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Sample records for adsorbed contaminants mass

  1. Interactions of organic contaminants with mineral-adsorbed surfactants.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lizhong; Chen, Baoliang; Tao, Shu; Chiou, Cary T

    2003-09-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants (phenol, p-nitrophenol, and naphthalene) to natural solids (soils and bentonite) with and without myristylpyridinium bromide (MPB) cationic surfactant was studied to provide novel insightto interactions of contaminants with the mineral-adsorbed surfactant. Contaminant sorption coefficients with mineral-adsorbed surfactants, Kss, show a strong dependence on surfactant loading in the solid. At low surfactant levels, the Kss values increased with increasing sorbed surfactant mass, reached a maximum, and then decreased with increasing surfactant loading. The Kss values for contaminants were always higher than respective partition coefficients with surfactant micelles (Kmc) and natural organic matter (Koc). At examined MPB concentrations in water the three organic contaminants showed little solubility enhancement by MPB. At low sorbed-surfactant levels, the resulting mineral-adsorbed surfactant via the cation-exchange process appears to form a thin organic film, which effectively "adsorbs" the contaminants, resulting in very high Kss values. At high surfactant levels, the sorbed surfactant on minerals appears to form a bulklike medium that behaves essentially as a partition phase (rather than an adsorptive surface), with the resulting Kss being significantly decreased and less dependent on the MPB loading. The results provide a reference to the use of surfactants for remediation of contaminated soils/sediments or groundwater in engineered surfactant-enhanced washing.

  2. Interactions of organic contaminants with mineral-adsorbed surfactants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, L.; Chen, B.; Tao, S.; Chiou, C.T.

    2003-01-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants (phenol, p-nitrophenol, and naphthalene) to natural solids (soils and bentonite) with and without myristylpyridinium bromide (MPB) cationic surfactant was studied to provide novel insight to interactions of contaminants with the mineral-adsorbed surfactant. Contaminant sorption coefficients with mineral-adsorbed surfactants, Kss, show a strong dependence on surfactant loading in the solid. At low surfactant levels, the Kss values increased with increasing sorbed surfactant mass, reached a maximum, and then decreased with increasing surfactant loading. The Kss values for contaminants were always higher than respective partition coefficients with surfactant micelles (Kmc) and natural organic matter (Koc). At examined MPB concentrations in water the three organic contaminants showed little solubility enhancement by MPB. At low sorbed-surfactant levels, the resulting mineral-adsorbed surfactant via the cation-exchange process appears to form a thin organic film, which effectively "adsorbs" the contaminants, resulting in very high Kss values. At high surfactant levels, the sorbed surfactant on minerals appears to form a bulklike medium that behaves essentially as a partition phase (rather than an adsorptive surface), with the resulting Kss being significantly decreased and less dependent on the MPB loading. The results provide a reference to the use of surfactants for remediation of contaminated soils/sediments or groundwater in engineered surfactant-enhanced washing.

  3. Trace contaminant studies of HSC adsorbent. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yieh, D. T. N.

    1978-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of fifteen trace contaminants on HSC (polyethylenimine coated acrylic ester) adsorbent were experimentally investigated with the following two objectives: to test the removal potential and the adsorption reversibility of the selected trace contaminants, and to test the effect a preadsorbed trace contaminant has on the CO2 adsorption capacity. The experimental method for acquiring the adsorption equilibrium data used is based on the volumetric (or displacement) concept of vacuum adsorption. From the experimental results, it was found that the HSC adsorbent has good adsorption potential for contaminants of alcohol compounds, esters, and benzene compounds; whereas, adsorption of ketone compounds, oxidizing and reducing agents are detrimental to the adsorbent. In addition, all liquid contaminants reduce the CO2 capacity of HSC adsorbent.

  4. Contaminant removal from enclosed atmospheres by regenerable adsorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, R. L.; Mcnulty, K. J.; Freedland, G. M.; Turk, A.; Nwankwo, J.

    1974-01-01

    A system for removing contaminants from spacecraft atmospheres was studied, which utilizes catalyst-impregnated activated carbon followed by in-situ regeneration by low-temperature catalytic oxidation of the adsorbed contaminants. Platinum was deposited on activated carbon by liquid phase impregnation with chloroplatinic acid, followed by drying and high-temperature reduction. Results were obtained for the seven selected spacecraft contaminants by means of three experimental test systems. The results indicate that the contaminants could be removed by oxidation with very little loss in adsorptive capacity. The advantages of a catalyst-impregnated carbon for oxidative regeneration are found to be significant enough to warrent its use.

  5. Mass transport contamination study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, S. J.

    1972-01-01

    A theoretical analysis was performed to determine the effects of outgassing and waste dumping on the contamination field around an orbiting spacecraft. The spacecraft was assumed to be spherical in shape with the mass flow emitting uniformly from the spherical surface at a constant rate and in a D'Lambertian spatial distribution. The outflow of gases were assumed to be neutrally charged and of a single species with a molecular weight characteristic of a composite of the actual species involved in the mass flow. The theoretical analysis showed that, for outgassing only, less than 1.5 percent of the outgas products will return to the Skylab spacecraft as a result of intermolecular collisions. When the total mass flow from the spacecraft, including waste dumps and reaction control motor firings, was considered, it was estimated that about 30 percent will return to the spacecraft.

  6. Extraction of bioavailable contaminants from marine sediments: an approach to reducing toxicity using adsorbent parcels.

    PubMed

    Goodsir, Freya; Fisher, Tom T; Barry, Jon; Bolam, Thi; Nelson, Leah D; Rumney, Heather S; Brant, Jan L

    2013-07-15

    This paper demonstrates an approach to reducing acute toxicity in marine sediments using adsorbent parcels. Acute toxicity tests were carried using the marine amphipod Corophium volutator. Marine sediments were spiked with two know contaminants tributyltin and naphthalene and then treated with adsorbent parcels containing either amberlite XAD4 or activated carbon. Results showed that both types of adsorbent parcels were effective in reducing acute toxicity, not only within spiked sediments containing naphthalene and/or tributyltin, but also in an environmental field samples form an expected contaminated site. Adsorbent parcels such as these could provide a practical approach to remediate areas of contaminated sediment within marine environments. Furthermore adsorbents can be used as an identification tool for problematic contaminants using a toxicity identification evaluation approach.

  7. Mass transport of adsorbates near a discontinuous structural phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granato, E.; Ying, S. C.; Elder, K. R.; Ala-Nissila, T.

    2016-12-01

    We study the mass transport dynamics of an adsorbed layer near a discontinuous incommensurate striped-honeycomb phase transition via numerical simulations of a coarse-grained model focusing on the motion of domain walls rather than individual atoms. Following an initial step profile created in the incommensurate striped phase, an intermediate hexagonal incommensurate phase nucleates and grows, leading to a bifurcation into two sharp profiles propagating in opposite directions as opposed to broad profiles induced by atomic diffusive motion. Our results are in agreement with recent numerical simulations of a microscopic model as well as experimental observations for the Pb/Si(111) adsorbate system.

  8. PREDICTING THE ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF ACTIVATED CARBON FOR ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS FROM ADSORBENT AND ADSORBATE PROPERTIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) was developed and combined with the Polanyi-Dubinin-Manes model to predict adsorption isotherms of emerging contaminants on activated carbons with a wide range of physico-chemical properties. Affinity coefficients (βl

  9. Development and characterization of activated hydrochars from orange peels as potential adsorbents for emerging organic contaminants.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, M E; Ledesma, B; Román, S; Bonelli, P R; Cukierman, A L

    2015-05-01

    Activated hydrochars obtained from the hydrothermal carbonization of orange peels (Citrus sinensis) followed by various thermochemical processing were assessed as adsorbents for emerging contaminants in water. Thermal activation under flows of CO2 or air as well as chemical activation with phosphoric acid were applied to the hydrochars. Their characteristics were analyzed and related to their ability to uptake three pharmaceuticals (diclofenac sodium, salicylic acid and flurbiprofen) considered as emerging contaminants. The hydrothermal carbonization and subsequent activations promoted substantial chemical transformations which affected the surface properties of the activated hydrochars; they exhibited specific surface areas ranging from 300 to ∼620 m(2)/g. Morphological characterization showed the development of coral-like microspheres dominating the surface of most hydrochars. Their ability to adsorb the three pharmaceuticals selected was found largely dependent on whether the molecules were ionized or in their neutral form and on the porosity developed by the new adsorbents.

  10. Adsorption interference in mixtures of trace contaminants flowing through activated carbon adsorber beds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madey, R.; Photinos, P. J.

    1980-01-01

    Adsorption interference in binary and ternary mixtures of trace contaminants in a helium carrier gas flowing through activated carbon adsorber beds are studied. The isothermal transmission, which is the ratio of the outlet to the inlet concentration, of each component is measured. Interference between co-adsorbing gases occurs when the components are adsorbed strongly. Displacement of one component by another is manifested by a transmission greater than unity for the displaced component over some range of eluted volume. Interference is evidenced not only by a reduction of the adsorption capacity of each component in the mixture in comparison with the value obtained in a single-component experiment, but also by a change in the slope of the transmission curve of each component experiment.

  11. Graphene nanosheets and graphite oxide as promising adsorbents for removal of organic contaminants from aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Ji, Liangliang; Chen, Wei; Xu, Zhaoyi; Zheng, Shourong; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2013-01-01

    Graphenes are an emerging class of carbon nanomaterials whose adsorption properties toward organic compounds have not been well understood. In the present study, graphene nanosheets were prepared by reoxidation and abrupt heating of graphite oxide, which was prepared by sequential chemical oxidation of commercial nonporous graphite powder. Adsorption properties of three aromatic compounds (naphthalene, 2-naphthol, and 1-naphthylamine) and one pharmaceutical compound (tylosin) on graphene nanosheets and graphite oxide were examined to explore the potential of these two adsorbents for the removal of organic contaminants from aqueous solutions. Compared with the literature data of adsorption on carbon nanotubes, adsorption of bulky, flexible tylosin on graphene nanosheets exhibited markedly faster adsorption kinetics, which can be attributed to their opened-up layer structure. Graphene nanosheets and graphite oxide showed similar sequences of adsorption affinity: 1-naphthylamine > 2-naphthol > tylosin > naphthalene (with much larger differences observed on graphite oxide). It was proposed that the strong adsorption of the three aromatic compounds was mainly due to π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions with the graphitic surfaces of adsorbents. Additionally, Lewis acid-base interaction was likely an important factor contributing to the strong adsorption of 1-naphthylamine and tylosin, especially for the O-functionality-abundant graphite oxide. After being normalized on the basis of adsorbent surface area, adsorption affinities of all four tested adsorbates on graphene nanosheets were very close to those on nonporous graphite powder, reflecting complete accessibility of the adsorbent surface area in adsorption.

  12. Desorption corona beam ionisation (DCBI) mass spectrometry for in-situ analysis of adsorbed phenol in cigarette acetate fiber filter.

    PubMed

    Du, Wen; Tang, Li-Juan; Wen, Jian-Hui; Zhong, Ke-Jun; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Wang, Hua; Chen, Bo; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2015-01-01

    The study of spatial distribution characteristics of the adsorbed compounds for absorbent materials has significant importance in understanding the behaviors of aerosols while they migrating in the absorbent materials. Herein, for the first time, desorption corona beam ionization-mass spectrometry (DCBI-MS) has proposed for direct in-situ analysis of adsorbed aerosol for absorbent materials. DCBI is a novel atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-related technique developed by our group in recent years. It can facilitate accurately localizing sampling by forming a visible thin corona beam and avoid the risk of sample contamination and matrix interference compared with other similar techniques. The advantages of DCBI-MS allow rapid screening of the spatial distribution characteristics of the adsorbed compounds for absorbent materials. The distribution characteristic of phenol in cigarette filter tip filled with cellulose acetate fiber was studied as a model case for demonstrating the feasibility of the developed method. As a comparison, conventional HPLC was also used for the study of the distribution characteristic of phenol. The results revealed DCBI-MS had highly improved assay simplicity in spatial distribution characteristic analysis of phenol for the acetate fiber tip, therefore, exhibiting a great potential for convenient, rapid and cost-efficient analysis of the spatial distribution characteristic investigation of adsorbed compounds for adsorbent materials.

  13. A dispersion model approach to the preliminary design of adsorber beds for trace contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madey, R.; Czayka, M.; Forsythe, R.; Povlis, J.; Yin, K.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that a dispersion model for the transport of a gas through a porous medium can be useful in the preliminary design of adsorber beds for the control of trace contaminants. The transmission function is considered, taking into account the transmission of 102-ppm acetaldehyde in helium flowing at various flow rates through an absorber bed. The experiments were conducted at a temperature of 25.0 C. Attention is given to a representation of the experimental breakthrough curve, the volume adsorption capacity, temperature studies, and correlations.

  14. Laser electrospray mass spectrometry of adsorbed molecules at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brady, John J.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Simon, Kuriakose; Levis, Robert J.

    2010-02-01

    Atmospheric pressure mass analysis of solid phase biomolecules is performed using laser electrospray mass spectrometry (LEMS). A non-resonant femtosecond duration laser pulse vaporizes native samples at atmospheric pressure for subsequent electrospray ionization and transfer into a mass spectrometer. LEMS was used to detect a complex molecule (irinotecan HCl), a complex mixture (cold medicine formulation with active ingredients: acetaminophen, dextromethorphan HBr and doxylamine succinate), and a biological building block (deoxyguanosine) deposited on steel surfaces without a matrix molecule.

  15. Dynamic model of heat and mass transfer in rectangular adsorber of a solar adsorption machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekirou, W.; Boukheit, N.; Karaali, A.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the study of a rectangular adsorber of solar adsorption cooling machine. The modeling and the analysis of the adsorber are the key point of such studies; because of the complex coupled heat and mass transfer phenomena that occur during the working cycle. The adsorber is heated by solar energy and contains a porous medium constituted of activated carbon AC-35 reacting by adsorption with methanol. To study the solar collector type effect on system's performances, the used model takes into account the variation of ambient temperature and solar intensity along a simulated day, corresponding to a total daily insolation of 26.12 MJ/m2 with ambient temperature average of 27.7 °C, which is useful to know the daily thermal behavior of the rectangular adsorber.

  16. Rapid removal of aniline from contaminated water by a novel polymeric adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yunhong; Xu, Yang; He, Qinghua; Cao, Yusheng; Du, Bibai

    2014-01-01

    Dummy molecularly imprinted polymers (DMIPs) for aniline were synthesized by a thermal polymerization method using acrylamide as a functional monomer, ethylene dimethacrylate as a crosslinker, 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile as a free radical initiator, acetonitrile as a porogenic solvent, and analogues of aniline, namely sulfadiazine, as the template. The DMIPs that were obtained showed a high affinity to aniline compared to non-imprinted polymers. It was proven that the DMIPs obtained using sulfadiazine as the template were much better than the molecularly imprinted polymers using aniline as the template. The results indicated that the Freundlich model was fit for the adsorption model of DMIP for aniline and the adsorption model of the DMIP for aniline was multilayer adsorption. Furthermore, the results showed that the DMIP synthesized by bulk polymerization could be used as a novel adsorbent for removal of aniline from contaminated water.

  17. Enhancement of mass transfer by ultrasound: Application to adsorbent regeneration and food drying/dehydration.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ye

    2016-07-01

    The physical mechanisms of heat and mass transfer enhancement by ultrasound have been identified by people. Basically, the effect of 'cavitation' induced by ultrasound is the main reason for the enhancement of heat and mass transfer in a liquid environment, and the acoustic streaming and vibration are the main reasons for that in a gaseous environment. The adsorbent regeneration and food drying/dehydration are typical heat and mass transfer process, and the intensification of the two processes by ultrasound is of complete feasibility. This paper makes an overview on recent studies regarding applications of power ultrasound to adsorbent regeneration and food drying/dehydration. The concerned adsorbents include desiccant materials (typically like silica gel) for air dehumidification and other ones (typically active carbon and polymeric resin) for water treatment. The applications of ultrasound in the regeneration of these adsorbents have been proved to be energy saving. The concerned foods are mostly fruits and vegetables. Although the ultrasonic treatment may cause food degradation or nutrient loss, it can greatly reduce the food processing time and decrease drying temperature. From the literature, it can be seen that the ultrasonic conditions (i.e., acoustic frequency and power levels) are always focused on during the study of ultrasonic applications. The increasing number of relevant studies argues that ultrasound is a very promising technology applied to the adsorbent regeneration and food drying/dehydration.

  18. PREDICTING THE ADSORPTION CAPACITY OF ACTIVATED CARBON FOR EMERGING ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS FROM FUNDAMENTAL ADSORBENT AND ADSORBATE PROPERTIES - PRESENTATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) was developed and combined with the Polanyi-Dubinin-Manes model to predict adsorption isotherms of emerging contaminants on activated carbons with a wide range of physico-chemical properties. Affinity coefficients (βl

  19. Mass and Force Sensing of an Adsorbate on a Beam Resonator Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yin; Zhao, Ya-Pu

    2015-01-01

    The mass sensing superiority of a micro-/nano-mechanical resonator sensor over conventional mass spectrometry has been, or at least is being firmly established. Because the sensing mechanism of a mechanical resonator sensor is the shifts of resonant frequencies, how to link the shifts of resonant frequencies with the material properties of an analyte formulates an inverse problem. Besides the analyte/adsorbate mass, many other factors, such as position and axial force, can also cause the shifts of resonant frequencies. The in situ measurement of the adsorbate position and axial force is extremely difficult if not impossible, especially when an adsorbate is as small as a molecule or an atom. Extra instruments are also required. In this study, an inverse problem of using three resonant frequencies to determine the mass, position and axial force is formulated and solved. The accuracy of the inverse problem solving method is demonstrated, and how the method can be used in the real application of a nanomechanical resonator is also discussed. Solving the inverse problem is helpful to the development and application of a mechanical resonator sensor for two reasons: reducing extra experimental equipment and achieving better mass sensing by considering more factors. PMID:26115457

  20. Remediation of Organic and Inorganic Arsenic Contaminated Groundwater using a Nonocrystalline TiO2 Based Adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, C.; Meng, X; Calvache, E; Jiang, G

    2009-01-01

    A nanocrystalline TiO2-based adsorbent was evaluated for the simultaneous removal of As(V), As(III), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in contaminated groundwater. Batch experimental results show that As adsorption followed pseudo-second order rate kinetics. The competitive adsorption was described with the charge distribution multi-site surface complexation model (CD-MUSIC). The groundwater containing an average of 329 ?g L-1 As(III), 246 ?g L-1 As(V), 151 ?g L-1 MMA, and 202 ?g L-1 DMA was continuously passed through a TiO2 filter at an empty bed contact time of 6 min for 4 months. Approximately 11 000, 14 000, and 9900 bed volumes of water had been treated before the As(III), As(V), and MMA concentration in the effluent increased to 10 ?g L-1. However, very little DMA was removed. The EXAFS results demonstrate the existence of a bidentate binuclear As(V) surface complex on spent adsorbent, indicating the oxidation of adsorbed As(III). A nanocrystalline TiO2-based adsorbent could be used for the simultaneous removal of As(V), As(III), MMA, and DMA in contaminated groundwater.

  1. Methods for Estimating Adsorbed Uranium(VI) and Distribution Coefficients of Contaminated Sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kohler, M.; Curtis, G.P.; Meece, D.E.; Davis, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Assessing the quantity of U(VI) that participates in sorption/desorption processes in a contaminated aquifer is an important task when investigating U migration behavior. U-contaminated aquifer sediments were obtained from 16 different locations at a former U mill tailings site at Naturita, CO (U.S.A.) and were extracted with an artificial groundwater, a high pH sodium bicarbonate solution, hydroxylamine hydrochloride solution, and concentrated nitric acid. With an isotopic exchange method, both a KD value for the specific experimental conditions as well as the total exchangeable mass of U(VI) was determined. Except for one sample, KD values determined by isotopic exchange with U-contaminated sediments that were in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 agreed within a factor of 2 with KD values predicted from a nonelectrostatic surface complexation model (NEM) developed from U(VI) adsorption experiments with uncontaminated sediments. The labile fraction of U(VI) and U extracted by the bicarbonate solution were highly correlated (r2 = 0.997), with a slope of 0.96 ?? 0.01. The proximity of the slope to one suggests that both methods likely access the same reservoir of U(VI) associated with the sediments. The results indicate that the bicarbonate extraction method is useful for estimating the mass of labile U(VI) in sediments that do not contain U(IV). In-situ KD values calculated from the measured labile U(VI) and the dissolved U(VI) in the Naturita alluvial aquifer agreed within a factor of 3 with in-situ K D values predicted with the NEM and groundwater chemistry at each well.

  2. Methods for estimating adsorbed uranium(VI) and distribution coefficients of contaminated sediments.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Matthias; Curtis, Gary P; Meece, David E; Davis, James A

    2004-01-01

    Assessing the quantity of U(VI) that participates in sorption/desorption processes in a contaminated aquifer is an important task when investigating U migration behavior. U-contaminated aquifer sediments were obtained from 16 different locations at a former U mill tailings site at Naturita, CO (U.S.A.) and were extracted with an artificial groundwater, a high pH sodium bicarbonate solution, hydroxylamine hydrochloride solution, and concentrated nitric acid. With an isotopic exchange method, both a KD value for the specific experimental conditions as well as the total exchangeable mass of U(VI) was determined. Except for one sample, KD values determined by isotopic exchange with U-contaminated sediments that were in equilibrium with atmospheric CO2 agreed within a factor of 2 with KD values predicted from a nonelectrostatic surface complexation model (NEM) developed from U(VI) adsorption experiments with uncontaminated sediments. The labile fraction of U(VI) and U extracted by the bicarbonate solution were highly correlated (r2 = 0.997), with a slope of 0.96 +/- 0.01. The proximity of the slope to one suggests that both methods likely access the same reservoir of U(VI) associated with the sediments. The results indicate that the bicarbonate extraction method is useful for estimating the mass of labile U(VI) in sediments that do not contain U(IV). In-situ KD values calculated from the measured labile U(VI) and the dissolved U(VI) in the Naturita alluvial aquifer agreed within a factor of 3 with in-situ KD values predicted with the NEM and groundwater chemistry at each well.

  3. Linking Mass Spectrometry with Toxicology for Emerging Water Contaminants

    EPA Science Inventory

    This overview presentation will discuss the benefits of combining mass spectrometry with toxicology. These benefits will be described for 3 main areas: (1) Toxicity assays used to test new environmental contaminants previously identified using mass spectrometry, such that furth...

  4. Utilization of recycled charcoal as a thermal source and adsorbent for the treatment of PCDD/Fs contaminated sediment.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Long; Hou, Hong; Iwasaki, Kanae; Terada, Akihiko; Hosomi, Masaaki

    2012-07-30

    A novel heat treatment process in which charcoal was used as both a thermal source and an adsorbent was investigated as a low-cost method for removal of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) from solids. Three laboratory scale experiments involving various ratios of charcoal to contaminated sediment and air superficial velocities were performed. The results indicated that the total and toxic equivalency quantities (TEQ) concentrations of PCDD/Fs decreased significantly in the treated sediment of all runs with removal efficiencies greater than 96% and 90%, which resulted in residual concentrations below the Japanese standard limit of 0.15ng-TEQg(-1). The charcoal/contaminated sediment ratio and air superficial velocity were determinant factors controlling the PCDD/Fs concentrations and homologue profiles in effluent. As the air superficial velocity increased and charcoal/contaminated sediment ratio decreased, more PCDD/Fs were released from the sediment as fly ash, making them less likely to remain in the treated sediment. These phenomena were likely a result of the vapor pressure of PCDD/Fs, contact time with effluent gas and amount of PCDD/Fs adsorbed by charcoal. The developed process would promise an alternative to a conventional remediation process for PCDD/Fs contaminated solids.

  5. Development of high efficiency silica coated β-cyclodextrin polymeric adsorbent for the removal of emerging contaminants of concern from water.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Bikash; Muruganandham, M; Suri, Rominder P S

    2014-05-30

    This article reports the removal of several emerging contaminants (ECs) from water using novel adsorbent comprising of β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) coated on silica. Fourteen different adsorbents were synthesized under different experimental conditions using two different crosslinking agents (hexamethylene diisocyanate (HMDI) and epichlorohydrin (EPI)) and co-polymers (glycidoxypropyl trimethoxysilane (GPTS) and aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES). The adsorption capacities of the synthesized adsorbents were initially evaluated using 17β-estradiol, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), and bisphenol-A (BPA) as adsorbates. The adsorbent prepared by using HMDI as crosslinking agent with DMSO as solvent was observed to perform the best, and removed more than 90% of 17β-estradiol, PFOA, and BPA. Furthermore, the β-CD loading on the ECs removal was studied which showed that the adsorbate removal increases with increase in loading of β-CD on the substrate. The best adsorbent was resynthesized in seven batches and its performance was reproducible for the removal of ten steroid hormones. The adsorbent showed very good regeneration potential for four successive adsorption-regeneration cycles to remove steroid hormones and PFOA. A plausible mechanism of adsorption is proposed. The synthesized best adsorbent is characterized using FTIR, HR-TEM, TGA and nitrogen adsorption analysis. The TGA results showed that the adsorbent has thermal stability of upto 300°C.

  6. Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon; Peters, Wanda; Hasegawa, Mark; Hedgeland, Randy; Petro, John; Novo-Gradac, Kevin; Wong, Alfred; Triolo, Jack; Miller, Cory

    2011-01-01

    A document discusses a zeolite-based sprayable molecular adsorber coating that has been developed to alleviate the size and weight issues of current ceramic puck-based technology, while providing a configuration that more projects can use to protect against degradation from outgassed materials within a spacecraft, particularly contamination-sensitive instruments. This coating system demonstrates five times the adsorption capacity of previously developed adsorber coating slurries. The molecular adsorber formulation was developed and refined, and a procedure for spray application was developed. Samples were spray-coated and tested for capacity, thermal optical/radiative properties, coating adhesion, and thermal cycling. Work performed during this study indicates that the molecular adsorber formulation can be applied to aluminum, stainless steel, or other metal substrates that can accept silicate-based coatings. The coating can also function as a thermal- control coating. This adsorber will dramatically reduce the mass and volume restrictions, and is less expensive than the currently used molecular adsorber puck design.

  7. Remediation of organic and inorganic arsenic contaminated groundwater using a nanocrystalline TiO2-based adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Jing, Chuanyong; Meng, Xiaoguang; Calvache, Edwin; Jiang, Guibin

    2009-01-01

    A nanocrystalline TiO2-based adsorbent was evaluated for the simultaneous removal of As(V), As(III), monomethylarsonic acid (MMA), and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) in contaminated groundwater. Batch experimental results show that As adsorption followed pseudo-second order rate kinetics. The competitive adsorption was described with the charge distribution multi-site surface complexation model (CD-MUSIC). The groundwater containing an average of 329 microg L(-1) As(III), 246 microg L(-1) As(V), 151 microg L(-1) MMA, and 202 microg L(-1) DMA was continuously passed through a TiO2 filter at an empty bed contact time of 6 min for 4 months. Approximately 11,000, 14,000, and 9900 bed volumes of water had been treated before the As(III), As(V), and MMA concentration in the effluent increased to 10 microg L(-1). However, very little DMA was removed. The EXAFS results demonstrate the existence of a bidentate binuclear As(V) surface complex on spent adsorbent, indicating the oxidation of adsorbed As(III).

  8. Environmental Mass Spectrometry: Emerging Contaminants and Current Issues, 2008 Review

    EPA Science Inventory

    This biennial review covers developments in Environmental Mass Spectrometry for Emerging Environmental Contaminants over the period of 2006-2007. A few significant references that appeared between January and February 2008 are also included. Analytical Chemistry’s current polic...

  9. Environmental Mass Spectrometry: Emerging Contaminants and Current Issues (2010 Review)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This biennial review covers developments in environmental mass spectrometry for emerging environmental contaminants over the period of 2008-2009. A few significant references that appeared between January and February 2010 are also included. Analytical Chemistry’s current polic...

  10. Modeling of transmittance degradation caused by optical surface contamination by atomic oxygen reaction with adsorbed silicones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Aaron; Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.; Stueber, Thomas; Sechkar, Edward

    2000-09-01

    A numerical procedure is presented to calculate transmittance degradation caused by contaminant films on spacecraft surfaces produced through the interaction of orbital atomic oxygen (AO) with volatile silicones and hydrocarbons from spacecraft components. In the model, contaminant accretion is dependent on the adsorption of species, depletion reactions due to gas-surface collisions, desorption, and surface reactions between AO and silicon producing SiOx (where x is near 2). A detailed description of the procedure used to calculate the constituents of the contaminant layer is presented, including the equations that govern the evolution of fractional coverage by specie type. As an illustrative example of film growth, calculation results using a prototype code that calculates the evolution of surface coverage by specie type is presented and discussed. An example of the transmittance degradation caused by surface interaction of AO with deposited contaminant is presented for the case of exponentially decaying contaminant flux. These examples are performed using hypothetical values for the process parameters.

  11. A Reliable Hybrid Adsorbent for Efficient Radioactive Cesium Accumulation from Contaminated Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Awual, Md. Rabiul; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Miyazaki, Yuji; Matsumura, Daiju; Shiwaku, Hideaki; Taguchi, Tomitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Cesium (Cs) removal from nuclear liquid wastewater has become an emerging issue for safeguarding public health after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. A novel macrocyclic ligand of o-benzo-p-xylyl-22-crown-6-ether (OBPX22C6) was developed and successfully immobilized onto mesoporous silica for the preparation of hybrid adsorbent. The benzene ring π electron is the part of crown ether of OBPX22C6 for easy orientation of the macrocyclic compound for making the π electron donation with Cs complexation. The potential and feasibility of the hybrid adsorbent as being Cs selective was evaluated in terms of sensitivity, selectivity and reusability. The results clarified that the Cs removal process was rapid and reached saturation within a short time. Considering the effect of competitive ions, sodium (Na) did not markedly affect the Cs adsorption whereas potassium (K) was slightly affected due to the similar ionic radii. However, the oxygen in long ethylene glycol chain in OBPX22C6 was expected to show strong coordination, including Cs-π interaction with Cs even in the presence of the high amount of K and Na. Due to its high selectivity and reusability, significant volume reduction is expected as this promising hybrid adsorbent is used for Cs removal in Fukushima wastewater. PMID:26818070

  12. A Reliable Hybrid Adsorbent for Efficient Radioactive Cesium Accumulation from Contaminated Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Awual, Md Rabiul; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Miyazaki, Yuji; Matsumura, Daiju; Shiwaku, Hideaki; Taguchi, Tomitsugu

    2016-01-28

    Cesium (Cs) removal from nuclear liquid wastewater has become an emerging issue for safeguarding public health after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. A novel macrocyclic ligand of o-benzo-p-xylyl-22-crown-6-ether (OBPX22C6) was developed and successfully immobilized onto mesoporous silica for the preparation of hybrid adsorbent. The benzene ring π electron is the part of crown ether of OBPX22C6 for easy orientation of the macrocyclic compound for making the π electron donation with Cs complexation. The potential and feasibility of the hybrid adsorbent as being Cs selective was evaluated in terms of sensitivity, selectivity and reusability. The results clarified that the Cs removal process was rapid and reached saturation within a short time. Considering the effect of competitive ions, sodium (Na) did not markedly affect the Cs adsorption whereas potassium (K) was slightly affected due to the similar ionic radii. However, the oxygen in long ethylene glycol chain in OBPX22C6 was expected to show strong coordination, including Cs-π interaction with Cs even in the presence of the high amount of K and Na. Due to its high selectivity and reusability, significant volume reduction is expected as this promising hybrid adsorbent is used for Cs removal in Fukushima wastewater.

  13. A Reliable Hybrid Adsorbent for Efficient Radioactive Cesium Accumulation from Contaminated Wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awual, Md. Rabiul; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Miyazaki, Yuji; Matsumura, Daiju; Shiwaku, Hideaki; Taguchi, Tomitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Cesium (Cs) removal from nuclear liquid wastewater has become an emerging issue for safeguarding public health after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. A novel macrocyclic ligand of o-benzo-p-xylyl-22-crown-6-ether (OBPX22C6) was developed and successfully immobilized onto mesoporous silica for the preparation of hybrid adsorbent. The benzene ring π electron is the part of crown ether of OBPX22C6 for easy orientation of the macrocyclic compound for making the π electron donation with Cs complexation. The potential and feasibility of the hybrid adsorbent as being Cs selective was evaluated in terms of sensitivity, selectivity and reusability. The results clarified that the Cs removal process was rapid and reached saturation within a short time. Considering the effect of competitive ions, sodium (Na) did not markedly affect the Cs adsorption whereas potassium (K) was slightly affected due to the similar ionic radii. However, the oxygen in long ethylene glycol chain in OBPX22C6 was expected to show strong coordination, including Cs-π interaction with Cs even in the presence of the high amount of K and Na. Due to its high selectivity and reusability, significant volume reduction is expected as this promising hybrid adsorbent is used for Cs removal in Fukushima wastewater.

  14. Determination of the mass transfer limiting step of dye adsorption onto commercial adsorbent by using mathematical models.

    PubMed

    Marin, Pricila; Borba, Carlos Eduardo; Módenes, Aparecido Nivaldo; Espinoza-Quiñones, Fernando R; de Oliveira, Silvia Priscila Dias; Kroumov, Alexander Dimitrov

    2014-01-01

    Reactive blue 5G dye removal in a fixed-bed column packed with Dowex Optipore SD-2 adsorbent was modelled. Three mathematical models were tested in order to determine the limiting step of the mass transfer of the dye adsorption process onto the adsorbent. The mass transfer resistance was considered to be a criterion for the determination of the difference between models. The models contained information about the external, internal, or surface adsorption limiting step. In the model development procedure, two hypotheses were applied to describe the internal mass transfer resistance. First, the mass transfer coefficient constant was considered. Second, the mass transfer coefficient was considered as a function of the dye concentration in the adsorbent. The experimental breakthrough curves were obtained for different particle diameters of the adsorbent, flow rates, and feed dye concentrations in order to evaluate the predictive power of the models. The values of the mass transfer parameters of the mathematical models were estimated by using the downhill simplex optimization method. The results showed that the model that considered internal resistance with a variable mass transfer coefficient was more flexible than the other ones and this model described the dynamics of the adsorption process of the dye in the fixed-bed column better. Hence, this model can be used for optimization and column design purposes for the investigated systems and similar ones.

  15. Modeling the movement of a pH perturbation and its impact on adsorbed zinc and phosphate in a wastewater-contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kent, D.B.; Wilkie, J.A.; Davis, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    Chemical conditions were perturbed in an aquifer with an ambient pH of 5.9 and wastewater-derived adsorbed zinc (Zn) and phosphate (P) contamination by injecting a pulse of amended groundwater. The injected groundwater had low concentrations of dissolved Zn and P, a pH value of 4.5 resulting from equilibration with carbon dioxide gas, and added potassium bromide (KBr). Downgradient of the injection, breakthrough of nonreactive Br and total dissolved carbonate concentrations in excess of ambient values (excess TCO 2) were accompanied by a decrease in pH values and over twentyfold increases in dissolved Zn concentrations above preinjection values. Peak concentrations of Br and excess TCO2 were followed by slow increases in pH values accompanied by significant increases in dissolved P above preinjection concentrations. The injected tracers mobilized a significant mass of wastewater-derived Zn. Reactive transport simulations incorporating surface complexation models for adsorption of Zn, P, hydrogen ions, and major cations onto the aquifer sediments, calibrated using laboratory experimental data, captured most of the important trends observed during the experiment. These include increases in Zn concentrations in response to the pH perturbation, perturbations in major cation concentrations, attenuation of the pH perturbation with transport distance, and increases in alkalinity with transport distance. Observed desorption of P in response to chemical perturbations was not predicted, possibly because of a disparity between the range of chemical conditions in the calibration data set and those encountered during the field experiment. Zinc and P desorbed rapidly in response to changing chemical conditions despite decades of contact with the sediments. Surface complexation models with relatively few parameters in the form of logK values and site concentrations show considerable promise for describing the influence of variable chemistry on the transport of adsorbing

  16. Resistively-Heated Microlith-based Adsorber for Carbon Dioxide and Trace Contaminant Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roychoudhury, S.; Walsh, D.; Perry, J.

    2005-01-01

    An integrated sorber-based Trace Contaminant Control System (TCCS) and Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) prototype was designed, fabricated and tested. It corresponds to a 7-person load. Performance over several adsorption/regeneration cycles was examined. Vacuum regenerations at effective time/temperature conditions, and estimated power requirements were experimentally verified for the combined CO2/trace contaminant removal prototype. The current paper details the design and performance of this prototype during initial testing at CO2 and trace contaminant concentrations in the existing CDRA, downstream of the drier. Additional long-term performance characterization is planned at NASA. Potential system design options permitting associated weight, volume savings and logistic benefits, especially as relevant for long-duration space flight, are reviewed. The technology consisted of a sorption bed with sorbent- coated metal meshes, trademarked and patented as Microlith by Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI). By contrast the current CO2 removal system on the International Space Station employs pellet beds. Preliminary bench scale performance data (without direct resistive heating) for simultaneous CO2 and trace contaminant removal was reviewed in SAE 2004-01-2442. In the prototype, the meshes were directly electrically heated for rapid response and accurate temperature control. This allowed regeneration via resistive heating with the potential for shorter regeneration times, reduced power requirement, and net energy savings vs. conventional systems. A novel flow arrangement, for removing both CO2 and trace contaminants within the same bed, was demonstrated. Thus, the need for a separate trace contaminant unit was eliminated resulting in an opportunity for significant weight savings. Unlike the current disposable charcoal bed, zeolites for trace contaminant removal are amenable to periodic regeneration.

  17. Modeling of Transmittance Degradation Caused by Optical Surface Contamination by Atomic Oxygen Reaction with Adsorbed Silicones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Aaron; Banks, Bruce; Miller, Sharon; Stueber, Thomas; Sechkar, Edward

    2001-01-01

    A numerical procedure is presented to calculate transmittance degradation caused by contaminant films on spacecraft surfaces produced through the interaction of orbital atomic oxygen (AO) with volatile silicones and hydrocarbons from spacecraft components. In the model, contaminant accretion is dependent on the adsorption of species, depletion reactions due to gas-surface collisions, desorption, and surface reactions between AO and silicone producing SiO(x), (where x is near 2). A detailed description of the procedure used to calculate the constituents of the contaminant layer is presented, including the equations that govern the evolution of fractional coverage by specie type. As an illustrative example of film growth, calculation results using a prototype code that calculates the evolution of surface coverage by specie type is presented and discussed. An example of the transmittance degradation caused by surface interaction of AO with deposited contaminant is presented for the case of exponentially decaying contaminant flux. These examples are performed using hypothetical values for the process parameters.

  18. Natural attenuation of pesticide water contamination by using ecological adsorbents: Application for chlorinated pesticides included in European Water Framework Directive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Bakouri, Hicham; Morillo, José; Usero, José; Ouassini, Abdelhamid

    2009-01-01

    SummaryIn this work, a series of experiments were performed to demonstrate the potential use of natural organic substances (NOS) as an ecological technique to prevent pesticide contamination of ground water resources. A preliminary test has been carried out for determining the potentialities of ten NOS in the elimination of alachlor, aldrin, atrazine, chlorpyrifos, chlorfenvinphos, dieldrin, alpha-endosulfan, endrin, hexachlorobenzene, beta-HCH, gamma-HCH (lindane), simazine and trifluralin. The best adsorbents that present higher removal efficiency were date and olives stones, and in minor measurement Raphanus raphanistrum and Cistus ladaniferus. Experimental results showed that the pH and temperature of pesticide solutions negatively affect the adsorption process. According to adsorption kinetic data, 8 h were considered as the equilibrium time for realizing adsorption isotherms. Adsorption data were fit with Freundlich isotherm model which describes better the adsorption process. The K f values depended mainly on the nature of each adsorbent and ranged from 4.53 for Eucalyptus gomphocephala to 13.54 for date stones.

  19. Assessment of the caesium-137 flux adsorbed to suspended sediment in a reservoir in the contaminated Fukushima region in Japan.

    PubMed

    Mouri, Goro; Golosov, Valentin; Shiiba, Michiharu; Hori, Tomoharu

    2014-04-01

    We estimated the flux of caesium-137 adsorbed to suspended sediment in the Kusaki Dam reservoir in the Fukushima region of eastern Japan, which was contaminated by the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident. The amount and rate of reservoir sedimentation and the caesium-137 concentration were validated based on the mixed-particle distribution and a sediment transport equation. The caesium-137 and sediment flux data suggested that wash load, suspended load sediment, and caesium-137 were deposited and the discharge and transport processes generated acute pollution, especially during extreme rainfall-runoff events. Additionally, we qualitatively assessed future changes in caesium-137 and sediment fluxes in the reservoir. The higher deposition and discharge at the start of the projection compared to the 2090s are most likely explained by the radioactive decay of caesium-137 and the effects of reservoir sedimentation. Predictions of the impacts of future climate on sediment and caesium-137 fluxes are crucial for environmental planning and management.

  20. Dynamical Mass Measurements of Contaminated Galaxy Clusters Using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntampaka, M.; Trac, H.; Sutherland, D. J.; Fromenteau, S.; Póczos, B.; Schneider, J.

    2016-11-01

    We study dynamical mass measurements of galaxy clusters contaminated by interlopers and show that a modern machine learning algorithm can predict masses by better than a factor of two compared to a standard scaling relation approach. We create two mock catalogs from Multidark’s publicly available N-body MDPL1 simulation, one with perfect galaxy cluster membership information and the other where a simple cylindrical cut around the cluster center allows interlopers to contaminate the clusters. In the standard approach, we use a power-law scaling relation to infer cluster mass from galaxy line-of-sight (LOS) velocity dispersion. Assuming perfect membership knowledge, this unrealistic case produces a wide fractional mass error distribution, with a width of {{Δ }}ε ≈ 0.87. Interlopers introduce additional scatter, significantly widening the error distribution further ({{Δ }}ε ≈ 2.13). We employ the support distribution machine (SDM) class of algorithms to learn from distributions of data to predict single values. Applied to distributions of galaxy observables such as LOS velocity and projected distance from the cluster center, SDM yields better than a factor-of-two improvement ({{Δ }}ε ≈ 0.67) for the contaminated case. Remarkably, SDM applied to contaminated clusters is better able to recover masses than even the scaling relation approach applied to uncontaminated clusters. We show that the SDM method more accurately reproduces the cluster mass function, making it a valuable tool for employing cluster observations to evaluate cosmological models.

  1. Contribution of selected perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances to the adsorbable organically bound fluorine in German rivers and in a highly contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Willach, Sarah; Brauch, Heinz-Jürgen; Lange, Frank T

    2016-02-01

    Due to the lack of analytical standards the application of surrogate parameters for organofluorine detection in the aquatic environment is a complementary approach to single compound target analysis of perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl chemicals (PFASs). The recently developed method adsorbable organically bound fluorine (AOF) is based on adsorption of organofluorine chemicals to activated carbon followed by combustion ion chromatography. This AOF method was further simplified to enable measurement of larger series of environmental samples. The limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.77 μg/L F. The modified protocol was applied to 22 samples from German rivers, a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluent, and four groundwater samples from a fire-fighting training site. The WWTP effluent (AOF = 1.98 μg/L F) and only three river water samples (AOF between 0.88 μg/L F and 1.47 μg/L F) exceeded the LOQ. The AOF levels in a PFASs plume at a heavily contaminated site were in the range of 162 ± 3 μg/L F to 782 ± 43 μg/L F. In addition to AOF 17 PFASs were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. 32-51% of AOF in the contaminated groundwater samples were explained by individual PFASs wheras in the surface waters more than 95% remained unknown. Organofluorine of two fluorinated pesticides, one pesticide metabolite and three fluorinated pharmaceuticals was recovered as AOF by >50% from all four tested water matrices. It is suggested that in the diffusely contaminated water bodies such fluorinated chemicals and not monitored PFASs contribute significantly to AOF.

  2. Quantitative time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry for the characterization of multicomponent adsorbed protein films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, M. S.; Shen, M.; Horbett, T. A.; Castner, David G.

    2003-01-01

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) is ideal for the characterization of adsorbed proteins due to its chemical specificity and surface sensitivity. We have employed ToF-SIMS and multivariate analysis to determine the surface composition of adsorbed protein films from binary mixtures, blood serum, and blood plasma. Good correlation between ToF-SIMS data and independent radiolabeling studies was achieved for binary mixtures, though these results depended on the substrate. Qualitative insight into the composition of the serum and plasma protein films was obtained via comparison to standard single protein film spectra. ToF-SIMS and multivariate analysis were able to measure the surface composition of multicomponent adsorbed protein films.

  3. Dynamical Mass Measurements of Contaminated Galaxy Clusters Using Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntampaka, Michelle; Trac, Hy; Sutherland, Dougal; Fromenteau, Sebastien; Poczos, Barnabas; Schneider, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Galaxy clusters are a rich source of information for examining fundamental astrophysical processes and cosmological parameters, however, employing clusters as cosmological probes requires accurate mass measurements derived from cluster observables. We study dynamical mass measurements of galaxy clusters contaminated by interlopers, and show that a modern machine learning (ML) algorithm can predict masses by better than a factor of two compared to a standard scaling relation approach. We create a mock catalog from Multidark's publicly-available N-body MDPL1 simulation where a simple cylindrical cut around the cluster center allows interlopers to contaminate the clusters. In the standard approach, we use a power law scaling relation to infer cluster mass from galaxy line of sight (LOS) velocity dispersion. The presence of interlopers in the catalog produces a wide, flat fractional mass error distribution, with width = 2.13. We employ the Support Distribution Machine (SDM) class of algorithms to learn from distributions of data to predict single values. Applied to distributions of galaxy observables such as LOS velocity and projected distance from the cluster center, SDM yields better than a factor-of-two improvement (width = 0.67). Remarkably, SDM applied to contaminated clusters is better able to recover masses than even a scaling relation approach applied to uncontaminated clusters. We show that the SDM method more accurately reproduces the cluster mass function, making it a valuable tool for employing cluster observations to evaluate cosmological models.

  4. Toxicity of Mycotoxins from Contaminated Corn with or withoutYeast Cell Wall Adsorbent on Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Q. H.; Yang, Z. B.; Yang, W. R.; Li, Z.; Zhang, G. G.; Jiang, S. Z.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of feeds naturally contaminated with mycotoxins on growth performance, serum biochemical parameters, carcass traits, and splenic heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) mRNA expression levels in broiler chickens. The efficacy of yeast cell wall (YCW) adsorbent in preventing mycotoxicosis was also evaluated. Three hundred 1-d-old Arbor Acres broiler chicks were randomly allotted to 3 treatments in completely randomized design for 42 d. Each treatment group had 5 replicate pens with 20 birds. The treatments were as follows: i) basal diet (control), ii) naturally contaminated diet (NCD), and iii) NCD+0.2% YCW adsorbent (NCDD). The NCD decreased average daily gain (ADG) (p<0.01) of 0 to 21 d, 22 to 42 d, and 0 to 42 d, and increased feed conversion ratio (p<0.01) of 22 to 42 d and 0 to 42 d. Both the breast meat percentage and thigh meat percentage of the NCD group were significantly higher (p<0.01) than that of the control group on d 21. The NCD group showed significantly increased levels of triglycerides (p<0.05) and cholesterol (p<0.05) on both d 21 and d 42 compared to the control group. However, the NCD significantly reduced (p<0.01) the high-density lipoprotein (HDL) on d 42 compared to controls. Compared with the NCD, supplementation with YCW significantly improved (p<0.01) the ADG of 0 to 21 d and 0 to 42 d, and increased (p<0.01) concentrations of HDL on d 42, and on d 21, and triglycerides (p<0.05) on d 21 and d 42. Supplementation with YCW reduced (p<0.01) the breast meat percentage, the thigh meat percentage, the concentrations of cholesterol (p<0.01) and the low-density lipoprotein (p<0.05) on d 21, and improved (p<0.01) the splenic Hsp70 mRNA expression levels compared with the NCD group. The results of this study indicated that feeding NCD for 42 d had adverse effects on broiler chickens, and that YCW might be beneficial in counteracting the effects of mycotoxins. PMID:26954178

  5. Study on contaminant mass removal by soil vapor extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fen, Chiu-Shia

    2015-04-01

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) is an effective remediation technology for removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in unsaturated zones, particularly for high permeability soils. However, due to the nature of soil heterogeneities in most of the subsurface systems, the performance of SVE systems may be affected. Radius of influence (ROI) is usually evaluated at sites by measuring vacumm pressures of subsurface systems or through judging from the magnitudes of soil permeabilities. Within the area of a ROI, it is usually believed that the vaporized VOCs can be effectively removed from soil pores. Besides, it has been discussed whether continuous or pulsed venting operations is efficient for contaminant mass removal. The purpose of this study is to assess the relationships of subsurface vacuum pressure, pore gas velocity and contaminant mass removal rate from a venting well. A multiphase flow and multicompositional contaminant transport model will be applied to various scenarios of soil heterogeneities with different strategies of venting operation. We are, in an attempt, to find out controlling factors affecting the efficiency of contaminant mass removal from a venting well.

  6. Mass spectrometric characterization of the Rosetta Spacecraft contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieler, A.; Altwegg, K.; Balsiger, H.; Berthelier, J.-J.; Calmonte, U.; Combi, M.; De Keyser, J.; Fiethe, B.; Fuselier, S. A.; Gasc, S.; Gombosi, T.; Hansen, K. C.; Hässig, M.; Korth, A.; Le Roy, L.; Mall, U.; Rème, H.; Rubin, M.; Sémon, T.; Tenishev, V.; Tzou, C.-Y.; Waite, J. H.; Wurz, P.

    2016-09-01

    Mass spectrometers are valuable tools for the in situ characterization of gaseous exo- and atmospheres and have been operated at various bodies in space. Typical measurements derive the elemental composition, relative abundances, and isotopic ratios of the examined environment. To sample tenuous gas environments around comets, icy moons, and the exosphere of Mercury, efficient instrument designs with high sensitivity are mandatory while the contamination by the spacecraft and the sensor itself should be kept as low as possible. With the Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis (ROSINA), designed to characterize the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, we were able to quantify the effects of spacecraft contamination on such measurements. By means of 3D computational modeling of a helium leak in the thruster pressurization tubing that was detected during the cruise phase we examine the physics involved leading to the measurements of contamination. 3 types of contamination can be distinguished: i) Compounds from the decomposition of the spacecraft material. ii) Contamination from thruster firing during maneuvers. iii) Adsorption and desorption of the sampled environment on and from the spacecraft. We show that even after more than ten years in space the effects of i) are still detectable by ROSINA and impose an important constraint on the lower limit of gas number densities one can examine by means of mass spectrometry. Effects from ii) act on much shorter time scales and can be avoided or minimized by proper mission planning and data analysis afterwards. iii) is the most difficult effect to quantify as it changes over time and finally carries the fingerprint of the sampled environment which makes prior calibration not possible.

  7. Characterization of silver ions adsorbed on gold nanorods: surface analysis by using surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Niidome, Yasuro; Nakamura, Yuki; Honda, Kanako; Akiyama, Yasuyuki; Nishioka, Koji; Kawasaki, Hideya; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2009-04-07

    Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) indicated AgBr2-, which adsorbed on gold nanorod surfaces, was a key material to control the anisotropic growth of gold nanorods.

  8. Regenerable adsorbents for removal of arsenic from contaminated waters and synthesis and characterization of multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles for environmental and biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdugo Gonzalez, Brenda

    The present work is divided into two sections. The first section deals with the synthesis of regenerable adsorbents for the removal of arsenic from contaminated waters. An adsorbent based on carboxymethylated polyethylenimine grafted agarose gels was synthesized and characterized as a regenerable synthetic ferric oxide adsorbent with high capacity for arsenate ions at pH 3.0. Similarly, four metal ion chelating adsorbents based on dipicolylamine were synthesized and characterized with respect to their Cu(II), Fe(III) and As(V) adsorption capacities. The most efficient adsorbents were Nov-PEI-DPA and Nov-TREN-DPA. Additionally, a commercial ion exchange resin was modified with permanganate to oxidize arsenite into arsenate. A complete oxidation-adsorption system was proposed in which a column packed with the oxidation resin was connected in series with an adsorbent column composed of the polyethylenimine grafted agarose gels. The second section involved work with magnetic nanoparticles. First, composite adsorbents consisting of magnetic particles encapsulated within agarose beads with and without grafted iminodiacetic acid (IDA) chelating groups were synthesized. The adsorption capacity of the adsorbents for Cu(II), Fe(III) and As(V) at different concentrations was investigated. Batch experiments were carried out to determine the Fe(III) and As(V) adsorption isotherms for the magnetic Novarose-IDA. Regenerability of the adsorbent was achieved with a pH change of the inlet solution, without affecting its magnetic or adsorption properties. Magnetic composite particles were synthesized for biomedical applications. First, magnetic nanoparticles were coated with silica and then used for gold nanoshell production. These nanoshells were functionalized with a Brij S10 derivative, containing carboxylic groups, using dodecanethiol as a bridging agent to incorporate a fluorescent biomolecule. Finally, magnetic and gold particles were encapsulated in PLGA nanoparticles

  9. Estimating initial contaminant mass based on fitting mass-depletion functions to contaminant mass discharge data: Testing method efficacy with SVE operations data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainhagu, J.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2016-09-01

    The mass of contaminant present at a site, particularly in the source zones, is one of the key parameters for assessing the risk posed by contaminated sites, and for setting and evaluating remediation goals and objectives. This quantity is rarely known and is challenging to estimate accurately. This work investigated the efficacy of fitting mass-depletion functions to temporal contaminant mass discharge (CMD) data as a means of estimating initial mass. Two common mass-depletion functions, exponential and power functions, were applied to historic soil vapor extraction (SVE) CMD data collected from 11 contaminated sites for which the SVE operations are considered to be at or close to essentially complete mass removal. The functions were applied to the entire available data set for each site, as well as to the early-time data (the initial 1/3 of the data available). Additionally, a complete differential-time analysis was conducted. The latter two analyses were conducted to investigate the impact of limited data on method performance, given that the primary mode of application would be to use the method during the early stages of a remediation effort. The estimated initial masses were compared to the total masses removed for the SVE operations. The mass estimates obtained from application to the full data sets were reasonably similar to the measured masses removed for both functions (13 and 15% mean error). The use of the early-time data resulted in a minimally higher variation for the exponential function (17%) but a much higher error (51%) for the power function. These results suggest that the method can produce reasonable estimates of initial mass useful for planning and assessing remediation efforts.

  10. Novel Mass Spectrometry Mutation Screening for Contaminant Impact Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Winston Chung-Hsuan; Lee, Kai-Lin

    2000-09-30

    present DNA analysis technology. Thus, our approach is to develop novel new DNA technologies which can potentially achieve rapid, reliable and inexpensive DNA analysis for environmental applications. The objective of this program is to develop innovative mass spectrometry technology to achieve fast mutation screening and to reveal the linkage between gene mutation and contaminants. Mass spectrometry has the potential to achieve very fast speed sample analysis.New innovative approaches for improving mass resolution and detection sensitivity were pursued to help to achieve rapid DNA screening. Allele specific polymerase chain reaction (ASPCR) coupled with mass spectrometry for DNA mutation detection was also pursued. This technology was applied to wildlife species such as fish for the genotoxic effect of hazardous waste to be assessed at DNA level.

  11. Changes in contaminant mass discharge from DNAPL source mass depletion: Evaluation at two field sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Michael C.; Wood, A. Lynn; Annable, Michael D.; Hatfield, Kirk; Cho, Jaehyun; Holbert, Charles; Rao, P. Suresh C.; Enfield, Carl G.; Lynch, Kira; Smith, Richard E.

    2008-11-01

    Changes in contaminant fluxes resulting from aggressive remediation of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zone were investigated at two sites, one at Hill Air Force Base (AFB), Utah, and the other at Ft. Lewis Military Reservation, Washington. Passive Flux Meters (PFM) and a variation of the Integral Pumping Test (IPT) were used to measure fluxes in ten wells installed along a transect down-gradient of the trichloroethylene (TCE) source zone, and perpendicular to the mean groundwater flow direction. At both sites, groundwater and contaminant fluxes were measured before and after the source-zone treatment. The measured contaminant fluxes ( J; ML - 2 T - 1 ) were integrated across the well transect to estimate contaminant mass discharge ( MD; MT - 1 ) from the source zone. Estimated MD before source treatment, based on both PFM and IPT methods, were ~ 76 g/day for TCE at the Hill AFB site; and ~ 640 g/day for TCE, and ~ 206 g/day for cis-dichloroethylene (DCE) at the Ft. Lewis site. TCE flux measurements made 1 year after source treatment at the Hill AFB site decreased to ~ 5 g/day. On the other hand, increased fluxes of DCE, a degradation byproduct of TCE, in tests subsequent to remediation at the Hill AFB site suggest enhanced microbial degradation after surfactant flooding. At the Ft. Lewis site, TCE mass discharge rates subsequent to remediation decreased to ~ 3 g/day for TCE and ~ 3 g/day for DCE ~ 1.8 years after remediation. At both field sites, PFM and IPT approaches provided comparable results for contaminant mass discharge rates, and show significant reductions (> 90%) in TCE mass discharge as a result of DNAPL mass depletion from the source zone.

  12. Changes in contaminant mass discharge from DNAPL source mass depletion: evaluation at two field sites.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Michael C; Wood, A Lynn; Annable, Michael D; Hatfield, Kirk; Cho, Jaehyun; Holbert, Charles; Rao, P Suresh C; Enfield, Carl G; Lynch, Kira; Smith, Richard E

    2008-11-14

    Changes in contaminant fluxes resulting from aggressive remediation of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zone were investigated at two sites, one at Hill Air Force Base (AFB), Utah, and the other at Ft. Lewis Military Reservation, Washington. Passive Flux Meters (PFM) and a variation of the Integral Pumping Test (IPT) were used to measure fluxes in ten wells installed along a transect down-gradient of the trichloroethylene (TCE) source zone, and perpendicular to the mean groundwater flow direction. At both sites, groundwater and contaminant fluxes were measured before and after the source-zone treatment. The measured contaminant fluxes (J; ML(-2)T(-1)) were integrated across the well transect to estimate contaminant mass discharge (M(D); MT(-1)) from the source zone. Estimated M(D) before source treatment, based on both PFM and IPT methods, were approximately 76 g/day for TCE at the Hill AFB site; and approximately 640 g/day for TCE, and approximately 206 g/day for cis-dichloroethylene (DCE) at the Ft. Lewis site. TCE flux measurements made 1 year after source treatment at the Hill AFB site decreased to approximately 5 g/day. On the other hand, increased fluxes of DCE, a degradation byproduct of TCE, in tests subsequent to remediation at the Hill AFB site suggest enhanced microbial degradation after surfactant flooding. At the Ft. Lewis site, TCE mass discharge rates subsequent to remediation decreased to approximately 3 g/day for TCE and approximately 3 g/day for DCE approximately 1.8 years after remediation. At both field sites, PFM and IPT approaches provided comparable results for contaminant mass discharge rates, and show significant reductions (>90%) in TCE mass discharge as a result of DNAPL mass depletion from the source zone.

  13. Polymer composite adsorbents using particles of molecularly imprinted polymers or aluminium oxide nanoparticles for treatment of arsenic contaminated waters.

    PubMed

    Önnby, L; Pakade, V; Mattiasson, B; Kirsebom, H

    2012-09-01

    Removal of As(V) by adsorption from water solutions was studied using three different synthetic adsorbents. The adsorbents, (a) aluminium nanoparticles (Alu-NPs, <50 nm) incorporated in amine rich cryogels (Alu-cryo), (b) molecular imprinted polymers (<38 μm) in polyacrylamide cryogels (MIP-cryo) and (c) thiol functionalised cryogels (SH-cryo) were evaluated regarding material characteristics and arsenic removal in batch test and continuous mode. Results revealed that a composite design with particles incorporated in cryogels was a successful means for applying small particles (nano- and micro- scale) in water solutions with maintained adsorption capacity and kinetics. Low capacity was obtained from SH-cryo and this adsorbent was hence excluded from the study. The adsorption capacities for the composites were 20.3 ± 0.8 mg/g adsorbent (Alu-cryo) and 7.9 ± 0.7 mg/g adsorbent (MIP-cryo) respectively. From SEM images it was seen that particles were homogeneously distributed in Alu-cryo and heterogeneously distributed in MIP-cryo. The particle incorporation increased the mechanical stability and the polymer backbones of pure polyacrylamide (MIP-cryo) were of better stability than the amine containing polymer backbone (Alu-cryo). Both composites worked well in the studied pH range of pH 2-8. Adsorption tested in real wastewater spiked with arsenic showed that co-ions (nitrate, sulphate and phosphate) affected arsenic removal for Alu-cryo more than for MIP-cryo. Both composites still adsorbed well in the presence of counter-ions (copper and zinc) present at low concentrations (μg/l). The unchanged and selective adsorption in realistic water observed for MIP-cryo was concluded to be due to a successful imprinting, here controlled using a non-imprinted polymer (NIP). A development of MIP-cryo is needed, considering its low adsorption capacity.

  14. Comprehensive mass flow analysis of Swedish sludge contaminants.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Ulrika; Brorström-Lundén, Eva; Kylin, Henrik; Haglund, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A screening of metals, persistent organic pollutants, pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), and other organic contaminants in sludge from seven Swedish sewage treatment plants (STPs) was performed in this study. This extensive screening provides information on mass flows of 282 compounds used in the Swedish society to sewage sludge. It reveals constant relative contaminant concentrations (ng mg kg(-1) d.w.), except for some pesticides and perfluorinated compounds, indicating that these originate from broad usage and diffuse dispersion rather than (industrial) point sources. There was a five order of magnitude difference in the sum concentrations of the most and least abundant species (metals and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and -furans, respectively). Lower total concentrations were found in sludge from STPs processing primarily food industry or household sewage. Proportions of the amounts used (in Sweden) found in sludge were lower for compounds that are present in consumer goods or are diffusely dispersed into the environment (0.01-1% recovered in sludge) than for compounds used as detergents or PPCPs (17-63%). In some cases, the recovery seemed to be affected by evaporation (e.g. octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane) or biotransformation (e.g. adipates) losses, while polychlorinated alkanes and brominated diphenyl ethers were recovered to disproportionately high degree (ca. 4%); likely due to incomplete statistics for imported goods.

  15. Time-Resolved Mass Sensing of a Molecular Adsorbate Nonuniformly Distributed Along a Nanomechnical String

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, T. S.; Xu, Jin; Miriyala, N.; Doolin, C.; Thundat, T.; Davis, J. P.; Beach, K. S. D.

    2015-06-01

    We show that the particular distribution of mass deposited on the surface of a nanomechanical resonator can be estimated by tracking the evolution of the device's resonance frequencies during the process of desorption. The technique, which relies on analytical models we have developed for the multimodal response of the system, enables mass sensing at much higher levels of accuracy than is typically achieved with a single frequency-shift measurement and no rigorous knowledge of the mass profile. We report on a series of demonstration experiments, in which the explosive molecule 1,3,5-trinitroperhydro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is vapor deposited along the length of a silicon nitride nanostring to create a dense, random covering of RDX crystallites on the surface. In some cases, the deposition is biased to produce distributions with a slight excess or deficit of mass at the string midpoint. The added mass is then allowed to sublimate away under vacuum conditions, with the device returning to its original state over about 4 h (and the resonance frequencies, measured via optical interferometry, relaxing back to their pre-mass-deposition values). Our claim is that the detailed time trace of observed frequency shifts is rich in information—not only about the quantity of RDX initially deposited but also about its spatial arrangement along the nanostring. The data also reveal that sublimation in this case follows a nontrivial rate law, consistent with mass loss occurring at the exposed surface area of the RDX crystallites.

  16. Organo-halogenated contaminants (OHCs) in the sediments from the Soan River, Pakistan: OHCs(adsorbed TOC) burial flux, status and risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Malik, Riffat Naseem; Mehboob, Fouzia; Ali, Usman; Katsoyiannis, Athanasios; Schuster, Jasmin K; Moeckel, Claudia; Jones, Kevin C

    2014-05-15

    In this study, regression analysis revealed that TOC is the principal factor in controlling the fate of organo-halogenated contaminants (OHCs: PCBs, PBDEs, OCPs) in Soan River, Pakistan. The OHCs(adsorbed TOC) burial flux (OHCs(adsorbed TOC)Bf; mg/cm(2)·yr) was calculated in the following ranges: ∑PCBs (0.07-0.31), ∑PBDEs (0.005-0.029), ∑HCHs (0.015-0.046) and ∑DDTs (0.007-0.039). Apart from OHCs(adsorbed TOC)Bf, the levels of OHCs were in the following order: PCBs>DDTs>PBDEs>HCH>Chlordane>HCB. PBDEs and PCB congener patterns showed following order respectively: BDE-149>-153>-18>-138>-44 and PCB-149>-153>-18>-138>-44. DDT isomers and metabolites' pattern were p,p'-DDT>p,p'-DDD>p,p'-DDE>o,p'-DDT>o,p'-DDD>o,p'-DDE and HCHs were β-HCH>α-HCH>γ-HCH>δ-HCH. PBDE composition had similarities to penta-BDE and DE-71 mixtures and PCBs with commercial products Aroclor-1254 and -1260. (DDE+DDD)/∑DDTs and p,p'-DDT/p,p'-DDE suggested the recent input of DDTs in sediments while α/γ-HCH indicated past usage of lindane and technical mixtures. Risk assessment suggested that Soan River and its tributaries are potentially at risk against most of the OHCs.

  17. Theory and applications of refractive index-based optical microscopy to measure protein mass transfer in spherical adsorbent particles.

    PubMed

    Bankston, Theresa E; Stone, Melani C; Carta, Giorgio

    2008-04-25

    This work provides the theoretical foundation and a range of practical application examples of a recently developed method to measure protein mass transfer in adsorbent particles using refractive index-based optical microscopy. A ray-theoretic approach is first used to predict the behavior of light traveling through a particle during transient protein adsorption. When the protein concentration gradient in the particle is sharp, resulting in a steep refractive index gradient, the rays bend and intersect, thereby concentrating light in a sharp ring that marks the position of the adsorption front. This behavior is observed when mass transfer is dominated by pore diffusion and the adsorption isotherm is highly favorable. Applications to protein cation-exchange, hydrophobic interaction, and affinity adsorption are then considered using, as examples, the three commercial, agarose-based stationary phases SP-Sepharose-FF, Butyl Sepharose 4FF, and MabSelect. In all three cases, the method provides results that are consistent with measurements based on batch adsorption and previously published data confirming its utility for the determination of protein mass transfer kinetics under a broad range of practically relevant conditions.

  18. Carboxylated carbon nanotubes as an efficient and cost-effective adsorbent for sustainable removal of insecticide fenvalerate from contaminated solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeimi, Atena; Saeidi, Mahboubeh; Baroumand, Naser

    2016-10-01

    In this study, carboxylic multiwall carbon nanotubes (CMNTs) were used as an adsorbent for removing fenvalerate as a toxic insecticide from solution through batch experiments. The influence of four independent parameters of HCl, initial fenvalerate concentration, CMNTs dosage, and contact time on the fenvalerate adsorption process was investigated. Raman spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis confirmed that the adsorption and maximum adsorption capacity (40.0 mg g-1) showed high adsorption potential of the proposed sorbent. The kinetic, isothermic, and thermodynamic of fenvalerate adsorptionon CMNTs were evaluated to better understand this environmental friendly adsorption strategy. A pseudo-first-order kinetic described very well the experimental data of the adsorption kinetics. The experimental data found to be properly fitted to Freundlich model, which indicates that the sorption takes place on a heterogeneous material. The thermodynamic results showed the negative value of the standard free energy (Δ G0) and standard enthalpy change (Δ H0) showing an exothermic and spontaneous system. Repeated availability of adsorbent investigated and SEM and HRTEM of reused adsorbent showed stability and non-aggregatable attributes of CMNTs.

