proteome analysis methods. In this review, starting with a briefing on genome-based drug discovery, I will discuss a new concept for proteome analysis based on mass spectrometry and

  16. Proteomic profiling of lymphocytes in autoimmunity, inflammation and cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocytes play important roles in the balance between body defense and noxious agents involved in a number of diseases, e.g. autoimmune diseases, allergic inflammation and cancer. The proteomic analyses have been applied to identify and validate disease-associated and disease-specific biomarkers for therapeutic strategies of diseases. The proteomic profiles of lymphocytes may provide more information to understand their functions and roles in the development of diseases, although proteomic approaches in lymphocytes are still limited. The present review overviewed the proteomics-based studies on lymphocytes to headlight the proteomic profiles of lymphocytes in diseases, such as autoimmune diseases, allergic inflammation and cancer, with a special focus on lung diseases. We will explore the potential significance of diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets from the current status in proteomic studies of lymphocytes and discuss the value of the currently available proteomic methodologies in the lymphocytes research. PMID:24397796

  17. Proteomics and the Analysis of Proteomic Data: 2013 Overview of Current Protein-Profiling Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Can; Stone, Kathryn; Gulcicek, Erol; Williams, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has become a major tool in the study of proteomes. The analysis of proteolytic peptides and their fragment ions by this technique enables the identification and quantitation of the precursor proteins in a mixture. However, deducing chemical structures and then protein sequences from mass-to-charge ratios is a challenging computational task. Software tools incorporating powerful algorithms and statistical methods improved our ability to process the large quantities of proteomics data. Repositories of spectral data make both data analysis and experimental design more efficient. New approaches in quantitative and statistical proteomics make possible a greater coverage of the proteome, the identification of more post-translational modifications and a greater sensitivity in the quantitation of targeted proteins. PMID:23504934

  18. Processing shotgun proteomics data on the Amazon cloud with the trans-proteomic pipeline.

    PubMed

    Slagel, Joseph; Mendoza, Luis; Shteynberg, David; Deutsch, Eric W; Moritz, Robert L

    2015-02-01

    Cloud computing, where scalable, on-demand compute cycles and storage are available as a service, has the potential to accelerate mass spectrometry-based proteomics research by providing simple, expandable, and affordable large-scale computing to all laboratories regardless of location or information technology expertise. We present new cloud computing functionality for the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline, a free and open-source suite of tools for the processing and analysis of tandem mass spectrometry datasets. Enabled with Amazon Web Services cloud computing, the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline now accesses large scale computing resources, limited only by the available Amazon Web Services infrastructure, for all users. The Trans-Proteomic Pipeline runs in an environment fully hosted on Amazon Web Services, where all software and data reside on cloud resources to tackle large search studies. In addition, it can also be run on a local computer with computationally intensive tasks launched onto the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud service to greatly decrease analysis times. We describe the new Trans-Proteomic Pipeline cloud service components, compare the relative performance and costs of various Elastic Compute Cloud service instance types, and present on-line tutorials that enable users to learn how to deploy cloud computing technology rapidly with the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline. We provide tools for estimating the necessary computing resources and costs given the scale of a job and demonstrate the use of cloud enabled Trans-Proteomic Pipeline by performing over 1100 tandem mass spectrometry files through four proteomic search engines in 9 h and at a very low cost.

  19. Processing shotgun proteomics data on the Amazon cloud with the trans-proteomic pipeline.

    PubMed

    Slagel, Joseph; Mendoza, Luis; Shteynberg, David; Deutsch, Eric W; Moritz, Robert L

    2015-02-01

    Cloud computing, where scalable, on-demand compute cycles and storage are available as a service, has the potential to accelerate mass spectrometry-based proteomics research by providing simple, expandable, and affordable large-scale computing to all laboratories regardless of location or information technology expertise. We present new cloud computing functionality for the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline, a free and open-source suite of tools for the processing and analysis of tandem mass spectrometry datasets. Enabled with Amazon Web Services cloud computing, the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline now accesses large scale computing resources, limited only by the available Amazon Web Services infrastructure, for all users. The Trans-Proteomic Pipeline runs in an environment fully hosted on Amazon Web Services, where all software and data reside on cloud resources to tackle large search studies. In addition, it can also be run on a local computer with computationally intensive tasks launched onto the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud service to greatly decrease analysis times. We describe the new Trans-Proteomic Pipeline cloud service components, compare the relative performance and costs of various Elastic Compute Cloud service instance types, and present on-line tutorials that enable users to learn how to deploy cloud computing technology rapidly with the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline. We provide tools for estimating the necessary computing resources and costs given the scale of a job and demonstrate the use of cloud enabled Trans-Proteomic Pipeline by performing over 1100 tandem mass spectrometry files through four proteomic search engines in 9 h and at a very low cost. PMID:25418363

  20. Processing Shotgun Proteomics Data on the Amazon Cloud with the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline*

    PubMed Central

    Slagel, Joseph; Mendoza, Luis; Shteynberg, David; Deutsch, Eric W.; Moritz, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Cloud computing, where scalable, on-demand compute cycles and storage are available as a service, has the potential to accelerate mass spectrometry-based proteomics research by providing simple, expandable, and affordable large-scale computing to all laboratories regardless of location or information technology expertise. We present new cloud computing functionality for the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline, a free and open-source suite of tools for the processing and analysis of tandem mass spectrometry datasets. Enabled with Amazon Web Services cloud computing, the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline now accesses large scale computing resources, limited only by the available Amazon Web Services infrastructure, for all users. The Trans-Proteomic Pipeline runs in an environment fully hosted on Amazon Web Services, where all software and data reside on cloud resources to tackle large search studies. In addition, it can also be run on a local computer with computationally intensive tasks launched onto the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud service to greatly decrease analysis times. We describe the new Trans-Proteomic Pipeline cloud service components, compare the relative performance and costs of various Elastic Compute Cloud service instance types, and present on-line tutorials that enable users to learn how to deploy cloud computing technology rapidly with the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline. We provide tools for estimating the necessary computing resources and costs given the scale of a job and demonstrate the use of cloud enabled Trans-Proteomic Pipeline by performing over 1100 tandem mass spectrometry files through four proteomic search engines in 9 h and at a very low cost. PMID:25418363

  1. Relationships between Myers-Briggs type indicator measure of psychological type and neo measure of big five personality factors in Polish University students: a preliminary cross-cultural comparison.

    PubMed

    Tobacyk, Jerome J; Livingston, Mary M; Robbins, James E

    2008-10-01

    English-language versions of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (Form G) measure of psychological type and the NEO-FFI measure of the Big Five personality factors were completed by 57 Polish university students fluent in the English language. The pattern of correlations between MBTI and NEO-FFI scales for the Polish sample was compared to the pattern of correlations for measures of these same constructs reported for Americans. Four of the five significant relationships between MBTI and NEO-FFI scales reported in the American sample were also recorded in the Polish sample: MBTI Extraversion-Introversion with NEO Extraversion, MBTI Sensing-Intuition and MBTI Judging-Perceiving with NEO-Openness, and MBTI Judging-Perceiving with NEO Conscientiousness. Pending replication with a larger, more representative sample, this preliminary study supports the validity of psychological type in Polish society. PMID:19102483

  2. PROTEOMER: A workflow-optimized laboratory information management system for 2-D electrophoresis-centered proteomics.

    PubMed

    Nebrich, Grit; Herrmann, Marion; Hartl, Daniela; Diedrich, Madeleine; Kreitler, Thomas; Wierling, Christoph; Klose, Joachim; Giavalisco, Patrick; Zabel, Claus; Mao, Lei

    2009-04-01

    In recent years proteomics became increasingly important to functional genomics. Although a large amount of data is generated by high throughput large-scale techniques, a connection of these mostly heterogeneous data from different analytical platforms and of different experiments is limited. Data mining procedures and algorithms are often insufficient to extract meaningful results from large datasets and therefore limit the exploitation of the generated biological information. In our proteomic core facility, which almost exclusively focuses on 2-DE/MS-based proteomics, we developed a proteomic database custom tailored to our needs aiming at connecting MS protein identification information to 2-DE derived protein expression profiles. The tools developed should not only enable an automatic evaluation of single experiments, but also link multiple 2-DE experiments with MS-data on different levels and thereby helping to create a comprehensive network of our proteomics data. Therefore the key feature of our "PROTEOMER" database is its high cross-referencing capacity, enabling integration of a wide range of experimental data. To illustrate the workflow and utility of the system, two practical examples are provided to demonstrate that proper data cross-referencing can transform information into biological knowledge. PMID:19259999

  3. Plant proteome changes under abiotic stress--contribution of proteomics studies to understanding plant stress response.

    PubMed

    Kosová, Klára; Vítámvás, Pavel; Prášil, Ilja Tom; Renaut, Jenny

    2011-08-12

    Plant acclimation to stress is associated with profound changes in proteome composition. Since proteins are directly involved in plant stress response, proteomics studies can significantly contribute to unravel the possible relationships between protein abundance and plant stress acclimation. In this review, proteomics studies dealing with plant response to a broad range of abiotic stress factors--cold, heat, drought, waterlogging, salinity, ozone treatment, hypoxia and anoxia, herbicide treatments, inadequate or excessive light conditions, disbalances in mineral nutrition, enhanced concentrations of heavy metals, radioactivity and mechanical wounding are discussed. Most studies have been carried out on model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and rice due to large protein sequence databases available; however, the variety of plant species used for proteomics analyses is rapidly increasing. Protein response pathways shared by different plant species under various stress conditions (glycolytic pathway, enzymes of ascorbate-glutathione cycle, accumulation of LEA proteins) as well as pathways unique to a given stress are discussed. Results from proteomics studies are interpreted with respect to physiological factors determining plant stress response. In conclusion, examples of application of proteomics studies in search for protein markers underlying phenotypic variation in physiological parameters associated with plant stress tolerance are given.

  4. HepatoProteomics: Applying Proteomic Technologies to the Study of Liver Function and Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Diamond, Deborah L.; Proll, Sean; Jacobs, Jon M.; Chan, Eric Y.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2006-08-01

    The wealth of human genome sequence information now available, coupled with technological advances in robotics, nanotechnology, mass spectrometry, and information systems, has given rise to a method of scientific inquiry known as functional genomics. By using these technologies to survey gene expression and protein production on a near global scale, the goal of functional genomics is to assign biological function to genes with currently unknown roles in physiology. This approach carries particular appeal in disease research, where it can uncover the function of previously unknown genes and molecular pathways that are directly involved in disease progression. With this knowledge may come improved diagnostic techniques, prognostic capabilities, and novel therapeutic approaches. In this regard, the continuing evolution of proteomic technologies has resulted in an increasingly greater impact of proteome studies in many areas of research and hepatology is no exception. Our laboratory has been extremely active in this area, applying both genomic and proteomic technologies to the analysis of virus-host interactions in several systems, including the study of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and HCV-associated liver disease. Since proteomic technologies are foreign to many hepatologists (and to almost everyone else), this article will provide an overview of proteomic methods and technologies and describe how they're being used to study liver function and disease. We use our studies of HCV infection and HCV-associated liver disease to present an operational framework for performing high throughput proteome analysis and extracting biologically meaningful information.

  5. Trans-Proteomic Pipeline, a standardized data processing pipeline for large-scale reproducible proteomics informatics

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Eric W.; Mendoza, Luis; Shteynberg, David; Slagel, Joseph; Sun, Zhi; Moritz, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Democratization of genomics technologies has enabled the rapid determination of genotypes. More recently the democratization of comprehensive proteomics technologies is enabling the determination of the cellular phenotype and the molecular events that define its dynamic state. Core proteomic technologies include mass spectrometry to define protein sequence, protein:protein interactions, and protein post-translational modifications. Key enabling technologies for proteomics are bioinformatic pipelines to identify, quantitate, and summarize these events. The Trans-Proteomics Pipeline (TPP) is a robust open-source standardized data processing pipeline for large-scale reproducible quantitative mass spectrometry proteomics. It supports all major operating systems and instrument vendors via open data formats. Here we provide a review of the overall proteomics workflow supported by the TPP, its major tools, and how it can be used in its various modes from desktop to cloud computing. We describe new features for the TPP, including data visualization functionality. We conclude by describing some common perils that affect the analysis of tandem mass spectrometry datasets, as well as some major upcoming features. PMID:25631240

  6. Pressurized Pepsin Digestion in Proteomics: An Automatable Alternative to Trypsin for Integrated Top-down Bottom-up Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Ferrer, Daniel; Petritis, Konstantinos; Robinson, Errol W.; Hixson, Kim K.; Tian, Zhixin; Lee, Jung Hwa; Lee, Sang-Won; Tolic, Nikola; Weitz, Karl K.; Belov, Mikhail E.; Smith, Richard D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2011-02-01

    Integrated top-down bottom-up proteomics combined with online digestion has great potential to improve the characterization of protein isoforms in biological systems and is amendable to highthroughput proteomics experiments. Bottom-up proteomics ultimately provides the peptide sequences derived from the tandem MS analyses of peptides after the proteome has been digested. Top-down proteomics conversely entails the MS analyses of intact proteins for more effective characterization of genetic variations and/or post-translational modifications (PTMs). Herein, we describe recent efforts towards efficient integration of bottom-up and top-down LCMS based proteomic strategies. Since most proteomic platforms (i.e. LC systems) operate in acidic environments, we exploited the compatibility of the pepsin (i.e. the enzyme’s natural acidic activity) for the integration of bottom-up and top-down proteomics. Pressure enhanced pepsin digestions were successfully performed and characterized with several standard proteins in either an offline mode using a Barocycler or an online mode using a modified high pressure LC system referred to as a fast online digestion system (FOLDS). FOLDS was tested using pepsin and a whole microbial proteome, and the results compared against traditional trypsin digestions on the same platform. Additionally, FOLDS was integrated with a RePlay configuration to demonstrate an ultra-rapid integrated bottom-up top-down proteomic strategy employing a standard mixture of proteins and a monkey pox virus proteome.

  7. Meeting Report: "Proteomics from Discovery to Function:" 6th Annual Meeting of Proteomics Society, India and International Conference-A Milestone for the Indian Proteomics Community.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shabarni; Reddy, Panga Jaipal; Ray, Sandipan; Atak, Apurva; Gollapalli, Kishore; Jain, Rekha; Shah, Veenita Grover; Ghantasala, Saicharan; Kumar, Saurabh; Pandala, Narendra Goud; Phapale, Prasad; Pandey, Vishnu Kumar; Zingde, Surekha; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2015-06-01

    Proteomics is at the epicenter of post-genomics biotechnologies that are currently driving the next generation system science. Moreover, proteomics is a truly global science. The 6(th) Annual Meeting of Proteomics Society, India (PSI) and International Conference on "Proteomics from Discovery to Function" held from December 7-9, 2014, was a transformative endeavor for global proteomics, bringing together the luminaries in the field of proteomics for the very first time in India. This meeting report presents the lessons learned and the highlights of this international scientific conference that was comprised of nine thematic sessions, pre- and post-conference workshops, and an opportunity to cultivate enduring collaborations for proteomics science to benefit both India and global society. The conference had an unforgettable impression on the participants: for the first time, India hosted past and present President and Council members from the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO), along with eminent scientists and young scholars from India and abroad in the field of proteomics at such a large scale, a major highlight of this international event. In all, the PSI 2014 was a milestone conference that has firmly poised the Indian life sciences community as a leading contributor to post-genomics life sciences, thus cultivating crucial trans-generational capacity and inspiration by recognizing the emerging scholars and omics systems scientists who can think and conduct science from cell to society.

  8. Introduction to mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Matthiesen, Rune; Bunkenborg, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied to study biomolecules and one rapidly developing field is the global analysis of proteins, proteomics. Understanding and handling mass spectrometry data is a multifaceted task that requires many decisions to be made to get the most comprehensive information from an experiment. Later chapters in this book deal in-depth with various aspects of the process and how different tools can be applied to the many analytical challenges. This introductory chapter is intended as a basic introduction to mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics to set the scene for newcomers and give pointers to reference material. There are many applications of mass spectrometry in proteomics and each application is associated with some analytical choices, instrumental limitations and data processing steps that depend on the aim of the study and means of conducting it. Different aspects of the proteome can be explored by choosing the right combination of sample preparation, MS instrumentation and data processing. This chapter gives an outline for some of these commonly used setups and some of the key concepts, many of which are explored in greater depth in later chapters. PMID:23666720

  9. Top Down proteomics: Facts and perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Catherman, Adam D.; Skinner, Owen S.; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2014-03-21

    Highlights: • Top Down versus Bottom Up proteomics analysis. • Separations methods for Top Down proteomics. • Developments in mass spectrometry instrumentation and fragmentation. • Native mass spectrometry. - Abstract: The rise of the “Top Down” method in the field of mass spectrometry-based proteomics has ushered in a new age of promise and challenge for the characterization and identification of proteins. Injecting intact proteins into the mass spectrometer allows for better characterization of post-translational modifications and avoids several of the serious “inference” problems associated with peptide-based proteomics. However, successful implementation of a Top Down approach to endogenous or other biologically relevant samples often requires the use of one or more forms of separation prior to mass spectrometric analysis, which have only begun to mature for whole protein MS. Recent advances in instrumentation have been used in conjunction with new ion fragmentation using photons and electrons that allow for better (and often complete) protein characterization on cases simply not tractable even just a few years ago. Finally, the use of native electrospray mass spectrometry has shown great promise for the identification and characterization of whole protein complexes in the 100 kDa to 1 MDa regime, with prospects for complete compositional analysis for endogenous protein assemblies a viable goal over the coming few years.

  10. Bacterial Electron Transfer Chains Primed by Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Wessels, H J C T; de Almeida, N M; Kartal, B; Keltjens, J T

    2016-01-01

    Electron transport phosphorylation is the central mechanism for most prokaryotic species to harvest energy released in the respiration of their substrates as ATP. Microorganisms have evolved incredible variations on this principle, most of these we perhaps do not know, considering that only a fraction of the microbial richness is known. Besides these variations, microbial species may show substantial versatility in using respiratory systems. In connection herewith, regulatory mechanisms control the expression of these respiratory enzyme systems and their assembly at the translational and posttranslational levels, to optimally accommodate changes in the supply of their energy substrates. Here, we present an overview of methods and techniques from the field of proteomics to explore bacterial electron transfer chains and their regulation at levels ranging from the whole organism down to the Ångstrom scales of protein structures. From the survey of the literature on this subject, it is concluded that proteomics, indeed, has substantially contributed to our comprehending of bacterial respiratory mechanisms, often in elegant combinations with genetic and biochemical approaches. However, we also note that advanced proteomics offers a wealth of opportunities, which have not been exploited at all, or at best underexploited in hypothesis-driving and hypothesis-driven research on bacterial bioenergetics. Examples obtained from the related area of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation research, where the application of advanced proteomics is more common, may illustrate these opportunities. PMID:27134025

  11. A draft map of the human proteome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Sik; Pinto, Sneha M.; Getnet, Derese; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Manda, Srikanth S.; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Madugundu, Anil K.; Kelkar, Dhanashree S.; Isserlin, Ruth; Jain, Shobhit; Thomas, Joji K.; Muthusamy, Babylakshmi; Leal-Rojas, Pamela; Kumar, Praveen; Sahasrabuddhe, Nandini A.; Balakrishnan, Lavanya; Advani, Jayshree; George, Bijesh; Renuse, Santosh; Selvan, Lakshmi Dhevi N.; Patil, Arun H.; Nanjappa, Vishalakshi; Radhakrishnan, Aneesha; Prasad, Samarjeet; Subbannayya, Tejaswini; Raju, Rajesh; Kumar, Manish; Sreenivasamurthy, Sreelakshmi K.; Marimuthu, Arivusudar; Sathe, Gajanan J.; Chavan, Sandip; Datta, Keshava K.; Subbannayya, Yashwanth; Sahu, Apeksha; Yelamanchi, Soujanya D.; Jayaram, Savita; Rajagopalan, Pavithra; Sharma, Jyoti; Murthy, Krishna R.; Syed, Nazia; Goel, Renu; Khan, Aafaque A.; Ahmad, Sartaj; Dey, Gourav; Mudgal, Keshav; Chatterjee, Aditi; Huang, Tai-Chung; Zhong, Jun; Wu, Xinyan; Shaw, Patrick G.; Freed, Donald; Zahari, Muhammad S.; Mukherjee, Kanchan K.; Shankar, Subramanian; Mahadevan, Anita; Lam, Henry; Mitchell, Christopher J.; Shankar, Susarla Krishna; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy; Schroeder, John T.; Sirdeshmukh, Ravi; Maitra, Anirban; Leach, Steven D.; Drake, Charles G.; Halushka, Marc K.; Prasad, T. S. Keshava; Hruban, Ralph H.; Kerr, Candace L.; Bader, Gary D.; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A.; Gowda, Harsha; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2014-01-01

    The availability of human genome sequence has transformed biomedical research over the past decade. However, an equivalent map for the human proteome with direct measurements of proteins and peptides does not exist yet. Here, we present a draft map of the human proteome using high resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry. In-depth proteomic profiling of 30 histologically normal human samples including 17 adult tissues, 7 fetal tissues and 6 purified primary hematopoietic cells resulted in identification of proteins encoded by 17,294 genes accounting for ~84% of the total annotated protein-coding genes in humans. A unique and comprehensive strategy for proteogenomic analysis enabled us to discover a number of novel protein-coding regions, which includes translated pseudogenes, non-coding RNAs and upstream ORFs. This large human proteome catalog (available as an interactive web-based resource at http://www.humanproteomemap.org) will complement available human genome and transcriptome data to accelerate biomedical research in health and disease. PMID:24870542

  12. The Rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) sperm proteome.

    PubMed

    Skerget, Sheri; Rosenow, Matthew; Polpitiya, Ashoka; Petritis, Konstantinos; Dorus, Steve; Karr, Timothy L

    2013-11-01

    Mass spectrometry based proteomics has facilitated sperm composition studies in several mammalian species but no studies have been undertaken in non-human primate species. Here we report the analysis of the 1247 proteins that comprise the Rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) sperm proteome (termed the MacSP). Comparative analysis with previously characterized mouse and human sperm proteomes reveals substantial levels of orthology (47% and 40% respectively) and widespread overlap of functional categories based on Gene Ontology analyses. Approximately 10% of macaque sperm genes (113/1247) are significantly under-expressed in the testis as compared with other tissues, which may reflect proteins specifically acquired during epididymal maturation. Phylogenetic and genomic analyses of three MacSP ADAMs (A-Disintegrin and Metalloprotease proteins), ADAM18-, 20- and 21-like, provides empirical support for sperm genes functioning in non-human primate taxa which have been subsequently lost in the lineages leading to humans. The MacSP contains proteasome proteins of the 20S core subunit, the 19S proteasome activator complex and an alternate proteasome activator PA200, raising the possibility that proteasome activity is present in mature sperm. Robust empirical characterization of the Rhesus sperm proteome should greatly expand the possibility for targeted molecular studies of spermatogenesis and fertilization in a commonly used model species for human infertility.

  13. Functional proteomics within the genus Lactobacillus.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Maria; Calasso, Maria; Cavallo, Noemi; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Gobbetti, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Lactobacillus are mainly used for the manufacture of fermented dairy, sourdough, meat, and vegetable foods or used as probiotics. Under optimal processing conditions, Lactobacillus strains contribute to food functionality through their enzyme portfolio and the release of metabolites. An extensive genomic diversity analysis was conducted to elucidate the core features of the genus Lactobacillus, and to provide a better comprehension of niche adaptation of the strains. However, proteomics is an indispensable "omics" science to elucidate the proteome diversity, and the mechanisms of regulation and adaptation of Lactobacillus strains. This review focuses on the novel and comprehensive knowledge of functional proteomics and metaproteomics of Lactobacillus species. A large list of proteomic case studies of different Lactobacillus species is provided to illustrate the adaptability of the main metabolic pathways (e.g., carbohydrate transport and metabolism, pyruvate metabolism, proteolytic system, amino acid metabolism, and protein synthesis) to various life conditions. These investigations have highlighted that lactobacilli modulate the level of a complex panel of proteins to growth/survive in different ecological niches. In addition to the general regulation and stress response, specific metabolic pathways can be switched on and off, modifying the behavior of the strains.

  14. Role of Proteomics in Crop Stress Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Parvaiz; Abdel Latef, Arafat A H; Rasool, Saiema; Akram, Nudrat A; Ashraf, Muhammad; Gucel, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Plants often experience various biotic and abiotic stresses during their life cycle. The abiotic stresses include mainly drought, salt, temperature (low/high), flooding and nutritional deficiency/excess which hamper crop growth and yield to a great extent. In view of a projection 50% of the crop loss is attributable to abiotic stresses. However, abiotic stresses cause a myriad of changes in physiological, molecular and biochemical processes operating in plants. It is now widely reported that several proteins respond to these stresses at pre- and post-transcriptional and translational levels. By knowing the role of these stress inducible proteins, it would be easy to comprehensively expound the processes of stress tolerance in plants. The proteomics study offers a new approach to discover proteins and pathways associated with crop physiological and stress responses. Thus, studying the plants at proteomic levels could help understand the pathways involved in stress tolerance. Furthermore, improving the understanding of the identified key metabolic proteins involved in tolerance can be implemented into biotechnological applications, regarding recombinant/transgenic formation. Additionally, the investigation of identified metabolic processes ultimately supports the development of antistress strategies. In this review, we discussed the role of proteomics in crop stress tolerance. We also discussed different abiotic stresses and their effects on plants, particularly with reference to stress-induced expression of proteins, and how proteomics could act as vital biotechnological tools for improving stress tolerance in plants. PMID:27660631

  15. False Discovery Rate Estimation in Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Suruchi; Yadav, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    With the advancement in proteomics separation techniques and improvements in mass analyzers, the data generated in a mass-spectrometry based proteomics experiment is rising exponentially. Such voluminous datasets necessitate automated computational tools for high-throughput data analysis and appropriate statistical control. The data is searched using one or more of the several popular database search algorithms. The matches assigned by these tools can have false positives and statistical validation of these false matches is necessary before making any biological interpretations. Without such procedures, the biological inferences do not hold true and may be outright misleading. There is a considerable overlap between true and false positives. To control the false positives amongst a set of accepted matches, there is a need for some statistical estimate that can reflect the amount of false positives present in the data processed. False discovery rate (FDR) is the metric for global confidence assessment of a large-scale proteomics dataset. This chapter covers the basics of FDR, its application in proteomics, and methods to estimate FDR.

