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Sample records for adsorbable organic halides

  1. Removal of hexenuronic acid by xylanase to reduce adsorbable organic halides formation in chlorine dioxide bleaching of bagasse pulp.

    PubMed

    Nie, Shuangxi; Wang, Shuangfei; Qin, Chengrong; Yao, Shuangquan; Ebonka, Johnbull Friday; Song, Xueping; Li, Kecheng

    2015-11-01

    Xylanase-aided chlorine dioxide bleaching of bagasse pulp was investigated. The pulp was pretreated with xylanase and followed a chlorine dioxide bleaching stage. The ATR-FTIR and XPS were employed to determine the surface chemistry of the control pulp, xylanase treated and chlorine dioxide treated pulps. The hexenuronic acid (HexA) could obviously be reduced after xylanase pretreatment, and the adsorbable organic halides (AOX) were reduced after chlorine dioxide bleaching. Compared to the control pulp, AOX could be reduced by 21.4-26.6% with xylanase treatment. Chlorine dioxide demand could be reduced by 12.5-22% to achieve the same brightness. The ATR-FTIR and XPS results showed that lignin and hemicellulose (mainly HexA) were the main source for AOX formation. Xylanase pretreatment could remove HexA and expose more lignin, which decreased the chlorine dioxide demand and thus reduced formation of AOX. PMID:26263004

  2. CO2 electrochemical reduction via adsorbed halide anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, Kotaro; Salazar-Villalpando, Maria D.

    2011-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of CO2 was studied utilizing halide ions as electrolytes, specifically, aqueous solutions of KCl, KBr, KI. Electrochemical experiments were carried out in a laboratory-made, divided H-type cell. The working electrode was a copper mesh, while the counter and reference electrodes were a Pt wire and an Ag/AgCl electrode, respectively. The results of our work suggest a reaction mechanism for the electrochemical reduction of CO2 where the presence of Cu-X as the catalytic layer facilitates the electron transfer from the electrode to CO2. Electron-transfer to CO2 may occur via the X- ad(Br-, Cl-, I-)-C bond, which is formed by the electron flow from the specifically adsorbed halide anion to the vacant orbital of CO2. The stronger the adsorption of the halide anion to the electrode, the more strongly CO2 is restrained, resulting in higher CO2 reduction current. Furthermore, it is suggested that specifically adsorbed halide anions could suppress the adsorption of protons; leading to a higher hydrogen overvoltage. These effects may synergistically mitigate the over potential necessary for CO2 reduction, and thus increase the rate of electrochemical CO2 reduction.

  3. Structural investigations of adsorbed films of Methyl Halides on Boron Nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprung, Michael; Freitag, Andrea; Hanson, Jonathan; Larese, John

    2000-03-01

    The Methyl Halides are a group of molecules whose properties of thin adsorbed films on Graphite have been well characterized. Boron Nitride forms a hexagonal structure with a slightly larger (about 2% ) unit cell than Graphite. The study of thin films of Methyl Halides (CH_3R, R=Cl, Br and I) on Boron Nitride is motivated by the hope to gain a better understanding of adsorbate-substrate interaction. High resolution adsorption isotherms and x-ray powder diffraction have been used to investigate the monolayer structures of CH_3R adsorbed on Boron Nitride. The experiments were carried out at the Beamline X7B of the NSLS. The gases were dosed onto the sample with an automated gas handling system, and a Mar345 image plate detector was used to collect the data. The measurements were performed in a temperature range between 50 and 175 K. All three adsorbates form a solid monolayer structure on Boron Nitride at low temperature. The structure of Methyl Chloride and Methyl Bromide is very similar to the high-density structure of CH_3Cl on Graphite. This is surprising for CH_3Br because it forms a different structure on Graphite. Methyl Iodide forms similar structures on both substrates.

  4. Halide anion effect on surface enhanced Raman scattering of 2-amino,5-nitropyridine adsorbed on silver sols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio; Neto, Natale; Sbrana, Giuseppe

    1995-03-01

    2-Amino,5-nitropiridine (ANP) can be adsorbed on silver sols as neutral molecule or ANP- anion, as detected by SERS. The adsorption of the ANP- is related to the presence of hydroxide ions on the metal surface. Strongly adsorbed halide anions are able to remove hydroxide ions from the silver surface, inducing the adsorption of ANP as neutral molecule.

  5. EVALUATION OF METHODS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF TOTAL ORGANIC HALIDE IN WATER AND WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Various methods for the determination of total organic halides (TOX) in groundwater and in waste oil samples have been evaluated. Of three inorganic halide species generation approaches and three inorganic halide determinative techniques evaluated for groundwater analyses, one co...

  6. Polarizabilities of Halide Ions Co-Adsorbed on Silver Nanoparticles and Their Relationship to Increased Surface-Enhanced Raman Intensities of Rhodamine-6G and Pyridine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Michael; Jagodzinski, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Glaspell et. al. (2004), found a linear relationship between the intensities of surface-enhanced Raman (SER) signals of selected vibrational modes of rhodamine-6G (R6G) and the polarizabilities of co-adsorbed halide ions. Furthermore, they noticed that the slopes of intensity versus time plots for R6G also exhibit a linear relationship with the halide polarizabilities. We will present similar results from the SER signals from selected vibrational modes of pyridine and the polarizabilities of co-adsorbed halide ions. In addition, we will present a plausible relationship between the adsorbates and the electric field of the induced dipole of the halide ions.

  7. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  8. Kinetic Studies of the Solvolysis of Two Organic Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, J. A.; Pasto, D. J.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory experiment which utilizes the solvolysis of organic halides to demonstrate first and second order reaction kinetics. The experiment also investigates the effect of a change of solvent polarity on reaction rate, common-ion and noncommon-ion salt effects, and the activation parameters of a…

  9. Students' Understanding of Alkyl Halide Reactions in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruz-Ramirez de Arellano, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry is an essential subject for many undergraduate students completing degrees in science, engineering, and pre-professional programs. However, students often struggle with the concepts and skills required to successfully solve organic chemistry exercises. Since alkyl halides are traditionally the first functional group that is…

  10. Size selective hydrophobic adsorbent for organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Hickey, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to an adsorbent formed by the pyrolysis of a hydrophobic silica with a pore size greater than 5 .ANG., such as SILICALITE.TM., with a molecular sieving polymer precursor such as polyfurfuryl alcohol, polyacrylonitrile, polyvinylidene chloride, phenol-formaldehyde resin, polyvinylidene difluoride and mixtures thereof. Polyfurfuryl alcohol is the most preferred. The adsorbent produced by the pyrolysis has a silicon to carbon mole ratio of between about 10:1 and 1:3, and preferably about 2:1 to 1:2, most preferably 1:1. The pyrolysis is performed as a ramped temperature program between about 100.degree. and 800.degree. C., and preferably between about 100.degree. and 600.degree. C. The present invention also relates to a method for selectively adsorbing organic molecules having a molecular size (mean molecular diameter) of between about 3 and 6 .ANG. comprising contacting a vapor containing the small organic molecules to be adsorbed with the adsorbent composition of the present invention.

  11. THE DETERMINATION OF TOTAL ORGANIC HALIDE IN WATER: AN INTERLABORATORY COMPARATIVE STUDY OF TWO METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total organic halide (TOX) analyzers are commonly used to measure the amount of dissolved halogenated organic byproducts in disinfected waters. Because of the lack of information on the identity of disinfection byproducts, rigorous testing of the dissolved organic halide (DOX) pr...

  12. THE DETERMINATION OF TOTAL ORGANIC HALIDE IN WATER: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF TWO INSTRUMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total organic halide (TOX) analyzers are commonly used to measure the amount of dissolved halogenated organic byproducts in disinfected waters. ecause of the lack of information on the identity of disinfection byproducts, rigorous testing of the dissolved organic halide (DOX) pro...

  13. Optical Properties of Photovoltaic Organic-Inorganic Lead Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Green, Martin A; Jiang, Yajie; Soufiani, Arman Mahboubi; Ho-Baillie, Anita

    2015-12-01

    Over the last several years, organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites have rapidly emerged as a new photovoltaic contender. Although energy conversion efficiency above 20% has now been certified, improved understanding of the material properties contributing to these high performance levels may allow the progression to even higher efficiency, stable cells. The optical properties of these new materials are important not only to device design but also because of the insight they provide into less directly accessible properties, including energy-band structures, binding energies, and likely impact of excitons, as well as into absorption and inverse radiative recombination processes. PMID:26560862

  14. EPA (ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY) METHOD STUDY 32: METHOD 450.1 - TOTAL ORGANIC HALIDES (TOX)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the interlaboratory method study that was performed to evaluate interim Method 450.1 for total organic halides (TOX). In the method, a measured volume of water is passed through two columns in series each containing 40 mg of activated charcoal. Organic halide...

  15. Theory of hydrogen migration in organic-inorganic halide perovskites.

    PubMed

    Egger, David A; Kronik, Leeor; Rappe, Andrew M

    2015-10-12

    Solar cells based on organic-inorganic halide perovskites have recently been proven to be remarkably efficient. However, they exhibit hysteresis in their current-voltage curves, and their stability in the presence of water is problematic. Both issues are possibly related to a diffusion of defects in the perovskite material. By using first-principles calculations based on density functional theory, we study the properties of an important defect in hybrid perovskites-interstitial hydrogen. We show that differently charged defects occupy different crystal sites, which may allow for ionization-enhanced defect migration following the Bourgoin-Corbett mechanism. Our analysis highlights the structural flexibility of organic-inorganic perovskites: successive iodide displacements, combined with hydrogen bonding, enable proton diffusion with low migration barriers. These findings indicate that hydrogen defects can be mobile and thus highly relevant for the performance of perovskite solar cells. PMID:26073061

  16. Giant photostriction in organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yang; You, Lu; Wang, Shiwei; Ku, Zhiliang; Fan, Hongjin; Schmidt, Daniel; Rusydi, Andrivo; Chang, Lei; Wang, Le; Ren, Peng; Chen, Liufang; Yuan, Guoliang; Chen, Lang; Wang, Junling

    2016-01-01

    Among the many materials investigated for next-generation photovoltaic cells, organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites have demonstrated great potential thanks to their high power conversion efficiency and solution processability. Within a short period of about 5 years, the efficiency of solar cells based on these materials has increased dramatically from 3.8 to over 20%. Despite the tremendous progress in device performance, much less is known about the underlying photophysics involving charge-orbital-lattice interactions and the role of the organic molecules in this hybrid material remains poorly understood. Here, we report a giant photostrictive response, that is, light-induced lattice change, of >1,200 p.p.m. in methylammonium lead iodide, which could be the key to understand its superior optical properties. The strong photon-lattice coupling also opens up the possibility of employing these materials in wireless opto-mechanical devices. PMID:27044485

  17. Giant photostriction in organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yang; You, Lu; Wang, Shiwei; Ku, Zhiliang; Fan, Hongjin; Schmidt, Daniel; Rusydi, Andrivo; Chang, Lei; Wang, Le; Ren, Peng; Chen, Liufang; Yuan, Guoliang; Chen, Lang; Wang, Junling

    2016-04-01

    Among the many materials investigated for next-generation photovoltaic cells, organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites have demonstrated great potential thanks to their high power conversion efficiency and solution processability. Within a short period of about 5 years, the efficiency of solar cells based on these materials has increased dramatically from 3.8 to over 20%. Despite the tremendous progress in device performance, much less is known about the underlying photophysics involving charge-orbital-lattice interactions and the role of the organic molecules in this hybrid material remains poorly understood. Here, we report a giant photostrictive response, that is, light-induced lattice change, of >1,200 p.p.m. in methylammonium lead iodide, which could be the key to understand its superior optical properties. The strong photon-lattice coupling also opens up the possibility of employing these materials in wireless opto-mechanical devices.

  18. Layered structures of organic/inorganic hybrid halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Tran Doan; Tuoc, Vu Ngoc; Minh, Nguyen Viet

    2016-03-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid halide perovskites, in which the A cations of an ABX3 perovskite are replaced by organic cations, may be used for photovoltaic and solar thermoelectric applications. In this contribution, we systematically study three lead-free hybrid perovskites, i.e., methylammonium tin iodide CH3NH3SnI3 , ammonium tin iodide NH4SnI3 , and formamidnium tin iodide HC (NH2)2SnI3 by first-principles calculations. We find that in addition to the commonly known motif in which the corner-shared SnI6 octahedra form a three-dimensional network, these materials may also favor a two-dimensional (layered) motif formed by alternating layers of the SnI6 octahedra and the organic cations. These two motifs are nearly equal in free energy and are separated by low barriers. These layered structures features many flat electronic bands near the band edges, making their electronic structures significantly different from those of the structural phases composed of three-dimension networks of SnI6 octahedra. Furthermore, because the electronic structures of HC (NH2)2SnI3 are found to be rather similar to those of CH3NH3SnI3 , formamidnium tin iodide may also be promising for the applications of methylammonium tin iodide.

  19. Unraveling the Role of Monovalent Halides in Mixed-Halide Organic-Inorganic Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Deepa, Melepurath; Ramos, F Javier; Shivaprasad, S M; Ahmad, Shahzada

    2016-03-16

    The performance of perovskite solar cells is strongly influenced by the composition and microstructure of the perovskite. A recent approach to improve the power conversion efficiencies utilized mixed-halide perovskites, but the halide ions and their roles were not directly studied. Unraveling their precise location in the perovskite layer is of paramount importance. Here, we investigated four different perovskites by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and found that among the three studied mixed-halide perovskites, CH3 NH3 Pb(I0.74 Br0.26 )3 and CH3 NH3 PbBr3-x Clx show peaks that unambiguously demonstrate the presence of iodide and bromide in the former, and bromide and chloride in the latter. The CH3 NH3 PbI3-x Clx perovskite shows anomalous behavior, the iodide content far outweighs that of the chloride; a small proportion of chloride, in all likelihood, resides deep within the TiO2 /absorber layer. Our study reveals that there are many distinguishable structural differences between these perovskites, and that these directly impact the photovoltaic performances. PMID:26717046

  20. Photoreaction of adsorbed diiodomethane: halide effects of a series of neutral palladium(ii) coordination cages.

    PubMed

    Noh, Tae Hwan; Lee, Haeri; Kim, Doeon; Moon, Dohyun; Lee, Young-A; Jung, Ok-Sang

    2016-06-21

    A series of Pd6L4-type neutral coordination cages, [Pd6X12L4] (X(-) = Cl(-) and Br(-)), are constructed via self-assembly of (COD)PdCl2 and K2PdBr4 with C3-symmetric N,N',N''-tris(2-pyridinylmethyl)-1,3,5-benzenetricarboxamide (L), respectively. The iodide analogue [Pd6I12L4] is smoothly synthesized from [Pd6Br12L4] in the presence of CH2I2 under mild conditions. The replacement of bromide to iodide in the nanocage system represents a landmark achievement in synthetic-methodology development. The CH2I2 molecules are adsorbed in the order [Pd6I12L4] > [Pd6Br12L4] > [Pd6Cl12L4] and in the "like-attracts-like" pattern, presumably owing to the van der Waals force. Irradiation of [Pd6I12L4]·3.5CH2I2 with 1-methylcyclohexene in chloroform at 350 nm preferentially affords the cyclopropanation product. PMID:27198071

  1. Accuracy improvement in leak detection of charcoal adsorbers by halide pulse integration method

    SciTech Connect

    Kovach, B.J.; Banks, E.M.

    1997-08-01

    Due to the phaseout of the supply of R-11, which is used as a charcoal adsorber leak-testing agent, several new substitutes have been suggested and tested. Pulse testing using agents with higher boiling points produced longer response times (due to prolonged evaporation and dispersion times). This longer evaporation time alters the pulse shape and lowers the peak concentration. Since the dispersion and evaporation time under different ambient condition are unpredictable, the peak concentration becomes unpredictable as well. One way to eliminate this unpredictability is to determine the area under the curve (of concentration versus time) after test-agent injection rather than the peak concentration (height). This value should be independent of the injection time and evaporation rate as long as the volume of the test agent injected remains constant. Thus, tests were performed with a constant volume injection of test agent but with different injection times and evaporation rates. The area under the curve of concentration versus time was then compared with the peak concentration for each injection. 4 refs., 1 fig.

  2. The effect of low solublility organic acids on the hygroscopicity of sodium halide aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miñambres, L.; Méndez, E.; Sánchez, M. N.; Castaño, F.; Basterretxea, F. J.

    2014-02-01

    In order to accurately assess the influence of fatty acids on the hygroscopic and other physicochemical properties of sea salt aerosols, hexanoic, octanoic or lauric acid together with sodium halide salts (NaCl, NaBr and NaI) have been chosen to be performed in this study. The hygroscopic properties of sodium halide submicrometer particles covered with organic acids have been examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy in an aerosol flow cell. Covered particles were generated by flowing atomized sodium halide particles (either dry or aqueous) through a heated oven containing the gaseous acid. The obtained results indicate that gaseous organic acids easily nucleate onto dry and aqueous sodium halide particles. On the other hand, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) images indicate that lauric acid coating on NaCl particles makes them to aggregate in small clusters. The hygroscopic behaviour of covered sodium halide particles in deliquescence mode shows different features with the exchange of the halide ion: whereas the organic covering has little effect in NaBr particles, NaCl and NaI covered particles change their deliquescence relative humidities, with different trends observed for each of the acids studied. In efflorescence mode, the overall effect of the organic covering is to retard the loss of water in the particles. It has been observed that the presence of gaseous water in heterogeneously nucleated particles tends to displace the cover of hexanoic acid to energetically stabilize the system.

  3. The effect of low solubility organic acids on the hygroscopicity of sodium halide aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miñambres, L.; Méndez, E.; Sánchez, M. N.; Castaño, F.; Basterretxea, F. J.

    2014-10-01

    In order to accurately assess the influence of fatty acids on the hygroscopic and other physicochemical properties of sea salt aerosols, hexanoic, octanoic or lauric acid together with sodium halide salts (NaCl, NaBr and NaI) have been chosen to be investigated in this study. The hygroscopic properties of sodium halide sub-micrometre particles covered with organic acids have been examined by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy in an aerosol flow cell. Covered particles were generated by flowing atomized sodium halide particles (either dry or aqueous) through a heated oven containing the gaseous acid. The obtained results indicate that gaseous organic acids easily nucleate onto dry and aqueous sodium halide particles. On the other hand, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images indicate that lauric acid coating on NaCl particles makes them to aggregate in small clusters. The hygroscopic behaviour of covered sodium halide particles in deliquescence mode shows different features with the exchange of the halide ion, whereas the organic surfactant has little effect in NaBr particles, NaCl and NaI covered particles experience appreciable shifts in their deliquescence relative humidities, with different trends observed for each of the acids studied. In efflorescence mode, the overall effect of the organic covering is to retard the loss of water in the particles. It has been observed that the presence of gaseous water in heterogeneously nucleated particles tends to displace the cover of hexanoic acid to energetically stabilize the system.

  4. Alkylammonium montmorillonites as adsorbents for organic vapors from air

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, M.; Purnell, C.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Montmorillonite clays may be modified by the exchange of the inorganic interlayer cations with alkylammonium ions, resulting in a fixed internal porosity. The pore size and shape depend on the nature of the alkylammonium ion. A number of different ions were used to prepare adsorbents with varying properties, and these were examined for their potential application to sampling organic vapors in air. Characterization involved determination of nitrogen and water contents, surface area, interlayer spacing, thermal stability, and breakthrough volumes of organic vapors. The adsorbent that showed the most promise (tetramethylammonium montmorillonite (TMA)) was further evaluated for use as an adsorbent in both thermal- and solvent-desorable sampling systems.

  5. Complexation of trace metals by adsorbed natural organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption behavior and solution speciation of Cu(II) and Cd(II) were studied in model systems containing colloidal alumina particles and dissolved natural organic matter. At equilibrium a significant fraction of the alumina surface was covered by adsorbed organic matter. Cu(II) was partitioned primarily between the surface-bound organic matter and dissolved Cu-organic complexes in the aqueous phase. Complexation of Cu2+ with the functional groups of adsorbed organic matter was stronger than complexation with uncovered alumina surface hydroxyls. It is shown that the complexation of Cu(II) by adsorbed organic matter can be described by an apparent stability constant approximately equal to the value found for solution phase equilibria. In contrast, Cd(II) adsorption was not significantly affected by the presence of organic matter at the surface, due to weak complex formation with the organic ligands. The results demonstrate that general models of trace element partitioning in natural waters must consider the presence of adsorbed organic matter. ?? 1984.

  6. AQUATIC PHOTOLYSIS OF OXY-ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ADSORBED ON GOETHITE.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, Marvin C.

    1985-01-01

    Organic materials that will not absorb light at wavelengths longer than 295 nanometers (the solar wavelength cutoff) may nevertheless, undergo electron transfer reactions initiated by light. These reactions occur when the organic materials are adsorbed as ligand complexes to the surface of iron oxy-hydroxide (goethite). The adsorbed materials can be either inner or outer coordination sphere complexes. Goethite was chosen as the iron oxyhydroxide surface because it has the highest thermodynamic stability of any of the oxyhydroxides in water and it can be synthesized easily, with high purity.

  7. Purcell effect in an organic-inorganic halide perovskite semiconductor microcavity system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun; Cao, Runan; Da, Peimei; Wang, Yafeng; Hu, Tao; Wu, Lin; Lu, Jian; Shen, Xuechu; Xu, Fei; Zheng, Gengfeng; Chen, Zhanghai

    2016-01-01

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite semiconductors with the attractive physics properties, including strong photoluminescence (PL), huge oscillator strengths, and low nonradiative recombination losses, are ideal candidates for studying the light-matter interaction in nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the coupling of the exciton state and the cavity mode in the lead halide perovskite microcavity system at room temperature. The Purcell effect in the coupling system is clearly observed by using angle-resolved photoluminescence spectra. Kinetic analysis based on time-resolved PL reveals that the spontaneous emission rate of the halide perovskite semiconductor is significantly enhanced at resonance of the exciton energy and the cavity mode. Our results provide the way for developing electrically driven organic polariton lasers, optical devices, and on-chip coherent quantum light sources.

  8. DESIGNING FIXED-BED ADSORBERS TO REMOVE MIXTURES OF ORGANICS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A liquid-phase granular activated carbon (GAC) pilot plant and a full-scale GAC adsorber were designed, built, and operated in order to evaluate their performance for treating a groundwater contaminated with several volatile and synthetic organic chemicals. Several empty bed con...

  9. Interactions of organic contaminants with mineral-adsorbed surfactants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, L.; Chen, B.; Tao, S.; Chiou, C.T.

    2003-01-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants (phenol, p-nitrophenol, and naphthalene) to natural solids (soils and bentonite) with and without myristylpyridinium bromide (MPB) cationic surfactant was studied to provide novel insight to interactions of contaminants with the mineral-adsorbed surfactant. Contaminant sorption coefficients with mineral-adsorbed surfactants, Kss, show a strong dependence on surfactant loading in the solid. At low surfactant levels, the Kss values increased with increasing sorbed surfactant mass, reached a maximum, and then decreased with increasing surfactant loading. The Kss values for contaminants were always higher than respective partition coefficients with surfactant micelles (Kmc) and natural organic matter (Koc). At examined MPB concentrations in water the three organic contaminants showed little solubility enhancement by MPB. At low sorbed-surfactant levels, the resulting mineral-adsorbed surfactant via the cation-exchange process appears to form a thin organic film, which effectively "adsorbs" the contaminants, resulting in very high Kss values. At high surfactant levels, the sorbed surfactant on minerals appears to form a bulklike medium that behaves essentially as a partition phase (rather than an adsorptive surface), with the resulting Kss being significantly decreased and less dependent on the MPB loading. The results provide a reference to the use of surfactants for remediation of contaminated soils/sediments or groundwater in engineered surfactant-enhanced washing.

  10. Exciton Binding Energy in Organic-Inorganic Tri-Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Askar, Abdelrahman M; Shankar, Karthik

    2016-06-01

    The recent dramatic increase in the power conversion efficiencies of organic-inorganic tri-halide perovskite solar cells has triggered intense research worldwide and created a paradigm shift in the photovoltaics field. It is crucial to develop a solid understanding of the photophysical processes underlying solar cell operation in order to both further improve the photovoltaic performance of perovskite solar cells as well as to exploit the broader optoelectronic applications of the tri-halide perovskites. In this short review, we summarize the main research findings about the binding energy of excitons in tri-halide perovskite materials and find that a value in the range of 2-22 meV at room temperature would be a safe estimate. Spontaneous free carrier generation is the dominant process taking place directly after photoexcitation in organic-inorganic tri-halide perovskites at room temperature, which eliminates the exciton diffusion bottleneck present in organic solar cells and constitutes a major contributing factor to the high photovoltaic performance of this material. PMID:27427650

  11. Promotion of Organic Reactions by Ultrasound: Coupling of Alkyl and Aryl Halides in the Presence of Lithium Metal and Ultrasound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lash, Timothy D.; Berry, Donna

    1985-01-01

    Experiments involving the coupling of alkyl and aryl halides in the presence of lithium metal and ultrasound are described. The experiments illustrate classical Wurtz and Fittig reactions in addition to being a convenient application of organic sonochemistry. (JN)

  12. Energetics and dynamics in organic-inorganic halide perovskite photovoltaics and light emitters.

    PubMed

    Sum, Tze Chien; Chen, Shi; Xing, Guichuan; Liu, Xinfeng; Wu, Bo

    2015-08-28

    The rapid transcendence of organic-inorganic metal halide perovskite solar cells to above the 20% efficiency mark has captivated the broad photovoltaic community. As the efficiency race continues unabated, it is essential that fundamental studies keep pace with these developments. Further gains in device efficiencies are expected to be increasingly arduous and harder to come by. The key to driving the perovskite solar cell efficiencies towards their Shockley-Queisser limit is through a clear understanding of the interfacial energetics and dynamics between perovskites and other functional materials in nanostructured- and heterojunction-type devices. In this review, we focus on the current progress in basic characterization studies to elucidate the interfacial energetics (energy-level alignment and band bending) and dynamical processes (from the ultrafast to the ultraslow) in organic-inorganic metal halide perovskite photovoltaics and light emitters. Major findings from these studies will be distilled. Open questions and scientific challenges will also be highlighted. PMID:26234397

  13. Energetics and dynamics in organic-inorganic halide perovskite photovoltaics and light emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien Sum, Tze; Chen, Shi; Xing, Guichuan; Liu, Xinfeng; Wu, Bo

    2015-08-01

    The rapid transcendence of organic-inorganic metal halide perovskite solar cells to above the 20% efficiency mark has captivated the broad photovoltaic community. As the efficiency race continues unabated, it is essential that fundamental studies keep pace with these developments. Further gains in device efficiencies are expected to be increasingly arduous and harder to come by. The key to driving the perovskite solar cell efficiencies towards their Shockley-Queisser limit is through a clear understanding of the interfacial energetics and dynamics between perovskites and other functional materials in nanostructured- and heterojunction-type devices. In this review, we focus on the current progress in basic characterization studies to elucidate the interfacial energetics (energy-level alignment and band bending) and dynamical processes (from the ultrafast to the ultraslow) in organic-inorganic metal halide perovskite photovoltaics and light emitters. Major findings from these studies will be distilled. Open questions and scientific challenges will also be highlighted.

  14. Enhanced photodegradation of organic dyes adsorbed on a clay.

    PubMed

    Tani, Seiji; Yamaki, Hiroshi; Sumiyoshi, Azumi; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Hasegawa, Shinya; Yamazaki, Suzuko; Kawamata, Jun

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of three photoactive organic dyes, Rhodamine B, Rhodamine 6G and a stilbazolium derivative 4'-dimethylamino-N-methyl-4-stilbazolium with synthetic sodium-saponite has been examined by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. In all cases, bathochromic shifts and the reduction of peak absorbance for the dyes were observed in the absorption spectra at a low dye concentration (25% adsorption of the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the clay), although the shape and the width of their absorption bands were similar to those in aqueous solution. This absorption behavior indicates that the organic dye molecules adsorbed onto the surface of the negatively charged clay particles and the adsorbed molecules were well dispersed. The photodegradation of the organic dyes in aqueous solution and in the clay suspension has been also examined by the irradiation of a laser beam at a wavelength of 532 nm. We have found that the hybridization of the organic dyes with the exfoliated clay particles largely enhanced a photodegradation. The clay particles acted as a catalyst even at a high concentration such as approximately 300% of CEC. PMID:19441365

  15. Trihalomethane and nonpurgeable total organic-halide formation potentials of the Mississippi river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    Trihalomethane and nonpurgeable total organic-hallide formation potentials were determined for water samples from 12 sites along the Mississippi River from Minneapolis, MN, to New Orleans, LA, for the summer and fall of 1991 and the spring of 1992. The formation potentials increased with distance upstream, approximately paralleling the increase of the dissolved organic- carbon concentration. The pH and the dissolved organic-carbon and free- chlorine concentrations were significant variables in the prediction of the formation potentials. The trihalomethane formation potential increased as the pH increased, whereas the nonpurgeable total organic-halide formation potential decreased. All formation potentials increased as the dissolved organic-carbon and free-chlorine concentrations increased, with the dissolved organic-carbon concentration having a much greater effect.

  16. Size-Dependent Photon Emission from Organometal Halide Perovskite Nanocrystals Embedded in an Organic Matrix

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, organometal halide perovskite materials have attracted significant research interest in the field of optoelectronics. Here, we introduce a simple and low-temperature route for the formation of self-assembled perovskite nanocrystals in a solid organic matrix. We demonstrate that the size and photoluminescence peak of the perovskite nanocrystals can be tuned by varying the concentration of perovskite in the matrix material. The physical origin of the blue shift of the perovskite nanocrystals’ emission compared to its bulk phase is also discussed. PMID:25949773

  17. Organic-inorganic interactions of single crystalline organolead halide perovskites studied by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li-Qiang; Zhang, Tai-Yang; Chen, Liang; Guo, Nanjie; Wang, Yu; Liu, Guo-Kun; Wang, Jia-Rui; Zhou, Jian-Zhang; Yan, Jia-Wei; Zhao, Yi-Xin; Mao, Bing-Wei; Tian, Zhong-Qun

    2016-07-21

    Organolead halide perovskites exhibit superior photoelectric properties, which have given rise to the perovskite-based solar cells whose power conversion efficiency has rapidly reached above 20% in the past few years. However, perovskite-based solar cells have also encountered problems such as current-voltage hysteresis and degradation under practical working conditions. Yet investigations into the intrinsic chemical nature of the perovskite material and its role on the performance of the solar cells are relatively rare. In this work, Raman spectroscopy is employed together with CASTEP calculations to investigate the organic-inorganic interactions in CH3NH3PbI3 and CH3NH3PbBr3-xClx perovskite single crystals with comparison to those having ammonic acid as the cations. For Raman measurements of CH3NH3PbI3, a low energy line of 1030 nm is used to avoid excitation of strong photoluminescence of CH3NH3PbI3. Raman spectra covering a wide range of wavenumbers are obtained, and the restricted rotation modes of CH3-NH3(+) embedded in CH3NH3PbBr3 (325 cm(-1)) are overwhelmingly stronger over the other vibrational bands of the cations. However, the band intensity diminishes dramatically in CH3NH3PbBr3-xClx and most of the bands shift towards high frequency, indicating the interaction with the halides. The details of such an interaction are further revealed by inspecting the band shift of the restricted rotation mode as well as the C-N, NH3(+) and CH3 stretching of the CH3NH3(+) as a function of Cl composition and length of the cationic ammonic acids. The results show that the CH3NH3(+) interacts with the PbX3(-) octahedral framework via the NH3(+) end through N(+)-HX hydrogen bonding whose strength can be tuned by the composition of halides but is insensitive to the size of the organic cations. Moreover, an increase of the Cl content strengthens the hydrogen bonding and thus blueshifts the C-N stretching bands. This is due to the fact that Cl is more electronegative than Br

  18. Regiodivergent Cross-Dehydrogenative Coupling of Pyridines and Benzoxazoles: Discovery of Organic Halides as Regio-Switching Oxidants.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shuya; Murakami, Kei; Itami, Kenichiro

    2016-05-20

    Cross-dehydrogenative coupling (CDC) of two unfunctionalized heteroarenes has been recognized as an ideal transformation to synthesize privileged heterobiaryl scaffolds. However, regioselective activation and transformation of a specific set of two heterocyclic C-H bonds among other bonds have been extremely challenging. Thus, discovering a new controlling element to achieve regio-controlled and regio-divergent heterocyclic CDCs is considered crucial. In this Letter, the unprecedented use of organic halides as an oxidant to achieve the CDC reaction of pyridines and benzoxazoles with palladium catalyst is described. Moreover, the regioselectivity of the pyridine functionalization site can be controlled by the choice of organic halides. PMID:27162109

  19. A First-Principles Study on the Structural and Electronic Properties of Sn-Based Organic-Inorganic Halide Perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zi-Qian; Pan, Hui; Wong, Pak Kin

    2016-08-01

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskites have attracted increasing interest on solar-energy harvesting because of their outstanding electronic properties. In this work, we systematically investigate the structural and electronic properties of Sn-based hybrid perovskites MASnX3 and FASnX3 (X = I, Br) based on density-functional-theory calculations. We find that their electronic properties strongly depend on the organic molecules, halide atoms, and structures. We show that there is a general rule to predict the band gap of the Sn-based hybrid perovskite: its band gap increases as the size of halide atom decreases as well as that of organic molecule increase. The band gap of high temperature phase (cubic structure) is smaller than that of low temperature phase (orthorhombic structure). The band gap of tetragonal structure (medium-temperature phase) may be larger or smaller than that of cubic phase, depending on the orientation of the molecule. Tunable band gap within a range of 0.73-1.53 eV can be achieved by choosing halide atom and organic molecule, and controlling structure. We further show that carrier effective mass also reduces as the size of halide atom increases and that of molecule decreases. By comparing with Pb-based hybrid perovskites, the Sn-based systems show enhanced visible-light absorption and carrier mobility due to narrowed band gap and reduced carrier effective mass. These Sn-based organic-inorganic halide perovskites may find applications in solar energy harvesting with improved performance.

  20. Photo-induced halide redistribution in organic-inorganic perovskite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dequilettes, Dane W.; Zhang, Wei; Burlakov, Victor M.; Graham, Daniel J.; Leijtens, Tomas; Osherov, Anna; Bulović, Vladimir; Snaith, Henry J.; Ginger, David S.; Stranks, Samuel D.

    2016-05-01

    Organic-inorganic perovskites such as CH3NH3PbI3 are promising materials for a variety of optoelectronic applications, with certified power conversion efficiencies in solar cells already exceeding 21%. Nevertheless, state-of-the-art films still contain performance-limiting non-radiative recombination sites and exhibit a range of complex dynamic phenomena under illumination that remain poorly understood. Here we use a unique combination of confocal photoluminescence (PL) microscopy and chemical imaging to correlate the local changes in photophysics with composition in CH3NH3PbI3 films under illumination. We demonstrate that the photo-induced `brightening' of the perovskite PL can be attributed to an order-of-magnitude reduction in trap state density. By imaging the same regions with time-of-flight secondary-ion-mass spectrometry, we correlate this photobrightening with a net migration of iodine. Our work provides visual evidence for photo-induced halide migration in triiodide perovskites and reveals the complex interplay between charge carrier populations, electronic traps and mobile halides that collectively impact optoelectronic performance.

  1. Photo-induced halide redistribution in organic-inorganic perovskite films.

    PubMed

    deQuilettes, Dane W; Zhang, Wei; Burlakov, Victor M; Graham, Daniel J; Leijtens, Tomas; Osherov, Anna; Bulović, Vladimir; Snaith, Henry J; Ginger, David S; Stranks, Samuel D

    2016-01-01

    Organic-inorganic perovskites such as CH3NH3PbI3 are promising materials for a variety of optoelectronic applications, with certified power conversion efficiencies in solar cells already exceeding 21%. Nevertheless, state-of-the-art films still contain performance-limiting non-radiative recombination sites and exhibit a range of complex dynamic phenomena under illumination that remain poorly understood. Here we use a unique combination of confocal photoluminescence (PL) microscopy and chemical imaging to correlate the local changes in photophysics with composition in CH3NH3PbI3 films under illumination. We demonstrate that the photo-induced 'brightening' of the perovskite PL can be attributed to an order-of-magnitude reduction in trap state density. By imaging the same regions with time-of-flight secondary-ion-mass spectrometry, we correlate this photobrightening with a net migration of iodine. Our work provides visual evidence for photo-induced halide migration in triiodide perovskites and reveals the complex interplay between charge carrier populations, electronic traps and mobile halides that collectively impact optoelectronic performance. PMID:27216703

  2. Hydrophobic Organic Hole Transporters for Improved Moisture Resistance in Metal Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Leijtens, Tomas; Giovenzana, Tommaso; Habisreutinger, Severin N; Tinkham, Jonathan S; Noel, Nakita K; Kamino, Brett A; Sadoughi, Golnaz; Sellinger, Alan; Snaith, Henry J

    2016-03-01

    Solar cells based on organic-inorganic perovskite semiconductor materials have recently made rapid improvements in performance, with the best cells performing at over 20% efficiency. With such rapid progress, questions such as cost and solar cell stability are becoming increasingly important to address if this new technology is to reach commercial deployment. The moisture sensitivity of commonly used organic-inorganic metal halide perovskites has especially raised concerns. Here, we demonstrate that the hygroscopic lithium salt commonly used as a dopant for the hole transport material in perovskite solar cells makes the top layer of the devices hydrophilic and causes the solar cells to rapidly degrade in the presence of moisture. By using novel, low cost, and hydrophobic hole transporters in conjunction with a doping method incorporating a preoxidized salt of the respective hole transporters, we are able to prepare efficient perovskite solar cells with greatly enhanced water resistance. PMID:26859777

  3. Click chemistry from organic halides, diazonium salts and anilines in water catalysed by copper nanoparticles on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Francisco; Moglie, Yanina; Radivoy, Gabriel; Yus, Miguel

    2011-09-21

    An easy-to-prepare, reusable and versatile catalyst consisting of oxidised copper nanoparticles on activated carbon has been fully characterised and found to effectively promote the multicomponent synthesis of 1,2,3-triazoles from organic halides, diazonium salts, and aromatic amines in water at a low copper loading. PMID:21789331

  4. Integrated Photoelectrolysis of Water Implemented On Organic Metal Halide Perovskite Photoelectrode.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Minh Tam; Pham, Ngoc Duy; Han, Ji Hun; Gardner, James M; Oh, Ilwhan

    2016-05-18

    Herein we report on integrated photoelectrolysis of water employing organic metal halide (OMH) perovskite material. Generic OMH perovskite material and device architecture are highly susceptible to degradation by moisture and water. We found that decomposition of perovskite devices proceeds by water ingress through pinholes in upper layers and is strongly affected by applied bias/light and electrolyte pH. It was also found that a pinhole-free hole transport layer (HTL) could significantly enhance the stability of the perovskite photoelectrode, thereby extending the photoelectrode lifetime to several tens of minutes, which is an unprecedented record-long operation. Furthermore, a carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer composite layer was developed that can effectively protect the underlying perovskite layer from electrolyte molecules. PMID:27120406

  5. Iron-catalysed cross-coupling of organolithium compounds with organic halides

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Zhenhua; Liu, Qiang; Peng, Xiao-Shui; Wong, Henry N. C.

    2016-01-01

    In past decades, catalytic cross-coupling reactions between organic halides and organometallic reagents to construct carbon–carbon bond have achieved a tremendous progress. However, organolithium reagents have rarely been used in cross-coupling reactions, due mainly to their high reactivity. Another limitation of this transformation using organolithium reagents is how to control reactivity with excellent selectivity. Although palladium catalysis has been applied in this field recently, the development of an approach to replace catalytic systems of noble metals with nonprecious metals is currently in high demand. Herein, we report an efficient synthetic protocol involving iron-catalysed cross-coupling reactions employing organolithium compounds as key coupling partners to unite aryl, alkyl and benzyl fragments and also disclose an efficient iron-catalysed release-capture ethylene coupling with isopropyllithium. PMID:26847602

  6. Charge Transfer Dynamics between Carbon Nanotubes and Hybrid Organic Metal Halide Perovskite Films.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Philip; Dowgiallo, Anne-Marie; Yang, Mengjin; Zhu, Kai; Blackburn, Jeffrey L; Berry, Joseph J

    2016-02-01

    In spite of the rapid rise of metal organic halide perovskites for next-generation solar cells, little quantitative information on the electronic structure of interfaces of these materials is available. The present study characterizes the electronic structure of interfaces between semiconducting single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) contacts and a prototypical methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) absorber layer. Using photoemission spectroscopy we provide quantitative values for the energy levels at the interface and observe the formation of an interfacial dipole between SWCNTs and perovskite. This process can be ascribed to electron donation from the MAPbI3 to the adjacent SWCNT making the nanotube film n-type at the interface and inducing band bending throughout the SWCNT layer. We then use transient absorbance spectroscopy to correlate this electronic alignment with rapid and efficient photoexcited charge transfer. The results indicate that SWCNT transport and contact layers facilitate rapid charge extraction and suggest avenues for enhancing device performance. PMID:26757105

  7. DFT +U Modeling of Hole Polarons in Organic Lead Halide Perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, Eric; Erhart, Paul; Scolfaro, Luisa; Zakhidov, Alex

    Due to the ever present drive towards improved efficiencies in solar cell technology, new and improved materials are emerging rapidly. Organic halide perovskites are a promising prospect, yet a fundamental understanding of the organic perovskite structure and electronic properties is missing. Particularly, explanations of certain physical phenomena, specifically a low recombination rate and high mobility of charge carriers still remain controversial. We theoretically investigate possible formation of hole polarons adopting methodology used for oxide perovskites. The perovskite studied here is the ABX3structure, with A being an organic cation, B lead and C a halogen; the combinations studied allow for A1,xA2 , 1 - xBX1,xX2 , 3 - xwhere the alloy convention is used to show mixtures of the organic cations and/or the halogens. Two organic cations, methylammonium and formamidinium, and three halogens, iodine, chlorine and bromine are studied. Electronic structures and polaron behavior is studied through first principle density functional theory (DFT) calculations using the Vienna Ab Initio Simulation Package (VASP). Local density approximation (LDA) pseudopotentials are used and a +U Hubbard correction of 8 eV is added; this method was shown to work with oxide perovskites. It is shown that a localized state is realized with the Hubbard correction in systems with an electron removed, residing in the band gap of each different structure. Thus, hole polarons are expected to be seen in these perovskites.

  8. RADIOLYSIS OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN THE ADSORBED STATE

    DOEpatents

    Sutherland, J.W.; Allen, A.O.

    1961-10-01

    >A method of forming branch chained hydrocarbons by means of energetic penetrating radiation is described. A solid zeolite substrate is admixed with a cobalt ion and is irradiated with a hydrocarbon adsorbed therein. Upon irradiation with gamma rays, there is an increased yield of branched and lower molecular straight chain compounds. (AEC)

  9. Impact of the organic halide salt on final perovskite composition for photovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, David T.; Sai, Hiroaki; Wee Tan, Kwan; Estroff, Lara A.; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2014-08-01

    The methylammonium lead halide perovskites have shown significant promise as a low-cost, second generation, photovoltaic material. Despite recent advances, however, there are still a number of fundamental aspects of their formation as well as their physical and electronic behavior that are not well understood. In this letter we explore the mechanism by which these materials crystallize by testing the outcome of each of the reagent halide salts. We find that components of both salts, lead halide and methylammonium halide, are relatively mobile and can be readily exchanged during the crystallization process when the reaction is carried out in solution or in the solid state. We exploit this fact by showing that the perovskite structure is formed even when the lead salt's anion is a non-halide, leading to lower annealing temperature and time requirements for film formation. Studies into these behaviors may ultimately lead to improved processing conditions for photovoltaic films.

  10. EVALUATION OF SOLID ADSORBENTS FOR THE COLLECTION AND ANALYSES OF AMBIENT BIOGENIC VOLATILE ORGANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micrometeorological flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) usually require that large volumes of air be collected (whole air samples) or focused during the sampling process (cryogenic trapping or gas-solid partitioning on adsorbents) in order to achiev...

  11. Inhomogeneous distribution of organic molecules adsorbed in sol gel glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneses-Nava, M. A.; Chávez-Cerda, S.; Sánchez-Villicaña, V.; Sánchez-Mondragón, J. J.; King, T. A.

    1999-09-01

    The effects of the porous matrix upon the radiative characteristics of quinine sulphate doped sol-gel glasses are investigated. The broadenings of the absorption and fluorescence spectra are explained by the attachment of the molecules on distorted sites or in a non-planar fashion, creating an inhomogeneous distribution of adsorbed molecules. For this reason, each emitting center relaxes with its own characteristics. This inhomogeneous distribution is also supported by the non-exponential and the wavelength dependence of the fluorescence decay.

  12. Silver-halide/organic-composite structures: Toward materials with multiple photographic functionalities

    SciTech Connect

    Bringley, Joseph F. . E-mail: joseph.bringley@kodak.com; Rajeswaran, Manju; Olson, Leif P.; Liebert, Nancy M.

    2005-10-15

    We report the synthesis and structure of the novel silver-halide-based organic-inorganic hybrids Ag{sub 2}Br{sub 6}(PPD){sub 2}, Ag{sub 2}Br{sub 6}(CD-2){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O, Ag{sub 2}Br{sub 4}(TMBD), and Ag{sub 2}I{sub 6}(CD-2){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O. 1,4-phenylenediammonium hexabromodiargentate(I) [Ag{sub 2}Br{sub 6}(PPD){sub 2}] crystals are monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/n), with unit-cell dimensions, a=10.1915(3)A, b=7.7562(2)A, c=12.4340(5)A and {beta}=93.109(1){sup o}. N,N-diethyl-2-methyl-1,4-benzenediammonium hexabromodiargentate(I) monohydrate [Ag{sub 2}Br{sub 6}(CD-2){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O] crystals are monoclinic (space group P2{sub 1}/c) with a=10.8434(2)A, b=11.4293(2)A, c=14.3729(1)A, and {beta}=96.153(1){sup o}. N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-1,4-benzenediammonium tetrabromodiargentate(I) [Ag{sub 2}Br{sub 4}(TMBD)] crystals are orthorhombic (space group Pbcn) with a=17.0030(6)A, b=6.6163(2)A, and c=15.9762(6)A. N,N-diethyl-2-methyl-1,4-benzenediammonium hexaiododiargentate(I) monohydrate, [Ag{sub 2}I{sub 6}(CD-2){sub 2}.H{sub 2}O], are monoclinic (C2/c), with unit-cell dimensions, a=21.4691(4)A, b=12.1411(2)A, c=14.3102(2)A, and {beta}=98.657(1){sup o}. The novel structures are members of a class of silver-halide-based organic-inorganic hybrids based upon the assembly of [Ag{sub a}X{sub b}]{sup n-} clusters and protonated organoamines in aqueous mineral acids. The clusters display short intracluster Ag-Ag distances, and computational methods are used to evaluate intracluster Ag-Ag bonding. The diverse stoichiometries and cluster connectivities observed suggest a rich compositional and structural chemistry based upon the general assembly method. We have extended the methodology to include a silver-halide-organoamonium chemistry in which the organic moiety is chosen to serve a specific photographic function and demonstrate the first examples of such materials. The methodology allows for the direct assembly of [Ag{sub a}X{sub b}]{sup n-} clusters with commercial photographic color

  13. Organic-inorganic hybrid lead halide perovskites for optoelectronic and electronic applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yixin; Zhu, Kai

    2016-02-01

    Organic and inorganic hybrid perovskites (e.g., CH(3)NH(3)PbI(3)), with advantages of facile processing, tunable bandgaps, and superior charge-transfer properties, have emerged as a new class of revolutionary optoelectronic semiconductors promising for various applications. Perovskite solar cells constructed with a variety of configurations have demonstrated unprecedented progress in efficiency, reaching about 20% from multiple groups after only several years of active research. A key to this success is the development of various solution-synthesis and film-deposition techniques for controlling the morphology and composition of hybrid perovskites. The rapid progress in material synthesis and device fabrication has also promoted the development of other optoelectronic applications including light-emitting diodes, photodetectors, and transistors. Both experimental and theoretical investigations on organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites have enabled some critical fundamental understandings of this material system. Recent studies have also demonstrated progress in addressing the potential stability issue, which has been identified as a main challenge for future research on halide perovskites. Here, we review recent progress on hybrid perovskites including basic chemical and crystal structures, chemical synthesis of bulk/nanocrystals and thin films with their chemical and physical properties, device configurations, operation principles for various optoelectronic applications (with a focus on solar cells), and photophysics of charge-carrier dynamics. We also discuss the importance of further understanding of the fundamental properties of hybrid perovskites, especially those related to chemical and structural stabilities. PMID:26645733

  14. Scandium-Triflate/Metal-Organic Frameworks: Remarkable Adsorbents for Desulfurization and Denitrogenation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Nazmul Abedin; Jhung, Sung Hwa

    2015-12-01

    Scandium-triflate (Sc(OTf)3) was introduced for the first time on metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), to utilize acidic Sc(OTf)3 for adsorptive desulfurization and denitrogenation of fuel containing benzothiophene (BT), dibenzothiophene (DBT), quinoline (QUI), and indole (IND). A remarkable improvement in the adsorption capacity (about 65% based on the weight of adsorbents; 90% based on the surface area of the adsorbents) was observed with the Sc(OTf)3/MOFs as compared to the virgin MOFs for the adsorption of BT from liquid fuel. The basic QUI was also adsorbed preferentially onto the acidic Sc(OTf)3/MOFs. However, nonsupported Sc(OTf)3 showed negligible adsorption capacities. The improved adsorptive performance for BT, DBT, and QUI might be derived from acid-base interactions between the acidic Sc(OTf)3 and basic adsorbates. On the other hand, the Sc(OTf)3, loaded on MOFs, reduced the adsorption capacity for neutral IND due to lack of interaction between the neutral adsorbate and acidic adsorbent and the reduced porosities of the modified adsorbents. The reusability of the adsorbents was found satisfactory up to the fourth run. On the basis of the result, it is suggested that metal-triflates, such as Sc(OTf)3, can be prospective materials for adsorptive desulfurization/denitrogenation of fuels when supported on porous materials such as MOFs. PMID:26575418

  15. Charge-Carrier Dynamics in Organic-Inorganic Metal Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Herz, Laura M

    2016-05-27

    Hybrid organic-inorganic metal halide perovskites have recently emerged as exciting new light-harvesting and charge-transporting materials for efficient photovoltaic devices. Yet knowledge of the nature of the photogenerated excitations and their subsequent dynamics is only just emerging. This article reviews the current state of the field, focusing first on a description of the crystal and electronic band structure that give rise to the strong optical transitions that enable light harvesting. An overview is presented of the numerous experimental approaches toward determining values for exciton binding energies, which appear to be small (a few milli-electron volts to a few tens of milli-electron volts) and depend significantly on temperature because of associated changes in the dielectric function. Experimental evidence for charge-carrier relaxation dynamics within the first few picoseconds after excitation is discussed in terms of thermalization, cooling, and many-body effects. Charge-carrier recombination mechanisms are reviewed, encompassing trap-assisted nonradiative recombination that is highly specific to processing conditions, radiative bimolecular (electron-hole) recombination, and nonradiative many-body (Auger) mechanisms. PMID:26980309

  16. Extra adsorption and adsorbate superlattice formation in metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung Cho, Hae; Deng, Hexiang; Miyasaka, Keiichi; Dong, Zhiyue; Cho, Minhyung; Neimark, Alexander V.; Ku Kang, Jeung; Yaghi, Omar M.; Terasaki, Osamu

    2015-11-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have a high internal surface area and widely tunable composition, which make them useful for applications involving adsorption, such as hydrogen, methane or carbon dioxide storage. The selectivity and uptake capacity of the adsorption process are determined by interactions involving the adsorbates and their porous host materials. But, although the interactions of adsorbate molecules with the internal MOF surface and also amongst themselves within individual pores have been extensively studied, adsorbate-adsorbate interactions across pore walls have not been explored. Here we show that local strain in the MOF, induced by pore filling, can give rise to collective and long-range adsorbate-adsorbate interactions and the formation of adsorbate superlattices that extend beyond an original MOF unit cell. Specifically, we use in situ small-angle X-ray scattering to track and map the distribution and ordering of adsorbate molecules in five members of the mesoporous MOF-74 series along entire adsorption-desorption isotherms. We find in all cases that the capillary condensation that fills the pores gives rise to the formation of ‘extra adsorption domains’—that is, domains spanning several neighbouring pores, which have a higher adsorbate density than non-domain pores. In the case of one MOF, IRMOF-74-V-hex, these domains form a superlattice structure that is difficult to reconcile with the prevailing view of pore-filling as a stochastic process. The visualization of the adsorption process provided by our data, with clear evidence for initial adsorbate aggregation in distinct domains and ordering before an even distribution is finally reached, should help to improve our understanding of this process and may thereby improve our ability to exploit it practically.

  17. Adsorption on Alkali Halides.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urzua Duran, Gilberto Antonio

    1995-01-01

    Using a variety of interionic potentials, I have computed the configurations of adsorbed alkali halides monomers on the (001) surface of selected alkali halides crystals. In the majority of cases studied it is found that the monomer adsorbs perpendicular to the surface with the cation sitting nearly on top of the surface anion. In about ten percent of the cases though the monomer adsorbs tilted from the vertical. In these cases the ion that is closer to the surface can be the cation or the anion. The effect of polarization forces is found to be important. In order to discuss the effects of surface retaxation with adsorbates, I have evaluated the surface relaxation of the alkali halide crystals, using a shell model for the interionic forces. It is found that surface relaxation and rumpling are generally small, especially when the van der Waals forces are included. A theory of the effect of substrate vibrations on the binding of an adsorbed atom is developed. At T = 0 the binding energy is D_0-E, where D_0 is the surface well depth (classical binding energy) and E is the quantum correction. For several simple models, it is found that E is surprisingly model-independent. We compare D _0-E with the binding energies to a rigid substrate, D_0-E_{rs}, and to a vibrationally averaged substrate, D _0-E_{va}. We prove that E_{va}>=q E>=q E_ {rs} and that similar relations hold at finite temperature for the free energy of binding. In most cases E_{rs} is better than E_{va} as an approximation to E.

  18. Covalent organic frameworks: Potential adsorbent for carbon dioxide adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yinhuan

    A series of covalent organic frameworks (COFs) based on propeller shaped hexaphenylbenzene derivatives were obtained under solvothermal conditions via Schiff base reaction. The relationship between the geometry parameters of monomers and gas absorption behaviors of planar COFs was investigated. The FT-IR spectroscopy confirms the formation of imine double bond in the obtained COFs by showing a peak around 1620 cm-1. The resulting frameworks have high BET surface areas approaching 700 m2/g and CO2 uptake up to 14% at 273 K and 1 bar, which are better than most of the 2-D porous aromatic frameworks. The thermogravimetric analysis shows those frameworks are stable until 773 K, allowing for the practical application of the post-combustion CO2 technology. Moreover, a novel synthetic strategy for the trigonal pyramidal hydrozide monomers was established. It provides an efficient way to synthesize the hydrozide monomers at multi-gram scale, promising for the synthesis of hydrozane porous organic cages.

  19. COMPARISON OF SOLID ADSORBENT SAMPLING TECHNIQUES FOR VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN AMBIENT AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The specific objective of the study was to compare the performance of three solid adsorbents (Tenax, an experimental polyimide resin, and Spherocarb) as well as cryogenic trapping/gas chromatography for sampling and analysis of a target list of volatile organic compounds in ambie...

  20. Influences of Dilute Organic Adsorbates on the Hydration of Low-Surface-Area Silicates.

    PubMed

    Sangodkar, Rahul P; Smith, Benjamin J; Gajan, David; Rossini, Aaron J; Roberts, Lawrence R; Funkhouser, Gary P; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon; Chmelka, Bradley F

    2015-07-01

    Competitive adsorption of dilute quantities of certain organic molecules and water at silicate surfaces strongly influence the rates of silicate dissolution, hydration, and crystallization. Here, we determine the molecular-level structures, compositions, and site-specific interactions of adsorbed organic molecules at low absolute bulk concentrations on heterogeneous silicate particle surfaces at early stages of hydration. Specifically, dilute quantities (∼0.1% by weight of solids) of the disaccharide sucrose or industrially important phosphonic acid species slow dramatically the hydration of low-surface-area (∼1 m(2)/g) silicate particles. Here, the physicochemically distinct adsorption interactions of these organic species are established by using dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) surface-enhanced solid-state NMR techniques. These measurements provide significantly improved signal sensitivity for near-surface species that is crucial for the detection and analysis of dilute adsorbed organic molecules and silicate species on low-surface-area particles, which until now have been infeasible to characterize. DNP-enhanced 2D (29)Si{(1)H}, (13)C{(1)H}, and (31)P{(1)H} heteronuclear correlation and 1D (29)Si{(13)C} rotational-echo double-resonance NMR measurements establish hydrogen-bond-mediated adsorption of sucrose at distinct nonhydrated and hydrated silicate surface sites and electrostatic interactions with surface Ca(2+) cations. By comparison, phosphonic acid molecules are found to adsorb electrostatically at or near cationic calcium surface sites to form Ca(2+)-phosphonate complexes. Although dilute quantities of both types of organic molecules effectively inhibit hydration, they do so by adsorbing in distinct ways that depend on their specific architectures and physicochemical interactions. The results demonstrate the feasibility of using DNP-enhanced NMR techniques to measure and assess dilute adsorbed molecules and their molecular interactions on low

  1. Transient magnetization of core excited organic molecules adsorbed on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, Abhilash; Baby, Anu; Lin, He; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Fratesi, Guido

    This work presents a density functional theory based computational investigation of electronic and magnetic properties of physisorbed and chemisorbed organic molecules on graphene in the ground state and core excited one at low molecular coverage. For physisorbed molecules, where the interaction with graphene is dominated by van der Waals forces and the system is non-magnetic in the ground state, it is found that the valence electrons relax towards a spin polarized configuration upon excitation of a core-level electron. The magnetism depends on efficient electron transfer from graphene on the femtosecond time scale. On the contrary, when graphene is covalently functionalized, the system is magnetic in the ground state presenting two spin dependent mid gap states localized around the adsorption site. At variance with the physisorbed case upon core-level excitation, the LUMO of the molecule and the mid gap states of graphene hybridize and the relaxed valence shell is not magnetic anymore. This project has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme under grant agreement n∘ 607232 [THINFACE].

  2. Electrospun polystyrene nanofibers as a novel adsorbent to transfer an organic phase from an aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feilong; Song, Dandan; Huang, Xueying; Xu, Hui

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work is to develop a simple phase-transfer method for dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. For this purpose, a polystyrene nanofiber was prepared by a facile electrospinning strategy and used for the first time as an adsorbent to transfer the organic phase in dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction procedure. The fiber was characterized and its chemical stability and excellent hydrophobicity enable it to selectively adsorb the organic solvent in an aqueous sample. High porosity and specific surface area provide a large adsorption capacity. Under the optimal conditions, the developed dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction with high-performance liquid chromatography method was successfully applied to the analysis of aldehydes in environmental water samples. The merits of this approach are that it is easy-to-operate, low-cost, time-saving, and has satisfactory sensitivity. It provides an alternative way for fast and convenient phase transfer of the hydrophobic organic solvent from the aqueous phase. PMID:26841974

  3. Radiochemical synthesis of pure anhydrous metal halides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philipp, W. H.; Marsik, S. J.; May, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    Method uses radiation chemistry as practical tool for inorganic preparations and in particular deposition of metals by irradiation of their aqueous metal salt solutions with high energy electrons. Higher valence metal halide is dissolved in organic liquid and exposed to high energy electrons. This causes metal halide to be reduced to a lower valence metal halide.

  4. Low cost adsorbents for the removal of organic pollutants from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Asim, Mohd; Khan, Tabrez A

    2012-12-30

    Water pollution due to organic contaminants is a serious issue because of acute toxicities and carcinogenic nature of the pollutants. Among various water treatment methods, adsorption is supposed as the best one due to its inexpensiveness, universal nature and ease of operation. Many waste materials used include fruit wastes, coconut shell, scrap tyres, bark and other tannin-rich materials, sawdust and other wood type materials, rice husk, petroleum wastes, fertilizer wastes, fly ash, sugar industry wastes blast furnace slag, chitosan and seafood processing wastes, seaweed and algae, peat moss, clays, red mud, zeolites, sediment and soil, ore minerals etc. These adsorbents have been found to remove various organic pollutants ranging from 80 to 99.9%. The present article describes the conversion of waste products into effective adsorbents and their application for water treatment. The possible mechanism of adsorption on these adsorbents has also been included in this article. Besides, attempts have been made to discuss the future perspectives of low cost adsorbents in water treatment. PMID:23023039

  5. Direct Measurement of Adsorbed Gas Redistribution in Metal–Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Ying-Pin; Liu, Yangyang; Liu, Dahuan; Bosch, Mathieu; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2015-03-04

    Knowledge about the interactions between gas molecules and adsorption sites is essential to customize metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as adsorbents. The dynamic interactions occurring during adsorption/desorption working cycles with several states are especially complicated. Even so, the gas dynamics based upon experimental observations and the distribution of guest molecules under various conditions in MOFs have not been extensively studied yet. In this work, a direct time-resolved diffraction structure envelope (TRDSE) method using sequential measurements by in situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction has been developed to monitor several gas dynamic processes taking place in MOFs: infusion, desorption, and gas redistribution upon temperature change. The electron density maps indicate that gas molecules prefer to redistribute over heterogeneous types of sites rather than to exclusively occupy the primary binding sites. We found that the gas molecules are entropically driven from open metal sites to larger neighboring spaces during the gas infusion period, matching the localized-to-mobile mechanism. In addition, the partitioning ratio of molecules adsorbed at each site varies with different temperatures, as opposed to an invariant distribution mode. Equally important, the gas adsorption in MOFs is intensely influenced by the gas–gas interactions, which might induce more molecules to be accommodated in an orderly compact arrangement. This sequential TRDSE method is generally applicable to most crystalline adsorbents, yielding information on distribution ratios of adsorbates at each type of site.

  6. Is There a Need to Discuss Atomic Orbital Overlap When Teaching Hydrogen-Halide Bond Strength and Acidity Trends in Organic Chemistry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devarajan, Deepa; Gustafson, Samantha J.; Bickelhaupt, F. Matthias; Ess, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate organic chemistry textbooks and Internet websites use a variety of approaches for presenting and explaining the impact of halogen atom size on trends in bond strengths and/or acidity of hydrogen halides. In particular, several textbooks and Internet websites explain these trends by invoking decreasing orbital overlap between the…

  7. Mercury removal from incineration flue gas by organic and inorganic adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Jurng, Jongsoo; Lee, Tai Gyu; Lee, Gyo Woo; Lee, Sung-Jun; Kim, Byung Hwa; Seier, Jochen

    2002-06-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate various adsorbents for their mercury removal capabilities from incineration flue gases. Four different materials were tested; Zeolite, Bentonite, activated carbon (AC), and wood char. Real incineration off-gas and in-lab simulated combustion flue gases (N2 + Hg) were used. Three cylindrical-shaped sorbent columns with 5 cm in diameter and 20 cm in length were used. The gas flow rate was fixed at 660 l/h at all times. Concentrations of NO, CO, O2, CO2, SO2, H2O, HCl, and mercury were continuously monitored. Mercury removal efficiencies of natural Zeolite and Bentonite were found to be much lower than those of the referenced AC. Amount of Hg removed were 9.2 and 7.4 microg/g of Zeolite and Bentonite, respectively. Removal efficiencies of each layer consisted of inorganic adsorbents were no higher than 7%. No significant improvement was observed with sulfur impregnation onto the inorganic adsorbents. Organic adsorbents (wood char and AC) showed much higher mercury removal efficiencies than those of inorganic ones (Zeolite and Bentonite). Mercury removal efficiency of wood char reached over 95% in the first layer, showing almost same effectiveness as AC which currently may be the most effective adsorbents for mercury. Amount of mercury captured by wood char was approximately 0.6 mg/g of wood char, close to the amount captured by AC tested in this study. Hence, wood char, made from the waste woods through a gasification process, should be considered as a possible alternative to relatively expensive AC. PMID:12108697

  8. Removal of organic pollutants from aqueous solutions by adsorbents prepared from an agroalimentary by-product.

    PubMed

    Delval, Franck; Crini, Grégorio; Vebrel, Joël

    2006-11-01

    Two series of crosslinked starch polymers were tested for their ability to adsorb organic pollutants in aqueous solutions. The polymers were prepared by a crosslinking reaction of starch-enriched flour using epichlorohydrin as the crosslinking agent, without and in the presence of NH(4)OH. These polymers were used as sorbent materials for the removal of phenolic derivatives from wastewater. The influence of several parameters (kinetics, pH and polymer structure) on the sorption capacity was evaluated using the batch and the open column methods. Results of adsorption experiments showed that the starch-based materials exhibited high sorption capacities toward phenolic derivatives. The study of the kinetics of pollutant uptake revealed that the adsorbents presented a relatively fast rate of adsorption. The experimental data were examined using the Langmuir and Freundlich models and it was found that the Freundlich model appeared to fit the isotherm data better than the Langmuir model. PMID:16275061

  9. Comparison of Gas and Adsorbed Phase X-ray Photoemission Spectra of Oxidized Organics on Ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newberg, J. T.; Bluhm, H.

