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Sample records for adsorbate covered gaas1

  1. Helium diffraction from adsorbate-covered surfaces: A study of the O-Ni(001) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, Inder P.; Barker, J. A.

    1984-05-01

    Elastic helium-atom-surface scattering is currently being used to obtain important structural information from adsorbate-covered surfaces. Since our earlier work on helium diffraction from p(2×2) and c(2×2) phases of oxygen on Ni(001) there have been three new developments. These are (i) the suggestion by Rieder of a prolate charge distribution on oxygen, (ii) the pseudobridge site proposal of Demuth et al., and (iii) the self-consistent calculation of the helium-surface interaction potential due to Lang and Nørskov. In this paper we present results for a wide range of calculational parameters for the c(2×2) phase of oxygen on Ni(001) and comment on the above developments. Specifically, based on the results in (iii), we are able to explore the implications of the use of the Esbjerg-Nørskov-Lang relation with and without helium averaged surface-charge density. We conclude that the prolate charge distribution produces a shape function in better agreement with experiment. Changes in corrugation coefficients introduced by shifting to the pseudobridge site from the centered site are noted to be small.

  2. LEED crystallography studies of the structure of clean and adsorbate-covered Ir, Pt and Rh crystal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Koestner, R.J.

    1982-08-01

    There have only been a few Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) intensity analyses carried out to determine the structure of molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces; most surface crystallography studies concentrated on the structure of clean unreconstructed or atomic adsorbate-covered transition metal faces. The few molecular adsorption systems already investigated by dynamical LEED are CO on Ni(100), Cu(100) and Pd(100) as well as C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ and C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ adsorbed on Pt(111). The emphasis of this thesis research has been to extend the applicability of LEED crystallography to the more complicated unit cells found in molecular overlayers on transition metals or in there constructed surfaces of clean transition metals.

  3. Structural Studies of Clean and Adsorbate-Covered Fcc Metal Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statiris, Panayiotis Athanasiou

    We have used medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) to study the structural and vibrational properties of the clean metal surfaces of Ni(110) and Ag(111), the structural changes induced by the presence of small amounts ( {~}1 atomic layer) of heteroatoms on the Ni(001) and Ni(110) surfaces (Cs, K, K and CO on Ni(110) and Au on Ni(001)) as well as the arrangement of the heteroatoms on the surface. The thesis consists of five chapters two of which serve as an introduction and provide general information about metal surfaces and medium energy ion scattering (chapters 1 and 2) and three chapters (3, 4, 5) in which the experimental results are being presented, and structural models are proposed for the surfaces studied. The purpose of the material contained in chapter one is to familiarize the reader with the general concepts, and provide an overview of the progress (experimental and theoretical) in the field of clean and adsorbate covered metal surfaces. The second chapter contains an extensive discussion about the principles and applications of medium energy ion scattering. A study of the structure of the clean Ni(001) surface and the K/Ni(110) and K/CO/Ni(110) surfaces is presented in chapter 3. Both the K/Ni(110) and K/CO/Ni(110) exhibit the missing row reconstruction. The change in the surface unit cell observed upon adsorption of CO atoms on the K/Ni(110) surface observed with low energy electron diffraction is due to the ordering of the CO molecules. The growth and structure of thin Au films (0.35 -3 layers) deposited on the Ni(001) surface is the subject of chapter 4. Au forms an almost incommensurate overlayer with a c(2 times 8) unit cell whose structure resembles that of fcc Au(111). The Au atoms exhibit unusually high vibrational amplitudes, indicating the presence of a soft phonon mode as predicted by theoretical work. The growth mode resembles the Stranski-Krastanov mode without exactly following it. The temperature dependence of the vibrational amplitudes

  4. LPE growth and optical characteristics of GaAs1-xSbx epilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Hu, Shuhong; Zhou, Wei; Sun, Yan; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Chao; Dai, Ning

    2017-04-01

    A series of GaAs1-xSbx epilayers have been successfully grown on GaAs (1 0 0) substrates by liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) technique at about 550 °C. Samples with different antimony (Sb) contents have been analyzed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) measurement, which confirms the incorporation of Sb in the epilayers. Room temperature optical properties of GaAs1-xSbx epilayers were performed by photoluminescence (PL) and transmission spectra.

  5. Anharmonicity in Light Scattering by Optical Phonons in GaAs1-xBix

    SciTech Connect

    Joshya, R. S.; Rajaji, V.; Narayana, Chandrabhas; Mascarenhas, Angelo; Kini, R. N.

    2016-05-28

    We present a Raman spectroscopic study of GaAs 1-xBix epilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We have investigated the anharmonic effect on the GaAs-like longitudinal optical phonon mode (LO'GaAs) of GaAs 1-xBix for different Bi concentrations at various temperatures. The results are analyzed in terms of the anharmonic damping effect induced by thermal and compositional disorder. We have observed that the anharmonicity increases with Bi concentration in GaAs 1-xBix as evident from the increase in the anharmonicity constants. In addition, the anharmonic lifetime of the optical phonon decreases with increasing Bi concentration in GaAs 1-xBix.

  6. Angular dependence of the electron energy loss spectra from a clean and adsorbate covered W(001) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avery, N. R.

    1981-11-01

    A dispersion analysis of the EELS from a W(001) surface in the range 1 < ΔE < 35 eV has been performed and compared with recent and complete optical data for tungsten. The non-dispersive ( k ˜ 0) EELS correlated well with a combination of the surface and bulk loss functions calculated from the optical data. Losses at 1-5 eV and a pair at 32 and 34.5 eV were assigned to interband and N 6,7 core ionization excitations respectively. The principal bulk and surface plasmon losses were identified at 24.0 and 20.3 eV respectively. Two further losses at 14.0 and 9.6 eV were also observed and assigned to subsidiary plasmon losses. All four plasmon losses showed only minimal energy dispersion, never exceeding 1.5 eV. A momentum selectivity for separating bulk and surface interband losses was demonstrated with the non-dispersive losses arising from excitations within the bulk even with incident energies as low as 88 eV, whereas their dispersive counterparts were extremely sensitive to the chemical state of the surface. New adsorbate derived losses which develop during adsorption were associated with excitations from the new deep lying adsorbate levels to final state levels at or near the Fermi level. It was concluded that this final state was also responsible for the N 6,7 ionization losses.

  7. Spectrally resolved localized states in GaAs1‑ x Bi x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Theresa M.; Alberi, Kirstin; Beaton, Daniel A.; Fluegel, Brian; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2017-03-01

    The role of localized states and their influence on the broader band structure remains a crucial question in understanding the band structure evolution in GaAs1‑ x Bi x . In this work, we present clear spectroscopic observations of recombination at several localized states in GaAs1‑ x Bi x . Sharp and recognizable photoluminescence features appear in multiple samples and redshift as a function of GaBi fraction between x = 0.16% and 0.4% at a linearized rate of 34 meV per % Bi, weaker than the redshift associated with band-to-band recombination. Interpreting these results in terms of radiative recombination between localized holes and free electrons sheds light on the relative movement of the conduction band minimum and the characteristics of localized bismuth-related trap states in GaAs1‑ x Bi x alloys.

  8. First-principles studies on molecular beam epitaxy growth of GaAs1-xBix

    DOE PAGES

    Luo, Guangfu; Yang, Shujiang; Li, Jincheng; ...

    2015-07-14

    We investigate the molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth of GaAs1-xBix film using density functional theory with spin-orbit coupling to understand the growth of this film, especially the mechanisms of Bi incorporation. We study the stable adsorption structures and kinetics of the incident molecules (As₂ molecule, Ga atom, Bi atom, and Bi₂ molecule) on the (2 x 1)-Gasub||Bi surface and a proposed q(1 x 1)-Gasub||AsAs surface has a quasi-(1 x 1) As layer above the Ga-terminated GaAs substrate and a randomly oriented As dimer layer on top. We obtain the desorption and diffusion barriers of the adsorbed molecules and also themore » reaction barriers of three key processes related to Bi evolution, namely, Bi incorporation, As/Bi exchange, and Bi clustering. The results help explain the experimentally observed dependence of Bi incorporation on the As/Ga ratio and growth temperature. Furthermore, we find that As₂ exchange with Bi of the (2 x 1)-Gasub||Bi surface is a key step controlling the kinetics of the Bi incorporation. Finally, we explore two possible methods to enhance the Bi incorporation, namely, replacing the MBE growth mode from codeposition of all fluxes with a sequential deposition of fluxes and applying asymmetric in-plane strain to the substrate.« less

  9. Direct Observation of the E_ Resonant State in GaAs1-xBix

    SciTech Connect

    Alberi, Kirstin; Beaton, Daniel A.; Mascarenhas, Angelo

    2015-12-15

    Bismuth-derived resonant states with T2 symmetry are detected in the valence band of GaAs1-xBix using electromodulated reflectance. A doublet is located 42 meV below the valence band edge of GaAs that is split by local strain around isolated Bi impurity atoms. A transition associated with a singlet is also observed just above the GaAs spin orbit split-off band. These states move deeper into the valence band with increasing Bi concentration but at a much slower rate than the well-known giant upward movement of the valence band edge in GaAs1-xBix. Our results provide key new insights for clarifying the mechanisms by which isovalent impurities alter the bandstructure of the host semiconductor.

  10. Growth and magnetic properties of MnAs/InAs hybrid structure on GaAs(1 1 1)B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Md. Earul; Akabori, Masashi

    2017-04-01

    We carried out molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) growth of MnAs/InAs hybrid structure on GaAs(1 1 1)B for spin field effect transistor (spin-FET) applications. We observed good alignment of hexagonal MnAs and cubic InAs epitaxial layers with GaAs(1 1 1)B by X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement. We observed smooth surface morphology of MnAs/InAs by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and also observed maze-like magnetic structure by magnetic force microscopy (MFM). We observed easy and hard magnetizations in-plane and out-of-plane directions similar to MnAs/GaAs(1 1 1)B using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. We believe that the MnAs/InAs hybrid structure on GaAs(1 1 1)B can be a base structure for spin-FETs.

  11. Evolution of superclusters and delocalized states in GaAs1–xNx

    DOE PAGES

    Fluegel, B.; Alberi, K.; Beaton, D. A.; ...

    2012-11-21

    The evolution of individual nitrogen cluster bound states into an extended state infinite supercluster in dilute GaAs1–xNx was probed through temperature and intensity-dependent, time-resolved and magnetophotoluminescence (PL) measurements. Samples with compositions less than 0.23% N exhibit PL behavior that is consistent with emission from the extended states of the conduction band. Near a composition of 0.23% N, a discontinuity develops between the extended state PL peak energy and the photoluminescence excitation absorption edge. The existence of dual localized/delocalized state behavior near this composition signals the formation of an N supercluster just below the conduction band edge. The infinite supercluster ismore » fully developed by 0.32% N.« less

  12. Adsorbent phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, S.

    1983-01-01

    An adsorbent which uses as its primary ingredient phosphoric acid salts of zirconium or titanium is presented. Production methods are discussed and several examples are detailed. Measurements of separating characteristics of some gases using the salts are given.

  13. Near Full-Composition-Range High-Quality GaAs1-xSbx Nanowires Grown by Molecular-Beam Epitaxy.

    PubMed

    Li, Lixia; Pan, Dong; Xue, Yongzhou; Wang, Xiaolei; Lin, Miaoling; Su, Dan; Zhang, Qinglin; Yu, Xuezhe; So, Hyok; Wei, Dahai; Sun, Baoquan; Tan, Pingheng; Pan, Anlian; Zhao, Jianhua

    2017-02-08

    Here we report on the Ga self-catalyzed growth of near full-composition-range energy-gap-tunable GaAs1-xSbx nanowires by molecular-beam epitaxy. GaAs1-xSbx nanowires with different Sb content are systematically grown by tuning the Sb and As fluxes, and the As background. We find that GaAs1-xSbx nanowires with low Sb content can be grown directly on Si(111) substrates (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.60) and GaAs nanowire stems (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.50) by tuning the Sb and As fluxes. To obtain GaAs1-xSbx nanowires with x ranging from 0.60 to 0.93, we grow the GaAs1-xSbx nanowires on GaAs nanowire stems by tuning the As background. Photoluminescence measurements confirm that the emission wavelength of the GaAs1-xSbx nanowires is tunable from 844 nm (GaAs) to 1760 nm (GaAs0.07Sb0.93). High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images show that the grown GaAs1-xSbx nanowires have pure zinc-blende crystal structure. Room-temperature Raman spectra reveal a redshift of the optical phonons in the GaAs1-xSbx nanowires with x increasing from 0 to 0.93. Field-effect transistors based on individual GaAs1-xSbx nanowires are fabricated, and rectifying behavior is observed in devices with low Sb content, which disappears in devices with high Sb content. The successful growth of high-quality GaAs1-xSbx nanowires with near full-range bandgap tuning may speed up the development of high-performance nanowire devices based on such ternaries.

  14. Nano-pits on GaAs (1 0 0) surface: Preferential sputtering and diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Tanuj; Panchal, Vandana; Kumar, Ashish; Kanjilal, D.

    2016-07-01

    Self organized nano-structure array on the surfaces of semiconductors have potential applications in photonics, magnetic devices, photovoltaics, and surface-wetting tailoring etc. Therefore, the control over their dimensions is gaining scientific interest in last couple of decades. In this work, fabrication of pits of nano-dimensions is carried out on the GaAs (1 0 0) surface using 50 keV Ar+ at normal incidence. Variation in fluence from 3 × 1017 ions/cm2 to 5 × 1018 ions/cm2 does not make a remarkable variation in the dimension of pits such as size and depth, which is confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). However the simultaneous dots formation is observed along with the pits at higher fluences. Average size of pits is found to be of 22 nm with depth of 1-5 nm for the used fluences. The importance of preferential sputtering of 'As' as compared to 'Ga' is estimated using energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The observed alteration in near surface composition shows the Ga enrichment of surface, which is not being much affected by variation in fluence. The growth evolution of pits and dots for the used experimental conditions is explained on the basis of ion beam induced preferential sputtering and surface diffusion.

  15. Droplet-mediated formation of embedded GaAs nanowires in MBE GaAs1-x Bi x films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Adam W.; Collar, Kristen; Li, Jincheng; Brown, April S.; Babcock, Susan E.

    2016-03-01

    We have examined the morphology and composition of embedded nanowires that can be formed during molecular beam epitaxy of GaAs1-x Bi x using high angle annular dark field (‘Z-contrast’) imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. Samples were grown in Ga-rich growth conditions on a stationary GaAs substrate. Ga-rich droplets are observed on the surface with lateral trails extending from the droplet in the [110] direction. Cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy of the film reveals epitaxial nanowire structures of composition ˜GaAs embedded in the GaAs1-x Bi x epitaxial layers. These nanowires extend from a surface droplet to the substrate at a shallow angle of inclination (˜4°). They typically are 4 μm long and have a lens-shaped cross section with major and minor axes dimensions of 800 and 120 nm. The top surface of the nanowires exhibits a linear trace in longitudinal cross-section, across which the composition change from ˜GaAs to GaAs1-x Bi x appears abrupt. The bottom surfaces of the nanowires appear wavy and the composition change appears to be graded over ˜25 nm. The droplets have phase separated into Ga- and Bi-rich components. A qualitative model is proposed in which Bi is gettered into Ga droplets, leaving Bi depleted nanowires in the wakes of the droplets as they migrate in one direction across the surface during GaAs1-x Bi x film growth.

  16. Te incorporation in GaAs1-xSbx nanowires and p-i-n axial structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Estiak; Kasanaboina, P. K.; Karim, M. R.; Sharma, M.; Reynolds, C. L.; Liu, Y.; Iyer, S.

    2016-12-01

    We report on in situ Te-doping in GaAs1-xSbx nanowires (NWs) grown via self-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Enhanced Te incorporation in the NW at higher Te cell temperature was attested by the broadening of the x-ray diffraction peak and the presence of a strong coupled-LO phonon mode in the Raman spectra. Te-doping was estimated from the shift in the coupled-LO phonon mode to be ˜2.0 × 1018/cm3. The surfactant nature of the Te modulated the growth kinetics, which was manifested in an enhanced radial growth rate with improved photoluminescence (PL) characteristics at both room temperature (RT) and 4 K. No noticeable planar defects were observed as ascertained from the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images and selected-area electron diffraction patterns. Finally, we demonstrate the experimental realization of a GaAs1-xSbx axial p-type/intrinsic/n-type (p-i-n) structure on a Si substrate with Te as the n-type dopant. The GaAs1-xSbx p-i-n NW structures exhibited rectifying current-voltage (I-V) behavior. The dopant concentration and the transport parameters estimated from the PL spectra and I-V curve were found to be in good agreement.

  17. Band lineup in GaAs(1-x)Sbx/GaAs strained-layer multiple quantum wells grown by molecular-beam epitaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ji, G.; Agarwala, S.; Huang, D.; Chyi, J.; Morkoc, H.

    1988-01-01

    GaAs(1-x)Sbx/GaAs strained-layer multiple quantum wells have been grown by molecular-beam epitaxy and characterized by room-temperature photoreflectance (PR). The PR spectra denote that high-quality layers can be grown in the GaAs(1-x)Sbx/GaAs system. The method for determining the band offset Q(vh) is discussed in this strained-layer system.

  18. Effect of Sb composition on the conduction type and photoluminescence of heavily Sn-doped GaAs1-xSbx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, T.; Jinbo, Y.; Uchitomi, N.

    2006-09-01

    Heavily Sn-doped GaAs1-xSbx epitaxial films were grown on SI-GaAs (001) substrates by solid source molecular beam epitaxy. A 5 nm-thick AlSb buffer layer was employed to relax the lattice mismatch between the epilayer and the substrate. X-ray diffraction (XRD), Hall effect measurements and photoluminescence measurements were performed to characterize the epitaxial films. The heavily Sn-doped GaAs1-xSbx / AlSb films with x 0.24 indicated n-type conduction while the epitaxial films with x 0.43 indicated p-type conduction.

  19. Dependence of barrier height on energy gap in Au n-type GaAs/1-x/P/x/ Schottky diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stirn, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    Data are presented which show that the Schottky barrier height for gold on the ternary compound GaAs(1-x)P(x) follows the commonly assumed two-thirds of the band gap relationship. An explanation is given for the reason that previously published data did not exhibit this behavior.

  20. Self-limiting growth when using trimethyl bismuth (TMBi) in the metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) of GaAs1-yBiy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forghani, Kamran; Guan, Yingxin; Wood, Adam W.; Anand, Amita; Babcock, Susan E.; Mawst, Luke J.; Kuech, Thomas F.

    2014-06-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies have confirmed that the GaAs1-yBiy semiconductor alloy system has potential for long wavelength applications and devices with improved performance over other materials emitting at similar wavelengths. The growth of GaAs1-yBiy by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) remains a challenge; bismuth is not easily incorporated into the GaAs matrix due the large difference in electronegativity and covalent radii between As and Bi. These differences often lead to Bi surface segregation or very low incorporation rates of Bi into the GaAs matrix. We have studied the growth of GaAs1-yBiy quantum well structures using trimethyl bismuth as the Bi source. A reduced growth rate is observed with increasing Bi precursor flux into the growth reactor. Additionally, an increase in the growth time for the Bi-containing layer at very low growth temperatures does not lead to a corresponding increase in layer thickness, which is indicative of a near self-limiting growth. Complex compositional profiles deduced from combining x-ray diffraction analysis with the transmission electron microscopy investigations are used to develop a phenomenological model of the MOVPE growth of GaAs1-yBiy heterostructures which includes a complex interplay of the chemical surface species. The presence of a methyl-terminated surface, associated with the use of trimethyl Bi, particularly at low growth temperatures, leads to an effective “site blocking” by Bi precursor inhibiting the growth of GaAs1-yBiy hetero-structures.

  1. Molecularly Imprinted Filtering Adsorbents for Odor Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Sho; Chiyomaru, You; Sassa, Fumihiro; Liu, Chuanjun; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2016-01-01

    Versatile odor sensors that can discriminate among huge numbers of environmental odorants are desired in many fields, including robotics, environmental monitoring, and food production. However, odor sensors comparable to an animal’s nose have not yet been developed. An animal’s olfactory system recognizes odor clusters with specific molecular properties and uses this combinatorial information in odor discrimination. This suggests that measurement and clustering of odor molecular properties (e.g., polarity, size) using an artificial sensor is a promising approach to odor sensing. Here, adsorbents composed of composite materials with molecular recognition properties were developed for odor sensing. The selectivity of the sensor depends on the adsorbent materials, so specific polymeric materials with particular solubility parameters were chosen to adsorb odorants with various properties. The adsorption properties of the adsorbents could be modified by mixing adsorbent materials. Moreover, a novel molecularly imprinted filtering adsorbent (MIFA), composed of an adsorbent substrate covered with a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) layer, was developed to improve the odor molecular recognition ability. The combination of the adsorbent and MIP layer provided a higher specificity toward target molecules. The MIFA thus provides a useful technique for the design and control of adsorbents with adsorption properties specific to particular odor molecules. PMID:27886070

  2. InAs quantum dots in a GaAs1-xSbx matrix for intermediate band solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yang; Debnath, Mukul; Whiteside, Vincent R.; Mishima, Tetsuya; Santos, Michael B.; Sellers, Ian R.; Phinney, Lucas; Hossain, Khalid

    2014-03-01

    Self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs) were grown by the migration-enhanced epitaxy (MEE) technique in a GaAs1-xSbx matrix material on a GaAs substrate for application as intermediate band single junction solar cells. Initially, a series of InAs QDs structures were studied with a nominal deposition of 1.75 - 3.5 ML and Sb concentration of x = 0 . 13 . The areal density measured by atomic force microscopy was observed to increase with total deposition to a maximum of ~ 4.0x1011/cm2 after ~ 3 MLs. A high QD density is required to facilitate the formation of an intermediate band (IB) within the band gap of the matrix material. With increasing QD density a simultaneous increase in the optical emission is also observed. The promise in this system is the potential to form a degenerate valence band offset, while forming an IB in the conduction band. As such, a second series of QDs was investigated in which the concentration of Sb in the matrix varied from x = 0 . 10 to x = 0 . 18 . The transition from type-I band alignment to type-II is observed. Temperature and power dependent photoluminescence, along with 8 band k . p calculations of the band structure will also be presented. Research supported by the OCAST OARS program.

  3. Growth, strain relaxation properties and high-κ dielectric integration of mixed-anion GaAs1-ySby metamorphic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y.; Clavel, M.; Goley, P.; Hudait, M. K.

    2014-10-01

    Mixed-anion, GaAs1-ySby metamorphic materials with a wide range of antimony (Sb) compositions extending from 15% to 62%, were grown by solid source molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on GaAs substrates. The impact of different growth parameters on the Sb composition in GaAs1-ySby materials was systemically investigated. The Sb composition was well-controlled by carefully optimizing the As/Ga ratio, the Sb/Ga ratio, and the substrate temperature during the MBE growth process. High-resolution x-ray diffraction demonstrated a quasi-complete strain relaxation within each composition of GaAs1-ySby. Atomic force microscopy exhibited smooth surface morphologies across the wide range of Sb compositions in the GaAs1-ySby structures. Selected high-κ dielectric materials, Al2O3, HfO2, and Ta2O5 were deposited using atomic layer deposition on the GaAs0.38Sb0.62 material, and their respective band alignment properties were investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Detailed XPS analysis revealed a valence band offset of >2 eV for all three dielectric materials on GaAs0.38Sb0.62, indicating the potential of utilizing these dielectrics on GaAs0.38Sb0.62 for p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) applications. Moreover, both Al2O3 and HfO2 showed a conduction band offset of >2 eV on GaAs0.38Sb0.62, suggesting these two dielectrics can also be used for n-type MOS applications. The well-controlled Sb composition in several GaAs1-ySby material systems and the detailed band alignment analysis of multiple high-κ dielectric materials on a fixed Sb composition, GaAs0.38Sb0.62, provides a pathway to utilize GaAs1-ySby materials in future microelectronic and optoelectronic applications.

  4. On the Chemical Origin of the Gap Bowing in (GaAs)1−xGe2x Alloys: A Combined DFT–QSGW Study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Motivated by the research and analysis of new materials for photovoltaics and by the possibility of tailoring their optical properties for improved solar energy conversion, we have focused our attention on the (GaAs)1−xGe2x series of alloys. We have investigated the structural properties of some (GaAs)1−xGe2x compounds within the local-density approximation to density-functional theory, and their optical properties within the Quasiparticle Self-consistent GW approximation. The QSGW results confirm the experimental evidence of asymmetric bandgap bowing. It is explained in terms of violations of the octet rule, as well as in terms of the order–disorder phase transition. PMID:20671794

  5. Droplet-mediated formation of embedded GaAs nanowires in MBE GaAs(1-x)Bi(x) films.

    PubMed

    Wood, Adam W; Collar, Kristen; Li, Jincheng; Brown, April S; Babcock, Susan E

    2016-03-18

    We have examined the morphology and composition of embedded nanowires that can be formed during molecular beam epitaxy of GaAs(1-x)Bi(x) using high angle annular dark field ('Z-contrast') imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. Samples were grown in Ga-rich growth conditions on a stationary GaAs substrate. Ga-rich droplets are observed on the surface with lateral trails extending from the droplet in the [110] direction. Cross-sectional scanning transmission electron microscopy of the film reveals epitaxial nanowire structures of composition ∼GaAs embedded in the GaAs(1-x)Bi(x) epitaxial layers. These nanowires extend from a surface droplet to the substrate at a shallow angle of inclination (∼4°). They typically are 4 μm long and have a lens-shaped cross section with major and minor axes dimensions of 800 and 120 nm. The top surface of the nanowires exhibits a linear trace in longitudinal cross-section, across which the composition change from ∼GaAs to GaAs(1-x)Bi(x) appears abrupt. The bottom surfaces of the nanowires appear wavy and the composition change appears to be graded over ∼25 nm. The droplets have phase separated into Ga- and Bi-rich components. A qualitative model is proposed in which Bi is gettered into Ga droplets, leaving Bi depleted nanowires in the wakes of the droplets as they migrate in one direction across the surface during GaAs(1-x)Bi(x) film growth.

  6. Modeling adsorption: Investigating adsorbate and adsorbent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Charles Edwin

    1999-12-01

    Surface catalyzed reactions play a major role in current chemical production technology. Currently, 90% of all chemicals are produced by heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. Most of these catalyzed reactions involve adsorption, concentrating the substrate(s) (the adsorbate) on the surface of the solid (the adsorbent). Pore volumes, accessible surface areas, and the thermodynamics of adsorption are essential in the understanding of solid surface characteristics fundamental to catalyst and adsorbent screening and selection. Molecular properties such as molecular volumes and projected molecular areas are needed in order to convert moles adsorbed to surface volumes and areas. Generally, these molecular properties have been estimated from bulk properties, but many assumptions are required. As a result, different literature values are employed for these essential molecular properties. Calculated molar volumes and excluded molecular areas are determined and tabulated for a variety of molecules. Molecular dimensions of molecules are important in the understanding of molecular exclusion as well as size and shape selectivity, diffusion, and adsorbent selection. Molecular dimensions can also be used in the determination of the effective catalytic pore size of a catalyst. Adsorption isotherms, on zeolites, (crystalline mineral oxides) and amorphous solids, can be analyzed with the Multiple Equilibrium Analysis (MEA) description of adsorption. The MEA produces equilibrium constants (Ki), capacities (ni), and thermodynamic parameters (enthalpies, ΔHi, and entropies, ΔSi) of adsorption for each process. Pore volumes and accessible surface areas are calculated from the process capacities. Adsorption isotherms can also be predicted for existing and new adsorbate-adsorbent systems with the MEA. The results show that MEA has the potential of becoming a standard characterization method for microporous solids that will lead to an increased understanding of their behavior in gas

  7. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  8. Surface kinetics study of metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of GaAs1-yBiy on offcut and mesa-patterned GaAs substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Yingxin; Forghani, Kamran; Kim, Honghyuk; Babcock, Susan E.; Mawst, Luke J.; Kuech, Thomas F.

    2017-04-01

    The influence of the surface step termination on the metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of GaAs1-yBiy was explored by examining the epitaxial layer growth rate, composition, and morphology characteristics on the offcut and mesa-patterned (001) GaAs substrates. Vicinal surfaces offcut to (111)B with a high density of As-terminated steps ('B-steps') increased the GaAs1-yBiy layer growth rate as well as possessed the fastest lateral growth rate on mesa-patterned substrates at a growth temperature of 420 °C, indicating that B-steps enhanced the Ga incorporation. With Bi accumulation on the surface, the Ga incorporation rate was reduced by the Bi preferential presence at B-steps blocking the Ga incorporation. Vicinal surfaces offcut to (111)A, which generated Ga-terminated steps ('A-steps') enhanced the Bi incorporation rate during growth at 380 °C. This work reveals that the surface step termination plays an important role in the growth of the metastable alloy. Appropriate choices of both the substrate surface-step structure and other growth parameters could lead to an enhanced Bi incorporation.

  9. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  10. Adsorbent and adsorbent bed for materials capture and separation processes

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Wei

    2011-01-25

    A method device and material for performing adsorption wherein a fluid mixture is passed through a channel in a structured adsorbent bed having a solid adsorbent comprised of adsorbent particles having a general diameter less than 100 um, loaded in a porous support matrix defining at least one straight flow channel. The adsorbent bed is configured to allow passage of a fluid through said channel and diffusion of a target material into said adsorbent under a pressure gradient driving force. The targeted molecular species in the fluid mixture diffuses across the porous support retaining layer, contacts the adsorbent, and adsorbs on the adsorbent, while the remaining species in the fluid mixture flows out of the channel.

  11. Bandgap tuning in GaAs1‑xSbx axial nanowires grown by Ga-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Estiak; Ojha, S. K.; Kasanaboina, P. K.; Reynolds, C. L., Jr.; Liu, Y.; Iyer, S.

    2017-03-01

    In this work we present a comprehensive study on the effects of Sb incorporation on the composition modulation, structural and optical properties of self-assisted axial GaAs1‑xSbx nanowires of 2–6 μm in length grown on (111) Si substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. The Sb composition in the GaAs1‑xSbx axial nanowire (NW) was varied from 2.8–16 at.%, as determined from energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Lower Sb composition leads to thinner nanowires and inhomogeneous Sb composition distribution radially with a depleted Sb surface region inducing weak type-II optical emission, the presence of an additional peak at higher Bragg angle in the x-ray diffraction spectra and an electric-field-induced strong Raman LO mode. Higher Sb composition of 16 at.% leads to a more uniform Sb compositional distribution radially leading to type-I optical transitions exhibiting the lowest PL peak energy occurring at 1.13 eV. In addition, the high quality of these nanowires exhibiting pure zinc blende crystal structure, largely free of any planar defects, is borne out by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area diffraction patterns. The shift and broadening of the Raman LO and TO modes reveal evidence of increased Sb incorporation in the nanowires. Significant improvement in optical characteristics was achieved by the incorporation of a Al0.2Ga0.8As passivating shell. The results are very promising and reveal the potential to further red shift the optical emission wavelength by fine tuning of the fluxes during growth.

  12. Evidence for Adsorbate-Enhanced Field Emission from Carbon Nanotube Fibers (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-31

    microscopy from single wall nanotube ( SWNT ) caps,9 and by current satura- tion measurements10 from adsorbate-covered SWNTs , were consistent with this...assertion. Comparison of the FE electron energy distributions acquired from clean and adsorbate- covered SWNTs led11 to the conclusion that enhancement...Residual Gas Analysis FE Field Emission CNT Carbon Nanotube SWNT Single Wall Nanotube CSA Chlorosulfonic Acid

  13. Ab-initio DFT FP-LAPW GGA and LDA TB-mBJ and SO theoretical study of structural and elastic properties of Zinc-Blende crystal phase GaAs1-xBix alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menezla, S.; Kadri, A.; Zitouni, K.; Djelal, A.; Djermouni, M.; Hallouche, A.; Zaoui, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present an ab-initio theoretical study of structural and elastic properties of GaAs1-xBix alloys in the Zinc-Blende (ZB) phase. We use a recent version of Wien2k package code based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) Full Potential and Linearized Augmented Plane Waves (FP-LAPW) method including recent Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson correction of the exchange potential (TB-mBJ) and the spin-orbit interaction (SO). The calculations are performed within the Local Density Approximation (LDA) as well as the Generalized Gradient Approximation (GGA). We study first the structural properties of GaAs1-xBix alloys by solving Murnaghan equation of state. Our results show that the ZB phase is the lowest equilibrium crystal structure of GaAs1-xBix in the whole alloy composition range, in agreement with previous theoretical predictions. The variations versus Bi contents of the ZB GaAs1-xBix lattice constant a0, bulk modulus B0 and its pressure derivative B0‧ are also found very close to other theoretical and experimental data, but with much smaller bowing effects indicating a better resolution thanks to TB-mBJ correction. The variations of B0 versus the reverse equilibrium volume of the unit cell (1/V0) are found to be described by the simple linear empirical expression B0 = -0.21068 + 0.16695/V0 which is close to the theoretical prediction for III-V semiconductors with, however, somewhat lower linear coefficients values, suggesting a more metallic behavior. In a second part of this work, we use Birch-Murnaghan approach to study the elastic properties of GaAs1-xBix alloys. The elastic stiffness coefficients, C11, C12 and C44, and their variations versus alloy composition were determined for ZB GaAs1-xBix alloy. Their values in GaAs and GaBi binary compounds are found in very good agreement with available experimental and/or theoretical data. Their variations in GaAs1-xBix alloy show a monotonic decrease with increasing Bi contents, indicating a softening behavior as is typically the case for metallic alloys. The values of the bulk modulus derived with the help of C11, C12 and C44 elastic stiffness coefficients are found very close to B0 values derived directly from Murnaghan equation of state, indicating the good accuracy of Cij coefficients deduced from Birch-Murnaghan procedure.

  14. Gas-Solid Dynamics at Disordered and Adsorbate Covered Surfaces.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-15

    Schrodinger equation . Specific numerical results are presented for pulses of area equal to v, 21r, 31r, 4r and 51r for both symmetric and asymmetric... Semiclassical Perturbation Theory for Atom Scattering from Surfaces with Defects 1 Presented here is an extension of semiclassical perturbation theory (SCP...Involved in solving the AWM equations in equivalent to that Involved for elastic scattering in the same formulation. As an initial Illustration, expUclt

  15. Ab Initio Investigation of the Structural, Electronic and Optical Properties of Cubic GaAs1- x P x Ternary Alloys Under Hydrostatic Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, R.; Abdiche, A.; Abbar, B.; Guemou, M.; Riane, R.; Murtaza, G.; Omran, SAAD Bin; Khenata, R.; Soyalp, F.

    2015-12-01

    The structural, electronic and optical properties of the GaAs1- x P x ternary alloys together with their binary GaP and GaAs compounds were investigated in the zinc-blende (ZB) phase using the density functional theory. The lattice constant of the GaAs compound decreases while its bulk modulus increases when the doping concentration of the P dopant is increased. In addition, both parameters (lattice constant and bulk modulus) show small deviations from the linear concentration dependence. The energy band gap of the GaAs compound is of the direct nature, which increases with the increase in the P dopant concentration, whereas at higher P dopant concentration, the band gap shifts from direct to indirect character. On the other hand, the hydrostatic pressure has a significant effect on the band structure of the investigated compounds where the binary GaAs compound changes from a direct band gap semiconductor to an indirect band gap semiconductor at P ≥ 5 GPa. Furthermore, the pressure-dependence of the optical properties of the GaAs, GaP and GaAs0.75P0.25 alloy were also investigated, where the calculated zero frequency refractive index and the dielectric function are also compared with the experimental results as well as with different empirical models.

  16. Evolution of the electron localization in a nonconventional alloy system GaAs1-xNx probed by high-magnetic-field photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. J.; Wei, X.; Zhang, Y.; Mascarenhas, A.; Xin, H. P.; Hong, Y. G.; Tu, C. W.

    2003-06-01

    We demonstrate that a high magnetic field can be used effectively not only to probe the nature of the photoluminescence (PL) in a semiconductor, but also to reveal emission peaks that are unobservable at zero field since the magnetic field can alter energy relaxation processes and the statistical distribution of the photocarriers. Our systematic magneto-PL study of GaAs1-xNx (0.1%⩽x<2.5%) in fields up to 30 T indicates that the character of the low-temperature PL in this system changes drastically with varying nitrogen composition x and exhibits transitions with applying strong magnetic fields. For x<0.7%, the PL spectrum shows many discrete features whose energies remain nearly stationary up to the highest applied field. However, the magnetic confinement gives rise to a feature emerging on the higher energy side of the zero-field spectrum. This feature does show a diamagnetic shift, but it is much slower that that of the GaAs band-edge transition. For x>1%, the PL spectrum evolves into a broad band, and its diamagnetic shift resembles the band-edge transition in a conventional semiconductor, and the rate of shift is comparable to that of GaAs. From the diamagnetic shift of the band, the reduced effective masses for different composition of nitrogen have been derived for this system using the standard theory for the magneto-exciton in a three dimensional semiconductor.

  17. Influence of hydrogen input partial pressure on the polarity of InN on GaAs (1 1 1)A grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Hisashi; Eriguchi, Ken-ichi; Torii, Jun-ichi; Cho, Hyun-Chol; Kumagai, Yoshinao; Koukitu, Akinori

    2008-04-01

    Influences of hydrogen input partial pressure in the carrier gas ( F=PHo/(PHo+PNo)) on the crystalline quality and polarities of InN on GaAs (1 1 1)A surfaces were investigated by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). It was found that the polarity of the InN was affected by the hydrogen gas in the system regardless of the polarity of GaAs starting substrate. The polarity of InN layer grown with the hydrogen partial pressure of Fo=0.004 was a mixture of In-polarity and N-polarity, while that grown with Fo=0 was In-polarity. Degradation of the crystalline quality of InN grown with Fo=0.004 occurred due to the polarity inversion during the growth. The reason why the polarity of InN was influenced by the hydrogen carrier gas could be explained by the preferential growth of N-polarity InN in the H 2 contained ambient and/or the limiting reaction of InN decomposition.

  18. Covering Crime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gest, Ted; Krajicek, David; Hackney, Suzette; Moore, Melissa

    2003-01-01

    Presents four brief articles on covering crime. Notes that reporting on crimes requires special skills for student reporters, editors, and photographers. Explains how to gain access to scenes, to develop journalistic ethics, and how to cover crime and its victims. Discusses the relation of race and ethnic issues to crime, and how visual…

  19. Adsorbed Water Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander detected small and variable amounts of water in the Martian soil.

    In this schematic illustration, water molecules are represented in red and white; soil minerals are represented in green and blue. The water, neither liquid, vapor, nor solid, adheres in very thin films of molecules to the surfaces of soil minerals. The left half illustrates an interpretation of less water being adsorbed onto the soil-particle surface during a period when the tilt, or obliquity, of Mars' rotation axis is small, as it is in the present. The right half illustrates a thicker film of water during a time when the obliquity is greater, as it is during cycles on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years. As the humidity of the atmosphere increases, more water accumulates on mineral surfaces. Thicker films behave increasingly like liquid water.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  20. MTBE adsorption on alternative adsorbents and packed bed adsorber performance.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Alfred; Knappe, Detlef R U

    2008-04-01

    Widespread use of the fuel additive methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) has led to frequent MTBE detections in North American and European drinking water sources. The overall objective of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of a silicalite zeolite, a carbonaceous resin, and a coconut-shell-based granular activated carbon (GAC) for the removal of MTBE from water. Isotherm and short bed adsorber tests were conducted in ultrapure water and river water to obtain parameters describing MTBE adsorption equilibria and kinetics and to quantify the effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on MTBE adsorption. Both the silicalite zeolite and the carbonaceous resin exhibited larger MTBE adsorption uptakes than the tested GAC. Surface diffusion coefficients describing intraparticle MTBE mass transfer rates were largest for the GAC and smallest for the carbonaceous resin. Pilot tests were conducted to verify MTBE breakthrough curve predictions obtained with the homogeneous surface diffusion model and to evaluate the effect of NOM preloading on packed bed adsorber performance. Results showed that GAC was the most cost-competitive adsorbent when considering adsorbent usage rate only; however, the useful life of an adsorber containing silicalite zeolite was predicted to be approximately 5-6 times longer than that of an equally sized adsorber containing GAC. Pilot column results also showed that NOM preloading did not impair the MTBE removal efficiency of the silicalite zeolite. Thus, it may be possible to regenerate spent silicalite with less energy-intensive methods than those required to regenerate GAC.

  1. Sky cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerth, Jordan J.

    Of all of the standard meteorological parameters collected and observed daily, sky cover is not only one of the most complex, but the one that is fairly ambiguously defined and difficult to quantify. Despite that, the implications of how cloud fraction and sky cover are understood not only impact daily weather forecasts, but also present challenges to assessing the state of the earth's climate system. Part of the reason for this is the lack of observational methods for verifying the skill of clouds represented and parameterized in numerical models. While human observers record sky cover as part of routine duties, the spatial coverage of such observations in the United States is relatively sparse. There is greater spatial coverage of automated observations, and essentially complete coverage from geostationary weather satellites that observe the Americas. A good analysis of sky cover reconciles differences between manual observations, automated observations, and satellite observations, through an algorithm that accounts for the strengths and weaknesses of each dataset. This work describes the decision structure for trusting and weighting these similar observations. Some of the issues addressed include: human and instrument error resulting from approximations and estimations, a deficiency in high cloud detectability using surface-based ceilometers, poorly resolved low cloud using infrared channels on space-based radiometers during overnight hours, and decreased confidence in satellite-detected cloud during stray light periods. Using the blended sky cover analysis as the best representation of cloudiness, it is possible to compare the analysis to numerical model fields in order to assess the performance of the model and the parameterizations therein, as well as confirm or uncover additional relationships between sky cover and pertinent fields using an optimization methodology. The optimizer minimizes an affine expression of adjusted fields to the "truth" sky cover

  2. Cover Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are great tools to improve soil quality and health, and great tools to increase carbon sequestration. They are nutrient management tools that can help scavenge nitrate, cycle nitrogen to the following crop, mine NO3 from groundwater, and increase nitrogen use efficiency of cropping syste...

  3. Rotary adsorbers for continuous bulk separations

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S [Oak Ridge, TN

    2011-11-08

    A rotary adsorber for continuous bulk separations is disclosed. The rotary adsorber includes an adsorption zone in fluid communication with an influent adsorption fluid stream, and a desorption zone in fluid communication with a desorption fluid stream. The fluid streams may be gas streams or liquid streams. The rotary adsorber includes one or more adsorption blocks including adsorbent structure(s). The adsorbent structure adsorbs the target species that is to be separated from the influent fluid stream. The apparatus includes a rotary wheel for moving each adsorption block through the adsorption zone and the desorption zone. A desorption circuit passes an electrical current through the adsorbent structure in the desorption zone to desorb the species from the adsorbent structure. The adsorbent structure may include porous activated carbon fibers aligned with their longitudinal axis essentially parallel to the flow direction of the desorption fluid stream. The adsorbent structure may be an inherently electrically-conductive honeycomb structure.

  4. Uremic toxins and oral adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shunsuke; Yoshiya, Kunihiko; Kita, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Hideki; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2011-04-01

    Uremic toxins are associated with various disorders in patients with end-stage renal disease and it is difficult to remove some of these toxins by dialysis. Since some uremic toxins are generated by bacterial metabolites in the colon, oral adsorbents that interfere with the absorption of uremic toxins or their precursors are believed to prevent their accumulation in the body. AST-120 adsorbs various uremic retention solutes in the gastrointestinal system and has potential for providing clinical benefit. Sevelamer hydrochloride binds some harmful compounds in addition to phosphate and seems to have pleiotropic effects that include lowering serum LDL cholesterol levels and reduction of inflammation. The effect of sevelamer hydrochloride on indoxyl sulfate and p-cresol has been shown in an in vitro study; however, in vivo studies in mice or humans did not demonstrate this effect on protein-binding uremic toxins. Oral adsorbents are thus one of the important modalities in the treatment of uremic syndrome.

  5. Transamidase subunit GAA1/GPAA1 is a M28 family metallo-peptide-synthetase that catalyzes the peptide bond formation between the substrate protein's omega-site and the GPI lipid anchor's phosphoethanolamine.

    PubMed

    Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Stephan; Kwang, Toh Yew; Grüber, Gerhard; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The transamidase subunit GAA1/GPAA1 is predicted to be the enzyme that catalyzes the attachment of the glycosylphosphatidyl (GPI) lipid anchor to the carbonyl intermediate of the substrate protein at the ω-site. Its ~300-amino acid residue lumenal domain is a M28 family metallo-peptide-synthetase with an α/β hydrolase fold, including a central 8-strand β-sheet and a single metal (most likely zinc) ion coordinated by 3 conserved polar residues. Phosphoethanolamine is used as an adaptor to make the non-peptide GPI lipid anchor look chemically similar to the N terminus of a peptide.

  6. Conformational changes of adsorbed proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Scott

    2005-03-01

    The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and pepsin to gold surfaces has been studied using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Proteins are adsorbed from solution onto a gold surface and changes in the conformation of the adsorbed proteins are induced by changing the buffer solution. We selected pH and ionic strength values for the buffer solutions that are known from our circular dichroism measurements to cause conformational changes of the proteins in bulk solution. We find that for both BSA and pepsin the changes in conformation are impeded by the interaction of the protein with the gold surface.

  7. Particle reflection and its energy spectrum from solid surfaces with adsorbate atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamura, Y.

    1988-06-01

    Using the ACAT and ACOCT codes, the particle reflection coefficients and energy spectra reflected from solid surfaces covered with adsorbated atoms have been calculated in the low-energy region. It is found that the particle reflection coefficients of low energy ions are much reduced due to the collision between an incoming ion and an adsorbate atom, especially for M1 > M3 ( M1 and M3 being the atomic masses of an ion and an adsorbate atom, respectively), and the surface peak from a substrate atom becomes strongly suppressed as the coverage increases.

  8. Complexation of trace metals by adsorbed natural organic matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The adsorption behavior and solution speciation of Cu(II) and Cd(II) were studied in model systems containing colloidal alumina particles and dissolved natural organic matter. At equilibrium a significant fraction of the alumina surface was covered by adsorbed organic matter. Cu(II) was partitioned primarily between the surface-bound organic matter and dissolved Cu-organic complexes in the aqueous phase. Complexation of Cu2+ with the functional groups of adsorbed organic matter was stronger than complexation with uncovered alumina surface hydroxyls. It is shown that the complexation of Cu(II) by adsorbed organic matter can be described by an apparent stability constant approximately equal to the value found for solution phase equilibria. In contrast, Cd(II) adsorption was not significantly affected by the presence of organic matter at the surface, due to weak complex formation with the organic ligands. The results demonstrate that general models of trace element partitioning in natural waters must consider the presence of adsorbed organic matter. ?? 1984.

  9. Adsorbate-induced demagnetization and restructuring of ultrathin magnetic films: CO chemisorbed on γ-Fe/Cu(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spišák, D.; Hafner, J.

    2001-09-01

    First-principles local-spin-density (LSD) investigations of the structural, magnetic, and electronic properties of clean and CO-adsorbed ultrathin γ-iron films epitaxially grown on Cu(100) surfaces demonstrate that both the geometrical and the magnetic structures of the films are profoundly modified by the adsorption of CO. The enhanced magnetic moments of the top-layer atoms are strongly quenched by the presence of the adsorbate. Due to the pronounced magnetovolume effect, this leads also to a correlated change in the interlayer relaxations. Strikingly, the adsorbate-induced demagnetization is primarily limited to those surface atoms directly bonded to the adsorbate. This leads to the formation of an in-plane magnetic pattern in a partially adsorbate-covered film. The comparison of the calculated vibrational eigenfrequencies of the CO adsorbate with experiment confirms the picture based on the LSD calculations.

  10. A novel fiber-based adsorbent technology

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T.A.

    1997-10-01

    In this Phase I Small Business Innovation Research program, Chemica Technologies, Inc. is developing an economical, robust, fiber-based adsorbent technology for removal of heavy metals from contaminated water. The key innovation is the development of regenerable adsorbent fibers and adsorbent fiber cloths that have high capacity and selectivity for heavy metals and are chemically robust. The process has the potential for widespread use at DOE facilities, mining operations, and the chemical process industry.

  11. The uranium from seawater program at PNNL: Overview of marine testing, adsorbent characterization, adsorbent durability, adsorbent toxicity, and deployment studies

    DOE PAGES

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li -Jung; Janke, Christopher James; ...

    2016-02-07

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacitymore » and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 ± 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 ± 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage. Marine testing

  12. The uranium from seawater program at PNNL: Overview of marine testing, adsorbent characterization, adsorbent durability, adsorbent toxicity, and deployment studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li -Jung; Janke, Christopher James; Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T.; Bonheyo, George T.; Pan, Horng -Bin; Wai, Chien; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Bianucci, Laura; Wood, Jordana R.; Warner, Marvin G.; Peterson, Sonja; Abrecht, David G.; Mayes, Richard T.; Tsouris, Costas; Oyola, Yatsandra; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Schlafer, Nicholas J.; Addleman, Shane R.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Das, Sadananda; Kim, Jungseung; Buesseler, Ken; Breier, Crystal; D'Alessandro, Evan

    2016-02-07

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacity and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 ± 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 ± 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage. Marine testing at Woods

  13. Complete braided adsorbent for marine testing to demonstrate 3g-U/kg-adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Chris; Yatsandra, Oyola; Mayes, Richard; none,; Gill, Gary; Li-Jung, Kuo; Wood, Jordana; Sadananda, Das

    2014-04-30

    ORNL has manufactured four braided adsorbents that successfully demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities ranging from 3.0-3.6 g-U/kg-adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. Four new braided and leno woven fabric adsorbents have also been prepared by ORNL and are currently undergoing marine testing at PNNL.

  14. A study of the alumina-silica gel adsorbent for the removal of silicic acid from geothermal water: increase in adsorption capacity of the adsorbent due to formation of amorphous aluminosilicate by adsorption of silicic acid.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Takushi; Ueda, Akira; Kato, Koichi; Mogi, Katsumi; Matsuo, Shorin

    2002-08-01

    Two kinds of adsorbents (Si adsorbent and Al adsorbent) for the removal of silicic acid from geothermal water to retard the formation of silica scales were prepared using silicic acid contained in geothermal water. The Si adsorbent was prepared by evaporating geothermal water, and the Al adsorbent was prepared by evaporating geothermal water after the addition of aluminum chloride. The specific surface area of the Si adsorbent was small and it's adsorption capacity of silicic acid was low. Although the specific surface area of the Al adsorbent was also small, it was significantly increased by the adsorption of silicic acid and it's adsorption capacity was high. Based on the change in the local structure of aluminum ion by the adsorption of silicic acid, the Al adsorbent was considered to be silica particles covered with crystalline aluminum hydroxide. Moreover, it was concluded that the increase in the specific surface area of the Al adsorbent and the decrease in the zeta potential were due to the formation of an amorphous aluminosilicate with a large surface area and a negative charge (one 4-coordinated Al) by the reaction between aluminum ions and silicic acids.

  15. Adsorbate Diffusion on Transition Metal Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    systematically studied adsorption and diffusion of atomic and diatomic species (H, C, N, O, CO, and NO) on nanometer-sized Pt and Cu nanoparticles with...species and two diatomic molecules (H, C, N, O, CO, and NO) as adsorbates and study the adsorption and diffusion of these adsorbates across the edges

  16. Development Trends in Porous Adsorbents for Carbon Capture.

    PubMed

    Sreenivasulu, Bolisetty; Sreedhar, Inkollu; Suresh, Pathi; Raghavan, Kondapuram Vijaya

    2015-11-03

    Accumulation of greenhouse gases especially CO2 in the atmosphere leading to global warming with undesirable climate changes has been a serious global concern. Major power generation in the world is from coal based power plants. Carbon capture through pre- and post- combustion technologies with various technical options like adsorption, absorption, membrane separations, and chemical looping combustion with and without oxygen uncoupling have received considerable attention of researchers, environmentalists and the stake holders. Carbon capture from flue gases can be achieved with micro and meso porous adsorbents. This review covers carbonaceous (organic and metal organic frameworks) and noncarbonaceous (inorganic) porous adsorbents for CO2 adsorption at different process conditions and pore sizes. Focus is also given to noncarbonaceous micro and meso porous adsorbents in chemical looping combustion involving insitu CO2 capture at high temperature (>400 °C). Adsorption mechanisms, material characteristics, and synthesis methods are discussed. Attention is given to isosteric heats and characterization techniques. The options to enhance the techno-economic viability of carbon capture techniques by integrating with CO2 utilization to produce industrially important chemicals like ammonia and urea are analyzed. From the reader's perspective, for different classes of materials, each section has been summarized in the form of tables or figures to get a quick glance of the developments.

  17. Database of Novel and Emerging Adsorbent Materials

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 205 NIST/ARPA-E Database of Novel and Emerging Adsorbent Materials (Web, free access)   The NIST/ARPA-E Database of Novel and Emerging Adsorbent Materials is a free, web-based catalog of adsorbent materials and measured adsorption properties of numerous materials obtained from article entries from the scientific literature. Search fields for the database include adsorbent material, adsorbate gas, experimental conditions (pressure, temperature), and bibliographic information (author, title, journal), and results from queries are provided as a list of articles matching the search parameters. The database also contains adsorption isotherms digitized from the cataloged articles, which can be compared visually online in the web application or exported for offline analysis.

  18. NOx adsorber and method of regenerating same

    DOEpatents

    Endicott, Dennis L.; Verkiel, Maarten; Driscoll, James J.

    2007-01-30

    New technologies, such as NOx adsorber catalytic converters, are being used to meet increasingly stringent regulations on undesirable emissions, including NOx emissions. NOx adsorbers must be periodically regenerated, which requires an increased fuel consumption. The present disclosure includes a method of regenerating a NOx adsorber within a NOx adsorber catalytic converter. At least one sensor positioned downstream from the NOx adsorber senses, in the downstream exhaust, at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations a plurality of times during a regeneration phase. The sensor is in communication with an electronic control module that includes a regeneration monitoring algorithm operable to end the regeneration phase when a time rate of change of the at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations is after an expected plateau region begins.

  19. Picosecond adsorbate dynamics at condensed phase interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, T.W.; Chang, Y.J.; Martorell, J.

    1993-12-31

    Picosecond surface second harmonic generation has been used to probe a variety of elementary adsorbate reactions at liquid-solid interfaces. Electron transfer reactions at semiconductor-liquid junctions, geminate recombination of photogenerated free radical pairs and the orientational dynamics of dipolar adsorbates have all been explored in varying degrees of detail. These kinetic studies have led to a detailed analysis of adsorbate detection on the surface of non-centrosymmetric substrates as well as the use of total internal reflection geometries for signal enhancement from optically absorbing liquids. Particular emphasis has been placed on the static and dynamic characterization of adsorbate orientational distribution functions and how these are determined from the torque exerted on adsorbates by the angular part of the molecule-surface interaction potential.

  20. Fluorescence dynamics of microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, R.

    2005-03-01

    Sunscreens are generally oily substances which are prepared in organic solvents, emulsions or dispersions with micro- or nanoparticles. These molecules adsorb to and integrate into skin cells. In order to understand the photophysical properties of the sunscreen, we compare steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence in organic solvent of varying dielectric constant ɛ and adsorbed to polystyrene microspheres and dispersed in water. Steady-state fluorescence is highest and average fluorescence lifetime longest in toluene, the solvent of lowest ɛ. However, there is no uniform dependence on ɛ. Sunscreens PABA and padimate-O show complex emission spectra. Microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens exhibit highly non-exponential decay, illustrative of multiple environments of the adsorbed molecule. The heterogeneous fluorescence dynamics likely characterizes sunscreen adsorbed to cells.

  1. Nanovalved Adsorbents for CH4 Storage.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhuonan; Nambo, Apolo; Tate, Kirby L; Bao, Ainan; Zhu, Minqi; Jasinski, Jacek B; Zhou, Shaojun J; Meyer, Howard S; Carreon, Moises A; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2016-05-11

    A novel concept of utilizing nanoporous coatings as effective nanovalves on microporous adsorbents was developed for high capacity natural gas storage at low storage pressure. The work reported here for the first time presents the concept of nanovalved adsorbents capable of sealing high pressure CH4 inside the adsorbents and storing it at low pressure. Traditional natural gas storage tanks are thick and heavy, which makes them expensive to manufacture and highly energy-consuming to carry around. Our design uses unique adsorbent pellets with nanoscale pores surrounded by a coating that functions as a valve to help manage the pressure of the gas and facilitate more efficient storage and transportation. We expect this new concept will result in a lighter, more affordable product with increased storage capacity. The nanovalved adsorbent concept demonstrated here can be potentially extended for the storage of other important gas molecules targeted for diverse relevant functional applications.

  2. Effects due to adsorbed atoms upon angular and energy distributions of surface produced negative hydrogen ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, M.; Bacal, M.; Kasuya, T.; Kato, S.; Kenmotsu, T.; Sasao, M.

    2013-02-01

    Exposure to Cs added hydrogen discharge makes surface of plasma grid of a negative hydrogen ion source covered with Cs and hydrogen. A Monte-Carlo particle simulation code ACAT was run to evaluate the effects due to adsorbed Cs and H atoms upon the angular and energy distributions of H atoms leaving the surface. Accumulation of H atoms on the surface reduces particle reflection coefficients and the mean energy of backscattered H atoms. Angular distributions of H atoms reflected from the hydrogen covered surface tend to be under-cosine at lower energies. Desorption of adsorbed H atoms is more efficient for hydrogen positive ions than for Cs positive ions at lower incident energy. At higher energy more than 100 eV, Cs ions desorb adsorbed H atoms more efficiently than hydrogen ions.