  16. Proteomic Profiling of Rat Thyroarytenoid Muscle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welham, Nathan V.; Marriott, Gerard; Bless, Diane M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Proteomic methodologies offer promise in elucidating the systemwide cellular and molecular processes that characterize normal and diseased thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle. This study examined methodological issues central to the application of 2-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D SDS-PAGE) to the study of…

  17. The Proteomics Identifications database: 2010 update.

    PubMed

    Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Côté, Richard; Reisinger, Florian; Barsnes, Harald; Foster, Joseph M; Rameseder, Jonathan; Hermjakob, Henning; Martens, Lennart

    2010-01-01

    The Proteomics Identifications database (PRIDE, http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride) at the European Bioinformatics Institute has become one of the main repositories of mass spectrometry-derived proteomics data. For the last 2 years, PRIDE data holdings have grown substantially, comprising 60 different species, more than 2.5 million protein identifications, 11.5 million peptides and over 50 million spectra by September 2009. We here describe several new and improved features in PRIDE, including the revised submission process, which now includes direct submission of fragment ion annotations. Correspondingly, it is now possible to visualize spectrum fragmentation annotations on tandem mass spectra, a key feature for compliance with journal data submission requirements. We also describe recent developments in the PRIDE BioMart interface, which now allows integrative queries that can join PRIDE data to a growing number of biological resources such as Reactome, Ensembl, InterPro and UniProt. This ability to perform extremely powerful across-domain queries will certainly be a cornerstone of future bioinformatics analyses. Finally, we highlight the importance of data sharing in the proteomics field, and the corresponding integration of PRIDE with other databases in the ProteomExchange consortium.

  18. Shotgun Proteomic Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Leaves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two shotgun tandem mass spectrometry proteomics approaches, Multidimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT) and 1D-Gel-LC-MS/MS, were used to identify Arabidopsis thaliana leaf proteins. These methods utilize different protein/peptide separation strategies. Detergents not compatible wit...

  19. feature - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    "Cancer is a disease of the genome," noted Lynda Chin, M.D., professor of dermatology, Harvard Medical School and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. "And understanding the impact of genomic changes in the proteome is critically important for converting genomic knowledge into something that a clinician can use on their patients."

  20. The Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta) Sperm Proteome*

    PubMed Central

    Skerget, Sheri; Rosenow, Matthew; Polpitiya, Ashoka; Petritis, Konstantinos; Dorus, Steve; Karr, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry based proteomics has facilitated sperm composition studies in several mammalian species but no studies have been undertaken in non-human primate species. Here we report the analysis of the 1247 proteins that comprise the Rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) sperm proteome (termed the MacSP). Comparative analysis with previously characterized mouse and human sperm proteomes reveals substantial levels of orthology (47% and 40% respectively) and widespread overlap of functional categories based on Gene Ontology analyses. Approximately 10% of macaque sperm genes (113/1247) are significantly under-expressed in the testis as compared with other tissues, which may reflect proteins specifically acquired during epididymal maturation. Phylogenetic and genomic analyses of three MacSP ADAMs (A-Disintegrin and Metalloprotease proteins), ADAM18-, 20- and 21-like, provides empirical support for sperm genes functioning in non-human primate taxa which have been subsequently lost in the lineages leading to humans. The MacSP contains proteasome proteins of the 20S core subunit, the 19S proteasome activator complex and an alternate proteasome activator PA200, raising the possibility that proteasome activity is present in mature sperm. Robust empirical characterization of the Rhesus sperm proteome should greatly expand the possibility for targeted molecular studies of spermatogenesis and fertilization in a commonly used model species for human infertility. PMID:23816990

  1. Global Proteome Analysis of Leptospira interrogans

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Comparative global proteome analyses were performed on Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni grown under conventional in vitro conditions and those mimicking in vivo conditions (iron limitation and serum presence). Proteomic analyses were conducted using iTRAQ and LC-ESI-tandem mass spectrometry complemented with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. A total of 563 proteins were identified in this study. Altered expression of 65 proteins, including upregulation of the L. interrogans virulence factor Loa22 and 5 novel proteins with homology to virulence factors found in other pathogens, was observed between the comparative conditions. Immunoblot analyses confirmed upregulation of 5 of the known or putative virulence factors in L. interrogans exposed to the in vivo-like environmental conditions. Further, ELISA analyses using serum from patients with leptospirosis and immunofluorescence studies performed on liver sections derived from L. interrogans-infected hamsters verified expression of all but one of the identified proteins during infection. These studies, which represent the first documented comparative global proteome analysis of Leptospira, demonstrated proteome alterations under conditions that mimic in vivo infection and allowed for the identification of novel putative L. interrogans virulence factors. PMID:19663501

  2. Proteomic Approaches for Biomarker Panels in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tanase, Cristiana; Albulescu, Radu; Neagu, Monica

    2016-01-01

    Proteomic technologies remain the main backbone of biomarkers discovery in cancer. The continuous development of proteomic technologies also enlarges the bioinformatics domain, thus founding the main pillars of cancer therapy. The main source for diagnostic/prognostic/therapy monitoring biomarker panels are molecules that have a dual role, being both indicators of disease development and therapy targets. Proteomic technologies, such as mass-spectrometry approaches and protein array technologies, represent the main technologies that can depict these biomarkers. Herein, we will illustrate some of the most recent strategies for biomarker discovery in cancer, including the development of immune-markers and the use of cancer stem cells as target therapy. The challenges of proteomic biomarker discovery need new forms of cross-disciplinary conglomerates that will result in increased and tailored access to treatments for patients; diagnostic companies would benefit from the enhanced co-development of companion diagnostics and pharmaceutical companies. In the technology optimization in biomarkers, immune assays are the leaders of discovery machinery.

  3. Shotgun proteome profile of Populus developing xylem

    SciTech Connect

    Kalluri, Udaya C; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Lankford, Patricia K; Ranjan, Priya; Pelletier, Dale A

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the molecular pathways of plant cell wall biosynthesis and remodeling is central to interpreting biological mechanisms underlying plant growth and adaptation as well as leveraging that knowledge towards development of improved bioenergy feedstocks. Here we report the application of shotgun tandem mass spectrometry profiling to the proteome of Populus developing xylem. Additionally, we mined public databases to obtain information in support of subcellular localization, transcript-level expression, and functional categorization of these proteins. Nearly 6000 different proteins were identified from the xylem proteome, with over 4400 proteins identified from one or more unique peptides. In addition to finding protein-level evidence of candidate wall biosynthesis genes from xylem (wood) tissue such as cellulose synthase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, and 4-coumarate:CoA ligase, several other potentially new candidate genes in the pathway were discovered. In order to identify low-abundance DNA-regulatory proteins from the developing xylem, a selective nuclear proteome profiling method was developed. Several putative transcription factor and chromatin remodeling proteins were identified using this method, such as LIM and NAC domain transcription factors and CHB3-SWI/SNF-related proteins. Further application of these proteomics methods will enhance understanding not only of cell wall biosynthesis in system biology modeling, but also other plant developmental and physiological pathways.

  4. Role of Proteomics in Crop Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Parvaiz; Abdel Latef, Arafat A. H.; Rasool, Saiema; Akram, Nudrat A.; Ashraf, Muhammad; Gucel, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Plants often experience various biotic and abiotic stresses during their life cycle. The abiotic stresses include mainly drought, salt, temperature (low/high), flooding and nutritional deficiency/excess which hamper crop growth and yield to a great extent. In view of a projection 50% of the crop loss is attributable to abiotic stresses. However, abiotic stresses cause a myriad of changes in physiological, molecular and biochemical processes operating in plants. It is now widely reported that several proteins respond to these stresses at pre- and post-transcriptional and translational levels. By knowing the role of these stress inducible proteins, it would be easy to comprehensively expound the processes of stress tolerance in plants. The proteomics study offers a new approach to discover proteins and pathways associated with crop physiological and stress responses. Thus, studying the plants at proteomic levels could help understand the pathways involved in stress tolerance. Furthermore, improving the understanding of the identified key metabolic proteins involved in tolerance can be implemented into biotechnological applications, regarding recombinant/transgenic formation. Additionally, the investigation of identified metabolic processes ultimately supports the development of antistress strategies. In this review, we discussed the role of proteomics in crop stress tolerance. We also discussed different abiotic stresses and their effects on plants, particularly with reference to stress-induced expression of proteins, and how proteomics could act as vital biotechnological tools for improving stress tolerance in plants.

  5. Role of Proteomics in Crop Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Parvaiz; Abdel Latef, Arafat A. H.; Rasool, Saiema; Akram, Nudrat A.; Ashraf, Muhammad; Gucel, Salih

    2016-01-01

    Plants often experience various biotic and abiotic stresses during their life cycle. The abiotic stresses include mainly drought, salt, temperature (low/high), flooding and nutritional deficiency/excess which hamper crop growth and yield to a great extent. In view of a projection 50% of the crop loss is attributable to abiotic stresses. However, abiotic stresses cause a myriad of changes in physiological, molecular and biochemical processes operating in plants. It is now widely reported that several proteins respond to these stresses at pre- and post-transcriptional and translational levels. By knowing the role of these stress inducible proteins, it would be easy to comprehensively expound the processes of stress tolerance in plants. The proteomics study offers a new approach to discover proteins and pathways associated with crop physiological and stress responses. Thus, studying the plants at proteomic levels could help understand the pathways involved in stress tolerance. Furthermore, improving the understanding of the identified key metabolic proteins involved in tolerance can be implemented into biotechnological applications, regarding recombinant/transgenic formation. Additionally, the investigation of identified metabolic processes ultimately supports the development of antistress strategies. In this review, we discussed the role of proteomics in crop stress tolerance. We also discussed different abiotic stresses and their effects on plants, particularly with reference to stress-induced expression of proteins, and how proteomics could act as vital biotechnological tools for improving stress tolerance in plants. PMID:27660631

  6. A proteomic approach to porcine saliva.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Ana M; Cerón, José J; Fuentes-Rubio, María; Tecles, Fernando; Beeley, Josie A

    2014-02-01

    This paper reviews recent progress in salivary animal proteomics, with special reference to the porcine proteome. Until fairly recently, most studies on saliva as a diagnostic fluid have focused on humans, primates and rodents, and the development of salivary analysis in monitoring health in farm animals including pigs has received only limited consideration. The porcine salivary proteome has been characterised by 2D-electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry. Major and minor proteins have been identified. The use of saliva as a non-invasive biological fluid in monitoring health and disease in pigs will be reviewed, together with the potential use of proteomics for the development of biomarkers. In this review, methods of collection and the composition of porcine saliva will be considered, together with saliva handling and analysis. The overall findings indicate that there is considerable potential for the development of salivary analysis as a non-invasive diagnostic fluid in the pig, and that it offers advantages over other body fluids in this animal.

  7. Introduction to mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Matthiesen, Rune; Bunkenborg, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry has been widely applied to study biomolecules and one rapidly developing field is the global analysis of proteins, proteomics. Understanding and handling mass spectrometry data is a multifaceted task that requires many decisions to be made to get the most comprehensive information from an experiment. Later chapters in this book deal in-depth with various aspects of the process and how different tools can be applied to the many analytical challenges. This introductory chapter is intended as a basic introduction to mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics to set the scene for newcomers and give pointers to reference material. There are many applications of mass spectrometry in proteomics and each application is associated with some analytical choices, instrumental limitations and data processing steps that depend on the aim of the study and means of conducting it. Different aspects of the proteome can be explored by choosing the right combination of sample preparation, MS instrumentation and data processing. This chapter gives an outline for some of these commonly used setups and some of the key concepts, many of which are explored in greater depth in later chapters.

  8. Proteomics Analysis of Bladder Cancer Exosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Welton, Joanne L.; Khanna, Sanjay; Giles, Peter J.; Brennan, Paul; Brewis, Ian A.; Staffurth, John; Mason, Malcolm D.; Clayton, Aled

    2010-01-01

    Exosomes are nanometer-sized vesicles, secreted by various cell types, present in biological fluids that are particularly rich in membrane proteins. Ex vivo analysis of exosomes may provide biomarker discovery platforms and form non-invasive tools for disease diagnosis and monitoring. These vesicles have never before been studied in the context of bladder cancer, a major malignancy of the urological tract. We present the first proteomics analysis of bladder cancer cell exosomes. Using ultracentrifugation on a sucrose cushion, exosomes were highly purified from cultured HT1376 bladder cancer cells and verified as low in contaminants by Western blotting and flow cytometry of exosome-coated beads. Solubilization in a buffer containing SDS and DTT was essential for achieving proteomics analysis using an LC-MALDI-TOF/TOF MS approach. We report 353 high quality identifications with 72 proteins not previously identified by other human exosome proteomics studies. Overrepresentation analysis to compare this data set with previous exosome proteomics studies (using the ExoCarta database) revealed that the proteome was consistent with that of various exosomes with particular overlap with exosomes of carcinoma origin. Interrogating the Gene Ontology database highlighted a strong association of this proteome with carcinoma of bladder and other sites. The data also highlighted how homology among human leukocyte antigen haplotypes may confound MASCOT designation of major histocompatability complex Class I nomenclature, requiring data from PCR-based human leukocyte antigen haplotyping to clarify anomalous identifications. Validation of 18 MS protein identifications (including basigin, galectin-3, trophoblast glycoprotein (5T4), and others) was performed by a combination of Western blotting, flotation on linear sucrose gradients, and flow cytometry, confirming their exosomal expression. Some were confirmed positive on urinary exosomes from a bladder cancer patient. In summary, the

  9. Proteome Regulation during Olea europaea Fruit Development

    PubMed Central

    Bianco, Linda; Alagna, Fiammetta; Baldoni, Luciana; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte; Perrotta, Gaetano

    2013-01-01

    Background Widespread in the Mediterranean basin, Olea europaea trees are gaining worldwide popularity for the nutritional and cancer-protective properties of the oil, mechanically extracted from ripe fruits. Fruit development is a physiological process with remarkable impact on the modulation of the biosynthesis of compounds affecting the quality of the drupes as well as the final composition of the olive oil. Proteomics offers the possibility to dig deeper into the major changes during fruit development, including the important phase of ripening, and to classify temporal patterns of protein accumulation occurring during these complex physiological processes. Methodology/Principal Findings In this work, we started monitoring the proteome variations associated with olive fruit development by using comparative proteomics coupled to mass spectrometry. Proteins extracted from drupes at three different developmental stages were separated on 2-DE and subjected to image analysis. 247 protein spots were revealed as differentially accumulated. Proteins were identified from a total of 121 spots and discussed in relation to olive drupe metabolic changes occurring during fruit development. In order to evaluate if changes observed at the protein level were consistent with changes of mRNAs, proteomic data produced in the present work were compared with transcriptomic data elaborated during previous studies. Conclusions/Significance This study identifies a number of proteins responsible for quality traits of cv. Coratina, with particular regard to proteins associated to the metabolism of fatty acids, phenolic and aroma compounds. Proteins involved in fruit photosynthesis have been also identified and their pivotal contribution in oleogenesis has been discussed. To date, this study represents the first characterization of the olive fruit proteome during development, providing new insights into fruit metabolism and oil accumulation process. PMID:23349718

  10. Approaching clinical proteomics: current state and future fields of application in cellular proteomics.

    PubMed

    Apweiler, Rolf; Aslanidis, Charalampos; Deufel, Thomas; Gerstner, Andreas; Hansen, Jens; Hochstrasser, Dennis; Kellner, Roland; Kubicek, Markus; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Maser, Edmund; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Meyer, Helmut E; Müllner, Stefan; Mutter, Wolfgang; Neumaier, Michael; Nollau, Peter; Nothwang, Hans G; Ponten, Fredrik; Radbruch, Andreas; Reinert, Knut; Rothe, Gregor; Stockinger, Hannes; Tárnok, Attila; Taussig, Mike J; Thiel, Andreas; Thiery, Joachim; Ueffing, Marius; Valet, Günther; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Wagener, Christoph; Wagner, Oswald; Schmitz, Gerd

    2009-10-01

    Recent developments in proteomics technology offer new opportunities for clinical applications in hospital or specialized laboratories including the identification of novel biomarkers, monitoring of disease, detecting adverse effects of drugs, and environmental hazards. Advanced spectrometry technologies and the development of new protein array formats have brought these analyses to a standard, which now has the potential to be used in clinical diagnostics. Besides standardization of methodologies and distribution of proteomic data into public databases, the nature of the human body fluid proteome with its high dynamic range in protein concentrations, its quantitation problems, and its extreme complexity present enormous challenges. Molecular cell biology (cytomics) with its link to proteomics is a new fast moving scientific field, which addresses functional cell analysis and bioinformatic approaches to search for novel cellular proteomic biomarkers or their release products into body fluids that provide better insight into the enormous biocomplexity of disease processes and are suitable for patient stratification, therapeutic monitoring, and prediction of prognosis. Experience from studies of in vitro diagnostics and especially in clinical chemistry showed that the majority of errors occurs in the preanalytical phase and the setup of the diagnostic strategy. This is also true for clinical proteomics where similar preanalytical variables such as inter- and intra-assay variability due to biological variations or proteolytical activities in the sample will most likely also influence the results of proteomics studies. However, before complex proteomic analysis can be introduced at a broader level into the clinic, standardization of the preanalytical phase including patient preparation, sample collection, sample preparation, sample storage, measurement, and data analysis is another issue which has to be improved. In this report, we discuss the recent advances and

  11. Approaching clinical proteomics: current state and future fields of application in fluid proteomics.

    PubMed

    Apweiler, Rolf; Aslanidis, Charalampos; Deufel, Thomas; Gerstner, Andreas; Hansen, Jens; Hochstrasser, Dennis; Kellner, Roland; Kubicek, Markus; Lottspeich, Friedrich; Maser, Edmund; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Meyer, Helmut E; Müllner, Stefan; Mutter, Wolfgang; Neumaier, Michael; Nollau, Peter; Nothwang, Hans G; Ponten, Fredrik; Radbruch, Andreas; Reinert, Knut; Rothe, Gregor; Stockinger, Hannes; Tarnok, Attila; Taussig, Mike J; Thiel, Andreas; Thiery, Joachim; Ueffing, Marius; Valet, Günther; Vandekerckhove, Joel; Verhuven, Wiltrud; Wagener, Christoph; Wagner, Oswald; Schmitz, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    The field of clinical proteomics offers opportunities to identify new disease biomarkers in body fluids, cells and tissues. These biomarkers can be used in clinical applications for diagnosis, stratification of patients for specific treatment, or therapy monitoring. New protein array formats and improved spectrometry technologies have brought these analyses to a level with potential for use in clinical diagnostics. The nature of the human body fluid proteome with its large dynamic range of protein concentrations presents problems with quantitation. The extreme complexity of the proteome in body fluids presents enormous challenges and requires the establishment of standard operating procedures for handling of specimens, increasing sensitivity for detection and bioinformatical tools for distribution of proteomic data into the public domain. From studies of in vitro diagnostics, especially in clinical chemistry, it is evident that most errors occur in the preanalytical phase and during implementation of the diagnostic strategy. This is also true for clinical proteomics, and especially for fluid proteomics because of the multiple pretreatment processes. These processes include depletion of high-abundance proteins from plasma or enrichment processes for urine where biological variation or differences in proteolytic activities in the sample along with preanalytical variables such as inter- and intra-assay variability will likely influence the results of proteomics studies. However, before proteomic analysis can be introduced at a broader level into the clinical setting, standardization of the preanalytical phase including patient preparation, sample collection, sample preparation, sample storage, measurement and data analysis needs to be improved. In this review, we discuss the recent technological advances and applications that fulfil the criteria for clinical proteomics, with the focus on fluid proteomics. These advances relate to preanalytical factors, analytical

  12. Plasmodium vivax trophozoite-stage proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, D.C.; Lapp, Stacey A.; Akinyi, Sheila; Meyer, Esmeralda V.S.; Barnwell, John W.; Korir-Morrison, Cindy; Galinski, Mary R.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the causative infectious agent of 80–300 million annual cases of malaria. Many aspects of this parasite’s biology remain unknown. To further elucidate the interaction of P. vivax with its Saimiri boliviensis host, we obtained detailed proteomes of infected red blood cells, representing the trophozoite-enriched stage of development. Data from two of three biological replicate proteomes, emphasized here, were analyzed using five search engines, which enhanced identifications and resulted in the most comprehensive P. vivax proteomes to date, with 1375 P. vivax and 3209 S. boliviensis identified proteins. Ribosome subunit proteins were noted for both P. vivax and S. boliviensis, consistent with P. vivax’s known reticulocyte host–cell specificity. A majority of the host and pathogen proteins identified belong to specific functional categories, and several parasite gene families, while 33% of the P. vivax proteins have no reported function. Hemoglobin was significantly oxidized in both proteomes, and additional protein oxidation and nitration was detected in one of the two proteomes. Detailed analyses of these post-translational modifications are presented. The proteins identified here significantly expand the known P. vivax proteome and complexity of available host protein functionality underlying the host–parasite interactive biology, and reveal unsuspected oxidative modifications that may impact protein function. Biological significance Plasmodium vivax malaria is a serious neglected disease, causing an estimated 80 to 300 million cases annually in 95 countries. Infection can result in significant morbidity and possible death. P. vivax, unlike the much better-studied Plasmodium falciparum species, cannot be grown in long-term culture, has a dormant form in the liver called the hypnozoite stage, has a reticulocyte host–cell preference in the blood, and creates caveolae vesicle complexes at the surface of the infected reticulocyte

  13. Biogeoscience from a Metallomic and Proteomic Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anbar, A. D.; Shock, E.

    2004-12-01

    In the wake of the genomics revolution, life scientists are expanding their focus from the genome to the "proteome" - the assemblage of all proteins in a cell - and the "metallome" - the distribution of inorganic species in a cell. The proteome and metallome are tightly connected because proteins and protein products are intimately involved in the transport and homeostasis of inorganic elements, and because many enzymes depend on inorganic elements for catalytic activity. Together, they are at the heart of metabolic function. Unlike the relatively static genome, the proteome and metallome are extremely dynamic, changing rapidly in response to environmental cues. They are substantially more complex than the genome; for example, in humans, some 30,000 genes code for approximately 500,000 proteins. Metaphorically, the proteome and metallome constitute the complex, dynamic "language" by which the genome and the environment communicate. Therefore biogeochemists, like life scientists, are moving beyond a strictly genomic perspective. Research guided by proteomic and metallomic perspectives and methodologies should provide new insights into the connections between life and the inorganic Earth in modern environments, and the evolution of these connections through time. For example, biogeochemical research in modern environments, such as Yellowstone hot springs, is hindered by the gap between genomic determinations of metabolic potential in ecosystems and geochemical characterizations of the energetic boundary conditions faced by these ecosystems; genomics tells us "who is there" and geochemistry tells us "what they might be doing", but neither genomics nor geochemistry easily provide quantitative information about which metabolisms are actually active or a framework for understanding why ecosystems do not fully exploit the energy available in their surroundings. Such questions are fundamentally kinetic rather than thermodynamic and therefore demand that we characterize and

  14. Next-generation proteomics faces new challenges in environmental biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Armengaud, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Environmental biotechnology relies on the exploration of novel biological systems and a thorough understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Next-generation proteomics based on the latest generation of mass analyzers currently allows the recording of complete proteomes from any microorganism. Interpreting these data can be straightforward if the genome of the organism is established, or relatively easy to perform through proteogenomics approaches if a draft sequence can be obtained. However, next-generation proteomics faces new, interesting challenges when the organism is distantly related to previously characterized organisms or when mixtures of organisms have to be analyzed. New mass spectrometers and innovative bioinformatics tools are reshaping the possibilities of homology-based proteomics, proteogenomics, and metaproteomics for the characterization of biological systems. Novel time- and cost-effective screening strategies are also possible with this methodology, as exemplified by whole proteome thermal profiling and subpopulation proteomics. The complexity of environmental samples allows for unique developments of approaches and concepts. PMID:26950175

  15. Clinical proteomics and OMICS clues useful in translational medicine research

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Since the advent of the new proteomics era more than a decade ago, large-scale studies of protein profiling have been used to identify distinctive molecular signatures in a wide array of biological systems, spanning areas of basic biological research, clinical diagnostics, and biomarker discovery directed toward therapeutic applications. Recent advances in protein separation and identification techniques have significantly improved proteomic approaches, leading to enhancement of the depth and breadth of proteome coverage. Proteomic signatures, specific for multiple diseases, including cancer and pre-invasive lesions, are emerging. This article combines, in a simple manner, relevant proteomic and OMICS clues used in the discovery and development of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers that are applicable to all clinical fields, thus helping to improve applications of clinical proteomic strategies for translational medicine research. PMID:22642823

  16. Next-generation proteomics faces new challenges in environmental biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Armengaud, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Environmental biotechnology relies on the exploration of novel biological systems and a thorough understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Next-generation proteomics based on the latest generation of mass analyzers currently allows the recording of complete proteomes from any microorganism. Interpreting these data can be straightforward if the genome of the organism is established, or relatively easy to perform through proteogenomics approaches if a draft sequence can be obtained. However, next-generation proteomics faces new, interesting challenges when the organism is distantly related to previously characterized organisms or when mixtures of organisms have to be analyzed. New mass spectrometers and innovative bioinformatics tools are reshaping the possibilities of homology-based proteomics, proteogenomics, and metaproteomics for the characterization of biological systems. Novel time- and cost-effective screening strategies are also possible with this methodology, as exemplified by whole proteome thermal profiling and subpopulation proteomics. The complexity of environmental samples allows for unique developments of approaches and concepts.