    2011-12-01

    Most uptake studies of small chain organics on ice surfaces at near ambient conditions have been performed using flow tube and other methods which monitor the disappearance of the gas phase. We will present results using synchrotron based, ambient pressure X-ray photoemission spectroscopy which allows for the probing of the ice surface directly at near ambient conditions. C 1s XPS and C K-edge NEXAFS gas phase and adsorbed phase spectra will be compared for 2-propanol, acetone, and 1-propanal on ice at -45 C. Uptake experiments give rise to first order Langmuirian isotherms. Acetone and 2-propanol show little difference in the photoemission spectra between the gas phase and adsorbed phase, suggesting that adsorption occurs molecularly. However, adsorption of 1-propanal shows evidence of chemical transformation (oxidation) at the interface of ice. Further studies are underway to better understand this adsorption behavior.

  10. The interaction between hybrid organic-inorganic halide perovskite and selective contacts in perovskite solar cells: an infrared spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Idígoras, J; Todinova, A; Sánchez-Valencia, J R; Barranco, A; Borrás, A; Anta, J A

    2016-05-11

    The interaction of hybrid organic-inorganic halide perovskite and selective contacts is crucial to get efficient, stable and hysteresis-free perovskite-based solar cells. In this report, we analyze the vibrational properties of methylammonium lead halide perovskites deposited on different substrates by infrared absorption (IR) measurements (4000-500 cm(-1)). The materials employed as substrates are not only characterized by different chemical natures (TiO2, ZnO and Al2O3), but also by different morphologies. For all of them, we have investigated the influence of these substrate properties on perovskite formation and its degradation by humidity. The effect of selective-hole contact (Spiro-OmeTad and P3HT) layers on the degradation rate by moisture has also been studied. Our IR results reveal the existence of a strong interaction between perovskite and all ZnO materials considered, evidenced by a shift of the peaks related to the N-H vibrational modes. The interaction even induces a morphological change in ZnO nanoparticles after perovskite deposition, pointing to an acid-base reaction that takes place through the NH3(+) groups of the methylammonium cation. Our IR and X-ray diffraction results also indicate that this specific interaction favors perovskite decomposition and PbI2 formation for ZnO/perovskite films subjected to humid conditions. Although no interaction is observed for TiO2, Al2O3, and the hole selective contact, the morphology and chemical nature of both contacts appear to play an important role in the rate of degradation upon exposure to moisture. PMID:27138224

  11. Development of adsorbent for the simultaneous removal of organic and inorganic contaminants from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Choi, J W; Chung, S G; Hong, S W; Kim, D J; Lee, S H

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a modified adsorbent, alginate complex beads, was prepared and applied to the removal of mixed contaminants from wastewater. The alginate complex beads were generated by the immobilization of powdered activated carbon and synthetic zeolites onto alginate gel beads, which were then dried at 110 °C for 20 h until the diameter had been reduced to 1 mm. This dry technique increased the hardness of the adsorbent to assure its durability and application. The adsorption onto the alginate complex beads of organic and inorganic compounds, as target contaminants, was investigated by performing both equilibrium and kinetic batch experiments. From the adsorption isotherms, according to the Langmuir equation, the alginate complex bead was capable of effectively removing benzene, toluene, zinc and cadmium. From kinetic batch experiments, the removal efficiencies of benzene, toluene, zinc and cadmium were found to be 66.5, 92.4, 74.1 and 76.7%, respectively, for initial solution concentrations of 100 mg L(-1). The results indicated that the adsorbent developed in this study has the potential to be a promising material for the removal of mixed pollutants from industrial wastewater or contaminated groundwater. PMID:22020474

  12. Polyethyleneimine Incorporated Metal-Organic Frameworks Adsorbent for Highly Selective CO2 Capture

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yichao; Yan, Qiuju; Kong, Chunlong; Chen, Liang

    2013-01-01

    A series of polyethyleneimine (PEI) incorporated MIL-101 adsorbents with different PEI loadings were reported for the first time in the present work. Although the surface area and pore volume of MIL-101 decreased significantly after loading PEI, all the resulting composites exhibited dramatically enhanced CO2 adsorption capacity at low pressures. At 100 wt% PEI loading, the CO2 adsorption capacity at 0.15 bar reached a very competitive value of 4.2 mmol g−1 at 25°C, and 3.4 mmol g−1 at 50°C. More importantly, the resulting adsorbents displayed rapid adsorption kinetics and ultrahigh selectivity for CO2 over N2 in the designed flue gas with 0.15 bar CO2 and 0.75 bar N2. The CO2 over N2 selectivity was up to 770 at 25°C, and 1200 at 50°C. We believe that the PEI based metal-organic frameworks is an attractive adsorbent for CO2 capture. PMID:23681218

  13. Hot-carrier cooling and photoinduced refractive index changes in organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Michael B.; Butkus, Justinas; Jellicoe, Tom C.; Sadhanala, Aditya; Briane, Anouk; Halpert, Jonathan E.; Broch, Katharina; Hodgkiss, Justin M.; Friend, Richard H.; Deschler, Felix

    2015-09-01

    Metal-halide perovskites are at the frontier of optoelectronic research due to solution processability and excellent semiconductor properties. Here we use transient absorption spectroscopy to study hot-carrier distributions in CH3NH3PbI3 and quantify key semiconductor parameters. Above bandgap, non-resonant excitation creates quasi-thermalized carrier distributions within 100 fs. During carrier cooling, a sub-bandgap transient absorption signal arises at ~1.6 eV, which is explained by the interplay of bandgap renormalization and hot-carrier distributions. At higher excitation densities, a `phonon bottleneck' substantially slows carrier cooling. This effect indicates a low contribution from inelastic carrier-impurity or phonon-impurity scattering in these polycrystalline materials, which supports high charge-carrier mobilities. Photoinduced reflectivity changes distort the shape of transient absorption spectra and must be included to extract physical constants. Using a simple band-filling model that accounts for these changes, we determine a small effective mass of mr=0.14 mo, which agrees with band structure calculations and high photovoltaic performance.

  14. Hot-carrier cooling and photoinduced refractive index changes in organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites.

    PubMed

    Price, Michael B; Butkus, Justinas; Jellicoe, Tom C; Sadhanala, Aditya; Briane, Anouk; Halpert, Jonathan E; Broch, Katharina; Hodgkiss, Justin M; Friend, Richard H; Deschler, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Metal-halide perovskites are at the frontier of optoelectronic research due to solution processability and excellent semiconductor properties. Here we use transient absorption spectroscopy to study hot-carrier distributions in CH3NH3PbI3 and quantify key semiconductor parameters. Above bandgap, non-resonant excitation creates quasi-thermalized carrier distributions within 100 fs. During carrier cooling, a sub-bandgap transient absorption signal arises at ∼ 1.6 eV, which is explained by the interplay of bandgap renormalization and hot-carrier distributions. At higher excitation densities, a 'phonon bottleneck' substantially slows carrier cooling. This effect indicates a low contribution from inelastic carrier-impurity or phonon-impurity scattering in these polycrystalline materials, which supports high charge-carrier mobilities. Photoinduced reflectivity changes distort the shape of transient absorption spectra and must be included to extract physical constants. Using a simple band-filling model that accounts for these changes, we determine a small effective mass of mr=0.14 mo, which agrees with band structure calculations and high photovoltaic performance. PMID:26404048

  15. The effects of adsorbing organic pollutants from super heavy oil wastewater by lignite activated coke.

    PubMed

    Tong, Kun; Lin, Aiguo; Ji, Guodong; Wang, Dong; Wang, Xinghui

    2016-05-01

    The adsorption of organic pollutants from super heavy oil wastewater (SHOW) by lignite activated coke (LAC) was investigated. Specifically, the effects of LAC adsorption on pH, BOD5/COD(Cr)(B/C), and the main pollutants before and after adsorption were examined. The removed organic pollutants were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Boehm titrations, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and liquid chromatography with organic carbon detection (LC-OCD). FTIR spectra indicated that organic pollutants containing -COOH and -NH2 functional groups were adsorbed from the SHOW. Boehm titrations further demonstrated that carboxyl, phenolic hydroxyl, and lactonic groups on the surface of the LAC increased. GC-MS showed that the removed main organic compounds are difficult to be degraded or extremely toxics to aquatic organisms. According to the results of LC-OCD, 30.37 mg/L of dissolved organic carbons were removed by LAC adsorption. Among these, hydrophobic organic contaminants accounted for 25.03 mg/L. Furthermore, LAC adsorption was found to increase pH and B/C ratio of the SHOW. The mechanisms of adsorption were found to involve between the hydrogen bonding and the functional groups of carboxylic, phenolic, and lactonic on the LAC surface. In summary, all these results demonstrated that LAC adsorption can remove bio-refractory DOCs, which is beneficial for biodegradation. PMID:26808249

  16. Orientation and order of aqueous organic ions adsorbed to a solid surface

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhishvili, S.A.; Granick, S.

    1999-01-21

    The adsorption and orientation of an aqueous organic ion with anisotropic shape (1,4-dimethylpyridinium, P{sup +}) at the surface of oxidized silicon carrying opposite charge (produced by conditions of high pH) were studied using polarized infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR). Orientation relative to the surface was quantified from the dichroic ratio of in-plane skeletal vibrations of the pyridinium ring (1643 and 1523 cm{sup {minus}1}), and the adsorbed amount was inferred from the intensity of these bands. The sticking energy of the organic ion was slightly larger than that of small inorganic ions of the same charge (Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Cs{sup +}). From relative quantities adsorbed in competitive adsorption, the relative sticking energy was quantified ({approximately}7k{sub B}T relative to Na{sup +} at pH = 9.2 and varying in the order Cs{sup +} > Na{sup +} > Li{sup +} by the total amount of 0.6k{sub B}T). At low ionic strength (no inorganic ions present except those in the buffer solution), P{sup +} stood preferably parallel to the surface when the surface coverage was low but more nearly upright both as its surface coverage increased and as the concentration of coadsorbed small ions increased. This shows the influence of steric packing on the orientation of this ion of asymmetric shape. The larger the hydrated diameter of the coadsorbed ion, the more the P{sup +} ion tilted away from the surface (H{sup +} < Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Cs{sup +} < Mg{sup 2+}). Furthermore, if the mass adsorbed exceeded a critical level, both the tilt and the amount adsorbed jumped in response to increasing P{sup +} concentration in bulk solution, with hysteresis upon dilution. This jump, together with the measured ellipsometric thickness and contact angle, suggests that the discontinuity involved structural change within a single monolayer. The organic ion thus behaved at the surface as an embryonic amphiphile, although in the bulk, micelle formation has

  17. Quantum confinement and dielectric profiles of colloidal nanoplatelets of halide inorganic and hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites.

    PubMed

    Sapori, Daniel; Kepenekian, Mikaël; Pedesseau, Laurent; Katan, Claudine; Even, Jacky

    2016-03-28

    Quantum confinement as well as high frequency ε∞ and static εs dielectric profiles are described for nanoplatelets of halide inorganic perovskites CsPbX3 (X = I, Br, Cl) and hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites (HOP) in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) structures. 3D HOP are currently being sought for their impressive photovoltaic ability. Prior to this sudden popularity, 2D HOP materials were driving intense activity in the field of optoelectronics. Such developments have been enriched by the recent ability to synthesize colloidal nanostructures of controlled sizes of 2D and 3D HOP. This raises the need to achieve a thorough description of the electronic structure and dielectric properties of these systems. In this work, we go beyond the abrupt dielectric interface model and reach the atomic scale description. We examine the influence of the nature of the halogen and of the cation on the band structure and dielectric constants. Similarly, we survey the effect of dimensionality and shape of the perovskite. In agreement with recent experimental results, we show an increase of the band gap and a decrease of ε∞ when the size of a nanoplatelet reduces. By inspecting 2D HOP, we find that it cannot be described as a simple superposition of independent inorganic and organic layers. Finally, the dramatic impact of ionic contributions on the dielectric constant εs is analysed. PMID:26705549

  18. Revealing the role of organic cations in hybrid halide perovskite CH3NH3PbI3

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Carlo; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Kais, Sabre; Tabet, Nouar; Alharbi, Fahhad; Sanvito, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The hybrid halide perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 has enabled solar cells to reach an efficiency of about 20%, demonstrating a pace for improvements with no precedents in the solar energy arena. Despite such explosive progress, the microscopic origin behind the success of such material is still debated, with the role played by the organic cations in the light-harvesting process remaining unclear. Here van der Waals-corrected density functional theory calculations reveal that the orientation of the organic molecules plays a fundamental role in determining the material electronic properties. For instance, if CH3NH3 orients along a (011)-like direction, the PbI6 octahedral cage will distort and the bandgap will become indirect. Our results suggest that molecular rotations, with the consequent dynamical change of the band structure, might be at the origin of the slow carrier recombination and the superior conversion efficiency of CH3NH3PbI3. PMID:25912782

  19. Investigation of organic, inorganic and synthetic adsorbents for the pretreatment of landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, H; Fernandes, L; Tezel, F H

    2008-05-01

    An investigation into the use of organic, inorganic and synthetic adsorbents for the pretreatment of landfill leachate, generated by the City of Ottawa Trail Road Landfill, was carried out. The purpose of this project was to reduce the concentration of contaminants in order to meet the local Sewer Use By-Laws, prior to transporting the leachate from the generating site to the local municipal sewage treatment plant, and thereby reducing the disposal fees. Peat moss, compost, clinoptilolite, basalt and two types of activated carbon (DSR-A and F400) were investigated to determine the adsorption capacity for contaminants from leachate. Kinetic studies were also performed. The results based on batch adsorption isotherms show that peat moss has the highest adsorption capacity for boron (B) and barium (Ba), compared with the other adsorbents. Also peat moss has good removals of Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen (TKN), Total Organic Carbon (TOC), and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX), but these are lower than the removals obtained with activated carbon. Because of its relatively low cost and higher adsorption of B and Ba, peat moss was selected as the filter media for the column studies. The treated leachate was tested for B, Ba, TKN, carbonaceous biological oxygen demand (CBOD5) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). The breakthrough curves for B and Ba showed the effectiveness of peat moss in removing these contaminants. PMID:18661738

  20. Hollow Co@C prepared from a Co-ZIF@microporous organic network: magnetic adsorbents for aromatic pollutants in water.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seokjo; Yoo, Jin; Park, Nojin; Lee, Sang Moon; Park, Je-Geun; Park, Ji Hoon; Son, Seung Uk

    2015-12-28

    This work shows the new engineering strategy of magnetic adsorbents by the combination of zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF) and microporous organic network (MON) chemistry. ZIF-67 nanoparticles containing Co(2+) ions were coated with MON. The thermolysis of ZIF-67@MON under argon resulted in hollow carbon materials bearing cobalt nanoparticles which showed promising performance as magnetic adsorbents for aromatic pollutants in water. PMID:26490193

  1. Sense or no-sense of the sum parameter for water soluble "adsorbable organic halogens" (AOX) and "absorbed organic halogens" (AOX-S18) for the assessment of organohalogens in sludges and sediments.

    PubMed

    Müller, German

    2003-07-01

    "AOX" is the abbreviation of the sum parameter for water soluble "adsorbable organic halogens" in which 'A' stands for adsorbable, 'O' for organic and 'X' for the halogens chlorine, bromine and iodine. After the introduction of the AOX in 1976, this parameter has been correctly used for "real" AOX constituents (DDT and its metabolites, PCBs, etc.) but also misused for non-adsorbable adsorbed OX-compounds, mostly high molecular organohalogens in plants and even to inorganic compounds being neither organic nor adsorbable. The question of natural "Adsorbable Organic Halogens" (AOX) formed by living organisms and/or during natural abiogenic processes has been definitively solved by the known existence of already more than 3650 organohalogen compounds, amongst them the highly reactive, cancerogenic vinyl chloride (VC). The extension of the AOX to AOX-S18 for Sludges and Sediments, in which A stands for adsorbed (not for adsorbable) is questionable. It includes the most important water insoluble technical organochlorine product: polyvinyl chloride, PVC. In addition to organic halogens it also includes inorganic, mineralogenic halides, incorporated mainly in the crystal lattice of fine grained phyllosilicates, the typical clay minerals (kaolinite, montmorillonite, illite and chlorite) which are main constituents of sediments and sedimentary rocks representing the major part of the sedimentary cover of the earth. Other phyllosilicates, biotite and muscovite, major constituents of granites and many metamorphic rocks (gneiss and mica schist) will also contribute to the AOX-S18 especially in soils as result of weathering processes. Since chlorine is incorporated into the mineral structure and, as a consequence, not soluble by the nitric acid analytical step (pH 0.5) of the S18 determination, it will account to the AOX-S18 in the final charcoal combustion step at temperatures >950 degrees C. After heavy rainfalls sewage sludge composition is strongly influenced by

  2. Effect of cuprous halide interlayers on the device performance of ZnPc/C{sub 60} organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jinho; Park, Dasom; Heo, Ilsu; Yim, Sanggyu

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Effect of CuX interlayers on subsequently deposited films and devices was studied. • CuI is the most effective for the performance of ZnPc/C{sub 60}-based solar cells. • Results were related to the molecular geometry of ZnPc and HOMO level of interlayers. - Abstract: The effect of various cuprous halide (CuX) interlayers introduced between a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) layer and zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) layer on the physical properties of the ZnPc thin films and device performances of ZnPc/C{sub 60}-based small-molecule organic solar cells was studied. Strong substrate–molecule interaction between the CuX and ZnPc partly converted surface-perpendicular stacking geometry of ZnPc molecules into surface-parallel one. This flat-lying geometry led to an enhancement in electronic absorption and charge transport within the ZnPc films. As a result, the overall power conversion efficiency of the cell with CuI interlayer increased by ∼37%. In the case of the cells with CuBr and CuCl interlayer, however, the enhancement in device performances was limited because of the reduced conversion of the molecular geometry and increased energy barrier for hole extraction due to the low highest occupied molecular orbital level of the interlayer.

  3. Why are organotin hydride reductions of organic halides so frequently retarded? Kinetic studies, analyses, and a few remedies.

    PubMed

    Ingold, K U; Bowry, Vincent W

    2015-02-01

    Kinetic data for reduction of organic halides (RX) by tri-n-butylstannane (SnH) reveal a serious flaw in the current view of the kinetic radical chain: the tacit but unproven assumption that the speed of reaction is determined by the slowest propagation step. Our results show this is rarely true for reductive chains and that the observed rate is in fact controlled by unseen side-reactions of propagating R(•) and Sn(•) radicals with the solvent (notably, benzene!) or solvent impurities (e.g., trace benzophenone dryness indicator in THF) or, crucially, with allylic-CH and conjugated unsaturated groups in substrates and products. Most R(•) and/or Sn(•) radicals are therefore converted into relatively inert delocalized species A(•) and/or B(•) that inhibit the chain. Retardation in the degraded chain is given by a simple sum of terms, each being the ratio of the chain-transfer rate divided by the rate of chain-return. The model kinetic equation is linear and easy to ratify, interpret, and apply: to calculate retarding rate constants, optimize reaction conditions, and identify additives or "remedies" that repair the chain and accelerate reaction. The present work is thus expected to have a helpful impact on the practice and design of SnH radical chain based (and related) syntheses. PMID:25545111

  4. Influence of structural fluctuations on lifetimes of adsorbate states at hybrid organic-semiconductor interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, M.; Sánchez-Portal, D.; Lin, H.; Fratesi, G.; Brivio, G. P.; Selloni, A.

    On the road towards a more realistic description of charge transfer processes at hybrid organic-semiconductor interfaces for photovoltaic applications we extend our first-principles scheme for the extraction of elastic linewidths to include the effects of structural fluctuations. Based on snapshots obtained from Car-Parinello molecular dynamics simulations at room temperature, we set up geometries in which dye molecules at interfaces are attached to a semi-infinite TiO2 substrate. The elastic linewidths are computed using a Green's function method. This effectively introduces the coupling to a continuum of states in the substrate. In particular we investigate catechol and isonicotinic acid on rutile(110) and anatase(101) at the level of semi-local density functional theory. We perform multiple calculations of linewidths and peak-positions associated with the adsorbate's frontier orbitals for different geometric configurations to obtain a time-averaged analysis of such physical properties. We compare the results from the considered systems to understand the effects of dynamics onto interfacial charge transfer and systematically assess the dependence of the extracted elastic lifetimes on the relative alignment between adsorbate and substrate states. This project has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme under Grant Agreement No. 607323 [THINFACE].

  5. Controlling the spatial arrangement of organic magnetic anions adsorbed on epitaxial graphene on Ru(0001).

    PubMed

    Stradi, Daniele; Garnica, Manuela; Díaz, Cristina; Calleja, Fabián; Barja, Sara; Martín, Nazario; Alcamí, Manuel; Vazquez de Parga, Amadeo L; Miranda, Rodolfo; Martín, Fernando

    2014-12-21

    Achieving control over the self-organization of functional molecules on graphene is critical for the development of graphene technology in organic electronic and spintronic. Here, by using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), we show that the electron acceptor molecule 7,7',8,8'-tetracyano-p-quinodimethane (TCNQ) and its fluorinated derivative 2,3,5,6-tetrafluoro-7,7',8,8'-tetracyano-p-quinodimethane (F4-TCNQ), co-deposited on the surface of epitaxial graphene on Ru(0001), transform spontaneously into their corresponding magnetic anions and self-organize in two remarkably different structures. TCNQ forms densely packed linear magnetic arrays, while F4-TCNQ molecules remain as isolated non interacting magnets. With the help of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we trace back the origin of this behavior in the competition between the intermolecular repulsion experienced by the individual charged anions, which tends to separate the molecules, and the delocalization of the electrons transferred from the surface to the molecules, which promotes the formation of molecular oligomers. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to control the spatial arrangement of organic magnetic anions co-adsorbed on a surface by means of chemical substitution, paving the way for the design of two-dimensional fully organic magnetic structures on graphene and on other surfaces. PMID:25382549

  6. Quantum confinement and dielectric profiles of colloidal nanoplatelets of halide inorganic and hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapori, Daniel; Kepenekian, Mikaël; Pedesseau, Laurent; Katan, Claudine; Even, Jacky

    2016-03-01

    Quantum confinement as well as high frequency ε∞ and static εs dielectric profiles are described for nanoplatelets of halide inorganic perovskites CsPbX3 (X = I, Br, Cl) and hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites (HOP) in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) structures. 3D HOP are currently being sought for their impressive photovoltaic ability. Prior to this sudden popularity, 2D HOP materials were driving intense activity in the field of optoelectronics. Such developments have been enriched by the recent ability to synthesize colloidal nanostructures of controlled sizes of 2D and 3D HOP. This raises the need to achieve a thorough description of the electronic structure and dielectric properties of these systems. In this work, we go beyond the abrupt dielectric interface model and reach the atomic scale description. We examine the influence of the nature of the halogen and of the cation on the band structure and dielectric constants. Similarly, we survey the effect of dimensionality and shape of the perovskite. In agreement with recent experimental results, we show an increase of the band gap and a decrease of ε∞ when the size of a nanoplatelet reduces. By inspecting 2D HOP, we find that it cannot be described as a simple superposition of independent inorganic and organic layers. Finally, the dramatic impact of ionic contributions on the dielectric constant εs is analysed.Quantum confinement as well as high frequency ε∞ and static εs dielectric profiles are described for nanoplatelets of halide inorganic perovskites CsPbX3 (X = I, Br, Cl) and hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites (HOP) in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) structures. 3D HOP are currently being sought for their impressive photovoltaic ability. Prior to this sudden popularity, 2D HOP materials were driving intense activity in the field of optoelectronics. Such developments have been enriched by the recent ability to synthesize colloidal nanostructures of controlled

  7. Spatially separated charge densities of electrons and holes in organic-inorganic halide perovskites

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dan; Liang, Chunjun E-mail: zhqhe@bjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Huimin; You, Fangtian; He, Zhiqun E-mail: zhqhe@bjtu.edu.cn; Zhang, Chunxiu

    2015-02-21

    Solution-processable methylammonium lead trihalide perovskites exhibit remarkable high-absorption and low-loss properties for solar energy conversion. Calculation from density functional theory indicates the presence of non-equivalent halogen atoms in the unit cell because of the specific orientation of the organic cation. Considering the 〈100〉 orientation as an example, I{sub 1}, one of the halogen atoms, differs from the other iodine atoms (I{sub 2} and I{sub 3}) in terms of its interaction with the organic cation. The valance-band-maximum (VBM) and conduction-band-minimum (CBM) states are derived mainly from 5p orbital of I{sub 1} atom and 6p orbital of Pb atom, respectively. The spatially separated charge densities of the electrons and holes justify the low recombination rate of the pure iodide perovskite. Chlorine substitution further strengthens the unique position of the I{sub 1} atom, leading to more localized charge density around the I{sub 1} atom and less charge density around the other atoms at the VBM state. The less overlap of charge densities between the VBM and CBM states explains the relatively lower carrier recombination rate of the iodine-chlorine mixed perovskite. Chlorine substitution significantly reduces the effective mass at a direction perpendicular to the Pb-Cl bond and organic axis, enhancing the carrier transport property of the mixed perovskite in this direction.

  8. Activated boron nitride as an effective adsorbent for metal ions and organic pollutants.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Xiao, Xing; Xu, Xuewen; Lin, Jing; Huang, Yang; Xue, Yanming; Jin, Peng; Zou, Jin; Tang, Chengchun

    2013-01-01

    Novel activated boron nitride (BN) as an effective adsorbent for pollutants in water and air has been reported in the present work. The activated BN was synthesized by a simple structure-directed method that enabled us to control the surface area, pore volume, crystal defects and surface groups. The obtained BN exhibits an super high surface area of 2078 m(2)/g, a large pore volume of 1.66 cm(3)/g and a special multimodal microporous/mesoporous structure located at ~ 1.3, ~ 2.7, and ~ 3.9 nm, respectively. More importantly, the novel activated BN exhibits an excellent adsorption performance for various metal ions (Cr(3+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Ce(3+), Pb(2+)) and organic pollutants (tetracycline, methyl orange and congo red) in water, as well as volatile organic compounds (benzene) in air. The excellent reusability of the activated BN has also been confirmed. All the features render the activated BN a promising material suitable for environmental remediation. PMID:24220570

  9. Activated boron nitride as an effective adsorbent for metal ions and organic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Xiao, Xing; Xu, Xuewen; Lin, Jing; Huang, Yang; Xue, Yanming; Jin, Peng; Zou, Jin; Tang, Chengchun

    2013-11-01

    Novel activated boron nitride (BN) as an effective adsorbent for pollutants in water and air has been reported in the present work. The activated BN was synthesized by a simple structure-directed method that enabled us to control the surface area, pore volume, crystal defects and surface groups. The obtained BN exhibits an super high surface area of 2078 m2/g, a large pore volume of 1.66 cm3/g and a special multimodal microporous/mesoporous structure located at ~ 1.3, ~ 2.7, and ~ 3.9 nm, respectively. More importantly, the novel activated BN exhibits an excellent adsorption performance for various metal ions (Cr3+, Co2+, Ni2+, Ce3+, Pb2+) and organic pollutants (tetracycline, methyl orange and congo red) in water, as well as volatile organic compounds (benzene) in air. The excellent reusability of the activated BN has also been confirmed. All the features render the activated BN a promising material suitable for environmental remediation.

  10. Activated boron nitride as an effective adsorbent for metal ions and organic pollutants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Xiao, Xing; Xu, Xuewen; Lin, Jing; Huang, Yang; Xue, Yanming; Jin, Peng; Zou, Jin; Tang, Chengchun

    2013-01-01

    Novel activated boron nitride (BN) as an effective adsorbent for pollutants in water and air has been reported in the present work. The activated BN was synthesized by a simple structure-directed method that enabled us to control the surface area, pore volume, crystal defects and surface groups. The obtained BN exhibits an super high surface area of 2078 m2/g, a large pore volume of 1.66 cm3/g and a special multimodal microporous/mesoporous structure located at ~ 1.3, ~ 2.7, and ~ 3.9 nm, respectively. More importantly, the novel activated BN exhibits an excellent adsorption performance for various metal ions (Cr3+, Co2+, Ni2+, Ce3+, Pb2+) and organic pollutants (tetracycline, methyl orange and congo red) in water, as well as volatile organic compounds (benzene) in air. The excellent reusability of the activated BN has also been confirmed. All the features render the activated BN a promising material suitable for environmental remediation. PMID:24220570

  11. Effect of halide ions and carbonates on organic contaminant degradation by hydroxyl radical-based advanced oxidation processes in saline waters.

    PubMed

    Grebel, Janel E; Pignatello, Joseph J; Mitch, William A

    2010-09-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) generating nonselective hydroxyl radicals (HO*) provide a broad-spectrum contaminant destruction option for the decontamination of waters. Halide ions are scavengers of HO* during AOP treatment, such that treatment of saline waters would be anticipated to be ineffective. However, HO* scavenging by halides converts HO* to radical reactive halogen species (RHS) that participate in contaminant destruction but react more selectively with electron-rich organic compounds. The effects of Cl-, Br-, and carbonates (H2CO3+HCO3-+CO3(2-)) on the UV/H2O2 treatment of model compounds in saline waters were evaluated. For single target organic contaminants, the impact of these constituents on contaminant destruction rate suppression at circumneutral pH followed the order Br->carbonates>Cl-. Traces of Br- in the NaCl stock had a greater effect than Cl- itself. Kinetic modeling of phenol destruction demonstrated that RHS contributed significantly to phenol destruction, mitigating the impact of HO* scavenging. The extent of treatment efficiency reduction in the presence of halides varied dramatically among different target organic compounds. Destruction of contaminants containing electron-poor reaction centers in seawater was nearly halted, while 17beta-estradiol removal declined by only 3%. Treatment of mixtures of contaminants with each other and with natural organic matter (NOM) was evaluated. Although NOM served as an oxidant scavenger, conversion of nonselective HO* to selective radicals due to the presence of anions enhanced the efficiency of electron-rich contaminant removal in saline waters by focusing the oxidizing power of the system away from the NOM toward the target contaminant. Despite the importance of contaminant oxidation by halogen radicals, the formation of halogenated byproducts was minimal. PMID:20681567

  12. Dipole-driven self-organization of zwitterionic molecules on alkali halide surfaces.

    PubMed

    Nony, Laurent; Bocquet, Franck; Para, Franck; Chérioux, Frédéric; Duverger, Eric; Palmino, Frank; Luzet, Vincent; Loppacher, Christian

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the adsorption of 4-methoxy-4'-(3-sulfonatopropyl)stilbazolium (MSPS) on different ionic (001) crystal surfaces by means of noncontact atomic force microscopy. MSPS is a zwitterionic molecule with a strong electric dipole moment. When deposited onto the substrates at room temperature, MSPS diffuses to step edges and defect sites and forms disordered assemblies of molecules. Subsequent annealing induces two different processes: First, at high coverage, the molecules assemble into a well-organized quadratic lattice, which is perfectly aligned with the <110> directions of the substrate surface (i.e., rows of equal charges) and which produces a Moiré pattern due to coincidences with the substrate lattice constant. Second, at low coverage, we observe step edges decorated with MSPS molecules that run along the <110> direction. These polar steps most probably minimize the surface energy as they counterbalance the molecular dipole by presenting oppositely charged ions on the rearranged step edge. PMID:22497002

  13. Dipole-driven self-organization of zwitterionic molecules on alkali halide surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Nony, Laurent; Bocquet, Franck; Para, Franck; Chérioux, Frédéric; Duverger, Eric; Palmino, Frank; Luzet, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    Summary We investigated the adsorption of 4-methoxy-4′-(3-sulfonatopropyl)stilbazolium (MSPS) on different ionic (001) crystal surfaces by means of noncontact atomic force microscopy. MSPS is a zwitterionic molecule with a strong electric dipole moment. When deposited onto the substrates at room temperature, MSPS diffuses to step edges and defect sites and forms disordered assemblies of molecules. Subsequent annealing induces two different processes: First, at high coverage, the molecules assemble into a well-organized quadratic lattice, which is perfectly aligned with the <110> directions of the substrate surface (i.e., rows of equal charges) and which produces a Moiré pattern due to coincidences with the substrate lattice constant. Second, at low coverage, we observe step edges decorated with MSPS molecules that run along the <110> direction. These polar steps most probably minimize the surface energy as they counterbalance the molecular dipole by presenting oppositely charged ions on the rearranged step edge. PMID:22497002

  14. Structural tunability and switchable exciton emission in inorganic-organic hybrids with mixed halides

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, Shahab; Vijaya Prakash, G.; Baumberg, Jeremy J.

    2013-12-21

    Room-temperature tunable excitonic photoluminescence is demonstrated in alloy-tuned layered Inorganic-Organic (IO) hybrids, (C{sub 12}H{sub 25}NH{sub 3}){sub 2}PbI{sub 4(1−y)}Br{sub 4y} (y = 0 to 1). These perovskite IO hybrids adopt structures with alternating stacks of low-dimensional inorganic and organic layers, considered to be naturally self-assembled multiple quantum wells. These systems resemble stacked monolayer 2D semiconductors since no interlayer coupling exists. Thin films of IO hybrids exhibit sharp and strong photoluminescence (PL) at room-temperature due to stable excitons formed within the low-dimensional inorganic layers. Systematic variation in the observed exciton PL from 510 nm to 350 nm as the alloy composition is changed, is attributed to the structural readjustment of crystal packing upon increase of the Br content in the Pb-I inorganic network. The energy separation between exciton absorption and PL is attributed to the modified exciton density of states and diffusion of excitons from relatively higher energy states corresponding to bromine rich sites towards the lower energy iodine sites. Apart from compositional fluctuations, these excitons show remarkable reversible flips at temperature-induced phase transitions. All the results are successfully correlated with thermal and structural studies. Such structural engineering flexibility in these hybrids allows selective tuning of desirable exciton properties within suitable operating temperature ranges. Such wide-range PL tunability and reversible exciton switching in these novel IO hybrids paves the way to potential applications in new generation of optoelectronic devices.

  15. Zero-dipole molecular organic cations in mixed organic-inorganic halide perovskites: possible chemical solution for the reported anomalous hysteresis in the current-voltage curve measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgi, Giacomo; Yamashita, Koichi

    2015-11-01

    Starting from a brief description of the main architectures characterizing the novel solar technology of perovskite-based solar cells, we focus our attention on the anomalous hysteresis experimentally found to affect the measurement of the current-voltage curve of such devices. This detrimental effect, associated with slow dynamic reorganization processes, depends on several parameters; among them, the scan rate of the measurements, the architecture of the cell, and the perovskite deposition rate are crucial. Even if a conclusive explanation of the origin of the hysteresis has not been provided so far, several experimental findings ascribe its origin to ionic migration at an applied bias and dielectric polarization that occurs in the perovskite layer. Consistently, a dipole-moment-reduced cation such as formamidinium ion is experimentally reported to quantitatively reduce the hysteresis from perovskite-based devices. By means of a density-functional theory-based set of calculations, we have predicted and characterized guanidinium ion (GA = +[C(NH2)3], a zero-dipole moment cation by symmetry)-based organic-inorganic halide perovskite’s structural and electronic properties, speculating that such a cation and the alloys it may form with other organic cations can represent a possible chemical solution for the puzzling issue of the hysteresis.

  16. Zero-dipole molecular organic cations in mixed organic-inorganic halide perovskites: possible chemical solution for the reported anomalous hysteresis in the current-voltage curve measurements.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Giacomo; Yamashita, Koichi

    2015-11-01

    Starting from a brief description of the main architectures characterizing the novel solar technology of perovskite-based solar cells, we focus our attention on the anomalous hysteresis experimentally found to affect the measurement of the current-voltage curve of such devices. This detrimental effect, associated with slow dynamic reorganization processes, depends on several parameters; among them, the scan rate of the measurements, the architecture of the cell, and the perovskite deposition rate are crucial. Even if a conclusive explanation of the origin of the hysteresis has not been provided so far, several experimental findings ascribe its origin to ionic migration at an applied bias and dielectric polarization that occurs in the perovskite layer. Consistently, a dipole-moment-reduced cation such as formamidinium ion is experimentally reported to quantitatively reduce the hysteresis from perovskite-based devices. By means of a density-functional theory-based set of calculations, we have predicted and characterized guanidinium ion (GA = (+)[C(NH2)3], a zero-dipole moment cation by symmetry)-based organic-inorganic halide perovskite's structural and electronic properties, speculating that such a cation and the alloys it may form with other organic cations can represent a possible chemical solution for the puzzling issue of the hysteresis. PMID:26468971

  17. Lead-free solid-state organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Feng; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Cao, Duyen Hanh; Chang, Robert P. H.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.

    2014-06-01

    Lead-free solution-processed solid-state photovoltaic devices based on methylammonium tin iodide (CH3NH3SnI3) perovskite semiconductor as the light harvester are reported. Featuring an optical bandgap of 1.3 eV, the CH3NH3SnI3 perovskite material can be incorporated into devices with the organic hole-transport layer spiro-OMeTAD and show an absorption onset at 950 nm, which is significantly redshifted compared with the benchmark CH3NH3PbI3 counterpart (1.55 eV). Bandgap engineering was implemented by chemical substitution in the form of CH3NH3SnI3-xBrx solid solutions, which can be controllably tuned to cover much of the visible spectrum, thus enabling the realization of lead-free solar cells with an initial power conversion efficiency of 5.73% under simulated full sunlight. Further efficiency enhancements are expected following optimization and a better fundamental understanding of the internal electron dynamics and corresponding interfacial engineering. The reported CH3NH3SnI3-xBrx perovskite solar cells represent a step towards the realization of low-cost, environmentally friendly solid-state solar cells.

  18. Use of layered double hydroxides and their derivatives as adsorbents for inorganic and organic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Youwen

    Contamination of surface and groundwaters by hazardous inorganic and organic pollutants has become an increasing threat to the safety of drinking waters. Cleanup of contaminated surface and groundwaters has, therefore, become a major focus of environmental research. Primary objectives of this dissertation study were to examine the adsorption properties of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and their derivatives for inorganic and organic contaminants and to identify potential technologies that utilize LDHs and their derivatives for environment remediation. Studies examined the adsorption characteristics of anionic selenium, arsenic and dicamba (3,6 dichloro-2-methoxy benzoic acid) on original LDHs and calcined-LDHs. Adsorption of selenium and arsenic on LDHs was a function of pH. Competing anions in solution strongly affected adsorption of all three contaminants, with divalent anions decreasing adsorption more intensely than monovalent anions. Adsorbed selenium, arsenic and dicamba could be released from LDHs in anion solutions. Adsorption isotherms for selenium and arsenic retention could be fitted to a simple Langmuir equation. Calcination processes significantly increased adsorption capacities of LDHs. Because of adsorption-desorpion characteristics, LDHs could be recycled. X-ray diffraction patterns revealed an increase of d-spacing coupling with adsorption of contaminants, verifying the intercalation of contaminants into layer structure of LDHs. Long chain anionic surfactants intercalated into LDHs modified their surface properties, resulting in organo-LDHs with hydrophobic surface properties. Various organo-LDHs were developed by incorporating different surfactants into LDHs via different synthesis methods. Surfactant intercalation properties were examined and the geometrical arrangements of the intercalated surfactants were characterized. Results revealed that surfactant molecules could adopt various configurations within the LDH interlayer space. Intercalation

  19. Aquatic photolysis: photolytic redox reactions between goethite and adsorbed organic acids in aqueous solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goldberg, M.C.; Cunningham, K.M.; Weiner, Eugene R.

    1993-01-01

    Photolysis of mono and di-carboxylic acids that are adsorbed onto the surface of the iron oxyhydroxide (goethite) results in an oxidation of the organic material and a reduction from Fe(III) to Fe(II) in the iron complex. There is a subsequent release of Fe2+ ions into solution. At constant light flux and constant solution light absorption, the factors responsible for the degree of photolytic reaction include: the number of lattice sites that are bonded by the organic acid; the rate of acid readsorption to the surface during photolysis; the conformation and structure of the organic acid; the degree of oxidation of the organic acid; the presence or absence of an ??-hydroxy group on the acid, the number of carbons in the di-acid chain and the conformation of the di-acid. The ability to liberate Fe(III) at pH 6.5 from the geothite lattice is described by the lyotropic series: tartrate>citrate> oxalate > glycolate > maleate > succinate > formate > fumarate > malonate > glutarate > benzoate = butanoate = control. Although a larger amount of iron is liberated, the series is almost the same at pH 5.5 except that oxalate > citrate and succinate > maleate. A set of rate equations are given that describe the release of iron from the goethite lattice. It was observed that the pH of the solution increases during photolysis if the solutions are not buffered. There is evidence to suggest the primary mechanism for all these reactions is an electron transfer from the organic ligand to the Fe(III) in the complex. Of all the iron-oxyhydroxide materials, crystalline goethite is the least soluble in water; yet, this study indicates that in an aqueous suspension, iron can be liberated from the goethite lattice. Further, it has been shown that photolysis can occur in a multiphase system at the sediment- water interface which results in an oxidation of the organic species and release of Fe2+ to solution where it becomes available for further reaction. ?? 1993.

  20. Adsorbable organic halogens (AOXs) in solid residues from hazardous and clinical waste incineration.

    PubMed

    Durmusoglu, Ertan; Bakoglu, Mithat; Karademir, Aykan; Kirli, Lale

    2006-01-01

    Trace concentrations of a variety of chemicals remain in solid residues following combustion even in properly designed and operated incinerators. In the present study, the adsorbable organic halogen (AOX) levels of the solid residues, i.e., bottom ash, fly ash, and filter cake, were investigated during a 82-day of continuous operation of a Hazardous and Clinical Waste Incinerator. The distribution of halogens in the waste input prior to the incineration was also determined. The AOX levels measured in bottom ash, fly ash and filter cake were in the range of 0.014-1.879, 0.012-0.263, and 0.004-0.062 mg-Cl(-)/kg, respectively. The AOX levels are significantly low in the fly ash and filter cake due to the post-combustion process in the incinerator. At the end of the 82 days, the total AOX output in the bottom ash, fly ash, and filter cake were 571, 3.71, and 6.26 g, respectively. The partitioning of the total AOX in solid residues was 98.28, 0.64, and 1.08% for the bottom ash, fly ash and filter cake, respectively. This shows that the bottom ash is more contaminated with AOX than the other two residues. PMID:16835121

  1. Organic silicon compounds anf hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas by mineral and adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Biogas utilized for energy production needs to be free from organic silicon compounds and hydrogen sulfide , as their burning has damaging effects on utilities and humans; organic silicon compounds and hydrogen sulfide can be found in biogas produced from biomass wastes, due to their massive industrial use in synthetic product,such as cosmetics, detergents and paints.Siloxanes and hydrogen sulfide removal from biogas can be carried out by various methods (Ajhar et al., 2010); aim of the present work is to find a single practical andeconomic way to drastically and simultaneously reduce both hydrogen sulfide and the siloxanes concentration to less than 1 ppm. Some commercial activated carbons previously selected (Monteleoneet al., 2011) as being effective in hydrogen sulfide up taking have been tested in an adsorption measurement apparatus, by flowing both hydrogen sulphide and volatile siloxane (Decamethycyclopentasiloxane or D5) in a nitrogen stream,typically 25-300 ppm D5 over N2, through an clay minerals, Fe oxides and Silica; the adsorption process was analyzed by varying some experimental parameters (concentration, grain size, bed height). The best silica shows an adsorption capacity of 0.2 g D5 per gram of silica. The next thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) confirms the capacity data obtained experimentally by the breakthrough curve tests.The capacity results depend on D5 and hydrogen sulphide concentrations. A regenerative silica process is then carried out byheating the silica bed up to 200 ° C and flushing out the adsorbed D5 and hydrogen sulphide samples in a nitrogen stream in athree step heating procedure up to 200 ° C. The adsorption capacity is observed to degrade after cyclingthe samples through several adsorption-desorption cycles.

  2. Kinetic and electrochemical studies of the oxidative addition of demanding organic halides to Pd(0): the efficiency of polyphosphane ligands in low palladium loading cross-couplings decrypted.

    PubMed

    Zinovyeva, Veronika A; Mom, Sophal; Fournier, Sophie; Devillers, Charles H; Cattey, Hélène; Doucet, Henri; Hierso, Jean-Cyrille; Lucas, Dominique

    2013-10-21

    Oxidative addition (OA) of organic halides to palladium(0) species is a fundamental reaction step which initiates the C-C bond formation catalytic processes typical of Pd(0)/Pd(II) chemistry. The use of structurally congested polyphosphane ligands in palladium-catalyzed C-C bond formation has generated very high turnover numbers (TONs) in topical reactions such as Heck, Suzuki, Sonogashira couplings, and direct sp(2)C-H functionalization. Herein, the OA of aryl bromides to Pd(0) complexes stabilized by ferrocenylpolyphosphane ligands L1 (tetraphosphane), L2 (triphosphane), and L3 (diphosphane) is considered. The investigation of kinetic constants for the addition of Ph-Br to Pd(0) intermediates (generated by electrochemical reduction of Pd(II) complexes coordinated by L1-L3) is reported. Thus, in the OA of halides to the Pd(0) complex coordinated by L1 the series of rate constants kapp is found (mol(-1) L s(-1)): kapp(Ph-Br) = 0.48 > kapp(ClCH2-Cl) = 0.25 ≫ kapp(p-MeC6H4-Br) = 0.08 ≈ kapp(o-MeC6H4-Br) = 0.07 ≫ kapp(Ph-Cl). Kinetic measurements clarify the influence that the presence of four, three, or two phosphorus atoms in the coordination sphere of Pd has on OA. The presence of supplementary phosphorus atoms in L1 and L2 unambiguously stabilizes Pd(0) species and thus slows down the OA of Ph-Br to Pd(0) of about 2 orders of magnitude compared to the diphosphane L3. The electrosynthesis of the complexes resulting from the OA of organic halides to [Pd(0)/L] is easily performed and show the concurrent OA to Pd(0) of the sp(3)C-Cl bond of dichloromethane solvent. The resulting unstable Pd/alkyl complex is characterized by NMR and single crystal X-ray structure. We additionally observed the perfect stereoselectivity of the OA reactions which is induced by the tetraphosphane ligand L1. Altogether, a clearer picture of the general effects of congested polydentate ligands on the OA of organic halides to Pd(0) is given. PMID:24107007

  3. EPR studies on the organization of self-assembled spin-labeled organic monolayers adsorbed on GaAs.

    PubMed

    Ruthstein, Sharon; Artzi, Reit; Goldfarb, Daniella; Naaman, Ron

    2005-02-01

    Characterizing the structure and dynamic properties of a single monolayer is a challenge due to the minute amount of material that is probed. Here, EPR spectroscopy is used for investigating the spatial and temporal organization of self-assembled monolayers of 5- and 16-doxyl stearic acid (5 DSA and 16 DSA, respectively) adsorbed on a GaAs substrate. The results are complemented with FTIR and ellipsometery measurements, which provide the evidence for the formation of monolayers. Moreover, a comparison with the FTIR spectrum of a monolayer of stearic acid shows that the monolayers of the spin labeled molecules are less packed due to the hindrance introduced by the labeling group. The EPR spectra provide a new insight on the ordering in the layer and more interestingly, it reveals the time dependence of the organization. For 5DSA, with the spin-label group situated close to the substrate, the EPR spectrum immediately after adsorption is poorly resolved and dominated by the spin-exchange interaction between neighboring molecules. As time increases (up to 1 week) the resolution of the 14N hyperfine coupling increases, revealing a better organized monolayer where the molecules are more homogenously spaced. Moreover, the spectrum of the layer, after reaching equilibrium, shows that there is no motional freedom near the GaAs surface. Orientation dependence measurements on the equilibrated sample show the presence of a preferred orientation of the molecules, although with a wide distribution. The spectrum of the 16DSA monolayer, where the nitroxide spin label is situated at the end of the chain, far from the surface, also showed a poorly resolved spectrum at short times, but unlike 5DSA, it did not exhibit any time dependence. Through EPR line-shape simulations and by comparison with FTIR results, the differences between 5DSA and 16DSA were attributed to difference in coverage caused by the bulky spin label near the surface in the case of 5DSA. PMID:19785139

  4. The Silver Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahyun, M. R. V.

    1977-01-01

    Illustrates the type of fractional bonding for solid silver halides. Treats the silver halides as electron excess compounds, and develops a model of a localized bonding unit that may be iterated in three dimensions to describe the bulk phase. (MLH)

  5. Nonequilibrium Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Organic Friction Modifiers Adsorbed on Iron Oxide Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ewen, James P; Gattinoni, Chiara; Morgan, Neal; Spikes, Hugh A; Dini, Daniele

    2016-05-10

    For the successful development and application of lubricants, a full understanding of the nanoscale behavior of complex tribological systems is required, but this is difficult to obtain experimentally. In this study, we use nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD) simulations to examine the atomistic structure and friction properties of commercially relevant organic friction modifier (OFM) monolayers adsorbed on iron oxide surfaces and lubricated by a thin, separating layer of hexadecane. Specifically, acid, amide, and glyceride OFMs, with saturated and Z-unsaturated hydrocarbon tail groups, are simulated at various surface coverages and sliding velocities. At low and medium coverage, the OFMs form liquidlike and amorphous monolayers, respectively, which are significantly interdigitated with the hexadecane lubricant, resulting in relatively high friction coefficients. At high coverage, solidlike monolayers are formed for all of the OFMs, which, during sliding, results in slip planes between well-defined OFM and hexadecane layers, yielding a marked reduction in the friction coefficient. When present at equal surface coverage, OFMs with saturated and Z-unsaturated tail groups are found to yield similar structure and friction behavior. OFMs with glyceride head groups yield significantly lower friction coefficients than amide and particularly carboxylic acid head groups. For all of the OFMs and coverages simulated, the friction coefficient is found to increase linearly with the logarithm of sliding velocity; however, the gradient of this increase depends on the coverage. The structure and friction details obtained from these simulations agree well with experimental results and also shed light on the relative tribological performance of these OFMs through nanoscale structural variations. This has important implications in terms of the applicability of NEMD to aid the development of new formulations to control friction. PMID:27064962

  6. Screening Metal-Organic Frameworks by Analysis of Transient Breakthrough of Gas Mixtures in a Fixed Bed Adsorber

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, Rajamani; Long, Jeffrey R.

    2011-07-07

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) offer considerable potential for separating a variety of mixtures that are important in applications such as CO₂ capture and H₂ purification. In view of the vast number of MOFs that have been synthesized, there is a need for a reliable procedure for comparing screening and ranking MOFs with regard to their anticipated performance in pressure swing adsorption (PSA) units. For this purpose, the most commonly used metrics are the adsorption selectivity and the working capacity. Here, we suggest an additional metric for comparing MOFs that is based on the analysis of the transient response of an adsorber to a step input of a gaseous mixture. For a chosen purity of the gaseous mixture exiting from the adsorber, a dimensionless breakthrough time τ{sub break} can be defined and determined; this metric determines the frequency of required regeneration and influences the productivity of a PSA unit. The values of τ{sub break} are dictated both by selectivity and by capacity metrics .By performing transient adsorber calculations for separation of CO₂/H₂, CO₂/CH₄, CH₄/H₂, and CO₂/CH₄/H₂ mixtures, we compare the values of τbreak to highlight some important advantages of MOFs over conventionally used adsorbents such as zeolite NaX. For a given separation duty, such comparisons provide a more realistic ranking of MOFs than afforded by either selectivity or capacity metrics alone. We conclude that breakthrough calculations can provide an essential tool for screening MOFs.

  7. Development and characterization of activated hydrochars from orange peels as potential adsorbents for emerging organic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, M E; Ledesma, B; Román, S; Bonelli, P R; Cukierman, A L

    2015-05-01

    Activated hydrochars obtained from the hydrothermal carbonization of orange peels (Citrus sinensis) followed by various thermochemical processing were assessed as adsorbents for emerging contaminants in water. Thermal activation under flows of CO2 or air as well as chemical activation with phosphoric acid were applied to the hydrochars. Their characteristics were analyzed and related to their ability to uptake three pharmaceuticals (diclofenac sodium, salicylic acid and flurbiprofen) considered as emerging contaminants. The hydrothermal carbonization and subsequent activations promoted substantial chemical transformations which affected the surface properties of the activated hydrochars; they exhibited specific surface areas ranging from 300 to ∼620 m(2)/g. Morphological characterization showed the development of coral-like microspheres dominating the surface of most hydrochars. Their ability to adsorb the three pharmaceuticals selected was found largely dependent on whether the molecules were ionized or in their neutral form and on the porosity developed by the new adsorbents. PMID:25742754

  8. Heterogeneous Reactions of Surface-Adsorbed Catechol: A Comparison of Tropospheric Aerosol Surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, R. Z.; Woodill, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    Surface-adsorbed organics can alter the chemistry of tropospheric solid-air interfaces, such as aerosol and ground level surfaces, thereby impacting photochemical cycles and altering aerosol properties. The nature of the surface can also influence the chemistry of the surface-adsorbed organic. We employed diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to monitor the adsorption of gaseous catechol on several tropospheric aerosol surrogates and to investigate the subsequent reactivity of adsorbed-catechol with nitrogen dioxide and, in separate preliminary experiments, ozone. Graphite, kaolinite, and sodium halide (NaF, NaCl, NaBr) powders served as carbonaceous, mineral and sea salt aerosol surrogates, respectively. Broad OH stretching bands for adsorbed catechol shifted to lower wavenumber with peak frequencies following the trend NaBr > NaCl > NaF ≈ kaolinite, consistent with the increasing basicity of the halide anions and basic Brønsted sites on kaolinite. The dark heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with NaCl-adsorbed catechol at relative humidity (RH) <2% promoted nitration forming 4-nitrocatechol and oxidation forming 1,2-benzoquinone and the ring cleavage product muconic acid, with product yields of 88%, 8%, and 4%, respectively. 4-Nitrocatechol was the dominant product for catechol adsorbed on NaF and kaolinite, while NaBr-adsorbed catechol produced less 4-nitrocatechol and more 1,2-benzoquinone and muconic acid. For all three sodium halides, the reactions of NO2 with adsorbed catechol were orders of magnitude faster than between NO2 and each NaX substrate. 4-Nitrocatechol rates and product yields were consistent with the relative ability of each substrate to enhance the deprotonated nature of adsorbed-catechol. Increasing the relative humidity caused the rate of each product channel to decrease and also altered the product branching ratios. Most notably, 1,2-benzoquinone formation decreased significantly even at 13% RH. The dramatic

  9. A Strained Disilane-Promoted Carboxylation of Organic Halides with CO2 under Transition-Metal-Free Conditions.

    PubMed

    Mita, Tsuyoshi; Suga, Kenta; Sato, Kaori; Sato, Yoshihiro

    2015-11-01

    By using a strained four-membered ring disilane (3,4-benzo-1,1,2,2-tetraethyldisilacyclobutene) and CsF, a wide range of aryl, alkenyl, alkynyl, benzyl, allyl, and alkyl halides was successfully carboxylated under an ambient CO2 atmosphere (CO2 balloon) at room temperature within 2 h. In this carboxylation, a highly reactive silyl anion, which is generated from the disilane and CsF, is a key to facilitating the formation of a carbanion equivalent. The resulting anionic species can be trapped with CO2 to produce carboxylic acids with high efficiency. PMID:26451945

  10. The analysis of surface-adsorbed organic molecules by alkali-assisted MIES combined with UPS(He I)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günster, J.; Ochs, D.; Dieckhoff, S.; Kempter, V.

    1996-12-01

    Metastable impact electron spectroscopy (MIES) in combination with UPS(He I) is applied to the study of s-triazine and triethoxytriazine molecules adsorbed on Si(100) either alone or in combination with cesium atoms. It is demonstrated that the presence of the Cs atoms facilitates the identification of the adsorbed species considerably. It is concluded that (i) non-dissociative adsorption of the studied organic molecules occurs whereby the basal rings of the molecules lie flat on the silicon surface, in accordance with previous studies by Bu and Lin, (ii) the binding of the molecules to the surface is mainly via the lone pair orbitals of the nitrogen in the ring, and (iii) s-triazine reacts strongly with oxygen which bonds to the carbon atoms of the triazine ring.

  11. Lanthanide-halide based humidity indicators

    DOEpatents

    Beitz, James V.; Williams, Clayton W.

    2008-01-01

    The present invention discloses a lanthanide-halide based humidity indicator and method of producing such indicator. The color of the present invention indicates the humidity of an atmosphere to which it is exposed. For example, impregnating an adsorbent support such as silica gel with an aqueous solution of the europium-containing reagent solution described herein, and dehydrating the support to dryness forms a substance with a yellow color. When this substance is exposed to a humid atmosphere the water vapor from the air is adsorbed into the coating on the pore surface of the silica gel. As the water content of the coating increases, the visual color of the coated silica gel changes from yellow to white. The color change is due to the water combining with the lanthanide-halide complex on the pores of the gel.

  12. Chemoselective Radical Dehalogenation and C-C Bond Formation on Aryl Halide Substrates Using Organic Photoredox Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Poelma, Saemi O; Burnett, G Leslie; Discekici, Emre H; Mattson, Kaila M; Treat, Nicolas J; Luo, Yingdong; Hudson, Zachary M; Shankel, Shelby L; Clark, Paul G; Kramer, John W; Hawker, Craig J; Read de Alaniz, Javier

    2016-08-19

    Despite the number of methods available for dehalogenation and carbon-carbon bond formation using aryl halides, strategies that provide chemoselectivity for systems bearing multiple carbon-halogen bonds are still needed. Herein, we report the ability to tune the reduction potential of metal-free phenothiazine-based photoredox catalysts and demonstrate the application of these catalysts for chemoselective carbon-halogen bond activation to achieve C-C cross-coupling reactions as well as reductive dehalogenations. This procedure works both for conjugated polyhalides as well as unconjugated substrates. We further illustrate the usefulness of this protocol by intramolecular cyclization of a pyrrole substrate, an advanced building block for a family of natural products known to exhibit biological activity. PMID:27276418

  13. Charge carrier recombination channels in the low-temperature phase of organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrenfennig, Christian; Liu, Mingzhen; Snaith, Henry J.; Johnston, Michael B.; Herz, Laura M.

    2014-08-01

    The optoelectronic properties of the mixed hybrid lead halide perovskite CH3NH3PbI3-xClx have been subject to numerous recent studies related to its extraordinary capabilities as an absorber material in thin film solar cells. While the greatest part of the current research concentrates on the behavior of the perovskite at room temperature, the observed influence of phonon-coupling and excitonic effects on charge carrier dynamics suggests that low-temperature phenomena can give valuable additional insights into the underlying physics. Here, we present a temperature-dependent study of optical absorption and photoluminescence (PL) emission of vapor-deposited CH3NH3PbI3-xClx exploring the nature of recombination channels in the room- and the low-temperature phase of the material. On cooling, we identify an up-shift of the absorption onset by about 0.1 eV at about 100 K, which is likely to correspond to the known tetragonal-to-orthorhombic transition of the pure halide CH3NH3PbI3. With further decreasing temperature, a second PL emission peak emerges in addition to the peak from the room-temperature phase. The transition on heating is found to occur at about 140 K, i.e., revealing significant hysteresis in the system. While PL decay lifetimes are found to be independent of temperature above the transition, significantly accelerated recombination is observed in the low-temperature phase. Our data suggest that small inclusions of domains adopting the room-temperature phase are responsible for this behavior rather than a spontaneous increase in the intrinsic rate constants. These observations show that even sparse lower-energy sites can have a strong impact on material performance, acting as charge recombination centres that may detrimentally affect photovoltaic performance but that may also prove useful for optoelectronic applications such as lasing by enhancing population inversion.

  14. Comparison between the adsorption behaviors of an organic cation and an organic anion on several reversed-phase liquid chromatography adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Fabrice; Guiochon, Georges

    2004-09-01

    Adsorption data of an organic cation (propranololium chloride) and an organic anion (sodium 1-naphthalene sulfonate) were measured by frontal analysis on two RPLC adsorbents, Symmetry-C18 and XTerra-C18, with aqueous solutions of methanol as the mobile phases. The influence of supporting neutral salts on the adsorption behavior of these two ions are compared. The Henry constants are close (H approximately 5). The four sets of isotherm data are all well accounted for using the bi-Moreau model. However, the isotherms of the two ions behave differently at high concentrations. The initial behaviors of all the isotherms are antilangmuirian but remain so in a much wider concentration range for the cation than for the anion, due to its stronger adsorbate-adsorbate interactions on the low-energy adsorption sites. The retention times of both ions increase with increasing concentration of neutral salt in the mobile phase, suggesting the formation of ion-pair complexes, with Cl- for the cation and with Na+ for the anion. The adsorbate-adsorbate interactions vanish in the presence of salt and the bi-Moreau isotherm model tends toward a bi-Langmuir model. Differences in adsorption behavior are also observed between the cation and the anion when bivalent inorganic anions and cations, respectively, are dissolved in the mobile phase. High concentration band profiles of 1-naphthalene sulfonic acid are langmuirian, except in the presence of a trivalent cation, while those of propranolol are antilangmuirian under certain conditions even with uni- or divalent cations. PMID:15453413

  15. Hybrid inorganic-organic adsorbents Part 1: Synthesis and characterization of mesoporous zirconium titanate frameworks containing coordinating organic functionalities.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Christopher S; De Los Reyes, Massey; Scales, Nicholas; Hanna, John V; Luca, Vittorio

    2010-12-01

    A series of functional hybrid inorganic-organic adsorbent materials have been prepared through postsynthetic grafting of mesoporous zirconium titanate xerogel powders using a range of synthesized and commercial mono-, bis-, and tris-phosphonic acids, many of which have never before been investigated for the preparation of hybrid phases. The hybrid materials have been characterized using thermogravimetric analysis, diffuse reflectance infrared (DRIFT) and 31P MAS NMR spectroscopic techniques and their adsorption properties studied using a 153Gd radiotracer. The highest level of surface functionalization (molecules/nm2) was observed for methylphosphonic acid (∼3 molecules/nm2). The level of functionalization decreased with an increase in the number of potential surface coordinating groups of the phosphonic acids. Spectral decomposition of the DRIFT and 31P MAS NMR spectra showed that each of the phosphonic acid molecules coordinated strongly to the metal oxide surface but that for the 1,1-bis-phosphonic acids and tris-phosphonic acids the coordination was highly variable resulting in a proportion of free or loosely coordinated phosphonic acid groups. Functionalization of a porous mixed metal oxide framework with the tris-methylenephosphonic acid (ATMP-ZrTi-0.33) resulted in a hybrid with the highest affinity for 153Gd3+ in nitric acid solutions across a wide range of acid concentrations. The ATMP-ZrTi-0.33 hybrid material extracted 153Gd3+ with a Kd value of 1×10(4) in 0.01 M HNO3 far exceeding that of the other hybrid phases. The unfunctionalized mesoporous mixed metal oxide had negligible affinity for Gd3+ (Kd<100) under identical experimental conditions. It has been shown that the presence of free or loosely coordinated phosphonic acid groups does not necessarily translate to affinity for 153Gd3+. The theoretical cation exchange capacity of the ATMP-ZrTi-0.33 hybrid phase for Gd3+ has been determined to be about 0.005 mmol/g in 0.01 M HNO3. This behavior and

  16. Mechanism of Charge Transfer and Recombination Dynamics in Organo Metal Halide Perovskites and Organic Electrodes, PCBM, and Spiro-OMeTAD: Role of Dark Carriers.

    PubMed

    Ponseca, Carlito S; Hutter, Eline M; Piatkowski, Piotr; Cohen, Boiko; Pascher, Torbjörn; Douhal, Abderrazzak; Yartsev, Arkady; Sundström, Villy; Savenije, Tom J

    2015-12-30

    Despite the unprecedented interest in organic-inorganic metal halide perovskite solar cells, quantitative information on the charge transfer dynamics into selective electrodes is still lacking. In this paper, we report the time scales and mechanisms of electron and hole injection and recombination dynamics at organic PCBM and Spiro-OMeTAD electrode interfaces. On the one hand, hole transfer is complete on the subpicosecond time scale in MAPbI3/Spiro-OMeTAD, and its recombination rate is similar to that in neat MAPbI3. This was found to be due to a high concentration of dark charges, i.e., holes brought about by unintentional p-type doping of MAPbI3. Hence, the total concentration of holes in the perovskite is hardly affected by optical excitation, which manifested as similar decay kinetics. On the other hand, the decay of the photoinduced conductivity in MAPbI3/PCBM is on the time scale of hundreds of picoseconds to several nanoseconds, due to electron injection into PCBM and electron-hole recombination at the interface occurring at similar rates. These results highlight the importance of understanding the role of dark carriers in deconvoluting the complex photophysical processes in these materials. Moreover, optimizing the preparation processes wherein undesired doping is minimized could prompt the use of organic molecules as a more viable electrode substitute for perovskite solar cell devices. PMID:26636183

  17. Effect of the adsorbate kinetic diameter on the accuracy of the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation for modeling adsorption of organic vapors on activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Jahandar Lashaki, Masoud; Fayaz, Mohammadreza; Niknaddaf, Saeid; Hashisho, Zaher

    2012-11-30

    This paper investigates the effect of the kinetic diameter (KD) of the reference adsorbate on the accuracy of the Dubinin-Radushkevich (D-R) equation for predicting the adsorption isotherms of organic vapors on microporous activated carbon. Adsorption isotherms for 13 organic compounds on microporous beaded activated carbon were experimentally measured, and predicted using the D-R model and affinity coefficients. The affinity coefficients calculated based on molar volumes, molecular polarizabilities, and molecular parachors were used to predict the isotherms based on four reference compounds (4.3≤KD≤6.8 Å). The results show that the affinity coefficients are independent of the calculation method if the reference and test adsorbates are from the same organic group. Choosing a reference adsorbate with a KD similar to that of the test adsorbate results in better prediction of the adsorption isotherm. The relative error between the predicted and the measured adsorption isotherms increases as the absolute difference in the kinetic diameters of the reference and test adsorbates increases. Finally, the proposed hypothesis was used to explain reports of inconsistent findings among published articles. The results from this study are important because they allow a more accurate prediction of adsorption capacities of adsorbents which allow for better design of adsorption systems. PMID:23044198

  18. Influence of molecular structure and adsorbent properties on sorption of organic compounds to a temperature series of wood chars.