  19. Removing organic contaminants with bifunctional iron modified rectorite as efficient adsorbent and visible light photo-Fenton catalyst.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaorong; Zhu, Lihua; Zhang, Yingying; Yan, Jingchun; Lu, Xiaohua; Huang, Yingping; Tang, Heqing

    2012-05-15

    Iron-modified rectorite (FeR) was prepared as both adsorbent and catalyst. The iron modification increased layer-to-layer spacing and surface area of rectorite, leading to much increased adsorption of Rhodamine B (RhB) on rectorite. The maximum adsorption capacity of RhB on FeR reached 101mgg(-1) at pH 4.5, being 11 folds of that on the unmodified one. The iron modification also enabled rectorite to have efficient visible light photocatalytic ability. The apparent rate constant for the degradation of RhB (80μM) at 298K and pH 4.5 in the presence of H(2)O(2) (6.0mM) and FeR (0.4gL(-1)) was evaluated to be 0.0413min(-1) under visible light and 0.122min(-1) under sunlight, respectively. The analysis with electron spin resonance spin-trapping technique supported that the iron modified rectorite effectively catalyzed the decomposition of H(2)O(2) into hydroxyl radicals. On the basis of the characterization and analysis, the new bifunctional material was well clarified as both adsorbent and photocatalyst in the removing of organic pollutants.

  20. The use of the Molecular Adsorber Coating technology to mitigate vacuum chamber contamination during Pathfinder testing for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Wooldridge, Eve M.; Henderson-Nelson, Kelly A.

    2016-09-01

    As a coating made of highly porous zeolite materials, the Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC) was developed to capture outgassed molecular contaminants, such as hydrocarbons and silicones. For spaceflight applications, the adsorptive capabilities of the coating can alleviate on-orbit outgassing concerns on or near sensitive surfaces and instruments within the spacecraft. Similarly, this sprayable paint technology has proven to be significantly beneficial for ground based space applications, in particular, for vacuum chamber environments. This paper describes the recent use of the MAC technology during Pathfinder testing of the Optical Ground Support Equipment (OGSE) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The coating was used as a mitigation tool to entrap persistent outgassed contaminants, specifically silicone based diffusion pump oil, from within JSC's cryogenic optical vacuum chamber test facility called Chamber A. This paper summarizes the sample fabrication, installation, laboratory testing, post-test chemical analysis results, and future plans for the MAC technology, which was effectively used to protect the JWST test equipment from vacuum chamber contamination.

  1. The Use of the Molecular Adsorber Coating Technology to Mitigate Vacuum Chamber Contamination During Pathfinder Testing for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Wooldridge, Eve M.; Henderson-Nelson, Kelly A.

    2016-01-01

    As a coating made of highly porous zeolite materials, the Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC) was developed to capture outgassed molecular contaminants, such as hydrocarbons and silicones. For spaceflight applications, the adsorptive capabilities of the coating can alleviate on-orbit outgassing concerns on or near sensitive surfaces and instruments within the spacecraft. Similarly, this sprayable paint technology has proven to be significantly beneficial for ground based space applications, in particular, for vacuum chamber environments. This paper describes the recent use of the MAC technology during Pathfinder testing of the Optical Ground Support Equipment (OGSE) for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) at NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC). The coating was used as a mitigation tool to entrap persistent outgassed contaminants, specifically silicone based diffusion pump oil, from within JSC's cryogenic optical vacuum chamber test facility called Chamber A. This paper summarizes the sample fabrication, installation, laboratory testing, post-test chemical analysis results, and future plans for the MAC technology, which was effectively used to protect the JWST test equipment from vacuum chamber contamination.

  2. Stability of reference masses: VI. Mercury and carbonaceous contamination on platinum weights manufactured at a similar time as the international and national prototype kilograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cumpson, Peter J.; Portoles, Jose F.; Sano, Naoko; Barlow, Anders J.

    2013-10-01

    The stability of prototype kilogram reference masses has been a long-standing question within the SI, with mass loss or gain at the surface being the principal concern. In papers I, III and IV of this series we showed mercury and organic carbonaceous contamination to be significant in sample surfaces exposed to typical prototype kilogram storage environments. In this work, we have examined the surfaces of six platinum mass standards manufactured in the mid-19th century. We used x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in order to identify mercury and carbonaceous contamination, and assess the validity of our previous models for the rate of increase. We use white-light interferometry to study surface roughness and polishing damage. We see mercury on all six of the 19th century polished prototypes we analysed. For one weight, manufactured around 1830, we see a quantity of mercury roughly equivalent to 250 µg if present on the surface of a prototype kilogram at the same mass per unit area. The quantities of these contaminations calculated from our XPS spectra are in good agreement with the theoretical models developed in papers III and IV for the growth of mercury and carbonaceous contamination, respectively, and increase our confidence that these processes are indeed happening at the surface of polished kilogram prototypes in most (if not all) cases. We discuss some potential sources of mercury contamination, though the most likely source remains the accidental breakage of thermometers and barometers containing mercury in the past. Mercury in laboratory air can adsorb and diffuse into defects and grain boundaries, especially at polished surfaces. We consider some possible ways to improve the situation, for example by placing a gold foil in the proximity of a prototype to act as a ‘getter’ that will preferentially adsorb mercury.

  3. The organic contamination level based on the total soil mass is not a proper index of the soil contamination intensity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hung, H.-W.; Daniel, Sheng G.; Lin, T.-F.; Su, Y.; Chiou, C.T.

    2009-01-01

    Concentrations of organic contaminants in common productive soils based on the total soil mass give a misleading account of actual contamination effects. This is attributed to the fact that productive soils are essentially water-saturated, with the result that the soil uptake of organic compounds occurs principally by partition into the soil organic matter (SOM). This report illustrates that the soil contamination intensity of a compound is governed by the concentration in the SOM (Com) rather than by the concentration in whole soil (Cs). Supporting data consist of the measured levels and toxicities of many pesticides in soils of widely differing SOM contents and the related levels in in-situ crops that defy explanation by the Cs values. This SOM-based index is timely needed for evaluating the contamination effects of food crops grown in different soils and for establishing a dependable priority ranking for intended remediation of numerous contamination sites.

  4. IMPACT OF DNAPL SOURCE TREATMENT ON CONTAMINANT MASS FLUX

    EPA Science Inventory

    Implementation of remediation technologies at DNAPL contaminated sites has shown that large quantities of contaminants can be removed or degraded using in-situ heating, flushing or oxidation. The rate and magnitude of DNAPL removal is dependent upon site-specific and technology-...

  5. Sorption and modeling of mass transfer of toxic chemical vapors in activated-carbon fiber-cloth adsorbers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lordgooei, M.; Sagen, J.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.

    1998-01-01

    A new activated-carbon fiber-cloth (ACFC) adsorber coupled with an electrothermal regenerator and a cryogenic condenser was designed and developed to efficiently capture and recover toxic chemical vapors (TCVs) from simulated industrial gas streams. The system was characterized for adsorption by ACFC, electrothermal desorption, and cryogenic condensation to separate acetone and methyl ethyl ketone from gas streams. Adsorption dynamics are numerically modeled to predict system characteristics during scale-up and optimization of the process in the future. The model requires diffusivities of TCVs into an activated-carbon fiber (ACF) as an input. Effective diffusivities of TCVs into ACFs were modeled as a function of temperature, concentration, and pore size distribution. Effective diffusivities for acetone at 65 ??C and 30-60 ppmv were measured using a chromatography method. The energy factor for surface diffusion was determined from comparison between the experimental and modeled effective diffusivities. The modeled effective diffusivities were used in a dispersive computational model to predict mass transfer zones of TCVs in fixed beds of ACFC under realistic conditions for industrial applications.

  6. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry of basic proteins using a new physically adsorbed polymer coating. Some applications in food analysis.

    PubMed

    Simó, Carolina; Elvira, Carlos; González, Nieves; San Román, J; Barbas, Coral; Cifuentes, Alejandro

    2004-07-01

    A new physically adsorbed capillary coating for capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry (CE-MS) of basic proteins is presented, which is easily obtained by flushing the capillary with a polymer aqueous solution for two min. This coating significantly reduces the electrostatic adsorption of a group of basic proteins (i.e., cytochrome c, lysozyme, and ribonuclease A) onto the capillary wall allowing their analysis by CE-MS. The coating protocol is compatible with electrospray inonization (ESI)-MS via the reproducible separation of the standard basic proteins (%RSD values (n = 5) < 1% for analysis time reproducibility and < 5% for peak heights, measured from the total ion electropherograms (TIEs) within the same day). The LODs determined using cytochrome c with total ion current and extracted ion current defection were 24.5 and 2.9 fmol, respectively. Using this new coating lysozymes from chicken and turkey egg white could be easily distinguished by CE-MS, demonstrating the usefulness of this method to differentiate animal species. Even after sterilization at 120 degrees C for 30 min, lysozyme could be detected, as well as in wines at concentrations much lower than the limit marked by the EC Commission Regulation. Adulteration of minced meat with 5% of egg-white could also be analysed by our CE-MS protocol.

  7. Analysis of TQCM surface contamination adsorbed during the Spacelab I Mission. [Temperature-controlled Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckeown, D.; Fountain, J. A.; Cox, V. H.; Peterson, R. V.

    1985-01-01

    The Temperature-Controlled Quartz Crystal Microbalance (TQCM) system was flown on the Spacelab I Mission as part of the Induced Environment Contamination Monitor to monitor surface contamination (SC) in the payload bay. SC on the five sensors of the TQCM was analyzed by means of IR spectroscopy, scanning electron spectroscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence. The amount of SC ranged from 1.4 micrograms/sq cm for the -Z sensor to 39.9 micrograms/sq cm for the +X sensor. The IR analysis showed strong CH2, CH3, and carbonyl absorption bands, indicative of ester and polyester compounds found in adhesives, plasticizers, and tape. The particulates (mostly ranging from 1 micron to 20 microns in size) were mainly composed of Mg, Al, Al2O3, and Si, and probably originated in the solid rocket firings.

  8. Prussian blue caged in alginate/calcium beads as adsorbents for removal of cesium ions from contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Vipin, Adavan Kiliyankil; Hu, Baiyang; Fugetsu, Bunshi

    2013-08-15

    Prussian blue encapsulated in alginate beads reinforced with highly dispersed carbon nanotubes were prepared for the safe removal of cesium ions from aqueous solutions. Equilibrium and kinetic studies were conducted using different models and the goodness of mathematical fitting of the experimental data on the adsorption isotherms was in the order Langmuir>Freundlich, and that of the kinetic models were in the order of pseudo second order>pseudo first order. Fixed bed adsorption column analysis indicated that the beads can be used for large scale treatment of cesium contaminated water.

  9. Mass Spectrometry contamination from Tinuvin 770, a common additive in laboratory plastics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The superior sensitivity of current mass spectrometers makes them prone to contamination issues which can have deleterious effects on sample analysis. Here, Bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidyl) sebacate (marketed under the name Tinuvin 770) is identified as a major contaminant in applications utiliz...

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL MASS SPECTROMETRY: EMERGING CONTAMINANTS AND CURRENT ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Much has been achieved in the way of environmental protection over the last 30 years. However, as we learn more, new concerns arise. This presentation will discuss chemical and microbial contaminants that the U.S. EPA and other agencies are currently concerned about. In this gr...

  11. Temporal Geophysical Signatures Due to Contaminant Mass Remediation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Geophysical surveys acquired over a ten year period are used to document changes in bulk electrical conductivity associated with the attenuation of hydrocarbon contaminants at the former fire training facility (FT-02) Wurtsmith Air Force base (WAFB), Oscoda, MI, USA. Initial inv...

  12. Assessment of carbon nanotubes and silver nanoparticles loaded clays as adsorbents for removal of bacterial contaminants from water sources.

    PubMed

    Hassouna, M E M; ElBably, M A; Mohammed, Asmaa N; Nasser, M A G

    2017-02-01

    This work evaluated the antimicrobial efficacy of kaolin clay and its loaded forms with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) against bacterial isolates from different water supplies (tap, underground and surface water) in addition to wastewater. A total of 160 water samples were collected from different water sources in the investigated districts. Samples were cultured for isolation and serological identification of pathogenic bacteria. AgNPs were synthesized by a typical one-step synthesis protocol, where CNTs were carried out in a reactor employing the double bias-assisted hot filament chemical vapor deposition method. Both were characterized using transmission electron microscopy, infrared and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. The antimicrobial efficacy of each of natural kaolin clay, AgNPs- and CNTs-loaded clays were evaluated by their application in four concentrations (0.01, 0.03, 0.05 and 0.1 ppm) at different contact times (5 min, 15 min, 30 min and 2 h). AgNPs-loaded clays at concentrations of 0.05 and 0.1 mg/l for 2 h contact time exhibited a higher bactericidal efficacy on Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. (70, 70, 80 and 90%, respectively) compared to CNTs-loaded clay. Concluding, the application of AgNPs-loaded clay for removal of water bacterial contaminants at a concentration of 0.1 ppm for 2 h contact times resulted in highly effective removals.

  13. Mass spectrometry contamination from Tinuvin 770, a common additive in laboratory plastics.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Kevin L; Broccardo, Carolyn J; Webb, Kimberly M; Covey, Paul A; Prenni, Jessica E

    2013-07-01

    The superior sensitivity of current mass spectrometers makes them prone to contamination issues, which can have deleterious effects on sample analysis. Here, bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-4-piperidyl) sebacate (marketed under the name Tinuvin 770) is identified as a major contaminant in applications using liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Tinuvin 770 is often added to laboratory and medical plastics as a UV stabilizer. One particular lot of microcentrifuge tubes was found to have an excess of this compound that would leach into samples and drastically interfere with LC-MS data acquisition. Further analysis found that Tinuvin 770 readily leached into polar and nonpolar solvents from the contaminated tube lot. Efforts to remove Tinuvin 770 from contaminated samples were unsuccessful. A prescreening method using MALDI-TOF MS is presented to prevent system contamination and sample loss.

  14. Laser-Induced Thermal Desorption and Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry for the Analysis of Molecular Adsorbates on Surfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Land, Donald Paul

    The field of surface science is growing rapidly, fueled by the needs to refine petroleum more efficiently, to clean up automobile exhaust, to protect against corrosion and wear, and to shrink the size of electronic components and information storage systems. These are important aspects of daily life, all of which could benefit from a better understanding of the fundamental processes that occur at the interfaces between different phases of matter. For the technologies mentioned, the most important interface is that between the gas and the solid phases. The technique described in this dissertation merges several recently established methods into a powerful instrument for the analysis of the solid-gas interface, yielding information on the chemical nature of species at this interface, relative concentrations, and even reactivities and intermediates. Details of the design and construction of the instrument are followed by a performance evaluation and a presentation of characterization studies for postionization methods, including electron impact ionization, resonance -enhanced multiphoton ionization, and chemical ionization. The use of the technique for the analysis of unknowns on surfaces is then detailed, highlighting the ability to obtain accurate mass measurement using the high resolution capabilities of FTMS. The use of ion storage techniques results in further unique analysis methods via gas-phase charge exchange reactions. This technique opens the door to the study of more complex molecules on surfaces, as well as mixtures of surface species, because FT mass spectrometry is well suited for such analyses. In this dissertation, data is presented for desorption of tens of molecular species encompassing nearly every organic functional group and including species as widely varying as cyanogen, ethylene, cyclohexane, methanol, and even a tetra-peptide. In-depth analyses of the kinetics of ethylene dehydrogenation and the identification of cyclohexene and 1,6-hexa

  15. Novel mass spectrometry mutation screening for contaminant impact analysis. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.H.

    1998-06-01

    'The objective is to develop innovative mass spectrometry technology to achieve fast mutation screening from contaminated area and to reveal the linkage between gene mutation and contaminants. In this program, the author will try innovative approaches to improve mass resolution and detection efficiency for large DNA ions. Allel specific polymerase chain reaction will be coupled with mass spectrometry for rapid DNA mutation detection. The ultimate goal is to lead to the risk analysis of hazardous wastes to be routinely assessed at DNA level at an affordable cost. This report is for the work after 7 months of a 3-year project.'

  16. Fast determination of sulfonamides from egg samples using magnetic multiwalled carbon nanotubes as adsorbents followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Ding, Jie; Chen, Haiyan; Zhao, Qi; Hou, Juan; Yan, Jin; Wang, Hui; Ding, Lan; Ren, Nanqi

    2013-09-01

    A simple and effective method based on magnetic separation has been developed for the extraction of sulfonamides (SAs) from egg samples using magnetic multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MMWCNTs) as an adsorbent. The MMWCNTs were simply prepared by depositing Fe3O4 onto MWCNTs that had been previously oxidised. The extraction procedure was carried out in a single step by blending and subsequently stirring the mixture of MMWCNTs and aqueous egg samples. The SAs were first extracted as described above, adsorbed onto the MMWCNTs directly and finally analysed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The limits of detection obtained are in the range of 1.4-2.8 ng g(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied in determining SAs in the eggs obtained from laying hens fed with SA standards, and compared to eggs purchased from local markets. The results demonstrate that SAs were detectable in the incurred egg samples.

  17. Analysis of trace halocarbon contaminants in ultra high purity helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fewell, Larry L.

    1994-01-01

    This study describes the analysis of ultra high purity helium. Purification studies were conducted and containment removal was effected by the utilization of solid adsorbent purge-trap systems at cryogenic temperatures. Volatile organic compounds in ultra high purity helium were adsorbed on a solid adsorbent-cryogenic trap, and thermally desorbed trace halocarbon and other contaminants were analyzed by combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  18. Adsorbent phosphates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watanabe, S.

    1983-01-01

    An adsorbent which uses as its primary ingredient phosphoric acid salts of zirconium or titanium is presented. Production methods are discussed and several examples are detailed. Measurements of separating characteristics of some gases using the salts are given.

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL MASS SPECTROMETRY: EMERGING CONTAMINANTS AND CURRENT ISSUES, 2006

    EPA Science Inventory

    This biennial review covers developments in Environmental Mass Spectrometry over the period of 2004-2005. A few significant references that appeared between January and February 2006 are also included. Analytical Chemistry's current policy is to limit reviews to include 100-200 s...

  20. Contaminant inclusion into protein crystals analyzed by electrospray mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed Central

    Hirschler, J.; Halgand, F.; Forest, E.; Fontecilla-Camps, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    The inclusion of protein contaminants into crystals of turkey egg white lysozyme (TEWL) was investigated by electrospray mass spectrometry of the dissolved crystals. The results show that significant amounts of the structurally related contaminant hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) are included in the crystals of TEWL. The structurally unrelated contaminant RNAse A, on the other hand, is not included. The X-ray diffraction data statistics of a hybrid TEWL/HEWL crystal and an uncontaminated TEWL crystal were of similar quality. This indicates that, even though the crystals contain much higher levels of the contaminant than one would have expected after a recrystallization experiment, they are still suitable for X-ray diffraction experiments. However, attempts to detect the presence of the contaminant in the crystal by crystallographic structure refinement did not yield conclusive results. PMID:9514273

  1. Structural elucidation of organic contaminants by chemical ionisation mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, Zaharie

    2009-08-01

    The PI-CI mass spectra formation for a new family of aromatic amines, with general formula: R1-Ph-NH-Ph-R2 is discussed in correlation with the R1 and R2 structure. The compounds where isolated from some environmental samples by GC/MS technique. The characteristic ions are produced by rearrangement processes involving olefin and alkane neutral molecule elimination from [M+H]+ and sole olefin molecule elimination from [M+ C2H5]+.

  2. Coupled effect of flow variability and mass transfer on contaminant transport and attenuation in groundwater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Fiori, Aldo; Dagan, Gedeon

    2016-04-01

    The driving mechanism of contaminant transport in aquifers is groundwater flow, which is controlled by boundary conditions and heterogeneity of hydraulic properties. In this work we show how hydrodynamics and mass transfer can be combined in a general analytical manner to derive a physically-based (or process-based) residence time distribution for a given integral scale of the hydraulic conductivity; the result can be applied for a broad class of linear mass transfer processes. The derived tracer residence time distribution is a transfer function with parameters to be inferred from combined field and laboratory measurements. It is scalable relative to the correlation length and applicable for an arbitrary statistical distribution of the hydraulic conductivity. Based on the derived residence time distribution, the coefficient of variation and skewness of contaminant residence time are illustrated assuming a log-normal hydraulic conductivity distribution and first-order mass transfer. We show that for a low Damkohler number the coefficient of variation is more strongly influenced by mass transfer than by heterogeneity, whereas skewness is more strongly influenced by heterogeneity. The derived physically-based residence time distribution for solute transport in heterogeneous aquifers is particularly useful for studying natural attenuation of contaminants. We illustrate the relative impacts of high heterogeneity and a generalised (non-Fickian) multi-rate mass transfer on natural attenuation defined as contaminant mass loss from injection to a downstream compliance boundary.

  3. A novel adsorbent obtained by inserting carbon nanotubes into cavities of diatomite and applications for organic dye elimination from contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongwen; Fugetsu, Bunshi

    2010-05-15

    A novel approach is described for establishing adsorbents for elimination of water-soluble organic dyes by using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as the adsorptive sites. Agglomerates of MWCNTs were dispersed into individual tubes (dispersed-MWCNTs) using sodium n-dodecyl itaconate mixed with 3-(N,N-dimethylmyristylammonio)-propanesulfonate as the dispersants. The resultant dispersed-MWCNTs were inserted into cavities of diatomite to form composites of diatomite/MWCNTs. These composites were finally immobilized onto the cell walls of flexible polyurethane foams (PUF) through an in situ PUF formation process to produce the foam-like CNT-based adsorbent. Ethidium bromide, acridine orange, methylene blue, eosin B, and eosin Y were chosen to represent typical water-soluble organic dyes for studying the adsorptive capabilities of the foam-like CNT-based adsorbent. For comparisons, adsorptive experiments were also carried out by using agglomerates of the sole MWCNTs as adsorbents. The foam-like CNT-based adsorbents were found to have higher adsorptive capacities than the CNT agglomerates for all five dyes; in addition, they are macro-sized, durable, flexible, hydrophilic and easy to use. Adsorption isotherms plotted based on the Langmuir equation gave linear results, suggesting that the foam-like CNT-based adsorbent functioned in the Langmuir adsorption manner. The foam-like CNT-based adsorbents are reusable after regeneration with aqueous ethanol solution.

  4. Monitoring Trace Contaminants in Air Via Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Peter T.; Karr, Dane; Pearson, Richard; Valero, Gustavo; Wong, Carla

    1995-01-01

    Recent passage of the Clean Air Act with its stricter regulation of toxic gas emissions, and the ever-growing number of applications which require faster turnaround times between sampling and analysis are two major factors which are helping to drive the development of new instrument technologies for in-situ, on-line, real-time monitoring. The ion trap, with its small size, excellent sensitivity, and tandem mass spectrometry capability is a rapidly evolving technology which is well-suited for these applications. In this paper, we describe the use of a commercial ion trap instrument for monitoring trace levels of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. A number of sample introduction devices including a direct transfer line interface, short column GC, and a cryotrapping interface are employed to achieve increasing levels of sensitivity. MS, MS/MS, and MS/MS/MS methods are compared to illustrate trade-offs between sensitivity and selectivity. Filtered Noise Field (FNF) technology is found to be an excellent means for achieving lower detection limits through selective storage of the ion(s) of interest during ionization. Figures of merit including typical sample sizes, detection limits, and response times are provided. The results indicate the potential of these techniques for atmospheric assessments, the High Speed Research Program, and advanced life support monitoring applications for NASA.

  5. Characterizing Long-term Contaminant Mass Discharge and the Relationship Between Reductions in Discharge and Reductions in Mass for DNAPL Source Areas

    PubMed Central

    Matthieu, D.E.; Carroll, K.C.; Mainhagu, J.; Morrison, C.; McMillan, A.; Russo, A.; Plaschke, M.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the temporal behavior of contaminant mass discharge, and the relationship between reductions in contaminant mass discharge and reductions in contaminant mass, for a very heterogeneous, highly contaminated source-zone field site. Trichloroethene is the primary contaminant of concern, and several lines of evidence indicate the presence of organic liquid in the subsurface. The site is undergoing groundwater extraction for source control, and contaminant mass discharge has been monitored since system startup. The results show a significant reduction in contaminant mass discharge with time, decreasing from approximately 1 to 0.15 kg/d. Two methods were used to estimate the mass of contaminant present in the source area at the initiation of the remediation project. One was based on a comparison of two sets of core data, collected 3.5 years apart, which suggests that a significant (~80%) reduction in aggregate sediment-phase TCE concentrations occurred between sampling events. The second method was based on fitting the temporal contaminant mass discharge data with a simple exponential source-depletion function. Relatively similar estimates, 784 and 993 kg, respectively, were obtained with the two methods. These data were used to characterize the relationship between reductions in contaminant mass discharge (CMDR) and reductions in contaminant mass (MR). The observed curvilinear relationship exhibits a reduction in contaminant mass discharge essentially immediately upon initiation of mass reduction. This behavior is consistent with a system wherein significant quantities of mass are present in hydraulically poorly accessible domains for which mass removal is influenced by rate-limited mass transfer. The results obtained from the present study are compared to those obtained from other field studies to evaluate the impact of system properties and conditions on mass-discharge and mass-removal behavior. The results indicated that

  6. Statistical Performance Evaluation of Spatiotemporal Characteristics of Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Mass Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matiatos, Ioannis; Papadopoulou, Maria P.; Varouchakis, Emmanouil A.

    2016-04-01

    As groundwater remains one of the most critical natural resources worldwide, numerical models of groundwater flow and contaminant mass transport provide a reliable tool for the efficient protection, planning and sustainable management of groundwater resources. This work focuses on the evaluation of the performance of different numerical models which have been developed to simulate spatiotemporal groundwater flow and contaminant mass transport in a coastal aquifer system. The evaluation of the models' performance has been based on 9 different statistical measures and indices of goodness of fit. Overall, the simulation of groundwater level and contaminant mass concentration delivered very good calibration and validation results in all cases, quite close to the desired values. Maps of aquifer water level and contaminant mass concentrations are provided for all cases in order the differences to be discussed and assessed. The selection of the appropriate model(s) is case oriented and it should be based on the problem's characteristics in order the spatiotemporal variability of the components under study to be optimally estimated.

  7. EFFECT OF MODEL COMPLEXITY OF THE PREDICTION OF CONTAMINANT MASS FLUX

    EPA Science Inventory

    When is a soil vapor extraction project complete? Regulatory entities are beginning to define site closure based on predicted contaminant mass flux degradation to the underlying aquifer. However, the regulatory entities do not give guidance on how to perform the modeling. This...

  8. EFFECT OF MODEL COMPLEXITY ON THE PREDICTION OF CONTAMINANT MASS FLUX

    EPA Science Inventory

    When is a soil vapor extraction (SVE) project complete? Regulatory entities are beginning to define site closure based on predicted contaminant mass flux degradation to the underlying aquifer. However, regulatory entities do not give guidance on how to perform the modeling. Th...

  9. Changes in Contaminant Mass Discharge from DNAPL Source Mass Depletion: Evaluation at Two Field Sites

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in contaminant fluxes resulting from aggressive remediation of dense nonaqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zone were investigated at two sites, one at Hill Air Force Base (AFB), Utah, and the other at Ft. Lewis Military Reservation, WA. Passive Flux Meters (PFM) and a va...

  10. Hydrophobic Porous Material Adsorbs Small Organic Molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Hickey, Gregory S.

    1994-01-01

    Composite molecular-sieve material has pore structure designed specifically for preferential adsorption of organic molecules for sizes ranging from 3 to 6 angstrom. Design based on principle that contaminant molecules become strongly bound to surface of adsorbent when size of contaminant molecules is nearly same as that of pores in adsorbent. Material used to remove small organic contaminant molecules from vacuum systems or from enclosed gaseous environments like closed-loop life-support systems.

  11. Effects of feeding a blend of grains naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins on feed intake, serum chemistry, and hematology of horses, and the efficacy of a polymeric glucomannan mycotoxin adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Raymond, S L; Smith, T K; Swamy, H V L N

    2003-09-01

    The feeding of Fusarium mycotoxin-contaminated grains adversely affects the performance of swine and poultry. Very little information is available, however, on adverse effects associated with feeding these mycotoxin-contaminated grains on the performance of horses. An experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of feeding a blend of grains naturally contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins on feed intake, serum immunoglobulin (Ig) concentrations, serum chemistry, and hematology of horses. A polymeric glucomannan mycotoxin adsorbent (GM polymer) was also tested for efficacy in preventing Fusarium mycotoxicoses. Nine mature, nonexercising, light, mixed-breed mares were assigned randomly to one of three dietary treatments for 21 d. The horses were randomly reassigned and the experiment was subsequently replicated in time following a 14-d washout interval. Feed consumed each day was a combination of up to 2.8 kg of concentrates and 5 kg of mixed timothy/alfalfa hay. The concentrates fed included the following: 1) control, 2) blend of contaminated grains (36% contaminated wheat and 53% contaminated corn), and 3) blend of contaminated grains + 0.2% GM polymer. Diets containing contaminated grains averaged 15.0 ppm of deoxynivalenol, 0.8 ppm of 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, 9.7 ppm of fusaric acid, and 2.0 ppm of zearalenone. Feed intake by all horses fed contaminated grains was reduced (P < 0.001) compared with controls throughout the experiment. Supplementation of 0.2% GM polymer to the contaminated diet increased (P = 0.004) feed intake of horses compared with those fed the unsupplemented contaminated diet. Serum activities of gamma-glutamyltransferase were higher (P = 0.047 and 0.027) in horses fed the diet containing contaminated grain compared with those fed the control diet on d 7 and 14, but not on d 21 (P = 0.273). Supplementation of GM polymer to the contaminated diet decreased (P < 0.05) serum gamma-glutamyltransferase activities of horses compared with those

  12. Identifying and quantifying contaminants contributing to endogenous analytes in gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Tsikas, Dimitrios

    2010-09-15

    Contaminants from various sources including medical devices, laboratory materials and the environment, and analytical apparatus may contribute to their endogenous congeners at different stages of the analytical process. Here, an approach is reported for the identification and quantification of contaminating analytes in biological fluids by stable-isotope dilution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and gas chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS) methods. This approach is based on the analysis of different sample volumes and determination of the peak area ratio (PAR) of the endogenous analyte to the stable-isotope labeled analogue serving as the internal standard. The PAR is obtained by selected-ion monitoring or selected-reaction monitoring of appropriate ions. Generation of PAR values that correlate inversely with the sample volume subjected to analysis reveals the existence of contamination. The extent of contamination is obtained by plotting the PAR of endogenous analyte to internal standard versus the reciprocal of the sample volume analyzed. Examples are given for uncontaminated and contaminated endogenous analytes in biological samples, including nitrite and nitrate analyzed by GC/MS, and the fatty acid metabolites oleic acid oxide, oleic acid ethanol amide, and arachidonic acid ethanol amide analyzed by GC/MS/MS. Dependence of the PAR of endogenous analyte to its internal standard upon derivatization time reveals a unique kind of contamination that was identified in the GC/MS analysis of nitrate in plasma as pentafluorobenzyl ester. This kind of contamination occurs at the latest stage of GC/MS analysis and cannot be controlled by reference to the internal standard.

  13. Laser Induced Desorption Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer Analysis of Adsorbed Contaminants on Vacuum Ultraviolet Lithography Optic Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-02-01

    particles or an energy transfer medium absorbed under and around the particles. In the first case, the substrate absorbs the laser energy and causes rapid...when the same areas were reirradiated later. They also observed large site-to-site variation of desorbed fluence from the same sample and under the...efficiency. O. Kreitschitz et al. used TOF-MS to conduct LID of SrF2 , CaF2 and MgO2 to investigate the dependence of yield and kinetic energies of

  14. Influence of polymolybdate adsorbates on electrooxidation of ethanol at PtRu nanoparticles: Combined electrochemical, mass spectrometric and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gralec, Barbara; Lewera, Adam; Kulesza, Pawel J.

    2016-05-01

    The role Keggin-type phosphomolybdate (PMo12O403-) ions (adsorbed on carbon-supported PtRu, PtRu/C) on electrooxidation of ethanol is addressed here. The combined results obtained using Differential Electrochemical Mass Spectrometry, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy and Cyclic Voltammetry are consistent with the view that presence of the Keggin-type polyoxometallate, phosphomolybdate, ions (adsorbates) leads to enlargement of the current densities associated with electrooxidation of ethanol at potentials greater than 700 mV vs. RHE. This increase of the anodic currents is correlated with the higher acetaldehyde yield which is likely to reflect changes in the reaction kinetics (e.g. more dynamic dehydrogenation of ethanol leading to acetaldehyde) or in the reaction mechanism defined by the preferential surface modification resulting not only in faster kinetics but also in higher selectivity with respect to acetaldehyde production. It is apparent from the spectroscopic data that modification of PtRu/C nanoparticles with phosphomolybdate ions leads to suppression of the formation of Ru surface oxides.

  15. Progress toward the Quantitative Analysis of PAHs Adsorbed on Soot by Laser Desorption/Laser Ionization/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Faccinetto, Alessandro; Focsa, Cristian; Desgroux, Pascale; Ziskind, Michael

    2015-09-01

    Ex situ analyses of substances extracted from flames provide useful albeit mostly qualitative information on the formation process of soot and on the impact of exhausts on the environment. An experimental setup based on the coupling of laser desorption, laser ionization and time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LD/LI/ToF-MS) is presented in past works as an alternative means to more traditional techniques like gas chromatography (GC) to characterize the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) content of soot. In this paper, we go one step further in the understanding of the laser desorption/laser ionization dynamics and propose a combined experimental/simulation approach: we estimate the limit of detection of LD/LI/ToF-MS as low as [0.2, 2.8] fmol per laser pulse and we make quantitative predictions on the concentration of PAHs desorbed from soot. In particular, external calibration with model samples where PAHs are adsorbed on black carbon at known concentrations allows us to link the concentration of PAHs desorbed and detected by photoionization ToF-MS to the concentration of PAHs adsorbed on soot. The comparison of data obtained from the analysis of flame sampled soot with standard commercial GC-MS run in parallel validates the approach and defines limits and potentialities of both techniques.

  16. Linking Contaminant Mass Discharge to DNAPL Source Zone Architecture and Mass Removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennell, K. D.; Suchomel, E. J.; Amos, B. K.; Loeffler, F. E.; Capiro, N. L.

    2007-05-01

    To evaluate the relationship between partial dense nonaqueous phase (DNAPL) mass removal and plume behavior, laboratory-scale experiments were conducted in a two-dimensional aquifer cell containing a tetrachloroethene (PCE) source zone and a down-gradient plume region. PCE-DNAPL saturation distributions were quantified using a light transmission system and expressed in terms of a ganglia-to-pool (GTP) volume ratio. To achieve incremental mass removal, the aquifer cells were flushed with a 4% Tween 80 surfactant solution that increased the solubility of PCE by more than two orders-of-magnitude with minimal mobilization of entrapped PCE-DNAPL. For a ganglia-dominated source zone (GTP = 1.6) greater than 70% mass removal was required before measurable reductions in mass discharge were realized, while for pool-dominated source zones (GTP < 0.3) reductions in mass discharge versus mass removal approached a 1:1 correlation. Current experiments are designed to evaluate the potential for coupling aggressive mass removal with microbial reductive dechlorination.

  17. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY: DEMONSTRATION OF AMBERSORB 563 ADSORBENT TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field pilot study was conducted to demonstrate the technical feasibility and cost-effectiveness of Ambersorb® 5631 carbonaceous adsorbent for remediating groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The Ambersorb adsorbent technology demonstration consist...

  18. Plasticizer contamination from vacuum system O-rings in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Verge, Kent M; Agnes, George R

    2002-08-01

    The outgassing of plasticizers from Buna-N and Viton o-rings under vacuum lead to undesired ion-molecule chemistry in an Electrospray Quadrupole Ion Trap Mass Spectrometer. In experiments with the helium bath gas pressure >1.2 mTorr, or whenever analyte ions were stored for >100 ms, extensive loss of analyte ions by proton transfer or adduction with o-ring plasticizers bis(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate and bis(2-ethylhexyl) adipate occurred. A temporary solution to this contamination problem was found to be overnight refluxing in hexane of all the o-rings in the vacuum system. This procedure alleviated this plasticizer contamination for approximately 100 hours of operation. These results, and those that lead to identification of the contamination as plasticizers outgassing from o-rings are described.

  19. Cross-Contamination From Vial Caps for SEC Analysis Determined by MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Veloso, A; Leiza, J R

    2017-02-01

    Cross-contamination from the polymeric material of the vial caps used in size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and high-performance liquid chromatography autosamplers in the low molar mass (LMM) range (<2000 Da) of polymer samples was demonstrated with the help of matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. It is shown that polyethylene (PE) caps, if exposed to either short or long periods in tetrahydrofuran solvent, might extract oligomers that contaminate the LMM end of the SEC chromatograms. On the other hand, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)/silicone caps have shown to be inert if used properly; namely, the PTFE part in contact with the sample solution. However, care should be taken if accidentally the silicon part is exposed to the solution because silicone oligomer peaks have been detected by MALDI-TOF MS analysis that might mislead the results.

  20. Application of Bayesian geostatistics for evaluation of mass discharge uncertainty at contaminated sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troldborg, Mads; Nowak, Wolfgang; Lange, Ida V.; Santos, Marta C.; Binning, Philip J.; Bjerg, Poul L.

    2012-09-01

    Mass discharge estimates are increasingly being used when assessing risks of groundwater contamination and designing remedial systems at contaminated sites. Such estimates are, however, rather uncertain as they integrate uncertain spatial distributions of both concentration and groundwater flow. Here a geostatistical simulation method for quantifying the uncertainty of the mass discharge across a multilevel control plane is presented. The method accounts for (1) heterogeneity of both the flow field and the concentration distribution through Bayesian geostatistics, (2) measurement uncertainty, and (3) uncertain source zone and transport parameters. The method generates conditional realizations of the spatial flow and concentration distribution. An analytical macrodispersive transport solution is employed to simulate the mean concentration distribution, and a geostatistical model of the Box-Cox transformed concentration data is used to simulate observed deviations from this mean solution. By combining the flow and concentration realizations, a mass discharge probability distribution is obtained. The method has the advantage of avoiding the heavy computational burden of three-dimensional numerical flow and transport simulation coupled with geostatistical inversion. It may therefore be of practical relevance to practitioners compared to existing methods that are either too simple or computationally demanding. The method is demonstrated on a field site contaminated with chlorinated ethenes. For this site, we show that including a physically meaningful concentration trend and the cosimulation of hydraulic conductivity and hydraulic gradient across the transect helps constrain the mass discharge uncertainty. The number of sampling points required for accurate mass discharge estimation and the relative influence of different data types on mass discharge uncertainty is discussed.

  1. Measurement of laser activated electron tunneling from semiconductor zinc oxide to adsorbed organic molecules by a matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hongying; Fu, Jieying; Wang, Xiaoli; Zheng, Shi

    2012-06-04

    Measurement of light induced heterogeneous electron transfer is important for understanding of fundamental processes involved in chemistry, physics and biology, which is still challenging by current techniques. Laser activated electron tunneling (LAET) from semiconductor metal oxides was observed and characterized by a MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption ionization) mass spectrometer in this work. Nanoparticles of ZnO were placed on a MALDI sample plate. Free fatty acids and derivatives were used as models of organic compounds and directly deposited on the surface of ZnO nanoparticles. Irradiation of UV laser (λ=355 nm) with energy more than the band gap of ZnO produces ions that can be detected in negative mode. When TiO(2) nanoparticles with similar band gap but much lower electron mobility were used, these ions were not observed unless the voltage on the sample plate was increased. The experimental results indicate that laser induced electron tunneling is dependent on the electron mobility and the strength of the electric field. Capture of low energy electrons by charge-deficient atoms of adsorbed organic molecules causes unpaired electron-directed cleavages of chemical bonds in a nonergodic pathway. In positive detection mode, electron tunneling cannot be observed due to the reverse moving direction of electrons. It should be able to expect that laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry is a new technique capable of probing the dynamics of electron tunneling. LAET offers advantages as a new ionization dissociation method for mass spectrometry.

  2. A novel fiber-based adsorbent technology

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T.A.

    1997-10-01

    In this Phase I Small Business Innovation Research program, Chemica Technologies, Inc. is developing an economical, robust, fiber-based adsorbent technology for removal of heavy metals from contaminated water. The key innovation is the development of regenerable adsorbent fibers and adsorbent fiber cloths that have high capacity and selectivity for heavy metals and are chemically robust. The process has the potential for widespread use at DOE facilities, mining operations, and the chemical process industry.

  3. A Bayesian geostatistical approach for evaluating the uncertainty of contaminant mass discharges from point sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troldborg, M.; Nowak, W.; Binning, P. J.; Bjerg, P. L.

    2012-12-01

    Estimates of mass discharge (mass/time) are increasingly being used when assessing risks of groundwater contamination and designing remedial systems at contaminated sites. Mass discharge estimates are, however, prone to rather large uncertainties as they integrate uncertain spatial distributions of both concentration and groundwater flow velocities. For risk assessments or any other decisions that are being based on mass discharge estimates, it is essential to address these uncertainties. We present a novel Bayesian geostatistical approach for quantifying the uncertainty of the mass discharge across a multilevel control plane. The method decouples the flow and transport simulation and has the advantage of avoiding the heavy computational burden of three-dimensional numerical flow and transport simulation coupled with geostatistical inversion. It may therefore be of practical relevance to practitioners compared to existing methods that are either too simple or computationally demanding. The method is based on conditional geostatistical simulation and accounts for i) heterogeneity of both the flow field and the concentration distribution through Bayesian geostatistics (including the uncertainty in covariance functions), ii) measurement uncertainty, and iii) uncertain source zone geometry and transport parameters. The method generates multiple equally likely realizations of the spatial flow and concentration distribution, which all honour the measured data at the control plane. The flow realizations are generated by analytical co-simulation of the hydraulic conductivity and the hydraulic gradient across the control plane. These realizations are made consistent with measurements of both hydraulic conductivity and head at the site. An analytical macro-dispersive transport solution is employed to simulate the mean concentration distribution across the control plane, and a geostatistical model of the Box-Cox transformed concentration data is used to simulate observed

  4. Humic acids as both matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry and adsorbent for magnetic solid phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qin; Xu, Jing; Yin, Jia; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-08-19

    In the present study, humic acids (HAs) were applied as both a matrix for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and an adsorbent of magnetic solid phase extraction (MSPE) for the first time. As natural macromolecule compounds, HAs are inherently highly functionalized and contain laser energy absorbing-transferring aromatic structures. This special molecular structure made HAs a good candidate for use as a MALDI matrix in small molecule analysis. At the same time, due to its good adsorption ability, HAs was prepared as MSPE adsorbent via a simple co-mixing method, in which the commercially available HAs were directly mixed with Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) in a mortar and grinded evenly and completely. In this process, MNPs were physically wrapped and adhered to tiny HAs leading to the formation of magnetic HAs (MHAs). To verify the bi-function of the MHAs, Rhodamine B (RdB) was chosen as model compound. Our results show that the combination of MHAs-based MSPE and MALDI-TOF-MS can provide a rapid and sensitive method for the determination of RdB in chili oil. The whole analytical procedure could be completed within 30 min for simultaneous determination of more than 20 samples, and the limit of quantitation for RdB was found to be 0.02 μg/g. The recoveries in chili oil were in the range 73.8-81.5% with the RSDs less than 21.3% (intraday) and 20.3% (interday). The proposed strategy has potential applications for high-throughput analysis of small molecules in complex samples.

  5. Using immobilized enzymes to reduce RNase contamination in RNase mapping of transfer RNAs by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Butterer, Annika; Zorc, Margret; Castleberry, Colette M; Limbach, Patrick A

    2012-03-01

    RNase (ribonuclease) mapping by nucleobase-specific endonucleases combined with mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for characterizing ribonucleic acids such as transfer RNAs. Typical free solution enzymatic digestion of RNA samples results in a significant amount of RNase being present in the sample solution analyzed by MS. In some cases, the RNase can lead to contamination of the high performance liquid chromatography and MS instrumentation. Here we investigate and compare several different approaches for reducing or eliminating contaminating RNase from the digested RNA sample before LC-MS analysis. Approaches using immobilized RNases were found to be most effective, with no enzyme carryover into the digested sample detected. Among the various options for immobilized RNases, we show that carbodiimide-based reactions can be used to couple RNases to carboxylic acid-terminated magnetic beads. The immobilized enzymes retain biological activity, are re-usable, and do not interfere with subsequent LC-MS analysis of the expected RNase digestion products. The use of immobilized RNases provides a simple approach for eliminating enzyme contamination in mass spectrometry-based RNase mapping experiments.

  6. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurement of isotope ratios in depleted uranium contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, Michael D

    2003-09-01

    Laser ablation of pressed soil pellets was examined as a means of direct sample introduction to enable inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) screening of soils for residual depleted uranium (DU) contamination. Differentiation between depleted uranium, an anthropogenic contaminant, and naturally occurring uranium was accomplished on the basis of measured 235U/238U isotope ratios. The amount of sample preparation required for laser ablation is considerably less than that typically required for aqueous sample introduction. The amount of hazardous laboratory waste generated is diminished accordingly. During the present investigation, 235U/238U isotope ratios measured for field samples were in good agreement with those derived from gamma spectrometry measurements. However, substantial compensation was required to mitigate the effects of impaired pulse counting attributed to sample inhomogeneity and sporadic introduction of uranium analyte into the plasma.

  7. A Self-Sensing Piezoelectric MicroCantilever Biosensor for Detection of Ultrasmall Adsorbed Masses: Theory and Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Faegh, Samira; Jalili, Nader; Sridhar, Srinivas

    2013-01-01

    Detection of ultrasmall masses such as proteins and pathogens has been made possible as a result of advancements in nanotechnology. Development of label-free and highly sensitive biosensors has enabled the transduction of molecular recognition into detectable physical quantities. Microcantilever (MC)-based systems have played a widespread role in developing such biosensors. One of the most important drawbacks of all of the available biosensors is that they all come at a very high cost. Moreover, there are certain limitations in the measurement equipments attached to the biosensors which are mostly optical measurement systems. A unique self-sensing detection technique is proposed in this paper in order to address most of the limitations of the current measurement systems. A self-sensing bridge is used to excite piezoelectric MC-based sensor functioning in dynamic mode, which simultaneously measures the system's response through the self-induced voltage generated in the piezoelectric material. As a result, the need for bulky, expensive read-out equipment is eliminated. A comprehensive mathematical model is presented for the proposed self-sensing detection platform using distributed-parameters system modeling. An adaptation strategy is then implemented in the second part in order to compensate for the time-variation of piezoelectric properties which dynamically improves the behavior of the system. Finally, results are reported from an extensive experimental investigation carried out to prove the capability of the proposed platform. Experimental results verified the proposed mathematical modeling presented in the first part of the study with accuracy of 97.48%. Implementing the adaptation strategy increased the accuracy to 99.82%. These results proved the measurement capability of the proposed self-sensing strategy. It enables development of a cost-effective, sensitive and miniaturized mass sensing platform. PMID:23666133

  8. Analysis of trace contamination of phthalate esters in ultrapure water using a modified solid-phase extraction procedure and automated thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hsu-Chuan; Den, Walter; Chan, Shu-Fei; Kin, Kuan Tzu

    2008-04-25

    The present study was aimed to develop a procedure modified from the conventional solid-phase extraction (SPE) method for the analysis of trace concentration of phthalate esters in industrial ultrapure water (UPW). The proposed procedure allows UPW sample to be drawn through a sampling tube containing hydrophobic sorbent (Tenax TA) to concentrate the aqueous phthalate esters. The solid trap was then demoisturized by two-stage gas drying before subjecting to thermal desorption and analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. This process removes the solvent extraction procedure necessary for the conventional SPE method, and permits automation of the analytical procedure for high-volume analyses. Several important parameters, including desorption temperature and duration, packing quantity and demoisturizing procedure, were optimized in this study based on the analytical sensitivity for a standard mixture containing five different phthalate esters. The method detection limits for the five phthalate esters were between 36 ng l(-1) and 95 ng l(-1) and recovery rates between 15% and 101%. Dioctyl phthalate (DOP) was not recovered adequately because the compound was both poorly adsorbed and desorbed on and off Tenax TA sorbents. Furthermore, analyses of material leaching from poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) tubes as well as the actual water samples showed that di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) and di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) were the common contaminants detected from PVC contaminated UPW and the actual UPW, as well as in tap water. The reduction of DEHP in the production processes of actual UPW was clearly observed, however a DEHP concentration of 0.20 microg l(-1) at the point of use was still being quantified, suggesting that the contamination of phthalate esters could present a barrier to the future cleanliness requirement of UPW. The work demonstrated that the proposed modified SPE procedure provided an effective method for rapid analysis and contamination

  9. A Zn2GeO4-ethylenediamine hybrid nanoribbon membrane as a recyclable adsorbent for the highly efficient removal of heavy metals from contaminated water.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Zou, Rujia; Zhang, Zhenyu; Song, Guosheng; Chen, Zhigang; Yang, Jianmao; Hu, Junqing

    2011-10-14

    Zn(2)GeO(4)-ethylenediamine (ZGO-EDA) hybrid nanoribbons have been synthesized on a large-scale and directly assembled to membranes, which exhibit an excellent recyclability, high selectivity, and good thermal stability for highly efficient removal of heavy metal ions, i.e., Pb(2+), Cd(2+), Co(2+), and Cu(2+), from contaminated water.

  10. MTBE adsorption on alternative adsorbents and packed bed adsorber performance.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Alfred; Knappe, Detlef R U

    2008-04-01

    Widespread use of the fuel additive methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) has led to frequent MTBE detections in North American and European drinking water sources. The overall objective of this research was to evaluate the effectiveness of a silicalite zeolite, a carbonaceous resin, and a coconut-shell-based granular activated carbon (GAC) for the removal of MTBE from water. Isotherm and short bed adsorber tests were conducted in ultrapure water and river water to obtain parameters describing MTBE adsorption equilibria and kinetics and to quantify the effect of natural organic matter (NOM) on MTBE adsorption. Both the silicalite zeolite and the carbonaceous resin exhibited larger MTBE adsorption uptakes than the tested GAC. Surface diffusion coefficients describing intraparticle MTBE mass transfer rates were largest for the GAC and smallest for the carbonaceous resin. Pilot tests were conducted to verify MTBE breakthrough curve predictions obtained with the homogeneous surface diffusion model and to evaluate the effect of NOM preloading on packed bed adsorber performance. Results showed that GAC was the most cost-competitive adsorbent when considering adsorbent usage rate only; however, the useful life of an adsorber containing silicalite zeolite was predicted to be approximately 5-6 times longer than that of an equally sized adsorber containing GAC. Pilot column results also showed that NOM preloading did not impair the MTBE removal efficiency of the silicalite zeolite. Thus, it may be possible to regenerate spent silicalite with less energy-intensive methods than those required to regenerate GAC.

  11. [Extraction of triazine herbicides from environmental water samples with magnetic graphene nanoparticles as the adsorbent followed by determination using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guijiang; Zang, Xiaohuan; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Lu; Wang, Chun; Wang, Zhi

    2013-11-01

    A novel method was developed for the determination of seven triazine herbicides in environmental water samples by magnetic solid-phase extraction with graphene-based magnetic nanoparticles (G-Fe3O4 MNPs) as the adsorbent coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry detection. The main factors influencing the extraction efficiency including the amount of G-Fe3O4, the extraction time, the pH and the ionic strength of sample solution and the desorption conditions were optimized. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the enrichment factors of the method for the analytes were in the range from 574 to 968; the linearities of the method ranged from 0.01 to 10.0 microg/L for simazine, propazine, metribuzin, simetryn and cyanazine, from 0.05 to 10.0 microg/L for atrazine and from 0.01 to 8.0 microg/L for prometryn, with the correlation coefficients (r) ranging from 0.996 8 to 0.999 8. The limits of detection were in the range between 1.0 and 5.0 ng/L. Good reproducibilities were obtained with the relative standard deviations below 10.5%. The developed method was applied to the analysis of the triazine herbicides in different water samples (lake, well and tap). The recoveries of the method were in the range from 79.8% to 118.3% at the spiked levels of 0.5 microg/L and 2.0 microg/L. The results indicated that the developed method can be used as a simple and efficient technique for the determination of the triazine herbicides in environmental water samples.

  12. The CRAPome: a Contaminant Repository for Affinity Purification Mass Spectrometry Data

    PubMed Central

    Mellacheruvu, Dattatreya; Wright, Zachary; Couzens, Amber L.; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; St-Denis, Nicole; Li, Tuo; Miteva, Yana V.; Hauri, Simon; Sardiu, Mihaela E.; Low, Teck Yew; Halim, Vincentius A.; Bagshaw, Richard D.; Hubner, Nina C.; al-Hakim, Abdallah; Bouchard, Annie; Faubert, Denis; Fermin, Damian; Dunham, Wade H.; Goudreault, Marilyn; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Badillo, Beatriz Gonzalez; Pawson, Tony; Durocher, Daniel; Coulombe, Benoit; Aebersold, Ruedi; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Colinge, Jacques; Heck, Albert J. R.; Choi, Hyungwon; Gstaiger, Matthias; Mohammed, Shabaz; Cristea, Ileana M.; Bennett, Keiryn L.; Washburn, Mike P.; Raught, Brian; Ewing, Rob M.; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.

    2013-01-01

    Affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (AP-MS) is now a widely used approach for the identification of protein-protein interactions. However, for any given protein of interest, determining which of the identified polypeptides represent bona fide interactors versus those that are background contaminants (e.g. proteins that interact with the solid-phase support, affinity reagent or epitope tag) is a challenging task. While the standard approach is to identify nonspecific interactions using one or more negative controls, most small-scale AP-MS studies do not capture a complete, accurate background protein set. Fortunately, negative controls are largely bait-independent. Hence, aggregating negative controls from multiple AP-MS studies can increase coverage and improve the characterization of background associated with a given experimental protocol. Here we present the Contaminant Repository for Affinity Purification (the CRAPome) and describe the use of this resource to score protein-protein interactions. The repository (currently available for Homo sapiens and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and computational tools are freely available online at www.crapome.org. PMID:23921808

  13. The CRAPome: a contaminant repository for affinity purification-mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Mellacheruvu, Dattatreya; Wright, Zachary; Couzens, Amber L; Lambert, Jean-Philippe; St-Denis, Nicole A; Li, Tuo; Miteva, Yana V; Hauri, Simon; Sardiu, Mihaela E; Low, Teck Yew; Halim, Vincentius A; Bagshaw, Richard D; Hubner, Nina C; Al-Hakim, Abdallah; Bouchard, Annie; Faubert, Denis; Fermin, Damian; Dunham, Wade H; Goudreault, Marilyn; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Badillo, Beatriz Gonzalez; Pawson, Tony; Durocher, Daniel; Coulombe, Benoit; Aebersold, Ruedi; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Colinge, Jacques; Heck, Albert J R; Choi, Hyungwon; Gstaiger, Matthias; Mohammed, Shabaz; Cristea, Ileana M; Bennett, Keiryn L; Washburn, Mike P; Raught, Brian; Ewing, Rob M; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I

    2013-08-01

    Affinity purification coupled with mass spectrometry (AP-MS) is a widely used approach for the identification of protein-protein interactions. However, for any given protein of interest, determining which of the identified polypeptides represent bona fide interactors versus those that are background contaminants (for example, proteins that interact with the solid-phase support, affinity reagent or epitope tag) is a challenging task. The standard approach is to identify nonspecific interactions using one or more negative-control purifications, but many small-scale AP-MS studies do not capture a complete, accurate background protein set when available controls are limited. Fortunately, negative controls are largely bait independent. Hence, aggregating negative controls from multiple AP-MS studies can increase coverage and improve the characterization of background associated with a given experimental protocol. Here we present the contaminant repository for affinity purification (the CRAPome) and describe its use for scoring protein-protein interactions. The repository (currently available for Homo sapiens and Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and computational tools are freely accessible at http://www.crapome.org/.

  14. Influence of organic acids on kinetic release of chromium in soil contaminated with leather factory waste in the presence of some adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Taghipour, Marzieh; Jalali, Mohsen

    2016-07-01

    In this study, batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of nanoparticles (NPs) (MgO, ZnO, TiO2) and clay minerals (bentonite, zeolite) on the release of chromium (Cr) from leather factory waste (LFW) and LFW treated soil using organic acids. Chromium release from all treatments was studied in the presence of citric acid, oxalic acid and CaCl2 solutions. The results showed that, in all treatments, organic acids released more Cr than inorganic salt (CaCl2). The release of Cr by citric acid was higher than that by oxalic acid. In LFW treated soil and LFW, the release of Cr from the all treatments with NPs was less than that from the clay mineral treatments. On the other hand, in the presence of organic acids, Cr release by NPs and clay minerals decreased. Two kinetic models including pseudo-first- and pseudo-second-order model were tested to describe the time dependent Cr release data. Among the kinetic models used, the pseudo-second-order model generally gave the best fits to experimental data. Before and after release experiments, Cr in LFW, treated LFW, control soil and LFW treated soils were fractionated. In all treatments, the greatest amounts of Cr were found in the residual fraction (RES). The organic acids were effective in reducing the exchangeable (EXC), bound to organic matter (OM) and bound to carbonate (CAR) fractions of Cr in all treatments, whereas, after release of Cr from treated soils, Cr remained mainly in the RES fraction. The application of NPs and clay minerals in soil led to a significant transformation of Cr from mobile fractions to the RES fraction. Therefore, organic ligands played a dominant role in mobility and bioavailability of Cr and the removal of Cr by adsorbents.

  15. Quantifying Contaminant Mass for the Feasibility Study of the DuPont Chambers Works FUSRAP Site - 13510

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Carl; Rahman, Mahmudur; Johnson, Ann; Owe, Stephan

    2013-07-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) - Philadelphia District is conducting an environmental restoration at the DuPont Chambers Works in Deepwater, New Jersey under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Discrete locations are contaminated with natural uranium, thorium-230 and radium-226. The USACE is proposing a preferred remedial alternative consisting of excavation and offsite disposal to address soil contamination followed by monitored natural attenuation to address residual groundwater contamination. Methods were developed to quantify the error associated with contaminant volume estimates and use mass balance calculations of the uranium plume to estimate the removal efficiency of the proposed alternative. During the remedial investigation, the USACE collected approximately 500 soil samples at various depths. As the first step of contaminant mass estimation, soil analytical data was segmented into several depth intervals. Second, using contouring software, analytical data for each depth interval was contoured to determine lateral extent of contamination. Six different contouring algorithms were used to generate alternative interpretations of the lateral extent of the soil contamination. Finally, geographical information system software was used to produce a three dimensional model in order to present both lateral and vertical extent of the soil contamination and to estimate the volume of impacted soil for each depth interval. The average soil volume from all six contouring methods was used to determine the estimated volume of impacted soil. This method also allowed an estimate of a standard deviation of the waste volume estimate. It was determined that the margin of error for the method was plus or minus 17% of the waste volume, which is within the acceptable construction contingency for cost estimation. USACE collected approximately 190 groundwater samples from 40 monitor wells. It is expected that excavation and disposal of

  16. Evaluating of arsenic(V) removal from water by weak-base anion exchange adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Awual, M Rabiul; Hossain, M Amran; Shenashen, M A; Yaita, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Shinichi; Jyo, Akinori

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of groundwater has been called the largest mass poisoning calamity in human history and creates severe health problems. The effective adsorbents are imperative in response to the widespread removal of toxic arsenic exposure through drinking water. Evaluation of arsenic(V) removal from water by weak-base anion exchange adsorbents was studied in this paper, aiming at the determination of the effects of pH, competing anions, and feed flow rates to improvement on remediation. Two types of weak-base adsorbents were used to evaluate arsenic(V) removal efficiency both in batch and column approaches. Anion selectivity was determined by both adsorbents in batch method as equilibrium As(V) adsorption capacities. Column studies were performed in fixed-bed experiments using both adsorbent packed columns, and kinetic performance was dependent on the feed flow rate and competing anions. The weak-base adsorbents clarified that these are selective to arsenic(V) over competition of chloride, nitrate, and sulfate anions. The solution pH played an important role in arsenic(V) removal, and a higher pH can cause lower adsorption capacities. A low concentration level of arsenic(V) was also removed by these adsorbents even at a high flow rate of 250-350 h(-1). Adsorbed arsenic(V) was quantitatively eluted with 1 M HCl acid and regenerated into hydrochloride form simultaneously for the next adsorption operation after rinsing with water. The weak-base anion exchange adsorbents are to be an effective means to remove arsenic(V) from drinking water. The fast adsorption rate and the excellent adsorption capacity in the neutral pH range will render this removal technique attractive in practical use in chemical industry.

  17. Predicting DNAPL mass discharge and contaminated site longevity probabilities: Conceptual model and high-resolution stochastic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, J.; Nowak, W.

    2015-02-01

    Improper storage and disposal of nonaqueous-phase liquids (NAPLs) has resulted in widespread contamination of the subsurface, threatening the quality of groundwater as a freshwater resource. The high frequency of contaminated sites and the difficulties of remediation efforts demand rational decisions based on a sound risk assessment. Due to sparse data and natural heterogeneities, this risk assessment needs to be supported by appropriate predictive models with quantified uncertainty. This study proposes a physically and stochastically coherent model concept to simulate and predict crucial impact metrics for DNAPL contaminated sites, such as contaminant mass discharge and DNAPL source longevity. To this end, aquifer parameters and the contaminant source architecture are conceptualized as random space functions. The governing processes are simulated in a three-dimensional, highly resolved, stochastic, and coupled model that can predict probability density functions of mass discharge and source depletion times. While it is not possible to determine whether the presented model framework is sufficiently complex or not, we can investigate whether and to which degree the desired model predictions are sensitive to simplifications often found in the literature. By testing four commonly made simplifications, we identified aquifer heterogeneity, groundwater flow irregularity, uncertain and physically based contaminant source zones, and their mutual interlinkages as indispensable components of a sound model framework.

  18. Assessment of advective porewater movement affecting mass transfer of hydrophobic organic contaminants in marine intertidal sediment.

    PubMed

    Cho, Yeo-Myoung; Werner, David; Moffett, Kevan B; Luthy, Richard G

    2010-08-01

    Advective porewater movement and molecular diffusion are important factors affecting the mass transfer of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in marsh and mudflat sediments. This study assessed porewater movement in an intertidal mudflat in South Basin adjacent to Hunters Point Shipyard, San Francisco, CA, where a pilot-scale test of sorbent amendment assessed the in situ stabilization of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). To quantify advective porewater movement within the top 0-60 cm sediment layer, we used temperature as a tracer and conducted heat transport analysis using 14-day data from multidepth sediment temperature logging stations and one-dimensional heat transport simulations. The best-fit conditions gave an average Darcy velocity of 3.8cm/d in the downward vertical direction for sorbent-amended sediment with a plausible range of 0 cm/d to 8 cm/d. In a limiting case with no net advection, the best-fit depth-averaged mechanical dispersion coefficient was 2.2x10(-7) m2/s with a range of 0.9x10(-7) m2/s to 5.6x10(-7) m2/s. The Peclet number for PCB mobilization showed that molecular diffusion would control PCB mass transfer from sediment to sorbent particles for the case of uniform distribution of sorbent. However, the advective flow and mechanical dispersion in the test site would significantly benefit the stabilization effect of heterogeneously distributed sorbent by acting to smooth out the heterogeneities and homogenizing pollutant concentrations across the entire bioactive zone. These measurements and modeling techniques on intertidal sediment porewater transport could be useful for the development of more reliable mass transfer models for the prediction of contaminant release within the sediment bed, the movement of HOCs in the intertidal aquatic environment, and in situ sequestration by sorbent addition.

  19. Three-year performance of in-situ mass stabilised contaminated site soils using MgO-bearing binders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Jin, Fei; Shen, Zhengtao; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2016-11-15

    This paper provides physical and chemical performances of mass stabilised organic and inorganic contaminated site soils using a new group of MgO-bearing binders over 3 years and evaluated the time-dependent performance during the 3 years. This study took place at a contaminated site in Castleford, UK in 2011, where MgO, ground granulated blastfurnace slag (GGBS) and Portland cement (PC) were mixed with the contaminated soils in a dry form using the ALLU mass mixing equipment. Soil cores were retrieved 40-day, 1-year and 3-year after the treatment. The core quality, strength, and the leaching properties were determined via physical observation, unconfined compressive strength (UCS) and batch leaching tests. After 3-year treatment, the UCS values of ALLU mixes were in the range of 50-250kPa; the leachate concentrations of Cd, Pb, Cu and Zn (except Ni) in all mixes were lower than their drinking water standards; and the leachability of total organics was in the range of 10-105mg/L. No apparent degradation of the mass stabilised materials after 3 years' exposure to the field conditions was found. MgO-GGBS blends were found able to provide higher strength and less leachability of contaminants compared to PC and MgO-only mixes in mass stabilised soils.

  20. Chemical structure influence on NAPL mixture nonideality evolution, rate-limited dissolution, and contaminant mass flux.

    PubMed

    Padgett, Mark C; Tick, Geoffrey R; Carroll, Kenneth C; Burke, William R

    2017-03-01

    The influence of chemical structure on NAPL mixture nonideality evolution, rate-limited dissolution, and contaminant mass flux was examined. The variability of measured and UNIFAC modeled NAPL activity coefficients as a function of mole fraction was compared for two NAPL mixtures containing structurally-different contaminants of concern including toluene (TOL) or trichloroethene (TCE) within a hexadecane (HEXDEC) matrix. The results showed that dissolution from the NAPL mixtures transitioned from ideality for mole fractions >0.05 to nonideality as mole fractions decreased. In particular, the TCE generally exhibited more ideal dissolution behavior except at lower mole fractions, and may indicate greater structural/polarity similarity between the two compounds. Raoult's Law and UNIFAC generally under-predicted the batch experiment results for TOL:HEXDEC mixtures especially for mole fractions ≤0.05. The dissolution rate coefficients were similar for both TOL and TCE over all mole fractions tested. Mass flux reduction (MFR) analysis showed that more efficient removal behavior occurred for TOL and TCE with larger mole fractions compared to the lower initial mole fraction mixtures (i.e. <0.2). However, compared to TOL, TCE generally exhibited more efficient removal behavior over all mole fractions tested and may have been the result of structural and molecular property differences between the compounds. Activity coefficient variability as a function of mole fraction was quantified through regression analysis and incorporated into dissolution modeling analyses for the dynamic flushing experiments. TOL elution concentrations were modeled (predicted) reasonable well using ideal and equilibrium assumptions, but the TCE elution concentrations could not be predicted using the ideal model. Rather, the dissolution modeling demonstrated that TCE elution was better described by the nonideal model whereby NAPL-phase activity coefficient varied as a function of COC mole fraction

  1. Groundwater contamination: identification of source signal by time-reverse mass transport computation and filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koussis, A. S.; Mazi, K.; Lykoudis, S.; Argyriou, A.

    2003-04-01

    Source signal identification is a forensic task, within regulatory and legal activities. Estimation of the contaminant's release history by reverse-solution (stepping back in time) of the mass transport equation, partialC/partialt + u partialC/partialx = D partial^2C/ partialx^2, is an ill-posed problem (its solution is non-unique and unstable). For this reason we propose the recovery of the source signal from measured concentration profile data through a numerical technique that is based on the premise of advection-dominated transport. We derive an explicit numerical scheme by discretising the pure advection equation, partialC/ partialt + u partial C/partialx = 0, such that it also models gradient-transport by matching numerical diffusion (leading truncation error term) to physical dispersion. The match is achieved by appropriate choice of the scheme’s spatial weighting coefficient q as function of the grid Peclet number P = u Δx/D: θ = 0.5 - P-1. This is a novel and efficient direct solution approach for the signal identification problem at hand that can accommodate space-variable transport parameters as well. First, we perform numerical experiments to define proper grids (in terms of Courant {bf C} = uΔt/Δx and grid Peclet P numbers) for control of spurious oscillations (instability). We then assess recovery of source signals, from perfect as well as from error-seeded field data, considering field data resulting from single- and double-peaked source signals. With perfect data, the scheme recovers source signals with very good accuracy. With imperfect data, however, additional data conditioning is required for control of signal noise. Alternating reverse profile computation with Savitzky-Golay low-pass filtering allows the recovery of well-timed and smooth source signals that satisfy mass conservation very well. Current research focuses on: a) optimising the performance of Savitzky-Golay filters, through selection of appropriate parameters (order of least

  2. Modeling adsorption: Investigating adsorbate and adsorbent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Charles Edwin

    1999-12-01

    Surface catalyzed reactions play a major role in current chemical production technology. Currently, 90% of all chemicals are produced by heterogeneously catalyzed reactions. Most of these catalyzed reactions involve adsorption, concentrating the substrate(s) (the adsorbate) on the surface of the solid (the adsorbent). Pore volumes, accessible surface areas, and the thermodynamics of adsorption are essential in the understanding of solid surface characteristics fundamental to catalyst and adsorbent screening and selection. Molecular properties such as molecular volumes and projected molecular areas are needed in order to convert moles adsorbed to surface volumes and areas. Generally, these molecular properties have been estimated from bulk properties, but many assumptions are required. As a result, different literature values are employed for these essential molecular properties. Calculated molar volumes and excluded molecular areas are determined and tabulated for a variety of molecules. Molecular dimensions of molecules are important in the understanding of molecular exclusion as well as size and shape selectivity, diffusion, and adsorbent selection. Molecular dimensions can also be used in the determination of the effective catalytic pore size of a catalyst. Adsorption isotherms, on zeolites, (crystalline mineral oxides) and amorphous solids, can be analyzed with the Multiple Equilibrium Analysis (MEA) description of adsorption. The MEA produces equilibrium constants (Ki), capacities (ni), and thermodynamic parameters (enthalpies, ΔHi, and entropies, ΔSi) of adsorption for each process. Pore volumes and accessible surface areas are calculated from the process capacities. Adsorption isotherms can also be predicted for existing and new adsorbate-adsorbent systems with the MEA. The results show that MEA has the potential of becoming a standard characterization method for microporous solids that will lead to an increased understanding of their behavior in gas

  3. ESTIMATING THE RATE OF NATURAL BIOATTENUATION OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINANTS BY A MASS CONSERVATION APPROACH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent field and experimental research has shown that certain classes of subsurface contaminants can biodegrade at many sites. A number of site specific factors influences the rate of biodegradation, which helps determine the ultimate extent of contamination at these sites. The...