  3. Inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, M.R.; Tavlarides, L.

    1997-10-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers are developing a technology that combines metal chelation extraction technology and synthesis chemistry. They begin with a ceramic substrate such as alumina, titanium oxide or silica gel because they provide high surface area, high mechanical strength, and radiolytic stability. One preparation method involves silylation to hydrophobize the surface, followed by chemisorption of a suitable chelation agent using vapor deposition. Another route attaches newly designed chelating agents through covalent bonding by the use of coupling agents. These approaches provide stable and selective, inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs) tailored for removal of metals. The technology has the following advantages over ion exchange: (1) higher mechanical strength, (2) higher resistance to radiation fields, (3) higher selectivity for the desired metal ion, (4) no cation exchange, (5) reduced or no interference from accompanying anions, (6) faster kinetics, and (7) easy and selective regeneration. Target waste streams include metal-containing groundwater/process wastewater at ORNL`s Y-12 Plant (multiple metals), Savannah River Site (SRS), Rocky Flats (multiple metals), and Hanford; aqueous mixed wastes at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); and scrubber water generated at SRS and INEL. Focus Areas that will benefit from this research include Mixed Waste, and Subsurface Contaminants.

  4. Heat transfer to the adsorbent in solar adsorption cooling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat, Peter; Patsch, Marek; Papucik, Stefan; Vantuch, Martin

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with design and construction of solar adsorption cooling device and with heat transfer problem in adsorber. The most important part of adsorption cooling system is adsorber/desorber containing adsorbent. Zeolith (adsorbent) type was chosen for its high adsorption capacity, like a coolant was used water. In adsorber/desorber occur, at heating of adsorbent, to heat transfer from heat change medium to the adsorbent. The time required for heating of adsorber filling is very important, because on it depend flexibility of cooling system. Zeolith has a large thermal resistance, therefore it had to be adapted the design and construction of adsorber. As the best shows the tube type of adsorber with double coat construction. By this construction is ensured thin layer of adsorbent and heating is quick in all volume of adsorbent. The process of heat transfer was experimentally measured, but for comparison simulated in ANSYS, too.

  5. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Despite technical advances to reduce air pollution emissions, motor vehicles still account for 30 to 70% emissions of all urban air pollutants. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require 100 cities in the United States to reduce the amount of their smog within 5 to 15 years. Hence, auto emissions, the major cause of smog, must be reduced 30 to 60% by 1998. Natural gas con be combusted with less pollutant emissions. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) uses adsorbents and operates with a low storage pressure which results in lower capital costs and maintenance. This paper describes the production of an activated carbon adsorbent produced from an Illinois coal for ANG.

  6. Photoexcitation of adsorbates on metal surfaces: One-step or three-step

    SciTech Connect

    Petek, Hrvoje

    2012-09-07

    In this essay we discuss the light-matter interactions at molecule-covered metal surfaces that initiate surface photochemistry. The hot-electron mechanism for surface photochemistry, whereby the absorption of light by a metal surface creates an electron-hole pair, and the hot electron scatters through an unoccupied resonance of adsorbate to initiate nuclear dynamics leading to photochemistry, has become widely accepted. Yet, ultrafast spectroscopic measurements of molecule-surface electronic structure and photoexcitation dynamics provide scant support for the hot electron mechanism. Instead, in most cases the adsorbate resonances are excited through photoinduced substrate-to-adsorbate charge transfer. Based on recent studies of the role of coherence in adsorbate photoexcitation, as measured by the optical phase and momentum resolved two-photon photoemission measurements, we examine critically the hot electron mechanism, and propose an alternative description based on direct charge transfer of electrons from the substrate to adsorbate. The advantage of this more quantum mechanically rigorous description is that it informs how material properties of the substrate and adsorbate, as well as their interaction, influence the frequency dependent probability of photoexcitation and ultimately how light can be used to probe and control surface femtochemistry.

  7. PERVAPORATION USING ADSORBENT-FILLED MEMBRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Membranes containing selective fillers, such as zeolites and activated carbon, can improve the separation by pervaporation. Applications of adsorbent-filled membranes in pervaporation have been demonstrated by a number of studies. These applications include removal of organic co...

  8. Chitin Adsorbents for Toxic Metals: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Anastopoulos, Ioannis; Bhatnagar, Amit; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N.; Kyzas, George Z.

    2017-01-01

    Wastewater treatment is still a critical issue all over the world. Among examined methods for the decontamination of wastewaters, adsorption is a promising, cheap, environmentally friendly and efficient procedure. There are various types of adsorbents that have been used to remove different pollutants such as agricultural waste, compost, nanomaterials, algae, etc., Chitin (poly-β-(1,4)-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine) is the second most abundant natural biopolymer and it has attracted scientific attention as an inexpensive adsorbent for toxic metals. This review article provides information about the use of chitin as an adsorbent. A list of chitin adsorbents with maximum adsorption capacity and the best isotherm and kinetic fitting models are provided. Moreover, thermodynamic studies, regeneration studies, the mechanism of adsorption and the experimental conditions are also discussed in depth. PMID:28067848

  9. Monitoring by Control Technique - Activated Carbon Adsorber

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about Activated Carbon Adsorber control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  10. IR investigations of surfaces and adsorbates

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn Williams

    2001-12-10

    Synchrotron infrared reflection-absorption measurements on single crystal metal surfaces with adsorbates have led to the determination of many key parameters related to the bonding vibrational modes and the dynamics of adsorbates. In particular, energy couplings between electrons and adsorbate motion have been shown to be a dominant mechanism on metal surfaces. Excellent agreement has been obtained with calculations for many of the observations, and the synergy between theory and experiment has led to a deeper understanding of the roles of electrons and phonons in determining the properties of interfaces and their roles in phenomena as diverse as friction, lubrication, catalysis and adhesion. Nonetheless, as the experiments are pushed harder, to describe such effects as co-adsorbed systems, disagreements continue to challenge the theory and our comprehension also is still evolving.

  11. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  12. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  13. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1991-01-22

    This invention relates to a regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor 5 concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC 10 exhaust gases.

  14. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  15. Vibrations on Cu surfaces covered with Ni monolayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sklyadneva, I. Yu.; Rusina, G. G.; Chulkov, E. V.

    1999-08-01

    Vibrational modes on the Cu(100) and Cu(111) surfaces covered with a Ni monolayer have been calculated using the embedded-atom method. A detailed discussion of the dispersion relations and polarizations of adsorbate modes and surface phonons is presented. The dispersion of the Rayleigh phonon is in good agreement with the experimental EELS data. The changes in interatomic force constants are discussed.

  16. Estimating Cloud Cover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this activity was to help students understand the percentage of cloud cover and make more accurate cloud cover observations. Students estimated the percentage of cloud cover represented by simulated clouds and assigned a cloud cover classification to those simulations. (Contains 2 notes and 3 tables.)

  17. Insight into the adsorption of PPCPs by porous adsorbents: Effect of the properties of adsorbents and adsorbates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zengyin; Xie, Jiawen; Zhang, Mancheng; Zhou, Qing; Liu, Fuqiang

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption is an efficient method for removal of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). Magnetic resins are efficient adsorbents for water treatment and exhibit potential for PPCP removal. In this study, the magnetic hypercrosslinked resin Q100 was used for adsorption of PPCPs. The adsorption behavior of this resin was compared with those of two activated carbons, namely, Norit and F400D. Norit exhibited the fastest adsorption kinetics, followed by Q100. Norit featured a honeycomb shape and long-range ordered pore channels, which facilitated the diffusion of PPCPs. Moreover, the large average pore size of Q100 reduced diffusion resistance. The adsorbed amounts of 11 PPCPs on the three adsorbents increased with increasing adsorbate hydrophobicity. For Q100, a significant linear correlation was observed between the adsorption performance for PPCPs and hydrophobicity (logD value) of adsorbates (R(2) = 0.8951); as such, PPCPs with high logD values (>1.69) could be efficiently removed. Compared with those of Norit and F400D, the adsorption performance of Q100 was less affected by humic acid because of the dominant hydrophobic interaction. Furthermore, Q100 showed improved regeneration performance, which renders it promising for PPCP removal in practical applications.

  18. Vehicle body cover

    SciTech Connect

    Hirose, T.

    1987-01-13

    This patent describes a vehicle body covered with a vehicle body cover which comprises: a front cover part, a rear cover part, a pair of side cover parts, and a roof cover part: the front cover part having portions adapted to cover only a hood, an area around a windshield and tops of front fenders of a vehicle body. The portion covering the hood is separated from the portions covering the tops of the fenders by cuts in the front cover part, the front cover part having an un-cut portion corresponding to a position at which the hood is hinged to the car body. The front cover part has a cut-out at a position corresponding to the windshield of the vehicle body and the front cover part has at least one cut-out at a position corresponding to where a rear view mirror is attached to the vehicle body; and the rear cover part having portions adapted to cover an area around a rear window, a trunk lid and a rear end of the vehicle body, the portion covering the trunk lid separated from the rest of the rear cover part by cuts corresponding to three sides of the trunk lid and an un-cut portion corresponding to a position at which the trunk lid is hinged to the vehicle body. The rear cover part has a hole at position corresponding to a trunk lid lock, a cut-out portion at a position corresponding to the rear window of the vehicle body, a cut-out at a position corresponding to a license plate of the vehicle body and cut-outs at positions corresponding to rear taillights of the vehicle body.

  19. Multiple layer insulation cover

    DOEpatents

    Farrell, James J.; Donohoe, Anthony J.

    1981-11-03

    A multiple layer insulation cover for preventing heat loss in, for example, a greenhouse, is disclosed. The cover is comprised of spaced layers of thin foil covered fabric separated from each other by air spaces. The spacing is accomplished by the inflation of spaced air bladders which are integrally formed in the cover and to which the layers of the cover are secured. The bladders are inflated after the cover has been deployed in its intended use to separate the layers of the foil material. The sizes of the material layers are selected to compensate for sagging across the width of the cover so that the desired spacing is uniformly maintained when the cover has been deployed. The bladders are deflated as the cover is stored thereby expediting the storage process and reducing the amount of storage space required.

  20. Black Molecular Adsorber Coatings for Spaceflight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin Susan; Hasegawa, Mark Makoto; Straka, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular adsorber coating is a new technology that was developed to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination on spaceflight missions. The application of this coating would be ideal near highly sensitive, interior surfaces and instruments that are negatively impacted by outgassed molecules from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, epoxies, and other similar compounds. This current, sprayable paint technology is comprised of inorganic white materials made from highly porous zeolite. In addition to good adhesion performance, thermal stability, and adsorptive capability, the molecular adsorber coating offers favorable thermal control characteristics. However, low reflectivity properties, which are typically offered by black thermal control coatings, are desired for some spaceflight applications. For example, black coatings are used on interior surfaces, in particular, on instrument baffles for optical stray light control. Similarly, they are also used within light paths between optical systems, such as telescopes, to absorb light. Recent efforts have been made to transform the white molecular adsorber coating into a black coating with similar adsorptive properties. This result is achieved by optimizing the current formulation with black pigments, while still maintaining its adsorption capability for outgassing control. Different binder to pigment ratios, coating thicknesses, and spray application techniques were explored to develop a black version of the molecular adsorber coating. During the development process, coating performance and adsorption characteristics were studied. The preliminary work performed on black molecular adsorber coatings thus far is very promising. Continued development and testing is necessary for its use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  1. Size selective hydrophobic adsorbent for organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Hickey, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to an adsorbent formed by the pyrolysis of a hydrophobic silica with a pore size greater than 5 .ANG., such as SILICALITE.TM., with a molecular sieving polymer precursor such as polyfurfuryl alcohol, polyacrylonitrile, polyvinylidene chloride, phenol-formaldehyde resin, polyvinylidene difluoride and mixtures thereof. Polyfurfuryl alcohol is the most preferred. The adsorbent produced by the pyrolysis has a silicon to carbon mole ratio of between about 10:1 and 1:3, and preferably about 2:1 to 1:2, most preferably 1:1. The pyrolysis is performed as a ramped temperature program between about 100.degree. and 800.degree. C., and preferably between about 100.degree. and 600.degree. C. The present invention also relates to a method for selectively adsorbing organic molecules having a molecular size (mean molecular diameter) of between about 3 and 6 .ANG. comprising contacting a vapor containing the small organic molecules to be adsorbed with the adsorbent composition of the present invention.

  2. Membrane Perturbation Induced by Interfacially Adsorbed Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zemel, Assaf; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; May, Sylvio

    2004-01-01

    The structural and energetic characteristics of the interaction between interfacially adsorbed (partially inserted) α-helical, amphipathic peptides and the lipid bilayer substrate are studied using a molecular level theory of lipid chain packing in membranes. The peptides are modeled as “amphipathic cylinders” characterized by a well-defined polar angle. Assuming two-dimensional nematic order of the adsorbed peptides, the membrane perturbation free energy is evaluated using a cell-like model; the peptide axes are parallel to the membrane plane. The elastic and interfacial contributions to the perturbation free energy of the “peptide-dressed” membrane are evaluated as a function of: the peptide penetration depth into the bilayer's hydrophobic core, the membrane thickness, the polar angle, and the lipid/peptide ratio. The structural properties calculated include the shape and extent of the distorted (stretched and bent) lipid chains surrounding the adsorbed peptide, and their orientational (C-H) bond order parameter profiles. The changes in bond order parameters attendant upon peptide adsorption are in good agreement with magnetic resonance measurements. Also consistent with experiment, our model predicts that peptide adsorption results in membrane thinning. Our calculations reveal pronounced, membrane-mediated, attractive interactions between the adsorbed peptides, suggesting a possible mechanism for lateral aggregation of membrane-bound peptides. As a special case of interest, we have also investigated completely hydrophobic peptides, for which we find a strong energetic preference for the transmembrane (inserted) orientation over the horizontal (adsorbed) orientation. PMID:15189858

  3. Adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles and methods of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-01-31

    The present invention provides an adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle having at least one adsorbent functional group bound thereto. The adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle also includes at least one catalytic material. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles. In some examples, the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles can be used to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks for biodiesel, and to hydrotreat the separated fatty acids.

  4. Adsorbate-driven morphological changes on Cu(111) nano-pits

    DOE PAGES

    Mudiyanselage, K.; Xu, F.; Hoffmann, F. M.; ...

    2014-12-09

    Adsorbate-driven morphological changes of pitted-Cu(111) surfaces have been investigated following the adsorption and desorption of CO and H. The morphology of the pitted-Cu(111) surfaces, prepared by Ar+ sputtering, exposed a few atomic layers deep nested hexagonal pits of diameters from 8 to 38 nm with steep step bundles. The roughness of pitted-Cu(111) surfaces can be healed by heating to 450-500 K in vacuum. Adsorption of CO on the pitted-Cu(111) surface leads to two infrared peaks at 2089-2090 and 2101-2105 cm-1 for CO adsorbed on under-coordinated sites in addition to the peak at 2071 cm-1 for CO adsorbed on atop sitesmore » of the close-packed Cu(111) surface. CO adsorbed on under-coordinated sites is thermally more stable than that of atop Cu(111) sites. Annealing of the CO-covered surface from 100 to 300 K leads to minor changes of the surface morphology. In contrast, annealing of a H covered surface to 300 K creates a smooth Cu(111) surface as deduced from infrared data of adsorbed CO and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) imaging. The observation of significant adsorbate-driven morphological changes with H is attributed to its stronger modification of the Cu(111) surface by the formation of a sub-surface hydride with a hexagonal structure, which relaxes into the healed Cu(111) surface upon hydrogen desorption. These morphological changes occur ~150 K below the temperature required for healing of the pitted-Cu(111) surface by annealing in vacuum. In contrast, the adsorption of CO, which only interacts with the top-most Cu layer and desorbs by 160 K, does not significantly change the morphology of the pitted-Cu(111) surface.« less

  5. Adsorbate-driven morphological changes on Cu(111) nano-pits

    SciTech Connect

    Mudiyanselage, K.; Xu, F.; Hoffmann, F. M.; Hrbek, J.; Waluyo, I.; Boscoboinik, J. A.; Stacchiola, D. J.

    2014-12-09

    Adsorbate-driven morphological changes of pitted-Cu(111) surfaces have been investigated following the adsorption and desorption of CO and H. The morphology of the pitted-Cu(111) surfaces, prepared by Ar+ sputtering, exposed a few atomic layers deep nested hexagonal pits of diameters from 8 to 38 nm with steep step bundles. The roughness of pitted-Cu(111) surfaces can be healed by heating to 450-500 K in vacuum. Adsorption of CO on the pitted-Cu(111) surface leads to two infrared peaks at 2089-2090 and 2101-2105 cm-1 for CO adsorbed on under-coordinated sites in addition to the peak at 2071 cm-1 for CO adsorbed on atop sites of the close-packed Cu(111) surface. CO adsorbed on under-coordinated sites is thermally more stable than that of atop Cu(111) sites. Annealing of the CO-covered surface from 100 to 300 K leads to minor changes of the surface morphology. In contrast, annealing of a H covered surface to 300 K creates a smooth Cu(111) surface as deduced from infrared data of adsorbed CO and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) imaging. The observation of significant adsorbate-driven morphological changes with H is attributed to its stronger modification of the Cu(111) surface by the formation of a sub-surface hydride with a hexagonal structure, which relaxes into the healed Cu(111) surface upon hydrogen desorption. These morphological changes occur ~150 K below the temperature required for healing of the pitted-Cu(111) surface by annealing in vacuum. In contrast, the adsorption of CO, which only interacts with the top-most Cu layer and desorbs by 160 K, does not significantly change the morphology of the pitted-Cu(111) surface.

  6. What Medicare Covers

    MedlinePlus

    ... your Medicare coverage — Original Medicare or a Medicare Advantage Plan (Part C). What Part A covers Medicare ... health plans cover Medicare health plans include Medicare Advantage, Medical Savings Account (MSA), Medicare Cost plans, PACE, ...

  7. Time Resolved Studies Of Adsorbed Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J.; Nicol, J. M.

    1985-12-01

    A time-resolved Fourier transform IR study of ethyne adsorbed on ZnNaA zeolite yields results very different from those reported for related systems. Initially two species (A and B) are formed by the interaction of C2H2 with the cations. Whereas species A (π-bonded C2H2) was found to be removed immediately on evacuation, species B (probably Zn-acetylide) was not fully removed after 60 mins evacuation. In the presence of the gas phase, bands due to Species A decreased slowly in intensity as new bands due to adsorbed ethanal were observed.

  8. Cover crops for Alabama

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are grown to benefit the following crop as well as to improve the soil, but they are normally not intended for harvest. Selecting the right cover crops for farming operations can improve yields, soil and water conservation and quality, and economic productivity. Properly managed cover ...

  9. Cover crop water use

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are being widely promoted because of soil health benefits. However, semi-arid dryland production systems, chronically short of water for crop production, may not be able to profitably withstand the yield reduction that follows cover crops because of cover crop water use. Some studies sug...

  10. Surface properties of mesoporous carbon-silica gel adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Leboda, R.; Turov, V.V.; Charmas, B.; Skubiszewska-Zieba, J.; Gun'ko, V.M.

    2000-03-01

    Carbon/silica (carbosil) samples prepared utilizing mesoporous silica gel (Si-60) modified by methylene chloride pyrolysis were studied by nitrogen adsorption, quasi-isothermal thermogravimetry, p-nitrophenol adsorption from aqueous solution, and {sup 1}H NMR methods. The structural characteristics and other properties of carbosils depend markedly on the synthetic conditions and the amount of carbon deposited. The changes in the pore size distribution with increasing carbon concentration suggest grafting of carbon mainly in pores, leading to diminution of the mesopore radii. However, heating pure silica gel at the pyrolysis temperature of 550 C leads to an increase in the pore radii. The quasi-isothermal thermogravimetry and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy methods used to investigate the water layers on carbosils showed a significant capability of carbosils to adsorb water despite a relatively large content of the hydrophobic carbon deposit, which represents a nonuniform layer incompletely covering the oxide surface.

  11. Development and testing of molecular adsorber coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Straka, Sharon A.

    2012-10-01

    The effect of on-orbit molecular contamination has the potential to degrade the performance of spaceflight hardware and diminish the lifetime of the spacecraft. For example, sensitive surfaces, such as optical surfaces, electronics, detectors, and thermal control surfaces, are vulnerable to the damaging effects of contamination from outgassed materials. The current solution to protect these surfaces is through the use of zeolite coated ceramic adsorber pucks. However, these pucks and its additional complex mounting hardware requirements result in several disadvantages, such as size, weight, and cost related concerns, that impact the spacecraft design and the integration and test schedule. As a result, a new innovative molecular adsorber coating was developed as a sprayable alternative to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination. In this study, the formulation for molecular adsorber coatings was optimized using various binders, pigment treatment methods, binder to pigment ratios, thicknesses, and spray application techniques. The formulas that passed coating adhesion and vacuum thermal cycling were further tested for its adsorptive capacity. Accelerated molecular capacitance tests were performed in an innovatively designed multi-unit system containing idealized contaminant sources. This novel system significantly increased the productivity of the testing phase for the various formulations that were developed. Work performed during the development and testing phases has demonstrated successful application of molecular adsorber coatings onto metallic substrates, as well as, very promising results for the adhesion performance and the molecular capacitance of the coating. Continued testing will assist in the qualification of molecular adsorber coatings for use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  12. Development and Testing of Molecular Adsorber Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin; Hasegawa, Mark; Straka, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The effect of on-orbit molecular contamination has the potential to degrade the performance of spaceflight hardware and diminish the lifetime of the spacecraft. For example, sensitive surfaces, such as optical surfaces, electronics, detectors, and thermal control surfaces, are vulnerable to the damaging effects of contamination from outgassed materials. The current solution to protect these surfaces is through the use of zeolite coated ceramic adsorber pucks. However, these pucks and its additional complex mounting hardware requirements result in several disadvantages, such as size, weight, and cost related concerns, that impact the spacecraft design and the integration and test schedule. As a result, a new innovative molecular adsorber coating was developed as a sprayable alternative to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination. In this study, the formulation for molecular adsorber coatings was optimized using various binders, pigment treatment methods, binder to pigment ratios, thicknesses, and spray application techniques. The formulations that passed coating adhesion and vacuum thermal cycling tests were further tested for its adsorptive capacity. Accelerated molecular capacitance tests were performed in an innovatively designed multi-unit system containing idealized contaminant sources. This novel system significantly increased the productivity of the testing phase for the various formulations that were developed. Work performed during the development and testing phases has demonstrated successful application of molecular adsorber coatings onto metallic substrates, as well as, very promising results for the adhesion performance and the molecular capacitance of the coating. Continued testing will assist in the qualification of molecular adsorber coatings for use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  13. Dynamic analysis of a closed-cycle solar adsorption refrigerator using two adsorbent-adsorbate pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Hajji, A. ); Worek, W. ); Lavan, Z. )

    1991-05-01

    In this paper a dynamic analysis of a closed-cycle, solar adsorption refrigerator is presented. The instantaneous and daily system performance are studied using two adsorbent-adsorbate pairs, Zeolite 13X-Water and Chabazite-Methanol. The effect of design and operating parameters, including inert material thermal capacitance, matrix porosity, and evaporation and condenser temperatures on the solar and cycle coefficients of performance are evaluated.

  14. Armored geomembrane cover engineering.

    PubMed

    Foye, Kevin

    2011-06-01

    Geomembranes are an important component of modern engineered barriers to prevent the infiltration of stormwater and runoff into contaminated soil and rock as well as waste containment facilities--a function generally described as a geomembrane cover. This paper presents a case history involving a novel implementation of a geomembrane cover system. Due to this novelty, the design engineers needed to assemble from disparate sources the design criteria for the engineering of the cover. This paper discusses the design methodologies assembled by the engineering team. This information will aid engineers designing similar cover systems as well as environmental and public health professionals selecting site improvements that involve infiltration barriers.

  15. Armored Geomembrane Cover Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Foye, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Geomembranes are an important component of modern engineered barriers to prevent the infiltration of stormwater and runoff into contaminated soil and rock as well as waste containment facilities—a function generally described as a geomembrane cover. This paper presents a case history involving a novel implementation of a geomembrane cover system. Due to this novelty, the design engineers needed to assemble from disparate sources the design criteria for the engineering of the cover. This paper discusses the design methodologies assembled by the engineering team. This information will aid engineers designing similar cover systems as well as environmental and public health professionals selecting site improvements that involve infiltration barriers. PMID:21776229

  16. National land cover dataset

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, has produced a land cover dataset for the conterminous United States on the basis of 1992 Landsat thematic mapper imagery and supplemental data. The National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) is a component of the USGS Land Cover Characterization Program. The seamless NLCD contains 21 categories of land cover information suitable for a variety of State and regional applications, including landscape analysis, land management, and modeling nutrient and pesticide runoff. The NLCD is distributed by State as 30-meter resolution raster images in an Albers Equal-Area map projection.

  17. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY: DEMONSTRATION OF AMBERSORB 563 ADSORBENT TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field pilot study was conducted to demonstrate the technical feasibility and cost-effectiveness of Ambersorb® 5631 carbonaceous adsorbent for remediating groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The Ambersorb adsorbent technology demonstration consist...

  18. Silostop Bunker Covers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The quality of the seal provided by the plastic cover is a key issue for minimizing losses in bunker and pile silos. Most bunker covers are 6 to 8 mil polyethylene sheets held in place by tires or tire sidewalls. Frequently there are problems with spoilage at the shoulders (i.e., against the walls),...

  19. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: LANDFILL COVERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landfill covers are used at Superfund sites to minimize surface water infiltration and control gas migration. In many cases covers are used in conjunction with other waste treatment technologies, such as slurry walls, ground water pump-and-treat systems, and gas collection. This ...

  20. Land Cover Trends Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Acevedo, William

    2006-01-01

    The Land Cover Trends Project is designed to document the types, rates, causes, and consequences of land cover change from 1973 to 2000 within each of the 84 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Level III ecoregions that span the conterminous United States. The project's objectives are to: * Develop a comprehensive methodology using probability sampling and change analysis techniques and Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS), Thematic Mapper (TM), and Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM) data for estimating regional land cover change. * Characterize the spatial and temporal characteristics of conterminous U.S. land cover change for five periods from 1973 to 2000 (nominally 1973, 1980, 1986, 1992, and 2000). * Document the regional driving forces and consequences of change. * Prepare a national synthesis of land cover change.

  1. Analytical supercritical fluid extraction of adsorbent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.W.; Wright, C.W.; Gale, R.W.; Smith, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The use of supercritical fluids for the analytical extraction of semivolatile and higher molecular weight materials from various adsorbent and particulate matrices was investigated. Instrumentation was designed to allow gram quantities of the matrix to be extracted at pressures up to 400 bar and temperatures to 235 /sup 0/C with collection of the effluent in a sealed liquid-nitrogen-cooled flask. Carbon dioxide, isobutane, and methanol modified (20 mol %) carbon dioxide fluid systems were evaluated and compared to liquid Soxhlet extraction. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) provided very rapid (approx. =30 min) extraction with comparable efficiency to the Soxhlet methods, and both more rapid and more efficient extractions appear feasible. The more polar carbon dioxide-methanol fluid system gave higher extraction efficiencies for the more polar adsorbates and the isobutane system was more efficient for the higher molecular weight and less polar compounds.

  2. Efficient adsorbate transport on graphene by electromigration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velizhanin, Kirill; Solenov, Dmitry

    2012-02-01

    Chemical functionalization of the surface of graphene holds promise for various applications ranging from nanoelectronics to surface catalysis and nano-assembling. In many practical situations it would be beneficial to be able to propel adsorbates along the graphene sheet in a controlled manner. We propose to use electromigration as an efficient means to transport adsorbates along the graphene surface. Within the tight-binding approximation for graphene, parametrized by density functional theory calculations, we estimate the contributions of the direct force and the electron wind force to the drift velocity of electromigration and demonstrate that the electromigration can be rather efficient. In particular, we show that the drift velocity of atomic oxygen covalently bound to graphene can reach up to 4 cm/s for realistic graphene samples. Further, we discuss ways to dynamically, i.e., during experiment, control the efficiency of electromigration by charging and/or local heating of graphene.

  3. Sand consolidation methods using adsorbable catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, R. H.

    1985-04-23

    Methods are provided for selectively consolidating sand grains within a subterranean formation. First an acidic zirconium salt catalyst, such as ZrOCl/sub 2/, Zr(SO/sub 4/)/sub 2/, or ZrCl/sub 4/, is injected into the subterranean formation, wherein the acidic salt catalyst is adsorbed to the surface of the sand grains. Next a polymerizable resin composition such as furfuryl alcohol oligomer is introduced into the well formation. Polymerization of the resin occurs upon exposure to the elevated well temperatures and contact with the acid salt catalyst adsorbed to the sand grains. The polymerized resin serves to consolidate the surfaces of the sand grains while retaining permeability through the pore spaces. An ester of a weak organic acid is included with the resin compositions to control the extent of a polymerization by consuming the water by-product formed during the polymerization reaction.

  4. Gas storage using fullerene based adsorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor); Lu, Xiao-Chun (Inventor); Li, Weijiong (Inventor); Mikhael, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    This invention is directed to the synthesis of high bulk density high gas absorption capacity adsorbents for gas storage applications. Specifically, this invention is concerned with novel gas absorbents with high gravimetric and volumetric gas adsorption capacities which are made from fullerene-based materials. By pressing fullerene powder into pellet form using a conventional press, then polymerizing it by subjecting the fullerene to high temperature and high inert gas pressure, the resulting fullerene-based materials have high bulk densities and high gas adsorption capacities. By pre-chemical modification or post-polymerization activation processes, the gas adsorption capacities of the fullerene-based adsorbents can be further enhanced. These materials are suitable for low pressure gas storage applications, such as oxygen storage for home oxygen therapy uses or on-board vehicle natural gas storage. They are also suitable for storing gases and vapors such as hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor.

  5. Analysis of Adsorbed Natural Gas Tank Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Ernest; Schultz, Conrad; Rash, Tyler; Dohnke, Elmar; Stalla, David; Gillespie, Andrew; Sweany, Mark; Seydel, Florian; Pfeifer, Peter

    With gasoline being an ever decreasing finite resource and with the desire to reduce humanity's carbon footprint, there has been an increasing focus on innovation of alternative fuel sources. Natural gas burns cleaner, is more abundant, and conforms to modern engines. However, storing compressed natural gas (CNG) requires large, heavy gas cylinders, which limits space and fuel efficiency. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) technology allows for much greater fuel storage capacity and the ability to store the gas at a much lower pressure. Thus, ANG tanks are much more flexible in terms of their size, shape, and weight. Our ANG tank employs monolithic nanoporous activated carbon as its adsorbent material. Several different configurations of this Flat Panel Tank Assembly (FPTA) along with a Fuel Extraction System (FES) were examined to compare with the mass flow rate demands of an engine.

  6. Remediation of AMD using industrial waste adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Nuur Hani Bte; Yaacob, Wan Zuhairi Wan

    2016-11-01

    The study investigates the characteristic of industrial waste as adsorbents and its potential as heavy metals absorbents in AMD samples. The AMD sample was collected from active mine pond and the pH was measured in situ. The metal contents were analyzed by ICP-MS. The AMD water was very acidic (pH< 3.5), and the average heavy metals content in AMD were high especially in Fe (822.029 mg/l). Fly ash was found to be the most effective absorbent material containing high percentage of CaO (57.24%) and SiO2 (13.88%), followed by ladle furnace slag containing of high amount of CaO (51.52%) and Al2O3 (21.23%), while biomass ash consists of SiO2 (43.07%) and CaO (12.97%). Tank analysis display a huge changes due to pH value change from acidity to nearly neutral phases. After 50 days, fly ash remediation successfully increase the AMD pH values from pH 2.57-7.09, while slag change from acidity to nearly alkaline phase from pH 2.60-7.3 and biomass has change to pH 2.54-6.8. Fly ash has successfully remove Fe, Mn, Cu, and Ni. Meanwhile, slag sample displays as an effective adsorbent to adsorb more Pb and Cd in acid mine drainage.

  7. Local anesthetics adsorbed onto infusion balloon.

    PubMed

    Mizogami, Maki; Tsuchiya, Hironori; Takakura, Ko

    2004-09-01

    We compared the adsorption of different local anesthetics onto infusion balloons and studied one of the possible mechanisms for adsorption. After injection of lidocaine, bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine solutions (1 mM each; pH 7.4) into balloons of 100-mL volume, their concentrations in effluents flowing out at 4 mL/h were determined over time by high-performance liquid chromatography. All were adsorbed in a structure-dependent manner, and the concentration decreased by 6%-14% within 5 min. Bupivacaine was most strongly adsorbed, followed by lidocaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine. QX-314, a quaternary ammonium derivative of lidocaine, was only weakly adsorbed compared with the parent compound lidocaine. The extent of adsorption of local anesthetics was related to their hydrophobicity (evaluated by reversed-phase chromatography) and was much more at pH 7.4 than at pH 6.0. A hydrophobic interaction with balloon materials appears to be responsible for the adsorption of local anesthetics. When infusion balloons are used for the continuous administration of local anesthetics, attention should be paid to the possibility that their actual concentrations in effluents are smaller than those present when they are initially prepared.

  8. Evapotranspiration (ET) covers.

    PubMed

    Rock, Steve; Myers, Bill; Fiedler, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) cover systems are increasingly being used at municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills, hazardous waste landfills, at industrial monofills, and at mine sites. Conventional cover systems use materials with low hydraulic permeability (barrier layers) to minimize the downward migration of water from the surface to the waste (percolation), ET cover systems use water balance components to minimize percolation. These cover systems rely on soil to capture and store precipitation until it is either transpired through vegetation or evaporated from the soil surface. Compared to conventional membrane or compacted clay cover systems, ET cover systems are expected to cost less to construct. They are often aesthetic because they employ naturalized vegetation, require less maintenance once the vegetative system is established, including eliminating mowing, and may require fewer repairs than a barrier system. All cover systems should consider the goals of the cover in terms of protectiveness, including the pathways of risk from contained material, the lifecycle of the containment system. The containment system needs to be protective of direct contact of people and animals with the waste, prevent surface and groundwater water pollution, and minimize release of airborne contaminants. While most containment strategies have been based on the dry tomb strategy of keeping waste dry, there are some sites where adding or allowing moisture to help decompose organic waste is the current plan. ET covers may work well in places where complete exclusion of precipitation is not needed. The U.S. EPA Alternative Cover Assessment Program (ACAP), USDOE, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and others have researched ET cover design and efficacy, including the history of their use, general considerations in their design, performance, monitoring, cost, current status, limitations on their use, and project specific examples. An on-line database has been developed with information

  9. Covering the State Legislature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hook, Stephen C.

    1975-01-01

    Describes how journalism majors at Ball State University are required to cover the annual sessions of the Indiana legislature, and discusses some of the experiences and problems that were encountered. (RB)

  10. Land Cover Characterization Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1997-01-01

    (2) identify sources, develop procedures, and organize partners to deliver data and information to meet user requirements. The LCCP builds on the heritage and success of previous USGS land use and land cover programs and projects. It will be compatible with current concepts of government operations, the changing needs of the land use and land cover data users, and the technological tools with which the data are applied.

  11. WATER COOLED RETORT COVER

    DOEpatents

    Ash, W.J.; Pozzi, J.F.

    1962-05-01

    A retort cover is designed for use in the production of magnesium metal by the condensation of vaporized metal on a collecting surface. The cover includes a condensing surface, insulating means adjacent to the condensing surface, ind a water-cooled means for the insulating means. The irrangement of insulation and the cooling means permits the magnesium to be condensed at a high temperature and in massive nonpyrophoric form. (AEC)

  12. Negatively charged ions on Mg(0001) surfaces: appearance and origin of attractive adsorbate-adsorbate interactions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Su-Ting; Todorova, Mira; Freysoldt, Christoph; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2014-09-26

    Adsorption of electronegative elements on a metal surface usually leads to an increase in the work function and decrease in the binding energy as the adsorbate coverage rises. Using density-functional theory calculations, we show that Cl adsorbed on a Mg(0001) surface complies with these expectations, but adsorption of {N,O,F} causes a decrease in the work function and an increase in the binding energy. Analyzing the electronic structure, we show that the presence of a highly polarizable electron spill-out in front of Mg(0001) causes this unusual adsorption behavior and is responsible for the appearance of a hitherto unknown net-attractive lateral electrostatic interaction between same charged adsorbates.

  13. The Uranium from Seawater Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Overview of Marine Testing, Adsorbent Characterization, Adsorbent Durability, Adsorbent Toxicity, and Deployment Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Janke, Chris J.; Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T.; Bonheyo, George T.; Pan, Horng-Bin; Wai, Chien; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Bianucci, Laura; Wood, Jordana R.; Warner, Marvin G.; Peterson, Sonja; Abrecht, David G.; Mayes, Richard T.; Tsouris, Costas; Oyola, Yatsandra; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Schlafer, Nicholas J.; Addleman, R. Shane; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Das, Sadananda; Kim, Jungseung; Buesseler, Ken; Breier, Crystal; D’Alessandro, Evan

    2016-02-07

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacity and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 ± 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 ± 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 ± 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 ± 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage

  14. Recovery of Technetium Adsorbed on Charcoal

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmann, Mark D.; Metz, Lori A.; Ballou, Nathan E.

    2006-05-01

    Two methods capable of near complete recovery of technetium adsorbed on charcoal are presented. The first involves liquid extraction of the technetium from the charcoal by hot 4M nitric acid. An average recovery of 98% (n=3) is obtained after three rounds of extraction. The second method involves dry ashing with air in a quartz combustion tube at 400-450 C. This method yields an average recovery of 96% (n=5). Other thermal methods were attempted, but resulted in reduced recovery and incomplete material balance

  15. Automatic cloud cover mapping.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strong, J. P., III; Rosenfeld, A.

    1971-01-01

    A method of converting a picture into a 'cartoon' or 'map' whose regions correspond to differently textured regions is described. Texture edges in the picture are detected, and solid regions surrounded by these (usually broken) edges are 'colored in' using a propagation process. The resulting map is cleaned by comparing the region colors with the textures of the corresponding regions in the picture, and also by merging some regions with others according to criteria based on topology and size. The method has been applied to the construction of cloud cover maps from cloud cover pictures obtained by satellites.

  16. Reusable pipe flange covers

    DOEpatents

    Holden, James Elliott; Perez, Julieta

    2001-01-01

    A molded, flexible pipe flange cover for temporarily covering a pipe flange and a pipe opening includes a substantially round center portion having a peripheral skirt portion depending from the center portion, the center portion adapted to engage a front side of the pipe flange and to seal the pipe opening. The peripheral skirt portion is formed to include a plurality of circumferentially spaced tabs, wherein free ends of the flexible tabs are formed with respective through passages adapted to receive a drawstring for pulling the tabs together on a back side of the pipe flange.

  17. Storage stability of ketones on carbon adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Prado, C; Alcaraz, M J; Fuentes, A; Garrido, J; Periago, J F

    2006-09-29

    Activated coconut carbon constitutes the more widely used sorbent for preconcentration of volatile organic compounds in sampling workplace air. Water vapour is always present in the air and its adsorption on the activated carbon surface is a serious drawback, mainly when sampling polar organic compounds, such as ketones. In this case, the recovery of the compounds diminishes; moreover, ketones can be decomposed during storage. Synthetic carbons contain less inorganic impurities and have a lower capacity for water adsorption than coconut charcoal. The aim of this work was to evaluate the storage stability of various ketones (acetone, 2-butanone, 4-methyl-2-pentanone and cyclohexanone) on different activated carbons and to study the effect of adsorbed water vapour under different storage conditions. The effect of storage temperature on extraction efficiencies was significant for each ketone in all the studied sorbents. Recovery was higher when samples were stored at 4 degrees C. The results obtained for storage stability of the studied ketones showed that the performance of synthetic carbons was better than for the coconut charcoals. The water adsorption and the ash content of the carbons can be a measure of the reactive sites that may chemisorb ketones or catalize their decomposition. Anasorb 747 showed good ketone stability at least for 7 days, except for cyclohexanone. After 30-days storage, the stability of the studied ketones was excellent on Carboxen 564. This sorbent had a nearly negligible ash content and the adsorbed water was much lower than for the other sorbents tested.

  18. Optimizing heterosurface adsorbent synthesis for liquid chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoslovskii, S. Yu.; Serdan, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The structural and geometric parameters of a silica matrix (SM) for the synthesis of heterosurface adsorbents (HAs) are optimized. Modification is performed by shielding the external surfaces of alkyl-modified silica (AS) using human serum albumin and its subsequent crosslinking. The structural and geometric characteristics of the SM, AS, and HA are measured via low-temperature nitrogen adsorption. It is found that the structural characteristics of AS pores with diameters D < 6 nm do not change during HA synthesis, while the volume of pores with diameters of 6 nm < D < 9 nm shrinks slightly due to the adsorption of albumin in the pore orifices. It is established that the volume of pores with diameters D > 9 nm reduces significantly due to adsorption of albumin. It is concluded that silica gel with a maximum pore size distribution close to 5 nm and a minimal proportion of pores with D > 9 nm is optimal for HA synthesis; this allows us to achieve the greatest similarity between the chromatographic retention parameters for HA and AS. The suitability of the synthesized adsorbents for analyzing drugs in biological fluids through direct sample injection is confirmed by chromatography. It was found that the percentage of the protein fraction detected at the outlet of the chromatographic column is 98%.

  19. Covering All Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Mike

    2011-01-01

    The day a school opens its doors for the first time, the flooring will be new and untarnished. When the flooring is in such pristine condition, many flooring materials--carpeting, vinyl, terrazzo, wood or some other surface--will look good. But school and university planners who decide what kind of material covers the floors of their facilities…

  20. Coronary covered stents.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Ismail Dogu; Fabris, Enrico; Serdoz, Roberta; Caiazzo, Gianluca; Foin, Nicolas; Abou-Sherif, Sara; Di Mario, Carlo

    2016-11-20

    Covered stents offer an effective bail-out strategy in vessel perforations, are an alternative to surgery for the exclusion of coronary aneurysms, and have a potential role in the treatment of friable embolisation-prone plaques. The aim of this manuscript is to offer an overview of currently available platforms and to report results obtained in prior studies.

  1. Adsorbent Alkali Conditioning for Uranium Adsorption from Seawater. Adsorbent Performance and Technology Cost Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsouris, Costas; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Christopher James; Dai, Sheng; Das, S.; Liao, W. -P.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana; Gill, Gary; Byers, Maggie Flicker; Schneider, Eric

    2015-09-30

    The Fuel Resources program of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is focused on identifying and implementing actions to assure that nuclear fuel resources are available in the United States. An immense source of uranium is seawater, which contains an estimated amount of 4.5 billion tonnes of dissolved uranium. This unconventional resource can provide a price cap and ensure centuries of uranium supply for future nuclear energy production. NE initiated a multidisciplinary program with participants from national laboratories, universities, and research institutes to enable technical breakthroughs related to uranium recovery from seawater. The goal is to develop advanced adsorbents to reduce the seawater uranium recovery technology cost and uncertainties. Under this program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a new amidoxime-based adsorbent of high surface area, which tripled the uranium capacity of leading Japanese adsorbents. Parallel efforts have been focused on the optimization of the physicochemical and operating parameters used during the preparation of the adsorbent for deployment. A set of parameters that need to be optimized are related to the conditioning of the adsorbent with alkali solution, which is necessary prior to adsorbent deployment. Previous work indicated that alkali-conditioning parameters significantly affect the adsorbent performance. Initiated in 2014, this study had as a goal to determine optimal parameters such as base type and concentration, temperature, and duration of conditioning that maximize the uranium adsorption performance of amidoxime functionalized adsorbent, while keeping the cost of uranium production low. After base-treatment at various conditions, samples of adsorbent developed at ORNL were tested in this study with batch simulated seawater solution of 8-ppm uranium concentration, batch seawater spiked with uranium nitrate at 75-100 ppb uranium, and continuous

  2. Interaction of sodium polyacrylate adsorbed on TiO2 with cationic and anionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan; Tripp, Carl P

    2004-11-23

    Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to identify the structures formed during the adsorption of sodium polyacrylate (NaPA) on charged TiO2 particles and to determine the subsequent interaction of the adsorbed polymer structure with cationic and anionic surfactants. The nature of the polymer structure was deduced from the adsorbed amount in tandem with the information obtained from monitoring the change in the relative intensity of the COO- and COOH infrared bands. In particular, it is found that the relative number of COO- and COOH groups on the polymer backbone for the adsorbed state differs from that of the same polymer in solution. This difference is due to a shift in the population of COO-/COOH groups on the polymer backbone that arises when the COO- groups bind to positively charged sites on the surface. A change in the number COO-/COOH groups on the polymer is thus related to a change in the bound fraction of polymer. It is shown that the initial NaPA approaching the bare surface adopts a flat conformation with high bound fraction. Once the bare sites on the surface are covered, the accommodation of additional polymer on the surface requires the existing adsorbed layer to adopt a conformation with a lower bound fraction. When the adsorbed NaPA is probed with a solution containing the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), the SDS competes for surface sites and displaces some of the bound NaPA segments from the surface, giving rise to an polymer layer adsorbed with an even lower bound fraction. In contrast, addition of a solution containing the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) results in the binding of the surfactant directly to the free COO- sites on the adsorbed polymer backbone. Confirmation of a direct interaction of the CTAB headgroup with the free COO- groups of the polymer is provided by intensity changes in the headgroup IR bands of the CTAB.

  3. Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases

    DOEpatents

    Senum, G.I.; Dietz, R.N.

    1994-04-05

    This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons. 8 figures.

  4. Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases

    DOEpatents

    Senum, Gunnar I.; Dietz, Russell N.

    1994-01-01

    This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons.

  5. Testing of chemically treated adsorbent air purifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, T.J. . Dept. of Atmospheric Science and Applied Technology); Kinkead, D.A. )

    1993-07-01

    New highly sensitive continuous monitors permit testing of air filters at parts-per-billion contaminant concentrations. This article describes testing of air purification filters intended for use in the National Archives 2 building in College Park, Maryland, using a test procedure that simulates the actual conditions of use. This test demonstrates both the effectiveness of the adsorbers at low contaminant levels, and the capability of existing instruments for conducting such tests. ASHRAE TC 2.3 (Gaseous Air Contaminants and Gas Contaminant Removal Equipment) is currently sponsoring research projects (follow-on studies to ASHRAE Project RP-674) aimed at developing a standard that will test and rate the performance of different types of gas phase air purification equipment at low concentrations. The work detailed in this article represents a first of this type of testing and a technical benchmark that may aid in the further development of ASHRAE gas phase performance standards.

  6. The condensation of water on adsorbed viruses.

    PubMed

    Alonso, José María; Tatti, Francesco; Chuvilin, Andrey; Mam, Keriya; Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Bittner, Alexander M

    2013-11-26

    The wetting and dewetting behavior of biological nanostructures and to a greater degree single molecules is not well-known even though their contact with water is the basis for all biology. Here, we show that environmental electron microscopy (EM) can be applied as a means of imaging the condensation of water onto viruses. We captured the formation of submicrometer water droplets and filaments on single viral particles by environmental EM and by environmental transmission EM. The condensate structures are compatible with capillary condensation between adsorbed virus particles and with known droplet shapes on patterned surfaces. Our results confirm that such droplets exist down to <50 nm. The viruses preserved their shape after a condensation/evaporation cycle as expected from their stability in air and water. Moreover we developed procedures that overcome problems of beam damage and of resolving structures with a low atomic number.

  7. Carbon Dioxide Capture Adsorbents: Chemistry and Methods.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hasmukh A; Byun, Jeehye; Yavuz, Cafer T

    2016-12-21

    Excess carbon dioxide (CO2 ) emissions and their inevitable consequences continue to stimulate hard debate and awareness in both academic and public spaces, despite the widespread lack of understanding on what really is needed to capture and store the unwanted CO2 . Of the entire carbon capture and storage (CCS) operation, capture is the most costly process, consisting of nearly 70 % of the price tag. In this tutorial review, CO2 capture science and technology based on adsorbents are described and evaluated in the context of chemistry and methods, after briefly introducing the current status of CO2 emissions. An effective sorbent design is suggested, whereby six checkpoints are expected to be met: cost, capacity, selectivity, stability, recyclability, and fast kinetics.

  8. Trends in adsorbate induced core level shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Viktor; Van den Bossche, Maxime; Hellman, Anders; Grönbeck, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    Photoelectron core level spectroscopy is commonly used to monitor atomic and molecular adsorption on metal surfaces. As changes in the electron binding energies are convoluted measures with different origins, calculations are often used to facilitate the decoding of experimental signatures. The interpretation could in this sense benefit from knowledge on trends in surface core level shifts for different metals and adsorbates. Here, density functional theory calculations have been used to systematically evaluate core level shifts for (111) and (100) surfaces of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals upon CO, H, O and S adsorption. The results reveal trends and several non-intuitive cases. Moreover, the difficulties correlating core level shifts with charging and d-band shifts are underlined.

  9. Structural and electrical properties of high-quality 0.41 μm-thick InSb films grown on GaAs (1 0 0) substrate with In{sub x}Al{sub 1−x}Sb continuously graded buffer

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Sang Hoon; Song, Jin Dong; Lim, Ju Young; Koo, Hyun Cheol; Kim, Tae Geun

    2012-10-15

    High-quality InSb was grown on a GaAs (1 0 0) substrate with an InAlSb continuously graded buffer (CGB). The temperatures of In, Al K-cells and substrate were modified during the growth of InAlSb CGB. The cross-section TEM image reveals that the defects due to lattice-mismatch disappear near lateral structures in CGB. The measured electron mobility of 0.41 μm-thick InSb was 46,300 cm{sup 2}/Vs at 300 K. These data surpass the electron mobility of state-of-the-art InSb grown by other methods with similar thickness of InSb.

  10. Growth and Dissolution of Calcite in the Presence of Adsorbed Stearic Acid.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Maria; Segura, Juan José; Erickson, Blake W; Fantner, Georg; Stellacci, Francesco; Voïtchovsky, Kislon

    2015-07-14

    The interaction of organic molecules with the surface of calcite plays a central role in many geochemical, petrochemical, and industrial processes and in biomineralization. Adsorbed organics, typically fatty acids, can interfere with the evolution of calcite when immersed in aqueous solutions. Here we use atomic force microscopy in liquid to explore in real-time the evolution of the (1014) surface of calcite covered with various densities of stearic acid and exposed to different saline solutions. Our results show that the stearic acid molecules tend to act as "pinning points" on the calcite's surface and slow down the crystal's restructuring kinetics. Depending on the amount of material adsorbed, the organic molecules can form monolayers or bilayer islands that become embedded into the growing crystal. The growth process can also displaces the organic molecules and actively concentrate them into stacked multilayers. Our results provide molecular-level insights into the interplay between the adsorbed fatty acid molecules and the evolving calcite crystal, highlighting mechanisms that could have important implications for several biochemical and geochemical processes and for the oil industry.

  11. Spin-polarized metastable-atom deexcitation spectroscopy study of Xenon-adsorbed iron surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Yasushi; Kurahashi, Mitsunori; Suzuki, Taku; Sun, Xia; Wang, Zhongping

    2007-03-01

    The electron spin polarization at the interface between nonmagnetic and ferromagnetic medias is one of the essential factors that may alter the spin transport phenomena. To investigate fundamental aspects of induced spin polarization we have examined the adsorbate-covered magnetic surfaces by means of spin polarized metastable-atom deexcitation spectroscopy (SPMDS). Use of spin-polarized metastable helium atoms in triplet states moving at thermal energies gives rise to the ultimate surface sensitivity. Although Xenon can adsorb on surfaces at low temperatures by the van der Waals force, no electron exchange with surfaces, especially no spin interaction, is expected because of its closed shell structure. SPMDS spectra measured for Xenon-adsorbed iron surfaces show three prominent peaks that are the same as those previously reported for other surfaces by D. M. Oro, et al. [Phys. Rev. A 49 (1994) 4703]. Two peaks (^2P1/2, ^2P3/2) at higher kinetic energies exhibit clear spin asymmetries while the other low energy peak has no appreciable spin asymmetry. The spin asymmetries will be discussed on the basis of spin polarization and deexcitation processes of metastable atoms.

  12. Development of a rapid sanitization solution for silica-based protein A affinity adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Marc; Hiraoka-Sutow, Martha; Mak, Polly; Mann, Fred; Lebreton, Bénédicte

    2009-05-22

    Protein A chromatography media require sanitization between batches as well as prior to long-term storage. While sodium hydroxide (NaOH) is probably one of the most widely used sanitants within the bioprocess industry, it cannot be used with silica- or controlled pore glass (CPG)-based adsorbents due to the instability of the base matrix at high pH. Benzyl alcohol is commonly used for sanitizing such adsorbents, though extended contact times may be required to meet desired microbial log reduction values, especially for fungal and bacterial spore formers. With the rising market need for monoclonal antibody therapeutics, higher manufacturing throughput may be required. In such cases, a shorter sanitization cycle would be extremely beneficial to maximize manufacturing throughput and productivity. This paper describes the development of a new synergistic sanitant solution, designated PAB (120 mM phosphoric acid, 167 mM acetic acid, 2.2% benzyl alcohol) that delivers improved microbial kill kinetics, enabling sanitization times of 2-3h at room temperature, while maintaining acceptable adsorbent stability. Both the approaches taken to establish the effectiveness of the improved solution as well as confirmation of its process compatibility are covered here.

  13. Metal adsorbent for alkaline etching aqua solutions of Si wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamada, Masao; Ueki, Yuji; Seko, Noriaki; Takeda, Toshihide; Kawano, Shin-ichi

    2012-08-01

    High performance adsorbent is expected to be synthesized for the removal of Ni and Cu ions from strong alkaline solution used in the surface etching process of Si wafer. Fibrous adsorbent was synthesized by radiation-induce emulsion graft polymerization onto polyethylene nonwoven fabric and subsequent amination. The reaction condition was optimized using 30 L reaction vessel and nonwoven fabric, 0.3 m width and 18 m long. The resulting fibrous adsorbent was evaluated by 48 wt% NaOH and KOH contaminated with Ni and Cu ions, respectively. The concentration levels of Ni and Cu ions was reduced to less than 1 μg/kg (ppb) at the flow rate of 10 h-1 in space velocity. The life of adsorbent was 30 times higher than that of the commercialized resin. This novel adsorbent was commercialized as METOLATE® since the ability of adsorption is remarkably higher than that of commercial resin used practically in Si wafer processing.

  14. Infrared-Laser Excitation of the Internal Vibrational Mode of a Diatomic Molecule Adsorbed on a Metal Surface.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-01

    Excitation of the Internal Vibrational Mode of a Diatomic Molecule Adsorbed on a Metal Surface m by ’ Andre Peremans, Jacques Darville , Jean-Marie...Andre Peremans, Jacques Darville , Jean-Marie Gilles and Thomas F. George 13. TYPE OF REPORT 13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (Yr. Mo.. Dayl As...ON A METAL SURFACE h Andr& Peremans , Jacques Darville and Jean-Marie Gilles _ _ _ _ Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Mol6culaire de Surface Accesnion

  15. Milestone Report - Complete New Adsorbent Materials for Marine Testing to Demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg Adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Christopher James; Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Yatsandra; Mayes, Richard T.; Saito, Tomonori; Brown, Suree; Gill, Gary; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana

    2014-08-01

    This report describes work on the successful completion of Milestone M2FT-14OR03100115 (8/20/2014) entitled, “Complete new adsorbent materials for marine testing to demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent”. This effort is part of the Seawater Uranium Recovery Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, and involved the development of new adsorbent materials at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and marine testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). ORNL has recently developed two new families of fiber adsorbents that have demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities greater than 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent after marine testing at PNNL. One adsorbent was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of itaconic acid and acrylonitrile onto high surface area polyethylene fibers followed by amidoximation and base conditioning. This fiber showed a capacity of 4.6 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. The second adsorbent was prepared by atom-transfer radical polymerization of t-butyl acrylate and acrylonitrile onto halide-functionalized round fibers followed by amidoximation and base hydrolysis. This fiber demonstrated uranium adsorption capacity of 5.4 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL.

  16. Feasibility of fullerene waste as carbonaceous adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, T.G.; Garg, S.; Rixey, W.G.

    1996-03-01

    This note investigates using the waste soot generated in fullerene manufacture as an adsorbent. Both oven-dried and air-activated samples of waste soot are compared with three commercially available powdered activated carbons (PACs): Nuchar-SA, HDH, and Calgon-RC. Three model compounds were chosen for adsorption tests--TCE, Benzene, and Phenol--representing a small branched molecule, a small nonpolar ring molecule, and relatively polar ring molecule. Additionally, the effectiveness of total organic carbon (TOC) removal from wastewater was evaluated. Oven-dried soot performed poorly as compared to the commercial carbons, but activation of the waste soot for 60 min at 450 C in air resulted in an activated carbon (aFWS) with properties similar to those of commercially available PACs. The aFWS performed better than one would predict from the typical characterization measures of iodine number, molasses number, and methylene blue number. The data for phenol suggest some functional groups are created during the activation of the waste soot. These results show that large-scale fullerene manufacturing can be a zero-waste industry, because its primary waste product can be converted into a useful material.

  17. Photoreduction of methylviologen adsorbed on silver

    SciTech Connect

    Feilchenfeld, H.; Chumanov, G.; Cotton, T.M. |

    1996-03-21

    Methylviologen adsorbed on a roughened silver electrode is reduced to its cation radical upon irradiation with laser light at liquid nitrogen temperature. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra were obtained with different excitation wavelengths between 406 and 752 nm and compared to those obtained at room temperature in an electrochemical cell under potential control. From two-color experiments, in which one laser frequency was used to generate the radical and a second to excite the SERS spectra, it was determined that radical formation occurs mainly with excitation in the blue spectral region. A comparison of the SERS spectra of the dication and cation radical forms of methylviologen with their solution spectra suggests that the former interacts more strongly with the surface than the latter. The cation radical appears to be stable for several hours in liquid nitrogen but has a short lifetime at room temperature. Two mechanisms for the photoreduction are discussed: plasmon-assisted electron transfer from the metal to the methylviologen dication and formation of a resonance charge transfer complex. The current experimental data are insufficient to determine the particular role of these mechanisms. 23 refs., 9 figs.

  18. NASA Applications of Molecular Adsorber Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.

    2015-01-01

    The Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC) is a new, innovative technology that was developed to reduce the risk of molecular contamination on spaceflight applications. Outgassing from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, silicones, epoxies, and potting compounds, pose a significant threat to the spacecraft and the lifetime of missions. As a coating made of highly porous inorganic materials, MAC offers impressive adsorptive capabilities that help capture and trap contaminants. Past research efforts have demonstrated the coating's promising adhesion performance, optical properties, acoustic durability, and thermal stability. These results advocate its use near or on surfaces that are targeted by outgassed materials, such as internal optics, electronics, detectors, baffles, sensitive instruments, thermal control coatings, and vacuum chamber test environments. The MAC technology has significantly progressed in development over the recent years. This presentation summarizes the many NASA spaceflight applications of MAC and how the coatings technology has been integrated as a mitigation tool for outgassed contaminants. For example, this sprayable paint technology has been beneficial for use in various vacuum chambers for contamination control and hardware bake-outs. The coating has also been used in small instrument cavities within spaceflight instrument for NASA missions.

