Science.gov

Sample records for adriatic continental shelf

  1. Phytoplankton distribution across the southeast Adriatic continental and shelf slope to the west of Albania (spring aspect).

    PubMed

    Viličić, Damir; Silović, Tina; Kuzmić, Milivoj; Mihanović, Hrvoje; Bosak, Sunčica; Tomažić, Igor; Olujić, Goran

    2011-06-01

    We present the first insight to the oceanography of the southeastern Adriatic Sea, where coastal water influenced by Albanian rivers comes into contact with the inflowing oligotrophic Eastern Adriatic Current (Ionian Surface Water and Levantine Intermediate Water). A distinct plankton distribution was observed on each side of the shelf break hydrographic boundary in May 2009, during gradual warming of the surface waters. The prochlorophytes accumulated along the nutricline above the shelf and continental slope. The phosphorus limited inshore waters were dominated by a small diatom Chaetoceros circinalis, dinoflagellates, cryptophytes, autotrophic picoplankton, and heterotrophic nanoplankton. The offshore surface layer was characterized by bigger nanoplankton (coccolithophorids, green flagellates). Low nutrient concentrations influence relatively low productivity not only above the Albanian shelf but also further to the north along the Montenegrine and Croatian coastal Adriatic Sea.

  2. Flocculation, heavy metals (Cu, Pb, Zn) and the sand-mud transition on the Adriatic continental shelf, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, D.A.; Hill, P.S.; Milligan, T.G.

    2007-01-01

    Across a limited depth range (5-10 m) on many continental shelves, the dominant sediment size changes from sand to mud. This important boundary, called the sand-mud transition (SMT), separates distinct benthic habitats, causes a significant change in acoustic backscatter, represents a key facies change, and delimits more surface-reactive mud from less surface-reactive sand. With the goal of improving dynamical understanding of the SMT, surficial sediments were characterized across two SMTs on the Adriatic continental shelf of Italy. Geometric mean diameter, specific surface area (SSA), mud fraction (<63 ??m) and heavy metal concentrations were all measured. The SMT related to the Tronto River is identified between 15 and 20 m water depth while the SMT associated with the Pescara River varies between 15 and 25 m water depth. The sediment properties correlate with a new, process-based sedimentological parameter that quantifies the fraction of the sediment in the seabed that was delivered as flocs. These correlations suggest that floc dynamics exert strong influence over sediment textural properties and metal concentrations. Relative constancy in the depth of the SMT along this portion of the margin and its lack of evolution over a period during which sediment input to the margin has dramatically decreased suggest that on the Adriatic continental shelf energy is the dominant control on the depth of the SMT. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Role of Recruitment Processes in Structuring Coralligenous Benthic Assemblages in the Northern Adriatic Continental Shelf.

    PubMed

    Fava, Federica; Ponti, Massimo; Abbiati, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Coralligenous biogenic reefs are among the most diverse marine habitats in the Mediterranean Sea. The northern Adriatic mesophotic coralligenous outcrops host very rich and diverse epibenthic assemblages. Several studies quantified the low temporal variability and high spatial heterogeneity of these habitats, while processes driving structuring and differentiation are still poorly understood. To shed light on these processes, temporal and spatial patterns of colonisation were investigated using travertine tiles deployed on three coralligenous outcrops, corresponding to the main typologies of benthic assemblages described in previous studies. Three years after deployment, assemblages colonising travertine tiles resembled the differentiation among sites revealed by the natural assemblages in terms of major ecological groups. Processes structuring and maintaining species diversity have been explored. Pioneer species with high reproduction rate, long distance larval dispersal and fast growth (e.g. the serpulid polychaete Spirobranchus triqueter and the bivalve Anomia ephippium), were the most abundant in the early stages of recruitment on the two outcrops further away from the coast and with lower sedimentation. Their success may vary according to larval availability and environmental conditions (e.g., sedimentation rates). At these sites early-stage lasted 10-12 months, during which even species from natural substrates began colonising tiles by settlement of planktonic propagules (e.g., encrusting calcareous Rhodophyta) and lateral encroachment (e.g., sponges and ascidians). On coastal outcrop, exposed to a higher sedimentation rates, tiles were colonised by fast-growing algal turfs. Resilience of northern Adriatic coralligenous assemblages, and maintenance of their diversity, appeared largely entrusted to asexual reproduction. Exploring the mechanisms that underlie the formation and maintenance of the species diversity is crucial to improve our understanding of

  4. Role of Recruitment Processes in Structuring Coralligenous Benthic Assemblages in the Northern Adriatic Continental Shelf

    PubMed Central

    Abbiati, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Coralligenous biogenic reefs are among the most diverse marine habitats in the Mediterranean Sea. The northern Adriatic mesophotic coralligenous outcrops host very rich and diverse epibenthic assemblages. Several studies quantified the low temporal variability and high spatial heterogeneity of these habitats, while processes driving structuring and differentiation are still poorly understood. To shed light on these processes, temporal and spatial patterns of colonisation were investigated using travertine tiles deployed on three coralligenous outcrops, corresponding to the main typologies of benthic assemblages described in previous studies. Three years after deployment, assemblages colonising travertine tiles resembled the differentiation among sites revealed by the natural assemblages in terms of major ecological groups. Processes structuring and maintaining species diversity have been explored. Pioneer species with high reproduction rate, long distance larval dispersal and fast growth (e.g. the serpulid polychaete Spirobranchus triqueter and the bivalve Anomia ephippium), were the most abundant in the early stages of recruitment on the two outcrops further away from the coast and with lower sedimentation. Their success may vary according to larval availability and environmental conditions (e.g., sedimentation rates). At these sites early-stage lasted 10–12 months, during which even species from natural substrates began colonising tiles by settlement of planktonic propagules (e.g., encrusting calcareous Rhodophyta) and lateral encroachment (e.g., sponges and ascidians). On coastal outcrop, exposed to a higher sedimentation rates, tiles were colonised by fast-growing algal turfs. Resilience of northern Adriatic coralligenous assemblages, and maintenance of their diversity, appeared largely entrusted to asexual reproduction. Exploring the mechanisms that underlie the formation and maintenance of the species diversity is crucial to improve our understanding of

  5. Benthic foraminifera for environmental monitoring: a case study in the central Adriatic continental shelf.

    PubMed

    Capotondi, L; Bergami, C; Orsini, G; Ravaioli, M; Colantoni, P; Galeotti, S

    2015-04-01

    A study of benthic foraminifera was carried out in sediment samples collected from the central Adriatic coast of Italy, near the Ancona harbour and the Falconara Marittima oil refinery, in order to validate and support their use as bioindicators of ecosystem quality. On the basis of a principal component analysis (PCA), three biotopes (following the bathymetric gradient) have been documented, showing that the distribution pattern of benthic foraminifera is principally related to riverine inputs, organic matter contents at the seafloor, and sediment grain size. We observed higher abundances of opportunistic, low-oxygen tolerant taxa along the coastline, thus being representative of polluted environmental conditions. Near the Falconara Marittima oil refinery, the microfaunal assemblages is characterized by the absence of living specimens and by a low diversity associated with the dominance of opportunistic species. At this site, aberrant tests were also found. The data point out that Ammonia parkinsoniana and Quinqueloculina seem to be the most sensitive taxa and can be considered as good bioindicators of environmental stress in this area. This study confirms that faunal composition and morphology of benthic foraminifera respond to human-induced environmental perturbations, making their study potentially useful for biomonitoring in coastal-marine areas.

  6. Characterization and distribution of organic matter using specific physico-chemical methods: A case study of the southeast Adriatic continental and shelf slope (Albania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plavšić, Marta; Strmečki, Slađana; Dautović, Jelena; Vojvodić, Vjeročka; Olujić, Goran; Ćosović, Božena

    2012-05-01

    In May 2009, we characterized the organic matter in the area where Albanian shelf riverine plume waters enter the Southern Adriatic Pit region. Due to stable weather and hydrological conditions at the time of sampling a longitudinal thermal front was present around the Albanian shelf break. Our measurements point to the input of inorganic nutrients, including phosphorus (average P-PO4 concentration was 0.71 μg/L) and nitrogen (average as total inorganic nitrogen (TIN) concentration was 25.33 μg/L) due to the intrusion of Levantine Intermediate Water (LIW) through the Otranto Strait. The input of LIW brings high salinity (˜38.7) water that is poor in organic matter content. Low concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (0.7 mg C/L) and particulate organic carbon (POC) (0.06 mg C/L), surface active substances (SAS) (in the range from 0.025 to 0.078 mg/L equiv. Triton-X-100) and copper complexing capacity (CuCC) (24 nmol Cu2+/L) were measured in the area. All the values for DOC, POC, SAS and CuCC were significantly lower in the Albanian coastal waters than in the North Adriatic. The measurable influence of the inflowing Albanian rivers was observed from the inverse dependance of the DOC concentrations and salinity data. The Albanian rivers contribute to the elevated nutrient concentrations especially those of silicate, which displayed concentrations up to 380 μg/L in the shallowest coastal station.

  7. Mediterranean shelf-edge muddy contourites: examples from the Gela and South Adriatic basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdicchio, Giuseppe; Trincardi, Fabio

    2008-06-01

    We present new evidence of shallow-water muddy contourite drifts at two distinct locations in the central Mediterranean characterized by a relatively deep shelf edge (between 170 and 300 m below sea level): the south-eastern Adriatic margin and the north-western Sicily Channel. The growth of these shelf-edge contourite drifts is ascribed to the long-term impact of the Mediterranean themohaline circulation. The Levantine Intermediate Water flows continuously, with annual or inter-annual variations, and affects the shelf edge and the upper slope in both study areas. In addition, the SW Adriatic margin is impinged by the seasonally modulated off-shelf cascading of North Adriatic Dense Water. This water mass has formed ever since the large Adriatic continental shelf was drowned by the post-glacial sea-level rise. It energetically sweeps the entire slope from the shelf edge to the deep basin. These bottom currents flow parallel or oblique to the depth contours, and are laterally constricted along markedly erosional moats aligned parallel to the shelf edge where they increase in flow velocity. The internal geometry and growth patterns of the shelf-edge contourites reflect changes in oceanographic setting affecting the whole Mediterranean Sea. In particular, seismic correlation with published sediment cores documents that these deposits are actively growing and migrating during the present interglacial, implying an enhancement in bottom-water formation during intervals of relative sea-level rise and highstand. Regardless of the specific mechanisms of formation, sediment drifts in both study areas have been affected by widespread thin-skinned mass-wasting events during post-glacial times. Repeated mass-transport processes have affected in particular the downslope flank of the shelf-edge contourite drifts, indicating that these muddy deposits are prone to failure during, or soon after, their deposition.

  8. Coordination: Southeast continental shelf studies

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1989-01-26

    The objective of this investigation is to obtain model descriptions of the flow modifications in the Southeast Atlantic continental shelf due to Gulf Stream fluctuations and topographic effects. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Coordination: southeast continental shelf studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1981-02-01

    The objectives are to identify important physical, chemical and biological processes which affect the transfer of materials on the southeast continental shelf, determine important parameters which govern observed temporal and spatial varibility on the continental shelf, determine the extent and modes of coupling between events at the shelf break and nearshore, and determine physical, chemical and biological exchange rates on the inner shelf. Progress in meeting these research objectives is presented. (ACR)

  10. Shaping of the Southern Adriatic Continental Margin Through Widespread Mass Wasting and Bottom Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trincardi, F.; Cattaneo, A.; Correggiari, A.; Verdicchio, G.; Tobi, T.

    2003-12-01

    New TOBI seafloor images and VHR Chirp sonar profiles reveal widespread collapsing of the South Adriatic continental slope including: multiple overlapping slide scars affecting more than 100 km of Pleistocene regressive shelf-margin deposits below the shelf edge, extensive blocky slides on the lower slope (block sizes up to 200 x 500 m), and a basin wide acoustically-transparent deposit up to 40 m thick, buried under a late-Pleistocene-Holocene mud section, in water depths greater than 1000 m. Lateral variations in internal geometry and seafloor morphology likely reflects along margin differences in sediment composition and thickness of the mass-transport deposits and variable run outs (up to 40 km). Preliminary correlation to published cores in the area indicates that the main mass transport deposit reached the basin floor during the Last Glacial Maximum, but younger failures of smaller size may have affected the slope in more recent times. The new data show that the entire slope area is swept by bottom currents generating furrowed areas up to several tens of km2 in extent, moats on the downdrift side of seafloor irregularities (slide blocks) and preferential sediment deposition on the inferred updrift side, and growth of upslope-migrating sediment waves. In particular, two fields of sediment waves can be mapped in water depths of 400-600 and 1000 m. The former may reflect the activity of the Levantine Intermediate Waters, while the latter may be linked to the downslope flow of the Northern Adriatic Dense Waters. Future work will focus on the definition of intervals of growth vs quiescence of the sediment waves, their possible relation to paleoceanographic reconfigurations, and their interplay with seafloor irregularities dictated by slope instability. A smaller-scale possibly comparable interaction of seafloor morphology generated by sediment deformation and differential deposition of muddy deposits on the shelf emphasizes the importance of bottom

  11. 76 FR 2919 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and Supplemental Official Outer Continental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block Diagrams AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean... American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram and...

  12. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  13. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  14. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  15. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  16. 49 CFR 192.10 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 192.10 Section... shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf (as defined in the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act; 43 U.S.C. 1331) must identify on all their respective pipelines...

  17. Coordination: southeast continental shelf studies. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Menzel, D.W.

    1980-03-01

    The GABEX I experiment is designed to provide synoptic coverage of a series of Gulf Stream wave-like disturbances, the effect of these on the circulation of the entire shelf, and on biological and chemical processes. This study was initiated in February 1980 when current meter arrays were deployed. These meters will be removed in July 1980. In April three ships will simultaneously study the effects of Gulf Stream disturbances on the hydrography, chemistry, and biology of the shelf. One vessel will track a specific wave-like disturbance and provide synoptic coverage of the shelf area. The second vessel will determine the effect of shelf break processes on adjacent shelf water; and the third will study trace metal distributions in and outside of disturbances. Research progress is reported in continental shelf studies, nearshore and estuarine studies (diffusion of freshwater out of nearshore zone), tidal currents and material transport, and mixing of inlet plumes.

  18. Delta growth and river valleys: the influence of climate and sea level changes on the South Adriatic shelf (Mediterranean Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maselli, V.; Trincardi, F.; Asioli, A.; Ceregato, A.; Rizzetto, F.; Taviani, M.

    2014-09-01

    Incised valleys across continental margins represent the response of fluvial systems to changes in their equilibrium dynamics, mainly driven by base level fall forced by glacial-eustatic cycles. The Manfredonia Incised Valley formed during the last glacial sea level lowstand, when most of the southern Adriatic shelf was sub-aerially exposed but the outer shelf remained under water. The pronounced upstream deepening of the valley is ascribed to river incision of the MIS5e highstand coastal prism and related subaqueous clinoform under the influence of MIS5-4 sea level fluctuations, while the downstream shallowing and narrowing mainly reflects the impact of increased rates of sea level fall at the MIS3-2 transition on a flatter mid-outer shelf. Until 15 ka BP, the valley fed an asymmetric delta confined to the mid-outer shelf, testifying that continental and deep marine systems remained disconnected during the lowstand. Sea level rise reached the inner shelf during the Early Holocene, drowning the valley and leading to the formation of a sheltered embayment confined toward the land: at this time part of the incision remained underfilled with a marked bathymetric expression. This mini-basin was rapidly filled by sandy bayhead deltas, prograding from both the northern and southern sides of the valley. In this environment, protected by marine reworking and where sediment dispersal was less effective, the accommodation space was reduced and autogenic processes forced the formation of multiple and coalescing delta lobes. Bayhead delta progradations occurred in few centuries, between 8 and 7.2 ka cal BP, confirming the recent hypothesis that in this area the valley was filled during the formation of sapropel S1. This proximal valley fill, representing the very shallow-water equivalent of the cm-thick sapropel layers accumulated offshore in the deeper southern Adriatic basin, is of key importance in following the signature of the sapropel in a facies-tract ideally from the

  19. Elephant teeth from the atlantic continental shelf.

    PubMed

    Whitmore, F C; Emery, K O; Cooke, H B; Swift, D J

    1967-06-16

    Teeth of mastodons and mammoths have been recovered by fishermen from at least 40 sites on the continental shelf as deep as 120 meters. Also present are submerged shorelines, peat deposits, lagoonal shells, anz relict sands. Evidently elephants and other large mammals ranged this region during the glacial stage of low sea level of the last 25,000 years.

  20. Elephant teeth from the atlantic continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitmore, F.C.; Emery, K.O.; Cooke, H.B.S.; Swift, D.J.P.

    1967-01-01

    Teeth of mastodons and mastodons have been recovered by fishermen from at least 40 sites on the continental shelf as deep as 120 meters. Also present are submerged shorelines, peat deposits, lagoonal shells, and relict sands. Evidently elephants and other large mammals ranged this region during the glacial stage of low sea level of the last 25.000 years.

  1. 75 FR 61512 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-05

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement, Interior. ACTION... Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagrams (OPDs) located within Atlantic Ocean areas,...

  2. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  3. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  4. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  5. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  6. 49 CFR 195.9 - Outer continental shelf pipelines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outer continental shelf pipelines. 195.9 Section... HAZARDOUS LIQUIDS BY PIPELINE General § 195.9 Outer continental shelf pipelines. Operators of transportation pipelines on the Outer Continental Shelf must identify on all their respective pipelines the specific...

  7. Oceanography of the Southeastern Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This volume, the second in the Coastal and Estuarine Sciences series, provides a synthesis of the physical, chemical, and biological oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight (SAB). The results presented derive from a decade-long multidisciplinary investigation of the SAB continental shelf regime.The SAB extends from West Palm Beach, Fla., where the narrow south Florida shelf begins to broaden, to Cape Hatteras, N.C., where the shelf again narrows. This broad and shallow area is distinguished by the proximity of the Gulf Stream to the shelf break. Large contrasts in the distribution of properties, the strength of oceanic and atmospheric forces, and the high frequency (4-12 days) at which these forces vary have created a unique natural laboratory in which a variety of oceanic processes may be studied.

  8. Modeling the dynamics of continental shelf carbon.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Eileen E; Cahill, Bronwyn; Fennel, Katja; Friedrichs, Marjorie A M; Hyde, Kimberly; Lee, Cindy; Mannino, Antonio; Najjar, Raymond G; O'Reilly, John E; Wilkin, John; Xue, Jianhong

    2011-01-01

    Continental margin systems are important contributors to global nutrient and carbon budgets. Effort is needed to quantify this contribution and how it will be modified under changing patterns of climate and land use. Coupled models will be used to provide projections of future states of continental margin systems. Thus, it is appropriate to consider the limitations that impede the development of realistic models. Here, we provide an overview of the current state of modeling carbon cycling on continental margins as well as the processes and issues that provide the next challenges to such models. Our overview is done within the context of a coupled circulation-biogeochemical model developed for the northeastern North American continental shelf region. Particular choices of forcing and initial fields and process parameterizations are used to illustrate the consequences for simulated distributions, as revealed by comparisons to observations using quantitative statistical metrics.

  9. Iceberg scouring on the Norwegian continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Lien, R.

    1983-05-01

    This paper is a condensed version of parts of a Dr. ing. thesis to be presented during 1983. The first part of the paper deals with the regional distribution of iceberg scouring on the Norwegian continental shelf, and some general aspects related to it. The second part deals with iceberg scouring as a local phenomenon and its relation to the sea floor topography, sediment distribution, and geological and geotechnical properties of the sediments.

  10. Exploring the Shelf-slope Dynamics in the Adriatic Sea Using Numerical Models and Seismic Oceanography (SO)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-02

    dynamics in the Adriatic Sea using numerical models and seismic oceanography (SO) Andrea Bergamasco, Francesco M. Falcieri, Jeffrey W. Book, Sandro...sandro.carniel@ismar.cnr.it Dense shelf waters are formed and spread in the Adriatic Sea during winter periods, which dynamics are usually...high-resolution numerical model (ROMS) results was performed in two restricted areas of the Adriatic Sea : off the Gargano promontory and off the Bari

  11. 76 FR 54787 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block Diagrams AGENCY... revised North American Datum of 1927 (NAD 27) Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram,...

  12. 76 FR 7518 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-10

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska AGENCY... of the Outer Continental Shelf (``OCS'') Air Regulations. Requirements applying to OCS sources..., Intergovernmental relations, Nitrogen dioxide, Nitrogen oxides, Outer Continental Shelf, Ozone, Particulate...

  13. 78 FR 33859 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Geological and Geophysical Exploration Activities in the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ... Continental Shelf (OCS) Geological and Geophysical Exploration Activities in the Gulf of Mexico; Correction... in the Federal Register (78 FR 27427) entitled ``Outer Continental Shelf Geological and...

  14. Oceanology of the antarctic continental shelf: Volume 43

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, S.S.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the seas of the deep continental shelf, which play an important climatic role in sea ice production, deep ocean ventilation and wastage of the Antarctic ice sheet. This volume includes analyses of measurements taken from ships and satellites, and from sea ice and glacial ice. High resolution profiling equipment, long term bottom-moored instruments, continuous remote sensors, geochemical tracers and computer models have provided the basis for new insights into the continental shelf circulation. Color plates and an accompanying GEBCO Circum-Antarctic map effectively portray the continental shelf in relation to the glaciated continent, the sea ice and the surrounding Southern Ocean.

  15. Petroleum potential of northern Australian Continental Shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.R.; Ross, J.G.

    1986-11-01

    A study of the publicly available data from the offshore northern Australian continental shelf has shown that three prospective sedimentary sequences are present. A Cenozoic basin possibly containing Miocene reefal carbonates exists in the west part of the region, a structurally distinct Mesozoic basin containing thick sandstone intervals underlies the Cenozoic, and a thick paleozoic basin, possibly containing Devonian reefs and younger Paleozoic sandstone intervals, lies southeast of the Aru Archipelago and east of a north-northeast-trending ridge located along the eastern edges of the Aru and Timor Troughs. Paleozoic sediments also underlie the Mesozoic west of this ridge. The cenozoic and Mesozoic basins and the western Paleozoic subbasin are separated by major sequence boundaries. All the basins present hydrocarbon potential to a greater or lesser extent. The Mesozoic basin will probably be the prime target for exploration over the next few years, but secondary objectives in Cenozoic and Paleozoic sediments should not be ignored. The numerous different play types identified in this study, the positive signs from exploration in the early 1970s, the recent neighboring discoveries, and improvements in seismic data quality provide an incentive for oil companies to conduct detailed exploration of the area. 7 figures.

  16. Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing/Production Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    This annual report on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing and Production program summarizes receipts and expenditures, and includes information on OCS safety violations as reported by the US Coast Guard. 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Manganese, Iron, and sulfur cycling in Louisiana continental shelf sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfate reduction is considered the primary pathway for organic carbon remineralization on the northern Gulf of Mexico Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) where bottom waters are seasonally hypoxic, yet limited information is available on the importance of iron and manganese cyclin...

  18. Phytoplankton Communities in Louisiana coastal waters and the continental shelf

    EPA Science Inventory

    Louisiana coastal waters and the adjacent continental shelf receive large freshwater and nutrient inputs from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers, creating favorable conditions for increased phytoplankton productivity. To examine inshore-offshore patterns in phytoplankton comm...

  19. Late Quaternary transgressive large dunes on the sediment-starved Adriatic shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Correggiari, A.; Field, M.E.; Trincardi, F.

    1996-01-01

    The Adriatic epicontinental basin is a low-gradient shelf where the late-Quaternary transgressive systems tract (TST) is composed of thin parasequences of backbarrier, shoreface and offshore deposits. The facies and internal architecture of the late-Quaternary TST in the Adriatic epicontinental basin changed consistently from early transgression to late transgression reflecting: (1) fluctuations in the balance between sediment supply and accommodation increase, and (2) a progressive intensification of the oceanographic regime, driven by the transgressive widening of the basin to as much as seven times its lowstand extent. One of the consequences of this trend is that high-energy marine bedforms such as sand ridges and sand waves characterize only areas that were flooded close to the end of the late-Quaternary sea-level rise, when the wind fetch was maximum and bigger waves and stronger storm currents could form. We studied the morphology, sediment composition and sequence-stratigraphical setting of a field of asymmetric bedforms (typically 3 m high and 600 m in wavelength) in 20-24 m water depth offshore the Venice Lagoon in the sediment-starved North Adriatic shelf. The sand that forms these large dunes derived from a drowned transgressive coastal deposit reworked by marine processes. Early cementation took place over most of the dune crests limiting their activity and preventing their destruction. Both the formation and deactivation of this field of sand dunes occurred over a short time interval close to the turn-around point that separates the late-Quaternary sea-level rise and the following highstand and reflect rapid changes in the oceanographic regime of the basin.

  20. Potential for Suboxic Ammonium Oxidation in Louisiana Continental Shelf Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediments deposited onto the Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) west of the Mississippi River Delta form mobile muds varying in thickness from meters near the outfall to centimeters on the western portion of the shelf. The muds have high concentrations of iron which promote rapid...

  1. Sediment metabolism on the Louisiana continental shelf - Eldridge

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rates of aerobic and anaerobic sediment metabolism were measured on the Louisiana Continental Shelf during 5 cruises in 2006 and 2007. On each cruise, 3-4 stations were occupied in regions of the shelf that experience summer bottom-water hypoxia. Net DIC, O2, N2, and nutrient f...

  2. Macrofaunal production along the UK continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolam, S. G.; Barrio-Frojan, C. R. S.; Eggleton, J. D.

    2010-10-01

    Estimates of secondary production ( P/ B ratio and total production) by macrobenthic communities across the UK continental shelf are presented. Values for individual sampling stations varied from 0.21 to 4.1 y - 1 for community P/ B and 3.1 to 897.2 kJ m - 2 y - 1 for total production. Such data fills an important gap pertaining to our understanding of the spatial variation in production estimates for this region. Benthic production estimates varied primarily at small (inter-station) scales (24 nm), although larger-scale differences were observed. In general, the highest production estimates were exhibited by benthic communities in Cardigan Bay (Irish Sea) and East English Channel, while the lowest estimates were observed for the mid- and northern North Sea areas. The former were typified by shallow, gravelly areas of seabed which exhibit high bed tidal stress and do not thermally stratify during the summer months. On average, annelids contribute an overwhelming majority of the total production with different regions varying in the relative contributions from other phyla such as molluscs, crustaceans and echinoderms. Spatial heterogeneity of sediment granulometric variables occurred primarily between stations while those of other variables (e.g., depth, stratification, and tidal bed stress) were more regional. Although a large proportion of the spatial variation in secondary production estimates was not explained by environmental characteristics, the data indicate that such relationships are scale-dependent. Average bed temperature was a significant factor in creating some of the observed differences at large spatial scales. The possible reasons why a larger proportion of the variation in production estimates was not explained by the present study are presented.

  3. Seafloor geology of the Monterey Bay area continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eittreim, S.L.; Anima, R.J.; Stevenson, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Acoustic swath-mapping of the greater Monterey Bay area continental shelf from Point An??o Nuevo to Point Sur reveals complex patterns of rock outcrops on the shelf, and coarse-sand bodies that occur in distinct depressions on the inner and mid-shelves. Most of the rock outcrops are erosional cuestas of dipping Tertiary rocks that make up the bedrock of the surrounding lands. A mid-shelf mud belt of Holocene sediment buries the Tertiary rocks in a continuous, 6-km-wide zone on the northern Monterey Bay shelf. Rock exposures occur on the inner shelf, near tectonically uplifting highlands, and on the outer shelf, beyond the reach of the mud depositing on the mid-shelf since the Holocene sea-level rise. The sediment-starved shelf off the Monterey Peninsula and south to Point Sur has a very thin cover of Holocene sediment, and bedrock outcrops occur across the whole shelf, with Salinian granite outcrops surrounding the Monterey Peninsula. Coarse-sand deposits occur both bounded within low-relief rippled scour depressions, and in broad sheets in areas like the Sur Platform where fine sediment sources are limited. The greatest concentrations of coarse-sand deposits occur on the southern Monterey Bay shelf and the Sur shelf. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Seals map bathymetry of the Antarctic continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padman, Laurie; Costa, Daniel P.; Bolmer, S. Thompson; Goebel, Michael E.; Huckstadt, Luis A.; Jenkins, Adrian; McDonald, Birgitte I.; Shoosmith, Deborah R.

    2010-11-01

    We demonstrate the first use of marine mammal dive-depth data to improve maps of bathymetry in poorly sampled regions of the continental shelf. A group of 57 instrumented elephant seals made on the order of 2 × 105 dives over and near the continental shelf on the western side of the Antarctic Peninsula during five seasons, 2005-2009. Maximum dive depth exceeded 2000 m. For dives made near existing ship tracks with measured water depths H<700 m, ˜30% of dive depths were to the seabed, consistent with expected benthic foraging behavior. By identifying the deepest of multiple dives within small areas as a dive to the seabed, we have developed a map of seal-derived bathymetry. Our map fills in several regions for which trackline data are sparse, significantly improving delineation of troughs crossing the continental shelf of the southern Bellingshausen Sea.

  5. In search of the Malaysian Extended Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahaya, N. A. Z.; Musa, T. A.; Omar, K. M.; Din, A. H. M.; Abdullah, N. M.; Othman, A. H.; Wahab, M. I. A.

    2016-06-01

    Over the years, the sovereignty proclamation of Coastal States for their extended continental shelf has been a crucial matter. The declaration and extension of a continental shelf under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea provide significant potential for many developing nations in economics, trades, resource exploitation, communication and security. Hence, the application of satellite altimeter, as one of the solutions for collecting bathymetry data to define the approximate limits of the continental shelf, is reviewed. This paper also discusses the possible significance or contribution of space-derived bathymetry, i.e. the seafloor topography, either independently or harmoniously with different datasets, to meet the element of the Article 76 of UNCLOS.

  6. Sediment movement on the continental shelf near Washington and Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gross, M. Grant; Nelson, Jack L.

    1966-01-01

    The nuclides zinc-65 and cobalt-60 associated with river-borne particulate matter are incorporated in sediment on the Continental Shelf near the Colum- ia River. Changes in the relative concentrations of zinc-65 and cobalt-60 and in the ratio of the activity of zinc-65 and cobalt-60 suggest that radioactive sediment moves northward 12 to 30 kilometers per year along the shelf and 2.5 to 10 kilometers per year westward away from the coast.

  7. Circulation and exchange processes over the continental shelf and slope

    SciTech Connect

    Csanady, G.T.

    1988-01-01

    The theme of the work during the past triennium has been the SEEP experiment, data interpretation and modeling related to the goals of the experiment, and was characterized by increasing cooperation with colleagues from other disciplines. The theoretical contributions dealt with shelf-slope interaction, the dynamics and climatology of currents over the continental slope, and the behavior of fate of organic particles. Observational papers discussed various exchange mechanisms at the shelf edge, with special attention to particle exchange, and the quiescence of currents over the mid continental slope which is presumably responsible for the accumulation of organic particles.

  8. Uncovering the glacial history of the Irish continental shelf (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunlop, P.; Benetti, S.; OCofaigh, C.

    2013-12-01

    In 1999 the Irish Government initiated a €32 million survey of its territorial waters known as the Irish National Seabed Survey (INSS). The INSS is amongst the largest marine mapping programmes ever undertaken anywhere in the world and provides high-resolution multibeam, backscatter and seismic data of the seabed around Ireland. These data have been used to provide the first clear evidence for extensive glaciation of the continental shelf west and northwest of Ireland. Streamlined drumlins on the mid to outer shelf record former offshore-directed ice flow towards the shelf edge and show that the ice sheet was grounded in a zone of confluence where ice flowing onto the shelf from northwest Ireland merged with ice flowing across the Malin Shelf from southwest Scotland. The major glacial features on the shelf are well developed nested arcuate moraine systems that mark the position of the ice sheet margin and confirm that the former British Irish Ice Sheet was grounded as far as the shelf edge around 100 km offshore of west Donegal at the last glacial maximum. Distal to the moraines, on the outermost shelf, prominent zones of iceberg plough marks give way to the Barra/Donegal fan and a well developed system of gullies and canyons which incise the continental slope. Since 2008 several scientific cruises have retrieved cores from the shelf and slope to help build a more detailed understanding of glacial events in this region. This presentation will provide an overview of the glacial history of the Irish shelf and will discuss ongoing research programmes that are building on the initial research findings to produce a better understanding of the nature and timing of ice sheet events in this region.

  9. Microbial Communities in Sediments across the Louisiana Continental Shelf

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Louisiana continental Shelf (LCS) is a dynamic system that receives discharges from two large rivers. It has a stratified water column that is mixed by winter storms, hypoxic bottom water from spring to fall, and a muddy seafloor with highly mixed surficial sediments. Spatia...

  10. 75 FR 1076 - Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 5 (Friday, January 8, 2010)] [Notices] [Page 1076] [FR Doc No: 2010-119] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Minerals Management Service Outer Continental Shelf Civil Penalties AGENCY: Minerals Management Service (MMS), Interior. ACTION: Notice summarizing review of...

  11. Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program: comprehensive bibliography, January 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The bibliography lists reports from investigators of the Alaska Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program. Some non-program documents are also included. More than 3600 entries are sorted by author and citation number. Cross-references are available by Alaska region, discipline and research unit number.

  12. 77 FR 15382 - Outer Continental Shelf Scientific Committee; Notice of Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Outer Continental Shelf Scientific Committee; Notice of Renewal AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy... the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee (Committee). The Committee provides advice...

  13. 76 FR 43230 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Virginia

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Virginia AGENCY... Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Air Regulations. Requirements applying to OCS sources located within...

  14. Coastal zone and Continental Shelf conflict resolution: improving ocean use and resource dispute management

    SciTech Connect

    Nyhart, J.D.; Harding, E.T.

    1985-11-01

    Contents include: An overview of coastal zone and continental shelf conflicts; Experience in coastal zone management conflict; Future coastal zone conflicts; Outer continental shelf conflicts; Georges Bank and Gulf of Maine; and Future considerations.

  15. 75 FR 10809 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee-Notice of Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee--Notice of Renewal AGENCY: Minerals Management Service (MMS), Interior. ACTION: Notice of renewal of the Outer Continental Shelf Scientific...

  16. 26 CFR 301.9001 - Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf... Rules Application of Internal Revenue Laws § 301.9001 Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978. Section 302 of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of...

  17. 78 FR 4167 - Commercial Wind Lease Issuance on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Delaware

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Lease Issuance on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf... Availability of a Commercial Lease of Submerged Lands for Renewable Energy on the Outer Continental Shelf... (Bluewater) for an area of the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) offshore Delaware. The purpose of this notice...

  18. 76 FR 63654 - Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-13

    ... Doc No: 2011-26503] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf Official Protraction Diagram, Lease Maps, and Supplemental Official Outer Continental Shelf Block... American Datum of 1927 (NAD 27) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Official Protraction Diagram (OPD),...

  19. 75 FR 3392 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska AGENCY... 50.410. Requirements applying to Outer Continental Shelf (``OCS'') sources located within 25 miles of..., Intergovernmental relations, Nitrogen dioxide, Nitrogen oxides, Outer Continental Shelf, Ozone, Particulate...

  20. 26 CFR 301.9001 - Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf... Rules Application of Internal Revenue Laws § 301.9001 Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978. Section 302 of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of...

  1. 76 FR 2254 - Notice of Arrival on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 146 RIN 1625-AB28 Notice of Arrival on the Outer Continental Shelf AGENCY... Continental Shelf (OCS) Activities to enhance maritime domain safety and security awareness on the OCS by... Arrival. NOA OCS Notice of Arrival on the Outer Continental Shelf. NPRM Notice of Proposed...

  2. 26 CFR 301.9001 - Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf... Rules Application of Internal Revenue Laws § 301.9001 Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978. Section 302 of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of...

  3. 26 CFR 1.1402(a)-12 - Continental shelf and certain possessions of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Continental shelf and certain possessions of... Income § 1.1402(a)-12 Continental shelf and certain possessions of the United States. (a) Certain... amounts are excluded from gross income under section 931. (b) Continental shelf. For the definition of...

  4. 76 FR 37274 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Alaska AGENCY... of the Outer Continental Shelf (``OCS'') Air Regulations proposed in the Federal Register on February..., Nitrogen oxides, Outer Continental Shelf, Ozone, Particulate matter, Permits, Reporting and...

  5. 26 CFR 301.9001 - Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf... Rules Application of Internal Revenue Laws § 301.9001 Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978. Section 302 of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of...

  6. 26 CFR 1.1402(a)-12 - Continental shelf and certain possessions of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Continental shelf and certain possessions of... Income § 1.1402(a)-12 Continental shelf and certain possessions of the United States. (a) Certain... amounts are excluded from gross income under section 931. (b) Continental shelf. For the definition of...

  7. 26 CFR 1.1402(a)-12 - Continental shelf and certain possessions of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Continental shelf and certain possessions of... Income § 1.1402(a)-12 Continental shelf and certain possessions of the United States. (a) Certain... amounts are excluded from gross income under section 931. (b) Continental shelf. For the definition of...

  8. 75 FR 51950 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Massachusetts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Massachusetts AGENCY... portion of the Outer Continental Shelf (``OCS'') Air Regulations. Requirements applying to OCS sources... established requirements to control air pollution from Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) sources in order...

  9. 26 CFR 1.1402(a)-12 - Continental shelf and certain possessions of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Continental shelf and certain possessions of... Income § 1.1402(a)-12 Continental shelf and certain possessions of the United States. (a) Certain... amounts are excluded from gross income under section 931. (b) Continental shelf. For the definition of...

  10. 26 CFR 301.9001 - Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf... Rules Application of Internal Revenue Laws § 301.9001 Statutory provisions; Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of 1978. Section 302 of the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Amendments of...

  11. 26 CFR 1.1402(a)-12 - Continental shelf and certain possessions of the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Continental shelf and certain possessions of....1402(a)-12 Continental shelf and certain possessions of the United States. (a) Certain possessions. For... from gross income under section 931. (b) Continental shelf. For the definition of the term...

  12. Heat flow of the Norwegian continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial heat flow influences a large collection of geological processes. Its determination is a requirement to assess the economic potential of deep sedimentary basins. Published heat flow calculations from e.g. major oil provinces are however seldom. Robust heat flow determinations in drillholes require logging of undisturbed temperatures and intensive sampling of core material for petrophysical measurements. Temperature logging in exploration drillholes is traditionally conducted during drill breaks or shortly after drilling, resulting in temperatures severely disturbed by mud circulation and coring is restricted to selected intervals. Alternatively, test temperatures, information from electric logs and lithological descriptions of drill cuttings can be used to overcome these limitations. The present contribution introduces new heat flow determinations based on 63 exploration drillholes from the Norwegian North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin and the Barents Shelf. Our analyses are based on released DST temperatures, precise lithological descriptions of drill cuttings, previously measured rock matrix thermal conductivities and established porosity laws. Our results suggest median heat flow values of 64 mW/m2, 65 mW/m2 and 72 mW/m2 for the North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin (mainly the Trøndelag Platform) and the SW Barents Shelf respectively. The Barents Shelf shows significantly high heat flow, suggesting lateral transfer of heat from the mantle of the adjacent young ocean. In detail, heat flow increases by ~ 10 mW/m2 from the southern Norwegian North Sea towards the Mid Norway Margin. This result appears to be in very good agreement with seismic tomographic studies suggesting northward thinning of the underlying mantle lithosphere. Our results together with published marine heat flow data from the Mid Norway Margin suggest a gradual decrease in heat flow levels from both the North Sea and the Trøndelag Platform towards the centres of the deep Møre and V

  13. Structure and development of the southern Moroccan continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dillon, William P.

    1974-01-01

    The structure of the continental shelf off southern Morocco was studied by means of 2,100 km of seismic reflection profiles, magnetic and bathymetric surveys, and dredge samples. The research area lies off four geologic divisions adjacent to the coast: the Atlas Mountains; the Souss Trough; the Anti-Atlas Mountains; and the Aaiun Basin. The continental shelf, along with the western Atlas Mountains, the western Souss Trough, and the entire Aaiun Basin, has subsided along a normal fault-flexure system. This system runs along the shore at the Anti-Atlas Mountains, and cuts off this cratonic block from the shelf subsidence. The shelf is narrow and characterized by out-building off the Anti-Atlas range, whereas it is broader and characterized by upbuilding to the north and south. Deposition was essentially continuous at least from Early Cretaceous through Eocene time. Published work suggests that the last cycle of sedimentation began during Permian rifting. After Eocene time, most sediments carried to the shelf must have bypassed it and gone to construct the slope and rise or to the deep sea. Tertiary orogenies caused extensive folding of Mesozoic and early Tertiary deposits off the Atlas Mountains. ?? 1974.

  14. Heat Flow of the Norwegian Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, C.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial heat flow determination is of prime interest for oil industry because it impacts directly maturation histories and economic potential of oil fields. Published systematic heat flow determinations from major oil provinces are however seldom. Robust heat flow determinations in drillholes require logging of undisturbed temperatures and intensive sampling of core material for petrophysical measurements. Temperature logging in exploration drillholes is traditionally conducted during drill breaks or shortly after drilling, resulting in temperatures severely disturbed by mud circulation and coring is restricted to selected intervals. Alternatively, test temperatures, information from electric logs and lithological descriptions of drill cuttings can be used to overcome these limitations. The present contribution introduces new heat flow determinations based on 63 exploration drillholes from the Norwegian North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin and the Barents Shelf. Our analyses are based on released DST temperatures, precise lithological descriptions of drill cuttings, previously measured rock matrix thermal conductivities and established porosity laws. For the sake of comparison, we carefully review previous heat flow studies carried out both onshore and offshore Norway. Our results suggest median heat flow values of 64 mW/m2, 65 mW/m2 and 72 mW/m2 for the North Sea, the Mid Norway Margin (mainly the Trøndelag Platform) and the SW Barents Shelf respectively. In detail, heat flow increases by ~ 10 mW/m2 from the southern Norwegian North Sea towards the Mid Norway Margin. This result appears to be in very good agreement with seismic tomographic studies suggesting northward thinning of the underlying mantle lithosphere. Our results together with published marine heat flow data from the Mid Norway Margin suggest a gradual decrease in heat flow levels from both the North Sea and the Trøndelag Platform towards the centres of the deep Møre and Vøring basins. This latter

  15. Insights on Continental Collisional Processes from GPS Data: Dynamics of the Peri-Adriatic Belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metois, Marianne; D'Agostino, Nicola; Avallone, Antonio; Chamot-Rooke, Nicolas; Rabaute, Alain; Duni, Llambro; Kuka, Neki; Koci, Rexhep; Georgiev, Ivan

    2015-04-01

    Recent advances in GPS technology and processing strategies make now spatial geodesy a suitable tool to image intra-continental slowly deforming areas such as collisional mountain belts and to get further insights on their kinematics and dynamics. Here, using the peri-Adriatic belts as a test case, we propose a methodology based on accurate GPS velocities to discriminate whether the current day deformation pattern over a mountain belt is controlled at the first order by gravity through gradients of gravitational potential energy. We calculate a new GPS velocity field covering the peri-Adriatic region and the entire Balkan Peninsula, taking advantage of newly available measurements coming from private networks operating since several years in this area. Based on these velocities, we derive the strain rate tensor and an interpolated velocity field using the method of Haines & Holt (1993). Opposite to the commonly accepted hypothesis considering the Balkans as part of the stable Eurasia, we show that the peninsula experiences significant compression across the Dinarides belt and extension toward the Aegean domain South of 44°N. We image a clockwise rotation of the entire peninsula around North Albania, and propose that the lithosphere under the old Scutari-Peck transform zone is weak and acts as a pivot point for this rotation since early Miocene. The Hellenic slab suction and the release of stress in the northern Hellenides subduction zone may favour the southwestward motion of the inner Balkan lithosphere, flowing between the rigid Apulia and Black sea blocks consequently. Because our velocity field is unusually dense in Slovenia and Austria, we picture the Eastern Alps deformation with great details and show that the Austrian Alps are moving eastward together with the Alpine foreland and Bohemian Promontory relative to stable Eurasia. Based on these new GPS data, we investigate the dynamics of the peri-Adriatic mountain belts, in particular of Albania and Eastern

  16. Modelisation of Circulation On The French Guiana Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, C.; Dekeyser, I.; Ramamonjiarisoa, A.; Baklouti, M.; van Nieuwerberg, V.

    The continental shelf which extends more over than 1000 km to the north-west of the mouth of the Amazon river is an usual oceanographic environment : the entire area is influenced by fresh water flowing from the Amazon. The current on the shelf inter- acts with the strong, shallow Guiana Current along the outer shelf area. The prevailing trade winds across the area impose surface stresses. The tidal influence is also signif- icant with a diminishing amplitude from the Amazon to the north. This combination results in a persistent long-shore current flowing north-westward in the shallow wa- ter along the shore. In particular on French Guiana continental shelf, the combination of significant stratification, great coastal current just out of the shelf, influence of the wind and strong tidal component presents an interesting process for study. The purpose of this study is to look into the circulation that develops under these interacting forces. For that, we develop a numerical model of the circulation on the French Guiana shelf. Nowadays, in the bibliography, it seems to be the first numerical study on this area. This work is included in the Programme National dSEnvironnement Côtier (PNEC) in French Guiana. Simulations described the coastal currents, the salinity and temperature evolution on the shelf under the influence of rivers discharging in the shelf and the effect of north- eastward wind on the circulation. The current is parallel to the coast and the highest velocities are in the middle of the shelf, the maximum intensity is located at the surface and reached speed of 1m/s. The fresh water discharged by rivers extends alongshore near the coast, to about 30m-isobath, whereas the fresh water coming from the Ama- zon spreads out essentially in the middle of the shelf. The halocline is situated few meters (between 2 and 5 m) under the surface, with a lower salinity at the south-east boundary which is 20 and which is 25 at the north-west boundary, whereas, the

  17. Comparison of marine productivity among Outer Continental Shelf planning areas

    SciTech Connect

    Darnell, R.M.

    1991-04-01

    Continental Shelf Associates was contracted to update and expand an earlier work on a comparison of primary productivity among Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) planning areas. The update consists of four general objectives. This report addresses the fourth objective, the potential to use measures of marine secondary productivity in determining relative rankings of the OCS planning area. Ideally, comparisons of secondary productivity among diverse geographic areas would take an ecosystem perspective. However, there is not enough ecosystem-level understanding to allow a comparison on that basis. The report focuses on individual species and group of species. Zooplankton and benthic communities represent major portions of the marine ecosystems and would be the preferred subjects for comparative studies. At this time comparisons of secondary productivity among planning areas would be difficult with existing databases. It is unlikely this situation will improve in the near future.

  18. Fisheries and oil development on the continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Benner, C.S.; Middleton, R.W.

    1991-01-01

    The title of this volume is misleading because it has not clearly defined the geographic limits of the continental shelf. However, a glance at the Contents makes it clear that the contributions to this symposium are restricted to some shelf areas of the continental USA and especially to the Beaufort Sea off the north coast of Alaska. These papers were derived from presentations at the 119th annual meeting of the American Fisheries Society held in Anchorage, Alaska, in 1989. An awareness of the geographic scope of this symposium helps to put its contents into better focus. It is apparent that a broad coverage of fisheries, oil development, and its probable consequences from a global or even North American perspective is not provided. With the exception of the first 38 pages covering a broad range of topics, the remaining 134 pages are devoted exclusively to the Beaufort Sea.

  19. Carbon Dynamics on the Louisiana Continental Shelf and Cross-Shelf Feeding of Hypoxia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Large-scale hypoxia regularly develops during the summer on the Louisiana continental shelf. Traditionally, hypoxia has been linked to the vast winter and spring nutrient inputs from the Mississippi River and its distributary, the Atchafalaya River. However, recent studies indica...

  20. Acoustic Propagation in Continental Shelf Break and Slope Environments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    goal of the research is to increase the physical understanding of acoustic propagation in continental shelf and slope environments in the 50-4000 Hz...band. This includes both the physics of the seabed and the coupling to physical mechanisms in the water column in complex range- and azimuth-dependent...combined study of statistical inference and the effects of seabed layering is expected to relate propagation statistics to physical mechanisms on

  1. Pleistocene mammals from the southern Brazilian continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Renato Pereira; Buchmann, Francisco Sekiguchi

    2011-02-01

    Fossils of terrestrial mammals preserved in submarine environment have been recorded in several places around the world. In Brazil such fossils are rather abundant in the southernmost portion of the coast, associated to fossiliferous concentrations at depths up to 10 m. Here is presented a review of such occurrences and the first record of fossils in deeper areas of the continental shelf. The fossils encompass several groups of both extinct and extant mammals, and exhibit several distinct taphonomic features, related to the marine environment. Those from the inner continental shelf are removed and transported from the submarine deposits to the coast during storm events, thus forming large konzentrat-lagerstätte on the beach, called “Concheiros”. The only fossils from deeper zones of the shelf known so far are a portion of a skull, a left humerus and of a femur of Toxodon sp. and a lower right molar of a Stegomastodon waringi, all collected by fishermen at depths around 20 m. The presence of fossils at great depths and distances from the present coastline, without signs of abrasion and far from areas of fluvial discharges does indicate that these remains have not been transported from the continent to the shelf, but have been preserved directly on the area that today correspond to the continental shelf. These remains indicate the existence of large fossiliferous deposits that have developed during periods of sea-level lowstand (glacial maxima) and have been submerged and reworked by the sea-level rise at the end of the last glaciation.

  2. Depositional history of Louisiana-Mississippi outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kindinger, J.L.; Miller, R.J.; Stelting, C.E.

    1982-01-01

    A geological study was undertaken in 1981 in the Louisiana-Mississippi outer continental shelf for the Bureau of Land Management. The study included a high-resolution seismic reflection survey, surficial sediment sampling and surface current drifter sampling. Approximately 7100 sq km of the Louisiana-Mississippi shelf and upper slope were surveyed. The sea floor of the entire area is relatively smooth except for occasional areas of uplift produced by diapiric intrusion along the upper slope. Characteristics of the topography and subsurface shelf sediments are the result of depositional sequences due to delta outbuilding over transgressive sediments with intervening periods of erosion during low sea level stands. Little evidence of structural deformation such as faults, diapirs, and shallow gas is present on the shelf and only a few minor faults and scarps are found on the slope. Minisparker seismic records in combination with air gun (40 and 5 cu in) and 3.5-kHz subbottom profile records reveal that seven major stages of shelf development have occurred since the middle Pleistocene. The shelf development has been controlled by the rise and fall of sea level. These stages are defined by four major unconformities, several depositions of transgressive sediments, sequences of river channeling and progradational delta deposits. Surficial sediment sample and seismic records indicate tat the last major depositional event was the progradation of the St. Bernard Delta lobe. This delta lobe covered the northwestern and central regions. Surficial sediments in most of the study area are the product of the reworking of the San Bernard Delta lobe and previous progradations.

  3. Southeastern U.S.A. Continental Shelf Respiratory Rates Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheldon, Joan E.; Griffith, Peter C.; Peters Francesc; Sheldon, Wade M., Jr.; Blanton, Jackson O.; Amft, Julie; Pomeroy, Lawrence R.

    2010-01-01

    Respiratory rates on the U. S. southeastern continental shelf have been estimated several times by different investigators, most recently by Jiang et al. (Biogeochemistry 98:101-113, 2010) who report lower mean rates thanwere found in earlier work and attribute the differences to analytical error in all methods used in earlier studies. The differences are, instead, attributable to the differences in the geographical scope of the studies. The lower estimates of regional organic carbon flux of Jiang et al. (Biogeochemistry 98:101-113, 2010) are a consequence of their extrapolation of data from a small portion of the shelf to the entire South Atlantic Bight. This comment examines the methodologies used as well as the variability of respiratory rates in this region over space and time.

  4. Bryozoans from rio grande do sul continental shelf, southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Laís V; Calliari, Lauro

    2015-05-06

    The continental shelf of Rio Grande do Sul (RS) is predominantly composed of unconsolidated sediments with a few hard substrates represented principally by beachrock. In this area there are elongate deposits of shell gravel material which are interpreted as indicators of the palaeo-shorelines. These Pleistocene deposits are overlapped by Holocene sediments (Recent), but are exposed during erosive events caused by extra-tropical cyclones, which provide the mixture of both sediments mainly during autumn and winter. The few studies on bryozoans made in this area previously recorded seven species, one fossil and the other six from Recent fluvial and marine environments. The aim of the present study was to describe the eight most abundant bryozoan species that occur in the inner RS shelf. Of these, four are new records for RS State (Arachnopusia aff. pusae, Hippomonavella brasiliensis, Turbicellepora pourtalesi, and Lifuella gorgonensis), and the other four are new to science (Chaperia taylori, Micropora nodimagna, Cellaria riograndensis, and Exochella moyani).

  5. The continental shelf benthic iron flux and its isotope composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severmann, Silke; McManus, James; Berelson, William M.; Hammond, Douglas E.

    2010-07-01

    Benthic iron fluxes from sites along the Oregon-California continental shelf determined using in situ benthic chambers, range from less than 10 μmol m -2 d -1 to values in excess of ˜300 μmol m -2 d -1. These fluxes are generally greater than previously published iron fluxes for continental shelves contiguous with the open ocean (as opposed to marginal seas, bays, or estuaries) with the highest fluxes measured in the regions around the high-sediment discharge Eel River and the Umpqua River. These benthic iron fluxes do not covary with organic carbon oxidation rates in any systematic fashion, but rather seem to respond to variations in bottom water oxygen and benthic oxygen demand. We hypothesize that the highest rates of benthic iron efflux are driven, in part, by the greater availability of reactive iron deposited along these river systems as compared to other more typical continental margin settings. Bioirrigation likely plays an important role in the benthic Fe flux in these systems as well. However, the influence of bottom water oxygen concentrations on the iron flux is significant, and there appears to be a threshold in dissolved oxygen (˜60-80 μM), below which sediment-ocean iron exchange is enhanced. The isotope composition of this shelf-derived benthic iron is enriched in the lighter isotopes, and appears to change by ˜3‰ (δ 56Fe) during the course of a benthic chamber experiment with a mean isotope composition of -2.7 ± 1.1‰ (2 SD, n = 9) by the end of the experiment. This average value is slightly heavier than those from two high benthic Fe flux restricted basins from the California Borderland region where δ 56Fe is -3.4 ± 0.4‰ (2 SD, n = 3). These light iron isotope compositions support previous ideas, based on sediment porewater analyses, suggesting that sedimentary iron reduction fractionates iron isotopes and produces an isotopically light iron pool that is transferred to the ocean water column. In sum, our data suggest that

  6. Surficial sediments on the western Canadian continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornhold, Brian D.; Barrie, J. Vaughn

    1991-08-01

    The active continental margin off western Canada is characterized in the south by convergence between the Explorer and Juan de Fuca Plates and the America Plate, and in the north by transform fault motion between the Pacific and America Plates along the Queen Charlotte Fault. Except in some of the deepest troughs and basins shelf sediments are dominated by immature lithic arenites reflecting this tectonic setting. The Vancouver Island shelf is from 5 to 75 km wide and displays complex topography on the inner shelf and a relatively featureless mid- and outer shelf. An exception is the area off southwestern Vancouver Island where large basins bounded by morainal deposits extend more than two-thirds of the distance across the shelf. The shelf edge varies from 180 to 225 m depth and is indented by numerous canyons. Nearshore sediments consist mainly of gravels and boulders and become finer offshore such that muds are slowly accumulating in depths greater than 100 m. Off northwestern Vancouver Island calcareous sediments are abundant with carbonate values often exceeding 75%. High wave and current energies and efficient sediment trapping in coastal fiords have resulted in low rates of accumulation. Olive, glauconitic, Holocene muds and muddy sands are generally less than 0.3 m thick and accumulate only on the outer shelf over an extensive stiff, gray, glaciomarine sandy mud. Queen Charlotte Sound exhibits three broad, shallow, glacially scoured troughs, filled mainly with clayey silts and fine sands and separated by sand and gravel covered banks. Hecate Strait, between the Queen Charlotte Islands and the mainland, consists of a prominent southward-opening trough along the east side of the Strait bounded by Dogfish and Laskeek Banks on the west adjacent to Graham and Moresby Islands, respectively. The trough below 200 m is filled by silts. The banks are covered by discontinuous sands and gravels of variable calcareous content. The bank edges often display megaripples and

  7. Continental shelf benthos off Otago Peninsula, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probert, P. Keith; Wilson, John B.

    1984-09-01

    Benthic macrofauna of the continental shelf off Otago Peninsula, south-eastern New Zealand (45°51'S, 170°52'E) was surveyed by dredge sampling during 1973-1975. Numerical classification (Canberra metric coefficient and flexible sorting) was used to produce site groups and species groups, and three major benthic communities were recognised: a shallow-water (14-25 m) fauna inhabiting well-sorted fine sand, a mid-shelf fauna (concentrated in the depth range 50-76 m) associated with sediments containing the greatest proportions of gravel and siltclay, and a predominantly sand-bottom fauna occurring mainly on the outer shelf (87-150 m). All station groups were dominated numerically by polychaetes (mean of 36·6-56% of individuals) with Mollusca (13·8-25%) or Crustacea (12·1-19·4%) the next most abundant group. The inshore sand fauna was the most distinct, characteristic elements being the trochid gastropod Antisolarium egenum, an amphipod of the genus Hippomedon and dense patches of the spionid polychaete Spiophanes bombyx. Diagnostic species of the mid-shelf mixed sediments were Lepidonotus jacksoni, Psammolyce antipoda, Lumbrineris brevicirra and Phyllamphicteis foliata (Polychaeta), Terenochiton otagoensis, Micrelenchus caelatus caelatus, Maoricolpus roseus roseus and Zegalerus tenuis (Mollusca), Ampelisca chiltoni (Amphipoda) and Amphipholis squamata (Ophiuroidea). Outer shelf sand stations were faunally less distinct, but among the more characteristic species were Euthalenessa fimbriata, Sigalion sp. and Euchone sp. (Polychaeta) and Gari stangeri (Bivalvia). Several abundant species were widely distributed among station groups, notably Nephtys macroura, Lumbrineris magalhaensis, Phyllochaetopterus socialis and Owenia fusiformis (Polychaeta) and Nucula nitidula and Tawera spissa (Bivalvia). Free-living lunulitiform Bryozoa of the genus Otionella were a characteristic component of inner and outer shelf sand faunas, and their inshore penetration probably marks

  8. Sources and Distribution of Organic Matter in Sediments of the Louisiana Continental Shelf

    EPA Science Inventory

    Both riverine and marine sources of organic matter (OM) contribute to sediment organic pools, and either source can contribute significantly to sediment accumulation, burial, and remineralization rates on river dominated continental shelf systems. For the Louisiana continental sh...

  9. Dense water generation on a shelf: the case of the Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilibić, Ivica; Supić, Nastjenjka

    2005-12-01

    The paper overviews recent and past studies of preconditioning, generation and spreading of North Adriatic Dense Water (NAdDW), by analysing both transient episodes and climatological data. The importance of wind stress, heat and water fluxes, and particularly river discharges during the preconditioning and generative period is emphasized, as well as the advection of saline levantine intermediate water from the southeast. After the generation, NAdDW affects deep and bottom layers of the middle and south Adriatic Sea, flowing as a dense current and mixing with the adjacent waters; it can be traced even in the Otranto Strait, contributing to the formation of deep water in the Eastern Mediterranean. Objective shortcomings and the projections in NAdDW investigations are also discussed, due to their high importance in the circulation of the Adriatic Sea, which may relate other similar basins around the world.

  10. Law of the sea, the continental shelf, and marine research

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Rowland, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    The question of the amount of seabed to which a coastal nation is entitled is addressed in the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS). This treaty, ratified by 153 nations and in force since 1994, specifies national obligations, rights, and jurisdiction in the oceans, and it allows nations a continental shelf out to at least 200 nautical miles or to a maritime boundary. Article 76 (A76) of the convention enables coastal nations to establish their continental shelves beyond 200 nautical miles and therefore to control, among other things, access for scientific research and the use of seabed resources that would otherwise be considered to lie beyond national jurisdiction. To date, seven submissions for extended continental shelves (ECS) have been filed under UNCLOS (Table 1). These submissions have begun to define the ambiguities in A76. How these ambiguities are resolved into final ECS boundaries will probably set important precedents guiding the future delimitation of the ECS by the United States, which has not ratified the convention, and other coastal nations. This report uses examples from the first three submissions—by the Russian Federation, Brazil, and Australia—to identify outstanding issues encountered in applying A76 to ECS delimitation.

  11. 77 FR 24980 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY... from bidding with any entity in any other of the following groups at Outer Continental Shelf oil...

  12. 77 FR 27480 - Outer Continental Shelf Scientific Committee; Announcement of Plenary Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf Scientific Committee; Announcement of Plenary...: The Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee (SC) will meet at the Fess Parker's...

  13. 78 FR 64243 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY... from bidding with any entity in any of the other following groups at Outer Continental Shelf oil...

  14. 75 FR 9780 - Technical Amendment to the Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Technical Amendment to the Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency... Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations for Alaska. DATES: Effective on March 22, 2010. FOR...

  15. 76 FR 67759 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY... from bidding with any entity in any other of the following groups at Outer Continental Shelf oil...

  16. 77 FR 64826 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY... with any entity in any of the other following groups at Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas lease...

  17. 78 FR 27430 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY... from bidding with any entity in any of the other following groups at Outer Continental Shelf oil...

  18. 75 FR 51968 - Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Massachusetts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 55 Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations Consistency Update for Massachusetts AGENCY... update to a portion of the Outer Continental Shelf (``OCS'') Air Regulations. Requirements applying...

  19. 76 FR 4129 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and... any entity in any other of the following groups at Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas lease sales...

  20. 78 FR 25100 - Outer Continental Shelf Scientific Committee; Announcement of Plenary Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf Scientific Committee; Announcement of Plenary...: The Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee (SC) will meet at the Marriott Downtown...

  1. 75 FR 24966 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Minerals Management Service Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY: Minerals... in any other of the following groups at Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas lease sales to be...

  2. 76 FR 28449 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) Notice on Outer Continental Shelf... with any entity in any other of the following groups at Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas lease...

  3. 77 FR 57572 - Notice of Arrival on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-18

    ... proposed changes to the computer application for electronic Notice of Arrival (NOA) on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). The Coast Guard NOA-OCS program currently requires NOA information for those vessels... of Arrival (NOA) on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) final rule [Docket No. USCG-2008-1088] (76...

  4. Estimated oil and gas reserves, Southern California outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ballantyne, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    Remaining recoverable reserves of oil* and gas in the Outer Continental Shelf off Southern California are estimated to be 968 million barrels of oil and 1,851 billion cubic feet of gas as of December 31, 1982. These reserves are attributed to 14 fields. Original recoverable reserves from these fields are estimated at 1,217 million barrels of oil and 1,983 billion cubic feet of gas. The estimates for both the remaining and the original recoverable reserves of oil and gas are higher than the corresponding estimates for December 31, 1981. Reserve estimates for 12 fields were based on volumetric reservoir studies. Decline-curve and volumetric analyses were used for the remaining two fields. Six fields were on production at year's end and a gas field is scheduled to commence production in 1983. *The term 'oil' as used in this report includes crude oil, condensate, and gas-plant liquids.

  5. Assessment of marine debris on the Belgian Continental Shelf.

    PubMed

    Van Cauwenberghe, Lisbeth; Claessens, Michiel; Vandegehuchte, Michiel B; Mees, Jan; Janssen, Colin R

    2013-08-15

    A comprehensive assessment of marine litter in three environmental compartments of Belgian coastal waters was performed. Abundance, weight and composition of marine debris, including microplastics, was assessed by performing beach, sea surface and seafloor monitoring campaigns during two consecutive years. Plastic items were the dominant type of macrodebris recorded: over 95% of debris present in the three sampled marine compartments were plastic. In general, concentrations of macrodebris were quite high. Especially the number of beached debris reached very high levels: on average 6429±6767 items per 100 m were recorded. Microplastic concentrations were determined to assess overall abundance in the different marine compartments of the Belgian Continental Shelf. In terms of weight, macrodebris still dominates the pollution of beaches, but in the water column and in the seafloor microplastics appear to be of higher importance: here, microplastic weight is approximately 100 times and 400 times higher, respectively, than macrodebris weight.

  6. Potential alternative energy technologies on the Outer Continental Shelf.

    SciTech Connect

    Elcock, D.; Environmental Assessment

    2007-04-20

    This technical memorandum (TM) describes the technology requirements for three alternative energy technologies for which pilot and/or commercial projects on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) are likely to be proposed within the next five to seven years. For each of the alternative technologies--wind, wave, and ocean current--the TM first presents an overview. After each technology-specific overview, it describes the technology requirements for four development phases: site monitoring and testing, construction, operation, and decommissioning. For each phase, the report covers the following topics (where data are available): facility description, electricity generated, ocean area (surface and bottom) occupied, resource requirements, emissions and noise sources, hazardous materials stored or used, transportation requirements, and accident potential. Where appropriate, the TM distinguishes between pilot-scale (or demonstration-scale) facilities and commercial-scale facilities.