    PubMed

    Lattao, Charisma; Cao, Xiaoyan; Mao, Jingdong; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus; Pignatello, Joseph J

    2014-05-01

    Chars from wildfires and soil amendments (biochars) are strong adsorbents that can impact the fate of organic compounds in soil, yet the effects of solute and adsorbent properties on sorption are poorly understood. We studied sorption of benzene, naphthalene, and 1,4-dinitrobenzene from water to a series of wood chars made anaerobically at different heat treatment temperatures (HTT) from 300 to 700 °C, and to graphite as a nonporous, unfunctionalized reference adsorbent. Peak suppression in the NMR spectrum by sorption of the paramagnetic relaxation probe TEMPO indicated that only a small fraction of char C atoms lie near sorption sites. Sorption intensity for all solutes maximized with the 500 °C char, but failed to trend regularly with N2 or CO2 surface area, micropore volume, mesopore volume, H/C ratio, O/C ratio, aromatic fused ring size, or HTT. A model relating sorption intensity to a weighted sum of microporosity and mesoporosity was more successful. Sorption isotherm linearity declined progressively with carbonization of the char. Application of a thermodynamic model incorporating solvent-water and char-graphite partition coefficients permitted for the first time quantification of steric (size exclusion in pores) and π-π electron donor-acceptor (EDA) free energy contributions, relative to benzene. Steric hindrance for naphthalene increases exponentially from 9 to 16 kJ/mol (∼ 1.6-2.9 log units of sorption coefficient) with the fraction of porosity in small micropores. π-π EDA interactions of dinitrobenzene contribute -17 to -19 kJ/mol (3-3.4 log units of sorption coefficient) to sorption on graphite, but less on chars. π-π EDA interaction of naphthalene on graphite is small (-2 to 2 kJ/mol). The results show that sorption is a complex function of char properties and solute molecular structure, and not very predictable on the basis of readily determined char properties. PMID:24758543

  19. Morphology-Controlled Synthesis of Organometal Halide Perovskite Inverse Opals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun; Tüysüz, Harun

    2015-11-01

    The booming development of organometal halide perovskites in recent years has prompted the exploration of morphology-control strategies to improve their performance in photovoltaic, photonic, and optoelectronic applications. However, the preparation of organometal halide perovskites with high hierarchical architecture is still highly challenging and a general morphology-control method for various organometal halide perovskites has not been achieved. A mild and scalable method to prepare organometal halide perovskites in inverse opal morphology is presented that uses a polystyrene-based artificial opal as hard template. Our method is flexible and compatible with different halides and organic ammonium compositions. Thus, the perovskite inverse opal maintains the advantage of straightforward structure and band gap engineering. Furthermore, optoelectronic investigations reveal that morphology exerted influence on the conducting nature of organometal halide perovskites. PMID:26376773

  20. CORRELATIONS FOR THE DETERMINATION OF SURFACE DIFFUSIVITIES OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS ADSORBED ONTO GRANULAR ACTIVATED CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Differential column batch reactor (DCBR) experiments in organic-free water were conducted for the following volatile organic compounds (VOCs): trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, cis-1,2 dichlorethene, and toluene. Surface diffusion was required to explain the rate of uptake for ...

  1. Removing organic contaminants with bifunctional iron modified rectorite as efficient adsorbent and visible light photo-Fenton catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaorong; Zhu, Lihua; Zhang, Yingying; Yan, Jingchun; Lu, Xiaohua; Huang, Yingping; Tang, Heqing

    2012-05-15

    Iron-modified rectorite (FeR) was prepared as both adsorbent and catalyst. The iron modification increased layer-to-layer spacing and surface area of rectorite, leading to much increased adsorption of Rhodamine B (RhB) on rectorite. The maximum adsorption capacity of RhB on FeR reached 101mgg(-1) at pH 4.5, being 11 folds of that on the unmodified one. The iron modification also enabled rectorite to have efficient visible light photocatalytic ability. The apparent rate constant for the degradation of RhB (80μM) at 298K and pH 4.5 in the presence of H(2)O(2) (6.0mM) and FeR (0.4gL(-1)) was evaluated to be 0.0413min(-1) under visible light and 0.122min(-1) under sunlight, respectively. The analysis with electron spin resonance spin-trapping technique supported that the iron modified rectorite effectively catalyzed the decomposition of H(2)O(2) into hydroxyl radicals. On the basis of the characterization and analysis, the new bifunctional material was well clarified as both adsorbent and photocatalyst in the removing of organic pollutants. PMID:22410720

  2. A model to predict the adsorber thermal behavior during treatment of volatile organic compounds onto wet activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Pré, P; Delage, F; Le Cloirec, P

    2002-11-01

    A model for adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) onto a wet activated carbon bed was proposed in this study. This model accounts for temperature changes induced by the reversed and coupled mass-transfer processes of both organic species adsorption and water desorption. Indeed, it was experimentally pointed out that temperature rises, which result from the exothermal nature of the energetic interactions between the organic molecule and the activated carbon surface, are notably reduced when the adsorbent contains an initial moisture of approximately 10% in weight. Moreover, it was shown that water rate desorption was enhanced in the presence of organic vapor. This phenomenon may be explained by the displacement of sorbed water bythe organic molecules, owing to more intensive interactions with the activated carbon surface. The model proposed was elaborated from a previous comprehensive analysis of the diffusion mechanisms governing VOC adsorption at high concentrations onto a dry activated carbon bed. In a similar way, a theoretical approach was developed to model water desorption during drying of a wet activated carbon bed under pure flowing air. At last, a theoretical depiction of both competitive and reverse processes was outlined. The final model fits reasonably with experimental data relative to both breakthrough curves and thermal wave shape along the bed, even if local temperature change calculation may require some further improvement. PMID:12433182

  3. Resin pellets from beaches of the Portuguese coast and adsorbed persistent organic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, J. C.; Frias, J. G. L.; Micaelo, A. C.; Sobral, P.

    2013-09-01

    The occurrence of stranded plastic marine debris along the Portuguese coastline was investigated. Number of items m-2 and size range of resin pellets were recorded, corresponding to 53% of total marine debris collected items. In addition, concentrations of adsorbed persistent bioaccumulative and toxic chemicals (PBTC) were determined, PAH - polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; PCB - polychlorinated biphenyls and DDT - dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane. Matosinhos (Mt) and Vieira de Leiria (VL) presented the highest number of items m-2 (362 and 332, respectively). Resin pellets with 4 mm diameter were the most abundant (50%). Contaminants concentration was variable. PAH concentrations recorded values between 53 and 44800 ng g-1, PCB ranged from 2 to 223 ng g-1 and DDT between 0.42 and 41 ng g-1. In general, aged and black pellets recorded higher concentrations for all contaminants. Matosinhos (Mt), Vieira de Leiria (VL) and Sines (Si), near industrial areas and port facilities, were the most contaminated beaches. Research efforts are needed to assess the points of entry of industrial plastic pellets in order to take action and minimize impacts on the ecosystems, in particular, points of transfer during transportation from plastic manufacturers to plastic converters should be identified and controlled so that virgin pellets are contained and will not enter rivers and be carried to the oceans where they can remain for a long time and travel great distances.

  4. Comparison of nutshell granular activated carbons to commercial adsorbents for the purge-and-trap gas chromatographic analysis of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Wartelle, L H; Marshall, W E; Toles, C A; Johns, M M

    2000-05-26

    Granular activated carbons (GACs) made from agricultural by-products were investigated as adsorbents for short path thermal desorption gas chromatographic analysis of selected polar and nonpolar organic compounds. GACs made from macadamia nut, black walnut and hazelnut shells were compared to four commercially available adsorbents, namely, Tenax TA, Carboxen 569, Carbosieve SIII and coconut charcoal for their properties in purge-and-trap analysis. Adsorption values and breakthrough volumes were calculated for compounds from C3 and C6-C10. GACs derived from macadamia nut shells were found to adsorb and desorb between 80% (benzene) and 277% (ethylbenzene) more acetone (C3), benzene (C6), toluene (C7), ethyl- (C8), n-propyl- (C9), or sec.-butylbenzenes (C10) purged from water at the 100 ppb level than the commercial adsorbents tested. PMID:10893033

  5. Binding energy and work function of organic electrode materials phenanthraquinone, pyromellitic dianhydride and their derivatives adsorbed on graphene.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang-Xin

    2014-09-24

    Electroactive organic compounds are a novel group of green cathode materials for rechargeable metal-ion batteries. However, the organic battery life is short because the organic compounds can be dissolved by nonaqueous electrolytes. Here a comparative investigation of phenanthraquinone (PQ), pyromellitic dianhydride (PMDA) and their derivatives, i.e., benzo[1,2-b:4,3-b']difuran-4,5-dione (BDFD), benzo[1,2-b:4,3-b']dithiophene-4,5-quinone (BDTQ), 3,8-phenanthroline-5,6-dione (PAD), pyromellitic dithioanhydride (PMDT), pyromellitic diimide (PMDI) and 1,4,5,8-anthracenetetrone (ATO), adsorbed on graphene is performed using a density functional theory (DFT) with a van der Waals (vdW) dispersion-correction. The computed results show a strong physisorption with the binding energies between 1.10 and 1.56 eV. A sequence of the calculated binding energies from weak to strong is found to be BDFD < BDTQ < PMDA ≤ PMDI < PMDT < PQ < PAD < ATO. The formation of stable organic molecule-graphene nanocomposites can prevent the dissolution of the eight organic compounds in nonaqueous electrolyte and hence improve cycling performance of batteries. In addition, the work functions for the nanocomposites are found to be strongly affected by the work function of each organic compound. To understand the DFT results, a novel simple expression is proposed to predict the work function of the nanocomposites from the interfacial dipole and the work functions of the isolated graphene nanosheet and organic molecules. The predicted work functions for the nanocomposites from the new equation agree quite well with the values calculated from the vdW dispersion-corrected DFT. PMID:25216389

  6. Prediction of capacity factors for aqueous organic solutes adsorbed on a porous acrylic resin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.

    1978-01-01

    The capacity factors of 20 aromatic, allphatic, and allcycllc organic solutes with carboxyl, hydroxyl, amine, and methyl functional groups were determined on Amberlite XAD-8, a porous acrylic resin. The logarithm of the capacity factor, k???, correlated inversely with the logarithm of the aqueous molar solubility with significance of less than 0.001. The log k???-log solubility relationship may be used to predict the capacity of any organic solute for XAD-8 using only the solubility of the solute. The prediction is useful as a guide for determining the proper ratio of sample to column size In the preconcentration of organic solutes from water. The inverse relationship of solubility and capacity is due to the unfavorable entropy of solution of organic solutes which affects both solubility and sorption.

  7. Direct measurement of the exciton binding energy and effective masses for charge carriers in organic-inorganic tri-halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Atsuhiko; Mitioglu, Anatolie; Plochocka, Paulina; Portugall, Oliver; Wang, Jacob Tse-Wei; Stranks, Samuel D.; Snaith, Henry J.; Nicholas, Robin J.

    2015-07-01

    Solar cells based on the organic-inorganic tri-halide perovskite family of materials have shown significant progress recently, offering the prospect of low-cost solar energy from devices that are very simple to process. Fundamental to understanding the operation of these devices is the exciton binding energy, which has proved both difficult to measure directly and controversial. We demonstrate that by using very high magnetic fields it is possible to make an accurate and direct spectroscopic measurement of the exciton binding energy, which we find to be only 16 meV at low temperatures, over three times smaller than has been previously assumed. In the room-temperature phase we show that the binding energy falls to even smaller values of only a few millielectronvolts, which explains their excellent device performance as being due to spontaneous free-carrier generation following light absorption. Additionally, we determine the excitonic reduced effective mass to be 0.104me (where me is the electron mass), significantly smaller than previously estimated experimentally but in good agreement with recent calculations. Our work provides crucial information about the photophysics of these materials, which will in turn allow improved optoelectronic device operation and better understanding of their electronic properties.

  8. Optical properties and structural phase transitions of lead-halide based inorganic-organic 3D and 2D perovskite semiconductors under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuishi, K.; Ishihara, T.; Onari, S.; Chang, Y. H.; Park, C. H.

    2004-11-01

    Optical absorption, photoluminescence and Raman scattering of lead-halide based inorganic-organic perovskite semiconductors were measured under quasi-hydrostatic pressure at room temperature. For the 3D perovskite semiconductor, (CH3NH3)PbBr3, the free exciton photoluminescence band exhibits red-shifts with pressure, and jumps to a higher energy by 0.07 eV at 0.8 GPa, which is associated with a phase transition from a cubic to an orthorhombic structure confirmed by Raman scattering. Above the phase transition pressure, the exciton band shows blue-shifts with further increasing pressure, and eventually disappears above 4.7 GPa. The results are compared with those for the 2D perovskite semiconductor, (C4H9NH3)2PbI4. First principles pseudopotential calculations were performed to investigate changes in octahedral distortion and electronic band structures with pressure. The calculations have explained the origins of the intriguing changes in the electronic states with pressure in view of bonding characters between atomic orbitals in octahedra.

  9. AMBIENT LEVEL VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) MONITORING USING SOLID ADSORBANTS - RECENT U.S. EPA STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ambient air spiked with 1-10 ppbv concentrations of 41 toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) listed in U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Compendium Method TO-14A was monitored using solid sorbents for sample collection and a Varian Saturn 2000 ion trap mass spectrome...

  10. Composition of Organic Compounds Adsorbed on PM10 in the Air Above Maribor.

    PubMed

    Miuc, Alen; Vončina, Ernest; Lečnik, Uroš

    2015-01-01

    Organic compounds in atmospheric particulate matterabove Maribor were analysed in 120 samples of PM10 sampled according to the EN 12341:2014 reference method. Organic compounds compositions were investigated together with the primary and secondary sources of air pollution. Silylation as derivatisation method was used for the GC/MS determination of volatile and semi-volatile polar organic compounds. Distribution of fatty acids, n-alkanes and iso-alkanes, phthalate esters, siloxanes, different sterols, various sugars and sugar alcohols, compounds of lignin and resin acids, dicarboxylic acids from photochemical reactions, PAHs, organic nitrogen compounds and products from secondary oxidation of monoterpenes were determined. The use of silicone grease for the purpose of lubricating the impact surface of the air sampler caused higher values of gravimetric determination. Solid particles may have been bounced from the surface of a greasy impact plate and re-entrained within the air stream and then collected on a sample filter. The carryover of siloxanes was at least from 5% up to 15% of the accumulated particles weight, depending on ambient temperature. This was the reason that the gravimetric results for determination of PM10 according to the standard EN 12341:2014 were overestimated. PMID:26680711

  11. Design of hydrophilic metal organic framework water adsorbents for heat reallocation.

    PubMed

    Cadiau, Amandine; Lee, Ji Sun; Damasceno Borges, Daiane; Fabry, Paul; Devic, Thomas; Wharmby, Michael T; Martineau, Charlotte; Foucher, Damien; Taulelle, Francis; Jun, Chul-Ho; Hwang, Young Kyu; Stock, Norbert; De Lange, Martijn F; Kapteijn, Freek; Gascon, Jorge; Maurin, Guillaume; Chang, Jong-San; Serre, Christian

    2015-08-26

    A new hydrothermally stable Al polycarboxylate metal-organic framework (MOF) based on a heteroatom bio-derived aromatic spacer is designed through a template-free green synthesis process. It appears that in some test conditions this MOF outperforms the heat reallocation performances of commercial SAPO-34. PMID:26193346

  12. Fluorous Metal Organic Frameworks as Superhydrophobic Adsorbents for Oil Spill Cleanup and Hydrocarbons Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Chi; Mather, Qian; Wang, Xiaoping; Kaipa, Ushasree; Nesterov, Vladimir; Venero, Augustin; Omary, Mohammad A

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that fluorous metal-organic frameworks (FMOFs) are highly hydrophobic porous materials with a high capacity and affinity to C{sub 6}-C{sub 8} hydrocarbons of oil components. FMOF-1 exhibits reversible adsorption with a high capacity for n-hexane, cyclohexane, benzene, toluene, and p-xylene, with no detectable water adsorption even at near 100% relative humidity, drastically outperforming activated carbon and zeolite porous materials. FMOF-2, obtained from annealing FMOF-1, shows enlarged cages and channels with double toluene adsorption vs FMOF-1 based on crystal structures. The results suggest great promise for FMOFs in applications such as removal of organic pollutants from oil spills or ambient humid air, hydrocarbon storage and transportation, water purification, etc. under practical working conditions.

  13. Reduction of ferrihydrite with adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter: microbial reduction by Geobacter bremensis vs. abiotic reduction by Na-dithionite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eusterhues, K.; Hädrich, A.; Neidhardt, J.; Küsel, K.; Keller, T. F.; Jandt, K. D.; Totsche, K. U.

    2014-09-01

    Ferrihydrite is a widespread poorly crystalline Fe oxide which becomes easily coated by natural organic matter in the environment. This mineral-bound organic matter entirely changes the mineral surface properties and therefore the reactivity of the original mineral. Here, we investigated 2-line ferrihydrite, ferrihydrite with adsorbed organic matter, and ferrihydrite coprecipitated with organic matter for microbial and abiotic reduction of Fe(III). Ferrihydrite-organic matter associations with different organic matter loadings were reduced either by Geobacter bremensis or abiotically by Na-dithionite. Both types of experiments showed decreasing initial Fe-reduction rates and decreasing degrees of reduction with increasing amounts of mineral-bound organic matter. At similar organic matter loadings, coprecipitated ferrihydrites were more reactive than ferrihydrites with adsorbed organic matter. The difference can be explained by the smaller crystal size and poor crystallinity of such coprecipitates. At small organic matter loadings the poor crystallinity of coprecipitates led to even faster Fe-reduction rates than found for pure ferrihydrite. The amount of mineral-bound organic matter also affected the formation of secondary minerals: goethite was only found after reduction of organic matter-free ferrihydrite and siderite was only detected when ferrihydrites with relatively low amounts of mineral-bound organic matter were reduced. We conclude that direct contact of G. bremensis to the Fe oxide mineral surface was inhibited by attached organic matter. Consequently, mineral-bound organic matter shall be taken into account as a factor in slowing down reductive dissolution.

  14. I. Fundamental Practicum: Temperature Measurements of Falling Droplets, July, 1989. II. Industrial Practicum: Interaction and Effect of Adsorbed Organics on Reference Clays and Reservoir Rock, April, 1988. III. Apprenticeship Practicum: Studies of Group XIII Metal Inclusion Complexes, March, 1987

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Mark Richard

    The temperature of 225 μm decane droplets falling through a hot, quiescent, oxygen -free environment were measured using laser-induced exciplex fluorescence thermometry. The temperature of the droplets was found to increase approximately 0.42^ circC/^circC increase in the environment temperature as the environment temperature was increased to 250^circ C. Less than 10% evaporation of the droplets was observed at the highest environment temperatures. This represents one of the first successful applications of a remote-sensing technique for the temperature determination of droplets in a dynamic system. Industrial practicum. The industrial practicum report, entitled "Interaction and Effect of Adsorbed Organics on Reference Clays and Reservoir Rock," is a discussion of the measurement of the effect adsorbed organic material, especially from crude petroleum, has on the surface area, cation exchange capacity, and zeta potential of reference clay material and reservoir rock. In addition, the energetics of adsorption of a petroleum extract onto several reference clays and reservoir rock were measured using both flow and batch microcalorimetry. These results are very important in evaluating and understanding the wettability of reservoir rock and its impact on the recovery of crude oil from a petroleum reservoir. Apprenticeship practicum. "Studies of Group XIII Metal Inclusion Complexes" investigates the structure and dynamics of liquid inclusion complexes having the general formula (R_4N) (Al_2 Me_6I) cdot (C_6H_6) _{rm x}. ^1H and ^{13}C spin-lattice relaxation times, nuclear Overhauser enhancements, and molecular correlation times were measured as well as diffusion coefficients of the various species in solution. The dynamics of transfer between "guest" and free solvent molecules were measured using a variety of techniques. The inherent structure of liquid inclusion complexes as an ordered medium for homogeneous catalysis was studied using hydrogenation catalyzed by

  15. Recycling of Organic Waste Sludge by Hydrothermal Dry Steam Aiming for Adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshikawa, Hisahiro; Hayakawa, Tomoki; Yamasaki, Nakamichi

    2006-05-01

    Global warming becomes more serious problem today. We have to develop new technology for new energy or fixation of carbon dioxide. Biomass is considered to be one of new energies. Methane fermentation is a method to make methane from biomass, such as garbage and fecal of farm animals, by methane fermentation bacteria. It has a problem, however, that bacteria are deactivated due to ammonia, which is made by itself. And much methane fermentation residue is incinerated. Therefore recycling methane fermentation residue is important for effective use of biomass. We research hydrothermal process. Dry steam means unsaturated vapor, we call. It demands a temperature less than 400 °C. And it is expected to accelerate dehydration effect, decompose and extract the organic matter, and make porous material. Thus, we try to apply the dry steam to recycling of organic waste sludge aiming for absorbent. Experiments were conducted at 250-350 °C in nitrogen atmosphere. The carbon products are analyzed by CHNS elemental analysis, and Thermogravimetry. The extractives are analyzed by gas chromatograph.

  16. Femtomagnetism in graphene induced by core level excitation of organic adsorbates.

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Abhilash; Baby, Anu; Lin, He; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Fratesi, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We predict the induction or suppression of magnetism in the valence shell of physisorbed and chemisorbed organic molecules on graphene occurring on the femtosecond time scale as a result of core level excitations. For physisorbed molecules, where the interaction with graphene is dominated by van der Waals forces and the system is non-magnetic in the ground state, numerical simulations based on density functional theory show that the valence electrons relax towards a spin polarized configuration upon excitation of a core-level electron. The magnetism depends on efficient electron transfer from graphene on the femtosecond time scale. On the other hand, when graphene is covalently functionalized, the system is magnetic in the ground state showing two spin dependent mid gap states localized around the adsorption site. At variance with the physisorbed case upon core-level excitation, the LUMO of the molecule and the mid gap states of graphene hybridize and the relaxed valence shell is not magnetic anymore. PMID:27089847

  17. Femtomagnetism in graphene induced by core level excitation of organic adsorbates

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, Abhilash; Baby, Anu; Lin, He; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Fratesi, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We predict the induction or suppression of magnetism in the valence shell of physisorbed and chemisorbed organic molecules on graphene occurring on the femtosecond time scale as a result of core level excitations. For physisorbed molecules, where the interaction with graphene is dominated by van der Waals forces and the system is non-magnetic in the ground state, numerical simulations based on density functional theory show that the valence electrons relax towards a spin polarized configuration upon excitation of a core-level electron. The magnetism depends on efficient electron transfer from graphene on the femtosecond time scale. On the other hand, when graphene is covalently functionalized, the system is magnetic in the ground state showing two spin dependent mid gap states localized around the adsorption site. At variance with the physisorbed case upon core-level excitation, the LUMO of the molecule and the mid gap states of graphene hybridize and the relaxed valence shell is not magnetic anymore. PMID:27089847

  18. Mechanisms of Heat Transfer in Porous Crystals Containing Adsorbed Gases: Applications to Metal-Organic Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babaei, Hasan; Wilmer, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    We have studied the mechanisms of heat transfer in a porous crystal-gas mixture system, motivated by the not insignificant challenge of quickly dissipating heat generated in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) due to gas adsorption. Our study reveals that the thermal conductance of the system (crystal and gas) is dominated by lattice thermal conductivity in the crystal, and that conductance is reduced as the concentration of gas in the pores increases. This mechanism was observed from classical molecular simulations of a monatomic gas in an idealized porous crystal structure. We show that the decreased conductivity associated with increased gas concentration is due to phonon scattering in the crystal due to interactions with gas molecules. Calculations of scattering rates for two phonon modes reveal that scattering of the lowest frequency mode scales linearly with gas density. This result suggests that the probability of a phonon-gas collision is simply proportional to the number of gas molecules in the pore.

  19. A Water-Stable Cationic Metal-Organic Framework as a Dual Adsorbent of Oxoanion Pollutants.

    PubMed

    Desai, Aamod V; Manna, Biplab; Karmakar, Avishek; Sahu, Amit; Ghosh, Sujit K

    2016-06-27

    A three-dimensional water-stable cationic metal-organic framework (MOF) pillared by a neutral ligand and with Ni(II)  metal nodes has been synthesized employing a rational design approach. Owing to the ordered arrangement of the uncoordinated tetrahedral sulfate (SO4 (2-) ) ions in the channels, the compound has been employed for aqueous-phase ion-exchange applications. The compound exhibits rapid and colorimetric aqueous-phase capture of environmentally toxic oxoanions (with similar geometries) in a selective manner. This system is the first example of a MOF-based system which absorbs both dichromate (Cr2 O7 (2-) ) and permanganate (MnO4 (-) ) ions, with the latter acting as a model for the radioactive contaminant pertechnetate (TcO4 (-) ). PMID:26855323

  20. Femtomagnetism in graphene induced by core level excitation of organic adsorbates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, Abhilash; Baby, Anu; Lin, He; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Fratesi, Guido

    2016-04-01

    We predict the induction or suppression of magnetism in the valence shell of physisorbed and chemisorbed organic molecules on graphene occurring on the femtosecond time scale as a result of core level excitations. For physisorbed molecules, where the interaction with graphene is dominated by van der Waals forces and the system is non-magnetic in the ground state, numerical simulations based on density functional theory show that the valence electrons relax towards a spin polarized configuration upon excitation of a core-level electron. The magnetism depends on efficient electron transfer from graphene on the femtosecond time scale. On the other hand, when graphene is covalently functionalized, the system is magnetic in the ground state showing two spin dependent mid gap states localized around the adsorption site. At variance with the physisorbed case upon core-level excitation, the LUMO of the molecule and the mid gap states of graphene hybridize and the relaxed valence shell is not magnetic anymore.

  1. Photoinduced electron transfer double fragmentation. An oxygen-mediated radical chain process in the cofragmentation of aminopinacol donors with organic halides

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; Farahat, M.S.; Gan, H.; Whitten, D.G.; Farid, S. |

    1995-06-14

    We reprot an investigation in which excited states of amino pinacols 1-3 are reacted with the halides CCl{sub 4}, benzyl bromide, and p-cyanobenzyl bromide. Interesting results from this study include the finding that low-to-moderate quantum efficiencies for reaction are observed when the reactions are carried out under degassed conditions, indicating that the halide radical anions must survive long enough within the initial ion pair formed in the quenching step to undergo considerable return electron transfer. More strikingly we find that for certain pinacol-halide combinations reaction in aerared solutions leads to much higher efficiencies, which can be attributed to a chain reaction involving oxygen capture of a primary radical product. 25 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  2. Aluminium fumarate metal-organic framework: A super adsorbent for fluoride from water.

    PubMed

    Karmakar, Sankha; Dechnik, Janina; Janiak, Christoph; De, Sirshendu

    2016-02-13

    Potential of aluminium fumarate metal organic framework (MOF) for fluoride removal from groundwater has been explored in this work. The laboratory produced MOF exhibited characteristics similar to the commercial version. MOF was found to be micro-porous with surface area of 1156 m(2)/g and average pore size 17Å. Scanning electron micrograph of the AlFu MOF showed minute pores and texture was completely different from either of the parent materials. Change in the composition of AlFu MOF after fluoride adsorption was evident from powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Thermal stability of the AlFu MOF up to 700K was established by thermo-gravimetric analysis. Incorporation of fluoride phase after adsorption was confirmed by X-ray fluorescence analysis. As observed from FTIR study, hydroxyl ions in AlFu MOF were substituted by fluoride. 0.75 g/l AlFu MOF was good enough for complete removal of 30 mg/l fluoride concentration in feed solution. The maximum adsorption capacity for fluoride was 600, 550, 504 and 431 mg/g, respectively, at 293, 303, 313 and 333K. PMID:26513559

  3. Adsorbent phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, S.

    1983-01-01

    An adsorbent which uses as its primary ingredient phosphoric acid salts of zirconium or titanium is presented. Production methods are discussed and several examples are detailed. Measurements of separating characteristics of some gases using the salts are given.

  4. Preparation of a new adsorbent from activated carbon and carbon nanofiber (AC/CNF) for manufacturing organic-vacbpour respirator cartridge

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study a composite of activated carbon and carbon nanofiber (AC/CNF) was prepared to improve the performance of activated carbon (AC) for adsorption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and its utilization for respirator cartridges. Activated carbon was impregnated with a nickel nitrate catalyst precursor and carbon nanofibers (CNF) were deposited directly on the AC surface using catalytic chemical vapor deposition. Deposited CNFs on catalyst particles in AC micropores, were activated by CO2 to recover the surface area and micropores. Surface and textural characterizations of the prepared composites were investigated using Brunauer, Emmett and Teller’s (BET) technique and electron microscopy respectively. Prepared composite adsorbent was tested for benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) adsorption and then employed in an organic respirator cartridge in granular form. Adsorption studies were conducted by passing air samples through the adsorbents in a glass column at an adjustable flow rate. Finally, any adsorbed species not retained by the adsorbents in the column were trapped in a charcoal sorbent tube and analyzed by gas chromatography. CNFs with a very thin diameter of about 10-20 nm were formed uniformly on the AC/CNF. The breakthrough time for cartridges prepared with CO2 activated AC/CNF was 117 minutes which are significantly longer than for those cartridges prepared with walnut shell- based activated carbon with the same weight of adsorbents. This study showed that a granular form CO2 activated AC/CNF composite could be a very effective alternate adsorbent for respirator cartridges due to its larger adsorption capacities and lower weight. PMID:23369424

  5. Preparation and characterization of humic acid-carbon hybrid materials as adsorbents for organic micro-pollutants.

    PubMed

    Radwan, Emad K; Abdel Ghafar, Hany H; Moursy, Ahmed S; Langford, Cooper H; Bedair, Ahmed H; Achari, Gopal

    2015-08-01

    The present work involves the preparation of novel adsorbent materials by the insolubilization and hybridization of humic acid (HA) with carbon. The prepared materials were characterized by N2 adsorption, elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, solid-state (13)C cross polarization magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance, and low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxometry on wetted samples. The water solubility of these materials and the lack of effect of oxidants were also confirmed. With this background, the adsorption capacities toward phenol, 2,4,6-tricholrophenol, and atrazine were evaluated, using these as model compounds for organic micropollutants of concern in water. Experimental results show that the prepared materials are mesoporous and have a higher surface area than humic acid and even than the porous carbon in the case of carbon coating. They retain the basic features of the starting materials with lowered functional group content. Moreover, there are interesting new features. NMR relaxometry shows that equilibration of water uptake is very fast, making use in water simple. They have higher adsorption capacities than the pure materials, and they can be applied under a wide range of environmental conditions. PMID:25874433

  6. EFFECTS OF COVAPORS ON ADSORPTION RATE COEFFICIENTS OF ORGANIC VAPORS ADSORBED ONTO ACTIVATED CARBON FROM FLOWING AIR

    SciTech Connect

    G. WOOD

    2000-12-01

    Published breakthrough time, adsorption rate, and capacity data for components of organic vapor mixtures adsorbed from flows through fixed activated carbon beds have been analyzed. Capacities (as stoichiometric centers of constant pattern breakthrough curves) yielded stoichiometric times {tau}, which are useful for determining elution orders of mixture components. We also calculated adsorption rate coefficients k{sub v} of the Wheeler (or, more general Reaction Kinetic) breakthrough curve equation, when not reported, from breakthrough times and {tau}. Ninety-five k{sub v} (in mixture)/ k{sub v} (single vapor) ratios at similar vapor concentrations were calculated and averaged for elution order categories. For 43 first-eluting vapors the average ratio (1.07) was statistically no different (0.21 standard deviation) than unity, so that we recommend using the single-vapor k{sub v} for such. Forty-seven second-eluting vapor ratios averaged 0.85 (0.24 standard deviation), also not significantly different from unity; however, other evidence and considerations lead us recommend using k{sub v} (in mixture) = 0.85 k{sub v} (single vapor). Five third- and fourth-eluting vapors gave an average of 0.56 (0.16 standard deviation) for a recommended k{sub v} (in mixture) = 0.56 k{sub v} (single vapor) for such.

  7. Use of industrial by-products and natural media to adsorb nutrients, metals and organic carbon from drinking water.

    PubMed

    Grace, Maebh A; Healy, Mark G; Clifford, Eoghan

    2015-06-15

    Filtration technology is well established in the water sector but is limited by inability to remove targeted contaminants, found in surface and groundwater, which can be damaging to human health. This study optimises the design of filters by examining the efficacy of seven media (fly ash, bottom ash, Bayer residue, granular blast furnace slag (GBS), pyritic fill, granular activated carbon (GAC) and zeolite), to adsorb nitrate, ammonium, total organic carbon (TOC), aluminium, copper (Cu) and phosphorus. Each medium and contaminant was modelled to a Langmuir, Freundlich or Temkin adsorption isotherm, and the impact of pH and temperature (ranging from 10 °C to 29 °C) on their performance was quantified. As retention time within water filters is important in contaminant removal, kinetic studies were carried out to observe the adsorption behaviour over a 24h period. Fly ash and Bayer residue had good TOC, nutrient and Cu adsorption capacity. Granular blast furnace slag and pyritic fill, previously un-investigated in water treatment, showed adsorption potential for all contaminants. In general, pH or temperature adjustment was not necessary to achieve effective adsorption. Kinetic studies showed that at least 60% of adsorption had occurred after 8h for all media. These media show potential for use in a multifunctional water treatment unit for the targeted treatment of specific contaminants. PMID:25777954

  8. Reversible CO Scavenging via Adsorbate-Dependent Spin State Transitions in an Iron(II)-Triazolate Metal-Organic Framework.

    PubMed

    Reed, Douglas A; Xiao, Dianne J; Gonzalez, Miguel I; Darago, Lucy E; Herm, Zoey R; Grandjean, Fernande; Long, Jeffrey R

    2016-05-01

    A new metal-organic framework, Fe-BTTri (Fe3[(Fe4Cl)3(BTTri)8]2·18CH3OH, H3BTTri =1,3,5-tris(1H-1,2,3-triazol-5-yl)benzene)), is found to be highly selective in the adsorption of CO over a variety of other gas molecules, making it extremely effective, for example, in the removal of trace CO from mixtures with H2, N2, and CH4. This framework not only displays significant CO adsorption capacity at very low pressures (1.45 mmol/g at just 100 μbar), but, importantly, also exhibits readily reversible CO binding. Fe-BTTri utilizes a unique spin state change mechanism to bind CO in which the coordinatively unsaturated, high-spin Fe(II) centers of the framework convert to octahedral, low-spin Fe(II) centers upon CO coordination. Desorption of CO converts the Fe(II) sites back to a high-spin ground state, enabling the facile regeneration and recyclability of the material. This spin state change is supported by characterization via infrared spectroscopy, single crystal X-ray analysis, Mössbauer spectroscopy, and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Importantly, the spin state change is selective for CO and is not observed in the presence of other gases, such as H2, N2, CO2, CH4, or other hydrocarbons, resulting in unprecedentedly high selectivities for CO adsorption for use in CO/H2, CO/N2, and CO/CH4 separations and in preferential CO adsorption over typical strongly adsorbing gases like CO2 and ethylene. While adsorbate-induced spin state transitions are well-known in molecular chemistry, particularly for CO, to our knowledge this is the first time such behavior has been observed in a porous material suitable for use in a gas separation process. Potentially, this effect can be extended to selective separations involving other π-acids. PMID:27097297

  9. Mechanism of formation of humus coatings on mineral surfaces 3. Composition of adsorbed organic acids from compost leachate on alumina by solid-state 13C NMR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wershaw, R. L.; Llaguno, E.C.; Leenheer, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The adsorption of compost leachate DOC on alumina is used as a model for elucidation of the mechanism of formation of natural organic coatings on hydrous metal oxide surfaces in soils and sediments. Compost leachate DOC is composed mainly of organic acid molecules. The solid-state 13C NMR spectra of these organic acids indicate that they are very similar in composition to aquatic humic substances. Changes in the solid-state 13C NMR spectra of compost leachate DOC fractions adsorbed on alumina indicate that the DOC molecules are most likely adsorbed on metal oxide surfaces through a combination of polar and hydrophobic interaction mechanisms. This combination of polar and hydrophobic mechanism leads to the formation of bilayer coatings of the leachate molecules on the oxide surfaces.

  10. The effects of framework dynamics on the behavior of water adsorbed in the [Zn(l-L)(Cl)] and Co-MOF-74 metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Terranova, Zachary L; Paesani, Francesco

    2016-03-21

    The effects of framework flexibility on the structural and dynamical properties of water adsorbed in two prototypical metal-organic frameworks are investigated through molecular dynamics simulations. It is found that water molecules in the pores of a flexible model of [Zn(l-L)(Cl)] exhibit slower dynamics than when the framework is artificially held rigid in the simulations. In contrast, the water dynamics in Co-MOF-74 is predicted to be accelerated by the framework vibrations. The origin of this different behavior directly relates to how water interacts with the two frameworks, which, in turn, determines different hydrogen-bond patterns in the pores. While the first water molecules adsorbed in [Zn(l-L)(Cl)] donate a single hydrogen bond to the Zn-Cl groups and point the other hydrogen atom towards the center of the pore, water molecules adsorbed in Co-MOF-74 initially bind to the cobalt atoms of the framework via their oxygen atoms, thus leaving each molecule free to form two hydrogen bonds with additional molecules adsorbed at higher loading. The simulation results indicate that taking into account the framework flexibility in computer simulations is necessary for a quantitative modeling of adsorption and transport processes in metal-organic frameworks. PMID:26928975

  11. Evaluation and Application of a Solid Adsorbent Method for Monitoring Exposure to Volatile Organic Compounds from Oil and Gas Operations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. R.; Helmig, D.; Thompson, C. R.; Wang, W.; Terrell, R. M.; Lewis, A. C.

    2014-12-01

    Residential communities are being increasingly impacted by emissions from oil and gas development and this has driven the need for simple, effective, and low-cost methods for air quality monitoring. Primary emissions from oil and gas production consist of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) ranging from the short chain alkanes and alkenes to aromatic and semi-volatile species; many of these are a concern from both an air quality and public health viewpoint, as they can lead to local ozone pollution and increased risk of cancer or respiratory illness. The fate of hydrocarbons once in the atmosphere is ultimately oxidation through to CO2 and water, adding to the greenhouse gas burden. Measurement techniques that are capable of identifying and quantifying the full range of primary emissions of concern are required to assess community exposure to air toxics and to better inform residents, as well as local and state legislators. Here, we present evaluation of a low-cost air monitoring technique using stainless steel diffusion cartridges containing multiple solid adsorbents. Over the course of a three-month period in summer of 2014, cartridges were deployed at five monitoring sites located around Boulder County in the Northern Colorado Front Range, and exposed to ambient air for periods of up to four days along with concurrent sampling using stainless steel SUMMA canisters. Samples collected with both methods were subsequently analyzed for VOCs by GC-FID and the results were compared to determine the accuracy and precision of the diffusion cartridge method. Results of this evaluation show that the diffusion cartridge method has the potential to be a simple and low-cost solution for widespread exposure monitoring in communities near oil and gas development regions. Such measurements may also provide supporting evidence on wider effects on greenhouse gas emissions from oil and gas development operations.

  12. Luminescence of quantum-dimensional centers with spatially ordered molecules of organic compunds adsorbed on their surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Belous, V.M.

    1995-11-01

    A dimensional effect in the luminescence of a narrow-band silver sulfide semiconductor (with the width of the forbidden band E{sub g} = 0.9 eV) was discovered in 1977, when a luminescent method was used to study the nature and functions of the centers appearing as a result of sulfur sensitization of halogen-silver photographic emulsions. As is known, during the indicated sensitization, certain sulfur-containing compounds (usually, sodium thiosulfate) are introduced into a melted emulsion containing microcrystals of silver halide, thus promoting an increase in the photosensitivity of the emulsion layers. The reason for the observed increase in photosensitivity is the fact that during the interaction between sulfur-containing compounds and silver halide silver-sulfide centers arise on the surface of the emulsion microcrystals, which serve as deep traps for electrons and therefore determine the possibility for silver centers of latent image to be formed near them by a two-stage electron-ion mechanism. Measurement of the low-temperature (T = 77 K) luminescence spectra of different photographic emulsions containing AgBr, AgBr (I), or AgCl microcrystals made it possible to establish that the introduction of sulfur sensitizers (sodium thiosulfate or thiourea) into emulsion to increase its photosensitivity is accompanied by the appearance of new luminescence bands in the near IR spectral region.

  13. Remediation of Organic and Inorganic Arsenic Contaminated Groundwater using a Nonocrystalline TiO2 Based Adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Meng, X; Calvache, E; Jiang, G

    2009-01-01

    A nanocrystalline TiO2-based adsorbent was evaluated for the simultaneous removal of As(V), As(III), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in contaminated groundwater. Batch experimental results show that As adsorption followed pseudo-second order rate kinetics. The competitive adsorption was described with the charge distribution multi-site surface complexation model (CD-MUSIC). The groundwater containing an average of 329 ?g L-1 As(III), 246 ?g L-1 As(V), 151 ?g L-1 MMA, and 202 ?g L-1 DMA was continuously passed through a TiO2 filter at an empty bed contact time of 6 min for 4 months. Approximately 11 000, 14 000, and 9900 bed volumes of water had been treated before the As(III), As(V), and MMA concentration in the effluent increased to 10 ?g L-1. However, very little DMA was removed. The EXAFS results demonstrate the existence of a bidentate binuclear As(V) surface complex on spent adsorbent, indicating the oxidation of adsorbed As(III). A nanocrystalline TiO2-based adsorbent could be used for the simultaneous removal of As(V), As(III), MMA, and DMA in contaminated groundwater.

  14. Reference spectra of important adsorbed organic and inorganic phosphate binding forms for soil P speciation using synchrotron-based K-edge XANES spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Prietzel, Jörg; Harrington, Gertraud; Häusler, Werner; Heister, Katja; Werner, Florian; Klysubun, Wantana

    2016-03-01

    Direct speciation of soil phosphorus (P) by linear combination fitting (LCF) of P K-edge XANES spectra requires a standard set of spectra representing all major P species supposed to be present in the investigated soil. Here, available spectra of free- and cation-bound inositol hexakisphosphate (IHP), representing organic P, and of Fe, Al and Ca phosphate minerals are supplemented with spectra of adsorbed P binding forms. First, various soil constituents assumed to be potentially relevant for P sorption were compared with respect to their retention efficiency for orthophosphate and IHP at P levels typical for soils. Then, P K-edge XANES spectra for orthophosphate and IHP retained by the most relevant constituents were acquired. The spectra were compared with each other as well as with spectra of Ca, Al or Fe orthophosphate and IHP precipitates. Orthophosphate and IHP were retained particularly efficiently by ferrihydrite, boehmite, Al-saturated montmorillonite and Al-saturated soil organic matter (SOM), but far less efficiently by hematite, Ca-saturated montmorillonite and Ca-saturated SOM. P retention by dolomite was negligible. Calcite retained a large portion of the applied IHP, but no orthophosphate. The respective P K-edge XANES spectra of orthophosphate and IHP adsorbed to ferrihydrite, boehmite, Al-saturated montmorillonite and Al-saturated SOM differ from each other. They also are different from the spectra of amorphous FePO4, amorphous or crystalline AlPO4, Ca phosphates and free IHP. Inclusion of reference spectra of orthophosphate as well as IHP adsorbed to P-retaining soil minerals in addition to spectra of free or cation-bound IHP, AlPO4, FePO4 and Ca phosphate minerals in linear combination fitting exercises results in improved fit quality and a more realistic soil P speciation. A standard set of P K-edge XANES spectra of the most relevant adsorbed P binding forms in soils is presented. PMID:26917141

  15. Model to explain the effects of halide ions on the increase in surface enhanced Raman spectral intensity over time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, Michael A.

    Understanding the mechanisms responsible for the large increase in spectral intensity when molecules are adsorbed to nanoparticle surfaces such as occurs during surface enhanced Raman (SER) spectroscopy will allow scientists to probe ever smaller scales, even allowing single molecule detection. One particular scenario that increased the SER scattering efficiency was the addition of halide ions to Rhodamine 6G (R6G)-ethanol solution. This thesis presents a theoretical model explaining the effects of halide ions on the SER spectral intensity of the Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecule when co-adsorbed to a silver nanoparticle surface. Glaspell et al. 2005, found a linear correlation between the increase in spectral intensities of selected vibrational normal modes of R6G over time and the polarizabilities of co-adsorbed halide ions. When the R6G molecule co-adsorbs to the silver nanoparticle surface with the halide ions, the molecule is exposed to three external electric fields that add vectorially, creating a total external electric field. Modelling the fields from the halide ions and the silver nanoparticles as electric dipole fields introduces the polarizability of the halide ion linearly into the Raman spectral intensity equation. This model also shows that there is a necessary interaction between the halide ions and the silver nanoparticle surface in order to see the effects as described by Glaspell et al. Furthermore, we will present experimental results that show that there is a necessary interaction between the halide ions and the nanoparticle surface. Without this interaction there was no increase in the SER spectral intensity of R6G or pyridine molecules in solution with the halide ions but without the silver nanoparticles.

  16. Graphene nanosheets as novel adsorbents in adsorption, preconcentration and removal of gases, organic compounds and metal ions.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jin-Gang; Yu, Lin-Yan; Yang, Hua; Liu, Qi; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Jiang, Xin-Yu; Chen, Xiao-Qing; Jiao, Fei-Peng

    2015-01-01

    Due to their high adsorption capacities, carbon-based nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes, activated carbons, fullerene and graphene are widely used as the currently most promising functional materials. Since its discovery in 2004, graphene has exhibited great potential in many technological fields, such as energy storage materials, supercapacitors, resonators, quantum dots, solar cells, electronics, and sensors. The large theoretical specific surface area of graphene nanosheets (2630 m(2)·g(-1)) makes them excellent candidates for adsorption technologies. Further, graphene nanosheets could be used as substrates for decorating the surfaces of nanoparticles, and the corresponding nanocomposites could be applied as novel adsorbents for the removal of low concentrated contaminants from aqueous solutions. Therefore, graphene nanosheets will challenge the current existing adsorbents, including other types of carbon-based nanomaterials. PMID:25244035

  17. Remediation of organic and inorganic arsenic contaminated groundwater using a nanocrystalline TiO2-based adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Jing, Chuanyong; Meng, Xiaoguang; Calvache, Edwin; Jiang, Guibin

    2009-01-01

    A nanocrystalline TiO2-based adsorbent was evaluated for the simultaneous removal of As(V), As(III), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in contaminated groundwater. Batch experimental results show that As adsorption followed pseudo-second order rate kinetics. The competitive adsorption was described with the charge distribution multi-site surface complexation model (CD-MUSIC). The groundwater containing an average of 329 microg L(-1) As(III), 246 microg L(-1) As(V), 151 microg L(-1) MMA, and 202 microg L(-1) DMA was continuously passed through a TiO2 filter at an empty bed contact time of 6 min for 4 months. Approximately 11,000, 14,000, and 9900 bed volumes of water had been treated before the As(III), As(V), and MMA concentration in the effluent increased to 10 microg L(-1). However, very little DMA was removed. The EXAFS results demonstrate the existence of a bidentate binuclear As(V) surface complex on spent adsorbent, indicating the oxidation of adsorbed As(III). PMID:19339086

  18. On the Boiling Points of the Alkyl Halides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correia, John

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the variety of explanations in organic chemistry textbooks of a physical property of organic compounds. Focuses on those concepts explaining attractive forces between molecules. Concludes that induction interactions play a major role in alkyl halides and other polar organic molecules and should be given wider exposure in chemistry texts.…

  19. How specific halide adsorption varies hydrophobic interactions.

    PubMed

    Stock, Philipp; Müller, Melanie; Utzig, Thomas; Valtiner, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Hydrophobic interactions (HI) are driven by the water structure around hydrophobes in aqueous electrolytes. How water structures at hydrophobic interfaces and how this influences the HI was subject to numerous studies. However, the effect of specific ion adsorption on HI and hydrophobic interfaces remains largely unexplored or controversial. Here, the authors utilized atomic force microscopy force spectroscopy at well-defined nanoscopic hydrophobic interfaces to experimentally address how specific ion adsorption of halide ions as well as NH4 (+), Cs(+), and Na(+) cations alters interaction forces across hydrophobic interfaces. Our data demonstrate that iodide adsorption at hydrophobic interfaces profoundly varies the hydrophobic interaction potential. A long-range and strong hydration repulsion at distances D > 3 nm, is followed by an instability which could be explained by a subsequent rapid ejection of adsorbed iodides from approaching hydrophobic interfaces. In addition, the authors find only a weakly pronounced influence of bromide, and as expected no influence of chloride. Also, all tested cations do not have any significant influence on HI. Complementary, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and quartz-crystal-microbalance with dissipation monitoring showed a clear adsorption of large halide ions (Br(-)/I(-)) onto hydrophobic self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). Interestingly, iodide can even lead to a full disintegration of SAMs due to specific and strong interactions of iodide with gold. Our data suggest that hydrophobic surfaces are not intrinsically charged negatively by hydroxide adsorption, as it was generally believed. Hydrophobic surfaces rather interact strongly with negatively charged large halide ions, leading to a surface charging and significant variation of interaction forces. PMID:26753786

  20. Effects of dissolved organic matter on adsorbed Fe(II) reactivity for the reduction of 2-nitrophenol in TiO2 suspensions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhenke; Tao, Liang; Li, Fangbai

    2013-09-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is widespread in aquatic and terrestrial environments. Iron is the most abundant transition metal in the Earth's crust. The biogeochemistry of iron and the strength of Fe(II) as a reducing agent while adsorbed on minerals are affected by DOM. This study investigated the effects of Fe(II)/DOM interactions on the reduction of 2-nitrophenol (2-NP) in TiO2 suspensions. Kinetic measurements demonstrated that rates (k) of 2-NP reduction by adsorbed Fe(II) species are affected by adding DOM (denoted O-DOM), and the obtained k values under the impact of the Fe(II)/DOM interaction with different molecular weight DOM fractions [including MW<3500Da (L-DOM), 350014000Da (H-DOM)] showed significant differences. The enhanced rates of 2-NP reduction contributed to increases in the amount of adsorbed Fe(II) species and negative shifts in peak oxidation potential values (EP) in CV tests. For different molecular weight DOM fractions, increases in k (O-DOMadsorbed Fe(II) and the lower EP values. In addition, the ETC values were slightly higher in the TiO2 suspension containing the H-DOM fraction as compared the other two DOM fractions, which would further enhance the reduction rate of 2-NP. These findings promote a general understanding of Fe(II)/DOM interactions and their impact on the fate of contaminants in actual subsurface environments. PMID:23796307

  1. PREPARATION OF HALIDES OF PLUTONIUM

    DOEpatents

    Garner, C.S.; Johns, I.B.

    1958-09-01

    A dry chemical method is described for preparing plutonium halides, which consists in contacting plutonyl nitrate with dry gaseous HCl or HF at an elevated temperature. The addition to the reaction gas of a small quantity of an oxidizing gas or a reducing gas will cause formation of the tetra- or tri-halide of plutonium as desired.

  2. Halide laser glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.J.

    1982-01-14

    Energy storage and energy extraction are of prime importance for efficient laser action and are affected by the line strengths and linewidths of optical transitions, excited-state lifetimes, nonradiative decay processes, spectroscopic inhomogeneities, nonlinear refractive index, and damage threshold. These properties are all host dependent. To illustrate this, the spectroscopic properties of Nd/sup 3 +/ have been measured in numerous oxide, oxyhalide, and halide glasses. A table summarizes the reported ranges of stimulated emission cross sections, peak wavelengths, linewidths, and radiative lifetimes associated with the /sup 4/F/sub 3/2/ ..-->.. /sup 4/I/sub 11/2/ lasing transition.

  3. Effects of feed-borne Fusarium mycotoxins with or without yeast cell wall adsorbent on organ weight, serum biochemistry, and immunological parameters of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Yang, Z B; Yang, W R; Wang, S J; Jiang, S Z; Wu, Y B

    2012-10-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate the toxicity of feed-borne Fusarium mycotoxins on organ weight, serum biochemistry, and immunological parameters of broiler chickens and to evaluate the efficacy of yeast cell wall adsorbent in preventing mycotoxin-induced adverse effects. In total, 300 one-day-old vaccinated (Marek's disease and infectious bronchitis) Arbor Acres broiler chickens (mixed sex) were randomly divided into 3 treatments (5 repetitions per treatment) and fed basal diet and naturally contaminated diets with or without yeast cell wall adsorbent. Treatments were control, naturally contaminated diet (NCD; aflatoxin, 102.08 mg/kg; zearalenone, 281.92 mg/kg; fumonisin, 5,874.38 mg/kg; deoxynivalenol, 2,038.96 mg/kg), and NCD + 2 g/kg of yeast cell wall adsorbent (NCDD). The test included 2 phases: d 0-21 and d 22-42. At 42 d, broilers fed contaminated diets without yeast cell wall adsorbent had higher (P < 0.05) serum albumin and higher relative weight of liver, bursa of Fabricius, and thymus, and greater splenic mRNA expression of IL-1β and IL-6 at 42 d compared with the control, but lower (P < 0.05) serum globulin at 42 d, IgA at 21 d, relative weight of spleen at 21 d, antibody titers of Newcastle disease at both 28 d and 42 d, and splenic mRNA expression of IFN-γ at 42 d were observed in the NCD treatment compared with control. Dietary addition of yeast cell wall adsorbent in the NCD treatment showed a positive protection effect on the relative weight of the liver and spleen at 21 d, relative weight of the bursa of Fabricius and thymus at 42 d, antibody titers of Newcastle disease at both 28 d and 42 d, and splenic mRNA expression of IL-1β, IL-6, and IFN-γ at 42 d. It is suggested that feeding a naturally contaminated diet for 42 d might result in a deleterious effect in broiler chickens, and addition of 2 g/kg of yeast cell wall enterosorbent can partly neutralize the detrimental effects of the naturally contaminated feed. PMID

  4. Insights from the Adsorption of Halide Ions on Graphene Materials.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chang; Yang, Gang

    2016-08-18

    Graphene has recently found applications in a wide range of fields. Density functional calculations show that halide ions can be adsorbed on pristine graphene, but only F(-) has an appreciable binding energy (-97.0 kJ mol(-1) ). Graphene materials, which are mainly electron donors, can be made strong electron acceptors by edge functionalization with F atoms. The binding strengths of halide ions are greatly enhanced by edge functionalization and show direct proportionality with the degree of functionalization Θ and increased charge transfer. In contrast, the adsorption strengths of metal ions on pristine graphene are clearly superior to those of halide ions but decline substantially with increasing degree of edge functionalization, and for Θ=100 %, the binding energies of -95.7, -44.8, and -25.9 kJ mol(-1) that are calculated for Li(+) , Na(+) , and K(+) , respectively, are obviously inferior to that of F(-) (-186.3 kJ mol(-1) ). Thus, the electronic properties of graphene are fundamentally regulated by edge functionalization, and the preferential adsorption of certain metal ions or anions can be facilely realized by choice of an appropriate degree of functionalization. Adsorbed metal ions and anions behave differently on gradual addition of water molecules, and their binding strengths remain substantial when graphene materials are in the pristine and highly edge functionalized states, respectively. PMID:27127939

  5. Surface vibrational spectroscopy. A comparison of the EELS spectra of organic adsorbates at Pt(111) with IR and Raman spectra of the unadsorbed organics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Bruce E.; Chaffins, Scott A.; Gui, John Y.; Lu, Frank; Stern, Donald A.; Hubbard, Arthur T.

    1990-02-01

    In this study EELS spectra obtained for the adsorbed species formed from aqueous electrolytes at Pt(111) electrode surfaces are compared with the IR and Raman spectra of the unadsorbed compounds in order to reveal the changes in vibrational spectra resulting from chemisorption of various important functional groups, and to explore the differences in vibrational absorptivities between EELS spectra of adsorbed species and IR and Raman spectra of the corresponding unadsorbed compounds. Of particular interest are the variations in EELS vibrational frequency, bandwidth and absorptivity due to bonding with the surface, intermolecular interactions of adsorbed molecules and changes in adsorbate molecular orientation. The influence of surface bonding on the EELS spectrum of a functional group was explored through studies of phenol (PL), phenol- d6 (PLD6), benzyl alcohol (BZOH), catechol (CT), benzoic acid (BA), 2-picolinic acid (PA), 2,6-pyridine dicarboxylic acid (26PDCA), and propenoic acid (PPEA). The aromatic ring of adsorbed PL, PLD6, BZA, CT, BA, PA and 26PDCA is oriented parallel to the Pt(111) surface. The resulting strong interactions affect the frequencies and relative intensities of the EELS bands: weak CH stretching modes; a large CC stretching band (1600-1650 cm -1), and weak CH bending (700-800 cm -1). The carboxylic acid moieties of BA and PA interact strongly with the Pt surface, while those of 26PDCA do so only when adsorbed at relatively positive electrode potentials. OH stretching and bending are absent from the EELS spectra of adsorbed PL, BZOH and CT, perhaps due to dissociation of the hydroxyl hydrogen during adsorption of the molecule. Adsorption of alkenes at Pt(111) from solution preserves the characteristic CC stretching band near 1650 cm -1; examples are: PPEA; 1-hexene (HXE); propenol (PPEOH); 4-pentenol (PTEOH); and cis-2-butene-1,4-diol (CBED); adsorption of ethene, propene and butene from vacuum at room temperature has been reported to

  6. Halide test agent replacement study

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, E.M.; Freeman, W.P.; Kovach, B.J.

    1995-02-01

    The intended phaseout of the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) from commercial use required the evaluation of substitute materials for the testing for leak paths through both individual adsorbers and installed adsorbent banks. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Committee on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (CONAGT) is in charge of maintaining the standards and codes specifying adsorbent leak test methods for the nuclear safety related air cleaning systems. The currently published standards and codes cite the use of R-11, R-12 and R-112 for leak path test agents. All of these compounds are CFCs. There are other agencies and organizations (USDOE, USDOD and USNRC) also specifying testing for leak paths or in some cases for special life tests using the above compounds. The CONAGT has recently developed criteria for the suitability evaluation of substitute test agents. On the basis of these criteria, several compounds were evaluated for their acceptability as adsorbent bed leak and life test agents. The ASME CONAGT Test Agent Qualification Criteria. The test agent qualification is based on the following parameters: (1) Similar retention times on activated carbons at the same concentration levels as one of the following: R-11, R-12, R-112 or R-112a. (2) Similar lower detection limit sensitivity and precision in the concentration range of use as R-11, R-12, R-112 and R-112a. (3) Gives the same in-place leak test results as R-11, R-12, R-112, or R-112a. (4) Chemical and radiological stability under the use conditions. (5) Causes no degradation of the carbon and its impregnant or of the other NATS components under the use conditions. (6) Is listed in the USEPA Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) inventory for commercial use.

  7. A rapid microwave-assisted synthesis of a sodium-cadmium metal-organic framework having improved performance as a CO2 adsorbent for CCS.

    PubMed

    Palomino Cabello, Carlos; Arean, Carlos Otero; Parra, José B; Ania, Conchi O; Rumori, P; Turnes Palomino, G

    2015-06-01

    We report on a facile and rapid microwave-assisted method for preparing a sodium-cadmium metal-organic framework (having coordinatively unsaturated sodium ions) that considerably shortens the conventional synthesis time from 5 days to 1 hour. The obtained (Na,Cd)-MOF showed an excellent volumetric CO2 adsorption capacity (5.2 mmol cm(-3) at 298 K and 1 bar) and better CO2 adsorption properties than those shown by the same metal-organic framework when synthesized following a more conventional procedure. Moreover, the newly prepared material was found to display high selectivity for adsorption of carbon dioxide over nitrogen, and good regenerability and stability during repeated CO2 adsorption-desorption cycles, which are the required properties for any adsorbent intended for carbon dioxide capture and sequestration (CSS) from the post-combustion flue gas of fossil fuelled power stations. PMID:25939594

  8. Systematic analysis of the unique band gap modulation of mixed halide perovskites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongseob; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Chung, Choong-Heui; Hong, Ki-Ha

    2016-02-14

    Solar cells based on organic-inorganic hybrid metal halide perovskites have been proven to be one of the most promising candidates for the next generation thin film photovoltaic cells. Mixing Br or Cl into I-based perovskites has been frequently tried to enhance the cell efficiency and stability. One of the advantages of mixed halides is the modulation of band gap by controlling the composition of the incorporated halides. However, the reported band gap transition behavior has not been resolved yet. Here a theoretical model is presented to understand the electronic structure variation of metal mixed-halide perovskites through hybrid density functional theory. Comparative calculations in this work suggest that the band gap correction including spin-orbit interaction is essential to describe the band gap changes of mixed halides. In our model, both the lattice variation and the orbital interactions between metal and halides play key roles to determine band gap changes and band alignments of mixed halides. It is also presented that the band gap of mixed halide thin films can be significantly affected by the distribution of halide composition. PMID:26791587

  9. Heat capacity of molten halides.

    PubMed

    Redkin, Alexander A; Zaikov, Yurii P; Korzun, Iraida V; Reznitskikh, Olga G; Yaroslavtseva, Tatiana V; Kumkov, Sergey I

    2015-01-15

    The heat capacities of molten salts are very important for their practical use. Experimental investigation of this property is challenging because of the high temperatures involved and the corrosive nature of these materials. It is preferable to combine experimental investigations with empirical relationships, which allows for the evaluation of the heat capacity of molten salt mixtures. The isobaric molar heat capacities of all molten alkali and alkaline-earth halides were found to be constant for each group of salts. The value depends on the number of atoms in the salt, and the molar heat capacity per atom is constant for all molten halide salts with the exception of the lithium halides. The molar heat capacities of molten halides do not change when the anions are changed. PMID:25530462

  10. METHOD OF PREPARING METAL HALIDES

    DOEpatents

    Hendrickson, A.V.

    1958-11-18

    The conversion of plutonium halides from plutonium peroxide can be done by washing the peroxide with hydrogen peroxide, drying the peroxide, passing a dry gaseous hydrohalide over the surface of the peroxide at a temperature of about lOO icient laborato C until the reaction rate has stabillzed, and then ralsing the reaction temperature to between 400 and 600 icient laborato C until the conversion to plutonium halide is substantially complete.

  11. Quantitation of persistent organic pollutants adsorbed on plastic debris from the Northern Pacific Gyre's "eastern garbage patch".

    PubMed

    Rios, Lorena M; Jones, Patrick R; Moore, Charles; Narayan, Urja V

    2010-12-01

    Floating marine plastic debris was found to function as solid-phase extraction media, adsorbing and concentrating pollutants out of the water column. Plastic debris was collected in the North Pacific Gyre, extracted, and analyzed for 36 individual PCB congeners, 17 organochlorine pesticides, and 16 EPA priority PAHs. Over 50% contained PCBs, 40% contained pesticides, and nearly 80% contained PAHs. The PAHs included 2, 3 and 4 ring congeners. The PCBs were primarily CB-11, 28, 44, 52, 66, and 101. The pesticides detected were primarily p,p-DDTs and its metabolite, o,p-DDD, as well as BHC (a,b,g and d). The concentrations of pollutants found ranged from a few ppb to thousands of ppb. The types of PCBs and PAHs found were similar to those found in marine sediments. However, these plastic particles were mostly polyethylene which is resistant to degradation and although functioning similarly to sediments in accumulating pollutants, these had remained on or near the ocean surface. Particles collected included intact plastic items as well as many pieces less than 5 mm in size. PMID:21042605

  12. Making and Breaking of Lead Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Manser, Joseph S; Saidaminov, Makhsud I; Christians, Jeffrey A; Bakr, Osman M; Kamat, Prashant V

    2016-02-16

    A new front-runner has emerged in the field of next-generation photovoltaics. A unique class of materials, known as organic metal halide perovskites, bridges the gap between low-cost fabrication and exceptional device performance. These compounds can be processed at low temperature (typically in the range 80-150 °C) and readily self-assemble from the solution phase into high-quality semiconductor thin films. The low energetic barrier for crystal formation has mixed consequences. On one hand, it enables inexpensive processing and both optical and electronic tunability. The caveat, however, is that many as-formed lead halide perovskite thin films lack chemical and structural stability, undergoing rapid degradation in the presence of moisture or heat. To date, improvements in perovskite solar cell efficiency have resulted primarily from better control over thin film morphology, manipulation of the stoichiometry and chemistry of lead halide and alkylammonium halide precursors, and the choice of solvent treatment. Proper characterization and tuning of processing parameters can aid in rational optimization of perovskite devices. Likewise, gaining a comprehensive understanding of the degradation mechanism and identifying components of the perovskite structure that may be particularly susceptible to attack by moisture are vital to mitigate device degradation under operating conditions. This Account provides insight into the lifecycle of organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites, including (i) the nature of the precursor solution, (ii) formation of solid-state perovskite thin films and single crystals, and (iii) transformation of perovskites into hydrated phases upon exposure to moisture. In particular, spectroscopic and structural characterization techniques shed light on the thermally driven evolution of the perovskite structure. By tuning precursor stoichiometry and chemistry, and thus the lead halide charge-transfer complexes present in solution, crystallization

  13. Mutagenicity of organic pollutants adsorbed on suspended particulate matter in the center of Wrocław (Poland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bełcik, Maciej; Trusz-Zdybek, Agnieszka; Galas, Ewa; Piekarska, Katarzyna

    2014-10-01

    Mutagenicity of pollutants adsorbed on suspended dust of the PM10 fraction, collected in winter and summer season alike over the Wrocław city centre (Poland) was studied using the standard Salmonella assay (plate-incorporation) and the Kado modified assay (microsuspension method). The dust was collected using Staplex high volume air sampler. Further on it was extracted with dichloromethane in a Soxhlet apparatus. PAH content in extracts was determined by the high performance liquid chromatography technique using fluorescence detection, whereas the nitro-PAH content- by the gas chromatography using mass detection. Two Salmonella typhimurium strains, TA98 and YG1041, were used in the assays. The assays were conducted with and without a metabolic activation. Investigated air pollution extracts differed against each other with regard to a total content as well as to a percentage of individual compounds, depending on the sampling season. Both the total PAH content and the nitro-PAH content in the tested samples, and their spectrum as well, were found the highest in winter season. Higher mutagenic effect was noted for the dust extract from samples collected in wintertime than from those collected in summer. Pollutants directly affecting the genetic material and those showing such indirect action were present in the examined samples. The YG1041 strain turned out to be the most sensitive, which was the sign that large amounts of nitro-aromatic compounds were present in the tested samples. Obtained results proved that the Kado modified Salmonella assay would be useful for the atmospheric air pollution monitoring in urban agglomerations. Mutagenic effect in assays conducted according to the Kado procedure was obtained by using in the assays lower concentrations of tested extracts, compared to the classical assay.