  4. The uranium from seawater program at PNNL: Overview of marine testing, adsorbent characterization, adsorbent durability, adsorbent toxicity, and deployment studies

    DOE PAGES

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li -Jung; Janke, Christopher James; ...

    2016-02-07

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacitymore » and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 ± 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 ± 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage. Marine testing

  5. The uranium from seawater program at PNNL: Overview of marine testing, adsorbent characterization, adsorbent durability, adsorbent toxicity, and deployment studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li -Jung; Janke, Christopher James; Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T.; Bonheyo, George T.; Pan, Horng -Bin; Wai, Chien; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.; Bianucci, Laura; Wood, Jordana R.; Warner, Marvin G.; Peterson, Sonja; Abrecht, David G.; Mayes, Richard T.; Tsouris, Costas; Oyola, Yatsandra; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Schlafer, Nicholas J.; Addleman, Shane R.; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Das, Sadananda; Kim, Jungseung; Buesseler, Ken; Breier, Crystal; D'Alessandro, Evan

    2016-02-07

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacity and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 ± 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 ± 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage. Marine testing at Woods

  6. Observation and modelling of dissolved gases as indicators for mass transfer during gas sparging in a contaminated aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oswald, S.; Balcke, G.

    2009-04-01

    Degradation of organic contaminants in aquifers is often limited by the availability of electron acceptors, and the attenuation of contaminants could be enhanced by additional supply of oxygen. Gas sparging is a remediation technique that supplies additional oxygen to ground water via injection of air or oxygen gas. For the performance of this method the mass transfer of gases from the gas phase trapped after injection is a key process. Our study investigated kinetic gas-water mass transfer between trapped gas phase in porous media and groundwater by spatially and temporally resolved dissolved gas measurements in an unconfined model aquifer. The aquifer model was built on-site as a 12 m tall underground tank filled with aquifer material and recharged in vertical direction by the local, contaminated groundwater. For the injection of short gas pulses, oxygen and air as injected gas phase were studied in view of interfacial mass transfer, gas transport in the aqueous phase, and accumulation of trapped gas in the porous space. At several locations dissolved nitrogen, methane and oxygen were observed at different stages of gas dissolution. Kinetic gas-water mass transfer in presence of oxygen demanding reactions in the polluted aquifer material and the transport of dissolved gases were simulated numerically for heterogeneous distribution of gas phase as was observed. Partitioning of nitrogen played an important role in the accumulation of trapped gas and contributes additional information on gas transfer processes. While injection of pure oxygen resulted in complete dissolution of trapped gas within a few meters, nitrogen and methane showed distinct patterns of mass transfer into the gas phase and back into aqueous phase. Naturally occurring gases such as methane or nitrogen were demonstrated to be valuable tracers to describe multiple compound gas-water mass transfer and to assist in predicting gas dissolution and oxygen consumption in porous media.

  7. The Impact of Well-Field Configuration and Permeability Heterogeneity on Contaminant Mass Removal and Plume Persistence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Z.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of well-field hydraulics and permeability heterogeneity on mass-removal efficiency for systems comprising large groundwater contaminant plumes. A three-dimensional (3D) numerical model was used to simulate the impact of different well-field configurations on pump-and-treat mass removal for heterogeneous domains. The relationship between reduction in contaminant mass discharge (CMDR) and mass removal (MR) was used as the metric to examine remediation efficiency. The impacts of well-field configuration on mass removal behavior is attributed to mass-transfer constraints associated with regions of low flow, which can be muted by the influence of permeability heterogeneity. These impacts are reflected in the associated CMDR-MR profiles. Systems whose CDMR-MR profiles are below the 1:1 relationship line are associated with more efficient well-field configurations. The impact of domain heterogeneity on mass-removal effectiveness was investigated in terms of both variance and correlation scale of the random permeability distributions and indexed by the CMDR-MR relationship. Data collected from pump-and-treat operations conducted in a section of the Tucson International Airport Area (TIAA) federal Superfund site were used as a case study. The comparison between simulated and measured site data supports the general validity of the numerical model, and results from the case study are consistent with the conclusions of the theoretical study. These results illustrate that the CMDR-MR relationship can be an effective way to quantify the impacts of different factors on mass-removal efficiency.

  8. Identification of Unknown Contaminants in Water Samples from ISS Employing Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutz, Jeffrey A.; Schultz, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Mass Spectrometry/Mass Spectrometry (MS/MS) is a powerful technique for identifying unknown organic compounds. For non-volatile or thermally unstable unknowns dissolved in liquids, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) is often the variety of MS/MS used for the identification. One type of LC/MS/MS that is rapidly becoming popular is time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. This technique is now in use at the Johnson Space Center for identification of unknown nonvolatile organics in water samples from the space program. An example of the successful identification of one unknown is reviewed in detail in this paper. The advantages of time-of-flight instrumentation are demonstrated through this example as well as the strategy employed in using time-of-flight data to identify unknowns.

  9. Development and testing of molecular adsorber coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Straka, Sharon A.

    2012-10-01

    The effect of on-orbit molecular contamination has the potential to degrade the performance of spaceflight hardware and diminish the lifetime of the spacecraft. For example, sensitive surfaces, such as optical surfaces, electronics, detectors, and thermal control surfaces, are vulnerable to the damaging effects of contamination from outgassed materials. The current solution to protect these surfaces is through the use of zeolite coated ceramic adsorber pucks. However, these pucks and its additional complex mounting hardware requirements result in several disadvantages, such as size, weight, and cost related concerns, that impact the spacecraft design and the integration and test schedule. As a result, a new innovative molecular adsorber coating was developed as a sprayable alternative to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination. In this study, the formulation for molecular adsorber coatings was optimized using various binders, pigment treatment methods, binder to pigment ratios, thicknesses, and spray application techniques. The formulas that passed coating adhesion and vacuum thermal cycling were further tested for its adsorptive capacity. Accelerated molecular capacitance tests were performed in an innovatively designed multi-unit system containing idealized contaminant sources. This novel system significantly increased the productivity of the testing phase for the various formulations that were developed. Work performed during the development and testing phases has demonstrated successful application of molecular adsorber coatings onto metallic substrates, as well as, very promising results for the adhesion performance and the molecular capacitance of the coating. Continued testing will assist in the qualification of molecular adsorber coatings for use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  10. Development and Testing of Molecular Adsorber Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin; Hasegawa, Mark; Straka, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The effect of on-orbit molecular contamination has the potential to degrade the performance of spaceflight hardware and diminish the lifetime of the spacecraft. For example, sensitive surfaces, such as optical surfaces, electronics, detectors, and thermal control surfaces, are vulnerable to the damaging effects of contamination from outgassed materials. The current solution to protect these surfaces is through the use of zeolite coated ceramic adsorber pucks. However, these pucks and its additional complex mounting hardware requirements result in several disadvantages, such as size, weight, and cost related concerns, that impact the spacecraft design and the integration and test schedule. As a result, a new innovative molecular adsorber coating was developed as a sprayable alternative to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination. In this study, the formulation for molecular adsorber coatings was optimized using various binders, pigment treatment methods, binder to pigment ratios, thicknesses, and spray application techniques. The formulations that passed coating adhesion and vacuum thermal cycling tests were further tested for its adsorptive capacity. Accelerated molecular capacitance tests were performed in an innovatively designed multi-unit system containing idealized contaminant sources. This novel system significantly increased the productivity of the testing phase for the various formulations that were developed. Work performed during the development and testing phases has demonstrated successful application of molecular adsorber coatings onto metallic substrates, as well as, very promising results for the adhesion performance and the molecular capacitance of the coating. Continued testing will assist in the qualification of molecular adsorber coatings for use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  11. TOF-SIMS measurements for toxic air pollutants adsorbed on the surface of airborne particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiyasu, Bunbunoshin; Hoshi, Takahiro; Owari, Masanori; Nihei, Yoshimasa

    2003-01-01

    Three kinds of particulate matter were collected: diesel and gasoline exhaust particles emitted directly from exhaust nozzle, and suspended particulate matter (SPM) near the traffic route. Soxhlet extraction was performed on each sample. By gas-chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) analysis of these extracts, di-ethyl phthalate and di- n-butyl phthalate were detected from the extract of SPM and diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). Because these phthalates were sometimes suspected as contamination, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) measurements were also performed on the samples collected at the same environment. By comparing obtained spectra, it is clear that these environmental endocrine disrupters (EEDs) were adsorbed on DEP surface. Thus, we concluded that the combination of conventional method and TOF-SIMS measurement is one of the most powerful techniques for analyzing the toxic air pollutants adsorbed on SPM surface.

  12. The Impact of In-situ Chemical Oxidation on Contaminant Mass Discharge: Linking Source-Zone and Plume-Scale Characterizations of Remediation Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusseau, M. L.; Carroll, K. C.; Baker, J. B.; Allen, T.; DiGuiseppi, W.; Hatton, J.; Morrison, C.; Russo, A. E.; Berkompas, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    A large-scale permanganate-based in-situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) effort has been conducted over the past ten years at a federal Superfund site in Tucson, AZ, for which trichloroethene (TCE) is the primary contaminant of concern. Remediation performance was assessed by examining the impact of treatment on contaminant mass discharge, an approach that has been used for only a very few prior ISCO projects. Contaminant mass discharge tests were conducted before and after permanganate injection to measure the impact at the source-zone scale. The results indicate that ISCO caused a significant reduction in mass discharge (approximately 75%). The standard approach of characterizing discharge at the source-zone scale was supplemented with additional characterization at the plume scale, which was evaluated by examining the change in contaminant mass discharge associated with the pump-and-treat system. The integrated contaminant mass discharge decreased by approximately 70%, consistent with the source-zone-scale measurements. The integrated mass discharge rebounded from 0.1 to 0.2 Kg/d within one year after cessation of permanganate injections, after which it has been stable for several years. Collection of the integrated contaminant mass discharge data throughout the ISCO treatment period provided a high-resolution, real-time analysis of the site-wide impact of ISCO, thereby linking source-zone remediation to impacts on overall risk. The results indicate that ISCO was successful in reducing contaminant mass discharge at this site, which comprises a highly heterogeneous subsurface environment. Analysis of TCE sediment concentration data for core material collected before and after ISCO supports the hypothesis that the remaining mass discharge is associated in part with poorly-accessible contaminant mass residing within lower-permeability zones.

  13. Impact of In Situ Chemical Oxidation on Contaminant Mass Discharge: Linking Source-Zone and Plume-Scale Characterizations of Remediation Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Brusseau, M. L.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Allen, Tim J.; Baker, Joseph R.; DiGuiseppi, W.; Hatton, J.; Morrison, C.; Russo, A.; Berkompas, J.

    2011-05-26

    A large-scale permanganate-based in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) effort has been conducted over the past ten years at a federal Superfund site in Tucson, AZ, for which trichloroethene (TCE) is the primary contaminant of concern. Remediation performance was assessed by examining the impact of treatment on contaminant mass discharge, an approach that has been used for only a very few prior ISCO projects. Contaminant mass discharge tests were conducted before and after permanganate injection to measure the impact at the source-zone scale. The results indicate that ISCO caused a significant reduction in mass discharge (approximately 75%). The standard approach of characterizing discharge at the source-zone scale was supplemented with additional characterization at the plume scale, which was evaluated by examining the change in contaminant mass discharge associated with the pump-and-treat system. The integrated contaminant mass discharge decreased by approximately 70%, consistent with the source-zone-scale measurements. The integrated mass discharge rebounded from 0.1 to 0.2 kg/d within one year after cessation of permanganate injections, after which it has been stable for several years. Collection of the integrated contaminant mass discharge data throughout the ISCO treatment period provided a high-resolution, real-time analysis of the site-wide impact of ISCO, thereby linking source-zone remediation to impacts on overall risk. The results indicate that ISCO was successful in reducing contaminant mass discharge at this site, which comprises a highly heterogeneous subsurface environment. Analysis of TCE sediment concentration data for core material collected before and after ISCO supports the hypothesis that the remaining mass discharge is associated in part with poorly accessible contaminant mass residing within lower permeability zones.

  14. Impact of in situ chemical oxidation on contaminant mass discharge: linking source-zone and plume-scale characterizations of remediation performance.

    PubMed

    Brusseau, M L; Carroll, K C; Allen, T; Baker, J; Diguiseppi, W; Hatton, J; Morrison, C; Russo, A; Berkompas, J

    2011-06-15

    A large-scale permanganate-based in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) effort has been conducted over the past ten years at a federal Superfund site in Tucson, AZ, for which trichloroethene (TCE) is the primary contaminant of concern. Remediation performance was assessed by examining the impact of treatment on contaminant mass discharge, an approach that has been used for only a very few prior ISCO projects. Contaminant mass discharge tests were conducted before and after permanganate injection to measure the impact at the source-zone scale. The results indicate that ISCO caused a significant reduction in mass discharge (approximately 75%). The standard approach of characterizing discharge at the source-zone scale was supplemented with additional characterization at the plume scale, which was evaluated by examining the change in contaminant mass discharge associated with the pump-and-treat system. The integrated contaminant mass discharge decreased by approximately 70%, consistent with the source-zone-scale measurements. The integrated mass discharge rebounded from 0.1 to 0.2 kg/d within one year after cessation of permanganate injections, after which it has been stable for several years. Collection of the integrated contaminant mass discharge data throughout the ISCO treatment period provided a high-resolution, real-time analysis of the site-wide impact of ISCO, thereby linking source-zone remediation to impacts on overall risk. The results indicate that ISCO was successful in reducing contaminant mass discharge at this site, which comprises a highly heterogeneous subsurface environment. Analysis of TCE sediment concentration data for core material collected before and after ISCO supports the hypothesis that the remaining mass discharge is associated in part with poorly accessible contaminant mass residing within lower-permeability zones.

  15. High-sensitivity detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons adsorbed onto soot particles using laser desorption/laser ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry: An approach to studying the soot inception process in low-pressure flames

    SciTech Connect

    Faccinetto, Alessandro; Desgroux, Pascale; Therssen, Eric; Ziskind, Michael; Focsa, Cristian

    2011-02-15

    Species adsorbed at the surfaces of soot particles sampled at different locations in a low-pressure methane flame have been analyzed. The analysis method is laser desorption/laser ionization/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LD/LI/TOF-MS) applied to soot particles deposited on a filter after probe extraction in the flame. In order to fully characterize the experimental apparatus, a strategy of systematic investigations has been adopted, beginning with the study of less complex systems constituted by model soot (standard polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs, adsorbed on black carbon), and then natural soot sampled from a literature reference ethylene flame. This characterization allowed a good understanding of the analytical response of PAHs to the desorption and ionization processes and the definition of the optimal experimental conditions. The soot PAH content was then investigated on a low-pressure methane/oxygen/nitrogen premixed flat flame ({phi} = 2.32) as a function of the sampling height above the burner (HAB). The obtained mass spectra are reproducible, fragment-free, well resolved in the analyzed m/z range and they are characterized by an excellent signal-to-noise ratio. They all feature regular peak sequences, where each signal peak has been assigned to the most stable high-temperature-formed PAHs. The structure of the mass spectra depends on the sampling HAB into the flame, i.e., on the reaction time. An original contribution to the data interpretation comes from the development of a new sampling method that makes it possible to infer hypotheses about the PAH partition between the gas phase and the soot particles. This method highlights the presence of high-mass PAHs in the soot nucleation zone, and it suggests the importance of heterogeneous reactions occurring between flame PAHs and soot particles. (author)

  16. Black Molecular Adsorber Coatings for Spaceflight Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin Susan; Hasegawa, Mark Makoto; Straka, Sharon A.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular adsorber coating is a new technology that was developed to mitigate the risk of on-orbit molecular contamination on spaceflight missions. The application of this coating would be ideal near highly sensitive, interior surfaces and instruments that are negatively impacted by outgassed molecules from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, epoxies, and other similar compounds. This current, sprayable paint technology is comprised of inorganic white materials made from highly porous zeolite. In addition to good adhesion performance, thermal stability, and adsorptive capability, the molecular adsorber coating offers favorable thermal control characteristics. However, low reflectivity properties, which are typically offered by black thermal control coatings, are desired for some spaceflight applications. For example, black coatings are used on interior surfaces, in particular, on instrument baffles for optical stray light control. Similarly, they are also used within light paths between optical systems, such as telescopes, to absorb light. Recent efforts have been made to transform the white molecular adsorber coating into a black coating with similar adsorptive properties. This result is achieved by optimizing the current formulation with black pigments, while still maintaining its adsorption capability for outgassing control. Different binder to pigment ratios, coating thicknesses, and spray application techniques were explored to develop a black version of the molecular adsorber coating. During the development process, coating performance and adsorption characteristics were studied. The preliminary work performed on black molecular adsorber coatings thus far is very promising. Continued development and testing is necessary for its use on future contamination sensitive spaceflight missions.

  17. Influence of mass transfer characteristics for DNAPL source depletion and contaminant flux in a highly characterized glaciofluvial aquifer.

    PubMed

    Maji, R; Sudicky, E A

    2008-11-14

    The transfer of contaminant mass between the nonaqueous- and aqueous-phases is a process of central importance for the remediation of sites contaminated by dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs). This paper describes a comparison of the results obtained with various alternative DNAPL-aqueous-phase mass transfer models contained in the literature for predicting DNAPL source-zone depletion times in groundwater systems. These dissolution models were largely developed through laboratory column experiments. To gain insight into the implications of various representations of the local-scale kinetic as well as equilibrium DNAPL dissolution processes, aquifer heterogeneity and the complex architecture of a DNAPL source-zone, the aqueous-phase contaminant concentrations and mass fluxes arriving at a down-gradient compliance boundary are analyzed in a conditional stochastic framework. The hydrogeologic setting is a heterogeneous fluvial aquifer in Southwest Germany, referred to as the aquifer analog dataset, that was intensively characterized in three dimensions for hydrogeological parameters that include permeability, effective porosity, grain size, mineralogy and sorption coefficients. By embedding the various dissolution models into the compositional, multiphase flow model, CompFlow, the relative times predicted for complete depletion of a released DNAPL source due to natural dissolution are explored. Issues related to achieving environmental benefits through, for example, partial DNAPL-zone source removal via enhanced remedial technologies are also discussed. In this context, performance metrics in the form of peak aqueous-phase contaminant concentrations and mass fluxes arriving at a down-gradient compliance boundary are compared to each other. This is done for each of the alternative mass transfer models. A significant reduction in the fractional flux at a downstream location from the DNAPL source can be achieved by partial source-zone mass reduction; however, peak

  18. Influence of mass transfer characteristics for DNAPL source depletion and contaminant flux in a highly characterized glaciofluvial aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maji, R.; Sudicky, E. A.

    2008-11-01

    The transfer of contaminant mass between the nonaqueous- and aqueous-phases is a process of central importance for the remediation of sites contaminated by dense nonaqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs). This paper describes a comparison of the results obtained with various alternative DNAPL-aqueous-phase mass transfer models contained in the literature for predicting DNAPL source-zone depletion times in groundwater systems. These dissolution models were largely developed through laboratory column experiments. To gain insight into the implications of various representations of the local-scale kinetic as well as equilibrium DNAPL dissolution processes, aquifer heterogeneity and the complex architecture of a DNAPL source-zone, the aqueous-phase contaminant concentrations and mass fluxes arriving at a down-gradient compliance boundary are analyzed in a conditional stochastic framework. The hydrogeologic setting is a heterogeneous fluvial aquifer in Southwest Germany, referred to as the aquifer analog dataset, that was intensively characterized in three dimensions for hydrogeological parameters that include permeability, effective porosity, grain size, mineralogy and sorption coefficients. By embedding the various dissolution models into the compositional, multiphase flow model, CompFlow, the relative times predicted for complete depletion of a released DNAPL source due to natural dissolution are explored. Issues related to achieving environmental benefits through, for example, partial DNAPL-zone source removal via enhanced remedial technologies are also discussed. In this context, performance metrics in the form of peak aqueous-phase contaminant concentrations and mass fluxes arriving at a down-gradient compliance boundary are compared to each other. This is done for each of the alternative mass transfer models. A significant reduction in the fractional flux at a downstream location from the DNAPL source can be achieved by partial source-zone mass reduction; however, peak

  19. Different Types of Peptide Detected by Mass Spectrometry among Fresh Silk and Archaeological Silk Remains for Distinguishing Modern Contamination

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Gong, Yuxuan; Yin, Hao; Gong, Decai

    2015-01-01

    Archaeological silk provides abundant information for studying ancient technologies and cultures. However, due to the spontaneous degradation and the damages from burial conditions, most ancient silk fibers which suffered the damages for thousands of years were turned into invisible molecular residues. For the obtained rare samples, extra care needs to be taken to accurately identify the genuine archaeological silk remains from modern contaminations. Although mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful tool for identifying and analyzing the ancient protein residues, the traditional approach could not directly determine the dating and contamination of each sample. In this paper, a series of samples with a broad range of ages were tested by MS to find an effective and innovative approach to determine whether modern contamination exists, in order to verify the authenticity and reliability of the ancient samples. The new findings highlighted that the detected peptide types of the fibroin light chain can indicate the degradation levels of silk samples and help to distinguish contamination from ancient silk remains. PMID:26186676

  20. Transformation products of emerging contaminants in the environment and high-resolution mass spectrometry: a new horizon.

    PubMed

    Picó, Yolanda; Barceló, Damià

    2015-08-01

    It is crucial to study the presence of transformation products (TPs) of emerging contaminants that can be potentially found in the environment after biological or chemical degradation. This review focuses on the potential and shortcomings of high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) to identify these TPs, with emphasis on recent developments in mass analyzers, data evaluation, and compound identification workflows and applications. Advances in HRMS technologies, including direct introduction or in-line chromatographic separation modes, ionization techniques, mass analyzers, and detection methods, have led to powerful tools to assess the molecular changes and the opening of new horizons to identify unknown molecules. Advances in HRMS pertaining to the generation of analytical data for the main methods to identify TPs, including nontargeted and targeted approaches as they are applied to elucidate the structure of TPs, are also discussed.

  1. Exploring the Behaviour of Emerging Contaminants in the Water Cycle using the Capabilities of High Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hollender, Juliane; Bourgin, Marc; Fenner, Kathrin B; Longrée, Philipp; Mcardell, Christa S; Moschet, Christoph; Ruff, Matthias; Schymanski, Emma L; Singer, Heinz P

    2014-11-01

    To characterize a broad range of organic contaminants and their transformation products (TPs) as well as their loads, input pathways and fate in the water cycle, the Department of Environmental Chemistry (Uchem) at Eawag applies and develops high-performance liquid chromatography (LC) methods combined with high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry (HRMS/MS). In this article, the background and state-of-the-art of LC-HRMS/MS for detection of i) known targets, ii) suspected compounds like TPs, and iii) unknown emerging compounds are introduced briefly. Examples for each approach are taken from recent research projects conducted within the department. These include the detection of trace organic contaminants and their TPs in wastewater, pesticides and their TPs in surface water, identification of new TPs in laboratory degradation studies and ozonation experiments and finally the screening for unknown compounds in the catchment of the river Rhine.

  2. Effect of organic contamination upon microbial distributions and heterotrophic uptake in a cape cod, mass., aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harvey, R.W.; Smith, R.L.; George, L.

    1984-01-01

    Bacterial abundance, distribution, and heterotrophic uptake in a freshwater aquifer contaminated by treated sewage were determined from analyses of groundwater and sediment-core samples. The number of free-living (unattached) bacteria in contaminated groundwater declined steadily with increasing distance from the source of sewage infiltration, from 1.94 ?? (?? 0.20) x 106 ml-1 at 0.21 km to 0.25 (?? 0.02) x 106 ml-1 at 0.97 km. Bacterial abundance in groundwater sampled at 0.31 km correlated strongly with specific conductance and increased sharply from 4.0 (?? 0.3) x 104 ml-1 at a depth of 6 m to 1.58 (?? 0.12) x 106 ml-1 at 14 m, then declined at 20 and 31 m to 1.29 (?? 0.12) x 106 and 0.96 (?? 0.12) x 106 ml-1, respectively. A majority of the bacteria in contaminated and uncontaminated zones of the aquifer were bound to the surfaces of particulates, <60 ??m in diameter. The glucose uptake rate, assayed at in situ and 5 ??M concentrations, declined steadily in contaminated groundwater sampled along a transect. A preparative wet-sieving technique for use in processing core samples for bacterial enumeration is described and evaluated.

  3. Effect of organic contamination upon microbial distributions and heterotrophic uptake in a Cape Cod, Mass., aquifer.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, R W; Smith, R L; George, L

    1984-01-01

    Bacterial abundance, distribution, and heterotrophic uptake in a freshwater aquifer contaminated by treated sewage were determined from analyses of groundwater and sediment-core samples. The number of free-living (unattached) bacteria in contaminated groundwater declined steadily with increasing distance from the source of sewage infiltration, from 1.94 (+/- 0.20) X 10(6) ml-1 at 0.21 km to 0.25 (+/- 0.02) X 10(6) ml-1 at 0.97 km. Bacterial abundance in groundwater sampled at 0.31 km correlated strongly with specific conductance and increased sharply from 4.0 (+/- 0.3) X 10(4) ml-1 at a depth of 6 m to 1.58 (+/- 0.12) X 10(6) ml-1 at 14 m, then declined at 20 and 31 m to 1.29 (+/- 0.12) X 10(6) and 0.96 (+/- 0.12) X 10(6) ml-1, respectively. A majority of the bacteria in contaminated and uncontaminated zones of the aquifer were bound to the surfaces of particulates, less than 60 micron in diameter. The glucose uptake rate, assayed at in situ and 5 microM concentrations, declined steadily in contaminated groundwater sampled along a transect. A preparative wet-sieving technique for use in processing core samples for bacterial enumeration is described and evaluated. Images PMID:6517587

  4. Development of the Molecular Adsorber Coating for Spacecraft and Instrument Interiors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin

    2011-01-01

    On-orbit Molecular Contamination occurs when materials outgas and deposit onto very sensitive interior surfaces of the spacecraft and instruments. The current solution, Molecular Adsorber Pucks, has disadvantages, which are reviewed. A new innovative solution, Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC), is currently being formulated, optimized, and tested. It is a sprayable alternative composed of Zeolite-based coating with adsorbing properties.

  5. Measurement of breakthrough volumes of volatile chemical warfare agents on a poly(2,6-diphenylphenylene oxide)-based adsorbent and application to thermal desorption-gas chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kanamori-Kataoka, Mieko; Seto, Yasuo

    2015-09-04

    To establish adequate on-site solvent trapping of volatile chemical warfare agents (CWAs) from air samples, we measured the breakthrough volumes of CWAs on three adsorbent resins by an elution technique using direct electron ionization mass spectrometry. The trapping characteristics of Tenax(®) TA were better than those of Tenax(®) GR and Carboxen(®) 1016. The latter two adsorbents showed non-reproducible breakthrough behavior and low VX recovery. The specific breakthrough values were more than 44 (sarin) L/g Tenax(®) TA resin at 20°C. Logarithmic values of specific breakthrough volume for four nerve agents (sarin, soman, tabun, and VX) showed a nearly linear correlation with the reciprocals of their boiling points, but the data point of sulfur mustard deviated from this linear curve. Next, we developed a method to determine volatile CWAs in ambient air by thermal desorption-gas chromatography (TD-GC/MS). CWA solutions that were spiked into the Tenax TA(®) adsorbent tubes were analyzed by a two-stage TD-GC/MS using a Tenax(®) TA-packed cold trap tube. Linear calibration curves for CWAs retained in the resin tubes were obtained in the range between 0.2pL and 100pL for sarin, soman, tabun, cyclohexylsarin, and sulfur mustard; and between 2pL and 100pL for VX and Russian VX. We also examined the stability of CWAs in Tenax(®) TA tubes purged with either dry or 50% relative humidity air under storage conditions at room temperature or 4°C. More than 80% sarin, soman, tabun, cyclohexylsarin, and sulfur mustard were recovered from the tubes within 2 weeks. In contrast, the recoveries of VX and Russian VX drastically reduced with storage time at room temperature, resulting in a drop to 10-30% after 2 weeks. Moreover, we examined the trapping efficiency of Tenax TA(®) adsorbent tubes for vaporized CWA samples (100mL) prepared in a 500mL gas sampling cylinder. In the concentration range of 0.2-2.5mg/m(3), >50% of sarin, soman, tabun, cyclohexylsarin, and HD were

  6. Consistent Simulation Framework for Efficient Mass Discharge and Source Depletion Time Predictions of DNAPL Contaminants in Heterogeneous Aquifers Under Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, W.; Koch, J.

    2014-12-01

    Predicting DNAPL fate and transport in heterogeneous aquifers is challenging and subject to an uncertainty that needs to be quantified. Models for this task needs to be equipped with an accurate source zone description, i.e., the distribution of mass of all partitioning phases (DNAPL, water, and soil) in all possible states ((im)mobile, dissolved, and sorbed), mass-transfer algorithms, and the simulation of transport processes in the groundwater. Such detailed models tend to be computationally cumbersome when used for uncertainty quantification. Therefore, a selective choice of the relevant model states, processes, and scales are both sensitive and indispensable. We investigate the questions: what is a meaningful level of model complexity and how to obtain an efficient model framework that is still physically and statistically consistent. In our proposed model, aquifer parameters and the contaminant source architecture are conceptualized jointly as random space functions. The governing processes are simulated in a three-dimensional, highly-resolved, stochastic, and coupled model that can predict probability density functions of mass discharge and source depletion times. We apply a stochastic percolation approach as an emulator to simulate the contaminant source formation, a random walk particle tracking method to simulate DNAPL dissolution and solute transport within the aqueous phase, and a quasi-steady-state approach to solve for DNAPL depletion times. Using this novel model framework, we test whether and to which degree the desired model predictions are sensitive to simplifications often found in the literature. With this we identify that aquifer heterogeneity, groundwater flow irregularity, uncertain and physically-based contaminant source zones, and their mutual interlinkages are indispensable components of a sound model framework.

  7. Plasma flame for mass purification of contaminated air with chemical and biological warfare agents

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, Han S.; Shin, Dong H.; Hong, Yong C.

    2006-09-18

    An elimination of airborne simulated chemical and biological warfare agents was carried out by making use of a plasma flame made of atmospheric plasma and a fuel-burning flame, which can purify the interior air of a large volume in isolated spaces such as buildings, public transportation systems, and military vehicles. The plasma flame generator consists of a microwave plasma torch connected in series to a fuel injector and a reaction chamber. For example, a reaction chamber, with the dimensions of a 22 cm diameter and 30 cm length, purifies an airflow rate of 5000 lpm contaminated with toluene (the simulated chemical agent) and soot from a diesel engine (the simulated aerosol for biological agents). Large volumes of purification by the plasma flame will free mankind from the threat of airborne warfare agents. The plasma flame may also effectively purify air that is contaminated with volatile organic compounds, in addition to eliminating soot from diesel engines as an environmental application.

  8. Plasma flame for mass purification of contaminated air with chemical and biological warfare agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Han S.; Shin, Dong H.; Hong, Yong C.

    2006-09-01

    An elimination of airborne simulated chemical and biological warfare agents was carried out by making use of a plasma flame made of atmospheric plasma and a fuel-burning flame, which can purify the interior air of a large volume in isolated spaces such as buildings, public transportation systems, and military vehicles. The plasma flame generator consists of a microwave plasma torch connected in series to a fuel injector and a reaction chamber. For example, a reaction chamber, with the dimensions of a 22cm diameter and 30cm length, purifies an airflow rate of 5000lpm contaminated with toluene (the simulated chemical agent) and soot from a diesel engine (the simulated aerosol for biological agents). Large volumes of purification by the plasma flame will free mankind from the threat of airborne warfare agents. The plasma flame may also effectively purify air that is contaminated with volatile organic compounds, in addition to eliminating soot from diesel engines as an environmental application.

  9. Mortuary Affairs - Is USNORTHCOM and the Department of Homeland Security Positioned for Contaminated Mass Fatality Management?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-05-31

    used to make various commercial items that we use everyday---from ballpoint pens to plastics to ceramics to fireworks.”5 Biological agents are much...management as the system is fragmented. Many states do not currently have any specific statues to address treatment of contaminated remains. Whether this...is an oversight or intentional omission is not known. An argument for oversight is the general lack of scientific specific data involving the

  10. Determination of platinum surface contamination in veterinary and human oncology centres using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Janssens, T; Brouwers, E E M; de Vos, J P; de Vries, N; Schellens, J H M; Beijnen, J H

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the surface contamination with platinum-containing antineoplastic drugs in veterinary and human oncology centres. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to measure platinum levels in surface samples. In veterinary and human oncology centres, 46.3 and 68.9% of the sampled surfaces demonstrated platinum contamination, respectively. Highest platinum levels were found in the preparation rooms (44.6 pg cm(-2)) in veterinary centres, while maximal levels in human centres were found in oncology patient-only toilets (725 pg cm(-2)). Transference of platinum by workers outside areas where antineoplastic drugs were handled was observed in veterinary and human oncology centres. In conclusion, only low levels of platinum contamination attributable to carboplatin were found in the sampled veterinary oncology centres. However, dispersion of platinum outside areas where antineoplastic drugs were handled was detected in veterinary and human oncology centres. Consequently, not only personnel, but also others may be exposed to platinum.

  11. Analysis of environmental contaminates in hair using an ion trap mass spectrometer with a filtered noise field waveboard

    SciTech Connect

    Alcaraz, A.; Hulsey, S.S.; Frantz, C.E.; Andresen, B.D.

    1994-12-31

    A variety of methods have been established using mass spectrometry (MS) for the analysis of chemicals in hair. Much of this past work has been focused on the detection of drugs of abuse. Human hair has been analyzed either directly by probe distillation (DIP) with some preliminary clean-up using HPLC or solid phase extraction (SPE). However, established drug analysis methods do not apply for the detection of some environmental contaminates. In this study, the authors selected 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and malathion as the target compounds. In addition two types of hair samples were analyzed: (1) human hair fortified with either TNT or malathion and (2) hair from mice who ingested the same analytes. The analytical method was DIP-EI-MS/MS with an ion trap mass spectrometer equipped with a filtered noise field wave board.

  12. Scanning ultraviolet two-step laser mass spectroscopy of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon distributions on creosote-contaminated soil particles.

    PubMed

    Fye, J L; Nelson, H H; Mowery, R L; Baronavski, A P; Callahan, J H

    2002-07-01

    The distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) on creosote-contaminated soil has been examined with scanning ultraviolet two-step laser desorption/laser ionization mass spectroscopy (UV-L2MS). The instrument has been constructed in-house by modifying a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Two-dimensional chemical maps were accurately generated from model patterned PAH distributions. From examination of three-dimensional substrates, the depth of field of the experiment allows surfaces with roughness of up to 120 microm to be treated as a two-dimensional system and still achieve an accurate representation of the surface deposits. Soil was obtained from a former wood treatment facility. Individual particles of 100-1000 microm were mounted on indexed sample plates and examined by reflectance infrared microscopy, optical microscopy, and imaging UV-L2MS. The most intense PAH signals were associated with regions on the particles where clay/organic carbon deposits were found.

  13. Contaminants of Emerging Concern: Mass Balance and Comparison of Wastewater Effluent and Upstream Sources in a Mixed-Use Watershed.

    PubMed

    Fairbairn, David J; Arnold, William A; Barber, Brian L; Kaufenberg, Elizabeth F; Koskinen, William C; Novak, Paige J; Rice, Pamela J; Swackhamer, Deborah L

    2016-01-05

    Understanding the sources, transport, and spatiotemporal variability of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) is important for understanding risks and developing monitoring and mitigation strategies. This study used mass balances to compare wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and upstream sources of 16 CECs to a mixed-use watershed in Minnesota, under different seasonal and hydrological conditions. Three distinct CEC groups emerged with respect to their source proportionality and instream behavior. Agricultural herbicides and daidzein inputs were primarily via upstream routes with the greatest loadings and concentrations during high flows. Trimethoprim, mecoprop, nonprescription pharmaceuticals, and personal care products entered the system via balanced/mixed pathways with peak loadings and concentrations in high flows. Carbaryl, 4-nonylphenol, and the remaining prescription pharmaceuticals entered the system via WWTP effluent with relatively stable loadings across sampling events. Mass balance analysis based on multiple sampling events and sites facilitated CEC source comparisons and may therefore prove to be a powerful tool for apportioning sources and exploring mitigation strategies.

  14. Quantitation of protein S-glutathionylation by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: correction for contaminating glutathione and glutathione disulfide.

    PubMed

    Bukowski, Michael R; Bucklin, Christopher; Picklo, Matthew J

    2015-01-15

    Protein S-glutathionylation is a posttranslational modification that links oxidative stimuli to reversible changes in cellular function. Protein-glutathione mixed disulfide (PSSG) is commonly quantified by reduction of the disulfide and detection of the resultant glutathione species. This methodology is susceptible to contamination by free unreacted cellular glutathione (GSH) species, which are present in 1000-fold greater concentration. A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based method was developed for quantification of glutathione and glutathione disulfide (GSSG), which was used for the determination of PSSG in biological samples. Analysis of rat liver samples demonstrated that GSH and GSSG coprecipitated with proteins similar to the range for PSSG in the sample. The use of [(13)C2,(5)N]GSH and [(13)C4,(5)N2]GSSG validated these results and demonstrated that the release of GSH from PSSG did not occur during sample preparation and analysis. These data demonstrate that GSH and GSSG contamination must be accounted for when determining PSSG content in cellular/tissue preparations. A protocol for rinsing samples to remove the adventitious glutathione species is demonstrated. The fragmentation patterns for glutathione were determined by high-resolution mass spectrometry, and candidate ions for detection of PSSG on protein and protein fragments were identified.

  15. Scenario-based modelling of mass transfer mechanisms at a petroleum contaminated field site-numerical implications.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, M; Nambi, Indumathi M; Suresh Kumar, G

    2016-06-15

    Knowledge about distribution of dissolved plumes and their influencing factors is essential for risk assessment and remediation of light non-aqueous phase liquid contamination in groundwater. Present study deals with the applicability of numerical model for simulating various hydro-geological scenarios considering non-uniform source distribution at a petroleum contaminated site in Chennai, India. The complexity associated with the hydrogeology of the site has limited scope for on-site quantification of petroleum pipeline spillage. The change in fuel composition under mass-transfer limited conditions was predicted by simultaneously comparing deviations in aqueous concentrations and activity coefficients (between Raoult's law and analytical approaches). The effects of source migration and weathering on the dissolution of major soluble fractions of petroleum fuel were also studied in relation to the apparent change in their activity coefficients and molar fractions. The model results were compared with field observations and found that field conditions were favourable for biodegradation, especially for the aromatic fraction (benzene and toluene (nearly 95% removal), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (up to 65% removal) and xylene (nearly 45% removal). The results help to differentiate the effect of compositional non-ideality from rate-limited dissolution towards tailing of less soluble compounds (alkanes and trimethylbenzene). Although the effect of non-ideality decreased with distance from the source, the assumption of spatially varying residual saturation could effectively illustrate post-spill scenario by estimating the consequent decrease in mass transfer rate.

  16. Validation of thermodesorption method for analysis of semi-volatile organic compounds adsorbed on wafer surface.

    PubMed

    Hayeck, Nathalie; Gligorovski, Sasho; Poulet, Irène; Wortham, Henri

    2014-05-01

    To prevent the degradation of the device characteristics it is important to detect the organic contaminants adsorbed on the wafers. In this respect, a reliable qualitative and quantitative analytical method for analysis of semi-volatile organic compounds which can adsorb on wafer surfaces is of paramount importance. Here, we present a new analytical method based on Wafer Outgassing System (WOS) coupled to Automated Thermal Desorber-Gas chromatography-Mass spectrometry (ATD-GC-MS) to identify and quantify volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds from 6", 8" and 12" wafers. WOS technique allows the desorption of organic compounds from one side of the wafers. This method was tested on three important airborne contaminants in cleanroom i.e. tris-(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris-(2-chloroisopropyl) phosphate (TCPP) and diethyl phthalate (DEP). In addition, we validated this method for the analysis and quantification of DEP, TCEP and TCPP and we estimated the backside organic contamination which may contribute to the front side of the contaminated wafers. We are demonstrating that WOS/ATD-GC-MS is a suitable and highly efficient technique for desorption and quantitative analysis of organophosphorous compounds and phthalate ester which could be found on the wafer surface.

  17. Testing of chemically treated adsorbent air purifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, T.J. . Dept. of Atmospheric Science and Applied Technology); Kinkead, D.A. )

    1993-07-01

    New highly sensitive continuous monitors permit testing of air filters at parts-per-billion contaminant concentrations. This article describes testing of air purification filters intended for use in the National Archives 2 building in College Park, Maryland, using a test procedure that simulates the actual conditions of use. This test demonstrates both the effectiveness of the adsorbers at low contaminant levels, and the capability of existing instruments for conducting such tests. ASHRAE TC 2.3 (Gaseous Air Contaminants and Gas Contaminant Removal Equipment) is currently sponsoring research projects (follow-on studies to ASHRAE Project RP-674) aimed at developing a standard that will test and rate the performance of different types of gas phase air purification equipment at low concentrations. The work detailed in this article represents a first of this type of testing and a technical benchmark that may aid in the further development of ASHRAE gas phase performance standards.

  18. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants and mass flow measurement

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Dennis G.; Rossabi, Joseph; Riha, Brian D.

    2003-07-15

    A system for improving the Baroball valve and a method for retrofitting an existing Baroball valve. This invention improves upon the Baroball valve by reshaping the interior chamber of the valve to form a flow meter measuring chamber. The Baroball valve sealing mechanism acts as a rotameter bob for determining mass flow rate through the Baroball valve. A method for retrofitting a Baroball valve includes providing static pressure ports and connecting a measuring device, to these ports, for measuring the pressure differential between the Baroball chamber and the well. A standard curve of nominal device measurements allows the mass flow rate to be determined through the retrofitted Baroball valve.

  19. A consistent framework to predict mass fluxes and depletion times for DNAPL contaminations in heterogeneous aquifers under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Jonas; Nowak, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    At many hazardous waste sites and accidental spills, dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) such as TCE, PCE, or TCA have been released into the subsurface. Once a DNAPL is released into the subsurface, it serves as persistent source of dissolved-phase contamination. In chronological order, the DNAPL migrates through the porous medium and penetrates the aquifer, it forms a complex pattern of immobile DNAPL saturation, it dissolves into the groundwater and forms a contaminant plume, and it slowly depletes and bio-degrades in the long-term. In industrial countries the number of such contaminated sites is tremendously high to the point that a ranking from most risky to least risky is advisable. Such a ranking helps to decide whether a site needs to be remediated or may be left to natural attenuation. Both the ranking and the designing of proper remediation or monitoring strategies require a good understanding of the relevant physical processes and their inherent uncertainty. To this end, we conceptualize a probabilistic simulation framework that estimates probability density functions of mass discharge, source depletion time, and critical concentration values at crucial target locations. Furthermore, it supports the inference of contaminant source architectures from arbitrary site data. As an essential novelty, the mutual dependencies of the key parameters and interacting physical processes are taken into account throughout the whole simulation. In an uncertain and heterogeneous subsurface setting, we identify three key parameter fields: the local velocities, the hydraulic permeabilities and the DNAPL phase saturations. Obviously, these parameters depend on each other during DNAPL infiltration, dissolution and depletion. In order to highlight the importance of these mutual dependencies and interactions, we present results of several model set ups where we vary the physical and stochastic dependencies of the input parameters and simulated processes. Under these

  20. [Determination of six phthalate acid esters in camellia oil by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry coupled with solid-phase extraction using single-walled carbon nanotubes as adsorbent].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Zhonghai; Zhang, Ying; Huang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Xiaosong

    2014-07-01

    An analytical method based on solid-phase extraction with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as adsorbent was developed for the simultaneous determination of six phthalate acid esters (PAEs) in camellia oil by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The samples were diluted by hexane and then cleaned up with a glass SWCNTs solid phase extraction (SPE) column. The PAEs were measured by GC-MS in selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode, using external standard method for quantitative analysis. The important factors affecting extraction efficiency, such as the dilution volume of hexane, the type of adsorbent material, the dosage of SWCNTs, the volume of wash solution, the type and volume of elution solution were optimized. The optimal conditions were as follows: the dilution volume of hexane was 5 mL, the dosage of SWCNTs was 0.6 g, the wash solution was 20 mL hexane, and the elution solution was 5 mL toluene. The six PAEs had a good linear range from 0.05 mg/L to 1.0 mg/L, with the correlation coefficients (r) all above 0.999 9. The average recoveries of the six targets in spiked camellia oil (from 0.05 mg/kg to 1.0 mg/kg) ranged from 86.4% to 111.7% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) from 4.2% to 10.4%. The developed method is accurate, quick and suitable for the determination of the six PAEs in camellia oil.

  1. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  2. Fate and mass balance of contaminants of emerging concern during wastewater treatment determined using the fractionated approach.

    PubMed

    Baalbaki, Zeina; Sultana, Tamanna; Maere, Thomas; Vanrolleghem, Peter A; Metcalfe, Chris D; Yargeau, Viviane

    2016-12-15

    Contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) are often poorly removed from wastewater using conventional treatment technologies and there is limited understanding of their fate during treatment. Inappropriate sampling strategies lead to inaccuracies in estimating removals of CECs. In this study, we used the "fractionated approach" that accounts for the residence time distribution (RTD) in treatment units to investigate the fate of 26 target CECs in a municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) that includes primary, secondary and tertiary treatment steps. Prior hydraulic calibration of each treatment unit was performed. Wastewater and sludge samples were collected at different locations along the treatment train and the concentrations of target CECs were measured by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. The most substantial aqueous removal occurred during activated sludge treatment (up to 99%). Removals were <50% in the primary clarifier and tertiary rotating biological contactors (RBCs) and up to 70% by sand filtration. Mass balance calculations demonstrated that (bio)degradation accounted for up to 50% of the removal in the primary clarifier and 100% in activated sludge. Removal by sorption to primary and secondary sludge was minimal for most CECs. Analysis of the selected metabolites demonstrated that negative removals obtained could be explained by transformations between the parent compound and their metabolites. This study contributes to the growing literature by applying the fractionated approach to calculate removal of different types of CECs across each wastewater treatment step. An additional level of understanding of the fate of CECs was provided by mass balance calculations in primary and secondary treatments.

  3. Evaluation of pharmaceuticals removal by sewage sludge-derived adsorbents with rapid small-scale column tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, P.; Ding, R.; Wallace, R.; Bandosz, T.

    2015-12-01

    New composite adsorbents were developed by pyrolyzing sewage sludge and fish waste (75:25 or 90:10 dry mass ratio) at 650 oC and 950 oC. Batch adsorption experiments demonstrated that the composite adsorbents were able to adsorb a wide range of organic contaminants (volatile organic compounds, pharmaceuticals and endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs), and nitrosamine disinfection byproducts) with high capacities. Here we further examine the performance of the adsorbents for the simultaneous removal of 8 pharmaceuticals and EDCs with rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCT). Results show that the order of breakthrough in RSSCT is in general consistent with the affinity determined via batch tests. As expected, the maximum amount of adsorption for each compound obtained from RSSCT is identical to or less than that obtained from batch tests (with only one exception), due to adsorption kinetics. However, despite the very different input concentration (1 mg/L vs. 100 mg/L) and contact time (2 min empty bed contact time vs. 16 hour equilibrium time) used in RSSCT and batch tests, the maximum amount of pharmaceuticals and EDCs adsorbed under RSSCT is still about one half of that under equilibrium batch tests, validating the approach of using batch tests with much higher input concentrations to determine adsorption capacities. Results of a pilot-scale column test in a drinking water treatment plant for pharmaceuticals removal will also be presented.

  4. Ultra high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry for rapid analysis of trace organic contaminants in water

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The widespread utilization of organic compounds in modern society and their dispersion through wastewater have resulted in extensive contamination of source and drinking waters. The vast majority of these compounds are not regulated in wastewater outfalls or in drinking water while trace amounts of certain compounds can impact aquatic wildlife. Hence it is prudent to monitor these contaminants in water sources until sufficient toxicological data relevant to humans becomes available. A method was developed for the analysis of 36 trace organic contaminants (TOrCs) including pharmaceuticals, pesticides, steroid hormones (androgens, progestins, and glucocorticoids), personal care products and polyfluorinated compounds (PFCs) using a single solid phase extraction (SPE) technique with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS). The method was applied to a variety of water matrices to demonstrate method performance and reliability. Results UHPLC-MS/MS in both positive and negative electrospray ionization (ESI) modes was employed to achieve optimum sensitivity while reducing sample analysis time (<20 min) compared with previously published methods. The detection limits for most compounds was lower than 1.0 picogram on the column while reporting limits in water ranged from 0.1 to 15 ng/L based on the extraction of a 1 L sample and concentration to 1 mL. Recoveries in ultrapure water for most compounds were between 90-110%, while recoveries in surface water and wastewater were in the range of 39-121% and 38-141% respectively. The analytical method was successfully applied to analyze samples across several different water matrices including wastewater, groundwater, surface water and drinking water at different stages of the treatment. Among several compounds detected in wastewater, sucralose and TCPP showed the highest concentrations. Conclusion The proposed method is sensitive, rapid and robust; hence it can

  5. Application of time-of-flight mass spectrometry for screening of crude glycerins for toxic phorbol ester contaminants.

    PubMed

    Herath, Kithsiri; Girard, Lauren; Reimschuessel, Renate; Jayasuriya, Hiranthi

    2017-03-01

    Since 2007, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has received numerous complaints of pet illnesses that may be related to the consumption of jerky pet treats. Many of those treats include glycerin as an ingredient. Glycerin can be made directly from oils such as palm seed oil, but can also be derived from the seed oil of toxic Jatropha plant during biodiesel production. If crude glycerin from biodiesel production from Jatropha curcas is used in the manufacture of animal feed, toxic tigliane diterpene phorbol esters (PEs), namely Jatropha factors (JFs), may be present and could lead to animal illnesses. Considering the numerous uses of glycerin in consumer products there is a need for a rapid method to screen crude glycerin for JF toxins and other PE contaminants. We describe the development of an ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography/quadrupole time of flight (UHPLC/Q-TOF) method for screening crude glycerin for PEs. An exact mass database, developed in-house, of previously identified PEs from Jatropha curcas as well as putative compounds was used to identify possible contaminants.

  6. The Uranium from Seawater Program at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: Overview of Marine Testing, Adsorbent Characterization, Adsorbent Durability, Adsorbent Toxicity, and Deployment Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Janke, Chris J.; Park, Jiyeon; Jeters, Robert T.; Bonheyo, George T.; Pan, Horng-Bin; Wai, Chien; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Bianucci, Laura; Wood, Jordana R.; Warner, Marvin G.; Peterson, Sonja; Abrecht, David G.; Mayes, Richard T.; Tsouris, Costas; Oyola, Yatsandra; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Schlafer, Nicholas J.; Addleman, R. Shane; Chouyyok, Wilaiwan; Das, Sadananda; Kim, Jungseung; Buesseler, Ken; Breier, Crystal; D’Alessandro, Evan

    2016-02-07

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) located along the coast of Washington State is evaluating the performance of uranium adsorption materials being developed for seawater extraction under realistic marine conditions with natural seawater. Two types of exposure systems were employed in this program: flow-through columns for testing of fixed beds of individual fibers and pellets and a recirculating water flume for testing of braided adsorbent material. Testing consists of measurements of the adsorption of uranium and other elements from seawater as a function of time, typically 42 to 56 day exposures, to determine the adsorbent capacity and adsorption rate (kinetics). Analysis of uranium and other trace elements collected by the adsorbents was conducted following strong acid digestion of the adsorbent with 50% aqua regia using either Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) or Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The ORNL 38H adsorbent had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.30 ± 0.68 g U/ kg adsorbent (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation adsorption capacity of 4.89 ± 0.83 g U/kg of adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half-saturation time of 28 ± 10 days. The AF1 adsorbent material had a 56 day adsorption capacity of 3.9 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu), a saturation capacity of 5.4 ± 0.2 g U/kg adsorbent material (normalized to a salinity of 35 psu) and a half saturation time of 23 ± 2 days. The ORNL amidoxime-based adsorbent materials are not specific for uranium, but also adsorb other elements from seawater. The major doubly charged cations in seawater (Ca and Mg) account for a majority of the cations adsorbed (61% by mass and 74% by molar percent). For the ORNL AF1 adsorbent material, U is the 4th most abundant element adsorbed by mass and 7th most abundant by molar percentage

  7. Metal adsorbent for alkaline etching aqua solutions of Si wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamada, Masao; Ueki, Yuji; Seko, Noriaki; Takeda, Toshihide; Kawano, Shin-ichi

    2012-08-01

    High performance adsorbent is expected to be synthesized for the removal of Ni and Cu ions from strong alkaline solution used in the surface etching process of Si wafer. Fibrous adsorbent was synthesized by radiation-induce emulsion graft polymerization onto polyethylene nonwoven fabric and subsequent amination. The reaction condition was optimized using 30 L reaction vessel and nonwoven fabric, 0.3 m width and 18 m long. The resulting fibrous adsorbent was evaluated by 48 wt% NaOH and KOH contaminated with Ni and Cu ions, respectively. The concentration levels of Ni and Cu ions was reduced to less than 1 μg/kg (ppb) at the flow rate of 10 h-1 in space velocity. The life of adsorbent was 30 times higher than that of the commercialized resin. This novel adsorbent was commercialized as METOLATE® since the ability of adsorption is remarkably higher than that of commercial resin used practically in Si wafer processing.

  8. Adsorbent and adsorbent bed for materials capture and separation processes

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Wei

    2011-01-25

    A method device and material for performing adsorption wherein a fluid mixture is passed through a channel in a structured adsorbent bed having a solid adsorbent comprised of adsorbent particles having a general diameter less than 100 um, loaded in a porous support matrix defining at least one straight flow channel. The adsorbent bed is configured to allow passage of a fluid through said channel and diffusion of a target material into said adsorbent under a pressure gradient driving force. The targeted molecular species in the fluid mixture diffuses across the porous support retaining layer, contacts the adsorbent, and adsorbs on the adsorbent, while the remaining species in the fluid mixture flows out of the channel.

  9. Rapid determination of trans-resveratrol in vegetable oils using magnetic hydrophilic multi-walled carbon nanotubes as adsorbents followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Li, Peiwu; Zhang, Qi; Yu, Li; Zhang, Liangxiao

    2015-07-01

    In the present work, a rapid and simple procedure was developed and validated for the analysis of trans-resveratrol in vegetable oils based on magnetic hydrophilic multi-walled carbon nanotubes (h-MWCNT-MNPs) combined with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). h-MWCNT-MNPs were simply obtained by wrapping amine-functionalized Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles into previously oxidized hydrophilic multi-walled carbon nanotubes. The major parameters affecting extraction efficiency were investigated, including the type and volume of desorption solvents, extraction and desorption time, washing solution, and sorbent amount. The limit of detection (LOD) and the limit of quantification (LOQ) were calculated as 0.6 and 2.0 μg/kg, respectively. The recoveries of trans-resveratrol in oil samples were in the range of 90.0-110.0% with RSDs of less than 17.5%. The results showed that only peanut oil contained trans-resveratrol, ranging from 8 ± 1 to 103 ± 12 μg/kg. The proposed method is reliable and robust, having an excellent potential for the analysis of trans-resveratrol in edible oils.

  10. Nitep, phase IIb: Assessment of contaminant leachability from the residues of a mass burning incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Sawell, S.E.; Constable, T.W.

    1988-01-01

    The National Incinerator Testing and Evaluation Program was established in 1984 to assess the impact of municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator emissions on the environment. Laboratory testing was begun to determine the chemical and leaching properties of the residues generated from different Canadian MSW generators. This report describes the results of the third study in the series, which examined 3 different types of ash (bottom, boiler/economizer and electrostatic precipitator), collected under 5 different operating conditions, from the Quebec Urban Community mass burning incinerator facility. Samples were collected during each of the 14 performance test runs under 5 different sets of operating conditions. Representative sub-samples of 1.5 kg of each type of ash from 4 'good' and 2 'poor' operating condition runs were acquired for characterization testing. Tests and analyses were conducted for total and fixed solids content, acid neutralization capacity, and organic and inorganic composition and leachability.

  11. Applications of ion chromatography with electrospray mass spectrometric detection to the determination of environmental contaminants in water.

    PubMed

    Roehl, R; Slingsby, R; Avdalovic, N; Jackson, P E

    2002-05-17

    Ion chromatography (IC) is widely used for the compliance monitoring of common inorganic anions in drinking water. However, there has recently been considerable interest in the development of IC methods to meet regulatory requirements for analytes other than common inorganic anions, including disinfection byproduct anions, perchlorate, and haloacetic acids. Many of these new methods require the use of large injection volumes, high capacity columns and analyte specific detection schemes, such as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry or postcolumn reaction with UV-Vis detection, in order to meet current regulatory objectives. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) is a detection technique that is particularly suitable for the analysis of permanently ionized or polar, ionizable compounds. The combination of IC with MS detection is emerging as an important tool for the analysis of ionic compounds in drinking water, as it provides increased specificity and sensitivity compared to conductivity detection. This paper reports on the application of IC-ESI-MS for the confirmation and quantitation of environmentally significant contaminants, i.e. compounds with adverse health effects which are either regulated or being considered for regulation, such as bromate, perchlorate, haloacetic acids, and selenium species, in various water samples.

  12. Multi-residue analysis of 80 environmental contaminants in honeys, honeybees and pollens by one extraction procedure followed by liquid and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometric detection.

    PubMed

    Wiest, Laure; Buleté, Audrey; Giroud, Barbara; Fratta, Cédric; Amic, Sophie; Lambert, Olivier; Pouliquen, Hervé; Arnaudguilhem, Carine

    2011-08-26

    One of the factors that may explain nowadays honeybees' colonies losses is the increasing presence of chemicals in the environment. The aim of this study is to obtain a global view of the presence of environmental contaminants in beehives and, develop a fast, cheap and sensitive tool to analyze environmental contaminants in apiarian matrices. A multi residue analysis was developed to quantify 80 environmental contaminants, pesticides and veterinary drugs, belonging to different chemical classes, in honeys, honeybees and pollens. It consists in a single extraction, based on a modified "QuEChERS method", followed by gas chromatography coupled with Time of Flight mass spectrometry (GC-ToF) and liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The "QuEChERS method" combines salting-out liquid-liquid extraction with acetonitrile and a dispersive-SPE clean up. It was adjusted to honey and especially to honeybee and pollen, by adding a small fraction of hexane in acetonitrile to eliminate lipids that interfere with mass spectrometry analysis. This method, combined with accurate and sensitive detection, allowed quantification and confirmation at levels as low as 10 ng/g, with recoveries between 60 and 120%. Application to more than 100 samples of each matrix was achieved for a global view of pesticide presence in the honeybee environment. Relatively high percentages of honeys, honeybees and pollens were found to be contaminated by pesticides used to combat varroa but also by fungicides like carbendazim and ubiquitous contaminants.

  13. Lagrangian mass-flow investigations of inorganic contaminants in wastewater-impacted streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber, L.B.; Antweiler, R.C.; Flynn, J.L.; Keefe, S.H.; Kolpin, D.W.; Roth, D.A.; Schnoebelen, D.J.; Taylor, H.E.; Verplanck, P.L.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the potential effects of increased reliance on wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents to meet municipal, agricultural, and environmental flow requires an understanding of the complex chemical loading characteristics of the WWTPs and the assimilative capacity of receiving waters. Stream ecosystem effects are linked to proportions of WWTP effluent under low-flow conditions as well as the nature of the effluent chemical mixtures. This study quantifies the loading of 58 inorganic constituents (nutrients to rare earth elements) from WWTP discharges relative to upstream landscape-based sources. Stream assimilation capacity was evaluated by Lagrangian sampling, using flow velocities determined from tracer experiments to track the same parcel of water as it moved downstream. Boulder Creek, Colorado and Fourmile Creek, Iowa, representing two different geologic and hydrologic landscapes, were sampled under low-flow conditions in the summer and spring. One-half of the constituents had greater loads from the WWTP effluents than the upstream drainages, and once introduced into the streams, dilution was the predominant assimilation mechanism. Only ammonium and bismuth had significant decreases in mass load downstream from the WWTPs during all samplings. The link between hydrology and water chemistry inherent in Lagrangian sampling allows quantitative assessment of chemical fate across different landscapes. ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  14. Lagrangian mass-flow investigations of inorganic contaminants in wastewater-impacted streams.

    PubMed

    Barber, Larry B; Antweiler, Ronald C; Flynn, Jennifer L; Keefe, Steffanie H; Kolpin, Dana W; Roth, David A; Schnoebelen, Douglas J; Taylor, Howard E; Verplanck, Philip L

    2011-04-01

    Understanding the potential effects of increased reliance on wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents to meet municipal, agricultural, and environmental flow requires an understanding of the complex chemical loading characteristics of the WWTPs and the assimilative capacity of receiving waters. Stream ecosystem effects are linked to proportions of WWTP effluent under low-flow conditions as well as the nature of the effluent chemical mixtures. This study quantifies the loading of 58 inorganic constituents (nutrients to rare earth elements) from WWTP discharges relative to upstream landscape-based sources. Stream assimilation capacity was evaluated by Lagrangian sampling, using flow velocities determined from tracer experiments to track the same parcel of water as it moved downstream. Boulder Creek, Colorado and Fourmile Creek, Iowa, representing two different geologic and hydrologic landscapes, were sampled under low-flow conditions in the summer and spring. One-half of the constituents had greater loads from the WWTP effluents than the upstream drainages, and once introduced into the streams, dilution was the predominant assimilation mechanism. Only ammonium and bismuth had significant decreases in mass load downstream from the WWTPs during all samplings. The link between hydrology and water chemistry inherent in Lagrangian sampling allows quantitative assessment of chemical fate across different landscapes.

  15. Mass-transfer limitations for nitrate removal in a uranium-contaminated aquifer.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian; Cirpka, Olaf A; Wu, Weimin; Fienen, Michael N; Jardine, Philip M; Mehlhorn, Tonia L; Watson, David B; Criddle, Craig S; Kitanidis, Peter K

    2005-11-01

    A field test on in situ subsurface bioremediation of uranium(VI) is underway at the Y-12 National Security Complex in the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, TN. Nitrate has a high concentration at the site, which prevents U(VI) reduction, and thus must be removed. An acidic-flush strategy for nitrate removal was proposed to create a treatment zone with low levels of accessible nitrate. The subsurface at the site contains highly interconnected fractures surrounded by matrix blocks of low permeability and high porosity and is therefore subject to preferential flow and matrix diffusion. To identify the heterogeneous mass transfer properties, we performed a novel forced-gradient tracer test, which involved the addition of bromide, the displacement of nitrate, and the rebound of nitrate after completion of pumping. The simplest conceptualization consistent with the data is that the pore-space consists of a single mobile domain, as well as a fast and a slowly reacting immobile domain. The slowly reacting immobile domain (shale matrix) constitutes over 80% of the pore volume and acts as a long-term reservoir of nitrate. According to simulations, the nitrate stored in the slowly interacting immobile domain in the fast flow layer, at depths of about 12.2-13.7 m, will be reduced by an order of magnitude over a period of about a year. By contrast, the mobile domain rapidly responds to flushing, and a low average nitrate concentration can be maintained if the nitrate is removed as soon as it enters the mobile domain. A field-scale experiment in which the aquifer was flushed with acidic solution confirmed our understanding of the system. For the ongoing experiments on microbial U(VI) reduction, nitrate concentrations must be low in the mobile domain to ensure U(VI) reducing conditions. We therefore conclude that the nitrate leaching out of the immobile pore space must continuously be removed by in situ denitrification to maintain favorable conditions.

  16. To-date spacecraft applications and demonstration testing results, and future product development for new molecular adsorber technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, Shaun; Hansen, Patricia; Straka, Sharon; Chen, Philip; Triolo, Jack; Bettini, Ron; Carosso, Paolo; Carosso, Nancy

    1997-01-01

    The use of molecular adsorbers, in order to aid in the reduction of the spacecraft contamination levels, is discussed. Molecular adsorbers are characterized by an extremely large surface area, molecularly-porous substructure, and processing charged sites capable of retaining molecular contaminant species. Molecular adsorbers were applied on two Hubble Space Telescope servicing missions, as well as on the tropical rainfall measuring mission. The use of molecular adsorbers carries the potential for low cost, easy fabrication and integration of reliable means for reducing the contamination level around spacecraft.

  17. Inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ally, M.R.; Tavlarides, L.

    1997-10-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers are developing a technology that combines metal chelation extraction technology and synthesis chemistry. They begin with a ceramic substrate such as alumina, titanium oxide or silica gel because they provide high surface area, high mechanical strength, and radiolytic stability. One preparation method involves silylation to hydrophobize the surface, followed by chemisorption of a suitable chelation agent using vapor deposition. Another route attaches newly designed chelating agents through covalent bonding by the use of coupling agents. These approaches provide stable and selective, inorganic chemically active adsorbents (ICAAs) tailored for removal of metals. The technology has the following advantages over ion exchange: (1) higher mechanical strength, (2) higher resistance to radiation fields, (3) higher selectivity for the desired metal ion, (4) no cation exchange, (5) reduced or no interference from accompanying anions, (6) faster kinetics, and (7) easy and selective regeneration. Target waste streams include metal-containing groundwater/process wastewater at ORNL`s Y-12 Plant (multiple metals), Savannah River Site (SRS), Rocky Flats (multiple metals), and Hanford; aqueous mixed wastes at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); and scrubber water generated at SRS and INEL. Focus Areas that will benefit from this research include Mixed Waste, and Subsurface Contaminants.

  18. [Interest and limits of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for urinary diagnosis of radionuclide internal contamination].

    PubMed

    Lecompte, Yannick; Bohand, Sandra; Laroche, Pierre; Cazoulat, Alain

    2013-01-01

    After a review of radiometric reference methods used in radiotoxicology, analytical performance of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) for the workplace urinary diagnosis of internal contamination by radionuclides are evaluated. A literature review (covering the period from 2000 to 2012) is performed to identify the different applications of ICP-MS in radiotoxicology for urine analysis. The limits of detection are compared to the recommendations of the International commission on radiological protection (ICRP 78: "Individual monitoring for internal exposure of workers"). Except one publication describing the determination of strontium-90 (β emitter), all methods using ICP-MS reported in the literature concern actinides (α emitters). For radionuclides with a radioactive period higher than 10(4) years, limits of detection are most often in compliance with ICRP publication 78 and frequently lower than radiometric methods. ICP-MS allows the specific determination of plutonium-239 + 240 isotopes which cannot be discriminated by α spectrometry. High resolution ICP-MS can also measure uranium isotopic ratios in urine for total uranium concentrations lower than 20 ng/L. The interest of ICP-MS in radiotoxicology concerns essentially the urinary measurement of long radioactive period actinides, particularly for uranium isotope ratio determination and 239 and 240 plutonium isotopes discrimination. Radiometric methods remain the most efficient for the majority of other radionuclides.