  7. Habitat Specialization in Tropical Continental Shelf Demersal Fish Assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Ben M.; Harvey, Euan S.; Heyward, Andrew J.; Twiggs, Emily J.; Colquhoun, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    The implications of shallow water impacts such as fishing and climate change on fish assemblages are generally considered in isolation from the distribution and abundance of these fish assemblages in adjacent deeper waters. We investigate the abundance and length of demersal fish assemblages across a section of tropical continental shelf at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia, to identify fish and fish habitat relationships across steep gradients in depth and in different benthic habitat types. The assemblage composition of demersal fish were assessed from baited remote underwater stereo-video samples (n = 304) collected from 16 depth and habitat combinations. Samples were collected across a depth range poorly represented in the literature from the fringing reef lagoon (1–10 m depth), down the fore reef slope to the reef base (10–30 m depth) then across the adjacent continental shelf (30–110 m depth). Multivariate analyses showed that there were distinctive fish assemblages and different sized fish were associated with each habitat/depth category. Species richness, MaxN and diversity declined with depth, while average length and trophic level increased. The assemblage structure, diversity, size and trophic structure of demersal fishes changes from shallow inshore habitats to deeper water habitats. More habitat specialists (unique species per habitat/depth category) were associated with the reef slope and reef base than other habitats, but offshore sponge-dominated habitats and inshore coral-dominated reef also supported unique species. This suggests that marine protected areas in shallow coral-dominated reef habitats may not adequately protect those species whose depth distribution extends beyond shallow habitats, or other significant elements of demersal fish biodiversity. The ontogenetic habitat partitioning which is characteristic of many species, suggests that to maintain entire species life histories it is necessary to protect corridors of connected

  8. Habitat specialization in tropical continental shelf demersal fish assemblages.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Ben M; Harvey, Euan S; Heyward, Andrew J; Twiggs, Emily J; Colquhoun, Jamie

    2012-01-01

    The implications of shallow water impacts such as fishing and climate change on fish assemblages are generally considered in isolation from the distribution and abundance of these fish assemblages in adjacent deeper waters. We investigate the abundance and length of demersal fish assemblages across a section of tropical continental shelf at Ningaloo Reef, Western Australia, to identify fish and fish habitat relationships across steep gradients in depth and in different benthic habitat types. The assemblage composition of demersal fish were assessed from baited remote underwater stereo-video samples (n = 304) collected from 16 depth and habitat combinations. Samples were collected across a depth range poorly represented in the literature from the fringing reef lagoon (1-10 m depth), down the fore reef slope to the reef base (10-30 m depth) then across the adjacent continental shelf (30-110 m depth). Multivariate analyses showed that there were distinctive fish assemblages and different sized fish were associated with each habitat/depth category. Species richness, MaxN and diversity declined with depth, while average length and trophic level increased. The assemblage structure, diversity, size and trophic structure of demersal fishes changes from shallow inshore habitats to deeper water habitats. More habitat specialists (unique species per habitat/depth category) were associated with the reef slope and reef base than other habitats, but offshore sponge-dominated habitats and inshore coral-dominated reef also supported unique species. This suggests that marine protected areas in shallow coral-dominated reef habitats may not adequately protect those species whose depth distribution extends beyond shallow habitats, or other significant elements of demersal fish biodiversity. The ontogenetic habitat partitioning which is characteristic of many species, suggests that to maintain entire species life histories it is necessary to protect corridors of connected habitats

  9. Anomalous topography on the continental shelf around Hudson Canyon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knebel, H. J.

    1979-01-01

    Recent seismic-reflection data show that the topography on the Continental Shelf around Hudson Canyon is composed of a series of depressions having variable spacings (< 100 m to 2 km), depths (1-10 m), outlines, and bottom configurations that give the sea floor an anomalous "jagged" appearance in profile. The acoustic and sedimentary characteristics, the proximity to relict shores, and the areal distribution indicate that this rough topography is an erosional surface formed on Upper Pleistocene silty sands about 13,000 to 15,000 years ago by processes related to Hudson Canyon. The pronounced southward extension of the surface, in particular, may reflect a former increase in the longshore-current erosion capacity caused by the loss of sediments over the canyon. Modern erosion or nondeposition of sediments has prevented the ubiquitous sand sheet on the Middle Atlantic shelf from covering the surface. The "anomalous" topography may, in fact, be characteristic of areas near other submarine canyons that interrupt or have interrupted the longshore drift of sediments. ?? 1979.

  10. Analysis of the petroleum resources of the Norwegian Continental Shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Flertoft, I.P.; Kvadsheim, E.; Kalheim, J.E.

    1995-08-01

    The 1995 analysis of the petroleum resources of Norway is based on a play analysis. The input to the 1995 analysis is updated and refined compared with the analysis of 1993. The analysis makes a major distinction between unconfirmed play models and plays confirmed by discoveries. The unconfirmed plays have a higher risk and a greater range of uncertainty in the resource estimates compared to the confirmed plays. The effect of the unconfirmed plays on the estimates within different exploration areas is discussed. The unconfirmed play models are an important aspect of the exploration in the new exploration areas north of 62{degrees}N. The total estimate for the Norwegian Shelf is well within the estimate given in the 1993 analysis, but there are some adjustments in the relative importance of the different exploration provinces. Much emphasis is placed on incorporating historical exploration data and statistics to calibrate the play models. This includes rate of success and field size distributions of the individual play models and exploration provinces. Major confirmed plays in the North Sea have a rate of success of about 30% and show a good fit to a log normal field size distribution. Based on the log normal distribution it is possible to give prognosis for the size distribution of the undiscovered accumulation. This has made it possible to work out an economic analysis of the profitability of future exploration on the Norwegian Continental Shelf.

  11. Surficial sediments along the inner Continental shelf of Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, J.T.; Dickson, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    Through 10 years of support from the Minerals Management Service-Association of American State Geologists' Continental Margins Program we have mapped along the Maine coast, seaward to the 100 m isobath. In all, 1,773 bottom sample stations were occupied, 3,358 km of side-scan sonar and 5,011 km of seismic reflection profiles were gathered. On the basis of these data, a surficial sediment map was created for the Maine inner continental shelf during the Year 8 project, and cores and seismic data were collected to evaluate sand thickness during Years 9 and 10. Sand covers only 8% of the Maine shelf, and is concentrated seaward of beaches off southern Maine in water depths less than 60 m. Sand occurs in three depositional settings: (1) in shoreface deposits connected dynamically to contemporary beaches; (2) in submerged deltas associated with lower sea-level positions; and (3) in submerged lowstand shoreline positions between 50 and 60 m. Seismic profiles over the shoreface off Saco Bay, Wells Embayment, and off the Kennebec River mouth each imaged a wedge-shaped acoustic unit which tapered off between 20 and 30 m. Cores determined that this was sand that was underlain by a variable but thin (commonly < 1 m) deposit of estuarine muddy sand and a thick deposit of glacial-marine mud. Off Saco Bay, more than 55 million m3 of sand exists in the shoreface, compared with about 22 million m3 on the adjacent beach and dunes. Seaward of the Kennebec River, a large delta deposited between 13 ka and the present time holds more than 300 million m3 of sand and gravel. The best sorted sand is on the surface nearshore, with increasing amounts of gravel offshore and mud beneath the surficial sand sheet. Bedforms indicate that the surficial sand is moved by waves to at least 55 m depth. Seaward of the Penobscot River, no significant sand or gravel was encountered. Muddy estuarine sediments overlie muddy glacial-marine sediment throughout the area offshore area of this river. No

  12. 76 FR 38294 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf-Civil Penalties

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf--Civil Penalties AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean... Continental Shelf Lands Act (OCSLA) requires the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement...@boemre.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Background The goal of BOEMRE's Outer Continental Shelf...

  13. 75 FR 76632 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf-Increased Safety Measures for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-09

    ... and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf--Increased Safety Measures for Energy Development on the Outer Continental Shelf; Correction AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation... oil and gas exploration and development on the Outer Continental Shelf. This document contains...

  14. 77 FR 44231 - Delegation of Authority To Implement and Enforce Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... AGENCY Delegation of Authority To Implement and Enforce Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations to the... enforce sections of the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Air Regulations. To inform regulated facilities and... the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 55 (Outer Continental Shelf Air Regulations). On February...

  15. Estimating rocky seafloor extent on the Southern California continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochrane, G.R.; Greene, H. Gary

    2009-01-01

    High-resolution sonar data are necessary to map bottom substrate for habitat studies but are lacking over much of the continental shelf. With such data, areas covered by sediment can be distinguished from bedrock areas with an accuracy of ??90%. Without these data, the extent of sediment as thick as 10 m cannot be resolved, and estimates of the extent of rocky seafloor are exaggerated. A study area north of Anacapa Island in Southern California interpreted as a large rocky area after mapping with low-resolution seismic systems was found to have exposed rocky bottom in only 10% of the area when mapped with high-resolution, side-scan sonar. The area of rock was estimated using video-supervised, sonar-image classification of textural derivatives of the data calculated from gray-level co-occurrence matrices. The classification of soft bottom was found to be ??90% accurate using an independent data set, derived from seafloor sampling records. Two general types of rock exposure are observed-sparse linear outcrops of layered sedimentary rocks and more massive, rounded outcrop areas of volcanic rocks. The percentage of exposed rock in volcanic areas exceeded that in sedimentary rock areas by a factor of 5 in the study area north of Anacapa Island. South of Point Arguello, 80% of the shelf seafloor is underlain by sedimentary rock units. The percentage of area that is exposed, rocky-reef habitat may be greater in other areas of coastal seafloor if the bedrock is predominantly volcanic. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  16. On instability and mixing on the UK Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhiyu

    2016-06-01

    The stability of stratified flows at locations in the Clyde, Irish and Celtic Seas on the UK Continental Shelf is examined. Flows are averaged over periods of 12-30 min in each hour, corresponding to the times taken to obtain reliable estimates of the rate of dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy per unit mass, ε. The Taylor-Goldstein equation is solved to find the maximum growth rate of small disturbances to these averaged flows, and the critical gradient Richardson number, Ric. The proportion of unstable periods where the minimum gradient Richardson number, Rimin, is less than Ric is about 35%. Cases are found in which Ric < 0.25; 37% of the flows with Rimin < 0.25 are stable, and Ric < 0.24 in 68% of the periods where Rimin < 0.25. Marginal conditions with 0.8 < Rimin/Ric < 1.2 occur in 30% of the periods examined. The mean dissipation rate at the level where the fastest growing disturbance has its maximum amplitude is examined to assess whether the turbulence there is isotropic and how it relates to the wave-turbulence boundary. It is concluded that there is a background level of dissipation that is augmented by instability; instability of the averaged flow does not account for all the turbulence observed in mid-water. The effects of a horizontal separation of the measurements of shear and buoyancy are considered. The available data do not support the hypothesis that the turbulent flows observed on the UK shelf adjust rapidly to conditions that are close to being marginal, or that flows in a particular location and period of time in one sea have stability characteristics that are very similar to those in another.

  17. Influence of the continental climatic conditions on the essential-oil composition of Salvia brachyodon Vandas transferred from Adriatic Coast.

    PubMed

    Vidic, Danijela; Maksimović, Milka; Cavar, Sanja; Siljak-Yakovlev, Sonja

    2010-05-01

    Essential-oil profile of Salvia brachyodon Vandas, an endemic Dinaric species transferred from Adriatic Coast to the continental climatic conditions, was determined. Hydrodistilled oils obtained from the plant material collected in three-year field trial were subjected to the detailed GC/MS analysis. Hundred and fifty volatile compounds were identified in four samples. Comparison of the chemical composition of the isolated essential oils showed that population collected one year after transfer preserved sesquiterpene character of its oil (74.3%), while all subsequent samples gave the oils of monoterpene type with 1,8-cineole as the principal constituent (22.2-42.3%). The high degree of variation in the qualitative and quantitative composition of the volatile constituents revealed the strong influence of environmental conditions on the nature of plant chemical composition that has an important role in a plant adaptation.

  18. Trophic interactions within the Ross Sea continental shelf ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Smith, Walker O; Ainley, David G; Cattaneo-Vietti, Riccardo

    2007-01-29

    The continental shelf of the Ross Sea is one of the Antarctic's most intensively studied regions. We review the available data on the region's physical characteristics (currents and ice concentrations) and their spatial variations, as well as components of the neritic food web, including lower and middle levels (phytoplankton, zooplankton, krill, fishes), the upper trophic levels (seals, penguins, pelagic birds, whales) and benthic fauna. A hypothetical food web is presented. Biotic interactions, such as the role of Euphausia crystallorophias and Pleuragramma antarcticum as grazers of lower levels and food for higher trophic levels, are suggested as being critical. The neritic food web contrasts dramatically with others in the Antarctic that appear to be structured around the keystone species Euphausia superba. Similarly, we suggest that benthic-pelagic coupling is stronger in the Ross Sea than in most other Antarctic regions. We also highlight many of the unknowns within the food web, and discuss the impacts of a changing Ross Sea habitat on the ecosystem.

  19. Trophic interactions within the Ross Sea continental shelf ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Walker O; Ainley, David G; Cattaneo-Vietti, Riccardo

    2006-01-01

    The continental shelf of the Ross Sea is one of the Antarctic's most intensively studied regions. We review the available data on the region's physical characteristics (currents and ice concentrations) and their spatial variations, as well as components of the neritic food web, including lower and middle levels (phytoplankton, zooplankton, krill, fishes), the upper trophic levels (seals, penguins, pelagic birds, whales) and benthic fauna. A hypothetical food web is presented. Biotic interactions, such as the role of Euphausia crystallorophias and Pleuragramma antarcticum as grazers of lower levels and food for higher trophic levels, are suggested as being critical. The neritic food web contrasts dramatically with others in the Antarctic that appear to be structured around the keystone species Euphausia superba. Similarly, we suggest that benthic–pelagic coupling is stronger in the Ross Sea than in most other Antarctic regions. We also highlight many of the unknowns within the food web, and discuss the impacts of a changing Ross Sea habitat on the ecosystem. PMID:17405209

  20. Continental shelf fish production estimation from CZCS chlorophyll data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iverson, Richard L.

    1989-01-01

    A method for ocean fish production estimation was proposed for development. The method was to use data acquired with the Coastal Zone Color Scanner, and processed into chlorophyll concentrations by the GSFC ocean Sciences Division, in combination with fish production and primary production data acquired from different ocean areas. A linear relation exits between annual fish production and annual phytoplankton carbon production for a wide range of coastal ocean environments. The uses of several existing algorithms which relate primary production to CZCS chlorophyll data as input to the fish production regression model is proposed. A question relating phytoplankton production to CZCS chlorophyll was obtained by Eppley (1984) using chlorophyll data obtained from field samples, equivalent to chlorophyll data obtained from CZCS imagery, and primary production data obtained from ship-board observations on a wide variety of coastal and open ocean environments. This equation was modified with additional data and was successfully tested using CZCS data and field chlorophyll and phytoplankton production data obtained from northeastern North American continental shelf waters and Atlantic open ocean waters. The modified Eppley (1984) relation also estimated phytoplankton annual carbon production in the Sargasso Sea within the confidence limits of a mean value obtained from the Eppley (1984) equation for oceanic waters that provide about 90 percent of total ocean primary production. The modified Eppley production formula applied to CZCS chlorophyll data obtained from several northeastern North American coastal environments gave phytoplankton annual carbon production values similar to the values used in the fish production regression equation.

  1. Phytoplankton Community Structure, Biomass and Diversity on the Louisiana Continental Shelf

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phytoplankton communities on the Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) respond to nutrient loading from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya River Basin (MARB). Enhanced phytoplankton biomass is a source of organic matter contributing to the development of seasonal hypoxia. Samples were ...

  2. 77 FR 19321 - Geological and Geophysical Exploration on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Geological and Geophysical Exploration on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice...

  3. Problem on the United States Continental Shelf - measuring the environmental {open_quotes}effectiveness{close_quotes} of the Outer Continental Shelf Act (OCSA)

    SciTech Connect

    Dubner, B.H.

    1994-12-31

    This article reviews the interplay of environmental standard with oil and gas leasing on the Outer Continental Shelf (OSC) in order to determine if the marine environment is really protected by the interplay of domestic legislation. The 1982 LOS treaty leaves environmental protection to State (domestic) regulation. There is no customary law regarding this type of domestic shelf regulation. The main problem is measuring the {open_quotes}effectiveness{close_quotes} of our domestic shelf legislation. For example, do we simply review effectiveness in terms of controlling operational damage or in terms of environmental injury caused by catastrophic accidents?

  4. Historical pattern and mass balance of trace metals in sediments of the northwestern Adriatic Sea Shelf.

    PubMed

    Romano, Stefania; Langone, Leonardo; Frignani, Mauro; Albertazzi, Sonia; Focaccia, Paola; Bellucci, Luca Giorgio; Ravaioli, Mariangela

    2013-11-15

    In view of the recent action in Marine Strategy Framework Directive, reconstructing the history of anthropogenic metal inputs and calculating the budgets for the northwestern part of the Italian Adriatic basin can provide a benchmark for comparison with new evidences and enlighten recent environmental changes. Among the metals, the attention was focused on Pb and Zn, as they provide the most significant anthropogenic signals. In 1988, areal distributions clearly identified the Po, Adige and Brenta rivers as the main sources of contaminants. The study area was divided in three compartments. The area in front of the Po delta represented a sink for metals but the accumulation of Zn and Pb integrated over the entire study area suggests an effective export throughout southern boundary. Most concentration-depth/year profiles in cores showed an upward increase from the Italian Unification (1861), with a still significant anthropogenic supply at the time of sampling.

  5. Cross-Shelf Circulation and Momentum and Heat Balances Over the Inner Continental Shelf Near Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    T2 or AT = 0 at x = c : 0, the temperature stratification as a function of cross-shelf position in the model is AT- QS_X (.32) Poe , Uo The vertical... Poe - U o - U o x ) (4 ., The cross-shelf temperature gradient in the model is positive near shore: a(T) Uo d> 0 for x < --- (4.35) 5W3 h 153 The...Wind-driven currents over the continental shelf. In Kenneth H. Brink and Allan R. Robinson, editors, The Global Coastal Ocean: Processes and Methods

  6. Activation of the Inner Continental Shelf Following the Great Mississippi/Atchafalaya River Flood of 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolker, A.; Li, C.; Allison, M. A.; Ameen, A. D.; Dash, P.; Ramatchandirane, C. G.; Sinclair, G.; Smith, D.; Ullah, M.; Williams, K.

    2011-12-01

    While rives are the primary means by which material is delivered from continents to the ocean, relatively little is known about the role that large rivers, particularly in North America, play in the geology of the inner continental shelf. Flood control measures initiated in response the to massive 2011 Mississippi River flood diverted nearly 22,900 m3 sec-1 of freshwater through the Atchafalaya River basin into the Atchafalaya River shelf in southwest Louisiana, temporarily creating one of the largest shelf-discharging rivers on Earth, and providing an historic opportunity to study shelf-to-shore exchange processes. A multi-disciplinary approach using Acoustic Current Doppler Profilers, CTDs, satellite photographs, and the naturally occurring radiotracer 7Be revealed that event produced intense gradients in temperature, salinity and turbidity across the inner continental shelf, resulting in complex circulation patterns. The freshwater plume extended over 30 km into the, "marine," environment. Furthermore, the flood activated sedimentary dynamics across the shelf, leading to large deposits of fine-grained material across the Atchafalaya/Chenier coast. Our study indicates that large rivers produce unique oceanographic dynamics when they interact with the continental shelf, and that these systems should be viewed differently from small shelf-discharging rivers (like the Hudson) or large continental-slope discharging rivers (like the Mississippi).

  7. Seafloor Rocks and Sediments of the Continental Shelf From Monterey Bay to Point Sur, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eittreim, Stephen L.; Anima, Roberto J.; Stevenson, Andrew J.; Wong, Florence L.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction Acoustic swath mapping of the greater Monterey Bay area continental shelf from Point Ano Nuevo to Point Sur reveals complex patterns of rock outcrops on the shelf, and coarse sand bodies that occur in distinct depressions on the inner and mid-shelves. This publication portrays the seafloor components in a 36- by 48-inch map sheet at 1:100,000 scale.

  8. Trinity shoal: a reworked deltaic barrier on Louisiana continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, J.R.; Penland, S.; Moslow, T.F.

    1985-02-01

    Abandonment and reworking of deltaic complexes of the Holocene Mississippi River have produced a series of sandy shoals on the muddy Louisiana continental shelf. Trinity shoal, one of these transgressive deposits, is located 30 km offshore of Atchafalaya Bay and the Point Au Fer-March Island shell reefs. Approximately 1000 km of high-resolution uniboom and 3.5 kHz subbottom-profile seismic data, taken in this area in 1983 and 1984, provide the data base for this study. Trinity shoal, associated with the abandoned Maringouin delta complex, is a lunate shore-parallel feature approximately 36 km long and 5-10 km wide. Relief on the shoal ranges from 2 to 3 m, and minimum water depths over the shoal vary from -5 to -2 m. The shoal sand body is from 5 to 7 m thick and is composed largely of parallel to low-angle clinoform reflectors. Several levels of buried fluvial channels, ranging in age from early Wisconsinian to Holocene, are associated with the shoal deposit. The occurrence of channel features within the shoal sand itself suggests the presence of tidal inlets, indicating a possible barrier-island origin for the shoal. The underlying deltaic sediments reach approximately 15 m in thickness and are made up of low-angle clinoform reflectors dipping to the southwest. Distributary, bay-fill, estuarine, and buried oyster-reef deposits can be recognized, making these similar to modern Atchafalaya delta deposits. Continued progradation of the Atchafalaya delta will probably result in burial of the Trinity shoal and Maringouin delta deposits by fine-grained sediments, giving these shoal deposits a high-preservation potential and creating an excellent stratigraphic trap.

  9. Some Cenozoic hydrocarbon basins on the continental shelf of Vietnam

    SciTech Connect

    Dien, P.T.

    1994-07-01

    The formation of the East Vietnam Sea basins was related to different geodynamic processes. The pre-Oligocene basement consists of igneous, metamorphic, and metasediment complexes. The Cretaceous-Eocene basement formations are formed by convergence of continents after destruction of the Tethys Ocean. Many Jurassic-Eocene fractured magmatic highs of the Cuulong basin basement constitute important reservoirs that are producing good crude oil. The Paleocene-Eocene formations are characterized by intramountain metamolasses, sometimes interbedded volcanic rocks. Interior structures of the Tertiary basins connect with rifted branches of the widened East Vietnam Sea. Bacbo (Song Hong) basin is predominated by alluvial-rhythmic clastics in high-constructive deltas, which developed on the rifting and sagging structures of the continental branch. Petroleum plays are constituted from Type III source rocks, clastic reservoirs, and local caprocks. Cuulong basin represents sagging structures and is predominated by fine clastics, with tidal-lagoonal fine sandstone and shalestone in high-destructive deltas that are rich in Type II source rocks. The association of the pre-Cenozoic fractured basement reservoirs and the Oligocene-Miocene clastic reservoir sequences with the Oligocene source rocks and the good caprocks is frequently met in petroleum plays of this basin. Nan Conson basin was formed from complicated structures that are related to spreading of the oceanic branch. This basin is characterized by Oligocene epicontinental fine clastics and Miocene marine carbonates that are rich in Types I, II, and III organic matter. There are both pre-Cenozoic fractured basement reservoirs, Miocene buildup carbonate reservoir rocks and Oligocene-Miocene clastic reservoir sequences, in this basin. Pliocene-Quaternary sediments are sand and mud carbonates in the shelf facies of the East Vietnam Sea back-arc basin. Their great thickness provides good conditions for maturation and trapping.

  10. Oceanography of the Subtropical Shelf Front Zone in the SW-Atlantic Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelbert, J. H.; Acha, M.; Berasategui, A.; Bersano, J. G.; Braga, E. S.; Eichler, P.; Garcia, V. M.; Gomez-Erache, M.; Guerrero, R.; Mianzan, H.; Reta, R.; Ramirez, F.

    2005-05-01

    Only physical aspects of the Subtropical Shelf Front (STSF) have been described for the Southwest Atlantic Continental Shelf. The main goal of this paper is to present results of an integrated physical, chemical and biological study at the STSF conducted during the winter of 2003 and summer of 2004. A cross section was established at the historical determined location of the STSF. Nine stations were sampled during the winter cruise and 7 stations during summer. Each section included a series of conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) stations fitted with dissolved oxygen and turbidity sensors. Selected water samples were filtered and frozen at -20oC for nutrient determination. Samples for chlorophyll were concentrated on filters and these were stored frozen for later processing. Plankton net tows were carried out above and below pycnocline. Surface benthic foraminifera were collected with a bottom snapper. Results revealed that winter was marked by an inner shelf salinity front and the STSF located in the mid-shelf. Inner salinity showed the strong influence of freshwater, with high silicate (71.98 μM), phosphate (2.70 μM), nitrate (1.01 μM), Total Dissolved Nitrogen (22.98 μM) and suspended matter (44.80 mg/L). With distance from the coast and reduction of terrestrial input, subsurface high values of nutrients were associated with SACW upwelling. As a result, chlorophyll a concentration decreased from coastal well-mixed waters, where values up to 3.0 mg.m3 are registered, to offshore waters. Zooplankton abundance and biomass, and ichthyoplankton abundance follows the same trend. Zoo and ichthyoplankton abundance revealed the presence of 3 groups associated to the inner, mid and offshore shelf region. Benthic foraminifera composition suggested that shallow stations are dominated by few large freshwater species, while offshore stations presented smaller forms and higher species diversity. During summer, the halocline extended over the shelf and joined the STSF in

  11. The Distribution of Permafrost Beneath the Beaufort Sea Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, B. M.

    2011-12-01

    The entire Beaufort Sea continental shelf (CS) is generally believed to have been sub-aerially exposed to temperatures of -12°C during the sea level low-stand that accompanied the last glacial age. After inundation due to rising sea level, the temperature of the seafloor would have been near 0°C. Permafrost formed prior to flooding was generally expected to be ubiquitous at depth due to the relatively recent time of inundation. Seaward of just beyond the Beaufort Sea barrier islands, downhole resistivity and sonic logging in the 10 hydrocarbon exploration wells that have logging at least as shallow as 300 m below sea level (BSL) has not demonstrated evidence of ice-bearing permafrost (IBPF). Indirect evidence of IBPF seaward of the barrier islands is limited to the Belcher well on the eastern Beaufort CS where rock containing gas hydrate was blown from the well while drilling at 754 m BSL (Exlog Canada, 1988). A bottom simulating reflection is observed on the multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data near the location of the Belcher well, confirming the presence of gas hydrate. From the barrier islands shoreward to the coast, IBPF is indicated by resistivity and sonic logs in all wells having data. The depth to the base of the permafrost in the near shore and onshore areas varies from 200m to over 600 m. Where the top and bottom of the IBPF are observed in the resistivity logs on the barrier islands, the thickness ranges from 100-300 m. MCS data have been collected on the Beaufort CS by the oil industry since the 1970's. IBPF may be inferred from maps of the Dix average velocity (Vave) at a travel time somewhat deeper than the anticipated depth to its base, e.g., 0.75 sec two-way-travel (TWT). Vave is 2.4-3.0 km/sec onshore. In the western Beaufort, Vave decreases rapidly across the shoreline and out to the barrier islands, beyond which it is relatively constant at 1.8 km/sec out to the shelf edge. Vave decreases across the shoreline in the eastern Beaufort, too

  12. On the difficulty of modeling Circumpolar Deep Water intrusions onto the Amundsen Sea continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Y.; Timmermann, R.; Schröder, M.; Hellmer, H. H.

    2014-12-01

    In the Amundsen Sea, warm Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) intrudes onto the continental shelf and flows into the ice shelf cavities of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, resulting in high basal melt rates. However, none of the high resolution global models resolving all the small ice shelves around Antarctica can reproduce a realistic CDW flow onto the Amundsen Sea continental shelf, and previous studies show simulated bottom potential temperature at the Pine Island Ice Shelf front of about -1.8 °C. In this study, using the Finite-Element Sea ice-ice shelf-Ocean Model (FESOM), we reproduce warm CDW intrusions onto the Amundsen Sea continental shelf and realistic melt rates of the ice shelves in West Antarctica. To investigate the importance of horizontal resolution, forcing, horizontal diffusivity, and the effect of grounded icebergs, eight sensitivity experiments are conducted. To simulate the CDW intrusion realistically, a horizontal resolution of about 5 km or smaller is required. The choice of forcing is also important and the cold bias in the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis over the eastern Amundsen Sea prevents warm CDW from intruding onto the continental shelf. On the other hand, the CDW intrusion is not highly sensitive to the strength of horizontal diffusion. The effect of grounded icebergs located off Bear Peninsula is minor, but may act as a buffer to an anomalously cold year.

  13. Low-frequency currents and continental shelf waves in the southern Weddell Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, J.H.; Foster, T.D.; Foldvik, A.

    1982-07-01

    The salient features of low-frequency current fluctuations, obtained from an analysis of eight current meter records from the continental shelf and slope of the southern Weddell sea, are compared to baroclinic and barotropic theories. A simple baroclinic theory of internal waves is used successfully to predict high-frequency spectral cutoff values from low-frequency velocity ellipse calculations made from the continental slope mooring data. The success of this theory indicates that the higher spectral energy levels observed over the slope compared to the shelf are probably due to baroclinic motions. A barotropic model of free continental shelf waves proposed by Saint-Guily (1976) is adapted for the local topography and the predictions of the model compared to observations. Coherences and phases between moorings separated by 10 and 160 km in the long-shelf direction provide substantial evidence of the existence of shelf waves as predicted by the theory for periods of 3--60 days and for the lowest three modes. For periods of 3--8 days rotary spectral levels indicate anticlockwise rotating current vectors over the shelf as predicted by theory, but for longer periods current vectors rotate clockwise. It is speculated that fluctuations in along-shelf wind stress drive the shelf waves but that the longer period motions are driven directly by the wind stress.

  14. Currents on the Continental Shelf of Northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, J.; Tang, T.

    2012-12-01

    The shelf current of northern South China Sea (SCS) is investigated by using moored observations. The short-term Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) array, which was deployed cross the shelf, and two long-term ADCPs, one on the shelf and another is at slope, are used to study the spatial structures and temporal variations of shelf current, respectively. The results indicate that the shelf current is quite variable. The tidal current varied in space and in time. For the diurnal tidal currents, the first baroclinic O1 tide dominated on the shelf but the first baroclinic K1 tide dominated at the slope. For the semi-diurnal tides, the barotropic M2 tide dominated on the shelf but first baroclinic mode dominated at the slope. The temporal variation on the shelf showed that barotropic mode is dominant in winter for both diurnal and semi-diurnal tide but only for semi-diurnal tides in summer. The sub-tidal current on the shelf is also variable. The wind played a critical role to drive the subtidal current on the shelf. The wind drove the Ekman transport first, and then piled up the water alone the coast. Finally the along-shelf geostrophic current driven by the seaward pressure gradient was seen. The southward run-off water from Taiwan Strait induced by typhoon, the eddy and the Kuroshio intrusion in the northern SCS also has impact on the current on the shelf and shelf break. The observation showed that SCS Warm Current (SCSWC), which was claimed as a persistent northeasterly flow, appeared/vanished with time. During the winter monsoon season, the headed wind SCSWC appeared only when the wind was relaxed (i.e. the wind stress less than 1.5 dyne/cm2); while the southwestward current was seen primarily when the wind intensified. Obviously, The SCSWC was a transient feature when the winter monsoon was prevailed. The northeastward current was seen frequently during the summer monsoon. Again, the wind caused sea level variation could be the main mechanism for the appear

  15. Production and remineralization in continental shelf ecosystems: A test of the SEEP hypothesis

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, G.T.

    1986-09-01

    The hypothesis that continental shelf ecosystems export a major fraction of the carbon produced by the phytoplankton during the spring bloom was tested during the Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) experiment off the northeast US coast in 1984. This study, along with a reanalysis of traditional concepts, leads to the conclusion that only a small fraction of continental shelf phytodetritus is exported across a distinct shelf-slope hydrographic frontal system. What is not consumed in the spring is utilized on the shelf during the ensuing stratified season. More open ended ecosystems may export production more readily. The total benthic standing stocks in terms of organic carbon (macrofauna, meiofauna, and bacteria) have been estimated in the SEEP area. Their preponderance on the continental shelf was partial evidence that little organic matter escapes to the upper continental slope. Measurements of the metabolism of the biota allowed calculation of turnover times of organic detritius and the total biota. The turnover time of detritus increased as grain size decreased, suggesting that fine-grained deposits contain mostly refractory, nonreactive compounds, especially on the deep slope. Turnover times of the total biota were about the same in the coarse versus fine-grained shelf deposits, but a far larger fraction of the turnover was attributed to the bacteria in the fine sediments than in the coarse. On average, about 25% of the primary production appeared to be utilized by the aerobic benthos on the continental shelf in the SEEP area. The role of anaerobes at depth in the sediments remains uncertain.

  16. Holocene stratigraphy of the Alabama inner continental shelf: Influence of shelf sand ridges on determining lithofacies architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, D.J.; Parker, S.J. . Energy and Coastal Geology Div.)

    1993-03-01

    Surface and subsurface distribution of lithofacies from Holocene sediments of the AL inner continental shelf was determined from a series of 59 vibracores and associated surface sediment grab sediments. Five Holocene lithofacies composed of 12 discrete microfacies were delineated based on grain size, color, sedimentary structures, shell content, and fabric of samples. These lithofacies include: (1) Graded Shelly Sand Lithofacies; (2) Clean Sand Lithofacies; (3) Dirty Sand Lithofacies; (4) Biogenic Sediment Lithofacies; and (5) Muddy Sediment Lithofacies. These represent four major depositional environments: The Shelf Sand Sheet Environment (lithofacies 1 and 2); the Sand Ridge Environment (lithofacies 1, 2, and 3); the Bay/Lagoon Environment (lithofacies 3, 4 and 5); and the Muddy Shelf Environment (lithofacies 5). East of the Main Pass of Mobile Bay, the seafloor is composed of a clean Shelf Sand Sheet with oblique shelf sand ridges; Clean Sand and Graded Shelly Sand are the dominant surface sediment types. Coarse shell beds that grade up to quartz sand units (total thickness 0.1 to 3+m) interpreted as tempestites comprise most of the upper portion of the ridges. West of the Pass, the muddier lithofacies (3 and 5) dominate surface samples. Microfacies at depth represent the early Holocene transgressive systems tract; these include the Muddy Shelf Depositional Environment and the filled estuaries and bays of the flooded Pleistocene fluvial valleys represented by the Bay/Lagoon Depositional Environment. The AL inner shelf provides an excellent model of the variability of sedimentation mode in time and space during deposition of a transgressive systems tract. Development of the palimpsest sand sheet/ridge complex progressed on the eastern shelf due to shut off of sediment influx, westward longshore currents, and episodic incidence of major hurricanes. On the western shelf a patchy distribution of muddier sediments developed from input of floodwaters from Mobile Bay.

  17. Variations in sediment texture on the northern Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edwards, B.D.

    2002-01-01

    The storm-protected continental shelf of Monterey Bay, part of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, north-central California, is subject to abundant, episodic sediment input from fluvial sources. North of Monterey Bay, conditions of reduced sediment supply combined with the exposed nature of the shelf provide an effective laboratory for studying the contrasting effects of storm- versus fluvial-dominated conditions on modern sedimentation. Textural analyses performed on surface sediment samples collected from more than 380 box cores and MultiCores??? document the existence of a clearly defined mud belt occupying the mid-shelf throughout the region. Inshore sands combined with these mid-shelf muds represent deposits from modern sedimentation processes. In Monterey Bay, where episodic fluvial input from winter storms dominates sedimentation, the mid-shelf mud belt extends across the shelf to the shelf break. North of Monterey Bay, where sediment loads are reduced and both oceanographic and storm processes dominate, the mid-shelf mud belt is bordered by relict sediments occupying the outer shelf. In the study area, mass accumulation rates established by radiochemical studies support the contention that storm-induced along-shelf processes result in northward transport of sediment within the mud belt. The continuity of transport, however, is interrupted by topographic highs which are barriers or inhibitors to sediment transport created by wrench-style tectonics associated with the San Andreas fault system.

  18. High Resolution Measurements of Nonlinear Internal Waves and Mixing on the Washington Continental Shelf

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    System ( SWIMS ) and shipboard acoustics (Biosonics). APPROACH Observations from a real-time mooring that we maintain on the Washington continental...remote internal tides shoal onto the shelf break. In this project we will use our Shallow Water Integrated Mapping System ( SWIMS ) and Modular...shelf indicate an extremely energetic field of nonlinear internal waves (NLIW) propagating onshore. As a fraction of the water depth, their

  19. A climatology and oceanographic analysis of the California Pacific Outer Continental Shelf region. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.G.; Reeves, R.W.; Godshall, F.A.; Fehler, S.W.; Pytlowany, P.J.

    1980-09-01

    The results of an environmental study of the California Pacific Offshore Continental Shelf (CPOCS) region are presented. The CPOCS region is defined as the area between the Mexican border to the Oregon State boundary and seaward to the shelf edge or 200 km. A larger region was examined in several components of the study to describe conditions upstream and downstream of potential leasing areas. Individual chapters focus on meteorological factors, ocean circulation, water masses and physical properties, nutrient chemistry and water elevations.

  20. Source and dispersal of silt on northern Gulf of Mexico Continental Shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M.; Mazzullo, J.

    1988-02-01

    The surficial sediment on the continental shelf of the northern Gulf of Mexico is characterized by abundant silty clay which was deposited during the late Pleistocene lowstand and reworked during and after the Holocene transgression. The purposes of this study were to determine the sources of the silt fraction in this surficial sediment by quartz grain roundness and surface texture analysis, and to determine the effects of modern shelf currents upon the distribution of silt.

  1. Suspended sediment transport on the continental shelf near Davenport, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, J. P.; Noble, M.; Eittreim, S.L.

    2002-01-01

    Suspended sediment transport on the shelves off Santa Cruz and Davenport, California is studied using field measurements and bottom boundary layer modeling. Strong transport events mostly occur during storms in winter; the volume of winter sediment transport is at least one order of magnitude greater than that of summer/spring transport. Rock outcrops on the inner shelf (< 40 m of water) indicates an erosional environment, but an elongated mid-shelf mud deposit evidently suggests a depositional environment on the mid-shelf. The seafloor geology appears to correlate to the poleward and offshore sediment transport pattern. This study also suggests that suspended sediment moves out of Monterey Bay, roughly along the isobaths of the northern bay. This fine material, originally from river sources, and the material from the coastal cliff erosion that is subsequently introduced to the transport system through cross-shelf sediment transport, are believed to be the sources of the mid-shelf mud deposit. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. An instrument system for long-term sediment transport studies on the continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, Bradford; Folger, David W.

    1979-01-01

    A bottom-mounted instrument system has been designed and built to monitor processes of bottom sediment movement on the continental shelf. The system measures bottom current speed and direction, pressure, temperature, and light transmission and photographs the bottom. The system can be deployed for periods of 2–6 months to monitor intermitent processes of sediment movement such as storms and to assess seasonal variability. Deployments of the system on the U.S. east coast continental shelf show sediment resuspension and changes in bottom microtopography due to surface waves, tidal currents, and storms.

  3. Circulation and exchange processes over the continental shelf and slope. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Csanady, G.T.

    1988-12-31

    The theme of the work during the past triennium has been the SEEP experiment, data interpretation and modeling related to the goals of the experiment, and was characterized by increasing cooperation with colleagues from other disciplines. The theoretical contributions dealt with shelf-slope interaction, the dynamics and climatology of currents over the continental slope, and the behavior of fate of organic particles. Observational papers discussed various exchange mechanisms at the shelf edge, with special attention to particle exchange, and the quiescence of currents over the mid continental slope which is presumably responsible for the accumulation of organic particles.

  4. Data-Enhanced Modeling of Sea and Swell on the Continental Shelf

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    Data-Enhanced Modeling of Sea and Swell on the Continental Shelf William C. O’Reilly and Thomas H.C. Herbers U.S. Naval Postgraduate School Dept. of...we will identify the types of wave data (eg. remotely sensed or in situ) and measurement locations (e.g. at the offshore model boundary or in the...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Data-Enhanced Modeling of Sea and Swell on the Continental Shelf 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  5. Seismic stratigraphy and cenozoic evolution of the mesetan moroccan atlantic continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roy, Pascal; Sahabi, Mohamed; Lahsini, Salim; Mehdi, Khalid; Zourarah, Bendehhou

    2004-06-01

    A recent high-resolution seismic survey of the El Jadida continental shelf allows the characterization of the Cenozoic evolution of the Northern Atlantic Moroccan Shelf, which belongs to the Western Meseta structural domain. Seismic stratigraphy indicates a subdivision of the Cenozoic deposits into four sequences (Sca1 to Sca4) restricted to the northern portion of the shelf. Chronostratigraphic identification of the sequences shows that principal deposits correspond to Upper Miocene deposits overlying the Cenomanian carbonate platform. Quaternary deposits are restricted to the lowstand sedimentary wedge extending below a water depth of 130 m and to the last highstand system tract corresponding to the Oum Er Rbia prodelta. Cenozoic evolution of the continental shelf was controlled by a combination of pluvial/interpluvial stages and eustatic fluctuations, but also by local tectonics. Terrigenous sediments built up the Oum Er Rbia prodelta during the estimated time interval 6-2 ka coinciding with stabilisation of high sea level and pluvial stage. Tectonic deformations occurred mainly during the Upper Miocene and accentuated shelf subsidence through reactivation of inherited N20°/N40° and N140° faults in response to the Europe/Africa collision. Some of the N140° faulting zones are still active during the Quaternary. Currently subsidence has ceased and a broad uplift of the greater part of the continental shelf probably occurs.

  6. Onshore-offshore movement of jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) on the continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Julia S.; Gilly, William F.; Field, John C.; Payne, John C.

    2013-10-01

    Jumbo squid (Dosidicus gigas) have greatly extended their range in the California Current System, where they forage on a variety of ecologically and economically important species that inhabit both coastal and offshore mesopelagic regions. Swimming abilities and behavior are important factors in assessing the impacts of this range expansion, particularly in regard to foraging in conjunction with onshore-offshore movement over the continental shelf. Here we describe a study of horizontal movements by jumbo squid along and across the continental shelf off Washington, USA, using acoustic tags in association with the Census of Marine Life's Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking Program (POST) receiver arrays. We detected frequent movements along the shelf break, movement onto the shelf at night, and no evidence of movement as a cohesive school. Our results demonstrate feasibility of using acoustic tags and arrays to document horizontal movements of jumbo squid along and across the continental shelf. This is important in order to determine how those movements overlap with those of other ecologically and commercially important fish species.

  7. British Columbian continental shelf as a source of dissolved iron to the subarctic northeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cullen, Jay T.; Chong, Marina; Ianson, Debby

    2009-12-01

    The distribution of dissolved (<0.4 μm) iron (Fe) across the continental shelf and slope of Queen Charlotte Sound on the west coast of Canada was examined to estimate the potential of these waters as a source of Fe to the Fe-limited waters of the subarctic northeast Pacific. Iron profiles obtained in shelf, slope, and offshore waters demonstrate decreasing concentrations of Fe with distance from the continent. Within 50 m of the shelf sediments dissolved Fe concentrations were 5.3 ± 0.3 nM. This signal was detected, although attenuated by 80%, along the isopycnal surface at offshore stations 40-50 km seaward of the shelf break, strongly suggesting cross-shelf transport of an Fe-rich plume originating in low dissolved oxygen (<3 ml L-1, <130 μmol kg-1) waters in subsurface water over the continental shelf. Several physical mechanisms that may cause these Fe-enriched waters to advect offshore in this region (i.e., tidal currents and Ekman transport in the bottom boundary layer, coastal downwelling/relaxation from upwelling, and the formation of anticyclonic, westward-propagating, coastal eddies) are discussed. We suggest that strong tidal currents over broad continental shelves may play a key role in Fe supply to ocean basins.

  8. Salinity variability along the eastern continental shelf of Canada and the United States, 1973-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisagni, James J.

    2016-09-01

    Continental shelf waters located off the east coast of Canada and the United States are part of a long shelf current system that is partly comprised of colder, less-saline waters originating from high latitudes, including waters from the North Atlantic sub-polar gyre, along with ice-melt and freshwater input from local rivers. A 41-year analysis (1973-2013) of near-surface salinity (NSS) using three hydrographic datasets (Bedford Institute of Oceanography "Climate", NOAA/ESDIM, and Canadian Marine Environmental Data Service (MEDS)) allowed an examination of NSS variability within 11 continental shelf sub-regions, extending from the southern Newfoundland Shelf of eastern Canada to the DelMarVa/Hatteras Shelf of the United States. Although the periods of record containing sufficient data vary between sub-regions, regional mean NSS values are lowest within the Gulf of St. Lawrence and highest on the DelMarVa/Hatteras shelf, with largest annual variability within the Gulf of St. Lawrence. After removal of outliers, long-term linear trends computed from annual mean NSS were detected along the Newfoundland Shelf (+0.011 y-1), Western Scotian Shelf (-0.007 y-1), Gulf of Maine (-0.014 y-1), Georges Bank (-0.011 y-1), and DelMarVa/Hatteras Shelf (+0.024 y-1). A long-term quadratic fit to annual mean NSS from the Eastern Scotian Shelf displays a salinity increase through 1992 of +0.026 y-1, decreasing thereafter until 2013 by -0.028 y-1. A quadratic fit for the Western Grand Banks displays a NSS increase through 2007 of +0.022 y-1, decreasing thereafter through 2013 by -0.006 y-1. Annual mean NSS from the Eastern Grand Banks, Tail of the Grand Banks, Gulf of St. Lawrence, and Middle Atlantic Bight display no long-term trends. Inter-annual variability (IAV) of NSS residuals shows similar small mean squared error (mse) of 0.02-0.04 for the four northern-most sub-regions (Newfoundland Shelf, Eastern, Tail and Western Grand Banks) and are correlated at 0-year lag. IAV of NSS

  9. Sea ice and oceanic processes on the Ross Sea continental shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, S. S.; Comiso, J. C.

    1989-01-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of Antarctic sea ice concentrations on the Ross Sea continental shelf have been investigated in relation to oceanic and atmospheric forcing. Sea ice data were derived from Nimbus 7 scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR) brightness temperatures from 1979-1986. Ice cover over the shelf was persistently lower than above the adjacent deep ocean, averaging 86 percent during winter with little month-to-month of interannual variability. The large spring Ross Sea polynya on the western shelf results in a longer period of summer insolation, greater surface layer heat storage, and later ice formation in that region the following autumn.

  10. 77 FR 5039 - Accommodation Service Provided on Vessels Engaged in U.S. Outer Continental Shelf Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Accommodation Service Provided on Vessels Engaged in U.S. Outer Continental Shelf... providing accommodation service on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf. DATES: Comments and related material... or reach the Docket Management Facility by that date. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments...

  11. 77 FR 7148 - Notice of Approval of Clean Air Act Outer Continental Shelf Permits Issued to Shell Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... AGENCY Notice of Approval of Clean Air Act Outer Continental Shelf Permits Issued to Shell Gulf of Mexico... Region 10 has issued two final permit decisions granting Clean Air Act Outer Continental Shelf (OCS... entities: (1) The Inupiat Community of the Arctic Slope (ICAS); \\1\\ (2) The Native Village of Point...

  12. 77 FR 3771 - Notice of Issuance of Final Outer Continental Shelf Air Permit for Shell Offshore, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Notice of Issuance of Final Outer Continental Shelf Air Permit for Shell Offshore, Inc. AGENCY... on November 30, 2011, EPA issued a final Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) air permit for Shell...

  13. 76 FR 53481 - Outer Continental Shelf, Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 193

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf, Alaska OCS Region... Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Lease Sale 193, Chukchi Sea, Alaska (OCS EIS/EA BOEMRE 2011-041)....

  14. Origin and extent of fresh paleowaters on the Atlantic continental shelf, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohen, D.; Person, M.; Wang, P.; Gable, C.W.; Hutchinson, D.; Marksamer, A.; Dugan, B.; Kooi, H.; Groen, K.; Lizarralde, D.; Evans, R.L.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Lane, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    While the existence of relatively fresh groundwater sequestered within permeable, porous sediments beneath the Atlantic continental shelf of North and South America has been known for some time, these waters have never been assessed as a potential resource. This fresh water was likely emplaced during Pleistocene sea-level low stands when the shelf was exposed to meteoric recharge and by elevated recharge in areas overrun by the Laurentide ice sheet at high latitudes. To test this hypothesis, we present results from a high-resolution paleohydrologic model of groundwater flow, heat and solute transport, ice sheet loading, and sea level fluctuations for the continental shelf from New Jersey to Maine over the last 2 million years. Our analysis suggests that the presence of fresh to brackish water within shallow Miocene sands more than 100 km offshore of New Jersey was facilitated by discharge of submarine springs along Baltimore and Hudson Canyons where these shallow aquifers crop out. Recharge rates four times modern levels were computed for portions of New England's continental shelf that were overrun by the Laurentide ice sheet during the last glacial maximum. We estimate the volume of emplaced Pleistocene continental shelf fresh water (less than 1 ppt) to be 1300 km3 in New England. We also present estimates of continental shelf fresh water resources for the U.S. Atlantic eastern seaboard (104 km3) and passive margins globally (3 ?? 105 km3). The simulation results support the hypothesis that offshore fresh water is a potentially valuable, albeit nonrenewable resource for coastal megacities faced with growing water shortages. ?? 2009 National Ground Water Association.

  15. Origin and extent of fresh paleowaters on the Atlantic continental shelf, USA.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Denis; Person, Mark; Wang, Peng; Gable, Carl W; Hutchinson, Deborah; Marksamer, Andee; Dugan, Brandon; Kooi, Henk; Groen, Koos; Lizarralde, Daniel; Evans, Robert L; Day-Lewis, Frederick D; Lane, John W

    2010-01-01

    While the existence of relatively fresh groundwater sequestered within permeable, porous sediments beneath the Atlantic continental shelf of North and South America has been known for some time, these waters have never been assessed as a potential resource. This fresh water was likely emplaced during Pleistocene sea-level low stands when the shelf was exposed to meteoric recharge and by elevated recharge in areas overrun by the Laurentide ice sheet at high latitudes. To test this hypothesis, we present results from a high-resolution paleohydrologic model of groundwater flow, heat and solute transport, ice sheet loading, and sea level fluctuations for the continental shelf from New Jersey to Maine over the last 2 million years. Our analysis suggests that the presence of fresh to brackish water within shallow Miocene sands more than 100 km offshore of New Jersey was facilitated by discharge of submarine springs along Baltimore and Hudson Canyons where these shallow aquifers crop out. Recharge rates four times modern levels were computed for portions of New England's continental shelf that were overrun by the Laurentide ice sheet during the last glacial maximum. We estimate the volume of emplaced Pleistocene continental shelf fresh water (less than 1 ppt) to be 1300 km(3) in New England. We also present estimates of continental shelf fresh water resources for the U.S. Atlantic eastern seaboard (10(4) km(3)) and passive margins globally (3 x 10(5) km(3)). The simulation results support the hypothesis that offshore fresh water is a potentially valuable, albeit nonrenewable resource for coastal megacities faced with growing water shortages.

  16. Continental shelf landscapes of the southeastern United States since the last interglacial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, M. Scott; Sautter, Leslie Reynolds; Johnson, Kacey L.; Luciano, Katherine E.; Sedberry, George R.; Wright, Eric E.; Siuda, Amy N. S.

    2013-12-01

    The wide, sediment-starved continental shelf and modern coastal areas of the southeastern United States retain well-preserved but scattered remnants of a submerged paleolandscape. This paper presents a conceptual model of stratigraphic deposition and landscape formation since the last interglacial on the continental shelf of South Carolina, with portions of North Carolina, Georgia, and Florida (USA). Data for this study include multibeam bathymetry surveys, sidescan sonar mosaics, high-resolution subbottom profiles, and ground-truth surveys from - 250 m to the modern tidewater region. Four bathymetric zones are recognized with eleven landforms and landform indicators. The described zones range in depths from the modern shoreline, across the shelf, and over the shelf edge to - 250 m MSL. Relative sea level curves are presented for the area and discussed in conjunction with cultural and climatic events. The potential for preservation of Paleoamerican sites is high at the shelf edge between - 130 m and - 45 m, with Archaic and later occupations likely in depths of less than - 25 m. Prominent vantage points for Paleoamericans (> 11 kya) would have existed at the shelf edge, and tidewater resources would have been available nearby for a period of almost 6 ka. Rapid transgression rates (> 60 km/ka) after the sea level rose over the shelf edge make preservation of tidewater sites less likely on the outer and middle shelf. Searches for the earliest Paleoamericans should focus on promontories at the edge of the shelf and along future discoveries of paleoincisions on the shelf. Mapping and delineating this paleolandscape and associated unconsolidated sedimentary deposits interspersed with rocky plains and ledges will continue to be a priority to marine archeologists, coastal managers, fishery scientists, and marine spatial planners over the next several decades.

  17. Sediment dispersal in the northwestern Adriatic Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harris, C.K.; Sherwood, C.R.; Signell, R.P.; Bever, A.J.; Warner, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    Sediment dispersal in the Adriatic Sea was evaluated using coupled three-dimensional circulation and sediment transport models, representing conditions from autumn 2002 through spring 2003. The calculations accounted for fluvial sources, resuspension by waves and currents, and suspended transport. Sediment fluxes peaked during southwestward Bora wind conditions that produced energetic waves and strengthened the Western Adriatic Coastal Current. Transport along the western Adriatic continental shelf was nearly always to the south, except during brief periods when northward Sirocco winds reduced the coastal current. Much of the modeled fluvial sediment deposition was near river mouths, such as the Po subaqueous delta. Nearly all Po sediment remained in the northern Adriatic. Material from rivers that drain the Apennine Mountains traveled farther before deposition than Po sediment, because it was modeled with a lower settling velocity. Fluvial sediment delivered to areas with high average bed shear stress was more highly dispersed than material delivered to more quiescent areas. Modeled depositional patterns were similar to observed patterns that have developed over longer timescales. Specifically, modeled Po sediment accumulation was thickest near the river mouth with a very thin deposit extending to the northeast, consistent with patterns of modern sediment texture in the northern Adriatic. Sediment resuspended from the bed and delivered by Apennine Rivers was preferentially deposited on the northern side of the Gargano Peninsula, in the location of thick Holocene accumulation. Deposition here was highest during Bora winds when convergences in current velocities and off-shelf flux enhanced delivery of material to the midshelf. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  18. Suspended particulate layers and internal waves over the southern Monterey Bay continental shelf: an important control on shelf mud belts?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheriton, Olivia M.; McPhee-Shaw, Erika E.; Shaw, William J.; Stanton, Timothy P.; Bellingham, James G.; Storlazzi, Curt D.

    2014-01-01

    Physical and optical measurements taken over the mud belt on the southern continental shelf of Monterey Bay, California documented the frequent occurrence of suspended particulate matter features, the majority of which were detached from the seafloor, centered 9–33 m above the bed. In fall 2011, an automated profiling mooring and fixed instrumentation, including a thermistor chain and upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler, were deployed at 70 m depth for 5 weeks, and from 12 to 16 October a long-range autonomous underwater vehicle performed across-shelf transects. Individual SPM events were uncorrelated with local bed shear stress caused by surface waves and bottom currents. Nearly half of all observed SPM layers occurred during 1 week of the study, 9–16 October 2011, and were advected past the fixed profiling mooring by the onshore phase of semidiurnal internal tide bottom currents. At the start of the 9–16 October period, we observed intense near-bed vertical velocities capable of lifting particulates into the middle of the water column. This “updraft” event appears to have been associated with nonlinear adjustment of high-amplitude internal tides over the mid and outer shelf. These findings suggest that nonlinear internal tidal motions can erode material over the outer shelf and that, once suspended, this SPM can then be transported shoreward to the middle and shallow sections of the mud belt. This represents a fundamental broadening of our understanding of how shelf mud belts may be built up and sustained.

  19. Novel decomposition products of chlorophyll- a in continental shelf (Louisiana shelf) sediments: formation and transformation of carotenol chlorin esters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nianhong; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Bland, John M.

    2003-06-01

    In April 2000, we collected box cores from five stations along a cross-shelf transect on the Louisiana (LA) continental shelf. Novel esters of carotenols and chlorins (carotenoid chlorin esters, CCEs), which are highly specific grazing markers, were identified in surface and deep sediments (>10 cm) from the LA shelf. Chlorophyll- a inventory indicated that CCEs are one of the major decay products of chlorophyll- a in shelf sediments. Abundances of total CCEs (9-18%) in surface sediments along the cross-shelf transect were comparable to the abundance of pheophytin- a, pyropheophytin- a, and total steryl chlorin esters (SCEs). Prior work has identified four CCEs which have dehydrated fucoxanthin/fucoxanthinol as a substitute alcohol of phytol. We report on four newly identified CCEs associated with nondehydrated fuxocanthin/fucoxanthinol esterified to (pyro)pheophorbide- a. These nondehydrated CCEs were generally present in lower concentrations than their dehydrated counterparts, but were detectable by atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) mass spectrometry coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). We attributed differences between this study and previous work to the time allowed for predepositional decay and grazing processes to occur. The rapid sedimentation of CCEs in the shallow water column (ca. 10 m) on the LA shelf allowed for effective burial of all CCEs compared to the deeper water column regions sampled by previous work. This speculation is supported by the fact that the concentrations of CCEs with nondehydrated fucoxanthin/fucoxanthinol were extremely low in sediments from the site on the outer LA shelf with a deeper (253 m) water column. We also tentatively identified an additional CCE and its isomer as fucoxanthinol didehydrate pyropheophorbide- a ester. We suggest that the formation and transformation of CCEs are primarily controlled by the following three biologically mediated reactions: demethoxycarbonylation, dehydration

  20. Reactive Iron and Iron-Reducing Bacteria in Louisiana Continental Shelf Sediments

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers release sediments containing 15 x 106 t of iron onto the Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) each year. Iron oxides reaching the seafloor may be utilized as electron acceptors by iron-reducing bacteria for organic matter oxidation or become r...

  1. 77 FR 24734 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Renewable Energy Program Leasing for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Renewable Energy Program Leasing for... and information on the public session can be found online at: http://www.boem.gov/Renewable-Energy... Renewable Energy Programs, 381 Elden Street, HM 1328, Herndon, Virginia 20170-4817, (703) 787-1340...

  2. 75 FR 17155 - Preparation of an Environmental Assessment (EA) for Proposed Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... all requirements of NEPA, the Coastal Zone Management Act, Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, and...-circulation modeling, ecological effects of oil and gas activities, and hurricane impacts on coastal... consistent with each affected state's federally approved Coastal Zone Management program. Finally, the...

  3. 78 FR 48180 - Consolidation of Officer in Charge, Marine Inspection For Outer Continental Shelf Activities...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ... for all Mobile Offshore Drilling Units and Floating Outer Continental Shelf Facilities (as defined in... engage directly in oil and gas exploration or production in the offshore waters of the Eighth Coast Guard... Commander. Vessels requiring Coast Guard inspection include Mobile Offshore Drilling Units (MODUs),...

  4. A PROBABILISTIC SURVEY OF FISH TISSUE CONTAMINATION FROM THE CONTINENTAL SHELF OF THE US WEST COAST

    EPA Science Inventory

    A probabilistic survey of environmental condition of the continental shelf of the US West Coast was conducted in 2003 by the US EPA National Coastal Assessment (NCA), with collaboration by the NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service. Metals and organic contaminants were analyzed ...

  5. 76 FR 23331 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee (SC); Announcement of Plenary Session

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-26

    ... status of the BOEMRE and its activities. There will be a presentation on Alternative Energy Programs... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Scientific Committee (SC); Announcement of Plenary Session AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation...

  6. Bottom fixed OTEC plant on the edge of a continental (or island) shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Daidola, J.C.; Basar, N.; Sasscer, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    Consideration is given to a generic type of OTEC plant. This shallow water bottom fixed OTEC plant consists of a platform structure rigidly attached to the seabed at the edge of a continental or island shelf. A cost comparison and thoughts on commercialization are presented. Conclusions and recommendations indicate the desire and need for further development. 12 refs.

  7. 76 FR 7230 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement,...

  8. 78 FR 36571 - North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Provisional Official...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Provisional Official Protraction Diagram (OPDs) AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM),...

  9. The application of Seasat-1 radar altimetry to continental shelf circulation modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornillon, P.; Reed, M.; Spaulding, M.; Swanson, C.

    1980-01-01

    Seasat-1 radar altimetry data have been used to verify a continental shelf circulation model subjected to tidal forcing on the open boundary. The model makes use of the semi-implicit mode of time integration, removing the surface gravity wave time step restriction. Both the altimetry and the model predictions are compared with empirically determined tidal fluctuations and generally good agreement is obtained.

  10. Outer continental shelf environmental-assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 68

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    The contents of this study include the following: biological reconnaissance of Boulder Island Shoal in western Camden Bay, Beaufort Sea, Alaska; the Chukchi Sea continental shelf: benthos-environmental interactions; ecological assessment of sublittoral plant communities in the northern Gulf of Alaska; and ecology of unconsolidated beaches in Lower Cook Inlet.

  11. Application of remote sensing to study nearshore circulation. [and the continental shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeigler, J.; Lobecker, R.; Stauble, D.; Welch, C.; Haas, L.; Fang, C. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research to use remote sensing techniques for studying the continental shelf is reported. The studies reported include: (1) nearshore circulation in the vincinity of a natural tidal inlet; (2) identification of indicators of biological activity; (3) remote navigation system for tracking free drifting buoys; (4) experimental design of an estuaring tidal circulation; and (5) Skylab support work.

  12. 75 FR 20859 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Policy Committee; Notice and Agenda for Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Minerals Management Service Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Policy Committee; Notice and Agenda for Meeting AGENCY: Minerals Management Service (MMS), Interior. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: The OCS...

  13. 76 FR 13205 - Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Notice on Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement,...

  14. 78 FR 5836 - Adjustment of Service Fees for Outer Continental Shelf Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Adjustment of Service Fees for Outer Continental Shelf Activities AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Adjustment of Service Fees....

  15. 77 FR 74218 - Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... identified in the document entitled, Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Wind Leasing and Site Assessment Activities on the Atlantic... agencies, states, tribes, local governments, offshore wind energy developers, and the public in...

  16. Nutrient distributions, transports, and budgets on the inner margin of a river-dominated continental shelf

    EPA Science Inventory

    Physical and biogeochemical processes determining the distribution and fate of nutrients delivered by the Mississippi and Atchafalaya rivers to the inner (<50 m depth) Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) were examined using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model of the LCS and obse...

  17. Atlantic update, July 1986--June 1990: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities

    SciTech Connect

    Karpas, R.M.; Gould, G.J.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic Region. This edition of the Atlantic Update includes an overview of the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area and a summary of the Manteo Prospect off-shore North Carolina. 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Impacts of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) development on recreation and tourism. Volume 5. Program logic manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The final report for the project is presented in five volumes. This volume is the Programmer's Manual. It covers: a system overview, attractiveness component of gravity model, trip-distribution component of gravity model, economic-effects model, and the consumer-surplus model. The project sought to determine the impact of Outer Continental Shelf development on recreation and tourism.

  19. Impacts of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) development on recreation and tourism. Volume 4. User's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The final report for the project is presented in five volumes. The project sought to determine the impact of Outer Continental Shelf development on recreation and tourism in California. This volume is the User's Guide. It includes the following topics: Introduction and Summary Guide; Input Data Files; Gravity Model Programs; Economic Effects Model Programs; Consumer Surplus Model Programs; References; and Appendices.

  20. Mineral resource management of the Outer Continental Shelf : leasing procedures, evaluation of resources, and supervision of production operations on leased lands of the Outer Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adams, Maurice V.; John, C.B.; Kelly, R.F.; LaPointe, A.E.; Meurer, R.W.

    1975-01-01

    An important function of the Geological Survey is the evaluation and management of the mineral resources of the Outer Continental Shelf, particularly with respect to oil and gas, salt, and sulfur. Production of oil and gas from the Outer Continental Shelf of the United States has increased substantially over the past 20 years and represents an increasing percentage of total United States production. As discovery of major onshore production of oil and gas has become more difficult, the search has moved into the surrounding waters where submerged sedimentary formations are conducive to the accumulation of oil and gas. Increased energy demands of recent years have accelerated the pace of offshore operations with a corresponding improvement in technology as exploration and development have proceeded farther from shore and into deeper water. While improved technology and enforcement of more stringent regulations have made offshore operations safer, it is unrealistic to believe that completely accident-free operations can ever be achieved. Only slightly more than six percent of the world's continental terrace is adjacent to the United States, but less than one percent has been explored for oil and gas. Since the lead time for the development of offshore oil and gas resources can be as much as a decade, they do not provide an immediate energy supply but should be viewed in the light of a near-term source with a potential of becoming a medium-range source of supply pending the development of alternative energy sources. Revenues from the Outer Continental Shelf are deposited to the general fund of the United States Treasury. A major portion of these funds is allocated to the Land and Water Conservation Fund, the largest Federal grant-in-aid program of assistance to States, counties, and cities for the acquisition and development of public parks, open space, and recreation lands and water.

  1. Source and dispersal of silt on northern Gulf of Mexico continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M.; Mazzullo, J.

    1988-01-01

    The surficial sediment on the continental shelf of the northern Gulf of Mexico is characterized by abundant silty clay which was deposited during the late Pleistocene lowstand and reworked during and after the Holocene transgression. The purposes of this study were to determine the sources of the silt fraction in this surficial sediment by quartz grain roundness and surface texture analysis, and to determine the effects of modern shelf currents upon the distribution of silt. Areal variations in quartz grain roundness and surface texture define six silt provinces on the northern Gulf of Mexico continental shelf. The Mississippi province is the largest province and stretches from the Chandeleur Islands to Matagorda Bay. It is characterized by a mixture of rounded grains that were derived from the sedimentary rocks of the Gulf coastal plain and the Mid-Continent, and angular, fractured grains that were derived from glacial deposits in the northern United States. A comparison of the areal distribution of these six provinces with the late Pleistocene paleogeography of the continental shelf shows evidence for varying degrees of shore-parallel transport of silt by modern shelf currents.