  14. Spectral sensitization with dyes of core-silver halide shell microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurin, A. V.; Zhukov, S. A.; Churashov, V. P.

    2015-09-01

    We have studied spectral sensitization with anionic dyes of core-silver halide shell microsystems cores of which can be either nonsilver or silver halide compounds. Conditions under which dye sensitizers, being adsorbed on cores, remain under silver halide shells after their growing are considered. Comparison of results of sensitometric and low-temperature ( T = 77 K) luminescent measurements have shown that these conditions are determined by the charge state of cations of microsystem cores. If the shell contains the same univalent component in its composition as the core does, as in the case in which the core is a silver halide compound, the anionic dye is displaced to the outer surface of the shell. If the core contains a divalent cationic component, as in the case in which the core is a nonsilver compound, the dye remains under the silver halide shell; i.e., it is overgrown by the shell. We have shown that the charge state of core cations affects the character of the core interaction with anionic dyes, which ensures differences in the spectral sensitization of core-silver halide shell microsystems, as well as differences in the dye photoexcitation relaxation in them.

  15. Ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy of lead halide perovskite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idowu, Mopelola A.; Yau, Sung H.; Varnavski, Oleg; Goodson, Theodore

    2015-09-01

    Recently, lead halide perovskites which are organic-inorganic hybrid structures, have been discovered to be highly efficient as light absorbers. Herein, we show the investigation of the excited state dynamics and emission properties of non-stoichiometric precursor formed lead halide perovskites grown by interdiffusion method using steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopic measurements. The influence of the different ratios of the non-stoichiometric precursor solution was examined. The observed photoluminescence properties were correlated with the femtosecond transient absorption measurements.

  16. Actinide halide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Avens, L.R.; Zwick, B.D.; Sattelberger, A.P.; Clark, D.L.; Watkin, J.G.

    1992-11-24

    A compound is described of the formula MX[sub n]L[sub m] wherein M is a metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, plutonium, neptunium or americium, X is a halide atom, n is an integer selected from the group of three or four, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is an integer selected from the group of three or four for monodentate ligands or is the integer two for bidentate ligands, where the sum of n+m equals seven or eight for monodentate ligands or five or six for bidentate ligands. A compound of the formula MX[sub n] wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds are described including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant.

  17. Actinide halide complexes

    DOEpatents

    Avens, Larry R.; Zwick, Bill D.; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Clark, David L.; Watkin, John G.

    1992-01-01

    A compound of the formula MX.sub.n L.sub.m wherein M is a metal atom selected from the group consisting of thorium, plutonium, neptunium or americium, X is a halide atom, n is an integer selected from the group of three or four, L is a coordinating ligand selected from the group consisting of aprotic Lewis bases having an oxygen-, nitrogen-, sulfur-, or phosphorus-donor, and m is an integer selected from the group of three or four for monodentate ligands or is the integer two for bidentate ligands, where the sum of n+m equals seven or eight for monodentate ligands or five or six for bidentate ligands, a compound of the formula MX.sub.n wherein M, X, and n are as previously defined, and a process of preparing such actinide metal compounds including admixing the actinide metal in an aprotic Lewis base as a coordinating solvent in the presence of a halogen-containing oxidant, are provided.

  18. Semiempirical and DFT Investigations of the Dissociation of Alkyl Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waas, Jack R.

    2006-01-01

    Enthalpy changes corresponding to the gas phase heats of dissociation of 12 organic halides were calculated using two semiempirical methods, the Hartree-Fock method, and two DFT methods. These calculated values were compared to experimental values where possible. All five methods agreed generally with the expected empirically known trends in the…

  19. Influence of organic acids on kinetic release of chromium in soil contaminated with leather factory waste in the presence of some adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Taghipour, Marzieh; Jalali, Mohsen

    2016-07-01

    In this study, batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of nanoparticles (NPs) (MgO, ZnO, TiO2) and clay minerals (bentonite, zeolite) on the release of chromium (Cr) from leather factory waste (LFW) and LFW treated soil using organic acids. Chromium release from all treatments was studied in the presence of citric acid, oxalic acid and CaCl2 solutions. The results showed that, in all treatments, organic acids released more Cr than inorganic salt (CaCl2). The release of Cr by citric acid was higher than that by oxalic acid. In LFW treated soil and LFW, the release of Cr from the all treatments with NPs was less than that from the clay mineral treatments. On the other hand, in the presence of organic acids, Cr release by NPs and clay minerals decreased. Two kinetic models including pseudo-first- and pseudo-second-order model were tested to describe the time dependent Cr release data. Among the kinetic models used, the pseudo-second-order model generally gave the best fits to experimental data. Before and after release experiments, Cr in LFW, treated LFW, control soil and LFW treated soils were fractionated. In all treatments, the greatest amounts of Cr were found in the residual fraction (RES). The organic acids were effective in reducing the exchangeable (EXC), bound to organic matter (OM) and bound to carbonate (CAR) fractions of Cr in all treatments, whereas, after release of Cr from treated soils, Cr remained mainly in the RES fraction. The application of NPs and clay minerals in soil led to a significant transformation of Cr from mobile fractions to the RES fraction. Therefore, organic ligands played a dominant role in mobility and bioavailability of Cr and the removal of Cr by adsorbents. PMID:27139119

  20. QSAR models for removal rates of organic pollutants adsorbed by in situ formed manganese dioxide under acid condition.

    PubMed

    Su, Pingru; Zhu, Huicen; Shen, Zhemin

    2016-02-01

    Manganese dioxide formed in oxidation process by potassium permanganate exhibits promising adsorptive capacity which can be utilized to remove organic pollutants in wastewater. However, the structure variances of organic molecules lead to wide difference of adsorption efficiency. Therefore, it is of great significance to find a general relationship between removal rate of organic compounds and their quantum parameters. This study focused on building up quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) models based on experimental removal rate (r(exp)) of 25 organic compounds and 17 quantum parameters of each organic compounds computed by Gaussian 09 and Material Studio 6.1. The recommended model is rpre = -0.502-7.742 f(+)x + 0.107 E HOMO + 0.959 q(H(+)) + 1.388 BOx. Both internal and external validations of the recommended model are satisfied, suggesting optimum stability and predictive ability. The definition of applicability domain and the Y-randomization test indicate all the prediction is reliable and no possibility of chance correlation. The recommended model contains four variables, which are closely related to adsorption mechanism. f(+)x reveals the degree of affinity for nucleophilic attack. E HOMO represents the difficulty of electron loss. q(H(+)) reflect the distribution of partial charge between carbon and hydrogen atom. BO x shows the stability of a molecule. PMID:26490942

  1. Simultaneous removal of multiple pesticides from water: effect of organically modified clays as coagulant aid and adsorbent in coagulation-flocculation process.

    PubMed

    Shabeer, T P Ahammed; Saha, Ajoy; Gajbhiye, V T; Gupta, Suman; Manjaiah, K M; Varghese, Eldho

    2014-01-01

    Contamination of drinking water sources with agrochemical residues became a major concern in the twenty-first century. Coagulation-flocculation is the most widely used water-treatment process, but the efficiency to remove pesticides and other organic pollutants are limited compared to adsorption process. Thus, simultaneous action of adsorption on normal bentonite or organo-modified montmorillonite clays [modified with octadecylamine (ODA-M) and octadecylamine + amino-propyltriethoxysilane (ODAAPS-M)] followed by coagulation-flocculation by alum and poly aluminium chloride has been evaluated for removal of 10 different pesticides, namely atrazine, lindane, metribuzin, aldrin, chlorpyriphos, pendimethalin, alpha-endosulphan, beta-endosulphan, p,p'-DDT, cypermethrin and two of its metabolites, endosulphan sulphate and p,p'-DDE, from water. The coagulation without integration of adsorption was less effective (removal % varies from 12 to 49) than the adsorption-coagulation integrated system (removal % varies from 71 to 100). Further, coagulation integrated with adsorption was more effective when organically modified montmorillonite was used as adsorbent compared to normal bentonite. The removal efficiency of organic clay depends upon the concentration of pesticides, doses of clay minerals, and efficiency was more for ODAAPS-M as compared to ODA-M. The combination of ODAAPS-M-clay with coagulants was also used efficiently for the removal of pesticides from natural and fortified natural water collected and the results exhibit the usefulness of this remediation technique for application in water decontamination and in treatment of industrial and agricultural waste waters. PMID:25145219

  2. REUSABLE ADSORBENTS FOR DILUTE SOLUTIONS SEPARATION. 5: PHOTODEGRADATION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS ON SURFACTANT-MODIFIED TITANIA. (R828598C753)

    EPA Science Inventory

    A semiconductor titania (TiO2) surface was modified by surfactant adsorption to make it more hydrophobic and to increase the adsorption of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) and their photodegradation rates under UV irradiation. Photocatalytic experiments using Ti...

  3. Reduction of ferrihydrite with adsorbed and coprecipitated organic matter: microbial reduction by Geobacter bremensis vs. abiotic reduction by Na-dithionite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eusterhues, K.; Hädrich, A.; Neidhardt, J.; Küsel, K.; Keller, T. F.; Jandt, K. D.; Totsche, K. U.

    2014-04-01

    Ferrihydrite (Fh) is a widespread poorly crystalline Fe oxide which becomes easily coated by natural organic matter (OM) in the environment. This mineral-bound OM entirely changes the mineral surface properties and therefore the reactivity of the original mineral. Here, we investigated the reactivity of 2-line Fh, Fh with adsorbed OM and Fh coprecipitated with OM towards microbial and abiotic reduction of Fe(III). As a surrogate for dissolved soil OM we used a water extract of a Podzol forest floor. Fh-OM associations with different OM-loadings were reduced either by Geobacter bremensis or abiotically by Na-dithionite. Both types of experiments showed decreasing initial Fe reduction rates and decreasing degrees of reduction with increasing amounts of mineral-bound OM. At similar OM-loadings, coprecipitated Fhs were more reactive than Fhs with adsorbed OM. The difference can be explained by the smaller crystal size and poor crystallinity of such coprecipitates. At small OM loadings this led to even faster Fe reduction rates than found for pure Fh. The amount of mineral-bound OM also affected the formation of secondary minerals: goethite was only found after reduction of OM-free Fh and siderite was only detected when Fhs with relatively low amounts of mineral-bound OM were reduced. We conclude that direct contact of G. bremensis to the Fe oxide mineral surface was inhibited when blocked by OM. Consequently, mineral-bound OM shall be taken into account besides Fe(II) accumulation as a further widespread mechanism to slow down reductive dissolution.

  4. Preparation of cerium halide solvate complexes

    DOEpatents

    Vasudevan, Kalyan V; Smith, Nickolaus A; Gordon, John C; McKigney, Edward A; Muenchaussen, Ross E

    2013-08-06

    Crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide solvate complex resulted from a process of forming a paste of a cerium(III) halide in an ionic liquid, adding a solvent to the paste, removing any undissolved solid, and then cooling the liquid phase. Diffusing a solvent vapor into the liquid phase also resulted in crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide complex.

  5. Organic and inorganic contaminants removal from water with biochar, a renewable, low cost and sustainable adsorbent--a critical review.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Dinesh; Sarswat, Ankur; Ok, Yong Sik; Pittman, Charles U

    2014-05-01

    Biochar is used for soil conditioning, remediation, carbon sequestration and water remediation. Biochar application to water and wastewater has never been reviewed previously. This review focuses on recent applications of biochars, produced from biomass pyrolysis (slow and fast), in water and wastewater treatment. Slow and fast pyrolysis biochar production is briefly discussed. The literature on sorption of organic and inorganic contaminants by biochars is surveyed and reviewed. Adsorption capacities for organic and inorganic contaminants by different biochars under different operating conditions are summarized and, where possible, compared. Mechanisms responsible for contaminant remediation are briefly discussed. Finally, a few recommendations for further research have been made in the area of biochar development for application to water filtration. PMID:24636918

  6. Performance of PF BL-13A, a vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray undulator beamline for studying organic thin films adsorbed on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoshima, Akio; Kikuchi, Takashi; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Mase, Kazuhiko; Amemiya, Kenta; Ozawa, Kenichi

    2013-03-01

    We report on the present status of a vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray undulator beamline, BL-13A, located at the Photon Factory. BL-13A is mainly dedicated to the study of organic thin films adsorbed on well-defined surfaces, using angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The photon-energy resolution (E/ΔE) is estimated to be about 10000 at a photon energy of 64 eV with an exit-slit width of 30 μm. The photon intensity is estimated to be 2.9 × 1012 to 5.6 × 108 photons/s for photon energies of 30-1600 eV with an exit-slit width of 100 μm at the ring current of 450 mA. An ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) chamber equipped with an electron-energy analyzer (Gamma Data/Scienta, SES 200) is used as the main end station for ARPES, XPS, and XAS measurements. A sample can be transferred from a UHV chamber for sample preparation or from a UHV chamber for the evaporation of organic materials. The sample-holder acceptors are equipped with a heating and cooling system. The overall electron-energy resolution is estimated to be about 12 meV at a photon energy of 30 eV.

  7. Femtosecond time-resolved photodissociation dynamics of methyl halide molecules on ultrathin gold films

    PubMed Central

    Vaida, Mihai E; Tchitnga, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Summary The photodissociation of small organic molecules, namely methyl iodide, methyl bromide, and methyl chloride, adsorbed on a metal surface was investigated in real time by means of femtosecond-laser pump–probe mass spectrometry. A weakly interacting gold surface was employed as substrate because the intact adsorption of the methyl halide molecules was desired prior to photoexcitation. The gold surface was prepared as an ultrathin film on Mo(100). The molecular adsorption behavior was characterized by coverage dependent temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy. Submonolayer preparations were irradiated with UV light of 266 nm wavelength and the subsequently emerging methyl fragments were probed by photoionization and mass spectrometric detection. A strong dependence of the excitation mechanism and the light-induced dynamics on the type of molecule was observed. Possible photoexcitation mechanisms included direct photoexcitation to the dissociative A-band of the methyl halide molecules as well as the attachment of surface-emitted electrons with transient negative ion formation and subsequent molecular fragmentation. Both reaction pathways were energetically possible in the case of methyl iodide, yet, no methyl fragments were observed. As a likely explanation, the rapid quenching of the excited states prior to fragmentation is proposed. This quenching mechanism could be prevented by modification of the gold surface through pre-adsorption of iodine atoms. In contrast, the A-band of methyl bromide was not energetically directly accessible through 266 nm excitation. Nevertheless, the one-photon-induced dissociation was observed in the case of methyl bromide. This was interpreted as being due to a considerable energetic down-shift of the electronic A-band states of methyl bromide by about 1.5 eV through interaction with the gold substrate. Finally, for methyl chloride no photofragmentation could be detected at all. PMID:22003467

  8. Fabrication of Isolated Metal-Organic Polyhedra in Confined Cavities: Adsorbents/Catalysts with Unusual Dispersity and Activity.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ying-Hu; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Yan, Ni; Jiang, Yao; Liu, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Lin-Bing; Li, Jian-Rong

    2016-05-18

    Metal-organic polyhedra (MOPs) have attracted great attention due to their intriguing structure. However, the applications of MOPs are severely hindered by two shortcomings, namely low dispersity and poor stability. Here we report the introduction of four MOPs (constructed from dicopper and carboxylates) to cavity-structured mesoporous silica SBA-16 via a double-solvent strategy to overcome both shortcomings simultaneously. By judicious design, the dimension of MOPs is just between the size of cavities and entrances of SBA-16, MOP molecules are thus confined in the cavities. This leads to the formation of isolated MOPs with unusual dispersion, making the active sites highly accessible. Hence, the adsorption capacity on carbon dioxide and propene as well as catalytic performance on ring opening are much superior to bulk MOPs. More importantly, the structure and catalytic activity of MOPs in confined cavities are well preserved after exposure to humid atmosphere, whereas those of bulk MOPs are degraded seriously. PMID:27049737

  9. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY: DEMONSTRATION OF AMBERSORB 563 ADSORBENT TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field pilot study was conducted to demonstrate the technical feasibility and cost-effectiveness of Ambersorb® 5631 carbonaceous adsorbent for remediating groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The Ambersorb adsorbent technology demonstration consist...

  10. Milestone Report - Complete New Adsorbent Materials for Marine Testing to Demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg Adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Christopher James; Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Yatsandra; Mayes, Richard T.; Saito, Tomonori; Brown, Suree; Gill, Gary; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana

    2014-08-01

    This report describes work on the successful completion of Milestone M2FT-14OR03100115 (8/20/2014) entitled, “Complete new adsorbent materials for marine testing to demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent”. This effort is part of the Seawater Uranium Recovery Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, and involved the development of new adsorbent materials at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and marine testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). ORNL has recently developed two new families of fiber adsorbents that have demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities greater than 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent after marine testing at PNNL. One adsorbent was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of itaconic acid and acrylonitrile onto high surface area polyethylene fibers followed by amidoximation and base conditioning. This fiber showed a capacity of 4.6 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. The second adsorbent was prepared by atom-transfer radical polymerization of t-butyl acrylate and acrylonitrile onto halide-functionalized round fibers followed by amidoximation and base hydrolysis. This fiber demonstrated uranium adsorption capacity of 5.4 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL.

  11. Influence of surface chemistry on the structural organization of monomolecular protein layers adsorbed to functionalized aqueous interfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Lösche, M; Piepenstock, M; Diederich, A; Grünewald, T; Kjaer, K; Vaknin, D

    1993-01-01

    The molecular organization of streptavidin (SA) bound to aqueous surface monolayers of biotin-functionalized lipids and binary lipid mixtures has been investigated with neutron reflectivity and electron and fluorescence microscopy. The substitution of deuterons (2H) for protons (1H), both in subphase water molecules and in the alkyl chains of the lipid surface monolayer, was utilized to determine the interface structure on the molecular length scale. In all cases studied, the protein forms monomolecular layers underneath the interface with thickness values of approximately 40 A. A systematic dependence of the structural properties of such self-assembled SA monolayers on the surface chemistry was observed: the lateral protein density depends on the length of the spacer connecting the biotin moiety and its hydrophobic anchor. The hydration of the lipid head groups in the protein-bound state depends on the dipole moment density at the interface. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 11 FIGURE 12 FIGURE A1 PMID:8298041

  12. Adsorption mechanism of ester phosphate on baryum titanate in organic medium. Preliminary results on the structure of the adsorbed layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bars, N.; Tinet, D.; Faugère, A. M.; van Damme, H.; Levitz, P.

    1991-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to evidence the adsorption mechanism and the structure of commercial phosphate ester surfactant stabilized BaTiO3 in organic suspension, and to relate these characteristics to rheological behaviour. Binders and plasticizers are omitted to reduce the number of system components. Firstly adsorption isotherm were determined by inductively coupled argon plasma technique and interpretated based on transmission electron microscopy and ^{31}P nuclear magnetic resonance studies. Preliminary rheological measurements were then performed and related to suspension structure. Structure of the adsorption layer is critically discussed. L'objectif de cette étude est la compréhension du mécanisme d'adsorption d'agents dispersants phosphatés dans des suspensions organiques de BaTiO3, ainsi que la caractérisation de la structure, et du comportement rhéologique de ces suspensions. Liants et plastifiants ne sont pas utilisés, afin de réduire le nombre de composants dans le système. Dans un premier temps, l'isotherme d'adsorption est établie par dosage en émission plasma, puis interprétée sur la base de résultats de Microscopie Eloctronique à Transmission, et de spectroscopie par Résonance Magnétique Nucléaire du ^{31}P. Des mesures rhéologiques préliminaires sont effectuées pour caractériser la structure des suspensions.

  13. Effect of the adsorbate (Bromacil) equilibrium concentration in water on its adsorption on powdered activated carbon. Part 3: Competition with natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Al Mardini, Fadi; Legube, Bernard

    2010-10-15

    This study (part 3) was carried out to investigate the effect of the natural organic matter (NOM) concentration on Bromacil (pesticide) adsorption on powdered activated carbon (PAC) in the same experimental conditions as in our previous studies (parts 1 and 2). Our previous findings showed that Bromacil adsorption in buffered pure water (pH 7.8) occurred at two types of site. In the presence of NOM (three kinds), we noted a significant reduction in Bromacil adsorption capacities due to the competitive effects exerted by NOM. Highly reactive sites (or pores) in PAC appeared to be blocked by NOM adsorption, as demonstrated by the application of a pseudo-single solute isotherm and of the simplified ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST), regardless of the initial Bromacil and NOM concentrations. The competing effect of low-molecular weight NOM was found to be greater than the competing effect of high-molecular weight NOM. The pseudo-second order surface-reaction model fitted Bromacil adsorption particularly well, even in the presence of NOM. However, the adsorption-kinetic constant values were found to be independent of the aqueous equilibrium concentration of the target compound, contrary to that observed in pure water. The kinetic data thus confirmed that high reactivity PAC sites were blocked by NOM adsorption. A practical approach concluded this work. PMID:20619963

  14. A novel dispersive solid-phase extraction method using metal-organic framework MIL-101 as the adsorbent for the analysis of benzophenones in toner.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Zhu, Quanfei; Yang, Yang; Huang, Jianlin; Dang, Xueping; Chen, Huaixia

    2015-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been paid widespread attention in the field of adsorption and separation materials due to its porosity, large specific surface area, unsaturated metal-ligand sites and structural diversity. In this study, the green powder MIL-101 was synthesized and used for the extraction of benzophenone, 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone and 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone from toner samples for the first time. The synthesized MIL-101 was characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetry and nitrogen adsorption porosimetry. The MIL-101 was applied as the dispersive solid phase extraction (DSPE) adsorbent for the extraction and preconcentration of benzophenone, 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone and 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone from toner samples. The extraction conditions were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, a DSPE-HPLC method for the determination of benzophenone, 2,4-dihydroxybenzophenone and 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone was developed. The method yielded a linear calibration curve in the concentration ranges from 4.0 to 3500 μg L(-1) for the three analytes in toner samples with regression coefficients (r(2)) of 0.9992, 0.9999 and 0.9990, respectively. Limits of detection were 1.2, 1.2 and 0.9 μg L(-1), respectively. Both the intra-day and inter-day precisions (RSDs) were <10%. PMID:25476369

  15. Magnetic metal-organic nanotubes: An adsorbent for magnetic solid-phase extraction of polychlorinated biphenyls from environmental and biological samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiu-Lin; Wang, Lei-Lei; Wang, Xia; Wang, Ming-Lin; Zhao, Ru-Song

    2016-06-01

    A new type of three-dimensional, echinus-like magnetic Fe3O4 @ cobalt(Ⅱ)-based metal-organic nanotube (Fe3O4 @ Co-MONT) yolk-shell microspheres, have been designed and synthesized for the first time. Fe3O4 @ Co-MONTs yolk-shell microspheres were characterized by scanning electron micrographs, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectra, X-ray diffraction, and vibrating sample magnetometry. The feasibility of the new material for use as an absorbent was investigated for magnetic solid phase-extraction (MSPE) of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from environmental water samples and biological samples. The Plackett-Burman design and Box-Behnken design were used to determine and optimize the extraction parameters influencing the extraction efficiency through response surface methodology. Under the optimized conditions, the developed method showed good linearity within the range of 5-1000ngL(-1), low limits of detection (0.31-0.49ngL(-1)), and good reproducibility (RSD<10%). The proposed method was successfully applied for the analysis of PCBs in real environmental water samples. These results demonstrated that Fe3O4 @ Co-MONTs is a promising adsorbent material for the MSPE of PCBs at trace levels from environmental water samples and biological samples. PMID:27156750

  16. Magnetic porous carbon derived from a Zn/Co bimetallic metal-organic framework as an adsorbent for the extraction of chlorophenols from water and honey tea samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Menghua; Wang, Junmin; Jiao, Caina; Wang, Chun; Wu, Qiuhua; Wang, Zhi

    2016-05-01

    A novel magnetic porous carbon derived from a bimetallic metal-organic framework, Zn/Co-MPC, was prepared by introducing cobalt into ZIF-8. Magnetic porous carbon that possesses magnetic properties and a large specific surface area was firstly fabricated by the direct carbonization of Zn/Co-ZIF-8. The prepared magnetic porous carbon material was characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, N2 adsorption, and vibrating sample magnetometry. The prepared magnetic porous carbon was used as a magnetic solid-phase extraction adsorbent for the enrichment of chlorophenols from water and honey tea samples before high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. Several experimental parameters that could influence the extraction efficiency were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, good linearities (r > 0.9957) for all calibration curves were obtained with low limits of detection, which are in the range of 0.1-0.2 ng mL(-1) for all the analytes. The results showed that the prepared magnetic porous carbon had an excellent adsorption capability toward the target analytes. PMID:26991637

  17. Seed-mediated growth of palladium nanocrystals: the effect of pseudo-halide thiocyanate ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Niu, Wenxin; Xu, Guobao

    2011-02-01

    In synthesis in a solution phase, adsorbates such as halides can interact selectively with different metal crystal facets and affect the final morphology of nanocrystals. Pseudo-halide thiocyanate ions (SCN-) can also adsorb on the metal surface, but they have never been used for the synthesis of shape-controlled colloidal metal nanocrystals. In this study, we first investigated the effect of SCN- on the morphology of palladium nanocrystals through a seed-mediated growth method. The presence of 1 µM SCN- in the growth solutions could lead to the formation of palladium polyhedra: truncated rhombic dodecahedra enclosed by twelve {110}, eight {111} and six {100} facets. The products were nanocubes enclosed with six {100} facets if cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was the only capping agent. Meanwhile, the mechanism of the effect of SCN- on the morphology of Pd nanocrystals is discussed. PMID:21170425

  18. Atomic structure of metal-halide perovskites from first principles: The chicken-and-egg paradox of the organic-inorganic interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingrui; Rinke, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    We have studied the prototype hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite CH3NH3PbI3 and its three close relatives, CH3NH3SnI3 ,CH3NH3PbCl3 , and CsPbI3, using relativistic density function theory. The long-range van der Waals (vdW) interactions were incorporated into the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) exchange-correlation functional using the Tkatchenko-Scheffler pairwise scheme. Our results reveal that hydrogen bonding, which is well described by the PBE functional, plays a decisive role for the structural parameters of these systems, including the position and orientation of the organic cation as well as the deformation of the inorganic framework. The magnitude of the inorganic-framework deformation depends sensitively on the orientation of the organic cation, and directly influences the stability of the hybrid perovskites. Our results suggest that the organic and the inorganic components complement each other; the low symmetry of the organic cation is the origin of the inorganic-framework deformation, which then aids the overall stabilization of the hybrid perovskite structure. This stabilization is indirectly affected by vdW interactions, which lead to smaller unit-cell volumes than in PBE and therefore modulate the interaction between the organic cation and the inorganic framework. The vdW-induced lattice-constant corrections are system dependent and lead to PBE+vdW lattice constants in good agreement with experiment. Further insight is gained by analyzing the vdW contributions. In all iodide-based hybrid perovskites, the interaction between the organic cation and the iodide anions provides the largest lattice-constant change, followed by iodine-iodine and the organic cation—heavy-metal cation interaction. These corrections follow an almost linear dependence on the lattice constant within the range considered in our study and are therefore approximately additive.

  19. Anion-dye-induced spectral sensitization of holographic microsystems core-silver halide shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyurin, A. V.; Zhukov, S. A.; Churashov, V. P.; Bekshaev, A. Y.

    2015-11-01

    We have studied spectral sensitization with anionic dyes of holographic microsystems "core - silver halide shell" (CSHS), cores of which can be either nonsilver or silver halide compounds. Conditions under which dye sensitizers, being adsorbed on cores, remain under silver halide shells after their growing are considered. Comparison of results of sensitometric and low-temperature (T = 77 K) luminescent measurements have shown that these conditions are determined by the charge state of cations of microsystem cores. If the shell contains the same univalent component in its composition as the core does, as in the case in which the core is a silver halide compound, the anionic dye is displaced to the outer surface of the shell. If the core contains a divalent cationic component, as in the case in which the core is a nonsilver compound, the dye remains under the silver halide shell; i.e., it is overgrown by the shell. We have shown that the charge state of core cations affects the character of the core interaction with anionic dyes, which ensures differences in the spectral sensitization of CSHS microsystems, as well as differences in the dye photoexcitation relaxation in them. We have found that supersensitization of AgBr microcrystals sensitized by infrachromatic dye affects the interaction between the dye aggregates and the surface silver ions, which induces modification of the holographic microsystems' spectral sensitivity range.

  20. Theoretical and experimental investigation of force imaging at the atomic scale on alkali halide crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shluger, A. L.; Wilson, R. Mark; Williams, R. T.

    1994-02-01

    Assuming a model tip (Si4O10H10) as a reasonable representation of the surface of a Si3N4 cantilever stylus having a hydrogen-terminated asperity and a broader load-bearing base, we investigate the interaction of an atomic force microscope (AFM) with an alkali halide crystal by quantum chemical methods. Structural relaxation of the sample during engagement is allowed, and defect formation is investigated. Force curves above cation and anion positions are calculated, determining maximum sustainable loads and indicating a basis for atomic contrast. Experiments using a Si3N4 cantilever for AFM imaging of 12 alkali halide and alkaline earth fluoride crystals in air and desiccated helium are reported, in the widest AFM survey of such materials to date. Adsorbed water is shown to significantly enhance the observation of atomic periodicity on ionic halide samples, and rapid surface diffusion on alkali halide crystals is illustrated as it affects prospects for defect investigations. Observations of step edges and point-defect candidates at atomic scale are reported. The theoretical and experimental results are discussed together in the effort to provide a quantum-mechanical model for observations of alkali halide samples at atomic resolution, and to examine a possible basis for atomic resolution in the presence of long-range attractive forces.

  1. Seed-mediated growth of palladium nanocrystals: The effect of pseudo-halide thiocyanate ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Niu, Wenxin; Xu, Guobao

    2011-02-01

    In synthesis in a solution phase, adsorbates such as halides can interact selectively with different metal crystal facets and affect the final morphology of nanocrystals. Pseudo-halide thiocyanate ions (SCN-) can also adsorb on the metal surface, but they have never been used for the synthesis of shape-controlled colloidal metal nanocrystals. In this study, we first investigated the effect of SCN- on the morphology of palladium nanocrystals through a seed-mediated growth method. The presence of 1 µM SCN- in the growth solutions could lead to the formation of palladium polyhedra: truncated rhombic dodecahedra enclosed by twelve {110}, eight {111} and six {100} facets. The products were nanocubes enclosed with six {100} facets if cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was the only capping agent. Meanwhile, the mechanism of the effect of SCN- on the morphology of Pd nanocrystals is discussed.In synthesis in a solution phase, adsorbates such as halides can interact selectively with different metal crystal facets and affect the final morphology of nanocrystals. Pseudo-halide thiocyanate ions (SCN-) can also adsorb on the metal surface, but they have never been used for the synthesis of shape-controlled colloidal metal nanocrystals. In this study, we first investigated the effect of SCN- on the morphology of palladium nanocrystals through a seed-mediated growth method. The presence of 1 µM SCN- in the growth solutions could lead to the formation of palladium polyhedra: truncated rhombic dodecahedra enclosed by twelve {110}, eight {111} and six {100} facets. The products were nanocubes enclosed with six {100} facets if cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was the only capping agent. Meanwhile, the mechanism of the effect of SCN- on the morphology of Pd nanocrystals is discussed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional SEM, TEM and XRD data. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00622j

  2. Development of Halide and Oxy-Halides for Isotopic Separations

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Jana Pfeiffer; Martha R. Finck

    2014-10-01

    The goal of this project was to synthesize a volatile form of Np for introduction into mass spectrometers at INL. Volatile solids of the 5f elements are typically those of the halides (e.g. UF6), however fluorine is highly corrosive to the sensitive internal components of the mass separator, and the other volatile halides exist as several different stable isotopes in nature. However, iodide is both mono-isotopic and volatile, and as such presents an avenue for creation of a form of Np suitable for introduction into the mass separator. To accomplish this goal, the technical work in the project sought to establish a novel synthetic route for the conversion NpO2+ (dissolved in nitric acid) to NpI3 and NpI4.

  3. Fluorescence dynamics of microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, R.

    2005-03-01

    Sunscreens are generally oily substances which are prepared in organic solvents, emulsions or dispersions with micro- or nanoparticles. These molecules adsorb to and integrate into skin cells. In order to understand the photophysical properties of the sunscreen, we compare steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence in organic solvent of varying dielectric constant ɛ and adsorbed to polystyrene microspheres and dispersed in water. Steady-state fluorescence is highest and average fluorescence lifetime longest in toluene, the solvent of lowest ɛ. However, there is no uniform dependence on ɛ. Sunscreens PABA and padimate-O show complex emission spectra. Microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens exhibit highly non-exponential decay, illustrative of multiple environments of the adsorbed molecule. The heterogeneous fluorescence dynamics likely characterizes sunscreen adsorbed to cells.

  4. PERVAPORATION USING ADSORBENT-FILLED MEMBRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Membranes containing selective fillers, such as zeolites and activated carbon, can improve the separation by pervaporation. Applications of adsorbent-filled membranes in pervaporation have been demonstrated by a number of studies. These applications include removal of organic co...

  5. 40 CFR 721.4095 - Quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... trialkylamine halides. 721.4095 Section 721.4095 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4095 Quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides. (a... generically as quaternary ammonium alkyltherpropyl trialkylamine halides (PMNs...

  6. TRANSURANIC METAL HALIDES AND A PROCESS FOR THE PRODUCTION THEREOF

    DOEpatents

    Fried, S.

    1951-03-20

    Halides of transuranic elements are prepared by contacting with aluminum and a halogen, or with an aluminum halide, a transuranic metal oxide, oxyhalide, halide, or mixture thereof at an elevated temperature.

  7. Contribution of selected perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances to the adsorbable organically bound fluorine in German rivers and in a highly contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Willach, Sarah; Brauch, Heinz-Jürgen; Lange, Frank T

    2016-02-01

    Due to the lack of analytical standards the application of surrogate parameters for organofluorine detection in the aquatic environment is a complementary approach to single compound target analysis of perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl chemicals (PFASs). The recently developed method adsorbable organically bound fluorine (AOF) is based on adsorption of organofluorine chemicals to activated carbon followed by combustion ion chromatography. This AOF method was further simplified to enable measurement of larger series of environmental samples. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.77 μg/L F. The modified protocol was applied to 22 samples from German rivers, a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent, and four groundwater samples from a fire-fighting training site. The WWTP effluent (AOF = 1.98 μg/L F) and only three river water samples (AOF between 0.88 μg/L F and 1.47 μg/L F) exceeded the LOQ. The AOF levels in a PFASs plume at a heavily contaminated site were in the range of 162 ± 3 μg/L F to 782 ± 43 μg/L F. In addition to AOF 17 PFASs were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. 32-51% of AOF in the contaminated groundwater samples were explained by individual PFASs wheras in the surface waters more than 95% remained unknown. Organofluorine of two fluorinated pesticides, one pesticide metabolite and three fluorinated pharmaceuticals was recovered as AOF by >50% from all four tested water matrices. It is suggested that in the diffusely contaminated water bodies such fluorinated chemicals and not monitored PFASs contribute significantly to AOF. PMID:26692511

  8. SERS effect of isonicotinic acid adsorbed on a copper electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Lucia K.; Sala, O.

    1987-11-01

    The surface enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) of isonicotinic acid adsorbed on a copper electrode were obtained in order to verify their dependence on the type of electrolyte solution, pH and applied potential. The results are discussed considering the most characteristic bands of the species (protonated or nonprotonated) in the ring nitrogen and in the carboxylic group. In specifically adsorbed electrolytes (Cl - and mainly I -) the completely protonated species is more stabilized on the electrode surface than it is in non-specifically adsorbed anions (ClO -4), because of the formation of ion pairs with the coadsorbed halide ions. For more negative potentials, even at low pH values, the spectra are characteristic of the nonprotonated species.

  9. Ag-doped carbon aerogels for removing halide ions in water treatment.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Polo, M; Rivera-Utrilla, J; Salhi, E; von Gunten, U

    2007-03-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the efficiency of silver(Ag)-doped carbon aerogels for the removal of bromide (Br(-)) and iodide (I(-)) from drinking waters. Textural characterization of Ag-doped aerogels showed that an increase in the Ag dose added during the preparation process produced: (i) a reduction in the surface area (S(BET)) and (ii) an increase in mesopore (V(2)) and macropore (V(3)) volumes. Chemical characterization of the materials revealed an acidic surface (pH of point of zero charge, pH(PZC)=4.5, O(surface)=20%). The oxidation state of Ag was +1 and the surface concentration of this element ranged from 4% to 10%. The adsorption capacity (X(m)) and affinity of adsorbent (BX(m)) increased with a reduction in the radius of the halogenide. Furthermore, an increase in the adsorption capacity was observed with higher Ag concentrations on the aerogel surface. The high adsorption capacity of the aerogel may be due to the presence of Ag(I) on its surface, with the formation of the corresponding Ag halides. Our observations indicate that the halogenides adsorption on commercial activated carbon (Sorbo-Norit) is much lower than that of the Ag-doped carbon aerogels. The presence of chloride and natural organic matter (NOM) in the medium reduced the adsorption capacity of Br(-) and I(-) on Ag carbon aerogels. PMID:16970974

  10. Computational Investigations for Undergraduate Organic Chemistry: Modeling Markovnikov and anti-Markovnikov Reactions for the Formation of Alkyl Halides and Alcohols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hessley, Rita K.

    2000-06-01

    Early in sophomore-level organic chemistry students are introduced to reaction mechanisms, and it is at this stage when they tend to become convinced that memorization is the skill they need to hone in order to succeed. This paper describes how the early introduction of molecular modeling for the study of reaction mechanisms leading to alcohols from alkenes can increase students' involvement in their own learning and can effectively challenge their misapprehension about memorization. It describes the use of modeling to emphasize structure-reactivity relationships rather than focusing on reagents, and tries to show that the use of molecular modeling is well suited for classroom and laboratory use as well as to assist students' study. Particularly in an educational setting that stresses collaborative or interactive learning, the methodology described here can be rewarding for teachers and students alike.

  11. A new 68Ge/68Ga generator system using an organic polymer containing N-methylglucamine groups as adsorbent for 68Ge.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, M; Haratake, M; Ono, M; Koiso, T; Harada, K; Nakayama, H; Yahara, S; Ohmomo, Y; Arano, Y

    2003-01-01

    A macroporous styrene-divinylbenzene copolymer containing N-methylglucamine groups was selected for a new 68Ge/68Ga generator system. This resin packed into a column effectively adsorbed the parent nuclide 68Ge. The daughter 68Ga was eluted from the resin with a solution of a low-affinity gallium chelating ligand such as citric or phosphoric acid. The 68Ge leakage was less than 0.0004% of the 68Ge adsorbed on the resin. By simple mixing of transferrin and desferoxamine conjugated HSA and IgG with the eluate from the column, 68Ga-labeling was completed in high yield. PMID:12485657

  12. Bio-conventional bleaching of kadam kraft-AQ pulp by thermo-alkali-tolerant xylanases from two strains of Coprinellus disseminatus for extenuating adsorbable organic halides and improving strength with optical properties and energy conservation.

    PubMed

    Lal, Mohan; Dutt, Dharm; Tyagi, C H

    2012-04-01

    Two novel thermo-alkali-tolerant crude xylanases namely MLK-01 (enzyme-A) and MLK-07 (enzyme-B) from Coprinellus disseminatus mitigated kappa numbers of Anthocephalus cadamba kraft-AQ pulps by 32.5 and 34.38%, improved brightness by 1.5 and 1.6% and viscosity by 5.75 and 6.47% after (A)XE(1) and (B)XE(1)-stages, respectively. The release of reducing sugars and chromophores was the highest during prebleaching of A. cadamba kraft-AQ pulp at enzyme doses of 5 and 10 IU/g, reaction times 90 and 120 min, reaction temperatures 75 and 65°C and consistency 10% for MLK-01 and MLK-07, respectively. MLK-07 was more efficient than MLK01 in terms of producing pulp brightness, improving mechanical strength properties and reducing pollution load. MLK-01 and MLK-07 reduced AOX by 19.51 and 42.77%, respectively at 4% chlorine demands with an increase in COD and colour due to removal of lignin carbohydrates complexes. A. cadamba kraft-AQ pulps treated with xylanases from MLK-01 to MLK-07 and followed by CEHH bleaching at half chlorine demand (2%) showed a drastic reduction in brightness with slight improvement in mechanical strength properties compared to pulp bleached at 4% chlorine demand. MLK-01 reduced AOX, COD and colour by 43.83, 39.03 and 27.71% and MLK-07 by 38.34, 40.48 and 30.77%, respectively at half chlorine demand compared to full chlorine demand (4%). pH variation during prebleaching of A. cadamba kraft-AQ pulps with strains MLK-01 and MLK-07 followed by CEHH bleaching sequences showed a decrease in pulp brightness, AOX, COD and colour with an increase in mechanical strength properties, pulp viscosity and PFI revolutions to get a beating level of 35 ± 1 °SR at full chlorine demand. PMID:22805918

  13. Application of three-coordinate copper(I) complexes with halide ligands in organic light-emitting diodes that exhibit delayed fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Osawa, Masahisa; Hoshino, Mikio; Hashimoto, Masashi; Kawata, Isao; Igawa, Satoshi; Yashima, Masataka

    2015-05-14

    A series of three-coordinate copper(I) complexes (L(Me))CuX [X = Cl (1), Br (2), I (3)], (L(Et))CuBr (4), and (L(iPr))CuBr (5) [L(Me) = 1,2-bis[bis(2-methylphenyl)phosphino]benzene, L(Et) = 1,2-bis[bis(2-ethylphenyl)phosphino]benzene, and L(iPr) = 1,2-bis[bis(2-isopropylphenyl)phosphino]benzene] exhibit efficient blue-green emission in the solid state at ambient temperature with peak wavelengths between 473 and 517 nm. The emission quantum yields were 0.38-0.95. The emission lifetimes were measured in the temperature range of 77-295 K using a nanosecond laser technique. The temperature dependence of the emission lifetimes was explained using a model with two excited states: a singlet and a triplet state. The small energy gaps (<830 cm(-1)) between the two states suggest that efficient emission from 1-5 was thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF). Alkyl substituents at ortho positions of peripheral phenyl groups were found to have little effect on the electronic excited states. Because the origin of the emission of complexes 2, 4, and 5 was thought to be a (σ + Br)→π* transition, photoluminescence characteristics of these complexes were dominated by the diphosphine ligands. Complexes 2, 4, and 5 had similar emission properties. Complexes 1-5 had efficient green TADF in amorphous films at 293 K with maximum emission wavelengths of 508-520 nm and quantum yields of 0.61-0.71. Organic light-emitting devices that contained complexes 1-5 and exhibited TADF exhibit bright green luminescence with current efficiencies of 55.6-69.4 cd A(-1) and maximum external quantum efficiencies of 18.6-22.5%. PMID:25470470

  14. Cohesive Energy-Lattice Constant and Bulk Modulus-Lattice Constant Relationships: Alkali Halides, Ag Halides, Tl Halides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlosser, Herbert

    1992-01-01

    In this note we present two expressions relating the cohesive energy, E(sub coh), and the zero pressure isothermal bulk modulus, B(sub 0), of the alkali halides. Ag halides and TI halides, with the nearest neighbor distances, d(sub nn). First, we show that the product E(sub coh)d(sub 0) within families of halide crystals with common crystal structure is to a good approximation constant, with maximum rms deviation of plus or minus 2%. Secondly, we demonstrate that within families of halide crystals with a common cation and common crystal structure the product B(sub 0)d(sup 3.5)(sub nn) is a good approximation constant, with maximum rms deviation of plus or minus 1.36%.

  15. Multiple-Wavelength Metal/Halide Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nerheim, N. M.

    1984-01-01

    Single device produces multiple lasing lines. Laser capable of producing many lasing lines has several reservoirs of halide lasant mixed with chlorides of copper, manganese and iron. Convection-control technique possible to rapidly change from one metal halide to another at maximum energy.

  16. VERUCLAY – a new type of photo-adsorbent active in the visible light range: modification of montmorillonite surface with organic surfactant

    EPA Science Inventory

    Montmorillonite K10 was treated with VeruSOL-3, a biodegradable and food-grade surfactant mixture of coconut oil, castor oil and citrus extracts, to manufacture a benign catalytic adsorbent that is active in the visible light. Veruclay was characterized by SEM, XRD, TGA, UVDRS, a...

  17. Determination of adsorbable organic fluorine from aqueous environmental samples by adsorption to polystyrene-divinylbenzene based activated carbon and combustion ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Andrea; Raue, Brigitte; Brauch, Heinz-Jürgen; Worch, Eckhard; Lange, Frank T

    2013-06-21

    A new method for the determination of trace levels of adsorbable organic fluorine (AOF) in water is presented. Even if the individual contributing target compounds are widely unknown, this surrogate parameter is suited to identify typical organofluorine contaminations, such as with polyfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), and represents a lower boundary of the organofluorine concentration in water bodies. It consists of the adsorption of organofluorine chemicals on a commercially available synthetic polystyrene-divinylbenzene based activated carbon (AC) followed by analysis of the loaded AC by hydropyrolysis combustion ion chromatography (CIC). Inorganic fluorine is displaced by excess nitrate during the extraction step and by washing the loaded activated carbon with an acidic sodium nitrate solution. Due to its high purity the synthetic AC had a very low and reproducible fluorine blank (0.3 μg/g) compared to natural ACs (up to approximately 9 μg/g). Using this AC, fluoride and the internal standard phosphate could be detected free of chromatographic interferences. With a sample volume of 100 mL and 2× 100 mg of AC packed into two extraction columns combined in series, a limit of quantification (LOQ), derived according to the German standard method DIN 32645, of 0.3 μg/L was achieved. The recoveries of six model PFCs were determined from tap water and a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent. Except for the extremely polar perfluoroacetic acid (recovery of approximately 10%) the model substances showed fairly good (50% for perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA)) to very good fluorine recoveries (100±20% for perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS), 6:2 fluorotelomersulfonate (6:2 FTS)), both from tap water and wastewater matrix. This new analytical protocol was exemplarily applied to several surface water and groundwater samples. The obtained AOF values were compared to the fluorine content of 19 target PFCs analyzed by high performance

  18. Understanding the effect of halide poisoning in CO oxidation over Au/TiO[subscript 2

    SciTech Connect

    Oxford, S.M.; Henao, J.D.; Yang, J.H.; Kung, M.C.; Kung, H.H.

    2008-07-08

    The effect of halide poisoning of Au/TiO{sub 2} catalysts in low temperature CO oxidation was investigated using bromide as the poison and a combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS), quantitative CO adsorption, and catalytic measurements. It was found that halide prevented full reduction of cationic Au by displacing oxyhydroxy ligands and remaining bound to Au during low temperature reduction, causing a reduction in catalytic activity. On reduced Au samples, bromide (likely as NaBr molecule) was preferentially adsorbed on Au and not on TiO{sub 2}, and suppressed both the adsorption of CO and the catalytic activity. At low Br contents, each adsorbed Br suppressed adsorption of three CO, suggesting that Br was adsorbed on three-fold sites but the effect decreased with increasing Br content possibly due to crowding of adsorbed Br. When 5--10% of the Au was bound to Br, the catalytic activity was completely blocked, although {approx}35% of the original CO adsorption capacity remained. The data suggest that not all CO adsorption sites are catalytic active sites, and are consistent with the perimeter Au atoms at/near the particle-support interface (perimeter) being active sites.

  19. Hygroscopicity Evaluation of Halide Scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuravleva, M; Stand, L; Wei, H; Hobbs, C. L.; Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Burger, Arnold; Rowe, E; Bhattacharya, P.; Tupitsyn, E; Melcher, Charles L

    2014-01-01

    A collaborative study of relative hygroscopicity of anhydrous halide scintillators grown at various laboratories is presented. We have developed a technique to evaluate moisture sensitivity of both raw materials and grown crystals, in which the moisture absorption rate is measured using a gravimetric analysis. Degradation of the scintillation performance was investigated by recording gamma-ray spectra and monitoring the photopeak position, count rate and energy resolution. The accompanying physical degradation of the samples exposed to ambient atmosphere was photographically recorded as well. The results were compared with ben

  20. Quantum Size Effect in Organometal Halide Perovskite Nanoplatelets.

    PubMed

    Sichert, Jasmina A; Tong, Yu; Mutz, Niklas; Vollmer, Mathias; Fischer, Stefan; Milowska, Karolina Z; García Cortadella, Ramon; Nickel, Bert; Cardenas-Daw, Carlos; Stolarczyk, Jacek K; Urban, Alexander S; Feldmann, Jochen

    2015-10-14

    Organometal halide perovskites have recently emerged displaying a huge potential for not only photovoltaic, but also light emitting applications. Exploiting the optical properties of specifically tailored perovskite nanocrystals could greatly enhance the efficiency and functionality of applications based on this material. In this study, we investigate the quantum size effect in colloidal organometal halide perovskite nanoplatelets. By tuning the ratio of the organic cations used, we can control the thickness and consequently the photoluminescence emission of the platelets. Quantum mechanical calculations match well with the experimental values. We find that not only do the properties of the perovskite, but also those of the organic ligands play an important role. Stacking of nanoplatelets leads to the formation of minibands, further shifting the bandgap energies. In addition, we find a large exciton binding energy of up to several hundreds of meV for nanoplatelets thinner than three unit cells, partially counteracting the blueshift induced by quantum confinement. Understanding of the quantum size effects in perovskite nanoplatelets and the ability to tune them provide an additional method with which to manipulate the optical properties of organometal halide perovskites. PMID:26327242

  1. Getting Away from the Cookbook in the Organic Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Neil H.; McGrath, Thomas F.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses an organic laboratory program emphasizing individual experiments for the second semester of a two-semester course. Describes the outlines of two topics, including halide or alcohol synthesis and multistep synthesis. Provides reaction tables of alcohols and halides. (YP)

  2. Shallow halogen vacancies in halide optoelectronic materials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao -Hua

    2014-11-05

    Halogen vacancies (VH) are usually deep color centers (F centers) in halides and can act as major electron traps or recombination centers. The deep VH contributes to the typically poor carrier transport properties in halides. However, several halides have recently emerged as excellent optoelectronic materials, e.g., CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr. Both CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr have been found to have shallow VH, in contrast to commonly seen deep VH in halides. In this paper, several halide optoelectronic materials, i.e., CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3 (photovoltaic materials), TlBr, and CsPbBr3, (gamma-ray detection materials) are studied to understand the material chemistry and structure that determine whether VHmore » is a shallow or deep defect in a halide material. It is found that crystal structure and chemistry of ns2 ions both play important roles in creating shallow VH in halides such as CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3, and TlBr. The key to identifying halides with shallow VH is to find the right crystal structures and compounds that suppress cation orbital hybridization at VH, such as those with long cation-cation distances and low anion coordination numbers, and those with crystal symmetry that prevents strong hybridization of cation dangling bond orbitals at VH. Furthermore, the results of this paper provide insight and guidance to identifying halides with shallow VH as good electronic and optoelectronic materials.« less

  3. Shallow halogen vacancies in halide optoelectronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao-Hua

    2014-11-01

    Halogen vacancies (VH ) are usually deep color centers (F centers) in halides and can act as major electron traps or recombination centers. The deep VH contributes to the typically poor carrier transport properties in halides. However, several halides have recently emerged as excellent optoelectronic materials, e.g., C H3N H3Pb I3 and TlBr. Both C H3N H3Pb I3 and TlBr have been found to have shallow VH , in contrast to commonly seen deep VH in halides. In this paper, several halide optoelectronic materials, i.e., C H3N H3Pb I3 , C H3N H3Sn I3 (photovoltaic materials), TlBr, and CsPbB r3 (gamma-ray detection materials) are studied to understand the material chemistry and structure that determine whether VH is a shallow or deep defect in a halide material. It is found that crystal structure and chemistry of n s2 ions both play important roles in creating shallow VH in halides such as C H3N H3Pb I3 , C H3N H3Sn I3 , and TlBr. The key to identifying halides with shallow VH is to find the right crystal structures and compounds that suppress cation orbital hybridization at VH , such as those with large cation-cation distances and low anion coordination numbers and those with crystal symmetry that prevents strong hybridization of cation dangling bond orbitals at VH . The results of this paper provide insight and guidance to identifying halides with shallow VH as good electronic and optoelectronic materials.

  4. Cross-Electrophile Coupling of Vinyl Halides with Alkyl Halides.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Keywan A; Biswas, Soumik; Weix, Daniel J

    2016-05-23

    An improved method for the reductive coupling of aryl and vinyl bromides with alkyl halides that gave high yields for a variety of substrates at room temperature with a low (2.5 to 0.5 mol %) catalyst loading is presented. Under the optimized conditions, difficult substrates, such as unhindered alkenyl bromides, can be coupled to give the desired olefins with minimal diene formation and good stereoretention. These improved conditions also worked well for aryl bromides. For example, a gram-scale reaction was demonstrated with 0.5 mol % catalyst loading, whereas reactions at 10 mol % catalyst loading completed in as little as 20 minutes. Finally, a low-cost single-component pre-catalyst, (bpy)NiI2 (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine) that is both air- and moisture-stable over a period of months was introduced. PMID:27017436

  5. Abiotic Formation of Methyl Halides in the Terrestrial Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppler, F.

    2011-12-01

    Methyl chloride and methyl bromide are the most abundant chlorine and bromine containing organic compounds in the atmosphere. Since both compounds have relatively long tropospheric lifetimes they can effectively transport halogen atoms from the Earth's surface, where they are released, to the stratosphere and following photolytic oxidation form reactive halogen gases that lead to the chemical destruction of ozone. Methyl chloride and methyl bromide account for more than 20% of the ozone-depleting halogens delivered to the stratosphere and are predicted to grow in importance as the chlorine contribution to the stratosphere from anthropogenic CFCs decline. Today methyl chloride and methyl bromide originate mainly from natural sources with only a minor fraction considered to be of anthropogenic origin. However, until as recently as 2000 most of the methyl chloride and methyl bromide input to the atmosphere was considered to originate from the oceans, but investigations in recent years have clearly demonstrated that terrestrial sources such as biomass burning, wood-rotting fungi, coastal salt marshes, tropical vegetation and organic matter degradation must dominate the atmospheric budgets of these trace gases. However, many uncertainties still exist regarding strengths of both sources and sinks, as well as the mechanisms of formation of these naturally occurring halogenated gases. A better understanding of the atmospheric budget of both methyl chloride and methyl bromide is therefore required for reliable prediction of future ozone depletion. Biotic and abiotic methylation processes of chloride and bromide ion are considered to be the dominant pathways of formation of these methyl halides in nature. In this presentation I will focus on abiotic formation processes in the terrestrial environment and the potential parameters that control their emissions. Recent advances in our understanding of the abiotic formation pathway of methyl halides will be discussed. This will

  6. Lasing in robust cesium lead halide perovskite nanowires.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Samuel W; Lai, Minliang; Gibson, Natalie A; Wong, Andrew B; Dou, Letian; Ma, Jie; Wang, Lin-Wang; Leone, Stephen R; Yang, Peidong

    2016-02-23

    The rapidly growing field of nanoscale lasers can be advanced through the discovery of new, tunable light sources. The emission wavelength tunability demonstrated in perovskite materials is an attractive property for nanoscale lasers. Whereas organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite materials are known for their instability, cesium lead halides offer a robust alternative without sacrificing emission tunability or ease of synthesis. Here, we report the low-temperature, solution-phase growth of cesium lead halide nanowires exhibiting low-threshold lasing and high stability. The as-grown nanowires are single crystalline with well-formed facets, and act as high-quality laser cavities. The nanowires display excellent stability while stored and handled under ambient conditions over the course of weeks. Upon optical excitation, Fabry-Pérot lasing occurs in CsPbBr3 nanowires with an onset of 5 μJ cm(-2) with the nanowire cavity displaying a maximum quality factor of 1,009 ± 5. Lasing under constant, pulsed excitation can be maintained for over 1 h, the equivalent of 10(9) excitation cycles, and lasing persists upon exposure to ambient atmosphere. Wavelength tunability in the green and blue regions of the spectrum in conjunction with excellent stability makes these nanowire lasers attractive for device fabrication. PMID:26862172

  7. How long may a breath sample be stored for at  -80 °C? A study of the stability of volatile organic compounds trapped onto a mixed Tenax:Carbograph trap adsorbent bed from exhaled breath.

    PubMed

    Kang, S; Paul Thomas, C L

    2016-06-01

    Thermal desorption is used extensively in exhaled breath volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis, and it is often necessary to store the adsorbent tube samples before analysis. The possible introduction of storage artefacts is an important potential confounding factor in the development of standard methodologies for breath sampling and analysis. The stability of VOCs trapped from breath samples onto a dual bed Tenax(®) TA:Carbograph adsorbent tube and stored  -80°C was studied over 12.5 month. 25 samples were collected from a single male participant over 3 h and then stored at  -80 °C. Randomly selected adsorbent tubes were subsequent analysed by thermal desorption-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry at 5 times points throughout the 12.5 month of the study. Toluene-d8, decane-d22 and hexadecane-d34 internal standards were used to manage the instrument variability throughout the duration of the study. A breath-matrix consisting of 161 endogenous and 423 exogenous VOC was created. Iterative orthogonal partial least squared discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) and principal components analysis (PCA) indicated that it was not possible to detect storage artefacts at 1.5 month storage. By 6 month storage artefacts were discernible with significant changes observed for 27% of the recovered VOC. Endogenous VOC were observed to be more susceptible to storage. A paired two-tailed t-test on the endogenous compounds indicated that the maximum storage duration under these conditions was 1.5 month with 94% of the VOCs stable. This study indicates that a prudent approach is best adopted for the storage of adsorbent samples; storage times should be minimised, and storage time examined as a possible discriminatory factor in multivariate analysis. PMID:27272219

  8. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  9. SORPTION PROPERTIES OF MODEL COMPOUNDS ON C18 ADSORBENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The bonded silica adsorbent Bondapak-C18 was evaluated for removing organic matter from secondary sewage effluents and from solutions of pure organic compounds. The adsorbent is hydrophobic and its behavior with water samples may be erratic unless first wet with a solvent. Howeve...

  10. Toxicity of organometal halide perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayigit, Aslihan; Ethirajan, Anitha; Muller, Marc; Conings, Bert

    2016-03-01

    In the last few years, the advent of metal halide perovskite solar cells has revolutionized the prospects of next-generation photovoltaics. As this technology is maturing at an exceptional rate, research on its environmental impact is becoming increasingly relevant.

  11. Effects of halide ions on photodegradation of sulfonamide antibiotics: Formation of halogenated intermediates.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingjie; Qiao, Xianliang; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Zhou, Chengzhi; Xie, Huaijun; Chen, Jingwen

    2016-10-01

    The occurrence of sulfonamide antibiotics (SAs) in estuarine waters urges insights into their environmental fate for ecological risk assessment. Although many studies focused on the photochemical behavior of SAs, yet the effects of halide ions relevant to estuarine and marine environments on their photodegradation have been poorly understood. Here, we investigated the effects of halide ions on the photodegradation of SAs with sulfapyridine, sulfamethazine, and sulfamethoxazole as representative compounds. Results showed that halide ions did not significantly impact the photodegradation of sulfapyridine and sulfamethoxazole, while they significantly promoted the photodegradation of sulfamethazine. Further experiments found that ionic strength applied with NaClO4 significantly enhanced the photodegradation of the SAs, which was attributed to the decreased quenching rate constant of the triplet-excited SAs ((3)SA(∗)). Compared with ionic strength, specific Cl(-) effects retarded the photodegradation of the SAs. Our study found that triplet-excited sulfamethazine can oxidize halide ions to produce halogen radicals, subsequently leading to the halogenation of sulfamethazine, which was confirmed by the identification of both chlorinated and brominated intermediates. These results indicate that halide ions play an important role in the photochemical behavior of some SAs in estuarine waters and seawater. The occurrence of halogenation for certain organic pollutants can be predicted by comparing the oxidation potentials of triplet-excited contaminants with those of halogen radicals. Our findings are helpful in understanding the photochemical behavior and assessing the ecological risks of SAs and other organic pollutants in estuarine and marine environment. PMID:27393965

  12. Oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOEpatents

    Rohrmann, Charles A.; Fullam, Harold T.

    1985-01-01

    A process for oxidizing hydrogen halides having substantially no sulfur impurities by means of a catalytically active molten salt is disclosed. A mixture of the subject hydrogen halide and an oxygen bearing gas is contacted with a molten salt containing an oxidizing catalyst and alkali metal normal sulfates and pyrosulfates to produce an effluent gas stream rich in the elemental halogen and substantially free of sulfur oxide gases.

  13. Hydrogen Halides on Jupiter and Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showman, Adam P.

    2001-07-01

    The quest to detect gaseous HCl, HBr, and HF in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn has led to a tentative detection of 1 ppb HCl near Saturn's cloud deck. The detection is puzzling because, while these hydrogen halides may be present several scale heights below the clouds, they are expected to react with ammonia to form solid ammonium halide salts in the upper troposphere. I show that the loss timescale for condensation of gaseous hydrogen halides onto particles is ˜10 3-10 5 s for realistic cloud densities and particle sizes, which is much less than the ˜10 8 s residence time of upper tropospheric air. The hydrogen halides can only survive transport up to the cloud layer if less than 1 in 10 6 of their collisions with particle surfaces leads to condensation, which is unlikely. Even in the absence of foreign particles, homogeneous nucleation would probably prevent supersaturations in excess of a few hundred, which is ˜10 20-10 40 times too low to explain the observation. These calculations therefore suggest that hydrogen halides cannot exist at part-per-billion levels in the upper troposphere. The interplanetary source of halogens is also too low to produce detectable quantities of hydrogen halides except perhaps at pressures less than 1 mbar. A possible detection of chlorine by the Galileo probe at pressures exceeding 9 bars on Jupiter may be consistent with the equilibrium abundance of gaseous HCl or NH 4Cl.

  14. Charge carrier mobility in hybrid halide perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Motta, Carlo; El-Mellouhi, Fedwa; Sanvito, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The charge transport properties of hybrid halide perovskites are investigated with a combination of density functional theory including van der Waals interaction and the Boltzmann theory for diffusive transport in the relaxation time approximation. We find the mobility of electrons to be in the range 5–10 cm2V−1s−1 and that for holes within 1–5 cm2V−1s−1, where the variations depend on the crystal structure investigated and the level of doping. Such results, in good agreement with recent experiments, set the relaxation time to about 1 ps, which is the time-scale for the molecular rotation at room temperature. For the room temperature tetragonal phase we explore two possible orientations of the organic cations and find that the mobility has a significant asymmetry depending on the direction of the current with respect to the molecular axis. This is due mostly to the way the PbI3 octahedral symmetry is broken. Interestingly we find that substituting I with Cl has minor effects on the mobilities. Our analysis suggests that the carrier mobility is probably not a key factor in determining the high solar-harvesting efficiency of this class of materials. PMID:26235910

  15. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  16. A composite light-harvesting layer from photoactive polymer and halide perovskite for planar heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Heming; Rahaq, Yaqub; Kumar, Vikas

    2016-07-01

    A new route for fabrication of photoactive materials in organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells is presented in this report. Photoactive materials by blending a semiconductive conjugated polymer with an organolead halide perovskite were fabricated for the first time. The composite active layer was then used to make planar heterojunction solar cells with the PCBM film as the electron-acceptor. Photovoltaic performance of solar cells was investigated by J-V curves and external quantum efficiency spectra. We demonstrated that the incorporation of the conjugated photoactive polymer into organolead halide perovskites did not only contribute to the generation of charges, but also enhance stability of solar cells by providing a barrier protection to halide perovskites. It is expected that versatile of conjugated semi-conductive polymers and halide perovskites in photoactive properties enables to create various combinations, forming composites with advantages offered by both types of photoactive materials.