  19. DBPs removal in GAC filter-adsorber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinkeun; Kang, Byeongsoo

    2008-01-01

    A rapid sand filter and granular activated carbon filter-adsorber (GAC FA) were compared in terms of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and disinfection by-products (DBPs) removal. A water treatment plant (WTP) that had a high ammonia concentration and DOC in raw water, which, in turn, led to a high concentration of DBPs because of a high dose of pre-chlorination, was investigated. To remove DBPs and DOC simultaneously, a conventional rapid sand filter had been retrofitted to a GAC FA at the Buyeo WTP in Korea. The overall removal efficiency of DBPs and DOC was higher in the GAC FA than in the sand filter, as expected. Breakthrough of trihalomethanes (THMs) was noticed after 3 months of GAC FA operation, and then removal of THMs was minimal (<10%). On the other hand, the removal efficiency of five haloacetic acids (HAA(5)) in the GAC FA was better than that of THMs, though adsorption of HAA(5) decreased rapidly after 3.5 months of GAC FA operation. And then, gradual improvement (>90%) in HAA(5) removal efficiency was again observed, which could be attributed to biodegradation. At the early stage of GAC FA operation, HAA(5) removal was largely due to physical adsorption, but later on biodegradation appeared to prevail. Biodegradation of HAA(5) was significantly influenced by water temperature. Similar turbidity removal was noticed in both filters, while better manganese removal was confirmed in the sand filter rather than in the GAC FA.

  20. Imaging the wave functions of adsorbed molecules.

    PubMed

    Lüftner, Daniel; Ules, Thomas; Reinisch, Eva Maria; Koller, Georg; Soubatch, Serguei; Tautz, F Stefan; Ramsey, Michael G; Puschnig, Peter

    2014-01-14

    The basis for a quantum-mechanical description of matter is electron wave functions. For atoms and molecules, their spatial distributions and phases are known as orbitals. Although orbitals are very powerful concepts, experimentally only the electron densities and -energy levels are directly observable. Regardless whether orbitals are observed in real space with scanning probe experiments, or in reciprocal space by photoemission, the phase information of the orbital is lost. Here, we show that the experimental momentum maps of angle-resolved photoemission from molecular orbitals can be transformed to real-space orbitals via an iterative procedure which also retrieves the lost phase information. This is demonstrated with images obtained of a number of orbitals of the molecules pentacene (C22H14) and perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (C24H8O6), adsorbed on silver, which are in excellent agreement with ab initio calculations. The procedure requires no a priori knowledge of the orbitals and is shown to be simple and robust.

  1. Unusual Morphologies of Poly(vinyl alcohol) Thin Films Adsorbed on Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Substrates.

    PubMed

    Karki, Akchheta; Nguyen, Lien; Sharma, Bhanushee; Yan, Yan; Chen, Wei

    2016-04-05

    Adsorption of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVOH), 99% and 88% hydrolyzed poly(vinyl acetate), to poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) substrates was studied. The substrates were prepared by covalently attaching linear PDMS polymers of 2, 9, 17, 49, and 116 kDa onto silicon wafers. As the PDMS molecular weight/thickness increases, the adsorbed PVOH thin films progressively transition from continuous to discontinuous morphologies, including honeycomb and fractal/droplet. The structures are the result of thin film dewetting that occurs upon exposure to air. The PVOH film thickness does not vary significantly on these PDMS substrates, implicating the PDMS thickness as the cause for the morphology differences. The adsorbed PVOH thin films are less stable and have a stronger tendency to dewet on thicker, more liquid-like PDMS layers. When PVOH(99%) and PVOH(88%) thin films are compared, fractal and droplet morphologies are observed on high molecular weight PDMS substrates, respectively. The formation of the unique fractal features in the PVOH(99%) thin films as well as other crystalline and semicrystalline thin films is most likely driven by crystallization during the dehydration process in a diffusion-limited aggregation fashion. The only significant enhancement in hydrophilicity via PVOH adsorption was obtained on PDMS(2k), which is completely covered with a PVOH thin film. To mimic the lower receding contact angle and less liquid-like character of the PDMS(2k) substrate, light plasma treatment of the higher molecular weight PDMS substrates was carried out. On the treated PDMS substrates, the adsorbed PVOH thin films are in the more continuous honeycomb morphology, giving rise to significantly enhanced wettability. Furthermore, hydrophobic recovery of the hydrophilized PDMS substrates was not observed during a 1 week period. Thus, light plasma oxidation and subsequent PVOH adsorption can be utilized as a means to effectively hydrophilize conventional PDMS substrates. This study

  2. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, T.R.; Golden, T.C.; Mayorga, S.G.; Brzozowski, J.R.; Taylor, F.W.

    1999-06-29

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO[sub 2] from a gaseous mixture containing CO[sub 2] comprises introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100 C and 500 C to adsorb CO[sub 2] to provide a CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent and a CO[sub 2] depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO[sub 2] laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO[sub 2] from the CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100 C and 600 C, is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions. 1 fig.

  3. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, Thomas Richard; Golden, Timothy Christopher; Mayorga, Steven Gerard; Brzozowski, Jeffrey Richard; Taylor, Fred William

    1999-01-01

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO.sub.2 from a gaseous mixture containing CO.sub.2 comprising introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. to adsorb CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent and a CO.sub.2 depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO.sub.2 laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO.sub.2 from the CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 600.degree. C., is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions.

  4. Methane Recovery from Gaseous Mixtures Using Carbonaceous Adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczek, Bronisław

    2016-06-01

    Methane recovery from gaseous mixtures has both economical and ecological aspect. Methane from different waste gases like mine gases, nitrogenated natural gases and biogases can be treated as local source for production electric and heat energy. Also occurs the problem of atmosphere pollution with methane that shows over 20 times more harmful environmental effect in comparison to carbon dioxide. One of the ways utilisation such gases is enrichment of methane in the PSA technique, which requires appropriate adsorbents. Active carbons and carbon molecular sieve produced by industry and obtained in laboratory scale were examined as adsorbent for methane recuperation. Porous structure of adsorbents was investigated using densimetry measurements and adsorption of argon at 77.5K. On the basis of adsorption data, the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation parameters, micropore volume (Wo) and characteristics of energy adsorption (Eo) as well as area micropores (Smi) and BET area (SBET) were determined. The usability of adsorbents in enrichment of the methane was evaluated in the test, which simulate the basic stages of PSA process: a) adsorbent degassing, b) pressure raise in column by feed gas, c) cocurrent desorption with analysis of out flowing gas. The composition of gas phase was accepted as the criterion of the suitability of adsorbent for methane separation from gaseous mixtures. The relationship between methane recovery from gas mixture and texture parameters of adsorbents was found.

  5. Mercury adsorption properties of sulfur-impregnated adsorbents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsi, N.-C.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chen, S.; Chang, R.

    2002-01-01

    Carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous adsorbents were impregnated with elemental sulfur to evaluate the chemical and physical properties of the adsorbents and their equilibrium mercury adsorption capacities. Simulated coal combustion flue gas conditions were used to determine the equilibrium adsorption capacities for Hg0 and HgCl2 gases to better understand how to remove mercury from gas streams generated by coal-fired utility power plants. Sulfur was deposited onto the adsorbents by monolayer surface deposition or volume pore filling. Sulfur impregnation increased the total sulfur content and decreased the total and micropore surface areas and pore volumes for all of the adsorbents tested. Adsorbents with sufficient amounts of active adsorption sites and sufficient microporous structure had mercury adsorption capacities up to 4,509 ??g Hg/g adsorbent. Elemental sulfur, organic sulfur, and sulfate were formed on the adsorbents during sulfur impregnation. Correlations were established with R2>0.92 between the equilibrium Hg0/HgCl2 adsorption capacities and the mass concentrations of elemental and organic sulfur. This result indicates that elemental and organic sulfur are important active adsorption sites for Hg0 and HgCl2.

  6. Novel adhesive properties of poly(ethylene-oxide) adsorbed nanolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Wenduo

    Solid-polymer interfaces play crucial roles in the multidisciplinary field of nanotechnology and are the confluence of physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. There is now growing evidence that polymer chains irreversibly adsorb even onto weakly attractive solid surfaces, forming a nanometer-thick adsorbed polymer layer ("adsorbed polymer nanolayers"). It has also been reported that the adsorbed layers greatly impact on local structures and properties of supported polymer thin films. In this thesis, I aim to clarify adhesive and tribological properties of adsorbed poly(ethylene-oxide) (PEO) nanolayers onto silicon (Si) substrates, which remain unsolved so far. The adsorbed nanolayers were prepared by the established protocol: one has to equilibrate the melt or dense solution against a solid surface; the unadsorbed chains can be then removed by a good solvent, while the adsorbed chains are assumed to maintain the same conformation due to the irreversible freezing through many physical solid-segment contacts. I firstly characterized the formation process and the surface/film structures of the adsorbed nanolayers by using X-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. Secondly, to compare the surface energy of the adsorbed layers with the bulk, static contact angle measurements with two liquids (water and glycerol) were carried out using a optical contact angle meter equipped with a video camera. Thirdly, I designed and constructed a custom-built adhesion-testing device to quantify the adhesive property. The experimental results provide new insight into the microscopic structure - macroscopic property relationship at the solid-polymer interface.

  7. The reaction of propylene with ordered and disordered oxygen atoms adsorbed on the Ag(110) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranney, Jeffrey T.; Bare, Simon R.

    1997-06-01

    The adsorption and reaction of propylene on oxygen covered Ag(110) was investigated using temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy. Propylene oxidation was compared on the oxygen reconstructed (ordered) Ag(110) surface and on the unreconstructed (disordered) oxygen dosed surface. Oxygen atoms adsorbed < 185 K do not incorporate into long silver-oxygen chains on the (110) surface and are referred to as disordered. Propylene desorbs from clean Ag(110) with an activation energy of 9.8 kcal mol -1. The desorption activation energy increases by 30% as the coverage of oxygen is increased up to 0.33 monolayers. While the desorption activation energy increase was the same on the reconstructed and unreconstructed surface, the reactivity of the adsorbed oxygen for propylene oxidation was quite different. Disordered oxygen adatoms were determined to be at least ten times more active for propylene oxidation than ordered oxygen atoms on the reconstructed surface. The decrease in activity of the oxygen atoms is attributed to the embedding of the oxygen adatoms into long silver-oxygen chains at higher temperatures. With increasing propylene coverage on the oxygen pre-covered surface the water yield increases and the yield of carbon dioxide decreases, indicating that water formation through hydrogen abstraction consumes the bulk of the oxygen at higher propylene coverages.

  8. Mysterious Lattice Rotations in Adsorbed Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Renee D.

    1997-03-01

    Lattice rotations due to a mismatch in structure have been observed in film growth for many years, probably beginning in the 1930's with the Nishiyama-Wasserman and Kurdjumov-Sachs orientations observed when fcc(111) films grow on bcc(110) surfaces, or vice versa. Early analysis of this problem was carried out with the aid of Moiré patterns and the observation that the preferred lattice orientations are those which maximize the Moiré fringe spacing. Later energy calculations indicated that the structures which were predicted by the the Moiré technique actually do correspond to energy minima. Epitaxial rotation in adsorbed monolayers is a conceptually simpler problem since in principle it involves only two planes of atoms, and it was first observed in 1977 for Ar on a graphite surface(C. G. Shaw, M. D. Chinn, S. C. Fain, Jr. Phys. Rev. Lett. 41 (1978) 955.). This observation came only a few months after a new theory, based on the expected elastic behavior of an overlayer, was developed by A. D. Novaco and J. P. McTague(A. D. Novaco and J. P. McTague, Phys. Rev. Lett. 38 (1977) 1286.), and the agreement with the experimental results was remarkable. It was later shown that a few symmetry principles similar to those used for the film growth studies sometimes can also predict the observed structures. However, the situation for incommensurate layers physisorbed on metal surfaces currently looks bleak. None of the existing theories or models appears to describe the experimental results. New data for physisorbed gases on metal surfaces will be presented, along with some half-baked (and probably wrong) ideas for what might be happening. This work was supported by NSF.

  9. VEGETATIVE COVERS FOR WASTE CONTAINMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Disposal of municipal ahd hazardous waste in the United States is primarily accomplished by containment in lined and capped landfills. Evapotranspiration cover systems offer an alternative to conventional landfill cap systems. These covers work on completely different principles ...

  10. Cover crops and N credits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops often provide many short- and long-term benefits to cropping systems. Legume cover crops can significantly reduce the N fertilizer requirement of non-legume cash crops that follow. The objectives of this presentation were to: I) educate stakeholders about the potential benefits of cover ...

  11. Method of coating aluminum substrates with solid adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, S.R.; McKeon, M.J.; Cohen, A.P.; Behan, A.S.

    1992-06-09

    This patent describes a method of coating a surface of an aluminum substrate with a layer of solid adsorbent selected from the group consisting of crystalline molecular sieves, activated alumina, and mixtures thereof. It comprises heating the surface in an oxygen containing atmosphere to a temperature of at least about 200{degrees} C and sufficient to enable bonding of the solid adsorbent to the surface, contacting the heated surface with a slurry comprising the adsorbent and a binder selected from the group consisting of volclay, kaolin, sepiolite, attapulgite, silicates, aluminates, activated alumina, and mixtures thereof in a suspending liquid to form a slurry-coated surface, and removing sufficient liquid to form an adsorbent coating thereon.

  12. Removal of adsorbed gases with CO2 snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Richard R.

    1991-09-01

    During the outgassing of orbiting astronomical observatories, the condensation of molecular species on optical surfaces can create difficulties for astronomers. The problem is particularly severe in ultraviolet astronomy where the adsorption of only a few atomic layers of some substances can be very damaging. In this paper the removal of adsorbed atomic layers using carbon dioxide snow is discussed. The rate of removal of adsorbed layers of isopropyl alcohol, Freon TF, and deionized distilled water on Teflon substrates was experimentally determined. The removal of fingerprints (containing fatty acids such as stearic acid) from optical surfaces is also demonstrated. The presence and rate of removal of the multilayers was monitored by detecting the molecular dipole field of adsorbed molecular species. For isopropyl alcohol, Freon TF (trichlorotrifluoroethane), and water adsorbed multilayers were removed in under 1.5 seconds. Fingerprint removal was much more difficult and required 20 seconds of spraying with a mixture of carbon dioxide snow flakes and atomized microdroplets of isopropyl alcohol.

  13. Radiation grafted adsorbents for newly emerging environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud Nasef, Mohamed; Ting, T. M.; Abbasi, Ali; Layeghi-moghaddam, Alireza; Sara Alinezhad, S.; Hashim, Kamaruddin

    2016-01-01

    Radiation induced grafting (RIG) is acquired to prepare a number of adsorbents for newly emerging environmental applications using a single route involving RIG of glycidymethacrylate (GMA) onto polyethylene-polypropylene (PE-PP) non-woven fabric. The grafted fabric was subjected to one of three functionalization reactions to impart desired ionic characters. This included treatment with (1) N-dimethyl-D-glucamine, (2) triethylamine and (3) triethylamine and alkalisation with KOH. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to study the changes in chemical and physical structures of the obtained fibrous adsorbents. The potential applications of the three adsorbents for removal of boron from solutions, capturing CO2 from CO2/N2 mixtures and catalysing transesterification of triacetin/methanol to methyl acetate (biodiesel) were explored. The obtained fibrous adsorbents provide potential alternatives to granular resins for the investigated applications and require further development.

  14. Trace contaminant studies of HSC adsorbent. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yieh, D. T. N.

    1978-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of fifteen trace contaminants on HSC (polyethylenimine coated acrylic ester) adsorbent were experimentally investigated with the following two objectives: to test the removal potential and the adsorption reversibility of the selected trace contaminants, and to test the effect a preadsorbed trace contaminant has on the CO2 adsorption capacity. The experimental method for acquiring the adsorption equilibrium data used is based on the volumetric (or displacement) concept of vacuum adsorption. From the experimental results, it was found that the HSC adsorbent has good adsorption potential for contaminants of alcohol compounds, esters, and benzene compounds; whereas, adsorption of ketone compounds, oxidizing and reducing agents are detrimental to the adsorbent. In addition, all liquid contaminants reduce the CO2 capacity of HSC adsorbent.

  15. Electronic structure of benzene adsorbed on Ni and Cu surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weinelt, M.; Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.

    1997-04-01

    Benzene has for a long time served as a prototype adsorption system of large molecules. It adsorbs with the molecular plane parallel to the surface. The bonding of benzene to a transition metal is typically viewed to involve the {pi} system. Benzene adsorbs weakly on Cu and strongly on Ni. It is interesting to study how the adsorption strength is reflected in the electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate complex. The authors have used X-ray Emission (XE) and X-ray Absorption (XA) spectroscopies to selectively study the electronic states localized on the adsorbed benzene molecule. Using XES the occupied states can be studies and with XAS the unoccupied states. The authors have used beamline 8.0 and the Swedish endstation equipped with a grazing incidence x-ray spectrometer and a partial yield absorption detector. The resolution in the XES and XAS were 0.5 eV and 0.05 eV, respectively.

  16. Oil palm biomass as an adsorbent for heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Vakili, Mohammadtaghi; Rafatullah, Mohd; Ibrahim, Mahamad Hakimi; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Salamatinia, Babak; Gholami, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Many industries discharge untreated wastewater into the environment. Heavy metals from many industrial processes end up as hazardous pollutants of wastewaters.Heavy metal pollution has increased in recent decades and there is a growing concern for the public health risk they may pose. To remove heavy metal ions from polluted waste streams, adsorption processes are among the most common and effective treatment methods. The adsorbents that are used to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous media have both advantages and disadvantages. Cost and effectiveness are two of the most prominent criteria for choosing adsorbents. Because cost is so important, great effort has been extended to study and find effective lower cost adsorbents.One class of adsorbents that is gaining considerable attention is agricultural wastes. Among many alternatives, palm oil biomasses have shown promise as effective adsorbents for removing heavy metals from wastewater. The palm oil industry has rapidly expanded in recent years, and a large amount of palm oil biomass is available. This biomass is a low-cost agricultural waste that exhibits, either in its raw form or after being processed, the potential for eliminating heavy metal ions from wastewater. In this article, we provide background information on oil palm biomass and describe studies that indicate its potential as an alternative adsorbent for removing heavy metal ions from wastewater. From having reviewed the cogent literature on this topic we are encouraged that low-cost oil-palm-related adsorbents have already demonstrated outstanding removal capabilities for various pollutants.Because cost is so important to those who choose to clean waste streams by using adsorbents, the use of cheap sources of unconventional adsorbents is increasingly being investigated. An adsorbent is considered to be inexpensive when it is readily available, is environmentally friendly, is cost-effective and be effectively used in economical processes. The

  17. Residence time determination for adsorbent beds of different configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Otermat, J.E.; Wikoff, W.O.; Kovach, J.L.

    1995-02-01

    The residence time calculations of ASME AG-1 Code, Section FC, currently specify a screen surface area method, that is technically incorrect. Test data has been obtained on Type II adsorber trays of different configurations to establish residence time in the adsorber trays. These data indicate that the air volume/carbon volume ratio or the average screen area are more appropriate for the calculation of the residence time calculation than the currently used, smallest screen area basis.

  18. Structure of water adsorbed on a single graphene sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo, M. C.; Martí, J.

    2008-08-01

    We present the result of molecular-dynamics simulations of water adsorbed on top of a single graphene layer at temperatures between 25 and 50°C . The analysis of the energy per particle and the density profiles indicate that the behavior of the adsorbed liquid is similar to the case of multiple graphene layers (graphite) with the only difference being the values of configurational energy. Other structural properties, such as stability ranges, hydrogen bond distributions, and molecular orientations are also presented.

  19. Efforts to Consolidate Chalcogels with Adsorbed Iodine

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Pierce, David A.; Chun, Jaehun

    2013-08-28

    This document discusses ongoing work with non-oxide aerogels, called chalcogels, that are under development at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as sorbents for gaseous iodine. Work was conducted in fiscal year 2012 to demonstrate the feasibility of converting Sn2S3 chalcogel without iodine into a glass. This current document summarizes the work conducted in fiscal year 2013 to assess the consolidation potential of non-oxide aerogels with adsorbed iodine. The Sn2S3 and Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogels were selected for study. The first step in the process for these experiments was to load them with iodine (I2). The I2 uptake was ~68 mass% for Sn2S3 and ~50 mass% for Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogels. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of both sets of sorbents showed that metal-iodide complexes were formed during adsorption, i.e., SnI4 for Sn2S3 and SbI3 for Sb13.5Sn5S20. Additionally, metal-sulfide-iodide complexes were formed, i.e., SnSI for Sn2S3 and SbSI for Sb13.5Sn5S20. No XRD evidence for unreacted iodine was found in any of these samples. Once the chalcogels had reached maximum adsorption, the consolidation potential was assessed. Here, the sorbents were heated for consolidation in vacuum-sealed quartz vessels. The Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogel was heated both (1) in a glassy carbon crucible within a fused quartz tube and (2) in a single-containment fused quartz tube. The Sn2S3 chalcogel was only heated in a single-containment fused quartz tube. In both cases with the single-containment fused quartz experiments, the material consolidated nicely. However, in both cases, there were small fractions of metal iodides not incorporated into the final product as well as fused quartz particles within the melt due to the sample attacking the quartz wall during the heat treatment. The Sb13.5Sn5S20 did not appear to attack the glassy carbon crucible so, for future experiments, it would be ideal to apply a coating, such as pyrolytic graphite, to the inner walls of the fused quartz vessel to prevent

  20. Cryogenic adsorber design in a helium refrigeration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhongjun; Zhang, Ning; Li, Zhengyu; Li, Q.

    2012-06-01

    The cryogenic adsorber is specially designed to eliminate impurities in gaseous helium such as O2, and N2 which is normally difficult to remove, based on the reversible cryotrapping of impurities on an activated carbon bed. The coconut shell activated carbon is adopted because of its developed micropore structure and specific surface area. This activated carbon adsorption is mostly determined by the micropore structure, and the adsorption rate of impurities is inversely proportional to the square of the particle sizes. The active carbon absorber's maximum permissible flow velocity is 0.25 m/s. When the gas flow velocity increases, the adsorption diffusion rate of the adsorbent is reduced, because an increase in the magnitude of the velocity resulted in a reduced amount of heat transfer to a unit volume of impure gas. According to the numerical simulation of N2 adsorption dynamics, the appropriate void tower link speed and the saturated adsorption capacity are determined. Then the diameter and height of the adsorber are designed. The mass transfer length should be taken into account in the adsorber height design. The pressure decrease is also calculated. The important factors that influence the adsorber pressure decrease are the void tower speed, the adsorbed layer height, and the active carbon particle shape and size.

  1. Evaluation of a cesium adsorbent grafted with ammonium 12-molybdophosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Takuya; Seko, Noriaki; Amada, Haruyo; Kasai, Noboru; Saiki, Seiichi; Hoshina, Hiroyuki; Ueki, Yuji

    2016-02-01

    A fibrous cesium (Cs) adsorbent was developed using radiation-induced graft polymerization with a cross-linked structure containing a highly stable adsorption ligand. The ligand, ammonium 12-molybdophosphate (AMP), was successfully introduced onto the fibrous polyethylene trunk material. The resulting Cs adsorbent contained 36% nonwoven fabric polyethylene (NFPE), 1% AMP, 2% triallyl isocyanurate (TAIC) and 61% glycidyl methacrylate (GMA). The adsorbent's Cs adsorption capacity was evaluated using batch and column tests. It was determined that the adsorbent could be used in a wide pH range. The amount of desorbed molybdenum, which can be used as an estimate for AMP stability on the Cs adsorbent, was minimized at the standard drinking water pH range of 5.8-8.6. Based from the inspection on the adherence of these results to the requirements set forth by the Food Sanitation Act by a third party organization, it can be concluded that the developed Cs adsorbent can be safely utilized for drinking water.

  2. The USGS Land Cover Institute

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Land Cover Institute (LCI) is located at the Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. It provides a focal point for advancing USGS land cover studies and applications. Satellite images and other remotely sensed data play an important role in this research. Land Cover scientists investigate new ways to use satellite images and other data to map land cover. They assess national and global land cover characteristics and monitor how - and how rapidly - land cover changes. They also study the economic impacts of land cover as well as its effects on water quality, the spread of invasive species, habitats and biodiversity, climate variability, and other environmental factors.

  3. Glass transition of adsorbed stereoregular PPMA by inverse gas chromatography at infinite dilution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamieh, T.; Rezzaki, M.; Grohens, Y.; Schultz, J.

    1998-10-01

    In this paper, we used inverse gas chromatography (IGC) at infinite dilution that proved to be a powerful technique to determine glass transition and other transitions of PMMA adsorbed on α-alumina. We highlighted the glass transition temperature of the system PMMA/α-Al2O3 with defined polymer tacticity at various covered surface fractions. Thus, the Tg of the adsorbed isotactic PMMA increases strongly as compared to the bulk value. The study of the physical chemical properties of PMMA/α-alumina revealed an important difference in the acidic and basic behaviour, in Lewis terms, of aluminium oxide covered by various concentrations of PMMA. It appears that there is a stabilisation of the physical chemical properties of PMMA/α-Al2O3 for a surface coverage above 50%. This study also highlighted an important effect of the tacticity of the polymer on the acid-base character of the system PMMA/Al2O3. Dans cet article, nous montrons que la chromatographie gazeuse inverse (CGI) à dilution infinie se révèle être une technique très intéressante pour la détermination de la transition vitreuse de polymères stéréoréguliers adsorbés sur des substrats solides tels que l'alumine. Nous avons mis en évidence des transitions attribuées aux phénomènes de relaxation béta, transition vitreuse et autres transitions des systèmes PMMA/Al2O3 de tacticité définie à différents taux de recouvrement. Ainsi, la Tg du PMMA isotactique adsorbé augmente de façon significative par rapport a celle du polymère massique. L'étude des propriétés physico-chimiques du système PMMA/Al2O3, révèle une différence importante dans le comportement acido-basique, au sens de Lewis, de l'alumine pour de taux de recouvrement en PMMA variables. Il apparaît qu'il y a stabilisation des propriétés physico-chimiques de PMMA/Al2O3 pour un taux de recouvrement en PMMA supérieur à 50 %. Cette étude a montré également une influence importante de la tacticité du polymère sur le

  4. Utility of adsorbents in the purification of drinking water: a review of characterization, efficiency and safety evaluation of various adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Shashi Prabha; Gopal, Krishna; Bersillon, J L

    2009-05-01

    Clean drinking water is one of the implicit requisites fora healthy human population. However the growing industrialization and extensive use of chemicals for various concerns, has increased the burden of unwanted pollutants in the drinking water of developing countries like India. The entry of potentially hazardous substances into the biota has been magnifying day by day. In the absence of a possible stoppage of these, otherwise, useful chemicals, the only way to maintain safer water bodies is to develop efficient purifying technologies. One such immensely beneficial procedure that has been in use is that of purification of water using 'adsorbents'. Indigenous minerals and natural plants products have potential for removing many pollutants viz. fluoride, arsenic, nitrate, heavy metals, pesticides as well as trihalomethanes. Adsorbents which are derived from carbon, alumina, zeolite, clay minerals, iron ores, industrial by products, and natural products viz. parts of the plants, herbs and algal biomass offer promising potential of removal. In the recent years attention has been paid to develop process involving screening/pretreatment/activation/impregnation using alkalies, acids, alum, lime, manganese dioxide, ferric chloride and other chemicals which are found to enhance their adsorbing efficiency. Chemical characterization of these adsorbents recapitulates the mechanism of the process. It is imperative to observe that capacities of the adsorbents may vary depending on the characteristics, chemical modifications and concentration of the individual adsorbent. Removal kinetics is found to be based on the experimental conditions viz. pH, concentration of the adsorbate, quantity of the adsorbent and temperature. It is suggested that isotherm model is suitable tool to assess the adsorption capacities in batch and column modes. Safety evaluation and risk assessment of the process/products may be useful to provide guidelines for its sustainable disposal.

  5. Fabricating electrospun cellulose nanofibre adsorbents for ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Dods, Stewart R; Hardick, Oliver; Stevens, Bob; Bracewell, Daniel G

    2015-01-09

    Protein separation is an integral step in biopharmaceutical manufacture with diffusion-limited packed bed chromatography remaining the default choice for industry. Rapid bind-elute separation using convective mass transfer media offers advantages in productivity by operating at high flowrates. Electrospun nanofibre adsorbents are a non-woven fibre matrix of high surface area and porosity previously investigated as a bioseparation medium. The effects of compression and bed layers, and subsequent heat treatment after electrospinning cellulose acetate nanofibres were investigated using diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) or carboxylate (COO) functionalisations. Transbed pressures were measured and compared by compression load, COO adsorbents were 30%, 70% and 90% higher than DEAE for compressions 1, 5 and 10MPa, respectively, which was attributed to the swelling effect of hydrophilic COO groups. Dynamic binding capacities (DBCs) at 10% breakthrough were measured between 2000 and 12,000CV/h (2s and 0.3s residence times) under normal binding conditions, and DBCs increased with reactant concentration from 4 to 12mgBSA/mL for DEAE and from 10 to 21mglysozyme/mL for COO adsorbents. Comparing capacities of compression loads applied after electrospinning showed that the lowest load tested, 1MPa, yielded the highest DBCs for DEAE and COO adsorbents at 20mgBSA/mL and 27mglysozyme/mL, respectively. At 1MPa, DBCs were the highest for the lowest flowrate tested but stabilised for flowrates above 2000CV/h. For compression loads of 5MPa and 10MPa, adsorbents recorded lower DBCs than 1MPa as a result of nanofibre packing and reduced surface area. Increasing the number of bed layers from 4 to 12 showed decreasing DBCs for both adsorbents. Tensile strengths were recorded to indicate the mechanical robustness of the adsorbent and be related to packing the nanofibre adsorbents in large scale configurations such as pleated cartridges. Compared with an uncompressed adsorbent, compressions of 1, 5

  6. Fabricating electrospun cellulose nanofibre adsorbents for ion-exchange chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Dods, Stewart R.; Hardick, Oliver; Stevens, Bob; Bracewell, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Protein separation is an integral step in biopharmaceutical manufacture with diffusion-limited packed bed chromatography remaining the default choice for industry. Rapid bind-elute separation using convective mass transfer media offers advantages in productivity by operating at high flowrates. Electrospun nanofibre adsorbents are a non-woven fibre matrix of high surface area and porosity previously investigated as a bioseparation medium. The effects of compression and bed layers, and subsequent heat treatment after electrospinning cellulose acetate nanofibres were investigated using diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) or carboxylate (COO) functionalisations. Transbed pressures were measured and compared by compression load, COO adsorbents were 30%, 70% and 90% higher than DEAE for compressions 1, 5 and 10 MPa, respectively, which was attributed to the swelling effect of hydrophilic COO groups. Dynamic binding capacities (DBCs) at 10% breakthrough were measured between 2000 and 12,000 CV/h (2 s and 0.3 s residence times) under normal binding conditions, and DBCs increased with reactant concentration from 4 to 12 mg BSA/mL for DEAE and from 10 to 21 mg lysozyme/mL for COO adsorbents. Comparing capacities of compression loads applied after electrospinning showed that the lowest load tested, 1 MPa, yielded the highest DBCs for DEAE and COO adsorbents at 20 mg BSA/mL and 27 mg lysozyme/mL, respectively. At 1 MPa, DBCs were the highest for the lowest flowrate tested but stabilised for flowrates above 2000 CV/h. For compression loads of 5 MPa and 10 MPa, adsorbents recorded lower DBCs than 1 MPa as a result of nanofibre packing and reduced surface area. Increasing the number of bed layers from 4 to 12 showed decreasing DBCs for both adsorbents. Tensile strengths were recorded to indicate the mechanical robustness of the adsorbent and be related to packing the nanofibre adsorbents in large scale configurations such as pleated cartridges. Compared with an

  7. Elution by Le Chatelier's principle for maximum recyclability of adsorbents: applied to polyacrylamidoxime adsorbents for extraction of uranium from seawater.

    PubMed

    Oyola, Yatsandra; Vukovic, Sinisa; Dai, Sheng

    2016-05-28

    Amidoxime-based polymer adsorbents have attracted interest within the last decade due to their high adsorption capacities for uranium and other rare earth metals from seawater. The ocean contains an approximated 4-5 billion tons of uranium and even though amidoxime-based adsorbents have demonstrated the highest uranium adsorption capacities to date, they are still economically impractical because of their limited recyclability. Typically, the adsorbed metals are eluted with a dilute acid solution that not only damages the amidoxime groups (metal adsorption sites), but is also not strong enough to remove the strongly bound vanadium, which decreases the adsorption capacity with each cycle. We resolved this challenge by incorporating Le Chatelier's principle to recycle adsorbents indefinitely. We used a solution with a high concentration of amidoxime-like chelating agents, such as hydroxylamine, to desorb nearly a 100% of adsorbed metals, including vanadium, without damaging the metal adsorption sites and preserving the high adsorption capacity. The method takes advantage of knowing the binding mode between the amidoxime ligand and the metal and mimics it with chelating agents that then in a Le Chatelier's manner removes metals by shifting to a new chemical equilibrium. For this reason the method is applicable to any ligand-metal adsorbent and it will make an impact on other extraction technologies.

  8. Extracting Uranium from Seawater: Promising AF Series Adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Chris J.; Kuo, L. -J.; Gill, G.; Wood, J. R.; Dai, S.

    2016-04-20

    A new family of high-surface-area polyethylene fiber adsorbents named the AF series was recently developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The AF series adsorbents were synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile and itaconic acid (at different monomer/comonomer mol ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fibers. The degree of grafting (%DOG) of AF series adsorbents was found to be 154-354%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by treating with hydroxylamine. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44 M KOH at 80 °C followed by screening at ORNL with sodium-based synthetic aqueous solution, spiked with 8 ppm uranium. The uranium adsorption capacity in simulated seawater screening ranged from 170 to 200 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of %DOG. A monomer/comonomer molar ratio in the range of 7.57-10.14 seemed to be optimum for highest uranium loading capacity. Subsequently, the adsorbents were also tested with natural seawater at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using flow-through column experiments to determine uranium loading capacity with varying KOH conditioning times at 80 °C. The highest adsorption capacity of AF1 measured after 56 days of marine testing was demonstrated as 3.9 g-U/kg-adsorbent and 3.2 g-U/kg-adsorbent for 1 and 3 h of KOH conditioning at 80 °C, respectively. Based on capacity values of several AF1 samples, it was observed that changing KOH conditioning from 1 to 3 h at 80 °C resulted in a 22-27% decrease in uranium adsorption capacity in seawater.

  9. Removal of arsenic from groundwater by granular titanium dioxide adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Bang, Sunbaek; Patel, Manish; Lippincott, Lee; Meng, Xiaoguang

    2005-07-01

    A novel granular titanium dioxide (TiO2) was evaluated for the removal of arsenic from groundwater. Laboratory experiments were carried out to investigate the adsorption capacity of the adsorbent and the effect of anions on arsenic removal. Batch experimental results showed that more arsenate [As(V)] was adsorbed on TiO2 than arsenite [As(III)] in US groundwater at pH 7.0. The adsorption capacities for As(V) and As(III) were 41.4 and 32.4 mgg(-1) TiO2, respectively. However, the adsorbent had a similar adsorption capacity for As(V) and As(III) (approximately 40 mgg(-1)) when simulated Bangladesh groundwater was used. Silica (20 mgl(-1)) and phosphate (5.8 mgl(-1)) had no obvious effect on the removal of As(V) and As(III) by TiO2 at neutral pH. Point-of-entry (POE) filters containing 3 l of the granular adsorbent were tested for the removal of arsenic from groundwater in central New Jersey, USA. Groundwater was continuously passed through the filters at an empty bed contact time (EBCT) of 3 min. Approximately 45,000 bed volumes of groundwater containing an average of 39 microgl(-1) of As(V) was treated by the POE filter before the effluent arsenic concentration increased to 10 microgl(-1). The total treated water volumes per weight of adsorbent were about 60,000 l per 1 kg of adsorbent. The field filtration results demonstrated that the granular TiO2 adsorbent was very effective for the removal of arsenic in groundwater.

  10. Vibrational Studies of Adsorbate-Induced Reconstruction on Molybdenum Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopinski, Gregory Peter

    Adsorbate-induced rearrangement of the substrate structure strongly modifies the adsorbate-substrate and adsorbate-adsorbate interactions, leading to the complex behavior observed in many chemisorption systems. In this thesis the H/Mo(211), O/Mo(211) and Na/Mo(100) systems have been studied using high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) to observe vibrations of the adsorbed atoms. The vibrational data is correlated with observations of the long-range order probed by LEED as well as the work function changes induced by adsorption. Adsorbate -induced substrate reconstruction plays an important role in all three of these systems. Studies of the coadsorption systems O+H/Mo(211) and Na+O/Mo(100) indicate how these effects can influence interactions between adsorbates. For H/Mo(211), above 1ML a (1 x 1) to (1 x 2) transition is observed and attributed to modification of the substrate periodicity. Below 1ML, H atoms are bridge bonded and induce local distortions of the substrate. The transition to the (1 x 2) phase involves the ordering of these displacements and occupation of three-fold sites partially populated by conversion of the bridge bonded species. This conversion accounts for the sawtooth-like coverage dependence of the work function. The structural model proposed for this system is also supported by the desorption parameters and partial molar entropy extracted from adsorption isobars. Oxygen adsorption on Mo(211) involves the occupation of multiple binding sites, with both the long-range order and the local geometry of the adsorbate phases strongly temperature dependent. Coadsorption of low coverages of oxygen and hydrogen leads to segregation of the two adsorbates which can be understood in terms of a substrate-mediated repulsive interaction between O and H. For Na/Mo(100), the frequency of the Na-Mo symmetric stretch mode does not shift with coverage although the mode intensity is strongly coverage dependent. The absence of a frequency shift

  11. Influence of H- and OH-adsorbates on the ethanol oxidation reaction--a DEMS study.

    PubMed

    Bach Delpeuch, Antoine; Chatenet, Marian; Rau, Maria Sol; Cremers, Carsten

    2015-04-28

    The ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) was investigated by potentiodynamic techniques on Pt/C, Rh/C, Pt-Rh/C, Pt-SnO2/C and Pt-Rh-SnO2/C by differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) in a flow cell system. Prior to the cyclic voltammetries, adsorption of H- and OH-species was carried out by chronoamperometry at Ead = 0.05 and 1 V vs. RHE, respectively, in order to examine their influence on the EOR on the different electrocatalysts. For the sake of comparison, another adsorption potential was chosen at Ead = 0.3 V vs. RHE, in the double layer region (i.e. in the absence of such adsorbates). For this study, 20 wt% electrocatalysts were synthesized using a modified polyol method and were physically characterized by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). When comparing the first and second cycles of the cyclic voltammograms (CVs) on Pt/C and Pt-SnO2/C, the presence of Had on the electrocatalyst surface seems to hinder the initiation of the ethanol electrooxidation, whereas the reaction onset potential is shifted negatively with the presence of OH-adsorbates. In contrast to them, the EOR on Rh/C is enhanced when the electrocatalyst surface is covered with Had and is inhibited after adsorption at Ead = 0.3 and 1 V vs. RHE. Finally, on Pt-Rh/C and Pt-Rh-SnO2/C, neither the H- nor OH-adsorbates do impact the EOR initiation. The lowest EOR onset was recorded on Pt-SnO2/C and Pt-Rh-SnO2/C electrocatalysts. The CO2 currency efficiency (CCE) was also determined for each electrocatalyst and demonstrated higher values on Pt-Rh-SnO2/C.

  12. Lipid monolayers and adsorbed polyelectrolytes with different degrees of polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ortmann, Thomas; Ahrens, Heiko; Lawrenz, Frank; Gröning, Andreas; Nestler, Peter; Günther, Jens-Uwe; Helm, Christiane A

    2014-06-17

    Polystyrene sulfonate (PSS) of different molecular weight M(w) is adsorbed to oppositely charged DODAB monolayers from dilute solutions (0.01 mmol/L). PSS adsorbs flatly in a lamellar manner, as is shown by X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence diffraction (exception: PSS with M(w) below 7 kDa adsorbs flatly disordered to the liquid expanded phase). The surface coverage and the separation of the PSS chains are independent of PSS M(w). On monolayer compression, the surface charge density increases by a factor of 2, and the separation of the PSS chains decreases by the same factor. Isotherms show that on increase of PSS M(w) the transition pressure of the LE/LC (liquid expanded/liquid condensed) phase transition decreases. When the contour length exceeds the persistence length (21 nm), the transition pressure is low and constant. For low-M(w) PSS (<7 kDa) the LE/LC transition of the lipids and the disordered/ordered transition of adsorbed PSS occur simultaneously, leading to a maximum in the contour length dependence of the transition enthalpy. These findings show that lipid monolayers at the air/water interface are a suitable model substrate with adjustable surface charge density to study the equilibrium conformation of adsorbed polyelectrolytes as well as their interactions with a model membrane.

  13. Synthesis of arsenic graft adsorbents in pilot scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshina, Hiroyuki; Kasai, Noboru; Shibata, Takuya; Aketagawa, Yasushi; Takahashi, Makikatsu; Yoshii, Akihiro; Tsunoda, Yasuhiko; Seko, Noriaki

    2012-08-01

    Synthesis of arsenic (As) adsorbents in pilot scale was carried out with a synthesizing apparatus by radiation-induced graft polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate phosphoric acid monomer (PA), which consists of phosphoric acid mono- (50%) and di- (50%) ethyl methacrylate esters onto a nonwoven cotton fabric (NCF), and following chemical modification by contact with a zirconium (Zr) solution. The apparatus which was equipped with reaction tanks, a washing tank and a pump can produce up to 0.3 m×14 m size of the As(V) adsorbent in one reaction. A degree of grafting of 150% was obtained at an irradiation dose of 20 kGy with 5% of PA solution mixed with deionized water for 1 h at 40 °C. Finally, after Zr(IV) was loaded onto a NCF with 5 mmol/L of Zr(IV) solution, the graft adsorbent for the removal of As(V) was achieved in pilot-scale. The adsorbent which was synthesized in pilot scale was evaluated in batch mode adsorption with 1 ppm (mg/l) of As(V) solution for 2 h at room temperature. As a result, the adsorption capacity for As(V) was 0.02 mmol/g-adsorbent.

  14. Natural material adsorbed onto a polymer to enhance immune function

    PubMed Central

    Reinaque, Ana Paula Barcelos; França, Eduardo Luzía; Scherer, Edson Fredulin; Côrtes, Mayra Aparecida; Souto, Francisco José Dutra; Honorio-França, Adenilda Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Background In this study, we produced poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) microspheres of different sizes and adsorbing a medicinal plant mixture, and verified their effect in vitro on the viability, superoxide production, and bactericidal activity of phagocytes in the blood. Methods The medicinal plant mixture was adsorbed onto PEG microspheres and its effects were evaluated by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. Results Adsorption of the herbal mixture onto the PEG microspheres was achieved and the particles were internalized by phagocytes. PEG microspheres bearing the adsorbed herbal mixture stimulated superoxide release, and activated scavenging and microbicidal activity in phagocytes. No differences in functional activity were observed when the phagocytes were not incubated with PEG microspheres bearing the adsorbed herbal mixture. Conclusion This system may be useful for the delivery of a variety of medicinal plants and can confer additional protection against infection. The data reported here suggest that a polymer adsorbed with a natural product is a treatment alternative for enhancing immune function. PMID:22956861

  15. Dynamics of adsorbed polymers on attractive homogeneous surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qing-Hui; Luo, Meng-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic behaviors of polymer chains adsorbed on an attractive, homogeneous surface are studied by using dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. The translational diffusion coefficient Dxy parallel to the surface decreases as the intra-polymer attraction strength EPP or the polymer-surface attraction strength EPS increases. The rotational relaxation time τR increases with EPS, but the dependence of τR on EPP is dependent on the adsorption state of the polymer. We find that τR decreases with increasing EPP for a partially adsorbed polymer but it increases with EPP for a fully adsorbed polymer. Scaling relations Dxy ~ N−α and τR ~ Nβ are found for long polymers. The scaling exponent α is independent of EPS for long polymers but increases with EPP from α = 1.06 at EPP = 0. While β ≈ 2.7 is also roughly independent of EPS for the adsorbed polymer at EPP = 0, but β increases with EPS at EPP > 0. Moreover, we find that β always decreases with increasing EPP. Our results reveal different effects of the attractive surface on the diffusion and rotation of adsorbed polymers. PMID:27849002

  16. High-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy and photoelectron-diffraction studies of the geometric structure of adsorbates on single-crystal metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenblatt, D.H.

    1982-11-01

    Two techniques which have made important contributions to the understanding of surface phenomena are high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and photoelectron diffraction (PD). EELS is capable of directly measuring the vibrational modes of clean and adsorbate covered metal surfaces. In this work, the design, construction, and performance of a new EELS spectrometer are described. These results are discussed in terms of possible structures of the O-Cu(001) system. Recommendations for improvements in this EELS spectrometer and guidelines for future spectrometers are given. PD experiments provide accurate quantitative information about the geometry of atoms and molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. The technique has advantages when used to study disordered overlayers, molecular overlayers, multiple site systems, and adsorbates which are weak electron scatterers. Four experiments were carried out which exploit these advantages.

  17. High plains cover crop research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Some recent statements have been made about the benefits of growing cover crops in mixtures as compared with single-species plantings of cover crops. Those stated benefits have included greatly reduced water use, enhanced soil microbiological activity, increased biomass productivity, and enhanced wa...

  18. Midwest Cover Crops Field Guide

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Producers who want to prevent soil erosion, improve nutrient cycling, sustain their soils, and protect/maintain the environment have been returning to a very old practice: planting cover crops. Cover crops are effective tools for reducing soil erosion and increasing nutrient recycling on farmlands, ...

  19. Activated carbons and low cost adsorbents for remediation of tri- and hexavalent chromium from water.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Dinesh; Pittman, Charles U

    2006-09-21

    Hexavalent chromium is a well-known highly toxic metal, considered a priority pollutant. Industrial sources of Cr(VI) include leather tanning, cooling tower blowdown, plating, electroplating, anodizing baths, rinse waters, etc. The most common method applied for chromate control is reduction of Cr(VI) to its trivalent form in acid (pH approximately 2.0) and subsequent hydroxide precipitation of Cr(III) by increasing the pH to approximately 9.0-10.0 using lime. Existing overviews of chromium removal only cover selected technologies that have traditionally been used in chromium removal. Far less attention has been paid to adsorption. Herein, we provide the first review article that provides readers an overview of the sorption capacities of commercial developed carbons and other low cost sorbents for chromium remediation. After an overview of chromium contamination is provided, more than 300 papers on chromium remediation using adsorption are discussed to provide recent information about the most widely used adsorbents applied for chromium remediation. Efforts to establish the adsorption mechanisms of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) on various adsorbents are reviewed. Chromium's impact environmental quality, sources of chromium pollution and toxicological/health effects is also briefly introduced. Interpretations of the surface interactions are offered. Particular attention is paid to comparing the sorption efficiency and capacities of commercially available activated carbons to other low cost alternatives, including an extensive table.

  20. Lotus Dust Mitigation Coating and Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Kenneth M.; Abraham, Nithin S.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has developed two unique coating formulations that will keep surfaces clean and sanitary and contain contaminants.The Lotus Dust Mitigation Coating, modeled after the self-cleaning, water-repellant lotus leaf, disallows buildup of dust, dirt, water, and more on surfaces. This coating, has been successfully tested on painted, aluminum, glass, silica, and some composite surfaces, could aid in keeping medical assets clean.The Molecular Adsorber Coating is a zeolite-based, sprayable molecular adsorber coating, designed to prevent outgassing in materials in vacuums. The coating works well to adsorb volatiles and contaminates in manufacturing and processing, such as in pharmaceutical production. The addition of a biocide would also aid in controlling bacteria levels.

  1. Method of recovering adsorbed liquid compounds from molecular sieve columns

    DOEpatents

    Burkholder, Harvey R.; Fanslow, Glenn E.

    1983-01-01

    Molecularly adsorbed volatile liquid compounds are recovered from molecular sieve adsorbent columns by directionally applying microwave energy to the bed of the adsorbent to produce a mixed liquid-gas effluent. The gas portion of the effluent generates pressure within the bed to promote the discharge of the effluent from the column bottoms. Preferably the discharged liquid-gas effluent is collected in two to three separate fractions, the second or intermediate fraction having a substantially higher concentration of the desorbed compound than the first or third fractions. The desorption does not need to be assisted by passing a carrier gas through the bed or by applying reduced pressure to the outlet from the bed.

  2. Method of recovering adsorbed liquid compounds from molecular sieve columns

    DOEpatents

    Burkholder, H.R.; Fanslow, G.E.

    1983-12-20

    Molecularly adsorbed volatile liquid compounds are recovered from molecular sieve adsorbent columns by directionally applying microwave energy to the bed of the adsorbent to produce a mixed liquid-gas effluent. The gas portion of the effluent generates pressure within the bed to promote the discharge of the effluent from the column bottoms. Preferably the discharged liquid-gas effluent is collected in two to three separate fractions, the second or intermediate fraction having a substantially higher concentration of the desorbed compound than the first or third fractions. The desorption does not need to be assisted by passing a carrier gas through the bed or by applying reduced pressure to the outlet from the bed. 8 figs.

  3. NMR study of n-dodecane adsorbed on graphite.

    PubMed

    Alba, M D; Castro, M A; Clarke, S M; Perdigón, A C

    2003-05-01

    In this brief contribution we demonstrate that 1H and 2H NMR spectroscopy can be an effective method of investigating adsorption from liquids at the solid-liquid interface. The method is illustrated here with the adsorption of a simple alkane adsorbed on graphite, in particular the system n-dodecane and graphite at coverages of 1 and 5 monolayers. Static single-pulse proton nuclear magnetic resonance and static quadrupolar echo deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were recorded for both coverages. The experimental NMR results presented here show features clearly consistent with earlier calorimetric and neutron scattering work and demonstrate the formation of solid adsorbed layers that coexist with the bulk adsorbate with both isotopes. This ability to probe both deuterated and protonated materials simultaneously illustrates that this experimental approach can be readily extended to investigate the adsorption behaviour of multicomponent mixtures.

  4. Adsorption of lead ions on composite biopolymer adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Seki, Hideshi; Suzuki, Akira

    1996-04-01

    A fundamental study about the application of biopolymers to the recovery of lead from dilute solution was carried out. A membranous composite biopolymer adsorbent containing two kind of biopolymers, alginic acid (AA) and humic acid (HA), was prepared. HA, which has high solubility in water, was almost completely immobilized in the adsorbent by a combination of calcium alginate gel and activated carbon powder. A general model for complexation between divalent metal ions and acidic sites on biopolymers was applied to explain the adsorption mechanism of lead on the adsorbent (HA-M). The results showed that the complexation constants and the complexation capacities of lead-AA and lead-HA systems were scarcely influenced by immobilization.

  5. ESR spectra of VO2+ ions adsorbed on calcium phosphates.

    PubMed

    Oniki, T; Doi, Y

    1983-07-01

    The ESR spectra of oxovanadium(IV) ions, (VO2+), adsorbed on hydroxyapatite(OHAp), fluorhydroxyapatite(FHAp), Mg-containing tricalcium phosphate(Mg-TCP), .octacalcium phosphate (OCP), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), and amorphous calcium phosphate(ACP) were measured at room temperature. The ESR parameters of VO2+ adsorbed on these compounds were slightly different from one another and accordingly, the ESR technique by use of VO2+ was useful for an analysis of the calcium phosphates precipitated from supersaturated solutions. The ESR parameters of VO2+ adsorbed on ACP and Mg-TCP were found to be very similar to each other, suggesting that ACP and TCP resemble each other in the structure of their crystal surfaces.

  6. Automatic design of magazine covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahanian, Ali; Liu, Jerry; Tretter, Daniel R.; Lin, Qian; Damera-Venkata, Niranjan; O'Brien-Strain, Eamonn; Lee, Seungyon; Fan, Jian; Allebach, Jan P.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we propose a system for automatic design of magazine covers that quantifies a number of concepts from art and aesthetics. Our solution to automatic design of this type of media has been shaped by input from professional designers, magazine art directors and editorial boards, and journalists. Consequently, a number of principles in design and rules in designing magazine covers are delineated. Several techniques are derived and employed in order to quantify and implement these principles and rules in the format of a software framework. At this stage, our framework divides the task of design into three main modules: layout of magazine cover elements, choice of color for masthead and cover lines, and typography of cover lines. Feedback from professional designers on our designs suggests that our results are congruent with their intuition.

  7. Adsorbent selection for endosulfan removal from water environment.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, Y; Dikshit, A K

    1999-01-01

    In the present study, an attempt was made to select a low cost adsorbing material for the removal of endosulfan [C,C'-(1,4,5,6,7,7-hexachloro-8,9,10- trinorborn-5-en-2,3-ylene)(dimethylsulphite)] from water. Various low cost adsorbents like wood charcoal, kimberlite tailings, silica, macro fungi sojar caju were tried with activated charcoal as reference material. The above materials were selected from various sources encompassing organic, inorganic, clayey, and biological sources. For the selection of suitable adsorbent for endosulfan uptake, maximum adsorption capacity (Qmax) was chosen as the parameter. Kinetic profiles of removal were generated for all the materials to assess the equilibrium time. Equilibrium studies were carried out for all materials to assess the adsorption equilibrium model that they followed. The model that gave the best correlation coefficient by linear regression analysis, was adopted for the calculation of Qmax of the corresponding adsorbent material. Using linearised forms of equilibrium models like Langmuir, BET, and Freundlich, maximum adsorptive capacities were determined. Activated charcoal showed the best adsorptive capacity with Qmax of 2.145 mg/g followed by wood charcoal 1.773 mg/g, sojar caju 1.575 mg/g, kimberlite tailings 0.8821 mg/g, and silica 0.3231 mg/g. Albeit activated charcoal gave better performance, it was not considered as a candidate material because of its high cost. Wood charcoal was the next best adsorbent with Qmax 1.773 mg/g. Therefore, wood charcoal was chosen as the best material for endosulfan removal. The study of physical and chemical characteristics of wood charcoal revealed that it is a potential adsorbent and can even be improved further.

  8. Experimental characterization of adsorbed protein orientation, conformation, and bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Thyparambil, Aby A.; Wei, Yang; Latour, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein adsorption on material surfaces is a common phenomenon that is of critical importance in many biotechnological applications. The structure and function of adsorbed proteins are tightly interrelated and play a key role in the communication and interaction of the adsorbed proteins with the surrounding environment. Because the bioactive state of a protein on a surface is a function of the orientation, conformation, and accessibility of its bioactive site(s), the isolated determination of just one or two of these factors will typically not be sufficient to understand the structure–function relationships of the adsorbed layer. Rather a combination of methods is needed to address each of these factors in a synergistic manner to provide a complementary dataset to characterize and understand the bioactive state of adsorbed protein. Over the past several years, the authors have focused on the development of such a set of complementary methods to address this need. These methods include adsorbed-state circular dichroism spectropolarimetry to determine adsorption-induced changes in protein secondary structure, amino-acid labeling/mass spectrometry to assess adsorbed protein orientation and tertiary structure by monitoring adsorption-induced changes in residue solvent accessibility, and bioactivity assays to assess adsorption-induced changes in protein bioactivity. In this paper, the authors describe the methods that they have developed and/or adapted for each of these assays. The authors then provide an example of their application to characterize how adsorption-induced changes in protein structure influence the enzymatic activity of hen egg-white lysozyme on fused silica glass, high density polyethylene, and poly(methyl-methacrylate) as a set of model systems. PMID:25708632

  9. Extracting uranium from seawater: Promising AF series adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Christopher James; Kuo, Li-Jung; Gill, Gary; Wood, Jordana; Dai, Sheng

    2015-11-02

    Here, a new family of high surface area polyethylene fiber adsorbents (AF series) was recently developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The AF series of were synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile and itaconic acid (at different monomer/co-monomer mol ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fibers. The degree of grafting (%DOG) of AF series adsorbents was found to be 154 354%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by treating with hydroxylamine. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44M KOH at 80 C followed by screening at ORNL with simulated seawater spiked with 8 ppm uranium. Uranium adsorption capacity in simulated seawater screening ranged from 170-200 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of %DOG. A monomer/co-monomer mol ratio in the range of 7.57-10.14 seemed to be optimum for highest uranium loading capacity. Subsequently, the adsorbents were also tested with natural seawater at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using flow-through exposure uptake experiments to determine uranium loading capacity with varying KOH conditioning time at 80 C. The highest adsorption capacity of AF1 measured after 56 days of marine testing was demonstrated as 3.9 g-U/kg-adsorbent and 3.2 g-U/kg-adsorbent for 1hr and 3hrs of KOH conditioning at 80 C, respectively. Based on capacity values of several AF1 samples, it was observed that changing KOH conditioning from 3hrs to 1hr at 80 C resulted in 22-27% increase in uranium loading capacity in seawater.

  10. Extracting uranium from seawater: Promising AF series adsorbents

    DOE PAGES

    Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, Richard T.; ...