  2. Evidence for upwelling of corrosive "acidified" water onto the continental shelf.

    PubMed

    Feely, Richard A; Sabine, Christopher L; Hernandez-Ayon, J Martin; Ianson, Debby; Hales, Burke

    2008-06-13

    The absorption of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) into the ocean lowers the pH of the waters. This so-called ocean acidification could have important consequences for marine ecosystems. To better understand the extent of this ocean acidification in coastal waters, we conducted hydrographic surveys along the continental shelf of western North America from central Canada to northern Mexico. We observed seawater that is undersaturated with respect to aragonite upwelling onto large portions of the continental shelf, reaching depths of approximately 40 to 120 meters along most transect lines and all the way to the surface on one transect off northern California. Although seasonal upwelling of the undersaturated waters onto the shelf is a natural phenomenon in this region, the ocean uptake of anthropogenic CO2 has increased the areal extent of the affected area.

  3. Observations of a coastal current in the continental shelf of Yucatan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Castillo, E.; Gomez-Valdes, J.; Rioja-Nieto, R.

    2013-05-01

    Oceanographic measurements were recorded at the continental shelf of Yucatan , over four CTD surveys carried out between 2003 and 2009. Results showed that the continental waters are confined in two layers. A 25 - year time series of sea surface temperature from AVHRR, with 1-day temporal resolution and 4-km spatial resolution, is also analyzed. Maps of the mean, the standard deviation, and the maximum temperature, obtained from the time series, showed the presence of low temperature waters along the northern coast of the Yucatan Peninsula, which were probably of subsurface origin. Monthly average temperature maps showed that cold surface water occur first in March at the southeast of the Yucatan continental shelf, and afterwards it flows westward and reaches the Campeche bay in July and August. Furthermore, in the continental waters the maximum temperature occurs in August and the minimum temperature occurs in February. The annual cycle explains more than 60 % of the variance with an error of the order of 1 C. The CTD surveys confirmed that the origin of the cold water was from the Caribbean Sea's subsurface that first appears at the southeast of the continental shelf. The water column along the coast was found to be well mixed in the same region where the band of cold water was detected using satellite data. It is concluded that the surface circulation along the northern coast of the Yucatan Peninsula is westward throughout the year except in February.

  4. U.S. Eastern Continental Shelf Carbon Cycling (USECoS): Modeling, Data Assimilation, and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannino, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Although the oceans play a major role in the uptake of fossil fuel CO2 from the atmosphere, there is much debate about the contribution from continental shelves, since many key shelf fluxes are not yet well quantified: the exchange of carbon across the land-ocean and shelf-slope interfaces, air-sea exchange of CO2, burial, and biological processes including productivity. Our goal is to quantify these carbon fluxes along the eastern U.S. coast using models quantitatively verified by comparison to observations, and to establish a framework for predicting how these fluxes may be modified as a result of climate and land use change. Our research questions build on those addressed with previous NASA funding for the USECoS (U.S. Eastern Continental Shelf Carbon Cycling) project. We have developed a coupled biogeochemical ocean circulation model configured for this study region and have extensively evaluated this model with both in situ and remotely-sensed data. Results indicate that to further reduce uncertainties in the shelf component of the global carbon cycle, future efforts must be directed towards 1) increasing the resolution of the physical model via nesting and 2) making refinements to the biogeochemical model and quantitatively evaluating these via the assimilation of biogeochemical data (in situ and remotely-sensed). These model improvements are essential for better understanding and reducing estimates of uncertainties in current and future carbon transformations and cycling in continental shelf systems. Our approach and science questions are particularly germane to the carbon cycle science goals of the NASA Earth Science Research Program as well as the U.S. Climate Change Research Program and the North American Carbon Program. Our interdisciplinary research team consists of scientists who have expertise in the physics and biogeochemistry of the U.S. eastern continental shelf, remote-sensing data analysis and data assimilative numerical models.

  5. The effects of trawling, dredging and ocean dumping on the eastern Canadian continental shelf seabed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messieh, S. N.; Rowell, T. W.; Peer, D. L.; Cranford, P. J.

    1991-08-01

    This paper presents an overview of current knowledge on the effects of trawling, dredging and ocean dumping on the eastern Canadian continental shelf seabed. The impact of trawling and dredging for fish and shellfish on marine habitats has recently attracted international attention among fisheries and environmental scientists. In Atlantic Canada, trawling and dredging are the principal methods of harvesting groundfish and scallops and ocean clams, respectively. It is estimated that fish trawlers and scallop dredges have swept tracks, cris-crossing the Canadian continental shelf, approximately 4.3 million km in length in 1985. In the past few years several studies were carried out by scientists from Canada, the United States and Europe to assess the impacts of trawling and dredging but results were inconclusive. Some studies showed physical damage as well as biological effects, whereas others indicated that the adverse effects were not considered to be serious. Fishermen are not the only potential users of the resources of the continental shelf. There is an increasing demand for good-quality sand and gravel aggregate and the ocean seabed is being seen as a possible source. The eastern Canadian continental shelf also exhibits hydrocarbon potential and operational and accidental discharges are an environmental concern. Increased marine transportation and expansion of the fishing fleet have resulted in a greater need for harbour dredging. Dredging and dredge spoil disposal were controlled by the Ocean Dumping Control Act and now the Canadian Environmental Protection Act which places restrictions on the composition of material that can be disposed of in the sea. Nevertheless some harbours contain contaminant concentrations exceeding the maximum allowable limits. It is concluded that the impacts of human activities on the continental shelf seabed environment are inevitable and the long-term effects, while difficult to determine, must be assessed. The sub-lethal effects

  6. High-magnesium calcite dissolution in tropical continental shelf sediments controlled by ocean acidification.

    PubMed

    Haese, R R; Smith, J; Weber, R; Trafford, J

    2014-01-01

    Increases in atmospheric CO2 cause the oceanic surface water to continuously acidify, which has multiple and profound impacts on coastal and continental shelf environments. Here we present the carbonate mineral composition in surface sediments from a range of continental shelf seabed environments and their current and predicted stability under ocean acidifying conditions. Samples come from the following four tropical Australian regions: (1) Capricorn Reef (southern end of the Great Barrier Reef), (2) the Great Barrier Reef Lagoon, (3) Torres Strait, and (4) the eastern Joseph Bonaparte Gulf. Beyond the near-shore zone, these regions typically have a carbonate content in surface sediments of 80 wt % or more. The abundance of high-magnesium calcites (HMC) dominates over aragonite (Arag) and low-magnesium calcite (LMC) and constitutes between 36% and 50% of all carbonate. HMC, with a magnesium content larger than 8-12 mol %, is more soluble than both Arag and LMC, and the solubility of HMC positively correlates with its magnesium concentration. From the solubility data of Plummer and Mackenzie ( Am. J. Sci. 1974 , 274 , 61 - 83 ), 95% of HMC in the four regions is presently in metastable equilibrium relative to global mean tropical sea surface water. HMC is predicted to become destabilized in the four regions between 2040 and 2080 AD, with typical HMC decline rates between 2% and 5% per year. The range of respective estimated carbonate dissolution rates is expected to exceed current continental shelf carbonate accumulation rates, leading to net dissolution of carbonate during the period of HMC decline. In a geological context, the decline in HMC in tropical continental shelf environments is a global event triggered by reaching below-equilibrium conditions. The characteristic change in carbonate mineral composition in continental shelf sediments will serve as a geological marker for the proposed Anthropocene Epoch.

  7. Flux of energy and essential elements through the continental shelf ecosystem. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, L.R.

    1981-11-30

    There are three distinct but not mutually exclusive areas of research in this contract, studies of intrusions of the west wall of the Gulf Stream onto the outer continental shelf, studies of the flux of materials across nearshore density fronts, and advances in understanding of the planktonic food web of the continental shelf. Studies of frontal events on the outer and inner continental shelf involve distinctive physical and chemical regimes and have proven to require distinctive biological approaches. The studies of the food web run through our work on both of the frontal regimes, but certain aspects have become subjects in their own right. We have developed a simulation model of the flux of energy through the continental shelf food web which we believe to be more realistic than previous ones of its type. We have examined several of the many roles of dissolved organic compounds in sea water which originate either from release by phytoplankton, digestive processes or metabolites of zooplankton, or extracellular digestion of microorganisms. Methods have been developed under this contract to measure both the chelating capacity of naturally occurring organic materials and the copper concentration in the water. It has been possible to characterize the effects, both toxic and stimulatory, of copper on photosynthesis of naturally occurring phytoplankton populations. It is possible to characterize in considerable detail the course of biological events associated with meanders of the Gulf Stream. We are now in a position to explain the limits to biological productivity of the outer continental shelf of the southeastern US and the reasons why that biological production moves through the food web in the characteristic way that it does.

  8. Sources of phytoplankton to the inner continental shelf in the Santa Barbara Channel inferred from cross-shelf gradients in biological, physical and chemical parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Jo; Brzezinski, Mark A.; Halewood, Elisa R.; Carlson, Craig A.

    2012-10-01

    Phytoplankton are a major food resource for filter-feeding organisms occupying intertidal and subtidal habitats of the inner continental shelf. Phytoplankton in these nearshore waters experience different anthropogenic and natural forcing compared to those offshore such that cross-shelf exchange would allow phytoplankton that were produced offshore to serve as a subsidy to inner shelf consumers when phytoplankton production on the shelf is negatively impacted. In the Santa Barbara Channel (SBC) the continental shelf is only a few kilometers wide facilitating exchange with offshore waters. Physical, chemical and biological gradients were examined monthly along a 3-km cross-shelf transect in the SBC from January, 2008 through April, 2009. Chemical and biological distributions followed temporal changes in physical forcing with higher nutrient concentrations and a more intense period of biological production associated with spring upwelling. Chlorophyll was relatively evenly distributed across the shelf during upwelling, but was present at higher concentrations on the inner shelf under stratified conditions. Similarly, cross-shelf gradients in the distribution of dominant phytoplankton genera were weakest during upwelling when blooms of the prymnesiophyte, Phaeocystis, and the diatoms, Eucampia spp. and Thalassiosira spp. occurred across most of the shelf. Upon stratification, blooms were largely confined to the inner shelf within 0.75 km of the shoreline with an initial bloom of the diatom Leptocylindrus spp. followed by Pseudo-nitzschia spp. and series of dinoflagellate blooms with Prorocentrum spp. and Lingulodinium spp. attaining the highest abundances. Phytoplankton taxonomic similarity decreased with increasing distance separating stations along the transect and was inversely related to stratification intensity. The observed distribution patterns and the trends in taxonomic similarity imply that for most of the year consumers within rocky intertidal and subtidal

  9. Postglacial transgressive stratigraphy of the Durban continental shelf, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Andrew; Salzmann, Leslee; Cooper, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    This paper examines the geomorphology and seismic stratigraphy of the high-energy KwaZulu-Natal shelf offshore Durban, South Africa. Particular attention is paid to a laterally persistent (30 km) Holocene submerged shoreline located at 60 m water depth. Five major seismic units are identified (Units 1-5). Unit 1 comprises a series of infilled incised valleys that formed during the sea level lowering towards the Last Glacial Maximum. Unit 2 comprises a calcarenite core that forms the -60 m postglacial barrier complex. Unit 3 comprises lake-lagoon depressions in the back-barrier that formed simultaneously with the barrier system. These are backed to landward by several relict parabolic dunes preserved in Unit 2. Several relict weathering features (Unit 4) are associated with the barrier and reflect similar processes observed in contemporary aeolianite/beachrock outcrops on the adjacent coastline. These are draped by a thin veneer of post-transgressive Holocene sediment that caps the shelf stratigraphy (Unit 5). The development of the barrier and associated features occurred during a period of stillstand or slowstand associated with the Younger Dryas Cold Period (~12.7-11.6 Ka BP). Shoreline preservation in such a high-energy environment is considered unlikely as a result of the intense ravinement processes experienced during shoreline translation, coupled with the relatively low gradient setting of the KwaZulu-Natal shelf. The preservation of both the 100 m and 60 m shorelines was fostered by overstepping of the paleo-landscape, whereby preservation was promoted by a particularly rapid phase of relative sea-level rise associated with meltwater pulse 1B. This was further aided by early subtropical diagenesis during stillstand.

  10. East Louisiana continental shelf sediments: a product of delta reworking

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, Gregg R.; Kingdinger, Jack L.; Penland, Shea; Williams, S. Jeffress

    1995-01-01

    Data from 77 vibracores were integrated with 6,700 line-km of high- resolution seismic reflection profiles collected off the eastern Louisiana coast in the region of the St. Bernard Delta, the first of the Holocene highstand deltas of the Mississippi River. Seismic fades and sediment facies were integrated in order to establish the stratigraphic details within this relict delta. Results provide a regional geologic framework from which comparisons can be made with other areas. Holocene deposits in the study area overlie a heavily dissected surface interpreted to represent a lowstand erosional surface. Resting on this surface is a thin unit of relatively clean, quartz sand interpreted to have been deposited during early transgression. This unit is overlain by sediments of the St. Bernard Delta, a seaward-prograding, coarsening-upward wedge of sands and muds that contain vertically-stacked units of deltaic succession. Two or more prograding units separated by an unconformity, delineated from regional seismic profiles, may represent laterally shifting subdelta lobes. Surficial sediments consist of a thin unit of sands and muds derived from and reflecting the individual subenvirons of the underlying delta. Holocene inner-shelf development off eastern Louisiana has been controlled by relative sea-level rise and sediment supply. Sediment supply and deposition are a product of delta progradation and delta-lobe switching. The modern shelf configuration and surficial sediment distribution patterns reflect reworking of underlying deltaic deposits. The lack of modern sediment input helps to maintain the imprint of this ancient delta on the modern shelf surface.

  11. Sea-ice and surface water circulation, Alaskan continental shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, F. F.; Sharma, G. D.; Burns, J. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Over 1500 water samples from surface and from standard hydrographic depths were collected during June and July 1973 from Bering Sea and Gulf of Alaska. The measurement of temperature, salinity, and productivity indicated that various distinct water masses cover the Bering Sea Shelf. The suspended load in surface waters will be correlated with the ERTS-1 imagery as it becomes available to delineate the surface water circulation. The movement of ice floes in the Bering Strait and Bering Sea indicated that movement of ice varies considerably and may depend on wind stress as well as ocean currents.

  12. Biological, physical and chemical properties at the Subtropical Shelf Front Zone in the SW Atlantic Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muelbert, José H.; Acha, Marcelo; Mianzan, Hermes; Guerrero, Raúl; Reta, Raúl; Braga, Elisabete S.; Garcia, Virginia M. T.; Berasategui, Alejandro; Gomez-Erache, Mónica; Ramírez, Fernando

    2008-07-01

    The physical aspects of the Subtropical Shelf Front (STSF) for the Southwest Atlantic Continental Shelf were previously described. However, only scarce data on the biology of the front is available in the literature. The main goal of this paper is to describe the physical, chemical and biological properties of the STSF found in winter 2003 and summer 2004. A cross-section was established at the historically determined location of the STSF. Nine stations were sampled in winter and seven in summer. Each section included a series of conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) stations where water samples from selected depths were filtered for nutrient determination. Surface samples were taken for chlorophyll a (Chl- a) determination and plankton net tows carried out above and below the pycnocline. Results revealed that winter was marked by an inner-shelf salinity front and that the STSF was located on the mid-shelf. The low salinity waters in the inner-shelf indicated a strong influence of freshwater, with high silicate (72 μM), suspended matter (45 mg l -1), phosphate (2.70 μM) and low nitrate (1.0 μM) levels. Total dissolved nitrogen was relatively high (22.98 μM), probably due to the elevated levels of organic compound contribution close to the continental margin. Surface Chl -a concentration decreased from coastal well-mixed waters, where values up to 8.0 mg m -3 were registered, to offshore waters. Towards the open ocean, high subsurface nutrients values were observed, probably associated to South Atlantic Central Waters (SACW). Zooplankton and ichthyoplankton abundance followed the same trend; three different groups associated to the inner-, mid- and outer-shelf region were identified. During summer, diluted waters extended over the shelf to join the STSF in the upper layer; the concentration of inorganic nutrients decreased in shallow waters; however, high values were observed between 40 and 60 m and in deep offshore waters. Surface Chl -a ranged 0.07-1.5 mg m -3

  13. Increased spatial variance accompanies reorganization of two continental shelf ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Litzow, Michael A; Urban, J Daniel; Laurel, Benjamin J

    2008-09-01

    Phase transitions between alternate stable states in marine ecosystems lead to disruptive changes in ecosystem services, especially fisheries productivity. We used trawl survey data spanning phase transitions in the North Pacific (Gulf of Alaska) and the North Atlantic (Scotian Shelf) to test for increases in ecosystem variability that might provide early warning of such transitions. In both time series, elevated spatial variability in a measure of community composition (ratio of cod [Gadus sp.] abundance to prey abundance) accompanied transitions between ecosystem states, and variability was negatively correlated with distance from the ecosystem transition point. In the Gulf of Alaska, where the phase transition was apparently the result of a sudden perturbation (climate regime shift), variance increased one year before the transition in mean state occurred. On the Scotian Shelf, where ecosystem reorganization was the result of persistent overfishing, a significant increase in variance occurred three years before the transition in mean state was detected. However, we could not reject the alternate explanation that increased variance may also have simply been inherent to the final stable state in that ecosystem. Increased variance has been previously observed around transition points in models, but rarely in real ecosystems, and our results demonstrate the possible management value in tracking the variance of key parameters in exploited ecosystems.

  14. Large-scale penetration of Gulf Stream water onto the continental shelf north of Cape Hatteras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawarkiewicz, Glen; Church, Thomas M.; Luther, George W., III; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Caruso, Michael

    1992-01-01

    The presence of Gulf Stream water on the continental shelf as much as 60 km north of Cape Hatteras was observed during a hydrographic cruise in the summer of 1990. Gulf Stream water was concentrated at mid-depth between 10 and 30 m and penetrated the shelfbreak front which normally separates the shelf water from slope water and Gulf Stream water. Velocities of Gulf Stream water in the upper 110 m of the water column along the 1000 m isobath indicated a flow of 18 to 25 cm/s directed towards the northwest. Gulf Stream water on the shelf is considered to be associated with low values of fluorescence, transmissivity, and nutrient concentrations relative to adjacent shelf water.

  15. Mean hydrography on the continental shelf from 26 repeat glider deployments along Southeastern Australia

    PubMed Central

    Schaeffer, Amandine; Roughan, Moninya; Austin, Tim; Everett, Jason D.; Griffin, David; Hollings, Ben; King, Edward; Mantovanelli, Alessandra; Milburn, Stuart; Pasquer, Benedicte; Pattiaratchi, Charitha; Robertson, Robin; Stanley, Dennis; Suthers, Iain; White, Dana

    2016-01-01

    Since 2008, 26 glider missions have been undertaken along the continental shelf of southeastern Australia. Typically these missions have spanned the continental shelf on the inshore edge of the East Australian Current from 29.5–33.5°S. This comprehensive dataset of over 33,600 CTD profiles from the surface to within 10 m of the bottom in water depths ranging 25–200 m provides new and unprecedented high resolution observations of the properties of the continental shelf waters adjacent to a western boundary current, straddling the region where it separates from the coast. The region is both physically and biologically significant, and is also in a hotspot of ocean warming. We present gridded mean fields for temperature, salinity and density, but also dissolved oxygen and chlorophyll-a fluorescence indicative of phytoplankton biomass. This data will be invaluable for understanding shelf stratification, circulation, biophysical and bio-geochemical interactions, as well as for the validation of high-resolution ocean models or serving as teaching material. PMID:27575831

  16. Upper ocean variability in west Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf waters as measured using instrumented seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Daniel P.; Klinck, John M.; Hofmann, Eileen E.; Dinniman, Michael S.; Burns, Jennifer M.

    2008-02-01

    Temperature profile data for the west Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) continental shelf waters, collected from freely ranging instrumented seals (crabeater, Lobodon carcinophagus and leopard, Hydrurga leptonyx), were used to demonstrate that these platforms can be used to supplement traditional oceanographic sampling methods to investigate the physical properties of the upper water column. The seal-derived profiles were combined with temperature profiles obtained from ship-based CTD measurements and from a numerical circulation model developed for the WAP to describe changes in temperature structure, heat content, and heat flux in the upper ocean waters of the WAP continental shelf. The seal-derived data documented the fall-to-winter transition of the surface waters and the shelf-wide presence of modified Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) below 150-200 m on the WAP continental shelf. The heat content of the upper 200 m calculated from the seal-derived temperature profiles ranged between 1000 and 1500 MJ m -2; similar estimates were obtained from simulated temperature distributions. The seal-derived temperature measurements provided broader space and time resolution than was possible using any other currently available oceanographic sampling method. As such, the seal-derived measurements provided a valuable dataset for evaluation of temperature fields obtained from a numerical circulation model.

  17. Mean hydrography on the continental shelf from 26 repeat glider deployments along Southeastern Australia.

    PubMed

    Schaeffer, Amandine; Roughan, Moninya; Austin, Tim; Everett, Jason D; Griffin, David; Hollings, Ben; King, Edward; Mantovanelli, Alessandra; Milburn, Stuart; Pasquer, Benedicte; Pattiaratchi, Charitha; Robertson, Robin; Stanley, Dennis; Suthers, Iain; White, Dana

    2016-08-30

    Since 2008, 26 glider missions have been undertaken along the continental shelf of southeastern Australia. Typically these missions have spanned the continental shelf on the inshore edge of the East Australian Current from 29.5-33.5°S. This comprehensive dataset of over 33,600 CTD profiles from the surface to within 10 m of the bottom in water depths ranging 25-200 m provides new and unprecedented high resolution observations of the properties of the continental shelf waters adjacent to a western boundary current, straddling the region where it separates from the coast. The region is both physically and biologically significant, and is also in a hotspot of ocean warming. We present gridded mean fields for temperature, salinity and density, but also dissolved oxygen and chlorophyll-a fluorescence indicative of phytoplankton biomass. This data will be invaluable for understanding shelf stratification, circulation, biophysical and bio-geochemical interactions, as well as for the validation of high-resolution ocean models or serving as teaching material.

  18. Mean hydrography on the continental shelf from 26 repeat glider deployments along Southeastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Amandine; Roughan, Moninya; Austin, Tim; Everett, Jason D.; Griffin, David; Hollings, Ben; King, Edward; Mantovanelli, Alessandra; Milburn, Stuart; Pasquer, Benedicte; Pattiaratchi, Charitha; Robertson, Robin; Stanley, Dennis; Suthers, Iain; White, Dana

    2016-08-01

    Since 2008, 26 glider missions have been undertaken along the continental shelf of southeastern Australia. Typically these missions have spanned the continental shelf on the inshore edge of the East Australian Current from 29.5-33.5°S. This comprehensive dataset of over 33,600 CTD profiles from the surface to within 10 m of the bottom in water depths ranging 25-200 m provides new and unprecedented high resolution observations of the properties of the continental shelf waters adjacent to a western boundary current, straddling the region where it separates from the coast. The region is both physically and biologically significant, and is also in a hotspot of ocean warming. We present gridded mean fields for temperature, salinity and density, but also dissolved oxygen and chlorophyll-a fluorescence indicative of phytoplankton biomass. This data will be invaluable for understanding shelf stratification, circulation, biophysical and bio-geochemical interactions, as well as for the validation of high-resolution ocean models or serving as teaching material.

  19. Relict sand waves in the continental shelf of the Gulf of Valencia (Western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarracín, Silvia; Alcántara-Carrió, Javier; Montoya-Montes, Isabel; Fontán-Bouzas, Ángela; Somoza, Luis; Amos, Carl L.; Salgado, Jorge Rey

    2014-10-01

    The presence of fossil or relict bedforms is common in the Quaternary fill of modern continental shelf due to sea level oscillations, tectonic subsidence and migration of associated sedimentary facies. The continental margin of the Gulf of Valencia has been strongly influenced by glacio-eustasy and neotectonics. High-resolution multibeam bathymetry data, seismic reflection profiles and box core samples were collected across the continental shelf of the Gulf of Valencia during the DERIVA cruises carried out in 2010 and 2011. The integrated analysis of this data set and high-resolution mapping of the relict bedforms on the Valencian continental shelf, ranging between 50 and 90 m allowed the study of previously identified system of sand waves located in front of the present-day Albufera de Valencia lagoon. The system is composed of 27 ridges with a NNE-SSW orientation, i.e. oblique to the present shoreline, in which the lateral horns point backwards. These sand waves can reach 10 m in height and 3 km in length resulting in a maximum slope of 6°. According to seismic stratigraphic and relative sea level curve reconstructions, these sand waves were formed during the Younger Dryas (~ 12-10 ky BP). Consequently, they have been classified as Holocene sand waves associated with coastal sedimentary evolution.

  20. Benthic manganese fluxes along the Oregon-California continental shelf and slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McManus, James; Berelson, William M.; Severmann, Silke; Johnson, Kenneth S.; Hammond, Douglas E.; Roy, Moutusi; Coale, Kenneth H.

    2012-07-01

    Here we examine the factors that influence the manganese (Mn) benthic flux from eastern North Pacific marine sediments, with a primary emphasis on continental shelf locations off Oregon and California and studies that involve the use of in situ benthic chambers. Typical shelf-to-shallow margin (<˜350 m) sites have benthic Mn efflux rates that average ˜8±5 μmol m-2 d-1. In contrast, for the Eel River continental shelf region the benthic Mn efflux can be an order of magnitude higher than other shelf settings with benthic effluxes exceeding ˜50 μmol m-2 d-1. Based on prior work and some new results, continental margin and slope sites (350-˜4000 m) have benthic Mn efflux rates that average ˜1±1 μmol m-2 d-1. The combination of the benthic flux and Mn solid-phase data, indicate that for the continental shelf off the Umpqua and Eel Rivers, approximately 15±10% of the total Mn that is delivered to the seafloor is remobilized. The compiled data set shows that the benthic Mn efflux co-varies with the organic carbon oxidation rate with a Mn to organic carbon oxidation (Cox) ratio of ˜0.8 mmol Mn mol-1. Although this ratio can be as high as ˜5 for some Eel River sites, the generally close correspondence between Mn and organic carbon implies that the organic carbon oxidation rate exerts some primary control over the rate of the Mn efflux. The amount of organic carbon oxidized by Mn-oxides, however, represents a small fraction (i.e., generally <1%) of the total organic carbon oxidized in these seafloor sediments.

  1. A new bathymetry of the Northeast Greenland continental shelf: Constraints on glacial and other processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Jan Erik; Jokat, Wilfried; Dorschel, Boris; Myklebust, Reidun; Dowdeswell, Julian A.; Evans, Jeffrey

    2015-10-01

    A new digital bathymetric model (DBM) for the Northeast Greenland (NEG) continental shelf (74°N-81°N) is presented. The DBM has a grid cell size of 250 m × 250 m and incorporates bathymetric data from 30 multibeam cruises, more than 20 single-beam cruises and first reflector depths from industrial seismic lines. The new DBM substantially improves the bathymetry compared to older models. The DBM not only allows a better delineation of previously known seafloor morphology but, in addition, reveals the presence of previously unmapped morphological features including glacially derived troughs, fjords, grounding-zone wedges, and lateral moraines. These submarine landforms are used to infer the past extent and ice-flow dynamics of the Greenland Ice Sheet during the last full-glacial period of the Quaternary and subsequent ice retreat across the continental shelf. The DBM reveals cross-shelf bathymetric troughs that may enable the inflow of warm Atlantic water masses across the shelf, driving enhanced basal melting of the marine-terminating outlet glaciers draining the ice sheet to the coast in Northeast Greenland. Knolls, sinks, and hummocky seafloor on the middle shelf are also suggested to be related to salt diapirism. North-south-orientated elongate depressions are identified that probably relate to ice-marginal processes in combination with erosion caused by the East Greenland Current. A single guyot-like peak has been discovered and is interpreted to have been produced during a volcanic event approximately 55 Ma ago.

  2. Malvinas-slope water intrusions on the northern Patagonia continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piola, A. R.; Martínez Avellaneda, N.; Guerrero, R. A.; Jardón, F. P.; Palma, E. D.; Romero, S. I.

    2010-03-01

    The Patagonia continental shelf located off southeastern South America is bounded offshore by the Malvinas Current, which extends northward from northern Drake Passage (~55° S) to nearly 38° S. The transition between relatively warm-fresh shelf waters and Subantarctic Waters from the western boundary current is characterized by a thermohaline front extending nearly 2500 km. We use satellite derived sea surface temperature, and chlorophyll-a data combined with hydrographic and surface drifter data to document the intrusions of slope waters onto the continental shelf near 41° S. These intrusions create vertically coherent localized negative temperature and positive salinity anomalies extending onshore about 150 km from the shelf break. The region is associated with a center of action of the first mode of non-seasonal sea surface temperature variability and also relatively high chlorophyll-a variability, suggesting that the intrusions are important in promoting the local development of phytoplankton. The generation of slope water penetrations at this location may be triggered by the inshore excursion of the 100 m isobath, which appears to steer the Malvinas Current waters over the outer shelf.

  3. Malvinas-slope water intrusions on the northern Patagonia continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piola, A. R.; Avellaneda, N. M.; Guerrero, R. A.; Jardón, F. P.; Palma, E. D.; Romero, S. I.

    2009-12-01

    The Patagonia continental shelf located off southeastern South America is bounded offshore by the Malvinas Current, which extends northward from northern Drake Passage (~55° S) to nearly 38° S. The transition between relatively warm-fresh shelf waters and Subantarctic Waters from the western boundary current is characterized by a thermohaline front extending nearly 2500 km. We use satellite derived sea surface temperature, and chlorophyll-a data combined with hydrographic and surface drifter data to document the intrusions of slope waters onto the continental shelf near 41° S. These intrusions create vertically coherent localized negative temperature and positive salinity anomalies extending onshore about 150 km from the shelf break. The region is associated with a center of action of the first mode of non-seasonal sea surface temperature variability and also relatively high chlorophyll-a variability, suggesting that the intrusions are important in promoting the local development of phytoplankton. The generation of slope water penetrations at this location may be triggered by the inshore excursion of the 100 m isobath, which appears to steer the Malvinas Current waters over the outer shelf.

  4. High level of bacterial diversity and novel taxa in continental shelf sediment.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jin-Kyung; Cho, Jae-Chang

    2012-06-01

    The bacterial diversity of the continental shelf sediment in the Yellow Sea was investigated by the cloning and sequencing of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes. The majority of the cloned sequences were distinct phylotypes that were novel at the species level. The richness estimator indicated that the sediment sample might harbor up to 32 phylum-level taxa. A large number of low-abundance, phylum-level taxa accounted for most of the observed phylogenetic diversity at our study site, suggesting that these low-abundance taxa might play crucial roles in the shelf sediment ecosystem.

  5. The imprint of sea-level changes in the Southeastern Iberian continental shelf, Western Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinna, Andrea; Lastras, Galderic; Acosta, Juan; Muñoz, Araceli; Canals, Miquel

    2014-05-01

    A detailed morphologic analysis of the Southeastern Iberian continental shelf, Western Mediterranean Sea, between the Mar Menor and the Gulf of Almería, based on swath bathymetry data, has revealed a number of seafloor features that we attribute to the imprint of sea-level changes since the last glacial maximum. The continental shelf has been divided in four different domains with contrasting characteristics: the Mar Menor sector, the Mazarrón and Vera sector, the Gata Cape shelf and the Gulf of Almería shelf. The Mar Menor sector displays an up to 40 km wide shelf with a very low slope gradient, which contrasts with the Mazarrón and Vera shelf, with a width ranging between 0.4 and 5 km, severely incised by the different branches of the Garrucha submarine canyon. On each of these sectors, a variety of morphologies such as crests and escarpments have been identified. Most of these crests and escarpments can be followed for distances exceeding 15 km, and are located at constant, characteristic water depths. We interpret these structures as the result of relatively short-lived sea-level still-stands and thus as palaeo-coastlines. Taking into account subsidence, we have correlated their bathymetric position with published post-MIS-5 Mediterranean sea-level evolution curves, allowing the attribution of an approximate age for each interpreted palaeo-coastline. The last sea-level regression is partially registered in the smooth Mar Menor shelf, where different crests and escarpments are cut by a LGM palaeo-channel, whereas all the sectors display structures related to the last sea-level transgression. The continuity of these structures along all the sectors has allowed reconstructing the evolution of the coastline during the last sea-level transgression, and thus inferring the palaeo-landscape of this sector of the Southeastern Iberian coast at different stages since 18 ka BP until the present.

  6. Sea, ice and surface water circulation, Alaskan continental shelf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, G. D.; Wright, F. F.; Burns, J. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. ERTS-1 imagery has been extremely useful in understanding the tidal water movements in a large estuary such as Cook Inlet. As more imagery obtained during various tidal stages become available it appears that complex and fast changing micro-circulation patterns develop in various regions of Cook Inlet during each advancing and receding tide. More ERTS-1 synoptic imagery is needed to fully understand the effect of the approach of tidal front on the water movements in the various regions through the estuary. The conventional onboard ship data gathered during various cruises although revealed the overall circulation pattern in Cook Inlet but failed to show micro-subgyres which develop in various regions during each tide which are discernible on ther ERTS-1 imagery. Suspended load distribution in the Bering Sea during summer varies significantly. In areas of phytoplankton bloom and at the river mouths the suspended load is higher than the 1 mg/1 which is found over most areas. The influence of major rivers on temperature, salinity, and suspended load in surface water as well as at shallow depth is apparent. On the Bering shelf a strong pycnocline generally at depth 10-20 m is formed by surface fresh water flow which retains sediment in suspension over extended periods.

  7. Modeling three-dimensional propagation in a continental shelf environment.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Megan S

    2012-03-01

    An acoustic propagation model is applied to predict measurements of three-dimensional (3-D) effects recorded off the southeast coast of Florida. The measured signal is produced by a low frequency source that is towed north parallel to the shelf from a fixed receiving array. The acoustic data show the direct path arrival at the bearing of the tow ship and a second refracted path arrival as much as 30° inshore of the direct arrival. Notably, the refracted arrival has a received level more than 25 dB greater than that of the direct arrival. A geoacoustic model of the environment is created to explain the data. It is shown that the topography of the seafloor plays the largest role in controlling horizontal refraction effects, whereas the range-dependent sediment properties have the most influence on the received level. The modeling approach is based on a 3-D adiabatic mode technique in which the horizontal refraction equation is solved using a parabolic equation in Cartesian coordinates. A modal decomposition of the field provides insight into the variability in the arrival angle and received level of the measured signal.

  8. Instabilities in nonlinear internal waves on the Washington continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuang; Alford, Matthew H.

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have identified two primary mechanisms (shear instability and convective instability) by which nonlinear internal waves (NLIWs) induce mixing on continental shelves. To determine the relative importance of these and their dependence on background flow conditions, we examine a much longer (6 month) data set from a moored ADCP/thermistor chain with 2 m vertical spacing in which over 600 NLIWs are detected. Turbulent properties of the 318 waves with detectable overturning instabilities are documented using Thorpe scales. The 130 waves detected while an ADCP was functioning are classified based on a Froude number criterion (Fr = uc, where u is velocity in the wave propagation direction, c is the wave phase speed). Of these, 108 waves are identified as shear-instability (Type I; Fr < 1) waves and 22 as convective instability (Type II; Fr > 1). Composites are constructed by averaging in a wave coordinate frame over all waves in each category, showing the mean spatial structure of dissipation and other wave quantities. Turbulence is highest at the sheared interface for Type I waves and throughout the wave core for Type II waves. No relationship between wave instability mechanisms and wave/background parameters such as wave steepness, stratification, or mean flow is found, except that unstable waves tend to be more energetic, demonstrating a need to better understand wave propagation and breaking in complex and variable coastal oceanographic background flows.

  9. Bottom stress estimates and sand transport on northern California inner continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cacchione, D.A.; Drake, D.E.; Ferreira, J.T.; Tate, G.B.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of velocities and light transmission in the bottom boundary layer on the continental shelf off northern California demonstrate the importance of storms in the transport of sediment along the coast and offshore in this region. Time-series estimates of bottom stress obtained from a combined wave-current bottom boundary layer model in which wave and current measurements from the Geoprobe tripod were used as input show high stress values of 10 dynes cm-2 during two distinct storm events in early February and early March, 1991. These stresses induce significant offshore sediment transport, achieving maximum values of about 0.5 g cm-1 s-1. The net transport over the entire measurement period from 30 January 1991 to 13 March 1991 was along the coast toward the north and offshore. This transport pattern explains slow migration of low amplitude, broad crescentic dunes along and across this portion of the inner continental shelf. ?? 1994.

  10. An oilspill risk analysis for the North Atlantic outer continental shelf lease area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Richard Allmon; Slack, James Richard; Davis, Robert K.

    1976-01-01

    The Federal Government has proposed to lease 1,172,795 acres of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) lands on Georges Bank off the New England Coast for oil and gas development. Estimated recoverable petroleum resources for the proposed 206 tract sale area range from 180 to 650 million barrels. Contingent upon actual discovery of this quantity of oil, production is expected to span a period of about 20 years. An oilspill risk analysis was conducted to determine relative environmental hazards of developing oil in the North Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf lease area. The study analyzed probability of spill occurrence, likely path of pollutants from spills, and locations in space and time of recreational and biological resources likely to be vulnerable. These results are combined to yield estimates of the overall oilspill risk associated with development of the lease area. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. The influence of surface waves on water circulation in a mid-Atlantic continental shelf region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitlock, C. H.; Talay, T. A.

    1974-01-01

    The importance of wave-induced currents in different weather conditions and water depths (18.3 m and 36.6 m) is assessed in a mid-Atlantic continental-shelf region. A review of general circulation conditions is conducted. Factors which perturb the general circulation are examined using analytic techniques and limited experimental data. Actual wind and wave statistics for the region are examined. Relative magnitudes of the various currents are compared on a frequency of annual occurrence basis. Results indicated that wave-induced currents are often the same order of magnitude as other currents in the region and become more important at higher wind and wave conditions. Wind-wave and ocean-swell characteristics are among those parameters which must be monitored for the analytical computation of continental-shelf circulation.

  12. Development of the benethic nepheloid layer on the south Texas continental shelf, western Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shideler, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    A monitoring study of suspended sediment on the South Texas Continental Shelf indicates that a turbid benthic nepheloid layer is regionally persistent. A sequence of quasi-synoptic measurements of the water column obtained during six cruises in an 18-month period indicates substantial spatial and temporal variability in nepheloidlayer characteristics. Regionally, the thickness of the shelf nepheloid layer increases both seaward and in a convergent alongshelf direction. Greatest thicknesses occur over a muddy substrate, indicating a causal relationship; maximum observed local thickness is 35 m which occurs along the southern shelf break. Analyses of suspended particulate matter in shelf bottom waters indicate mean concentrations ranging from 49 ?? 104 to 111 ?? 104 particle counts/cc; concentrations persistently increase shoreward throughout the region. Bottom particulate matter is predominantly composed of inorganic detritus. Admixtures of organic skeletal particles, primarily diatoms, are generally present but average less than 10% of the total particulate composition. Texturally, the particulate matter in bottom waters is predominantly poorly sorted sediment composed of very fine silt (3.9-7.8 ??m). The variability in nepheloid-layer characteristics indicates a highly dynamic shelf feature. The relationship of nepheloid-layer characteristics to hydrographic and substrate conditions suggests a conceptual model whereby nepheloid-layer development and maintenance are the results of the resuspension of sea-floor sediment. Bottom turbulence is attributed primarily to vertical shear and shoaling progressive internal waves generated by migrating shelf-water masses, especially oceanic frontal systems, and secondarily to shoaling surface gravity waves. ?? 1981.

  13. High Resolution Quaternary Seismic Stratigraphy of the New York Bight Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwab, William C.; Denny, J.F.; Foster, D.S.; Lotto, L.L.; Allison, M.A.; Uchupi, E.; Swift, B.A.; Danforth, W.W.; Thieler, E.R.; Butman, Bradford

    2003-01-01

    A principal focus for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program (marine.usgs.gov) is regional reconnaissance mapping of inner-continental shelf areas, with initial emphasis on heavily used areas of the sea floor near major population centers. The objectives are to develop a detailed regional synthesis of the sea-floor geology in order to provide information for a wide range of management decisions and to form a basis for further investigations of marine geological processes. In 1995, the USGS, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACOE), New York District, began to generate reconnaissance maps of the continental shelf seaward of the New York - New Jersey metropolitan area. This mapping encompassed the New York Bight inner-continental shelf, one of the most heavily trafficked and exploited coastal regions in the United States. Contiguous areas of the Hudson Shelf Valley, the largest physiographic feature on this segment of the continental shelf, also were mapped as part of a USGS study of contaminated sediments (Buchholtz ten Brink and others, 1994; 1996). The goal of the reconnaissance mapping was to provide a regional synthesis of the sea-floor geology in the New York Bight area, including: (a) a description of sea-floor morphology; (b) a map of sea-floor sedimentary lithotypes; (c) the geometry and structure of the Cretaceous strata and Quaternary deposits; and (d) the geologic history of the region. Pursuing the course of this mapping effort, we obtained sidescan-sonar images of 100 % of the sea floor in the study area. Initial interpretations of these sidescan data were presented by Schwab and others, (1997a, 1997b, 2000a). High-resolution seismic-reflection profiles collected along each sidescan-sonar line used multiple acoustic sources (e.g., watergun, CHIRP, Geopulse). Multibeam swath-bathymetry data also were obtained for a portion of the study area (Butman and others, 1998;). In this report, we present a series

  14. Model for the Formation and Evolution of Sand Ridges on the Continental Shelf

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    structures such as longshore sand ridges, on the continental shelf in water deeper than that of the shoaling region, is proposed. The model is based on the...interaction between surficial or internal weakly nonlinear shallow water waves having weak span- wise spatial dependence and the bottom topography. While...structure, model, 169 non-linear, shallow water waves, finite difference 1.4 PIC[ coot 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATOM 1t SECURITY .ASSWICATON 1t. SECU10TY

  15. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic Coastal Plain and Outer Continental Shelf in 1985 and 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Amato, R.V.

    1987-10-01

    Drilling activity for 1985 was not reported previously due to the low level of activity. No exploratory drilling took place on the Atlantic outer continental shelf in 1985 or 1986. One shallow well was drilled onshore in Georgia on the Atlantic coastal plan in 1985, and 2 wells were completed in Georgia in 1986. Texaco drilled 6 core holes on the Virginia coastal plain in 1986. 2 tables.

  16. Sidescan-sonar data collected during May 1978 from the southern New England continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McClennen, Charles E.

    1981-01-01

    Sidescan-sonar data were collected aboard R/V WESTWARD (Cruise W-39-4) during May 1978 by the U.S. Geological Survey using an Ocean Research Equipment System. Navigation in the study area was by Loran C. The 368 kilometers of survey were conducted in Block Island Sound, in Rhode Island Sound, and over the mid-Continental Shelf south of Block Island and Martha's Vineyard (Fig. 1).

  17. Outer continental shelf, Beaufort Sea, oil and gas lease sale 170 (proposed notice of sale)

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    The Minerals Management Service (MMS) is issuing this proposed Notice of Sale under the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Lands Act (43 U.S.C. 1331-1356, as amended) and the regulations issued thereunder (30 CFR Part 256). A `Sale Notice Package,` containing this Notice and several supporting and essential documents referenced in the Notice, is available from the MMS Alaska OCS Regional Office Public Information Unit.

  18. Transport and transfer rates in the waters of the continental shelf. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Biscaye, P.E.

    1980-09-01

    The goal of govern project is to understand and quantify the processes that the transport and dispersal of energy-related pollutants introduced to the waters of the continental shelf and slope. The report is divided into sections dealing with processes associated with suspended solids; processes associated with sediments sinks for radionuclides and other pollutants; and spreading of water characteristics and species in solution. (ACR)

  19. Hydrothermal origin of oil and gas reservoirs in basement rock of the South Vietnam continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitriyevskiy, A.N.; Kireyev, F.A.; Bochko, R.A.; Fedorova, T.A. )

    1993-07-01

    Oil-saturated granites, with mineral parageneses typical of hydrothermal metasomatism and leaching haloes, have been found near faults in the crystalline basement of the South Vietnam continental shelf. The presence of native silver, barite, zincian copper, and iron chloride indicates a deep origin for the mineralizing fluids. Hydrothermally altered granites are a new possible type of reservoir and considerably broaden the possibilities of oil and gas exploration. 15 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Megaflutes in a continental shelf setting, Placentia Bay, Newfoundland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, John; Puig, Pere; Han, Guoqi

    2013-05-01

    Megaflutes - erosional scours normally found in deep water on continental slopes - were identified in 1978 on sidescan sonograms and seismic reflection profiles from Placentia Bay on the south coast of Newfoundland, Canada. Data from recent extensive multibeam sonar surveys provide an opportunity to describe the morphology and distribution of the megaflutes in detail, and to consider the formative processes. They occur on the east side of the outer bay, at a depth of ~ 200 m, in a 2-3 km-wide swath that continues to the south into Halibut Channel, over a total distance of ~ 100 km. The megaflutes have been formed by removal of a layer of postglacial mud, exposing underlying glaciomarine sediments and releasing a volume of 4.5 km3. They occur in a range of forms, including single, multiple, and coalescent types, and in some areas at least their inception was related to pre-existing pockmarks. Radiocarbon dates from piston cores are used to demonstrate that megaflute formation post-dated ca. 9 ka. Megaflute formation in Placentia Bay has been attributed to a 'reverse flow' from the tsunami generated by the 1929 Grand Banks earthquake, and this is still the accepted hypothesis. We argue that the return flow from a tsunami did not generate the megaflutes, and suggest instead that they could be formed during south-flowing density currents generated when volumes of cold saline water stored in the deep (> 250 m) basins at the head of Placentia Bay are intermittently displaced and spilled south in a shallow channel at the east side of the bay after intense coastal surface dense water formation events, perhaps during very cold winters.

  1. Temporal coherence of the acoustic field forward propagated through a continental shelf with random internal waves.

    PubMed

    Gong, Zheng; Chen, Tianrun; Ratilal, Purnima; Makris, Nicholas C

    2013-11-01

    An analytical model derived from normal mode theory for the accumulated effects of range-dependent multiple forward scattering is applied to estimate the temporal coherence of the acoustic field forward propagated through a continental-shelf waveguide containing random three-dimensional internal waves. The modeled coherence time scale of narrow band low-frequency acoustic field fluctuations after propagating through a continental-shelf waveguide is shown to decay with a power-law of range to the -1/2 beyond roughly 1 km, decrease with increasing internal wave energy, to be consistent with measured acoustic coherence time scales. The model should provide a useful prediction of the acoustic coherence time scale as a function of internal wave energy in continental-shelf environments. The acoustic coherence time scale is an important parameter in remote sensing applications because it determines (i) the time window within which standard coherent processing such as matched filtering may be conducted, and (ii) the number of statistically independent fluctuations in a given measurement period that determines the variance reduction possible by stationary averaging.

  2. Impact of Satellite Remote Sensing Data on Simulations of Coastal Circulation and Hypoxia on the Louisiana Continental Shelf

    EPA Science Inventory

    We estimated surface salinity flux and solar penetration from satellite data, and performed model simulations to examine the impact of including the satellite estimates on temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen distributions on the Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) near the ...

  3. 76 FR 19122 - Record of Decision (ROD) for Authorizing the Use of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Sand Resources...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ... resources in National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Wallops Flight Facility (WFF... the Use of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Sand Resources in National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Wallops Flight Facility Shoreline Restoration and Infrastructure Protection Program...

  4. 75 FR 17156 - Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf, Western Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 215 (2010...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... Minerals Management Service Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf, Western Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 215 (2010) Environmental Assessment AGENCY: Minerals Management Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability of an environmental assessment. SUMMARY: The Minerals Management Service (MMS)...

  5. 78 FR 59632 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations on the Outer Continental Shelf-Oil and Gas Production Safety...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... comments to the Department of the Interior (DOI); Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement; Attention... operating dry tree and subsea tree production systems on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) and divide...

  6. Resuspended sediments can contribute to the establishment and maintenance of hypoxia on the Louisiana continental shelf - Eldridge

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hypoxia occurs during summer on the Louisiana Continental Shelf. We investigated whether resuspension of sediment organic matter and the reduced end products of anaerobic microbial metabolism contributes to the onset and maintenance of hypoxia. The potential oxygen demand due to...

  7. Spatiotemporal chlorophyll-a dynamics on the Louisiana continental shelf derived from a dual satellite imagery algorithm

    EPA Science Inventory

    A monthly time series of remotely sensed chlorophyll-a (Chlars) over the Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) was developed and examined for its relationship to river discharge, nitrate concentration, total phosphorus concentration, photosynthetically available radiation (PAR), wind...

  8. Cetacean high-use habitats of the northeast United States continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, R.D.; Winn, H.E.

    1986-04-01

    Results of the Cetacean and Turtle Assessment Program previously demonstrated at a qualitative level that specific areas of the continental shelf waters off the northeastern US coast consistently showed high-density utilization by several cetacean species. They have quantified, on a multispecies basis and with adjustment for level of survey effort, the intensity of habitat use by whales and dolphins, and defined areas of especially high-intensity utilization. The results demonstrate that the area off the northeast US, which is used most intensively as cetacean habitat, is the western margin of the Gulf of Maine, from the Great South Channel to Stellwagen Bank and Jeffreys Ledge. Secondary high-use areas include the continental shelf edge and the region around the eastern end of Georges Bank. High-use areas for piseivorous cetaceans are concentrated mainly in the western Gulf of Maine and secondarily at mid-shelf east of the Chesapeake region, for planktivores in the western Gulf of Maine and the southwestern and eastern portions of Georges Bank, and for teuthivores in the western Gulf of Maine and the southwestern and eastern portions of Georges Bank, and for teuthivores along the edge of the shelf. In general, habitat use by cetaceans is highest in spring and summer, and lowest in fall and winter.

  9. Seismic stratigraphy of the Mississippi-Alabama shelf and upper continental slope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kindinger, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The Mississippi-Alabama shelf and upper continental slope contain relatively thin Upper Pleistocene and Holocene deposits. Five stages of shelf evolution can be identified from the early Wisconsinan to present. The stages were controlled by glacioeustatic or relative sea-level changes and are defined by the stratigraphic position of depositional and erosional episodes. The stratigraphy was identified on seismic profiles by means of geomorphic pattern, high-angle clinoform progradational deposits, buried stream entrenchments, planar conformities, and erosional unconformities. The oldest stage (stage 1) of evolution occurred during the early Wisconsinan lowstand; the subaerially exposed shelf was eroded to a smooth seaward-sloping surface. This paleosurface is overlain by a thin (< 10 m) drape of transgressive deposits (stage 2). Stage 3 occurred in three phases as the late Wisconsinan sea retreated: (1) fluvial channel systems eroded across the shelf, (2) deposited a thick (90 m) shelf-margin delta, and (3) contemporaneously deposited sediments on the upper slope. Stage 4 included the rapid Holocene sea-level rise that deposited a relatively thin transgressive facies over parts of the shelf. The last major depositional episode (stage 5) was the progradation of the St. Bernard delta over the northwestern and central parts of the area. A depositional hiatus has occurred since the St. Bernard progradation. These Upper Quaternary shelf and slope deposits provide models for analogous deposits in the geologic record. Primarily, they are examples of cyclic sedimentation caused by changes in sea level and may be useful in describing short-term, sandy depositional episodes in prograding shelf and slope sequences. ?? 1988.

  10. Geology of the head of Lydonia Canyon, U.S. Atlantic outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twichell, D.C.

    1983-01-01

    The geology of the part of Lydonia Canyon shoreward of the continental shelf edge on the southern side of Georges Bank was mapped using high-resolution seismic-reflection and side-scan sonar techniques and surface sediment grab samples. The head of the canyon incises Pleistocene deltaic deposits and Miocene shallow marine strata. Medium sand containing some coarse sand and gravel covers the shelf except for a belt of very fine sand containing no gravel on either side of the canyon in water depths of 125-140 m. Gravel and boulders, presumably ice-rafted debris, cover the rim of the canyon. The canyon floor and canyon wall gullies are covered by coarse silt of Holocene age which is as much as 25 m thick, and Miocene and Pleistocene strata are exposed on the spurs between gullies. The Holocene sediment is restricted to the canyon shoreward of the shelf edge and has been winnowed from the shelf. Furrows cut in the shelf sands and ripples on the shelf and in the canyon suggest that sediment continues to be moved in this area. Sediment distribution, however, is inconsistent with that expected from the inferred westward sediment transport on the shelf. Either the fine-grained deposits on the shelf to either side of the canyon head are relict or there is a significant component of offshore transport around the canyon head. In the head of Oceanographer Canyon, only 40 km west of Lydonia Canyon, present conditions are strikingly different. The floor of Oceanographer Canyon is covered by sand waves, and their presence indicates active reworking of the bottom sediments by strong currents. The close proximity of the two canyons suggests that the relative importance of processes acting in canyons can be variable over short distances. ?? 1983.

  11. Mixed carbonate-siliciclastic sequence stratigraphy of a Paleogene transition zone continental shelf, southeastern USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffey, Brian P.; Fred Read, J.

    2004-04-01

    The sequence stratigraphy and facies of the Paleogene in the subsurface of the Albemarle Basin, North Carolina was defined using 1600 thin sections of plastic impregnated well cuttings from 24 wells, wireline logs, biostratigraphic data, and seismic data. The facies formed in the transition zone between warm subtropical and temperate conditions on a swell-wave dominated, open shelf exposed to major boundary current activity. The shelf has a distinctive seismic profile consisting of a shallow inner shelf, inner-shelf break, deep shelf (depths in excess of 200 m), and the continental slope. The inner shelf was characterized by distinctive quartz sand and sandy mollusk facies inshore, passing seaward into a broad, wave-swept abrasional shelf, and then into storm-influenced bryozoan-echinoderm limestones to depths of several tens of meters. Argillaceous lime mud (marl) deposition was widespread across the deep shelf, extending onto the inner-shelf during major highstands. Sediment thickness trends were controlled by greater differential subsidence of crustal blocks within the Albemarle Basin, which considerably modified but did not obliterate the effects of eustatic sea level changes in this passive margin setting. Five supersequences were identified on seismic and in wells, each consisting of multiple regionally identifiable sequences. The Paleocene supersequence is dominated by widespread marl deposition, reflecting shelf flooding into the Late Paleocene thermal maximum. This warming corresponds with widespread inner-shelf skeletal carbonate deposition from the Late Paleocene through the Middle Eocene. The two Eocene supersequences identified are dominated by bryozoan-echinoderm-rich carbonates that formed a seismically definable sediment buildup 50 km wide by 100 m thick across the deepest inner-shelf during the Lower to early Middle Eocene. Middle to Upper Eocene supersequence highstand sequences indicate increased progradation and greater mixing of shelf

  12. Insights into Diversity and Imputed Metabolic Potential of Bacterial Communities in the Continental Shelf of Agatti Island

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Sunil Kumar; Jani, Kunal; Apte, Deepak A.; Shouche, Yogesh S.; Sharma, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Marine microbes play a key role and contribute largely to the global biogeochemical cycles. This study aims to explore microbial diversity from one such ecological hotspot, the continental shelf of Agatti Island. Sediment samples from various depths of the continental shelf were analyzed for bacterial diversity using deep sequencing technology along with the culturable approach. Additionally, imputed metagenomic approach was carried out to understand the functional aspects of microbial community especially for microbial genes important in nutrient uptake, survival and biogeochemical cycling in the marine environment. Using culturable approach, 28 bacterial strains representing 9 genera were isolated from various depths of continental shelf. The microbial community structure throughout the samples was dominated by phylum Proteobacteria and harbored various bacterioplanktons as well. Significant differences were observed in bacterial diversity within a short region of the continental shelf (1–40 meters) i.e. between upper continental shelf samples (UCS) with lesser depths (i.e. 1–20 meters) and lower continental shelf samples (LCS) with greater depths (i.e. 25–40 meters). By using imputed metagenomic approach, this study also discusses several adaptive mechanisms which enable microbes to survive in nutritionally deprived conditions, and also help to understand the influence of nutrition availability on bacterial diversity. PMID:26066038

  13. Insights into Diversity and Imputed Metabolic Potential of Bacterial Communities in the Continental Shelf of Agatti Island.

    PubMed

    Kumbhare, Shreyas V; Dhotre, Dhiraj P; Dhar, Sunil Kumar; Jani, Kunal; Apte, Deepak A; Shouche, Yogesh S; Sharma, Avinash

    2015-01-01

    Marine microbes play a key role and contribute largely to the global biogeochemical cycles. This study aims to explore microbial diversity from one such ecological hotspot, the continental shelf of Agatti Island. Sediment samples from various depths of the continental shelf were analyzed for bacterial diversity using deep sequencing technology along with the culturable approach. Additionally, imputed metagenomic approach was carried out to understand the functional aspects of microbial community especially for microbial genes important in nutrient uptake, survival and biogeochemical cycling in the marine environment. Using culturable approach, 28 bacterial strains representing 9 genera were isolated from various depths of continental shelf. The microbial community structure throughout the samples was dominated by phylum Proteobacteria and harbored various bacterioplanktons as well. Significant differences were observed in bacterial diversity within a short region of the continental shelf (1-40 meters) i.e. between upper continental shelf samples (UCS) with lesser depths (i.e. 1-20 meters) and lower continental shelf samples (LCS) with greater depths (i.e. 25-40 meters). By using imputed metagenomic approach, this study also discusses several adaptive mechanisms which enable microbes to survive in nutritionally deprived conditions, and also help to understand the influence of nutrition availability on bacterial diversity.

  14. Influence of fluvial processes on the quaternary geologic framework of the continental shelf, North Carolina, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boss, S.K.; Hoffman, C.W.; Cooper, B.

    2002-01-01

    Digital, single-channel, high-resolution seismic reflection profiles were acquired from the insular continental shelf of North Carolina, USA along a data grid extending from Oregon Inlet northward 48 km to Duck, North Carolina and from the nearshore zone seaward approximately 28 km (total surveyed area= 1334 km2). These data were processed and interpreted to delineate principal reflecting horizons and develop a three-dimensional seismic stratigraphic framework for the continental shelf that was compared to stratigraphic data from the shoreward back-barrier (estuarine) and barrier island system. Six principal reflecting horizons (designated R0 through R5) were present within the upper 60 m of the shelf stratigraphic succession. Three-dimensional mapping of reflector R1 demonstrated its origin from fluvial incision of the continental shelf during an episode (or episodes) of lowered sea-level. Fluvial processes during development of reflector R1 were responsible for extensive reworking and re-deposition of sediment throughout most of the northern half of the study area. Five seismic stratigraphic units (designated S1 through S5) were tentatively correlated with depositional sequences previously identified from the North Carolina back-barrier (estuarine) and barrier island system. These five stratigraphic units span the Quaternary Period (S1 = early Holocene; S2 = 51-78 ka; S3 = 330-530 ka; S4 = 1.1-1.8 Ma; S5 = earliest Pleistocene). Unit S1 is composed of fine-grained fluvial/estuarine sediment that back-filled incised streams during early Holocene sea-level rise. The four other stratigraphic units (S2-S5) display tabular depositional geometries, low total relief, and thicken toward the east-southeast as their basal reflectors dip gently between 0.41 m km-1 (0.02??) and 0.54 m km-1 (0.03??). Knowledge of the three-dimensional subsurface stratigraphic architecture of the continental shelf enhances understanding of the development of shelf depositional successions and

  15. Compiling Multibeam Sonar data for the U.S. Pacific West Coast Extended Continental Shelf Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, E.; Gardner, J. V.; Henderson, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    The United States Extended Continental Shelf (ECS) Project is a multi-agency collaboration whose goals are to determine and define a potential extension of the U.S. continental shelf beyond 200 nautical miles (nmi). Under international law as reflected in the 1982 United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), every coastal state is entitled to a continental shelf out to 200 nmi (the Exclusive Economic Zone) from its coastal baseline or out to a maritime boundary with another coastal country. The extended continental shelf (ECS) is the area that lies beyond this 200 nm limit where a country could gain sovereign rights to the resources of the seafloor and sub-seafloor. In 2007, the U.S. ECS Task Force designated NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) as the Data Management lead for the U.S. ECS Project and the data stewards and archival location for all data related to this project. The process to determine the outer limits of the ECS requires the collection and analysis of data that describe the depth, shape, and geophysical characteristics of the seafloor and sub-seafloor, as well as the thickness of the underlying sediments. The specific types of data that need to be collected include bathymetric data, seismic profiles, magnetic and gravity data, and other geophysical data. NGDC maintains several global geophysical databases, including bathymetric, seismic and geological data, all critical for supporting ECS analysis. Multibeam bathymetry is a primary dataset used for ECS analysis. Since 2003, the U.S. has collected more than 1.65 million square kilometers of multibeam bathymetric data from 18 cruises. One area where new data has been collected and where the U.S. may have an extended continental shelf is off the U.S. Pacific West Coast. New and old multibeam bathymetry archived at and delivered by NGDC were individually gridded by survey for an area within 48-30 degrees north latitude and -140 and -115 west longitude at a resolution of 210

  16. Wave-driven sediment mobilization on a storm-controlled continental shelf (Northwest Iberia)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberle, Ferdinand; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Hanebuth, Till

    2014-01-01

    Seafloor sediment mobilization on the inner Northwest Iberian continental shelf is caused largely by ocean surface waves. The temporal and spatial variability in the wave height, wave period, and wave direction has a profound effect on local sediment mobilization, leading to distinct sediment mobilization scenarios. Six grain-size specific sediment mobilization scenarios, representing seasonal average and storm conditions, were simulated with a physics-based numerical model. Model inputs included meteorological and oceanographic data in conjunction with seafloor grain-size and the shelf bathymetric data. The results show distinct seasonal variations, most importantly in wave height, leading to sediment mobilization, specifically on the inner shelf shallower than 30 m water depth where up to 49% of the shelf area is mobilized. Medium to severe storm events are modeled to mobilize up to 89% of the shelf area above 150 m water depth. The frequency of each of these seasonal and storm-related sediment mobilization scenarios is addressed using a decade of meteorological and oceanographic data. The temporal and spatial patterns of the modeled sediment mobilization scenarios are discussed in the context of existing geological and environmental processes and conditions to assist scientific, industrial and environmental efforts that are directly affected by sediment mobilization. Examples, where sediment mobilization plays a vital role, include seafloor nutrient advection, recurrent arrival of oil from oil-spill-laden seafloor sediment, and bottom trawling impacts.

  17. Imbalance between vertical nitrate flux and nitrate assimilation on a continental shelf: Implications of nitrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozaki, Takuhei; Furuya, Ken; Kurotori, Hiroyuki; Kodama, Taketoshi; Takeda, Shigenobu; Endoh, Takahiro; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Ishizaka, Joji; Matsuno, Takeshi

    2011-10-01

    The nitrate assimilation rate and diapycnal nitrate flux were simultaneously determined on the continental shelf of the East China Sea (ECS). Further, the archaeal amoA gene was quantified to examine the potential distribution of nitrification activity. Nitrate assimilation rates and distribution of the archaeal amoA gene were also investigated in the Philippine Sea and in the Kuroshio Current. At all the stations, while the surface nitrate was depleted (<0.1 μM), active nitrate assimilation was observed with mean rates of 1400, 270, and 96 μmolN m-2 d-1 in the ECS, the Philippine Sea, and the Kuroshio Current, respectively. Archaeal amoA was observed at shallower light depths, namely at or above 10% light depth, in the ECS than in other regions, suggesting that nitrification occurred within the euphotic zone in the ECS, especially on the shelf. Moreover, a station on the continental shelf of the ECS exhibited a considerable discrepancy between the nitrate assimilation rate (1500 μmolN m-2 d-1) and vertical nitrate flux (98 μmolN m-2 d-1). Here, 6.7 ± 3.1 × 103 and 2.5 ± 0.7 × 105 copies mL-1 of archaeal amoA were detected at 10% and 1% light depths relative to the surface, respectively. Thus nitrification within the euphotic zone would be attributed at least in part to the observed discrepancy between nitrate assimilation and vertical flux. These observations imply that the assumption of a direct relationship between new production, export production, and measured nitrate assimilation is misplaced, particularly regarding the continental shelf of the ECS.

  18. Larval Transport on the Atlantic Continental Shelf of North America: a Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epifanio, C. E.; Garvine, R. W.

    2001-01-01

    This review considers transport of larval fish and crustaceans on the continental shelf. Previous reviews have contained only limited treatments of the physical processes involved. The present paper provides a physical background that is considerably more comprehensive. It includes a discussion of three principal forcing agents: (1) wind stress; (2) tides propagating from the deep ocean; and (3) differences in density associated with the buoyant outflow of estuaries, surface heat flux, or the interaction of coastal and oceanic water masses at the seaward margin of the shelf. The authors discuss the effects of these forcing agents on transport of larvae in the Middle Atlantic and South Atlantic Bights along the east coast of North America. The discussion concentrates on three species (blue crab, menhaden, bluefish) that have been the subject of a very recent multi-disciplinary study. Taken as a whole, the reproductive activities of these three species span the entire year and utilize the entire shelf, from the most seaward margin to the estuarine nursery. The blue crab is representative of species affected by physical processes occurring during summer and early autumn on the inner and mid-shelf. Menhaden are impacted by processes occurring in winter on the outer and mid-shelf. Bluefish are influenced primarily by processes occurring during early spring at the outer shelf margin near the western boundary current. The authors conclude that alongshore wind stress and density differences, i.e. buoyancy-driven flow, are the primary agents of larval transport in the region. Circulation associated with the western boundary current is only important at the shelf margin and tidally driven processes are generally inconsequential.