  19. ZVI-Clay remediation of a chlorinated solvent source zone, Skuldelev, Denmark: 1. Site description and contaminant source mass reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjordbøge, Annika S.; Riis, Charlotte; Christensen, Anders G.; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Field investigations on the effects of ZVI-Clay soil mixing were conducted at a small DNAPL source zone with PCE as the parent compound. In a one-year monitoring program, soil samples were collected at three horizontal sampling planes (2.5, 5.0 and 7.5 m bgs.). PCE was found to have a pseudo first-order degradation half-life of 47 days resulting in more than 99% depletion of the source mass after one year. The main degradation product was ethene, while only low concentrations of the primarily biotic sequential degradation products (cDCE, VC) were detected. The soil mixing resulted in more homogeneous vertical conditions, while the horizontal homogenization was very limited. Iron was delivered in the full targeted depth with an average iron enrichment of 3.1%, and an average decline in the oxidation-reduction potential of more than 500 mV. Due to the applied top-down addition of ZVI, the iron content decreased from 4.6% to 2.1% on average over a depth of 5 m; hence, there is a potential for optimization of the delivery method. Most in situ technologies are limited by subsurface heterogeneities, whereby the successful dispersion of geological units and contaminants holds great promise for remediation of DNAPL source zones with ZVI-Clay soil mixing.

  20. Rapid characterisation of Klebsiella oxytoca isolates from contaminated liquid hand soap using mass spectrometry, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dieckmann, Ralf; Hammerl, Jens Andre; Hahmann, Hartmut; Wicke, Amal; Kleta, Sylvia; Dabrowski, Piotr Wojciech; Nitsche, Andreas; Stämmler, Maren; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Lasch, Peter

    2016-06-23

    Microbiological monitoring of consumer products and the efficiency of early warning systems and outbreak investigations depend on the rapid identification and strain characterisation of pathogens posing risks to the health and safety of consumers. This study evaluates the potential of three rapid analytical techniques for identification and subtyping of bacterial isolates obtained from a liquid hand soap product, which has been recalled and reported through the EU RAPEX system due to its severe bacterial contamination. Ten isolates recovered from two bottles of the product were identified as Klebsiella oxytoca and subtyped using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI TOF MS), near-infrared Fourier transform (NIR FT) Raman spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Comparison of the classification results obtained by these phenotype-based techniques with outcomes of the DNA-based methods pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multi-locus sequence typing (MLST) and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis of whole-genome sequencing (WGS) data revealed a high level of concordance. In conclusion, a set of analytical techniques might be useful for rapid, reliable and cost-effective microbial typing to ensure safe consumer products and allow source tracking.

  1. Differentiation of the volatile profile of microbiologically contaminated canned tomatoes by dynamic headspace extraction followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, F; Careri, M; Mangia, A; Mattarozzi, M; Musci, M; Concina, I; Falasconi, M; Gobbi, E; Pardo, M; Sberveglieri, G

    2009-01-15

    The aromatic profile of microbiologically contaminated canned tomatoes was analyzed by the dynamic headspace extraction technique coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Canned tomatoes contaminated with Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus carbonarius were analyzed after 2 and 7 days. About 100 volatiles were detected, among which alcohols, aldehydes and ketones were the most abundant compounds. Gas chromatographic peak areas were used for statistical purposes. First, principal component analysis was carried out in order to visualize data trends and clusters. Then, linear discriminant analysis was performed in order to detect the set of volatile compounds ables to differentiate groups of analyzed samples. Five volatile compounds, i.e. ethanol, beta-myrcene, o-methyl styrene, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-ol and 1-octanol, were found to be able to better discriminate between uncontaminated and contaminated samples. Prediction ability of the calculated model was estimated to be 100% by the "leave-one-out" cross-validation. An electronic nose device was then used to analyze the same contaminated and not contaminated canned tomato samples. Preliminary results were compared with those obtained by dynamic headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, showing a good agreement.

  2. Multivariate Calibration Approach for Quantitative Determination of Cell-Line Cross Contamination by Intact Cell Mass Spectrometry and Artificial Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Prokeš, Lubomír; Amato, Filippo; Pivetta, Tiziana; Hampl, Aleš; Havel, Josef; Vaňhara, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Cross-contamination of eukaryotic cell lines used in biomedical research represents a highly relevant problem. Analysis of repetitive DNA sequences, such as Short Tandem Repeats (STR), or Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR), is a widely accepted, simple, and commercially available technique to authenticate cell lines. However, it provides only qualitative information that depends on the extent of reference databases for interpretation. In this work, we developed and validated a rapid and routinely applicable method for evaluation of cell culture cross-contamination levels based on mass spectrometric fingerprints of intact mammalian cells coupled with artificial neural networks (ANNs). We used human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) contaminated by either mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) or mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) as a model. We determined the contamination level using a mass spectra database of known calibration mixtures that served as training input for an ANN. The ANN was then capable of correct quantification of the level of contamination of hESCs by mESCs or MEFs. We demonstrate that MS analysis, when linked to proper mathematical instruments, is a tangible tool for unraveling and quantifying heterogeneity in cell cultures. The analysis is applicable in routine scenarios for cell authentication and/or cell phenotyping in general. PMID:26821236

  3. Multivariate Calibration Approach for Quantitative Determination of Cell-Line Cross Contamination by Intact Cell Mass Spectrometry and Artificial Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Valletta, Elisa; Kučera, Lukáš; Prokeš, Lubomír; Amato, Filippo; Pivetta, Tiziana; Hampl, Aleš; Havel, Josef; Vaňhara, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Cross-contamination of eukaryotic cell lines used in biomedical research represents a highly relevant problem. Analysis of repetitive DNA sequences, such as Short Tandem Repeats (STR), or Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR), is a widely accepted, simple, and commercially available technique to authenticate cell lines. However, it provides only qualitative information that depends on the extent of reference databases for interpretation. In this work, we developed and validated a rapid and routinely applicable method for evaluation of cell culture cross-contamination levels based on mass spectrometric fingerprints of intact mammalian cells coupled with artificial neural networks (ANNs). We used human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) contaminated by either mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) or mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) as a model. We determined the contamination level using a mass spectra database of known calibration mixtures that served as training input for an ANN. The ANN was then capable of correct quantification of the level of contamination of hESCs by mESCs or MEFs. We demonstrate that MS analysis, when linked to proper mathematical instruments, is a tangible tool for unraveling and quantifying heterogeneity in cell cultures. The analysis is applicable in routine scenarios for cell authentication and/or cell phenotyping in general.

  4. Determination of Adsorption Capacity and Kinetics of Amidoxime-Based Uranium Adsorbent Braided Material in Unfiltered Seawater Using a Flume Exposure System

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Park, Jiyeon; Bonheyo, George T.; Jeters, Robert T.; Schlafer, Nicholas J.; Wood, Jordana R.

    2015-08-31

    PNNL has developed a recirculating flume system for exposing braided adsorbent material to natural seawater under realistic temperature and flow-rate exposure conditions. The flumes are constructed of transparent acrylic material they allow external light to pass into the flumes and permit photosynthetic growth of naturally present marine organisms (biofouling). Because the system consists of two flumes, replicate experiments can be conducted in which one of the flumes can be manipulated relative to the other. For example, one flume can be darkened to eliminate light exposure by placing a black tarp over the flume such that dark/light experiments can be conducted. Alternatively, two different braided adsorbents can be exposed simultaneously with no potential cross contamination issues. This report describes the first use of the PNNL flume system to study the impact of biofouling on adsorbent capacity. Experiments were conducted with the ORNL AI8 braided adsorbent material in light exposed and darkened flumes for a 42 day exposure experiment. The major objective of this effort is to develop a system for the exposure of braided adsorbent material to unfiltered seawater and to demonstrate the system by evaluating the performance of adsorption material when it is exposed to natural marine biofouling as it would be when the technology is used in the marine environment. Exposures of amidoxime-based polymeric braid adsorbents prepared by Oak Ridge Natural Laboratory (ORNL) were exposed to ambient seawater at 20°C in a flume system. Adsorption kinetics and adsorption capacity were assessed using time series determinations of uranium adsorption and one-site ligand saturation modeling. Biofouling in sunlight surface seawater has the potential to significantly add substantial biogenic mass to adsorption material when it is exposed for periods greater than 21 days. The observed biomass increase in the light flume was approximately 80 % of the adsorbent mass after 42 days. The

  5. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes as solid-phase extraction adsorbents for determination of atrazine and its principal metabolites in water and soil samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Min, Guang; Wang, Shuo; Zhu, Huaping; Fang, Guozhen; Zhang, Yan

    2008-06-15

    A novel, simple, cost-effective, and sensitive method was developed for the determination of atrazine and its principal metabolites namely deisopropyl-atrazine (DIA) and deethyl-atrazine (DEA) in water and soil samples using multi-walled carbon nanotubes as solid-phase extraction (SPE) adsorbents coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Several condition parameters, such as sample loading flow-rate, eluent and elution volume, extractant and ratio of extraction solvent to sample, were optimized to achieve good sensitivity and precision for the extraction and elution of analytes. A methanol/water solution (50%, v/v) was used to extract atrazine, DIA and DEA from soil. After the extracts went through SPE cartridges (packed with multi-walled carbon nanotubes) at a flow-rate of 4 mL min(-1), the analytes were eluted by 4 mL ethyl acetate at the rate of 1 mL min(-1) under a vacuum pump. The limit of detection (S/N=3) of the proposed method was 0.02 microg kg(-1) for atrazine in water and 0.3 microg kg(-1) in soil; 0.04 microg kg(-1) for DIA in water and 1.0 microg kg(-1) in soil; 0.05 microg kg(-1) for DEA in water and 0.8 microg kg(-1) in soil. Mean recoveries were in the range of 72.27-109.68%, and the reproducibility was accepted (RSD <13%) under the optimum conditions. This developed method was applied to determine the analytes in real environmental samples, and the concentrations of atrazine were 0.77-10.83 microg kg(-1), while DEA and DIA were not detected.

  6. Lotus Dust Mitigation Coating and Molecular Adsorber Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Connor, Kenneth M.; Abraham, Nithin S.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has developed two unique coating formulations that will keep surfaces clean and sanitary and contain contaminants.The Lotus Dust Mitigation Coating, modeled after the self-cleaning, water-repellant lotus leaf, disallows buildup of dust, dirt, water, and more on surfaces. This coating, has been successfully tested on painted, aluminum, glass, silica, and some composite surfaces, could aid in keeping medical assets clean.The Molecular Adsorber Coating is a zeolite-based, sprayable molecular adsorber coating, designed to prevent outgassing in materials in vacuums. The coating works well to adsorb volatiles and contaminates in manufacturing and processing, such as in pharmaceutical production. The addition of a biocide would also aid in controlling bacteria levels.

  7. The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC-2) molecular adsorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barengoltz, Jack; Moore, Sonya; Soules, David; Voecks, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    A device has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, for the adsorption of contaminants inside a space instrument during flight. The molecular adsorber was developed for use on the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, and it has been shown to perform at its design specifications in the WFPC-2. The basic principle of the molecular adsorber is a zeolite-coated ceramic honeycomb. The arrangement is efficient for adsorption and also provides the needed rigidity to retain the special zeolite coating during the launch vibrational environment. The adsorber, on other forms, is expected to be useful for all flight instruments sensitive to internal sources of contamination. Typically, some internal contamination is unavoidable. A common design solution is to increase the venting to the exterior. However, for truly sensitive instruments, the external contamination environment is more severe. The molecular adsorber acts as a one-way vent to solve this problem. Continued development is planned for this device.

  8. Different low-molecular-mass organic acids specifically control leaching of arsenic and lead from contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Ash, Christopher; Tejnecký, Václav; Borůvka, Luboš; Drábek, Ondřej

    2016-04-01

    Low-molecular-mass organic acids (LMMOA) are of key importance for mobilisation and fate of metals in soil, by functioning as ligands that increase the amount of dissolved metal in solution or by dissociation of metal binding minerals. Column leaching experiments were performed on soil polluted with As and Pb, in order to determine the specificity of LMMOA related release for individual elements, at varying organic acid concentrations. Acetic, citric and oxalic acids were applied in 12h leaching experiments over a concentration range (0.5-25 mM) to soil samples that represent organic and mineral horizons. The leaching of As followed the order: oxalic>citric>acetic acid in both soils. Arsenic leaching was attributed primarily to ligand-enhanced dissolution of mineral oxides followed by As released into solution, as shown by significant correlation between oxalic and citric acids and content of Al and Fe in leaching solutions. Results suggest that subsurface mineral soil layers are more vulnerable to As toxicity. Leaching of Pb from both soils followed the order: citric>oxalic>acetic acid. Mineral soil samples were shown to be more susceptible to leaching of Pb than samples characterised by a high content of organic matter. The leaching efficiency of citric acid was attributed to formation of stable complexes with Pb ions, which other acids are not capable of. Results obtained in the study are evidence that the extent of As and Pb leaching in contaminated surface and subsurface soil depends significantly on the types of carboxylic acid involved. The implications of the type of acid and the specific element that can be mobilised become increasingly significant where LMMOA concentrations are highest, such as in rhizosphere soil.

  9. Different low-molecular-mass organic acids specifically control leaching of arsenic and lead from contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, Christopher; Tejnecký, Václav; Borůvka, Luboš; Drábek, Ondřej

    2016-04-01

    Low-molecular-mass organic acids (LMMOA) are of key importance for mobilisation and fate of metals in soil, by functioning as ligands that increase the amount of dissolved metal in solution or by dissociation of metal binding minerals. Column leaching experiments were performed on soil polluted with As and Pb, in order to determine the specificity of LMMOA related release for individual elements, at varying organic acid concentrations. Acetic, citric and oxalic acids were applied in 12 h leaching experiments over a concentration range (0.5-25 mM) to soil samples that represent organic and mineral horizons. The leaching of As followed the order: oxalic > citric > acetic acid in both soils. Arsenic leaching was attributed primarily to ligand-enhanced dissolution of mineral oxides followed by As released into solution, as shown by significant correlation between oxalic and citric acids and content of Al and Fe in leaching solutions. Results suggest that subsurface mineral soil layers are more vulnerable to As toxicity. Leaching of Pb from both soils followed the order: citric > oxalic > acetic acid. Mineral soil samples were shown to be more susceptible to leaching of Pb than samples characterised by a high content of organic matter. The leaching efficiency of citric acid was attributed to formation of stable complexes with Pb ions, which other acids are not capable of. Results obtained in the study are evidence that the extent of As and Pb leaching in contaminated surface and subsurface soil depends significantly on the types of carboxylic acid involved. The implications of the type of acid and the specific element that can be mobilised become increasingly significant where LMMOA concentrations are highest, such as in rhizosphere soil.

  10. Evaluation of techniques for removal of spacecraft contaminants from activated carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnulty, K. J.; Goldsmith, R. L.; Goldsmith, G. A.; Hoover, P. R.; Nwankwo, J. N.; Turk, A.

    1977-01-01

    Alternative techniques for the regeneration of carbon contaminated with various spacecraft contaminants were evaluated. Four different modes of regeneration were evaluated: (1) thermal desorption via vacuum, (2) thermal desorption via nitrogen purge, (3) in-situ catalytic oxidation of adsorbed contaminants, and (4) in-situ non-catalytic oxidation of adsorbed contaminants.

  11. Nontarget analysis of polar contaminants in freshwater sediments influenced by pharmaceutical industry using ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Terzic, Senka; Ahel, Marijan

    2011-02-01

    A comprehensive analytical procedure for a reliable identification of nontarget polar contaminants in aquatic sediments was developed, based on the application of ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled to hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (QTOFMS). The procedure was applied for the analysis of freshwater sediment that was highly impacted by wastewater discharges from the pharmaceutical industry. A number of different contaminants were successfully identified owing to the high mass accuracy of the QTOFMS system, used in combination with high chromatographic resolution of UHPLC. The major compounds, identified in investigated sediment, included a series of polypropylene glycols (n=3-16), alkylbenzene sulfonate and benzalkonium surfactants as well as a number of various pharmaceuticals (chlorthalidone, warfarin, terbinafine, torsemide, zolpidem and macrolide antibiotics). The particular advantage of the applied technique is its capability to detect less known pharmaceutical intermediates and/or transformation products, which have not been previously reported in freshwater sediments.

  12. An experimental design approach for optimizing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon analysis in contaminated soil by pyrolyser-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Buco, S; Moragues, M; Sergent, M; Doumenq, P; Mille, G

    2007-06-01

    Pyrolyser-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to analyze polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in contaminated soil without preliminary extraction. Experimental research methodology was used to obtain optimal performance of the system. After determination of the main factors (desorption time, Curie point temperature, carrier gas flow), modeling was done using a Box-Behnken matrix. Study of the response surface led to factor values that optimize the experimental response and achieve better chromatographic results.

  13. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  14. Mass Casualty Decontamination in a Chemical or Radiological/Nuclear Incident with External Contamination: Guiding Principles and Research Needs

    PubMed Central

    Cibulsky, Susan M; Sokolowski, Danny; Lafontaine, Marc; Gagnon, Christine; Blain, Peter G.; Russell, David; Kreppel, Helmut; Biederbick, Walter; Shimazu, Takeshi; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Saito, Tomoya; Jourdain, Jean- René; Paquet, Francois; Li, Chunsheng; Akashi, Makoto; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Prosser, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    Hazardous chemical, radiological, and nuclear materials threaten public health in scenarios of accidental or intentional release which can lead to external contamination of people.  Without intervention, the contamination could cause severe adverse health effects, through systemic absorption by the contaminated casualties as well as spread of contamination to other people, medical equipment, and facilities.  Timely decontamination can prevent or interrupt absorption into the body and minimize opportunities for spread of the contamination, thereby mitigating the health impact of the incident.  Although the specific physicochemical characteristics of the hazardous material(s) will determine the nature of an incident and its risks, some decontamination and medical challenges and recommended response strategies are common among chemical and radioactive material incidents.  Furthermore, the identity of the hazardous material released may not be known early in an incident.  Therefore, it may be beneficial to compare the evidence and harmonize approaches between chemical and radioactive contamination incidents.  Experts from the Global Health Security Initiative’s Chemical and Radiological/Nuclear Working Groups present here a succinct summary of guiding principles for planning and response based on current best practices, as well as research needs, to address the challenges of managing contaminated casualties in a chemical or radiological/nuclear incident. PMID:26635995

  15. It’s what’s inside that counts: Egg contaminant concentrations are influenced by estimates of egg density, egg volume, and fresh egg mass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herzog, Mark; Ackerman, Josh; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Hartman, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    In egg contaminant studies, it is necessary to calculate egg contaminant concentrations on a fresh wet weight basis and this requires accurate estimates of egg density and egg volume. We show that the inclusion or exclusion of the eggshell can influence egg contaminant concentrations, and we provide estimates of egg density (both with and without the eggshell) and egg-shape coefficients (used to estimate egg volume from egg morphometrics) for American avocet (Recurvirostra americana), black-necked stilt (Himantopus mexicanus), and Forster’s tern (Sterna forsteri). Egg densities (g/cm3) estimated for whole eggs (1.056 ± 0.003) were higher than egg densities estimated for egg contents (1.024 ± 0.001), and were 1.059 ± 0.001 and 1.025 ± 0.001 for avocets, 1.056 ± 0.001 and 1.023 ± 0.001 for stilts, and 1.053 ± 0.002 and 1.025 ± 0.002 for terns. The egg-shape coefficients for egg volume (K v ) and egg mass (K w ) also differed depending on whether the eggshell was included (K v = 0.491 ± 0.001; K w = 0.518 ± 0.001) or excluded (K v = 0.493 ± 0.001; K w = 0.505 ± 0.001), and varied among species. Although egg contaminant concentrations are rarely meant to include the eggshell, we show that the typical inclusion of the eggshell in egg density and egg volume estimates results in egg contaminant concentrations being underestimated by 6–13 %. Our results demonstrate that the inclusion of the eggshell significantly influences estimates of egg density, egg volume, and fresh egg mass, which leads to egg contaminant concentrations that are biased low. We suggest that egg contaminant concentrations be calculated on a fresh wet weight basis using only internal egg-content densities, volumes, and masses appropriate for the species. For the three waterbirds in our study, these corrected coefficients are 1.024 ± 0.001 for egg density, 0.493 ± 0.001 for K v , and 0.505 ± 0.001 for K w .

  16. It's what's inside that counts: egg contaminant concentrations are influenced by estimates of egg density, egg volume, and fresh egg mass.

    PubMed

    Herzog, Mark P; Ackerman, Joshua T; Eagles-Smith, Collin A; Hartman, C Alex

    2016-05-01

    In egg contaminant studies, it is necessary to calculate egg contaminant concentrations on a fresh wet weight basis and this requires accurate estimates of egg density and egg volume. We show that the inclusion or exclusion of the eggshell can influence egg contaminant concentrations, and we provide estimates of egg density (both with and without the eggshell) and egg-shape coefficients (used to estimate egg volume from egg morphometrics) for American avocet (Recurvirostra americana), black-necked stilt (Himantopus mexicanus), and Forster's tern (Sterna forsteri). Egg densities (g/cm(3)) estimated for whole eggs (1.056 ± 0.003) were higher than egg densities estimated for egg contents (1.024 ± 0.001), and were 1.059 ± 0.001 and 1.025 ± 0.001 for avocets, 1.056 ± 0.001 and 1.023 ± 0.001 for stilts, and 1.053 ± 0.002 and 1.025 ± 0.002 for terns. The egg-shape coefficients for egg volume (K v ) and egg mass (K w ) also differed depending on whether the eggshell was included (K v  = 0.491 ± 0.001; K w  = 0.518 ± 0.001) or excluded (K v  = 0.493 ± 0.001; K w  = 0.505 ± 0.001), and varied among species. Although egg contaminant concentrations are rarely meant to include the eggshell, we show that the typical inclusion of the eggshell in egg density and egg volume estimates results in egg contaminant concentrations being underestimated by 6-13 %. Our results demonstrate that the inclusion of the eggshell significantly influences estimates of egg density, egg volume, and fresh egg mass, which leads to egg contaminant concentrations that are biased low. We suggest that egg contaminant concentrations be calculated on a fresh wet weight basis using only internal egg-content densities, volumes, and masses appropriate for the species. For the three waterbirds in our study, these corrected coefficients are 1.024 ± 0.001 for egg density, 0.493 ± 0.001 for K v , and 0.505 ± 0.001 for K w .

  17. Analysis of Adsorbed Natural Gas Tank Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knight, Ernest; Schultz, Conrad; Rash, Tyler; Dohnke, Elmar; Stalla, David; Gillespie, Andrew; Sweany, Mark; Seydel, Florian; Pfeifer, Peter

    With gasoline being an ever decreasing finite resource and with the desire to reduce humanity's carbon footprint, there has been an increasing focus on innovation of alternative fuel sources. Natural gas burns cleaner, is more abundant, and conforms to modern engines. However, storing compressed natural gas (CNG) requires large, heavy gas cylinders, which limits space and fuel efficiency. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) technology allows for much greater fuel storage capacity and the ability to store the gas at a much lower pressure. Thus, ANG tanks are much more flexible in terms of their size, shape, and weight. Our ANG tank employs monolithic nanoporous activated carbon as its adsorbent material. Several different configurations of this Flat Panel Tank Assembly (FPTA) along with a Fuel Extraction System (FES) were examined to compare with the mass flow rate demands of an engine.

  18. NASA Applications of Molecular Adsorber Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.

    2015-01-01

    The Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC) is a new, innovative technology that was developed to reduce the risk of molecular contamination on spaceflight applications. Outgassing from materials, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, silicones, epoxies, and potting compounds, pose a significant threat to the spacecraft and the lifetime of missions. As a coating made of highly porous inorganic materials, MAC offers impressive adsorptive capabilities that help capture and trap contaminants. Past research efforts have demonstrated the coating's promising adhesion performance, optical properties, acoustic durability, and thermal stability. These results advocate its use near or on surfaces that are targeted by outgassed materials, such as internal optics, electronics, detectors, baffles, sensitive instruments, thermal control coatings, and vacuum chamber test environments. The MAC technology has significantly progressed in development over the recent years. This presentation summarizes the many NASA spaceflight applications of MAC and how the coatings technology has been integrated as a mitigation tool for outgassed contaminants. For example, this sprayable paint technology has been beneficial for use in various vacuum chambers for contamination control and hardware bake-outs. The coating has also been used in small instrument cavities within spaceflight instrument for NASA missions.

  19. Contaminants of emerging concern: Mass balance and comparison of wastewater effluent and upstream sources in a mixed-use watershed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the sources, transport, and spatiotemporal variability of contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) is important for understanding risks and developing monitoring and mitigation strategies. This study compared CEC loading and transport from a wastewater treatment plant and upstream areas...

  20. MULTI-LAYER SAMPLING IN CONVENTIONAL MONITORING WELLS FOR IMPROVED ESTIMATION OF VERTICAL CONTAMINANT DISTRIBUTIONS AND MASS

    EPA Science Inventory

    "Traditional" approaches to sampling groundwater and interpreting monitoring well data often provide misleading pictures of plume shape and location in the subsurface and the true extent of contamination. Groundwater samples acquired using pumps and bailers in conventional monito...

  1. COMPARISON OF IMMUNOASSAY AND GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/MASS SPECTROMETRY FOR MEASUREMENT OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are frequently encountered in the environment and may pose health concerns due to their carcinogenicity. A commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), was evaluated as a screening method for monitoring PAHs at contaminated site...

  2. MONITORING OF WATERWAYS FOR EMERGING CONTAMINANTS USING INTEGRATIVE SAMPLING COUPLED WITH LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY-ELECTROSPRAY/MASS SPECTROMETRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessing the potential impact to the aquatic environment from emerging contaminants, entails monitoring a complex mixture (pharmaceuticals, polar pesticides, industrial by- products and degradation products) in natural waters. The presence of these chemicals, often at ultra-trac...

  3. Method of removing contaminant from a feedstock stream

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, E. O.; Johnson, M. M.

    1981-05-26

    Contaminants such as petroleum sulfonates, anticorrosion amines, and silicone oils are removed from a contaminated feedstock stream by contacting said feedstock stream with an adsorbent comprising bauxite. In a further aspect, a thus purified petroleum feedstock stream is hydrodesulfurized.

  4. Method of removing contaminant from a feedstock stream

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, E.O.; Johnson, M.M.

    1982-08-10

    Contaminants such as petroleum sulfonates, anticorrosion amines, and silicone oils are removed from a contaminated feedstock stream by contacting said feedstock stream with an adsorbent comprising bauxite. In a further aspect, a thus purified petroleum feedstock stream is hydrodesulfurized.

  5. Adsorbed Water Illustration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander detected small and variable amounts of water in the Martian soil.

    In this schematic illustration, water molecules are represented in red and white; soil minerals are represented in green and blue. The water, neither liquid, vapor, nor solid, adheres in very thin films of molecules to the surfaces of soil minerals. The left half illustrates an interpretation of less water being adsorbed onto the soil-particle surface during a period when the tilt, or obliquity, of Mars' rotation axis is small, as it is in the present. The right half illustrates a thicker film of water during a time when the obliquity is greater, as it is during cycles on time scales of hundreds of thousands of years. As the humidity of the atmosphere increases, more water accumulates on mineral surfaces. Thicker films behave increasingly like liquid water.

    The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. Multi-residue analysis of legacy POPs and emerging organic contaminants in Singapore's coastal waters using gas chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Bayen, Stéphane; Kelly, Barry C

    2015-08-01

    A gas chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) based method was developed for determination of 86 hydrophobic organic compounds in seawater. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was employed for sequestration of target analytes in the dissolved phase. Ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE) and florisil chromatography were utilized for determination of concentrations in suspended sediments (particulate phase). The target compounds included multi-class hydrophobic contaminants with a wide range of physical-chemical properties. This list includes several polycyclic and nitro-aromatic musks, brominated and chlorinated flame retardants, methyl triclosan, chlorobenzenes, organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Spiked MilliQ water and seawater samples were used to evaluate the method performance. Analyte recoveries were generally good, with the exception of some of the more volatile target analytes (chlorobenzenes and bromobenzenes). The method is very sensitive, with method detection limits typically in the low parts per quadrillion (ppq) range. Analysis of 51 field-collected seawater samples (dissolved and particulate-bound phases) from four distinct coastal sites around Singapore showed trace detection of several polychlorinated biphenyl congeners and other legacy POPs, as well as several current-use emerging organic contaminants (EOCs). Polycyclic and nitro-aromatic musks, bromobenzenes, dechlorane plus isomers (syn-DP, anti-DP) and methyl triclosan were frequently detected at appreciable levels (2-20,000pgL(-1)). The observed concentrations of the monitored contaminants in Singapore's marine environment were generally comparable to previously reported levels in other coastal marine systems. To our knowledge, these are the first measurements of these emerging contaminants of concern in Singapore or Southeast Asia. The developed method may prove beneficial for future environmental monitoring of hydrophobic organic contaminants

  7. Mercury adsorption properties of sulfur-impregnated adsorbents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hsi, N.-C.; Rood, M.J.; Rostam-Abadi, M.; Chen, S.; Chang, R.

    2002-01-01

    Carbonaceous and noncarbonaceous adsorbents were impregnated with elemental sulfur to evaluate the chemical and physical properties of the adsorbents and their equilibrium mercury adsorption capacities. Simulated coal combustion flue gas conditions were used to determine the equilibrium adsorption capacities for Hg0 and HgCl2 gases to better understand how to remove mercury from gas streams generated by coal-fired utility power plants. Sulfur was deposited onto the adsorbents by monolayer surface deposition or volume pore filling. Sulfur impregnation increased the total sulfur content and decreased the total and micropore surface areas and pore volumes for all of the adsorbents tested. Adsorbents with sufficient amounts of active adsorption sites and sufficient microporous structure had mercury adsorption capacities up to 4,509 ??g Hg/g adsorbent. Elemental sulfur, organic sulfur, and sulfate were formed on the adsorbents during sulfur impregnation. Correlations were established with R2>0.92 between the equilibrium Hg0/HgCl2 adsorption capacities and the mass concentrations of elemental and organic sulfur. This result indicates that elemental and organic sulfur are important active adsorption sites for Hg0 and HgCl2.

  8. Dietary bioavailability of Cu adsorbed to colloidal hydrous ferric oxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cain, Daniel J.; Croteau, Marie-Noële; Fuller, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    The dietary bioavailability of copper (Cu) adsorbed to synthetic colloidal hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) was evaluated from the assimilation of 65Cu by two benthic grazers, a gastropod and a larval mayfly. HFO was synthesized, labeled with 65Cu to achieve a Cu/Fe ratio comparable to that determined in naturally formed HFO, and then aged. The labeled colloids were mixed with a food source (the diatom Nitzschia palea) to yield dietary 65Cu concentrations ranging from 211 to 2204 nmol/g (dry weight). Animals were pulse fed the contaminated diet and assimilation of 65Cu from HFO was determined following 1–3 days of depuration. Mass transfer of 65Cu from HFO to the diatom was less than 1%, indicating that HFO was the source of 65Cu to the grazers. Estimates of assimilation efficiency indicated that the majority of Cu ingested as HFO was assimilated (values >70%), implying that colloidal HFO potentially represents a source of dietary Cu to benthic grazers, especially where there is active formation and infiltration of these particles into benthic substrates.

  9. Use of Clinical Decision Guidance as a New Public Health Tool for the Medical Management of Internal Contamination in Radiological Mass Casualty Scenarios.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Albert L

    2016-09-01

    This review is a discussion of special issues associated with the medical and public health management of persons at risk of internal contamination from radionuclides, following various radiological mass-casualty scenarios, as well as definition, discussion and use of the Clinical Decision Guidance (CDG) in such scenarios. Specific medical countermeasures are available for reducing the internal radiation dose and the subsequent stochastic and deterministic risks to persons internally contaminated with radionuclides from nuclear power plant, fuel processing and nuclear weapon accidents/incidents. There is a public health need for rapidly identifying and quantifying the 'source term' of such radiation exposures and assessment of the associated committed doses, so that appropriate medical countermeasure(s) can be given as soon as possible. The CDG, which was initially defined in NCRP-161, was specifically developed to be a new public health tool for facilitating the integration of local community healthcare professionals into the general medical, mass casualty, triage and treatment response of internally contaminated populations.

  10. Determination of emerging contaminants in wastewater utilizing comprehensive two-dimensional gas-chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Prebihalo, Sarah; Brockman, Adrienne; Cochran, Jack; Dorman, Frank L

    2015-11-06

    An analytical method for identification of emerging contaminants of concern, such as pesticides and organohalogens has been developed and utilized for true discovery-based analysis. In order to achieve the level of sensitivity and selectivity necessary for detecting compounds in complex samples, comprehensive gas chromatography coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-TOFMS) was utilized to analyze wastewater samples obtained from the Pennsylvania State University wastewater treatment facility (WWTF). Determination of emerging contaminants through a process of combining samples which represent "normal background" and comparing this to new samples was developed. Results show the presence of halogenated benzotriazoles in wastewater samples as well as soil samples from Pennsylvania State University agricultural fields. The trace levels of chlorinated benzotriazoles observed in the monitoring wells present on the property indicate likely environmental degradation of the chlorinated benzotriazoles. Preliminary investigation of environmental fate of the substituted benzotriazoles indicates their likely degradation into phenol; an Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) priority pollutant.

  11. Determination of volatile organic contaminants in bulk oils (edible, injectable, and other internal medicinal) by purge-and-trap gas chromatography/mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.W.

    1994-05-01

    Purge-and-trap gas chromatography/mass spectrometry is evaluated for the quantitation of part-per-billion levels of volatile organic contaminants in bulk vegetable oils. Results using 2 purge techniques (direct purging of the heated oil and purging after dispersing the oil on an aluminum oxide powder) and 2 quantitative methods (standard curve and deuterium-labeled internal standard addition) are reported. Twenty volatile compounds and 8 vegetable oils were investigated. Recovery data and estimated detection limits for each compound are reported for each purge technique. Generally acceptable recoveries (70-130% for more than 90% of the analyte spikes) and acceptable detection levels (approximately 4-10 ppb) were obtained for all compounds using either the external standard curve of the deuterium-isotope-labeled internal standard. The use of a dispersant (such as alumina) for sample purging resulted in poor recoveries of the highly volatile contaminants. 16 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry to identify contaminants in water: an insight on environmental forensics.

    PubMed

    Masiá, Ana; Campo, Julian; Blasco, Cristina; Picó, Yolanda

    2014-06-06

    Ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QqTOF-MS) acquiring full scan MS data for quantification, and automatic data dependent information product ion spectra (IDA-MS/MS) without any predefinition of the ions by the user was checked for identifying organic contaminants in water samples. The use of a database with more than 2000 compounds achieved high confidence results for a wide number of contaminants based upon retention time, accurate mass, isotopic pattern and MS/MS library searching. More than 20 contaminants, mostly pharmaceuticals, but also mycotoxins and polyphenols were unambiguously identified. Furthermore, the combination of statistical data analysis using principal component analysis (PCA) followed by empirical formula calculation, on-line database searching and MS/MS fragment ion interpretation achieves not only the successful detection of unknown contaminants but also the selection of those relevant to different types of waters. Unknown compounds, such as C₂₀H₃₄O₃, were identified in waste water showing the prospects of this technique. A group of 42 currently used pesticides were selected as target compounds to evaluate the quantitative possibilities. Mean recoveries and percentage relative standard deviation (RSD) were 48-79% (4-20% RSD). The limit of detections ranged from 0.02 to 2 ng L(-1), with a validated limit of quantification of 2 ng L(-1) for water after solid-phase (SPE) isolation and concentration. The quantitative data obtained using UHPLC-QqTOF-MS were compared with those obtained using conventional LC-MS/MS with a triple quadrupole (QqQ).

  13. Determination of selected organic contaminants in soil by pressurized liquid extraction and gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry with in situ derivatization.

    PubMed

    Albero, Beatriz; Sánchez-Brunete, Consuelo; Miguel, Esther; Pérez, Rosa A; Tadeo, José L

    2012-07-27

    The determination of organic contaminants in soil is a real challenge due to the large number of these compounds with quite different physico-chemical properties. In the present work, an analytical method was developed for the simultaneous determination in soil of 40 organic contaminants belonging to different chemical classes: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, polybrominated diphenyl ethers, UV filters, parabens, bisphenols and triclosan. Soil was extracted by pressurized liquid extraction and the extracts, without the need of a clean-up step, were analyzed by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry after in situ derivatization in the gas chromatographic system. In the pressurized liquid extraction step, two extraction cycles were performed with a mixture of ethyl acetate-methanol (90:10, v/v) at 80 °C. Recovery of these contaminants from soil samples spiked at levels ranging from 30 to 120 ng g(-1) was satisfactory for most of the compounds. The developed procedure provided detection method limits from 0.1 to 2.5 ng g(-1). The analysis of soil samples collected in different agricultural fields confirmed the presence of some of the studied contaminants. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were the main contaminants detected, parabens and polychlorinated biphenyls were also found but at relatively low concentration levels, 2-ethylhexyl salicylate was the UV filter that appeared most frequently at levels ranging from 17.2 to 43.4 ng g(-1) and triclosan was found in eight out of fourteen samples, at relatively low concentration levels (0.8-28.6 ng g(-1)).

  14. Subsoil heterogeneities controlling porewater contaminant mass and microbial diversity at a site with a complex pollution history.

    PubMed

    Puigserver, Diana; Carmona, José M; Cortés, Amparo; Viladevall, Manuel; Nieto, José M; Grifoll, Magdalena; Vila, Joaquim; Parker, Beth L

    2013-01-01

    This study seeks to improve our understanding of the conceptual model of pollutant transport and fate in cases of DNAPL contamination at sites with a complex contamination history. The study was carried out in an unconfined aquifer of alluvial fans in the Tarragona Petrochemical Complex (Spain). Two boreholes were drilled and continuous cores were recovered in order to carry out a detailed core description at centimeter scale and a comprehensive sampling of borehole cores. The biogeochemical heterogeneity at these sites is controlled by the conjunction of lithological, hydrochemical and microbiological heterogeneities. Biodegradation processes of contaminant compounds take place not only at the level of the dissolved fraction in the aquifer but also at the level of the fraction retained in the fine, less conductive materials as shown by the biodegradation haloes of parent and metabolite compounds. Sampling the low-conductivity levels also allowed us to identify compounds, e.g. BTEX, that are the remaining traces of the passage of old contaminant plumes whose sources no longer exist. This enabled us to describe past biogeochemical processes and to partially account for the processes occurring today. Transition zones, characterized by numerous textural changes, constitute ecotones whose biostimulation could be effective in promoting the acceleration of the remediation of the multiple pollution at these sites.

  15. Subsoil heterogeneities controlling porewater contaminant mass and microbial diversity at a site with a complex pollution history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puigserver, Diana; Carmona, José M.; Cortés, Amparo; Viladevall, Manuel; Nieto, José M.; Grifoll, Magdalena; Vila, Joaquim; Parker, Beth L.

    2013-01-01

    This study seeks to improve our understanding of the conceptual model of pollutant transport and fate in cases of DNAPL contamination at sites with a complex contamination history. The study was carried out in an unconfined aquifer of alluvial fans in the Tarragona Petrochemical Complex (Spain). Two boreholes were drilled and continuous cores were recovered in order to carry out a detailed core description at centimeter scale and a comprehensive sampling of borehole cores. The biogeochemical heterogeneity at these sites is controlled by the conjunction of lithological, hydrochemical and microbiological heterogeneities. Biodegradation processes of contaminant compounds take place not only at the level of the dissolved fraction in the aquifer but also at the level of the fraction retained in the fine, less conductive materials as shown by the biodegradation haloes of parent and metabolite compounds. Sampling the low-conductivity levels also allowed us to identify compounds, e.g. BTEX, that are the remaining traces of the passage of old contaminant plumes whose sources no longer exist. This enabled us to describe past biogeochemical processes and to partially account for the processes occurring today. Transition zones, characterized by numerous textural changes, constitute ecotones whose biostimulation could be effective in promoting the acceleration of the remediation of the multiple pollution at these sites.

  16. Method for detection of trace metal and metalloid contaminants in coal-generated fuel gas using gas chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rupp, Erik C; Granite, Evan J; Stanko, Dennis C

    2010-07-15

    There exists an increasing need to develop a reliable method to detect trace contaminants in fuel gas derived from coal gasification. While Hg is subject to current and future regulations, As, Se, and P emissions may eventually be regulated. Sorbents are the most promising technology for the removal of contaminants from coal-derived fuel gas, and it will be important to develop a rapid analytical detection method to ensure complete removal and determine the ideal time for sorbent replacement/regeneration in order to reduce costs. This technical note explores the use of a commercial gas chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry system for the detection of four gaseous trace contaminants in a simulated fuel gas. Quantitative, repeatable detection with limits at ppbv to ppmv levels were obtained for arsine (AsH(3)), phosphine (PH(3)), and hydrogen selenide (H(2)Se), while qualitative detection was observed for mercury. Decreased accuracy and response caused by the primary components of fuel gas were observed.

  17. Chemical speciation studies on DU contaminated soils using flow field flow fractionation linked to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (FlFFF-ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Brittain, S R; Cox, A G; Tomos, A D; Paterson, E; Siripinyanond, A; McLeod, C W

    2012-03-01

    Flow field flow fractionation (FlFFF) in combination with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to study the chemical speciation of U and trace metals in depleted uranium (DU) contaminated soils. A chemical extraction procedure using sodium pyrophosphate, followed by isolation of humic and fulvic substances was applied to two dissimilar DU contaminated sample types (a sandy soil and a clay-rich soil), in addition to a control soil. The sodium pyrophosphate fractions of the firing range soils (Eskmeals and Kirkcudbright) were found to contain over 50% of the total U (measured after aqua regia digestion), compared to approximately 10% for the control soil. This implies that the soils from the contaminated sites contained a large proportion of the U within more easily mobile soil fractions. Humic and fulvic acid fractions each gave characteristic peak maxima for analytes of interest (Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb and U), with the fulvic acid fraction eluting at a smaller diameter (approximately 2.1 nm on average) than the humic fraction (approximately 2.4 nm on average). DU in the fulvic acid fraction gave a bimodal peak, not apparent for other trace elements investigated, including natural U. This implies that DU interacts with the fulvic acid fraction in a different way to all other elements studied.

  18. Method for Detection of Trace Metal and Metalloid Contaminants in Coal-Generated Fuel Gas Using Gas Chromatography/Ion Trap Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rupp, Erik C.; Granite, Evan J.; Stanko, Dennis C.

    2010-07-15

    There exists an increasing need to develop a reliable method to detect trace contaminants in fuel gas derived from coal gasification. While Hg is subject to current and future regulations, As, Se, and P emissions may eventually be regulated. Sorbents are the most promising technology for the removal of contaminants from coal-derived fuel gas, and it will be important to develop a rapid analytical detection method to ensure complete removal and determine the ideal time for sorbent replacement/regeneration in order to reduce costs. This technical note explores the use of a commercial gas chromatography/ion trap mass spectrometry system for the detection of four gaseous trace contaminants in a simulated fuel gas. Quantitative, repeatable detection with limits at ppbv to ppmv levels were obtained for arsine (AsH3), phosphine (PH3), and hydrogen selenide (H2Se), while qualitative detection was observed for mercury. Decreased accuracy and response caused by the primary components of fuel gas were observed.

  19. Application of surrogates, indicators, and high-resolution mass spectrometry to evaluate the efficacy of UV processes for attenuation of emerging contaminants in water

    PubMed Central

    Merel, Sylvain; Anumol, Tarun; Park, Minkyu; Snyder, Shane A.

    2016-01-01

    In response to water scarcity, strategies relying on multiple processes to turn wastewater effluent into potable water are being increasingly considered by many cities. In such context, the occurrence of contaminants as well as their fate during treatment processes is a major concern. Three analytical approaches where used to characterize the efficacy of UV and UV/H2O2 processes on a secondary wastewater effluent. The first analytical approach assessed bulk organic parameters or surrogates before and after treatment, while the second analytical approach measured the removal of specific indicator compounds. Sixteen trace organic contaminants were selected due to their relative high concentration and detection frequency over eight monitoring campaigns. While their removal rate ranges from approximately 10 to >90%, some of these compounds can be used to gauge process efficacy (or failure). The third analytical approach assessed the fate of unknown contaminants through high-resolution time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry with advanced data processing and demonstrated the occurrence of several thousand organic compounds in the water. A heat map clearly evidenced compounds as recalcitrant or transformed by the UV processes applied. In addition, those chemicals with similar fate were able to be grouped together into clusters to identify new indicator compounds. In this manuscript, each approach is evaluated with advantages and disadvantages compared. PMID:25262385

  20. Cryogenic adsorber design in a helium refrigeration system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhongjun; Zhang, Ning; Li, Zhengyu; Li, Q.

    2012-06-01

    The cryogenic adsorber is specially designed to eliminate impurities in gaseous helium such as O2, and N2 which is normally difficult to remove, based on the reversible cryotrapping of impurities on an activated carbon bed. The coconut shell activated carbon is adopted because of its developed micropore structure and specific surface area. This activated carbon adsorption is mostly determined by the micropore structure, and the adsorption rate of impurities is inversely proportional to the square of the particle sizes. The active carbon absorber's maximum permissible flow velocity is 0.25 m/s. When the gas flow velocity increases, the adsorption diffusion rate of the adsorbent is reduced, because an increase in the magnitude of the velocity resulted in a reduced amount of heat transfer to a unit volume of impure gas. According to the numerical simulation of N2 adsorption dynamics, the appropriate void tower link speed and the saturated adsorption capacity are determined. Then the diameter and height of the adsorber are designed. The mass transfer length should be taken into account in the adsorber height design. The pressure decrease is also calculated. The important factors that influence the adsorber pressure decrease are the void tower speed, the adsorbed layer height, and the active carbon particle shape and size.

  1. Rotary adsorbers for continuous bulk separations

    DOEpatents

    Baker, Frederick S [Oak Ridge, TN

    2011-11-08

    A rotary adsorber for continuous bulk separations is disclosed. The rotary adsorber includes an adsorption zone in fluid communication with an influent adsorption fluid stream, and a desorption zone in fluid communication with a desorption fluid stream. The fluid streams may be gas streams or liquid streams. The rotary adsorber includes one or more adsorption blocks including adsorbent structure(s). The adsorbent structure adsorbs the target species that is to be separated from the influent fluid stream. The apparatus includes a rotary wheel for moving each adsorption block through the adsorption zone and the desorption zone. A desorption circuit passes an electrical current through the adsorbent structure in the desorption zone to desorb the species from the adsorbent structure. The adsorbent structure may include porous activated carbon fibers aligned with their longitudinal axis essentially parallel to the flow direction of the desorption fluid stream. The adsorbent structure may be an inherently electrically-conductive honeycomb structure.

  2. Estimating contaminant mass discharge: A field comparison of the multilevel point measurement and the integral pumping investigation approaches and their uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béland-Pelletier, Caroline; Fraser, Michelle; Barker, Jim; Ptak, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    In this field study, two approaches to assess contaminant mass discharge were compared: the sampling of multilevel wells (MLS) and the integral groundwater investigation (or integral pumping test, IPT) that makes use of the concentration-time series obtained from pumping wells. The MLS approached used concentrations, hydraulic conductivity and gradient rather than direct chemical flux measurements, while the IPT made use of a simplified analytical inversion. The two approaches were applied at a control plane located approximately 40 m downgradient of a gasoline source at Canadian Forces Base Borden, Ontario, Canada. The methods yielded similar estimates of the mass discharging across the control plane. The sources of uncertainties in the mass discharge in each approach were evaluated, including the uncertainties inherent in the underlying assumptions and procedures. The maximum uncertainty of the MLS method was about 67%, and about 28% for the IPT method in this specific field situation. For the MLS method, the largest relative uncertainty (62%) was attributed to the limited sampling density (0.63 points/m 2), through a novel comparison with a denser sampling grid nearby. A five-fold increase of the sampling grid density would have been required to reduce the overall relative uncertainty for the MLS method to about the same level as that for the IPT method. Uncertainty in the complete coverage of the control plane provided the largest relative uncertainty (37%) in the IPT method. While MLS or IPT methods to assess contaminant mass discharge are attractive assessment tools, the large relative uncertainty in either method found for this reasonable well monitored and simple aquifer suggests that results in more complex plumes in more heterogeneous aquifers should be viewed with caution.

  3. Estimating contaminant mass discharge: a field comparison of the multilevel point measurement and the integral pumping investigation approaches and their uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Béland-Pelletier, Caroline; Fraser, Michelle; Barker, Jim; Ptak, Thomas

    2011-03-25

    In this field study, two approaches to assess contaminant mass discharge were compared: the sampling of multilevel wells (MLS) and the integral groundwater investigation (or integral pumping test, IPT) that makes use of the concentration-time series obtained from pumping wells. The MLS approached used concentrations, hydraulic conductivity and gradient rather than direct chemical flux measurements, while the IPT made use of a simplified analytical inversion. The two approaches were applied at a control plane located approximately 40m downgradient of a gasoline source at Canadian Forces Base Borden, Ontario, Canada. The methods yielded similar estimates of the mass discharging across the control plane. The sources of uncertainties in the mass discharge in each approach were evaluated, including the uncertainties inherent in the underlying assumptions and procedures. The maximum uncertainty of the MLS method was about 67%, and about 28% for the IPT method in this specific field situation. For the MLS method, the largest relative uncertainty (62%) was attributed to the limited sampling density (0.63 points/m(2)), through a novel comparison with a denser sampling grid nearby. A five-fold increase of the sampling grid density would have been required to reduce the overall relative uncertainty for the MLS method to about the same level as that for the IPT method. Uncertainty in the complete coverage of the control plane provided the largest relative uncertainty (37%) in the IPT method. While MLS or IPT methods to assess contaminant mass discharge are attractive assessment tools, the large relative uncertainty in either method found for this reasonable well monitored and simple aquifer suggests that results in more complex plumes in more heterogeneous aquifers should be viewed with caution.

  4. Application of novel, low-cost, laterite-based adsorbent for removal of lead from water: Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic studies.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Somak; De, Sirshendu

    2016-01-01

    Contamination of groundwater by carcinogenic heavy metal, e.g., lead is an important issue and possibility of using a natural rock, laterite, is explored in this work to mitigate this problem. Treated laterite (TL- prepared using hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide) was successfully utilized for this purpose. The adsorbent was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) to highlight its physical and chemical properties. Optimized equilibrium conditions were 1 g L(-1) adsorbent concentration, 0.26 mm size and a pH of 7 ± 0.2. Monolayer adsorption capacity of lead on treated laterite was 15 mg/g, 14.5 and 13 mg g(-1) at temperatures of 303 K, 313 K and 323 K, respectively. The adsorption was exothermic and physical in nature. At 303 K, value of effective diffusivity of (De) and mass transfer co-efficient (Kf) of lead onto TL were 6.5 × 10(-10) m(2)/s and 3.3 × 10(-4) m/s, respectively (solved from shrinking core model of adsorption kinetics). Magnesium and sulphate show highest interference effect on the adsorption of lead by TL. Efficacy of the adsorbent has been verified using real-life contaminated groundwater. Thus, this work demonstrates performance of a cost-effective media for lead removal.

  5. Analysis of emerging contaminants in water and solid samples using high resolution mass spectrometry with a Q Exactive orbital ion trap and estrogenic activity with YES-assay.

    PubMed

    Comtois-Marotte, Simon; Chappuis, Thomas; Vo Duy, Sung; Gilbert, Nicolas; Lajeunesse, André; Taktek, Salma; Desrosiers, Mélanie; Veilleux, Éloïse; Sauvé, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Trace emerging contaminants (ECs) occur in both waste and surface waters that are rich in particulates that have been found to sorb several organic contaminants. An analytical method based on off-line solid-phase extraction (SPE) followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis was developed for the detection and quantification of 31 ECs from surface water, wastewater, suspended particulate matter (SPM) as well as sediments. Lyophilized sediments and air-dried SPM were subjected to ultrasonic extraction. Water samples and extracts were then concentrated and cleaned-up by off-line SPE. Quantification was realized using a Q Exactive mass spectrometer in both full scan (FS) and MS(2) modes. These two modes were optimized and compared to determine which one was the most suitable for each matrix studied. Yeast estrogen screen assay (YES-assay) adapted from the direct measurement of estrogenic activity without sample extraction was tested on filtered wastewater samples. An endocrine disrupting effect was detected in all effluent samples analyzed with estradiol equivalent concentrations ranging from 4.4 to 720 ng eq E2 L(-1) for the WWTP-1 and 6.5-42 ng eq E2 L(-1) for the WWTP-2. The analytical methods were also applied on six samples of surface water, the corresponding SPM, the sediments and thirty-nine effluent samples from two wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) sampled over a period of five months (February to June 2014).

  6. Plume mass flow and optical damage distributions for an MMH/N2O4 RCS thruster. [exhaust plume contamination of spacecraft components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spisz, E. W.; Bowman, R. L.; Jack, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The data obtained from two recent experiments conducted in a continuing series of experiments at the Lewis Research Center into the contamination characteristics of a 5-pound thrust MMH/N2O4 engine are presented. The primary objectives of these experiments were to establish the angular distribution of condensible exhaust products within the plume and the corresponding optical damage angular distribution of transmitting optical elements attributable to this contaminant. The plume mass flow distribution was measured by five quartz crystal microbalances (QCM's) located at the engine axis evaluation. The fifth QCM was located above the engine and 15 deg behind the nozzle exit plane. The optical damage was determined by ex-situ transmittance measurements for the wavelength range from 0.2 to 0.6 microns on 2.54 cm diameter fused silica discs also located at engine centerline elevation. Both the mass deposition and optical damage angular distributions followed the expected trend of decreasing deposition and damage as the angle between sensor or sample and the nozzle axis increased. A simple plume gas flow equation predicted the deposition distribution reasonably well for angles of up to 55 degrees. The optical damage measurements also indicated significant effects at large angles.

  7. Analysis of organic contaminants from silicon wafer and disk surfaces by thermal desorption-GC-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camenzind, Mark J.; Ahmed, Latif; Kumar, Anurag

    1999-03-01

    Organic contaminants can affect semiconductor wafer processing including gate oxide integrity, polysilicon growth, deep ultraviolet photoresist line-width, and cleaning & etching steps. Organophosphates are known to counter dope silicon wafers. Organic contaminants in disk drives can cause failures due to stiction or buildup on the heads. Therefore, it is important to identify organic contaminants adsorbed on wafer or disk surfaces and find their sources so they can be either completely eliminated or at least controlled. Dynamic headspace TD-GC-MS (Thermal Desorption-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry) methods are very sensitive and can be used to identify organic contaminants on disks and wafers, in air, or outgassing from running drives or their individual components.

  8. Uremic toxins and oral adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Goto, Shunsuke; Yoshiya, Kunihiko; Kita, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Hideki; Fukagawa, Masafumi

    2011-04-01

    Uremic toxins are associated with various disorders in patients with end-stage renal disease and it is difficult to remove some of these toxins by dialysis. Since some uremic toxins are generated by bacterial metabolites in the colon, oral adsorbents that interfere with the absorption of uremic toxins or their precursors are believed to prevent their accumulation in the body. AST-120 adsorbs various uremic retention solutes in the gastrointestinal system and has potential for providing clinical benefit. Sevelamer hydrochloride binds some harmful compounds in addition to phosphate and seems to have pleiotropic effects that include lowering serum LDL cholesterol levels and reduction of inflammation. The effect of sevelamer hydrochloride on indoxyl sulfate and p-cresol has been shown in an in vitro study; however, in vivo studies in mice or humans did not demonstrate this effect on protein-binding uremic toxins. Oral adsorbents are thus one of the important modalities in the treatment of uremic syndrome.

  9. Conformational changes of adsorbed proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Scott

    2005-03-01

    The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and pepsin to gold surfaces has been studied using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Proteins are adsorbed from solution onto a gold surface and changes in the conformation of the adsorbed proteins are induced by changing the buffer solution. We selected pH and ionic strength values for the buffer solutions that are known from our circular dichroism measurements to cause conformational changes of the proteins in bulk solution. We find that for both BSA and pepsin the changes in conformation are impeded by the interaction of the protein with the gold surface.

  10. Determination of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol in indoor air as an indicator of marijuana cigarette smoking using adsorbent sampling and in-injector thermal desorption gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chou, Su-Lien; Ling, Yong-Chien; Yang, Mo-Hsiung; Pai, Chung-Yen

    2007-08-13

    The marijuana leaves are usually mixed with tobaccos and smoked at amusement places in Taiwan. Recently, for investigation-legal purposes, the police asked if we can identify the marijuana smoke in a KTV stateroom (a private room at the entertainment spot for singing, smoking, alcohol drinking, etc.) without marijuana residues. A personal air-sampler pump fitted with the GC liner-tube packed with Tenax-TA adsorbent was used for air sampling. The GC-adsorbent tube was placed in the GC injector port and desorbed directly, followed by GC-MS analysis for the determination of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) in indoor air. The average desorption efficiency and limit of detection for delta9-THC were 89% and 0.1 microg m(-3), respectively, approximately needing 1.09 mg of marijuana leaves smoked in an unventilated closed room (3.0 m x 2.4 m x 2.7 m) to reach this level. The mean delta9-THC contained in the 15 marijuana plants seized from diverse locations was measured to be 0.32%. The delta9-THC in room air can be successfully identified from mock marijuana cigarettes, mixtures of marijuana and tobacco, and an actual case. The characteristic delta9-THC peak in chromatogram can serve as the indicator of marijuana. Positive result suggests marijuana smoking at the specific scene in the recent past, facilitating the formulation of further investigation.

  11. Dynamics of benzene vapor adsorption on carbon adsorbents having different volumes of transporting pores

    SciTech Connect

    Ivakhnyuk, G.K.; Fedorov, N.F.; Babkin, O.E.; Smetanin, G.N.; Belotserkovskii, G.M.

    1986-08-20

    To ascertain the effect of the porosity peculiarities on the benzene vapor adsorption process under dynamic conditions, a series of adsorbents was synthesized in this work from zirconium carbide. Their porous structure was studied by a traditional set of methods, viz., pycnometric, porometric, and sorption. Carbon adsorbents derived from zirconium carbide have an open-pore system of adsorbing pores which communicate directly with the outer surface. Transporting porosity of carbon adsorbents derived from zirconium carbide does not affect the mass transport processes during adsorption of benzene vapors on them under the conditions of a dynamic experiment.

  12. Contamination analysis unit

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, Hugh R.; Meltzer, Michael P.

    1996-01-01

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantifies of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surface by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings.

  13. Contamination analysis unit

    DOEpatents

    Gregg, H.R.; Meltzer, M.P.

    1996-05-28

    The portable Contamination Analysis Unit (CAU) measures trace quantities of surface contamination in real time. The detector head of the portable contamination analysis unit has an opening with an O-ring seal, one or more vacuum valves and a small mass spectrometer. With the valve closed, the mass spectrometer is evacuated with one or more pumps. The O-ring seal is placed against a surface to be tested and the vacuum valve is opened. Data is collected from the mass spectrometer and a portable computer provides contamination analysis. The CAU can be used to decontaminate and decommission hazardous and radioactive surfaces by measuring residual hazardous surface contamination, such as tritium and trace organics. It provides surface contamination data for research and development applications as well as real-time process control feedback for industrial cleaning operations and can be used to determine the readiness of a surface to accept bonding or coatings. 1 fig.

  14. Identification of discharge zones and quantification of contaminant mass discharges into a local stream from a landfill in a heterogeneous geologic setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milosevic, N.; Thomsen, N. I.; Juhler, R. K.; Albrechtsen, H.-J.; Bjerg, P. L.

    2012-06-01

    SummaryContaminants from Risby Landfill (Denmark) are expected to leach through the underlying geologic strata and eventually reach the local Risby Stream. Identification of the groundwater discharge zone was conducted systematically by an array of methods including studies on site geology and hydrogeology, ground- and surface water flows and landfill leachate tracing from April 2009 to December 2010. Chemical profiling by driven wells and gradients in streambed temperatures was an efficient method to identify the contaminant discharge area. A considerable variation of leachate indicators, redox parameters and xenobiotic organic compounds were revealed in this area because of a complex geological setting with clay till (interbedded sand lenses) and deposits of sand and peat. Concentrations of leachate indicators decreased from the landfill to the stream, implying attenuation processes. Xenobiotic organic compounds were mainly phenoxy acid herbicides, while petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents were found at very few boreholes. Findings of putative metabolites of phenoxy acid herbicides suggest degradation under the anaerobic conditions, which dominated inside and beneath the landfill. The groundwater discharge was quantified by two methods: direct collection of discharged groundwater by seepage meters and calculations from measurement of streambed temperature gradients. The landfill impacted the stream seasonally during dry periods when concentrations in the stream reached groundwater concentration levels. A comparison between mass balance for selected stream stretches and upscaled measurements of the contaminant discharge from groundwater into the stream indicated that only a small part of the actual contaminant discharge of the stream could be explained by the inflowing contaminant discharge from groundwater. Surface runoff and seepage from ponds along the stream impacted by landfill interflow may be important pathways as well. The placement of Risby

  15. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell cathode contamination - Acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Y.; St-Pierre, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Acetylene adsorption on PEMFC electrodes and contamination in single cells are investigated with 300 ppm acetylene at a cathode held at 80 °C. The results of adsorption experiments suggest that acetylene adsorbs readily on electrodes and is reduced to ethylene and ethane under an open circuit potential of H2/N2, as the adsorbates can be electro-oxidized at high potentials. The cell voltage response shows that 300 ppm acetylene results in a cell performance loss of approximately 88%. The voltage degradation curve is divided into two stages by an inflection point, which suggests that potential-dependent processes are involved in acetylene poisoning. These potential-dependent processes may include acetylene oxidation and reduction as well as accumulation of intermediates on the electrode surface. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis suggests that acetylene affects the oxygen reduction reaction and may also affect mass transport processes. Acetylene also may be reduced in the steady poisoning state of the operating cell. After neat air operation, the cyclic voltammetry results imply that the cathode catalyst surface is almost completely restored, with no contaminant residues remaining in the MEA. Linear scanning voltammetry measurements show no change in hydrogen crossover caused by contamination, and polarization curves confirm complete recovery of cell performance.

  16. An experimental and modeling study of grain-scale uranium desorption from field-contaminated sediments and the potential influence of microporosity on mass-transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoliker, D.; Liu, C.; Kent, D. B.; Zachara, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    The aquifer below the 300-Area of the Hanford site (Richland, WA, USA) is plagued by a persistent plume of dissolved uranium (U(VI)) in excess of the Environmental Protection Agency drinking water maximum contamination level even after the removal of highly contaminated sediments. The aquifer sediments in the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone act as both a source and sink for uranium during stage changes in the nearby Columbia River. Diffusion limitation of uranium mass-transfer within these sediments has been cited as a potential cause of the plume's persistence. Equilibrium U(VI) sorption is a strong function of variable chemical conditions, especially carbonate, hydrogen, and uranyl ion activities. Field-contaminated sediments from the site require up to 1,000 hours to reach equilibrium in static batch reactors. Increases in U(VI) concentrations over longer time-scales result from changes in chemical conditions, which drive reactions with sediments that favor U(VI) desorption. Grain-scale U(VI) sorption/desorption rates are slow, likely owing to diffusion of U(VI) and other solutes through intra-granular pore domains. In order to improve understanding of the impact of intra-granular diffusion and chemical reactions controlling grain-scale U(VI) release, experiments were conducted on individual particle size fractions of a <8 mm composite of field-contaminated, lower vadose zone sediments. For each size fraction, equilibrium U(VI) sorption/desorption in static batch reactors was well-described by surface complexation models over a range of chemical conditions applicable to the field site. Desorption rates from individual size fractions in flow-through batch reactors, examined under a single set of constant chemical conditions with multiple stop-flow events, were similar for all size fractions <2 mm. Kinetic U(VI) desorption in flow-through batch reactors was modeled using a multi-rate surface complexation approach, where sorption/desorption rates were

  17. Determination of some organic contaminants in water samples by solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Maldaner, Liane; Jardim, Isabel C S F

    2012-10-15

    Independent methods for determination of organic contaminants such as pharmaceuticals and pesticides in drinking water samples, using SPE as the extraction technique and LC-MS/MS in the MRM mode with electrospray ionization, were developed and validated. Different SPE sorbents were evaluated, including lab-made fluorinated and phenyl and commercial Oasis HLB and C18, with the commercial phases being more suitable for the target compounds. Recoveries in the range of 70-120% were obtained for all target compounds, with the exception for paracetamol (acetaminophen), and precision values (inter-day and intra-day), expressed in terms of relative standard deviations (RSD), lower than 20% were obtained for all target compounds. Quantification limits were in the range of 0.006-0.208 μg L(-1) and the methods developed were successfully applied for the analysis of drinking water samples, detecting some pharmaceuticals and pesticides, but at concentration levels lower than the MRL.

  18. Rapid automated screening, identification and quantification of organic micro-contaminants and their main transformation products in wastewater and river waters using liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry with an accurate-mass database.

    PubMed

    Gómez, M J; Gómez-Ramos, M M; Malato, O; Mezcua, M; Férnandez-Alba, A R

    2010-11-05

    In this study we have developed and evaluated an analytical method for a rapid automated screening and confirmation of a large number of organic micro-contaminants (almost 400) and also the quantification of the positive findings in water samples of different types (surface and wastewaters) using liquid chromatography-electrospray quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOFMS) based on the use of an accurate-mass database. The created database includes data not only on the accurate masses of the target ions but also on the characteristic in-source fragment ions, isotopic pattern and retention time data. This customized database was linked to commercially available software which extracted all the potential compounds of interest from the LC-QTOFMS raw data of each sample and matched them against the database to search for targeted compounds in the sample. The detailed fragmentation information has also been used as a powerful tool for the automatic identification of unknown compounds and/or transformation products with similar structures to those of known organic contaminants included in the database. The database can be continually enlarged. To confirm identification of compounds which have no fragment ions (or fragments with low intensity/relative abundance) from in-source CID fragmentation or isomers which are not distinguished within full single mass spectra, a "Targeted MS/MS" method is developed. Thereafter, these compounds can be further analyzed using the collision energy (CE) in QTOF-MS/MS mode. Linearity and limits of detection were studied. Method detection limits (MDLs) in effluent wastewater and river waters were, in most cases, lowers or equal to 5 and 2 ng/L, respectively. Only 15 compounds had MDLs between 5 and 50 ng/L in effluent wastewater matrix. We obtained a linearity of the calibration curves over two orders of magnitude. The method has been applied to real samples and the results obtained reveal that most of the pharmaceutically

  19. A mass-balance approach for assessing PCB movement during remediation of a PCB-contaminated deposit on the Fox River, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steuer, Jeffrey J.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, collected water samples during the September 1 - December 15, 1999 removal of sediment contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) from a reach of the Lower Fox River designated Sediment Management Unit (SMU) 56/57. Results of analyses of the samples, along with monitoring activities of several other organizations, were used to delineate and compare PCB mass pathways during the cleanup effort (fig. 1). Results indicate that the cleanup at SMU 56/57 had the following effect on PCB mass: dredging permanently removed more than 650 kg (1441 lb) of PCBs, transported 14.5 kg (32 lb) downstream, and volatilized 2.6 kg (5.7 lb) to the atmosphere; associated activities on the shore returned 0.1 kg (0.3 lb) to the river. This report documents the USGS data-collection efforts and details the mass-balance approach for PCB pathway delineation.

  20. Influence of Wetting and Mass Transfer Properties of Organic Chemical Mixtures in Vadose Zone Materials on Groundwater Contamination by Nonaqueous Phase Liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Charles J Werth; Albert J Valocchi, Hongkyu Yoon

    2011-05-21

    Previous studies have found that organic acids, organic bases, and detergent-like chemicals change surface wettability. The wastewater and NAPL mixtures discharged at the Hanford site contain such chemicals, and their proportions likely change over time due to reaction-facilitated aging. The specific objectives of this work were to (1) determine the effect of organic chemical mixtures on surface wettability, (2) determine the effect of organic chemical mixtures on CCl4 volatilization rates from NAPL, and (3) accurately determine the migration, entrapment, and volatilization of organic chemical mixtures. Five tasks were proposed to achieve the project objectives. These are to (1) prepare representative batches of fresh and aged NAPL-wastewater mixtures, (2) to measure interfacial tension, contact angle, and capillary pressure-saturation profiles for the same mixtures, (3) to measure interphase mass transfer rates for the same mixtures using micromodels, (4) to measure multiphase flow and interphase mass transfer in large flow cell experiments, all using the same mixtures, and (5) to modify the multiphase flow simulator STOMP in order to account for updated P-S and interphase mass transfer relationships, and to simulate the impact of CCl4 in the vadose zone on groundwater contamination. Results and findings from these tasks and summarized in the attached final report.