  17. Proteome identification of the silkworm middle silk gland

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian-ying; Ye, Lu-peng; Che, Jia-qian; Song, Jia; You, Zheng-ying; Wang, Shao-hua; Zhong, Bo-xiong

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the functional differentiation among the anterior (A), middle (M), and posterior (P) regions of silkworm middle silk gland (MSG), their proteomes were characterized by shotgun LC–MS/MS analysis with a LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. To get better proteome identification and quantification, triplicate replicates of mass spectrometry analysis were performed for each sample. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (Vizcaíno et al., 2014) [1] via the PRIDE partner repository (Vizcaino, 2013) [2] with the dataset identifier PXD003371. The peptide identifications that were further processed by PeptideProphet program in Trans-Proteomic Pipeline (TPP) after database search with Mascot software were also available in .XML format files. Data presented here are related to a research article published in Journal of Proteomics by Li et al. (2015) [3]. PMID:26937469

  18. Proteome identification of the silkworm middle silk gland.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian-Ying; Ye, Lu-Peng; Che, Jia-Qian; Song, Jia; You, Zheng-Ying; Wang, Shao-Hua; Zhong, Bo-Xiong

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the functional differentiation among the anterior (A), middle (M), and posterior (P) regions of silkworm middle silk gland (MSG), their proteomes were characterized by shotgun LC-MS/MS analysis with a LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. To get better proteome identification and quantification, triplicate replicates of mass spectrometry analysis were performed for each sample. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium (Vizcaíno et al., 2014) [1] via the PRIDE partner repository (Vizcaino, 2013) [2] with the dataset identifier PXD003371. The peptide identifications that were further processed by PeptideProphet program in Trans-Proteomic Pipeline (TPP) after database search with Mascot software were also available in .XML format files. Data presented here are related to a research article published in Journal of Proteomics by Li et al. (2015) [3]. PMID:26937469

  19. Recent advances in maize nuclear proteomic studies reveal histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Casati, Paula

    2012-01-01

    The nucleus of eukaryotic organisms is highly dynamic and complex, containing different types of macromolecules including DNA, RNA, and a wide range of proteins. Novel proteomic applications have led to a better overall determination of nucleus protein content. Although nuclear plant proteomics is only at the initial phase, several studies have been reported and are summarized in this review using different plants species, such as Arabidopsis thaliana, rice, cowpea, onion, garden cress, and barrel clover. These include the description of the total nuclear or phospho-proteome (i.e., Arabidopsis, cowpea, onion), or the analysis of the differential nuclear proteome under different growth environments (i.e., Arabidopsis, rice, cowpea, onion, garden cress, and barrel clover). However, only few reports exist on the analysis of the maize nuclear proteome or its changes under various conditions. This review will present recent data on the study of the nuclear maize proteome, including the analysis of changes in posttranslational modifications in histone proteins. PMID:23248634

  20. Advances in urinary proteome analysis and biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Fliser, Danilo; Novak, Jan; Thongboonkerd, Visith; Argilés, Angel; Jankowski, Vera; Girolami, Mark A; Jankowski, Joachim; Mischak, Harald

    2007-04-01

    Noninvasive diagnosis of kidney diseases and assessment of the prognosis are still challenges in clinical nephrology. Definition of biomarkers on the basis of proteome analysis, especially of the urine, has advanced recently and may provide new tools to solve those challenges. This article highlights the most promising technological approaches toward deciphering the human proteome and applications of the knowledge in clinical nephrology, with emphasis on the urinary proteome. The data in the current literature indicate that although a thorough investigation of the entire urinary proteome is still a distant goal, clinical applications are already available. Progress in the analysis of human proteome in health and disease will depend more on the standardization of data and availability of suitable bioinformatics and software solutions than on new technological advances. It is predicted that proteomics will play an important role in clinical nephrology in the very near future and that this progress will require interactive dialogue and collaboration between clinicians and analytical specialists.

  1. Plant fluid proteomics: Delving into the xylem sap, phloem sap and apoplastic fluid proteomes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Celma, Jorge; Ceballos-Laita, Laura; Grusak, Michael A; Abadía, Javier; López-Millán, Ana-Flor

    2016-08-01

    The phloem sap, xylem sap and apoplastic fluid play key roles in long and short distance transport of signals and nutrients, and act as a barrier against local and systemic pathogen infection. Among other components, these plant fluids contain proteins which are likely to be important players in their functionalities. However, detailed information about their proteomes is only starting to arise due to the difficulties inherent to the collection methods. This review compiles the proteomic information available to date in these three plant fluids, and compares the proteomes obtained in different plant species in order to shed light into conserved functions in each plant fluid. Inter-species comparisons indicate that all these fluids contain the protein machinery for self-maintenance and defense, including proteins related to cell wall metabolism, pathogen defense, proteolysis, and redox response. These analyses also revealed that proteins may play more relevant roles in signaling in the phloem sap and apoplastic fluid than in the xylem sap. A comparison of the proteomes of the three fluids indicates that although functional categories are somewhat similar, proteins involved are likely to be fluid-specific, except for a small group of proteins present in the three fluids, which may have a universal role, especially in cell wall maintenance and defense. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics--a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock.

  2. Plasma proteomics, the Human Proteome Project, and cancer-associated alternative splice variant proteins.

    PubMed

    Omenn, Gilbert S

    2014-05-01

    This article addresses three inter-related subjects: the development of the Human Plasma Proteome Peptide Atlas, the launch of the Human Proteome Project, and the emergence of alternative splice variant transcripts and proteins as important features of evolution and pathogenesis. The current Plasma Peptide Atlas provides evidence on which peptides have been detected for every protein confidently identified in plasma; there are links to their spectra and their estimated abundance, facilitating the planning of targeted proteomics for biomarker studies. The Human Proteome Project (HPP) combines a chromosome-centric C-HPP with a biology and disease-driven B/D-HPP, upon a foundation of mass spectrometry, antibody, and knowledgebase resource pillars. The HPP aims to identify the approximately 7000 "missing proteins" and to characterize all proteins and their many isoforms. Success will enable the larger research community to utilize newly-available peptides, spectra, informative MS transitions, and databases for targeted analyses of priority proteins for each organ and disease. Among the isoforms of proteins, splice variants have the special feature of greatly enlarging protein diversity without enlarging the genome; evidence is accumulating of striking differential expression of splice variants in cancers. In this era of RNA-sequencing and advanced mass spectrometry, it is no longer sufficient to speak simply of increased or decreased expression of genes or proteins without carefully examining the splice variants in the protein mixture produced from each multi-exon gene. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge.

  3. Peptide prefractionation is essential for proteomic approaches employing multiple-reaction monitoring of fruit proteomic research.

    PubMed

    Yang, XiaoTang; Li, Li; Song, Jun; Palmer, Leslie Campbell; Li, XiHong; Zhang, ZhaoQi

    2014-01-01

    Off-gel™ IEF has become a popular tool in proteomics research to fractionate peptides or proteins. We conducted a detailed investigation on the fruit proteomics of apple, banana, and strawberry fruit employing Off-gel™ electrophoresis (OGE) as a crucial step to improve the proteome coverage and quantitative proteomic workflows including multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM). We provide technical details concerning the application of Off-gel™IEF, nano-LC-MS detection, and MRM optimization and analysis. Our results demonstrated that the application of OGE is an effective method for peptide fractionation and increased significantly the number of proteins identified by at least ten times, with more total peptides detected and collected. Furthermore, we developed a protocol combining OGE and MRM studies to identify and quantitatively investigate monodehydroascorbate reductase, a key enzyme in the redox and antioxidant system of apple fruit during fruit ripening. Using this method, the quantitative changes in this protein during ripening and in response to ethylene treatment was investigated. Our results provide direct and comprehensive evidence demonstrating the benefits of OGE and its application for both shotgun and quantitative proteomics research. PMID:24227789

  4. Proteome-wide analysis and diel proteomic profiling of the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis PCC 8005.

    PubMed

    Matallana-Surget, Sabine; Derock, Jérémy; Leroy, Baptiste; Badri, Hanène; Deschoenmaeker, Frédéric; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis has a long history of use as a food supply and it has been used by the European Space Agency in the MELiSSA project, an artificial microecosystem which supports life during long-term manned space missions. This study assesses progress in the field of cyanobacterial shotgun proteomics and light/dark diurnal cycles by focusing on Arthrospira platensis. Several fractionation workflows including gel-free and gel-based protein/peptide fractionation procedures were used and combined with LC-MS/MS analysis, enabling the overall identification of 1306 proteins, which represents 21% coverage of the theoretical proteome. A total of 30 proteins were found to be significantly differentially regulated under light/dark growth transition. Interestingly, most of the proteins showing differential abundance were related to photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle and translation processes. A novel aspect and major achievement of this work is the successful improvement of the cyanobacterial proteome coverage using a 3D LC-MS/MS approach, based on an immobilized metal affinity chromatography, a suitable tool that enabled us to eliminate the most abundant protein, the allophycocyanin. We also demonstrated that cell growth follows a light/dark cycle in A. platensis. This preliminary proteomic study has highlighted new characteristics of the Arthrospira platensis proteome in terms of diurnal regulation. PMID:24914774

  5. Proteomics study revealed altered proteome of Dichogaster curgensis upon exposure to fly ash.

    PubMed

    Markad, Vijaykumar L; Adav, Sunil S; Ghole, Vikram S; Sze, Siu Kwan; Kodam, Kisan M

    2016-10-01

    Fly ash is toxic and its escalating use as a soil amendment and disposal by dumping into environment is receiving alarming attention due to its impact on environment. Proteomics technology is being used for environmental studies since proteins respond rapidly when an organism is exposed to a toxicant, and hence soil engineers such as earthworms are used as model organisms to assess the toxic effects of soil toxicants. This study adopted proteomics technology and profiled proteome of earthworm Dichogaster curgensis that was exposed to fly ash, with main aim to elucidate fly ash effects on cellular and metabolic pathways. The functional classification of identified proteins revealed carbohydrate metabolism (14.36%), genetic information processing (15.02%), folding, sorting and degradation (10.83%), replication and repair (3.95%); environmental information processing (2.19%), signal transduction (9.61%), transport and catabolism (17.27%), energy metabolism (6.69%), etc. in the proteome. Proteomics data and functional assays revealed that the exposure of earthworm to fly ash induced protein synthesis, up-regulation of gluconeogenesis, disturbed energy metabolism, oxidative and cellular stress, and mis-folding of proteins. The regulation of ubiquitination, proteasome and modified alkaline comet assay in earthworm coelomocytes suggested DNA-protein cross link affecting chromatin remodeling and protein folding. PMID:27371791

  6. Proteome Dynamics Reveals Pro-Inflammatory Remodeling of Plasma Proteome in a Mouse Model of NAFLD.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Bebek, Gurkan; Previs, Stephen F; Smith, Jonathan D; Sadygov, Rovshan G; McCullough, Arthur J; Willard, Belinda; Kasumov, Takhar

    2016-09-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Because the liver is the major source of circulatory proteins, it is not surprising that hepatic disease could lead to alterations in the plasma proteome, which are therein implicated in atherosclerosis. The current study used low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (LDLR(-/-)) mice to examine the impact of Western diet (WD)-induced NAFLD on plasma proteome homeostasis. Using a (2)H2O-metabolic labeling method, we found that a WD led to a proinflammatory distribution of circulatory proteins analyzed in apoB-depleted plasma, which was attributed to an increased production. The fractional turnover rates of short-lived proteins that are implicated in stress-response, lipid metabolism, and transport functions were significantly increased with WD (P < 0.05). Pathway analyses revealed that alterations in plasma proteome dynamics were related to the suppression of hepatic PPARα, which was confirmed based on reduced gene and protein expression of PPARα in mice fed a WD. These changes were associated with ∼4-fold increase (P < 0.0001) in the proinflammatory property of apoB-depleted plasma. In conclusion, the proteome dynamics method reveals proinflammatory remodeling of the plasma proteome relevant to liver disease. The approach used herein may provide a useful metric of in vivo liver function and better enable studies of novel therapies surrounding NAFLD and other diseases. PMID:27439437

  7. Proteome-Wide Analysis and Diel Proteomic Profiling of the Cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis PCC 8005

    PubMed Central

    Matallana-Surget, Sabine; Derock, Jérémy; Leroy, Baptiste; Badri, Hanène; Deschoenmaeker, Frédéric; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2014-01-01

    The filamentous cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis has a long history of use as a food supply and it has been used by the European Space Agency in the MELiSSA project, an artificial microecosystem which supports life during long-term manned space missions. This study assesses progress in the field of cyanobacterial shotgun proteomics and light/dark diurnal cycles by focusing on Arthrospira platensis. Several fractionation workflows including gel-free and gel-based protein/peptide fractionation procedures were used and combined with LC-MS/MS analysis, enabling the overall identification of 1306 proteins, which represents 21% coverage of the theoretical proteome. A total of 30 proteins were found to be significantly differentially regulated under light/dark growth transition. Interestingly, most of the proteins showing differential abundance were related to photosynthesis, the Calvin cycle and translation processes. A novel aspect and major achievement of this work is the successful improvement of the cyanobacterial proteome coverage using a 3D LC-MS/MS approach, based on an immobilized metal affinity chromatography, a suitable tool that enabled us to eliminate the most abundant protein, the allophycocyanin. We also demonstrated that cell growth follows a light/dark cycle in A. platensis. This preliminary proteomic study has highlighted new characteristics of the Arthrospira platensis proteome in terms of diurnal regulation. PMID:24914774

  8. Comparative proteomics lends insight into genotype-specific pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Michael T

    2013-09-01

    Comparative proteomic analyses have emerged as a powerful tool for the identification of unique biomarkers and mechanisms of pathogenesis. In this issue of Proteomics, Murugaiyan et al. utilize difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) to examine differential protein expression between nonpathogenic and pathogenic genotypes of Prototheca zopfii, a causative agent in bovine enteritis and mastitis. Their findings provide insights into molecular mechanisms of infection and evolutionary adaptation of pathogenic genotypes, demonstrating the power of comparative proteomic analyses. PMID:23925996

  9. Farm Animal Serum Proteomics and Impact on Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Girolamo, Francesco Di; D’Amato, Alfonsina; Lante, Isabella; Signore, Fabrizio; Muraca, Marta; Putignani, Lorenza

    2014-01-01

    Due to the incompleteness of animal genome sequencing, the analysis and characterization of serum proteomes of most farm animals are still in their infancy, compared to the already well-documented human serum proteome. This review focuses on the implications of the farm animal serum proteomics in order to identify novel biomarkers for animal welfare, early diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of infectious disease treatment, and develop new vaccines, aiming at determining the reciprocal benefits for humans and animals. PMID:25257521

  10. Farm animal serum proteomics and impact on human health.

    PubMed

    Di Girolamo, Francesco; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Lante, Isabella; Signore, Fabrizio; Muraca, Marta; Putignani, Lorenza

    2014-09-01

    Due to the incompleteness of animal genome sequencing, the analysis and characterization of serum proteomes of most farm animals are still in their infancy, compared to the already well-documented human serum proteome. This review focuses on the implications of the farm animal serum proteomics in order to identify novel biomarkers for animal welfare, early diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of infectious disease treatment, and develop new vaccines, aiming at determining the reciprocal benefits for humans and animals.

  11. Proteomic analyses of soybean root tips during germination.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Setsuko; Oh, Myeong W; Jang, Hee Y; Kwon, Soo J; Kim, Hye R; Ko, Jung H; Woo, Sun H; Nanjo, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    Plant root systems form complex networks with the surrounding soil environment and are controlled by both internal and external factors. To better understand the function of root tips of soybean during germination, three proteomic techniques were used to analyze the protein profiles of root tip cells. Proteins were extracted from the root tips of 4-day-old soybean seedlings and analyzed using two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis-based proteomics, SDS-gel based proteomics, and gel-free proteomics techniques. A total of 121, 862, and 341 proteins were identified in root tips using the 2D gel-based, SDS gel-based, and gel-free proteomic techniques, respectively. The proteins identified by 2D gel-based proteomic analysis were predominantly localized in the cytoplasm, whereas nuclear-localized proteins were most commonly identified by the SDS gel-based and gel-free proteomics techniques. Of the 862 proteins identified in the SDS gel-based proteomic analysis, 190 were protein synthesis-related proteins. Furthermore, 24 proteins identified using the 2D-gel based proteomic technique shifted between acidic and basic isoelectric points, and 2 proteins, heat shock protein 70.2 and AAA-type ATPase, displayed two different molecular weights at the same isoelectric point. Taken together, these results suggest that a number of proteins related to protein synthesis and modification are activated in the root tips of soybean seedlings during germination.

  12. Molecular biology tools: proteomics techniques in biomarker discovery.

    PubMed

    Lottspeich, Friedrich; Kellermann, Josef; Keidel, Eva-Maria

    2010-01-01

    Despite worldwide efforts biomarker discovery by plasma proteomics was not successful so far. Several reasons for this failure are obvious. Mainly, proteome diversity is remarkable between different individuals and is caused by genetic, environmental and life style parameters. To recognize disease related proteins that could serve as potential biomarkers is only feasible by investigating a non realizable large number of patients. Furthermore, plasma proteomics comprises enormous technical hurdles for quantitative analysis. High reproducibility of blood sampling in clinical routine is hard to achieve. Quantitative proteome analysis has to struggle with the complexity of millions of protein species comprising typical plasma proteins, cellular leakage proteins and antibodies and concentration differences of more than 1011 between high and low abundant proteins. Therefore, no successful quantitative and comprehensive plasma proteome analysis is reported so far. A novel proteomics strategy is proposed for biomarker discovery in plasma. Instead of comparing the plasma proteome of different individuals it is recommended to analyze the proteomes of different time points of a single individual during the development of a disease. This strategy is realized by the use of plasma of the Bavarian Red Cross Blood Bank, were three million samples are stored under standardized conditions. To achieve reliable data the isotope coded protein labelling proteomics technology was used.

  13. The use of proteomic technologies in breast cancer research.

    PubMed

    Mazur, M G; Pyatchanina, T V

    2016-09-01

    The main findings in the field of breast cancer proteomic research as well as modern strategies, technologies and methods of validation are reviewed. A special attention is focused on validated proteomic biomarkers of breast cancer. The data on proteomic profiling of stroma, tumor microenvironment, involvement of proteins in tumor progression, invasion and metastasis, and mechanisms of action of new generation drugs, are analyzed. The results of proteomic analysis are of high clinical importance and significantly improve tumor molecular profiling, stratification of patients, screening, diagnostics, and therapy of breast cancer. PMID:27685521

  14. Proteomic and Bioinformatic Profile of Primary Human Oral Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Santosh K.; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Bebek, Gurkan; Weinberg, Aaron; Jiang, Bin; Willard, Belinda; Chance, Mark R.; Kinter, Michael T.; McCormick, Thomas S.

    2012-01-01

    Wounding of the oral mucosa occurs frequently in a highly septic environment. Remarkably, these wounds heal quickly and the oral cavity, for the most part, remains healthy. Deciphering the normal human oral epithelial cell (NHOEC) proteome is critical for understanding the mechanism(s) of protection elicited when the mucosal barrier is intact, as well as when it is breached. Combining 2D gel electrophoresis with shotgun proteomics resulted in identification of 1662 NHOEC proteins. Proteome annotations were performed based on protein classes, molecular functions, disease association and membership in canonical and metabolic signaling pathways. Comparing the NHOEC proteome with a database of innate immunity-relevant interactions (InnateDB) identified 64 common proteins associated with innate immunity. Comparison with published salivary proteomes revealed that 738/1662 NHOEC proteins were common, suggesting that significant numbers of salivary proteins are of epithelial origin. Gene ontology analysis showed similarities in the distributions of NHOEC and saliva proteomes with regard to biological processes, and molecular functions. We also assessed the inter-individual variability of the NHOEC proteome and observed it to be comparable with other primary cells. The baseline proteome described in this study should serve as a resource for proteome studies of the oral mucosa, especially in relation to disease processes. PMID:23035736

  15. Proteomics, biomarkers, and HIV‐1: A current perspective

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, Maire Rose

    2015-01-01

    Despite more than three decades of extensive research, HIV‐1 infection although well controlled with cART, remains incurable. Multifactorial complexity of the viral life‐cycle poses great challenges in understanding molecular mechanisms underlying this infection and the development of biomarkers, which we hope will lead us to its eradication. For a more in‐depth understanding of how the virus interacts with host target cells, T cells and macrophages, proteomic profiling techniques that offer strategies to investigate the proteome in its entirety were employed. Here, we review proteomic studies related to HIV‐1 infection and discuss perspectives and limitations of proteomic and systems biology approaches in future studies. PMID:26033875

  16. Single muscle fiber proteomics reveals unexpected mitochondrial specialization

    PubMed Central

    Murgia, Marta; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Deshmukh, Atul S; Zeiler, Marlis; Cancellara, Pasqua; Moretti, Irene; Reggiani, Carlo; Schiaffino, Stefano; Mann, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian skeletal muscles are composed of multinucleated cells termed slow or fast fibers according to their contractile and metabolic properties. Here, we developed a high-sensitivity workflow to characterize the proteome of single fibers. Analysis of segments of the same fiber by traditional and unbiased proteomics methods yielded the same subtype assignment. We discovered novel subtype-specific features, most prominently mitochondrial specialization of fiber types in substrate utilization. The fiber type-resolved proteomes can be applied to a variety of physiological and pathological conditions and illustrate the utility of single cell type analysis for dissecting proteomic heterogeneity. PMID:25643707

  17. Virtual Labs in proteomics: new E-learning tools.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sandipan; Koshy, Nicole Rachel; Reddy, Panga Jaipal; Srivastava, Sanjeeva

    2012-05-17

    Web-based educational resources have gained enormous popularity recently and are increasingly becoming a part of modern educational systems. Virtual Labs are E-learning platforms where learners can gain the experience of practical experimentation without any direct physical involvement on real bench work. They use computerized simulations, models, videos, animations and other instructional technologies to create interactive content. Proteomics being one of the most rapidly growing fields of the biological sciences is now an important part of college and university curriculums. Consequently, many E-learning programs have started incorporating the theoretical and practical aspects of different proteomic techniques as an element of their course work in the form of Video Lectures and Virtual Labs. To this end, recently we have developed a Virtual Proteomics Lab at the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, which demonstrates different proteomics techniques, including basic and advanced gel and MS-based protein separation and identification techniques, bioinformatics tools and molecular docking methods, and their applications in different biological samples. This Tutorial will discuss the prominent Virtual Labs featuring proteomics content, including the Virtual Proteomics Lab of IIT-Bombay, and E-resources available for proteomics study that are striving to make proteomic techniques and concepts available and accessible to the student and research community. This Tutorial is part of the International Proteomics Tutorial Programme (IPTP 14). Details can be found at: http://www.proteomicstutorials.org/. PMID:22484059

  18. Proteomic dissection of plant responses to various pathogens.

    PubMed

    Fang, Xianping; Chen, Jianping; Dai, Liangying; Ma, Huasheng; Zhang, Hengmu; Yang, Jian; Wang, Fang; Yan, Chengqi

    2015-05-01

    During their growth and development, plants are vulnerable to the effects of a variety of pathogens. Proteomics technology plays an important role in research studies of plant defense mechanisms by mining the expression changes of proteins in response to various biotic stresses. This review article provides a comprehensive overview of the latest developments in international proteomic research on plant biotic stress. It summarizes the methods commonly used in plant proteomic research to investigate biotic stress, analyze the protein responses of plants in adverse conditions, and reviews the applications of proteomics combined with transgenic technology in plant protection.

  19. Lessons from the proteomic study of osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Romero, Cristina; Fernández-Puente, Patricia; Calamia, Valentina; Blanco, Francisco J

    2015-08-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most common rheumatic pathology and one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. It is a very complex disease whose etiopathogenesis is not fully understood. Furthermore, there are serious limitations for its management, since it lacks specific and sensitive biomarkers for early diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic monitoring. Proteomic approaches performed in the last few decades have contributed to the knowledge on the molecular mechanisms that participate in this pathology and they have also led to interesting panels of putative biomarker candidates. In the next few years, further efforts should be made for translating these findings into the clinical routines. It is expected that targeted proteomics strategies will be highly valuable for the verification and qualification of biomarkers of osteoarthritis.

  20. Proteomics applications in Caenorhabditis elegans research.

    PubMed

    Husson, Steven J; Moyson, Sofie; Valkenborg, Dirk; Baggerman, Geert; Mertens, Inge

    2015-12-25

    The free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is one of the most studied models in a wide variety of research fields with applications in agro- or pharmaceutical industries. It has been used for the development of new anthelminthic drugs and was proven to yield key insights in neurodegenerative diseases and metabolic syndromes. Due to its suitability for high-throughput genetic screens, efficiency for RNA interference approaches and the availability of thousands of mutants, most studies were carried out at the genetic level. However, determining the cellular function of each gene product remains an unfinished goal in this post-genomic era. A systems biology approach focusing on the actual gene products (i.e. proteins) can help unraveling this puzzle. A fundamental pillar in this research is mass spectrometry-based proteomics. We here provide an in-depth overview of proteomics-related studies in C. elegans research, with special emphasis on the methodologies and biological applications. PMID:26585491

  1. An update of the macaque testis proteome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tao; Guo, Yueshuai; Zhou, Zuomin; Guo, Xuejiang; Sha, Jiahao

    2015-01-01

    The genome sequence of rhesus macaque is a draft version with many errors and is lack of Y chromosome annotation. In the present dataset, we reanalyzed the previously published macaque testis proteome. We searched for refined protein sequences, potential Y chromosome proteins and transcripts predicted proteins in addition to the latest Ensembl protein sequences of macaque. A total of 74,433 peptides corresponding to 9247 protein groups were identified, and the data are supplied in this paper. The updated version of macaque testis proteome provided evidences for predicted genes or transcripts at the peptide level. It can be used for further in-depth proteogenomic annotation of macaque genome and is useful for studying the mechanisms of macaque spermatogenesis. PMID:26484360

  2. Leveraging Genomics Software to Improve Proteomics Results

    SciTech Connect

    Fodor, I K; Nelson, D O

    2005-09-06

    Rigorous data analysis techniques are essential in quantifying the differential expression of proteins in biological samples of interest. Statistical methods from the microarray literature were applied to the analysis of two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE) proteomics experiments, in the context of technical variability studies involving human plasma. Protein expression measurements were corrected to account for observed intensity-dependent biases within gels, and normalized to mitigate observed gel to gel variations. The methods improved upon the results achieved using the best currently available 2-D DIGE proteomics software. The spot-wise protein variance was reduced by 10% and the number of apparently differentially expressed proteins was reduced by over 50%.