    2015-11-02

    Here, a new family of high surface area polyethylene fiber adsorbents (AF series) was recently developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The AF series of were synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylonitrile and itaconic acid (at different monomer/co-monomer mol ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fibers. The degree of grafting (%DOG) of AF series adsorbents was found to be 154 354%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by treating with hydroxylamine. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44M KOH at 80 C followed by screening at ORNL with simulated seawater spiked with 8more » ppm uranium. Uranium adsorption capacity in simulated seawater screening ranged from 170-200 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of %DOG. A monomer/co-monomer mol ratio in the range of 7.57-10.14 seemed to be optimum for highest uranium loading capacity. Subsequently, the adsorbents were also tested with natural seawater at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) using flow-through exposure uptake experiments to determine uranium loading capacity with varying KOH conditioning time at 80 C. The highest adsorption capacity of AF1 measured after 56 days of marine testing was demonstrated as 3.9 g-U/kg-adsorbent and 3.2 g-U/kg-adsorbent for 1hr and 3hrs of KOH conditioning at 80 C, respectively. Based on capacity values of several AF1 samples, it was observed that changing KOH conditioning from 3hrs to 1hr at 80 C resulted in 22-27% increase in uranium loading capacity in seawater.« less

  11. Structure and dynamics of highly adsorbed semiflexible polymer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, Jan-Michael; Cheng, Shiwang; Kumar, Rajeev; Goswami, Monojoy; Sokolov, Alexie; Sumpter, Bobby

    2015-03-01

    We present a detailed analysis of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of melts of semi-flexible polymer chains in the presence of an adsorbing substrate. For polymer chains located far from the substrate the chain conformations follow the worm-like chain model, in contrast to the reflected Gaussian conformation near the substrate. This is demonstrated in the chain center-of-mass distribution normal to the substrate and the probability of a polymer chain ends to be the closest to the substrate. Both quantities agree with Silberberg's derivation for an ideal chain in the presence of a reflecting wall. We characterized the adsorbed chains and counted the number of loops and tails. For stiff chains, a tail and an adsorbed segment dominate the chain conformation of the adsorbed layer. Also, the mean-square end-to-end distance normal to the substrate is proportional to the normal component of the mean-square end-to-end distance of the tails. The tails do not follow the worm-like chain model and exhibit a stretched conformation. This picture for the adsorbed layer is akin to the ``polydisperse pseudobrush'' envisioned by Guiselin. We probe the dynamics of the segments by calculating the layer (z-)resolved intermediate coherent collective dynamics structure factor, S(q,t,z), for q values equivalent to the bond length. The segment dynamics is slower for stiffer chains. In the adsorbed layer, dynamics is slowed down and can be described by two relaxation times. Department of Energy, Office of Science DE-AC05-00OR227.

  12. Random registry shifts in quasi-one-dimensional adsorbate systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, J.; Erwin, S. C.; Hansmann, M.; Song, Z.; Rotenberg, E.; Kevan, S. D.; Hellberg, C. S.; Horn, K.

    2003-02-01

    The apparent contradiction of one-dimensional adsorbate chains on Si(111) having a 3×2 unit cell and yet a 3×1 diffraction pattern is resolved for the example of Ba/Si(111)-(3×2). Random registry shifts between adsorbate chains are observed in tunneling microscopy, with very short interchain correlation lengths. Fourier analysis provides a natural explanation for a pseudo-(3×1) diffraction pattern. Within density-functional theory such registry shifts can occur with essentially negligible energy cost, leading to entropy-driven, virtually perfect disorder. Substrate states of high symmetry and one-dimensional character are inferred to promote this phenomenon.

  13. Ordering and phase separation of adsorbed binary mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahale, N. K.; Cole, M. W.

    1986-10-01

    The ground state energy is calculated for mixtures adsorbed on graphite and Ag surfaces. The graphite case considers noble gases adsorbed in a commensurate array, while for Ag the substrate is ignored except for its mediation of the interatomic interaction. The balance between alternative possible structures is sensitive to the assumed interaction, for which realistic potential models are employed. Comparison is made with predictions based on simple combining rules. The cases of Ar mixtures with N 2 or CO on graphite are treated, including both herringbone and pinwheel structures for the N 2. Finite temperature behavior is described qualitatively.

  14. Random registry shifts in quasi-one-dimensional adsorbate systems

    SciTech Connect

    Schafer, J.; Erwin, S.C.; Hansmann, M.; Song, Z.; Rotenberg, E.; Kevan, S.D.; Hellberg, C.S.; Horn, K.

    2003-02-18

    The apparent contradiction of one-dimensional adsorbate chains on Si(111) having a 3x2 unit cell and yet a 3x1 diffraction pattern is resolved for the example of Ba/Si(111)-(3x2). Random registry shifts between adsorbate chains are observed in tunneling microscopy, with very short interchain correlation lengths. Fourier analysis provides a natural explanation for a pseudo-(3x1) diffraction pattern. Within density-functional theory such registry shifts can occur with essentially negligible energy cost, leading to entropy-driven, virtually perfect disorder. Substrate states of high symmetry and one-dimensional character are inferred to promote this phenomenon.

  15. Mass transport of adsorbates near a discontinuous structural phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granato, E.; Ying, S. C.; Elder, K. R.; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-12-01

    We study the mass transport dynamics of an adsorbed layer near a discontinuous incommensurate striped-honeycomb phase transition via numerical simulations of a coarse-grained model focusing on the motion of domain walls rather than individual atoms. Following an initial step profile created in the incommensurate striped phase, an intermediate hexagonal incommensurate phase nucleates and grows, leading to a bifurcation into two sharp profiles propagating in opposite directions as opposed to broad profiles induced by atomic diffusive motion. Our results are in agreement with recent numerical simulations of a microscopic model as well as experimental observations for the Pb/Si(111) adsorbate system.

  16. Structure of adsorbed organometallic rhodium: model single atom catalysts.

    PubMed

    Bennett, R A; McCavish, N D; Basham, M; Dhanak, V R; Newton, M A

    2007-02-02

    We have determined the structure of a complex rhodium carbonyl chloride [Rh(CO)2Cl] molecule adsorbed on the TiO2(110) surface by the normal incidence x-ray standing wave technique. The data show that the technique is applicable to reducible oxide systems and that the dominant adsorbed species is undissociated with Rh binding atop bridging oxygen and to the Cl found close to the fivefold coordinated Ti ions in the surface. A minority geminal dicarbonyl species, where Rh-Cl bond scission has occurred, is found bridging the bridging oxygen ions forming a high-symmetry site.

  17. Structure and self-assembly of sequentially adsorbed coronene/octanethiol monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raigoza, Annette F.; Villalba, D. Andres; Kautz, Natalie A.; Kandel, S. Alex

    2010-09-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy is used to investigate the structure of sequentially adsorbed coronene/octanethiol monolayers on Au(111). In these experiments, coronene-covered gold surfaces are exposed to octanethiol vapor. The resulting mixed monolayers are covered by close-packed octanethiol domains with clusters of coronene located within octanethiol domain boundaries. For these systems, the positions of coronene on the surface are determined by the kinetics of octanethiol monolayer formation and the local structure of the gold. The initial coverage and order of the coronene-covered surface influence the final structure of the mixed coronene/alkanethiol monolayer: deposition of coronene from the vapor phase, which creates a relatively lower coverage and higher degree of order than solution-based deposition, results in smaller coronene clusters. Statistical analysis of the locations of clusters of coronene shows that depending on the deposition parameters, coronene clusters are repelled in varying degree by upward-going and downward-going steps or are attracted to the top edges of surface step defects. In contrast to clusters, isolated coronene molecules are observed in the middle of close-packed octanethiol domains, but also appear to have an affinity for the edge of downward-going steps. We compare these results to mixed monolayers composed of C 70 and octanethiol.

  18. Small Vertex Cover Makes Petri Net Coverability and Boundedness Easier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveen, M.

    The coverability and boundedness problems for Petri nets are known to be Expspace-complete. Given a Petri net, we associate a graph with it. With the vertex cover number k of this graph and the maximum arc weight W as parameters, we show that coverability and boundedness are in ParaPspace. This means that these problems can be solved in space O(ef(k,W)poly(n)) where ef(k,W) is some exponential function and poly(n) is some polynomial in the size of the input. We then extend the ParaPspace result to model checking a logic that can express some generalizations of coverability and boundedness.

  19. Integrally covered silicon solar cells.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, P. M.; Somberg, H.

    1972-01-01

    The electron-beam technique for evaporating dielectric materials onto solar cells has been examined and developed. Titanium oxide cell antireflection coatings have been obtained which compare to silicon monoxide in environmental capabilities and which provide 3 to 4% improvement over SiO for glass covered cells. Evaporation processes have been obtained which provide a 50 to 100 micromil thick transparent (0.5 to 1.0% absorption per mil), low stressed integral cover capable of surviving space type qualification testing. Irradiation with 10 to the 15th power 1-MeV electrons shows 2% darkening, and long term UV irradiation incurs approximately 1.3% cover darkening for 50 micromil thick covers.

  20. Fast and efficient protein purification using membrane adsorber systems.

    PubMed

    Suck, Kirstin; Walter, Johanna; Menzel, Frauke; Tappe, Alexander; Kasper, Cornelia; Naumann, Claudia; Zeidler, Robert; Scheper, Thomas

    2006-02-10

    The purification of proteins from complex cell culture samples is an essential step in proteomic research. Traditional chromatographic methods often require several steps resulting in time consuming and costly procedures. In contrast, protein purification via membrane adsorbers offers the advantage of fast and gentle but still effective isolation. In this work, we present a new method for purification of proteins from crude cell extracts via membrane adsorber based devices. This isolation procedure utilises the membranes favourable pore structure allowing high flow rates without causing high back pressure. Therefore, shear stress to fragile structures is avoided. In addition, mass transfer takes place through convection rather than diffusion, thus allowing very rapid separation processes. Based on this membrane adsorber technology the separation of two model proteins, human serum albumin (HSA) and immungluboline G (IgG) is shown. The isolation of human growth hormone (hGH) from chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture supernatant was performed using a cation exchange membrane. The isolation of the enzyme penicillin acylase from the crude Escherichia coli supernatant was achieved using an anion exchange spin column within one step at a considerable purity. In summary, the membrane adsorber devices have proven to be suitable tools for the purification of proteins from different complex cell culture samples.

  1. RADIOLYSIS OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN THE ADSORBED STATE

    DOEpatents

    Sutherland, J.W.; Allen, A.O.

    1961-10-01

    >A method of forming branch chained hydrocarbons by means of energetic penetrating radiation is described. A solid zeolite substrate is admixed with a cobalt ion and is irradiated with a hydrocarbon adsorbed therein. Upon irradiation with gamma rays, there is an increased yield of branched and lower molecular straight chain compounds. (AEC)

  2. Activity of alkaline phosphatase adsorbed and grafted on "polydopamine" films.

    PubMed

    Ball, Vincent

    2014-09-01

    The oxidation of dopamine in slightly basic solutions and in the presence of oxygen as an oxidant allows for the deposition of dopamine-eumelanin ("polydopamine") films on almost all kinds of materials allowing for an easy secondary functionalization. Molecules carrying nucleophilic groups like thiols and amines can be easily grafted on those films. Herein we show that alkaline phosphatase (ALP), as a model enzyme, adsorbs to "polydopamine" films and part of the adsorbed enzyme is rapidly desorbed in contact with Tris buffer. However a significant part of the enzyme remains irreversibly adsorbed and keeps some enzymatic activity for at least 2 weeks whereas ALP adsorbed on quartz slides is rapidly and quantitatively deactivated. In addition we estimated the Michaelis constant Km of the enzyme irreversibly bound to the "polydopamine" film. The Michaelis constant, and hence the affinity constant between paranitrophenol phosphate and ALP are almost identical between the enzyme bound on the film and the free enzyme in solution. Complementarily, it was found that "polydopamine" films display some phosphatase like catalytic activity.

  3. Extracting uranium from seawater: Promising AI series adsorbents

    DOE PAGES

    Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, Richard T.; ...

    2015-11-10

    A series of adsorbent (AI10 through AI17) were successfully developed at ORNL by radiation induced graft polymerization (RIGP) of acrylonitrile (AN) and vinylphosphonic acid (VPA) (at different mole/mole ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fiber, with higher degree of grafting which ranges from 110 300%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by reaction with 10 wt% hydroxylamine at 80 C for 72 hours. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44M KOH at 80 C followed by screening at ORNL with simulated seawater spiked with 8 ppm uranium. Uranium adsorption capacity in simulated seawater screening ranged frommore » 171-187 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of %DOG. The performance of the adsorbents for uranium adsorption in natural seawater was also carried out using flow-through-column at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The three hours KOH conditioning was better for higher uranium uptake than one hour. The adsorbent AI11 containing AN and VPA at the mole ration of 3.52, emerged as the potential candidate for higher uranium adsorption (3.35 g-U/Kg-ads.) after 56 days of exposure in the seawater in the flow-through-column. The rate vanadium adsorption over uranium was linearly increased throughout the 56 days exposure. The total vanadium uptake was ~5 times over uranium after 56 days.« less

  4. Extracting Uranium from Seawater: Promising AI Series Adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, R. T.; Janke, C. J.; Kuo, L. -J.; Gill, G.; Wood, J. R.; Dai, S.

    2016-04-20

    A new series of adsorbents (AI10 through AI17) were successfully developed at ORNL by radiation induced graft polymerization (RIGP) of acrylonitrile (AN) and vinylphosphonic acid (VPA) (at different mole to mole ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fiber, with high degrees of grafting (DOG) varying from 110 to 300%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by reaction with 5 wt % hydroxylamine at 80 °C for 72 h. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44 M KOH at 80 °C followed by screening at ORNL with prescreening brine spiked with 8 ppm uranium. Uranium adsorption capacities in prescreening ranged from 171 to 187 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of percent DOG. The performance of the adsorbents with respect to uranium adsorption in natural seawater was also investigated using flow-throughcolumn testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Three hours of KOH conditioning led to higher uranium uptake than 1 h of conditioning. The adsorbent AI11, containing AN and VPA at the mole ratio of 3.52, emerged as the potential candidate for the highest uranium adsorption (3.35 g-U/kg-ads.) after 56 days of exposure in seawater flow-through-columns. The rate of vanadium adsorption over uranium linearly increased throughout the 56 days of exposure. The total mass of vanadium uptake was ~5 times greater than uranium after 56 days.

  5. Enhanced encapsulation of metoprolol tartrate with carbon nanotubes as adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garala, Kevin; Patel, Jaydeep; Patel, Anjali; Dharamsi, Abhay

    2011-12-01

    A highly water-soluble antihypertensive drug, metoprolol tartrate (MT), was selected as a model drug for preparation of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)-impregnated ethyl cellulose (EC) microspheres. The present investigation was aimed to increase encapsulation efficiency of MT with excellent adsorbent properties of MWCNTs. The unique surface area, stiffness, strength and resilience of MWCNTs have drawn much anticipation as carrier for highly water-soluble drugs. Carbon nanotubes drug adsorbate (MWCNTs:MT)-loaded EC microspheres were further optimized by the central composite design of the experiment. The effects of independent variables (MWCNTs:MT and EC:adsorbate) were evaluated on responses like entrapment efficiency (EE) and t 50 (time required for 50% drug release). The optimized batch was compared with drug alone EC microspheres. The results revealed high degree of improvement in encapsulation efficiency for MWCNTs:MT-loaded EC microspheres. In vitro drug release study exhibited complete release form drug alone microspheres within 15 h, while by the same time only 50-60% drug was released for MWCNTs-impregnated EC microspheres. The optimized batch was further characterized by various instrumental analyses such as scanning electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry. The results endorse encapsulation of MWCNTs:MT adsorbate inside the matrix of EC microspheres, which might have resulted in enhanced encapsulation and sustained effect of MT. Hence, MWCNTs can be utilized as novel carriers for extended drug release and enhanced encapsulation of highly water-soluble drug, MT.

  6. EVALUATING VARIOUS ADSORBENTS AND MEMBRANES FOR REMOVING RADIUM FROM GROUNDWATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Field studies were conducted in Lemont, Ill., to evaluate specific adsorbents and reverse osmosis (RO) membranes for removing radium from groundwater. A radium-selective complexer and barium-sulfate-loaded alumina appeared to have the best potential for low-cost adsorption of ra...

  7. Interactions of organic contaminants with mineral-adsorbed surfactants.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lizhong; Chen, Baoliang; Tao, Shu; Chiou, Cary T

    2003-09-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants (phenol, p-nitrophenol, and naphthalene) to natural solids (soils and bentonite) with and without myristylpyridinium bromide (MPB) cationic surfactant was studied to provide novel insightto interactions of contaminants with the mineral-adsorbed surfactant. Contaminant sorption coefficients with mineral-adsorbed surfactants, Kss, show a strong dependence on surfactant loading in the solid. At low surfactant levels, the Kss values increased with increasing sorbed surfactant mass, reached a maximum, and then decreased with increasing surfactant loading. The Kss values for contaminants were always higher than respective partition coefficients with surfactant micelles (Kmc) and natural organic matter (Koc). At examined MPB concentrations in water the three organic contaminants showed little solubility enhancement by MPB. At low sorbed-surfactant levels, the resulting mineral-adsorbed surfactant via the cation-exchange process appears to form a thin organic film, which effectively "adsorbs" the contaminants, resulting in very high Kss values. At high surfactant levels, the sorbed surfactant on minerals appears to form a bulklike medium that behaves essentially as a partition phase (rather than an adsorptive surface), with the resulting Kss being significantly decreased and less dependent on the MPB loading. The results provide a reference to the use of surfactants for remediation of contaminated soils/sediments or groundwater in engineered surfactant-enhanced washing.

  8. Extracting uranium from seawater: Promising AI series adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Christopher James; Kuo, Li-Jung; Gill, Gary; Wood, Jordana; Dai, Sheng

    2015-11-10

    A series of adsorbent (AI10 through AI17) were successfully developed at ORNL by radiation induced graft polymerization (RIGP) of acrylonitrile (AN) and vinylphosphonic acid (VPA) (at different mole/mole ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fiber, with higher degree of grafting which ranges from 110 300%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by reaction with 10 wt% hydroxylamine at 80 C for 72 hours. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44M KOH at 80 C followed by screening at ORNL with simulated seawater spiked with 8 ppm uranium. Uranium adsorption capacity in simulated seawater screening ranged from 171-187 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of %DOG. The performance of the adsorbents for uranium adsorption in natural seawater was also carried out using flow-through-column at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The three hours KOH conditioning was better for higher uranium uptake than one hour. The adsorbent AI11 containing AN and VPA at the mole ration of 3.52, emerged as the potential candidate for higher uranium adsorption (3.35 g-U/Kg-ads.) after 56 days of exposure in the seawater in the flow-through-column. The rate vanadium adsorption over uranium was linearly increased throughout the 56 days exposure. The total vanadium uptake was ~5 times over uranium after 56 days.

  9. Interactions of organic contaminants with mineral-adsorbed surfactants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, L.; Chen, B.; Tao, S.; Chiou, C.T.

    2003-01-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants (phenol, p-nitrophenol, and naphthalene) to natural solids (soils and bentonite) with and without myristylpyridinium bromide (MPB) cationic surfactant was studied to provide novel insight to interactions of contaminants with the mineral-adsorbed surfactant. Contaminant sorption coefficients with mineral-adsorbed surfactants, Kss, show a strong dependence on surfactant loading in the solid. At low surfactant levels, the Kss values increased with increasing sorbed surfactant mass, reached a maximum, and then decreased with increasing surfactant loading. The Kss values for contaminants were always higher than respective partition coefficients with surfactant micelles (Kmc) and natural organic matter (Koc). At examined MPB concentrations in water the three organic contaminants showed little solubility enhancement by MPB. At low sorbed-surfactant levels, the resulting mineral-adsorbed surfactant via the cation-exchange process appears to form a thin organic film, which effectively "adsorbs" the contaminants, resulting in very high Kss values. At high surfactant levels, the sorbed surfactant on minerals appears to form a bulklike medium that behaves essentially as a partition phase (rather than an adsorptive surface), with the resulting Kss being significantly decreased and less dependent on the MPB loading. The results provide a reference to the use of surfactants for remediation of contaminated soils/sediments or groundwater in engineered surfactant-enhanced washing.

  10. Agricultural Waste as Sources for Mercury Adsorbents in Gas Applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased emphasis on reduction of mercury emissions from coal fired electric power plants have resulted in environmental regulations that may in the future require application of activated carbons as mercury sorbents. The sorbents could be injected into the flue gas stream where it adsorbs the mer...

  11. Agricultural By-products as Mercury Adsorbents in Gas Applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased emphasis on reduction of mercury emissions from coal fired electric power plans have resulted in environmental regulations that may in the future require application of activated carbons as mercury sorbents. The sorbents could be injected into the flue gas stream where is adsorbs the merc...

  12. Chemical speciation of adsorbed glycine on metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jeong Woo; James, Joanna N.; Sholl, David S.

    2011-07-01

    Experimental studies have reported that glycine is adsorbed on the Cu(110) and Cu(100) surfaces in its deprotonated form at room temperature, but in its zwitterionic form on Pd(111) and Pt(111). In contrast, recent density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicated that the deprotonated molecules are thermodynamically favored on Cu(110), Cu(100), and Pd(111). To explore the source of this disagreement, we have tested three possible hypotheses. Using DFT calculations, we first show that the kinetic barrier for the deprotonation reaction of glycine on Pd(111) is larger than on Cu(110) or Cu(100). We then report that the presence of excess hydrogen would have little influence on the experimentally observed results, especially for Pd(111). Lastly, we perform Monte Carlo simulations to demonstrate that the aggregates of zwitterionic species on Pt(111) are energetically preferred to those of neutral species. Our results strongly suggest that the formation of aggregates with relatively large numbers of adsorbed molecules is favored under experimentally relevant conditions and that the adsorbate-adsorbate interactions in these aggregates stabilize the zwitterionic species.

  13. Hydraulic properties of adsorbed water films in unsaturated porous media

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.

    2009-03-01

    Adsorbed water films strongly influence residual water saturations and hydraulic conductivities in porous media at low saturations. Hydraulic properties of adsorbed water films in unsaturated porous media were investigated through combining Langmuir's film model with scaling analysis, without use of any adjustable parameters. Diffuse double layer influences are predicted to be important through the strong dependence of adsorbed water film thickness (f) on matric potential ({Psi}) and ion charge (z). Film thickness, film velocity, and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity are predicted to vary with z{sup -1}, z{sup -2}, and z{sup -3}, respectively. In monodisperse granular media, the characteristic grain size ({lambda}) controls film hydraulics through {lambda}{sup -1} scaling of (1) the perimeter length per unit cross sectional area over which films occur, (2) the critical matric potential ({Psi}{sub c}) below which films control flow, and (3) the magnitude of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity when {Psi} < {Psi}{sub c}. While it is recognized that finer textured sediments have higher unsaturated hydraulic conductivities than coarser sands at intermediate {Psi}, the {lambda}{sup -1} scaling of hydraulic conductivity predicted here extends this understanding to very low saturations where all pores are drained. Extremely low unsaturated hydraulic conductivities are predicted under adsorbed film-controlled conditions (generally < 0.1 mm y{sup -1}). On flat surfaces, the film hydraulic diffusivity is shown to be constant (invariant with respect to {Psi}).

  14. Gd uptake experiments for preliminary set of functionalized adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Clinton Noack

    2015-03-16

    These data summarize adsorption experiments conducted with Gd in 0.5 M NaCl. Results represent preliminary, proof-of-concept data utilizing fine-powder silica gel as the adsorbent support. Future testing will focus on larger, application-appropriate beads.

  15. Dispersive kinetic of fluorescence decay of alloxazines adsorbed into cellulose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Alina; Sikorska, Ewa; Khmelinskii, Igor V.; Sikorski, Marek

    2005-09-01

    The fluorescence decay of alloxazines adsorbed into microcrystalline cellulose shows a complex kinetics suggesting at least three emitting species. The exponential series method and the Albery model were used to calculate the underlying distributions, providing results about the decay rate constants or lifetime distributions.

  16. Comparison of natural adsorbents for metal removal from acidic effluent.

    PubMed

    Blais, J F; Shen, S; Meunier, N; Tyagi, R D

    2003-02-01

    Adsorption tests were carried out in acidic synthetic solutions (pH 2.0) using 20 g l(-1) of various natural adsorbents and 0.25 mM of 11 different metals. In decreasing order, the most efficient adsorbents tested were: oyster shells, cedar bark, vermiculite, cocoa shells and peanut shells. In contrast, weak metal adsorption was demonstrated by: red cedar wood, peat moss, pine wood, corn cobs and perlite. Metal adsorption capacities in acidic synthetic solution followed the order: Pb2+> Cr3+> Cu2+> Fe2+> Al3+> Ni2+> Cd2+ > Mn2+ > Zn2+ > Ca2+, Mg2+. Alkaline treatment (0.75 M NaOH) increased the effectiveness of metal removal for the majority of adsorbents. In contrast, acid treatment (0.75 M H2SO4) either reduced or did not affect the adsorption capacity of the materials tested. Finally, oyster shells, red cedar wood, vermiculite, cocoa shells and peanut shells, were effective natural adsorbents for the selective recovery of lead and trivalent chromium from acidic effluent.

  17. High-capacity hydrogen storage in Al-adsorbed graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Z. M.; Peeters, F. M.

    2010-05-01

    A high-capacity hydrogen storage medium—Al-adsorbed graphene—is proposed based on density-functional theory calculations. We find that a graphene layer with Al adsorbed on both sides can store hydrogen up to 13.79wt% with average adsorption energy -0.193eV/H2 . Its hydrogen storage capacity is in excess of 6wt% , surpassing U. S. Department of Energy (DOE’s) target. Based on the binding-energy criterion and molecular-dynamics calculations, we find that hydrogen storage can be recycled at near ambient conditions. This high-capacity hydrogen storage is due to the adsorbed Al atoms that act as bridges to link the electron clouds of the H2 molecules and the graphene layer. As a consequence, a two-layer arrangement of H2 molecules is formed on each side of the Al-adsorbed graphene layer. The H2 concentration in the hydrogen storage medium can be measured by the change in the conductivity of the graphene layer.

  18. Activation volumes of enzymes adsorbed on silica particles.

    PubMed

    Schuabb, Vitor; Czeslik, Claus

    2014-12-30

    The immobilization of enzymes on carrier particles is useful in many biotechnological processes. In this way, enzymes can be separated from the reaction solution by filtering and can be reused in several cycles. On the other hand, there is a series of examples of free enzymes in solution that can be activated by the application of pressure. Thus, a potential loss of enzymatic activity upon immobilization on carrier particles might be compensated by pressure. In this study, we have determined the activation volumes of two enzymes, α-chymotrypsin (α-CT) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP), when they are adsorbed on silica particles and free in solution. The experiments have been carried out using fluorescence assays under pressures up to 2000 bar. In all cases, activation volumes were found to depend on the applied pressure, suggesting different compressions of the enzyme-substrate complex and the transition state. The volume profiles of free and adsorbed HRP are similar. For α-CT, larger activation volumes are found in the adsorbed state. However, up to about 500 bar, the enzymatic reaction of α-CT, which is adsorbed on silica particles, is characterized by a negative activation volume. This observation suggests that application of pressure might indeed be useful to enhance the activity of enzymes on carrier particles.

  19. Chiral switching by spontaneous conformational change in adsorbed organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Weigelt, Sigrid; Busse, Carsten; Petersen, Lars; Rauls, Eva; Hammer, Bjørk; Gothelf, Kurt V; Besenbacher, Flemming; Linderoth, Trolle R

    2006-02-01

    Self-assembly of adsorbed organic molecules is a promising route towards functional surface nano-architectures, and our understanding of associated dynamic processes has been significantly advanced by several scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) investigations. Intramolecular degrees of freedom are widely accepted to influence ordering of complex adsorbates, but although molecular conformation has been identified and even manipulated by STM, the detailed dynamics of spontaneous conformational change in adsorbed molecules has hitherto not been addressed. Molecular surface structures often show important stereochemical effects as, aside from truly chiral molecules, a large class of so-called prochiral molecules become chiral once confined on a surface with an associated loss of symmetry. Here, we investigate a model system in which adsorbed molecules surprisingly switch between enantiomeric forms as they undergo thermally induced conformational changes. The associated kinetic parameters are quantified from time-resolved STM data whereas mechanistic insight is obtained from theoretical modelling. The chiral switching is demonstrated to enable an efficient channel towards formation of extended homochiral surface domains. Our results imply that appropriate prochiral molecules may be induced (for example, by seeding) to assume only one enantiomeric form in surface assemblies, which is of relevance for chiral amplification and asymmetric heterogenous catalysis.

  20. Results of testing various natural gas desulfurization adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Israelson, Gordon

    2004-06-01

    This article presents the results of testing many commercially available and some experimental sulfur adsorbents. The desired result of our testing was to find an effective method to reduce the quantity of sulfur in natural gas to less than 100 ppb volume (0.1 ppm volume). An amount of 100 ppb sulfur is the maximum limit permitted for Siemens Westinghouse solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The tested adsorbents include some that rely only on physical adsorption such as activated carbon, some that rely on chemisorption such as heated zinc oxide, and some that may use both processes. The testing was performed on an engineering scale with beds larger than those used for typical laboratory tests. All tests were done at about 3.45 barg (50 psig). The natural gas used for testing was from the local pipeline in Pittsburgh and averaged 6 ppm volume total sulfur. The primary sulfur species were dimethyl sulfide (DMS), isopropyl mercaptan, tertiary butyl mercaptan, and tetrahydrothiophene. Some tests required several months to achieve a sulfur breakthrough of the bed. It was found that DMS always came through a desulfurizer bed first, independent of adsorption process. Since the breakthrough of DMS always exceeds the 100 ppb SOFC sulfur limit before other sulfurs were detected, an index was created to rate the adsorbents in units of ppm DMS × absorbent bed volume. This index is useful for calculating the expected adsorbent bed lifetime before sulfur breakthrough when the inlet natural gas DMS content is known. The adsorbents that are included in these reports were obtained from suppliers in the United States, the Netherlands, Japan, and England. Three activated carbons from different suppliers were found to have identical performance in removing DMS. One of these activated carbons was operated at four different space velocities and again showed the same performance. When using activated carbon as the basis of comparison for other adsorbents, three high-performance adsorbents

  1. Land-cover change detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, Xuexia; Giri, Chandra; Vogelmann, James

    2012-01-01

    Land cover is the biophysical material on the surface of the earth. Land-cover types include grass, shrubs, trees, barren, water, and man-made features. Land cover changes continuously.  The rate of change can be either dramatic and abrupt, such as the changes caused by logging, hurricanes and fire, or subtle and gradual, such as regeneration of forests and damage caused by insects (Verbesselt et al., 2001).  Previous studies have shown that land cover has changed dramatically during the past sevearal centuries and that these changes have severely affected our ecosystems (Foody, 2010; Lambin et al., 2001). Lambin and Strahlers (1994b) summarized five types of cause for land-cover changes: (1) long-term natural changes in climate conditions, (2) geomorphological and ecological processes, (3) human-induced alterations of vegetation cover and landscapes, (4) interannual climate variability, and (5) human-induced greenhouse effect.  Tools and techniques are needed to detect, describe, and predict these changes to facilitate sustainable management of natural resources.

  2. Nanopore reactive adsorbents for the high-efficiency removal of waste species

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Arthur Jing-Min; Zhang, Yuehua

    2005-01-04

    A nanoporous reactive adsorbent incorporates a relatively small number of relatively larger reactant, e.g., metal, enzyme, etc., particles (10) forming a discontinuous or continuous phase interspersed among and surrounded by a continuous phase of smaller adsorbent particles (12) and connected interstitial pores (14) therebetween. The reactive adsorbent can effectively remove inorganic or organic impurities in a liquid by causing the liquid to flow through the adsorbent. For example, silver ions may be adsorbed by the adsorbent particles (12) and reduced to metallic silver by reducing metal, such as ions, as the reactant particles (10). The column can be regenerated by backwashing with the liquid effluent containing, for example, acetic acid.

  3. Performance of mango seed adsorbents in the adsorption of anthraquinone and azo acid dyes in single and binary aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Dávila-Jiménez, Martín M; Elizalde-González, María P; Hernández-Montoya, Virginia

    2009-12-01

    In this study the husk of mango seed and two carbonaceous adsorbents prepared from it were used to study the adsorption behavior of eight acid dyes. The adsorbed amount in mmol m(-2) decayed asymptotically as the molecular volume and area increased. The interaction between the studied dyes and the mesoporous carbon was governed by the ionic species in solution and the acidic/basic groups on the surface. Less than 50% of the external surface of the microporous carbon became covered with the dyes molecules, though monolayer formation demonstrating specific interactions only with active sites on the surface and the adsorption magnitudes correlated with the shape parameter of the molecule within a particular dye group. The adsorption behavior in mixtures was determined by the molecular volume of the constituents; the greater the molecular volume difference, the greater the effect on the adsorbed amount. We also demonstrated that the raw husk of the mango seed can be used to remove up to 50% from model 50 mg l(-1) solutions of the studied acid dyes.

  4. Abstraction of sulfur from Pt( 1 1 1 ) surfaces with thermal H atoms toward adsorbed and gaseous H 2S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güttler, A.; Kolovos-Vellianitis, D.; Zecho, T.; Küppers, J.

    2002-09-01

    Sulphur layers on Pt(1 1 1) surfaces with coverages of 0.25 and 0.33 were prepared by H 2S adsorption at 85 K and subsequent annealing. H 2S adsorption on Pt, S/Pt and H/Pt surfaces and S adsorbate layers were characterized by Auger electron and thermal desorption spectroscopies. Admission of thermal H atoms to S covered Pt(1 1 1) at 85 K leads to formation of gaseous (80%) as well as adsorbed H 2S (20%). The yield of adsorbed H 2S decreases due to its isothermal desorption above 90 K. The interaction of H(g) with S(a) involves three reaction steps: 1. H(g)+S(a)→SH(a), 2. H(g)+SH(a)→H 2S(g,a), and 3. H(g)+SH(a)→H 2(g)+S(a) with apparent cross-sections σ1=0.3 Å 2, σ2=0.6 Å 2 and σ3=0.03 Å 2. Above 140 K the hydrogenation of SH toward H 2S(a,g) is blocked by thermal decomposition of H 2S. Impact of D on coadsorbed S, SH, and H 2S leads to desorption of H 2S.

  5. Analytical phase diagrams for colloids and non-adsorbing polymer.

    PubMed

    Fleer, Gerard J; Tuinier, Remco

    2008-11-04

    We review the free-volume theory (FVT) of Lekkerkerker et al. [Europhys. Lett. 20 (1992) 559] for the phase behavior of colloids in the presence of non-adsorbing polymer and we extend this theory in several aspects: (i) We take the solvent into account as a separate component and show that the natural thermodynamic parameter for the polymer properties is the insertion work Pi(v), where Pi is the osmotic pressure of the (external) polymer solution and v the volume of a colloid particle. (ii) Curvature effects are included along the lines of Aarts et al. [J. Phys.: Condens. Matt. 14 (2002) 7551] but we find accurate simple power laws which simplify the mathematical procedure considerably. (iii) We find analytical forms for the first, second, and third derivatives of the grand potential, needed for the calculation of the colloid chemical potential, the pressure, gas-liquid critical points and the critical endpoint (cep), where the (stable) critical line ends and then coincides with the triple point. This cep determines the boundary condition for a stable liquid. We first apply these modifications to the so-called colloid limit, where the size ratio q(R)=R/a between the radius of gyration R of the polymer and the particle radius a is small. In this limit the binodal polymer concentrations are below overlap: the depletion thickness delta is nearly equal to R, and Pi can be approximated by the ideal (van't Hoff) law Pi=Pi(0)=phi/N, where phi is the polymer volume fraction and N the number of segments per chain. The results are close to those of the original Lekkerkerker theory. However, our analysis enables very simple analytical expressions for the polymer and colloid concentrations in the critical and triple points and along the binodals as a function of q(R). Also the position of the cep is found analytically. In order to make the model applicable to higher size ratio's q(R) (including the so-called protein limit where q(R)>1) further extensions are needed. We

  6. Nano porous alkaline earth metal silicates as free fatty acid adsorbents from Crude Palm Oil (CPO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masmur, Indra; Sembiring, Seri Bima; Bangun, Nimpan; Kaban, Jamaran; Putri, Nabila Karina

    2017-01-01

    Free fatty acids(FFA) from Crude Palm Oil (CPO) have been adsorbed by alkaline earth metal silicate (M-silicate : M = Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) adsorbents in ethanol using batch method. The adsorbents were prepared from the chloride salts of alkaline metals and Na2SiO3. The resulting white solid of the alkaline earth metal silicates were then heated at 800°C for 3 hours to enlarge their porosities. All adsorbents were characterized by SEM-EDX, XRD and BET. The EDX spectrum of SEM-EDX showed the appearance of all elements in the adsorbents, and the XRD spectrum of all adsorbents showed that they have crystobalite structure. The porosity of the adsorbents calculated by BET method showed that the porosities of the adsorbents range from 2.0884 - 2.0969 nm. All the adsorbents were used to adsorb the FFA from CPO containing 4.79%, 7.3%, 10.37% and 13.34% of FFA. The ratio of adsorbent to CPO to be used in adsorption of FFA from CPO were made 1:1, 1:2 and 1:3, with adsorption time of 1 hour. We found that the maximum adsorption of FFA from CPO was given by Ca-Silicate adsorbent which was between 69.86 - 94.78%, while the lowest adsorption was shown by Mg-silicate adsorbent which was 49.32 -74.53%.

  7. MODIS Snow-Cover Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Riggs, George A.; Salomonson, Vinvent V.; DiGirolamo, Nicolo; Bayr, Klaus J.; Houser, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    On December 18, 1999, the Terra satellite was launched with a complement of five instruments including the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Many geophysical products are derived from MODIS data including global snow-cover products. These products have been available through the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) since September 13, 2000. MODIS snow-cover products represent potential improvement to the currently available operation products mainly because the MODIS products are global and 500-m resolution, and have the capability to separate most snow and clouds. Also the snow-mapping algorithms are automated which means that a consistent data set is generated for long-term climates studies that require snow-cover information. Extensive quality assurance (QA) information is stored with the product. The snow product suite starts with a 500-m resolution swath snow-cover map which is gridded to the Integerized Sinusoidal Grid to produce daily and eight-day composite tile products. The sequence then proceeds to a climate-modeling grid product at 5-km spatial resolution, with both daily and eight-day composite products. A case study from March 6, 2000, involving MODIS data and field and aircraft measurements, is presented. Near-term enhancements include daily snow albedo and fractional snow cover.

  8. GALLIUM ARSENIDE ANTIMONIDE (GaAs1-xSbx)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vul', A. Ya.

    The following sections are included: * Basic Parameters at 300 K * Band Structure and Carrier Concentration * Temperature Dependences * Dependences on Hydrostatic Pressure * Effective Masses * Donors and Acceptors * Electrical Properties * Mobility and Hall Effect * Impact Ionization * Optical Properties * Thermal Properties * Mechanical Properties, Elastic Constants, Lattice Vibrations, Other Properties * References

  9. Novel adsorbent applicability for decontamination of printing wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiurski, Jelena; Oros, Ivana; Ranogajec, Jonjaua; Kecic, Vesna

    2013-04-01

    Adsorption capacity of clayey minerals can be enhanced by replacing the natural exchangeable cations with organic cations, which makes the clay surface more hydrophobic. Different solids such as activated carbon, clay minerals, zeolites, metal oxides and organic polymers have been tested as effective adsorbents. On a global scale, clays have a large applicability for decontamination, purification of urban and industrial residual waters, protection of waste disposal areas, and purification of industrial gases and so on. Clay derivative materials with high adsorption capacities are very attractive from an economical point of view. Due to the economic constraints, a development of cost effective and clean processes is desired. Adsorption processes has proved to be the most effective, especially for effluents with moderate and low heavy metal concentrations, as like as in printing wastewaters. Among several removal technologies, the adsorption of Zn(II) ion onto NZ, B, pure C and C with PEG 600 addition could be of great importance for the printing wastewaters purification. However, the newly designed adsorbent of the defined pore size distribution and phase structure considered as the most suitable material for Zn(II) ion removal. The values of distribution coefficient (Kd) increased with decreasing of the adsorbent amount. The Kd values depend also on the type of used adsorbent, the following increased order is obtained: NZ < B = pure C < C with PEG 600 addition. The adsorption equilibrium data of Zn(II) ion on NZ, B, pure C and C with PEG 600 were analyzed in terms of the Freundlich, Langmuir and Dubinin-Kaganer-Radushkevich (DKR) isotherm models. The characteristic parameters for each isotherms and related correlation coefficients were determined. The values of correlation coefficient (R2) indicated the following order of the isotherm models: Freundlich > Langmuir > DKR. The study also showed that the fired clay modified with PEG 600 addition has great potential

  10. The National Land Cover Database

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Homer, Collin H.; Fry, Joyce A.; Barnes, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    The National Land Cover Database (NLCD) serves as the definitive Landsat-based, 30-meter resolution, land cover database for the Nation. NLCD provides spatial reference and descriptive data for characteristics of the land surface such as thematic class (for example, urban, agriculture, and forest), percent impervious surface, and percent tree canopy cover. NLCD supports a wide variety of Federal, State, local, and nongovernmental applications that seek to assess ecosystem status and health, understand the spatial patterns of biodiversity, predict effects of climate change, and develop land management policy. NLCD products are created by the Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics (MRLC) Consortium, a partnership of Federal agencies led by the U.S. Geological Survey. All NLCD data products are available for download at no charge to the public from the MRLC Web site: http://www.mrlc.gov.

  11. Removal of acutely hazardous pharmaceuticals from water using multi-template imprinted polymer adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Avinash; Chopra, Nikita; Krupadam, Reddithota J

    2014-05-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymer adsorbent has been prepared to remove a group of recalcitrant and acutely hazardous (p-type) chemicals from water and wastewaters. The polymer adsorbent exhibited twofold higher adsorption capacity than the commercially used polystyrene divinylbenzene resin (XAD) and powdered activated carbon adsorbents. Higher adsorption capacity of the polymer adsorbent was explained on the basis of high specific surface area formed during molecular imprinting process. Freundlich isotherms drawn showed that the adsorption of p-type chemicals onto polymer adsorbent was kinetically faster than the other reference adsorbents. Matrix effect on adsorption of p-type chemicals was minimal, and also polymer adsorbent was amenable to regeneration by washing with water/methanol (3:1, v/v) solution. The polymer adsorbent was unaltered in its adsorption capacity up to 10 cycles of adsorption and desorption, which will be more desirable in cost reduction of treatment compared with single-time-use activated carbon.

  12. MODIS Snow-Cover Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Dorothy K.; Riggs, George A.; Salomonson, Vincent V.; DiGirolamo, Nicole E.; Bayr, Klaus J.; Houser, Paul R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    On December 18, 1999, the Terra satellite was launched with a complement of five instruments including the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Many geophysical products are derived from MODIS data including global snow-cover products. MODIS snow and ice products have been available through the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) since September 13, 2000. MODIS snow-cover products represent potential improvement to or enhancement of the currently-available operational products mainly because the MODIS products are global and 500-m resolution, and have the capability to separate most snow and clouds. Also the snow-mapping algorithms are automated which means that a consistent data set may be generated for long-term climate studies that require snow-cover information. Extensive quality assurance (QA) information is stored with the products. The MODIS snow product suite begins with a 500-m resolution, 2330-km swath snow-cover map which is then gridded to an integerized sinusoidal grid to produce daily and 8-day composite tile products. The sequence proceeds to a climate-modeling grid (CMG) product at about 5.6-km spatial resolution, with both daily and 8-day composite products. Each pixel of the CMG contains fraction of snow cover from 40 - 100%. Measured errors of commission in the CMG are low, for example, on the continent of Australia in the spring, they vary from 0.02 - 0.10%. Near-term enhancements include daily snow albedo and fractional snow cover. A case study from March 6, 2000, involving MODIS data and field and aircraft measurements, is presented to show some early validation work.

  13. Adsorbed molecules in external fields: Effect of confining potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Ashish; Silotia, Poonam; Maan, Anjali; Prasad, Vinod

    2016-12-01

    We study the rotational excitation of a molecule adsorbed on a surface. As is well known the interaction potential between the surface and the molecule can be modeled in number of ways, depending on the molecular structure and the geometry under which the molecule is being adsorbed by the surface. We explore the effect of change of confining potential on the excitation, which is largely controlled by the static electric fields and continuous wave laser fields. We focus on dipolar molecules and hence we restrict ourselves to the first order interaction in field-molecule interaction potential either through permanent dipole moment or/and the molecular polarizability parameter. It is shown that confining potential shapes, strength of the confinement, strongly affect the excitation. We compare our results for different confining potentials.

  14. Candidate Source of Flux Noise in SQUIDs: Adsorbed Oxygen Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Shi, Chuntai; Hu, Jun; Han, Sungho; Yu, Clare C.; Wu, R. Q.

    2015-08-01

    A major obstacle to using superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) as qubits is flux noise. We propose that the heretofore mysterious spins producing flux noise could be O2 molecules adsorbed on the surface. Using density functional theory calculations, we find that an O2 molecule adsorbed on an α-alumina surface has a magnetic moment of ˜1.8 μB . The spin is oriented perpendicular to the axis of the O-O bond, the barrier to spin rotations is about 10 mK. Monte Carlo simulations of ferromagnetically coupled, anisotropic X Y spins on a square lattice find 1 /f magnetization noise, consistent with flux noise in Al SQUIDs.

  15. Palladium dimers adsorbed on graphene: A DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Dharamvir, Keya

    2015-05-01

    The 2D structure of graphene shows a great promise for enhanced catalytic activity when adsorbed with palladium. We performed a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study of the adsorption of palladium dimer (Pd2) on graphene using SIESTA package, in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The adsorption energy, geometry, and charge transfer of Pd2-graphene system are calculated. Both horizontal and vertical orientations of Pd2 on graphene are studied. Our calculations revealed that the minimum energy configuration for Pd dimer is parallel to the graphene sheet with its two atoms occupying centre of adjacent hexagonal rings of graphene sheet. Magnetic moment is induced for Pd dimer adsorbed on graphene in vertical orientation while horizontal orientation of Pd dimer on graphene do not exhibit magnetism. Insignificant energy differences among adsorption sites means that dimer mobility on the graphene sheet is high. There is imperceptible distortion of graphene sheet perpendicular to its plane. However, some lateral displacements are seen.

  16. Nanoalloy electrocatalysis: Simulating cyclic voltammetry from configurational thermodynamics with adsorbates

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin -Lin; Tan, Teck L.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2015-02-27

    We simulate the adsorption isotherms for alloyed nanoparticles (nanoalloys) with adsorbates to determine cyclic voltammetry (CV) during electrocatalysis. The effect of alloying on nanoparticle adsorption isotherms is provided by a hybrid-ensemble Monte Carlo simulation that uses the cluster expansion method extended to non-exchangeable coupled lattices for nanoalloys with adsorbates. Exemplified here for the hydrogen evolution reaction, a 2-dimensional CV is mapped for Pd–Pt nanoalloys as a function of both electrochemical potential and the global Pt composition, and shows a highly non-linear alloying effect on CV. Detailed features in CV arise from the interplay among the H-adsorption in multiple sites that is closely correlated with alloy configurations, which are in turn affected by the H-coverage. The origins of specific features in CV curves are assigned. As a result, the method provides a more complete means to design nanoalloys for electrocatalysis.

  17. Nanoalloy electrocatalysis: Simulating cyclic voltammetry from configurational thermodynamics with adsorbates

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Lin -Lin; Tan, Teck L.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2015-02-27

    We simulate the adsorption isotherms for alloyed nanoparticles (nanoalloys) with adsorbates to determine cyclic voltammetry (CV) during electrocatalysis. The effect of alloying on nanoparticle adsorption isotherms is provided by a hybrid-ensemble Monte Carlo simulation that uses the cluster expansion method extended to non-exchangeable coupled lattices for nanoalloys with adsorbates. Exemplified here for the hydrogen evolution reaction, a 2-dimensional CV is mapped for Pd–Pt nanoalloys as a function of both electrochemical potential and the global Pt composition, and shows a highly non-linear alloying effect on CV. Detailed features in CV arise from the interplay among the H-adsorption in multiple sites thatmore » is closely correlated with alloy configurations, which are in turn affected by the H-coverage. The origins of specific features in CV curves are assigned. As a result, the method provides a more complete means to design nanoalloys for electrocatalysis.« less

  18. Nanoalloy electrocatalysis: simulating cyclic voltammetry from configurational thermodynamics with adsorbates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin-Lin; Tan, Teck L; Johnson, Duane D

    2015-11-14

    We simulate the adsorption isotherms for alloyed nanoparticles (nanoalloys) with adsorbates to determine cyclic voltammetry (CV) during electrocatalysis. The effect of alloying on nanoparticle adsorption isotherms is provided by a hybrid-ensemble Monte Carlo simulation that uses the cluster expansion method extended to non-exchangeable coupled lattices for nanoalloys with adsorbates. Exemplified here for the hydrogen evolution reaction, a 2-dimensional CV is mapped for Pd-Pt nanoalloys as a function of both electrochemical potential and the global Pt composition, and shows a highly non-linear alloying effect on CV. Detailed features in CV arise from the interplay among the H-adsorption in multiple sites that is closely correlated with alloy configurations, which are in turn affected by the H-coverage. The origins of specific features in CV curves are assigned. The method provides a more complete means to design nanoalloys for electrocatalysis.

  19. Radiolysis of alanine adsorbed in a clay mineral

    SciTech Connect

    Aguilar-Ovando, Ellen Y.; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia

    2013-07-03

    Optical activity in molecules is a chemical characteristic of living beings. In this work, we examine the hypothesis of the influence of different mineral surfaces on the development of a specific chirality in organic molecules when subjected to conditions simulating the primitive Earth during the period of chemical evolution. By using X-ray diffraction techniques and HPLC/ELSD to analyze aqueous suspensions of amino acids adsorbed on minerals irradiated in different doses with a cobalt-60 gamma source, the experiments attempt to prove the hypothesis that some solid surfaces (like clays and meteorite rocks) may have a concentration capacity and protective role against external sources of ionizing radiation (specifically {gamma}-ray) for some organic compounds (like some amino acids) adsorbed on them. Preliminary results show a slight difference in the adsorption and radiolysis of the D-and L-alanine.

  20. Monte Carlo lattice models for adsorbed polymer conformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Good, B. S.

    1985-01-01

    The adhesion between a polymer film and a metal surface is of great technological interest. However, the prediction of adhesion and wear properties of polymer coated metals is quite difficult because a fundamental understanding of the polymer surface interaction does not yet exist. A computer model for the conformation of a polymer molecule adsorbed on a surface is discussed. The chain conformation is assumed to be described by a partially directed random walk on a three dimensional simple cubic lattice. An attractive surface potential is incorporated into the model through the use of a random walk step probability distribution that is anisotropic in the direction normal to the attractive surface. The effects of variations in potential characteristics are qualitatively included by varying both the degree of anisotropy of the step distribution and the range of the anisotropy. Polymer conformation is characterized by the average end to end distance, average radius of gyration, and average number of chain segments adsorbed on the surface.

  1. Allantoin as a solid phase adsorbent for removing endotoxins.

    PubMed

    Vagenende, Vincent; Ching, Tim-Jang; Chua, Rui-Jing; Gagnon, Pete

    2013-10-04

    In this study we present a simple and robust method for removing endotoxins from protein solutions by using crystals of the small-molecule compound 2,5-dioxo-4-imidazolidinyl urea (allantoin) as a solid phase adsorbent. Allantoin crystalline powder is added to a protein solution at supersaturated concentrations, endotoxins bind and undissolved allantoin crystals with bound endotoxins are removed by filtration or centrifugation. This method removes an average of 99.98% endotoxin for 20 test proteins. The average protein recovery is ∼80%. Endotoxin binding is largely independent of pH, conductivity, reducing agent and various organic solvents. This is consistent with a hydrogen-bond based binding mechanism. Allantoin does not affect protein activity and stability, and the use of allantoin as a solid phase adsorbent provides better endotoxin removal than anion exchange, polymixin affinity and biological affinity methods for endotoxin clearance.

  2. Graphene-modulated photo-absorption in adsorbed azobenzene monolayers.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Cocchi, Caterina; Nabok, Dmitrii; Gulans, Andris; Draxl, Claudia

    2017-02-22

    The impact of graphene on the photo-absorption properties of trans- and cis-azobenzene monolayers is studied in the framework of density-functional theory and many-body perturbation theory. We find that, despite the weak hybridization between the electronic bands of graphene and those of the azobenzene monolayers, graphene remarkably modulates the absorption spectra of the adsorbates. The excitation energies are affected via two counteracting mechanisms: substrate polarization reduces the band-gap of azobenzene, and enhanced dielectric screening weakens the attractive interaction between electrons and holes. The competition between these two effects gives rise to an overall blueshift of peaks stemming from intramolecular excitations, and a redshift of peaks from intermolecular ones. Even more interesting is that excitations corresponding to intermolecular electron-hole pairs, which are dark in the isolated monolayers, are activated by the graphene substrate. Our results demonstrate that the photoisomerization process of weakly adsorbed azobenzene undergoes notable changes on a carbon-based substrate.

  3. Adsorption of trichlorophenol on zeolite and adsorbent regeneration with ozone.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongjun; Mancke, Raoul Georg; Sabelfeld, Marina; Geißen, Sven-Uwe

    2014-04-30

    A FAU-type zeolite was studied as an adsorbent to remove 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (TCP), a frequently detected recalcitrant pollutant in water bodies. Both adsorption isotherm and kinetics were studied with TCP concentrations from 10 to 100mg/L. It was observed that TCP was effectively adsorbed onto the zeolite with a high adsorption capacity and a high kinetic rate. Freundlich model and pseudo-second-order kinetics were successfully applied to describe the experimental data. The influence of solution pH was also studied. Furthermore, ozone was applied to regenerate the loaded zeolite. It was found that an effective adsorption of TCP was kept for at least 8 cycles of adsorption and regeneration. The ozonation also increased the BET specific surface of zeolite by over 60% and consequently enhanced the adsorption capacity.

  4. pyIAST: Ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) Python package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Cory M.; Smit, Berend; Haranczyk, Maciej

    2016-03-01

    Ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST) is a widely-used thermodynamic framework to readily predict mixed-gas adsorption isotherms from a set of pure-component adsorption isotherms. We present an open-source, user-friendly Python package, pyIAST, to perform IAST calculations for an arbitrary number of components. pyIAST supports several common analytical models to characterize the pure-component isotherms from experimental or simulated data. Alternatively, pyIAST can use numerical quadrature to compute the spreading pressure for IAST calculations by interpolating the pure-component isotherm data. pyIAST can also perform reverse IAST calculations, where one seeks the required gas phase composition to yield a desired adsorbed phase composition.

  5. Heavy metals and adsorbents effects on activated sludge microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Ong, S A; Lim, P E; Seng, C E

    2004-01-01

    The sorption of Cu(II) and Cd(II) from synthetic solution by powdered activated carbon (PAC), biomass, rice husk (RH) and activated rice husk (ARH) were investigate under batch conditions. After activated by concentrated nitric acid for 15 hours at 60-65 degrees C, the adsorption capacity for RH was increased. The adsorbents arranged in the increasing order of adsorption capacities to the Langmuir Q degree parameter were biomass > PAC > ARH > RH. The addition of adsorbents in base mix solution had increased the specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR) activated sludge microorganisms with and without the presence of metals. The increased of SOUR were due to the ability of PAC and RH in reducing the inhibitory effect of metals on microorganisms and provide a reaction site between activated sludge microorganisms and substrates.

  6. Factors affecting cellulose hydrolysis based on inactivation of adsorbed enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhuoliang; Berson, R Eric

    2014-09-01

    The rate of enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose reaction is known to decrease significantly as the reaction proceeds. Factors such as reaction temperature, time, and surface area of substrate that affect cellulose conversion were analyzed relative to their role in a mechanistic model based on first order inactivation of adsorbed cellulases. The activation energies for the hydrolytic step and inactivation step were very close in magnitude: 16.3 kcal mol(-1) for hydrolysis and 18.0 kcal mol(-1) for inactivation, respectively. Therefore, increasing reaction temperature would cause a significant increase in the inactivation rate in addition to the catalytic reaction rate. Vmax,app was only 20% or less of the value at 72 h compared to at 2h as a result of inactivation of adsorbed cellulases, suggesting prolonged hydrolysis is not an efficient way to improve cellulose hydrolysis. Hydrolysis rate increased with corresponding increases in available substrate surface binding area.

  7. Development of glucose sensor using two-photon adsorbed photopolymerization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Min; Park, Jung-Jin; Lee, Haeng-Ja; Kim, Woo-Sik; Muramatsu, Hiroshi; Chang, Sang-Mok

    2010-01-01

    A novel glucose sensor was constructed, and its analytical potential examined. A chip-type three-electrode system for use in a flow-type electrochemical glucose sensor was fabricated using a UV lithography technique on a glass slide. An Ag/AgCl reference electrode was made by electroplating silver onto a Pt electrode and dipping in a saturated KCl solution for 30 min. In addition, a glucose-sensing electrode was fabricated using a two-photon adsorbed photopolymerization technique with a photo-reactive resin containing a glucose oxidase enzyme, ferrocene mediator, non-ionic surfactant, and carbon nanotubes. The cyclic voltammetry of the potassium ferrocyanide in the Pt sensor system showed a stable electrode condition. The response of the modified Pt sensor confirms the feasibility of using a two-photon adsorbed photopolymerization technique for the easy fabrication of functional biosensors.

  8. Enhanced Photovoltaic Properties of Potassium-Adsorbed Titania Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, C.; Jaye, C; Fischer, D; Lewis, L; Willey, R; Menon, L

    2009-01-01

    It is demonstrated that vertically-aligned titania nanotube planar arrays fabricated by electrochemical anodization using standard potassium-containing electrolytes invariably contain a significant amount of surface-adsorbed potassium ions, hitherto undetected, that affect the titania photoelectrochemical or PEC performance. Synchrotron-based near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy reveals the strong ionic nature of surface potassium-titania bonds that alters the PEC performance over that of pure titania nanotubes through reduction of the external electrical bias needed to produce hydrogen at maximum efficiency. This result implies that the external electrical energy input required per liter of solar hydrogen produced with potassium-adsorbed titania nanotubes may be reduced. Tailoring the potassium content may thus be an alternative means to fine-tune the photoelectrochemical response of TiO2 nanotube-based PEC electrodes.