  1. Liquid chromatography with high resolution mass spectrometry for identification of organic contaminants in fish fillet: screening and quantification assessment using two scan modes for data acquisition.

    PubMed

    Munaretto, Juliana S; May, Marília M; Saibt, Nathália; Zanella, Renato

    2016-07-22

    This study proposed a strategy to identify and quantify 182 organic contaminants from different chemical classes, as for instance pesticides, veterinary drug and personal care products, in fish fillet using liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QToF/MS). For this purpose, two different scan methods (full scan and all ions MS/MS) were evaluated to assess the best option for screening analysis in spiked fish fillet samples. In general, full scan acquisition was found to be more reliable (84%) in the automatic identification and quantification when compared to all ions MS/MS with 72% of the compounds detected. Additionally, a qualitative automatic search showed a mass accuracy error below 5ppm for 77% of the compounds in full scan mode compared to only 52% in all ions MS/MS scan. However, all ions MS/MS provides fragmentation information of the target compounds. Undoubtedly, structural information of a wide number of compounds can be obtained using high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), but it is necessary thoroughly assess it, in order to choose the best scan mode.

  2. Fabricating electrospun cellulose nanofibre adsorbents for ion-exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Dods, Stewart R; Hardick, Oliver; Stevens, Bob; Bracewell, Daniel G

    2015-01-09

    Protein separation is an integral step in biopharmaceutical manufacture with diffusion-limited packed bed chromatography remaining the default choice for industry. Rapid bind-elute separation using convective mass transfer media offers advantages in productivity by operating at high flowrates. Electrospun nanofibre adsorbents are a non-woven fibre matrix of high surface area and porosity previously investigated as a bioseparation medium. The effects of compression and bed layers, and subsequent heat treatment after electrospinning cellulose acetate nanofibres were investigated using diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) or carboxylate (COO) functionalisations. Transbed pressures were measured and compared by compression load, COO adsorbents were 30%, 70% and 90% higher than DEAE for compressions 1, 5 and 10MPa, respectively, which was attributed to the swelling effect of hydrophilic COO groups. Dynamic binding capacities (DBCs) at 10% breakthrough were measured between 2000 and 12,000CV/h (2s and 0.3s residence times) under normal binding conditions, and DBCs increased with reactant concentration from 4 to 12mgBSA/mL for DEAE and from 10 to 21mglysozyme/mL for COO adsorbents. Comparing capacities of compression loads applied after electrospinning showed that the lowest load tested, 1MPa, yielded the highest DBCs for DEAE and COO adsorbents at 20mgBSA/mL and 27mglysozyme/mL, respectively. At 1MPa, DBCs were the highest for the lowest flowrate tested but stabilised for flowrates above 2000CV/h. For compression loads of 5MPa and 10MPa, adsorbents recorded lower DBCs than 1MPa as a result of nanofibre packing and reduced surface area. Increasing the number of bed layers from 4 to 12 showed decreasing DBCs for both adsorbents. Tensile strengths were recorded to indicate the mechanical robustness of the adsorbent and be related to packing the nanofibre adsorbents in large scale configurations such as pleated cartridges. Compared with an uncompressed adsorbent, compressions of 1, 5

  3. Fabricating electrospun cellulose nanofibre adsorbents for ion-exchange chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Dods, Stewart R.; Hardick, Oliver; Stevens, Bob; Bracewell, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Protein separation is an integral step in biopharmaceutical manufacture with diffusion-limited packed bed chromatography remaining the default choice for industry. Rapid bind-elute separation using convective mass transfer media offers advantages in productivity by operating at high flowrates. Electrospun nanofibre adsorbents are a non-woven fibre matrix of high surface area and porosity previously investigated as a bioseparation medium. The effects of compression and bed layers, and subsequent heat treatment after electrospinning cellulose acetate nanofibres were investigated using diethylaminoethyl (DEAE) or carboxylate (COO) functionalisations. Transbed pressures were measured and compared by compression load, COO adsorbents were 30%, 70% and 90% higher than DEAE for compressions 1, 5 and 10 MPa, respectively, which was attributed to the swelling effect of hydrophilic COO groups. Dynamic binding capacities (DBCs) at 10% breakthrough were measured between 2000 and 12,000 CV/h (2 s and 0.3 s residence times) under normal binding conditions, and DBCs increased with reactant concentration from 4 to 12 mg BSA/mL for DEAE and from 10 to 21 mg lysozyme/mL for COO adsorbents. Comparing capacities of compression loads applied after electrospinning showed that the lowest load tested, 1 MPa, yielded the highest DBCs for DEAE and COO adsorbents at 20 mg BSA/mL and 27 mg lysozyme/mL, respectively. At 1 MPa, DBCs were the highest for the lowest flowrate tested but stabilised for flowrates above 2000 CV/h. For compression loads of 5 MPa and 10 MPa, adsorbents recorded lower DBCs than 1 MPa as a result of nanofibre packing and reduced surface area. Increasing the number of bed layers from 4 to 12 showed decreasing DBCs for both adsorbents. Tensile strengths were recorded to indicate the mechanical robustness of the adsorbent and be related to packing the nanofibre adsorbents in large scale configurations such as pleated cartridges. Compared with an

  4. Detection of triclocarban and two co-contaminating chlorocarbanilides in US aquatic environments using isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sapkota, Amir; Heidler, Jochen; Halden, Rolf U. . E-mail: rhalden@jhsph.edu

    2007-01-15

    The antimicrobial compound triclocarban (TCC; 3,4,4'-trichlorocarbanilide; CAS-bar 101-20-2) is a high-production-volume chemical, recently suggested to cause widespread contamination of US water resources. To test this hypothesis, we developed an isotope dilution liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry method for ultratrace analysis of TCC (0.9ng/L detection limit) and analyzed low-volume water samples (200mL) along with primary sludge samples from across the United States. All river water samples (100%) collected downstream of wastewater treatment plants had detectable levels of TCC, as compared to 56% of those taken upstream. Concentrations of TCC (mean+/-standard deviation) downstream of sewage treatment plants (84+/-110ng/L) were significantly higher (P<0.05; Wilcoxon rank sum test) than those of samples taken upstream (12+/-15ng/L). Compared to surface water, mean TCC concentrations found in dried, primary sludge obtained from municipal sewage treatment plants in five states were six orders of magnitude greater (19,300+/-7100{mu}g/kg). Several river samples contained a co-contaminant, identified based on its chromatographic retention time, molecular base ion, and MS/MS fragmentation behavior as 4,4'-dichlorocarbanilide (DCC; CAS-bar 1219-99-4). In addition to TCC and DCC, municipal sludge contained a second co-contaminant, 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorocarbanilide (TetraCC; CAS-bar 4300-43-0). Both newly detected compounds were present as impurities (0.2%{sub w/w} each) in technical grade TCC (99%). Application of the new method for chlorocarbanilide analysis yielded TCC occurrence data for 13 US states, confirmed the role of sewage treatment plants as environmental inputs of TCC, and identified DCC and TetraCC as previously unrecognized pollutants released into the environment alongside TCC.

  5. Is the diagnosis of mass hysteria an excuse for incomplete investigation of low-level environmental contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, H.S.; Brilliant, L.B.

    1981-01-01

    Mass hysteria is an epidemic diagnostic term used to characterize unexplained outbreaks of syncope among women. A syncope outbreak among women in a meeting in a rural area of Michigan prompted an intense investigation for etiology. Low levels of ozone, carbon monoxide, and pentane were found associated with the outbreak. These levels were too low by themselves to explain the symptoms. A sociometric scale of intensity of illness was devised and found to be highly correlated (r = -0.94) with the weight of those who fainted. It is argued that mass hysteria may be the result of interactions of low levels of toxicants and may not be a result of the hysterical behavior in women at all.

  6. Is the diagnosis of mass hysteria an excuse for incomplete investigation of low-level environmental contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Faust, H.S.; Brilliant, L.B.

    1981-01-01

    Mass hysteria is an epidemic diagnostic term used to characterize unexplained outbreaks of syncope among women. A syncope outbreak among women in a meeting in a rural area of Michigan prompted an intense investigation to etiology. Low levels of ozone, carbon monoxide, and pentane were found associated with the outbreak. These levels were too low by themselves to explain the symptoms. A sociometric scale of intensity of illness was devised and found to be highly correlated (r = -.094) with the weight of those who fainted. It is argued that mass hysteria may be the result of interactions of low levels of toxicants and may not be a result of the hysterical behavior in women at all.

  7. Background contamination by coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in trace level high resolution gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS) analytical procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrario, J.; Byrne, C.; Dupuy, A. E. Jr

    1997-01-01

    The addition of the "dioxin-like" polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners to the assessment of risk associated with the 2,3,7,8-chlorine substituted dioxins and furans has dramatically increased the number of laboratories worldwide that are developing analytical procedures for their detection and quantitation. Most of these procedures are based on established sample preparation and analytical techniques employing high resolution gas chromatography/high resolution mass spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS), which are used for the analyses of dioxin/furans at low parts-per-trillion (ppt) levels. A significant and widespread problem that arises when using these sample preparation procedures for the analysis of coplanar PCBs is the presence of background levels of these congeners. Industrial processes, urban incineration, leaking electrical transformers, hazardous waste accidents, and improper waste disposal practices have released appreciable quantities of PCBs into the environment. This contamination has resulted in the global distribution of these compounds via the atmosphere and their ubiquitous presence in ambient air. The background presence of these compounds in method blanks must be addressed when determining the exact concentrations of these and other congeners in environmental samples. In this study reliable procedures were developed to accurately define these background levels and assess their variability over the course of the study. The background subtraction procedures developed and employed increase the probability that the values reported accurately represent the concentrations found in the samples and were not biased due to this background contamination.

  8. Qualitative analysis of halogenated organic contaminants in American eel by gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Byer, Jonathan D; Pacepavicius, Grazina; Lebeuf, Michel; Brown, R Stephen; Backus, Sean; Hodson, Peter V; Alaee, Mehran

    2014-12-01

    Target compound analysis with scanning mass spectrometers such as quadrupole or magnetic sector instruments is used extensively in environmental chemistry because of the selectivity, sensitivity, and robustness. Yet, target compound analysis selectively ignores the majority of compounds present in a sample, especially in complex matrices like fish. In this study, time-of-flight mass spectrometry was used to screen for and identify halogenated compounds in American eels (Anguilla rostrata). Individual and then pooled eel samples were analysed using electron ionization and electron capture negative ionization (ECNI) modes. Eels were differentiated by principal component analysis of chemical profiles and were grouped corresponding to their capture location, all with a single instrument injection per sample. Bromine containing compounds were further investigated by taking advantage of the selectivity of ECNI by utilizing the Br(-) ion m/z 79 and 81. A total of 51 brominated compounds were detected and their identities were attempted by authentic standards, library searching, and/or chemical formula prediction based on accurate mass measurements. Several PBDEs were identified in the samples, and the majority of the non-PBDEs identified were bromophenols, bromoanisoles, and bromobenzenes. These classes of compounds are synthesized for use in flame retardant production either as intermediates or as final products. However, their occurrence in eels was most likely the result of metabolism or break-down products of high production volume flame retardants like polybrominated diphenyl ethers and bromophenoxy compounds.

  9. Biomonitoring of metal contamination in a marine prosobranch snail (Nassarius reticulatus) by imaging laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS).

    PubMed

    Santos, Mirian C; Wagner, Martin; Wu, Bei; Scheider, Jessica; Oehlmann, Jörg; Cadore, Solange; Becker, J Sabine

    2009-12-15

    An imaging mass spectrometric method using laser ablation inductively coupled plasma spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was developed to determine Cu, Zn, Cd, Hg and Pb and metal distribution in longitudinal tissue sections of the marine snail Nassarius reticulatus (Gastropoda, Prosobranchia). Snails were sampled in northern Brittany (France) at three stations with different contamination levels. The quantification of metal distribution (imaging or mapping) in a thin slice of the snail tissue was carried out using different strategies: by one-point calibration and via matrix-matched laboratory standards using different biological materials (BCR 278, snail tissue, and rat brain). Together with the imaging of metals the distribution of two non-metals (carbon and sulfur) was analyzed. The imaging LA-ICP-MS analysis yielded an inhomogeneous distribution for all elements investigated. The detection limits for the distribution analysis of Cu, Zn, Cd, Hg and Pb measured by LA-ICP-MS were in the low microg g(-1) range.

  10. Determination of benzylsuccinic acid in gasoline-contaminated groundwater by solid-phase extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reusser, D E; Field, J A

    2002-04-12

    Benzylsuccinic acid (BSA) and methylbenzylsuccinic acid (methyl-BSA) are unambiguous biotransformation products resulting from anaerobic toluene and xylene biodegradation, respectively. A solid-phase extraction method based on polystyrene-divinylbenzene sorbent was developed for the quantitative BSA determination in groundwater samples as an alternative to liquid-liquid extraction. Gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry was used for separation and detection. The recovery from spiked 11 groundwater samples was 88 to 100%. The precision of the method, indicated by the relative standard deviation, was +/- 4% and the method detection limit was 0.2 microg/l. The concentration of BSA and methyl-BSA in groundwater samples from anaerobic BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes)-contaminated sites ranged from below the detection limit (3 microg/l) to 155 microg/l.

  11. Bioaccumulation Potential Of Air Contaminants: Combining Biological Allometry, Chemical Equilibrium And Mass-Balances To Predict Accumulation Of Air Pollutants In Various Mammals

    SciTech Connect

    Veltman, Karin; McKone, Thomas E.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; Hendriks, A. Jan

    2009-03-01

    In the present study we develop and test a uniform model intended for single compartment analysis in the context of human and environmental risk assessment of airborne contaminants. The new aspects of the model are the integration of biological allometry with fugacity-based mass-balance theory to describe exchange of contaminants with air. The developed model is applicable to various mammalian species and a range of chemicals, while requiring few and typically well-known input parameters, such as the adult mass and composition of the species, and the octanol-water and air-water partition coefficient of the chemical. Accumulation of organic chemicals is typically considered to be a function of the chemical affinity forlipid components in tissues. Here, we use a generic description of chemical affinity for neutral and polar lipids and proteins to estimate blood-air partition coefficients (Kba) and tissue-air partition coefficients (Kta) for various mammals. This provides a more accurate prediction of blood-air partition coefficients, as proteins make up a large fraction of total blood components. The results show that 75percent of the modeled inhalation and exhalation rate constants are within a factor of 2 from independent empirical values for humans, rats and mice, and 87percent of the predicted blood-air partition coefficients are within a factor of 5 from empirical data. At steady-state, the bioaccumulation potential of air pollutants is shown to be mainly a function of the tissue-air partition coefficient and the biotransformation capacity of the species and depends weakly on the ventilation rate and the cardiac output of mammals.

  12. Removal of arsenic from water using nano adsorbents and challenges: A review.

    PubMed

    Lata, Sneh; Samadder, S R

    2016-01-15

    Many researchers have used nanoparticles as adsorbents to remove water pollutants including arsenic after modifying the properties of nanoparticles by improving reactivity, biocompatibility, stability, charge density, multi-functionalities, and dispersibility. For arsenic removal, nano adsorbents emerged as the potential alternatives to existing conventional technologies. The present study critically reviewed the past and current available information on the potential of nano adsorbents for arsenic removal from contaminated water and the challenges involved in that. The study discussed the separation and regeneration techniques of nano adsorbents and the performance thereof. The study evaluated the adsorption efficiency of the various nanoparticles based on size of nanoparticles, types of nano adsorbents, method of synthesis, separation and regeneration of the nano adsorbents. The study found that more studies are required on suitable holding materials for the nano adsorbents to improve the permeability and to make the technology applicable at the field condition. The study will help the readers to choose suitable nanomaterials and to take up further research required for arsenic removal using nano adsorbents.

  13. Distribution of soil arsenic species, lead and arsenic bound to humic acid molar mass fractions in a contaminated apple orchard.

    PubMed

    Newton, Kimberly; Amarasiriwardena, Dulasiri; Xing, Baoshan

    2006-09-01

    Excessive application of lead arsenate pesticides in apple orchards during the early 1900s has led to the accumulation of lead and arsenic in these soils. Lead and arsenic bound to soil humic acids (HA) and soil arsenic species in a western Massachusetts apple orchard was investigated. The metal-humate binding profiles of Pb and As were analyzed with size exclusion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SEC-ICP-MS). It was observed that both Pb and As bind "tightly" to soil HA molar mass fractions. The surface soils of the apple orchard contained a ratio of about 14:1 of water soluble As (V) to As (III), while mono-methyl (MMA) and di-methyl arsenic (DMA) were not detectable. The control soil contained comparatively very low levels of As (III) and As (V). The analysis of soil core samples demonstrated that As (III) and As (V) species are confined to the top 20 cm of the soil.

  14. Persistent organic contaminants in Saharan dust air masses in West Africa, Cape Verde and the eastern Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Garrison, V H; Majewski, M S; Foreman, W T; Genualdi, S A; Mohammed, A; Massey Simonich, S L

    2014-01-15

    Anthropogenic semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) that persist in the environment, bioaccumulate, are toxic at low concentrations, and undergo long-range atmospheric transport (LRT) were identified and quantified in the atmosphere of a Saharan dust source region (Mali) and during Saharan dust incursions at downwind sites in the eastern Caribbean (U.S. Virgin Islands, Trinidad and Tobago) and Cape Verde. More organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides (OCPPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were detected in the Saharan dust region than at downwind sites. Seven of the 13 OCPPs detected occurred at all sites: chlordanes, chlorpyrifos, dacthal, dieldrin, endosulfans, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and trifluralin. Total SOCs ranged from 1.9-126 ng/m(3) (mean = 25 ± 34) at source and 0.05-0.71 ng/m(3) (mean = 0.24 ± 0.18) at downwind sites during dust conditions. Most SOC concentrations were 1-3 orders of magnitude higher in source than downwind sites. A Saharan source was confirmed for sampled air masses at downwind sites based on dust particle elemental composition and rare earth ratios, atmospheric back trajectory models, and field observations. SOC concentrations were considerably below existing occupational and/or regulatory limits; however, few regulatory limits exist for these persistent organic compounds. Long-term effects of chronic exposure to low concentrations of SOCs are unknown, as are possible additive or synergistic effects of mixtures of SOCs, biologically active trace metals, and mineral dust particles transported together in Saharan dust air masses.

  15. Thermodynamic properties of adsorbed water on silica gel - Exergy losses in adiabatic sorption processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worek, W. M.; Zengh, W.; San, J.-Y.

    1991-09-01

    In order to perform exergy analyses to optimize the transient heat and mass transfer processes involving sorption by solid adsorbents, the thermodynamic properties of adsorbed water must be determined. In this paper, the integral enthalpy and entropy are determined directly from isotherm data of water adsorbed on silica gel particles and silica gel manufactured in the form of a felt with 25 percent cotton as a support and Teflon as a binder. These results are then used to evaluate the exergy losses, due to the sorption and the convective heat and mass transfer processes, that occur in each portion of an adiabatic desiccant dehumidificaton cycle.

  16. Mechanism of dialkyl phthalates removal from aqueous solution using γ-cyclodextrin and starch based polyurethane polymer adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Okoli, Chukwunonso Peter; Adewuyi, Gregory Olufemi; Zhang, Qian; Diagboya, Paul N; Guo, Qingjun

    2014-12-19

    Phthalate esters have been known as potent endocrine disruptors and carcinogens; and their removal from water have been of considerable concern recently. In the present study, γ-cyclodextrin polyurethane polymer (GPP), γ-cyclodextrin/starch polyurethane copolymer (GSP), and starch polyurethane polymer (SPP) have been synthesized and characterized. Their adsorption efficiencies for the removal of dimethyl phthalate (DMP) and diethyl phthalate (DEP) from aqueous solutions were investigated. The characterization results showed the success of the synthesis. The isotherms were L-type, and both the Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm gave good fittings to the adsorption data. Adsorption mechanisms suggested that these adsorbents spontaneously adsorb phthalate molecules driven mainly by enthalpy change, and the adsorption process was attributed to multiple adsorbent-adsorbate interactions such as hydrogen bonding, π-π stacking, and pore filling. The results showed that starch and γ-cyclodextrin polyurethane polymer adsorbents have excellent potential as adsorbent materials for the removal of phthalates from the contaminated water.

  17. Rapid simultaneous analysis of 17 haloacetic acids and related halogenated water contaminants by high-performance ion chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Xue, Runmiao; Donovan, Ariel; Shi, Honglan; Yang, John; Hua, Bin; Inniss, Enos; Eichholz, Todd

    2016-09-01

    Haloacetic acids (HAAs), which include chloroacetic acids, bromoacetic acids, and emerging iodoacetic acids, are toxic water disinfection byproducts. General screening methodology is lacking for simultaneously monitoring chloro-, bromo-, and iodoacetic acids. In this study, a rapid and sensitive high-performance ion chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for simultaneous determination of chloro-, bromo-, and iodo- acetic acids and related halogenated contaminants including bromate, bromide, iodate, and iodide was developed to directly analyze water samples after filtration, eliminating the need for preconcentration, and chemical derivatization. The resulting method was validated in both untreated and treated water matrices including tap water, bottled water, swimming pool water, and both source water and drinking water from a drinking water treatment facility to demonstrate application potential. Satisfactory accuracies and precisions were obtained for all types of tested samples. The detection limits of this newly developed method were lower or comparable with similar techniques without the need for extensive sample treatment requirement and it includes all HAAs and other halogenated compounds. This provides a powerful methodology to water facilities for routine water quality monitoring and related water research, especially for the emerging iodoacetic acids. Graphical abstract High performance ion chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for detection of haloacetic acids in water.

  18. Persistent organic contaminants in Saharan dust air masses in West Africa, Cape Verde and the eastern Caribbean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, Virginia H.; Majewski, Michael S.; Foreman, William T.; Genualdi, Susan A.; Mohammed, Azad; Massey Simonich, Stacy L.

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic semivolatile organic compounds (SOCs) that persist in the environment, bioaccumulate, are toxic at low concentrations, and undergo long-range atmospheric transport (LRT) were identified and quantified in the atmosphere of a Saharan dust source region (Mali) and during Saharan dust incursions at downwind sites in the eastern Caribbean (U.S. Virgin Islands, Trinidad and Tobago) and Cape Verde. More organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides (OCPPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners were detected in the Saharan dust region than at downwind sites. Seven of the 13 OCPPs detected occurred at all sites: chlordanes, chlorpyrifos, dacthal, dieldrin, endosulfans, hexachlorobenzene (HCB), and trifluralin. Total SOCs ranged from 1.9–126 ng/m3 (mean = 25 ± 34) at source and 0.05–0.71 ng/m3 (mean = 0.24 ± 0.18) at downwind sites during dust conditions. Most SOC concentrations were 1–3 orders of magnitude higher in source than downwind sites. A Saharan source was confirmed for sampled air masses at downwind sites based on dust particle elemental composition and rare earth ratios, atmospheric back trajectory models, and field observations. SOC concentrations were considerably below existing occupational and/or regulatory limits; however, few regulatory limits exist for these persistent organic compounds. Long-term effects of chronic exposure to low concentrations of SOCs are unknown, as are possible additive or synergistic effects of mixtures of SOCs, biologically active trace metals, and mineral dust particles transported together in Saharan dust air masses.

  19. Gold nanoparticle-aluminum oxide adsorbent for efficient removal of mercury species from natural waters.

    PubMed

    Lo, Sut-I; Chen, Po-Cheng; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2012-03-06

    We report a new adsorbent for removal of mercury species. By mixing Au nanoparticles (NPs) 13 nm in diameter with aluminum oxide (Al(2)O(3)) particles 50-200 μm in diameter, Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbents are easily prepared. Three adsorbents, Al(2)O(3), Au NPs, and Au NP-Al(2)O(3), were tested for removal of mercury species [Hg(2+), methylmercury (MeHg(+)), ethylmercury (EtHg(+)), and phenylmercury (PhHg(+))]. The Au NP adsorbent has a higher binding affinity (dissociation constant; K(d) = 0.3 nM) for Hg(2+) ions than the Al(2)O(3) adsorbent (K(d) = 52.9 nM). The Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbent has a higher affinity for mercury species and other tested metal ions than the Al(2)O(3) and Au NP adsorbents. The Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbent provides a synergic effect and, thus, is effective for removal of most tested metal ions and organic mercury species. After preconcentration of mercury ions by an Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbent, analysis of mercury ions down to the subppq level in aqueous solution was performed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbent allows effective removal of mercury species spiked in lake water, groundwater, and seawater with efficiencies greater than 97%. We also used Al(2)O(3) and Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbents sequentially for selectively removing Hg(2+) and MeHg(+) ions from water. The low-cost, effective, and stable Au NP-Al(2)O(3) adsorbent shows great potential for economical removal of various mercury species.

  20. Coupling passive sampling and time of flight mass spectrometry for a better estimation of polar pesticide freshwater contamination: Simultaneous target quantification and screening analysis.

    PubMed

    Guibal, Robin; Lissalde, Sophie; Charriau, Adeline; Poulier, Gaëlle; Mazzella, Nicolas; Guibaud, Gilles

    2015-03-27

    The aim of this study was first to develop and validate an analytical method for the quantification of 35 polar pesticides and 9 metabolites by ultra-high-performance-liquid chromatography combined with a high resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometer detector (UHPLC-(Q)-TOF). Various analytical conditions were investigated (eluent composition and mass parameters) to optimize analyte responses. Analytical performance (linearity, limit of quantification, and accuracy) was then evaluated and interference in the extract of a passive sampler exposed in freshwater (POCIS: Polar Organic Chemical Integrative Sampler) was studied. The proposed quantification method was validated for 43 compounds with variation of calibration slopes below 10% in environmental matrix. For the unvalidated compound DIA (atrazine-desisopropyl: an atrazine metabolite), interference increased the error of concentration determination (50%). The limits of quantification obtained by combining POCIS and UHPLC-(Q)-TOF for 43 target compounds were between 0.1 (terbuthylazine) and 10.7 ng/L (acetochlor). Secondly, the method was successfully applied during a 14-day POCIS river exposure, and gave concentration values similar to a more commonly used triple quadrupole detector regarding concentration, but allowed for the detection of more compounds. Additionally with the targeted compound quantification, the (Q)-TOF mass spectrometer was also used for screening non-target compounds (other pesticides and pharmaceuticals) in POCIS extracts. Moreover, the acquisition of full scan MS data allowed the identification of the polyethylene glycol (PEG) compounds which gave unresolvable interference to DIA, and thus questions the ability of DIA to be used as performance reference compound (PRC) to determine sampling rates in situ. This study therefore illustrates the potential, and proposes a pathway, of UHPLC-(Q)-TOF combined with POCIS in situ pre-concentration for both quantitative and screening analyses of

  1. Determination of petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated soils using solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cam, D; Gagni, S

    2001-11-01

    Manual solid-phase microextraction (SPME) coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry is investigated as a possible alternative for the determination of petroleum hydrocarbons in soils. Spiked onto an agricultural soil is a commercial diesel fuel (DF) with the following composition by weight: 12% linear alkanes, 52% saturated hydrocarbons (branched and cyclic), 21% alkylated aromatic hydrocarbons, 6% polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and 9% unidentified compounds. The spiked soil samples are aged three days at room temperature before analysis. The optimal conditions for the SPME of DF from soils are examined and maximum sensitivity is obtained using a 100-microm polydimethylsiloxane fiber at a sampling temperature of 47 degrees C by sonication both in the headspace and directly through a water medium. The reproducibility of the whole technique showed a relative standard deviation of 10%. The parameters that can influence the recovery of DF (such as the time of SPME extraction, the presence of organic solvent and water, and the matrix) are investigated. The linearity is verified in the range of 40 to 1200 mg/L for the direct injection of DF, 0.1 to 1 mg/L for the SPME of DF from water, and 1 to 50 mg/Kg of dry soil for the SPME of DF from soils. The detection limits are respectively 0.5 mg/L, 0.02 mg/L, and 0.1 mg/Kg of dry soil. The method is corroborated by comparing the results with those obtained by the traditional way.

  2. Coupling centrifuge modeling and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to determine contaminant retardation in clays.

    PubMed

    Timms, Wendy; Hendry, M Jim; Muise, Jason; Kerrich, Robert

    2009-02-15

    Quantifying the retardation (Rd) of reactive solutes as they migrate through low-permeability clay-rich media is difficult, thus motivating this study to assess the viability of combining centrifuge modeling and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) techniques. An influent solution containing Cl-, trace metals, and lanthanide species flowed at 1.0 mL x h(-1) through an undisturbed clay-rich core sample (33 mm diameter x 50 mm long) mounted in a UFA Beckman centrifuge operating at 3000 rpm (N factor = 876 g). During the 87 day experiment the hydraulic conductivity of the core was 3.4 x 10(-10) m x s(-1). Effluent breakthrough data indicate the Rd of Tl to be 10; incomplete breakthrough (non-steady-state) data for 145Nd and 171Yb suggest Rd values of >75 and >85, respectively. At the completion of the transport experiment, longitudinal sections of the core solid were analyzed for 145Nd and 171Yb using a Cetac laser ablation system coupled with an ICP-MS. The longitudinal core sections yielded Rd values of >10000 for 145Nd and 171Yb. This study demonstrates coupling these techniques can provide Rd values for a wide range of reactive solutes with relatively rapid testing of small-scale, low hydraulic conductivity core samples.

  3. Fast determination of four polar contaminants in soy nutraceutical products by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Domingos Alves, Renata; Romero-González, Roberto; López-Ruiz, Rosalía; Jiménez-Medina, M L; Garrido Frenich, Antonia

    2016-11-01

    An analytical method based on a modified QuPPe (quick polar pesticide) extraction procedure coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was evaluated for the determination of four polar compounds (chlorate, fosetyl-Al, maleic hydrazide, and perchlorate) in nutraceutical products obtained from soy. Experimental conditions including extraction such as solvent, acidification, time, and clean-up sorbents were varied. Acidified acetonitrile (1 % formic acid, v/v) was used as extraction solvent instead of methanol (conventional QuPPe), which provides a doughy mixture which cannot be injected into the LC. Clean-up or derivatization steps were avoided. For analysis, several stationary phases were evaluated and Hypercarb (porous graphitic carbon) provided the best results. The optimized method was validated and recoveries ranged between 46 and 119 %, and correction factors can be used for quantification purposes bearing in mind that inter-day precision was equal to or lower than 17 %. Limits of quantification (LOQs) ranged from 4 to 100 μg kg(-1). Soy-based nutraceutical products were analyzed and chlorate was detected in five samples at concentrations between 63 and 1642 μg kg(-1). Graphical Abstract Analysis of polar compounds in soy-based nutraceutical products.

  4. Experimental characterization of adsorbed protein orientation, conformation, and bioactivity

    PubMed Central

    Thyparambil, Aby A.; Wei, Yang; Latour, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Protein adsorption on material surfaces is a common phenomenon that is of critical importance in many biotechnological applications. The structure and function of adsorbed proteins are tightly interrelated and play a key role in the communication and interaction of the adsorbed proteins with the surrounding environment. Because the bioactive state of a protein on a surface is a function of the orientation, conformation, and accessibility of its bioactive site(s), the isolated determination of just one or two of these factors will typically not be sufficient to understand the structure–function relationships of the adsorbed layer. Rather a combination of methods is needed to address each of these factors in a synergistic manner to provide a complementary dataset to characterize and understand the bioactive state of adsorbed protein. Over the past several years, the authors have focused on the development of such a set of complementary methods to address this need. These methods include adsorbed-state circular dichroism spectropolarimetry to determine adsorption-induced changes in protein secondary structure, amino-acid labeling/mass spectrometry to assess adsorbed protein orientation and tertiary structure by monitoring adsorption-induced changes in residue solvent accessibility, and bioactivity assays to assess adsorption-induced changes in protein bioactivity. In this paper, the authors describe the methods that they have developed and/or adapted for each of these assays. The authors then provide an example of their application to characterize how adsorption-induced changes in protein structure influence the enzymatic activity of hen egg-white lysozyme on fused silica glass, high density polyethylene, and poly(methyl-methacrylate) as a set of model systems. PMID:25708632

  5. Structure and dynamics of highly adsorbed semiflexible polymer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo, Jan-Michael; Cheng, Shiwang; Kumar, Rajeev; Goswami, Monojoy; Sokolov, Alexie; Sumpter, Bobby

    2015-03-01

    We present a detailed analysis of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of melts of semi-flexible polymer chains in the presence of an adsorbing substrate. For polymer chains located far from the substrate the chain conformations follow the worm-like chain model, in contrast to the reflected Gaussian conformation near the substrate. This is demonstrated in the chain center-of-mass distribution normal to the substrate and the probability of a polymer chain ends to be the closest to the substrate. Both quantities agree with Silberberg's derivation for an ideal chain in the presence of a reflecting wall. We characterized the adsorbed chains and counted the number of loops and tails. For stiff chains, a tail and an adsorbed segment dominate the chain conformation of the adsorbed layer. Also, the mean-square end-to-end distance normal to the substrate is proportional to the normal component of the mean-square end-to-end distance of the tails. The tails do not follow the worm-like chain model and exhibit a stretched conformation. This picture for the adsorbed layer is akin to the ``polydisperse pseudobrush'' envisioned by Guiselin. We probe the dynamics of the segments by calculating the layer (z-)resolved intermediate coherent collective dynamics structure factor, S(q,t,z), for q values equivalent to the bond length. The segment dynamics is slower for stiffer chains. In the adsorbed layer, dynamics is slowed down and can be described by two relaxation times. Department of Energy, Office of Science DE-AC05-00OR227.

  6. Nicotine and metabolites determination in human plasma by ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: a simple approach for solving contamination problem and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Liachenko, Natalia; Boulamery, Audrey; Simon, Nicolas

    2015-10-01

    A quantitative method using ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry is described for simultaneous determination of nicotine and its metabolites (cotinine and trans-3'- hydroxycotinine) in human plasma. Aliquots of 0.25 mL of plasma specimens were used for analysis, and 3 analytes were extracted by liquid-liquid extraction. The main problem was blank plasma contamination with environmental nicotine. Activated charcoal was used to avoid this analytical interference. For optimized chromatographic performance, a basic mobile phase consisting of 0.2% ammonia in water (mobile phase A, pH10.6) and acetonitrile (mobile phase B) was selected. The analytes were separated on a 50 mm × 2.1 mm BEH C18 column, 1.7 μm particle size, and quantified by MS/MS using multiple-reaction monitoring (MRM) in positive mode. The chromatographic separation was achieved in 3 min followed by 1.2 min of column equilibration. The calibration curves were linear in the concentration range of 10-1000 ng/mL with correlation coefficients exceeding 0.99. Within-day precisions and between-day precisions (CV, %) were <15 %. The accuracy expressed as bias was within ±15% for all analytes. The recovery values ranged from 50% to 97%. The ions used for quantification of nicotine, cotinine and 3-OH-cotinine were 166.9 > 129.7; 176.9 > 79.7; 192.9 > 79.7 m/z, respectively. The original blank sample preparation solved the problem of contamination in a cost-effective and efficient way. The validated method has been routinely used for analysis of nicotine and metabolites and determination of hydroxycotinine/cotinine metabolic ratio. This biomarker seems to be interesting at predicting response of nicotine patch replacement therapies.

  7. Sampling and mass spectrometry approaches for the detection of drugs and foreign contaminants in breath for homeland security applications

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Audrey Noreen

    2009-01-01

    Homeland security relies heavily on analytical chemistry to identify suspicious materials and persons. Traditionally this role has focused on attribution, determining the type and origin of an explosive, for example. But as technology advances, analytical chemistry can and will play an important role in the prevention and preemption of terrorist attacks. More sensitive and selective detection techniques can allow suspicious materials and persons to be identified even before a final destructive product is made. The work presented herein focuses on the use of commercial and novel detection techniques for application to the prevention of terrorist activities. Although drugs are not commonly thought of when discussing terrorism, narcoterrorism has become a significant threat in the 21st century. The role of the drug trade in the funding of terrorist groups is prevalent; thus, reducing the trafficking of illegal drugs can play a role in the prevention of terrorism by cutting off much needed funding. To do so, sensitive, specific, and robust analytical equipment is needed to quickly identify a suspected drug sample no matter what matrix it is in. Single Particle Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (SPAMS) is a novel technique that has previously been applied to biological and chemical detection. The current work applies SPAMS to drug analysis, identifying the active ingredients in single component, multi-component, and multi-tablet drug samples in a relatively non-destructive manner. In order to do so, a sampling apparatus was created to allow particle generation from drug tablets with on-line introduction to the SPAMS instrument. Rules trees were developed to automate the identification of drug samples on a single particle basis. A novel analytical scheme was also developed to identify suspect individuals based on chemical signatures in human breath. Human breath was sampled using an RTube{trademark} and the trace volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were preconcentrated using solid

  8. A compositional multiphase model for groundwater contamination by petroleum products: 1. Theoretical considerations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corapcioglu, M.Y.; Baehr, Arthur L.

    1987-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed to describe the fate of hydrocarbon constituents of petroleum products introduced to soils as an immiscible liquid from sources such as leaking underground storage tanks and ruptured pipelines. The problem is one of multiphase transport (oil (immiscible), air, and water phases) of a reactive contaminant with constituents such as benzene, toluene, and xylene found in refined petroleum products like gasoline. In the unsaturated zone, transport of each constituent can occur as a solute in the water phase, vapor in the air phase, and as an unaltered constituent in the oil phase. Additionally, the model allows for adsorption. Molecular transformations, microbially mediated or abiotic, are incorporated as sink terms in the conservation of mass equations. An equilibrium approximation, applicable to any immiscible organic contaminant is applied to partition constituent mass between the air, oil, water, and adsorbed phases for points in the region where the oil phase exists. Outside the oil plume the equilibrium approximation takes on a simpler form to partition constituent mass between the air, water, and adsorbed phases only. Microbial degradation of petroleum products is first discussed in a general model, then the conservation of mass equation for oxygen is incorporated into the analysis which takes advantage of the key role played by oxygen in the metabolism of hydrocarbon utilizing microbes in soil environments. Approximations to two subproblems, oil plume establishment in the unsaturated zone, and solute and vapor transport subsequent to immiscible plume establishment are then developed from the general model.

  9. Automated mini-column solid-phase extraction cleanup for high-throughput analysis of chemical contaminants in foods by low-pressure gas chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study demonstrated the application of an automated high-throughput mini-cartridge solid-phase extraction (mini-SPE) cleanup for the rapid low-pressure gas chromatography – tandem mass spectrometry (LPGC-MS/MS) analysis of pesticides and environmental contaminants in QuEChERS extracts of foods. ...

  10. 3,5-Dichlorophenol Removal From Wastewater Using Alternative Adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobetičová, Hana; Lipovský, Marek; Wachter, Igor; Soldán, Maroš

    2015-06-01

    The main objective of this paper is to evaluate the efficiency of 3,5-dichlorophenol removal from wastewater by using alternative low cost adsorbents. Waste from the production and processing of metals (black nickel mud, red mud) and a biosorbent (Lemna minor) were used for this research. Initial concentration of the contaminant was 4 mmol L-1, the contact time of sorbent and waste water was 0 - 48 hrs and the temperature during experiment was 25 ± 0.2 °C. The results show that the highest removal efficiency of 3,5 - dichlorophenol (58.18 %) was reached by the red mud in 48 hours.

  11. Effect of adsorbed chlorine and oxygen on the shear strength of iron and copper junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    Static-friction experiments were performed in ultrahigh vacuum at room temperature on copper, iron, and steel contacts selectively contaminated with oxygen and chlorine in submonolayer amounts. The concentration of the adsorbates was determined with Auger electron spectroscopy and was measured relative to the saturation concentration of oxygen on iron (concentration, 1.0). The coefficient of static friction decreased with increasing adsorbate concentration; however, it was independent of the type of metal and the adsorbate species. The results compared satisfactorily with an extension of the junction growth theory to heterogeneous interfaces. The reduction in interfacial shear strength was measured by the ratio of the shear strength of the interface with an adsorbate concentration of 1.0 and the strength of the clean metal interface. This ratio was about 0.835 for all the systems tested.

  12. Effect of adsorbed chlorine and oxygen on shear strength of iron and copper junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. R.

    1975-01-01

    Static friction experiments were performed in ultrahigh vacuum at room temperature on copper, iron, and steel contacts selectively contaminated with oxygen and chlorine in submonolayer amounts. The concentration of the adsorbates was determined with Auger electron spectroscopy and was measured relative to the saturation concentration of oxygen on iron (concentration 1.0). The coefficient of static friction decreased with increasing adsorbate concentration. It was independent of the metal and the adsorbate. The results compared satisfactorily with an extension of the junction growth theory to heterogeneous interfaces. The reduction in interfacial shear strength was measured by the ratio sub a/sub m where sub a is the shear strength of the interface with an adsorbate concentration of 1.0, and sub m is the strength of the clean metal interface. This ratio was 0.835 + or - 0.012 for all the systems tested.

  13. Removal effects and mechanisms of Microcystic aeruginosa by Chitosan-modified Adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xi; Wu, Cuirong; He, Yan; Zhang, Bingru; Li, Fengting

    2010-11-01

    The health of humans and other organisms is threatened by increasingly serious water contamination by algae in all the country's major lakes such as Taihu Lake. This experiment was conducted to investigate the removal effects and mechanism of Microcystic aeruginosa by Chitosan-modified adsorbent, with comparison of polyaluminium chloride (PAC) and poly ferric sulfate (PFS). Microcystic aeruginosa grown in the laboratory was used for this experiment. The results showed that the algae-removal efficiency of Chitosan-modified adsorbent presents a good performance. When the dosage of the adsorbent reached 20 ppm, the turbidity and the chlorophyll a of treated water dropped by 90% and 86%, respectively. Compared to conventional coagulation, the dosage was reduced. The adhesive bridge effect of Chitosan and adsorption of modified adsorbent provided an important complement to subsequent dehydrating treatment for algae.

  14. Adsorption and Desorption of Carbon Dioxide and Water Mixtures on Synthetic Hydrophobic Carbonaceous Adsorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John E.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Several synthetic carbonaceous adsorbents produced through pyrolysis of polymeric materials are available commercially. Some appear to have advantages over activated carbon for certain adsorption applications. In particular, they can have tailored hydrophobicities that are significantly greater than that of activated carbon, while moderately high surfaces areas are retained. These sorbents are being investigated for possible use in removing trace contaminants and excess carbon dioxide from air in closed habitats, plant growth chambers, and other applications involving purification of humid gas streams. We have analyzed the characteristics of a few of these adsorbents through adsorption and desorption experiments and standard characterization techniques. This paper presents pure and multicomponent adsorption data collected for carbon dioxide and water on two synthetic carbonaceous adsorbents having different hydrophobicities and capillary condensation characteristics. The observations are interpreted through consideration of the pore structure and surface chemistry of the solids and interactions between adsorbed carbon dioxide, water, and the solvent gas.

  15. Graphene oxide/chitin nanofibril composite foams as column adsorbents for aqueous pollutants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhongshi; Liu, Dagang; Zhu, Yi; Li, Zehui; Li, Zhenxuan; Tian, Huafeng; Liu, Haiqing

    2016-06-25

    A novel graphene oxide/chitin nanofibrils (GO-CNF) composite foam as a column adsorbent was prepared for aqueous contaminant disposal. The structures, morphologies and properties of composite foams supported by nanofibrils were characterized. As a special case, the adsorption of methylene blue (MB) on GO-CNF was investigated regarding the static adsorption and column adsorption-desorption tests. Results from equilibrium adsorption isotherms indicated that the adsorption behavior was well-fitted to Langmuir model. The composite foams reinforced by CNF were dimensionally stable during the column adsorption process and could be reused after elution. The removal efficiency of MB was still nearly 90% after 3 cycles. Furthermore, other inorganic or organic pollutants adsorbed by composite foams were also explored. Therefore, this novel composite foam with remarkable properties such as dimensional stability, universal adsorbent for cationic pollutants, high adsorption capacity, and ease of regeneration was a desirable adsorbent in the future practical application of water pollutant treatment.

  16. The effects of surfactants on the desorption of organic contaminants from aquifer materials

    SciTech Connect

    Brickell, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The efficiency of removing organic contaminants from groundwater aquifers by the pump and treat process is adversely affected by the retardation of the contaminant's mobility due to adsorption onto aquifer material. The use of surfactants in conjunction with the pump and treat process has the potential for improving contaminant mobility by solubilizing the adsorbed contaminant. An experimental program was conducted to screen various types of commercially available nonionic and anionic surfactants for solubilizing adsorbed naphthalene from one type of aquifer material. Two additional types of aquifer materials were obtained, and the surfactant mixture, Tween 20 and Aerosol AY-65, selected during the screening process was used at various concentrations for equilibrium desorption studies to quantify surfactant effects on naphthalene desorption. Column studies subsequently were conducted to determine surfactant effects in a flow through system. Equilibrium desorption studies showed that a 0.125% surfactant solution decreased the partition coefficient 65% compared with water alone for one soil type, while greater surfactant concentrations resulted in less effective mobilization. However, the same surfactant mixture markedly increased the partition coefficient when used with another soil type, and had negligible effects for the third soil type. It was shown that the clay mineralogy significantly influenced the effect of the surfactant solution. Column studies showed that mass removal efficiencies were increased by approximately 40 to 60% using the surfactant solution as compared with water alone. Varying flow rates did not influence the effectiveness of either the surfactant or water solutions.

  17. Submerged membrane adsorption hybrid system using four adsorbents to remove nitrate from water.

    PubMed

    Kalaruban, Mahatheva; Loganathan, Paripurnanda; Kandasamy, Jaya; Vigneswaran, Saravanamuthu

    2017-04-05

    Nitrate contamination of ground and surface waters causes environmental pollution and human health problems in many parts of the world. This study tests the nitrate removal efficiencies of two ion exchange resins (Dowex 21K XLT and iron-modified Dowex 21K XLT (Dowex-Fe)) and two chemically modified bio-adsorbents (amine-grafted corn cob (AG corn cob) and amine-grafted coconut copra (AG coconut copra)) using a dynamic adsorption treatment system. A submerged membrane (microfiltration) adsorption hybrid system (SMAHS) was used for the continuous removal of nitrate with a minimal amount of adsorbents. The efficiency of membrane filtration flux and replacement rate of adsorbent were studied to determine suitable operating conditions to maintain the effluent nitrate concentration below the WHO drinking standard limit of 11.3 mg N/L. The volume of water treated and the amount of nitrate adsorbed per gramme of adsorbent for all four flux tested were in the order Dowex-Fe > Dowex > AG coconut copra > AG corn cob. The volumes of water treated (L/g adsorbent) were 0.91 and 1.85, and the amount of nitrate removed (mg N/g adsorbent) were 9.8 and 22.2 for AG corn cob and Dowex-Fe, respectively, at a flux of 15 L/(m(2)/h).

  18. Suspect screening of large numbers of emerging contaminants in environmental waters using artificial neural networks for chromatographic retention time prediction and high resolution mass spectrometry data analysis.

    PubMed

    Bade, Richard; Bijlsma, Lubertus; Miller, Thomas H; Barron, Leon P; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Hernández, Felix

    2015-12-15

    The recent development of broad-scope high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) screening methods has resulted in a much improved capability for new compound identification in environmental samples. However, positive identifications at the ng/L concentration level rely on analytical reference standards for chromatographic retention time (tR) and mass spectral comparisons. Chromatographic tR prediction can play a role in increasing confidence in suspect screening efforts for new compounds in the environment, especially when standards are not available, but reliable methods are lacking. The current work focuses on the development of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for tR prediction in gradient reversed-phase liquid chromatography and applied along with HRMS data to suspect screening of wastewater and environmental surface water samples. Based on a compound tR dataset of >500 compounds, an optimized 4-layer back-propagation multi-layer perceptron model enabled predictions for 85% of all compounds to within 2min of their measured tR for training (n=344) and verification (n=100) datasets. To evaluate the ANN ability for generalization to new data, the model was further tested using 100 randomly selected compounds and revealed 95% prediction accuracy within the 2-minute elution interval. Given the increasing concern on the presence of drug metabolites and other transformation products (TPs) in the aquatic environment, the model was applied along with HRMS data for preliminary identification of pharmaceutically-related compounds in real samples. Examples of compounds where reference standards were subsequently acquired and later confirmed are also presented. To our knowledge, this work presents for the first time, the successful application of an accurate retention time predictor and HRMS data-mining using the largest number of compounds to preliminarily identify new or emerging contaminants in wastewater and surface waters.

  19. Fast and efficient protein purification using membrane adsorber systems.

    PubMed

    Suck, Kirstin; Walter, Johanna; Menzel, Frauke; Tappe, Alexander; Kasper, Cornelia; Naumann, Claudia; Zeidler, Robert; Scheper, Thomas

    2006-02-10

    The purification of proteins from complex cell culture samples is an essential step in proteomic research. Traditional chromatographic methods often require several steps resulting in time consuming and costly procedures. In contrast, protein purification via membrane adsorbers offers the advantage of fast and gentle but still effective isolation. In this work, we present a new method for purification of proteins from crude cell extracts via membrane adsorber based devices. This isolation procedure utilises the membranes favourable pore structure allowing high flow rates without causing high back pressure. Therefore, shear stress to fragile structures is avoided. In addition, mass transfer takes place through convection rather than diffusion, thus allowing very rapid separation processes. Based on this membrane adsorber technology the separation of two model proteins, human serum albumin (HSA) and immungluboline G (IgG) is shown. The isolation of human growth hormone (hGH) from chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture supernatant was performed using a cation exchange membrane. The isolation of the enzyme penicillin acylase from the crude Escherichia coli supernatant was achieved using an anion exchange spin column within one step at a considerable purity. In summary, the membrane adsorber devices have proven to be suitable tools for the purification of proteins from different complex cell culture samples.

  20. Extracting Uranium from Seawater: Promising AI Series Adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Das, S.; Oyola, Y.; Mayes, R. T.; Janke, C. J.; Kuo, L. -J.; Gill, G.; Wood, J. R.; Dai, S.

    2016-04-20

    A new series of adsorbents (AI10 through AI17) were successfully developed at ORNL by radiation induced graft polymerization (RIGP) of acrylonitrile (AN) and vinylphosphonic acid (VPA) (at different mole to mole ratios) onto high surface area polyethylene fiber, with high degrees of grafting (DOG) varying from 110 to 300%. The grafted nitrile groups were converted to amidoxime groups by reaction with 5 wt % hydroxylamine at 80 °C for 72 h. The amidoximated adsorbents were then conditioned with 0.44 M KOH at 80 °C followed by screening at ORNL with prescreening brine spiked with 8 ppm uranium. Uranium adsorption capacities in prescreening ranged from 171 to 187 g-U/kg-ads irrespective of percent DOG. The performance of the adsorbents with respect to uranium adsorption in natural seawater was also investigated using flow-throughcolumn testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Three hours of KOH conditioning led to higher uranium uptake than 1 h of conditioning. The adsorbent AI11, containing AN and VPA at the mole ratio of 3.52, emerged as the potential candidate for the highest uranium adsorption (3.35 g-U/kg-ads.) after 56 days of exposure in seawater flow-through-columns. The rate of vanadium adsorption over uranium linearly increased throughout the 56 days of exposure. The total mass of vanadium uptake was ~5 times greater than uranium after 56 days.

  1. Analysis of processing contaminants in edible oils. Part 1. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the direct detection of 3-monochloropropanediol monoesters and glycidyl esters.

    PubMed

    MacMahon, Shaun; Mazzola, Eugene; Begley, Timothy H; Diachenko, Gregory W

    2013-05-22

    A new analytical method has been developed and validated for the detection of glycidyl esters (GEs) and 3-monochloropropanediol (3-MCPD) monoesters in edible oils. The target compounds represent two classes of potentially carcinogenic chemical contaminants formed during the processing of edible oils. Target analytes are separated from edible oil matrices using a two-step solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure. The extracts are then analyzed using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI). Chromatographic conditions that separate sn-1 and sn-2 monoesters of 3-MCPD have been developed for the first time. The method has been validated for GEs, sn-1 3-MCPD monoesters of lauric, myristic, linolenic, linoleic, oleic, and stearic acids, and sn-2 3-MCPD monoesters of oleic and palmitic acids in coconut, olive, and palm oils using an external calibration curve. The range of average recoveries and relative standard deviations (RSDs) across the three oil matrices at three spiking concentrations are 84-115% (3-16% RSD) for the GEs, 95-113% (1-10% RSD) for the sn-1 3-MCPD monoesters, and 76.8-103% (5.1-11.2% RSD) for the sn-2 3-MCPD monoesters, with limits of quantitation at or below 30 ng/g for the GEs, 60 ng/g for sn-1 3-MCPD monoesters, and 180 ng/g for sn-2 3-MCPD monoesters.

  2. Analysis of processing contaminants in edible oils. Part 2. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for the direct detection of 3-monochloropropanediol and 2-monochloropropanediol diesters.

    PubMed

    MacMahon, Shaun; Begley, Timothy H; Diachenko, Gregory W

    2013-05-22

    A method was developed and validated for the detection of fatty acid diesters of 2-monochloropropanediol (2-MCPD) and 3-monochloropropanediol (3-MCPD) in edible oils. These analytes are potentially carcinogenic chemical contaminants formed during edible oil processing. After separation from oil matrices using a two-step solid-phase extraction (SPE) procedure, the target compounds are quantitated using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI). The first chromatographic conditions have been developed that separate intact diesters of 2-MCPD and 3-MCPD, allowing for their individual quantitation. The method has been validated for 28 3-MCPD diesters of lauric, myristic, palmitic, linolenic, linoleic, oleic, and stearic acids in coconut, olive, and palm oils, as well as 3 2-MCPD diesters, using an external calibration curve. The range of average recoveries and relative standard deviations (RSDs) across the three oil matrices at three spiking concentrations are 88-118% (2-16% RSD) with maximum limits of quantitation of 30 ng/g (ppb).

  3. Distribution, mass inventories, and ecological risk assessment of legacy and emerging contaminants in sediments from the Pearl River Estuary in China.

    PubMed

    Pintado-Herrera, Marina G; Wang, Cuicui; Lu, Jungtai; Chang, Yuan-Pin; Chen, Weifang; Li, Xiaolin; Lara-Martín, Pablo A

    2017-02-05

    This study focused on comparing the occurrences and environmental toxic risks for diverse priority and emerging contaminants (>100 chemicals) in the sediments from the Pearl River Estuary (PRE, China). The most predominant compounds were cationic surfactants, organophosphate flame retardants (e.g., triisobutylphosphate), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), accounting for >75% of the total mass inventory (∼330 metric tons). Wastewater discharges seem to be one of the main sources of pollution in the area, as the highest concentrations (>1000ngg(-1) for some chemicals) were reported in the upper part of the PRE (near Guangzhou city) and Macau. Highest levels of ultraviolet (UV) filters, however, were observed in recreational areas, revealing the importance of direct sources (e.g., outdoor activities). An environmental risk assessment showed that PAHs and dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene had the highest hazard quotient (HQ) values (up to 233). Nonylphenol, a metabolite from nonionic surfactant, and two UV filters (2-ethyl-hexyl-4-trimethoxycinnamate and 4-methylbenzylidene camphor) also posed a significant threat to benthic species (HQ>1). Further research through the realization of monitoring campaigns and toxicity tests is encouraged, as the exposure of the resident aquatic organisms and human population to these and other emerging chemicals is expected to increase over the years.

  4. Evaluation of Dietary Supplement Contamination by Xenobiotic and Essential Elements Using Microwave-Enhanced Sample Digestion and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Gregory M; Rahman, G M Mizanur; Faber, Scott; Wolle, Mesay Mulugeta; Pamuku, Matt; Kingston, H M Skip

    2016-01-01

    Dietary supplements were analyzed by evaluating the elemental content in six widely consumed products manufactured by four well-known companies. The elements included the neurotoxic and carcinogenic elements cadmium, mercury, aluminum, lead, arsenic, and antimony, as well as the essential elements zinc, selenium, chromium, iron, and copper, which were often not listed as ingredients on the product labels. Contamination from either xenobiotic or essential elements was found in all samples analyzed. The samples were prepared using US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 3052, microwave-enhanced digestion. The resulting digests were analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry based on EPA Method 6020B. The analytical protocols were validated by analyzing a multivitamin standard reference material, the National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 3280. The application of EPA standard methods demonstrated their utility in making accurate and precise measurements in complex matrices with multiple ingredients and excipients. In the future, the use of these methods could provide a uniform quality assurance protocol that can be implemented along with other industry guidelines to improve the production of dietary supplements.

  5. Determination of the abundance of delta15N in nitrate ion in contaminated groundwater samples using an elemental analyzer coupled to a mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Y; Nishikawa, M; Nakasugi, O; Ii, H; Hirata, T

    2001-07-01

    A rapid method for measuring the delta15N of nitrate ion in water samples using an isotope ratio mass spectrometer coupled to an elemental analyzer system (EA-MS) was investigated. The water should be removed from the analytical sample before measurement with this system. We investigated the application of a super-absorbent polymer resin powder to various water samples. Each 1 mg of polymer resin powder can absorb about 50-100 mg of solution depending on the concentrations of major ions. Only samples which contain more than 100 mg l(-1) of nitrate-nitrogen are suitable to be absorbed by the polymer resin for the determination of delta15N of nitrate. Preconcentration by rotary evaporation was necessary for dilute samples but the temperature should be kept below 60 degrees C. The polymer resin (about 8 mg) containing the nitrate was directly analyzed using an EA-MS after being oven-dried at 80 degrees C. Good accuracy (precision +/- 0.3%) for delta15N measurements of nitrate-nitrogen in a sample without any isotope fractionation effects during pre-treatment was observed. Results for delta15N of nitrate in contaminated groundwater samples collected in the spring at a tea plantation area in Shizuoka, Japan, were from 9.8 to 10.6%, which were close to the delta15N abundance in organic fertilizers.

  6. Use of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the assessment of the contamination caused by small concentrations of nitrophenols in soils and sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cacho, Juan-Ignacio; Campillo, Natalia; Viñas, Pilar; Hernandez-Cordoba, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    Nitrophenols (NPs) are widely distributed environmental contaminants that can be present in soils and sediments due to the degradation of some pesticides (parathion and fenitrothion) or by accidental spilling in ammunition plants or storage places. This communication reports a rapid and sensitive procedure for the determination of the most common NPs in soils by using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as the analytical technique. Ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE) was employed for the extraction of the NPs from the soil samples to an organic solvent. Next, the resulting UAE extracts were submitted to dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME) for achieving an effective preconcentration. DLLME is an easy-to-carry out, environmentally friendly separation technique involving minimal amounts of organic solvents. Since the volatility of NPs is low, as a previous stage to the GC-MS measurement the compounds were derivatized using a simple "in-situ" acetylation procedure. The main parameters affecting the UAE stage, as well as the DLLME and derivatization steps, were investigated looking for maximum analytical signals. The optimized procedure provided extraction recoveries in the 72-86% range, with precision values (expressed as relative standard deviation, RSD) ≤ 12%, and detection limits ranging from 1.3 and 3.3 ng g-1, depending on the compound. 20 soil and sediment samples, from military, industrial and agricultural areas were analyzed by the studied procedure in order to check its applicability.

  7. Determination of saturated-hydrocarbon contamination in baby foods by using on-line liquid-gas chromatography and off-line liquid chromatography-comprehensive gas chromatography combined with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mondello, Luigi; Zoccali, Mariosimone; Purcaro, Giorgia; Franchina, Flavio Antonio; Sciarrone, Danilo; Moret, Sabrina; Conte, Lanfranco; Tranchida, Peter Quinto

    2012-10-12

    The present contribution describes an investigation directed towards the use of a rapid heart-cutting multidimensional LC-GC-FID method for the analysis of mineral oil saturated hydrocarbons (MOSH), contained in different types of homogenized solid baby food (fish, meat and fruit products). The fish and meat products all contained vegetable oil (sunflower), potentially an important source of mineral-oil contamination. Sixteen commercial baby food samples were subjected to analysis, with various degrees of MOSH contamination (from 0.3mg/kg to circa 14 mg/kg) found. Hence, MOSH contamination was found not only in the meat and fish products, but also in the fruit ones. A fruit-based baby food was lab-made, using the ingredients reported on the commercial product, and was found to be contaminated. The single ingredients were then subjected to LC-GC analysis, with corn starch and sugar found to be the source of contamination. For confirmation of the analytical findings, three of the sixteen samples were analyzed in two separate laboratories, using two distinct LC-GC methods, based on different interfaces. The results were confirmed, in qualitative terms, by collecting the LC fractions, relative to some of the food samples, and subjecting them to comprehensive two-dimensional GC-quadrupole mass spectrometry. Thus, mass spectral data were attained for the saturated hydrocarbons.

  8. Kinetics and isotherm analysis of Tropaeoline 000 adsorption onto unsaturated polyester resin (UPR): a non-carbon adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rajeev; Sharma, Pooja; Sikarwar, Shalini

    2013-03-01

    The presence of dyes in water is undesirable due to the toxicological impact of their entrance into the food chain. Owing to the recalcitrant nature of dyes to biological oxidation, a tertiary treatment like adsorption is required. In the present study, unsaturated polyester resin (UPR) has been used as a sorbent in the treatment of dye-contaminated water. Different concentrations of Tropaeoline 000 containing water were treated with UPR. The preliminary investigations were carried out by batch adsorption to examine the effects of pH, adsorbate concentration, adsorbent dosage, contact time, and temperature. A plausible mechanism for the ongoing adsorption process and thermodynamic parameters have also been obtained from Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherm models. Thermodynamic parameter showed that the sorption process of Tropaeoline 000 onto activated carbon (AC) and UPR were feasible, spontaneous, and endothermic under studied conditions. The estimated values for (ΔG) are -10.48 × 10(3) and -6.098 × 10(3) kJ mol(-1) over AC and UPR at 303 K (30 °C), indicating towards a spontaneous process. The adsorption process followed pseudo-first-order model. The mass transfer property of the sorption process was studied using Lagergren pseudo-first-order kinetic models. The values of % removal and k (ad) for dye systems were calculated at different temperatures (303-323 K). The mechanism of the adsorption process was determined from the intraparticle diffusion model.

  9. Molecularly Imprinted Filtering Adsorbents for Odor Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Shinohara, Sho; Chiyomaru, You; Sassa, Fumihiro; Liu, Chuanjun; Hayashi, Kenshi

    2016-01-01

    Versatile odor sensors that can discriminate among huge numbers of environmental odorants are desired in many fields, including robotics, environmental monitoring, and food production. However, odor sensors comparable to an animal’s nose have not yet been developed. An animal’s olfactory system recognizes odor clusters with specific molecular properties and uses this combinatorial information in odor discrimination. This suggests that measurement and clustering of odor molecular properties (e.g., polarity, size) using an artificial sensor is a promising approach to odor sensing. Here, adsorbents composed of composite materials with molecular recognition properties were developed for odor sensing. The selectivity of the sensor depends on the adsorbent materials, so specific polymeric materials with particular solubility parameters were chosen to adsorb odorants with various properties. The adsorption properties of the adsorbents could be modified by mixing adsorbent materials. Moreover, a novel molecularly imprinted filtering adsorbent (MIFA), composed of an adsorbent substrate covered with a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) layer, was developed to improve the odor molecular recognition ability. The combination of the adsorbent and MIP layer provided a higher specificity toward target molecules. The MIFA thus provides a useful technique for the design and control of adsorbents with adsorption properties specific to particular odor molecules. PMID:27886070

  10. Effects of surfactants on the desorption of organic contaminants from aquifer materials. Doctoral thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Brickell, J.L.

    1989-08-01

    The efficiency of removing organic contaminants from groundwater aquifers by the pump and treat process is adversely affected by the retardation of the contaminant's mobility due to adsorption onto aquifer material. The use of surfactants in conjunction with the pump and treat process has the potential for improving contaminant mobility by solubilizing the adsorbed contaminant.

  11. Particle reflection and its energy spectrum from solid surfaces with adsorbate atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamura, Y.

    1988-06-01

    Using the ACAT and ACOCT codes, the particle reflection coefficients and energy spectra reflected from solid surfaces covered with adsorbated atoms have been calculated in the low-energy region. It is found that the particle reflection coefficients of low energy ions are much reduced due to the collision between an incoming ion and an adsorbate atom, especially for M1 > M3 ( M1 and M3 being the atomic masses of an ion and an adsorbate atom, respectively), and the surface peak from a substrate atom becomes strongly suppressed as the coverage increases.

  12. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a solid-phase extraction adsorbent for the determination of three barbiturates in pork by ion trap gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS) following microwave assisted derivatization.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Haixiang; Wang, Liping; Qiu, Yueming; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Zhong, Weike; Li, Xiang

    2007-03-14

    A new method was developed for the rapid screening and confirmation analysis of barbital, amobarbital and phenobarbital residues in pork by gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC/MS/MS) with ion trap MSD. The residual barbiturates in pork were extracted by ultrasonic extraction, cleaned up on a multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) packed solid phase extraction (SPE) cartridge and applied acetone-ethyl acetate (3:7, v/v) mixture as eluting solvent and derivatized with CH3I under microwave irradiation. The methylated barbiturates were separated on a TR-5MS capillary column and detected with an ion trap mass detector. Electron impact ion source (EI) operating MS/MS mode was adopted for identification and external standard method was employed for quantification. One precursor ion m/z 169 was selected for analysis of barbital and amobarbital and m/z 232 was selected for phenobarbital. The product ions were obtained under 1.0 V excitation voltage. Good linearities (linear coefficient R > 0.99) were obtained at the range of 0.5-50 microg kg(-1). Limit of detection (LOD) of barbital was 0.2 microg kg(-1) and that of amobarbital and phenobarbital were both 0.1 microg kg(-1) (S/N > or = 3). Limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.5 microg kg(-1) for three barbiturates (S/N > or = 10). Satisfying recoveries ranging from 75% to 96% of the three barbiturates spiked in pork were obtained, with relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) in the range of 2.1-7.8%.

  13. Complete braided adsorbent for marine testing to demonstrate 3g-U/kg-adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Chris; Yatsandra, Oyola; Mayes, Richard; none,; Gill, Gary; Li-Jung, Kuo; Wood, Jordana; Sadananda, Das

    2014-04-30

    ORNL has manufactured four braided adsorbents that successfully demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities ranging from 3.0-3.6 g-U/kg-adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. Four new braided and leno woven fabric adsorbents have also been prepared by ORNL and are currently undergoing marine testing at PNNL.

  14. Contaminant hydrogeology

    SciTech Connect

    Fetter, C.W.

    1993-01-01

    Hydrogeology is a rapidly evolving field in which new approaches and tools are being applied to solve problems. This new book fills an important niche. Fetter focuses primarily on chemical processes in the subsurface, avoiding duplication of materials that are covered in other, more classical texts. This book is an excellent follow-up to his earlier text, Applied Hydrogeology, and reviews only briefly the foundational concepts covered in the earlier textbook. Contaminant Hydrogeology is written at the graduate student level and assumes prerequisite courses in physics, chemistry, and hydrogeology. For the most part, each of the nine chapters covers a major area of concern common to applied contaminant studies. A thorough, theoretical treatment of solute transport through the vadose zone is presented, and a sample problem and a case study add unusually high value to this discussion of a topic that generally is not well understood in the practice. Topics covered include the Buckingham Flux Law, the Richards Equation, vapor-phase transport, equilibrium and nonequilibrium models of mass transport, and preferential flow paths. Nonaqueous-phase liquid migrations under both saturated and unsaturated conditions is covered for horizontal as well as vertical migration. Both light and dense nonaqueous phase liquids are presented, and Darcy's Law for two-phase flow is introduced. The strength of Contaminant Hydrogeology lies in the author's ability to translate concepts through practical experience. This book links the theoretical to the practical through example problems and case histories. It should be considered for use in graduate classes and would be a valuable reference in the library of any practicing hydrogeologist.

  15. Application of the Molecular Adsorber Coating Technology on the Ionospheric Connection Explorer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Secunda, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    The Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC) is a zeolite based highly porous coating technology that was developed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to capture outgassed contaminants, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, silicones, epoxies, potting compounds, and other similar materials. This paper describes the use of the MAC technology to address molecular contamination concerns on NASAs Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) program led by the University of California (UC) Berkeleys Space Sciences Laboratory. The sprayable paint technology was applied onto plates that were installed within the instrument cavity of ICONs Far Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (FUV). However, due to the instruments particulate sensitivity, the coating surface was vibrationally cleaned through simulated acoustics to reduce the risk of particle fall-out contamination. This paper summarizes the coating application efforts on the FUV adsorber plates, the simulated laboratory acoustic level cleaning test methods, particulation characteristics, and future plans for the MAC technology.