  3. Statistical Aspects in Proteomic Biomarker Discovery.

    PubMed

    Jung, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    In the pursuit of a personalized medicine, i.e., the individual treatment of a patient, many medical decision problems are desired to be supported by biomarkers that can help to make a diagnosis, prediction, or prognosis. Proteomic biomarkers are of special interest since they can not only be detected in tissue samples but can also often be easily detected in diverse body fluids. Statistical methods play an important role in the discovery and validation of proteomic biomarkers. They are necessary in the planning of experiments, in the processing of raw signals, and in the final data analysis. This review provides an overview on the most frequent experimental settings including sample size considerations, and focuses on exploratory data analysis and classifier development.

  4. Global analysis of Brucella melitensis proteomes.

    PubMed

    Mujer, Cesar V; Wagner, Mary Ann; Eschenbrenner, Michel; Horn, Troy; Kraycer, Jo Ann; Redkar, Rajendra; Hagius, Sue; Elzer, Philip; Delvecchio, Vito G

    2002-10-01

    Brucella melitensis is a facultative, intracellular, gram-negative cocco-bacillus that causes Malta fever in humans and brucellosis in animals. There are at least six species in the genus, and the disease is classified as zoonotic because several species infect humans. Using 2-D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, we have initiated (i) a comprehensive mapping and identification of all the expressed proteins of B. melitensis virulent strain 16M, and (ii) a comparative study of its proteome with the attentuated vaccinal strain Rev 1. Comprehensive proteome maps of all six Brucella species will be generated in order to obtain vital information for vaccine development, identification of pathogenicity islands, and establishment of host specificity and evolutionary relatedness.

  5. Applying proteomic technology to clinical virology.

    PubMed

    Mancone, C; Ciccosanti, F; Montaldo, C; Perdomo, A B; Piacentini, M; Alonzi, T; Fimia, G M; Tripodi, M

    2013-01-01

    Developing antiviral drugs, vaccines and diagnostic markers is still the most ambitious challenge in clinical virology. In the past few decades, data from high-throughput technologies have allowed for the rapid development of new antiviral therapeutic strategies, thus making a profound impact on translational research. Most of the current preclinical studies in virology are aimed at evaluating the dynamic composition and localization of the protein platforms involved in various host-virus interactions. Among the different possible approaches, mass spectrometry-based proteomics is increasingly being used to define the protein composition in subcellular compartments, quantify differential protein expression among samples, characterize protein complexes, and analyse protein post-translational modifications. Here, we review the current knowledge of the most useful proteomic approaches in the study of viral persistence and pathogenicity, with a particular focus on recent advances in hepatitis C research.

  6. Proteomics of Uveal Melanoma: A Minireview

    PubMed Central

    Abildgaard, Søren K. O.; Vorum, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Uveal melanoma (UM) continues to be associated with a high mortality rate of up to 50% due to metastatic spread primarily to the liver. Currently there are relatively effective treatments for the primary tumor, though the management of the metastatic disease remains inadequate. Conventional diagnostic tools have a low sensitivity for detecting metastasis, and early detection of metastatic spread would allow more treatment options that could ultimately increase survival of UM patients. Advanced proteomic methods have already helped to find potential biomarkers associated with UM pathogenesis and metastasis. In the present review we discuss the field of proteomics in relation to studies elucidating biomarkers of UM, where proteins such as S-100β, osteopontin (OPN), and melanoma inhibitory activity (MIA) have been shown to be associated with metastasis. PMID:24078811

  7. Purification of specific loci for proteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Byrum, Stephanie D.; Taverna, Sean D.; Tackett, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Purification of small, native chromatin sections for proteomic identification of specifically bound proteins and histone posttranslational modifications is a powerful approach for studying mechanisms of chromosome metabolism. We detail a Chromatin Affinity Purification with Mass Spectrometry (ChAP-MS) approach for affinity purification of ~1 kb sections of chromatin for targeted proteomic analysis. This approach utilizes quantitative, high resolution mass spectrometry to categorize proteins and histone posttranslational modifications co-enriching with the given chromatin section as either “specific” to the targeted chromatin or “non-specific” contamination. In this way, the ChAP-MS approach can help define and re-define mechanisms of chromatin-templated activities. PMID:25311124

  8. Collision cross sections for structural proteomics.

    PubMed

    Marklund, Erik G; Degiacomi, Matteo T; Robinson, Carol V; Baldwin, Andrew J; Benesch, Justin L P

    2015-04-01

    Ion mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) allows the structural interrogation of biomolecules by reporting their collision cross sections (CCSs). The major bottleneck for exploiting IM-MS in structural proteomics lies in the lack of speed at which structures and models can be related to experimental data. Here we present IMPACT (Ion Mobility Projection Approximation Calculation Tool), which overcomes these twin challenges, providing accurate CCSs up to 10(6) times faster than alternative methods. This allows us to assess the CCS space presented by the entire structural proteome, interrogate ensembles of protein conformers, and monitor molecular dynamics trajectories. Our data demonstrate that the CCS is a highly informative parameter and that IM-MS is of considerable practical value to structural biologists. PMID:25800554

  9. Global MS-Based Proteomics Drug Profiling.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana Sofia; Matthiesen, Rune

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based technologies such as RNAi, chemical-genetic profiling, or gene expression profiling by DNA microarrays combined with other biochemical methods are established strategies for surveying drug mechanisms. Such approaches can provide mechanistic information on how drugs act and affect cellular pathways. By studying how cancer cells compensate for the drug treatment, novel targets used in a combined treatment can be designed. Furthermore, toxicity effects on cells not targeted can be obtained on a molecular level. For example, drug companies are particularly interested in studying the molecular side effects of drugs in the liver. In addition, experiments with the purpose of elucidating liver toxicity can be studied using samples obtained from animal models exposed to different concentrations of a drug over time. More recently considerable advances in mass spectrometry (MS) technologies and bioinformatics tools allows informative global drug profiling experiments to be performed at a cost comparable to other large-scale technologies such as DNA-based technologies. Moreover, MS-based proteomics provides an additional layer of information on the dynamic regulation of proteins translation and particularly protein degradation. MS-based proteomics approaches combined with other biochemical methods delivers information on regulatory networks, signaling cascades, and metabolic pathways upon drug treatment. Furthermore, MS-based proteomics can provide additional information on single amino acid polymorphisms, protein isoform distribution, posttranslational modifications, and subcellular localization. In this chapter, we will share our experience using MS based proteomics as a pharmacoproteomics strategy to characterize drug mechanisms of action in single drug therapy or in multidrug combination. Finally, the emergence of integrated proteogenomics analysis, such as "The Cancer Genome Atlas" program, opened interesting perspectives to extend this approach to drug target

  10. Proteomics Development and Application for Bioforensics

    SciTech Connect

    Wahl, Karen L.; Wunschel, David S.; Clowers, Brian H.

    2010-09-15

    Proteomics is a relatively new scientific discipline dedicated to the comprehensive study of the protein composition of biological systems. While genomic sequencing is an invaluable tool for bioforensic sample identification, proteomics complements genomics in that the genes present in an organism code for the proteins that can be present in a microorganism. Many proteins are conserved for general identification while other protein expression varies with environment/growth state/growth conditions (i.e. not all proteins are expressed at any given time or condition) providing additional information beyond genomic analysis. This expression specificity and the relative stability of proteins with respect to genetic material make them attractive targets for microorganism identification and forensic applications to complement genomic approaches. Proteomic analysis depends upon the availability of genome sequences of the relevant organisms or their near relatives. The known amino acid sequences for potential proteins within the database can be compared to amino acid sequences of actual proteins present in a sample as determined with high mass accuracy by mass spectrometry for identification of the proteins in the sample. With the development of technology for rapid genome sequencing of organisms, the known protein database is growing, supporting improved identification of the proteins present in a sample. Recent developments in mass spectrometry instrumentation and microbial sequencing are leading to an increased growth in application of proteomics to microbiology, pathogen detection, disease diagnosis and microbial forensics as well as other biological disciplines. Mass spectrometry analysis does not require a priori knowledge of the sample or expected targets to gain meaningful.

  11. Global MS-Based Proteomics Drug Profiling.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Ana Sofia; Matthiesen, Rune

    2016-01-01

    DNA-based technologies such as RNAi, chemical-genetic profiling, or gene expression profiling by DNA microarrays combined with other biochemical methods are established strategies for surveying drug mechanisms. Such approaches can provide mechanistic information on how drugs act and affect cellular pathways. By studying how cancer cells compensate for the drug treatment, novel targets used in a combined treatment can be designed. Furthermore, toxicity effects on cells not targeted can be obtained on a molecular level. For example, drug companies are particularly interested in studying the molecular side effects of drugs in the liver. In addition, experiments with the purpose of elucidating liver toxicity can be studied using samples obtained from animal models exposed to different concentrations of a drug over time. More recently considerable advances in mass spectrometry (MS) technologies and bioinformatics tools allows informative global drug profiling experiments to be performed at a cost comparable to other large-scale technologies such as DNA-based technologies. Moreover, MS-based proteomics provides an additional layer of information on the dynamic regulation of proteins translation and particularly protein degradation. MS-based proteomics approaches combined with other biochemical methods delivers information on regulatory networks, signaling cascades, and metabolic pathways upon drug treatment. Furthermore, MS-based proteomics can provide additional information on single amino acid polymorphisms, protein isoform distribution, posttranslational modifications, and subcellular localization. In this chapter, we will share our experience using MS based proteomics as a pharmacoproteomics strategy to characterize drug mechanisms of action in single drug therapy or in multidrug combination. Finally, the emergence of integrated proteogenomics analysis, such as "The Cancer Genome Atlas" program, opened interesting perspectives to extend this approach to drug target

  12. Proteomics: the industrialization of protein chemistry.

    PubMed

    Patterson, S D

    2000-08-01

    Establishing a proteomics platform in the industrial setting initially required implementation of a series of robotic systems to allow a high-throughput approach to analysis and identification of differences observed on 2-D electrophoresis gels. Now, a simpler alternative approach employing chromatography-based systems is emerging for identification of many components of complex mixtures, which can also provide quantitative comparisons through the use of a new labeling methodology.

  13. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granström, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA) into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease. PMID:26381655

  14. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granström, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA) into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease. PMID:26381655

  15. How to submit MS proteomics data to ProteomeXchange via the PRIDE database.

    PubMed

    Ternent, Tobias; Csordas, Attila; Qi, Da; Gómez-Baena, Guadalupe; Beynon, Robert J; Jones, Andrew R; Hermjakob, Henning; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio

    2014-10-01

    The ProteomeXchange (PX) consortium has been established to standardize and facilitate submission and dissemination of MS-based proteomics data in the public domain. In the consortium, the PRIDE database at the European Bioinformatics Institute, acts as the initial submission point of MS/MS data sets. In this manuscript, we explain step by step the submission process of MS/MS data sets to PX via PRIDE. We describe in detail the two available workflows: 'complete' and 'partial' submissions, together with the available tools to streamline the process. Throughout the manuscript, we will use one example data set containing identification and quantification data, which has been deposited in PRIDE/ProteomeXchange with the accession number PXD000764 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD000764).

  16. Unveiling the Trypanosoma cruzi Nuclear Proteome.

    PubMed

    dos Santos Júnior, Agenor de Castro Moreira; Kalume, Dário Eluan; Camargo, Ricardo; Gómez-Mendoza, Diana Paola; Correa, José Raimundo; Charneau, Sébastien; de Sousa, Marcelo Valle; de Lima, Beatriz Dolabela; Ricart, Carlos André Ornelas

    2015-01-01

    Replication of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease, displays peculiar features, such as absence of chromosome condensation and closed mitosis. Although previous proteome and subproteome analyses of T. cruzi have been carried out, the nuclear subproteome of this protozoan has not been described. Here, we report, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the isolation and proteome analysis of T. cruzi nuclear fraction. For that, T. cruzi epimastigote cells were lysed and subjected to cell fractionation using two steps of sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The purity of the nuclear fraction was confirmed by phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) allowed the identification of 864 proteins. Among those, 272 proteins were annotated as putative uncharacterized, and 275 had not been previously reported on global T. cruzi proteome analysis. Additionally, to support our enrichment method, bioinformatics analysis in DAVID was carried out. It grouped the nuclear proteins in 65 gene clusters, wherein the clusters with the highest enrichment scores harbor members with chromatin organization and DNA binding functions. PMID:26383644

  17. The lipid raft proteome of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Alvaro; Pérez, Alberto; Coleman, James L; Benach, Jorge L

    2015-11-01

    Eukaryotic lipid rafts are membrane microdomains that have significant amounts of cholesterol and a selective set of proteins that have been associated with multiple biological functions. The Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi, is one of an increasing number of bacterial pathogens that incorporates cholesterol onto its membrane, and form cholesterol glycolipid domains that possess all the hallmarks of eukaryotic lipid rafts. In this study, we isolated lipid rafts from cultured B. burgdorferi as a detergent resistant membrane (DRM) fraction on density gradients, and characterized those molecules that partitioned exclusively or are highly enriched in these domains. Cholesterol glycolipids, the previously known raft-associated lipoproteins OspA and OpsB, and cholera toxin partitioned into the lipid rafts fraction indicating compatibility with components of the DRM. The proteome of lipid rafts was analyzed by a combination of LC-MS/MS or MudPIT. Identified proteins were analyzed in silico for parameters that included localization, isoelectric point, molecular mass and biological function. The proteome provided a consistent pattern of lipoproteins, proteases and their substrates, sensing molecules and prokaryotic homologs of eukaryotic lipid rafts. This study provides the first analysis of a prokaryotic lipid raft and has relevance for the biology of Borrelia, other pathogenic bacteria, as well as for the evolution of these structures. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002365 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002365).

  18. Proteomic identification of rainbow trout sperm proteins.

    PubMed

    Nynca, Joanna; Arnold, Georg J; Fröhlich, Thomas; Otte, Kathrin; Ciereszko, Andrzej

    2014-06-01

    Proteomics represents a powerful tool for the analysis of fish spermatozoa, since these cells are transcriptionally inactive. The aim of the present study was to generate an inventory of the most prominent rainbow trout sperm proteins by SDS-PAGE prefractionation combined with nano-LC-MS/MS based identification. This study provides the first in-depth analysis of the rainbow trout sperm proteome, with a total of 206 identified proteins. We found that rainbow trout spermatozoa are equipped with functionally diverse proteins related to energetic metabolism, signal transduction, protein turnover, transport, cytoskeleton, oxidative injuries, and stress and reproduction. The availability of a catalog of rainbow trout sperm proteins provides a crucial tool for the understanding of fundamental molecular processes in fish spermatozoa, for the ongoing development of novel markers of sperm quality and for the optimization of short- and long-term sperm preservation procedures. The MS data are available at ProteomeXchange with the dataset identifier PXD000355 and DOI 10.6019/PXD000355.

  19. Defining the extracellular matrix using proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Byron, Adam; Humphries, Jonathan D; Humphries, Martin J

    2013-01-01

    The cell microenvironment has a profound influence on the behaviour, growth and survival of cells. The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides not only mechanical and structural support to cells and tissues but also binds soluble ligands and transmembrane receptors to provide spatial coordination of signalling processes. The ability of cells to sense the chemical, mechanical and topographical features of the ECM enables them to integrate complex, multiparametric information into a coherent response to the surrounding microenvironment. Consequently, dysregulation or mutation of ECM components results in a broad range of pathological conditions. Characterization of the composition of ECM derived from various cells has begun to reveal insights into ECM structure and function, and mechanisms of disease. Proteomic methodologies permit the global analysis of subcellular systems, but extracellular and transmembrane proteins present analytical difficulties to proteomic strategies owing to the particular biochemical properties of these molecules. Here, we review advances in proteomic approaches that have been applied to furthering our understanding of the ECM microenvironment. We survey recent studies that have addressed challenges in the analysis of ECM and discuss major outcomes in the context of health and disease. In addition, we summarize efforts to progress towards a systems-level understanding of ECM biology. PMID:23419153

  20. Proteomics: a biotechnology tool for crop improvement

    PubMed Central

    Eldakak, Moustafa; Milad, Sanaa I. M.; Nawar, Ali I.; Rohila, Jai S.

    2013-01-01

    A sharp decline in the availability of arable land and sufficient supply of irrigation water along with a continuous steep increase in food demands have exerted a pressure on farmers to produce more with fewer resources. A viable solution to release this pressure is to speed up the plant breeding process by employing biotechnology in breeding programs. The majority of biotechnological applications rely on information generated from various -omic technologies. The latest outstanding improvements in proteomic platforms and many other but related advances in plant biotechnology techniques offer various new ways to encourage the usage of these technologies by plant scientists for crop improvement programs. A combinatorial approach of accelerated gene discovery through genomics, proteomics, and other associated -omic branches of biotechnology, as an applied approach, is proving to be an effective way to speed up the crop improvement programs worldwide. In the near future, swift improvements in -omic databases are becoming critical and demand immediate attention for the effective utilization of these techniques to produce next-generation crops for the progressive farmers. Here, we have reviewed the recent advances in proteomics, as tools of biotechnology, which are offering great promise and leading the path toward crop improvement for sustainable agriculture. PMID:23450788

  1. Proteomics in human Parkinson's disease research.

    PubMed

    Licker, Virginie; Kövari, Enikö; Hochstrasser, Denis F; Burkhard, Pierre R

    2009-11-01

    During the last decades, considerable advances in the understanding of specific mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease have been achieved, yet neither definite etiology nor unifying sequence of molecular events has been formally established. Current unmet needs in Parkinson's disease research include exploring new hypotheses regarding disease susceptibility, occurrence and progression, identifying reliable diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic biomarkers, and translating basic research into appropriate disease-modifying strategies. The most popular view proposes that Parkinson's disease results from the complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors and mechanisms believed to be at work include oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, iron deposition and inflammation. More recently, a plethora of data has accumulated pinpointing an abnormal processing of the neuronal protein alpha-synuclein as a pivotal mechanism leading to aggregation, inclusions formation and degeneration. This protein-oriented scenario logically opens the door to the application of proteomic strategies to this field of research. We here review the current literature on proteomics applied to Parkinson's disease research, with particular emphasis on pathogenesis of sporadic Parkinson's disease in humans. We propose the view that Parkinson's disease may be an acquired or genetically-determined brain proteinopathy involving an abnormal processing of several, rather than individual neuronal proteins, and discuss some pre-analytical and analytical developments in proteomics that may help in verifying this concept.

  2. Characterizing the nuclear proteome of Paracoccidioides spp.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Lucas Nojosa; Casaletti, Luciana; Báo, Sônia Nair; Borges, Clayton Luiz; de Sousa Lima, Patrícia; de Almeida Soares, Célia Maria

    2016-10-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is an endemic disease in Latin America, caused by thermo dimorphic fungi of the genus Paracoccidioides. Although previous proteome analyses of Paracoccidioides spp. have been carried out, the nuclear subproteome of this pathogen has not been described. In this way, we aimed to characterize the nuclear proteome of Paracoccidioides species, in the yeast form. For that, yeast cells were disrupted and submitted to cell fractionation. The purity of the nuclear fraction was confirmed by fluorescence and electron microscopy. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) allowed the identification of 867 proteins. In order to support our enrichment method for nuclear proteins, bioinformatics analysis were applied that allowed the identification of 281 proteins with nuclear localization. The analysis revealed proteins related to DNA maintenance, gene expression, synthesis and processing of messenger and ribosomal RNAs, likewise proteins of nuclear-cytoplasmic traffic. It was also possible to detect some proteins that are poorly expressed, like transcription factors involved in important roles such as resistance to abiotic stress, sporulation, cellular growth and DNA and chromatin maintenance. This is the first descriptive nuclear proteome of Paracoccidioides spp. that can be useful as an important platform base for fungi-specific nuclear processes. PMID:27647238

  3. Characterizing the nuclear proteome of Paracoccidioides spp.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Lucas Nojosa; Casaletti, Luciana; Báo, Sônia Nair; Borges, Clayton Luiz; de Sousa Lima, Patrícia; de Almeida Soares, Célia Maria

    2016-10-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is an endemic disease in Latin America, caused by thermo dimorphic fungi of the genus Paracoccidioides. Although previous proteome analyses of Paracoccidioides spp. have been carried out, the nuclear subproteome of this pathogen has not been described. In this way, we aimed to characterize the nuclear proteome of Paracoccidioides species, in the yeast form. For that, yeast cells were disrupted and submitted to cell fractionation. The purity of the nuclear fraction was confirmed by fluorescence and electron microscopy. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) allowed the identification of 867 proteins. In order to support our enrichment method for nuclear proteins, bioinformatics analysis were applied that allowed the identification of 281 proteins with nuclear localization. The analysis revealed proteins related to DNA maintenance, gene expression, synthesis and processing of messenger and ribosomal RNAs, likewise proteins of nuclear-cytoplasmic traffic. It was also possible to detect some proteins that are poorly expressed, like transcription factors involved in important roles such as resistance to abiotic stress, sporulation, cellular growth and DNA and chromatin maintenance. This is the first descriptive nuclear proteome of Paracoccidioides spp. that can be useful as an important platform base for fungi-specific nuclear processes.

  4. The Nuclear Proteome of a Vertebrate.

    PubMed

    Wühr, Martin; Güttler, Thomas; Peshkin, Leonid; McAlister, Graeme C; Sonnett, Matthew; Ishihara, Keisuke; Groen, Aaron C; Presler, Marc; Erickson, Brian K; Mitchison, Timothy J; Kirschner, Marc W; Gygi, Steven P

    2015-10-19

    The composition of the nucleoplasm determines the behavior of key processes such as transcription, yet there is still no reliable and quantitative resource of nuclear proteins. Furthermore, it is still unclear how the distinct nuclear and cytoplasmic compositions are maintained. To describe the nuclear proteome quantitatively, we isolated the large nuclei of frog oocytes via microdissection and measured the nucleocytoplasmic partitioning of ∼9,000 proteins by mass spectrometry. Most proteins localize entirely to either nucleus or cytoplasm; only ∼17% partition equally. A protein's native size in a complex, but not polypeptide molecular weight, is predictive of localization: partitioned proteins exhibit native sizes larger than ∼100 kDa, whereas natively smaller proteins are equidistributed. To evaluate the role of nuclear export in maintaining localization, we inhibited Exportin 1. This resulted in the expected re-localization of proteins toward the nucleus, but only 3% of the proteome was affected. Thus, complex assembly and passive retention, rather than continuous active transport, is the dominant mechanism for the maintenance of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteomes. PMID:26441354

  5. Proteomic contributions to personalized cancer care.

    PubMed

    Koomen, John M; Haura, Eric B; Bepler, Gerold; Sutphen, Rebecca; Remily-Wood, Elizabeth R; Benson, Kaaron; Hussein, Mohamad; Hazlehurst, Lori A; Yeatman, Timothy J; Hildreth, Lynne T; Sellers, Thomas A; Jacobsen, Paul B; Fenstermacher, David A; Dalton, William S

    2008-10-01

    Cancer impacts each patient and family differently. Our current understanding of the disease is primarily limited to clinical hallmarks of cancer, but many specific molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Genetic markers can be used to determine predisposition to tumor development, but molecularly targeted treatment strategies that improve patient prognosis are not widely available for most cancers. Individualized care plans, also described as personalized medicine, still must be developed by understanding and implementing basic science research into clinical treatment. Proteomics holds great promise in contributing to the prevention and cure of cancer because it provides unique tools for discovery of biomarkers and therapeutic targets. As such, proteomics can help translate basic science discoveries into the clinical practice of personalized medicine. Here we describe how biological mass spectrometry and proteome analysis interact with other major patient care and research initiatives and present vignettes illustrating efforts in discovery of diagnostic biomarkers for ovarian cancer, development of treatment strategies in lung cancer, and monitoring prognosis and relapse in multiple myeloma patients.

  6. Proteome and peptidome profiling of spider venoms.

    PubMed

    Liang, Songping

    2008-10-01

    Spider venoms are an important source of novel molecules with different pharmacological properties. Recent technological developments of proteomics, especially mass spectrometry, have greatly promoted the systematic analysis of spider venom. The enormous diversity of venom components between spider species and the lack of complete genome sequence, and the limited database of protein and peptide sequences make spider venom profiling a challenging task and special considerations for technical strategies are required. This review highlights recently used methods for spider venom profiling. In general, spider venom profiling can be achieved in two parts: proteome profiling of the components with molecular weights above 10 kDa, and peptidome profiling of the components with a molecular weight of 10 kDa or under through the use of different methods. Venom proteomes are rich in various enzymes, hemocyanins, toxin-like proteins and many unknown proteins. Peptidomes are dominated by peptides with a mass of 3-6 kDa with three to five disulfide bonds. Although there are some similarities in peptide superfamily types of venoms from different spider species, the venom profile of each species is unique. The linkage of the peptidomic data with that of the cDNA approach is discussed briefly. Future challenges and perspectives are also highlighted in this review.

  7. Glycocapture-based proteomics for secretome analysis.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zon W; Nice, Edouard C; Schilling, Oliver

    2013-02-01

    Protein glycosylation represents the most abundant extracellular posttranslational modification in multicellular organisms. These glycoproteins unequivocally comprise the major biomolecules involved in extracellular processes, such as growth factors, signaling proteins for cellular communication, enzymes, and proteases for on- and off-site processing. It is now known that altered protein glycosylation is a hallmark event in many different pathologies. Glycoproteins are found mostly in the so-called secretome, which comprises classically and nonclassically secreted proteins and protein fragments that are released from the cell surface through ectodomain shedding. Due to biological complexity and technical difficulty, comparably few studies have taken an in-depth investigation of cellular secretomes using system-wide approaches. The cellular secretomes are considered to be a valuable source of therapeutic targets and novel biomarkers. It is not surprising that many existing biomarkers, including biomarkers for breast, ovarian, prostate, and colorectal cancers are glycoproteins. Focused analysis of secreted glycoproteins could thus provide valuable information for early disease diagnosis, and surveillance. Furthermore, since most secreted proteins are glycosylated and glycosylation predominantly targets secreted proteins, the glycan/sugar moiety itself can be used as a chemical "handle" for the targeted analysis of cellular secretomes, thereby reducing sample complexity and allowing detection of low abundance proteins in proteomic workflows. This review will focus on various glycoprotein enrichment strategies that facilitate proteomics-based technologies for the quantitative analysis of cell secretomes and cell surface proteomes.