  9. Adsorbed molecules in external fields: Effect of confining potential.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Ashish; Silotia, Poonam; Maan, Anjali; Prasad, Vinod

    2016-12-05

    We study the rotational excitation of a molecule adsorbed on a surface. As is well known the interaction potential between the surface and the molecule can be modeled in number of ways, depending on the molecular structure and the geometry under which the molecule is being adsorbed by the surface. We explore the effect of change of confining potential on the excitation, which is largely controlled by the static electric fields and continuous wave laser fields. We focus on dipolar molecules and hence we restrict ourselves to the first order interaction in field-molecule interaction potential either through permanent dipole moment or/and the molecular polarizability parameter. It is shown that confining potential shapes, strength of the confinement, strongly affect the excitation. We compare our results for different confining potentials.

  10. An innovative zinc oxide-coated zeolite adsorbent for removal of humic acid

    EPA Science Inventory

    Zinc oxide (ZnO)-coated zeolite adsorbents were developed by both nitric acid modification and Zn(NO3)2•6H2O functionalization of zeolite. The developed adsorbents were used for the removal of humic acid (HA) from aqueous solutions. The adsorption capacity of the adsorbents at 21...

  11. Development of the Molecular Adsorber Coating for Spacecraft and Instrument Interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin

    2011-01-01

    On-orbit Molecular Contamination occurs when materials outgas and deposit onto very sensitive interior surfaces of the spacecraft and instruments. The current solution, Molecular Adsorber Pucks, has disadvantages, which are reviewed. A new innovative solution, Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC), is currently being formulated, optimized, and tested. It is a sprayable alternative composed of Zeolite-based coating with adsorbing properties.

  12. Silver diffusion over silicon surfaces with adsorbed tin atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Dolbak, A. E. Olshanetskii, B. Z.

    2015-02-15

    Silver diffusion over the (111), (100), and (110) surfaces of silicon with preliminarily adsorbed tin atoms is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. Diffusion is observed only on the surface of Si(111)-2√3 × 2√3-Sn. The diffusion mechanism is established. It is found that the diffusion coefficient depends on the concentration of diffusing atoms. The diffusion coefficient decreases with increasing silver concentration, while the activation energy and the preexponential factor increase.

  13. Toxicity of Uranium Adsorbent Materials using the Microtox Toxicity Test

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T.; Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Bonheyo, George T.

    2015-10-01

    The Marine Sciences Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the toxicity of a diverse range of natural and synthetic materials used to extract uranium from seawater. The uranium adsorbent materials are being developed as part of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Resources Program. The goal of this effort was to identify whether deployment of a farm of these materials into the marine environment would have any toxic effects on marine organisms.

  14. Resonant vibrational excitation of adsorbed molecules by electron impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djamo, V.; Teillet-Billy, D.; Gauyacq, J. P.

    1993-11-01

    The vibrational excitation of N2 molecules adsorbed on a silver surface by low energy electron impact is studied within the newly developed coupled angular mode method. The process involves the formation of a transient negative molecular ion. The results account well for the observations of Demuth and co-workers. They also reveal that most of the vibrational excitation corresponds to electrons scattered into the metal and thus unobservable in a scattering experiment.

  15. Second virial coefficient of helium adsorbed on liquid hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Paine, C.G.; Seidel, G.M. )

    1994-08-01

    The nonlinear dependence of the surface energy of liquid hydrogen as a function of the density of helium gas in equilibrium with the liquid surface has been used to determine the second virial coefficient of the two-dimensional gas of helium atoms adsorbed on the surface. The surface energy of both liquid hydrogen and liquid deuterium has been measured in the presence of [sup 4]He and [sup 3]He. The experimental results are in rough agreement with theoretical prediction.

  16. Non-linear optical studies of adsorbates: Spectroscopy and dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xiangdong.

    1989-08-01

    In the first part of this thesis, we have established a systematic procedure to apply the surface optical second-harmonic generation (SHG) technique to study surface dynamics of adsorbates. In particular, we have developed a novel technique for studies of molecular surface diffusions. In this technique, the laser-induced desorption with two interfering laser beams is used to produce a monolayer grating of adsorbates. The monolayer grating is detected with diffractions of optical SHG. By monitoring the first-order second-harmonic diffraction, we can follow the time evolution of the grating modulation from which we are able to deduce the diffusion constant of the adsorbates on the surface. We have successfully applied this technique to investigate the surface diffusion of CO on Ni(111). The unique advantages of this novel technique will enable us to readily study anisotropy of a surface diffusion with variable grating orientation, and to investigate diffusion processes of a large dynamic range with variable grating spacings. In the second part of this work, we demonstrate that optical infrared-visible sum-frequency generation (SFG) from surfaces can be used as a viable surface vibrational spectroscopic technique. We have successfully recorded the first vibrational spectrum of a monolayer of adsorbates using optical infrared-visible SFG. The qualitative and quantitative correlation of optical SFG with infrared absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopies are examined and experimentally demonstrated. We have further investigated the possibility to use transient infrared-visible SFG to probe vibrational transients and ultrafast relaxations on surfaces. 146 refs.

  17. Infrared Analysis Of Enzymes Adsorbed Onto Model Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Story, Gloria M.; Rauch, Deborah S.; Brode, Philip F.; Marcott, Curtis A.

    1989-12-01

    The adsorption of the enzymes, subtilisin BPN' and lysozyme, onto model surfaces was examined using attenuated total reflectance (ATR) infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Using a cylindrical internal reflection (CIRcle) cell with a Germanium (Ge) internal reflection element (IRE), model hydrophilic surfaces were made by plasma cleaning the IRE and model hydrophobic surfaces were made by precoating the IRE with a thin film of polystyrene. Gas chromatography (GC)-IR data collection software was used to monitor adsorption kinetics during the first five minutes after injection of the enzyme into the CIRcle cell. It was found that for both lysozyme and BPN', most of the enzyme that was going to adsorb onto the model surface did so within ten seconds after injection. Nearly an order-of-magnitude more BPN' adsorbed on the hydrophobic Ge surface than the hydrophilic one, while lysozyme adsorbed somewhat more strongly to the hydrophilic Ge surface. Overnight, the lysozyme layer continued to increase in thickness, while BPN' maintained its initial coverage. The appearance of carboxylate bands in some of the adsorbed BPN' spectra suggests the occurrence of peptide bond hydrolysis. A Au/Pd coating on the CIRcle cell o-rings had a significant effect on the adsorption of BPN'. (This coating was applied in an attempt to eliminate interfering Teflon absorption bands.) An apparent electrochemical reaction occurred, involving BPN', Ge, Au/Pd, and the salt solution used to stabilize BPN'. The result of this reaction was enhanced adsorption of the enzyme around the coated o-rings, etching of the Ge IRE at the o-ring site, and some autolysis of the enzyme. No such reaction was observed with lysozyme.

  18. COVERING A CORE BY EXTRUSION

    DOEpatents

    Karnie, A.J.

    1963-07-16

    A method of covering a cylindrical fuel core with a cladding metal ms described. The metal is forced between dies around the core from both ends in two opposing skirts, and as these meet the ends turn outward into an annular recess in the dics. By cutting off the raised portion formed by the recess, oxide impurities are eliminated. (AEC)

  19. Cover times of random searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupeau, Marie; Bénichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphaël

    2015-10-01

    How long must one undertake a random search to visit all sites of a given domain? This time, known as the cover time, is a key observable to quantify the efficiency of exhaustive searches, which require a complete exploration of an area and not only the discovery of a single target. Examples range from immune-system cells chasing pathogens to animals harvesting resources, from robotic exploration for cleaning or demining to the task of improving search algorithms. Despite its broad relevance, the cover time has remained elusive and so far explicit results have been scarce and mostly limited to regular random walks. Here we determine the full distribution of the cover time for a broad range of random search processes, including Lévy strategies, intermittent strategies, persistent random walks and random walks on complex networks, and reveal its universal features. We show that for all these examples the mean cover time can be minimized, and that the corresponding optimal strategies also minimize the mean search time for a single target, unambiguously pointing towards their robustness.

  20. Resumes, Applications, and Cover Letters

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Olivia

    2009-01-01

    Good resumes, applications, and cover letters broadcast one's abilities. They tell employers how one's qualifications match a job's responsibilities. If these critical preliminaries are constructed well, one has a better chance of landing interviews--and, eventually, a job. This article provides some guidelines for creating resumes and cover…

  1. Saving the Kilgore Covered Bridge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Wilma

    1988-01-01

    Describes an American literature class project to save a covered bridge from collapse. Illustrates how student initiative in contacting government agencies and news media, learning the history of the bridge, and raising public awareness about the project led to a joint county agreement to preserve the historic span. (DHP)

  2. Heterogeneous Ozonolysis of Surface Adsorbed Lignin Pyrolysis Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, R. Z.

    2012-12-01

    Biomass combustion releases semi-volatile organic compounds into the troposphere, including many phenols and methoxyphenols as the result of lignin pyrolysis. Given their relatively low vapor pressures, these compounds readily adsorb on inorganic and organic aerosol substrates where they may alter aerosol properties and undergo heterogeneous chemistry. We use infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS and ATR-FTIR) to monitor the adsorption and subsequent heterogeneous ozonolysis of model lignin pyrolysis products, including catechol, eugenol, and 4-propylguaiacol. Ozonolysis reaction kinetics were compared on various inorganic substrates - such as Al2O3 and NaCl, which serve as mineral and sea salt aerosol substrates, respectively - and as a function of ozone concentration and relative humidity. Following in situ FTIR analysis, the adsorbed organics were extracted and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy to identify reaction products and quantify product branching ratios. Ozonolysis of catechol and 4-propylguaiacol readily resulted in ring cleavage forming dicarboxylic acids (e.g., muconic acid). Eugenol ozonolysis proceeded rapidly at the alkene side chain producing homovanillic acid and homovanillin in an approximate 2:1 branching ratio at 0% RH; ring cleavage was also observed. For all lignin pyrolysis products, heterogeneous ozonolysis was faster on NaCl versus Al2O3. Implications for the atmospheric chemistry of semi-volatile methoxylphenols adsorbed on aerosol substrates will be discussed.

  3. Modeling adsorbate-induced property changes of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Groß, Lynn; Bahlke, Marc Philipp; Steenbock, Torben; Klinke, Christian; Herrmann, Carmen

    2017-05-05

    Because of their potential for chemical functionalization, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising candidates for the development of devices such as nanoscale sensors or transistors with novel gating mechanisms. However, the mechanisms underlying the property changes due to functionalization of CNTs still remain subject to debate. Our goal is to reliably model one possible mechanism for such chemical gating: adsorption directly on the nanotubes. Within a Kohn-Sham density functional theory framework, such systems would ideally be described using periodic boundary conditions. Truncating the tube and saturating the edges in practice often offers a broader selection of approximate exchange-correlation functionals and analysis methods. By comparing the two approaches systematically for NH3 and NO2 adsorbates on semiconducting and metallic CNTs, we find that while structural properties are less sensitive to the details of the model, local properties of the adsorbate may be as sensitive to truncation as they are to the choice of exchange-correlation functional, and are similarly challenging to compute as adsorption energies. This suggests that these adsorbate effects are nonlocal. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Bayer Electrofilter Fines as Potential Se(VI) Adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayala, Julia; Fernández, Begoña

    2015-11-01

    Removal of Se(VI) from an aqueous solution under different conditions was investigated using Bayer electrofilter fines (BEFs), a waste from alumina production, as an adsorbent. Adsorption selenate was studied using batch adsorption experiments as a function of pH (2-12), contact time (0.08-30 h), adsorbent concentration (4-80 g/L), initial selenium concentration (5-203 mg/L), and ionic strength (0-0.1 M NaCl). The results showed that adsorption was significantly affected by pH Se(VI) having the highest affinity for BEFs at pH 3. Sorption Se(VI) reached equilibrium in 4 h. Increasing ionic strength decreased selenate sorption. The adsorption of Se(VI) onto BEFs was found to fit the Langmuir isotherm. Maximum selenium uptake values were calculated as 2.3613 mg/g and 1.5608 mg/g when using adsorbent concentrations of 20 g/L and 40 g/L, respectively.

  5. SPR-MS: from identifying adsorbed molecules to image tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Jean-François; Breault-Turcot, Julien; Forest, Simon; Chaurand, Pierre

    2015-03-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors have become valuable analytical sensors for biomolecule detection. While SPR is heralded with high sensitivity, label-free and real-time detection, nonspecific adsorption and detection of ultralow concentrations remain issues. Nonspecific adsorption can be minimized using adequate surface chemistry. For example, we have employed peptide monolayers to reduce nonspecific adsorption of crude serum or cell lysate. It is important to uncover the nature of molecules nonspecifically adsorbing to surfaces in these biofluids, to further improve understanding of the nonspecific adsorption processes. Mass spectrometry (MS) provides a complementary tool to SPR to identify biomolecule adsorbed to surface. Trypsic digestion of the proteins adsorbed to surfaces led to identification of characteristic peptides from the proteins involved in nonspecific adsorption. Nonspecific adsorption in crude cell lysate results mainly from lipids, as confirmed with SPR and MS but proteins were observed on some surfaces. In another application of SPR and MS, imaging SPR can be used in combination to imaging MS to image tissue sections. Thin sections of mouse liver were inserted in the fluidic chamber of a SPRi instrument and proteins were transferred to the SPRi chip. The SPR chip was then imaged using MALDI imaging MS to identify the biomolecules that were transferred to the SPRi chip.

  6. Structural damages in adsorbed vaccines affected by freezing.

    PubMed

    Kurzątkowski, Wiesław; Kartoğlu, Ümit; Staniszewska, Monika; Górska, Paulina; Krause, Aleksandra; Wysocki, Mirosław Jan

    2013-03-01

    This study was planned to evaluate structural damages in adsorbed vaccines affected by freezing using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray analysis of the elements. Randomly selected 42 vials of eight different types of WHO pre-qualified adsorbed freeze-sensitive vaccines from 10 manufacturers were included in the study. Vaccines were kept at 5 °C. Selected numbers of vials from each type were then exposed to -25 °C for 24 h periods. All samples were evaluated for their structure using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray analysis of the elements and precipitation time. Scanning electron microscopy of vaccines affected by freezing showed either smooth or rough surfaced conglomerates associated with phosphate content of the precipitate. These vaccines precipitated 2-15 times faster compared to non-frozen samples. Non-frozen samples showed uniform flocculent structure either dense or dispersed. X-ray analysis of precipitates in frozen samples confirmed that the precipitate is mainly aluminium clutters. Scanning electron microscopy confirmed that the lattice structure of bonds between adsorbent and the antigen is broken and aluminium forms conglomerates that grow in size and weight. The precipitation time of vaccines affected by freezing is 4.5 times faster on average compared to non-frozen samples. These facts form the basis of the "shake test".

  7. Metal carbon bond energies for adsorbed hydrocarbons from calorimetric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Heike; Campbell, Charles T.; King, David A.

    2004-11-01

    Single crystal adsorption calorimetry (SCAC) is a powerful new method for measuring adsorption and reaction energies. Particularly for hydrocarbons, where little or no information is available from either experiment or theory on well-defined surfaces, this method can provide crucially needed information. Assignment of the measured calorimetric heats to the appropriate surface reaction yields directly reaction heats and heats of formation of surface species. An important extension using these results is to derive values for metal-carbon bond energies in adsorbed hydrocarbon species. In this paper we review the definition of the bond dissociation energy for a surface species and discuss methodologies and limitations for calculating accurate values of this quantity from measured calorimetric data. As a step in establishing benchmark data for adsorbed hydrocarbons, we calculate a Pt-C σ bond strength, < D(Pt-C)>, of about 245 kJ/mol from data for ethylidyne on Pt{1 1 1}. Two independent methods, the quasiempirical valence bond (QVB) method and an average bond energy (ABE) method, were used to obtain this value, and the two values derived from these two approaches agree quite well. We also discuss the implications and applicability of this value of D(Pt-C) for other adsorbed hydrocarbons and on other Pt surfaces, and estimates of how this bond energy should differ when the C atom's ligands are different.

  8. R&D for graft adsorbents by radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seko, Noriaki; Tamada, Masao

    Fibrous adsorbent for removal and recovery of metal ions have been synthesized by graft polymerization. In the grafting, the functional groups which have high selectivity against for target metal ions such as Fe, Sc, As, and U are introduced onto nonwoven fabric. When the monomer has a chelate group which makes selective coordination bond to specific these ions, it was directly grafted on the trunk polymer. In the case of precursor monomer having functional groups such as epoxy ring, the grafted trunk fabric is chemically modified. The resultant fibrous adsorbent leads the swift adsorption of metal ions. This property by using fibrous material can reduce the column size of adsorbent in the purification of waste water. The size of purification equipment becomes quite compact and that implies total volume of equipment can reduce. Instead of organic solvent, emulsion system which disperses monomer micelles in water with assistance of surfactant was found to accelerate the graft polymerization. This means the air pollution from organic solvent can be avoided by water system grafting. Furthermore, since the emulsion grafting was highly efficient, the required irradiation dose was considerably lower compared to general organic solvent system. As a result, the emulsion grafting has enormous potential for natural polymer to use as a trunk material for grafting. If a natural polymer such as cellulose can be used, the dependence on petroleum resources, the amount of industrial waste and the generation of carbon dioxide will be reduced to some extent.

  9. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of {sup 129}Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, {sup 129}Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature.

  10. Adsorption isotherm of non-azeotropic solution onto porous adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, A.; Ramlan, N. A.; Anisuzzaman, S. M.; Chu, C. M.; Farm, Y. Y.

    2016-06-01

    Adsorption isotherm is essential component in the understanding of the adsorption process. Several methods of the measurements, analysis and interpretation of adsorption from solution have been reported in the literature. Most of the measurements of adsorption isotherm from solution were involved the measurement of excess isotherm conducted at low region of sorbates concentration. Direct interpretation of excess adsorption isotherm as adsorption isotherm is always been practice. Therefore, in this work a study on the measurement of the adsorption isotherm from solution of non-azeotropic organic solvent mixture onto porous adsorbents for whole range of liquid concentration was conducted. The study included the measurement of excess adsorption isotherm using conventional technique. Theoretical analysis and interpretation of adsorption isotherm from the excess isotherm were conducted using Pseudo Ideal Adsorption, Gibbs Dividing Plane Model and Langmuir-Fruendlich binary isotherm model. For organic solvents, acetone and propanol were chosen as the adsorbates due to the non-azeotropic properties in the mixture. Activated carbon and silicalite were chosen as adsorbents due to the different in their porosity such as macro porous and micro porous structure. The result of the study has revealed that the adsorption isotherm of non-azeotropic mixture onto activated carbon and silicalite can be interpreted as monolayer type of adsorption.

  11. Cellular Responses Modulated by FGF-2 Adsorbed on Albumin/Heparin Layer-by-Layer Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Kumorek, Marta; Kubies, Dana; Filová, Elena; Houska, Milan; Kasoju, Naresh; Mázl Chánová, Eliška; Matějka, Roman; Krýslová, Markéta; Bačáková, Lucie; Rypáček, František

    2015-01-01

    In a typical cell culture system, growth factors immobilized on the cell culture surfaces can serve as a reservoir of bio-signaling molecules, without the need to supplement them additionally into the culture medium. In this paper, we report on the fabrication of albumin/heparin (Alb/Hep) assemblies for controlled binding of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2). The surfaces were constructed by layer-by-layer adsorption of polyelectrolytes albumin and heparin and were subsequently stabilized by covalent crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. An analysis of the surface morphology by atomic force microscopy showed that two Alb/Hep bilayers are required to cover the surface of substrate. The formation of the Alb/Hep assemblies was monitored by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR), the infrared multiinternal reflection spectroscopy (FTIR MIRS) and UV/VIS spectroscopy. The adsorption of FGF-2 on the cross-linked Alb/Hep was followed by SPR. The results revealed that FGF-2 binds to the Alb/Hep assembly in a dose and time-dependent manner up to the surface concentration of 120 ng/cm2. The bioactivity of the adsorbed FGF-2 was assessed in experiments in vitro, using calf pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (CPAE). CPAE cells could attach and proliferate on Alb/Hep surfaces. The adsorbed FGF-2 was bioactive and stimulated both the proliferation and the differentiation of CPAE cells. The improvement was more pronounced at a lower FGF-2 surface concentration (30 ng/cm2) than on surfaces with a higher concentration of FGF-2 (120 ng/cm2). PMID:25945799

  12. Cellular Responses Modulated by FGF-2 Adsorbed on Albumin/Heparin Layer-by-Layer Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Kumorek, Marta; Kubies, Dana; Filová, Elena; Houska, Milan; Kasoju, Naresh; Mázl Chánová, Eliška; Matějka, Roman; Krýslová, Markéta; Bačáková, Lucie; Rypáček, František

    2015-01-01

    In a typical cell culture system, growth factors immobilized on the cell culture surfaces can serve as a reservoir of bio-signaling molecules, without the need to supplement them additionally into the culture medium. In this paper, we report on the fabrication of albumin/heparin (Alb/Hep) assemblies for controlled binding of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2). The surfaces were constructed by layer-by-layer adsorption of polyelectrolytes albumin and heparin and were subsequently stabilized by covalent crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. An analysis of the surface morphology by atomic force microscopy showed that two Alb/Hep bilayers are required to cover the surface of substrate. The formation of the Alb/Hep assemblies was monitored by the surface plasmon resonance (SPR), the infrared multiinternal reflection spectroscopy (FTIR MIRS) and UV/VIS spectroscopy. The adsorption of FGF-2 on the cross-linked Alb/Hep was followed by SPR. The results revealed that FGF-2 binds to the Alb/Hep assembly in a dose and time-dependent manner up to the surface concentration of 120 ng/cm(2). The bioactivity of the adsorbed FGF-2 was assessed in experiments in vitro, using calf pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (CPAE). CPAE cells could attach and proliferate on Alb/Hep surfaces. The adsorbed FGF-2 was bioactive and stimulated both the proliferation and the differentiation of CPAE cells. The improvement was more pronounced at a lower FGF-2 surface concentration (30 ng/cm(2)) than on surfaces with a higher concentration of FGF-2 (120 ng/cm(2)).

  13. Adsorbent-adsorbate interactions in the adsorption of Cd(II) and Hg(II) on ozonized activated carbons.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Polo, M; Rivera-Utrilla, J

    2002-09-01

    The present work investigated the effect of surface oxygenated groups on the adsorption of Cd(II) and Hg(II) by activated carbon. A study was undertaken to determine the adsorption isotherms and the influence of the pH on the adsorption of each metallic ion by a series of ozonized activated carbons. In the case of Cd(II), the adsorption capacity and the affinity of the adsorbent augmented with the increase in acid-oxygenated groups on the activated carbon surface. These results imply that electrostatic-type interactions predominate in this adsorption process. The adsorption observed at solution pH values below the pH(PZC) of the carbon indicates that other forces also participate in this process. Ionic exchange between -C pi-H3O+ interaction protons and Cd(II) ions would account for these findings. In the case of Hg(II), the adsorption diminished with an increase in the degree of oxidation of the activated carbon. The presence of electron-withdrawing groups on oxidized carbons decreases the electronic density of their surface, producing a reduction in the adsorbent-adsorbate dispersion interactions and in their reductive capacity, thus decreasing the adsorption of Hg(II) on the activated carbon. At pH values above 3, the pH had no influence on the adsorption of Hg(II) by the activated carbon, confirming that electrostatic interactions do not have a determinant influence on Hg(II) adsorption.

  14. Powder-based adsorbents having high adsorption capacities for recovering dissolved metals and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dai, Sheng; Oyola, Yatsandra

    2016-05-03

    A powder-based adsorbent and a related method of manufacture are provided. The powder-based adsorbent includes polymer powder with grafted side chains and an increased surface area per unit weight to increase the adsorption of dissolved metals, for example uranium, from aqueous solutions. A method for forming the powder-based adsorbent includes irradiating polymer powder, grafting with polymerizable reactive monomers, reacting with hydroxylamine, and conditioning with an alkaline solution. Powder-based adsorbents formed according to the present method demonstrated a significantly improved uranium adsorption capacity per unit weight over existing adsorbents.

  15. Foam-based adsorbents having high adsorption capacities for recovering dissolved metals and methods thereof

    DOEpatents

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dai, Sheng; Oyola, Yatsandra

    2015-06-02

    Foam-based adsorbents and a related method of manufacture are provided. The foam-based adsorbents include polymer foam with grafted side chains and an increased surface area per unit weight to increase the adsorption of dissolved metals, for example uranium, from aqueous solutions. A method for forming the foam-based adsorbents includes irradiating polymer foam, grafting with polymerizable reactive monomers, reacting with hydroxylamine, and conditioning with an alkaline solution. Foam-based adsorbents formed according to the present method demonstrated a significantly improved uranium adsorption capacity per unit weight over existing adsorbents.

  16. Electric Field Cancellation on Quartz by Rb Adsorbate-Induced Negative Electron Affinity.

    PubMed

    Sedlacek, J A; Kim, E; Rittenhouse, S T; Weck, P F; Sadeghpour, H R; Shaffer, J P

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the (0001) surface of single crystal quartz with a submonolayer of Rb adsorbates. Using Rydberg atom electromagnetically induced transparency, we investigate the electric fields resulting from Rb adsorbed on the quartz surface, and measure the activation energy of the Rb adsorbates. We show that the adsorbed Rb induces negative electron affinity (NEA) on the quartz surface. The NEA surface allows low energy electrons to bind to the surface and cancel the electric field from the Rb adsorbates. Our results will be important for integrating Rydberg atoms into hybrid quantum systems, as fundamental probes of atom-surface interactions, and for studies of 2D electron gases bound to surfaces.

  17. Nilpotent groups with a ℭ9-covering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarmizi, Rawdah Adawiyah; Sulaiman, Hajar

    2016-10-01

    A collection of proper subgroups of a group is called a covering if the union of the collection is equal to the whole group. A covering is irredundant if it has no proper sub-collection which also covers G. A covering of G in which all members are maximal subgroups is called maximal covering. For any integer n > 2, a covering with n members is called an n-covering. We denote the covering of G by ℭn-covering if it is an irredundant maximal n-covering with core free intersection for G, and a group G is a ℭn-group if G admits ℭn-covering. In this paper, we prove that a group G having a ℭ9-covering is nilpotent if and only if G ≅ (C2)8 or G ≅ (C3)5 or G ≅ (C5)3.

  18. ESTIMATING IMPERVIOUS COVER FROM REGIONALLY AVAILABLE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this study is to compare and evaluate the reliability of different approaches for estimating impervious cover including three empirical formulations for estimating impervious cover from population density data, estimation from categorized land cover data, and to ...

  19. 7 CFR 65.135 - Covered commodity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ..., PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.135 Covered commodity. (a) Covered commodity... nuts; (6) Pecans; and (7) Ginseng. (b) Covered commodities are excluded from this part if the...

  20. 7 CFR 65.135 - Covered commodity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.135 Covered commodity. (a) Covered commodity... nuts; (6) Pecans; and (7) Ginseng. (b) Covered commodities are excluded from this part if the...

  1. 7 CFR 65.135 - Covered commodity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.135 Covered commodity. (a) Covered commodity... nuts; (6) Pecans; and (7) Ginseng. (b) Covered commodities are excluded from this part if the...

  2. 7 CFR 65.135 - Covered commodity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ..., PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.135 Covered commodity. (a) Covered commodity... nuts; (6) Pecans; and (7) Ginseng. (b) Covered commodities are excluded from this part if the...

  3. Corrugated cover plate for flat plate collector

    DOEpatents

    Hollands, K. G. Terry; Sibbitt, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    A flat plate radiant energy collector is providing having a transparent cover. The cover has a V-corrugated shape which reduces the amount of energy reflected by the cover away from the flat plate absorber of the collector.

  4. Sky Cover from MFRSR Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Berg, Larry K.; Flynn, Connor J.; Long, Charles N.

    2011-07-01

    The diffuse all-sky surface irradiances measured at two nearby wavelengths in the visible spectral range and their model clear-sky counterparts are two main components of a new method for estimating the fractional sky cover of different cloud types, including cumulus clouds. The performance of this method is illustrated using 1-min resolution data from ground-based Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR). The MFRSR data are collected at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during the summer of 2007 and represent 13 days with cumulus clouds. Good agreement is obtained between estimated values of the fractional sky cover and those provided by a well-established independent method based on broadband observations.

  5. Slotted Antenna with Anisotropic Covering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-06

    08-2015 Publication Slotted Antenna with Anisotropic Covering David A. Tonn et al Naval Under Warfare Center Division, Newport 1176 Howell St...NUWC 300055 Distribution A An antenna includes a tubular, conductive radiator having a longitudinal slot formed therein from a first end of the...conductive radiator to a second end of the conductive radiator. An antenna feed can be joined to the conductive radiator adjacent to and across the slot

  6. Polyacrylate adsorbents for the selective adsorption of cholesterol-rich lipoproteins from plasma or blood

    PubMed Central

    Heuck, Claus-Chr.

    2011-01-01

    Polyacrylate (PAA) adsorbents selectively bind low density lipoproteins (LDL) from human plasma and blood, whereas very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) are only minimally adsorbed. The adsorption of cholesterol-rich lipoproteins to PAA adsorbents is related to the molecular weight (mw) of the polyanion ligand. Ca++ and Mg++ inhibit the binding of LDL to PAA adsorbents. The chemical composition of the organic hardgels of the adsorbents does not have an influence on adsorption. The selective adsorption of LDL to PAA adsorbents can be explained to result from their low negative surface charge density and the specific colloid-chemical properties of the surface-bound PAA, which do not prevent LDL from binding to charge-like domains of the ligand. By contrast, VLDL and high density lipoproteins (HDL) are repelled from the adsorbents due to their higher negative surface charge density. PMID:21289994

  7. Properties of competitively adsorbed BSA and fibrinogen from their mixture on mixed and hybrid surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Lalit M.; Pattanayek, Sudip K.

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the adsorption of BSA and fibrinogen from their mixture onto surfaces with mixed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of amine and octyl (ratio 1:1) and hybrid SAM. The properties of adsorbed proteins obtained from individual protein solution differ considerably from the properties of the adsorbed proteins obtained from mixture of proteins at same total concentration. The adsorbed amount of proteins is lesser and the adsorbed protein is more elastic if it is adsorbing from mixture of proteins. It is found that with increasing total protein concentration, adsorbed amount increases and elasticity of the adsorbed proteins decreases. The apparent displacements of BSA with Fb are observed on the graphs of change in frequency with time, which are obtained from quartz crystal microbalance.

  8. Polyacrylate adsorbents for the selective adsorption of cholesterol-rich lipoproteins from plasma or blood.

    PubMed

    Heuck, Claus-Chr

    2011-01-24

    Polyacrylate (PAA) adsorbents selectively bind low density lipoproteins (LDL) from human plasma and blood, whereas very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) are only minimally adsorbed. The adsorption of cholesterol-rich lipoproteins to PAA adsorbents is related to the molecular weight (mw) of the polyanion ligand. Ca(++) and Mg(++) inhibit the binding of LDL to PAA adsorbents. The chemical composition of the organic hardgels of the adsorbents does not have an influence on adsorption. The selective adsorption of LDL to PAA adsorbents can be explained to result from their low negative surface charge density and the specific colloid-chemical properties of the surface-bound PAA, which do not prevent LDL from binding to charge-like domains of the ligand. By contrast, VLDL and high density lipoproteins (HDL) are repelled from the adsorbents due to their higher negative surface charge density.

  9. Adsorption equilibrium and dynamics of gasoline vapors onto polymeric adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lijuan; Yu, Weihua; Long, Chao; Li, Aimin

    2014-03-01

    The emission of gasoline vapors is becoming a significant environmental problem especially for the population-dense area and also results in a significant economic loss. In this study, adsorption equilibrium and dynamics of gasoline vapors onto macroporous and hypercrosslinked polymeric resins at 308 K were investigated and compared with commercial activated carbon (NucharWV-A 1100). The results showed that the equilibrium and breakthrough adsorption capacities of virgin macroporous and hypercrosslinked polymeric resins were lower than virgin-activated carbon. Compared with origin adsorbents, however, the breakthrough adsorption capacities of the regenerated activated carbon for gasoline vapors decreased by 58.5 % and 61.3 % when the initial concentration of gasoline vapors were 700 and 1,400 mg/L, while those of macroporous and hypercrosslinked resins decreased by 17.4 % and 17.5 %, and 46.5 % and 45.5 %, respectively. Due to the specific bimodal property in the region of micropore (0.5-2.0 nm) and meso-macropore (30-70 nm), the regenerated hypercrosslinked polymeric resin exhibited the comparable breakthrough adsorption capacities with the regenerated activated carbon at the initial concentration of 700 mg/L, and even higher when the initial concentration of gasoline vapors was 1,400 mg/L. In addition, 90 % of relative humidity had ignorable effect on the adsorption of gasoline vapors on hypercrosslinked polymeric resin. Taken together, it is expected that hypercrosslinked polymeric adsorbent would be a promising adsorbent for the removal of gasoline vapors from gas streams.

  10. Controlling the magnetism of adsorbed metal-organic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuch, Wolfgang; Bernien, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Gaining control on the size or the direction of the magnetic moment of adsorbed metal-organic molecules constitutes an important step towards the realization of a surface-mounted molecular spin electronics. Such control can be gained by taking advantage of interactions of the molecule’s magnetic moment with the environment. The paramagnetic moments of adsorbed metal-organic molecules, for example, can be controlled by the interaction with magnetically ordered substrates. Metalloporphyrins and -phthalocyanines display a quasi-planar geometry, allowing the central metal ion to interact with substrate electronic states. This can lead to magnetic coupling with a ferromagnetic or even antiferromagnetic substrate. The molecule-substrate coupling can be mediated and controlled by insertion layers such as oxygen atoms, graphene, or nonmagnetic metal layers. Control on the magnetic properties of adsorbed metalloporphyrins or -phthalocyanines can also be gained by on-surface chemical modification of the molecules. The magnetic moment or the magnetic coupling to ferromagnetic substrates can be changed by adsorption and thermal desorption of small molecules that interact with the fourfold-coordinated metal center via the remaining axial coordination site. Spin-crossover molecules, which possess a metastable spin state that can be switched by external stimuli such as temperature or light, are another promising class of candidates for control of magnetic properties. However, the immobilization of such molecules on a solid surface often results in a quench of the spin transition due to the interaction with the substrate. We present examples of Fe(II) spin-crossover complexes in direct contact with a solid surface that undergo a reversible spin-crossover transition as a function of temperature, by illumination with visible light, or can be switched by the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope.

  11. Controlling the magnetism of adsorbed metal-organic molecules.

    PubMed

    Kuch, Wolfgang; Bernien, Matthias

    2017-01-18

    Gaining control on the size or the direction of the magnetic moment of adsorbed metal-organic molecules constitutes an important step towards the realization of a surface-mounted molecular spin electronics. Such control can be gained by taking advantage of interactions of the molecule's magnetic moment with the environment. The paramagnetic moments of adsorbed metal-organic molecules, for example, can be controlled by the interaction with magnetically ordered substrates. Metalloporphyrins and -phthalocyanines display a quasi-planar geometry, allowing the central metal ion to interact with substrate electronic states. This can lead to magnetic coupling with a ferromagnetic or even antiferromagnetic substrate. The molecule-substrate coupling can be mediated and controlled by insertion layers such as oxygen atoms, graphene, or nonmagnetic metal layers. Control on the magnetic properties of adsorbed metalloporphyrins or -phthalocyanines can also be gained by on-surface chemical modification of the molecules. The magnetic moment or the magnetic coupling to ferromagnetic substrates can be changed by adsorption and thermal desorption of small molecules that interact with the fourfold-coordinated metal center via the remaining axial coordination site. Spin-crossover molecules, which possess a metastable spin state that can be switched by external stimuli such as temperature or light, are another promising class of candidates for control of magnetic properties. However, the immobilization of such molecules on a solid surface often results in a quench of the spin transition due to the interaction with the substrate. We present examples of Fe(II) spin-crossover complexes in direct contact with a solid surface that undergo a reversible spin-crossover transition as a function of temperature, by illumination with visible light, or can be switched by the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope.

  12. Titanate-based adsorbents for radioactive ions entrapment from water.

    PubMed

    Yang, Dongjiang; Liu, Hongwei; Zheng, Zhanfeng; Sarina, Sarina; Zhu, Huaiyong

    2013-03-21

    This feature article reviews some titanate-based adsorbents for the removal of radioactive wastes (cations and anions) from water. At the beginning, we discuss the development of the conventional ion-exchangeable titanate powders for the entrapment of radioactive cations, such as crystalline silicotitanate (CST), monosodium titanate (MST), peroxotitanate (PT). Then, we specially emphasize the recent progress in the uptake of radioactive ions by one-dimensional (1D) sodium titanate nanofibers and nanotubes, which includes the synthesis and phase transformation of the 1D nanomaterials, adsorption ability (capacity, selectivity, kinetics, etc.) of radioactive cations and anions, and the structural evolution during the adsorption process.

  13. Molecular switches from benzene derivatives adsorbed on metal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Filimonov, Sergey N.; Carrasco, Javier; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    Transient precursor states are often experimentally observed for molecules adsorbing on surfaces. However, such precursor states are typically rather short-lived, quickly yielding to more stable adsorption configurations. Here we employ first-principles calculations to systematically explore the interaction mechanism for benzene derivatives on metal surfaces, enabling us to selectively tune the stability and the barrier between two metastable adsorption states. In particular, in the case of the tetrachloropyrazine molecule, two equally stable adsorption states are identified with a moderate and conceivably reversible barrier between them. We address the feasibility of experimentally detecting the predicted bistable behaviour and discuss its potential usefulness in a molecular switch. PMID:24157660

  14. Electrically heated particulate filter regeneration using hydrocarbon adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2011-02-01

    An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine is provided. The system generally includes a particulate filter (PF) that filters particulates from the exhaust wherein an upstream end of the PF receives exhaust from the engine. A grid of electrically resistive material selectively heats exhaust passing through the upstream end to initiate combustion of particulates within the PF. A hydrocarbon adsorbent coating applied to the PF releases hydrocarbons into the exhaust to increase a temperature of the combustion of the particulates within the PF.

  15. Mobilization of arsenite by dissimilatory reduction of adsorbed arsenate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zobrist, J.; Dowdle, P.R.; Davis, J.A.; Oremland, R.S.

    2000-01-01

    Sulfurospirillum barnesii is capable of anaerobic growth using ferric iron or arsenate as electron acceptors. Cell suspensions of S. barnesii were able to reduce arsenate to arsenite when the former oxyanion was dissolved in solution, or when it was adsorbed onto the surface of ferrihydrite, a common soil mineral, by a variety of mechanisms (e.g., coprecipitation, presorption). Reduction of Fe(III) in ferrihydrite to soluble Fe(II) also occurred, but dissolution of ferrihydrite was not required in order for adsorbed arsenate reduction to be achieved. This was illustrated by bacterial reduction of arsenate coprecipitated with aluminum hydroxide, a mineral that does not undergo reductive dissolution. The rate of arsenate reduction was influenced by the method in which arsenate became associated with the mineral phases and may have been strongly coupled with arsenate desorption rates. The extent of release of arsenite into solution was governed by adsorption of arsenite onto the ferrihydrite or alumina phases. The results of these experiments have interpretive significance to the mobilization of arsenic in large alluvial aquifers, such as those of the Ganges in India and Bangladesh, and in the hyporheic zones of contaminated streams.Sulfurospirillum barnesii is capable of anaerobic growth using ferric iron or arsenate as electron acceptors. Cell suspensions of S. barnesii were able to reduce arsenate to arsenite when the former oxyanion was dissolved in solution, or when it was adsorbed onto the surface of ferrihydrite a common soil mineral, by a variety of mechanisms (e.g., coprecipitation, presorption). Reduction of Fe(III) in ferrihydrite to soluble Fe(II) also occurred, but dissolution of ferrihydrite was not required in order for adsorbed arsenate reduction to be achieved. This was illustrated by bacterial reduction of arsenate coprecipitated with aluminum hydroxide, a mineral that does not undergo reductive dissolution. The rate of arsenate reduction was

  16. The effective thermal conductivity of an adsorbent - Praseodymium cerium oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Secary, J. J.; Tong, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    The results of an experimental study to determine the effective thermal conductivity of praseodymium cerium oxide are reported. Praseodymium cerium oxide is an adsorbent used in the development of adsorption compressors for spaceborne refrigeration systems. A guarded-hot-plate apparatus was built for this study. Measurements were carried out for mean temperatures ranging from 300 to 600 C under a vacuum of 10 exp -5 torr. For the temperature range studied, the effective thermal conductivity increased from 0.14 to 0.76 W/m per C with increasing temperature, while displaying a cubic temperature dependency.

  17. Contaminant removal from enclosed atmospheres by regenerable adsorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, R. L.; Mcnulty, K. J.; Freedland, G. M.; Turk, A.; Nwankwo, J.

    1974-01-01

    A system for removing contaminants from spacecraft atmospheres was studied, which utilizes catalyst-impregnated activated carbon followed by in-situ regeneration by low-temperature catalytic oxidation of the adsorbed contaminants. Platinum was deposited on activated carbon by liquid phase impregnation with chloroplatinic acid, followed by drying and high-temperature reduction. Results were obtained for the seven selected spacecraft contaminants by means of three experimental test systems. The results indicate that the contaminants could be removed by oxidation with very little loss in adsorptive capacity. The advantages of a catalyst-impregnated carbon for oxidative regeneration are found to be significant enough to warrent its use.

  18. Detection of adsorbed water and hydroxyl on the Moon.

    PubMed

    Clark, Roger N

    2009-10-23

    Data from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on Cassini during its flyby of the Moon in 1999 show a broad absorption at 3 micrometers due to adsorbed water and near 2.8 micrometers attributed to hydroxyl in the sunlit surface on the Moon. The amounts of water indicated in the spectra depend on the type of mixing and the grain sizes in the rocks and soils but could be 10 to 1000 parts per million and locally higher. Water in the polar regions may be water that has migrated to the colder environments there. Trace hydroxyl is observed in the anorthositic highlands at lower latitudes.

  19. Temperature programmed desorption of weakly bound adsorbates on Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhart, Daniel P.; Wagner, Roman J. V.; Meling, Artur; Wodtke, Alec M.; Schäfer, Tim

    2016-08-01

    We have performed temperature programmed desorption (TPD) experiments to analyze the desorption kinetics of Ar, Kr, Xe, C2H2, SF6, N2, NO and CO on Au(111). We report desorption activation energies (Edes), which are an excellent proxy for the binding energies. The derived binding energies scale with the polarizability of the molecules, consistent with the conclusion that the surface-adsorbate bonds arise due to dispersion forces. The reported results serve as a benchmark for theories of dispersion force interactions of molecules at metal surfaces.

  20. Detection of adsorbed water and hydroxyl on the moon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.

    2009-01-01

    Data from the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIAAS) on Cassini during its flyby of the AAoon in 1999 show a broad absorption at 3 micrometers due to adsorbed water and near 2.8 micrometers attributed to hydroxyl in the sunlit surface on the AAoon. The amounts of water indicated in the spectra depend on the type of mixing and the grain sizes in the rocks and soils but could be 10 to 1000 parts per million and locally higher. Water in the polar regions may be water that has migrated to the colder environments there. Trace hydroxyl is observed in the anorthositic highlands at lower latitudes.

  1. 3,5-Dichlorophenol Removal From Wastewater Using Alternative Adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobetičová, Hana; Lipovský, Marek; Wachter, Igor; Soldán, Maroš

    2015-06-01

    The main objective of this paper is to evaluate the efficiency of 3,5-dichlorophenol removal from wastewater by using alternative low cost adsorbents. Waste from the production and processing of metals (black nickel mud, red mud) and a biosorbent (Lemna minor) were used for this research. Initial concentration of the contaminant was 4 mmol L-1, the contact time of sorbent and waste water was 0 - 48 hrs and the temperature during experiment was 25 ± 0.2 °C. The results show that the highest removal efficiency of 3,5 - dichlorophenol (58.18 %) was reached by the red mud in 48 hours.

  2. Do methanethiol adsorbates on the Au(111) surface dissociate?

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian-Ge; Hagelberg, Frank

    2006-07-28

    The interaction of methanethiol molecules CH3SH with the Au(111) surface is investigated, and it is found for the first time that the S-H bond remains intact when the methanethiol molecules are adsorbed on the regular Au(111) surface. However, it breaks if defects are present in the Au(111) surface. At low coverage, the fcc region is favored for S atom adsorption, but at saturated coverage the adsorption energies at various sites are almost isoenergetic. The presented calculations show that a methanethiol layer on the regular Au(111) surface does not dimerize.

  3. Do Methanethiol Adsorbates on the Au(111) Surface Dissociate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian-Ge; Hagelberg, Frank

    2006-07-01

    The interaction of methanethiol molecules CH3SH with the Au(111) surface is investigated, and it is found for the first time that the S-H bond remains intact when the methanethiol molecules are adsorbed on the regular Au(111) surface. However, it breaks if defects are present in the Au(111) surface. At low coverage, the fcc region is favored for S atom adsorption, but at saturated coverage the adsorption energies at various sites are almost isoenergetic. The presented calculations show that a methanethiol layer on the regular Au(111) surface does not dimerize.

  4. Sustainable catalyst supports for carbon dioxide gas adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazlee, M. N.

    2016-07-01

    The adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) become the prime attention nowadays due to the fact that increasing CO2 emissions has been identified as a contributor to global climate change. Major sources of CO2 emissions are thermoelectric power plants and industrial plants which account for approximately 45% of global CO2 emissions. Therefore, it is an urgent need to develop an efficient CO2 reduction technology such as carbon capture and storage (CCS) that can reduce CO2 emissions particularly from the energy sector. A lot of sustainable catalyst supports have been developed particularly for CO2 gas adsorbent applications.

  5. Behavior of adsorbed Poly-A onto sodium montmorillonite

    SciTech Connect

    Palomino-Aquino, Nayeli; Negrón-Mendoza, Alicia

    2015-07-23

    The adsorption of Poly-A (a polynucleotide consisting of adenine, ribose and a phosphate group), onto a clay mineral, was studied to investigate the extent of adsorption, the site of binding, and the capacity of the clay to protect Poly-A, while it is adsorbed onto the clay, from external sources of energy. The results showed that Poly-A presented a high percentage of adsorption at the edges of the clay and that the survival of the polynucleotide was superior to irradiating the polymer in the absence of the clay.

  6. 46 CFR 171.117 - Dead covers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dead covers. 171.117 Section 171.117 Shipping COAST... Dead covers. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, each port light with the sill located below the margin line must have a hinged, inside dead cover. (b) The dead cover on a port...

  7. Tunable surface charge of ZnS:Cu nano-adsorbent induced the selective preconcentration of cationic dyes from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongjing; Chen, Dagui; Wang, Yandi; Huang, Feng; Hu, Qichang; Lin, Zhang

    2012-06-21

    A novel environmentally friendly nano-adsorbent is developed by doping Cu(+) cations into the lattice of ZnS microspheres. The adsorbent shows selective adsorbability for cationic dyes in low concentrations in wastewater. The adsorbed dye could be successfully eluted with alcohol, resulting in a 1000 fold enrichment of the dye solution.

  8. Mercury(II) removal with modified magnetic chitosan adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Kyzas, George Z; Deliyanni, Eleni A

    2013-05-24

    Two modified chitosan derivatives were prepared in order to compare their adsorption properties for Hg(II) removal from aqueous solutions. The one chitosan adsorbent (CS) is only cross-linked with glutaraldehyde, while the other (CSm), which is magnetic, is cross-linked with glutaraldehyde and functionalized with magnetic nanoparticles (Fe₃O₄). Many possible interactions between materials and Hg(II) were observed after adsorption and explained via characterization with various techniques (SEM/EDAX, FTIR, XRD, DTG, DTA, VSM, swelling tests). The adsorption evaluation was done studying various parameters as the effect of pH (optimum value 5 for adsorption and 2 for desorption), contact time (fitting to pseudo-first, -second order and Elovich equations), temperature (isotherms at 25, 45, 65 °C), in line with a brief thermodynamic analysis (ΔG⁰ < 0, ΔH⁰ > 0, ΔS⁰ > 0). The maximum adsorption capacity (fitting with Langmuir and Freundlich model) of CS and CSm at 25 °C was 145 and 152 mg/g, respectively. The reuse ability of the adsorbents prepared was confirmed with sequential cycles of adsorption-desorption.

  9. Adsorbate electric fields on a cryogenic atom chip.

    PubMed

    Chan, K S; Siercke, M; Hufnagel, C; Dumke, R

    2014-01-17

    We investigate the behavior of electric fields originating from adsorbates deposited on a cryogenic atom chip as it is cooled from room temperature to cryogenic temperature. Using Rydberg electromagnetically induced transparency, we measure the field strength versus distance from a 1 mm square of yttrium barium copper oxide (YBCO) patterned onto a yttria stabilized zirconia chip substrate. We find a localized and stable dipole field at room temperature and attribute it to a saturated layer of chemically adsorbed rubidium atoms on the YBCO. As the chip is cooled towards 83 K we observe a change in sign of the electric field as well as a transition from a localized to a delocalized dipole density. We relate these changes to the onset of physisorption on the chip surface when the van der Waals attraction overcomes the thermal desorption mechanisms. Our findings suggest that through careful selection of substrate materials, it may be possible to reduce the electric fields caused by atomic adsorption on chips, opening up experiments to controlled Rydberg-surface coupling schemes.

  10. Sustainable conversion of agro-wastes into useful adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, Olugbenga Solomon; Owojuyigbe, Emmanuel Seun; Babatunde, Monsurat Abiodun; Folaranmi, Folasayo Eunice

    2016-11-01

    Preparation and characterization of raw and activated carbon derived from three different selected agricultural wastes: kola nut pod raw and activated (KNPR and KNPA), bean husk raw and activated (BHR and BHA) and coconut husk raw and activated (CHR and CHA) were investigated, respectively. Influences of carbonization and acid activation on the activated carbon were investigated using SEM, FTIR, EDX, pHpzc and Boehm titration techniques, respectively. Carbonization was done at 350 °C for 2 h followed by activation with 0.3 M H3PO4 (ortho-phosphoric acid). Results obtained from SEM, FTIR, and EDX revealed that, carbonization followed by acid activation had a significant influence on morphology and elemental composition of the samples. SEM showed well-developed pores on the surface of the precursors after acid treatment, FTIR spectra revealed reduction, broadening, disappearance or appearance of new peaks after acid activation. EDX results showed highest percentage of carbon by atom respectively in the order BHA > KNPA > CHA respectively. The pHpzc was found to be 5.32, 4.57 and 3.69 for KNPA, BHA and CHA, respectively. Boehm titration result compliments that of pHpzc, indicating that the surfaces of the prepared adsorbents are predominantly acidic. This study promotes a sustainable innovative use of agro-wastes in the production of cheap and readily available activated carbons, thereby ensuring more affordable water and effluent treatment adsorbents.

  11. Waste metal hydroxide sludge as adsorbent for a reactive dye.

    PubMed

    Santos, Sílvia C R; Vílar, Vítor J P; Boaventura, Rui A R

    2008-05-30

    An industrial waste sludge mainly composed by metal hydroxides was used as a low-cost adsorbent for removing a reactive textile dye (Remazol Brilliant Blue) in solution. Characterization of this waste material included chemical composition, pH(ZPC) determination, particle size distribution, physical textural properties and metals mobility under different pH conditions. Dye adsorption equilibrium isotherms were determined at 25 and 35 degrees C and pH of 4, 7 and 10 revealing reasonably fits to Langmuir and Freundlich models. At 25 degrees C and pH 7, Langmuir fit indicates a maximum adsorption capacity of 91.0mg/g. An adsorptive ion-exchange mechanism was identified from desorption studies. Batch kinetic experiments were also conducted at different initial dye concentration, temperature, adsorbent dosage and pH. A pseudo-second-order model showed good agreement with experimental data. LDF approximation model was used to estimate homogeneous solid diffusion coefficients and the effective pore diffusivities. Additionally, a simulated real effluent containing the selected dye, salts and dyeing auxiliary chemicals, was also used in equilibrium and kinetic experiments and the adsorption performance was compared with aqueous dye solutions.

  12. Fibrous adsorbent for removal of aqueous aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Jung, Yong-Jun; Kiso, Yoshiaki; Oguchi, Tatsuo; Yamada, Toshiro; Takagi, Hiroo; Nishimura, Kazuyuki

    2007-01-01

    Bundles of a strongly hydrophobic fibrous material (p-phenylene-2,6-benzobisoxazole; PBO; Zylon) were employed as an adsorbent for the removal of aqueous aromatic compounds, because the PBO fibers are too rigid to be woven and did not entrap suspended solids. The removal performance for nine kinds of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) was evaluated. PAHs and DEHP at initial concentrations of 50 microg L(-1) were removed at 72.5-99.9% and ca. 95%, respectively, although the removal efficiencies were affected by the phase ratio (fiber weight/solution volume). The logarithm of the partition coefficient (log K) for planar PAHs was linearly correlated with the logarithm of the n-octanol/water partition coefficient (log P), but nonplanar PAHs, such as cis-stilbene, p-terphenyl, and o-terphenyl, showed significantly lower adsorption performance. The adsorbed PAHs were not desorbed effectively with CH3CN, CH2Cl2, and toluene. On the other hand, DEHP was effectively desorbed with methanol.

  13. Solvent cleanup using base-treated silica gel solid adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Tallent, O.K.; Mailen, J.C.; Pannell, K.D.

    1984-06-01

    A solvent cleanup method using silica gel columns treated with either sodium hydroxide (NaOH) or lithium hydroxide (LiOH) has been investigated. Its effectiveness compares favorably with that of traditional wash methods. After treatment with NaOH solution, the gels adsorb HNO/sub 3/, dibutyl phosphate (DBP), UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/, Pu/sup 4 +/, various metal-ion fission products, and other species from the solvent. Adsorption mechanisms include neutralization, hydrolysis, polymerization, and precipitation, depending on the species adsorbed. Sodium dibutyl phosphate, which partially distributes to the solvent from the gels, can be stripped with water; the stripping coefficient ranges from 280 to 540. Adsorption rates are diffusion controlled such that temperature effects are relatively small. Recycle of the gels is achieved either by an aqueous elution and recycle sequence or by a thermal treatment method, which may be preferable. Potential advantages of this solvent cleanup method are that (1) some operational problems are avoided and (2) the amount of NaNO/sub 3/ waste generated per metric ton of nuclear fuel reprocessed would be reduced significantly. 19 references, 6 figures, 12 tables.

  14. Solubility of adsorbed sulfate in coastal plain soils

    SciTech Connect

    Camberato, J.J.; Kamprath, E.J.

    1986-10-01

    Ultisols of the Atlantic Coastal Plain have sandy surface horizons low in Ca(H/sub 2/PO/sub 4/)/sub 2/-extractable SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ and clayey subsoil horizons high in extractable SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/. The capacity of the subsoils to supply adequate S is dependent upon the solubility of the extractable SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/. To assess the solubility of adsorbed SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/ in Coastal Plain soils, the authors collected samples from the Ap and B horizons of 12 sites and determined Ca(H/sub 2/PO/sub 4/)/sub 2/-extractable and water-soluble SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/. The Ap horizon contained 2 to 7 mg kg/sup -1/ of Ca(H/sub 2/PO/sub 4/)/sub 2/-extractable SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/-S, which ranged from 33 to 100% water soluble, with an average of 79%. The B horizon Ca(H/sub 2/PO/sub 4/)/sub 2/-extractable SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/-S levels ranged from 26 to 142 mg kg/sup -1/ soil. The solubility of the adsorbed SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/-S in the B horizons ranged from 0.203 to 0.359 mM L/sup -1/ SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/-S, which is adequate to supply plant requirements for S if plant roots can gain access to the B horizon.

  15. Graphene protected surface state on Ir(111) with adsorbed lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazic, Predrag; Pervan, Petar; Petrovic, Marin; Srut-Rakic, Iva; Pletikosic, Ivo; Kralj, Marko; Milun, Milorad; Valla, Tonica

    It is well known that electronic surface states (SS) get strongly perturbed upon the chemical adsorption of very small amount of adsorbates. Adsorption of lithium atoms on Ir(111) is no exception to that rule. Iridium SS gets strongly perturbed and is practically eradicated - it can not be seen as a sharp peak in the ARPES measurement. However, if the system is prepared with graphene on top of Ir/Li system, the iridium SS reappears. We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of the described system. Using the density functional theory calculations for large unit cells with disordered lithium atoms geometries on the (111) surface of iridium we were able to reproduce the results of the ARPES measurements - showing clearly that the SS signal is strongly suppressed when lithium is adsorbed, while it is almost unchanged when lithium is intercalated (i.e. with graphene on top of it). Looking at the projected density of states we constructed a rather simple model explaining this behavior which seems to be general.

  16. Mechanisms of Sulfur Poisoning of NOx Adsorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Do Heui; Chin, Ya-Huei; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF; Stork, Kevin; Broering, L. C.; Stafford, R. J.; Stang, J. H.; Chen, H.-Y.; Cooper, B.; Hess, H.; Lafyatis, D.

    2004-10-01

    This annual report will review progress of the initial 4 months of a three-year effort between Cummins Engine Company and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to understand and improve the performance and sulfur tolerance of the materials used in the NOx adsorber after-treatment technology in order to meet both performance and reliability standards required for diesel engines. The goal of this project is to enable NOx after-treatment technologies that will meet both EPA 2007 emission standards and customer cost, reliability and durability requirements. The project will consist of three phases. First, the efforts will focus on understanding the current limitation of capture, regeneration and durability of existing NOx adsorber materials, especially with respect to their sulfur tolerance. With this developing understanding, efforts will also be focused on the optimization of the NOx absorber chemical and material properties to increase performance and durability over many regeneration cycles. We anticipate that improved materials will be tested and evaluated, in partnership with Cummins, on diesel vehicle engines over expected operating conditions.

  17. Cellulose: A review as natural, modified and activated carbon adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Suhas; Gupta, V K; Carrott, P J M; Singh, Randhir; Chaudhary, Monika; Kushwaha, Sarita

    2016-09-01

    Cellulose is a biodegradable, renewable, non-meltable polymer which is insoluble in most solvents due to hydrogen bonding and crystallinity. Natural cellulose shows lower adsorption capacity as compared to modified cellulose and its capacity can be enhanced by modification usually by chemicals. This review focuses on the utilization of cellulose as an adsorbent in natural/modified form or as a precursor for activated carbon (AC) for adsorbing substances from water. The literature revealed that cellulose can be a promising precursor for production of activated carbon with appreciable surface area (∼1300m(2)g(-1)) and total pore volume (∼0.6cm(3)g(-1)) and the surface area and pore volume varies with the cellulose content. Finally, the purpose of review is to report a few controversies and unresolved questions concerning the preparation/properties of ACs from cellulose and to make aware to readers that there is still considerable scope for future development, characterization and utilization of ACs from cellulose.