  16. Application of the Molecular Adsorber Coating technology on the Ionospheric Connection Explorer program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, Nithin S.; Hasegawa, Mark M.; Secunda, Mark S.

    2016-09-01

    The Molecular Adsorber Coating (MAC) is a zeolite based highly porous coating technology that was developed by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to capture outgassed contaminants, such as plastics, adhesives, lubricants, silicones, epoxies, potting compounds, and other similar materials. This paper describes the use of the MAC technology to address molecular contamination concerns on NASA's Ionospheric Connection Explorer (ICON) program led by the University of California (UC) Berkeley's Space Sciences Laboratory. The sprayable paint technology was applied onto plates that were installed within the instrument cavity of ICON's Far Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (FUV). However, due to the instrument's particulate sensitivity, the coating surface was vibrationally cleaned through simulated acoustics to reduce the risk of particle fall-out contamination. This paper summarizes the coating application efforts on the FUV adsorber plates, the simulated laboratory acoustic level cleaning test methods, particulation characteristics, and future plans for the MAC technology.

  17. Adsorbate Diffusion on Transition Metal Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    systematically studied adsorption and diffusion of atomic and diatomic species (H, C, N, O, CO, and NO) on nanometer-sized Pt and Cu nanoparticles with...species and two diatomic molecules (H, C, N, O, CO, and NO) as adsorbates and study the adsorption and diffusion of these adsorbates across the edges

  18. Establishing a geochemical heterogeneity model for a contaminated vadose zone--aquifer system.

    PubMed

    Murray, Christopher J; Zachara, John M; McKinley, James P; Ward, Andy; Bott, Yi-Ju; Draper, Kate; Moore, Dean

    2013-10-01

    A large set of sediment samples from a 1600 m² experimental plot within a 2.2 km² vadose zone and groundwater uranium (VI) plume was subject to physical, chemical, and mineralogic characterization. The plot is being used for field experimentation on U(VI) recharge and transport processes within a persistent groundwater plume that exists in the groundwater-river interaction zone of the Columbia River at the U.S. DOE Hanford site. The samples were obtained during the installation of 35 tightly spaced (10 m separation) groundwater monitoring wells. The characterization measurements for each sample included total contaminant concentrations (U and Cu primarily), bicarbonate extractable U(VI), sequential ²³⁸U(VI) contaminant desorption Kd, ²³³U(VI) adsorption K(d), grain size distribution, surface area, extractable poorly crystalline Fe(III) oxides, and mineralogy. The characterization objective was to inform a conceptual model of coupled processes controlling the anomalous longevity of the plume, and to quantify the spatial heterogeneity of the contaminant inventory and the primary properties effecting reactive transport. Correlations were drawn between chemical, physical, and reaction properties, and Gaussian simulation was used to compute multiple 3-D realizations of extractable U(VI), the ²³³U(VI) adsorption K(d), and the distribution of the reactive <2 mm fraction. Adsorbed contaminant U(VI) was highest in the vadose zone and the zone of seasonal water table fluctuation lying at its base. Adsorbed U(VI) was measureable, but low, in the groundwater plume region where very high hydraulic conductivities existed. The distribution of adsorbed U(VI) displayed no apparent correlation with sediment physical or chemical properties. Desorption [²³⁸U(IV)] and adsorption [²³³U(VI)] K(d) values showed appreciable differences due to mass transfer controlled surface complexation and the effects of long subsurface residence times. The ²³³U(VI) adsorption K

  19. Screening of lake sediments for emerging contaminants by liquid chromatography atmospheric pressure photoionization and electrospray ionization coupled to high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chiaia-Hernandez, Aurea C; Krauss, Martin; Hollender, Juliane

    2013-01-15

    We developed a multiresidue method for the target and suspect screening of more than 180 pharmaceuticals, personal care products, pesticides, biocides, additives, corrosion inhibitors, musk fragrances, UV light stabilizers, and industrial chemicals in sediments. Sediment samples were freeze-dried, extracted by pressurized liquid extraction, and cleaned up by liquid-liquid partitioning. The quantification and identification of target compounds with a broad range of physicochemical properties (log K(ow) 0-12) was carried out by liquid chromatography followed by electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) coupled to high resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry (HRMS/MS). The overall method average recoveries and precision are 103% and 9% (RSD), respectively. The method detection limits range from 0.010 to 4 ng/g(dw), while limits of quantification range from 0.030 to 14 ng/g(dw). The use of APPI as an alternative ionization source helped to distinguish two isomeric musk fragrances by means of different ionization behavior. The method was demonstrated on sediment cores from Lake Greifensee located in northeastern Switzerland. The results show that biocides, musk fragrances, and other personal care products were the most frequently detected compounds with concentrations ranging from pg/g(dw) to ng/g(dw), whereas none of the targeted pharmaceuticals were found. The concentrations of many urban contaminants originating from wastewater correlate with the highest phosphorus input into the lake as a proxy for treatment efficiency. HRMS enabled a retrospective analysis of the full-scan data acquisition allowing the detection of suspected compounds like quaternary ammonium surfactants, the biocide triclocarban, and the tentative identification of further compounds without reference standards, among others transformation products of triclosan and triclocarban.

  20. Database of Novel and Emerging Adsorbent Materials

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 205 NIST/ARPA-E Database of Novel and Emerging Adsorbent Materials (Web, free access)   The NIST/ARPA-E Database of Novel and Emerging Adsorbent Materials is a free, web-based catalog of adsorbent materials and measured adsorption properties of numerous materials obtained from article entries from the scientific literature. Search fields for the database include adsorbent material, adsorbate gas, experimental conditions (pressure, temperature), and bibliographic information (author, title, journal), and results from queries are provided as a list of articles matching the search parameters. The database also contains adsorption isotherms digitized from the cataloged articles, which can be compared visually online in the web application or exported for offline analysis.

  1. NOx adsorber and method of regenerating same

    DOEpatents

    Endicott, Dennis L.; Verkiel, Maarten; Driscoll, James J.

    2007-01-30

    New technologies, such as NOx adsorber catalytic converters, are being used to meet increasingly stringent regulations on undesirable emissions, including NOx emissions. NOx adsorbers must be periodically regenerated, which requires an increased fuel consumption. The present disclosure includes a method of regenerating a NOx adsorber within a NOx adsorber catalytic converter. At least one sensor positioned downstream from the NOx adsorber senses, in the downstream exhaust, at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations a plurality of times during a regeneration phase. The sensor is in communication with an electronic control module that includes a regeneration monitoring algorithm operable to end the regeneration phase when a time rate of change of the at least one of NOx, nitrous oxide and ammonia concentrations is after an expected plateau region begins.

  2. Picosecond adsorbate dynamics at condensed phase interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, T.W.; Chang, Y.J.; Martorell, J.

    1993-12-31

    Picosecond surface second harmonic generation has been used to probe a variety of elementary adsorbate reactions at liquid-solid interfaces. Electron transfer reactions at semiconductor-liquid junctions, geminate recombination of photogenerated free radical pairs and the orientational dynamics of dipolar adsorbates have all been explored in varying degrees of detail. These kinetic studies have led to a detailed analysis of adsorbate detection on the surface of non-centrosymmetric substrates as well as the use of total internal reflection geometries for signal enhancement from optically absorbing liquids. Particular emphasis has been placed on the static and dynamic characterization of adsorbate orientational distribution functions and how these are determined from the torque exerted on adsorbates by the angular part of the molecule-surface interaction potential.

  3. Fluorescence dynamics of microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, R.

    2005-03-01

    Sunscreens are generally oily substances which are prepared in organic solvents, emulsions or dispersions with micro- or nanoparticles. These molecules adsorb to and integrate into skin cells. In order to understand the photophysical properties of the sunscreen, we compare steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence in organic solvent of varying dielectric constant ɛ and adsorbed to polystyrene microspheres and dispersed in water. Steady-state fluorescence is highest and average fluorescence lifetime longest in toluene, the solvent of lowest ɛ. However, there is no uniform dependence on ɛ. Sunscreens PABA and padimate-O show complex emission spectra. Microsphere-adsorbed sunscreens exhibit highly non-exponential decay, illustrative of multiple environments of the adsorbed molecule. The heterogeneous fluorescence dynamics likely characterizes sunscreen adsorbed to cells.

  4. Nanovalved Adsorbents for CH4 Storage.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhuonan; Nambo, Apolo; Tate, Kirby L; Bao, Ainan; Zhu, Minqi; Jasinski, Jacek B; Zhou, Shaojun J; Meyer, Howard S; Carreon, Moises A; Li, Shiguang; Yu, Miao

    2016-05-11

    A novel concept of utilizing nanoporous coatings as effective nanovalves on microporous adsorbents was developed for high capacity natural gas storage at low storage pressure. The work reported here for the first time presents the concept of nanovalved adsorbents capable of sealing high pressure CH4 inside the adsorbents and storing it at low pressure. Traditional natural gas storage tanks are thick and heavy, which makes them expensive to manufacture and highly energy-consuming to carry around. Our design uses unique adsorbent pellets with nanoscale pores surrounded by a coating that functions as a valve to help manage the pressure of the gas and facilitate more efficient storage and transportation. We expect this new concept will result in a lighter, more affordable product with increased storage capacity. The nanovalved adsorbent concept demonstrated here can be potentially extended for the storage of other important gas molecules targeted for diverse relevant functional applications.

  5. A non-targeted comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry method and software for inventorying persistent and bioaccumulative contaminants in marine environments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Routine environmental contaminant monitoring projects generally use targeted analytical methods and are not designed to regularly screen for unrecognized or novel contaminants. We describe a non-targeted analytical method and data reporting system designed to identify and document unrecognized and n...

  6. Phosphorylated cellulose triacetate-silica composite adsorbent for recovery of heavy metal ion.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Niharika; Thakur, Amit K; Shahi, Vinod K

    2016-01-20

    Phosphorylated cellulose triacetate (CTA)/silica composite adsorbent was prepared by acid catalyzed sol-gel method using an inorganic precursor (3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTEOS)). Reported composite adsorbent showed comparatively high adsorption capacity for Ni(II) in compare with different heavy metal ions (Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Cd(2+) and Pb(2+)). For Ni(II) adsorption, effect of time, temperature, pH, adsorbent dose and adsorbate concentration were investigated; different kinetic models were also evaluated. Thermodynamic parameters such as ΔG°, ΔH° and ΔS° were also estimated and equilibrium adsorption obeyed Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. Developed adsorbent exhibited about 78.8% Ni(II) adsorption at pH: 6 and a suitable candidate for the removal of Ni(II) ions from wastewater. Further, about 65.5% recovery of adsorbed Ni(II) using EDTA solution was demonstrated, which suggested effective recycling of the functionalized beads would enable it to be used in the treatment of contaminated water in industry.

  7. [Leaching Remediation of Copper and Lead Contaminated Lou Soil by Saponin Under Different Conditions].

    PubMed

    Deng, Hong-xia; Yang, Ya-li; Li, Zhen; Xu, Yan; Li, Rong-hua; Meng, Zhao-fu; Yang, Ya-ti

    2015-04-01

    In order to investigate the leaching remediation effect of the eco-friendly biosurfactant saponin for Cu and Pb in contaminated Lou soil, batch tests method was used to study the leaching effect of saponin solution on single Cu, Pb contaminated Lou soil and mixed Cu and Pb contaminated Lou soil under different conditions such as reaction time, mass concentration of saponin, pH, concentration of background electrolyte and leaching times. The results showed that the maximum leaching removal effect of Cu and Pb in contaminated Lou soil was achieved by complexation of the heavy metals with saponin micelle, when the mass concentration of saponin solution was 50 g x L(-1), pH was 5.0, the reaction time was 240 min, and there was no background electrolyte. In single and mixed contaminated Lou soil, the leaching percentages of Cu were 29.02% and 25.09% after a single leaching with 50 g x L(-1) saponin under optimal condition, while the single leaching percentages of Pb were 31.56% and 28.03%, respectively. The result indicated the removal efficiency of Pb was more significant than that of Cu. After 4 times of leaching, the cumulative leaching percentages of Cu reached 58.92% and 53.11%, while the cumulative leaching percentages of Pb reached 77.69% and 65.32% for single and mixed contaminated Lou soil, respectively. The fractionation results of heavy metals in soil before and after a single leaching showed that the contents of adsorbed and exchangeable Cu and Pb increased in the contaminated soil, while the carbonate-bound, organic bound and sulfide residual Cu and Pb in the contaminated Lou soil could be effectively removed by saponin.

  8. Scrubbing of contaminants from contaminated air streams with aerogel materials with optional photocatalytic destruction

    DOEpatents

    Attia, Yosry A.

    2000-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for separating a vaporous or gaseous contaminant from an air stream contaminated therewith. This method includes the steps of: (a) passing said contaminated air into a contact zone in which is disposed an aerogel material capable of selecting adsorbing said contaminant from air and therein contacting said contaminated air with an aerogel material; and (b) withdrawing from said zone, air depleted of said contaminant. For present purposes, "contaminant" means a material not naturally occurring in ambient air and/or a material naturally occurring in air but present at a concentration above that found in ambient air. Thus, the present invention scrubs (or treats) air for the purpose of returning it to its ambient composition. Also disclosed herein is a process for the photocatalytic destruction of contaminants from an air stream wherein the contaminated air stream is passed into a control cell or contact zone in which is disposed a photocatalytic aerogel and exposing said aerogel to ultraviolet (UV) radiation for photocatalytically destroying the adsorbed contaminant, and withdrawing from said cell an exhaust air stream depleted in said contaminant.

  9. Identification and characterization of new Fusarium masked mycotoxins, T2 and HT2 glycosyl derivatives, in naturally contaminated wheat and oats by liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lattanzio, Veronica M T; Visconti, Angelo; Haidukowski, Miriam; Pascale, Michelangelo

    2012-04-01

    The presence of glucoside derivatives of T-2 and HT-2 toxins (type A trichothecene mycotoxins) in naturally contaminated wheat and oats is reported for the first time. The use of advanced high-resolution mass spectrometry based on Orbitrap technology allowed to obtain molecular structure details by measuring exact masses of main characteristic fragments, with mass accuracy lower than 2.8 ppm (absolute value). A monoglucoside derivative of T-2 toxin and two monoglucoside derivatives of HT-2 toxin were identified and characterized. The analysis of their fragmentation patterns provided evidence for glucosylation at C-3 position for T-2 toxin and at C-3 or C-4 position for HT-2 toxin. A screening for the presence of these new masked forms of mycotoxins was carried out on a set of naturally contaminated wheat and oats samples. On the basis of peak area ratio between glucoside derivatives and free T-2 and HT-2 toxins, the presence of glucoside derivatives was more likely in wheat than in oats samples. The present work confirms the widespread occurrence of trichothecene glucosides in cereal grains naturally contaminated with the relevant unconjugated toxins, thus suggesting the importance of developing suitable analytical methods for their detection. Besides toxicity studies, tracking down these new masked forms of trichothecenes along the food/feed chain would enable to collect information on their relevance in human/animal exposure to mycotoxin risk.

  10. The effects of adsorbing organic pollutants from super heavy oil wastewater by lignite activated coke.

    PubMed

    Tong, Kun; Lin, Aiguo; Ji, Guodong; Wang, Dong; Wang, Xinghui

    2016-05-05

    The adsorption of organic pollutants from super heavy oil wastewater (SHOW) by lignite activated coke (LAC) was investigated. Specifically, the effects of LAC adsorption on pH, BOD5/COD(Cr)(B/C), and the main pollutants before and after adsorption were examined. The removed organic pollutants were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Boehm titrations, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and liquid chromatography with organic carbon detection (LC-OCD). FTIR spectra indicated that organic pollutants containing -COOH and -NH2 functional groups were adsorbed from the SHOW. Boehm titrations further demonstrated that carboxyl, phenolic hydroxyl, and lactonic groups on the surface of the LAC increased. GC-MS showed that the removed main organic compounds are difficult to be degraded or extremely toxics to aquatic organisms. According to the results of LC-OCD, 30.37 mg/L of dissolved organic carbons were removed by LAC adsorption. Among these, hydrophobic organic contaminants accounted for 25.03 mg/L. Furthermore, LAC adsorption was found to increase pH and B/C ratio of the SHOW. The mechanisms of adsorption were found to involve between the hydrogen bonding and the functional groups of carboxylic, phenolic, and lactonic on the LAC surface. In summary, all these results demonstrated that LAC adsorption can remove bio-refractory DOCs, which is beneficial for biodegradation.

  11. Comparative Investigation of the Efficacy of Three Different Adsorbents against OTA-Induced Toxicity in Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Nedeljković-Trailović, Jelena; Trailović, Saša; Resanović, Radmila; Milićević, Dragan; Jovanovic, Milijan; Vasiljevic, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the efficacy of three different adsorbents, inorganic (modified zeolite), organic (esterified glucomannans) and mixed (inorganic and organic components, with the addition of enzymes), in protecting broilers from the toxic effects of ochratoxin A in feed. Broilers were fed diets containing 2 mg/kg of ochratoxin A (OTA) and supplemented with adsorbents at the recommended concentration of 2 g/kg for 21 days. The presence of OTA led to a notable reduction in body weight, lower weight gain, increased feed conversion and induced histopathological changes in the liver and kidneys. The presence of inorganic, organic and mixed adsorbents in contaminated feed only partially reduced the negative effects of OTA on the broiler performances. Broilers that were fed with adsorbent-supplemented feed reached higher body weight (17.96%, 19.09% and 13.59%), compared to the group that received only OTA. The presence of adsorbents partially alleviated the reduction in feed consumption (22.68%, 12.91% and 10.59%), and a similar effect was observed with feed conversion. The applied adsorbents have also reduced the intensity of histopathological changes caused by OTA; however, they were not able to prevent their onset. After the withdrawal of the toxin and adsorbents from the feed (21–42 days), all previously observed disturbances in broilers were reduced, but more remarkably in broilers fed with adsorbents. PMID:25855130

  12. Mobilization of arsenite by dissimilatory reduction of adsorbed arsenate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zobrist, J.; Dowdle, P.R.; Davis, J.A.; Oremland, R.S.

    2000-01-01

    Sulfurospirillum barnesii is capable of anaerobic growth using ferric iron or arsenate as electron acceptors. Cell suspensions of S. barnesii were able to reduce arsenate to arsenite when the former oxyanion was dissolved in solution, or when it was adsorbed onto the surface of ferrihydrite, a common soil mineral, by a variety of mechanisms (e.g., coprecipitation, presorption). Reduction of Fe(III) in ferrihydrite to soluble Fe(II) also occurred, but dissolution of ferrihydrite was not required in order for adsorbed arsenate reduction to be achieved. This was illustrated by bacterial reduction of arsenate coprecipitated with aluminum hydroxide, a mineral that does not undergo reductive dissolution. The rate of arsenate reduction was influenced by the method in which arsenate became associated with the mineral phases and may have been strongly coupled with arsenate desorption rates. The extent of release of arsenite into solution was governed by adsorption of arsenite onto the ferrihydrite or alumina phases. The results of these experiments have interpretive significance to the mobilization of arsenic in large alluvial aquifers, such as those of the Ganges in India and Bangladesh, and in the hyporheic zones of contaminated streams.Sulfurospirillum barnesii is capable of anaerobic growth using ferric iron or arsenate as electron acceptors. Cell suspensions of S. barnesii were able to reduce arsenate to arsenite when the former oxyanion was dissolved in solution, or when it was adsorbed onto the surface of ferrihydrite a common soil mineral, by a variety of mechanisms (e.g., coprecipitation, presorption). Reduction of Fe(III) in ferrihydrite to soluble Fe(II) also occurred, but dissolution of ferrihydrite was not required in order for adsorbed arsenate reduction to be achieved. This was illustrated by bacterial reduction of arsenate coprecipitated with aluminum hydroxide, a mineral that does not undergo reductive dissolution. The rate of arsenate reduction was

  13. Heat transfer to the adsorbent in solar adsorption cooling device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilat, Peter; Patsch, Marek; Papucik, Stefan; Vantuch, Martin

    2014-08-01

    The article deals with design and construction of solar adsorption cooling device and with heat transfer problem in adsorber. The most important part of adsorption cooling system is adsorber/desorber containing adsorbent. Zeolith (adsorbent) type was chosen for its high adsorption capacity, like a coolant was used water. In adsorber/desorber occur, at heating of adsorbent, to heat transfer from heat change medium to the adsorbent. The time required for heating of adsorber filling is very important, because on it depend flexibility of cooling system. Zeolith has a large thermal resistance, therefore it had to be adapted the design and construction of adsorber. As the best shows the tube type of adsorber with double coat construction. By this construction is ensured thin layer of adsorbent and heating is quick in all volume of adsorbent. The process of heat transfer was experimentally measured, but for comparison simulated in ANSYS, too.

  14. Adsorbed natural gas storage with activated carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jian; Brady, T.A.; Rood, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    Despite technical advances to reduce air pollution emissions, motor vehicles still account for 30 to 70% emissions of all urban air pollutants. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require 100 cities in the United States to reduce the amount of their smog within 5 to 15 years. Hence, auto emissions, the major cause of smog, must be reduced 30 to 60% by 1998. Natural gas con be combusted with less pollutant emissions. Adsorbed natural gas (ANG) uses adsorbents and operates with a low storage pressure which results in lower capital costs and maintenance. This paper describes the production of an activated carbon adsorbent produced from an Illinois coal for ANG.

  15. The preparation of polyelectrolyte complexes carboxymethyl chitosan(CMC)-pectin by reflux method as a Pb (II) metal ion adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hastuti, Budi; Mudasir, Siswanta, Dwi; Triyono

    2016-02-01

    Aim of this research is to synthesized a chemically stable polyelectrolyte complexs carboxymetyl chitosan CMC-pectin as Pb(II) ion adsorbent by reflux method. During synthesis process, the optimum mass ratio of CMC and pectin was pre-determined and the active groups of the CMC-pectin complex was characterized by using IR spectrofotometer. Finally, adsorption capacity of the adsorbent material for Pb (II) ions was studied under optimum condition, i.e. adsorbent mass, contact time, and pH. Result shows that CMC could be succesfully combined with pectin to produce CMC-pectin complex. The optimum mass ratio CMC: pectin to form the polyelectrolyte complexs CMC-pectin was 70% : 30%. The active groups identified in the CMC-pectin complex was a hydroxyl (OH) and carboxylate (-COOH) groups. The optimum conditions for Pb (II) ion absoprtion was 10 mg of the adsorbent mass, 75 min of contact time, and pH 5. This material can be effectively used as adsorbents for Pb (II) ions, where up to 91% Pb (II) metal ions was adsorbed from aqueous solution and the adsorption capacity of the adsorbent was 41.63 mg/g.

  16. Parallel pore and surface diffusion of levulinic acid in basic polymeric adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baojian; Yang, Yiwen; Ren, Qilong

    2006-11-03

    The equilibrium and kinetics of levulinic acid (LA) adsorption on two basic polymeric adsorbents, 335 (highly porous gel) and D315 (macroreticular), were investigated. Experimental adsorption rates in batch stirred vessels under a variety of operating conditions were described successfully by the parallel pore and surface diffusion model taking into account external mass transfer and nonlinear Toth isotherm. The film-pore diffusion model was matched with the rate data and the resulting apparent pore diffusivities were strongly concentration-dependent and approached to a constant value for 335 adsorbent. Thus, the constant value was taken as the accurate pore diffusivity, while the pore diffusivity in D315 was estimated from the particle porosity. The surface diffusivities decreased with increasing initial bulk concentration for both adsorbents. The inverse concentration dependence was correlated reasonably well to the change of isosteric heat of adsorption as amount adsorbed.

  17. Novel adsorbent applicability for decontamination of printing wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiurski, Jelena; Oros, Ivana; Ranogajec, Jonjaua; Kecic, Vesna

    2013-04-01

    (up to 93.5%) to remove Zn(II) ion from printing wastewaters. The results showed that fired clay, fired clay modified with polymer addition, natural zeolite and bentonite can be used for Zn(II) ion removal from printing wastewaters by adsorption method in laboratory batch mode. Based on higher affinity to the Zn(II) ion adsorption than fired clay, bentonite and zeolite it was concluded that feasibility of newly designed clayey adsorbent, fired clay with 5 mass% PEG addition is very good. A new designed clayey adsorbent is an effective and economical alternative for the Zn(II) ion removal from printing wastewaters. Acknowledgment: The authors acknowledge the financial support of the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of the Republic of Serbia (Projects No. TR 34014, III 45008 and III 46009).

  18. Simultaneous testing of multiclass organic contaminants in food and environment by liquid chromatography/dielectric barrier discharge ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; García-Reyes, Juan F; Meyer, Cordula; Michels, Antje; Franzke, Joachim; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; Hayen, Heiko

    2012-11-21

    A Dielectric Barrier Discharge Ionization (DBDI) LC/MS interface is based on the use of a low-temperature helium plasma, which features the possibility of simultaneous ionization of species with a wide variety of physicochemical properties. In this work, the performance of LC/DBDI-MS for trace analysis of highly relevant species in food and environment has been examined. Over 75 relevant species including multiclass priority organic contaminants and residues such as pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, organochlorine species, pharmaceuticals, personal care products, and drugs of abuse were tested. LC/DBDI-MS performance for this application was assessed and compared with standard LC/MS sources (electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)). The used benchtop Orbitrap mass spectrometer features a 10 Hz polarity switching mode, so that both positive and negative ion mode acquisitions are possible with acquisition cycles matching the requirements of fast liquid chromatography. Both polar and nonpolar species (including those typically analyzed by GC/electron ionization-MS) can be tested in a single run using polarity switching mode. The methodology was found to be effective in detecting a wide array of organic compounds at concentration levels in the low ng L(-1) to μg kg(-1) range in wastewater and food matrices, respectively. The linearity was evaluated in an olive oil extract, obtaining good correlation coefficients in the studied range. Additionally, minor matrix effects (≤15% of signal suppression or enhancement) were observed for most of the studied analytes in this complex fatty matrix. The results obtained were compared with data from both ESI and APCI sources, obtaining a merged coverage between ESI and APCI in terms of analyte ionization and higher overall sensitivity for the proposed ion source based on the DBD principle. The use of this approach further extends the coverage of current LC/MS methods towards

  19. Heterogeneous Ozonolysis of Surface Adsorbed Lignin Pyrolysis Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinrichs, R. Z.

    2012-12-01

    Biomass combustion releases semi-volatile organic compounds into the troposphere, including many phenols and methoxyphenols as the result of lignin pyrolysis. Given their relatively low vapor pressures, these compounds readily adsorb on inorganic and organic aerosol substrates where they may alter aerosol properties and undergo heterogeneous chemistry. We use infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS and ATR-FTIR) to monitor the adsorption and subsequent heterogeneous ozonolysis of model lignin pyrolysis products, including catechol, eugenol, and 4-propylguaiacol. Ozonolysis reaction kinetics were compared on various inorganic substrates - such as Al2O3 and NaCl, which serve as mineral and sea salt aerosol substrates, respectively - and as a function of ozone concentration and relative humidity. Following in situ FTIR analysis, the adsorbed organics were extracted and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy to identify reaction products and quantify product branching ratios. Ozonolysis of catechol and 4-propylguaiacol readily resulted in ring cleavage forming dicarboxylic acids (e.g., muconic acid). Eugenol ozonolysis proceeded rapidly at the alkene side chain producing homovanillic acid and homovanillin in an approximate 2:1 branching ratio at 0% RH; ring cleavage was also observed. For all lignin pyrolysis products, heterogeneous ozonolysis was faster on NaCl versus Al2O3. Implications for the atmospheric chemistry of semi-volatile methoxylphenols adsorbed on aerosol substrates will be discussed.

  20. SPR-MS: from identifying adsorbed molecules to image tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, Jean-François; Breault-Turcot, Julien; Forest, Simon; Chaurand, Pierre

    2015-03-01

    Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors have become valuable analytical sensors for biomolecule detection. While SPR is heralded with high sensitivity, label-free and real-time detection, nonspecific adsorption and detection of ultralow concentrations remain issues. Nonspecific adsorption can be minimized using adequate surface chemistry. For example, we have employed peptide monolayers to reduce nonspecific adsorption of crude serum or cell lysate. It is important to uncover the nature of molecules nonspecifically adsorbing to surfaces in these biofluids, to further improve understanding of the nonspecific adsorption processes. Mass spectrometry (MS) provides a complementary tool to SPR to identify biomolecule adsorbed to surface. Trypsic digestion of the proteins adsorbed to surfaces led to identification of characteristic peptides from the proteins involved in nonspecific adsorption. Nonspecific adsorption in crude cell lysate results mainly from lipids, as confirmed with SPR and MS but proteins were observed on some surfaces. In another application of SPR and MS, imaging SPR can be used in combination to imaging MS to image tissue sections. Thin sections of mouse liver were inserted in the fluidic chamber of a SPRi instrument and proteins were transferred to the SPRi chip. The SPR chip was then imaged using MALDI imaging MS to identify the biomolecules that were transferred to the SPRi chip.

  1. Contaminated Sediment

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Contaminated sediments are a significant problem in the Great Lakes basin. Persistent high concentrations of contaminants in the bottom sediments of rivers and harbors pose risks to aquatic organisms, wildlife, and humans.

  2. PERVAPORATION USING ADSORBENT-FILLED MEMBRANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Membranes containing selective fillers, such as zeolites and activated carbon, can improve the separation by pervaporation. Applications of adsorbent-filled membranes in pervaporation have been demonstrated by a number of studies. These applications include removal of organic co...

  3. Chitin Adsorbents for Toxic Metals: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Anastopoulos, Ioannis; Bhatnagar, Amit; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N.; Kyzas, George Z.

    2017-01-01

    Wastewater treatment is still a critical issue all over the world. Among examined methods for the decontamination of wastewaters, adsorption is a promising, cheap, environmentally friendly and efficient procedure. There are various types of adsorbents that have been used to remove different pollutants such as agricultural waste, compost, nanomaterials, algae, etc., Chitin (poly-β-(1,4)-N-acetyl-d-glucosamine) is the second most abundant natural biopolymer and it has attracted scientific attention as an inexpensive adsorbent for toxic metals. This review article provides information about the use of chitin as an adsorbent. A list of chitin adsorbents with maximum adsorption capacity and the best isotherm and kinetic fitting models are provided. Moreover, thermodynamic studies, regeneration studies, the mechanism of adsorption and the experimental conditions are also discussed in depth. PMID:28067848

  4. Monitoring by Control Technique - Activated Carbon Adsorber

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page is about Activated Carbon Adsorber control techniques used to reduce pollutant emissions.

  5. IR investigations of surfaces and adsorbates

    SciTech Connect

    Gwyn Williams

    2001-12-10

    Synchrotron infrared reflection-absorption measurements on single crystal metal surfaces with adsorbates have led to the determination of many key parameters related to the bonding vibrational modes and the dynamics of adsorbates. In particular, energy couplings between electrons and adsorbate motion have been shown to be a dominant mechanism on metal surfaces. Excellent agreement has been obtained with calculations for many of the observations, and the synergy between theory and experiment has led to a deeper understanding of the roles of electrons and phonons in determining the properties of interfaces and their roles in phenomena as diverse as friction, lubrication, catalysis and adhesion. Nonetheless, as the experiments are pushed harder, to describe such effects as co-adsorbed systems, disagreements continue to challenge the theory and our comprehension also is still evolving.

  6. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    1992-01-01

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases.

  7. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1991-01-22

    This invention relates to a regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor 5 concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC 10 exhaust gases.

  8. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOEpatents

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  9. Behaviour of emerging contaminants in sewage sludge after anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Boix, C; Ibáñez, M; Fabregat-Safont, D; Morales, E; Pastor, L; Sancho, J V; Sánchez-Ramírez, J E; Hernández, F

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays, there is an increasing concern over the presence of contaminants in the aquatic environment, where they can be introduced from wastewater after their incomplete removal in the treatment plants. In this work, degradation of selected emerging pollutants in the aqueous and solid phases of sewage sludge has been investigated after anaerobic digestion using two different digesters: mesophilic and thermophilic. Initially, sludge samples were screened by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOF MS) for identification of emerging contaminants in the samples. In a second step, a target quantitative method based on LC coupled to tandem MS was applied for selected pollutants identified in the previous screening. The behaviour of the compounds under anaerobic conditions was studied estimating the degradation efficiency and distribution of compounds between both sludge phases. Irbesartan and benzoylecgonine seemed to be notably degraded in both phases of the sludge. Venlafaxine showed a significant concentration decrease in the aqueous phase in parallel to an increase in the solid phase. The majority of the compounds showed an increase of their concentrations in both phases after the digestion. Concentrations in the solid phase were commonly higher than in the aqueous for most contaminants, indicating that they were preferentially adsorbed onto the solid particles.

  10. Insight into the adsorption of PPCPs by porous adsorbents: Effect of the properties of adsorbents and adsorbates.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zengyin; Xie, Jiawen; Zhang, Mancheng; Zhou, Qing; Liu, Fuqiang

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption is an efficient method for removal of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs). Magnetic resins are efficient adsorbents for water treatment and exhibit potential for PPCP removal. In this study, the magnetic hypercrosslinked resin Q100 was used for adsorption of PPCPs. The adsorption behavior of this resin was compared with those of two activated carbons, namely, Norit and F400D. Norit exhibited the fastest adsorption kinetics, followed by Q100. Norit featured a honeycomb shape and long-range ordered pore channels, which facilitated the diffusion of PPCPs. Moreover, the large average pore size of Q100 reduced diffusion resistance. The adsorbed amounts of 11 PPCPs on the three adsorbents increased with increasing adsorbate hydrophobicity. For Q100, a significant linear correlation was observed between the adsorption performance for PPCPs and hydrophobicity (logD value) of adsorbates (R(2) = 0.8951); as such, PPCPs with high logD values (>1.69) could be efficiently removed. Compared with those of Norit and F400D, the adsorption performance of Q100 was less affected by humic acid because of the dominant hydrophobic interaction. Furthermore, Q100 showed improved regeneration performance, which renders it promising for PPCP removal in practical applications.

  11. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 600-111, P-11 Critical Mass Laboratory Crib, and UPR-600-16, Fire and Contamination Spread Waste Sites, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2004-065

    SciTech Connect

    J. M. Capron

    2008-10-28

    The 600-111, P-11 Critical Mass Laboratory Crib waste site, also referred to as the P-11 Facility, included the 120 Experimental Building, the 123 Control Building, and the P-11 Crib. The facility was constructed in 1949 and was used as a laboratory for plutonium criticality studies. In accordance with this evaluation, the confirmatory and verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of confirmatory and verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  12. Efforts to Consolidate Chalcogels with Adsorbed Iodine

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, Brian J.; Pierce, David A.; Chun, Jaehun

    2013-08-28

    This document discusses ongoing work with non-oxide aerogels, called chalcogels, that are under development at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory as sorbents for gaseous iodine. Work was conducted in fiscal year 2012 to demonstrate the feasibility of converting Sn2S3 chalcogel without iodine into a glass. This current document summarizes the work conducted in fiscal year 2013 to assess the consolidation potential of non-oxide aerogels with adsorbed iodine. The Sn2S3 and Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogels were selected for study. The first step in the process for these experiments was to load them with iodine (I2). The I2 uptake was ~68 mass% for Sn2S3 and ~50 mass% for Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogels. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of both sets of sorbents showed that metal-iodide complexes were formed during adsorption, i.e., SnI4 for Sn2S3 and SbI3 for Sb13.5Sn5S20. Additionally, metal-sulfide-iodide complexes were formed, i.e., SnSI for Sn2S3 and SbSI for Sb13.5Sn5S20. No XRD evidence for unreacted iodine was found in any of these samples. Once the chalcogels had reached maximum adsorption, the consolidation potential was assessed. Here, the sorbents were heated for consolidation in vacuum-sealed quartz vessels. The Sb13.5Sn5S20 chalcogel was heated both (1) in a glassy carbon crucible within a fused quartz tube and (2) in a single-containment fused quartz tube. The Sn2S3 chalcogel was only heated in a single-containment fused quartz tube. In both cases with the single-containment fused quartz experiments, the material consolidated nicely. However, in both cases, there were small fractions of metal iodides not incorporated into the final product as well as fused quartz particles within the melt due to the sample attacking the quartz wall during the heat treatment. The Sb13.5Sn5S20 did not appear to attack the glassy carbon crucible so, for future experiments, it would be ideal to apply a coating, such as pyrolytic graphite, to the inner walls of the fused quartz vessel to prevent

  13. Validation of adsorbents for sample preconcentration in compound-specific isotope analysis of common vapor intrusion pollutants.

    PubMed

    Klisch, Monika; Kuder, Tomasz; Philp, R Paul; McHugh, Thomas E

    2012-12-28

    Isotope ratios of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the environment are often of interest in contaminant fate studies. Adsorbent preconcentration-thermal desorption of VOCs can be used to collect environmental vapor samples for compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA). While active adsorbent samplers offer logistic benefits in handling large volumes of air, their performance in preserving VOCs isotope ratios was not previously tested under sampling conditions corresponding to typical indoor air sampling conditions. In this study, the performance of selected adsorbents was tested for preconcentration of TCE (for determination of C and Cl isotope ratios), PCE (C and Cl) and benzene (C and H). The key objective of the study was to identify the adsorbent(s) permitting preconcentration of the target VOCs present in air at low μg/m(3) concentrations, without significant alteration of their isotope ratios. Carboxen 1016 was found to perform well for the full range of tested parameters. Carboxen 1016 can be recommended for sampling of TCE, PCE and benzene, for CSIA, from air volumes up to 100 L. Variable extent of isotope ratio alteration was observed in the preconcentration of the target VOCs on Carbopack B and Carbopack X, resulting from partial analyte loss via adsorbent bed breakthrough and (possibly) via incomplete desorption. The results from testing the Carbopack B and Carbopack X highlight the need of adsorbent performance validation at conditions fully representative of actual sample collection conditions, and caution against extrapolation of performance data toward more challenging sampling conditions.

  14. Size selective hydrophobic adsorbent for organic molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Pramod K. (Inventor); Hickey, Gregory S. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    The present invention relates to an adsorbent formed by the pyrolysis of a hydrophobic silica with a pore size greater than 5 .ANG., such as SILICALITE.TM., with a molecular sieving polymer precursor such as polyfurfuryl alcohol, polyacrylonitrile, polyvinylidene chloride, phenol-formaldehyde resin, polyvinylidene difluoride and mixtures thereof. Polyfurfuryl alcohol is the most preferred. The adsorbent produced by the pyrolysis has a silicon to carbon mole ratio of between about 10:1 and 1:3, and preferably about 2:1 to 1:2, most preferably 1:1. The pyrolysis is performed as a ramped temperature program between about 100.degree. and 800.degree. C., and preferably between about 100.degree. and 600.degree. C. The present invention also relates to a method for selectively adsorbing organic molecules having a molecular size (mean molecular diameter) of between about 3 and 6 .ANG. comprising contacting a vapor containing the small organic molecules to be adsorbed with the adsorbent composition of the present invention.

  15. Membrane Perturbation Induced by Interfacially Adsorbed Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Zemel, Assaf; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; May, Sylvio

    2004-01-01

    The structural and energetic characteristics of the interaction between interfacially adsorbed (partially inserted) α-helical, amphipathic peptides and the lipid bilayer substrate are studied using a molecular level theory of lipid chain packing in membranes. The peptides are modeled as “amphipathic cylinders” characterized by a well-defined polar angle. Assuming two-dimensional nematic order of the adsorbed peptides, the membrane perturbation free energy is evaluated using a cell-like model; the peptide axes are parallel to the membrane plane. The elastic and interfacial contributions to the perturbation free energy of the “peptide-dressed” membrane are evaluated as a function of: the peptide penetration depth into the bilayer's hydrophobic core, the membrane thickness, the polar angle, and the lipid/peptide ratio. The structural properties calculated include the shape and extent of the distorted (stretched and bent) lipid chains surrounding the adsorbed peptide, and their orientational (C-H) bond order parameter profiles. The changes in bond order parameters attendant upon peptide adsorption are in good agreement with magnetic resonance measurements. Also consistent with experiment, our model predicts that peptide adsorption results in membrane thinning. Our calculations reveal pronounced, membrane-mediated, attractive interactions between the adsorbed peptides, suggesting a possible mechanism for lateral aggregation of membrane-bound peptides. As a special case of interest, we have also investigated completely hydrophobic peptides, for which we find a strong energetic preference for the transmembrane (inserted) orientation over the horizontal (adsorbed) orientation. PMID:15189858

  16. Prospecting for zones of contaminated ground-water discharge to streams using bottom-sediment gas bubbles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Lorah, Michelle M.

    1991-01-01

    Decomposition of organic-rich bottom sediment in a tidal creek in Maryland results in production of gas bubbles in the bottom sediment during summer and fall. In areas where volatile organic contaminants discharge from ground water, through the bottom sediment, and into the creek, part of the volatile contamination diffuses into the gas bubbles and is released to the atmosphere by ebullition. Collection and analysis of gas bubbles for their volatile organic contaminant content indicate that relative concentrations of the volatile organic contaminants in the gas bubbles are substantially higher in areas where the same contaminants occur in the ground water that discharges to the streams. Analyses of the bubbles located an area of previously unknown ground-water contamination. The method developed for this study consisted of disturbing the bottom sediment to release gas bubbles, and then capturing the bubbles in a polyethylene bag at the water-column surface. The captured gas was transferred either into sealable polyethylene bags for immediate analysis with a photoionization detector or by syringe to glass tubes containing wires coated with an activated-carbon adsorbent. Relative concentrations were determined by mass spectral analysis for chloroform and trichloroethylene.

  17. Emerging Contaminants in the Environment

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter explores the use of mass spectrometry and its application to emerging contaminants (ECs) in the environment; such classes of compounds as organometallics, pharmaceuticals/drugs, nanomaterials, and dispersants (surfactants). Table 1 shows the variety of ECs that are...

  18. Adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles and methods of using the same

    DOEpatents

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-01-31

    The present invention provides an adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle having at least one adsorbent functional group bound thereto. The adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle also includes at least one catalytic material. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles. In some examples, the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles can be used to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks for biodiesel, and to hydrotreat the separated fatty acids.

  19. Environmental contaminants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Kushlna, J.A.; Hafner, H.

    2000-01-01

    Throughout the world, individuals and populations of herons are affected by environmental contaminants, leading to direct mortality, decreased reproductive success, or degradation of feeding habitat. Contaminants suspected or known to affect herons include organochlorine compounds, organophosphorus insecticides, trace elements, and petroleum (Parnell et al. 1988).General reviews on the effects of pesticides on birds (Risebrough 1986, 1991) and colonial water birds (Nisbet 1980) are presented elsewhere. The objective of this chapter is to review toxic effects of contaminants on herons. Unless otherwise noted, contaminant concentrations are presented as parts per million (ppm) on a wet weight (ww) basis.

  20. Evaluation of a rapid screening method for chemical contaminants of concern in four food-related matrices using QuEChERS extraction, UHPLC and high resolution mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Filigenzi, Michael S; Ehrke, Nanette; Aston, Linda S; Poppenga, Robert H

    2011-10-01

    A method combining QuEChERS extraction, ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography and full scan high resolution mass spectrometry was evaluated for its use in screening for chemical residues and contaminants in animal-related food matrices. The method was evaluated by analysis of multiple replicates of whole milk, muscle tissue, liver tissue and corn silage. Analytes tested included plant alkaloids, carbamate and organophosphate pesticides, and several types of veterinary drugs. A database containing the chemical formula for each analyte was used to calculate accurate mass-to-charge ratios for expected pseudo-molecular ions. This information, as well as retention times, was used to identify analytes. Of 118 compounds chosen for analysis, 86 were detectable in all fortified replicates of at least one matrix at levels ranging from 1.0 to 5000 ng/g. Variability of response, as measured in % relative standard deviation of peak areas over seven replicate fortified sample analyses, was found to differ among the classes of analytes, ranging from <10% to >100%. Retention times were stable and analytes were routinely detected at measured mass-to-charge ratios within 2 ppm of their theoretical mass-to-charge ratios. These results indicate that the combination of generic extraction and chromatographic procedures with full scan high resolution mass spectrometry can serve as a useful method for screening complex matrices.

  1. Electrokinetic In Situ Treatment of Metal-Contaminated Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Jacqueline; Clausen, Christian A., III; Geiger, Cherie; Reinhart, Debra

    2004-01-01

    An electrokinetic technique has been developed as a means of in situ remediation of soils, sludges, and sediments that are contaminated with heavy metals. Examples of common metal contaminants that can be removed by this technique include cadmium, chromium, zinc, lead, mercury, and radionuclides. Some organic contaminants can also be removed by this technique. In the electrokinetic technique, a low-intensity direct current is applied between electrodes that have been implanted in the ground on each side of a contaminated soil mass. The electric current causes electro-osmosis and migration of ions, thereby moving aqueous-phase subsurface contaminants from one electrode to the other. The half reaction at the anode yields H+, thereby generating an acid front that travels from the anode toward the cathode. As this acid front passes through a given location, the local increase in acidity increases the solubility of cations that were previously adsorbed on soil particles. Ions are transported towards one electrode or the other which one depending on their respective electric charges. Upon arrival at the electrodes, the ionic contaminants can be allowed to become deposited on the electrodes or can be extracted to a recovery system. Surfactants and other reagents can be introduced at the electrodes to enhance rates of removal of contaminants. Placements of electrodes and concentrations and rates of pumping of reagents can be adjusted to maximize efficiency. The basic concept of electrokinetic treatment of soil is not new. What is new here are some of the details of application and the utilization of this technique as an alternative to other techniques (e.g., flushing or bioremediation) that are not suitable for treating soils of low hydraulic conductivity. Another novel aspect is the use of this technique as a less expensive alternative to excavation: The cost advantage over excavation is especially large in settings in which contaminated soil lies near and/or under

  2. Time Resolved Studies Of Adsorbed Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, J.; Nicol, J. M.

    1985-12-01

    A time-resolved Fourier transform IR study of ethyne adsorbed on ZnNaA zeolite yields results very different from those reported for related systems. Initially two species (A and B) are formed by the interaction of C2H2 with the cations. Whereas species A (π-bonded C2H2) was found to be removed immediately on evacuation, species B (probably Zn-acetylide) was not fully removed after 60 mins evacuation. In the presence of the gas phase, bands due to Species A decreased slowly in intensity as new bands due to adsorbed ethanal were observed.

  3. Accounting for Mass Transfer Kinetics when Modeling the Impact of Low Permeability Layers in a Groundwater Source Zone on Dissolved Contaminant Fate and Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    Figure 4: Conceptual Model of contaminated aquifer (After Sievers, 2012) ................... 30 Figure 5: MODFLOW Head Output along a Longitudinal Cross...Table 3: Bachman Road Site Hydrogeological Values (Abriola et al., 2005) .................. 25 Table 4: Parameter Values Input into MODFLOW ...software. Two modeling packages within GMS were employed in this study, MODFLOW (Chapman and Parker, 2011) and RT3D (Clement et al., 2004). GMS was used

  4. A Feasibility Study On Pd/Mg Application In Historically Contaminated Sediments And PCB Spiked Substrates

    EPA Science Inventory

    A vast majority of literature on bimetals deals with aqueous contaminants, very little being on organics strongly adsorbed on sediments and hence very challenging to remediate. Having previously reported materials, mechanistic and parametric aspects of PCB dechlorination with Pd...

  5. Regenerable Air Purification System for Gas-Phase Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinescu, Ileana C.; Finn, John E.; LeVan, M. Douglas; Lung, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tests of a pre-prototype regenerable air purification system (RAPS) that uses water vapor to displace adsorbed contaminants from an adsorbent column have been performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A unit based on this design can be used for removing trace gas-phase contaminants from spacecraft cabin air or from polluted process streams including incinerator exhaust. During the normal operation mode, contaminants are removed from the air on the column. Regeneration of the column is performed on-line. During regeneration, contaminants are displaced and destroyed inside the closed oxidation loop. In this presentation we discuss initial experimental results for the performance of RAPS in the removal and treatment of several important spacecraft contaminant species from air.

  6. The metal-organic framework MIL-101(Cr) as efficient adsorbent in a vortex-assisted dispersive solid-phase extraction of imatinib mesylate in rat plasma coupled with ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry: Application to a pharmacokinetic study.

    PubMed

    Qi, Chao; Cai, Qianqian; Zhao, Pan; Jia, Xiuna; Lu, Nan; He, Lu; Hou, Xiaohong

    2016-06-03

    Metal-organic framework MIL-101(Cr) was successfully used as an efficient sorbent in a vortex-assisted dispersive solid-phase extraction (VA-DSPE) and applied for the determination and the pharmacokinetic of imatinib mesylate in rat plasma by UPLC-MS/MS. In the enrichment of imatinib from rat plasma, the analyte was efficiently adsorbed on MIL-101(Cr) and simply recovered by using initial mobile phase (0.1% formic acid-methanol (6:4 v/v)) as elution solvent. Meanwhile, the protein in the plasma samples was excluded from the porous structure of MIL-101(Cr), leading to direct extraction of drug molecule from protein-rich biological samples without any other pretreatment procedure. After being removed, the supernatant was filtered and directly injected into the UPLC-MS/MS for the analysis of the target. The experimental parameters, including nature of MOFs, amount of MIL-101(Cr), pH value of aqueous solution, extraction time, type and volume of elution solvent, were systematically optimized. After VA-DSPE, chromatographic separation was performed on an ACQUITY UPLC(®) BEH C18 column (2.1mm×100mm, 1.7μm) with a 3min gradient elution using 0.1% formic acid and methanol as mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.3mL/min. The detection was accomplished on a tandem mass spectrometer via an electrospray ionization (ESI) source by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) in the positive ionization mode. The lower limit of quantification of 1ng/mL was achieved and the mean recovery of the analyte was higher than 81.2%. Moreover, computational simulation was primarily applied to predict the adsorption behavior and revealed the molecular interactions and free binding energies between MIL-101(Cr) and imatinib with the molecular modeling method, providing certain explanation of the adsorption mechanism. The originally established pretreatment and detection method has some merits, such as less solvent consumption, easy operation, higher sensitivity and lower matrix effect. And the MIL-101

  7. Adsorption modeling for macroscopic contaminant dispersal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Axley, J.W.

    1990-05-01

    Two families of macroscopic adsorption models are formulated, based on fundamental principles of adsorption science and technology, that may be used for macroscopic (such as whole-building) contaminant dispersal analysis. The first family of adsorption models - the Equilibrium Adsorption (EA) Models - are based upon the simple requirement of equilibrium between adsorbent and room air. The second family - the Boundary Layer Diffusion Controlled Adsorption (BLDC) Models - add to the equilibrium requirement a boundary layer model for diffusion of the adsorbate from the room air to the adsorbent surface. Two members of each of these families are explicitly discussed, one based on the linear adsorption isotherm model and the other on the Langmuir model. The linear variants of each family are applied to model the adsorption dynamics of formaldehyde in gypsum wall board and compared to measured data.

  8. A novel adsorbent of Na(2)Ta(2)O(6) porous microspheres with F(-) gradient concentration distribution: high cationic selectivity and well-regulated recycling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Huang, Shushu; Su, Yiguo; Chai, Zhanli; Zhai, Hao; Wang, Xiaojing

    2014-01-30

    Pyrochlore Na2Ta2O6 porous microspheres with F(-) gradient concentration distribution were first prepared, which showed an excellent selectivity toward cationic dyes as an adsorbent. These dyes were regenerated rapidly by adding to NaAc solution. After then, the adsorbent still showed a high adsorption capacity. Optionally, the effective recycling of the adsorbents was achieved by UV light illumination, free of secondary environmental contamination. The rate of adsorption reaction followed the pseudo second-order kinetics, and the sorption isotherm well fitted to the Freundlich isotherm model. Eventually, the adsorption reaction for the absorbents was found to be a spontaneous and endothermic process.

  9. ToF-SIMS and XPS Characterization of Protein Films Adsorbed onto Bare and Sodium Styrenesulfonate-Grafted Gold Substrates.

    PubMed

    Foster, Rami N; Harrison, Elisa T; Castner, David G

    2016-04-05

    The adsorption of single-component bovine serum albumin (BSA), bovine fibrinogen (Fgn), and bovine immunoglobulin G (IgG) films as well as multicomponent bovine plasma films onto bare and sodium styrenesulfonate (NaSS)-grafted gold substrates was characterized. The adsorption isotherms, measured via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, showed that at low solution concentrations all three single-component proteins adsorb with higher affinity onto gold surfaces compared to NaSS surfaces. However, at higher concentrations, NaSS surfaces adsorb the same or more total protein than gold surfaces. This may be because proteins that adsorb onto NaSS undergo structural rearrangements, resulting in a larger fraction of irreversibly adsorbed species over time. Still, with the possible exception of BSA adsorbed onto gold, neither surface appeared to have saturated at the highest protein solution concentration studied. Principal component (PC) analysis of amino acid mass fragments from time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectra distinguished between the same protein adsorbed onto NaSS and gold surfaces, suggesting that proteins adsorb differently on NaSS and gold surfaces. Explored further using peak ratios for buried/surface amino acids for each protein, we found that proteins denature more on NaSS surfaces than on gold surfaces. Also, using peak ratios for asymmetrically distributed amino acids, potential structural differences were postulated for BSA and IgG adsorbed onto NaSS and gold surfaces. PC modeling, used to track changes in plasma adsorption with time, suggests that plasma films on NaSS and Au surfaces become more Fgn-like with increasing adsorption time. However, the PC models included only three proteins, where plasma is composed of hundreds of proteins. Therefore, while both gold and NaSS appear to adsorb more Fgn with time, further study is required to confirm that this is representative of the final state of the plasma films.

  10. Enantiomeric determination and evaluation of the racemization process of atropine in Solanaceae seeds and contaminated samples by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Marín-Sáez, Jesús; Romero-González, Roberto; Garrido Frenich, Antonia

    2016-11-25

    A new method has been developed for the enantioselective separation of (-) and (+) hyoscyamine in Solanaceaes seeds and contaminated buckwheat. Chromatographic separation was optimized, evaluating two chiral columns, Chirobiotic V and Chiralpal-AY3. Better resolution was obtained using a Chiralpak-AY3 column, utilizing as mobile phase ethanol (0.1% diethanolamine). An extraction procedure based on a modified QuEChERS (Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe) was applied, using water and acetonitrile containing 1% of acetic acid, and a clean-up step utilizing primary secondary amine (PSA) and graphitized carbon black (GCB) as sorbents. The extract was diluted with ethanol (50/:50, v/v) prior to chromatographic analysis, and the separation was carried out avoiding the racemization during this stage. Enantiomerization process of atropine was studied in samples at different conditions such as temperature (30, 50 and 80°C) and pH (3, 5, 7 and 9), observing that racemization occurs at high pH (9) and temperature (80°C). Stramonium and Brugmansia seeds were analyzed and the concentration of (-)-hyoscyamine was 1500mg/kg and 320mg/kg respectively. Contaminated buckwheat was also determined and (-)-hyoscyamine was detected at 170μg/kg.

  11. Investigations into the Effect of Current Velocity on Amidoxime-Based Polymeric Uranium Adsorbent Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Gary A.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Strivens, Jonathan E.; Wood, Jordana R.; Schlafer, Nicholas J.; Tsouris, Costas; Ladshaw, Austin; Yiacoumi, Sotira

    2015-12-01

    The Fuel Resources Program at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) is developing adsorbent technology to extract uranium from seawater. This technology is being developed to provide a sustainable and economically viable supply of uranium fuel for nuclear reactors (DOE, 2010). Among the key environmental variables to understand for adsorbent deployment in the coastal ocean is what effect flow-rates or linear velocity has on uranium adsorption capacity. The goal is to find a flow conditions that optimize uranium adsorption capacity in the shortest exposure time. Understanding these criteria will be critical in choosing a location for deployment of a marine adsorbent farm. The objective of this study was to identify at what linear velocity the adsorption kinetics for uranium extraction starts to drop off due to limitations in mass transport of uranium to the surface of the adsorbent fibers. Two independent laboratory-based experimental approaches using flow-through columns and recirculating flumes for adsorbent exposure were used to assess the effect of flow-rate (linear velocity) on the kinetic uptake of uranium on amidoxime-based polymeric adsorbent material. Time series observations over a 56 day period were conducted with flow-through columns over a 35-fold range in linear velocity from 0.29 to 10.2 cm/s, while the flume study was conducted over a narrower 11-fold range, from 0.48 to 5.52 cm/s. These ranges were specifically chosen to focus on the lower end of oceanic currents and expand above and below the linear velocity of ~ 2.5 cm/s adopted for marine testing of adsorbent material at PNNL.

  12. Dynamic analysis of a closed-cycle solar adsorption refrigerator using two adsorbent-adsorbate pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Hajji, A. ); Worek, W. ); Lavan, Z. )

    1991-05-01

    In this paper a dynamic analysis of a closed-cycle, solar adsorption refrigerator is presented. The instantaneous and daily system performance are studied using two adsorbent-adsorbate pairs, Zeolite 13X-Water and Chabazite-Methanol. The effect of design and operating parameters, including inert material thermal capacitance, matrix porosity, and evaporation and condenser temperatures on the solar and cycle coefficients of performance are evaluated.

  13. Mercury removal from solution by superconducting magnetic separation with nanostructured magnetic adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, T.; Tachibana, S.; Miura, O.; Takeuchi, M.

    2011-11-01

    Recently, mercury Hg concentration in human blood increases due to expanding the global mercury contamination. Excess mercury bioaccumulation poses a significant health risk. In order to decrease mercury concentration in the environment and human blood, we have developed two different kinds of nanostructured magnetic adsorbents for mercury to apply them to superconducting magnetic separation instead of conventional filtration. One is magnetic beads (MBs) which have nanosize magnetite particles in the core and a lot of SH radicals on the surface to adsorb Hg ions effectively. MBs were developed mainly to remove mercury from human blood. The maximum amount of the adsorption for MBs is 6.3 mg/g in the solution in less than a minute. Dithiothreitol can easily remove mercury adsorbed to MBs, hence MBs can be reusable. The other is nanostructured magnetic activated carbon (MAC) which is activated carbon with mesopores and nanosize magnetite. The maximum amount of the adsorption for MAC is 38.3 mg/g in the solution. By heat-treatment mercury can be easily removed from MAC. We have studied superconducting magnetic separation using each adsorbent for mercury removal from solution.

  14. Phosphorus leaching from a sandy soil in the presence of modified and un-modified adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Moharami, Somayeh; Jalali, Mohsen

    2014-10-01

    Phosphorus (P) leaching from a sandy soil was investigated in the presence of modified and unmodified clay minerals and nanoparticles (NPs). Compared with control soil, amended soil with NPs had the highest percentage of P retention than amended soil with clay minerals. Among the adsorbents used, the highest percentage of P retention was produced by Al₂O₃-chitosan while the lowest percentage of P retention was by zeolite. Data measured for P leaching after using adsorbents were used to predict P leaching using transport model. PHREEQC model was able to model P leaching from control and amended soil. After leaching, P values in control and amended soil were fractionated by a sequential extraction procedure. Concentration of P in Ca-bound fraction (HCl-P) after application of modified and unmodified clay minerals and NPs (except TiO₂ and Al₂O₃) increased and decreased, respectively. Saturation indices (SIs) and P speciation were assessed using the Visual MINTEQ version 2.3 program. According to the SIs, leaching P from control and amended soil with different adsorbent was controlled by dissolution of hydroxyapatite. The results indicated that used adsorbents can reduce P leaching from the sandy soil. Thus, retention of P by amended soil reduced a risk in terms of groundwater contamination with P.

  15. Low cost adsorbents for the removal of organic pollutants from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Ali, Imran; Asim, Mohd; Khan, Tabrez A

    2012-12-30

    Water pollution due to organic contaminants is a serious issue because of acute toxicities and carcinogenic nature of the pollutants. Among various water treatment methods, adsorption is supposed as the best one due to its inexpensiveness, universal nature and ease of operation. Many waste materials used include fruit wastes, coconut shell, scrap tyres, bark and other tannin-rich materials, sawdust and other wood type materials, rice husk, petroleum wastes, fertilizer wastes, fly ash, sugar industry wastes blast furnace slag, chitosan and seafood processing wastes, seaweed and algae, peat moss, clays, red mud, zeolites, sediment and soil, ore minerals etc. These adsorbents have been found to remove various organic pollutants ranging from 80 to 99.9%. The present article describes the conversion of waste products into effective adsorbents and their application for water treatment. The possible mechanism of adsorption on these adsorbents has also been included in this article. Besides, attempts have been made to discuss the future perspectives of low cost adsorbents in water treatment.

  16. Contamination Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Upjohn Company sought a solution to their problem of potential particulate contamination of sterile injectable drugs. Contamination was caused by dust particles attracted by static electrical charge, which clung to plastic curtains in clean rooms. Upjohn found guidance in NASA Tech Briefs which provided detailed information for reducing static electricity. Guidelines for setting up static free work stations, materials and equipment needed to maintain antistatic protection.

  17. Characteristics of adsorbents made from biological, chemical and hybrid sludges and their effect on organics removal in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhi-hui; Tian, Jia-yu; Xu, Guo-ren; Li, Jun-jing; Li, Gui-bai

    2011-01-01

    Meso-macropore adsorbents were prepared from biological sludge, chemical sludge and hybrid sludge of biological and chemical sludges, by chemically activating with 18.0 M H(2)SO(4) in the mass ratio of 1:3, and then pyrolyzing at 550 °C for 1 h in anoxic atmosphere. The physical and chemical characteristics of the sludge-based adsorbents were examined in terms of surface physical morphology, specific surface area and pore size distribution, aluminum and iron contents, surface functional groups and crystal structure. Furthermore, the adsorption effect of these adsorbents on the organic substances in wastewater was also investigated. The results indicated that the adsorption capacities of the sludge-based adsorbents for UV(254) were lower than that of commercial activated carbon (AC), whereas the adsorption capacities of the adsorbents prepared from hybrid sludge (HA) and chemical sludge (CA) for soluble COD(Cr) (SCOD(Cr)) were comparable or even higher than that of the commercial AC. The reasons might be that the HA and CA possessed well-developed mesopore and macropore structure, as well as abundant acidic surface functional groups. However, the lowest adsorption efficiency was observed for the biological sludge-based adsorbent, which might be due to the lowest metal content and overabundance of surface acidic functional groups in this adsorbent.

  18. EVIDENCE OF FEED CONTAMINATION DUE TO SAMPLE HANDLING AND PREPARATION DURING A MASS BALANCE STUDY OF DIOXINS IN LACTATING COWS IN BACKGROUND CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1997, the United States (US) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted a mass balance study of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (CDDs) and dibenzofurans (CDFs) in lactating cows in background conditions. The field portion of the study occurred at the US Department of A...

  19. Analytical supercritical fluid extraction of adsorbent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, B.W.; Wright, C.W.; Gale, R.W.; Smith, R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The use of supercritical fluids for the analytical extraction of semivolatile and higher molecular weight materials from various adsorbent and particulate matrices was investigated. Instrumentation was designed to allow gram quantities of the matrix to be extracted at pressures up to 400 bar and temperatures to 235 /sup 0/C with collection of the effluent in a sealed liquid-nitrogen-cooled flask. Carbon dioxide, isobutane, and methanol modified (20 mol %) carbon dioxide fluid systems were evaluated and compared to liquid Soxhlet extraction. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) provided very rapid (approx. =30 min) extraction with comparable efficiency to the Soxhlet methods, and both more rapid and more efficient extractions appear feasible. The more polar carbon dioxide-methanol fluid system gave higher extraction efficiencies for the more polar adsorbates and the isobutane system was more efficient for the higher molecular weight and less polar compounds.

  20. Efficient adsorbate transport on graphene by electromigration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velizhanin, Kirill; Solenov, Dmitry

    2012-02-01

    Chemical functionalization of the surface of graphene holds promise for various applications ranging from nanoelectronics to surface catalysis and nano-assembling. In many practical situations it would be beneficial to be able to propel adsorbates along the graphene sheet in a controlled manner. We propose to use electromigration as an efficient means to transport adsorbates along the graphene surface. Within the tight-binding approximation for graphene, parametrized by density functional theory calculations, we estimate the contributions of the direct force and the electron wind force to the drift velocity of electromigration and demonstrate that the electromigration can be rather efficient. In particular, we show that the drift velocity of atomic oxygen covalently bound to graphene can reach up to 4 cm/s for realistic graphene samples. Further, we discuss ways to dynamically, i.e., during experiment, control the efficiency of electromigration by charging and/or local heating of graphene.

  1. Sand consolidation methods using adsorbable catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, R. H.

    1985-04-23

    Methods are provided for selectively consolidating sand grains within a subterranean formation. First an acidic zirconium salt catalyst, such as ZrOCl/sub 2/, Zr(SO/sub 4/)/sub 2/, or ZrCl/sub 4/, is injected into the subterranean formation, wherein the acidic salt catalyst is adsorbed to the surface of the sand grains. Next a polymerizable resin composition such as furfuryl alcohol oligomer is introduced into the well formation. Polymerization of the resin occurs upon exposure to the elevated well temperatures and contact with the acid salt catalyst adsorbed to the sand grains. The polymerized resin serves to consolidate the surfaces of the sand grains while retaining permeability through the pore spaces. An ester of a weak organic acid is included with the resin compositions to control the extent of a polymerization by consuming the water by-product formed during the polymerization reaction.

  2. Gas storage using fullerene based adsorbents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor); Lu, Xiao-Chun (Inventor); Li, Weijiong (Inventor); Mikhael, Michael G. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    This invention is directed to the synthesis of high bulk density high gas absorption capacity adsorbents for gas storage applications. Specifically, this invention is concerned with novel gas absorbents with high gravimetric and volumetric gas adsorption capacities which are made from fullerene-based materials. By pressing fullerene powder into pellet form using a conventional press, then polymerizing it by subjecting the fullerene to high temperature and high inert gas pressure, the resulting fullerene-based materials have high bulk densities and high gas adsorption capacities. By pre-chemical modification or post-polymerization activation processes, the gas adsorption capacities of the fullerene-based adsorbents can be further enhanced. These materials are suitable for low pressure gas storage applications, such as oxygen storage for home oxygen therapy uses or on-board vehicle natural gas storage. They are also suitable for storing gases and vapors such as hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor.

  3. Remediation of AMD using industrial waste adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Nuur Hani Bte; Yaacob, Wan Zuhairi Wan

    2016-11-01

    The study investigates the characteristic of industrial waste as adsorbents and its potential as heavy metals absorbents in AMD samples. The AMD sample was collected from active mine pond and the pH was measured in situ. The metal contents were analyzed by ICP-MS. The AMD water was very acidic (pH< 3.5), and the average heavy metals content in AMD were high especially in Fe (822.029 mg/l). Fly ash was found to be the most effective absorbent material containing high percentage of CaO (57.24%) and SiO2 (13.88%), followed by ladle furnace slag containing of high amount of CaO (51.52%) and Al2O3 (21.23%), while biomass ash consists of SiO2 (43.07%) and CaO (12.97%). Tank analysis display a huge changes due to pH value change from acidity to nearly neutral phases. After 50 days, fly ash remediation successfully increase the AMD pH values from pH 2.57-7.09, while slag change from acidity to nearly alkaline phase from pH 2.60-7.3 and biomass has change to pH 2.54-6.8. Fly ash has successfully remove Fe, Mn, Cu, and Ni. Meanwhile, slag sample displays as an effective adsorbent to adsorb more Pb and Cd in acid mine drainage.

  4. Local anesthetics adsorbed onto infusion balloon.

    PubMed

    Mizogami, Maki; Tsuchiya, Hironori; Takakura, Ko

    2004-09-01

    We compared the adsorption of different local anesthetics onto infusion balloons and studied one of the possible mechanisms for adsorption. After injection of lidocaine, bupivacaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine solutions (1 mM each; pH 7.4) into balloons of 100-mL volume, their concentrations in effluents flowing out at 4 mL/h were determined over time by high-performance liquid chromatography. All were adsorbed in a structure-dependent manner, and the concentration decreased by 6%-14% within 5 min. Bupivacaine was most strongly adsorbed, followed by lidocaine, ropivacaine, and mepivacaine. QX-314, a quaternary ammonium derivative of lidocaine, was only weakly adsorbed compared with the parent compound lidocaine. The extent of adsorption of local anesthetics was related to their hydrophobicity (evaluated by reversed-phase chromatography) and was much more at pH 7.4 than at pH 6.0. A hydrophobic interaction with balloon materials appears to be responsible for the adsorption of local anesthetics. When infusion balloons are used for the continuous administration of local anesthetics, attention should be paid to the possibility that their actual concentrations in effluents are smaller than those present when they are initially prepared.