  19. Maps showing late Pleistocene and Holocene evolution of the South Texas continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pyle, Carroll A.; Berryhill, Henry L.; Trippet, Anita R.

    1979-01-01

    Interpretation of acoustical profiles has provided insight into the late Quaternary geologic history of the Continental Shelf off South Texas. (See the geographic index map on sheet 1 for location of the area studied.) The profiles reveal the interplay of tectonism, sedimentation, and cyclic fluctuations of sea level in the building and geologic evolution of the continental terrace. The sequence of sediments studied extends to about 200 meters (m) beneath the sea-floor surface. Four seismic-stratigraphic units underlain by four prominent sound reflectors were identified and mapped. This geologic synthesis, for which the research was funded by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM), is but one aspect of a coordinated, multidisciplinary environmental study of the South Texas Outer Continental Shelf sponsored by BLM (Berryhill, 1976, 1977). The environmental studies are keyed to the leasing of Federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) lands for petroleum exploration and production. Their purpose is to provide the data development of petroleum resources on the OCS, as well as to provide the basis for predicting the impact of oil and gas exploration and production on the marine environment. Of primary concern is the recognition of geologic conditions that might be hazardous to structures placed on the sea floor. Geologic hazards relate directly to the potential for significant movement of the sea floor in the future. Judging sea-floor stability and recognizing geologic features that are potentially hazardous require an understanding of the recent geologic history of the area, which, in turn, entails determining the relative rates and interactions of sedimentation and tectonism through time. In addition to the primary objective, the synthesis provides knowledge about the magnitude and extent of sea-level fluctuations in the western Gulf of Mexico, and it provides a depositional facies model of possible use in appraising the resource potential of the more deeply buried

  20. Wind forcing controls on river plume spreading on a tropical continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarya, A.; van der Vegt, M.; Hoitink, A. J. F.

    2015-01-01

    Berau Continental Shelf is located close to the Equator in the Indonesian Archipelago, hosting a complex of coral reefs along its oceanic edge. The Berau coral reefs have a very high biodiversity, but the area is under serious risk due to river-derived nutrients and sediments. The region is characterized by weak winds, moderate tides, and almost absent Coriolis forcing. Existing knowledge about river plume behavior in tropical environments is limited. The aim of this paper is to investigate the influence of the subtle physical forcing on the dynamics of the Berau river plume. A three-dimensional model (ECOMSED) was calibrated with observational data. The model was forced by freshwater input from the Berau river distributaries, tides at the open boundaries, and measured hourly wind. The model reproduces the freshwater dynamics on the shelf adequately and highlights that the river plume spreads symmetrically for river forcing only. Tides cause vertical mixing and suppress the cross-shelf spreading of the river plume. However, the spreading of the river plume over the shelf is mainly controlled by the weak monsoonal winds, resulting in a seasonal development. During the Southeast Monsoon, the southerly winds push the plume northeastward and cause a stratified water column in the northern part of the continental shelf. Northerly winds during the Northwest Monsoon disperse the plume to the south, promoting a vertically well-mixed water column. The results can be used to predict the possible impact of land-use changes in the steadily developing Berau region on coral reef health.

  1. Flux of energy and essential elements through the continental shelf ecosystem. Progress report, June 1, 1982-May 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, L.R.

    1983-01-15

    Methods were perfected for counting protozoans in shelf water and we are working on methods for measuring bacterial production, taking into account the problem of protozoan grazing, which does not seem to have been investigated with respect to bacteria. Samples were collected on transects of the continental shelf on six cruises to improve our seasonal coverage and provide materials for the development of methods. Work on a model of energy flux through continental shelf ecosystems has been completed, and a manuscript will be submitted during the present contract year.

  2. Late Pleistocene and Holocene sedimentary facies on the Ebro continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diaz, J.; Nelson, C.H.; Barber, J.H.; Giro, S.

    1990-01-01

    Late Pleistocene-Holocene history of the Ebro continental shelf of northeastern Spain is recorded in two main sedimentary units: (1) a lower, transgressive unit that covers the shelf and is exposed on the outer shelf south of 40??40???N, and (2) an upper, progradational, prodeltaic unit that borders the Ebro Delta and extends southward along the inner shelf. The lower transgressive unit includes a large linear shoal found at a water depth of 90 m and hardground mounds at water depths of 70-80 m. Some patches of earlier Pleistocene prodelta mud remain also, exposed or covered by a thin veneer of transgressive sand on the northern outer shelf. This relict sand sheet is 2-3 m thick and contains 9000-12,500 yr old oyster and other shells at water depths of 78-88 m. The upper prodelta unit covers most of the inner shelf from water depths of 20-80 m and extends from the present Ebro River Delta to an area to the southwest where the unit progressively thins and narrows. Interpretation of high-resolution seismic reflection data shows the following facies occurring progressively offshore: (1) a thick stratified facies with thin progradational "foresets beds", (2) a faintly laminated facies with sparse reflectors of low continuity, and (3) a thin transparent bottomset facies underlain by a prominent flat-lying reflector. Deposition in the northern half of the prodelta began as soon as the shoreline transgressed over the mid-shelf, but progradation of the southern half did not begin until about 1000-3000 yrs after the transgression. A classic deltaic progradational sequence is shown in the Ebro prodelta mud by (1) gradation of seismic facies away from the delta, (2) coarsening-upward sequences near the delta and fining-upward sequences in the distal mud belt deposits, and (3) thin storm-sand layers and shell lags in the nearshore stratified facies. The boundaries of the prodeltaic unit are controlled by increased current speeds on the outer shelf (where the shelf narrows) and

  3. Circulation over the continental shelf of the western and southwestern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubranna, Jean; PéRez-Brunius, Paula; López, Manuel; Candela, Julio

    2011-08-01

    The circulation over the continental shelf break of the western and southwestern Gulf of Mexico is inferred from the analysis of drifter trajectories and 12-19 months of continuous current measurements at seven different locations. The interpretation of the data is backed up by satellite altimetry, coastal sea level from tide gauges and wind model outputs. In accordance with previous numerical results, subinertial surface currents are driven by the wind along the shelves of the states of Tamaulipas and Veracruz. Northern wind regimes would force southward currents, whereas southern wind regimes would force northward currents at the surface but southward near the bottom, through a process involving Ekman drift and geostrophic balance. Our results show, however, that alongshore current variations are not correlated with the wind over the Western Campeche Bank. In addition, we identify other sources of current forcing. The transient eddies that collapse along the continental shelf can force strong alongshore currents and overwhelm the influence of established wind regimes. Their erratic occurrence is likely to be a major factor of interannual variability of the alongshore currents. Also, we point out the existence of coastally trapped waves generated by the wind in the northern shelf of Tamaulipas and propagating down to the Western Campeche Bank. The period of these waves ranges between 6 and 10 days, with phase speeds in the 4 m/s range.

  4. Upwelling and dissolved oxygen variability over the continental shelf off Central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pizarro, Oscar

    2014-05-01

    In contrast to the legendary upwelling that is present along the Peruvian and northern Chilean coasts, the coastal ocean off central Chile presents a highly seasonal upwelling regime that extends from early spring to mid fall. This region is also affected by a strong subsurface poleward flow, which transports southward low-oxygen water from the eastern equatorial Pacific. Coastal waters are highly productive due to upwelling, but the upwelled source waters are very low in oxygen and may produce hypoxia near the bottom over the continental shelf. The spatial structure and main scales of variability of the upwelling cells and dissolved oxygen are poorly understood off central Chile. One of the main limitations has been the lack of direct information. During the last years an observational program has been conducted over the relatively wide continental shelf off Concepción (36°30' S). This program has included ship-based (monthly) time-series, underwater glider observations and time-series based on moored sensors. Here, based on physical (temperature, salinity, pressure, velocity), biological (chlorophyll fluorescence) and chemical (dissolved oxygen) information, we analyze the main scales of time variability of the upwelling, the coastal currents and their impact on the dissolved oxygen. The cross-shelf structure of the upwelling region was sampled using underwater gliders capable of sampling the entire water column to a maximum of 1000 m and from near shore to 200 km offshore.

  5. 210Pb balance and implications for particle transport on the continental shelf, U.S. Middle Atlantic Bight

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, M.P.; Belastock, Rebecca A.; Bothner, Michael H.

    1994-01-01

    Supply of 210Pb to the continental shelf off the northeastern United States is dominated by the deposition from the atmosphere, the rate of which is reliably known from previously published work. Excess 210Pb inventories in the shelf sediments show accumulations that are nearly in balance with the supply, even in areas of relict sands where it is believed that no net accumulation of sediment presently occurs. The 210Pb distributions in shelf and slope water indicate that the two-way fluid exchange at the shelf-slope front and the net transport in the alongshore flow make comparatively small contributions to the shelf 210Pb budget. The near balance between supply and decay of 210Pb on the shelf implies a limit to the particle export flux. It is concluded that the export of particulate organic carbon does not exceed 60 g m-2 y-1 (???25% of primary production) and is probably lower. The hypothesis is advanced that fine particulate matter introduced to the continental shelf is detained in its transit of the shelf because of bioturbational trapping in the sediment due to benthic animals. Distributions of 210Pb in suspended particulate matter and in the fine fraction of shelf sediments suggest that the average fine particle must undergo several cycles of deposition-bioturbation-resuspension-redeposition and requires a number of decades for its transit and ultimate export from the shelf. Thus, only the most refractory organic matter is likely to be exported. ?? 1994.

  6. Estimating the benthic efflux of dissolved iron on the Ross Sea continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsay, C. M.; Sedwick, P. N.; Dinniman, M. S.; Barrett, P. M.; Mack, S. L.; McGillicuddy, D. J.

    2014-11-01

    Continental margin sediments provide a potentially large but poorly constrained source of dissolved iron (dFe) to the upper ocean. The Ross Sea continental shelf is one region where this benthic supply is thought to play a key role in regulating the magnitude of seasonal primary production. Here we present data collected during austral summer 2012 that reveal contrasting low surface (0.08 ± 0.07 nM) and elevated near-seafloor (0.74 ± 0.47 nM) dFe concentrations. Combining these observations with results from a high-resolution physical circulation model, we estimate dFe efflux of 5.8 × 107 mol yr-1 from the deeper portions (>400 m) of the Ross Sea continental shelf; more than sufficient to account for the inferred "winter reserve" dFe inventory at the onset of the growing season. In addition, elevated dFe concentrations observed over shallower bathymetry suggest that such features provide additional inputs of dFe to the euphotic zone throughout the year.

  7. Seasonal variability of living benthic foraminifera from the outer continental shelf of the Bay of Biscay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duchemin, Gérald; Jorissen, Frans J.; Le Loc'h, François; Andrieux-Loyer, Françoise; Hily, Christian; Thouzeau, Gérard

    2008-08-01

    Living benthic foraminiferal faunas of six stations from the continental shelf of the Bay of Biscay have been investigated during three successive seasons (spring, summer and autumn 2002). For the three investigated stations, bottom water oxygen concentration, oxygen penetration into the sediment and sediment organic carbon contents are all relatively similar. Therefore, we think that the density and the composition of the foraminiferal faunas is mainly controlled by the quantity and quality of organic input resulting from a succession of phytoplankton bloom events, occurring from late February to early September. The earliest blooms are positioned at the shelf break, late spring and early summer blooms occur off Brittany, whereas in late summer and early autumn, only coastal blooms appear, often in the vicinity of river outlets. In spring, the benthic foraminiferal faunas of central (B, C and D) and outer (E) continental shelf stations are characterised by strong dominance in the first area and strong presence in the second area of Nonionella iridea. In fact, station E does not serve as a major depocenter for the remains of phytoplankton blooms. If station E is not considered, the densities of this taxon show a clear gradient from the shelf-break, where the species dominates the assemblages, to the coast, where it attains very low densities. We explain this gradient as a response to the presence, in early spring, of an important phytoplankton bloom, mainly composed of coccolithophorids, over the shelf break. This observation is supported by the maximum particles flux values at stations close to the shelf break (18.5 g m - 2 h - 1 ) and lower values in a station closer to the coast (6.8 g m - 2 h - 1 ). In summer, the faunal density is maximum at station A, relatively close to more varied phytoplancton blooms that occur off Brittany until early June. We suggest that the dominant species, Nonion fabum, Cassidulina carinata and Bolivina ex. gr. dilatata respond to

  8. Temporal variability of the Circumpolar Deep Water inflow onto the Ross Sea continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castagno, Pasquale; Falco, Pierpaolo; Dinniman, Michael S.; Spezie, Giancarlo; Budillon, Giorgio

    2017-02-01

    The intrusion of Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) is the primary source of heat, salt and nutrients onto Antarctica's continental shelves and plays a major role in the shelf physical and biological processes. Different studies have analyzed the processes responsible for the transport of CDW across the Ross Sea shelf break, but until now, there are no continuous observations that investigate the timing of the intrusions. Also, few works have focused on the effect of the tides that control these intrusions. In the Ross Sea, the CDW intrudes onto the shelf in several locations, but mostly along the troughs. We use hydrographic observations and a mooring placed on the outer shelf in the middle of the Drygalski Trough in order to characterize the spatial and temporal variability of CDW inflow onto the shelf. Our data span from 2004 to the beginning of 2014. In the Drygalski Trough, the CDW enters as a 150 m thick layer between 250 and 400 m, and moves upward towards the south. At the mooring location, about 50 km from the shelf break, two main CDW cores can be observed: one on the east side of the trough spreading along the west slope of Mawson Bank from about 200 m to the bottom and the other one in the central-west side from 200 m to about 350 m depth. A signature of this lighter and relatively warm water is detected by the instruments on the mooring at bottom of the Drygalski Trough. High frequency periodic CDW intrusion at the bottom of the trough is related to the diurnal and spring/neap tidal cycles. At lower frequency, a seasonal variability of the CDW intrusion is noticed. A strong inflow of CDW is observed every year at the end of December, while the CDW inflow is at its seasonal minimum during the beginning of the austral fall. In addition an interannual variability is also evident. A change of the CDW intrusion before and after 2010 is observed.

  9. Mapping and classifying the seabed of the West Greenland continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gougeon, S.; Kemp, K. M.; Blicher, M. E.; Yesson, C.

    2017-03-01

    Marine benthic habitats support a diversity of marine organisms that are both economically and intrinsically valuable. Our knowledge of the distribution of these habitats is largely incomplete, particularly in deeper water and at higher latitudes. The western continental shelf of Greenland is one example of a deep (more than 500 m) Arctic region with limited information available. This study uses an adaptation of the EUNIS seabed classification scheme to document benthic habitats in the region of the West Greenland shrimp trawl fishery from 60°N to 72°N in depths of 61-725 m. More than 2000 images collected at 224 stations between 2011 and 2015 were grouped into 7 habitat classes. A classification model was developed using environmental proxies to make habitat predictions for the entire western shelf (200-700 m below 72°N). The spatial distribution of habitats correlates with temperature and latitude. Muddy sediments appear in northern and colder areas whereas sandy and rocky areas dominate in the south. Southern regions are also warmer and have stronger currents. The Mud habitat is the most widespread, covering around a third of the study area. There is a general pattern that deep channels and basins are dominated by muddy sediments, many of which are fed by glacial sedimentation and outlets from fjords, while shallow banks and shelf have a mix of more complex habitats. This first habitat classification map of the West Greenland shelf will be a useful tool for researchers, management and conservationists.

  10. Galveston Symposium: Physical Oceanography of the Louisiana/Texas Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, Thomas M.; Brown, Murray

    The Minerals Management Service (MMS), Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region sponsored a symposium on the Physical Oceanography of the Louisiana/Texas (LA/TX) Shelf in Galveston, Texas, on May 24-26, 1988. The symposium brought together a number of physical oceanographers, meteorologists, and ecologists to discuss the state of knowledge and to begin the planning process for a long-term study of shelf circulation covering the region from the mouth of the Mississippi River to approximately 24° latitude along the Mexican coast and from the shore out to a depth of approximately 500 m. The proposed study, to be a component of the ongoing MMS Environmental Studies Program, is expected to take place during the period 1989-1991. It is anticipated that the work will be done principally through contracts after a competitive procurement process. Specific charges to the participants were as follows:to assess the current state of knowledge concerning the circulation on the LA/TX shelfto identify significant gaps in that knowledgeto recommend a field measurement program to address these gapsto recommend a circulation modeling program for the LA/TX shelf that will improve MMS' oil spill risk assessmentsto identify and initiate coordination mechanisms and data-sharing arrangements with other proposed research efforts

  11. What a drag: Quantifying the global impact of chronic bottom trawling on continental shelf sediment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberle, Ferdinand K.J.; Storlazzi, Curt; Hanebuth, Till J.J.

    2016-01-01

    Continental shelves worldwide are subject to intense bottom trawling that causes sediment to be resuspended. The widely used traditional concepts of modern sedimentary transport systems on the shelf rely only on estimates for naturally driven sediment resuspension such as through storm waves, bottom currents, and gravity-driven flows but they overlook a critical anthropogenic factor. The strong influence of bottom trawling on a source-to-sink sediment budget is explored on the NW Iberian shelf. Use of Automated Information System vessel tracking data provides for a high-resolution vessel track reconstruction and the accurate calculation of the spatial distribution of bottom trawling intensity and associated resuspended sediment load. The mean bottom trawling-induced resuspended sediment mass for the NW Iberian shelf is 13.50 Mt yr− 1, which leads to a six-fold increase in off-shelf sediment transport when compared to natural resuspension mechanisms. The source-to-sink budget analysis provides evidence that bottom trawling causes a rapid erosion of the fine sediment on human time scales. Combining global soft sediment distribution data of the shelves with worldwide bottom trawling intensity estimates we show that the bottom trawling-induced resuspended sediment mass amounts to approximately the same mass of all sediment entering the shelves through rivers. Spatial delineations between natural and anthropogenic sediment resuspension areas are presented to aid in marine management questions.

  12. What a drag: Quantifying the global impact of chronic bottom trawling on continental shelf sediment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberle, Ferdinand K. J.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Hanebuth, Till J. J.

    2016-07-01

    Continental shelves worldwide are subject to intense bottom trawling that causes sediment to be resuspended. The widely used traditional concepts of modern sedimentary transport systems on the shelf rely only on estimates for naturally driven sediment resuspension such as through storm waves, bottom currents, and gravity-driven flows but they overlook a critical anthropogenic factor. The strong influence of bottom trawling on a source-to-sink sediment budget is explored on the NW Iberian shelf. Use of Automated Information System vessel tracking data provides for a high-resolution vessel track reconstruction and the accurate calculation of the spatial distribution of bottom trawling intensity and associated resuspended sediment load. The mean bottom trawling-induced resuspended sediment mass for the NW Iberian shelf is 13.50 Mt yr- 1, which leads to a six-fold increase in off-shelf sediment transport when compared to natural resuspension mechanisms. The source-to-sink budget analysis provides evidence that bottom trawling causes a rapid erosion of the fine sediment on human time scales. Combining global soft sediment distribution data of the shelves with worldwide bottom trawling intensity estimates we show that the bottom trawling-induced resuspended sediment mass amounts to approximately the same mass of all sediment entering the shelves through rivers. Spatial delineations between natural and anthropogenic sediment resuspension areas are presented to aid in marine management questions.

  13. Air-sea interaction at the Southern Brazilian Continental Shelf: In situ observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzi, L. P.; Souza, R. B.; Farias, P. C.; Acevedo, O.; Miller, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of the cross-shelf oceanographic front occurring between the Brazil Current (BC) and the Brazilian Coastal Current (BCC) on the local Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL) is investigated here. This front is typical of wintertime in the Southern Brazilian Continental Shelf (SBCS) and this is the first time that its effects are investigated over the above MABL. Here we analyze variability, vertical structure, and stability of MABL as well as heat fluxes at air-sea interface, across five oceanographic transects in the SBCS made during a winter 2012 cruise. Local thermal gradients associated with mixing between distinct water masses, play an essential role on MABL modulation and stability. Although weaker when compared with other frontal regions, the cross-shelf thermal gradients reproduce exactly what is expected for open ocean regions: Stronger (weaker) winds, lower (higher) sea level pressure, and a more unstable (stable) MABL are found over the warm (cold) side of the oceanographic front between the BC (warm) and coastal (cold) waters. Our findings strongly support the coexistence of both known MABL modulation mechanisms: the static and hydrostatic MABL stability. This is the first time that these modulation mechanisms are documented for this region. Turbulent fluxes were found to be markedly dependent on the cross-shelf SST gradients resulting in differences of up to 100 W.m-2 especially in the southernmost region where the gradients were more intense.

  14. Tidal influence on the hydrodynamics of the French Guiana continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourret, A.; Devenon, J.-L.; Chevalier, C.

    2008-04-01

    This study investigates the circulation on the French Guiana continental shelf under tidal influence. Indeed, hydrodynamics are characterised by a weak salinity tongue located in the middle of the shelf and induced by the Amazon River, a coastal current flowing from the southeast, and a tidal standing wave whose co-range lines are parallel to the coast. In addition to field observations, a numerical model also is used to evaluate the tidal influence on coastal circulation. The model makes use of the MOBEEHDYCS code, a three-dimensional free surface time-splitting model whose domain is bounded with a closed coastal boundary, two active boundaries (offshore and lateral) and a passive boundary. The boundary configuration and hydrodynamics require a careful choice of passive open boundary conditions. The initial and boundary conditions come from field data. The tidal currents are essentially cross-shore and do not have a great influence on the main current direction on the offshore part of the shelf. The offshore currents remain parallel to the coast. In the inner shelf, the tidal influence is found to be much more important and the tidal currents can reach 0.45 m/s. Vertically, the tidal currents are barotropic, in spite of the high stratification and they induce a horizontal cross-shore migration (about 3 km) of the weak salinity tongue and vertical oscillations of the halocline without complete mixing.

  15. Tracking anthropogenic influences on the continental shelf of China with sedimentary linear alkylbenzenes (LABs).

    PubMed

    Wei, Gao-Ling; Liu, Liang-Ying; Bao, Lian-Jun; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2014-03-15

    Surface sediments collected along the entire continental shelf of China, including Yellow Sea, the East China Sea (ECS) inner shelf and the South China Sea (SCS), were analyzed for linear alkylbenzenes (LABs), from which regional anthropogenic influences on the marine environment were assessed. The occurrence of LABs (5.6-77 ng/g; mean: 25 ng/g; median: 20 ng/g) implied light sewage contamination in coast sediment off China. Specifically, the SCS had higher sedimentary LAB levels than Yellow Sea and the ECS inner shelf, which was mainly related to the intensity of domestic wastewater discharge and marine fishing activities. Values of L/S and C₁₃/C₁₂ (defined in the main text) suggested certain degradation while I/E indicated limited degradation of LABs. Also, additional input sources and congener inter-conversions may have contributed to the inconsistent results for degradation of LABs in offshore sediments. Atmospheric inputs and wastewater discharge from marine fishing vessels predominantly contributed to sedimentary LABs in Yellow Sea and the SCS, while riverine input was mainly responsible for LABs along the ECS inner shelf.

  16. Map of Distribution of Bottom Sediments on the Continental Shelf, Gulf of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, Kevin R.; Carlson, Paul R.; Hampton, Monty A.; Marlow, Michael S.; Barnes, Peter W.

    2000-01-01

    Introduction The U.S. Geological Survey has a long history of exploring marine geology in the Gulf of Alaska. As part of a cooperative program with other federal and state agencies, the USGS is investigating the relations between ocean-floor geology and benthic marine biohabitats. This bottom sediment map, compiled from published literature will help marine biologists develop an understanding of sea-floor geology in relation to various biological habitats. The pattern of sea-floor sedimentation and bottom morphology in the Gulf of Alaska reflects a complex interplay of regional tectonism, glacial advances and retreats, oceanic and tidal currents, waves, storms, eustatic change, and gravity-driven processes. This map, based on numerous cruises during the period of 1970-1996, shows distribution of bottom sediments in areas of study on the continental shelf. The samples were collected with piston, box, and gravity corers, and grab samplers. The interpretations of sediment distribution are the products of sediment size analyses combined with interpretations of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles. The sea floor was separated into several areas as follows: Cook Inlet -- Hazards studies in this embayment emphasized sediment distribution, sediment dynamics, bedforms, shallow faults, and seafloor stability. Migrating mega-sandwaves, driven by strong tidal currents, influence seabed habitats and stability of the seafloor, especially near pipelines and drilling platforms. The coarseness of the bottom sediment reinforces the influence of the strong tidal currents on the seafloor habitats. Kodiak Shelf -- Tectonic framework studies demonstrate the development of an accretionary wedge as the Pacific Plate underthrusts the Alaskan landmass. Seismic data across the accretionary wedge reveal anomalies indicative of fluid/gas vent sites in this segment of the continental margin. Geologic hazards research shows that movement along numerous shallow faults poses a risk to sea

  17. High particle export over the continental shelf of the west Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buesseler, Ken O.; McDonnell, Andrew M. P.; Schofield, Oscar M. E.; Steinberg, Deborah K.; Ducklow, Hugh W.

    2010-11-01

    Drifting cylindrical traps and the flux proxy 234Th indicate more than an order of magnitude higher sinking fluxes of particulate carbon and 234Th in January 2009 than measured by a time-series conical trap used regularly on the shelf of the west Antarctic Peninsula (WAP). The higher fluxes measured in this study have several implications for our understanding of the WAP ecosystem. Larger sinking fluxes result in a revised export efficiency of at least 10% (C flux/net primary production) and a requisite lower regeneration efficiency in surface waters. High fluxes also result in a large supply of sinking organic matter to support subsurface and benthic food webs on the continental shelf. These new findings call into question the magnitude of seasonal and interannual variability in particle flux and reaffirm the difficulty of using moored conical traps as a quantitative flux collector in shallow waters.

  18. Direct observations of American eels migrating across the continental shelf to the Sargasso Sea

    PubMed Central

    Béguer-Pon, Mélanie; Castonguay, Martin; Shan, Shiliang; Benchetrit, José; Dodson, Julian J.

    2015-01-01

    Since inferring spawning areas from larval distributions in the Sargasso Sea a century ago, the oceanic migration of adult American eels has remained a mystery. No adult eel has ever been observed migrating in the open ocean or in the spawning area. Here, we track movements of maturing eels equipped with pop-up satellite archival tags from the Scotian Shelf (Canada) into the open ocean, with one individual migrating 2,400 km to the northern limit of the spawning site in the Sargasso Sea. The reconstructed routes suggest a migration in two phases: one over the continental shelf and along its edge in shallow waters; the second in deeper waters straight south towards the spawning area. This study is the first direct evidence of adult Anguilla migrating to the Sargasso Sea and represents an important step forward in the understanding of routes and migratory cues. PMID:26505325

  19. Heavy metal distribution in surface sediments from the continental shelf adjacent to Nazaré canyon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A.; Palma, C.; Valença, M.

    2011-12-01

    The continental shelf surface sediments around the Nazaré canyon have been analyzed for heavy metal contamination. Organic carbon content and grain size were also determined. The shelf area around the Nazaré canyon shows mean concentrations of Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb and Zn within the limits recommended by OSPAR (2008). Some enrichment and human impact was found for Cr and especially Pb. Local rivers, mainly the Mondego and southern creeks seem to be the major sources of heavy metals for the Nazaré area, showing similar contamination levels. A set of reference values for non-contaminated fine surface sediments (<63 μm) in the North-Eastern Atlantic are proposed for As, Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Li, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn.

  20. Direct observations of American eels migrating across the continental shelf to the Sargasso Sea.

    PubMed

    Béguer-Pon, Mélanie; Castonguay, Martin; Shan, Shiliang; Benchetrit, José; Dodson, Julian J

    2015-10-27

    Since inferring spawning areas from larval distributions in the Sargasso Sea a century ago, the oceanic migration of adult American eels has remained a mystery. No adult eel has ever been observed migrating in the open ocean or in the spawning area. Here, we track movements of maturing eels equipped with pop-up satellite archival tags from the Scotian Shelf (Canada) into the open ocean, with one individual migrating 2,400 km to the northern limit of the spawning site in the Sargasso Sea. The reconstructed routes suggest a migration in two phases: one over the continental shelf and along its edge in shallow waters; the second in deeper waters straight south towards the spawning area. This study is the first direct evidence of adult Anguilla migrating to the Sargasso Sea and represents an important step forward in the understanding of routes and migratory cues.

  1. Oil, gas potential in shallow water: Peru`s continental shelf basins

    SciTech Connect

    Zuniga-Rivero, F.; Keeling, J.A.; Hay-Roe, H.

    1998-11-16

    This third article of a series highlights the three sedimentary basins that underlie the 16 million acres of continental shelf adjacent to a 650-mile stretch of Peruvian coastline. This area lies roughly between the ports of Chiclayo and Pisco. These basins offer a variety of reservoirs, traps, and source-rock potential in water depths of less than 1,000 ft. They are characterized by a thick sequence of Neogene strata, underlain by Paleogene, Mesozoic, and Upper Paleozoic sediments down to as much as 7 sec two-way time on modern seismic records. In some places the sedimentary section may reach an aggregate thickness in excess of 50,000 ft. From north to south these contiguous shelf basins are the Sechura-Salaverry, Huacho, and Pisco basins. All three basins are described.

  2. Estimated oil and gas reserves, Gulf of Mexico outer continental shelf and continental slope, December 31, 1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hewitt, Jack E.; Brooke, Jeff P.; Knipmeyer, John H.

    1983-01-01

    Remaining recoverable reserves of oil* and gas in the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf and Continental Slope have been estimated to be about 2.98 billion barrels of oil and 39.8 trillion cubic feet of gas, as of December 31, 1982. These reserves are recoverable from 468 studied fields under the Federal submerged lands off the coasts of Louisiana and Texas. An additional 53 fields, discovered since December 31, 1980, have not been sufficiently developed to permit a reasonably accurate estimate of reserves. Original recoverable reserves are estimated to have been 8.56 billion barrels of oil and 98.1 trillion cubic feet of gas from 484 fields in the same geographic area. Included in this number are 16 fields that are depleted and were abandoned; not included are the 53 insufficiently developed fields. Estimates were made for individual reservoirs in 382 fields and on a field-wide basis for the other 102 fields. *The term 'oil' as used in this report includes crude oil and condensate.

  3. Diversity and Distribution Patterns of Cetaceans in the Subtropical Southwestern Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf and Slope

    PubMed Central

    Di Tullio, Juliana Couto; Gandra, Tiago B. R.; Zerbini, Alexandre N.; Secchi, Eduardo R.

    2016-01-01

    Temporal and spatial patterns of cetacean diversity and distribution were investigated through eight ship-based surveys carried out during spring and autumn between 2009 and 2014 on the outer continental shelf (~150m) and slope (1500m) off southeastern and southern Brazil (~23°S to ~34°S). The survey area was divided into southeast and south areas according to their oceanographic characteristics. Twenty-one species were observed in 503 sightings. The overall number of species was similar between the two areas, though it was higher in the spring in the south area. Five species were dominant and diversity varied more seasonally than spatially. ANOVA and kernel analyses showed that overall cetacean densities were higher in spring compared to autumn. Physeter macrocephalus, the most frequent species, concentrated throughout the south area at depths over 1000m in both seasons. Despite the overlapped occurrence at a broader scale, small delphinids presented latitudinal and in-offshore gradients as well as seasonal variation in distribution patterns, which could indicate habitat partitioning between some species. Delphinus delphis was only recorded in the south and its density decreased in areas where the presence of Stenella frontalis increased, mainly beyond the 250m isobath. Densities of S. longirostris and S. attenuata increased in lower latitudes and beyond the shelf break. The large delphinids Tursiops truncatus and Globicephala melas formed mixed groups in many occasions and were observed along the study area around depths of 500m. Grampus griseus was twice as frequent in the south area and densities increased in waters deeper than 600m. As expected, densities of both small and large migratory whales were higher during spring, over the continental slope, in the southeast area. The results presented here provided strong evidence on the importance of the outer continental shelf and slope to a diverse community of cetaceans occurring in the subtropical Southwestern

  4. Sequence stratigraphy and continental margin development of the northwestern shelf of the South China Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, P.P.H. ); Zhi Yuong Chen; Qi Min Zhang )

    1993-05-01

    Based on the sequence stratigraphic analyses of the Tertiary in the northwestern continental margin of the South China Sea, this paper summarizes the regional tectonics and their influences on the basin developments and discusses the systems tract distributions through the continental margin growth. The study area is underlain by two Tertiary basins separated by a major basin boundary fault across which two distinctly different basin structural styles developed. The Qiongdongnan basin shows characteristic rift structures and is closely related to the opening of the South China Sea. The Yinggehai basin is filled with thick Neogene monoclines overlying basement without apparent rift structures. The Yinggehai's genesis has been linked to the tectonism along the Red River suture zone. The margin development is characterized by depositional environments of sediment influx constantly exceeding accommodation space. Under these environments, the highstand deltas frequently developed near shelf edges, where vertically stacked shallow water sands of both highstand deltas and lowstand wedges/deltas could produce favorable exploration targets. High rates of sedimentation in the study area allow the identification of fourth-order cyclicity in the Quaternary. Regional sequence stratigraphic correlations suggest that many sequence boundaries appear to be synchronous, but not all boundaries exist in all basins along the eastern and southern continental margins of mainland China. The margin evolved through the repeated development of lowstand fans, lowstand wedges, transgressive systems tracts, and highstand deltas. Prior to the Pliocene, the shelf was sourced both from Vietnam and Hainan Island and, as a result, two shelf margins developed. The southwestern margin stopped growing in the late Miocene, and the northern margin continued to prograde with possible additional sediment inputs through the Red River system in the Quaternary. 29 refs., 22 figs.

  5. Environmental geologic studies on the southeastern United States Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf, 1977-1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Popenoe, Peter; Popenoe, Peter

    1981-01-01

    This report is a summary of the second year of marine environmental research activities by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) on the southeaster U.S. Atlantic Continental Margin, in accordance with with Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) AA551-MU8-13 between the USGS and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The report covers studies whose fieldwork was conducted during the period from 1 October 1977 to 30 September 1978. The results of the first year of study are reported in Popenoe (1978a and b) and as U.S. Department of Commerce NTIS report PB 300-820. The purpose of these investigations is to provide basic geologic and oceanographic data to the BLM Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Marine Environmental Studies Program in support of management decisions which relate to possible development of oil and gas resources of the continental shelf. The objectives of the USGS-BLM geologic research program for fiscal year 1978 (FY-78) were 1) to determine the sedimentation rates and processes on the upper slope and inner Blake Plateau; 2) to determine the distribution, areal extent, and vertical characteristics of geological features supportive of biological communities; 3) to monitor the transport of bottom sediment across the OCS, evaluate its possible effect on pollutant transfer along the seabed and the potential of sediment as a pollutant sink, determine the implications of erosion/deposition on pipeline emplacement, and aid the interpretation of chemical, biological, and physical data; 4) to determine the concentration levels of chosen trace metals and silica in three chemically defined fractions of the suspended particulate matter (seston); 5) to study the shelf edge and slope near areas of oil and gas interest, and the northern portion of the Blake Plateau for evidence of slope instability and other geologic hazards, and 6) to determine the depth and rate of sediment mixing caused by large storms and/or by benthic organisms and where possible to estimate the rate of

  6. Diversity and Distribution Patterns of Cetaceans in the Subtropical Southwestern Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf and Slope.

    PubMed

    Di Tullio, Juliana Couto; Gandra, Tiago B R; Zerbini, Alexandre N; Secchi, Eduardo R

    2016-01-01

    Temporal and spatial patterns of cetacean diversity and distribution were investigated through eight ship-based surveys carried out during spring and autumn between 2009 and 2014 on the outer continental shelf (~150m) and slope (1500m) off southeastern and southern Brazil (~23°S to ~34°S). The survey area was divided into southeast and south areas according to their oceanographic characteristics. Twenty-one species were observed in 503 sightings. The overall number of species was similar between the two areas, though it was higher in the spring in the south area. Five species were dominant and diversity varied more seasonally than spatially. ANOVA and kernel analyses showed that overall cetacean densities were higher in spring compared to autumn. Physeter macrocephalus, the most frequent species, concentrated throughout the south area at depths over 1000m in both seasons. Despite the overlapped occurrence at a broader scale, small delphinids presented latitudinal and in-offshore gradients as well as seasonal variation in distribution patterns, which could indicate habitat partitioning between some species. Delphinus delphis was only recorded in the south and its density decreased in areas where the presence of Stenella frontalis increased, mainly beyond the 250m isobath. Densities of S. longirostris and S. attenuata increased in lower latitudes and beyond the shelf break. The large delphinids Tursiops truncatus and Globicephala melas formed mixed groups in many occasions and were observed along the study area around depths of 500m. Grampus griseus was twice as frequent in the south area and densities increased in waters deeper than 600m. As expected, densities of both small and large migratory whales were higher during spring, over the continental slope, in the southeast area. The results presented here provided strong evidence on the importance of the outer continental shelf and slope to a diverse community of cetaceans occurring in the subtropical Southwestern

  7. Satellite observation of particulate organic carbon dynamics on the Louisiana continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Chengfeng; Lehrter, John C.; Hu, Chuanmin; MacIntyre, Hugh; Beck, Marcus W.

    2017-01-01

    Particulate organic carbon (POC) plays an important role in coastal carbon cycling and the formation of hypoxia. Yet, coastal POC dynamics are often poorly understood due to a lack of long-term POC observations and the complexity of coastal hydrodynamic and biogeochemical processes that influence POC sources and sinks. Using field observations and satellite ocean color products, we developed a new multiple regression algorithm to estimate POC on the Louisiana Continental Shelf (LCS) from satellite observations. The algorithm had reliable performance with mean relative error (MRE) of ˜40% and root mean square error (RMSE) of ˜50% for MODIS and SeaWiFS images for POC ranging between ˜80 and ˜1200 mg m-3, and showed similar performance for a large estuary (Mobile Bay). Substantial spatiotemporal variability in the satellite-derived POC was observed on the LCS, with high POC found on the inner shelf (<10 m depth) and lower POC on the middle (10-50 m depth) and outer shelf (50-200 m depth), and with high POC found in winter (January-March) and lower POC in summer to fall (August-October). Correlation analysis between long-term POC time series and several potential influencing factors indicated that river discharge played a dominant role in POC dynamics on the LCS, while wind and surface currents also affected POC spatial patterns on short time scales. This study adds another example where satellite data with carefully developed algorithms can greatly increase the spatial and temporal observations of important biogeochemical variables on continental shelf and estuaries.

  8. High-Resolution Geologic Mapping of the Inner Continental Shelf: Cape Ann to Salisbury Beach, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhardt, Walter A.; Andrews, Brian D.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Baldwin, Wayne E.; Hein, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    The geologic framework of the Massachusetts inner continental shelf between Cape Ann and Salisbury Beach has been shaped by a complicated history of glaciation, deglaciation, and changes in relative sea level. New geophysical data (swath bathymetry, sidescan sonar and seismic-reflection profiling), sediment samples, and seafloor photography provide insight into the geomorphic and stratigraphic record generated by these processes. High-resolution spatial data and geologic maps in this report support coastal research and efforts to understand the type, distribution, and quality of subtidal marine habitats in the Massachusetts coastal ocean.

  9. Seabed acoustics of a sand ridge on the New Jersey continental shelf.

    PubMed

    Knobles, D P; Wilson, P S; Goff, J A; Cho, S E

    2008-09-01

    Acoustic measurements were made on a sand ridge on the New Jersey continental shelf. Data collected on two L arrays separated by 20 km from a single multi-frequency tow suggest small horizontal environmental variability. Values for the sound speed structure of the seabed are extracted by first applying a geo-acoustic inversion method to broadband and narrowband acoustic data from short-range sources. Then, a parabolic equation algorithm is used to properly include the bathymetry and sub-bottom layering. Finally, the frequency dependence of the seabed attenuation is inferred by optimizing the model fit to long-range transmission loss data in the 50-3000 Hz band.

  10. Upper Wisconsinan till recovered on the continental shelf southeast of New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bothner, Michael H.; Spiker, E. C.

    1980-01-01

    Basal till was identified in two sediment cores collected about 69 kilometers southeast of Nantucket Island on the east and west sides of Great South Channel. These are the first samples of till collected on the outer continental shelf off the northeastern United States. The carbon-14 age of the total organic carbon in the tills provides a "no older than" age of about 20,000 years before present and suggests that the tills were deposited during the late Wisconsinan glaciation. This conclusion is in support of the hypothesis of an extensive Laurentide ice sheet that extended to the northern side of Georges Bank. Copyright ?? 1980 AAAS.

  11. Denudation of the continental shelf between Britain and France at the glacial-interglacial timescale.

    PubMed

    Mellett, Claire L; Hodgson, David M; Plater, Andrew J; Mauz, Barbara; Selby, Ian; Lang, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    The erosional morphology preserved at the sea bed in the eastern English Channel dominantly records denudation of the continental shelf by fluvial processes over multiple glacial-interglacial sea-level cycles rather than by catastrophic flooding through the Straits of Dover during the mid-Quaternary. Here, through the integration of multibeam bathymetry and shallow sub-bottom 2D seismic reflection profiles calibrated with vibrocore records, the first stratigraphic model of erosion and deposition on the eastern English Channel continental shelf is presented. Published Optical Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) and (14)C ages were used to chronometrically constrain the stratigraphy and allow correlation of the continental shelf record with major climatic/sea-level periods. Five major erosion surfaces overlain by discrete sediment packages have been identified. The continental shelf in the eastern English Channel preserves a record of processes operating from Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6 to MIS 1. Planar and channelised erosion surfaces were formed by fluvial incision during lowstands or relative sea-level fall. The depth and lateral extent of incision was partly conditioned by underlying geology (rock type and tectonic structure), climatic conditions and changes in water and sediment discharge coupled to ice sheet dynamics and the drainage configuration of major rivers in Northwest Europe. Evidence for major erosion during or prior to MIS 6 is preserved. Fluvial sediments of MIS 2 age were identified within the Northern Palaeovalley, providing insights into the scale of erosion by normal fluvial regimes. Seismic and sedimentary facies indicate that deposition predominantly occurred during transgression when accommodation was created in palaeovalleys to allow discrete sediment bodies to form. Sediment reworking over multiple sea-level cycles (Saalian-Eemian-early Weichselian) by fluvial, coastal and marine processes created a multi-lateral, multi-storey succession of

  12. Derivation of a three dimensional numerical water quality model for estuary and continental shelf application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, M.

    1973-01-01

    A derivation is given for a three dimensional mass transport equation which is appropriate for numerical modeling of estuary and continental shelf water quality variations for both the time dependent and steady state cases. A finite difference approximation to the derived equation is presented and a solution scheme for the resulting equations outlined. Preliminary results are obtained using the model for the extremely simple problems which have analytical solutions. The numerical model, as presented, will provide a scheme to study water quality problems in coastal waters for both steady state and time dependent cases.

  13. Fish assemblages associated with oil industry structures on the continental shelf of north-western Australia.

    PubMed

    Pradella, N; Fowler, A M; Booth, D J; Macreadie, P I

    2014-01-01

    This study provides the first assessment of fish associations with oil and gas structures located in deep water (85-175 m) on Australia's north-west continental shelf, using rare oil industry video footage obtained from remotely operated vehicles. A diverse range of taxa were observed associating with the structures, including reef-dependent species and transient pelagic species. Ten commercially fished species were observed, the most abundant of which was Lutjanus argentimaculatus, with an estimated biomass for the two deepest structures (Goodwyn and Echo) of 109 kg.

  14. The circulation over the continental shelf of Tamaulipas-North of Veracruz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancilla-Rojas, M. D.; Rivas, D.

    2012-12-01

    A 3D regional ocean model with a terrain-following vertical coordinate and high horizontal resolution (~ 2 km) was used to describe the circulation over the continental shelf of Tamaulipas-North of Veraruz. This study is focused on the sensitivity of the local dynamics to the main forcings such as the Panuco river discharge and the wind stress field. The model reproduces reasonably well the dynamics variables such as salinity and temperature field but further validation work is still need. This model results are of particular importance since much of the study area remain to be described.

  15. Denudation of the continental shelf between Britain and France at the glacial–interglacial timescale

    PubMed Central

    Mellett, Claire L.; Hodgson, David M.; Plater, Andrew J.; Mauz, Barbara; Selby, Ian; Lang, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The erosional morphology preserved at the sea bed in the eastern English Channel dominantly records denudation of the continental shelf by fluvial processes over multiple glacial–interglacial sea-level cycles rather than by catastrophic flooding through the Straits of Dover during the mid-Quaternary. Here, through the integration of multibeam bathymetry and shallow sub-bottom 2D seismic reflection profiles calibrated with vibrocore records, the first stratigraphic model of erosion and deposition on the eastern English Channel continental shelf is presented. Published Optical Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) and 14C ages were used to chronometrically constrain the stratigraphy and allow correlation of the continental shelf record with major climatic/sea-level periods. Five major erosion surfaces overlain by discrete sediment packages have been identified. The continental shelf in the eastern English Channel preserves a record of processes operating from Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6 to MIS 1. Planar and channelised erosion surfaces were formed by fluvial incision during lowstands or relative sea-level fall. The depth and lateral extent of incision was partly conditioned by underlying geology (rock type and tectonic structure), climatic conditions and changes in water and sediment discharge coupled to ice sheet dynamics and the drainage configuration of major rivers in Northwest Europe. Evidence for major erosion during or prior to MIS 6 is preserved. Fluvial sediments of MIS 2 age were identified within the Northern Palaeovalley, providing insights into the scale of erosion by normal fluvial regimes. Seismic and sedimentary facies indicate that deposition predominantly occurred during transgression when accommodation was created in palaeovalleys to allow discrete sediment bodies to form. Sediment reworking over multiple sea-level cycles (Saalian–Eemian–early Weichselian) by fluvial, coastal and marine processes created a multi-lateral, multi-storey succession of

  16. Denudation of the continental shelf between Britain and France at the glacial-interglacial timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellett, Claire L.; Hodgson, David M.; Plater, Andrew J.; Mauz, Barbara; Selby, Ian; Lang, Andreas

    2013-12-01

    The erosional morphology preserved at the sea bed in the eastern English Channel dominantly records denudation of the continental shelf by fluvial processes over multiple glacial-interglacial sea-level cycles rather than by catastrophic flooding through the Straits of Dover during the mid-Quaternary. Here, through the integration of multibeam bathymetry and shallow sub-bottom 2D seismic reflection profiles calibrated with vibrocore records, the first stratigraphic model of erosion and deposition on the eastern English Channel continental shelf is presented. Published Optical Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) and 14C ages were used to chronometrically constrain the stratigraphy and allow correlation of the continental shelf record with major climatic/sea-level periods. Five major erosion surfaces overlain by discrete sediment packages have been identified. The continental shelf in the eastern English Channel preserves a record of processes operating from Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6 to MIS 1. Planar and channelised erosion surfaces were formed by fluvial incision during lowstands or relative sea-level fall. The depth and lateral extent of incision was partly conditioned by underlying geology (rock type and tectonic structure), climatic conditions and changes in water and sediment discharge coupled to ice sheet dynamics and the drainage configuration of major rivers in Northwest Europe. Evidence for major erosion during or prior to MIS 6 is preserved. Fluvial sediments of MIS 2 age were identified within the Northern Palaeovalley, providing insights into the scale of erosion by normal fluvial regimes. Seismic and sedimentary facies indicate that deposition predominantly occurred during transgression when accommodation was created in palaeovalleys to allow discrete sediment bodies to form. Sediment reworking over multiple sea-level cycles (Saalian-Eemian-early Weichselian) by fluvial, coastal and marine processes created a multi-lateral, multi-storey succession of

  17. Wave height, peak period, and orbital velocity for the California continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erikson, Li H.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Golden, Nadine E.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, bathymetric data compiled as part of the California Seafloor Mapping Program Project and within the 3-NM limit were supplemented with deeper water bathymetric data (NOAA, http://maps.ngdc.noaa.gov/, last downloaded April 2013) and used to populate numerical wave grids for simulation of wave growth and propagation across the continental shelf bordering the California coast. Wave computations were done with the widely used and accepted numerical model SWAN (Ris, 1997; Booij and others, 1999; Ris and others, 1999). SWAN is a third-generation spectral model that simulates wind-wave growth, propagation, refraction, dissipation, and depth-induced breaking.

  18. The macro- and megabenthic fauna on the continental shelf of the eastern Amundsen Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linse, Katrin; Griffiths, Huw J.; Barnes, Dave KA; Brandt, Angelika; Davey, Niki; David, Bruno; De Grave, Sammy; d‧Udekem d‧Acoz, Cédric; Eléaume, Marc; Glover, Adrian G.; Hemery, Lenaïg G.; Mah, Christopher; Martín-Ledo, Rafael; Munilla, Tomás; O‧Loughlin, Mark; Pierrat, Benjamin; Saucède, Thomas; Sands, Chester J.; Strugnell, Jan M.; Enderlein, Peter

    2013-10-01

    In 2008 the BIOPEARL II expedition on board of RRS James Clark Ross sailed to the eastern Amundsen Sea Embayment and Pine Island Bay, one of the least studied Antarctic continental shelf regions due to its remoteness and ice cover. A total of 37 Agassiz trawls were deployed at depth transects along the continental and trough slopes. A total of 5469 specimens, belonging to 32 higher taxonomic groups and more than 270 species, were collected. Species richness per station varied from 1 to 55. The benthic assemblages were dominated by echinoderms and clearly different to those in the Ross, Scotia and Weddell seas. Here we present the macro- and megafaunal assemblage structure, its species richness and the presence of several undescribed species.

  19. Carbonate sediment production in the equatorial continental shelf of South America: Quantifying Halimeda incrassata (Chlorophyta) contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carneiro, Pedro Bastos de Macêdo; Morais, Jader Onofre de

    2016-12-01

    The middle and outer continental shelves of eastern equatorial South America (ESA) are characterized by intense production of carbonate sediments. Qualitative analyses of sediment deposits suggest that the calcareous green alga Halimeda incrassata is among the top CaCO3 producers. Nevertheless, no study so far has quantified its real contributions. To better understand the sediment dynamic in this area, we measured biomass, growth rates and calcium carbonate production by this alga. The species exhibited high growth rates (3.38 segments.individual-1.day-1), coverage (174 individuals.m-2) and biomass (214.02 g.m-2). Substitution of segments may allow a sedimentation rate of 1.53 mm.yr-1 and a complete turnover of the population every 60.2 days. The rapid growth indicates that this alga can produce as much CaCO3 (1.19 kg CaCO3.m-2.year-1) as other tropical organisms, such as corals and rhodoliths. In a conservative estimate, 773.500 tonnes of CaCO3 are produced per year in a 5000 km2 area off the northern coast of Brazil. Sedimentation rate seems to be higher than that promoted by continental inputs in middle and outer continental shelf. On the other hand, population turnover is twice as slow as in other H. incrassata assemblages, suggesting that South American populations are sensible to physical disturbances. New studies are necessary to accurately estimate H. incrassata coverage along the Brazilian coast and to integrate data on other CaCO3 producers, such as foraminifera and coralline algae. This would allow a better understanding of the role of South American continental shelf on the global carbon budget. Furthermore, analysis on the health of these organisms is urgent, since a decline in their populations could negatively affect ecosystems functioning and services.

  20. Multichannel seismic depth sections and interval velocities over outer continental shelf and upper continental slope between Cape Hatteras and Cape Cod: rifted margins

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grow, John A.; Mattick, Robert E.; Schlee, John S.

    1979-01-01

    Six computer-generated seismic depth sections over the outer continental shelf and upper slope reveal that subhorizontal Lower Cretaceous reflectors continue 20 to 30 km seaward of the present shelf edge. Extensive erosion on the continental slope has occurred primarily during the Tertiary, causing major unconformities and retreat of the shelf edge to its present position. The precise age and number of erosional events is not established, but at least one major erosional event is thought to be Oligocene and related to a marine regression in response to a worldwide eustatic lowering of sea level. Velocities derived from the multichannel data reveal distinctive ranges and lateral trends as functions of sediment age, depth of burial, and distance from the coastline. Seismic units beneath the shelf and slope of inferred Tertiary age range from 1.7 to 2.7 km/sec, increasing with age and depth of burial. Units interpreted as Upper Cretaceous rocks beneath the shelf range from 2.3 to 3.6 km/sec and show a distinct lateral increase across the shelf followed by a decrease beneath the present continental slope. Inferred Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic rocks beneath the shelf increase from 3.7 to 4.8 km/sec from nearshore to offshore and indicate a change in facies from clastic units below the inner shelf to carbonate units beneath the outer shelf and upper continental slope. Both reflection and refraction data suggest that thin, high-velocity limestone units (5.0 km/sec) are present within the Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic units beneath the outermost shelf edge, but that these change lithology or pinch out before reaching the middle shelf. Although lateral changes in velocity across the shelf and local velocity inversions appear, the interval velocities along the length of the margin show excellent continuity between Cape Hatteras and Cape Cod. The high-velocity horizons within the Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic shelf-edge complex indicate the presence of a

  1. A 3D, finite element model for baroclinic circulation on the Vancouver Island continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Foreman, M.G.G.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a 3-dimensional model of the barotropic and baroclinic circulation on the continental shelf west of Vancouver Island, Canada. A previous study with a 2D barotropic model and field data revealed that several tidal constituents have a significant baroclinic component (the K1 in particular). Thus we embarked on another study with a 3D model to study the baroclinic effects on the residual and several selected tidal constituents. The 3D model uses a harmonic expansion in time and a finite element discretization in space. All nonlinear terms are retained, including quadratic bottom stress, advection and wave transport (continuity nonlinearity). The equations are solved as a global and a local problem, where the global problem is the solution of the wave equation formulation of the shallow water equations, and the local problem is the solution of the momentum equation for the vertical velocity profile. These equations are coupled to the advection-diffusion equation for density so that density gradient forcing is included in the momentum equations. However, the study presented here describes diagnostic calculations for the baroclinic residual circulation only. The model is sufficiently efficient that it encourages sensitivity testing with a large number of model runs. In this sense, the model is akin to an extension of analytical solutions to the domain of irregular geometry and bottom topography where this parameter space can be explored in some detail. In particular, the consequences of the sigma coordinate system used by the model are explored. Test cases using an idealized representation of the continental shelf, shelf break and shelf slope, lead to an estimation of the velocity errors caused by interpolation errors inherent in the sigma coordinate system. On the basis of these estimates, the computational grid used in the 2D model is found to have inadequate resolution. Thus a new grid is generated with increased

  2. Geophysical and Geotechnical Determination of Sand Resources on the Florida Atlantic Continental Shelf: Preliminary Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkl, C. W.; Andrews, J. L.; Suthard, B. C.; Robertson, W.

    2007-12-01

    The State of Florida is committed to maintaining beaches to sustain beach width and protect coastal infrastructure. Nearshore sand resources must be identified and cataloged for potential beach nourishment projects in response to sea-level rise and increased tropical storm activity. Given the vast length of Florida coastline, application of a variety of remote sensing techniques are required for measuring large areas in a short amount of time. The study area encompasses a shelf area of about 2,053,220 ha (20,532 km2) from Miami to the Georgia State line (about 653 km shoreline length) and extends up to 27 km offshore to about the 45 m isobath offshore Jacksonville. The continental shelf along the east coast of the Florida peninsula contains a wide range of seafloor environments that lie above the Florida-Hatteras Slope on the shoreface and inner, middle, and outer shelf floors. This study used Airborne Laser Bathymetry (ALB), 3D digital terrain models based on reformatted NOAA bathymetric data, sidescan sonar, and seismic reflection profiling to map seafloor geomorphological conditions that range from coralline-algal reef systems to drowned karst, submerged paleo shorelines (drowned beach ridge plains), and buried paleo channels. Seatruthing of morphosedimentary features is achieved via jetprobe and vibracore surveys in the study of inter-reefal sand troughs, ebb-tidal deltas, transverse bars, shoals, sand waves, ridges, and banks. Preliminary results, which visualize seafloor topography as color-ramped morphoforms, indicate the presence of sedimentary deposits that may constitute viable sand resources for shore protection in the form of beach renourishment. Use of ALB and reformatted NOAA bathymetric data in the form of 3D terrain models permits classification of submarine landform topologies that was heretofore not possible using isobaths. The combination of multiple remote sensing methods showed the spatial distribution of morphosedimentary features and provided

  3. The role of continental shelf width in determining freshwater phylogeographic patterns in south-eastern Australian pygmy perches (Teleostei: Percichthyidae).

    PubMed

    Unmack, Peter J; Hammer, Michael P; Adams, Mark; Johnson, Jerald B; Dowling, Thomas E

    2013-03-01

    Biogeographic patterns displayed by obligate freshwater organisms are intimately related to the nature and extent of connectivity between suitable habitats. Two of the more significant barriers to freshwater connections are seawater and major drainage divides. South-eastern Australia provides a contrast between these barriers as it has discrete areas that are likely influenced to a greater or lesser extent by each barrier type. We use continental shelf width as a proxy for the potential degree of river coalescence during low sea levels. Our specific hypothesis is that the degree of phylogeographic divergence between coastal river basins should correspond to the continental shelf width of each region. This predicts that genetic divergences between river basins should be lowest in regions with a wider continental shelf and that regions with similar continental shelf width should have similar genetic divergences. Pygmy perches (Nannoperca australis and Nannoperca 'flindersi') in south-eastern Australia provide an ideal opportunity to test these biogeographic hypotheses. Phylogeographic patterns were examined based on range-wide sampling of 82 populations for cytochrome b and 23 polymorphic allozyme loci. Our results recovered only limited support for our continental shelf width hypothesis, although patterns within Bass clade were largely congruent with reconstructed low sea-level drainage patterns. In addition, we identified several instances of drainage divide crossings, typically associated with low elevational differences. Our results demonstrate high levels of genetic heterogeneity with important conservation implications, especially for declining populations in the Murray-Darling Basin and a highly restricted disjunct population in Ansons River, Tasmania.

  4. Sediment distribution and transport across the continental shelf and slope under idealized wind forcing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Condie, S.A.; Sherwood, C.R.

    2006-01-01

    Resuspension, transport, and deposition of sediments over the continental shelf and slope are complex processes and there is still a need to understand the underlying spatial and temporal dynamical scales. As a step towards this goal, a two-dimensional slice model (zero gradients in the alongshore direction) based on the primitive flow equations and a range of sediment classes has been developed. The circulation is forced from rest by upwelling or downwelling winds, which are spatially uniform. Results are presented for a range of wind speeds and sediment settling speeds. Upwelling flows carry fine sediments (low settling speeds) far offshore within the surface Ekman layer, and significant deposition eventually occurs beyond the shelf break. However, coarser sediments quickly settle out of the deeper onshore component of the circulation, which can lead to accumulation of bottom sediments within the coastal zone. Downwelling flows are more effective at transporting coarse sediments off the shelf. However, strong vertical mixing at the shelf break ensures that some material is also carried into the surface Ekman layer and returned onshore. The concentrations and settling fluxes of coarse sediments decrease offshore and increase with depth under both upwelling and downwelling conditions, consistent with trends observed in sediment trap data. However, finer sediments decrease with depth (upwelling) or reach a maximum around the depth of the shelf break (downwelling). It is shown that under uniform wind conditions, suspended sediment concentrations and settling fluxes decay offshore over a length scale of order τs/ρf|ws|, where τs is the wind stress, ρ the water density, f the Coriolis parameter, and ws is the sediment settling velocity. This scaling applies to both upwelling and downwelling conditions, provided offshore transport is dominated by wind-driven advection, rather than horizontal diffusion.

  5. Phytoplankton functional community structure in Argentinian continental shelf determined by HPLC pigment signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, D. Vega; Marrero, J. Pérez; Morales, J.; García, C. Llerandi; Úbeda, M. G. Villagarcía; Rueda, M. J.; Llinás, O.

    2012-03-01

    The Patagonian Sea in Argentina is known as an area with high primary production and biodiversity. The complex hydrodynamic environment resulting from the interaction between the Malvinas-Brazil convergence and the waters over the continental shelf and slope enhances the development of high chlorophyll concentrations, especially in frontal and coastal areas. The composition, distribution and variability of several phytoplankton functional types (PFTs) derived from diagnostic pigments were studied in relation to the local hydrographical conditions, using data from a research cruise carried out on board the RV Bio Hesperides at the end of the Summer season (March 2008). Phytoplankton cell size and PFT distributions were found to be highly influenced by the physical and chemical characteristics of the studied environments. Thus large cells, mainly diatoms, were the dominant size fraction in the southern frontal areas, where the SubAntarctic Surface Waters (SASW) from the Malvinas Current meet shelf waters. However, other groups of microphytoplankton (mPF), mainly dinoflagellates, were also detected in the shallow waters zone influenced by the tidal regime near the Valdes Peninsula. Picophytoplankton (pPF) was an important contributor to the floristic composition in the southern frontal zones, while nanophytoplankton (nPF) was dominant in the stations located over the continental slope, and in the oligotrophic area near Mar del Plata. The ratio between photoprotective and photosynthetic pigments (PPC:PSC) and the photoprotection index (PI) indirectly provide information about the environment and its effect on the PFTs composition.

  6. Community structure of rhodolith-forming beds on the central Brazilian continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villas-Boas, Alexandre B.; Riosmena-Rodriguez, Rafael; de Oliveira Figueiredo, Marcia Abreu

    2014-03-01

    The community structure of rhodoliths beds in the central Brazilian continental shelf was studied under the hypothesis that nongeniculate coralline algae are the major contributors of the individual rhodoliths. Samples were collected from five localities within a single area at 17-18 m depth. At each locality, rhodoliths were collected in 10 random quadrat samples along a 20-m transect. Our results show that dead cores of rhodoliths were significantly composed by nongeniculate coralline red algae rather than bryozoans, corals, or inorganic material. The live outer layers of the rhodoliths are composed mainly of 7 species of nongeniculate red coralline algae ( Lithophyllum coralline, L. johansenii, L. depressum, L. stictaeformis, Neogoniolithon brassica- florida, Spongites fruticosus, and Lithothamnion muellerii) associated with other encrusting organisms such as bryozoans, sponges, corals, barnacles, and Peyssonnelia red algae. Significant differences were found in the proportion of Lithophyllum species in relation to other red coralline algae found in this study. Our results show that on the Brazilian continental shelf, the rhodolith-forming species are quite higher in size than in any other studied areas in the world. There was no difference in the proportion of live-to-dead rhodolith materials, suggesting an old bed deposit. Also, the amount of calcium carbonate material in the specimens is relevant to take in account in terms of the CO2 balance worldwide.

  7. Minimum distribution of subsea ice-bearing permafrost on the US Beaufort Sea continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, Laura L.; Hart, Patrick E.; Ruppel, Carolyn D.

    2012-01-01

    Starting in Late Pleistocene time (~19 ka), sea level rise inundated coastal zones worldwide. On some parts of the present-day circum-Arctic continental shelf, this led to flooding and thawing of formerly subaerial permafrost and probable dissociation of associated gas hydrates. Relict permafrost has never been systematically mapped along the 700-km-long U.S. Beaufort Sea continental shelf and is often assumed to extend to ~120 m water depth, the approximate amount of sea level rise since the Late Pleistocene. Here, 5,000 km of multichannel seismic (MCS) data acquired between 1977 and 1992 were examined for high-velocity (>2.3 km s−1) refractions consistent with ice-bearing, coarse-grained sediments. Permafrost refractions were identified along <5% of the tracklines at depths of ~5 to 470 m below the seafloor. The resulting map reveals the minimum extent of subsea ice-bearing permafrost, which does not extend seaward of 30 km offshore or beyond the 20 m isobath.

  8. Achievements of risk-based produced water management on the Norwegian continental shelf (2002-2008).

    PubMed

    Smit, Mathijs G D; Frost, Tone K; Johnsen, Ståle

    2011-10-01

    In 1996, the Norwegian government issued a White Paper requiring the Norwegian oil industry to reach the goal of "zero discharge" for the marine environment by 2005. To achieve this goal, the Norwegian oil and gas industry initiated the Zero Discharge Programme for discharges of produced formation water from the hydrocarbon-containing reservoir, in close communication with regulators. The environmental impact factor (EIF), a risk-based management tool, was developed by the industry to quantify and document the environmental risks from produced water discharges. The EIF represents a volume of recipient water containing concentrations of one or more substances to a level exceeding a generic threshold for ecotoxicological effects. In addition, this tool facilitates the identification and selection of cost-effective risk mitigation measures. The EIF tool has been used by all operators on the Norwegian continental shelf since 2002 to report progress toward the goal of "zero discharge," interpreted as "zero harmful discharges," to the regulators. Even though produced water volumes have increased by approximately 30% between 2002 and 2008 on the Norwegian continental shelf, the total environmental risk from produced water discharges expressed by the summed EIF for all installations has been reduced by approximately 55%. The total amount of oil discharged to the sea has been reduced by 18% over the period 2000 to 2006. The experience from the Zero Discharge Programme shows that a risk-based approach is an excellent working tool to reduce discharges of potential harmful substances from offshore oil and gas installations.

  9. Seabed erodibility variations on the Louisiana continental shelf before and after the 2011 Mississippi River flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, K.; Corbett, D. R.; Walsh, J. P.; Young, D.; Briggs, K. B.; Cartwright, G. M.; Friedrichs, C. T.; Harris, C. K.; Mickey, R. C.; Mitra, S.