  18. Dopants adsorbed as single atoms prevent degradation of catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sanwu; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Rashkeev, Sergey N.; Glazoff, Michael V.; Sohlberg, Karl; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2004-03-01

    The design of catalysts with desired chemical and thermal properties is viewed as a grand challenge for scientists and engineers. For operation at high temperatures, stability against structural transformations is a key requirement. Although doping has been found to impede degradation, the lack of atomistic understanding of the pertinent mechanism has hindered optimization. For example, porous γ-Al2O3, a widely used catalyst and catalytic support, transforms to non-porous α-Al2O3 at ~1,100 °C (refs 7-10). Doping with La raises the transformation temperature to ~1,250 °C, but it has not been possible to establish if La atoms enter the bulk, adsorb on surfaces as single atoms or clusters, or form surface compounds. Here, we use direct imaging by aberration-corrected Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with extended X-ray absorption fine structure and first-principles calculations to demonstrate that, contrary to expectations, stabilization is achieved by isolated La atoms adsorbed on the surface. Strong binding and mutual repulsion of La atoms effectively pin the surface and inhibit both sintering and the transformation to α-Al2O3. The results provide the first guidelines for the choice of dopants to prevent thermal degradation of catalysts and other porous materials.

  19. Fly ash adsorbents for multi-cation wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visa, Maria; Isac, Luminita; Duta, Anca

    2012-06-01

    Class "F" fly ash (FA), collected from the Central Heat and Power (CHP) Plant Brasov (Romania), with oxides composition SiO2/Al2O3 over 2.4 proved good adsorbent properties, and was further used for obtaining a new substrate with good adsorption capacity for heavy metals from multi-cation wastewater treatment. Firstly, the new adsorbent was characterized by AFM, XRD, DSC, FTIR and the surface energy was evaluated by contact angle measurements. The experimental data suggested that the new type of substrate is predominant crystalline with highly polar surface. The substrate was used for removing the Pb2+, Cd2+ and Zn2+ cations from mixed solutions. The results show high efficiency and selective adsorption the Pb2+ and Zn2+ cations. The optimized adsorption parameters were further used in thermodynamic and kinetic studies of the adsorption processes. The Langmuir and Freundlich models were used to describe the processes. The pseudo-second order kinetics could well model all the processes, indicating a surface concentration of the adsorption sites with the same order of magnitude as the cation concentrations.

  20. Chemical and structural characterization of copper adsorbed on mosses (Bryophyta).

    PubMed

    González, Aridane G; Jimenez-Villacorta, Felix; Beike, Anna K; Reski, Ralf; Adamo, Paola; Pokrovsky, Oleg S

    2016-05-05

    The adsorption of copper on passive biomonitors (devitalized mosses Hypnum sp., Sphagnum denticulatum, Pseudoscleropodium purum and Brachythecium rutabulum) was studied under different experimental conditions such as a function of pH and Cu concentration in solution. Cu assimilation by living Physcomitrella patents was also investigated. Molecular structure of surface adsorbed and incorporated Cu was studied by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS). Devitalized mosses exhibited the universal adsorption pattern of Cu as a function of pH, with a total binding sites number 0.05-0.06 mmolg(dry)(-1) and a maximal adsorption capacity of 0.93-1.25 mmolg(dry)(-1) for these devitalized species. The Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) fit of the first neighbor demonstrated that for all studied mosses there are ∼4.5 O/N atoms around Cu at ∼1.95 Å likely in a pseudo-square geometry. The X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) analysis demonstrated that Cu(II)-cellulose (representing carboxylate groups) and Cu(II)-phosphate are the main moss surface binding moieties, and the percentage of these sites varies as a function of solution pH. P. patens exposed during one month to Cu(2+) yielded ∼20% of Cu(I) in the form of Cu-S(CN) complexes, suggesting metabolically-controlled reduction of adsorbed and assimilated Cu(2+).

  1. Interaction of Pd electron states with adsorbed hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solov'ev, S. M.; Pettenkofer, C.; Pronin, I. I.; Potekhina, N. D.; Petrov, V. N.

    2013-02-01

    Investigations of electrons excited into image states (IS) of Pd clusters and their interaction with adsorbed hydrogen using photoelectron (PE) spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation is presented. Pd clusters were deposited on pyrolytic graphite surfaces which were used as inert substrates. PE spectra measured for Pd clusters at low photon energies show additional peaks at energies of ~ 4.7 and 5.25 eV that corresponds to Pd image states at energies EIS - Evac ≈ - 0.75 ± 0.1 eV and EIS - Evac ≈ - 0.2 ± 0.1 eV. After hydrogen adsorption on graphite with Pd clusters the H-induced features: positive peaks at energy - 2 eV, - 3.5 eV, - 7 eV and a small negative peak at - 4.6 eV, were observed in the valence band spectra of Pd below EF. While the peaks at - 3.5 eV and - 2 eV are the result of the formation of H-induced states in the SBZ the - 7 eV peak is due to strong interaction of Pd clusters with hydrogen producing a H―Pd bonding adsorbate state. It is proposed that a charge transfer from IS2 to Pd-H bond dominates over the H- anion neutralization via transfer of excess charge from H- to IS1.

  2. Vibrational spectroscopic studies of adsorbates on bimetallic surfaces. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, W.K.

    1992-12-01

    In this work, well-defined bimetallic surfaces have been studied using carbon monoxide adsorption in conjunction with infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS). These studies have indicated that for CO adsorbed on Cu overlayers, the bond between the CO and the Cu adatoms is comprised of both pi-back-donation and polarization interaction components. The sum of the contributions from these effects determines the observed bond strength with the observed CO stretching frequency being determined by the relative contributions of the components. In addition, it was determined that IR spectra of adsorbed CO show a remarkable sensitivity to surface structure. Three-dimensional Cu clusters, well-ordered two dimensional Cu islands and isolated Cu atoms are distinctively characterized by their CO IR peaks. In addition, both disorder-order and order-order transitions are observed for the metal overlayers on the single crystal metal substrates. It was also observed that localized segregation and ordering of mixed Co and S overlayers on a Mo(110) substrate occurs upon annealing.

  3. Structure of CO2 adsorbed on the KCl(100) surface.

    PubMed

    Traeger, Franziska; Hadnadjev, Milica; Vogt, Jochen; Weiss, Helmut

    2011-06-30

    The structure and dynamics of the adsorbate CO(2)/KCl(100) from a diluted phase to a saturated monolayer have been investigated with He atom scattering (HAS), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), and polarization dependent infrared spectroscopy (PIRS). Two adsorbate phases with different CO(2) coverage have been found. The low-coverage phase is disordered at temperatures near 80 K and becomes at least partially ordered at lower temperatures, characterized by a (2√2×√2)R45° diffraction pattern. The saturated 2D phase has a high long-range order and exhibits (6√2×√2)R45° symmetry. Its isosteric heat of adsorption is 26 ± 4 kJ mol(-1). According to PIRS, the molecules are oriented nearly parallel to the surface, the average tilt angle in the saturated monolayer phase is 10° with respect to the surface plane. For both phases, structure models are proposed by means of potential calculations. For the saturated monolayer phase, a striped herringbone structure with 12 inequivalent molecules is deduced. The simulation of infrared spectra based on the proposed structures and the vibrational exciton approach gives reasonable agreement between experimental and simulated infrared spectra.

  4. Structure of Inert Gases Adsorbed in MCM-41

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Dylan; Sokol, Paul

    One-dimensional quantum liquids of 3He or 4He have generated recent interest for investigation in the Luttinger liquid model. Unfortunately, current studies lack a clear demonstration of definitively one-dimensional behavior. We propose using the templated, porous material, MCM-41, as a host for an atomic Luttinger liquid. In general, the pores of MCM-41 are too wide to provide a strictly one-dimensional environment, so we investigate preplating these pores with inert gases to effectively reduce their diameter. We present the results of studies of the structure of inert gases in MCM-41. Nitrogen sorption isotherms were used to characterize the sample. Then, using inert gases as adsorbates, we determined the minimum effective pore diameter that can be achieved in our sample before capillary condensation takes over. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) was performed on the ideally preplated sample to investigate the structure of the adsorbates in the nanopores. The XRD measurements are compared to simulations of core-shell cylinder model scattering, and the validity of the model is assessed. The prospects for creating a definitively one-dimensional channel for the application of studying the structure and dynamics of helium confined in one dimension are discussed. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant DGE-1069091.

  5. Palladium dimers adsorbed on graphene: A DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, Gagandeep; Gupta, Shuchi; Dharamvir, Keya

    2015-05-15

    The 2D structure of graphene shows a great promise for enhanced catalytic activity when adsorbed with palladium. We performed a systematic density functional theory (DFT) study of the adsorption of palladium dimer (Pd{sub 2}) on graphene using SIESTA package, in the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The adsorption energy, geometry, and charge transfer of Pd{sub 2}-graphene system are calculated. Both horizontal and vertical orientations of Pd{sub 2} on graphene are studied. Our calculations revealed that the minimum energy configuration for Pd dimer is parallel to the graphene sheet with its two atoms occupying centre of adjacent hexagonal rings of graphene sheet. Magnetic moment is induced for Pd dimer adsorbed on graphene in vertical orientation while horizontal orientation of Pd dimer on graphene do not exhibit magnetism. Insignificant energy differences among adsorption sites means that dimer mobility on the graphene sheet is high. There is imperceptible distortion of graphene sheet perpendicular to its plane. However, some lateral displacements are seen.

  6. Photon-exposure-dependent photon-stimulated desorption for obtaining photolysis cross section of molecules adsorbed on surface by monochromatic soft x-ray photons.

    PubMed

    Chou, L-C; Jang, C-Y; Wu, Y-H; Tsai, W-C; Wang, S-K; Chen, J; Chang, S-C; Liu, C-C; Shai, Y; Wen, C-R

    2008-12-07

    Photon-exposure-dependent positive- and negative-ion photon-stimulated desorption (PSD) was proposed to study the photoreactions and obtain the photolysis cross sections of molecules adsorbed on a single-crystal surface by monochromatic soft x-ray photons with energy near the core level of adsorbate. The changes in the F(+) and F(-) PSD ion yields were measured from CF(3)Cl molecules adsorbed on Si(111)-7x7 at 30 K (CF(3)Cl dose=0.3x10(15) molecules/cm(2), approximately 0.75 monolayer) during irradiation of monochromatic soft x-ray photons near the F(1s) edge. The PSD ion yield data show the following characteristics: (a) The dissociation of adsorbed CF(3)Cl molecules is due to a combination of direct photodissociation via excitation of F(1s) core level and substrate-mediated dissociation [dissociative attachment and dipolar dissociation induced by the photoelectrons emitting from the silicon substrate]. (b) the F(+) ion desorption is associated with the bond breaking of the surface CF(3)Cl, CF(2)Cl, CFCl, and SiF species. (c) the F(-) yield is mainly due to DA and DD of the adsorbed CF(3)Cl molecules. (d) The surface SiF is formed by reaction of the surface Si atom with the neutral fluorine atom, F(+), or F(-) ion produced by scission of C-F bond of CF(3)Cl, CF(2)Cl, or CFCl species. A kinetic model was proposed for the explanation of the photolysis of this submonolayer CF(3)Cl-covered surface. Based on this model and the variation rates of the F(+)F(-) signals during fixed-energy monochromatic photon bombardment at 690.2 and 692.6 eV [near the F(1s) edge], the photolysis cross section was deduced as a function of energy.

  7. Application of 1H NMR spectroscopy method for determination of characteristics of thin layers of water adsorbed on the surface of dispersed and porous adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Turov, V V; Leboda, R

    1999-02-01

    The paper presents 1H NMR spectroscopy as a perspective method of the studies of the characteristics of water boundary layers in the hydrated powders and aqueous dispergated suspensions of the adsorbents. The method involves measurements of temperature dependence proton signals intensity in the adsorbed water at temperatures lower than 273 K. Free energy of water molecules at the adsorbent/water interface is diminished due to the adsorption interactions causing the water dosed to the adsorbent surface freezes at T < 273 K. Thickness of a non-freezing layer of water can be determined from the intensity of the water signal of 1H NMR during the freezing-thawing process. Due to a disturbing action of the adsorbent surface, water occurs in the quasi-liquid state. As a result, it is observed in the 1H NMR spectra as a relatively narrow signal. The signal of ice is not registered due to great differences in the transverse relaxation times of the adsorbed water and ice. The method of measuring the free surface energy of the adsorbents from the temperature dependence of the signal intensity of non-freezing water is based on the fact that the temperature of water freezing decreases by the quantity which depends on the surface energy and the distance of the adsorbed molecules from the solid surface. The water at the interface freezes when the free energies of the adsorbed water and ice are equal. To illustrate the applicability of the method under consideration the series of adsorption systems in which the absorbents used differed in the surface chemistry and porous structure. In particular, the behaviour of water on the surface of the following adsorbents is discussed: non-porous and porous silica (aerosils, silica gels); chemically and physically modified non-porous and porous silica (silanization, carbonization, biopolymer deposition); and pyrogeneous Al2O3 and aluminasilicas. The effect of preliminary treatment of the adsorbent (thermal, high pressure, wetting with polar

  8. Oil palm biomass-based adsorbents for the removal of water pollutants--a review.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Tanweer; Rafatullah, Mohd; Ghazali, Arniza; Sulaiman, Othman; Hashim, Rokiah

    2011-07-01

    This article presents a review on the role of oil palm biomass (trunks, fronds, leaves, empty fruit bunches, shells, etc.) as adsorbents in the removal of water pollutants such as acid and basic dyes, heavy metals, phenolic compounds, various gaseous pollutants, and so on. Numerous studies on adsorption properties of various low-cost adsorbents, such as agricultural wastes and its based activated carbons, have been reported in recent years. Studies have shown that oil palm-based adsorbent, among the low-cost adsorbents mentioned, is the most promising adsorbent for removing water pollutants. Further, these bioadsorbents can be chemically modified for better efficiency and can undergo multiple reuses to enhance their applicability at an industrial scale. It is evident from a literature survey of more than 100 recent papers that low-cost adsorbents have demonstrated outstanding removal capabilities for various pollutants. The conclusion is been drawn from the reviewed literature, and suggestions for future research are proposed.

  9. Selection and evaluation of adsorbents for the removal of anionic surfactants from laundry rinsing water.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Natasja; van der Ham, Louis G J; Euverink, Gert-Jan W; de Haan, André B

    2007-10-01

    Low-cost adsorbents were tested to remove anionic surfactants from laundry rinsing water to allow re-use of water. Adsorbents were selected corresponding to the different surfactant adsorption mechanisms. Equilibrium adsorption studies of linear alkyl benzene sulfonate (LAS) show that ionic interaction results in a high maximum adsorption capacity on positively charged adsorbents of 0.6-1.7 gLAS/g. Non-ionic interactions, such as hydrophobic interactions of LAS with non-ionic resins or activated carbons, result in a lower adsorption capacity of 0.02-0.6 gLAS/g. Negatively charged materials, such as cation exchange resins or bentonite clay, have negligible adsorption capacities for LAS. Similar results are obtained for alpha olefin sulfonate (AOS). Cost comparison of different adsorbents shows that an inorganic anion exchange material (layered double hydroxide) and activated carbons are the most cost-effective materials in terms of the amount of surfactant adsorbed per dollar worth of adsorbent.

  10. Understanding the lateral movement of particles adsorbed at a solid-liquid interface.

    PubMed

    Savaji, Kunal; Li, Xue; Couzis, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we study the phenomenon of lateral movement of particles that are electrostatically adsorbed at a solid-liquid interface. The experimental system involves negatively charged silica particles of two different sizes (65 nm and 90 nm) that are exposed to the positively charged solid surface (silane coated silicon wafer) in sequential steps. The particle-adsorbed wafers are analyzed under a scanning electron microscope and the images are processed to determine the pair-correlation function for the particles adsorbed in the first step. From the pair correlation data and the particle surface coverage data we show that the adsorbed particles are mobile at the solid-liquid interface. In specific, we show that the adsorbed particles are mobile at the solid-liquid interface when there is a driving force for the adsorbed particles to move. The driving force in the scheme of experiments discussed in this paper is the reduction in the free energy of the system.

  11. Preparation and characterization of novel carbon dioxide adsorbents based on polyethylenimine-modified Halloysite nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cai, Haohao; Bao, Feng; Gao, Jie; Chen, Tao; Wang, Si; Ma, Rui

    2015-01-01

    New nano-sized carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorbents based on Halloysite nanotubes impregnated with polyethylenimine (PEI) were designed and synthesized, which were excellent adsorbents for the capture of CO2 at room temperature and had relatively high CO2 adsorption capacity. The prepared adsorbents were characterized by various techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, gel permeation chromatography, dynamic light scattering, thermogravimetry, thermogravimetry-Fourier transform-infrared spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The adsorption characteristics and capacity were studied at room temperature, the highest CO2 adsorption capacity of 156.6 mg/g-PEI was obtained and the optimal adsorption capacity can reach a maximum value of 54.8 mg/g-adsorbent. The experiment indicated that this kind of adsorbent has a high stability at 80°C and PEI-impregnated adsorbents showed good reversibility and stability during cyclic adsorption-regeneration tests.

  12. Methods for Cloud Cover Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glackin, D. L.; Huning, J. R.; Smith, J. H.; Logan, T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Several methods for cloud cover estimation are described relevant to assessing the performance of a ground-based network of solar observatories. The methods rely on ground and satellite data sources and provide meteorological or climatological information. One means of acquiring long-term observations of solar oscillations is the establishment of a ground-based network of solar observatories. Criteria for station site selection are: gross cloudiness, accurate transparency information, and seeing. Alternative methods for computing this duty cycle are discussed. The cycle, or alternatively a time history of solar visibility from the network, can then be input to a model to determine the effect of duty cycle on derived solar seismology parameters. Cloudiness from space is studied to examine various means by which the duty cycle might be computed. Cloudiness, and to some extent transparency, can potentially be estimated from satellite data.

  13. Influence of natural adsorbates of magnesium oxide on its reactivity in basic catalysis.

    PubMed

    Cornu, Damien; Petitjean, Hugo; Costentin, Guylène; Guesmi, Hazar; Krafft, Jean-Marc; Lauron-Pernot, Hélène

    2013-12-07

    Solid materials possessing basic properties are naturally covered by carbonates and hydroxyl groups. Those natural adsorbates modify their chemical reactivity. This article aims to specifically evidence the role of surface carbonates and hydroxyls in basic heterogeneous catalysis on MgO. It compares the catalytic behaviors of hydroxylated or carbonated MgO surfaces for two types of reactions: one alkene isomerization and one alcohol conversion (hept-1-ene isomerization and 2-methyl-3-butyn-2-ol conversion). Catalysis experiments showed that carbon dioxide adsorption poisons the catalyst surface and the DRIFT-DFT combination showed that the nature of active sites in the two reactions differs. On the reverse, partial hydroxylation of the surface enhances activity for both reactions. Interestingly hept-1-ene isomerization gives a volcano curve for the conversion as a function of hydroxyl coverage. Calculations of the electronic structure of magnesium oxide surfaces show that neither Lewis basicity nor Brønsted basicity of the surface defects (steps for example) are enhanced by hydroxylation. Meanwhile CO2 adsorption followed by IR spectroscopy shows that (110) and (111) unstable planes are strongly basic and are stabilized by partial surface hydroxylation. These results could explain the volcano curve obtained for the evolution of alkene isomerisation as a function of hydroxyl coverage.

  14. Preventing in-stent restenosis using lipoprotein (a), lipid and cholesterol adsorbent materials.

    PubMed

    Kazemian, Mohammad Reza; Solouk, Atefeh; Tan, Aaron; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2015-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the major cause of mortality in developed countries. The characteristic lesion of atherosclerosis is the atheroma or plaque that forms through thickening of the inner layer of the vessel wall (called the intima). The development of stent in 1980s revolutionised treatment of cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis. However the advent of stenting was hindered by the new problem of in-stent restenosis. It was demonstrated that in-stent restenosis was the result of a new pathology in the form of neointimal hyperplasia, which was a maladaptive healing response to bare-metal stent implantation. Recent evidence suggests that although drug-eluting stent (DES) have reduced restenosis rates, important concerns have been raised regarding increased late stent thrombosis, myocardial infarction and death. With advances in nanotechnology and smart materials, covered stents has been proposed to overcome this problem. This is due to in-stent late restenosis and thromboses are mainly caused by smooth muscle cells (SMC) proliferation. Studies showed that there is a relation between high low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and lipoprotein (a) [Lp(a)] level in blood stream and chance of in-stent restenosis, moreover studies show that Lp(a) could stimulate SMC proliferation. We hypothesis development of covered stent with novel design and use of smart materials which could adsorb cholesterol and prevent contact between Lp(a) and vessel wall to overcome problem indicated in DES. In addition cost of stents will significantly reduce by elimination of drugs as well as complex manufacturing of the drug incorporation.

  15. The Effects of Organic Adsorbates on the Underpotential Deposition of Silver on Pt(111) Electrodes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    CV) The Effects of Organic Adsorbates on the Underpotential Deposition W.0 of Silver on Pt(111) Electrodes _• D. L. Taylor and H. D. Abruxla* D TIC...to determine the effects of competing organic adsorbates on the underpotential deposition of silver on Pt(111). The adsorbates studied are known to...hcis )n appive tor pubic release and sal Its distribution is unlimited. fu .. 93-12456 INTRODUCTION The process of underpotential deposition (UPD) of

  16. The National Shipbuilding Research Program, Heavy Metal Adsorbents for Storm Water Pollution Prevention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    Heavy Metal Adsorbents for Storm Water Pollution Prevention U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY CARDEROCK DIVISION, NAVAL SURFACE WARFARE CENTER in...National Shipbuilding Research Program, Heavy Metal Adsorbents for Storm Water Pollution Prevention 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM...States Navy. ANY POSSIBLE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND/OR FITNESS FOR PURPOSE ARE SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIMED. FINAL REPORT HEAVY METAL ADSORBENTS

  17. Gold nanoparticle-aluminum oxide adsorbent for efficient removal of mercury species from natural waters.

    PubMed

    Lo, Sut-I; Chen, Po-Cheng; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2012-03-06

    We report a new adsorbent for removal of mercury species. By mixing Au nanoparticles (NPs) 13 nm in diameter with aluminum oxide (Al(2)O(3)) particles 50-200 μm in diameter, Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbents are easily prepared. Three adsorbents, Al(2)O(3), Au NPs, and Au NP-Al(2)O(3), were tested for removal of mercury species [Hg(2+), methylmercury (MeHg(+)), ethylmercury (EtHg(+)), and phenylmercury (PhHg(+))]. The Au NP adsorbent has a higher binding affinity (dissociation constant; K(d) = 0.3 nM) for Hg(2+) ions than the Al(2)O(3) adsorbent (K(d) = 52.9 nM). The Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbent has a higher affinity for mercury species and other tested metal ions than the Al(2)O(3) and Au NP adsorbents. The Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbent provides a synergic effect and, thus, is effective for removal of most tested metal ions and organic mercury species. After preconcentration of mercury ions by an Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbent, analysis of mercury ions down to the subppq level in aqueous solution was performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbent allows effective removal of mercury species spiked in lake water, groundwater, and seawater with efficiencies greater than 97%. We also used Al(2)O(3) and Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbents sequentially for selectively removing Hg(2+) and MeHg(+) ions from water. The low-cost, effective, and stable Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbent shows great potential for economical removal of various mercury species.

  18. Novel (115) faceting induced by Sr adsorbed on Si(114)-2 × 1 with subsurface C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hidong; Kim, Yanghui; Lkhagvasuren, Altaibaatar; Zhang, Rui; Seo, Jae M.

    2016-09-01

    The Sr-induced structural evolution of Si(114)-2 × 1, through depositing SrF2 on the reconstructed surface held at 800 °C, has been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy. By submonolayer of adsorbed Sr atoms, any well-defined facet besides (113) has not been formed on the clean Si(114)-2 × 1 surface, while a well-ordered and sawtooth-like structure composed of a (113) facet and its compensating (115) facet has been formed on Si(114)-2 × 1 with subsurface C atoms. Such a contrasting result is due to the stress-compensating mechanism between adsorbed Sr atoms and subsurface C atoms making the (115) facet stable. From the present studies, it has been confirmed that a stable and sawtooth-like structure covering the whole surface can be formed by modulating the surface stress even if the high-index surface does not have a pair of stable facets near the direction of the substrate.

  19. Construction Costs of Six Landfill Cover Designs

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, S.F.

    1998-12-23

    A large-scale field demonstration comparing and contrasting final landfill cover designs has been constructed and is currently being monitored. Four alternative cover designs and two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle `D' Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle `C' Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed side-by-side for direct comparison. The demonstration is intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. This paper provides an overview of the construction costs of each cover design.

  20. Regulating the interactions of adsorbates on surfaces by scanning tunneling microscopy manipulation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiang; Xu, Wei

    2014-09-15

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) manipulation has received wide attention in the surface science community since the pioneering work of Eigler to construct surface nanostructures in an atom by atom fashion. Lots of scientists have been inspired and devoted to study the surface issues with the help of STM manipulations and great achievements have been obtained. In this Minireview, we mainly describe the recent progress in applying STM manipulations to regulate the inter-adsorbate and adsorbate-substrate interactions on solid surfaces. It was shown that this technique could not only differentiate intermolecular interactions but also construct molecular nanostructures by regulating different kinds of inter-adsorbate interactions or adsorbate-substrate interactions.

  1. Investigations into Alternative Desorption Agents for Amidoxime-Based Polymeric Uranium Adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Wood, Jordana R.; Wai, Chien; Pan, Horng-Bin

    2015-06-01

    Amidoxime-based polymeric braid adsorbents that can extract uranium (U) from seawater are being developed to provide a sustainable supply of fuel for nuclear reactors. A critical step in the development of the technology is to develop elution procedures to selectively remove U from the adsorbents and to do so in a manner that allows the adsorbent material to be reused. This study investigates use of high concentrations of bicarbonate along with targeted chelating agents as an alternative means to the mild acid elution procedures currently in use for selectively eluting uranium from amidoxime-based polymeric adsorbents.

  2. Biodegradable metal adsorbent synthesized by graft polymerization onto nonwoven cotton fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Ayako; Seko, Noriaki; Tamada, Masao; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2010-01-01

    A fibrous adsorbent for Hg ions was synthesized by radiation-induced emulsion graft polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) onto a nonwoven cotton fabric and subsequent chemical modification. The optimal pre-irradiation dose for initiation of the graft polymerization of GMA, which minimized the effects of radiation damage on the mechanical strength of the nonwoven cotton fabric, was found to be 10 kGy. The GMA-grafted nonwoven cotton fabric was subsequently modified with ethylenediamine (EDA) or diethylenetriamine (DETA) to obtain a Hg adsorbent. The resulting amine-type adsorbents were evaluated for batch and continuous adsorption of Hg. In batch adsorption, the distribution coefficients of Hg reached 1.9×10 5 and 1.0×10 5 for EDA- and DETA-type adsorbents, respectively. A column packed with EDA-type adsorbent removed Hg from 1.8 ppm Hg solution at a space velocity of 100 h -1, which corresponds to 16,000 times the volume of the packed adsorbent. The adsorbed Hg on the EDA-type adsorbent could be completely eluted by 1 M HCl solution. A microbial oxidative degradation test revealed that the EDA-type adsorbent is biodegradable.

  3. Toward an effective adsorbent for polar pollutants: formaldehyde adsorption by activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung Jin; Miyawaki, Jin; Shiratori, Nanako; Yoon, Seong-Ho; Jang, Jyongsik

    2013-09-15

    Due to increasing concerns about environmental pollutants, the development of an effective adsorbent or sensitive sensor has been pursued in recent years. Diverse porous materials have been selected as promising candidates for detecting and removing harmful materials, but the most appropriate pore structure and surface functional groups, both important factors for effective adsorbency, have not yet been fully elucidated. In particular, there is limited information relating to the use of activated carbon materials for effective adsorbent of specific pollutants. Here, the pore structure and surface functionality of polyacrylonitrile-based activated carbon fibers were investigated to develop an efficient adsorbent for polar pollutants. The effect of pore structure and surface functional groups on removal capability was investigated. The activated carbons with higher nitrogen content show a great ability to absorb formaldehyde because of their increased affinity with polar pollutants. In particular, nitrogen functional groups that neighbor oxygen atoms play an important role in maximizing adsorption capability. However, because there is also a similar increase in water affinity in adsorbents with polar functional groups, there is a considerable decrease in adsorption ability under humid conditions because of preferential adsorption of water to adsorbents. Therefore, it can be concluded that pore structures, surface functional groups and the water affinity of any adsorbent should be considered together to develop an effective and practical adsorbent for polar pollutants. These studies can provide vital information for developing porous materials for efficient adsorbents, especially for polar pollutants.

  4. Recovery of cadmium from waste of scallop processing with amidoxime adsorbent synthesized by graft-polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Tomoyuki; Tamada, Masao; Saito, Kyouichi; Sugo, Takanobu

    2003-01-01

    Fabric adsorbent having amidoxime function was synthesized by radiation-induced graft-polymerization. This adsorbent was applied to the removal of Cd from the scallop waste. The scallop waste was homogenized as a pre-treatment. The obtained top layer was used for the Cd absorption experiment at various pH conditions. At pH 6, the adsorbent showed the highest performance in Cd adsorption. The concentration factor was thousand for Cd. Preliminary column experiment was also carried out. The amidoxime adsorbent recovered 96.1% of Cd in the waste solution.

  5. Dynamics of benzene vapor adsorption on carbon adsorbents having different volumes of transporting pores

    SciTech Connect

    Ivakhnyuk, G.K.; Fedorov, N.F.; Babkin, O.E.; Smetanin, G.N.; Belotserkovskii, G.M.

    1986-08-20

    To ascertain the effect of the porosity peculiarities on the benzene vapor adsorption process under dynamic conditions, a series of adsorbents was synthesized in this work from zirconium carbide. Their porous structure was studied by a traditional set of methods, viz., pycnometric, porometric, and sorption. Carbon adsorbents derived from zirconium carbide have an open-pore system of adsorbing pores which communicate directly with the outer surface. Transporting porosity of carbon adsorbents derived from zirconium carbide does not affect the mass transport processes during adsorption of benzene vapors on them under the conditions of a dynamic experiment.

  6. Enhancing the reactivity of gold: Nanostructured Au(111) adsorbs CO

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, F. M.; Hrbek, J.; Ma, S.; Park, J. B.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Senanayake, S. D.

    2015-12-02

    Low-coordinated sites are surface defects whose presence can transform a surface of inert or noble metal such as Au into an active catalyst. We prepared gold surfaces modified by pits, starting with a well-ordered Au(111) surface; we then used microscopy (STM) for their structural characterization and CO spectroscopy (IRAS and NEXAFS) for probing reactivity of surface defects. In contrast to the Au(111) surface CO adsorbs readily on the pitted surfaces bonding to low-coordinated sites identified as step atoms forming {111} and {100} microfacets. Finally, pitted nanostructured surfaces can serve as interesting and easily prepared models of catalytic surfaces with defined defects that offer an attractive alternative to vicinal surfaces or nanoparticles commonly employed in catalysis science.

  7. Enhancing the reactivity of gold: Nanostructured Au(111) adsorbs CO

    DOE PAGES

    Hoffmann, F. M.; Hrbek, J.; Ma, S.; ...

    2015-12-02

    Low-coordinated sites are surface defects whose presence can transform a surface of inert or noble metal such as Au into an active catalyst. We prepared gold surfaces modified by pits, starting with a well-ordered Au(111) surface; we then used microscopy (STM) for their structural characterization and CO spectroscopy (IRAS and NEXAFS) for probing reactivity of surface defects. In contrast to the Au(111) surface CO adsorbs readily on the pitted surfaces bonding to low-coordinated sites identified as step atoms forming {111} and {100} microfacets. Finally, pitted nanostructured surfaces can serve as interesting and easily prepared models of catalytic surfaces with definedmore » defects that offer an attractive alternative to vicinal surfaces or nanoparticles commonly employed in catalysis science.« less

  8. Photoluminescence Enhancement of Adsorbed Species on Si Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Taketoshi; Maeda, Masanori; Kobayashi, Hikaru

    2016-01-01

    We have fabricated Si nanoparticles from Si swarf using the beads milling method. The mode diameter of produced Si nanoparticles was between 4.8 and 5.2 nm. Si nanoparticles in hexane show photoluminescence (PL) spectra with peaks at 2.56, 2.73, 2.91, and 3.09 eV. The peaked PL spectra are attributed to the vibronic structure of adsorbed dimethylanthracene (DMA) impurity in hexane. The PL intensity of hexane with DMA increases by ~3000 times by adsorption on Si nanoparticles. The PL enhancement results from an increase in absorption probability of incident light by DMA caused by adsorption on the surface of Si nanoparticles.

  9. Enhancing the reactivity of gold: Nanostructured Au(111) adsorbs CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, F. M.; Hrbek, J.; Ma, S.; Park, J. B.; Rodriguez, J. A.; Stacchiola, D. J.; Senanayake, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    Low-coordinated sites are surface defects whose presence can transform a surface of inert or noble metal such as Au into an active catalyst. Starting with a well-ordered Au(111) surface we prepared by ion sputtering gold surfaces modified by pits, used microscopy (STM) for their structural characterization and CO spectroscopy (IRAS and NEXAFS) for probing reactivity of surface defects. In contrast to the Au(111) surface CO adsorbs readily on the pitted surfaces bonding to low-coordinated sites identified as step atoms forming {111} and {100} microfacets. Pitted nanostructured surfaces can serve as interesting and easily prepared models of catalytic surfaces with defined defects that offer an attractive alternative to vicinal surfaces or nanoparticles commonly employed in catalysis science.

  10. Sunflower stalks as adsorbents for color removal from textile wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, G.; Xu, X.

    1997-03-01

    Sunflower stalks as adsorbents for two basic dyes (Methylene Blue and Basic Red 9) and two direct dyes (Congo Red and Direct Blue 71) in aqueous solutions were studied with equilibrium isotherms and kinetic adsorptions. The maximum adsorptions of two basic dyes on sunflower stalks are very high, i.e., 205 and 317 mg/g for Methylene Blue and Basic Red 9, respectively. The two direct dyes have relatively lower adsorption on sunflower stalks. The adsorptive behaviors of sunflower stalk components are different. The pith, which is the soft and porous material in the center of stalks, has twice the adsorptive capacity of the skin. Particle sizes of sunflower stalks also affect the adsorption of dyes. The adsorption rates of two basic dyestuffs are much higher than that of the direct dyes. Within 30 min about 80% basic dyes were removed from the solutions.

  11. Thermal relaxation of adsorbed atoms in an intense laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoldus, Henk F.; van Smaalen, Sander; George, Thomas F.

    1986-11-01

    Adsorbed atoms on the surface of a harmonic lattice are immersed in a strong laser field. The optical Bloch equations are derived, which include the thermal relaxation and the coherent excitation of the adbond. This is accomplished by a transformation to dressed states, which diagonalizes the interaction with the laser. The single-phonon couplings are then understood as transitions between dressed states. The radiative contributions for arbitrarily strong fields are obtained in the master equation, and it is shown that the coherences with respect to the dressed states decay exponentially, due to the phonon relaxation. General properties of the competing phonon-induced redistribution and optical excitation of the level populations are presented, and exemplified by an explicit elaboration of a three-level system. The results are amenable to analytical evaluation once the interaction potential is prescribed, and extensions of the approach to include multiphonon processes are straightforward.

  12. Long-term storage of surface-adsorbed protein machines.

    PubMed

    Albet-Torres, Nuria; Månsson, Alf

    2011-06-07

    The effective and simple long-term storage of complex functional proteins is critical in achieving commercially viable biosensors. This issue is particularly challenging in recently proposed types of nanobiosensors, where molecular-motor-driven transportation substitutes microfluidics and forms the basis for novel detection schemes. Importantly, therefore, we here describe that delicate heavy meromyosin (HMM)-based nanodevices (HMM motor fragments adsorbed to silanized surfaces and actin bound to HMM) fully maintain their function when stored at -20 °C for more than a month. The mechanisms for the excellent preservation of acto-HMM motor function upon repeated freeze-thaw cycles are discussed. The results are important to the future commercial implementation of motor-based nanodevices and are of more general value to the long-term storage of any protein-based bionanodevice.

  13. Charge transfer properties of pentacene adsorbed on silver: DFT study

    SciTech Connect

    N, Rekha T.; Rajkumar, Beulah J. M.

    2015-06-24

    Charge transfer properties of pentacene adsorbed on silver is investigated using DFT methods. Optimized geometry of pentacene after adsorption on silver indicates distortion in hexagonal structure of the ring close to the silver cluster and deviations in co-planarity of carbon atoms due to the variations in bond angles and dihedral angles. Theoretically simulated absorption spectrum has a symmetric surface plasmon resonance peak around 486nm corresponding to the transfer of charge from HOMO-2 to LUMO. Theoretical SERS confirms the process of adsorption, tilted orientation of pentacene on silver surface and the charge transfers reported. Localization of electron density arising from redistribution of electrostatic potential together with a reduced bandgap of pentacene after adsorption on silver suggests its utility in the design of electro active organic semiconducting devices.

  14. Liquid 4He Adsorbed Films on Very Attractive Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, Ignacio; Szybisz, Leszek

    Adsorbed films of liquid 4He are analized, in the framework of Density functionals Theories (DF). In these systems, when the substrate becomes increasingly attractive, the thin films of 4He approaches the quasi-bidimensional limit. We study this strongly attractive substrate regime with two DF, the Orsay-Trento (OT) and a recent Hybrid proposal (Hyb), focusing in the energy behavior. It is showed that OT does not reproduce the correct limiting energy curve, and it implies that this functional could not provide reliable results for very strongly attractive substrates like Graphite (Gr). In other hand, with the Hyb DF, the correct energy behavior is found for the adsorption energy of 4He on Gr. These results show that OT should not be applied to quasi 2D (confinement) situations, and that Hyb DF provides a much more realistic description.

  15. Liquid 4He Adsorbed Films on Very Attractive Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urrutia, Ignacio; Szybisz, Leszek

    2006-09-01

    Adsorbed films of liquid 4He are analized, in the framework of Density Functional Theories (DF). In these systems, when the substrate becomes increasingly attractive, the thin films of 4He approaches the quasi-bidimensional limit. We study this strongly attractive substrate regime with two DF, the Orsay-Trento (OT) and a recent Hybrid proposal (Hyb), focusing in the energy behavior. It is showed that OT does not reproduce the correct limiting energy curve, and it implies that this functional could not provide reliable results for very strongly attractive substrates like Graphite (Gr). In other hand, with the Hyb DF, the correct energy behavior is found for the adsorption energy of 4He on Gr. These results show that OT should not be applied to quasi 2D (confinement) situations, and that Hyb DF provides a much more realistic description.

  16. Controlling spins in adsorbed molecules by a chemical switch

    PubMed Central

    Wäckerlin, Christian; Chylarecka, Dorota; Kleibert, Armin; Müller, Kathrin; Iacovita, Cristian; Nolting, Frithjof; Jung, Thomas A.; Ballav, Nirmalya

    2010-01-01

    The development of chemical systems with switchable molecular spins could lead to the architecture of materials with controllable magnetic or spintronic properties. Here, we present conclusive evidence that the spin of an organometallic molecule coupled to a ferromagnetic substrate can be switched between magnetic off and on states by a chemical stimulus. This is achieved by nitric oxide (NO) functioning as an axial ligand of cobalt(II)tetraphenylporphyrin (CoTPP) ferromagnetically coupled to nickel thin-film (Ni(001)). On NO addition, the coordination sphere of Co2+ is modified and a NO–CoTPP nitrosyl complex is formed, which corresponds to an off state of the Co spin. Thermal dissociation of NO from the nitrosyl complex restores the on state of the Co spin. The NO-induced reversible off–on switching of surface-adsorbed molecular spins observed here is attributed to a spin trans effect. PMID:20975713

  17. The value of snow cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokratov, S. A.

    2009-04-01

    only and not even the main outcome from snow cover use. The value of snow cover for agriculture, water resources, industry and transportation is so naturally inside the activities that is not often quantified. However, any considerations of adaptation strategies for climate change with changing snow conditions need such quantification.

  18. Photolysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons adsorbed on fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Behymer, T.D.

    1987-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are formed by the combustion of almost any fuel under oxygen-deficient conditions. Previous laboratory studies have found that many PAH degrade with lifetimes as short as a few hours; however, studies of marine and lacustrine sediments, the ultimate sinks of PAH, have shown relative abundances of PAH which are similar to those in combustion sources; this suggests that PAH are stable in the atmosphere. Eighteen PAH adsorbed on carbon black and fifteen coal fly ashes of varying physical and chemical composition were photolyzed in order to study their atmospheric fate. Photolytic half-lives for these particle-bound PAH were found to be highly dependent on the substrate onto which they were adsorbed. On low-carbon fly ash, PAH showed a wide range of half-lives, indicating a relationship between PAH structure and photochemical reactivity. However, PAH on carbon black and fly ashes with a high-carbon content, show similar half-lives for most PAH including reactive PAH such as anthracene and benzo(a)pyrene. This indicates a photolytic process that is independent of structure and dependent on the physical and chemical nature of the fly ash. Surprisingly, no other parameter accounts for observed PAH reactivity. Substrate characteristics such as surface area, porosity, particle size, surface pH, and iron content have all been suggested to influence the rate of PAH degradation. However, these parameters, measured for substrates studied in this thesis, do not correlate with PAH reactivity. Because carbon black and high-carbon fly ashes stabilize reactive PAH, it is these substrates which would facilitate the transport of PAH from combustion sources through the atmosphere to ultimate sinks.

  19. A Citizen's Guide to Evapotranspiration Covers

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This guide explains Evapotranspiration Covers which are Evapotranspiration (ET) covers are a type of cap placed over contaminated material, such as soil, landfill waste, or mining tailings, to prevent water from reaching it.

  20. Health Insurance: Understanding What It Covers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Your Health Resources Healthcare Management Insurance & Bills Health Insurance: Understanding What It Covers Health Insurance: Understanding What It Covers Family HealthHealthcare ManagementInsurance & BillsMenWomenYour ...

  1. Indicators: Lakeshore Habitat/Riparian Vegetative Cover

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Riparian and lakeshore vegetative cover consist of the vegetation corridor alongside streams, rivers, and lakes. Vegetative cover refers to overhanging or submerged tree limbs, shrubs, and other plants growing along the shore of the waterbody.

  2. [Snow cover pollution monitoring in Ufa].

    PubMed

    Daukaev, R A; Suleĭmanov, R A

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the results of examining the snow cover polluted with heavy metals in the large industrial town of Ufa. The level of man-caused burden on the snow cover of the conventional parts of the town was estimated and compared upon exposure to a wide range of snow cover pollutants. The priority snow cover pollutants were identified among the test heavy metals.

  3. Completion of the National Land Cover Database (NLCD) 1992-2001 Land Cover Change Retrofit Product

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Multi-Resolution Land Characteristics Consortium has supported the development of two national digital land cover products: the National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) 1992 and National Land Cover Database (NLCD) 2001. Substantial differences in imagery, legends, and methods betwe...

  4. Managing cover crops: an economic perspective

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Common reasons given by producers as to why they do not adopt cover crops are related to economics: time, labor, and cost required for planting and managing cover crops. While many of the agronomic benefits of cover crops directly relate to economics, there are costs associated with adopting the pra...

  5. Selection of fungi by candidate cover crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diversified cropping systems that incorporate year-round ground cover, are known to maintain healthy soils. Information is available for producers regarding the benefits of specific cover crop species for soil fertility, weed and pest management. Even though it is widely recognized that cover crops ...

  6. Field Water Balance of Landfill Final Covers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landfill covers are critical to waste containment, yet field performance of specific cover designs has not been well documented and seldom been compared in side-by-side testing. A study was conducted to assess the ability of landfill final covers to control percolation into unde...

  7. Wheelspace windage cover plate for turbine

    DOEpatents

    Lathrop, Norman Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Windage cover plates are secured between the wheels and spacer of a turbine rotor to prevent hot flow path gas ingestion into the wheelspace cavities. Each cover plate includes a linear, axially extending body curved circumferentially with a radially outwardly directed wall at one axial end. The wall defines a axially opening recess for receiving a dovetail lug. The cover plate includes an axially extending tongue received in a circumferential groove of the spacer. The cover plate is secured with the tongue in the groove and dovetail lug in the recess. Lap joints between circumferentially adjacent cover plates are provided.

  8. Removal of arsenic from water using nano adsorbents and challenges: A review.

    PubMed

    Lata, Sneh; Samadder, S R

    2016-01-15

    Many researchers have used nanoparticles as adsorbents to remove water pollutants including arsenic after modifying the properties of nanoparticles by improving reactivity, biocompatibility, stability, charge density, multi-functionalities, and dispersibility. For arsenic removal, nano adsorbents emerged as the potential alternatives to existing conventional technologies. The present study critically reviewed the past and current available information on the potential of nano adsorbents for arsenic removal from contaminated water and the challenges involved in that. The study discussed the separation and regeneration techniques of nano adsorbents and the performance thereof. The study evaluated the adsorption efficiency of the various nanoparticles based on size of nanoparticles, types of nano adsorbents, method of synthesis, separation and regeneration of the nano adsorbents. The study found that more studies are required on suitable holding materials for the nano adsorbents to improve the permeability and to make the technology applicable at the field condition. The study will help the readers to choose suitable nanomaterials and to take up further research required for arsenic removal using nano adsorbents.

  9. Towards understanding KOH conditioning of amidoxime-based oolymer adsorbents for sequestering uranium from seawater

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Horng-Bin; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana; ...

    2015-11-17

    Conditioning of polymer fiber adsorbents grafted with amidoxime and carboxylic acid groups is necessary to make the materials hydrophilic for sequestering uranium from seawater. In this paper, spectroscopic techniques were employed to study the effectiveness of the traditional KOH conditioning method (2.5% KOH at 80⁰C) on recently developed high-surface-area amidoxime-based polymer fiber adsorbents developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. FTIR spectra reveal that the KOH conditioning process removes the proton from the carboxylic acids and also converts the amidoxime groups to carboxylate groups in the adsorbent. With prolonged KOH treatment (>1 hr) at 80⁰C, physical damage to the adsorbent materialmore » occurs which can lead to a significant reduction in the adsorbent's uranium adsorption capability in real seawater during extended exposure times (>21 days). The physical damage to the adsorbent can be minimized by lowering KOH conditioning temperature. For the high-surface-area amidoxime-based adsorbents, 20 min of conditioning in 2.5% KOH at 80⁰C or 1 hr of conditioning in 2.5% KOH at 60⁰C appears sufficient to achieve de-protonation of the carboxylic acid with minimal harmful effects to the adsorbent material. Lastly, the use of NaOH instead of KOH can also reduce the cost of the base treatment process required for conditioning the amidoxime-based sorbents with minimal loss of adsorption capacity (≤7%).« less

  10. Fabrication and thermal conductivity improvement of novel composite adsorbents adding with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qibai; Yu, Xiaofen; Zhang, Haiyan; Chen, Yiming; Liu, Liying; Xie, Xialin; Tang, Ke; Lu, Yiji; Wang, Yaodong; Roskilly, Anthony Paul

    2016-10-01

    Thermal conductivity is one of key parameters of adsorbents, which will affect the overall system performance of adsorption chiller. To improve adsorbent's thermal conductivity is always one of research focuses in chemisorption field. A new chemical composite adsorbent is fabricated by adding carbon coated metal(Aluminum and Nickel) nanoparticles with three different addition amounts into the mixture of chloride salts and natural expanded graphite aiming to improve the thermal conductivity. The preparation processes and its thermal conductivity of this novel composite adsorbent are reported and summarized. Experimental results indicate that the nanoparticles are homogenously dispersed in the composite adsorbent by applying the reported preparation processes. The thermal conductivity of the composite adsorbent can averagely enlarge by 20% when the weight ratio of the added nanoparticles is 10 wt%. Moreover, carbon coated aluminum nanoparticles exhibit more effective enlargement in thermal conductivity than nickel nanoparticles. As for the composite adsorbent of CaCl2-NEG, there is a big reinforcement from 30% to 50% for Al@C nanoparticles, however only 10% in maximum caused by Ni@C nanoparticles. The proposed research provides a methodology to design and prepare thermal conductive chemical composite adsorbent.

  11. Towards understanding KOH conditioning of amidoxime-based oolymer adsorbents for sequestering uranium from seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Horng-Bin; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Gill, Gary A.; Janke, Christopher James; Wai, Chien M.

    2015-11-17

    Conditioning of polymer fiber adsorbents grafted with amidoxime and carboxylic acid groups is necessary to make the materials hydrophilic for sequestering uranium from seawater. In this paper, spectroscopic techniques were employed to study the effectiveness of the traditional KOH conditioning method (2.5% KOH at 80⁰C) on recently developed high-surface-area amidoxime-based polymer fiber adsorbents developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. FTIR spectra reveal that the KOH conditioning process removes the proton from the carboxylic acids and also converts the amidoxime groups to carboxylate groups in the adsorbent. With prolonged KOH treatment (>1 hr) at 80⁰C, physical damage to the adsorbent material occurs which can lead to a significant reduction in the adsorbent's uranium adsorption capability in real seawater during extended exposure times (>21 days). The physical damage to the adsorbent can be minimized by lowering KOH conditioning temperature. For the high-surface-area amidoxime-based adsorbents, 20 min of conditioning in 2.5% KOH at 80⁰C or 1 hr of conditioning in 2.5% KOH at 60⁰C appears sufficient to achieve de-protonation of the carboxylic acid with minimal harmful effects to the adsorbent material. Lastly, the use of NaOH instead of KOH can also reduce the cost of the base treatment process required for conditioning the amidoxime-based sorbents with minimal loss of adsorption capacity (≤7%).

  12. Adsorbate-metal bond effect on empirical determination of surface plasmon penetration depth.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Laurel L; Menegazzo, Nicola; Booksh, Karl S

    2013-05-21

    The penetration depth of surface plasmons is commonly determined empirically from the observed response for adsorbate loading on gold surface plasmon resonance (SPR) substrates. However, changes in the SPR spectrum may originate from both changes in the effective refractive index near the metal surface and changes in the metal permittivity following covalent binding of the adsorbate layer. Herein, the significance of incorporating an additional adsorbate-metal bonding effect in the calculation is demonstrated in theory and in practice. The bonding effect is determined from the nonzero intercept of a SPR shift versus adsorbate thickness calibration and incorporated into the calculation of penetration depth at various excitation wavelengths. Determinations of plasmon penetration depth with and without the bonding response for alkanethiolate-gold are compared and are shown to be significantly different for a thiol monolayer adsorbate system. Additionally, plasmon penetration depth evaluated with bonding effect compensation shows greater consistency over different adsorbate thicknesses and better agreement with theory derived from Maxwell's equation, particularly for adsorbate thicknesses that are much smaller (<5%) than the plasmon penetration depth. The method is also extended to a more practically applicable polyelectrolyte multilayer adsorbate system.

  13. An innovative zinc oxide-coated zeolite adsorbent for removal of humic acid.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lingling; Han, Changseok; Nadagouda, Mallikarjuna N; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2016-08-05

    Zinc oxide (ZnO)-coated zeolite adsorbents were developed by both nitric acid modification and Zn(NO3)2·6H2O functionalization of zeolite 4A. The developed adsorbents were used for the removal of humic acid (HA) from aqueous solutions. The synthesized materials were characterized by porosimetry analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-Ray diffraction analysis, and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The maximum adsorption capacity of the adsorbents at 21±1°C was about 60mgCg(-1). The results showed that the positive charge density of ZnO-coated zeolite adsorbents was proportional to the amount of ZnO coated on zeolite and thus, ZnO-coated zeolite adsorbents exhibited a greater affinity for negatively charged ions. Furthermore, the adsorption capacity of ZnO-coated zeolite adsorbents increased markedly after acid modification. Adsorption experiments demonstrated ZnO-coated zeolite adsorbents possessed high adsorption capacity to remove HA from aqueous solutions mainly due to strong electrostatic interactions between negative functional groups of HA and the positive charges of ZnO-coated zeolite adsorbents.

  14. Use of potassium dihydrogen phosphate and sawdust as adsorbents of ammoniacal nitrogen in aerobic composting process.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tian-Jue; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Huang, Dan-Lian; Yu, Hong-Yan; Jiang, Xiao-Yun; Dai, Fang; Huang, Guo-He

    2007-03-22

    Three kinds of adsorbents-potassium dihydrogen phosphate, sawdust and mixture of potassium dihydrogen phosphate and sawdust were added respectively into composting to investigate their adsorption effect on ammonia. The experimental results showed that all the adsorbents could restrain ammonia volatilizing, with the sorption of potassium dihydrogen phosphate adsorbents being the best of all, the sorption of mixture adsorbent with potassium dihydrogen phosphate and sawdust being the second and the sorption of sawdust adsorbent being the last. Therefore, the total nitrogen loss ratios respectively reduced from 38% to 13%, 15% and 21% after adding these three kinds of adsorbents into composting. However, potassium dihydrogen phosphate produced negative influence on composting properties as its supplemented amount exceeded a quantity basis equivalent to 18% of total nitrogen in the composting, for example: pH value had been lessened, microorganism activity reduced, which finally resulted in the reduction of biodegradation ratio of organic matter. But it did not result in these problems when using the mixture of potassium dihydrogen phosphate and sawdust as adsorbent, in which the amount of potassium dihydrogen phosphate was under a quantity basis equivalent to 6% of total nitrogen in the composting. Moreover, the mixture adsorbent produced better adsorption effect on ammonia, and raised biodegradation ratio of organic matter from 26% to 33%.

  15. Lysozyme adsorption onto mesoporous materials: effect of pore geometry and stability of adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Vinu, Ajayan; Miyahara, Masahiko; Hossain, Kazi Zakir; Takahashi, Motoi; Balasubramanian, Veerappan Vaithilingam; Mori, Toshiyuki; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2007-03-01

    In this paper, adsorption of lysozyme onto two kinds of mesoporous adsorbents (KIT-5 and AISBA-15) has been investigated and the results on the effects of pore geometry and stability of the adsorbents are also discussed. The KIT-5 mesoporous silica materials possess cage-type pore geometry while the AISBA-15 adsorbent has mesopores of cylindrical type with rather large diameter (9.7 nm). Adsorption of lysozyme onto AISBA-15 aluminosilicate obeys a Langmuir isotherm, resulting in pore occupation of 25 to 30%. In contrast, the KIT-5 adsorbents showed very small adsorption capacities for the lysozyme adsorption, typically falling in 6 to 13% of pore occupation. The cage-type KIT-5 adsorbents have narrow channel (4 to 6 nm) where penetration of the lysozyme (3 x 3 x 4.5 nm) might be restricted. The KIT-5 adsorbent tends to collapse after long-time immersion in water, as indicated by XRD patterns, while the AISBA-15 adsorbent retains its regular structure even after immersion in basic water for 4 days. These facts confirm superiority of the AISBA-15 as an adsorbent as compared with the KIT-5 mesoporous silicates. This research strikingly demonstrates the selection of mesoporous materials is crucial to achieve efficient immobilization of biomaterials in aqueous environment.

  16. Primary, secondary, and tertiary amines for CO2 capture: designing for mesoporous CO2 adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Ko, Young Gun; Shin, Seung Su; Choi, Ung Su

    2011-09-15

    CO(2) emissions, from fossil-fuel-burning power plants, the breathing, etc., influence the global worming on large scale and the man's work efficiency on small scale. The reversible capture of CO(2) is a prominent feature of CO(2) organic-inorganic hybrid adsorbent to sequester CO(2). Herein, (3-aminopropyl) trimethoxysilane (APTMS), [3-(methylamino)propyl] trimethoxysilane (MAPTMS), and [3-(diethylamino) propyl] trimethoxysilane (DEAPTMS) are immobilized on highly ordered mesoporous silicas (SBA-15) to catch CO(2) as primary, secondary, and tertiary aminosilica adsorbents. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to analyze the immobilized APTMS, MAPTMS, and DEAPTMS on the SBA-15. We report an interesting discovery that the CO(2) adsorption and desorption on the adsorbent depend on the amine type of the aminosilica adsorbent. The adsorbed CO(2) was easily desorbed from the adsorbent with the low energy consumption in the order of tertiary, secondary, and primary amino-adsorbents while the adsorption amount and the bonding-affinity increased in the reverse order. The effectiveness of amino-functionalized (1(o), 2(o), and 3(o) amines) SBA-15s as a CO(2) capturing agent was investigated in terms of adsorption capacity, adsorption-desorption kinetics, and thermodynamics. This work demonstrates apt amine types to catch CO(2) and regenerate the adsorbent, which may open new avenues to designing "CO(2) basket".

  17. Phosphorus removal from aqueous solutions using a synthesized adsorbent prepared from mineralized refuse and sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kaining; Zhao, Keqiang; Zhang, Houhu; Sun, Qinfang; Wu, Zhilin; Zhou, Yongmin; Zhong, Yongchao; Ke, Fan

    2013-01-01

    Mineralized refuse and sewage sludge generated from solid waste from municipal landfills and sewage treatment plants were sintered as a cost-effective adsorbent for the removal of phosphorus. Compared with the Freundlich model, phosphorus adsorption on the synthesized adsorbent, zeolite and ironstone was best described by the Langmuir model. Based on the Langmuir model, the maximum adsorption capacity of the synthesized adsorbent (9718 mg kg(-1)) was 13.7 and 25.4 times greater than those of zeolite and ironstone, respectively. The desorbability of phosphorus from the synthesized adsorbent was significantly lower than that of zeolite. Moreover, phosphorus removal using the synthesized adsorbent was more tolerant to pH fluctuations than zeolite and ironstone for the removal of phosphorus from aqueous solutions. The immobilization of phosphorus onto the synthesized adsorbent was attributed to the formation of insoluble calcium, aluminium and iron phosphorus. The heavy metal ion concentrations of the leachate of the synthesized adsorbent were negligible. The synthesized adsorbent prepared from mineralized refuse and sewage sludge was cost-effective and possessed a high adsorptive capacity for phosphorus removal from aqueous solutions.