  17. A composite light-harvesting layer from photoactive polymer and halide perovskite for planar heterojunction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heming; Rahaq, Yaqub; Kumar, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    A new route for fabrication of photoactive materials in organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells is presented in this report. Photoactive materials by blending a semiconductive conjugated polymer with an organolead halide perovskite were fabricated for the first time. The composite active layer was then used to make planar heterojunction solar cells with the PCBM film as the electron-acceptor. Photovoltaic performance of solar cells was investigated by J-V curves and external quantum efficiency spectra. We demonstrated that the incorporation of the conjugated photoactive polymer into organolead halide perovskites did not only contribute to the generation of charges, but also enhance stability of solar cells by providing a barrier protection to halide perovskites. It is expected that versatile of conjugated semi-conductive polymers and halide perovskites in photoactive properties enables to create various combinations, forming composites with advantages offered by both types of photoactive materials. PMID:27411487

  18. A composite light-harvesting layer from photoactive polymer and halide perovskite for planar heterojunction solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Heming; Rahaq, Yaqub; Kumar, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    A new route for fabrication of photoactive materials in organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells is presented in this report. Photoactive materials by blending a semiconductive conjugated polymer with an organolead halide perovskite were fabricated for the first time. The composite active layer was then used to make planar heterojunction solar cells with the PCBM film as the electron-acceptor. Photovoltaic performance of solar cells was investigated by J-V curves and external quantum efficiency spectra. We demonstrated that the incorporation of the conjugated photoactive polymer into organolead halide perovskites did not only contribute to the generation of charges, but also enhance stability of solar cells by providing a barrier protection to halide perovskites. It is expected that versatile of conjugated semi-conductive polymers and halide perovskites in photoactive properties enables to create various combinations, forming composites with advantages offered by both types of photoactive materials. PMID:27411487

  19. Dimming of metal halide lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    We ran some tests on the effect of dimming of metal halide (MH) lamps upon the stability and the spectral quality of the light output. Lamps used were a new Philips lamp HPI-T 250W, a similar Philips lamp with a few thousand burning hours and a new Osram lamp HQI-T 250W/D. The ballast was a BBC type DJ 250/2KS, the starter a BAS TORGI type MZN 250 SE and the dimmer an Elstrom Control System type ERHQ-T 250. Power was derived from a Philips stabilizer, type PE 1602. Lamp output was monitored with a PAR meter. Spectra were taken at 100% and at 50% output as measured with the PAR meter. Lamps were allowed to stabilize at any setting for 30 minutes before measurements were made. Lamp manufacturers advise against dimming for fear of poor stability and intolerable changes of the spectrum. However, none of the lamps showed a decrease in stability, no flicker or wandering of the discharge, and the changes of the spectrum were not negligible, but certainly not dramatic. Lamps of either manufacture retain their white color, relative peak heights of spectral lines did shift, but no gaps in the spectrum occurred. Spectra taken at 50% with 30 minutes intervals coincided. Differences between the new and the older Philips lamp were noticeable, but not really significant.

  20. Adsorbent and adsorbent bed for materials capture and separation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wei

    2011-01-25

    A method device and material for performing adsorption wherein a fluid mixture is passed through a channel in a structured adsorbent bed having a solid adsorbent comprised of adsorbent particles having a general diameter less than 100 um, loaded in a porous support matrix defining at least one straight flow channel. The adsorbent bed is configured to allow passage of a fluid through said channel and diffusion of a target material into said adsorbent under a pressure gradient driving force. The targeted molecular species in the fluid mixture diffuses across the porous support retaining layer, contacts the adsorbent, and adsorbs on the adsorbent, while the remaining species in the fluid mixture flows out of the channel.

  1. The Remarkable Reactivity of Aryl Halides with Nucleophiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunnett, Joseph F.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the reactivity of aryl halides with nucleophilic or basic reagents, including nucleophilic attacks on carbon, hydrogen, halogen, and arynes. Suggestions are made concerning revisions of the sections on aryl halide chemistry courses and the corresponding chapters in textbooks. (CC)

  2. Shallow halogen vacancies in halide optoelectronic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Hongliang; Du, Mao -Hua

    2014-11-05

    Halogen vacancies (VH) are usually deep color centers (F centers) in halides and can act as major electron traps or recombination centers. The deep VH contributes to the typically poor carrier transport properties in halides. However, several halides have recently emerged as excellent optoelectronic materials, e.g., CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr. Both CH3NH3PbI3 and TlBr have been found to have shallow VH, in contrast to commonly seen deep VH in halides. In this paper, several halide optoelectronic materials, i.e., CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3 (photovoltaic materials), TlBr, and CsPbBr3, (gamma-ray detection materials) are studied to understand the material chemistry and structure that determine whether VH is a shallow or deep defect in a halide material. It is found that crystal structure and chemistry of ns2 ions both play important roles in creating shallow VH in halides such as CH3NH3PbI3, CH3NH3SnI3, and TlBr. The key to identifying halides with shallow VH is to find the right crystal structures and compounds that suppress cation orbital hybridization at VH, such as those with long cation-cation distances and low anion coordination numbers, and those with crystal symmetry that prevents strong hybridization of cation dangling bond orbitals at VH. Furthermore, the results of this paper provide insight and guidance to identifying halides with shallow VH as good electronic and optoelectronic materials.

  3. 40 CFR 721.575 - Substituted alkyl halide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted alkyl halide. 721.575... Substances § 721.575 Substituted alkyl halide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as substituted alkyl halide (PMN P-83-1222)...

  4. Method for recovering hydrocarbons from molten metal halides

    DOEpatents

    Pell, Melvyn B.

    1979-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy carbonaceous materials by contacting such carbonaceous materials with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst to produce hydrocarbons having lower molecular weights and thereafter recovering the hydrocarbons so produced from the molten metal halide, an improvement comprising injecting into the spent molten metal halide, a liquid low-boiling hydrocarbon stream is disclosed.

  5. Detection of halide ions with AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, B. S.; Ren, F.; Kang, M. C.; Lofton, C.; Tan, Weihong; Pearton, S. J.; Dabiran, A.; Osinsky, A.; Chow, P. P.

    2005-04-01

    AlGaN /GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) both with and without a Au gate are found to exhibit significant changes in channel conductance upon exposing the gate region to various halide ions. The polar nature of the halide ions leads to a change of surface charge in the gate region on the HEMT, producing a change in the surface potential at the semiconductor/liquid interface. HEMTs with a Au-gate electrode not only doubled the sensitivity of changing the channel conductance as compared to gateless HEMT, but also showed the opposite conductance behavior. When anions adsorbed on the Au, they produced a counter charge for electrovalence. These anions drag some counter ions from the bulk solution or create an image positive charge on the metal for the required neutrality. The gateless HEMTs can be used as sensors for a range of chemicals through appropriate modification with covalently bonded halide functional groups on the Au surface. This creates many possibilities to functionalize the surface for a wide range of integrated biological, chemical, and fluid monitoring sensors.

  6. Enhancing stability of octahedral PtNi nanoparticles for oxygen reduction reaction by halide treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Juhyuk; Lee, Youhan; Kim, Jihan; Lee, Hyunjoo

    2016-03-01

    Because a reduction in the amount of Pt catalysts is essential for the commercialization of fuel cells, various approaches have been tested to maximize the mass activity of Pt-based catalysts. Among these, the most successful results so far were obtained using shaped PtNi alloy nanoparticles, preferably with PtNi(111) facets. However, these nanoparticles typically suffer from much lower activity after the durability tests due to the leaching out of the surface Ni during the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which leads to the disappearance of the activity-enhancing effect caused by electronic structure modification. Here, we showed that halide treatment of the octahedral PtNi nanoparticles could significantly enhance their durability. Halides are adsorbed on surface Ni more strongly than on surface Pt, and the surface halides are found to preserve the surface Ni that induces the ORR activity enhancement. Especially, Br can preserve the surface Ni effectively. Durability testing by repeating cyclic voltammetry 10,000 times in the 0.6-1.1 V range showed that the mass activity decreased by 52.6% for the as-prepared PtNi octahedral nanoparticles, whereas the mass activity decreased by only 15.0% for the Br-treated PtNi nanoparticles. The simple treatment significantly enhanced the long-term stability of the highly active PtNi alloy nano-octahedra.

  7. Recent advances in technetium halide chemistry.

    PubMed

    Poineau, Frederic; Johnstone, Erik V; Czerwinski, Kenneth R; Sattelberger, Alfred P

    2014-02-18

    Transition metal binary halides are fundamental compounds, and the study of their structure, bonding, and other properties gives chemists a better understanding of physicochemical trends across the periodic table. One transition metal whose halide chemistry is underdeveloped is technetium, the lightest radioelement. For half a century, the halide chemistry of technetium has been defined by three compounds: TcF6, TcF5, and TcCl4. The absence of Tc binary bromides and iodides in the literature was surprising considering the existence of such compounds for all of the elements surrounding technetium. The common synthetic routes that scientists use to obtain binary halides of the neighboring elements, such as sealed tube reactions between elements and flowing gas reactions between a molecular complex and HX gas (X = Cl, Br, or I), had not been reported for technetium. In this Account, we discuss how we used these routes to revisit the halide chemistry of technetium. We report seven new phases: TcBr4, TcBr3, α/β-TcCl3, α/β-TcCl2, and TcI3. Technetium tetrachloride and tetrabromide are isostructural to PtX4 (X = Cl or Br) and consist of infinite chains of edge-sharing TcX6 octahedra. Trivalent technetium halides are isostructural to ruthenium and molybdenum (β-TcCl3, TcBr3, and TcI3) and to rhenium (α-TcCl3). Technetium tribromide and triiodide exhibit the TiI3 structure-type and consist of infinite chains of face-sharing TcX6 (X = Br or I) octahedra. Concerning the trichlorides, β-TcCl3 crystallizes with the AlCl3 structure-type and consists of infinite layers of edge-sharing TcCl6 octahedra, while α-TcCl3 consists of infinite layers of Tc3Cl9 units. Both phases of technetium dichloride exhibit new structure-types that consist of infinite chains of [Tc2Cl8] units. For the technetium binary halides, we studied the metal-metal interaction by theoretical methods and magnetic measurements. The change of the electronic configuration of the metal atom from d(3) (Tc

  8. The interaction of organic adsorbate vibrations with substrate lattice waves in methyl-Si(111)-(1 × 1)

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Ryan D.; Hund, Zachary M.; Sibener, S. J.; Campi, Davide; Bernasconi, M.; O’Leary, Leslie E.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Benedek, G.

    2014-07-14

    A combined helium atom scattering and density functional perturbation theory study has been performed to elucidate the surface phonon dispersion relations for both the CH{sub 3}-Si(111)-(1 × 1) and CD{sub 3}-Si(111)-(1 × 1) surfaces. The combination of experimental and theoretical methods has allowed characterization of the interactions between the low energy vibrations of the adsorbate and the lattice waves of the underlying substrate, as well as characterization of the interactions between neighboring methyl groups, across the entire wavevector resolved vibrational energy spectrum of each system. The Rayleigh wave was found to hybridize with the surface rocking libration near the surface Brillouin zone edge at both the M{sup ¯}-point and K{sup ¯}-point. The calculations indicated that the range of possible energies for the potential barrier to the methyl rotation about the Si-C axis is sufficient to prevent the free rotation of the methyl groups at a room temperature interface. The density functional perturbation theory calculations revealed several other surface phonons that experienced mode-splitting arising from the mutual interaction of adjacent methyl groups. The theory identified a Lucas pair that exists just below the silicon optical bands. For both the CH{sub 3}- and CD{sub 3}-terminated Si(111) surfaces, the deformations of the methyl groups were examined and compared to previous experimental and theoretical work on the nature of the surface vibrations. The calculations indicated a splitting of the asymmetric deformation of the methyl group near the zone edges due to steric interactions of adjacent methyl groups. The observed shifts in vibrational energies of the -CD{sub 3} groups were consistent with the expected effect of isotopic substitution in this system.

  9. Natural Transformation of Azotobacter vinelandii by Adsorbed Chromosomal DNA: Role of Adsorbed DNA Conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, N.; Zilles, J.; Nguyen, H.

    2008-12-01

    Recent increases in antibiotic resistance among pathogenic microorganisms and the accompanying public health concerns result both from the widespread use of antibiotics and from the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes among microorganisms. To understand the transfer of antibiotic resistance genes and identify efficient measures to minimize these transfers, an interdisciplinary approach was used to identify physical and chemical factors that control the fate and biological availability of extracellular DNA. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was used to study extracellular DNA adsorption and the conformation of the adsorbed DNA on silica and natural organic matter (NOM) surfaces. Solution chemistry was varied systematically to investigate the role of adsorbed DNA conformation on transformation. Gene transfer was assessed under the same conditions using natural transformation of chromosomal DNA into the soil bacteria Azotobacter vinelandii. DNA adsorbed to both silica and NOM surfaces has a more compact and rigid conformation in the presence of Ca2+ compared to Na+. Extracellular DNA adsorbed on silica and NOM surfaces transformed A. vinelandii. The transformation efficiency of adsorbed DNA was up to 4 orders of magnitude lower than that of dissolved DNA. Preliminary results suggest that the presence of Ca2+ in groundwater (e.g. hardness) reduces the availability of adsorbed DNA for transformation.

  10. Vibration-Resistant Support for Halide Lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiss, J.

    1987-01-01

    Lamp envelope protected against breakage. Old and new mounts for halide arc lamp sealed in housing with parabolic refector and quartz window. New version supports lamp with compliant garters instead of rigid brazed joint at top and dimensionally unstable finger stock at bottom.

  11. Molecular compressibility of some halides in alcohols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serban, C.; Auslaender, D.

    1974-01-01

    After measuring ultrasonic velocity and density, the molecular compressibility values from Wada's formula were calculated, for alkali metal halide solutions in methyl, ethyl, butyl, and glycol alcohol. The temperature and concentration dependence were studied, finding deviations due to the hydrogen bonds of the solvent.

  12. The Additive Coloration of Alkali Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jirgal, G. H.; and others

    1969-01-01

    Describes the construction and use of an inexpensive, vacuum furnace designed to produce F-centers in alkali halide crystals by additive coloration. The method described avoids corrosion or contamination during the coloration process. Examination of the resultant crystals is discussed and several experiments using additively colored crystals are…

  13. SUPERCRITICAL FLUID EXTRACTION OF PARTICULATE AND ADSORBENT MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a summary of work performed by PNL on the extraction of semivolatile organic materials (SVOCs), for example, polynuclear aromatic compounds, from various adsorbents and environmental matrices, using supercritical fluids (SCFs) as extractants. The results of the work...

  14. Nanopore reactive adsorbents for the high-efficiency removal of waste species

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Arthur Jing-Min; Zhang, Yuehua

    2005-01-04

    A nanoporous reactive adsorbent incorporates a relatively small number of relatively larger reactant, e.g., metal, enzyme, etc., particles (10) forming a discontinuous or continuous phase interspersed among and surrounded by a continuous phase of smaller adsorbent particles (12) and connected interstitial pores (14) therebetween. The reactive adsorbent can effectively remove inorganic or organic impurities in a liquid by causing the liquid to flow through the adsorbent. For example, silver ions may be adsorbed by the adsorbent particles (12) and reduced to metallic silver by reducing metal, such as ions, as the reactant particles (10). The column can be regenerated by backwashing with the liquid effluent containing, for example, acetic acid.

  15. Ionic alkali halide XUV laser feasibility study

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, T.T.; Gylys, V.T.; Bower, R.D.; Harris, D.G.; Blauer, J.A.; Turner, C.E.; Hindy, R.N.

    1989-11-10

    The objective of this work is to assess the feasibility of a select set of ionic alkali halide XUV laser concepts by obtaining the relevant kinetic and spectroscopic parameters required for a proof-of-principle and conceptual design. The proposed lasers operate in the 80--200 nm spectral region and do not require input from outside radiation sources for their operation. Frequency up-conversion and frequency mixing techniques and therefore not considered in the work to be described. An experimental and theoretical study of a new type of laser operating in the extreme ultraviolet wavelength region has been conducted. The lasing species are singly ionized alkali halide molecules such as Rb{sup 2+}F{sub {minus}}, Rb{sup 2+}Br{sup {minus}} and Cs{sup 2+}F{sup {minus}}. These species are similar in electronic structure to the rare gas halide excimers, such as XeF and Krf, except that the ionic molecules emit at wavelengths of 80--200 nm, much shorter than the conventional rare-gas halide excimer laser. The radiative lifetime of these molecules are typically near 1 ns, which is about an order of magnitude shorter than that for rare-gas halide systems. The values of the cross section for stimulated emission are on the order of 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}16}cm{sup 2}. Because of the fundamental similarity to existing UV lasers, these systems show promise as a high power, efficient XUV lasers. 55 refs., 50 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Surface relaxation phenomena at electrified interfaces: Revealing adsorbate, potential, and solvent effects by combined x-ray diffraction, STM and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracino, Martino; Broekmann, Peter; Gentz, Knud; Becker, Moritz; Keller, Hubert; Janetzko, Florian; Bredow, Thomas; Wandelt, Klaus; Dosch, Helmut

    2009-03-01

    Surface relaxation phenomena have been studied in an electrochemical environment using halide modified Cu(100) electrodes as model systems to unravel the impact of the chemical nature of the adsorbed halide, the applied potential, and the presence of solvent species on the surface interlayer spacings. Both, in situ STM and in situ x-ray scattering data point to lateral structures of the adsorbed halides on Cu(100) which are identical for both chloride and bromide. Under saturation conditions both halides form a p(1×1) adlayer on Cu(100) with reference to a conventional choice of the substrate fcc unit cell. The in situ x-ray scattering data clearly indicate that the copper-halide and the copper-copper interlayer spacings are much more affected by potential changes when bromide is adsorbed on the copper surface and are less affected when chloride is present. This difference in the potential dependence of both halides can be attributed to the larger polarizability of the bromide anion that is almost discharged on the copper surface at the highest applied potentials, while chloride remains largely ionic in the adsorbed state even at the highest applied potential. At the lowest applied potential of Ework=-150mV [vs reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)] the Br-Cu and the topmost Cu-Cu layer distances are expanded by 0.150 and 0.058Å , respectively, with reference to their bulk analogs CuBr and Cu. These spacings continuously contract by up to 0.075 and 0.038Å when the electrode potential is increased to Ework=+50mV (RHE). Intriguingly, the second Cu layer experiences a potential-dependent buckling due to a different second-shell coordination of Cu by bromide while deeper Cu layers retain the bulk spacing at all potentials. Changes in the halide-copper and the copper-copper interlayer spacings are strongly correlated. An understanding of the in situ x-ray results is achieved by periodic quantum-chemical calculations at density-functional level that allow a modeling of

  17. Investigation of the spin-lattice relaxation of 13CO and 13CO2 adsorbed in the metal-organic frameworks Cu3(btc)2 and Cu3-xZnx(btc)2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gul-E-Noor, Farhana; Michel, Dieter; Krautscheid, Harald; Haase, Jürgen; Bertmer, Marko

    2013-07-01

    The 13C nuclear spin-lattice relaxation time of 13CO and 13CO2 molecules adsorbed in the metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) Cu2.97Zn0.03(btc)2 and Cu3(btc)2 is investigated over a wide range of temperatures at resonance frequencies of 75.468 and 188.62 MHz. In all cases a mono-exponential relaxation is observed, and the 13C spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) reveal minima within the temperature range of the measurements and both frequencies. This allows us to carry out a more detailed analysis of the 13C spin relaxation data and to consider the influence due to the spectral functions of the thermal motion. In a model-free discussion of the temperature dependence of the ratios T1 (T)/T1,min we observe a motional mechanism that can be described by a single correlation time. In relation to the discussion of the relaxation mechanisms this can be understood in terms of dominating translational motion with mean jump distance being larger than the minimum distances between neighboring adsorption sites in the MOFs. A more detailed discussion of the jump-like motion observed here might be carried out on the basis of self-diffusion coefficients. From the present spin relaxation measurements activation energies for the local motion of the adsorbed molecules in the MOFs can be estimated to be 3.3 kJ/mol and 2.2 kJ/mol, for CO and CO2 molecules, respectively. Finally, our findings are compared with our recent results derived from the 13C line shape analysis.

  18. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering study of riboflavin on borohydride-reduced silver colloids: Dependence of concentration, halide anions and pH values

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fangfang; Gu, Huaimin; Lin, Yue; Qi, Yajing; Dong, Xiao; Gao, Junxiang; Cai, Tiantian

    2012-01-01

    The influences of concentration, halide anions and pH on the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of riboflavin adsorbed on borohydride-reduced silver colloids were studied. The optimum concentration for the SERS of riboflavin is 10 -6 mol/L while the SERS enhancement varies for different modes. The addition of 0.2 mol/L halide (NaCl, NaBr, and NaI) aqueous solutions, leads to a general decrease of the SERS intensity and a change of spectral profile of riboflavin excited at 514.5 nm. Riboflavin interacts with the silver surface possibly through the C dbnd O and N-H modes of the uracil ring. The SERS spectra of riboflavin were recorded in the 3.4-11.6 pH range. By analyzing several SERS marker bands, the protonated, deprotonated or the coexistence of both molecular species adsorbed on the colloidal silver particles was proved.

  19. A study of the influence of halide adsorption on a reconstructed Au(111) electrode by second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, A.; Shannon, C.; Pettinger, B.

    1991-07-01

    Optical second harmonic generation (SHG) rotational anisotropy measurements were employed to study the influence of specifically adsorbed anions on the reconstructed Au(111)-(1 × 23) surface. Azimuthal rotation of the gold electrode at different potentials yields for the unreconstructed Au(111)-(1 × 1) surface the well-known three-fold symmetry pattern, while for the reconstructed Au(111)-(1 × 23) an additional one-fold symmetry pattern is observed, which leads to an assignment of Cs-symmetry for this surface. Due to the observation of this symmetry change Cs → C3v it is possible to monitor in situ the reversible transition between Au(111)-(1 × 23) and Au(111)-(1 × 1). While in perclorate solution the phase transition occurs over a wide potential region, in halide containing solution the same phase transition is restricted to the sharp potential region typical for the halide adsorption.

  20. Ab initio molecular orbital study of adsorption of oxygen, nitrogen, and ethylene on silver-zeolite and silver halides

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, N.; Yang, R.T.

    1996-11-01

    An ab initio molecular orbital study is undertaken on the adsorption of N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (adsorbate) on Ag-zeolite and Ag halides (adsorbent). Geometry optimization is performed at the HF/3-21G level, while MP2/3-21G with natural bond orbital calculations are performed to obtain energies, atomic charges, orbital energies, and orbital populations (occupancies). The bonding of adsorbate to adsorbent is discussed in the context of {sigma}-donation (i.e., overlap of the 2p orbitals of the adsorbate molecule with the 5s orbital of Ag) and d-{pi}* back donation (i.e., overlap of the 4d{sub yz} orbitals of Ag with the 2p* antibonding orbitals of the adsorbate). For all adsorbate-adsorbent pairs, the ratio of {sigma}-donation to d-{pi}* back donation is approximately 3:1. Results on occupancy analysis indicate that a considerable electron redistribution from the 4d{sub zy} orbitals to the 4d{sub yz} orbitals occurs in Ag during adsorption and that this redistribution has possibly enhanced the d-{pi}* back donation. Net charge and energy gap ({Delta}{epsilon}) analyses indicate that it is slightly easier for N{sub 2} than O{sub 2} to adsorb, whereas a comparison of N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} adsorption from calculations of the energies of adsorption is inconclusive. However, a fair agreement is obtained in comparison of theory and experiment for energy of adsorption of N{sub 2} and C{sub 2}J{sub 4} on Ag-zeolite. The dispersion energies of adsorption, based on the MP2 correlation energies, are nearly the same for all adsorption pairs, i.e,, approximately 4--5 kcal/mol.

  1. Enhancement of Exciton Emission in Lead Halide-Based Layered Perovskites by Cation Mixing.

    PubMed

    Era, Masanao; Komatsu, Yumeko; Sakamoto, Naotaka

    2016-04-01

    Spin-coated films of a lead halide, PbX: X = I and Br, layered perovskites having cyclohexenylethyl ammonium molecule as an organic layer, which were mixed with other metal halide-based layered perovskites consisting of various divalent metal halides (for example, Ca2, Cdl2, FeI2, SnBr2 and so on), were prepared. The results of X-ray diffraction measurements exhibited that solid solution formation between PbX-based layered perovskite and other divalent metal halide-based layered perovskites was observed up to very high molar concentration of 50 molar% in the mixed film samples when divalent cations having ionic radius close to that of Pb2+ were employed. In the solid solution films, the exciton emission was much enhanced at room temperature. Exciton emission intensity of Pbl-based layered perovskite mixed with Cal-based layered perovskite (20 molar%) is about 5 times large that of the pristine Pbl-based layered perovskite, and that of PbBr-based layered perovskite mixed with SnBr-based layered perovskite (20 molar%) was also about 5 times large that of the pristine PbBr-based layered perovskite at room temperature. PMID:27451628

  2. Mercury adsorption properties of sulfur-impregnated adsorbents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsi, N.-C.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chen, S.; Chang, R.

    2002-01-01

    Carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous adsorbents were impregnated with elemental sulfur to evaluate the chemical and physical properties of the adsorbents and their equilibrium mercury adsorption capacities. Simulated coal combustion flue gas conditions were used to determine the equilibrium adsorption capacities for Hg0 and HgCl2 gases to better understand how to remove mercury from gas streams generated by coal-fired utility power plants. Sulfur was deposited onto the adsorbents by monolayer surface deposition or volume pore filling. Sulfur impregnation increased the total sulfur content and decreased the total and micropore surface areas and pore volumes for all of the adsorbents tested. Adsorbents with sufficient amounts of active adsorption sites and sufficient microporous structure had mercury adsorption capacities up to 4,509 ??g Hg/g adsorbent. Elemental sulfur, organic sulfur, and sulfate were formed on the adsorbents during sulfur impregnation. Correlations were established with R2>0.92 between the equilibrium Hg0/HgCl2 adsorption capacities and the mass concentrations of elemental and organic sulfur. This result indicates that elemental and organic sulfur are important active adsorption sites for Hg0 and HgCl2.

  3. Microchip electrophoresis with background electrolyte containing polyacrylic acid and high content organic solvent in cyclic olefin copolymer microchips for easily adsorbed dyes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xuan; Sun, Ping; Yang, Shenghong; Zhao, Lei; Wu, Jing; Li, Fengyun; Pu, Qiaosheng

    2016-07-29

    Plastic microchips can significantly reduce the fabrication cost but the adsorption of some analytes limits their application. In this work, background electrolyte containing ionic polymer and high content of organic solvent was adopted to eliminate the analyte adsorption and achieve highly efficient separation in microchip electrophoresis. Two dyes, rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and rhodamine B (RhB) were used as the model analytes. By using methanol as the organic solvent and polyacrylic acid (PAA) as a multifunctional additive, successful separation of the two dyes within 75μm id. microchannels was realized. The role of PAA is multiple, including viscosity regulator, selectivity modifier and active additive for counteracting analyte adsorption on the microchannel surface. The number of theoretical plate of 7.0×10(5)/m was attained within an effective separation distance of 2cm using background electrolyte consisting 80% methanol, 0.36% PAA and 30mmol/L phosphate at pH 5.0. Under optimized conditions, relative standard deviations of Rh6G and RhB detection (n=5) were no more than 1.5% for migration time and 2.0% for peak area, respectively. The limit of detection (S/N=3) was 0.1nmol/L for Rh6G. The proposed technique was applied in the determination of both Rh6G and RhB in chilli powder and lipstick samples with satisfactory recoveries of 81.3-103.7%. PMID:27371017

  4. Transport of Soil Halides through Rice Paddies: A Viable Mechanism for Rapid Dispersion of the Soil Halide Reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redeker, K. R.; Manley, S.; Wang, N.; Cicerone, R.

    2002-05-01

    On short time scales (1-10 years) soil halide concentrations have been assumed to be primarily driven by leaching and deposition processes. Recent results however, have shown that terrestrial plants volatilize soil halides in the form of methyl halides. Emissions of methyl chloride, methyl bromide and methyl iodide represent major pathways for delivery of inorganic halogen radicals to the atmosphere. Inorganic halogen radicals destroy ozone in the stratosphere and modify the oxidative capacity of the lower atmosphere. We have previously shown that rice paddies emit methyl halides and that emissions depend on growth stage of the rice plant as well as field water management. We show here that rice grown in a greenhouse at UCI is capable of volatilizing and/or storing up to 30%, 5%, and 10% of the available chloride, bromide and iodide within the top meter of soil. The percent of plant tissue halide volatilized as methyl halide over the course of the season is calculated to be 0.05%, 0.25% and 85.0% for chloride, bromide and iodide. We compare our greenhouse soil halide concentrations to other commercial rice fields around the world and estimate the e-folding time for soil halides within each region. We suggest that rice agriculture is the driving removal mechanism for halides within rice paddies and that terrestrial plants play a larger role in global cycling of halides than previously estimated.

  5. Flame inhibition by hydrogen halides - Some spectroscopic measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, N. R.; Cagliostro, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    The far-ultraviolet absorption spectrum of an air-propane diffusion flame inhibited with hydrogen halides has been studied. Plots of the absorption of light by hydrogen halides as a function of position in the flame and also as a function of the amount of hydrogen halide added to the flame have been obtained. The hydrogen halides are shown to be more stable on the fuel side of the reaction zone than they are on the air side. Thermal diffusion is seen to be important in determining the concentration distribution of the heavier hydrogen halides in diffusion flames. The relationship between the concentration distribution of the hydrogen halides in the flame and the flame inhibition mechanism is discussed.

  6. The influence of sediment particle size on the properties of adsorbed dissolved organic matter in the Yangtze Estuary and its interactions with As/Sb.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Zhang, Manman; Zhang, Di; Shen, Zhenyao

    2016-04-15

    The characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) extracted from sediments with four particle sizes (<25, 63-25, 200-63 and >200μm) in the Yangtze Estuary were compared. The differences in their binding capacities for individual fluorescent components with As/Sb were studied using fluorescence-quenching titrations combined with excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra. The results indicated that the particle size influenced the quality and quantity of extracted DOM. With increasing particle size, the extracted DOM content, value of UV280 and acidic functional group content of the DOM decreased. Three protein-like components (C2, C3 and C4) and one humic-like component (C1) were identified using the parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) model. Wherein, protein-like material dominated in DOM on different particle-size fractions and possessed a stronger complex capacity with As/Sb. A significant positive correlation between the complexation capacity of extracted DOM from samples, as well as with the acidic functional group content, was observed. PMID:26965093

  7. Systematic Investigation of Nanoscale Adsorbate Effects at Organic Light-Emitting diode Interfaces. Interfacial Structure-Charge Injection-Luminance Relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Huang,Q.; Li, J.; Evmenenko, G.; Dutta, P.; Marks, T.

    2006-01-01

    Molecule-scale structure effects at indium tin oxide (ITO) anode-hole transport layer (HTL) interfaces in organic light-emitting diode (OLED) heterostructures are systematically probed via a self-assembly approach. A series of ITO anode-linked silyltriarylamine precursors differing in aryl group and linker density are synthesized for this purpose and used to probe the relationship between nanoscale interfacial chemical structure and charge-injection/electroluminescence properties. These precursors form conformal and largely pinhole-free self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on the ITO anode surface with angstrom-level thickness control. Deposition of a HTL on top of the SAMs places the probe molecules precisely at the anode-HTL interface. OLEDs containing ITO/SAM/HTL configurations have dramatically varied hole-injection magnitudes and OLED responses. These can be correlated with the probe molecular structures and electrochemically derived heterogeneous electron-transfer rates for such triarylamine fragments. The large observed interfacial molecular structure effects offer an approach to tuning OLED hole-injection flux over 1-2 orders of magnitude, resulting in up to 3-fold variations in OLED brightness at identical bias and up to a 2 V driving voltage reduction at identical brightness. Very bright and efficient ({approx}70 000 cd/m{sup 2}, {approx}2.5% forward external quantum efficiency, {approx}11 lm/W power efficiency) Alq (tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum(III))-based OLEDs can thereby be fabricated.

  8. Interpulse kinetics in copper and copper halide lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harstad, K. G.

    1983-01-01

    The various rate processes that govern the interpulse relaxation in metal vapor and metal halide vapor lasers are considered. Computer calculations indicate that the rapid metastable levels relaxation observed in copper and copper halide laser experiments requires the existence of a relatively small resonance in the cross section for metastable excitation or deexcitation near threshold. The accurate calculation of interpulse relaxation requires knowledge of rate constants presently not well known; this is especially so for metal halide lasers.

  9. Process and composition for drying of gaseous hydrogen halides

    DOEpatents

    Tom, Glenn M.; Brown, Duncan W.

    1989-08-01

    A process for drying a gaseous hydrogen halide of the formula HX, wherein X is selected from the group consisting of bromine, chlorine, fluorine, and iodine, to remove water impurity therefrom, comprising: contacting the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide with a scavenger including a support having associated therewith one or more members of the group consisting of: (a) an active scavenging moiety selected from one or more members of the group consisting of: (i) metal halide compounds dispersed in the support, of the formula MX.sub.y ; and (ii) metal halide pendant functional groups of the formula -MX.sub.y-1 covalently bonded to the support, wherein M is a y-valent metal, and y is an integer whose value is from 1 to 3; (b) corresponding partially or fully alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, of the metal halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); wherein the alkylated compounds and/or pendant functional groups, when present, are reactive with the gaseous hydrogen halide to form the corresponding halide compounds and/or pendant functional groups of (a); and M being selected such that the heat of formation, .DELTA.H.sub.f of its hydrated halide, MX.sub.y.(H.sub.2 O).sub.n, is governed by the relationship: .DELTA.H.sub.f .gtoreq.n.times.10.1 kilocalories/mole of such hydrated halide compound wherein n is the number of water molecules bound to the metal halide in the metal halide hydrate. Also disclosed is an appertaining scavenger composition and a contacting apparatus wherein the scavenger is deployed in a bed for contacting with the water impurity-containing gaseous hydrogen halide.

  10. Evaluation of low melting halide systems for battery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamantov, G.; Perrovic, C.

    1981-03-01

    This three year program involves evaluation of selected low temperature molten salt solvent systems containing inorganic and/or organic chlorides and bromides for battery applications. The research involves determination of the liquidus temperatures, the specific electrical conductivity, and the electrochemical span of selected halide systems. Characterization of the solvent species by Raman spectroscopy, vapor pressure measurements, and the electrochemical study of a few cathode and anode systems will be undertaken for the most promising solvent systems. The research during the second year of this project involved the determination of liquidus temperatures and/or specific electrical conductivities for a number of binary and ternary molten salt systems containing AlCl3, AlBr3, SbCl3, FeCl3, and GaCl3.

  11. Giant photostriction in organic–inorganic lead halide perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yang; You, Lu; Wang, Shiwei; Ku, Zhiliang; Fan, Hongjin; Schmidt, Daniel; Rusydi, Andrivo; Chang, Lei; Wang, Le; Ren, Peng; Chen, Liufang; Yuan, Guoliang; Chen, Lang; Wang, Junling

    2016-01-01

    Among the many materials investigated for next-generation photovoltaic cells, organic–inorganic lead halide perovskites have demonstrated great potential thanks to their high power conversion efficiency and solution processability. Within a short period of about 5 years, the efficiency of solar cells based on these materials has increased dramatically from 3.8 to over 20%. Despite the tremendous progress in device performance, much less is known about the underlying photophysics involving charge–orbital–lattice interactions and the role of the organic molecules in this hybrid material remains poorly understood. Here, we report a giant photostrictive response, that is, light-induced lattice change, of >1,200 p.p.m. in methylammonium lead iodide, which could be the key to understand its superior optical properties. The strong photon-lattice coupling also opens up the possibility of employing these materials in wireless opto-mechanical devices. PMID:27044485

  12. Lanthanide doped strontium-barium cesium halide scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarri, Gregory; Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Borade, Ramesh B.; Gundiah, Gautam; Yan, Zewu; Hanrahan, Stephen M.; Chaudhry, Anurag; Canning, Andrew

    2015-06-09

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising an optionally lanthanide-doped strontium-barium, optionally cesium, halide, useful for detecting nuclear material.

  13. Microtitration of various anions with quaternary ammonium halides using solid-state electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Selig, W.

    1980-01-01

    Many solid-state electrodes were found to respond as endpoint detectors in the potentiometric titration of large inorganic and organic anions with quaternary ammonium halides. The best response was obtained with the iodide and cyanide electrodes although practically any electrode can function as endpoint sensor. The titrants were hexadecylpyridinium chloride and hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride; hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide and Hyamine 1622 may also be used. Some inorganic anions thus titratable are perrhenate, persulfate, ferricyanide, hexafluorophosphate, and hexachloroplatinate. Examples of organic anions titratable are nitroform, tetraphenylborate, cyanotriphenylborate, picrate, long-chain sulfates and sulfonates, and some soaps. The reverse titration of quaternary ammonium halides vs dodecylsulfate is also feasible. Some titrations are feasible in a partially nonaqueous medium.

  14. Adsorbed Water Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander detected small and variable amounts of water in the Martian soil.

    In this schematic illustration, water molecules are represented in red and white; soil minerals are represented in green and blue. The water, neither liquid, vapor, nor solid, adheres in very thin films of molecules to the surfaces of soil minerals. The left half illustrates an interpretation of less water being adsorbed onto the soil-particle surface during a period when the tilt, or obliquity, of Mars' rotation axis is small, as it is in the present. The right half illustrates a thicker film of water during a time when the obliquity is greater, as it is during cycles on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years. As the humidity of the atmosphere increases, more water accumulates on mineral surfaces. Thicker films behave increasingly like liquid water.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Mechanism and Selectivity in Nickel-Catalyzed Cross-Electrophile Coupling of Aryl Halides with Alkyl Halides

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Soumik; Weix, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    The direct cross-coupling of two different electrophiles, such as an aryl halide with an alkyl halide, offers many advantages over conventional cross-coupling methods that require a carbon nucleophile. Despite its promise as a versatile synthetic strategy, a limited understanding of the mechanism and origin of cross selectivity has hindered progress in reaction development and design. Herein, we shed light on the mechanism for the nickel-catalyzed cross-electrophile coupling of aryl halides with alkyl halides and demonstrate that the selectivity arises from an unusual catalytic cycle that combines both polar and radical steps to form the new C-C bond. PMID:23952217

  16. Involvement of S-adenosylmethionine-dependent halide/thiol methyltransferase (HTMT) in methyl halide emissions from agricultural plants: isolation and characterization of an HTMT-coding gene from Raphanus sativus (daikon radish)

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Nobuya; Toda, Hiroshi; Matsuda, Michiko; Negishi, Takashi; Taniguchi, Tomokazu; Ohsawa, Noboru

    2009-01-01

    Background Biogenic emissions of methyl halides (CH3Cl, CH3Br and CH3I) are the major source of these compounds in the atmosphere; however, there are few reports about the halide profiles and strengths of these emissions. Halide ion methyltransferase (HMT) and halide/thiol methyltransferase (HTMT) enzymes concerning these emissions have been purified and characterized from several organisms including marine algae, fungi, and higher plants; however, the correlation between emission profiles of methyl halides and the enzymatic properties of HMT/HTMT, and their role in vivo remains unclear. Results Thirty-five higher plant species were screened, and high CH3I emissions and HMT/HTMT activities were found in higher plants belonging to the Poaceae family, including wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and paddy rice (Oryza sativa L.), as well as the Brassicaceae family, including daikon radish (Raphanus sativus). The in vivo emission of CH3I clearly correlated with HMT/HTMT activity. The emission of CH3I from the sprouting leaves of R. sativus, T. aestivum and O. sativa grown hydroponically increased with increasing concentrations of supplied iodide. A gene encoding an S-adenosylmethionine halide/thiol methyltransferase (HTMT) was cloned from R. sativus and expressed in Escherichia coli as a soluble protein. The recombinant R. sativus HTMT (RsHTMT) was revealed to possess high specificity for iodide (I-), bisulfide ([SH]-), and thiocyanate ([SCN]-) ions. Conclusion The present findings suggest that HMT/HTMT activity is present in several families of higher plants including Poaceae and Brassicaceae, and is involved in the formation of methyl halides. Moreover, it was found that the emission of methyl iodide from plants was affected by the iodide concentration in the cultures. The recombinant RsHTMT demonstrated enzymatic properties similar to those of Brassica oleracea HTMT, especially in terms of its high specificity for iodide, bisulfide, and thiocyanate ions. A survey of

  17. Theoretical characterization of dihydrogen adducts with halide anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitillo, Jenny G.; Damin, Alessandro; Zecchina, Adriano; Ricchiardi, Gabriele

    2006-06-01

    The interaction between a hydrogen molecule and the halide anions F-, Cl-, Br-, and I- has been studied at different levels of theory and with different basis sets. The most stable configurations of the complexes have a linear geometry, while the t-shaped complexes are saddle points on the potential energy surface, opposite to what is observed for alkali cations. An electrostatic analysis conducted on the resulting adducts has highlighted the predominance of the electrostatic term in the complexation energy and, in particular, of the quadrupole- and dipole-polarizability dependent contributions. Another striking difference with respect to the positive ions, is the fact that although the binding energies have similar values (ranging between 25 and 3kJ/mol for F- and I-, respectively), the vibrational shift of the ν˜H-H and in general the perturbation of the hydrogen molecule in complexes are much greater in the complexes with anions (Δν˜H-H ranges between -720 and -65cm-1). Another difference with respect to the interaction with cations is a larger charge transfer from the anion to the hydrogen molecule. The Δν˜ is the result of the cooperative role of the electrostatics and of the charge transfer in the interaction. The correlation between binding energies and vibrational shift is far from linear, contrary to what is observed for cation complexes, in accordance with the higher polarizability and dynamic polarizability of the molecule along the molecular axis. The observed correlation may be valuable in the interpretation of spectra and thermodynamic properties of adsorbed H2 in storage materials.

  18. Methyl halides in and over the eastern Pacific (40 /sup 0/N-32 /sup 0/S)

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, H.B.; Salas, L.J.; Stiles, R.E.

    1983-04-20

    Methyl chloride, methyl bromide, and methyl iodide measurements in and over the eastern Pacific (40 /sup 0/N and 32 /sup 0/S latitude) show mean air concentrations of 633 parts per trillion (ppt), 23 ppt, and 2 ppt, and mean surface seawater concentrations of 11.5 ng/l, 1.2 ng/l, and 1.6 ng/l respectively. Long-term ambient measurements at a marine Pacific site (39 /sup 0/N) show an essentially unchanging background, with some indication of high concentrations of methyl bromide and methyl iodide during summertime. The oceanic data indicate a mean surface supersaturation of 275%, 250%, and 340%, respectively, for these three methyl halides. Depth profiles show that methyl halides are most abundant in the top mixed layer of the ocean. Oceanic concentrations of methyl chloride and methyl bromide are significantly correlated (linear regression coefficient of 0.85), suggesting a common source. No relationship between oceanic methyl iodide concentrations and the other two halides could be found. Coexistence of high concentrations of methyl iodide with relatively low concentrations of methyl chloride and vice versa provided no direct support for the hypothesis that chloride ion reactions with methyl iodide may be the dominant oceanic source of methyl chloride. For the eastern Pacific, mean ocean to air fluxes (in units of 10/sup -7/ g cm/sup -2/ yr/sup -1/) of 13,1, and 1 are determined for methyl chloride, methyl bromine, and methyl iodide, respectively. When extrapolated to global waters, they provide an adequate source to explain the atmospheric reservoir of these organic halides. Total organic bromine and iodine measurements would suggest that methyl bromide and methyl iodide contribute predominately to the tropospheric bromine and iodine organic reservoir.

  19. Controlling Metal-Halide Vapor Density in Lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pivirotto, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Streams of buffer gas convect and dilute metal-halide vapor. Technique uses flow of buffer gas through reservoir, which contains heated metal halide, to convect vapors into discharge tube. Second stream of buffer gas dilutes vapor. Final vapor density in laser tube controlled and changed by adjusting either one or both of buffer gas flow rates.

  20. [Emissions of methyl halides from coastal salt marshes: A review].

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen-xia; Zhao, Quan-sheng; Cui, Yu-qian; Du, Hui-na; Ye, Si-yuan

    2015-11-01

    Methyl halides are the major carrier of halogens in the atmosphere, and they play an important role in tropospheric and stratospheric ozone depletion. Meanwhile, methyl halides can act as greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, and they are also environmentally significant because of their toxicity. Coastal salt marshes, the important intertidal ecosystems at the land-ocean interface, have been considered to be a large potential natural source of methyl halides. In this paper, the research status of the natural source or sink of methyl halides, the mechanisms of their emission from coastal salt marshes and affecting factors were summarized. In view of this, the following research fields need to be strengthened in the future: 1) Long time-scale and large region-range researches about the emission of methyl halides and the evaluation of their source and sink function, 2) Accurate quantification of contribution rates of different plant species and various biological types to fluxes of methyl halides, 3) Further researches on effects of the tidal fluctuation process and flooding duration on methyl halides emission, 4) Effects of the global change and human activities on methyl halides emission. PMID:26915215

  1. Selective separation behavior of graphene flakes in interaction with halide anions in the presence of an external electric field.

    PubMed

    Farajpour, E; Sohrabi, B; Beheshtian, J

    2016-03-14

    The adsorption of halide anions in the absence, and presence, of a perpendicularly external electric field on the C54H18 graphene surface has been investigated using M06-2X/6-31G(d,p) density functional theory (DFT). The structural characteristics, charge transfer, electric surface potential (ESP) maps, equilibrium distances between ions and the graphene surface and dipole moments of the ion-graphene complexes were investigated. The optimized structures show that halide anions (F(-) and Br(-)) adsorb on the graphene surface in contrast to the chloride anion that was stabilized on the edge area of the graphene flake. To clarify this unexpected behavior, diffusion of the chloride anion on the graphene surface was analyzed. The observations suggest that the moving of the chloride halide anion between barrier energies on the graphene flake has been facilitated as a result of the applied external electric field. In addition, an effective anion-π interaction between the fluoride anion and the graphene surface in the presence of an electric field holds out the capability of these anion-graphene complexes to design anion-selective nanoscale materials. PMID:26899635

  2. Ultraviolet absorption spectra of mercuric halides.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Templet, P.; Mcdonald, J. R.; Mcglynn, S. P.; Kendrow, C. H.; Roebber, J. L.; Weiss, K.

    1972-01-01

    The gas phase transitions of the mercuric halides were observed in the UV region by operating at temperatures above 400 K and at vapor pressures on the order of 0.5 mm. Spectral features exhibited by the chloride, bromide, and iodide of mercury correlate energetically with bands previously designated as intermolecular charge transfer transitions. The solution spectra of mercuric iodide and deep color of the crystals (if not due to some solid state interactions) indicate that this molecule may also have longer wavelength transitions.

  3. Raman spectra of hydroxide-halide melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakiriyanova, I. D.; Khokhlov, V. A.

    2012-08-01

    The Raman spectra of molten binary mixtures based on sodium hydroxide and containing (mol %) 35 NaCl, 30 NaBr, and 30 NaI have been recorded at various temperatures. An increase in the vibrational frequency and the force constant of the O-H bond is detected under isothermal conditions upon a variation of the anionic composition of a melt in the series I → Br → Cl. Based on the experimental data, the viscosity of the hydroxide-halide melts is estimated.

  4. Amine synthesis via iron-catalysed reductive coupling of nitroarenes with alkyl halides.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Chi Wai; Hu, Xile

    2016-01-01

    (Hetero)Aryl amines, an important class of organic molecules in medicinal chemistry, are most commonly synthesized from anilines, which are in turn synthesized by hydrogenation of nitroarenes. Amine synthesis directly from nitroarenes is attractive due to improved step economy and functional group compatibility. Despite these potential advantages, there is yet no general method for the synthesis of (hetero)aryl amines by carbon-nitrogen cross-coupling of nitroarenes. Here we report the reductive coupling of nitroarenes with alkyl halides to yield (hetero)aryl amines. A simple iron catalyst enables the coupling with numerous primary, secondary and tertiary alkyl halides. Broad scope and high functional group tolerance are demonstrated. Mechanistic study suggests that nitrosoarenes and alkyl radicals are involved as intermediates. This new C-N coupling method provides general and step-economical access to aryl amines. PMID:27515391

  5. Amine synthesis via iron-catalysed reductive coupling of nitroarenes with alkyl halides

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Chi Wai; Hu, Xile

    2016-01-01

    (Hetero)Aryl amines, an important class of organic molecules in medicinal chemistry, are most commonly synthesized from anilines, which are in turn synthesized by hydrogenation of nitroarenes. Amine synthesis directly from nitroarenes is attractive due to improved step economy and functional group compatibility. Despite these potential advantages, there is yet no general method for the synthesis of (hetero)aryl amines by carbon–nitrogen cross-coupling of nitroarenes. Here we report the reductive coupling of nitroarenes with alkyl halides to yield (hetero)aryl amines. A simple iron catalyst enables the coupling with numerous primary, secondary and tertiary alkyl halides. Broad scope and high functional group tolerance are demonstrated. Mechanistic study suggests that nitrosoarenes and alkyl radicals are involved as intermediates. This new C–N coupling method provides general and step-economical access to aryl amines. PMID:27515391

  6. Microscopic Investigation of Grain Boundaries in Organolead Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiang-Jun; Ma, Jing-Yuan; Ge, Qian-Qing; Hu, Jin-Song; Wang, Dong; Wan, Li-Jun

    2015-12-30

    Grain boundaries (GBs) play an important role in organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells, which have generally been recognized as a new class of materials for photovoltaic applications. To definitely understand the electrical structure and behavior of GBs, here we present Kelvin probe force microscopy and conductive atomic force microscopy (c-AFM) measurements of both typical and inverted planar organolead halide perovskite solar cells. By comparing the contact potential difference (CPD) of these two devices in the dark and under illumination, we found that a downward band bending exists in GBs that predominantly attract photoinduced electrons. The c-AFM measurements observed that higher photocurrents flow through GBs when a low bias overcomes the barrier created by the band bending, indicating that GBs act as effective charge dissociation interfaces and photocurrent transduction pathways rather than recombination sites. PMID:26633192

  7. Tuning the thermal conductivity of methylammonium lead halide by the molecular substructure.

    PubMed

    Caddeo, Claudia; Melis, Claudio; Saba, Maria Ilenia; Filippetti, Alessio; Colombo, Luciano; Mattoni, Alessandro

    2016-09-21

    By using state-of-the-art atomistic methods we provide an accurate estimate of thermal conductivity of methylammonium lead halide as a function of sample size and temperature, in agreement with experimental works. We show that the thermal conductivity of methylammonium lead halide is intrinsically low, due to the low sound velocity of the PbI lattice. Furthermore, by selectively analyzing the effect of different molecular degrees of freedom, we clarify the role of the molecular substructure by showing that the internal modes above 150 cm(-1) (in addition to rotations) are effective in reducing the thermal conductivity of hybrid perovskites. This analysis suggests strategies to tailor the thermal conductivity by modifying the internal structure of organic cations. PMID:27531063

  8. Orbital tomography for highly symmetric adsorbate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadtmüller, B.; Willenbockel, M.; Reinisch, E. M.; Ules, T.; Bocquet, F. C.; Soubatch, S.; Puschnig, P.; Koller, G.; Ramsey, M. G.; Tautz, F. S.; Kumpf, C.

    2012-10-01

    Orbital tomography is a new and very powerful tool to analyze the angular distribution of a photoemission spectroscopy experiment. It was successfully used for organic adsorbate systems to identify (and consequently deconvolute) the contributions of specific molecular orbitals to the photoemission data. The technique was so far limited to surfaces with low symmetry like fcc(110) oriented surfaces, owing to the small number of rotational domains that occur on such surfaces. In this letter we overcome this limitation and present an orbital tomography study of a 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetra-carboxylic-dianhydride (PTCDA) monolayer film adsorbed on Ag(111). Although this system exhibits twelve differently oriented molecules, the angular resolved photoemission data still allow a meaningful analysis of the different local density of states and reveal different electronic structures for symmetrically inequivalent molecules. We also discuss the precision of the orbital tomography technique in terms of counting statistics and linear regression fitting algorithm. Our results demonstrate that orbital tomography is not limited to low-symmetry surfaces, a finding which makes a broad field of complex adsorbate systems accessible to this powerful technique.

  9. New insights into perfluorinated adsorbents for analytical and bioanalytical applications.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Nicola; Guzzinati, Roberta; Catani, Martina; Massi, Alessandro; Pasti, Luisa; Cavazzini, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Perfluorinated (F-) adsorbents are generally prepared by bonding perfluoro-functionalized silanes to silica gels. They have been employed for a long time essentially as media for solid-phase extraction of F-molecules or F-tagged molecules in organic chemistry and heterogeneous catalysis. More recently, this approach has been extended to proteomics and metabolomics. Owing to their unique physicochemical properties, namely fluorophilicity and proteinophilicity, and a better understanding of some fundamental aspects of their behavior, new applications of F-adsorbents in the field of environmental science and bio-affinity studies can be envisaged. In this article, we revisit the most important features of F-adsorbents by focusing, in particular, on some basic information that has been recently obtained through (nonlinear) chromatographic studies. Finally, we try to envisage new applications and possibilities that F-adsorbents will allow in the near future. PMID:25358910

  10. 10 CFR 429.54 - Metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures. 429.54 Section... CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.54 Metal halide lamp ballasts... are applicable to metal halide lamp ballasts; and (2) For each basic model of metal halide...

  11. 10 CFR 429.54 - Metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures. 429.54 Section... CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.54 Metal halide lamp ballasts... are applicable to metal halide lamp ballasts; and (2) For each basic model of metal halide...

  12. 10 CFR 429.54 - Metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures. 429.54 Section... CONSUMER PRODUCTS AND COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Certification § 429.54 Metal halide lamp ballasts... are applicable to metal halide lamp ballasts; and (2) For each basic model of metal halide...

  13. Adsorption of halide ions from aqueous solutions at a Cd(0 0 0 1) electrode surface: quantum chemical modelling and experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazmutdinov, Renat R.; Zinkicheva, Tamara T.; Probst, Michael; Lust, Karmen; Lust, Enn

    2005-03-01

    Adsorption of the halide ions X (X = Cl -, Br -, I -) at a cadmium monocrystalline face (0 0 0 1) from aqueous solutions has been studied by the impedance spectroscopy. Analysis of the impedance data does not predict specific adsorption for Cl - and shows that the Gibbs adsorption energy increases from Br - to I - in accordance with the decrease of the hydration energy of anions. The adsorption of halide ions and their atomic forms on a Cd(0 0 0 1) electrode at the potential of zero charge (pzc) has been studied with the use of the cluster model. The quantum chemical calculations were performed at the DFT and the SCF levels involving the hydrated species X -(H 2O) 3 and X -(H 2O) 6 besides the bare anions. The effective distance-dependent solvation energy of halide ions constructed on the basis of molecular dynamics simulations was used to build the adsorption terms. For all three halides contact adsorption was found to be the most favourable state. The partial charge transfer (PCT) from the adsorbed species to the metal was analysed in terms of the Anderson-Newns model. A combined consideration of the solvation and PCT effects enables prediction of the experimentally observed metal-ion interaction order (Cl - < Br - < I -).

  14. Methyl halide production associated with kelp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dastoor, Minoo N.; Manley, Steven L.

    1985-01-01

    Methyl halides (MeX) are important trace constituents of the atmosphere because they, mostly MeCl, have a major impact on the atmospheric ozone layer. Also, MeCl may account for 5 pct. of the total Cl budget and MeI may have a central role in the biogeochemical cycling of iodine. High MeI concentrations were found in seawater from kelp beds and it has been suggested that MeI is produced by kelps and that MeI and MeBr along with numerous other halocarbons were released by non-kelp marine macroalgae. The objective was to determine if kelps (and other seaweeds) are sources of MeX and to assess their contribution to the estimated global source strength (EGSS) of MeX. Although the production of MeX appears to be associated with kelp, microbes involved with kelp degradation also produce MeX. Microbial MeX production may be of global significance. The microbial MeX production potential, assuming annual kelp production equals kelp degradation and 100 pct. conversion of kelp halides to MeX, is approx. 2 x the EGSS. This is not achieved but indicates that microbial production of MeX may be of global significance.

  15. Finding new perovskite halides via machine learning

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Kim, Chiho; Lookman, Turab

    2016-04-26

    Advanced materials with improved properties have the potential to fuel future technological advancements. However, identification and discovery of these optimal materials for a specific application is a non-trivial task, because of the vastness of the chemical search space with enormous compositional and configurational degrees of freedom. Materials informatics provides an efficient approach toward rational design of new materials, via learning from known data to make decisions on new and previously unexplored compounds in an accelerated manner. Here, we demonstrate the power and utility of such statistical learning (or machine learning, henceforth referred to as ML) via building a support vectormore » machine (SVM) based classifier that uses elemental features (or descriptors) to predict the formability of a given ABX3 halide composition (where A and B represent monovalent and divalent cations, respectively, and X is F, Cl, Br, or I anion) in the perovskite crystal structure. The classification model is built by learning from a dataset of 185 experimentally known ABX3 compounds. After exploring a wide range of features, we identify ionic radii, tolerance factor, and octahedral factor to be the most important factors for the classification, suggesting that steric and geometric packing effects govern the stability of these halides. As a result, the trained and validated models then predict, with a high degree of confidence, several novel ABX3 compositions with perovskite crystal structure.« less

  16. Finding New Perovskite Halides via Machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilania, Ghanshyam; Balachandran, Prasanna V.; Kim, Chiho; Lookman, Turab

    2016-04-01

    Advanced materials with improved properties have the potential to fuel future technological advancements. However, identification and discovery of these optimal materials for a specific application is a non-trivial task, because of the vastness of the chemical search space with enormous compositional and configurational degrees of freedom. Materials informatics provides an efficient approach towards rational design of new materials, via learning from known data to make decisions on new and previously unexplored compounds in an accelerated manner. Here, we demonstrate the power and utility of such statistical learning (or machine learning) via building a support vector machine (SVM) based classifier that uses elemental features (or descriptors) to predict the formability of a given ABX3 halide composition (where A and B represent monovalent and divalent cations, respectively, and X is F, Cl, Br or I anion) in the perovskite crystal structure. The classification model is built by learning from a dataset of 181 experimentally known ABX3 compounds. After exploring a wide range of features, we identify ionic radii, tolerance factor and octahedral factor to be the most important factors for the classification, suggesting that steric and geometric packing effects govern the stability of these halides. The trained and validated models then predict, with a high degree of confidence, several novel ABX3 compositions with perovskite crystal structure.

  17. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of Omethoate adsorbed on silver surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hee Jin; Lee, Chul Jae; Karim, Mohammad Rezaul; Kim, Mak Soon; Lee, Mu Sang

    2011-01-01

    We have investigated surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) spectrum of Omethoate (O,O-dimethyl-S-methylcarbamoylmethylthiophosphate). It is found significant signals in the ordinary Raman spectrum for solid-state Omethoate as well as strong vibrational signals absorbed on the silver sol surface which is prepared by γ-irradiation technique at a very low concentration. Effects of pH and anions (Cl -, Br -, I -) on the adsorption orientation are investigated as well. Two different adsorption mechanisms are deduced, depending on the experimental conditions. The sulfur atom or the sulfur and two oxygen atoms are adsorbed onto the silver sol surface. Among halide ions, Br - and I - are more strongly adsorbed onto the silver sol surface. As a result, the adsorption of Omethoate is less effective due to their steric hindrance.

  18. Photophysics of Hybrid Lead Halide Perovskites: The Role of Microstructure.

    PubMed

    Srimath Kandada, Ajay Ram; Petrozza, Annamaria

    2016-03-15

    Since the first reports on high efficiency, solution processed solar cells based on hybrid lead halide perovskites, there has been an explosion of activities on these materials. Researchers with interests spanning the full range from conventional inorganic to emerging organic and hybrid optoelectronic technologies have been contributing to the prolific research output. This has led to solar cell power conversion efficiencies now exceeding 20% and the demonstration of proofs of concept for electroluminescent and lasing devices. Hybrid perovskites can be self-assembled by a simple chemical deposition of the constituent units, with the possibility of integrating the useful properties of organic and inorganic compounds at the molecular scale within a single crystalline material, thus enabling a fine-tuning of the electronic properties. Tellingly, the fundamental properties of these materials may make us think of a new, solution processable, GaAs-like semiconductor. While this can be true to a first approximation, hybrid perovskites are intrinsically complex materials, where the presence of various types of interactions and structural disorder may strongly affect their properties. In particular, a clear understanding and control of the relative interactions between the organic and inorganic moieties is of paramount importance to properly disentangle their innate physics. In this Account we review our recent studies which aim to clarify the relationship between structural and electronic properties from a molecular to mesoscopic level. First we identify the markers for local disorder at the molecular level by using Raman spectroscopy as a probe. Then, we exploit such a tool to explore the role of microstructure on the absorption and luminescence properties of the semiconductor. Finally we address the controversy surrounding electron-hole interactions and excitonic effects. We show that in hybrid lead-halide perovskites dielectric screening also depends on the local

  19. A Discovery-Based Experiment Involving Rearrangement in the Conversion of Alcohols to Alkyl Halides: Permanent Magnet [to the thirteenth power]C NMR in the First-Semester Organic Chemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjonaas, Richard A.; Tucker, Ryand J. F.

    2008-01-01

    The use of permanent magnet [to the thirteenth power]C NMR in large-section first-semester organic chemistry lab courses is limited by the availability of experiments that not only hinge on first-semester lecture topics, but which also produce at least 0.5 mL of neat liquid sample. This article reports a discovery-based experiment that meets both…

  20. On the Thermal and Thermodynamic (In)Stability of Methylammonium Lead Halide Perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Brunetti, Bruno; Cavallo, Carmen; Ciccioli, Andrea; Gigli, Guido; Latini, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The interest of the scientific community on methylammonium lead halide perovskites (MAPbX3, X = Cl, Br, I) for hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells has grown exponentially since the first report in 2009. This fact is clearly justified by the very high efficiencies attainable (reaching 20% in lab scale devices) at a fraction of the cost of conventional photovoltaics. However, many problems must be solved before a market introduction of these devices can be envisaged. Perhaps the most important to be addressed is the lack of information regarding the thermal and thermodynamic stability of the materials towards decomposition, which are intrinsic properties of them and which can seriously limit or even exclude their use in real devices. In this work we present and discuss the results we obtained using non-ambient X-ray diffraction, Knudsen effusion-mass spectrometry (KEMS) and Knudsen effusion mass loss (KEML) techniques on MAPbCl3, MAPbBr3 and MAPbI3. The measurements demonstrate that all the materials decompose to the corresponding solid lead (II) halide and gaseous methylamine and hydrogen halide, and the decomposition is well detectable even at moderate temperatures (~60 °C). Our results suggest that these materials may be problematic for long term operation of solar devices. PMID:27545661

  1. On the Thermal and Thermodynamic (In)Stability of Methylammonium Lead Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Bruno; Cavallo, Carmen; Ciccioli, Andrea; Gigli, Guido; Latini, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The interest of the scientific community on methylammonium lead halide perovskites (MAPbX3, X = Cl, Br, I) for hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells has grown exponentially since the first report in 2009. This fact is clearly justified by the very high efficiencies attainable (reaching 20% in lab scale devices) at a fraction of the cost of conventional photovoltaics. However, many problems must be solved before a market introduction of these devices can be envisaged. Perhaps the most important to be addressed is the lack of information regarding the thermal and thermodynamic stability of the materials towards decomposition, which are intrinsic properties of them and which can seriously limit or even exclude their use in real devices. In this work we present and discuss the results we obtained using non-ambient X-ray diffraction, Knudsen effusion-mass spectrometry (KEMS) and Knudsen effusion mass loss (KEML) techniques on MAPbCl3, MAPbBr3 and MAPbI3. The measurements demonstrate that all the materials decompose to the corresponding solid lead (II) halide and gaseous methylamine and hydrogen halide, and the decomposition is well detectable even at moderate temperatures (~60 °C). Our results suggest that these materials may be problematic for long term operation of solar devices. PMID:27545661

  2. Simultaneous analyses and applications of multiple fluorobenzoate and halide tracers in hydrologic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Qinhong; Moran, Jean E.

    2005-09-01

    An analytical method that employs ion chromatography has been developed to exploit the use of fluorobenzoic acids (FBAs) and halides more fully as hydrologic tracers. In a single run, this reliable, sensitive, and robust method can simultaneously separate and quantify halides (fluoride, chloride, bromide, and iodide) and up to seven FBAs from other common groundwater constituents (e.g. nitrate and sulphate). The usefulness of this analytical method is demonstrated in both field and laboratory tracer experiments. The field study examines the hydrologic response of fractures and the matrix to different flow rates and the contribution of matrix diffusion in chemical transport. Laboratory tracer experiments with eight geologic media from across the USA - mostly from Department of Energy facilities where groundwater contamination is prevalent and where subsurface characterization employing tracers has been ongoing or is in need - reveal several insights about tracer transport behaviour: (1) bromide and FBAs are not always transported conservatively; (2) the delayed transport of these anionic tracers is likely related to geologic media characteristics, such as organic matter, pH, iron oxide content, and clay mineralogy; (3) use of iodine as a hydrologic tracer should take into account the different sorption behaviours of iodide and iodate and the possible conversion of iodine's initial chemical form; (4) the transport behaviour of potential FBA and halide tracers under relevant geochemical conditions should be evaluated before beginning ambitious, large-scale field tracer experiments.

  3. Alkali metal and alkali earth metal gadolinium halide scintillators

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith; Derenzo, Stephen E.; Parms, Shameka; Porter-Chapman, Yetta D.; Wiggins, Latoria K.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising an inorganic scintillator comprising a gadolinium halide, optionally cerium-doped, having the formula A.sub.nGdX.sub.m:Ce; wherein A is nothing, an alkali metal, such as Li or Na, or an alkali earth metal, such as Ba; X is F, Br, Cl, or I; n is an integer from 1 to 2; m is an integer from 4 to 7; and the molar percent of cerium is 0% to 100%. The gadolinium halides or alkali earth metal gadolinium halides are scintillators and produce a bright luminescence upon irradiation by a suitable radiation.