    2014-08-01

    Erodibility is critical to the sediment resuspension process but has not been measured systematically in large river-dominated muddy continental shelves before. During early summer of 2011, the Mississippi River experienced a major flood event. This flood provided a unique opportunity to examine how shelf seabed erodibility responded to a large river flood, and the ultimate fate of flood deposition is important to geological and biogeochemical processes (e.g., stratal formation, carbon sequestration). A total of 106 sediment cores were collected on the Louisiana shelf during five cruises in 2010 and 2011, and a new dataset was used to evaluate the response of the seabed to the recent conditions. The localized flood deposit was mainly within tens of kilometers of river sources, and little sediment accumulated on the middle Louisiana shelf. Seabed erodibility was measured using a dual-core Gust Erosion Microcosm System. The erodibility of sediment collected in April 2011 exceeded that for August 2010 and August 2011. The springtime increase in erodibility seemed to be related to the recent presence of energetic waves that mobilized the seabed. Erodibility was highest on the inner shelf southwest of Atchafalaya Bay, intermediate on the middle shelf, lowest in the Mississippi Canyon, and highly variable on the Mississippi subaqueous delta. These spatial patterns were influenced by proximity to river sources, flood-deposit thicknesses, intensity of wave-driven bed stresses, and bioturbation. The flood-deposit thickness itself, however, was not sufficient to explain all the spatial variations of erodibility after the peak of the Mississippi flood. Comparing values to published data, the depth-varying erodibility on the Louisiana shelf was close to the "low erodibility" level for the York River of Virginia, and similar to the data collected from Baltimore Harbor in Maryland and the main stem of upper Chesapeake Bay. Our findings promote understanding of the resuspension

  10. Benthic Foraminiferal Census Data from Louisiana Continental Shelf Cores, Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osterman, Lisa E.; Kelly, Wendy S.; Ricardo, John P.

    2009-01-01

    An area of oxygen-depleted bottom- and subsurface-water (hypoxia = dissolved oxygen < 2 mg/L-1) occurs seasonally on the Louisiana Shelf near the Mississippi River. The area of hypoxia, also known as the 'dead zone', forms when spring and early summer freshwater flow from the Mississippi River supplies a large amount of nutrients to the shelf while creating a freshwater lens, or cap, above the shelf water. The excess nutrients cause phytoplankton blooms in the shallow shelf water. After the bloom ceases, the organic material sinks in the water column and uses up oxygen during decomposition. Thus, the subsurface waters become oxygen depleted. The seasonal dead zone exists until a reduction in freshwater flow, or overturning by storms, allows mixing of the water column to restore normal oxygen conditions (Rabalais and others, 1994, 1996; Rabalais, 2002). Since systematic measurement of the extent of the dead zone began in 1985, the overall pattern indicates that the area of the dead zone is increasing (Rabalais and Turner, 2001; Turner and others, 2005). Several studies have concluded that the expansion of the Louisiana Shelf dead zone is related to increased nutrients (primarily nitrogen, but possibly also phosphorous) in the Mississippi River drainage basin and is responsible for the degradation of Gulf of Mexico marine habitats (Goolsby and others, 2001). This paper presents the benthic foraminiferal data from 10 sediment cores collected from the Continental Shelf of Louisiana (table 1), obtained as part of an initiative to investigate the geographic and temporal extent of hypoxia prior to 1985 in the Gulf of Mexico. Benthic foraminifers provide a method to track the development of hypoxia prior to 1985 (Blackwelder and others, 1996; Sen Gupta and others, 1996). Previous work (Osterman, 2003) has shown statistically that the relative occurrence of three low-oxygen-tolerant species represents the modern seasonal Louisiana hypoxia zone. The cumulative percentage of

  11. Production and turnover of suspended organic detritus in the coastal water of the southeastern continental shelf: Progress report, June 1, 1988--May 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, L.R.

    1988-12-01

    As one of a group cooperative research projects on the southeastern continental shelf, this project is concerned with specific aspects of microbial processes and related phenomena that influence the fate of particulate organic materials naturally produced on the continental shelf. The projects of other grantees encompass the dynamics of the shelf from physical oceanography to biology. The integrated information as a whole will be useful in understanding the potential fate of a variety of energy related pollutants that may be released in continental shelf waters. With a focus on events on the southeastern continental shelf and their boundary conditions (Gulf Stream dynamics; river and estuarine processes), we form an interface between studies of oceanic processes such as GOFS and WOCE, and studies of processes at the land-sea boundary. During this grant year we completed two research cruises on the southeastern continental shelf on R/V Blue Fin, and processed data from previous cruises.

  12. Relaxation from upwelling: The effect on dissolved oxygen on the continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Send, Uwe; Nam, Sunghyun

    2012-04-01

    Continental shelves in upwelling regimes are subject to sequences of upwelling and relaxation events, each on timescales of order 1 week typically. These episodes have pronounced impacts on the temperature and density structure on the shelves and also on the along-shore and cross-shore flow regimes. It had previously been demonstrated that relaxation phases advect warm water along shore (poleward) from regions of less intense upwelling, thus adding to the heat balance in upwelling locations and providing a rectification of oscillating heat fluxes. In the current paper it is shown that relaxations also modify the dissolved oxygen (DO) budget of the lower layers. On a narrow shelf, this provides enhanced DO values due to near-surface exposure, while on a wide shelf decreased DO concentrations are created due to oxygen consumption on the inner shelf. The resulting variations along the coast can lead to along-shore advection of high or low DO during a relaxation event. Observations are presented from moorings off San Diego and Del Mar, which show large departures from density-correlated DO values during relaxations and which support the proposed mechanisms.

  13. Processes controlling the characteristics of the surficial sand sheet, U.S. Atlantic outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knebel, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    A review of recent data on the velocity of bottom currents, the frequency of bottom-sediment movement, the kinds and amounts of suspended sediments in near-bottom waters, and the acoustic and sedimentary features of subbottom strata indicates that the characteristics of the ubiquitous sand sheet on the Atlantic outer continental shelf of the United States have been controlled by a variety of past and present processes. Although these processes collectively have had a widespread effect on the characteristics of the sand sheet, the relative importance of each process changes geographically. On Georges Bank, late Pleistocene glaciations along with modern tidal currents and the regional circulation pattern have played a dominant role. On the Middle Atlantic shelf, ancestral rivers, former near-shore processes, and modern wind- and wave-generated currents are important factors. On the South Atlantic shelf, the sediments reflect subaerial weathering, erosion or nondeposition over or near hardgrounds, and the production of biogenic carbonate. Other processes such as the movement of water masses, bioturbation, and bottom fishing probably have affected the sediments in all areas. A knowledge of the various factors affecting the sand sheet is fundamental to an understanding of its general geologic history and to the paleoenvironmental interpretation of ancient sand strata. ?? 1981.

  14. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in continental shelf sediment of China: implications for anthropogenic influences on coastal marine environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang-Ying; Wang, Ji-Zhong; Wei, Gao-Ling; Guan, Yu-Feng; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2012-08-01

    Sediments collected from the continental shelf of China, embracing Yellow Sea, inner shelf of the East China Sea (ECS), and the South China Sea (SCS), were analyzed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The concentrations of anthropogenic PAHs (Σ(18)PAH) were 27-224 ng/g dry weight, with an average of 82 ng/g. Sedimentary PAHs in the continental shelf off China were mainly derived from mixed residues of biomass, coal, and petroleum combustion. Fluvial transport and atmospheric deposition mainly accounted for sediment PAHs in the ECS inner shelf and Yellow Sea (and the SCS), respectively. Furthermore, statistically higher levels of Σ(18)PAH (28-224 ng/g; mean 110 ng/g) in the Yellow Sea sediment than in the SCS sediment (28-109 ng/g; mean 58 ng/g) were probably resulted from higher PAH emissions from coke industry and domestic coal combustion in North China than in South China.

  15. How well do we know the infaunal biomass of the continental shelf?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Eric N.; Mann, Roger

    2016-03-01

    Benthic infauna comprise a wide range of taxa of varying abundances and sizes, but large infaunal taxa are infrequently recorded in community surveys of the shelf benthos. These larger, but numerically rare, species may contribute disproportionately to biomass, however. We examine the degree to which standard benthic sampling gear and survey design provide an adequate estimate of the biomass of large infauna using the Atlantic surfclam, Spisula solidissima, on the continental shelf off the northeastern coast of the United States as a test organism. We develop a numerical model that simulates standard survey designs, gear types, and sampling densities to evaluate the effectiveness of vertically-dropped sampling gear (e.g., boxcores, grabs) for estimating density of large species. Simulations of randomly distributed clams at a density of 0.5-1 m-2 within an 0.25-km2 domain show that lower sampling densities (1-5 samples per sampling event) resulted in highly inaccurate estimates of clam density with the presence of clams detected in less than 25% of the sampling events. In all cases in which patchiness was present in the simulated clam population, surveys were prone to very large errors (survey availability events) unless a dense (e.g., 100-sample) sampling protocol was imposed. Thus, commercial quantities of surfclams could easily go completely undetected by any standard benthic community survey protocol using vertically-dropped gear. Without recourse to modern high-volume sampling gear capable of sampling many meters at a swath, such as hydraulic dredges, biomass of the continental shelf will be grievously underestimated if large infauna are present even at moderate densities.

  16. Bryozoan faunal composition and community structure from the continental shelf off Cap de Creus (Northwestern Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madurell, T.; Zabala, M.; Dominguez-Carrió, C.; Gili, J. M.

    2013-10-01

    Bryozoan specimens obtained in 2009-2010 from the continental shelf off Cap de Creus (Northwestern Mediterranean) were studied. Samples were collected using a Rauschert sled at depths ranging from 61 to 225 m. Bryozoans were present in all 26 samples examined, although they were only abundant in 20 of them. A total of 113 species of Bryozoa were identified (2 Ctenostomata, 90 Cheilostomata and 21 Cyclostomata), most of them are well known to science, although a few of the species have barely or never been cited in the Mediterranean Sea (Hincksinoflustra octodon, Alderina imbellis, Escharella immersa, Neolagenipora collaris and Escharina johnstoni), or are currently poorly described (Lagenipora lepralioides). The species Palmicellaria aff. aviculifera (sensu Gautier, 1957) is redescribed, for which the new name of Palmiskenea gautieri is proposed. Species richness, abundance and biomass were linked to the availability of suitable substrates. Multivariate analysis in relation to environmental data showed that the spatial distribution of the bryozoan species was related to the sediment type. Samples from areas dominated by silt and sandy sediments showed few or no bryozoans, whereas coarse sands and gravels presented higher diversity, abundance and biomass. Within the depth range studied, the faunistic composition of the bryozoan assemblages was similar for the whole continental shelf off Cap de Creus. The bulk of bryozoans was found near the canyon rim. This is related to the proximity of the submarine canyon and its associated hydrological processes. The high diversity and abundance of the bryozoan community located on the circalittoral and shelf-edge off Cap de Creus reflect the presence of critical habitats that are essential for the design of marine protected areas.

  17. Sea level anomaly on the Patagonian continental shelf: Trends, annual patterns and geostrophic flows.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Etcheverry, L A; Saraceno, M; Piola, A R; Strub, P T

    2016-04-01

    We study the annual patterns and linear trend of satellite sea level anomaly (SLA) over the southwest South Atlantic continental shelf (SWACS) between 54ºS and 36ºS. Results show that south of 42°S the thermal steric effect explains nearly 100% of the annual amplitude of the SLA, while north of 42°S it explains less than 60%. This difference is due to the halosteric contribution. The annual wind variability plays a minor role over the whole continental shelf. The temporal linear trend in SLA ranges between 1 and 5 mm/yr (95% confidence level). The largest linear trends are found north of 39°S, at 42°S and at 50°S. We propose that in the northern region the large positive linear trends are associated with local changes in the density field caused by advective effects in response to a southward displacement of the South Atlantic High. The causes of the relative large SLA trends in two southern coastal regions are discussed as a function meridional wind stress and river discharge. Finally, we combined the annual cycle of SLA with the mean dynamic topography to estimate the absolute geostrophic velocities. This approach provides the first comprehensive description of the seasonal component of SWACS circulation based on satellite observations. The general circulation of the SWACS is northeastward with stronger/weaker geostrophic currents in austral summer/winter. At all latitudes, geostrophic velocities are larger (up to 20 cm/s) close to the shelf-break and decrease toward the coast. This spatio-temporal pattern is more intense north of 45°S.

  18. Paleoecology of late-glacial terrestrial deposits with in situ conifers from the submerged continental shelf of western canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacourse, Terri; Mathewes, Rolf W.; Fedje, Daryl W.

    2003-09-01

    Extensive portions of the continental shelf off the coast of British Columbia were subaerially exposed during Late Wisconsinan deglaciation due to lowering of relative sea level by as much as 150 m. Paleoecological analyses were conducted at two sites on the emergent continental shelf where terrestrial surfaces with in situ conifers are preserved. The woody plant remains confirm that, during the latest period of subaerial exposure, terrestrial vegetation was established on the continental shelf. Microscopic identification of fossil wood, and analyses of pollen and plant macrofossils from the associated paleosols and overlying shallow pond sediments indicate that productive Pinus contorta-dominated communities with abundant Alnus crispa and ferns grew on the shelf adjacent to and on the Queen Charlotte Islands around 12,200 14C yr B.P. Dwarf shrubs including Salix and Empetrum, and herbaceous plants such as Heracleum lanatum and Hippuris vulgaris, were also important components of the shelf vegetation. Near northern Vancouver Island, mixed coniferous forests dominated by Pinus contorta with Picea, Tsuga spp., Alnus spp., and ferns occupied the shelf at 10,500 14C yr B.P.

  19. Distribution of DDT and other persistent organic contaminants in Canyons and on the continental shelf off the central California coast.

    PubMed

    Hartwell, S Ian

    2008-04-01

    Sediment samples were collected to delineate the distribution of contaminants along the central California coast. Sampling included a variety of Canyons and shelf/slope areas to evaluate contaminant transport patterns and potential delivery to Canyons and the continental slope to a depth of 1200 m. Sediments were collected and analyzed for organic contaminants using standard techniques of the NOAA National Status and Trends Program (NS&T). DDT is distributed on the shelf within a zone of fine-grained sediments between Half Moon and Monterey Bays. DDT was found at higher concentrations in Ascension, Año Nuevo, and Monterey/Soquel Canyons than in Pioneer and Carmel Canyons, the Gulf of the Farallones, or the continental slope. The Monterey Bay watershed appears to be the primary source of DDT. In contrast, PAHs and PCBs on the shelf appear to be derived primarily from San Francisco Bay. DDT appears to be delivered to the deep ocean via the Canyons more than from cross-shelf sediment transport. Sediment budget estimates for the continental shelf north of Monterey Bay need further refinement and more data to account for the movement of material from Monterey Bay onto the shelf.

  20. Surface sedimentary units of the Gulf of Alaska continental shelf: Montague Island to Yakutat Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Molnia, Bruce F.

    1977-01-01

    Four major sedimentary units occur on the sea floor of the continental shelf in the northern Gulf of Alaska. These units, defined on the basis of seismic and sedimentologic data, are: (1) Holocene sediments, (2) Holocene mind moraines, C3) Quaternary glacial marine sediments, and (4) Tertiary and Pleistocene lithified deposits. A wedge of Holocene fine sand to clayey silt covers most of the inner shelf, reaching maximum thicknesses of about 350 m seaward of the Copper River and about 200 m seaward of Icy Bay. Holocene end moraines are found at the mouth of Icy Bay, south of Bering Glacier, and at the mouth of Yakutat Bay. Quaternary glacial marine sediments are found in a narrow arc that borders, on the north and west side of Tart Bank and in a large arc 20 km or more offshore that parallels the shoreline between Kayak Island and Yakutat Bay. Tertiary or Pleistocene stratified sedimentary rocks, which in profile commonly are folded, faulted, and truncated, crop out on Tarr Bank, offshore of Montague Island, and in several localities southeast and southwest of Cape Yakataga. The lack of Holocene cover on Tarr Bank and Middleton, Kayak and Montague Island platforms may be due to the scouring action of swift bottom currents and large storm waves. West of Kayak Island the Copper River is the primary source of Holocene sediment. East of Kayak Island the major sediment sources are streams draining the larger ice fields, notably, the Malaspina and Bering Glaciers. Transport of bottom and suspended sediment is predominantly to the west. If deglaciation of the shelf was completed by 10,000 years B.P., maximum rates of accumulation of Holocene sediment on the inner shelf may be as high as 10-35 m per 1,000 years.

  1. Hydrographic and particle distributions over the Palos Verdes continental shelf: Spatial, seasonal and daily variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, B.H.; Noble, M.A.; Dickey, T.D.

    2002-01-01

    Moorings and towyo mapping were used to study the temporal and spatial variability of physical processes and suspended particulate material over the continental shelf of the Palos Verdes Peninsula in southwestern Los Angeles, California during the late summer of 1992 and winter of 1992-93. Seasonal evolution of the hydrographic structure is related to seasonal atmospheric forcing. During summer, stratification results from heating of the upper layer. Summer insolation coupled with the stratification results in a slight salinity increase nearsurface due to evaporation. Winter cooling removes much of the upper layer stratification, but winter storms can introduce sufficient quantities of freshwater into the shelf water column again adding stratification through the buoyancy input. Vertical mixing of the low salinity surface water deeper into the water column decreases the sharp nearsurface stratification and reduces the overall salinity of the upper water column. Moored conductivity measurements indicate that the decreased salinity persisted for at least 2 months after a major storm with additional freshwater inputs through the period. Four particulate groups contributed to the suspended particulate load in the water column: phytoplankton, resuspended sediments, and particles in treated sewage effluent were observed in every towyo mapping cruise; terrigenous particles are introduced through runoff from winter rainstorms. Terrigenous suspended particulate material sinks from the water column in <9 days and phytoplankton respond to the stormwater input of buoyancy and nutrients within the same period. The suspended particles near the bottom have spatially patchy distributions, but are always present in hydrographic surveys of the shelf. Temporal variations in these particles do not show a significant tidal response, but they may be maintained in suspension by internal wave and tide processes impinging on the shelf. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Observations of storm and river flood-driven sediment transport on the northern California continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogston, A.S.; Cacchione, D.A.; Sternberg, R.W.; Kineke, G.C.

    2000-01-01

    In the winter of 1996-1997, three bottom-boundary layer tripods were placed in an alongshelf array on the northern California continental shelf off Eureka, CA in 60-65-m water depth. During the observation period, multiple storms and river discharge events occurred, as well as the largest flood on record since 1964. Suspended-sediment concentration at all three sites fluctuated in response to both wave resuspension and advection of river-derived sediments. However, considerable spatial differences in low-frequency currents and suspended-sediment concentration were observed at the three sites. Sediment flux vectors calculated during periods of high suspended-sediment concentration suggest a convergence of sediment flux coincident with the center of recent flood deposits. Suspended-sediment concentrations observed at the two northern tripod sites following the large flood reached magnitudes typical of fluid mud (> 10 g/l) in a thin near-bed layer. The net sediment flux during the single three-day event was two orders of magnitude larger than any other event during the winter, and accounted for seven times the flux observed over an entire year (1995-1996). A conceptual model for the advection of sediment to the mid shelf is proposed in which river plume sediments are trapped on the inner shelf either due to a weak front or the rapid input of sediment from a confined plume, and form a thin layer of fluid mud. The fluid mud subsequently is transported seaward due to gravitational forcing. The measured sediment concentration and velocity profiles on the shelf provide strong evidence to support this conclusion. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  3. Observed wintertime tidal and subtidal currents over the continental shelf in the northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruixiang; Chen, Changsheng; Xia, Huayong; Beardsley, Robert C.; Shi, Maochong; Lai, Zhigang; Lin, Huichan; Feng, Yanqing; Liu, Changjian; Xu, Qichun; Ding, Yang; Zhang, Yu

    2014-08-01

    Synthesis analyses were performed to examine characteristics of tidal and subtidal currents at eight mooring sites deployed over the northern South China Sea (NSCS) continental shelf in the 2006-2007 and 2009-2010 winters. Rotary spectra and harmonic analysis results showed that observed tidal currents in the NSCS were dominated by baroclinic diurnal tides with phases varying both vertically and horizontally. This feature was supported by the CC-FVCOM results, which demonstrated that the diurnal tidal flow over this shelf was characterized by baroclinic Kelvin waves with vertical phase differences varying in different flow zones. The northeasterly wind-induced southwestward flow prevailed over the NSCS shelf during winter, with episodic appearances of mesoscale eddies and a bottom-intensified buoyancy-driven slope water intrusion. The moored current records captured a warm-core anticyclonic eddy, which originated from the southwestern coast of Taiwan and propagated southwestward along the slope consistent with a combination of β-plane and topographic Rossby waves. The eddy was surface-intensified with a swirl speed of >50 cm/s and a vertical scale of ˜400 m. In absence of eddies and onshore deep slope water intrusion, the observed southwestward flow was highly coherent with the northeasterly wind stress. Observations did not support the existence of the permanent wintertime South China Sea Warm Current (SCSWC). The definition of SCSWC, which was based mainly on thermal wind calculations with assumed level of no motion at the bottom, needs to be interpreted with caution since the observed circulation over the NSCS shelf in winter included both barotropic and baroclinic components.

  4. The origin, distribution, and depositional history of gravel deposits on the Beaufort Sea Continental Shelf, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodeick, Craig A.

    1979-01-01

    Two distinct gravel populations are present on the Beaufort Sea continental shelf. First, a geographically arcuate deposit that is convex seaward has been designated as the Chert Facies. This deposit is restricted to landward of the 10 meter bathymetric contour and west of Heald Point. The Chert Facies, originally a fluvial gravel deposit and probably part of the basal transgressive, represents reworked Gubik Formation. The Chert Facies is derived from the Brooks Range. The second population is the Dolomite Facies. This facies is a blanket deposit covering much of the shelf and occurs in most water depths greater than 10 meters. The Dolomite Facies extends on land into the Quaternary Gubik Formation east of Prudhoe Bay and probably to Point Barrow. Rocks of the Dolomite Facies are exotic to Alaska and represent ice rafted clasts. The distribution of the Dolomite Facies shelf gravel indicates an easterly source compatible with a proposed provenance surrounding the Amundsen Gulf of the Canadian Archipelago. Radiocarbon dates from undisturbed sediment underlying the gravel on the upper slope indicate that low Holocene sedimentation rates are the reason for gravel exposure in this region and on the outer shelf. Considerations of sea level fluctuations, possible times available for the transportation of gravel from the proposed source area to the study area, and radiocarbon dates indicate influxes of ice rafted debris during the mid-Wisconsin transgression and probably between 15, 000-10,000 years B. P. Correlation of the Gubik Formation at Heald Point with the Barrow unit of the Gubik Formation at Point Barrow on the basis of incorporated dolomite and orthoquartzite clasts is suggested.

  5. Arctic continental shelf morphology related to sea-ice zonation, Beaufort Sea, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reimnitz, E.; Toimil, L.; Barnes, P.

    1978-01-01

    Landsat-1 and NOAA satellite imagery for the winter 1972-1973, and a variety of ice and sea-floor data were used to study sea-ice zonation and dynamics and their relation to bottom morphology and geology on the Beaufort Sea continental shelf of arctic Alaska. In early winter the location of the boundary between undeformed fast ice and westward-drifting pack ice of the Pacific Gyre is controlled by major coastal promontories. Pronounced linear pressure- and shear-ridges, as well as hummock fields, form along this boundary and are stabilized by grounding, generally between the 10- and 20-m isobaths. Slippage along this boundary occurs intermittently at or seaward of the grounded ridges, forming new grounded ridges in a widening zone, the stamukhi zone, which by late winter extends out to the 40-m isobath. Between intermittent events along the stamukhi zone, pack-ice drift and slippage is continuous along the shelf edge, at average rates of 3-10 km/day. Whether slippage occurs along the stamukhi zone or along the shelf edge, it is restricted to a zone several hundred meters wide, and ice seaward of the slip face moves at uniform rates without discernible drag effects. A causal relationship is seen between the spatial distribution of major ice-ridge systems and offshore shoals downdrift of major coastal promontories. The shoals appear to have migrated shoreward under the influence of ice up to 400 m in the last 25 years. The sea floor seaward of these shoals within the stamukhi zone shows high ice-gouge density, large incision depths, and a high degree of disruption of internal sedimentary structures. The concentration of large ice ridges and our sea floor data in the stamukhi zone indicate that much of the available marine energy is expended here, while the inner shelf and coast, where the relatively undeformed fast ice grows, are sheltered. There is evidence that anomalies in the overall arctic shelf profile are related to sea-ice zonation, ice dynamics, and bottom

  6. Pelagic fishes in the Marguerite Bay region of the West Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Joseph; Torres, Joseph J.

    2008-02-01

    Pelagic fishes in the Marguerite Bay region of the western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) continental margin were sampled using a 10-m 2 MOCNESS as part of the Southern Ocean Global Ocean Ecosystems Dynamics (SO GLOBEC) program. Sixty-two tows were completed during the course of four cruises conducted during the austral fall and winter, 22 each during the austral fall, and 9 each during the austral winter. Six thousand and sixty individuals of 34 species representing 13 families were collected in the fall, while 672 individuals of 22 species from 10 families were collected in the winter. Nearly all of the notothenioid specimens collected (families Artedraconidae, Bathydraconidae, Channichthyidae, and Nototheniidae) were either larvae or young juveniles (0-2 years). Conversely, except for the paralepidid Notolepis coatsi and the occasional juveniles of the bathylagid Bathylagus antarcticus, the gonostomatid Cyclothone kobayashii, or the myctophid Electrona antarctica, the non-notothenioid specimens collected were predominantly adults. In the fall, the nototheniids Pleuragramma antarcticum and Trematomus scotti, and the myctophid E. antarctica numerically dominated the overall assemblage, collectively accounting for 89.7% of the total catch. In the winter, E. antarctica, Cyclothone microdon, and B. antarcticus were the numerical dominants, each contributing 14-20% of the total. The pelagic fish community within the Marguerite Bay region of the WAP continental shelf is a variable mixture of mesopelagic and neritic fauna. At one extreme is an oceanic assemblage exhibiting high-diversity indices and characterized by the genera Electrona, Gymnoscopelus, Protomyctophum, Bathylagus, Cyclothone, and Notolepis. Minor components of this group include numerous less common mesopelagic genera (e.g., Paradiplospinus, Lampanyctus, Benthalbella, Borostomias) and the occasional larval/juvenile notothenioid. At the other extreme is a coastal assemblage with low-diversity indices dominated

  7. Metal elements in the bottom sediments of the Changjiang Estuary and its adjacent continental shelf of the East China Sea.

    PubMed

    Cao, Lu; Hong, Gi Hoon; Liu, Sumei

    2015-06-15

    The metal elements (Al, Fe, Mn, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pb and Ca) in the bottom sediment of the Changjiang Estuary and its adjacent continental shelf of the East China Sea were studied to map their spatial distribution and to assess their potential risk to the marine biota. These metal concentrations except Ca were generally higher in the inner shelf and northeastern part, and were found to decrease from the coast to the offshore of the Changjiang Estuary. Sedimentary Ca was most abundant in the outer shelf sediments and decreased in inner shelf. Arsenic (As) appeared to be contaminated due to economic development from 1980s in the inner shelf overall, but the potential ecological risk from the selected metals was low in the coastal sea off the Changjiang.

  8. Total assemblages of benthic foraminifera from a mixed siliciclastic/carbonate inner shelf; preliminary results from the bays of Soline and Nin (Adriatic Sea, Croatia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidović, J.; Ćosović, V.; Juračić, M.; Benac, Č.

    2012-04-01

    Eastern Adriatic shelf is mixed siliciclastic/carbonate area with a great proportion of carbonate biogenous production. This study presents analysis and comparison of total benthic foraminiferal assemblages (their composition, diversity and distribution) in surface sediments from two Eastern Adriatic shallow water bays (Soline and Nin Bay), sampled seasonally from 2006 to 2008. In order to characterize the carbonate sediment production, 62 samples along the bathymetric profiles (from 2 to 20 m) were collected by scuba diving with short PVC corers. Granulometrical analysis was done using method of wet sieving. Statistical analyses (cluster analysis, PCA) were performed using Past program. The most abundant biogenous components in different sediments from Soline Bay (muddy sandy gravel and mud) are foraminifera, followed by fragments of mollusks, gastropods, bryozoans and sea urchins. Foraminiferal assemblages are high diversified as confirmed by Shannon-Wiener index varying from 2.14 to 3.39, Fisher α index from 5.74 to 16.30 and Equitability from 0.32 to 0.72. The shallowest part of the bay is covered with the sand, consisted of high proportion of siliciclastic component and impoverished in biogenous remnants. Foraminiferal assemblages have low diversity (Shannon-Wiener index 1.36, Fisher α index 2.31 and Equitability 0.32). Throughout Nin Bay, sediments (classified as sand, muddy sand and mud) are consisted of various biogenic remnants. Foraminiferal assemblages have high biodiversity, with Shannon-Wiener index varying from 2.51 to 3.20, α-Fisher index from 7.84 to 12.64 and Equitability from 0.37 to 0.77. Statistical analyses (cluster analysis and PCA) grouped foraminifera in two major assemblages, related to sediment type. On sandy and gravely substrates, assemblage is dominated by epifaunal genera and species: Quinqueloculina sp. (6-20%), Elphidium sp. (5-16%), Neoconorbina terquemi (6-10 %) and Asterigerinata mamilla (5-7%). Infaunal species, Ammonia

  9. Model for the formation of longshore sand ridges on the Continental Shelf: The interaction of internal waves and the bottom topography

    SciTech Connect

    Restrepo, J.M.; Bona, J.L.

    1994-01-05

    Longshore sand ridges are frequently observed to occur on the continental shelf where the overlying ocean is stratified. This study formulates a model for the formation and evolution of three-dimensional longshore sand ridges on the continental shelf. The model is based on the interaction of interfacial, weakly nonlinear waves in a stratified ocean with the sedimentary bottom topography.

  10. Shelf basin exchange along the Siberian continental margin: Modification of Atlantic Water and Lower Halocline Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauch, Dorothea; Cherniavskaia, Ekaterina; Timokhov, Leonid

    2016-09-01

    Salinity and stable oxygen isotope (δ18O) evidence shows a modification of Atlantic Water in the Arctic Ocean by a mixture of sea-ice meltwater and meteoric waters along the Barents Sea continental margin. On average no further influence of meteoric waters is detectable within the core of the Atlantic Water east of the Kara Sea as indicated by constant δ18O, while salinity further decreases along the Siberian continental slope. Lower Halocline Waters (LHW) may be divided into different types by Principal Component Analysis. All LHW types show the addition of river water and an influence of sea-ice formation to a varying extent. The geographical distribution of LHW types suggest that the high salinity type of LHW forms in the Barents and Kara seas, while other LHW types are formed either in the northwestern Laptev Sea or from southeastern Kara Sea waters that enter the northwestern Laptev Sea through Vilkitsky Strait. No further modification of LHW is seen in the eastern Laptev Sea but the distribution of LHW-types suggest a bifurcation of LHW at this location, possibly with one branch continuing along the continental margin and a second branch along the Lomonosov Ridge. We see no pronounced distinction between onshore and offshore LHW types, as the LHW components that are found within the halocline over the basin also show a narrow bottom-bound distribution at the continental slope that is consistent with a shelf boundary current as well as a jet of water entering the western Laptev Sea from the Kara Sea through Vilkitsky Strait.

  11. Abbot Ice Shelf, the Amundsen Sea Continental Margin and the Southern Boundary of the Bellingshausen Plate Seaward of West Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, J. R.; Tinto, K. J.; Bell, R. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Abbot Ice Shelf extends 450 km along the coast of West Antarctica between 103°W and 89°W and straddles the boundary between the Bellingshausen Sea continental margin, which overlies a former subduction zone, and Amundsen Sea rifted continental margin. Inversion of NASA Operation IceBridge airborne gravity data for sub-ice bathymetry shows that the western part of the ice shelf, as well as Cosgrove Ice Shelf to the south, are underlain by a series of east-west trending rift basins. The eastern boundary of the rifted terrain coincides with the eastern boundary of rifting between Antarctica and Zealandia and the rifts formed during the early stages of this rifting. Extension in these rifts is minor as rifting quickly jumped north of Thurston Island. The southern boundary of the Cosgrove Rift is aligned with the southern boundary of a sedimentary basin under the Amundsen Embayment continental shelf to the west, also formed by Antarctica-Zealandia rifting. The shelf basin has an extension factor, β, of 1.5 - 1.7 with 80 -100 km of extension occurring in an area now ~250 km wide. Following this extension early in the rifting process, rifting centered to the north of the present shelf edge and proceeded to continental rupture. Since then, the Amundsen Embayment continental shelf has been tectonically quiescent and has primarily been shaped though subsidence, sedimentation and the passage of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet back and forth across it. The former Bellingshausen Plate was located seaward of the Amundsen Sea margin prior to its incorporation into the Antarctic Plate at ~62 Ma. During the latter part of its existence, Bellingshausen plate motion had a clockwise rotational component relative to Antarctica producing convergence between the Bellingshausen and Antarctic plates east of 102°W. Seismic reflection and gravity data show that this convergence is expressed by an area of intensely deformed sediments beneath the continental slope from 102°W to 95°W and

  12. 210Pb balance and implications for particle transport on the continental shelf, U.S. Middle Atlantic Bight

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, M.P.; Belastock, Rebecca A.; Bothner, Michael H.

    1994-01-01

    Supply of 210Pb to the continental shelf off the northeastern United States is dominated by the deposition from the atmosphere, the rate of which is reliably known from previously published work. Excess 210Pb inventories in the shelf sediments show accumulations that are nearly in balance with the supply, even in areas of relict sands where it is believed that no net accumulation of sediment presently occurs. The 210Pb distributions in shelf and slope water indicate that the two-way fluid exchange at the shelf-slope front and the net transport in the alongshore flow make comparatively small contributions to the shelf 210Pb budget. The near balance between supply and decay of 210Pb on the shelf implies a limit to the particle export flux. It is concluded that the export of particulate organic carbon does not exceed 60 g m−2 y−1 (∼25% of primary production) and is probably lower. The hypothesis is advanced that fine particulate matter introduced to the continental shelf is detained in its transit of the shelf because of bioturbational trapping in the sediment due to benthic animals. Distributions of 210Pb in suspended particulate matter and in the fine fraction of shelf sediments suggest that the average fine particle must undergo several cycles of deposition-bioturbation-resuspension-redeposition and requires a number of decades for its transit and ultimate export from the shelf. Thus, only the most refractory organic matter is likely to be exported.

  13. Geophysical and sampling data from the inner continental shelf: Northern Cape Cod Bay, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, Brian D.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Baldwin, Wayne E.; Barnhardt, Walter A.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) have cooperated to map approximately 480 km2 of the inner continental shelf in northern Cape Cod Bay, MA. This report contains geophysical and sampling data collected by the USGS during five research cruises between 2006 and 2008. The geophysical data include (1) swath bathymetry from interferometric sonar, (2) acoustic backscatter from interferometric and sidescan sonars, and (3) subsurface stratigraphy and structure from seismic-reflection profilers. The seafloor sampling data include sediment samples, photographs, and video tracklines. These spatial data support research on the influence that sea-level change and sediment supply have on coastal evolution and help identify the type, distribution, and quality of subtidal marine habitats within the coastal zone of Massachusetts.

  14. Rippled scour depressions on the inner continental shelf off central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cacchione, David A.; Drake, David E.; Grant, William D.; Tate, George B.

    1984-01-01

    Side-scan sonar records taken during the recent Coastal Ocean Dynamics Experiment (CODE) show elongate, shore-normal tippled depressions of low relief on the inner continental shelf off central California between Bodega Bay and Point Arena. These features extend up to 2 kin from the coast into water depths of up to 65 m. The proposed mechanism for their generation is storm- generated bottom currents associated with coastal downwelling during the late fall and winter which scour the surficial fine-sand sediment and expose the coarser-sand substrate in the depressions. The zones of most intense erosion and the irregular spacing of the features may be controlled by submerged rock ledges and other prominent coastal features. The large straight-crested ripples within the depres- sions (heights to 40 cm; wavelengths to 1.7 m) are probably formed by large-amplitude, long-period surface waves generated by winter storms.

  15. Subsurface geology of upper Tertiary and Quaternary deposits, coastal Louisiana and adjacent Continental Shelf

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlan, E. Jr.; Leroy, D.O.

    1988-09-01

    Upper Tertiary and Quaternary deposits thicken seaward from a feather edge on the outcrop in the uplands of southern Louisiana to more than 7000 ft (2134 m) beneath the middle continental shelf. Through a study of cores and cuttings from 100 control wells and electric-log pattern correlations from 350 water and petroleum industry wells with seismic corroboration in the offshore area, these deposits have been divided into six major time-stratigraphic units, four of which correlate to outcropping terraces. This investigation presents a regional stratigraphic framework of the major upper Tertiary and Quaternary units from their updip pinch-outs in and beneath the terraced uplands, into the subsurface, across the coastal plain to the Louisiana offshore area.

  16. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic Coastal Plain and outer continental shelf in 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, A.C.; Amato, R.V.

    1985-10-01

    Exploratory drilling on the Atlantic outer continental shelf remained at about the same level as in 1983. Two wells were spudded in the Baltimore Canyon Trough. Three were completed and announced as dry holes, one in a world record water depth of 6,952 ft (2,119 m). Onshore in the Atlantic coastal plain, a dry hole was drilled in Colleton County, South Carolina, and another well, drilled in 1982 in Lee County, North Carolina, was plugged and abandoned as a dry hole. North Atlantic Lease Sale 82, which was to be held in 2 parts, was cancelled in late 1984. The International Court of Justice determined the United States-Canada boundary line in the North Atlantic. Seismic data acquisition decreased 41% below the 1983 level to 7,223 line-mi(11,625 line-km).

  17. Oil and gas developments in Atlantic coastal plain and outer continental shelf in 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Giordano, A.C.; Amato, R.V.

    1985-10-01

    Exploratory drilling on the Atlantic outer continental shelf remained at about the same level as in 1983. Two wells were spudded in the Baltimore Canyon Trough. Three were completed and announced as dry holes, one in a world record water depth of 6952 ft (2119 m). Onshore in the Atlantic coastal plain, a dry hole was drilled in Colleton County, South Carolina, and another well, drilled in 1982 in Lee County, North Carolina, was plugged and abandoned as a dry hole. North Atlantic Lease Sale 82, which was to be held in 2 parts, was cancelled in late 1984. The International Court of Justice determined the US-Canada boundary line in the North Atlantic. Seismic data acquisition decreased 41% below the 1983 level to 7223 line-mi (11,625 line-km). 3 figures, 2 tables.

  18. Self-advection of density perturbations on a sloping continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Ping-Tung Shaw; Csanady, G.T.

    1983-05-01

    Bottom water movement on the continental shelf is modeled by the nonlinear interaction between longshore bottom geostrophic flow and the density field. Bottom geostrophic velocity, subject to linear steady momentum equations with linear bottom friction, can be generated by along-isobath density variations over a sloping bottom. At the same time, the density field is slowly advected by the velocity field. Away from boundary layers, the interplay is governed by Burgers' equation, which shows the formation and self-propulsion of strong density gradients along an isobath. The direction of propagation of a dense water blob is to have shallow water on the right- (left-) hand side facing downstream in the Northern (Southern) Hemisphere. The propagation of a light water blob is opposite to that of a dense water blob.

  19. Random-access technique for modular bathymetry data storage in a continental shelf wave refraction program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.

    1974-01-01

    A study was conducted of an alternate method for storage and use of bathymetry data in the Langley Research Center and Virginia Institute of Marine Science mid-Atlantic continental-shelf wave-refraction computer program. The regional bathymetry array was divided into 105 indexed modules which can be read individually into memory in a nonsequential manner from a peripheral file using special random-access subroutines. In running a sample refraction case, a 75-percent decrease in program field length was achieved by using the random-access storage method in comparison with the conventional method of total regional array storage. This field-length decrease was accompanied by a comparative 5-percent increase in central processing time and a 477-percent increase in the number of operating-system calls. A comparative Langley Research Center computer system cost savings of 68 percent was achieved by using the random-access storage method.

  20. Chlorophyll distribution in continental shelf sediments off West Palm Beach, Florida and west end, Bahamas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heffernan, John J.; Gibson, Robert A.

    1983-07-01

    Measurements were made of chlorophyll- a and phaeophytin- a in calcareous sediments along transects off the east coast of Florida (75-190 m) and the west coast of Grand Bahama Island (170-300 m). Solvent partitioning showed that chlorophyll- a concentrations never exceeded 0·1 mg m -2 at either location, most as degradation products. Total pigment concentrations (chlorophyll and phaeopigments) ranged from 0·18-1·83 mg m -2 in sediments off Grand Bahama Island and 2·50 to 20·65 mg m -2 off West Palm Beach. Pigments, expressed per gram dry weight of sediments, increased with depth across the Florida Continental Shelf. This is probably due to differences in sediment character between near-shore and off-shore sediments.

  1. Environmental studies results: 1973-1992. Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Environmental Studies Program was initiated in 1973 under the Bureau of Land Management by the Secretary of the Interior. The Purpose of the program was to conduct studies needed to predict, assess and manage impacts on the human, marine and coastal environments of the OCS and nearshore areas that may be affected by oil and gas activities. The narrative summary updates the version printed in 1986, which covered studies managed by the MMS in the Atlantic OCS region between 1973 and 1985. Descriptions of the study results are divided into the following categories: baseline studies and environmental inventories, biology/ecology, drill site monitoring, endangered species, geology/chemistry, oil spill studies, physical oceanography/meteorology, and social and economic studies. Results of each major type of study are subdivided into North Atlantic, Mid-Atlantic, South Atlantic, and multiregional studies in chronological sequence.

  2. Drowned forests and archaeology on the continental shelf of British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedje, Daryl W.; Josenhans, Heiner

    2000-02-01

    We have used high-resolution digital terrain imaging and sea-floor sampling to reveal drowned late glacial to early postglacial terrestrial landscapes at water depths as great as 150 m. In situ tree stumps and shellfish-rich paleobeaches are present on these drowned landscapes. A stone tool encrusted with barnacles and bryozoa was recovered from a drowned delta flood plain now 53 m below mean sea level. This is the first tangible evidence that the formerly subaerial broad banks of the western North American Continental Shelf may have been occupied by humans in earliest Holocene and possibly late-glacial time. Analyses (14C) of the drowned terrestrial and intertidal deposits were used to refine the local sea-level curve, which shows very rapid change within this glacio-isostatically dynamic region.

  3. Resistance to hurricane disturbance of an epifaunal community on the continental shelf off North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirby-Smith, William W.; Ustach, Joseph

    1986-10-01

    Hurricane Diana was stalled over the continental shelf of central North Carolina on 11-13 September 1984 in the vicinity of a previously studied epifaunal community (30 m depth). Two research cruises following the hurricane used still camera and TV transects to obtain data which allowed an evaluation of stormrelated effects on taxa of algae, sponges, corals, echinoderms and fish. Analysis of 35-mm slides suggested no effects attributable to the hurricane except observations of damaged coral heads and dead mussels. Analysis of television transects indicated no storm related changes from the previous study in frequency of occurrence of large epibenthic taxa. Hurricane damage was much less than anticipated and it is hypothesized that these coral reef-type communities are adapted to or structured by strong bottom currents generated by the frequent passage of gales and that the passage of hurricanes causes little additional stress.

  4. High-Resolution geophysical data from the inner continental shelf at Vineyard Sound, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, Brian D.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Baldwin, Wayne E.; Foster, David S.; Schwab, William C.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) have mapped approximately 340 square kilometers of the inner continental shelf in Vineyard Sound, Massachusetts, under a cooperative mapping program. The geophysical data collected between 2009 and 2011 by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of this program are published in this report. The data include (1) swath bathymetry from interferometric sonar, (2) acoustic backscatter from sidescan sonar, and (3) seismic-reflection profiles from a chirp subbottom profiler. These data were collected to support research on the influence of sea-level change and sediment supply on coastal evolution and sediment transport processes and to provide baseline seabed characterization information required for management of coastal and offshore resources within the coastal zone of Massachusetts.

  5. Large sand waves on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf around Wilmington Canyon, off Eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knebel, H. J.; Folger, D.W.

    1976-01-01

    New seismic-reflection data show that large sand waves near the head of Wilmington Canyon on the Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf have a spacing of 100-650 m and a relief of 2-9 m. The bedforms trend northwest and are asymmetrical, the steeper slopes being toward the south or west. Vibracore sediments indicate that the waves apparently have formed on a substrate of relict nearshore sediments. Although the age of the original bedforms is unknown, the asymmetry is consistent with the dominant westerly to southerly drift in this area which has been determined by other methods; the asymmetry, therefore, is probably modern. Observations in the sand-wave area from a submersible during August 1975, revealed weak bottom currents, sediment bioturbation, unrippled microtopography, and lack of scour. Thus, the asymmetry may be maintained by periodic water motion, possibly associated with storms or perhaps with flow in the canyon head. ?? 1976.

  6. Ophiuroids (Echinodermata; Ophiuroidea) of biogenic habitats on the continental shelf of New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Mills, V Sadie; O'Hara, Timothy D

    2013-02-13

    The taxonomy of ophiuroids collected in 2009 and 2011, from biogenic habitats across the New Zealand continental shelf, is reviewed. Ophionereis novaezelandiae Mortensen, 1936, and its junior synonym Ophionereis terba Baker & Devaney, 1981 from South-Eastern Australia, is now recognised as a distinct species, and has been removed from synonymy with Ophionereis fasciata Hutton, 1872. Ophiacantha abyssicola var. otagoensis Fell, 1958 is also recognised as a distinct species and has been removed from synonymy with Ophiacantha brachygnatha Clark H L, 1928. Amphiura eugeniae var. latisquama Mortensen, 1924 is raised to species rank and Amphioplus longirima Fell, 1952 treated as a synonym of A. latisquama. Ophiolycus farquhari McKnight, 2003 is transferred to the genus Ophiologimus. The diagnostic characters of several other species are reviewed and colour descriptions and images are included where available. The tropical species Ophiacantha longidens Lyman, 1878, Ophiotreta valenciennesi (Lyman, 1879) and Ophiobyrsa intorta (Koehler, 1922) are reported from New Zealand waters for the first time.

  7. Arctic geodynamics: Continental shelf and deep ocean geophysics. ERS-1 satellite altimetry: A first look

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Allen Joel; Sandwell, David T.; Marquart, Gabriele; Scherneck, Hans-Georg

    1993-01-01

    An overall review of the Arctic Geodynamics project is presented. A composite gravity field model of the region based upon altimetry data from ERS-1, Geosat, and Seasat is made. ERS-1 altimetry covers unique Arctic and Antarctic latitudes above 72 deg. Both areas contain large continental shelf areas, passive margins, as well as recently formed deep ocean areas. Until ERS-1 it was not possible to study these areas with satellite altimetry. Gravity field solutions for the Barents sea, portions of the Arctic ocean, and the Norwegian sea north of Iceland are shown. The gravity anomalies around Svalbard (Spitsbergen) and Bear island are particularly large, indicating large isostatic anomalies which remain from the recent breakup of Greenland from Scandinavian. Recently released gravity data from the Armed Forces Topographic Service of Russia cover a portion of the Barents and Kara seas. A comparison of this data with the ERS-1 produced gravity field is shown.

  8. Temperatures of quartz cementation in Jurassic sandstones from the Norwegian continental shelf -- evidence from fluid inclusions

    SciTech Connect

    Walderhaug, O. )

    1994-04-01

    Recent studies of fluid inclusions in quartz overgrowths have shown quartz cementation to have taken place at temperatures within the range 60--145 C in several sandstones from the North Sea and offshore mid-Norway (Malley et al. 1986; Konnerup-Madsen and Dypvik 1988; Burley et al. 1989; Walderhaug 1990; Ehrenberg 1990; Saigal et al. 1992; Nedkvitne et al. 1993). This study aims at determining whether these results are typical for quartz cementation of sandstones by presenting homogenization temperatures for 274 aqueous and 366 hydrocarbon inclusions in quartz overgrowths from Jurassic reservoir sandstones on the Norwegian continental shelf, and by reviewing previously published fluid-inclusion data. Possible explanations for different ranges of homogenization temperatures in different sandstones are also discussed, and possible sources of quartz cement and the effect of hydrocarbon emplacement on quartz cementation are considered.

  9. Pollution by petroleum hydrocarbons in sediments from continental shelf of Tabasco State, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Botello, A.V.; Gonzalez, C.; Diaz, G. )

    1991-10-01

    The Wider Caribbean is potentially one of the largest oil producing areas in the world. Major petroleum production areas include Louisiana and Texas, USA; the Bay of Campeche, Mexico; Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela; and Gulf of Paria, Trinidad; all of which are classified as production accident high-risk zones. About 5 million of barrels are transported every day in the Caribbean, thus generating an intense tanker traffic. It has been estimated that oil discharges from tank washings within the Wider Caribbean could be as high as 7 million barrels/year. For all those reasons petroleum pollution is considered as the major environmental problem in the Wider Caribbean area and increasing day to day due to the use of petroleum as the main energy source. On the other hand, the continental shelf of Tabasco state actually represents one of the most productive areas for crude oil in the Gulf of Mexico. Sediments were collected from this area and analyzed for hydrocarbons.

  10. Impacts of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) development on recreation and tourism. Volume 3. Detailed methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The final report for the project is presented in five volumes. This volume, Detailed Methodology Review, presents a discussion of the methods considered and used to estimate the impacts of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas development on coastal recreation in California. The purpose is to provide the Minerals Management Service with data and methods to improve their ability to analyze the socio-economic impacts of OCS development. Chapter II provides a review of previous attempts to evaluate the effects of OCS development and of oil spills on coastal recreation. The review also discusses the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches and presents the rationale for the methodology selection made. Chapter III presents a detailed discussion of the methods actually used in the study. The volume contains the bibliography for the entire study.

  11. Impacts of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) development on recreation and tourism. Volume 1. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    The study was intended to provide the Mineral Management Service (MMS) with an analytical tool to evaluate possible economic impacts from Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) development. In particular, the study was designed to provide MMS staff who work on lease sale Energy Impact Statements with an objective technique for estimating the impacts to coastal communities from events that might occur as a result of lease sales: oil spills, onshore construction, and construction of platforms offshore. The project had several specific objectives: (1) provide profiles of 1982 socio-economic conditions in coastal communities, including an analysis of the relative importance of the tourist industry in each coastal county; (2) develop a methodology for determining the effects of OCS development on coastal recreation; and recommend mitigation measure that may reduce the negative effect of OCS development on coastal recreation using gravity and economic effects models.

  12. Geophysical and sampling data from the inner continental shelf: Duxbury to Hull, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnhardt, Walter A.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Andrews, Brian D.; Baldwin, Wayne E.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management (CZM) have cooperated to map approximately 200 km² of the Massachusetts inner continental shelf between Duxbury and Hull. This report contains geophysical and geological data collected by the USGS on three cruises between 2006 and 2007. These USGS data are supplemented with a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) hydrographic survey conducted in 2003 to update navigation charts. The geophysical data include (1) swath bathymetry from interferometric sonar and multibeam echosounders, (2) acoustic backscatter from sidescan sonar and multibeam echosounders, and (3) subsurface stratigraphy and structure from seismic-reflection profilers. The geological data include sediment samples, seafloor photographs, and bottom videos. These spatial data support research on the influence sea-level change and sediment supply have on coastal evolution, and on efforts to understand the type, distribution, and quality of subtidal marine habitats in the Massachusetts coastal ocean.

  13. Sedimentary and geochemical characterization and provenance of the Portuguese continental shelf soft-bottom sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, R.; Azevedo, M. R.; Mamede, R.; Sousa, B.; Freitas, R.; Rocha, F.; Quintino, V.; Rodrigues, A. M.

    2012-03-01

    Grain-size and geochemical analyses for soft-bottom sediments from the Portuguese continental shelf are used to determine their provenance and to identify the main factors governing the sediment distribution patterns. The deeper areas of the northwestern and central sectors of the Portuguese shelf and most of its southwestern sector are covered by fine and very fine sands. Coarse deposits are found in the inner and middle shelf of the northernmost sector and immediately south of the Nazaré and Setúbal canyons, while muddy sediments are restricted to areas located off the mouths of major rivers (Douro and Tagus mud patches). In contrast, the southern shelf corresponds to a low energy environment receiving most of its sediment supply from the Guadiana River. As a result, an expressive mud patch is developed off the Guadiana estuarine system. The application of multivariate analysis to geochemical data allowed the classification of the studied samples into four main groups: (a) a group of mud deposits constituted by detrital clay minerals and authigenic iron-manganese oxyhydroxides, displaying high contents for organic matter and for most major and trace elements; (b) a group of biogenic carbonate-rich sands showing high CaO, Sr and U contents which is well represented throughout the entire Portuguese shelf; (c) a group of quart-rich sediments, with very high SiO 2 contents and moderate Al 2O 3, K 2O and TiO 2 contents, supporting a major terrigenous contribution and (d) a group of coarse sand samples with high As levels from off important rivers, pointing to anthropogenic contamination. Trace metal enrichments observed in the muddy areas from both the western and southern coasts appear to result from natural causes and do not exceed the international sediment quality thresholds. There is, however, local evidence for As, Zn, Cr and Pb anthropogenic contamination in near-shore sediments associated with rivers draining regions characterized by urban, industrial or

  14. Soft-sediment crustacean diversity and distribution along the Portuguese continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampaio, Leandro; Mamede, Renato; Ricardo, Fernando; Magalhães, Luísa; Rocha, Hélder; Martins, Roberto; Dauvin, Jean-Claude; Rodrigues, Ana Maria; Quintino, Victor

    2016-11-01

    This study analyzed the crustacean diversity, distribution and relationship with environmental factors in the western and the southern Portuguese continental shelf, between 10 and 200 m depth. A total of 10,639 specimens belonging to 242 taxa from 90 families were identified, mostly amphipods (55.8% of the total taxa). The mysid Gastrosaccus spinifer and the amphipods Socarnes erythrophthalmus and Cheirocratus sundevallii were the most abundant and the amphipods Ampelisca brevicornis, Leucothoe incisa and Autonoe spiniventris were the most frequent species. The highest abundance and diversity was found in coarser sediments with up to 306 individuals per 0.1 m2. Alpha diversity ranged from 1 to 28 sp./0.1 m2. Moreover, this study confirmed six previously doubtful first records and added an additional 19 new records to the Portuguese fauna. The results also confirmed the Portuguese coast as a transition zone of mixed Atlantic and Mediterranean faunas and exposed a noticeable North African and Macaronesian influence. A multivariate analysis based on the abundance of crustaceans revealed six affinity groups characterized by: (a) C. sundevallii, Guernea (Guernea) coalita and Sarsinebalia cristoboi on very coarse sands; (b) G. spinifer, Nototropis falcatus and Pontocrates arenarius on coarse sands; (c) Othomaera othonis, Processa modica modica and Animoceradocus semiserratus on heterogeneous medium sands; (d) A. brevicornis, Urothoe pulchella and Necalianassa truncata on fine sands; (e) Ampelisca pectenata, Bodotria scorpioides and Astacilla dilatata on heterogeneous fine sands and (f) Callianassa subterranea, Ampelisca tenuicornis and Ampelisca typica on muddy fine sands. Sediment grain-size and depth were the variables best related to the benthic crustacean spatial distribution patterns along the Portuguese continental shelf.

  15. Seismic refraction studies on the acoustic basement in the continental shelf of the East Sea, Korea

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.Y.; Kim, H.J.; Han, S.J.

    1996-12-31

    Critically refracted seismic waves can be utilized in elucidation of physical properties of a high-impedance acoustic basement, where reflection methods are not effective in general. Quality factor Q was estimated for the high-impedance acoustic basement in the continental shelf of the East Sea, Korea. Various pre-processing steps for the estimation included static correction for gun delay, geometric correction, data interpolation, and Fourier transform. Based on the constant Q model, quality factor was computed for the uppermost layer within the basement using the spectral-ratio method. The computation gives values between 10.4 and 13.6, which fall under the range for water-saturated clastic sedimentary rocks. Using seismic events refracted from the layer boundaries within the acoustic basement in the study area, sedimentary layers were successfully defined. A short window AGC (automatic gain control) is an effective tool to reveal existence of the refraction boundaries. Based on a model for horizontal layers, refraction velocity and thickness were computed for each layer under a short seismic line of 3.75 km long in the continental shelf. From four distinct linear events, three layers were interpreted under the water body of 150 m deep. The computed thickness is 275 m for the top layer and 200 m for the middle one. The corresponding refraction velocities are approximately 3,900 m/s and 5,100 m/s, respectively. The refraction event from the top of the lowest layer suggests that its phase velocity is greater than 6,400 m/s.

  16. Sea level anomaly on the Patagonian continental shelf: Trends, annual patterns and geostrophic flows

    PubMed Central

    Saraceno, M.; Piola, A. R.; Strub, P. T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We study the annual patterns and linear trend of satellite sea level anomaly (SLA) over the southwest South Atlantic continental shelf (SWACS) between 54ºS and 36ºS. Results show that south of 42°S the thermal steric effect explains nearly 100% of the annual amplitude of the SLA, while north of 42°S it explains less than 60%. This difference is due to the halosteric contribution. The annual wind variability plays a minor role over the whole continental shelf. The temporal linear trend in SLA ranges between 1 and 5 mm/yr (95% confidence level). The largest linear trends are found north of 39°S, at 42°S and at 50°S. We propose that in the northern region the large positive linear trends are associated with local changes in the density field caused by advective effects in response to a southward displacement of the South Atlantic High. The causes of the relative large SLA trends in two southern coastal regions are discussed as a function meridional wind stress and river discharge. Finally, we combined the annual cycle of SLA with the mean dynamic topography to estimate the absolute geostrophic velocities. This approach provides the first comprehensive description of the seasonal component of SWACS circulation based on satellite observations. The general circulation of the SWACS is northeastward with stronger/weaker geostrophic currents in austral summer/winter. At all latitudes, geostrophic velocities are larger (up to 20 cm/s) close to the shelf‐break and decrease toward the coast. This spatio‐temporal pattern is more intense north of 45°S. PMID:27840784

  17. 77 FR 67394 - Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western Planning Area (WPA) Lease Sale 233...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western Planning... AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice of Availability (NOA) of the... scientific journals, available scientific data, and information from academic institutions and Federal,...

  18. Flux of energy and essential elements through the continental shelf ecosystem. Progress report, May 31, 1980-May 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, L R

    1981-02-01

    There are three distinct areas of research reported, studies of intrusions of the west wall of the Gulf Stream onto the outer continental shelf, studies of the flux of materials across near-shore density fronts, and advances in the understanding of the planktonic food web of the continental shelf. Studies of frontal events on the outer and inner continental shelf involve distinctive physical and chemical regimes and have proven to required distinctive biological approaches. A simulation model of the flux of energy through the continental shelf food web was developed. It represents realistically both details of the energy transfers within the plankton community and the termanal production of fishes. It was discovered that the fecal ribbons of pelagic tunicates break up into flocculent material visually and chemically identical with the flocculent organic aggregates present in sea water. Subsequent experimental work with tunicate fecal matter indicates that some of the naturally occurring aggregates are indeed fecal. This makes it possible to understand and quantify for the first time the production and fate of that population of seston. An examination was made of several of the many roles of dissolved organic compounds in sea water which originate either from release by phytoplankton, digestive processes or metabolites of zooplankton, or extracellular digestion of microorganisms.

  19. 78 FR 52562 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Oil and Gas Lease Sales, Central Planning...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Oil and Gas Lease... socioeconomic analyses in the Gulf of Mexico OCS Oil and Gas Lease Sales: 2012-2017; Western Planning Area Lease... Oil and Gas Lease Sales: 2013-2014; Western Planning Area Lease Sale 233; Central Planning Area...

  20. 77 FR 5529 - Commercial Lease of Submerged Lands for Renewable Energy Development on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Lease of Submerged Lands for Renewable Energy Development on.... SUMMARY: The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) will use Form 0008 to issue commercial renewable..., ``Renewable Energy and Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf,'' BOEM...

  1. 75 FR 72679 - Renewable Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf-Acquire a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 285 RIN 1010-AD71 Renewable... an Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) renewable energy lease. We are taking this action because the current regulations covering noncompetitive leasing of an OCS renewable energy lease and an...

  2. 76 FR 8962 - Renewable Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf-Acquire a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 285 RIN 1010-AD71 Renewable... acquisition of an Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) renewable energy lease. We are taking this action because the current regulations governing the noncompetitive acquisition of an OCS renewable energy lease initiated...

  3. 76 FR 28178 - Renewable Energy Alternate Uses of Existing Facilities on the Outer Continental Shelf-Acquire a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement 30 CFR Part 285 RIN 1010-AD71 Renewable... acquisition of an Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) renewable energy lease. We are taking this action because... for an OCS renewable energy lease, where BOEMRE is required to publish only a single notice. The...

  4. 76 FR 70156 - Proposed 5-Year Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2012-2017

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Proposed 5-Year Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing... on the Proposed 5-Year OCS Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2012-2017 (``Proposed Program''). This is part of a multi-step process required by law before the Secretary of the Interior may approve a new...

  5. 75 FR 22623 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Mid-Atlantic Proposed Oil and Gas Lease Sale 220 and Geological and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... Minerals Management Service Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Mid-Atlantic Proposed Oil and Gas Lease Sale 220 and Geological and Geophysical Exploration (G&G) on the Mid- and South Atlantic OCS AGENCY: Minerals... Environment (MS 5410), Minerals Management Service, Gulf of Mexico OCS Region, 1201 Elmwood Park...

  6. 77 FR 5820 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Massachusetts-Call for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    .... The American Waterways Operators expressed concerns related to the placement of wind turbines and... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf... nominations for commercial leases that would allow a lessee to propose the construction of a wind...

  7. 76 FR 55090 - Commercial Lease of Submerged Lands for Renewable Energy Development on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ... Offshore Alternative Energy Programs at (703) 787-1300 for lease questions. ADDRESSES: You may submit... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Commercial Lease of Submerged Lands for Renewable Energy Development on the Outer Continental Shelf AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy...

  8. ON THE WIND-INDUCED EXCHANGE BETWEEN INDIAN RIVER BAY, DELAWARE AND THE ADJACENT CONTINENTAL SHELF. (R826945)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The structure of the wind-induced exchange between Indian River Bay, Delaware and the adjacent continental shelf is examined based on current measurements made at the Indian River Inlet which represents the only conduit of exchange between the bay and the coastal ocean. Local ...

  9. 78 FR 42544 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Oil and Gas Lease Sale, Western Planning...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Oil and Gas Lease... Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice of Intent (NOI) to Prepare a Supplemental... deemed appropriate to supplement the NEPA documents cited above for these lease sales in order...

  10. 76 FR 40725 - Approval of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Permit Issued to Cape Wind Associates, LLC (EPA Permit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... AGENCY Approval of Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Permit Issued to Cape Wind Associates, LLC (EPA Permit Number OCS-R1-01) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of final action. SUMMARY: This document announces that on June 2, 2011, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a...

  11. 76 FR 56683 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf-Revisions to Safety and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ... well as other issues related to managing human factors to promote safety and environmental protection... operators to specifically address issues associated with human behavior as it applies to their SEMS program... and Sulphur Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf--Revisions to Safety and...

  12. Carbon and oxygen dynamics on the Louisiana continental shelf: role of water column primary production and respiration

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a multi-year study of the Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) to better understand the linkages between water column net metabolism and the formation of hypoxia (dissolved oxygen <2 ml O2 L-1) in the region. Rates of water column community respiration (R) and primary p...

  13. Sediment and Lower Water Column Oxygen Consumption in the Seasonally-hypoxic Region of the Louisiana Continental Shelf

    EPA Science Inventory

    We report sediment and bottom water respiration rates from 10 cruises from 2003-2007 on the Louisiana Continental Shelf (LSC) where summer hypoxia regularly occurs. Cruises were conducted during spring (5 cruises), summer (3 cruises) and fall (2 cruises). Cruise average sediment ...

  14. Plankton community respiration, net ecosystem metabolism, and oxygen dynamics on the Louisiana continental shelf: implications for hypoxia

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a multi-year study of the Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) to better understand the linkages between water column metabolism and the formation of hypoxia (dissolved oxygen <2 mg L-1) in the region. Water column community respiration rates (WR) were measured on 10 cr...

  15. 76 FR 30956 - Outer Continental Shelf, Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 193

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf, Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 193 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy...

  16. 75 FR 25291 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Mid-Atlantic Proposed Oil and Gas Lease Sale 220

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Minerals Management Service Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Mid-Atlantic Proposed Oil and Gas Lease Sale 220 AGENCY: Minerals Management Service (MMS), Interior. ACTION: Notice of indefinite postponement of...

  17. 75 FR 63504 - Outer Continental Shelf, Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 193

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement Outer Continental Shelf, Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 193 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy...

  18. 78 FR 8190 - Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Offshore North Carolina...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Commercial Leasing for Wind Power on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS... Information and Nominations for Commercial Leasing for Wind Power Offshore North Carolina (Call), published on... obtaining a commercial wind lease in one or more, or any portion of, the Call Areas, postmarked by March...

  19. 77 FR 27054 - Notice of Approval of Clean Air Act Outer Continental Shelf Permits Issued to Shell Offshore, Inc...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ... AGENCY Notice of Approval of Clean Air Act Outer Continental Shelf Permits Issued to Shell Offshore, Inc. for the Kulluk Conical Drilling Unit AGENCY: United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Title V air quality operating permit to Shell Offshore, Inc. (``Shell'') for operation of the...

  20. 77 FR 18260 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Alaska OCS Region, Cook Inlet Planning Area, Proposed Oil and Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Alaska OCS Region, Cook Inlet Planning... of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Request for Interest (RFI). SUMMARY: The... Federal OCS offshore area has been limited in the past decade, recently there has been renewed interest...

  1. 78 FR 60892 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Proposed Oil and Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Alaska OCS Region, Chukchi Sea Planning Area, Proposed Oil and Gas Lease Sale 237 (Lease Sale 237) MMAA104000 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy... addressed in this Call (``Program Area'') is located offshore Alaska in the Chukchi Sea Planning Area....