  8. Connecting Genomic Alterations to Cancer Biology with Proteomics: The NCI Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, Matthew; Gillette, Michael; Carr, Steven A.; Paulovich, Amanda G.; Smith, Richard D.; Rodland, Karin D.; Townsend, Reid; Kinsinger, Christopher; Mesri, Mehdi; Rodriguez, Henry; Liebler, Daniel

    2013-10-03

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium is applying the latest generation of proteomic technologies to genomically annotated tumors from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program, a joint initiative of the NCI and the National Human Genome Research Institute. By providing a fully integrated accounting of DNA, RNA, and protein abnormalities in individual tumors, these datasets will illuminate the complex relationship between genomic abnormalities and cancer phenotypes, thus producing biologic insights as well as a wave of novel candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets amenable to verifi cation using targeted mass spectrometry methods.

  9. Knowledge Translation: Moving Proteomics Science to Innovation in Society.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Christina; McDonald, Fiona; Jones, Mavis; Graham, Janice

    2016-06-01

    Proteomics is one of the pivotal next-generation biotechnologies in the current "postgenomics" era. Little is known about the ways in which innovative proteomics science is navigating the complex socio-political space between laboratory and society. It cannot be assumed that the trajectory between proteomics laboratory and society is linear and unidirectional. Concerned about public accountability and hopes for knowledge-based innovations, funding agencies and citizens increasingly expect that emerging science and technologies, such as proteomics, are effectively translated and disseminated as innovation in society. Here, we describe translation strategies promoted in the knowledge translation (KT) and science communication literatures and examine the use of these strategies within the field of proteomics. Drawing on data generated from qualitative interviews with proteomics scientists and ethnographic observation of international proteomics conferences over a 5-year period, we found that proteomics science incorporates a variety of KT strategies to reach knowledge users outside the field. To attain the full benefit of KT, however, proteomics scientists must challenge their own normative assumptions and approaches to innovation dissemination-beyond the current paradigm relying primarily on publication for one's scientific peers within one's field-and embrace the value of broader (interdisciplinary) KT strategies in promoting the uptake of their research. Notably, the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) is paying increasing attention to a broader range of KT strategies, including targeted dissemination, integrated KT, and public outreach. We suggest that increasing the variety of KT strategies employed by proteomics scientists is timely and would serve well the omics system sciences community. PMID:27223900

  10. Knowledge Translation: Moving Proteomics Science to Innovation in Society.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Christina; McDonald, Fiona; Jones, Mavis; Graham, Janice

    2016-06-01

    Proteomics is one of the pivotal next-generation biotechnologies in the current "postgenomics" era. Little is known about the ways in which innovative proteomics science is navigating the complex socio-political space between laboratory and society. It cannot be assumed that the trajectory between proteomics laboratory and society is linear and unidirectional. Concerned about public accountability and hopes for knowledge-based innovations, funding agencies and citizens increasingly expect that emerging science and technologies, such as proteomics, are effectively translated and disseminated as innovation in society. Here, we describe translation strategies promoted in the knowledge translation (KT) and science communication literatures and examine the use of these strategies within the field of proteomics. Drawing on data generated from qualitative interviews with proteomics scientists and ethnographic observation of international proteomics conferences over a 5-year period, we found that proteomics science incorporates a variety of KT strategies to reach knowledge users outside the field. To attain the full benefit of KT, however, proteomics scientists must challenge their own normative assumptions and approaches to innovation dissemination-beyond the current paradigm relying primarily on publication for one's scientific peers within one's field-and embrace the value of broader (interdisciplinary) KT strategies in promoting the uptake of their research. Notably, the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) is paying increasing attention to a broader range of KT strategies, including targeted dissemination, integrated KT, and public outreach. We suggest that increasing the variety of KT strategies employed by proteomics scientists is timely and would serve well the omics system sciences community.

  11. Rice proteomics: A move toward expanded proteome coverage to comparative and functional proteomics uncovers the mysteries of rice and plant biology.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Ganesh Kumar; Rakwal, Randeep

    2011-05-01

    Growing rice is an important socio-economic activity. Rice proteomics has achieved a tremendous progress in establishing techniques to proteomes of almost all tissues, organs, and organelles during the past one decade (year 2000-2010). We have compiled these progresses time to time over this period. The present compilation discusses proteomics research in rice published between 1st April 2008 and 30th July 2010. Progress continues mainly towards protein cataloging deep into the proteome with high-confident protein assignment and some functional significance than ever before by (i) identifying previously unreported/low-abundance proteins, (ii) quantifying relative/absolute values of proteins, (iii) assigning protein responses to biotic/abiotic stresses, (iv) protein localization into organelles, (v) validating previous proteomes and eliminating false-positive proteins, and (vi) discovering potential biomarkers for tissues, organs, organelles, and for screening transgenic plants and food-safety evaluation. The notable achievements in global mapping of phosphorylation sites and identifying several novel secreted proteins into the extracellular space are worth appreciating. Our ever-increasing knowledge on the rice proteomics is beginning to impact the biology of not only rice, but also crops and plants. These major achievements will be discussed in this review keeping in mind newcomers, young, and established scientists in proteomics and plants.

  12. Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry-based Quantitative Proteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Fang; Liu, Tao; Qian, Weijun; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-07-22

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based quantitative proteomics has become increasingly applied for a broad range of biological applications due to growing capabilities for broad proteome coverage and good accuracy in quantification. Herein, we review the current LC-MS-based quantification methods with respect to their advantages and limitations, and highlight their potential applications.

  13. Proteomics for Validation of Automated Gene Model Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Kemin; Panisko, Ellen A.; Magnuson, Jon K.; Baker, Scott E.; Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2008-02-14

    High-throughput liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based proteomic analysis has emerged as a powerful tool for functional annotation of genome sequences. These analyses complement the bioinformatic and experimental tools used for deriving, verifying, and functionally annotating models of genes and their transcripts. Furthermore, proteomics extends verification and functional annotation to the level of the translation product of the gene model.

  14. Biospecimen Solicitation - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    A new funding opportunity in support of the National Cancer Institute’s Clinical Proteomic Tumor Analysis Consortium (CPTAC) seeks to prospectively procure tumor samples, collected for proteomics investigation. This procurement is being solicited for award by SAIC-F under its contract #HHSN261200800001E for Operations and Technical support at the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research.

  15. Human Pituitary Adenoma Proteomics: New Progresses and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Xianquan; Wang, Xiaowei; Cheng, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenoma (PA) is a common intracranial neoplasm that impacts on human health through interfering hypothalamus–pituitary–target organ axis systems. The development of proteomics gives great promises in the clarification of molecular mechanisms of a PA and discovery of effective biomarkers for prediction, prevention, early-stage diagnosis, and treatment for a PA. A great progress in the field of PA proteomics has been made in the past 10 years, including (i) the use of laser-capture microdissection, (ii) proteomics analyses of functional PAs (such as prolactinoma), invasive and non-invasive non-functional pituitary adenomas (NFPAs), protein post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and tyrosine nitration, NFPA heterogeneity, and hormone isoforms, (iii) the use of protein antibody array, (iv) serum proteomics and peptidomics, (v) the integration of proteomics and other omics data, and (vi) the proposal of multi-parameter systematic strategy for a PA. This review will summarize these progresses of proteomics in PAs, point out the existing drawbacks, propose the future research directions, and address the clinical relevance of PA proteomics data, in order to achieve our long-term goal that is use of proteomics to clarify molecular mechanisms, construct molecular networks, and discover effective biomarkers. PMID:27303365

  16. Integration of proteomics into systems biology of cancer.

    PubMed

    Hanash, S; Schliekelman, M; Zhang, Q; Taguchi, A

    2012-01-01

    Deciphering the complexity and heterogeneity of cancer, benefits from integration of proteomic level data into systems biology efforts. The opportunities available as a result of advances in proteomic technologies, the successes to date, and the challenges involved in integrating diverse datasets are addressed in this review.

  17. The role of targeted chemical proteomics in pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Chris W

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, proteomics is the high-throughput characterization of the global complement of proteins in a biological system using cutting-edge technologies (robotics and mass spectrometry) and bioinformatics tools (Internet-based search engines and databases). As the field of proteomics has matured, a diverse range of strategies have evolved to answer specific problems. Chemical proteomics is one such direction that provides the means to enrich and detect less abundant proteins (the ‘hidden’ proteome) from complex mixtures of wide dynamic range (the ‘deep’ proteome). In pharmacology, chemical proteomics has been utilized to determine the specificity of drugs and their analogues, for anticipated known targets, only to discover other proteins that bind and could account for side effects observed in preclinical and clinical trials. As a consequence, chemical proteomics provides a valuable accessory in refinement of second- and third-generation drug design for treatment of many diseases. However, determining definitive affinity capture of proteins by a drug immobilized on soft gel chromatography matrices has highlighted some of the challenges that remain to be addressed. Examples of the different strategies that have emerged using well-established drugs against pharmaceutically important enzymes, such as protein kinases, metalloproteases, PDEs, cytochrome P450s, etc., indicate the potential opportunity to employ chemical proteomics as an early-stage screening approach in the identification of new targets. PMID:22074351

  18. The proteomic future: where mass spectrometry should be taking us

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A newcomer to the -omics era, proteomics is a broad, instrument-intensive research area that has advanced rapidly since its inception less than twenty years ago. Although the “wet-bench” aspects of proteomics have undergone a renaissance with the improvement in protein and peptide separation techni...

  19. Skyline Reaches Agreement - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The full proteomics analysis of a small tumor sample (similar in mass to a few grains of rice) produces well over 500 megabytes of unprocessed "raw" data when analyzed on a mass spectrometer (MS). Thus, for every proteomics experiment there is a vast amount of raw data that must be analyzed and interrogated in order to extract biological information.

  20. Human Pituitary Adenoma Proteomics: New Progresses and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xianquan; Wang, Xiaowei; Cheng, Tingting

    2016-01-01

    Pituitary adenoma (PA) is a common intracranial neoplasm that impacts on human health through interfering hypothalamus-pituitary-target organ axis systems. The development of proteomics gives great promises in the clarification of molecular mechanisms of a PA and discovery of effective biomarkers for prediction, prevention, early-stage diagnosis, and treatment for a PA. A great progress in the field of PA proteomics has been made in the past 10 years, including (i) the use of laser-capture microdissection, (ii) proteomics analyses of functional PAs (such as prolactinoma), invasive and non-invasive non-functional pituitary adenomas (NFPAs), protein post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and tyrosine nitration, NFPA heterogeneity, and hormone isoforms, (iii) the use of protein antibody array, (iv) serum proteomics and peptidomics, (v) the integration of proteomics and other omics data, and (vi) the proposal of multi-parameter systematic strategy for a PA. This review will summarize these progresses of proteomics in PAs, point out the existing drawbacks, propose the future research directions, and address the clinical relevance of PA proteomics data, in order to achieve our long-term goal that is use of proteomics to clarify molecular mechanisms, construct molecular networks, and discover effective biomarkers. PMID:27303365

  1. The Escherichia coli Proteome: Past, Present, and Future Prospects†

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mee-Jung; Lee, Sang Yup

    2006-01-01

    Proteomics has emerged as an indispensable methodology for large-scale protein analysis in functional genomics. The Escherichia coli proteome has been extensively studied and is well defined in terms of biochemical, biological, and biotechnological data. Even before the entire E. coli proteome was fully elucidated, the largest available data set had been integrated to decipher regulatory circuits and metabolic pathways, providing valuable insights into global cellular physiology and the development of metabolic and cellular engineering strategies. With the recent advent of advanced proteomic technologies, the E. coli proteome has been used for the validation of new technologies and methodologies such as sample prefractionation, protein enrichment, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, protein detection, mass spectrometry (MS), combinatorial assays with n-dimensional chromatographies and MS, and image analysis software. These important technologies will not only provide a great amount of additional information on the E. coli proteome but also synergistically contribute to other proteomic studies. Here, we review the past development and current status of E. coli proteome research in terms of its biological, biotechnological, and methodological significance and suggest future prospects. PMID:16760308

  2. Proteomic changes in chicken plasma induced by Salmonella typhimurium lipopolysaccharides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are cell wall components of gram-negative bacteria that cause inflammation and sickness through genetic and proteomic activation. The objective of our study was to identify the proteomic changes in plasma associated with inflammation induced by LPS treatment. Five-week-old ...

  3. Directed Shotgun Proteomics Guided by Saturated RNA-seq Identifies a Complete Expressed Prokaryotic Proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Omasits, U.; Quebatte, Maxime; Stekhoven, Daniel J.; Fortes, Claudia; Roschitzki, Bernd; Robinson, Mark D.; Dehio, Christoph; Ahrens, Christian H.

    2013-11-01

    Prokaryotes, due to their moderate complexity, are particularly amenable to the comprehensive identification of the protein repertoire expressed under different conditions. We applied a generic strategy to identify a complete expressed prokaryotic proteome, which is based on the analysis of RNA and proteins extracted from matched samples. Saturated transcriptome profiling by RNA-seq provided an endpoint estimate of the protein-coding genes expressed under two conditions which mimic the interaction of Bartonella henselae with its mammalian host. Directed shotgun proteomics experiments were carried out on four subcellular fractions. By specifically targeting proteins which are short, basic, low abundant, and membrane localized, we could eliminate their initial underrepresentation compared to the estimated endpoint. A total of 1250 proteins were identified with an estimated false discovery rate below 1%. This represents 85% of all distinct annotated proteins and ~90% of the expressed protein-coding genes. Genes that were detected at the transcript but not protein level, were found to be highly enriched in several genomic islands. Furthermore, genes that lacked an ortholog and a functional annotation were not detected at the protein level; these may represent examples of overprediction in genome annotations. A dramatic membrane proteome reorganization was observed, including differential regulation of autotransporters, adhesins, and hemin binding proteins. Particularly noteworthy was the complete membrane proteome coverage, which included expression of all members of the VirB/D4 type IV secretion system, a key virulence factor.

  4. Exploring the Arabidopsis Proteome: Influence of Protein Solubilization Buffers on Proteome Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Marondedze, Claudius; Wong, Aloysius; Groen, Arnoud; Serrano, Natalia; Jankovic, Boris; Lilley, Kathryn; Gehring, Christoph; Thomas, Ludivine

    2014-01-01

    The study of proteomes provides new insights into stimulus-specific responses of protein synthesis and turnover, and the role of post-translational modifications at the systems level. Due to the diverse chemical nature of proteins and shortcomings in the analytical techniques used in their study, only a partial display of the proteome is achieved in any study, and this holds particularly true for plant proteomes. Here we show that different solubilization and separation methods have profound effects on the resulting proteome. In particular, we observed that the type of detergents employed in the solubilization buffer preferentially enriches proteins in different functional categories. These include proteins with a role in signaling, transport, response to temperature stimuli and metabolism. This data may offer a functional bias on comparative analysis studies. In order to obtain a broader coverage, we propose a two-step solubilization protocol with first a detergent-free buffer and then a second step utilizing a combination of two detergents to solubilize proteins. PMID:25561235

  5. Identification of Protease Specificity by Combining Proteome-Derived Peptide Libraries and Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Biniossek, Martin L; Niemer, Melanie; Maksimchuk, Ken; Mayer, Bettina; Fuchs, Julian; Huesgen, Pitter F; McCafferty, Dewey G; Turk, Boris; Fritz, Guenther; Mayer, Jens; Haecker, Georg; Mach, Lukas; Schilling, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We present protease specificity profiling based on quantitative proteomics in combination with proteome-derived peptide libraries. Peptide libraries are generated by endoproteolytic digestion of proteomes without chemical modification of primary amines before exposure to a protease under investigation. After incubation with a test protease, treated and control libraries are differentially isotope-labeled using cost-effective reductive dimethylation. Upon analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, cleavage products of the test protease appear as semi-specific peptides that are enriched for the corresponding isotope label. We validate our workflow with two proteases with well-characterized specificity profiles: trypsin and caspase-3. We provide the first specificity profile of a protease encoded by a human endogenous retrovirus and for chlamydial protease-like activity factor (CPAF). For CPAF, we also highlight the structural basis of negative subsite cooperativity between subsites S1 and S2'. For A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) -4, -5, and -15, we show a canonical preference profile, including glutamate in P1 and glycine in P3'. In total, we report nearly 4000 cleavage sites for seven proteases. Our protocol is fast, avoids enrichment or synthesis steps, and enables probing for lysine selectivity as well as subsite cooperativity. Due to its simplicity, we anticipate usability by most proteomic laboratories. PMID:27122596

  6. The proteome of Hypobaric Induced Hypoxic Lung: Insights from Temporal Proteomic Profiling for Biomarker Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Yasmin; Sharma, Narendra K.; Ahmad, Mohammad Faiz; Sharma, Manish; Garg, Iti; Srivastava, Mousami; Bhargava, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to high altitude induces physiological responses due to hypoxia. Lungs being at the first level to face the alterations in oxygen levels are critical to counter and balance these changes. Studies have been done analysing pulmonary proteome alterations in response to exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. However, such studies have reported the alterations at specific time points and do not reflect the gradual proteomic changes. These studies also identify the various biochemical pathways and responses induced after immediate exposure and the resolution of these effects in challenge to hypobaric hypoxia. In the present study, using 2-DE/MS approach, we attempt to resolve these shortcomings by analysing the proteome alterations in lungs in response to different durations of exposure to hypobaric hypoxia. Our study thus highlights the gradual and dynamic changes in pulmonary proteome following hypobaric hypoxia. For the first time, we also report the possible consideration of SULT1A1, as a biomarker for the diagnosis of high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE). Higher SULT1A1 levels were observed in rats as well as in humans exposed to high altitude, when compared to sea-level controls. This study can thus form the basis for identifying biomarkers for diagnostic and prognostic purposes in responses to hypobaric hypoxia. PMID:26022216

  7. Exploring the Arabidopsis proteome: influence of protein solubilization buffers on proteome coverage.

    PubMed

    Marondedze, Claudius; Wong, Aloysius; Groen, Arnoud; Serrano, Natalia; Jankovic, Boris; Lilley, Kathryn; Gehring, Christoph; Thomas, Ludivine

    2015-01-01

    The study of proteomes provides new insights into stimulus-specific responses of protein synthesis and turnover, and the role of post-translational modifications at the systems level. Due to the diverse chemical nature of proteins and shortcomings in the analytical techniques used in their study, only a partial display of the proteome is achieved in any study, and this holds particularly true for plant proteomes. Here we show that different solubilization and separation methods have profound effects on the resulting proteome. In particular, we observed that the type of detergents employed in the solubilization buffer preferentially enriches proteins in different functional categories. These include proteins with a role in signaling, transport, response to temperature stimuli and metabolism. This data may offer a functional bias on comparative analysis studies. In order to obtain a broader coverage, we propose a two-step solubilization protocol with first a detergent-free buffer and then a second step utilizing a combination of two detergents to solubilize proteins.

  8. Identification of Protease Specificity by Combining Proteome-Derived Peptide Libraries and Quantitative Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Biniossek, Martin L; Niemer, Melanie; Maksimchuk, Ken; Mayer, Bettina; Fuchs, Julian; Huesgen, Pitter F; McCafferty, Dewey G; Turk, Boris; Fritz, Guenther; Mayer, Jens; Haecker, Georg; Mach, Lukas; Schilling, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    We present protease specificity profiling based on quantitative proteomics in combination with proteome-derived peptide libraries. Peptide libraries are generated by endoproteolytic digestion of proteomes without chemical modification of primary amines before exposure to a protease under investigation. After incubation with a test protease, treated and control libraries are differentially isotope-labeled using cost-effective reductive dimethylation. Upon analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, cleavage products of the test protease appear as semi-specific peptides that are enriched for the corresponding isotope label. We validate our workflow with two proteases with well-characterized specificity profiles: trypsin and caspase-3. We provide the first specificity profile of a protease encoded by a human endogenous retrovirus and for chlamydial protease-like activity factor (CPAF). For CPAF, we also highlight the structural basis of negative subsite cooperativity between subsites S1 and S2'. For A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS) -4, -5, and -15, we show a canonical preference profile, including glutamate in P1 and glycine in P3'. In total, we report nearly 4000 cleavage sites for seven proteases. Our protocol is fast, avoids enrichment or synthesis steps, and enables probing for lysine selectivity as well as subsite cooperativity. Due to its simplicity, we anticipate usability by most proteomic laboratories.

  9. A roadmap for successful applications of clinical proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ioannidis, John P A

    2011-06-01

    Despite over 30,000 publications on proteomics in the last decade, and the accumulation of extensive interesting information on the human proteome in diverse observations, the clinical translation of proteomics to-date has had major setbacks. I review here a roadmap for improving the success rate of clinical proteomics. The roadmap includes steps for improvements that need to be made in analytical tools, discovery, validation, clinical application, and post-clinical application appraisal. It is likely that most if not all of the components that are necessary for clinical success are either readily available, or should be possible to put in place with more rigorous research standards and concerted efforts of the research community, clinicians, and health agencies. Enthusiasm for the clinical impact of proteomics may need to be tempered currently until robust evidence can be obtained, but some clinical successes should eventually be feasible. PMID:21523915

  10. Contributions of quantitative proteomics to understanding membrane microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yu Zi; Foster, Leonard J.

    2009-01-01

    Membrane microdomains, e.g., lipid rafts and caveolae, are crucial cell surface organelles responsible for many cellular signaling and communication events, which makes the characterization of their proteomes both interesting and valuable. They are large cellular complexes comprised of specific proteins and lipids, yet they are simple enough in composition to be amenable to modern LC/MS/MS methods for proteomics. However, the proteomic characterization of membrane microdomains by traditional qualitative mass spectrometry is insufficient for distinguishing true components of the microdomains from copurifying contaminants or for evaluating dynamic changes in the proteome compositions. In this review, we discuss the contributions quantitative proteomics has made to our understanding of the biology of membrane microdomains. PMID:19578161

  11. The proteomics of formalin-fixed wax-embedded tissue.

    PubMed

    Vincenti, David Cilia; Murray, Graeme I

    2013-04-01

    Proteomics, which is the global analysis of protein expression in cells and tissues, has emerged over the last ten to fifteen years as a key set of technologies to improve our understanding of disease processes and to identify new diagnostic, prognostic and predictive disease biomarkers. Whilst most proteomic studies have been conducted on fresh frozen tissue, the continuous improvements in technical procedures for protein extraction and separation, coupled with increasingly powerful bioinformatics, have provided the opportunity for proteomic analysis to be conducted on formalin-fixed wax-embedded tissue. This potential advance should allow proteomic analysis to be performed on the extensive archives of clinically annotated formalin fixed wax embedded tissue blocks stored in pathology departments worldwide. In this review the main techniques and their limitations involved in proteomic analysis of formalin fixed wax embedded tissue will be outlined and examples of their successful application will be indicated.

  12. [Exploration on correlation of syndrome proteomics and syndromatology of TCM].

    PubMed

    Shen, Ding-zhu; Li, Jia-bang; Jiang, Rong-xin

    2006-04-01

    The advent of the Post-Human Genome Project Era, represented by the raising of proteomics, would inevitably lead to the change of molecular biology from topical view to holistic with its thought turning from linear to complex mode. Based on the proteomics development in recent years, the authors summarized the methodology of TCM syndromatologic research, advocated in using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and bioinformatics to identify different proteins. Proteomics should be led into the research of TCM syndrome categorization and the rule of evolution, which is necessary for researching the integration of the TCM study with proteomics and even with modern molecular biology based on molecular epidemiology level. Owing to the gradually developed coherence and mutual penetration of proteomics and TCM on the thinking method in studying life science, it has denoted the necessity and importance of integration of TCM and Western medicine in investigating the complex vital life phenomena.

  13. Mass Spectrometry for Translational Proteomics: Progress and Clinical Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Erin Shammel; Liu, Tao; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2012-08-31

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics measurements have become increasingly utilized in a wide range of biological and biomedical applications, and have significantly enhanced the understanding of the complex and dynamic nature of the proteome and its connections to biology and diseases. While some MS techniques such as those for targeted analysis are increasingly applied with great success, others such as global quantitative analysis (for e.g. biomarker discovery) are more challenging and continue to be developed and refined to provide the desired throughput, sensitivity and/ or specificity. New MS capabilities and proteomics-based pipelines/strategies also keep enhancing for the advancement of clinical proteomics applications such as protein biomarker discovery and validation. Herein, we provide a brief review to summarize the current state of MS-based proteomics with respect to its advantages and present limitations, while highlighting its potential in future clinical applications.

  14. Quantitative proteomics using SILAC: Principles, applications, and developments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiulan; Wei, Shasha; Ji, Yanlong; Guo, Xiaojing; Yang, Fuquan

    2015-09-01

    SILAC is based on direct addition of selected stable isotope amino acids into the cell culture medium, allowing superior quantitative analysis of the cellular proteome compared to other labeling methods. The great advantages of SILAC lie in its straight-forward implementation, quantitative accuracy, and reproducibility over chemical labeling or label-free quantification strategies, favoring its adoption for proteomic research. SILAC has been widely applied to characterize the proteomic changes between different biological samples, to investigate dynamic changes of protein PTMs, to distinguish specific interacting proteins in interaction proteomic analysis, and to analyze protein turnover in the proteome-wide scale. The present review summarizes the principles of SILAC technology, its applications in biological research, and the present state of this technology.

  15. Serum proteomics for biomarker discovery in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Yusuf

    2012-08-16

    Proteomic platforms have gained increasing attention in the clinical spectrum of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). This approach allows for the unbiased discovery of circulating biochemical markers, i.e., it is not limited to known molecules of presumed importance. This manuscript provides an overview of proteomic serum biomarker discovery in NAFLD. Hemoglobin is currently the most widely replicated proteomic circulating biomarker of NAFLD; it was identified as a biomarker of fatty liver in two distinct proteomic studies and subsequently validated using distinct analytical methods by independent research groups in large replication cohorts. Given the increasing availability of numerous serum samples and the refinement of the technological platforms available to scrutinize the blood proteome, large collaborative studies between academia and industry are warmly encouraged to identify novel, unbiased circulating biomarkers of NAFLD.