  4. Simultaneous Analyses and Applications of Multiple Fluorobenzoate and Halide Tracers in Hydrologic Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Q; Moran, J E

    2004-01-22

    An analytical method that employs ion chromatography has been developed to more fully exploit the use of fluorobenzoic acids (FBAs) and halides as hydrologic tracers. In a single run, this reliable, sensitive, and robust method can simultaneously separate and quantify halides (fluoride, chloride, bromide, and iodide) and up to seven FBAs from other common groundwater constituents (e.g., nitrate and sulfate). The usefulness of this ion chromatographic (IC) analytical method is demonstrated in both field and laboratory tracer experiments. Field experiments in unsaturated tuff featuring fractures or a fault show that this efficient and cost-effective method helps achieve the objectives of tracer studies that use multiple FBAs and/or diffusivity tracers (simultaneous use of one or more FBA and halide). The field study examines the hydrologic response of fractures and the matrix to different flow rates and the contribution of matrix diffusion in chemical transport. Laboratory tracer experiments with eight geologic media from across the United States--mostly from Department of Energy facilities where groundwater contamination is prevalent and where subsurface characterization employing tracers has been ongoing or is in need--reveal several insights about tracer transport behavior: (1) Bromide and FBAs are not always transported conservatively. (2) The delayed transport of these anionic tracers is likely related to geologic media characteristics, such as organic matter, pH, iron oxide content, and clay mineralogy. (3) Any use of iodine as a hydrologic tracer should take into account the different sorption behaviors of iodide and iodate and the possible conversion of iodine's initial chemical form. (4) The transport behavior of potential FBA and halide tracers under relevant geochemical conditions should be evaluated before beginning ambitious, large-scale field tracer experiments.

  5. Halide-Substituted Electronic Properties of Organometal Halide Perovskite Films: Direct and Inverse Photoemission Studies.

    PubMed

    Li, Chi; Wei, Jian; Sato, Mikio; Koike, Harunobu; Xie, Zhong-Zhi; Li, Yan-Qing; Kanai, Kaname; Kera, Satoshi; Ueno, Nobuo; Tang, Jian-Xin

    2016-05-11

    Solution-processed perovskite solar cells are attracting increasing interest due to their potential in next-generation hybrid photovoltaic devices. Despite the morphological control over the perovskite films, quantitative information on electronic structures and interface energetics is of paramount importance to the optimal photovoltaic performance. Here, direct and inverse photoemission spectroscopies are used to determine the electronic structures and chemical compositions of various methylammonium lead halide perovskite films (MAPbX3, X = Cl, Br, and I), revealing the strong influence of halide substitution on the electronic properties of perovskite films. Precise control over halide compositions in MAPbX3 films causes the manipulation of the electronic properties, with a qualitatively blue shift along the I → Br → Cl series and showing the increase in ionization potentials from 5.96 to 7.04 eV and the change of transport band gaps in the range from 1.70 to 3.09 eV. The resulting light absorption of MAPbX3 films can cover the entire visible region from 420 to 800 nm. The results presented here provide a quantitative guide for the analysis of perovskite-based solar cell performance and the selection of optimal carrier-extraction materials for photogenerated electrons and holes. PMID:27101940

  6. Vibrational Spectroscopy of Sodium Halide and Hydrogen Halide Aqueous Solutions: Application to Atmospheric Aerosol Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levering, L. M.; Liu, D.; Allen, H. C.

    2003-12-01

    Heterogeneous reactions on the surfaces of atmospheric aerosols play an important role in atmospheric chemistry. These reactions are capable of converting alkyl and hydrogen halides (common constituents of marine boundary aerosols) into active halogen compounds. Fundamental questions still remain concerning surface species and reaction mechanisms pertaining to marine boundary aerosols. The first step in beginning to understand these heterogeneous reactions is to determine how ions in solution affect the structure of water at the interface. Vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopy is used to examine the air-liquid interface of sodium halide and hydrogen halide (i.e. strong acid) solutions. In addition, comparison of the bulk water structure to that of the interface is accomplished using Raman spectroscopy. The hydrogen-bonding environment at the surface of NaCl is found to be similar to that of the air-water interface. In contrast, the interfacial water structure of NaBr, HCl, and HBr solutions is significantly altered from that of neat water. In the bulk, NaCl, NaBr, HCl, and HBr solutions disturb the hydrogen-bonding network of neat water. A comparison between the corresponding salts and acids show that the salts produce greater disorder (i.e. less coupling of the water symmetric stretching modes) in the bulk water structure.

  7. Evaluation of a cesium adsorbent grafted with ammonium 12-molybdophosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Takuya; Seko, Noriaki; Amada, Haruyo; Kasai, Noboru; Saiki, Seiichi; Hoshina, Hiroyuki; Ueki, Yuji

    2016-02-01

    A fibrous cesium (Cs) adsorbent was developed using radiation-induced graft polymerization with a cross-linked structure containing a highly stable adsorption ligand. The ligand, ammonium 12-molybdophosphate (AMP), was successfully introduced onto the fibrous polyethylene trunk material. The resulting Cs adsorbent contained 36% nonwoven fabric polyethylene (NFPE), 1% AMP, 2% triallyl isocyanurate (TAIC) and 61% glycidyl methacrylate (GMA). The adsorbent's Cs adsorption capacity was evaluated using batch and column tests. It was determined that the adsorbent could be used in a wide pH range. The amount of desorbed molybdenum, which can be used as an estimate for AMP stability on the Cs adsorbent, was minimized at the standard drinking water pH range of 5.8-8.6. Based from the inspection on the adherence of these results to the requirements set forth by the Food Sanitation Act by a third party organization, it can be concluded that the developed Cs adsorbent can be safely utilized for drinking water.

  8. Control of acid gases using a fluidized bed adsorber.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Bo-Chin; Wey, Ming-Yen; Yeh, Chia-Lin

    2003-08-01

    During incineration, secondary pollutants such as acid gases, organic compounds, heavy metals and particulates are generated. Among these pollutants, the acid gases, including sulfur oxides (SO(x)) and hydrogen chloride (HCl), can cause corrosion of the incinerator piping and can generate acid rain after being emitted to the atmosphere. To address this problem, the present study used a novel combination of air pollution control devices (APCDs), composed of a fluidized bed adsorber integrated with a fabric filter. The major objective of the work is to demonstrate the performance of a fluidized bed adsorber for removal of acid gases from flue gas of an incinerator. The adsorbents added in the fluidized bed adsorber were mainly granular activated carbon (AC; with or without chemical treatment) and with calcium oxide used as an additive. The advantages of a fluidized bed reactor for high mass transfer and high gas-solid contact can enhance the removal of acid gases when using a dry method. On the other hand, because the fluidized bed can filter particles, fine particles prior to and after passing through the fluidized bed adsorber were investigated. The competing adsorption on activated carbon between different characteristics of pollutants was also given preliminary discussion. The results indicate that the removal efficiencies of the investigated acid gases, SO(2) and HCl, are higher than 94 and 87%, respectively. Thus, a fluidized bed adsorber integrated with a fabric filter has the potential to replace conventional APCDs, even when there are other pollutants at the same time. PMID:12935758

  9. Experimental and theoretical optical properties of methylammonium lead halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leguy, Aurélien M. A.; Azarhoosh, Pooya; Alonso, M. Isabel; Campoy-Quiles, Mariano; Weber, Oliver J.; Yao, Jizhong; Bryant, Daniel; Weller, Mark T.; Nelson, Jenny; Walsh, Aron; van Schilfgaarde, Mark; Barnes, Piers R. F.

    2016-03-01

    The optical constants of methylammonium lead halide single crystals CH3NH3PbX3 (X = I, Br, Cl) are interpreted with high level ab initio calculations using the relativistic quasiparticle self-consistent GW approximation (QSGW). Good agreement between the optical constants derived from QSGW and those obtained from spectroscopic ellipsometry enables the assignment of the spectral features to their respective inter-band transitions. We show that the transition from the highest valence band (VB) to the lowest conduction band (CB) is responsible for almost all the optical response of MAPbI3 between 1.2 and 5.5 eV (with minor contributions from the second highest VB and the second lowest CB). The calculations indicate that the orientation of [CH3NH3]+ cations has a significant influence on the position of the bandgap suggesting that collective orientation of the organic moieties could result in significant local variations of the optical properties. The optical constants and energy band diagram of CH3NH3PbI3 are then used to simulate the contributions from different optical transitions to a typical transient absorption spectrum (TAS).The optical constants of methylammonium lead halide single crystals CH3NH3PbX3 (X = I, Br, Cl) are interpreted with high level ab initio calculations using the relativistic quasiparticle self-consistent GW approximation (QSGW). Good agreement between the optical constants derived from QSGW and those obtained from spectroscopic ellipsometry enables the assignment of the spectral features to their respective inter-band transitions. We show that the transition from the highest valence band (VB) to the lowest conduction band (CB) is responsible for almost all the optical response of MAPbI3 between 1.2 and 5.5 eV (with minor contributions from the second highest VB and the second lowest CB). The calculations indicate that the orientation of [CH3NH3]+ cations has a significant influence on the position of the bandgap suggesting that collective

  10. Conformational changes of adsorbed proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Scott

    2005-03-01

    The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and pepsin to gold surfaces has been studied using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Proteins are adsorbed from solution onto a gold surface and changes in the conformation of the adsorbed proteins are induced by changing the buffer solution. We selected pH and ionic strength values for the buffer solutions that are known from our circular dichroism measurements to cause conformational changes of the proteins in bulk solution. We find that for both BSA and pepsin the changes in conformation are impeded by the interaction of the protein with the gold surface.

  11. Passive particle dosimetry. [silver halide crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, C. B.

    1977-01-01

    Present methods of dosimetry are reviewed with emphasis on the processes using silver chloride crystals for ionizing particle dosimetry. Differences between the ability of various crystals to record ionizing particle paths are directly related to impurities in the range of a few ppm (parts per million). To understand the roles of these impurities in the process, a method for consistent production of high purity silver chloride, and silver bromide was developed which yields silver halides with detectable impurity content less than 1 ppm. This high purity silver chloride was used in growing crystals with controlled doping. Crystals were grown by both the Czochalski method and the Bridgman method, and the Bridgman grown crystals were used for the experiments discussed. The distribution coefficients of ten divalent cations were determined for the Bridgman crystals. The best dosimeters were made with silver chloride crystals containing 5 to 10 ppm of lead; other impurities tested did not produce proper dosimeters.

  12. Metal halide perovskites for energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Eperon, Giles E.; Snaith, Henry J.

    2016-06-01

    Exploring prospective materials for energy production and storage is one of the biggest challenges of this century. Solar energy is one of the most important renewable energy resources, due to its wide availability and low environmental impact. Metal halide perovskites have emerged as a class of semiconductor materials with unique properties, including tunable bandgap, high absorption coefficient, broad absorption spectrum, high charge carrier mobility and long charge diffusion lengths, which enable a broad range of photovoltaic and optoelectronic applications. Since the first embodiment of perovskite solar cells showing a power conversion efficiency of 3.8%, the device performance has been boosted up to a certified 22.1% within a few years. In this Perspective, we discuss differing forms of perovskite materials produced via various deposition procedures. We focus on their energy-related applications and discuss current challenges and possible solutions, with the aim of stimulating potential new applications.

  13. Electronic and Ionic Transport Dynamics in Organolead Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Li, Dehui; Wu, Hao; Cheng, Hung-Chieh; Wang, Gongming; Huang, Yu; Duan, Xiangfeng

    2016-07-26

    Ion migration has been postulated as the underlying mechanism responsible for the hysteresis in organolead halide perovskite devices. However, the electronic and ionic transport dynamics and how they impact each other in organolead halide perovskites remain elusive to date. Here we report a systematic investigation of the electronic and ionic transport dynamics in organolead halide perovskite microplate crystals and thin films using temperature-dependent transient response measurements. Our study reveals that thermally activated ionic and electronic conduction coexist in perovskite devices. The extracted activation energies suggest that the electronic transport is easier, but ions migrate harder in microplates than in thin films, demonstrating that the crystalline quality and grain boundaries can fundamentally modify electronic and ionic transport in perovskites. These findings offer valuable insight on the electronic and ionic transport dynamics in organolead halide perovskites, which is critical for optimizing perovskite devices with reduced hysteresis and improved stability and efficiency. PMID:27315525

  14. Adsorption of organic matter at mineral/water interfaces: I. ATR-FTIR spectroscopic and quantum chemical study of oxalate adsorbed at boehmite/water and corundum/water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Tae Hyun; Johnson, Stephen B.; Musgrave, Charles B.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2004-11-01

    The types and structures of adsorption complexes formed by oxalate at boehmite (γ-AlOOH)/water and corundum (α-Al 2O 3)/water interfaces were determined using in situ attenuated total reflectance fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and quantum chemical simulation methods. At pH 5.1, at least four different oxalate species were found at or near the boehmite/water interface for oxalate surface coverages (Γ ox) ranging from 0.25 to 16.44 μmol/m 2. At relatively low coverages (Γ ox < 2.47), strongly adsorbed inner-sphere oxalate species (IR peaks at 1286, 1418, 1700, and 1720 cm -1) replace weakly adsorbed carbonate species, and a small proportion of oxalate anions are adsorbed in an outer-sphere mode (IR peaks at 1314 and 1591 cm -1). IR peaks indicative of inner-sphere adsorbed oxalate are also observed for oxalate at the corundum/water interface at Γ ox = 1.4 μmol/m 2. With increasing oxalate concentration (Γ ox > 2.47 μmol/m 2), the boehmite surface binding sites for inner-sphere adsorbed oxalate become saturated, and excess oxalate ions are present dominantly as aqueous species (IR peaks at 1309 and 1571 cm -1). In addition to these adsorption processes, oxalate-promoted dissolution of boehmite following inner-sphere oxalate adsorption becomes increasingly pronounced with increasing Γ ox and results in an aqueous Al(III)-oxalate species, as indicated by shifted IR peaks (1286 → 1297 cm -1 and 1418 → 1408 cm -1). At pH 2.5, no outer-sphere adsorbed oxalate or aqueous oxalate species were observed. The similarity of adsorbed oxalate spectral features at pH 2.5 and 5.1 implies that the adsorption mechanism of aqueous HOx - species involves loss of protons from this species during the ligand-exchange reaction. As a consequence, adsorbed inner-sphere oxalate and aqueous Al(III)-oxalate complexes formed at pH 2.5 have coordination geometries very similar to those formed at pH 5.1. The coordination geometry of inner-sphere adsorbed oxalate

  15. Relation between the electroforming voltage in alkali halide-polymer diodes and the bandgap of the alkali halide

    SciTech Connect

    Bory, Benjamin F.; Wang, Jingxin; Janssen, René A. J.; Meskers, Stefan C. J.; Gomes, Henrique L.; De Leeuw, Dago M.

    2014-12-08

    Electroforming of indium-tin-oxide/alkali halide/poly(spirofluorene)/Ba/Al diodes has been investigated by bias dependent reflectivity measurements. The threshold voltages for electrocoloration and electroforming are independent of layer thickness and correlate with the bandgap of the alkali halide. We argue that the origin is voltage induced defect formation. Frenkel defect pairs are formed by electron–hole recombination in the alkali halide. This self-accelerating process mitigates injection barriers. The dynamic junction formation is compared to that of a light emitting electrochemical cell. A critical defect density for electroforming is 10{sup 25}/m{sup 3}. The electroformed alkali halide layer can be considered as a highly doped semiconductor with metallic transport characteristics.

  16. Adsorbent Alkali Conditioning for Uranium Adsorption from Seawater. Adsorbent Performance and Technology Cost Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsouris, Costas; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Christopher James; Dai, Sheng; Das, S.; Liao, W. -P.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana; Gill, Gary; Byers, Maggie Flicker; Schneider, Eric

    2015-09-30

    natural seawater. Uptake of other metal ions such as V, Fe, and Cu follows the same trend as that of uranium. Also, the uptake of Ca, Mg, and Zn ions increased with increasing KOH conditioning time, probably due to formation of more carboxylates, which leads to conversion of uranium-selective binding sites to less selective sites. In the second part of the study, inorganic based reagents such as sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sodium carbonate (Na2CO3), cesium hydroxide (CsOH), as well as organic based reagents such as ammonium hydroxide (AOH), tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAOH), tetraethylammonium hydroxide (TEAOH), triethylmethylammonium hydroxide (TEMAOH), tetrapropylammonium hydroxide (TPAOH) and tetrabutylammonium hydroxide (TBAOH), in addition to KOH, were used for alkaline conditioning. NaOH has emerged as a better reagent for alkaline conditioning of amidoxime-based adsorbent because of higher uranium uptake capacity, higher uranium uptake selectivity ...

  17. Experimental and theoretical optical properties of methylammonium lead halide perovskites.

    PubMed

    Leguy, Aurélien M A; Azarhoosh, Pooya; Alonso, M Isabel; Campoy-Quiles, Mariano; Weber, Oliver J; Yao, Jizhong; Bryant, Daniel; Weller, Mark T; Nelson, Jenny; Walsh, Aron; van Schilfgaarde, Mark; Barnes, Piers R F

    2016-03-17

    The optical constants of methylammonium lead halide single crystals CH3NH3PbX3 (X = I, Br, Cl) are interpreted with high level ab initio calculations using the relativistic quasiparticle self-consistent GW approximation (QSGW). Good agreement between the optical constants derived from QSGW and those obtained from spectroscopic ellipsometry enables the assignment of the spectral features to their respective inter-band transitions. We show that the transition from the highest valence band (VB) to the lowest conduction band (CB) is responsible for almost all the optical response of MAPbI3 between 1.2 and 5.5 eV (with minor contributions from the second highest VB and the second lowest CB). The calculations indicate that the orientation of [CH3NH3](+) cations has a significant influence on the position of the bandgap suggesting that collective orientation of the organic moieties could result in significant local variations of the optical properties. The optical constants and energy band diagram of CH3NH3PbI3 are then used to simulate the contributions from different optical transitions to a typical transient absorption spectrum (TAS). PMID:26477295

  18. Tallgrass Prairie as a Source and Sink of Methyl Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, T.; Rhew, R. C.; Mazeas, O.; Atwood, A.; King, A. J.; Ma, L.; Whelan, M.

    2007-12-01

    Temperate grasslands are believed to be a globally significant sink for methyl bromide (CH3Br) and perhaps methyl chloride (CH3Cl), compounds which lead to stratospheric ozone destruction. Fluxes of these compounds were measured at Konza Prairie, a tallgrass prairie in the Flint Hills of Kansas, during June 2006 and August 2007. A stable isotope tracer technique was used to distinguish between simultaneous production and oxidation processes, allowing the first gross flux measurements of CH3Cl and CH3Br from a tallgrass prairie. Observed gross uptake rates of CH3Cl and CH3Br were similar to what we previously observed from the shortgrass steppe in Colorado and annual grasslands in California, but much lower than reported fluxes from a grassland in northeastern North America. A water manipulation experiment was performed both under controlled laboratory conditions, as well as in the field, demonstrating that uptake rates of both CH3Cl and CH3Br were strongly affected by soil moisture. On the production side, new sources of methyl halides were identified in association with certain plant species. Fluxes of these halogenated trace gases were compared to environmental variables, such as air temperature and volumetric water content. Net fluxes of methyl iodide (CH3I), carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), and other halogenated volatile organic compounds (HVOCs), were also measured.

  19. Emission Enhancement and Intermittency in Polycrystalline Organolead Halide Perovskite Films.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng; Zhong, Yu; Luna, Carlos Andres Melo; Unger, Thomas; Deichsel, Konstantin; Gräser, Anna; Köhler, Jürgen; Köhler, Anna; Hildner, Richard; Huettner, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic-organic halide organometal perovskites have demonstrated very promising performance for opto-electronic applications, such as solar cells, light-emitting diodes, lasers, single-photon sources, etc. However, the little knowledge on the underlying photophysics, especially on a microscopic scale, hampers the further improvement of devices based on this material. In this communication, correlated conventional photoluminescence (PL) characterization and wide-field PL imaging as a function of time are employed to investigate the spatially- and temporally-resolved PL in CH₃NH₃PbI3-xClx perovskite films. Along with a continuous increase of the PL intensity during light soaking, we also observe PL blinking or PL intermittency behavior in individual grains of these films. Combined with significant suppression of PL blinking in perovskite films coated with a phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) layer, it suggests that this PL intermittency is attributed to Auger recombination induced by photoionized defects/traps or mobile ions within grains. These defects/traps are detrimental for light conversion and can be effectively passivated by the PCBM layer. This finding paves the way to provide a guideline on the further improvement of perovskite opto-electronic devices. PMID:27548128

  20. Density functional studies on hydrogen-bonded clusters of hydrogen halides and the interaction on halide anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirmala, V.; Kolandaivel, P.

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been performed to study the structures and stability of X-·(HX)n=2-5 clusters where X = F, Cl, Br at B3LYP/6-311++G** level of theory. The presence of halide ions in these clusters disintegrates the hydrogen halide clusters. All the hydrogen halides are then hydrogen bonded to the centrally placed halide ions, thereby forming multiple hydrogen bonds. The interaction energies have been corrected for the basis set superposition error (BSSE) using Boy's counterpoise correction method. Evidence for the destruction of hydrogen bonds in hydrogen halide clusters due to the presence of halide ions is further obtained from topological analysis and natural bond orbital analysis. The chemical hardness and chemical potential have been calculated for all the anion clusters. The above analysis reveals that hydrogen bonding in these systems is not an essentially electrostatic interaction. The nature of the stabilization interactions operative in these multiple hydrogen-bonded clusters has been explained in terms of many-body contribution to interaction energies. From these studies, an attempt has been made to understand the nature of the molecular properties resulting from different electronegativities of the halogens.

  1. Metallaphotoredox-catalysed sp(3)-sp(3) cross-coupling of carboxylic acids with alkyl halides.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Craig P; Smith, Russell T; Allmendinger, Simon; MacMillan, David W C

    2016-08-18

    In the past 50 years, cross-coupling reactions mediated by transition metals have changed the way in which complex organic molecules are synthesized. The predictable and chemoselective nature of these transformations has led to their widespread adoption across many areas of chemical research. However, the construction of a bond between two sp(3)-hybridized carbon atoms, a fundamental unit of organic chemistry, remains an important yet elusive objective for engineering cross-coupling reactions. In comparison to related procedures with sp(2)-hybridized species, the development of methods for sp(3)-sp(3) bond formation via transition metal catalysis has been hampered historically by deleterious side-reactions, such as β-hydride elimination with palladium catalysis or the reluctance of alkyl halides to undergo oxidative addition. To address this issue, nickel-catalysed cross-coupling processes can be used to form sp(3)-sp(3) bonds that utilize organometallic nucleophiles and alkyl electrophiles. In particular, the coupling of alkyl halides with pre-generated organozinc, Grignard and organoborane species has been used to furnish diverse molecular structures. However, the manipulations required to produce these activated structures is inefficient, leading to poor step- and atom-economies. Moreover, the operational difficulties associated with making and using these reactive coupling partners, and preserving them through a synthetic sequence, has hindered their widespread adoption. A generically useful sp(3)-sp(3) coupling technology that uses bench-stable, native organic functional groups, without the need for pre-functionalization or substrate derivatization, would therefore be valuable. Here we demonstrate that the synergistic merger of photoredox and nickel catalysis enables the direct formation of sp(3)-sp(3) bonds using only simple carboxylic acids and alkyl halides as the nucleophilic and electrophilic coupling partners, respectively. This metallaphotoredox

  2. Synthesis of 4-vinylpyridine-divinylbenzene copolymer adsorbents for microwave-assisted desorption of benzene.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qing Bo; Yang, Go-Su; Lee, Youn-Sik

    2012-02-29

    Reports on the development of polymer adsorbents for microwave-assisted desorption of nonpolar volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are rare. In this study, we synthesized macroporous polymeric adsorbents with hydrophilic methyl pyridinium units for microwave-assisted desorption of nonpolar VOCs. The benzene adsorption and desorption properties of the adsorbents were investigated under both dry and humid conditions. Under humid conditions, as the content of the hydrophilic methyl pyridinium units in the adsorbents increased from 0 to 20%, the adsorption capacity of benzene decreased from about 21 to 7 mg/g, while the desorption efficiency of benzene increased significantly from 48 to 87%. The maximum concentration of desorbate also increased significantly as the content of the hydrophilic units was increased under humid conditions. We attributed the enhanced desorption efficiency mainly to more adsorbed moisture, which indirectly allowed heating of the polymer adsorbents to higher temperatures upon irradiation with 600 W microwaves. PMID:22236950

  3. Palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions of aryl boronic acids with aryl halides in water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaoyan; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Hu, Zhizhi; Wang, Yue; Lei, Peng; Chi, Haijun

    2009-01-01

    An efficient Suzuki cross-coupling reaction using a variety of aryl halides in neat water was developed. The Pd-catalyzed reaction between aryl bromides or chlorides and phenyl boronic acids was compatible with various functional groups and affords biphenyls in good to excellent yields without requirement of organic cosolvents. The air stability and solubility in water of the palladium-phosphinous acid complexes were considered to facilitate operation of the coupling reaction and product isolation. The reaction conditions including Pd catalyst selection, temperature, base and catalyst recoverability were also investigated. PMID:25084408

  4. Organic chemistry: No double bond left behind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarlah, David

    2016-03-01

    Alkenyl halides are some of the most useful building blocks for synthesizing small organic molecules. A catalyst has now allowed their direct preparation from widely available alkenes using the cross-metathesis reaction. See Article p.459

  5. Supercritical fluid regeneration of adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defilippi, R. P.; Robey, R. J.

    1983-05-01

    The results of a program to perform studies supercritical (fluid) carbon dioxide (SCF CO2) regeneration of adsorbents, using samples of industrial wastewaters from manufacturing pesticides and synthetic solution, and to estimate the economics of the specific wastewater treatment regenerations, based on test data are given. Processing costs for regenerating granular activated carbon GAC) for treating industrial wastewaters depend on stream properties and regeneration throughput.

  6. Chloro-Organics in Papermill Effluent: Identification and Removal by Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd. Rahman, Rakmi; Zahrim, A. Y.; Abu Bakar, Azizah

    Effluents from paper mills are among major sources of aquatic pollution and may be toxic since they contain chlorinated phenolic compounds which are measured as adsorbable organic halides (AOX). In this work, removal of chlorophenol was investigated using a Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor (SBBR) with Granular Activated Carbon (GAC) as a growth media. Wastewater for this study was obtained from treated effluent outlet of a papermill in Selangor. Treatment of the papermill secondary effluent shows that SBBR process, with a combination of adsorption and biodegradation, gave a good removal of pentachlorophenol (PCP), on average, about 70%. The growth kinetic parameters obtained were: YH = 0.6504 mg biomass/mg PCP, dH = 6.50x10-5 h-1, μh = 0.00315 h-1 and Ks = 5.82 mg PCP L-1. These show that the SBBR system is suitable to be operated at long SRTs.

  7. Adsorption of hydrated halide ions on charged electrodes: Molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glosli, James N.; Philpott, Michael R.

    1993-04-01

    Constant temperature molecular dynamics has been used to simulate the adsorption of hydrated halide ion X(-) = F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), and I(-), and lithium ion Li(+) on a flat uniformly charged surfaces. The simulations were done with either 214 water molecules and two ions (Li(+) and X(-)) in a box 2.362 nm deep or with 430 water molecules and the two ions in a box 4.320 nm deep. The boxes were periodically replicated in the xy directions. The magnitude of the surface charge on the box end was + or - 0.11 c/nm(sup 2), corresponding to an electric field of 2 x 10(exp 7) V/cm. The lateral dimensions of the simulation cell were 1.862 nm x 1.862 nm (x times y) in each case. All of the water molecules and ions interacted with the end walls via a weak 9 - 3 potential. The ST2 water model and parameters optimized for alkali halides interacting with the model ST2 water molecule were used in the calculations. Common practices of truncating the interactions at a finite distance (0.82 nm) and switching off Coulomb interactions at small distances were followed. The temperature was set at T = 2.411 kJ/mole (290 K). Some of the properties calculated were: distribution density profiles for ions and water across the gap important for comparisons iwth Gouy-Chapman theory, adsorbed ion-water pair correlation functions, the number of water molecules in the first and second hydration shells of the ions as a function of time. The time spent by a water molecule in the hydration shell was calculated to be approximately ten times longer for lithium than any other ion. The correlation between distance from the electrode and hydration number was studied and generally found to be pronounced for the larger anions.

  8. Ozonation of isoproturon adsorbed on silica particles under atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pflieger, Maryline; Grgić, Irena; Kitanovski, Zoran

    2012-12-01

    The results on heterogeneous ozonation of a phenylurea pesticide, isoproturon, under atmospheric conditions are presented for the first time in the present study. The study was carried out using an experimental device previously adopted and validated for the heterogeneous reactivity of organics toward ozone (Pflieger et al., 2011). Isoproturon was adsorbed on silica particles via a liquid-to-solid equilibrium with a load far below a monolayer (0.02% by weight/surface coverage of 0.5%). The rate constants were estimated by measuring the consumption of the organic (dark, T = 26 °C, RH < 1%). The experimental data were fitted by both the modified Langmuir-Hinshelwood and the Eley-Rideal patterns, resulting in atmospheric lifetimes of heterogeneous ozonation of 4 and 6 days, respectively (for 40 ppb of O3). Parameters, such as the number and the quantity of pesticides adsorbed on the solid support, which can significantly influence the heterogeneous kinetics, were investigated as well. The results obtained suggest that the organic compound is adsorbed in multilayer aggregates on the aerosol even though submonolayer coverage is assumed. The presence of a second herbicide, trifluralin, together with isoproturon on the aerosol surface does not affect the kinetics of ozonation, indicating that both compounds are adsorbed on different surface sites of silica particles.

  9. Color silver halide hologram production and mastering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjelkhagen, Hans I.; Huang, Qiang

    1997-04-01

    Color reflection holograms recorded with the Denisyuk geometry have been demonstrated by the recently formed HOLOS Corporation in New Hampshire. The Slavich red-green-blue (RGB) sensitized ultra-high resolution silver halide emulsion was used for the hologram recording. The employed laser wavelengths were 647 nm, 532 nm, and 476 nm, generated by an argon ion, a frequency doubled Nd:YAG, and a krypton ion laser, respectively. A beam combination mechanism with dichroic filters enabled a simultaneous RGB exposure, which made the color balance and overall exposure energy easy to control as well as simplifying the recording procedure. HOLOS has been producing limited edition color holograms in various sizes from 4' X 5' to 12' X 16'. A 30 foot long optical table and high power lasers will enable HOLOS to record color holograms up to the size of one meter square in the near future. Various approaches have been investigated in generating color hologram masters which have sufficiently high diffraction efficiency to contact copy the color images onto photopolymer materials. A specially designed test object including the 1931 CIE chromaticity diagram, a rainbow ribbon cable, pure yellow dots, and a cloisonne elephant was used for color recording experiments. In addition, the Macbeth Color Checker chart was used. Both colorimetric evaluation and scattering noise measurements were performed using the PR-650 Photo Research SpectraScan SpectraCalorimeter.

  10. Ab initio modeling of the optical properties in organometallic halide perovskites for photovoltaic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neukirch, Amanda; Nei, Wanyi; Pedesseau, Laurent; Even, Jacky; Katan, Claudine; Mohite, Aditya; Tretiak, Segrei

    2015-03-01

    The need for an inexpensive, clean, and plentiful source of energy has generated large amounts of research in an assortment of solution processed organic and hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells. A relative newcomer to the field of solution processed photovoltaics is the lead halide perovskite solar cell. In the past 5 years, the efficiencies of devices made from this material have increased from 3.5% to nearly 20%. Despite the rapid development of organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells, a thorough understanding of the fundamental photophysical processes driving the high performance of these devices is not well understood. I am using state-of-the-art ab initio computational techniques in order to characterize the properties at the interface of perovskite devices in order to aide in materials design and device engineering. I will present an in-depth analysis of the electronic and optical properties of bulk and surface states of pure and mixed halide systems. The high-level static quantum mechanical calculations, including spin-orbit-coupling and the many body GW approach, identify the key electronic states involved in photoinduced dynamics. This knowledge provides important information on how the optical properties change with variations to the system. Supported by the DOE, the LANL LDRD program XW11, and CNLS.

  11. Highly Tunable Colloidal Perovskite Nanoplatelets through Variable Cation, Metal, and Halide Composition.

    PubMed

    Weidman, Mark C; Seitz, Michael; Stranks, Samuel D; Tisdale, William A

    2016-08-23

    Colloidal perovskite nanoplatelets are a promising class of semiconductor nanomaterials-exhibiting bright luminescence, tunable and spectrally narrow absorption and emission features, strongly confined excitonic states, and facile colloidal synthesis. Here, we demonstrate the high degree of spectral tunability achievable through variation of the cation, metal, and halide composition as well as nanoplatelet thickness. We synthesize nanoplatelets of the form L2[ABX3]n-1BX4, where L is an organic ligand (octylammonium, butylammonium), A is a monovalent metal or organic molecular cation (cesium, methylammonium, formamidinium), B is a divalent metal cation (lead, tin), X is a halide anion (chloride, bromide, iodide), and n-1 is the number of unit cells in thickness. We show that variation of n, B, and X leads to large changes in the absorption and emission energy, while variation of the A cation leads to only subtle changes but can significantly impact the nanoplatelet stability and photoluminescence quantum yield (with values over 20%). Furthermore, mixed halide nanoplatelets exhibit continuous spectral tunability over a 1.5 eV spectral range, from 2.2 to 3.7 eV. The nanoplatelets have relatively large lateral dimensions (100 nm to 1 μm), which promote self-assembly into stacked superlattice structures-the periodicity of which can be adjusted based on the nanoplatelet surface ligand length. These results demonstrate the versatility of colloidal perovskite nanoplatelets as a material platform, with tunability extending from the deep-UV, across the visible, into the near-IR. In particular, the tin-containing nanoplatelets represent a significant addition to the small but increasingly important family of lead- and cadmium-free colloidal semiconductors. PMID:27471862

  12. Method And Apparatus For Regenerating Nox Adsorbers

    DOEpatents

    Driscoll, J. Joshua; Endicott, Dennis L.; Faulkner, Stephen A.; Verkiel, Maarten

    2006-03-28

    Methods and apparatuses for regenerating a NOx adsorber coupled with an exhaust of an engine. An actuator drives a throttle valve to a first position when regeneration of the NOx adsorber is desired. The first position is a position that causes the regeneration of the NOx adsorber. An actuator drives the throttle valve to a second position while regeneration of the NOx adsorber is still desired. The second position being a position that is more open than the first position and operable to regenerate a NOx adsorber.

  13. Laser cooling of organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ha, Son-Tung; Shen, Chao; Zhang, Jun; Xiong, Qihua

    2016-02-01

    Optical irradiation with suitable energy can cool solids, a phenomenon known as optical refrigeration, first proposed in 1929 and experimentally achieved in ytterbium-doped glasses in 1995. Since then, considerable progress has been made in various rare earth element-doped materials, with a recent record of cooling to 91 K directly from ambient temperatures. For practical use and to suit future applications of optical refrigeration, the discovery of materials with facile and scalable synthesis and high cooling power density will be required. Herein we present the realization of a net cooling of 23.0 K in micrometre-thick 3D CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3) and 58.7 K in exfoliated 2D (C6H5C2H4NH3)2PbI4 (PhEPbI4) perovskite crystals directly from room temperature. We found that the perovskite crystals exhibit strong photoluminescence upconversion and near unity external quantum efficiency, properties that are responsible for the realization of net laser cooling. Our findings indicate that solution-processed perovskite thin films may be a highly suitable candidate for constructing integrated optical cooler devices.

  14. Vitrification of IFR and MSBR halide salt reprocessing wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Siemer, D.D.

    2013-07-01

    Both of the genuinely sustainable (breeder) nuclear fuel cycles (IFR - Integral Fast Reactor - and MSBR - Molten Salt Breeder Reactor -) studied by the USA's national laboratories would generate high level reprocessing waste (HLRW) streams consisting of a relatively small amount ( about 4 mole %) of fission product halide (chloride or fluoride) salts in a matrix comprised primarily (about 95 mole %) of non radioactive alkali metal halide salts. Because leach resistant glasses cannot accommodate much of any of the halides, most of the treatment scenarios previously envisioned for such HLRW have assumed a monolithic waste form comprised of a synthetic analog of an insoluble crystalline halide mineral. In practice, this translates to making a 'substituted' sodalite ('Ceramic Waste Form') of the IFR's chloride salt-based wastes and fluoroapatite of the MSBR's fluoride salt-based wastes. This paper discusses my experimental studies of an alternative waste management scenario for both fuel cycles that would separate/recycle the waste's halide and immobilize everything else in iron phosphate (Fe-P) glass. It will describe both how the work was done and what its results indicate about how a treatment process for both of those wastes should be implemented (fluoride and chloride behave differently). In either case, this scenario's primary advantages include much higher waste loadings, much lower overall cost, and the generation of a product (glass) that is more consistent with current waste management practices. (author)

  15. Genetic Control of Methyl Halide Production in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhew, R. C.; Ostergaard, L.; Saltzman, E. S.; Yanofsky, M. F.

    2003-12-01

    Methyl chloride and methyl bromide are the primary carriers of natural chlorine and bromine to the stratosphere where they catalyze the destruction of ozone, whereas methyl iodide influences aerosol formation and ozone loss in the troposphere. Methyl bromide is also an agricultural fumigant whose use is scheduled to be phased out by international agreement. Despite the economic and environmental importance of these methyl halides, their natural sources and biological production mechanisms are poorly understood. Currently identified sources include oceans, biomass burning, industrial and agricultural use, fuel combustion, salt marshes, wetlands, rice paddies, certain terrestrial plants and fungi, and abiotic processes. We demonstrate that the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana produces and emits methyl halides and that the enzyme primarily responsible for the production is encoded by the HARMLESS TO OZONE LAYER (HOL) gene located on chromosome II. In mutant plants that have a disruption of the HOL gene, methyl halide production is largely eliminated. A phylogenetic analysis using the HOL gene suggests that the ability to produce methyl halides is widespread among vascular plants. This approach provides a genetic basis for understanding and predicting patterns of methyl halide production by plants.

  16. Halide Perovskites: Poor Man's High-Performance Semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2016-07-01

    Halide perovskites are a rapidly developing class of medium-bandgap semiconductors which, to date, have been popularized on account of their remarkable success in solid-state heterojunction solar cells raising the photovoltaic efficiency to 20% within the last 5 years. As the physical properties of the materials are being explored, it is becoming apparent that the photovoltaic performance of the halide perovskites is just but one aspect of the wealth of opportunities that these compounds offer as high-performance semiconductors. From unique optical and electrical properties stemming from their characteristic electronic structure to highly efficient real-life technological applications, halide perovskites constitute a brand new class of materials with exotic properties awaiting discovery. The nature of halide perovskites from the materials' viewpoint is discussed here, enlisting the most important classes of the compounds and describing their most exciting properties. The topics covered focus on the optical and electrical properties highlighting some of the milestone achievements reported to date but also addressing controversies in the vastly expanding halide perovskite literature. PMID:27174223

  17. Two Dimensional Organometal Halide Perovskite Nanorods with Tunable Optical Properties.

    PubMed

    Aharon, Sigalit; Etgar, Lioz

    2016-05-11

    Organo-metal halide perovskite is an efficient light harvester in photovoltaic solar cells. Organometal halide perovskite is used mainly in its "bulk" form in the solar cell. Confined perovskite nanostructures could be a promising candidate for efficient optoelectronic devices, taking advantage of the superior bulk properties of organo-metal halide perovskite, as well as the nanoscale properties. In this paper, we present facile low-temperature synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) lead halide perovskite nanorods (NRs). These NRs show a shift to higher energies in the absorbance and in the photoluminescence compared to the bulk material, which supports their 2D structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of the NRs demonstrates their 2D nature combined with the tetragonal 3D perovskite structure. In addition, by alternating the halide composition, we were able to tune the optical properties of the NRs. Fast Fourier transform, and electron diffraction show the tetragonal structure of these NRs. By varying the ligands ratio (e.g., octylammonium to oleic acid) in the synthesis, we were able to provide the formation mechanism of these novel 2D perovskite NRs. The 2D perovskite NRs are promising candidates for a variety of optoelectronic applications, such as light-emitting diodes, lasing, solar cells, and sensors. PMID:27089497

  18. Process for oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOEpatents

    Lyke, Stephen E.

    1992-01-01

    An improved process for generating an elemental halogen selected from chlorine, bromine or iodine, from a corresponding hydrogen halide by absorbing a molten salt mixture, which includes sulfur, alkali metals and oxygen with a sulfur to metal molar ratio between 0.9 and 1.1 and includes a dissolved oxygen compound capable of reacting with hydrogen halide to produce elemental halogen, into a porous, relatively inert substrate to produce a substrate-supported salt mixture. Thereafter, the substrate-supported salt mixture is contacted (stage 1) with a hydrogen halide while maintaining the substrate-supported salt mixture during the contacting at an elevated temperature sufficient to sustain a reaction between the oxygen compound and the hydrogen halide to produce a gaseous elemental halogen product. This is followed by purging the substrate-supported salt mixture with steam (stage 2) thereby recovering any unreacted hydrogen halide and additional elemental halogen for recycle to stage 1. The dissolved oxygen compound is regenerated in a high temperature (stage 3) and an optical intermediate temperature stage (stage 4) by contacting the substrate-supported salt mixture with a gas containing oxygen whereby the dissolved oxygen compound in the substrate-supported salt mixture is regenerated by being oxidized to a higher valence state.

  19. Regeneration of zinc halide catalyst used in the hydrocracking of polynuclear hydrocarbons

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Everett

    1978-01-01

    Improved recovery of spent molten zinc halide hydro-cracking catalyst is achieved in the oxidative vapor phase regeneration thereof by selective treatment of the zinc oxide carried over by the effluent vapors from the regeneration zone with hydrogen halide gas under conditions favoring the reaction of the zinc oxide with the hydrogen halide, whereby regenerated zinc halide is recovered in a solids-free state with little loss of zinc values.

  20. Rare-earth tri-halides methanol-adduct single-crystal scintillators for gamma ray and neutron detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boatner, L. A.; Wisniewski, D. J.; Neal, J. S.; Bell, Z. W.; Ramey, J. O.; Kolopus, J. A.; Chakoumakos, B. C.; Custelcean, R.; Wisniewska, M.; Pena, K. E.

    2009-08-01

    Cerium activated rare-earth tri- halides represent a well-known family of high performance inorganic rare-earth scintillators - including the high-light-yield, high-energy-resolution scintillator, cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide. These hygroscopic inorganic rare-earth halides are currently grown as single crystals from the melt - either by the Bridgman or Czochralski techniques - slow and expensive processes that are frequently characterized by severe cracking of the material due to anisotropic thermal stresses and cleavage effects. We have recently discovered a new family of cerium-activated rare-earth metal organic scintillators consisting of tri-halide methanol adducts of cerium and lanthanum - namely CeCl3(CH3OH)4 and LaBr3(CH3OH)4:Ce. These methanol-adduct scintillator materials can be grown near room temperature from a methanol solution, and their high solubility is consistent with the application of the rapid solution growth methods that are currently used to grow very large single crystals of potassium dihydrogen phosphate. The structures of these new rare-earth metal-organic scintillating compounds were determined by single crystal x-ray refinements, and their scintillation response to both gamma rays and neutrons, as presented here, was characterized using different excitation sources. Tri-halide methanol-adduct crystals activated with trivalent cerium apparently represent the initial example of a solution-grown rare-earth metal-organic molecular scintillator that is applicable to gamma ray, x-ray, and fast neutron detection.

  1. High Biomass Specific Methyl Halide Production Rates of Selected Coastal Marsh Plants and its Relationship to Halide Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manley, S. L.; Wang, N.; Cicerone, R. J.

    2002-12-01

    Salt tolerant coastal marsh plants (halophytes) have previously been shown to be globally significant producers of methyl chloride (MeCl) and methyl bromide (MeBr). While halophytes are known for their high salt content, there are few reports of their halide content. Our studies have attempted to quantify biomass specific methyl halide (MeX) production from these plants and relate it to tissue halide levels. MeCl, MeBr and MeI production rates and tissue chloride, bromide and iodide concentrations from selected coastal marsh plants were measured for nearly a year. Certain halophyte species (i.e. Batis and Frankenia) have very high summer biomass specific production rates for MeX (e.g. Frankenia: 1 ug MeCl /gfwt/hr; 80 ng MeBr/gfwt/hr; 8 ng MeI/gfwt/hr). These rates of MeCl and MeBr production are much higher than those from other coastal marsh plants or seaweeds. Plant halide levels remain high throughout the year, while MeX production peaks at a high level in mid summer falling to low winter rates. This implies a linkage to plant growth. Higher levels of chloride and bromide were seen in the fleshy marsh plants such as Batis (saltwort, approximately 20 percent dry wt chloride, 0.4 percent dry wt bromide) and Salicornia (pickleweed) than in the others such as Frankenia (alkali heath) approx 7 percent dry wt chloride, 0.1 percent dry wt bromide) or Spartina (cordgrass). No such trend was seen for iodide, which ranged from 4 - 10 ppm. Calculations show the daily halide losses from MeX production are far less than the variability in tissue halide content. MeX production removes a small fraction of the total tissue halide from these plants suggesting that MeX production is not a mechanism used by these species to control internal halide levels. Saltwort cell-free extracts incubated with bromide or iodide in the presence of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) produced the corresponding MeX. MeBr production was inhibited by caffeic acid the substrate of lignin-specific O

  2. 10 CFR 431.322 - Definitions concerning metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Definitions concerning metal halide lamp ballasts and... FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts and Fixtures § 431.322 Definitions concerning metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures. Ballast efficiency means, in the case of...

  3. 10 CFR 431.322 - Definitions concerning metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Definitions concerning metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures. 431.322 Section 431.322 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts and Fixtures § 431.322 Definitions concerning metal halide...

  4. 10 CFR 431.322 - Definitions concerning metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Definitions concerning metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures. 431.322 Section 431.322 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts and Fixtures § 431.322 Definitions concerning metal halide...

  5. 10 CFR 431.322 - Definitions concerning metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Definitions concerning metal halide lamp ballasts and fixtures. 431.322 Section 431.322 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Metal Halide Lamp Ballasts and Fixtures § 431.322 Definitions concerning metal halide...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10181 - Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10181 Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halide salt...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10181 - Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10181 Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halide salt...

  8. 40 CFR 721.10181 - Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10181 Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halide salt...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10181 - Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10181 Halide salt of an alkylamine (generic). (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as halide salt...

  10. Metal-halide mixtures for latent heat energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K.; Manvi, R.

    1981-01-01

    Alkali metal and alkali halide mixtures are identified which may be suitable for thermal energy storage at temperatures above 600 C. The use of metal-halides is appropriate because of their tendency to form two immiscible melts with a density difference, which reduces scale formation and solidification on heat transfer surfaces. Also, the accumulation of phase change material along the melt interface is avoided by the self-dispersing characteristic of some metal-halides, in particular Sr-SrCl2, Ba-BaCl2, and Ba-BaBr2 mixtures. Further advantages lie in their high thermal conductivities, ability to cope with thermal shock, corrosion inhibition, and possibly higher energy densities.

  11. Metallotropic liquid crystals formed by surfactant templating of molten metal halides.

    PubMed

    Martin, James D; Keary, Cristin L; Thornton, Todd A; Novotnak, Mark P; Knutson, Jeremey W; Folmer, Jacob C W

    2006-04-01

    Liquid crystals consist of anisotropic molecular units, and most are organic molecules. Materials incorporating metals into anisotropic molecules, described as metallomesogens, have been prepared. Anisotropic structures such as one-dimensional chains and two-dimensional layers are frequently observed in solid-state inorganic materials, however, little is understood about structural organization in melts of such materials. Achieving liquid-crystalline behaviour in inorganic fluids should be possible if the anisotropic structure can be retained or designed into the molten phase. We demonstrated the ability to engineer zeolite-type structures into metal halide glasses and liquids. In this work we have engineered lamellar, cubic and hexagonal liquid-crystalline structure in metal-halide melts by controlling the volume fraction and nature of the inorganic block (up to 80 mol%) with respect to alkylammonium surfactants. The high metal content of these liquid-crystalline systems significantly advances the field of metallomesogens, which seeks to combine magnetic, electronic, optical, redox and catalytic properties common to inorganic materials with the fluid properties of liquid crystals. PMID:16547520

  12. Direct synthesis of Z-alkenyl halides through catalytic cross-metathesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Ming Joo; Nguyen, Thach T.; Zhang, Hanmo; Schrock, Richard R.; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2016-03-01

    Olefin metathesis has had a large impact on modern organic chemistry, but important shortcomings remain: for example, the lack of efficient processes that can be used to generate acyclic alkenyl halides. Halo-substituted ruthenium carbene complexes decompose rapidly or deliver low activity and/or minimal stereoselectivity, and our understanding of the corresponding high-oxidation-state systems is limited. Here we show that previously unknown halo-substituted molybdenum alkylidene species are exceptionally reactive and are able to participate in high-yielding olefin metathesis reactions that afford acyclic 1,2-disubstituted Z-alkenyl halides. Transformations are promoted by small amounts of a catalyst that is generated in situ and used with unpurified, commercially available and easy-to-handle liquid 1,2-dihaloethene reagents, and proceed to high conversion at ambient temperature within four hours. We obtain many alkenyl chlorides, bromides and fluorides in up to 91 per cent yield and complete Z selectivity. This method can be used to synthesize biologically active compounds readily and to perform site- and stereoselective fluorination of complex organic molecules.

  13. Direct synthesis of Z-alkenyl halides through catalytic cross-metathesis.

    PubMed

    Koh, Ming Joo; Nguyen, Thach T; Zhang, Hanmo; Schrock, Richard R; Hoveyda, Amir H

    2016-03-24

    Olefin metathesis has had a large impact on modern organic chemistry, but important shortcomings remain: for example, the lack of efficient processes that can be used to generate acyclic alkenyl halides. Halo-substituted ruthenium carbene complexes decompose rapidly or deliver low activity and/or minimal stereoselectivity, and our understanding of the corresponding high-oxidation-state systems is limited. Here we show that previously unknown halo-substituted molybdenum alkylidene species are exceptionally reactive and are able to participate in high-yielding olefin metathesis reactions that afford acyclic 1,2-disubstituted Z-alkenyl halides. Transformations are promoted by small amounts of a catalyst that is generated in situ and used with unpurified, commercially available and easy-to-handle liquid 1,2-dihaloethene reagents, and proceed to high conversion at ambient temperature within four hours. We obtain many alkenyl chlorides, bromides and fluorides in up to 91 per cent yield and complete Z selectivity. This method can be used to synthesize biologically active compounds readily and to perform site- and stereoselective fluorination of complex organic molecules. PMID:27008965

  14. Characterizing the Sources and Sinks of Methyl Halides in the Florida Everglades and Coastal Waters by Isotopic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, N. M.; Jones, R. D.; Raffel, A.; Rice, A. L.

    2012-12-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the methyl halides, methyl chloride and methyl bromide, are produced in significant quantities by phytoplankton and by the photochemical oxidation of dissolved organic matter (DOM). However, we know little of the mechanisms responsible for the photochemical production of methyl halides and also the factors which affect the microbial formation and consumption in the surface waters. We are currently conducting laboratory experiments to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for the photochemical and microbial formation and consumption of methyl chloride and methyl bromide in the Florida Everglades and coastal waters. We present data from laboratory experiments using a stable isotope spiking tracer method to quantify photochemical flux rates of methyl chloride and methyl bromide from wetland and estuarine water samples collected at FCE-LTER sites located in Taylor Slough and Florida Bay. These photochemical experiments include waters that span a wide range of halide and DOM concentrations. We use these results to estimate the net photochemical flux of methyl chloride and methyl bromide from the Florida Everglades. We have also conducted stable carbon isotope analysis of the methyl chloride. These experiments are being conducted to determine the carbon isotopic ratios (d13C) of methyl chloride produced from the photolysis of organic matter in natural waters and will provide an inventory of d13C values from one of the sources within the studied Everglades ecotones. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation Chemical Oceanography Program Award No. 1029710.

  15. Adsorbent selection for endosulfan removal from water environment.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, Y; Dikshit, A K

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, an attempt was made to select a low cost adsorbing material for the removal of endosulfan [C,C'-(1,4,5,6,7,7-hexachloro-8,9,10- trinorborn-5-en-2,3-ylene)(dimethylsulphite)] from water. Various low cost adsorbents like wood charcoal, kimberlite tailings, silica, macro fungi sojar caju were tried with activated charcoal as reference material. The above materials were selected from various sources encompassing organic, inorganic, clayey, and biological sources. For the selection of suitable adsorbent for endosulfan uptake, maximum adsorption capacity (Qmax) was chosen as the parameter. Kinetic profiles of removal were generated for all the materials to assess the equilibrium time. Equilibrium studies were carried out for all materials to assess the adsorption equilibrium model that they followed. The model that gave the best correlation coefficient by linear regression analysis, was adopted for the calculation of Qmax of the corresponding adsorbent material. Using linearised forms of equilibrium models like Langmuir, BET, and Freundlich, maximum adsorptive capacities were determined. Activated charcoal showed the best adsorptive capacity with Qmax of 2.145 mg/g followed by wood charcoal 1.773 mg/g, sojar caju 1.575 mg/g, kimberlite tailings 0.8821 mg/g, and silica 0.3231 mg/g. Albeit activated charcoal gave better performance, it was not considered as a candidate material because of its high cost. Wood charcoal was the next best adsorbent with Qmax 1.773 mg/g. Therefore, wood charcoal was chosen as the best material for endosulfan removal. The study of physical and chemical characteristics of wood charcoal revealed that it is a potential adsorbent and can even be improved further. PMID:10048207

  16. Thermodynamic reactivity, growth and characterization of mercurous halide crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N. B.; Gottlieb, M.; Henningsen, T.; Hopkins, R. H.; Mazelsky, R.; Singh, M.; Glicksman, M. E.; Paradies, C.

    1992-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations were carried out for the Hg-X-O system (X = Cl, Br, I) to identify the potential sources of contamination and relative stability of oxides and oxy-halide phases. The effect of excess mercury vapor pressure on the optical quality of mercurous halide crystal was studied by growing several mercurous chloride crystals from mercury-rich composition. The optical quality of crystals was examined by birefringence interferometry and laser scattering studies. Crystals grown in slightly mercury-rich composition showed improved optical quality relative to stoichiometric crystals.

  17. Thallous halide materials for use in cryogenic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, William N. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Thallous halides, either alone or in combination with other ceramic materials, are used in cryogenic applications such as heat exchange material for the regenerator section of a closed-cycle cryogenic refrigeration section, as stabilizing coatings for superconducting wires, and as dielectric insulating materials. The thallous halides possess unusually large specific heats at low temperatures, have large thermal conductivities, are nonmagnetic, and are nonconductors of electricity. They can be formed into a variety of shapes such as spheres, bars, rods, or the like and can be coated onto substrates.

  18. Boron and aluminum halides under pressure - polymerization and chemical transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yansun

    2013-06-01

    High-pressure phase transitions of boron and aluminum halides have been theoretically studied. At low pressure, crystals of the familiar monomers (BX3) and dimers (Al2X6) are the structures of choice. While the higher oligomers as well as three dimensional infinite polymers are unstable at ambient pressure, they are stabilized by application of external pressure, taking advantage of the extra orbitals made accessible by the increased coordination. Several new crystal structures of boron and aluminum halides have been predicted at high pressures. Calculated x-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra of these phases are in good agreement with available experimental data.

  19. Applications of Raman scattering spectroscopy to halide glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendow, B.; Banerjee, P. K.; Drexhage, M. G.

    1983-04-01

    Polarized Raman scattering spectroscopy is a useful tool for investigating fundamental vibrational properties, structure and bonding, origins of IR edge absorption, and dispersion of the IR refractive index. In this paper, the application of Raman spectroscopy to halide glasses and, in particular, heavy metal fluoride glasses, is described. The spectra of the latter differ substantially from those of simple oxide, halide or chalcogenide glasses and, moreover, display a wide range of vibrational characteristics, depending on composition. In combination with infrared spectroscopy, useful guidelines can be developed for tailoring glass compositions for specific applications.

  20. A novel fiber-based adsorbent technology

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T.A.

    1997-10-01

    In this Phase I Small Business Innovation Research program, Chemica Technologies, Inc. is developing an economical, robust, fiber-based adsorbent technology for removal of heavy metals from contaminated water. The key innovation is the development of regenerable adsorbent fibers and adsorbent fiber cloths that have high capacity and selectivity for heavy metals and are chemically robust. The process has the potential for widespread use at DOE facilities, mining operations, and the chemical process industry.

  1. Structural Characterization of Methanol Substituted Lanthanum Halides

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Ottley, Leigh Anna M.; Alam, Todd M.; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Yang, Pin; Mcintyre, Sarah K.

    2010-01-01

    The first study into the alcohol solvation of lanthanum halide [LaX3] derivatives as a means to lower the processing temperature for the production of the LaBr3 scintillators was undertaken using methanol (MeOH). Initially the de-hydration of {[La(µ-Br)(H2O)7](Br)2}2 (1) was investigated through the simple room temperature dissolution of 1 in MeOH. The mixed solvate monomeric [La(H2O)7(MeOH)2](Br)3 (2) compound was isolated where the La metal center retains its original 9-coordination through the binding of two additional MeOH solvents but necessitates the transfer of the innersphere Br to the outersphere. In an attempt to in situ dry the reaction mixture of 1 in MeOH over CaH2, crystals of [Ca(MeOH)6](Br)2 (3) were isolated. Compound 1 dissolved in MeOH at reflux temperatures led to the isolation of an unusual arrangement identified as the salt derivative {[LaBr2.75•5.25(MeOH)]+0.25 [LaBr3.25•4.75(MeOH)]−0.25} (4). The fully substituted species was ultimately isolated through the dissolution of dried LaBr3 in MeOH forming the 8-coordinated [LaBr3(MeOH)5] (5) complex. It was determined that the concentration of the crystallization solution directed the structure isolated (4 concentrated; 5 dilute) The other LaX3 derivatives were isolated as [(MeOH)4(Cl)2La(µ-Cl)]2 (6) and [La(MeOH)9](I)3•MeOH (7). Beryllium Dome XRD analysis indicated that the bulk material for 5 appear to have multiple solvated species, 6 is consistent with the single crystal, and 7 was too broad to elucidate structural aspects. Multinuclear NMR (139La) indicated that these compounds do not retain their structure in MeOD. TGA/DTA data revealed that the de-solvation temperatures of the MeOH derivatives 4 – 6 were slightly higher in comparison to their hydrated counterparts. PMID:20514349

  2. Quasiparticle excitations of adsorbates on doped graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lischner, Johannes; Wickenburg, Sebastian; Wong, Dillon; Karrasch, Christoph; Wang, Yang; Lu, Jiong; Omrani, Arash A.; Brar, Victor; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Wu, Qiong; Corsetti, Fabiano; Mostofi, Arash; Kawakami, Roland K.; Moore, Joel; Zettl, Alex; Louie, Steven G.; Crommie, Mike

    Adsorbed atoms and molecules can modify the electronic structure of graphene, but in turn it is also possible to control the properties of adsorbates via the graphene substrate. In my talk, I will discuss the electronic structure of F4-TCNQ molecules on doped graphene and present a first-principles based theory of quasiparticle excitations that captures the interplay of doping-dependent image charge interactions between substrate and adsorbate and electron-electron interaction effects on the molecule. The resulting doping-dependent quasiparticle energies will be compared to experimental scanning tunnelling spectra. Finally, I will also discuss the effects of charged adsorbates on the electronic structure of doped graphene.

  3. Thermodynamic formalism of water uptakes on solid porous adsorbents for adsorption cooling applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Baichuan; Chakraborty, Anutosh

    2014-05-19

    This Letter presents a thermodynamic formulation to calculate the amount of water vapor uptakes on various adsorbents such as zeolites, metal organic frameworks, and silica gel for the development of an advanced adsorption chiller. This formalism is developed from the rigor of the partition distribution function of each water vapor adsorptive site on adsorbents and the condensation approximation of adsorptive water molecules and is validated with experimental data. An interesting and useful finding has been established that the proposed model is thermodynamically connected with the pore structures of adsorbent materials, and the water vapor uptake highly depends on the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero surface coverage and the adsorptive sites of the adsorbent materials. Employing the proposed model, the thermodynamic trends of water vapor uptakes on various adsorbents can be estimated.

  4. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negrón-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-01

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically γ-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  5. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-03

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically {gamma}-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  6. Surface Spectroscopy Studies of the Reactive Uptake of Ozone on Alkali Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newberg, J. T.; Hemminger, J. C.

    2003-12-01

    Heterogeneous reactions in the atmosphere have attracted a lot of attention. In particular, reactions involving sea-salt in the form of aerosol droplets, particles, and/or sea-ice have been implicated to significantly affect the chemistry and composition of the marine boundary layer. For example, highly reactive chlorine and bromine atoms resulting from the oxidation of sea-salt halides (Cl- and Br-) have been implicated in tropospheric ozone depletion in the arctic and in lower latitude marine regions, as well as the deposition of mercury. While the heterogeneous processing of sea-salt has been studied extensively in laboratory, field and model studies, the mechanistic details behind the release of gas-phase halogens remains unclear and has sparked some interests. Recently there has been attention focused on the interaction of important atmospheric oxidants (e.g., OH and O3) with halides that reside at the air-particle interface of sea-salt. Such chemical interactions at the surface of particles may lead to unique chemical transformations that can alter current views of known chemical processing of sea-salt particles. There are several laboratory investigations which have investigated the surface reactivity of salts by measuring the reactive loss and/or formation of gas-phase species, indicating that reactions at the interface likely play an important role in aerosol chemistry. The efficacy of such surface-phase chemistry has yet to be elucidated with surface spectroscopy studies. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is a surface spectroscopy technique with submonolayer resolution. Using XPS, we have investigated changes in the surface chemistry of various alkali halide salts upon exposure to ozone in an ultra-high vacuum (UHV) instrument. Salt samples were either freshly cleaved single crystals which were prepared from a melt, or purified salt crystals/powders pressed into pellets. Upon exposure to ozone, oxygen on the salt surfaces was monitored by measuring

  7. 40 CFR 721.10698 - Polyfluorinated alkyl halide (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Polyfluorinated alkyl halide (generic). 721.10698 Section 721.10698 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES Significant New Uses for Specific Chemical Substances §...

  8. Method for calcining nuclear waste solutions containing zirconium and halides

    DOEpatents

    Newby, Billie J.

    1979-01-01

    A reduction in the quantity of gelatinous solids which are formed in aqueous zirconium-fluoride nuclear reprocessing waste solutions by calcium nitrate added to suppress halide volatility during calcination of the solution while further suppressing chloride volatility is achieved by increasing the aluminum to fluoride mole ratio in the waste solution prior to adding the calcium nitrate.

  9. Methyl halide emission estimates from domestic biomass burning in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, M. I.; Khan, M. A. H.; White, I. R.; Nickless, G.; Shallcross, D. E.

    Inventories of methyl halide emissions from domestic burning of biomass in Africa, from 1950 to the present day and projected to 2030, have been constructed. By combining emission factors from Andreae and Merlet [2001. Emission of trace gases and aerosols from biomass burning. Global Biogeochemical Cycles 15, 955-966], the biomass burning estimates from Yevich and Logan [2003. An assessment of biofuel use and burning of agricultural waste in the developing world. Global Biogeochemical Cycles 17(4), 1095, doi:10.1029/2002GB001952] and the population data from the UN population division, the emission of methyl halides from domestic biomass usage in Africa has been estimated. Data from this study suggest that methyl halide emissions from domestic biomass burning have increased by a factor of 4-5 from 1950 to 2005 and based on the expected population growth could double over the next 25 years. This estimated change has a non-negligible impact on the atmospheric budgets of methyl halides.

  10. Electro-optic contribution to Raman scattering from alkali halides

    SciTech Connect

    Mahan, G.D.; Subbaswamy, K.R.

    1986-06-15

    The electro-optic contributions to second-order Raman scattering and field-induced first-order scattering from alkali halides are calculated explicitly in terms of the ionic hyperpolarizability coefficients. The relevant local-field corrections are evaluated. Illustrative numerical results are presented.

  11. Removing 3,5-Dichlorophenol from Wastewater by Alternative Adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobetičová, Hana; Galbičková, Blanka; Ševčíková, Janka; Soldán, Maroš

    2014-12-01

    The main objective of this paper is to evaluate an efficiency of 3,5 - dichlorophenol removal from wastewater by using alternative adsorbents. Chlorophenols are organic compounds consisting of a benzene ring, OH groups and also atoms of chlorine. Chlorophenols may have a huge isomere variety that means there are differences in their chemical and physical properties. Due to their toxicity it is necessary to remove them from waste water and in this paper an alternative way of such process is described.

  12. MOFs as adsorbents for low temperature heating and cooling applications.

    PubMed

    Henninger, Stefan K; Habib, Hesham A; Janiak, Christoph

    2009-03-01

    The 3D metal-organic framework (MOF) (3)(infinity){[Ni(3)(mu(3)-btc)(2)(mu(4)-btre)(2)(mu-H(2)O)(2)]. approximately 22H(2)O} is found to be a reversibly dehydratable-hydratable water-stable MOF material with a large loading spread of 210 g/kg as a candidate for solid adsorbents in heat transformation cycles for refrigeration, heat pumping, and heat storage. PMID:19206233

  13. Toxicity of Uranium Adsorbent Materials using the Microtox Toxicity Test

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T.; Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Bonheyo, George T.