  2. 77 FR 4360 - Notice of Availability of the Proposed Notice of Sale for Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Lease Sale 216/222 in the Central Planning Area (CPA) in the Gulf of... Proposed Notice of Sale for Proposed Sale 216/222. SUMMARY: BOEM announces the availability of the proposed Notice of Sale (NOS) for proposed Sale 216/222 in the CPA. This Notice is published pursuant to 30...

  3. 76 FR 7228 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western and Central Planning Areas of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-09

    ... Central Planning Areas of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Oil and Gas Lease Sales for 2012-2017 AGENCY: Bureau...- 2017 oil and gas leasing proposals in the Western and Central Planning Areas of the GOM, off the States... Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2012-2017 in the draft proposed Outer Continental Shelf Oil and...

  4. 77 FR 41448 - Notice of Availability of the Proposed Final Five Year Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2012-2017 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management... availability of the Proposed Final Five Year OCS Oil and Gas Leasing Program for 2012-2017 (PFP). This is the... Barrow and covers 208 OCS lease blocks beyond the northern edge of the 25-mile exclusion area. In...

  5. 77 FR 40380 - Outer Continental Shelf, Gulf of Mexico, Oil and Gas Lease Sales, Western Planning Area Lease...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-09

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf, Gulf of Mexico, Oil and Gas Lease Sales... will update the environmental and socioeconomic analyses in the Gulf of Mexico OCS Oil and Gas Lease... oil and natural gas leasing, exploration, development, and production in the WPA and CPA. The...

  6. 77 FR 50855 - Oil and Gas and Sulphur Operations on the Outer Continental Shelf-Increased Safety Measures for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ...This Final Rule implements certain safety measures recommended in the report entitled, ``Increased Safety Measures for Energy Development on the Outer Continental Shelf.'' To implement the appropriate recommendations in the Safety Measures Report and DWH JIT report, BSEE is amending drilling, well-completion, well-workover, and decommissioning regulations related to well-control, including:......

  7. 76 FR 70473 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Western Planning Area (WPA) Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Oil and Gas Lease...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Western Planning Area (WPA) Gulf... a Package by contacting BOEM at: Gulf of Mexico Region Public Information Unit, Bureau of Ocean...) 200-GULF, http://www.gomr.boem.gov . Filing of Bids: Bidders must submit sealed bids to the...

  8. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations across the Florida Panhandle continental shelf and slope after the BP MC 252 well failure.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Richard A; Ederington-Hagy, Melissa; Hileman, Fredrick; Moss, Joseph A; Amick, Lauren; Carruth, Rebecca; Head, Marie; Marks, Joel; Tominack, Sarah; Jeffrey, Wade H

    2014-12-15

    The Florida Panhandle continental shelf environment was exposed to oil from the BP oil well failure in the Gulf of Mexico during 2010. Floating mats of oil were documented by satellite, but the distribution of dissolved components of the oil in this region was unknown. Shipek® grab samples of sediments were taken during repeated cruises between June 2010 and June 2012 to test for selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) as indicators of this contamination. Sediments were collected as composite samples, extracted using standard techniques, and PAHs were quantified by GC/MS-SIM. PAHs in samples from the continental slope in May 2011 were highest near to the failed well site and were reduced in samples taken one year later. PAHs from continental shelf sediments during the spill (June 2010) ranged from 10 to 165 ng g(-1). Subsequent cruises yielded variable and reduced amounts of PAHs across the shelf. The data suggest that PAHs were distributed widely across the shelf, and their subsequent loss to background levels suggests these compounds were of oil spill origin. PAH half-life estimates by regression were 70-122 days for slope and 201 days for shelf stations.

  9. Surface area control of organic carbon accumulation in continental shelf sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, L.M. )

    1994-02-01

    The relationship between organic carbon (OC) and grain size found in most continental shelf sediments is here reinterpreted in terms of the surface area of the sediments. Cores from many North American shelf environments show downcore decreases in OC to similar refractory background concentrations if expressed relative to the surface area of the sediments. This consistent concentration is 0.86 mg-OC m[sup [minus]2], which is equivalent in concentration to a monolayer of organic matter coating all mineral surfaces. A more global collection of sediment-water interface samples show that this relationship is even more extensive, with exceptions occurring in areas of very high riverine sediment input, organic pollution, or low-oxygen water columns. Density separations indicate that organic matter is largely adsorbed to mineral grains. The microtopography of surfaces was examined with N[sub 2] sorption and most surface area was found to be inside pores of <10 nm width. These data lead to a hypothesis that organic matter is protected by its location inside pores too small to allow functioning of the hydrolytic enzymes necessary for organic matter decay. Such protection would likely work in concert with other protection mechanisms such as humification. This consistent surface area correlation with OC concentration may explain control of spatial and temporal variations in OC burial rates by sedimentation rates; the pore protection hypothesis provides a causal mechanism for this observed control.

  10. Submarine faults and slides on the continental shelf, northern Gulf of Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, Paul R.; Molnia, Bruce F.

    1977-01-01

    Submarine faults and slides or slumps of Quaternary age are potential environmental hazards on the outer continental shelf (OCS) of the northern Gulf of Alaska. Most faults that approach or reach the seafloor cut strata that may be equivalent in age to the upper Yakataga Formation (Pliocene‐Pleistocene). Along several faults, the seafloor is vertically offset from 5 to 20 m. A few faults appear to cut Holocene sediments, but none of these shows displacement at the seafloor. Submarine slides or slumps have been found in two places in the OCS region: (1) seaward of the Malaspina Glacier and Icy Bay, an area of 1200 km2 with a slope of less than 0.5°, and (2) across the entire span of the Copper river prodelta, an area of 1730 km2, having a slope of about 0.5°. Seismic profiles across these areas show disrupted reflectors and irregular topography commonly associated with submarine slides or slumps. Potential slide or slump areas have been delineated in areas of thick sediment accumulation and relatively steep slopes. These areas include (1) Kayak Trough, (2) parts of Hinchinbrook Entrance and Sea Valley, (3) parts of the outer shelf and upper slope between Kayak Island and Yakutat Bay, and (4) Bering Trough.

  11. A sediment-dispersal model for the South Texas continental shelf, northwest Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shideler, G.L.

    1978-01-01

    Textural-distribution patterns of sea-floor sediments on the South Texas continental shelf between Matagorda Bay and the U.S.-Mexico international boundary were evaluated as part of a regional environmental-studies program. Sediment textural gradients support a conceptual model for the regional sediment-dispersal system, which is characterized by both net offshore transport and net south-trending coastwise transport components on a wind-dominated shelf. Coastwise transport results in the net southward migration of both palimpsest sandy mud composing the ancestral Brazos-Colorado delta flank in the northern sector, and modern mud composing the central sector; these migrating sediments are encroaching southward onto immobile relict muddy sands composing the ancestral Rio Grande delta in the southern sector. In the proposed model, the suspension transport of modern silt-enriched mud derived mainly from coastal sources is the dominant dispersal mechanism. Net offshore transport is attributed both to diffusion, and to the advective ebb-tide discharge of turbid lagoonal-estuarine waters from coastal inlets. Net southward transport is attributed mainly to advection by seasonally residual coastwise drift currents reflecting a winter-dominated hydraulic regime. Frequent winter storms characterized by relatively high-speed northerly winds that accompany the passage of cold fronts appear to be dominant regional dispersal agents. ?? 1978.

  12. Environmental magnetism and application in the continental shelf sediments of India.

    PubMed

    Alagarsamy, R

    2009-08-01

    Mineral magnetic and geochemical analyses were carried out on surface sediments from the continental shelf of India. The purpose of this study is to examine the environmental assessment of heavy metal concentrations and its impact in the coastal environment using magnetic techniques and to gain an understanding on the factors controlling metal concentrations and distributions in the east and west coast of India. The strong relationships between Anhysteretic Remanent Magnetization (chi(ARM)) and heavy metals can be explained by the role of iron oxides controlling metal concentrations, though the link is also reinforced by the strong tendency of chi(ARM) to be associated with the finer particle sizes. Higher values of magnetic susceptibility, IRM(20 mT) and SIRM are associated with the east coast shelf sediments suggest the presence of high ferrimagnetic content, which can be derived from the weathering products of the Deccan Basalts. chi(ARM) can be used as a normalizer for particle size effects in the way that Aluminium (Al) is often used. The relationship between magnetic parameters and heavy metal concentrations (Fe, Cu, Cr and Ni) showed a strong positive correlation in the east coast sediments, much less so in the case of the west coast. This finding suggests that the simple, rapid and non-destructive magnetic measurement can be used as an indicator for the heavy metal contamination and proxies for the measurement of heavy metals content in the coastal environment.

  13. Geologic evidence for onshore sediment transport from the inner continental shelf: Fire Island, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwab, William C.; Baldwin, Wayne E.; Hapke, Cheryl J.; Lentz, Erika E.; Gayes, Paul T.; Denny, Jane F.; List, Jeffrey H.; Warner, John C.

    2013-01-01

    Sediment budget analyses along the south shore of Fire Island, New York, have been conducted and debated in the scientific and coastal engineering literature for decades. It is well documented that a primary component of sediment transport in this system is directed alongshore from E to W, but discrepancies in volumetric sediment budget calculations remain. An additional quantity of sand, averaging about 200,000 m3/y is required to explain the growth of the western segment of the barrier island, a prograding spit. Littoral sediment derived from updrift erosion of the coast, addition of beach nourishment fill, and onshore transport of inner continental shelf, shoreface sediments, or both have all been proposed as potential sources of the additional sediment needed to balance the sediment budget deficit. Analysis of high-resolution seafloor mapping data collected in 2011, including seismic reflection profiles and inteferometric sonar acoustic backscatter and swath bathymetry; comparison with seafloor mapping data collected in 1996–1997; and shoreline change analysis from 1933 to 2011 support previous suggestions that the inner-shelf Holocene sedimentary deposit is a likely source to resolve this sediment budget discrepancy.

  14. Acoustic and Physical Properties of Mud Deposit in the Southern Continental Shelf of Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, S.; Kim, D. C.; Lee, G.; Kim, G.; Seo, Y.; Çifci, G.

    2010-12-01

    High-resolution seismic profiles and core sediment sampling have been conducted to investigate the acoustic characteristics and physical properties of shelf mud deposit in the southern continental shelf of Korea. The major sediment source is the Seomjin River. The sediments are transported through the Yeosu Sound. Approximately 1000 line-km data of Chirp subbottom profiling and sparker were used. Along with seismic profiling, 40 piston core samples were collected. High-resolution seismic profiles show the Holocene mud deposits dominated in the study area, ranging from 10 to 40 m in thickness, and gas-related acoustic anomalies were also recorded in the Yeosu Sound and the south of Oenaro Island. The late Quaternary deposits on the study area can be divided into three sequences (Unit Ι, Unit ΙΙ, Unit ΙΙΙ). The seismic units ΙΙ and ΙΙΙ are interpreted as the inner-shelf transgressive sand sheet and the deltaic-estuarine complex, respectively. The highstand systems tract (unit Ι) overlying the maximum flooding surface is recent mud deposits formed during recent highstand of sea level. Core samples were analyzed for sediment texture (grain size, sand, silt and clay contents), physical properties (porosity, water content, bulk density, grain density and shear strength), and acoustic properties (compressional wave velocity and attenuation). Thirty-nine piston core samples were employed for the measurement. The mud sediments in the study area is vertically homogenous in texture. The mean grain size decreases generally from the mouth of Yeosu Sound to seaward. The sound velocity decreases from 1505 to 1485 m/s then increases to 1520 m/s southeastward due to Pleistocene sand ridges. Kim et al. (1992) suggested the grading effect of the Seomjin River discharge transported through the Yeosu Peninsula and Namhae Island results in the physical and acoustic properties.

  15. Holocene Formation of Heald Sand Bank on the East Texas Inner Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartz, J. M.; Cleveland, V.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Goff, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Heald Bank is a Gulf of Mexico sand bank located ~50 km off the coast of east Texas on the inner continental shelf. The bank is proposed to be a remnant of barrier islands drowned and thus preserved during an episode of rapid sea level rise. For this hypothesis to be true, the transgressive ravinement that marks the erosion by the shoreline moving from shelf edge towards the modern location would by definition postdate and thus be stratigraphically above the bank. To test this hypothesis we present ~90 km of Compressed High Intensity Radar Pulse (CHIRP) and Multi-channel seismic (MCS) data collected from the University of Texas Geophysics marine field course during 2008, 2013, and 2014. In these data, there are several visible underlying channels beneath Heald Bank. These channels have channel fill which are truncated by an overlying erosional surface, which we interpret to be the transgressive ravinement from sea level rise. However, this interpretation places the ravinement below the sand bank, meaning it could not have been drowned and buried by a rapid sea level rise event. Thus, Heald Bank and potentially the related inner shelf banks (Thomas, Shepard, and Sabine) from eastern Texas to western Louisiana cannot be used as an example of coastal response to climate change and sea level rise. We examine alternate origins for the banks and their sand using published cores as well as age models and integrating them with our seismic data. One possibility is that the sand was sourced from the nearby Sabine River system immediately following local transgression or the sand was remobilized from sediment fill within underlying paleo-river channels imaged below the Heald Bank. In either case Heald Bank appears not to serve as an indicator for rapid sea-level rise, yet could be an important analog for sand transport mechanisms offshore.

  16. The sensitivity of the northwest European continental shelf ecosystem to anthropogenic pressures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakelin, Sarah; Artioli, Yuri; Holt, Jason; Butenschön, Momme

    2013-04-01

    Anthropogenic pressure is exerted on ecosystems in several ways, through direct drivers such as eutrophication and levels of fishing effort and by changes in the physical environment brought about by climate change. Changes in water temperature, the timing and duration of seasonal stratification, circulation patterns and ocean-shelf exchange all impact on shelf-sea primary production. We use a coupled hydrodynamics-ecosystem model (POLCOMS-ERSEM) to study ecosystem sensitivity to climate change and the anthropogenic drivers of river nutrient loads, impacting on eutrophication, and trawling effort on the northwest European continental shelf, with an emphasis on changes in the North Sea. To force the model we use data from a coupled ocean-atmosphere global model (IPSL-CM4) representative of conditions in the recent past (1983-2000) and possible conditions in the near future (2030-2040) under a business as usual emissions scenario SRES A1B. To study ecosystem sensitivity to direct anthropogenic forcing, we adopt two scenarios impacting on river nutrient loads and trawling effort - one where there is rapid economic growth and limited environmental policies and a second where economic growth is constrained by environmental objectives. The sensitivity of the system to each single driver: climate change, increase in river nutrient loads, decrease in river nutrient loads and reduction in trawling effort is explored. The response of the ecosystem to the combined effects of changes in multiple drivers under the two scenarios of economic growth is also studied. The results are relevant to the Marine Strategy Framework Directive descriptors on marine food webs, eutrophication and biodiversity.

  17. Budgeting postglacial sedimentation history on the Santa Cruz, California mid-continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grossman, E.E.; Eittreim, S.L.; Hanes, D.M.; Field, M.E.; Edwards, B.D.; Fallon, S.J.; Anima, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection profiling and surface texture mapping of the central California continental shelf, reveal a prominent subsurface reflector interpreted as a low stand erosion surface and an overlying mudbelt that covers 421 km2 of the mid-shelf in depths of 40-90 m. Radiometric and sedimentologic analyses of samples from vibracores taken along the seaward edge of the mudbelt show that initial deposition above the pre-Holocene erosion surface began ca. 14.5 ka. These data and model results of sea-level history, tectonics, and the Monterey Bay littoral sediment budget support the notion that the entire midshelf deposit was formed during the postglacial transgression. An alternative explanation, that <30% of the deposit is Holocene, requires that (1) sediment input is overestimated and/or loss is greatly underestimated, and (2) preservation on the shelf was significant despite deep and active wave scour observed in the form of rapid cliff and bedrock cutting early and late in the transgression. The difference between a basal age of ???14.5 ka and residence time of midshelf sediment (3,273 years), derived from dividing mudbelt volume by modern accumulation rate, implies: (1) significant sediment loss occurred since the mudbelt formed and/or (2) sediment accumulation has varied greatly over time. Although modern sediment budgets are relatively well constrained, it remains uncertain how well we can apply them to the past. An evolving model of sedimentation history explores the likelihood of changes in sediment supply, accumulation patterns, and depositional patterns owing to postglacial sea-level history and human land-use activities while providing important boundary conditions for modeling shoreface evolution.

  18. Postglacial sedimentary record of the Southern California continental shelf and slope, Point Conception to Dana Point

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sommerfield, C.K.; Lee, H.J.; Normark, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    Sedimentary strata on the Southern California shelf and slope (Point Conception to Dana Point) display patterns and rates of sediment accumulation that convey information on sea-level inundation, sediment supply, and oceanic transport processes following the Last Glacial Maximum. In Santa Monica Bay and San Pedro Bay, postglacial transgression is recorded in shelf deposits by wave-ravinement surfaces dated at 13-11 ka and an upsection transition from coastal to shallow-marine sediment facies. Depositional conditions analogous to the modern environment were established in the bays by 8-9 ka. On the continental slope, transgression is evidenced in places by an increase in sediment grain size and accumulation rate ca. 15-10 ka, a consequence of coastal ravinement and downslope resedimentation, perhaps in conjunction with climatic increases in fluvial sediment delivery. Grain sizes and accumulation rates then decreased after 12-10 ka when the shelf flooded and backfilled under rising sea level. The Santa Barbara coastal cell contains the largest mass of postglacial sediment at 32-42 ?? 109 metric tons, most of which occurs between offshore Santa Barbara and Hueneme Canyon. The San Pedro cell contains the second largest quantity of sediment, 8-11 ?? 109 metric tons, much of which is present on the eastern Palos Verdes and outer San Pedro shelves. By comparison, the mass of sediment sequestered within the Santa Monica cell is smaller at ??6-8 ?? 109 metric tons. The postglacial sediment mass distribution among coastal cells reflects the size of local fluvial sediment sources, whereas intracell accumulation patterns reflect antecedent bathymetric features conducive for sediment bypass or trapping. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  19. Measurements of slope currents and internal tides on the Continental Shelf and slope off Newport Beach, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenberger, Kurt J.; Noble, Marlene A.; Norris, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    An array of seven moorings housing current meters and oceanographic sensors was deployed for 6 months at 5 sites on the Continental Shelf and slope off Newport Beach, California, from July 2011 to January 2012. Full water-column profiles of currents were acquired at all five sites, and a profile of water-column temperature was also acquired at two of the five sites for the duration of the deployment. In conjunction with this deployment, the Orange County Sanitation District deployed four bottom platforms with current meters on the San Pedro Shelf, and these meters provided water-column profiles of currents. The data from this program will provide the basis for an investigation of the interaction between the deep water flow over the slope and the internal tide on the Continental Shelf.

  20. Sedimentology and geochemistry of surface sediments, outer continental shelf, southern Bering Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, J.V.; Dean, W.E.; Vallier, T.L.

    1980-01-01

    Present-day sediment dynamics, combined with lowerings of sea level during the Pleistocene, have created a mixture of sediments on the outer continental shelf of the southern Bering Sea that was derived from the Alaskan Mainland, the Aleutian Islands, and the Pribilof ridge. Concentrations of finer-grained, higher-organic sediments in the region of the St. George basin have further modified regional distribution patterns of sediment composition. Q-mode factor analysis of 58 variables related to sediment size and composition - including content of major, minor, and trace elements, heavy and light minerals, and clay minerals - reveals three dominant associations of sediment: 1. (1) The most significant contribution, forming a coarse-grained sediment scattered over most of the shelf consists of felsic sediment derived from the generally quartz-rich rocks of the Alaskan mainland. This sediment contains relatively high concentrations of Si, Ba, Rb, quartz, garnet, epidote, metamorphic rock fragments, potassium feldspar, and illite. 2. (2) The next most important group, superimposed on the felsic group consists of andesitic sediment derived from the Aleutian Islands. This more mafic sediment contains relatively high concentrations of Na, Ca, Ti, Sr, V, Mn, Cu, Fe, Al, Co, Zn, Y, Yb, Ga, volcanic rock fragments, glass, clinopyroxene, smectite, and vermiculite. 3. (3) A local group of basaltic sediment, derived from rocks of the Pribilof Islands, is a subgroup of the Aleutian andesite group. Accumulation of fine-grained sediment in St. George basin has created a sediment group containing relatively high concentrations of C, S, U, Li, B, Zr, Ga, Hg, silt, and clay. Sediment of the Aleutian andesite group exhibits a strong gradient, or "plume", with concentrations decreasing away from Unimak Pass and toward St. George basin. The absence of present-day currents sufficient to move even clay-size material as well as the presence of Bering submarine canyon between the Aleutian

  1. Fossil ostracodes of continental shelf cores at IODP Site U1354 (Expedition 317)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusunoki, S.; Ohi, T.; Kawagata, S.; Ishida, K.; Shipboard Scientific Party, E.

    2010-12-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 317 was devoted to understanding the relative importance of global sea level (eustasy) versus local tectonic and sedimentary processes in controlling continental margin sedimentary cycles. The expedition recovered sediments from the Eocene to recent period, with a particular focus on the sequence stratigraphy of the late Miocene to recent, when global sea level change was dominated by glacioeustasy. Drilling in the Canterbury Basin, on the eastern margin of the South Island of New Zealand took advantage of high rates of Neogene sediment supply, which preserved a high-frequency (0.1-0.5 m.y.) record of depositional cyclicity. Ostracodes are crustaceans that widely inhabit marine, brackish, and non-marine environments. Shallow marine species have more restricted habitat and respond sensitively to environmental changes. Therefore they are a useful tool for high-resolution analyses of paleoenvironmental changes. We study samples older than ~1.0 Ma from Site U1354, which is in an intermediate position within the three shelf sites transect of Expedition 317. Quaternary to early Pliocene (~4.5 Ma) sediments were cored in this site with best core recovery (81%) among the shelf sites. The period from the Pliocene to Pleistocene is known for distinct paleoclimatic changes, from the intensive warming at around 3.5 Ma, to the cooling stage starting from 2.75 Ma. We expect that high-resolution analyses of fossil ostracode assemblages reveal detailed sea level and paleoceanographic changes on the continental shelf of the Canterbury Basin caused by global climate changes. Samples were examined at 1.5 m depth intervals. Samples of ~20 cc were freeze-dried and washed through a 63 µm opening sieve. The residues were dried and then divided into aliquot parts containing around 200 specimens using a sample splitter. All individual ostracodes were picked from residues coarser than 125 µm. Valves and carapaces were counted as one

  2. Stratigraphic framework and heavy minerals of the continental shelf of Onslow and Long Bays, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, Charles W.; Grosz, Andrew E.; Nickerson, John G.

    1999-01-01

    One hundred fourteen vibracores from the Atlantic continental shelf offshore of southeastern North Carolina were opened, described, and processed over several contract years (years 6-9) of the Minerals Management Service-Association of American State Geologists Continental Margins program. Reports for years 9 and 10 of the program compiled the results of the work and assembled the data for release as an interactive CD-ROM report, respectively. The continental shelf of Onslow and Long Bays consists predominantly of outcropping Cretaceous through late Tertiary geologic units. Nearshore these units are covered and incised by late Tertiary and Quaternary units. From oldest to youngest, formally recognized geologic units mapped as part of this study are the Late Cretaceous Peedee Formation-a muddy, fine- to medium-grained quartz sand with trace amounts of glauconite and phosphate; the Paleocene Beaufort Formation-a muddy, fine- to medium-grained glauconitic quartz sand with locally occurring turritelid-mold biosparrudite; the middle Eocene Castle Hayne Formation-a sandy bryozoan biomicrudite and biosparrudite; the Oligocene River Bend Formation-a sandy molluscan-mold biosparrudite; and the Miocene Pungo River Formation-a medium-grained, poorly sorted slightly shelly phosphatic sand. Informal units include a very widespread, unnamed fine- to very fine grained, well-sorted, dolomitic muddy quartz sand that is biostratigraphically equivalent to the Oligocene River Bend Formation; several large valley-fill lithosomes composed of biomicrudite, biomicrite, and biosparrudite of Plio/Pleistocene age; muddy, shelly sands and silty clays of Pliocene, Pleistocene, or mixed Plio/Pleistocene age; and loose, slightly shelly, medium- to coarse-grained sands assigned a Holocene age. Heavy minerals (SG > 2.96) comprise an average of 0.54 wt% (on a bulk-sample basis) of the sediments in 306 samples derived from the 114 vibracores. Heavy-mineral content ranges from 3 in the sediments. The

  3. Benthic mineralization and nutrient exchange over the inner continental shelf of western India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratihary, A. K.; Naqvi, S. W. A.; Narvenkar, G.; Kurian, S.; Naik, H.; Naik, R.; Manjunatha, B. R.

    2014-05-01

    The western Indian continental shelf is one of the most productive coastal systems of the world ocean. This system experiences extreme changes in its oxygen regime, being normoxic from November to May and suboxic (denitrifying)/anoxic from June to October, owing to the biogeochemical response to cyclical monsoonal influence. In order to understand the impact of the seasonally varying oxygen regime on benthic mineralization, nutrient exchange and, in turn, on the shelf ecosystem, we carried out the first ever intact-core incubations during two contrasting seasons - spring intermonsoon and fall intermonsoon (late southwest monsoon) at a 28 m-deep fixed site on the inner shelf off Goa, dominated by fine-grained cohesive sediments. The results showed that incomplete sediment oxygen consumption (SOC) occurred during April as opposed to the complete SOC and subsequent sulfide flux observed in the fall intermonsoon incubations. The sediments acted as a perennial net source of DIN (dissolved inorganic nitrogen i.e. NO3- + NO2- + NH4+), PO43- and SiO44- to the overlying water column. The efflux of DIN increased from 1.4 to 3.74 mmol m-2 d-1 from April to October, of which NH4+ flux comprised 59-100%. During the oxic regime, ∼75% of diffusing NH4+ appeared to be nitrified (2.55 mmol m-2 d-1), of which ∼77% remained coupled to benthic denitrification. Consequently, 58% of NH4+ flux was lost in active coupled nitrification-denitrification, resulting in substantial N loss (1.98 mmol m-2 d-1) in the sediments. The continental shelf sediments switched over from being a NO3- source during the oxic regime to a NO3- sink during the anoxic regime. During suboxia, benthic denitrification that is fed by NO3- from the overlying water caused N loss at the rate of 1.04 mmol m-2 d-1. Nitrogen loss continued even under sulfidic conditions during October, possibly through the chemolithoautotrophic denitrification, at a potential rate of 3.21 mmol m-2 d-1. Phosphate flux increased

  4. A long and winding road: Skeletonema sp transport by Northern Adriatic Dense Waters to the Southern Adriatic Pit.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcello Falcieri, Francesco; Bernardy Aubry, Fabrizio; Barbariol, Francesco; Benetazzo, Alvise; Bergamasco, Andrea; Boldrin, Alfredo; Bonaldo, Davide; Carniel, Sandro; Finotto, Stefania; Sclavo, Mauro

    2015-04-01

    The semi enclosed Adriatic Sea is a sub basin of the Mediterranean Sea located in its northeastern part; it has a shallow northern part (average depth of 40 m) and a deep Southern Adriatic Pit (SAP) that reaches 1200m. The presence of a wide continental shelf exposed to strong heat and momentum fluxes during winter months makes the Northern Adriatic a formation site of dense waters, generally referred to as Northern Adriatic Dense Water (NAdDW). Once produced, it moves south as a quasi-geostrophically adjusted vein , flowing along the Italian coast and enters the SAP giving origin to descent and cascading dense shelf water bringing into the deep layers oxygen, nutrients and organic compound. In February 2012 a long and intense cold air outbreak, with strong Bora winds, interested the northern part of the Adriatic sea causing a drop in water temperature to less than 6 °C and an increase in density to values as high as 1030.2 kg/m3 (likely the maximum values since 1929). This resulted in a massive production of NAdDW. In order to study the behavior of the NAdDW vein, a rapid response 2 legs cruise (ODW2012) was organized in the southern Adriatic. During the cruise, along with physical and chemical measurements, water and phytoplankton samples were collected at different depths. Usual abundance and distribution with a general decrease in phytoplankton abundance from the surface to the bottom were found in all stations with one exception. The bottom sample of a station located roughly 40 km at 120 m depth in front of Gargano showed a significantly high dominance (40%) of the small diatom Skeletonema sp whose flowering is typical in the surface waters of the northern Adriatic in late winter. The physical parameters of the water column showed signs of the passage of the dense water vein (lower temperature and higher dissolved oxygen concentrations) hence it was hypothesized that those diatoms were actively transported by the NAdDW near-bottom stream. A further

  5. A Field Study of The Behaviour of An Anticyclonic Eddy On The Catalan Continental Shelf (nw Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio, A.; Espino, M.; Puigdefàbregas, J.; Jordà, G.; Flexas, M.; Arnau, P. A.; Zúñiga, D.; Salat, J.; Arcilla, A. S.

    Local inversions of the general circulation on the Catalan Continental Shelf have been observed. These inversions are produced by anticyclonic structures that recurrently drift along this shelf. A near real-time experiment was planned to study the evolu- tion of these eddies on the Catalan Continental Shelf. The experiment consisted on an oceanographic cruise to monitor one of these structures through CTD casts and repeated fast surveys with a Nu-Shuttle and ADCP measurements, during 5 days in September 2001. The selection of a suitable anticyclonic eddy was carried out, during the days previous to the cruise, through satellite infrared images (AVHRR, AATSR). During the cruise, a real-time image analysis was also carried out and transmitted to the operating ship in order to follow accurately the targeted eddy. This presentation will focus on the preliminary results of the experiment which show the behaviour of a very well developed anticyclonic structure. It was located on the continental shelf, 60 km north of Barcelona. This eddy was 50 m deep, with a diameter of near 50 km and surface velocities of around 50 cm/s it was moving southwestwards at a speed of 5 km/day.

  6. The death mask of the antarctic ice sheet: Comparison of glacial geomorphic features across the continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wellner, J. S.; Heroy, D. C.; Anderson, J. B.

    2006-04-01

    Multibeam swath bathymetry data, seismic lines, and shallow cores were collected seaward of all of the major drainage outlets of the Antarctic Ice Sheet from the Pennell Coast of North Victoria Land to the northwestern Weddell Sea. The results show that during the last glacial maximum, the ice sheet extended onto the outer shelf in all areas, to the shelf break in many. Swath bathymetry and deep-tow sidescan sonar data from the continental shelf also record the geomorphology left by the retreating ice sheet. Glacial troughs occur offshore of all major glacial outlets. In each drainage area except for parts of the Ross Sea, the inner shelf is characterized by acoustic basement interpreted as crystalline substrate. The geomorphology of these inner shelf areas consists of erosional features such as grooves that show that ice flow tended to follow the structural grain of the bedrock. Outer shelf areas are floored by sedimentary substrate where the direction of ice flow was more directly offshore and depositional features characterize the seafloor. In these areas the signature of the grounded ice consists of till deposits and large-scale geomorphic features, mega-scale glacial lineations. Drumlins occur within the region of contact between crystalline and sedimentary substrates. Meltwater channels also have been imaged in both inner and outer shelf settings. While the presence of meltwater across the shelf has long been suspected, we present here the first multibeam image of a meltwater channel on the outer continental shelf of Antarctica. At the shelf break gullies are in all areas where we know ice reached the shelf break. We note the remarkable similarity in form of mega-scale glacial lineations observed on the outer shelf over sedimentary substrate across all areas surveyed, typically measuring 200-600 m crest to crest. This suggests that the shape of these landforms is governed by the same process in each drainage area and that process was occurring under a large

  7. Long-term development and current status of the Barcelona continental shelf: A source-to-sink approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liquete, C.; Canals, M.; Lastras, G.; Amblas, D.; Urgeles, R.; De Mol, B.; De Batist, M.; Hughes-Clarke, J. E.

    2007-07-01

    The Barcelona continental shelf, off the city of Barcelona (NE Spain), is a relatively narrow canyon-bounded shelf in the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. Three medium-size rivers (Tordera, Besós and Llobregat) and several ephemeral rivulets flow into this margin. Two main domains have been recognized in the Barcelona shelf: (i) a modern, river-influenced area, and (ii) a relict, sediment depleted area, both affected by a variety of human impacts. A detailed geomorphologic study based on multibeam bathymetry and backscatter data, high resolution seismic profiles, and surface sediment samples allowed mapping and interpreting the main distinctive seafloor features on the Barcelona shelf. Modern sedimentary features reveal that the Llobregat River is the main sediment source of the Barcelona prodeltaic shelf. High-discharge fluvial events result in the formation of suspended sediment plumes and sediment waves on the shelf floor. Relict (late Pleistocene-Holocene) sedimentary features reflect that an important shift occurred in the seashore direction between MIS 4 and MIS 2, and that recent neotectonic reactivation has created a set of seafloor faults. The Barcelona inner and middle shelf is severely impacted by anthropogenic activities such as the enlargement works of the Port of Barcelona, sewage pipes, dredging, anchoring and trawling.

  8. Marine geological and geophysical records of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet on the continental shelf west of Ireland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Cofaigh, Colm; Callard, S. Louise; Benetti, Sara; Chiverell, Richard C.; Saher, Margot; van Landeghem, Katrien; Livingstone, Stephen J.; Scourse, James; Clark, Chris D.

    2015-04-01

    The record of glaciation on the continental shelf west of Ireland has, until recently, been relatively poorly studied. The UK NERC funded project BRITICE-CHRONO collected marine geophysical data in the form of multibeam swath bathymetry and sub-bottom profiles supplemented by over 50 vibro- and piston cores across the continental shelf west of Ireland during cruise JC106 of the RRS James Cook in 2014. Across the western Irish shelf, offshore of counties Galway and Clare, a series of large arcuate moraines record the former presence of a grounded ice sheet on the shelf. However, geophysical data from further to the west across the Porcupine Bank show a series of ridges and wedge-shaped sedimentary features whose form is consistent with an origin as moraines and/or grounding-zone wedges. Sediment cores from several of these landforms recovered stiff, massive diamictons containing reworked shells that are interpreted as subglacial tills. Cores from the eastern Porcupine Bank recovered laminated muds with cold-water glacimarine foraminifera, in some cases overlying till. Collectively the geophysical and sedimentary data imply the presence of grounded ice across the northern Porcupine Bank and thus much further west on the Irish margin than has previously been considered. This ice underwent retreat in a glacimarine setting. The large 'Olex Moraine' on the western Irish shelf is thus interpreted as recessional feature. Work is currently underway to dates these features and to obtain a retreat chronology for this sector of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet.

  9. Circulation and exchange processes on the South Atlantic Bight Continental Shelf: Progress report, July 1, 1988 to June 30, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.N.

    1989-03-01

    The work reported here is part of the Department of Energy sponsored Southeast US Continental Shelf Program. The DOE Program is a coordinated, multi-university, interdisciplinary investigation aimed at understanding the physical, chemical and biological processes in the South Atlantic Bight (SAB: east coast continental shelf region from Cape Hatteras to Cape Canaveral). The program is coordinated by Dr. David Menzel of Skidaway Oceanographic Institute. The activities of the other Program Investigators will be discussed briefly under Program Overview. The University of Miami component of the program involves an investigation of the physical processes regulating the transport and exchange of materials in the shelf waters. The guiding scientific objective of this work is to improve the capability for prediction of the physical environment. The principal scientific task is to determine the relative importance of the forces driving shelf circulation and exchange and to measure the shelf waters' response over variable time and space scales. The influence of physical processes on chemical and biological distributions and their interactions is studied through interdisciplinary investigations, joint analysis and interpretation of data and joint publications. 103 refs., 14 figs.

  10. Architectures of the Moroccan continental shelf of the Alboran Sea: insights from high-resolution bathymetry and seismic data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lafosse, Manfred; Gorini, Christian; Leroy, Pascal; d'Acremont, Elia; Rabineau, Marina; Ercilla, Gemma; Alonso, Belén; Ammar, Abdellah

    2016-04-01

    The MARLBORO and the SARAS oceanographic surveys have explored the continental shelf in the vicinity of the transtensive Nekor basin (South Alboran Sea, Western Mediterranean) and over three submarine highs located at several tens of kilometers from the shelf. Those surveys have produced high-resolution (≤29m²/pixel) bathymetry maps. Simultaneously, seismic SPARKER and TOPAS profiles were recorded. To quantify and understand Quaternary vertical motions of this tectonically active area, we searched for morphological and sedimentary paleobathymetric or paleo-elevations markers. Shelf-edge wedges associated marine terraces and paleo-shorelines have been identified on the bathymetry and on seismic cross-sections. These features reflect the trends of long term accommodation variations. Along the Moroccan continental shelf the lateral changes of shelf-edges geometries and the spatial distribution of marine landforms (sedimentary marine terraces, sediment wave fields, marine incisions) reflect the interaction between sea level changes and spatial variations of subsidence rates. Positions of paleo-shorelines identified in the studied area have been correlated with the relative sea-level curve (Rohling et al., 2014). Several still stands or slow stands periods have been recognized between -130-125m, -100-110m and -85-80m. The astronomical forcing controls the architecture of Mediterranean continental shelves. Marine landforms distribution also reveals the way sea level changed since the LGM. The comparison with observations on other western Mediterranean margins (e.g. the Gulf of Lion, the Ionian-Calabrian shelf) allowed a first order access to vertical motion rates.

  11. Ocean acidification research alongside extended continental shelf exploration in the western Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynn, J. G.; Robbins, L. L.; Knorr, P. O.; Byrne, R. H.; Takahashi, T.; Onac, B. P.

    2013-12-01

    Research investments funded to fulfill the requirements of the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea in the western Arctic have allowed simultaneous acquisition of marine chemistry data, including baseline monitoring of changes in ocean acidification. Our participation in the Extended Continental Shelf cruises on the USCGC Healy in the western Arctic have allowed us to collect data focused on understanding processes driving rapid changes in seawater chemistry that result from increased oceanic uptake of CO2 (ocean acidification), increased freshwater runoff, changes in sea ice growth and decay processes and changes in biogeochemical processes. Carbonate mineral saturation data collected during HLY1002, HLY1102, and HLY1202 (summers 2010-2012) document undersaturation with respect to aragonite (Ωaragonite) in ~20% of the surface waters of the Canada and Makarov Basins, in direct association with areas of recently accelerated sea ice loss. Conservative tracer studies using salinity, stable oxygen isotopic composition, dissolved silica and barium augment this work by elucidating contributions from distinct water sources. These data show that while surface water in this entire area retains abundant freshwater from meteoric sources, it is freshwater additions from melting of multiyear sea ice which is most closely linked to the areas of aragonite undersaturation. Depth profiles from 20 oceanographic stations taken during the cruises show a ~100 m thick lens of Ωaragonite undersaturated water at ~150 m depth in the western Arctic, but not further north than 85°N. The surface waters in the Canada and Makarov Basins have pCO2 values much lower than the atmospheric pCO2 (~390 uatm), ranging between 350 μatm and 100 μatm, and are a strong sink for atmospheric CO2. The strong sink areas are found in the Chukchi Sea and western Beaufort shelf areas. These studies represent the frontiers of ocean acidification research in the western Arctic, in which baseline data have been

  12. Decadal Changes in Zooplankton of the Northeast U.S. Continental Shelf

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Hongsheng; Ji, Rubao; Liu, Hui; Jo, Young-Heon; Hare, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    The abundance of the subarctic copepod, Calanus finmarchicus, and temperate, shelf copepod, Centropages typicus, was estimated from samples collected bi-monthly over the Northeast U.S. continental shelf (NEUS) from 1977–2010. Latitudinal variation in long term trends and seasonal patterns for the two copepod species were examined for four sub-regions: the Gulf of Maine (GOM), Georges Bank (GB), Southern New England (SNE), and Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB). Results suggested that there was significant difference in long term variation between northern region (GOM and GB), and the MAB for both species. C. finmarchicus generally peaked in May – June throughout the entire study region and Cen. typicus had a more complex seasonal pattern. Time series analysis revealed that the peak time for Cen. typicus switched from November – December to January - March after 1985 in the MAB. The long term abundance of C. finmarchicus showed more fluctuation in the MAB than the GOM and GB, whereas the long term abundance of Cen. typicus was more variable in the GB than other sub-regions. Alongshore transport was significantly correlated with the abundance of C. finmarchicus, i.e., more water from north, higher abundance for C. finmarchicus. The abundance of Cen. typicus showed positive relationship with the Gulf Stream north wall index (GSNWI) in the GOM and GB, but the GSNWI only explained 12–15% of variation in Cen. typicus abundance. In general, the alongshore current was negatively correlated with the GSNWI, suggesting that Cen. typicus is more abundant when advection from the north is less. However, the relationship between Cen. typicus and alongshore transport was not significant. The present study highlights the importance of spatial scales in the study of marine populations: observed long term changes in the northern region were different from the south for both species. PMID:24498177

  13. Bottom-boundary-layer measurements on the continental shelf off the Ebro River, Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cacchione, D.A.; Drake, D.E.; Losada, M.A.; Medina, R.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements of currents, waves and light transmission obtained with an instrumented bottom tripod (GEOPROBE) were used in conjunction with a theoretical bottom-boundary-layer model for waves and currents to investigate sediment transport on the continental shelf south of the Ebro River Delta, Spain. The current data show that over a 48-day period during the fall of 1984, the average transport at 1 m above the seabed was alongshelf and slightly offshore toward the south-southwest at about 2 cm/s. A weak storm passed through the region during this period and caused elevated wave and current speeds near the bed. The bottom-boundary-layer model predicted correspondingly higher combined wave and current bottom shear velocities at this time, but the GEOPROBE optical data indicate that little to no resuspension occurred. This result suggests that the fine-grained bottom sediment, which has a clay component of 80%, behaves cohesively and is more difficult to resuspend than noncohesive materials of similar size. Model computations also indicate that noncohesive very fine sand in shallow water (20 m deep) was resuspended and transported mainly as bedload during this storm. Fine-grained materials in shallow water that are resuspended and transported as suspended load into deeper water probably account for the slight increase in sediment concentration at the GEOPROBE sensors during the waning stages of the storm. The bottom-boundary-layer data suggest that the belt of fine-grained bottom sediment that extends along the shelf toward the southwest is deposited during prolonged periods of low energy and southwestward bottom flow. This pattern is augmented by enhanced resuspension and transport toward the southwest during storms. ?? 1990.

  14. Oceanographic and atmospheric conditions on the continental shelf north of the Monterey Bay during August 2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramp, Steven R.; Lermusiaux, Pierre F. J.; Shulman, Igor; Chao, Yi; Wolf, Rebecca E.; Bahr, Frederick L.

    2011-09-01

    A comprehensive data set from the ocean and atmosphere was obtained just north of the Monterey Bay as part of the Monterey Bay 2006 (MB06) field experiment. The wind stress, heat fluxes, and sea surface temperature were sampled by the Naval Postgraduate School's TWIN OTTER research aircraft. In situ data were collected using ships, moorings, gliders and AUVs. Four data-assimilating numerical models were additionally run, including the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS ®) model for the atmosphere and the Harvard Ocean Prediction System (HOPS), the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), and the Navy Coastal Ocean Model (NCOM) for the ocean. The scientific focus of the Adaptive Sampling and Prediction Experiment (ASAP) was on the upwelling/relaxation cycle and the resulting three-dimensional coastal circulation near a coastal promontory, in this case Point Año Nuevo, CA. The emphasis of this study is on the circulation over the continental shelf as estimated from the wind forcing, two ADCP moorings, and model outputs. The wind stress during August 2006 consisted of 3-10 day upwelling favorable events separated by brief 1-3 day relaxations. During the first two weeks there was some correlation between local winds and currents and the three models' capability to reproduce the events. During the last two weeks, largely equatorward surface wind stress forced the sea surface and barotropic poleward flow occurred over the shelf, reducing model skill at predicting the circulation. The poleward flow was apparently remotely forced by mesoscale eddies and alongshore pressure gradients, which were not well simulated by the models. The small, high-resolution model domains were highly reliant on correct open boundary conditions to drive these larger-scale poleward flows. Multiply-nested models were no more effective than well-initialized local models in this respect.

  15. Neotectonics and sedimentation on the central continental shelf of western Canada

    SciTech Connect

    Moslow, T.F. ); Luternauer, J.L. ); Rohr, K. )

    1991-03-01

    Analysis of high resolution seismic profiles from the central Canadian continental shelf provides substantial evidence for Quaternary faulting. Along the northwestern margin of Moresby Trough, one of three largescale Quaternary canyons cutting across the shelf, a divergence of reflectors, thickening of seismic units, and concavity of reflectors suggestive of drag are seen along the downthrown side of listric normal faults. Faulting appears to be syndepositional. Some of the faults are interpreted as growth or compaction faults. Fault traces commonly terminate below the seabed. Deformation of Quaternary sediments due to faulting is non-brittle in nature, and maximum offset of the reflectors thus far seen is 2.5 m. It is suggested that the Quaternary faulting observed is a product of rapid deposition and loading of late Quaternary sediment rather than being related to seismicity. A multichannel survey in the Queen Charlotte basin gives an excellent image of structure of the sediment-basement interface and Tertiary sedimentary fill. In the Queen Charlotte Sound the basin is divided into several subbasins that are bounded by normal faults. Three crossings of Quaternary canyons show that they cut into sedimentary fill in the subbasins as well as basement highs; from this observation it is inferred that there is little control on their location from Tertiary structure. Several features in the data indicate that Tertiary structures are not being reactivated. Basement has less than 0.2 s relief under Moresby through and steep gradients in the seafloor cannot be correlated with basement topography. Canyon erosion and subsequent fill (up to 175 m thick) are probably of Quaternary age and seem to act independently of Tertiary structure.

  16. Decadal changes in zooplankton of the Northeast U.S. continental shelf.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hongsheng; Ji, Rubao; Liu, Hui; Jo, Young-Heon; Hare, Jonathan A

    2014-01-01

    The abundance of the subarctic copepod, Calanus finmarchicus, and temperate, shelf copepod, Centropages typicus, was estimated from samples collected bi-monthly over the Northeast U.S. continental shelf (NEUS) from 1977-2010. Latitudinal variation in long term trends and seasonal patterns for the two copepod species were examined for four sub-regions: the Gulf of Maine (GOM), Georges Bank (GB), Southern New England (SNE), and Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB). Results suggested that there was significant difference in long term variation between northern region (GOM and GB), and the MAB for both species. C. finmarchicus generally peaked in May - June throughout the entire study region and Cen. typicus had a more complex seasonal pattern. Time series analysis revealed that the peak time for Cen. typicus switched from November - December to January - March after 1985 in the MAB. The long term abundance of C. finmarchicus showed more fluctuation in the MAB than the GOM and GB, whereas the long term abundance of Cen. typicus was more variable in the GB than other sub-regions. Alongshore transport was significantly correlated with the abundance of C. finmarchicus, i.e., more water from north, higher abundance for C. finmarchicus. The abundance of Cen. typicus showed positive relationship with the Gulf Stream north wall index (GSNWI) in the GOM and GB, but the GSNWI only explained 12-15% of variation in Cen. typicus abundance. In general, the alongshore current was negatively correlated with the GSNWI, suggesting that Cen. typicus is more abundant when advection from the north is less. However, the relationship between Cen. typicus and alongshore transport was not significant. The present study highlights the importance of spatial scales in the study of marine populations: observed long term changes in the northern region were different from the south for both species.

  17. Overview of the recent sediment hydrocarbon geochemistry of Atlantic and Gulf Coast outer continental shelf environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehm, Paul D.; Requejo, A. G.

    1986-07-01

    An overview of the hydrocarbon geochemistry of recent marine sediments from the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) regions is presented. Hydrocarbon levels along the Atlantic OCS are fairly uniform, ranging between <0·1 and 20 ppm, with the higher values occurring in areas of fine-grained sediment accumulation. Elevated hydrocarbon concentrations appear to be associated with anthropogenic inputs of silt/clay-sized particles to OCS sediments via particulate resuspension and transport, as evidenced by an increase in contributions from the unresolved complex mixture (UCM) feature in gas chromatograms. Compositional characteristics of hydrocarbons in the high-carbonate sediments of the Eastern Gulf OCS indicate a primarily marine origin. Proceeding north and west along the shelf, sedimentary hydrocarbons assume a more terrestrial and/or anthropogenic character in response to a greater input of silt/clays from the Mississippi River. Highest hydrocarbon concentrations in this region (up to 70 ppm) are found in the shallow nearshore areas west of the Mississippi River discharge and in the vicinity of Galveston Bay along the South Texas OCS. In the North Atlantic, Eastern Gulf, South Texas Gulf and coastal Louisiana sediments a linear relationship exists between total hydrocarbon and total organic carbon concentrations, indicating that each area consists of a geochemical 'province' defined by a source input or depositional regime specific to the region. The use of trace parameter/bulk parameter ratios (such as total hydrocarbon or individual PAH concentrations/total organic carbon content) in defining such provinces, and thus in serving as a basis for evaluating variations in source inputs as part of future surveys, is demonstrated. This approach views the hydrocarbon content and composition of Atlantic and Gulf coast OCS sediments as points on a spectrum defined by input types (sources) and deposition patterns (sedimentation and erosion

  18. Oxygenation episodes on the continental shelf of central Peru: Remote forcing and benthic ecosystem response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez, Dimitri; Enríquez, E.; Purca, S.; Quipúzcoa, L.; Marquina, R.; Flores, G.; Graco, M.

    2008-10-01

    The interplay between the oxygen minimum zone and remotely-forced oxygenation episodes determines the fate of the benthic subsystem off the Central Peruvian coast. We analyzed a 12 year monthly time-series of oceanographic and benthic parameters at 94 m depth off Callao, Central Peru (12°S), to analyze: (i) near-bottom oxygen level on the continental shelf in relation to dynamic height on the equator (095°W); and (ii) benthic ecosystem responses to oxygen change (macrobiotic infauna, meiofauna, and sulphide-oxidizing bacteria, Thioploca spp.). Shelf oxygenation episodes occurred after equatorial dynamic height increases one month before, consistent with the propagation of coastal trapped waves. Several but not all of these episodes occurred during El Niños. The benthic biota responded to oxygenation episodes by undergoing succession through three major ecological states. Under strong oxygen deficiency or anoxia, the sediments were nearly defaunated of macro-invertebrates and Thioploca was scarce, such that nematode biomass dominated the macro- and meiobiotas. When frequency of oxygenation events reduced the periods of anoxia, but the prevailing oxygen range was 10-20 μmol L -1, mats of Thioploca formed and dominated the biomass. Finally, with frequent and intense (>40 μmol L -1) oxygenation, the sediments were colonized by macrofauna, which then dominated biomass. The Thioploca state evolved during the 2002-2003 weak EN, while the macrofauna state was developed during the onset of the strong1997-1998 EN. Repeated episodes of strong oxygen deficiency during the summer of 2004, in parallel with the occurrence of red tides in surface waters, resulted in the collapse of Thioploca mats and development of the Nematode state. Ecological interactions may affect persistence or the transition between benthic ecosystem states.

  19. Meiofauna abundance on the Gulf of Mexico continental shelf affected by hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murrell, Michael C.; Fleeger, John W.

    1989-12-01

    Meiofauna were sampled in shallow (8-13 m) continental shelf waters off the coast of Louisiana at three stations on 13 dates from June 1985 to August 1986. Total meiofauna abundances ranged from 525 to 3406 individuals per 10 cm 2 with a mean of 1810 individuals per 10 cm 2. Peak abundances occurred in late spring and early summer while seasonal lows occurred during late summer and winter. The three predominant taxa were Nematoda (91.8%), Copepoda (3.2%) and Kinorhyncha (2.5%). The meiobenthic copepod assemblage displayed low diversity and was dominated by three epibenthic species which together comprised 87% of the copepod fauna. Hypoxic conditions (dissolved oxygen <2mg l -1) developed seasonally on this shelf as a result of water column density stratification and eutrophication during late spring and summer. Abundances of all taxa declined during the summers of both years apparently in response to hypoxic conditions. Copepods were most dramatically affected, dropping from springtime peak abundances (several hundred per 10 cm 2) to virtually zero in a one-month period of time. Copepod density declines were spatially correlated with the onset of hypoxia, as inshore stations developed hypoxia later and underwent declines later. Densities remained low after the return of normal oxygen conditions, rising in the spring of the following year. The effect on nematodes and kinorhynchs was not as dramatic. A single collection of meiofauna from July 1983 in nearby normoxic Terrebonne Bay at similar water depths reveals a high density and diversity of copepods, further suggesting the sensitivity of copepods to hypoxia.

  20. Submarine end moraines on the continental shelf off NE Greenland - Implications for Lateglacial dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, Daniel; Jokat, Wilfried; Jensen, Laura; Schenke, Hans-Werner

    2010-05-01

    Favourable sea-ice conditions gave way to an acoustic survey offshore NE Greenland during RV Polarstern ARK-XXIV/3 leg in 2009. The acquired data set clearly depicts sediment ridges in an area of app. 18 × 9 km. The ridges are found in water depths between 270 and 350 m. The sediment ridges are 2.5-9 km long, 50-250 m wide and 5-25 m high. In profile, most of these ridges are characterized by steep slopes towards Northwest and gentle slopes towards Southeast. Their internal structure, imaged by parametric echo-sounding data, shows that they are positive sedimentation features rather than erosive remnant structures. Arcuate shape, joint orientation and position on a basal till are indicative for end moraines. Because they are positioned within the Westwind Trough on a basal till that extends further east, we consider these ridges end moraines of the Westwind ice stream reported by Evans et al. (2009), Marine geophysical evidence for former expansion and flow of the Greenland Ice Sheet across the north-east Greenland continental shelf. Journal of Quaternary Science (2008), doi: 10.1002/jqs.1231.). Based on our hydro-acoustic data, we interpret these end moraines to be formed by short-lived re-advances during an overall recession of the ice margin. However, they could also be deposited during halts of the grounding line (comparable to De Geer moraines) though their morphological characteristics are slightly different from most published De Geer moraines. The ages for the moraine deposition can be inferred from a thin sedimentary drape indicating timing between Lateglacial and early Holocene. This set of end moraines is direct evidence for a dynamic behaviour of the marine-based ice stream during the last deglaciation on the NE Greenland shelf.

  1. Storm-induced inner-continental shelf circulation and sediment transport: Long Bay, South Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, John C.; Armstrong, Brandy; Sylvester, Charlene S.; Voulgaris, George; Nelson, Tim; Schwab, William C.; Denny, Jane F.

    2012-07-01

    drove a net sediment flux southwestward. Analysis of a 12-year data record from a local buoy shows an average of 41 cold fronts, 32 warm fronts, and 26 low-pressure systems per year. The culmination of these events would yield a cumulative net inner-continental shelf transport to the south-west, a trend that is further verified by sediment textural analysis and bedform morphology on the inner-continental shelf.

  2. Fish community diversity in the middle continental shelf of the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Xiujuan; Jin, Xianshi; Zhou, Zhipeng; Dai, Fangqun

    2011-11-01

    The status of fishery stocks in the coastal waters of China is far from ideal, mainly due to climate change and the impacts of human activities (e.g., pollution and overfishing). Thus, the restoration and protection of fishery resources have become critical and complex. The stability and balanced structure of the fish community is a basic foundation for the protection of fishery resources. Based on data collected from bottom trawls by the R/V Beidou in continental shelf of the East China Sea in November 2006 and February 2007, changes in the composition and diversity of fish species and functional groups were analyzed. The research area was divided into offshore waters and inshore waters by the two-way indicator species analysis (TWIA). The results showed that the dominant species were different between offshore waters and inshore waters and also varied with the survey time. The most abundant family was Sciaenidae and Teraponidae in November 2006, Sciaenidae, Engraulidae and Triglidae were most abundant in February 2007. The species belonged mainly to mobile piscivores (G6), benthivores/piscivores (G4), benthivores (G3) and planktivores (G1), and the dominant species in November 2006 were commercial species (e.g. Larimichthys polyactis and Trichiurus japonicus), but small-sized species were dominant in February 2007 (e.g., Harpadon nehereus, Benthosema pterotum, Champsodon capensis, and Acropoma japonicum). The species diversity showed a similar trend as the functional group diversity. Stations with higher diversity were mainly distributed in inshore waters in February 2007, whereas higher diversity was found in offshore waters in November 2006. The highest biomass and species number were found in G6 group, followed by the G4, G5 and G1 groups. The distribution of the number of individuals of each functional group showed the opposite trend as that of the biomass distribution. In addition, the size spectra were mainly concentrated around 3-29 cm, and the individual

  3. Continental Shelf Freshwater Water Resources and Enhanced Oil Recovery By Low Salinity Water Flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Person, M. A.; Morrow, N.; Wilson, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the prospects of utilizing offshore freshwater in continental shelf oil production. Petroleum engineers have recently shown that tertiary water floods using freshwater can enhance oil recovery by as much as 18% (Morrow and Buckley, 2011). Hydrogeologists recently estimated that up to 5x105 km3of fresh to brackish water are sequestered in shallow ( < 500 m) permeable sands and carbonate reservoirs within 80 km of the present-day coastline around the world (Post et al., 2013). Most of the offshore freshwater was emplaced during the Pleistocene during periods of sea level low stands and when ice sheets over ran passive margins at high latitudes. We have analyzed a series of continental shelf cross sections from around the world estimating the average freshwater volume emplaced with distance offshore. We compare the distribution of fresh-brackish water with distance from the coastline to oil platform locations in order to assess the economic viability of this energy-water nexus. We also discuss a project that is currently underway within the North Sea (Clair Ridge) to field validate this concept. We present a series of variable-density groundwater flow and solute transport simulations that are intended to assess how long freshwater resources could be produced in an offshore environment using horizontal drilling technologies before seawater invades the well. We considered a 100m thick freshwater reservoir sandwiched between two 200-300m thick confining units. We pumped the horizontal well at a rate of 5.4 m3/day (1 gpm per meter of well). The resulting drawdown was less than 5 m at the well head (r=0.15 m). For a 1000 m long horizontal well, this resulted in the production of 5455 m3/day of fresh water (over 34,000 barrels per day). Concentrations increased at the wellhead by about 5000 mg/l after 20 years of continuous pumping using a reservoir permeability of 10-13 m2. This simulation demonstrates that where freshwater is available it is likely

  4. Storm-induced inner-continental shelf circulation and sediment transport: Long Bay, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warner, John C.; Armstrong, Brandy N.; Sylvester, Charlene S.; Voulgaris, George; Nelson, Tim; Schwab, William C.; Denny, Jane F.

    2012-01-01

    -pressure systems drove a net sediment flux southwestward. Analysis of a 12-year data record from a local buoy shows an average of 41 cold fronts, 32 warm fronts, and 26 low-pressure systems per year. The culmination of these events would yield a cumulative net inner-continental shelf transport to the south–west, a trend that is further verified by sediment textural analysis and bedform morphology on the inner-continental shelf.

  5. Splay faults and tsunamigenic sources across the continental shelf from 1964 great Alaska earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liberty, L. M.; Haeussler, P. J.; Moeller, M.

    2013-12-01

    Using tsunami run up, seismic reflection and bathymetric data, we identify tsunamigenic sea floor ruptures that resulted from the 1964 Great Alaska earthquake. These sea floor lineaments are rooted in megathrust splay faults that appear across the 500-km wide Gulf of Alaska continental shelf. Based on estimated tsunami travel times, we identify two splay faults that produced 5-10 m wave heights in the coastal town of Seward and remote settlements along the Kenai Peninsula. These faults splay from the megathrust along the trailing edge of the subducted Yakutat terrane that is sandwiched between the Pacific and North American plates. Duplexing along the megathrust likely transferred lateral motion along the decollement to vertical splay fault motion that resulted in multi-meter sea floor uplifts. We identify the Cape Cleare fault as the source of the earliest tsunami arrival for Seward, Puget Bay and Whidbey Bay. Sparker seismic data, pre- and post-earthquake bathymetry and crustal seismic data characterize the along-strike Holocene motion on this 70-km long fault that parallels the Patton Bay fault that ruptured on nearby Montague Island. We define a strand of the Middleton Island fault system as the source of the second arrival in Puget and Whidbey Bays and the earliest tsunami source on Middleton Island and other sites in the eastern Gulf of Alaska. Sea floor displacements of more than 20 m suggest both of these faults have repeatedly ruptured during Holocene earthquakes. Additionally, we identify a series of active thrust faults along the length of the Gulf of Alaska to Kodiak Island that likely initiated tsunami waves from smaller sea floor displacements. Sea floor offsets and splay faults that are mapped along the length of the continental shelf suggest Holocene coseismic rupture patterns are not reflected in interseismic GPS measurements along the Kenai Peninsula, but are consistent with seismic, tsunami, and geodetic measurements from the 1964 earthquake

  6. Surficial sediment character of the Louisiana offshore continental shelf region: a GIS compilation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, S. Jeffress; Arsenault, Matthew A.; Buczkowski, Brian J.; Reid, Jane A.; Flocks, James; Kulp, Mark A.; Penland, Shea; Jenkins, Chris J.

    2007-01-01

    switching by the Mississippi River and its distributaries over the past ~10,000 years that resulted in laterally overlapping deltaic depocenters. The interactions among riverine, coastal, and inner shelf processes have been superimposed on the Holocene transgression resulting in distinctive landforms and sedimentary sequences. Four Holocene shelf-phase delta complexes have been identified using seismic reflection data and vibracores. Each delta complex is bounded by transgressive surfaces. Following each cycle of deposition and abandonment, the delta lobes undergo regional subsidence and marine reworking that forms transgressive coastal systems and barrier islands. Ultimately, the distal end of each of the abandoned delta lobes is marked by submerged marine sand bodies representing drowned barriers. These sand bodies (e.g. Ship Shoal, Outer Shoal, Trinity Shoal, Tiger Shoal, St. Bernard Shoal) offer the largest volumes and highest quality sand for beach nourishment and shoreline and wetlands restoration. These four large sand shoals on inner continental shelf, representing the reworked remnants of former prograded deltaic headlands that existed on the continental shelf at lower sea level, were generated in the retreat path of the Mississippi River delta plain during the Holocene transgression. Penland and others (1989) have shown these sand bodies represent former shoreline positions associated with lower still stands in sea level. Short periods of rapid relative sea-level rise led to the transgressive submergence of the shorelines which today can be recognized at the -10 m to -20 m isobaths on the Louisiana continental shelf. Trinity Shoal and Ship Shoal represent the -10 m middle-to-late Holocene shoreline trend, whereas Outer Shoal and the St. Bernard Shoals define the -20 m early Holocene shoreline trend (Penland and others, 1989). Collectively, these sand shoals constitute a large volume of high quality sandy sediment potentially suitable for barrier island nourishment

  7. Spatially quantitative seafloor habitat mapping: example from the northern South Carolina inner continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda, Germán Y.; Gayes, Paul T.; Van Dolah, Robert F.; Schwab, William C.

    2004-03-01

    Naturally occurring hard bottom areas provide the geological substrate that can support diverse assemblages of sessile benthic organisms, which in turn, attract many reef-dwelling fish species. Alternatively, defining the location and extent of bottom sand bodies is relevant for potential nourishment projects as well as to ensure that transient sediment does not affect reef habitats, particularly in sediment-starved continental margins. Furthermore, defining sediment transport pathways documents the effects these mobile bedforms have on proximal reef habitats. Thematic mapping of these substrates is therefore crucial in safeguarding critical habitats and offshore resources of coastal nations. This study presents the results of a spatially quantitative mapping approach based on classification of sidescan-sonar imagery. By using bottom video for image-to-ground control, digital image textural features for pattern recognition, and an artificial neural network for rapid, quantitative, multivariable decision-making, this approach resulted in recognition rates of hard bottom as high as 87%. The recognition of sand bottom was less successful (31%). This approach was applied to a large (686 km 2), high-quality, 2-m resolution sidescan-sonar mosaic of the northern South Carolina inner continental shelf. Results of this analysis indicate that both surficial sand and hard bottoms of variable extent are present over the study area. In total, 59% of the imaged area was covered by hard bottom, while 41% was covered by sand. Qualitative spatial correlation between bottom type and bathymetry appears possible from comparison of our interpretive map and available bathymetry. Hard bottom areas tend to be located on flat, low-lying areas, and sandy bottoms tend to reside on areas of positive relief. Published bio-erosion rates were used to calculate the potential sediment input from the mapped hard bottom areas rendering sediment volumes that may be as high as 0.8 million m 3/yr for

  8. Spatially quantitative seafloor habitat mapping: Example from the northern South Carolina inner continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ojeda, G.Y.; Gayes, P.T.; Van Dolah, R. F.; Schwab, W.C.

    2004-01-01

    Naturally occurring hard bottom areas provide the geological substrate that can support diverse assemblages of sessile benthic organisms, which in turn, attract many reef-dwelling fish species. Alternatively, defining the location and extent of bottom sand bodies is relevant for potential nourishment projects as well as to ensure that transient sediment does not affect reef habitats, particularly in sediment-starved continental margins. Furthermore, defining sediment transport pathways documents the effects these mobile bedforms have on proximal reef habitats. Thematic mapping of these substrates is therefore crucial in safeguarding critical habitats and offshore resources of coastal nations. This study presents the results of a spatially quantitative mapping approach based on classification of sidescan-sonar imagery. By using bottom video for image-to-ground control, digital image textural features for pattern recognition, and an artificial neural network for rapid, quantitative, multivariable decision-making, this approach resulted in recognition rates of hard bottom as high as 87%. The recognition of sand bottom was less successful (31%). This approach was applied to a large (686 km2), high-quality, 2-m resolution sidescan-sonar mosaic of the northern South Carolina inner continental shelf. Results of this analysis indicate that both surficial sand and hard bottoms of variable extent are present over the study area. In total, 59% of the imaged area was covered by hard bottom, while 41% was covered by sand. Qualitative spatial correlation between bottom type and bathymetry appears possible from comparison of our interpretive map and available bathymetry. Hard bottom areas tend to be located on flat, low-lying areas, and sandy bottoms tend to reside on areas of positive relief. Published bio-erosion rates were used to calculate the potential sediment input from the mapped hard bottom areas rendering sediment volumes that may be as high as 0.8 million m3/yr for

  9. An eddy resolving numerical study of the general circulation and deep-water formation in the Adriatic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantziafou, A.; Lascaratos, A.