  18. Sorption of methylene blue on treated agricultural adsorbents: equilibrium and kinetic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, D. P.; Singh, S. K.; Sharma, Neetu

    2015-03-01

    Agricultural adsorbents are reported to have a remarkable performance for adsorption of dyes. In the present study, formaldehyde and sulphuric acid treated two agricultural adsorbents; potato peel and neem bark are used to adsorb methylene blue. On the whole, the acid-treated adsorbents are investigated to have high sorption efficiency compared to HCHO treated adsorbents. The percentage removal efficiency of H2SO4 treated potato peel (APP) increases considerably high from 75 to 100 % with increase in adsorbent dose, whereas the removal efficiency of H2SO4 treated neem bark (ANB) is found to be 98 % after adding the first dose only. The monolayer sorption behaviour of HCHO treated potato peel (PP) and APP is well defined by Langmuir, whereas the chemisorptions behaviour of HCHO treated neem bark (NB) and ANB is suggested by Temkin's isotherm model. The maximum adsorption capacity measured is highest in ANB followed by NB, PP and APP with the values of 1000, 90, 47.62 and 40.0 mg/g, respectively. The pseudo-second-order kinetic model fitted well with the observed data of all the four adsorbents. The results obtained reveal that NB and ANB both are good adsorbents compared to PP and APP.

  19. Surface-enhanced raman spectra and molecular orientation of phthalazine adsorbed on a silver electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Machiko; Fujita, Masato; Ito, Masatoki

    1984-08-01

    SERS from phthalazine adsorbed on an Ag electrode was investigated under several conditions of applied voltage and solution concentration. Spectral assignments of the Raman bands were successfully performed and two differently oriented adsorbates, i.e. flat and end-on species, were identified. The contribution of the image field to the SERS intensity was considerable.

  20. Abstraction of Si and SiH x ( x=1, 2, 3) adsorbed on Cu(1 0 0) surfaces with gaseous H(D) towards silane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolovos-Vellianitis, D.; Kammler, Th.; Zecho, Th.; Küppers, J.

    2001-09-01

    The interaction of silane and disilane with Cu(1 0 0) surfaces was studied in the temperature range 77-650 K with thermal desorption and Auger electron spectroscopies. Silane admission to Cu(1 0 0) at low temperatures initially leads to a complete decomposition of the silanes into adsorbed Si and H. Close to saturation of the surface with H, SiH x species remain intact on the surface. They were identified as SiH 3 and to a smaller extent SiH 2 by monitoring the silane abstraction products and their kinetics during admitting gaseous D to the surface between 77 and 200 K. Silane desorption through recombination of SiH 3 and SiH 2 with adsorbed H occurs around 157 and 224 K, respectively. After hydrogen desorption around 300 K a Si covered surface remains, which can be converted to a clean Cu(1 0 0) surface by activating Si bulk diffusion around 700 K. Adsorbed Si is abstracted from the surface below 200 K by gaseous H via formation of silane through a sequence of four hydrogenation steps. The first hydrogenation reaction is rate determining and is significantly accelerated by increasing the temperature between 77 and 200 K. Above 200 K a thermally unstable SiH x species blocks the abstraction reaction. The reaction kinetics phenomenology is in accordance with an Eley-Rideal scenario.

  1. Molecular-scale interface engineering of nanocrystalline titania by co-adsorbents for solar energy conversion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mingkui; Plogmaker, Stefan; Humphry-Baker, Robin; Pechy, Peter; Rensmo, Håkan; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael

    2012-01-09

    The use of mixed self-assembled monolayers, combining hydrophobic co-adsorbents with the sensitizer, has been demonstrated to enhance the efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Herein, the influence of the anchoring groups of the co-adsorbents on the performance of the DSCs is carefully examined by selecting two model molecules: neohexyl phosphonic acid (NHOOP) and bis-(3,3-dimethyl-butyl)-phosphinic acid (DINHOP). The effect of these co-adsorbents on the photovoltaic performance (J-V curves, incident photon-to-electron conversion efficiency) is investigated. Photoelectron spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy are performed to assess the spatial configuration of adsorbed dye and co-adsorbent molecules. The photoelectron spectroscopy studies indicate that the ligands of the ruthenium complex, containing thiophene groups, point out away from the surface of TiO(2) in comparison with the NCS group.

  2. Extraction of bioavailable contaminants from marine sediments: an approach to reducing toxicity using adsorbent parcels.

    PubMed

    Goodsir, Freya; Fisher, Tom T; Barry, Jon; Bolam, Thi; Nelson, Leah D; Rumney, Heather S; Brant, Jan L

    2013-07-15

    This paper demonstrates an approach to reducing acute toxicity in marine sediments using adsorbent parcels. Acute toxicity tests were carried using the marine amphipod Corophium volutator. Marine sediments were spiked with two know contaminants tributyltin and naphthalene and then treated with adsorbent parcels containing either amberlite XAD4 or activated carbon. Results showed that both types of adsorbent parcels were effective in reducing acute toxicity, not only within spiked sediments containing naphthalene and/or tributyltin, but also in an environmental field samples form an expected contaminated site. Adsorbent parcels such as these could provide a practical approach to remediate areas of contaminated sediment within marine environments. Furthermore adsorbents can be used as an identification tool for problematic contaminants using a toxicity identification evaluation approach.

  3. Poly(ethylene oxide) Mushrooms Adsorbed at Silica-Ionic Liquid Interfaces Reduce Friction.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, James; Webber, Grant B; Atkin, Rob

    2016-03-01

    The adsorbed layer conformation and lubricity of 35, 100, and 300 kDa PEO adsorbed to ionic liquid (IL)-silica interfaces from 0.01 wt % solutions have been investigated using colloid probe atomic force microscopy. The ILs used were propylammonium nitrate (PAN) and 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([BMIM][BF4]), which are protic and aprotic ILs, respectively. Normal force curves reveal steric interactions consistent with adsorbed polymer layers which are best fit using the mushroom model. Friction measurements show that the adsorbed polymer layer markedly reduces friction compared to surfaces sliding in the pure ILs and that lubricity increases with polymer length. When polymer is adsorbed to the sliding surfaces, friction is controlled by the creation and disruption of intermolecular interactions between entangled chains and the dragging of polymer chains through the interpenetration region. These experiments show that added polymer can reduce friction while maintaining the useful properties of ILs as lubricants.

  4. Thermodynamic formalism of water uptakes on solid porous adsorbents for adsorption cooling applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Baichuan; Chakraborty, Anutosh

    2014-05-01

    This Letter presents a thermodynamic formulation to calculate the amount of water vapor uptakes on various adsorbents such as zeolites, metal organic frameworks, and silica gel for the development of an advanced adsorption chiller. This formalism is developed from the rigor of the partition distribution function of each water vapor adsorptive site on adsorbents and the condensation approximation of adsorptive water molecules and is validated with experimental data. An interesting and useful finding has been established that the proposed model is thermodynamically connected with the pore structures of adsorbent materials, and the water vapor uptake highly depends on the isosteric heat of adsorption at zero surface coverage and the adsorptive sites of the adsorbent materials. Employing the proposed model, the thermodynamic trends of water vapor uptakes on various adsorbents can be estimated.

  5. Chirality transfer from gold nanocluster to adsorbate evidenced by vibrational circular dichroism

    PubMed Central

    Dolamic, Igor; Varnholt, Birte; Bürgi, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The transfer of chirality from one set of molecules to another is fundamental for applications in chiral technology and has likely played a crucial role for establishing homochirality on earth. Here we show that an intrinsically chiral gold cluster can transfer its handedness to an achiral molecule adsorbed on its surface. Solutions of chiral Au38(2-PET)24 (2-PET=2-phenylethylthiolate) cluster enantiomers show strong vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) signals in vibrations of the achiral adsorbate. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that 2-PET molecules adopt a chiral conformation. Chirality transfer from the cluster to the achiral adsorbate is responsible for the preference of one of the two mirror images. Intermolecular interactions between the adsorbed molecules on the crowded cluster surface seem to play a dominant role for the phenomena. Such chirality transfer from metals to adsorbates likely plays an important role in heterogeneous enantioselective catalysis. PMID:25960309

  6. Chirality transfer from gold nanocluster to adsorbate evidenced by vibrational circular dichroism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolamic, Igor; Varnholt, Birte; Bürgi, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    The transfer of chirality from one set of molecules to another is fundamental for applications in chiral technology and has likely played a crucial role for establishing homochirality on earth. Here we show that an intrinsically chiral gold cluster can transfer its handedness to an achiral molecule adsorbed on its surface. Solutions of chiral Au38(2-PET)24 (2-PET=2-phenylethylthiolate) cluster enantiomers show strong vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) signals in vibrations of the achiral adsorbate. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations reveal that 2-PET molecules adopt a chiral conformation. Chirality transfer from the cluster to the achiral adsorbate is responsible for the preference of one of the two mirror images. Intermolecular interactions between the adsorbed molecules on the crowded cluster surface seem to play a dominant role for the phenomena. Such chirality transfer from metals to adsorbates likely plays an important role in heterogeneous enantioselective catalysis.

  7. Electric field cancellation on quartz by Rb adsorbate-induced negative electron affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaffer, James

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the (0001) surface of single crystal quartz with a submonolayer of Rb adsorbates. Using Rydberg atom electromagnetically induced transparency, we investigate the electric fields resulting from Rb adsorbed on the quartz surface, and measure the activation energy of the Rb adsorbates. We show that the adsorbed Rb induces a negative electron affinity (NEA) on the quartz surface. The NEA surface allows low energy electrons to bind to the surface and cancel the electric field from the Rb adsorbates. Our results are important for integrating Rydberg atoms into hybrid quantum systems and the fundamental study of atom-surface interactions, as well as applications for electrons bound to a 2D surface. This work was supported by the DARPA Quasar program by a Grant through ARO (60181-PH-DRP) and the AFOSR (FA9550-12-1-0282),.

  8. Molecule-specific interactions of diatomic adsorbates at metal-liquid interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Kraack, Jan Philip; Kaech, Andres; Hamm, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Ultrafast vibrational dynamics of small molecules on platinum (Pt) layers in water are investigated using 2D attenuated total reflectance IR spectroscopy. Isotope combinations of carbon monoxide and cyanide are used to elucidate inter-adsorbate and substrate-adsorbate interactions. Despite observed cross-peaks in the CO spectra, we conclude that the molecules are not vibrationally coupled. Rather, strong substrate-adsorbate interactions evoke rapid (∼2 ps) vibrational relaxation from the adsorbate into the Pt layer, leading to thermal cross-peaks. In the case of CN, vibrational relaxation is significantly slower (∼10 ps) and dominated by adsorbate-solvent interactions, while the coupling to the substrate is negligible.

  9. Preparation and characterization of a novel adsorbent from Moringa oleifera leaf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bello, Olugbenga Solomon; Adegoke, Kayode Adesina; Akinyunni, Opeyemi Omowumi

    2015-10-01

    A new and novel adsorbent was obtained by impregnation of Moringa oleifera leaf in H2SO4 and NaOH, respectively. Prepared adsorbents were characterized using elemental analysis, FT-IR, SEM, TGA and EDX analyses, respectively. The effects of operational parameters, such as pH, moisture content, ash content, porosity and iodine number on these adsorbents were investigated and compared with those of commercial activated carbon (CAC). EDX results of acid activated M. oleifera leaf have the highest percentage of carbon by weight (69.40 %) and (76.11 %) by atom, respectively. Proximate analysis showed that the fixed carbon content of acid activated M. oleifera leaf (69.14 ± 0.01) was the highest of all adsorbents studied. Conclusively, the present investigation shows that acid activated M. oleifera leaf is a good alternative adsorbent that could be used in lieu of CAC for recovery of dyes and heavy metal from aqueous solutions and other separation techniques.

  10. Solid-state conversion of fly ash to effective adsorbents for Cu removal from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaobin; Li, Lin; Zhu, Z H

    2007-01-10

    Solid-state conversion of fly ash to an amorphous aluminosilicate adsorbent (geopolymer) has been investigated under different conditions and the synthesised material has been tested for Cu2+ removal from aqueous solution. It has been found that higher reaction temperature and Na:FA ratio will make the adsorbents achieving higher removal efficiency. The adsorbent loading and Cu2+ initial concentration will also affect the removal efficiency while the adsorption capacity exhibits similarly at 30-40 degrees C. The adsorption capacity of the synthesised adsorbent shows much higher value than fly ash and natural zeolite. The capacity is 0.1, 3.5 and 92 mg/g, for fly ash, natural zeolite, and FA derived adsorbent, respectively. The kinetic studies indicate that the adsorption can be fitted by the second-order kinetic model. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms also can fit to the adsorption isotherm.

  11. Development of carbon dioxide adsorbent from rice husk char

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abang, S.; Janaun, J.; Anisuzzaman, S. M.; Ikhwan, F. S.

    2016-06-01

    This study was mainly concerned about the development of carbon dioxide (CO2) adsorbent from rice husk (RH). Several chemical treatments were used to produce activated rice husk char (RHAC) from RH. Initially the RH was refluxed with 3M of sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution, activation followed by using 0.5M of zinc chloride (ZnCl2) solution and finally acidic treatment by using 0.1M of hydrochloric acid (HCl). Then, the RHAC was functionalized by using 3-chloropropylamine hydrochloride (3-CPA) and noted as RHN. RHN samples were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Based on the SEM, the RHN sample had a large pore diameter compared to RH sample after being treated. Based on MIP data, the average pore diameter between RH and RHAC samples were increased significantly from 0.928 microns to 1.017 microns. The RHN sample also had higher total porosity (%) compared to RHAC and RH (58.45%, 47.82% and 45.57% respectively). The total specific surface area of the sample was much increasing from RHO to RHAC (29.17 m2/g and 62.94 m2/g respectively) and slightly being decreasing from RHAC to RHN (58.88 m2/g). FTIR result showed the present of weak band at 1587 cm-1 which demonstrating of the amine group present on the sample. The CO2 capture result showed that the decreasing of operating temperature can increase the breakthrough time of CO2 capture. On the contrary decreasing of CO2 gas flow rate can increase the breakthrough time of CO2 capture. The highest total amount of CO2 adsorbed was 25338.57 mg of CO2/g of RHN sample by using 100 mL/min of gas flow rate at 30oC. Based on adsorption isotherm analysis, the Freundlich isotherm was the best isotherm to describe the CO2 adsorption on the sample.

  12. Multiple species of noninteracting molecules adsorbed on a Bethe lattice.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael; Harris, A B

    2008-10-01

    A simple method, previously used to calculate the equilibrium concentration of dimers adsorbed on a Bethe lattice as a function of the dimer activity, is generalized to solve the problem of a Bethe lattice in contact with a reservoir containing a mixture of molecules. The molecules may have arbitrary sizes and shapes consistent with the geometry of the lattice and the molecules do not interact with one another except for the hard-core restriction that two molecules cannot touch the same site. We obtain a set of simultaneous nonlinear equations, one equation for each species of molecule, which determines the equilibrium concentration of each type of molecule as a function of the (arbitrary) activities of the various species. Surprisingly, regardless of the number of species, the equilibrium concentrations are given explicitly in terms of the solution of a single equation in one unknown which can be solved numerically, if need be. Some numerical examples show that increasing the activity of one species need not necessarily decrease the equilibrium concentration of all other species. We also calculate the adsorption isotherm of an "annealed" Bethe lattice consisting of two types of sites which differently influence the activity of an adsorbed molecule. We prove that if the reservoir contains a finite number of molecular species, regions of two different polymer densities cannot simultaneously exist on the lattice. The widely used Guggenheim theory of mixtures, which can also be construed as a theory of adsorption, assumes for simplicity that the molecules in the mixture are composed of elementary units, which occupy sites of a lattice of coordination number q . Guggenheim's analysis relies on approximate combinatorial formulas which become exact on a Bethe lattice of the same coordination number, as we show in an appendix. Our analysis involves no combinatorics and relies only on recognizing the statistical independence of certain quantities. Despite the nominal

  13. Extra adsorption and adsorbate superlattice formation in metal-organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Sung Cho, Hae; Deng, Hexiang; Miyasaka, Keiichi; Dong, Zhiyue; Cho, Minhyung; Neimark, Alexander V; Ku Kang, Jeung; Yaghi, Omar M; Terasaki, Osamu

    2015-11-26

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have a high internal surface area and widely tunable composition, which make them useful for applications involving adsorption, such as hydrogen, methane or carbon dioxide storage. The selectivity and uptake capacity of the adsorption process are determined by interactions involving the adsorbates and their porous host materials. But, although the interactions of adsorbate molecules with the internal MOF surface and also amongst themselves within individual pores have been extensively studied, adsorbate-adsorbate interactions across pore walls have not been explored. Here we show that local strain in the MOF, induced by pore filling, can give rise to collective and long-range adsorbate-adsorbate interactions and the formation of adsorbate superlattices that extend beyond an original MOF unit cell. Specifically, we use in situ small-angle X-ray scattering to track and map the distribution and ordering of adsorbate molecules in five members of the mesoporous MOF-74 series along entire adsorption-desorption isotherms. We find in all cases that the capillary condensation that fills the pores gives rise to the formation of 'extra adsorption domains'-that is, domains spanning several neighbouring pores, which have a higher adsorbate density than non-domain pores. In the case of one MOF, IRMOF-74-V-hex, these domains form a superlattice structure that is difficult to reconcile with the prevailing view of pore-filling as a stochastic process. The visualization of the adsorption process provided by our data, with clear evidence for initial adsorbate aggregation in distinct domains and ordering before an even distribution is finally reached, should help to improve our understanding of this process and may thereby improve our ability to exploit it practically.

  14. Extra adsorption and adsorbate superlattice formation in metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung Cho, Hae; Deng, Hexiang; Miyasaka, Keiichi; Dong, Zhiyue; Cho, Minhyung; Neimark, Alexander V.; Ku Kang, Jeung; Yaghi, Omar M.; Terasaki, Osamu

    2015-11-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have a high internal surface area and widely tunable composition, which make them useful for applications involving adsorption, such as hydrogen, methane or carbon dioxide storage. The selectivity and uptake capacity of the adsorption process are determined by interactions involving the adsorbates and their porous host materials. But, although the interactions of adsorbate molecules with the internal MOF surface and also amongst themselves within individual pores have been extensively studied, adsorbate-adsorbate interactions across pore walls have not been explored. Here we show that local strain in the MOF, induced by pore filling, can give rise to collective and long-range adsorbate-adsorbate interactions and the formation of adsorbate superlattices that extend beyond an original MOF unit cell. Specifically, we use in situ small-angle X-ray scattering to track and map the distribution and ordering of adsorbate molecules in five members of the mesoporous MOF-74 series along entire adsorption-desorption isotherms. We find in all cases that the capillary condensation that fills the pores gives rise to the formation of ‘extra adsorption domains’—that is, domains spanning several neighbouring pores, which have a higher adsorbate density than non-domain pores. In the case of one MOF, IRMOF-74-V-hex, these domains form a superlattice structure that is difficult to reconcile with the prevailing view of pore-filling as a stochastic process. The visualization of the adsorption process provided by our data, with clear evidence for initial adsorbate aggregation in distinct domains and ordering before an even distribution is finally reached, should help to improve our understanding of this process and may thereby improve our ability to exploit it practically.

  15. Gas Sensing with Bare and Graphene-covered Optical Nano-Antenna Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Bhaven; Benkstein, Kurt D.; Semancik, Steve; Zaghloul, Mona E.

    2016-02-01

    The motivation behind this work is to study the gas phase chemical sensing characteristics of optical (plasmonic) nano-antennas (ONA) and graphene/graphene oxide-covered versions of these structures. ONA are devices that have their resonating frequency in the visible range. The basic principle governing the detection mechanism for ONA is refractive index sensing. The change in the concentration of the analyte results in a differing amount of adsorbate and correlated shifts in the resonance wavelength of the device. In this work, bare and graphene or graphene oxide covered ONA have been evaluated for gas sensing performance. Four different analytes (ethanol, acetone, nitrogen dioxide and toluene) were used in testing. ONA response behavior to different analytes was modified by adsorption within the graphene and graphene oxide overlayers. This work is a preliminary study to understand resonance wavelength shift caused by different analytes. Results imply that the combination of well-structured ONA functionalized by graphene-based adsorbers can give sensitive and selective sensors but baseline drift effects identified in this work must be addressed for applied measurements.

  16. Gas Sensing with Bare and Graphene-covered Optical Nano-Antenna Structures

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Bhaven; Benkstein, Kurt D.; Semancik, Steve; Zaghloul, Mona E.

    2016-01-01

    The motivation behind this work is to study the gas phase chemical sensing characteristics of optical (plasmonic) nano-antennas (ONA) and graphene/graphene oxide-covered versions of these structures. ONA are devices that have their resonating frequency in the visible range. The basic principle governing the detection mechanism for ONA is refractive index sensing. The change in the concentration of the analyte results in a differing amount of adsorbate and correlated shifts in the resonance wavelength of the device. In this work, bare and graphene or graphene oxide covered ONA have been evaluated for gas sensing performance. Four different analytes (ethanol, acetone, nitrogen dioxide and toluene) were used in testing. ONA response behavior to different analytes was modified by adsorption within the graphene and graphene oxide overlayers. This work is a preliminary study to understand resonance wavelength shift caused by different analytes. Results imply that the combination of well-structured ONA functionalized by graphene-based adsorbers can give sensitive and selective sensors but baseline drift effects identified in this work must be addressed for applied measurements. PMID:26883289

  17. Detection of individual gas molecules adsorbed on graphene.

    PubMed

    Schedin, F; Geim, A K; Morozov, S V; Hill, E W; Blake, P; Katsnelson, M I; Novoselov, K S

    2007-09-01

    The ultimate aim of any detection method is to achieve such a level of sensitivity that individual quanta of a measured entity can be resolved. In the case of chemical sensors, the quantum is one atom or molecule. Such resolution has so far been beyond the reach of any detection technique, including solid-state gas sensors hailed for their exceptional sensitivity. The fundamental reason limiting the resolution of such sensors is fluctuations due to thermal motion of charges and defects, which lead to intrinsic noise exceeding the sought-after signal from individual molecules, usually by many orders of magnitude. Here, we show that micrometre-size sensors made from graphene are capable of detecting individual events when a gas molecule attaches to or detaches from graphene's surface. The adsorbed molecules change the local carrier concentration in graphene one by one electron, which leads to step-like changes in resistance. The achieved sensitivity is due to the fact that graphene is an exceptionally low-noise material electronically, which makes it a promising candidate not only for chemical detectors but also for other applications where local probes sensitive to external charge, magnetic field or mechanical strain are required.

  18. Efficiency of sepiolite in broilers diet as uranium adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Mitrović, Branislava M; Jovanović, Milijan; Lazarević-Macanović, Mirjana; Janaćković, Djordje; Krstić, Nikola; Stojanović, Mirjana; Mirilović, Milorad

    2015-05-01

    The use of phosphate mineral products in animal nutrition, as a major source of phosphor and calcium, can lead to uranium entering the food chain. The aim of the present study was to determine the protective effect of natural sepiolite and sepiolite treated with acid for broilers after oral intake of uranium. The broilers were contaminated for 7 days with 25 mg/uranyl nitrate per day. Two different adsorbents (natural sepiolite and sepiolite treated with acid) were given via gastric tube immediately after the oral administration of uranium. Natural sepiolite reduced uranium distribution by 57% in kidney, 80% in liver, 42% in brain, and 56% in muscle. A lower protective effect was observed after the administration of sepiolite treated with acid, resulting in significant damage of intestinal villi in the form of shortening, fragmentation, and necrosis, and histopathological lesions on kidney in the form of edema and abruption of epithelial cells in tubules. When broilers received only sepiolite treated with acid (no uranyl nitrate), shortening of intestinal villi occurred. Kidney injuries were evident when uranium concentrations in kidney were 0.88 and 1.25 µg/g dry weight. It is concluded that adding of natural sepiolite to the diets of broilers can reduce uranium distribution in organs by significant amount without adverse side effects.

  19. Interactions of NO2 with sewage sludge based composite adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Pietrzak, Robert; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2008-06-15

    Interactions of NO2 present in most air were analyzed at room temperature on composite sewage sludge-derived adsorbents. They consist of carbonaceous and inorganic phases with the majority of the latter. The adsorption capacity was evaluated using the dynamic breakthrough experiments. The materials before and after NO2 exposure were characterized using adsorption of nitrogen, thermal analysis and FTIR. The results showed differences in the surface activities of sludge-derived materials towards immobilization and reduction of nitric dioxide. Nitrates and nitrite are the main products of surface reactions. This is linked to the presence of active oxides and hydroxides, which are formed when the surface is exposed to water. The highest activity of the sample pyrolyzed at 650 degrees C is owing to the high content of those species formed as a result of decomposition of inorganic salts (likely chlorides, sulfates and phosphates) during thermal treatment. When sludge is pyrolyzed at 950 degrees C those oxides are engaged in stable mineral phases formed in solid-state reactions, which limits the surface activity towards NO2 retention. The reactivity of the high temperature pyrolyzed samples can be linked to the physical adsorption of water. In a water film nitrous and nitric acid can be formed and they can further react with inorganic and carbonaceous phases to the limited extent.

  20. Morin Flavonoid Adsorbed on Mesoporous Silica, a Novel Antioxidant Nanomaterial.

    PubMed

    Arriagada, Francisco; Correa, Olosmira; Günther, Germán; Nonell, Santi; Mura, Francisco; Olea-Azar, Claudio; Morales, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Morin (2´,3, 4´,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) is a flavonoid with several beneficial health effects. However, its poor water solubility and it sensitivity to several environmental factors avoid its use in applications like pharmaceutical and cosmetic. In this work, we synthetized morin-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (AMSNPs-MOR) as useful material to be used as potential nanoantioxidant. To achieve this, we characterized its adsorption kinetics, isotherm and the antioxidant capacity as hydroxyl radical (HO•) scavenger and singlet oxygen (1O2) quencher. The experimental data could be well fitted with Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models, besides the pseudo-second order kinetics model. The total quenching rate constant obtained for singlet oxygen deactivation by AMSNPs-MOR was one order of magnitude lower than the morin rate constant reported previously in neat solvents and lipid membranes. The AMSNPs-MOR have good antioxidant properties by itself and exhibit a synergic effect with morin on the antioxidant property against hydroxyl radical. This effect, in the range of concentrations studied, was increased when the amount of morin adsorbed increased.

  1. Morin Flavonoid Adsorbed on Mesoporous Silica, a Novel Antioxidant Nanomaterial

    PubMed Central

    Arriagada, Francisco; Correa, Olosmira; Günther, Germán; Nonell, Santi; Mura, Francisco; Olea-Azar, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Morin (2´,3, 4´,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone) is a flavonoid with several beneficial health effects. However, its poor water solubility and it sensitivity to several environmental factors avoid its use in applications like pharmaceutical and cosmetic. In this work, we synthetized morin-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (AMSNPs-MOR) as useful material to be used as potential nanoantioxidant. To achieve this, we characterized its adsorption kinetics, isotherm and the antioxidant capacity as hydroxyl radical (HO•) scavenger and singlet oxygen (1O2) quencher. The experimental data could be well fitted with Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isotherm models, besides the pseudo-second order kinetics model. The total quenching rate constant obtained for singlet oxygen deactivation by AMSNPs-MOR was one order of magnitude lower than the morin rate constant reported previously in neat solvents and lipid membranes. The AMSNPs-MOR have good antioxidant properties by itself and exhibit a synergic effect with morin on the antioxidant property against hydroxyl radical. This effect, in the range of concentrations studied, was increased when the amount of morin adsorbed increased. PMID:27812111

  2. Adsorbed Methane Film Properties in Nanoporous Carbon Monoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo, Yuchoong; Chada, Nagaraju; Beckner, Matthew; Romanos, Jimmy; Burress, Jacob; Pfeifer, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Carbon briquetting can increase methane storage capacity by reducing the useless void volume resulting in a better packing density. It is a robust and efficient space-filling form for an adsorbed natural gas vehicle storage tank. To optimize methane storage capacity, we studied three fabrication process parameters: carbon-to-binder ratio, compaction temperature, and pyrolysis temperature. We found that carbon-to-binder ratio and pyrolysis temperature both have large influences on monolith uptakes. We have been able to optimize these parameters for high methane storage. All monolith uptakes (up to 260 bar) were measured by a custom-built, volumetric, reservoir-type instrument. The saturated film density and the film thickness was determined using linear extrapolation on the high pressure excess adsorption isotherms. The saturated film density was also determined using the monolayer Ono-Kondo model. Film densities ranged from ca. 0.32 g/cm3 - 0.37 g/cm3.The Ono-Kondo model also determines the binding energy of methane. Binding energies were also determined from isosteric heats calculated from the Clausius-Clapeyron equation and compared with the Ono-Kondo model method. Binding energies from Ono-Kondo were ca. 7.8 kJ/mol - 10 kJ/mol. Work funded by California Energy Commission Contract #500-08-022.

  3. Utilization of Rice Husk as Pb Adsorbent in Blood Cockles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohaeti, Eti; Permata Sari, Wenny; Batubara, Irmanida

    2016-01-01

    Water pollution by lead affects blood cockles, a potential source of food. The aim of this research is to compare rice husk (RH) and rice husk carbon (RHC) in reducing the concentration of lead in blood cockles. RH and RHC were activated with NaOH 1 M, and then the optimal conditions and maximum capacity were determined. This research showed that RH and RHC had maximum adsorbancy capacities of 28.7326 mg/g and 51.5464 mg/g at optimal condition. The optimal adsorption condition for RH in 100 ml Pb solution is 0.32 gram, pH 5, for 4 hours. The optimal adsorption condition for RHC in 100 ml Pb solution is 0.20 gram, pH 5, for 2 hours. Lead content in blood cockles from the north waters of Jakarta (1.9658 mg/kg) is beyond the threshold limit. Lead adsorption by RH and RHC could reduce lead content in blood cockles by about 40% and 31%, respectively.

  4. Tunable magnetism in metal adsorbed fluorinated nanoporous graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Sharma, Vinit; Reboredo, Fernando A.; Yang, Li-Ming; Pushpa, Raghani

    2016-08-01

    Developing nanostructures with tunable magnetic states is crucial for designing novel data storage and quantum information devices. Using density functional theory, we investigate the thermodynamic stability and magnetic properties of tungsten adsorbed tri-vacancy fluorinated (TVF) graphene. We demonstrate a strong structure-property relationship and its response to external stimuli via defect engineering in graphene-based materials. Complex interplay between defect states and the chemisorbed atom results in a large magnetic moment of 7 μB along with high in-plane magneto-crystalline anisotropy energy (MAE) of 17 meV. Under the influence of electric field, spin crossover effect accompanied by a change in the MAE is observed. The ascribed change in spin-configuration is caused by the modification of exchange coupling between defect states and a change in the occupation of d-orbitals of the metal complex. Our predictions open a promising way towards controlling the magnetic properties in graphene based spintronic and non-volatile memory devices.

  5. Modulation of the molecular spintronic properties of adsorbed copper corroles

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fan; Liu, Jie; Mishra, Puneet; Komeda, Tadahiro; Mack, John; Chang, Yi; Kobayashi, Nagao; Shen, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    The ability to modulate the spin states of adsorbed molecules is in high demand for molecular spintronics applications. Here, we demonstrate that the spin state of a corrole complex can be tuned by expanding its fused ring as a result of the modification to the d–π interaction between the metal and ligand. A bicyclo[2.2.2]octadiene-fused copper corrole can readily be converted into a tetrabenzocorrole radical on an Au(111) substrate during the sublimation process. In the scanning tunnelling spectroscopy spectrum, a sharp Kondo resonance appears near the Fermi level on the corrole ligand of the tetrabenzocorrole molecule. In contrast, a non-fused-ring-expanded copper corrole molecule, copper 5,10,15-triphenylcorrole, shows no such Kondo feature. Mapping of the Kondo resonance demonstrates that the spin distribution of the tetrabenzocorrole molecule can be further modified by the rotation of the meso-aryl groups, in a manner that could lead to applications in molecular spintronics. PMID:26112968

  6. Dietary bioavailability of Cu adsorbed to colloidal hydrous ferric oxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cain, Daniel J.; Croteau, Marie-Noële; Fuller, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    The dietary bioavailability of copper (Cu) adsorbed to synthetic colloidal hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was evaluated from the assimilation of 65Cu by two benthic grazers, a gastropod and a larval mayfly. HFO was synthesized, labeled with 65Cu to achieve a Cu/Fe ratio comparable to that determined in naturally formed HFO, and then aged. The labeled colloids were mixed with a food source (the diatom Nitzschia palea) to yield dietary 65Cu concentrations ranging from 211 to 2204 nmol/g (dry weight). Animals were pulse fed the contaminated diet and assimilation of 65Cu from HFO was determined following 1–3 days of depuration. Mass transfer of 65Cu from HFO to the diatom was less than 1%, indicating that HFO was the source of 65Cu to the grazers. Estimates of assimilation efficiency indicated that the majority of Cu ingested as HFO was assimilated (values >70%), implying that colloidal HFO potentially represents a source of dietary Cu to benthic grazers, especially where there is active formation and infiltration of these particles into benthic substrates.

  7. New insights into the ideal adsorbed solution theory.

    PubMed

    Furmaniak, Sylwester; Koter, Stanisław; Terzyk, Artur P; Gauden, Piotr A; Kowalczyk, Piotr; Rychlicki, Gerhard

    2015-03-21

    The GCMC technique is used for simulation of adsorption of CO2-CH4, CO2-N2 and CH4-N2 mixtures (at 298 K) on six porous carbon models. Next we formulate a new condition of the IAS concept application, showing that our simulated data obey this condition. Calculated deviations between IAS predictions and simulation results increase with the rise in pressure as in the real experiment. For the weakly adsorbed mixture component the deviation from IAS predictions is higher, especially when its content in the gas mixture is low, and this is in agreement with the experimental data. Calculated activity coefficients have similar plots to deviations between IAS and simulations, moreover obtained from simulated data activity coefficients are similar qualitatively as well as quantitatively to experimental data. Since the physical interpretation of activity coefficients is completely lacking we show for the first time that they can be described by the formulas derived from the expression for G(ex) for the ternary mixture. Finally we also for the first time show the linear relationship between the chemical potentials of nonideal and ideal solutions and the reduced temperature of interacting mixture components, and it is proved that the deviation from ideality is larger if adsorption occurs in a more microporous system.

  8. Tunable magnetism in metal adsorbed fluorinated nanoporous graphene

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pankaj; Sharma, Vinit; Reboredo, Fernando A.; Yang, Li-Ming; Pushpa, Raghani

    2016-01-01

    Developing nanostructures with tunable magnetic states is crucial for designing novel data storage and quantum information devices. Using density functional theory, we investigate the thermodynamic stability and magnetic properties of tungsten adsorbed tri-vacancy fluorinated (TVF) graphene. We demonstrate a strong structure-property relationship and its response to external stimuli via defect engineering in graphene-based materials. Complex interplay between defect states and the chemisorbed atom results in a large magnetic moment of 7 μB along with high in-plane magneto-crystalline anisotropy energy (MAE) of 17 meV. Under the influence of electric field, spin crossover effect accompanied by a change in the MAE is observed. The ascribed change in spin-configuration is caused by the modification of exchange coupling between defect states and a change in the occupation of d-orbitals of the metal complex. Our predictions open a promising way towards controlling the magnetic properties in graphene based spintronic and non-volatile memory devices. PMID:27554975

  9. Adsorption of copper cyanide on chemically active adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.S.; Deorkar, N.V.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1998-07-01

    An inorganic chemically active adsorbent (ICAA), SG(1)-TEPA (tetraethylenepentaamine)-propyl, is developed for removal, recovery, and recycling of copper cyanide from industrial waste streams. Equilibrium studies are executed to determine and model adsorption of the copper cyanide complex from aqueous solutions in a batch and packed column. It appears that adsorption is dependent on anionic copper cyanide species and the basicity of the ligand. Aqueous-phase equilibrium modeling shows that monovalent (Cu(CN){sub 2}{sup {minus}}), divalent (Cu(CN){sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), and trivalent (Cu(CN){sub 4}{sup 3{minus}}) species of copper cyanide exist in the solution, depending on the pH and the concentration of total cyanide ions. Batch adsorption data are modeled using a modified multicomponent Langmuir isotherm which includes aqueous-phase speciation and basicity of the SG(1)-TEPA-propyl. This developed model is applied with a mass balance equation to describe the adsorption of copper cyanide complexes in a packed column.

  10. Tunable magnetism in metal adsorbed fluorinated nanoporous graphene

    DOE PAGES

    Kumar, Pankaj; Sharma, Vinit; Reboredo, Fernando A.; ...

    2016-08-24

    Developing nanostructures with tunable magnetic states is crucial for designing novel data storage and quantum information devices. Using density functional theory, we study the thermodynamic stability and magnetic properties of tungsten adsorbed tri-vacancy fluorinated (TVF) graphene. We demonstrate a strong structure-property relationship and its response to external stimuli via defect engineering in graphene-based materials. Complex interplay between defect states and the chemisorbed atom results in a large magnetic moment of 7 μB along with high in-plane magneto-crystalline anisotropy energy (MAE) of 17 meV. Under the influence of electric field, spin crossover effect accompanied by a change in the MAE ismore » observed. The ascribed change in spin-configuration is caused by the modification of exchange coupling between defect states and a change in the occupation of d-orbitals of the metal complex. In conclusion, our predictions open a promising way towards controlling the magnetic properties in graphene based spintronic and non-volatile memory devices.« less

  11. Tunable magnetism in metal adsorbed fluorinated nanoporous graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Pankaj; Sharma, Vinit; Reboredo, Fernando A.; Yang, Li-Ming; Pushpa, Raghani

    2016-08-24

    Developing nanostructures with tunable magnetic states is crucial for designing novel data storage and quantum information devices. Using density functional theory, we study the thermodynamic stability and magnetic properties of tungsten adsorbed tri-vacancy fluorinated (TVF) graphene. We demonstrate a strong structure-property relationship and its response to external stimuli via defect engineering in graphene-based materials. Complex interplay between defect states and the chemisorbed atom results in a large magnetic moment of 7 μB along with high in-plane magneto-crystalline anisotropy energy (MAE) of 17 meV. Under the influence of electric field, spin crossover effect accompanied by a change in the MAE is observed. The ascribed change in spin-configuration is caused by the modification of exchange coupling between defect states and a change in the occupation of d-orbitals of the metal complex. In conclusion, our predictions open a promising way towards controlling the magnetic properties in graphene based spintronic and non-volatile memory devices.

  12. Adsorption and separation of proteins by collagen fiber adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Liao, Xue-pin; Zhang, Qi-xian; Shi, Bi

    2013-06-01

    The separation of proteins is a key step in biomedical and pharmaceutical industries. In the present investigation, the collagen fiber adsorbent (CFA) was exploited as column packing material to separate proteins. Bovine serum albumin (BSA), bovine hemoglobin (Hb) and lysozyme (LYS) that have different isoelectric points (pIs) were selected as model proteins to investigate the separation ability of CFA to proteins. In batch adsorption, the adsorption behaviors of these proteins on CFA under different pHs and ionic strengths indicated that the electrostatic interaction plays a predominant role in the adsorption of proteins on CFA. CFA exhibited high adsorption capacity to Hb and LYS. In column separation, the proteins were completely separated by adjusting pH and ionic strength of the eluent. The increase of flow rate could reduce the separation time with no influence on the recovery of protein in the experimental range. The protein recovery was higher than 90% even when the CFA column was re-used for 4 times in separation of BSA and LYS, and the retention time of BSA or LYS was almost constant during the repeated applications. In addition, as a practical application, LYS was successfully separated from chicken egg white powder by CFA column.

  13. Adsorbed polymers under flow. A stochastic dynamical system approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, Robert; Jhon, Myung S.

    1985-09-01

    Recent experiments have shown that porous filters preadsorbed with polymer molecules exhibit an anomalously high pressure drop at high rates of flow. We have modeled the adsorbed polymers as dynamical systems and have found that the introduction of hydrodynamic interaction between molecules destabilizes at a high applied shear. As a direct result this instability will cause the molecules to unravel and stretch far into the cross section of the pore, and thus by inference, cause the observed anomalously high pressure drop. Although much of this paper is devoted to the stability characteristics of the deterministic system, Brownian motion is also considered, and an account of the statistics of the Brownian system when the deterministic system becomes unstable is given. The examples revealed in this paper are not of sufficient complexity to calculate with any accuracy the magnitude of this anomalous pressure drop. We simply present a procedure by which a large variety of more complex models could be undertaken and their ultimate effect clearly understood.

  14. Structures of multidomain proteins adsorbed on hydrophobic interaction chromatography surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gospodarek, Adrian M; Sun, Weitong; O'Connell, John P; Fernandez, Erik J

    2014-12-05

    In hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), interactions between buried hydrophobic residues and HIC surfaces can cause conformational changes that interfere with separations and cause yield losses. This paper extends our previous investigations of protein unfolding in HIC chromatography by identifying protein structures on HIC surfaces under denaturing conditions and relating them to solution behavior. The thermal unfolding of three model multidomain proteins on three HIC surfaces of differing hydrophobicities was investigated with hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HXMS). The data were analyzed to obtain unfolding rates and Gibbs free energies for unfolding of adsorbed proteins. The melting temperatures of the proteins were lowered, but by different amounts, on the different surfaces. In addition, the structures of the proteins on the chromatographic surfaces were similar to the partially unfolded structures produced in the absence of a surface by temperature as well as by chemical denaturants. Finally, it was found that patterns of residue exposure to solvent on different surfaces at different temperatures can be largely superimposed. These findings suggest that protein unfolding on various HIC surfaces might be quantitatively related to protein unfolding in solution and that details of surface unfolding behavior might be generalized.

  15. Investigations Into the Reusability of Amidoxime-Based Polymeric Uranium Adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Li-Jung; Gill, Gary A.; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Wood, Jordana R.; Schlafer, Nicholas J.; Wai, Chien M.; Pan, H. B.

    2016-09-28

    Significant advancements in amidoxime-based polymeric adsorbents to extract uranium from seawater are achieved in recent years. The success of uranium adsorbent development can help provide a sustainable supply of fuel for nuclear reactors. To bring down the production cost of this new technology, in addition to the development of novel adsorbents with high uranium capacity and manufacture cost, the development of adsorbent re-using technique is critical because it can further reduce the cost of the adsorbent manufacture. In our last report, the use of high concentrations of bicarbonate solution (3M KHCO3) was identified as a cost-effective, environmental friendly method to strip uranium from amidoxime-based polymeric adsorbents. This study aims to further improve the method for high recovery of uranium capacity in re-uses and to evaluate the performance of adsorbents after multiple re-use cycles. Adsorption of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on the uranium adsorbents during seawater exposure can hinder the uranium adsorption and slow down the adsorption rate. An additional NaOH rinse (0.5 M NaOH, room temperature) was applied after the 3 M KHCO3 elution to remove natural organic matter from adsorbents. The combination of 3 M KHCO3 elution and 0.5 M NaOH rinse significantly improves the recovery of uranium adsorption capacity in the re-used adsorbents. In the first re-use, most ORNL adsorbents tested achieve ~100% recovery by using 3 M KHCO3 elution + 0.5 M NaOH rinse approach, in comparison to 54% recovery when only 3 M KHCO3 elution was applied. A significant drop in capacity was observed when the adsorbents went through more than one re-use. FTIR spectra revealed that degradation of amidoxime ligands occurs during seawater exposure, and is more significant the longer the exposure time. Significantly elevated ratios of Ca/U and Mg/U in re-used adsorbents support the decrease in abundance of amidoxime ligands and increase carboxylate group from FT-IR analysis. The

  16. Lightweight composite fighting cover prototype development program

    SciTech Connect

    Wrenn, G.E. Jr.; Frame, B.J.; Gwaltney, R.C.; Akerman, M.A.

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Army Field Assistance Science and Technology Program requested Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to demonstrate the use of lightweight composite materials in construction of overhead covers for reinforced infantry fighting positions. In recent years, ORNL researchers have designed and tested several concepts for lightweight ballistic protection structures, and they have developed numerous prototype composite structures for military and civilian applications. In the current program, composite panel designs and materials are tested and optimized to meet anticipated static and dynamic load conditions for the overhead cover structure. Ten prototype composite covers were built at ORNL for use in Army field tests. Each composite cover has a nominal surface area of 12 ft[sup 2] and a nominal weight of 8 lb. Four of the prototypes are made with folding sections to improve their handling characteristics. The composite covers exhibit equivalent performance in Army field tests to covers made with conventional materials that weigh four times as much.

  17. Field water balance of landfill final covers.

    PubMed

    Albright, William H; Benson, Craig H; Gee, Glendon W; Roesler, Arthur C; Abichou, Tarek; Apiwantragoon, Preecha; Lyles, Bradley F; Rock, Steven A

    2004-01-01

    Landfill covers are critical to waste containment, yet field performance of specific cover designs has not been well documented and seldom been compared in side-by-side testing. A study was conducted to assess the ability of landfill final covers to control percolation into underlying waste. Conventional covers employing resistive barriers as well as alternative covers relying on water-storage principles were monitored in large (10 x 20 m), instrumented drainage lysimeters over a range of climates at 11 field sites in the United States. Surface runoff was a small fraction of the water balance (0-10%, 4% on average) and was nearly insensitive to the cover slope, cover design, or climate. Lateral drainage from internal drainage layers was also a small fraction of the water balance (0-5.0%, 2.0% on average). Average percolation rates for the conventional covers with composite barriers (geomembrane over fine soil) typically were less than 12 mm/yr (1.4% of precipitation) at humid locations and 1.5 mm/yr (0.4% of precipitation) at arid, semiarid, and subhumid locations. Average percolation rates for conventional covers with soil barriers in humid climates were between 52 and 195 mm/yr (6-17% of precipitation), probably due to preferential flow through defects in the soil barrier. Average percolation rates for alternative covers ranged between 33 and 160 mm/yr (6 and 18% of precipitation) in humid climates and generally less than 2.2 mm/yr (0.4% of precipitation) in arid, semiarid, and subhumid climates. One-half (five) of the alternative covers in arid, semiarid, and subhumid climates transmitted less than 0.1 mm of percolation, but two transmitted much more percolation (26.8 and 52 mm) than anticipated during design. The data collected support conclusions from other studies that detailed, site-specific design procedures are very important for successful performance of alternative landfill covers.

  18. Polarimetric Backscattering Behavior of River Ice Cover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mermoz, S.; Gherboudj, I.; Allain, S.; Bernier, M.; Pottier, E.

    2009-04-01

    In many northern rivers of Canada, the formation of the ice covers leads to important situations: ice jamming, and then flooding of large areas. Thus, the monitoring of river ice is necessary. Gherboudj has developed a model in order to understand the interactions of the radar signal with the river ice cover. The model is improved to simulate the fully polarimetric response of a river ice cover. The aim of this work is to analyse the results of the simulations.

  19. Utilizing Multiple Datasets for Snow Cover Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tait, Andrew B.; Hall, Dorothy K.; Foster, James L.; Armstrong, Richard L.

    1999-01-01

    Snow-cover maps generated from surface data are based on direct measurements, however they are prone to interpolation errors where climate stations are sparsely distributed. Snow cover is clearly discernable using satellite-attained optical data because of the high albedo of snow, yet the surface is often obscured by cloud cover. Passive microwave (PM) data is unaffected by clouds, however, the snow-cover signature is significantly affected by melting snow and the microwaves may be transparent to thin snow (less than 3cm). Both optical and microwave sensors have problems discerning snow beneath forest canopies. This paper describes a method that combines ground and satellite data to produce a Multiple-Dataset Snow-Cover Product (MDSCP). Comparisons with current snow-cover products show that the MDSCP draws together the advantages of each of its component products while minimizing their potential errors. Improved estimates of the snow-covered area are derived through the addition of two snow-cover classes ("thin or patchy" and "high elevation" snow cover) and from the analysis of the climate station data within each class. The compatibility of this method for use with Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data, which will be available in 2000, is also discussed. With the assimilation of these data, the resolution of the MDSCP would be improved both spatially and temporally and the analysis would become completely automated.

  20. Effects of dilution of poly(ethylvinylbenzene-divinylbenzene) adsorbent on the adsorption of aliphatic, alicyclic, and aromatic hydrocarbon adsorbates from effective zero to finite surface coverage

    SciTech Connect

    Djordjevic, N.M.; Laub, R.J.

    1988-01-15

    The chromatographic measurement and systematic interpretation of the solidgas partition coefficients K/sub s/ and related thermodynamic properties of a number of hydrocarbon adsorbates (n-pentane through n-octane, cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane, benzene, dichloromethane, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, tetrahydrofuran, thiophene, and acetone) at effective zero surface coverage with a 1:10 admixture of the title adsorbent-inert diluent from 393 to 443 K are reported. Despite a difference of an order of magnitude in the surface areas of bulk and admixed packings, the adsorbate relative retentions were in good agreement with those found in previous work with neat Porapak Q. The heats of adsorption also coincided to within an experimental error of ca. +- 5%. The GSC technique of elution by characteristic point was then used to derive the finite-concentration adsorption isotherms and isosteric heats of adsorption on n-hexane, cyclohexane, benzene, carbon tetrachloride, and acetone adsorbates with diluted Porapak Q over the temperature range 393-433 K. All exhibited BET Type IV isotherms, as well as changes in the respective isotherm temperature coefficients. The latter is said to be a consequence of the microporous substructure of this adsorbent.

  1. Applications and limits of theoretical adsorption models for predicting the adsorption properties of adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Ju; Nguyen, Duc Canh; Na, Choon-Ki; Kim, Chung-il

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the applicability of adsorption models for predicting the properties of adsorbents. The kinetics of the adsorption of NO3- ions on a PP-g-AA-Am non-woven fabric have been investigated under equilibrium conditions in both batch and fixed bed column processes. The adsorption equilibrium experiments in the batch process were carried out under different adsorbate concentration and adsorbent dosage conditions and the results were analyzed using adsorption isotherm models, energy models, and kinetic models. The results of the analysis indicate that the adsorption occurring at a fixed adsorbate concentration with a varying adsorbent dosage occur more easily compared to those under a fixed adsorbent dosage with a varying adsorbate concentration. In the second part of the study, the experimental data obtained using fixed bed columns were fit to Bed Depth Service Time, Bohart-Adams, Clark, and Wolborska models, to predict the breakthrough curves and determine the column kinetic parameters. The adsorption properties of the NO3- ions on the PP-g-AA-Am non-woven fabric were differently described by different models for both the batch and fixed bed column process. Therefore, it appears reasonable to assume that the adsorption properties were dominated by multiple mechanisms, depending on the experimental conditions.

  2. Electronic and magnetic properties of nonmetal atoms adsorbed ReS{sub 2} monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoou; Li, Qingfang

    2015-08-14

    The stable configurations and electronic and magnetic properties of nonmetal atoms (H, N, P, O, S, F, and Cl) adsorbed ReS{sub 2} monolayers have been investigated by first-principles calculations. It is found that H, O, S, F, and Cl prefer to occupy the peak sites of S atoms, while both N and P atoms favor the valley sites of S atoms. The ReS{sub 2} sheet exhibits a good adsorption capability to nonmetal atoms. The reconstruction of the surface is pronounced in N- and P-adsorbed ReS{sub 2} monolayers. In H-adsorbed case, the Fermi level is pulled into the conduction band, which results in the semiconductor-metal transition. The same magnetic moment of 1μ{sub B} is found in the N-, P-, F-, and Cl-adsorbed ReS{sub 2} monolayers, while the mechanisms of forming magnetic moment for N (P)- and F (Cl)-adsorbed cases are different. In addition, the spatial extensions of spin density in P-, F-, and Cl-adsorbed cases are larger than that in N-adsorbed case, which is more suitable to achieve long-range magnetic coupling interaction at low defect concentrations. Our results provide insight for achieving metal-free magnetism and a tunable band gap for various electronic and spintronic devices based on ReS{sub 2}.

  3. Preparation of Al-Ce hybrid adsorbent and its application for defluoridation of drinking water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Han; Deng, Shubo; Li, Zhijian; Yu, Gang; Huang, Jun

    2010-07-15

    A novel Al-Ce hybrid adsorbent with high sorption capacity for fluoride was prepared through the coprecipitation method in this study, and its preparation conditions were optimized. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) results showed that the hybrid adsorbent was of amorphous structure and constituted by some aggregated nanoparticles. As the adsorbent had the zero point of zeta potential at pH 9.6, it was very effective in fluoride removal from aqueous solution via electrostatic interaction. The results of sorption experiments including sorption kinetics, isotherms, and the effect of solution pH showed that the sorption of fluoride on the Al-Ce adsorbent was fast and pH-dependent. Especially, the adsorbent had high sorption capacity up to 27.5 mg g(-1) for fluoride at the equilibrium fluoride concentration of 1 mg L(-1), much higher than that of the conventional adsorbents. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis and zeta potential measurement showed that the hydroxyl groups and the protonated hydroxyl groups on the adsorbent surface were involved in the fluoride adsorption.

  4. Cellulose based cationic adsorbent fabricated via radiation grafting process for treatment of dyes waste water.

    PubMed

    Goel, Narender Kumar; Kumar, Virendra; Misra, Nilanjal; Varshney, Lalit

    2015-11-05

    A cationized adsorbent was prepared from cellulosic cotton fabric waste via a single step-green-radiation grafting process using gamma radiation source, wherein poly[2-(methacryloyloxy) ethyl]trimethylammonium chloride (PMAETC) was covalently attached to cotton cellulose substrate. Radiation grafted (PMAETC-g-cellulose) adsorbent was investigated for removal of acid dyes from aqueous solutions using two model dyes: Acid Blue 25 (AB25) and Acid Blue 74 (AB74). The equilibrium adsorption data was analyzed by Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms, whereas kinetic data was analyzed by pseudo first order, pseudo second order, intra particle diffusion and Boyd's models. The PMAETC-g-cellulose adsorbent with 25% grafting yield exhibited equilibrium adsorption capacities of ∼ 540.0mg/g and ∼ 340.0mg/g for AB25 and AB74, respectively. Linear and nonlinear fitting of adsorption data suggested that the equilibrium adsorption process followed Langmuir adsorption isotherm model, whereas, the kinetic adsorption process followed pseudo-second order model. The multi-linearities observed in the intra-particle kinetic plots suggested that the intraparticle diffusion was not the only rate-controlling process in the adsorption of acid dyes on the adsorbent, which was further supported by Boyd's model. The adsorbent could be regenerated by eluting the adsorbed dye from the adsorbent and could be repeatedly used.

  5. Selective cesium removal from radioactive liquid waste by crown ether immobilized new class conjugate adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Awual, Md Rabiul; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Taguchi, Tomitsugu; Shiwaku, Hideaki; Suzuki, Shinichi; Okamoto, Yoshihiro

    2014-08-15

    Conjugate materials can provide chemical functionality, enabling an assembly of the ligand complexation ability to metal ions that are important for applications, such as separation and removal devices. In this study, we developed ligand immobilized conjugate adsorbent for selective cesium (Cs) removal from wastewater. The adsorbent was synthesized by direct immobilization of dibenzo-24-crown-8 ether onto inorganic mesoporous silica. The effective parameters such as solution pH, contact time, initial Cs concentration and ionic strength of Na and K ion concentrations were evaluated and optimized systematically. This adsorbent was exhibited the high surface area-to-volume ratios and uniformly shaped pores in case cavities, and its active sites kept open functionality to taking up Cs. The obtained results revealed that adsorbent had higher selectivity toward Cs even in the presence of a high concentration of Na and K and this is probably due to the Cs-π interaction of the benzene ring. The proposed adsorbent was successfully applied for radioactive Cs removal to be used as the potential candidate in Fukushima nuclear wastewater treatment. The adsorbed Cs was eluted with suitable eluent and simultaneously regenerated into the initial form for the next removal operation after rinsing with water. The adsorbent retained functionality despite several cycles during sorption-elution-regeneration operations.

  6. Application of a novel magnetic carbon nanotube adsorbent for removal of mercury from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Homayoon, Farshid; Faghihian, Hossein; Torki, Firoozeh

    2017-04-01

    In this research, multiwall carbon nanotube was magnetized and subsequently functionalized by thiosemicarbazide. After characterization by FTIR, BET, SEM, EDAX, and VSM techniques, the magnetized adsorbent (multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/Fe3O4) was used for removal of Hg(2+) from aqueous solutions and the experimental conditions were optimized. The adsorption capacity of 172.83 mg g(-1) was obtained at 25 °C and pH = 3 which was superior to the value obtained for initial multiwall carbon nanotube, magnetized sample, and many previously reported values. In the presence of Pb(+2) and Cd(+2), the adsorbent was selective towards mercury when their concentration was respectively below 50 and 100 mg L(-1). The adsorption process was kinetically fast and the equilibration was attained within 60 min with 69.5% of the capacity obtained within 10 min. The used adsorbent was regenerated by HNO3 solution, and the regenerated adsorbent retained 92% of its initial capacity. The magnetic sensitivity of the adsorbent allowed the simple separation of the used adsorbent from the solution by implying an appropriate external magnetic field. The adsorption data was well fitted to the Langmuir isotherm model, indicating homogeneous and monolayer adsorption of mercury by the adsorbent.

  7. CO{sub 2} capture by polyethylenimine-modified fibrous adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Li, P.Y.; Ge, B.Q.; Zhang, S.J.; Chen, S.X.; Zhang, Q.K.; Zhao, Y.N.

    2008-07-15

    This work focuses on developing a novel adsorbent for CO{sub 2} capture, by coating polyethylenimine (PEI) on glass fiber matrix and using epichlorohydrin (ECH) as cross-linking agent. The physicochemical properties of the fibrous adsorbent were characterized. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity was evaluated. Factors that affect the adsorption capacity of the fibrous adsorbent were studied. The experimental results show that this fibrous PEI adsorbent exhibits a much higher adsorption capacity for CO{sub 2} compared with another PEI fiber prepared in our previous work, which employed epoxy resin as the cross-linking agent. A CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity as high as 4.12 mmol CO{sub 2}/g of adsorbent was obtained for this fibrous PEI adsorbent at 30{sup o}C, equal to 13.56 mmol CO{sub 2}/g of PEI, with a PEI/ECH ratio of 20:1. The adsorbent can be completely regenerated at 120{sup o}C.