    2015-10-01

    The Marine Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the toxicity of a diverse range of natural and synthetic materials used to extract uranium from seawater. The uranium adsorbent materials are being developed as part of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Resources Program. The goal of this effort was to identify whether deployment of a farm of these materials into the marine environment would have any toxic effects on marine organisms.

  14. The uranium from seawater program at PNNL: Overview of marine testing, adsorbent characterization, adsorbent durability, adsorbent toxicity, and deployment studies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li -Jung; Janke, Christopher James; Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T.; Bonheyo, George T.; Pan, Horng -Bin; Wai, Chien; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Bianucci, Laura; et al

    2016-02-07

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacitymore » and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 ± 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 ± 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage. Marine testing

  15. The Uranium from Seawater Program at PNNL: Overview of marine testing, adsorbent characterization, adsorbent durability, adsorbent toxicity, and deployment studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Gary; Kuo, Li-Jung; Janke, Christopher James; Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T; Bonheyo, George; Pan, Horng-Bin; Wai, Chien; Khangaonkar, Tarang P; Bianucci, Laura; Wood, Jordana; Warner, Marvin G; Peterson, Sonja; Abrecht, David; Mayes, Richard T; Tsouris, Costas; Oyola, Yatsandra; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Schlafer, Nicholas; Addleman, Shane R; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Das, Sadananda; Kim, Jungseung; Buesseler, Dr. Ken; Breier, Crystalline; D'Alessandro, Dr. Evan

    2016-01-01

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory s (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacity and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage. Marine testing at Woods Hole

  16. Color-Pure Violet-Light-Emitting Diodes Based on Layered Lead Halide Perovskite Nanoplates.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dong; Peng, Yuelin; Fu, Yongping; Shearer, Melinda J; Zhang, Jingjing; Zhai, Jianyuan; Zhang, Yi; Hamers, Robert J; Andrew, Trisha L; Jin, Song

    2016-07-26

    Violet electroluminescence is rare in both inorganic and organic light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Low-cost and room-temperature solution-processed lead halide perovskites with high-efficiency and color-tunable photoluminescence are promising for LEDs. Here, we report room-temperature color-pure violet LEDs based on a two-dimensional lead halide perovskite material, namely, 2-phenylethylammonium (C6H5CH2CH2NH3(+), PEA) lead bromide [(PEA)2PbBr4]. The natural quantum confinement of two-dimensional layered perovskite (PEA)2PbBr4 allows for photoluminescence of shorter wavelength (410 nm) than its three-dimensional counterpart. By converting as-deposited polycrystalline thin films to micrometer-sized (PEA)2PbBr4 nanoplates using solvent vapor annealing, we successfully integrated this layered perovskite material into LEDs and achieved efficient room-temperature violet electroluminescence at 410 nm with a narrow bandwidth. This conversion to nanoplates significantly enhanced the crystallinity and photophysical properties of the (PEA)2PbBr4 samples and the external quantum efficiency of the violet LED. The solvent vapor annealing method reported herein can be generally applied to other perovskite materials to increase their grain size and, ultimately, improve the performance of optoelectronic devices based on perovskite materials. PMID:27336850

  17. Photo-induced halide redistribution in organic–inorganic perovskite films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    deQuilettes, Dane W.; Zhang, Wei; Burlakov, Victor M.; Graham, Daniel J.; Leijtens, Tomas; Osherov, Anna; Bulovic, Vladimir; Snaith, Henry J.; Ginger, David S.; Stranks, Samuel D.

    2016-05-24

    Organic-inorganic perovskites such as CH3NH3PbI3 are promising materials for a variety of optoelectronic applications, with certified power conversion efficiencies in solar cells already exceeding 21%. Nevertheless, state-of-the-art films still contain performance-limiting non-radiative recombination sites and exhibit a range of complex dynamic phenomena under illumination that remain poorly understood. Here we use a unique combination of confocal photoluminescence (PL) microscopy and chemical imaging to correlate the local changes in photophysics with composition in CH3NH3PbI3 films under illumination. We demonstrate that the photo-induced 'brightening' of the perovskite PL can be attributed to an order-of-magnitude reduction in trap state density. By imaging themore » same regions with time-of-flight secondary-ion-mass spectrometry, we correlate this photobrightening with a net migration of iodine. In conclusion, our work provides visual evidence for photo-induced halide migration in triiodide perovskites and reveals the complex interplay between charge carrier populations, electronic traps and mobile halides that collectively impact optoelectronic performance.« less

  18. Multiple neutral alkali halide attachments onto oligosaccharides in electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Striegel, André M.; Timpa, Judy D.; Piotrowiak, Piotr; Cole, Richard B.

    1997-03-01

    Oligosaccharides perform essential functions in a variety of biological and agricultural processes. Recent approaches to characterization of these molecules by mass spectrometry have utilized mainly soft-ionization methods such as electrospray ionization (ESI) and thermospray (TS), as well as fast atom bombardment (FAB). The behavior of a series of maltooligosaccharides with [alpha]-(1 --> 4) linkages, maltose (G2) through maltoheptaose (G7), under ESI conditions, has been investigated here. The oligosaccharides were dissolved in N,N-dimethylacetamide containing lithium chloride (DMAc/LiCl) prior to analysis by ESI-MS. A highly unusual feature, evident in all mass spectra obtained using this solvent system, was the presence of multiple [`]neutral' salt attachments onto lithium adducts of the sugars. Resultant ions took the form of [Gx + Li + nLiCl+, where n may reach a value as high as eight. Compared to LiCl, the propensity for alkali halide attachment using other alkali chlorides or lithium halides was greatly reduced. An investigation of this phenomenon is presented in which the organic and inorganic portions of the employed solvent were systematically varied, and semi-empirical computer modeling was performed to better understand lithium coordination by the sugars.

  19. Enhancing the carrier thermalization time in organometallic perovskites by halide mixing.

    PubMed

    Madjet, Mohamed El-Amine; Akimov, Alexey V; El-Mellouhi, Fadwa; Berdiyorov, Golibjon R; Ashhab, Sahel; Tabet, Nouar; Kais, Sabre

    2016-02-21

    Hybrid metal-organic halide perovskites have recently attracted a great deal of attention because of their interesting electronic, optical and transport properties, which make them promising materials for high-performance, low-cost solar cells. Fundamental understanding of the formation mechanisms and dynamics of photoinduced charge carriers is essential for improving the performance of perovskite solar cell devices. For example, a significant amount of absorbed solar energy is lost as a result of carrier thermalization. This energy could be harnessed by extracting hot carriers before they cool down to the band edges. Although such hot carrier collection is experimentally challenging, theoretical investigations based on time-dependent methods can guide future experimental research by providing insights into the thermalization process. Here, we perform ab initio nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations to study non-radiative relaxation dynamics of charge carriers in hybrid halide perovskites. We find that the carrier relaxation time can be considerably increased by mixing halogen atoms in the perovskite materials. These findings show that simple approaches could be adopted to slow down the thermalization process of hot carriers in perovskite materials. PMID:26812955

  20. Calorimetric and theoretical study of the interaction between some saccharides and sodium halide in water.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Kelei; Fu, Yingyi; Bai, Guangyue; Wang, Jianji; Yan, Haike; Wang, Hanqing

    2012-08-23

    Dilution enthalpies and mixing enthalpies of sodium halide and some saccharides (glucose, galactose, xylose, arabinose, fructose, and sucrose) in aqueous solution were determined by calorimetric measurements at 298.15 K. The values were used to determine enthalpic pair interaction parameters. Combined with Gibbs energy pair parameters, entropic pair interaction parameters were also obtained. Theoretical calculations at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level were carried out to provide the information of structures and thermodynamic functions. The information reveals the thermodynamic essence of the interactions between sodium halide and saccharides in aqueous solutions. The experimental results and theoretical calculations show that the sign of enthalpic pair interaction parameter 2υh(ES) is determined by the direct interaction between saccharides and ions, whereas the difference in value of 2υh(ES) for different saccharides or electrolytes depends on the partial dehydration of saccharides or anions in aqueous solution. The difference in value of entropic pair interaction parameters depends partly on the different dominant interactions in the process of partial dehydration of saccharides or ions. An enthalpy-entropy compensation relationship was observed for the sodium bromide-aldopyranose-water systems. Remarkably, it can be conjectured that the hydration entropy of glucose is lower than for other monosaccharides. Perhaps it is one of the reasons why glucose plays an important role in living organisms rather than other monosaccharides. PMID:22779908

  1. A Bismuth-Halide Double Perovskite with Long Carrier Recombination Lifetime for Photovoltaic Applications.

    PubMed

    Slavney, Adam H; Hu, Te; Lindenberg, Aaron M; Karunadasa, Hemamala I

    2016-02-24

    Despite the remarkable rise in efficiencies of solar cells containing the lead-halide perovskite absorbers RPbX3 (R = organic cation; X = Br(-) or I(-)), the toxicity of lead remains a concern for the large-scale implementation of this technology. This has spurred the search for lead-free materials with similar optoelectronic properties. Here, we use the double-perovskite structure to incorporate nontoxic Bi(3+) into the perovskite lattice in Cs2AgBiBr6 (1). The solid shows a long room-temperature fundamental photoluminescence (PL) lifetime of ca. 660 ns, which is very encouraging for photovoltaic applications. Comparison between single-crystal and powder PL decay curves of 1 suggests inherently high defect tolerance. The material has an indirect bandgap of 1.95 eV, suited for a tandem solar cell. Furthermore, 1 is significantly more heat and moisture stable compared to (MA)PbI3. The extremely promising optical and physical properties of 1 shown here motivate further exploration of both inorganic and hybrid halide double perovskites for photovoltaics and other optoelectronics. PMID:26853379

  2. Heterogeneous Ozonolysis of Surface Adsorbed Lignin Pyrolysis Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, R. Z.

    2012-12-01

    Biomass combustion releases semi-volatile organic compounds into the troposphere, including many phenols and methoxyphenols as the result of lignin pyrolysis. Given their relatively low vapor pressures, these compounds readily adsorb on inorganic and organic aerosol substrates where they may alter aerosol properties and undergo heterogeneous chemistry. We use infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS and ATR-FTIR) to monitor the adsorption and subsequent heterogeneous ozonolysis of model lignin pyrolysis products, including catechol, eugenol, and 4-propylguaiacol. Ozonolysis reaction kinetics were compared on various inorganic substrates - such as Al2O3 and NaCl, which serve as mineral and sea salt aerosol substrates, respectively - and as a function of ozone concentration and relative humidity. Following in situ FTIR analysis, the adsorbed organics were extracted and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy to identify reaction products and quantify product branching ratios. Ozonolysis of catechol and 4-propylguaiacol readily resulted in ring cleavage forming dicarboxylic acids (e.g., muconic acid). Eugenol ozonolysis proceeded rapidly at the alkene side chain producing homovanillic acid and homovanillin in an approximate 2:1 branching ratio at 0% RH; ring cleavage was also observed. For all lignin pyrolysis products, heterogeneous ozonolysis was faster on NaCl versus Al2O3. Implications for the atmospheric chemistry of semi-volatile methoxylphenols adsorbed on aerosol substrates will be discussed.

  3. Complete braided adsorbent for marine testing to demonstrate 3g-U/kg-adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Chris; Yatsandra, Oyola; Mayes, Richard; none,; Gill, Gary; Li-Jung, Kuo; Wood, Jordana; Sadananda, Das

    2014-04-30

    ORNL has manufactured four braided adsorbents that successfully demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities ranging from 3.0-3.6 g-U/kg-adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. Four new braided and leno woven fabric adsorbents have also been prepared by ORNL and are currently undergoing marine testing at PNNL.

  4. Morphology and structure of photosensitive dye J-aggregates adsorbed on AgBr microcrystals grown in gelatin.

    PubMed

    Saijo, H; Shiojiri, M

    1998-07-15

    Though the cyanine dye J-aggregates carry the role to sense the exposing light in the silver halide photographic system, little research on the morphology of the aggregates in adsorption has been made with modern surface analytical methods. In this paper, we describe the size, epitaxy, multi-layered array formation, nucleation and preferential adsorption, and irregular distribution of population between particles and the segregation on a particle, of J-aggregates adsorbed on AgBr grown in gelatin. We employed cathodoluminescence microscopy, low energy high resolution scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Dye molecules aggregate together near the surface of AgBr and adsorb on the surface. The growth of adsorbed aggregates is controlled by the diffusion of dye molecules from the surrounding solution. The population of J-aggregates adsorbed on an AgBr particle varies from almost none to full coverage. Each aggregate is about (20-30) x (30-50) nm in size and is 2.1 nm thick for thiacarbocyanine with sodium ion, 1.04 nm for thiacarbocyanine with tosyl ion, and 0.5 nm for an oxacarbocyanine. The aggregates connect their longer edges to each other to form arrays, and the arrays build up multi-layered stacks. The arrays align parallel and segregate to form terraces. The longer edges of J-aggregates align along [210] on AgBr (100) or [632] on AgBr (111). PMID:9728883

  5. Spectral and Dynamical Properties of Single Excitons, Biexcitons, and Trions in Cesium-Lead-Halide Perovskite Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Nikolay S; Guo, Shaojun; Isaienko, Oleksandr; Liu, Wenyong; Robel, István; Klimov, Victor I

    2016-04-13

    Organic-inorganic lead-halide perovskites have been the subject of recent intense interest due to their unusually strong photovoltaic performance. A new addition to the perovskite family is all-inorganic Cs-Pb-halide perovskite nanocrystals, or quantum dots, fabricated via a moderate-temperature colloidal synthesis. While being only recently introduced to the research community, these nanomaterials have already shown promise for a range of applications from color-converting phosphors and light-emitting diodes to lasers, and even room-temperature single-photon sources. Knowledge of the optical properties of perovskite quantum dots still remains vastly incomplete. Here we apply various time-resolved spectroscopic techniques to conduct a comprehensive study of spectral and dynamical characteristics of single- and multiexciton states in CsPbX3 nanocrystals with X being either Br, I, or their mixture. Specifically, we measure exciton radiative lifetimes, absorption cross-sections, and derive the degeneracies of the band-edge electron and hole states. We also characterize the rates of intraband cooling and nonradiative Auger recombination and evaluate the strength of exciton-exciton coupling. The overall conclusion of this work is that spectroscopic properties of Cs-Pb-halide quantum dots are largely similar to those of quantum dots of more traditional semiconductors such as CdSe and PbSe. At the same time, we observe some distinctions including, for example, an appreciable effect of the halide identity on radiative lifetimes, considerably shorter biexciton Auger lifetimes, and apparent deviation of their size dependence from the "universal volume scaling" previously observed for many traditional nanocrystal systems. The high efficiency of Auger decay in perovskite quantum dots is detrimental to their prospective applications in light-emitting devices and lasers. This points toward the need for the development of approaches for effective suppression of Auger

  6. Selective Ni-P electroless plating on photopatterned cationic adsorption films influenced by alkyl chain lengths of polyelectrolyte adsorbates and additive surfactants.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Masaru; Nawa, Nozomi; Iyoda, Tomokazu

    2004-10-26

    We demonstrated that the photopatterned single-layer adsorption film of poly(1-dodecyl-4-pyridinium bromide) on a silica surface was available for a template of nickel-phosphorus (Ni-P) electroless plating through sensitization with a SnCl(2) aqueous solution and activation with a PdCl(2) aqueous solution. Four kinds of poly(1-alkyl-4-vinylpyridinium halide)s bearing methyl, propyl, hexyl, and dodecyl groups were prepared. The cationic polymers were adsorbed by a negatively charged silica surface from their solutions, to form single-layer adsorption films exhibiting desorption-resistance toward deionized water and ethanol. The organic adsorption films could be decomposed completely by exposure to 172 nm deep-UV light. The formation and decomposition of the single-layer films were confirmed by deep-UV absorption spectral measurement and zeta-potential measurement. Ni-P electroless plating was carried out on the photopatterned adsorption films, using three types of SnO(x) colloidal materials without and with cationic or anionic surfactant as catalyst precursors in the sensitization step. In the case of the negatively charged SnO(x) colloids surrounded by anionic surfactant, Ni-deposition took place preferentially on the cationic adsorption films remaining in unexposed regions. The Ni-deposition was accelerated significantly on the cationic adsorption film bearing dodecyl groups. It was obvious by ICP-AES analyses that the hydrophobic long-chain dodecyl groups in the adsorption film could promote the adsorption of the negative SnO(x) colloids on the film surface, followed by much nucleus formation of zerovalent Pd catalysts useful for the electroless plating. The result of our experiment clearly showed that, in addition to electrostatic interaction, van der Waals interaction generating between the hydrophobic long-chain hydrocarbons of the adsorption film and the surfactant improved significantly the adsorption stability of the SnO(x) colloids, resulting in highly

  7. Nanovalved Adsorbents for CH4 Storage.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhuonan; Nambo, Apolo; Tate, Kirby L; Bao, Ainan; Zhu, Minqi; Jasinski, Jacek B; Zhou, Shaojun J; Meyer, Howard S; Carreon, Moises A; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2016-05-11

    A novel concept of utilizing nanoporous coatings as effective nanovalves on microporous adsorbents was developed for high capacity natural gas storage at low storage pressure. The work reported here for the first time presents the concept of nanovalved adsorbents capable of sealing high pressure CH4 inside the adsorbents and storing it at low pressure. Traditional natural gas storage tanks are thick and heavy, which makes them expensive to manufacture and highly energy-consuming to carry around. Our design uses unique adsorbent pellets with nanoscale pores surrounded by a coating that functions as a valve to help manage the pressure of the gas and facilitate more efficient storage and transportation. We expect this new concept will result in a lighter, more affordable product with increased storage capacity. The nanovalved adsorbent concept demonstrated here can be potentially extended for the storage of other important gas molecules targeted for diverse relevant functional applications. PMID:27124722

  8. NOx adsorber and method of regenerating same

    SciTech Connect

    Endicott, Dennis L.; Verkiel, Maarten; Driscoll, James J.

    2007-01-30

    New technologies, such as NOx adsorber catalytic converters, are being used to meet increasingly stringent regulations on undesirable emissions, including NOx emissions. NOx adsorbers must be periodically regenerated, which requires an increased fuel consumption. The present disclosure includes a method of regenerating a NOx adsorber within a NOx adsorber catalytic converter. At least one sensor positioned downstream from the NOx adsorber senses, in the downstream exhaust, at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations a plurality of times during a regeneration phase. The sensor is in communication with an electronic control module that includes a regeneration monitoring algorithm operable to end the regeneration phase when a time rate of change of the at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations is after an expected plateau region begins.

  9. Effect of adsorbent addition on floc formation and clarification.

    PubMed

    Younker, Jessica M; Walsh, Margaret E

    2016-07-01

    Adding adsorbent into the coagulation process is an emerging treatment solution for targeting hard-to-remove dissolved organic compounds from both drinking water and industrial wastewater. The impact of adding powdered activated carbon (PAC) or organoclay (OC) adsorbents with ferric chloride (FeCl3) coagulant was investigated in terms of potential changes to the coagulated flocs formed with respect to size, structure, and breakage and regrowth properties. The ability of dissolved air flotation (DAF) and sedimentation (SED) clarification processes to remove hybrid adsorbent-coagulant flocs was also evaluated through clarified water quality analysis of samples collected in bench-scale jar test experiments. The jar tests were conducted using both a synthetic fresh water and oily wastewater test water spiked with dissolved aromatic compounds phenol and naphthalene. Results of the study demonstrated that addition of adsorbent reduced the median coagulated floc size by up to 50% but did not affect floc strength or regrowth potential after application of high shear. Experimental results in fresh water demonstrated that sedimentation was more effective than DAF for clarification of both FeCl3-PAC and FeCl3-OC floc aggregates. However, experimental tests performed on the synthetic oily wastewater showed that coagulant-adsorbent floc aggregates were effectively removed with both DAF and sedimentation treatment, with lower residual turbidity achieved in clarified water samples than with coagulation treatment alone. Addition of OC or PAC into the coagulation process resulted in removals of over half, or nearly all of the dissolved aromatics, respectively. PMID:27064206

  10. Separation of the attractive and repulsive contributions to the adsorbate-adsorbate interactions of polar adsorbates on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Lin, Deng-Sung

    2015-11-01

    Dissociative adsorption of H2O, NH3, CH3OH and CH3NH2 polar molecules on the Si(100) surface results in a 1:1 mixture of two adsorbates (H and multi-atomic fragment A = OH, NH2, CH3O, CH3NH, respectively) on the surface. By using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the adsorption geometry, the total energies and the charge densities for various possible ordered structures of the mixed adsorbate layer have been found. Analyzing the systematic trends in the total energies unveils concurrently the nearest-neighbor interactions ENN and the next nearest-neighbor interactions ENNN between two polar adsorbates A. In going from small to large polar adsorbates, ENN's exhibit an attractive-to-repulsive crossover behavior, indicating that they include competing attractive and repulsive contributions. Exploration of the charge density distributions allows the estimation of the degree of charge overlapping between immediately neighboring A's, the resulting contribution of the steric repulsions, and that of the attractive interactions to the corresponding ENN's. The attractive contributions to nearest neighboring adsorbate-adsorbate interactions between the polar adsorbates under study are shown to result from hydrogen bonds or dipole-dipole interactions.

  11. Transformation of Sintered CsPbBr3 Nanocrystals to Cubic CsPbI3 and Gradient CsPbBrxI3-x through Halide Exchange.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jacob B; Schleper, A Lennart; Kamat, Prashant V

    2016-07-13

    All-inorganic cesium lead halide (CsPbX3, X = Br(-), I(-)) perovskites could potentially provide comparable photovoltaic performance with enhanced stability compared to organic-inorganic lead halide species. However, small-bandgap cubic CsPbI3 has been difficult to study due to challenges forming CsPbI3 in the cubic phase. Here, a low-temperature procedure to form cubic CsPbI3 has been developed through a halide exchange reaction using films of sintered CsPbBr3 nanocrystals. The reaction was found to be strongly dependent upon temperature, featuring an Arrhenius relationship. Additionally, film thickness played a significant role in determining internal film structure at intermediate reaction times. Thin films (50 nm) showed only a small distribution of CsPbBrxI3-x species, while thicker films (350 nm) exhibited much broader distributions. Furthermore, internal film structure was ordered, featuring a compositional gradient within film. Transient absorption spectroscopy showed the influence of halide exchange on the excited state of the material. In thicker films, charge carriers were rapidly transferred to iodide-rich regions near the film surface within the first several picoseconds after excitation. This ultrafast vectorial charge-transfer process illustrates the potential of utilizing compositional gradients to direct charge flow in perovskite-based photovoltaics. PMID:27322132

  12. Analysis of Adsorbate-Adsorbate and Adsorbate-Adsorbent Interactions to Decode Isosteric Heats of Gas Adsorption.

    PubMed

    Madani, S Hadi; Sedghi, Saeid; Biggs, Mark J; Pendleton, Phillip

    2015-12-21

    A qualitative interpretation is proposed to interpret isosteric heats of adsorption by considering contributions from three general classes of interaction energy: fluid-fluid heat, fluid-solid heat, and fluid-high-energy site (HES) heat. Multiple temperature adsorption isotherms are defined for nitrogen, T=(75, 77, 79) K, argon at T=(85, 87, 89) K, and for water and methanol at T=(278, 288, 298) K on a well-characterized polymer-based, activated carbon. Nitrogen and argon are subjected to isosteric heat analyses; their zero filling isosteric heats of adsorption are consistent with slit-pore, adsorption energy enhancement modelling. Water adsorbs entirely via specific interactions, offering decreasing isosteric heat at low pore filling followed by a constant heat slightly in excess of water condensation enthalpy, demonstrating the effects of micropores. Methanol offers both specific adsorption via the alcohol group and non-specific interactions via its methyl group; the isosteric heat increases at low pore filling, indicating the predominance of non-specific interactions. PMID:26538339

  13. Inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, M.R.; Tavlarides, L.

    1997-10-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers are developing a technology that combines metal chelation extraction technology and synthesis chemistry. They begin with a ceramic substrate such as alumina, titanium oxide or silica gel because they provide high surface area, high mechanical strength, and radiolytic stability. One preparation method involves silylation to hydrophobize the surface, followed by chemisorption of a suitable chelation agent using vapor deposition. Another route attaches newly designed chelating agents through covalent bonding by the use of coupling agents. These approaches provide stable and selective, inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs) tailored for removal of metals. The technology has the following advantages over ion exchange: (1) higher mechanical strength, (2) higher resistance to radiation fields, (3) higher selectivity for the desired metal ion, (4) no cation exchange, (5) reduced or no interference from accompanying anions, (6) faster kinetics, and (7) easy and selective regeneration. Target waste streams include metal-containing groundwater/process wastewater at ORNL`s Y-12 Plant (multiple metals), Savannah River Site (SRS), Rocky Flats (multiple metals), and Hanford; aqueous mixed wastes at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); and scrubber water generated at SRS and INEL. Focus Areas that will benefit from this research include Mixed Waste, and Subsurface Contaminants.

  14. Spectroscopic effects of disorder and vibrational localization in mixed-halide metal-halide chain solids

    SciTech Connect

    Love, S.P.; Scott, B.; Worl, L.A.; Huckett, S.C.; Saxena, A.; Huang, X.Z.; Bishop, A.R.; Swanson, B.I.

    1993-02-01

    Resonance Raman techniques, together with lattice-dynamics and Peierls-Hubbard modelling, are used to explore the electronic and vibrational dynamics of the quasi-one-dimensional metal-halogen chain solids [Pt(en){sub 2}][R(en){sub 2}X{sub 2}](ClO{sub 4}){sub 4}, (en = C{sub 2}H{sub 8}N{sub 2} and X=Cl, Br), abbreviated ``PLX.`` The mixed-halide materials PtCl{sub 1-x}Br{sub x} and PtCl{sub 1-x}I{sub x} consist of long mixed chains with heterojunctions between segments of the two constituent materials. Thus, in addition to providing mesoscale modulation of the chain electronic states, they serve as prototypes for elucidating the properties to be expected for macroscopic heterojunctions of these highly nonlinear materials. Once a detailed understanding of the various local vibrational modes occurring in these disordered solids is developed, the electronic structure of the chain segments and junctions can be probed by tuning the Raman excitation through their various electronic resonances.

  15. Matrix isolation infrared spectra of hydrogen halide and halogen complexes with nitrosyl halides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, Louis J.; Lucas, Donald; Pimentel, George C.

    1982-01-01

    Matrix isolation infrared spectra of nitrosyl halide (XNO) complexes with HX and X2 (X = Cl, Br) are presented. The relative frequency shifts of the HX mode are modest (ClNO H-Cl, delta-nu/nu = -0.045; BrNO H-Br, delta-nu/nu = -0.026), indicating weak hydrogen bonds 1-3 kcal/mol. These shifts are accompanied by significant shifts to higher frequencies in the XN-O stretching mode (CIN-O HCl, delta-nu/nu = +0.016; BrN-O HBr, delta-nu/nu = +0.011). Similar shifts were observed for the XN-O X2 complexes (ClN-O Cl2, delta-nu/nu = +0.009; BrN-O-Br2, delta-nu/nu = +0.013). In all four complexes, the X-NO stretching mode relative shift is opposite in sign and about 1.6 times that of the NO stretching mode. These four complexes are considered to be similar in structure and charge distribution. The XN-O frequency shift suggests that complex formation is accompanied by charge withdrawal from the NO bond ranging from about .04 to .07 electron charges. The HX and X2 molecules act as electron acceptors, drawing electrons out of the antibonding orbital of NO and strengthening the XN-O bond. The implications of the pattern of vibrational shifts concerning the structure of the complexes are discussed.

  16. Development Trends in Porous Adsorbents for Carbon Capture.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasulu, Bolisetty; Sreedhar, Inkollu; Suresh, Pathi; Raghavan, Kondapuram Vijaya

    2015-11-01

    Accumulation of greenhouse gases especially CO2 in the atmosphere leading to global warming with undesirable climate changes has been a serious global concern. Major power generation in the world is from coal based power plants. Carbon capture through pre- and post- combustion technologies with various technical options like adsorption, absorption, membrane separations, and chemical looping combustion with and without oxygen uncoupling have received considerable attention of researchers, environmentalists and the stake holders. Carbon capture from flue gases can be achieved with micro and meso porous adsorbents. This review covers carbonaceous (organic and metal organic frameworks) and noncarbonaceous (inorganic) porous adsorbents for CO2 adsorption at different process conditions and pore sizes. Focus is also given to noncarbonaceous micro and meso porous adsorbents in chemical looping combustion involving insitu CO2 capture at high temperature (>400 °C). Adsorption mechanisms, material characteristics, and synthesis methods are discussed. Attention is given to isosteric heats and characterization techniques. The options to enhance the techno-economic viability of carbon capture techniques by integrating with CO2 utilization to produce industrially important chemicals like ammonia and urea are analyzed. From the reader's perspective, for different classes of materials, each section has been summarized in the form of tables or figures to get a quick glance of the developments. PMID:26422294

  17. Adsorption isotherm of non-azeotropic solution onto porous adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, A.; Ramlan, N. A.; Anisuzzaman, S. M.; Chu, C. M.; Farm, Y. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Adsorption isotherm is essential component in the understanding of the adsorption process. Several methods of the measurements, analysis and interpretation of adsorption from solution have been reported in the literature. Most of the measurements of adsorption isotherm from solution were involved the measurement of excess isotherm conducted at low region of sorbates concentration. Direct interpretation of excess adsorption isotherm as adsorption isotherm is always been practice. Therefore, in this work a study on the measurement of the adsorption isotherm from solution of non-azeotropic organic solvent mixture onto porous adsorbents for whole range of liquid concentration was conducted. The study included the measurement of excess adsorption isotherm using conventional technique. Theoretical analysis and interpretation of adsorption isotherm from the excess isotherm were conducted using Pseudo Ideal Adsorption, Gibbs Dividing Plane Model and Langmuir-Fruendlich binary isotherm model. For organic solvents, acetone and propanol were chosen as the adsorbates due to the non-azeotropic properties in the mixture. Activated carbon and silicalite were chosen as adsorbents due to the different in their porosity such as macro porous and micro porous structure. The result of the study has revealed that the adsorption isotherm of non-azeotropic mixture onto activated carbon and silicalite can be interpreted as monolayer type of adsorption.

  18. Novel adsorbent applicability for decontamination of printing wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiurski, Jelena; Oros, Ivana; Ranogajec, Jonjaua; Kecic, Vesna

    2013-04-01

    Adsorption capacity of clayey minerals can be enhanced by replacing the natural exchangeable cations with organic cations, which makes the clay surface more hydrophobic. Different solids such as activated carbon, clay minerals, zeolites, metal oxides and organic polymers have been tested as effective adsorbents. On a global scale, clays have a large applicability for decontamination, purification of urban and industrial residual waters, protection of waste disposal areas, and purification of industrial gases and so on. Clay derivative materials with high adsorption capacities are very attractive from an economical point of view. Due to the economic constraints, a development of cost effective and clean processes is desired. Adsorption processes has proved to be the most effective, especially for effluents with moderate and low heavy metal concentrations, as like as in printing wastewaters. Among several removal technologies, the adsorption of Zn(II) ion onto NZ, B, pure C and C with PEG 600 addition could be of great importance for the printing wastewaters purification. However, the newly designed adsorbent of the defined pore size distribution and phase structure considered as the most suitable material for Zn(II) ion removal. The values of distribution coefficient (Kd) increased with decreasing of the adsorbent amount. The Kd values depend also on the type of used adsorbent, the following increased order is obtained: NZ < B = pure C < C with PEG 600 addition. The adsorption equilibrium data of Zn(II) ion on NZ, B, pure C and C with PEG 600 were analyzed in terms of the Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich (DKR) isotherm models. The characteristic parameters for each isotherms and related correlation coefficients were determined. The values of correlation coefficient (R2) indicated the following order of the isotherm models: Freundlich > Langmuir > DKR. The study also showed that the fired clay modified with PEG 600 addition has great potential

  19. Site blocking effects on adsorbed polyacrylamide conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brotherson, Brett A.

    The use of polymers as flocculating additives is a common practice in many manufacturing environments. However, exactly how these polymers interact with surfaces is relatively unknown. One specific topic which is thought to be very important to flocculation is an adsorbed polymer's conformation. Substantial amounts of previous work, mainly using simulations, have been performed to elucidate the theory surrounding adsorbed polymer conformations. Yet, there is little experimental work which directly verifies current theory. In order to optimize the use of polymer flocculants in industrial applications, a better understanding of an adsorbed polymer's conformation on a surface beyond theoretical simulations is necessary. This work looks specifically at site blocking, which has a broad impact on flocculation, adsorption, and surface modification, and investigated its effects on the resulting adsorbed polymer conformation. Experimental methods which would allow direct determination of adsorbed polymer conformational details and be comparable with previous experimental results were first determined or developed. Characterization of an adsorbed polymer's conformation was then evaluated using dynamic light scattering, a currently accepted experimental technique to examine this. This commonly used technique was performed to allow the comparison of this works results with past literature. Next, a new technique using atomic force microscopy was developed, building on previous experimental techniques, to allow the direct determination of an adsorbed polymer's loop lengths. This method also was able to quantify changes in the length of adsorbed polymer tails. Finally, mesoscopic simulation was attempted using dissipative particle dynamics. In order to determine more information about an adsorbed polymer's conformation, three different environmental factors were analyzed: an adsorbed polymer on a surface in water, an adsorbed polymer on a surface in aqueous solutions of varying

  20. Methods and Mechanisms for Cross-Electrophile Coupling of Csp(2) Halides with Alkyl Electrophiles.

    PubMed

    Weix, Daniel J

    2015-06-16

    Cross-electrophile coupling, the cross-coupling of two different electrophiles, avoids the need for preformed carbon nucleophiles, but development of general methods has lagged behind cross-coupling and C-H functionalization. A central reason for this slow development is the challenge of selectively coupling two substrates that are alike in reactivity. This Account describes the discovery of generally cross-selective reactions of aryl halides and acyl halides with alkyl halides, the mechanistic studies that illuminated the underlying principles of these reactions, and the use of these fundamental principles in the rational design of new cross-electrophile coupling reactions. Although the coupling of two different electrophiles under reducing conditions often leads primarily to symmetric dimers, the subtle differences in reactivity of aryl halides and alkyl halides with nickel catalysts allowed for generally cross-selective coupling reactions. These conditions could also be extended to the coupling of acyl halides with alkyl halides. These reactions are exceptionally functional group tolerant and can be assembled on the benchtop. A combination of stoichiometric and catalytic studies on the mechanism of these reactions revealed an unusual radical-chain mechanism and suggests that selectivity arises from (1) the preference of nickel(0) for oxidative addition to aryl halides and acyl halides over alkyl halides and (2) the greater propensity of alkyl halides to form free radicals. Bipyridine-ligated arylnickel intermediates react with alkyl radicals to efficiently form, after reductive elimination, new C-C bonds. Finally, the resulting nickel(I) species is proposed to regenerate an alkyl radical to carry the chain. Examples of new reactions designed using these principles include carbonylative coupling of aryl halides with alkyl halides to form ketones, arylation of epoxides to form β-aryl alcohols, and coupling of benzyl sulfonate esters with aryl halides to form

  1. Methods and Mechanisms for Cross-Electrophile Coupling of Csp2 Halides with Alkyl Electrophiles

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Cross-electrophile coupling, the cross-coupling of two different electrophiles, avoids the need for preformed carbon nucleophiles, but development of general methods has lagged behind cross-coupling and C–H functionalization. A central reason for this slow development is the challenge of selectively coupling two substrates that are alike in reactivity. This Account describes the discovery of generally cross-selective reactions of aryl halides and acyl halides with alkyl halides, the mechanistic studies that illuminated the underlying principles of these reactions, and the use of these fundamental principles in the rational design of new cross-electrophile coupling reactions. Although the coupling of two different electrophiles under reducing conditions often leads primarily to symmetric dimers, the subtle differences in reactivity of aryl halides and alkyl halides with nickel catalysts allowed for generally cross-selective coupling reactions. These conditions could also be extended to the coupling of acyl halides with alkyl halides. These reactions are exceptionally functional group tolerant and can be assembled on the benchtop. A combination of stoichiometric and catalytic studies on the mechanism of these reactions revealed an unusual radical-chain mechanism and suggests that selectivity arises from (1) the preference of nickel(0) for oxidative addition to aryl halides and acyl halides over alkyl halides and (2) the greater propensity of alkyl halides to form free radicals. Bipyridine-ligated arylnickel intermediates react with alkyl radicals to efficiently form, after reductive elimination, new C–C bonds. Finally, the resulting nickel(I) species is proposed to regenerate an alkyl radical to carry the chain. Examples of new reactions designed using these principles include carbonylative coupling of aryl halides with alkyl halides to form ketones, arylation of epoxides to form β-aryl alcohols, and coupling of benzyl sulfonate esters with aryl

  2. Adsorbate-induced curvature and stiffening of graphene.

    PubMed

    Svatek, Simon A; Scott, Oliver R; Rivett, Jasmine P H; Wright, Katherine; Baldoni, Matteo; Bichoutskaia, Elena; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Marsden, Alexander J; Wilson, Neil R; Beton, Peter H

    2015-01-14

    The adsorption of the alkane tetratetracontane (TTC, C44H90) on graphene induces the formation of a curved surface stabilized by a gain in adsorption energy. This effect arises from a curvature-dependent variation of a moiré pattern due to the mismatch of the carbon-carbon separation in the adsorbed molecule and the period of graphene. The effect is observed when graphene is transferred onto a deformable substrate, which in our case is the interface between water layers adsorbed on mica and an organic solvent, but is not observed on more rigid substrates such as boron nitride. Our results show that molecular adsorption can be influenced by substrate curvature, provide an example of two-dimensional molecular self-assembly on a soft, responsive interface, and demonstrate that the mechanical properties of graphene may be modified by molecular adsorption, which is of relevance to nanomechanical systems, electronics, and membrane technology. PMID:25469625

  3. Allantoin as a solid phase adsorbent for removing endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Vagenende, Vincent; Ching, Tim-Jang; Chua, Rui-Jing; Gagnon, Pete

    2013-10-01

    In this study we present a simple and robust method for removing endotoxins from protein solutions by using crystals of the small-molecule compound 2,5-dioxo-4-imidazolidinyl urea (allantoin) as a solid phase adsorbent. Allantoin crystalline powder is added to a protein solution at supersaturated concentrations, endotoxins bind and undissolved allantoin crystals with bound endotoxins are removed by filtration or centrifugation. This method removes an average of 99.98% endotoxin for 20 test proteins. The average protein recovery is ∼80%. Endotoxin binding is largely independent of pH, conductivity, reducing agent and various organic solvents. This is consistent with a hydrogen-bond based binding mechanism. Allantoin does not affect protein activity and stability, and the use of allantoin as a solid phase adsorbent provides better endotoxin removal than anion exchange, polymixin affinity and biological affinity methods for endotoxin clearance. PMID:24001944

  4. Electrolytic systems and methods for making metal halides and refining metals

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Justin M.; Cecala, David M.

    2015-05-26

    Disclosed are electrochemical cells and methods for producing a halide of a non-alkali metal and for electrorefining the halide. The systems typically involve an electrochemical cell having a cathode structure configured for dissolving a hydrogen halide that forms the halide into a molten salt of the halogen and an alkali metal. Typically a direct current voltage is applied across the cathode and an anode that is fabricated with the non-alkali metal such that the halide of the non-alkali metal is formed adjacent the anode. Electrorefining cells and methods involve applying a direct current voltage across the anode where the halide of the non-alkali metal is formed and the cathode where the non-alkali metal is electro-deposited. In a representative embodiment the halogen is chlorine, the alkali metal is lithium and the non-alkali metal is uranium.

  5. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Despite technical advances to reduce air pollution emissions, motor vehicles still account for 30 to 70% emissions of all urban air pollutants. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require 100 cities in the United States to reduce the amount of their smog within 5 to 15 years. Hence, auto emissions, the major cause of smog, must be reduced 30 to 60% by 1998. Natural gas con be combusted with less pollutant emissions. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) uses adsorbents and operates with a low storage pressure which results in lower capital costs and maintenance. This paper describes the production of an activated carbon adsorbent produced from an Illinois coal for ANG.

  6. States of water adsorbed on perindopril crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanov, V. A.; Khmelevskaya, V. S.; Bogdanov, N. Yu.; Gorchakov, K. A.

    2011-10-01

    The relationship between the structural state of adsorbed water, the crystal structure of the substances, and the solubility of the perindopril salt C19H32N2O5 · C4H11N in water was studied by IR spectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry. The high-frequency shift of the stretching vibrations of adsorbed water and the solubility depend on the crystal structure of the drug substance. A reversible chemical reaction occurred between the adsorbed water and the perindopril salt.

  7. Volumetric Interpretation of Protein Adsorption: Capacity Scaling with Adsorbate Molecular Weight and Adsorbent Surface Energy

    PubMed Central

    Parhi, Purnendu; Golas, Avantika; Barnthip, Naris; Noh, Hyeran; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2009-01-01

    Silanized-glass-particle adsorbent capacities are extracted from adsorption isotherms of human serum albumin (HSA, 66 kDa), immunoglobulin G (IgG, 160 kDa), fibrinogen (Fib, 341 kDa), and immunoglobulin M (IgM, 1000 kDa) for adsorbent surface energies sampling the observable range of water wettability. Adsorbent capacity expressed as either mass-or-moles per-unit-adsorbent-area increases with protein molecular weight (MW) in a manner that is quantitatively inconsistent with the idea that proteins adsorb as a monolayer at the solution-material interface in any physically-realizable configuration or state of denaturation. Capacity decreases monotonically with increasing adsorbent hydrophilicity to the limit-of-detection (LOD) near τo = 30 dyne/cm (θ~65o) for all protein/surface combinations studied (where τo≡γlvocosθ is the water adhesion tension, γlvo is the interfacial tension of pure-buffer solution, and θ is the buffer advancing contact angle). Experimental evidence thus shows that adsorbent capacity depends on both adsorbent surface energy and adsorbate size. Comparison of theory to experiment implies that proteins do not adsorb onto a two-dimensional (2D) interfacial plane as frequently depicted in the literature but rather partition from solution into a three-dimensional (3D) interphase region that separates the physical surface from bulk solution. This interphase has a finite volume related to the dimensions of hydrated protein in the adsorbed state (defining “layer” thickness). The interphase can be comprised of a number of adsorbed-protein layers depending on the solution concentration in which adsorbent is immersed, molecular volume of the adsorbing protein (proportional to MW), and adsorbent hydrophilicity. Multilayer adsorption accounts for adsorbent capacity over-and-above monolayer and is inconsistent with the idea that protein adsorbs to surfaces primarily through protein/surface interactions because proteins within second (or higher

  8. Alkali Halide Microstructured Optical Fiber for X-Ray Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeHaven, S. L.; Wincheski, R. A.; Albin, S.

    2014-01-01

    Microstructured optical fibers containing alkali halide scintillation materials of CsI(Na), CsI(Tl), and NaI(Tl) are presented. The scintillation materials are grown inside the microstructured fibers using a modified Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers, with and without an aluminum film coating are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The photon count results show significant variations in the fiber output based on the materials. The alkali halide fiber output can exceed that of the CdTe detector, dependent upon photon counter efficiency and fiber configuration. The results and associated materials difference are discussed.

  9. Gaseous NH3 Confers Porous Pt Nanodendrites Assisted by Halides.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shuanglong; Eid, Kamel; Li, Weifeng; Cao, Xueqin; Pan, Yue; Guo, Jun; Wang, Liang; Wang, Hongjing; Gu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Tailoring the morphology of Pt nanocrystals (NCs) is of great concern for their enhancement in catalytic activity and durability. In this article, a novel synthetic strategy is developed to selectively prepare porous dendritic Pt NCs with different structures for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) assisted by NH3 gas and halides (F(-), Cl(-), Br(-)). The NH3 gas plays critical roles on tuning the morphology. Previously, H2 and CO gas are reported to assist the shape control of metallic nanocrystals. This is the first demonstration that NH3 gas assists the Pt anisotropic growth. The halides also play important role in the synthetic strategy to regulate the formation of Pt NCs. As-made porous dendritic Pt NCs, especially when NH4F is used as a regulating reagent, show superior catalytic activity for ORR compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst and other previously reported Pt-based NCs. PMID:27184228

  10. Gaseous NH3 Confers Porous Pt Nanodendrites Assisted by Halides

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shuanglong; Eid, Kamel; Li, Weifeng; Cao, Xueqin; Pan, Yue; Guo, Jun; Wang, Liang; Wang, Hongjing; Gu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Tailoring the morphology of Pt nanocrystals (NCs) is of great concern for their enhancement in catalytic activity and durability. In this article, a novel synthetic strategy is developed to selectively prepare porous dendritic Pt NCs with different structures for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) assisted by NH3 gas and halides (F−, Cl−, Br−). The NH3 gas plays critical roles on tuning the morphology. Previously, H2 and CO gas are reported to assist the shape control of metallic nanocrystals. This is the first demonstration that NH3 gas assists the Pt anisotropic growth. The halides also play important role in the synthetic strategy to regulate the formation of Pt NCs. As-made porous dendritic Pt NCs, especially when NH4F is used as a regulating reagent, show superior catalytic activity for ORR compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst and other previously reported Pt-based NCs. PMID:27184228

  11. Alkali halide microstructured optical fiber for X-ray detection

    SciTech Connect

    DeHaven, S. L. E-mail: russel.a.wincheski@nasa.gov; Wincheski, R. A. E-mail: russel.a.wincheski@nasa.gov; Albin, S.

    2015-03-31

    Microstructured optical fibers containing alkali halide scintillation materials of CsI(Na), CsI(Tl), and NaI(Tl) are presented. The scintillation materials are grown inside the microstructured fibers using a modified Bridgman-Stockbarger technique. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers, with and without an aluminum film coating are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The photon count results show significant variations in the fiber output based on the materials. The alkali halide fiber output can exceed that of the CdTe detector, dependent upon photon counter efficiency and fiber configuration. The results and associated materials difference are discussed.

  12. Gaseous NH3 Confers Porous Pt Nanodendrites Assisted by Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shuanglong; Eid, Kamel; Li, Weifeng; Cao, Xueqin; Pan, Yue; Guo, Jun; Wang, Liang; Wang, Hongjing; Gu, Hongwei

    2016-05-01

    Tailoring the morphology of Pt nanocrystals (NCs) is of great concern for their enhancement in catalytic activity and durability. In this article, a novel synthetic strategy is developed to selectively prepare porous dendritic Pt NCs with different structures for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) assisted by NH3 gas and halides (F‑, Cl‑, Br‑). The NH3 gas plays critical roles on tuning the morphology. Previously, H2 and CO gas are reported to assist the shape control of metallic nanocrystals. This is the first demonstration that NH3 gas assists the Pt anisotropic growth. The halides also play important role in the synthetic strategy to regulate the formation of Pt NCs. As-made porous dendritic Pt NCs, especially when NH4F is used as a regulating reagent, show superior catalytic activity for ORR compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst and other previously reported Pt-based NCs.

  13. Large methyl halide emissions from south Texas salt marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhew, R. C.; Whelan, M. E.; Min, D.-H.

    2014-06-01

    Coastal salt marshes are natural sources of methyl chloride (CH3Cl) and methyl bromide (CH3Br) to the atmosphere, but measured emission rates vary widely by geography. Here we report large methyl halide fluxes from subtropical salt marshes of south Texas. Sites with the halophytic plant, Batis maritima, emitted methyl halides at rates that are orders of magnitude greater than sites containing other vascular plants or macroalgae. B. maritima emissions were generally highest at midday; however, diurnal variability was more pronounced for CH3Br than CH3Cl, and surprisingly high nighttime CH3Cl fluxes were observed in July. Seasonal and intra-site variability were large, even taking into account biomass differences. Overall, these subtropical salt marsh sites show much higher emission rates than temperate salt marshes at similar times of the year, supporting the contention that low-latitude salt marshes are significant sources of CH3Cl and CH3Br.

  14. Large methyl halide emissions from south Texas salt marshes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhew, R. C.; Whelan, M. E.; Min, D.-H.

    2014-11-01

    Coastal salt marshes are natural sources of methyl chloride (CH3Cl) and methyl bromide (CH3Br) to the atmosphere, but measured emission rates vary widely by geography. Here we report large methyl halide fluxes from subtropical salt marshes of south Texas. Sites with the halophytic plant, Batis maritima, emitted methyl halides at rates that are orders of magnitude greater than sites containing other vascular plants or macroalgae. B. maritima emissions were generally highest at midday; however, diurnal variability was more pronounced for CH3Br than CH3Cl, and surprisingly high nighttime CH3Cl fluxes were observed in July. Seasonal and intra-site variability were large, even taking into account biomass differences. Overall, these subtropical salt marsh sites show much higher emission rates than temperate salt marshes at similar times of the year, supporting the contention that low-latitude salt marshes are significant sources of CH3Cl and CH3Br.

  15. Electronic excitation in bulk and nanocrystalline alkali halides.

    PubMed

    Bichoutskaia, Elena; Pyper, Nicholas C

    2012-11-14

    The lowest energy excitations in bulk alkali halides are investigated by considering five different excited state descriptions. It is concluded that excitation transfers one outermost halide electron in the fully ionic ground state to the lowest energy vacant s orbital of one closest cation neighbour to produce the excited state termed dipolar. The excitation energies of seven salts were computed using shell model description of the lattice polarization produced by the effective dipole moment of the excited state neutral halogen-neutral metal pair. Ab initio uncorrelated short-range inter-ionic interactions computed from anion wavefunctions adapted to the in-crystal environment were augmented by short-range electron correlation contributions derived from uniform electron-gas density functional theory. Dispersive attractions including wavefunction overlap damping were introduced using reliable semi-empirical dispersion coefficients. The good agreement between the predicted excitation energies and experiment provides strong evidence that the excited state is dipolar. In alkali halide nanocrystals in which each ionic plane contains only four ions, the Madelung energies are significantly reduced compared with the bulk. This predicts that the corresponding intra-crystal excitation energies in the nanocrystals, where there are two excited states depending on whether the halide electron is transferred to a cation in the same or in the neighbouring plane, will be reduced by almost 2 eV. For such an encapsulated KI crystal, it has been shown that the greater polarization in the excited state of the bulk crystal causes these reductions to be lowered to a 1.1 eV-1.5 eV range for the case of charge transfer to a neighbouring plane. For intra-plane charge transfer the magnitude of the polarization energy is further reduced thus causing the excitation in these encapsulated materials to be only 0.2 eV less than in the bulk crystal. PMID:23163361

  16. Oxidative alkoxylation of phosphine in alcohol solutions of copper halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polimbetova, G. S.; Borangazieva, A. K.; Ibraimova, Zh. U.; Bugubaeva, G. O.; Keynbay, S.

    2016-08-01

    The phosphine oxidation reaction with oxygen in alcohol solutions of copper (I, II) halides is studied. Kinetic parameters, intermediates, and by-products are studied by means of NMR 31Р-, IR-, UV-, and ESR- spectroscopy; and by magnetic susceptibility, redox potentiometry, gas chromatography, and elemental analysis. A reaction mechanism is proposed, and the optimum conditions are found for the reaction of oxidative alkoxylation phosphine.

  17. Copper-catalyzed arylation of alkyl halides with arylaluminum reagents

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Bijay

    2015-01-01

    Summary We report a Cu-catalyzed coupling between triarylaluminum reagents and alkyl halides to form arylalkanes. The reaction proceeds in the presence of N,N,N’,N’-tetramethyl-o-phenylenediamine (NN-1) as a ligand in combination with CuI as a catalyst. This catalyst system enables the coupling of primary alkyl iodides and bromides with electron-neutral and electron-rich triarylaluminum reagents and affords the cross-coupled products in good to excellent yields. PMID:26734088

  18. Copper-catalyzed arylation of alkyl halides with arylaluminum reagents.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Bijay; Giri, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    We report a Cu-catalyzed coupling between triarylaluminum reagents and alkyl halides to form arylalkanes. The reaction proceeds in the presence of N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-o-phenylenediamine (NN-1) as a ligand in combination with CuI as a catalyst. This catalyst system enables the coupling of primary alkyl iodides and bromides with electron-neutral and electron-rich triarylaluminum reagents and affords the cross-coupled products in good to excellent yields. PMID:26734088

  19. Organolead Halide Perovskites for Low Operating Voltage Multilevel Resistive Switching.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaeho; Park, Sunghak; Lee, Joohee; Hong, Kootak; Kim, Do-Hong; Moon, Cheon Woo; Park, Gyeong Do; Suh, Junmin; Hwang, Jinyeon; Kim, Soo Young; Jung, Hyun Suk; Park, Nam-Gyu; Han, Seungwu; Nam, Ki Tae; Jang, Ho Won

    2016-08-01

    Organolead halide perovskites are used for low-operating-voltage multilevel resistive switching. Ag/CH3 NH3 PbI3 /Pt cells exhibit electroforming-free resistive switching at an electric field of 3.25 × 10(3) V cm(-1) for four distinguishable ON-state resistance levels. The migration of iodine interstitials and vacancies with low activation energies is responsible for the low-electric-field resistive switching via filament formation and annihilation. PMID:27192161

  20. Role of Microstructure in the Electron-Hole Interaction of Hybrid Lead-Halide Perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Jarvist M.; Barker, Alex J.; De Bastiani, Michele; Gandini, Marina; Marras, Sergio; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Walsh, Aron; Petrozza, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Solar cells based on hybrid inorganic-organic halide perovskites have demonstrated high power conversion efficiencies in a range of architectures. The existence and stability of bound electron-hole pairs in these materials, and their role in the exceptional performance of optoelectronic devices, remains a controversial issue. Here we demonstrate, through a combination of optical spectroscopy and multiscale modeling as a function of the degree of polycrystallinity and temperature, that the electron-hole interaction is sensitive to the microstructure of the material. The long-range order is disrupted by polycrystalline disorder and the variations in electrostatic potential found for smaller crystals suppress exciton formation, while larger crystals of the same composition demonstrate an unambiguous excitonic state. We conclude that fabrication procedures and morphology strongly influence perovskite behaviour, with both free carrier and excitonic regimes possible, with strong implications for optoelectronic devices. PMID:26442125

  1. Artifacts in Absorption Measurements of Organometal Halide Perovskite Materials: What Are the Real Spectra?

    PubMed

    Tian, Yuxi; Scheblykin, Ivan G

    2015-09-01

    Organometal halide (OMH) perovskites have attracted lots of attention over the last several years due to their very promising performance as the materials for solar cells and light-emitting devices. Photophysical processes in these hybrid organic-inorganic semiconductors are still heavily debated. To know precise absorption spectra is absolutely necessary for quantitative understanding of the fundamental properties of OMH perovskites. We show that to measure the absorption of perovskite materials correctly is a difficult task which could be easily overlooked by the community. Many of the published absorption spectra exhibit a characteristic step-like featureless shape due to light scattering, high optical density of individual perovskite crystals and poor coverage of the substrate. We show how to recognize these artifacts, to avoid them, and to use absorption spectra of films for estimation of the surface coverage ratio. PMID:27120683

  2. Polar-solvent-free colloidal synthesis of highly luminescent alkylammonium lead halide perovskite nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Vybornyi, Oleh; Yakunin, Sergii; Kovalenko, Maksym V

    2016-03-17

    A novel synthesis of hybrid organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite nanocrystals (CH3NH3PbX3, X = Br or I) that does not involve the use of dimethylformamide or other polar solvents is presented. The reaction between methylamine and PbX2 salts is conducted in a high-boiling nonpolar solvent (1-octadecene) in the presence of oleylamine and oleic acid as coordinating ligands. The resulting nanocrystals are characterized by high photoluminescence quantum efficiencies of 15-50%, outstanding phase purity and tunable shapes (nanocubes, nanowires, and nanoplatelets). Nanoplatelets spontaneously assemble into micrometer-length wires by face-to-face stacking. In addition, we demonstrate amplified spontaneous emission from thin films of green-emitting CH3NH3PbBr3 nanowires with low pumping thresholds of 3 μJ cm(-2). PMID:26645348

  3. Lasing in robust cesium lead halide perovskite nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Samuel W.; Lai, Minliang; Gibson, Natalie A.; Wong, Andrew B.; Dou, Letian; Ma, Jie; Wang, Lin-Wang; Leone, Stephen R.; Yang, Peidong

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly growing field of nanoscale lasers can be advanced through the discovery of new, tunable light sources. The emission wavelength tunability demonstrated in perovskite materials is an attractive property for nanoscale lasers. Whereas organic–inorganic lead halide perovskite materials are known for their instability, cesium lead halides offer a robust alternative without sacrificing emission tunability or ease of synthesis. Here, we report the low-temperature, solution-phase growth of cesium lead halide nanowires exhibiting low-threshold lasing and high stability. The as-grown nanowires are single crystalline with well-formed facets, and act as high-quality laser cavities. The nanowires display excellent stability while stored and handled under ambient conditions over the course of weeks. Upon optical excitation, Fabry–Pérot lasing occurs in CsPbBr3 nanowires with an onset of 5 μJ cm−2 with the nanowire cavity displaying a maximum quality factor of 1,009 ± 5. Lasing under constant, pulsed excitation can be maintained for over 1 h, the equivalent of 109 excitation cycles, and lasing persists upon exposure to ambient atmosphere. Wavelength tunability in the green and blue regions of the spectrum in conjunction with excellent stability makes these nanowire lasers attractive for device fabrication. PMID:26862172

  4. Deciphering Halogen Competition in Organometallic Halide Perovskite Growth

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Keum, Jong Kahk; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Chen, Shiyou; Du, Mao-Hua; Ivanov, Ilia N; Rouleau, Christopher; Geohegan, David B.; Xiao, Kai

    2016-03-01

    Organometallic halide perovskites (OHPs) hold great promise for next-generation, low-cost optoelectronic devices. During the chemical synthesis and crystallization of OHP thin films a major unresolved question is the competition between multiple halide species (e.g. I-, Cl-, Br-) in the formation of the mixed halide perovskite crystals. Whether Cl- ions are successfully incorporated into the perovskite crystal structure or alternatively, where they are located, is not yet fully understood. Here, in situ X-ray diffraction measurements of crystallization dynamics are combined with ex situ TOF-SIMS chemical analysis to reveal that Br- or Cl- ions can promote crystal growth, yet reactive I- ionsmore » prevent them from incorporating into the lattice of the final perovskite crystal structure. The Cl- ions are located in the grain boundaries of the perovskite films. These findings significantly advance our understanding of the role of halogens during synthesis of hybrid perovskites, and provide an insightful guidance to the engineering of high-quality perovskite films, essential for exploring superior-performance and cost-effective optoelectronic devices.« less

  5. Environmental controls over methyl halide emissions from rice paddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redeker, K. R.; Cicerone, R. J.

    2004-03-01

    This paper examines primary controlling factors that affect methyl halide emissions from rice paddy ecosystems. Observations of four cultivars under multiple growth conditions during studies in commercial fields and the University of California, Irvine, greenhouse lead to the conclusion that daily emissions of methyl halides are primarily determined by the growth stage of the rice plant, with the exception that methyl chloride emissions show no clear seasonal pattern. Methyl chloride emissions appear to be more from the paddy water and/or soil as opposed to the plants; however, in soils with high chloride content, these emissions appear to peak during the reproductive phase. Strong secondary influences include air temperature, soil halide concentration, and soil pore water saturation. The cultivars studied had statistically separate seasonally integrated emissions. Irradiant light and aboveground biomass appear to have little effect on emissions. Emissions of methyl chloride, methyl bromide, and methyl iodide are estimated to be 3.5, 2.3, and 48 mg/m2/yr, or 5.3, 3.5, and 72 Gg/yr, from rice paddies globally.

  6. Deciphering Halogen Competition in Organometallic Halide Perovskite Growth.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bin; Keum, Jong; Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Belianinov, Alex; Chen, Shiyou; Du, Mao-Hua; Ivanov, Ilia N; Rouleau, Christopher M; Geohegan, David B; Xiao, Kai

    2016-04-20

    Organometallic halide perovskites (OHPs) hold great promise for next-generation, low-cost optoelectronic devices. During the chemical synthesis and crystallization of OHP thin films, a major unresolved question is the competition between multiple halide species (e.g., I(-), Cl(-), Br(-)) in the formation of the mixed-halide perovskite crystals. Whether Cl(-) ions are successfully incorporated into the perovskite crystal structure or, alternatively, where they are located is not yet fully understood. Here, in situ X-ray diffraction measurements of crystallization dynamics are combined with ex situ TOF-SIMS chemical analysis to reveal that Br(-) or Cl(-) ions can promote crystal growth, yet reactive I(-) ions prevent them from incorporating into the lattice of the final perovskite crystal structure. The Cl(-) ions are located in the grain boundaries of the perovskite films. These findings significantly advance our understanding of the role of halogens during synthesis of hybrid perovskites and provide an insightful guidance to the engineering of high-quality perovskite films, essential for exploring superior-performing and cost-effective optoelectronic devices. PMID:26931634

  7. Depth profile of halide anions under highly charged biological membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Woongmo; Wang, Wenjie; Lee, Jonggwan; Vaknin, David; Kim, Doseok

    2015-03-01

    Halide ion (Cl- and I-) distribution under a cationic Langmuir monolayer consisting of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-3 trimethylammonium-propane (DPTAP) molecules was investigated by vibrational sum-frequency generation (VSFG) and X-ray spectroscopy. From VSFG spectra, it was observed that large halide anions (I-) screen surface charge more efficiently so that interfacial water alignment becomes more randomized. On the other hand, number density of ions directly measured by X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy at grazing incidence angle reveals that the ion densities within 6 ~ 8 nm are the same for both I- and Cl-. Since the observed ion densities in both cases are almost equal to the charge density of the DPTAP monolayer, we propose that larger halide anions are attracted closer to the surface making direct binding with the charged headgroups of the molecules in the monolayer, accomplishing charge neutrality in short distance. This direct adsorption of anions also disturbs the monolayer structure both in terms of the conformation of alkyl chains and the vertical configuration of the monolayer, with iodine having the stronger effect. Our study shows that the length scale that ions neutralize a charged interface varies significantly and specifically even between monovalent ions.

  8. Iodomethane-Mediated Organometal Halide Perovskite with Record Photoluminescence Lifetime.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weidong; McLeod, John A; Yang, Yingguo; Wang, Yimeng; Wu, Zhongwei; Bai, Sai; Yuan, Zhongcheng; Song, Tao; Wang, Yusheng; Si, Junjie; Wang, Rongbin; Gao, Xingyu; Zhang, Xinping; Liu, Lijia; Sun, Baoquan

    2016-09-01

    Organometallic lead halide perovskites are excellent light harvesters for high-efficiency photovoltaic devices. However, as the key component in these devices, a perovskite thin film with good morphology and minimal trap states is still difficult to obtain. Herein we show that by incorporating a low boiling point alkyl halide such as iodomethane (CH3I) into the precursor solution, a perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3-xClx) film with improved grain size and orientation can be easily achieved. More importantly, these films exhibit a significantly reduced amount of trap states. Record photoluminescence lifetimes of more than 4 μs are achieved; these lifetimes are significantly longer than that of pristine CH3NH3PbI3-xClx films. Planar heterojunction solar cells incorporating these CH3I-mediated perovskites have demonstrated a dramatically increased power conversion efficiency compared to the ones using pristine CH3NH3PbI3-xClx. Photoluminescence, transient absorption, and microwave detected photoconductivity measurements all provide consistent evidence that CH3I addition increases the number of excitons generated and their diffusion length, both of which assist efficient carrier transport in the photovoltaic device. The simple incorporation of alkyl halide to enhance perovskite surface passivation introduces an important direction for future progress on high efficiency perovskite optoelectronic devices. PMID:27529636

  9. Extensive and Highly Accurate Line Lists for Hydrogen Halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Bernath, P. F.; Gordon, I. E.; Rothman, L. S.; Richard, C.; Le Roy, R. J.; Coxon, J. A.; Hajigeorgiou, P.

    2011-06-01

    New dipole moment functions (DMF) for the ground X 1Σ+ electronic states of the hydrogen halides (HF, HCl, HBr, HI) have been obtained using a direct fit approach that fits the best available and appropriately weighted experimental line intensity data for individual ro-vibrational transitions. Combining the newly developed (taking into account the most recent experiments) empirical potential energy functions and the DMFs, line positions and line intensities of the hydrogen halides and their isotopologues have been calculated numerically using program LEVEL. In addition, new semi-empirical algorithms for assigning line-shape parameters for these species have been developed. Using these improvements, new line lists for hydrogen halides were created to update the HITRAN spectroscopic database. These new lists are more accurate and significantly more extensive than those included in the current version of the database (HITRAN2008). R.J. Le Roy, ``LEVEL 8.0, 2007'', University of Waterloo Chemical Physics Research Report CP-663 (2007); see http://leroy.uwaterloo.ca/programs/. L.S. Rothman, I.E. Gordon, A. Barbe, D.C. Benner, P.F. Bernath, et al., ``The HITRAN 2008 Molecular Spectroscopic Database,'' JQSRT 110, 532-572 (2009).