    2004-07-01

    General circulation and deep-water formation (DWF) processes in the Adriatic basin in a climatological year were numerically simulated in a high-resolution (1/20th of a degree) implementation of the Princeton Ocean Model (POM). The "perpetual" year atmospheric data were computed from the ECMWF Reanalysis data (1°×1°) covering the period 1979-1994. The model reproduces the main basin features of the general circulation, water mass distribution and their seasonal variability. The Adriatic Deep Water exiting through the Otranto Strait is produced with two different mechanisms inside the basin: (a) by open ocean deep convection over the Southern Adriatic Pit and Middle Adriatic Pit (b) on the continental shelf of the Northern and Middle Adriatic. The estimated contributions of both mechanisms suggest that 82% of the Adriatic Deep Water is formed inside the Southern Adriatic Pit, while all the higher density water in this water mass comes from the northern regions. The role of mesoscale eddies at the periphery of the dense-water chimney in the Southern Adriatic Pit was examined and their contribution to the lateral buoyancy flux, during the convection process, found to be small. The DWF rate at Otranto Strait is 0.28 Sv with σθ over 29.15. The sensitivity of the DWF processes to interannual variability of the buoyancy forcing and river runoff was assessed with a number of process-study numerical experiments. In these experiments the effect of an imposed "extreme" buoyancy forcing during 1 year, on the DWF rates, was to modify them during the specific year, but the effects were still present in the following normal climatological year. This shows that the DWF rates and their mass characteristics at a specific year depend not only on the atmospheric conditions prevailing that specific year but on the previous year's as well, thus leading to the concept of a "memory" of the basin.

  10. Climatic fluctuations during the Holocene based on eastern Mediterranean continental shelf sediment cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor-Federman, Tsofit; Bookman, Revital; Almogi-Labin, Ahuva; Herut, Barak

    2013-04-01

    Sediments deposited on the south eastern Mediterranean continental shelf are sensitive recorders of climatic and oceanographic variability affected by the north Atlantic and indirectly by monsoonal systems. In order to reconstruct the influence of these climatic systems two cores were taken off shore the southern and central Israeli coast at water depths of ~35 m. The sediments were characterized by majors and traces elements, and the sediment provenance was determined using 87Sr/86Sr ratios. Detrital input from the Nile and local environment was studied using grain size distribution and sedimentation rates. Water column productivity was inferred by TOC and δ13Corg. The cores, dated to 7,630 and 8,440 14C years BP, show two distinct sedimentation regimes. The early Holocene is characterized by high sedimentation rates (190-140 cm/ka) that decrease in the last 5,500 years (50-60 cm/ka) in both north and central cores. Coarse grain size is dominant in the early Holocene, with a decreasing trend in the northern core. This distribution is probably connected to eustatic sea level rise and recycling of coarse sediments from the flooded shallow Nile cone. In the late Holocene, as sea level stabilized, grain size is finer in the south; while to the north, cycles of ~1,500 years in coarse grain size characterize the period. Carbonate and organic carbon further present the change along the period. Decrease in carbonate content and increase in δ13Corg during the late Holocene indicate decrease in water column productivity. In contradiction, organic carbon is relatively high in the late Holocene. This is explained by the coarse sediment texture in the early Holocene leading to better oxidation of buried organic matter. Strontium isotopes show changes in sediment provenance. In the early Holocene high 87Sr/86Sr values of ~0.71 reflect a dominant signature of the White Nile and the Yellow Nile and in part the local streams. During the last 5,500 years lower values of ~0

  11. Plate motions at the transition from the Lomonosov Ridge to Eurasian Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyushkov, Eugene; Chekhovich, Peter; Petrov, Eugene

    2016-04-01

    Distribution of the Cenozoic plate motions in the Amerasian Basin is a serious problem. Cenozoic opening of the Gakkel Ridge has resulted in the eastward drift of the Lomonosov Ridge and Podvodnikov Basin. According to a popular point of view these two structures are separated from the Eurasian continent by the Khatanga-Lomonosov Transform Fault. It is supposed that this fault with a right-lateral displacement of about 300 km begins at the southern end of the Gakkel Ridge, passes between the southern end of the Lomonosov Ridge and the Asian Shelf probably continuing further to the east into the Podvodnikov Basin. During the last decade the area was covered by a number of seismic profiles. In 2007 reference profile A-7 was shot (Kazanin, Ivanov, UNCLOS Symposium, St.-Petersburg, May 26, 27 2014). This longitudinal profile 832 km long includes both seismic reflection and deep seismic profiling. It follows the eastern slope of the Lomonosov Ridge in the north and crosses the Asian Continental Rise and shelf of the Laptev Sea terminating near the Novosibirsk Islands in the south. The quality of the data is very high because at that time the area was completely free of ice. Transform faults with large strike-slip displacement are crossing many sedimentary basins (Liemiszki, Brown, GSA Bull., 1988, v. 100, p. 665-676 and others). In such basins the structure of the sedimentary cover changes completely across the fault. Not only sedimentary beds become disrupted but the thicknesses of synchronous sedimentary units on the fault walls commonly appear to be quite different. This indicates that during their movement the units were far one from another. The Khatanga-Lomonosov Transform Fault, if it exists, should cross profile A-7 in its middle part. The profile includes some normal faults slightly disrupting the sedimentary sequences. However, on both fault walls the thickness of the main units of the sedimentary cover separated by regional unconformities remains the same

  12. Mercury in sediments from shelf and continental slope at Campos Basin near Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, Beatriz; Hintelmann, Holger; Dimock, Brian; Gomes de Almeida, Marcelo; Falcão, Ana Paula; de Rezende, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a global pollutant due to its ability to undergo long-range transport from source regions to remote parts of the world, and its ubiquitous presence in aquatic ecosystems. The Hg isotope ratios could be an effective tool for tracing the sources and process of Hg in the environment. This study aimed to establish the distribution of mercury in surface sediments of three transects (25- 3000m water depth) in continental shelf and slope in Campos Basin-RJ-Brazil, using the Hg isotopes to understand the geochemical processes relating to Hg cycling that occur in a subtropical coastal environment. The study area was divided into three transects: A (located to the south and close to a upwelling area), D (located opposite the mouth of the Paraiba do Sul River) and I (located north near the top of Vitória-ES). Sampling isobaths were 25, 50, 75, 100, 150, 400, 700, 1000, 1300, 1900, 2500 and 3000m. The Total Hg, MMHg and Hg stable isotopes were determined based on EPA Method 1631, EPA method 1630 and Foucher and Hintelmann (2006), respectively. The silt/clay ranged from 0.05 to 95%, and the organic carbon (OC) from 0.07 to 1.43 % for all transects. THg and MMHg concentrations in the shelf were 11.9 ± 7.2 (1.7- 22.2) ng.g-1 and 0.15 ± 0.12 (0.02 - 0.40) ng.g-1; in the slope 30.3 ± 9.2 (11.6 - 51.6) ng.g-1 and 0.13 ± 0.06 (0.03 -0.29) ng.g-1 , respectively. The δ202Hg and Δ199Hg varied from -0.32 to -1.85 ‰ (-0.79 ± 0.44‰) and -0.41 to 0.09 ‰ (-0.03 ± 0.12 ‰) for all transects, respectively. The delta values between both regions are significantly different, the shelf region showed δ202Hg from -0.59 to -2.19 ‰ (mean: -1.52 ±0.65) and Δ199Hg from - 0.53 to 0.08 ‰ (mean: -0.27 ±0.55) and the slope region were observed δ202Hg values from -0.32 to -1.82 ‰ (mean: -0.73 ±0.39 ‰ n=18) and gΔ199Hg from -0.23 to 0.09‰ (mean: -0.02 ±0.08‰ n=5). The slope appears to be enriched with heavier isotopes compared to the shelf, however, in the

  13. The last glaciation and deglaciation of the Northeast Greenland continental shelf revealed by hydro-acoustic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, Jan Erik; Jokat, Wilfried; Dorschel, Boris

    2017-03-01

    About 16% of the Greenland Ice Sheet drains in the area of the Northeast Greenland shelf between 76°N and 80.5°N via marine terminating glaciers. Most of it is via the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream, the largest ice stream of Greenland. During ice ages, the ice sheet extended onto the continental shelf and modern-day cross-shelf troughs were filled by ice streams. In this study, high-resolution hydro-acoustic data acquired during three decades of research were jointly investigated to reveal the past glacial conditions. Our data shows that Westwind Trough and Norske Trough were filled by fast flowing ice streams that extended to the shelf edge during the last glacial maximum. In between the cross-shelf troughs, ice domes resided on shallow banks that may have contributed about a decimetre to global sea level. Most probably these ice domes initiated fast ice flow through sinks in the inter-trough area. In Westwind Trough, ice sheet retreat to the inner shelf after the last glacial maximum was intermittent. In contrast, in Norske Trough the ice sheet retreat appears relatively rapid with no evidences for phases of grounding line stabilization. Probably during the Younger Dryas, the ice sheet readvanced to a mid-shelf position in both troughs documented by grounding zone wedges. During this time, a thick ice shelf was present in Norske Trough releasing tabular icebergs. Ice sheet retreat from the mid-shelf to the coastline during Holocene deglaciation was rapid.

  14. Searching for tsunamis evidences on the Algarve (Southern Portugal) continental shelf sedimentary record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drago, Teresa; Silva, Pedro; Lopes, Ana; Magalhães, Vitor; Roque, Cristina; Rodrigues, Ana Isabel; Noiva, João; Terrinha, Pedro; Mena, Anxo; Francés, Guillermo; Kopf, Achim; Völker, David; Omira, Rachid; Baptista, Maria Ana

    2016-04-01

    Tsunami hazard assessment is important in order to prevent and/or minimize its effects, which is only possible if a complete and long record dataset of past events is available, allowing the estimation of their recurrence intervals. The knowledge of past tsunami events are based on instrumental, historical and geological records. Although instrumental and historical records are reliable sources they are limited in time. Geological records can give a much more extended reconstruction overview of thousand years, which can provide a good estimation of tsunami return periods. Most of the existing studies have been conducted onshore and only a few were based on offshore sedimentary record. These last ones, have the advantage to provide a more continuous and almost undisturbed records but the identification of tsunami sediments in marine environment require a multi-proxy approach in order to better identify the allochtonous layers/deposits and to differentiate them from storm deposits. In the context of ASTARTE project (FP7), five gravity and piston cores on the southern Portuguese continental shelf collected in 2008 and 2014 were studied. The methodology included XRF, MSCL, sedimentological and magnetic analyses. Preliminary results show some identifiable layers that may related with allochthonous sedimentary material, compatible with a genesis resulting from tsunami backwash sediment transport and deposition. Acknowledgments - Publication supported by project FCT UID/GEO/50019/2013 - Instituto Dom Luiz.

  15. Sea-floor features on Mississippi and Alabama outer Continental Shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Rezak, R.; Sager, W.W.; Laswell, J.S.; Gittings, S.R. )

    1989-09-01

    Approximately 400 mi{sup 2} were surveyed on the Alabama outer continental shelf during October 1987 and March 1988 using an Edo-Western 4 kHz High Resolution Subbottom Profiler, an EG and G Model 260 Seafloor Mapping System and Starfix Navigation. The mapping is part of a larger project, The Mississippi-Alabama Marine Ecosystems Study, funded by the US Department of the Interior, Minerals Management Service, Gulf of Mexico Regional Office. Bathymetric maps and side-scan mosaics are being prepared from the raw data. Sea-floor features recognized on the side-scan and subbottom records include: (1) low topographic features - possibly bed-rock outcrops, and an enigmatic feature the authors are calling footprints, (2) moderate topographic features - low reefs or bed-rock outcrops, (3) major topographic features - pinnacles and large reefal masses, (4) pox - patches of closely spaced strong reflections with no relief, (5) ridges - closely spaced outcrops along clearly defined features such as shorelines and scarps (possibly truncated dunes or beach ridges), (6) patch reefs, closely spaced, which look like pox but have relief, (7) wave fields - closely spaced sand or gravel waves, and (8) wrecks - sunken rigs or platforms. Except for the wave fields, they believe that the remaining sea-floor features are relict and related to the post-Pleistocene rise of sea level.

  16. Long range acoustic imaging of the continental shelf environment: the Acoustic Clutter Reconnaissance Experiment 2001.

    PubMed

    Ratilal, Purnima; Lai, Yisan; Symonds, Deanelle T; Ruhlmann, Lilimar A; Preston, John R; Scheer, Edward K; Garr, Michael T; Holland, Charles W; Goff, John A; Makris, Nicholas C

    2005-04-01

    An active sonar system is used to image wide areas of the continental shelf environment by long-range echo sounding at low frequency. The bistatic system, deployed in the STRATAFORM area south of Long Island in April-May of 2001, imaged a large number of prominent clutter events over ranges spanning tens of kilometers in near real time. Roughly 3000 waveforms were transmitted into the water column. Wide-area acoustic images of the ocean environment were generated in near real time for each transmission. Between roughly 10 to more than 100 discrete and localized scatterers were registered for each image. This amounts to a total of at least 30000 scattering events that could be confused with those from submerged vehicles over the period of the experiment. Bathymetric relief in the STRATAFORM area is extremely benign, with slopes typically less than 0.5 degrees according to high resolution (30 m sampled) bathymetric data. Most of the clutter occurs in regions where the bathymetry is locally level and does not coregister with seafloor features. No statistically significant difference is found in the frequency of occurrence per unit area of repeatable clutter inside versus outside of areas occupied by subsurface river channels.

  17. The Toms Canyon structure, New Jersey outer continental shelf: A possible late Eocene impact crater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C.W.; Poppe, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Toms Canyon structure [~20-22 km wide] is located on the New Jersey outer continental shelf beneath 80-100 m of water, and is buried by ~1 km of upper Eocene to Holocene sedimentary strata. The structure displays several characteristics typical of terrestrial impact craters (flat floor; upraised faulted rim: brecciated sedimentary fill), but several other characteristics are atypical (an unusually thin ejecta blanket; lack of an inner basin, peak ring, or central peak; bearing nearly completely filled with breccia). Seismostratigraphic and biostratigraphic analyses show that the structure formed during planktonic foraminiferal biochron P15 of the early to middle late Eocene. The fill unit is stratigraphically correlating with impact ejecta cored nearby at Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Site 612 and at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Sites 903 and 904 (22-35 km southeast of the Toms Canyon structure). The Toms Canyon fill unit also correlates with the Exmore breccia, which fills the much larger Chesapeake Bay impact crater (90-km diameter; 335 km to the southwest). On the basis of our analyses, we postulate that the Toms Canyon structure is an impact crater, formed when a cluster of relatively small meteorites approached the target site bearing ~N 50 E, and struck the sea floor obliquely.

  18. Downscaling an Eddy-Resolving Global Model for the Continental Shelf off South Eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roughan, M.; Baird, M.; MacDonald, H.; Oke, P.

    2008-12-01

    The Australian Bluelink collaboration between CSIRO, the Bureau of Meteorology and the Royal Australian Navy has made available to the research community the output of BODAS (Bluelink ocean data assimilation system), an ensemble optimal interpolation reanalysis system with ~10 km resolution around Australia. Within the Bluelink project, BODAS fields are assimilated into a dynamic ocean model of the same resolution to produce BRAN (BlueLink ReANalysis, a hindcast of water properties around Australia from 1992 to 2004). In this study, BODAS hydrographic fields are assimilated into a ~ 3 km resolution Princeton Ocean Model (POM) configuration of the coastal ocean off SE Australia. Experiments were undertaken to establish the optimal strength and duration of the assimilation of BODAS fields into the 3 km resolution POM configuration for the purpose of producing hindcasts of ocean state. It is shown that the resultant downscaling of Bluelink products is better able to reproduce coastal features, particularly velocities and hydrography over the continental shelf off south eastern Australia. The BODAS-POM modelling system is used to provide a high-resolution simulation of the East Australian Current over the period 1992 to 2004. One of the applications that we will present is an investigation of the seasonal and inter-annual variability in the dispersion of passive particles in the East Australian Current. The practical outcome is an estimate of the connectivity of estuaries along the coast of southeast Australia, which is relevant for the dispersion of marine pests.

  19. Factors controlling heavy-mineral variations on the South Texas outer continental shelf, Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flores, R.M.; Shideler, G.L.

    1978-01-01

    Heavy-mineral distribution on the outer continental shelf off the southern coast of Texas shows regional variability induced by provenance and local variability reflecting genetic differences in sea-floor sediments. Q-mode factor analysis showed that three suites of heavy minerals are present. The southern ancestral Rio Grande delta sediments contain a distinct opaque-pyroxene-garnet suite, whereas the northern ancestral Brazes-Colorado delta sediments contain a tourmaline-green hornblende suite. An interdelta region contains a heavy mineral suite that is mixed owing to contributions from both ancestral deltas. Analysis of variance, correlation, and regression methods indicate that heavy-mineral variations in each sedimentary province have been significantly influenced by hydraulic fractionation by size, shape, and density, and by a selective chemical decomposition of unstable minerals. These factors have operated at varying degrees on the relict, palimpsest, and modern sediment populations of the sedimentary provinces since the end of Pleistocene time. The differential effects of these processes on the sediments have resulted in local variations that contribute to the total mineralogical variability. A comparison of the heavy mineral suites of the modern and relict Rio Grande delta sediments, which are derived from a common provenance, also shows mineral variations resulting from factors other than provenance.

  20. Distribution and abundance of flatfish on the South American continental shelf from Suriname to Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manickchand-Heileman, Sherry C.

    This study is based on data collected during four trawl surveys conducted in 1988 on the South American continental shelf from Suriname to Colombia. Members of four flatfish families were caught in depths ranging from 15 to 410 m at 264 of the 1200 stations trawled: Bothidae (13 genera, 30 species), Cynoglossidae (1 genus, 4 species), Soleidae (3 genera, 4 species) and Pleuronectidae (1 genus, 3 species). Flatfish comprised less than 5% of total catch by weight at most stations. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed between 4 and 6 groups of stations in each survey characterized according to depth, temperature and species associations. Cynoglossids, soleids and some bothids characterized shallow-water stations while bothids and pleuronectids characterized intermediate and deep-water stations. Highest catches were taken off northern Venezuela and Colombia during times of increased upwelling and in areas influenced by river runoff. Mean density of flatfish was less than 0.0005 ind·m -2. The major species caught were Paralichthys tropicus, Paralichthys lethostigma, Cyclopsetta chittendeni, Syacium micrurum, Syacium papillosum,, Syacium sp. and Symphurus plagiusa and range extensions were found for six species.

  1. Distribution of modern benthic foraminifers on the New Jersey Outer Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poag, C. Wylie; Knebel, H. J.; Todd, R.

    1980-01-01

    We used samples from 21 stations within a 600 km2 area of the New Jersey Outer Continental Shelf to assess the effects of a hydrodynamic environment on the distribution and redistribution of benthic foraminifers. These samples show that, although the predominant genera (Elphidium, Cibicides, and Saccammina) are the same as those reported by other investigators for this region, the environmental factors that control the generic distribution are more complex than were previously postulated. Generic distribution patterns derived from this study are correlated with the bottom topography and sediment distribution as well as the temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen concentrations of the bottom waters. The six predominant species observed in the samples (and their phenotypic variants) are cryophilic forms known to occur in the Virginian and Nova Scotian biogeographic provinces and in Arctic waters. Species distribution patterns also correlate well with bottom topography and hydrographic factors, but may be modified by seasonal fluctuations in test production and by redistribution of dead tests. At most stations, specimens of Elphidium subarcticum were attached to quartz grains. This phenomenon, which has not been reported before, probably is an adaptation to a high-energy environment. The distribution pattern of Elphidium subarcticum along with those of the sessile species Webbinella concava and Vasiglobulina n.sp. corroborate sedimentological evidence that the accumulation of modern sediments in the area is negligible. ?? 1980.

  2. Assessment of the U. S. outer continental shelf environmental studies program. 2. Ecology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    In 1986, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) requested that the National Research Council (NRC) evaluate the adequacy and applicability of studies conducted in the Environmental Studies Program (ESP), review the general state of knowledge in the appropriate disciplines, and recommend future studies. Under the auspices of the NRC Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, the Committee to Review the Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Studies Program was formed to conduct the assignment. Three panels-dealing with ecology, physical oceanography, and socioeconomics--were established to review specific aspects of the assessment. The Ecology Panel investigated the main questions of ecological relevance to OCS oil and gas activities and ecological aspects of the ESP. The panel was divided into three working groups: on marine birds, mammals, turtles, and endangered species; on benthic processes; and on fisheries and ecosystems. The panel conducted workshops on each of those topics, focused on the progress of the ESP in assessing the environmental impacts of OCS oil and gas activities, evaluated shortcomings of the ESP, and identified future information needs. The report, the second in a series, presents the findings and recommendations of the Ecology Panel.

  3. Continental shelf-wide response of a fish assemblage to rapid warming of the sea.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Stephen D; Jennings, Simon; Johnson, Mark P; Blanchard, Julia L; Schön, Pieter-Jan; Sims, David W; Genner, Martin J

    2011-09-27

    Climate change affects marine biological processes from genetic to ecosystem levels [1-3]. Recent warming in the northeast Atlantic [4, 5] has caused distributional shifts in some fish species along latitudinal and depth gradients [6, 7], but such changes, as predicted by climate envelope models [8], may often be prevented because population movement requires availability of suitable habitat. We assessed the full impacts of warming on the commercially important European continental shelf fish assemblage using a data-driven Eulerian (grid-based) approach that accommodates spatial heterogeneity in ecological and environmental conditions. We analyzed local associations of species abundance and community diversity with climatic variables, assessing trends in 172 cells from records of >100 million individuals sampled over 1.2 million km(2) from 1980-2008. We demonstrate responses to warming in 72% of common species, with three times more species increasing in abundance than declining, and find these trends reflected in international commercial landings. Profound reorganization of the relative abundance of species in local communities occurred despite decadal stability in the presence-absence of species. Our analysis highlights the importance of focusing on changes in species abundance in established local communities to assess the full consequences of climate change for commercial fisheries and food security.

  4. Model for the formation of longshore sand ridges on the continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Restrepo, J.M.; Bona, J.L.

    1994-01-05

    A model is proposed for the formation and evolution of three- dimensional sedimentary structures such as longshore sand ridges on the continental shelf in water deeper than that of the shoaling region. Owing to the striking similarity between the bar spacing and the length scales in which interactions among the most energetic modes of shallow water waves take place, we argue that these bars are formed slowly by flows in the turbulent boundary layer generated by weakly nonlinear, dispersive waves. Hence the model is based on the interaction between surficial, weakly nonlinear shallow water waves, having weak spanwise spatial dependence, and the bottom topography. While such underwater structures are not the result of a single formative agent, it is argued that the mechanism proposed in this study does contribute significantly to their generation and evolution. Comparisons of this model with oceanographic data must wait for sufficient data to become available. In conjunction with developing the sand ridge model, this study proposes new mathematical equations of interest in their own right.

  5. Organic matter content of sediments in continental shelf area of southeast coast of India.

    PubMed

    Khan, Syed Ajmal; Ansari, K G Mohamed Thameemul; Lyla, P Somasundharanair

    2012-12-01

    Total organic matter (TOM) content of sediment samples collected from various depths of continental shelf region of the southeast coast of India varied from 0.19% to 7.73%. Higher TOM content and lower median particle diameter could be attributed to the influence of higher riverine flow. Higher values were observed at 100 m depth and above (average 5.29%) and lower values in shallower depths below 100 m (average 3.07%). In the Principal Coordinate Analysis (PCO), the first two axes explained about 83.1% of the total variability. The direction of the vector representing total organic matter was towards 150 m depth. In the Canonical Analysis of Principal Coordinates (CAP) done to confirm the above pattern, the canonical correlation value obtained for the first axis was high (0.9999). The same for the second axis was 0.9995. The direction of the axis representing TOM in this analysis was towards the 100 m depth truly reflecting higher TOM level recorded here (average TOM at 100 m depth-5.81% and at 150 m depth-5.33%). The percentage of samples allocated to the correct group in CAP was 91.67% (33 out of the 36 samples). As the allocation success of samples is substantially greater around 92%, the CAP is explaining greater percentage of variability of TOM than PCO and was found to be quite useful for studies of this nature.

  6. Chriolepis prolata, a new species of Atlantic goby (Teleostei: Gobiidae) from the North American continental shelf.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Philip A; Findley, Lloyd T

    2015-01-08

    A new species of seven-spined goby of the genus Chriolepis is described from five specimens collected from the continental shelf of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean off South Carolina in depths of ca 54 to 110 m. The "Platform Goby", Chriolepis prolata, is distinguishable from all other western Atlantic species currently assigned to the genus Chriolepis and the morphologically similar genus Varicus in having pelvic-fin rays one through four branched, the fifth (innermost) pelvic-fin ray unbranched and relatively long (longer than the second ray to longer than all other pelvic-fin rays); most lateral body scales ctenoid, extending anteriorly in a wedge to a level anterior to the first dorsal-fin insertion or nearly to the pectoral-fin axil, with two or more rows of small cycloid scales extending anteriorly to near the pectoral-fin axil, cycloid scales along the bases of the dorsal and anal fins, and no scales on the belly; and the first two anal-fin pterygiophores inserted anterior to the first haemal spine. It closely resembles C. bilix but differs from that species which has a scaled belly, a shorter fifth pelvic-fin ray, prolonged dorsal-fin spines and smaller teeth in the lower jaw. An earlier report of C. bilix from Florida waters apparently refers to C. prolata. 

  7. Functional feeding responses of piscivorous fishes from the northeast US continental shelf.

    PubMed

    Moustahfid, H; Tyrrell, M C; Link, J S; Nye, J A; Smith, B E; Gamble, R J

    2010-08-01

    The functional feeding response forms of piscivorous fishes used in multispecies and ecosystem modeling have been questioned because they were mostly conjectural or solely based on laboratory studies. Here, we investigate the functional feeding response of seven species of piscivorous fishes on four species of their prey from the northeast US continental shelf using field data that spans 30 years. Our study confirmed that Holling's types II and III functional responses are the most common functional responses for piscivorous fishes in this region. However, our analyses also revealed that differences exist between piscivorous fishes' functional responses, and, therefore, combining functional responses of piscivores is probably not appropriate in multispecies and ecosystem modeling. In the absence of specific predator-prey functional responses, we suggest that, for cruising, actively attacking predators, a type II functional response is slightly preferable; for a sedentary, ambush predator, a type III functional response is slightly preferable; at low prey densities for a generic fish predator, a type III functional response should be used; and at moderate to high prey densities, either should work sufficiently. Because we have shown that the functional response of a particular predator to individual prey species varies, these relationships must be further evaluated as we continue to develop and employ multispecies and ecosystem modeling.

  8. Maps Showing Distribution of Heavy Minerals on the South Texas Outer Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shideler, Gerald L.; Flores, Romeo M.

    1976-01-01

    Heavy minerals constitute a natural resource which, under proper conditions, could have potential economic significance. The purpose of this report is to describe the heavy-mineral distribution in sea-floor sediments On the South Texas Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) within the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. The South Texas OCS encompasses approximately 24,500 sq km extending southward from Matagorda Bay to the U.S.-Mexico border (fig. 1). In a shoreward direction, the OCS extends from the 180-m isobath to the Federal-State water boundary (16.6 km offshore); however, the mineral distribution patterns presented in these maps have been extrapolated slightly shoreward of the l5-m isobath. This work was part of a regional environmental studies program in the South Texas OCS that was conducted in conjunction with the offshore petroleum-lease sales, under the auspices of the U.S. Bureau of Land Management. Some previous work on heavy minerals within the OCS had been done by van Andel and Poole (1960) and van Andel (1960); the fOrIner work was based on relatively few OCS samples and was part of a broader regional study of the northern Gulf of Mexico.

  9. Influences of salt structures on reservoir rocks in block L-2, Dutch continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Dronkert, H. ); Remmelts, G. )

    1993-09-01

    In the subsurface of the Netherlands Continental Shelf, thick layers of Zechstein salt have developed into salt domes and ridges that pierce through the overlying formations. To measure the range of lateral influence of the salt in these structures on the sandstone reservoir rocks of the Mesozoic sequence, a cementation model was developed. The target area, Block L-2, was chosen for the presence of salt domes, wells, and reservoir rocks. The L-2 case study has been performed on two Triassic sandstone intervals. The lower, Volpriehausen, sandstone showed halite cementation in one well, located within several 100 m from a salt dome. Four other wells, located more than 1.5 km from a salt structure, did not show any signs of halite cementation. Therefore, the lateral influence of salt domes on the surrounding reservoir rock is, in this case, limited to less than 1.5 km at 3-4 km depth. A slightly shallower Triassic sandstone (Detfurth) shows more frequent halite cementation. This cementation can be attributed to early seepage from overlying Rot salt brines.Triassic Rot salt is present above depletion areas of the Zechstein salt structures, and in such a way the seepage can be seen as an indirect influence of the salt structures.

  10. Model for the Formation and Evolution of Sand Ridges on the Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, Juan Mario

    1992-01-01

    A model for the formation and evolution of three -dimensional sedimentary structures such as longshore sand ridges, on the continental shelf in water deeper than that of the shoaling region, is proposed. The model is based on the interaction between surficial or internal weakly nonlinear shallow water waves having weak span-wise spatial dependence and the bottom topography. While these ridges are not the result of a single formative agent, it is argued that the mechanism proposed in this study does contribute significantly to their generation and evolution. Testing the hypothesis, however, is as difficult as formulating it. Comparisons of this model with oceanographic data must wait for sufficient data to become available. In conjunction with developing the sand ridge model, this study proposes a new mathematical equation, properties of which are explored here in some detail. This equation potentially applies to other physical processes and raises questions which are themselves good avenues for further research. The numerical implementation of the model combines fixed point methods with finite difference techniques, resulting in a scheme which is found to be superior to conventional finite difference techniques in economy of computational resources and speed. Details of the scheme's inner workings and its performance are included.

  11. Observed and modeled mixed-layer variability on the continental shelf of Sardinia (Western Mediterranean)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onken, Reiner

    2016-04-01

    An important task of Military Oceanography is the prediction of mixed-layer properties and their spatial and temporal variability. In the mainframe of the REP14-MED sea trial which was conducted under the lead of CMRE in June 2014 in the waters west of Sardinia, an oceanographic mooring was deployed on the continental shelf which recorded the seawater temperature between the surface and 40-m depth with high resolution for about twelve days; meteorological parameters were collected at the same time on top of the mooring by a meteorological buoy. A series of ROMS model runs was conducted and validated against the observations. Those runs applied different setups for the forcing at the lateral open boundaries and at the surface, different arrangements of the vertical coordinates, and different strategies for the assimilation of data from CTD casts and gliders. The goal was to test the sensitivity of the forecast skill to the different setups and to find a "cheap" setup which predicts the observed temperature and the mixed-layer depth and their temporal variabilities to a satisfactory degree. That setup is supposed to provide also reliable forecasts for the other areas of the model domain.

  12. A preliminary assessment of geologic framework and sediment thickness studies relevant to prospective US submission on extended continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchinson, Deborah R.; Childs, Jonathan R.; Hammar-Klose, Erika; Dadisman, Shawn; Edgar, N. Terrence; Barth, Ginger A.

    2004-01-01

    Under the provisions of Articles 76 and 77 of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS), coastal States have sovereign rights over the continental shelf territory beyond 200-nautical mile (nm) from the baseline from which the territorial sea is measured if certain conditions are met regarding the geologic and physiographic character of the legal continental shelf as defined in those articles. These claims to an extended continental shelf must be supported by relevant bathymetric, geophysical and geological data according to guidelines established by the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf (CLCS, 1999). In anticipation of the United States becoming party to UNCLOS, Congress in 2001 directed the Joint Hydrographic Center/Center for Coastal and Ocean Mapping at the University of New Hampshire to conduct a study to evaluate data relevant to establishing the outer limit of the juridical continental shelf beyond 200 nm and to recommend what additional data might be needed to substantiate such an outer limit (Mayer and others, 2002). The resulting report produced an impressive and sophisticated GIS database of data sources. Because of the short time allowed to complete the report, all seismic reflection data were classified together; the authors therefore recommended that USGS perform additional analysis on seismic and related data holdings. The results of this additional analysis are the substance of this report, including the status of geologic framework, sediment isopach research, and resource potential in the eight regions1 identified by Mayer and others (2002) where analysis of seismic data might be crucial for establishing an outer limit . Seismic reflection and refraction data are essential in determining sediment thickness, one of the criteria used in establishing the outer limits of the juridical continental shelf. Accordingly, the initial task has been to inventory public-domain seismic data sources, primarily those regionally

  13. Collision of a loop current anticyclonic ring against the continental shelf slope of the western Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, VíCtor M. V.; Vidal, Francisco V.; PéRez-Molero, José M.

    1992-02-01

    A Loop Current anticyclonic ring ˜330 km in diameter and extending to a depth of >1500 m was observed to collide in January of 1984 against the continental shelf slope of the western Gulf of Mexico between 21.5° and 23°N. The collision occurred precisely at the time we conducted our Argos 84-1 hydrographic cruise in the western gulf (26°00' to 19°20'N) aboard the R/V Justo Sierra. The Caribbean Subtropical Underwater (SUW) was used as a tracer to identify the Loop Current anticyclonic ring within the western gulf. The collision was identified from temperature and salinity distributions and from the dynamic topography distribution relative to 500 m. The ring's collision zone was identified by the presence of a horizontal baroclinic flow divergence, to the east of Tamiahua, that divides the surface circulation into northward and southward baroclinic currents parallel to the western gulf's continental shelf break, with speeds of 85 and 32 cm s-1, respectively. Horizontal divergence and vertical convergence (ring asymmetries) resulted at the focus of the anticyclonic ring's collision and originated the alongshore self advection and northward translation of the colliding anticyclone. Upon colliding the anticyclonic ring shed approximately one third of its volume (˜2 × 104 km3), mass, and transferred angular momentum to the south flanking water mass, thus generating a cyclonic ring to the south of the collision zone. The observed alongshelf southward current results from mass conservation and volume continuity requirements associated with the anticyclonic ring's volume shedding and most probably constitutes the colliding ring's potential vorticity conservation mechanism. The weakening of the anticyclonic ring's relative vorticity due to the collision is most likely made up by gain of vorticity from lateral shear in the northward and southward current jets parallel to the continental shelf break. The core of both the anticyclonic and cyclonic rings had typical SUW

  14. Comparison of remotely sensed continental-shelf wave spectra with spectra computed by using a wave refraction computer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, L. R.

    1976-01-01

    An initial attempt was made to verify the Langley Research Center and Virginia Institute of Marine Science mid-Atlantic continental-shelf wave refraction model. The model was used to simulate refraction occurring during a continental-shelf remote sensing experiment conducted on August 17, 1973. Simulated wave spectra compared favorably, in a qualitative sense, with the experimental spectra. However, it was observed that most of the wave energy resided at frequencies higher than those for which refraction and shoaling effects were predicted, In addition, variations among the experimental spectra were so small that they were not considered statistically significant. In order to verify the refraction model, simulation must be performed in conjunction with a set of significantly varying spectra in which a considerable portion of the total energy resides at frequencies for which refraction and shoaling effects are likely.

  15. Oil-spill risk analysis: Gulf of Mexico (Proposed Lease Sales 131/135/137) Outer Continental Shelf. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hannon, L.J.; LaBelle, R.P.; Lear, E.M.

    1991-09-01

    The Federal Government has proposed to offer Outer Continental Shelf lands in the Gulf of Mexico for oil and gas leasing. Because oil spills may occur from activities associated with offshore oil production, the Minerals Management Service conducts a formal risk assessment. In evaluating the significance of accidental oil spills, it is important to remember that the occurrence of such spills is fundamentally probabilistic. The effects of oil spills that could occur during oil and gas production must be considered. The report summarizes results of an oil spill risk analysis conducted for the proposed Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf Lease Sales 131/135/137. The objective of this analysis was to estimate relative risks associated with oil and gas production for the proposed lease sales.

  16. Influence of the Atchafalaya River on recent evolution of the chenier-plain inner continental shelf, northern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Draut, A.E.; Kineke, G.C.; Velasco, D.W.; Allison, M.A.; Prime, R.J.

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the influence of the Atchafalaya River, a major distributary of the Mississippi River, on stratigraphic evolution of the inner continental shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Sedimentary, geochemical, and shallow acoustic data are used to identify the western limit of the distal Atchafalaya subaqueous delta, and to estimate the proportion of the Atchafalaya River's sediment load that accumulates on the inner shelf seaward of Louisiana's chenier-plain coast. The results demonstrate a link between sedimentary facies distribution on the inner shelf and patterns of shoreline accretion and retreat on the chenier plain. Mudflat progradation on the eastern chenier-plain coast corresponds to the location of deltaic mud accumulation on the inner shelf. On the central chenier-plain shelf, west of the subaqueous delta, relict sediment is exposed that was originally deposited between ???1200 and 600 years BP during activity of the Lafourche lobe of the Mississippi Delta complex. Mass-balance calculations indicate that the eastern chenier-plain inner shelf and coastal zone form a sink for 7??2% of the sediment load carried by the Atchafalaya River. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neotectonics and basin development at a continental/island arc transition in the Western Alaska Peninsula shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomb, K.R.

    1985-01-01

    A transition in shelf structure occurs between the eastern Alaska Peninsula and the Aleutians. In the east, compressive structures striking parallel to the margin characterize the outer shelf off of Kodiak, Chirikov, and Semidi Islands. Further to the west, multichannel seismic (MSC) data exhibit a systematic transition in style of deformation and orientation of recently active structures in the shelf region of the Shumagin and Sanak Islands. In this area, deformation near the trench slope break is manifested by drapelike folds and normal faults striking parallel to the margin. In contrast, further west between the Shumagin and Sanak Island, MCS profiles for the shelf region reveal basement-involved extensional structures transverse to the margin that have controlled the development of the Sanak and East Sanak Basis. These fault bounded basins have hanging wall sequences with syndepositional rotational displacements over normal faults, indicating a protracted history of extensional faulting and basin subsidence. Present displacement is indicated by the effects of many of the faults upon the uppermost basin and shelf strata, which in some cases offset the sea floor. The aforementioned systematic change in shelf structure of the Alaska Peninsula is coincident with an arcward shift in bathymetric contours of the trench and slope. This transition zone, from margin-parallel compressive structures in the east, to margin-transverse extensional structures in the west, coincides with the continental to island arc transition in the North American plate that reflects the ancient Beringian margin of western Alaska.

  18. Arctic summary report: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities in the Arctic and their onshore impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, C.; Slitor, D. L.; Rudolph, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    Issues and developments occuring in the Arctic Outer Continental Shelf subregion are discussed. The geology and hydrocarbon potential of the Diapir Field petroleum provinces are detailed. Recent lease sales, exploration activities, and the first development proposals for offshore areas of the North slope are considered. Issues relating to transporting resources from production islands to shore and various proposals for moving Arctic hydrocarbons to market are presented. Production projects onshore and possible support bases for offshore activity are also examined.

  19. Monitoring estuarine circulation and ocean waste dispersion using an integrated satellite-aircraft-drogue approach. [Continental Shelf and Delaware Bay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klemas, V. (Principal Investigator); Davis, G. R.; Wang, H.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An integrated satellite-aircraft-drogue approach was developed which employs remotely tracked expendable drogues together with satellite and aircraft observations of oil slicks, waste plumes, and natural tracers, such as suspended sediment. Tests conducted on the Continental Shelf and in Delaware Bay indicate that the system provides a cost effective means of monitoring current circulation and verifying oil slick and ocean waste dispersion models even under severe environmental conditions.

  20. An anomalous near-bottom cross-shelf intrusion of slope water on the southern New England continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullman, D. S.; Codiga, D. L.; Pfeiffer-Herbert, A.; Kincaid, C. R.

    2014-03-01

    Hydrographic surveys and moored observations in Rhode Island Sound (RIS) in water depths of 30-50 m, off the southern New England coast, revealed a near-bottom intrusion of anomalously warm and saline water in late fall 2009. The properties of this water mass, with peak salinity of nearly 35, are typical of slope water that is normally found offshore of the shelfbreak front, located approximately 100 km to the south. The slope water intrusion, with a horizontal spatial scale of about 45 km, appears to have been brought onto the outer shelf during the interaction of a Gulf Stream warm core ring with the shelfbreak east (upshelf) of RIS. The along-shelf transport rate of the intrusion can be explained as due to advection by the mean outer-shelf along-isobath current, although the transit time of the intrusion is also consistent with the self-advection of a dense bolus on a sloping shelf. The mechanism responsible for the large onshore movement of the intrusion from the outer shelf is not entirely clear, although a wind-driven upwelling circulation appeared to be responsible for its final movement into the RIS region. Depth-averaged salinity at all RIS mooring sites increased by 0.5-1 over the 3-4 week intrusion period suggesting that the intrusion mixed irreversibly, at least partially, with the ambient shelf water. The mixing of the salty intrusion over the shelf indicates that net cross-isobath fluxes of salt and other water properties have occurred.

  1. Sediments, structural framework, petroleum potential, environmental conditions, and operational considerations of the United States South Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1975-01-01

    The area designated for possible oil and gas lease sale in Bureau of Land Management memorandum 3310 #43 (722) and referred to therein as part of the United States South Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) contains about 98,000 square kilometres of the continental margin seaward of the 3 mile offshore limit and within the 600 metre isobath. The designated area, offshore of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, encompasses parts of three physiographic provinces: the Continental Shelf, the Florida-Hatteras Slope, and the Blake Plateau. The structural framework of the U.3. South Atlantic region is dominated by the Southeast Georgia Embayment --an east-plunging depression recessed into the Atlantic Coastal Plain and shelf between Cape Fear, North Carolina and Jacksonville, Florida. The embayment is bounded to the north by the Cape Fear Arch and to southeast by the Peninsular Arch. Refraction data indicate a minor basement(?) ridge beneath the outer shelf between 30? and 32?N at 80?W. Drill hole data also suggest a gentle fold or accretionary structure (reef?) off the east coast of Florida. Several other structural features have been identified by refraction and reflection techniques and drilling. These are the Yamacraw Uplift, Burton High, Stone Arch, and the Suwannee Channel. Gravity and magnetic anomalies within the area probably result from emplacement of magma bodies along linear features representing fundamental crustal boundaries. Of these anomalies, the most prominent, is a segment of the East Coast Magnetic Anomaly which crosses the coast at Brunswick, Georgia. This anomaly has been interpreted as representing an ancient continental boundary where two formerly separate continental plates collided and were welded together. There may be as much as 5,000 m of sedimentary rocks in the Southeast Georgia Embayment out to the 600 m isobath. Basement rocks beneath the Southeast Georgia Embayment are expected to be similar to those exposed in the

  2. Currents and water characteristics around the West Flower Garden Bank. [West Flower Garden Bank, coral reef, Texas continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Horne, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The West Flower Garden Bank is a coral reef on the Texas Continental shelf. The corals on the bank are vulnerable to sediment contamination and to excess turbidity in the overlying water column. Concern for the environmental impact on this and other banks in the region exposed to nearby hydrocarbon production prompted the Bureau of Land Management to fund a data collection effort on the Texas/Louisiana shelf which provided the data analyzed here. Data analyzed includes profiles of velocity, temperature and salinity taken around the Bank in Oct., 1980 and March, 1981. Fixed current meter moorings and a dye experiment conducted in the bottom boundary layer provided additional input. The data reveals a very complicated flow regime around the bank, with some intensification of flow around and over the bank but no movement of water from the bottom of the surrounding shelf up onto the bank.

  3. Environmental risk assessment of the Moroccan Atlantic continental shelf: the role of the industrial and urban area.

    PubMed

    Maanan, Mohamed; Zourarah, Bendahhou; Sahabi, Mohamed; Maanan, Mehdi; Le Roy, Pascal; Mehdi, Khalid; Salhi, Fouad

    2015-04-01

    The present research presents the first large-scale analysis of heavy metal assessment in the Moroccan Atlantic shelf. This work provides scientific basis for future studies on environmental research and fills the gap in knowledge on the worldwide continental platforms. Metal distributions identified three different zones, mainly influenced by industrial and urban sewer (northern areas), agriculture runoffs (central zone), and estuarine discharges (southern areas), respectively. In the north part of the shelf, metal enrichments are observed near industrial and urban sewer mouths (Casablanca and Mohammedia cities). In the south and central areas, the probable absence of human impact on sediments is attributed to effective trapping in the estuary (Oum Er Rbia) and coastal zones, as well as dilution with less contaminated sediments and shelf sediments and removal with fine fractions due to estuary discharges.

  4. Flux of energy and essential elements through the Continental Shelf ecosystem. Progress report, June 1, 1983-May 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, L.R.

    1983-12-01

    The summer of 1981 was one of unusually intense intrusion of cold Gulf Stream subsurface water onto the southeastern continental shelf, not only off northern Florida, where summer intrusions are frequent, but off Georgia as well. Numbers of free bacteria were 10/sup 6//ml over most of the continental shelf throughout the period of observation. These high numbers, an order of magnitude above usual numbers for the outer shelf, were associated with both newly arrived intrusions and old, stranded intrusions. Our third study of the coastal water and coastal front (FRNFLX II) in April 1981 showed that microbial numbers and heterotrophic activity are quite uniformly and continuously high in the coastal water and in water on both sides of the coastal front. Heterotrophic uptake of glucose shows that microorganisms are not substrate limited but probably are limited by protozoan grazers. The populations appear to be in steady state at high rates of production. Numbers of bacteria attached to particles are high in the coastal water compared with the water of the outer shelf, even during periods of Gulf Stream intrusion. 21 references, 11 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Oil-spill risk analysis: Central and western Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf, Lease Sales 139 and 141. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.R.; Lear, E.M.

    1992-02-01

    The Federal Government has proposed to offer Outer Continental Shelf lands in the Gulf of Mexico for oil and gas leasing. Because oil spills may occur from activities associated with offshore oil production, the Minerals Management Service conducts a formal risk assessment. The effects of oil spills that could occur during oil and gas production must be considered. The report summarizes results of an oil spill risk analysis conducted for the proposed Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf Lease Sales 139 and 141.

  6. Aeromagnetic and gravity investigations of the Coastal Area and Continental Shelf of Liberia, West Africa, and their relation to continental drift

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behrendt, John C.; Wotorson, Cletus S.

    1970-01-01

    An aeromagnetic survey has shown the existence of several basins in which magnetic basement depths are greater than 5 km on the continental shelf off Liberia. Magnetic diabase of 176 to 192 m.y. (Jurassic) in age intruding the Paleozoic (?) rocks and overlain by younger rocks onshore requires the distinction between “magnetic basement” and “basement.” Several lines of evidence suggest that the Paleozoic(?) rocks are less than 1 km thick; this implies that the diabase does not introduce a large error in depth-to-basement estimates. The dikes or their extrusive equivalents are traceable, on the basis of the magnetic data, beneath the younger sedimentary rock in the basins to the edge of the continental slope. The magnetic data also delineate a second zone of diabase dikes 90 km inland, parallel to the coast, which cross the entire country. The intrusion of the younger dikes probably coincides with rifting at the beginning of the separation of Africa and South America, and the associated magnetic anomaly zones appear to be parallel with and continuous into the anomaly bands in the Atlantic. A major northeast-trending break in the magnetic fabric intersects the coast near 9° W. and is associated with Eburnean age rocks (about 2000 m.y.) to the southeast as contrasted with Liberian-age rocks (about 2700 m.y.) to the northwest. Change in magnetic fabric direction inland from northeast to northwest in the coastal area allows recognition of a boundary between the Liberian-age rocks inland and Pan-African-age (about 550 m.y.) rocks in the coastal area northwest of about 9° 20'W. Sets of north-northwest-and west-northwest—trending faults of 1 to 2 km vertical displacement cut the Cretaceous sedimentary rocks onshore and can be traced into the offshore basins. Vertical displacements of several kilometers in the magnetic basement underlying the continental shelf suggest a pattern of block faulting all along the coast and continental shelf. Negative Bouguer

  7. Hurricane Sandy's Fingerprint: Ripple Bedforms at an Inner Continental Shelf Sorted Bedform Field Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DuVal, C.; Trembanis, A. C.; Beaudoin, J. D.; Schmidt, V. E.; Mayer, L. A.

    2013-12-01

    The hydrodynamics and seabed morphodynamics on the inner continental shelf and near shore environments have increasing relevance with continued development of near shore structures, offshore energy technologies and artificial reef construction. Characterizing the stresses on and response of the seabed near and around seabed objects will inform best practices for structural design, seabed mine and unexploded ordnance detection, and archaeological and benthic habitat studies. As part of an ONR funded project, Delaware's Redbird Reef is being studied for object scour and sorted bedform morphodynamics (Trembanis et al., in press). Central to this study are the effects of large storm events, such as Hurricane Sandy, which have had significant impact on the seafloor. Previous studies of inner shelf bedform dynamics have typically focused on near bed currents and bed stressors (e.g. Trembanis et al., 2004), sorted bedforms (e.g. Green et al., 2004) and object scour (e.g. Quinn, 2006; Trembanis et al., 2007; Mayer et al., 2007), but our understanding of the direct effects of objects and object scour on bedform morphodynamics is still incomplete. With prominent sorted bedform ripple fields, the Delaware Redbird artificial reef site, composed of 997 former New York City subway cars, as well as various military vehicles, tugboats, barges and ballasted tires, has made an ideal study location (Raineault et al., 2013 and 2011). Acoustic mapping of the Redbird reef three days prior to Sandy and two days after the following nor'easter, captured the extensive effects of the storms to the site, while acoustic Doppler current profilers characterized both the waves and bottom currents generated by the storm events. Results of the post-Sandy survey support the theory of sorted bedform evolution proposed by Murray and Thieler (2004). Acoustic imagery analysis indicates a highly energized and mobile bed during the storms, leading to self-organization of bedforms and creation of large

  8. A century of oceanographic and fisheries exploration on the continental shelf off Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelescu, V.; Sánchez, R. P.

    1995-03-01

    A detailed analysis is presented of the main contributions, both local and international, to the fields of oceanography and fishery sciences resulting from exploratory cruises carried out on the continental shelf off Argentina over the last 100 years. The end of the 19th century is chosen as a starting point for this analysis as it marks the beginning of active marine research by Argentinian scientists and an accumulation of information on Antarctic and Subantarctic organisms in foreign journals. Mention is also made of previous contributions derived from the classic expeditions and global circumnavigational voyages during the 18th and 19th centuries. Although the aims of those were not always strictly oceanographic, they rendered significant information to this field of knowledge. In the early years, references arose mainly from the particular geographic situation of the Argentinian shelf, a necessary passage in the navigation routes to the Pacific Ocean, and later on the way to Antarctica. Sources of information are divided into four categories: (a) foreign scientific projects in the area; (b) investigation by Argentinian scientists and research vessels; (c) joint projects between Argentinian and foreign institutions; and (d) contributions from sources other than oceanographic cruises (commercial navigation, maritime weather reports, satellite images, etc.). The analysis includes an updated and classified bibliographical list of the main contributions to the fields of oceanography and fishery sciences derived from those sources, published either in international or local journals or appearing as technical and internal reports. The motivations, objectives and main achievements of foreign surveys and programmes in the area and their impact on local scientific progress are discussed. The early sixties mark a turning point in the evolution of international research in the area. The creation of biological stations along the Argentinian coast, and the support given to

  9. Interactions between Freshwater Input, Light, and Phytoplankton Dynamics on the Louisiana Continental Shelf.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Light attenuation (kd), chlorophyll a (chl a), and primary production (PP) were measured across the Louisiana shelf, encompassing the area of the shelf where summer hypoxia forms, on 7 spring/summer cruises from 2005 to 2007. Shelf-wide average kd (1/m) co-varied with Mississipp...

  10. On the distribution of dissolved lead in the Loire estuary and the North Biscay continental shelf, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waeles, Matthieu; Riso, Ricardo D.; Maguer, Jean-François; Guillaud, Jean-François; Le Corre, Pierre

    2008-07-01

    The dissolved lead was studied in the whole salinity gradient of the system composed of the Loire estuary and the North Biscay continental shelf. About 130 samples were collected in winter 2001 and spring 2002 during Nutrigas and Gasprod campaigns (Programme PNEC-Golfe de Gascogne, RV Thalassa) and metal measurements were conducted on board by Potentiometric Stripping Analysis. In the Loire estuary, levels of dissolved lead ranged from 0.15 to 0.24 nM and from 0.04 to 0.26 nM in winter and spring, respectively. Compared to the concentrations reported in 1987 and 1990 (0.4-1.7 nM; Boutier, B., Chiffoleau, J.F., Auger, D., Truquet, I., 1993. Influence of the Loire river on dissolved lead and cadmium concentrations in coastal waters of Brittany. Estuar. Coast. Shelf S., 36:133-143, Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science 36, 133-143) our study indicated much lower values. The fall in concentration in the estuary could be attributed to the stopping of activity of Octel, a big manufacturer of tetra alkyl lead. Discharge in dissolved metal to the continental shelf by the Loire river was assessed as 7.5 and 1.9 kg day - 1 for winter and spring, respectively. On the continental shelf, levels of dissolved lead varied within 0.06 and 0.27 nM in winter (0.15 ± 0.06 nM, sd = 1.96, n = 49), whereas concentrations measured in spring were in the range 0.06-0.17 nM (0.09 ± 0.03 nM, sd = 1.96, n = 60). This difference in metal concentration was related to the amounts of rainfall that have fallen over the continental shelf: estimations of inputs by this way (74 and 32 kg day - 1 in winter and spring, respectively) appeared to be significantly higher than inputs from the Loire river (7.5 and 1.9 kg day - 1 in winter and spring, respectively). The distributions of dissolved metal in the surface waters highlighted the role of suspended particular matter (SPM) for a rapid "trapping" of lead near the mouth of the estuary. The vertical distributions showed, in the stratified area, a

  11. Trend and dynamic cause of sediment particle size on the adjacent continental shelf of the Yangtze Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yun-ping; Zhang, Ming-jin; Li, Yi-tian; Fan, Yong-yang

    2016-12-01

    Based on the measured data in recent 20 years, the variation trends of the median grain size of the surface sediment, the sand-silt boundary and the mud area on the adjacent continental shelf of the Yangtze Estuary were analyzed in depth, and the effects of natural mechanism and human activities were discussed. The results show that: (1) In recent years (2006-2013), the median grain size of sediment and the distribution pattern of grouped sediments in the adjacent continental shelf area to the Yangtze Estuary have presented no obvious change compared with those before 2006; (2) The median diameter of the surface sediment in the continental shelf area displayed a coarsening trend with the decrease of sediment discharge from the basin and the drop in suspended sediment concentration in the shore area; (3) In 2004-2007, the sand-silt boundary in the north part (31°30'N) of the continental shelf area presented no significant changes, while that in the south part (31°30'S) moved inwards; In 2008-2013, both the sand-silt boundaries in the north and south parts of the continental shelf area moved inwards, mainly due to the fact that in the dry season, a relatively enhanced hydrodynamic force of the tides was generated in the Yangtze River, as well as a decreased suspended sediment concentration and a flow along the banks in North Jiangsu; (4) The mud area where the maximum deposition rate is found in the Yangtze Estuary, tends to shrink due to the drop in sediment discharge from the basin, and the decrease in suspended sediment concentration in the shore area and erosion in the delta. Moreover, it tended to shift to the south at the same time because the implement of the training works on the deep-water channel of the North Passage changed the split ratio between the North and South Passages with an increase in the power of the discharged runoff in the South Passage.

  12. Inventory and burial fluxes of Black Carbon in the Swedish continental shelf sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-García, L.; Cato, I.; Gustafsson, Ö.

    2009-04-01

    Highly condensed black carbon (BC) particles, mainly derived from incomplete combustion of biomass and fossil fuel, are involved in several important processes in the biogeosphere [1], including sedimentary carbon burial, sequestration of organic pollutants in soils and sediments, affecting Earth's radiative heat balance and even human respiratory health. BC is commonly found to constitute several to 20% of total sedimentary carbon, and thus plays an important but poorly constrained role in the global biogeospheric carbon cycle. Sequestration of biogenic carbon as BC is a direct sink of the element from the rapidly cycling atmosphere-biosphere reservoirs, whereas burial of petrogenic/fossil BC is simply a conversion of one form of geological carbon to another [2]. Considerable emphasis has been made on the relevant role this recalcitrant form of organic matter (OM) may play on the global C cycle and yet large uncertainty exists around BC detection and quantification. This work seeks to provide a large-scale estimate of the reservoir and burial sink flux of BC in sediments from the extensive Swedish continental shelf (SCS), as a first approach to global inventories. To this end, a total of 120 sediment samples were collected from the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) along the ?2000 km SCS stretch. The most recalcitrant fraction of the sedimentary OM was isolated and determined by means of a commonly applied method in biogeochemical studies of soils and sediments: chemo-thermal oxidation at 375˚ C in air (CTO-375). The obtained BC concentration was used to estimate the inventory and burial flux of BC in the SCS surface sediments, following [3], which takes into account key geophysical and geochemical properties of the nine distinct sedimentary regimes of the SCS that was separately assessed. Globally representative values of the sediment properties (e.g. density of dried sediments, bioturbated mixing depth, sedimentation rate or porosity over the mixed depth) were

  13. The Bay of Bengal and the Statement of Understanding Concerning the Establishment of the Outer Edge of the Continental Margin: Regional Implications for Delimiting the Juridical Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mridha, M.; Varma, H.; Macnab, R.

    2005-12-01

    The Bay of Bengal is the site of massive depositions of sediment from the Ganga-Brahmaputra river systems, which discharge an estimated 2300 million tons of material into the Indian Ocean every year. The accumulated material comprises an enormous fan that extends some 4000 km from the Mouths of the Ganges, a delta system which encompasses the entire coast of Bangladesh and a segment of the coast of India. The major tectonic elements of the Bay of Bengal and surrounding areas are: the passive eastern continental margin of India; the 85E Ridge; the Ninetyeast Ridge; the intervening basin buried beneath deep sediment; and the Sunda Arc system with the associated back-arc Andaman Basin. Except for the Nikitin Seamounts which rise above the seabed just south of the Equator, the 85E Ridge is totally covered by thick sediment. The Ninetyeast Ridge, on the other hand, protrudes above the seabed as far north as 10N, where it plunges beneath the thickening sediment and separates the deposits into the Bengal Fan and the smaller Nicobar Fan. The 85E and Ninetyeast Ridges present the most significant relief in the crystalline basement underlying the Bay of Bengal, and should therefore figure substantially in any analysis of sediment thickness pursuant to the delimitation of the outer continental shelf. In this region, the sediment thickness provision of Article 76 has been modified by a Statement of Understanding in Annex II of the Final Act of the Third UN Conference on the Law of the Sea. To avoid a perceived inequity that might arise from the application of the standard one percent sediment thickness formula of Article 76, the Statement introduced a new formula: a qualified State in this region, even if it has a narrow physiographic continental shelf, may establish the outer edge of its continental margin by a line where the thickness of sedimentary rock is not less than one km. This presentation will describe the development of a joint formula line for the States that

  14. [Phytoplankton assemblages on the continental shelf of East China Sea in autumn 2006].

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Sun, Jun; An, Bai-zheng; Ni, Xiao-bo; Liu, Su-mei

    2008-11-01

    Based on the survey from November 19 to December 24, 2006, the species composition, assemblage structure, and cell abundance of phytoplankton on the continental shelf of East China Sea (24.0 degrees N- 32.0 degrees N, 120.0 degrees - 128.0 degrees E) were studied. The phytoplankton flora in the survey area included 145 taxa, belonging to 64 genera of 4 classes (including uncertain species). Bacillariophyta was the dominant functional group, followed by Pyrrophyta. The dominant species in turn were Thalassionema nitzschioides, Thalassiosira rotula, Leptocylindrus danicus, Guinardia striata, Pseudo-nitzschia pungens, and Trichodesmium thiebautii. The cell abundance of the phytoplankton ranged from 0.09 to 35.11 cells x ml(-1), with an average of 4.92 cells x ml(-1). In the autumn, Bacillariophyta abundance discriminated the surface pattern of the phytoplankton, and the higher abundance area was located at the northeast part of offshore regions, with the cell abundance reached 30 cells x ml(-1). On the whole, the cell abundance of Bacillariophyta and Pyrrophyta was concentrated in surface water, and it reduced rapidly from surface layer down to the bottom. According to the section distribution, the phytoplankton mainly concentrated in surface water, and also, in the middle and bottom layers for some stations. The average of Shannon-Wiener indices of phytoplankton assemblage was 2.80, with the higher values occurred in the northeast and southeast of the survey area. The average of Pielou' s evenness of phytoplankton assemblage was 0.81, and the higher value was located at the middle of the survey area. The surface horizontal distribution of Shannon-Wiener indices was coincided with that of phytoplankton cell abundance. According to the Pearson correlation analysis, the factors that significantly affected the growth of the phytoplankton were nitrite, dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and temperature.

  15. Geological and technological assessment of artificial reef sites, Louisiana outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pope, D.L.; Moslow, T.F.; Wagner, J.B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the general procedures used to select sites for obsolete oil and gas platforms as artificial reefs on the Louisiana outer continental shelf (OCS). The methods employed incorporate six basic steps designed to resolve multiple-use conflicts that might otherwise arise with daily industry and commercial fishery operations, and to identify and assess both geological and technological constraints that could affect placement of the structures. These steps include: (1) exclusion mapping; (2) establishment of artificial reef planning areas; (3) database compilation; (4) assessment and interpretation of database; (5) mapping of geological and man-made features within each proposed reef site; and (6) site selection. Nautical charts, bathymetric maps, and offshore oil and gas maps were used for exclusion mapping, and to select nine regional planning areas. Pipeline maps were acquired from federal agencies and private industry to determine their general locations within each planning area, and to establish exclusion fairways along each pipeline route. Approximately 1600 line kilometers of high-resolution geophysical data collected by federal agencies and private industry was acquired for the nine planning areas. These data were interpreted to determine the nature and extent of near-surface geologic features that could affect placement of the structures. Seismic reflection patterns were also characterized to evaluate near-bottom sedimentation processes in the vicinity of each reef site. Geotechnical borings were used to determine the lithological and physical properties of the sediment, and for correlation with the geophysical data. Since 1987, five sites containing 10 obsolete production platforms have been selected on the Louisiana OCS using these procedures. Industry participants have realized a total savings of approximately US $1 500 000 in salvaging costs by converting these structures into artificial reefs. ?? 1993.

  16. Spatially Resolving Ocean Color and Sediment Dispersion in River Plumes, Coastal Systems, and Continental Shelf Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aurin, Dirk Alexander; Mannino, Antonio; Franz, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing of ocean color in dynamic coastal, inland, and nearshorewaters is impeded by high variability in optical constituents, demands specialized atmospheric correction, and is limited by instrument sensitivity. To accurately detect dispersion of bio-optical properties, remote sensors require ample signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) to sense small variations in ocean color without saturating over bright pixels, an atmospheric correction that can accommodate significantwater-leaving radiance in the near infrared (NIR), and spatial and temporal resolution that coincides with the scales of variability in the environment. Several current and historic space-borne sensors have met these requirements with success in the open ocean, but are not optimized for highly red-reflective and heterogeneous waters such as those found near river outflows or in the presence of sediment resuspension. Here we apply analytical approaches for determining optimal spatial resolution, dominant spatial scales of variability ("patches"), and proportions of patch variability that can be resolved from four river plumes around the world between 2008 and 2011. An offshore region in the Sargasso Sea is analyzed for comparison. A method is presented for processing Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Aqua and Terra imagery including cloud detection, stray lightmasking, faulty detector avoidance, and dynamic aerosol correction using short-wave- and near-infrared wavebands in extremely turbid regions which pose distinct optical and technical challenges. Results showthat a pixel size of approx. 520 mor smaller is generally required to resolve spatial heterogeneity in ocean color and total suspended materials in river plumes. Optimal pixel size increases with distance from shore to approx. 630 m in nearshore regions, approx 750 m on the continental shelf, and approx. 1350 m in the open ocean. Greater than 90% of the optical variability within plume regions is resolvable with

  17. Consumption by marine mammals on the Northeast U.S. continental shelf.

    PubMed

    Smith, Laurel A; Link, Jason S; Cadrin, Steven X; Palka, Debra L

    2015-03-01

    The economic and ecological impacts of fish consumption by marine mammals, the associated interactions with commercial fish stocks, and the forage demands of these marine mammal populations are largely unknown. Consumption estimates are often either data deficient or not fully evaluated in a rigorous, quantitative manner. Although consumption estimates exist for the Northeast United States (NEUS) Large Marine Ecosystem, there is considerable uncertainty in those estimates. We examined consumption estimates for 12 marine mammal species inhabiting the regional ecosystem. We used sensitivity analyses to examine metabolically driven daily individual consumption rates, resulting in a suite of feasible parameter-pair ranges for each of three taxonomic groups: mysticetes, odontocetes, and pinnipeds. We expanded daily individual consumption to annual consumption based on abundance estimates of marine mammals found on the NEUS continental shelf coupled with estimates of annual residence time for each species. To examine consumptive removals for specific prey, diet compositions were summarized into major prey categories, and predatory removals by marine mammal species as well as for total marine mammal consumption were estimated for each prey taxa. Bounds on consumption estimates for each marine mammal species were determined using Monte Carlo resampling simulations. Our results suggest that consumption for these 12 marine mammal species combined may be similar in magnitude to commercial fishery landings for small pelagic and groundfish prey groups. Consumption by marine mammals warrants consideration both as a source of mortality in assessments of prey-stocks, and to determine marine mammal forage demands in ecosystem assessment models. The approach that we present represents a rigorous, quantitative method to scope the bounds of the biomass that marine mammals are expected to consume, and is appropriate for use in other ecosystems where the interaction between marine

  18. Evidence of post-Pleistocene faults on New Jersey Atlantic outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheridan, R.E.; Knebel, H. J.