  5. Sediment-adsorbed total mercury flux through Yolo Bypass, the primary floodway and wetland in the Sacramento Valley, California.

    PubMed

    Springborn, Michael; Singer, Michael Bliss; Dunne, Thomas

    2011-12-15

    The fate and transport of mercury are of critical concern in lowland floodplains and wetlands worldwide, especially those with a history of upstream mining that increases the mobility of both dissolved and sediment-bound Hg in watersheds. A mass budget of total mercury (THg) quantifies sources and storage for particular areas - knowledge that is required for understanding of management options in lowland floodplains. In order to assess contaminant risk in the largest flood-control bypass, prime wetland, and restoration target in the Sacramento River basin, we estimated empirical relationships between THg, suspended sediment concentration (SSC), and streamflow (Q) for each of the major inputs and outputs using data from various publicly available sources. These relationships were improved by incorporating statistical representations of the dynamics of seasonal and intra-flood exhaustion (hysteresis) of sediment and mercury. Using continuous records of Q to estimate SSC suspended sediment flux and SSC to estimate THg flux, we computed the net transfer of sediment-adsorbed mercury through the Yolo Bypass over a decade, 1993-2003. Flood control weirs spilling Sacramento River floodwaters into the bypass deliver ~75% of the water and ~50% of the river's suspended sediment load, while one Coast Range tributary of the bypass, Cache Creek, contributes twice the THg load of the mainstem Sacramento. Although estimated sediment flux entering Yolo Bypass is balanced by efflux to the Sacramento/San Francisco Bay-Delta, there is much evidence of deposition and remobilization of sediment in Yolo Bypass during flooding. These factors point to the importance of the bypass as sedimentary reservoir and as an evolving substrate for biogeochemical processing of heavy metals. The estimates of mercury flux suggest net deposition of ~500 kg in the 24,000 ha floodway over a decade, dominated by two large floods, representing a storage reservoir for this important contaminant.

  6. Mitigation of radiation induced surface contamination

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Stulen, Richard H.

    2003-01-01

    A process for mitigating or eliminating contamination and/or degradation of surfaces having common, adventitious atmospheric contaminants adsorbed thereon and exposed to radiation. A gas or a mixture of gases is introduced into the environment of a surface(s) to be protected. The choice of the gaseous species to be introduced (typically a hydrocarbon gas, water vapor, or oxygen or mixtures thereof) is dependent upon the contaminant as well as the ability of the gaseous species to bind to the surface to be protected. When the surface and associated bound species are exposed to radiation reactive species are formed that react with surface contaminants such as carbon or oxide films to form volatile products (e.g., CO, CO.sub.2) which desorb from the surface.

  7. Estimation of transport parameters of phenolic compounds and inorganic contaminants through composite landfill liners using one-dimensional mass transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Varank, Gamze; Demir, Ahmet; Yetilmezsoy, Kaan; Bilgili, M. Sinan; Top, Selin; Sekman, Elif

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > We conduct 1D advection-dispersion modeling to estimate transport parameters. > We examine fourteen phenolic compounds and three inorganic contaminants. > 2-MP, 2,4-DCP, 2,6-DCP, 2,4,5-TCP, 2,3,4,6-TeCP have the highest coefficients. > Dispersion coefficients of Cu are determined to be higher than Zn and Fe. > Transport of phenolics can be prevented by zeolite and bentonite in landfill liners. - Abstract: One-dimensional (1D) advection-dispersion transport modeling was conducted as a conceptual approach for the estimation of the transport parameters of fourteen different phenolic compounds (phenol, 2-CP, 2-MP, 3-MP, 4-MP, 2-NP, 4-NP, 2,4-DNP, 2,4-DCP, 2,6-DCP, 2,4,5-TCP, 2,4,6-TCP, 2,3,4,6-TeCP, PCP) and three different inorganic contaminants (Cu, Zn, Fe) migrating downward through the several liner systems. Four identical pilot-scale landfill reactors (0.25 m{sup 3}) with different composite liners (R1: 0.10 + 0.10 m of compacted clay liner (CCL), L{sub e} = 0.20 m, k{sub e} = 1 x 10{sup -8} m/s, R2: 0.002-m-thick damaged high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane overlying 0.10 + 0.10 m of CCL, L{sub e} = 0.20 m, k{sub e} = 1 x 10{sup -8} m/s, R3: 0.002-m-thick damaged HDPE geomembrane overlying a 0.02-m-thick bentonite layer encapsulated between 0.10 + 0.10 m CCL, L{sub e} = 0.22 m, k{sub e} = 1 x 10{sup -8} m/s, R4: 0.002-m-thick damaged HDPE geomembrane overlying a 0.02-m-thick zeolite layer encapsulated between 0.10 + 0.10 m CCL, L{sub e} = 0.22 m, k{sub e} = 4.24 x 10{sup -7} m/s) were simultaneously run for a period of about 540 days to investigate the nature of diffusive and advective transport of the selected organic and inorganic contaminants. The results of 1D transport model showed that the highest molecular diffusion coefficients, ranging from 4.77 x 10{sup -10} to 10.67 x 10{sup -10} m{sup 2}/s, were estimated for phenol (R4), 2-MP (R1), 2,4-DNP (R2), 2,4-DCP (R1), 2,6-DCP (R2), 2,4,5-TCP (R2) and 2,3,4,6-TeCP (R1). For all reactors

  8. Near-infrared spectroscopy study for determination of adsorbed acetochlor in the organic and inorganic bentonites.

    PubMed

    Tomić, Zorica P; Ašanin, Darko; Đurović, Rada; Đorđević, Aleksandar; Makreski, Petre

    2012-12-01

    NIR spectroscopy is used to determine acetochlor herbicide adsorption on Na-montmorillonite (NaP) and organically modified montmorillonite (NaOM). Both montmorillonites NIR spectra shows bands at 7061 and 6791 cm(-1). Organo-montmorillonite is characterised by two emphasized bands at 5871 and 5667 cm(-1) that are attributed to the fundamental overtones of the mid-IR bands at 2916 and 2850 cm(-1). Bands at 6017 and 6013 cm(-1) are attributed to acetochlor adsorbed to organo-montmorillonite and Na-montmorillonite, which is confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). Greater quantity of acetochlor is adsorbed to organo-clays compared to non-modified montmorillonite. Acetochlor poses high risk to environmental contamination. Organo-clays are the most useful for removing acetochlor from water and soil.

  9. Development of novel nanocomposite adsorbent based on potassium nickel hexacyanoferrate-loaded polypropylene fabric

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A nanocomposite adsorbent based on potassium nickel hexacyanoferrate-loaded polypropylene fabric was synthesized for selective removal of Cs ions from contaminated waters by a two-stage synthesis: radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylic acid monomer onto the nonwoven polypropylene fabric surface with subsequent in situ formation of potassium nickel hexacyanoferrate (KNiHCF) nanoparticles within the grafted chains. Data of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the formation of KNiHCF homogeneous phase on the fabric surface, which consisted of crystalline cubic-shaped nanoparticles (70 to 100 nm). The efficiency of the synthesized adsorbent for removal of cesium ions was evaluated under various experimental conditions. It has demonstrated a rapid adsorption process, high adsorption capacity over a wide pH range, and selectivity in Cs ion removal from model solutions with high concentration of sodium ions. PMID:24725367

  10. Evaluation of Hydrogen Isotope Exchange Methodology on Adsorbents for Tritium Removal

    DOE PAGES

    Morgan, Gregg A.; Xiao, S. Xin

    2015-03-06

    The Savannah River National Laboratory has demonstrated a potential process that can be used to remove tritium from tritiated water using Pt-catalyzed molecular sieves. The process is an elemental isotope exchange process in which H2 (when flowed through the molecular sieves) will exchange with the adsorbed water, D2O, leaving H2O adsorbed on the molecular sieves. Various formulations of catalyzed molecular sieve material were prepared using two different techniques, Pt-implantation and Pt-ion exchange. This technology has been demonstrated for a protium (H) and deuterium (D) system, but can also be used for the removal of tritium from contaminated water (T2O, HTO,more » and DTO) using D2 (or H2)« less

  11. Evaluation of Hydrogen Isotope Exchange Methodology on Adsorbents for Tritium Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Gregg A.; Xiao, S. Xin

    2015-03-06

    The Savannah River National Laboratory has demonstrated a potential process that can be used to remove tritium from tritiated water using Pt-catalyzed molecular sieves. The process is an elemental isotope exchange process in which H2 (when flowed through the molecular sieves) will exchange with the adsorbed water, D2O, leaving H2O adsorbed on the molecular sieves. Various formulations of catalyzed molecular sieve material were prepared using two different techniques, Pt-implantation and Pt-ion exchange. This technology has been demonstrated for a protium (H) and deuterium (D) system, but can also be used for the removal of tritium from contaminated water (T2O, HTO, and DTO) using D2 (or H2)

  12. Evaluation of hydrogen isotope exchange methodology on adsorbents for tritium removal

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, G.A.; Xin Xiao, S.

    2015-03-15

    The Savannah River National Laboratory has demonstrated a potential process that can be used to remove tritium from tritiated water using Pt-catalyzed molecular sieves. The process is an elemental isotope exchange process in which H{sub 2} (when flowed through the molecular sieves) will exchange with the adsorbed water, D{sub 2}O, leaving H{sub 2}O adsorbed on the molecular sieves. Various formulations of catalyzed molecular sieve material were prepared using two different techniques, Pt-implantation and Pt-ion exchange. This technology has been demonstrated for a protium (H) and deuterium (D) system, but can also be used for the removal of tritium from contaminated water (T{sub 2}O, HTO, and DTO) using D{sub 2} (or H{sub 2}). (authors)

  13. Development of novel nanocomposite adsorbent based on potassium nickel hexacyanoferrate-loaded polypropylene fabric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondar, Yuliia; Kuzenko, Svetlana; Han, Do-Hung; Cho, Hyun-Kug

    2014-04-01

    A nanocomposite adsorbent based on potassium nickel hexacyanoferrate-loaded polypropylene fabric was synthesized for selective removal of Cs ions from contaminated waters by a two-stage synthesis: radiation-induced graft polymerization of acrylic acid monomer onto the nonwoven polypropylene fabric surface with subsequent in situ formation of potassium nickel hexacyanoferrate (KNiHCF) nanoparticles within the grafted chains. Data of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the formation of KNiHCF homogeneous phase on the fabric surface, which consisted of crystalline cubic-shaped nanoparticles (70 to 100 nm). The efficiency of the synthesized adsorbent for removal of cesium ions was evaluated under various experimental conditions. It has demonstrated a rapid adsorption process, high adsorption capacity over a wide pH range, and selectivity in Cs ion removal from model solutions with high concentration of sodium ions.

  14. Non-targeted screening for contaminants in paper and board food-contact materials using effect-directed analysis and accurate mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Bengtström, Linda; Rosenmai, Anna Kjerstine; Trier, Xenia; Jensen, Lisbeth Krüger; Granby, Kit; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Driffield, Malcolm; Højslev Petersen, Jens

    2016-06-01

    Due to large knowledge gaps in chemical composition and toxicological data for substances involved, paper and board food-contact materials (P&B FCM) have been emerging as a FCM type of particular concern for consumer safety. This study describes the development of a step-by-step strategy, including extraction, high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fractionation, tentative identification of relevant substances and in vitro testing of selected tentatively identified substances. As a case study, we used two fractions from a recycled pizza box sample which exhibited aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activity. These fractions were analysed by gas chromatography (GC) and ultra-HPLC (UHPLC) coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometers (QTOF MS) in order tentatively to identify substances. The elemental composition was determined for peaks above a threshold, and compared with entries in a commercial mass spectral library for GC-MS (GC-EI-QTOF MS) analysis and an in-house built library of accurate masses for substances known to be used in P&B packaging for UHPLC-QTOF analysis. Of 75 tentatively identified substances, 15 were initially selected for further testing in vitro; however, only seven were commercially available and subsequently tested in vitro and quantified. Of these seven, the identities of three pigments found in printing inks were confirmed by UHPLC tandem mass spectrometry (QqQ MS/MS). Two pigments had entries in the database, meaning that a material relevant accurate mass database can provide a fast tentative identification. Pure standards of the seven tentatively identified substances were tested in vitro but could not explain a significant proportion of the AhR-response in the extract. Targeted analyses of dioxins and PCBs, both well-known AhR agonists, was performed. However, the dioxins could explain approximately 3% of the activity observed in the pizza box extract indicating that some very AhR active substance(s) still remain to be

  15. Atmospheric pressure gas chromatography-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (APGC-ToF-MS) for the determination of regulated and emerging contaminants in aqueous samples after stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE).

    PubMed

    Pintado-Herrera, Marina G; González-Mazo, Eduardo; Lara-Martín, Pablo A

    2014-12-03

    This work presents the development, optimization and validation of a multi-residue method for the simultaneous determination of 102 contaminants, including fragrances, UV filters, repellents, endocrine disruptors, biocides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and several types of pesticides in aqueous matrices. Water samples were processed using stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE) after the optimization of several parameters: agitation time, ionic strength, presence of organic modifiers, pH, and volume of the derivatizing agent. Target compounds were extracted from the bars by liquid desorption (LD). Separation, identification and quantification of analytes were carried out by gas chromatography (GC) coupled to time-of-flight (ToF-MS) mass spectrometry. A new ionization source, atmospheric pressure gas chromatography (APGC), was tested. The optimized protocol showed acceptable recovery percentages (50-100%) and limits of detection below 1ngL(-1) for most of the compounds. Occurrence of 21 out of 102 analytes was confirmed in several environmental aquatic matrices, including seawater, sewage effluent, river water and groundwater. Non-target compounds such as organophosphorus flame retardants were also identified in real samples by accurate mass measurement of their molecular ions using GC-APGC-ToF-MS. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that this technique has been applied for the analysis of contaminants in aquatic systems. By employing lower energy than the more widely used electron impact ionization (EI), AGPC provides significant advantages over EI for those substances very susceptible to high fragmentation (e.g., fragrances, pyrethroids).

  16. Comparative evaluation of liquid-liquid extraction, solid-phase extraction and solid-phase microextraction for the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry determination of multiclass priority organic contaminants in wastewater.

    PubMed

    Robles-Molina, José; Gilbert-López, Bienvenida; García-Reyes, Juan F; Molina-Díaz, Antonio

    2013-12-15

    The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) 2000/60/EC establishes guidelines to control the pollution of surface water by sorting out a list of priority substances that involves a significant risk to or via the aquatic systems. In this article, the analytical performance of three different sample preparation methodologies for the GC-MS/MS determination of multiclass organic contaminants-including priority comprounds from the WFD-in wastewater samples using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was evaluated. The methodologies tested were: (a) liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) with n-hexane; (b) solid-phase extraction (SPE) with C18 cartridges and elution with ethyl acetate:dichloromethane (1:1 (v/v)), and (c) headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) using two different fibers: polyacrylate and polydimethylsiloxane/carboxen/divinilbenzene. Identification and confirmation of the selected 57 compounds included in the study (comprising polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), pesticides and other contaminants) were accomplished using gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) with a triple quadrupole instrument operated in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. Three MS/MS transitions were selected for unambiguous confirmation of the target chemicals. The different advantages and pitfalls of each method were discussed. In the case of both LLE and SPE procedures, the method was validated at two different concentration levels (15 and 150 ng L(-1)) obtaining recovery rates in the range 70-120% for most of the target compounds. In terms of analyte coverage, results with HS-SPME were not satisfactory, since 14 of the compounds tested were not properly recovered and the overall performance was worse than the other two methods tested. LLE, SPE and HS-SPME (using polyacrylate fiber) procedures also showed good linearity and precision. Using any of the three methodologies tested, limits of quantitation obtained for most of the detected compounds were in

  17. Multi-residue analysis of 90 emerging contaminants in liquid and solid environmental matrices by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Bruce; Youdan, Jane; Barden, Ruth; Kasprzyk-Hordern, Barbara

    2016-01-29

    Reported herein is new analytical methodology for the determination of 90 emerging contaminants (ECs) in liquid environmental matrices (crude wastewater, final effluent and river water). The application of a novel buffer, ammonium fluoride improved signal response for several ECs determined in negative ionisation mode. Most notably the sensitivity of steroid estrogens was improved by 4-5 times in environmental extracts. Method recoveries ranged from 40 to 152% in all matrices and method quantitation limits (MQLs) achieved were <1ngL(-1) for numerous ECs. Development of a microwave assisted extraction (MAE) protocol as an additional sample extraction step for solid matrices enabled 63 ECs to be simultaneously analysed in digested sludge. To the authors knowledge this is considerably more than any previously reported MAE method. Here, MQLs ranged from 0.1-24.1ngg(-1) dry weight. The application of MAE offers several advantages over pressurized liquid extraction including faster sample preparation, lower solvent requirements, and the ability to perform several extractions simultaneously as well as lower purchasing and running costs. To demonstrate the method's sensitivity, application to environmental samples revealed 68 and 40 ECs to be above their respective MQL in liquid environmental samples and digested sludge, respectively. To date, this is the most comprehensive multi-residue analytical method reported in the literature for the determination of ECs in both liquid and solid environmental matrices.

  18. Environmental contaminants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Rattner, B.A.; Scheunert, I.; Korte, F.; Shore, Richard F.; Rattner, Barnett A.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of the ecotoxicology of major classes of environmental contaminants, with respect to sources, environmental chemistry, most likely routes of exposure, potential bioaccumulation and biomagification, mechanisms of toxicity, and effects on potentially vulnerable species of mammalian wildlife. Major contaminants reviewed were selected on the basis of their use patterns, availability and potential toxicity to wild mammals. These included pesticides used in agroecosystems (organochlorines, organophosphorus and carbamate compounds, anticoagulants, herbicides and fungicides), various organic pollutants (chlorobenzenes, chlorophenols, polychlorinated biphenyls, dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), heavy metals (lead, mercury, and cadmium), agricultural drainwater mixtures, leachates and radionuclides. Many of the above aspects of ecotoxicology and contaminants will be expanded upon in subsequent chapters of this book as they relate to distinct mammalian species and potential risk.

  19. Contamination study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. Barry; Herren, Kenneth A.

    1990-01-01

    The time dependence of the angular reflectance from molecularly contaminated optical surfaces in the Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) is measured. The light scattering measurements are accomplished in situ on optical surfaces in real time during deposition of molecular contaminants. The measurements are taken using non-coherent VUV sources with the predominant wavelengths being the Krypton resonance lines at 1236 and 1600 A. Detection of the scattered light is accomplished using a set of three solar blind VUV photomultipliers. An in-plane VUV BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Functions) experiment is described and details of the ongoing program to characterize optical materials exposed to the space environment is reported.

  20. (Contaminated soil)

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, R.L.

    1991-01-08

    The traveler attended the Third International Conference on Contaminated Soil, held in Karlsruhe, Germany. The Conference was a status conference for worldwide research and practice in contaminated soil assessment and environmental restoration, with more than 1500 attendees representing over 26 countries. The traveler made an oral presentation and presented a poster. At the Federal Institute for Water, Soil and Air Hygiene, the traveler met with Dr. Z. Filip, Director and Professor, and Dr. R. Smed-Hildmann, Research Scientist. Detailed discussions were held regarding the results and conclusions of a collaborative experiment concerning humic substance formation in waste-amended soils.

  1. Macroscopic and microscopic spatially-resolved analysis of food contaminants and constituents using laser-ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Nielen, Michel W F; van Beek, Teris A

    2014-11-01

    Laser-ablation electrospray ionization (LAESI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) does not require very flat surfaces, high-precision sample preparation, or the addition of matrix. Because of these features, LAESI-MSI may be the method of choice for spatially-resolved food analysis. In this work, LAESI time-of-flight MSI was investigated for macroscopic and microscopic imaging of pesticides, mycotoxins, and plant metabolites on rose leaves, orange and lemon fruit, ergot bodies, cherry tomatoes, and maize kernels. Accurate mass ion-map data were acquired at sampling locations with an x-y center-to-center distance of 0.2-1.0 mm and were superimposed onto co-registered optical images. The spatially-resolved ion maps of pesticides on rose leaves suggest co-application of registered and banned pesticides. Ion maps of the fungicide imazalil reveal that this compound is only localized on the peel of citrus fruit. However, according to three-dimensional LAESI-MSI the penetration depth of imazalil into the peel has significant local variation. Ion maps of different plant alkaloids on ergot bodies from rye reveal co-localization in accordance with expectations. The feasibility of using untargeted MSI for food analysis was revealed by ion maps of plant metabolites in cherry tomatoes and maize-kernel slices. For tomatoes, traveling-wave ion mobility (TWIM) was used to discriminate between different lycoperoside glycoalkaloid isomers; for maize quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MS-MS) was successfully used to elucidate the structure of a localized unknown. It is envisaged that LAESI-MSI will contribute to future research in food science, agriforensics, and plant metabolomics.

  2. A Field-Portable Membrane Introduction Mass Spectrometer for Real-time Quantitation and Spatial Mapping of Atmospheric and Aqueous Contaminants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Ryan J.; Davey, Nicholas G.; Martinsen, Morten; Collin-Hansen, Christian; Krogh, Erik T.; Gill, Christopher G.

    2015-02-01

    Environmental concentrations of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds (VOC/SVOCs) can vary dramatically in time and space under the influence of environmental conditions. In an industrial setting, multiple point and diffuse sources can contribute to fugitive emissions. Assessments and monitoring programs using periodic grab sampling provide limited information, often with delay times of days or weeks. We report the development and use of a novel, portable membrane introduction mass spectrometry (MIMS) system capable of resolving and quantifying VOC and SVOCs with high spatial and temporal resolution, in the field, in real-time. An electron impact ionization cylindrical ion trap mass spectrometer modified with a capillary hollow fiber polydimethylsiloxane membrane interface was used for continuous air and water sampling. Tandem mass spectrometry and selected ion monitoring scans performed in series allowed for the quantitation of target analytes, and full scan mode was used to survey for unexpected analytes. Predeployment and in-field external calibrations were combined with a continuously infused internal standard to enable real-time quantitation and monitor instrument performance. The system was operated in a moving vehicle with internet-linked data processing and storage. Software development to integrate MIMS and relevant meta-data for visualization and geospatial presentation in Google Earth is presented. Continuous quantitation enables the capture of transient events that may be missed or under-represented by traditional grab sampling strategies. Real-time geospatial maps of chemical concentration enable adaptive sampling and in-field decision support. Sample datasets presented in this work were collected in Northern Alberta in 2010-2012.

  3. Detection of VX contamination in soil through solid-phase microextraction sampling and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry of the VX degradation product bis(diisopropylaminoethyl)disulfide.

    PubMed

    Hook, Gary L; Kimm, Gregory; Koch, David; Savage, Paul B; Ding, Bangwei; Smith, Philip A

    2003-04-11

    A solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) sampling and analysis method was developed for bis(diisopropylaminoethyl)disulfide (a degradation product of the nerve agent VX) in soil. A 30-min sampling time with a polydimethylsiloxane-coated fiber and high temperature alkaline hydrolysis allowed detection with 1.0 microg of VX spiked per g of agricultural soil. The method was successfully used in the field with portable GC-MS instrumentation. This method is relatively rapid (less than 1 h), avoids the use of complex preparation steps, and enhances analyst safety through limited use of solvents and decontamination of the soil before sampling.

  4. Evaluation of adsorbents for volatile methyl siloxanes sampling based on the determination of their breakthrough volume.

    PubMed

    Lamaa, L; Ferronato, C; Fine, L; Jaber, F; Chovelon, J M

    2013-10-15

    Volatile methyl siloxanes (VMS) have been detected in many different atmospheres such as biogas, sewage sludge, landfill gas, gasoline and ambient air. In these different atmospheres, their presence can involve several contamination problems and negative effects in industrial processes, their identification and quantification become a real challenge. Up to now there is no standardized procedure for VMS quantification, the sampling step remaining the major obstacle. Sampling gas through sorbent tube followed by analysis on TD-GC-MS is one of the reliable possibilities. It gathers sampling and preconcentration in one step and allows discrimination between all VMS, despite the difficulty to choose the appropriate adsorbent in order to avoid loss of analytes during sampling. In this context, this work deals with the comparison of different types of adsorbents based on the determination of the VMS breakthrough volume (BV). Although Tenax TA is the most widely used adsorbent, experiments show low BV values for the lightest VMS. At 25°C, the BV of TMS and L2 are, respectively, 0.2 and 0.44 L g(-1) which can contribute to an underestimation in concentration during their quantification. Carbosieve SIII usually used for C2-C5, did not adsorb light VMS as it was expected, and breakthrough volume obtained for VMS are more than ten times less than the values obtained for Tenax. On other hand, Chromosorb 106 and Carboxen 1000 in association with Carbotrap C and Carbotrap proved to be appropriated for VMS sampling, due to the high breakthrough volumes obtained for the lightest compounds comparing to the other adsorbents. The BVs of TMS for Carboxen 1000 and Chromosorb 106 are 1.2 × 10(4) and 39 L g(-1), respectively, and 49 × 10(4) and 1142 L g(-1) for L2, respectively.

  5. Investigation of organic, inorganic and synthetic adsorbents for the pretreatment of landfill leachate.

    PubMed

    Shahriari, H; Fernandes, L; Tezel, F H

    2008-05-01

    An investigation into the use of organic, inorganic and synthetic adsorbents for the pretreatment of landfill leachate, generated by the City of Ottawa Trail Road Landfill, was carried out. The purpose of this project was to reduce the concentration of contaminants in order to meet the local Sewer Use By-Laws, prior to transporting the leachate from the generating site to the local municipal sewage treatment plant, and thereby reducing the disposal fees. Peat moss, compost, clinoptilolite, basalt and two types of activated carbon (DSR-A and F400) were investigated to determine the adsorption capacity for contaminants from leachate. Kinetic studies were also performed. The results based on batch adsorption isotherms show that peat moss has the highest adsorption capacity for boron (B) and barium (Ba), compared with the other adsorbents. Also peat moss has good removals of Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen (TKN), Total Organic Carbon (TOC), and benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX), but these are lower than the removals obtained with activated carbon. Because of its relatively low cost and higher adsorption of B and Ba, peat moss was selected as the filter media for the column studies. The treated leachate was tested for B, Ba, TKN, carbonaceous biological oxygen demand (CBOD5) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S). The breakthrough curves for B and Ba showed the effectiveness of peat moss in removing these contaminants.

  6. Negatively charged ions on Mg(0001) surfaces: appearance and origin of attractive adsorbate-adsorbate interactions.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Su-Ting; Todorova, Mira; Freysoldt, Christoph; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2014-09-26

    Adsorption of electronegative elements on a metal surface usually leads to an increase in the work function and decrease in the binding energy as the adsorbate coverage rises. Using density-functional theory calculations, we show that Cl adsorbed on a Mg(0001) surface complies with these expectations, but adsorption of {N,O,F} causes a decrease in the work function and an increase in the binding energy. Analyzing the electronic structure, we show that the presence of a highly polarizable electron spill-out in front of Mg(0001) causes this unusual adsorption behavior and is responsible for the appearance of a hitherto unknown net-attractive lateral electrostatic interaction between same charged adsorbates.

  7. Efficiency of sepiolite in broilers diet as uranium adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Mitrović, Branislava M; Jovanović, Milijan; Lazarević-Macanović, Mirjana; Janaćković, Djordje; Krstić, Nikola; Stojanović, Mirjana; Mirilović, Milorad

    2015-05-01

    The use of phosphate mineral products in animal nutrition, as a major source of phosphor and calcium, can lead to uranium entering the food chain. The aim of the present study was to determine the protective effect of natural sepiolite and sepiolite treated with acid for broilers after oral intake of uranium. The broilers were contaminated for 7 days with 25 mg/uranyl nitrate per day. Two different adsorbents (natural sepiolite and sepiolite treated with acid) were given via gastric tube immediately after the oral administration of uranium. Natural sepiolite reduced uranium distribution by 57% in kidney, 80% in liver, 42% in brain, and 56% in muscle. A lower protective effect was observed after the administration of sepiolite treated with acid, resulting in significant damage of intestinal villi in the form of shortening, fragmentation, and necrosis, and histopathological lesions on kidney in the form of edema and abruption of epithelial cells in tubules. When broilers received only sepiolite treated with acid (no uranyl nitrate), shortening of intestinal villi occurred. Kidney injuries were evident when uranium concentrations in kidney were 0.88 and 1.25 µg/g dry weight. It is concluded that adding of natural sepiolite to the diets of broilers can reduce uranium distribution in organs by significant amount without adverse side effects.

  8. Groundwater contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Haimes, Y. . Dept. of Systems Engineering)

    1986-01-01

    The subject of these conference proceedings is the groundwater contamination. It is by nature multifarious - dealing with detection and monitoring, prevention, abatement and containment, and correction and restoration of contaminated groundwater - it intrinsically encompasses myriad disciplines, and it involves all levels of government. Also, the subject of groundwater contamination is complex because decisions concerning groundwater pollution control that are scientifically sound, technologically within the state of the art, economically feasible, politically tractable, legally sustainable, socially acceptable, morally accountable, and organizationally implementable must be grounded on appropriate information and intelligence bases in their respective areas - science, technology, economics, politics, the law, society, ethics, and management. Indeed, the human health effects (e.g., cancer, damage to the central nervous system, liver and kidney damage) and non-health effects (economic hardship to industry, agriculture, households, and municipalities; environmental impacts; social impacts) necessitate that we, as a society, address in a somber way the following variations of the same question: How safe is safe enough How clean is safe enough The enormous cost - in billions of dollars over the next decade - that various studies project for the prevention, detection and monitoring, abatement and containment, and correction and restoration of groundwater contamination make an answer to these questions even more urgent. There are sixteen papers in these proceedings.

  9. Validation of mega composite sampling and nationwide mass inventories for 26 previously unmonitored contaminants in archived biosolids from the U.S National Biosolids Repository

    PubMed Central

    Chari, Bipin P.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study, archived U.S biosolids from the 2001 Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) National Sewage Sludge Survey were analyzed with an expanded U.S EPA Method 1694, to determine the occurrence of 26 previously unmonitored pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) among a total of 120 analytes. The study further served to examine the reproducibility of a mega-composite approach for creating chemical mass inventories in biosolids based on pooled samples from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) nationwide. Five mega-composites reflecting 94 WWTPs in 32 states and the District of Columbia were constructed from archived biosolids and analyzed by LC/ESI-MS/MS using a newly introduced analytical method expanding upon U.S EPA Method 1694. In addition, soil-biosolids mixtures from a mesocosm setup were analyzed to experimentally determine the half-lives of biosolids-borne compounds applied on U.S land. Among 59 analytes detected, 33 had been reported previously, whereas 26 are reported in biosolids for the first time, at levels ranging from 1.65 to 673 μg kg−1 dry weight. Newly recognized biosolids constituents were identified as Ca2+ channel blockers, antidepressants, diuretics, β-blockers and analgesics. Using a mass balance approach, the total loading of these 26 pharmaceuticals to U.S soils from biosolids land application was estimated at 5–15 tons year−1. Past and present datasets for 30 pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) were determined to be statistically indistinguishable (paired t-test; p = 0.01). This study expands the list of PPCPs reported in U.S biosolids, provides the first estimates of nationwide release rates to and environmental half-lives in U.S agricultural soils, and confirms the utility of using mega-composite sampling for economical tracking of chemical inventories in biosolids on a national scale. PMID:22789759

  10. An evaluation of sucrose as a possible contaminant in e-liquids for electronic cigarettes by hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kubica, Paweł; Wasik, Andrzej; Kot-Wasik, Agata; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2014-05-01

    The influence of sucrose combustion products on smoking and nicotine addiction is still controversial because the presence of the sucrose may be treated as a source of aldehydes and organic acids. In e-liquids used as refills for electronic cigarettes, which are made primarily of poly(propylene glycol), glycerine and ethanol, sucrose may be present at trace levels, and its impact on mainstream smoke formation, and hence on human health and smoking/nicotine addiction is unknown. An analytical method was developed where high-performance liquid chromatography in hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography mode and tandem mass spectrometry were used for fast and simple determination of sucrose and other saccharides in e-liquids for electronic cigarettes. Minimal effort was required in the sample preparation step, and satisfactory results were obtained, and the sample matrix had an insignificant impact. The chromatographic separation was done using an Ascentis Express OH5 column (150 mm × 2.1 mm, 2.7 μm). The coefficients of variation for within-day precision for three concentrations were 2.4 %, 1.6 % and 2.3 %, and the between-day coefficients of variation for a single concentration were 2.1 %, 2.5 % and 1.7 % measured on the next 3 days. The detection limit was 0.73 μg/g, and the sucrose content in e-liquids ranged from 0.76 to 72.93 μg/g among 37 samples. Moreover, with the method presented it is possible to determine the presence of other saccharides such as fructose, glucose, maltose and lactose. However, only sucrose was found in all samples of e-liquids. The proposed method is rapid, simple and reliable in terms of high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry.

  11. Recovery of Technetium Adsorbed on Charcoal

    SciTech Connect

    Engelmann, Mark D.; Metz, Lori A.; Ballou, Nathan E.

    2006-05-01

    Two methods capable of near complete recovery of technetium adsorbed on charcoal are presented. The first involves liquid extraction of the technetium from the charcoal by hot 4M nitric acid. An average recovery of 98% (n=3) is obtained after three rounds of extraction. The second method involves dry ashing with air in a quartz combustion tube at 400-450 C. This method yields an average recovery of 96% (n=5). Other thermal methods were attempted, but resulted in reduced recovery and incomplete material balance

  12. Adsorption removal of cesium from drinking waters: a mini review on use of biosorbents and other adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Chen, Guan-Ru; Lee, Duu-Jong; Kawamoto, Tohru; Tanaka, Hisashi; Chen, Man-Li; Luo, Yu-Kuo

    2014-05-01

    Radiocesium (Cs) removal from waters becomes an emerging issue after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Disaster, during which a total of approximately 3.3×10(16) Bq Cs was released to contaminate the environment. This mini-review provided a summary on literature works to develop efficient adsorbent for removing Cs from waters. Adsorbent made of raw and modified minerals, composites particles, and biosorbents that are highly specific to Cs in the presence of other alkali and alkali earth metals were summarized. Development of Prussian blue (PB) nanoparticles on Cs removal and its potential use in drinking waterworks was discussed. This review is a unique report for adsorption removal of Cs from contaminated waters.

  13. Ground water contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This book covers: Ground water contamination and basic concepts of water law; Federal law governing water contamination and remediation; Ground water flow and contaminant migration; Ground water cleanup under CERCLA; Technical methods of remediation and prevention of contamination; Liability for ground water contamination; State constraints on contamination of ground water; Water quantity versus water quality; Prevention of use of contaminated ground water as an alternative to remediation; Economic considerations in liability for ground water contamination; and Contamination, extraction, and injection issues.

  14. Mineral Adsorbents for Removal of Metals in Urban Runoff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorklund, Karin; Li, Loretta

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the capacity of four different soil minerals to adsorb metals frequently detected in urban runoff. These are low-cost, natural and commercially available soil minerals. Contaminated surface runoff from urban areas is a major cause of concern for water quality and aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Pollution in urban areas is generated by a wide array of non-point sources, including vehicular transportation and building materials. Some of the most frequently detected pollutants in urban runoff are metals. Exhaust gases, tire wear and brake linings are major sources of such metals as Pb, Zn and Cu, while impregnated wood, plastics and galvanized surfaces may release As, Cd, Cr and Zn. Many metals have toxic effects on aquatic plants and animals, depending on metal speciation and bioavailability. The removal efficiency of pollutants in stormwater depends on treatment practices and on the properties the pollutant. The distribution of metals in urban runoff has shown, for example, that Pb is predominantly particle-associated, whereas Zn and Cd are present mainly in dissolved form. Many metals are also attached to colloids, which may act as carriers for contaminants, thereby facilitating their transport through conventional water treatment processes. Filtration of stormwater is one of the most promising techniques for removal of particulates, colloidal and truly dissolved pollutants, provided that effective filtration and adsorption media are used. Filtration and infiltration are used in a wide array of stormwater treatment methods e.g. porous paving, infiltration drains and rain gardens. Several soil minerals were investigated for their potential as stormwater filter materials. Laboratory batch tests were conducted to determine the adsorption capacity of these minerals. A synthetic stormwater was tested, with spiked concentrations corresponding to levels reported in urban runoff, ranging from 50-1,500 µg/L for Zn; 5-250 µg/L for Cu

  15. Storage stability of ketones on carbon adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Prado, C; Alcaraz, M J; Fuentes, A; Garrido, J; Periago, J F

    2006-09-29

    Activated coconut carbon constitutes the more widely used sorbent for preconcentration of volatile organic compounds in sampling workplace air. Water vapour is always present in the air and its adsorption on the activated carbon surface is a serious drawback, mainly when sampling polar organic compounds, such as ketones. In this case, the recovery of the compounds diminishes; moreover, ketones can be decomposed during storage. Synthetic carbons contain less inorganic impurities and have a lower capacity for water adsorption than coconut charcoal. The aim of this work was to evaluate the storage stability of various ketones (acetone, 2-butanone, 4-methyl-2-pentanone and cyclohexanone) on different activated carbons and to study the effect of adsorbed water vapour under different storage conditions. The effect of storage temperature on extraction efficiencies was significant for each ketone in all the studied sorbents. Recovery was higher when samples were stored at 4 degrees C. The results obtained for storage stability of the studied ketones showed that the performance of synthetic carbons was better than for the coconut charcoals. The water adsorption and the ash content of the carbons can be a measure of the reactive sites that may chemisorb ketones or catalize their decomposition. Anasorb 747 showed good ketone stability at least for 7 days, except for cyclohexanone. After 30-days storage, the stability of the studied ketones was excellent on Carboxen 564. This sorbent had a nearly negligible ash content and the adsorbed water was much lower than for the other sorbents tested.

  16. Optimizing heterosurface adsorbent synthesis for liquid chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogoslovskii, S. Yu.; Serdan, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The structural and geometric parameters of a silica matrix (SM) for the synthesis of heterosurface adsorbents (HAs) are optimized. Modification is performed by shielding the external surfaces of alkyl-modified silica (AS) using human serum albumin and its subsequent crosslinking. The structural and geometric characteristics of the SM, AS, and HA are measured via low-temperature nitrogen adsorption. It is found that the structural characteristics of AS pores with diameters D < 6 nm do not change during HA synthesis, while the volume of pores with diameters of 6 nm < D < 9 nm shrinks slightly due to the adsorption of albumin in the pore orifices. It is established that the volume of pores with diameters D > 9 nm reduces significantly due to adsorption of albumin. It is concluded that silica gel with a maximum pore size distribution close to 5 nm and a minimal proportion of pores with D > 9 nm is optimal for HA synthesis; this allows us to achieve the greatest similarity between the chromatographic retention parameters for HA and AS. The suitability of the synthesized adsorbents for analyzing drugs in biological fluids through direct sample injection is confirmed by chromatography. It was found that the percentage of the protein fraction detected at the outlet of the chromatographic column is 98%.

  17. Comparative study of different fabric phase sorptive extraction sorbents to determine emerging contaminants from environmental water using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lakade, Sameer S; Borrull, Francesc; Furton, Kenneth G; Kabir, Abuzar; Fontanals, Núria; Marcé, Rosa Maria

    2015-11-01

    A new sorptive extraction technique, fabric phase sorptive extraction (FPSE), using different coating chemistries: non-polar sol-gel poly(dimethyldiphenylsiloxane) (PDMDPS), medium polar sol-gel poly(tetrahydrofuran) (PTHF), and polar sol-gel poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(propylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PPG-PEG triblock) and sol-gel Carbowax 20 M were evaluated to extract a group of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) with wide range of polarity from environmental aqueous samples. Different parameters affecting FPSE such as sample pH, stirring speed, addition of salt, extraction time, sample volume, elution solvent and desorption time were optimized for each sorbent coated FPSE media. Under optimum conditions, FPSE media coated with sol-gel Carbowax 20 M provided the highest absolute recoveries (77-85%) for majority of the analytes with the exception of the most polar ones. Nevertheless, all four sorbents offered better recovery compared to the commercially available coating for stir-bar sorptive extraction based on Ethylene Glycol/Silicone (EG/Silicone). The method based on FPSE with sol-gel Carbowax 20 M media and liquid chromatography-(electrospray ionization) tandem mass spectrometry (LC-(ESI) MS/MS) was developed and validated for environmental water samples. Good apparent recoveries (41-80%), detection limits (1-50 ng L(-1)), repeatability (%RSD<15%, n=5) and reproducibility (%RSD<18%, n=5) were achieved.

  18. Limited transfer of uranium to higher trophic levels by Gammarus pulex L. in contaminated environments.

    PubMed

    Schaller, Jörg; Brackhage, Carsten; Dudel, E Gert

    2009-09-01

    In contrast to the classification of most invertebrate shredders being sensitive to uranium, a G. pulex L. population with reproduction was found in a stream at a former uranium mining site with uranium concentrations of 150 microg l(-1) in water and up to 2000 mg kg(-1) DW(-1) (dry weight) in litter born organic sediments. The survival of G. pulex, collected from a site without uranium contamination, was tested in a laboratory microcosm experiment using synthetic uranium-contaminated water and uranium-contaminated but nutrient rich food, simulating physicochemical conditions of water from former uranium mining sites. The results reveal that there are no significant differences in survival rate between individuals exposed and those not exposed to uranium. The uptake of uranium by G. pulex in environments with concentrations in food of 1152 mg kg(-1) in DM (dry mass, organically bound) and in water of 63.9 microg L(-1) is very low (4.48(1.93-8.46) mg kg(-1) in DM). The accumulation of uranium in these invertebrates was verified to be via two pathways: body surface and food. A relevant amount of uranium adsorbs to the body surface where it can readily be desorbed.

  19. Catalyst Substrates Remove Contaminants, Produce Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    A spacecraft is the ultimate tight building. We don t want any leaks, and there is very little fresh air coming in, says Jay Perry, an aerospace engineer at Marshall Space Flight Center. As a result, there is a huge potential for a buildup of contaminants from a host of sources. Inside a spacecraft, contaminants can be introduced from the materials that make spacecraft components, electronics boxes, or activities by the crew such as food preparation or cleaning. Humans also generate contaminants by breathing and through the body s natural metabolic processes. As part of the sophisticated Environmental Control and Life Support System on the International Space Station (ISS), a trace contaminant control system removes carbon dioxide and other impurities from the cabin atmosphere. To maintain healthy levels, the system uses adsorbent media to filter chemical contaminant molecules and a high-temperature catalytic oxidizer to change the chemical structure of the contaminants to something more benign, usually carbon dioxide and water. In the 1990s, while researching air quality control technology for extended spaceflight travel, Perry and others at Marshall were looking for a regenerable process for the continuous removal of carbon dioxide and trace chemical contaminants on long-duration manned space flights. At the time, the existing technology used on U.S. spacecraft could only be used once, which meant that a spacecraft had to carry additional spare parts for use in case the first one was depleted, or the spacecraft would have to return to Earth to exchange the components.

  20. Efficient tandem solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry method to determine polar benzotriazole, benzothiazole and benzenesulfonamide contaminants in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Herrero, P; Borrull, F; Pocurull, E; Marcé, R M

    2013-09-27

    An analytical method has been developed that allows the simultaneous determination of five benzotriazole (BTRs), four benzothiazole (BTs) and five benzenesulfonamide (BSAs) derivates. The method is based on tandem solid-phase extraction (SPE) with Oasis HLB followed by a clean-up step with Florisil. The chromatographic analysis was performed in less than 15min and detection was carried out with a triple quadrupole mass analyser operating in multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. A comparison was performed between Oasis HLB and Oasis MAX sorbents for the solid-phase extraction, with Oasis HLB being the sorbent that gave the highest recoveries, ranging between 75% and 106%, depending on the compound and the matrix analysed. The proposed clean-up with Florisil sorbent reduced the matrix effect to below 20%. The repeatability (%RSD, 50-3000ng/L, n=3) of the method was less than 15% for all of the compounds in all of the matrices. The limits of detection (LODs) achieved ranged from 1ng/L for BTR in river water up to 100ng/L for BT in influent sewage. All of the compounds were determined in environmental waters such as river water and sewage. The highest concentrations determined corresponded to influent sewage samples in which the sum of concentrations for all compounds were between 4.6μg/L and 8.0μg/L. These concentrations were slightly reduced in secondary effluent and tertiary effluent sewage. Moreover, samples from tertiary effluent sewage based on ultra-filtration membrane treatments were also analysed and preliminary results seem to indicate that these treatments may be most effective for removing BTR, BT and BSA derivates.

  1. Method validation for high resolution sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry determination of the emerging contaminants in the open ocean: Rare earth elements as a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wysocka, Irena; Vassileva, Emilia

    2017-02-01

    Analytical procedure for the determination of fourteen rare earth elements (REEs) in the seawater samples has been developed and validated. The elements (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) at ultra-trace level were measured by high resolution sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HR ICP-SFMS) after off-line analytes pre-concentration and matrix separation. The sample pre-treatment was carried out by commercially available automated system seaFAST-pico™, which is a low-pressure ion chromatography technique, based on solid phase extraction principles. Efficient elimination of seawater matrix and up to 50-fold pre-concentration of REEs enabled their accurate and precise quantification at ng L- 1 level. A validation approach in line with the requirements of ISO/IEC 17025 standard and Eurachem guidelines were followed. With this in mind, selectivity, working range, linearity, recovery (from 92% to 102%), repeatability (1%-4%), intermediate precision (2%-6%), limits of detection (0.001-0.08 ng L- 1) were systematically assessed. The total uncertainty associated to each result was estimated and the main sources of uncertainty sorted out. All major contributions to the combined uncertainty of the obtained results were identified and propagated together, following the ISO/GUM guidelines. The relative expanded uncertainty was estimated at range from 10.4% to 11.6% (k = 2). Demonstration of traceability of measurement results was also presented. Due to the low limits of detection, this method enables the determination of ultra-low levels of REEs in the open seawater as well as small variations in their concentrations. The potential of the proposed analytical procedure, based on combination of seaFAST-pico™ for sample preparation and HR ICP-SFMS, was demonstrated by direct analysis of seawater form different regions of the world.

  2. Contamination levels of mercury and cadmium in melon-headed whales (Peponocephala electra) from a mass stranding on the Japanese coast.

    PubMed

    Endo, Tetsuya; Hisamichi, Yohsuke; Kimura, Osamu; Haraguchi, Koichi; Baker, C Scott

    2008-08-15

    Total mercury (T-Hg), methyl mercury (M-Hg), cadmium (Cd), selenium (Se), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) concentrations in the organs of melon-headed whales from a mass stranding on the Japanese coast were analyzed. The mean concentration of T-Hg in the liver (126+/-97 microg/wet g, n=13) was markedly higher than those in kidney (6.34+/-2.36 microg/wet g, n=12) and muscle (4.90+/-2.33 microg/wet g, n=15). In contrast, the mean concentration of M-Hg in the liver (9.08+/-2.24 microg/wet g) was similar to those in the kidney (3.47+/-0.91 microg/wet g) and muscle (3.78+/-1.53 microg/wet g). The mean percentage of M-Hg in the T-Hg found in the liver (13.1+/-10.3) was significantly lower than those in the kidney (58.3+/-15.0) and muscle (78.9+/-8.4). The molar ratio of T-Hg to Se in the liver was effectively 1.0, but those in the kidney and muscle were markedly lower. Conversely, the mean concentration of Cd was markedly higher in the kidney (24.4+/-7.4 microg/wet g) than in the liver (7.24+/-2.08 microg/wet g) and muscle (less than 0.05 microg/wet g). These results suggest that the formation of Hg-Se compounds mainly occurs in the liver after the demethylation of M-Hg, and Cd preferentially accumulates in the kidney of melon-headed whales.

  3. Adsorbent Alkali Conditioning for Uranium Adsorption from Seawater. Adsorbent Performance and Technology Cost Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Tsouris, Costas; Mayes, Richard T.; Janke, Christopher James; Dai, Sheng; Das, S.; Liao, W. -P.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana; Gill, Gary; Byers, Maggie Flicker; Schneider, Eric

    2015-09-30

    The Fuel Resources program of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program of the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) is focused on identifying and implementing actions to assure that nuclear fuel resources are available in the United States. An immense source of uranium is seawater, which contains an estimated amount of 4.5 billion tonnes of dissolved uranium. This unconventional resource can provide a price cap and ensure centuries of uranium supply for future nuclear energy production. NE initiated a multidisciplinary program with participants from national laboratories, universities, and research institutes to enable technical breakthroughs related to uranium recovery from seawater. The goal is to develop advanced adsorbents to reduce the seawater uranium recovery technology cost and uncertainties. Under this program, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a new amidoxime-based adsorbent of high surface area, which tripled the uranium capacity of leading Japanese adsorbents. Parallel efforts have been focused on the optimization of the physicochemical and operating parameters used during the preparation of the adsorbent for deployment. A set of parameters that need to be optimized are related to the conditioning of the adsorbent with alkali solution, which is necessary prior to adsorbent deployment. Previous work indicated that alkali-conditioning parameters significantly affect the adsorbent performance. Initiated in 2014, this study had as a goal to determine optimal parameters such as base type and concentration, temperature, and duration of conditioning that maximize the uranium adsorption performance of amidoxime functionalized adsorbent, while keeping the cost of uranium production low. After base-treatment at various conditions, samples of adsorbent developed at ORNL were tested in this study with batch simulated seawater solution of 8-ppm uranium concentration, batch seawater spiked with uranium nitrate at 75-100 ppb uranium, and continuous

  4. Aging assessment of nuclear air-treatment system HEPA filters and adsorbers. Volume 1, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Winegardner, W.K.

    1993-08-01

    A Phase I aging assessment of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters and activated carbon gas adsorption units (adsorbers) was performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Nuclear Plant Aging Research (NPAR) Program. Information concerning design features; failure experience; aging mechanisms, effects, and stressors; and surveillance and monitoring methods for these key air-treatment system components was compiled. Over 1100 failures, or 12 percent of the filter installations, were reported as part of a Department of Energy (DOE) survey. Investigators from other national laboratories have suggested that aging effects could have contributed to over 80 percent of these failures. Tensile strength tests on aged filter media specimens indicated a decrease in strength. Filter aging mechanisms range from those associated with particle loading to reactions that alter properties of sealants and gaskets. Low radioiodine decontamination factors associated with the Three Mile Island (TMI) accident were attributed to the premature aging of the carbon in the adsorbers. Mechanisms that can lead to impaired adsorber performance include oxidation as well as the loss of potentially available active sites as a result of the adsorption of pollutants. Stressors include heat, moisture, radiation, and airborne particles and contaminants.

  5. Cleanup of contaminated soil -- Unreal risk assumptions: Contaminant degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffman, A.

    1995-12-31

    Exposure assessments for development of risk-based soil cleanup standards or criteria assume that contaminant mass in soil is infinite and conservative (constant concentration). This assumption is not real for most organic chemicals. Contaminant mass is lost from soil and ground water when organic chemicals degrade. Factors to correct for chemical mass lost by degradation are derived from first-order kinetics for 85 organic chemicals commonly listed by USEPA and state agencies. Soil cleanup criteria, based on constant concentration, are then corrected for contaminant mass lost. For many chemicals, accounting for mass lost yields large correction factors to risk-based soil concentrations. For degradation in ground water and soil, correction factors range from greater than one to several orders of magnitude. The long exposure durations normally used in exposure assessments (25 to 70 years) result in large correction factors to standards even for carcinogenic chemicals with long half-lives. For the ground water pathway, a typical soil criterion for TCE of 1 mg/kg would be corrected to 11 mg/kg. For noncarcinogens, correcting for mass lost means that risk algorithms used to set soil cleanup requirements are inapplicable for many chemicals, especially for long periods of exposure.

  6. Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases

    DOEpatents

    Senum, G.I.; Dietz, R.N.

    1994-04-05

    This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons. 8 figures.

  7. Carbonaceous adsorbent regeneration and halocarbon displacement by hydrocarbon gases

    DOEpatents

    Senum, Gunnar I.; Dietz, Russell N.

    1994-01-01

    This invention describes a process for regeneration of halocarbon bearing carbonaceous adsorbents through which a carbonaceous adsorbent is contacted with hydrocarbon gases, preferably propane, butane and pentane at near room temperatures and at atmospheric pressure. As the hydrocarbon gases come in contact with the adsorbent, the hydrocarbons displace the halocarbons by physical adsorption. As a result of using this process, the halocarbon concentration and the hydrocarbon eluant is increased thereby allowing for an easier recovery of pure halocarbons. By using the process of this invention, carbonaceous adsorbents can be regenerated by an inexpensive process which also allows for subsequent re-use of the recovered halocarbons.

  8. Plasticizers, antioxidants, and other contaminants found in air delivered by PVC tubing used in respiratory therapy.

    PubMed

    Hill, Sandra S; Shaw, Brenda R; Wu, Alan H B

    2003-06-01

    Of the many compounds that leach from respiratory therapy tubing into air passing through it, we selected five compounds to analyze. The five compounds are known to be potentially carcinogenic, toxic or known to induce estrogenic activity. Parts-per-million and parts-per-billion concentrations of these species were found in the air passing through the tubing: the plasticizers di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) and di-ethyl phthalate (DEP), the antioxidants butylated hydroxy toluene (BHT) and p-nonylphenol (p-NP), and the contaminant (from commercial preparation of DEHP) 2-ethylhexanol (2-EH). These levels are high enough to cause some concern about exposure for patients who use oxygen on a long-term basis, those sensitive or allergic to these species, or those with asthma. A method was developed for analysis of solid tubing samples, showing great variability in concentrations of small, volatile molecules from sample to sample. A method was also developed for pre-concentration of small molecules onto Tenax adsorbants from air passing through the tubing. Both solid samples and adsorbant loaded with analyte were analyzed by direct dynamic thermal desorption gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). This study does not imply that adverse reactions by patients to chemical compounds leaching from respiratory medical tubing will occur but that further investigation is warranted.

  9. Bio-based Adsorbents from Agricultural Byproducts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural byproducts are often not used to the extent possible. Here we demonstrate that these byproducts can be used as starting material for production of activated carbon. These carbons can be used for uptake of water contaminants such as trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene. We will sho...

  10. The condensation of water on adsorbed viruses.

    PubMed

    Alonso, José María; Tatti, Francesco; Chuvilin, Andrey; Mam, Keriya; Ondarçuhu, Thierry; Bittner, Alexander M

    2013-11-26

    The wetting and dewetting behavior of biological nanostructures and to a greater degree single molecules is not well-known even though their contact with water is the basis for all biology. Here, we show that environmental electron microscopy (EM) can be applied as a means of imaging the condensation of water onto viruses. We captured the formation of submicrometer water droplets and filaments on single viral particles by environmental EM and by environmental transmission EM. The condensate structures are compatible with capillary condensation between adsorbed virus particles and with known droplet shapes on patterned surfaces. Our results confirm that such droplets exist down to <50 nm. The viruses preserved their shape after a condensation/evaporation cycle as expected from their stability in air and water. Moreover we developed procedures that overcome problems of beam damage and of resolving structures with a low atomic number.

  11. Carbon Dioxide Capture Adsorbents: Chemistry and Methods.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hasmukh A; Byun, Jeehye; Yavuz, Cafer T

    2016-12-21

    Excess carbon dioxide (CO2 ) emissions and their inevitable consequences continue to stimulate hard debate and awareness in both academic and public spaces, despite the widespread lack of understanding on what really is needed to capture and store the unwanted CO2 . Of the entire carbon capture and storage (CCS) operation, capture is the most costly process, consisting of nearly 70 % of the price tag. In this tutorial review, CO2 capture science and technology based on adsorbents are described and evaluated in the context of chemistry and methods, after briefly introducing the current status of CO2 emissions. An effective sorbent design is suggested, whereby six checkpoints are expected to be met: cost, capacity, selectivity, stability, recyclability, and fast kinetics.

  12. Trends in adsorbate induced core level shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, Viktor; Van den Bossche, Maxime; Hellman, Anders; Grönbeck, Henrik

    2015-10-01

    Photoelectron core level spectroscopy is commonly used to monitor atomic and molecular adsorption on metal surfaces. As changes in the electron binding energies are convoluted measures with different origins, calculations are often used to facilitate the decoding of experimental signatures. The interpretation could in this sense benefit from knowledge on trends in surface core level shifts for different metals and adsorbates. Here, density functional theory calculations have been used to systematically evaluate core level shifts for (111) and (100) surfaces of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals upon CO, H, O and S adsorption. The results reveal trends and several non-intuitive cases. Moreover, the difficulties correlating core level shifts with charging and d-band shifts are underlined.

  13. Contamination Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Measurement of the total organic carbon content in water is important in assessing contamination levels in high purity water for power generation, pharmaceutical production and electronics manufacture. Even trace levels of organic compounds can cause defects in manufactured products. The Sievers Model 800 Total Organic Carbon (TOC) Analyzer, based on technology developed for the Space Station, uses a strong chemical oxidizing agent and ultraviolet light to convert organic compounds in water to carbon dioxide. After ionizing the carbon dioxide, the amount of ions is determined by measuring the conductivity of the deionized water. The new technique is highly sensitive, does not require compressed gas, and maintenance is minimal.

  14. metAlignID: a high-throughput software tool set for automated detection of trace level contaminants in comprehensive LECO two-dimensional gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry data.

    PubMed

    Lommen, Arjen; van der Kamp, Henk J; Kools, Harrie J; van der Lee, Martijn K; van der Weg, Guido; Mol, Hans G J

    2012-11-09

    A new alternative data processing tool set, metAlignID, is developed for automated pre-processing and library-based identification and concentration estimation of target compounds after analysis by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection. The tool set has been developed for and tested on LECO data. The software is developed to run multi-threaded (one thread per processor core) on a standard PC (personal computer) under different operating systems and is as such capable of processing multiple data sets simultaneously. Raw data files are converted into netCDF (network Common Data Form) format using a fast conversion tool. They are then preprocessed using previously developed algorithms originating from metAlign software. Next, the resulting reduced data files are searched against a user-composed library (derived from user or commercial NIST-compatible libraries) (NIST=National Institute of Standards and Technology) and the identified compounds, including an indicative concentration, are reported in Excel format. Data can be processed batch wise. The overall time needed for conversion together with processing and searching of 30 raw data sets for 560 compounds is routinely within an hour. The screening performance is evaluated for detection of pesticides and contaminants in raw data obtained after analysis of soil and plant samples. Results are compared to the existing data-handling routine based on proprietary software (LECO, ChromaTOF). The developed software tool set, which is freely downloadable at www.metalign.nl, greatly accelerates data-analysis and offers more options for fine-tuning automated identification toward specific application needs. The quality of the results obtained is slightly better than the standard processing and also adds a quantitative estimate. The software tool set in combination with two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry shows great potential as a highly

  15. Arsenic removal from water/wastewater using adsorbents--A critical review.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Dinesh; Pittman, Charles U

    2007-04-02

    Arsenic's history in science, medicine and technology has been overshadowed by its notoriety as a poison in homicides. Arsenic is viewed as being synonymous with toxicity. Dangerous arsenic concentrations in natural waters is now a worldwide problem and often referred to as a 20th-21st century calamity. High arsenic concentrations have been reported recently from the USA, China, Chile, Bangladesh, Taiwan, Mexico, Argentina, Poland, Canada, Hungary, Japan and India. Among 21 countries in different parts of the world affected by groundwater arsenic contamination, the largest population at risk is in Bangladesh followed by West Bengal in India. Existing overviews of arsenic removal include technologies that have traditionally been used (oxidation, precipitation/coagulation/membrane separation) with far less attention paid to adsorption. No previous review is available where readers can get an overview of the sorption capacities of both available and developed sorbents used for arsenic remediation together with the traditional remediation methods. We have incorporated most of the valuable available literature on arsenic remediation by adsorption ( approximately 600 references). Existing purification methods for drinking water; wastewater; industrial effluents, and technological solutions for arsenic have been listed. Arsenic sorption by commercially available carbons and other low-cost adsorbents are surveyed and critically reviewed and their sorption efficiencies are compared. Arsenic adsorption behavior in presence of other impurities has been discussed. Some commercially available adsorbents are also surveyed. An extensive table summarizes the sorption capacities of various adsorbents. Some low-cost adsorbents are superior including treated slags, carbons developed from agricultural waste (char carbons and coconut husk carbons), biosorbents (immobilized biomass, orange juice residue), goethite and some commercial adsorbents, which include resins, gels, silica

  16. Zinc peroxide nanomaterial as an adsorbent for removal of Congo red dye from waste water.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Sneha; Uppal, Himani; Yadav, Mohit; Bahadur, Nupur; Singh, Nahar

    2017-01-01

    In the past decade, various natural byproducts, advanced metal oxide composites and photocatalysts have been reported for removal of dyes from water. Although these materials are useful for select applications, they have some limitations such as use at fixed temperature, ultra violet (UV) light and the need for sophisticated experimental set up. These materials can remove dyes up to a certain extent but require long time. To overcome these limitations, a promising adsorbent zinc peroxide (ZnO2) nanomaterial has been developed for the removal of Congo red (CR) dye from contaminated water. ZnO2 is highly efficient even in the absence of sunlight to remove CR from contaminated water upto the permissible limits set by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United States- Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA). The adsorbent has a specific property to adjust the pH of the test solution within 6.5-7.5 range irrespective of acidic or basic nature of water. The adsorption capacity of the material for CR dye was 208mgg(-1) within 10min at 2-10pH range. The proposed material could be useful for the industries involved in water purification. The removal of CR has been confirmed by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The adsorption data followed a second order kinetics and Freundlich isotherm.

  17. Development of sludge-based adsorbents: preparation, characterization, utilization and its feasibility assessment.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guoren; Yang, Xin; Spinosa, Ludovico

    2015-03-15

    The increasing generation of sludge and its subsequent treatment are very sensitive environmental problems. For a more stable and sustainable treatment of sludge, there have been many studies, including the conversion of sludge into sludge-based adsorbents (SBAs) for pollutants removal. In this review, current SBAs preparation conditions and use as adsorbent for contaminant removal in water treatment are summarized and discussed. Carbonization, physical activation and chemical activation are three common preparation methods. The controlling key parameters include pyrolysis temperature, dwell time, heating rate, activator and feedstock type. The efficacy of SBAs in contaminant adsorption depends on their surface area, pore size distribution, surface functional groups and ion-exchange capacity. It has been demonstrated that SBAs can attain high uptakes of dyes and metal ions due to their high cation exchange capacity; whereas the strong antibiotics adsorption performance of SBAs derives from high degree of mesoporosity. In addition, thermal treatment significantly stabilizes heavy metals contained in sludge. The paper also discusses the economic feasibility and environmental safety of preparation and application of SBAs. Further research will include investigations on the migration and transformation of element in sludge by thermal treatment, more economical and efficient chemical activation reagents, obtaining SBAs for designated application, combination of coagulation and SBAs adsorption, regeneration of SBAs and full-scale tests.

  18. Magnesium oxide-impregnated tuff soil-derived ceramic: a novel cadmium(II) adsorbing media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salim, Md; Bhakta, Jatindra N.; Maneesh, Namburath; Munekage, Yukihiro; Motomura, Kevin

    2015-07-01

    The contamination of cadmium (Cd) in the aquatic environment is one of the serious environmental and human health's risks. The present study attempted to develop the potential magnesium oxide (MgO)-impregnated tuff soil-derived ceramic (MITDC)-based novel adsorbent media for adsorbing higher rate of cadmium [Cd(II)] from water phase. A potential MITDC adsorbent media was developed using volcanic raw tuff soil and its Cd(II) adsorption capacity from water phase was evaluated comparing with the raw tuff soil. A series of studies were carried out in an agitated batch method at 20 ± 2 °C to characterize the adsorption capacity of MITDC under different conditions of factors, such as contact time (0-360 min), initial pH (3-11) of solution, dose of MITDC (2, 5, 7.5 and 10 g/L), and initial concentration of Cd(II) (5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 mg/L), influencing the adsorption mechanism. MITDC exhibited the equilibrium state of maximum Cd(II) adsorption at the contact time 120 min and pH 4.7 (removed 98.2 % Cd) when initial Cd(II) concentration was 10 mg/L in the present study. The dose of 7.5 g MITDC/L showed maximum removal of Cd(II) from water. Experimental data were described by the Freundlich and the Langmuir isotherms and equilibrium data fitted well with the Langmuir model (R 2 = 0.996). The Cd(II) adsorption capacity of MITDC was 31.25 mg/g. The high Cd(II) adsorption capacity indicated that novel MITDC could be used as a potential ceramic adsorbent media to remove high rate of Cd(II) from aqueous phase.

  19. Single and binary adsorption of proteins on ion-exchange adsorbent: The effectiveness of isothermal models.

    PubMed

    Liang, Juan; Fieg, Georg; Shi, Qing-Hong; Sun, Yan

    2012-09-01

    Simultaneous and sequential adsorption equilibria of single and binary adsorption of bovine serum albumin and bovine hemoglobin on Q Sepharose FF were investigated in different buffer constituents and initial conditions. The results in simultaneous adsorption showed that both proteins underwent competitive adsorption onto the adsorbent following greatly by protein-surface interaction. Preferentially adsorbed albumin complied with the universal rule of ion-exchange adsorption whereas buffer had no marked influence on hemoglobin adsorption. Moreover, an increase in initial ratios of proteins was benefit to a growth of adsorption density. In sequential adsorption, hemoglobin had the same adsorption densities as single-component adsorption. It was attributed to the displacement of preadsorbed albumin and multiple layer adsorption of hemoglobin. Three isothermal models (i.e. extended Langmuir, steric mass-action, and statistical thermodynamic (ST) models) were introduced to describe the ion-exchange adsorption of albumin and hemoglobin mixtures. The results suggested that extended Langmuir model gave the lowest deviation in describing preferential adsorption of albumin at a given salt concentration while steric mass-action model could very well describe the salt effect in albumin adsorption. For weaker adsorbed hemoglobin, ST model was the preferred choice. In concert with breakthrough data, the research further revealed the complexity in ion-exchange adsorption of proteins.

  20. Contaminant treatment method

    DOEpatents

    Shapiro, Andrew Philip; Thornton, Roy Fred; Salvo, Joseph James

    2003-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for treating contaminated media. The method comprises introducing remediating ions consisting essentially of ferrous ions, and being peroxide-free, in the contaminated media; applying a potential difference across the contaminated media to cause the remediating ions to migrate into contact with contaminants in the contaminated media; chemically degrading contaminants in the contaminated media by contact with the remediating ions; monitoring the contaminated media for degradation products of the contaminants; and controlling the step of applying the potential difference across the contaminated media in response to the step of monitoring.