  10. Comparative Investigation of the Efficacy of Three Different Adsorbents against OTA-Induced Toxicity in Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Nedeljković-Trailović, Jelena; Trailović, Saša; Resanović, Radmila; Milićević, Dragan; Jovanovic, Milijan; Vasiljevic, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the efficacy of three different adsorbents, inorganic (modified zeolite), organic (esterified glucomannans) and mixed (inorganic and organic components, with the addition of enzymes), in protecting broilers from the toxic effects of ochratoxin A in feed. Broilers were fed diets containing 2 mg/kg of ochratoxin A (OTA) and supplemented with adsorbents at the recommended concentration of 2 g/kg for 21 days. The presence of OTA led to a notable reduction in body weight, lower weight gain, increased feed conversion and induced histopathological changes in the liver and kidneys. The presence of inorganic, organic and mixed adsorbents in contaminated feed only partially reduced the negative effects of OTA on the broiler performances. Broilers that were fed with adsorbent-supplemented feed reached higher body weight (17.96%, 19.09% and 13.59%), compared to the group that received only OTA. The presence of adsorbents partially alleviated the reduction in feed consumption (22.68%, 12.91% and 10.59%), and a similar effect was observed with feed conversion. The applied adsorbents have also reduced the intensity of histopathological changes caused by OTA; however, they were not able to prevent their onset. After the withdrawal of the toxin and adsorbents from the feed (21–42 days), all previously observed disturbances in broilers were reduced, but more remarkably in broilers fed with adsorbents. PMID:25855130

  11. Comparative investigation of the efficacy of three different adsorbents against OTA-induced toxicity in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Nedeljković-Trailović, Jelena; Trailović, Saša; Resanović, Radmila; Milićević, Dragan; Jovanovic, Milijan; Vasiljevic, Marko

    2015-04-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the efficacy of three different adsorbents, inorganic (modified zeolite), organic (esterified glucomannans) and mixed (inorganic and organic components, with the addition of enzymes), in protecting broilers from the toxic effects of ochratoxin A in feed. Broilers were fed diets containing 2 mg/kg of ochratoxin A (OTA) and supplemented with adsorbents at the recommended concentration of 2 g/kg for 21 days. The presence of OTA led to a notable reduction in body weight, lower weight gain, increased feed conversion and induced histopathological changes in the liver and kidneys. The presence of inorganic, organic and mixed adsorbents in contaminated feed only partially reduced the negative effects of OTA on the broiler performances. Broilers that were fed with adsorbent-supplemented feed reached higher body weight (17.96%, 19.09% and 13.59%), compared to the group that received only OTA. The presence of adsorbents partially alleviated the reduction in feed consumption (22.68%, 12.91% and 10.59%), and a similar effect was observed with feed conversion. The applied adsorbents have also reduced the intensity of histopathological changes caused by OTA; however, they were not able to prevent their onset. After the withdrawal of the toxin and adsorbents from the feed (21-42 days), all previously observed disturbances in broilers were reduced, but more remarkably in broilers fed with adsorbents. PMID:25855130

  12. Indirect detection of halide ions via fluorescence quenching of quinine sulfate in microcolumn ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Toyohide; Sumida, Junichi

    2004-06-01

    Halide ions could be visualized via fluorescence quenching in microcolumn ion chromatography. The fluorescence of quinine sulfate, which was contained in an acidic eluent, was quenched by halide ions. The observed fluorescence quenching values increased in this order: iodide, bromide, and chloride. The present detection system was relatively sensitive to halide ions except for fluoride: other anions gave smaller signals than halide ions. The present detection system provided quantitative information, so it could be applied to the determination of chloride in water samples. PMID:15228124

  13. Method for producing hydrocarbon fuels from heavy polynuclear hydrocarbons by use of molten metal halide catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Everett

    1979-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the heavy feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst, thereafter separating at least a substantial portion of the carbonaceous material associated with the reaction mixture from the spent molten metal halide and thereafter regenerating the metal halide catalyst, an improvement comprising contacting the spent molten metal halide catalyst after removal of a major portion of the carbonaceous material therefrom with an additional quantity of hydrogen is disclosed.

  14. IR investigations of surfaces and adsorbates

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn Williams

    2001-12-10

    Synchrotron infrared reflection-absorption measurements on single crystal metal surfaces with adsorbates have led to the determination of many key parameters related to the bonding vibrational modes and the dynamics of adsorbates. In particular, energy couplings between electrons and adsorbate motion have been shown to be a dominant mechanism on metal surfaces. Excellent agreement has been obtained with calculations for many of the observations, and the synergy between theory and experiment has led to a deeper understanding of the roles of electrons and phonons in determining the properties of interfaces and their roles in phenomena as diverse as friction, lubrication, catalysis and adhesion. Nonetheless, as the experiments are pushed harder, to describe such effects as co-adsorbed systems, disagreements continue to challenge the theory and our comprehension also is still evolving.

  15. Examining Adsorbed Polymer Conformations with Fluorescence Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, Maria; Chennaoui, Mourad; Wong, Janet; Tribology Group, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Team

    2011-03-01

    The conformation of adsorbed polymers can have significant impact on their properties such as dynamics and elasticity as well as their ability to take part in reactions with other molecules. Experimental research to determine adsorbed polymer conformation has relied mainly on atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies. During an AFM scan, the contact between the scanning probe and the polymer could affect the polymer conformation, particularly where parts of the polymer might have formed projected loops and tails. In this work, conformations of model polymers are examined with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). The advantage of TIRFM over AFM is that TIRFM is a non contact technique. Lambda DNA labelled along its length with fluorescent probes was adsorbed in a projected 2D -- 3D state. With TIRFM, the relationship between intensity and depth was used as a basis to determine how the conformation of the adsorbed polymers evolved with time using our custom algorithm.

  16. Polar-solvent-free colloidal synthesis of highly luminescent alkylammonium lead halide perovskite nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vybornyi, Oleh; Yakunin, Sergii; Kovalenko, Maksym V.

    2016-03-01

    A novel synthesis of hybrid organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite nanocrystals (CH3NH3PbX3, X = Br or I) that does not involve the use of dimethylformamide or other polar solvents is presented. The reaction between methylamine and PbX2 salts is conducted in a high-boiling nonpolar solvent (1-octadecene) in the presence of oleylamine and oleic acid as coordinating ligands. The resulting nanocrystals are characterized by high photoluminescence quantum efficiencies of 15-50%, outstanding phase purity and tunable shapes (nanocubes, nanowires, and nanoplatelets). Nanoplatelets spontaneously assemble into micrometer-length wires by face-to-face stacking. In addition, we demonstrate amplified spontaneous emission from thin films of green-emitting CH3NH3PbBr3 nanowires with low pumping thresholds of 3 μJ cm-2.A novel synthesis of hybrid organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite nanocrystals (CH3NH3PbX3, X = Br or I) that does not involve the use of dimethylformamide or other polar solvents is presented. The reaction between methylamine and PbX2 salts is conducted in a high-boiling nonpolar solvent (1-octadecene) in the presence of oleylamine and oleic acid as coordinating ligands. The resulting nanocrystals are characterized by high photoluminescence quantum efficiencies of 15-50%, outstanding phase purity and tunable shapes (nanocubes, nanowires, and nanoplatelets). Nanoplatelets spontaneously assemble into micrometer-length wires by face-to-face stacking. In addition, we demonstrate amplified spontaneous emission from thin films of green-emitting CH3NH3PbBr3 nanowires with low pumping thresholds of 3 μJ cm-2. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials and methods, additional figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06890h

  17. Dispersed-phase adsorbents for biotechnology applications

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, C.D.

    1987-01-01

    A new type of adsorbent material has been developed in which very small adsorbent particles are entrapped in a hydrocolloidal gel matrix that is formed into small, monodisperse spherical beads. Examples of applications of this type of material include dispersed, hydrous transition metal oxides that can be used for the retention of biocatalysts, such as enzymes, and certain microorganisms or microbial fragments that can be dispersed into the gel matrix to accumulate and isolate various dissolved metals. 7 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  19. Mesoporous Silica: A Suitable Adsorbent for Amines

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Mesoporous silica with KIT-6 structure was investigated as a preconcentrating material in chromatographic systems for ammonia and trimethylamine. Its adsorption capacity was compared to that of existing commercial materials, showing its increased adsorption power. In addition, KIT-6 mesoporous silica efficiently adsorbs both gases, while none of the employed commercial adsorbents did. This means that KIT-6 Mesoporous silica may be a good choice for integrated chromatography/gas sensing micro-devices. PMID:20628459

  20. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  1. Thiophilic adsorbents for RIA and ELISA procedures.

    PubMed

    Oscarsson, S; Chaga, G; Porath, J

    1991-10-25

    Three types of agarose derivatives have been prepared and investigated as adsorbents for radioimmunoassay and ELISA analysis. The analytical systems were evaluated using beta 2 microglobulin as a model. After a competitive reaction between the immunocomponents in solution, the formed immune complexes were adsorbed onto the adsorbent in the presence of 0.5 M potassium sulfate in 0.1 M Tris, pH 7.5. The binding constant between the interaction site on human IgG and the adsorbent 3-(2-pyridylthio)-2-hydroxypropylagarose (Py-S-gel) was determined to be 1.5 x 10(7) M-1 and the binding capacity was 20 mg/ml gel. The immune complex was desorbed by deleting potassium sulfate from the buffer, and only 0.5% of the total applied protein remained after washing the adsorbent with 0.5 M NaOH. The same adsorbent can be used repetitively with different systems. PMID:1940385

  2. Photochemistry of Nitrate Adsorbed on Mineral Dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gankanda, A.; Grassian, V. H.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral dust particles in the atmosphere are often associated with adsorbed nitrate from heterogeneous reactions with nitrogen oxides including HNO3 and NO2. Although nitrate ion is a well-studied chromophore in natural waters, the photochemistry of adsorbed nitrate on mineral dust particles is yet to be fully explored. In this study, wavelength dependence of the photochemistry of adsorbed nitrate on different model components of mineral dust aerosol has been investigated using transmission FTIR spectroscopy. Al2O3, TiO2 and NaY zeolite were used as model systems to represent non-photoactive oxides, photoactive semiconductor oxides and porous materials respectively, present in mineral dust aerosol. In this study, adsorbed nitrate is irradiated with 254 nm, 310 nm and 350 nm narrow band light. In the irradiation with narrow band light, NO2 is the only detectable gas-phase product formed from nitrate adsorbed on Al2O3 and TiO2. The NO2 yield is highest at 310 nm for both Al2O3 and TiO2. Unlike Al2O3 and TiO2, in zeolite, adsorbed nitrate photolysis to nitrite is observed only at 310 nm during narrow band irradiation. Moreover gas phase products were not detected during nitrate photolysis in zeolite at all three wavelengths. The significance of these differences as related to nitrate photochemistry on different mineral dust components will be highlighted.

  3. Graphene oxide/chitin nanofibril composite foams as column adsorbents for aqueous pollutants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhongshi; Liu, Dagang; Zhu, Yi; Li, Zehui; Li, Zhenxuan; Tian, Huafeng; Liu, Haiqing

    2016-06-25

    A novel graphene oxide/chitin nanofibrils (GO-CNF) composite foam as a column adsorbent was prepared for aqueous contaminant disposal. The structures, morphologies and properties of composite foams supported by nanofibrils were characterized. As a special case, the adsorption of methylene blue (MB) on GO-CNF was investigated regarding the static adsorption and column adsorption-desorption tests. Results from equilibrium adsorption isotherms indicated that the adsorption behavior was well-fitted to Langmuir model. The composite foams reinforced by CNF were dimensionally stable during the column adsorption process and could be reused after elution. The removal efficiency of MB was still nearly 90% after 3 cycles. Furthermore, other inorganic or organic pollutants adsorbed by composite foams were also explored. Therefore, this novel composite foam with remarkable properties such as dimensional stability, universal adsorbent for cationic pollutants, high adsorption capacity, and ease of regeneration was a desirable adsorbent in the future practical application of water pollutant treatment. PMID:27083813

  4. Removal effects and mechanisms of Microcystic aeruginosa by Chitosan-modified Adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Wu, Cuirong; He, Yan; Zhang, Bingru; Li, Fengting

    2010-11-01

    The health of humans and other organisms is threatened by increasingly serious water contamination by algae in all the country's major lakes such as Taihu Lake. This experiment was conducted to investigate the removal effects and mechanism of Microcystic aeruginosa by Chitosan-modified adsorbent, with comparison of polyaluminium chloride (PAC) and poly ferric sulfate (PFS). Microcystic aeruginosa grown in the laboratory was used for this experiment. The results showed that the algae-removal efficiency of Chitosan-modified adsorbent presents a good performance. When the dosage of the adsorbent reached 20 ppm, the turbidity and the chlorophyll a of treated water dropped by 90% and 86%, respectively. Compared to conventional coagulation, the dosage was reduced. The adhesive bridge effect of Chitosan and adsorption of modified adsorbent provided an important complement to subsequent dehydrating treatment for algae.

  5. Investigating the potential of metal-organic framework material as an adsorbent for matrix solid-phase dispersion extraction of pesticides during analysis of dehydrated Hyptis pectinata medicinal plant by GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Aquino, Adriano; Ferreira, Jordana Alves; Navickiene, Sandro; Wanderley, Kaline A; de Sá, Gilberto F; Júnior, Severino A

    2012-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks aluminum terephthalate MIL-53 and Cu-benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate (BTC) were tested for extraction of pyrimethanil, ametryn, dichlofluanid, tetraconazole, flumetralin, kresoximmethyl, and tebuconazole from the medicinal plant Hyptis pectinata, with analysis using GC/MS in the selected ion monitoring mode. Experiments carried out at different fortification levels (0.1, 0.5, and 1.0 microg/g) resulted in recoveries in the range 61 to 107% with RSD values between 3 and 12% for the metal-organic framework materials. Detection and quantification limits ranged from 0.02 to 0.07 and 0.05 to 0.1 microg/g, respectively, for the different pesticides studied. The method developed was linear over the range tested (0.04-20.0 microg/g), with correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9987 to 0.9998. Comparison of MIL-53 and Cu-BTC with C18-bonded silica showed good performance of the MIL-53 metal-organic framework as a sorbent for the pesticides tested. PMID:23175963

  6. Comparison of adsorbents for H2S and D4 removal for biogas conversion in a solid oxide fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Sigot, Léa; Ducom, Gaëlle; Benadda, Belkacem; Labouré, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Biogas contains trace compounds detrimental for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) application, especially sulphur-containing compounds and volatile organic silicon compounds (VOSiCs). It is therefore necessary to remove these impurities from the biogas for fuelling an SOFC. In this paper, dynamic lab-scale adsorption tests were performed on synthetic polluted gas to evaluate the performance of a polishing treatment to remove hydrogen sulphide (H2S - sulphur compound) and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4 - VOSiC). Three kinds of adsorbents were tested: an activated carbon, a silica gel (SG) and a zeolite (Z). Z proved to be the best adsorbent for H2S removal, with an adsorbed quantity higher than [Formula: see text] at the SOFC tolerance limit. However, as concerns D4 removal, SG was the most efficient adsorbent, with an adsorbed quantity of about 184 mgD4/gSG at the SOFC tolerance limit. These results could not be explained by structural characteristics of the adsorbents, but they were partly explained by chemical interactions between the adsorbate and the adsorbent. In these experiments, internal diffusion was the controlling step, Knudsen diffusion being predominant to molecular diffusion. As Z was also a good adsorbent for D4 removal, competition phenomena were investigated with Z for the simultaneous removal of H2S and D4. It was shown that H2S retention was dramatically decreased in the presence of D4, probably due to D4 polymerization resulting in pore blocking. PMID:26183696

  7. Insight into the adsorption of PPCPs by porous adsorbents: Effect of the properties of adsorbents and adsorbates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zengyin; Xie, Jiawen; Zhang, Mancheng; Zhou, Qing; Liu, Fuqiang

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption is an efficient method for removal of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). Magnetic resins are efficient adsorbents for water treatment and exhibit potential for PPCP removal. In this study, the magnetic hypercrosslinked resin Q100 was used for adsorption of PPCPs. The adsorption behavior of this resin was compared with those of two activated carbons, namely, Norit and F400D. Norit exhibited the fastest adsorption kinetics, followed by Q100. Norit featured a honeycomb shape and long-range ordered pore channels, which facilitated the diffusion of PPCPs. Moreover, the large average pore size of Q100 reduced diffusion resistance. The adsorbed amounts of 11 PPCPs on the three adsorbents increased with increasing adsorbate hydrophobicity. For Q100, a significant linear correlation was observed between the adsorption performance for PPCPs and hydrophobicity (logD value) of adsorbates (R(2) = 0.8951); as such, PPCPs with high logD values (>1.69) could be efficiently removed. Compared with those of Norit and F400D, the adsorption performance of Q100 was less affected by humic acid because of the dominant hydrophobic interaction. Furthermore, Q100 showed improved regeneration performance, which renders it promising for PPCP removal in practical applications. PMID:27131811

  8. Adsorption of hydrated halide ions on charged electrodes. Molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glosli, James N.; Philpott, Michael R.

    1993-06-01

    Constant temperature molecular dynamics has been used to simulate the adsorption of hydrated halide ions X-=F-, Cl-, Br- and I-, and lithium ion Li+ on flat uniformly charged surfaces. The simulations were done with either 214 water molecules and two ions (Li+ and X-) in a box 2.362 nm deep or with 430 water molecules and the two ions in a box 4.320 nm deep. The boxes were periodically replicated in the xy directions. The magnitude of the surface charge on the box ends was ±0.11 e/(nm)2, corresponding to an electric field of 2×107 V/cm. The lateral dimensions of the simulation cell were 1.862 nm×1.862 nm (x×y) in each case. All of the water molecules and ions interacted with the end walls via a weak 9-3 potential. The Stillinger ST2 water model and parameters optimized for alkali halides interacting with the model ST2 water molecule were used in the calculations. Common particles of truncating the interactions at a finite distance (0.82 nm) and switching off Coulomb interactions at small distances were followed. The temperature was set at T=2.411 kJ/mol (290 K). Some of the properties calculated were distribution density profiles for ions and water across the gap important for comparisons with Gouy-Chapman theory, adsorbed ion-water pair correlation functions, and the number of water molecules in the first and second hydration shells of the ions as a function of time. The time spent by a water molecule in the hydration shell was calculated to be approximately ten times longer for lithium than any other ion. The correlation between distance from the electrode and hydration number was studied and generally found to be pronounced for the larger anions. Comparison of the dynamics of the common ion Li+ for different anions revealed the subtle influence of a transcell interaction in the 2.362 nm thick film. In the given field, the smallest ions Li+ and F- remained fully solvated at all times. Chloride behaved quite differently. Part of the time this ion was far

  9. A Series of Synthetic Organic Experiments Demonstrating Physical Organic Principles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayed, Yousry; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes several common synthetic organic transformations involving alkenes, alcohols, alkyl halides, and ketones. Includes concepts on kinetic versus thermodynamic control of reaction, rearrangement of a secondary carbocation to a tertiary cation, and the effect of the size of the base on orientation during elimination. (MVL)

  10. Decomposition of trichloroethene on ozone-adsorbed high silica zeolites.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Hirotaka; Izumi, Jun; Sagehashi, Masaki; Fujii, Takao; Sakoda, Akiyoshi

    2004-01-01

    We developed a novel ozonation process for water treatment using high silica zeolites as an adsorptive concentrator of water-dissolved ozone and organic pollutants, resulting in a significant increase in reaction rate. In experiments involving trichloroethene (TCE) decomposition using a tubular flow reactor, TCE decomposition was much greater in the presence of ZSM-5 (SiO(2)/Al(2)O(3) ratio=3000) than in its absence, possibly due to the high concentrations of ozone and TCE inside the adsorbent. The TCE conversion obtained in our experiments was found to reach its theoretically maximum limit. PMID:14630114

  11. Rare-Earth Tri-Halide Methanol-Adduct Single-Crystal Scintillators for Gamma Ray and Neutron Detection - 8/17/09

    SciTech Connect

    Boatner, Lynn A; Wisniewski, D.; Neal, John S; Bell, Zane W; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Kolopus, James A; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Custelcean, Radu; Wisniewska, Monika; Peña, K. E.

    2009-01-01

    Cerium activated rare-earth tri- halides represent a well-known family of high performance inorganic rare-earth scintillators - including the high-light-yield, high-energy-resolution scintillator, cerium-doped lanthanum tribromide. These hygroscopic inorganic rare-earth halides are currently grown as single crystals from the melt - either by the Bridgman or Czochralski techniques slow and expensive processes that are frequently characterized by severe cracking of the material due to anisotropic thermal stresses and cleavage effects. We have recently discovered a new family of cerium-activated rare-earth metal organic scintillators consisting of tri-halide methanol adducts of cerium and lanthanum namely CeCl3(CH3OH)4 and LaBr3(CH3OH)4:Ce. These methanol-adduct scintillator materials can be grown near room temperature from a methanol solution, and their high solubility is consistent with the application of the rapid solution growth methods that are currently used to grow very large single crystals of potassium dihydrogen phosphate. The structures of these new rare-earth metal-organic scintillating compounds were determined by single crystal x-ray refinements, and their scintillation response to both gamma rays and neutrons, as presented here, was characterized using different excitation sources. Tri-halide methanol-adduct crystals activated with trivalent cerium apparently represent the initial example of a solution-grown rare-earth metal-organic molecular scintillator that is applicable to gamma ray, x-ray, and fast neutron detection.

  12. PREDICTING THE ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF ACTIVATED CARBON FOR ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS FROM ADSORBENT AND ADSORBATE PROPERTIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) was developed and combined with the Polanyi-Dubinin-Manes model to predict adsorption isotherms of emerging contaminants on activated carbons with a wide range of physico-chemical properties. Affinity coefficients (βl

  13. Black Molecular Adsorber Coatings for Spaceflight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin Susan; Hasegawa, Mark Makoto; Straka, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular adsorber coating is a new technology that was developed to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination on spaceflight missions. The application of this coating would be ideal near highly sensitive, interior surfaces and instruments that are negatively impacted by outgassed molecules from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, epoxies, and other similar compounds. This current, sprayable paint technology is comprised of inorganic white materials made from highly porous zeolite. In addition to good adhesion performance, thermal stability, and adsorptive capability, the molecular adsorber coating offers favorable thermal control characteristics. However, low reflectivity properties, which are typically offered by black thermal control coatings, are desired for some spaceflight applications. For example, black coatings are used on interior surfaces, in particular, on instrument baffles for optical stray light control. Similarly, they are also used within light paths between optical systems, such as telescopes, to absorb light. Recent efforts have been made to transform the white molecular adsorber coating into a black coating with similar adsorptive properties. This result is achieved by optimizing the current formulation with black pigments, while still maintaining its adsorption capability for outgassing control. Different binder to pigment ratios, coating thicknesses, and spray application techniques were explored to develop a black version of the molecular adsorber coating. During the development process, coating performance and adsorption characteristics were studied. The preliminary work performed on black molecular adsorber coatings thus far is very promising. Continued development and testing is necessary for its use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  14. Artificial Synapses: Organometal Halide Perovskite Artificial Synapses (Adv. Mater. 28/2016).

    PubMed

    Xu, Wentao; Cho, Himchan; Kim, Young-Hoon; Kim, Young-Tae; Wolf, Christoph; Park, Chan-Gyung; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-07-01

    A synapse-emulating electronic device based on organometal halide perovskite thin films is described by T.-W. Lee and co-workers on page 5916. The device successfully emulates important characteristics of a biological synapse. This work extends the application of organometal halide perovskites to bioinspired electronic devices, and contributes to the development of neuromorphic electronics. PMID:27442971

  15. Aryl-triazole foldamers incorporating a pyridinium motif for halide anion binding in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Shang, Jie; Zhao, Wei; Li, Xichen; Wang, Ying; Jiang, Hua

    2016-03-15

    Aryl-triazole oligomers incorporating a pyridinium motif have been synthesized from their pyridine precursors. Anion binding studies show that methylation of the pyridine units can significantly enhance the halide anion affinities of the folded oligomers so that the foldamers are capable of binding halide anions in aqueous solutions. PMID:26933696

  16. 75 FR 5544 - Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures: Public...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... public meeting and availability of the Framework Document in the Federal Register (74 FR 69036) for... for Metal Halide Lamp Fixtures: Public Meeting and Availability of the Framework Document AGENCY... conservation standards for certain metal halide lamp fixtures. This document announces that the period...

  17. Thermal battery. [solid metal halide electrolytes with enhanced electrical conductance after a phase transition

    DOEpatents

    Carlsten, R.W.; Nissen, D.A.

    1973-03-06

    The patent describes an improved thermal battery whose novel design eliminates various disadvantages of previous such devices. Its major features include a halide cathode, a solid metal halide electrolyte which has a substantially greater electrical conductance after a phase transition at some temperature, and a means for heating its electrochemical cells to activation temperature.

  18. Method for producing hydrocarbon fuels and fuel gas from heavy polynuclear hydrocarbons by the use of molten metal halide catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Gorin, Everett

    1979-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy polynuclear carbonaceous feedstocks to produce lighter hydrocarbon fuels by contacting the heavy feedstocks with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst in a hydrocracking zone, thereafter separating at least a major portion of the lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten metal halide and thereafter regenerating the spent molten metal halide by incinerating the spent molten metal halide by combustion of carbon and sulfur compounds in the spent molten metal halide in an incineration zone, the improvement comprising: (a) contacting the heavy feedstocks and hydrogen in the presence of the molten metal halide in the hydrocracking zone at reaction conditions effective to convert from about 60 to about 90 weight percent of the feedstock to lighter hydrocarbon fuels; (b) separating at least a major portion of the lighter hydrocarbon fuels from the spent molten metal halide; (c) contacting the spent molten metal halide with oxygen in a liquid phase gasification zone at a temperature and pressure sufficient to vaporize from about 25 to about 75 weight percent of the spent metal halide, the oxygen being introduced in an amount sufficient to remove from about 60 to about 90 weight percent of the carbon contained in the spent molten metal halide to produce a fuel gas and regenerated metal halide; and (d) incinerating the spent molten metal halide by combusting carbon and sulfur compounds contained therein.

  19. M4FT-15OR03100415 - Update on COF-based Adsorbent Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Mayes, Richard T.; Dai, Sheng

    2015-02-01

    This letter report provides an update on activities focused on generating nanoporous adsorbents involving covalent organic frameworks (COF) and zeolitic imidazolium frameworks (ZIF). The adsorbents have been generated and screened in a uranyl-spiked brine (6 ppm U) to understand uranyl-binding behavior. Porous organic polymers (POP) also qualify under this title and are similar to the COF PPN-6 that is discussed herein. Seven COF/POP and one 1 ZIF were synthesized and screened for uranyl adsorption. Seawater screening is on-going via batch testing while flow screening systems are being developed at PNNL.

  20. Method for modifying trigger level for adsorber regeneration

    DOEpatents

    Ruth, Michael J.; Cunningham, Michael J.

    2010-05-25

    A method for modifying a NO.sub.x adsorber regeneration triggering variable. Engine operating conditions are monitored until the regeneration triggering variable is met. The adsorber is regenerated and the adsorbtion efficiency of the adsorber is subsequently determined. The regeneration triggering variable is modified to correspond with the decline in adsorber efficiency. The adsorber efficiency may be determined using an empirically predetermined set of values or by using a pair of oxygen sensors to determine the oxygen response delay across the sensors.

  1. Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviation/Space, 1980

    1980-01-01

    This is a list of aerospace organizations and other groups that provides educators with assistance and information in specific areas. Both government and nongovernment organizations are included. (Author/SA)

  2. Methyl Halide Production by Periphyton Mats from the Florida Everglades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raffel, A.; Jones, R. D.; Rice, A. L.; Scully, N. M.

    2012-12-01

    Methyl chloride and methyl bromide are trace gases with both natural and anthropogenic origins. Once generated these gases transport chlorine and bromine into the stratosphere, where they play an important role in atmospheric chemistry by participating in ozone depleting catalytic cycles. Coastal wetlands are one location where methyl halide emissions have been proposed to be elevated due to high primary production and ionic halogens. This region also provides a unique study environment due to salt water intrusions which occur during storm or low marsh water level-high tide events. The purpose of this research was to determine how varying concentrations of salinity affect methyl halide production originating from periphyton mats within the Florida Everglades. Florida Everglades periphyton (25 g/L) were exposed to continuous 12 hour dark/light cycles in varying concentrations of salt water (0, 0.1, 1.0, and 10‰). All water samples were analyzed to determine the concentration and production rate of methyl chloride and methyl bromide in periphyton samples using a gas chromatograph coupled with an electron capture detector. The concentration of methyl chloride increased by approximately 3.4 and 60 pM over a 0 to 72 hour range for 1‰ and 10 ‰ treatments respectively, and reached a steady state concentration after 24 hours. There was no significant production of methyl bromide for all treatments. These studies will be used to gain a better understanding of methyl halide production from periphyton mats in simulated natural conditions. This research was supported by the National Science Foundation Chemical Oceanography Program Award No. 1029710.

  3. New generation of medium wattage metal halide lamps and spectroscopic tools for their diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunaevsky, A.; Tu, J.; Gibson, R.; Steere, T.; Graham, K.; van der Eyden, J.

    2010-11-01

    A new generation of ceramic metal halide high intensity discharge (HID) lamps has achieved high efficiencies by implementing new design concepts. The shape of the ceramic burner is optimized to withstand high temperatures with minimal thermal stress. Corrosion processes with the ceramic walls are slowed down via adoption of non-aggressive metal halide chemistry. Light losses over life due to tungsten deposition on the walls are minimized by maintaining a self-cleaning chemical process, known as tungsten cycle. All these advancements have made the new ceramic metal halide lamps comparable to high pressure sodium lamps for luminous efficacy, life, and maintenance while providing white light with high color rendering. Direct replacement of quartz metal halide lamps and systems results in the energy saving from 18 up to 50%. High resolution spectroscopy remains the major non-destructive tool for the ceramic metal halide lamps. Approaches to reliable measurements of relative partial pressures of the arc species are discussed.

  4. Dimensionally Frustrated Diffusion towards Fractal Adsorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Pradeep R.; Alam, Muhammad A.

    2007-12-01

    Diffusion towards a fractal adsorber is a well-researched problem with many applications. While the steady-state flux towards such adsorbers is known to be characterized by the fractal dimension (DF) of the surface, the more general problem of time-dependent adsorption kinetics of fractal surfaces remains poorly understood. In this Letter, we show that the time-dependent flux to fractal adsorbers (1

  5. Standoff Spectroscopy of Surface Adsorbed Chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Van Neste, Charles W; Senesac, Larry R; Thundat, Thomas George

    2009-01-01

    Despite its immediate applications, selective detection of trace quantities of surface adsorbed chemicals, such as explosives, without physically collecting the sample molecules is a challenging task. Standoff spectroscopic techniques offer an ideal method of detecting chemicals without using a sample collection step. Though standoff spectroscopic techniques are capable of providing high selectivity, their demonstrated sensitivities are poor. Here we describe standoff detection of trace quantities of surface adsorbed chemicals using two quantum cascade lasers operated simultaneously, with tunable wavelength windows that match with absorption peaks of the analytes. This standoff method is a variation of photoacoustic spectroscopy, where scattered light from the sample surface is used for exciting acoustic resonance of the detector. We demonstrate a sensitivity of 100 ng/cm{sup 2} and a standoff detection distance of 20 m for surface adsorbed analytes such as explosives and tributyl phosphate.

  6. Metal-halide mixtures for latent heat energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, K.; Manvi, R.

    1981-01-01

    Some candidates for alkali metal and alkali halide mixtures suitable for thermal energy storage at temperatures 600 C are identified. A solar thermal system application which offer advantages such as precipitation of salt crystals away from heat transfer surfaces, increased thermal conductivity of phase change materials, corrosion inhibition, and a constant monotectic temperature, independent of mixture concentrations. By using the lighters, metal rich phase as a heat transfer medium and the denser, salt rich phase as a phase change material for latent heat storage, undesirable solidification on the heat transfer surface may be prevented, is presented.

  7. Volatile species in halide-activated-diffusion coating packs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianco, Robert; Rapp, Robert A.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1992-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure sampling mass spectrometer was used to identify the vapor species generated in a halide-activated cementation pack. Pack powder mixtures containing a Cr-Al binary masteralloy powder, an NH4Cl activator salt, and either ZrO2 or Y2O3 (or neither) were analyzed at 1000 C. Both the equilibrium calculations for the pack and mass spectrometer results indicated that volatile AlCl(x) and CrCl(y) species were generated by the pack powder mixture; in packs containing the reactive element oxide, volatile ZrCl(z) and YCl(w) species were formed by the conversion of their oxide sources.

  8. Silylaryl Halides Can Replace Triflates as Aryne Precursors.

    PubMed

    Mesgar, Milad; Daugulis, Olafs

    2016-08-01

    Silylaryl bromides and iodides can be prepared in one step from commercially available starting materials. Arynes can be generated from these compounds under conditions nearly identical to those employed for silylaryl triflates. Three distinct transformations, ortho-arylation of N-tritylanilines, intermolecular addition of arynes to amides, and reaction of ureas with arynes, were shown to be successful for the new aryne precursors. The main advantage of silylaryl halides relative to silyl aryl triflates is their one-step preparation from commercially available starting materials. PMID:27415183

  9. Heavy ion passive dosimetry with silver halide single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Childs, C. B.; Parnell, T. A.

    1972-01-01

    A method of detecting radiation damage tracks due to heavy particles in large single crystals of the silver halides is described. The tracks, when made visible with a simple electrical apparatus, appear similar to tracks in emulsions. The properties of the crystals, the technique of printing out the tracks, and evidence concerning the threshold energy for registering particles indicates that this method may find application in heavy ion dosimetry. The method has been found to be sensitive to stopping He nuclei and relativistic M group cosmic rays. Some impurities strongly influence the printout of the tracks, and the effects of these impurities are discussed.

  10. A new mechanism for radiation damage processes in alkali halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubinko, V. I.; Turkin, A. A.; Vainshtein, D. I.; den Hartog, H. W.

    1999-12-01

    We present a theory of radiation damage formation in alkali halides based on a new mechanism of dislocation climb, which involves the production of VF centers (self-trapped hole neighboring a cation vacancy) as a result of the absorption of H centers of dislocation lines. We consider the evolution of all experimentally observed extended defects: metal colloids, gas bubbles, and vacancy voids. Voids are shown to arise and grow large due to the reaction between F and VF centers at the surface of halogen bubbles. Voids can ignite a back reaction between the radiolytic products resulting in decomposition of the irradiated material.

  11. Interfacial tension in immiscible mixtures of alkali halides.

    PubMed

    Lockett, Vera; Rukavishnikova, Irina V; Stepanov, Victor P; Tkachev, Nikolai K

    2010-02-01

    The interfacial tension of the liquid-phase interface in seven immiscible reciprocal ternary mixtures of lithium fluoride with the following alkali halides: CsCl, KBr, RbBr, CsBr, KI, RbI, and CsI was measured using the cylinder weighing method over a wide temperature range. It was shown that for all mixtures the interfacial tension gradually decreases with growing temperature. The interfacial tension of the reciprocal ternary mixtures at a given temperature increases both with the alkali cation radius (K(+) < Rb(+) < Cs(+)) and with the radius of the halogen anion (Cl(-) < Br(-) < I(-)). PMID:20094678

  12. Thermal conductivity of halide solid solutions: measurement and prediction.

    PubMed

    Gheribi, Aïmen E; Poncsák, Sándor; St-Pierre, Rémi; Kiss, László I; Chartrand, Patrice

    2014-09-14

    The composition dependence of the lattice thermal conductivity in NaCl-KCl solid solutions has been measured as a function of composition and temperature. Samples with systematically varied compositions were prepared and the laser flash technique was used to determine the thermal diffusivity from 373 K to 823 K. A theoretical model, based on the Debye approximation of phonon density of state (which contains no adjustable parameters) was used to predict the thermal conductivity of both stoichiometric compounds and fully disordered solid solutions. The predictions obtained with the model agree very well with our measurement. A general method for predicting the thermal conductivity of different halide systems is discussed. PMID:25217938

  13. Ferroelectricity and Rashba-type band splittings in metal halides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minsung; Im, Jino; Freeman, Arthur; Ihm, Jisoon; Jin, Hosub

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we investigate Rashba-type band splittings in metal halides. We use a minimal tight-binding model and first principles calculations based on density functional theory to understand the electronic structures of the materials. We find that different types of Rashba bands occur in the conduction and valence band edges in terms of the angular momentum textures. Also, the characteristics of the band splittings will be discussed in connection with the ferroelectric property. Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747, Korea.

  14. Two-Dimensional Halide Perovskites: Tuning Electronic Activities of Defects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuanyue; Xiao, Hai; Goddard, William A

    2016-05-11

    Two-dimensional (2D) halide perovskites are emerging as promising candidates for nanoelectronics and optoelectronics. To realize their full potential, it is important to understand the role of those defects that can strongly impact material properties. In contrast to other popular 2D semiconductors (e.g., transition metal dichalcogenides MX2) for which defects typically induce harmful traps, we show that the electronic activities of defects in 2D perovskites are significantly tunable. For example, even with a fixed lattice orientation one can change the synthesis conditions to convert a line defect (edge or grain boundary) from electron acceptor to inactive site without deep gap states. We show that this difference originates from the enhanced ionic bonding in these perovskites compared with MX2. The donors tend to have high formation energies and the harmful defects are difficult to form at a low halide chemical potential. Thus, we unveil unique properties of defects in 2D perovskites and suggest practical routes to improve them. PMID:27100910

  15. Oxide Film Aging on Alloy 22 in Halide Containing Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Martin A.; Carranza, Ricardo M.; Rebak, Raul B.

    2007-07-01

    Passive and corrosion behaviors of Alloy 22 in chloride and fluoride containing solutions, changing the heat treatment of the alloy, the halide concentration and the pH of the solutions at 90 deg. C, was investigated. The study was implemented using electrochemical techniques, which included open circuit potential monitoring over time, potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements carried out at open circuit and at passivity potentials. Corrosion rates obtained by EIS measurements after 24 h immersion in naturally aerated solutions were below 0.5 {mu}m/year. The corrosion rates were practically independent of solution pH, alloy heat treatment and halide ion nature and concentration. EIS low frequency resistance values increased with applied potential in the passive domain and with polarization time in pH 6 - 1 M NaCl at 90 deg. C. This effect was attributed to an increase in the oxide film thickness and oxide film aging. High frequency capacitance measurements indicated that passive oxide on Alloy 22 presented a double n-type/p-type semiconductor behavior in the passive potential range. (authors)

  16. Tunable Near-Infrared Luminescence in Tin Halide Perovskite Devices.

    PubMed

    Lai, May L; Tay, Timothy Y S; Sadhanala, Aditya; Dutton, Siân E; Li, Guangru; Friend, Richard H; Tan, Zhi-Kuang

    2016-07-21

    Infrared emitters are reasonably rare in solution-processed materials. Recently, research into hybrid organo-lead halide perovskite, originally popular in photovoltaics,1-3 has gained traction in light-emitting diodes (LED) due to their low-cost solution processing and good performance.4-9 The lead-based electroluminescent materials show strong colorful emission in the visible region, but lack emissive variants further in the infrared. The concerns with the toxicity of lead may, additionally, limit their wide-scale applications. Here, we demonstrate tunable near-infrared electroluminescence from a lead-free organo-tin halide perovskite, using an ITO/PEDOT:PSS/CH3NH3Sn(Br1-xIx)3/F8/Ca/Ag device architecture. In our tin iodide (CH3NH3SnI3) LEDs, we achieved a 945 nm near-infrared emission with a radiance of 3.4 W sr(-1) m(-2) and a maximum external quantum efficiency of 0.72%, comparable with earlier lead-based devices. Increasing the bromide content in these tin perovskite devices widens the semiconductor bandgap and leads to shorter wavelength emissions, tunable down to 667 nm. These near-infrared LEDs could find useful applications in a range of optical communication, sensing and medical device applications. PMID:27336412

  17. Two-Dimensional Halide Perovskites: Tuning Electronic Activities of Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanyue; Xiao, Hai; Goddard, William A., III

    2016-05-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) halide perovskites are emerging as promising candidates for nano-electronics and optoelectronics. To realize their full potential, it is important to understand the role of those defects that can strongly impact material properties. In contrast to other popular 2D semiconductors (e.g. transition metal dichalcogenides MX2) for which defects typically induce harmful traps, we show that the electronic activities of defects in 2D perovskites are significantly tunable. For example, even with a fixed lattice orientation, one can change the synthesis conditions to convert a line defect (edge or grain boundary) from electron acceptor to inactive site without deep gap states. We show that this difference originates from the enhanced ionic bonding in these perovskites compared with MX2. The donors tend to have high formation energies, and the harmful defects are difficult to form at a low halide chemical potential. Thus we unveil unique properties of defects in 2D perovskites and suggest practical routes to improve them.

  18. Subsurface Ectomycorrhizal Fungi: A New Source of Atmospheric Methyl Halides?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treseder, K. K.; Redeker, K. R.; Allen, M. F.

    2001-12-01

    Incomplete source budgets for methyl halides---compounds that release inorganic halogen radicals which, in turn, catalyze atmospheric ozone depletion---limit our abilities to predict the fate of the stratospheric ozone layer. We tested the ability ectomycorrhizal fungi to produce methyl bromide and methyl iodide. These fungi are abundant in temperate forests, where they colonize tree roots and provide nutrients to their symbiotic plants in exchange for carbon compounds. The observed range of emissions from seven different species in culture is 0.001- to 100-μ g g-1 fungi d-1 for methyl bromide, and 0.5- to 500-μ g g-1 fungi d-1 for methyl iodide. While methyl chloride was not specifically tested, large emissions were observed from several species with little to no emissions observed from others. Further analyses of the effects of substrate concentration, headspace concentration, and temperature were performed on the species Cenococcum geophilum, one of the most abundant ectomycorrhizal fungi. Our results suggest that subsurface fungal emissions may be a significant global source of methyl halides.

  19. Photocrystallographic Observation of Halide-Bridged Intermediates in Halogen Photoeliminations

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Polynuclear transition metal complexes, which frequently constitute the active sites of both biological and chemical catalysts, provide access to unique chemical transformations that are derived from metal–metal cooperation. Reductive elimination via ligand-bridged binuclear intermediates from bimetallic cores is one mechanism by which metals may cooperate during catalysis. We have established families of Rh2 complexes that participate in HX-splitting photocatalysis in which metal–metal cooperation is credited with the ability to achieve multielectron photochemical reactions in preference to single-electron transformations. Nanosecond-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy, steady-state photocrystallography, and computational modeling have allowed direct observation and characterization of Cl-bridged intermediates (intramolecular analogues of classical ligand-bridged intermediates in binuclear eliminations) in halogen elimination reactions. On the basis of these observations, a new class of Rh2 complexes, supported by CO ligands, has been prepared, allowing for the isolation and independent characterization of the proposed halide-bridged intermediates. Direct observation of halide-bridged structures establishes binuclear reductive elimination as a viable mechanism for photogenerating energetic bonds. PMID:25264809

  20. A new polarizable force field for alkali and halide ions

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, Péter T.; Baranyai, András

    2014-09-21

    We developed transferable potentials for alkali and halide ions which are consistent with our recent model of water [P. T. Kiss and A. Baranyai, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 204507 (2013)]. Following the approach used for the water potential, we applied Gaussian charge distributions, exponential repulsion, and r{sup −6} attraction. One of the two charges of the ions is fixed to the center of the particle, while the other is connected to this charge by a harmonic spring to express polarization. Polarizability is taken from quantum chemical calculations. The repulsion between different species is expressed by the combining rule of Kong [J. Chem. Phys. 59, 2464 (1972)]. Our primary target was the hydration free energy of ions which is correct within the error of calculations. We calculated water-ion clusters up to 6 water molecules, and, as a crosscheck, we determined the density and internal energy of alkali-halide crystals at ambient conditions with acceptable accuracy. The structure of hydrated ions was also discussed.

  1. A new polarizable force field for alkali and halide ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Péter T.; Baranyai, András

    2014-09-01

    We developed transferable potentials for alkali and halide ions which are consistent with our recent model of water [P. T. Kiss and A. Baranyai, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 204507 (2013)]. Following the approach used for the water potential, we applied Gaussian charge distributions, exponential repulsion, and r-6 attraction. One of the two charges of the ions is fixed to the center of the particle, while the other is connected to this charge by a harmonic spring to express polarization. Polarizability is taken from quantum chemical calculations. The repulsion between different species is expressed by the combining rule of Kong [J. Chem. Phys. 59, 2464 (1972)]. Our primary target was the hydration free energy of ions which is correct within the error of calculations. We calculated water-ion clusters up to 6 water molecules, and, as a crosscheck, we determined the density and internal energy of alkali-halide crystals at ambient conditions with acceptable accuracy. The structure of hydrated ions was also discussed.

  2. The biogeochemical cycle of the adsorbed template. II - Selective adsorption of mononucleotides on adsorbed polynucleotide templates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazard, Daniel; Lahav, Noam; Orenberg, James B.

    1988-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for the verification of the specific interaction step of the 'adsorbed template' biogeochemical cycle, a simple model for a primitive prebiotic replication system. The experimental system consisted of gypsum as the mineral to which an oligonucleotide template attaches (Poly-C or Poly-U) and (5-prime)-AMP, (5-prime)-GMP, (5-prime)-CMP and (5-prime)-UMP as the interacting biomonomers. When Poly-C or Poly-U were used as adsorbed templates, (5-prime)-GMP and (5-prime)-AMP, respectively, were observed to be the most strongly adsorbed species.

  3. Unoccupied electronic states in adsorbate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertel, E.

    1991-11-01

    Experimental work on unoccupied electronic states in adsorbate systems on metallic substrates is reviewed with emphasis on recent developments. The first part is devoted to molecular adsorbates. Weakly chemisorbed hydrocarbons are briefly discussed. An exhaustive inverse photoemission (IPE) study of the CO bond to the transition metals Ni, Pb, and Pt is presented. Adsorbed NO is taken as an example to demonstrate the persisting discrepancies in the interpretation of IPE spectra. Atomic adsorbates are discussed in the second part. The quantum well state model is applied to interpret the surface states in reconstructing and non-reconstructing adsorption systems of alkali metals and hydrogen. A recent controversy on the unoccupied electronic states of the Cu(110)/O p(2×1) surface is critically reviewed. The quantum well state model is then compared to tight binding and local-density-functional calculations of the unoccupied bands and the deficiencies of the various approaches are pointed out. Finally, the relation between the surface state model and more chemically oriented models of surface bonding is briefly discussed.

  4. Green Technology for the Removal of Chloro-Organics from Pulp and Paper Mill Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Ashutosh Kumar; Kumar, Satish; Sharma, Chhaya; Kumar, Vivek

    2015-07-01

    This study evaluates the treatment efficiency of a horizontal subsurface-flow constructed wetland (HSSF-CW) for the removal of chloro-organic compounds from pulp and paper mill wastewater. The surface area of the HSSF-CW unit was 5.25 m² and was planted with Colocasia esculenta. The wastewater was characterized for different chloro-organic compounds, that is, adsorbable organic halides (AOX), chlorophenolics, and chlorinated resin and fatty acids (cRFAs). Under a hydraulic retention time of 5.9 days, the average AOX, chlorophenolics, and cRFA removal from wastewater was 87, 87, and 93%, respectively. Some of the chlorophenolics were found to accumulate in the plant biomass and soil material. The mass balance studies show that a significant fraction of chlorophenolics and cRFA was degraded in the constructed wetland system. Modeling studies were carried out to estimate the first-order area-based removal rate constants (k) for chemical oxygen demand removal. The HSSF-CW was found to be an effective treatment technology for the remediation of pulp and paper mill wastewater. PMID:26163503

  5. Organics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chian, Edward S. K.; DeWalle, Foppe B.

    1978-01-01

    Presents water analysis literature for 1978. This review is concerned with organics, and it covers: (1) detergents and surfactants; (2) aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons; (3) pesticides and chlorinated hydrocarbons; and (4) naturally occurring organics. A list of 208 references is also presented. (HM)

  6. Organizers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on "organizers," tools or techniques that provide identification and classification along with possible relationships or connections among ideas, concepts, and issues. Discusses David Ausubel's research and ideas concerning advance organizers; the implications of Ausubel's theory to curriculum and teaching; "webbing," a specific…

  7. Development and Testing of Molecular Adsorber Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin; Hasegawa, Mark; Straka, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The effect of on-orbit molecular contamination has the potential to degrade the performance of spaceflight hardware and diminish the lifetime of the spacecraft. For example, sensitive surfaces, such as optical surfaces, electronics, detectors, and thermal control surfaces, are vulnerable to the damaging effects of contamination from outgassed materials. The current solution to protect these surfaces is through the use of zeolite coated ceramic adsorber pucks. However, these pucks and its additional complex mounting hardware requirements result in several disadvantages, such as size, weight, and cost related concerns, that impact the spacecraft design and the integration and test schedule. As a result, a new innovative molecular adsorber coating was developed as a sprayable alternative to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination. In this study, the formulation for molecular adsorber coatings was optimized using various binders, pigment treatment methods, binder to pigment ratios, thicknesses, and spray application techniques. The formulations that passed coating adhesion and vacuum thermal cycling tests were further tested for its adsorptive capacity. Accelerated molecular capacitance tests were performed in an innovatively designed multi-unit system containing idealized contaminant sources. This novel system significantly increased the productivity of the testing phase for the various formulations that were developed. Work performed during the development and testing phases has demonstrated successful application of molecular adsorber coatings onto metallic substrates, as well as, very promising results for the adhesion performance and the molecular capacitance of the coating. Continued testing will assist in the qualification of molecular adsorber coatings for use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  8. Formability of ABX3 (X = F, Cl, Br, I) halide perovskites.

    PubMed

    Li, Chonghea; Lu, Xionggang; Ding, Weizhong; Feng, Liming; Gao, Yonghui; Guo, Ziming

    2008-12-01

    In this study a total of 186 complex halide systems were collected; the formabilities of ABX3 (X = F, Cl, Br and I) halide perovskites were investigated using the empirical structure map, which was constructed by Goldschmidt's tolerance factor and the octahedral factor. A model for halide perovskite formability was built up. In this model obtained, for all 186 complex halides systems, only one system (CsF-MnF2) without perovskite structure and six systems (RbF-PbF2, CsF-BeF2, KCl-FeCl2, TlI-MnI2, RbI-SnI2, TlI-PbI2) with perovskite structure were wrongly classified, so its predicting accuracy reaches 96%. It is also indicated that both the tolerance factor and the octahedral factor are a necessary but not sufficient condition for ABX3 halide perovskite formability, and a lowest limit of the octahedral factor exists for halide perovskite formation. This result is consistent with our previous report for ABO3 oxide perovskite, and may be helpful to design novel halide materials with the perovskite structure. PMID:19029699

  9. Using Perovskite Nanoparticles as Halide Reservoirs in Catalysis and as Spectrochemical Probes of Ions in Solution.

    PubMed

    Doane, Tennyson L; Ryan, Kayla L; Pathade, Laxmikant; Cruz, Kevin J; Zang, Huidong; Cotlet, Mircea; Maye, Mathew M

    2016-06-28

    The ability of cesium lead halide (CsPbX3; X = Cl(-), Br(-), I(-)) perovskite nanoparticles (P-NPs) to participate in halide exchange reactions, to catalyze Finkelstein organohalide substitution reactions, and to colorimetrically monitor chemical reactions and detect anions in real time is described. With the use of tetraoctylammonium halide salts as a starting point, halide exchange with the P-NPs was performed to calibrate reactivity, stability, and extent of ion exchange. The exchange of CsPbI3 with Cl(-) or Br(-) causes a significant blue-shift in absorption and photoluminescence, whereas reacting I(-) with CsPbBr3 causes a red-shift of similar magnitudes. With the high local halide concentrations and the facile nature of halide exchange in mind, we then explored the ability of P-NPs to catalyze organohalide exchange in Finkelstein like reactions. Results indicate that the P-NPs serve as excellent halide reservoirs for substitution of organohalides in nonpolar media, leading to not only different organohalide products, but also a complementary color change over the course of the reaction, which can be used to monitor kinetics in a precise manner. The merits of using P-NP as spectrochemical probes for real time assaying is then expanded to other anions which can react with, or result in unique, classes of perovskites. PMID:27149396

  10. Amine-pillared Nanosheet Adsorbents for CO2 Capture Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hui

    Amine-functionalized solid adsorbents have gained attention within the last decade for their application in carbon dioxide capture, due to their many advantages such as low energy cost for regeneration, tunable structure, elimination of corrosion problems, and additional advantages. However, one of the challenges facing this technology is to accomplish both high CO 2 capture capacity along with high CO2 diffusion rates concurrently. Current amine-based solid sorbents such as porous materials similar to SBA-15 have large pores diffusion entering molecules; however, the pores become clogged upon amine inclusion. To meet this challenge, our group's solution involves the creation of a new type of material which we are calling-amino-pillared nanosheet (APN) adsorbents which are generated from layered nanosheet precursors. These materials are being proposed because of their unique lamellar structure which exhibits ability to be modified by organic or inorganic pillars through consecutive swelling and pillaring steps to form large mesoporous interlayer spaces. After the expansion of the layer space through swelling and pillaring, the large pore space can be functionalized with amine groups. This selective functionalization is possible by the choice of amine group introduced. Our choice, large amine molecules, do not access the micropore within each layer; however, either physically or chemically immobilized onto the surface of the mesoporous interlayer space between each layer. The final goal of the research is to investigate the ability to prepare APN adsorbents from a model nanoporous layered materials including nanosheets precursor material MCM-22(P) and nanoporous layered silicate material AMH-3. MCM-22(P) contains 2-dimensional porous channels, 6 membered rings (MB) openings perpendicular to the layers and 10 MB channels in the plane of the layers. However, the transport limiting openings (6 MB) to the layers is smaller than CO2 gas molecules. In contrast, AMH-3 has

  11. Adsorption of halide anions at the Pt(111)-solution interfacestudied by in situ surface x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, C. A.; Marković, N. M.; Ross, P. N.

    1997-03-01

    In this paper we present x-ray scattering results of iodide, bromide, and chloride adsorption onto the Pt(111) surface in solution. Iodide forms two commensurate adlayer structures, a (7×7)R19.1° phase and a hexagonal (3×3) phase, which coexist on the Pt surface. Formation of the (3×3) phase appears to be kinetically limited, whereas the 7 phase shows a hysteretic effect as a function of the electrode potential, associated with an order-disorder transition. Bromide forms a series of high-order commensurate structures on Pt(111) that are poorly ordered unless the size of the unit cell is small. No ordered structures for chloride adsorption are observed and specular x-ray reflectivity results suggest that the chloride coverage at low potential is too small to form a close-packed monolayer on the surface. The differences between the structures formed by the adsorbed anions, and the differences between results for Pt(111) and Au(111), are discussed in terms of the strength of the metal-halide interaction.

  12. Metal Halide Solid-State Surface Treatment for High Efficiency PbS and PbSe QD Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Crisp, R. W.; Kroupa, D. M.; Marshall, A. R.; Miller, E. M.; Zhang, J.; Beard, M. C.; Luther, J. M.

    2015-04-24

    We developed a layer-by-layer method of preparing PbE (E = S or Se) quantum dot (QD) solar cells using metal halide (PbI2, PbCl2, CdI2, or CdCl2) salts dissolved in dimethylformamide to displace oleate surface ligands and form conductive QD solids. The resulting QD solids have a significant reduction in the carbon content compared to films treated with thiols and organic halides. We find that the PbI2 treatment is the most successful in removing alkyl surface ligands and also replaces most surface bound Cl- with I-. The treatment protocol results in PbS QD films exhibiting a deeper work function and band positions than other ligand exchanges reported previously. The method developed here produces solar cells that perform well even at film thicknesses approaching a micron, indicating improved carrier transport in the QD films. We demonstrate QD solar cells based on PbI2 with power conversion efficiencies above 7%.

  13. Tunable room-temperature spin-selective optical Stark effect in solution-processed layered halide perovskites

    PubMed Central

    Giovanni, David; Chong, Wee Kiang; Dewi, Herlina Arianita; Thirumal, Krishnamoorthy; Neogi, Ishita; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Mhaisalkar, Subodh; Mathews, Nripan; Sum, Tze Chien

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafast spin manipulation for opto–spin logic applications requires material systems that have strong spin-selective light-matter interaction. Conventional inorganic semiconductor nanostructures [for example, epitaxial II to VI quantum dots and III to V multiple quantum wells (MQWs)] are considered forerunners but encounter challenges such as lattice matching and cryogenic cooling requirements. Two-dimensional halide perovskite semiconductors, combining intrinsic tunable MQW structures and large oscillator strengths with facile solution processability, can offer breakthroughs in this area. We demonstrate novel room-temperature, strong ultrafast spin-selective optical Stark effect in solution-processed (C6H4FC2H4NH3)2PbI4 perovskite thin films. Exciton spin states are selectively tuned by ~6.3 meV using circularly polarized optical pulses without any external photonic cavity (that is, corresponding to a Rabi energy of ~55 meV and equivalent to applying a 70 T magnetic field), which is much larger than any conventional system. The facile halide and organic replacement in these perovskites affords control of the dielectric confinement and thus presents a straightforward strategy for tuning light-matter coupling strength. PMID:27386583

  14. Tunable room-temperature spin-selective optical Stark effect in solution-processed layered halide perovskites.

    PubMed

    Giovanni, David; Chong, Wee Kiang; Dewi, Herlina Arianita; Thirumal, Krishnamoorthy; Neogi, Ishita; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Mhaisalkar, Subodh; Mathews, Nripan; Sum, Tze Chien

    2016-06-01

    Ultrafast spin manipulation for opto-spin logic applications requires material systems that have strong spin-selective light-matter interaction. Conventional inorganic semiconductor nanostructures [for example, epitaxial II to VI quantum dots and III to V multiple quantum wells (MQWs)] are considered forerunners but encounter challenges such as lattice matching and cryogenic cooling requirements. Two-dimensional halide perovskite semiconductors, combining intrinsic tunable MQW structures and large oscillator strengths with facile solution processability, can offer breakthroughs in this area. We demonstrate novel room-temperature, strong ultrafast spin-selective optical Stark effect in solution-processed (C6H4FC2H4NH3)2PbI4 perovskite thin films. Exciton spin states are selectively tuned by ~6.3 meV using circularly polarized optical pulses without any external photonic cavity (that is, corresponding to a Rabi energy of ~55 meV and equivalent to applying a 70 T magnetic field), which is much larger than any conventional system. The facile halide and organic replacement in these perovskites affords control of the dielectric confinement and thus presents a straightforward strategy for tuning light-matter coupling strength. PMID:27386583

  15. Metal Halide Solid-State Surface Treatment for High Efficiency PbS and PbSe QD Solar Cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Crisp, R. W.; Kroupa, D. M.; Marshall, A. R.; Miller, E. M.; Zhang, J.; Beard, M. C.; Luther, J. M.

    2015-04-24

    We developed a layer-by-layer method of preparing PbE (E = S or Se) quantum dot (QD) solar cells using metal halide (PbI2, PbCl2, CdI2, or CdCl2) salts dissolved in dimethylformamide to displace oleate surface ligands and form conductive QD solids. The resulting QD solids have a significant reduction in the carbon content compared to films treated with thiols and organic halides. We find that the PbI2 treatment is the most successful in removing alkyl surface ligands and also replaces most surface bound Cl- with I-. The treatment protocol results in PbS QD films exhibiting a deeper work function and bandmore » positions than other ligand exchanges reported previously. The method developed here produces solar cells that perform well even at film thicknesses approaching a micron, indicating improved carrier transport in the QD films. We demonstrate QD solar cells based on PbI2 with power conversion efficiencies above 7%.« less

  16. Mesoscopic photosystems for solar light harvesting and conversion: facile and reversible transformation of metal-halide perovskites.

    PubMed

    Harms, Hauke Arne; Tétreault, Nicolas; Pellet, Norman; Bensimon, Michaël; Grätzel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Recently, hybrid organic-inorganic metal halide perovskites have gained prominence as potent light harvesters in thin film solid-state photovoltaics. In particular the solar-to-electric power conversion efficiency (PCE) of devices using CH(3)NH(3)PbI(3) as sensitizer has increased from 3 to 20.1% within only a few years. This key material can be prepared by solution processing from PbI(2) and CH(3)NH(3)I in one step or by sequential deposition. In the latter case an electron capturing support such as TiO(2) is first covered with PbI(2), which upon exposure to a CH(3)NH(3)I solution is converted to the perovskite. Here we apply for the first time quartz crystal microbalance (QCMD) measurements in conjunction with X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy to analyse the dynamics of the conversion of PbI(2) to CH(3)NH(3)PbI(3). Employing 200 nm thick PbI(2) films as substrates we discover that the CH(3)NH(3)I insertion in the PbI(2) is reversible, with the extraction into the solvent isopropanol occurring on the same time scale of seconds as the intercalation process. This offers an explanation for the strikingly rapid and facile exchange of halide ions in CH(3)NH(3)PbX(3) by solution processing at room temperature. PMID:25643832

  17. Low-pressure indium-halide discharges for fluorescent illumination applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Daiyu; Hilbig, Rainer; Körber, Achim; Schwan, Stefan; Scholl, Robert; Boerger, Martin; Huppertz, Maria

    2010-02-01

    Low-pressure gas discharges of molecular radiators were studied for fluorescent lighting applications with a goal of reducing the energy loss due to the large Stokes shift in phosphors of conventional mercury-based fluorescent lamp technology. Indium halides (InCl, InBr, and InI) were chosen as the molecular radiators that generate ultraviolet to blue light emissions. The electrical characteristics and optical emission intensities were measured in discharges containing gaseous indium halides (InCl, InBr, and InI) as molecular radiators. The low-pressure discharges in indium halide vapor showed potential as a highly efficient gas discharge system for fluorescent lighting application.

  18. High Photoluminescence Quantum Yield in Band Gap Tunable Bromide Containing Mixed Halide Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Sutter-Fella, Carolin M; Li, Yanbo; Amani, Matin; Ager, Joel W; Toma, Francesca M; Yablonovitch, Eli; Sharp, Ian D; Javey, Ali

    2016-01-13

    Hybrid organic-inorganic halide perovskite based semiconductor materials are attractive for use in a wide range of optoelectronic devices because they combine the advantages of suitable optoelectronic attributes and simultaneously low-cost solution processability. Here, we present a two-step low-pressure vapor-assisted solution process to grow high quality homogeneous CH3NH3PbI3-xBrx perovskite films over the full band gap range of 1.6-2.3 eV. Photoluminescence light-in versus light-out characterization techniques are used to provide new insights into the optoelectronic properties of Br-containing hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites as a function of optical carrier injection by employing pump-powers over a 6 orders of magnitude dynamic range. The internal luminescence quantum yield of wide band gap perovskites reaches impressive values up to 30%. This high quantum yield translates into substantial quasi-Fermi level splitting and high "luminescence or optically implied" open-circuit voltage. Most importantly, both attributes, high internal quantum yield and high optically implied open-circuit voltage, are demonstrated over the entire band gap range (1.6 eV ≤ Eg ≤ 2.3 eV). These results establish the versatility of Br-containing perovskite semiconductors for a variety of applications and especially for the use as high-quality top cell in tandem photovoltaic devices in combination with industry dominant Si bottom cells. PMID:26691065

  19. Pressure-Induced Structural and Optical Properties of Organometal Halide Perovskite-Based Formamidinium Lead Bromide.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingrui; Wang, Kai; Zou, Bo

    2016-07-01

    Organometal halide perovskites (OMHPs) are attracting an ever-growing scientific interest as photovoltaic materials with moderate cost and compelling properties. In this Letter, pressure-induced optical and structural changes of OMHP-based formamidinium lead bromide (FAPbBr3) were systematically investigated. We studied the pressure dependence of optical absorption and photoluminescence, both of which showed piezochromism. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction indicated that FAPbBr3 underwent two phase transitions and subsequent amorphization, leading directly to the bandgap evolution with redshift followed by blueshift during compression. Raman experiments illustrated the high pressure behavior of organic cation and the surrounding inorganic octahedra. Additionally, the effect of cation size and the different intermolecular interactions between organic cation and inorganic octahedra result in the fact that FAPbBr3 is less compressible than the reported methylammonium lead bromide (MAPbBr3). High pressure studies of the structural evolution and optical properties of OMHPs provide important clues in optimizing photovoltaic performance and help to design novel OMHPs with higher stimuli-resistant ability. PMID:27321024

  20. A review on modification methods to cellulose-based adsorbents to improve adsorption capacity.

    PubMed

    Hokkanen, Sanna; Bhatnagar, Amit; Sillanpää, Mika

    2016-03-15

    In recent decades, increased domestic, agricultural and industrial activities worldwide have led to the release of various pollutants, such as toxic heavy metals, inorganic anions, organics, micropollutants and nutrients into the aquatic environment. The removal of these wide varieties of pollutants for better quality of water for various activities is an emerging issue and a robust and eco-friendly treatment technology is needed for the purpose. It is well known that cellulosic materials can be obtained from various natural sources and can be employed as cheap adsorbents. Their adsorption capacities for heavy metal ions and other aquatic pollutants can be significantly affected upon chemical treatment. In general, chemically modified cellulose exhibits higher adsorption capacities for various aquatic pollutants than their unmodified forms. Numerous chemicals have been used for cellulose modifications which include mineral and organic acids, bases, oxidizing agent, organic compounds, etc. This paper reviews the current state of research on the use of cellulose, a naturally occurring material, its modified forms and their efficacy as adsorbents for the removal of various pollutants from waste streams. In this review, an extensive list of various cellulose-based adsorbents from literature has been compiled and their adsorption capacities under various conditions for the removal of various pollutants, as available in the literature, are presented along with highlighting and discussing the key advancement on the preparation of cellulose-based adsorbents. It is evident from the literature survey presented herein that modified cellulose-based adsorbents exhibit good potential for the removal of various aquatic pollutants. However, still there is a need to find out the practical utility of these adsorbents on a commercial scale, leading to the improvement of pollution control. PMID:26789698