    1976-01-01

    Recently obtained high-resolution seismic profiles (400-4,000-Hz band) show evidence of faults in shallow sedimentary strata near the edge of the Atlantic continental shelf off New Jersey. Apparent normal faults having a throw of about 1.5 m displace sediments to within 7 m of the sea floor. The faults appear to be overlain by undeformed horizontal beds of relatively recent age. Several faults 1 to 2 km apart strike approximately N70°E and dip northwest. The data suggest that the faults are upthrown on the southeast. Projection of the faults on the high-resolution profiles to a nearby multichannel seismic-reflection profile indicates that these shallow faults might be the near-surface expression of a more fundamental deep-seated fault. Several prominent reflectors in the multichannel records are offset by a high-angle normal fault reaching depths of 4.0 to 5.0 sec (6.0 to 6.5 km). The deep fault on the multichannel line also is upthrown on the southeast. Throws of as much as 90 m are apparent at depth, but offsets of as much as 10 m could be present in the shallower parts of the section that may not be resolved in the multichannel data. The position and strike of these faults coincide with and parallel the East Coast magnetic anomaly interpreted as the fundamental seaward basement boundary of the Baltimore Canyon trough. Recurring movements along such boundary faults are expected theoretically if the marginal basins are subsiding in response to the plate rotation of North America and seafloor spreading in the Atlantic.

  19. Bathymetry and acoustic backscatter of the mid and outer continental shelf, head of De Soto Canyon, northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, James V.; Hughes-Clarke, John E.; Meyer, Larry A.

    2002-01-01

    The mid to outer continental shelf off Mississippi-Alabama and off northwest Florida were the focus of US Geological Survey (USGS) multibeam echosounder (MBES) mapping cruises in 2000 and 2001, respectively. These areas were mapped to investigate the extent of "deep-water reefs" first suggested by Ludwick and Walton (1957). The reefs off Mississippi and Alabama were initially described in water depths of 60 to 120 m (Ludwick and Walton, 1957) but the 2000 mapping found reef and hardgrounds to be much more extensive than previously thought (Gardner et al., 2001). The persistent trend of reef-like features along the outer shelf of Mississippi-Alabama suggested the trend might continue along the northwest Florida mid and outer shelf so a MBES-mapping effort was mounted in 2001 to test this suggestion. It is critical to determine the accurate location, geomorphology, and types of the ridges and reefs that occur in this region to understand the Quaternary history of the area and to assess their importance as benthic habitats for fisheries. The 2001 survey found a series of shelf-depth platforms with ridges (possibly reefs) constructed on their surfaces (Gardner et al., 2002). The area known as the "head of De Soto Canyon" is the large unmapped region between the 2000 and 2001 mapped areas. The head of De Soto Canyon is an outer shelf zone with a relatively steep western wall and a much gentler eastern wall. It was unknown prior to this cruise whether the reefs of the Mississippi-Alabama shelf continue eastward into the head of De Soto Canyon and connect with the ridges and reefs mapped on the northwest Florida outer shelf. The existence of carbonate-cemented latest Quaternary to Holocene sandstones along the western wall of the head of De Soto Canyon (Shipp and Hopkins, 1978; Benson et al., 1997; W.W. Schroeder, personnel comm., 2002) is of interest because of the potential benthic habitats they may represent. Precisely georeferenced high-resolution mapping of

  20. Long-term observations of bottom current and bottom sediment movement on the mid-Atlantic continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Butman, Bradford; Noble, Marlene A.; Folger, David W.

    1979-01-01

    Long-term in situ observations made at three locations on the mid-Atlantic continental shelf during 1975–1976 clearly show intermittent movement of bottom sediment caused by currents, waves, and other forcing mechanisms. In winter, storm-associated bottom currents greater than 30 cm s−1 resuspended and transported sediments. Net water particle excursions during storms were about 20–30 km longshelf and 5–10 km cross-shelf. Wave-induced bottom currents also resuspended sediments during periods of low mean flow. Sediment motion was observed in summer, although bottom conditions were generally tranquil. Significant changes in suspended matter concentration were observed that were only partially related to bottom currents. These changes may have been caused by biological activity or advection. Bottom currents on the mid-Atlantic region of the continental shelf were characterized by a coherent, primarily cross-shelf tidal flow of 5–10 cm s−1 and a low-frequency longshelf component of 5–20 cm s−1. The longshelf current was coherent over length scales of 100 km at tidal frequencies and for motions with periods greater than 50 hours. For these longer periods the longshelf flow was coherent with wind stress, which implies that winds were a major driving force of the longshelf current. The cross-shelf current was not coherent at stations separated by 100 km except at tidal frequencies. Packets of high-frequency internal waves were observed during stratified conditions in summer with bottom currents as large as 20 cm s−1.

  1. Reconstructing a 180 yr record of natural and anthropogenic induced low-oxygen conditions from Louisiana continental shelf sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osterman, L.E.; Poore, R.Z.; Swarzenski, P.W.; Turner, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    Hypoxia on the Louisiana continental shelf is tied to nutrient Loading and freshwater stratification from the Mississippi River. Variations in the relative abundance of low-oxygen-tolerant benthic foraminifers in four sediment cores from the Louisiana shelf provide a proxy record of low-oxygen events. Core chronologies are obtained using 210Pb dating techniques. The foraminiferal data are consistent with previous studies indicating that the intensity of hypoxic events (oxygen <2 mg /L) has increased over the past 50 yr owing to the higher nutrient loading associated with the use of commercial fertilizer, and also reveal several low-oxygen events between A.D. 1817 and 1910, prior to the widespread use of fertilizer. The pre-1910 low-oxygen events are associated with high Mississippi River discharge rates, indicating that these low-oxygen episodes are related to natural variations in river drainage that enhance transport of nutrients and freshwater to the continental shelf. Our data show that the low-oxygen events of the past few decades were more extreme than any that occurred in the previous ???180 yr, and support the interpretation that the increased use of fertilizer has amplified an otherwise naturally occurring process. ?? 2005 Geological Society of America.

  2. Production and turnover of suspended organic matter in the coastal water of the southeastern continental shelf. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pomeroy, L.R.

    1992-02-15

    Sixteen years of work on the microbial food web of the southeastern shelf and its relation to the production, movement, and fate of organic materials, have helped us understand the roles of microorganisms in that ecosystem. We found that microbial metabolism dominates the flow of energy and materials on the continental shelf, utilizing nearly all available organic matter, except in mid-winter. Bacteria strongly influence the cycle of carbon in continental shelf waters, both by rapidly utilizing organic materials and by promoting aggregation of particulate material. We demonstrated a strong interaction between microorganisms in the water and those in the nearshore bottom sediments. We showed that chelation of copper by dissolved organic ligands in the coastal water protects phytoplankton not only from existing amounts but from much larger amounts. Simulation modeling predicted that there is usually little transfer of energy from the microbial food web to macroorganisms (fishes), an observation that has since been validated by investigators. A complete list of publications, theses and dissertations resulting from this project is provided.

  3. Geologic framework of the northern North Carolina, USA inner continental shelf and its influence on coastal evolution

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thieler, E. Robert; Foster, David S.; Himmelstoss, Emily A.; Mallinson, David J.

    2013-01-01

    The inner continental shelf off the northern Outer Banks of North Carolina was mapped using sidescan sonar, interferometric swath bathymetry, and high-resolution chirp and boomer subbottom profiling systems. We use this information to describe the shallow stratigraphy, reinterpret formation mechanisms of some shoal features, evaluate local relative sea-levels during the Late Pleistocene, and provide new constraints, via recent bedform evolution, on regional sediment transport patterns. The study area is approximately 290 km long by 11 km wide, extending from False Cape, Virginia to Cape Lookout, North Carolina, in water depths ranging from 6 to 34 m. Late Pleistocene sedimentary units comprise the shallow geologic framework of this region and determine both the morphology of the inner shelf and the distribution of sediment sources and sinks. We identify Pleistocene sedimentary units beneath Diamond Shoals that may have provided a geologic template for the location of modern Cape Hatteras and earlier paleo-capes during the Late Pleistocene. These units indicate shallow marine deposition 15–25 m below present sea-level. The uppermost Pleistocene unit may have been deposited as recently as Marine Isotope Stage 3, although some apparent ages for this timing may be suspect. Paleofluvial valleys incised during the Last Glacial Maximum traverse the inner shelf throughout the study area and dissect the Late Pleistocene units. Sediments deposited in the valleys record the Holocene transgression and provide insight into the evolutionary history of the barrier-estuary system in this region. The relationship between these valleys and adjacent shoal complexes suggests that the paleo-Roanoke River did not form the Albemarle Shelf Valley complex as previously proposed; a major fluvial system is absent and thus makes the formation of this feature enigmatic. Major shoal features in the study area show mobility at decadal to centennial timescales, including nearly a kilometer of

  4. Surface and bottom temperature and salinity climatology along the continental shelf off the Canadian and U.S. East Coasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richaud, Benjamin; Kwon, Young-Oh; Joyce, Terrence M.; Fratantoni, Paula S.; Lentz, Steven J.

    2016-08-01

    A new hydrographic climatology has been created for the continental shelf region, extending from the Labrador shelf to the Mid-Atlantic Bight. The 0.2-degree climatology combines all available observations of surface and bottom temperature and salinity collected between 1950 and 2010 along with the location, depth and date of these measurements. While climatological studies of surface and bottom temperature and salinity have been presented previously for various regions along the Canadian and U.S. shelves, studies also suggest that all these regions are part of one coherent system. This study focuses on the coherent structure of the mean seasonal cycle of surface and bottom temperature and salinity and its variation along the shelf and upper slope. The seasonal cycle of surface temperature is mainly driven by the surface heat flux and exhibits strong dependency on latitude (r≈-0.9). The amplitude of the seasonal cycle of bottom temperature is rather dependent on the depth, while the spatial distribution of bottom temperature is correlated with latitude. The seasonal cycle of surface salinity is influenced by several components, such as sea-ice on the northern shelves and river discharge in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The bottom salinity exhibits no clear seasonal cycle, but its spatial distribution is highly correlated with bathymetry, thus Slope Water and its intrusion on the shelf can be identified by its relatively high salinity compared to shallow, fresher shelf water. Two different regimes can be identified, especially on the shelf, separated by the Laurentian Channel: advection influences the phasing of the seasonal cycle of surface salinity and bottom temperature to the north, while in the southern region, river runoff and air-sea heat flux forcing are dominant, especially over the shallower bathymetry.

  5. Modern sedimentation on the shoreface and inner continental shelf at wrightsville beach, North Carolina, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thieler, R.E.; Pilkey, O.H.; Cleary, W.J.; Schwab, W.C.

    2001-01-01

    The geologic framework and surficial morphology of the shoreface and inner continental shelf off the Wrightsville Beach, North Carolina, barrier island were mapped using high-resolution sidescansonar, bathyme??trie, and seismic-reflection surveying techniques, a suite of over 200 diver vibracores, and extensive seafloor observations by divers. The inner shelf is a sediment-starved, active surface of marine erosion; modern sediments, where present, form a patchy veneer over Tertiary and Quaternary units. The lithology of the underlying units exerts a primary control on the distribution, texture, and composition of surficial sediments, as well as inner-shelf bathymetry. The shoreface is dominated by a linear, cross-shore morphology of rippled scour depressions (RSDs) extending from just seaward of the surf zone onto the inner shelf. On the upper shoreface, the RSDs are incised up to l m below surrounding areas of fine sand, and have an asymmetric cross section that is steeper-sided to the north. On the inner shelf, the RSDs have a similar but more subdued cross-sectional profile. The depressions are floored primarily by shell hash and quartz gravel. Vibracore data show a thick (up to 1.5 m) sequence of RSD sediments that unconformably overlies ancient coastal lithosomes. In this sediment-starved inner shelf setting, rippled scour depressions probably form initially on preexisting coarse-sediment substrates such as modern lag deposits of paleofluvial channel lithosomes or ancient tidal inlet thalwegs. Interannual observations of seafloor morphologic change and the longer-term record contained in vibracores suggest that the present seafloor morphology is either relatively stable or represents a recurring, preferential morphologic state to which the seafloor returns after storm-induced perturbations. The apparent stability is interpreted to be the result of interactions at several scales that contribute to a repeating, self-reinforcing pattern of forcing and sedimentary

  6. Geological studies of the COST GE-1 well, United States South Atlantic outer continental shelf area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scholle, Peter A.

    1979-01-01

    The COST No. GE-1 well is the first deep stratigraphic test to be drilled in the southern part of the U.S. Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf (AOCS) area. The well was drilled within the Southeast Georgia Embayment to a total depth of 13,254 ft (4,040 m). It penetrated a section composed largely of chalky limestones to a depth of about 3,300 ft (1,000 m) below the drill platform. Limestones and calcareous shales with some dolomite predominate between 3,300 and 7,200 ft (1,000 and 2,200 m), whereas interbedded sandstones and shales are dominant from 7,200 to 11,000 ft (2,200 to 3,350 m). From 11,000 ft (3,350 m) to the bottom, the section consists of highly indurated to weakly metamorphosed pelitic sedimentary rocks and meta-igneous flows or intrusives. Biostratigraphic examination has shown that the section down to approximately 3,500 ft (1,060 m) is Tertiary, the interval from 3,500 to 5,900 ft (1,060 to 1,800 m) is Upper Cretaceous, and the section from 5,900 to 11,000 ft (1,800 to 3,350 m) is apparently Lower Cretaceous. The indurated to weakly metamorphosed section below 11,000 ft (3,350 m) is barren of fauna or flora but is presumed to be Paleozoic based on radiometric age determinations. Rocks deposited at upper-slope water depths were encountered in the Upper Cretaceous, Oligocene, and Miocene parts of the section. All other units were deposited in outer-shelf to terrestrial environments. Examination of cores, well cuttings, and electric logs shows that potential hydrocarbon-reservoir units are present within the chalks in the uppermost part of the section as well as in sandstone beds to a depth of at least 10,000 ft (3,000 m). Sandstones below that depth, and the metamorphic section between 11,000 and 13.250 ft (3,350 and 4,040 m) have extremely low permeabilities and are unlikely to contain potential reservoir rock. Studies of organic geochemistry, vitrinite reflectance, and color alteration of visible organic matter indicate that the chalk section down to

  7. Records of sedimentary dynamics in the continental shelf and upper slope between Aveiro-Espinho (N Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Virgínia; Abrantes, Isabel; Grangeia, Carlos; Martins, Paula; Nagai, Renata; Sousa, Sílvia H. M.; Laut, Lazaro L. M.; Dias, João M. Alveirinho; Dias, João M.; da Silva, Eduardo Ferreira; Rocha, Fernando

    2012-08-01

    The sedimentary unconsolidated cover of the Aveiro-Espinho continental shelf and upper slope (NW Portugal) records a complex interplay of processes including wave energy and currents, fluvial input, sediment transport alongshore and cross-shelf, geological and oceanographic processes and sediment sources and sinks. In order to study this record, a set of surface sediment samples was studied. Sediment grain size and composition, as well as the mineralogical composition (by XRD) of the fine (< 63 μm) and clay (< 2 μm) fractions and benthic microfaunal (foraminifera) data were analysed. Cluster analysis applied to the sedimentological data (grain size, sediment composition and mineralogy) allowed the establishment of three main zones corresponding to the: inner-, mid- and outer-shelf/upper slope. On the inner-shelf, the sedimentary coverture is composed of siliciclastic fine to very fine sand, essentially comprising modern (immature) terrigenous particles. The sediment grain size, as well as mineralogical and microfaunal composition, denote the high energetic conditions of this sector in which the alongshore transport of sand is predominantly southward and occurs mostly during the spring-summer oceanographic regime, when the main river providing sediments to this area, the River Douro, undergoes periods of drought. This effect may emphasize the erosive character of this coastal sector at present, since the Ria de Aveiro provides the shelf with few sediments. On the mid-shelf, an alongshore siliciclastic band of coarse sand and gravel can be found between the 40 m and 60 m isobaths. This gravelly deposit includes relic sediments deposited during lower sea-level stands. This structure stays on the surface due to the high bottom energy, which promotes the remobilization of the fine-grained sediments, and/or events of sediments bypassing. Benthic foraminifera density and "Benthic Foraminifera High Productivity" (BFHP) proxy values are in general low, which is consistent

  8. Glacial geomorphology of the northwestern Weddell Sea, eastern Antarctic Peninsula continental shelf: Shifting ice flow patterns during deglaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campo, Jennifer M.; Wellner, Julia S.; Domack, Eugene; Lavoie, Caroline; Yoo, Kyu-Cheul

    2017-03-01

    During the Last Glacial Maximum, grounded ice from the expanded Antarctic Peninsula Ice Sheet extended across the continental shelf. Grounded and flowing ice created a distinctive array of glacial geomorphic features on the sea floor, which were then exposed as the ice sheet retreated. The recent disintegration of the northern parts of the Larsen Ice Shelf (Larsen A and B) have permitted acquisition of marine geophysical data in previously inaccessible and unmapped areas. We present a reconstruction of the evolving ice-flow path and ice sheet geometry of the eastern Antarctic Peninsula, with particular focus paid to newly surveyed areas that shed light on the dynamics of a marine-terminating glacial geomorphic environment, where ice shelves play a major role in grounding line stability. Shifting flow directions were mapped in several areas, including across the Seal Nunataks, which divide Larsen A and B, and offshore of Larsen C, indicating flow reorientation that reflects the changing ice sheet geometry as retreat neared the modern coastline. The measured flow indicators in this area reveal comparatively high elongation ratios (> 20), indicating rapid ice flow. Evidence of possible previous ice-shelf collapses are noted near the shelf break, further illustrating the critical, protective effect that ice shelves impart to marine-terminating glacial environments. Modern ice retreat is governed in part by reorganization of flow patterns accompanying grounding line movement; such reorganizations happened in the past and can aid understanding of modern processes.

  9. Sediment-transport events on the northern California continental shelf during the 1990-1991 STRESS experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherwood, C.R.; Butman, B.; Cacchione, D.A.; Drake, D.E.; Gross, T.F.; Sternberg, R.W.; Wiberg, P.L.; Williams, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of currents and light transmission were made at bottom tripods and moorings arrayed across the northern California continental shelf along the Coastal Ocean Dynamics Experiment (CODE) "C" transect as part of the 1990-1991 Sediment Transport Events on Shelves and Slopes (STRESS) experiment. In combination with meteorological and wave data from the National Data Buoy Center Buoy 46013, these measurements provide information about the physical forcing and resultant resuspension and transport of bottom material between 21 November and 8 March. Sixteen events were identified in the wave, wind and current-meter records for this period. Only two were local storms with southerly winds, but they caused about half of the seasonal net transport. Seven were swell events that combined long-period waves generated by distant storms with local currents. At the 90-m site, swells interacted with the mean northward flow to produce northward transport. During six northerly wind events, upwelling-favorable winds often were sufficient to slow or reverse the mean northward flow and thus caused southward transport. A single current event, which produced moderate southward transport, was observed at the 130-m site. Net transport during the winter experiment was offshore at all sites, northward at the inner- and mid-shelf sites, but southward at the outer-shelf site. The results suggest that local storms with southerly winds may dominate seasonal transport, as on the Washington shelf, but significant transport also can occur during fair weather and during periods of northerly winds. ?? 1994.

  10. Shallow geology, seafloor texture, and physiographic zones of the Inner Continental Shelf from Nahant to northern Cape Cod Bay, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pendleton, Elizabeth A.; Baldwin, Wayne E.; Barnhardt, Walter A.; Ackerman, Seth D.; Foster, David S.; Andrews, Brian D.; Schwab, William C.

    2013-01-01

    The Massachusetts inner continental shelf between Nahant and northern Cape Cod Bay has been profoundly affected by the occupation and retreat of glacial ice sheets and relative sea-level change during the Quaternary. Marine geologic mapping of this area is a component of a statewide cooperative effort involving the U.S. Geological Survey and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management. Interpretation of high-resolution geophysical data (interferometric and multibeam swath bathymetry, lidar, backscatter, and seismic reflection), sediment samples, and bottom photographs was used to produce a series of maps that describe the distribution and texture of seafloor sediments, shallow geologic framework, and physiographic zones of this inner-shelf region. These data and interpretations are intended to aid efforts to inventory and manage coastal and marine resources, and provide baseline information for research focused on coastal evolution and environmental change.

  11. Seabed fluid expulsion along the upper slope and outer shelf of the U.S. Atlantic continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brothers, D.S.; Ruppel, C.; Kluesner, J.W.; ten Brink, U.S.; Chaytor, J.D.; Hill, J.C.; Andrews, B.D.; Flores, C.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the spatial distribution of seabed fluid expulsion features is crucial for understanding the substrate plumbing system of any continental margin. A 1100 km stretch of the U.S. Atlantic margin contains more than 5000 pockmarks at water depths of 120 m (shelf edge) to 700 m (upper slope), mostly updip of the contemporary gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ). Advanced attribute analyses of high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection data reveal gas-charged sediment and probable fluid chimneys beneath pockmark fields. A series of enhanced reflectors, inferred to represent hydrate-bearing sediments, occur within the GHSZ. Differential sediment loading at the shelf edge and warming-induced gas hydrate dissociation along the upper slope are the proposed mechanisms that led to transient changes in substrate pore fluid overpressure, vertical fluid/gas migration, and pockmark formation.

  12. Interannual changes in seafloor surficial geology at an artificial reef site on the inner continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raineault, Nicole A.; Trembanis, Arthur C.; Miller, Douglas C.; Capone, Vince

    2013-04-01

    The influence of reef structures on seafloor surface sediments has implications for marine spatial planning and coastal development, including use of the coastal zone for offshore wind energy. We present results of interannual changes in seafloor surficial geology at the Redbird artificial reef site, located on the continental shelf offshore of Delaware Bay. The Redbird reef is composed of NYC subway cars, barges, tugboats, and other sunken objects. Since objects were added sporadically between 1996 and 2009, the survey area acts as a natural laboratory to study the evolution of the surrounding seafloor at a structural reef habitat through time. Annual side-scan surveys from 2008 through 2011, and one bathymetric survey in 2010 provide information about surface geology and morphology. Local wave and current data for this time period were analyzed to determine the main morphological agents. Automated backscatter segmentation show that three bottom types dominate and that these large-scale (>10 m) surface sediment patterns persist from year to year. Grab samples reveal that the bottom types are silty sand with clay and sandy gravel. Clear sediment and biological patterns emerged revealing the influence of the objects on the seafloor. Comet-shaped moats of sandy gravel surround single objects and grow to form large-scale coalesced patches around groups of objects. Alignment of sediment patches suggests the periodic hydrodynamic influence of seasonal storms. The abundance and diversity of organisms increases with decreasing clay/silt content. Evidence of scour includes the removal of fine sediments, the formation of moats 1-30 m in diameter and 0.5-1 m deep around the reef objects, and the >1 m settling of objects into the seafloor. Data suggest subway cars reached equilibrium with the environment in 6-7 years, but that larger objects or clusters of objects take a longer time to equilibrate and have farther-reaching effects. Knowledge of local wave and current climate

  13. Oil spills, 1971-75, Gulf of Mexico outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Danenberger, Elmer P.

    1976-01-01

    Oil spillage connected with federally supervised drilling and production activities has been a matter of wide public concern. In its supervision of mineral-resource development on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), the U.S. Geological Survey is responsible for the day-to-day inspection and monitoring of OCS oil and gas operations. During these activities, the U.S. Geological Survey records and investigates hydrocarbon discharges resulting from such operations. Beginning in 1971, all spills have been recorded, and a computer file has been maintained on all spills of 1 barrel or more. The total Gulf of Mexico OCS oil spillage recorded during January 1, 1971-December 31, 1975, amounted to 51,421 barrels. Production during that period amounted to 35,219 barrels per barrel spilled. In all, 5,857 spills were recorded, but 85.5 percent of the total spill volume was contributed by just 5 incidents. The environmental effect of these incidents apparently was minimal and of short duration. No spills of more than 50 barrels resulted from drilling operations during the period. The only spillage resulting from blowouts was caused by nondrilling incidents, including completion, production, and workover. The amount of oil discharged from spills of less than 50 barrels decreased by more than half between 1971 and 1975. The improvement reflects changes in the operating philosophy of the offshore industry, tightening of U.S. Geological Survey operating orders, and substantial increases in the inspection force. Most production-platform spills involve failures in the sump system, the separator system, or other hydrocarbon-handling equipment; improved sump-system designs and better high-low-level controls have reduced both the number and the volume of spills. Pipeline and pump spills also declined significantly, although the decline appears less attributable to revisions in OCS operating requirements. No operator consistently contributed a disproportionate amount of spillage. Most of

  14. An oilspill risk analysis for the South Atlantic (proposed sale 78) outer continental shelf lease area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Samuels, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    An oilspill risk analysis was conducted for the South Atlantic (proposed sale 78) Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) lease area. The analysis considered the probability of spill occurrences based on historical trends; likely movement of oil slicks based on a climatological model ; and locations of environmental resources which could be vulnerable to spilled oil. The times between spill occurrence and contact with resources were estimated to aid analysts in estimating slick characteristics. Critical assumptions made for this particular analysis were: (1) that oil exists in the lease area, (2) that either 0.228 billion (mean case) or 1.14 billion (high case) barrels of oil will be found and produced from tracts sold in sale 78, and (3) that all the oil will be found either in the northern or the southern portion of the lease area. On the basis of these resource estimates, it was estimated that 1 to 5 oilspills of 1,000 barrels or greater will occur over the 25 to 30-year production life of the proposed sale 78 tracts. The results also depend upon the routes and methods chosen to transport oil from OCS platforms to shore. Given the above assumptions, the estimated probability that one or more oilspills of 1,000 barrels or larger will occur and contact land after being at sea less than 30 days is less than 15 percent for all cases considered; for spills 10,000 barrels or larger, the probability is less than 10 percent. These probabilities also reflect the following assumptions: oilspills remain intact for up to 30 days, do not weather, and are not cleaned up. It is noteworthy that over 80 percent of the risk of oilspill occurrence from proposed sale 78 is due to transportation rather than production of oil. In addition, the risks of oilspill occurrence from proposed sale 78 (mean resource estimate) are less than one-tenth of the risks of existing tanker transportation of crude oil imports and refined products in the South Atlantic area.

  15. Shelf-edge deltas and drowned barrier-island complexes on the northwest Florida outer continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, J.V.; Dartnell, P.; Mayer, L.A.; Hughes, Clarke J.E.; Calder, B.R.; Duffy, G.

    2005-01-01

    A high-resolution multibeam survey of the northwest Florida shelf mapped six relict shelf-edge deltas, each with a drowned barrier-island system developed on its south and southwestern rims. The deltas appear to have formed during periods of sea-level stasis that occurred between 58,000 and 28,000 years ago. The barrier islands formed on the deltas during periods of slow regression during this same time interval. Large fields of asymmetric dunes are found on the delta surfaces as well as on the south and southwestern flanks of the deltas. The asymmetry and orientation of the dunes suggest that a northward-flowing current was sheared by the presence of the delta topography, and as a result, the upper layer of the flow continued to the north, whereas the lower layer was steered by the topography. The topographic steering accelerated the northward flow around the south and southwestern flanks with speeds adequate to form large dunes. The flow slowed after rounding southwestern flank but accelerated again as it encountered the next delta flank to the north. The age of the dune formation is unknown, and no northward-flowing geostrophic flow has been reported in the literature from this area. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Geomorphic characterization of four shelf-sourced submarine canyons along the U.S. Mid-Atlantic continental margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obelcz, Jeffrey; Brothers, Daniel; Chaytor, Jason; Brink, Uri ten; Ross, Steve W.; Brooke, Sandra

    2014-06-01

    Shelf-sourced submarine canyons are common features of continental margins and are fundamental to deep-sea sedimentary systems. Despite their geomorphic and geologic significance, relatively few passive margin shelf-breaching canyons worldwide have been mapped using modern geophysical methods. Between 2007 and 2012 a series of geophysical surveys was conducted across four major canyons of the US Mid-Atlantic margin: Wilmington, Baltimore, Washington, and Norfolk canyons. More than 5700 km2 of high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and 890 line-km of sub-bottom CHIRP profiles were collected along the outer shelf and uppermost slope (depths of 80-1200 m). The data allowed us to compare and contrast the fine-scale morphology of each canyon system. The canyons have marked differences in the morphology and orientation of canyon heads, steepness and density of sidewall gullies, and the character of the continental shelf surrounding canyon rims. Down-canyon axial profiles for Washington, Baltimore and Wilmington canyons have linear shapes, and each canyon thalweg exhibits morphological evidence for recent, relatively small-scale sediment transport. For example, Washington Canyon displays extremely steep wall gradients and contains ~100 m wide, 5-10 m deep, v-shaped incisions down the canyon axis, suggesting modern or recent sediment transport. In contrast, the convex axial thalweg profile, the absence of thalweg incision, and evidence for sediment infilling at the canyon head, suggest that depositional processes strongly influence Norfolk Canyon during the current sea-level high-stand. The north walls of Wilmington, Washington and Norfolk canyons are steeper than the south walls due to differential erosion, though the underlying cause for this asymmetry is not clear. Furthermore, we speculate that most of the geomorphic features observed within the canyons (e.g., terraces, tributary canyons, gullies, and hanging valleys) were formed during the Pleistocene, and show only

  17. Geomorphic characterization of four shelf-sourced submarine canyons along the U.S. Mid-Atlantic continental margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Obelcz, Jeffrey; Brothers, Daniel S.; Chaytor, Jason D.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Ross, Steve W.; Brooke, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Shelf-sourced submarine canyons are common features of continental margins and are fundamental to deep-sea sedimentary systems. Despite their geomorphic and geologic significance, relatively few passive margin shelf-breaching canyons worldwide have been mapped using modern geophysical methods. Between 2007 and 2012 a series of geophysical surveys was conducted across four major canyons of the US Mid-Atlantic margin: Wilmington, Baltimore, Washington, and Norfolk canyons. More than 5700 km2 of high-resolution multibeam bathymetry and 890 line-km of sub-bottom CHIRP profiles were collected along the outer shelf and uppermost slope (depths of 80-1200 m). The data allowed us to compare and contrast the fine-scale morphology of each canyon system. The canyons have marked differences in the morphology and orientation of canyon heads, steepness and density of sidewall gullies, and the character of the continental shelf surrounding canyon rims. Down-canyon axial profiles for Washington, Baltimore and Wilmington canyons have linear shapes, and each canyon thalweg exhibits morphological evidence for recent, relatively small-scale sediment transport. For example, Washington Canyon displays extremely steep wall gradients and contains ~100 m wide, 5–10 m deep, v-shaped incisions down the canyon axis, suggesting modern or recent sediment transport. In contrast, the convex axial thalweg profile, the absence of thalweg incision, and evidence for sediment infilling at the canyon head, suggest that depositional processes strongly influence Norfolk Canyon during the current sea-level high-stand. The north walls of Wilmington, Washington and Norfolk canyons are steeper than the south walls due to differential erosion, though the underlying cause for this asymmetry is not clear. Furthermore, we speculate that most of the geomorphic features observed within the canyons (e.g., terraces, tributary canyons, gullies, and hanging valleys) were formed during the Pleistocene, and show only

  18. Using MODIS True-Color 250 m Remote Sensing Data to Assess Interannual Variability of Suspended Matter over Southeastern Brazilian Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belem, A. L.; Silva, T. M. L.; Albuquerque, A. L.

    2014-12-01

    Continental shelf is the final destination of terrigenous sediments drained by rivers and estuaries, forming a mass of water drifting over the shelf due to its differential density from underlaying salty oceanic waters, forming a coastal plume. On the Southeastern Brazilian Continental Shelf, Cabo Frio region represents the limit between Santos and Campos basin oil reserves. The continental drainage in this area is not expressive, nevertheless presents a complex interaction between the western boundary Brazil Current (BC) and shelf border mechanisms providing amid-shelf intrusion and a coastal upwelling of South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) over the shelf. Satellite images of the region shows expressive shelf plumes with sedimentary contributions from Paraiba do Sul river located approximately 180 km northward of Cabo Frio, as well as from Guanabara bay, located 150 km westward of Cabo Frio. In order to understand the role of plumes in sedimentary processes over the continental shelf, this study analyzed 10 years of MODIS true-color 250 m remote sensing data in order to understand the temporal variability of the shelf front and the area of plumes. The remote data were obtained from the Aerosol Robotic Network and USDA Foreign Agricultural Service subsets. Selected 17% of daily images were cloud-free to allow shelf plumes to be delimited and processed to enhancement of features as well as land masking, geo-referencing, and daily area calculation on pixel basis. During austral winter (dry season) the plumes get its maximum extension in area over the shelf, suggesting that the mechanism of sediment transport is connected with high energetic wave-wind interactions on the coast followed by wind-driven dispersion less than continental drainage. The interannual pattern shows a general decreasing trend, mainly in the last 4 years, associated with sediment availability on the inner shelf, which is driven by river discharge during the austral summer (rain season). We also

  19. Prediction of Continental Shelf Sediment Transport Using a Theoretical Model of the Wave-Current Boundary Layer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-01

    and E) Leet and Judson (1958) (illustration from Dietz, 1963). * ~ 28 5. ’ wide variety of variables in this location: seasonal waves and currents...34________ I___.________,-_____ I I I 111111 " IiI I -I Nr-I c( ,) c( 0. ) v-; ..1. t,.’..0,;9,,. 1.- ..-. , I TT . .. . I . . . .O0 I ’ ’ ’ I I I " . , 0 7...the American Gas Association, 63 pp. Grant, W. D. and S. M. Glenn, 1983c. A continental shelf bottom boundary layer model. Vol. III : Users manual

  20. Trace metals in the surface sediments of the eastern continental shelf of Hainan Island: Sources and contamination.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fangjian; Tian, Xu; Yin, Xuebo; Yan, Huimei; Yin, Feng; Liu, Zhaoqing

    2015-10-15

    Major (Al) and trace metal (Cu, Pb, Zn, Cr, Ni, Cd, and As) concentrations in 29 surface sediment samples from the eastern continental shelf of Hainan Island were evaluated to determine the level of contamination. A multivariate analysis indicated that the sources of Cd, As, and Pb were primarily anthropogenic, whereas the sources of Cu, Zn, Cr, and Ni were primarily natural and/or partially anthropogenic. Enrichment factor (EF) and geoaccumulation index (Igeo) values were calculated to assess the anthropogenic contamination in the region. Both the EF and Igeo values indicated relatively elevated Cd and As concentrations. This study provides a useful aid for sustainable marine management in the region.

  1. Gastropods and bivalves of commercial interest from the continental shelf of Jalisco and Colima, México.

    PubMed

    Ríos-Jara, E; Pérez-Peña, M; Beas-Luna, R; López-Uriarte, E; Juárez-Carrillo, E

    2001-01-01

    The distribution and abundance with respect to depth and type of substratum of 20 species of gastropods and four species of bivalves of economic importance were examined in the continental shelf of Jalisco and Colima, México. These species were taken with net trawls at depths from 24 to 83 m in August, 1988. Most individuals and species of gastropods were collected in stations with sandy silt substratum. Bivalves were collected in sandy silt and medium sand substrata. The six most abundant species represented 81.2% of all gastropods and bivalves collected. These species are: Cantharus pallidus, Fusinus dupetittouarsi, Ficus ventricosa, Hexaplex brassica, Harpa conoidalis and Arca pacifica.

  2. Isotope and fatty acid trends along continental shelf depth gradients: Inshore versus offshore hydrological influences on benthic trophic functioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouvelon, T.; Schaal, G.; Grall, J.; Pernet, F.; Perdriau, M.; A-Pernet, E. J.; Le Bris, H.

    2015-11-01

    Anthropogenic activities and land-based inputs into the sea may influence the trophic structure and functioning of coastal and continental shelf ecosystems, despite the numerous opportunities and services the latter offer to humans and wildlife. In addition, hydrological structures and physical dynamics potentially influence the sources of organic matter (e.g., terrestrial versus marine, or fresh material versus detrital material) entering marine food webs. Understanding the significance of the processes that influence marine food webs and ecosystems (e.g., terrestrial inputs, physical dynamics) is crucially important because trophic dynamics are a vital part of ecosystem integrity. This can be achieved by identifying organic matter sources that enter food webs along inshore-offshore transects. We hypothesised that regional hydrological structures over wide continental shelves directly control the benthic trophic functioning across the shelf. We investigated this issue along two transects in the northern ecosystem of the Bay of Biscay (north-eastern Atlantic). Carbon and nitrogen stable isotope analysis (SIA) and fatty acid analysis (FAA) were conducted on different complementary ecosystem compartments that include suspended particulate organic matter (POM), sedimentary organic matter (SOM), and benthic consumers such as bivalves, large crustaceans and demersal fish. Samples were collected from inshore shallow waters (at ∼1 m in depth) to more than 200 m in depth on the offshore shelf break. Results indicated strong discrepancies in stable isotope (SI) and fatty acid (FA) compositions in the sampled compartments between inshore and offshore areas, although nitrogen SI (δ15N) and FA trends were similar along both transects. Offshore the influence of a permanently stratified area (described previously as a ;cold pool;) was evident in both transects. The influence of this hydrological structure on benthic trophic functioning (i.e., on the food sources available for

  3. Investigation of the shelf break and continental slope in the Western part of the Black Sea using acoustic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutu, F.; Ion, G.; Jugaru Tiron, L.

    2009-04-01

    The Black Sea is a large marginal sea surrounded by a system of Alpine orogenic chains, including the Balkanides-Pontides, Caucasus, Crimea and North Dobrogea located to the south, northeast, north and northwest, respectively (Dinu et al., 2005). The north-western part of the Black Sea is the main depocentre for sediment supply from Central Europe via the Danube River, but also from Eastern Europe through the Ukrainian rivers Dniepr, Dniestr and Southern Bug (Popescu et al., 2004). The shelfbreak is located at water depths of 120-140 m southward of the Danube Canyon, and up to 170 m northward of the canyon possibly due to recent faulting which is very common in this area. The continental slope is dissected by numerous canyons, each of which is fed by several tributaries. The Danube Canyon (also known as Viteaz Canyon) is a large shelf-indenting canyon located in the north-western Black Sea and connected to the youngest channel-levee system of the Danube Fan (Popescu et al., 2004). The acoustic methods are a useful way for investigate the shelf break and the continental slope giving us information about landslides on the continental slope, the topography of the investigated area, the sedimentary zones affected by instability and to quantify the geometry of the underwater landslides. The measurements made on the continental slope from north-western part of the Black Sea gave us the possibility to make a digital terrain model. After processing the data the model offer information about the main access ways of the sediments through gravitational slide on the submarines canyons, with forming of turbidity currents, debris flows and also other transport/transformation phenomena of the sediments on the continental slope like submarine landslides and submarine collapse. References Dinu, C., Wong, H.K., Tambrea, D., Matenco, L., 2005. Stratigraphic and structural characteristics of the Romanian Black Sea shelf. Tectonophysics 410, 417-435. Popescu, I., Lericolais, G., Panin

  4. Estimates of suspended-sediment flux and bedform activity on the inner portion of the Eel continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cacchione, D.A.; Wiberg, P.L.; Lynch, J.; Irish, J.; Traykovski, P.

    1999-01-01

    Energetic waves, strong bottom currents, and relatively high rates of sediment discharge from the Eel River combined to produce large amounts of suspended-sediment transport on the inner continental shelf near the Eel River during the winter of 1995-1996. Bottom-boundary-layer (BBL) measurements at a depth of ~50 m using the GEOPROBE tripod showed that the strongest near-bottom flows (combined wave and current speeds of over 1 m/s) and highest sediment concentrations (exceeding 2 g/l at ~1.2 m above the bed) occurred during two storms, one in December 1995 and the other in February 1996. Discharge from the Eel River during these storms was estimated at between 2 and 4 x 103 m3/s. Suspended-sediment flux (SSF) was measured 1.2 m above the bed and calculated throughout the BBL, by applying the tripod data to a shelf sediment-transport model. These results showed initially northward along-shelf SSF during the storms, followed by abrupt and persistent southward reversals. Along-shelf flux was more pronounced during and after the December storm than in February. Across-shelf SSF over the entire measurement period was decidedly seaward. This seaward transport could be responsible for surficial deposits of recent sediment on the outer shelf and upper continental slope in this region. Sediment ripples and larger bedforms were observed in the very fine to fine sand at 50-m depth using a sector-scanning sonar mounted on the tripod. Ripple wavelengths estimated from the sonar images were about 9 cm, which compared favorably with photographs of the bottom taken with a camera mounted on the tripod. The ripple patterns were stable during periods of low combined wave-current bottom stresses, but changed significantly during high-stress events, such as the February storm. Two different sonic altimeters recorded changes in bed elevation of 10 to 20 cm during the periods of measurement. These changes are thought to have been caused principally by the migration of low-amplitude, long

  5. Abbot Ice Shelf, structure of the Amundsen Sea continental margin and the southern boundary of the Bellingshausen Plate seaward of West Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Cochran, James R; Tinto, Kirsty J; Bell, Robin E

    2015-01-01

    Inversion of NASA Operation IceBridge airborne gravity over the Abbot Ice Shelf in West Antarctica for subice bathymetry defines an extensional terrain made up of east-west trending rift basins formed during the early stages of Antarctica/Zealandia rifting. Extension is minor, as rifting jumped north of Thurston Island early in the rifting process. The Amundsen Sea Embayment continental shelf west of the rifted terrain is underlain by a deeper, more extensive sedimentary basin also formed during rifting between Antarctica and Zealandia. A well-defined boundary zone separates the mildly extended Abbot extensional terrain from the deeper Amundsen Embayment shelf basin. The shelf basin has an extension factor, β, of 1.5–1.7 with 80–100 km of extension occurring across an area now 250 km wide. Following this extension, rifting centered north of the present shelf edge and proceeded to continental rupture. Since then, the Amundsen Embayment continental shelf appears to have been tectonically quiescent and shaped by subsidence, sedimentation, and the advance and retreat of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The Bellingshausen Plate was located seaward of the Amundsen Sea margin prior to incorporation into the Antarctic Plate at about 62 Ma. During the latter part of its independent existence, Bellingshausen plate motion had a clockwise rotational component relative to Antarctica producing convergence across the north-south trending Bellingshausen Gravity Anomaly structure at 94°W and compressive deformation on the continental slope between 94°W and 102°W. Farther west, the relative motion was extensional along an east-west trending zone occupied by the Marie Byrd Seamounts. Key Points: Abbot Ice Shelf is underlain by E-W rift basins created at ∼90 Ma Amundsen shelf shaped by subsidence, sedimentation, and passage of the ice sheet Bellingshausen plate boundary is located near the base of continental slope and rise PMID:26709352

  6. Submarine geomorphology of the Celtic Sea - new observations and hypotheses for the glaciation of a mid-latitude continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praeg, Daniel; McCarron, Stephen; Dove, Dayton; Cofaigh, Colm Ó.; Monteys, Xavier; Coxon, Peter; Accettella, Daniella; Cova, Andrea; Facchin, Lorenzo; Romeo, Roberto; Scott, Gill

    2015-04-01

    The southern limit of glaciation of the European continental margin lies in the Celtic Sea, where the full extent and dynamics of the British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS) remain in question. This is in part because the broad continental shelf contains no obvious glacial geomorphological features, but is dominated by a system of shelf-crossing sediment ridges, up to 60 m high, 10 km wide and 300 km long, traditionally interpreted as moribund palaeo-tidal sand banks. Ice sheet extent has been constrained by samples of subglacial and glacimarine sediments recovered (in the 1970s) between the ridges, and in places on their flanks, used to propose a tidewater ice margin that advanced to a grounding line on the mid-shelf, overriding a precursor ridge system. New information on the glaciation of the Celtic Sea is available from geophysical and core data acquired during Italian- and Irish-led campaigns in 2009, 2012, and 2014, both from the mid- and outer shelf. On the mid-shelf, multibeam seabed imagery of a 25 x 100 km area reveal a distinctive rectilinear network of en echelon ridge segments giving way laterally and longitudinally to transverse ribs. Seismic correlation to glacigenic sediments previously cored on a ridge flank (at core site 49/-09/44) indicates the ribs to be composed in part of glacimarine sediments, above a till reflection that can be traced across the ridge crest. No change in seabed morphology is observed across the proposed grounding line. On the outer shelf, new cores of glacigenic sediments were obtained from the flank of a shelf-crossing ridge, and provide evidence of ice sheet advance to the shelf edge, 150 km beyond the proposed grounding line. The cores from outer Cockburn Bank contain facies interpreted to record subglacial deformation and glacimarine deposition from turbid meltwater plumes during withdrawal of a tidewater ice sheet margin from the shelf edge by 24,265 ± 195 cal BP. These sediments are inferred to form part of a sheet of

  7. On the mass and salt budgets for a region of the continental shelf in the southern Mid-Atlantic Bight

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoo Yin; Weatherly, Georges L.; Pietrafesa, Leonard J.

    2001-12-01

    Two field studies were conducted across and along the continental shelf, one from February to May 1996 (deployment 1) and the other from July to October 1996 (deployment 2), in part to determine the mass and salt budgets of shelf water from south of Cape Henry to north of Cape Hatteras, the southernmost portion of the Mid-Atlantic Bight. The temporal means of current meter records indicated that most of the water enters the region across its northern boundary near the shelf break as part of a southward, alongshore current and exits the southeast corner as a southeastward flowing current. Estimates of the volume transports indicated that not all the transport across the northern boundary was accounted for by transport across the southern boundary, and that the remainder occurred as a broad, diffusive flow across the eastern boundary at the shelf break. Time series of volume transport across northern and southern boundaries were very similar and associated with variations in the alongshore wind stress and sea level, indicative of a geostrophic balance. Examination of the individual current meter records indicated these fluctuations were very barotropic even during deployment 2, which included the stratified summer season. Time series of the volume transport across the eastern boundary at the shelf break strongly mirrored the volume transport across the northern boundary minus that across the southern boundary, suggesting that the inferred eastern boundary transport was real and accommodated whatever the southern boundary could not. The turbulent salt flux across each boundary contributes very little to the net respective mass fluxes because the salt fluxes are almost governed by current velocity fields. The instantaneous and mean salt fluxes across each boundary were very well approximated by the instantaneous and mean volume transports across the boundary times the deployment average salinity across that boundary, respectively. The Ocean Margins Program (OMP) moored

  8. The impact of floods and storms on the acoustic reflectivity of the inner continental shelf: A modeling assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratson, Lincoln F.; Hutton, E.W.H.; Kettner, A.J.; Syvitski, J.P.M.; Hill, P.S.; George, D.A.; Milligan, T.G.

    2007-01-01

    Flood deposition and storm reworking of sediments on the inner shelf can change the mixture of grain sizes on the seabed and thus its porosity, bulk density, bulk compressional velocity and reflectivity. Whether these changes are significant enough to be detectable by repeat sub-bottom sonar surveys, however, is uncertain. Here the question is addressed through numerical modeling. Episodic flooding of a large versus small river over the course of a century are modeled with HYDROTREND using the drainage basin characteristics of the Po and Pescara Rivers (respectively). A similarly long stochastic record of storms offshore of both rivers is simulated from the statistics of a long-term mooring recording of waves in the western Adriatic Sea. These time series are then input to the stratigraphic model SEDFLUX2D, which simulates flood deposition and storm reworking on the inner shelf beyond the river mouths. Finally, annual changes in seabed reflectivity across these shelf regions are computed from bulk densities output by SEDFLUX2D and compressional sound speeds computed from mean seafloor grain size using the analytical model of Buckingham [1997. Theory of acoustic attenuation, dispersion, and pulse propagation in unconsolidated granular materials including marine sediments. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 102, 2579-2596; 1998. Theory of compressional and shear waves in fluidlike marine sediments. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 103, 288-299; 2000. Wave propagation, stress relaxation, and grain-tograin shearing in saturated, unconsolidated marine sediments. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 108, 2796-2815]. The modeling predicts reflectivities that change from 9 dB for muds farther offshore, values that agree with reflectivity measurements for these sediment types. On local scales of ???100 m, however, maximum changes in reflectivity are <0.5 dB. So are most annual changes in reflectivity over all water depths modeled (i.e., 0-35 m

  9. Outer Continental Shelf environmental assessment program. Final reports of principal investigators. Volume 38

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-04-01

    This final report of a study of the environmental characterization of the North Aleutian Shelf nearshore region includes: characterization, processes, and vulnerability to development; and annotated bibliography and keyword index.

  10. Offshore-onshore correlation of upper Pleistocene strata, New Jersey Coastal Plain to continental shelf and slope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheridan, R.E.; Ashley, G.M.; Miller, K.G.; Waldner, J.S.; Hall, D.W.; Uptegrove, J.

    2000-01-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection profiles (~ 1-5 m resolution), including Geopulse(TM), Uniboom(TM), minisparker, small air gun, and water gun sources, are used to trace the ?? 18O stage 5 portion of the outcropping Cape May Formation across the shelf to the continental slope. The ?? 18O stage 5/6 boundary identified at Ocean Drilling Project (ODP) Site 903 on the continental slope anchors the onshore-offshore seismic correlations. Above the ?? 18O stage 5 sequence, there are distinguishable lowstand systems tracts (LST), transgressive systems tracts (TST) and highstand systems tracts (HST) that correlate with ?? 18O stages 4 through 1. Atlantic Margin Coring Project (AMCOR) holes 6009, 6010, 6011, 6020, and 6021C provide age and paleoenvironmental indicators that agree with these correlations. The sub-arctic paleoenvironmental indicators in sequences of ?? 18O stage 3 agree with the cooler temperatures and lower sea-level highstands of that time. Thicker ?? 18O stage 3 and 4 sequences are preserved in the Paleo-Hudson River incised valley across the shelf. The expanded ice sheets during stage ?? 18O 3 compared to ?? 18O stages 1 and 5 probably increased sediment discharge in the Hudson River drainage system. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Offshore-onshore correlation of upper Pleistocene strata, New Jersey Coastal Plain to continental shelf and slope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, R. E.; Ashley, G. M.; Miller, K. G.; Waldner, J. S.; Hall, D. W.; Uptegrove, J.

    2000-07-01

    High-resolution seismic reflection profiles (˜1-5 m resolution), including Geopulse™, Uniboom™, minisparker, small air gun, and water gun sources, are used to trace the δ18O stage 5 portion of the outcropping Cape May Formation across the shelf to the continental slope. The δ18O stage 5/6 boundary identified at Ocean Drilling Project (ODP) Site 903 on the continental slope anchors the onshore-offshore seismic correlations. Above the δ18O stage 5 sequence, there are distinguishable lowstand systems tracts (LST), transgressive systems tracts (TST) and highstand systems tracts (HST) that correlate with δ18O stages 4 through 1. Atlantic Margin Coring Project (AMCOR) holes 6009, 6010, 6011, 6020, and 6021C provide age and paleoenvironmental indicators that agree with these correlations. The sub-arctic paleoenvironmental indicators in sequences of δ18O stage 3 agree with the cooler temperatures and lower sea-level highstands of that time. Thicker δ18O stage 3 and 4 sequences are preserved in the Paleo-Hudson River incised valley across the shelf. The expanded ice sheets during stage δ18O 3 compared to δ18O stages 1 and 5 probably increased sediment discharge in the Hudson River drainage system.

  12. Modeling a three-dimensional river plume over continental shelf using a 3D unstructured grid model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cheng, R.T.; Casulli, V.; ,

    2004-01-01

    River derived fresh water discharging into an adjacent continental shelf forms a trapped river plume that propagates in a narrow region along the coast. These river plumes are real and they have been observed in the field. Many previous investigations have reported some aspects of the river plume properties, which are sensitive to stratification, Coriolis acceleration, winds (upwelling or downwelling), coastal currents, and river discharge. Numerical modeling of the dynamics of river plumes is very challenging, because the complete problem involves a wide range of vertical and horizontal scales. Proper simulations of river plume dynamics cannot be achieved without a realistic representation of the flow and salinity structure near the river mouth that controls the initial formation and propagation of the plume in the coastal ocean. In this study, an unstructured grid model was used for simulations of river plume dynamics allowing fine grid resolution in the river and in regions near the coast with a coarse grid in the far field of the river plume in the coastal ocean, in the vertical, fine fixed levels were used near the free surface, and coarse vertical levels were used over the continental shelf. The simulations have demonstrated the uniquely important role played by Coriolis acceleration. Without Coriolis acceleration, no trapped river plume can be formed no matter how favorable the ambient conditions might be. The simulation results show properties of the river plume and the characteristics of flow and salinity within the estuary; they are completely consistent with the physics of estuaries and coastal oceans.

  13. The role of storm-generated combined flows in shoreface and inner continental shelf sediment erosion, transport, and deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Stephen Mitchell

    The shoreface is where sand is exchanged between the beach and inner continental shelf under the influence of storm waves. Storm erosion and ravinement redistributes sediment and, over time, affects coastal barrier evolution. This research investigates coastal circulation, sediment dynamics in storms, the ravinement process, shoreface evolution, and the geologic record. Field data collected in Maine for this study include storm currents, cores, grab samples, seismic reflection, side-scan sonar, and fathometer profiles. A time series of side-scan sonar images on the Kennebec paleodelta, provide the longest and most comprehensive data set to date for any one location. During this study there was a remarkable persistence of sand waves and sand sheet morphology despite major storms and a hurricane in the last decade. Stratigraphy and relief of shoreface and inner-shelf sediment identifies the basal and ravinement unconformities and constrains the age and origin of surficial sand deposits. Meteorological and oceanographic conditions in the Gulf of Maine produce three types of combined flow that move sand. Storms generate wave-current combined flow that simultaneously produces hummocky cross-stratification in fine sand, and ripples in coarse sand and gravel on the inner shelf. A modified Bagnold equation is used to illustrate how sand moves at 30 m depth. In the absence of local surface wind, incoming swells augment tidal currents to produce wave-tide combined flow about 27 days per year in Saco Bay and at Cape Small. Wind-driven surface currents in northeasters cause downwelling that carries sand from the shoreface to inner shelf for about 11 days per year. Northwesterly gales induce upwelling and sand transport from the inner shelf to the shoreface for about 21 days per year. Prevailing westerlies conserve sand in Maine coastal barriers that would otherwise be lost to the inner shelf by downwelling. In a new model of ravinement, combined flow reworks coarse

  14. Seabed morphology along the rocky shore of the Barlavento Coast, southern Portuguese continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Ricardo; Lavoie, Caroline; Pinheiro, Luis; Magalhães, Vitor; Moura, Delminda; Bennazzouz, Omar; Sena, Clara; Silva, Paulo; Gabriel, Selma; Horta, João; Abreu, Tiago; Mota, António

    2014-05-01

    The coastal area between Galé and Olhos de Água, in the southernmost coast of the Algarve (Portugal) is characterized by shore platforms and sandy beaches where the carbonate rocky cliffs are undergoing a dramatic recession (Marques, 2008; Nunes et al., 2009). Such crenulated coast plays an important morphological control on alongshore drift. In order to understand the sedimentation patterns in this area and characterize the seabed morphology and subsurface geology, a detailed sidescan sonar (100 and 400 kHz) and high-resolution seismic (Chirp Sonar, 05-12 kHz) survey was carried out, complemented with sediment sampling, along the rocky shore of the Barlavento Coast, southern Portuguese continental shelf, in the scope of the EROS project. The acquired data concentrate in two main areas: Olhos de Água and Galé. The sidescan sonar data were processed and analyzed using the integrated Triton perspective software and the mosaics were gridded at a cell size of 0.5 m. 27 seabed sediment grab samples were used to ground-truth the sidescan mosaics and produce a semi-quantitative seabed classification map. The seismic data were processed using the SPW and RadExPro softwares. Preliminary results show that the seafloor of the area Galé (2.25 km2) is characterized by: (1) a field of ripples that occurs on the flat portions and in the deeper part of the study area between 10 and 18 m depth; these ripples are symmetric, 3-400 m long and have wavelengths up to 2.5 m; most of the ripples can be classified as straight or sinuous in phase, and they are generally sub-parallel to the slope with a NW-SE trending; (2) bedrock outcrops that are present from the coastline until 12 m water depth; and (3) anthropogenic features associated to small scale fishing activities, observed at the border between fine sand with high concentration of shells and low concentration. In the Olhos de Água area (3.1 km2) the seafloor is generally characterized by (1) asymmetrical E-W trending

  15. Transport and transfer rates in the waters of the continental shelf and slope: SEEP. Final report, May 1, 1987--December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Biscaye, P.E.; Anderson, R.F.

    1993-12-31

    The overall Shelf Edge Exchange Processes (SEEP) Program, which began in 1980 or 1981, had as its goal the testing of a hypothesis with respect to the fate of particulate matter formed in and introduced into the waters of the continental shelf adjacent to the northern east coast of the US, i.e., the MAB. The original hypothesis was that a large proportion of the particles in general, and of the particulate organic carbon (POC) in particular, was exported from the shelf, across the shelf/slope break and front, into the waters of, and, to some degree, deposited in the sediments of the continental slope. This hypothesis was based on budgets of organic carbon and lead-210 that did not account for a large proportion of those species in the waters or sediments of the shelf, and on a carbon-rich band of sediments centered on the slope at {approximately}1,000 m water depth. The results of the first SEEP experiment, south of New England and Long Island (SEEP-1) suggested, but did not prove, that there was only a relatively small proportion of the carbon which was exported from the shelf to the slope. The objective of the second experiment -- SEEP-2 -- done under the subject grant, was to tighten the experiment in terms of the kinds of data collected, and to focus it more on the shelf and only the upper slope, where shelf-derived particles were thought to be deposited.

  16. Stable isotope analysis of some representative fish and invertebrates of the Newfoundland and Labrador continental shelf food web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherwood, Graham D.; Rose, George A.

    2005-06-01

    We examined stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic signatures of 17 fish and 16 invertebrate taxa common to the Newfoundland and Labrador (NL) continental shelf food web. Particular sampling emphasis was placed on Atlantic cod ( Gadus morhua) and related prey species (e.g. shrimp, Pandalus borealis, and capelin, Mallotus villosus). We found highly significant ( p < 0.0001) differences between near-shore (bays) and offshore (shelf edge) δ15N signatures for cod, 'other fish' (pooled) and invertebrates (pooled). In contrast, there were only minor differences in δ13C signatures of 'other fish' ( p < 0.05) and no difference for cod and invertebrates among the two habitats. We sampled at two times of the year (January and June) and found no systematic effect of season on both δ13C and δ15N in cod, 'other fish' and invertebrates. We calculated isotopic fractionation factors for cod from the entire shelf (mixed diet) and for cod with diets composed mainly of capelin or shrimp. These values ranged between 2.2‰ and 3.9‰ for δ15N and -0.4‰ and 0.8‰ for δ13C and, for δ15N, may reflect diet-related differences in bioenergetic status. We discuss potential mechanisms for near-shore versus offshore enrichment of δ15N signatures, and demonstrate the implications of this spatial variation on δ15N-derived trophic position estimates.

  17. Physiography, surficial sediments and Quaternary stratigraphy of the inner continental shelf and nearshore region of the Gulf of Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, J.T.; Belknap, D.F.

    1991-01-01

    The western margin of the Gulf of Maine is a bedrock-framed, glaciated continental shelf that has only recently been geologically mapped. The bathymetry is divisible into four physiographic areas: nearshore basins, shelf valleys, rocky zones, and outer basins. The nearshore basins are largely floored by mud except near rock outcrops where shelly gravel occurs. Shelf valleys extend seaward from nearshore basins and estuaries and generally possess less sediment than nearshore basins. Abundant exposures of Pleistocene sediment with rippled substrates suggest that contemporary reworking is occurring. Rocky zones are the most abundant physiographic area and include both exposed bedrock and glacial gravel outcrops. Shell material produced by organisms living on or near rocks is common both in the rocky zones and in abutting environments. The outer basin begins at a depth of about 60 m and extends beyond the 100 m isobath. This area is occasionally bordered on its landward side by the late Quaternary lowstand shoreline. Below this shoreline thicker deposits of sediment exist, while all environments landward were reworked by a regression and transgression of the sea. ?? 1991.

  18. Reconstructing the last British-Irish Ice Sheet from continental shelf records: initial results from BRITICE-CHRONO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Cofaigh, Colm; Benetti, Sara; Callard, S. Louise; Chiverell, Richard; Clark, Chris D.; Livingstone, Stephen; Praeg, Daniel; Saher, Margot; Scourse, James; van Landeghem, Katrien

    2015-04-01

    BRITICE-CHRONO is a large UK NERC-funded project that aims to constrain the timing and rate of retreat of the last British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS). Although the pattern of ice sheet retreat is reasonably well established the retreat chronology remains poorly constrained for many areas, particularly offshore. In BRITICE-CHRONO marine and terrestrial samples are being collected for dating along a series of 8 transects extending from the continental shelf edge to a few tens of kilometres onshore. The transects will yield over 800 new dates, which will be combined with existing age and landform information to undertake an ice-sheet wide empirical reconstruction of the demise of the BIIS as it underwent the transition from marine-terminating margins to being entirely land-based. This talk will present an overview of the project and highlight some of the key scientific findings from the first of two research cruises that form a central part of the project. Cruise JC106 of the RRS James Cook took place in 2014 and circumnavigated Ireland, surveying and sampling in the Celtic Sea, Irish Sea, Malin Sea, Donegal Bay and the shelf offshore of western Ireland, including the Porcupine Bank. During the 38 day cruise over 220 cores were collected as well as extensive geophysical datasets (sub-bottom profiles and swath bathymetry). Analysis of these data is now underway and is yielding important new insights into the extent, retreat style, chronology and depositional environments associated with the BIIS during and following the Last Glacial Maximum. A second cruise, planned for the summer 2015, will survey and sample the continental shelf north of Scotland and the North Sea.

  19. Changes in water clarity in response to river discharges on the Great Barrier Reef continental shelf: 2002-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabricius, K. E.; Logan, M.; Weeks, S. J.; Lewis, S. E.; Brodie, J.

    2016-05-01

    Water clarity is a key factor for the health of marine ecosystems. The Australian Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is located on a continental shelf, with >35 major seasonal rivers discharging into this 344,000 km2 tropical to subtropical ecosystem. This work investigates how river discharges affect water clarity in different zones along and across the GBR. For each day over 11 years (2002-2013) we calculated 'photic depth' as a proxy measure of water clarity (calibrated to be equivalent to Secchi depth), for each 1 km2 pixel from MODIS-Aqua remote sensing data. Long-term and seasonal changes in photic depth were related to the daily discharge volumes of the nearest rivers, after statistically removing the effects of waves and tides on photic depth. The relationships between photic depths and rivers differed across and along the GBR. They typically declined from the coastal to offshore zones, and were strongest in proximity to rivers in agriculturally modified catchments. In most southern inner zones, photic depth declined consistently throughout the 11-year observation period; such long-term trend was not observed offshore nor in the northern regions. Averaged across the GBR, photic depths declined to 47% of local maximum values soon after the onset of river floods, and recovery to 95% of maximum values took on average 6 months (range: 150-260 days). The river effects were strongest at latitude 14.5°-19.0°S, where river loads are high and the continental shelf is narrow. Here, even offshore zones showed a >40% seasonal decline in photic depth, and 17-24% reductions in annual mean photic depth in years with large river nutrients and sediment loads. Our methodology is based on freely available data and tools and may be applied to other shelf systems, providing valuable insights in support of ecosystem management.

  20. Exploring the Eastern United States Continental Shelf with the NOAA Cooperative Institute for Ocean Exploration, Research, and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickson, D.; Pomponi, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Cooperative Institute for Ocean Exploration, Research, and Technology (CIOERT) serves NOAA priorities in three theme areas: exploring the eastern U.S. continental shelf, improving the understanding of coral and sponge ecosystems, and developing advanced underwater technologies. CIOERT focuses on the exploration and research of ecosystems and habitats along frontier regions of the eastern U.S. continental shelf that are of economic, scientific, or cultural importance or of natural hazards concern. One particular focus is supporting ocean exploration and research through the use of advanced underwater technologies and techniques in order to improve the understanding of vulnerable deep and shallow coral and sponge ecosystems. CIOERT expands the scope and efficiency of exploration and research by developing, testing, and applying new and/or innovative uses of existing technologies to ocean exploration and research activities. In addition, CIOERT is dedicated to expanding ocean literacy and building NOAA's technical and scientific workforce through hands-on, at-sea experiences. A recent CIOERT cruise characterized Gulf of Mexico mesophotic and deepwater reef ecosystems off the west Florida shelf, targeting northern Pulley Ridge. This project created and ground-truthed new sonar maps made with an autonomous underwater vehicle; conducted video and photographic transects of benthic habitat and fish using a remotely operated vehicle; and examined the connectivity of fauna from shallow to deep reef ecosystems. CIOERT was established in 2009 by FAU-Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute, with University of North Carolina, Wilmington, SRI International, and the University of Miami. The primary NOAA partner is the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research.