  16. Design principles for clinical network-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Goh, Wilson Wen Bin; Wong, Limsoon

    2016-07-01

    Integrating biological networks with proteomics is a tantalizing option for system-level analysis; for example it can help remove false-positives from proteomics data and improve coverage by detecting false-negatives, as well as resolving inconsistent inter-sample protein expression due to biological heterogeneity. Yet, designing a robust network-based analysis strategy on proteomics data is nontrivial. The issues include dealing with test set bias caused by, for example, inappropriate normalization procedure, devising appropriate benchmarking criteria and formulating statistically robust feature-selection techniques. Given the increasing importance of proteomics in contemporary clinical studies, more powerful network-based approaches are needed. We provide some design principles and considerations that can help achieve this, while taking into account the idiosyncrasies of proteomics data. PMID:27240775

  17. A bioinformatics perspective on proteomics: data storage, analysis, and integration.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Andreas; Schneider, Reinhard; Terstappen, Georg C

    2005-01-01

    The field of proteomics is advancing rapidly as a result of powerful new technologies and proteomics experiments yield a vast and increasing amount of information. Data regarding protein occurrence, abundance, identity, sequence, structure, properties, and interactions need to be stored. Currently, a common standard has not yet been established and open access to results is needed for further development of robust analysis algorithms. Databases for proteomics will evolve from pure storage into knowledge resources, providing a repository for information (meta-data) which is mainly not stored in simple flat files. This review will shed light on recent steps towards the generation of a common standard in proteomics data storage and integration, but is not meant to be a comprehensive overview of all available databases and tools in the proteomics community.

  18. Environmental Microbial Community Proteomics: Status, Challenges and Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Da-Zhi; Kong, Ling-Fen; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Xie, Zhang-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Microbial community proteomics, also termed metaproteomics, is an emerging field within the area of microbiology, which studies the entire protein complement recovered directly from a complex environmental microbial community at a given point in time. Although it is still in its infancy, microbial community proteomics has shown its powerful potential in exploring microbial diversity, metabolic potential, ecological function and microbe-environment interactions. In this paper, we review recent advances achieved in microbial community proteomics conducted in diverse environments, such as marine and freshwater, sediment and soil, activated sludge, acid mine drainage biofilms and symbiotic communities. The challenges facing microbial community proteomics are also discussed, and we believe that microbial community proteomics will greatly enhance our understanding of the microbial world and its interactions with the environment. PMID:27527164

  19. Environmental Microbial Community Proteomics: Status, Challenges and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Da-Zhi; Kong, Ling-Fen; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Xie, Zhang-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Microbial community proteomics, also termed metaproteomics, is an emerging field within the area of microbiology, which studies the entire protein complement recovered directly from a complex environmental microbial community at a given point in time. Although it is still in its infancy, microbial community proteomics has shown its powerful potential in exploring microbial diversity, metabolic potential, ecological function and microbe-environment interactions. In this paper, we review recent advances achieved in microbial community proteomics conducted in diverse environments, such as marine and freshwater, sediment and soil, activated sludge, acid mine drainage biofilms and symbiotic communities. The challenges facing microbial community proteomics are also discussed, and we believe that microbial community proteomics will greatly enhance our understanding of the microbial world and its interactions with the environment. PMID:27527164

  20. Proteomics analysis in lung cancer: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Takefumi; Carbone, David P

    2007-01-01

    Recent technological developments in proteomic analysis are bringing us new insights into the molecular classification of tumours. Although proteomic analysis in cancer profiling is still under development both in terms of the instruments used and the data analytical tools, this method has great potential advantages for the analysis of biospecimens of many types. Direct measurement of abnormally expressed or modified proteins in the tumour tissue and/or patient blood may be an effective approach for discovering new biomarkers. Proteomics has the significant advantage of being able to discern not only changes in expression levels but also in post-translational modifications. Thus, the proteomics approach to protein profiling and biomarker discovery uncovers biomarkers from a different viewpoint than microarray analysis. This review summarizes the range of proteomics technologies employed for cancer profiling, and how they have been used to derive new classification models for human lung cancer.

  1. Micro-proteomics with iterative data analysis: Proteome analysis in C. elegans at the single worm level.

    PubMed

    Bensaddek, Dalila; Narayan, Vikram; Nicolas, Armel; Murillo, Alejandro Brenes; Gartner, Anton; Kenyon, Cynthia J; Lamond, Angus I

    2016-02-01

    Proteomics studies typically analyze proteins at a population level, using extracts prepared from tens of thousands to millions of cells. The resulting measurements correspond to average values across the cell population and can mask considerable variation in protein expression and function between individual cells or organisms. Here, we report the development of micro-proteomics for the analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans, a eukaryote composed of 959 somatic cells and ∼1500 germ cells, measuring the worm proteome at a single organism level to a depth of ∼3000 proteins. This includes detection of proteins across a wide dynamic range of expression levels (>6 orders of magnitude), including many chromatin-associated factors involved in chromosome structure and gene regulation. We apply the micro-proteomics workflow to measure the global proteome response to heat-shock in individual nematodes. This shows variation between individual animals in the magnitude of proteome response following heat-shock, including variable induction of heat-shock proteins. The micro-proteomics pipeline thus facilitates the investigation of stochastic variation in protein expression between individuals within an isogenic population of C. elegans. All data described in this study are available online via the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd), an open access, searchable database resource. PMID:26552604

  2. Micro‐proteomics with iterative data analysis: Proteome analysis in C. elegans at the single worm level

    PubMed Central

    Bensaddek, Dalila; Narayan, Vikram; Nicolas, Armel; Brenes Murillo, Alejandro; Gartner, Anton; Kenyon, Cynthia J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteomics studies typically analyze proteins at a population level, using extracts prepared from tens of thousands to millions of cells. The resulting measurements correspond to average values across the cell population and can mask considerable variation in protein expression and function between individual cells or organisms. Here, we report the development of micro‐proteomics for the analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans, a eukaryote composed of 959 somatic cells and ∼1500 germ cells, measuring the worm proteome at a single organism level to a depth of ∼3000 proteins. This includes detection of proteins across a wide dynamic range of expression levels (>6 orders of magnitude), including many chromatin‐associated factors involved in chromosome structure and gene regulation. We apply the micro‐proteomics workflow to measure the global proteome response to heat‐shock in individual nematodes. This shows variation between individual animals in the magnitude of proteome response following heat‐shock, including variable induction of heat‐shock proteins. The micro‐proteomics pipeline thus facilitates the investigation of stochastic variation in protein expression between individuals within an isogenic population of C. elegans. All data described in this study are available online via the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd), an open access, searchable database resource. PMID:26552604

  3. Micro-proteomics with iterative data analysis: Proteome analysis in C. elegans at the single worm level.

    PubMed

    Bensaddek, Dalila; Narayan, Vikram; Nicolas, Armel; Murillo, Alejandro Brenes; Gartner, Anton; Kenyon, Cynthia J; Lamond, Angus I

    2016-02-01

    Proteomics studies typically analyze proteins at a population level, using extracts prepared from tens of thousands to millions of cells. The resulting measurements correspond to average values across the cell population and can mask considerable variation in protein expression and function between individual cells or organisms. Here, we report the development of micro-proteomics for the analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans, a eukaryote composed of 959 somatic cells and ∼1500 germ cells, measuring the worm proteome at a single organism level to a depth of ∼3000 proteins. This includes detection of proteins across a wide dynamic range of expression levels (>6 orders of magnitude), including many chromatin-associated factors involved in chromosome structure and gene regulation. We apply the micro-proteomics workflow to measure the global proteome response to heat-shock in individual nematodes. This shows variation between individual animals in the magnitude of proteome response following heat-shock, including variable induction of heat-shock proteins. The micro-proteomics pipeline thus facilitates the investigation of stochastic variation in protein expression between individuals within an isogenic population of C. elegans. All data described in this study are available online via the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd), an open access, searchable database resource.

  4. Proteome Profile and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Buffalo (Bubalusbubalis) Follicular Fluid during Follicle Development.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Huang, Yulin; Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Fumei; Huang, Delun; Lu, Yangqing; Liang, Xianwei; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Follicular fluid (FF) accumulates in the antrum of the ovarian follicle and provides the microenvironment for oocyte development. FF plays an important role in follicle growth and oocyte maturation. The FF provides a unique window to investigate the processes occurring during buffalo follicular development. The observed low quality of buffalo oocytes may arise from the poor follicular microenvironment. Investigating proteins found in buffalo FF (BFF) should provide insight into follicular development processes and provide further understanding of intra-follicular maturation and oocytes quality. Here, a proteomic-based approach was used to analyze the proteome of BFF. SDS-PAGE separation combined with mass spectrometry was used to generate the proteomic dataset. In total, 363 proteins were identified and classified by Gene Ontology terms. The proteins were assigned to 153 pathways, including signaling pathways. To evaluate difference in proteins expressed between BFF with different follicle size (small, <4 mm; and large, >8 mm), a quantitative proteomic analysis based on multi-dimensional liquid chromatography pre-fractionation tandem Orbitrap mass spectrometry identification was performed. Eleven differentially expressed proteins (six downregulated and five upregulated in large BFF) were identified and assigned to a variety of functional processes, including serine protease inhibition, oxidation protection and the complement cascade system. Three differentially expressed proteins, Vimentin, Peroxiredoxin-1 and SERPIND1, were verified by Western blotting, consistent with the quantitative proteomics results. Our datasets offers new information about proteins present in BFF and should facilitate the development of new biomarkers. These differentially expressed proteins illuminate the size-dependent protein changes in follicle microenvironment. PMID:27136540

  5. Development of data representation standards by the human proteome organization proteomics standards initiative

    PubMed Central

    Albar, Juan Pablo; Binz, Pierre-Alain; Eisenacher, Martin; Jones, Andrew R; Mayer, Gerhard; Omenn, Gilbert S; Orchard, Sandra; Vizcaíno, Juan Antonio; Hermjakob, Henning

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the goals of the Proteomics Standards Initiative (PSI) of the Human Proteome Organization, the methods that the PSI has employed to create data standards, the resulting output of the PSI, lessons learned from the PSI’s evolution, and future directions and synergies for the group. Materials and Methods The PSI has 5 categories of deliverables that have guided the group. These are minimum information guidelines, data formats, controlled vocabularies, resources and software tools, and dissemination activities. These deliverables are produced via the leadership and working group organization of the initiative, driven by frequent workshops and ongoing communication within the working groups. Official standards are subjected to a rigorous document process that includes several levels of peer review prior to release. Results We have produced and published minimum information guidelines describing what information should be provided when making data public, either via public repositories or other means. The PSI has produced a series of standard formats covering mass spectrometer input, mass spectrometer output, results of informatics analysis (both qualitative and quantitative analyses), reports of molecular interaction data, and gel electrophoresis analyses. We have produced controlled vocabularies that ensure that concepts are uniformly annotated in the formats and engaged in extensive software development and dissemination efforts so that the standards can efficiently be used by the community. Conclusion In its first dozen years of operation, the PSI has produced many standards that have accelerated the field of proteomics by facilitating data exchange and deposition to data repositories. We look to the future to continue developing standards for new proteomics technologies and workflows and mechanisms for integration with other omics data types. Our products facilitate the translation of genomics and proteomics findings to clinical and

  6. Improving HIV proteome annotation: new features of BioAfrica HIV Proteomics Resource

    PubMed Central

    Druce, Megan; Hulo, Chantal; Masson, Patrick; Sommer, Paula; Xenarios, Ioannis; Le Mercier, Philippe; De Oliveira, Tulio

    2016-01-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is one of the pathogens that cause the greatest global concern, with approximately 35 million people currently infected with HIV. Extensive HIV research has been performed, generating a large amount of HIV and host genomic data. However, no effective vaccine that protects the host from HIV infection is available and HIV is still spreading at an alarming rate, despite effective antiretroviral (ARV) treatment. In order to develop effective therapies, we need to expand our knowledge of the interaction between HIV and host proteins. In contrast to virus proteins, which often rapidly evolve drug resistance mutations, the host proteins are essentially invariant within all humans. Thus, if we can identify the host proteins needed for virus replication, such as those involved in transporting viral proteins to the cell surface, we have a chance of interrupting viral replication. There is no proteome resource that summarizes this interaction, making research on this subject a difficult enterprise. In order to fill this gap in knowledge, we curated a resource presents detailed annotation on the interaction between the HIV proteome and host proteins. Our resource was produced in collaboration with ViralZone and used manual curation techniques developed by UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot. Our new website also used previous annotations of the BioAfrica HIV-1 Proteome Resource, which has been accessed by approximately 10 000 unique users a year since its inception in 2005. The novel features include a dedicated new page for each HIV protein, a graphic display of its function and a section on its interaction with host proteins. Our new webpages also add information on the genomic location of each HIV protein and the position of ARV drug resistance mutations. Our improved BioAfrica HIV-1 Proteome Resource fills a gap in the current knowledge of biocuration. Database URL: http://www.bioafrica.net/proteomics/HIVproteome.html PMID:27087306

  7. Proteome Profile and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Buffalo (Bubalusbubalis) Follicular Fluid during Follicle Development

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiang; Huang, Yulin; Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Fumei; Huang, Delun; Lu, Yangqing; Liang, Xianwei; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Follicular fluid (FF) accumulates in the antrum of the ovarian follicle and provides the microenvironment for oocyte development. FF plays an important role in follicle growth and oocyte maturation. The FF provides a unique window to investigate the processes occurring during buffalo follicular development. The observed low quality of buffalo oocytes may arise from the poor follicular microenvironment. Investigating proteins found in buffalo FF (BFF) should provide insight into follicular development processes and provide further understanding of intra-follicular maturation and oocytes quality. Here, a proteomic-based approach was used to analyze the proteome of BFF. SDS-PAGE separation combined with mass spectrometry was used to generate the proteomic dataset. In total, 363 proteins were identified and classified by Gene Ontology terms. The proteins were assigned to 153 pathways, including signaling pathways. To evaluate difference in proteins expressed between BFF with different follicle size (small, <4 mm; and large, >8 mm), a quantitative proteomic analysis based on multi-dimensional liquid chromatography pre-fractionation tandem Orbitrap mass spectrometry identification was performed. Eleven differentially expressed proteins (six downregulated and five upregulated in large BFF) were identified and assigned to a variety of functional processes, including serine protease inhibition, oxidation protection and the complement cascade system. Three differentially expressed proteins, Vimentin, Peroxiredoxin-1 and SERPIND1, were verified by Western blotting, consistent with the quantitative proteomics results. Our datasets offers new information about proteins present in BFF and should facilitate the development of new biomarkers. These differentially expressed proteins illuminate the size-dependent protein changes in follicle microenvironment. PMID:27136540

  8. Proteome Profile and Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Buffalo (Bubalusbubalis) Follicular Fluid during Follicle Development.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Huang, Yulin; Wang, Zhiqiang; Chen, Fumei; Huang, Delun; Lu, Yangqing; Liang, Xianwei; Zhang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Follicular fluid (FF) accumulates in the antrum of the ovarian follicle and provides the microenvironment for oocyte development. FF plays an important role in follicle growth and oocyte maturation. The FF provides a unique window to investigate the processes occurring during buffalo follicular development. The observed low quality of buffalo oocytes may arise from the poor follicular microenvironment. Investigating proteins found in buffalo FF (BFF) should provide insight into follicular development processes and provide further understanding of intra-follicular maturation and oocytes quality. Here, a proteomic-based approach was used to analyze the proteome of BFF. SDS-PAGE separation combined with mass spectrometry was used to generate the proteomic dataset. In total, 363 proteins were identified and classified by Gene Ontology terms. The proteins were assigned to 153 pathways, including signaling pathways. To evaluate difference in proteins expressed between BFF with different follicle size (small, <4 mm; and large, >8 mm), a quantitative proteomic analysis based on multi-dimensional liquid chromatography pre-fractionation tandem Orbitrap mass spectrometry identification was performed. Eleven differentially expressed proteins (six downregulated and five upregulated in large BFF) were identified and assigned to a variety of functional processes, including serine protease inhibition, oxidation protection and the complement cascade system. Three differentially expressed proteins, Vimentin, Peroxiredoxin-1 and SERPIND1, were verified by Western blotting, consistent with the quantitative proteomics results. Our datasets offers new information about proteins present in BFF and should facilitate the development of new biomarkers. These differentially expressed proteins illuminate the size-dependent protein changes in follicle microenvironment.

  9. Improving HIV proteome annotation: new features of BioAfrica HIV Proteomics Resource.

    PubMed

    Druce, Megan; Hulo, Chantal; Masson, Patrick; Sommer, Paula; Xenarios, Ioannis; Le Mercier, Philippe; De Oliveira, Tulio

    2016-01-01

    The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is one of the pathogens that cause the greatest global concern, with approximately 35 million people currently infected with HIV. Extensive HIV research has been performed, generating a large amount of HIV and host genomic data. However, no effective vaccine that protects the host from HIV infection is available and HIV is still spreading at an alarming rate, despite effective antiretroviral (ARV) treatment. In order to develop effective therapies, we need to expand our knowledge of the interaction between HIV and host proteins. In contrast to virus proteins, which often rapidly evolve drug resistance mutations, the host proteins are essentially invariant within all humans. Thus, if we can identify the host proteins needed for virus replication, such as those involved in transporting viral proteins to the cell surface, we have a chance of interrupting viral replication. There is no proteome resource that summarizes this interaction, making research on this subject a difficult enterprise. In order to fill this gap in knowledge, we curated a resource presents detailed annotation on the interaction between the HIV proteome and host proteins. Our resource was produced in collaboration with ViralZone and used manual curation techniques developed by UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot. Our new website also used previous annotations of the BioAfrica HIV-1 Proteome Resource, which has been accessed by approximately 10 000 unique users a year since its inception in 2005. The novel features include a dedicated new page for each HIV protein, a graphic display of its function and a section on its interaction with host proteins. Our new webpages also add information on the genomic location of each HIV protein and the position of ARV drug resistance mutations. Our improved BioAfrica HIV-1 Proteome Resource fills a gap in the current knowledge of biocuration.Database URL:http://www.bioafrica.net/proteomics/HIVproteome.html. PMID:27087306

  10. Methods for Pseudopodia Purification and Proteomic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingchun; Ding, Shi-Jian; Wang, Wei; Yang, Feng; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2007-08-21

    Directional cell migration (chemotaxis) plays a central role in a wide spectrum of physiological and pathological processes, including embryo development, wounding healing, immunity, and cancer metastasis (1, 2). The process of chemotaxis is characterized by the sustained migration of cells in the direction of an increasing concentration of chemoattractant and/or ECM protein. Upon sensing the chemoattractant cells response with localized amplification of signals on the side facing the gradient (3-7). The spatial signal propagation facilitates reorganization of the actin-myosin cytoskeleton leading to extension of a dominant pseudopodium (PD) only in the direction of chemoattractant (7-10). While it is clear that localized signaling is critical for pseudopodium formation and chemotaxis, the molecular mechanisms that mediate this response remain poorly defined. To investigate mechanisms of pseudopodia formation, we recently described a novel approach to separate the PD and cell body (CB) compartments for large scale proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses using chambers equipped with microporous filters (Fig. 1) (3, 7, 11). This in vitro system recapitulates physiological events associates with pseudopodial protrusion through small openings in the ECM and the vessel wall during immune cell intravasation and cancer cell metastasis (12, 13). The model system has been used to reveal important signaling pathways and novel proteins that mediate cell migration. This model, combined with the state-of-the-art proteomics and phosphoproteomics technology, will provide an effective approach to systematically analyze the proteins that differentially localized or phosphorylated in the front and the back of polarized migrating cells. In the following sections, we will describe in detail the protocols used to purify the PD and CB compartments for large-scale proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses using mass spectrometry.

  11. Osmoprotective proteome adjustments in mouse kidney papilla

    PubMed Central

    Gabert, B. J.; Kültz, D.

    2011-01-01

    The papilla of the mammalian kidney must tolerate greatly varying degrees of hyperosmotic stress during urine concentration and depending on whole organism hydration state. To identify proteome adaptations supporting cell function and survival in such a harsh environment we compared the proteome of a) the hyperosmotic renal papilla with that of adjacent iso-osmotic cortex tissue and b) the renal papilla of diuretic versus that of anti-diuretic mice. Though functionally distinct the papilla is in close physical proximity to the renal cortex, an iso-osmotic region. Proteomic differences between the papilla and cortex of C57BL6 mice were identified using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. We found 37 different proteins characteristic of the cortex and 16 proteins over-represented in the papilla. Regional specificity was confirmed by Western Blot and further substantiated by immunohistochemistry for selected proteins. Proteins that are characteristic of the renal papilla include αB crystallin, Hsp beta-1, Hsp90, 14-3-3 protein, glutathione S-transferase, aldose reductase, actin and tropomyosin. Gene ontology analysis confirmed a significant increase in molecular functions associated with protein chaperoning and cell stabilization. Proteins over-represented in the cortex were largely related to routine metabolism. During antidiuresis 15 different proteins changed significantly while 18 different proteins changed significantly during diuresis relative to normally hydrated controls. Changes were confirmed by Western blot for selected proteins. Proteins that are significantly altered by diuretic state are associated with cell structure (actin, tubulin), signaling (Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor, abhydrolase domain-containing protein 14B), chaperone functioning (Hsp beta-1, αB crystallin, T complex protein-1) and anti-oxidant functions (α-enolase, GAPDH and LDH). Taken together our study reveals that specific proteins involved in

  12. Proteomic profiling of the rat hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The hypothalamus plays a pivotal role in numerous mechanisms highly relevant to the maintenance of body homeostasis, such as the control of food intake and energy expenditure. Impairment of these mechanisms has been associated with the metabolic disturbances involved in the pathogenesis of obesity. Since rodent species constitute important models for metabolism studies and the rat hypothalamus is poorly characterized by proteomic strategies, we performed experiments aimed at constructing a two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) profile of rat hypothalamus proteins. Results As a first step, we established the best conditions for tissue collection and protein extraction, quantification and separation. The extraction buffer composition selected for proteome characterization of rat hypothalamus was urea 7 M, thiourea 2 M, CHAPS 4%, Triton X-100 0.5%, followed by a precipitation step with chloroform/methanol. Two-dimensional (2-D) gels of hypothalamic extracts from four-month-old rats were analyzed; the protein spots were digested and identified by using tandem mass spectrometry and database query using the protein search engine MASCOT. Eighty-six hypothalamic proteins were identified, the majority of which were classified as participating in metabolic processes, consistent with the finding of a large number of proteins with catalytic activity. Genes encoding proteins identified in this study have been related to obesity development. Conclusion The present results indicate that the 2-DE technique will be useful for nutritional studies focusing on hypothalamic proteins. The data presented herein will serve as a reference database for studies testing the effects of dietary manipulations on hypothalamic proteome. We trust that these experiments will lead to important knowledge on protein targets of nutritional variables potentially able to affect the complex central nervous system control of energy homeostasis. PMID:22519962

  13. The proteome landscape of Giardia lamblia encystation.

    PubMed

    Faso, Carmen; Bischof, Sylvain; Hehl, Adrian B

    2013-01-01

    Giardia lamblia is an intestinal protozoan parasite required to survive in the environment in order to be transmitted to a new host. To ensure parasite survival, flagellated trophozoites colonizing the small intestine differentiate into non-motile environmentally-resistant cysts which are then shed in the environment. This cell differentiation process called encystation is characterized by significant morphological remodeling which includes secretion of large amounts of cyst wall material. Although much is known about the transcriptional regulation of encystation and the synthesis and trafficking of cyst wall material, the investigation of global changes in protein content and abundance during G. lamblia encystation is still unaddressed. In this study, we report on the quantitative analysis of the G. lamblia proteome during encystation using tandem mass spectrometry. Quantification of more than 1000 proteins revealed major changes in protein abundance in early, mid and late encystation, notably in constitutive secretory protein trafficking. Early stages of encystation were marked by a striking decrease of endoplasmic reticulum-targeted variant-specific surface proteins and significant increases in cytoskeleton regulatory components, NEK protein kinases and proteins involved in protein folding and glycolysis. This was in stark contrast to cells in the later stages of encystation which presented a surprisingly similar proteome composition to non-encysting trophozoites. Altogether these data constitute the first quantitative atlas of the Giardia proteome covering the whole process of encystation and point towards an important role for post-transcriptional control of gene expression in Giardia differentiation. Furthermore, our data provide a valuable resource for the community-based annotation effort of the G. lamblia genome, where almost 70% of all predicted gene models remains "hypothetical". PMID:24391747

  14. The Proteome Landscape of Giardia lamblia Encystation

    PubMed Central

    Hehl, Adrian B.

    2013-01-01

    Giardia lamblia is an intestinal protozoan parasite required to survive in the environment in order to be transmitted to a new host. To ensure parasite survival, flagellated trophozoites colonizing the small intestine differentiate into non-motile environmentally-resistant cysts which are then shed in the environment. This cell differentiation process called encystation is characterized by significant morphological remodeling which includes secretion of large amounts of cyst wall material. Although much is known about the transcriptional regulation of encystation and the synthesis and trafficking of cyst wall material, the investigation of global changes in protein content and abundance during G. lamblia encystation is still unaddressed. In this study, we report on the quantitative analysis of the G. lamblia proteome during encystation using tandem mass spectrometry. Quantification of more than 1000 proteins revealed major changes in protein abundance in early, mid and late encystation, notably in constitutive secretory protein trafficking. Early stages of encystation were marked by a striking decrease of endoplasmic reticulum-targeted variant-specific surface proteins and significant increases in cytoskeleton regulatory components, NEK protein kinases and proteins involved in protein folding and glycolysis. This was in stark contrast to cells in the later stages of encystation which presented a surprisingly similar proteome composition to non-encysting trophozoites. Altogether these data constitute the first quantitative atlas of the Giardia proteome covering the whole process of encystation and point towards an important role for post-transcriptional control of gene expression in Giardia differentiation. Furthermore, our data provide a valuable resource for the community-based annotation effort of the G. lamblia genome, where almost 70% of all predicted gene models remains “hypothetical”. PMID:24391747

  15. Methylglyoxal, glyoxalase 1 and the dicarbonyl proteome.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Naila; Thornalley, Paul J

    2012-04-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a potent protein glycating agent. Glycation is directed to guanidino groups of arginine residues forming mainly hydroimidazolone N (δ)-(5-hydro-5-methyl-4-imidazolon-2-yl)-ornithine (MG-H1) residues. MG-H1 formation is damaging to the proteome as modification is often directed to functionally important arginine residues. MG-H1 content of proteins is quantified by stable isotopic dilution analysis tandem mass spectrometry and also by immunoblotting with specific monoclonal antibodies. MG-glycated proteins undergo cellular proteolysis and release MG-H1 free adduct for excretion. MG-H1 residues have been found in proteins of animals, plants, bacteria, fungi and protoctista. MG-H1 is often the major advanced glycation endproduct in proteins of tissues and body fluids, increasing in diabetes and associated vascular complications, renal failure, cirrhosis, Alzheimer's disease, arthritis, Parkinson's disease and ageing. Glyoxalase 1 and aldo-keto reductase 1B1 metabolise >99% MG to innocuous products and thereby protect the proteome, providing an enzymatic defence against MG-mediated glycation. Proteins susceptible to MG modification with related functional impairment are called the "dicarbonyl proteome" (DCP). DCP includes albumin, haemoglobin, transcription factors, mitochondrial proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, lens crystallins and other proteins. DCP component proteins are linked to mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetes and ageing, oxidative stress, dyslipidemia, cell detachment and anoikis and apoptosis. Biochemical and physiological susceptibility of a protein to modification by MG and sensitivity of biochemical pathways and physiological systems to related functional impairment under challenge of physiologically relevant increases in MG exposure are key concepts. Improved understanding of the DCP will likely have profound importance for human health, longevity and treatment of disease.