  8. Characterisation of adsorbents prepared by pyrolysis of sludge and sludge/disposal filter cake mix.

    PubMed

    Velghe, I; Carleer, R; Yperman, J; Schreurs, S; D'Haen, Jan

    2012-05-15

    Copper and zinc removal from water (pH = 5.0) using adsorbents produced from slow and fast pyrolysis of industrial sludge and industrial sludge mixed with a disposal filter cake (FC), post treated with HCl, is investigated in comparison with a commercial adsorbent F400. The results show that a pseudo-second order kinetics model is followed. The Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm model is found to fit the data best. The capacity for heavy metal removal of studied adsorbents is generally better than that of commercial F400. The dominant heavy metal removal mechanism is cation exchange. Higher heavy metal removal capacity is associated with fast pyrolysis adsorbents and sludge/FC derived adsorbents, due to enhanced cation exchange. Improvement of Zn(2+) removal via 1 N HCl post-treatment is only effective when exchangeable cations of the adsorbent are substituted with H(+) ions, which boost the cation exchange capacity. Increase of temperature also enhances metal removal capacity. Fast pyrolysis sludge-based adsorbents can be reused after several adsorption-desorption cycles.

  9. An adsorbent with a high adsorption capacity obtained from the cellulose sludge of industrial residues.

    PubMed

    Orlandi, Géssica; Cavasotto, Jéssica; Machado, Francisco R S; Colpani, Gustavo L; Magro, Jacir Dal; Dalcanton, Francieli; Mello, Josiane M M; Fiori, Márcio A

    2017-02-01

    One of the major problems in effluent treatment plants of the cellulose and paper industry is the large amount of residual sludge generated. Therefore, this industry is trying to develop new methods to treat such residues and to use them as new products, such as adsorbents. In this regard, the objective of this work was to develop an adsorbent using the raw activated sludge generated by the cellulose and paper industry. The activated cellulose sludge, after being dried, was chemically activated with 42.5% (v/v) phosphoric acid at 85 °C for 1 h and was charred at 500 °C, 600 °C and 700 °C for 2 h. The efficiency of the obtained adsorbent materials was evaluated using kinetic tests with methylene blue solutions. Using the adsorption kinetics, it was verified that the three adsorbents showed the capacity to adsorb dye, and the adsorbent obtained at a temperature of 600 °C showed the highest adsorption capacity of 107.1 mg g(-1). The kinetic model that best fit the experimental data was pseudo-second order. The Langmuir-Freudlich isotherm adequately described the experimental data. As a result, the cellulose sludge generated by the cellulose and paper industries could be used as an adsorbent.

  10. Molecular separations with breathing metal-organic frameworks: modelling packed bed adsorbers.

    PubMed

    Van Assche, Tom R C; Baron, Gino V; Denayer, Joeri F M

    2016-03-14

    Various metal-organic framework (MOFs) adsorbents show peculiar adsorption behaviour as they can adopt different crystal phases, each phase with its own adsorption characteristics. Besides external stimuli such as temperature or light, different species of guest adsorbate can trigger a transition (breathing) of the host structure at a different pressure. Such phase transitions also occur during dynamic separations on a packed bed of adsorbent, where the concentrations of the adsorbates vary throughout axial column distance and time. This work presents a general strategy to model the adsorption behavior of such phase changing adsorbents during column separations and focuses on remarkable model predictions for pure components and binary mixtures in diluted and non-diluted conditions. During binary breakthrough experiments, the behaviour of flexible adsorbents is quite complex. A succession of complete or even partial phase transformations (resulting in phase coexistence) can occur during the adsorption process. A variety of unusual breakthrough profiles is observed for diluted binary mixtures. Simulations reveal at least five types of breakthrough profiles to emerge. The occurrence of these cases can be rationalized by the hodograph technique, combined with the phase diagram of the adsorbent. The remarkable experimental breakthrough profiles observed for ortho-xylene/ethylbenzene (diluted) and CO2/CH4 (non-diluted) separation on the flexible MIL-53 framework can be rationalized by application of the proposed model strategy.

  11. Submerged membrane adsorption hybrid system using four adsorbents to remove nitrate from water.

    PubMed

    Kalaruban, Mahatheva; Loganathan, Paripurnanda; Kandasamy, Jaya; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu

    2017-04-05

    Nitrate contamination of ground and surface waters causes environmental pollution and human health problems in many parts of the world. This study tests the nitrate removal efficiencies of two ion exchange resins (Dowex 21K XLT and iron-modified Dowex 21K XLT (Dowex-Fe)) and two chemically modified bio-adsorbents (amine-grafted corn cob (AG corn cob) and amine-grafted coconut copra (AG coconut copra)) using a dynamic adsorption treatment system. A submerged membrane (microfiltration) adsorption hybrid system (SMAHS) was used for the continuous removal of nitrate with a minimal amount of adsorbents. The efficiency of membrane filtration flux and replacement rate of adsorbent were studied to determine suitable operating conditions to maintain the effluent nitrate concentration below the WHO drinking standard limit of 11.3 mg N/L. The volume of water treated and the amount of nitrate adsorbed per gramme of adsorbent for all four flux tested were in the order Dowex-Fe > Dowex > AG coconut copra > AG corn cob. The volumes of water treated (L/g adsorbent) were 0.91 and 1.85, and the amount of nitrate removed (mg N/g adsorbent) were 9.8 and 22.2 for AG corn cob and Dowex-Fe, respectively, at a flux of 15 L/(m(2)/h).

  12. Evaluating of arsenic(V) removal from water by weak-base anion exchange adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Awual, M Rabiul; Hossain, M Amran; Shenashen, M A; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Shinichi; Jyo, Akinori

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater has been called the largest mass poisoning calamity in human history and creates severe health problems. The effective adsorbents are imperative in response to the widespread removal of toxic arsenic exposure through drinking water. Evaluation of arsenic(V) removal from water by weak-base anion exchange adsorbents was studied in this paper, aiming at the determination of the effects of pH, competing anions, and feed flow rates to improvement on remediation. Two types of weak-base adsorbents were used to evaluate arsenic(V) removal efficiency both in batch and column approaches. Anion selectivity was determined by both adsorbents in batch method as equilibrium As(V) adsorption capacities. Column studies were performed in fixed-bed experiments using both adsorbent packed columns, and kinetic performance was dependent on the feed flow rate and competing anions. The weak-base adsorbents clarified that these are selective to arsenic(V) over competition of chloride, nitrate, and sulfate anions. The solution pH played an important role in arsenic(V) removal, and a higher pH can cause lower adsorption capacities. A low concentration level of arsenic(V) was also removed by these adsorbents even at a high flow rate of 250-350 h(-1). Adsorbed arsenic(V) was quantitatively eluted with 1 M HCl acid and regenerated into hydrochloride form simultaneously for the next adsorption operation after rinsing with water. The weak-base anion exchange adsorbents are to be an effective means to remove arsenic(V) from drinking water. The fast adsorption rate and the excellent adsorption capacity in the neutral pH range will render this removal technique attractive in practical use in chemical industry.

  13. Mesoporous carbon adsorbents from melamine-formaldehyde resin using nanocasting technique for CO2 adsorption.

    PubMed

    Goel, Chitrakshi; Bhunia, Haripada; Bajpai, Pramod K

    2015-06-01

    Mesoporous carbon adsorbents, having high nitrogen content, were synthesized via nanocasting technique with melamine-formaldehyde resin as precursor and mesoporous silica as template. A series of adsorbents were prepared by varying the carbonization temperature from 400 to 700°C. Adsorbents were characterized thoroughly by nitrogen sorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), elemental (CHN) analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Boehm titration. Carbonization temperature controlled the properties of the synthesized adsorbents ranging from surface area to their nitrogen content, which play major role in their application as adsorbents for CO2 capture. The nanostructure of these materials was confirmed by XRD and TEM. Their nitrogen content decreased with an increase in carbonization temperature while other properties like surface area, pore volume, thermal stability and surface basicity increased with the carbonization temperature. These materials were evaluated for CO2 adsorption by fixed-bed column adsorption experiments. Adsorbent synthesized at 700°C was found to have the highest surface area and surface basicity along with maximum CO2 adsorption capacity among the synthesized adsorbents. Breakthrough time and CO2 equilibrium adsorption capacity were investigated from the breakthrough curves and were found to decrease with increase in adsorption temperature. Adsorption process for carbon adsorbent-CO2 system was found to be reversible with stable adsorption capacity over four consecutive adsorption-desorption cycles. From three isotherm models used to analyze the equilibrium data, Temkin isotherm model presented a nearly perfect fit implying the heterogeneous adsorbent surface.

  14. A computer modelling study of the interaction of organic adsorbates with fluorapatite surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkhonto, Donald; Ngoepe, Phuti E.; Cooper, Timothy G.; de Leeuw, Nora H.

    2006-08-01

    Computer modelling techniques were employed to investigate the adsorption of a selection of organic surfactant molecules to a range of fluorapatite surfaces, and new interatomic potential models for the apatite/adsorbate interactions are presented. The adsorbates coordinate mainly to the surfaces through interaction between their oxygen (or nitrogen) atoms to surface calcium ions, followed by hydrogen-bonded interactions to surface oxygen ions and, to a much lesser extent, surface fluorides. Bridging between two surface calcium ions is the preferred mode of adsorption, when the geometry of the adsorbates allows it, and multiple interactions between surfaces and adsorbate molecules lead to the largest adsorption energies. All adsorbates containing carbonyl and hydroxy groups interact strongly with the surfaces, releasing energies between approximately 100 and 215 kJ mol-1, but methylamine containing only the NH2 functional group adsorbs to the surfaces to a much lesser extent (25 95 kJ mol-1). Both hydroxy methanamide and hydroxy ethanal prefer to adsorb to some surfaces in an eclipsed conformation, which is a requisite for these functional groups. Sorption of the organic material by replacement of pre-adsorbed water at different surface features is calculated to be mainly exothermic for methanoic acid, hydroxy methanamide and hydroxy ethanal molecules, whereas methyl amine would not replace pre-adsorbed water at the fluorapatite surfaces. The efficacy of the surfactant molecules is calculated to be hydroxy aldehydes > alkyl hydroxamates > carboxylic acids ≫ alkyl amines. The results from this study suggest that computer simulations may provide a route to the identification or even design of particular organic surfactants for use in mineral separation by flotation.

  15. Titanium-incorporated organic–inorganic hybrid adsorbent for improved CO{sub 2} adsorption performance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xiaoyun; Qin, Hongyan; Zhang, Sisi; Wu, Wei

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Titanium-incorporated organic–inorganic hybrid adsorbent was prepared. • The incorporation of Ti to the adsorbent showed significant effect. • The sorbent shows high CO{sub 2} capture capacity both in pure and diluted CO{sub 2} at RT. • The sorbent exhibits a high recycling stability after 15 cycling runs. - Abstract: The CO{sub 2} adsorption performance of acrylonitrile (AN)–tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) adduct (hereafter referred to as TN) impregnated adsorbent was greatly enhanced by introduction of Titanium atom into the silica matrix. The adsorbents were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption, UV–vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The adsorption experiments together with the physicochemical characterization demonstrated that these adsorbents containing an optimal amount of Titanium (Ti/Si ≈ 0.1) remarkably reinforced the CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity and recycling stability. The highest CO{sub 2} uptakes reached 4.65 and 1.80 mmol CO{sub 2}/g adsorbent at 25 °C under 90% CO{sub 2} (CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, 90:10 V/V) and 1% CO{sub 2} (CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, 1:99 V/V) conditions for sample Ti(0.1)-DMS-TN, respectively. Repeated adsorption/desorption cycles revealed that the Ti-incorporated adsorbent showed only a tiny decrease in adsorption capacity (1.778 mmol CO{sub 2}/g adsorbent after 15 cycles, decreased by 0.95%), significantly enhanced the adsorbent recycling stability.

  16. Inverse photoemission of adsorbed xenon multilayers on Ru(001): Refutation of final-state screening effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wandelt, K.; Jacob, W.; Memmel, N.; Dose, V.

    1986-09-01

    In this Letter we describe photoemission and inverse photoemission spectra of adsorbed xenon multilayers on Ru(001). Electron energy-loss spectra of xenon adsorbed on gold by Demuth, Avouris, and Schmeisser are included in the discussion. The observed layer-dependent shifts of the inverse photoemission spectra closer to the Fermi level clearly invalidate image screening effects as being the dominant cause of these shifts but support a ``floating'' of the adsorbed Xe potential well as a whole with the surface potential in the initial state.

  17. Thermodynamic properties of adsorbed water on silica gel - Exergy losses in adiabatic sorption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worek, W. M.; Zengh, W.; San, J.-Y.

    1991-09-01

    In order to perform exergy analyses to optimize the transient heat and mass transfer processes involving sorption by solid adsorbents, the thermodynamic properties of adsorbed water must be determined. In this paper, the integral enthalpy and entropy are determined directly from isotherm data of water adsorbed on silica gel particles and silica gel manufactured in the form of a felt with 25 percent cotton as a support and Teflon as a binder. These results are then used to evaluate the exergy losses, due to the sorption and the convective heat and mass transfer processes, that occur in each portion of an adiabatic desiccant dehumidificaton cycle.

  18. Enhanced membrane filtration of wood hydrolysates for hemicelluloses recovery by pretreatment with polymeric adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Koivula, Elsi; Kallioinen, Mari; Sainio, Tuomo; Antón, Enrique; Luque, Susana; Mänttäri, Mika

    2013-09-01

    In this study adsorption of foulants from birch and pine/eucalyptus wood hydrolysates on two polymeric adsorbents was studied aiming to reduce the membrane fouling. The effect of the pretreatment of hydrolysate on polyethersulphone membrane performance was studied in dead-end filtration experiments. Adsorption pretreatment improved significantly filtration capacity and decreased membrane fouling. Especially high-molecular weight lignin was efficiently removed. A multistep adsorption pretreatment was found to reduce the amount of adsorbent required. While large adsorbent amount was shown to increase flux in filtration, it was found also to cause significant hemicellulose losses.

  19. Extraction of palladium from acidic solutions with the use of carbon adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    O.N. Kononova; N.G. Goryaeva; N.B. Dostovalova; S.V. Kachin; A.G. Kholmogorov

    2007-08-15

    We studied the sorption of palladium(II) on LKAU-4, LKAU-7, and BAU carbon adsorbents from model hydrochloric acid solutions and the solutions of spent palladium-containing catalysts. It was found that sorbents based on charcoal (BAU) and anthracite (LKAU-4) were characterized by high sorption capacities for palladium. The kinetics of the saturation of carbon adsorbents with palladium(II) ions was studied, and it was found that more than 60% of the initial amount of Pd(II) was recovered in a 1-h contact of an adsorbent with a model solution. This value for the solutions of spent catalysts was higher than 35%.

  20. Direct Measurement of Core-Level Relaxation Dynamics on a Surface-Adsorbate System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miaja-Avila, L.; Saathoff, G.; Mathias, S.; Yin, J.; La-O-Vorakiat, C.; Bauer, M.; Aeschlimann, M.; Murnane, M. M.; Kapteyn, H. C.

    2008-07-01

    The coupling between electronic states in a surface-adsorbate system is fundamental to the understanding of many surface interactions. In this Letter, we present the first direct time-resolved observations of the lifetime of core-excited states of an atom adsorbed onto a surface. By comparing laser-assisted photoemission from a substrate with a delayed Auger decay process from an adsorbate, we measure the lifetime of the 4d-1 core level of xenon on Pt(111) to be 7.1±1.1fs. This result opens up time-domain measurements of surface dynamics where energy-resolved measurements may provide incomplete information.

  1. Direct electrochemistry of Penicillium chrysogenum catalase adsorbed on spectroscopic graphite.

    PubMed

    Dimcheva, Nina; Horozova, Elena

    2013-04-01

    The voltammetric studies of Penicillium chrysogenum catalase (PcCAT) adsorbed on spectroscopic graphite, showed direct electron transfer (DET) between its active site and the electrode surface. Analogous tests performed with the commercially available bovine catalase revealed that mammalian enzyme is much less efficient in the DET process. Both catalases were found capable to catalyse the electrooxidation of phenol, but differed in the specifics of catalytic action. At an applied potential of 0.45V the non-linear regression showed the kinetics of the bioelectrochemical oxidation catalysed by the PcCAT obeyed the Hill equation with a binding constant K=0.034±0.002 M(2) (Hill's coefficient n=2.097±0.083, R(2)=0.997), whilst the catalytic action of the bovine catalase was described by the Michaelis-Menten kinetic model with the following parameters: V(max,app)=7.780±0.509 μA, and K(M,app)=0.068±0.070 mol L(-1). The performance of the electrode reaction was affected by the electrode potential, the pH, and temperature. Based on the effect of pH and temperature on the electrode response in presence of phenol a tentative reaction pathway of its bioelectrocatalytic oxidation has been hypothesised. The possible application of these findings in biosensing phenol up to concentration 30 mM at pHs below 7 and in absence of oxidising agents (oxygen or H(2)O(2)) was considered.

  2. The Structure and Properties of Carbon Fiber Based Adsorbent Monoliths

    SciTech Connect

    Burchell, T.; Judkins, R.R.; Rogers, M.R.; Shaw, W.S.

    1998-11-06

    Carbon fiber monoliths manufactured by a novel slurry molding process from isotropic pitch-derived fibers are being developed at ORNL for gas separation and storage applications [1]. Low density (p = 0.2 - 0,3 g/cm3) monoliths have been successfully demonstrated to have an acceptable pressure drop for gas separation applications and are currently being developed for C02/CH4 separations, whereas monoliths with densities in the range p = 0.4 - 0.6 g/cm3 have been "shown to have natural gas storage capacities of >100 VIV at 500 psi pressure and room temperature. Thermal conductivity, as a function of temperature, was measured using the LASER flash, thermal- pulse method. Another approach to minimizing the temperature gradients that develop in a storage bed is to increase the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent carbon. To this end, we have developed hybrid monoliths that contain small fractions of mesophase pitch- derived carbon fibers. Our hybrid monoliths exhibit thermal conductivities in the range 0.2-0.9 W/m.K depending on the blend and density of the monolith. In comparison, a packed bed of granular carbon at comparable density would have a thermal conductivity of approximately 0.1 W/m.K [ 1 ]. The thermal conductivities of several of the hybrid The improved thermal conductivity of our monoliths is attributed to the bonding between the fibers and the incorporation of high thermal conductivity, mesophase pitch-derived carbon fibers. These features are visible in the SEM micrograph in Fig. 4.

  3. Siloxanes removal from biogas by high surface area adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Gislon, P; Galli, S; Monteleone, G

    2013-12-01

    Biogas utilized for energy production needs to be free from organic silicon compounds, as their burning has damaging effects on turbines and engines; organic silicon compounds in the form of siloxanes can be found in biogas produced from urban wastes, due to their massive industrial use in synthetic product, such as cosmetics, detergents and paints. Siloxanes removal from biogas can be carried out by various methods (Mona, 2009; Ajhar et al., 2010 May; Schweigkofler and Niessner, 2001); aim of the present work is to find a single practical and economic way to drastically and simultaneously reduce both the hydrogen sulphide and the siloxanes concentration to less than 1 ppm. Some commercial activated carbons previously selected (Monteleone et al., 2011) as being effective in hydrogen sulfide up taking have been tested in an adsorption measurement apparatus, by flowing the most volatile siloxane (hexamethyldisiloxane or L2) in a nitrogen stream, typically 100-200 ppm L2 over N2, through an activated carbon powder bed; the adsorption process was analyzed by varying some experimental parameters (concentration, grain size, bed height). The best activated carbon shows an adsorption capacity of 0.1g L2 per gram of carbon. The next thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) confirms the capacity data obtained experimentally by the breakthrough curve tests. The capacity results depend on L2 concentration. A regenerative carbon process is then carried out by heating the carbon bed up to 200 °C and flushing out the adsorbed L2 samples in a nitrogen stream in a three step heating procedure up to 200 °C. The adsorption capacity is observed to degrade after cycling the samples through several adsorption-desorption cycles.

  4. The aqueous photolysis of ethylene glycol adsorbed on geothite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cunningham, Kirkwood M.; Goldberg, Marvin C.; Weiner, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    Suspensions of goethite (α-FeOOH) were photolyzed in aerated ethylene glycol-water solutions at pH 6.5, with ultraviolet light in the wavelength range300–400 nm. Under these conditions, formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde were detected as photoproducts. Quantum yields of formaldehyde production ranged from 1.9 7times; 10-5 to 2.9 × 10-4 over the ethylene glycol concentration range of 0.002-2.0 mol/ℓ, and gave evidence that the reaction occurred at the goethite surface. Quantum yields of glycolaldehyde were 20% less than those of formaldehyde, and displayed a concentration-dependent relationship with ethylene glycol similar to that of formaldehyde. Immediately after photolysis, Fe2+ was measured to be 4.6 × 10-7 mol/ℓ in an aerated suspension containing 1.3 mol/ℓ ethylene glycol, and 8.5 × 10-6 mol/ℓ in the corresponding deoxygenated suspension. Glycolaldehyde was not generated in the deoxygenated suspensions. These results are consistent with a mechanism involving the transfer of an electron from an adsorbed ethylene glycol molecule to an excited state of Fe3+ (Iron[III]) in the goethite lattice, to produce Fe2+ and an organic cation. In a series of reactions involving O2, FeOOH, and Fe2+, the organic cation decomposes to form formaldehyde and the intermediate radicals “OH and” CH2OH. OH reacts further with ethylene glycol in the presence of O2to yield glycolaldehyde. Aqueous photolysis of ethylene glycol sorbed onto goethite is typical of reactions that can occur in the aquatic environment.

  5. Microfungal alkylation and volatilization of selenium adsorbed by goethite.

    PubMed

    Peitzsch, Mirko; Kremer, Daniel; Kersten, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Selenium adsorbed in the oxyanionic form by Fe-oxides like goethite is considered of benefit for long-term stabilization of (79)Se under near field conditions of radionuclide waste disposal sites. However, microbe-mediated volatilization of the uranium fission product (79)Se has not yet been considered for risk assessment based on the use of the water-solid distribution coefficient K(D). We have performed incubation experiments in a ternary system selenium-microbe-goethite and show that mycobiota including the common black microfungi genera Alternaria alternata are capable of volatilizing the Se even if immobilized by goethite. The microfungi were incubated in a standardized nutrient broth suspension with 10 g L(-1) of the oxide target under defined conditions. Volatile organic selenium (VOSe) species formed in the head space of the culture flasks were sampled and measured directly by a cryotrapping cryofocusing gas chromatographic system coupled with ICP-MS detection (CT-CF-GC-ICP-MS). Alkylated VOSe species were found at the tens to hundreds ng m(-3) levels dominated by dimethyl selenide (DMSe) and dimethyl diselenide (DMDSe). The total amount of DMSe released into the 80-mL headspace volume within the 21 days of incubation was up to 1.12 +/- 0.17 nmol and 0.48 +/- 0.12 nmol for systems without and with goethite amendment, respectively. Alkylation rates of up to 0.1 mumol Se per day and g biomass cannot be neglected as a potential fission product mobilization pathway, unless the inherent radioactivity is proven to prevent any such microbial activity on the long-term. Otherwise it may lead to an onsite accumulation of (79)Se through evapoconcentration in the enclosed underground caverns.

  6. 49 CFR 633.11 - Covered projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT Project Management Oversight Services § 633.11 Covered projects. The Administrator may contract for project management oversight services when the... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Covered projects. 633.11 Section...

  7. 49 CFR 633.11 - Covered projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT Project Management Oversight Services § 633.11 Covered projects. The Administrator may contract for project management oversight services when the... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Covered projects. 633.11 Section...

  8. 49 CFR 633.11 - Covered projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT Project Management Oversight Services § 633.11 Covered projects. The Administrator may contract for project management oversight services when the... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Covered projects. 633.11 Section...

  9. 49 CFR 633.11 - Covered projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT Project Management Oversight Services § 633.11 Covered projects. The Administrator may contract for project management oversight services when the... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Covered projects. 633.11 Section...

  10. 39 CFR 233.3 - Mail covers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mail covers. 233.3 Section 233.3 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION INSPECTION SERVICE AUTHORITY § 233.3 Mail... transcription, photograph, photocopy or any other facsimile of the image of the outside cover, envelope,...

  11. Managing cover crops on strawberry furrow bottoms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bare furrows in strawberry fields with plastic mulch covered beds can lead to lots of soil erosion and runoff during winter rainy periods. This article describes how growers can plant and manage cover crops in these furrows to minimize runoff and soil erosion. This is based on on-going research at...

  12. 7 CFR 353.4 - Products covered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Products covered. 353.4 Section 353.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORT CERTIFICATION § 353.4 Products covered. Plants and plant products...

  13. 7 CFR 353.4 - Products covered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Products covered. 353.4 Section 353.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EXPORT CERTIFICATION § 353.4 Products covered. Plants and plant products...

  14. 49 CFR 633.11 - Covered projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Covered projects. 633.11 Section 633.11..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PROJECT MANAGEMENT OVERSIGHT Project Management Oversight Services § 633.11 Covered projects. The Administrator may contract for project management oversight services when...

  15. 29 CFR 16.104 - Proceedings covered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proceedings covered. 16.104 Section 16.104 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT General Provisions § 16.104 Proceedings covered. (a.... 3303(b) and 3304(c). (iii) Proceedings under section 303(b) of the Social Security Act of 1935,...

  16. 29 CFR 16.104 - Proceedings covered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proceedings covered. 16.104 Section 16.104 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT General Provisions § 16.104 Proceedings covered. (a.... 3303(b) and 3304(c). (iii) Proceedings under section 303(b) of the Social Security Act of 1935,...

  17. 29 CFR 16.104 - Proceedings covered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Proceedings covered. 16.104 Section 16.104 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT General Provisions § 16.104 Proceedings covered. (a.... 3303(b) and 3304(c). (iii) Proceedings under section 303(b) of the Social Security Act of 1935,...

  18. 39 CFR 233.3 - Mail covers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mail covers. 233.3 Section 233.3 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION INSPECTION SERVICE AUTHORITY § 233.3 Mail... use of mail covers as an investigative technique for law enforcement or the protection of...

  19. 39 CFR 233.3 - Mail covers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mail covers. 233.3 Section 233.3 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION INSPECTION SERVICE AUTHORITY § 233.3 Mail... use of mail covers as an investigative technique for law enforcement or the protection of...

  20. 39 CFR 233.3 - Mail covers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mail covers. 233.3 Section 233.3 Postal Service UNITED STATES POSTAL SERVICE ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION INSPECTION SERVICE AUTHORITY § 233.3 Mail... use of mail covers as an investigative technique for law enforcement or the protection of...

  1. Zinc requirements of tropical legume cover crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical soils are deficient in essential plant nutrients, including zinc (Zn). Using cover crops in cropping systems is an important option to improve soil fertility for sustainable crop production. However, success of cover crops in highly weathered tropical infertile acid soils is greatly influen...

  2. Roadmap to increased cover crop adoption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops are increasingly utilized by farmers and promoted by agronomists for the multiple benefits they contribute to soil and crop management systems. Yet, only a small percentage of cropland is planted to cover crops. In June of 2012, the National Wildlife Federation brought together 36 of the...

  3. AsMA journal covers, a history.

    PubMed

    Day, Pamela C

    2014-01-01

    The cover of our journal has changed quite often over the years. As we look forward to changing the name and design of the journal, it seems appropriate to reflect on the previous journal titles and covers. A brief history follows.

  4. Winter cover crops influence Amaranthus palmeri establishment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Winter cover crops were evaluated for their effect on Palmer amaranth (PA) suppression in cotton production. Cover crops examined included rye and four winter legumes: narrow-leaf lupine, crimson clover, Austrian winter pea, and cahaba vetch. Each legume was evaluated alone and in a mixture with rye...

  5. Growing cover crops to improve carbon sequestration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Different cover crops were grown and evaluated for improving carbon sequestration. The cover crops in the study include not only winter and summer types but also legumes and non-legumes, respectively. Winter legumes are white clover, bell beans, and purple vetch, and winter non-legumes are triticale...

  6. Timely precipitation drives cover crop outcomes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cover crops can expand ecosystem services, though sound management recommendations for their use within semi-arid cropping systems is currently constrained by a lack of information. This study was conducted to determine agroecosystem responses to late-summer seeded cover crops under no-till managem...

  7. 16 CFR 700.1 - Products covered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Products covered. 700.1 Section 700.1 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE MAGNUSON-MOSS WARRANTY ACT INTERPRETATIONS OF MAGNUSON-MOSS WARRANTY ACT § 700.1 Products covered. (a)...

  8. 16 CFR 700.1 - Products covered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Products covered. 700.1 Section 700.1 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE MAGNUSON-MOSS WARRANTY ACT INTERPRETATIONS OF MAGNUSON-MOSS WARRANTY ACT § 700.1 Products covered. (a)...

  9. 16 CFR 700.1 - Products covered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Products covered. 700.1 Section 700.1 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE MAGNUSON-MOSS WARRANTY ACT INTERPRETATIONS OF MAGNUSON-MOSS WARRANTY ACT § 700.1 Products covered. (a)...

  10. 16 CFR 700.1 - Products covered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Products covered. 700.1 Section 700.1 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE MAGNUSON-MOSS WARRANTY ACT INTERPRETATIONS OF MAGNUSON-MOSS WARRANTY ACT § 700.1 Products covered. (a)...

  11. 16 CFR 700.1 - Products covered.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Products covered. 700.1 Section 700.1 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND INTERPRETATIONS UNDER THE MAGNUSON-MOSS WARRANTY ACT INTERPRETATIONS OF MAGNUSON-MOSS WARRANTY ACT § 700.1 Products covered. (a)...

  12. "Lolita": Genealogy of a Cover Girl

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, Shari L.

    2015-01-01

    At the publication of Vladimir Nabokov's controversial novel "Lolita" (1958), the author insisted that a girl never appear on the cover. This discourse analysis of 185 "Lolita" book covers, most of which feature a girl, considers the genealogy of "Lolita" in relation to representation, myth, and tacit knowledge…

  13. Landfill Gas Effects on Evapotranspirative Landfill Covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, M. A.; Mattson, E.; Ankeny, M.; Kelsey, J.

    2005-05-01

    The performance of an evapotranspirative landfill cover can be adversely affected by transport of landfill gases to the plant root zone. Healthy plant communities are critical to the success and effectiveness of these vegetated landfill covers. Poor vegetative cover can result in reduced transpiration, increased percolation, and increased erosion regardless of the thickness of the cover. Visual inspections of landfill covers indicate that vegetation-free areas are not uncommon at municipal waste landfills. Data from soil profiles beneath these areas suggest that anaerobic conditions in the plant-rooting zone are controlling plant distribution. On the same landfill, aerobic conditions exist at similar depths beneath well-vegetated areas. The movement of methane and carbon dioxide, generated by degradation of organic wastes, into the overlying soil cover displaces oxygen in the root zone. Monitoring data from landfills in semi-arid areas indicate that barometric pumping can result in hours of anaerobic conditions in the root zone. Microbial consumption of oxygen in the root zone reduces the amount of oxygen available for plant root respiration but consumption of oxygen and methane also produce water as a reaction byproduct. This biogenic water production can be on the order of centimeters of water per year which, while increasing water availability, also has a negative feedback on transport of landfill gases through the cover. Accounting for these processes can improve evapotranspirative landfill cover design at other sites.

  14. Sewage sludge-derived materials as efficient adsorbents for removal of hydrogen sulfide.

    PubMed

    Bagreev, A; Bashkova, S; Locke, D C; Bandosz, T J

    2001-04-01

    Sewage sludge-derived materials were used as adsorbents of hydrogen sulfide from moist air. The adsorbent obtained by carbonization at 950 degrees C has a capacity twice of that of coconut-shell-based activated carbon. The capacity of the sludge-derived materials increases with increasing carbonization temperature. It is likelythatduring carbonization at 950 degrees C a mineral-like phase is formed that consists of such catalytically active metals as iron, zinc, and copper. The results obtained demonstrate that the presence of iron oxide significantly increases the capacity of commercial carbon and activated alumina. The sludge-derived adsorbents are efficient for hydrogen sulfide removal until the pore entrances are blocked with sulfur as the product of oxidation reaction. For materials in which the catalytic effect is predominant, hydrogen sulfide is adsorbed until all pores are filled with sulfur. There is also indication that chemisorption plays a significant role in the removal of hydrogen sulfide from moist air.

  15. Parallel pore and surface diffusion of levulinic acid in basic polymeric adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baojian; Yang, Yiwen; Ren, Qilong

    2006-11-03

    The equilibrium and kinetics of levulinic acid (LA) adsorption on two basic polymeric adsorbents, 335 (highly porous gel) and D315 (macroreticular), were investigated. Experimental adsorption rates in batch stirred vessels under a variety of operating conditions were described successfully by the parallel pore and surface diffusion model taking into account external mass transfer and nonlinear Toth isotherm. The film-pore diffusion model was matched with the rate data and the resulting apparent pore diffusivities were strongly concentration-dependent and approached to a constant value for 335 adsorbent. Thus, the constant value was taken as the accurate pore diffusivity, while the pore diffusivity in D315 was estimated from the particle porosity. The surface diffusivities decreased with increasing initial bulk concentration for both adsorbents. The inverse concentration dependence was correlated reasonably well to the change of isosteric heat of adsorption as amount adsorbed.

  16. Effect of adsorbed chlorine and oxygen on the shear strength of iron and copper junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    Static-friction experiments were performed in ultrahigh vacuum at room temperature on copper, iron, and steel contacts selectively contaminated with oxygen and chlorine in submonolayer amounts. The concentration of the adsorbates was determined with Auger electron spectroscopy and was measured relative to the saturation concentration of oxygen on iron (concentration, 1.0). The coefficient of static friction decreased with increasing adsorbate concentration; however, it was independent of the type of metal and the adsorbate species. The results compared satisfactorily with an extension of the junction growth theory to heterogeneous interfaces. The reduction in interfacial shear strength was measured by the ratio of the shear strength of the interface with an adsorbate concentration of 1.0 and the strength of the clean metal interface. This ratio was about 0.835 for all the systems tested.

  17. A Cascaded Discharge Plasma-Adsorbent Technique for Engine Exhaust Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajanikanth, B. S.; Srinivasan, A. D.; Arya, Nandiny B.

    2003-06-01

    A cascaded system of electrical discharges (non-thermal plasma) and adsorption process was investigated for the removal of oxides of Nitrogen (NOx) and total hydrocarbons (THC) from an actual diesel engine exhaust. The non-thermal plasma and adsorption processes were separately studied first and then the cascaded process was studied. In this study, different types of adsorbents were used. The NOx removal efficiency was higher with plasma-associated adsorption (cascaded) process compared to the individual processes and the removal efficiency was found almost invariant in time. When associated by plasma, among the adsorbents studied, activated charcoal and MS-13X were more effective for NOx and THC removal respectively. The experiments were conducted at no load and at 50% load conditions. The plasma reactor was kept at room temperature throughout the experiment, while the temperature of the adsorbent reactor was varied. A relative comparison of adsorbents was discussed at the end.

  18. Performance of a membrane adsorber for trace impurity removal in biotechnology manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Michael; Cormier, Jason; Ferrence, Jennifer; Dowd, Chris; Kiss, Robert; Lutz, Herbert; Carter, Jeffrey

    2005-06-17

    Membrane adsorbers provide an attractive alternative to traditional bead-based chromatography columns used to remove trace impurities in downstream applications. A linearly scalable novel membrane adsorber family designed for the efficient removal of trace impurities from biotherapeutics, are capable of reproducibly achieving greater than 4 log removal of mammalian viruses, 3 log removal of endotoxin and DNA, and greater than 1 log removal of host cell protein. Single use, disposable membrane adsorbers eliminate the need for costly and time consuming column packing and cleaning validation associated with bead-based chromatography systems, and minimize the required number and volume of buffers. A membrane adsorber step reduces process time, floor space, buffer usage, labor cost, and improves manufacturing flexibility. This "process compression" effect is commonly associated with reducing the number of processing steps. The rigid microporous structure of the membrane layers allows for high process flux operation and uniform bed consistency at all processing scales.

  19. Adsorption of Pb(II) from aqueous solution by a poly-elemental mesoporous adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiu-Wen; Ma, Hong-Wen; Yang, Jing; Wang, Feng-Jiao; Li, Zhi-Hong

    2012-05-01

    A poly-elemental mesoporous adsorbent was hydrothermally prepared from microcline in an alkaline condition with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as synthesis directing agent. The properties of the mesoporous adsorbent were determined by X-ray powder diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscope, N2 adsorption, and solid-state Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. The pore size distribution was detected by small angle X-ray scattering. The particles size was observed by Scanning electron microscope imagine. The chemical content of SiO2 in the mesoporous adsorbent was determined by spectrometry of the silicone molybdenum and sulfosalicylic acid complexes, and Al2O3 determined by complexometry with ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid in the presence of KF-Zn(Ac)2 tests. The adsorption properties of the mesoporous adsorbent to Pb(II) were studied, and three main factors, the adsorption time, solution pH, and initial concentration of Pb(II), were considered in the adsorption experiments.

  20. The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC-2) molecular adsorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barengoltz, Jack; Moore, Sonya; Soules, David; Voecks, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    A device has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, for the adsorption of contaminants inside a space instrument during flight. The molecular adsorber was developed for use on the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, and it has been shown to perform at its design specifications in the WFPC-2. The basic principle of the molecular adsorber is a zeolite-coated ceramic honeycomb. The arrangement is efficient for adsorption and also provides the needed rigidity to retain the special zeolite coating during the launch vibrational environment. The adsorber, on other forms, is expected to be useful for all flight instruments sensitive to internal sources of contamination. Typically, some internal contamination is unavoidable. A common design solution is to increase the venting to the exterior. However, for truly sensitive instruments, the external contamination environment is more severe. The molecular adsorber acts as a one-way vent to solve this problem. Continued development is planned for this device.

  1. EVALUATION OF SOLID ADSORBENTS FOR THE COLLECTION AND ANALYSES OF AMBIENT BIOGENIC VOLATILE ORGANICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Micrometeorological flux measurements of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) usually require that large volumes of air be collected (whole air samples) or focused during the sampling process (cryogenic trapping or gas-solid partitioning on adsorbents) in order to achiev...

  2. Electrochemical hydrogenation of a homogeneous nickel complex to form a surface adsorbed hydrogen-evolving species.

    PubMed

    Martin, Daniel J; McCarthy, Brian D; Donley, Carrie L; Dempsey, Jillian L

    2015-03-28

    A Ni(II) complex degrades electrochemically in the presence of acid in acetonitrile to form an electrode adsorbed film that catalytically evolves hydrogen. Comparison with a similar compound permitted investigation of the degradation mechanism.

  3. The effect of mineral bond strength and adsorbed water on fault gouge frictional strength

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, C.A.; Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, D.A.

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the tendency of many fault gouge minerals to take on adsorbed or interlayer water may strongly influence their frictional strength. To test this hypothesis, triaxial sliding experiments were conducted on 15 different single-mineral gouges with various water-adsorbing affinities. Vacuum dried samples were sheared at 100 MPa, then saturated with water and sheared farther to compare dry and wet strengths. The coefficients of friction, μ, for the dry sheet-structure minerals (0.2-0.8), were related to mineral bond strength, and dropped 20-60% with the addition of water. For non-adsorbing minerals (μ = 0.6-0.8), the strength remained unchanged after saturation. These results confirm that the ability of minerals to adsorb various amounts of water is related to their relative frictional strengths, and may explain the anomalously low strength of certain natural fault gouges.

  4. Effect of adsorbed chlorine and oxygen on shear strength of iron and copper junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    Static friction experiments were performed in ultrahigh vacuum at room temperature on copper, iron, and steel contacts selectively contaminated with oxygen and chlorine in submonolayer amounts. The concentration of the adsorbates was determined with Auger electron spectroscopy and was measured relative to the saturation concentration of oxygen on iron (concentration 1.0). The coefficient of static friction decreased with increasing adsorbate concentration. It was independent of the metal and the adsorbate. The results compared satisfactorily with an extension of the junction growth theory to heterogeneous interfaces. The reduction in interfacial shear strength was measured by the ratio sub a/sub m where sub a is the shear strength of the interface with an adsorbate concentration of 1.0, and sub m is the strength of the clean metal interface. This ratio was 0.835 + or - 0.012 for all the systems tested.

  5. Graphene single-electron transistor as a spin sensor for magnetic adsorbates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, J. W.; Delgado, F.; Fernández-Rossier, J.

    2013-02-01

    We study single-electron transport through a graphene quantum dot with magnetic adsorbates. We focus on the relation between the spin order of the adsorbates and the linear conductance of the device. The electronic structure of the graphene dot with magnetic adsorbates is modeled through numerical diagonalization of a tight-binding model with an exchange potential. We consider several mechanisms by which the adsorbate magnetic state can influence transport in a single-electron transistor: tuning the addition energy, changing the tunneling rate, and in the case of spin-polarized electrodes, through magnetoresistive effects. Whereas the first mechanism is always present, the others require that the electrode has to have either an energy- or spin-dependent density of states. We find that graphene dots are optimal systems to detect the spin state of a few magnetic centers.

  6. Single walled carbon nanotubes functionally adsorbed to biopolymers for use as chemical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Jr., Alan T.; Gelperin, Alan; Staii, Cristian

    2011-07-12

    Chemical field effect sensors comprising nanotube field effect devices having biopolymers such as single stranded DNA functionally adsorbed to the nanotubes are provided. Also included are arrays comprising the sensors and methods of using the devices to detect volatile compounds.

  7. Removal effects and mechanisms of Microcystic aeruginosa by Chitosan-modified Adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Wu, Cuirong; He, Yan; Zhang, Bingru; Li, Fengting

    2010-11-01

    The health of humans and other organisms is threatened by increasingly serious water contamination by algae in all the country's major lakes such as Taihu Lake. This experiment was conducted to investigate the removal effects and mechanism of Microcystic aeruginosa by Chitosan-modified adsorbent, with comparison of polyaluminium chloride (PAC) and poly ferric sulfate (PFS). Microcystic aeruginosa grown in the laboratory was used for this experiment. The results showed that the algae-removal efficiency of Chitosan-modified adsorbent presents a good performance. When the dosage of the adsorbent reached 20 ppm, the turbidity and the chlorophyll a of treated water dropped by 90% and 86%, respectively. Compared to conventional coagulation, the dosage was reduced. The adhesive bridge effect of Chitosan and adsorption of modified adsorbent provided an important complement to subsequent dehydrating treatment for algae.

  8. Adsorption and Desorption of Carbon Dioxide and Water Mixtures on Synthetic Hydrophobic Carbonaceous Adsorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John E.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Several synthetic carbonaceous adsorbents produced through pyrolysis of polymeric materials are available commercially. Some appear to have advantages over activated carbon for certain adsorption applications. In particular, they can have tailored hydrophobicities that are significantly greater than that of activated carbon, while moderately high surfaces areas are retained. These sorbents are being investigated for possible use in removing trace contaminants and excess carbon dioxide from air in closed habitats, plant growth chambers, and other applications involving purification of humid gas streams. We have analyzed the characteristics of a few of these adsorbents through adsorption and desorption experiments and standard characterization techniques. This paper presents pure and multicomponent adsorption data collected for carbon dioxide and water on two synthetic carbonaceous adsorbents having different hydrophobicities and capillary condensation characteristics. The observations are interpreted through consideration of the pore structure and surface chemistry of the solids and interactions between adsorbed carbon dioxide, water, and the solvent gas.

  9. Dynamic model of heat and mass transfer in rectangular adsorber of a solar adsorption machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekirou, W.; Boukheit, N.; Karaali, A.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the study of a rectangular adsorber of solar adsorption cooling machine. The modeling and the analysis of the adsorber are the key point of such studies; because of the complex coupled heat and mass transfer phenomena that occur during the working cycle. The adsorber is heated by solar energy and contains a porous medium constituted of activated carbon AC-35 reacting by adsorption with methanol. To study the solar collector type effect on system's performances, the used model takes into account the variation of ambient temperature and solar intensity along a simulated day, corresponding to a total daily insolation of 26.12 MJ/m2 with ambient temperature average of 27.7 °C, which is useful to know the daily thermal behavior of the rectangular adsorber.

  10. Adsorbate-induced lifting of substrate relaxation is a general mechanism governing titania surface chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silber, David; Kowalski, Piotr M.; Traeger, Franziska; Buchholz, Maria; Bebensee, Fabian; Meyer, Bernd; Wöll, Christof

    2016-09-01

    Under ambient conditions, almost all metals are coated by an oxide. These coatings, the result of a chemical reaction, are not passive. Many of them bind, activate and modify adsorbed molecules, processes that are exploited, for example, in heterogeneous catalysis and photochemistry. Here we report an effect of general importance that governs the bonding, structure formation and dissociation of molecules on oxidic substrates. For a specific example, methanol adsorbed on the rutile TiO2(110) single crystal surface, we demonstrate by using a combination of experimental and theoretical techniques that strongly bonding adsorbates can lift surface relaxations beyond their adsorption site, which leads to a significant substrate-mediated interaction between adsorbates. The result is a complex superstructure consisting of pairs of methanol molecules and unoccupied adsorption sites. Infrared spectroscopy reveals that the paired methanol molecules remain intact and do not deprotonate on the defect-free terraces of the rutile TiO2(110) surface.

  11. Adsorbate-induced lifting of substrate relaxation is a general mechanism governing titania surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Silber, David; Kowalski, Piotr M; Traeger, Franziska; Buchholz, Maria; Bebensee, Fabian; Meyer, Bernd; Wöll, Christof

    2016-09-30

    Under ambient conditions, almost all metals are coated by an oxide. These coatings, the result of a chemical reaction, are not passive. Many of them bind, activate and modify adsorbed molecules, processes that are exploited, for example, in heterogeneous catalysis and photochemistry. Here we report an effect of general importance that governs the bonding, structure formation and dissociation of molecules on oxidic substrates. For a specific example, methanol adsorbed on the rutile TiO2(110) single crystal surface, we demonstrate by using a combination of experimental and theoretical techniques that strongly bonding adsorbates can lift surface relaxations beyond their adsorption site, which leads to a significant substrate-mediated interaction between adsorbates. The result is a complex superstructure consisting of pairs of methanol molecules and unoccupied adsorption sites. Infrared spectroscopy reveals that the paired methanol molecules remain intact and do not deprotonate on the defect-free terraces of the rutile TiO2(110) surface.

  12. Adsorbate-induced lifting of substrate relaxation is a general mechanism governing titania surface chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Silber, David; Kowalski, Piotr M.; Traeger, Franziska; Buchholz, Maria; Bebensee, Fabian; Meyer, Bernd; Wöll, Christof

    2016-01-01

    Under ambient conditions, almost all metals are coated by an oxide. These coatings, the result of a chemical reaction, are not passive. Many of them bind, activate and modify adsorbed molecules, processes that are exploited, for example, in heterogeneous catalysis and photochemistry. Here we report an effect of general importance that governs the bonding, structure formation and dissociation of molecules on oxidic substrates. For a specific example, methanol adsorbed on the rutile TiO2(110) single crystal surface, we demonstrate by using a combination of experimental and theoretical techniques that strongly bonding adsorbates can lift surface relaxations beyond their adsorption site, which leads to a significant substrate-mediated interaction between adsorbates. The result is a complex superstructure consisting of pairs of methanol molecules and unoccupied adsorption sites. Infrared spectroscopy reveals that the paired methanol molecules remain intact and do not deprotonate on the defect-free terraces of the rutile TiO2(110) surface. PMID:27686286

  13. Prussian blue caged in spongiform adsorbents using diatomite and carbon nanotubes for elimination of cesium.

    PubMed

    Hu, Baiyang; Fugetsu, Bunshi; Yu, Hongwen; Abe, Yoshiteru

    2012-05-30

    We developed a spongiform adsorbent that contains Prussian blue, which showed a high capacity for eliminating cesium. An in situ synthesizing approach was used to synthesize Prussian blue inside diatomite cavities. Highly dispersed carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were used to form CNT networks that coated the diatomite to seal in the Prussian blue particles. These ternary (CNT/diatomite/Prussian-blue) composites were mixed with polyurethane (PU) prepolymers to produce a quaternary (PU/CNT/diatomite/Prussian-blue), spongiform adsorbent with an in situ foaming procedure. Prussian blue was permanently immobilized in the cell walls of the spongiform matrix and preferentially adsorbed cesium with a theoretical capacity of 167 mg/g cesium. Cesium was absorbed primarily by an ion-exchange mechanism, and the absorption was accomplished by self-uptake of radioactive water by the quaternary spongiform adsorbent.

  14. Direct measurement of core-level relaxation dynamics on a surface- adsorbate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jing; Miaja-Avila, Luis; Saathoff, Guido; La-O-Vorakiat, Chan; Murnane, Margaret; Kapteyn, Henry; Mathias, Stefan; Aeschlimann, Martin; Bauer, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Electronic coupling between an adsorbate and the surface on which it resides is fundamental to the understanding of many surface interactions. However, the interaction of highly-excited adsorbate states is an area that has been explored only indirectly to-date. In this work, we present the first direct time-resolved observations of the lifetime of core-excited states of an atom adsorbed onto a surface. By implementing laser-assisted Auger decay on an adsorbate/surface system, we directly measure the lifetime of the 4d-1 core level of Xenon on Pt(111) to be 7.1 ± 1.1 fs. This result opens up time domain measurements of highly-excited state dynamics in materials systems where, because of complex interactions, energy-resolved measurements provide incomplete information.

  15. Direct measurement of core-level relaxation dynamics on a surface- adsorbate system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jing; Miaja-Avila, Luis; Saathoff, Guido; La-O-Vorakiat, Chan; Murnane, Margaret; Kapteyn, Henry; Mathias, Stefan; Aeschlimann, Martin; Bauer, Michael

    2008-05-01

    Electronic coupling between an adsorbate and the surface on which it resides is fundamental to the understanding of many surface interactions. However, the interaction of highly-excited adsorbate states is an area that has been explored only indirectly to-date. In this work, we present the first direct time-resolved observations of the lifetime of core-excited states of an atom adsorbed onto a surface. By implementing laser-assisted Auger decay on an adsorbate/surface system, we directly measure the lifetime of the 4d-1 core level of Xenon on Pt(111) to be 7.1 ± 1.1 fs. This result opens up time domain measurements of highly-excited state dynamics in materials systems where, because of complex interactions, energy-resolved measurements provide incomplete information.

  16. Graphene oxide/chitin nanofibril composite foams as column adsorbents for aqueous pollutants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhongshi; Liu, Dagang; Zhu, Yi; Li, Zehui; Li, Zhenxuan; Tian, Huafeng; Liu, Haiqing

    2016-06-25

    A novel graphene oxide/chitin nanofibrils (GO-CNF) composite foam as a column adsorbent was prepared for aqueous contaminant disposal. The structures, morphologies and properties of composite foams supported by nanofibrils were characterized. As a special case, the adsorption of methylene blue (MB) on GO-CNF was investigated regarding the static adsorption and column adsorption-desorption tests. Results from equilibrium adsorption isotherms indicated that the adsorption behavior was well-fitted to Langmuir model. The composite foams reinforced by CNF were dimensionally stable during the column adsorption process and could be reused after elution. The removal efficiency of MB was still nearly 90% after 3 cycles. Furthermore, other inorganic or organic pollutants adsorbed by composite foams were also explored. Therefore, this novel composite foam with remarkable properties such as dimensional stability, universal adsorbent for cationic pollutants, high adsorption capacity, and ease of regeneration was a desirable adsorbent in the future practical application of water pollutant treatment.

  17. Heterogeneous Reactions of Surface-Adsorbed Catechol: A Comparison of Tropospheric Aerosol Surrogates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, R. Z.; Woodill, L. A.

    2009-12-01

    Surface-adsorbed organics can alter the chemistry of tropospheric solid-air interfaces, such as aerosol and ground level surfaces, thereby impacting photochemical cycles and altering aerosol properties. The nature of the surface can also influence the chemistry of the surface-adsorbed organic. We employed diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to monitor the adsorption of gaseous catechol on several tropospheric aerosol surrogates and to investigate the subsequent reactivity of adsorbed-catechol with nitrogen dioxide and, in separate preliminary experiments, ozone. Graphite, kaolinite, and sodium halide (NaF, NaCl, NaBr) powders served as carbonaceous, mineral and sea salt aerosol surrogates, respectively. Broad OH stretching bands for adsorbed catechol shifted to lower wavenumber with peak frequencies following the trend NaBr > NaCl > NaF ≈ kaolinite, consistent with the increasing basicity of the halide anions and basic Brønsted sites on kaolinite. The dark heterogeneous reaction of NO2 with NaCl-adsorbed catechol at relative humidity (RH) <2% promoted nitration forming 4-nitrocatechol and oxidation forming 1,2-benzoquinone and the ring cleavage product muconic acid, with product yields of 88%, 8%, and 4%, respectively. 4-Nitrocatechol was the dominant product for catechol adsorbed on NaF and kaolinite, while NaBr-adsorbed catechol produced less 4-nitrocatechol and more 1,2-benzoquinone and muconic acid. For all three sodium halides, the reactions of NO2 with adsorbed catechol were orders of magnitude faster than between NO2 and each NaX substrate. 4-Nitrocatechol rates and product yields were consistent with the relative ability of each substrate to enhance the deprotonated nature of adsorbed-catechol. Increasing the relative humidity caused the rate of each product channel to decrease and also altered the product branching ratios. Most notably, 1,2-benzoquinone formation decreased significantly even at 13% RH. The dramatic

  18. A continuous heat regenerative adsorption refrigerator using spiral plate heat exchanger as adsorbers: improvements

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, R.Z.; Wu, J.Y.; Xu, Y.X.

    1999-02-01

    Spiral plate heat exchangers as adsorbers have been proposed, and a prototype heat regenerative adsorption refrigerator using activated carbon-methanol pair has been developed and tested. Various improvements have been made, the authors get a specific cooling power for 2.6 kg-ice/day-kg adsorbent at the condition of generation temperature lower than 100 C. Discussions on the arrangements of thermal cycles and influences of design are shown.

  19. The Effect of Melatonin Adsorbed to Polyethylene Glycol Microspheres on the Survival of MCF-7 Cells.

    PubMed

    França, Eduardo Luzía; Honorio-França, Adenilda Cristina; Fernandes, Rubian Trindade da Silva; Marins, Camila Moreira Ferreira; Pereira, Claudia Cristina de Souza; Varotti, Fernando de Pilla

    2016-01-01

    Although melatonin exhibits oncostatic properties such as antiproliferative effects, the oral bioavailability of this hormone is less than 20%. Modified drug release systems have been used to improve the pharmacological efficiency of drugs. These systems can change the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of the associated drugs. Thus, this study investigated the effect of melatonin adsorbed to polyethylene glycol (PEG) microspheres on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The MCF-7 cells were obtained from the American Type Culture Collection. MCF-7 cells were preincubated for 24 h with or without melatonin (100 ng/ml), PEG microspheres or melatonin adsorbed to PEG microspheres (100 ng/ml). Viability, intracellular calcium release and apoptosis in MCF-7 cells were determined by flow cytometry. MCF-7 cells incubated with melatonin adsorbed to PEG microspheres showed a lower viability rate (40.0 ± 8.3 with melatonin adsorbed to PEG microspheres compared to 54.1 ± 7.3 with melatonin; 81.8 ± 12.5 with PEG microsphere and 92.7 ± 4.1 with medium), increased spontaneous intracellular Ca2+ release (27.0 ± 8.6 with melatonin adsorbed to PEG microspheres compared to 21.5 ± 13.4 with melatonin; 10.1 ± 5.4 with PEG microsphere and 9.1 ± 5.6 with medium) and increased apoptosis index (51.2 ± 2.7 with melatonin adsorbed to PEG microspheres compared to 36.0 ± 2.1 with melatonin; 4.9 ± 0.5 with PEG microsphere and 3.1 ± 0.6 with medium). The results indicate that melatonin adsorbed to PEG microspheres exerts antitumor effects on human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. However, clinical tests must be performed to confirm the use of melatonin adsorbed to PEG microspheres as an alternative therapy against cancer.

  20. Characterization and testing of amidoxime-based adsorbent materials to extract uranium from natural seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Kuo, Li-Jung; Janke, Christopher James; Wood, Jordana; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Gill, Gary

    2015-11-19

    Extraction of uranium (U) from seawater for use as a nuclear fuel is a significant challenge due to the low concentration of U in seawater (~3.3 ppb) and difficulties to selectively extract U from the background of major and trace elements in seawater. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) s Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) has been serving as a marine test site for determining performance characteristics (adsorption capacity, adsorption kinetics, and selectivity) of novel amidoxime-based polymeric adsorbents developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under natural seawater exposure conditions. This report describes the performance of three formulations (38H, AF1, AI8) of amidoxime-based polymeric adsorbent produced at ORNL in MSL s ambient seawater testing facility. The adsorbents were produced in two forms, fibrous material (40-100 mg samples) and braided material (5-10 g samples), exposed to natural seawater using flow-through columns and recirculating flumes. All three formulations demonstrated high 56 day uranium adsorption capacity (>3 gU/kg adsorbent). The AF1 formulation had the best uranium adsorption performance, with 56-day capacity of 3.9 g U/kg adsorbent, saturation capacity of 5.4 g U/kg adsorbent, and ~25 days half-saturation time. The two exposure methods, flow-through columns and flumes were demonstrated to produce similar performance results, providing confidence that the test methods were reliable, that scaling up from 10 s of mg quantities of exposure in flow-through columns to gram quantities in flumes produced similar results, and that the manufacturing process produces a homogenous adsorbent. Adsorption kinetics appear to be element specific, with half-saturation times ranging from minutes for the major cations in seawater to 8-10weeks for V and Fe. Reducing the exposure time provides a potential pathway to improve the adsorption capacity of U by reducing the V/U ratio on the adsorbent.