  1. Groundwater contamination downstream of a contaminant penetration site. II. Horizontal penetration of the contaminant plume

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, H.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    2002-01-01

    Part I of this study (Rubin, H.; Buddemeier, R.W. Groundwater Contamination Downstream of a Contaminant Penetration Site Part 1: Extension-Expansion of the Contaminant Plume. J. of Environmental Science and Health Part A (in press).) addressed cases, in which a comparatively thin contaminated region represented by boundary layers (BLs) developed within the freshwater aquifer close to contaminant penetration site. However, at some distance downstream from the penetration site, the top of the contaminant plume reaches the top or bottom of the aquifer. This is the location of the "attachment point," which comprises the entrance cross section of the domain evaluated by the present part of the study. It is shown that downstream from the entrance cross section, a set of two BLs develop in the aquifer, termed inner and outer BLs. It is assumed that the evaluated domain, in which the contaminant distribution gradually becomes uniform, can be divided into two sections, designated: (a) the restructuring section, and (b) the establishment section. In the restructuring section, the vertical concentration gradient leads to expansion of the inner BL at the expense of the outer BL, and there is almost no transfer of contaminant mass between the two layers. In the establishment section, each of the BLs occupies half of the aquifer thickness, and the vertical concentration gradient leads to transfer of contaminant mass from the inner to the outer BL. By use of BL approximations, changes of salinity distribution in the aquifer are calculated and evaluated. The establishment section ends at the uniformity point, downstream from which the contaminant concentration profile is practically uniform. The length of the restructuring section, as well as that of the establishment section, is approximately proportional to the aquifer thickness squared, and is inversely proportional to the transverse dispersivity. The study provides a convenient set of definitions and terminology that are

  2. Simulation of the mobility of metal - EDTA complexes in groundwater: The influence of contaminant metals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedly, J.C.; Kent, D.B.; Davis, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    Reactive transport simulations were conducted to model chemical reactions between metal - EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) complexes during transport in a mildly acidic quartz - sand aquifer. Simulations were compared with the results of small-scale tracer tests wherein nickel-, zinc-, and calcium - EDTA complexes and free EDTA were injected into three distinct chemical zones of a plume of sewage-contaminated groundwater. One zone had a large mass of adsorbed, sewage-derived zinc; one zone had a large mass of adsorbed manganese resulting from mildly reducing conditions created bythe sewage plume; and one zone had significantly less adsorbed manganese and negligible zinc background. The chemical model assumed that the dissolution of iron(III) from metal - hydroxypolymer coatings on the aquifer sediments by the metal - EDTA complexes was kinetically restricted. All other reactions, including metal - EDTA complexation, zinc and manganese adsorption, and aluminum hydroxide dissolution were assumed to reach equilibrium on the time scale of transport; equilibrium constants were either taken from the literature or determined independently in the laboratory. A single iron(III) dissolution rate constant was used to fit the breakthrough curves observed in the zone with negligible zinc background. Simulation results agreed well with the experimental data in all three zones, which included temporal moments derived from breakthrough curves at different distances downgradient from the injections and spatial moments calculated from synoptic samplings conducted at different times. Results show that the tracer cloud was near equilibrium with respect to Fe in the sediment after 11 m of transport in the Zn-contaminated region but remained far from equilibrium in the other two zones. Sensitivity studies showed that the relative rate of iron(III) dissolution by the different metal - EDTA complexes was less important than the fact that these reactions are rate controlled. Results

  3. Simulation of the mobility of metal-EDTA complexes in groundwater: the influence of contaminant metals.

    PubMed

    Friedly, J C; Kent, D B; Davis, J A

    2002-02-01

    Reactive transport simulations were conducted to model chemical reactions between metal-EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) complexes during transport in a mildly acidic quartz-sand aquifer. Simulations were compared with the results of small-scale tracer tests wherein nickel-, zinc-, and calcium-EDTA complexes and free EDTA were injected into three distinct chemical zones of a plume of sewage-contaminated groundwater. One zone had a large mass of adsorbed, sewage-derived zinc; one zone had a large mass of adsorbed manganese resulting from mildly reducing conditions created by the sewage plume; and one zone had significantly less adsorbed manganese and negligible zinc background. The chemical model assumed that the dissolution of iron(III) from metal-hydroxypolymer coatings on the aquifer sediments by the metal-EDTA complexes was kinetically restricted. All other reactions, including metal-EDTA complexation, zinc and manganese adsorption, and aluminum hydroxide dissolution were assumed to reach equilibrium on the time scale of transport; equilibrium constants were either taken from the literature or determined independently in the laboratory. A single iron(III) dissolution rate constant was used to fit the breakthrough curves observed in the zone with negligible zinc background. Simulation results agreed well with the experimental data in all three zones, which included temporal moments derived from breakthrough curves at different distances downgradient from the injections and spatial moments calculated from synoptic samplings conducted at different times. Results show that the tracer cloud was near equilibrium with respect to Fe in the sediment after 11 m of transport in the Zn-contaminated region but remained far from equilibrium in the other two zones. Sensitivity studies showed that the relative rate of iron(III) dissolution by the different metal-EDTA complexes was less important than the fact that these reactions are rate controlled. Results suggest that

  4. Aquaculture of Uranium in Seawater by a Fabric-Adsorbent Submerged System

    SciTech Connect

    Seko, Noriaki; Katakai, Akio; Hasegawa, Shin; Tamada, Masao; Kasai, Noboru; Takeda, Hayato; Sugo, Takanobu; Saito, Kyoichi

    2003-11-15

    The total amount of uranium dissolved in seawater at a uniform concentration of 3 mg U/m{sup 3} in the world's oceans is 4.5 billion tons. An adsorption method using polymeric adsorbents capable of specifically recovering uranium from seawater is reported to be economically feasible. A uranium-specific nonwoven fabric was used as the adsorbent packed in an adsorption cage 16 m{sup 2} in cross-sectional area and 16 cm in height. We submerged three adsorption cages in the Pacific Ocean at a depth of 20 m at 7 km offshore of Japan. The three adsorption cages consisted of stacks of 52 000 sheets of the uranium-specific non-woven fabric with a total mass of 350 kg. The total amount of uranium recovered by the nonwoven fabric was >1 kg in terms of yellow cake during a total submersion time of 240 days in the ocean.

  5. Preparation of Chito-Oligomers by Hydrolysis of Chitosan in the Presence of Zeolite as Adsorbent.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Khalid A; El-Eswed, Bassam I; Abu-Sbeih, Khaleel A; Arafat, Tawfeeq A; Al Omari, Mahmoud M H; Darras, Fouad H; Badwan, Adnan A

    2016-07-23

    An increasing interest has recently been shown to use chitin/chitosan oligomers (chito-oligomers) in medicine and food fields because they are not only water-soluble, nontoxic, and biocompatible materials, but they also exhibit numerous biological properties, including antibacterial, antifungal, and antitumor activities, as well as immuno-enhancing effects on animals. Conventional depolymerization methods of chitosan to chito-oligomers are either chemical by acid-hydrolysis under harsh conditions or by enzymatic degradation. In this work, hydrolysis of chitosan to chito-oligomers has been achieved by applying adsorption-separation technique using diluted HCl in the presence of different types of zeolite as adsorbents. The chito-oligomers were retrieved from adsorbents and characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy (LC/MS), and ninhydrin test.

  6. Preparation of Chito-Oligomers by Hydrolysis of Chitosan in the Presence of Zeolite as Adsorbent

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Khalid A.; El-Eswed, Bassam I.; Abu-Sbeih, Khaleel A.; Arafat, Tawfeeq A.; Al Omari, Mahmoud M. H.; Darras, Fouad H.; Badwan, Adnan A.

    2016-01-01

    An increasing interest has recently been shown to use chitin/chitosan oligomers (chito-oligomers) in medicine and food fields because they are not only water-soluble, nontoxic, and biocompatible materials, but they also exhibit numerous biological properties, including antibacterial, antifungal, and antitumor activities, as well as immuno-enhancing effects on animals. Conventional depolymerization methods of chitosan to chito-oligomers are either chemical by acid-hydrolysis under harsh conditions or by enzymatic degradation. In this work, hydrolysis of chitosan to chito-oligomers has been achieved by applying adsorption-separation technique using diluted HCl in the presence of different types of zeolite as adsorbents. The chito-oligomers were retrieved from adsorbents and characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy (LC/MS), and ninhydrin test. PMID:27455287

  7. Adsorption of Single and Binary Gases on Polystyrene and Carbon Adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothstein, Daniel P.

    Time-dependent transmissions of light organic gases at low concentrations through crosslinked polystyrene and activated carbon adsorbents were measured and analyzed to extract kinetic and equilibrium parameters and to evaluate these parameters in terms of several models of adsorption. Mass -balance in the adsorber bed allows calculation of the equilibrium adsorbed-phase concentration and the model-independent adsorption capacity. Adsorption isotherms are calculated from transmission curves for eight light organic gases adsorbed on polystyrene at several temperatures. The power-law forms of the Freundlich and Chakravarti-Dhar isotherms and the concentration-dependent adsorption capacities indicate heterogeneous adsorption well below monolayer coverage. The effects of heterogeneity increase as non-linearity of the isotherm increases. A mesopore structure is indicated for polystyrene. Characteristic curves are independent of temperature, but the use of an affinity coefficient is not able to demonstrate their independence of adsorbate. Isosteric hearts of adsorption are larger than the heats of vaporization and decrease with increasing surface coverage for three alkanes adsorbed on polystyrene. The transmission curves of several binary mixtures of gases with non-linear isotherms reveal adsorption interference, with adsorption capacities smaller than those from single -component experiments. The pairs with unequal adsorption capacities exhibit displacement, in qualitative agreement with adsorption interference models. The equilibrium adsorption of the binary mixtures cannot be reproduced by single-component isotherm parameters alone, but are described by modified Freundlich isotherms requiring binary experiments. Adsorption in a porous medium is described by a model including four dynamic processes: gas- and solid -phase diffusion, interfacial mass-transfer resistance, and a first-order chemical reaction. A new time-dependent solution to the differential equations of

  8. Adsorption of copper cyanide on chemically active adsorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J.S.; Deorkar, N.V.; Tavlarides, L.L.

    1998-07-01

    An inorganic chemically active adsorbent (ICAA), SG(1)-TEPA (tetraethylenepentaamine)-propyl, is developed for removal, recovery, and recycling of copper cyanide from industrial waste streams. Equilibrium studies are executed to determine and model adsorption of the copper cyanide complex from aqueous solutions in a batch and packed column. It appears that adsorption is dependent on anionic copper cyanide species and the basicity of the ligand. Aqueous-phase equilibrium modeling shows that monovalent (Cu(CN){sub 2}{sup {minus}}), divalent (Cu(CN){sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), and trivalent (Cu(CN){sub 4}{sup 3{minus}}) species of copper cyanide exist in the solution, depending on the pH and the concentration of total cyanide ions. Batch adsorption data are modeled using a modified multicomponent Langmuir isotherm which includes aqueous-phase speciation and basicity of the SG(1)-TEPA-propyl. This developed model is applied with a mass balance equation to describe the adsorption of copper cyanide complexes in a packed column.

  9. Structures of multidomain proteins adsorbed on hydrophobic interaction chromatography surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gospodarek, Adrian M; Sun, Weitong; O'Connell, John P; Fernandez, Erik J

    2014-12-05

    In hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), interactions between buried hydrophobic residues and HIC surfaces can cause conformational changes that interfere with separations and cause yield losses. This paper extends our previous investigations of protein unfolding in HIC chromatography by identifying protein structures on HIC surfaces under denaturing conditions and relating them to solution behavior. The thermal unfolding of three model multidomain proteins on three HIC surfaces of differing hydrophobicities was investigated with hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HXMS). The data were analyzed to obtain unfolding rates and Gibbs free energies for unfolding of adsorbed proteins. The melting temperatures of the proteins were lowered, but by different amounts, on the different surfaces. In addition, the structures of the proteins on the chromatographic surfaces were similar to the partially unfolded structures produced in the absence of a surface by temperature as well as by chemical denaturants. Finally, it was found that patterns of residue exposure to solvent on different surfaces at different temperatures can be largely superimposed. These findings suggest that protein unfolding on various HIC surfaces might be quantitatively related to protein unfolding in solution and that details of surface unfolding behavior might be generalized.

  10. Pseudo Order Kinetics Model to Predict the Adsorption Interaction of Corn-Stalk Adsorbent Surface with Metal Ion Adsorbate Cu (II) and Fe (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haryanto, B.; Singh, W. B.; Barus, E. S.; Ridho, A.; Rawa, M. R.

    2017-01-01

    The adsorption process using cornstalk as adsorbent was used to remove the single metal ion such as copper ion and cadmium ion. The adsorption kinetics of each contaminant then used to predict the interaction type of metal ion on surface of corn stalk by calculating pseudo order 1st and 2nd. The identification type as chemically or physically interaction was predicted from the quality of r2 by plotting the adsorption capacity (q) and time (t). The r2 were 0.01 and 0.99 for pseudo order 1st and 2nd respectively for Fe (II). The r2 were 0.26 and 0.999 for pseudo order 1st and 2nd respectively for Cu (II). The result of adsorption interaction of metal ion and surface function of corn stalk is chemical type. SEM/EDX confirmed the Cu2+ presence on cornstalk surface.

  11. Stabilization of aqueous nanoscale zerovalent iron dispersions by anionic polyelectrolytes: adsorbed anionic polyelectrolyte layer properties and their effect on aggregation and sedimentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phenrat, Tanapon; Saleh, Navid; Sirk, Kevin; Kim, Hye-Jin; Tilton, Robert D.; Lowry, Gregory V.

    2008-05-01

    Nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) particles are 5-40 nm sized Fe0/Fe-oxide particles that rapidly transform many environmental contaminants to benign products and are a promising in situ remediation agent. Rapid aggregation and limited mobility in water-saturated porous media limits the ability to deliver NZVI dispersions in the subsurface. This study prepares stable NZVI dispersions through physisorption of commercially available anionic polyelectrolytes, characterizes the adsorbed polymer layer, and correlates the polymer coating properties with the ability to prevent rapid aggregation and sedimentation of NZVI dispersions. Poly(styrene sulfonate) with molecular weights of 70 k and 1,000 k g/mol (PSS70K and PSS1M), carboxymethyl cellulose with molecular weights of 90 k and 700 k g/mol (CMC90K and CMC700K), and polyaspartate with molecular weights of 2.5 k and 10 k g/mol (PAP2.5K and 10K) were compared. Particle size distributions were determined by dynamic light scattering during aggregation. The order of effectiveness to prevent rapid aggregation and stabilize the dispersions was PSS70K(83%) > ≈PAP10K(82%) > PAP2.5K(72%) > CMC700K(52%), where stability is defined operationally as the volume percent of particles that do not aggregate after 1 h. CMC90K and PSS1M could not stabilize RNIP relative to bare RNIP. A similar trend was observed for their ability to prevent sedimentation, with 40, 34, 32, 20, and 5 wt%, of the PSS70K, PAP10K, PAP2.5K, CMC700K, and CMC90K modified NZVI remaining suspended after 7 h of quiescent settling, respectively. The stable fractions with respect to both aggregation and sedimentation correlate well with the adsorbed polyelectrolyte mass and thickness of the adsorbed polyelectrolyte layers as determined by Oshima's soft particle theory. A fraction of the particles cannot be stabilized by any modifier and rapidly agglomerates to micron sized aggregates, as is also observed for unmodified NZVI. This non-dispersible fraction is

  12. Milestone Report - Complete New Adsorbent Materials for Marine Testing to Demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg Adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Janke, Christopher James; Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Yatsandra; Mayes, Richard T.; Saito, Tomonori; Brown, Suree; Gill, Gary; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana

    2014-08-01

    This report describes work on the successful completion of Milestone M2FT-14OR03100115 (8/20/2014) entitled, “Complete new adsorbent materials for marine testing to demonstrate 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent”. This effort is part of the Seawater Uranium Recovery Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, and involved the development of new adsorbent materials at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and marine testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). ORNL has recently developed two new families of fiber adsorbents that have demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities greater than 4.5 g-U/kg adsorbent after marine testing at PNNL. One adsorbent was synthesized by radiation-induced graft polymerization of itaconic acid and acrylonitrile onto high surface area polyethylene fibers followed by amidoximation and base conditioning. This fiber showed a capacity of 4.6 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL. The second adsorbent was prepared by atom-transfer radical polymerization of t-butyl acrylate and acrylonitrile onto halide-functionalized round fibers followed by amidoximation and base hydrolysis. This fiber demonstrated uranium adsorption capacity of 5.4 g-U/kg adsorbent in marine testing at PNNL.

  13. Feasibility of fullerene waste as carbonaceous adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Cleveland, T.G.; Garg, S.; Rixey, W.G.

    1996-03-01

    This note investigates using the waste soot generated in fullerene manufacture as an adsorbent. Both oven-dried and air-activated samples of waste soot are compared with three commercially available powdered activated carbons (PACs): Nuchar-SA, HDH, and Calgon-RC. Three model compounds were chosen for adsorption tests--TCE, Benzene, and Phenol--representing a small branched molecule, a small nonpolar ring molecule, and relatively polar ring molecule. Additionally, the effectiveness of total organic carbon (TOC) removal from wastewater was evaluated. Oven-dried soot performed poorly as compared to the commercial carbons, but activation of the waste soot for 60 min at 450 C in air resulted in an activated carbon (aFWS) with properties similar to those of commercially available PACs. The aFWS performed better than one would predict from the typical characterization measures of iodine number, molasses number, and methylene blue number. The data for phenol suggest some functional groups are created during the activation of the waste soot. These results show that large-scale fullerene manufacturing can be a zero-waste industry, because its primary waste product can be converted into a useful material.

  14. Photoreduction of methylviologen adsorbed on silver

    SciTech Connect

    Feilchenfeld, H.; Chumanov, G.; Cotton, T.M. |

    1996-03-21

    Methylviologen adsorbed on a roughened silver electrode is reduced to its cation radical upon irradiation with laser light at liquid nitrogen temperature. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra were obtained with different excitation wavelengths between 406 and 752 nm and compared to those obtained at room temperature in an electrochemical cell under potential control. From two-color experiments, in which one laser frequency was used to generate the radical and a second to excite the SERS spectra, it was determined that radical formation occurs mainly with excitation in the blue spectral region. A comparison of the SERS spectra of the dication and cation radical forms of methylviologen with their solution spectra suggests that the former interacts more strongly with the surface than the latter. The cation radical appears to be stable for several hours in liquid nitrogen but has a short lifetime at room temperature. Two mechanisms for the photoreduction are discussed: plasmon-assisted electron transfer from the metal to the methylviologen dication and formation of a resonance charge transfer complex. The current experimental data are insufficient to determine the particular role of these mechanisms. 23 refs., 9 figs.

  15. DBPs removal in GAC filter-adsorber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinkeun; Kang, Byeongsoo

    2008-01-01

    A rapid sand filter and granular activated carbon filter-adsorber (GAC FA) were compared in terms of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and disinfection by-products (DBPs) removal. A water treatment plant (WTP) that had a high ammonia concentration and DOC in raw water, which, in turn, led to a high concentration of DBPs because of a high dose of pre-chlorination, was investigated. To remove DBPs and DOC simultaneously, a conventional rapid sand filter had been retrofitted to a GAC FA at the Buyeo WTP in Korea. The overall removal efficiency of DBPs and DOC was higher in the GAC FA than in the sand filter, as expected. Breakthrough of trihalomethanes (THMs) was noticed after 3 months of GAC FA operation, and then removal of THMs was minimal (<10%). On the other hand, the removal efficiency of five haloacetic acids (HAA(5)) in the GAC FA was better than that of THMs, though adsorption of HAA(5) decreased rapidly after 3.5 months of GAC FA operation. And then, gradual improvement (>90%) in HAA(5) removal efficiency was again observed, which could be attributed to biodegradation. At the early stage of GAC FA operation, HAA(5) removal was largely due to physical adsorption, but later on biodegradation appeared to prevail. Biodegradation of HAA(5) was significantly influenced by water temperature. Similar turbidity removal was noticed in both filters, while better manganese removal was confirmed in the sand filter rather than in the GAC FA.

  16. Imaging the wave functions of adsorbed molecules.

    PubMed

    Lüftner, Daniel; Ules, Thomas; Reinisch, Eva Maria; Koller, Georg; Soubatch, Serguei; Tautz, F Stefan; Ramsey, Michael G; Puschnig, Peter

    2014-01-14

    The basis for a quantum-mechanical description of matter is electron wave functions. For atoms and molecules, their spatial distributions and phases are known as orbitals. Although orbitals are very powerful concepts, experimentally only the electron densities and -energy levels are directly observable. Regardless whether orbitals are observed in real space with scanning probe experiments, or in reciprocal space by photoemission, the phase information of the orbital is lost. Here, we show that the experimental momentum maps of angle-resolved photoemission from molecular orbitals can be transformed to real-space orbitals via an iterative procedure which also retrieves the lost phase information. This is demonstrated with images obtained of a number of orbitals of the molecules pentacene (C22H14) and perylene-3,4,9,10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride (C24H8O6), adsorbed on silver, which are in excellent agreement with ab initio calculations. The procedure requires no a priori knowledge of the orbitals and is shown to be simple and robust.

  17. Bioremediation of trichloroethylene contaminated groundwater using anaerobic process.

    PubMed

    Chomsurin, Cheema; Kajorntraidej, Juthathip; Luangmuang, Kongrit

    2008-01-01

    Anaerobic remediation of trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated soil and groundwater was studied in laboratory setups. In this process fermentation of polymeric organic materials (POMS) produced volatile fatty acids (VFAs) that were electron donors in reductive dechlorination of TCE. Shredded peanut shell was selected as low cost POM and the experiments were set up in 500 ml Erlenmeyer flasks. In the setups, approximately 25 mg of leachate contaminated soil was used as the main source of microorganisms and about 5 g of shredded peanut shell (0.5-2.36 mm) was added to produce VFAs for dechlorination of TCE. In the first set of experiments, fermentation of soil and shredded peanut shell was studied and it was found that VFAs were produced continuously with increasing concentration (5.63 mM as CH3COOH from the first day to 17.17 in the 10th day of the experiment). During the fermentation, concentration of ammonia-nitrogen was 22-50 mg/L, the ratio of VFA to NH3 was 15.29-23.44 and pH was 5.24-6.00. These results show that the system was appropriate for microorganism activities. In the second set of experiments, TCE (approximately 48 mg/L) was added to the fermentation system and remediation of TCE by reductive dechlorination was studied. It was found that 0.04(+/-0.01) mg TCE adsorbed to a gram of soil and peanut shells at the beginning of the experiment and based on mass balance of the system, TCE concentration in water was linearly reduced at the rate of 0.0098 mg/hr.

  18. Development of a new adsorbent from agro-industrial waste and its potential use in endocrine disruptor compound removal.

    PubMed

    Rovani, Suzimara; Censi, Monique T; Pedrotti, Sidnei L; Lima, Eder C; Cataluña, Renato; Fernandes, Andreia N

    2014-04-30

    A new activated carbon (AC) material was prepared by pyrolysis of a mixture of coffee grounds, eucalyptus sawdust, calcium hydroxide and soybean oil at 800°C. This material was used as adsorbent for the removal of the endocrine disruptor compounds 17β-estradiol (E2) and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) from aqueous solutions. The carbon material was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), N2 adsorption/desorption curves and point of zero charge (pHPZC). Variables including the initial pH of the adsorbate solutions, adsorbent masses and contact time were optimized. The optimum range of initial pH for removal of endocrine disruptor compounds (EDC) was 2.0-11.0. The kinetics of adsorption were investigated using general order, pseudo first-order and pseudo-second order kinetic models. The Sips isotherm model gave the best fits of the equilibrium data (298K). The maximum amounts of E2 and EE2 removed at 298K were 7.584 (E2) and 7.883mgg(-1) (EE2) using the AC as adsorbent. The carbon adsorbent was employed in SPE (solid phase extraction) of E2 and EE2 from aqueous solutions.

  19. Toward 3D graphene oxide gels based adsorbents for high-efficient water treatment via the promotion of biopolymers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chong Sage; Deng, Jie; Lei, Bei; He, Ai; Zhang, Xiang; Ma, Lang; Li, Shuang; Zhao, Changsheng

    2013-12-15

    Recent studies showed that graphene oxide (GO) presented high adsorption capacities to various water contaminants. However, the needed centrifugation after adsorption and the potential biological toxicity of GO restricted its applications in wastewater treatment. In this study, a facile method is provided by using biopolymers to mediate and synthesize 3D GO based gels. The obtained hybrid gels present well-defined and interconnected 3D porous network, which allows the adsorbate molecules to diffuse easily into the adsorbent. The adsorption experiments indicate that the obtained porous GO-biopolymer gels can efficiently remove cationic dyes and heavy metal ions from wastewater. Methylene blue (MB) and methyl violet (MV), two cationic dyes, are chosen as model adsorbates to investigate the adsorption capability and desorption ratio; meanwhile, the influence of contacting time, initial concentration, and pH value on the adsorption capacity of the prepared GO-biopolymer gels are also studied. The GO-biopolymer gels displayed an adsorption capacity as high as 1100 mg/g for MB dye and 1350 mg/g for MV dye, respectively. Furthermore, the adsorption kinetics and isotherms of the MB were studied in details. The experimental data of MB adsorption fitted well with the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the Langmuir isotherm, and the results indicated that the adsorption process was controlled by the intraparticle diffusion. Moreover, the adsorption data revealed that the porous GO-biopolymer gels showed good selective adsorbability to cationic dyes and metal ions.

  20. Thermal desorption mass spectrometer for mass metrology.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Z; Azouigui, S; Bouhtiyya, S; Macé, S; Plimmer, M D; Pinot, P; Tayeb-Chandoul, F; Hannachi, R

    2014-04-01

    This article presents a device for the study of physisorbed elements on polished surfaces (diameter ⩽56 mm) of the kind used in mass metrology. The technique is based on mass spectrometry of molecules desorbed after heating under vacuum of the analyzed surface. We describe a first application of the device to study current and future mass standards in order to understand how their surface reactivity depends on storage conditions, cleaning processes, and polishing methods. Surface contamination analysis by thermal desorption mass spectrometry to examine the effect of cleaning on pure iridium is given as an example.

  1. Influence of Mycotoxins and a Mycotoxin Adsorbing Agent on the Oral Bioavailability of Commonly Used Antibiotics in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Goossens, Joline; Vandenbroucke, Virginie; Pasmans, Frank; De Baere, Siegrid; Devreese, Mathias; Osselaere, Ann; Verbrugghe, Elin; Haesebrouck, Freddy; De Saeger, Sarah; Eeckhout, Mia; Audenaert, Kris; Haesaert, Geert; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2012-01-01

    It is recognized that mycotoxins can cause a variety of adverse health effects in animals, including altered gastrointestinal barrier function. It is the aim of the present study to determine whether mycotoxin-contaminated diets can alter the oral bioavailability of the antibiotics doxycycline and paromomycin in pigs, and whether a mycotoxin adsorbing agent included into diets interacts with those antibiotics. Experiments were conducted with pigs utilizing diets that contained blank feed, mycotoxin-contaminated feed (T-2 toxin or deoxynivalenol), mycotoxin-contaminated feed supplemented with a glucomannan mycotoxin binder, or blank feed supplemented with mycotoxin binder. Diets with T-2 toxin and binder or deoxynivalenol and binder induced increased plasma concentrations of doxycycline administered as single bolus in pigs compared to diets containing blank feed. These results suggest that complex interactions may occur between mycotoxins, mycotoxin binders, and antibiotics which could alter antibiotic bioavailability. This could have consequences for animal toxicity, withdrawal time for oral antibiotics, or public health. PMID:22606377

  2. Influence of mycotoxins and a mycotoxin adsorbing agent on the oral bioavailability of commonly used antibiotics in pigs.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Joline; Vandenbroucke, Virginie; Pasmans, Frank; De Baere, Siegrid; Devreese, Mathias; Osselaere, Ann; Verbrugghe, Elin; Haesebrouck, Freddy; De Saeger, Sarah; Eeckhout, Mia; Audenaert, Kris; Haesaert, Geert; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2012-04-01

    It is recognized that mycotoxins can cause a variety of adverse health effects in animals, including altered gastrointestinal barrier function. It is the aim of the present study to determine whether mycotoxin-contaminated diets can alter the oral bioavailability of the antibiotics doxycycline and paromomycin in pigs, and whether a mycotoxin adsorbing agent included into diets interacts with those antibiotics. Experiments were conducted with pigs utilizing diets that contained blank feed, mycotoxin-contaminated feed (T-2 toxin or deoxynivalenol), mycotoxin-contaminated feed supplemented with a glucomannan mycotoxin binder, or blank feed supplemented with mycotoxin binder. Diets with T-2 toxin and binder or deoxynivalenol and binder induced increased plasma concentrations of doxycycline administered as single bolus in pigs compared to diets containing blank feed. These results suggest that complex interactions may occur between mycotoxins, mycotoxin binders, and antibiotics which could alter antibiotic bioavailability. This could have consequences for animal toxicity, withdrawal time for oral antibiotics, or public health.

  3. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, T.R.; Golden, T.C.; Mayorga, S.G.; Brzozowski, J.R.; Taylor, F.W.

    1999-06-29

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO[sub 2] from a gaseous mixture containing CO[sub 2] comprises introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100 C and 500 C to adsorb CO[sub 2] to provide a CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent and a CO[sub 2] depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO[sub 2] laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO[sub 2] from the CO[sub 2] laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100 C and 600 C, is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions. 1 fig.

  4. Carbon dioxide pressure swing adsorption process using modified alumina adsorbents

    DOEpatents

    Gaffney, Thomas Richard; Golden, Timothy Christopher; Mayorga, Steven Gerard; Brzozowski, Jeffrey Richard; Taylor, Fred William

    1999-01-01

    A pressure swing adsorption process for absorbing CO.sub.2 from a gaseous mixture containing CO.sub.2 comprising introducing the gaseous mixture at a first pressure into a reactor containing a modified alumina adsorbent maintained at a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. to adsorb CO.sub.2 to provide a CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent and a CO.sub.2 depleted gaseous mixture and contacting the CO.sub.2 laden adsorbent with a weakly adsorbing purge fluid at a second pressure which is lower than the first pressure to desorb CO.sub.2 from the CO.sub.2 laden alumina adsorbent. The modified alumina adsorbent which is formed by depositing a solution having a pH of 3.0 or more onto alumina and heating the alumina to a temperature ranging from 100.degree. C. and 600.degree. C., is not degraded by high concentrations of water under process operating conditions.

  5. Methane Recovery from Gaseous Mixtures Using Carbonaceous Adsorbents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczek, Bronisław

    2016-06-01

    Methane recovery from gaseous mixtures has both economical and ecological aspect. Methane from different waste gases like mine gases, nitrogenated natural gases and biogases can be treated as local source for production electric and heat energy. Also occurs the problem of atmosphere pollution with methane that shows over 20 times more harmful environmental effect in comparison to carbon dioxide. One of the ways utilisation such gases is enrichment of methane in the PSA technique, which requires appropriate adsorbents. Active carbons and carbon molecular sieve produced by industry and obtained in laboratory scale were examined as adsorbent for methane recuperation. Porous structure of adsorbents was investigated using densimetry measurements and adsorption of argon at 77.5K. On the basis of adsorption data, the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation parameters, micropore volume (Wo) and characteristics of energy adsorption (Eo) as well as area micropores (Smi) and BET area (SBET) were determined. The usability of adsorbents in enrichment of the methane was evaluated in the test, which simulate the basic stages of PSA process: a) adsorbent degassing, b) pressure raise in column by feed gas, c) cocurrent desorption with analysis of out flowing gas. The composition of gas phase was accepted as the criterion of the suitability of adsorbent for methane separation from gaseous mixtures. The relationship between methane recovery from gas mixture and texture parameters of adsorbents was found.

  6. Novel adhesive properties of poly(ethylene-oxide) adsorbed nanolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Wenduo

    Solid-polymer interfaces play crucial roles in the multidisciplinary field of nanotechnology and are the confluence of physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering. There is now growing evidence that polymer chains irreversibly adsorb even onto weakly attractive solid surfaces, forming a nanometer-thick adsorbed polymer layer ("adsorbed polymer nanolayers"). It has also been reported that the adsorbed layers greatly impact on local structures and properties of supported polymer thin films. In this thesis, I aim to clarify adhesive and tribological properties of adsorbed poly(ethylene-oxide) (PEO) nanolayers onto silicon (Si) substrates, which remain unsolved so far. The adsorbed nanolayers were prepared by the established protocol: one has to equilibrate the melt or dense solution against a solid surface; the unadsorbed chains can be then removed by a good solvent, while the adsorbed chains are assumed to maintain the same conformation due to the irreversible freezing through many physical solid-segment contacts. I firstly characterized the formation process and the surface/film structures of the adsorbed nanolayers by using X-ray reflectivity, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. Secondly, to compare the surface energy of the adsorbed layers with the bulk, static contact angle measurements with two liquids (water and glycerol) were carried out using a optical contact angle meter equipped with a video camera. Thirdly, I designed and constructed a custom-built adhesion-testing device to quantify the adhesive property. The experimental results provide new insight into the microscopic structure - macroscopic property relationship at the solid-polymer interface.

  7. Monitoring contamination due to materials outgassing by QCM-based sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirri, Fabrizio

    2016-07-01

    F. Dirri, E. Palomba, A. Longobardo, D. Biondi, A. Boccaccini, E. Zampetti, B. Saggin, D. Scaccabarozzi, A. Tortora, A. Nanni, J. Alves, A. Tighe Outgassing from spacecraft materials often occurs and degassing contaminants can degrade critical spacecraft surfaces, such as optical systems, solar panels, thermal radiators and thermal management systems. The main contaminants are the water adsorbed by cold surface, organics from spacecraft structure, electronics, insulation and thrusters firings [1]. Thus, it is fundamental to monitor these low-outgassing rates especially in a long duration mission: Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) based sensors (i.e. single and double crystal configurations) are a suitable instruments to monitor step by step these degradation processes which occur in space conditions. The Contamination Assessment Microbalance (CAM) is a device aimed at monitoring in-orbit contamination of sensitive surfaces and payloads on ESA's future satellites. The device, developed by a consortium of Italian research Institutes, is based on QCM technology, previously considered by NASA and ESA experiments performed on Space Shuttle and satellite missions [2,3,4]. CAM is a low mass (200 grams for the sensor head), low volume (smaller than 5x5x5 cm3 for the sensor head) and low power consumption (less than 1.5 W) sensor. The device is composed by: 1) the Sensor Head, containing a sensing crystal (which measures the deposited contaminant mass), a reference crystal (used as frequency reference), their related Proximity Electronics (PE) and a Temperature Control System (TCS); 2) the Main Electronics Unit (MEU), which acquires the signal in output from Sensor Head unit; 3) the Harness connecting Sensor Head and MEU; 4) the User Interface (UI) to read and display the data. The device shows several improvements, i.e. possibility to measure directly the crystal temperature (with an accuracy better than 0.1°C), large measurable mass range (from 5•10-9 to 7•10-4 g/cm2

  8. Mysterious Lattice Rotations in Adsorbed Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, Renee D.

    1997-03-01

    Lattice rotations due to a mismatch in structure have been observed in film growth for many years, probably beginning in the 1930's with the Nishiyama-Wasserman and Kurdjumov-Sachs orientations observed when fcc(111) films grow on bcc(110) surfaces, or vice versa. Early analysis of this problem was carried out with the aid of Moiré patterns and the observation that the preferred lattice orientations are those which maximize the Moiré fringe spacing. Later energy calculations indicated that the structures which were predicted by the the Moiré technique actually do correspond to energy minima. Epitaxial rotation in adsorbed monolayers is a conceptually simpler problem since in principle it involves only two planes of atoms, and it was first observed in 1977 for Ar on a graphite surface(C. G. Shaw, M. D. Chinn, S. C. Fain, Jr. Phys. Rev. Lett. 41 (1978) 955.). This observation came only a few months after a new theory, based on the expected elastic behavior of an overlayer, was developed by A. D. Novaco and J. P. McTague(A. D. Novaco and J. P. McTague, Phys. Rev. Lett. 38 (1977) 1286.), and the agreement with the experimental results was remarkable. It was later shown that a few symmetry principles similar to those used for the film growth studies sometimes can also predict the observed structures. However, the situation for incommensurate layers physisorbed on metal surfaces currently looks bleak. None of the existing theories or models appears to describe the experimental results. New data for physisorbed gases on metal surfaces will be presented, along with some half-baked (and probably wrong) ideas for what might be happening. This work was supported by NSF.

  9. Outer-sphere Pb(II) adsorbed at specific surface sites on single crystal α-alumina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, John R.; Towle, Steven N.; Brown, Gordon E.; Parks, George A.

    1996-01-01

    Solvated Pb(II) ions were found to adsorb as structurally well-defined outer-sphere complexes at specific sites on the α-Al2O3 (0001) single crystal surface, as determined by grazing-incidence X-ray absorption fine structure (GI-XAFS) measurements. The XAFS results suggest that the distance between Pb(II) adions and the alumina surface is approximately 4.2 Å. In contrast, Pb(II) adsorbs as more strongly bound inner-sphere complexes on α-Al2O3 (102). The difference in reactivities of the two alumina surfaces has implications for modeling surface complexation reactions of contaminants in natural environments, catalysis, and compositional sector zoning of oxide crystals.

  10. Corrigendum to "The vapor-phase multi-stage CMD test for characterizing contaminant mass discharge associated with VOC sources in the vadose zone: Application to three sites in different lifecycle stages of SVE operations" [J. Contam. Hydrol. 179 (2015) 55-64

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brusseau, M. L.; Mainhagu, J.; Morrison, C.; Carroll, K. C.

    2017-01-01

    We have recognized that there may be potential ambiguity in the presentation of the site conditions and discussion for one of the three sites used for the study reported in Brusseau et al. (2015). With this Erratum, we would like to clarify information presented for the Hassayampa Landfill (HASS) site. Please note that the original conclusions reported in the paper regarding the performance of the contaminant mass discharge (CMD) tests themselves are not affected.

  11. Anomalous conformational transitions in cytochrome C adsorbing to Langmuir-Blodgett films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankaranarayanan, Kamatchi; Nair, B. U.; Dhathathreyan, A.

    2013-05-01

    Helix to beta conformational transitions in proteins has attracted much attention due to their relevance to fibril formation which is implicated in many neurological diseases. This study reports on unusual conformational transition of cytochrome C adsorbing to hydrophilic surface containing pure cationic lipid and mixed Langmuir-Blodgett films (LB films) of cationic and neutral lipids. Evidence for conformational changes of the protein from its native helical state to beta sheet comes from Circular dichroic spectroscopy (CD spectroscopy). Analysis of these samples using High resolution TEM (HRTEM) shows a typical fibrillar pattern with each strand spacing of about 0.41 nm across which can be attributed to the repeat distance of interdigitated neighboring hydrogen-bonded ribbons in a beta sheet. Changes in contact angles of protein adsorbing to the LB films together with the increased mass uptake of water using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) confirm the role of positive charges in the conformational transition. Dehydration of the protein resulting from the excess water entrainment in the polar planes of the cationic lipid in hydrophilic surface seems to trigger the refolding of the protein to beta sheet while it retains its native conformation in hydrophobic films. The results suggest that drastic conformational changes in CytC adsorbing to cationic lipids may be of significance in its role as a peripheral membrane protein.

  12. Ordered phases of ethylene adsorbed on charged fullerenes and their aggregates☆

    PubMed Central

    Zöttl, Samuel; Kaiser, Alexander; Daxner, Matthias; Goulart, Marcelo; Mauracher, Andreas; Probst, Michael; Hagelberg, Frank; Denifl, Stephan; Scheier, Paul; Echt, Olof

    2014-01-01

    In spite of extensive investigations of ethylene adsorbed on graphite, bundles of nanotubes, and crystals of fullerenes, little is known about the existence of commensurate phases; they have escaped detection in almost all previous work. Here we present a combined experimental and theoretical study of ethylene adsorbed on free C60 and its aggregates. The ion yield of (C60)m(C2H4)n+ measured by mass spectrometry reveals a propensity to form a structurally ordered phase on monomers, dimers and trimers of C60 in which all sterically accessible hollow sites over carbon rings are occupied. Presumably the enhancement of the corrugation by the curvature of the fullerene surface favors this phase which is akin to a hypothetical 1 × 1 phase on graphite. Experimental data also reveal the number of molecules in groove sites of the C60 dimer through tetramer. The identity of the sites, adsorption energies and orientations of the adsorbed molecules are determined by molecular dynamics calculations based on quantum chemical potentials, as well as density functional theory. The decrease in orientational order with increasing temperature is also explored in the simulations whereas in the experiment it is impossible to vary the temperature. PMID:25843960

  13. Removal of Heavy Metal Contamination from Peanut Skin Extracts by Waste Biomass Adsorbents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Each year, 3.6 million pounds of peanuts are harvested in the United States. Consequent processing, however, generates large amounts of waste biomass as only the seed portion of the fruit is consumed. The under-utilization of waste biomass is a lost economic opportunity to the industry. In particula...

  14. Cleaning Water Contaminated with Heavy Metal Ions Using Pyrolyzed Biochar Adsorbents

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extraction of pollutants from water using activated biochar materials is a low cost, sustainable approach for providing safe water in developing countries. The adsorption of copper ions, Cu (II), onto banana peels that were dried, pyrolyzed and activated was studied and compa...

  15. Method of coating aluminum substrates with solid adsorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, S.R.; McKeon, M.J.; Cohen, A.P.; Behan, A.S.

    1992-06-09

    This patent describes a method of coating a surface of an aluminum substrate with a layer of solid adsorbent selected from the group consisting of crystalline molecular sieves, activated alumina, and mixtures thereof. It comprises heating the surface in an oxygen containing atmosphere to a temperature of at least about 200{degrees} C and sufficient to enable bonding of the solid adsorbent to the surface, contacting the heated surface with a slurry comprising the adsorbent and a binder selected from the group consisting of volclay, kaolin, sepiolite, attapulgite, silicates, aluminates, activated alumina, and mixtures thereof in a suspending liquid to form a slurry-coated surface, and removing sufficient liquid to form an adsorbent coating thereon.

  16. Removal of adsorbed gases with CO2 snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zito, Richard R.

    1991-09-01

    During the outgassing of orbiting astronomical observatories, the condensation of molecular species on optical surfaces can create difficulties for astronomers. The problem is particularly severe in ultraviolet astronomy where the adsorption of only a few atomic layers of some substances can be very damaging. In this paper the removal of adsorbed atomic layers using carbon dioxide snow is discussed. The rate of removal of adsorbed layers of isopropyl alcohol, Freon TF, and deionized distilled water on Teflon substrates was experimentally determined. The removal of fingerprints (containing fatty acids such as stearic acid) from optical surfaces is also demonstrated. The presence and rate of removal of the multilayers was monitored by detecting the molecular dipole field of adsorbed molecular species. For isopropyl alcohol, Freon TF (trichlorotrifluoroethane), and water adsorbed multilayers were removed in under 1.5 seconds. Fingerprint removal was much more difficult and required 20 seconds of spraying with a mixture of carbon dioxide snow flakes and atomized microdroplets of isopropyl alcohol.

  17. Radiation grafted adsorbents for newly emerging environmental applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud Nasef, Mohamed; Ting, T. M.; Abbasi, Ali; Layeghi-moghaddam, Alireza; Sara Alinezhad, S.; Hashim, Kamaruddin

    2016-01-01

    Radiation induced grafting (RIG) is acquired to prepare a number of adsorbents for newly emerging environmental applications using a single route involving RIG of glycidymethacrylate (GMA) onto polyethylene-polypropylene (PE-PP) non-woven fabric. The grafted fabric was subjected to one of three functionalization reactions to impart desired ionic characters. This included treatment with (1) N-dimethyl-D-glucamine, (2) triethylamine and (3) triethylamine and alkalisation with KOH. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used to study the changes in chemical and physical structures of the obtained fibrous adsorbents. The potential applications of the three adsorbents for removal of boron from solutions, capturing CO2 from CO2/N2 mixtures and catalysing transesterification of triacetin/methanol to methyl acetate (biodiesel) were explored. The obtained fibrous adsorbents provide potential alternatives to granular resins for the investigated applications and require further development.

  18. Electronic structure of benzene adsorbed on Ni and Cu surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Weinelt, M.; Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.

    1997-04-01

    Benzene has for a long time served as a prototype adsorption system of large molecules. It adsorbs with the molecular plane parallel to the surface. The bonding of benzene to a transition metal is typically viewed to involve the {pi} system. Benzene adsorbs weakly on Cu and strongly on Ni. It is interesting to study how the adsorption strength is reflected in the electronic structure of the adsorbate-substrate complex. The authors have used X-ray Emission (XE) and X-ray Absorption (XA) spectroscopies to selectively study the electronic states localized on the adsorbed benzene molecule. Using XES the occupied states can be studies and with XAS the unoccupied states. The authors have used beamline 8.0 and the Swedish endstation equipped with a grazing incidence x-ray spectrometer and a partial yield absorption detector. The resolution in the XES and XAS were 0.5 eV and 0.05 eV, respectively.

  19. Oil palm biomass as an adsorbent for heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Vakili, Mohammadtaghi; Rafatullah, Mohd; Ibrahim, Mahamad Hakimi; Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi; Salamatinia, Babak; Gholami, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Many industries discharge untreated wastewater into the environment. Heavy metals from many industrial processes end up as hazardous pollutants of wastewaters.Heavy metal pollution has increased in recent decades and there is a growing concern for the public health risk they may pose. To remove heavy metal ions from polluted waste streams, adsorption processes are among the most common and effective treatment methods. The adsorbents that are used to remove heavy metal ions from aqueous media have both advantages and disadvantages. Cost and effectiveness are two of the most prominent criteria for choosing adsorbents. Because cost is so important, great effort has been extended to study and find effective lower cost adsorbents.One class of adsorbents that is gaining considerable attention is agricultural wastes. Among many alternatives, palm oil biomasses have shown promise as effective adsorbents for removing heavy metals from wastewater. The palm oil industry has rapidly expanded in recent years, and a large amount of palm oil biomass is available. This biomass is a low-cost agricultural waste that exhibits, either in its raw form or after being processed, the potential for eliminating heavy metal ions from wastewater. In this article, we provide background information on oil palm biomass and describe studies that indicate its potential as an alternative adsorbent for removing heavy metal ions from wastewater. From having reviewed the cogent literature on this topic we are encouraged that low-cost oil-palm-related adsorbents have already demonstrated outstanding removal capabilities for various pollutants.Because cost is so important to those who choose to clean waste streams by using adsorbents, the use of cheap sources of unconventional adsorbents is increasingly being investigated. An adsorbent is considered to be inexpensive when it is readily available, is environmentally friendly, is cost-effective and be effectively used in economical processes. The

  20. Regenerable Air Purification System for Gas-Phase Contaminant Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Constantinescu, Ileana C.; Qi, Nan; LeVan, M. Douglas; Finn, Cory K.; Finn, John E.; Luna, Bernadette (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A regenerable air purification system (RAPS) that uses water vapor to displace adsorbed contaminants from an. adsorbent column into a closed oxidation loop is under development through cooperative R&D between Vanderbilt University and NASA Ames Research Center. A unit based on this design can be used for removing trace gas-phase contaminants from spacecraft cabin air or from polluted process streams including incinerator exhaust. Recent work has focused on fabrication and operation of a RAPS breadboard at NASA Ames, and on measurement of adsorption isotherm data for several important organic compounds at Vanderbilt. These activities support the use and validation of RAPS modeling software also under development at Vanderbilt, which will in turn be used to construct a prototype system later in the project.

  1. Measuring electric fields from surface contaminants with neutral atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Obrecht, J. M.; Wild, R. J.; Cornell, E. A.

    2007-06-15

    In this paper we demonstrate a technique of utilizing magnetically trapped neutral {sup 87}Rb atoms to measure the magnitude and direction of stray electric fields emanating from surface contaminants. We apply an alternating external electric field that adds to (or subtracts from) the stray field in such a way as to resonantly drive the trapped atoms into a mechanical dipole oscillation. The growth rate of the oscillation's amplitude provides information about the magnitude and sign of the stray field gradient. Using this measurement technique, we are able to reconstruct the vector electric field produced by surface contaminants. In addition, we can accurately measure the electric fields generated from adsorbed atoms purposely placed onto the surface and account for their systematic effects, which can plague a precision surface-force measurement. We show that baking the substrate can reduce the electric fields emanating from adsorbate and that the mechanism for reduction is likely surface diffusion, not desorption.

  2. Residence time determination for adsorbent beds of different configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Otermat, J.E.; Wikoff, W.O.; Kovach, J.L.

    1995-02-01

    The residence time calculations of ASME AG-1 Code, Section FC, currently specify a screen surface area method, that is technically incorrect. Test data has been obtained on Type II adsorber trays of different configurations to establish residence time in the adsorber trays. These data indicate that the air volume/carbon volume ratio or the average screen area are more appropriate for the calculation of the residence time calculation than the currently used, smallest screen area basis.

  3. Structure of water adsorbed on a single graphene sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo, M. C.; Martí, J.

    2008-08-01

    We present the result of molecular-dynamics simulations of water adsorbed on top of a single graphene layer at temperatures between 25 and 50°C . The analysis of the energy per particle and the density profiles indicate that the behavior of the adsorbed liquid is similar to the case of multiple graphene layers (graphite) with the only difference being the values of configurational energy. Other structural properties, such as stability ranges, hydrogen bond distributions, and molecular orientations are also presented.

  4. Analysis of moist air unwatering by adsorbent in fluidized bed for thermal power stations units conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldaev, Sergey; Khushvaktov, Alisher

    2014-08-01

    Within the model of adsorption unit with a fluidized bed of silica gel the necessary weight to place it inside the aggregates of TPP water vapor path was determined. Fluidized mode is efficient due to the developed mass transfer surface. On the other hand, it is power-consuming and more complex in structure than the embodiment proposed by the authors with car-tridges filled with silica gel. At the same time the adsorbers size will increase, but it is simplifies and reduces the cost of construction due to the desorption stage rejection.

  5. Anomalous fast dynamics of adsorbate overlayers near an incommensurate structural transition.

    PubMed

    Granato, Enzo; Ying, S C; Elder, K R; Ala-Nissila, T

    2013-09-20

    We investigate the dynamics of a compressively strained adsorbed layer on a periodic substrate via a simple two-dimensional model that admits striped and hexagonal incommensurate phases. We show that the mass transport is superfast near the striped-hexagonal phase boundary and in the hexagonal phase. For an initial step profile separating a bare substrate region (or "hole") from the rest of a striped incommensurate phase, the superfast domain wall dynamics leads to a bifurcation of the initial step profile into two interfaces or profiles propagating in opposite directions with a hexagonal phase in between. This yields a theoretical understanding of the recent experiments for the Pb/Si(111) system.

  6. Resin pellets from beaches of the Portuguese coast and adsorbed persistent organic pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antunes, J. C.; Frias, J. G. L.; Micaelo, A. C.; Sobral, P.

    2013-09-01

    The occurrence of stranded plastic marine debris along the Portuguese coastline was investigated. Number of items m-2 and size range of resin pellets were recorded, corresponding to 53% of total marine debris collected items. In addition, concentrations of adsorbed persistent bioaccumulative and toxic chemicals (PBTC) were determined, PAH - polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons; PCB - polychlorinated biphenyls and DDT - dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane. Matosinhos (Mt) and Vieira de Leiria (VL) presented the highest number of items m-2 (362 and 332, respectively). Resin pellets with 4 mm diameter were the most abundant (50%). Contaminants concentration was variable. PAH concentrations recorded values between 53 and 44800 ng g-1, PCB ranged from 2 to 223 ng g-1 and DDT between 0.42 and 41 ng g-1. In general, aged and black pellets recorded higher concentrations for all contaminants. Matosinhos (Mt), Vieira de Leiria (VL) and Sines (Si), near industrial areas and port facilities, were the most contaminated beaches. Research efforts are needed to assess the points of entry of industrial plastic pellets in order to take action and minimize impacts on the ecosystems, in particular, points of transfer during transportation from plastic manufacturers to plastic converters should be identified and controlled so that virgin pellets are contained and will not enter rivers and be carried to the oceans where they can remain for a long time and travel great distances.

  7. Evaluation of a cesium adsorbent grafted with ammonium 12-molybdophosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, Takuya; Seko, Noriaki; Amada, Haruyo; Kasai, Noboru; Saiki, Seiichi; Hoshina, Hiroyuki; Ueki, Yuji

    2016-02-01

    A fibrous cesium (Cs) adsorbent was developed using radiation-induced graft polymerization with a cross-linked structure containing a highly stable adsorption ligand. The ligand, ammonium 12-molybdophosphate (AMP), was successfully introduced onto the fibrous polyethylene trunk material. The resulting Cs adsorbent contained 36% nonwoven fabric polyethylene (NFPE), 1% AMP, 2% triallyl isocyanurate (TAIC) and 61% glycidyl methacrylate (GMA). The adsorbent's Cs adsorption capacity was evaluated using batch and column tests. It was determined that the adsorbent could be used in a wide pH range. The amount of desorbed molybdenum, which can be used as an estimate for AMP stability on the Cs adsorbent, was minimized at the standard drinking water pH range of 5.8-8.6. Based from the inspection on the adherence of these results to the requirements set forth by the Food Sanitation Act by a third party organization, it can be concluded that the developed Cs adsorbent can be safely utilized for drinking water.

  8. Soluble hydrocarbons uptake by porous carbonaceous adsorbents at different water ionic strength and temperature: something to consider in oil spills.

    PubMed

    Flores-Chaparro, Carlos E; Ruiz, Luis Felipe Chazaro; Alfaro-De la Torre, Ma Catalina; Rangel-Mendez, Jose Rene

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays, petrochemical operations involve risks to the environment and one of the biggest is oil spills. Low molecular aromatics like benzene, toluene, and naphthalene dissolve in water, and because of their toxicological characteristics, these produce severe consequences to the environment. The oil spill cleanup strategies are mainly designed to deal with the heavy fractions accumulated on the water surface. Unfortunately, very limited information is available regarding the treatment of dissolved fractions.A commercial (Filtrasorb 400) and modified activated carbons were evaluated to remove benzene, toluene, and naphthalene from water, which are the most soluble aromatic hydrocarbons, at different ionic strengths (I) and temperatures (0-0.76 M and 4-25 °C, respectively). This allowed simulating the conditions of fresh and saline waters when assessing the performance of these adsorbents. It was found that the hydrocarbons adsorption affinity increased 12 % at a I of 0.5 M, due to the less negative charge of the adsorbent, while at a high I (≃0.76 M) in a synthetic seawater, the adsorption capacity decreased 21 % that was attributed to the adsorbent's pores occlusion by water clusters. Approximately, 40 h were needed to reach equilibrium; however, the maximum adsorption rate occurred within the first hour in all the cases. Moreover, the hydrocarbons adsorption and desorption capacities increased when the temperature augmented from 4 to 25 °C. On the other hand, thermally and chemically modified materials showed that the interactions between adsorbent-contaminant increased with the basification degree of the adsorbent surface.

  9. Immobilized smart RNA on graphene oxide nanosheets to specifically recognize and adsorb trace peptide toxins in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiangang; Mu, Li; Wen, Jianping; Zhou, Qixing

    2012-04-30

    The contaminations of peptide toxins in drinking water lead directly to sickness and even death in both humans and animals. A smart RNA as aptamer is covalently immobilized on graphene oxide to form a polydispersed and stable RNA-graphene oxide nanosheet. RNA-graphene oxide nanosheets can resist nuclease and natural organic matter, and specifically adsorb trace peptide toxin (microcystin-LR) in drinking water. The adsorption data fit the pseudo-second-order kinetics and the Langmuir isotherm model. The adsorption capacity of RNA-graphene oxide nanosheets decreases at extreme pH, temperature, ionic strength and natural organic matter, but it is suitable to adsorb trance pollutants in contaminated drinking water. Compared with other chemical and biological sorbents, RNA-graphene oxide nanosheets present specific and competitive adsorption, and are easily synthesized and regenerated. Aptamer (RNA) covalently immobilized on graphene oxide nanosheets is a potentially useful tool in recognizing, enriching and separating small molecules and biomacromolecules in the purification of contaminated water and the preparation of samples.

  10. Electrokinetic removal of charged contaminant species from soil and other media using moderately conductive adsorptive materials

    DOEpatents

    Lindgren, Eric R.; Mattson, Earl D.

    2001-01-01

    Method for collecting and concentrating charged species, specifically, contaminant species in a medium, preferably soil. The method utilizes electrokinesis to drive contaminant species into and through a bed adjacent to a drive electrode. The bed comprises a moderately electrically conductive adsorbent material which is porous and is infused with water or other solvent capable of conducting electrical current. The bed material, preferably activated carbon, is easily removed and disposed of. Preferably, where activated carbon is used, after contaminant species are collected and concentrated, the mixture of activated carbon and contaminant species is removed and burned to form a stable and easily disposable waste product.

  11. Utility of adsorbents in the purification of drinking water: a review of characterization, efficiency and safety evaluation of various adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Shashi Prabha; Gopal, Krishna; Bersillon, J L

    2009-05-01

    Clean drinking water is one of the implicit requisites fora healthy human population. However the growing industrialization and extensive use of chemicals for various concerns, has increased the burden of unwanted pollutants in the drinking water of developing countries like India. The entry of potentially hazardous substances into the biota has been magnifying day by day. In the absence of a possible stoppage of these, otherwise, useful chemicals, the only way to maintain safer water bodies is to develop efficient purifying technologies. One such immensely beneficial procedure that has been in use is that of purification of water using 'adsorbents'. Indigenous minerals and natural plants products have potential for removing many pollutants viz. fluoride, arsenic, nitrate, heavy metals, pesticides as well as trihalomethanes. Adsorbents which are derived from carbon, alumina, zeolite, clay minerals, iron ores, industrial by products, and natural products viz. parts of the plants, herbs and algal biomass offer promising potential of removal. In the recent years attention has been paid to develop process involving screening/pretreatment/activation/impregnation using alkalies, acids, alum, lime, manganese dioxide, ferric chloride and other chemicals which are found to enhance their adsorbing efficiency. Chemical characterization of these adsorbents recapitulates the mechanism of the process. It is imperative to observe that capacities of the adsorbents may vary depending on the characteristics, chemical modifications and concentration of the individual adsorbent. Removal kinetics is found to be based on the experimental conditions viz. pH, concentration of the adsorbate, quantity of the adsorbent and temperature. It is suggested that isotherm model is suitable tool to assess the adsorption capacities in batch and column modes. Safety evaluation and risk assessment of the process/products may be useful to provide guidelines for its sustainable disposal.

  12. Enhanced Arsenate Removal Performance in Aqueous Solution by Yttrium-Based Adsorbents

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Lee, Byung-Tae; Bang, Sunbaek; Kim, Hyunseok; Kang, Hyorang; Jang, Am

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water has become an increasingly important issue due to its high toxicity to humans. The present study focuses on the development of the yttrium-based adsorbents, with basic yttrium carbonate (BYC), Ti-loaded basic yttrium carbonate (Ti-loaded BYC) and yttrium hydroxide prepared using a co-precipitation method. The Langmuir isotherm results confirmed the maximum adsorption capacity of Ti-loaded BYC (348.5 mg/g) was 25% higher than either BYC (289.6 mg/g) or yttrium hydroxide (206.5 mg/g) due to its increased specific surface area (82 m2/g) and surface charge (PZC: 8.4). Pseudo first- and second-order kinetic models further confirmed that the arsenate removal rate of Ti-loaded BYC was faster than for BYC and yttrium hydroxide. It was subsequently posited that the dominant removal mechanism of BYC and Ti-loaded BYC was the carbonate-arsenate ion exchange process, whereas yttrium hydroxide was regarded to be a co-precipitation process. The Ti-loaded BYC also displayed the highest adsorption affinity for a wide pH range (3–11) and in the presence of coexisting anionic species such as phosphate, silicate, and bicarbonate. Therefore, it is expected that Ti-loaded BYC can be used as an effective and practical adsorbent for arsenate remediation in drinking water. PMID:26516879

  13. Interaction of inorganic anions with iron-mineral adsorbents in aqueous media--a review.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Eva; Bhatnagar, Amit; Hogland, William; Marques, Marcia; Sillanpää, Mika

    2014-01-01

    A number of inorganic anions (e.g., nitrate, fluoride, bromate, phosphate, and perchlorate) have been reported in alarming concentrations in numerous drinking water sources around the world. Their presence even in very low concentrations may cause serious environmental and health related problems. Due to the presence and significance of iron minerals in the natural aquatic environment and increasing application of iron in water treatment, the knowledge of the structure of iron and iron minerals and their interactions with aquatic pollutants, especially inorganic anions in water are of great importance. Iron minerals have been known since long as potential adsorbents for the removal of inorganic anions from aqueous phase. The chemistry of iron and iron minerals reactions in water is complex. The adsorption ability of iron and iron minerals towards inorganic anions is influenced by several factors such as, surface characteristics of the adsorbent (surface area, density, pore volume, porosity, pore size distribution, pHpzc, purity), pH of the solution, and ionic strength. Furthermore, the physico-chemical properties of inorganic anions (pore size, ionic radius, bulk diffusion coefficient) also significantly influence the adsorption process. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the properties of iron and iron minerals and their reactivity with some important inorganic anionic contaminants present in water. It also summarizes the usage of iron and iron minerals in water treatment technology.

  14. Development of long-life-cycle tablet ceramic adsorbent for geosmin removal from water solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Rongzhi; Xue, Qiang; Zhang, Zhenya; Sugiura, Norio; Yang, Yingnan; Li, Miao; Chen, Nan; Ying, Zhao; Lei, Zhongfang

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the tablet ceramic adsorbent (TCA), a silica/iron(III) oxide composite material, has been developed for geosmin (GSM) removal from the water solution. The physicochemical characteristics of TCA were examined with XRD, SEM, EDX and BET analyses. The sorption characteristics of GSM on TCA were investigated in a batch system. Attempts have been made to understand the adsorption kinetics, the effect of initial GSM concentration, solution pH, and reaction time. The batch experiments equilibrium data were well fitted to the Lagergren kinetic equation, which indicate the first-order nature adsorption. Over 82% of the GSM was removed by the TCA within 600 min at an initial concentration of 200 ng/L with 20 g/L of TCA dose. The batch and regeneration study indicated that the TCA is a cost-effective GSM adsorbent with sufficient mechanical strength to retain its physical integrity after long-time adsorption, and high regeneration performance for long-life-cycle application. Almost no second contamination (toxic sludge or leached iron) was observed after adsorption, and the gas resultant of thermal regeneration is harmless to atmospheric environment.

  15. Activated carbons and low cost adsorbents for remediation of tri- and hexavalent chromium from water.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Dinesh; Pittman, Charles U

    2006-09-21

    Hexavalent chromium is a well-known highly toxic metal, considered a priority pollutant. Industrial sources of Cr(VI) include leather tanning, cooling tower blowdown, plating, electroplating, anodizing baths, rinse waters, etc. The most common method applied for chromate control is reduction of Cr(VI) to its trivalent form in acid (pH approximately 2.0) and subsequent hydroxide precipitation of Cr(III) by increasing the pH to approximately 9.0-10.0 using lime. Existing overviews of chromium removal only cover selected technologies that have traditionally been used in chromium removal. Far less attention has been paid to adsorption. Herein, we provide the first review article that provides readers an overview of the sorption capacities of commercial developed carbons and other low cost sorbents for chromium remediation. After an overview of chromium contamination is provided, more than 300 papers on chromium remediation using adsorption are discussed to provide recent information about the most widely used adsorbents applied for chromium remediation. Efforts to establish the adsorption mechanisms of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) on various adsorbents are reviewed. Chromium's impact environmental quality, sources of chromium pollution and toxicological/health effects is also briefly introduced. Interpretations of the surface interactions are offered. Particular attention is paid to comparing the sorption efficiency and capacities of commercially available activated carbons to other low cost alternatives, including an extensive table.

  16. Application of fly ash as an adsorbent for Estradiol in animal waste.

    PubMed

    Norris, Pauline; Hagan, Stephanie; Cohron, Martin; Zhao, Houying; Pan, Wei-Ping; Li, Kawang

    2015-09-15

    The contamination of agricultural ground with estrogen compounds through application of animal wastes is a present concern. At the same time, current uses for waste fly ash having high carbon content are limited. To help mitigate these problems, we examine using waste fly ash as a useful adsorbent for Estradiol in pig waste digests. In this study, Estradiol was added to vials containing water and fly ash from several different power plants. After an extraction process, the amount of Estradiol in the water was measured. Commercial activated carbon was also used for comparison purposes. Vials containing varying concentrations of Estradiol and no trapping material were used as a control. The results from this study indicate that fly ash can be used as a trapping material for Estradiol in water, but that commercially available activated carbon can trap about an order of magnitude more Estradiol than the fly ash and that the effects of the fly ash matrix can both inhibit and promote the solvation of Estradiol into water depending possibly upon pH and cation concentration effects. In addition, preliminary extraction studies using pig waste digest indicate that fly ash can be used as adsorbent for Estradiol present in pig waste.

  17. Enhanced Arsenate Removal Performance in Aqueous Solution by Yttrium-Based Adsorbents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Kim, Kyoung-Woong; Lee, Byung-Tae; Bang, Sunbaek; Kim, Hyunseok; Kang, Hyorang; Jang, Am

    2015-10-26

    Arsenic contamination in drinking water has become an increasingly important issue due to its high toxicity to humans. The present study focuses on the development of the yttrium-based adsorbents, with basic yttrium carbonate (BYC), Ti-loaded basic yttrium carbonate (Ti-loaded BYC) and yttrium hydroxide prepared using a co-precipitation method. The Langmuir isotherm results confirmed the maximum adsorption capacity of Ti-loaded BYC (348.5 mg/g) was 25% higher than either BYC (289.6 mg/g) or yttrium hydroxide (206.5 mg/g) due to its increased specific surface area (82 m²/g) and surface charge (PZC: 8.4). Pseudo first- and second-order kinetic models further confirmed that the arsenate removal rate of Ti-loaded BYC was faster than for BYC and yttrium hydroxide. It was subsequently posited that the dominant removal mechanism of BYC and Ti-loaded BYC was the carbonate-arsenate ion exchange process, whereas yttrium hydroxide was regarded to be a co-precipitation process. The Ti-loaded BYC also displayed the highest adsorption affinity for a wide pH range (3-11) and in the presence of coexisting anionic species such as phosphate, silicate, and bicarbonate. Therefore, it is expected that Ti-loaded BYC can be used as an effective and practical adsorbent for arsenate remediation in drinking water.

  18. Elution by Le Chatelier's principle for maximum recyclability of adsorbents: applied to polyacrylamidoxime adsorbents for extraction of uranium from seawater.

    PubMed

    Oyola, Yatsandra; Vukovic, Sinisa; Dai, Sheng

    2016-05-28

    Amidoxime-based polymer adsorbents have attracted interest within the last decade due to their high adsorption capacities for uranium and other rare earth metals from seawater. The ocean contains an approximated 4-5 billion tons of uranium and even though amidoxime-based adsorbents have demonstrated the highest uranium adsorption capacities to date, they are still economically impractical because of their limited recyclability. Typically, the adsorbed metals are eluted with a dilute acid solution that not only damages the amidoxime groups (metal adsorption sites), but is also not strong enough to remove the strongly bound vanadium, which decreases the adsorption capacity with each cycle. We resolved this challenge by incorporating Le Chatelier's principle to recycle adsorbents indefinitely. We used a solution with a high concentration of amidoxime-like chelating agents, such as hydroxylamine, to desorb nearly a 100% of adsorbed metals, including vanadium, without damaging the metal adsorption sites and preserving the high adsorption capacity. The method takes advantage of knowing the binding mode between the amidoxime ligand and the metal and mimics it with chelating agents that then in a Le Chatelier's manner removes metals by shifting to a new chemical equilibrium. For this reason the method is applicable to any ligand-metal adsorbent and it will make an impact on other extraction technologies.

  19. Ant cuticles: a trap for atmospheric phthalate contaminants.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Alain; Cuvillier-Hot, Virginie; Devers, Séverine; Christidès, Jean-Philippe; Montigny, Frédéric

    2012-12-15

    Phthalates are universal contaminants. We show that they are trapped by the ant cuticles and maintained permanently at a low level, generally less than 1% of cuticular components. They are found throughout the interior of the insect, predominately in the fat body, which suggests that they are adsorbed by the cuticle. In open plastic boxes free of phthalates the ants became more contaminated with phthalates over a period of time, whereas in closed glass jars they did not. This finding suggests that the main source of pollutants is the atmosphere. Different ant species collected from multiple places showed similar levels of contamination. It appeared that in some pristine places the contamination was lower, but this needs to be confirmed. Ants can be considered as bio-indicators of phthalate pollution.

  20. Comparison of modified montmorillonite adsorbents. Part II: The effects of the type of raw clays and modification conditions on the adsorption performance.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jia-Qian; Zeng, Zhiqiang

    2003-10-01

    This paper builds on the preceding researches to study the effects of the type of clays (montmorillonites K10, KSF) and modifying conditions on the structure and adsorption behavior of resulting clay adsorbents. The raw clays were modified by polymeric Al/Fe species, hexadecyl-trimethylammonium (HDTMA) surfactant and a complex of polymeric Al/Fe-HDTMA. X-ray diffraction spectra was applied to analyze the structure of the raw and modified clays. After modification, the basal spacing of the clays varied, depending on the types of raw clay and modification conditions. Copper and phenol were selected as adsorbates for evaluating the adsorption performance of various clays, which was affected significantly by the types of raw clay and modification conditions. In general the inorganic contaminant (e.g., Cu) tend to be adsorbed by the polymeric Al/Fe modified clay and the organic impurities (e.g., phenol) will be preferably captured by the surfactant modified clay; both due to the specific surface properties resulting from introducing the modifiers. The complex modified clays possessed the ability of adsorbing both inorganic and organic contaminants. In addition, the d 0 0 1 spacing of modified KSF was greater than that of K10; the adsorption performance with modified KSF was thus greater than that with the modified K10. Finally, the ratio of modifiers to the clay (metal:surfactant:clay) has been observed to affect the adsorption performance; the optimal conditions have been defined.