  16. Proteomics of extracellular vesicles: Exosomes and ectosomes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong-Sic; Kim, Dae-Kyum; Kim, Yoon-Keun; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-01-01

    Almost all bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotic cells shed extracellular vesicles either constitutively or in a regulated manner. These nanosized membrane vesicles are spherical, bilayered proteolipids that harbor specific subsets of proteins, DNAs, RNAs, and lipids. Recent research has facilitated conceptual advancements in this emerging field that indicate that extracellular vesicles act as intercellular communicasomes by transferring signals to their target cell via surface ligands and delivering receptors and functional molecules. Recent progress in mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses of mammalian extracellular vesicles derived from diverse cell types and body fluids has resulted in the identification of several thousand vesicular proteins that provide us with essential clues to the molecular mechanisms involved in vesicle cargo sorting and biogenesis. Furthermore, cell-type- or disease-specific vesicular proteins help us to understand the pathophysiological functions of extracellular vesicles and contribute to the discovery of diagnostic and therapeutic target proteins. This review focuses on the high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses of mammalian extracellular vesicles (i.e., exosomes and ectosomes), EVpedia (a free web-based integrated database of high-throughput data for systematic analyses of extracellular vesicles; http://evpedia.info), and the intravesicular protein-protein interaction network analyses of mammalian extracellular vesicles. The goal of this article is to encourage further studies to construct a comprehensive proteome database for extracellular vesicles that will help us to not only decode the biogenesis and cargo-sorting mechanisms during vesicle formation but also elucidate the pathophysiological roles of these complex extracellular organelles.

  17. Proteome Analysis of Human Aqueous Humor

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Uttio Roy; Madden, Benjamin J.; Charlesworth, Mary Christine

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Human aqueous humor (hAH) provides nutrition and immunity within the anterior chamber of the eye. Characterization of the protein composition of hAH will identify molecules involved in maintaining a homeostatic environment for anterior segment tissues. The present study was conducted to analyze the proteome of hAH. Methods. hAH samples obtained during elective cataract surgery were divided into three matched groups and immunodepleted of albumin, IgG, IgA, haploglobin, antitrypsin, and transferrin. Reduced and denatured proteins (20 μg) from each group were separated by gel electrophoresis. Thirty-three gel slices were excised from each of three gel lanes (n = 99), digested with trypsin, and subjected to nanoflow liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS). The protein component of hAH was also analyzed by antibody-based protein arrays, and selected proteins were quantified. Results. A total of 676 proteins were identified in hAH. Of the 355 proteins identified by nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS, 206 were found in all three groups. Most of the proteins identified by nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS had catalytic, enzymatic, and structural properties. Using antibody-based protein arrays, 328 cytokines, chemokines, and receptors were identified. Most of the quantified proteins had concentrations that ranged between 0.1 and 2.5 ng/mL. Ten proteins were identified by both nano-LC-ESI-MS/MS and antibody protein arrays. Conclusions. Proteomic analysis of hAH identified 676 nonredundant proteins. More than 80% of these proteins are novel identifications. The elucidation of the aqueous proteome will establish a foundation for protein function analysis and identification of differentially expressed markers associated with diseases of the anterior segment. PMID:20463327

  18. Methylglyoxal, glyoxalase 1 and the dicarbonyl proteome.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Naila; Thornalley, Paul J

    2012-04-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a potent protein glycating agent. Glycation is directed to guanidino groups of arginine residues forming mainly hydroimidazolone N (δ)-(5-hydro-5-methyl-4-imidazolon-2-yl)-ornithine (MG-H1) residues. MG-H1 formation is damaging to the proteome as modification is often directed to functionally important arginine residues. MG-H1 content of proteins is quantified by stable isotopic dilution analysis tandem mass spectrometry and also by immunoblotting with specific monoclonal antibodies. MG-glycated proteins undergo cellular proteolysis and release MG-H1 free adduct for excretion. MG-H1 residues have been found in proteins of animals, plants, bacteria, fungi and protoctista. MG-H1 is often the major advanced glycation endproduct in proteins of tissues and body fluids, increasing in diabetes and associated vascular complications, renal failure, cirrhosis, Alzheimer's disease, arthritis, Parkinson's disease and ageing. Glyoxalase 1 and aldo-keto reductase 1B1 metabolise >99% MG to innocuous products and thereby protect the proteome, providing an enzymatic defence against MG-mediated glycation. Proteins susceptible to MG modification with related functional impairment are called the "dicarbonyl proteome" (DCP). DCP includes albumin, haemoglobin, transcription factors, mitochondrial proteins, extracellular matrix proteins, lens crystallins and other proteins. DCP component proteins are linked to mitochondrial dysfunction in diabetes and ageing, oxidative stress, dyslipidemia, cell detachment and anoikis and apoptosis. Biochemical and physiological susceptibility of a protein to modification by MG and sensitivity of biochemical pathways and physiological systems to related functional impairment under challenge of physiologically relevant increases in MG exposure are key concepts. Improved understanding of the DCP will likely have profound importance for human health, longevity and treatment of disease. PMID:20963454

  19. Environmental Proteomics: Changes in the Proteome of Marine Organisms in Response to Environmental Stress, Pollutants, Infection, Symbiosis, and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomanek, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Environmental proteomics, the study of changes in the abundance of proteins and their post-translational modifications, has become a powerful tool for generating hypotheses regarding how the environment affects the biology of marine organisms. Proteomics discovers hitherto unknown cellular effects of environmental stressors such as changes in thermal, osmotic, and anaerobic conditions. Proteomic analyses have advanced the characterization of the biological effects of pollutants and identified comprehensive and pollutant-specific sets of biomarkers, especially those highlighting post-translational modifications. Proteomic analyses of infected organisms have highlighted the broader changes occurring during immune responses and how the same pathways are attenuated during the maintenance of symbiotic relationships. Finally, proteomic changes occurring during the early life stages of marine organisms emphasize the importance of signaling events during development in a rapidly changing environment. Changes in proteins functioning in energy metabolism, cytoskeleton, protein stabilization and turnover, oxidative stress, and signaling are common responses to environmental change.

  20. In between - Proteomics of dog biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ingrid; Preßlmayer-Hartler, Andrea; Wait, Robin; Hummel, Karin; Sensi, Cristina; Eberini, Ivano; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Gianazza, Elisabetta

    2014-06-25

    Dogs are relevant to biomedical research in connection both to veterinary medicine for their role as pets and to basic investigations for their use as animal models in pathology, pharmacology and toxicology studies. Proteomic analysis of biological fluids is less advanced for dogs than for other animal species but a wealth of information has already been gathered, which we summarize in this review. As a remarkable feature, we also assemble here for due reference a number of 2-DE serum/plasma or urine patterns in health and disease; some of them correspond to unpublished data from the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna.

  1. Proteomic analysis of SETD6 interacting proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cohn, Ofir; Chen, Ayelet; Feldman, Michal; Levy, Dan

    2016-01-01

    SETD6 (SET-domain-containing protein 6) is a mono-methyltransferase that has been shown to methylate RelA and H2AZ. Using a proteomic approach we recently identified several new SETD6 substrates. To identify novel SETD6 interacting proteins, SETD6 was immunoprecipitated (IP) from Human erythromyeloblastoid leukemia K562 cells. SETD6 binding proteins were subjected to mass-spectrometry analysis resulting in 115 new SETD6 binding candidates. STRING database was used to map the SETD6 interactome network. Network enrichment analysis of biological processes with Gene Ontology (GO) database, identified three major groups; metabolic processes, muscle contraction and protein folding. PMID:26937450

  2. Proteomic profiling of hempseed proteins from Cheungsam.

    PubMed

    Park, Seul-Ki; Seo, Jong-Bok; Lee, Mi-Young

    2012-02-01

    Proteomic profiling of hempseed proteins from a non-drug type of industrial hemp (Cannabis sativa L.), Cheungsam, was conducted using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. A total of 1102 protein spots were resolved on pH 3-10 immobilized pH gradient strips, and 168 unique protein spots were identified. The proteins were categorized based on function, including involvement in energy regulation (23%), metabolism (18%), stress response (16%), unclassified (12%), cytoskeleton (11%), binding function (5%), and protein synthesis (3%). These proteins might have important biological functions in hempseed, such as germination, storage, or development.

  3. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Halbach, Sebastian; Dengjel, Jörn; Brummer, Tilman

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is driven by the oncogenic fusion kinase Bcr-Abl, which organizes its own signaling network with various proteins. These proteins, their interactions, and their role in relevant signaling pathways can be analyzed by quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) approaches in various models systems, e.g., in cell culture models. In this chapter, we describe in detail immunoprecipitations and quantitative proteomics analysis using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) of components of the Bcr-Abl signaling pathway in the human CML cell line K562. PMID:27581145

  4. The Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Subcommittee for Proteomics Assembles the Largest Proteome Database Resource for Plant Systems Biology

    SciTech Connect

    Weckwerth, Wolfram; Baginsky, Sacha; Van Wijk, Klass; Heazlewood, Joshua; Millar, Harvey

    2009-12-01

    In the past 10 years, we have witnessed remarkable advances in the field of plant molecular biology. The rapid development of proteomic technologies and the speed with which these techniques have been applied to the field have altered our perception of how we can analyze proteins in complex systems. At nearly the same time, the availability of the complete genome for the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was released; this effort provides an unsurpassed resource for the identification of proteins when researchers use MS to analyze plant samples. Recognizing the growth in this area, the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Committee (MASC) established a subcommittee for A. thaliana proteomics in 2006 with the objective of consolidating databases, technique standards, and experimentally validated candidate genes and functions. Since the establishment of the Multinational Arabidopsis Steering Subcommittee for Proteomics (MASCP), many new approaches and resources have become available. Recently, the subcommittee established a webpage to consolidate this information (www.masc-proteomics.org). It includes links to plant proteomic databases, general information about proteomic techniques, meeting information, a summary of proteomic standards, and other relevant resources. Altogether, this website provides a useful resource for the Arabidopsis proteomics community. In the future, the website will host discussions and investigate the cross-linking of databases. The subcommittee members have extensive experience in arabidopsis proteomics and collectively have produced some of the most extensive proteomics data sets for this model plant (Table S1 in the Supporting Information has a list of resources). The largest collection of proteomics data from a single study in A. thaliana was assembled into an accessible database (AtProteome; http://fgcz-atproteome.unizh.ch/index.php) and was recently published by the Baginsky lab.1 The database provides links to major Arabidopsis online

  5. Saliva proteome research: current status and future outlook.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Benjamin L; Cooper-White, Justin; Punyadeera, Chamindie K

    2013-09-01

    Human saliva harbours proteins of clinical relevance and about 30% of blood proteins are also present in saliva. This highlights that saliva can be used for clinical applications just as urine or blood. However, the translation of salivary biomarker discoveries into clinical settings is hampered by the dynamics and complexity of the salivary proteome. This review focuses on the current status of technological developments and achievements relating to approaches for unravelling the human salivary proteome. We discuss the dynamics of the salivary proteome, as well as the importance of sample preparation and processing techniques and their influence on downstream protein applications; post-translational modifications of salivary proteome and protein: protein interactions. In addition, we describe possible enrichment strategies for discerning post-translational modifications of salivary proteins, the potential utility of selected-reaction-monitoring techniques for biomarker discovery and validation, limitations to proteomics and the biomarker challenge and future perspectives. In summary, we provide recommendations for practical saliva sampling, processing and storage conditions to increase the quality of future studies in an emerging field of saliva clinical proteomics. We propose that the advent of technologies allowing sensitive and high throughput proteome-wide analyses, coupled to well-controlled study design, will allow saliva to enter clinical practice as an alternative to blood-based methods due to its simplistic nature of sampling, non-invasiveness, easy of collection and multiple collections by untrained professionals and cost-effective advantages. PMID:22612344

  6. From protein catalogues towards targeted proteomics approaches in cereal grains.

    PubMed

    Finnie, Christine; Sultan, Abida; Grasser, Klaus D

    2011-07-01

    Due to their importance for human nutrition, the protein content of cereal grains has been a subject of intense study for over a century and cereal grains were not surprisingly one of the earliest subjects for 2D-gel-based proteome analysis. Over the last two decades, countless cereal grain proteomes, mostly derived using 2D-gel based technologies, have been described and hundreds of proteins identified. However, very little is still known about post-translational modifications, subcellular proteomes, and protein-protein interactions in cereal grains. Development of techniques for improved extraction, separation and identification of proteins and peptides is facilitating functional proteomics and analysis of sub-proteomes from small amounts of starting material, such as seed tissues. The combination of proteomics with structural and functional analysis is increasingly applied to target subsets of proteins. These "next-generation" proteomics studies will vastly increase our depth of knowledge about the processes controlling cereal grain development, nutritional and processing characteristics.

  7. Proteomics of industrial fungi: trends and insights for biotechnology.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, José Miguel P Ferreira; de Graaff, Leo H

    2011-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are widely known for their industrial applications, namely, the production of food-processing enzymes and metabolites such as antibiotics and organic acids. In the past decade, the full genome sequencing of filamentous fungi increased the potential to predict encoded proteins enormously, namely, hydrolytic enzymes or proteins involved in the biosynthesis of metabolites of interest. The integration of genome sequence information with possible phenotypes requires, however, the knowledge of all the proteins in the cell in a system-wise manner, given by proteomics. This review summarises the progress of proteomics and its importance for the study of biotechnological processes in filamentous fungi. A major step forward in proteomics was to couple protein separation with high-resolution mass spectrometry, allowing accurate protein quantification. Despite the fact that most fungal proteomic studies have been focused on proteins from mycelial extracts, many proteins are related to processes which are compartmentalised in the fungal cell, e.g. β-lactam antibiotic production in the microbody. For the study of such processes, a targeted approach is required, e.g. by organelle proteomics. Typical workflows for sample preparation in fungal organelle proteomics are discussed, including homogenisation and sub-cellular fractionation. Finally, examples are presented of fungal organelle proteomic studies, which have enlarged the knowledge on areas of interest to biotechnology, such as protein secretion, energy production or antibiotic biosynthesis.

  8. The proteome: structure, function and evolution.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Keiran; Kelley, Lawrence A; Islam, Suhail A; MacCallum, Robert M; Muller, Arne; Pazos, Florencio; Sternberg, Michael J E

    2006-03-29

    This paper reports two studies to model the inter-relationships between protein sequence, structure and function. First, an automated pipeline to provide a structural annotation of proteomes in the major genomes is described. The results are stored in a database at Imperial College, London (3D-GENOMICS) that can be accessed at www.sbg.bio.ic.ac.uk. Analysis of the assignments to structural superfamilies provides evolutionary insights. 3D-GENOMICS is being integrated with related proteome annotation data at University College London and the European Bioinformatics Institute in a project known as e-protein (http://www.e-protein.org/). The second topic is motivated by the developments in structural genomics projects in which the structure of a protein is determined prior to knowledge of its function. We have developed a new approach PHUNCTIONER that uses the gene ontology (GO) classification to supervise the extraction of the sequence signal responsible for protein function from a structure-based sequence alignment. Using GO we can obtain profiles for a range of specificities described in the ontology. In the region of low sequence similarity (around 15%), our method is more accurate than assignment from the closest structural homologue. The method is also able to identify the specific residues associated with the function of the protein family.

  9. Proteomic analysis of apricot fruit during ripening.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Arena, Simona; Rocco, Mariapina; Verrillo, Francesca; Novi, Gianfranco; Viscosi, Vincenzo; Marra, Mauro; Scaloni, Andrea

    2013-01-14

    Ripening of climacteric fruits involves a complex network of biochemical and metabolic changes that make them palatable and rich in nutritional and health-beneficial compounds. Since fruit maturation has a profound impact on human nutrition, it has been recently the object of increasing research activity by holistic approaches, especially on model species. Here we report on the original proteomic characterization of ripening in apricot, a widely cultivated species of temperate zones appreciated for its taste and aromas, whose cultivation is yet hampered by specific limitations. Fruits of Prunus armeniaca cv. Vesuviana were harvested at three ripening stages and proteins extracted and resolved by 1D and 2D electrophoresis. Whole lanes from 1D gels were subjected to shot-gun analysis that identified 245 gene products, showing preliminary qualitative differences between maturation stages. In parallel, differential analysis of 2D proteomic maps highlighted 106 spots as differentially represented among variably ripen fruits. Most of these were further identified by means of MALDI-TOF-PMF and nanoLC-ESI-LIT-MS/MS as enzymes involved in main biochemical processes influencing metabolic/structural changes occurring during maturation, i.e. organic acids, carbohydrates and energy metabolism, ethylene biosynthesis, cell wall restructuring and stress response, or as protein species linkable to peculiar fruit organoleptic characteristics. In addition to originally present preliminary information on the main biochemical changes that characterize apricot ripening, this study also provides indications for future marker-assisted selection breeding programs aimed to ameliorate fruit quality.

  10. Sperm Proteome Maturation in the Mouse Epididymis

    PubMed Central

    Skerget, Sheri; Rosenow, Matthew A.; Petritis, Konstantinos; Karr, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, transit through the epididymis, which involves the acquisition, loss and modification of proteins, is required to confer motility and fertilization competency to sperm. The overall dynamics of maturation is poorly understood, and a systems level understanding of the complex maturation process will provide valuable new information about changes occurring during epididymal transport. We report the proteomes of sperm collected from the caput, corpus and cauda segments of the mouse epididymis, identifying 1536, 1720 and 1234 proteins respectively. This study identified 765 proteins that are present in sperm obtained from all three segments. We identified 1766 proteins that are potentially added (732) or removed (1034) from sperm during epididymal transit. Phenotypic analyses of the caput, corpus and cauda sperm proteomes identified 60 proteins that have known sperm phenotypes when mutated, or absent from sperm. Our analysis indicates that as much as one-third of proteins with known sperm phenotypes are added to sperm during epididymal transit. GO analyses revealed that cauda sperm are enriched for specific functions including sperm-egg recognition and motility, consistent with the observation that sperm acquire motility and fertilization competency during transit through the epididymis. In addition, GO analyses revealed that the immunity protein profile of sperm changes during sperm maturation. Finally, we identified components of the 26S proteasome, the immunoproteasome, and a proteasome activator in mature sperm. PMID:26556802

  11. A proteomic approach to neuropeptide function elucidation.

    PubMed

    Temmerman, L; Bogaerts, A; Meelkop, E; Cardoen, D; Boerjan, B; Janssen, T; Schoofs, L

    2012-03-01

    Many of the diverse functions of neuropeptides are still elusive. As they are ideally suited to modulate traditional signaling, their added actions are not always detectable under standard laboratory conditions. The search for function assignment to peptide encoding genes can therefore greatly benefit from molecular information. Specific molecular changes resulting from neuropeptide signaling may direct researchers to yet unknown processes or conditions, for which studying these signaling systems may eventually lead to phenotypic confirmation. Here, we applied gel-based proteomics after pdf-1 neuropeptide gene knockout in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. It has previously been described that pdf-1 null mutants display a locomotion defect, being slower and making more turns and reversals than wild type worms. The vertebrate functional homolog of PDF-1, vasocative intestinal peptide (VIP), is known to influence a plethora of processes, which have so far not been investigated for pdf-1. Because proteins represent the actual effectors inside an organism, proteomic analysis can guide our view to novel pdf-1 actions in the nematode worm. Our data show that knocking out pdf-1 results in alteration of levels of proteins involved in fat metabolism, stress resistance and development. This indicates a possible conservation of VIP-like actions for pdf-1 in C. elegans.

  12. TUBULIN PROTEOMICS: TOWARDS BREAKING THE CODE1

    PubMed Central

    Verdier-Pinard, Pascal; Pasquier, Eddy; Xiao, Hui; Burd, Berta; Villard, Claude; Lafitte, Daniel; Miller, Leah M.; Angeletti, Ruth H; Horwitz, Susan Band; Braguer, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of tubulin as the major component of microtubules over 40 years ago, its diversity of forms has raised a continuum of fundamental questions about its regulation and functions in a variety of organisms across phyla. Its high abundance in the brain or in specialized organelles such as cilia has allowed early characterization of this important target for anticancer drugs. However, it was only when matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry technologies became available in the late 1980's that the full complexity of tubulin expression patterns became more obvious. This contributed in a major way to the idea that due to increasing and conserved tubulin heterogeneity during evolution, a tubulin code read by microtubule associated proteins might exist and be of functional significance. We review here the merging of recent genetic and cell biology studies with proteomics to decipher this code and illustrate some of the tubulin proteomic approaches with new data generated in our laboratories. PMID:18840397

  13. Finding Our Way in the Dark Proteome.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Asmit; Brookes, David H; Yost, Shane R; Dyson, H Jane; Forman-Kay, Julie D; Gunter, Daniel; Head-Gordon, Martin; Hura, Gregory L; Pande, Vijay S; Wemmer, David E; Wright, Peter E; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2016-08-10

    The traditional structure-function paradigm has provided significant insights for well-folded proteins in which structures can be easily and rapidly revealed by X-ray crystallography beamlines. However, approximately one-third of the human proteome is comprised of intrinsically disordered proteins and regions (IDPs/IDRs) that do not adopt a dominant well-folded structure, and therefore remain "unseen" by traditional structural biology methods. This Perspective considers the challenges raised by the "Dark Proteome", in which determining the diverse conformational substates of IDPs in their free states, in encounter complexes of bound states, and in complexes retaining significant disorder requires an unprecedented level of integration of multiple and complementary solution-based experiments that are analyzed with state-of-the art molecular simulation, Bayesian probabilistic models, and high-throughput computation. We envision how these diverse experimental and computational tools can work together through formation of a "computational beamline" that will allow key functional features to be identified in IDP structural ensembles. PMID:27387657

  14. Proteome analysis of chick embryonic cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Aparicio, Mariano; Bueno, David

    2006-01-01

    During early stages of embryo development, the brain cavity is filled with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF), a complex fluid containing different protein fractions that contributes to the regulation of the survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of the neuroectodermal stem cells. Using 2-DE, protein sequencing and database searches, we identified and analyzed the proteome of the E-CSF from chick embryos (Gallus gallus). We identified 26 different gene products, including proteins related to the extracellular matrix, proteins associated with the regulation of osmotic pressure and metal transport, proteins related to cell survival, MAP kinase activators, proteins involved in the transport of retinol and vitamin D, antioxidant and antimicrobial proteins, intracellular proteins and some unknown proteins. Most of these gene products are involved in the regulation of developmental processes during embryogenesis in systems other than E-CSF. Interestingly, 14 of them are also present in adult human CSF proteome, and it has been reported that they are altered in the CSF of patients suffering neurodegenerative diseases and/or neurological disorders. Understanding these molecules and the mechanisms they control during embryonic neurogenesis is a key contribution to the general understanding of CNS development, and may also contribute to greater knowledge of these human diseases. PMID:16287170

  15. Characterization of the human blood plasma proteome

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Kim, Jeongkwon; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Fang, Ruihua; Tolic, Nikola; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2005-10-15

    We describe methods for broad characterization of the human plasma proteome. The combination of stepwise IgG and albumin protein depletion by affinity chromatography and ultrahigh-efficiency capillary liquid chromatography separations coupled to ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry enabled identification of 2392 proteins from a single plasma sample with an estimated confidence level of >94%, and an additional 2198 proteins with an estimated confidence level of 80%. The relative abundances of the identified proteins span a range of over eight orders of magnitude in concentration (<30 pg/mL to {approx}30 mg/mL), facilitated by the attomole-level sensitivity of the analysis methods. More than 80% of the observed proteins demonstrate interactions with IgG and/or albumin. The results from this study provide a basis for a wide range of plasma proteomics studies, including broad quantitation of relative abundances in comparative studies for the identification of novel protein disease markers, as well as further studies of protein-protein interactions.

  16. Biochemical and Proteomic Characterization of Alkaptonuric Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Braconi, Daniela; Bernardini, Giulia; Bianchini, Claretta; Laschi, Marcella; Millucci, Lia; Amato, Loredana; Tinti, Laura; Serchi, Tommaso; Chellini, Federico; Spreafico, Adriano; Santucci, Annalisa

    2012-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is a rare genetic disease associated with the accumulation of homogentisic acid (HGA) and its oxidized/polymerized products which leads to the deposition of melanin-like pigments (ochronosis) in connective tissues. Although numerous case reports have described ochronosis in joints, little is known on the molecular mechanisms leading to such a phenomenon. For this reason, we characterized biochemically chondrocytes isolated from the ochronotic cartilage of AKU patients. Based on the macroscopic appearance of the ochronotic cartilage, two sub-populations were identified: cells coming from the black portion of the cartilage were referred to as “black” AKU chondrocytes, while those coming from the white portion were referred to as “white” AKU chondrocytes. Notably, both AKU chondrocytic types were characterized by increased apoptosis, NO release, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Transmission electron microscopy also revealed that intracellular ochronotic pigment deposition was common to both “white” and “black” AKU cells. We then undertook a proteomic and redox-proteomic analysis of AKU chondrocytes which revealed profound alterations in the levels of proteins involved in cell defence, protein folding, and cell organization. An increased post-translational oxidation of proteins, which also involved high molecular weight protein aggregates, was found to be particularly relevant in “black” AKU chondrocytes. J. Cell. Physiol. 227: 3333–3343, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22213341

  17. Proteomic discovery of diabetic nephropathy biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Michael L; Klein, Jon B

    2010-11-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a complex systemic disease with complications that result from both genetic predisposition and dysregulated metabolic pathways. It is highly prevalent, with current estimates stating that there are 17.5 million diagnosed and 6.6 million undiagnosed patients with diabetes in the United States. DM and its complications impose a significant societal and economic burden. The medical costs of common microvascular complications of uncontrolled DM, diabetic nephropathy (DN) and diabetic retinopathy account for 29% and 15%, respectively, of the $116 billion worth expenditures associated with diabetes. A substantial gap exists in our knowledge related to the understanding of these complications. To advance therapy and decrease the societal burden of DM, there is a clear need for biomarkers that can diagnose DN at an early stage and predict its course. Proteomics has evolved into a high-throughput, analytical discipline used to analyze complex biological data sets. These open-ended, hypothesis-generating approaches, when appropriately designed and interpreted, are well suited to the study of the pathogenic mechanisms of diabetic microvascular disease and the identification of biomarkers of DN. In this study, we review the evolving role played by proteomics in expanding our understanding of the diagnosis and pathogenesis of DN. PMID:21044770

  18. Actin cytoskeleton redox proteome oxidation by cadmium

    PubMed Central

    Go, Young-Mi; Orr, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies associate environmental cadmium (Cd) exposure with the risk of lung diseases. Although mechanisms are not fully elucidated, several studies demonstrate Cd effects on actin and actin-associated proteins. In a recent study of Cd at concentrations similar to environmental exposures, we found that redox-dependent inflammatory signaling by NF-κB was sensitive to the actin-disrupting agent, cytochalasin D. The goal of the present study was to use mass spectrometry-based redox proteomics to investigate Cd effects on the actin cytoskeleton proteome and related functional pathways in lung cells at low environmental concentrations. The results showed that Cd under conditions that did not alter total protein thiols or glutathione redox state caused significant oxidation of peptidyl Cys of proteins regulating actin cytoskeleton. Immunofluorescence microscopy of lung fibroblasts and pulmonary artery endothelial cells showed that low-dose Cd exposure stimulated filamentous actin formation and nuclear localization of destrin, an actin-depolymerizing factor. Taken together, the results show that redox states of peptidyl Cys in proteins associated with actin cytoskeleton pathways are selectively oxidized in lung by Cd at levels thought to occur from environmental exposure. PMID:24077948

  19. Proteomics for routine identification of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Welker, Martin

    2011-08-01

    The invention of MALDI-TOF-MS enormously contributed to the understanding of protein chemistry and cell biology. Without this technique proteomics would most likely not be the important discipline it is today. Besides 'true' proteomics, MALDI-TOF-MS was applied for the analysis of microorganisms for their taxonomic characterization from its beginning. This approach has since been developed as a diagnostic tool readily available for routine, high-throughput analysis of microbial isolates from clinical specimens by intact-cell mass spectrometry (ICMS), the direct analysis of whole bacterial cell without a preceding fractionation or separation by chromatography or electrophoresis. ICMS exploits the reproducibility of mass fingerprints for individual bacterial and fungal strains as well as the high similarity of mass fingerprints within a species. Comparison of mass spectral data to genomic sequences emphasized the validity of peak patterns as taxonomic markers. Supported by comprehensive databases, MALDI-TOF-MS-based identification has been widely accepted in clinical laboratories within only a few years.

  20. Proteome profiling of Leishmania infantum promastigotes.

    PubMed

    Alcolea, Pedro J; Alonso, Ana; Larraga, Vicente

    2011-01-01

    A proteome analysis of the promastigote stage of the trypanosomatid parasite Leishmania infantum (MON-1 zymodeme) is described here for the first time. Total protein extracts were prepared at early logarithmic and stationary phases of replicate axenic cultures and processed by 2D electrophoresis (pH 3-10). A total of 28 differentially regulated proteins were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-tandem time of flight mass spectrometry. This approach has revealed that the electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) and the eukaryotic elongation factor 1α (eEF1α) subunit have the same differential expression pattern at the protein and mRNA levels, up-regulation in the stationary phase. A low-molecular-weight isoform and an alternatively processed form of the eEF1α subunit have been detected. A 51 kDa subunit of replication factor A is up-regulated in dividing logarithmic promastigotes. None of the proteins described here shows opposite differential regulation values with the corresponding mRNA levels. Taken together with previous approaches to the proteome and the transcriptome, this report contributes to the elucidation of the differential regulation patterns of the ETF, the eEF1α subunit, the 40S ribosomal protein S12, α-tubulin and the T-complex protein 1 subunit γ throughout the life cycle of the parasites from the genus Leishmania. PMID:21569158

  1. The cell envelope proteome of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kenneth P.; Fields, Julia G.; Voogt, Richard D.; Deng, Bin; Lam, Ying-Wai; Mintz, Keith P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The cell envelope of Gram-negative bacteria serves a critical role in maintenance of cellular homeostasis, resistance to external stress, and host-pathogen interactions. Envelope protein composition is influenced by the physiological and environmental demands placed on the bacterium. In this study, we report a comprehensive compilation of cell envelope proteins from the periodontal and systemic pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans VT1169, an afimbriated serotype b strain. The urea-extracted membrane proteins were identified by mass spectrometry-based shotgun proteomics. The membrane proteome, isolated from actively growing bacteria under normal laboratory conditions, included 648 proteins representing 28% of the predicted ORFs in the genome. Bioinformatic analyses were used to annotate and predict the cellular location and function of the proteins. Surface adhesins, porins, lipoproteins, numerous influx and efflux pumps, multiple sugar, amino acid and iron transporters, and components of the type I, II and V secretion systems were identified. Periplasmic space and cytoplasmic proteins with chaperone function were also identified. 107 proteins with unknown function were associated with the cell envelope. Orthologs of a subset of these uncharacterized proteins are present in other bacterial genomes, while others are found exclusively in A. actinomycetemcomitans. This knowledge will contribute to elucidating the role of cell envelope proteins in bacterial growth and survival in the oral cavity. PMID:25055881

  2. Proteomic responses of fruits to environmental stresses

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Zhulong

    2012-01-01

    Fruits and vegetables are extremely susceptible to decay and easily lose commercial value after harvest. Different strategies have been developed to control postharvest decay and prevent quality deterioration during postharvest storage, including cold storage, controlled atmosphere (CA), and application of biotic and abiotic stimulus. In this review, mechanisms related to protein level responses of host side and pathogen side were characterized. Protein extraction protocols have been successfully developed for recalcitrant, low protein content fruit tissues. Comparative proteome profiling and functional analysis revealed that defense related proteins, energy metabolism, and antioxidant pathway played important roles in fruits in response to storage conditions and exogenous elicitor treatments. Secretome of pathogenic fungi has been well-investigated and the results indicated that hydrolytic enzymes were the key virulent factors for the pathogen infection. These protein level changes shed new light on interaction among fruits, pathogens, and environmental conditions. Potential postharvest strategies to reduce risk of fruit decay were further proposed based on currently available proteomic data. PMID:23335934

  3. Feature detection techniques for preprocessing proteomic data.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Kimberly F; Miecznikowski, Jeffrey C

    2010-01-01

    Numerous gel-based and nongel-based technologies are used to detect protein changes potentially associated with disease. The raw data, however, are abundant with technical and structural complexities, making statistical analysis a difficult task. Low-level analysis issues (including normalization, background correction, gel and/or spectral alignment, feature detection, and image registration) are substantial problems that need to be addressed, because any large-level data analyses are contingent on appropriate and statistically sound low-level procedures. Feature detection approaches are particularly interesting due to the increased computational speed associated with subsequent calculations. Such summary data corresponding to image features provide a significant reduction in overall data size and structure while retaining key information. In this paper, we focus on recent advances in feature detection as a tool for preprocessing proteomic data. This work highlights existing and newly developed feature detection algorithms for proteomic datasets, particularly relating to time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Note, however, that the associated data structures (i.e., spectral data, and images containing spots) used as input for these methods are obtained via all gel-based and nongel-based methods discussed in this manuscript, and thus the discussed methods are likewise applicable.

  4. From 2-D electrophoresis to proteomics.

    PubMed

    Klose, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    At first, a short history of the beginning of 2-DE is provided. Based on the present state of the art at the time I developed a 2-DE technique in 1975 that was able to resolve complex protein extracts from mouse tissues in hundreds of protein spots. My intention was to study proteins from a global point of view. Questions of interest were, how do proteins change during embryonic development, and what is the effect of induced mutations on the protein level. At that time protein chemistry was a matter of analyzing single proteins in detail. Therefore, my approach was frequently criticized as inappropriate because it would be impossible to identify and characterize the hundreds of proteins resolved. But soon it was realized that studying total proteins gives opportunities to answer many interesting questions. This led to a research field nowadays called "proteomics". Already in the beginning of the 1980s the idea to analyze the total human proteins had come up. By entering the post-genome era it became obvious that a human proteome project is needed in order to explain the human genome in terms of its functions. The problems in realizing such a project are considered. PMID:19517494

  5. Proteome analysis in the assessment of ageing.

    PubMed

    Nkuipou-Kenfack, Esther; Koeck, Thomas; Mischak, Harald; Pich, Andreas; Schanstra, Joost P; Zürbig, Petra; Schumacher, Björn

    2014-11-01

    Based on demographic trends, the societies in many developed countries are facing an increasing number and proportion of people over the age of 65. The raise in elderly populations along with improved health-care will be concomitant with an increased prevalence of ageing-associated chronic conditions like cardiovascular, renal, and respiratory diseases, arthritis, dementia, and diabetes mellitus. This is expected to pose unprecedented challenges both for individuals and societies and their health care systems. An ultimate goal of ageing research is therefore the understanding of physiological ageing and the achievement of 'healthy' ageing by decreasing age-related pathologies. However, on a molecular level, ageing is a complex multi-mechanistic process whose contributing factors may vary individually, partly overlap with pathological alterations, and are often poorly understood. Proteome analysis potentially allows modelling of these multifactorial processes. This review summarises recent proteomic research on age-related changes identified in animal models and human studies. We combined this information with pathway analysis to identify molecular mechanisms associated with ageing. We identified some molecular pathways that are affected in most or even all organs and others that are organ-specific. However, appropriately powered studies are needed to confirm these findings based in in silico evaluation. PMID:25257180

  6. Proteomics analysis of human nonalcoholic fatty liver.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Suarez, Eva; Mato, Jose M; Elortza, Felix

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is being increasingly recognized as a major cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality. Given the increasing prevalence of obesity in western countries, NAFLD has become an important public health problem. The principal aim of this study was to find differences in protein expression between patients with NAFLD and healthy controls. Changes in protein expression of liver samples from controls, nonalcoholic steatosis, and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) subjects were analyzed by two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE). With this proteomic technique, hundreds of proteins can be analyzed simultaneously and their relative abundance can be calculated. Proteins showing significant changes (ratio ≥ 1.5, p < 0.05) were identified by MALDI TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Western blot of tissue homogenates was then used as a complementary method to validate protein expression changes observed by DIGE. With the aim to have a noninvasive approach to detect changes produced in NAFLD-affected liver, validated proteins were further tested in serum samples of different cohorts of patients. Following this approach, we identified two candidate markers CPS1 and GRP78 that were differentially expressed between control, steatosis, and NASH. This proteomics approach demonstrates that DIGE combined with MALDI TOF/TOF and Western blot analysis of tissue and serum samples is a useful approach to identify candidate markers associated with NAFLD.

  7. The proteome of human brain microdialysate

    PubMed Central

    Maurer, Martin H; Berger, Christian; Wolf, Margit; Fütterer, Carsten D; Feldmann, Robert E; Schwab, Stefan; Kuschinsky, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Background Cerebral microdialysis has been established as a monitoring tool in neurocritically ill patients suffering from severe stroke. The technique allows to sample small molecules in the brain tissue for subsequent biochemical analysis. In this study, we investigated the proteomic profile of human cerebral microdialysate and if the identified proteins might be useful predictors for disease characteristics in stroke for tissue at risk in the contralateral hemisphere. We analysed cerebral protein expression in microdialysate from three stroke patients sampled from the hemisphere contralateral to the lesion. Using a proteomic approach based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and subsequent mass spectrometry, we created a protein map for the global protein expression pattern of human microdialyste. Results We found an average of 158 ± 24 (N = 18) protein spots in the human cerebral microdialysate and could identify 95 spots, representing 27 individual proteins. Most of these have been detected in human cerebrospinal fluid before, but 10 additional proteins mainly of cerebral intracellular origin were identified exclusively in the microdialysate. Conclusions The 10 proteins found exclusively in human cerebral microdialysate, but not in cerebrospinal fluid, indicate the possibility to monitor the progression of the disease towards deterioration. The correlation of protein composition in the human cerebral microdialysate with the patients' clinical condition and results of cerebral imaging may be a useful approach to future applications for neurological stroke diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. PMID:14675487

  8. Framing the nano-biointeractions by proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabella, S.; Maiorano, G.; Rizzello, L.; Kote, S.; Cingolani, R.; Pompa, P. P.

    2012-03-01

    Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying the interactions between nanomaterials and living systems is fundamental for providing more effective products for nanomedicine and drug delivery. Controlling the response of cells/bacteria (such as activation of inflammatory processes or apoptosis/necrosis in tumor cells or pathogenic bacteria) by tuning specific properties of the nanomaterials is ultimately the challenging goal. Notably, this may also provide crucial information in the assessment of any toxic risks induced by nanoparticles on humans. However, in studying the nano-biointeractions, it is imperative to take into account the dynamic evolutions of nanoparticles in the biological environments (in terms of protein corona formation, size and charge changes) in synergy with the dynamic events occurring in cells, including signal transduction, metabolic processes, homeostasis and membrane trafficking. In this context, we discuss the impact of analytical technologies, especially in the field of proteomics, which can provide major insights into the processes affecting the NPs surface as well as the cells and bacteria functionalities. In particular, we show that a precise control of the chemical-physical characteristics of the interacting nanoparticles or nanostructures may impact the cells by inducing changes in the proteomic profiles with direct consequences on their viability.

  9. Finding Our Way in the Dark Proteome.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Asmit; Brookes, David H; Yost, Shane R; Dyson, H Jane; Forman-Kay, Julie D; Gunter, Daniel; Head-Gordon, Martin; Hura, Gregory L; Pande, Vijay S; Wemmer, David E; Wright, Peter E; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2016-08-10

    The traditional structure-function paradigm has provided significant insights for well-folded proteins in which structures can be easily and rapidly revealed by X-ray crystallography beamlines. However, approximately one-third of the human proteome is comprised of intrinsically disordered proteins and regions (IDPs/IDRs) that do not adopt a dominant well-folded structure, and therefore remain "unseen" by traditional structural biology methods. This Perspective considers the challenges raised by the "Dark Proteome", in which determining the diverse conformational substates of IDPs in their free states, in encounter complexes of bound states, and in complexes retaining significant disorder requires an unprecedented level of integration of multiple and complementary solution-based experiments that are analyzed with state-of-the art molecular simulation, Bayesian probabilistic models, and high-throughput computation. We envision how these diverse experimental and computational tools can work together through formation of a "computational beamline" that will allow key functional features to be identified in IDP structural ensembles.

  10. The PROTICdb database for 2-DE proteomics.

    PubMed

    Langella, Olivier; Zivy, Michel; Joets, Johann

    2007-01-01

    PROTICdb is a web-based database mainly designed to store and analyze plant proteome data obtained by 2D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) and mass spectrometry (MS). The goals of PROTICdb are (1) to store, track, and query information related to proteomic experiments, i.e., from tissue sampling to protein identification and quantitative measurements; and (2) to integrate information from the user's own expertise and other sources into a knowledge base, used to support data interpretation (e.g., for the determination of allelic variants or products of posttranslational modifications). Data insertion into the relational database of PROTICdb is achieved either by uploading outputs from Mélanie, PDQuest, IM2d, ImageMaster(tm) 2D Platinum v5.0, Progenesis, Sequest, MS-Fit, and Mascot software, or by filling in web forms (experimental design and methods). 2D PAGE-annotated maps can be displayed, queried, and compared through the GelBrowser. Quantitative data can be easily exported in a tabulated format for statistical analyses with any third-party software. PROTICdb is based on the Oracle or the PostgreSQLDataBase Management System (DBMS) and is freely available upon request at http://cms.moulon.inra.fr/content/view/14/44/.

  11. [LEGUME-RHIZOBIUM SYMBIOSIS PROTEOMICS: ACHIEVEMENTS AND PERSPECTIVES].

    PubMed

    Kondratiuk, Iu Iu; Mamenko, P M; Kots, S Ya

    2015-01-01

    The present review contains results of proteomic researches of legume-rhizobium symbiosis. The technical difficulties associated with the methods of obtaining protein extracts from symbiotic structures and ways of overcoming them were discussed. The changes of protein synthesis under formation and functioning of symbiotic structures were shown. Special attention has been given to the importance of proteomic studies of plant-microbe structures in the formation of adaptation strategies under adverse environmental conditions. The technical and conceptual perspectives of legume-rhizobium symbiosis proteomics were shown.

  12. FunRich proteomics software analysis, let the fun begin!

    PubMed

    Benito-Martin, Alberto; Peinado, Héctor

    2015-08-01

    Protein MS analysis is the preferred method for unbiased protein identification. It is normally applied to a large number of both small-scale and high-throughput studies. However, user-friendly computational tools for protein analysis are still needed. In this issue, Mathivanan and colleagues (Proteomics 2015, 15, 2597-2601) report the development of FunRich software, an open-access software that facilitates the analysis of proteomics data, providing tools for functional enrichment and interaction network analysis of genes and proteins. FunRich is a reinterpretation of proteomic software, a standalone tool combining ease of use with customizable databases, free access, and graphical representations.

  13. Spatial and temporal dynamics of the cardiac mitochondrial proteome

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Edward; Huang, Derrick; Cao, Quan; Dincer, T. Umut; Black, Caitie M.; Lin, Amanda J.; Lee, Jessica M.; Wang, Ding; Liem, David A.; Lam, Maggie P.Y.; Ping, Peipei

    2015-01-01

    Summary Mitochondrial proteins alter in their composition and quantity drastically through time and space in correspondence to changing energy demands and cellular signaling events. The integrity and permutations of this dynamism are increasingly recognized to impact the functions of the cardiac proteome in health and disease. This article provides an overview on recent advances in defining the spatial and temporal dynamics of mitochondrial proteins in the heart. Proteomics techniques to characterize dynamics on a proteome scale are reviewed and the physiological consequences of altered mitochondrial protein dynamics are discussed. Lastly, we offer our perspectives on the unmet challenges in translating mitochondrial dynamics markers to the clinic. PMID:25752359

  14. Interlaboratory studies and initiatives developing standards for proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Alexander R; Colangelo, Christopher M; Dufresne, Craig P; Friedman, David B; Lilley, Kathryn S; Mechtler, Karl; Phinney, Brett S; Rose, Kristie L; Rudnick, Paul A; Searle, Brian C; Shaffer, Scott A; Weintraub, Susan T

    2013-03-01

    Proteomics is a rapidly transforming interdisciplinary field of research that embraces a diverse set of analytical approaches to tackle problems in fundamental and applied biology. This viewpoint article highlights the benefits of interlaboratory studies and standardization initiatives to enable investigators to address many of the challenges found in proteomics research. Among these initiatives, we discuss our efforts on a comprehensive performance standard for characterizing PTMs by MS that was recently developed by the Association of Biomolecular Resource Facilities (ABRF) Proteomics Standards Research Group (sPRG).

  15. Global Analysis of Protein Activities Using Proteome Chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Heng; Bilgin, Metin; Bangham, Rhonda; Hall, David; Casamayor, Antonio; Bertone, Paul; Lan, Ning; Jansen, Ronald; Bidlingmaier, Scott; Houfek, Thomas; Mitchell, Tom; Miller, Perry; Dean, Ralph A.; Gerstein, Mark; Snyder, Michael

    2001-09-01

    To facilitate studies of the yeast proteome, we cloned 5800 open reading frames and overexpressed and purified their corresponding proteins. The proteins were printed onto slides at high spatial density to form a yeast proteome microarray and screened for their ability to interact with proteins and phospholipids. We identified many new calmodulin- and phospholipid-interacting proteins; a common potential binding motif was identified for many of the calmodulin-binding proteins. Thus, microarrays of an entire eukaryotic proteome can be prepared and screened for diverse biochemical activities. The microarrays can also be used to screen protein-drug interactions and to detect posttranslational modifications.

  16. Global quantitative proteomics using spectral counting: an inexpensive experimental and bioinformatics workflow for deep proteome coverage.

    PubMed

    Balbuena, Tiago S; Demartini, Diogo Ribeiro; Thelen, Jay J

    2014-01-01

    As the field of proteomics shifts from qualitative identification of protein "subfractions" to quantitative comparison of proteins from complex biological samples, it is apparent that the number of approaches for quantitation can be daunting for the result-oriented biologist. There have been many recent reviews on quantitative proteomic approaches, discussing the strengths and limitations of each. Unfortunately, there are few detailed methodological descriptions of any one of these quantitative approaches. Here we present a detailed bioinformatics workflow for one of the simplest, most pervasive quantitative approach-spectral counting. The informatics and statistical workflow detailed here includes newly available freeware, such as SePro and PatternLab which post-process data according to false discovery rate parameters, and statistically model the data to detect differences and trends. PMID:24136522

  17. Spatial proteomic and phospho-proteomic organization in three prototypical cell migration modes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tight spatio-temporal signaling of cytoskeletal and adhesion dynamics is required for localized membrane protrusion that drives directed cell migration. Different ensembles of proteins are therefore likely to get recruited and phosphorylated in membrane protrusions in response to specific cues. Results Here, we use an assay that allows to biochemically purify extending protrusions of cells migrating in response to three prototypical receptors: integrins, recepor tyrosine kinases and G-coupled protein receptors. Using quantitative proteomics and phospho-proteomics approaches, we provide evidence for the existence of cue-specific, spatially distinct protein networks in the different cell migration modes. Conclusions The integrated analysis of the large-scale experimental data with protein information from databases allows us to understand some emergent properties of spatial regulation of signaling during cell migration. This provides the cell migration community with a large-scale view of the distribution of proteins and phospho-proteins regulating directed cell migration. PMID:24987309

  18. Beneficial effects of omega-3 fatty acids in the proteome of high-density lipoprotein proteome

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Omega-3 poly-unsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFAs) have demonstrated to be beneficial in the prevention of cardiovascular disease, however, the mechanisms by which they perform their cardiovascular protection have not been clarified. Intriguingly, some of these protective effects have also been linked to HDL. The hypothesis of this study was that ω-3 PUFAs could modify the protein cargo of HDL particle in a triglyceride non-dependent mode. The objective of the study was to compare the proteome of HDL before and after ω-3 PUFAs supplemented diet. Methods A comparative proteomic analysis in 6 smoker subjects HDL before and after a 5 weeks ω-3 PUFAs enriched diet has been performed. Results Among the altered proteins, clusterin, paraoxonase, and apoAI were found to increase, while fibronectin, α-1-antitrypsin, complement C1r subcomponent and complement factor H decreased after diet supplementation with ω-3 PUFAs. Immunodetection assays confirmed these results. The up-regulated proteins are related to anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-atherosclerotic properties of HDL, while the down-regulated proteins are related to regulation of complement activation and acute phase response. Conclusions Despite the low number of subjects included in the study, our findings demonstrate that ω-3 PUFAs supplementation modifies lipoprotein containing apoAI (LpAI) proteome and suggest that these protein changes improve the functionality of the particle. PMID:22978374

  19. Urinary proteome alterations in HER2 enriched breast cancer revealed by multipronged quantitative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Gajbhiye, Akshada; Dabhi, Raju; Taunk, Khushman; Vannuruswamy, Garikapati; RoyChoudhury, Sourav; Adhav, Ragini; Seal, Shubhendu; Mane, Anupama; Bayatigeri, Santhakumari; Santra, Manas K; Chaudhury, Koel; Rapole, Srikanth

    2016-09-01

    Globally, breast cancer is the second most common cancer among women. Although biomarker discoveries through various proteomic approaches of tissue and serum samples have been studied in breast cancer, urinary proteome alterations in breast cancer are least studied. Urine being a noninvasive biofluid and a significant source of proteins, it has the potential in early diagnosis of breast cancer. This study used complementary quantitative gel-based and gel-free proteomic approaches to find a panel of urinary protein markers that could discriminate HER2 enriched (HE) subtype breast cancer from the healthy controls. A total of 183 differentially expressed proteins were identified using three complementary approaches, namely 2D-DIGE, iTRAQ, and sequential window acquisition of all theoretical mass spectra. The differentially expressed proteins were subjected to various bioinformatics analyses for deciphering the biological context of these proteins using protein analysis through evolutionary relationships, database for annotation, visualization and integrated discovery, and STRING. Multivariate statistical analysis was undertaken to identify the set of most significant proteins, which could discriminate HE breast cancer from healthy controls. Immunoblotting and MRM-based validation in a separate cohort testified a panel of 21 proteins such as zinc-alpha2-glycoprotein, A2GL, retinol-binding protein 4, annexin A1, SAP3, SRC8, gelsolin, kininogen 1, CO9, clusterin, ceruloplasmin, and α1-antitrypsin could be a panel of candidate markers that could discriminate HE breast cancer from healthy controls. PMID:27324523

  20. Mammalian embryonic cerebrospinal fluid proteome has greater apolipoprotein and enzyme pattern complexity than the avian proteome.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Bueno, David

    2005-01-01

    During early stages of embryo development, the brain cavity is filled with Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid, which has an essential role in the survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of the neuroectodermal stem cells. We identified and analyzed the proteome of Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid from rat embryos (Rattus norvegicus), which includes proteins involved in the regulation of Central Nervous System development. The comparison between mammalian and avian Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid proteomes reveals great similarity, but also greater complexity in some protein groups. The pattern of apolipoproteins and enzymes in CSF is more complex in the mammals than in birds. This difference may underlie the greater neural complexity and synaptic plasticity found in mammals. Fourteen Embryonic Cerebro-Spinal Fluid gene products were previously identified in adult human Cerebro-Spinal Fluid proteome, and interestingly they are altered in patients with neurodegenerative diseases and/or neurological disorders. Understanding these molecules and the mechanisms they control during embryonic neurogenesis may contribute to our understanding of Central Nervous System development and evolution, and these human diseases. PMID:16335996